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Sample records for damage mutation frequency

  1. Effect of increased intake of dietary animal fat and fat energy on oxidative damage, mutation frequency, DNA adduct level and DNA repair in rat colon and liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Danesvar, B.; Autrup, H.

    2003-01-01

    supplemented with 0, 3, 10 or 30% w/w lard. After 3 weeks, the mutation frequency, DNA repair gene expression, DNA damage and oxidative markers were determined in liver, colon and plasma. The mutation frequency of the lambda gene cII did not increase with increased fat or energy intake in colon or liver......, colon, or urine. Thus, lard intake at the expense of other nutrients and a large increase in the fat energy consumption affects the redox state locally in the liver cytosol, but does not induce DNA-damage, systemic oxidative stress or a dose-dependent increase in mutation frequency in rat colon or liver.......The effect of high dietary intake of animal fat and an increased fat energy intake on colon and liver genotoxicity and on markers of oxidative damage and antioxidative defence in colon, liver and plasma was investigated in Big Blue rats. The rats were fed ad libitum with semi-synthetic feed...

  2. Effect of increased intake of dietary animal fat and fat energy on oxidative damage, mutation frequency, DNA adduct level and DNA repair in rat colon and liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ulla; Daneshvar, Bahram; Autrup, Herman

    2003-01-01

    supplemented with 0, 3, 10 or 30% w/w lard. After 3 weeks, the mutation frequency, DNA repair gene expression, DNA damage and oxidative markers were determined in liver, colon and plasma. The mutation frequency of the lambda gene cII did not increase with increased fat or energy intake in colon or liver......, colon, or urine. Thus, lard intake at the expense of other nutrients and a large increase in the fat energy consumption affects the redox state locally in the liver cytosol, but does not induce DNA-damage, systemic oxidative stress or a dose-dependent increase in mutation frequency in rat colon or liver........ The DNA-adduct level measured by 32P-postlabelling decreased in both liver and colon with increased fat intake. In liver, this was accompanied by a 2-fold increase of the mRNA level of nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene ERCC1. In colon, a non-statistically significant increase in the ERCC1 mRNA levels...

  3. Effect of increased intake of dietary animal fat and fat energy on oxidative damage, mutation frequency, DNA adduct level and DNA repair in rat colon and liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Danesvar, B.; Autrup, H.

    2003-01-01

    supplemented with 0, 3, 10 or 30% w/w lard. After 3 weeks, the mutation frequency, DNA repair gene expression, DNA damage and oxidative markers were determined in liver, colon and plasma. The mutation frequency of the lambda gene cII did not increase with increased fat or energy intake in colon or liver......, colon, or urine. Thus, lard intake at the expense of other nutrients and a large increase in the fat energy consumption affects the redox state locally in the liver cytosol, but does not induce DNA-damage, systemic oxidative stress or a dose-dependent increase in mutation frequency in rat colon or liver........ The DNA-adduct level measured by P-32-postlabelling decreased in both liver and colon with increased fat intake. In liver, this was accompanied by a 2-fold increase of the mRNA level of nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene ERCC1. In colon, a non-statistically significant increase in the ERCC1 mRNA levels...

  4. An inhibitor of potentially lethal damage (PLD) repair reduces the frequency of γ-ray mutations in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoiyama, A.; Kada, T.; Kuroda, Y.

    1992-01-01

    Cordycepin (3'-deoxyadenosine, 3 - dA) is an RNA antimetabolite and a radiosensitizer in cultured mammalian cells. In the present paper, the effects of 3'-dA on γ-ray-induced lethality and 6-thioguanine (6TG)-resistant mutations in cultured Chinese hamster V79 cells were examined. 3'-dA had the effect of sensitizing the lethality induced by γ-rays. The potentially lethal damage (PLD) repair produced by post-incubation cells in Hanks' solution after γ-irradiation was almost completely suppressed by 5x10 -5 M 3'-dA. When cells were irradiated with 10 Gy γ-rays and incubated with 3'-dA for 5 h, the frequency of 6TG-resistant mutations induced by γ-rays decreased to 1/6 of that of the irradiated cells incubated without 3'-dA. The decrease in the frequency of γ-ray-induced mutations was dependent on the length of incubation time with 3'-dA. It is suggested that the inhibition of PLD repair by 3'-dA may be that of error-prone repair. (author). 26 refs.; 5 figs

  5. The mutation frequency of 8-oxo-7,8 dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) situated in a multiply damaged site: comparison of a single and two closely opposed 8-oxodG in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malyarchuk, S.G.; Youngblood, R.C.; Landry, A.M.; Quillin, E.; Harrison, L.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A multiply damaged site (MDS) is defined as >= two lesions within a distance of 10-15 base pairs (bp). MDS generated by ionizing radiation contains oxidative base damage, and in vitro studies have indicated that if the base damage is less than 3 bp apart, repair of one lesion is inhibited until repair of the lesion in the opposite strand is completed. Inhibition of repair could result in an increase in the mutation frequency of the base damage. We have designed an assay to determine whether a closely opposed lesion causes an increase in adenine insertion opposite an 8-oxodG in bacteria. The double-stranded oligonucleotides (with no damage, each single 8-oxodG or the MDS) were ligated into the firefly luciferase coding region of a reporter vector and transformed into wild type or MutY-deficient bacteria. The MDS contained an 8-oxodG in the transcribed strand (T) and a second 8-oxodG immediately 5' to this lesion in the non-transcribed strand (NT). During two rounds of replication, insertion of adenine opposite the 8-oxodG in the T or NT strand results in a translation termination codon at position 444 or 445, respectively. In wild-type bacteria, we detected a translation stop at a frequency of 0.15% (codon 444) and 0.09% (codon 445) with a single 8-oxodG in the T or NT strand, respectively. This was enhanced ∼3 fold when single lesions were replicated in MutY-deficient bacteria. Positioning an 8-oxodG in the T strand within the MDS enhanced the mutation frequency by ∼2 fold in wild-type bacteria and 8 fold in Mut Y-deficient bacteria, while the mutation frequency of the 8-oxodG in the NT strand increased by 6 fold in Mut Y-deficient bacteria. This enhancement of mutation frequency supports the in vitro MDS studies, which demonstrated the inability of base excision repair to completely repair closely opposed lesions

  6. EGFR mutation frequency and effectiveness of erlotinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Britta; Hager, Henrik; Sorensen, Boe S

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In 2008, we initiated a prospective study to explore the frequency and predictive value of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in an unselected population of Danish patients with non-small cell lung cancer offered treatment with erlotinib, mainly in second-line. MATERIALS...... AND METHODS: Four hundred and eighty eight patients with advanced NSCLC were included. The mutation status was assessed using the cobas EGFR Mutation Test. Erlotinib was administrated (150 mg/d) until disease progression or unacceptable toxicities occurred. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival....... Secondary endpoints were overall survival and response. RESULTS: Biopsies were retrieved from 467 patients, and mutation results obtained for 462. We identified 57 (12%) patients with EGFR mutations: 33 exon 19 deletions, 13 exon 21 mutations, 5 exon 18 mutations, 3 exon 20 insertions, 1 exon 20 point...

  7. Radiation in relation to mutation rate, mutational damage and human ill-health

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, P.B.

    1976-09-01

    The effect of radiation in increasing the frequency of gene mutations is now reasonably understood. We discuss first how an increase in the mutation rate is reflected in the mutational damage expressed in populations. It is shown that the mutational damage, assessed by the loss of fitness in a population or the number of eventual gene extinctions, is equal to the number of new mutations arising per generation or the mutation rate. In a population of stable size, a dose of 1 rem given to 10 6 people leads to roughly 600 gene extinctions when summed over all ensuing generations if the dose is applied to only one generation; this number of extinctions will occur in each succeeding generation if the dose is given to every generation. However, the concept of genetic extinction, although quantifiable, is of limited value in assessing radiation risks since its impact on human ill-health is very speculative. In particular, no estimate can be made of the total cost of effects which are minor in each individual in which they arise, but which, because they are so minor, persist in the population for many generations. The best current estimate is for 14-140 obvious defects in the first few generations following exposure of 10 6 people to a dose of 1 rem. (auth.)

  8. The spontaneous chlorophyll mutation frequency in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jørgen Helms; Jensen, Hans Peter

    1986-01-01

    materials and the resulting estimate of the chlorophyll mutant frequency is 1.6 .times. 10-4 in about 1.43 million seedlings. The estimate of the chlorophyll mutation rate per generation is close to 67.3 .times. 10-4 per diploid genome or in the order of 6 .times. 10-7 per locus and haploid genome....

  9. The occurrence and frequency of genomic mutations that mediate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence and frequency of genomic mutations that mediate Isoniazid and Rifampicin resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from untreated pulmonary Tuberculosis cases in urban Blantyre, Malawi.

  10. Frequency and distribution of Notch mutations in tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutvei, Anders Peter; Fredlund, Erik; Lendahl, Urban

    2015-01-01

    Deregulated Notch signaling is linked to a variety of tumors and it is therefore important to learn more about the frequency and distribution of Notch mutations in a tumor context. In this report, we use data from the recently developed Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia to assess the frequency and distribution of Notch mutations in a large panel of cancer cell lines in silico. Our results show that the mutation frequency of Notch receptor and ligand genes is at par with that for established oncogenes and higher than for a set of house-keeping genes. Mutations were found across all four Notch receptor genes, but with notable differences between protein domains, mutations were for example more prevalent in the regions encoding the LNR and PEST domains in the Notch intracellular domain. Furthermore, an in silico estimation of functional impact showed that deleterious mutations cluster to the ligand-binding and the intracellular domains of NOTCH1. For most cell line groups, the mutation frequency of Notch genes is higher than in associated primary tumors. Our results shed new light on the spectrum of Notch mutations after in vitro culturing of tumor cells. The higher mutation frequency in tumor cell lines indicates that Notch mutations are associated with a growth advantage in vitro, and thus may be considered to be driver mutations in a tumor cell line context. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1278-x) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  11. Mutation analysis of Swedish haemophilia B families - high frequency of unique mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mårtensson, A; Letelier, A; Halldén, C; Ljung, R

    2016-05-01

    Haemophilia B is caused by a heterogeneous spectrum of mutations. Mutation characterization is important in genetic counselling, prenatal diagnosis and to predict risk of inhibitor development. To study the mutation spectrum, frequency of unique recurrent mutations, genotype-phenotype association and inhibitor development in a population-based study of the complete Swedish haemophilia B population. The study included, facilitated by centralized DNA diagnostics, the complete registered Swedish haemophilia B population (113 families: 47 severe, 22 moderate and 44 mild), each represented by a single patient. Mutation characterization was performed by conventional sequencing of all exons and haplotyping by genotyping of single nucleotide variants and microsatellites. A mutation was found in every family: eight had large deletions, three had small deletions (mutations were found and were predicted to be deleterious. Sixteen mutations (one total gene deletion, 14 substitutions and one acceptor splice site) were present in more than one family. Of the single nucleotide mutations (37/102), 36% arose at CpG sites. Haplotyping of families with identical mutations and present analyses showed that the frequency of unique mutations was at least 65%. Inhibitors developed in 9/47 (19%) patients with severe haemophilia B. The spectrum of haemophilia B mutations reveals at least 65% of the families carry a unique mutation, but with more inhibitor patients than reported internationally, probably as a result of many 'null' mutations. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Deficiency of the DNA repair protein nibrin increases the basal but not the radiation induced mutation frequency in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessendorf, Petra; Vijg, Jan; Nussenzweig, André; Digweed, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • lacZ mutant frequencies measured in vivo in mouse models of radiosensitive Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome. • Spontaneous mutation frequencies are increased in lymphatic tissue due to Nbn mutation. • Single base transitions, not deletions, dominate the mutation spectrum. • Radiation induced mutation frequencies are not increased due to Nbn mutation. - Abstract: Nibrin (NBN) is a member of a DNA repair complex together with MRE11 and RAD50. The complex is associated particularly with the repair of DNA double strand breaks and with the regulation of cell cycle check points. Hypomorphic mutation of components of the complex leads to human disorders characterised by radiosensitivity and increased tumour occurrence, particularly of the lymphatic system. We have examined here the relationship between DNA damage, mutation frequency and mutation spectrum in vitro and in vivo in mouse models carrying NBN mutations and a lacZ reporter plasmid. We find that NBN mutation leads to increased spontaneous DNA damage in fibroblasts in vitro and high basal mutation rates in lymphatic tissue of mice in vivo. The characteristic mutation spectrum is dominated by single base transitions rather than the deletions and complex rearrangements expected after abortive repair of DNA double strand breaks. We conclude that in the absence of wild type nibrin, the repair of spontaneous errors, presumably arising during DNA replication, makes a major contribution to the basal mutation rate. This applies also to cells heterozygous for an NBN null mutation. Mutation frequencies after irradiation in vivo were not increased in mice with nibrin mutations as might have been expected considering the radiosensitivity of NBS patient cells in vitro. Evidently apoptosis is efficient, even in the absence of wild type nibrin

  13. Comparative genetic mutation frequencies based on amino acid composition differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Amandio

    2006-08-30

    Genetic variation inferred from large-scale amino acid composition comparisons among genomes and chromosomes of several species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, Ceanorhabditis elegans, H. sapiens, is shown to be correlated (highest, r(2)=0.9855, p<0.01) with reported mutation rates for various genes in these species. This study, based largely on pseudogene data, helps to establish reference mutation frequencies that are likely to be representative of overall genome mutation rates in each of the species examined, and provides further insight into heterogeneity of mutation rates among genomes.

  14. Cystic fibrosis in Jews: frequency and mutation distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerem, B; Chiba-Falek, O; Kerem, E

    1997-01-01

    The incidence of cystic fibrosis and the frequency of disease causing mutations varies among different ethnic groups and geographical regions around the world. The Jewish population is comprised of two major ethnic groups. Ashkenazi and Non-Ashkenazi. The latter is further classified according to country of origin. An extreme variability in the disease frequency (from 1:2400-1:39,000) was found among the different Jewish ethnic groups. In the entire Jewish CF population, only 12 mutations were identified that altogether enable the identification of 91% of the CF chromosomes. However, in each Jewish ethnic group, the disease is caused by a different repertoire of a small number of mutations. In several ethnic groups, there is a major CFTR mutation that accounts for at least 48% of the CF chromosomes. High proportion of the CF chromosomes can be identified in Ashkenazi Jews (95%), Jews originating from Tunisia (100%), Libya (91%), Turkey (90%), and Georgia (88%). High frequencies of CFTR mutations were found among infertile males with CBAVD who might not have additional CF clinical characteristics. Of the Jewish males with CBAVD, 77% carried at least one CFTR mutation. The 5T mutation is the major mutation in Jewish CBAVD affecteds accounting for 32% of the chromosomes among Ashkenazi Jews and 36% among the non-Ashkenazi Jews. Five additional CFTR mutations, W1282X (12%), delta F508 (9%), N1303K (3%), D1152H, (5%)), and R117H (1%) were identified among Ashkenazi Jews with CBAVD. Only two mutations, delta F508 and R117H, were found among non-Ashkenazi males with CBAVD. An increased frequency of the 5T allele was also found among Jewish patients with atypical CF presentation, 18% in Ashkenazi, and 10% in non-Ashkenazi Jews. In summary, we present the required information for genetic counseling of Jewish families with typical and atypical CF and for carrier screening of healthy Jewish individuals.

  15. Aging of hematopoietic stem cells: DNA damage and mutations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehrle, Bettina M; Geiger, Hartmut

    2016-10-01

    Aging in the hematopoietic system and the stem cell niche contributes to aging-associated phenotypes of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), including leukemia and aging-associated immune remodeling. Among others, the DNA damage theory of aging of HSCs is well established, based on the detection of a significantly larger amount of γH2AX foci and a higher tail moment in the comet assay, both initially thought to be associated with DNA damage in aged HSCs compared with young cells, and bone marrow failure in animals devoid of DNA repair factors. Novel data on the increase in and nature of DNA mutations in the hematopoietic system with age, the quality of the DNA damage response in aged HSCs, and the nature of γH2AX foci question a direct link between DNA damage and the DNA damage response and aging of HSCs, and rather favor changes in epigenetics, splicing-factors or three-dimensional architecture of the cell as major cell intrinsic factors of HSCs aging. Aging of HSCs is also driven by a strong contribution of aging of the niche. This review discusses the DNA damage theory of HSC aging in the light of these novel mechanisms of aging of HSCs. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. In utero DNA damage from environmental pollution is associated with somatic gene mutation in newborns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, F.; Hemminki, K.; Jedrychowski, W.; Whyatt, R.; Campbell, U.; Hsu, Y.Z.; Santella, R.; Albertini, R.; O' Neill, J.P. [Columbia University, New York, NY (United States). School of Public Health

    2002-10-01

    Transplacental exposure to carcinogenic air pollutants from the combustion of fossil fuels is a growing health concern, given evidence of the heightened susceptibility of the fetus. These mutagenic/carcinogenic pollutants include aromatic compounds such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that bind to DNA, forming chemical-DNA adducts. The genotoxic effects of transplacental exposure in humans has been investigated by analyzing aromatic-DNA adducts and the frequency of gene mutations at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) locus in umbilical cord and maternal blood samples. Here the authors show, in a cross-sectional study of 67 mothers and 64 newborns from the Krakow Region of Poland, that aromatic-DNA adducts measured by P-32-postlabeling are positively associated with HPRT mutant frequency in the newborns (beta = 0.56, P = 0.03) after controlling for exposure to tobacco smoke, diet, and socioeconomic status. In contrast to the fetus, HPRT mutations and DNA adducts do not reflect similar exposure periods in the mother, and the maternal biomarkers were not correlated. Adducts were higher in the newborn than the mother, indicating differential susceptibility of the fetus to DNA damage; but HPRT mutation frequency was 4-fold lower, consistent with the long lifetime of the biomarker. These results provide the first demonstration of a molecular link between somatic mutation in the newborn and transplacental exposure to common air pollutants, a finding that is relevant to cancer risk assessment.

  17. Frequency of mutations in Mediterranean fever gene, with gender ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF) is the most common hereditary inflammatory periodic disease, characterized by recurrent episodes of fever, abdominal pain, synovitis and pleurisy. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and distri- bution of Mediterranean fever (MEFV) gene mutations and to investigate the ...

  18. Frequency of mutations in Mediterranean fever gene, with gender ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary data: Frequency of mutations in Mediterranean fever gene, with gender and genotype–phenotype correlations in a Turkish population. Salih Coskun, Serkan Kurtgöz, Ece Keskin, Ferah Sönmez and Gökay Bozkurt. J. Genet. 94, 629–635. Table 1. Whole data of genotype–phenotype correlations of M694V ...

  19. Induced mutations in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) II. frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharkwal, M.C.

    1998-01-01

    A comparative study of frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll mutations induced by two physical (gamma rays, fast neutrons) and two chemical mutagens (NMU, EMS) in relation to the effects in M1 plants and induction of mutations in M2 was made in four chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) varieties, two desi (G 130 & H 214) one Kabuli (C 104) and one green seeded (L 345). The treatments included three doses each of gamma rays (400, 500 & 600 Gy) and fast neutrons (5, 10 & 15 Gy) and two concentrations with two different durations of two chemical mutagens, NMU [0.01% (20h), & 0.02% (8h)] and EMS [0.1% (20h) & 0.2% (8h)]. The frequencies and spectrum of three different kinds of induced chlorophyll mutations in the order albina (43.5%), chlorina (27.3%) and xantha (24.2%) were recorded. Chemical mutagens were found to be efficient in inducing chlorophyll mutations in chickpea. Highest frequency of mutations was observed in green seeded var. L 345 (83% of M1 families and 19.9/1000 M2 plants). Kabuli var. C 104 was least responsive for chlorophyll mutations

  20. Influence of X-ray dose fractionation on the frequency of somatic mutations induced in Tradescantia stamen hairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNulty, P.J.; Nauman, C.H.; Sparrow, A.H.; Schwemmer, S.S.; Schairer, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    X-rays were used to investigate the influence of dose fractionation on the induction of pink and colorless somatic mutations in stamen hair cells of Tradescantia clone 02. Inflorescences were exposed to a single acute dose of 60 rad, two acute doses of 30 rad, or three acute doses of 20 rad. The dose rate in all cases was 30 rad/min. Intervals between dose fractions were varied from 35 sec to 48 h and the mutation frequency was compared with that resulting after the single dose of 60 rad. The date show a reduction in mutation frequency for fractionation intervals longer than 15 and 6 min for pink and colorless mutations, respectively, but not for shorter intervals. One interpretation of the data predicts that pink mutation frequencies are reduced by 11% for fraction intervals of 30 min to 6 h, and that colorless mutation frequencies are reduced by 24% for intervals of 15 min to 6 h. The corresponding sparing effect of dose fractionation is equal to 6 rad for pink mutations and 9 rad at the colorless mutation endpoint. A calculation has been made which indicates that the percentages of the total repairable (presumably two-hit) damage that is repaired during fraction intervals up to 6 h, are 16 and 35% for pink and colorless mutations, respectively

  1. Analysis of core damage frequency: Surry, Unit 1 internal events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertucio, R.C.; Julius, J.A.; Cramond, W.R.

    1990-04-01

    This document contains the accident sequence analysis of internally initiated events for the Surry Nuclear Station, Unit 1. This is one of the five plant analyses conducted as part of the NUREG-1150 effort by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUREG-1150 documents the risk of a selected group of nuclear power plants. The work performed and described here is an extensive of that published in November 1986 as NUREG/CR-4450, Volume 3. It addresses comments form numerous reviewers and significant changes to the plant systems and procedures made since the first report. The uncertainty analysis and presentation of results are also much improved. The context and detail of this report are directed toward PRA practitioners who need to know how the work was performed and the details for use in further studies. The mean core damage frequency at Surry was calculated to be 4.05-E-5 per year, with a 95% upper bound of 1.34E-4 and 5% lower bound of 6.8E-6 per year. Station blackout type accidents (loss of all AC power) were the largest contributors to the core damage frequency, accounting for approximately 68% of the total. The next type of dominant contributors were Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCAs). These sequences account for 15% of core damage frequency. No other type of sequence accounts for more than 10% of core damage frequency. 49 refs., 52 figs., 70 tabs

  2. Genotoxicity of formaldehyde: Molecular basis of DNA damage and mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanobu eKawanishi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Formaldehyde is commonly used in the chemical industry and is present in the environment, such as vehicle emissions, some building materials, food and tobacco smoke. It also occurs as a natural product in most organisms, the sources of which include a number of metabolic processes. It causes various acute and chronic adverse effects in humans if they inhale its fumes. Among the chronic effects on human health, we summarize data on genotoxicity and carcinogenicity in this review, and we particularly focus on the molecular mechanisms involved in the formaldehyde mutagenesis. Formaldehyde mainly induces N-hydroxymethyl mono-adducts on guanine, adenine and cytosine, and N-methylene crosslinks between adjacent purines in DNA. These crosslinks are types of DNA damage potentially fatal for cell survival if they are not removed by the nucleotide excision repair pathway. In the previous studies, we showed evidence that formaldehyde causes intra-strand crosslinks between purines in DNA using a unique method (Matsuda et al. Nucleic Acids Res. 26, 1769-1774,1998. Using shuttle vector plasmids, we also showed that formaldehyde as well as acetaldehyde induces tandem base substitutions, mainly at 5’-GG and 5’-GA sequences, which would arise from the intra-strand crosslinks. These mutation features are different from those of other aldehydes such as crotonaldehyde, acrolein, glyoxal and methylglyoxal. These findings provide molecular clues to improve our understanding of the genotoxicity and carcinogenicity of formaldehyde.

  3. High frequency of BRAF V600E mutations in ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurppa, Kari J; Catón, Javier; Morgan, Peter R; Ristimäki, Ari; Ruhin, Blandine; Kellokoski, Jari; Elenius, Klaus; Heikinheimo, Kristiina

    2014-04-01

    Ameloblastoma is a benign but locally infiltrative odontogenic neoplasm. Although ameloblastomas rarely metastasise, recurrences together with radical surgery often result in facial deformity and significant morbidity. Development of non-invasive therapies has been precluded by a lack of understanding of the molecular background of ameloblastoma pathogenesis. When addressing the role of ERBB receptors as potential new targets for ameloblastoma, we discovered significant EGFR over-expression in clinical samples using real-time RT-PCR, but observed variable sensitivity of novel primary ameloblastoma cells to EGFR-targeted drugs in vitro. In the quest for mutations downstream of EGFR that could explain this apparent discrepancy, Sanger sequencing revealed an oncogenic BRAF V600E mutation in the cell line resistant to EGFR inhibition. Further analysis of the clinical samples by Sanger sequencing and BRAF V600E-specific immunohistochemistry demonstrated a high frequency of BRAF V600E mutations (15 of 24 samples, 63%). These data provide novel insight into the poorly understood molecular pathogenesis of ameloblastoma and offer a rationale to test drugs targeting EGFR or mutant BRAF as novel therapies for ameloblastoma. © 2013 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  4. DNA Damage Is a Potential Marker for TP53 Mutation in Colorectal Carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise, José Ricardo; Poças, Regina Caeli Guerra; Caneloi, Thamy Pelatieri; Lopes, Camila Oliveira; Kanno, Danilo Toshio; Marques, Mayara Gonçalves; Valdivia, Júlio Cesar Martins; Maximo, Felipe Rodrigues; Pereira, José Aires; Ribeiro, Marcelo Lima; Priolli, Denise Gonçalves

    2016-12-01

    The ability to measure oxidative DNA damage in a tissue allows establishment of the relationship between DNA damage and mutations in normal and neoplastic cells. It is well known that TP53 is a key inhibitor of tumor development and preserves the genome integrity in each cell. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between DNA damage and TP53 mutation in colorectal adenoma and adenocarcinoma, and the value of DNA damage as potential marker of TP53 mutation in non-tumor tissues adjacent to colon malignant lesions. Tissue samples were obtained by colonoscopy from patients with adenoma and/or adenocarcinoma and from healthy volunteers. Diagnosis was defined by histopathology. Immunohistochemistry with computer-assisted image analysis was performed to quantify TP53 mutation. Oxidative DNA damage was determined by comet assay. Statistical analyses were performed with 5 % of significance level. The TP53 level was higher in non-tumor tissues from tumor patients than in normal tissues from healthy volunteers (p = 0.01). Likewise, higher TP53 levels were observed in tumor tissues compared with the non-tumor tissues (p = 0.00). Oxidative DNA damage levels were higher in tumor tissues than in non-tumor tissues (p = 0.00). The amount of TP53 (p = 0.00) and oxidative DNA damage (p = 0.00) in normal and tumor tissue was related. The relationship between oxidative DNA damage and TP53 mutation was demonstrated in all samples (p = 0.00). Oxidative DNA damage is an intervening variable for TP53 mutation in colorectal adenoma-carcinoma. Our data suggests that oxidative DNA damage is a potential marker of TP53 mutation in colorectal carcinogenesis.

  5. Collateral damage: Spread of repeat-induced point mutation from a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    [Vyas M and Kasbekar D P 2005 Collateral damage: Spread of repeat-induced point mutation from a duplicated DNA sequence into an ad- joining single-copy gene in Neurospora ... 9⋅3 kb DNA sequence. Approximately 170–200 copies of ..... progeny inheriting a RIP-mutated erg-3 allele. Since the hph-marked transgene ...

  6. Core damage frequency (reactor design) perspectives based on IPE results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, A.L.; Dingman, S.E.; Forester, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides perspectives gained from reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals covering 108 nuclear power plant units. Variability both within and among reactor types is examined to provide perspectives regarding plant-specific design and operational features, and C, modeling assumptions that play a significant role in the estimates of core damage frequencies in the IPEs. Human actions found to be important in boiling water reactors (BWRs) and in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are presented and the events most frequently found important are discussed

  7. Investigating the effects of dietary folic acid on sperm count, DNA damage and mutation in Balb/c mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swayne, Breanne G.; Kawata, Alice; Behan, Nathalie A.; Williams, Andrew; Wade, Mike G.; MacFarlane, Amanda J.; Yauk, Carole L.

    2012-01-01

    To date, fewer than 50 mutagens have been studied for their ability to cause heritable mutations. The majority of those studied are classical mutagens like radiation and anti-cancer drugs. Very little is known about the dietary variables influencing germline mutation rates. Folate is essential for DNA synthesis and methylation and can impact chromatin structure. We therefore determined the effects of folic acid-deficient (0 mg/kg), control (2 mg/kg) and supplemented (6 mg/kg) diets in early development and during lactation or post-weaning on mutation rates and chromatin quality in sperm of adult male Balb/c mice. The sperm chromatin structure assay and mutation frequencies at expanded simple tandem repeats (ESTRs) were used to evaluate germline DNA integrity. Treatment of a subset of mice fed the control diet with the mutagen ethylnitrosourea (ENU) at 8 weeks of age was included as a positive control. ENU treated mice exhibited decreased cauda sperm counts, increased DNA fragmentation and increased ESTR mutation frequencies relative to non-ENU treated mice fed the control diet. Male mice weaned to the folic acid deficient diet had decreased cauda sperm numbers, increased DNA fragmentation index, and increased ESTR mutation frequency. Folic acid deficiency in early development did not lead to changes in sperm counts or chromatin integrity in adult mice. Folic acid supplementation in early development or post-weaning did not affect germ cell measures. Therefore, adequate folic acid intake in adulthood is important for preventing chromatin damage and mutation in the male germline. Folic acid supplementation at the level achieved in this study does not improve nor is it detrimental to male germline chromatin integrity.

  8. Investigating the effects of dietary folic acid on sperm count, DNA damage and mutation in Balb/c mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swayne, Breanne G.; Kawata, Alice [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0K9 (Canada); Behan, Nathalie A. [Nutrition Research Division, Food Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0K9 (Canada); Williams, Andrew; Wade, Mike G. [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0K9 (Canada); MacFarlane, Amanda J. [Nutrition Research Division, Food Directorate, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0K9 (Canada); Yauk, Carole L., E-mail: carole.yauk@hc-sc.ga.ca [Environmental Health Science and Research Bureau, Health Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0K9 (Canada)

    2012-09-01

    To date, fewer than 50 mutagens have been studied for their ability to cause heritable mutations. The majority of those studied are classical mutagens like radiation and anti-cancer drugs. Very little is known about the dietary variables influencing germline mutation rates. Folate is essential for DNA synthesis and methylation and can impact chromatin structure. We therefore determined the effects of folic acid-deficient (0 mg/kg), control (2 mg/kg) and supplemented (6 mg/kg) diets in early development and during lactation or post-weaning on mutation rates and chromatin quality in sperm of adult male Balb/c mice. The sperm chromatin structure assay and mutation frequencies at expanded simple tandem repeats (ESTRs) were used to evaluate germline DNA integrity. Treatment of a subset of mice fed the control diet with the mutagen ethylnitrosourea (ENU) at 8 weeks of age was included as a positive control. ENU treated mice exhibited decreased cauda sperm counts, increased DNA fragmentation and increased ESTR mutation frequencies relative to non-ENU treated mice fed the control diet. Male mice weaned to the folic acid deficient diet had decreased cauda sperm numbers, increased DNA fragmentation index, and increased ESTR mutation frequency. Folic acid deficiency in early development did not lead to changes in sperm counts or chromatin integrity in adult mice. Folic acid supplementation in early development or post-weaning did not affect germ cell measures. Therefore, adequate folic acid intake in adulthood is important for preventing chromatin damage and mutation in the male germline. Folic acid supplementation at the level achieved in this study does not improve nor is it detrimental to male germline chromatin integrity.

  9. Station blackout core damage frequency in an advanced nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Luiz Sergio de

    2004-01-01

    Even though nuclear reactors are provided with protection systems so that they can be automatically shut down in the event of a station blackout, the consequences of this event can be severe. This is because many safety systems that are needed for removing residual heat from the core and for maintaining containment integrity, in the majority of the nuclear power plants, are AC dependent. In order to minimize core damage frequency, advanced reactor concepts are being developed with safety systems that use natural forces. This work shows an improvement in the safety of a small nuclear power reactor provided by a passive core residual heat removal system. Station blackout core melt frequencies, with and without this system, are both calculated. The results are also compared with available data in the literature. (author)

  10. Induction of a:T mutations is dependent on cellular environment but independent of mutation frequency and target gene location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukai, Akiko; Ishimaru, Konomi; Ouchida, Rika; Mori, Hiromi; Kano, Chie; Moritan, Toshiyuki; Wang, Ji-Yang

    2008-12-01

    Based on its substrate specificity, activation-induced cytidine deaminase can directly induce C:G mutations in Ig genes. However the origin of A:T mutations, which occur in a similar proportion in germinal center (GC) B cells, is unclear. Genetic evidence suggests that the induction of A:T mutations requires the components of the mismatch repair system and DNA polymerase eta (POLH). We found that fibroblasts and GC B cells expressed similar levels of the mismatch repair components, but nonetheless the fibroblasts failed to generate a significant proportion of A:T mutations in a GFP reporter gene even after POLH overexpression. To investigate whether the ability to generate A:T mutations is dependent on the cellular environment (i.e., GC B cell or fibroblast) or the target gene (i.e., Ig or GFP), we developed a mutation detection system in a human GC-like cell line. We introduced a GFP gene with a premature stop codon into Ramos cells and compared the activation-induced cytidine deaminase-induced mutations in the endogenous V(H) and the transgenic GFP genes. Remarkably, a high proportion of A:T mutations was induced in both genes. Ectopic expression of POLH did not further increase the proportion of A:T mutations but diminished the strand bias of these mutations that is normally observed in V(H) genes. Intriguingly, the total mutation frequency in the GFP gene was consistently one-fifth of that in the V(H) gene. These results demonstrate that the ability to generate A:T mutations is dependent on the GC B cell environment but independent of the mutation frequency and target gene location.

  11. Frequency Response Function Based Damage Identification for Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Joseph Acton

    Structural health monitoring technologies continue to be pursued for aerospace structures in the interests of increased safety and, when combined with health prognosis, efficiency in life-cycle management. The current dissertation develops and validates damage identification technology as a critical component for structural health monitoring of aerospace structures and, in particular, composite unmanned aerial vehicles. The primary innovation is a statistical least-squares damage identification algorithm based in concepts of parameter estimation and model update. The algorithm uses frequency response function based residual force vectors derived from distributed vibration measurements to update a structural finite element model through statistically weighted least-squares minimization producing location and quantification of the damage, estimation uncertainty, and an updated model. Advantages compared to other approaches include robust applicability to systems which are heavily damped, large, and noisy, with a relatively low number of distributed measurement points compared to the number of analytical degrees-of-freedom of an associated analytical structural model (e.g., modal finite element model). Motivation, research objectives, and a dissertation summary are discussed in Chapter 1 followed by a literature review in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 gives background theory and the damage identification algorithm derivation followed by a study of fundamental algorithm behavior on a two degree-of-freedom mass-spring system with generalized damping. Chapter 4 investigates the impact of noise then successfully proves the algorithm against competing methods using an analytical eight degree-of-freedom mass-spring system with non-proportional structural damping. Chapter 5 extends use of the algorithm to finite element models, including solutions for numerical issues, approaches for modeling damping approximately in reduced coordinates, and analytical validation using a composite

  12. Acute Myeloid Leukemia with IDH1 or IDH2 Mutations: Frequency and Clinicopathologic Features

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Keyur P.; Ravandi, Farhad; Ma, Deqin; Paladugu, Abhaya; Barkoh, Bedia A.; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and IDH2 genes are reported recently in AML. Here we investigate the frequency and the clinicopathologic features of IDH1 and IDH2 mutations in AML. Mutations in IDH1 (IDH1R132) and IDH2 (IDH2R172) were assessed by Sanger sequencing in 199 AML cases. Point mutations in IDH1R132 were detected in 12/199 (6%) cases, and in IDH2R172 in 4/196 (2%) cases. Fifteen out of the 16 (94%) mutated cases were cytogenetically normal, for an overall frequenc...

  13. Frequency of damage by external hazards based on geographical information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, G. [RISA Sicherheitsanalysen GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Camarinopoulos, A.; Karali, T. [ERRA, Athens (Greece); Camarinopoulos, L. [Piraeus Univ. (Greece); Schubert, B. [VENE, Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    External explosions can significantly contribute to risk of damage for industrial plants. External explosions may origin from other plants in the neighborhood, which store and operate with explosive substances, or from transport of such substances on road, rail, or water. In all cases, some accident is a necessary condition for a hazard. Another probabilistic element is the probability of ignition. If transport causes the explosion, the location of the accident will influence the consequences. If deflagration is involved, ignition will not necessarily occur at the place of the accident, but a cloud of a combustible gas-air mixture may develop, which will ignite at some distance depending on wind velocity. In order to avoid unnecessarily pessimistic approaches, geographical information can be used in addition to local weather statistics. Geographical information systems provide map material for sites, roads, rail and rivers on a computer. This information can be used to find frequencies of damage based on numerical integration or on Monte Carlo simulation. A probabilistic model has been developed. It is based on: - A joint probability density function for wind direction and wind speed, which has been estimated from local weather statistics, - Frequency of hazards for neighboring plants and various types of traffic, - Statistics on the amounts and types of explosive materials, - The model has been implemented using one numerical integrations method and two variants of Monte Carlo method. Data has been collected and applied for a nuclear power plant in Northern Germany as an example. The method, however, can be used for any type of plant subject to external explosion hazards. In its present form, it makes use of design criteria specific for nuclear power plants, but these could be replaced by different criteria. (orig.)

  14. WFS1 and non-syndromic low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss: a novel mutation in a Portuguese case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, A C; Matos, T D; Simões-Teixeira, H R; Pimenta Machado, M; Simão, M; Dias, O P; Andrea, M; Fialho, G; Caria, H

    2014-04-01

    Low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL) is an unusual type of HL in which frequencies at 2,000 Hz and below are predominantly affected. Most of the families with LFSNHL carry missense mutations in WFS1 gene, coding for wolframin. A Portuguese patient aged 49, reporting HL since her third decade of life, and also referring tinnitus, was shown to display bilateral moderate LFSNHL after audiological evaluation. Molecular analysis led to the identification of a novel mutation, c.511G>A (p.Asp171Asn), found in heterozygosity in the exon 5 of the WFS1 gene, and changing the aspartic acid at position 171 to an asparagine, in the extracellular N-terminus domain of the wolframin protein. This novel mutation wasn't present either in 200 control chromosomes analyzed or in the hearing proband's half-brother, and it had not been reported in 1000 Genomes, Exome Variant Server, HGMD or dbSNP databases. No mutations were found in GJB2 and GJB6 genes. Multi-alignment of 27 wolframin sequences from mammalian species, against the human wolframin sequence in ConSurf, indicated a conservation score corresponding to 7 in a 1-9 color scale where 9 is conserved and 1 is variable. In addition, the mutation p.Asp171Asn was predicted to be damaging and possibly damaging by SIFT and Polyphen-2, respectively. The auditory phenotype of this patient could thus be due to the novel mutation p.Asp171Asn. Further functional characterization might enable to elucidate in which way the change in the residue 171, as other changes introduced by LFSNHL-associated mutations previously described, leads to this type of HL. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Inflammation-Induced Cell Proliferation Potentiates DNA Damage-Induced Mutations In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraly, Orsolya; Gong, Guanyu; Olipitz, Werner; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations are a critical driver of cancer initiation. While extensive studies have focused on exposure-induced mutations, few studies have explored the importance of tissue physiology as a modulator of mutation susceptibility in vivo. Of particular interest is inflammation, a known cancer risk factor relevant to chronic inflammatory diseases and pathogen-induced inflammation. Here, we used the fluorescent yellow direct repeat (FYDR) mice that harbor a reporter to detect misalignments during homologous recombination (HR), an important class of mutations. FYDR mice were exposed to cerulein, a potent inducer of pancreatic inflammation. We show that inflammation induces DSBs (γH2AX foci) and that several days later there is an increase in cell proliferation. While isolated bouts of inflammation did not induce HR, overlap between inflammation-induced DNA damage and inflammation-induced cell proliferation induced HR significantly. To study exogenously-induced DNA damage, animals were exposed to methylnitrosourea, a model alkylating agent that creates DNA lesions relevant to both environmental exposures and cancer chemotherapy. We found that exposure to alkylation damage induces HR, and importantly, that inflammation-induced cell proliferation and alkylation induce HR in a synergistic fashion. Taken together, these results show that, during an acute bout of inflammation, there is a kinetic barrier separating DNA damage from cell proliferation that protects against mutations, and that inflammation-induced cell proliferation greatly potentiates exposure-induced mutations. These studies demonstrate a fundamental mechanism by which inflammation can act synergistically with DNA damage to induce mutations that drive cancer and cancer recurrence. PMID:25647331

  16. How DNA is damaged by external electric fields: selective mutation vs. random degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerón-Carrasco, José Pedro; Cerezo, Javier; Jacquemin, Denis

    2014-05-14

    DNA is constantly exposed to exogenous agents that randomly damage the genetic code. However, external perturbations might also be used to induce malignant cell death if the mutation processes are controlled. The present communication reports a set of parameters allowing DNA mutation through the use of intense external electric fields. This is a step towards the design of pulsed electric field therapy for genetic diseases.

  17. Improvement of Accuracy in Damage Localization Using Frequency Slice Wavelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinglong Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Damage localization is a primary objective of damage identification. This paper presents damage localization in beam structure using impact-induced Lamb wave and Frequency Slice Wavelet Transform (FSWT. FSWT is a new time-frequency analysis method and has the adaptive resolution feature. The time-frequency resolution is a vital factor affecting the accuracy of damage localization. In FSWT there is a unique parameter controlling the time-frequency resolution. To improve the accuracy of damage localization, a generalized criterion is proposed to determine the parameter value for achieving a suitable time-frequency resolution. For damage localization, the group velocity dispersion curve (GVDC of A0 Lamb waves in beam is first accurately estimated using FSWT, and then the arrival times of reflection wave from the crack for some individual frequency components are determined. An average operation on the calculated propagation distance is then performed to further improve the accuracy of damage localization.

  18. Collateral damage: Spread of repeat-induced point mutation from a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2004-10-16

    Oct 16, 2004 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 30; Issue 1. Collateral damage: Spread of repeat-induced point mutation from a duplicated DNA sequence into an adjoining single-copy gene in Neurospora crassa. Meenal Vyas Durgadas P Kasbekar. Volume 30 Issue 1 February 2005 pp 15-20 ...

  19. HPRT gene mutation frequency and the factor of influence in adult peripheral blood lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jingyong; Zheng Siying; Cui Fengmei; Wang Liuyi; Lao Qinhua; Wu Hongliang

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the HPRT gene loci mutation frequencies and the factor of influence in peripheral blood lymphocytes of adult with ages ranging from 21-50. Methods: HPRT gene mutation frequency (GMf) were examined by the technique of multinuclear cell assay. Relation between GMf and years were fitted with a computer. Results: Relation could be described by the following equation: y = 0.7555 + 0.0440x, r = 0.9829. Smoking has influence on GMf and sex hasn't. Conclusion: HPRT gene mutation frequency increases with increasing of age. Increasing rate is 0.00440% per year

  20. The mutation frequency of Drosophila melanogaster populations living under conditions of increased background radiation due to the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zainullin, V.G.; Rakin, A.O.; Shevchenko, V.A.; Myasnyankina, E.N.; Generalova, M.V.

    1992-01-01

    One of the problems facing the program in the wake of the Chernobyl accident is the estimation of genetic damage to plants and animals. Special attention was directed to studying the influence of radioactive pollutants at the accident site by means of an appropriate test system, using standard genetic subjects. The present study describes such investigations. Levels of persistent genetic damage in natural populations of Drosophila melanogaster found in the vicinity of the Chernobyl accident site were examined from August 1986-September 1989. Evidence is presented which indicates a relationship between the levels of radioactive pollution resulting from the Chernobyl accident and increasing genetic damage to exposed populations. The possible reasons for the decrease of mutation frequency observed in 1988 and 1989 are also discussed. Furthermore, evidence is presented which suggests that radiosensitive Drosophila mutants may be particularly sensitive indicators of radioactive pollution. (author). 16 refs.; 6 figs

  1. Evaluation of frequency of kirsten rat sarcoma gene mutations in Iranian colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Roudbari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Kirsten rat sarcoma (KRAS gene is a target of genetic alterations which are diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer who are treated with monoclonal anti-EGFR antibodies such as cetuximab and panitumumab. KRAS mutations are seen in 35-42% of patients with colorectal cancer. The high frequency of these mutations in colorectal cancer represents their high potential as a biomarker in early diagnosis of cancer. This study was done to evaluate the frequency of KRAS gene mutations in a small population of Iranian patients suffering from colorectal cancer.   Methods: 50 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks with colorectal cancer (CRC, already confirmed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry testing, were received to Payvand Clinical and Specialty Laboratory, Tehran, from across the country in 2015. DNA was extracted from the tissue blocks and its quality was then evaluated. The reverse dot blotting method was used to evaluate KRAS gene mutations. Results: KRAS mutations were found in 42% of the study patients. 30% and 12% of the mutations were found in codon 12 and codon 13, respectively. Moreover, no mutation was found in codon 61. Results also showed that the most frequency of samples examined belonged to male with 68% (average age of 56 years old and then to female with 32% (median age of 54.8 years old. Conclusion: This study was performed to evaluate the frequency of KRAS gene mutations in Iranian colorectal cancer patients. According to the study results, the frequency of KRAS mutations was consistent with that of other countries, reported in previous studies. The high prevalence of these mutations in patients with colorectal cancer indicates the important role of these genes in this group of patients. Thus, the presence of these mutations can be used as a suitable biomarker for evaluation of response to targeted therapies in patients suffering from colorectal cancer.

  2. Frequency of EGFR mutations in lung adenocarcinoma with malignant pleural effusion: Implication of cancer biological behaviour regulated by EGFR mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, JianYong; Bella, Amos Ela; Chen, ZhenGuang; Han, XiangQian; Su, ChunHua; Lei, YiYan; Luo, HongHe

    2014-10-01

    A retrospective single-centre study to compare the clinical features of patients with lung adenocarcinoma with and without epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations. Pretreatment medical records of patients with lung adenocarcinoma were reviewed. DNA was extracted from paraffin wax-embedded tumour tissue for analysis of EGFR mutations. Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) was diagnosed by cytopathological testing of pleural fluid. EGFR mutations (19-Del and L858R) were recorded in 81/283 patients (28.6%). MPE was found in 42/283 patients (14.8%). In patients with stage IV disease, the frequency of EGFR mutations was higher in those with MPE than in those without MPE. EGFR mutations were independently associated with female sex, no history of smoking and presence of MPE. There was a positive association between EGFR mutation and the presence of MPE. EGFR mutations may play an important role in the formation of MPE. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  3. The effects of extremely low frequency magnetic fields on mutation induction in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, James W. [Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Haines, Jackie; Sienkiewicz, Zenon [Centre for Radiation, Chemical and Environmental Hazards, Public Health England, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0RQ (United Kingdom); Dubrova, Yuri E., E-mail: yed2@le.ac.uk [Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • The effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields on mutation induction in mice were analyzed. • The frequency of ESTR mutation was established in sperm and blood. • Exposure to 10–300 μT for 2 and 15 h did not result in mutation induction. • Mutagenic effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields are likely to be negligible. - Abstract: The growing human exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields has raised a considerable concern regarding their genotoxic effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo effects of ELF magnetic fields irradiation on mutation induction in the germline and somatic tissues of male mice. Seven week old BALB/c × CBA/Ca F{sub 1} hybrid males were exposed to 10, 100 or 300 μT of 50 Hz magnetic fields for 2 or 15 h. Using single-molecule PCR, the frequency of mutation at the mouse Expanded Simple Tandem Repeat (ESTR) locus Ms6-hm was established in sperm and blood samples of exposed and matched sham-treated males. ESTR mutation frequency was also established in sperm and blood samples taken from male mice exposed to 1 Gy of acute X-rays. The frequency of ESTR mutation in DNA samples extracted from blood of mice exposed to magnetic fields did not significantly differ from that in sham-treated controls. However, there was a marginally significant increase in mutation frequency in sperm but this was not dose-dependent. In contrast, acute exposure X-rays led to significant increases in mutation frequency in sperm and blood of exposed males. The results of our study suggest that, within the range of doses analyzed here, the in vivo mutagenic effects of ELF magnetic fields are likely to be minor if not negligible.

  4. The effects of extremely low frequency magnetic fields on mutation induction in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, James W.; Haines, Jackie; Sienkiewicz, Zenon; Dubrova, Yuri E.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields on mutation induction in mice were analyzed. • The frequency of ESTR mutation was established in sperm and blood. • Exposure to 10–300 μT for 2 and 15 h did not result in mutation induction. • Mutagenic effects of 50 Hz magnetic fields are likely to be negligible. - Abstract: The growing human exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields has raised a considerable concern regarding their genotoxic effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vivo effects of ELF magnetic fields irradiation on mutation induction in the germline and somatic tissues of male mice. Seven week old BALB/c × CBA/Ca F 1 hybrid males were exposed to 10, 100 or 300 μT of 50 Hz magnetic fields for 2 or 15 h. Using single-molecule PCR, the frequency of mutation at the mouse Expanded Simple Tandem Repeat (ESTR) locus Ms6-hm was established in sperm and blood samples of exposed and matched sham-treated males. ESTR mutation frequency was also established in sperm and blood samples taken from male mice exposed to 1 Gy of acute X-rays. The frequency of ESTR mutation in DNA samples extracted from blood of mice exposed to magnetic fields did not significantly differ from that in sham-treated controls. However, there was a marginally significant increase in mutation frequency in sperm but this was not dose-dependent. In contrast, acute exposure X-rays led to significant increases in mutation frequency in sperm and blood of exposed males. The results of our study suggest that, within the range of doses analyzed here, the in vivo mutagenic effects of ELF magnetic fields are likely to be minor if not negligible

  5. Frequency of BRAF V600E Mutation in the Mexican Population of Patients With Metastatic Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Ruiz-Garcia

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The BRAF V600E mutation has been described in melanomas occurring in the Caucasian, European, and Asian populations. However, in the Mexican population, the status and clinical significance of BRAF mutation has not been researched on a large scale. Methods: Consecutive BRAF-tested Mexican patients with metastatic melanoma (n = 127 were analyzed for mutations in exon 15 of the BRAF gene in genomic DNA by real-time polymerase chain reaction technology for amplification and detection. The results were correlated with the clinical-pathologic features and the prognosis of the patients. Results: The frequency of somatic mutation V600E within the BRAF gene was 54.6% (43 of 127 patients. Nodular melanoma was the most prevalent subtype in our population, with BRAF mutations in 37.2% (16 of 55 patients. In contrast, superficial spread had a frequency of 18.6% BRAF mutation (eight of 24. Other clinicopathologic features were assessed to correlate with the mutation status. Conclusion: This study searched for the most prevalent BRAF V600E mutation type in melanoma in a heterogeneous population from Mexico. Nodular melanoma was found to be the most prevalent in metastatic presentation and the presence of BRAF V600E mutation, perhaps related to the mixed ancestry; in the north, ancestry is predominantly European and in the south, it is predominantly Asian. The outcomes of the mutation correlations were similar to those found in other populations.

  6. Tumor-specific mutations in low-frequency genes affect their functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem-Eraslan, Lale; Heijsman, Daphne; de Wit, Maurice; Kremer, Andreas; Sacchetti, Andrea; van der Spek, Peter J; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A E; French, Pim J

    2015-05-01

    Causal genetic changes in oligodendrogliomas (OD) with 1p/19q co-deletion include mutations in IDH1, IDH2, CIC, FUBP1, TERT promoter and NOTCH1. However, it is generally assumed that more somatic mutations are required for tumorigenesis. This study aimed to establish whether genes mutated at low frequency can be involved in OD initiation and/or progression. We performed whole-genome sequencing on three anaplastic ODs with 1p/19q co-deletion. To estimate mutation frequency, we performed targeted resequencing on an additional 39 ODs. Whole-genome sequencing identified a total of 55 coding mutations (range 8-32 mutations per tumor), including known abnormalities in IDH1, IDH2, CIC and FUBP1. We also identified mutations in genes, most of which were previously not implicated in ODs. Targeted resequencing on 39 additional ODs confirmed that these genes are mutated at low frequency. Most of the mutations identified were predicted to have a deleterious functional effect. Functional analysis on a subset of these genes (e.g. NTN4 and MAGEH1) showed that the mutation affects the subcellular localization of the protein (n = 2/12). In addition, HOG cells stably expressing mutant GDI1 or XPO7 showed altered cell proliferation compared to those expressing wildtype constructs. Similarly, HOG cells expressing mutant SASH3 or GDI1 showed altered migration. The significantly higher rate of predicted deleterious mutations, the changes in subcellular localization and the effects on proliferation and/or migration indicate that many of these genes functionally may contribute to gliomagenesis and/or progression. These low-frequency genes and their affected pathways may provide new treatment targets for this tumor type.

  7. Increased Oxidative Damage in Carriers of the Germline TP53 p.R337H Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Gabriel S.; Lisbôa da Motta, Leonardo; Giacomazzi, Juliana; Netto, Cristina B. O.; Manfredini, Vanusa; S.Vanzin, Camila; Vargas, Carmen Regla; Hainaut, Pierre; Klamt, Fábio; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in TP53 are the underlying defect of Li-Fraumeni Syndrome (LFS) and Li-Fraumeni-like (LFL) Syndrome, autosomal dominant disorders characterized by predisposition to multiple early onset cancers. In Brazil, a variant form of LFS/LFL is commonly detected because of the high prevalence of a founder mutation at codon 337 in TP53 (p.R337H). The p53 protein exerts multiple roles in the regulation of oxidative metabolism and cellular anti-oxidant defense systems. Herein, we analyzed the redox parameters in blood samples from p.R337H mutation carriers (C, n = 17) and non-carriers (NC, n = 17). We identified a significant increase in erythrocyte GPx activity and in plasma carbonyl content,an indicator of protein oxidative damage, in mutation carriers compared to non-carriers (P = 0.048 and P = 0.035, respectively). Mutation carriers also showed a four-fold increase in plasma malondialdehyde levels, indicating increased lipid peroxidation (NC = 40.20±0.71, C = 160.5±0.88, P<0.0001). Finally, carriers showed increased total antioxidant status but a decrease in plasma ascorbic acid content. The observed imbalance could be associated with deregulated cell bioenergetics and/or with increased inflammatory stress, two effects that may result from loss of wild-type p53 function. These findings provide the first evidence that oxidative damage occurs in carriers of a germline TP53 mutation, and these may have important implications regarding our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for germline TP53 p.R337H mutation-associated carcinogenesis. PMID:23056559

  8. Adducts in sperm protamine and DNA (deoxyribonuclease) vs. mutation frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sega, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    In mammals, variability in the genetic sensitivity of different germ-cell stages to mutagens could be the result of how much chemical reaches the different stages, what molecular targets may be affected in the different stages and whether or not repair of lesions occurs. In the mouse, several mutagens have been found that cause their greatest genetic damage in late-spermatid and early-spermatozoa stages and that also bind very strongly to the protamine in these stages. Chemicals which are less genetically damaging to these stages have been found to have much less affinity for protamine. Furthermore, the level of chemical binding to DNA in late-spermatid and early-spermatozoa stages has not been correlated with the level of induced genetic damage, although DNA breakage in these sensitive stages has been shown to increase. This DNA damage is believed to indirectly result from chemical binding to sulfhydryl groups in protamine which prevents normal chromatin condensation within the sperm nucleus. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Frequency and Distribution of Tuberculosis Resistance-Associated Mutations between Mumbai, Moldova, and Eastern Cape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georghiou, S B; Seifert, M; Catanzaro, D; Garfein, R S; Valafar, F; Crudu, V; Rodrigues, C; Victor, T C; Catanzaro, A; Rodwell, T C

    2016-07-01

    Molecular diagnostic assays, with their ability to rapidly detect resistance-associated mutations in bacterial genes, are promising technologies to control the spread of drug-resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB). Sequencing assays provide detailed information for specific gene regions and can help diagnostic assay developers prioritize mutations for inclusion in their assays. We performed pyrosequencing of seven Mycobacterium tuberculosis gene regions (katG, inhA, ahpC, rpoB, gyrA, rrs, and eis) for 1,128 clinical specimens from India, Moldova, and South Africa. We determined the frequencies of each mutation among drug-resistant and -susceptible specimens based on phenotypic drug susceptibility testing results and examined mutation distributions by country. The most common mutation among isoniazid-resistant (INH(r)) specimens was the katG 315ACC mutation (87%). However, in the Eastern Cape, INH(r) specimens had a lower frequency of katG mutations (44%) and higher frequencies of inhA (47%) and ahpC (10%) promoter mutations. The most common mutation among rifampin-resistant (RIF(r)) specimens was the rpoB 531TTG mutation (80%). The mutation was common in RIF(r) specimens in Mumbai (83%) and Moldova (84%) but not the Eastern Cape (17%), where the 516GTC mutation appeared more frequently (57%). The most common mutation among fluoroquinolone-resistant specimens was the gyrA 94GGC mutation (44%). The rrs 1401G mutation was found in 84%, 84%, and 50% of amikacin-resistant, capreomycin-resistant, and kanamycin (KAN)-resistant (KAN(r)) specimens, respectively. The eis promoter mutation -12T was found in 26% of KAN(r) and 4% of KAN-susceptible (KAN(s)) specimens. Inclusion of the ahpC and eis promoter gene regions was critical for optimal test sensitivity for the detection of INH resistance in the Eastern Cape and KAN resistance in Moldova. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration number NCT02170441.). Copyright © 2016, American Society for

  10. Phenotype and frequency of STUB1 mutations: next-generation screenings in Caucasian ataxia and spastic paraplegia cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synofzik, Matthis; Schüle, Rebecca; Schulze, Martin; Gburek-Augustat, Janina; Schweizer, Roland; Schirmacher, Anja; Krägeloh-Mann, Ingeborg; Gonzalez, Michael; Young, Peter; Züchner, Stephan; Schöls, Ludger; Bauer, Peter

    2014-04-17

    Mutations in the gene STUB1, encoding the protein CHIP (C-terminus of HSC70-interacting protein), have recently been suggested as a cause of recessive ataxia based on the findings in few Chinese families. Here we aimed to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic spectrum of STUB1 mutations, and to assess their frequency in different Caucasian disease cohorts. 300 subjects with degenerative ataxia (n = 167) or spastic paraplegia (n = 133) were screened for STUB1 variants by whole-exome-sequencing (n = 204) or shotgun-fragment-library-sequencing (n = 96). To control for the specificity of STUB1 variants, we screened an additional 1707 exomes from 891 index families with other neurological diseases. We identified 3 ataxia patients (3/167 = 1.8%) with 4 novel missense mutations in STUB1, including 3 mutations in its tetratricopeptide-repeat domain. All patients showed evidence of pyramidal tract damage. Cognitive impairment was present only in one and hypogonadism in none of them. Ataxia did not start before age 48 years in one subject. No recessive STUB1 variants were identified in families with other neurological diseases, demonstrating that STUB1 variants are not simply rare polymorphisms ubiquitous in neurodegenerative disease. STUB1-disease occurs also in Caucasian ataxia populations (1.8%). Our results expand the genotypic spectrum of STUB1-disease, showing that pathogenic mutations affect also the tetratricopeptide-repeat domain, thus providing clinical evidence for the functional importance of this domain. Moreover, they further delineate the phenotypic core features of STUB1-ataxia. Pyramidal tract damage is a common accompanying feature and can include lower limb spasticity, thus adding STUB1-ataxia to the differential diagnosis of "spastic ataxias". However, STUB1 is rare in subjects with predominant spastic paraplegia (0/133). In contrast to previous reports, STUB1-ataxia can start even above age 40 years, and neither hypogonadism nor prominent cognitive

  11. Use of Time- and Frequency-Domain Approaches for Damage Detection in Civil Engineering Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. H. Nguyen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to apply both time- and frequency-domain-based approaches on real-life civil engineering structures and to assess their capability for damage detection. The methodology is based on Principal Component Analysis of the Hankel matrix built from output-only measurements and of Frequency Response Functions. Damage detection is performed using the concept of subspace angles between a current (possibly damaged state and a reference (undamaged state. The first structure is the Champangshiehl Bridge located in Luxembourg. Several damage levels were intentionally created by cutting a growing number of prestressed tendons and vibration data were acquired by the University of Luxembourg for each damaged state. The second example consists in reinforced and prestressed concrete panels. Successive damages were introduced in the panels by loading heavy weights and by cutting steel wires. The illustrations show different consequences in damage identification by the considered techniques.

  12. CHEK2 1100DELC germline mutation: a frequency study in hereditary breast and colon cancer Brazilian families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamile Abud

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: CHEK2 encodes a cell cycle checkpoint kinase that plays an important role in the DNA damage repair pathway, activated mainly by ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated in response to double-stranded DNA breaks. A germline mutation in CHEK2, 1100delC, has been described as a low penetrance allele in a significant number of families with breast and colorectal cancer in certain countries and is also associated with increased risk of contralateral breast cancer in women previously affected by the disease. About 5%-10% of all breast and colorectal cancers are associated with hereditary predisposition and its recognition is of great importance for genetic counseling and cancer risk management. OBJECTIVES: Here, we have assessed the frequency of the CHEK2 1100delC mutation in the germline of 59 unrelated Brazilian individuals with clinical criteria for the hereditary breast and colorectal cancer syndrome. METHODS: A long-range PCR strategy followed by gene sequencing was used. RESULTS: The 1100delC mutation was encountered in the germline of one (1.7% individual in this high risk cohort. This indicates that the CHEK2 1100delC is not commonly encountered in Brazilian families with multiple diagnoses of breast and colorectal cancer. CONCLUSION: These results should be confirmed in a larger series of families and further testing should be undertaken to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the hereditary breast and colorectal cancer phenotype.

  13. Frequency of mutations in Mediterranean fever gene, with gender ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Also, the most common symptoms were vomiting, fatigue and anorexia, which were not included as Tel–Hashomer criteria (Livneh et al. 1997). Anorexia was especially common in children. Frequencies of. FMF clinical features in previous studies from other ethnic groups (Armenians, Jews and Arabs) have been reported.

  14. The Mutation Frequency in Different Spike Categories in Barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenberg, O.; Doll, Hans; Sandfær, J.

    1964-01-01

    After gamma irradiation of barley seeds, a comparison has been made between the chlorophyll-mutant frequencies in X1 spikes that had multicellular bud meristems in the seeds at the time of treatment (denoted as pre-formed spikes) and X1 spikes having no recognizable meristems at the time...

  15. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  16. Frequency and spectrum of mutations induced by gamma irradiation in single, double and triple dwarf wheats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhonukshe, B.L.

    1981-01-01

    Induced mutation studies were carried with three dwarf wheat varieties viz., ''Sonalika'', ''Chhoti Lerma'' and ''Hira'', considered to be single, double and trible dwarfs, respectively. Gamma-rays were used as a source of irradiation. Frequency of chlorophyll mutations were comparatively low and the spectrum was narrow. Chlorophyll mutations were altogether absent in the variety ''Sonalika''. A very wide spectrum of viable mutations affecting stem, leaf, ear growth habit, maturity and fertility characteristics was observed in the M 2 . The cumulative frequency of all the mutants together was quite high, which varied with the varieties. There were varietal differences in the composition and width of the spectrum induced by gamma-rays. The dwarf mutants having desirable leaf and spike characters were isolated in all the three varieties. (author)

  17. Diversity and frequency of kdr mutations within Anopheles sinensis populations from Guangxi, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chan; Feng, Xiangyang; Huang, Zushi; Li, Mei; Qiu, Xinghui

    2016-08-15

    Anopheles sinensis is a major vector of malaria in China and its control is under great threat as the development of insecticide resistance. Voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) is the target of several classes of insecticides. Genetic mutations of VGSC have been documented to confer knockdown resistance (kdr) to dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and pyrethroids in mosquitoes. To control this vector efficiently, it is important to know the resistance-associated genetic mutations, their distribution frequencies and genealogical relations. Three hundreds and thirteen (313) adults of An. sinensis collected from nine locations across Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region were used. The partial sequence of the An. sinensis voltage gated sodium channel gene (AS-VGSC) containing codon 1014 was sequenced. PHASE2.1 was used to construct the haplotypes of each individual, and the accuracy of haplotypes was further confirmed by clone sequencing. The genealogical relations of kdr mutations in AS-VGSC was analysed using TCS 2.1 and Network 5.0. Sixteen AS-VGSC haplotypes including seven haplotypes carrying non-synonymous mutations at codon 1014, and fifty-five AS-VGSC genotypes were identified from 313 mosquitoes collected from nine geographical locations across Guangxi. The number of haplotypes in each of the nine populations ranged from 5 to 13. The frequency of haplotypes carrying kdr mutations ranged from 2.7 to 80.0 % within the nine populations, of which 1014C was unexpectedly high in the northeast of Guangxi. Genealogical analysis suggested multiple origins of kdr mutations in An. sinensis. Diverse haplotypes of AS-VGSC are distributed in Guangxi. The presence of haplotypes carrying mutations at codon 1014 indicates a risk of pyrethroid and DDT resistance. The kdr mutations show differential distribution geographically, with high frequencies occurred in the northeast of Guangxi. Genealogical analysis suggests multiple origins of kdr mutations in An. sinensis populations

  18. [Frequency of delta F508 mutation in Venezuelan patients with cystic fibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Machin, Alisandra; Borjas-Fajardo, Lisbeth; Pineda, Lennie; González, Sandra; Delgado, Wilmer; Zabala, Wiliam; Fernández, Erika

    2004-06-01

    Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is the most common and severe autosomal recessive disease in Caucasian populations, with an incidence of 1 in 2500 live births. It is characterized by a generalized disturbance in exocrine glands and it is caused by over one thousand mutations at the cystic fibrosis conductance regulator gene (CFTR) mapped at 7q31. AF508 is the most frequent mutation worldwide and it consists in a deletion of the codon that encodes fenilalanine at the 508 protein's position. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of the delta F508 mutation in Venezuelan patients with CF using the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). We studied thirty patients of twenty eight families who were diagnosed with CF based on their clinical features and sweat chloride level > 60 mEq/l in two determinations. Detection of the mutation was performed from the amplification of a 98 pair of bases (pb) CF gene segment which contains the codon that encodes fenilalanine in the 508 position by PCR. This PCR product is absent in those who have the mutation. The delta F508 allelic frequency was 26.79%, distributed in six homozygous and seven compound heterozygote delta F508/X. The reminder mutations (no delta F508) represent 73.21%. The delta F508 frequency in our sample is less than the reported in European countries. On the other hand, a delta F508 frequency highly heterogeneous has been observed in Latin-American countries. This variation results from mixed populations with a different genetic background influenced by external migration and CF molecular alterations, which exists in the analyzed populations. In this study, the delta F508 mutation comes mainly from grandparents (79.41%) who were born in Mediterranean countries and Colombia, while the no delta F508 mutations come from grandparents who were born in Venezuela (79.27%) and Colombia (17.07%).

  19. Mutational jackpot events generate effective frequency-dependent selection in adapting populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallatschek, Oskar

    The site-frequency spectrum is one the most easily measurable quantities that characterize the genetic diversity of a population. While most neutral models predict that site frequency spectra should decay with increasing frequency, a high-frequency uptick has been reported in many populations. Anomalies in the high-frequency tail are particularly unsettling because the highest frequencies can be measured with greatest accuracy. Here, we show that an uptick in the spectrum of neutral mutations generally arises when mutant frequencies are dominated by rare jackpot events, mutational events with large descendant numbers. This leads to an effective pattern of frequency-dependent selection (or unstable internal equilibrium at one half frequency) that causes an accumulation of high-frequency polymorphic sites. We reproduce the known uptick occurring for recurrent hitchhiking (genetic draft) as well as rapid adaptation, and (in the future) generalize the shape of the high-frequency tail to other scenarios that are dominated by jackpot events, such as frequent range expansions. We also tackle (in the future) the inverse approach to use the high-frequency uptick for learning about the tail of the offspring number distribution. Positively selected alleles need to surpass, typically, an u NSF Career Award (PoLS), NIH NIGMS R01, Simons Foundation.

  20. Damage Detection Based on Cross-Term Extraction from Bilinear Time-Frequency Distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Yuchao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abundant damage information is implicated in the bilinear time-frequency distribution of structural dynamic signals, which could provide effective support for structural damage identification. Signal time-frequency analysis methods are reviewed, and the characters of linear time-frequency distribution and bilinear time-frequency distribution typically represented by the Wigner-Ville distribution are compared. The existence of the cross-term and its application in structural damage detection are demonstrated. A method of extracting the dominant term is proposed, which combines the short-time Fourier spectrum and Wigner-Ville distribution; then two-dimensional time-frequency transformation matrix is constructed and the complete cross-term is extracted finally. The distribution character of which could be applied to the structural damage identification. Through theoretical analysis, model experiment and numerical simulation of the girder structure, the change rate of cross-term amplitude is validated to identify the damage location and degree. The effectiveness of the cross-term of bilinear time-frequency distribution for damage detection is confirmed and the analytical method of damage identification used in structural engineering is available.

  1. Complexity of the ultraviolet mutation frequency response curve in Escherichia coli B/r: SOS induction, one-lesion and two-lesion mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doudney, C.O.

    1976-01-01

    Three distinct sections of the ultraviolet mutation frequency response (MFR) curve toward tryptophan prototrophy have been demonstrated in Escherichia coli B/r WP2 trp thy and its uvrA derivative in log-phase growth in minimal medium. The initial section, which appears fluence-squared, may reflect the necessity, if mutation is to result, for induction of two lesions, one located within the potentially mutated genetic locus and the other damaging deoxyribonucleic acid replication and resulting in induction of the error-prone SOS repair function. A second linear section is ascribed to the continued induction, after exposure above that sufficient for complete SOS expression, of isolated lesions which lead to mutation in potentially mutated loci. The third section demonstrates an increased rate of mutagenesis and suggests the induction of two lesions in proximity which result in additional mutations. Split-exposure studies support the inducible nature of the SOS function and suggest that mutation frequency decline (MFD) is due to excision resulting from or related to the prevention of SOS induction by inhibition of protein synthesis. Preirradiation tryptophan starvation of the uvr + strain for 30 min decreases MFR in the first and second sections of the curve. Reduction of MFR in the third section requires more prestarvation time and is blocked by nalidixic acid. The decreased MFR of the first and second sections is ascribed to promotion of postirradiation MFD based on excision and that of the third section to completion of the chromosome during the prestarvation period

  2. The impact of SF3B1 mutations in CLL on the DNA-damage response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Te Raa, G D; Derks, I A M; Navrkalova, V

    2015-01-01

    . Interestingly, SF3B1 mutated samples without concurrent ATM and TP53 aberrations (sole SF3B1) displayed partially defective ATM/p53 transcriptional and apoptotic responses to various DNA-damaging regimens. In contrast, NOTCH1 or K/N-RAS mutated CLL displayed normal responses in p53/ATM target gene induction...

  3. Identification of a Maximum Softening Damage Indicator of RC-Structures Using Time-Frequency Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Micaletti, R. C.

    This paper considers estimation of the Maximum Damage Indicator (MSDI) by using time-frequency system identification techniques for an RC-structure subjected to earthquake excitation. The MSDI relates the global damage state of the RC-structure to the relative decrease of the fundamental...

  4. Identification and Level 1 Damage Detection of the Z24 Highway Bridge by Frequency Domain Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Andersen, P.; Cantieni, R.

    2001-01-01

    A series of 15 progressive damage tests were performed on a prestressed concrete highway bridge in Switzerland. The ambient response of the bridge was recorded for each damage case with a relatively large number of sensors. Changes in frequencies, damping ratios and MAC values were determined...

  5. Frequency of EGFR mutations in 907 lung adenocarcioma patients of Indian ethnicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anuradha Chougule

    Full Text Available During the past decade, the incidence of EGFR mutation has been shown to vary across different ethnicities. It occurs at the rate of 10-15% in North Americans and Europeans, 19% in African-Americans, 20-30% in various East Asian series including Chinese, Koreans, and Japanese. Frequency of EGFR mutations in India however remains sparsely explored.We report 23% incidence of Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutations in 907 Non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients of Indian ethnicity, in contrast to 10-15% known in Caucasians and 27-62% among East Asians. In this study, EGFR mutations were found to be more common in never-smokers 29.4% as compared to smokers 15.3%. Consistent with other populations, mutation rates among adenocarcinoma-males were predominantly lower than females with 32% incidence. However unlike Caucasians, EGFR mutation rate among adenocarcinoma-never-smoker females were comparable to males suggesting lack of gender bias among never smokers likely to benefit from EGFR targeted therapy.This study has an overall implication for establishing relevance for routine EGFR mutation diagnostics for NSCLC patients in clinics and emphasizes effectiveness for adoption of EGFR inhibitors as the first line treatment among Indian population. The intermediate frequency of EGFR mutation among Indian population compared to Caucasians and East Asians is reminiscent of an ancestral admixture of genetic influence from Middle Easterners, Central Asians, and Europeans on modern- Indian population that may confer differential susceptibility to somatic mutations in EGFR.

  6. The observed human sperm mutation frequency cannot explain the achondroplasia paternal age effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiemann-Boege, Irene; Navidi, William; Grewal, Raji; Cohn, Dan; Eskenazi, Brenda; Wyrobek, Andrew J.; Arnheim, Norman

    2002-01-01

    The lifelong spermatogonial stem cell divisions unique to male germ cell production are thought to contribute to a higher mutation frequency in males. The fact that certain de novo human genetic conditions (e.g., achondroplasia) increase in incidence with the age of the father is consistent with this idea. Although it is assumed that the paternal age effect is the result of an increasing frequency of mutant sperm as a man grows older, no direct molecular measurement of the germ-line mutation frequency has been made to confirm this hypothesis. Using sperm DNA from donors of different ages, we determined the frequency of the nucleotide substitution in the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) gene that causes achondroplasia. Surprisingly, the magnitude of the increase in mutation frequency with age appears insufficient to explain why older fathers have a greater chance of having a child with this condition. A number of alternatives may explain this discrepancy, including selection for sperm that carry the mutation or an age-dependent increase in premutagenic lesions that remain unrepaired in sperm and are inefficiently detected by the PCR assay. PMID:12397172

  7. High frequency of additional gene mutations in acute myeloid leukemia with MLL partial tandem duplication: DNMT3A mutation is associated with poor prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Hsiao-Wen; Liang, D Cherng; Kuo, Ming-Chung; Wu, Jin-Hou; Dunn, Po; Wang, Po-Nan; Lin, Tung-Liang; Shih, Yu-Shu; Liang, Sung-Tzu; Lin, Tung-Huei; Lai, Chen-Yu; Lin, Chun-Hui; Shih, Lee-Yung

    2015-10-20

    The mutational profiles of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with partial tandem duplication of mixed-lineage leukemia gene (MLL-PTD) have not been comprehensively studied. We studied 19 gene mutations for 98 patients with MLL-PTD AML to determine the mutation frequency and clinical correlations. MLL-PTD was screened by reverse-transcriptase PCR and confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR. The mutational analyses were performed with PCR-based assays followed by direct sequencing. Gene mutations of signaling pathways occurred in 63.3% of patients, with FLT3-ITD (44.9%) and FLT3-TKD (13.3%) being the most frequent. 66% of patients had gene mutations involving epigenetic regulation, and DNMT3A (32.7%), IDH2 (18.4%), TET2 (18.4%), and IDH1 (10.2%) mutations were most common. Genes of transcription pathways and tumor suppressors accounted for 23.5% and 10.2% of patients. RUNX1 mutation occurred in 23.5% of patients, while none had NPM1 or double CEBPA mutation. 90.8% of MLL-PTD AML patients had at least one additional gene mutation. Of 55 MLL-PTD AML patients who received standard chemotherapy, age older than 50 years and DNMT3A mutation were associated with inferior outcome. In conclusion, gene mutations involving DNA methylation and activated signaling pathway were common co-existed gene mutations. DNMT3A mutation was a poor prognostic factor in MLL-PTD AML.

  8. Antibiotic resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains with increased mutation frequency due to inactivation of the DNA oxidative repair system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandsberg, L F; Ciofu, O; Kirkby, N; Christiansen, L E; Poulsen, H E; Høiby, N

    2009-06-01

    The chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection of the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is characterized by the biofilm mode of growth and chronic inflammation dominated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). A high percentage of P. aeruginosa strains show high frequencies of mutations (hypermutators [HP]). P. aeruginosa is exposed to oxygen radicals, both those generated by its own metabolism and especially those released by a large number of PMNs in response to the chronic CF lung infection. Our work therefore focused on the role of the DNA oxidative repair system in the development of HP and antibiotic resistance. We have constructed and characterized mutT, mutY, and mutM mutants in P. aeruginosa strain PAO1. The mutT and mutY mutants showed 28- and 7.5-fold increases in mutation frequencies, respectively, over that for PAO1. These mutators had more oxidative DNA damage (higher levels of 7,8-dihydro-8-oxodeoxyguanosine) than PAO1 after exposure to PMNs, and they developed resistance to antibiotics more frequently. The mechanisms of resistance were increased beta-lactamase production and overexpression of the MexCD-OprJ efflux-pump. Mutations in either the mutT or the mutY gene were found in resistant HP clinical isolates from patients with CF, and complementation with wild-type genes reverted the phenotype. In conclusion, oxidative stress might be involved in the development of resistance to antibiotics. We therefore suggest the possible use of antioxidants for CF patients to prevent the development of antibiotic resistance.

  9. Detection of damaged supports under railway track based on frequency shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Longqi; Zhang, Yao; Lie, Seng Tjhen

    2017-03-01

    In railway transportation systems, the tracks are usually fastened on sleepers which are supported by the ballast. A lot of research has been conducted to guarantee the safety of railway track because of its importance, and more concern is expressed about monitoring of track itself such as railway level and alignment. The ballast and fasteners which provide strong support to the railway track are important as well whereas the detection of loose or missing fasteners and damaged ballast mainly relies on visual inspection. Although it is reliable when the fastener is missing and the damaged ballast is on the surface, it provides less help if the fastener is only loose and the damaged ballast is under the sleepers, which are however frequently observed in practice. This paper proposes an approach based on frequency shift to identify the damaged supports including the loose or missing fasteners and damaged ballast. In this study, the rail-sleeper-ballast system is modeled as an Euler beam evenly supported by a series of springs, the stiffness of which are reduced when the fastener is loose or missing and the ballast under the sleepers is damaged. An auxiliary mass is utilized herein and when it is mounted on the beam, the natural frequencies of the whole system will change with respect to the location of the auxiliary mass. The auxiliary mass induced frequency shift is analyzed and it is found the natural frequencies change periodically when the supports are undamaged, whereas the periodicity will be broken due to damaged supports. In fact, the natural frequencies drop clearly when the auxiliary mass moves over the damaged support. A special damage index only using the information of the damaged states is proposed and both numerical and experimental examples are carried out to validate the proposed method.

  10. Identities and frequencies of mutations of the otoferlin gene (OTOF) causing DFNB9 deafness in Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, BY; Ahmed, ZM; Riazuddin, S; Bhinder, MA; Shahzad, M; Husnain, T; Riazuddin, S; Griffith, AJ; Friedman, TB

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in OTOF, encoding otoferlin, cause non-syndromic recessive hearing loss. The goal of our study was to define the identities and frequencies of OTOF mutations in a model population. We screened a cohort of 557 large consanguineous Pakistani families segregating recessive, severe-to-profound, prelingual-onset deafness for linkage to DFNB9. There were 13 families segregating deafness consistent with linkage to markers for DFNB9. We analyzed the genomic nucleotide sequence of OTOF and detected probable pathogenic sequence variants among all 13 families. These include the previously reported nonsense mutation p.R708X and 10 novel variants: 3 nonsense mutations (p.R425X, p.W536X, and p.Y1603X), 1 frameshift (c.1103_1104delinsC), 1 single amino acid deletion (p.E766del) and 5 missense substitutions of conserved residues (p.L573R, p.A1090E, p.E1733K, p.R1856Q and p.R1939W). OTOF mutations thus account for deafness in 13 (2.3%) of 557 Pakistani families. This overall prevalence is similar, but the mutation spectrum is different from those for Western populations. In addition, we demonstrate the existence of an alternative splice isoform of OTOF expressed in the human cochlea. This isoform must be required for human hearing because it encodes a unique alternative C-terminus affected by some DFNB9 mutations. PMID:19250381

  11. ABCC8 mutation allele frequency in the Ashkenazi Jewish population and risk of focal hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Benjamin; Blech, Ilana; Krakinovsky, Yocheved; Ekstein, Josef; Gillis, David; Mazor-Aronovitch, Kineret; Landau, Heddy; Abeliovich, Dvorah

    2011-10-01

    Congenital hyperinsulinism of infancy (OMIM# 256450) is a devastating disease most commonly caused by dominant or recessive mutations in either ABCC8 or KCNJ11, the genes that encode for the β-cell adenosine triphosphate-regulated potassium channel. A unique combination of a paternally inherited germline mutation and somatic loss-of-heterozygosity causes the focal form of the disease (Focal-congenital hyperinsulinism of infancy [Focal-CHI]), the incidence of which in genetically susceptible individuals is not known. We genotyped 21,122 Ashkenazi Jewish individuals for two previously identified ABCC8 founder mutations and utilized a clinical database of 61 unrelated Ashkenazi patients with congenital hyperinsulinism of infancy to obtain an estimate of the risk of Focal-CHI in a genetically susceptible fetus. The combined mutation carrier rate in Ashkenazi Jews was 1:52, giving an estimated frequency of homozygosity or compound heterozygosity of 1:10,816 in this population. The risk of Focal-CHI is 1:540 per pregnancy in offspring of carrier fathers. We recommend that these mutations be included in the genetic screening program for the Ashkenazi Jewish population. As the risk of Focal-CHI is not expected to be mutation specific, the data reported in this study are useful for counseling all families in which the father was found to carry a recessive ABCC8 or KCNJ11 mutation.

  12. Six novel P gene mutations and oculocutaneous albinism type 2 frequency in Japanese albino patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Tamio; Miyamura, Yoshinori; Matsunaga, Jun; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Kawachi, Yasuhiro; Ohyama, Naoko; Ishikawa, Osamu; Ishikawa, Tomoyuki; Terao, Hiroshi; Tomita, Yasushi

    2003-05-01

    Type 2 oculocutaneous albinism (OCA2) is an autosomal recessive disorder that results from mutations in the P gene that codes one of the melanosomal proteins, the function of which remains unknown. In this paper, we report the frequency of OCA2, 8%, among the Japanese albino population, six novel mutations containing four missense substitutions (P198L, P211L, R10W, M398I), and two splice site mutations (IVS15+1 G>A, IVS24-1 G>C). One of them, R10W, was within the putative signal peptide at the N-terminal of the P protein. This is the first report on the frequency of OCA2 in the Japanese albino population.

  13. C282Y and H63D Mutation Frequencies in a Population from Central Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Alvarez

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine the frequency of hereditary hemochromatosis gene mutations, C282Y and H63D, from 125 autochthonous blood donors originating from a Central region of Spain, to provide epidemiological data about HFE gene in the Iberian Peninsula.

  14. Robust structural damage detection and localization based on joint approximate diagonalization technique in frequency domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shancheng; Ouyang, Huajiang

    2017-01-01

    The structural characteristic deflection shapes (CDS’s) such as mode shapes and operational deflection shapes are highly sensitive to structural damage in beam- or plate-type structures. Nevertheless, they are vulnerable to measurement noise and could result in unacceptable identification errors. In order to increase the accuracy and noise robustness of damage identification based on CDS’s using vibration responses of random excitation, joint approximate diagonalization (JAD) technique and gapped smoothing method (GSM) are combined to form a sensitive and robust damage index (DI), which can simultaneously detect the existence of damage and localize its position. In addition, it is possible to apply this approach to damage identification of structures under ambient excitation. First, JAD method which is an essential technique of blind source separation is investigated to simultaneously diagonalize a set of power spectral density matrices corresponding to frequencies near a certain natural frequency to estimate a joint unitary diagonalizer. The columns of this joint diagonalizer contain dominant CDS’s. With the identified dominant CDS’s around different natural frequencies, GSM is used to extract damage features and a robust damage identification index is then proposed. Numerical and experimental examples of beams with cracks are used to verify the validity and noise robustness of JAD based CDS estimation and the proposed DI. Furthermore, damage identification using dominant CDS’s estimated by JAD method is demonstrated to be more accurate and noise robust than by the commonly used singular value decomposition method.

  15. Effect of Ku80 deficiency on mutation frequencies and spectra at a LacZ reporter locus in mouse tissues and cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita A Busuttil

    Full Text Available Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ is thought to be an important mechanism for preventing the adverse effects of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs and its absence has been associated with premature aging. To investigate the effect of inactivated NHEJ on spontaneous mutation frequencies and spectra in vivo and in cultured cells, we crossed a Ku80-deficient mouse with mice harboring a lacZ-plasmid-based mutation reporter. We analyzed various organs and tissues, as well as cultured embryonic fibroblasts, for mutations at the lacZ locus. When comparing mutant with wild-type mice, we observed a significantly higher number of genome rearrangements in liver and spleen and a significantly lower number of point mutations in liver and brain. The reduced point mutation frequency was not due to a decrease in small deletion mutations thought to be a hallmark of NHEJ, but could be a consequence of increased cellular responses to unrepaired DSBs. Indeed, we found a substantial increase in persistent 53BP1 and gammaH2AX DNA damage foci in Ku80-/- as compared to wild-type liver. Treatment of cultured Ku80-deficient or wild-type embryonic fibroblasts, either proliferating or quiescent, with hydrogen peroxide or bleomycin showed no differences in the number or type of induced genome rearrangements. However, after such treatment, Ku80-deficient cells did show an increased number of persistent DNA damage foci. These results indicate that Ku80-dependent repair of DNA damage is predominantly error-free with the effect of alternative more error-prone pathways creating genome rearrangements only detectable after extended periods of time, i.e., in young adult animals. The observed premature aging likely results from a combination of increased cellular senescence and an increased load of stable, genome rearrangements.

  16. Recombination affects accumulation of damaging and disease-associated mutations in human populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussin, Julie G; Hodgkinson, Alan; Idaghdour, Youssef; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; Goulet, Jean-Philippe; Gbeha, Elias; Hip-Ki, Elodie; Awadalla, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Many decades of theory have demonstrated that, in non-recombining systems, slightly deleterious mutations accumulate non-reversibly, potentially driving the extinction of many asexual species. Non-recombining chromosomes in sexual organisms are thought to have degenerated in a similar fashion; however, it is not clear the extent to which damaging mutations accumulate along chromosomes with highly variable rates of crossing over. Using high-coverage sequencing data from over 1,400 individuals in the 1000 Genomes and CARTaGENE projects, we show that recombination rate modulates the distribution of putatively deleterious variants across the entire human genome. Exons in regions of low recombination are significantly enriched for deleterious and disease-associated variants, a signature varying in strength across worldwide human populations with different demographic histories. Regions with low recombination rates are enriched for highly conserved genes with essential cellular functions and show an excess of mutations with demonstrated effects on health, a phenomenon likely affecting disease susceptibility in humans.

  17. The Impact of Environmental and Endogenous Damage on Somatic Mutation Load in Human Skin Fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Saini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Accumulation of somatic changes, due to environmental and endogenous lesions, in the human genome is associated with aging and cancer. Understanding the impacts of these processes on mutagenesis is fundamental to understanding the etiology, and improving the prognosis and prevention of cancers and other genetic diseases. Previous methods relying on either the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells, or sequencing of single-cell genomes were inherently error-prone and did not allow independent validation of the mutations. In the current study we eliminated these potential sources of error by high coverage genome sequencing of single-cell derived clonal fibroblast lineages, obtained after minimal propagation in culture, prepared from skin biopsies of two healthy adult humans. We report here accurate measurement of genome-wide magnitude and spectra of mutations accrued in skin fibroblasts of healthy adult humans. We found that every cell contains at least one chromosomal rearrangement and 600–13,000 base substitutions. The spectra and correlation of base substitutions with epigenomic features resemble many cancers. Moreover, because biopsies were taken from body parts differing by sun exposure, we can delineate the precise contributions of environmental and endogenous factors to the accrual of genetic changes within the same individual. We show here that UV-induced and endogenous DNA damage can have a comparable impact on the somatic mutation loads in skin fibroblasts. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01087307.

  18. Germ-line mutations, DNA damage, and global hypermethylation in mice exposed to particulate air pollution in an urban/industrial location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yauk, Carole; Polyzos, Aris; Rowan-Carroll, Andrea; Somers, Christopher M; Godschalk, Roger W; Van Schooten, Frederik J; Berndt, M Lynn; Pogribny, Igor P; Koturbash, Igor; Williams, Andrew; Douglas, George R; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2008-01-15

    Particulate air pollution is widespread, yet we have little understanding of the long-term health implications associated with exposure. We investigated DNA damage, mutation, and methylation in gametes of male mice exposed to particulate air pollution in an industrial/urban environment. C57BL/CBA mice were exposed in situ to ambient air near two integrated steel mills and a major highway, alongside control mice breathing high-efficiency air particulate (HEPA) filtered ambient air. PCR analysis of an expanded simple tandem repeat (ESTR) locus revealed a 1.6-fold increase in sperm mutation frequency in mice exposed to ambient air for 10 wks, followed by a 6-wk break, compared with HEPA-filtered air, indicating that mutations were induced in spermatogonial stem cells. DNA collected after 3 or 10 wks of exposure did not exhibit increased mutation frequency. Bulky DNA adducts were below the detection threshold in testes samples, suggesting that DNA reactive chemicals do not reach the germ line and cause ESTR mutation. In contrast, DNA strand breaks were elevated at 3 and 10 wks, possibly resulting from oxidative stress arising from exposure to particles and associated airborne pollutants. Sperm DNA was hypermethylated in mice breathing ambient relative to HEPA-filtered air and this change persisted following removal from the environmental exposure. Increased germ-line DNA mutation frequencies may cause population-level changes in genetic composition and disease. Changes in methylation can have widespread repercussions for chromatin structure, gene expression and genome stability. Potential health effects warrant extensive further investigation.

  19. Frequency of Calreticulin (CALR) Mutation and Its Clinical Prognostic Significance in Essential Thrombocythemia and Primary Myelofibrosis: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Hao; Liu, Yancheng; Luo, Sai; Li, Qiaoqiao; Wang, Qinglu

    2016-01-01

    Objective As the calreticulin (CALR) mutation frequency is significantly associated with essential thrombocythemia (ET) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF), this mutation may be an important biomarker in patients with ET and PMF. Methods We performed a literature search until April 2015 and obtained 21 relevant studies. The outcome was pooled as the effect size by using the Stata software program. Results The CALR mutation frequencies in patients with ET and PMF were 19% and 22%, respectively. The CALR mutation ratio in Asian patients with ET was 23% and higher than that in European-American patients (16%). Moreover, the mutation ratio in Asian patients with PMF was lower (21%) than that in European-American patients (23%). A slight trend toward fibrotic transformation was found in ET with CALR mutations, whereas leukemic transformation was not significant in patients with ET or PMF with CALR mutations. Conclusion CALR mutations significantly influence the incident of ET as demonstrated by the meta-analysis.

  20. Frequency of CNKSR2 mutation in the X-linked epilepsy-aphasia spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiano, John A; Burgess, Rosemary; Kivity, Sara; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Afawi, Zaid; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Berkovic, Samuel F; Hildebrand, Michael S

    2017-03-01

    Synaptic proteins are critical to neuronal function in the brain, and their deficiency can lead to seizures and cognitive impairments. CNKSR2 (connector enhancer of KSR2) is a synaptic protein involved in Ras signaling-mediated neuronal proliferation, migration and differentiation. Mutations in the X-linked gene CNKSR2 have been described in patients with seizures and neurodevelopmental deficits, especially those affecting language. In this study, we sequenced 112 patients with phenotypes within the epilepsy-aphasia spectrum (EAS) to determine the frequency of CNKSR2 mutation within this complex set of disorders. We detected a novel nonsense mutation (c.2314 C>T; p.Arg712*) in one Ashkenazi Jewish family, the male proband of which had a severe epileptic encephalopathy with continuous spike-waves in sleep (ECSWS). His affected brother also had ECSWS with better outcome, whereas the sister had childhood epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes. This mutation segregated in the three affected siblings in an X-linked manner, inherited from their mother who had febrile seizures. Although the frequency of point mutation is low, CNKSR2 sequencing should be considered in families with suspected X-linked EAS because of the specific genetic counseling implications. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  1. Frequencies and prognostic role of KRAS and BRAF mutations in patients with localized pancreatic and ampullary adenocarcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Nicolai Aagaard; Roslind, Anne; Christensen, Ib J

    2012-01-01

    The frequencies and prognostic role of KRAS and BRAF mutations in patients operated on for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) and ampullary adenocarcinomas (A-ACs) are scantily studied.......The frequencies and prognostic role of KRAS and BRAF mutations in patients operated on for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) and ampullary adenocarcinomas (A-ACs) are scantily studied....

  2. Models of frequency-dependent selection with mutation from parental alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotter, Meredith V; Spencer, Hamish G

    2013-09-01

    Frequency-dependent selection (FDS) remains a common heuristic explanation for the maintenance of genetic variation in natural populations. The pairwise-interaction model (PIM) is a well-studied general model of frequency-dependent selection, which assumes that a genotype's fitness is a function of within-population intergenotypic interactions. Previous theoretical work indicated that this type of model is able to sustain large numbers of alleles at a single locus when it incorporates recurrent mutation. These studies, however, have ignored the impact of the distribution of fitness effects of new mutations on the dynamics and end results of polymorphism construction. We suggest that a natural way to model mutation would be to assume mutant fitness is related to the fitness of the parental allele, i.e., the existing allele from which the mutant arose. Here we examine the numbers and distributions of fitnesses and alleles produced by construction under the PIM with mutation from parental alleles and the impacts on such measures due to different methods of generating mutant fitnesses. We find that, in comparison with previous results, generating mutants from existing alleles lowers the average number of alleles likely to be observed in a system subject to FDS, but produces polymorphisms that are highly stable and have realistic allele-frequency distributions.

  3. Robust DNA Damage Response and Elevated Reactive Oxygen Species in TINF2-Mutated Dyskeratosis Congenita Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereboeva, Larisa; Hubbard, Meredith; Goldman, Frederick D; Westin, Erik R

    2016-01-01

    Dyskeratosis Congenita (DC) is an inherited multisystem premature aging disorder with characteristic skin and mucosal findings as well as a predisposition to cancer and bone marrow failure. DC arises due to gene mutations associated with the telomerase complex or telomere maintenance, resulting in critically shortened telomeres. The pathogenesis of DC, as well as several congenital bone marrow failure (BMF) syndromes, converges on the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway and subsequent elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Historically, DC patients have had poor outcomes following bone marrow transplantation (BMT), perhaps as a consequence of an underlying DNA hypersensitivity to cytotoxic agents. Previously, we demonstrated an activated DDR and increased ROS, augmented by chemotherapy and radiation, in somatic cells isolated from DC patients with a mutation in the RNA component of telomerase, TERC. The current study was undertaken to determine whether previous findings related to ROS and DDR in TERC patients' cells could be extended to other DC mutations. Of particular interest was whether an antioxidant approach could counter increased ROS and decrease DC pathologies. To test this, we examined lymphocytes from DC patients from different DC mutations (TERT, TINF2, and TERC) for the presence of an active DDR and increased ROS. All DC mutations led to increased steady-state p53 (2-fold to 10-fold) and ROS (1.5-fold to 2-fold). Upon exposure to ionizing radiation (XRT), DC cells increased in both DDR and ROS to a significant degree. Exposing DC cells to hydrogen peroxide also revealed that DC cells maintain a significant oxidant burden compared to controls (1.5-fold to 3-fold). DC cell culture supplemented with N-acetylcysteine, or alternatively grown in low oxygen, afforded significant proliferative benefits (proliferation: maximum 2-fold increase; NAC: 5-fold p53 decrease; low oxygen: maximum 3.5-fold p53 decrease). Together, our data supports a mechanism

  4. Robust DNA Damage Response and Elevated Reactive Oxygen Species in TINF2-Mutated Dyskeratosis Congenita Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Pereboeva

    Full Text Available Dyskeratosis Congenita (DC is an inherited multisystem premature aging disorder with characteristic skin and mucosal findings as well as a predisposition to cancer and bone marrow failure. DC arises due to gene mutations associated with the telomerase complex or telomere maintenance, resulting in critically shortened telomeres. The pathogenesis of DC, as well as several congenital bone marrow failure (BMF syndromes, converges on the DNA damage response (DDR pathway and subsequent elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Historically, DC patients have had poor outcomes following bone marrow transplantation (BMT, perhaps as a consequence of an underlying DNA hypersensitivity to cytotoxic agents. Previously, we demonstrated an activated DDR and increased ROS, augmented by chemotherapy and radiation, in somatic cells isolated from DC patients with a mutation in the RNA component of telomerase, TERC. The current study was undertaken to determine whether previous findings related to ROS and DDR in TERC patients' cells could be extended to other DC mutations. Of particular interest was whether an antioxidant approach could counter increased ROS and decrease DC pathologies. To test this, we examined lymphocytes from DC patients from different DC mutations (TERT, TINF2, and TERC for the presence of an active DDR and increased ROS. All DC mutations led to increased steady-state p53 (2-fold to 10-fold and ROS (1.5-fold to 2-fold. Upon exposure to ionizing radiation (XRT, DC cells increased in both DDR and ROS to a significant degree. Exposing DC cells to hydrogen peroxide also revealed that DC cells maintain a significant oxidant burden compared to controls (1.5-fold to 3-fold. DC cell culture supplemented with N-acetylcysteine, or alternatively grown in low oxygen, afforded significant proliferative benefits (proliferation: maximum 2-fold increase; NAC: 5-fold p53 decrease; low oxygen: maximum 3.5-fold p53 decrease. Together, our data supports a

  5. Assessment and evaluation of damage detection method based on modal frequency changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    HoThu, Hien; Mita, Akira

    2013-04-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) for evaluating and maintaining structural integrity of a building is a very important research field. This paper proposes the use of squared modal frequencies, to detect damage to individual parts of the structures as well their extent by using a limited number of sensors, as proposed by Mita and Hagiwara1. This damage assessment method evaluated in numerical simulations of a five-story shear structure and in shake-table tests of a five-story steel model. The damage to the structure was simulated by reducing the stiffness of each floor. The study showed that it is possible to identify, localize, and evaluate the magnitude of the real damage in a multi-story structure from shifts in its natural frequencies.

  6. Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events: Surry, Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, F.T.

    1986-11-01

    This document contains the accident sequence analyses for Surry, Unit 1; one of the reference plants being examined as part of the NUREG-1150 effort by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). NUREG-1150 will document the risk of a selected group of nuclear power plants. As part of that work, this report contains the overall core damage frequency estimate for Surry, Unit 1, and the accompanying plant damage state frequencies. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses provide additional insights regarding the dominant contributors to the Surry core damage frequency estimate. The numerical results are driven to some degree by modeling assumptions and data selection for issues such as reactor coolant pump seal LOCAs, common cause failure probabilities, and plant response to station blackout and loss of electrical bust initiators. The sensitivity studies explore the impact of alternate theories and data on these issues

  7. Synthetic Modifications In the Frequency Domain for Finite Element Model Update and Damage Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Aeronautical Society , 24, pp. 590–591. [23] Fritzen, C., and Kiefer, T., 1992, “Localization and Correction of Errors in Finite Element Models Based on...MODIFICATIONS IN THE FREQUENCY DOMAIN FOR FINITE ELEMENT MODEL UPDATE AND DAMAGE DETECTION by Ryun J. C. Konze September 2017 Thesis Advisor...FINITE ELEMENT MODEL UPDATE AND DAMAGE DETECTION 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Ryun J. C. Konze 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES

  8. Effect of low velocity impact damage on the natural frequency of composite plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chok, E. Y. L.; Majid, D. L. A. A.; Harmin, M. Y.

    2017-12-01

    Biodegradable natural fibers have been suggested to replace the hazardous synthetic fibers in many aerospace applications. However, this notion has been limited due to their low mechanical properties, which leads to the idea of hybridizing the two materials. Many aircraft components such as radome, aft body and wing are highly susceptible to low velocity impact damage while in-service. The damages degrade the structural integrity of the components and change their dynamic characteristics. In worst case scenario, the changes can lead to resonance, which is an excessive vibration. This research is conducted to study the dynamic characteristic changes of low velocity impact damaged hybrid composites that is designed for aircraft radome applications. Three materials, which are glass fiber, kenaf fiber and kenaf/glass fiber hybrid composites, have been impacted with 3J, 6J and 9J of energy. Cantilevered and also vertically clamped boundary conditions are used and the natural frequencies are extracted for each of the specimens. The obtained results show that natural frequency decreases with increasing impact level. Cantilevered condition is found to induce lower modes due to the gravitational pull. To eliminate mass and geometrical effects, normalized modes are computed. Among the three materials considered, glass fiber composites have displayed the highest normalized frequency that reflects on its higher stiffness compared to the other two materials. As the damage level is increased, glass fiber composites have shown the highest frequency reduction to a maximum of 35% while kenaf composites have the least frequency reduction in the range of 1 - 18%. Thus, kenaf fiber is taken to be helpful in stalling the damage progression and reducing the effect of damage. This has been proven when the percentage frequency decrement shown by kenaf/glass fiber composite lies between glass fiber and kenaf fiber composites.

  9. Damage Localization of Cable-Supported Bridges Using Modal Frequency Data and Probabilistic Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. T. Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation on using the probabilistic neural network (PNN for damage localization in the suspension Tsing Ma Bridge (TMB and the cable-stayed Ting Kau Bridge (TKB from simulated noisy modal data. Because the PNN approach describes measurement data in a Bayesian probabilistic framework, it is promising for structural damage detection in noisy conditions. For locating damage on the TMB deck, the main span of the TMB is divided into a number of segments, and damage to the deck members in a segment is classified as one pattern class. The characteristic ensembles (training samples for each pattern class are obtained by computing the modal frequency change ratios from a 3D finite element model (FEM when incurring damage at different members of the same segment and then corrupting the analytical results with random noise. The testing samples for damage localization are obtained in a similar way except that damage is generated at locations different from the training samples. For damage region/type identification of the TKB, a series of pattern classes are defined to depict different scenarios with damage occurring at different portions/components. Research efforts have been focused on evaluating the influence of measurement noise level on the identification accuracy.

  10. Characterization of the factor VIII defect in 147 patients with sporadic hemophilia A: Family studies indicate a mutation type-dependent sex ratio of mutation frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, J.; Schmidt, W.; Olek, K. [Univ. of Bonn (Germany)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    The clinical manifestation of hemophilia A is caused by a wide range of different mutations. In this study the factor VIII genes of 147 severe hemophilia A patients-all exclusively from sporadic families-were screened for mutations by use of the complete panel of modern DNA techniques. The pathogenous defect could be characterized in 126 patients (85.7%). Fifty-five patients (37.4%) showed a F8A-gene inversion, 47 (32.0%) a point mutation, 14 (9.5%) a small deletion, 8 (5.4%) a large deletion, and 2 (1.4%) a small insertion. Further, four (2.7%) mutations were localized but could not be sequenced yet. No mutation could be identified in 17 patients (11.6%). Sixteen (10.9%) of the P identified mutations occurred in the B domain. Four of these were located in an adenosine nucleotide stretch at codon 1192, indicating a mutation hotspot. Somatic mosaicisms were detected in 3 (3.9%) of 76 patients` mothers, comprising 3 of 16 de novo mutations in the patients` mothers. Investigation of family relatives allowed detection of a de novo mutation in 16 of 76 two-generation and 28 of 34 three-generation families. On the basis of these data, the male:female ratio of mutation frequencies (k) was estimated as k = 3.6. By use of the quotients of mutation origin in maternal grandfather to patient`s mother or to maternal grandmother, k was directly estimated as k = 15 and k = 7.5, respectively. Considering each mutation type separately, we revealed a mutation type-specific sex ratio of mutation frequencies. Point mutations showed a 5-to-10-fold-higher and inversions a >10-fold- higher mutation rate in male germ cells, whereas deletions showed a >5-fold-higher mutation rate in female germ cells. Consequently, and in accordance with the data of other diseases like Duchenne muscular dystrophy, our results indicate that at least for X-chromosomal disorders the male:female mutation rate of a disease is determined by its proportion of the different mutation types. 68 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  11. Collagen XI mutation lowers susceptibility to load-induced cartilage damage in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holyoak, Derek T; Otero, Miguel; Armar, Naa Shidaa; Ziemian, Sophia N; Otto, Ariana; Cullinane, Devinne; Wright, Timothy M; Goldring, Steven R; Goldring, Mary B; van der Meulen, Marjolein C H

    2018-02-01

    Interactions among risk factors for osteoarthritis (OA) are not well understood. We investigated the combined impact of two prevalent risk factors: mechanical loading and genetically abnormal cartilage tissue properties. We used cyclic tibial compression to simulate mechanical loading in the cho/+ (Col11a1 haploinsufficient) mouse, which has abnormal collagen fibrils in cartilage due to a point mutation in the Col11a1 gene. We hypothesized that the mutant collagen would not alter phenotypic bone properties and that cho/+ mice, which develop early onset OA, would develop enhanced load-induced cartilage damage compared to their littermates. To test our hypotheses, we applied cyclic compression to the left tibiae of 6-month-old cho/+ male mice and wild-type (WT) littermates for 1, 2, and 6 weeks at moderate (4.5 N) and high (9.0 N) peak load magnitudes. We then characterized load-induced cartilage and bone changes by histology, microcomputed tomography, and immunohistochemistry. Prior to loading, cho/+ mice had less dense, thinner cortical bone compared to WT littermates. In addition, in loaded and non-loaded limbs, cho/+ mice had thicker cartilage. With high loads, cho/+ mice experienced less load-induced cartilage damage at all time points and displayed decreased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13 levels compared to WT littermates. The thinner, less dense cortical bone and thicker cartilage were unexpected and may have contributed to the reduced severity of load-induced cartilage damage in cho/+ mice. Furthermore, the spontaneous proteoglycan loss resulting from the mutant collagen XI was not additive to cartilage damage from mechanical loading, suggesting that these risk factors act through independent pathways. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:711-720, 2018. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. The resistance of Micrococcus radiodurans to killing and mutation by agents which damage DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweet, D.M.; Moseley, B.E.B.

    1976-01-01

    The resistance of Micrococcus radiodurans to the lethal and mutagenic action of ultraviolet (UV) light, ionising (γ) radiation, mitomycin C (MTC), nitrous acid (NA), hydroxylamine (HA), N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (NG), ethylmethanesulphonate (EMS) and β-propiolactone (βPL) has been compared with that of Escherichia coli B/r. M. radiodurans was much more resistant than E. coli B/r to the lethal effects of UV light (by a factor of 33), γ-radiation (55), NG (15) and NA (62), showed intermediate resistance to MTC (4) and HA (7), but was sensitive to EMS (1) and βPL (2). M. radiodurans was very resistant to mutagens producing damage which can be repaired by a recombination system, indicating that it possesses an extremely efficient recombination repair mechanism. Both species were equally sensitive to mutation to trimethoprim resistance by NG, but M. radiodurans was more resistant than E. coli B/r to the other mutagens tested, being non-mutable by UV light, γ-radiation, MTC and HA, and only slightly sensitive to mutation by NA, EMS, and βPL. The resistance of M. radiodurans to mutation by UV light, γ-radiation and MTC is consistent with an hypothesis that recombination repair in M. radiodurans is accurate since these mutagens may depend on an 'error-prone' recombination system for their mutagenic effect in E. coli B/r. However, because M. radiodurans is also resistant to mutagens such as HA and EMS, which are mutagenic in E. coli in the absence of an 'error-prone' system, we propose that all the mutagens tested may have a common mode of action in E. coli B/r, but that this mutagenic pathway is missing in M. radiodurans

  13. Later Onset Fabry Disease, Cardiac Damage Progress in Silence: Experience With a Highly Prevalent Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ting-Rong; Hung, Sheng-Che; Chang, Fu-Pang; Yu, Wen-Chung; Sung, Shih-Hsien; Hsu, Chia-Lin; Dzhagalov, Ivan; Yang, Chia-Feng; Chu, Tzu-Hung; Lee, Han-Jui; Lu, Yung-Hsiu; Chang, Sheng-Kai; Liao, Hsuan-Chieh; Lin, Hsiang-Yu; Liao, Tsan-Chieh; Lee, Pi-Chang; Li, Hsing-Yuan; Yang, An-Hang; Ho, Hui-Chen; Chiang, Chuan-Chi; Lin, Ching-Yuang; Desnick, Robert J; Niu, Dau-Ming

    2016-12-13

    Recently, several studies revealed a much higher prevalence of later onset Fabry disease (FD) than previously expected. It suggested that later onset FD might present as an important hidden health issue in certain ethnic or demographic populations in the world. However, the natural history of its phenotype has not been systemically investigated, especially the cardiac involvement. The study analyzed a large-scale newborn screening program for FD to understand the natural course of later onset FD. To date, 916,383 newborns have been screened for FD in Taiwan, including more than 1,200 individuals with the common, later onset IVS4+919G>A (IVS4) mutation. Echocardiography was performed in 620 adults with the IVS4 mutation to analyze the prevalence of left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), and gadolinium-enhanced cardiac magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 129 patients with FD, including 100 IVS4 adults. LVH was observed in 67% of men and 32% of women older than 40 years. Imaging evidenced significant late gadolinium enhancement in 38.1% of IVS4 men and 16.7% of IVS4 women with the IVS4 mutation but without LVH. Seventeen patients underwent endomyocardial biopsies, which revealed significant globotriaosylceramide substrate accumulation in their cardiomyocytes. Significant cardiomyocyte substrate accumulation in IVS4 patients led to severe and irreversible cardiac fibrosis before development of LVH or other significant cardiac manifestations. Thus, it might be too late to start enzyme replacement therapy after the occurrence of LVH or other significant cardiac manifestations in patients with later onset FD. This study also indicated the importance of newborn screening for early detection of the insidious, ongoing, irreversible cardiac damage in patients with later onset FD. Copyright © 2016 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events: Peach Bottom, Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Lambright, J.A.; Ferrell, W.L.; Cathey, N.G.; Najafi, B.; Harper, F.T.

    1986-10-01

    This document contains the internal event initiated accident sequence analyses for Peach Bottom, Unit 2; one of the reference plants being examined as part of the NUREG-1150 effort by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUREG-1150 will document the risk of a selected group of nuclear power plants. As part of that work, this report contains the overall core damage frequency estimate for Peach Bottom, Unit 2, and the accompanying plant damage state frequencies. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses provided additional insights regarding the dominant contributors to the Peach Bottom core damage frequency estimate. The mean core damage frequency at Peach Bottom was calculated to be 8.2E-6. Station blackout type accidents (loss of all ac power) were found to dominate the overall results. Anticipated Transient Without Scram accidents were also found to be non-negligible contributors. The numerical results are largely driven by common mode failure probability estimates and to some extent, human error. Because of significant data and analysis uncertainties in these two areas (important, for instance, to the most dominant scenario in this study), it is recommended that the results of the uncertainty and sensitivity analyses be considered before any actions are taken based on this analysis

  15. Analysis of core damage frequency, Surry, Unit 1 internal events appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertucio, R.C.; Julius, J.A.; Cramond, W.R.

    1990-04-01

    This document contains the appendices for the accident sequence analyses of internally initiated events for the Surry Nuclear Station, Unit 1. This is one of the five plant analyses conducted as part of the NUREG-1150 effort by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. NUREG-1150 documents the risk of a selected group of nuclear power plants. The work performed is an extensive reanalysis of that published in November 1986 as NUREG/CR-4450, Volume 3. It addresses comments from numerous reviewers and significant changes to the plant systems and procedures made since the first report. The uncertainty analysis and presentation of results are also much improved. The context and detail of this report are directed toward PRA practitioners who need to know how the work was performed and the details for use in further studies. The mean core damage frequency at Surry was calculated to be 4.0E-5 per year, with a 95% upper bound of 1.3E-4 and 5% lower bound of 6.8E-6 per year. Station blackout type accidents (loss of all AC power) were the largest contributors to the core damage frequency, accounting for approximately 68% of the total. The next type of dominant contributors were Loss of Coolant Accidents (LOCAs). These sequences account for 15% of core damage frequency. No other type of sequence accounts for more than 10% of core damage frequency

  16. Analysis of relation between the mutation frequencies and somatic recombination induced by neutrons and the age of D. Melanogaster larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman R, J.; Zambrano A, F.; Paredes G, L.; Delfin L, A.; Quiroz R, C.

    1998-01-01

    Neutrons are subatomic particles with neutral electric charge, equal zero, which are emitted during the fissile material fission in nuclear reactors. It is known a little about biological effects induced by neutrons. There is a world interest in the use of reactors and accelerators for patients radiotherapy using neutrons with the purpose to destroy malignant cells of deep tumours where traditional methods have not given satisfactory results. There for it is required to do wide studies of biological effects of neutrons as well as their dosimetry. It was used the Smart test (Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test) of D. Melanogaster for quantifying the mutation induction and somatic recombination induced by neutrons of the National Institute of Nuclear Research reactor, at power of 300 and 1000 k W, with equivalent doses calculated 95.14 and 190.2 Sv for 300 k W and of 25.64 and 51.29 Sv for 1000 k W, using larvae with 72 or 96 hours aged. It was observed a linear relation between equivalent dose and genetic effects frequency, these last were greater when the reactor power was 1000 k W than those 300 k W. It was observed too that the damage was greater in 96 hours larvae than those 72 hours. The stain size presented an inverse relation with respect to larvae age. It is concluded that the Smart system is sensitive to neutrons effect and it responds of a directly proportional form to radiation dose, as well as to dose rate. It is noted more the effect when are used larvas in pre pupa stage where the irradiation target (imagal cells) is greater. The Smart is sensitive to damage induced by neutrons , thus can be used to studying its direct biological effects or by the use of chemical modulators. (Author)

  17. Identification of characteristic frequencies of damaged railway tracks using field hammer test measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oregui, M.; Li, Z.; Dollevoet, R.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of the Frequency Response Function (FRF)-based statistical method to identify the characteristic frequencies of railway track defects is studied. The method compares a damaged track state to a healthy state based on non-destructive field hammer test measurements. First, a study is carried out to investigate the repeatability of hammer tests in railway tracks. By changing the excitation and measurement locations it is shown that the variability introduced by the test process is negligible. Second, following the concepts of control charts employed in process monitoring, a method to define an approximate healthy state is introduced by using hammer test measurements at locations without visual damage. Then, the feasibility study includes an investigation into squats (i.e. a major type of rail surface defect) of varying severity. The identified frequency ranges related to squats agree with those found in an extensively validated vehicle-borne detection system. Therefore, the FRF-based statistical method in combination with the non-destructive hammer test measurements has the potential to be employed to identify the characteristic frequencies of damaged conditions in railway tracks in the frequency range of 300-3000 Hz.

  18. Frequency of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation in Smokers with Lung Cancer Without Pulmonary Emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kenichi; Yamasaki, Akira; Igishi, Tadashi; Kawasaki, Yuji; Ito-Nishii, Shizuka; Izumi, Hiroki; Sakamoto, Tomohiro; Touge, Hirokazu; Kodani, Masahiro; Makino, Haruhiko; Yanai, Masaaki; Tanaka, Natsumi; Matsumoto, Shingo; Araki, Kunio; Nakamura, Hiroshige; Shimizu, Eiji

    2017-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is a smoking-related disease, and is categorized into the emphysema and airway dominant phenotypes. We examined the relationship between emphysematous changes and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status in patients with lung adenocarcinoma. The medical records for 250 patients with lung adenocarcinoma were retrospectively reviewed. All patients were categorized into the emphysema or non-emphysema group. Wild-type EGFR was detected in 136 (54%) and mutant EGFR in 48 (19%). Emphysematous changes were observed in 87 (36%) patients. EGFR mutation was highly frequent in the non-emphysema group (p=0.0014). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that emphysema was an independent risk factor for reduced frequency of EGFR mutation (Odds Ratio=3.47, p=0.005). Our data showed a relationship between emphysematous changes and EGFR mutation status. There might be mutually exclusive genetic risk factors for carcinogenesis and development of emphysematous changes. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  19. Damage Location and Quantification Indices of Shear Structures Based on Changes in the First Two or Three Natural Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    This study proposes damage detection algorithms for multistory shear structures that only need the first two or three natural frequencies. The methods are able to determine the location and severity of damage on the basis of damage location indices (DLI) and damage quantification indices (DQI) consisting of the changes in the first few squared natural frequencies of the undamaged and damaged states. The damage is assumed to be represented by a reduction in stiffness. This stiffness reduction causes a shift in the natural frequencies of the structure. The uncertainty associated with system identification methods for obtaining natural frequencies is also carefully considered. The methods are accurate and cost-effective means only requiring the changes in the natural frequencies. PMID:27471745

  20. Transfection with extracellularly UV-damaged DNA induces human and rat cells to express a mutator phenotype towards parvovirus H-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinsart, C.; Cornelis, J.J.; Klein, B.; van der Eb, A.J.; Rommelaere, J.

    1984-02-01

    Human and rat cells transfected with UV-irradiated linear double-stranded DNA from calf thymus displayed a mutator activity. This phenotype was identified by growing a lytic thermosensitive single-stranded DNA virus (parvovirus H-1) in those cells and determining viral reversion frequencies. Likewise, exogenous UV-irradiated closed circular DNAs, either double-stranded (simian virus 40) or single-stranded (phi X174), enhanced the ability of recipient cells to mutate parvovirus H-1. The magnitude of mutator activity expression increased along with the number of UV lesions present in the inoculated DNA up to a saturation level. Unirradiated DNA displayed little inducing capacity, irrespective of whether it was single or double stranded. Deprivation of a functional replication origin did not impede UV-irradiated simian virus 40 DNA from providing rat and human cells with a mutator function. Our data suggest that in mammalian cells a trans-acting mutagenic signal might be generated from UV-irradiated DNA without the necessity for damaged DNA to replicate.

  1. Review of the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station Probabilistic Risk Assessment: internal events and core damage frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilberg, D.; Shiu, K.; Hanan, N.; Anavim, E.

    1985-11-01

    A review of the Probabilistic Risk Assessment of the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station was conducted with the broad objective of evaluating its risks in relation to those identified in the Reactor Safety Study (WASH-1400). The scope of the review was limited to the ''front end'' part, i.e., to the evaluation of the frequencies of states in which core damage may occur. Furthermore, the review considered only internally generated accidents, consistent with the scope of the PRA. The review included an assessment of the assumptions and methods used in the Shoreham study. It also encompassed a reevaluation of the main results within the scope and general methodological framework of the Shoreham PRA, including both qualitative and quantitative analyses of accident initiators, data bases, and accident sequences which result in initiation of core damage. Specific comparisons are given between the Shoreham study, the results of the present review, and the WASH-1400 BWR, for the core damage frequency. The effect of modeling uncertainties was considered by a limited sensitivity study so as to show how the results would change if other assumptions were made. This review provides an independently assessed point value estimate of core damage frequency and describes the major contributors, by frontline systems and by accident sequences. 17 figs., 81 tabs

  2. Abiotic stress leads to somatic and heritable changes in homologous recombination frequency, point mutation frequency and microsatellite stability in Arabidopsis plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Youli; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2011-01-01

    In earlier studies, we showed that abiotic stresses, such as ionizing radiation, heavy metals, temperature and water, trigger an increase in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). We also demonstrated that many of these stresses led to inheritance of high-frequency homologous recombination, HRF. Although an increase in recombination frequency is an important indicator of genome rearrangements, it only represents a minor portion of possible stress-induced mutations. Here, we analyzed the influence of heat, cold, drought, flood and UVC abiotic stresses on two major types of mutations in the genome, point mutations and small deletions/insertions. We used two transgenic lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, one allowing an analysis of reversions in a stop codon-containing inactivated β-glucuronidase transgene and another one allowing an analysis of repeat stability in a microsatellite-interrupted β-glucuronidase transgene. The transgenic Arabidopsis line carrying the β-glucuronidase-based homologous recombination substrate was used as a positive control. We showed that the majority of stresses increased the frequency of point mutations, homologous recombination and microsatellite instability in somatic cells, with the frequency of homologous recombination being affected the most. The analysis of transgenerational changes showed an increase in HRF to be the most prominent effect observed in progeny. Significant changes in recombination frequency were observed upon exposure to all types of stress except drought, whereas changes in microsatellite instability were observed upon exposure to UVC, heat and cold. The frequency of point mutations in the progeny of stress-exposed plants was the least affected; an increase in mutation frequency was observed only in the progeny of plants exposed to UVC. We thus conclude that transgenerational changes in genome stability in response to stress primarily involve an increase in recombination frequency.

  3. Abiotic stress leads to somatic and heritable changes in homologous recombination frequency, point mutation frequency and microsatellite stability in Arabidopsis plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Youli, E-mail: youli.yao@uleth.ca [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, T1K 3M4 Alberta (Canada); Kovalchuk, Igor, E-mail: igor.kovalchuk@uleth.ca [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, Lethbridge, T1K 3M4 Alberta (Canada)

    2011-02-10

    In earlier studies, we showed that abiotic stresses, such as ionizing radiation, heavy metals, temperature and water, trigger an increase in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). We also demonstrated that many of these stresses led to inheritance of high-frequency homologous recombination, HRF. Although an increase in recombination frequency is an important indicator of genome rearrangements, it only represents a minor portion of possible stress-induced mutations. Here, we analyzed the influence of heat, cold, drought, flood and UVC abiotic stresses on two major types of mutations in the genome, point mutations and small deletions/insertions. We used two transgenic lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, one allowing an analysis of reversions in a stop codon-containing inactivated {beta}-glucuronidase transgene and another one allowing an analysis of repeat stability in a microsatellite-interrupted {beta}-glucuronidase transgene. The transgenic Arabidopsis line carrying the {beta}-glucuronidase-based homologous recombination substrate was used as a positive control. We showed that the majority of stresses increased the frequency of point mutations, homologous recombination and microsatellite instability in somatic cells, with the frequency of homologous recombination being affected the most. The analysis of transgenerational changes showed an increase in HRF to be the most prominent effect observed in progeny. Significant changes in recombination frequency were observed upon exposure to all types of stress except drought, whereas changes in microsatellite instability were observed upon exposure to UVC, heat and cold. The frequency of point mutations in the progeny of stress-exposed plants was the least affected; an increase in mutation frequency was observed only in the progeny of plants exposed to UVC. We thus conclude that transgenerational changes in genome stability in response to stress primarily involve an increase in recombination frequency.

  4. Abiotic stress leads to somatic and heritable changes in homologous recombination frequency, point mutation frequency and microsatellite stability in Arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Youli; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2011-02-10

    In earlier studies, we showed that abiotic stresses, such as ionizing radiation, heavy metals, temperature and water, trigger an increase in homologous recombination frequency (HRF). We also demonstrated that many of these stresses led to inheritance of high-frequency homologous recombination, HRF. Although an increase in recombination frequency is an important indicator of genome rearrangements, it only represents a minor portion of possible stress-induced mutations. Here, we analyzed the influence of heat, cold, drought, flood and UVC abiotic stresses on two major types of mutations in the genome, point mutations and small deletions/insertions. We used two transgenic lines of Arabidopsis thaliana, one allowing an analysis of reversions in a stop codon-containing inactivated β-glucuronidase transgene and another one allowing an analysis of repeat stability in a microsatellite-interrupted β-glucuronidase transgene. The transgenic Arabidopsis line carrying the β-glucuronidase-based homologous recombination substrate was used as a positive control. We showed that the majority of stresses increased the frequency of point mutations, homologous recombination and microsatellite instability in somatic cells, with the frequency of homologous recombination being affected the most. The analysis of transgenerational changes showed an increase in HRF to be the most prominent effect observed in progeny. Significant changes in recombination frequency were observed upon exposure to all types of stress except drought, whereas changes in microsatellite instability were observed upon exposure to UVC, heat and cold. The frequency of point mutations in the progeny of stress-exposed plants was the least affected; an increase in mutation frequency was observed only in the progeny of plants exposed to UVC. We thus conclude that transgenerational changes in genome stability in response to stress primarily involve an increase in recombination frequency. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B

  5. Frequency of FMR1 gene mutation and CGG repeat polymorphism in intellectually disabled children in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Tasneem; Zaidi, Syed Aley Hasan; Sarfraz, Noorjehan; Perween, Siddiqa; Khurshid, Faraz; Imtiaz, Fauzia

    2014-05-01

    Fragile X syndrome is considered the most common heritable form of X-linked intellectual disability (ID). The syndrome is caused by silencing of the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene (Xq27.3) due to hypermethylation. This mutation results in absence or deficit of its protein product, the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) that affects synaptic plasticity in neurons, hence leads to brain dysfunction. The syndrome is widely distributed throughout the world. This study reported for the first time the frequency of the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene mutations in intellectually disabled children in Pakistan. We recruited 333 intellectually disabled children and 250 normal children with age ranging from 5 to 18 years for this study. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood and full mutations were identified by methylation sensitive PCR using primers corresponding to modified methylated and unmethylated DNA. Southern blot was used for confirmation of the results. The frequency of fragile X syndrome with full mutation was found as 4.8%. It was 6.5% in males as opposed to 0.9% in females; 29 CGG repeats were found as the most common allele; 31.5% in the intellectually disabled and 34% in control subjects. In Pakistan intellectual disability is considered as a social stigma for the individuals and their families. Due to lack of knowledge and cultural background people make such patients and families isolated. This study will increase public awareness about the intellectual disability and importance of prenatal screening and genetic counseling for vulnerable families. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Monitoring of corrosion damage using high-frequency guided ultrasonic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, D.; Fromme, P.

    2015-03-01

    Due to adverse environmental conditions corrosion can develop during the life cycle of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Both pitting corrosion and generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the degradation of the integrity and load bearing capacity of the structure. Structural health monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can in principle be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic transducers with single sided access to the structure, high frequency guided wave modes were generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. Wall thickness reduction was induced using accelerated corrosion in a salt water bath. The corrosion damage was monitored based on the effect on the wave propagation and interference of the different modes. The change in the wave interference was quantified based on an analysis in the frequency domain (Fourier transform) and was found to match well with theoretical predictions for the wall thickness loss. High frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  7. Frequency and spectrum of hemoglobinopathy mutations in a Uruguayan pediatric population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Da Luz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobinopathies are the most common recessive diseases worldwide but their prevalence in Uruguay has not been investigated. In this study, 397 unrelated outpatient children from the Pereira Rosell Hospital Center (CHPR, as well as 31 selected patients with microcytic anemia and 28 β-thalassemia carriers were analyzed for hemoglobinopathies by using biochemical and molecular biology methods. Parametric and non-parametric methods were used to compare the hematological indices between groups of genotypes. Of the 397 patients in the first group, approximately 1% (0.76% HbS and 0.25% β-thalassemia had a mutation in the HBB gene and 3.3% had α-thalassemia. These mutations had a heterogeneous distribution that varied according to individual ancestry. HbS was found exclusively in individuals with declared African ancestry and had a carrier frequency of 2.2%. The frequency of α-thalassemia carriers in outpatients of European and African ancestry was 1.2% and 6.5%, respectively. In contrast, the frequency of α-thalassemia carriers in patients with microcytic anemia was 25.8%, significantly higher (p < 0.01 than that observed in the sample as a whole and in Afro-descendants and Euro-descendants. Significant differences were observed in the hematological parameters between individuals with thalassemia genotypes and those with a normal genotype. These results indicate that hemoglobinopathies are a relevant health problem in Uruguay.

  8. High frequency of germline p53 mutations in childhood adrenocortical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, J; Portwine, C; Rabin, K; Leclerc, J M; Narod, S A; Malkin, D

    1994-11-16

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ADCC) is a rare childhood cancer, affecting three of 1 million children younger than 16 years old in the United States. ADCC may be found in association with the Li-Fraumeni and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndromes. Children with ADCC are also at substantially increased risk of second primary cancers. Because of these associations, it is believed that the genetic basis for ADCC is stronger than for most childhood malignancies. Germline mutations of the TP53 tumor suppressor gene are associated with cancer predisposition in families with the Li-Fraumeni syndrome as well as in individuals with sporadically occurring component tumors of the syndrome. We investigated the possibility that germline TP53 gene alterations existed in children with ADCC. Sixteen children with ADCC under the age of 18 were identified from searches of medial oncology records at three Canadian hospitals. Eleven of these 16 patients identified were alive. The mean age at diagnosis was 4.8 years (range, 1-17 years). Family histories were obtained for 11 unselected children with ADCC (six girls and five boys). Pathologic confirmation of tumor diagnosis was obtained from the medical records. Using single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis followed by single-strand DNA sequencing, genomic DNA extracted from whole blood was analyzed for the presence of TP53 mutations for six living ADCC patients. Three of six (50%) children were found to carry germline TP53 mutations in exons 5, 6, and 7, respectively. Both wild-type and mutant alleles were identified in all three TP53 sequences, indicating that the patients were heterozygous for germline TP53 mutations. None of these children was from a family with the Li-Fraumeni syndrome. The mutation in one child was shown to be inherited from the mother, who subsequently developed breast cancer. A striking excess of cancer was found in one family of a patient carrying wild-type TP53. Our observation of a high frequency of germline TP53

  9. [Analysis of the relation of the frequency of new gene mutations for Mendelian diseases to parental age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhenova, M D; Kozlova, S I; Al'tshuler, B A; Tatishvili, G G

    1984-10-01

    The effect of parental age on mutation rates of achondroplasia, neurophibromatosis, hereditary gastrointestinal adenomatosis and Duchenne muscular dystrophy loci was studied. A significant parental age effect on the occurrence of new mutations for achondroplasia and neurophybromatosis was shown. The paternal component of this parental age effect was the major factor in the occurrence of such mutations. The risk of the occurrence of new cases of achondroplasia and neurophybromatosis, as compared with their overall frequency, due to new mutations, are increased by a factor of 2 and 3, respectively, up to the paternal age of 50. The possibility of application of the data obtained in genetic counselling is discussed.

  10. Self-cytoplasmic DNA upregulates the mutator enzyme APOBEC3A leading to chromosomal DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suspène, Rodolphe; Mussil, Bianka; Laude, Hélène; Caval, Vincent; Berry, Noémie; Bouzidi, Mohamed S; Thiers, Valérie; Wain-Hobson, Simon; Vartanian, Jean-Pierre

    2017-04-07

    Foreign and self-cytoplasmic DNA are recognized by numerous DNA sensor molecules leading to the production of type I interferons. Such DNA agonists should be degraded otherwise cells would be chronically stressed. Most human APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases can initiate catabolism of cytoplasmic mitochondrial DNA. Using the human myeloid cell line THP-1 with an interferon inducible APOBEC3A gene, we show that cytoplasmic DNA triggers interferon α and β production through the RNA polymerase III transcription/RIG-I pathway leading to massive upregulation of APOBEC3A. By catalyzing C→U editing in single stranded DNA fragments, the enzyme prevents them from re-annealing so attenuating the danger signal. The price to pay is chromosomal DNA damage in the form of CG→TA mutations and double stranded DNA breaks which, in the context of chronic inflammation, could drive cells down the path toward cancer. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. Baseline subtraction technique in the frequency-wavenumber domain for high sensitivity damage detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeon, Peter; Yaacoubi, Slah; Declercq, Nico F; Ramadan, Salah; Yaacoubi, Weina K

    2014-02-01

    This paper suggests a method for high-sensitivity damage detection. The method is based on pitch-catch measurements of Lamb waves combined with a baseline subtraction technique in the frequency-wavenumber domain. Small amplitude converted modes, generated during the interaction of propagating waves with damage, can thus be detected with minimal a priori information regarding their expected location in the frequency-wavenumber plane. This method is applied in the present paper to a case of notches with varied depth. Finite element simulations are carried out in the temporal domain to mimic results obtainable in real-world experiments. Two cases are studied, namely when each of the two pure fundamental modes are incident on a notch. The advantages of the method are detailed. The procedure to implement this method is described in the context of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) or Non-Destructive Testing (NDT). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Quantification of LOCA core damage frequency based on thermal-hydraulics analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jaehyun, E-mail: chojh@kaeri.re.kr; Park, Jin Hee; Kim, Dong-San; Lim, Ho-Gon

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • We quantified the LOCA core damage frequency based on the best-estimated success criteria analysis. • The thermal-hydraulic analysis using MARS code has been applied to Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plants. • Five new event trees with new break size boundaries and new success criteria were developed. • The core damage frequency is 5.80E−07 (/y), which is 12% less than the conventional PSA event trees. - Abstract: A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) has always been significantly considered one of the most important initiating events. However, most probabilistic safety assessment models, up to now, have undoubtedly adopted the three groups of LOCA, and even an exact break size boundary that used in WASH-1400 reports was published in 1975. With an awareness of the importance of a realistic PSA for a risk-informed application, several studies have tried to find the realistic thermal-hydraulic behavior of a LOCA, and improve the PSA model. The purpose of this research is to obtain realistic results of the LOCA core damage frequency based on a success criteria analysis using the best-estimate thermal-hydraulics code. To do so, the Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNP) was selected for this study. The MARS code was used for a thermal hydraulics analysis and the AIMS code was used for the core damage quantification. One of the major findings in the thermal hydraulics analysis was that the decay power is well removed by only a normal secondary cooling in LOCAs of below 1.4 in and by only a high pressure safety injection in LOCAs of 0.8–9.4 in. Based on the thermal hydraulics results regarding new break size boundaries and new success criteria, five new event trees (ETs) were developed. The core damage frequency of new LOCA ETs is 5.80E−07 (/y), which is 12% less than the conventional PSA ETs. In this research, we obtained not only thermal-hydraulics characteristics for the entire break size of a LOCA in view of the deterministic safety

  13. CHEK2 1100DELC germline mutation: a frequency study in hereditary breast and colon cancer Brazilian families

    OpenAIRE

    Abud, Jamile; Prolla, João Carlos; Koehler-Santos, Patrícia; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    CONTEXT: CHEK2 encodes a cell cycle checkpoint kinase that plays an important role in the DNA damage repair pathway, activated mainly by ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated) in response to double-stranded DNA breaks. A germline mutation in CHEK2, 1100delC, has been described as a low penetrance allele in a significant number of families with breast and colorectal cancer in certain countries and is also associated with increased risk of contralateral breast cancer in women previously affected b...

  14. Identification of a novel mutation in WFS1 in a family affected by low-frequency hearing impairment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, Juergen; Marquez-Klaka, Ben; Uebe, Steffen; Volz-Peters, Anja; Berger, Roswitha; Rausch, Peter

    2003-04-09

    Previously we confirmed linkage of autosomal dominantly inherited low-frequency sensorineural hearing impairment (LFSNHI) in a German family to the genetic locus DFNA6/DFNA14 on chromosome 4p16.3 close to the markers D4S432 and D4S431. Analysis of data from the Human Genome Project, showed that WFS1 is located in this region. Mutations in WFS1 are known to be responsible for Wolfram syndrome (DIDMOAD, MIM no. 606201), which follows an autosomal recessive trait. Studies in low-frequency hearing loss families showed that mutations in WFS1 were responsible for the phenotype. In all affected family members analysed, we detected a missense mutation in WFS1 (K705N) and therefore confirm the finding that the majority of mutations responsible for LFSNHI are missense mutations which localise to the C-terminal domain of the protein.

  15. Identification of a novel mutation in WFS1 in a family affected by low-frequency hearing impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunz, Juergen; Marquez-Klaka, Ben; Uebe, Steffen; Volz-Peters, Anja; Berger, Roswitha; Rausch, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Previously we confirmed linkage of autosomal dominantly inherited low-frequency sensorineural hearing impairment (LFSNHI) in a German family to the genetic locus DFNA6/DFNA14 on chromosome 4p16.3 close to the markers D4S432 and D4S431. Analysis of data from the Human Genome Project, showed that WFS1 is located in this region. Mutations in WFS1 are known to be responsible for Wolfram syndrome (DIDMOAD, MIM no. 606201), which follows an autosomal recessive trait. Studies in low-frequency hearing loss families showed that mutations in WFS1 were responsible for the phenotype. In all affected family members analysed, we detected a missense mutation in WFS1 (K705N) and therefore confirm the finding that the majority of mutations responsible for LFSNHI are missense mutations which localise to the C-terminal domain of the protein

  16. Detection of sudden structural damage using blind source separation and time–frequency approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morovati, V; Kazemi, M T

    2016-01-01

    Seismic signal processing is one of the most reliable methods of detecting the structural damage during earthquakes. In this paper, the use of the hybrid method of blind source separation (BSS) and time–frequency analysis (TFA) is explored to detect the changes in the structural response data. The combination of the BSS and TFA is applied to the seismic signals due to the non-stationary nature of them. Firstly, the second-order blind identification technique is used to decompose the response signal of structural vibration into modal coordinate signals which will be mono-components for TFA. Then each mono-component signal is analyzed to extract instantaneous frequency of structure. Numerical simulations and a real-world seismic-excited structure with time-varying frequencies show the accuracy and robustness of the developed algorithm. TFA of extracted sources shows that used method can be successfully applied to structural damage detection. The results also demonstrate that the combined method can be used to identify the time instant of structural damage occurrence more sharply and effectively than by the use of TFA alone. (paper)

  17. An estimation of core damage frequency of a pressurized water reactor during mid-loop operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, C.C.; Chen, C.T.; Lee, M.

    2004-01-01

    The core damage frequency during mid-loop operation of a Westinghouse designed 3-loop Pressurizer Water Reactor (PWR) due to loss of Residual Heat Removal (RHR) events was assessed. The assessment considers two types of outages (refueling and drained maintenance), and uses failure data collected specifically for shutdown condition. Event trees were developed for five categories of loss of RHR events. Human actions to mitigate the loss of RHR events was identified and human error probabilities were quantified using HCR and THERP model. The result showed that the core damage frequency due to loss of RHR events during mid-loop operation is 3.1x10 -5 per year. The results also showed that the core damage frequency can be reduced significantly by removing a pressurizer safety valve before entering mid-loop operation. The establishment of reflux cooling, i.e. decay heat removal through steam generator secondary side also plays important role in mitigating the loss of RHR events. (author)

  18. Mutation frequencies of the cytochrome CYP2D6 gene in Parkinson disease patients and in families

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucotte, G.; Turpin, J.C. [CHR, Reims (France); Gerard, N. [INSERM, Paris (France)] [and others

    1996-07-26

    The frequencies of five mutations of the debrisoquine 4-hydroxylase (CYP2D6) gene (mutations D6-A, B, C, D, and T), corresponding to poor metabolizer (PM) phenotypes, were determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 47 patients with Parkinson disease, and compared with the findings in 47 healthy controls. These mutant alleles were about twice as frequent among patients as in controls, with an approximate relative risk ratio of 2.12 (95% confidence interval, 1.41-2.62). There seem to be no significant differences in frequencies of mutant genotypes in patients among gender and modalities of response with levodopa therapy; but frequency of the mutations was slightly enhanced after age-at-onset of 60 years. Mutations D6-B, D, and T were detected in 7 patients belonging to 10 Parkinson pedigrees. 25 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  19. Prevalence of TECTA mutation in patients with mid-frequency sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Nobuko; Mutai, Hideki; Namba, Kazunori; Morita, Noriko; Masuda, Shin; Nishi, Yasuyuki; Nakano, Atsuko; Masuda, Sawako; Fujioka, Masato; Kaga, Kimitaka; Ogawa, Kaoru; Matsunaga, Tatsuo

    2017-09-25

    To date, 102 genes have been reported as responsible for non-syndromic hearing loss, some of which are associated with specific audiogram features. Four genes have been reported as causative for mid-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (MFSNHL), among which TECTA is the most frequently reported; however, the prevalence of TECTA mutations is unknown. To elucidate the prevalence of TECTA mutation in MFSNHL and clarify genotype-phenotype correlations, we analyzed the genetic and clinical features of patients with MFSNHL. Subjects with bilateral non-syndromic hearing loss were prescreened for GJB2 and m.1555A > G and m.3243A > G mitochondrial DNA mutations, and patients with inner ear malformations were excluded. We selected MFSNHL patients whose audiograms met the U-shaped criterion proposed by the GENDEAF study group, along with those with shallow U-shaped audiograms, for TECTA analysis. All TECTA exons were analyzed by Sanger sequencing. Novel missense variants were classified as possibly pathogenic, non-pathogenic, and variants of uncertain significance, based on genetic data. To evaluate novel possibly pathogenic variants, we predicted changes in protein structure by molecular modeling. Pathogenic and possibly pathogenic variants of TECTA were found in 4 (6.0%) of 67 patients with MFSNHL. In patients with U-shaped audiograms, none (0%) of 21 had pathogenic or possibly pathogenic variants. In patients with shallow U-shaped audiograms, four (8.7%) of 46 had pathogenic or possibly pathogenic variants. Two novel possibly pathogenic variants were identified and two previously reported mutations were considered as variant of unknown significance. The clinical features of patients with pathogenic and possibly pathogenic variants were consistent with those in previous studies. Pathogenic or possibly pathogenic variants were identified in 3 of 23 families (13.0%) which have the family histories compatible with autosomal dominant and 1 of 44 families (2.3%) which have

  20. Mutation frequency and genotype/phenotype correlation among phenylketonuria patients from Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, S.L.C.; Martinez, D.; Kuozmine, A. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of hepatic phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH). To determine the molecular basis of PKU in the state of Georgia, thirty-five Georgian PKU patients representing sixty independent alleles were examined by a combination of DGGE and direct sequence analysis. At present, this approach has led to the identification of 55/60 or about 92% of all mutant alleles. The relatively high frequencies of mutations common to the British Isles (R408W, I65T and L348V) are compatible with 1990 census data showing that 34% of the general Georgian population claim Irish, English or Scottish ancestors. Three new mutations, E76A (1/60), R241L (2/60), and R400R (2/60), were also detected in this study. Although the nucleotide substitution in codon 400 (AGG{r_arrow}CGG) did not change the amino acid sequence, it was the only base change detected in a scan of all 13 exons of two independent alleles. Since codon 400 is split between exons 11 and 12, this change may exert some effect on splicing, as has previously been seen in the PAH gene for the silent mutation Q304Q and the nonsense mutation Y356X, each of which effect codons immediately adjacent to splicing signals. This hypothesis remains to be tested by expression analysis or studies of ectopic transcripts. The remaining 19 characterized alleles contained one of 15 previously identified mutations. Twenty-five of the thirty non-related patients examined in this study were completely genotyped, and there was a strong correlation between mutant PAH genotype, PAH activity predicted from in vitro expression studies where known, and PKU or HPA phenotype. For mutations not yet studied by expression analysis, this correlation suggests that L213P, R241L, Y277D may drastically reduce residual PAH activity while F39L and E76A may retain significant amounts of PAH activity.

  1. Effect of transforming DNA on growth and frequency of mutation of Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grist, R W; Butler, L O

    1983-01-01

    We studied the effect of the presence of homologous transforming DNA on the growth of several transformable strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae and on the frequency of mutation of these strains to various antibiotic resistances. We observed no effect on growth until the strains became competent, when growth was depressed. At the end of the competence period, some strains showed recovery to varying degrees, whereas others showed evidence of cell death. Growth was also depressed by the presence of DNA from Escherichia coli, indicating that recombination was not likely to be the cause of the observed effect. Furthermore, cell death was not caused by the induction of a prophage. Several of the strains showed increased mutation frequencies during the competence period, although treatment with E. coli DNA gave no such effect, indicating that the mutagenesis was due to recombination. We observed no mutagenesis due to UV irradiation of the strains. The possibility that integration of the transforming DNA may produce lesions which induce error-prone repair is discussed. Furthermore, a strain that showed no mutability by transforming DNA, indicating the presence of a more efficient repair system, gave evidence of producing higher amounts of the hex system when competent, and the possible relationship between these properties is discussed.

  2. Frequency of Mitochondrial DNA D-Loop Somatic Mutations in Patients with HTLV-I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toktam Zolfaghari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell Lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1 is endemic in Northeast of Iran. Still, it is unclear that genetic background has role in infection by HTLV-1. Methods: We ascertained the frequency of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA D-loop region nucleotide changes in 45 HTLV-1 infected individuals and 463 healthy control subjects using Sanger sequencing method. Results: Out of totally 164 identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs among HTLV-1 patients, 89 SNPs found statistically significant in comparison to the control group (P<0.05. In this study, no deletion was identified in mtDNA D-loop region. But, for the first time a high frequency of point mutations was observed in HTLV-1 patients. Conclusion: Such nucleotide changes in HTLV-1 patients propose that these mutations may result in impaired mitochondria function directly and/or indirectly. Moreover, these variations may act as a predisposing factor along with the environmental factors, and might play an important role in pathogenesis of HTLV-1.

  3. Experiences from treatment-predictive KRAS testing; high mutation frequency in rectal cancers from females and concurrent mutations in the same tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Mats; Ekstrand, Anna; Edekling, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    . METHODS: We used a real-time PCR based method to determine KRAS mutations in 136 colorectal cancers with mutations identified in 53 (39%) tumors. RESULTS: KRAS mutations were significantly more often found in rectal cancer (21/38, 55%) than in colon cancer (32/98, 33%) (P = 0.02). This finding...... was explained by marked differences mutation rates in female patients who showed mutations in 33% of the colon cancers and in 67% of the rectal cancers (P = 0.01). Concurrent KRAS mutations were identified in three tumors; two colorectal cancers harbored Gly12Asp/Gly13Asp and Gly12Cys/Gly13Asp and a third tumor...... carried Gly12Cys/Gly12Asp in an adenomatous component and additionally acquired Gly12Val in the invasive component. CONCLUSION: The demonstration of a particularly high KRAS mutation frequency among female rectal cancer patients suggests that this subset is the least likely to respond to anti...

  4. X-Linked Agammagobulinemia in a Large Series of North African Patients: Frequency, Clinical Features and Novel BTK Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aadam, Zahra; Kechout, Nadia; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Chan, Koon-Wing; Ben-Ali, Meriem; Ben-Mustapha, Imen; Zidi, Fethi; Ailal, Fatima; Attal, Nabila; Doudou, Fatouma; Abbadi, Mohamed-Cherif; Kaddache, Chawki; Smati, Leila; Touri, Nabila; Chemli, Jalel; Gargah, Tahar; Brini, Ines; Bakhchane, Amina; Charoute, Hicham; Jeddane, Leila; El Atiqi, Sara; El Hafidi, Naïma; Hida, Mustapha; Saile, Rachid; Alj, Hanane Salih; Boukari, Rachida; Bejaoui, Mohamed; Najib, Jilali; Barbouche, Mohamed-Ridha; Lau, Yu-Lung; Mellouli, Fethi; Bousfiha, Ahmed Aziz

    2016-04-01

    X-linked agammagobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene defect. XLA patients have absent or reduced number of peripheral B cells and a profound deficiency in all immunoglobulin isotypes. This multicenter study reports the clinical, immunological and molecular features of Bruton's disease in 40 North African male patients. Fifty male out of 63 (male and female) patients diagnosed with serum agammaglobulinemia and non detectable to less than 2% peripheral B cells were enrolled. The search for BTK gene mutations was performed for all of them by genomic DNA amplification and Sanger sequencing. We identified 33 different mutations in the BTK gene in 40 patients including 12 missense mutations, 6 nonsense mutations, 6 splice-site mutations, 5 frameshift, 2 large deletions, one complex mutation and one in-frame deletion. Seventeen of these mutations are novel. This large series shows a lower frequency of XLA among male patients from North Africa with agammaglobulinemia and absent to low B cells compared with other international studies (63.5% vs. 85%). No strong evidence for genotype-phenotype correlation was observed. This study adds to other reports from highly consanguineous North African populations, showing lower frequency of X-linked forms as compared to AR forms of the same primary immunodeficiency. Furthermore, a large number of novel BTK mutations were identified and could further help identify carriers for genetic counseling.

  5. Real-time PCR genotyping and frequency of the myostatin F94L mutation in beef cattle breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vankan, D M; Waine, D R; Fortes, M R S

    2010-04-01

    This research developed two real-time PCR assays, employing high-resolution melt and allele-specific analysis to accurately genotype the F94L mutation in cattle. This mutation (g.433C > A) in the growth differentiation factor 8 or myostatin gene has recently been shown to be functionally associated with increased muscle mass and carcass yield in cattle. The F94L mutation is not, like other myostatin mutations, associated with reduced fertility and dystocia. It is therefore a candidate for introgression into other breeds to improve retail beef yield and the development of a simple and accurate test to genotype this specific mutation is warranted. Variations in the efficiency of enzyme cleavage compromised the accuracy of genotyping by published methods, potentially resulting in an overestimation of the frequency of the mutant allele. The frequency of the F94L mutation was determined by real-time PCR in 1140 animals from 15 breeds of cattle in Australia. The mutation was present in Simmental (0.8%), Piedmontese (2%), Droughtmaster (4%) and Limousin (94.2%) but not found in Salers, Angus, Poll Hereford, Hereford, Gelbvieh, Charolais, Jersey, Brahman, Holstein, Shorthorn or Maine Anjou. The low prevalence of F94L in all beef breeds except Limousin indicates the significant potential for this mutation to improve retail yield in Australian beef cattle.

  6. Cadmium induces DNA damage in tobacco roots, but no DNA damage, somatic mutations or homologous recombination in tobacco leaves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gichner, Tomáš; Patková, Zdeňka; Száková, J.; Demnerová, K.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 559, 1/2 (2004), s. 49-57 ISSN 1383-5718 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/02/0293; GA ČR GA521/02/0400; GA MŠk LN00B030 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910 Keywords : beta-Glucuronidase * Chlorophyll mutations * Comet assay Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.020, year: 2004

  7. Collateral damage: Spread of repeat-induced point mutation from a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2004-10-16

    Oct 16, 2004 ... Repeat-induced point mutation (RIP) is an unusual genome defense mechanism that was discovered in Neurospora crassa. RIP occurs during a sexual cross and induces numerous G : C to A : T mutations in duplicated DNA sequences and also methylates many of the remaining cytosine residues.

  8. Frequency of mutations in the genes associated with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy in a UK cohort.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Davidson, G L

    2012-08-01

    The hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (HSAN, also known as the hereditary sensory neuropathies) are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders, characterised by a progressive sensory neuropathy often complicated by ulcers and amputations, with variable motor and autonomic involvement. To date, mutations in twelve genes have been identified as causing HSAN. To study the frequency of mutations in these genes and the associated phenotypes, we screened 140 index patients in our inherited neuropathy cohort with a clinical diagnosis of HSAN for mutations in the coding regions of SPTLC1, RAB7, WNK1\\/HSN2, FAM134B, NTRK1 (TRKA) and NGFB. We identified 25 index patients with mutations in six genes associated with HSAN (SPTLC1, RAB7, WNK1\\/HSN2, FAM134B, NTRK1 and NGFB); 20 of which appear to be pathogenic giving an overall mutation frequency of 14.3%. Mutations in the known genes for HSAN are rare suggesting that further HSAN genes are yet to be identified. The p.Cys133Trp mutation in SPTLC1 is the most common cause of HSAN in the UK population and should be screened first in all patients with sporadic or autosomal dominant HSAN.

  9. The spectrum of HNF1A gene mutations in Greek patients with MODY3: relative frequency and identification of seven novel germline mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsi, Christina; Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina; Vazeou-Gerassimidi, Adriani; Chrysis, Dionysios; Delis, Dimitrios; Tentolouris, Nikolaos; Dacou-Voutetakis, Catherine; Chrousos, George P; Sertedaki, Amalia

    2013-11-01

    Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young (MODY) is the most common type of monogenic diabetes accounting for 1-2% of the population with diabetes. The relative incidence of HNF1A-MODY (MODY3) is high in European countries; however, data are not available for the Greek population. The aims of this study were to determine the relative frequency of MODY3 in Greece, the type of the mutations observed, and their relation to the phenotype of the patients. Three hundred ninety-five patients were referred to our center because of suspected MODY during a period of 15 yr. The use of Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis of polymerase chain reaction amplified DNA revealed 72 patients carrying Glucokinase gene mutations (MODY2) and 8 patients carrying HNF1A gene mutations (MODY3). After using strict criteria, 54 patients were selected to be further evaluated by direct sequencing or by multiplex ligation probe amplification (MLPA) for the presence of HNF1A gene mutations. In 16 unrelated patients and 13 of their relatives, 15 mutations were identified in the HNF1A gene. Eight of these mutations were previously reported, whereas seven were novel. Clinical features, such as age of diabetes at diagnosis or severity of hyperglycemia, were not related to the mutation type or location. In our cohort of patients fulfilling strict clinical criteria for MODY, 12% carried an HNF1A gene mutation, suggesting that defects of this gene are responsible for a significant proportion of monogenic diabetes in the Greek population. No clear phenotype-genotype correlations were identified. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Role of Macronutrients and Micronutrients in DNA Damage: Results From a Food Frequency Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Ladeira

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The links between diet and genomic instability have been under investigation for several decades, and evidence suggests a significant causal or preventive role for various dietary factors. This study investigates the influence of macronutrients (calories, protein, and glucides and micronutrients, such as vitamins and minerals, as assessed by a food frequency questionnaire, on genotoxicity biomarkers measured by cytokinesis-blocked micronucleus assay and comet assay. The results found significant positive and negative correlations. Micronucleus frequency tends to increase with higher intake of caffeine, calcium, magnesium, zinc, and protein ( P  < .05, Spearman correlation. Calorie and omega-6 intakes are negatively correlated with DNA damage measured by the comet assay. These results are somewhat controversial because some of the correlations found are contrary to dominant views in the literature; however, we suggest that unraveling the association between diet and genetic instability requires a much better understanding of the modulating role of macronutrients and micronutrients.

  11. The role of human demographic history in determining the distribution and frequency of transferase-deficient galactosaemia mutations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flanagan, J M

    2010-02-01

    Classical or transferase-deficient galactosaemia is an inherited metabolic disorder caused by mutation in the human Galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase (GALT) gene. Of some 170 causative mutations reported, fewer than 10% are observed in more than one geographic region or ethnic group. To better understand the population history of the common GALT mutations, we have established a haplotyping system for the GALT locus incorporating eight single nucleotide polymorphisms and three short tandem repeat markers. We analysed haplotypes associated with the three most frequent GALT gene mutations, Q188R, K285N and Duarte-2 (D2), and estimated their age. Haplotype diversity, in conjunction with measures of genetic diversity and of linkage disequilibrium, indicated that Q188R and K285N are European mutations. The Q188R mutation arose in central Europe within the last 20 000 years, with its observed east-west cline of increasing relative allele frequency possibly being due to population expansion during the re-colonization of Europe by Homo sapiens in the Mesolithic age. K285N was found to be a younger mutation that originated in Eastern Europe and is probably more geographically restricted as it arose after all major European population expansions. The D2 variant was found to be an ancient mutation that originated before the expansion of Homo sapiens out of Africa.

  12. Effect of uvs1, uvs2 and xrs mutations on the radiosensitivity and the induced mitotic recombination frequency in diploid yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suslova, N.G.; Fedorova, I.V.; Zheleznyakova, N.Yu.

    1975-01-01

    The influence of the loci of radiosensitivity uvs1, uvs2, and xrs in the homozygous state at the diploid level on the sensitivity to UV and ionizing radiation and induced mitotic recombination was studied in the yeast Sacch. cerevisiae. Hypersensitivity to UV irradiation was detected in the diploids uvs2 uvs2 xrs xrs in comparision with the corresponding control. The diploid uvs1 uvs1 uvs2 uvs2 does not differ in UV sensitivity from the diploid uvs1 uvs1 UVS2 UVS2. These facts demonstrate that the uvs1 and uvs2 mutations, on the one hand, and the xrs mutations, on the other, normally control different pathways of elimination of UV-induced damages. It was shown that the diploid uvs2 uvs2 xrs3 xrs3 is far more sensitive to the lethal action of x rays than the control diploid UVS2 UVS2 xrs3 xrs3. Consequently, the mutations uvs2 and xrs3 block different modes of repair of damages induced by ionizing radiation. In all the double-mutant diploids, the frequency of mitotic recombination induced by UV rays increases sharply in comparison with that of the radioresistant diploids UVS UVS XRS XRS and the UV-sensitive diploids uvs2 uvs2 XRS XRS. Possible causes of the observed phenomenon are discussed. It was established that in a diploid homozygous for the loci uvs2 xrs5, the frequency of mitotic recombination induced by x rays increases extremely sharply. This fact confirms the hypothesis that the gene product of the locus uvs2 participates in the repair of DNA after the action of ionizing radiation. (author)

  13. Study of cumulative fatigue damage detection for used parts with nonlinear output frequency response functions based on NARMAX modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Honglan; Mao, Hanying; Mao, Hanling; Zheng, Weixue; Huang, Zhenfeng; Li, Xinxin; Wang, Xianghong

    2017-12-01

    Cumulative fatigue damage detection for used parts plays a key role in the process of remanufacturing engineering and is related to the service safety of the remanufactured parts. In light of the nonlinear properties of used parts caused by cumulative fatigue damage, the based nonlinear output frequency response functions detection approach offers a breakthrough to solve this key problem. First, a modified PSO-adaptive lasso algorithm is introduced to improve the accuracy of the NARMAX model under impulse hammer excitation, and then, an effective new algorithm is derived to estimate the nonlinear output frequency response functions under rectangular pulse excitation, and a based nonlinear output frequency response functions index is introduced to detect the cumulative fatigue damage in used parts. Then, a novel damage detection approach that integrates the NARMAX model and the rectangular pulse is proposed for nonlinear output frequency response functions identification and cumulative fatigue damage detection of used parts. Finally, experimental studies of fatigued plate specimens and used connecting rod parts are conducted to verify the validity of the novel approach. The obtained results reveal that the new approach can detect cumulative fatigue damages of used parts effectively and efficiently and that the various values of the based nonlinear output frequency response functions index can be used to detect the different fatigue damages or working time. Since the proposed new approach can extract nonlinear properties of systems by only a single excitation of the inspected system, it shows great promise for use in remanufacturing engineering applications.

  14. Analysis of core damage frequency: Surry Power Station, Unit 1 external events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohn, M.P.; Lambright, J.A.; Daniel, S.L.; Johnson, J.J.; Ravindra, M.K.; Hashimoto, P.O.; Mraz, M.J.; Tong, W.H.

    1990-12-01

    This report presents the analysis of external events (earthquakes, fires, floods, etc.) performed for the Surry Power Station as part of the USNRC-sponsored NUREG-1150 program. Both the internal and external events analyses make full use of recent insights and developments in risk assessment methods. In addition, the external event analyses make use of newly-developed simplified methods. As a first step, a screening analysis was performed which showed that all external events were negligible except for fires and seismic events. Subsequent detailed analysis of fires resulted in a total (mean) core damage frequency of 1.13E-5 per year. The seismic analysis resulted in a total (mean) core damage frequency of 1.16E-4 per year using hazard curves developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and 2.50E-5 per year using hazard curves developed by the Electric Power Research Institute. Uncertainty analyses were performed, and dominant components and sources of uncertainty were identified. 71 refs., 61 figs., 59 tabs

  15. Analysis of core damage frequency: Peach Bottom, Unit 2 internal events appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Cramond, W.R.; Sype, T.T.; Maloney, K.J.; Wheeler, T.A.; Daniel, S.L. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA); Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1989-08-01

    This document contains the appendices for the accident sequence analysis of internally initiated events for the Peach Bottom, Unit 2 Nuclear Power Plant. This is one of the five plant analyses conducted as part of the NUREG-1150 effort for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The work performed and described here is an extensive reanalysis of that published in October 1986 as NUREG/CR-4550, Volume 4. It addresses comments from numerous reviewers and significant changes to the plant systems and procedures made since the first report. The uncertainty analysis and presentation of results are also much improved, and considerable effort was expended on an improved analysis of loss of offsite power. The content and detail of this report is directed toward PRA practitioners who need to know how the work was done and the details for use in further studies. The mean core damage frequency is 4.5E-6 with 5% and 95% uncertainty bounds of 3.5E-7 and 1.3E-5, respectively. Station blackout type accidents (loss of all ac power) contributed about 46% of the core damage frequency with Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) accidents contributing another 42%. The numerical results are driven by loss of offsite power, transients with the power conversion system initially available operator errors, and mechanical failure to scram. 13 refs., 345 figs., 171 tabs.

  16. Analysis of mutant frequencies and mutation spectra in hMTH1 knockdown TK6 cells exposed to UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fotouhi, Asal [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University (Sweden); Hagos, Winta Woldai [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Ilic, Marina; Wojcik, Andrzej; Harms-Ringdahl, Mats [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University (Sweden); Gruijl, Frank de [Department of Dermatology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Mullenders, Leon; Jansen, Jacob G. [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Haghdoost, Siamak, E-mail: Siamak.Haghdoost@su.se [Center for Radiation Protection Research, Department of Molecular Biosciences, Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University (Sweden)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • hMTH1 protects cells from mutagenesis induced by UVA and UVB, but not UVC. • No protective role of hMTH1 in cell survival post UVB and UVC irradiation. • hMTH1 prevents induction of transition-type mutations at AT and GC post UVA irradiation. • 2-OH-dATP rather than 8-oxo-dGTP in the nucleotide pool likely contributes in UVA-induced mutations. - Abstract: Ultraviolet radiation is a highly mutagenic agent that damages the DNA by the formation of mutagenic photoproducts at dipyrimidine sites and by oxidative DNA damages via reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS can also give rise to mutations via oxidation of dNTPs in the nucleotide pool, e.g. 8-oxo-dGTP and 2-OH-dATP and subsequent incorporation during DNA replication. Here we show that expression of human MutT homolog 1 (hMTH1) which sanitizes the nucleotide pool by dephosphorylating oxidized dNTPs, protects against mutagenesis induced by long wave UVA light and by UVB light but not by short wave UVC light. Mutational spectra analyses of UVA-induced mutations at the endogenous Thymidine kinase gene in human lymphoblastoid cells revealed that hMTH1 mainly protects cells from transitions at GC and AT base pairs.

  17. [Frequency of Helicobacter pylori nitroreductase RdxA mutations for metronidazole activation in a population in the Cauca Department, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Claudia Patricia; Quiroga, Andrés Javier; Sierra, Carlos H; Trespalacios, Alba Alicia

    2017-06-01

    Resistance to metronidazole is a key factor associated with Helicobacter pylori treatment failure. Even though resistance is mostly associated with RdxA nitroreductase mutations, studies of this H. pylori protein in Popayán (Colombia) are still incipient. To evaluate the frequency of mutations in the RdxA nitroreductase in a population of patients with H. pylori-positive gastrointestinal disease. We amplified the DNA of 170 gastric biopsies by PCR to detect mutations in the RdxA nitroreductase. An analysis of DNA sequences translated into amino acid sequences was done and then compared to the reference strain 26695. The frequency of RdxA nitroreductase mutations in this study population was 78%. Its most frequent distribution was found in positions D59N (153 samples), R131K (101 samples), R90K (97 samples), A118T (42 samples), I160F (32 samples) and H97T (26 samples), and meaningful stop codons Q50*, D59*; E75*, C159* and I160* in five, one, three, ten and six samples, respectively. The most common virulence genotype was vacAs1/m1 cagA negative (48.6 %). The high frequency of RdxA nitroreductase mutations in H. pylori isolates in Popayán (Colombia) indicates that empirical therapy with metronidazole may not be a valid option for the eradication of H. pylori in patients of the studied population.

  18. Frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll-deficient mutations in rice after treatment with radiation and alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhan, A.K.; Kaul, M.L.H.

    1976-01-01

    Three varieties of rice were treated with gamma rays and two alkylating agents EMS and DES, separately and in combinations, with a view to finding out the frequency and spectrum of chlorophyll mutations in relation to the genotype and the nature of the mutagen. Chlorophyll mutation frequency was enhanced with increasing dose but dropped at very high doses (doses that induced over 90% seeding lethality in M 1 ). The fall was attributed to either the increased mutated sector and diplontic selection after exposure to very high doses or relatively high resistance of some of the seeds. Among chlorophyll mutants in M 2 induced by radiations as well as alkylating agents, the albina type formed the majority class. EMS induced a significantly higher proportion of albinas than did gamma rays

  19. Frequency of Germline Mutations in 25 Cancer Susceptibility Genes in a Sequential Series of Patients With Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Nadine; Lin, Nancy U; Kidd, John; Allen, Brian A; Singh, Nanda; Wenstrup, Richard J; Hartman, Anne-Renee; Winer, Eric P; Garber, Judy E

    2016-05-01

    Testing for germline mutations in BRCA1/2 is standard for select patients with breast cancer to guide clinical management. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) allows testing for mutations in additional breast cancer predisposition genes. The frequency of germline mutations detected by using NGS has been reported in patients with breast cancer who were referred for BRCA1/2 testing or with triple-negative breast cancer. We assessed the frequency and predictors of mutations in 25 cancer predisposition genes, including BRCA1/2, in a sequential series of patients with breast cancer at an academic institution to examine the utility of genetic testing in this population. Patients with stages I to III breast cancer who were seen at a single cancer center between 2010 and 2012, and who agreed to participate in research DNA banking, were included (N = 488). Personal and family cancer histories were collected and germline DNA was sequenced with NGS to identify mutations. Deleterious mutations were identified in 10.7% of women, including 6.1% in BRCA1/2 (5.1% in non-Ashkenazi Jewish patients) and 4.6% in other breast/ovarian cancer predisposition genes including CHEK2 (n = 10), ATM (n = 4), BRIP1 (n = 4), and one each in PALB2, PTEN, NBN, RAD51C, RAD51D, MSH6, and PMS2. Whereas young age (P breast cancer (P = .01), and family history of breast/ovarian cancer (P = .01) predicted for BRCA1/2 mutations, no factors predicted for mutations in other breast cancer predisposition genes. Among sequential patients with breast cancer, 10.7% were found to have a germline mutation in a gene that predisposes women to breast or ovarian cancer, using a panel of 25 predisposition genes. Factors that predict for BRCA1/2 mutations do not predict for mutations in other breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility genes when these genes are analyzed as a single group. Additional cohorts will be helpful to define individuals at higher risk of carrying mutations in genes other than BRCA1/2. © 2016 by American

  20. Low pesticide rates may hasten the evolution of resistance by increasing mutation frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gressel, Jonathan

    2011-03-01

    At very low pesticide rates, a certain low proportion of pests may receive a sublethal dose, are highly stressed by the pesticide and yet survive. Stress is a general enhancer of mutation rates. Thus, the survivors are likely to have more than normal mutations, which might include mutations leading to pesticide resistance, both for multifactorial (polygenic, gene amplification, sequential allelic mutations) and for major gene resistance. Management strategies should consider how to eliminate the subpopulation of pests with the high mutation rates, but the best strategy is probably to avoid too low application rates of pesticides from the outset. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Stationary biofilm growth normalizes mutation frequencies and mutant prevention concentrations in Pseudomonas aeruginosa from cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Castillo, M; del Campo, R; Baquero, F; Morosini, M-I; Turrientes, M-C; Zamora, J; Cantón, R

    2011-05-01

    Bacterial biofilms play an important role in the persistent colonization of the respiratory tract in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The trade-offs among planktonic or sessile modes of growth, mutation frequency, antibiotic susceptibility and mutant prevention concentrations (MPCs) were studied in a well-defined collection of 42 CF Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. MICs of ciprofloxacin, tobramycin, imipenem and ceftazidime increased in the biofilm mode of growth, but not the MPCs of the same drugs. The mutation frequency median was significantly higher in planktonic conditions (1.1 × 10(-8)) than in biofilm (9.9 × 10(-9)) (p 0.015). Isolates categorized as hypomutable increased their mutation frequency from 3.6 × 10(-9) in the planktonic mode to 6 × 10(-8) in biofilm, whereas normomutators (from 9.4 × 10(-8) to 5.3 × 10(-8)) and hypermutators (from 1.6 × 10(-6) to 7.7 × 10(-7)) decreased their mutation frequencies in biofilm. High and low mutation frequencies in planktonic growth converge into the normomutable category in the biofilm mode of growth of CF P. aeruginosa, leading to stabilization of MPCs. This result suggests that once the biofilm mode of growth has been established, the propensity of CF P. aeruginosa populations to evolve towards resistance is not necessarily increased. © 2010 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2010 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  2. The IPE Database: providing information on plant design, core damage frequency and containment performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, J.R.; Lin, C.C.; Pratt, W.T.; Su, T.; Danziger, L.

    1996-01-01

    A database, called the IPE Database has been developed that stores data obtained from the Individual Plant Examinations (IPEs) which licensees of nuclear power plants have conducted in response to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Generic Letter GL88-20. The IPE Database is a collection of linked files which store information about plant design, core damage frequency (CDF), and containment performance in a uniform, structured way. The information contained in the various files is based on data contained in the IPE submittals. The information extracted from the submittals and entered into the IPE Database can be manipulated so that queries regarding individual or groups of plants can be answered using the IPE Database

  3. Laboratory simulation of high-frequency GPR responses of damaged tunnel liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siggins, A. F.; Whiteley, Robert J.

    2000-04-01

    Concrete lined tunnels and pipelines commonly suffer from damage due to subsidence or poor drainage in the surrounding soils, corrosion of reinforcement if present, and acid vapor leaching of the lining. There is a need to conduct tunnel condition monitoring using non-destructive testing methods (NDT) on a regular basis in many buried installations, for example sewers and storm water drains. A wide variety of NDT methods have been employed in the past to monitor these linings including closed circuit TV (CCTV) inspection, magnetic and various electromagnetic and seismic methods. Ground penetrating radar, GPR, is a promising technique for this application, however there are few systems currently available that can provide the high resolution imaging needed to test the lining. A recently developed Australian GPR system operating at 1400 MHz offers the potential to overcome many of these limitations while maintaining adequate resolution to the rear of the linings which are typically less than 0.5 meters thick. The new high frequency GPR has a nominal resolution of 0.03 m at the center of the pulse band-width. This is a significant improvement over existing radars with the possible exception of some horn based systems. This paper describes the results of a laboratory study on a model tunnel lining using the new 1.4 GHz radar. The model simulated a concrete lining with various degrees of damage including, heavily leached sections, voids and corroded reinforcing. The test results established that the new GPR was capable of imaging subtle variations in the concrete structure and that simulated damage could be detected throughout the liner depth. Furthermore, resolution was found to exceed 0.02 m which was significantly better than expected.

  4. Low doses of gamma ionizing radiation increase hprt mutant frequencies of TK6 cells without triggering the mutator phenotype pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayres, Flavio Monteiro; Glickman, Barry W.; Steele, Patricia [University of Victoria, BC (Canada). Dept. of Biology. Centre for Environmental; Cruz, Aparecido Divino da [Universidade Estadual de Goias, Anapolis, GO (Brazil). Dept. de Biologia. Nucleo de Pesquisas Replicon]. E-mail: acruz@ucg.br

    2006-07-01

    The TK6 lymphoblastoid cell line is known to be mismatch repair (MMR) and p53 proficient. Deficiency in MMR results in a mutator phenotype characterized by microsatellite instability (MSI) and increased hprt mutant frequency (MF). Increased hprt MF is also a biomarker of effect for exposure to ionizing radiation. In order to test if a mutator phenotype could be induced by low doses of gamma ionizing radiation, an hprt cloning assay and a MSI investigation were performed after radiation exposure. The spontaneous MF was 1.6 x 10-6. The groups exposed to 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 Gy had hprt MFs of 2.3, 3.3 and 2.2 x 10-6, respectively. The spontaneous MSI frequency per allele in non-selected cells was 5.4 x 10-3, as evidenced at the loci D11S35, nm23-H1, D8S135 and p53. MSI frequencies in the groups exposed to 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 Gy were found to be < 4.7, < 7.7 and < 12 x 10-3, respectively. The frequencies of hprt mutants and MSI found in this study suggest that low doses of ionizing radiation increase hprt mutant frequency without triggering the mutator phenotype pathway. (author)

  5. Different mosaicism frequencies for proximal and distal Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) mutations indicate difference in etiology and recurrence risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passos-Bueno, M.R.; Takata, R.I.; Rapaport, D.; Bakker, E.; Kneppers, A.L.J.; Dunnen, J.T. den; Ommen, J.B. van

    1992-11-01

    In about 65% of the cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) a partial gene deletion or duplication in the dystrophin gene can be detected. These mutations are clustered at two hot spots: 30% at the hot spot in the proximal part of the gene and about 70% at a more distal hot spot. Unexpectedly the authors observed a higher frequency of proximal gene rearrangements among proved germ line' mosaic cases. Of the 24 mosaic cases they are aware of, 19 (79%) have a proximal mutation, while only 5 (21%) have a distal mutation. This finding indicates that the mutations at the two hot spots in the dystrophin gene differ in origin. Independent support for the different mosaicism frequency was found by comparing the mutation spectra observed in isolated cases of DMD and familial cases (ratio 1:1). The authors conclude from these data that proximal deletions most likely occur early in embryonic development, causing them to have a higher chance of becoming familial, while distal deletions occur later and have a higher chance of causing only isolated cases. Finally, the findings have important consequences for the calculation of recurrence-risk estimates according to the site of the deletion: a [open quote]proximal[close quote] new mutant has an increased recurrence risk of approximately 30%, and a [open quote]distal[close quote] new mutant has a decreased recurrence risk of approximately 4%. 28 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Size-related variation in arm damage frequency in the crown-of-thorns sea star, Acanthaster planci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Rivera-Posada

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To examine variation in the frequency of arm damage in different sizes of Acanthaster planci (A. planci, assess how this damage is inflicted by fish predators, and infer the potential role of predation in population regulation. Methods: Diameters of A. planci collected from three sites in the Philippines were measured and arm damage frequency and severity was assessed. Frequency of arm damage was compared between sizes. Feeding behavior of fish predators was also observed in the laboratory. Results: This study demonstrates that sublethal predation by triggerfishes on A. planci result in extensive arm damage. Overall, 60% of A. planci sampled across all sites had sublethal injuries. The frequency of individuals with missing or regenerating arms was highest in medium-sized young adults (11-20 cm, which coincides with the phase where A. planci shift from cryptic to exposed daytime feeding. Conclusions: The high incidence of arm damage within intermediate-sized sea stars indicates that predators exercise some level of regulation on A. planci populations at a local scale. Identification and protection of putative predators that target the most vulnerable life history stages of A. planci are essential in developing population control strategies and reverse sustained declines in coral cover.

  7. Update on the frequency of Ile1016 mutation in voltage-gated sodium channel gene of Aedes aegypti in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siller, Quetzaly; Ponce, Gustavo; Lozano, Saul; Flores, Adriana E

    2011-12-01

    We analyzed 790 Aedes aegypti from 14 localities of Mexico in 2009 to update information on the frequency of the Ile1016 allele in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene that confers resistance to pyrethroids and DDT. The Ile1016 mutation was present in all 17 collections, and was close to fixation in Acapulco (frequency = 0.97), Iguala (0.93), and San Nicolas (0.90). Genotypes at the 1016 locus were not in Hardy-Weinberg proportions in collections from Panuco, Veracruz, Cosoleacaque, Coatzacoalcos, Tantoyuca, and Monterrey due in every case to an excess of homozygotes. The high frequencies of this mutation in Ae. aegypti are probably due to selection pressure from pyrethroid insecticides, particularly permethrin, which has been used in mosquito control programs for >10 years in Mexico.

  8. Effect of X-irradiation of clonogenic HeLa cells on the genome mutation frequencies in their progenies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucheryabaya, N.A.; Zavol' naya, E.S.; Khrust, Yu.R.; Vakhtin, Yu.B. (AN SSSR, Leningrad. Inst. Tsitologii; Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR). Biologo-Pochvennyj Fakul' tet)

    1980-01-01

    Irradiation of clonogenic Hela cells with 100-350 R doses results in the increase of general frequency of genome mutations from (20.7+-0.4)x10/sup -2/ up to (24.8+-0.4)x10/sup -2/-(31.9+-0.3)x10/sup -2/ on a cell per a generation. The increase occurs mainly at the expense of hyperploid mutants, whereas frequency of appearance of cells with reduced number of chromosomes (hypoploids) does not change reliably. For Hela culture, used in experiments, a very high heterogeneity of cells on DNA content in interfase nuclei and a very high level of spontaneous frequency of genome mutation are characteristical, that should be taken into account during the analysis of obtained results.

  9. UVA activation of N-dialkylnitrosamines releasing nitric oxide, producing strand breaks as well as oxidative damages in DNA, and inducing mutations in the Ames test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimoto-Kobayashi, Sakae; Sano, Kayoko; Machida, Masaki; Kaji, Keiko; Yakushi, Keiko

    2010-09-10

    We investigated the photo-mutagenicity and photo-genotoxicity of N-dialkylnitrosamines and its mechanisms of UVA activation. With simultaneous irradiation of UVA, photo-mutagenicity of seven N-dialkylnitrosamines was observed in Ames bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium TA1535) in the absence of metabolic activation. Mutagenicity of pre-irradiated N-dialkylnitrosamines was also observed with S. typhimurium hisG46, TA100, TA102 and YG7108 in the absence of metabolic activation. UVA-mediated mutation with N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) decreased by adding either the NO or OH radical scavenger. When superhelical DNA was irradiated with N-dialkylnitrosamines, nicked circular DNA appeared. Ten N-dialkylnitrosamines examined produced strand breaks in the treated DNA in the presence of UVA. The level of single-strand breaks in phiX174 DNA mediated by N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) and UVA decreased by adding either a radical scavenger or superoxide dismutase. When calf thymus DNA was treated with N-dialkylnitrosamines (NDMA, NDEA, NMOR, N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR) and N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP)) and UVA, the ratio of 8-oxodG/dG in the DNA increased. Action spectra were obtained to determine if nitrosamine acts as a sensitizer of UVA. Both mutation frequency and NO formation were highest at the absorption maximum of nitrosamines, approximately 340 nm. The plots of NO formation and mutation frequency align with the absorption curve of NPYR, NMOR and NDMA. A significant linear correlation between the optical density of N-dialkynitrosamines at 340 nm and NO formation in each irradiated solution was revealed by ANOVA. We would like to propose the hypothesis that the N-nitroso moiety of N-dialkylnitrosamines absorbs UVA photons, UVA-photolysis of N-dialkylnitrosamines brings release of nitric oxide, and subsequent production of alkyl radical cations and active oxygen species follow as secondary events, which cause DNA strand breaks, oxidative and

  10. UVA activation of N-dialkylnitrosamines releasing nitric oxide, producing strand breaks as well as oxidative damages in DNA, and inducing mutations in the Ames test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arimoto-Kobayashi, Sakae, E-mail: arimoto@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 1-1-1 Tsushima, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sano, Kayoko; Machida, Masaki; Kaji, Keiko; Yakushi, Keiko [Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 1-1-1 Tsushima, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan)

    2010-09-10

    We investigated the photo-mutagenicity and photo-genotoxicity of N-dialkylnitrosamines and its mechanisms of UVA activation. With simultaneous irradiation of UVA, photo-mutagenicity of seven N-dialkylnitrosamines was observed in Ames bacteria (Salmonella typhimurium TA1535) in the absence of metabolic activation. Mutagenicity of pre-irradiated N-dialkylnitrosamines was also observed with S. typhimurium hisG46, TA100, TA102 and YG7108 in the absence of metabolic activation. UVA-mediated mutation with N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and N-nitrosodiethylamine (NDEA) decreased by adding either the NO or OH radical scavenger. When superhelical DNA was irradiated with N-dialkylnitrosamines, nicked circular DNA appeared. Ten N-dialkylnitrosamines examined produced strand breaks in the treated DNA in the presence of UVA. The level of single-strand breaks in {phi}X174 DNA mediated by N-nitrosomorpholine (NMOR) and UVA decreased by adding either a radical scavenger or superoxide dismutase. When calf thymus DNA was treated with N-dialkylnitrosamines (NDMA, NDEA, NMOR, N-nitrosopyrrolidine (NPYR) and N-nitrosopiperidine (NPIP)) and UVA, the ratio of 8-oxodG/dG in the DNA increased. Action spectra were obtained to determine if nitrosamine acts as a sensitizer of UVA. Both mutation frequency and NO formation were highest at the absorption maximum of nitrosamines, approximately 340 nm. The plots of NO formation and mutation frequency align with the absorption curve of NPYR, NMOR and NDMA. A significant linear correlation between the optical density of N-dialkynitrosamines at 340 nm and NO formation in each irradiated solution was revealed by ANOVA. We would like to propose the hypothesis that the N-nitroso moiety of N-dialkylnitrosamines absorbs UVA photons, UVA-photolysis of N-dialkylnitrosamines brings release of nitric oxide, and subsequent production of alkyl radical cations and active oxygen species follow as secondary events, which cause DNA strand breaks, oxidative and

  11. Association between population structure and allele frequencies of the glycogen synthase 1 mutation in the Austrian Noriker draft horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druml, T; Grilz-Seger, G; Neuditschko, M; Brem, G

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the allele frequency of the glycogen synthase 1 (GYS1) mutation associated with polysaccharide storage myopathy type 1 in the Austrian Noriker horse. Furthermore, we examined the influence of population substructures on the allele distribution. The study was based upon a comprehensive population sample (208 breeding stallions and 309 mares) and a complete cohort of unselected offspring from the year 2014 (1553 foals). The mean proportion of GYS1 carrier animals in the foal cohort was 33%, ranging from 15% to 50% according to population substructures based on coat colours. In 517 mature breeding horses the mutation carrier frequency reached 34%, ranging on a wider scale from 4% to 62% within genetic substructures. We could show that the occurrence of the mutated GYS1 allele is influenced by coat colour; genetic bottlenecks; and assortative, rotating and random mating strategies. Highest GYS1 carrier frequencies were observed in the chestnut sample comprising 50% in foals, 54% in mares and 62% in breeding stallions. The mean inbreeding of homozygous carrier animals reached 4.10%, whereas non-carrier horses were characterized by an inbreeding coefficient of 3.48%. Lowest GYS1 carrier frequencies were observed in the leopard spotted Noriker subpopulation. Here the mean carrier frequency reached 15% in foals, 17% in mares and 4% in stallions and inbreeding decreased from 3.28% in homozygous non-carrier horses to 2.70% in heterozygous horses and 0.94% in homozygous carriers. This study illustrates that lineage breeding and specified mating strategies result in genetic substructures, which affect the frequencies of the GYS1 gene mutation. © 2016 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  12. Frequency and Significance of Abnormal Pancreatic Imaging in Patients with BRCA1 and BRCA2 Genetic Mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie Chahla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is typically diagnosed in advanced stages resulting in a significant reduction in the number of patients who are candidates for surgical resection. Although the majority of cases are believed to occur sporadically, about 10% show familial clustering and studies have identified an increased frequency of BRCA germline mutations. The role of screening for pancreatic adenocarcinoma in these populations is unclear. Our study aims to identify the abnormal pancreatic imaging findings in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. Methods. A retrospective review of patient medical records with known BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations was conducted. Data was collected and all available abdominal imaging studies were reviewed. Results. A total of 66 patients were identified, 36 with BRCA1 and 30 with BRCA2 mutations. Only 20/66 (30% had abdominal imaging (14 BRCA1 and 6 BRCA2 patients. Of those patients with abdominal imaging, abnormal pancreatic imaging findings were detected in 7/20 (35% cases. Conclusion. Our study shows a high incidence of abnormal pancreatic imaging findings in patients with BRCA genetic mutations (35%. Larger studies are needed to further define the role of pancreatic cancer screening and the significance of abnormal imaging findings in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers.

  13. Frequency of BRAF V600E Mutation in the Mexican Population of Patients With Metastatic Melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Erika Ruiz-Garcia; Juan A. Matus-Santos; Jorge Alberto Guadarrama-Orozco; Miguel Angel Alvarez-Avitia; Jose Luis Aguilar-Ponce; Edith Fernandez-Figueroa; Jessica Maldonado-Mendoza; Cesar Lopez-Camarillo; Laurence A. Marchat; Saul Lino-Silva; Mario Cuellar-Hubbe; Jamie de la Garza-Salazar; Abelardo Meneses-García; Horacio Astudillo-de la Vega; Hector Martinez-Said

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The BRAF V600E mutation has been described in melanomas occurring in the Caucasian, European, and Asian populations. However, in the Mexican population, the status and clinical significance of BRAF mutation has not been researched on a large scale. Methods: Consecutive BRAF-tested Mexican patients with metastatic melanoma (n = 127) were analyzed for mutations in exon 15 of the BRAF gene in genomic DNA by real-time polymerase chain reaction technology for amplification and detection. ...

  14. Frequencies of the Common Mefv Gene Mutations in Adiyaman, Southeast Anatolia, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korkmaz D. T.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Familial Mediterranean fever (FMF is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by fever and serosal inflammation. The reasons for the disorder are mutations in the Mediterranean fever (MEFV gene; the most common of which are M694V, M680I, M694I and V726A. In this study, we aimed to screen these common mutations of the MEFV gene and then determine the prevalence of FMF according to these mutations in Adıyaman, Southeast Anatolia, Turkey. Seven hundred and sixty-seven healthy individuals from the region of Adıyaman participated in the study. Polymerase chain reaction-amplification refractory mutation system (PCR-ARMS methods were used to determine the common mutations of the MEFV gene. Twenty-six (3.9% individuals had only one mutation in the MEFV gene, 25 individuals were heterozygous and one person was homozygous for the V726A mutation (0.15%. In the present study, the V726A mutation (50.0% was the most frequent, followed by M694V (38.5%, M680I (7.7% and M694I (3.8%. It was seen that the carrier rate was very low and the prevalence of FMF was 0.15%, according to the common mutations of the MEFV gene in Adıyaman, Southeast Anatolia, Turkey.

  15. Analysis of core damage frequency due to external events at the DOE [Department of Energy] N-Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambright, J.A.; Bohn, M.P.; Daniel, S.L.; Baxter, J.T.; Johnson, J.J.; Ravindra, M.K.; Hashimoto, P.O.; Mraz, M.J.; Tong, W.H.; Conoscente, J.P.; Brosseau, D.A.

    1990-11-01

    A complete external events probabilistic risk assessment has been performed for the N-Reactor power plant, making full use of all insights gained during the past ten years' developments in risk assessment methodologies. A detailed screening analysis was performed which showed that all external events had negligible contribution to core damage frequency except fires, seismic events, and external flooding. A limited scope analysis of the external flooding risk indicated that it is not a major risk contributor. Detailed analyses of the fire and seismic risks resulted in total (mean) core damage frequencies of 1.96E-5 and 4.60E-05 per reactor year, respectively. Detailed uncertainty analyses were performed for both fire and seismic risks. These results show that the core damage frequency profile for these events is comparable to that found for existing commercial power plants if proposed fixes are completed as part of the restart program. 108 refs., 85 figs., 80 tabs

  16. A second mutation associated with apparent beta-hexosaminidase A pseudodeficiency: identification and frequency estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Z; Natowicz, M R; Kaback, M M; Lim-Steele, J S; Prence, E M; Brown, D; Chabot, T; Triggs-Raine, B L

    1993-01-01

    Deficient activity of beta-hexosaminidase A (Hex A), resulting from mutations in the HEXA gene, typically causes Tay-Sachs disease. However, healthy individuals lacking Hex A activity against synthetic substrates (i.e., individuals who are pseudodeficient) have been described. Recently, an apparently benign C739-to-T (Arg247Trp) mutation was found among individuals with Hex A levels indistinguishable from those of carriers of Tay-Sachs disease. This allele, when in compound heterozygosity with a second "disease-causing" allele, results in Hex A pseudodeficiency. We examined the HEXA gene of a healthy 42-year-old who was Hex A deficient but did not have the C739-to-T mutation. The HEXA exons were PCR amplified, and the products were analyzed for mutations by using restriction-enzyme digestion or single-strand gel electrophoresis. A G805-to-A (Gly269Ser) mutation associated with adult-onset GM2 gangliosidosis was found on one chromosome. A new mutation, C745-to-T (Arg249Trp), was identified on the second chromosome. This mutation was detected in an additional 4/63 (6%) non-Jewish and 0/218 Ashkenazi Jewish enzyme-defined carriers. Although the Arg249Trp change may result in a late-onset form of GM2 gangliosidosis, any phenotype must be very mild. This new mutation and the benign C739-to-T mutation together account for approximately 38% of non-Jewish enzyme-defined carriers. Because carriers of the C739-to-T and C745-to-T mutations cannot be differentiated from carriers of disease-causing alleles by using the classical biochemical screening approaches, DNA-based analyses for these mutations should be offered for non-Jewish enzyme-defined heterozygotes, before definitive counseling is provided. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7902672

  17. Low frequency of filaggrin null mutations in Croatia and their relation with allergic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabolić Pipinić, I.; Varnai, V. M.; Turk, R.; Breljak, D.; Kezić, S.; Macan, J.

    2013-01-01

    Filaggrin gene (FLG) null mutations are considered associated with atopic dermatitis. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of FLG null mutations R501X, 2282del4, R2447X and S3247X in the Croatian population and their role in the occurrence of allergic diseases including atopic

  18. The frequency of pre-core gene mutations in chronic hepatitis B infection: a study of Malaysian subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, S F; Wong, P W; Chen, Y C; Rosmawati, M

    2002-03-01

    A retrospective study was carried out to determine the frequency of the pre-core stop codon mutant virus in a group of chronic hepatitis B carriers: 81 cases were considered [33 hepatits B e antigen (HBe) positive and 48 HBe negative]. All of the HBe positive cases had detectable viral DNA by hybridization analysis; in the case of the HBe negative cases, one third had detectable viral DNA by hybridization analysis and two thirds had HBV DNA detectable by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. Pre-core stop codon mutant detection was carried out on all specimens using allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization following PCR amplification of the target sequence. The pre-core mutant was detected in 13/33 (39.4%) of HBe positive cases and in 32/48 (66.7%) of HBe negative cases. Sequence analysis was carried out on 8 of the 16 HBe negative specimens that did not carry the pre-core mutant virus to determine the molecular basis for the HBe minus phenotype in these cases: the 1762/1764 TA paired mutation in the second AT rich region of the core promoter was detected in five cases; a start codon mutation was detected in one case. The predominant mutation resulting in the HBe minus phenotype in our isolates was the 1896A pre-core ("pre-core stop codon") mutation; other mutations responsible for the phenotype included the core promoter paired mutation and pre-core start codon mutation. In view of the high frequency of the pre-core mutant virus, sequence analysis was performed to determine the virus genotype on the basis of the nucleotide sequence of codon 15. The sequences of 21 wild type virus (14 HBe positive and 7 HBe negative cases) were examined: 15 were found to be codon 15 CCT variants (71.4%); the frequency in the HBe positive group was 12/14 (85.7%), while that in the HBe negative group was 3/7 (42.9%). The high frequency of the codon 15 CCT variant in association with the frequent occurrence of the pre-core mutant in our isolates concurs with the results

  19. Machine learning classifier for identification of damaging missense mutations exclusive to human mitochondrial DNA-encoded polypeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Navarro, Antonio; Gaudioso-Simón, Andrés; Álvarez-Jarreta, Jorge; Montoya, Julio; Mayordomo, Elvira; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo

    2017-03-07

    Several methods have been developed to predict the pathogenicity of missense mutations but none has been specifically designed for classification of variants in mtDNA-encoded polypeptides. Moreover, there is not available curated dataset of neutral and damaging mtDNA missense variants to test the accuracy of predictors. Because mtDNA sequencing of patients suffering mitochondrial diseases is revealing many missense mutations, it is needed to prioritize candidate substitutions for further confirmation. Predictors can be useful as screening tools but their performance must be improved. We have developed a SVM classifier (Mitoclass.1) specific for mtDNA missense variants. Training and validation of the model was executed with 2,835 mtDNA damaging and neutral amino acid substitutions, previously curated by a set of rigorous pathogenicity criteria with high specificity. Each instance is described by a set of three attributes based on evolutionary conservation in Eukaryota of wildtype and mutant amino acids as well as coevolution and a novel evolutionary analysis of specific substitutions belonging to the same domain of mitochondrial polypeptides. Our classifier has performed better than other web-available tested predictors. We checked performance of three broadly used predictors with the total mutations of our curated dataset. PolyPhen-2 showed the best results for a screening proposal with a good sensitivity. Nevertheless, the number of false positive predictions was too high. Our method has an improved sensitivity and better specificity in relation to PolyPhen-2. We also publish predictions for the complete set of 24,201 possible missense variants in the 13 human mtDNA-encoded polypeptides. Mitoclass.1 allows a better selection of candidate damaging missense variants from mtDNA. A careful search of discriminatory attributes and a training step based on a curated dataset of amino acid substitutions belonging exclusively to human mtDNA genes allows an improved

  20. Uptake of tritiated 1,2-dibromoethane by Tradescantia floral tissues: relation to induced mutation frequency in stamen hair cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nauman, C.H.; Klotz, P.J.; Schairer, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    Inflorescences of two clones of Tradescantia (02 and 4430) have been exposed to the gaseous form of tritium-labeled 1,2-dibromoethane (DBE). A comparison of chemical exposure concentration and tissue dose for various exposure periods indicated that DBE readily and rapidly penetrated through the outer sepal and petal tissues to the critical stamen hair cells - the targets for mutation induction. Bud and open flower tissues of both clones contained generally similar amounts of [ 3 H]-DBE after similar exposures; thus, a differential penetration or uptake of the mutagen into the tissues of these clones cannot account for the 7 to 9 fold difference between clones in pink mutation frequency elicited by DBE exposure. Autoradiographs of stamen hair cells showed clearly that the DBE was not localized, but distributed randomly throughout the cytoplasm and nucleus. Comparison of [ 3 H]-DBE-induced pink mutation-response curves to those derived previously with unlabeled DBE revealed that the rad dose of tritium could not account entirely for the elevated mutation response following exposure to the [ 3 H]-DBE. Plots of the total exposure to [ 3 H]-DBE vs both tissue molar concentration of [ 3 H]-DBE and pink mutation incidence following exposure to DBE made possible the construction of true target-tissue dose-response curves. (author)

  1. Evaluation the frequency of factor V Leiden mutation in pregnant women with preeclampsia syndrome in an Iranian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Samieh; Yavarian, Majid; Azinfar, Azadeh; Rajaei, Minoo; Azizi Kootenaee, Maryam

    2012-01-01

    Role of genetic factors in etiology of preeclampsia is not confirmed yet. Gene defect frequency varies in different geographic areas as well as ethnic groups. In this study, the role of factor V Leiden mutation in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia syndrome among the pregnant population of northern shore of Persian Gulf in Iran, were considered. Between Jan. 2008 and Dec. 2009, in a nested case control study, pregnant women with preeclampsia (N=198) as cases and healthy (N=201) as controls were enrolled in the study. DNA were extracted from 10 CC peripheral blood and analyzed for presence of factor V Leiden mutation in these subjects. The maternal and neonatal outcomes of pregnancy according to the distribution of factor V Leiden were also compared among cases. In total, 17(8.6%) of cases and 2(1%) of controls showed the factor V Leiden mutation. The incidence of factor V Leiden was typically higher in preeclamptic women than control group (OR: 9.34 %95 CI: 2.12-41.01). There was no difference in incidence rate of preterm deliveryfactor V Leiden mutation. The pregnant women with factor V Leiden mutation are prone for preeclampsia syndrome during pregnancy, but this risk factor was not correlated to pregnancy complications in the studied women.

  2. Frequency of known mutations in early onset PD; implication for genetic counseling: the CORE-PD study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalay, RN; Caccappolo, E; Mejia-Santana, H; Tang, M-X; Rosado, L; Ross, B; Verbitsky, M; Kisselev, S; Louis, ED; Comella, C; Colcher, A; Jennings, D; Nance, M; Bressman, S; Scott, WK; Tanner, C; Mickel, S; Andrews, H; Waters, C; Fahn, S; Cote, L; Frucht, S; Ford, B; Rezak, M; Novak, K; Friedman, JH; Pfeiffer, R; Marsh, L; Hiner, B; Siderowf, A; Ottman, R; Marder, K; Clark, LN

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the frequency and clinical characteristics of carriers of previously identified mutations in six genes associated with early onset Parkinson disease (EOPD) and provide empirical data that can be used to inform genetic counseling. Methods Mutations in SNCA, PRKN, PINK1, DJ1, LRRK2 and GBA were assessed in 953 individuals with EOPD ascertained based on age at onset (AAO) ≤50 years. Participants included 77 Hispanics and 139 of Jewish ancestry. A validated family history interview and the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) were administered. Demographic and phenotypic characteristics were compared among groups defined by mutation status. Results One hundred and fifty eight (16.6%) had mutations including 64 (6.7%) PRKN, 35 (3.6%) LRRK2 G2019S, 64 (6.7%) GBA and one (0.2%) DJ1. Mutation carriers were more frequent among cases with AAO ≤30 than among cases with AAO between 31 and 50 (40.6% vs. 14.6% pJews compared to non-Jews (32.4% vs. 13.7% pgenetic counseling. PMID:20837857

  3. SOLAR RADIATION AND INDUCTION OF DNA DAMAGE, MUTATIONS AND SKIN CANCERS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SETLOW,R.B.

    2007-05-10

    An understanding of the effects of sunlight on human skin begins with the effects on DNA and extends to cells, animals and humans. The major DNA photoproducts arising from UVB (280-320 nm) exposures are cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. If unrepaired, they may kill or mutate cells and result in basal and squamous cell carcinomas. Although UVA (320-400 nm) and visible wavelengths are poorly absorbed by DNA, the existing data indicate clearly that exposures to these wavelengths are responsible, in an animal model, for {approx}95 % of the incidence of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM). Six lines of evidence, to be discussed in detail, support the photosensitizing role of melanin in the induction of this cancer. They are: (1) Melanomas induced in backcross hybrids of small tropical fish of the genus Xiphophorus, exposed to wavelengths from 302-547 nm, indicate that {approx}95% of the cancers induced by exposure to sunlight would arise from UVA + visible wavelengths; (2) The action spectrum for inducing melanin-photosensitized oxidant production is very similar to the spectrum for inducing melanoma; (3) Albino whites and blacks, although very sensitive to sunburn and the sunlight induction of non-CMM, have very low incidences of CMM; (4) The incidence of CMM as a function of latitude is very similar to that of UVA, but not UVB; (5) Use of UVA-exposing sun-tanning parlors by the young increases the incidence rate of CMM and (6) Major mutations observed in CMM are not UVB-induced.

  4. Frequency Analysis of Acoustic Emission Signal to Monitor Damage Evolution in Masonry Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masera, D; Bocca, P; Grazzini, A

    2011-01-01

    A crucial aspect in damage evaluation of masonry structures is the analysis of long-term behaviour and for this reason fatigue analysis has a great influence on safety assessment of this structures. Acoustic Emission (AE) are very effective non-destructive techniques applied to identify micro and macro-defects and their temporal evolution in several materials. This technique permits to estimate the velocity of ultrasound waves propagation and the amount of energy released during fracture propagation to obtain information on the criticality of the ongoing process. By means of AE monitoring, an experimental analysis on a set of reinforced and unreinforced masonry walls under variable amplitude and static loading has been carried out. During these tests, the AE signals were recorded. The AE signals were analysed using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) to examine the frequency distribution of the micro and macro cracking. It possible to evaluate the evolution of the wavelength of the AE signal through the two characteristic peak in the AE spectrum signals and the wave speed of the P or S waves. This wavelength evolution can be represent the microcrak and macrocrack evolution in masonry walls. This procedure permits to estimate the fracture dimension characteristic in several loading condition and for several masonry reinforced condition.

  5. Procedures for the external event core damage frequency analyses for NUREG-1150

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohn, M.P.; Lambright, J.A.

    1990-11-01

    This report presents methods which can be used to perform the assessment of risk due to external events at nuclear power plants. These methods were used to perform the external events risk assessments for the Surry and Peach Bottom nuclear power plants as part of the NRC-sponsored NUREG-1150 risk assessments. These methods apply to the full range of hazards such as earthquakes, fires, floods, etc. which are collectively known as external events. The methods described in this report have been developed under NRC sponsorship and represent, in many cases, both advancements and simplifications over techniques that have been used in past years. They also include the most up-to-date data bases on equipment seismic fragilities, fire occurrence frequencies and fire damageability thresholds. The methods described here are based on making full utilization of the power plant systems logic models developed in the internal events analyses. By making full use of the internal events models one obtains an external event analysis that is consistent both in nomenclature and in level of detail with the internal events analyses, and in addition, automatically includes all the appropriate random and tests/maintenance unavailabilities as appropriate. 50 refs., 9 figs., 11 tabs

  6. Time-frequency analysis of GPR data to investigate the damage of monumental buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leucci, Giovanni; Masini, Nicola; Persico, Raffaele

    2012-08-01

    The presence of particular microclimatic conditions inside monumental buildings is responsible for bio-deterioration processes. In many cases, efflorescence and moulds are visible on the facades of several monuments of historical importance. In many other cases, the effects of decay processes are not visible, thus making difficult the diagnosis and the consequent setup of effective rehabilitation and preservation interventions, especially in the presence of a complex geometry and/or a large variability of construction materials. In such cases, a valuable contribution could be provided by geophysical methods (such as electrical resistivity, electromagnetic conductivity, ground-penetrating radar (GPR), etc), which have been proved to be successful tools for sub-surface investigation and characterization of historical buildings. In old monumental buildings, the masonry structures frequently exhibit cracks, voids, detachments and high moisture contrasts that can give rise to reflection events in radar signals. However, the complexity of the geometry and the structural heterogeneity that characterize these old structures often make the GPR results difficult to analyse and interpret. In particular, the spatial variation in GPR signal attenuation can provide important information about the electrical properties of the investigated materials that, in turn, can be used to assess the physical parameters associated with damage. In this paper, we propose an approach that analyses the data in the form of ‘frequency maps’ to evidence absorption losses probably linked to higher moisture content. Two real case histories back up the proposed method.

  7. IPE Data Base: Plant design, core damage frequency and containment performance information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, J.; Lin, C.C.; Pratt, W.T.; Su, T.; Danziger, L.

    1995-01-01

    This data base stores data obtained from the Individual Plant Examinations (IPEs) which licensees of nuclear power plants have conducted in response to NRC's Generic Letter GL88-20. The IPE Data Base is a collection of linked files which store information about plant design, core damage frequency, and containment performance in a uniform, structured way. The information contined in the various files is based on data contained in the IPE submittals. The information extracted from the submittals and entered into the IPE Data Base can be maniulated so that queries regarding individual or groups of plants can be answered using the IPE Data Base. The IPE Data Base supports detailed inquiries into the characteristics of individual plants or classes of plants. Progress has been made on the IPE Data Base and it is largely complete. Recent focus has been the development of a user friendly version which is menu driven and allows the user to ask queries of varying complexity easily, without the need to become familiar with particular data base formats or conventions such as those of DBase IV or Microsoft Access. The user can obtain the information he desired by quickly moving through a series of on-screen menus and ''clicking'' on appropriate choices. In this way even a first time user can benefit from the large amount of information stored in the IPE Data Base without the need of a learning period

  8. Time–frequency analysis of GPR data to investigate the damage of monumental buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leucci, Giovanni; Persico, Raffaele; Masini, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    The presence of particular microclimatic conditions inside monumental buildings is responsible for bio-deterioration processes. In many cases, efflorescence and moulds are visible on the facades of several monuments of historical importance. In many other cases, the effects of decay processes are not visible, thus making difficult the diagnosis and the consequent setup of effective rehabilitation and preservation interventions, especially in the presence of a complex geometry and/or a large variability of construction materials. In such cases, a valuable contribution could be provided by geophysical methods (such as electrical resistivity, electromagnetic conductivity, ground-penetrating radar (GPR), etc), which have been proved to be successful tools for sub-surface investigation and characterization of historical buildings. In old monumental buildings, the masonry structures frequently exhibit cracks, voids, detachments and high moisture contrasts that can give rise to reflection events in radar signals. However, the complexity of the geometry and the structural heterogeneity that characterize these old structures often make the GPR results difficult to analyse and interpret. In particular, the spatial variation in GPR signal attenuation can provide important information about the electrical properties of the investigated materials that, in turn, can be used to assess the physical parameters associated with damage. In this paper, we propose an approach that analyses the data in the form of ‘frequency maps’ to evidence absorption losses probably linked to higher moisture content. Two real case histories back up the proposed method. (paper)

  9. Increase in radiation-induced HPRT gene mutation frequency after nonthermal exposure to nonionizing 60 Hz electromagnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walleczek, J; Shiu, E C; Hahn, G M

    1999-04-01

    It is widely accepted that moderate levels of nonionizing electric or magnetic fields, for example 50/60 Hz magnetic fields of about 1 mT, are not mutagenic. However, it is not known whether such fields can enhance the action of known mutagens. To explore this question, a stringent experimental protocol, which included blinding and systematic negative controls, was implemented, minimizing the possibility of observer bias or experimental artifacts. As a model system, we chose to measure mutation frequencies induced by 2 Gy gamma rays in the redox-sensitive hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HPRT) gene in Chinese hamster ovary cells. We tested whether a 12-h exposure to a 60 Hz sinusoidally oscillating magnetic-flux density (Brms = 0.7 mT) could affect the mutagenic effects of ionizing radiation on the HPRT gene locus. We determined that the magnetic-field exposure induced an approximate 1.8-fold increase in HPRT mutation frequency. Additional experiments at Brms = 0.23 and 0.47 mT revealed that the effect was reduced at lower flux densities. The field exposure did not enhance radiation-induced cytotoxicity or mutation frequencies in cells not exposed to ionizing radiation. These results suggest that moderate-strength, oscillating magnetic fields may act as an enhancer of mutagenesis in mammalian cells.

  10. Impaired DNA damage response signaling by FUS-NLS mutations leads to neurodegeneration and FUS aggregate formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, Marcel; Pal, Arun; Goswami, Anand; Lojewski, Xenia; Japtok, Julia; Vehlow, Anne; Naujock, Maximilian; Günther, René; Jin, Mengmeng; Stanslowsky, Nancy; Reinhardt, Peter; Sterneckert, Jared; Frickenhaus, Marie; Pan-Montojo, Francisco; Storkebaum, Erik; Poser, Ina; Freischmidt, Axel; Weishaupt, Jochen H; Holzmann, Karlheinz; Troost, Dirk; Ludolph, Albert C; Boeckers, Tobias M; Liebau, Stefan; Petri, Susanne; Cordes, Nils; Hyman, Anthony A; Wegner, Florian; Grill, Stephan W; Weis, Joachim; Storch, Alexander; Hermann, Andreas

    2018-01-23

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most frequent motor neuron disease. Cytoplasmic fused in sarcoma (FUS) aggregates are pathological hallmarks of FUS-ALS. Proper shuttling between the nucleus and cytoplasm is essential for physiological cell function. However, the initial event in the pathophysiology of FUS-ALS remains enigmatic. Using human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSCs)-derived motor neurons (MNs), we show that impairment of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-dependent DNA damage response (DDR) signaling due to mutations in the FUS nuclear localization sequence (NLS) induces additional cytoplasmic FUS mislocalization which in turn results in neurodegeneration and FUS aggregate formation. Our work suggests that a key pathophysiologic event in ALS is upstream of aggregate formation. Targeting DDR signaling could lead to novel therapeutic routes for ameliorating ALS.

  11. Patients with genetically heterogeneous synchronous colorectal cancer carry rare damaging germline mutations in immune-related genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cereda, Matteo; Gambardella, Gennaro; Benedetti, Lorena; Iannelli, Fabio; Patel, Dominic; Basso, Gianluca; Guerra, Rosalinda F.; Mourikis, Thanos P.; Puccio, Ignazio; Sinha, Shruti; Laghi, Luigi; Spencer, Jo; Rodriguez-Justo, Manuel; Ciccarelli, Francesca D.

    2016-01-01

    Synchronous colorectal cancers (syCRCs) are physically separated tumours that develop simultaneously. To understand how the genetic and environmental background influences the development of multiple tumours, here we conduct a comparative analysis of 20 syCRCs from 10 patients. We show that syCRCs have independent genetic origins, acquire dissimilar somatic alterations, and have different clone composition. This inter- and intratumour heterogeneity must be considered in the selection of therapy and in the monitoring of resistance. SyCRC patients show a higher occurrence of inherited damaging mutations in immune-related genes compared to patients with solitary colorectal cancer and to healthy individuals from the 1,000 Genomes Project. Moreover, they have a different composition of immune cell populations in tumour and normal mucosa, and transcriptional differences in immune-related biological processes. This suggests an environmental field effect that promotes multiple tumours likely in the background of inflammation. PMID:27377421

  12. High frequency of potentially pathogenic SORL1 mutations in autosomal dominant early-onset Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottier, C; Hannequin, D; Coutant, S; Rovelet-Lecrux, A; Wallon, D; Rousseau, S; Legallic, S; Paquet, C; Bombois, S; Pariente, J; Thomas-Anterion, C; Michon, A; Croisile, B; Etcharry-Bouyx, F; Berr, C; Dartigues, J-F; Amouyel, P; Dauchel, H; Boutoleau-Bretonnière, C; Thauvin, C; Frebourg, T; Lambert, J-C; Campion, D

    2012-09-01

    Performing exome sequencing in 14 autosomal dominant early-onset Alzheimer disease (ADEOAD) index cases without mutation on known genes (amyloid precursor protein (APP), presenilin1 (PSEN1) and presenilin2 (PSEN2)), we found that in five patients, the SORL1 gene harbored unknown nonsense (n=1) or missense (n=4) mutations. These mutations were not retrieved in 1500 controls of same ethnic origin. In a replication sample, including 15 ADEOAD cases, 2 unknown non-synonymous mutations (1 missense, 1 nonsense) were retrieved, thus yielding to a total of 7/29 unknown mutations in the combined sample. Using in silico predictions, we conclude that these seven private mutations are likely to have a pathogenic effect. SORL1 encodes the Sortilin-related receptor LR11/SorLA, a protein involved in the control of amyloid beta peptide production. Our results suggest that besides the involvement of the APP and PSEN genes, further genetic heterogeneity, involving another gene of the same pathway is present in ADEOAD.

  13. Sequence risk analysis: A method for the evaluation of event significance based on potential core damage frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fader, G.B.; Jones, M.A.; Zebroski, E.L.

    1984-01-01

    This chapter describes a quantitative evaluation method which can be used in lieu of a Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) to estimate event-related risk of core damage, and it is intended to handle unusual sequences and plant-unique system unavailability and operator behavior. Core damage is defined as damage sufficient to cause prolonged outage for replacement of a deformed core and plant decontamination. The event severity evaluation procedure is as follows: assemble plant information, develop plant-specific event tree headings, identify the event initiator, develop the event-specific event tree, and evaluate the event tree for event severity. The event significance evaluation procedure involves the evaluation of the event tree for core damage frequency, the determination of the relevance of the event to other plants or units, and the determination of event significance. Each step is given a detailed explanation

  14. Frequency of Fanconi anemia in Brazil and efficacy of screening for the FANCA 3788-3790del mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Magdalena

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Fanconi anemia (FA is an autosomal recessive genetic disease characterized by progressive bone marrow failure, susceptibility to cancer and multiple congenital anomalies. There is important clinical variability among patients and the knowledge of factors which might predict outcome would greatly help the decision making regarding the choices of treatment and the appropriate time to start it. Future studies of the possible correlation between specific mutations with specific clinical presentations will provide the answer to one of these factors. At our Center we standardized a rapid and precise screening test using a mismatch PCR assay for a specific mutation (3788-3790del in exon 38 of gene FANCA in Brazilian FA patients. We present the results obtained after screening 80 non-consanguineous FA patients referred from all regions of Brazil with a clinical diagnosis of FA supported by cellular hypersensitivity to diepoxybutane. We were able to detect the 3788-3790del allele in 24 of the 80 (30% FA patients studied. Thirteen of the 80 (16.25% were homozygotes and 11 of the 80 (13.75% were compound heterozygotes, thus confirming the high frequency of the FANCA 3788-3790del mutation in Brazilian FA patients. The identification of patients with specific mutations in the FA genes may lead to a better clinical description of this condition, also providing data for genotype-phenotype correlations, to a better understanding of the interaction of this specific mutation with other mutations in compound heterozygote patients, and ultimately to the right choices of treatment for each patient with improvement of the prognosis on future studies.

  15. The Inhibitory Effects of Aqueous Extract from Guava Twigs, Psidium guajava L., on Mutation and Oxidative Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Chyang Kang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the inhibitory effects of the aqueous extract from guava twigs (GTE, Psidium guajava L., on mutation and oxidative damage. The results show that GTE inhibits the mutagenicity of 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide (4-NQO, a direct mutagen, and 2-aminoanthracene (2-AA, an indirect mutagen, toward Salmonella typhimurium TA 98 and TA 100. In addition, GTE shows radical scavenging, reducing activities, tyrosinase inhibition, and liposome protection effects. Meanwhile, GTE in the range of 0.1–0.4 mg/mL protects liver cells from tert-butyl-hydroperoxide-(t-BHP- induced cytotoxicity. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity inhibition of GTE in the t-BHP-treated cells was demonstrated in a dose-dependent manner. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis suggests that the major phenolic constituents in GTE are gallic acid, ferulic acid, and myricetin. These active phenolic components may contribute to the biological protective effects of GTE in different models. The data suggest that GTE exhibiting biological activities can be applied to antimutation, antityrosinase, and antioxidative damage.

  16. Somatic mutation frequencies in the stamen hairs of stable and mutable clones of Tradescantia after acute gamma-ray treatments with small doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Sadao; Takahashi, C.S.

    1977-01-01

    Young inflorescences of two different Tradescantia clones heterozygous for flower and stamen-hair color, one stable (KU 9) and the other spontaneously mutable (KU 20), were irradiated acutely with small doses (approx. 3 to 50 R) of 60 Co gamma-rays. Somatic mutation frequencies from blue to pink in the stamen hairs scored on post-irradiation days 10 to 16 increased essentially linearly with increasing gamma-ray dose in both clones. Despite about a 5-fold difference in spontaneous mutation frequency per hair found between the two clones, the dose-response curves of pink mutations determined were similar to each other, giving average mutation frequencies of 1.51 and 1.41 pink-mutant events per 1000 hairs per R for KU 9 and KU 20, respectively. These frequencies are comparable to earlier results obtained from acute irradiation treatments of other clones with higher doses. The doubling dose of pink mutation (the radiation dose making the mutation frequency double the spontaneous level) was calculated to be 2.09 R for KU 9, and this low doubling dose must be given full attention. On the other hand, the doubling dose for KU 20 (calculated to be 10.4 R) is of questionable value, being greatly subject to change because of the diversely variable spontaneous mutation frequency of this clone

  17. A targeted analysis identifies a high frequency of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers in women with ovarian cancer from a founder population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belanger, Moria H; Dolman, Lena; Arcand, Suzanna L; Shen, Zhen; Chong, George; Mes-Masson, Anne-Marie; Provencher, Diane; Tonin, Patricia N

    2015-03-27

    The frequency of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in ovarian cancer patients varies depending on histological subtype and population investigated. The six most commonly recurring BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations previously identified in a founder French Canadian population were investigated in 439 histologically defined ovarian, fallopian tube and primary peritoneal cancer cases that were ascertained at one hospital servicing French Canadians. To further assess the frequency of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations, a defined subgroup of 116 cases were investigated for all mutations previously reported in this population. A PCR-based assay was used to screen 439 ovarian, fallopian tube or extra-ovarian cancers comprised of serous, high grade endometrioid and mixed cell adenocarcinomas with serous components for specific BRCA1: C4446T and 2953delGTAinsC and BRCA2: 8765delAG, G6085T, 3398del5 and E3002K mutations. A multiplex bead-array-based Luminex assay was used to evaluate 19 specific mutations that have ever been reported in French Canadians, which included the six mutations assayed by PCR, in 116 cases representing all women ascertained within a defined 3-year window. A targeted analysis of six mutations identified 34/439 (7.7%) mutation carriers and at least two mutation carriers for each mutation screened were found. The BRCA1:C4446T mutation was the most frequently identified variant (15/34, 44.1%) among mutation-positive cases. The expanded mutation screen that also included 13 additional variants identified 19/116 (16.4%) mutation carriers, where C4446T was the most common variant (8/19, 42.1%) identified among mutation-positive carriers in this subgroup. Mutations were identified in women with serous, endometrioid, mixed cell, and undifferentiated adenocarcinomas. Within this subgroup there were 73 high-grade (G3) serous ovarian carcinomas, the most common subtype, with mutations identified in 19.2% (n = 14) serous cases. Our results reaffirm that specific BRCA1 and BRCA2

  18. Collateral damage: Spread of repeat-induced point mutation from a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    nomic segments of defined length (1, 1⋅5 or 2 kb) and located at defined distances (0, 0⋅5, 1 or 2 kb) upstream or ... ally the mechanism that confines RIP to the duplicated segment seems to fail (frequency 0⋅1–0⋅8%) and then. RIP can spread ..... tive (0⋅02 × 0⋅7 × 0⋅5), none of the 520 erg-3+ segregants examined ...

  19. Structural and mutational analysis of Escherichia coli AlkB provides insight into substrate specificity and DNA damage searching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Holland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Escherichia coli, cytotoxic DNA methyl lesions on the N1 position of purines and N3 position of pyrimidines are primarily repaired by the 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG iron(II dependent dioxygenase, AlkB. AlkB repairs 1-methyladenine (1-meA and 3-methylcytosine (3-meC lesions, but it also repairs 1-methylguanine (1-meG and 3-methylthymine (3-meT at a much less efficient rate. How the AlkB enzyme is able to locate and identify methylated bases in ssDNA has remained an open question. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined the crystal structures of the E. coli AlkB protein holoenzyme and the AlkB-ssDNA complex containing a 1-meG lesion. We coupled this to site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids in and around the active site, and tested the effects of these mutations on the ability of the protein to bind both damaged and undamaged DNA, as well as catalyze repair of a methylated substrate. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A comparison of our substrate-bound AlkB-ssDNA complex with our unliganded holoenzyme reveals conformational changes of residues within the active site that are important for binding damaged bases. Site-directed mutagenesis of these residues reveals novel insight into their roles in DNA damage recognition and repair. Our data support a model that the AlkB protein utilizes at least two distinct conformations in searching and binding methylated bases within DNA: a "searching" mode and "repair" mode. Moreover, we are able to functionally separate these modes through mutagenesis of residues that affect one or the other binding state. Finally, our mutagenesis experiments show that amino acid D135 of AlkB participates in both substrate specificity and catalysis.

  20. Efficiency of analytical methodologies in uncertainty analysis of seismic core damage frequency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, Kenji; Uchiyama, Tomoaki; Muramatsu, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Fault Tree and Event Tree analysis is almost exclusively relied upon in the assessments of seismic Core Damage Frequency (CDF). In this approach, Direct Quantification of Fault tree using Monte Carlo simulation (DQFM) method, or simply called Monte Carlo (MC) method, and Binary Decision Diagram (BDD) method were introduced as alternatives for a traditional approximation method, namely Minimal Cut Set (MCS) method. However, there is still no agreement as to which method should be used in a risk assessment of seismic CDF, especially for uncertainty analysis. The purpose of this study is to examine the efficiencies of the three methods in uncertainty analysis as well as in point estimation so that the decision of selecting a proper method can be made effectively. The results show that the most efficient method would be BDD method in terms of accuracy and computational time. However, it will be discussed that BDD method is not always applicable to PSA models while MC method is so in theory. In turn, MC method was confirmed to agree with the exact solution obtained by BDD method, but it took a large amount of time, in particular for uncertainty analysis. On the other hand, it was shown that the approximation error of MCS method may not be as bad in uncertainty analysis as it is in point estimation. Based on these results and previous works, this paper will propose a scheme to select an appropriate analytical method for a seismic PSA study. Throughout this study, SECOM2-DQFM code was expanded to be able to utilize BDD method and to conduct uncertainty analysis with both MC and BDD method. (author)

  1. Frequency of MELAS main mutation in a phenotype-targeted young ischemic stroke patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatlisumak, Turgut; Putaala, Jukka; Innilä, Markus; Enzinger, Christian; Metso, Tiina M; Curtze, Sami; von Sarnowski, Bettina; Amaral-Silva, Alexandre; Jungehulsing, Gerhard Jan; Tanislav, Christian; Thijs, Vincent; Rolfs, Arndt; Norrving, Bo; Fazekas, Franz; Suomalainen, Anu; Kolodny, Edwin H

    2016-02-01

    Mitochondrial diseases, predominantly mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), may occasionally underlie or coincide with ischemic stroke (IS) in young and middle-aged individuals. We searched for undiagnosed patients with MELAS in a target subpopulation of unselected young IS patients enrolled in the Stroke in Young Fabry Patients study (sifap1). Among the 3291 IS patients aged 18-55 years recruited to the sifap1 study at 47 centers across 14 European countries, we identified potential MELAS patients with the following phenotypic features: (a) diagnosed cardiomyopathy or (b) presence of two of the three following findings: migraine, short stature (≤165 cm for males; ≤155 cm for females), and diabetes. Identified patients' blood samples underwent analysis of the common MELAS mutation, m.3243A>G in the MTTL1 gene of mitochondrial DNA. Clinical and cerebral MRI features of the mutation carriers were reviewed. We analyzed blood samples of 238 patients (177 with cardiomyopathy) leading to identification of four previously unrecognized MELAS main mutation carrier-patients. Their clinical and MRI characteristics were within the expectation for common IS patients except for severe hearing loss in one patient and hyperintensity of the pulvinar thalami on T1-weighted MRI in another one. Genetic testing for the m.3243A>G MELAS mutation in young patients with IS based on phenotypes suggestive of mitochondrial disease identifies previously unrecognized carriers of MELAS main mutation, but does not prove MELAS as the putative cause.

  2. A novel mutation in the WFS1 gene identified in a Taiwanese family with low-frequency hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Shing-Fang

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wolfram syndrome gene 1 (WFS1 accounts for most of the familial nonsyndromic low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL which is characterized by sensorineural hearing losses equal to and below 2000 Hz. The current study aimed to contribute to our understanding of the molecular basis of LFSNHL in an affected Taiwanese family. Methods The Taiwanese family with LFSNHL was phenotypically characterized using audiologic examination and pedigree analysis. Genetic characterization was performed by direct sequencing of WFS1 and mutation analysis. Results Pure tone audiometry confirmed that the family members affected with LFSNHL had a bilateral sensorineural hearing loss equal to or below 2000 Hz. The hearing loss threshold of the affected members showed no progression, a characteristic that was consistent with a mutation in the WFS1 gene located in the DFNA6/14/38 locus. Pedigree analysis showed a hereditarily autosomal dominant pattern characterized by a full penetrance. Among several polymorphisms, a missense mutation Y669H (2005T>C in exon 8 of WFS1 was identified in members of a Taiwanese family diagnosed with LFSNHL but not in any of the control subjects. Conclusion We discovered a novel heterozygous missense mutation in exon 8 of WFS1 (i.e., Y669H which is likely responsible for the LFSNHL phenotype in this particular Taiwanese family.

  3. [Research progress of mutational spectrum and pathophysiology of WFS1 gene in Wolfram syndrome and nonsyndromic low frequency sensorineural hearing loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, S M; Han, Y H; Wang, H B

    2016-09-07

    Compound homozygous or heterozygous mutations in WFS 1 can lead to autosomal recessive Wolfram syndrome (WS), and heterozygous mutations in WFS 1 can lead to autosomal dominant non-syndromic low frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL). In addition, mutations in the WFS region has relationship with diabetes and psychiatric diseases. In this paper, we provide an overview of genetic research with different phenotypes, including WS and LFSNHL.

  4. Relationship between mutation frequency of GPA locus and cumulative dose among medical diagnostic X-ray workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jixian; Yu Wenru; Li Benxiao; Fan Tiqiang; Li Zhen; Gao Zhiwei; Chen Zhenjun; Zhao Yongcheng

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility of using GPA locus mutation assay as a bio-dosimeter for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation. Methods: An improved technique of GPA locus mutation assay was used in th study. The frequencies of mutant RBC in peripheral blood of 55 medical X-ray workers and 50 controls employed in different calendar-year periods were detected. The relationship between mutation frequencies (MFs) and period of entry, working years and cumulative doses were analyzed. Results: The MFs were significantly elevated among X-ray workers employed before 1970. This finding is similar to the result of cancer epidemiological study among medical X-ray workers , in which the cancer risk was significantly increased only X-ray workers employed before 1970. The MFs of GPA increased with increasing cumulative dose. The dose-effect relationship of Nφ MF with cumulative dose was closer than that of NN MF. Conclusion: There are many problems to be solved for using GPA MF assay as a bio-dosimeter such as individual variation, specificity and calibration curve of dose-effect relationship

  5. Molecular spectrum of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53, and APC somatic gene mutations in Arab patients with colorectal cancer: determination of frequency and distribution pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shamsi, Humaid O.; Jones, Jeremy; Fahmawi, Yazan; Dahbour, Ibrahim; Tabash, Aziz; Abdel-Wahab, Reham; Abousamra, Ahmed O. S.; Shaw, Kenna R.; Xiao, Lianchun; Hassan, Manal M.; Kipp, Benjamin R.; Kopetz, Scott; Soliman, Amr S.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Wolff, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The frequency rates of mutations such as KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA in colorectal cancer (CRC) differ among populations. The aim of this study was to assess mutation frequencies in the Arab population and determine their correlations with certain clinicopathological features. Methods Arab patients from the Arab Gulf region and a population of age- and sex-matched Western patients with CRC whose tumors were evaluated with next-generation sequencing (NGS) were identified and retrospectively reviewed. The mutation rates of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53, and APC were recorded, along with clinicopathological features. Other somatic mutation and their rates were also identified. Fisher’s exact test was used to determine the association between mutation status and clinical features. Results A total of 198 cases were identified; 99 Arab patients and 99 Western patients. Fifty-two point seven percent of Arab patients had stage IV disease at initial presentation, 74.2% had left-sided tumors. Eighty-nine point two percent had tubular adenocarcinoma and 10.8% had mucinous adenocarcinoma. The prevalence rates of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, TP53, APC, SMAD, FBXW7 mutations in Arab population were 44.4%, 4%, 4%, 13.1%, 52.5%, 27.3%, 2% and 3% respectively. Compared to 48.4%, 4%, 4%, 12.1%, 47.5%, 24.2%, 11.1% and 0% respectively in matched Western population. Associations between these mutations and patient clinicopathological features were not statistically significant. Conclusions This is the first study to report comprehensive hotspot mutations using NGS in Arab patients with CRC. The frequency of KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, TP53, APC and PIK3CA mutations were similar to reported frequencies in Western population except SMAD4 that had a lower frequency and higher frequency of FBXW7 mutation. PMID:28078112

  6. Prevalence of Germline Mutations in Genes Engaged in DNA Damage Repair by Homologous Recombination in Patients with Triple-Negative and Hereditary Non-Triple-Negative Breast Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Domagala

    Full Text Available This study sought to assess the prevalence of common germline mutations in several genes engaged in the repair of DNA double-strand break by homologous recombination in patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers. Tumors deficient in this type of DNA damage repair are known to be especially sensitive to DNA cross-linking agents (e.g., platinum drugs and to poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibitors.Genetic testing was performed for 36 common germline mutations in genes engaged in the repair of DNA by homologous recombination, i.e., BRCA1, BRCA2, CHEK2, NBN, ATM, PALB2, BARD1, and RAD51D, in 202 consecutive patients with triple-negative breast cancers and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers.Thirty five (22.2% of 158 patients in the triple-negative group carried mutations in genes involved in DNA repair by homologous recombination, while 10 (22.7% of the 44 patients in the hereditary non-triple-negative group carried such mutations. Mutations in BRCA1 were most frequent in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (18.4%, and mutations in CHEK2 were most frequent in patients with hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancers (15.9%. In addition, in the triple-negative group, mutations in CHEK2, NBN, and ATM (3.8% combined were found, while mutations in BRCA1, NBN, and PALB2 (6.8% combined were identified in the hereditary non-triple-negative group.Identifying mutations in genes engaged in DNA damage repair by homologous recombination other than BRCA1/2 can substantially increase the proportion of patients with triple-negative breast cancer and hereditary non-triple-negative breast cancer who may be eligible for therapy using PARP inhibitors and platinum drugs.

  7. Mitochondrial DNA exhibits resistance to induced point and deletion mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, William J.; Ericson, Nolan G.; Long, Alexandra S.; White, Paul A.; Marchetti, Francesco; Bielas, Jason H.

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations contributes to the pathogenesis of human disease. Currently, mitochondrial mutations are largely considered results of inaccurate processing of its heavily damaged genome. However, mainly from a lack of methods to monitor mtDNA mutations with sufficient sensitivity and accuracy, a link between mtDNA damage and mutation has not been established. To test the hypothesis that mtDNA-damaging agents induce mtDNA mutations, we exposed MutaTMMouse mice to benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) or N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), daily for 28 consecutive days, and quantified mtDNA point and deletion mutations in bone marrow and liver using our newly developed Digital Random Mutation Capture (dRMC) and Digital Deletion Detection (3D) assays. Surprisingly, our results demonstrate mutagen treatment did not increase mitochondrial point or deletion mutation frequencies, despite evidence both compounds increase nuclear DNA mutations and demonstrated B[a]P adduct formation in mtDNA. These findings contradict models of mtDNA mutagenesis that assert the elevated rate of mtDNA mutation stems from damage sensitivity and abridged repair capacity. Rather, our results demonstrate induced mtDNA damage does not readily convert into mutation. These findings suggest robust mitochondrial damage responses repress induced mutations after mutagen exposure. PMID:27550180

  8. Analysis of mutation/rearrangement frequencies and methylation patterns at a given DNA locus using restriction fragment length polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyko, Alex; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2010-01-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) is a difference in DNA sequences of organisms belonging to the same species. RFLPs are typically detected as DNA fragments of different lengths after digestion with various restriction endonucleases. The comparison of RFLPs allows investigators to analyze the frequency of occurrence of mutations, such as point mutations, deletions, insertions, and gross chromosomal rearrangements, in the progeny of stressed plants. The assay involves restriction enzyme digestion of DNA followed by hybridization of digested DNA using a radioactively or enzymatically labeled probe. Since DNA can be digested with methylation sensitive enzymes, the assay can also be used to analyze a methylation pattern of a particular locus. Here, we describe RFLP analysis using methylation-insensitive and methylation-sensitive enzymes.

  9. Oral exposure to commercially available coal tar‐based pavement sealcoat induces murine genetic damage and mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Margaret; Arlt, Volker M.; White, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Coal tar (CT) is a thick black liquid produced as a by‐product of coal carbonization to produce coke or manufactured gas. It is comprised a complex mixture of polycyclic aromatic compounds, including a wide range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), many of which are genotoxic and carcinogenic. CT is used in some pavement sealants (also known as sealcoat), which are applied to pavement in order to seal and beautify the surface. Human exposure is known to occur not only during application, but also as a result of the weathering process, as elevated levels of PAHs have been found in settled house dust in residences adjacent to CT‐sealed surfaces. In this study we examined the genotoxicity of an extract of a commercially available CT‐based sealcoat in the transgenic Muta™Mouse model. Mice were orally exposed to 3 doses of sealcoat extract daily for 28 days. We evaluated genotoxicity by examining: (1) stable DNA adducts and (2) lacZ mutations in bone marrow, liver, lung, small intestine, and glandular stomach, as well as (3) micronucleated red blood cells. Significant increases were seen for each endpoint and in all tissues. The potency of the response differed across tissues, with the highest frequency of adducts occurring in liver and lung, and the highest frequency of mutations occurring in small intestine. The results of this study are the first demonstration of mammalian genotoxicity following exposure to CT‐containing pavement sealcoat. This work provides in vivo evidence to support the contention that there may be adverse health effects in mammals, and potentially in humans, from exposure to coal tar. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:535–545, 2016. © 2016 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada PMID:27473530

  10. Oral exposure to commercially available coal tar-based pavement sealcoat induces murine genetic damage and mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Alexandra S; Watson, Margaret; Arlt, Volker M; White, Paul A

    2016-08-01

    Coal tar (CT) is a thick black liquid produced as a by-product of coal carbonization to produce coke or manufactured gas. It is comprised a complex mixture of polycyclic aromatic compounds, including a wide range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), many of which are genotoxic and carcinogenic. CT is used in some pavement sealants (also known as sealcoat), which are applied to pavement in order to seal and beautify the surface. Human exposure is known to occur not only during application, but also as a result of the weathering process, as elevated levels of PAHs have been found in settled house dust in residences adjacent to CT-sealed surfaces. In this study we examined the genotoxicity of an extract of a commercially available CT-based sealcoat in the transgenic Muta™Mouse model. Mice were orally exposed to 3 doses of sealcoat extract daily for 28 days. We evaluated genotoxicity by examining: (1) stable DNA adducts and (2) lacZ mutations in bone marrow, liver, lung, small intestine, and glandular stomach, as well as (3) micronucleated red blood cells. Significant increases were seen for each endpoint and in all tissues. The potency of the response differed across tissues, with the highest frequency of adducts occurring in liver and lung, and the highest frequency of mutations occurring in small intestine. The results of this study are the first demonstration of mammalian genotoxicity following exposure to CT-containing pavement sealcoat. This work provides in vivo evidence to support the contention that there may be adverse health effects in mammals, and potentially in humans, from exposure to coal tar. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:535-545, 2016. © 2016 Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada. © 2016 Reproduced with the permission of the Government of Canada.

  11. Modal Identification and Damage Detection on a Concrete Highway Bridge by Frequency Domain Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Andersen, P.; Zhang, L.

    2002-01-01

    As a part of a research project co-founded by the European Community, a series of 15 damage tests were performed on a prestressed concrete highway bridge in Switzerland. The ambient response of the bridge was recorded for each damage case. A dense array of instruments allowed the identification...

  12. Modal Identification and Damage Detection on a Concrete Highway Bridge by Frequency Domain Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Andersen, Palle; Zhang, Lingmi

    2007-01-01

    As a part of a research project co-founded by the European Community, a series of 15 damage tests were performed on a prestressed concrete highway bridge in Switzerland. The ambient response of the bridge was recorded for each damage case. A dense array of instruments allowed the identification...

  13. A novel 355–357delGAG mutation and frequency of connexin-26 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    nomic DNA was extracted by using standard salting out method. Detection of mutations within GJB2 gene was carried out by DNA sequencing for all samples. The entire coding region of GJB2 gene (GenBank accession no. M86849) was amplified using the primers: Cx148F2. (5-CCTGTGTTGTGTGYGCATTCGTC-3) and ...

  14. The frequency of CCR5 promoter polymorphisms and CCR5 32 mutation in Iranian populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Zare-Bidaki

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Evidence showed that chemokines serve as pro-migratory factors for immune cells. CCL3, CCL4 and CCL5, as the main CC  chemokines subfamily members, activate immune cells through binding to CC chemokine receptor 5 or CCR5. Macrophages, NK cells and T lymphocytes express CCR5 and thus, affected CCR5 expression or functions could be associated with altered immune responses. Deletion of 32 base pairs (D 32 in the exon 1 of the CCR5 gene, which is known as CCR5 D 32 mutation causes down regulation and malfunction of the molecule. Furthermore, it has been evidenced that three polymorphisms in the promoter region of CCR5 modulate its expression. Altered CCR5 expression in microbial infection and immune related diseases have been reported by several researchers but the role of CCR5 promoter polymorphisms and CCR5 D 32 mutation in Iranian patients suffering from these diseases are controversial. Due to the fact that Iranian people have different genetic backgrounds compared to other ethnics, hence, CCR5 promoter polymorphisms and CCR5 D 32 mutation association with the diseases may be different in Iranian patients. Therefore, this review addresses the most recent information regarding the prevalence as well as association of the mutation and polymorphisms in Iranian patients with microbial infection and immune related diseases as along with normal population.

  15. Frequency of epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in Jordanian lung adenocarcinoma patients at diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natheir Obeidat

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The present study revealed that the EGFR mutations rate in Jordanian patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung was higher than in African-American, and some white Caucasian patients, and was lower than in patients in East Asia, and other countries of South Asia.

  16. Evaluation the frequency of factor V Leiden mutation in pregnant women with preeclampsia syndrome in an Iranian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Azinfar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Role of genetic factors in etiology of preeclampsia is not confirmed yet.Objective: Gene defect frequency varies in different geographic areas as well as ethnic groups. In this study, the role of factor V Leiden mutation in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia syndrome among the pregnant population of northern shore of Persian Gulf in Iran, were considered.Materials and Methods: Between Jan. 2008 and Dec. 2009, in a nested case control study, pregnant women with preeclampsia (N=198 as cases and healthy (N=201 as controls were enrolled in the study. DNA were extracted from 10 CC peripheral blood and analyzed for presence of factor V Leiden mutation in these subjects. The maternal and neonatal outcomes of pregnancy according to the distribution of factor V Leiden were also compared among cases.Results: In total, 17(8.6% of cases and 2(1% of controls showed the factor V Leiden mutation. The incidence of factor V Leiden was typically higher in preeclamptic women than control group (OR: 9.34 %95 CI: 2.12-41.01. There was no difference in incidence rate of preterm delivery< 37 weeks (OR: 1.23 %95 CI: 0.38-4.02, very early preterm delivery<32 weeks (OR: 1.00 %95 CI: 0.12-8.46, intra uterine fetal growth restriction (IUGR (OR: 1.32 %95 CI: 0.15-11.30 ,and the rate of cesarean section (OR: 0.88 %95 CI: 0.29-2.62 among cases based on the prevalence of factor V Leiden mutation.Conclusion: The pregnant women with factor V Leiden mutation are prone for preeclampsia syndrome during pregnancy, but this risk factor was not correlated to pregnancy complications in the studied women

  17. Frequency of CFTR, SPINK1, and Cathepsin B Gene Mutation in North Indian Population: Connections between Genetics and Clinical Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Genetic mutations and polymorphisms have been correlated with chronic pancreatitis (CP. This study aims to investigate the association of genetic variants of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR and serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK-1 genes and Cathepsin B gene polymorphisms with CP and to associate genetic backgrounds with clinical phenotypes. Methods. 150 CP patients and 150 normal controls were enrolled consecutively. We analyzed SPINK-1 N34S and IVS3+2T>C gene mutations by PCR-restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLP. The identification of DF508, G551D, G542X, R117H, and W1282X mutations was carried out by ARMS-PCR. S549N mutation, IVS8 polyTn polymorphism, and Cathepsin B Lec26Val were analysed by PCR-RFLP, nested PCR, and PCR-RFLP plus sequencing, respectively. Results. We found a significant association of SPINK1 (N34S gene polymorphism. IVS1−37T>C polymorphism shows linkage with 101A>G. 300 chromosomes belonging to the CFTR subgroup exhibited minor allele frequency of 0.04, 0.03, 0.03, 0.013, 0.006, and 0.02 for DF508, G452X, G551D, S549N, R117H, and IVS8 T5, respectively. Except for R117H and IVS8 T5 polymorphisms, all other mutations showed significant variation. Conclusion. Analysis of potential susceptibility variants is needed to support nature of the genes and environment in pancreatitis. This data may help establish genetic screening and prenatal setup for Indian population.

  18. Frequency of CFTR, SPINK1, and cathepsin B gene mutation in North Indian population: connections between genetics and clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shweta; Choudhuri, Gourdas; Agarwal, Sarita

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations and polymorphisms have been correlated with chronic pancreatitis (CP). This study aims to investigate the association of genetic variants of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK-1) genes and Cathepsin B gene polymorphisms with CP and to associate genetic backgrounds with clinical phenotypes. 150 CP patients and 150 normal controls were enrolled consecutively. We analyzed SPINK-1 N34S and IVS3+2T>C gene mutations by PCR-restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The identification of DF508, G551D, G542X, R117H, and W1282X mutations was carried out by ARMS-PCR. S549N mutation, IVS8 polyTn polymorphism, and Cathepsin B Lec26Val were analysed by PCR-RFLP, nested PCR, and PCR-RFLP plus sequencing, respectively. We found a significant association of SPINK1 (N34S) gene polymorphism. IVS1-37T>C polymorphism shows linkage with 101A>G. 300 chromosomes belonging to the CFTR subgroup exhibited minor allele frequency of 0.04, 0.03, 0.03, 0.013, 0.006, and 0.02 for DF508, G452X, G551D, S549N, R117H, and IVS8 T5, respectively. Except for R117H and IVS8 T5 polymorphisms, all other mutations showed significant variation. Analysis of potential susceptibility variants is needed to support nature of the genes and environment in pancreatitis. This data may help establish genetic screening and prenatal setup for Indian population.

  19. Mutagenic treatments towards increasing the frequency of day-neutral mutations and standardization of procedures for tissue culture, in potato

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhya, M.D.; Chandra, R.; Abraham, M.J.

    1976-01-01

    Various chemical mutagens and gamma radiation have been used on single dormant eyes and true seeds with a view to finding effective mutagenic treatment for the induction of day-length neutral mutants in potato using an effective screening technique for the isolation of day-length neutral mutants. Sodium meta bisulphite (SMS) was found to be an efficient mutagen in inducing mutations for this trait in true seeds although the same concentrations, when used for treating the single tuber eyes proved lethal. Pre-soaking the seeds for 24 hrs prior to treatment with 0.0025M SMS gave highest frequency of the mutants followed by 48 hrs presoaking, indicating a sensitive stage during the cell cycle in true seeds. Other mutagen treatments gave different frequencies of mutations. The highest frequency of day-length neutral mutants was observed when seeds irradiated with 40 Kr of gamma radiation were treated with 0.05M hydrazinium dichloride solution. Screening procedures have also been standardised with the development of synethetic media for the isolation of biochemical mutants at the true seed level. Initial efforts have yielded mutants resistant to LD 100 doses of ethionine. Another aspect of the study was to develop a proper potato callus culture technique. A medium has been developed to produce and maintain callus from potato leaf strips. Efforts on the regeneration of shoot and roots from callus, have so far lead to differentiation of callus to form roots. The ultimate aim of these studies is to develop plantlets from single cell which would form the units of mutation induction and isolation. (author)

  20. Locating small structural damages in pipes using space-frequency DORT processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Fei; Teixeira, Fernando L.

    A new imaging algorithm is introduced and applied for inspection of damages in pipes employing ultrasonic guided waves. The algorithm is based on the decomposition of the time-reversal operator (DORT, in its French acronym) and is demonstrated using both simulations and experiments. Its performance is compared against more traditional time-reversal imaging algorithms. The proposed algorithm is shown to be effective to determine the number and relative location of multiple small damages in pipes with good resolution.

  1. The Splicing Efficiency of Activating HRAS Mutations Can Determine Costello Syndrome Phenotype and Frequency in Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartung, Anne-Mette; Swensen, Jeff; Uriz, Inaki E

    2016-01-01

    identified an unusual, new germline p.Gly12Val mutation, c.35_36GC>TG, in a 12-year-old boy with attenuated CS. Analysis of his HRAS cDNA showed high levels of exon 2 skipping. Using wild type and mutant HRAS minigenes, we confirmed that c.35_36GC>TG results in exon 2 skipping by simultaneously disrupting...

  2. Frequency of Thrombophilic Gene Mutations in Patients with Deep Vein Thrombosis and in Women with Recurrent Pregnancy Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elgari Mahmoud Mohamed

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Thrombophilia may be anticipated by single or combined hereditary defects in encoding genes factor V, Prothrombin, and MTHFR. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and associated risks of V Leiden (G1691A, Prothrombin (G20210A, and MTHFR (C677T mutations in Saudi women with Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT and women with recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL. Protein C and protein S activity were measured to determine combined effects, if any. We examined 60 women with a history of DVT and 60 with RPL, extracted DNA from EDTA blood and determined three mutations by using multiplex PCR reactions followed by Strip Assay KIT. Pro C Global assay was used to determine the cutoff value [PCATNR = 0.80]. Protein C/S chromogenic assay was used to estimate protein C and S percentages. Frequency of Factor V Leiden G/A genotype in patients with DVT 7 (11.6% had a significant association for DVT χ2 (OR = 5.1, P = 0.03. In women with RPL the three mutations did not show any significant association, levels of Protein C, protein S and PCAT-NR in patient groups not different from controls (P > 0.05. In conclusion, we recommend expanding on these data to provide larger-scale studies.

  3. The frequency of Tay-Sachs disease causing mutations in the Brazilian Jewish population justifies a carrier screening program

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    Roberto Rozenberg

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Tay-Sachs disease is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive neurologic degeneration, fatal in early childhood. In the Ashkenazi Jewish population the disease incidence is about 1 in every 3,500 newborns and the carrier frequency is 1 in every 29 individuals. Carrier screening programs for Tay-Sachs disease have reduced disease incidence by 90% in high-risk populations in several countries. The Brazilian Jewish population is estimated at 90,000 individuals. Currently, there is no screening program for Tay-Sachs disease in this population. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the importance of a Tay-Sachs disease carrier screening program in the Brazilian Jewish population by determining the frequency of heterozygotes and the acceptance of the program by the community. SETTING: Laboratory of Molecular Genetics - Institute of Biosciences - Universidade de São Paulo. PARTICIPANTS: 581 senior students from selected Jewish high schools. PROCEDURE: Molecular analysis of Tay-Sachs disease causing mutations by PCR amplification of genomic DNA, followed by restriction enzyme digestion. RESULTS: Among 581 students that attended educational classes, 404 (70% elected to be tested for Tay-Sachs disease mutations. Of these, approximately 65% were of Ashkenazi Jewish origin. Eight carriers were detected corresponding to a carrier frequency of 1 in every 33 individuals in the Ashkenazi Jewish fraction of the sample. CONCLUSION: The frequency of Tay-Sachs disease carriers among the Ashkenazi Jewish population of Brazil is similar to that of other countries where carrier screening programs have led to a significant decrease in disease incidence. Therefore, it is justifiable to implement a Tay-Sachs disease carrier screening program for the Brazilian Jewish population.

  4. Frequency and geographic distribution of gyrA and gyrB mutations associated with fluoroquinolone resistance in clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avalos, Elisea; Catanzaro, Donald; Catanzaro, Antonino; Ganiats, Theodore; Brodine, Stephanie; Alcaraz, John; Rodwell, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    The detection of mutations in the gyrA and gyrB genes in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome that have been demonstrated to confer phenotypic resistance to fluoroquinolones is the most promising technology for rapid diagnosis of fluoroquinolone resistance. In order to characterize the diversity and frequency of gyrA and gyrB mutations and to describe the global distribution of these mutations, we conducted a systematic review, from May 1996 to April 2013, of all published studies evaluating Mycobacterium tuberculosis mutations associated with resistance to fluoroquinolones. The overall goal of the study was to determine the potential utility and reliability of these mutations as diagnostic markers to detect phenotypic fluoroquinolone resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and to describe their geographic distribution. Forty-six studies, covering four continents and 18 countries, provided mutation data for 3,846 unique clinical isolates with phenotypic resistance profiles to fluoroquinolones. The gyrA mutations occurring most frequently in fluoroquinolone-resistant isolates, ranged from 21-32% for D94G and 13-20% for A90V, by drug. Eighty seven percent of all strains that were phenotypically resistant to moxifloxacin and 83% of ofloxacin resistant isolates contained mutations in gyrA. Additionally we found that 83% and 80% of moxifloxacin and ofloxacin resistant strains respectively, were observed to have mutations in the gyrA codons interrogated by the existing MTBDRsl line probe assay. In China and Russia, 83% and 84% of fluoroquinolone resistant strains respectively, were observed to have gyrA mutations in the gene regions covered by the MTBDRsl assay. Molecular diagnostics, specifically the Genotype MTBDRsl assay, focusing on codons 88-94 should have moderate to high sensitivity in most countries. While we did observe geographic differences in the frequencies of single gyrA mutations across countries, molecular diagnostics based on detection of all gyr

  5. Spectrum and Frequency of Mutations Induced by Gamma Radiations in Three Varieties of Nigerian Sesame (Sesamum indicum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Liman MUHAMMAD

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Insufficient genetic variability is one of the major problems of plant breeding programmes, especially in sesame. Gamma radiation has been reported to be very effective in creating genetic variability in plants. Three varieties of Nigerian sesame were assessed for spectrum and frequency of mutation induced by Gamma radiations in M1 and M2 generations. The varieties (NCRIBEN-04E, NCRIBEN-01M and NCRIBEN-03L were treated with four different doses of gamma rays (250, 350, 450 and 550 Gy. The treated and untreated seeds (control were sown in planting bags (under field condition to raise M1 plants. Four treatments: V1D5, V2D3, V3D2 and V3D4 (from M1 plants were selected and bulked to obtain M2 populations. The results of M1 revealed four mutant fruit traits: multicarpellate capsule, multiple capsule per leaf axil, indehiscent capsule and terminal capsules. The highest frequencies of the traits in M1 generation were 2.50×10-2, 9.17×10-2, 1.67×10-2and3.33×10-2 respectively. The highest branching (7 was from NCRIBEN-01M, while the least (2 was from NCRIBEN-04E. The M2 plants were grouped into eight M2 lines. The dose range (250-550 Gy was proved to be effective in inducing viable mutations in sesame.

  6. Fetal origin of brain damage in 2 infants with a COL4A1 mutation: fetal and neonatal MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, R. J.; Peeters-Scholte, C.; van Vugt, J. J. M.; van Vught, J. J. M. G.; Barkhof, F.; Rizzu, P.; van der Schoor, S. R. D.; van der Knaap, M. S.

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the gene COL4A1, encoding collagen IV A1, are associated with familial porencephaly. Previously, COL4A1 mutation-associated antenatal hemorrhages have been suggested by early post-natal imaging. We describe 2 children with fetal intracerebral hemorrhages and a COL4A1 mutation. There was

  7. Different frequencies of drug resistance mutations among HIV-1 subtypes circulating in China: a comprehensive study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongshuai Sui

    Full Text Available The rapid spreading of HIV drug resistance is threatening the overall success of free HAART in China. Much work has been done on drug-resistant mutations, however, most of which were based on subtype B. Due to different genetic background, subtypes difference would have an effect on the development of drug-resistant mutations, which has already been proved by more and more studies. In China, the main epidemic subtypes are CRF07_BC, CRF08_BC, Thai B and CRF01_AE. The depiction of drug resistance mutations in those subtypes will be helpful for the selection of regimens for Chinese. In this study, the distributions difference of amino acids at sites related to HIV drug resistance were compared among subtype B, CRF01_AE, CRF07_BC and CRF08_BC strains prevalent in China. The amino acid composition of sequences belonging to different subtypes, which were obtained from untreated and treated individuals separately, were also compared. The amino acids proportions of 19 sites in RT among subtype B, CRF01_AE and CRF08_BC have significant difference in drug resistance groups (chi-square test, p<0.05. Genetic barriers analysis revealed that sites 69, 138, 181, 215 and 238 were significantly different among subtypes (Kruskal Wallis test, p<0.05. All subtypes shared three highest prevalent drug resistance sites 103, 181 and 184 in common. Many drug resistant sites in protease show surprising high proportions in almost all subtypes in drug-naïve patients. This is the first comprehensive study in China on different development of drug resistance among different subtypes. The detailed data will lay a foundation for HIV treatment regimens design and improve HIV therapy in China.

  8. Tornado risk analysis at Savannah River Plant using windspeed damage thresholds and single building strike frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.H.; McDonald, J.R.; Twisdale, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    Tornado risk analysis at the Savannah River Plant has taken a two pronged approach: (1) developing a catalogue of damage thresholds as a function of windspeed for processing buildings and other representative site structures; (2) developing a method of estimating, for each building, the probability of a tornado exceeding each damage threshold. Wind resistance of building construction at SRP varies widely depending on the function of the structure. It was recognized that all tornadoes do not necessarily seriously damage buildings, but the damage thresholds were unknown. In order to evaluate the safety of existing structures and properly design new structures, an analysis of tornado resistance was conducted by J.R. McDonald on each process building at SRP and other buildings by type. Damage estimates were catalogued for each Fujita class windspeed interval and windspeeds were catalogued as a function of increased levels of damage. Tornado single point and structure specific strike probabilities for the SRP site were determined by L.A. Twisdale using the TORRISK computer code. To calculate the structure specific strike probability, a correction factor is determined from a set of curves using building area and aspect ratio (length/width relative to north) as parameters. The structure specific probability is then the product of the correction factor and the point probability. The correction factor increases as a function of building size and windspeed. For large buildings (10 5 ft 2 ) and very intense storms (250 mph), the correction factor is equal to or greater than 4. The cumulative probability of a tornado striking any building type (process, personnel, etc.) was also calculated

  9. Frequency of the hemochromatosis HFE mutations C282Y, H63D, and S65C in blood donors in the Faroe Islands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, Nils; á Steig, Torkil; Koefoed, Pernille

    2004-01-01

    .3-2.5%). The frequency of the C282Y mutation is high in Faroese blood donors, being close to and not significantly different from the frequencies reported in other Scandinavian countries: Denmark 5.7%, Norway 6.6%, Iceland 5.1%, and Sweden 6.1%. The frequency of the H63D mutation in Faroese subjects is significantly......The aim of the study was to assess the frequencies of the hereditary hemochromatosis HFE mutations C282Y, H63D, and S65C in the population in the Faroe Islands. The series comprised 200 randomly selected blood donors of Faroese heritage. The frequency of the C282Y, H63D, and S65C mutations...... frequency was 8.0% (95% CI 5.3-10.7%). The series contained three (1.5%) H63D homozygous subjects and 60 (30.0%) H63D heterozygous subjects. The H63D allele frequency was 17.5% (95% CI 13.8-21.2%). There were four (2.0%) S65C heterozygous subjects. The S65C allele frequency was 1.0% (95% CI 0...

  10. Fluoroquinolone Enhances the Mutation Frequency for Meropenem-Selected Carbapenem Resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but Use of the High-Potency Drug Doripenem Inhibits Mutant Formation▿

    OpenAIRE

    Tanimoto, Koichi; Tomita, Haruyoshi; Fujimoto, Shuhei; Okuzumi, Katsuko; Ike, Yasuyoshi

    2008-01-01

    The mutation frequency for carbapenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains that were selected with carbapenems was enhanced in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of fluoroquinolones. The mutants showed either a loss of OprD activity or increased mexAB-oprM expression. The highest mutant isolation frequency was obtained by selection with meropenem, while doripenem inhibited mutant growth.

  11. Fluoroquinolone enhances the mutation frequency for meropenem-selected carbapenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but use of the high-potency drug doripenem inhibits mutant formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Koichi; Tomita, Haruyoshi; Fujimoto, Shuhei; Okuzumi, Katsuko; Ike, Yasuyoshi

    2008-10-01

    The mutation frequency for carbapenem resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains that were selected with carbapenems was enhanced in the presence of subinhibitory concentrations of fluoroquinolones. The mutants showed either a loss of OprD activity or increased mexAB-oprM expression. The highest mutant isolation frequency was obtained by selection with meropenem, while doripenem inhibited mutant growth.

  12. Base damage, local sequence context and TP53 mutation hotspots: a molecular dynamics study of benzo[a]pyrene induced DNA distortion and mutability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Georgina E; Reed, Simon H; Brancale, Andrea; Lewis, Paul D

    2015-10-30

    The mutational pattern for the TP53 tumour suppressor gene in lung tumours differs to other cancer types by having a higher frequency of G:C>T:A transversions. The aetiology of this differing mutation pattern is still unknown. Benzo[a]pyrene,diol epoxide (BPDE) is a potent cigarette smoke carcinogen that forms guanine adducts at TP53 CpG mutation hotspot sites including codons 157, 158, 245, 248 and 273. We performed molecular modelling of BPDE-adducted TP53 duplex sequences to determine the degree of local distortion caused by adducts which could influence the ability of nucleotide excision repair. We show that BPDE adducted codon 157 has greater structural distortion than other TP53 G:C>T:A hotspot sites and that sequence context more distal to adjacent bases must influence local distortion. Using TP53 trinucleotide mutation signatures for lung cancer in smokers and non-smokers we further show that codons 157 and 273 have the highest mutation probability in smokers. Combining this information with adduct structural data we predict that G:C>T:A mutations at codon 157 in lung tumours of smokers are predominantly caused by BPDE. Our results provide insight into how different DNA sequence contexts show variability in DNA distortion at mutagen adduct sites that could compromise DNA repair at well characterized cancer related mutation hotspots. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  13. Whole exome sequencing identifies a pathogenic mutation in WFS1 in two large Chinese families with autosomal dominant all-frequency hearing loss and prenatal counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hongbo; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Wenbin; Meng, Qingxia; Wang, Fuxin; Liu, Minjuan; Mao, Jun; Shi, Yichao; Wang, Wei; Li, Hong

    2018-03-01

    To identify the pathogenic mutation and provide prenatal counseling and diagnosis in two large Chinese families with autosomal dominant all-frequency hearing loss. Whole exome sequencing technology was used to identify the pathogenic mutation of the two families. In addition, 298 patients with sporadic hearing loss and 400 normal controls were studied to verify the mutation/polymorphism nature of the identified variant. Prenatal diagnosis was carried out. A rare missense mutation c.2389G > A (p.D572N) in the Wolframin syndrome 1 (WFS1) gene was identified. It was reported in only one previous Chinese study, and never in other populations/ethnicities. The mutation was also found in one patient with sporadic hearing loss (1/298, 0.3%). A healthy baby was born after prenatal diagnosis. Our findings strongly suggest that the c.2389G > A mutation in WFS1 is associated with all-frequency hearing loss, rather than low- or high-frequency loss. So far, the mutation is only reported in Chinese. Prenatal diagnosis and prenatal counseling is available for these two Chinese families. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Heart tissue of harlequin (hq)/Big Blue mice has elevated reactive oxygen species without significant impact on the frequency and nature of point mutations in nuclear DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crabbe, Rory A. [Department of Biology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Hill, Kathleen A., E-mail: khill22@uwo.ca [Department of Biology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, N6A 5B7 (Canada)

    2010-09-10

    Age is a major risk factor for heart disease, and cardiac aging is characterized by elevated mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) with compromised mitochondrial and nuclear DNA integrity. To assess links between increased ROS levels and mutations, we examined in situ levels of ROS and cII mutation frequency, pattern and spectrum in the heart of harlequin (hq)/Big Blue mice. The hq mouse is a model of premature aging with mitochondrial dysfunction and increased risk of oxidative stress-induced heart disease with the means for in vivo mutation detection. The hq mutation produces a significant downregulation in the X-linked apoptosis-inducing factor gene (Aif) impairing both the antioxidant and oxidative phosphorylation functions of AIF. Brain and skin of hq disease mice have elevated frequencies of point mutations in nuclear DNA and histopathology characterized by cell loss. Reports of associated elevations in ROS in brain and skin have mixed results. Herein, heart in situ ROS levels were elevated in hq disease compared to AIF-proficient mice (p < 0.0001) yet, mutation frequency and pattern were similar in hq disease, hq carrier and AIF-proficient mice. Heart cII mutations were also assessed 15 days following an acute exposure to an exogenous ROS inducer (10 mg paraquat/kg). Acute paraquat exposure with a short mutant manifestation period was insufficient to elevate mutation frequency or alter mutation pattern in the post-mitotic heart tissue of AIF-proficient mice. Paraquat induction of ROS requires mitochondrial complex I and thus is likely compromised in hq mice. Results of this preliminary survey and the context of recent literature suggest that determining causal links between AIF deficiency and the premature aging phenotypes of specific tissues is better addressed with assay of mitochondrial ROS and large-scale changes in mitochondrial DNA in specific cell types.

  15. Heart tissue of harlequin (hq)/Big Blue mice has elevated reactive oxygen species without significant impact on the frequency and nature of point mutations in nuclear DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crabbe, Rory A.; Hill, Kathleen A.

    2010-01-01

    Age is a major risk factor for heart disease, and cardiac aging is characterized by elevated mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) with compromised mitochondrial and nuclear DNA integrity. To assess links between increased ROS levels and mutations, we examined in situ levels of ROS and cII mutation frequency, pattern and spectrum in the heart of harlequin (hq)/Big Blue mice. The hq mouse is a model of premature aging with mitochondrial dysfunction and increased risk of oxidative stress-induced heart disease with the means for in vivo mutation detection. The hq mutation produces a significant downregulation in the X-linked apoptosis-inducing factor gene (Aif) impairing both the antioxidant and oxidative phosphorylation functions of AIF. Brain and skin of hq disease mice have elevated frequencies of point mutations in nuclear DNA and histopathology characterized by cell loss. Reports of associated elevations in ROS in brain and skin have mixed results. Herein, heart in situ ROS levels were elevated in hq disease compared to AIF-proficient mice (p < 0.0001) yet, mutation frequency and pattern were similar in hq disease, hq carrier and AIF-proficient mice. Heart cII mutations were also assessed 15 days following an acute exposure to an exogenous ROS inducer (10 mg paraquat/kg). Acute paraquat exposure with a short mutant manifestation period was insufficient to elevate mutation frequency or alter mutation pattern in the post-mitotic heart tissue of AIF-proficient mice. Paraquat induction of ROS requires mitochondrial complex I and thus is likely compromised in hq mice. Results of this preliminary survey and the context of recent literature suggest that determining causal links between AIF deficiency and the premature aging phenotypes of specific tissues is better addressed with assay of mitochondrial ROS and large-scale changes in mitochondrial DNA in specific cell types.

  16. Effect of frequency-doubling pulse Nd:YAG laser on microbial mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yansheng; Wang, Luyan; Zheng, Heng; Yin, Hongping; Chen, Xiangdong; Tan, Zheng; Wu, Wutong

    1999-09-01

    We are going to report the mutagenic effect of frequency-doubling pulse Nd:YAG laser (532 nm) on microbe. After irradiation with pulse laser, mutants of abscisic acid producing strains and erythromycin producing strains were obtained, one of which could produce 62.1% and 57% more products than control, respectively. In the study of mutagenization of Spirulina platensis caused by pulse laser, we selected a high photosynthetic strains, with improved productivity of protein and exocellular ploysaccharides of 12% and 246%, respectively. The experimental results indicate that frequency-doubling pulse laser (532 nm) is a potential new type of physical mutagenic factor.

  17. Damage Detection of Axially Loaded Beam: A Frequency-Based Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Rezaifar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study utilizes an analytical method to formulate the three lowest modal frequencies of axially-loaded notched beam through both crack location and load level in a specific format that can be used in existing frequency-based crack-identification methods. The proposed formula provides a basis to shift into two states, one with axial loading and the other without any loading whatsoever. When any two natural frequencies in simply-supported beam with an open crack, subjected to axial load, are measured, crack position and extent can be determined, using a characteristic equation, which is a function of crack location, sectional flexibility, and eigenvalue (natural frequency. Theoretical results show high accuracy for service axial loads. In this range, errors for crack location and extent are less than 12% and 10%, respectively.

  18. The influence of large deletions on the mutation frequency induced by tritiated water and X-radiation in male Drosophila melanogaster post-meiotic germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossett, N.G.; Byrne, B.J.; Kelley, S.J.; Tucker, A.B.; Arbour-Reily, P.; Lee, W.R.

    1994-01-01

    Tritium beta radiation ( 3 H β-radiation) in the form of tritiated water was used to induce mutations at the alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) locus in male Drosophila melanogaster post-meiotic germ cells. All 23 Adh null mutations were large deletions (>20 kb), determined by genetic complementation and Southern blot analyses. 27 Adh null mutations have been induced by 100-kVp X-rays and have been genetically and molecularly characterized. In contrast to 3 H β-radiation, 100-kVp X-rays induced a bimodal distribution of Adh null mutations, intragenic mutations, ≤250 bp, and large deletions, >100 kb. A statistically significant difference was observed between the frequency of large deletions (23/23 or 1.0) induced by 3 H β-radiation and the frequency of large deletions (19/27 or 0.7) induced by 100-kVp X-rays. However, a statistical difference was not observed between the size distribution of the large deletions induced by 3 H β-radiation and X-rays. The relative deletion frequency (RDF) induced by 3 H β-radiation and 100-kVp X-rays was (1.0/0.7=1.4). The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of these two radiation sources was 1.4, determined from the ratio of the regression coefficients of the respective 3 H β-radiation and X-ray sex-linked recessive lethal (SLRL) dose-response data. The large difference in size between the two classes of X-ray-induced Adh null mutations and the increase in mutation frequency and deletion frequency for 3 H β-radiation with respect to X-rays may indicate that the relative deletion frequency (RDF) is the molecular biological basis for the increase in the RBE for radiation sources with a mean LET value ≤10 keV/μm

  19. Nonnegative Matrix Factorization of time frequency representation of vibration signal for local damage detection - comparison of algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodecki, Jacek

    2018-01-01

    Local damage detection in rotating machine elements is very important problem widely researched in the literature. One of the most common approaches is the vibration signal analysis. Since time domain processing is often insufficient, other representations are frequently favored. One of the most common one is time-frequency representation hence authors propose to separate internal processes occurring in the vibration signal by spectrogram matrix factorization. In order to achieve this, it is proposed to use the approach of Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF). In this paper three NMF algorithms are tested using real and simulated data describing single-channel vibration signal acquired on damaged rolling bearing operating in drive pulley in belt conveyor driving station. Results are compared with filtration using Spectral Kurtosis, which is currently recognized as classical method for impulsive information extraction, to verify the validity of presented methodology.

  20. Damage detection in multi-span beams based on the analysis of frequency changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillich, G R; Ntakpe, J L; Praisach, Z I; Mimis, M C; Abdel Wahab, M

    2017-01-01

    Crack identification in multi-span beams is performed to determine whether the structure is healthy or not. Among all crack identification methods, these based on measured natural frequency changes present the advantage of simplicity and easy to use in practical engineering. To accurately identify the cracks characteristics for multi-span beam structure, a mathematical model is established, which can predict frequency changes for any boundary conditions, the intermediate supports being hinges. This relation is based on the modal strain energy concept. Since frequency changes are relative small, to obtain natural frequencies with high resolution, a signal processing algorithm based on superposing of numerous spectra is also proposed, which overcomes the disadvantage of Fast Fourier Transform in the aspect of frequency resolution. Based on above-mentioned mathematical model and signal processing algorithm, the method of identifying cracks on multi-span beams is presented. To verify the accuracy of this identification method, experimental examples are conducted on a two-span structure. The results demonstrate that the method proposed in this paper can accurately identify the crack position and depth. (paper)

  1. Neutron-induced mutation experiments and total radiation-induced genetic damage in entire genomes of Drosophila melanogaster. Final report, November 1, 1967-August 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahamson, S.

    1981-02-01

    Neutron-induced mutation experiments with Drosophila oogonia were conducted at the University of Wisconsin, with irradiations being carried out at the RARAF facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory. X-linked recessive lethals and specific locus mutations were studied. Using the α value of the weighted linear regression equation for lethal data, RBE's relative to X-rays were calculated for the energies of neutrons studied. They are: 15 MeV to 2.0; 6 MeV to 2.9; 2 MeV to 3.2; .66 MeV to 4.0; .43 MeV to 4.8. The dose/frequency response curves for lethal data of all neutron energies studied was suggestive of a quadratic component. All data best fit a linear hypothesis, however. Control data for specific locus mutations was used to estimate the number of loci on the X-chromosome which are capable of mutating to lethals. Neutron-induced data for specific locus mutation was inconclusive due to the high error inherent in the frequencies obtained

  2. Optineurin is an autophagy receptor for damaged mitochondria in parkin-mediated mitophagy that is disrupted by an ALS-linked mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Yvette C.; Holzbaur, Erika L. F.

    2014-01-01

    Mitophagy is a cellular quality control pathway in which the E3 ubiquitin ligase parkin targets damaged mitochondria for degradation by autophagosomes. We examined the role of optineurin in mitophagy, as mutations in optineurin are causative for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and glaucoma, diseases in which mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated. Using live cell imaging, we demonstrate the parkin-dependent recruitment of optineurin to mitochondria damaged by depolarization or reactive oxygen species. Parkin’s E3 ubiquitin ligase activity is required to ubiquitinate outer mitochondrial membrane proteins, allowing optineurin to stably associate with ubiquitinated mitochondria via its ubiquitin binding domain; in the absence of parkin, optineurin transiently localizes to damaged mitochondrial tips. Following optineurin recruitment, the omegasome protein double FYVE-containing protein 1 (DFCP1) transiently localizes to damaged mitochondria to initialize autophagosome formation and the recruitment of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3). Optineurin then induces autophagosome formation around damaged mitochondria via its LC3 interaction region (LIR) domain. Depletion of endogenous optineurin inhibits LC3 recruitment to mitochondria and inhibits mitochondrial degradation. These defects are rescued by expression of siRNA-resistant wild-type optineurin, but not by an ALS-associated mutant in the ubiquitin binding domain (E478G), or by optineurin with a mutation in the LIR domain. Optineurin and p62/SQSTM1 are independently recruited to separate domains on damaged mitochondria, and p62 is not required for the recruitment of either optineurin or LC3 to damaged mitochondria. Thus, our study establishes an important role for optineurin as an autophagy receptor in parkin-mediated mitophagy and demonstrates that defects in a single pathway can lead to neurodegenerative diseases with distinct pathologies. PMID:25294927

  3. Distribution and Frequency of kdr Mutations within Anopheles gambiae s.l. Populations and First Report of the Ace.1G119S Mutation in Anopheles arabiensis from Burkina Faso (West Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabiré, Roch K.; Namountougou, Moussa; Diabaté, Abdoulaye; Soma, Dieudonné D.; Bado, Joseph; Toé, Hyacinthe K.; Bass, Chris; Combary, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    An entomological survey was carried out at 15 sites dispersed throughout the three eco-climatic regions of Burkina Faso (West Africa) in order to assess the current distribution and frequency of mutations that confer resistance to insecticides in An. gambiae s.l. populations in the country. Both knockdown (kdr) resistance mutation variants (L1014F and L1014S), that confer resistance to pyrethroid insecticides, were identified concomitant with the ace-1 G119S mutation confirming the presence of multiple resistance mechanisms in the An. gambiae complex in Burkina Faso. Compared to the last survey, the frequency of the L1014F kdr mutation appears to have remained largely stable and relatively high in all species. In contrast, the distribution and frequency of the L1014S mutation has increased significantly in An. gambiae s.l. across much of the country. Furthermore we report, for the first time, the identification of the ace.1 G116S mutation in An. arabiensis populations collected at 8 sites. This mutation, which confers resistance to organophosphate and carbamate insecticides, has been reported previously only in the An. gambiae S and M molecular forms. This finding is significant as organophosphates and carbamates are used in indoor residual sprays (IRS) to control malaria vectors as complementary strategies to the use of pyrethroid impregnated bednets. The occurrence of the three target-site resistance mutations in both An. gambiae molecular forms and now An. arabiensis has significant implications for the control of malaria vector populations in Burkina Faso and for resistance management strategies based on the rotation of insecticides with different modes of action. PMID:25077792

  4. Oxidative Stress Is Not a Major Contributor to Somatic Mitochondrial DNA Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itsara, Leslie S.; Kennedy, Scott R.; Fox, Edward J.; Yu, Selina; Hewitt, Joshua J.; Sanchez-Contreras, Monica; Cardozo-Pelaez, Fernando; Pallanck, Leo J.

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations is implicated in aging and common diseases of the elderly, including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. However, the mechanisms that influence the frequency of somatic mtDNA mutations are poorly understood. To develop a simple invertebrate model system to address this matter, we used the Random Mutation Capture (RMC) assay to characterize the age-dependent frequency and distribution of mtDNA mutations in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Because oxidative stress is a major suspect in the age-dependent accumulation of somatic mtDNA mutations, we also used the RMC assay to explore the influence of oxidative stress on the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency. We found that many of the features associated with mtDNA mutations in vertebrates are conserved in Drosophila, including a comparable somatic mtDNA mutation frequency (∼10−5), an increased frequency of mtDNA mutations with age, and a prevalence of transition mutations. Only a small fraction of the mtDNA mutations detected in young or old animals were G∶C to T∶A transversions, a signature of oxidative damage, and loss-of-function mutations in the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, Sod2, had no detectable influence on the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency. Moreover, a loss-of-function mutation in Ogg1, which encodes a DNA repair enzyme that removes oxidatively damaged deoxyguanosine residues (8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine), did not significantly influence the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency of Sod2 mutants. Together, these findings indicate that oxidative stress is not a major cause of somatic mtDNA mutations. Our data instead suggests that somatic mtDNA mutations arise primarily from errors that occur during mtDNA replication. Further studies using Drosophila should aid in the identification of factors that influence the frequency of somatic mtDNA mutations. PMID:24516391

  5. A novel WFS1 mutation in a family with dominant low frequency sensorineural hearing loss with normal VEMP and EcochG findings

    OpenAIRE

    Bramhall, Naomi F; Kallman, Jeremy C; Verrall, Aimee M; Street, Valerie A

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Low frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL) is an uncommon clinical finding. Mutations within three different identified genes (DIAPH1, MYO7A, and WFS1) are known to cause LFSNHL. The majority of hereditary LFSNHL is associated with heterozygous mutations in the WFS1 gene (wolframin protein). The goal of this study was to use genetic analysis to determine if a small American family's hereditary LFSNHL is linked to a mutation in the WFS1 gene and to use VEMP and Ecoch...

  6. Case control study of the factor V Leiden and factor II G20210A mutation frequency in women with recurrent pregnancy loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teremmahi Ardestani, Majid; Nodushan, Hossein Hadi; Aflatoonian, Abbas; Ghasemi, Nasrin; Sheikhha, Mohammad Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL) caused by various genetic and non-genetic factors. After chromosome abnormality, thrombophilia is one of the most important genetic factors that could cause RPL. Factor V Leiden and factor II G20210A mutation were the most common mutations cause thrombophilia in the world. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of factor V Leiden and prothrombine gene mutations in women with RPL compared with women who had uneventful pregnancies. This case control study evaluates the frequency of factor V-Leiden and factor II G20210 genotypes in 80 women with two or more pregnancy losses, compared with 80 women without adverse pregnancy outcome. The mutations were assessed by PCR-RFLP. Frequency of the factor V Leiden among cases was 2.5%, which was higher than controls (1.25%), but the difference was not significant. No factor II G20210 mutation was found among cases and controls. These data did not confirm that factor V Leiden and factor II G20210 mutation might play a role in recurrent pregnancy loss in Iranian women.

  7. Frequency of CHEK2 mutations in a population based, case–control study of breast cancer in young women

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedrichsen, Danielle M; Malone, Kathleen E; Doody, David R; Daling, Janet R; Ostrander, Elaine A

    2004-01-01

    The cell-cycle checkpoint kinase (CHEK)2 protein truncating mutation 1100delC has been associated with increased risk for breast or prostate cancer. Multiple studies have found an elevated frequency of the 1100delC variant in specific stratifications of breast cancer patients with a family history of the disease, including BRCA1/BRCA2 negative families and families with a history of bilateral disease or male breast cancer. However, the 1100delC mutation has only been investigated in a few population-based studies and none from North America. We report here on the frequency of three CHEK2 variants that alter protein function – 1100delC, R145W, and I175T – in 506 cases and 459 controls from a population based, case–control study of breast cancer conducted in young women from western Washington. There was a suggestive enrichment in the 1100delC variant in the cases (1.2%) as compared with the controls (0.4%), but this was based on small numbers of carriers and the differences were not statistically significant. The 1100delC variant was more frequent in cases with a first-degree family history of breast cancer (4.3%; P = 0.02) and slightly enriched in cases with a family history of ovarian cancer (4.4%; P = 0.09). The CHEK2 variants are rare in the western Washington population and, based on accumulated evidence across studies, are unlikely to be major breast cancer susceptibility genes. Thus, screening for the 1100delC variant may have limited usefulness in breast cancer prevention programs in the USA

  8. Frequencies of myohistological mitochondrial changes in patients with mitochondrial DNA deletions and the common m.3243A>G point mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierz, Charlotte Maria; Joshi, Pushpa Raj; Zierz, Stephan

    2015-04-01

    Frequencies of typical myohistological changes such as ragged red fibers (RRF) and cytochrome c oxidase (COX)-deficient fibers have been suggested to be dependent on underlying mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) defect. However, there are no systematic studies comparing frequencies of myohistological changes and underlying genotypes. The histopathological changes were analysed in 29 patients with genetically confirmed mitochondrial myopathies. Genotypes included multiple mtDNA deletions due to POLG1 mutations (n = 11), single mtDNA deletion (n = 10) and mtDNA point mutation m.3243A>G (n = 8). Histochemical reactions, including Gomori-trichome, COX/SDH (succinate dehydrogenase) and SDH as well as immunohistological reaction with COX-antibody against subunit I (COI) were carried out in muscle biopsy sections of all patients. The COX-deficient fibers were observed most frequently in all three patient groups. The frequencies of myopathological changes were not significantly different in the different genotypes in all three histochemical stains. However, there was a tendency to lower means and variations in patients with point mutation. Only COI-negative fibers were histochemically negative for COX activity in all patient groups. Frequency of COI-negative fibers was significantly lower in patients with mtDNA point mutation than in patients with deletions. This suggests that impact of point mutation on protein synthesis is less than that of deletions. © 2014 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  9. The Frequency of Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin G20210A and Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T Mutations in Migraine Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhsen Öcal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Migraine is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke, but its pathophysiology is still unclear. Genetic factors that predispose patients to thrombosis have been studied in patients with migraine to highlight the pathogenesis, but the results remain controversial. In this study, the frequencies of factor V Leiden (FVL, prothrombin (Pt G20210A and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T mutations were investigated. METHODS: One hundred and sixty patients aged of 15 to 55 years with no history of systemic disease and who had been diagnosed as migraine according to the International Headache Society (IHS diagnostic criteria at Baskent University Hospital Neurology Outpatient Clinics were investigated for FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T mutations from their genomic DNA, and the results were compared with those of healthy controls. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty five (96.9% of 160 migraine patients were homozygote normal, 5 (3.1% were heterozygote and none of them were homozygote mutant for FVL. The control group had 9.8% heterozygote individuals but the difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p> 0.05. There were no homozygote mutant individuals in the Turkish population study in normal subjects like our study. Thirty nine (24.4% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 8 (5% were homozygote mutant for MTHFR C677T. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.15. Three (1.9% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 5 (2.9% of the control group were heterozygote mutant for Pt G20210A mutation. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.420. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T gene mutations, which are considered

  10. The Frequency of Factor V Leiden, Prothrombin G20210A and Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase C677T Mutations in Migraine Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhsen Öcal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Migraine is an independent risk factor for ischemic stroke, but its pathophysiology is still unclear. Genetic factors that predispose patients to thrombosis have been studied in patients with migraine to highlight the pathogenesis, but the results remain controversial. In this study, the frequencies of factor V Leiden (FVL, prothrombin (Pt G20210A and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T mutations were investigated. METHODS: One hundred and sixty patients aged of 15 to 55 years with no history of systemic disease and who had been diagnosed as migraine according to the International Headache Society (IHS diagnostic criteria at Baskent University Hospital Neurology Outpatient Clinics were investigated for FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T mutations from their genomic DNA, and the results were compared with those of healthy controls. RESULTS: One hundred and fifty five (96.9% of 160 migraine patients were homozygote normal, 5 (3.1% were heterozygote and none of them were homozygote mutant for FVL. The control group had 9.8% heterozygote individuals but the difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p> 0.05. There were no homozygote mutant individuals in the Turkish population study in normal subjects like our study. Thirty nine (24.4% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 8 (5% were homozygote mutant for MTHFR C677T. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.15. Three (1.9% of 160 migraine patients were heterozygote and 5 (2.9% of the control group were heterozygote mutant for Pt G20210A mutation. The control group had 37 (34.9% heterozygote and 6 (5.6% homozygote mutant individuals. The difference between the percentages was not statistically significant (p= 0.420. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that FVL, Pt G20210A and MTHFR C677T gene mutations, which are considered

  11. DNA Repair Domain Modeling Can Predict Cell Death and Mutation Frequency for Wide Range Spectrum of Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viger, Louise; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Plante, Ianik; Evain, Trevor; Penninckx, Sebastien; Blattnig, Steve R.; Costes, Sylvain V.

    2017-01-01

    Exploration missions to Mars and other destinations raise many questions about the health of astronauts. The continuous exposure of astronauts to galactic cosmic rays is one of the main concerns for long-term missions. Cosmic ionizing radiations are composed of different ions of various charges and energies notably, highly charged energy (HZE) particles. The HZE particles have been shown to be more carcinogenic than low-LET radiation, suggesting the severity of chromosomal aberrations induced by HZE particles is one possible explanation. However, most mathematical models predicting cell death and mutation frequency are based on directly fitting various HZE dose response and are in essence empirical approaches. In this work, we assume a simple biological mechanism to model DNA repair and use it to simultaneously explain the low- and high-LET response using the exact same fitting parameters. Our work shows that the geometrical position of DNA repair along tracks of heavy ions are sufficient to explain why high-LET particles can induce more death and mutations. Our model is based on assuming DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired within repair domain, and that any DSBs located within the same repair domain cluster into one repair unit, facilitating chromosomal rearrangements and increasing the probability of cell death. We introduced this model in 2014 using simplified microdosimetry profiles to predict cell death. In this work, we collaborated with NASA Johnson Space Center to generate more accurate microdosimetry profiles derived by Monte Carlo techniques, taking into account track structure of HZE particles and simulating DSBs in realistic cell geometry. We simulated 224 data points (D, A, Z, E) with the BDSTRACKS model, leading to a large coverage of LET from 10 to 2,400 keV/µm. This model was used to generate theoretical RBE for various particles and energies for both cell death and mutation frequencies. The RBE LET dependence is in agreement with

  12. Detection and quantitation of single nucleotide polymorphisms, DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    DNA mutation binding proteins alone and as chimeric proteins with nucleases are used with solid supports to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. The solid supports may be flow cytometry beads, DNA chips, glass slides or DNA dips sticks. DNA molecules are coupled to solid supports to form DNA-support complexes. Labeled DNA is used with unlabeled DNA mutation binding proteins such at TthMutS to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by binding which gives an increase in signal. Unlabeled DNA is utilized with labeled chimeras to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by nuclease activity of the chimera which gives a decrease in signal.

  13. TP53 germline mutation testing in 180 families suspected of Li-Fraumeni syndrome: mutation detection rate and relative frequency of cancers in different familial phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, M.W.G.; Verhoef, S.; Rookus, M.A.; Pruntel, R.; van der Hout, A.H.; Hogervorst, F.B.L.; Kluijt, I.; Sijmons, R.H.; Aalfs, C.M.; Wagner, A.; Ausems, M.G.E.M.; Hoogerbrugge, N.; van Asperen, C.J.; Gómez García, E.B.; Meijers-Heijboer, H.; ten Kate, L.P.; Menko, F.H.; van 't Veer, L.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare autosomal dominant cancer predisposition syndrome. Most families fulfilling the classical diagnostic criteria harbour TP53 germline mutations. However, TP53 germline mutations may also occur in less obvious phenotypes. As a result, different criteria

  14. Frequency of ABL gene mutations in chronic myeloid leukemia patients resistant to imatinib and results of treatment switch to second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcé, Silvia; Zamora, Lurdes; Cabezón, Marta; Xicoy, Blanca; Boqué, Concha; Fernández, Cristalina; Grau, Javier; Navarro, José-Tomás; Fernández de Sevilla, Alberto; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Feliu, Evarist; Millá, Fuensanta

    2013-08-04

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) have improved the management of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, a significant proportion of patients do not achieve the optimal response or are resistant to TKI. ABL kinase domain mutations have been extensively implicated in the pathogenesis of TKI resistance. Treatment with second-generation TKI has produced high rates of hematologic and cytogenetic responses in mutated ABL patients. The aim of this study was to determine the type and frequency of ABL mutations in patients who were resistant to imatinib or had lost the response, and to analyze the effect of second-generation TKI on their outcome. The presence of ABL mutations in 45 CML patients resistant to imatinib was evaluated by direct sequencing and was correlated with the results of the cytogenetic study (performed in 39 cases). The outcome of these patients after therapy with nilotinib or dasatinib was analyzed. ABL mutations were detected in 14 out of 45 resistant patients. Patients with clonal cytogenetic evolution tended to develop mutations more frequently than those without clonal evolution. Nine out of the 15 patients with ABL mutation responded to a treatment switch to nilotinib (n=4), dasatinib (n=2), interferon (n=1) or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (n=2). The frequency of ABL mutations in CML patients resistant to imatinib is high and is more frequent among those with clonal cytogenetic evolution. The change to second-generation TKI can overcome imatinib resistance in most of the mutated patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  15. Review of the Oconee-3 probabilistic risk assessment: external events, core damage frequency. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanan, N.A.; Ilberg, D.; Xue, D.

    1986-03-01

    A review of the Oconee-3 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (OPRA) was conducted with the broad objective of evaluating qualitatively and quantitatively (as much as possible) the OPRA assessment of the important sequences that are ''externally'' generated and lead to core damage. The review included a technical assessment of the assumptions and methods used in the OPRA within its stated objective and with the limited information available. Within this scope, BNL performed a detailed reevaluation of the accident sequences generated by internal floods and earthquakes and a less detailed review (in some cases a scoping review) for the accident sequences generated by fires, tornadoes, external floods, and aircraft impact. 12 refs., 24 figs., 31 tabs

  16. Damage mechanisms and estimation of the frequency of leaks of steam generator tubes in German PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reck, H.

    1992-01-01

    Operating experience of steam generator tubes in German PWRs has shown that so far there have only relatively few cases of damage been registered. The only steam generators with a high failure rate were exchanged in 1983. The material of the affected tubes was Inconel 600. The types of failure that occurred in the late 70's and early 80's were mainly wastage corrosion, which was thought to be the result of phosphate operating. After optimising the water chemistry and changing to ''high AVT'' operating, the failure rate decreased considerably. In total, about 973 of the 193335 tubes that were in operation were plugged because of wall-thinning or leaks. There have been 6 leaks, with the highest leakage volume being 40 liters per hour. 7 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs

  17. Compound Heterozygosity of Low-Frequency Promoter Deletions and Rare Loss-of-Function Mutations in TXNL4A Causes Burn-McKeown Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Dagmar; Newman, William G.; Wieland, Thomas; Berulava, Tea; Kaffe, Maria; Falkenstein, Daniela; Beetz, Christian; Graf, Elisabeth; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Douzgou, Sofia; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Daly, Sarah B.; Williams, Simon G.; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S.; Urquhart, Jill E.; Anderson, Beverley; O’Sullivan, James; Boute, Odile; Gundlach, Jasmin; Czeschik, Johanna Christina; van Essen, Anthonie J.; Hazan, Filiz; Park, Sarah; Hing, Anne; Kuechler, Alma; Lohmann, Dietmar R.; Ludwig, Kerstin U.; Mangold, Elisabeth; Steenpaß, Laura; Zeschnigk, Michael; Lemke, Johannes R.; Lourenco, Charles Marques; Hehr, Ute; Prott, Eva-Christina; Waldenberger, Melanie; Böhmer, Anne C.; Horsthemke, Bernhard; O’Keefe, Raymond T.; Meitinger, Thomas; Burn, John; Lüdecke, Hermann-Josef; Strom, Tim M.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in components of the major spliceosome have been described in disorders with craniofacial anomalies, e.g., Nager syndrome and mandibulofacial dysostosis type Guion-Almeida. The U5 spliceosomal complex of eight highly conserved proteins is critical for pre-mRNA splicing. We identified biallelic mutations in TXNL4A, a member of this complex, in individuals with Burn-McKeown syndrome (BMKS). This rare condition is characterized by bilateral choanal atresia, hearing loss, cleft lip and/or palate, and other craniofacial dysmorphisms. Mutations were found in 9 of 11 affected families. In 8 families, affected individuals carried a rare loss-of-function mutation (nonsense, frameshift, or microdeletion) on one allele and a low-frequency 34 bp deletion (allele frequency 0.76%) in the core promoter region on the other allele. In a single highly consanguineous family, formerly diagnosed as oculo-oto-facial dysplasia, the four affected individuals were homozygous for a 34 bp promoter deletion, which differed from the promoter deletion in the other families. Reporter gene and in vivo assays showed that the promoter deletions led to reduced expression of TXNL4A. Depletion of TXNL4A (Dib1) in yeast demonstrated reduced assembly of the tri-snRNP complex. Our results indicate that BMKS is an autosomal-recessive condition, which is frequently caused by compound heterozygosity of low-frequency promoter deletions in combination with very rare loss-of-function mutations. PMID:25434003

  18. Further characterisation of the recently described SLC26A4 c.918+2T>C mutation and reporting of a novel variant predicted to be damaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, A C; Santos, R; O'Neill, A; Escada, P; Fialho, G; Caria, H

    2016-06-01

    Pendred syndrome (PS) is the second most common type of autosomal recessive syndromic hearing loss (HL). It is characterised by sensorineural HL and goiter with occasional hypothyroidism. These features are generally accompanied by malformations of the inner ear, as enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA). In about 50% of probands, mutations in the SLC26A4 gene are the cause of the disease. Here we report the case of a Portuguese female, aged 47, presenting with severe to profound HL and hypothyroidism. Her mother and sister, both deceased, had suffered from HL and goiter. By MRI and CT, an enlarged vestibular aqueduct and endolymphatic sac were observed. Molecular study of the patient included screening for GJB2 coding mutations and GJB6 common deletions followed by screening of all SLC26A4 exons, as well as intronic regions 8 and 14. Mutation c.918+2T>C was found for the first time in homozygosity in the intronic region 7 of the SLC26A4 gene. Whilst sequencing the control samples, a novel mutation c.821C>G was found in heterozygosity in the exon 7 of SLC26A4 gene and was predicted to be damaging. This study thus led to the finding of two novel SLC26A4 genotypes and provides new insight on the phenotypic features associated with PS. © Copyright by Società Italiana di Otorinolaringologia e Chirurgia Cervico-Facciale, Rome, Italy.

  19. Effect of low dose gamma radiation on stamen-hairs of different clones of Tradescantia presenting variability in the frequency of spontaneous mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, C.S.

    1976-01-01

    Changes in the frequency of spontaneous somatic mutations were studied for three different clones of Tradescantia heterozygotes for flower and stamen-hair color keeping them under controlled or natural conditions in order to verify the effect of different environmental conditions on the different genotypes. The effect of inflorescence age on the variation of spontaneous mutations was studied choosing young and old inflorescences of a same plant. Low dose irradiation experiments were carried out with those clones to elucidate the radiation effects on the clones presenting changes in the frequency of spontaneous mutations. The chronic-and acute irradiation effects of low dose irradiation of the stamen-hair of Tradescantia were also studied. Results are discussed. (M.A.) [pt

  20. Core damage frequency prespectives for BWR 3/4 and Westinghouse 4-loop plants based on IPE results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingman, S.; Camp, S.; LaChance, J.; Mary Drouin

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the core damage frequency (CDF) insights gained by analyzing the results of the Individual Plant Examinations (IPES) for two groups of plants: boiling water reactor (BWR) 3/4 plants with Reactor Core Isolation Cooling systems, and Westinghouse 4-loop plants. Wide variability was observed for the plant CDFs and for the CDFs of the contributing accident classes. On average, transients-with loss of injection, station blackout sequences, and transients with loss of decay heat removal are important contributors for the BWR 3/4 plants, while transients, station blackout sequences, and loss-of-coolant accidents are important for the Westinghouse 4-loop plants. The key factors that contribute to the variability in the results are discussed. The results are often driven by plant-specific design and operational characteristics, but differences in modeling approaches are also important for some accident classes

  1. Calculation of Core Damage Frequency for the Change of the Common Cause Failure Parameters According to the Testing Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Dae Il; Kim, Kil You; Jin, Young Ho; Kim, Tae Woon

    2011-01-01

    Common cause failure (CCF) probabilities are differently estimated according to testing strategies. There are two representative testing schemes; staggered testing and non-staggered testing schemes. For the cases where trains or channels of standby safety systems consisting of more than two redundant components are tested in a staggered manner, the standby safety components within a train can be tested simultaneously or consecutively. In this case, mixed testing scheme, staggered and non-staggered testing schemes, are used for testing the components. Kang et al. derived the formulas for the estimations of the CCF probabilities of the components under the mixed testing scheme. This paper presents the sensitivity study results on the core damage frequency (CDF) of the SMART (System-integrated Modular Advanced Reactor) for the changes of the CCF parameters according to the testing strategies

  2. Alkylating agent (MNU)-induced mutation in space environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, T; Takahashi, A; Ohnishi, K; Takahashi, S; Masukawa, M; Sekikawa, K; Amano, T; Nakano, T; Nagaoka, S

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, some contradictory data about the effects of microgravity on radiation-induced biological responses in space experiments have been reported. We prepared a damaged template DNA produced with an alkylating agent (N-methyl-N-nitroso urea; MNU) to measure incorrect base-incorporation during DNA replication in microgravity. We examined whether mutation frequency is affected by microgravity during DNA replication for a DNA template damaged by an alkylating agent. Using an in vitro enzymatic reaction system, DNA synthesis by Taq polymerase or polymerase III was done during a US space shuttle mission (Discovery, STS-91). After the flight, DNA replication and mutation frequencies were measured. We found that there was almost no effect of microgravity on DNA replication and mutation frequency. It is suggested that microgravity might not affect at the stage of substrate incorporation in induced-mutation frequency. c2001 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A novel WFS1 mutation in a family with dominant low frequency sensorineural hearing loss with normal VEMP and EcochG findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramhall, Naomi F; Kallman, Jeremy C; Verrall, Aimee M; Street, Valerie A

    2008-06-02

    Low frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL) is an uncommon clinical finding. Mutations within three different identified genes (DIAPH1, MYO7A, and WFS1) are known to cause LFSNHL. The majority of hereditary LFSNHL is associated with heterozygous mutations in the WFS1 gene (wolframin protein). The goal of this study was to use genetic analysis to determine if a small American family's hereditary LFSNHL is linked to a mutation in the WFS1 gene and to use VEMP and EcochG testing to further characterize the family's audiovestibular phenotype. The clinical phenotype of the American family was characterized by audiologic testing, vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP), and electrocochleography (EcochG) evaluation. Genetic characterization was performed by microsatellite analysis and direct sequencing of WFS1 for mutation detection. Sequence analysis of the WFS1 gene revealed a novel heterozygous mutation at c.2054G>C predicting a p.R685P amino acid substitution in wolframin. The c.2054G>C mutation segregates faithfully with hearing loss in the family and is absent in 230 control chromosomes. The p.R685 residue is located within the hydrophilic C-terminus of wolframin and is conserved across species. The VEMP and EcochG findings were normal in individuals segregating the WFS1 c.2054G>C mutation. We discovered a novel heterozygous missense mutation in exon 8 of WFS1 predicting a p.R685P amino acid substitution that is likely to underlie the LFSNHL phenotype in the American family. For the first time, we describe VEMP and EcochG findings for individuals segregating a heterozygous WFS1 mutation.

  4. A novel WFS1 mutation in a family with dominant low frequency sensorineural hearing loss with normal VEMP and EcochG findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verrall Aimee M

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL is an uncommon clinical finding. Mutations within three different identified genes (DIAPH1, MYO7A, and WFS1 are known to cause LFSNHL. The majority of hereditary LFSNHL is associated with heterozygous mutations in the WFS1 gene (wolframin protein. The goal of this study was to use genetic analysis to determine if a small American family's hereditary LFSNHL is linked to a mutation in the WFS1 gene and to use VEMP and EcochG testing to further characterize the family's audiovestibular phenotype. Methods The clinical phenotype of the American family was characterized by audiologic testing, vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP, and electrocochleography (EcochG evaluation. Genetic characterization was performed by microsatellite analysis and direct sequencing of WFS1 for mutation detection. Results Sequence analysis of the WFS1 gene revealed a novel heterozygous mutation at c.2054G>C predicting a p.R685P amino acid substitution in wolframin. The c.2054G>C mutation segregates faithfully with hearing loss in the family and is absent in 230 control chromosomes. The p.R685 residue is located within the hydrophilic C-terminus of wolframin and is conserved across species. The VEMP and EcochG findings were normal in individuals segregating the WFS1 c.2054G>C mutation. Conclusion We discovered a novel heterozygous missense mutation in exon 8 of WFS1 predicting a p.R685P amino acid substitution that is likely to underlie the LFSNHL phenotype in the American family. For the first time, we describe VEMP and EcochG findings for individuals segregating a heterozygous WFS1 mutation.

  5. Concept and methodology for evaluating core damage frequency considering failure correlation at multi units and sites and its application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebisawa, K.; Teragaki, T.; Nomura, S. [Former Incorporated Administrative Agency, Japan Nuclear Safety Organization (Japan); Abe, H., E-mail: Hiroshi_abe@nsr.go.jp [Former Incorporated Administrative Agency, Japan Nuclear Safety Organization (Japan); Shigemori, M.; Shimomoto, M. [Mizuho Information & Research Institute, 2-3, Kanda-Nishikicho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • We develop a method to evaluate CDF considering failure correlation at multi units. • We develop a procedure to evaluate correlation coefficient between multi components. • We evaluate CDF at two different BWR units using correlation coefficients. • We confirm the validity of method and correlation coefficient through the evaluation. - Abstract: The Tohoku earthquake (Mw9.0) occurred on March 11, 2011 and caused a large tsunami. The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant with six units were overwhelmed by the tsunami and core damage occurred. Authors proposed the concept and method for evaluating core damage frequency (CDF) considering failure correlation at the multi units and sites. Based on the above method, one of authors developed the procedure for evaluating the failure correlation coefficient and response correlation coefficient between the multi components under the strong seismic motion. These method and failure correlation coefficients were applied to two different BWR units and their CDF was evaluated by seismic probabilistic risk assessment technology. Through this quantitative evaluation, the validity of the method and failure correlation coefficient was confirmed.

  6. Correlation of the UV-induced mutational spectra and the DNA damage distribution of the human HPRT gene: Automating the analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotturi, G.; Erfle, H.; Koop, B.F.; Boer, J.G. de; Glickman, B.W.

    1994-01-01

    Automated DNA sequencers can be readily adapted for various types of sequence-based nucleic acid analysis: more recently it was determined the distribution of UV photoproducts in the E. coli laci gene using techniques developed for automated fluorescence-based analysis. We have been working to improve the automated approach of damage distribution. Our current method is more rigorous. We have new software that integrates the area under the individual peaks, rather than measuring the height of the curve. In addition, we now employ an internal standard. The analysis can also be partially automated. Detection limits for both major types of UV-photoproducts (cyclobutane dimers and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproducts) are reported. The UV-induced damage distribution in the hprt gene is compared to the mutational spectra in human and rodents cells

  7. Use of DNA-damaging agents and RNA pooling to assess expression profiles associated with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status in familial breast cancer patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logan C Walker

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A large number of rare sequence variants of unknown clinical significance have been identified in the breast cancer susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2. Laboratory-based methods that can distinguish between carriers of pathogenic mutations and non-carriers are likely to have utility for the classification of these sequence variants. To identify predictors of pathogenic mutation status in familial breast cancer patients, we explored the use of gene expression arrays to assess the effect of two DNA-damaging agents (irradiation and mitomycin C on cellular response in relation to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation status. A range of regimes was used to treat 27 lymphoblastoid cell-lines (LCLs derived from affected women in high-risk breast cancer families (nine BRCA1, nine BRCA2, and nine non-BRCA1/2 or BRCAX individuals and nine LCLs from healthy individuals. Using an RNA-pooling strategy, we found that treating LCLs with 1.2 microM mitomycin C and measuring the gene expression profiles 1 hour post-treatment had the greatest potential to discriminate BRCA1, BRCA2, and BRCAX mutation status. A classifier was built using the expression profile of nine QRT-PCR validated genes that were associated with BRCA1, BRCA2, and BRCAX status in RNA pools. These nine genes could distinguish BRCA1 from BRCA2 carriers with 83% accuracy in individual samples, but three-way analysis for BRCA1, BRCA2, and BRCAX had a maximum of 59% prediction accuracy. Our results suggest that, compared to BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, non-BRCA1/2 (BRCAX individuals are genetically heterogeneous. This study also demonstrates the effectiveness of RNA pools to compare the expression profiles of cell-lines from BRCA1, BRCA2, and BRCAX cases after treatment with irradiation and mitomycin C as a method to prioritize treatment regimes for detailed downstream expression analysis.

  8. Common mutations in the phosphofructokinase-M gene in Ashkenazi Jewish patients with glycogenesis VII - and their population frequency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherman, J.B.; Raben, N.; Nicastri, C.; Adams, E.M.; Plotz, P.H. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Argov, Z. (Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel)); Nakajima, Hiromu (Osaka Univ. (Japan)); Eng, C.M.; Cowan, T.M. (Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States))

    1994-08-01

    Phosphofructokinase (PFK) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of glycolysis. Deficiency of the muscle enzyme is manifested by exercise intolerance and a compensated hemolytic anemia. Case reports of this autosomal recessive disease suggest a predominance in Ashkenazi Jews in the United States. The authors have explored the genetic basis for this illness in nine affected families and surveyed the normal Ashkenazi population for the mutations found. Genomic DNA was amplified using PCR, and denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis. The polymorphic exons were sequenced or digested with restriction enzymes. A previously described splicing mutation, [Delta]5, accounted for 11 (61%) of 18 abnormal alleles in the nine families. A single base deletion leading to a frameshift mutation in exon 22 ([Delta]C-22) was found in six of seven alleles. A third mutation, resulting in a nonconservative amino acid substitution in exon 4, accounted for the remaining allele. Thus, three mutations could account for an illness in this group, and two mutations could account for 17 of 18 alleles. In screening 250 normal Ashkenazi individuals for all three mutations, they found only one [Delta]5 allele. Clinical data revealed no correlation between the particular mutations and symptoms, but male patients were more symptomatic than females, and only males had frank hemolysis and hyperuricemia. Because PFK deficiency in Ashkenazi Jews is caused by a limited number of mutations, screening genomic DNA from peripheral blood for the described mutations in this population should enable rapid diagnosis without muscle biopsy. 41 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. The frequency of factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A mutations in Slovak and Roma (Gypsy) ethnic group of Eastern Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bôžiková, Alexandra; Gabriková, Dana; Sovičová, Adriana; Behulová, Regina; Mačeková, Soňa; Boroňová, Iveta; Petrejčíková, Eva; Soták, Miroslav; Bernasovská, Jarmila; Bernasovský, Ivan

    2012-10-01

    Factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A are the two most prevalent causes of inherited thrombophilia. The prevalence of these mutations varies widely in healthy Caucasian population. The aim of our study was to determine the frequency of factor V Leiden and prothrombin G20210A mutations in Slovak and Roma ethnic group from Eastern Slovakia. We analyzed 540 asymptomatic individuals (269 individuals of Slovak ethnicity and 271 individuals of Roma ethnicity) by real-time PCR method. The detected allele frequencies were 2.97 versus 6.64 % for factor V Leiden (p = 0.0049), and 0.74 versus 0.92 % for prothrombin mutation (p = 0.7463) in Slovak and Roma population, respectively. The Roma ethnic group had significantly higher prevalence of factor V Leiden mutation when compared to Slovak ethnic group. The allele frequency of factor V Leiden in ethnic Romanies from Eastern Slovakia was one of the highest in Europe. Our results confirm an uneven geographical and ethnic distribution of factor V Leiden.

  10. Exome sequencing identifies a novel missense mutation of WFS1 as the cause of non-syndromic low-frequency hearing loss in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhijie; Feng, Yong; Hu, Zhengmao; Li, Jiada; Sun, Jie; Chen, Hongsheng; He, Chufeng; Wang, Xueping; Jiang, Lu; Liu, Yalan; Cai, Xinzhang; Wang, Lili; Cai, Yuxiang; Liu, Xuezhong; Mei, Lingyun

    2017-09-01

    Autosomal dominant non-syndromic low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL) DFNA6/14/38 is an uncommon type of hearing loss that classically affects low frequencies of 2000 Hz and below, demonstrating an ascending configuration. The current study aimed to investigate the cause of LFSNHL in a five-generation Chinese family. The phenotype of the Chinese family was characterized using audiologic testing and pedigree analysis. The combined approach of array screening and whole-exome sequencing was used to identify the disease-causing gene in this family. This pedigree, in which the affected subjects presented isolated low-frequency sensorineural hearing impairment with childhood onset, was associated with autosomal dominant inheritance of the c.2591A > G mutation in exon 8 of the Wolframin syndrome 1 (WFS1) gene which was not present in 286 unrelated controls with matched ancestry and is highly conserved across species. In addition, several mutations affecting the Glu864 residue have been previously identified in different populations, suggesting that this site is likely to be a mutational hot spot. We identified a novel substitution, Glu864Gly, of WFS1 as the causative variant for this pedigree. Our data extend the mutation spectrum of the WFS1 gene in Chinese individuals and may contribute to establishing a better genotype-phenotype correlation for LFSNHL. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Germline CDH1 mutations are a significant contributor to the high frequency of early-onset diffuse gastric cancer cases in New Zealand Māori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkaart, Christopher; Ellison-Loschmann, Lis; Day, Robert; Sporle, Andrew; Koea, Jonathan; Harawira, Pauline; Cheng, Soo; Gray, Michelle; Whaanga, Tracey; Pearce, Neil; Guilford, Parry

    2018-03-27

    New Zealand Māori have a considerably higher incidence of gastric cancer compared to non-Māori, and are one of the few populations worldwide with a higher prevalence of diffuse-type disease. Pathogenic germline CDH1 mutations are causative of hereditary diffuse gastric cancer, a cancer predisposition syndrome primarily characterised by an extreme lifetime risk of developing diffuse gastric cancer. Pathogenic CDH1 mutations are well described in Māori families in New Zealand. However, the contribution of these mutations to the high incidence of gastric cancer is unknown. We have used next-generation sequencing, Sanger sequencing, and Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification to examine germline CDH1 in an unselected series of 94 Māori gastric cancer patients and 200 healthy matched controls. Overall, 18% of all cases, 34% of cases diagnosed with diffuse-type gastric cancer, and 67% of cases diagnosed aged less than 45 years carried pathogenic CDH1 mutations. After adjusting for the effect of screening known HDGC families, we estimate that 6% of all advanced gastric cancers and 13% of all advanced diffuse-type gastric cancers would carry germline CDH1 mutations. Our results demonstrate that germline CDH1 mutations are a significant contributor to the high frequency of diffuse gastric cancer in New Zealand Māori.

  12. The Frequency and Clinical Implications of the BRAF Mutation in Papillary Thyroid Cancer Patients in Korea Over the Past Two Decades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ram Hong

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundOver the past several decades, there has been a rapid worldwide increase in the prevalence of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC as well as a number of changes in the clinicopathological characteristics of this disease. BRAFV600E, which is a mutation of the proto-oncogene BRAF, has become the most frequent genetic mutation associated with PTC, particularly in Korea. Thus, the present study investigated whether the prevalence of the BRAFV600E mutation has increased over the past two decades in the Korean population and whether various PTC-related clinicopathological characteristics have changed.MethodsThe present study included 2,624 patients who underwent a thyroidectomy for PTC during two preselected periods; 1995 to 2003 and 2009 to 2012. The BRAFV600E mutation status of each patient was confirmed using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method or by the direct sequencing of DNA.ResultsThe prevalence of the BRAFV600E mutation in Korean PTC patients increased from 62.2% to 73.7% (P=0.001 over the last two decades. Additionally, there was a greater degree of extrathyroidal extension (ETE and lymph node metastasis in 2009 to 2012 patients with the BRAFV600E mutation and a higher frequency of thyroiditis and follicular variant-PTC in 2009 to 2012 patients with wild-type BRAF. However, only the frequency of ETE was significantly higher in 1995 to 2003 patients with the BRAFV600E mutation (P=0.047. Long-term recurrence rates during a 10-year median follow-up did not differ based on BRAFV600E mutation status.ConclusionThe BRAFV600E mutation rate in Korean PTC patients has been persistently high (approximately 70% over the past two decades and continues to increase. The present findings demonstrate that BRAFV600E-positive PTC was associated with more aggressive clinicopathological features, especially in patients who were recently diagnosed, suggesting that BRAFV600E mutation status may be a useful prognostic

  13. Drug resistance and BCR-ABL kinase domain mutations in Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia from the imatinib to the second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitor era: The main changes are in the type of mutations, but not in the frequency of mutation involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soverini, Simona; De Benedittis, Caterina; Papayannidis, Cristina; Paolini, Stefania; Venturi, Claudia; Iacobucci, Ilaria; Luppi, Mario; Bresciani, Paola; Salvucci, Marzia; Russo, Domenico; Sica, Simona; Orlandi, Ester; Intermesoli, Tamara; Gozzini, Antonella; Bonifacio, Massimiliano; Rigolin, Gian Matteo; Pane, Fabrizio; Baccarani, Michele; Cavo, Michele; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2014-04-01

    Patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) frequently relapse on imatinib with acquisition of BCR-ABL kinase domain (KD) mutations. To analyze the changes that second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have brought in mutation frequency and type, a database review was undertaken of the results of all the BCR-ABL KD mutation analyses performed in the authors' laboratory from January 2004 to January 2013. Interrogation of the database retrieved 450 mutation analyses in 272 patients with Ph+ ALL. Prescreening of samples was performed with denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (D-HPLC), followed by direct sequencing of D-HPLC-positive cases. BCR-ABL KD mutations were detected in 70% of imatinib-resistant patients, with T315I, E255K, and Y253H mutations accounting for 75% of cases. Seventy-eight percent of the patients reported to be resistant to second-generation TKIs after imatinib failure were positive for mutations, and 58% of them had multiple mutations. Analysis of patients relapsing on dasatinib revealed a newly acquired T315I mutation in almost two-thirds of the cases. Direct sequencing detected no mutations at diagnosis, even in patients who relapsed after a few months. Second-generation TKIs ensure a more rapid debulking of the leukemic clone and have much fewer insensitive mutations, but long-term disease control remains a problem, and the T315I mutation is revealed to be an even more frequent enemy. BCR-ABL KD mutation screening of patients with Ph+ ALL who are receiving imatinib or second-generation TKIs would be a precious ally for timely treatment optimization. In contrast, the clinical usefulness of conventional direct sequencing at diagnosis seems to be very low. American Cancer Society. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  14. Low frequency of mutations in the core promoter and precore regions of hepatitis B virus in anti-HBe positive Brazilian carriers

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    Niel Christian

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the core promoter and precore regions of the hepatitis B virus (HBV genome, notably the double substitution (AGG to TGA at nt positions 1762-1764 in the core promoter, and the precore stop codon mutation G to A at nt 1896, can often explain the anti-HBe phenotype in chronic carriers. However, the A1896 mutation is restricted to HBV isolates that have T at nt 1858. The double substitution at positions 1762-1764 has been described to occur preferentially in patients infected with strains showing C instead of T at nt 1858. Results HBV DNAs from 29 anti-HBe Brazilian samples were characterized by nucleotide sequencing of PCR products from precore region. Among them, 18 isolates presented C at nt 1858 (mostly genotype A strains. The 11 remaining isolates (genotypes D and F had T1858. The stop codon mutation at nt 1896 was found in seven isolates (24% of the total and 63% of the isolates that had T1858. The frequency of the double substitution at positions 1762-1764 was surprisingly low (20% among C1858 isolates. An association between A1896 and TGA 1762-1764 mutations was observed among genotype D isolates: these showed either none of the two mutations or both. Furthermore, strains mutated at positions 1896 and/or 1762-1764 also presented an elevated number of other, less common substitutions in the core promoter and precore regions. Conclusions The data reported here are not in accordance with some reports from other parts of the world. In half of the isolates, none of the mutations previously described could explain the anti-HBe phenotype.

  15. [Population frequency and age of mutation G5741→A in gene NBAS which is a cause of SOPH syndrome in Sakha (Yakutia) Republic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimova, N R; Nogovicina, A N; Kurtanov, Kh A; Alekseeva, E I

    2016-10-01

    SOPH syndrome (Short stature with Optic nerve atrophy and Pelger–Huët anomaly syndrome, OMIM#614800) is an autosomal recessive hereditary disease characterized by the following main clinical symptoms: postnatal hypoplasia, proportionately short stature, facial dysmorphism, micromelia of feet and hands, limp and loose skin, optic nerve atrophy, and Pelger–Huët anomaly of neutrophils. For the first time, this disease was described in Yakuts. The molecular-genetic study showed that its cause in Yakuts is mutation G5741→A in gene NBAS. On the basis of disequilibrium analysis for linkage of ten microsatellite markers flanking the NBAS gene with the disease, the haplotype of the founder chromosome was determined. The age of the mutation in Yakutia was estimated to be about 804 ± 140 years. The frequency of heterozygous carriers of mutation G5741→A (R1914H) in gene NBAS was found, which averaged 13 per 1000 healthy Yakuts.

  16. Molecular dynamic simulation reveals damaging impact of RAC1 F28L mutation in the switch I region.

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    Ambuj Kumar

    Full Text Available Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (RAC1 is a plasma membrane-associated small GTPase which cycles between the active GTP-bound and inactive GDP-bound states. There is wide range of evidences indicating its active participation in inducing cancer-associated phenotypes. RAC1 F28L mutation (RAC(F28L is a fast recycling mutation which has been implicated in several cancer associated cases. In this work we have performed molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation (~0.3 μs to investigate the conformational changes occurring in the mutant protein. The RMSD, RMSF and NHbonds results strongly suggested that the loss of native conformation in the Switch I region in RAC1 mutant protein could be the reason behind its oncogenic transformation. The overall results suggested that the mutant protein attained compact conformation as compared to the native. The major impact of mutation was observed in the Switch I region which might be the crucial reason behind the loss of interaction between the guanine ring and F28 residue.

  17. Mutation frequency of Tradescantia (BNL clone 4430) stamen hairs exposed to low dose of gamma ray in KAERI γ-field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, S.H.; Lee, Y.I.; Chung, K.H.; Oh, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    For determination of mutation frequency induced by chronic irradiation of low dose gamma rays, Tradescantia clone 4430 was exposed to Co-60 γ rays with different exposure rates from 3.6mR/day to 182R/day in or out of the gamma field at Kumkok Experiment Farm of KAERI. Somatic mutations based on pink mutant events of the stamen hair cells were clearly observed by the treatment. The pink mutant events were increased proportionally with increasing exposure rates of gamma ray except fo relatively high dose rates of 105R/day and 182R/day, indicating saturation effect of mutation. The somatic pink mutations could be fairly detectable even in the low dose rate of 3.6mR/day. Therefore, this stamen hair system of Tradescantia clone 4430 seemed to be a reasonable test system for detecting mutability of low level irradiation. These results imply that artificial mutation induction in the fruit and ornamental trees could be expected in the γ-field. (author)

  18. Influence of the Chernobyl accident on the frequency of chromosomal damage and health status of Lithuanian clean-up workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazutka, R. J.; Ridmeika, G. J.

    2006-01-01

    Chromosomal damage and health status were analyzed in Chernobyl clean-up workers currently residing in Lithuania. Statistically significantly (P < 0.05) increased frequencies of chromosome-type aberrations (chromosome breaks, dicentric and ring chromosomes) as well as aberrant cells were found in the peripheral blood lymphocytes of clean-up workers when measured 6-8 years after the exposure. Significant health impairment was characteristic of these persons as well. On average, 5.6 diseases per patient were diagnosed in clean-up workers suffering from cardiovascular diseases. This high co-morbidity resulted in quite high rates of metabolic syndrome (16.7%). Among Chernobyl clean-up workers that had experienced post-traumatic stress disorder, 76% suffered from highly expressed sleep disturbances. Analysis of thyroid diseases among 500 clean-up workers has revealed that 27.6% individuals have different pathology of thyroid gland. Thus, even 20 years after the Chernobyl disaster, clean-up workers must be considered as a group of primary interest both for researchers and physicians. (author)

  19. Frequency of CCR5 Delta-32 Mutation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-seropositive and HIV-exposed Seronegative Individuals and in General Population of Medellin, Colombia

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    Francisco J Díaz

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Repeated exposure to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV does not always result in seroconversion. Modifications in coreceptors for HIV entrance to target cells are one of the factors that block the infection. We studied the frequency of Delta-32 mutation in ccr5 gene in Medellin, Colombia. Two hundred and eighteen individuals distributed in three different groups were analyzed for Delta-32 mutation in ccr5 gene by polymerase chain reaction (PCR: 29 HIV seropositive (SP, 39 exposed seronegative (ESN and 150 individuals as a general population sample (GPS. The frequency of the Delta-32 mutant allele was 3.8% for ESN, 2.7% for GPS and 1.7% for SP. Only one homozygous mutant genotype (Delta-32/Delta-32 was found among the ESN (2.6%. The heterozygous genotype (ccr5/Delta-32 was found in eight GPS (5.3%, in one SP (3.4% and in one ESN (2.6%. The differences in the allelic and genotypic frequencies among the three groups were not statistically significant. A comparison between the expected and the observed genotypic frequencies showed that these frequencies were significantly different for the ESN group, which indirectly suggests a protective effect of the mutant genotype (Delta-32/Delta-32. Since this mutant genotype explained the resistance of infection in only one of our ESN persons, different mechanisms of protection must be playing a more important role in this population.

  20. An epidemiological investigation of a Forkhead box protein E3 founder mutation underlying the high frequency of sclerocornea, aphakia, and microphthalmia in a Mexican village.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoja-Melendez, Carlos; Ali, Manir; Zenteno, Juan C

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the molecular epidemiological basis for the unusually high incidence of sclerocornea, aphakia, and microphthalmia in a village in the Tlaxcala province of central Mexico. A population census was performed in a village to identify all sclerocornea, aphakia, and microphthalmia cases. Molecular analysis of the previously identified Forkhead box protein E3 (FOXE3) mutation, c.292T>C (p.Y98H), was performed with PCR amplification and direct DNA sequencing. In addition, DNA from 405 randomly selected unaffected villagers was analyzed to establish the carrier frequency of the causal mutation. To identify the number of generations since the mutation arose in the village, 17 polymorphic markers distributed in a region of 6 Mb around the mutated locus were genotyped in the affected individuals, followed by DMLE software analysis to calculate mutation age. A total of 22 patients with sclerocornea, aphakia, and microphthalmia were identified in the village, rendering a disease prevalence of 2.52 cases per 1,000 habitants (1 in 397). The FOXE3 homozygous mutation was identified in all 17 affected subjects who consented to molecular analysis. Haplotype analysis indicated that the mutation arose 5.0-6.5 generations ago (approximately 106-138 years). Among the 405 unaffected villagers who were genotyped, ten heterozygote carriers were identified, yielding a population carrier frequency of approximately 1 in 40 and a predicted incidence of affected of 1 in 6,400 based on random marriages between two carriers in the village. This study demonstrates that a cluster of patients with sclerocornea, aphakia, and microphthalmia in a small Mexican village is due to a FOXE3 p.Y98H founder mutation that arose in the village just over a century ago at a time when a population migrated from a nearby village because of land disputes. The actual disease incidence is higher than the calculated predicted value and suggests non-random marriages (i.e., consanguinity) within the

  1. Temporal frequency of knockdown resistance mutations, F1534C and V1016G, in Aedes aegypti in Chiang Mai city, Thailand and the impact of the mutations on the efficiency of thermal fogging spray with pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plernsub, Suriya; Saingamsook, Jassada; Yanola, Jintana; Lumjuan, Nongkran; Tippawangkosol, Pongsri; Walton, Catherine; Somboon, Pradya

    2016-10-01

    In Thailand, control of dengue outbreaks is currently attained by the use of space sprays, particularly thermal fogging using pyrethroids, with the aim of killing infected Aedes mosquito vectors in epidemic areas. However, the principal dengue vector, Aedes aegypti, is resistant to pyrethroids conferred mainly by mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene, F1534C and V1016G, termed knockdown resistance (kdr). The objectives of this study were to determine the temporal frequencies of F1534C and V1016G in Ae. aegypti populations in relation to pyrethroid resistance in Chiang Mai city, and to evaluate the impact of the mutations on the efficacy of thermal fogging with the pyrethroid deltamethrin. Larvae and pupae were collected from several areas around Chiang Mai city during 2011-2015 and reared to adulthood for bioassays for deltamethrin susceptibility. These revealed no trend of increasing deltamethrin resistance during the study period (mortality 58.0-69.5%, average 62.8%). This corresponded to no overall change in the frequencies of the C1534 allele (0.55-0.66, average 0.62) and G1016 allele (0.34-0.45, average 0.38), determined using allele specific amplification. Only three genotypes of kdr mutations were detected: C1534 homozygous (VV/CC); G1016/C1534 double heterozygous (VG/FC); and G1016 homozygous (GG/FF) indicating that the F1534C and V1016G mutations occurred on separate haplotypic backgrounds and a lack of recombination between them to date. The F1 progeny females were used to evaluate the efficacy of thermal fogging spray with Damthrin-SP(®) (deltamethrin+S-bioallethrin+piperonyl butoxide) using a caged mosquito bioassay. The thermal fogging spray killed 100% and 61.3% of caged mosquito bioassay placed indoors and outdoors, respectively. The outdoor spray had greater killing effect on C1534 homozygous and had partially effect on double heterozygous mosquitoes, but did not kill any G1016 homozygous mutants living outdoors. As this selection

  2. [Pulse-modulated Electromagnetic Radiation of Extremely High Frequencies Protects Cellular DNA against Damaging Effect of Physico-Chemical Factors in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gapeyev, A B; Lukyanova, N A

    2015-01-01

    Using a comet assay technique, we investigated protective effects of. extremely high frequency electromagnetic radiation in combination with the damaging effect of X-ray irradiation, the effect of damaging agents hydrogen peroxide and methyl methanesulfonate on DNA in mouse whole blood leukocytes. It was shown that the preliminary exposure of the cells to low intensity pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation (42.2 GHz, 0.1 mW/cm2, 20-min exposure, modulation frequencies of 1 and 16 Hz) caused protective effects decreasing the DNA damage by 20-45%. The efficacy of pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation depended on the type of genotoxic agent and increased in a row methyl methanesulfonate--X-rays--hydrogen peroxide. Continuous electromagnetic radiation was ineffective. The mechanisms of protective effects may be connected with an induction of the adaptive response by nanomolar concentrations of reactive oxygen species formed by pulse-modulated electromagnetic radiation.

  3. Relative frequency of GJB2 gene mutations in autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL patients in Lorestan population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mitra Sapahvand

    2007-01-01

    Conclusion: Unexpectedly, in this research just 17 percent of cases are covered. In this study 510 insCGAA mutation was seen. This is a new mutation which is not reported in other studied populations in the world. Hence, this research shows that – at least in our studied population- the effect of other genes that could cause non-syndromic hearing loss is possible and should be studied

  4. The scid mutation does not affect slowly repairing potentially lethal damage that is sensitive to 0.23 M NaCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Ikebuchi, Makoto; Fushiki, Masato; Komatsu, Kenshi.

    1996-01-01

    The repair of slowly repairing potentially lethal damage (PLD) in radiosensitive cells from the severe combined immunodeficient (scid) mouse was compared with that in Balb/c 3T3 cells with ''wild-type'' radiosensitivity and that in RD13B2 cells derived from scid cells whose sensitivity is normal because of the presence of fragments of human chromosome 8. Treatment with 0.23 M NaCl was used for fixation of slowly repairing PLD. The scid cells repaired PLD sensitive to 0.23 M NaCl to a great extent whin 3-4 h, similarly to Balb/c 3T3 and RD13B2 cells. This indicates that the scid mutation hardly affects the repair of PLD sensitive to 0.23 M NaCl. On the other hand, as reported previously, the rapidly repairing PLD that is sensitive to 0.5 M NaCl was repaired only slowly (3-4 h) in scid cells, in contrast to the rapid repair (within 1 h) seen with Balb/c 3T3 and RD13B2. This suggests that scid mutation is responsible for this repair at reduced rate. To confirm the independence of repair of 0.23 M NaCl-sensitive PLD from that of 0.5 M NaCl-sensitive PLD, both treatments with 0.23 M NaCl and 0.5 M NaCl were combined in each line. It is found that the repair of either PLD was not affected by the other treatment. The scid mutation impaired only the repair of 0.5 M NaCl-sensitive PLD. (author)

  5. Experimental Evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Human Macrophages Results in Low-Frequency Mutations Not Associated with Selective Advantage.

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    Valentina Guerrini

    Full Text Available Isolates of the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis recovered from clinical samples exhibit genetic heterogeneity. Such variation may result from the stressful environment encountered by the pathogen inside the macrophage, which is the host cell tubercle bacilli parasitize. To study the evolution of the M. tuberculosis genome during growth inside macrophages, we developed a model of intracellular culture in which bacteria were serially passaged in macrophage-like THP-1 cells for about 80 bacterial generations. Genome sequencing of single bacterial colonies isolated before and after the infection cycles revealed that M. tuberculosis developed mutations at a rate of about 5.7 × 10-9 / bp/ generation, consistent with mutation rates calculated during in vivo infection. Analysis of mutant growth in macrophages and in mice showed that the mutations identified after the cyclic infection conferred no advantage to the mutants relative to wild-type. Furthermore, activity testing of the recombinant protein harboring one of these mutations showed that the presence of the mutation did not affect the enzymatic activity. The serial infection protocol developed in this work to study M. tuberculosis genome microevolution can be applied to exposure to stressors to determine their effect on genome remodeling during intra-macrophage growth.

  6. High Frequency of Pulmonary Hypertension-Causing Gene Mutation in Chinese Patients with Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension.

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    Qunying Xi

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH is unknown. Histopathologic studies revealed that pulmonary vasculature lesions similar to idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH existed in CTEPH patients as well. It's well-known that genetic predisposition plays an important role in the mechanism of PAH. So we hypothesized that PAH-causing gene mutation might exist in some CTEPH patients and act as a background to facilitate the development of CTEPH. In this study, we analyzed 7 PAH-causing genes including BMPR2, ACVRL1, ENG, SMAD9, CAV1, KCNK3, and CBLN2 in 49 CTEPH patients and 17 patients recovered from pulmonary embolism (PE but without pulmonary hypertension(PH. The results showed that the nonsynonymous mutation rate in CTEPH patients is significantly higher than that in PE without PH patients (25 out of 49 (51% CTEPH patients vs. 3 out of 17 PE without PH patients (18%; p = 0.022. Four CTEPH patients had the same point mutation in ACVRL1 exon 10 (c.1450C>G, a mutation approved to be associated with PH in a previous study. In addition, we identified two CTEPH associated SNPs (rs3739817 and rs55805125. Our results suggest that PAH-causing gene mutation might play an important role in the development of CTEPH.

  7. A novel mutation of EYA4 in a large Chinese family with autosomal dominant middle-frequency sensorineural hearing loss by targeted exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Zhang, Zhao; Cheng, Jing; Lu, Yu; Yang, Chang-Liang; Luo, Yan-Yun; Yang, Guang; Yang, Hui; Zhu, Li; Zhou, Jia; Yao, Hang-Qi

    2015-06-01

    The middle-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (MFSNHL) is rare among hereditary non-syndromic hearing loss. To date, only three genes are reported to be associated with MFSNHL, including TECTA, EYA4 and COL11A2. In this report, we analyzed and explored the clinical audiological characteristics and the causative gene of a Chinese family named HG-Z087 with non-syndromic autosomal dominant inherited MFSNHL. Clinical audiological characteristics and inheritance pattern of a family were evaluated, and pedigree was drawn based on medical history investigation. Our results showed that the Chinese family was characterized by late onset, progressive, non-sydromic autosomal dominant MFSNHL. Targeted exome sequencing, conducted using DNA samples of an affected member in this family, revealed a novel heterozygous missense mutation c.1643C>G in exon 18 of EYA4, causing amino-acid (aa) substitution Arg for Thr at a conserved position aa-548. The p.T548R mutation related to hearing loss in the selected Chinese family was validated by Sanger sequencing. However, the mutation was absent in control group containing 100 DNA samples from normal Chinese families. In conclusion, we identified the pathogenic gene and found that the novel missense mutation c.1643C>G (p.T548R) in EYA4 might have caused autosomal dominant non-syndromic hearing impairment in the selected Chinese family.

  8. Rare mutations and potentially damaging missense variants in genes encoding fibrillar collagens and proteins involved in their production are candidates for risk for preterm premature rupture of membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavi P Modi

    Full Text Available Preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM is the leading identifiable cause of preterm birth with ~ 40% of preterm births being associated with PPROM and occurs in 1% - 2% of all pregnancies. We hypothesized that multiple rare variants in fetal genes involved in extracellular matrix synthesis would associate with PPROM, based on the assumption that impaired elaboration of matrix proteins would reduce fetal membrane tensile strength, predisposing to unscheduled rupture. We performed whole exome sequencing (WES on neonatal DNA derived from pregnancies complicated by PPROM (49 cases and healthy term deliveries (20 controls to identify candidate mutations/variants. Genotyping for selected variants from the WES study was carried out on an additional 188 PPROM cases and 175 controls. All mothers were self-reported African Americans, and a panel of ancestry informative markers was used to control for genetic ancestry in all genetic association tests. In support of the primary hypothesis, a statistically significant genetic burden (all samples combined, SKAT-O p-value = 0.0225 of damaging/potentially damaging rare variants was identified in the genes of interest-fibrillar collagen genes, which contribute to fetal membrane strength and integrity. These findings suggest that the fetal contribution to PPROM is polygenic, and driven by an increased burden of rare variants that may also contribute to the disparities in rates of preterm birth among African Americans.

  9. Rare mutations and potentially damaging missense variants in genes encoding fibrillar collagens and proteins involved in their production are candidates for risk for preterm premature rupture of membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Bhavi P; Teves, Maria E; Pearson, Laurel N; Parikh, Hardik I; Chaemsaithong, Piya; Sheth, Nihar U; York, Timothy P; Romero, Roberto; Strauss, Jerome F

    2017-01-01

    Preterm premature rupture of membranes (PPROM) is the leading identifiable cause of preterm birth with ~ 40% of preterm births being associated with PPROM and occurs in 1% - 2% of all pregnancies. We hypothesized that multiple rare variants in fetal genes involved in extracellular matrix synthesis would associate with PPROM, based on the assumption that impaired elaboration of matrix proteins would reduce fetal membrane tensile strength, predisposing to unscheduled rupture. We performed whole exome sequencing (WES) on neonatal DNA derived from pregnancies complicated by PPROM (49 cases) and healthy term deliveries (20 controls) to identify candidate mutations/variants. Genotyping for selected variants from the WES study was carried out on an additional 188 PPROM cases and 175 controls. All mothers were self-reported African Americans, and a panel of ancestry informative markers was used to control for genetic ancestry in all genetic association tests. In support of the primary hypothesis, a statistically significant genetic burden (all samples combined, SKAT-O p-value = 0.0225) of damaging/potentially damaging rare variants was identified in the genes of interest-fibrillar collagen genes, which contribute to fetal membrane strength and integrity. These findings suggest that the fetal contribution to PPROM is polygenic, and driven by an increased burden of rare variants that may also contribute to the disparities in rates of preterm birth among African Americans.

  10. The retinitis pigmentosa-mutated RP2 protein exhibits exonuclease activity and translocates to the nucleus in response to DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Jung-Hoon; Qiu Junzhuan; Cai Sheng; Chen Yuan; Cheetham, Michael E.; Shen Binghui; Pfeifer, Gerd P.

    2006-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous disease characterized by degeneration of the retina. Mutations in the RP2 gene are linked to the second most frequent form of X-linked retinitis pigmentosa. RP2 is a plasma membrane-associated protein of unknown function. The N-terminal domain of RP2 shares amino acid sequence similarity to the tubulin-specific chaperone protein co-factor C. The C-terminus consists of a domain with similarity to nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDKs). Human NDK1, in addition to its role in providing nucleoside triphosphates, has recently been described as a 3' to 5' exonuclease. Here, we show that RP2 is a DNA-binding protein that exhibits exonuclease activity, with a preference for single-stranded or nicked DNA substrates that occur as intermediates of base excision repair pathways. Furthermore, we show that RP2 undergoes re-localization into the nucleus upon treatment of cells with DNA damaging agents inducing oxidative stress, most notably solar simulated light and UVA radiation. The data suggest that RP2 may have previously unrecognized roles as a DNA damage response factor and 3' to 5' exonuclease

  11. Personalizing cancer treatment in the age of global genomic analyses: PALB2 gene mutations and the response to DNA damaging agents in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroel, Maria C; Rajeshkumar, N V; Garrido-Laguna, Ignacio; De Jesus-Acosta, Ana; Jones, Siân; Maitra, Anirban; Hruban, Ralph H; Eshleman, James R; Klein, Alison; Laheru, Daniel; Donehower, Ross; Hidalgo, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    Metastasis and drug resistance are the major causes of mortality in patients with pancreatic cancer. Once developed, the progression of pancreatic cancer metastasis is virtually unstoppable with current therapies. Here, we report the remarkable clinical outcome of a patient with advanced, gemcitabine-resistant, pancreatic cancer who was later treated with DNA damaging agents, on the basis of the observation of significant activity of this class of drugs against a personalized xenograft generated from the patient's surgically resected tumor. Mitomycin C treatment, selected on the basis of its robust preclinical activity in a personalized xenograft generated from the patient's tumor, resulted in long-lasting (36+ months) tumor response. Global genomic sequencing revealed biallelic inactivation of the gene encoding PalB2 protein in this patient's cancer; the mutation is predicted to disrupt BRCA1 and BRCA2 interactions critical to DNA double-strand break repair. This work suggests that inactivation of the PALB2 gene is a determinant of response to DNA damage in pancreatic cancer and a new target for personalizing cancer treatment. Integrating personalized xenografts with unbiased exomic sequencing led to customized therapy, tailored to the genetic environment of the patient's tumor, and identification of a new biomarker of drug response in a lethal cancer. ©2010 AACR.

  12. Response-only method for damage detection of beam-like structures using high accuracy frequencies with auxiliary mass spatial probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shuncong; Oyadiji, S. Olutunde; Ding, Kang

    2008-04-01

    This paper proposes a new approach based on auxiliary mass spatial probing using spectral centre correction method (SCCM), to provide a simple solution for damage detection by just using the response time history of beam-like structures. The natural frequencies of a damaged beam with a traversing auxiliary mass change due to change in the inertia of the beam as the auxiliary mass is traversed along the beam, as well as the point-to-point variations in the flexibility of the beam. Therefore the auxiliary mass can enhance the effects of the crack on the dynamics of the beam and, therefore, facilitate the identification and location of damage in the beam. That is, the auxiliary mass can be used to probe the dynamic characteristic of the beam by traversing the mass from one end of the beam to the other. However, it is impossible to obtain accurate modal frequencies by the direct operation of the fast Fourier transform (FFT) of the response data of the structure because the frequency spectrum can be only calculated from limited sampled time data which results in the well-known leakage effect. SCCM is identical to the energy centrobaric correction method (ECCM) which is a practical and effective method used in rotating mechanical fault diagnosis and which resolves the shortcoming of FFT and can provide high accuracy estimate of frequency, amplitude and phase. In the present work, the modal responses of damaged simply supported beams with auxiliary mass are computed using the finite element method (FEM). The graphical plots of the natural frequencies calculated by SCCM versus axial location of auxiliary mass are obtained. However, it is difficult to locate the crack directly from the curve of natural frequencies. A simple and fast method, the derivatives of natural frequency curve, is proposed in the paper which can provide crack information for damage detection of beam-like structures. The efficiency and practicability of the proposed method is illustrated via numerical

  13. High Frequency of AML1/RUNX1 Point Mutations in Radiation-Associated Myelodysplastic Syndrome Around Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site

    OpenAIRE

    Dinara, ZHARLYGANOVA; Hironori, HARADA; Yuka, HARADA; Sergey, SHINKAREV; Zhaxybay, ZHUMADILOV; Aigul, ZHUNUSOVA; Naylya J., TCHAIZHUNUSOVA; Kazbek N., APSALIKOV; Vadim, KEMAIKIN; Kassym, ZHUMADILOV; Noriyuki, KAWANO; Akiro, KIMURA; Masaharu, HOSHI; Department of Radiation Biophysics, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University; Department of Hematology and Oncology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University

    2008-01-01

    It is known that bone marrow is a sensitive organ to ionizing radiation, and many patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) have been diagnosed in radiation-treated cases and atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The AML1/RUNX1 gene has been known to be frequently mutated in MDS/AML patients among atomic bomb survivors and radiation therapy-related MDS/AML patients. In this study, we investigated the AML1 mutations in radiation-exposed patients wi...

  14. Sensitivity and Frequencies of Dystrophin Gene Mutations in Thai DMD/BMD Patients As Detected by Multiplex PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanyachai Sura

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, a lethal X-linked disease affecting 1 in 3500 male births, and its more benign variant, Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD, are caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Because of its large size, analysing the whole gene is impractical. Methods have been developed to detect the commonest mutations i.e. the deletions of the exons. Although these tests are highly specific, their sensitivity is inherently limited by the prevalence of deletions, which differs among different populations.

  15. Quasi-optical coherence vibration tomography technique for damage detection in beam-like structures based on auxiliary mass induced frequency shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Shuncong; Zhong, Jianfeng; Zhang, Qiukun; Maia, Nuno

    2017-09-01

    A novel quasi-optical coherence vibration tomography (Quasi-OCVT) measurement system suitable for structural damage detection is proposed by taking the concept of two-dimensional optical coherence vibration tomography (2D-OCVT) technique. An artificial quasi-interferogram fringe pattern (QIFP) similar to the interferogram of 2D-OCVT system, as a sensor, was pasted on the surface of a vibrating structure. Image sequences of QIFP were captured by a high-speed camera that worked as a detector. The period density of the imaged QIFP changed due to the structural vibration, from which the vibration information of the structure could be obtained. Noise influence on the measurement accuracy, torsional sensitivity and optical distortion effect of the Quasi-OCVT system were investigated. The efficiency and reliability of the proposed method were demonstrated by applying the system to damage detection of a cracked beam-like structure with a roving auxiliary mass. The roving of the mass along the cracked beam brings about the change of natural frequencies that could be obtained by the Quasi-OCVT technique. Therefore, frequency-shift curves can be achieved and these curves provide additional spatial information for structural damage detection. Same cases were also analyzed by the finite element method (FEM) and conventional accelerometer-based measurement method. Comparisons were carried out among these results. Results obtained by the proposed Quasi-OCVT method had a good agreement with the ones obtained by FEM, from which the damage could be directly detected. However, the results obtained by conventional accelerometer showed misleading ambiguous peaks at damage position owing to the mass effect on the structure, where the damage location cannot be identified confidently without further confirmation. The good performance of the cost-effective Quasi-OCVT method makes it attractive for vibration measurement and damage detection of beam-like structures.

  16. Frequency of the cholesteryl ester storage disease common LIPA E8SJM mutation (c.894G>A) in various racial and ethnic groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Stuart A; Liu, Benny; Nazarenko, Irina; Martis, Suparna; Kozlitina, Julia; Yang, Yao; Ramirez, Charina; Kasai, Yumi; Hyatt, Tommy; Peter, Inga; Desnick, Robert J

    2013-09-01

    Cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD) and Wolman disease are autosomal recessive later-onset and severe infantile disorders, respectively, which result from the deficient activity of lysosomal acid lipase (LAL). LAL is encoded by LIPA (10q23.31) and the most common mutation associated with CESD is an exon 8 splice junction mutation (c.894G>A; E8SJM), which expresses only ∼3%-5% of normally spliced LAL. However, the frequency of c.894G>A is unknown in most populations. To estimate the prevalence of CESD in different populations, the frequencies of the c.894G>A mutation were determined in 10,000 LIPA alleles from healthy African-American, Asian, Caucasian, Hispanic, and Ashkenazi Jewish individuals from the greater New York metropolitan area and 6,578 LIPA alleles from African-American, Caucasian, and Hispanic subjects enrolled in the Dallas Heart Study. The combined c.894G>A allele frequencies from the two cohorts ranged from 0.0005 (Asian) to 0.0017 (Caucasian and Hispanic), which translated to carrier frequencies of 1 in 1,000 to ∼1 in 300, respectively. No African-American heterozygotes were detected. Additionally, by surveying the available literature, c.894G>A was estimated to account for 60% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 51%-69%) of reported mutations among multiethnic CESD patients. Using this estimate, the predicted prevalence of CESD in the Caucasian and Hispanic populations is ∼0.8 per 100,000 (∼1 in 130,000; 95% CI: ∼1 in 90,000 to 1 in 170,000). These data indicate that CESD may be underdiagnosed in the general Caucasian and Hispanic populations, which is important since clinical trials of enzyme replacement therapy for LAL deficiency are currently being developed. Moreover, future studies on CESD prevalence in African and Asian populations may require full-gene LIPA sequencing to determine heterozygote frequencies, since c.894G>A is not common in these racial groups. Copyright © 2013 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  17. Frequency of V1016I and F1534C mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene in Aedes aegypti in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Leslie C; Ponce, Gustavo; Saavedra-Rodriguez, Karla; Lopez, Beatriz; Flores, Adriana E

    2015-06-01

    The V1016I and F1534C mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel gene have been associated with resistance to pyrethroids and DDT in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. A study was carried out to determine the frequency of I1016 and C1534 by real-time PCR in five natural populations of Ae. aegypti in Venezuela during 2008, 2010 and 2012, as well as in a strain selected with 0.14 µg of deltamethrin for 15 generations. In natural populations, frequencies of I1016 varied between 0.01 and 0.37, and frequencies of C1534 between 0.35 and 1.0. In the Pampanito strain, the frequency of I1016 increased from 0.02 in F1 up to 0.5 in F15 and from 0.35 up to fixation for C1534 after selection with deltamethrin. The results showed that C1534 frequencies are higher than I1016 frequencies in natural populations of Ae. aegypti in Venezuela, and that deltamethrin selected the C1534 more rapidly than I1016. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. High frequency of mutations in codon 98 of the peripheral myelin protein Po gene in 20 French CMT1 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rougher, H.; LeGuern, E. Gouider, R. [and others

    1996-03-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, characterized by distal muscle weakness and amyotrophy, decreased or absent tendon reflexes, and high arched feet, is the most common inherited peripheral neuropathy, with a prevalence of 1 in 2,500. Two types of CMT have been distinguished on the basis of nerve conduction velocities. CMT type 1 is the most frequent, with markedly slowed velocities ({<=}40 m/s) associated with hypertrophic onion bulb changes on nerve biopsy. Autosomal dominant CMT1 is genetically heterogeneous: CMT1A is caused by a 1.5-Mb duplication in 17p11.2 and, more rarely, by a point mutation in tha PMP22 (peripheral myelin protein, 22 kD) gene located in the duplicated region; CMT1B results from mutations in the Po (peripheral myelin protein zero) gene in 1q22-23. Forty-five percent (7/16) of the published mutations associated with CMT1 occur in exon 3 of Po. In order to determine the cause of CMT1 in 20 unrelated patients without 17p11.2 duplications, mutations were sought in exon 3 of Po with three techniques: nonradioactive SSCP, automated sequencing, and PCR enzymatic restriction. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  19. A Low Frequency of Losses in 11q Chromosome Is Associated with Better Outcome and Lower Rate of Genomic Mutations in Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ángel Hernández

    Full Text Available To analyze the impact of the 11q deleted (11q- cells in CLL patients on the time to first therapy (TFT and overall survival (OS, 2,493 patients with CLL were studied. 242 patients (9.7% had 11q-. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH studies showed a threshold of 40% of deleted cells to be optimal for showing that clinical differences in terms of TFT and OS within 11q- CLLs. In patients with ≥40% of losses in 11q (11q-H (74%, the median TFT was 19 months compared with 44 months in CLL patients with <40% del(11q (11q-L (P<0.0001. In the multivariate analysis, only the presence of 11q-L, mutated IGHV status, early Binet stage and absence of extended lymphadenopathy were associated with longer TFT. Patients with 11q-H had an OS of 90 months, while in the 11q-L group the OS was not reached (P = 0.008. The absence of splenomegaly (P = 0.02, low LDH (P = 0.018 or β2M (P = 0.006, and the presence of 11q-L (P = 0.003 were associated with a longer OS. In addition, to detect the presence of mutations in the ATM, TP53, NOTCH1, SF3B1, MYD88, FBXW7, XPO1 and BIRC3 genes, a select cohort of CLL patients with losses in 11q was sequenced by next-generation sequencing of amplicons. Eighty % of CLLs with 11q- showed mutations and fewer patients with low frequencies of 11q- had mutations among genes examined (50% vs 94.1%, P = 0.023. In summary, CLL patients with <40% of 11q- had a long TFT and OS that could be associated with the presence of fewer mutated genes.

  20. Nuclear topology modulates the mutational landscapes of cancer genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kyle S; Liu, Lin L; Ganesan, Shridar; Michor, Franziska; De, Subhajyoti

    2017-11-01

    Nuclear organization of genomic DNA affects processes of DNA damage and repair, yet its effects on mutational landscapes in cancer genomes remain unclear. Here we analyzed genome-wide somatic mutations from 366 samples of six cancer types. We found that lamina-associated regions, which are typically localized at the nuclear periphery, displayed higher somatic mutation frequencies than did the interlamina regions at the nuclear core. This effect was observed even after adjustment for features such as GC percentage, chromatin, and replication timing. Furthermore, mutational signatures differed between the nuclear core and periphery, thus indicating differences in the patterns of DNA-damage or DNA-repair processes. For instance, smoking and UV-related signatures, as well as substitutions at certain motifs, were more enriched in the nuclear periphery. Thus, the nuclear architecture may influence mutational landscapes in cancer genomes beyond the previously described effects of chromatin structure and replication timing.

  1. Frequency of Iatrogenic damage to adjacent tooth during class II cavity preparation among dental students at Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Yazdani

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available   Background and Aims: Iatrogenic damage to adjacent tooth during proximal cavity preparation is one of the most common side effects in operative dentistry. The aim of this study was to determine prevalence of iatrogenic damages to adjacent tooth during the preparation of proximal Class II cavities among undergraduate students at dental faculty of Tehran University of Medical Sciences in 2010 .   Materials and Methods: 106 posterior permanent teeth which had Class II decay with sound proximal surfaces of adjacent teeth were selected and restored by dental students awarding the aims of the present study. After finishing restoration, proximal surfaces were completely dried by air and evaluated with dental chair light. In doubtful cases, surfaces were evaluated with × 3 magnification. Damages were classified into 2 groups; abrasion and groove. Data were analyzed using Fishers exact and Pearson chi square tests .   Results: The frequency of adjacent surfaces damage were 57.5%, with 31.1% damages as abrasion and 26.4% as groove. Students who used matrix band and wedge in proximal area as preventive instruments showed 53.4% damages and other students showed 57.3% damages (P>0.05. A significantly higher number of females and students at restorative course level (3 used wedge and matrix band than males and students at restorative course level (4 for protecting adjacent teeth (P<0.05.   Conclusion: According to the high percentage of iatrogenic damages on adjacent sound teeth in class II cavity preparation, teaching of preventive methods and using proper techniques is necessary for dental students as future dentists.

  2. DNA damage in lung after oral exposure to diesel exhaust particles in Big Blue (R) rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Anne Kirstine; Farombi, E.O.; Møller, P.

    2004-01-01

    , in terms of markers of DNA damage, mutations and repair, in the lung of Big Blue(R) rats fed a diet with 0, 0.2, 0.8, 2, 8, 20 or 80 mg DEP/kg feed for 21 days. There was no significant increase in the mutation frequency in the cII gene. However, an increase of DNA damage measured as DNA strand breaks...

  3. Characterization, at the mesoscopic and microscopic scales, of the low-frequency fatigue-corrosion damage in a 316L steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, J.M.; Ranaivoarisoa, A.; Desjardins, D.; Puiggali, M.

    1994-01-01

    The relation existing between the stress corrosion behaviour and the fatigue-corrosion behaviour at low frequencies (inferior to 1 Hz), concerning initiation as well as propagation, of a 316L steel in a Mg Cl 2 medium at 117 deg C, is studied. Fatigue-corrosion tests are realized using fixed amplitude traction-compression type stresses. The effects of stress frequency on rupture life and propagation speed, are studied. The damage kinetics study is completed with crack morphological observations realized with a specially developed optical technique. 2 figs., 2 refs

  4. Insight to UV-induced formation of laser damage on LiB(3)O(5) optical surfaces during long-term sum-frequency generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, S; Andresen, A; Merschjann, C; Zimmermann, B; Prinz, M; Imlau, M

    2007-06-11

    Microscopic investigations of UV-induced formation of laser damage on LiB(3)O(5) optical surfaces during long-term sum-frequency generation (SFG) uncovers a significant growth of a SiO(2)-amorphous layer spatially limited to the illuminated area. The layer gives rise to a catastrophic break-down of the LiB(3)O(5)-output surface upon long-term laser operation even at intensities far below the laser-induced damage threshold. The interaction of UV laser light, LiB(3)O(5) surface and foreign atoms in the ambient atmosphere is discussed in the frame of a two-step process for surface-damage formation.

  5. Antibodies to Mutated Citrullinated Vimentin in Rheumatoid Arthritis: Diagnostic Value, Association with Radiological Damage and Axial Skeleton Affection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howaida E. Mansour

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Early definitive diagnosis and effective treatment are mandatory in rheumatoid arthritis (RA as it can halt the disease progression and subsequent joints destruction. Objective: To investigate the diagnostic and prognostic value of anti-mutated citrullinated vimentin (anti-MCV and its correlation with disease activity, peripheral and axial skeleton affection in RA patients. Patients and methods: A total of 123 patients with different rheumatic diseases were enrolled in a prospective-two year study at Ain Shams University hospital: 64 patients with RA and 59 patients with other rheumatic diseases as controls. RA patients were fulfilling the traditional and the new ACR/EULAR diagnostic criteria for RA. They have been followed up for two years. At baseline, all RA patients were subjected to: Clinical assessment of disease activity by taking full histories, general and local examination, measurement of 28 joint count of tender and swollen joints with calculation of disease activity score (DAS-28 for each patient. Complete blood count, erythrocytes sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein and rheumatoid factor titers were performed. Anti-MCV IgG immunoglobulins’ assay was performed at the study endpoint by ELISA. RA patients were then classified into; anti-MCV positive and anti-MCV negative groups for statistical comparison. Plain X-ray was performed on the peripheral joints and scored by the Simple Erosion Narrowing score (SEN-score. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI scans were carried out to 22 RA patients on cervical and lumbosacral regions. Results: Anti-MCV antibodies were found to be of high sensitivity (79.6% and specificity (96.6% in diagnosing RA. The area under the curve was 0.893 at 95% confidence interval (CI, confers an odds ratio of 23.5. Anti-MCV positive RA patients had significantly higher DAS-28 and SEN-scores than anti-MCV negative patients; who were found to have more benign disease with lower incidence of

  6. A frameshift mutation in MC1R and a high frequency of somatic reversions cause black spotting in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kijas, J M; Moller, M; Plastow, G; Andersson, L

    2001-06-01

    Black spotting on a red or white background in pigs is determined by the E(P) allele at the MC1R/Extension locus. A previous comparison of partial MC1R sequences revealed that E(P) shares a missense mutation (D121N) with the E(D2) allele for dominant black color. Sequence analysis of the entire coding region now reveals a second mutation in the form of a 2-bp insertion at codon 23 (nt67insCC). This mutation expands a tract of six C nucleotides to eight and introduces a premature stop codon at position 56. This frameshift mutation is expected to cause a recessive red color, which was in fact observed in some breeds with the E(P) allele present (Tamworth and Hereford). RT-PCR analyses were conducted using skin samples taken from both spotted and background areas of spotted pigs. The background red area had transcript only from the mutant nt67insCC MC1R allele, whereas the black spot also contained a transcript without the 2-bp insertion. This indicates that black spots are due to somatic reversion events that restore the frame and MC1R function. The phenotypic expression of the E(P) allele is highly variable and the associated coat color ranges from red, red with black spots, white with black spots, to almost completely solid black. In several breeds of pigs the phenotypic manifestation of this allele has been modified by selection for or against black spots.

  7. Frequency of c.35delG Mutation in GJB2 Gene (Connexin 26 in Syrian Patients with Nonsyndromic Hearing Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazem Kaheel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hearing impairments (HI are the most common birth defect worldwide. Very large numbers of genes have been identified but the most profound is GJB2. The clinical interest regarding this gene is very pronounced due to its high carrier frequency (0.5–5.4% across different ethnic groups. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of common GJB2 mutations in Syrian patients with profound sensorineural HI. Methods. We carried out PCR, restriction enzyme based screening, and sequencing of 132 Syrian patients diagnosed clinically with hereditary deafness for different GJB2 mutations. Results. The result revealed that, in GJB2 gene, c.35delG is the most prevalent among affected studied subjects (13.64%, followed by c.457G>A (2.4%. Conclusion. The benefit of this study on the one hand is its first report of prelingual deafness causative gene mutations identified by sequencing technology in the Syrian families. It is obvious from the results that the deployment in biomedical research is highly effective and has a great impact on the ability to uncover the cause of genetic variation in different genetic diseases.

  8. The frequency of a disease-causing point mutation in the gene coding for medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase in sudden infant death syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banner, Jytte; Gregersen, N; Kølvraa, S

    1993-01-01

    syndrome is still a matter of controversy. The present study investigated 120 well-defined cases of sudden infant death syndrome in order to detect the frequency of the most common disease-causing point mutation in the gene coding for medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (G985) compared with the frequency...... in the general population. A highly specific polymerase chain reaction assay was applied on dried blood spots. No over-representation of homo- or heterozygosity for G985 appears to exist in such a strictly defined population, for which reason it may be more relevant to look at a broader spectrum of clinical...... presentations of inherited metabolic disorders and examine a wider range of sudden death in infancy....

  9. SLC45A2 mutation frequency in Oculocutaneous Albinism Italian patients doesn't differ from other European studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauri, Lucia; Barone, Luca; Al Oum, Muna; Del Longo, Alessandra; Piozzi, Elena; Manfredini, Emanuela; Stanzial, Franco; Benedicenti, Francesco; Penco, Silvana; Patrosso, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Oculocutaneous Albinism (OCA) is a heterogeneous group of inherited diseases involving hair, skin and eyes. To date, six forms are recognized on the effects of different melanogenesis genes. OCA4 is caused by mutations in SLC45A2 showing a heterogeneous phenotype ranging from white hair, blue irides and nystagmus to brown/black hair, brown irides and no nystagmus. The high clinic variety often leads to misdiagnosis. Our aim is to contribute to OCA4 diagnosis defining SLC45A2 genetic variants in Italian patients with OCA without any TYR, OCA2 and TYRP1 gene defects. After the clinical diagnosis of OCA, all patients received genetic counseling and genetic test. Automatic sequencing of TYR, OCA2, and TYRP1 genes was performed on DNA of 117 albino patients. Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) was carried out on TYR and OCA2 genes to increase the mutation rate. SLC45A2 gene sequencing was then executed in the patients with a single mutation in one of the TYR, OCA2, TYRP1 genes and in the patients, which resulted negative at the screening of these genes. SLC45A2 gene analysis was performed in 41 patients and gene alterations were found in 5 patients. Four previously reported SLC45A2 mutations were found: p.G100S, p.W202C, p.A511E and c.986delC, and three novel variants were identified: p.M265L, p.H94D, and c.1156+1G>A. All the alterations have been detected in the group of patients without mutations in the other OCA genes. Three new variants were identified in OCA4 gene; the analysis allowed the classification of a patient previously misdiagnosed as OA1 because of skin and hair pigmentation presence. The molecular defects in SLC45A2 gene represent the 3.4% in this cohort of Italian patients, similar to other Caucasian populations; our data differ from those previously published by an Italian researcher group, obtained on a smaller cohort of patients. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Frequency of polymorphism -262 c/t in catalase gene and oxidative damage in Slovak children with bronchial asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babusikova, Eva; Jesenak, Milos; Evinova, Andrea; Banovcin, Peter; Dobrota, Dusan

    2013-12-01

    Bronchial asthma is a complex disease in which genetic factors, environmental factors and oxidative damage are responsible for the initiation and modulation of disease progression. If antioxidant mechanisms fail, reactive oxygen species damage the biomolecules followed by progression of the disease. Catalase is one of the most important endogenous enzymatic antioxidants. In the present study, we examined the hypothesis that increased oxidative damage and polymorphism in the CAT gene (-262 promoter region, C/T) are associated with childhood bronchial asthma. Genotyping of the polymorphisms in the CAT gene in healthy (249) and asthmatic children (248) was performed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Markers of oxidative damage: content of sulfhydryl groups and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances were determined by spectrophotometry in children. The TT genotype of catalase was more frequent among the asthmatic patients (22.6%) than in healthy children (4.8%) (odds ratio=5.63; 95% confidence interval=2.93-10.81, P<.001). The amount of sulfhydryl groups decreased significantly and conversely, the content of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances increased significantly in bronchial asthma and in catalase TT genotype compared to other catalase genotypes of this gene. These results suggest that catalase polymorphism might participate in development of bronchial asthma and in enhanced oxidative damage in asthmatic children. Genetic variation of enzymatic antioxidants may modulate disease risk. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of the Wilson disease gene: Genomic organization; alternative splicing; structure/function predictions; and population frequencies of disease-specific mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrukhin, K.; Chernov, I.; Ross, B.M. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Wilson disease (WD) gene has recently been identified as a putative copper-transporting ATPase with high amino acid similarity with the Menkes disease (MNK) gene. We have further characterized the WD gene by extending the 5{prime}-coding and non-coding DNA sequence and elucidating the intron/exon structure and genomic organization. Analysis of RNA transcripts from liver, brain, kidney and placenta reveals extensive alternative splicing which may provide a mechanism to regulate the quantity of functional protein product. Comparative sequence analysis shows that WD and MNK belong to the sub-family of heavy metal-transporting ATPases with several characterizing features which include unique amino acid motifs and distinct N-terminal and C-terminal transmembrane structure. Our data indicate that the 600 amino acid metal binding portion of the WD and MNK proteins was formed by gene duplication events and splicing of the 6 metal binding domain segment to a common ancestral protein. We have raised a WD-specific anti-peptide antibody to the N-terminal region and are beginning to explore the cellular and intracellular location of the WD protein. The metal-binding segment of the WD protein has been expressed in E. coli and metal binding assays are underway to characterize this aspect of the protein`s function. We have identified numerous disease-specific mutations and developed a rapid {open_quotes}reverse dot blot{close_quotes} screening protocol to determine mutation frequencies in different populations. The most common mutation disrupts the characteristic SEHP motif and accounts for more than 40% of WD cases in North American, Russian, and Swedish populations. This mutation has not been observed in our limited Sicilian sample.

  12. The effect of fast neutrons, as compared with X-rays upon mutation spectrum and mutation frequency in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. and Hordeum vulgare L. in relation to evaluation of the BARN-reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellaert, L.M.W.

    1980-01-01

    Explanations were sought for the 'saturation' in mutant frequency, observed after relatively high irradiation doses (fast neutrons and X-rays) in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh, when scoring for mutants is done in the siliques (Mueller's embryotest) of the 'main' inflorescence of M 1 -plants. Studies have been carried out on the effect of the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT) during irradiation, on fast neutron and X-ray induced M 1 -ovule sterility, M 2 -embryonic lethals, M 2 -chlorophyll mutants and M 2 -viable mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana. It was found that DTT provides considerable protection against both fast neutron and X-ray induced genetic damage. (Auth.)

  13. Identification of two novel missense WFS1 mutations, H696Y and R703H, in patients with non-syndromic low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi; Cheng, Jing; Lu, Yanping; Li, Jianzhong; Lu, Yu; Jin, Zhanguo; Dai, Pu; Wang, Rongguang; Yuan, Huijun

    2011-02-01

    Non-syndromic low-frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL) is an unusual type of hearing loss in which frequencies ≤2000 Hz predominantly are affected. To date, different mutations in two genes, DIAPH1 and WFS1, have been found to be associated with LFSNHL. Here, we report a five-generation Chinese family with postlingual and progressive LFSNHL. We mapped the disease locus to a 2.5 Mb region on chromosome 4p16 between markers SNP_A-2167174 and D4S431, overlapping with the DFNA6/14/38 locus. Sequencing of candidate gene revealed a heterozygous c.2086C>T substitution in exon 8 of WFS1, leading to p.H696Y substitution at the C-terminus of Wolframin (WFS1). In addition, we performed mutational screening of WFS1 in 37 sporadic patients, 7-50 years of age, with LFSNHL. We detected a heterozygous c.2108G>A substitution in exon 8 of WFS1, leading to p.R703H substitution in a patient. The H696 and R703 in WFS1 are highly conserved across species, including human, orangutan, rat, mouse, and frog (Xenopus). Sequence analysis demonstrated the absence of c.2086C>T or c.2108G>A substitutions in the WFS1 genes among 200 unrelated control subjects of Chinese background, supporting the hypothesis that they represent causative mutations, and not rare polymorphisms. Our data provide additional molecular and clinical information for establishing a better genotype-phenotype correlation for LFSNHL. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Identification of protein-damaging mutations in 10 swine taste receptors and 191 appetite-reward genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clop, Alex; Sharaf, Abdoallah; Castelló, Anna; Ramos-Onsins, Sebastián; Cirera, Susanna; Mercadé, Anna; Derdak, Sophia; Beltran, Sergi; Huisman, Abe; Fredholm, Merete; van As, Pieter; Sánchez, Armand

    2016-08-26

    Taste receptors (TASRs) are essential for the body's recognition of chemical compounds. In the tongue, TASRs sense the sweet and umami and the toxin-related bitter taste thus promoting a particular eating behaviour. Moreover, their relevance in other organs is now becoming evident. In the intestine, they regulate nutrient absorption and gut motility. Upon ligand binding, TASRs activate the appetite-reward circuitry to signal the nervous system and keep body homeostasis. With the aim to identify genetic variation in the swine TASRs and in the genes from the appetite and the reward pathways, we have sequenced the exons of 201 TASRs and appetite-reward genes from 304 pigs belonging to ten breeds, wild boars and to two phenotypically extreme groups from a F2 resource with data on growth and fat deposition. We identified 2,766 coding variants 395 of which were predicted to have a strong impact on protein sequence and function. 334 variants were present in only one breed and at predicted alternative allele frequency (pAAF) ≥ 0.1. The Asian pigs and the wild boars showed the largest proportion of breed specific variants. We also compared the pAAF of the two F2 groups and found that variants in TAS2R39 and CD36 display significant differences suggesting that these genes could influence growth and fat deposition. We developed a 128-variant genotyping assay and confirmed 57 of these variants. We have identified thousands of variants affecting TASRs as well as genes involved in the appetite and the reward mechanisms. Some of these genes have been already associated to taste preferences, appetite or behaviour in humans and mouse. We have also detected indications of a potential relationship of some of these genes with growth and fat deposition, which could have been caused by changes in taste preferences, appetite or reward and ultimately impact on food intake. A genotyping array with 57 variants in 31 of these genes is now available for genotyping and start elucidating

  15. Multi-parametric study of temperature and thermal damage of tumor exposed to high-frequency nanosecond-pulsed electric fields based on finite element simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Yan; Rui, Shaoqin; Li, Chengxiang; Yao, Chenguo; Xu, Jin; Bian, Changhao; Tang, Xuefeng

    2017-07-01

    High-frequency nanosecond-pulsed electric fields were recently introduced for tumor or abnormal tissue ablation to solve some problems of conventional electroporation. However, it is necessary to study the thermal effects of high-field-intensity nanosecond pulses inside tissues. The multi-parametric analysis performed here is based on a finite element model of liver tissue with a tumor that has been punctured by a pair of needle electrodes. The pulse voltage used in this study ranges from 1 to 4 kV, the pulse width ranges from 50 to 500 ns, and the repetition frequency is between 100 kHz and 1 MHz. The total pulse length is 100 μs, and the pulse burst repetition frequency is 1 Hz. Blood flow and metabolic heat generation have also been considered. Results indicate that the maximum instantaneous temperature at 100 µs can reach 49 °C, with a maximum instantaneous temperature at 1 s of 40 °C, and will not cause thermal damage during single pulse bursts. By parameter fitting, we can obtain maximum instantaneous temperature at 100 µs and 1 s for any parameter values. However, higher temperatures will be achieved and may cause thermal damage when multiple pulse bursts are applied. These results provide theoretical basis of pulse parameter selection for future experimental researches.

  16. Time-synchronized wireless strain and damage measurements at multiple locations in CFRP laminate using oscillating frequency changes and spectral analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, Ryosuke; Todoroki, Akira; Takahashi, Kosuke

    2008-01-01

    Wireless monitoring of the health of CFRP structures reduces the cost and time of inspections and can be usefully applied for continuous monitoring. In a previous study, we presented a wireless sensor for detection of internal delamination in a CFRP laminate. The method utilizes a simple electrical resistance change in CFRP and so monitors delamination at only one location. For monitoring of large-scale structures, however, many sensors have to be distributed to cover the structure. A major problem for using many sensors is time synchronization among sensors. To overcome the problem and enable strain/damage to be monitored at multiple locations with time synchronization, we develop a simple wireless strain/damage sensor that consists of a bridge circuit, voltage-controlled oscillator and amplifiers. Since the sensor does not need A/D conversion procedures or memory storing, there is no time delay. Each sensor has an original basic frequency that changes in accordance with the electrical resistance. The frequencies from the multiple sensors are transmitted to a receiver. Using a short-time maximum entropy method, the received waves are converted to multiple electrical resistance data. The proposed method is applied to CFRP laminates and oscillating frequencies are measured in real time. The results show that the system successfully measures applied strain and detects fiber breakage at multiple locations in CFRP laminates with time synchronization

  17. Mutations in the Wolfram syndrome 1 gene (WFS1) are a common cause of low frequency sensorineural hearing loss.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bespalova, I.N.; Camp, G. van; Bom, S.J.H.; Brown, D.J.; Cryns, K.; Wan, A.T. de; Erson, A.E.; Flothmann, K.; Kunst, H.P.M.; Kurnool, P.; Sivakumaran, T.A.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Leal, S.M.; Burmeister, M.; Lesperance, M.M.

    2001-01-01

    Non-syndromic low frequency sensorineural hearing loss (LFSNHL) affecting only 2000 Hz and below is an unusual type of hearing loss that worsens over time without progressing to profound deafness. This type of LFSNHL may be associated with mild tinnitus but is not associated with vertigo. We have

  18. A model for damage load and its implications for the evolution of bacterial aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chao

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Deleterious mutations appearing in a population increase in frequency until stopped by natural selection. The ensuing equilibrium creates a stable frequency of deleterious mutations or the mutational load. Here I develop the comparable concept of a damage load, which is caused by harmful non-heritable changes to the phenotype. A damage load also ensues when the increase of damage is opposed by selection. The presence of a damage load favors the evolution of asymmetrical transmission of damage by a mother to her daughters. The asymmetry is beneficial because it increases fitness variance, but it also leads to aging or senescence. A mathematical model based on microbes reveals that a cell lineage dividing symmetrically is immortal if lifetime damage rates do not exceed a threshold. The evolution of asymmetry allows the lineage to persist above the threshold, but the lineage becomes mortal. In microbes with low genomic mutation rates, it is likely that the damage load is much greater than the mutational load. In metazoans with higher genomic mutation rates, the damage and the mutational load could be of the same magnitude. A fit of the model to experimental data shows that Escherichia coli cells experience a damage rate that is below the threshold and are immortal under the conditions examined. The model estimates the asymmetry level of E. coli to be low but sufficient for persisting at higher damage rates. The model also predicts that increasing asymmetry results in diminishing fitness returns, which may explain why the bacterium has not evolved higher asymmetry.

  19. Induced micro-mutations in rice - the frequency and spectrum of gamma ray induced height variations in rice variety-Jaya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, N.K.; Ninan, C.A.

    1975-01-01

    Seeds of rice variety, Jaya, treated with moderate doses of (10, 20 and 30 kR) gamma rays were subjected to study the relative magnitude of induced variability and the type of mutations induced for height of plant in M 2 and M 3 generations. Progenies of 3352 M 1 spikes, totalling to 35691 M 2 plants and their subsequent progenies in M 3 were analysed. To get wider variability, very large populations in all the generations were studied. The mean value, genetic variance and phenotypic frequency distribution with and between generations were studied. The treated population showed no significant shift in mean values from that of control. The variance was greater in the irradiated material compared to control. The variability was found to shift in both plus and minus direction from that of control with a higher frequency in the minus direction in M 2 . A high frequency of dwarf mutants was observed in 20 kR treated population in the M 2 generation. The segregation ratio was higher in M 2 compared to M 3 generation. (author)

  20. [High-frequency rotation sensation function damage of the crista of the horizontal semicircular canal induced by gentamicin and its morphological basis.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; He, Ming; Wang, Wu-Qing

    2009-12-25

    The goal of the present study was to explore high-frequency rotation sensation function damage of the crista of the horizontal semicircular canal induced by gentamicin and its morphological basis. The guinea pigs were randomly divided into four groups (group 1, 2, 3 and control group, n=20). The animals of treated groups received gentamicin subcutaneously (50 mg/kg per day) for 1 week (group 1), 2 weeks (group 2) and 3 weeks (group 3), respectively. The animals of control group were administered with equal volume of saline subcutaneously. Videonystagmography (VNG) evoked by ice water or high-frequency rotations, and vestibular evoked potential (VsEP) evoked by low- and high-frequency rotations were recorded after the administration. After VNG and VsEP were examined, the cristae of the horizontal semicircular canals were prepared for scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The results are as follows: (1) In VNG examination, after ice water stimulation, no obvious nystagmus was observed in the animals of group 3, and there was no significant difference in nystagmus frequency and duration among group 1, 2 and control group (P>0.05). After high- frequency rotations, no obvious nystagmus was yet observed in the animals of group 3. There were significant differences in the nystagmus frequency and duration of the VNG waves between the experimental group 2 and control group (P0.05). (2) In VsEP examination, there was no significant difference in the parameters of VsEP among group 1, 2 and control group (P>0.05), and VsEP was not observed in group 3 after low-frequency rotations. After high- frequency rotations, compared with control group, the latencies and amplitudes of P1 and P2 in group 2 significantly decreased (P0.05). Group 3 had no response of VsEP to high-frequency rotations. (3) Electron microscopy was used to observe the crista hair cells of the four groups. In control group, the hair cells were normal. In group 1, almost normal appearance with slight

  1. A nationwide survey of PMM2-CDG in Italy: high frequency of a mild neurological variant associated with the L32R mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, Rita; Carrozzi, M; Parini, R; Battini, R; Martinelli, D; Elia, M; Spada, M; Lilliu, F; Ciana, G; Burlina, A; Leuzzi, V; Leoni, M; Sturiale, L; Matthijs, G; Jaeken, J; Di Rocco, M; Garozzo, D; Fiumara, A

    2015-01-01

    PMM2-CDG (PMM2 gene mutations) is the most common congenital disorder of N-glycosylation. We conducted a nationwide survey to characterize the frequency, clinical features, glycosylation and genetic correlates in Italian patients with PMM2-CDG. Clinical information was obtained through a questionnaire filled in by the referral physicians including demographics, neurological and systemic features, neuroimaging data and genotype. Glycosylation analyses of serum transferrin were complemented by MALDI-Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-MS). Between 1996 and 2012, data on 37 Italian patients with PMM2-CDG were collected. All the patients with a severe phenotype were unable to walk unaided, 84 % had severe intellectual disability and 81 % microcephaly. Conversely, among 17 mildly affected patients 82 % had independent ambulation, 64 % had borderline to mild intellectual disability and 35 % microcephaly. Epilepsy and stroke-like events did not occur among patients with the mild phenotype. The rate and extent of systemic involvement were more pronounced in severely affected patients. The L32R misfolding mutation of the PMM2 gene occurred in 70 % of the patients with the mild phenotype and was associated with a less severe underglycosylation of serum Tf at MALDI-MS analyses. Despite their different disease severity, all patients had progressive (olivo)ponto-cerebellar atrophy that was the hallmark clinical feature for the diagnosis. A mild neurological phenotype of PMM2-CDG marked by preserved ambulatory ability and autonomy and associated with L32R mutation is particularly frequent in Italy. PMM2-CDG should be considered in patients with even mild developmental disability and/or unexplained progressive cerebellar atrophy.

  2. Radiation damage to thyroid gland may be the reason of increase in frequency of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and other hematological diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinogradova, Yu.E.; Shinkarkina, A.P.; Poverennyj, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Distribution of autoimmune thyroidities in the patients with diseases of blood system was investigated. Attribute of autoimmune thyroidities was revealed by the detection of antimicrosomal antibodies. It was established that the autoimmune thyroidities are more often in patients with various hematological diseases than in control group. It is supposed that the increase in frequency of some hematological diseases in residents suffered from the Chernobyl accident can be defined not only by the influence of the radiation on blood system, but also can be connected with damage to thyroid glands [ru

  3. Detection of Ultra-Rare Mitochondrial Mutations in Breast Stem Cells by Duplex Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Eun Hyun; Hirohata, Kensen; Kohrn, Brendan F.; Fox, Edward J.; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Loeb, Lawrence A.

    2015-01-01

    Long-lived adult stem cells could accumulate non-repaired DNA damage or mutations that increase the risk of tumor formation. To date, studies on mutations in stem cells have concentrated on clonal (homoplasmic) mutations and have not focused on rarely occurring stochastic mutations that may accumulate during stem cell dormancy. A major challenge in investigating these rare mutations is that conventional next generation sequencing (NGS) methods have high error rates. We have established a new method termed Duplex Sequencing (DS), which detects mutations with unprecedented accuracy. We present a comprehensive analysis of mitochondrial DNA mutations in human breast normal stem cells and non-stem cells using DS. The vast majority of mutations occur at low frequency and are not detectable by NGS. The most prevalent point mutation types are the C>T/G>A and A>G/T>C transitions. The mutations exhibit a strand bias with higher prevalence of G>A, T>C, and A>C mutations on the light strand of the mitochondrial genome. The overall rare mutation frequency is significantly lower in stem cells than in the corresponding non-stem cells. We have identified common and unique non-homoplasmic mutations between non-stem and stem cells that include new mutations which have not been reported previously. Four mutations found within the MT-ND5 gene (m.12684G>A, m.12705C>T, m.13095T>C, m.13105A>G) are present in all groups of stem and non-stem cells. Two mutations (m.8567T>C, m.10547C>G) are found only in non-stem cells. This first genome-wide analysis of mitochondrial DNA mutations may aid in characterizing human breast normal epithelial cells and serve as a reference for cancer stem cell mutation profiles. PMID:26305705

  4. Mutagenic and epigenetic influence of caffeine on the frequencies of UV-induced ouabain-resistant Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Chia-Cheng; Philipps, C.; Trosko, J.E.; Hart, R.W.

    1977-01-01

    Caffeine, given as a post-treatment to UV-irradiated Chinese hamster cells in vitro, modified the frequency of induced mutations at the ouabain resistance locus. Mutation frequencies were increased when caffeine was added only for the DNA repair and mutation fixation period. When caffeine was added after the DNA repair and mutation fixation period, or immediately after DNA damage and for the entire repair and selection period, mutation frequencies were reduced. A hypothesis, given to explain both results, is that caffeine, by blocking a constitutive 'error-free' postreplication repair process, allows an 'error-prone' DNA repair process to produce many mutations. Moreover, caffeine, possibly by modifying C-AMP metabolism, causes a repression of induced mutations which, in effect, explains its anti-mutagenic and anti-carcinogenic properties

  5. Indicators of Macromolecular Oxidative Damage and Antioxidant Defence Examinees Exposed to the Radar Frequencies 1.5 - 10.9 GHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marjanovic, A.M.; Flajs, D.; Pavicic, I.; Domijan, A.

    2011-01-01

    Radar is an object-detection system which uses microwaves (Mw). As a result of increased use of radar there is a rising concern regarding health effects of Mw radiation on human body. Living organisms are complex electrochemical systems being evolved in a relatively narrow range of well-defined environmental parameters. For life to be maintained these parameters must be kept within their normal range, since deviations can induce biochemical effects causing cell function impairment and disease. Some theories indicate connection between Mw radiation, oxidative damage as well as antioxidant defence of organism. Aim of this study was to evaluate level and damage of macromolecular structures - proteins and lipids in blood of men occupationally exposed to Mw radiation. Concentration of glutathione (GSH), a known indicator of organism antioxidant defence, was also determined. Blood samples were collected from 27 male workers occupationally exposed to radar frequencies 1.5 to 10.9 GHz. Corresponding control group (N = 8) was a part of study. Concentrations of total and oxidised proteins, protein carbonyls, and GSH were measured by spectrophotometric method, while malondialdeyde (MDA), product of lipid peroxidation, was determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Gained concentrations of oxidised proteins, GSH and MDA were presented in relation to total proteins. Concentration of oxidised proteins between control and exposed group of examinees did not show any significant statistical difference. However, concentration of GSH in exposed group was found considerably decreased, while concentration of MDA was found to be increased. Results indicate that Mw radiation of radar operating at frequencies 1.5 - 10.9 GHz could cause damage to proteins and lipids in addition to impairment of antioxidant defence of organism. (author)

  6. Mutation rate and spectrum of spontaneous mutations of deinococcus radiodurans under rifampin stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hua Xiaoting; Wang Chao; Huang Lifen

    2010-01-01

    An rpoB/Rif r mutation analysis system has been developed from D. radiodurans based on the conservation of rpoB gene. To investigate the concentration effect of rifampin on the spontaneous mutation rate and spectrum of D. radiodurans, the mutation frequencies and rates of D. radiodurans were measured under a wide concentration range of 5∼50 μg /ml of rifampin. It was found that the mutation rate of the bacterium in 5μg /ml of rifampin was significantly higher than those in 25 and 50μg /ml rifampin. Rifampin had concentration-dependent effect not only on the mutation rate but also on the mutation spectrum. The different mutation spectrum under different concentration of rifampin suggested that D. radiodurans might change its anti-mutant strategy under reactive oxygen species (ROS) stress caused by low concentration of rifampin. It is speculated that D. radiodurans focuses on preventing base substitution mutation under low concentration of rifampin as ROS induces mainly oxidative base damage. (authors)

  7. Frequencies of CCR5-D32, CCR2-64I and SDF1-3’A mutations in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV seropositive subjects and seronegative individuals from the state of Pará in Brazilian Amazonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Andreza de Pinho Lott Carvalhaes

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of genetic polymorphisms of chemokine receptors CCR5-delta32, CCR2-64I and chemokine (SDF1-3’A mutations were studied in 110 Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1 seropositive individuals (seropositive group and 139 seronegative individuals (seronegative group from the population of the northern Brazilian city of Belém which is the capital of the state of Pará in the Brazilian Amazon. The CCR5-delta32 mutation was found in the two groups at similar frequencies, i.e. 2.2% for the seronegative group and 2.7% for the seropositive group. The frequencies of the SDF1-3’A mutation were 21.0% for the seronegative group and 15.4% for the seropositive group, and the CCR2-64I allele was found at frequencies of 12.5% for the seronegative group and 5.4% for the seropositive group. Genotype distributions were consistent with Hardy-Weinberg expectations in both groups, suggesting that none of the three mutations has a detectable selective effect. Difference in the allelic and genotypic frequencies was statistically significant for the CCR2 locus, the frequency in the seronegative group being twice that found in the seropositive group. This finding may indicate a protective effect of the CCR2-64I mutation in relation to HIV transmission. However, considering that the CCR2-64I mutation has been more strongly associated with a decreased risk for progression for AIDS than to the resistance to the HIV infection, this could reflect an aspect of population structure or a Type I error.

  8. The effects of microgravity on induced mutation in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, A; Ohnishi, K; Takahashi, S; Masukawa, M; Sekikawa, K; Amano, T; Nakano, T; Nagaoka, S; Ohnishi, T

    2001-01-01

    We examined whether microgravity influences the induced-mutation frequencies through in vivo experiments during space flight aboard the space shuttle Discovery (STS-91). We prepared dried samples of repair-deficient strains and parental strains of Escherichia (E.) coli and Saccharomyces (S.) cerevisiae given DNA damage treatment. After culture in space, we measured the induced-mutation frequencies and SOS-responses under microgravity. The experimental findings indicate that almost the same induced-mutation frequencies and SOS-responses of space samples were observed in both strains compared with the ground control samples. It is suggested that microgravity might not influence induced-mutation frequencies and SOS-responses at the stages of DNA replication and/or DNA repair. In addition, we developed a new experimental apparatus for space experiments to culture and freeze stocks of E. coli and S. cerevisiae cells. c2001 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. High frequency of the recurrent c.1310_1313delAAGA BRCA2 mutation in the North-East of Morocco and implication for hereditary breast-ovarian cancer prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laarabi, Fatima-Zahra; Ratbi, Ilham; Elalaoui, Siham Chafai; Mezzouar, Loubna; Doubaj, Yassamine; Bouguenouch, Laila; Ouldim, Karim; Benjaafar, Noureddine; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2017-06-02

    To date, a limited number of BRCA1/2 germline mutations have been reported in hereditary breast and/or ovarian cancer in the Moroccan population. Less than 20 different mutations of these two genes have been identified in Moroccan patients, and recently we reported a further BRCA2 mutation (c.1310_1313delAAGA; p.Lys437IlefsX22) in three unrelated patients, all from the North-East of the country. We aimed in this study to evaluate the frequency and geographic distribution of this BRCA2 frameshift mutation, in order to access its use as the first-line BRCA genetic testing strategy for Moroccan patients. We enrolled in this study 122 patients from different regions of Morocco, with suggestive inherited predisposition to breast and ovarian cancers. All subjects gave written informed consent to BRCA1/2 genetic testing. According to available resources of our lab and enrolled families, 51 patients were analyzed by the conventional individual exon-by-exon Sanger sequencing, 23 patients were able to benefit from a BRCA next generation sequencing and a target screening for exon 10 of BRCA2 gene was performed in 48 patients. Overall, and among the 122 patients analyzed for at least the exon 10 of the BRCA2 gene, the c.1310_1313delAAGA frameshift mutation was found in 14 patients. Genealogic investigation revealed that all carriers of this mutation shared the same geographic origin and were descendants of the North-East of Morocco. In this study, we highlighted that c.1310_1313delAAGA mutation of BRCA2 gene is recurrent with high frequency in patients from the North-East region of Morocco. Therefore, we propose to use, in public health strategies, the detection of this mutation as the first-line screening tests in patients with breast and ovarian cancer originated from this region.

  10. Relationships between range access as monitored by radio frequency identification technology, fearfulness, and plumage damage in free-range laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartcher, K M; Hickey, K A; Hemsworth, P H; Cronin, G M; Wilkinson, S J; Singh, M

    2016-05-01

    Severe feather-pecking (SFP), a particularly injurious behaviour in laying hens (Gallus gallus domesticus), is thought to be negatively correlated with range use in free-range systems. In turn, range use is thought to be inversely associated with fearfulness, where fearful birds may be less likely to venture outside. However, very few experiments have investigated the proposed association between range use and fearfulness. This experiment investigated associations between range use (time spent outside), fearfulness, plumage damage, and BW. Two pens of 50 ISA Brown laying hens (n=100) were fitted with radio frequency identification (RFID) transponders (contained within silicone leg rings) at 26 weeks of age. Data were then collected over 13 days. A total of 95% of birds accessed the outdoor run more than once per day. Birds spent an average duration of 6.1 h outside each day over 11 visits per bird per day (51.5 min per visit). The top 15 and bottom 15 range users (n=30), as determined by the total time spent on the range over 13 days, were selected for study. These birds were tonic immobility (TI) tested at the end of the trial and were feather-scored and weighed after TI testing. Birds with longer TI durations spent less time outside (P=0.01). Plumage damage was not associated with range use (P=0.68). The small group sizes used in this experiment may have been conducive to the high numbers of birds utilising the outdoor range area. The RFID technology collected a large amount of data on range access in the tagged birds, and provides a potential means for quantitatively assessing range access in laying hens. The present findings indicate a negative association between fearfulness and range use. However, the proposed negative association between plumage damage and range use was not supported. The relationships between range use, fearfulness, and SFP warrant further research.

  11. The contribution to site core damage frequency from independent occurrences of initiators in two or more units: How low is it?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-San; Park, Jin Hee; Lim, Ho Gon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Stutzke estimated the site risk by summing the contribution from common cause initiators and the contribution from single-unit initiators. He considered some kinds of multi-unit accident sequences caused by single-unit initiators. However, the contribution from independent occurrences of initiators in two or more units at a site was not taken into account. The purpose of this study is to estimate the contribution to site core damage frequency (CDF) from simultaneous occurrences of independent initiators in two or more units at the same site. Some assumptions and methods used in this analysis are firstly described, and the results and conclusions of the analysis are described. In this study, the contribution to site core damage frequency (CDF) from simultaneous occurrences of independent initiators in two or more units at the same site was estimated. A Korean six-unit site was selected as the reference site and the at-power internal events Level 1 PSA model for an OPR1000 unit at the reference site was used as the base model, and was modified to deal with some major dependencies between units at the site. Specifically, the availability of the AAC D/G, dependencies between offsite power recovery actions in different unis, and inter-unit CCF modeling for risk-significant components such as diesel generators were taken into account. As a result, the sum of dual-unit CDF due to independent occurrences of initiators in two units at the reference site was estimated to be sufficiently low to be neglected.

  12. Distribution and frequencies of PDS (SLC26A4) mutations in Pendred syndrome and nonsyndromic hearing loss associated with enlarged vestibular aqueduct: a unique spectrum of mutations in Japanese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Koji; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Harada, Daisuke; Namba, Atsushi; Abe, Satoko; Usami, Shin-ichi

    2003-12-01

    Molecular diagnosis makes a substantial contribution to precise diagnosis, subclassification, prognosis, and selection of therapy. Mutations in the PDS (SLC26A4) gene are known to be responsible for both Pendred syndrome and nonsyndromic hearing loss associated with enlarged vestibular aqueduct, and the molecular confirmation of the PDS gene has become important in the diagnosis of these conditions. In the present study, PDS mutation analysis confirmed that PDS mutations were present and significantly responsible in 90% of Pendred families, and in 78.1% of families with nonsyndromic hearing loss associated with enlarged vestibular aqueduct. Furthermore, variable phenotypic expression by the same combination of mutations indicated that these two conditions are part of a continuous category of disease. Interestingly, the PDS mutation spectrum in Japanese, including the seven novel mutations revealed by this study, is very different from that found in Caucasians. Of the novel mutations detected, 53% were the H723R mutation, suggesting a possible founder effect. Ethnic background is therefore presumably important and should be noted when genetic testing is being performed. The PDS gene mutation spectrum in Japanese may be representative of those in Eastern Asian populations and its elucidation is expected to facilitate the molecular diagnosis of a variety of diseases. Published online 24 September 2003

  13. Mutation breeding newsletter. No. 33

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This issue of the newsletter reports a number of research news and research abstracts on application of radiation induced mutation techniques to increase mutagenesis and mutation frequency in plant breeding projects

  14. Mutation breeding techniques and behaviour of irradiated shoot apices of potato

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harten, A.M. van.

    1978-01-01

    The author describes part of the investigations being carried out at the Institute of Plant Breeding, Wageningen into mutation breeding in potato; in particular, efforts to produce a di(ha)ploid tester clone for reliable mutation frequency data are described, the formation of adventitious roots and shoots from potato leaves, leaflets and stem parts in vivo is studied, and damage and recovery of irradiated potato tuber eyes is investigated. (G.T.H.)

  15. Mutation induction by ion beams in arabidopsis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Atsushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1999-07-01

    An investigation was made on characteristics of ion beams for the biological effects and the induction of mutation using Arabidopsis plant as a model plant for the molecular genetics. Here, the characteristics of mutation at the molecular level as well as new mutants induced by ion beams were described. The ast and sep1 were obtained from the offspring of 1488 carbon ion-irradiated seeds respectively. The uvi1-uvi4 mutants were also induced from 1280 M{sub 1} lines. Thus, ion beams can induce not only known mutants such as tt, gl and hy but also novel mutants with high frequency. Even in the tt phenotype, two new mutant loci other than known loci were found. In chrysanthemum, several kinds of single, complex or stripped flower-color mutants that have been never induced by {gamma}irradiation, indicating that ion beams could produce a variety of mutants with the same phenotype. In conclusion, ion beams for the mutation induction are characterized by 1) to induce mutants with high frequency, 2) to show broad mutation spectrum and 3) to produce novel mutants. For these reasons, chemical mutagens such as EMS and low LET ionizing radiation such as X-rays and {gamma}-rays will predominantly induce many but small modifications or DNA damages on the DNA strands. As the result, several point mutations will be produced on the genome. On the contrary, ion beams as a high LET ionizing radiation will not cause so many but large and irreparable DNA damage locally, resulting in production of limited number of null mutation. (M.N.)

  16. Synergistic effects of UdgB and Ung in mutation prevention and protection against commonly encountered DNA damaging agents in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malshetty, Vidyasagar S; Jain, Ruchi; Srinath, Thiruneelakantan; Kurthkoti, Krishna; Varshney, Umesh

    2010-03-01

    The incorporation of dUMP during replication or the deamination of cytosine in DNA results in the occurrence of uracils in genomes. To maintain genomic integrity, uracil DNA glycosylases (UDGs) excise uracil from DNA and initiate the base-excision repair pathway. Here, we cloned, purified and biochemically characterized a family 5 UDG, UdgB, from Mycobacterium smegmatis to allow us to use it as a model organism to investigate the physiological significance of the novel enzyme. Studies with knockout strains showed that compared with the wild-type parent, the mutation rate of the udgB( -) strain was approximately twofold higher, whereas the mutation rate of a strain deficient in the family 1 UDG (ung(- )) was found to be approximately 8.4-fold higher. Interestingly, the mutation rate of the double-knockout (ung(-)/ udgB(-)) strain was remarkably high, at approximately 19.6-fold. While CG to TA mutations predominated in the ung(-) and ung(-)/udgB(-) strains, AT to GC mutations were enhanced in the udgB(-) strain. The ung(-)/udgB(-) strain was notably more sensitive to acidified nitrite and hydrogen peroxide stresses compared with the single knockouts (ung(-) or udgB(-)). These observations reveal a synergistic effect of UdgB and Ung in DNA repair, and could have implications for the generation of attenuated strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

  17. Modification of UV-induced mutation frequency and cell survival of Escherichia coli B/r WP2 trpE65 by treatment before irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doudney, C.O.; Rinaldi, C.N.

    1984-01-01

    The UV radiation survival curve of exponentially growing cultures of Escherichia coli B/r WP2 trpE65 was modified by pretreatment for short incubation periods (up to 20 min) with chloramphenicol such that an extended exponential section of intermediate slope appeared between the shoulder and the final exponential slope. Surges of mutation to tryptophan independence occurred with each increase in slope of the survival curve. These surges were separated by extended sections of little mutation. Nalidixic acid prevented both the changes in survival and mutation. Mutation curves obtained with overnight cultures had three extended sections of little mutation alternating with section of high mutation. Reincubation for 60 min in fresh medium reduced or eliminated the low-response sections. These reappeared after 80 to 90 min, when DNA had doubled in the culture and before the initial synchronous cell divisions had occurred. Nalidixic acid prevented this reappearance

  18. Polymorphism and mutation analysis of genomic DNA on cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Tsutomu

    2003-01-01

    DNA repair is a universal process in living cells that maintains the structural integrity of chromosomal DNA molecules in face of damage. A deficiency in DNA damage repair is associated with an increased cancer risk by increasing a mutation frequency of cancer-related genes. Variation in DNA repair capacity may be genetically determined. Therefore, we searched single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in major DNA repair genes. This led to the finding of 600 SNPs and mutations including many novel SNPs in Japanese population. Case-control studies to explore the contribution of the SNPs in DNA repair genes to the risk of lung cancer revealed that five SNPs are associated with lung carcinogenesis. One of these SNPs is found in RAD54L gene, which is involved in double-strand DNA repair. We analyzed and reported activities of Rad54L protein with SNP and mutations. (authors)

  19. Studies on mutation techniques in rice breeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Cailian; Chen Qiufang; Jin Wei

    2001-01-01

    Synthetical techniques for improving rice mutation breeding efficiency were studied. The techniques consist of corresponding relationship between radiosensitivity and mutation frequency, choosing appropriate materials, combination of physical and chemical mutagens, mutagenic effects of the new mutagenic agents as proton, ions, synchronous irradiation and space mutation. These techniques and methods for inducing mutations are very valuable to increase inducing mutation efficiency and breeding level

  20. Frequency of the CCR5-delta32 mutation in the Atlantic island populations of Madeira, the Azores, Cabo Verde, and São Tomé e Príncipe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Tamira; Brehm, António; Fernandes, Ana Teresa

    2006-12-01

    There is evidence that the CCR5-delta32 mutation confers protection against HIV-1 infection to homozygous individuals. It is believed that this mutation spread through Europe with the Vikings and that it has been subjected to positive selection, leading to a high frequency in Europe (approximately 10%). We carried out the present study to determine the 32-bp deletion allele and genotype frequencies of the CCR5 gene (CCR5-delta32) in the Atlantic island populations of Madeira, the Azores, Cabo Verde, and São Tomé e Principe. These Atlantic archipelagos were all colonized by the Portuguese in the 15th and 16th centuries, but the latter two received most of their settlers from the West African coast. The frequency of the CCR5-delta32 mutation varies between 0% in São Tomé e Príncipe and 16.5% in the Azores. The Azores Islands have one of the highest frequencies of homozygotes found in Europe (4.8%). There are significant differences (P < 0.05) between some of these populations, for example, between São Tomé e Príncipe and Cabo Verde, and even within populations (e.g., Portugal, Madeira, and the Azores).

  1. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internally induced flooding events for Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage. Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dandini, V.; Staple, B.; Kirk, H.; Whitehead, D.; Forester, J.

    1994-07-01

    An estimate of the contribution of internal flooding to the mean core damage frequency at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station was calculated for Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage. Pursuant to this objective, flood zones and sources were identified and flood volumes were calculated. Equipment necessary for the maintenance of plant safety was identified and its vulnerability to flooding was determined. Event trees and fault trees were modified or developed as required, and PRA quantification was performed using the IRRAS code. The mean core damage frequency estimate for GGNS during POS 5 was found to be 2.3 E-8 per year

  2. The role of SLC2A1 mutations in myoclonic astatic epilepsy and absence epilepsy, and the estimated frequency of GLUT1 deficiency syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jan; Johannesen, Katrine Marie; Ek, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    The first mutations identified in SLC2A1, encoding the glucose transporter type 1 (GLUT1) protein of the blood-brain barrier, were associated with severe epileptic encephalopathy. Recently, dominant SLC2A1 mutations were found in rare autosomal dominant families with various forms of epilepsy inc...

  3. The ABCA4 2588G > C Stargardt mutation : Single origin and increasing frequency from South-West to North-East Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maugeri, A; Flothmann, K; Hemmrich, N; Ingvast, S; Jorge, P; Paloma, E; Patel, R; Rozet, JM; Tammur, J; Testa, F; Balcells, S; Bird, AC; Brunner, HG; Hoyng, CB; Metspalu, A; Simonelli, F; Allikmets, R; Bhattacharya, SS; D'Urso, M; Gonzalez-Duarte, R; Kaplan, J; Meerman, GJT; Santoss, R; Schwartz, M; Van Camp, G; Wadelius, C; Weber, BHF; Cremers, FPM

    Inherited retinal dystrophies represent the most important cause of vision impairment in adolescence, affecting approximately 1 out of 3000 individuals. Mutations of the photoreceptor-specific gene ABCA4 (ABCR) are a common cause of retinal dystrophy. A number of mutations have been repeatedly

  4. The frequency of cancer predisposition gene mutations in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer patients in Taiwan: From BRCA1/2 to multi-gene panels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pi-Lin Sung

    Full Text Available An important role of genetic factors in the development of breast cancer (BC or ovarian cancer (OC in Taiwanese (ethnic Chinese patients has been suggested. However, other than germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations, which are related to hereditary breast-ovarian cancer (HBOC, cancer-predisposition genes have not been well studied in this population. The aim of the present study was to more accurately summarize the prevalence of genetic mutations in HBOC patients using various gene panels ranging in size from BRCA1/2 alone to multi-gene panels. Among 272 HBOC patients analyzed, the prevalence of BRCA1, BRCA2 and non-BRCA1/2 pathogenic mutations was 7.7% (21/272, 6.8% (16/236 and 8.2% (13/159, respectively. The total mutation rate was 18.4% (50/272. Although no founder mutations were identified in this study, two recurrent mutations, BRCA1 (c.3607C>T and BRCA2 (c.5164_5165 delAG, were found. The main pathogenic/likely pathogenic mutations in non-BRCA1/2 genes included ATM, BRIP1, FANCI, MSH2, MUYTH, RAD50, RAD51C and TP53. The prevalence rate of gene mutations in HBOC patients did not differ with respect to whether BC or OC was the first diagnosis or they presented a family history of the disease or their age at diagnosis. HBOC patients with both BC and OC exhibited a higher prevalence rate of mutations (50.0% than patients with OC (25.0% or BC (8.6% alone. In conclusion, evaluation of hereditary cancer risk in Taiwan HBOC patients, particularly individuals with double cancer, is strongly encouraged. Panel testing can yield additional genomic information, and widespread and well-designed panel testing will help in assessing more accurate mutational prevalence of risk genes.

  5. Ultra-deep sequencing of mouse mitochondrial DNA: mutational patterns and their origins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Ameur

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Somatic mutations of mtDNA are implicated in the aging process, but there is no universally accepted method for their accurate quantification. We have used ultra-deep sequencing to study genome-wide mtDNA mutation load in the liver of normally- and prematurely-aging mice. Mice that are homozygous for an allele expressing a proof-reading-deficient mtDNA polymerase (mtDNA mutator mice have 10-times-higher point mutation loads than their wildtype siblings. In addition, the mtDNA mutator mice have increased levels of a truncated linear mtDNA molecule, resulting in decreased sequence coverage in the deleted region. In contrast, circular mtDNA molecules with large deletions occur at extremely low frequencies in mtDNA mutator mice and can therefore not drive the premature aging phenotype. Sequence analysis shows that the main proportion of the mutation load in heterozygous mtDNA mutator mice and their wildtype siblings is inherited from their heterozygous mothers consistent with germline transmission. We found no increase in levels of point mutations or deletions in wildtype C57Bl/6N mice with increasing age, thus questioning the causative role of these changes in aging. In addition, there was no increased frequency of transversion mutations with time in any of the studied genotypes, arguing against oxidative damage as a major cause of mtDNA mutations. Our results from studies of mice thus indicate that most somatic mtDNA mutations occur as replication errors during development and do not result from damage accumulation in adult life.

  6. Frequency of the allelic variant c.1150T > C in exon 10 of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 gene is not increased in patients with pathogenic mutations and related chondrodysplasia phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thatiane Yoshie Kanazawa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the FGFR3 gene cause the phenotypic spectrum of FGFR3 chondrodysplasias ranging from lethal forms to the milder phenotype seen in hypochondroplasia (Hch. The p.N540K mutation in the FGFR3 gene occurs in ~70% of individuals with Hch, and nearly 30% of individuals with the Hch phenotype have no mutations in the FGFR3, which suggests genetic heterogeneity. The identification of a severe case of Hch associated with the typical mutation c.1620C > A and the occurrence of a c.1150T > C change that resulted in a p.F384L in exon 10, together with the suspicion that this second change could be a modulator of the phenotype, prompted us to investigate this hypothesis in a cohort of patients. An analysis of 48 patients with FGFR3 chondrodysplasia phenotypes and 330 healthy (control individuals revealed no significant difference in the frequency of the C allele at the c.1150 position (p = 0.34. One patient carrying the combination `pathogenic mutation plus the allelic variant c.1150T > C' had a typical achondroplasia (Ach phenotype. In addition, three other patients with atypical phenotypes showed no association with the allelic variant. Together, these results do not support the hypothesis of a modulatory role for the c.1150T > C change in the FGFR3 gene.

  7. Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events: Expert judgment elicitation. Part 1: Expert panel results. Part 2: Project staff results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, T.A.; Cramond, W.R.; Hora, S.C.; Unwin, S.D.

    1989-04-01

    Quantitative modeling techniques have limitations as to the resolution of important issues in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). Not all issues can be resolved via the existing set of methods such as fault trees, event trees, statistical analyses, data collection, and computer simulation. Therefore, an expert judgment process was developed to address issues perceived as important to risk in the NUREG-1150 analysis but which could not be resolved with existing techniques. This process was applied to several issues that could significantly affect the internal event core damage frequencies of the PRAs performed on six light water reactors. Detailed descriptions of these issues and the results of the expert judgment elicitation are reported here, as well as an explanation of the methodology used and the procedure followed in performing the overall elicitation task. The process is time-consuming and expensive. However, the results are very useful, and represent an improvement over the draft NUREG-1150 analysis in the areas of expert selection, elicitation training, issue selection and presentation, elicitation of judgment and aggregation of results. The results are presented in two parts. Part documents the expert panel elicitations, where the most important issues were presented to a panel of experts convened from throughout the nuclear power risk assessment community. Part 2 documents the process by which the project staff performed expert judgment on other important issues, using the project staff as panel members. (author)

  8. Delayed chromosomal instability induced by DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, W.F.; Marder, B.A.; Day, J.P.

    1994-01-01

    Cellular exposure to DNA damaging agents rapidly results in a dose dependent increase in chromosomal breakage and gross structural chromosomal rearrangements. Over recent years, evidence has been accumulating indicating genomic instability can manifest multiple generations after cellular exposure to physical and chemical DNA damaging agents. Genomic instability manifests in the progeny of surviving cells, and has been implicated in mutation, gene application, cellular transformation, and cell killing. To investigate chromosome instability following DNA damage, we have used fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect chromosomal rearrangements in a human/hamster somatic hybrid cell line following exposure to ionizing radiation. Delayed chromosomal instability was detected when multiple populations of uniquely arranged metaphases were observed in clonal isolates raised from single cells surviving X-irradiation many generations after exposure. At higher radiation doses, chromosomal instability was observed in a relatively high frequency of surviving clones and, in general, those clones showed delayed chromosome instability also showed reduced survival as measured by colony forming ability

  9. The TP53 mutational spectrum and frequency of CHEK2*1100delC in Li-Fraumeni-like kindreds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Rina; Onel, Kenan; Facio, Flavia; Nafa, Kedoudja; Diaz, Louis Robles; Kauff, Noah; Huang, Helen; Robson, Mark; Ellis, Nathan; Offit, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a dominantly inherited cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by a wide spectrum of neoplasms occurring at young age. Germline mutations in the TP53 tumor suppressor gene have been identified in approximately 71 of LFS patients and 22 of Li-Fraumeni-like (LFL) patients. Mutations within the cell cycle checkpoint gene CHEK2 have also been reported in some patients with LFS, LFL, and phenotypically suggestive of LFS (PS-LFS) not carrying a TP53 mutation. In this study, we show that 7 of the 23 patients with LFS/LFL tested positive for deleterious mutations in p53. Fifteen of the remaining sixteen were not found to carry the CHEK2* 1100delCmutation. These results indicate that CHEK2*1100delC is not a common cause of LFS, LFL, or PS-LFS in North American kindreds not carrying a TP53 mutation. Of note, two patients were found to carry p53* R72P, which is of unknown clinical significance. Lack of segregation of this allele in one of these kindreds provides strong evidence that the R72P allele is not disease-causing. While mutations in p53 account for a proportion of patients with LFS/LFL, future studies are needed to determine if other genes are responsible for LFS/LFL families not carrying germline p53 mutations.

  10. Point mutation in D8C domain of Tamm-Horsfall protein/uromodulin in transgenic mice causes progressive renal damage and hyperuricemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lijie; Liu, Yan; Landry, Nichole K; El-Achkar, Tarek M; Lieske, John C; Wu, Xue-Ru

    2017-01-01

    Hereditary mutations in Tamm-Horsfall protein (THP/uromodulin) gene cause autosomal dominant kidney diseases characterized by juvenile-onset hyperuricemia, gout and progressive kidney failure, although the disease pathogenesis remains unclear. Here we show that targeted expression in transgenic mice of a mutation within the domain of 8 cysteines of THP in kidneys' thick ascending limb (TAL) caused unfolded protein response in younger (1-month old) mice and apoptosis in older (12-month old) mice. While the young mice had urine concentration defects and polyuria, such defects progressively reversed in the older mice to marked oliguria, highly concentrated urine, fibrotic kidneys and reduced creatinine clearance. Both the young and the old transgenic mice had significantly higher serum uric acid and its catabolic product, allantoin, than age-matched wild-type mice. This THP mutation apparently caused primary defects in TAL by compromising the luminal translocation and reabsorptive functions of NKCC2 and ROMK and secondary responses in proximal tubules by upregulating NHE3 and URAT1. Our results strongly suggest that the progressive worsening of kidney functions reflects the accumulation of the deleterious effects of the misfolded mutant THP and the compensatory responses. Transgenic mice recapitulating human THP/uromodulin-associated kidney diseases could be used to elucidate their pathogenesis and test novel therapeutic strategies.

  11. Germline mutations affecting the histone H4 core cause a developmental syndrome by altering DNA damage response and cell cycle control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessadori, Federico; Giltay, Jacques C; Hurst, Jane A; Massink, Maarten P; Duran, Karen; Vos, Harmjan R; van Es, Robert M; Scott, Richard H; van Gassen, Koen L I; Bakkers, Jeroen; van Haaften, Gijs

    2017-11-01

    Covalent modifications of histones have an established role as chromatin effectors, as they control processes such as DNA replication and transcription, and repair or regulate nucleosomal structure. Loss of modifications on histone N tails, whether due to mutations in genes belonging to histone-modifying complexes or mutations directly affecting the histone tails, causes developmental disorders or has a role in tumorigenesis. More recently, modifications affecting the globular histone core have been uncovered as being crucial for DNA repair, pluripotency and oncogenesis. Here we report monoallelic missense mutations affecting lysine 91 in the histone H4 core (H4K91) in three individuals with a syndrome of growth delay, microcephaly and intellectual disability. Expression of the histone H4 mutants in zebrafish embryos recapitulates the developmental anomalies seen in the patients. We show that the histone H4 alterations cause genomic instability, resulting in increased apoptosis and cell cycle progression anomalies during early development. Mechanistically, our findings indicate an important role for the ubiquitination of H4K91 in genomic stability during embryonic development.

  12. Singlet oxygen-induced mutations in M13 lacZ phage DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Decuyper-Debergh, D; Piette, J; Van de Vorst, A

    1987-01-01

    The mutagenic consequences of damages to M13 mp19 RF DNA produced by singlet oxygen have been determined in a forward mutational system capable of detecting all classes of mutagenic events. When the damaged M13 mp19 RF DNA is used to transfect competent E. coli JM105 cells, a 16.6-fold increase in mutation frequency is observed at 5% survivors when measured as a loss of alpha-complementation. The enhanced mutagenicity is largely due to single-nucleotide substitutions, frameshift events and do...

  13. The frequency of BRCA1 founder mutation c.5266dupC (5382insC) in breast cancer patients from Ukraine

    OpenAIRE

    Gorodetska, Ielizaveta; Serga, Svitlana; Levkovich, Natalia; Lahuta, Tetiana; Ostapchenko, Ludmila; Demydov, Serhyi; Anikusko, Nikolay; Cheshuk, Valeriy; Smolanka, Ivan; Sklyar, Svitlana; Polenkov, Serhyi; Boichenko, Oleksander; Kozeretska, Iryna

    2015-01-01

    Germ-line mutations in several genes, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2, are known to increase the risk of breast cancer. These heritable mutations are unequally represented among populations with different ethnic background due to founder effects and thereby contribute to differences in breast cancer rates in different populations. The BRCA1 mutation c.5266dupC (also known as 5382insC or 5385insC) was detected in a sample of 193 breast cancer patients in Ukraine by multiplex mutagenically separated PC...

  14. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal floods during mid-loop operations. Volume 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohut, P.

    1994-07-01

    The major objective of the Surry internal flood analysis was to provide an improved understanding of the core damage scenarios arising from internal flood-related events. The mean core damage frequency of the Surry plant due to internal flood events during mid-loop operations is 4.8E-06 per year, and the 5th and 95th percentiles are 2.2E-07 and 1.8E-05 per year, respectively. Some limited sensitivity calculations were performed on three plant improvement options. The most significant result involves modifications of intake-level structure on the canal, which reduced core damage frequency contribution from floods in mid-loop by about 75%

  15. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal floods during mid-loop operations. Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohut, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-07-01

    The major objective of the Surry internal flood analysis was to provide an improved understanding of the core damage scenarios arising from internal flood-related events. The mean core damage frequency of the Surry plant due to internal flood events during mid-loop operations is 4.8E-06 per year, and the 5th and 95th percentiles are 2.2E-07 and 1.8E-05 per year, respectively. Some limited sensitivity calculations were performed on three plant improvement options. The most significant result involves modifications of intake-level structure on the canal, which reduced core damage frequency contribution from floods in mid-loop by about 75%.

  16. Trends of mutation studies in bread wheat (Tricticum aestivum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, M.P.; Dubey, S.D.; Singhal, N.C.

    1974-01-01

    Studies were undertaken in different wheat varieties to determine (a) the relative efficiency of different ionizing radiations in realising viable mutations; (b) effectiveness of acute VS chronic irradiation; (c) genotypic differences and varietal response to radiation damage and (d) fertility and survival in M 1 as a parameter for mutation percentage in M 2 . The chemicals (ethyl methane sulphonate, nitroso methyl urethan and nitroso guanidine) and radiations (X-rays, gamma-rays, radio-isotopes P 32 and S 35 and neutrons) were used in different sets of treatments. The relative effect of these treatments on variable genotypes was studied, in relation to seed germination, growth, chromosome structure, pollen fertility an seed set in M 1 and in M 2 mutation frequency and spectrum. The treatments including higher sterility in M 1 , gave higher mutation percentage of phenotypic detectable types. In spite of the limited M 2 population, the higher mutation frequency and mutation spectrum were maintained irrespective of the treatment and the genotype involved. (N.M.M.)

  17. Analysis of relation between the mutation frequencies and somatic recombination induced by neutrons and the age of D. Melanogaster larvae; Analisis de la relacion entre las frecuencias de mutacion y recombinacion somaticas inducidas por neutrones y la edad de las larvas en D. Melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman R, J.; Zambrano A, F.; Paredes G, L.; Delfin L, A.; Quiroz R, C. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1998-07-01

    Neutrons are subatomic particles with neutral electric charge, equal zero, which are emitted during the fissile material fission in nuclear reactors. It is known a little about biological effects induced by neutrons. There is a world interest in the use of reactors and accelerators for patients radiotherapy using neutrons with the purpose to destroy malignant cells of deep tumours where traditional methods have not given satisfactory results. There for it is required to do wide studies of biological effects of neutrons as well as their dosimetry. It was used the Smart test (Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test) of D. Melanogaster for quantifying the mutation induction and somatic recombination induced by neutrons of the National Institute of Nuclear Research reactor, at power of 300 and 1000 k W, with equivalent doses calculated 95.14 and 190.2 Sv for 300 k W and of 25.64 and 51.29 Sv for 1000 k W, using larvae with 72 or 96 hours aged. It was observed a linear relation between equivalent dose and genetic effects frequency, these last were greater when the reactor power was 1000 k W than those 300 k W. It was observed too that the damage was greater in 96 hours larvae than those 72 hours. The stain size presented an inverse relation with respect to larvae age. It is concluded that the Smart system is sensitive to neutrons effect and it responds of a directly proportional form to radiation dose, as well as to dose rate. It is noted more the effect when are used larvas in pre pupa stage where the irradiation target (imagal cells) is greater. The Smart is sensitive to damage induced by neutrons , thus can be used to studying its direct biological effects or by the use of chemical modulators. (Author)

  18. Loss of function JAK1 mutations occur at high frequency in cancers with microsatellite instability and are suggestive of immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albacker, Lee A; Wu, Jeremy; Smith, Peter; Warmuth, Markus; Stephens, Philip J; Zhu, Ping; Yu, Lihua; Chmielecki, Juliann

    2017-01-01

    Immune evasion is a well-recognized hallmark of cancer and recent studies with immunotherapy agents have suggested that tumors with increased numbers of neoantigens elicit greater immune responses. We hypothesized that the immune system presents a common selective pressure on high mutation burden tumors and therefore immune evasion mutations would be enriched in high mutation burden tumors. The JAK family of kinases is required for the signaling of a host of immune modulators in tumor, stromal, and immune cells. Therefore, we analyzed alterations in this family for the hypothesized signature of an immune evasion mutation. Here, we searched a database of 61,704 unique solid tumors for alterations in the JAK family kinases (JAK1/2/3, TYK2). We used The Cancer Genome Atlas and Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia data to confirm and extend our findings by analyzing gene expression patterns. Recurrent frameshift mutations in JAK1 were associated with high mutation burden and microsatellite instability. These mutations occurred in multiple tumor types including endometrial, colorectal, stomach, and prostate carcinomas. Analyzing gene expression signatures in endometrial and stomach adenocarcinomas revealed that tumors with a JAK1 frameshift exhibited reduced expression of interferon response signatures and multiple anti-tumor immune signatures. Importantly, endometrial cancer cell lines exhibited similar gene expression changes that were expected to be tumor cell intrinsic (e.g. interferon response) but not those expected to be tumor cell extrinsic (e.g. NK cells). From these data, we derive two primary conclusions: 1) JAK1 frameshifts are loss of function alterations that represent a potential pan-cancer adaptation to immune responses against tumors with microsatellite instability; 2) The mechanism by which JAK1 loss of function contributes to tumor immune evasion is likely associated with loss of the JAK1-mediated interferon response.

  19. Reduction of arsenite-enhanced ultraviolet radiation-induced DNA damage by supplemental zinc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, Karen L.; King, Brenee S.; Sandoval, Monica M.; Liu, Ke Jian; Hudson, Laurie G., E-mail: lhudson@salud.unm.edu

    2013-06-01

    Arsenic is a recognized human carcinogen and there is evidence that arsenic augments the carcinogenicity of DNA damaging agents such as ultraviolet radiation (UVR) thereby acting as a co-carcinogen. Inhibition of DNA repair is one proposed mechanism to account for the co-carcinogenic actions of arsenic. We and others find that arsenite interferes with the function of certain zinc finger DNA repair proteins. Furthermore, we reported that zinc reverses the effects of arsenite in cultured cells and a DNA repair target protein, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1. In order to determine whether zinc ameliorates the effects of arsenite on UVR-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes and in an in vivo model, normal human epidermal keratinocytes and SKH-1 hairless mice were exposed to arsenite, zinc or both before solar-simulated (ss) UVR exposure. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, DNA damage and mutation frequencies at the Hprt locus were measured in each treatment group in normal human keratinocytes. DNA damage was assessed in vivo by immunohistochemical staining of skin sections isolated from SKH-1 hairless mice. Cell-based findings demonstrate that ssUVR-induced DNA damage and mutagenesis are enhanced by arsenite, and supplemental zinc partially reverses the arsenite effect. In vivo studies confirm that zinc supplementation decreases arsenite-enhanced DNA damage in response to ssUVR exposure. From these data we can conclude that zinc offsets the impact of arsenic on ssUVR-stimulated DNA damage in cells and in vivo suggesting that zinc supplementation may provide a strategy to improve DNA repair capacity in arsenic exposed human populations. - Highlights: • Low levels of arsenite enhance UV-induced DNA damage in human keratinocytes. • UV-initiated HPRT mutation frequency is enhanced by arsenite. • Zinc supplementation offsets DNA damage and mutation frequency enhanced by arsenite. • Zinc-dependent reduction of arsenite enhanced DNA damage is confirmed in vivo.

  20. Cultivation of Staphylococcus epidermidis in the Human Spaceflight Environment Leads to Alterations in the Frequency and Spectrum of Spontaneous Rifampicin-Resistance Mutations in the rpoB Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo-Cavazos, Patricia; Nicholson, Wayne L

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Staphylococcus are persistent inhabitants of human spaceflight habitats and represent potential opportunistic pathogens. The effect of the human spaceflight environment on the growth and the frequency of mutations to antibiotic resistance in the model organism Staphylococcus epidermidis strain ATCC12228 was investigated. Six cultures of the test organism were cultivated in biological research in canisters-Petri dish fixation units for 122 h on orbit in the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the SpaceX-3 resupply mission. Asynchronous ground controls (GCs) consisted of identical sets of cultures cultivated for 122 h in the ISS Environmental Simulator at Kennedy Space Center. S. epidermidis exhibited significantly lower viable counts but significantly higher frequencies of mutation to rifampicin (Rif) resistance in space vs. GC cultures. The spectrum of mutations in the rpoB gene leading to Rif(R) was altered in S. epidermidis isolates cultivated in the ISS compared to GCs. The results suggest that the human spaceflight environment induces unique physiologic stresses on growing bacterial cells leading to changes in mutagenic potential.

  1. The effects of duration of pre-soaking treatments on the frequency and spectrum of mutations induced by sodium azide in CES 14 Mungbean variety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asencion, A.B.

    1982-04-01

    Seeds of mungbean variety CES 14 were treated with 10 - 3 sodium azide for 2 hours buffered at pH 3 after various pre-soaking treatment durations of 0, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14 and 16 hours. The biological parameters that were significantly affected by the treatments in the M 1 were germination, seedling height and survival. The chlorophyll and other morphological mutations in the M 2 gradually increased with increasing pre-soaking time. The treatment that had the lowest mutation rate was the 16-hour pre-soaked seeds. No chlorophyll mutation was noted in both the water and buffer control. One variant was noted, however, in the buffer control. (author)

  2. A Threshold Exists in the Dose-response Relationship for Somatic Mutation Frequency Inducted by X-ray Irradiation of Drosophia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koana, T.; Takashima, Y.; Okada, M. O.; Ikehata, M.; Miyakoshi, J.; Sakai, K.

    2004-01-01

    The dose-response relationship of ionizing radiation and its stochastic effects has been thought to be linear without any thresholds. The basic data for this model was obtained from mutational assays in the male germ cells of fruits fly Drosophila melanogaster. However, carcinogenic activity should be examined more appropriately in somatic cells than in germ cells. Here, the dose-response relationship of X- ray irradiation and somatic mutation is examined in Drosophila. A threshold at approximately 1Gy was observed in the DNA repair proficient flies. In the repair deficient siblings, the threshold was smaller and the inclination of the dose-response curve was much steeper. These results suggest that the dose-response relationship between X-ray irradiation and somatic mutation has a threshold, and that the DNA repair function contributes to its formation. (Author) 35 refs

  3. α-Thalassemia frequency and mutations in children with hypochromic microcytic anemias and relation with β-thalassemia, iron deficiency anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulen, Huseyin; Hanimeli, Ozlem; Karaca, Ozlem; Taneli, Fatma

    2012-04-01

    The majority of the anemias during childhood are hypochromic and microcytic. The aim of the present study was to determine the status of α-thalassemia mutations and its association with other etiologies, such as iron deficiency anemia (IDA) and β-thalassemia trait, that are frequently seen hypochromic microcytic anemias in children. Children with hypochromic microcytic anemias were included in the study. Serum iron (SI), total iron-binding capacity (TIBC), ferritin levels, and hemoglobin electrophoresis with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method were analyzed. Reverse hybridization of biotinylated polymerase chain reaction (PCR) product method was used for detection of α-globin gene mutations. Of the 46 patients involved in the study, 54.3% (n = 25) were boys, and 45.7% (n = 21) were girls. Iron deficiency anemia and β-thalassemia trait were diagnosed in 67.4% (n = 31) and 19.5% (n = 9), respectively. In 17.4% there were α-thalassemia mutations (in 10.9% 3.7 single-gene heterozygote mutation, in 4.3% 20.5-kb double-gene deletion mutation, and in 2.2% α-2 poly-A-1 heterozygote mutation was detected). In 2 patients (4.3%) no etiology was determined. In 2 patients (4.3%) association between iron deficiency anemia and α-thalassemia, in 1 patient (2.2%) association between β and α-thalassemia was detected. In conclusion, α-thalassemia carrier status and its association with other etiologies are frequently seen in Manisa. So, α-thalassemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of hypochromic microcytic anemias, especially in cases without iron deficiency (ID) and β-thalassemia carrier state.

  4. High frequency of Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance marker (pfcrt T76 mutation) in Yemen: an urgent need to re-examine malaria drug policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mekhlafi, Abdulsalam M; Mahdy, Mohammed A K; Al-Mekhlafi, Hesham M; Azazy, Ahmed A; Fong, Mun Yik

    2011-05-27

    Malaria remains a significant health problem in Yemen with Plasmodium falciparum being the predominant species which is responsible for 90% of the malaria cases. Despite serious concerns regarding increasing drug resistance, chloroquine is still used for the prevention and treatment of malaria in Yemen. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of choloroquine resistance (CQR) of P. falciparum isolated from Yemen based on the pfcrt T76 mutation. A cross-sectional study was carried out among 511 participants from four governorates in Yemen. Blood samples were screened using microscopic and species-specific nested PCR based on the 18S rRNA gene to detect and identify Plasmodium species. Blood samples positive for P. falciparum were used for detecting the pfcrt T76 mutation using nested-PCR. The prevalence of pfcrt T76 mutation was 81.5% (66 of 81 isolates). Coastal areas/foothills had higher prevalence of pfcrt T76 mutation compared to highland areas (90.5% vs 71.8%) (p = 0.031). The pfcrt T76 mutation had a significant association with parasitaemia (p = 0.045). Univariate analysis shows a significant association of pfcrt T76 mutation with people aged > 10 years (OR = 9, 95% CI = 2.3 - 36.2, p = 0.001), low household income (OR = 5, 95% CI = 1.3 - 19.5, p = 0.027), no insecticide spray (OR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.16 - 11.86, p = 0.025) and not sleeping under insecticide treated nets (ITNs) (OR = 4.8, 95% CI = 1.38 - 16.78, p = 0.01). Logistic regression model confirmed age > 10 years and low household income as predictors of pfcrt T76 mutation in Yemen P. falciparum isolates. The high prevalence of pfcrt T76 mutation in Yemen could be a predictive marker for the prevalence of P. falciparum CQR. This finding shows the necessity for an in-vivo therapeutic efficacy test for CQ. P. falciparum CQR should be addressed in the national strategy to control malaria.

  5. ENU-induced phenovariance in mice: inferences from 587 mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Carrie N

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present a compendium of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU-induced mouse mutations, identified in our laboratory over a period of 10 years either on the basis of phenotype or whole genome and/or whole exome sequencing, and archived in the Mutagenetix database. Our purpose is threefold: 1 to formally describe many point mutations, including those that were not previously disclosed in peer-reviewed publications; 2 to assess the characteristics of these mutations; and 3 to estimate the likelihood that a missense mutation induced by ENU will create a detectable phenotype. Findings In the context of an ENU mutagenesis program for C57BL/6J mice, a total of 185 phenotypes were tracked to mutations in 129 genes. In addition, 402 incidental mutations were identified and predicted to affect 390 genes. As previously reported, ENU shows strand asymmetry in its induction of mutations, particularly favoring T to A rather than A to T in the sense strand of coding regions and splice junctions. Some amino acid substitutions are far more likely to be damaging than others, and some are far more likely to be observed. Indeed, from among a total of 494 non-synonymous coding mutations, ENU was observed to create only 114 of the 182 possible amino acid substitutions that single base changes can achieve. Based on differences in overt null allele frequencies observed in phenotypic vs. non-phenotypic mutation sets, we infer that ENU-induced missense mutations create detectable phenotype only about 1 in 4.7 times. While the remaining mutations may not be functionally neutral, they are, on average, beneath the limits of detection of the phenotypic assays we applied. Conclusions Collectively, these mutations add to our understanding of the chemical specificity of ENU, the types of amino acid substitutions it creates, and its efficiency in causing phenovariance. Our data support the validity of computational algorithms for the prediction of damage caused by

  6. The frequencies and clinical implications of mutations in 33 kinase-related genes in locally advanced rectal cancer: a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abdul-Jalil, Khairun I

    2014-08-01

    Locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC: T3\\/4 and\\/or node-positive) is treated with preoperative\\/neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT), but responses are not uniform. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), MAP kinase (MAPK), and related pathways are implicated in rectal cancer tumorigenesis. Here, we investigated the association between genetic mutations in these pathways and LARC clinical outcomes.

  7. Compound Heterozygosity of Low-Frequency Promoter Deletions and Rare Loss-of-Function Mutations in TXNL4A Causes Burn-McKeown Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieczorek, Dagmar; Newman, William G.; Wieland, Thomas; Berulava, Tea; Kaffe, Maria; Falkenstein, Daniela; Beetz, Christian; Graf, Elisabeth; Schwarzmayr, Thomas; Douzgou, Sofia; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Daly, Sarah B.; Williams, Simon G.; Bhaskar, Sanjeev S.; Urquhart, Jill E.; Anderson, Beverley; O'Sullivan, James; Boute, Odile; Gundlach, Jasmin; Czeschik, Johanna Christina; van Essen, Anthonie J.; Hazan, Filiz; Park, Sarah; Hing, Anne; Kuechler, Alma; Lohmann, Dietmar R.; Ludwig, Kerstin U.; Mangold, Elisabeth; Steenpass, Laura; Zeschnigk, Michael; Lemke, Johannes R.; Lourenco, Charles Marques; Hehr, Ute; Prott, Eva-Christina; Waldenberger, Melanie; Boehmer, Anne C.; Horsthemke, Bernhard; O'Keefe, Raymond T.; Meitinger, Thomas; Bum, John; Luedecke, Hermann-Josef; Strom, Tim M.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in components of the major spliceosome have been described in disorders with craniofacial anomalies, e.g., Nager syndrome and mandibulofacial dysostosis type Guion-Almeida. The US spliceosomal complex of eight highly conserved proteins is critical for premRNA splicing. We identified

  8. Mutational spectrum drives the rise of mutator bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couce, Alejandro; Guelfo, Javier R; Blázquez, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how mutator strains emerge in bacterial populations is relevant both to evolutionary theory and to reduce the threat they pose in clinical settings. The rise of mutator alleles is understood as a result of their hitchhiking with linked beneficial mutations, although the factors that govern this process remain unclear. A prominent but underappreciated fact is that each mutator allele increases only a specific spectrum of mutational changes. This spectrum has been speculated to alter the distribution of fitness effects of beneficial mutations, potentially affecting hitchhiking. To study this possibility, we analyzed the fitness distribution of beneficial mutations generated from different mutator and wild-type Escherichia coli strains. Using antibiotic resistance as a model system, we show that mutational spectra can alter these distributions substantially, ultimately determining the competitive ability of each strain across environments. Computer simulation showed that the effect of mutational spectrum on hitchhiking dynamics follows a non-linear function, implying that even slight spectrum-dependent fitness differences are sufficient to alter mutator success frequency by several orders of magnitude. These results indicate an unanticipated central role for the mutational spectrum in the evolution of bacterial mutation rates. At a practical level, this study indicates that knowledge of the molecular details of resistance determinants is crucial for minimizing mutator evolution during antibiotic therapy.

  9. Mutational spectrum drives the rise of mutator bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Couce

    Full Text Available Understanding how mutator strains emerge in bacterial populations is relevant both to evolutionary theory and to reduce the threat they pose in clinical settings. The rise of mutator alleles is understood as a result of their hitchhiking with linked beneficial mutations, although the factors that govern this process remain unclear. A prominent but underappreciated fact is that each mutator allele increases only a specific spectrum of mutational changes. This spectrum has been speculated to alter the distribution of fitness effects of beneficial mutations, potentially affecting hitchhiking. To study this possibility, we analyzed the fitness distribution of beneficial mutations generated from different mutator and wild-type Escherichia coli strains. Using antibiotic resistance as a model system, we show that mutational spectra can alter these distributions substantially, ultimately determining the competitive ability of each strain across environments. Computer simulation showed that the effect of mutational spectrum on hitchhiking dynamics follows a non-linear function, implying that even slight spectrum-dependent fitness differences are sufficient to alter mutator success frequency by several orders of magnitude. These results indicate an unanticipated central role for the mutational spectrum in the evolution of bacterial mutation rates. At a practical level, this study indicates that knowledge of the molecular details of resistance determinants is crucial for minimizing mutator evolution during antibiotic therapy.

  10. Frequency and phenotypic spectrum of germline mutations in POLE and seven other polymerase genes in 266 patients with colorectal adenomas and carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spier, Isabel; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Altmüller, Janine; Zhao, Bixiao; Horpaopan, Sukanya; Vogt, Stefanie; Chen, Sophia; Morak, Monika; Raeder, Susanne; Kayser, Katrin; Stienen, Dietlinde; Adam, Ronja; Nürnberg, Peter; Plotz, Guido; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Lifton, Richard P; Thiele, Holger; Hoffmann, Per; Steinke, Verena; Aretz, Stefan

    2015-07-15

    In a number of families with colorectal adenomatous polyposis or suspected Lynch syndrome/HNPCC, no germline alteration in the APC, MUTYH, or mismatch repair (MMR) genes are found. Missense mutations in the polymerase genes POLE and POLD1 have recently been identified as rare cause of multiple colorectal adenomas and carcinomas, a condition termed polymerase proofreading-associated polyposis (PPAP). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the clinical relevance and phenotypic spectrum of polymerase germline mutations. Therefore, targeted sequencing of the polymerase genes POLD1, POLD2, POLD3, POLD4, POLE, POLE2, POLE3 and POLE4 was performed in 266 unrelated patients with polyposis or fulfilled Amsterdam criteria. The POLE mutation c.1270C>G;p.Leu424Val was detected in four unrelated patients. The mutation was present in 1.5% (4/266) of all patients, 4% (3/77) of all familial cases and 7% (2/30) of familial polyposis cases. The colorectal phenotype in 14 affected individuals ranged from typical adenomatous polyposis to a HNPCC phenotype, with high intrafamilial variability. Multiple colorectal carcinomas and duodenal adenomas were common, and one case of duodenal carcinoma was reported. Additionally, various extraintestinal lesions were evident. Nine further putative pathogenic variants were identified. The most promising was c.1306C>T;p.Pro436Ser in POLE. In conclusion, a PPAP was identified in a substantial number of polyposis and familial colorectal cancer patients. Screening for polymerase proofreading mutations should therefore be considered, particularly in unexplained familial cases. The present study broadens the phenotypic spectrum of PPAP to duodenal adenomas and carcinomas, and identified novel, potentially pathogenic variants in four polymerase genes. © 2014 UICC.

  11. DNA damage in lung after oral exposure to diesel exhaust particles in Big Blue (R) rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Anne Kirstine; Farombi, E.O.; Møller, P.

    2004-01-01

    Several chemical mutagens and carcinogens, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitrated PAHs, are adsorbed to the surface of diesel exhaust particles (DEP). DEP can induce formation of reactive oxygen species and cause oxidative DNA damage as well as bulky carcinogen DNA adducts....... Lung tissue is a target organ for DEP induced cancer following inhalation. Recent studies have provided evidence that the lung is also a target organ for DNA damage and cancer after oral exposure to other complex mixtures of PAHs. The genotoxic effect of oral administration of DEP was investigated......, in terms of markers of DNA damage, mutations and repair, in the lung of Big Blue(R) rats fed a diet with 0, 0.2, 0.8, 2, 8, 20 or 80 mg DEP/kg feed for 21 days. There was no significant increase in the mutation frequency in the cII gene. However, an increase of DNA damage measured as DNA strand breaks...

  12. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal fire events for Plant Operational State 5 during a refueling outage. Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambright, J.; Yakle, J.

    1994-07-01

    This report, Volume 3, presents the details of the analysis of core damage frequency due to fire during shutdown Plant Operational State 5 at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station. Insights from previous fire analyses (Peach Bottom, Surry, LaSalle) were used to the greatest extent possible in this analysis. The fire analysis was fully integrated utilizing the same event trees and fault trees that were used in the internal events analysis. In assessing shutdown risk due to fire at Grand Gulf, a detailed screening was performed which included the following elements: (a) Computer-aided vital area analysis; (b) Plant inspections; (c) Credit for automatic fire protection systems; (d) Recovery of random failures; (e) Detailed fire propagation modeling. This screening process revealed that all plant areas had a negligible (<1.0E-8 per year) contribution to fire-induced core damage frequency

  13. Evolution in Fast Forward: a Potential Role for Mutators in Accelerating Staphylococcus aureus Pathoadaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canfield, Gregory S.; Schwingel, Johanna M.; Foley, Matthew H.; Vore, Kelly L.; Boonanantanasarn, Kanitsak; Gill, Ann L.; Sutton, Mark D.

    2013-01-01

    Pathogen evolution and subsequent phenotypic heterogeneity during chronic infection are proposed to enhance Staphylococcus aureus survival during human infection. We tested this theory by genetically and phenotypically characterizing strains with mutations constructed in the mismatch repair (MMR) and oxidized guanine (GO) system, termed mutators, which exhibit increased spontaneous-mutation frequencies. Analysis of these mutators revealed not only strain-dependent increases in the spontaneous-mutation frequency but also shifts in mutational type and hot spots consistent with loss of GO or MMR functions. Although the GO and MMR systems are relied upon in some bacterial species to prevent reactive oxygen species-induced DNA damage, no deficit in hydrogen peroxide sensitivity was found when either of these DNA repair pathways was lost in S. aureus. To gain insight into the contribution of increased mutation supply to S. aureus pathoadaptation, we measured the rate of α-hemolysin and staphyloxanthin inactivation during serial passage. Detection of increased rates of α-hemolysin and staphyloxanthin inactivation in GO and MMR mutants suggests that these strains are capable of modifying virulence phenotypes implicated in mediating infection. Accelerated derivation of altered virulence phenotypes, combined with the absence of increased ROS sensitivity, highlights the potential of mutators to drive pathoadaptation in the host and serve as catalysts for persistent infections. PMID:23204459

  14. Nicotinamide starvation and inhibition of poly(ADP-Ribose) synthesis enhance the induced mutation in Chinese hamster V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Gensaku; Kaneko, Ichiro; Mitsui, Hideki.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of nicotinamide (NA) deficiency and added NA and 3-aminobenzamide (3AB) on the cytotoxicity and the induction of mutations in Chinese hamster V79-14 cells were investigated. In NA deficiency the addition of NA (up to 4 mM) and 3AB (up to 7.5 mM) was not cytotoxic. The presence of NA prior to exposure to mitomycin C (MMC) or γ-rays produced a dose-dependent increase in the relative cloning ability of DNA-damaged cells. The lethality of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) was significantly potentiated by pre-treatment with 5 mM 3AB, but no potentiation by 3AB was observed for MMC, ultraviolet (UV)-B light, or γ-rays. Among cells pre-cultured in NA-free medium there were increased frequencies of mutations at both the hypoxanthineguanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) and the adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) loci following DNA damage. The enhancing effect by NA deficiency was time-dependent. Incubation with NA prior to DNA damage produced a significant reduction in the frequency of mutations. The addition of 3AB to the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + )-depleted cell cultures before or after the DNA damage also strongly increased the frequency of induced mutations, with increasing concentrations of 3AB up to 5 mM, but the frequency was reduced at higher concentrations. The interaction between NA deficiency and the addition of 3AB appears to act synergistically on mutation induction. A correlation was observed between the potential of inhibiting poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and the enhancement of mutation frequency. (author)

  15. Mitochondrial DNA Damage and its Consequences for Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, Susan D.

    2012-01-01

    How mitochondria process DNA damage and whether a change in the steady-state level of mitochondrial DNA damage (mtDNA) contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction are questions that fuel burgeoning areas of research into aging and disease pathogenesis. Over the past decade, researchers have identified and measured various forms of endogenous and environmental mtDNA damage and have elucidated mtDNA repair pathways. Interestingly, mitochondria do not appear to contain the full range of DNA repair mechanisms that operate in the nucleus, although mtDNA contains types of damage that are targets of each nuclear DNA repair pathway. The reduced repair capacity may, in part, explain the high mutation frequency of the mitochondrial chromosome. Since mtDNA replication is dependent on transcription, mtDNA damage may alter mitochondrial gene expression at three levels: by causing DNA polymerase γ nucleotide incorporation errors leading to mutations, by interfering with the priming of mtDNA replication by the mitochondrial RNA polymerase, or by inducing transcriptional mutagenesis or premature transcript termination. This review summarizes our current knowledge of mtDNA damage, its repair, and its effects on mtDNA integrity and gene expression. PMID:22728831

  16. CHEK2 1100DELC germline mutation: a frequency study in hereditary breast and colon cancer Brazilian families Mutação germinativa 1100delC no gene CHEK2: estudo da frequência em famílias brasileiras com câncer de mama e cólon hereditários

    OpenAIRE

    Jamile Abud; João Carlos Prolla

    2012-01-01

    CONTEXT: CHEK2 encodes a cell cycle checkpoint kinase that plays an important role in the DNA damage repair pathway, activated mainly by ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated) in response to double-stranded DNA breaks. A germline mutation in CHEK2, 1100delC, has been described as a low penetrance allele in a significant number of families with breast and colorectal cancer in certain countries and is also associated with increased risk of contralateral breast cancer in women previously affected b...

  17. Frequency of the HFE C282Y and H63D mutations in Danish patients with clinical haemochromatosis initially diagnosed by phenotypic methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milman, Nils; Koefoed, Pernille; Pedersen, Palle

    2003-01-01

    idiopathic haemochromatosis diagnosed by phenotypic methods (serum transferrin saturation, serum ferritin, liver biopsy and mobilisable body iron stores). In 32 unrelated patients, frozen blood samples were available for genetic analysis. In a subsequent series of 26 unrelated Danish patients, a phenotypic......: Among the patients, 55 of 58 (94.8%) were C282Y/C282Y homozygous. One 63-year-old woman (1.7%) was compound C282Y/H63D heterozygous. Two women (3.4%), aged 42 and 43 yrs were negative for both the C282Y and the H63D mutation. CONCLUSION: In the Danish population, homozygosity for the C282Y mutation...

  18. Frequency and phenotype of patients carrying TPM2 and TPM3 gene mutations in a cohort of 94 patients with congenital myopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Citirak, Gülsenay; Witting, Nanna; Duno, Morten

    2014-01-01

    patients carrying the same mutations as found in our study (c.503G>A, and c.502C>T in TPM3, and c.415_417delGAG in TPM2), clinical presentation and muscle morphological findings differed in our patients. Differences included variation in distribution of muscle weakness, presence of scoliosis and ptosis......, physical performance and joint contractures. The variation in clinical profiles emphasizes the phenotypic heterogeneity. However, common features were also present, such as onset of symptoms in infancy or childhood, musculoskeletal deformities and normal or low plasma levels of creatine kinase. One patient...... had nemaline myopathy and fiber size disproportion, while three patients had congenital fiber type disproportion (CFTD) on muscle biopsies. TPM2-related CFTD has only been described in two cases, indicating that mutations in TPM2 are rare causes of CFTD....

  19. Downsloping high-frequency hearing loss due to inner ear tricellular tight junction disruption by a novel ILDR1 mutation in the Ig-like domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayoung K D Kim

    Full Text Available The immunoglobulin (Ig-like domain containing receptor 1 (ILDR1 gene encodes angulin-2/ILDR1, a recently discovered tight junction protein, which forms tricellular tight junction (tTJ structures with tricellulin and lipolysis-stimulated lipoprotein receptor (LSR at tricellular contacts (TCs in the inner ear. Previously reported recessive mutations within ILDR1 have been shown to cause severe to profound nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL, DFNB42. Whole-exome sequencing of a Korean multiplex family segregating partial deafness identified a novel homozygous ILDR1 variant (p.P69H within the Ig-like domain. To address the pathogenicity of p.P69H, the angulin-2/ILDR1 p.P69H variant protein, along with the previously reported pathogenic ILDR1 mutations, was expressed in angulin-1/LSR knockdown epithelial cells. Interestingly, partial mislocalization of the p.P69H variant protein and tricellulin at TCs was observed, in contrast to a severe mislocalization and complete failure of tricellulin recruitment of the other reported ILDR1 mutations. Additionally, three-dimensional protein modeling revealed that angulin-2/ILDR1 contributed to tTJ by forming a homo-trimer structure through its Ig-like domain, and the p.P69H variant was predicted to disturb homo-trimer formation. In this study, we propose a possible role of angulin-2/ILDR1 in tTJ formation in the inner ear and a wider audiologic phenotypic spectrum of DFNB42 caused by mutations within ILDR1.

  20. High frequency of the aac(6')-Ib-cr gene associated with double mutations in gyrA and parC in Escherichia coli isolates from patients with urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volcão, Lisiane M; Lacava, Juliano P; Gewehr, Martina F; Real, Valéria L; Ramis, Ivy B; Ramos, Daniela F; Gonçalves, Carla V; Possuelo, Lia G; Minarini, Luciene A R; da Silva, Pedro E A; von Groll, Andrea

    2018-01-04

    The aims of this study were (1) to determine the frequency of plasmid-mediated resistance to fluoroquinolones (FQs) in Escherichia coli isolated from patients with urinary tract infections (UTIs) of nosocomial and community origin and (2) to determine the relationships between the presence of extended spectrum beta lactamases (ESBL), mutations in the gyrA and parC genes, and resistance to FQs. A total of 71 E. coli isolates, including 35 ESBL producers and 36 randomly selected non-ESBL-producers, were analysed. The aac(6')-Ib gene was amplified using PCR and subsequently digested with the BtsCl restriction enzyme to identify aac(6')-Ib-cr, a variant associated with FQ resistance. The detection of the qnr genes was performed using multiplex PCR. In isolates that tested positive for these genes, the gyrA and parC genes were sequenced and the modulation factor of an efflux pump inhibitor (EPI) was determined on the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of norfloxacin. The frequencies of qnrS, qnrB and qnrA were 4.2%, 2.8%, and 0%, respectively. The frequency of aac(6')-Ib-cr was 40.8% and this variant was associated with double mutations in gyrA and parC as well as resistance to FQs and ESBL production. Modulation of EPI activity was more frequent in resistant isolates, which had wild-type parC gene. An interplay of resistance mechanisms increased the level of resistance to FQs and the high frequency of putative plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance genes associate with ESBL producer reduced therapeutic options to treat UTIs in the affected population. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Carrier frequency of a nonsense mutation in the adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene implies a high incidence of ADA-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in Somalia and a single, common haplotype indicates common ancestry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez Sanchez, Juan Jose; Monaghan, Gemma; Børsting, Claus

    2007-01-01

    Inherited adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency is a rare metabolic disorder that causes immunodeficiency, varying from severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) in the majority of cases to a less severe form in a small minority of patients. Five patients of Somali origin from four unrelated families......, with severe ADA-SCID, were registered in the Greater London area. Patients and their parents were investigated for the nonsense mutation Q3X (ADA c7C>T), two missense mutations K80R (ADA c239A>G) and R142Q (ADA c425G>A), and a TAAA repeat located at the 3' end of an Alu element (AluVpA) positioned 1.1 kb...... upstream of the ADA transcription start site. All patients were homozygous for the haplotype ADA-7T/ADA-239G/ADA-425G/AluVpA7. Among 207 Somali immigrants to Denmark, the frequency of ADA c7C>T and the maximum likelihood estimate of the frequency of the haplotype ADA-7T/ADA-239G/ADA-425G/AluVpA7 were both...

  2. Increased transmission of mutations by low-condition females: evidence for condition-dependent DNA repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneil F Agrawal

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Evidence is mounting that mutation rates are sufficiently high for deleterious alleles to be a major evolutionary force affecting the evolution of sex, the maintenance of genetic variation, and many other evolutionary phenomena. Though point estimates of mutation rates are improving, we remain largely ignorant of the biological factors affecting these rates at the individual level. Of special importance is the possibility that mutation rates are condition-dependent with low-condition individuals experiencing more mutation. Theory predicts that such condition dependence would dramatically increase the rate at which populations adapt to new environments and the extent to which populations suffer from mutation load. Despite its importance, there has been little study of this phenomenon in multicellular organisms. Here, we examine whether DNA repair processes are condition-dependent in Drosophila melanogaster. In this species, damaged DNA in sperm can be repaired by maternal repair processes after fertilization. We exposed high- and low-condition females to sperm containing damaged DNA and then assessed the frequency of lethal mutations on paternally derived X chromosomes transmitted by these females. The rate of lethal mutations transmitted by low-condition females was 30% greater than that of high-condition females, indicating reduced repair capacity of low-condition females. A separate experiment provided no support for an alternative hypothesis based on sperm selection.

  3. New approaches for effective mutation induction in gamma field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagatomi, Shigeki [National Institute of Agrobiological Resources, Institute of Radiation Breeding, Omiya, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of the report is to clarify the effects of chronic irradiation using in vitro culture on inducing the mutation of two model plants. Culture technique combined with irradiation can overcome the problem of chimera formation and provided 10 times greater mutation efficiency than conventional method. Proper mutagenic treatment using cultured materials is indispensable to effective mutation induction. The chronic culture method showed the widest color spectrum in chrysanthemum and extended toward not only the negative but positive direction. However, the acute culture methods indicated a relatively low mutation rate and a very limited flower color spectrum. Flower color mutation of the regenerations could be induced more from petals and buds than from leaves. These facts is supposed that the gene loci fully expressed on floral organs may be unstable for mutation by mutagenesis or culture. It may be likely to control a direction of desired mutation. One possible reason why the chronic culture methods showed higher frequencies is that most of the cells composing the tissue and organs continually irradiated into a cell division which was highly sensitive and more mutable to irradiation. Under these conditions, many mutated sectors may accumulate in the cells of the growing organs. Regenerated mutant lines show remarkable decrease of chromosome numbers by irradiation. It is a proper indicator to monitor radiation damage. In this study, the six flower color mutant varieties registered were derived from chronic irradiation. The combined method of chronic irradiation with floral organ cultures proved to be of particularly great practical use in mutation breeding for not only flower species but any other species. (author)

  4. New approaches for effective mutation induction in gamma field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagatomi, Shigeki

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the report is to clarify the effects of chronic irradiation using in vitro culture on inducing the mutation of two model plants. Culture technique combined with irradiation can overcome the problem of chimera formation and provided 10 times greater mutation efficiency than conventional method. Proper mutagenic treatment using cultured materials is indispensable to effective mutation induction. The chronic culture method showed the widest color spectrum in chrysanthemum and extended toward not only the negative but positive direction. However, the acute culture methods indicated a relatively low mutation rate and a very limited flower color spectrum. Flower color mutation of the regenerations could be induced more from petals and buds than from leaves. These facts is supposed that the gene loci fully expressed on floral organs may be unstable for mutation by mutagenesis or culture. It may be likely to control a direction of desired mutation. One possible reason why the chronic culture methods showed higher frequencies is that most of the cells composing the tissue and organs continually irradiated into a cell division which was highly sensitive and more mutable to irradiation. Under these conditions, many mutated sectors may accumulate in the cells of the growing organs. Regenerated mutant lines show remarkable decrease of chromosome numbers by irradiation. It is a proper indicator to monitor radiation damage. In this study, the six flower color mutant varieties registered were derived from chronic irradiation. The combined method of chronic irradiation with floral organ cultures proved to be of particularly great practical use in mutation breeding for not only flower species but any other species. (author)

  5. Determination of somatic mutations in human erythrocytes by cytometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, R.H.; Langlois, R.G.; Bigbee, W.L.

    1985-06-21

    Flow cytometric assays of human erythrocytes labeled with monoclonal antibodies specific for glycophorin A were used to enumerate variant cells that appear in peripheral blood as a result of somatic gene-loss mutations in erythrocyte precursor cells. The assay was performed on erythrocytes from 10 oncology patients who had received at least one treatment from radiation or mutagenic chemotherapy at least 3 weeks before being assayed. The patients were suffering from many different malignancies (e.g., breast, renal, bone, colon and lung), and were treated with several different mutagenic therapeutics (e.g., cisplatinum, adriamycin, daunomycin, or cyclophosphamide). The frequency of these variant cells is an indication of the amount of mutagenic damage accumulated in the individual's erythropoietic cell population. Comparing these results to HPRT clonogenic assays, we find similar baseline frequencies of somatic mutation as well as similar correlation with mutagenic exposures. 9 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Septin mutations in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias T Spiliotis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Septins are GTP-binding proteins that are evolutionarily and structurally related to the RAS oncogenes. Septin expression levels are altered in many cancers and new advances point to how abnormal septin expression may contribute to the progression of cancer. In contrast to the RAS GTPases, which are frequently mutated and actively promote tumorigenesis, little is known about the occurrence and role of septin mutations in human cancers. Here, we review septin missense mutations that are currently in the Catalog of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC database. The majority of septin mutations occur in tumors of the large intestine, skin, endometrium and stomach. Over 25% of the annotated mutations in SEPT2, SEPT4 and SEPT9 belong to large intestine tumors. From all septins, SEPT9 and SEPT14 exhibit the highest mutation frequencies in skin, stomach and large intestine cancers. While septin mutations occur with frequencies lower than 3%, recurring mutations in several invariant and highly conserved amino acids are found across different septin paralogs and tumor types. Interestingly, a significant number of these mutations occur in the GTP-binding pocket and septin dimerization interfaces. Future studies may determine how these somatic mutations affect septin structure and function, whether they contribute to the progression of specific cancers and if they could serve as tumor-specific biomarkers.

  7. Transformation and mutation of golden hamster embryo cells induced by low doses of x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, M.; Suzuki, N.; Nikaido, O.

    1982-01-01

    A new cell system which makes quantitative analysis possible in both mutation and transformation induced by low doses of X-rays was described and the frequencies of both mutation and transformation were compared in relation to DNA repair which takes place in X-irradiated cells. Golden hamster embryo (GHE) cells were employed to show the availability of the system for the efficient detection of both mutants and transformants concomitantly. The mutation frequency of the cell population irradiated with various doses of X-rays was expressed as the ratio of the number of 8-azaguanine resistant colonies to the 10 5 colonies formed in normal medium. A linear increase in mutation frequency with increasing dose was observed at doses ranging from 100 to 600 rad. There was no significant increase in mutation frequency with doses below 100 rad. On the other hand, the transformation frequency of the cells was expressed as the ratio of the number of the transformed colonies to the total number of colonies counted. A drastic increase in the transformation frequency was observed when cells were irradiated with less than 100 rad of X-rays. DNA repair might be involved in modifying transformation frequency and survivals of GHE cells, and DNA synthesis might be involved in inducing transformation in GHE cells. It seems that the repair of potentially lethal damage taking place in density-inhibited GHE cells within 24 hours after X-irradiation decreases the frequencies of both transformation and mutation. Furthermore, it is evident that the system using GHE cells is sensitive enough to assess the transformational effect of low doses of X-rays. (Namekawa, K.)

  8. Patterns of hepatitis B virus infection in Brazilian human immunodeficiency virus infected patients: high prevalence of occult infection and low frequency of lamivudine resistant mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel VF Sucupira

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus (HBV molecular profiles were determined for 44 patients who were infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV type 1 and had antibodies to the hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc, with and without other HBV serological markers. In this population, 70% of the patients were under lamivudine treatment as a component of antiretroviral therapy. HBV DNA was detected in 14 (32% patients. Eight out of 12 (67% HBsAg positive samples, 3/10 (30% anti-HBc only samples, and 3/22 (14% anti-HBs positive samples were HBV DNA positive. HBV DNA loads, measured by real time polymerase chain reaction, were much higher in the HBsAg positive patients (mean, 2.5 × 10(9 copies/ml than in the negative ones (HBV occult infection; mean, 2.7 × 10(5 copies/ml. Nine out of the 14 HBV DNA positive patients were under lamivudine treatment. Lamivudine resistant mutations in the polymerase gene were detected in only three patients, all of them belonging to the subgroup of five HBsAg positive, HBV DNA positive patients. A low mean HBV load (2.7 × 10(5 copies/ml and an absence of lamivudine resistant mutations were observed among the cases of HBV occult infection.

  9. Evaluation of the correlation between KRAS mutated allele frequency and pathologist tumorous nuclei percentage assessment in colorectal cancer suggests a role for zygosity status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libbrecht, Louis; Baldin, Pamela; Dekairelle, Anne-France; Jouret-Mourin, Anne

    2018-04-27

    Evaluation of molecular tumour heterogeneity relies on the tumorous nuclei percentage (TNP) assessment by a pathologist, which has been criticised for being inaccurate and suffering from interobserver variability. Based on the 'Big Bang theory' which states that KRAS mutation in colorectal cancer is mostly homogeneous, we investigated this issue by performing a critical analysis of the correlation of the KRAS mutant allele fraction with the TNP in 99 colorectal tumour samples with a positive KRAS mutation status as determined by next-generation sequencing. Our results yield indirect evidence that the KRAS zygosity status influences the correlation between these parameters and we show that a well-trained pathologist is indeed capable of accurately assessing TNP. Our findings indicate that tumour zygosity, a feature which has largely been neglected until now, should be taken into account in future studies on (colorectal) molecular tumour heterogeneity. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Estimative of core damage frequency in IPEN's IEA-R1 research reactor (PSA level 1) due to the initiating event of loss of coolant caused by large rupture in the pipe of the primary circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Daniel Massami

    2009-01-01

    This work applies the methodology of probabilistic safety assessment level 1 to the research reactor IEA-R1 IPEN-CNEN/SP. Two categories of identified initiating events of accidents in the reactor are studied: loss of flow and loss of primary coolant. Among the initiating events, blockage of flow channel and loss of cooling fluid by major pipe rupture in the primary circuit are chosen for a detailed analysis. The event tree technique is used to analyze the evolution of the accident, including the actuation or the fail of actuation of the safety systems and the reactor damages. Using the fault tree the reliability of the following reactor safety systems is evaluated: reactor shutdown system, isolation of the reactor pool, emergency core cooling system (ECCS) and the electric system. Estimative for the frequency of damage to the reactor core and the probability of failure of the analyzed systems are calculated. The estimated values for the frequencies of core damage are within the expected margins and are of the same order of magnitude as those found for similar reactors. The reliability of the reactor shutdown system, isolation of the reactor pool and ECCS are satisfactory for the conditions these systems are required. However, for the electric system it is suggested an upgrade to increase its reliability. (author)

  11. Circumsporozoite protein rates, blood-feeding pattern and frequency of knockdown resistance mutations in Anopheles spp. in two ecological zones of Mauritania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekweiry, Khadijetou Mint; Salem, Mohamed Salem Ould Ahmedou; Cotteaux-Lautard, Christelle; Jarjaval, Fanny; Marin-Jauffre, Adeline; Bogreau, Hervé; Basco, Leonardo; Briolant, Sébastien; Boukhary, Ali Ould Mohamed Salem; Brahim, Khyarhoum Ould; Pagès, Frédéric

    2016-05-05

    Mosquitoes belonging to Anopheles gambiae species complex are the main malaria vector in Mauritania but data on their vector capacities, feeding habits and insecticide susceptibility are still scanty. The objectives of this study were to fill this gap. Adult Anopheles spp. mosquitoes were collected using pyrethrum spray catch method from two ecological zones of Mauritania: Nouakchott (Saharan zone) and Hodh Elgharbi region (Sahelian zone). Circumsporozoite proteins (CSP) for P. falciparum, P. vivax VK210 and P. vivax VK247 were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) from the female anopheline mosquitoes. To confirm CSP-ELISA results, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was also performed. Blood meal identification was performed in all engorged females by partial sequencing of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene. Molecular assessments of pyrethroid knockdown resistance (kdr) and insensitive acetylcholinesterase resistance (ace-1) were conducted. In Nouakchott, the only species of Anopheles identified during the survey was Anopheles arabiensis (356 specimens). In Hodh Elgharbi, 1016 specimens of Anopheles were collected, including 578 (56.9%) Anopheles rufipes, 410 (40.35%) An. arabiensis, 20 (1.96%) An. gambiae, 5 (0.5%) An. pharoensis and 3 (0.3 %) An. funestus. Three of 186 female An. arabiensis collected in Nouakchott and tested by ELISA were found positive for Plasmodium vivax VK210, corresponding to a sporozoite rate of 1.6%; however PCR confirmed infection by P. vivax sporozoite in only one of these. In Hodh Elgharbi, no mosquito was found positive for Plasmodium spp. infection. There was a statistically significant difference in the percentage of human blood-fed Anopheles spp. between Nouakchott (58.7%, 47 of 80 blood-engorged An. arabiensis females) and Hodh Elgharbi (11.1%, 2 of 18 blood-engorged mosquitoes). Analysis of the kdr polymorphisms showed 48.2% (70/145) of East African kdr mutation (L1014S) in Nouakchott compared to 10% (4/40) in Hodh

  12. Impact of low-frequency hotspot mutation R282Q on the structure of p53 DNA-binding domain as revealed by crystallography at 1.54 Å resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Chao [Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Tan, Yu-Hong [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Shaw, Gary [Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Zhou, Zheng; Bai, Yawen [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Luo, Ray [Department of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry, University of California at Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Ji, Xinhua, E-mail: jix@ncifcrf.gov [Macromolecular Crystallography Laboratory, National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States)

    2008-05-01

    The impact of hotspot mutation R282Q on the structure of human p53 DNA-binding domain has been characterized by X-ray crystallography and molecular-dynamics simulations. Tumor suppressor p53 is a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein and its central DNA-binding domain (DBD) harbors six hotspots (Arg175, Gly245, Arg248, Arg249, Arg273 and Arg282) for human cancers. Here, the crystal structure of a low-frequency hotspot mutant, p53DBD(R282Q), is reported at 1.54 Å resolution together with the results of molecular-dynamics simulations on the basis of the structure. In addition to eliminating a salt bridge, the R282Q mutation has a significant impact on the properties of two DNA-binding loops (L1 and L3). The L1 loop is flexible in the wild type, but it is not flexible in the mutant. The L3 loop of the wild type is not flexible, whereas it assumes two conformations in the mutant. Molecular-dynamics simulations indicated that both conformations of the L3 loop are accessible under biological conditions. It is predicted that the elimination of the salt bridge and the inversion of the flexibility of L1 and L3 are directly or indirectly responsible for deactivating the tumor suppressor p53.

  13. Resistance mechanisms to chlorpyrifos and F392W mutation frequencies in the acetylcholine esterase ace1 allele of field populations of the tobacco whitefly, Bemisia tabaci in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning-ning; Liu, Cai-feng; Yang, Fang; Dong, Shuang-lin; Han, Zhao-jun

    2012-01-01

    The tobacco whitefly B-biotype Bemisia tabaci Gennadius (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) is a worldwide pest of many crops. In China, chlorpyrifos has been used to control this insect for many years and is still being used despite the fact that some resistance has been reported. To combat resistance and maintain good control efficiency of chlorpyrifos, it is essential to understand resistance mechanisms. A chlorpyrifos resistant tobacco whitefly strain (NJ-R) and a susceptible strain (NJ-S) were derived from a field-collected population in Nanjing, China, and the resistance mechanisms were investigated. More than 30-fold resistance was achieved after selected by chlorpyrifos for 13 generations in the laboratory. However, the resistance dropped significantly to about 18-fold in only 4 generations without selection pressure. Biochemical assays indicated that increased esterase activity was responsible for this resistance, while acetylcholine esterase, glutathione S-transferase, and microsomal-O-demethylase played little or no role. F392W mutations in acel were prevalent in NJ-S and NJ-R strains and 6 field-collected populations of both B and Q-biotype from locations that cover a wide geographical area of China. These findings provide important information about tobacco whitefly chlorpyrifos resistance mechanisms and guidance to combat resistance and optimize use patterns of chlorpyrifos and other organophosphate and carbamate insecticides.

  14. BRCA1-mutated and basal-like breast cancers have similar aCGH profiles and a high incidence of protein truncating TP53 mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holstege, Henne; Horlings, Hugo M; Velds, Arno; Langerød, Anita; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Vijver, Marc J van de; Nederlof, Petra M; Jonkers, Jos

    2010-01-01

    Basal-like breast cancers (BLBC) are aggressive breast cancers for which, so far, no targeted therapy is available because they typically lack expression of hormone receptors and HER2. Phenotypic features of BLBCs, such as clinical presentation and early age of onset, resemble those of breast tumors from BRCA1-mutation carriers. The genomic instability of BRCA1-mutated tumors can be effectively targeted with DNA-damaging agents and poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) inhibitors. Molecular similarities between BLBCs and BRCA1-mutated tumors may therefore provide predictive markers for therapeutic response of BLBCs. There are several known molecular features characteristic for BRCA1-mutated breast tumors: 1) increased numbers of genomic aberrations, 2) a distinct pattern of genomic aberrations, 3) a high frequency of TP53 mutations and 4) a high incidence of complex, protein-truncating TP53 mutations. We compared the frequency of TP53 mutations and the pattern and amount of genomic aberrations between BRCA1-mutated breast tumors, BLBCs and luminal breast tumors by TP53 gene sequencing and array-based comparative genomics hybridization (aCGH) analysis. We found that the high incidence of protein truncating TP53 mutations and the pattern and amount of genomic aberrations specific for BRCA1-mutated breast tumors are also characteristic for BLBCs and different from luminal breast tumors. Complex, protein truncating TP53 mutations in BRCA1-mutated tumors may be a direct consequence of genomic instability caused by BRCA1 loss, therefore, the presence of these types of TP53 mutations in sporadic BLBCs might be a hallmark of BRCAness and a potential biomarker for sensitivity to PARP inhibition. Also, our data suggest that a small subset of genomic regions may be used to identify BRCA1-like BLBCs. BLBCs share molecular features that were previously found to be specific for BRCA1-mutated breast tumors. These features might be useful for the identification of tumors with

  15. Studies of human mutation rates: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neel, J.V.

    1988-01-01

    Progress was recorded between January 1 and July 1, 1987 on a project entitled ''Studies of Human Mutation Rates''. Studies underway include methodology for studying mutation at the DNA level, algorithms for automated analyses of two-dimensional polyacrylamide DNA gels, theoretical and applied population genetics, and studies of mutation frequency in A-bomb survivors

  16. Efficient visual object and word recognition relies on high spatial frequency coding in the left posterior fusiform gyrus: evidence from a case-series of patients with ventral occipito-temporal cortex damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Daniel J; Woollams, Anna M; Kim, Esther; Beeson, Pelagie M; Rapcsak, Steven Z; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A

    2013-11-01

    Recent visual neuroscience investigations suggest that ventral occipito-temporal cortex is retinotopically organized, with high acuity foveal input projecting primarily to the posterior fusiform gyrus (pFG), making this region crucial for coding high spatial frequency information. Because high spatial frequencies are critical for fine-grained visual discrimination, we hypothesized that damage to the left pFG should have an adverse effect not only on efficient reading, as observed in pure alexia, but also on the processing of complex non-orthographic visual stimuli. Consistent with this hypothesis, we obtained evidence that a large case series (n = 20) of patients with lesions centered on left pFG: 1) Exhibited reduced sensitivity to high spatial frequencies; 2) demonstrated prolonged response latencies both in reading (pure alexia) and object naming; and 3) were especially sensitive to visual complexity and similarity when discriminating between novel visual patterns. These results suggest that the patients' dual reading and non-orthographic recognition impairments have a common underlying mechanism and reflect the loss of high spatial frequency visual information normally coded in the left pFG.

  17. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations, Main report (Chapters 7--12). Volume 2, Part 1B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.

    1994-06-01

    During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this report is to document the approach utilized in the Surry plant and discuss the results obtained. A parallel report for the Grand Gulf plant is prepared by SNL. This study shows that the core-damage frequency during mid-loop operation at the Surry plant is comparable to that of power operation. We recognize that there is very large uncertainty in the human error probabilities in this study. This study identified that only a few procedures are available for mitigating accidents that may occur during shutdown. Procedures written specific shutdown accidents would be useful

  18. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations, Appendices E (Sections E.1--E.8). Volume 2, Part 3A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this report is to document the approach utilized in the Surry plant and discuss the results obtained. A parallel report for the Grand Gulf plant is prepared by SNL. This study shows that the core-damage frequency during mid-loop operation at the Surry plant is comparable to that of power operation. The authors recognize that there is very large uncertainty in the human error probabilities in this study. This study identified that only a few procedures are available for mitigating accidents that may occur during shutdown. Procedures written specifically for shutdown accidents would be useful.

  19. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations, Appendices A--D. Volume 2, Part 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the Potential risks during low Power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the Plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this report is to document the approach utilized in the Surry plant and discuss the results obtained. A parallel report for the Grand Gulf plant is prepared by SNL. This study shows that the core-damage frequency during mid-loop operation at the Surry plant is comparable to that of power operation. We recognize that there is very large uncertainty in the human error probabilities in this study. This study identified that only a few procedures are available for mitigating accidents that may occur during shutdown. Procedures written specifically for shutdown accidents would be useful. This document, Volume 2, Pt. 2 provides appendices A through D of this report.

  20. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations, Appendices A--D. Volume 2, Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.

    1994-06-01

    During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the Potential risks during low Power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the Plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this report is to document the approach utilized in the Surry plant and discuss the results obtained. A parallel report for the Grand Gulf plant is prepared by SNL. This study shows that the core-damage frequency during mid-loop operation at the Surry plant is comparable to that of power operation. We recognize that there is very large uncertainty in the human error probabilities in this study. This study identified that only a few procedures are available for mitigating accidents that may occur during shutdown. Procedures written specifically for shutdown accidents would be useful. This document, Volume 2, Pt. 2 provides appendices A through D of this report

  1. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations, Main report (Chapters 1--6). Volume 2, Part 1A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.

    1992-06-01

    During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this report is to document the approach utilized in the Surry plant and discuss the results obtained. A parallel report for the Grand Gulf plant is prepared by SNL. This study shows that the core-damage frequency during mid-loop operation at the Surry plant is comparable to that of power operation. We recognize that there is very large uncertainty in the human error probabilities in this study. This study identified that only a few procedures are available for mitigating accidents that may occur during shutdown written specifically for shutdown accidents would be useful. This document presents Chapters 1--6 of the report

  2. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations, Appendices E (Sections E.1--E.8). Volume 2, Part 3A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.

    1994-06-01

    During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this report is to document the approach utilized in the Surry plant and discuss the results obtained. A parallel report for the Grand Gulf plant is prepared by SNL. This study shows that the core-damage frequency during mid-loop operation at the Surry plant is comparable to that of power operation. The authors recognize that there is very large uncertainty in the human error probabilities in this study. This study identified that only a few procedures are available for mitigating accidents that may occur during shutdown. Procedures written specifically for shutdown accidents would be useful

  3. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal fires during mid-loop operations. Volume 3, Part 1, Main report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musicki, Z.; Chu, T.L.; Yang, J.; Ho, V.; Hou, Y.M.; Lin, J.; Siu, N.

    1994-07-01

    During l989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than fun power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this report is to document the approach utilized in ' the Surry plant and discuss the results obtained. A parallel report for the Grand Gulf plant is prepared by SNL. This study shows that the core-damage frequency during mid-loop operation at the Surry plant is comparable to that of power operation. We recognize that there is very large uncertainty in the human error probabilities in this study. This study identified that only a few. procedures are available for mitigating accidents that may occur during shutdown. Procedures written specifically for shutdown accidents would be useful

  4. Rare Mutations of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma: Frequencies and Relationship with Insulin Resistance and Diabetes Risk in the Mixed Ancestry Population from South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Vergotine

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Genetic variants in the nuclear transcription receptor, PPARG, are associated with cardiometabolic traits, but reports remain conflicting. We determined the frequency and the clinical relevance of PPARG SNPs in an African mixed ancestry population. Methods. In a cross-sectional study, 820 participants were genotyped for rs1800571, rs72551362, rs72551363, rs72551364, and rs3856806, using allele-specific TaqMan technology. The homeostatic model assessment of insulin (HOMA-IR, β-cells function (HOMA-B%, fasting insulin resistance index (FIRI, and the quantitative insulin-sensitivity check index (QUICKI were calculated. Results. No sequence variants were found except for the rs3856806. The frequency of the PPARG-His447His variant was 23.8% in the overall population group, with no difference by diabetes status (P=0.215. The His447His allele T was associated with none of the markers of insulin resistance overall and by diabetes status. In models adjusted for 2-hour insulin, the T allele was associated with lower prevalent diabetes risk (odds ratio 0.56 (95% CI 0.31–0.95. Conclusion. Our study confirms the almost zero occurrences of known rare PPARG SNPs and has shown for the first time in an African population that one of the common SNPs, His447His, may be protective against type 2 diabetes.

  5. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1. Volume 5: Analysis of core damage frequency from seismic events during mid-loop operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budnitz, R.J. [Future Resources Associates, Inc., Berkeley, CA (United States); Davis, P.R. [PRD Consulting (United States); Ravindra, M.K.; Tong, W.H. [EQE International, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    In 1989 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine carefully the potential risks during low-power and shutdown operations. The program included two parallel projects, one at Brookhaven National Laboratory studying a pressurized water reactor (Surry Unit 1) and the other at Sandia National Laboratories studying a boiling water reactor (Grand Gulf). Both the Brookhaven and Sandia projects have examined only accidents initiated by internal plant faults--so-called ``internal initiators.`` This project, which has explored the likelihood of seismic-initiated core damage accidents during refueling shutdown conditions, is complementary to the internal-initiator analyses at Brookhaven and Sandia. This report covers the seismic analysis at Surry Unit 1. All of the many systems modeling assumptions, component non-seismic failure rates, and human error rates that were used in the internal-initiator study at Surry have been adopted here, so that the results of the two studies can be as comparable as possible. Both the Brookhaven study and this study examine only two shutdown plant operating states (POSs) during refueling outages at Surry, called POS 6 and POS 10, which represent mid-loop operation before and after refueling, respectively. This analysis has been limited to work analogous to a level-1 seismic PRA, in which estimates have been developed for the core-damage frequency from seismic events during POSs 6 and 10. The results of the analysis are that the core-damage frequency of earthquake-initiated accidents during refueling outages in POS 6 and POS 10 is found to be low in absolute terms, less than 10{sup {minus}6}/year.

  6. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1. Volume 5: Analysis of core damage frequency from seismic events during mid-loop operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budnitz, R.J.; Davis, P.R.; Ravindra, M.K.; Tong, W.H.

    1994-08-01

    In 1989 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine carefully the potential risks during low-power and shutdown operations. The program included two parallel projects, one at Brookhaven National Laboratory studying a pressurized water reactor (Surry Unit 1) and the other at Sandia National Laboratories studying a boiling water reactor (Grand Gulf). Both the Brookhaven and Sandia projects have examined only accidents initiated by internal plant faults--so-called ''internal initiators.'' This project, which has explored the likelihood of seismic-initiated core damage accidents during refueling shutdown conditions, is complementary to the internal-initiator analyses at Brookhaven and Sandia. This report covers the seismic analysis at Surry Unit 1. All of the many systems modeling assumptions, component non-seismic failure rates, and human error rates that were used in the internal-initiator study at Surry have been adopted here, so that the results of the two studies can be as comparable as possible. Both the Brookhaven study and this study examine only two shutdown plant operating states (POSs) during refueling outages at Surry, called POS 6 and POS 10, which represent mid-loop operation before and after refueling, respectively. This analysis has been limited to work analogous to a level-1 seismic PRA, in which estimates have been developed for the core-damage frequency from seismic events during POSs 6 and 10. The results of the analysis are that the core-damage frequency of earthquake-initiated accidents during refueling outages in POS 6 and POS 10 is found to be low in absolute terms, less than 10 -6 /year

  7. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1. Volume 5: Analysis of core damage frequency from seismic events for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budnitz, R.J. [Future Resources Associates, Inc., Berkeley, CA (United States); Davis, P.R. [PRD Consulting (United States); Ravindra, M.K.; Tong, W.H. [EQE International, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    In 1989 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine carefully the potential risks during low-power and shutdown operations. The program included two parallel projects, one at Sandia National Laboratories studying a boiling water reactor (Grand Gulf), and the other at Brookhaven National Laboratory studying a pressurized water reactor (Surry Unit 1). Both the Sandia and Brookhaven projects have examined only accidents initiated by internal plant faults---so-called ``internal initiators.`` This project, which has explored the likelihood of seismic-initiated core damage accidents during refueling outage conditions, is complementary to the internal-initiator analyses at Brookhaven and Sandia. This report covers the seismic analysis at Grand Gulf. All of the many systems modeling assumptions, component non-seismic failure rates, and human effort rates that were used in the internal-initiator study at Grand Gulf have been adopted here, so that the results of the study can be as comparable as possible. Both the Sandia study and this study examine only one shutdown plant operating state (POS) at Grand Gulf, namely POS 5 representing cold shutdown during a refueling outage. This analysis has been limited to work analogous to a level-1 seismic PRA, in which estimates have been developed for the core-damage frequency from seismic events during POS 5. The results of the analysis are that the core-damage frequency for earthquake-initiated accidents during refueling outages in POS 5 is found to be quite low in absolute terms, less than 10{sup {minus}7}/year.

  8. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Grand Gulf, Unit 1. Volume 5: Analysis of core damage frequency from seismic events for plant operational state 5 during a refueling outage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budnitz, R.J.; Davis, P.R.; Ravindra, M.K.; Tong, W.H.

    1994-08-01

    In 1989 the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to examine carefully the potential risks during low-power and shutdown operations. The program included two parallel projects, one at Sandia National Laboratories studying a boiling water reactor (Grand Gulf), and the other at Brookhaven National Laboratory studying a pressurized water reactor (Surry Unit 1). Both the Sandia and Brookhaven projects have examined only accidents initiated by internal plant faults---so-called ''internal initiators.'' This project, which has explored the likelihood of seismic-initiated core damage accidents during refueling outage conditions, is complementary to the internal-initiator analyses at Brookhaven and Sandia. This report covers the seismic analysis at Grand Gulf. All of the many systems modeling assumptions, component non-seismic failure rates, and human effort rates that were used in the internal-initiator study at Grand Gulf have been adopted here, so that the results of the study can be as comparable as possible. Both the Sandia study and this study examine only one shutdown plant operating state (POS) at Grand Gulf, namely POS 5 representing cold shutdown during a refueling outage. This analysis has been limited to work analogous to a level-1 seismic PRA, in which estimates have been developed for the core-damage frequency from seismic events during POS 5. The results of the analysis are that the core-damage frequency for earthquake-initiated accidents during refueling outages in POS 5 is found to be quite low in absolute terms, less than 10 -7 /year

  9. Radiation-induced mutation at minisatellite loci

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubrova, Y.E.; Nesterov, V.N.; Krouchinsky, N.G.

    1997-01-01

    We are studying the radiation-induced increase of mutation rate in minisatellite loci in mice and humans. Minisatellite mutations were scored by multilocus DNA fingerprint analysis in the progeny of γ-irradiated and non-irradiated mice. The frequency of mutation in offspring of irradiated males was 1.7 higher that in the control group. Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci was studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation assayed both by DNA fingerprinting and by eight single locus probes was found to be two times higher in the exposed families than in the control group. Furthermore, mutation rate was correlated with the parental radiation dose for chronic exposure 137 Cs, consistent with radiation-induction of germline mutation. The potential use of minisatellites in monitoring germline mutation in humans will be discussed

  10. Transitions at CpG dinucleotides, geographic clustering of TP53 mutations and food availability patterns in colorectal cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Verginelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer is mainly attributed to diet, but the role exerted by foods remains unclear because involved factors are extremely complex. Geography substantially impacts on foods. Correlations between international variation in colorectal cancer-associated mutation patterns and food availabilities could highlight the influence of foods on colorectal mutagenesis. METHODOLOGY: To test such hypothesis, we applied techniques based on hierarchical clustering, feature extraction and selection, and statistical pattern recognition to the analysis of 2,572 colorectal cancer-associated TP53 mutations from 12 countries/geographic areas. For food availabilities, we relied on data extracted from the Food Balance Sheets of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Dendrograms for mutation sites, mutation types and food patterns were constructed through Ward's hierarchical clustering algorithm and their stability was assessed evaluating silhouette values. Feature selection used entropy-based measures for similarity between clusterings, combined with principal component analysis by exhaustive and heuristic approaches. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Mutations clustered in two major geographic groups, one including only Western countries, the other Asia and parts of Europe. This was determined by variation in the frequency of transitions at CpGs, the most common mutation type. Higher frequencies of transitions at CpGs in the cluster that included only Western countries mainly reflected higher frequencies of mutations at CpG codons 175, 248 and 273, the three major TP53 hotspots. Pearson's correlation scores, computed between the principal components of the datamatrices for mutation types, food availability and mutation sites, demonstrated statistically significant correlations between transitions at CpGs and both mutation sites and availabilities of meat, milk, sweeteners and animal fats, the energy-dense foods at the basis of

  11. Radiation damage and induced tetraploidy in mulberry (Morus alba L.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katagiri, K.

    1976-01-01

    Vigorously growing mulberry shoots were exposed to 5 kR of gamma rays at the rate of 0.2 kR/hr and 5.0 kR/hr and successively pruned three times in two growing seasons. The most radiosensitive part of both the apical and axillary meristems was the second cell layer. The younger axillary bud primordia were more sensitive to radiation then the older ones. Recovery from radiation damage was assumed to be from the flank meristem in the shoot apex. The frequency of mutations was much lower than that of tetraploidy. Among the tetraploids 50% were 2-4-4 chimeras. (author)

  12. Elimination of radiation-induced chromosomal damages in numan peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures. 1. The frequency of aberrations in the first and second mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyatkin, E.K.; Nugis, V.Yu.

    1981-01-01

    A comparative analysis of chromosomal aberrations in the first and second mitosis of cultivated human peripheral blood lymphocytes after gamma irradiation in vitro at 1-5 Gy doses has been made. Irradiated blood lymphocytes were incubated for 58 to 66 h at 37 deg with PGA and BDU (20 μg /ml). The first, second and third postradiation mitosises were identified using the distinguishing staining of sister chromatids. The share of the cells in the first mitosis fluctuated from 32 to 77 %, in the second - from 23 to 68 %, and the third - from 0 to 9 %. At all radiation doses significant differences in the frequency of the aberration cells passing the first and second mitosises were revealed as well as in the total number of chromosomal aberrations in all the cells. The frequency of pair fragments and dicentrics chromosomes in the first mitosis was on the average 1.6 and 2 times as high as in the second one, respectively. In the first mitosis almost all dicentric chromosomes occurred with accompanying pair fragments, and in the second mitosis the share of dicentric chromosomes without accompanying fragments was 25 to 50 %. The distribution of the dicentric chromosomes in the cells in the first and second mitosis did not differ from Poison distribution for the 2 to 5 Gy dose range

  13. Elimination of radiation-induced chromosome damages in human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures. 2. The frequency of aberrations in the first-fifth post-irradiation mitosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyatkin, E.K.; Pokrovskaya, V.N.; Nugis, V.Yu.

    1982-01-01

    The number of chromosome aberrations in 1.-5. mitoses cultivated from lymphocyte PHA of peripheric man blood after gamma irradiation in vitro in 1e5; 3 and 6 Gy has been determined. For all the doses, as the cells passed 1. and successive postradiation divisiops, observed was the decrease in the number of aberrant metaphases and all the aberrations of the chromosomal typee at that their elimination rate increases with the dose increase. No considerable differences in the frequency of pair fragments in 1.-4. mitosis after irradiation in 1,5 Gy dose, in 1.-3. mitoses after irradiation in 3 Gy dose and in 1.-2. mitoses after irradiation in 6 Gy dose were found. In lymphocyte cultures irradiated in 3 and 6 Gy doses the number of dicentries in 2. mitosis was approximately 2 times smaller than in 1. mitosis and in 3. mitosis two times smaller than in 2. mitosis. In 1. mitosis almost all the dicentrics have accompanying pair fragments in 2. and 3. mitoses a share of the dicentrics without fragments constituted about 30-70 %, and in 4.-5. mitoses amounted to 95-100 %. The reduction of the number of irregular chromosomes in the process of cell passing of 1. and successive postradiation mitosis was noted only during lymphocyte investigation irradiated in 6 Gy. At 1,5 and 3 Gy doses these aberration frequency in 1.-5. and 1.-4. mitoses were nearly the same

  14. Elimination of radiation-induced chromosomal damages in human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures. 1. The frequency of aberrations in the first and second mitosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyatkin, E.K.; Nugis, V.Yu. (Institut Biofiziki, Moscow (USSR))

    1981-01-01

    A comparative analysis of chromosomal aberrations in the first and second mitosis of cultivated human peripheral blood lymphocytes after gamma irradiation in vitro at 1-5 Gy doses has been made. Irradiated blood lymphocytes were incubated for 58 to 66 h at 37 deg with PGA and BDU (20 ..mu..g /ml). The first, second and third postradiation mitoses were identified using the distinguishing staining of sister chromatids. The share of the cells in the first mitosis fluctuated from 32 to 77 %, in the second - from 23 to 68 %, and the third - from 0 to 9 %. At all radiation doses significant differences in the frequency of the aberration cells passing the first and second mitoses were revealed as well as in the total number of chromosomal aberrations in all the cells. The frequency of pair fragments and dicentric chromosomes in the first mitosis was on the average 1.6 and 2 times as high as in the second one, respectively. In the first mitosis almost all dicentric chromosomes occurred with accompanying pair fragments, and in the second mitosis the share of dicentric chromosomes without accompanying fragments was 25 to 50 %. The distribution of the dicentric chromosomes in the cells in the first and second mitosis did not differ from Poisson distribution for the 2 to 5 Gy dose range.

  15. Elimination of radiation-induced chromosome damages in human peripheral blood lymphocyte cultures. 2. The frequency of aberrations in the first-fifth post-irradiation mitosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyatkin, E.K.; Pokrovskaya, V.N.; Nugis, V.Yu. (Institut Biofiziki, Moscow (USSR))

    1982-11-01

    The number of chromosome aberrations in 1.-5. mitoses cultivated from lymphocyte PHA of peripheric man blood after gamma irradiation in vitro in 1e5; 3 and 6 Gy has been determined. For all the doses, as the cells passed 1. and successive postradiation divisions, observed was the decrease in the number of aberrant metaphases and all the aberrations of the chromosomal typee at that their elimination rate increases with the dose increase. No considerable differences in the frequency of pair fragments in 1.-4. mitosis after irradiation in 1,5 Gy dose, in 1.-3. mitoses after irradiation in 3 Gy dose and in 1.-2. mitoses after irradiation in 6 Gy dose were found. In lymphocyte cultures irradiated in 3 and 6 Gy doses the number of dicentrics in 2. mitosis was approximately 2 times smaller than in 1. mitosis and in 3. mitosis two times smaller than in 2. mitosis. In 1. mitosis almost all the dicentrics have accompanying pair fragments in 2. and 3. mitoses a share of the dicentrics without fragments constituted about 30-70 %, and in 4.-5. mitoses amounted to 95-100 %. The reduction of the number of irregular chromosomes in the process of cell passing of 1. and successive postradiation mitosis was noted only during lymphocyte investigation irradiated in 6 Gy. At 1,5 and 3 Gy doses these aberration frequency in 1.-5. and 1.-4. mitoses were nearly the same.

  16. Radiation induction of germline mutation at a hypervariable mouse minisatellite locus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadamoto, S.; Hiroshima Univ.; Suzuki, S.; Kominami, R.; Kamiya, K.; Niwa, O.; Dohi, K.

    1994-01-01

    Paternal 60 Co γ-irradiation was tested for the induction of germline mutation at the mouse hypervariable minisatellite locus, Ms6hm. Male C3H/HeN mice were exposed to 3 Gy 60 Co γ-ray and mated with C57BL/6N females. Matings were made at 1-7, 15-21 and 71-77 days post-treatment to test spermatozoa, spermatids and spermatogonia stages. Reciprocal crosses were also made with irradiated C57BL/6N males. Southern analysis was carried out on DNA from parents and F 1 mice. The paternal mutation frequencies per gamete of the Ms6hm locus were 8.3, 13, 28 and 15% for the C3H/HeN control, exposed spermatozoa, spermatids and spermatogonia stages, respectively. The paternal mutation frequencies per gamete were 7.7% for the C57BL/6N control and 13% for the C57BL/6N exposed spermatozoa stage. The increase in the paternal germline mutation frequency was statistically significant for C3H/HeN spermatids irradiation (p -1 , and was too high to be accounted for by the direct action of radiation on the locus. These results suggest the presence of a previously unexpected mechanism of radiation induction of germline mutation. In addition, we demonstrate that the hypervariable minisatellite locus can serve as a sensitive monitor for genetic damages to germline cells. (Author)

  17. Evaluation of fatigue damage induced by thermal striping in a T junction using the three dimensional coupling method and frequency response method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Hye; Choi, Jae boong; Kim, Moon Ki [Sungkyunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Huh, Nam Su [Seoul Nat' l Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jin Ho [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Thermal fatigue cracking induced by thermal stratification, cycling and striping have been observed in several PWR plants. Especially, thermal striping, the highly fluctuating thermal layer, became one of the significant problems, since it can cause un predicted high cycle thermal fatigue (HCTF) at piping systems. This problem are usually found in T junctions of energy cooling systems, where cold and hot flows with high level of turbulence mix together. Thermal striping can cause the networks of fatigue crack at the vicinity of weld parts and these cracks can propagate to significant depth in a relatively short time. Therefore, thermal striping and fatigue crack initiations should be predicted in advance to prevent the severe failure of piping systems. The final goal of this research is to develop a rational thermal and mechanical model considering thermohydraulic characteristics of thermal striping and an evaluation procedure to predict the initiation of thermal fatigue crack. As a first step, we evaluated the fatigue damage in a T junction using two widely used methods. Then, we analyzed the results of each method and conducted comparisons and verifications.

  18. Rapid evolution of the human mutation spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kelley; Pritchard, Jonathan K

    2017-04-25

    DNA is a remarkably precise medium for copying and storing biological information. This high fidelity results from the action of hundreds of genes involved in replication, proofreading, and damage repair. Evolutionary theory suggests that in such a system, selection has limited ability to remove genetic variants that change mutation rates by small amounts or in specific sequence contexts. Consistent with this, using SNV variation as a proxy for mutational input, we report here that mutational spectra differ substantially among species, human continental groups and even some closely related populations. Close examination of one signal, an increased TCC→TTC mutation rate in Europeans, indicates a burst of mutations from about 15,000 to 2000 years ago, perhaps due to the appearance, drift, and ultimate elimination of a genetic modifier of mutation rate. Our results suggest that mutation rates can evolve markedly over short evolutionary timescales and suggest the possibility of mapping mutational modifiers.

  19. Up-regulation of miR-21 and 146a expression and increased DNA damage frequency in a mouse model of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Salimi-Asl

    2016-06-01

    Methods: miR-21 and miR-146a expression levels were measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. DNA strand breakage frequency was measured using the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE assay (comet assay and micronucleus test (MN. CRP levels were measured by ELISA method and ESR values were measured by means of Micro-Dispette (Fisher No: 02-675-256 tubes according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA in SPSS 21.0 software. Results: Our results showed that miR-21 and miR-146a as inflammation markers were up-regulated in the sample group in comparison with control group. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR and C- reactive protein (CRP levels were also increased in mouse models of PCOS (p < 0.000. Micronucleated polychromatic erythrocyte (MNPCE rates per 1000 polychromatic erythrocyte (PCE significantly increased in DHEA treated mice (6.22 ± 3.28 in comparison with the controls (2.33 ± 2.23, p < 0.000. Moreover, mean arbitrary unit in DHEA treated animals (277 ± 92 was significantly higher than that in controls (184 ± 76, p = 0.005. Conclusion: To conclude, increased DNA strand breakage frequency and increased expression levels of miR-21 and miR-146a in DHEA administrated animals suggest that low grade chronic inflammation and oxidative stress can act as the main etiologies of PCOS.

  20. Dihydropyridines decrease X-ray-induced DNA base damage in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojewodzka, M., E-mail: marylaw@ichtj.waw.pl [Center of Radiobiology and Biological Dosimetry, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warszawa (Poland); Gradzka, I.; Buraczewska, I.; Brzoska, K.; Sochanowicz, B. [Center of Radiobiology and Biological Dosimetry, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warszawa (Poland); Goncharova, R.; Kuzhir, T. [Institute of Genetics and Cytology, Belarussian National Academy of Sciences, Minsk (Belarus); Szumiel, I. [Center of Radiobiology and Biological Dosimetry, Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warszawa (Poland)

    2009-12-01

    Compounds with the structural motif of 1,4-dihydropyridine display a broad spectrum of biological activities, often defined as bioprotective. Among them are L-type calcium channel blockers, however, also derivatives which do not block calcium channels exert various effects at the cellular and organismal levels. We examined the effect of sodium 3,5-bis-ethoxycarbonyl-2,6-dimethyl-1,4-dihydropyridine-4-carboxylate (denoted here as DHP and previously also as AV-153) on X-ray-induced DNA damage and mutation frequency at the HGPRT (hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase) locus in Chinese hamster ovary CHO-K1 cells. Using formamido-pyrimidine glycosylase (FPG) comet assay, we found that 1-h DHP (10 nM) treatment before X-irradiation considerably reduced the initial level of FPG-recognized DNA base damage, which was consistent with decreased 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine content and mutation frequency lowered by about 40%. No effect on single strand break rejoining or on cell survival was observed. Similar base damage-protective effect was observed for two calcium channel blockers: nifedipine (structurally similar to DHP) or verapamil (structurally unrelated). So far, the specificity of the DHP-caused reduction in DNA damage - practically limited to base damage - has no satisfactory explanation.

  1. Mutation at intronic repeats of the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM gene and ATM protein loss in primary gastric cancer with microsatellite instability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Sung Kim

    Full Text Available Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM is a Ser/Thr protein kinase that plays a critical role in DNA damage-induced signaling and initiation of cell cycle checkpoint signaling in response to DNA-damaging agents such as ionizing radiation. We have previously reported the ATM protein loss by immunohistochemistry (IHC in 16% of human gastric cancer (GC tissue. We hypothesized that ATM gene intron mutations targeted by microsatellite instability (MSI cause ATM protein loss in a subset of GC. We studied mononucleotide mutations at the intron of ATM gene, ATM IHC and MSI in GC. Ten human gastric cancer cell lines were studied for the ATM gene mutation at introns, RT-PCR, direct sequencing, and immunohistochemistry. GC tissues of 839 patients were analyzed for MSI and ATM IHC. Among them, 604 cases were analyzed for the ATM mutations at introns preceding exon 6, exon 10 and exon 20. Two human GC cell lines (SNU-1 and -638 showed ATM intron mutations, deletion in RT-PCR and direct sequencing, and ATM protein loss by IHC. The frequencies of ATM mutation, MSI, and ATM protein loss were 12.9% (78/604, 9.2% (81/882 and 15.2% (134/839, respectively. Analysis of associations among MSI, ATM gene mutation, and ATM protein loss revealed highly co-existing ATM gene alterations and MSI. ATM intron mutation and ATM protein loss were detected in 69.3% (52/75 and 53.3% (40/75 of MSI positive GC. MSI positivity and ATM protein loss were present in 68.4% (52/76 and 48.7% (37/76 of GC with ATM intron mutation. ATM mutation and ATM protein loss had characteristics of old age, distal location of tumor, large tumor size, and histologic intestinal type. Our study might be interpreted as that ATM gene mutation at intron might be targeted by MSI and lead to ATM protein loss in a selected group of GC.

  2. Mutations at the mei-41, mus(1)101, mus(1)103, mus(2)205 and mus(3)310 loci of Drosophila exhibit differential UDS responses with different DNA-damaging agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dusenbery, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    5 mutagen-sensitive mutants of Drosophila melanogaster, reported to perform normal or only slightly reduced excision repair of UV damage, were examined by an unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) assay. 2 mutants, classified as completely or partially proficient for both excision and postreplication repair of UV damage, mus(1)103 and mus(2)205, were found to give positive UDS responses only for UV damage. These mutants exhibit no measurable UDS activity following DNA damage by several different alkylating agents and X-rays. 3 mutants, classified as having no defect in excision repair, but measurable defects in postreplication repair of UV damage, exhibit 3 different response patterns. The mutant mei-41 exhibits a highly positive UDS response following damage by all agents, consistent with its prior classification as excision-repair-proficient, but postreplication-repair-deficient for UV damage. The mutant mus(1)101, however, exhibits a strong positive UDS response following only UV damage and appears to be blocked in the excision repair of damage produced by both alkylating agents and X-irradiation. Finally, mus(3)310 exhibits no UDS response to alkylation, X-ray or UV damage. This is not consistent with its previous classification. Results obtained w0272the qualitative in vitro UDS assay are entirely consistent with the results from two separate in vivo measures of excision repair deficiency followign DNA damage, larval hypersensitivity to killing and hypermutability in the sex-linked recessive lethal test. (Auth.)

  3. CHEK2 1100DELC germline mutation: a frequency study in hereditary breast and colon cancer Brazilian families Mutação germinativa 1100delC no gene CHEK2: estudo da frequência em famílias brasileiras com câncer de mama e cólon hereditários

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamile Abud

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: CHEK2 encodes a cell cycle checkpoint kinase that plays an important role in the DNA damage repair pathway, activated mainly by ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated in response to double-stranded DNA breaks. A germline mutation in CHEK2, 1100delC, has been described as a low penetrance allele in a significant number of families with breast and colorectal cancer in certain countries and is also associated with increased risk of contralateral breast cancer in women previously affected by the disease. About 5%-10% of all breast and colorectal cancers are associated with hereditary predisposition and its recognition is of great importance for genetic counseling and cancer risk management. OBJECTIVES: Here, we have assessed the frequency of the CHEK2 1100delC mutation in the germline of 59 unrelated Brazilian individuals with clinical criteria for the hereditary breast and colorectal cancer syndrome. METHODS: A long-range PCR strategy followed by gene sequencing was used. RESULTS: The 1100delC mutation was encountered in the germline of one (1.7% individual in this high risk cohort. This indicates that the CHEK2 1100delC is not commonly encountered in Brazilian families with multiple diagnoses of breast and colorectal cancer. CONCLUSION: These results should be confirmed in a larger series of families and further testing should be undertaken to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the hereditary breast and colorectal cancer phenotype.INTRODUÇÃO: CHEK2 codifica uma proteína quinase envolvida em um ponto de checagem do ciclo celular que desempenha um papel importante na via de reparação do DNA, danos ativados principalmente por ATM (Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutado em resposta a danos na dupla hélice do DNA. A mutação germinativa 1100delC no gene CHEK2 tem sido descrita como um alelo de baixa penetrância em um número significativo de famílias com câncer de mama e cólon em certos países e também está associada com risco

  4. A genetic cluster of patients with variant xeroderma pigmentosum with two different founder mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munford, V; Castro, L P; Souto, R; Lerner, L K; Vilar, J B; Quayle, C; Asif, H; Schuch, A P; de Souza, T A; Ienne, S; Alves, F I A; Moura, L M S; Galante, P A F; Camargo, A A; Liboredo, R; Pena, S D J; Sarasin, A; Chaibub, S C; Menck, C F M

    2017-05-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare human syndrome associated with hypersensitivity to sunlight and a high frequency of skin tumours at an early age. We identified a community in the state of Goias (central Brazil), a sunny and tropical region, with a high incidence of XP (17 patients among approximately 1000 inhabitants). To identify gene mutations in the affected community and map the distribution of the affected alleles, correlating the mutations with clinical phenotypes. Functional analyses of DNA repair capacity and cell-cycle responses after ultraviolet exposure were investigated in cells from local patients with XP, allowing the identification of the mutated gene, which was then sequenced to locate the mutations. A specific assay was designed for mapping the distribution of these mutations in the community. Skin primary fibroblasts showed normal DNA damage removal but abnormal DNA synthesis after ultraviolet irradiation and deficient expression of the Polη protein, which is encoded by POLH. We detected two different POLH mutations: one at the splice donor site of intron 6 (c.764 +1 G>A), and the other in exon 8 (c.907 C>T, p.Arg303X). The mutation at intron 6 is novel, whereas the mutation at exon 8 has been previously described in Europe. Thus, these mutations were likely brought to the community long ago, suggesting two founder effects for this rare disease. This work describes a genetic cluster involving POLH, and, particularly unexpected, with two independent founder mutations, including one that likely originated in Europe. © 2016 British Association of Dermatologists.

  5. Transient DNA damage induced by high-frequency electromagnetic fields (GSM 1.8 GHz) in the human trophoblast HTR-8/SVneo cell line evaluated with the alkaline comet assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzellitti, Silvia; Valbonesi, Paola; Ciancaglini, Nicola; Biondi, Carla; Contin, Andrea; Bersani, Ferdinando; Fabbri, Elena

    2010-01-01

    One of the most controversial issue regarding high-frequency electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF) is their putative capacity to affect DNA integrity. This is of particular concern due to the increasing use of HF-EMF in communication technologies, including mobile phones. Although epidemiological studies report no detrimental effects on human health, the possible disturbance generated by HF-EMF on cell physiology remains controversial. In addition, the question remains as to whether cells are able to compensate their potential effects. We have previously reported that a 1-h exposure to amplitude-modulated 1.8 GHz sinusoidal waves (GSM-217 Hz, SAR = 2 W/kg) largely used in mobile telephony did not cause increased levels of primary DNA damage in human trophoblast HTR-8/SVneo cells. Nevertheless, further investigations on trophoblast cell responses after exposure to GSM signals of different types and durations were considered of interest. In the present work, HTR-8/SVneo cells were exposed for 4, 16 or 24 h to 1.8 GHz continuous wave (CW) and different GSM signals, namely GSM-217 Hz and GSM-Talk (intermittent exposure: 5 min field on, 10 min field off). The alkaline comet assay was used to evaluate primary DNA damages and/or strand breaks due to uncompleted repair processes in HF-EMF exposed samples. The amplitude-modulated signals GSM-217 Hz and GSM-Talk induced a significant increase in comet parameters in trophoblast cells after 16 and 24 h of exposure, while the un-modulated CW was ineffective. However, alterations were rapidly recovered and the DNA integrity of HF-EMF exposed cells was similar to that of sham-exposed cells within 2 h of recovery in the absence irradiation. Our data suggest that HF-EMF with a carrier frequency and modulation scheme typical of the GSM signal may affect the DNA integrity.

  6. Transient DNA damage induced by high-frequency electromagnetic fields (GSM 1.8 GHz) in the human trophoblast HTR-8/SVneo cell line evaluated with the alkaline comet assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzellitti, Silvia; Valbonesi, Paola; Ciancaglini, Nicola; Biondi, Carla; Contin, Andrea; Bersani, Ferdinando; Fabbri, Elena

    2010-01-05

    One of the most controversial issue regarding high-frequency electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF) is their putative capacity to affect DNA integrity. This is of particular concern due to the increasing use of HF-EMF in communication technologies, including mobile phones. Although epidemiological studies report no detrimental effects on human health, the possible disturbance generated by HF-EMF on cell physiology remains controversial. In addition, the question remains as to whether cells are able to compensate their potential effects. We have previously reported that a 1-h exposure to amplitude-modulated 1.8 GHz sinusoidal waves (GSM-217 Hz, SAR=2 W/kg) largely used in mobile telephony did not cause increased levels of primary DNA damage in human trophoblast HTR-8/SVneo cells. Nevertheless, further investigations on trophoblast cell responses after exposure to GSM signals of different types and durations were considered of interest. In the present work, HTR-8/SVneo cells were exposed for 4, 16 or 24h to 1.8 GHz continuous wave (CW) and different GSM signals, namely GSM-217 Hz and GSM-Talk (intermittent exposure: 5 min field on, 10 min field off). The alkaline comet assay was used to evaluate primary DNA damages and/or strand breaks due to uncompleted repair processes in HF-EMF exposed samples. The amplitude-modulated signals GSM-217 Hz and GSM-Talk induced a significant increase in comet parameters in trophoblast cells after 16 and 24h of exposure, while the un-modulated CW was ineffective. However, alterations were rapidly recovered and the DNA integrity of HF-EMF exposed cells was similar to that of sham-exposed cells within 2h of recovery in the absence irradiation. Our data suggest that HF-EMF with a carrier frequency and modulation scheme typical of the GSM signal may affect the DNA integrity.

  7. Estimative of core damage frequency in IPEN'S IEA-R1 research reactor due to the initiating event of loss of coolant caused by large rupture in the pipe of the primary circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirata, Daniel Massami; Sabundjian, Gaiane; Cabral, Eduardo Lobo Lustosa

    2009-01-01

    The National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN), which is the Brazilian nuclear regulatory commission, imposes safety and licensing standards in order to ensure that the nuclear power plants operate in a safe way. For licensing a nuclear reactor one of the demands of CNEN is the simulation of some accidents and thermalhydraulic transients considered as design base to verify the integrity of the plant when submitted to adverse conditions. The accidents that must be simulated are those that present large probability to occur or those that can cause more serious consequences. According to the FSAR (Final Safety Analysis Report) the initiating event that can cause the largest damage in the core, of the IEA-R1 research reactor at IPEN-CNEN/SP, is the LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident). The objective of this paper is estimate the frequency of the IEA-R1 core damage, caused by this initiating event. In this paper we analyze the accident evolution and performance of the systems which should mitigate this event: the Emergency Coolant Core System (ECCS) and the isolated pool system. They will be analyzed by means of the event tree. In this work the reliability of these systems are also quantified using the fault tree. (author)

  8. Somatic mtDNA mutations in lung tissues of pesticide-exposed fruit growers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng-Ye; Zhao, Zhong-Bao

    2012-01-27

    Some pesticides have been considered potential chemical mutagens and their widespread use involves the assessment of their potentially hazardous effects. The mitochondrial genome is especially prone to DNA damage and thus can serve as a biomarker to monitor the genotoxicity of pesticides to human DNA. We performed a screening for somatic mutations in lung tissues from pesticide-exposed fruit growers, by direct comparing the entire mtDNA sequences of the lung tissue and the matched peripheral blood from the same individual. A phylogenetic approach and a high standard procedure were utilized to avoid potential errors in data generation and analysis. We observed a significantly increased frequency of mtDNA somatic mutations in lung tissues which had been exposed to pesticides multiple times by inhalation, and the potential biological significance of these mutations was further discussed. The samples represented in this observational study, which has multiple exposures to pesticides, experience a significant greater incidence of mtDNA mutations, suggesting that multiple exposures to pesticides could damage human mtDNA and cause somatic mutations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Mutation induction by ion beams in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Atsushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    The effect of ion beams such as C, He, and Ne ions was investigated on the mutation induction in plants with the expectation that ion beams of high linear energy transfer (LET) can frequently produce large DNA alternation such as inversion, translocation and large deletion rather than point mutation. Mutation frequency was investigated using Arabidopsis visible phenotype loci and was 8 to 33 fold higher for 220 MeV carbon ions than for electrons. Mutation spectrum was investigated on the flower color of chrysanthemum cv to find that flower mutants induced by ion beams show complex and stripe types rather than single color. Polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to investigate DNA alteration of mutations. In conclusion, the characteristics of ion beams for the mutation induction are 1) high frequency, 2) broad mutation spectrum, and 3) novel mutants. (S. Ohno)

  10. Particle radiation-induced genetic damage in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, P.Y.; Bakke, J.; Lin, S.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Assessment of radiation-induced alterations in the genomic is important to determine both short and long-term effects after exposure. Transgenic mouse mutation model systems, based on the insertion of specific target genes into the genome of every cell of the animals, provide a rapid and efficient means to obtain statistically reliable results on the frequencies of mutations in all tissues without requiring prior drug selection and clonal expansion of the target cells. We are using the plasmid-based lacZ transgenic mouse model system to measure the dose- and temporal-dependent particle-radiation induced responses. We measured cytogenetic damage to the hematopoietic system as well as mutations in the transgene in both the brain and spleen tissues after an acute dose of 250 MeV/amu protons or 1 GeV/amu iron ions. The level of peripheral blood micronucleated reticulocytes (MN-RET) increased dramatically within 48 h after whole body exposure for both proton or iron irradiated animals and returned to control levels within 1 week after treatment suggesting that these severely damaged transient cell populations are rapidly eliminated from the body. Mutation frequencies (MF) of the lacZ transgene increased as a function of proton dose in the spleen and brain tissues at 1, 8 and 16 wks post irradiation. We demonstrated that the MF of the lacZ target transgene was responsive to low doses of protons with significant increases in the MF (p 0.5 Gy iron ions. The overall magnitude of induction of lacZ MF in the brain is lower than that of the spleen, suggesting that radiation-induced genetic effects are tissue-specific, and tissue physiology plays a role in determining the late effects after particle radiation. This work was supported by NASA/NSBRI NCC 9-58-163

  11. A novel somatic mutation in ACD induces telomere lengthening and apoptosis resistance in leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinella, Jean-François; Cassart, Pauline; Garnier, Nicolas; Rousseau, Philippe; Drullion, Claire; Richer, Chantal; Ouimet, Manon; Saillour, Virginie; Healy, Jasmine; Autexier, Chantal; Sinnett, Daniel

    2015-09-07

    The identification of oncogenic driver mutations has largely relied on the assumption that genes that exhibit more mutations than expected by chance are more likely to play an active role in tumorigenesis. Major cancer sequencing initiatives have therefore focused on recurrent mutations that are more likely to be drivers. However, in specific genetic contexts, low frequency mutations may also be capable of participating in oncogenic processes. Reliable strategies for identifying these rare or even patient-specific (private) mutations are needed in order to elucidate more personalized approaches to cancer diagnosis and treatment. Here we performed whole-exome sequencing on three cases of childhood pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (cALL), representing three cytogenetically-defined subgroups (high hyperdiploid, t(12;21) translocation, and cytogenetically normal). We applied a data reduction strategy to identify both common and rare/private somatic events with high functional potential. Top-ranked candidate mutations were subsequently validated at high sequencing depth on an independent platform and in vitro expression assays were performed to evaluate the impact of identified mutations on cell growth and survival. We identified 6 putatively damaging non-synonymous somatic mutations among the three cALL patients. Three of these mutations were well-characterized common cALL mutations involved in constitutive activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway (FLT3 p.D835Y, NRAS p.G13D, BRAF p.G466A). The remaining three patient-specific mutations (ACD p.G223V, DOT1L p.V114F, HCFC1 p.Y103H) were novel mutations previously undescribed in public cancer databases. Cytotoxicity assays demonstrated a protective effect of the ACD p.G223V mutation against apoptosis in leukemia cells. ACD plays a key role in protecting telomeres and recruiting telomerase. Using a telomere restriction fragment assay, we also showed that this novel mutation in ACD leads to increased

  12. Mutation breeding in ornamental plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, S.K.

    1990-01-01

    Full text: Mutation induction produced a large number of new promising varieties in ornamental species. 37 new mutants of Chrysanthemum and 14 of rose have been developed by mutations and released for commercialisation. The mutations in flower colour/shape were detected as chimeras in M 1 V 1 , M 1 V 2 , M 1 V 3 generations. The mutation frequency varied with the cultivar and exposure to gamma rays. Comparative analysis of original cultivars and their respective induced mutants on cytomorphological, anatomical and biochemical characters are being carried out for better understanding of the mechanism involved in the origin and evolution of somatic flower colour/shape mutations. Cytological analysis with reference to chromosomal aberrations, chromosome number, ICV, INV and DNA content gave no differences between the original and mutant cultivars. Analysis of florets/petal pigments by TLC and spectrophotometric methods indicated both qualitative and quantitative changes. (author)

  13. Evaluation of CFTR gene mutations in Adana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Goruroglu Ozturk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Cystic fibrosis is the most common autosomal recessive inherited disorder seen in the white populations. It develops in result of mutations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR gene. Rate of these mutations vary in different geographical regions. In this study, we aimed to determine the frequency of CFTR gene mutations in Adana. Methods: DNA samples of 63 subjects (21 women, 42 men who were diagnosed as cystic fibrosis at Balcali Hospital of Cukurova University, were studied for 19 different CFTR mutations by the strip assay method which is based on reverse hybridization. Results: In cystic fibrosis diagnosed patients, 19 mutations were observed of which 9 were homozygous and 10 were heterozygous. ∆F508 frequency was found as 11.9%, and rate of homozygous was found as 66.7%. Mutation frequencies of W1282X and N1303K were found as 2.40% and 4.80% respectively and rate of homozygous mutations were 50% for both. I148T mutation frequency was found as 3.20% and all were heterozygous. For the whole 19 mutations, frequency of mutation in 63 subjects was 22.3%. Conclusion: Detection of CFTR gene mutations by the strip assay method by reverse hybridization is an easy, fast and informative method. However, due to improvability of the common mutations in probable cystic fibrosis patients because of heterogenity in this region, it is still a major problem and does not exclude cystic fibrosis diagnosis. But this problematic issue can be overcome by evaluating the whole exons of CFTR mutations by advanced molecular tecniques. Key words: CFTR, cystic fibrosis, molecular diagnosis, reverse hibridisation [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 202-208

  14. Relationship of p53 Mutations to Epidermal Cell Proliferation and Apoptosis in Human UV-Induced Skin Carcinogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine G. Einspahr

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Human skin is continually subjected to UV-irradiation with the p53 gene playing a pivotal role in repair of UV-induced DNA damage and apoptosis. Consequently, p53 alterations are early events in human UV-induced skin carcinogenesis. We studied 13 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC, 16 actinic keratoses (AK, 13 samples adjacent to an AK (chronically sun-damaged, and 14 normal-appearing skin samples for p53 mutation, p53 immunostaining (IHC, apoptosis (in situ TUNEL and morphology, and proliferation (PCNA. The frequency of p53 mutation increased from 14% in normal skin, to 38.5% in sun-damaged skin, 63% in AK, and 54% in SCC. p53 IHC increased similarly. Apoptosis (TUNEL increased from 0.06 ± 0.02%, to 0.1 ± 0.2, 0.3 ± 0.3, and 0.4 ± 0.3 in normal skin, sun-damaged skin, AK, and SCC, respectively. Apoptosis was strongly correlated with proliferation (i.e., TUNEL and PCNA, r = 0.7, P < 0.0001, and proliferation was significantly increased in the progression from normal skin to SCC. Bax was significantly increased in SCC compared to AK. These data imply that apoptosis in samples with a high frequency of p53 mutation may not necessarily be p53-dependent. We suggest that there is a mechanism for apoptosis in response to increased cellular proliferation that is p53-independent.

  15. Mutation, somatic mutation and diseases of man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnet, F.M.

    1976-01-01

    The relevance of the intrinsic mutagenesis for the evolution process, genetic diseases and the process of aging is exemplified. The fundamental reaction is the function of the DNA and the DNA-enzymes like the DNA-polymerases in replication, repair, and transcription. These defects are responsible for the mutation frequency and the genetic drift in the evolution process. They cause genetic diseases like Xeroderma pigmentosum which is described here in detail. The accumulation of structural and functional mistakes leads to diseases of old age, for example to autoimmune diseases and immune suppression. There is a proportionality between the duration of life and the frequency of mistakes in the enzymatic repair system. No possibility of prophylaxis or therapy is seen. Methods for prognosis could be developed. (AJ) [de

  16. Identifying driver mutations in sequenced cancer genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raphael, Benjamin J; Dobson, Jason R; Oesper, Layla

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing is revolutionizing the study of cancer and enabling the measurement of the somatic mutations that drive cancer development. However, the resulting sequencing datasets are large and complex, obscuring the clinically important mutations in a background of errors, noise......, and random mutations. Here, we review computational approaches to identify somatic mutations in cancer genome sequences and to distinguish the driver mutations that are responsible for cancer from random, passenger mutations. First, we describe approaches to detect somatic mutations from high-throughput DNA...... sequencing data, particularly for tumor samples that comprise heterogeneous populations of cells. Next, we review computational approaches that aim to predict driver mutations according to their frequency of occurrence in a cohort of samples, or according to their predicted functional impact on protein...

  17. Potent radio-protective effects of vitamins E and C on radiation induced DNA damage in gametes leading to lower frequencies of chromosomal aberrations and micronuclei in subsequent embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossein Mozdarani

    2007-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Objective: To compare the effects of parental and maternal exposure of NMRI mice with γ-rays on gametes in the absence or presence of vitamins E and C and subsequent cytogenetic damage in pre-implantation embryos generated from irradiated gametes. Materials and Methods: Male and female NMRI mice were whole body irradiated in the presence of 200 IU/Kg vitamin E and 100 μg/ml vitamin C. Various mating schemes were designed for mating of irradiated mice, e.g. mating irradiated male with non-irradiated female, irradiated female with non irradiated male or both male and female irradiated. About 68 h post coitus, 4-8-cell embryos were flushed out from oviducts and fixed on slides using standard methods in order to screen for chromosome abnormalities and micronuclei. Results: In control embryos, frequencies of abnormal metaphase and embryos with micronuclei was low and there was no significant difference between vitamins treated samples and controls. However there was an increase in both abnormal metaphases and micronuclei frequency in embryos generated after parental or maternal irradiation or both. Vitamin E effectively reduced the frequency of aneuploidy in all irradiated groups and vitamin C was very effective in reducing the frequencies of micronuclei. DRF calculated for both vitamins indicate that vitamin C is more potent than vitamin E in reducing clastogenic effects of gamma-rays in pre-implantation embryos. Conclusion: Data indicate that γ-irradiation affects spermatogenesis and preovulatory stage oocytes in male and female mice respectively. These effects might be due to DNA alterations in sperms and oocytes affecting meiotic segregations that may lead to chromosome abnormalities in subsequent embryos expressed as numerical chromosome abnormalities or micronuclei. Administration of vitamins E and C before irradiation effectively reduced the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities. The way these vitamins reduces genotoxic

  18. Telomerase reverse transcriptase promoter mutations in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allory, Yves; Beukers, Willemien; Sagrera, Ana

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hotspot mutations in the promoter of the gene coding for telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) have been described and proposed to activate gene expression. OBJECTIVES: To investigate TERT mutation frequency, spectrum, association with expression and clinical outcome, and potential ...

  19. Mutation Induction with UV- and X-radiations in spores and vegetative cells of Bacillus subtilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanooka, H.; Munakata, N.; Kitahara, S.

    1978-01-01

    Spores and vegetative cells of Bacillus subtilis strains with various defects in DNA-repair capacities (hcr - , ssp - , hcr - ssp - ) were irradiated with UV radiation or X-rays. Induced mutation frequency was determined from the observed frequency of prototrophic reversion of a suppressible auxotropic mutation. At equal physical dose, after either UV- or X-irradiation, spores were more resistant to mutations as well as to killing than were vegetative cells. However, quantitative comparison revealed that, at equally lethal doses, spores and vegetative cells were almost equally mutable by X-rays whereas spores were considerably less mutable by UV than were vegetative cells. Thus, as judged from their mutagenic efficiency relative to the lethality, X-ray-induced damage in the spore DNA and the vegetative DNA were equally mutagenic, while UV-induced DNA photoproducts in the spore were less mutagenic than those in vegetative cells. Post-treatment of UV-irradiated cells with caffeine decreased the survival and the induced mutation frequency for either spores or vegetative cells for all the strains. In X-irradiated spores however, a similar suppressing effect of caffeine was observed only for mutability of a strain lacking DNA polymerase I activity

  20. Genomic and Molecular Landscape of DNA Damage Repair Deficiency across The Cancer Genome Atlas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theo A. Knijnenburg

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: DNA damage repair (DDR pathways modulate cancer risk, progression, and therapeutic response. We systematically analyzed somatic alterations to provide a comprehensive view of DDR deficiency across 33 cancer types. Mutations with accompanying loss of heterozygosity were observed in over 1/3 of DDR genes, including TP53 and BRCA1/2. Other prevalent alterations included epigenetic silencing of the direct repair genes EXO5, MGMT, and ALKBH3 in ∼20% of samples. Homologous recombination deficiency (HRD was present at varying frequency in many cancer types, most notably ovarian cancer. However, in contrast to ovarian cancer, HRD was associated with worse outcomes in several other cancers. Protein structure-based analyses allowed us to predict functional consequences of rare, recurrent DDR mutations. A new machine-learning-based classifier developed from gene expression data allowed us to identify alterations that phenocopy deleterious TP53 mutations. These frequent DDR gene alterations in many human cancers have functional consequences that may determine cancer progression and guide therapy. : Knijnenburg et al. present The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA Pan-Cancer analysis of DNA damage repair (DDR deficiency in cancer. They use integrative genomic and molecular analyses to identify frequent DDR alterations across 33 cancer types, correlate gene- and pathway-level alterations with genome-wide measures of genome instability and impaired function, and demonstrate the prognostic utility of DDR deficiency scores. Keywords: The Cancer Genome Atlas PanCanAtlas project, DNA damage repair, somatic mutations, somatic copy-number alterations, epigenetic silencing, DNA damage footprints, mutational signatures, integrative statistical analysis, protein structure analysis

  1. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix E (Sections E.9-E.16), Volume 2, Part 3B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Wong, S.M.; Bley, D.; Johnson, D.

    1994-06-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The scope of the level-1 study includes plant damage state analysis, and uncertainty analysis. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the study. Internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. It also contains an appendix that documents the part of the phase 1 study that has to do with POSs other than mid-loop operation. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. Volume 6 documents the accident progression, source terms, and consequence analysis

  2. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendices F-H, Volume 2, Part 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bley, D.; Johnson, D. [PLG Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States); Holmes, B. [AEA Technology, Dorset (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The scope of the program includes that of a level-3 PRA. In phase 2, mid-loop operation was selected as the plant configuration to be analyzed based on the results of the phase 1 study. The objective of the phase 2 study is to perform a detailed analysis of the potential accident scenarios that may occur during mid-loop operation, and compare the results with those of NUREG-1150. The scope of the level-1 study includes plant damage state analysis, and uncertainty analysis. Volume 1 summarizes the results of the study. Internal events analysis is documented in Volume 2. It also contains an appendix that documents the part of the phase 1 study that has to do with POSs other than mid-loop operation. Internal fire and internal flood analyses are documented in Volumes 3 and 4. A separate study on seismic analysis, documented in Volume 5, was performed for the NRC by Future Resources Associates, Inc. Volume 6 documents the accident progression, source terms, and consequence analysis.

  3. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix I, Volume 2, Part 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Bley, D.; Johnson, D. [PLG Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States); Holmes, B. [AEA Technology, Dorset (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1994-06-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL) and Sandia National Labs. (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this volume of the report is to document the approach utilized in the level-1 internal events PRA for the Surry plant, and discuss the results obtained. A phased approach was used in the level-1 program. In phase 1, which was completed in Fall 1991, a coarse screening analysis examining accidents initiated by internal events (including internal fire and flood) was performed for all plant operational states (POSs). The objective of the phase 1 study was to identify potential vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) the potential core damage accident scenarios, and to provide a foundation for a detailed phase 2 analysis.

  4. Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit-1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal events during mid-loop operations. Appendix I, Volume 2, Part 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, T.L.; Musicki, Z.; Kohut, P.; Yang, J.; Bozoki, G.; Hsu, C.J.; Diamond, D.J.; Bley, D.; Johnson, D.; Holmes, B.

    1994-06-01

    Traditionally, probabilistic risk assessments (PRA) of severe accidents in nuclear power plants have considered initiating events potentially occurring only during full power operation. Some previous screening analyses that were performed for other modes of operation suggested that risks during those modes were small relative to full power operation. However, more recent studies and operational experience have implied that accidents during low power and shutdown could be significant contributors to risk. During 1989, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated an extensive program to carefully examine the potential risks during low power and shutdown operations. The program includes two parallel projects being performed by Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL) and Sandia National Labs. (SNL). Two plants, Surry (pressurized water reactor) and Grand Gulf (boiling water reactor), were selected as the plants to be studied. The objectives of the program are to assess the risks of severe accidents initiated during plant operational states other than full power operation and to compare the estimated core damage frequencies, important accident sequences and other qualitative and quantitative results with those accidents initiated during full power operation as assessed in NUREG-1150. The objective of this volume of the report is to document the approach utilized in the level-1 internal events PRA for the Surry plant, and discuss the results obtained. A phased approach was used in the level-1 program. In phase 1, which was completed in Fall 1991, a coarse screening analysis examining accidents initiated by internal events (including internal fire and flood) was performed for all plant operational states (POSs). The objective of the phase 1 study was to identify potential vulnerable plant configurations, to characterize (on a high, medium, or low basis) the potential core damage accident scenarios, and to provide a foundation for a detailed phase 2 analysis

  5. uv photobiology: DNA damage and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutherland, B.M.

    1978-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: targets that determine the fate of the cell when uv light interacts with a cell; comparison of action spectrum for a given biological effect with the absorption spectrum of different biological macromolecules; biological effects of damage to DNA; measurement of mutations; chemical damage to DNA; photoreactivation; role of pyrimidine dimers in induction of skin cancer by uv

  6. High-frequency ultrasound to grade disease progression in murine models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nabeel; Bygrave, Mike; Chhem, Rethy; Hoffman, Lisa; Welch, Ian; Grange, Robert; Fenster, Aaron; Hill, David; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2009-06-01

    This study used high-frequency ultrasound (HFU) imaging to assess muscle damage noninvasively in a longitudinal study of 2 transgenic murine models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD): mdx, which has mutated cytoskeletal protein dystrophin; and udx, which has mutated dystrophin and lacks another cytoskeleton protein, utrophin. The mdx group was further subdivided into exercised and nonexercised subgroups to assess exercise-induced damage. Muscle damage was assessed with HFU imaging (40 MHz) at biweekly intervals for 16 weeks. The assessment was based on the number of hyperechoic lesions, the lesion diameter, and muscle disorganization, giving a combined grade according to a 5-point scale. High-frequency ultrasound discriminated the severity of muscle damage between wild-type and transgenic models of DMD and between mdx and udx models. Qualitative comparisons of 3-dimensional HFU images with serial histologic sections of the skeletal muscle showed the ability of ultrasound to accurately depict changes seen in the muscle architecture in vivo. High-frequency ultrasound images soft tissue in mice at high contrast and spatial resolution, thereby showing that this microimaging modality has the capability to assess architectural changes in muscle fibers due to myotonic dystrophy-related diseases such as DMD.

  7. Evaluation of CFTR gene mutations in Adana

    OpenAIRE

    Ozlem Goruroglu Ozturk; Filiz Kibar; Esin Damla Ziyanoglu Karacor; Salih Cetiner; Gulhan Sahin; Akgun Yaman

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: Cystic fibrosis is the most common autosomal recessive inherited disorder seen in the white populations. It develops in result of mutations of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene. Rate of these mutations vary in different geographical regions. In this study, we aimed to determine the frequency of CFTR gene mutations in Adana. Methods: DNA samples of 63 subjects (21 women, 42 men) who were diagnosed as cystic fibrosis at Balcali Hospital of Cukurova Universi...

  8. Understanding the role of p53 in adaptive response to radiation-induced germline mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langlois, N.L.; Quinn, J.S.; Somers, C.M.; Boreham, D.R.; Mitchel, R.E.J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Radiation-induced adaptive response is now a widely studied area of radiation biology. Studies have demonstrated reduced levels of radiation-induced biological damage when an 'adaptive dose' is given before a higher 'challenge dose' compared to when the challenge dose is given alone. It has been shown in some systems to be a result of inducible cellular repair systems. The adaptive response has been clearly demonstrated in many model systems, however its impact on heritable effects in the mammalian germline has never been studied. Expanded Simple Tandem Repeat (ESTR) loci have been used as markers demonstrating that induced heritable mutations in mice follow a dose-response relationship. Recent data in our laboratory show preliminary evidence of radiation-induced adaptive response suppressing germline mutations at ESTR loci in wild type mice. The frequency of heritable mutations was significantly reduced when a priming dose of 0.1 Gy was given 24 hours prior to a 1 Gy acute challenging dose. We are now conducting a follow-up study to attempt to understand the mechanism of this adaptive response. P53 is known to play a significant role in governing apoptosis, DNA repair and cancer induction. In order to determine what function p53 has in the adaptive response for heritable mutations, we have mated radiation treated Trp53+/- male mice (C57Bl) to untreated, normal females (C57Bl). Using DNA fingerprinting, we are investigating the rate of inherited radiation-induced mutations on pre- and post-meiotic radiation-treated gametocytes by examining mutation frequencies in offspring DNA. If p53 is integral in the mechanism of adaptive response, we should not see an adaptive response in radiation-induced heritable mutations in these mice. This research is significant in that it will provide insight to understanding the mechanism behind radiation-induced adaptive response in the mammalian germline

  9. Repair-resistant mutation in Neurospora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadler, D.; Macleod, H.; Loo, M.

    1987-01-01

    Chronic UV treatment produces severalfold fewer mutations in Neurospora conidia than does the same total dose of acute UV. Experiments were designed to determine the conditions required for chronic UV mutagenesis. Measurement of the coincidence frequency for two independent mutations revealed the existence of a subset of cells which are mutable by chronic UV. Analysis of forward mutation at the mtr locus showed that the genetic alterations produced by chronic UV were virtually all point mutants, even though the assay system could detect alterations or deletions extending into neighboring genes. A significant fraction of the mutants produced by acute UV were multigenic deletions. The size of the dose-rate effect (acute UV mutation frequency divided by chronic UV mutation frequency) was compared for several different mutation assay systems. Forward mutations (recessive lethals and mtr) gave values ranging from four to nine. For events which were restricted to specific molecular sites (specific reversions and nonsense suppressor mutations), there was a wider range of dose-rate ratios. This suggests that chronic UV mutation may be restricted to certain molecular sequences or configurations

  10. Mitochondrial mutations drive prostate cancer aggression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hopkins, Julia F.; Sabelnykova, Veronica Y.; Weischenfeldt, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear mutations are well known to drive tumor incidence, aggression and response to therapy. By contrast, the frequency and roles of mutations in the maternally inherited mitochondrial genome are poorly understood. Here we sequence the mitochondrial genomes of 384 localized prostate cancer...

  11. Minisequencing mitochondrial DNA pathogenic mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carracedo Ángel

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are a number of well-known mutations responsible of common mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA diseases. In order to overcome technical problems related to the analysis of complete mtDNA genomes, a variety of different techniques have been proposed that allow the screening of coding region pathogenic mutations. Methods We here propose a minisequencing assay for the analysis of mtDNA mutations. In a single reaction, we interrogate a total of 25 pathogenic mutations distributed all around the whole mtDNA genome in a sample of patients suspected for mtDNA disease. Results We have detected 11 causal homoplasmic mutations in patients suspected for Leber disease, which were further confirmed by standard automatic sequencing. Mutations m.11778G>A and m.14484T>C occur at higher frequency than expected by change in the Galician (northwest Spain patients carrying haplogroup J lineages (Fisher's Exact test, P-value Conclusion We here developed a minisequencing genotyping method for the screening of the most common pathogenic mtDNA mutations which is simple, fast, and low-cost. The technique is robust and reproducible and can easily be implemented in standard clinical laboratories.

  12. Calreticulin Mutations in Bulgarian MPN Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Ivan; Hadjiev, Evgueniy; Alaikov, Tzvetan; Spassova, Sylva; Stoimenov, Angel; Naumova, Elissaveta; Shivarov, Velizar; Ivanova, Milena

    2018-01-01

    Somatic mutations in JAK2, MPL and CALR are recurrently identified in most of the cases with Philadelphia chromosome negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). We applied four molecular genetic methods for identification of CALR exon 9 mutations, including high resolution melt (HRM) analysis, Sanger sequencing, semiconductor target genes sequencing and whole exome sequencing. A total of 78 patients with myeloid malignancies were included in the study. We identified 14 CALR exon 9 mutated cases out of 78 studied patients with myeloid malignancies. All mutated patients were diagnosed with MPN being either PMF (n = 7) or ET (n = 7). Nine cases had type 1 mutations and 5 cases had type 2 mutations. CALR exon 9, MPL exon 10 and JAK2 p. V617F were mutually exclusive. There were no statistically significant differences in the hematological parameters between the cases with CALR and JAK2 or MPL mutations. Notably, all four techniques were fully concordant in the detection of CALR mutations. This is one of the few reports on the CALR mutations frequency in South-eastern populations. Our study shows that the frequency and patterns of these mutations is identical to those in the patients' cohorts from Western countries. Besides we demonstrated the utility of four different methods for their detection.

  13. Analysis of the B-RAFV600E mutation in cutaneous melanoma patients with occupational sun exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    CANDIDO, SAVERIO; RAPISARDA, VENERANDO; MARCONI, ANDREA; MALAPONTE, GRAZIA; BEVELACQUA, VALENTINA; GANGEMI, PIETRO; SCALISI, AURORA; McCUBREY, JAMES A.; MAESTRO, ROBERTA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.; FENGA, CONCETTINA; LIBRA, MASSIMO

    2014-01-01

    Sun-exposure is one of the risk factors associated with the development of a cutaneous neoplasm. In melanoma, the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK (MAPK) signaling pathway is constitutively activated through multiple mechanisms, including B-RAF mutation. It has been hypothesized that B-RAF mutations in melanocytic lesions arise from DNA damage induced by ultraviolet (UV) radiation. However, it is still discussed if B-RAF mutations are associated with melanoma patients exposed to the sun. Therefore, in the present study, the known B-RAFV600E mutation was analysed in melanoma samples from 30 indoor and 38 outdoor workers. B-RAFV600E mutation was detected in 52 and 73% of outdoor workers and indoor workers, respectively. Of note, this mutation was identified in 12 of 14 (85%) melanoma of the trunk diagnosed in indoor workers and in 9 of 19 (47%) samples from outdoor workers (p=0.03). By analyzing melanomas of other body sites, no statistical difference in the frequency of B-RAFV600E mutation was identified between the groups of workers. It appears that the mutation detected among indoor workers may be associated with a recreational or intermittent exposure to the sun, as usually the trunk is a sun-protected body site. Overall, these data indicate that the B-RAFV600E mutation detected in melanoma is not associated with a chronic exposure to the sun. Mutations detected in other genes may also contribute to melanoma development in the subset of patients exposed to UV radiation. PMID:24424406

  14. A mutational comparison of adult and adolescent and young adult (AYA) colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricoli, James V; Boardman, Lisa A; Patidar, Rajesh; Sindiri, Sivasish; Jang, Jin S; Walsh, William D; McGregor, Paul M; Camalier, Corinne E; Mehaffey, Michele G; Furman, Wayne L; Bahrami, Armita; Williams, P Mickey; Lih, Chih-Jian; Conley, Barbara A; Khan, Javed

    2018-03-01

    It is possible that the relative lack of progress in treatment outcomes among adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with cancer is caused by a difference in disease biology compared with the corresponding diseases in younger and older individuals. There is evidence that colon cancer is more aggressive and has a poorer prognosis in AYA patients than in older adult patients. To further understand the molecular basis for this difference, whole-exome sequencing was conducted on a cohort of 30 adult, 30 AYA, and 2 pediatric colon cancers. A statistically significant difference in mutational frequency was observed between AYA and adult samples in 43 genes, including ROBO1, MYC binding protein 2 (MYCBP2), breast cancer 2 (early onset) (BRCA2), MAP3K3, MCPH1, RASGRP3, PTCH1, RAD9B, CTNND1, ATM, NF1; KIT, PTEN, and FBXW7. Many of these mutations were nonsynonymous, missense, stop-gain, or frameshift mutations that were damaging. Next, RNA sequencing was performed on a subset of the samples to confirm the mutations identified by exome sequencing. This confirmation study verified the presence of a significantly greater frequency of damaging mutations in AYA compared with adult colon cancers for 5 of the 43 genes (MYCBP2, BRCA2, PHLPP1, TOPORS, and ATR). The current results provide the rationale for a more comprehensive study with a larger sample set and experimental validation of the functional impact of the identified variants along with their contribution to the biologic and clinical characteristics of AYA colon cancer. Cancer 2018;124:1070-82. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  15. Mutation in cultured mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, N.; Okada, S.

    1982-01-01

    Mammalian cell cultures were exposed to gamma-rays at various dose rates. Dose-rate effects were observed in cultured somatic cells of the mouse for cell killing and mutations resistant to 6-thioguanine (TGsup(r)) and to methotrexate (MTXsup(r)). Linear quadratic model may be applied to cell killing and TGsup(r) mutations in some cases but can not explain the whole data. Results at low doses with far low dose-rate were not predictable from data at high doses with acute or chronic irradiation. Radioprotective effects of dimethyl sulfoxide were seen only after acute exposure but not after chronic one, suggesting that damages by indirect action of radiations may be potentially reparable by cells. TGsup(r) mutations seem to contain gross structural changes whereas MTXsup(r) ones may have smaller alterations. (Namekawa, K.)

  16. Evaluation of the potential inhibitor of Ix (Pp-Ix) protoporphyrin of the genetic damage induced by gamma rays administered to different dose reasons in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores A, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation can damage in DNA directly or indirectly by free radicals (Rl), characterized by unstable and highly reactive. To avoid damage by Rl the cell has endogenous antioxidants such as Sod, Cat, GSH or exogenous as some vitamins, but if with these mechanisms does not reach the cell homeostasis, the consequence may be the generation of chronic-disease degenerative such as cancer. This study was conducted in order to test the inhibitory role of Rl protoporphyrin Ix (Pp-Ix), induced by 20 Gy of gamma rays administered at different dose ratios using the assay of somatic mutation and recombination in the Drosophila wing. The results indicated that 20 Gy delivered at a rate of low dose (6.659 Gy/h), caused elevated frequencies of genetic damage (p <0.001), compared with those that induced a high dose reason (1111.42 Gy/h) in larvae of 48 h old. The difference is probably due to an indirect damage by Rl; when this hypothesis was approved with the possible inhibitor role of Pp-Ix (0.69 m M), damage was increased with the two reasons of tested doses. This result may be due to: 1) the Pp-Ix is not a good inhibitor of Rl, 2) the difference in the frequency of mutation found with both dose reasons, not due to Rl so that this compound did not reduce the genetic damage, and 3) that Pp-Ix acts as pro oxidant. (Author)

  17. Radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Heijne, Erik H M; CERN. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    a) Radiation damage in organic materials. This series of lectures will give an overview of radiation effects on materials and components frequently used in accelerator engineering and experiments. Basic degradation phenomena will be presented for organic materials with comprehensive damage threshold doses for commonly used rubbers, thermoplastics, thermosets and composite materials. Some indications will be given for glass, scintillators and optical fibres. b) Radiation effects in semiconductor materials and devices. The major part of the time will be devoted to treat radiation effects in semiconductor sensors and the associated electronics, in particular displacement damage, interface and single event phenomena. Evaluation methods and practical aspects will be shown. Strategies will be developed for the survival of the materials under the expected environmental conditions of the LHC machine and detectors. I will describe profound revolution in our understanding of black holes and their relation to quantum me...

  18. Petroleum pollution and mutation in mangroves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klekowski, E.J. Jr.; Corredor, J.E.; Morell, J.M.; Del Castillo, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    Chlorophyll-deficiency has often been used as a sensitive genetic end-point in plant mutation research. The frequency of trees heterozygous for nuclear chlorophyll-deficient mutations was determined for mangrove populations growing along the southwest coast of Puerto Rico. The frequency of heterozygotes was strongly correlated with the concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the underlying sediment and with both acute and chronic petroleum pollution. Although epidemiological studies can seldom prove causation, a strong correlation is certainly compatible with a cause-effect relationship. Our results suggest that the biota of oil-polluted habitats may be experiencing increased mutation. (Author)

  19. Mutators and hypermutability in bacteria: the Escherichia coli ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mutators and hypermutability in bacteria: the Escherichia coli paradigm. R. Jayaraman*. R. H. 35, Palaami Enclave, New Natham Road, Madurai 625 014, India. Abstract. Mutators (also called hypermutators) are mutants which show higher than normal spontaneous mutation frequencies, ranging from 10–20 fold to ...

  20. Fitness-compensatory mutations facilitate the spread of drug ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Charissa C. Naidoo

    2017-08-19

    Aug 19, 2017 ... In addition, it possessed a low-frequency rpoC mutation, suggesting that this strain was in the process of developing compensation. In contrast, no compensatory mutations ... fitness 'cost' as mutations may affect the normal function of target genes ..... to have increased expression during nutrient starvation,.

  1. Recessive mutations of TMC1 associated with moderate to severe hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imtiaz, Ayesha; Maqsood, Azra; Rehman, Atteeq U; Morell, Robert J; Holt, Jeffrey R; Friedman, Thomas B; Naz, Sadaf

    2016-04-01

    TMC1 encodes a protein required for the normal function of mechanically activated channels that enable sensory transduction in auditory and vestibular hair cells. TMC1 protein is localized at the tips of the hair cell stereocilia, the site of conventional mechanotransduction. In many populations, loss-of-function recessive mutations of TMC1 are associated with profound deafness across all frequencies tested. In six families reported here, variable moderate-to-severe or moderate-to-profound hearing loss co-segregated with STR (short tandem repeats) markers at the TMC1 locus DFNB7/11. Massively parallel and Sanger sequencing of genomic DNA revealed each family co-segregating hearing loss with a homozygous TMC1 mutation: two reported mutations (p.R34X and p.R389Q) and three novel mutations (p.S596R, p.N199I, and c.1404 + 1G > T). TMC1 cDNA sequence from affected subjects homozygous for the donor splice site transversion c.1404 + 1G > T revealed skipping of exon 16, deleting 60 amino acids from the TMC1 protein. Since the mutations in our study cause less than profound hearing loss, we speculate that there is hypo-functional TMC1 mechanotransduction channel activity and that other even less damaging variants of TMC1 may be associated with more common mild-to-severe sensorineural hearing loss.

  2. Comparison of genotoxic damage in monolayer cell cultures and three-dimensional tissue-like cell assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behravesh, E.; Emami, K.; Wu, H.; Gonda, S.

    Assessing the biological risks associated with exposure to the high-energy charged particles encountered in space is essential for the success of long-term space exploration. Although prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell models developed in our laboratory and others have advanced our understanding of many aspects of genotoxicity, in vitro models are needed to assess the risk to humans from space radiation insults. Such models must be representative of the cellular interactions present in tissues and capable of quantifying genotoxic damage. Toward this overall goal, the objectives of this study were to examine the effect of the localized microenvironment of cells, cultured as either 2-dimensional (2D) monolayers or 3-dimensional (3D) aggregates, on the rate and type of genotoxic damage resulting from exposure to Fe-charged particles, a significant portion of space radiation. We used rodent transgenic cell lines containing 50-70 copies of a LacI transgene to provide the enhanced sensitivity required to quantify mutational frequency and type in the 1100-bp LacI target as well as assessment of DNA damage to the entire 45-kbp construct. Cultured cells were exposed to high-energy Fe charged particles at Brookhaven National Laboratory's Alternating Gradient Synchrotron facility for a total dose ranging from 0.1 to 2 Gy and allowed to recover for 0-7 days, after which mutational type and frequency were evaluated. The mutational frequency was found to be higher in 3D samples than in 2D samples at all radiation doses. Mutational frequency also was higher at 7 days after irradiation than immediately after exposure. DNA sequencing of the mutant targets revealed that deletional mutations contributed an increasingly high percentage (up to 27%) of all mutations in cells as the dose was increased from 0.5 to 2 Gy. Several mutants also showed large and complex deletions in multiple locations within the LacI target. However, no differences in mutational type were found between the 2D and

  3. Escherichia coli DNA polymerase III is responsible for the high level of spontaneous mutations in mutT strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Masami; Shimizu, Masatomi; Katafuchi, Atsushi; Grúz, Petr; Fujii, Shingo; Usui, Yukio; Fuchs, Robert P; Nohmi, Takehiko

    2012-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species induce oxidative damage in DNA precursors, i.e. dNTPs, leading to point mutations upon incorporation. Escherichia coli mutT strains, deficient in the activity hydrolysing 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate (8-oxo-dGTP), display more than a 100-fold higher spontaneous mutation frequency over the wild-type strain. 8-oxo-dGTP induces A to C transversions when misincorporated opposite template A. Here, we report that DNA pol III incorporates 8-oxo-dGTP ≈ 20 times more efficiently opposite template A compared with template C. Single, double or triple deletions of pol I, pol II, pol IV or pol V had modest effects on the mutT mutator phenotype. Only the deletion of all four polymerases led to a 70% reduction of the mutator phenotype. While pol III may account for nearly all 8-oxo-dGTP incorporation opposite template A, it only extends ≈ 30% of them, the remaining 70% being extended by the combined action of pol I, pol II, pol IV or pol V. The unique property of pol III, a C-family DNA polymerase present only in eubacteria, to preferentially incorporate 8-oxo-dGTP opposite template A during replication might explain the high spontaneous mutation frequency in E. coli mutT compared with the mammalian counterparts lacking the 8-oxo-dGTP hydrolysing activities. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Exploring the common molecular basis for the universal DNA mutation bias: Revival of Loewdin mutation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Liang-Yu; Wang, Guang-Zhong; Ma, Bin-Guang; Zhang, Hong-Yu

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → There exists a universal G:C → A:T mutation bias in three domains of life. → This universal mutation bias has not been sufficiently explained. → A DNA mutation model proposed by Loewdin 40 years ago offers a common explanation. -- Abstract: Recently, numerous genome analyses revealed the existence of a universal G:C → A:T mutation bias in bacteria, fungi, plants and animals. To explore the molecular basis for this mutation bias, we examined the three well-known DNA mutation models, i.e., oxidative damage model, UV-radiation damage model and CpG hypermutation model. It was revealed that these models cannot provide a sufficient explanation to the universal mutation bias. Therefore, we resorted to a DNA mutation model proposed by Loewdin 40 years ago, which was based on inter-base double proton transfers (DPT). Since DPT is a fundamental and spontaneous chemical process and occurs much more frequently within GC pairs than AT pairs, Loewdin model offers a common explanation for the observed universal mutation bias and thus has broad biological implications.

  5. Tort Damages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.T. Visscher (Louis)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: In this Chapter, I provide an overview of Law and Economics literature regarding tort damages. Where necessary, attention is also spent to rules of tort liability. Both types of rules provide behavioral incentives to both injurers and victims, with respect to their level of

  6. Effects of smoke and tea on radiation-induced bone marrow cell mutation and marrow inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yong; Zhang Weiguang

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To provide scientific information for the prevention and treatment of the radiation damage by analyzing the effects of smoke and tea on radiation-induced bone marrow cell mutation and marrow inhibition. Methods: 7 group mice were exposed to smoke and/or tea and/or radiation respectively. There were also b blank control group and a cyclophosphamide positive control group. The frequencies of micronucleated polychromatic erythrocytes (MPCE), the ratio of polychromatic erythrocytes (PCE) to mature erythrocytes (RBC) in marrow, and the count of peripheral blood hemoleukocyte were observed. Results: The frequencies of MPCE in the groups irradiated with γ-rays were significantly higher than that in the blank control group (P<0.05 or 0.01). The smoke + radiation group's frequency was significantly higher than single radiation group (P<0.05). The ratios of PCE to RBC in the groups irradiated were significantly lower than that in the blank control group (P<0.01). The counts of peripheral blood hemoleukocyte in the groups irradiated were significantly lower than the blank control group (P<0.01). Conclusion: Radiation were able to cause marrow cell mutation and induce marrow inhibition. Smoke increases the effect of radiation-induced marrow cell mutation. Tea and smoke could not affect radiation-induced bone marrow inhibition

  7. The somatic autosomal mutation matrix in cancer genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temiz, Nuri A; Donohue, Duncan E; Bacolla, Albino; Vasquez, Karen M; Cooper, David N; Mudunuri, Uma; Ivanic, Joseph; Cer, Regina Z; Yi, Ming; Stephens, Robert M; Collins, Jack R; Luke, Brian T

    2015-08-01

    DNA damage in somatic cells originates from both environmental and endogenous sources, giving rise to mutations through multiple mechanisms. When these mutations affect the function of critical genes, cancer may ensue. Although identifying genomic subsets of mutated genes may inform therapeutic options, a systematic survey of tumor mutational spectra is required to improve our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of mutagenesis involved in cancer etiology. Recent studies have presented genome-wide sets of somatic mutations as a 96-element vector, a procedure that only captures the immediate neighbors of the mutated nucleotide. Herein, we present a 32 × 12 mutation matrix that captures the nucleotide pattern two nucleotides upstream and downstream of the mutation. A somatic autosomal mutation matrix (SAMM) was constructed from tumor-specific mutations derived from each of 909 individual cancer genomes harboring a total of 10,681,843 single-base substitutions. In addition, mechanistic template mutation matrices (MTMMs) representing oxidative DNA damage, ultraviolet-induced DNA damage, (5m)CpG deamination, and APOBEC-mediated cytosine mutation, are presented. MTMMs were mapped to the individual tumor SAMMs to determine the maximum contribution of each mutational mechanism to the overall mutation pattern. A Manhattan distance across all SAMM elements between any two tumor genomes was used to determine their relative distance. Employing this metric, 89.5% of all tumor genomes were found to have a nearest neighbor from the same tissue of origin. When a distance-dependent 6-nearest neighbor classifier was used, 10.4% of the SAMMs had an Undetermined tissue of origin, and 92.2% of the remaining SAMMs were assigned to the correct tissue of origin. [corrected]. Thus, although tumors from different tissues may have similar mutation patterns, their SAMMs often display signatures that are characteristic of specific tissues.

  8. A mild mutator phenotype arises in a mouse model for malignancies associated with neurofibromatosis type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garza, Rene [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, University of Texas, Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900 (United States); Hudson, Robert A. [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, University of Texas, Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900 (United States); McMahan, C. Alex [Department of Pathology, University of Texas, Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900 (United States); Walter, Christi A. [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, University of Texas, Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900 (United States); South Texas Veterans Healthcare System, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Vogel, Kristine S. [Department of Cellular and Structural Biology, University of Texas, Health Science Center at San Antonio, 7703 Floyd Curl Drive, San Antonio, TX 78229-3900 (United States)]. E-mail: vogelk@uthscsa.edu

    2007-02-03

    Defects in genes that control DNA repair, proliferation, and apoptosis can increase genomic instability, and thus promote malignant progression. Although most tumors that arise in humans with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) are benign, these individuals are at increased risk for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST). To characterize additional mutations required for the development of MPNST from benign plexiform neurofibromas, we generated a mouse model for these tumors by combining targeted null mutations in Nf1 and p53, in cis. CisNf1+/-; p53+/- mice spontaneously develop PNST, and these tumors exhibit loss-of-heterozygosity at both the Nf1 and p53 loci. Because p53 has well-characterized roles in the DNA damage response, DNA repair, and apoptosis, and because DNA repair genes have been proposed to act as modifiers in NF1, we used the cisNf1+/-; p53+/- mice to determine whether a mutator phenotype arises in NF1-associated malignancies. To quantitate spontaneous mutant frequencies (MF), we crossed the Big Blue mouse, which harbors a lacI transgene, to the cisNf1+/-; p53+/- mice, and isolated genomic DNA from both tumor and normal tissues in compound heterozygotes and wild-type siblings. Many of the PNST exhibited increased mutant frequencies (MF = 4.70) when compared to normal peripheral nerve and brain (MF = 2.09); mutations occurred throughout the entire lacI gene, and included base substitutions, insertions, and deletions. Moreover, the brains, spleens, and livers of these cisNf1+/-; p53+/- animals exhibited increased mutant frequencies when compared to tissues from wild-type littermates. We conclude that a mild mutator phenotype arises in the tumors and tissues of cisNf1+/-; p53+/- mice, and propose that genomic instability influences NF1 tumor progression and disease severity.

  9. Human minisatellite mutation rate after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubrova, Y.E.; Neumann, R.; Neil, D.L.; Jeffreys, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    Germline mutation at human minisatellite loci has been studied among children born in heavily polluted areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus after the Chernobyl accident and in a control population. The frequency of mutation was found to be twice as high in the exposed families as in the control group. Mutation rate in the Mogilev families was correlated with the level of caesium-137 surface contamination, consistent with radiation induction of germline mutation. (author)

  10. Mutational specificity of γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoebee, Barbara.

    1990-01-01

    The aim of the study described in this thesis was to get more information on the mutagenic properties of radiation-induced DNA modifications and the possible mechanisms involved in radiation-induced mutagenesis, principally by investigating the kinds of mutations by DNA sequence analysis. The mutations were analyzed after γ-irradiation of recombinant bacteriophage M13 and plasmide pUC DNA in diluted aqueous solutions, followed by transfection or transformation to E. coli cells, in which the damaged DNA molecules are repaired and replicated. Error-prone repair, misrepair or bypass of lesions during replication may lead to the introduction of mutations. Both the M13 and the plasmid DNA used in our mutation studies contain a mutation target sequence, which makes an easy selection and sequence analysis of mutant DNA molecules possible. Under the radiation conditions used, e.g. irradiation of diluted aqueous DNA solutions, only DNA damage occurs introduced by the water derived OH* and H* radicals and the hydrated electrons. By using different gas conditions during irradiation the relative yields of these reaction species can be manipulated, which opens up the opportunity to determine their effects separately. The mutation spectrum obtained in double-stranded (ds) M13DNA after irradiation under oxic conditions and the mutation spectrum obtained under the same conditions and in the same mutation target but cloned in plasmid DNA, are described. The mutation specificity under anoxic conditions in ds M13DNA is given. Results obtained after irradiation of ds M13DNA under N 2 conditions are discussed together with experiments with single-stranded DNA. Similarities and differences between radiation-induced mutation spectra obtained by other groups and those presented in this thesis are discussed. (author). 155 refs.; 134 figs.; 16 tabs

  11. UV-Associated Mutations Underlie the Etiology of MCV-Negative Merkel Cell Carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Stephen Q; Waldeck, Kelly; Vergara, Ismael A; Schröder, Jan; Madore, Jason; Wilmott, James S; Colebatch, Andrew J; De Paoli-Iseppi, Ricardo; Li, Jason; Lupat, Richard; Semple, Timothy; Arnau, Gisela Mir; Fellowes, Andrew; Leonard, J Helen; Hruby, George; Mann, Graham J; Thompson, John F; Cullinane, Carleen; Johnston, Meredith; Shackleton, Mark; Sandhu, Shahneen; Bowtell, David D L; Johnstone, Ricky W; Fox, Stephen B; McArthur, Grant A; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Scolyer, Richard A; Gill, Anthony J; Hicks, Rodney J; Tothill, Richard W

    2015-12-15

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an uncommon, but highly malignant, cutaneous tumor. Merkel cell polyoma virus (MCV) has been implicated in a majority of MCC tumors; however, viral-negative tumors have been reported to be more prevalent in some geographic regions subject to high sun exposure. While the impact of MCV and viral T-antigens on MCC development has been extensively investigated, little is known about the etiology of viral-negative tumors. We performed targeted capture and massively parallel DNA sequencing of 619 cancer genes to compare the gene mutations and copy number alterations in MCV-positive (n = 13) and -negative (n = 21) MCC tumors and cell lines. We found that MCV-positive tumors displayed very low mutation rates, but MCV-negative tumors exhibited a high mutation burden associated with a UV-induced DNA damage signature. All viral-negative tumors harbored mutations in RB1, TP53, and a high frequency of mutations in NOTCH1 and FAT1. Additional mutated or amplified cancer genes of potential clinical importance included PI3K (PIK3CA, AKT1, PIK3CG) and MAPK (HRAS, NF1) pathway members and the receptor tyrosine kinase FGFR2. Furthermore, looking ahead to potential therapeutic strategies encompassing immune checkpoint inhibitors such as anti-PD-L1, we also assessed the status of T-cell-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and PD-L1 in MCC tumors. A subset of viral-negative tumors exhibited high TILs and PD-L1 expression, corresponding with the higher mutation load within these cancers. Taken together, this study provides new insights into the underlying biology of viral-negative MCC and paves the road for further investigation into new treatment opportunities. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Mutation of Chinese hamster cells b