WorldWideScience

Sample records for damage model based

  1. Intelligent-based Structural Damage Detection Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eric Wai Ming; Yu, K.F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the application of a novel Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for the diagnosis of structural damage. The ANN model, denoted as the GRNNFA, is a hybrid model combining the General Regression Neural Network Model (GRNN) and the Fuzzy ART (FA) model. It not only retains the important features of the GRNN and FA models (i.e. fast and stable network training and incremental growth of network structure) but also facilitates the removal of the noise embedded in the training samples. Structural damage alters the stiffness distribution of the structure and so as to change the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the system. The measured modal parameter changes due to a particular damage are treated as patterns for that damage. The proposed GRNNFA model was trained to learn those patterns in order to detect the possible damage location of the structure. Simulated data is employed to verify and illustrate the procedures of the proposed ANN-based damage diagnosis methodology. The results of this study have demonstrated the feasibility of applying the GRNNFA model to structural damage diagnosis even when the training samples were noise contaminated.

  2. Intelligent-based Structural Damage Detection Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eric Wai Ming; Yu, Kin Fung

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents the application of a novel Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for the diagnosis of structural damage. The ANN model, denoted as the GRNNFA, is a hybrid model combining the General Regression Neural Network Model (GRNN) and the Fuzzy ART (FA) model. It not only retains the important features of the GRNN and FA models (i.e. fast and stable network training and incremental growth of network structure) but also facilitates the removal of the noise embedded in the training samples. Structural damage alters the stiffness distribution of the structure and so as to change the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the system. The measured modal parameter changes due to a particular damage are treated as patterns for that damage. The proposed GRNNFA model was trained to learn those patterns in order to detect the possible damage location of the structure. Simulated data is employed to verify and illustrate the procedures of the proposed ANN-based damage diagnosis methodology. The results of this study have demonstrated the feasibility of applying the GRNNFA model to structural damage diagnosis even when the training samples were noise contaminated.

  3. Damage Analysis and Evaluation of High Strength Concrete Frame Based on Deformation-Energy Damage Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang-bin Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of characterizing the damage of high strength concrete structures is presented, which is based on the deformation energy double parameters damage model and incorporates both of the main forms of damage by earthquakes: first time damage beyond destruction and energy consumption. Firstly, test data of high strength reinforced concrete (RC columns were evaluated. Then, the relationship between stiffness degradation, strength degradation, and ductility performance was obtained. And an expression for damage in terms of model parameters was determined, as well as the critical input data for the restoring force model to be used in analytical damage evaluation. Experimentally, the unloading stiffness was found to be related to the cycle number. Then, a correction for this changing was applied to better describe the unloading phenomenon and compensate for the shortcomings of structure elastic-plastic time history analysis. The above algorithm was embedded into an IDARC program. Finally, a case study of high strength RC multistory frames was presented. Under various seismic wave inputs, the structural damages were predicted. The damage model and correction algorithm of stiffness unloading were proved to be suitable and applicable in engineering design and damage evaluation of a high strength concrete structure.

  4. Tree-based flood damage modeling of companies: Damage processes and model performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieg, Tobias; Vogel, Kristin; Merz, Bruno; Kreibich, Heidi

    2017-07-01

    Reliable flood risk analyses, including the estimation of damage, are an important prerequisite for efficient risk management. However, not much is known about flood damage processes affecting companies. Thus, we conduct a flood damage assessment of companies in Germany with regard to two aspects. First, we identify relevant damage-influencing variables. Second, we assess the prediction performance of the developed damage models with respect to the gain by using an increasing amount of training data and a sector-specific evaluation of the data. Random forests are trained with data from two postevent surveys after flood events occurring in the years 2002 and 2013. For a sector-specific consideration, the data set is split into four subsets corresponding to the manufacturing, commercial, financial, and service sectors. Further, separate models are derived for three different company assets: buildings, equipment, and goods and stock. Calculated variable importance values reveal different variable sets relevant for the damage estimation, indicating significant differences in the damage process for various company sectors and assets. With an increasing number of data used to build the models, prediction errors decrease. Yet the effect is rather small and seems to saturate for a data set size of several hundred observations. In contrast, the prediction improvement achieved by a sector-specific consideration is more distinct, especially for damage to equipment and goods and stock. Consequently, sector-specific data acquisition and a consideration of sector-specific company characteristics in future flood damage assessments is expected to improve the model performance more than a mere increase in data.

  5. Search-based model identification of smart-structure damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, B. J.; Macalou, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a combined model and parameter identification approach, based on modal analysis and artificial intelligence (AI) techniques, for identifying damage or flaws in a rotating truss structure incorporating embedded piezoceramic sensors. This smart structure example is representative of a class of structures commonly found in aerospace systems and next generation space structures. Artificial intelligence techniques of classification, heuristic search, and an object-oriented knowledge base are used in an AI-based model identification approach. A finite model space is classified into a search tree, over which a variant of best-first search is used to identify the model whose stored response most closely matches that of the input. Newly-encountered models can be incorporated into the model space. This adaptativeness demonstrates the potential for learning control. Following this output-error model identification, numerical parameter identification is used to further refine the identified model. Given the rotating truss example in this paper, noisy data corresponding to various damage configurations are input to both this approach and a conventional parameter identification method. The combination of the AI-based model identification with parameter identification is shown to lead to smaller parameter corrections than required by the use of parameter identification alone.

  6. Micromechanics Based Inelastic and Damage Modeling of Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. Procházka

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Micromechanics based models are considered for application to viscoelasticity and damage in metal matrix composites. The method proposes a continuation and development of Dvooák’s transformation field analysis, considering the piecewise uniform eigenstrains in each material phase. Standard applications of the method to a two-phase are considered in this study model, i.e., only one sub-volume per phase is considered. A continuous model is used, employing transformation field analysis with softening in order to prevent the tensile stress overstepping the tensile strength. At the same time shear cracking occurs in the tangential direction of the possible crack. This is considered in the principal shear stresses and they make disconnections in displacements. In this case, discontinuous models are more promising. Because discrete models, that can describe the situation more realistically have not been worked out in detail, we retain a continuous model and substitute the slip caused by overstepping the damage law by introducing eigenparameters from TFA. The various aspects of the proposed methods are systematically checked by comparing with finite element unit cell analyses, made through periodic homogenization assumptions, for SiC/Ti unidirectional lay-ups. 

  7. Model-based Prognostics with Concurrent Damage Progression Processes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Model-based prognostics approaches rely on physics-based models that describe the behavior of systems and their components. These models must account for the several...

  8. A Kriging Model Based Finite Element Model Updating Method for Damage Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuming Yang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Model updating is an effective means of damage identification and surrogate modeling has attracted considerable attention for saving computational cost in finite element (FE model updating, especially for large-scale structures. In this context, a surrogate model of frequency is normally constructed for damage identification, while the frequency response function (FRF is rarely used as it usually changes dramatically with updating parameters. This paper presents a new surrogate model based model updating method taking advantage of the measured FRFs. The Frequency Domain Assurance Criterion (FDAC is used to build the objective function, whose nonlinear response surface is constructed by the Kriging model. Then, the efficient global optimization (EGO algorithm is introduced to get the model updating results. The proposed method has good accuracy and robustness, which have been verified by a numerical simulation of a cantilever and experimental test data of a laboratory three-story structure.

  9. A model based bayesian solution for characterization of complex damage scenarios in aerospace composite structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, H; Leckey, Cara A C; Dick, A; Harvey, G; Dobson, J

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasonic damage detection and characterization is commonly used in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of aerospace composite components. In recent years there has been an increased development of guided wave based methods. In real materials and structures, these dispersive waves result in complicated behavior in the presence of complex damage scenarios. Model-based characterization methods utilize accurate three dimensional finite element models (FEMs) of guided wave interaction with realistic damage scenarios to aid in defect identification and classification. This work describes an inverse solution for realistic composite damage characterization by comparing the wavenumber-frequency spectra of experimental and simulated ultrasonic inspections. The composite laminate material properties are first verified through a Bayesian solution (Markov chain Monte Carlo), enabling uncertainty quantification surrounding the characterization. A study is undertaken to assess the efficacy of the proposed damage model and comparative metrics between the experimental and simulated output. The FEM is then parameterized with a damage model capable of describing the typical complex damage created by impact events in composites. The damage is characterized through a transdimensional Markov chain Monte Carlo solution, enabling a flexible damage model capable of adapting to the complex damage geometry investigated here. The posterior probability distributions of the individual delamination petals as well as the overall envelope of the damage site are determined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Model-Based Fatigue Prognosis of Fiber-Reinforced Laminates Exhibiting Concurrent Damage Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbetta, M.; Sbarufatti, C.; Saxena, A.; Giglio, M.; Goebel, K.

    2016-01-01

    Prognostics of large composite structures is a topic of increasing interest in the field of structural health monitoring for aerospace, civil, and mechanical systems. Along with recent advancements in real-time structural health data acquisition and processing for damage detection and characterization, model-based stochastic methods for life prediction are showing promising results in the literature. Among various model-based approaches, particle-filtering algorithms are particularly capable in coping with uncertainties associated with the process. These include uncertainties about information on the damage extent and the inherent uncertainties of the damage propagation process. Some efforts have shown successful applications of particle filtering-based frameworks for predicting the matrix crack evolution and structural stiffness degradation caused by repetitive fatigue loads. Effects of other damage modes such as delamination, however, are not incorporated in these works. It is well established that delamination and matrix cracks not only co-exist in most laminate structures during the fatigue degradation process but also affect each other's progression. Furthermore, delamination significantly alters the stress-state in the laminates and accelerates the material degradation leading to catastrophic failure. Therefore, the work presented herein proposes a particle filtering-based framework for predicting a structure's remaining useful life with consideration of multiple co-existing damage-mechanisms. The framework uses an energy-based model from the composite modeling literature. The multiple damage-mode model has been shown to suitably estimate the energy release rate of cross-ply laminates as affected by matrix cracks and delamination modes. The model is also able to estimate the reduction in stiffness of the damaged laminate. This information is then used in the algorithms for life prediction capabilities. First, a brief summary of the energy-based damage model

  11. Micro-mechanics based damage mechanics for 3D Orthogonal Woven Composites: Experiment and Numerical Modelling

    KAUST Repository

    Saleh, Mohamed Nasr

    2016-01-08

    Damage initiation and evolution of three-dimensional (3D) orthogonal woven carbon fibre composite (3DOWC) is investigated experimentally and numerically. Meso-scale homogenisation of the representative volume element (RVE) is utilised to predict the elastic properties, simulate damage initiation and evolution when loaded in tension. The effect of intra-yarns transverse cracking and shear diffused damage on the in-plane transverse modulus and shear modulus is investigated while one failure criterion is introduced to simulate the matrix damage. The proposed model is based on two major assumptions. First, the effect of the binder yarns, on the in-plane properties, is neglected, so the 3DOWC unit cell can be approximated as a (0o/90o) cross-ply laminate. Second, a micro-mechanics based damage approach is used at the meso-scale, so damage indicators can be correlated, explicitly, to the density of cracks within the material. Results from the simulated RVE are validated against experimental results along the warp (0o direction) and weft (90o direction). This approach paves the road for more predictive models as damage evolution laws are obtained from micro mechanical considerations and rely on few well-defined material parameters. This largely differs from classical damage mechanics approaches in which the evolution law is obtained by retrofitting experimental observations.

  12. Micro-mechanics based damage mechanics for 3D Orthogonal Woven Composites: Experiment and Numerical Modelling

    KAUST Repository

    Saleh, Mohamed Nasr; Lubineau, Gilles; Potluri, Prasad; Withers, Philip; Soutis, Constantinos

    2016-01-01

    Damage initiation and evolution of three-dimensional (3D) orthogonal woven carbon fibre composite (3DOWC) is investigated experimentally and numerically. Meso-scale homogenisation of the representative volume element (RVE) is utilised to predict the elastic properties, simulate damage initiation and evolution when loaded in tension. The effect of intra-yarns transverse cracking and shear diffused damage on the in-plane transverse modulus and shear modulus is investigated while one failure criterion is introduced to simulate the matrix damage. The proposed model is based on two major assumptions. First, the effect of the binder yarns, on the in-plane properties, is neglected, so the 3DOWC unit cell can be approximated as a (0o/90o) cross-ply laminate. Second, a micro-mechanics based damage approach is used at the meso-scale, so damage indicators can be correlated, explicitly, to the density of cracks within the material. Results from the simulated RVE are validated against experimental results along the warp (0o direction) and weft (90o direction). This approach paves the road for more predictive models as damage evolution laws are obtained from micro mechanical considerations and rely on few well-defined material parameters. This largely differs from classical damage mechanics approaches in which the evolution law is obtained by retrofitting experimental observations.

  13. Rock Failure Analysis Based on a Coupled Elastoplastic-Logarithmic Damage Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdia, M.; Molladavoodi, H.; Salarirad, H.

    2017-12-01

    The rock materials surrounding the underground excavations typically demonstrate nonlinear mechanical response and irreversible behavior in particular under high in-situ stress states. The dominant causes of irreversible behavior are plastic flow and damage process. The plastic flow is controlled by the presence of local shear stresses which cause the frictional sliding. During this process, the net number of bonds remains unchanged practically. The overall macroscopic consequence of plastic flow is that the elastic properties (e.g. the stiffness of the material) are insensitive to this type of irreversible change. The main cause of irreversible changes in quasi-brittle materials such as rock is the damage process occurring within the material. From a microscopic viewpoint, damage initiates with the nucleation and growth of microcracks. When the microcracks length reaches a critical value, the coalescence of them occurs and finally, the localized meso-cracks appear. The macroscopic and phenomenological consequence of damage process is stiffness degradation, dilatation and softening response. In this paper, a coupled elastoplastic-logarithmic damage model was used to simulate the irreversible deformations and stiffness degradation of rock materials under loading. In this model, damage evolution & plastic flow rules were formulated in the framework of irreversible thermodynamics principles. To take into account the stiffness degradation and softening on post-peak region, logarithmic damage variable was implemented. Also, a plastic model with Drucker-Prager yield function was used to model plastic strains. Then, an algorithm was proposed to calculate the numerical steps based on the proposed coupled plastic and damage constitutive model. The developed model has been programmed in VC++ environment. Then, it was used as a separate and new constitutive model in DEM code (UDEC). Finally, the experimental Oolitic limestone rock behavior was simulated based on the developed

  14. Research on borehole stability of shale based on seepage-stress-damage coupling model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Ran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In oil drilling, one of the most complicated problems is borehole stability of shale. Based on the theory of continuum damage mechanics, a modified Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion according to plastic damage evolution and the seepage-stress coupling is established. Meanwhile, the damage evolution equation which is based on equivalent plastic strain and the permeability evolution equation of shale are proposed in this paper. The physical model of borehole rock for a well in China western oilfield is set up to analyze the distribution of damage, permeability, stress, plastic strain and displacement. In the calculation process, the influence of rock damage to elastic modulus, cohesion and permeability is involved by writing a subroutine for ABAQUS. The results show that the rock damage evolution has a significant effect to the plastic strain and stress in plastic zone. Different drilling fluid density will produce different damage in its value, range and type. This study improves the theory of mechanical mechanism of borehole collapse and fracture, and provides a reference for the further research of seepage-stress-chemical-damage coupling of wall rock.

  15. A Simulation Model for Tensile Fracture Procedure Analysis of Graphite Material based on Damage Evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Erqiang; Ma Shaopeng; Wang Hongtao

    2014-01-01

    Graphite material is generally easy to be damaged by the widely distributed micro-cracks when subjects to load. For numerically analyzing of the structure made of graphite material, the influences of the degradation of the material in damaged areas need to be considered. In this paper, an axial tension test method is proposed to obtain the dynamic damage evolution rule of the material. Using the degradation rule (variation of elastic modulus), the finite element model is then constructed to analyze the tensile fracture process of the L-shaped graphite specimen. An axial tension test of graphite is performed to obtain the stress-strain curve. Based on the variation of the measured curve, the damage evolution rule of the material are fitted out. A simulation model based on the above measured results is then constructed on ABAQUS by user subroutine. Using this simulation model, the tension failure process of L-shaped graphite specimen with fillet are simulated. The calculated and experimental results on fracture load are in good agreement. The damage simulation model based on the stress-strain curve of axial tensile test can be used in other tensile fracture analysis. (author)

  16. Damage evaluation by a guided wave-hidden Markov model based method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Hanfei; Yuan, Shenfang; Qiu, Lei; Zhang, Jinjin

    2016-02-01

    Guided wave based structural health monitoring has shown great potential in aerospace applications. However, one of the key challenges of practical engineering applications is the accurate interpretation of the guided wave signals under time-varying environmental and operational conditions. This paper presents a guided wave-hidden Markov model based method to improve the damage evaluation reliability of real aircraft structures under time-varying conditions. In the proposed approach, an HMM based unweighted moving average trend estimation method, which can capture the trend of damage propagation from the posterior probability obtained by HMM modeling is used to achieve a probabilistic evaluation of the structural damage. To validate the developed method, experiments are performed on a hole-edge crack specimen under fatigue loading condition and a real aircraft wing spar under changing structural boundary conditions. Experimental results show the advantage of the proposed method.

  17. Micromechanics-based damage model for failure prediction in cold forming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, X.Z.; Chan, L.C., E-mail: lc.chan@polyu.edu.hk

    2017-04-06

    The purpose of this study was to develop a micromechanics-based damage (micro-damage) model that was concerned with the evolution of micro-voids for failure prediction in cold forming. Typical stainless steel SS316L was selected as the specimen material, and the nonlinear isotropic hardening rule was extended to describe the large deformation of the specimen undergoing cold forming. A micro-focus high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (CT) system was employed to trace and measure the micro-voids inside the specimen directly. Three-dimensional (3D) representative volume element (RVE) models with different sizes and spatial locations were reconstructed from the processed CT images of the specimen, and the average size and volume fraction of micro-voids (VFMV) for the specimen were determined via statistical analysis. Subsequently, the micro-damage model was compiled as a user-defined material subroutine into the finite element (FE) package ABAQUS. The stress-strain responses and damage evolutions of SS316L specimens under tensile and compressive deformations at different strain rates were predicted and further verified experimentally. It was concluded that the proposed micro-damage model is convincing for failure prediction in cold forming of the SS316L material.

  18. The evaluation of distributed damage in concrete based on sinusoidal modeling of the ultrasonic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepehrinezhad, Alireza; Toufigh, Vahab

    2018-05-25

    Ultrasonic wave attenuation is an effective descriptor of distributed damage in inhomogeneous materials. Methods developed to measure wave attenuation have the potential to provide an in-site evaluation of existing concrete structures insofar as they are accurate and time-efficient. In this study, material classification and distributed damage evaluation were investigated based on the sinusoidal modeling of the response from the through-transmission ultrasonic tests on polymer concrete specimens. The response signal was modeled as single or the sum of damping sinusoids. Due to the inhomogeneous nature of concrete materials, model parameters may vary from one specimen to another. Therefore, these parameters are not known in advance and should be estimated while the response signal is being received. The modeling procedure used in this study involves a data-adaptive algorithm to estimate the parameters online. Data-adaptive algorithms are used due to a lack of knowledge of the model parameters. The damping factor was estimated as a descriptor of the distributed damage. The results were compared in two different cases as follows: (1) constant excitation frequency with varying concrete mixtures and (2) constant mixture with varying excitation frequencies. The specimens were also loaded up to their ultimate compressive strength to investigate the effect of distributed damage in the response signal. The results of the estimation indicated that the damping was highly sensitive to the change in material inhomogeneity, even in comparable mixtures. In addition to the proposed method, three methods were employed to compare the results based on their accuracy in the classification of materials and the evaluation of the distributed damage. It is shown that the estimated damping factor is not only sensitive to damage in the final stages of loading, but it is also applicable in evaluating micro damages in the earlier stages providing a reliable descriptor of damage. In addition

  19. Metamodel-based inverse method for parameter identification: elastic-plastic damage model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Changwu; El Hami, Abdelkhalak; Radi, Bouchaïb

    2017-04-01

    This article proposed a metamodel-based inverse method for material parameter identification and applies it to elastic-plastic damage model parameter identification. An elastic-plastic damage model is presented and implemented in numerical simulation. The metamodel-based inverse method is proposed in order to overcome the disadvantage in computational cost of the inverse method. In the metamodel-based inverse method, a Kriging metamodel is constructed based on the experimental design in order to model the relationship between material parameters and the objective function values in the inverse problem, and then the optimization procedure is executed by the use of a metamodel. The applications of the presented material model and proposed parameter identification method in the standard A 2017-T4 tensile test prove that the presented elastic-plastic damage model is adequate to describe the material's mechanical behaviour and that the proposed metamodel-based inverse method not only enhances the efficiency of parameter identification but also gives reliable results.

  20. Electrical Resistance Based Damage Modeling of Multifunctional Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Robert James

    In the current thesis, the 4-probe electrical resistance of carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composites is utilized as a metric for sensing low-velocity impact damage. A robust method has been developed for recovering the directionally dependent electrical resistivities using an experimental line-type 4-probe resistance method. Next, the concept of effective conducting thickness was uniquely applied in the development of a brand new point-type 4-probe method for applications with electrically anisotropic materials. An extensive experimental study was completed to characterize the 4-probe electrical resistance of CFRP specimens using both the traditional line-type and new point-type methods. Leveraging the concept of effective conducting thickness, a novel method was developed for building 4-probe electrical finite element (FE) models in COMSOL. The electrical models were validated against experimental resistance measurements and the FE models demonstrated predictive capabilities when applied to CFRP specimens with varying thickness and layup. These new models demonstrated a significant improvement in accuracy compared to previous literature and could provide a framework for future advancements in FE modeling of electrically anisotropic materials. FE models were then developed in ABAQUS for evaluating the influence of prescribed localized damage on the 4-probe resistance. Experimental data was compiled on the impact response of various CFRP laminates, and was used in the development of quasi- static FE models for predicting presence of impact-induced delamination. The simulation-based delamination predictions were then integrated into the electrical FE models for the purpose of studying the influence of realistic damage patterns on electrical resistance. When the size of the delamination damage was moderate compared to the electrode spacing, the electrical resistance increased by less than 1% due to the delamination damage. However, for a specimen with large

  1. Damage Detection of Refractory Based on Principle Component Analysis and Gaussian Mixture Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changming Liu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic emission (AE technique is a common approach to identify the damage of the refractories; however, there is a complex problem since there are as many as fifteen involved parameters, which calls for effective data processing and classification algorithms to reduce the level of complexity. In this paper, experiments involving three-point bending tests of refractories were conducted and AE signals were collected. A new data processing method of merging the similar parameters in the description of the damage and reducing the dimension was developed. By means of the principle component analysis (PCA for dimension reduction, the fifteen related parameters can be reduced to two parameters. The parameters were the linear combinations of the fifteen original parameters and taken as the indexes for damage classification. Based on the proposed approach, the Gaussian mixture model was integrated with the Bayesian information criterion to group the AE signals into two damage categories, which accounted for 99% of all damage. Electronic microscope scanning of the refractories verified the two types of damage.

  2. 3D Progressive Damage Modeling for Laminated Composite Based on Crack Band Theory and Continuum Damage Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, John T.; Pineda, Evan J.; Ranatunga, Vipul; Smeltzer, Stanley S.

    2015-01-01

    A simple continuum damage mechanics (CDM) based 3D progressive damage analysis (PDA) tool for laminated composites was developed and implemented as a user defined material subroutine to link with a commercially available explicit finite element code. This PDA tool uses linear lamina properties from standard tests, predicts damage initiation with an easy-to-implement Hashin-Rotem failure criteria, and in the damage evolution phase, evaluates the degradation of material properties based on the crack band theory and traction-separation cohesive laws. It follows Matzenmiller et al.'s formulation to incorporate the degrading material properties into the damaged stiffness matrix. Since nonlinear shear and matrix stress-strain relations are not implemented, correction factors are used for slowing the reduction of the damaged shear stiffness terms to reflect the effect of these nonlinearities on the laminate strength predictions. This CDM based PDA tool is implemented as a user defined material (VUMAT) to link with the Abaqus/Explicit code. Strength predictions obtained, using this VUMAT, are correlated with test data for a set of notched specimens under tension and compression loads.

  3. Assessment of damage localization based on spatial filters using numerical crack propagation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deraemaeker, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    This paper is concerned with vibration based structural health monitoring with a focus on non-model based damage localization. The type of damage investigated is cracking of concrete structures due to the loss of prestress. In previous works, an automated method based on spatial filtering techniques applied to large dynamic strain sensor networks has been proposed and tested using data from numerical simulations. In the simulations, simplified representations of cracks (such as a reduced Young's modulus) have been used. While this gives the general trend for global properties such as eigen frequencies, the change of more local features, such as strains, is not adequately represented. Instead, crack propagation models should be used. In this study, a first attempt is made in this direction for concrete structures (quasi brittle material with softening laws) using crack-band models implemented in the commercial software DIANA. The strategy consists in performing a non-linear computation which leads to cracking of the concrete, followed by a dynamic analysis. The dynamic response is then used as the input to the previously designed damage localization system in order to assess its performances. The approach is illustrated on a simply supported beam modeled with 2D plane stress elements.

  4. Ductile failure analysis of high strength steel in hot forming based on micromechanical damage model

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Liang; Liu Wenquan; Wang Dantong; Hu Ping

    2016-01-01

    The damage evolution of high strength steel at elevated temperature is investigated by using the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model. A hybrid method integrated thermal tensile test and numerical technique is employed to identify the damage parameters. The analysis results show that the damage parameters are different at different temperature as the variation of tested material microstructure. Furthermore, the calibrated damage parameters are implemented to simulate a bugling forming at el...

  5. Ductile failure analysis of high strength steel in hot forming based on micromechanical damage model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The damage evolution of high strength steel at elevated temperature is investigated by using the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN model. A hybrid method integrated thermal tensile test and numerical technique is employed to identify the damage parameters. The analysis results show that the damage parameters are different at different temperature as the variation of tested material microstructure. Furthermore, the calibrated damage parameters are implemented to simulate a bugling forming at elevated temperature. The experimental results show the availability of GTN damage model in analyzing sheet formability in hot forming.

  6. Modeling damage in concrete pavements and bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    This project focused on micromechanical modeling of damage in concrete under general, multi-axial loading. A : continuum-level, three-dimensional constitutive model based on micromechanics was developed. The model : accounts for damage in concrete by...

  7. Creep Tests and Modeling Based on Continuum Damage Mechanics for T91 and T92 Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, J. P.; Tu, S. H.; Zhu, X. W.; Tan, L. J.; Hu, B.; Wang, Q.

    2017-12-01

    9-11%Cr ferritic steels play an important role in high-temperature and high-pressure boilers of advanced power plants. In this paper, a continuum damage mechanics (CDM)-based creep model was proposed to study the creep behavior of T91 and T92 steels at high temperatures. Long-time creep tests were performed for both steels under different conditions. The creep rupture data and creep curves obtained from creep tests were captured well by theoretical calculation based on the CDM model over a long creep time. It is shown that the developed model is able to predict creep data for the two ferritic steels accurately up to tens of thousands of hours.

  8. Assessment of compressive failure process of cortical bone materials using damage-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Theng Pin; R Koloor, S S; Djuansjah, J R P; Abdul Kadir, M R

    2017-02-01

    The main failure factors of cortical bone are aging or osteoporosis, accident and high energy trauma or physiological activities. However, the mechanism of damage evolution coupled with yield criterion is considered as one of the unclear subjects in failure analysis of cortical bone materials. Therefore, this study attempts to assess the structural response and progressive failure process of cortical bone using a brittle damaged plasticity model. For this reason, several compressive tests are performed on cortical bone specimens made of bovine femur, in order to obtain the structural response and mechanical properties of the material. Complementary finite element (FE) model of the sample and test is prepared to simulate the elastic-to-damage behavior of the cortical bone using the brittle damaged plasticity model. The FE model is validated in a comparative method using the predicted and measured structural response as load-compressive displacement through simulation and experiment. FE results indicated that the compressive damage initiated and propagated at central region where maximum equivalent plastic strain is computed, which coincided with the degradation of structural compressive stiffness followed by a vast amount of strain energy dissipation. The parameter of compressive damage rate, which is a function dependent on damage parameter and the plastic strain is examined for different rates. Results show that considering a similar rate to the initial slope of the damage parameter in the experiment would give a better sense for prediction of compressive failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Watson-Crick Base Pair Radical Cation as a Model for Oxidative Damage in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feketeová, Linda; Chan, Bun; Khairallah, George N; Steinmetz, Vincent; Maitre, Philippe; Radom, Leo; O'Hair, Richard A J

    2017-07-06

    The deleterious cellular effects of ionizing radiation are well-known, but the mechanisms causing DNA damage are poorly understood. The accepted molecular events involve initial oxidation and deprotonation at guanine sites, triggering hydrogen atom abstraction reactions from the sugar moieties, causing DNA strand breaks. Probing the chemistry of the initially formed radical cation has been challenging. Here, we generate, spectroscopically characterize, and examine the reactivity of the Watson-Crick nucleobase pair radical cation in the gas phase. We observe rich chemistry, including proton transfer between the bases and propagation of the radical site in deoxyguanosine from the base to the sugar, thus rupturing the sugar. This first example of a gas-phase model system providing molecular-level details on the chemistry of an ionized DNA base pair paves the way toward a more complete understanding of molecular processes induced by radiation. It also highlights the role of radical propagation in chemistry, biology, and nanotechnology.

  10. An Elasto-Plastic Damage Model for Rocks Based on a New Nonlinear Strength Criterion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jingqi; Zhao, Mi; Du, Xiuli; Dai, Feng; Ma, Chao; Liu, Jingbo

    2018-05-01

    The strength and deformation characteristics of rocks are the most important mechanical properties for rock engineering constructions. A new nonlinear strength criterion is developed for rocks by combining the Hoek-Brown (HB) criterion and the nonlinear unified strength criterion (NUSC). The proposed criterion takes account of the intermediate principal stress effect against HB criterion, as well as being nonlinear in the meridian plane against NUSC. Only three parameters are required to be determined by experiments, including the two HB parameters σ c and m i . The failure surface of the proposed criterion is continuous, smooth and convex. The proposed criterion fits the true triaxial test data well and performs better than the other three existing criteria. Then, by introducing the Geological Strength Index, the proposed criterion is extended to rock masses and predicts the test data well. Finally, based on the proposed criterion, a triaxial elasto-plastic damage model for intact rock is developed. The plastic part is based on the effective stress, whose yield function is developed by the proposed criterion. For the damage part, the evolution function is assumed to have an exponential form. The performance of the constitutive model shows good agreement with the results of experimental tests.

  11. Analysis of Fatigue Life of PMMA at Different Frequencies Based on a New Damage Mechanics Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aifeng Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-cycle fatigue tests at different frequencies and creep tests under different stress levels of Plexiglas Resist 45 were conducted. Correspondingly, the creep fracture time, S-N curves, cyclic creep, and hysteresis loop were obtained. These results showed that the fatigue life increases with frequency at low frequency domain. After analysis, it was found that fatigue life is dependent on the load rate and is affected by the creep damage. In addition, a new continuum damage mechanics (CDM model was established to analyze creep-fatigue life, where the damage increment nonlinear summation rule was proposed and the frequency modification was made on the fatigue damage evolution equation. Differential evolution (DE algorithm was employed to determine the parameters within the model. The proposed model described fatigue life under different frequencies, and the calculated results agreed well with the experimental results.

  12. A Micromechanics-Based Elastoplastic Damage Model for Rocks with a Brittle-Ductile Transition in Mechanical Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kun; Zhu, Qi-zhi; Chen, Liang; Shao, Jian-fu; Liu, Jian

    2018-06-01

    As confining pressure increases, crystalline rocks of moderate porosity usually undergo a transition in failure mode from localized brittle fracture to diffused damage and ductile failure. This transition has been widely reported experimentally for several decades; however, satisfactory modeling is still lacking. The present paper aims at modeling the brittle-ductile transition process of rocks under conventional triaxial compression. Based on quantitative analyses of experimental results, it is found that there is a quite satisfactory linearity between the axial inelastic strain at failure and the confining pressure prescribed. A micromechanics-based frictional damage model is then formulated using an associated plastic flow rule and a strain energy release rate-based damage criterion. The analytical solution to the strong plasticity-damage coupling problem is provided and applied to simulate the nonlinear mechanical behaviors of Tennessee marble, Indiana limestone and Jinping marble, each presenting a brittle-ductile transition in stress-strain curves.

  13. Damage Identification of Bridge Based on Chebyshev Polynomial Fitting and Fuzzy Logic without Considering Baseline Model Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Bo Jiao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an effective approach for damage identification of bridge based on Chebyshev polynomial fitting and fuzzy logic systems without considering baseline model data. The modal curvature of damaged bridge can be obtained through central difference approximation based on displacement modal shape. Depending on the modal curvature of damaged structure, Chebyshev polynomial fitting is applied to acquire the curvature of undamaged one without considering baseline parameters. Therefore, modal curvature difference can be derived and used for damage localizing. Subsequently, the normalized modal curvature difference is treated as input variable of fuzzy logic systems for damage condition assessment. Numerical simulation on a simply supported bridge was carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed method.

  14. Hierarchical composites: Analysis of damage evolution based on fiber bundle model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2011-01-01

    A computational model of multiscale composites is developed on the basis of the fiber bundle model with the hierarchical load sharing rule, and employed to study the effect of the microstructures of hierarchical composites on their damage resistance. Two types of hierarchical materials were consi...

  15. An Assessment of the Effectiveness of Tree-Based Models for Multi-Variate Flood Damage Assessment in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roozbeh Hasanzadeh Nafari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Flood is a frequent natural hazard that has significant financial consequences for Australia. In Australia, physical losses caused by floods are commonly estimated by stage-damage functions. These methods usually consider only the depth of the water and the type of buildings at risk. However, flood damage is a complicated process, and it is dependent on a variety of factors which are rarely taken into account. This study explores the interaction, importance, and influence of water depth, flow velocity, water contamination, precautionary measures, emergency measures, flood experience, floor area, building value, building quality, and socioeconomic status. The study uses tree-based models (regression trees and bagging decision trees and a dataset collected from 2012 to 2013 flood events in Queensland, which includes information on structural damages, impact parameters, and resistance variables. The tree-based approaches show water depth, floor area, precautionary measures, building value, and building quality to be important damage-influencing parameters. Furthermore, the performance of the tree-based models is validated and contrasted with the outcomes of a multi-parameter loss function (FLFArs from Australia. The tree-based models are shown to be more accurate than the stage-damage function. Consequently, considering more parameters and taking advantage of tree-based models is recommended. The outcome is important for improving established Australian flood loss models and assisting decision-makers and insurance companies dealing with flood risk assessment.

  16. Study of cumulative fatigue damage detection for used parts with nonlinear output frequency response functions based on NARMAX modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Honglan; Mao, Hanying; Mao, Hanling; Zheng, Weixue; Huang, Zhenfeng; Li, Xinxin; Wang, Xianghong

    2017-12-01

    Cumulative fatigue damage detection for used parts plays a key role in the process of remanufacturing engineering and is related to the service safety of the remanufactured parts. In light of the nonlinear properties of used parts caused by cumulative fatigue damage, the based nonlinear output frequency response functions detection approach offers a breakthrough to solve this key problem. First, a modified PSO-adaptive lasso algorithm is introduced to improve the accuracy of the NARMAX model under impulse hammer excitation, and then, an effective new algorithm is derived to estimate the nonlinear output frequency response functions under rectangular pulse excitation, and a based nonlinear output frequency response functions index is introduced to detect the cumulative fatigue damage in used parts. Then, a novel damage detection approach that integrates the NARMAX model and the rectangular pulse is proposed for nonlinear output frequency response functions identification and cumulative fatigue damage detection of used parts. Finally, experimental studies of fatigued plate specimens and used connecting rod parts are conducted to verify the validity of the novel approach. The obtained results reveal that the new approach can detect cumulative fatigue damages of used parts effectively and efficiently and that the various values of the based nonlinear output frequency response functions index can be used to detect the different fatigue damages or working time. Since the proposed new approach can extract nonlinear properties of systems by only a single excitation of the inspected system, it shows great promise for use in remanufacturing engineering applications.

  17. Vibration-Based Damage Diagnosis in a Laboratory Cable-Stayed Bridge Model via an RCP-ARX Model Based Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaelides, P G; Apostolellis, P G; Fassois, S D

    2011-01-01

    Vibration-based damage detection and identification in a laboratory cable-stayed bridge model is addressed under inherent, environmental, and experimental uncertainties. The problem is challenging as conventional stochastic methods face difficulties due to uncertainty underestimation. A novel method is formulated based on identified Random Coefficient Pooled ARX (RCP-ARX) representations of the dynamics and statistical hypothesis testing. The method benefits from the ability of RCP models in properly capturing uncertainty. Its effectiveness is demonstrated via a high number of experiments under a variety of damage scenarios.

  18. Vibration-Based Damage Diagnosis in a Laboratory Cable-Stayed Bridge Model via an RCP-ARX Model Based Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michaelides, P G; Apostolellis, P G; Fassois, S D, E-mail: mixail@mech.upatras.gr, E-mail: fassois@mech.upatras.gr [Laboratory for Stochastic Mechanical Systems and Automation (SMSA), Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, University of Patras, GR 265 00 Patras (Greece)

    2011-07-19

    Vibration-based damage detection and identification in a laboratory cable-stayed bridge model is addressed under inherent, environmental, and experimental uncertainties. The problem is challenging as conventional stochastic methods face difficulties due to uncertainty underestimation. A novel method is formulated based on identified Random Coefficient Pooled ARX (RCP-ARX) representations of the dynamics and statistical hypothesis testing. The method benefits from the ability of RCP models in properly capturing uncertainty. Its effectiveness is demonstrated via a high number of experiments under a variety of damage scenarios.

  19. A LATIN-based model reduction approach for the simulation of cycling damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Mainak; Fau, Amelie; Nackenhorst, Udo; Néron, David; Ladevèze, Pierre

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this article is to introduce a new method including model order reduction for the life prediction of structures subjected to cycling damage. Contrary to classical incremental schemes for damage computation, a non-incremental technique, the LATIN method, is used herein as a solution framework. This approach allows to introduce a PGD model reduction technique which leads to a drastic reduction of the computational cost. The proposed framework is exemplified for structures subjected to cyclic loading, where damage is considered to be isotropic and micro-defect closure effects are taken into account. A difficulty herein for the use of the LATIN method comes from the state laws which can not be transformed into linear relations through an internal variable transformation. A specific treatment of this issue is introduced in this work.

  20. Study on quantitative risk assessment model of the third party damage for natural gas pipelines based on fuzzy comprehensive assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, Zeyang; Liang, Wei; Lin, Yang; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Xue

    2017-01-01

    As an important part of national energy supply system, transmission pipelines for natural gas are possible to cause serious environmental pollution, life and property loss in case of accident. The third party damage is one of the most significant causes for natural gas pipeline system accidents, and it is very important to establish an effective quantitative risk assessment model of the third party damage for reducing the number of gas pipelines operation accidents. Against the third party damage accident has the characteristics such as diversity, complexity and uncertainty, this paper establishes a quantitative risk assessment model of the third party damage based on Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) and Fuzzy Comprehensive Evaluation (FCE). Firstly, risk sources of third party damage should be identified exactly, and the weight of factors could be determined via improved AHP, finally the importance of each factor is calculated by fuzzy comprehensive evaluation model. The results show that the quantitative risk assessment model is suitable for the third party damage of natural gas pipelines and improvement measures could be put forward to avoid accidents based on the importance of each factor. (paper)

  1. An improved Corten-Dolan's model based on damage and stress state effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Huiying; Huang, Hong Zhong; Lv, Zhiqiang; Zuo, Fang Jun; Wang, Hai Kun

    2015-01-01

    The value of exponent d in Corten-Dolan's model is generally considered to be a constant. Nonetheless, the results predicted on the basis of this statement deviate significantly from the real values. In consideration of the effects of damage and stress state on fatigue life prediction, Corten-Dolan's model is improved by redefining the exponent d used in the traditional model. The improved model performs better than the traditional one with respect to the demonstration of a fatigue failure mechanism. Predictions of fatigue life on the basis of investigations into three metallic specimens indicate that the errors caused by the improved model are significantly smaller than those induced by the traditional model. Meanwhile, predictions derived according to the improved model fall into a narrower dispersion zone than those made as per Miner's rule and the traditional model. This finding suggests that the proposed model improves the life prediction accuracy of the other two models. The predictions obtained using the improved Corten-Dolan's model differ slightly from those derived according to a model proposed in previous literature; a few life predictions obtained on the basis of the former are more accurate than those derived according to the latter. Therefore, the improved model proposed in this paper is proven to be rational and reliable given the proven validity of the existing model. Therefore, the improved model can be feasibly and credibly applied to damage accumulation and fatigue life prediction to some extent.

  2. An improved Corten-Dolan's model based on damage and stress state effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Huiying; Huang, Hong Zhong; Lv, Zhiqiang; Zuo, Fang Jun; Wang, Hai Kun [University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu (China)

    2015-08-15

    The value of exponent d in Corten-Dolan's model is generally considered to be a constant. Nonetheless, the results predicted on the basis of this statement deviate significantly from the real values. In consideration of the effects of damage and stress state on fatigue life prediction, Corten-Dolan's model is improved by redefining the exponent d used in the traditional model. The improved model performs better than the traditional one with respect to the demonstration of a fatigue failure mechanism. Predictions of fatigue life on the basis of investigations into three metallic specimens indicate that the errors caused by the improved model are significantly smaller than those induced by the traditional model. Meanwhile, predictions derived according to the improved model fall into a narrower dispersion zone than those made as per Miner's rule and the traditional model. This finding suggests that the proposed model improves the life prediction accuracy of the other two models. The predictions obtained using the improved Corten-Dolan's model differ slightly from those derived according to a model proposed in previous literature; a few life predictions obtained on the basis of the former are more accurate than those derived according to the latter. Therefore, the improved model proposed in this paper is proven to be rational and reliable given the proven validity of the existing model. Therefore, the improved model can be feasibly and credibly applied to damage accumulation and fatigue life prediction to some extent.

  3. 3D constitutive model of anisotropic damage for unidirectional ply based on physical failure mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2010-01-01

    in a computational finite element framework, which is capable of predicting initial failure, subsequent progressive damage up to final collapse. Crack band model and viscous regularization are applied to depress the convergence difficulties associated with strain softening behaviours. To verify the accuracy...

  4. Hydro-Economic based Model of Damage and Loss Analysis of Winongo River Flood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rifki Hardika

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Winongo River experienced considerably high flow that caused overflows along the downstream part of the river and some inundation at the surrounding area. The inundation has reached up to 1 m spread over the Tegalrejo Sub-district of Yogyakarta City and swept two houses. This paper analyses the damage and loss due to the flood by taking into account the hydraulics phenomena and the economic impact at the inundation area. A hydraulics model has been developed to study the flow characteristics during the flood of Winongo River, especially in the river reach in Tegalrejo Sub-district. The hazard-induced damages in the flooded area were identified and the economic impacts were studied. Several related software have been utilized to analyse the damage and loss of the disaster, including the HEC-RAS 5.0, ArcGIS, HEC-GeoRAS and InaSAFE. Through the integration of the characteristics of both flood phenomena and the economic factor, the damage and loss were then analysed and the Average Annual Damage (AAD of approximately IDR 88,750,000,000 was obtained.

  5. Structural Damage Detection using Frequency Response Function Index and Surrogate Model Based on Optimized Extreme Learning Machine Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ghiasi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing surrogate models based on artificial intelligence methods for detecting structural damages has attracted the attention of many researchers in recent decades. In this study, a new kernel based on Littlewood-Paley Wavelet (LPW is proposed for Extreme Learning Machine (ELM algorithm to improve the accuracy of detecting multiple damages in structural systems.  ELM is used as metamodel (surrogate model of exact finite element analysis of structures in order to efficiently reduce the computational cost through updating process. In the proposed two-step method, first a damage index, based on Frequency Response Function (FRF of the structure, is used to identify the location of damages. In the second step, the severity of damages in identified elements is detected using ELM. In order to evaluate the efficacy of ELM, the results obtained from the proposed kernel were compared with other kernels proposed for ELM as well as Least Square Support Vector Machine algorithm. The solved numerical problems indicated that ELM algorithm accuracy in detecting structural damages is increased drastically in case of using LPW kernel.

  6. Repairable-conditionally repairable damage model based on dual Poisson processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, B K; Persson, L M; Edgren, M R; Hedlöf, I; Brahme, A

    2003-09-01

    The advent of intensity-modulated radiation therapy makes it increasingly important to model the response accurately when large volumes of normal tissues are irradiated by controlled graded dose distributions aimed at maximizing tumor cure and minimizing normal tissue toxicity. The cell survival model proposed here is very useful and flexible for accurate description of the response of healthy tissues as well as tumors in classical and truly radiobiologically optimized radiation therapy. The repairable-conditionally repairable (RCR) model distinguishes between two different types of damage, namely the potentially repairable, which may also be lethal, i.e. if unrepaired or misrepaired, and the conditionally repairable, which may be repaired or may lead to apoptosis if it has not been repaired correctly. When potentially repairable damage is being repaired, for example by nonhomologous end joining, conditionally repairable damage may require in addition a high-fidelity correction by homologous repair. The induction of both types of damage is assumed to be described by Poisson statistics. The resultant cell survival expression has the unique ability to fit most experimental data well at low doses (the initial hypersensitive range), intermediate doses (on the shoulder of the survival curve), and high doses (on the quasi-exponential region of the survival curve). The complete Poisson expression can be approximated well by a simple bi-exponential cell survival expression, S(D) = e(-aD) + bDe(-cD), where the first term describes the survival of undamaged cells and the last term represents survival after complete repair of sublethal damage. The bi-exponential expression makes it easy to derive D(0), D(q), n and alpha, beta values to facilitate comparison with classical cell survival models.

  7. Experimental verification of a progressive damage model for composite laminates based on continuum damage mechanics. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Timothy William

    1994-01-01

    Progressive failure is a crucial concern when using laminated composites in structural design. Therefore the ability to model damage and predict the life of laminated composites is vital. The purpose of this research was to experimentally verify the application of the continuum damage model, a progressive failure theory utilizing continuum damage mechanics, to a toughened material system. Damage due to tension-tension fatigue was documented for the IM7/5260 composite laminates. Crack density and delamination surface area were used to calculate matrix cracking and delamination internal state variables, respectively, to predict stiffness loss. A damage dependent finite element code qualitatively predicted trends in transverse matrix cracking, axial splits and local stress-strain distributions for notched quasi-isotropic laminates. The predictions were similar to the experimental data and it was concluded that the continuum damage model provided a good prediction of stiffness loss while qualitatively predicting damage growth in notched laminates.

  8. Model-Based Structural Health Monitoring of Fatigue Damage Test-Bed Specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-15

    the hull welds or notches along component edges are good initial candidates for the hypothetical damage initiation areas. The branching process adds...to it off-center. The base plate and the stiffener plate are rigidly welded by a tungsten inert gas ( TIG ) weld . Three different crack paths...shown in Figure 9(a), an 18 in long stiffener plate has been welded to each of the tested plates with 0.625 in long discrete TIG welds at 5 locations

  9. Damage-Based Time-Dependent Modeling of Paraglacial to Postglacial Progressive Failure of Large Rock Slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Federico; Agliardi, Federico; Amitrano, David; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2018-01-01

    Large alpine rock slopes undergo long-term evolution in paraglacial to postglacial environments. Rock mass weakening and increased permeability associated with the progressive failure of deglaciated slopes promote the development of potentially catastrophic rockslides. We captured the entire life cycle of alpine slopes in one damage-based, time-dependent 2-D model of brittle creep, including deglaciation, damage-dependent fluid occurrence, and rock mass property upscaling. We applied the model to the Spriana rock slope (Central Alps), affected by long-term instability after Last Glacial Maximum and representing an active threat. We simulated the evolution of the slope from glaciated conditions to present day and calibrated the model using site investigation data and available temporal constraints. The model tracks the entire progressive failure path of the slope from deglaciation to rockslide development, without a priori assumptions on shear zone geometry and hydraulic conditions. Complete rockslide differentiation occurs through the transition from dilatant damage to a compacting basal shear zone, accounting for observed hydraulic barrier effects and perched aquifer formation. Our model investigates the mechanical role of deglaciation and damage-controlled fluid distribution in the development of alpine rockslides. The absolute simulated timing of rock slope instability development supports a very long "paraglacial" period of subcritical rock mass damage. After initial damage localization during the Lateglacial, rockslide nucleation initiates soon after the onset of Holocene, whereas full mechanical and hydraulic rockslide differentiation occurs during Mid-Holocene, supporting a key role of long-term damage in the reported occurrence of widespread rockslide clusters of these ages.

  10. A linear model of ductile plastic damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaitre, J.

    1983-01-01

    A three-dimensional model of isotropic ductile plastic damage based on a continuum damage variable on the effective stress concept and on thermodynamics is derived. As shown by experiments on several metals and alloys, the model, integrated in the case of proportional loading, is linear with respect to the accumulated plastic strain and shows a large influence of stress triaxiality [fr

  11. Nonlinear Fatigue Damage Model Based on the Residual Strength Degradation Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongyi, Gao; Zhixiao, Su

    In this paper, a logarithmic expression to describe the residual strength degradation process is developed in order to fatigue test results for normalized carbon steel. The definition and expression of fatigue damage due to symmetrical stress with a constant amplitude are also given. The expression of fatigue damage can also explain the nonlinear properties of fatigue damage. Furthermore, the fatigue damage of structures under random stress is analyzed, and an iterative formula to describe the fatigue damage process is deduced. Finally, an approximate method for evaluating the fatigue life of structures under repeated random stress blocking is presented through various calculation examples.

  12. Multiscale modeling of radiation damage in Fe-based alloys in the fusion environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, B.D.; Odette, G.R.; Marian, J.; Ventelon, L.; Young-Vandersall, J.A.; Zepeda-Ruiz, L.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ferritic alloys represent a technologically important class of candidate materials for fusion first wall and blanket structures. A detailed understanding of the mechanisms of defect accumulation and microstructure evolution, and the corresponding effects on mechanical properties is required to predict their in-service structural performance limits. The physical processes involved in radiation damage, and its effects on mechanical properties, are inherently multiscale and hierarchical, spanning length and time scales from the atomic nucleus to meters and picosecond to decades. In this paper, we present a multiscale modeling methodology to describe radiation effects within the fusion energy environment. Selected results from atomic scale investigation are presented, focusing on (i) the mechanisms of self-interstitial dislocation loop formation with Burgers vector of a in iron relative to vanadium, (ii) helium transport and (iii) the interaction between helium and small self-interstitial clusters in iron, and (iv) dislocation-helium bubble interactions in fcc aluminum

  13. Multivariate pluvial flood damage models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Ootegem, Luc; Verhofstadt, Elsy; Van Herck, Kristine; Creten, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Depth–damage-functions, relating the monetary flood damage to the depth of the inundation, are commonly used in the case of fluvial floods (floods caused by a river overflowing). We construct four multivariate damage models for pluvial floods (caused by extreme rainfall) by differentiating on the one hand between ground floor floods and basement floods and on the other hand between damage to residential buildings and damage to housing contents. We do not only take into account the effect of flood-depth on damage, but also incorporate the effects of non-hazard indicators (building characteristics, behavioural indicators and socio-economic variables). By using a Tobit-estimation technique on identified victims of pluvial floods in Flanders (Belgium), we take into account the effect of cases of reported zero damage. Our results show that the flood depth is an important predictor of damage, but with a diverging impact between ground floor floods and basement floods. Also non-hazard indicators are important. For example being aware of the risk just before the water enters the building reduces content damage considerably, underlining the importance of warning systems and policy in this case of pluvial floods. - Highlights: • Prediction of damage of pluvial floods using also non-hazard information • We include ‘no damage cases’ using a Tobit model. • The damage of flood depth is stronger for ground floor than for basement floods. • Non-hazard indicators are especially important for content damage. • Potential gain of policies that increase awareness of flood risks

  14. Multivariate pluvial flood damage models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Ootegem, Luc [HIVA — University of Louvain (Belgium); SHERPPA — Ghent University (Belgium); Verhofstadt, Elsy [SHERPPA — Ghent University (Belgium); Van Herck, Kristine; Creten, Tom [HIVA — University of Louvain (Belgium)

    2015-09-15

    Depth–damage-functions, relating the monetary flood damage to the depth of the inundation, are commonly used in the case of fluvial floods (floods caused by a river overflowing). We construct four multivariate damage models for pluvial floods (caused by extreme rainfall) by differentiating on the one hand between ground floor floods and basement floods and on the other hand between damage to residential buildings and damage to housing contents. We do not only take into account the effect of flood-depth on damage, but also incorporate the effects of non-hazard indicators (building characteristics, behavioural indicators and socio-economic variables). By using a Tobit-estimation technique on identified victims of pluvial floods in Flanders (Belgium), we take into account the effect of cases of reported zero damage. Our results show that the flood depth is an important predictor of damage, but with a diverging impact between ground floor floods and basement floods. Also non-hazard indicators are important. For example being aware of the risk just before the water enters the building reduces content damage considerably, underlining the importance of warning systems and policy in this case of pluvial floods. - Highlights: • Prediction of damage of pluvial floods using also non-hazard information • We include ‘no damage cases’ using a Tobit model. • The damage of flood depth is stronger for ground floor than for basement floods. • Non-hazard indicators are especially important for content damage. • Potential gain of policies that increase awareness of flood risks.

  15. Characterizing and modeling the pressure- and rate-dependent elastic-plastic-damage behaviors of polypropylene-based polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Pulungan, Ditho Ardiansyah

    2018-02-24

    Polymers in general exhibit pressure- and rate-dependent behavior. Modeling such behavior requires extensive, costly and time-consuming experimental work. Common simplifications may lead to severe inaccuracy when using the model for predicting the failure of structures. Here, we propose a viscoelastic viscoplastic damage model for polypropylene-based polymers. Such a set of constitutive equations can be used to describe the response of polypropylene under various strain-rates and stress-triaxiality conditions. Our model can also be applied to a broad range of thermoplastic polymers. We detail the experimental campaign that is needed to identify every parameter of the model at best. We validated the proposed model by performing 3-point bending tests at different loading speeds, where the load-displacement response of polypropylene beam up to failure was accurately predicted.

  16. Analysis of Proton Induced Material Damage Using the DPA Cross-sections Based on NRT and BCA-MD Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung-O; Roh, Gyuhong; Lee, Byungchul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The level of radiation induced material damage is mainly quantified by using the unit of Displacements Per Atom (DPA), and particularly, the displacement cross-section is used for characterizing/analyzing the radiation damage from incident neutrons and charged particles. Not long ago, the standard Norgett-Robinson-Torrens (NRT) model had been applied to produce the nuclear data due to its simplicity and implementation in commonly used codes, such as NJOY and MCNP codes. However, the evaluations based on NRT model represent the severe disagreement with experimental data and more accurate calculations. Hence, the evaluations with existing and new nuclear data are performed/compared in this study. It is assumed that a high energy proton beam is directly moved to the target, and a series of calculations are performed by using MCNPX code. The proton induced material damage is evaluated by using the displacement cross-sections, and the effect of nuclear data on the evaluation is specifically analyzed with MCNPX code. First, there is significant difference between the nuclear data from existing and new models, and the new evaluated data is generally lower than the existing one. Second, the position of maximum DPA is slightly differed with the position of maximum energy deposition, and the evaluation using new evaluated data is lower about 2 times than the other.

  17. Failure Analysis of a Sheet Metal Blanking Process Based on Damage Coupling Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Y.; Chen, Z. H.; Zang, Y.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, a blanking process of sheet metal is studied by the methods of numerical simulation and experimental observation. The effects of varying technological parameters related to the quality of products are investigated. An elastoplastic constitutive equation accounting for isotropic ductile damage is implemented into the finite element code ABAQUS with a user-defined material subroutine UMAT. The simulations of the damage evolution and ductile fracture in a sheet metal blanking process have been carried out by the FEM. In order to guarantee computation accuracy and avoid numerical divergence during large plastic deformation, a specified remeshing technique is successively applied when severe element distortion occurs. In the simulation, the evolutions of damage at different stage of the blanking process have been evaluated and the distributions of damage obtained from simulation are in proper agreement with the experimental results.

  18. Wave propagation numerical models in damage detection based on the time domain spectral element method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostachowicz, W; Kudela, P

    2010-01-01

    A Spectral Element Method is used for wave propagation modelling. A 3D solid spectral element is derived with shape functions based on Lagrange interpolation and Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre points. This approach is applied for displacement approximation suited for fundamental modes of Lamb waves as well as potential distribution in piezoelectric transducers. The novelty is the model geometry extension from flat to curved elements for application in shell-like structures. Exemplary visualisations of waves excited by the piezoelectric transducers in curved shell structure made of aluminium alloy are presented. Simple signal analysis of wave interaction with crack is performed. The crack is modelled by separation of appropriate nodes between elements. An investigation of influence of the crack length on wave propagation signals is performed. Additionally, some aspects of the spectral element method implementation are discussed.

  19. Model of designating the critical damages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwolińska Bożena

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article consists of two parts which make for an integral body. This article depicts the method of designating the critical damages in accordance with lean maintenance method. Author considered exemplary production system (serial-parallel in which in time Δt appeared a damage on three different objects. Article depicts the mathematical model which enables determination of an indicator called “prioritized digit of the device”. In the developed model there were considered some parameters: production abilities of devices, existence of potential vicarious devices, position of damage in the production stream based on the capacity of operational buffers, time needed to remove the damages and influence of damages to the finalization of customers’ orders – CEF indicator.

  20. Modeling of radiation damage recovery in particle detectors based on GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaubas, E., E-mail: eugenijus.gaubas@ff.vu.lt; Ceponis, T.; Pavlov, J.

    2015-12-15

    The pulsed characteristics of the capacitor-type and PIN diode type detectors based on GaN have been simulated using the dynamic and drift–diffusion models. The drift–diffusion current simulations have been implemented by employing the commercial software package Synopsys TCAD Sentaurus. The bipolar drift regime has been analyzed. The possible internal gain in charge collection through carrier multiplication processes determined by impact ionization has been considered in order to compensate carrier lifetime reduction due to radiation defects introduced into GaN material of detector.

  1. Improving Flood Damage Assessment Models in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadio, M.; Mysiak, J.; Carrera, L.; Koks, E.

    2015-12-01

    The use of Stage-Damage Curve (SDC) models is prevalent in ex-ante assessments of flood risk. To assess the potential damage of a flood event, SDCs describe a relation between water depth and the associated potential economic damage over land use. This relation is normally developed and calibrated through site-specific analysis based on ex-post damage observations. In some cases (e.g. Italy) SDCs are transferred from other countries, undermining the accuracy and reliability of simulation results. Against this background, we developed a refined SDC model for Northern Italy, underpinned by damage compensation records from a recent flood event. Our analysis considers both damage to physical assets and production losses from business interruptions. While the first is calculated based on land use information, production losses are measured through the spatial distribution of Gross Value Added (GVA). An additional component of the model assesses crop-specific agricultural losses as a function of flood seasonality. Our results show an overestimation of asset damage from non-calibrated SDC values up to a factor of 4.5 for tested land use categories. Furthermore, we estimate that production losses amount to around 6 per cent of the annual GVA. Also, maximum yield losses are less than a half of the amount predicted by the standard SDC methods.

  2. Quasi-brittle damage modeling based on incremental energy relaxation combined with a viscous-type regularization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenfeld, K.; Junker, P.; Mosler, J.

    2018-05-01

    This paper deals with a constitutive model suitable for the analysis of quasi-brittle damage in structures. The model is based on incremental energy relaxation combined with a viscous-type regularization. A similar approach—which also represents the inspiration for the improved model presented in this paper—was recently proposed in Junker et al. (Contin Mech Thermodyn 29(1):291-310, 2017). Within this work, the model introduced in Junker et al. (2017) is critically analyzed first. This analysis leads to an improved model which shows the same features as that in Junker et al. (2017), but which (i) eliminates unnecessary model parameters, (ii) can be better interpreted from a physics point of view, (iii) can capture a fully softened state (zero stresses), and (iv) is characterized by a very simple evolution equation. In contrast to the cited work, this evolution equation is (v) integrated fully implicitly and (vi) the resulting time-discrete evolution equation can be solved analytically providing a numerically efficient closed-form solution. It is shown that the final model is indeed well-posed (i.e., its tangent is positive definite). Explicit conditions guaranteeing this well-posedness are derived. Furthermore, by additively decomposing the stress rate into deformation- and purely time-dependent terms, the functionality of the model is explained. Illustrative numerical examples confirm the theoretical findings.

  3. A Coupled Plastic Damage Model for Concrete considering the Effect of Damage on Plastic Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Feng; Cheng, Guangxu

    2015-01-01

    A coupled plastic damage model with two damage scalars is proposed to describe the nonlinear features of concrete. The constitutive formulations are developed by assuming that damage can be represented effectively in the material compliance tensor. Damage evolution law and plastic damage coupling are described using the framework of irreversible thermodynamics. The plasticity part is developed without using the effective stress concept. A plastic yield function based on the true stress is ado...

  4. Knowledge-Based Energy Damage Model for Evaluating Industrialised Building Systems (IBS Occupational Health and Safety (OHS Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abas Nor Haslinda

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaysia’s construction industry has been long considered hazardous, owing to its poor health and safety record. It is proposed that one of the ways to improve safety and health in the construction industry is through the implementation of ‘off-site’ systems, commonly termed ‘industrialised building systems (IBS’ in Malaysia. This is deemed safer based on the risk concept of reduced exposure, brought about by the reduction in onsite workers; however, no method yet exists for determining the relative safety of various construction methods, including IBS. This study presents a comparative evaluation of the occupational health and safety (OHS risk presented by different construction approaches, namely IBS and traditional methods. The evaluation involved developing a model based on the concept of ‘argumentation theory’, which helps construction designers integrate the management of OHS risk into the design process. In addition, an ‘energy damage model’ was used as an underpinning framework. Development of the model was achieved through three phases, namely Phase I – knowledge acquisitaion, Phase II – argument trees mapping, and Phase III – validation of the model. The research revealed that different approaches/methods of construction projects carried a different level of energy damage, depending on how the activities were carried out. A study of the way in which the risks change from one construction process to another shows that there is a difference in the profile of OHS risk between IBS construction and traditional methods.Therefore, whether the option is an IBS or traditional approach, the fundamental idea of the model is to motivate construction designers or decision-makers to address safety in the design process and encourage them to examine carefully the probable OHS risk variables surrounding an action, thus preventing accidents in construction.

  5. Application of a Microstructure-Based ISV Plasticity Damage Model to Study Penetration Mechanics of Metals and Validation through Penetration Study of Aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangqing Dou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A developed microstructure-based internal state variable (ISV plasticity damage model is for the first time used for simulating penetration mechanics of aluminum to find out its penetration properties. The ISV damage model tries to explain the interplay between physics at different length scales that governs the failure and damage mechanisms of materials by linking the macroscopic failure and damage behavior of the materials with their micromechanical performance, such as void nucleation, growth, and coalescence. Within the continuum modeling framework, microstructural features of materials are represented using a set of ISVs, and rate equations are employed to depict damage history and evolution of the materials. For experimental calibration of this damage model, compression, tension, and torsion straining conditions are considered to distinguish damage evolutions under different stress states. To demonstrate the reliability of the presented ISV model, that model is applied for studying penetration mechanics of aluminum and the numerical results are validated by comparing with simulation results yielded from the Johnson-Cook model as well as analytical results calculated from an existing theoretical model.

  6. Modeling laser damage to the retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Clifton D.

    This dissertation presents recent progress in several areas related to modeling laser damage to the retina. In Chapter 3, we consider the consequences of using the Arrhenius damage model to predict the damage thresholds of multiple pulse, or repetitive pulse, exposures. We have identified a few fundamental trends associated with the multiple pulse damage predictions made by the Arrhenius model. These trends differ from what would be expected by non-thermal mechanisms, and could prove useful in differentiating thermal and non-thermal damage. Chapter 4 presents a new rate equation damage model hypothesized to describe photochemical damage. The model adds a temperature dependent term to the simple rate equation implied by the principle of reciprocity that is characteristic of photochemical damage thresholds. A recent damage threshold study, conducted in-vitro, has revealed a very sharp transition between thermal and photochemical damage threshold trends. For the wavelength used in the experiment (413 nm), thermal damage thresholds were observed at exposure levels that were twice the expected photochemical damage threshold, based on the traditional understanding of photochemical damage. Our model accounts for this observed trend by introducing a temperature dependent quenching, or repair, rate to the photochemical damage rate. For long exposures that give a very small temperature rise, the model reduces to the principle of reciprocity. Near the transition region between thermal and photochemical damage, the model allows the damage threshold to be set by thermal mechanisms, even at exposure above the reciprocity exposure. In Chapter 5, we describe a retina damage model that includes thermal lensing in the eye by coupling beam propagation and heat transfer models together. Thermal lensing has recently been suggested as a contributing factor to the large increase in measured retinal damage thresholds in the near infrared. The transmission of the vitreous decreases

  7. Damage estimation of subterranean building constructions due to groundwater inundation – the GIS-based model approach GRUWAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Schinke

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The analysis and management of flood risk commonly focuses on surface water floods, because these types are often associated with high economic losses due to damage to buildings and settlements. The rising groundwater as a secondary effect of these floods induces additional damage, particularly in the basements of buildings. Mostly, these losses remain underestimated, because they are difficult to assess, especially for the entire building stock of flood-prone urban areas. For this purpose an appropriate methodology has been developed and lead to a groundwater damage simulation model named GRUWAD. The overall methodology combines various engineering and geoinformatic methods to calculate major damage processes by high groundwater levels. It considers a classification of buildings by building types, synthetic depth-damage functions for groundwater inundation as well as the results of a groundwater-flow model. The modular structure of this procedure can be adapted in the level of detail. Hence, the model allows damage calculations from the local to the regional scale. Among others it can be used to prepare risk maps, for ex-ante analysis of future risks, and to simulate the effects of mitigation measures. Therefore, the model is a multifarious tool for determining urban resilience with respect to high groundwater levels.

  8. A new incomplete-repair model based on a ''reciprocal-time'' pattern of sublethal damage repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dale, R.G.; Fowler, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    A radiobiological model for closely spaced non-instantaneous radiation fractions is presented, based on the premise that the time process of sublethal damage (SLD) repair is 'reciprocal-time' (second order), rather than exponential (first order), in form. The initial clinical implications of such an incomplete-repair model are assessed. A previously derived linear-quadratic-based model was revised to take account of the possibility that SLD may repair with time such that the fraction of an element of initial damage remaining at time t is given as 1/(1+zt), where z is an appropriate rate constant; z is the reciprocal of the first half-time (τ) of repair. The general equation so derived for incomplete repair is applicable to all types of radiotherapy delivered at high, low and medium dose-rate in fractions delivered at regular time intervals. The model allows both the fraction duration and interfraction intervals to vary between zero and infinity. For any given value of z, reciprocal repair is associated with an apparent 'slowing-down' in the SLD repair rate as treatment proceeds. The instantaneous repair rates are not directly governed by total dose or dose per fraction, but are influenced by the treatment duration and individual fraction duration. Instantaneous repair rates of SLD appear to be slower towards the end of a continuous treatment, and are also slower following 'long' fractions than they are following 'short' fractions. The new model, with its single repair-rate parameter, is shown to be capable of providing a degree of quantitative explanation for some enigmas that have been encountered in clinical studies. A single-component reciprocal repair process provides an alternative explanation for the apparent existence of a range of repair rates in human tissues, and which have hitherto been explained by postulating the existence of a multi-exponential repair process. The build-up of SLD over extended treatments is greater than would be inferred using a

  9. Damage Model of Reinforced Concrete Members under Cyclic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bo Chen; Zhang, Jing Shu; Zhang, Yin Hua; Zhou, Jia Lai

    2018-06-01

    Based on the Kumar damage model, a new damage model for reinforced concrete members is established in this paper. According to the damage characteristics of reinforced concrete members subjected to cyclic loading, four judgment conditions for determining the rationality of damage models are put forward. An ideal damage index (D) is supposed to vary within a scale of zero (no damage) to one (collapse). D should be a monotone increasing function which tends to increase in the case of the same displacement amplitude. As for members under large displacement amplitude loading, the growth rate of D should be greater than that of D under small amplitude displacement loading. Subsequently, the Park-Ang damage model, the Niu-Ren damage model, the Lu-Wang damage model and the proposed damage model are analyzed for 30 experimental reinforced concrete members, including slabs, walls, beams and columns. The results show that current damage models do not fully matches the reasonable judgment conditions, but the proposed damage model does. Therefore, a conclusion can be drawn that the proposed damage model can be used for evaluating and predicting damage performance of RC members under cyclic loading.

  10. Experiment-based modelling of hardening and localized plasticity in metals irradiated under cascade damage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.N.; Ghoniem, N.M.; Trinkaus, H.

    2002-01-01

    The analysis of the available experimental observations shows that the occurrence of a sudden yield drop and the associated plastic flow localization are the major concerns regarding the performance and lifetime of materials exposed to fission or fusion neutrons. In the light of the known mechanical properties and microstructures of the as-irradiated and irradiated and deformed materials, it has been argued that the increase in the upper yield stress, the sudden yield drop and the initiation of plastic flow localization, can be rationalized in terms of the cascade induced source hardening (CISH) model. Various aspects of the model (main assumptions and predictions) have been investigated using analytical calculations, 3-D dislocation dynamics and molecular dynamics simulations. The main results and conclusions are briefly summarized. Finally, it is pointed out that even though the formation of cleared channels may be rationalized in terms of climb-controlled glide of the source dislocation, a number of problems regarding the initiation and the evolution of these channels remain unsolved

  11. Experiment-based modelling of hardening and localized plasticity in metals irradiated under cascade damage conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, B.N. E-mail: bachu.singh@risoe.dk; Ghoniem, N.M.; Trinkaus, H

    2002-12-01

    The analysis of the available experimental observations shows that the occurrence of a sudden yield drop and the associated plastic flow localization are the major concerns regarding the performance and lifetime of materials exposed to fission or fusion neutrons. In the light of the known mechanical properties and microstructures of the as-irradiated and irradiated and deformed materials, it has been argued that the increase in the upper yield stress, the sudden yield drop and the initiation of plastic flow localization, can be rationalized in terms of the cascade induced source hardening (CISH) model. Various aspects of the model (main assumptions and predictions) have been investigated using analytical calculations, 3-D dislocation dynamics and molecular dynamics simulations. The main results and conclusions are briefly summarized. Finally, it is pointed out that even though the formation of cleared channels may be rationalized in terms of climb-controlled glide of the source dislocation, a number of problems regarding the initiation and the evolution of these channels remain unsolved.

  12. Damage-based life prediction model for uniaxial low-cycle stress fatigue of super-elastic NiTi shape memory alloy microtubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Di; Kang, Guozheng; Kan, Qianhua; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2015-08-01

    Based on the experimental observations for the uniaxial low-cycle stress fatigue failure of super-elastic NiTi shape memory alloy microtubes (Song et al 2015 Smart Mater. Struct. 24 075004) and a new definition of damage variable corresponding to the variation of accumulated dissipation energy, a phenomenological damage model is proposed to describe the damage evolution of the NiTi microtubes during cyclic loading. Then, with a failure criterion of Dc = 1, the fatigue lives of the NiTi microtubes are predicted by the damage-based model, the predicted lives are in good agreement with the experimental ones, and all of the points are located within an error band of 1.5 times.

  13. Damage-based life prediction model for uniaxial low-cycle stress fatigue of super-elastic NiTi shape memory alloy microtubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Di; Kang, Guozheng; Kan, Qianhua; Yu, Chao; Zhang, Chuanzeng

    2015-01-01

    Based on the experimental observations for the uniaxial low-cycle stress fatigue failure of super-elastic NiTi shape memory alloy microtubes (Song et al 2015 Smart Mater. Struct. 24 075004) and a new definition of damage variable corresponding to the variation of accumulated dissipation energy, a phenomenological damage model is proposed to describe the damage evolution of the NiTi microtubes during cyclic loading. Then, with a failure criterion of D c = 1, the fatigue lives of the NiTi microtubes are predicted by the damage-based model, the predicted lives are in good agreement with the experimental ones, and all of the points are located within an error band of 1.5 times. (paper)

  14. Achilles tendons from decorin- and biglycan-null mouse models have inferior mechanical and structural properties predicted by an image-based empirical damage model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, J A; Freedman, B R; Zuskov, A; Iozzo, R V; Birk, D E; Soslowsky, L J

    2015-07-16

    Achilles tendons are a common source of pain and injury, and their pathology may originate from aberrant structure function relationships. Small leucine rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) influence mechanical and structural properties in a tendon-specific manner. However, their roles in the Achilles tendon have not been defined. The objective of this study was to evaluate the mechanical and structural differences observed in mouse Achilles tendons lacking class I SLRPs; either decorin or biglycan. In addition, empirical modeling techniques based on mechanical and image-based measures were employed. Achilles tendons from decorin-null (Dcn(-/-)) and biglycan-null (Bgn(-/-)) C57BL/6 female mice (N=102) were used. Each tendon underwent a dynamic mechanical testing protocol including simultaneous polarized light image capture to evaluate both structural and mechanical properties of each Achilles tendon. An empirical damage model was adapted for application to genetic variation and for use with image based structural properties to predict tendon dynamic mechanical properties. We found that Achilles tendons lacking decorin and biglycan had inferior mechanical and structural properties that were age dependent; and that simple empirical models, based on previously described damage models, were predictive of Achilles tendon dynamic modulus in both decorin- and biglycan-null mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Three-dimensional temperature effect modelling of piezoceramic transducers used for Lamb wave based damage detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kijanka, Piotr; Packo, Pawel; Staszewski, Wieslaw J; Zhu, Xuan; Di Scalea, Francesco Lanza

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a three-dimensional temperature-dependent model of surface-bonded, low-profile piezoceramic transducers (PZT) used for Lamb wave propagation. The effect of temperature on Lamb wave actuation, propagation and sensing is investigated. The major focus is on the study of actuation and sensing properties of PZT for various temperature levels. These properties are investigated through the electric field analysis of transducers. The temperature effect on transducer bond layers is also investigated. Numerically simulated amplitude responses are analysed for various temperatures and excitation frequencies. Numerical simulations are validated experimentally. The results demonstrate that temperature-dependent physical properties of PZT, bond layers and particularly host structures significantly affect the amplitude and phase of Lamb wave responses. (paper)

  16. Intra-articular TSG-6 delivery from heparin-based microparticles reduces cartilage damage in a rat model of osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellier, Liane E; Treviño, Elda A; Brimeyer, Alexandra L; Reece, David S; Willett, Nick J; Guldberg, Robert E; Temenoff, Johnna S

    2018-05-01

    As a potential treatment for osteoarthritis (OA), we have developed injectable and hydrolytically degradable heparin-based biomaterials with tunable sulfation for the intra-articular delivery of tumor necrosis factor-alpha stimulated gene-6 (TSG-6), a protein known to inhibit plasmin which may degrade extracellular matrix within OA joints. We first assessed the effect of heparin sulfation on TSG-6 anti-plasmin activity and found that while fully sulfated (Hep) and heparin desulfated at only the N position (Hep-N) significantly enhanced TSG-6 bioactivity in vitro, fully desulfated heparin (Hep-) had no effect, indicating that heparin sulfation plays a significant role in modulating TSG-6 bioactivity. Next, TSG-6 loaded, degradable 10 wt% Hep-N microparticles (MPs) were delivered via intra-articular injection into the knee at 1, 7, and 15 days following medial meniscal transection (MMT) injury in a rat model. After 21 days, cartilage thickness, volume, and attenuation were significantly increased with soluble TSG-6, indicating degenerative changes. In contrast, no significant differences were observed with TSG-6 loaded MP treatment, demonstrating that TSG-6 loaded MPs reduced cartilage damage following MMT injury. Ultimately, our results indicate that Hep-N can enhance TSG-6 anti-plasmin activity and that Hep-N-based biomaterials may be an effective method for TSG-6 delivery to treat OA.

  17. Simulation of Intergranular Ductile Cracking in β Titanium Alloys Based on a Micro-Mechanical Damage Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Li, Jinshan; Tang, Bin; Fan, Jiangkun; Yuan, Huang

    2017-10-30

    The intergranular crack propagation of the lamellar structure β titanium alloys is investigated by using a modified Gurson-type damage model. The representative microstructure of the lamellar alloy, which consists of the soft α phase layer surrounding the hard grain interiors, is generated based on an advanced Voronoi algorithm. Both the normal fracture due to void growth and the shear fracture associated with void shearing are considered for the grain boundary α layer. The individual phase properties are determined according to the experimental nanoindentation result and the macroscopic stress-strain curve from a uni-axial tensile test. The effects of the strain hardening exponent of the grain interiors and the void shearing mechanism of the grain boundary α layer on fracture toughness and the intergranular crack growth behavior are emphatically studied. The computational predictions indicate that fracture toughness can be increased with increasing the strain hardening ability of the grain interiors and void shearing can be deleterious to fracture toughness. Based on the current simulation technique, qualitative understanding of relationships between the individual phase features and the fracture toughness of the lamellar alloys can be obtained, which provides useful suggestions to the heat treatment process of the β titanium alloys.

  18. Numerical Modelling and Damage Assessment of Rotary Wing Aircraft Cabin Door Using Continuum Damage Mechanics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyina, Gangadhara Rao T.; Rayavarapu, Vijaya Kumar; V. V., Subba Rao

    2017-02-01

    The prediction of ultimate strength remains the main challenge in the simulation of the mechanical response of composite structures. This paper examines continuum damage model to predict the strength and size effects for deformation and failure response of polymer composite laminates when subjected to complex state of stress. The paper also considers how the overall results of the exercise can be applied in design applications. The continuum damage model is described and the resulting prediction of size effects are compared against the standard benchmark solutions. The stress analysis for strength prediction of rotary wing aircraft cabin door is carried out. The goal of this study is to extend the proposed continuum damage model such that it can be accurately predict the failure around stress concentration regions. The finite element-based continuum damage mechanics model can be applied to the structures and components of arbitrary configurations where analytical solutions could not be developed.

  19. Damage Models for Soft Tissues: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenguang

    Damage to soft tissues in the human body has been investigated for applications in healthcare, sports, and biomedical engineering. This paper reviews and classifies damage models for soft tissues to summarize achievements, identify new directions, and facilitate finite element analysis. The main ideas of damage modeling methods are illustrated and interpreted. A few key issues related to damage models, such as experimental data curve-fitting, computational effort, connection between damage and fractures/cracks, damage model applications, and fracture/crack extension simulation, are discussed. Several new challenges in the field are identified and outlined. This review can be useful for developing more advanced damage models and extending damage modeling methods to a variety of soft tissues.

  20. Microstructural modeling of Vienne granite damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homand, F.; Hoxha, D.

    2002-01-01

    The microstructural approach in damage modeling, which is presented in this paper describes the evolution of micro-crack geometry as a function of history loading. If the crack geometry is known, the effective properties could then be calculated foe any cracked rock by the mean of a micro-mechanical model. The P L evolution law which is necessary in the describing of crack geometry evolution is hardly based on the crack microscope observation as well as on the theory of fabric tensors. This approach is applied in the modeling of mechanical behaviour of Vienne granite. The result of model simulations are compared with laboratory tests. (author)

  1. Modeling the damage of welded steel, using the GTN model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Ahmar Kadi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our work is the modeling of the damage in the weld metal according to the finite element method and the concepts of fracture mechanics based on local approaches using the code ABAQUS calculates. The use of the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model axisymmetric specimens AE type to three different zones (Base metal, molten metal and heat affected Zone with four levels of triaxiality (AE2, AE4, AE10 and AE80, we have used to model the behavior of damage to welded steel, which is described as being due to the growth and coalescence of cavities with high rates of triaxiality

  2. Fatigue and damage tolerance scatter models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raikher, Veniamin L.

    1994-09-01

    Effective Total Fatigue Life and Crack Growth Scatter Models are proposed. The first of them is based on the power form of the Wohler curve, fatigue scatter dependence on mean life value, cycle stress ratio influence on fatigue scatter, and validated description of the mean stress influence on the mean fatigue life. The second uses in addition are fracture mechanics approach, assumption of initial damage existence, and Paris equation. Simple formulas are derived for configurations of models. A preliminary identification of the parameters of the models is fulfilled on the basis of experimental data. Some new and important results for fatigue and crack growth scatter characteristics are obtained.

  3. Experimental Damage Identification of a Model Reticulated Shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The damage identification of a reticulated shell is a challenging task, facing various difficulties, such as the large number of degrees of freedom (DOFs, the phenomenon of modal localization and transition, and low modeling accuracy. Based on structural vibration responses, the damage identification of a reticulated shell was studied. At first, the auto-regressive (AR time series model was established based on the acceleration responses of the reticulated shell. According to the changes in the coefficients of the AR model between the damaged conditions and the undamaged condition, the damage of the reticulated shell can be detected. In addition, the damage sensitive factors were determined based on the coefficients of the AR model. With the damage sensitive factors as the inputs and the damage positions as the outputs, back-propagation neural networks (BPNNs were then established and were trained using the Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm (L–M algorithm. The locations of the damages can be predicted by the back-propagation neural networks. At last, according to the experimental scheme of single-point excitation and multi-point responses, the impact experiments on a K6 shell model with a scale of 1/10 were conducted. The experimental results verified the efficiency of the proposed damage identification method based on the AR time series model and back-propagation neural networks. The proposed damage identification method can ensure the safety of the practical engineering to some extent.

  4. GPU-based local interaction simulation approach for simplified temperature effect modelling in Lamb wave propagation used for damage detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kijanka, P; Radecki, R; Packo, P; Staszewski, W J; Uhl, T

    2013-01-01

    Temperature has a significant effect on Lamb wave propagation. It is important to compensate for this effect when the method is considered for structural damage detection. The paper explores a newly proposed, very efficient numerical simulation tool for Lamb wave propagation modelling in aluminum plates exposed to temperature changes. A local interaction approach implemented with a parallel computing architecture and graphics cards is used for these numerical simulations. The numerical results are compared with the experimental data. The results demonstrate that the proposed approach could be used efficiently to produce a large database required for the development of various temperature compensation procedures in structural health monitoring applications. (paper)

  5. A nonlinear CDM based damage growth law for ductile materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Abhinav; Priya Ajit, K.; Sarkar, Prabir Kumar

    2018-02-01

    A nonlinear ductile damage growth criterion is proposed based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) approach. The model is derived in the framework of thermodynamically consistent CDM assuming damage to be isotropic. In this study, the damage dissipation potential is also derived to be a function of varying strain hardening exponent in addition to damage strain energy release rate density. Uniaxial tensile tests and load-unload-cyclic tensile tests for AISI 1020 steel, AISI 1030 steel and Al 2024 aluminum alloy are considered for the determination of their respective damage variable D and other parameters required for the model(s). The experimental results are very closely predicted, with a deviation of 0%-3%, by the proposed model for each of the materials. The model is also tested with predictabilities of damage growth by other models in the literature. Present model detects the state of damage quantitatively at any level of plastic strain and uses simpler material tests to find the parameters of the model. So, it should be useful in metal forming industries to assess the damage growth for the desired deformation level a priori. The superiority of the new model is clarified by the deviations in the predictability of test results by other models.

  6. Lamb wave-based damage quantification and probability of detection modeling for fatigue life assessment of riveted lap joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jingjing; Wang, Dengjiang; Zhang, Weifang

    2015-03-01

    This study presents an experimental and modeling study for damage detection and quantification in riveted lap joints. Embedded lead zirconate titanate piezoelectric (PZT) ceramic wafer-type sensors are employed to perform in-situ non-destructive testing during fatigue cyclical loading. A multi-feature integration method is developed to quantify the crack size using signal features of correlation coefficient, amplitude change, and phase change. In addition, probability of detection (POD) model is constructed to quantify the reliability of the developed sizing method. Using the developed crack size quantification method and the resulting POD curve, probabilistic fatigue life prediction can be performed to provide comprehensive information for decision-making. The effectiveness of the overall methodology is demonstrated and validated using several aircraft lap joint specimens from different manufactures and under different loading conditions.

  7. Model of designating the critical damages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwolińska Bożena

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Managing company in the lean way presumes no breakdowns nor reserves in the whole delivery chain. However, achieving such low indicators is impossible. That is why in some production plants it is extremely important to focus on preventive actions which can limit damages. This article depicts the method of designating the critical damages in accordance with lean maintenance method. The article consists of two parts which make for an integral body. Part one depicts the characteristic of a realistic object, it also contains productions capabilities analysis of certain areas within the production structure. Part two depicts the probabilistic model of shaping maximal time loss basing on emptying and filling interoperational buffers.

  8. [Depersonalization syndrome after acquired brain damage. Overview based on 3 case reports and the literature and discussion of etiological models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulig, M; Böttger, S; Sommer, M; Prosiegel, M

    1998-12-01

    Depersonalization after brain damage is still only rarely reported and poorly understood. We describe three patients between the ages of 21 and 25 who experienced depersonalization and derealization for periods of 6 weeks to 4 months, two after traumatic brain injury, the third after surgical and radiation treatment of a pineocytoma. Each one believed to be living in a nightmare and thought about committing suicide in order to wake up. One patient developed symptoms as described in Cotard delusion. Aspects of neuroanatomy, psychodynamics, and anthropology are discussed with reference to the literature. Frontal and temporal lesions seem only to play a facilitating role but not to be a necessary condition. There is evidence for additional influence of psychological and premorbid personality factors. Summarizing the current state of information we consider depersonalization with the experience of being in a dream or being dead as a heuristic reaction to brain damage. Similar models have already been discussed in neuropsychological disorders as for instance reduplicative paramnesias, neglect, and anosognosia.

  9. Probabilistic structural damage identification based on vibration data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao, H.; Xia, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Vibration-based methods are being rapidly developed and applied to detect structural damage in civil, mechanical and aerospace engineering communities in the last two decades. But uncertainties existing in the structural model and measured vibration data might lead to unreliable results. This paper will present some recent research results to tackle the above mentioned uncertainty problems. By assuming each of the FE model parameters and measured vibration data as a normally distributed random variable, a probabilistic damage detection procedure is developed based on perturbation method and validated by Monte Carlo simulation technique. With this technique, the damage probability of each structural element can be determined. The method developed has been verified by applying it to identify the damages of laboratory tested structures. It was proven that, as compared to the deterministic damage identification method, the present method can not only reduce the possibility of false identification, but also give the identification results in terms of probability. which is deemed more realistic and practical in detecting possible damages in a structure. It has also been found that the modal data included in damage identification analysis have a great influence on the identification results. With a sensitivity study, an optimal measurement set for damage detection is determined. This set includes the optimal measurement locations and the most appropriate modes that should be used in the damage identification analysis. Numerical results indicated that if the optimal set determined in a pre-analysis is used in the damage detection better results will be achieved. (author)

  10. Signal-based nonlinear modelling for damage assessment under variable temperature conditions by means of acousto-ultrasonics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torres-Arredondo, M. -A.; Sierra-Perez, Julian; Tibaduiza, D. -A.

    2015-01-01

    Damage assessment can be considered as the main task within the context of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems. This task is not only confined to the detection of damages in its basic algorithms but also in the generation of early warnings to prevent possible catastrophes in the daily use...

  11. Probabilistic flood damage modelling at the meso-scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreibich, Heidi; Botto, Anna; Schröter, Kai; Merz, Bruno

    2014-05-01

    Decisions on flood risk management and adaptation are usually based on risk analyses. Such analyses are associated with significant uncertainty, even more if changes in risk due to global change are expected. Although uncertainty analysis and probabilistic approaches have received increased attention during the last years, they are still not standard practice for flood risk assessments. Most damage models have in common that complex damaging processes are described by simple, deterministic approaches like stage-damage functions. Novel probabilistic, multi-variate flood damage models have been developed and validated on the micro-scale using a data-mining approach, namely bagging decision trees (Merz et al. 2013). In this presentation we show how the model BT-FLEMO (Bagging decision Tree based Flood Loss Estimation MOdel) can be applied on the meso-scale, namely on the basis of ATKIS land-use units. The model is applied in 19 municipalities which were affected during the 2002 flood by the River Mulde in Saxony, Germany. The application of BT-FLEMO provides a probability distribution of estimated damage to residential buildings per municipality. Validation is undertaken on the one hand via a comparison with eight other damage models including stage-damage functions as well as multi-variate models. On the other hand the results are compared with official damage data provided by the Saxon Relief Bank (SAB). The results show, that uncertainties of damage estimation remain high. Thus, the significant advantage of this probabilistic flood loss estimation model BT-FLEMO is that it inherently provides quantitative information about the uncertainty of the prediction. Reference: Merz, B.; Kreibich, H.; Lall, U. (2013): Multi-variate flood damage assessment: a tree-based data-mining approach. NHESS, 13(1), 53-64.

  12. A Plastic Damage Mechanics Model for Engineered Cementitious Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Lars; Stang, Henrik; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the establishment of a plasticity-based damage mechanics model for Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECC). The present model differs from existing models by combining a matrix and fiber description in order to describe the behavior of the ECC material. The model provides...

  13. Foam-on-Tile Damage Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koharchik, Michael; Murphy, Lindsay; Parker, Paul

    2012-01-01

    An impact model was developed to predict how three specific foam types would damage the Space Shuttle Orbiter insulating tiles. The inputs needed for the model are the foam type, the foam mass, the foam impact velocity, the foam impact incident angle, the type being impacted, and whether the tile is new or aged (has flown at least one mission). The model will determine if the foam impact will cause damage to the tile. If it can cause damage, the model will output the damage cavity dimensions (length, depth, entry angle, exit angle, and sidewall angles). It makes the calculations as soon as the inputs are entered (less than 1 second). The model allows for the rapid calculation of numerous scenarios in a short time. The model was developed from engineering principles coupled with significant impact testing (over 800 foam impact tests). This model is applicable to masses ranging from 0.0002 up to 0.4 pound (0.09 up to 181 g). A prior tool performed a similar function, but was limited to the assessment of a small range of masses and did not have the large test database for verification. In addition, the prior model did not provide outputs of the cavity damage length, entry angle, exit angle, or sidewall angles.

  14. 3D random Voronoi grain-based models for simulation of brittle rock damage and fabric-guided micro-fracturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ghazvinian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A grain-based distinct element model featuring three-dimensional (3D Voronoi tessellations (random poly-crystals is proposed for simulation of crack damage development in brittle rocks. The grain boundaries in poly-crystal structure produced by Voronoi tessellations can represent flaws in intact rock and allow for numerical replication of crack damage progression through initiation and propagation of micro-fractures along grain boundaries. The Voronoi modelling scheme has been used widely in the past for brittle fracture simulation of rock materials. However the difficulty of generating 3D Voronoi models has limited its application to two-dimensional (2D codes. The proposed approach is implemented in Neper, an open-source engine for generation of 3D Voronoi grains, to generate block geometry files that can be read directly into 3DEC. A series of Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS tests are simulated in 3DEC to verify the proposed methodology for 3D simulation of brittle fractures and to investigate the relationship between each micro-parameter and the model's macro-response. The possibility of numerical replication of the classical U-shape strength curve for anisotropic rocks is also investigated in numerical UCS tests by using complex-shaped (elongated grains that are cemented to one another along their adjoining sides. A micro-parameter calibration procedure is established for 3D Voronoi models for accurate replication of the mechanical behaviour of isotropic and anisotropic (containing a fabric rocks.

  15. Modelling of Damage During Hot Forging of Ingots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Bay, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Ductile damage modelling in the ingot forging process is discussed. Advantages and disadvantages of both coupled and uncoupled ductile damage models are presented. Some uncoupled damage models are examined in greater detail regarding their applicability to different processes, where hydrostatic...

  16. Molecular Data for a Biochemical Model of DNA Radiation Damage: Electron Impact Ionization and Dissociative Ionization of DNA Bases and Sugar-Phosphate Backbone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dateo, Christopher E.; Fletcher, Graham D.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the database for building up a biochemical model of DNA radiation damage, electron impact ionization cross sections of sugar-phosphate backbone and DNA bases have been calculated using the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) model. It is found that the total ionization cross sections of C3'- and C5'-deoxyribose-phospate, two conformers of the sugar-phosphate backbone, are close to each other. Furthermore, the sum of the ionization cross sections of the separate deoxyribose and phosphate fragments is in close agreement with the C3'- and C5'-deoxyribose-phospate cross sections, differing by less than 10%. Of the four DNA bases, the ionization cross section of guanine is the largest, then in decreasing order, adenine, thymine, and cytosine. The order is in accordance with the known propensity of oxidation of the bases by ionizing radiation. Dissociative ionization (DI), a process that both ionizes and dissociates a molecule, is investigated for cytosine. The DI cross section for the formation of H and (cytosine-Hl)(+), with the cytosine ion losing H at the 1 position, is also reported. The threshold of this process is calculated to be 17.1 eV. Detailed analysis of ionization products such as in DI is important to trace the sequential steps in the biochemical process of DNA damage.

  17. Molecular data for a biochemical model of DNA damage: Electron impact ionization and dissociative ionization cross sections of DNA bases and sugar-phosphate backbone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Fletcher, Graham D.

    2006-01-01

    As part of the database for building up a biochemical model of DNA radiation damage, electron impact ionization cross sections of sugar-phosphate backbone and DNA bases have been calculated using the improved binary-encounter dipole (iBED) model. It is found that the total ionization cross sections of C 3 ' - and C 5 ' -deoxyribose-phosphate, two conformers of the sugar-phosphate backbone, are close to each other. Furthermore, the sum of the ionization cross sections of the separate deoxyribose and phosphate fragments is in close agreement with the C 3 ' - and C 5 ' -deoxyribose-phosphate cross sections, differing by less than 10%, an indication that a building-up principle may be applicable. Of the four DNA bases, the ionization cross section of guanine is the largest, then in decreasing order, adenine, thymine, and cytosine. The order is in accordance with the known propensity of oxidation of the bases by ionizing radiation. Dissociative ionization (DI), a process that both ionizes and dissociates a molecule, is investigated for cytosine. The DI cross section for the formation of H and (cytosine-H1) + , with the cytosine ion losing H at the 1 position, is also reported. The threshold of this process is calculated to be 16.9eV. Detailed analysis of ionization products such as in DI is important to trace the sequential steps in the biochemical process of DNA damage

  18. Prediction of Foreign Object Debris/Damage type based in human factors for aeronautics using logistic regression model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, David Ricardo

    Foreign Object Debris/Damage (FOD) has been an issue for military and commercial aircraft manufacturers since the early ages of aviation and aerospace. Currently, aerospace is growing rapidly and the chances of FOD presence are growing as well. One of the principal causes in manufacturing is the human error. The cost associated with human error in commercial and military aircrafts is approximately accountable for 4 billion dollars per year. This problem is currently addressed with prevention programs, elimination techniques, and designation of FOD areas, controlled access, restrictions of personal items entering designated areas, tool accountability, and the use of technology such as Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags, etc. All of the efforts mentioned before, have not show a significant occurrence reduction in terms of manufacturing processes. On the contrary, a repetitive path of occurrence is present, and the cost associated has not declined in a significant manner. In order to address the problem, this thesis proposes a new approach using statistical analysis. The effort of this thesis is to create a predictive model using historical categorical data from an aircraft manufacturer only focusing in human error causes. The use of contingency tables, natural logarithm of the odds and probability transformation is used in order to provide the predicted probabilities of each aircraft. A case of study is shown in this thesis in order to show the applied methodology. As a result, this approach is able to predict the possible outcomes of FOD by the workstation/area needed, and monthly predictions per workstation. This thesis is intended to be the starting point of statistical data analysis regarding FOD in human factors. The purpose of this thesis is to identify the areas where human error is the primary cause of FOD occurrence in order to design and implement accurate solutions. The advantages of the proposed methodology can go from the reduction of cost

  19. Implementation of an anisotropic damage material model using general second order damage tensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niazi, Muhammad Sohail; Mori, K.; Wisselink, H.H.; Pietrzyk, M.; Kusiak, J.; Meinders, Vincent T.; ten Horn, Carel; Majta, J.; Hartley, P.; Lin, J.

    2010-01-01

    Damage in metals is mainly the process of the initiation and growth of voids. With the growing complexity in materials and forming proc-esses, it becomes inevitable to include anisotropy in damage (tensorial damage variable). Most of the anisotropic damage models define the damage tensor in the

  20. Early models of DNA damage formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Śmiałek, Małgorzata A

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of DNA damage, induced by various types of incident radiation as well as chemical agents, has been the subject of many theoretical and experimental studies, supporting the development of modern cancer therapy. The primary observations showed that many factors can lead to damage of DNA molecules. It became clear that the development of experimental techniques for exploring this phenomenon is required. Another problem was simultaneously dealt with, anticipating on how the damage is distributed within the double helix of the DNA molecule and how the single strand break formation and accumulation can influence the lethal double strand break formation. In this work the most important probabilistic models for DNA strand breakage and damage propagation are summarized and compared.

  1. Molecular models for DNA damaged by photoreaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearlman, D.A.; Holbrook, S.R.; Pirkle, D.H.; Kim, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    Structural models of a DNA molecule containing a radiation-induced psoralen cross-link and of a DNA containing a thymine photodimer were constructed by applying energy-minimization techniques and model-building procedures to data from x-ray crystallographic studies. The helical axes of the models show substantial kinking and unwinding at the sites of the damage, which may have long-range as well as local effects arising from the concomitant changes in the supercoiling and overall structure of the DNA. The damaged areas may also serve as recognition sites for repair enzymes. These results should help in understanding the biologic effects of radiation-induced damage on cells

  2. A plastic damage model with stress triaxiality-dependent hardening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Xinpu; Shen Guoxiao; Zhou Lin

    2005-01-01

    Emphases of this study were placed on the modelling of plastic damage behaviour of prestressed structural concrete, with special attention being paid to the stress-triaxiality dependent plastic hardening law and the corresponding damage evolution law. A definition of stress triaxiality was proposed and introduced in the model presented here. Drucker-Prager -type plasticity was adopted in the formulation of the plastic damage constitutive equations. Numerical validations were performed for the proposed plasticity-based damage model with a driver subroutine developed in this study. The predicted stress-strain behaviour seems reasonably accurate for the uniaxial tension and uniaxial compression compared with the experimental data reported in references. Numerical calculations of compressions under various hydrostatic stress confinements were carried out in order to validate the stress triaxiality dependent properties of the model. (authors)

  3. Development of damage probability matrices based on Greek earthquake damage data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriadou, Anastasia K.; Karabinis, Athanasios I.

    2011-03-01

    A comprehensive study is presented for empirical seismic vulnerability assessment of typical structural types, representative of the building stock of Southern Europe, based on a large set of damage statistics. The observational database was obtained from post-earthquake surveys carried out in the area struck by the September 7, 1999 Athens earthquake. After analysis of the collected observational data, a unified damage database has been created which comprises 180,945 damaged buildings from/after the near-field area of the earthquake. The damaged buildings are classified in specific structural types, according to the materials, seismic codes and construction techniques in Southern Europe. The seismic demand is described in terms of both the regional macroseismic intensity and the ratio α g/ a o, where α g is the maximum peak ground acceleration (PGA) of the earthquake event and a o is the unique value PGA that characterizes each municipality shown on the Greek hazard map. The relative and cumulative frequencies of the different damage states for each structural type and each intensity level are computed in terms of damage ratio. Damage probability matrices (DPMs) and vulnerability curves are obtained for specific structural types. A comparison analysis is fulfilled between the produced and the existing vulnerability models.

  4. Multi-scale modelling of radiation damage in Fe-Cr based on ab initio electronic structure calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsson, Paer

    2004-04-01

    The efficiency of fast neutron reactors, such as for fusion, breeding and transmutation, depend strongly on the neutron radiation resistance of the materials used in the reactors. The binary Fe-Cr alloy, which has many attractive properties in this regard, is the base for the best steels of today which are, however, still not up to the required standards. Therefore, substantial effort has been devoted to finding new materials that can cope with the demands better. Experimental studies must be complemented with extensive theoretical modelling in order to understand the effects that different alloying elements has on the resistance properties of materials. To this end, the first steps of multi-scale modelling has been taken, starting out with ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of the complete concentration range range of the disordered binary Fe-C alloy. The mixing enthalpy of Fe-Cr has been quantitatively predicted and has, together with data from literature, been used in order to fit two sets of interatomic potentials for the purpose of simulating defect evolution with molecular dynamics and kinetic Monte-Carlo codes. These dedicated Fe-Cr alloy potentials are new and represent important additions to the pure element potentials that can be found in literature

  5. Multi-scale modelling of radiation damage in Fe-Cr based on ab initio electronic structure calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, Paer

    2004-04-01

    The efficiency of fast neutron reactors, such as for fusion, breeding and transmutation, depend strongly on the neutron radiation resistance of the materials used in the reactors. The binary Fe-Cr alloy, which has many attractive properties in this regard, is the base for the best steels of today which are, however, still not up to the required standards. Therefore, substantial effort has been devoted to finding new materials that can cope with the demands better. Experimental studies must be complemented with extensive theoretical modelling in order to understand the effects that different alloying elements has on the resistance properties of materials. To this end, the first steps of multi-scale modelling has been taken, starting out with ab initio calculations of the electronic structure of the complete concentration range range of the disordered binary Fe-C alloy. The mixing enthalpy of Fe-Cr has been quantitatively predicted and has, together with data from literature, been used in order to fit two sets of interatomic potentials for the purpose of simulating defect evolution with molecular dynamics and kinetic Monte-Carlo codes. These dedicated Fe-Cr alloy potentials are new and represent important additions to the pure element potentials that can be found in literature.

  6. Processing of free radical damaged DNA bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, S.

    2003-01-01

    Free radicals produced during the radiolysis of water gives rise to a plethora of DNA damages including single strand breaks, sites of base loss and a wide variety of purine and pyrimidine base lesions. All these damages are processed in cells by base excision repair. The oxidative DNA glycosylases which catalyze the first step in the removal of a base damage during base excision repair evolved primarily to protect the cells from the deleterious mutagenic effects of single free radical-induced DNA lesions arising during oxidative metabolism. This is evidenced by the high spontaneous mutation rate in bacterial mutants lacking the oxidative DNA glycosylases. However, when a low LET photon transverses the DNA molecule, a burst of free radicals is produced during the radiolysis of water that leads to the formation of clustered damages in the DNA molecule, that are recognized by the oxidative DNA glycosylases. When substrates containing two closely opposed sugar damages or base and sugar damages are incubated with the oxidative DNA glycosylases in vitro, one strand is readily incised by the lyase activity of the DNA glycosylase. Whether or not the second strand is incised depends on the distance between the strand break resulting from the incised first strand and the remaining DNA lesion on the other strand. If the lesions are more than two or three base pairs apart, the second strand is readily cleaved by the DNA glycosylase, giving rise to a double strand break. Even if the entire base excision repair system is reconstituted in vitro, whether or not a double strand break ensues depends solely upon the ability of the DNA glycosylase to cleave the second strand. These data predicted that cells deficient in the oxidative DNA glycosylases would be radioresistant while those that overproduce an oxidative DNA glycosylase would be radiosensitive. This prediction was indeed borne in Escherichia coli that is, mutants lacking the oxidative DNA glycosylases are radioresistant

  7. Impact damages modeling in laminated composite structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreculj Dragan D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laminated composites have an important application in modern engineering structures. They are characterized by extraordinary properties, such as: high strength and stiffness and lightweight. Nevertheless, a serious obstacle to more widespread use of those materials is their sensitivity to the impact loads. Impacts cause initiation and development of certain types of damages. Failures that occur in laminated composite structures can be intralaminar and interlaminar. To date it was developed a lot of simulation models for impact damages analysis in laminates. Those models can replace real and expensive testing in laminated structures with a certain accuracy. By using specialized software the damage parameters and distributions can be determined (at certain conditions on laminate structures. With performing numerical simulation of impact on composite laminates there are corresponding results valid for the analysis of these structures.

  8. The comparison of two continuum damage mechanics-based material models for formability prediction of AA6082 under hot stamping conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Z.; Li, N.; Lin, J.

    2017-09-01

    The hot stamping and cold die quenching process has experienced tremendous development in order to obtain shapes of structural components with great complexity in automotive applications. Prediction of the formability of a metal sheet is significant for practical applications of forming components in the automotive industry. Since microstructural evolution in an alloy at elevated temperature has a large effect on formability, continuum damage mechanics (CDM)-based material models can be used to characterise the behaviour of metals when a forming process is conducted at elevated temperatures. In this paper, two sets of unified multi-axial constitutive equations based on material’s stress states and strain states, respectively, were calibrated and used to effectively predict the thermo-mechanical response and forming limits of alloys under complex hot stamping conditions. In order to determine and calibrate the two material models, formability tests of AA6082 using a developed novel biaxial testing system were conducted at various temperatures and strain rates under hot stamping conditions. The determined unified constitutive equations from experimental data are presented in this paper. It is found that both of the stress-state based and strain-state based material models can predict the formability of AA6082 under hot stamping conditions.

  9. Modelling of settlement induced building damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giardina, G.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the modelling of settlement induced damage to masonry buildings. In densely populated areas, the need for new space is nowadays producing a rapid increment of underground excavations. Due to the construction of new metro lines, tunnelling activity in urban areas is growing.

  10. Vibration Based Sun Gear Damage Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Adrian; LaBerge, Kelsen; Lewicki, David; Pines, Darryll

    2013-01-01

    Seeded fault experiments were conducted on the planetary stage of an OH-58C helicopter transmission. Two vibration based methods are discussed that isolate the dynamics of the sun gear from that of the planet gears, bearings, input spiral bevel stage, and other components in and around the gearbox. Three damaged sun gears: two spalled and one cracked, serve as the focus of this current work. A non-sequential vibration separation algorithm was developed and the resulting signals analyzed. The second method uses only the time synchronously averaged data but takes advantage of the signal/source mapping required for vibration separation. Both algorithms were successful in identifying the spall damage. Sun gear damage was confirmed by the presence of sun mesh groups. The sun tooth crack condition was inconclusive.

  11. Incorporating damage mechanics into explosion simulation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sammis, C.G.

    1993-01-01

    The source region of an underground explosion is commonly modeled as a nested series of shells. In the innermost open-quotes hydrodynamic regimeclose quotes pressures and temperatures are sufficiently high that the rock deforms as a fluid and may be described using a PVT equation of state. Just beyond the hydrodynamic regime, is the open-quotes non-linear regimeclose quotes in which the rock has shear strength but the deformation is nonlinear. This regime extends out to the open-quotes elastic radiusclose quotes beyond which the deformation is linear. In this paper, we develop a model for the non-linear regime in crystalline source rock where the nonlinearity is mostly due to fractures. We divide the non-linear regime into a open-quotes damage regimeclose quotes in which the stresses are sufficiently high to nucleate new fractures from preexisting ones and a open-quotes crack-slidingclose quotes regime where motion on preexisting cracks produces amplitude dependent attenuation and other non-linear effects, but no new cracks are nucleated. The boundary between these two regimes is called the open-quotes damage radius.close quotes The micromechanical damage mechanics recently developed by Ashby and Sammis (1990) is used to write an analytic expression for the damage radius in terms of the initial fracture spectrum of the source rock, and to develop an algorithm which may be used to incorporate damage mechanics into computer source models for the damage regime. Effects of water saturation and loading rate are also discussed

  12. A 3D Orthotropic Elastic Continuum Damage Material Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    English, Shawn Allen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, Arthur A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-08-01

    A three dimensional orthotropic elastic constitutive model with continuum damage is implemented for polymer matrix composite lamina. Damage evolves based on a quadratic homogeneous function of thermodynamic forces in the orthotropic planes. A small strain formulation is used to assess damage. In order to account for large deformations, a Kirchhoff material formulation is implemented and coded for numerical simulation in Sandia’s Sierra Finite Element code suite. The theoretical formulation is described in detail. An example of material parameter determination is given and an example is presented.

  13. A Progressive Damage Model for Predicting Permanent Indentation and Impact Damage in Composite Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhaojie; Guan, Zhidong; Li, Zengshan

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a progressive damage model was established on the basis of ABAQUS software for predicting permanent indentation and impact damage in composite laminates. Intralaminar and interlaminar damage was modelled based on the continuum damage mechanics (CDM) in the finite element model. For the verification of the model, low-velocity impact tests of quasi-isotropic laminates with material system of T300/5228A were conducted. Permanent indentation and impact damage of the laminates were simulated and the numerical results agree well with the experiments. It can be concluded that an obvious knee point can be identified on the curve of the indentation depth versus impact energy. Matrix cracking and delamination develops rapidly with the increasing impact energy, while considerable amount of fiber breakage only occurs when the impact energy exceeds the energy corresponding to the knee point. Predicted indentation depth after the knee point is very sensitive to the parameter μ which is proposed in this paper, and the acceptable value of this parameter is in range from 0.9 to 1.0.

  14. Characterizing and modeling the pressure- and rate-dependent elastic-plastic-damage behaviors of polypropylene-based polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Pulungan, Ditho Ardiansyah; Yudhanto, Arief; Goutham, Shiva; Lubineau, Gilles; Yaldiz, Recep; Schijve, Warden

    2018-01-01

    Polymers in general exhibit pressure- and rate-dependent behavior. Modeling such behavior requires extensive, costly and time-consuming experimental work. Common simplifications may lead to severe inaccuracy when using the model for predicting

  15. Modelling of plastic flow localization and damage development in friction stir welded 6005A aluminium alloy using physics based strain hardening law

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau; Pardoen, Thomas; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2010-01-01

    of these zones was extracted from micro-tensile specimens cut parallel to the welding direction. The measured material properties and weld topology were introduced into a 3D finite element model, fully coupled with the damage model. A Voce law hardening model involving a constant stage IV is used within...

  16. Development of system based code for integrity of FBR. Fundamental probabilistic approach, Part 1: Model calculation of creep-fatigue damage (Research report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawasaki, Nobuchika; Asayama, Tai

    2001-09-01

    Both reliability and safety have to be further improved for the successful commercialization of FBRs. At the same time, construction and operation costs need to be reduced to a same level of future LWRs. To realize compatibility among reliability, safety and, cost, the Structural Mechanics Research Group in JNC started the development of System Based Code for Integrity of FBR. This code extends the present structural design standard to include the areas of fabrication, installation, plant system design, safety design, operation and maintenance, and so on. A quantitative index is necessary to connect different partial standards in this code. Failure probability is considered as a candidate index. Therefore we decided to make a model calculation using failure probability and judge its applicability. We first investigated other probabilistic standards like ASME Code Case N-578. A probabilistic approach in the structural integrity evaluation was created based on these results, and also an evaluation flow was proposed. According to this flow, a model calculation of creep-fatigue damage was performed. This trial calculation was for a vessel in a sodium-cooled FBR. As the result of this model calculation, a crack initiation probability and a crack penetration probability were found to be effective indices. Last we discussed merits of this System Based Code, which are presented in this report. Furthermore, this report presents future development tasks. (author)

  17. Flood damage: a model for consistent, complete and multipurpose scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menoni, Scira; Molinari, Daniela; Ballio, Francesco; Minucci, Guido; Mejri, Ouejdane; Atun, Funda; Berni, Nicola; Pandolfo, Claudia

    2016-12-01

    Effective flood risk mitigation requires the impacts of flood events to be much better and more reliably known than is currently the case. Available post-flood damage assessments usually supply only a partial vision of the consequences of the floods as they typically respond to the specific needs of a particular stakeholder. Consequently, they generally focus (i) on particular items at risk, (ii) on a certain time window after the occurrence of the flood, (iii) on a specific scale of analysis or (iv) on the analysis of damage only, without an investigation of damage mechanisms and root causes. This paper responds to the necessity of a more integrated interpretation of flood events as the base to address the variety of needs arising after a disaster. In particular, a model is supplied to develop multipurpose complete event scenarios. The model organizes available information after the event according to five logical axes. This way post-flood damage assessments can be developed that (i) are multisectoral, (ii) consider physical as well as functional and systemic damage, (iii) address the spatial scales that are relevant for the event at stake depending on the type of damage that has to be analyzed, i.e., direct, functional and systemic, (iv) consider the temporal evolution of damage and finally (v) allow damage mechanisms and root causes to be understood. All the above features are key for the multi-usability of resulting flood scenarios. The model allows, on the one hand, the rationalization of efforts currently implemented in ex post damage assessments, also with the objective of better programming financial resources that will be needed for these types of events in the future. On the other hand, integrated interpretations of flood events are fundamental to adapting and optimizing flood mitigation strategies on the basis of thorough forensic investigation of each event, as corroborated by the implementation of the model in a case study.

  18. Physics-Based Stress Corrosion Cracking Component Reliability Model cast in an R7-Compatible Cumulative Damage Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unwin, Stephen D.; Lowry, Peter P.; Layton, Robert F.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Johnson, Kenneth I.; Sanborn, Scott E.

    2011-07-01

    This is a working report drafted under the Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization pathway of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, describing statistical models of passives component reliabilities.

  19. Formability prediction for AHSS materials using damage models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, R.; Santos, Abel D.; José, César de Sá; Miranda, Sara

    2017-05-01

    Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are seeing an increased use, mostly due to lightweight design in automobile industry and strict regulations on safety and greenhouse gases emissions. However, the use of these materials, characterized by a high strength to weight ratio, stiffness and high work hardening at early stages of plastic deformation, have imposed many challenges in sheet metal industry, mainly their low formability and different behaviour, when compared to traditional steels, which may represent a defying task, both to obtain a successful component and also when using numerical simulation to predict material behaviour and its fracture limits. Although numerical prediction of critical strains in sheet metal forming processes is still very often based on the classic forming limit diagrams, alternative approaches can use damage models, which are based on stress states to predict failure during the forming process and they can be classified as empirical, physics based and phenomenological models. In the present paper a comparative analysis of different ductile damage models is carried out, in order numerically evaluate two isotropic coupled damage models proposed by Johnson-Cook and Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN), each of them corresponding to the first two previous group classification. Finite element analysis is used considering these damage mechanics approaches and the obtained results are compared with experimental Nakajima tests, thus being possible to evaluate and validate the ability to predict damage and formability limits for previous defined approaches.

  20. Formability prediction for AHSS materials using damage models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, R.; Miranda, Sara; Santos, Abel D.; José, César de Sá

    2017-01-01

    Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are seeing an increased use, mostly due to lightweight design in automobile industry and strict regulations on safety and greenhouse gases emissions. However, the use of these materials, characterized by a high strength to weight ratio, stiffness and high work hardening at early stages of plastic deformation, have imposed many challenges in sheet metal industry, mainly their low formability and different behaviour, when compared to traditional steels, which may represent a defying task, both to obtain a successful component and also when using numerical simulation to predict material behaviour and its fracture limits. Although numerical prediction of critical strains in sheet metal forming processes is still very often based on the classic forming limit diagrams, alternative approaches can use damage models, which are based on stress states to predict failure during the forming process and they can be classified as empirical, physics based and phenomenological models. In the present paper a comparative analysis of different ductile damage models is carried out, in order numerically evaluate two isotropic coupled damage models proposed by Johnson-Cook and Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN), each of them corresponding to the first two previous group classification. Finite element analysis is used considering these damage mechanics approaches and the obtained results are compared with experimental Nakajima tests, thus being possible to evaluate and validate the ability to predict damage and formability limits for previous defined approaches. (paper)

  1. Irreversible entropy model for damage diagnosis in resistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuadras, Angel, E-mail: angel.cuadras@upc.edu; Crisóstomo, Javier; Ovejas, Victoria J.; Quilez, Marcos [Instrumentation, Sensor and Interfaces Group, Electronic Engineering Department, Escola d' Enginyeria de Telecomunicació i Aeronàutica de Castelldefels EETAC, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona Tech (UPC), Castelldefels-Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-10-28

    We propose a method to characterize electrical resistor damage based on entropy measurements. Irreversible entropy and the rate at which it is generated are more convenient parameters than resistance for describing damage because they are essentially positive in virtue of the second law of thermodynamics, whereas resistance may increase or decrease depending on the degradation mechanism. Commercial resistors were tested in order to characterize the damage induced by power surges. Resistors were biased with constant and pulsed voltage signals, leading to power dissipation in the range of 4–8 W, which is well above the 0.25 W nominal power to initiate failure. Entropy was inferred from the added power and temperature evolution. A model is proposed to understand the relationship among resistance, entropy, and damage. The power surge dissipates into heat (Joule effect) and damages the resistor. The results show a correlation between entropy generation rate and resistor failure. We conclude that damage can be conveniently assessed from irreversible entropy generation. Our results for resistors can be easily extrapolated to other systems or machines that can be modeled based on their resistance.

  2. Irreversible entropy model for damage diagnosis in resistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuadras, Angel; Crisóstomo, Javier; Ovejas, Victoria J.; Quilez, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method to characterize electrical resistor damage based on entropy measurements. Irreversible entropy and the rate at which it is generated are more convenient parameters than resistance for describing damage because they are essentially positive in virtue of the second law of thermodynamics, whereas resistance may increase or decrease depending on the degradation mechanism. Commercial resistors were tested in order to characterize the damage induced by power surges. Resistors were biased with constant and pulsed voltage signals, leading to power dissipation in the range of 4–8 W, which is well above the 0.25 W nominal power to initiate failure. Entropy was inferred from the added power and temperature evolution. A model is proposed to understand the relationship among resistance, entropy, and damage. The power surge dissipates into heat (Joule effect) and damages the resistor. The results show a correlation between entropy generation rate and resistor failure. We conclude that damage can be conveniently assessed from irreversible entropy generation. Our results for resistors can be easily extrapolated to other systems or machines that can be modeled based on their resistance

  3. Bayesian inference method for stochastic damage accumulation modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Xiaomo; Yuan, Yong; Liu, Xian

    2013-01-01

    Damage accumulation based reliability model plays an increasingly important role in successful realization of condition based maintenance for complicated engineering systems. This paper developed a Bayesian framework to establish stochastic damage accumulation model from historical inspection data, considering data uncertainty. Proportional hazards modeling technique is developed to model the nonlinear effect of multiple influencing factors on system reliability. Different from other hazard modeling techniques such as normal linear regression model, the approach does not require any distribution assumption for the hazard model, and can be applied for a wide variety of distribution models. A Bayesian network is created to represent the nonlinear proportional hazards models and to estimate model parameters by Bayesian inference with Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation. Both qualitative and quantitative approaches are developed to assess the validity of the established damage accumulation model. Anderson–Darling goodness-of-fit test is employed to perform the normality test, and Box–Cox transformation approach is utilized to convert the non-normality data into normal distribution for hypothesis testing in quantitative model validation. The methodology is illustrated with the seepage data collected from real-world subway tunnels.

  4. Uncertainty in urban flood damage assessment due to urban drainage modelling and depth-damage curve estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freni, G; La Loggia, G; Notaro, V

    2010-01-01

    Due to the increased occurrence of flooding events in urban areas, many procedures for flood damage quantification have been defined in recent decades. The lack of large databases in most cases is overcome by combining the output of urban drainage models and damage curves linking flooding to expected damage. The application of advanced hydraulic models as diagnostic, design and decision-making support tools has become a standard practice in hydraulic research and application. Flooding damage functions are usually evaluated by a priori estimation of potential damage (based on the value of exposed goods) or by interpolating real damage data (recorded during historical flooding events). Hydraulic models have undergone continuous advancements, pushed forward by increasing computer capacity. The details of the flooding propagation process on the surface and the details of the interconnections between underground and surface drainage systems have been studied extensively in recent years, resulting in progressively more reliable models. The same level of was advancement has not been reached with regard to damage curves, for which improvements are highly connected to data availability; this remains the main bottleneck in the expected flooding damage estimation. Such functions are usually affected by significant uncertainty intrinsically related to the collected data and to the simplified structure of the adopted functional relationships. The present paper aimed to evaluate this uncertainty by comparing the intrinsic uncertainty connected to the construction of the damage-depth function to the hydraulic model uncertainty. In this way, the paper sought to evaluate the role of hydraulic model detail level in the wider context of flood damage estimation. This paper demonstrated that the use of detailed hydraulic models might not be justified because of the higher computational cost and the significant uncertainty in damage estimation curves. This uncertainty occurs mainly

  5. Verification of flood damage modelling using insurance data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Qianqian; Petersen, Toke E. P.; Thorsen, Bo J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an analysis using insurance data for damage description and risk model verification, based on data from a Danish case. The results show that simple, local statistics of rainfall are not able to describe the variation in individual cost per claim, but are, howeve...

  6. Verification of flood damage modelling using insurance data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Qianqian; Panduro, T. E.; Thorsen, B. J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an analysis using insurance data for damage description and risk model verification, based on data from a Danish case. The results show that simple, local statistics of rainfall are not able to describe the variation in individual cost per claim, but are, howeve...

  7. A model of photon cell killing based on the spatio-temporal clustering of DNA damage in higher order chromatin structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Herr

    Full Text Available We present a new approach to model dose rate effects on cell killing after photon radiation based on the spatio-temporal clustering of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs within higher order chromatin structures of approximately 1-2 Mbp size, so called giant loops. The main concept of this approach consists of a distinction of two classes of lesions, isolated and clustered DSBs, characterized by the number of double strand breaks induced in a giant loop. We assume a low lethality and fast component of repair for isolated DSBs and a high lethality and slow component of repair for clustered DSBs. With appropriate rates, the temporal transition between the different lesion classes is expressed in terms of five differential equations. These allow formulating the dynamics involved in the competition of damage induction and repair for arbitrary dose rates and fractionation schemes. Final cell survival probabilities are computable with a cell line specific set of three parameters: The lethality for isolated DSBs, the lethality for clustered DSBs and the half-life time of isolated DSBs. By comparison with larger sets of published experimental data it is demonstrated that the model describes the cell line dependent response to treatments using either continuous irradiation at a constant dose rate or to split dose irradiation well. Furthermore, an analytic investigation of the formulation concerning single fraction treatments with constant dose rates in the limiting cases of extremely high or low dose rates is presented. The approach is consistent with the Linear-Quadratic model extended by the Lea-Catcheside factor up to the second moment in dose. Finally, it is shown that the model correctly predicts empirical findings about the dose rate dependence of incidence probabilities for deterministic radiation effects like pneumonitis and the bone marrow syndrome. These findings further support the general concepts on which the approach is based.

  8. Modeling of Corrosion-induced Concrete Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Anna Emilie A.; Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper a finite element model is introduced to simulate corrosion-induced damage in concrete. The model takes into account the penetration of corrosion products into the concrete as well as non-uniform formation of corrosion products around the reinforcement. To ac-count for the non...... of corrosion products affects both the time-to cover cracking and the crack width at the concrete surface.......In the present paper a finite element model is introduced to simulate corrosion-induced damage in concrete. The model takes into account the penetration of corrosion products into the concrete as well as non-uniform formation of corrosion products around the reinforcement. To ac-count for the non......-uniform formation of corrosion products at the concrete/reinforcement interface, a deterministic approach is used. The model gives good estimates of both deformations in the con-crete/reinforcement interface and crack width when compared to experimental data. Further, it is shown that non-uniform deposition...

  9. A damage mechanics based general purpose interface/contact element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chengyong

    Most of the microelectronics packaging structures consist of layered substrates connected with bonding materials, such as solder or epoxy. Predicting the thermomechanical behavior of these multilayered structures is a challenging task in electronic packaging engineering. In a layered structure the most complex part is always the interfaces between the strates. Simulating the thermo-mechanical behavior of such interfaces, is the main theme of this dissertation. The most commonly used solder material, Pb-Sn alloy, has a very low melting temperature 180sp°C, so that the material demonstrates a highly viscous behavior. And, creep usually dominates the failure mechanism. Hence, the theory of viscoplasticity is adapted to describe the constitutive behavior. In a multilayered assembly each layer has a different coefficient of thermal expansion. Under thermal cycling, due to heat dissipated from circuits, interfaces and interconnects experience low cycle fatigue. Presently, the state-of-the art damage mechanics model used for fatigue life predictions is based on Kachanov (1986) continuum damage model. This model uses plastic strain as a damage criterion. Since plastic strain is a stress path dependent value, the criterion does not yield unique damage values for the same state of stress. In this dissertation a new damage evolution equation based on the second law of thermodynamic is proposed. The new criterion is based on the entropy of the system and it yields unique damage values for all stress paths to the final state of stress. In the electronics industry, there is a strong desire to develop fatigue free interconnections. The proposed interface/contact element can also simulate the behavior of the fatigue free Z-direction thin film interconnections as well as traditional layered interconnects. The proposed interface element can simulate behavior of a bonded interface or unbonded sliding interface, also called contact element. The proposed element was verified against

  10. Modeling Fatigue Damage Onset and Progression in Composites Using an Element-Based Virtual Crack Closure Technique Combined With the Floating Node Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carvalho, Nelson V.; Krueger, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    A new methodology is proposed to model the onset and propagation of matrix cracks and delaminations in carbon-epoxy composites subject to fatigue loading. An extended interface element, based on the Floating Node Method, is developed to represent delaminations and matrix cracks explicitly in a mesh independent fashion. Crack propagation is determined using an element-based Virtual Crack Closure Technique approach to determine mixed-mode energy release rates, and the Paris-Law relationship to obtain crack growth rate. Crack onset is determined using a stressbased onset criterion coupled with a stress vs. cycle curve and Palmgren-Miner rule to account for fatigue damage accumulation. The approach is implemented in Abaqus/Standard® via the user subroutine functionality. Verification exercises are performed to assess the accuracy and correct implementation of the approach. Finally, it was demonstrated that this approach captured the differences in failure morphology in fatigue for two laminates of identical stiffness, but with layups containing ?deg plies that were either stacked in a single group, or distributed through the laminate thickness.

  11. Statistical 3D damage accumulation model for ion implant simulators

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Mangas, J M; Enriquez, L E; Bailon, L; Barbolla, J; Jaraiz, M

    2003-01-01

    A statistical 3D damage accumulation model, based on the modified Kinchin-Pease formula, for ion implant simulation has been included in our physically based ion implantation code. It has only one fitting parameter for electronic stopping and uses 3D electron density distributions for different types of targets including compound semiconductors. Also, a statistical noise reduction mechanism based on the dose division is used. The model has been adapted to be run under parallel execution in order to speed up the calculation in 3D structures. Sequential ion implantation has been modelled including previous damage profiles. It can also simulate the implantation of molecular and cluster projectiles. Comparisons of simulated doping profiles with experimental SIMS profiles are presented. Also comparisons between simulated amorphization and experimental RBS profiles are shown. An analysis of sequential versus parallel processing is provided.

  12. Statistical 3D damage accumulation model for ion implant simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Mangas, J.M.; Lazaro, J.; Enriquez, L.; Bailon, L.; Barbolla, J.; Jaraiz, M.

    2003-01-01

    A statistical 3D damage accumulation model, based on the modified Kinchin-Pease formula, for ion implant simulation has been included in our physically based ion implantation code. It has only one fitting parameter for electronic stopping and uses 3D electron density distributions for different types of targets including compound semiconductors. Also, a statistical noise reduction mechanism based on the dose division is used. The model has been adapted to be run under parallel execution in order to speed up the calculation in 3D structures. Sequential ion implantation has been modelled including previous damage profiles. It can also simulate the implantation of molecular and cluster projectiles. Comparisons of simulated doping profiles with experimental SIMS profiles are presented. Also comparisons between simulated amorphization and experimental RBS profiles are shown. An analysis of sequential versus parallel processing is provided

  13. New Computational Model Based on Finite Element Method to Quantify Damage Evolution Due to External Sulfate Attack on Self-Compacting Concretes

    KAUST Repository

    Khelifa, Mohammed Rissel; Guessasma, Sofiane

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: This work combines experimental and numerical investigations to study the mechanical degradation of self-compacting concrete under accelerated aging conditions. Four different experimental treatments are tested among them constant immersion and immersion-drying protocols allow an efficient external sulfate attack of the material. Significant damage is observed due to interfacial ettringite. A predictive analysis is then adopted to quantify the relationship between ettringite growth and mechanical damage evolution during aging. Typical 3D microstructures representing the cement paste-aggregate structures are generated using Monte Carlo scheme. These images are converted into a finite element model to predict the mechanical performance under different criteria of damage kinetics. The effect of ettringite is then associated to the development of an interphase of lower mechanical properties. Our results show that the observed time evolution of Young's modulus is best described by a linear increase of the interphase content. Our model results indicate also that the interphase regions grow at maximum stress regions rather than exclusively at interfaces. Finally, constant immersion predicts a rate of damage growth five times lower than that of immersion-drying protocol. © 2012 Computer-Aided Civil and Infrastructure Engineering.

  14. New Computational Model Based on Finite Element Method to Quantify Damage Evolution Due to External Sulfate Attack on Self-Compacting Concretes

    KAUST Repository

    Khelifa, Mohammed Rissel

    2012-12-27

    Abstract: This work combines experimental and numerical investigations to study the mechanical degradation of self-compacting concrete under accelerated aging conditions. Four different experimental treatments are tested among them constant immersion and immersion-drying protocols allow an efficient external sulfate attack of the material. Significant damage is observed due to interfacial ettringite. A predictive analysis is then adopted to quantify the relationship between ettringite growth and mechanical damage evolution during aging. Typical 3D microstructures representing the cement paste-aggregate structures are generated using Monte Carlo scheme. These images are converted into a finite element model to predict the mechanical performance under different criteria of damage kinetics. The effect of ettringite is then associated to the development of an interphase of lower mechanical properties. Our results show that the observed time evolution of Young\\'s modulus is best described by a linear increase of the interphase content. Our model results indicate also that the interphase regions grow at maximum stress regions rather than exclusively at interfaces. Finally, constant immersion predicts a rate of damage growth five times lower than that of immersion-drying protocol. © 2012 Computer-Aided Civil and Infrastructure Engineering.

  15. An overview of modal-based damage identification methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, C.R.; Doebling, S.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Engineering Analysis Group

    1997-09-01

    This paper provides an overview of methods that examine changes in measured vibration response to detect, locate, and characterize damage in structural and mechanical systems. The basic idea behind this technology is that modal parameters (notably frequencies, mode shapes, and modal damping) are functions of the physical properties of the structure (mass, damping, and stiffness). Therefore, changes in the physical properties will cause detectable changes in the modal properties. The motivation for the development of this technology is first provided. The methods are then categorized according to various criteria such as the level of damage detection provided, model-based vs. non-model-based methods and linear vs. nonlinear methods. This overview is limited to methods that can be adapted to a wide range of structures (i.e., are not dependent on a particular assumed model form for the system such as beam-bending behavior and methods and that are not based on updating finite element models). Next, the methods are described in general terms including difficulties associated with their implementation and their fidelity. Past, current and future-planned applications of this technology to actual engineering systems are summarized. The paper concludes with a discussion of critical issues for future research in the area of modal-based damage identification.

  16. A 3D Orthotropic Strain-Rate Dependent Elastic Damage Material Model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    English, Shawn Allen

    2014-09-01

    A three dimensional orthotropic elastic constitutive model with continuum damage and cohesive based fracture is implemented for a general polymer matrix composite lamina. The formulation assumes the possibility of distributed (continuum) damage followed b y localized damage. The current damage activation functions are simply partially interactive quadratic strain criteria . However, the code structure allows for changes in the functions without extraordinary effort. The material model formulation, implementation, characterization and use cases are presented.

  17. Micromechanics based framework with second-order damage tensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmorat, R.; Desmorat, B.; Olive, M.; Kolev, B.

    2018-05-01

    The harmonic product of tensors---leading to the concept of harmonic factorization---has been defined in a previous work (Olive et al, 2017). In the practical case of 3D crack density measurements on thin or thick walled structures, this mathematical tool allows us to factorize the harmonic (irreducible) part of the fourth-order damage tensor as an harmonic square: an exact harmonic square in 2D, an harmonic square over the set of so-called mechanically accessible directions for measurements in the 3D case. The corresponding micro-mechanics framework based on second---instead of fourth---order damage tensors is derived. An illustrating example is provided showing how the proposed framework allows for the modeling of the so-called hydrostatic sensitivity up to high damage levels.

  18. Multiscale Modeling of Dewetting Damage in Highly Filled Particulate Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geubelle, P. H.; Inglis, H. M.; Kramer, J. D.; Patel, J. J.; Kumar, N. C.; Tan, H.

    2008-02-01

    Particle debonding or dewetting constitutes one of the key damage processes in highly filled particulate composites such as solid propellant and other energetic materials. To analyze this failure process, we have developed a multiscale finite element framework that combines, at the microscale, a nonlinear description of the binder response with a cohesive model of the damage process taking place in a representative periodic unit cell (PUC). To relate micro-scale damage to the macroscopic constitutive response of the material, we employ the mathematical theory of homogenization (MTH). After a description of the numerical scheme, we present the results of the damage response of a highly filled particulate composite subjected to a uniaxial macroscopic strain, and show the direct correlation between the complex damage processes taking place in the PUC and the nonlinear macroscopic constitutive response. We also present a detailed study of the PUC size and a comparison between the finite element MTH-based study and a micromechanics model of the dewetting process.

  19. Combinatorial DNA Damage Pairing Model Based on X-Ray-Induced Foci Predicts the Dose and LET Dependence of Cell Death in Human Breast Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vadhavkar, Nikhil [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Pham, Christopher [University of Texas, Houston, TX (United States). MD Anderson Cancer Center; Georgescu, Walter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Deschamps, Thomas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Heuskin, Anne-Catherine [Univ. of Namur (Belgium). Namur Research inst. for Life Sciences (NARILIS), Research Center for the Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR); Tang, Jonathan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.; Costes, Sylvain V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Life Sciences Div.

    2014-09-01

    In contrast to the classic view of static DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) being repaired at the site of damage, we hypothesize that DSBs move and merge with each other over large distances (m). As X-ray dose increases, the probability of having DSB clusters increases as does the probability of misrepair and cell death. Experimental work characterizing the X-ray dose dependence of radiation-induced foci (RIF) in nonmalignant human mammary epithelial cells (MCF10A) is used here to validate a DSB clustering model. We then use the principles of the local effect model (LEM) to predict the yield of DSBs at the submicron level. Two mechanisms for DSB clustering, namely random coalescence of DSBs versus active movement of DSBs into repair domains are compared and tested. Simulations that best predicted both RIF dose dependence and cell survival after X-ray irradiation favored the repair domain hypothesis, suggesting the nucleus is divided into an array of regularly spaced repair domains of ~;;1.55 m sides. Applying the same approach to high-linear energy transfer (LET) ion tracks, we are able to predict experimental RIF/m along tracks with an overall relative error of 12percent, for LET ranging between 30 350 keV/m and for three different ions. Finally, cell death was predicted by assuming an exponential dependence on the total number of DSBs and of all possible combinations of paired DSBs within each simulated RIF. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) predictions for cell survival of MCF10A exposed to high-LET showed an LET dependence that matches previous experimental results for similar cell types. Overall, this work suggests that microdosimetric properties of ion tracks at the submicron level are sufficient to explain both RIF data and survival curves for any LET, similarly to the LEM assumption. Conversely, high-LET death mechanism does not have to infer linear-quadratic dose formalism as done in the LEM. In addition, the size of repair domains derived in our model

  20. Analyzing the effectiveness of using branchial NKA activity as a biomarker for assessing waterborne copper toxicity in tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus): A damage-based modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Su-Mei; Tsai, Jeng-Wei; Tzeng, Wen-Nan; Chen, Wei-Yu; Shih, Wan-Yu

    2015-06-01

    Branchial Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase (NKA) activity has been suggested as a promising biomarker for assessing metal stress in aquatic organisms. However, studies that systematically show the effectiveness of using NKA activity to detect metal exposure and toxicity at the individual level are limited. In this study, we aimed to determine whether branchial NKA activity mechanistically responds to the accumulation of waterborne copper (Cu) and accounts for observed toxicity over time under environmentally-relevant and aquafarming Cu exposure levels (0.2, 1 and 2 mg L(-1)). Temporal trends in Cu accumulation and the corresponding responses of branchial NKA activity resulting from Cu exposure were investigated in laboratory experiments conducted on juvenile tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus), a freshwater teleost that shows potential as a bioindicator of real-time and historical metal pollution. We used the process-based damage assessment model (DAM) to inspect the time course of Cu toxicity by integrating the compensation process between Cu-induced inhibition and repair of branchial NKA activity. NKA activity acted as a sensitive biomarker for Cu exposure and accumulation in tilapia, which showed induced impairment of osmoregulation and lethality when they were exposed to environmentally relevant levels (0.2 mg L(-1)), but not to higher exposure levels (1 and 2 mg L(-1)) in aquaculture farms or contaminated aquatic ecosystems. This study highlights the benefits and limitations of using branchial NKA activity as a sensitive biomarker to assess the health status of a fish population and its ecosystem. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Exploring the potential of multivariate depth-damage and rainfall-damage models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Ootegem, Luc; van Herck, K.; Creten, T.

    2018-01-01

    In Europe, floods are among the natural catastrophes that cause the largest economic damage. This article explores the potential of two distinct types of multivariate flood damage models: ‘depth-damage’ models and ‘rainfall-damage’ models. We use survey data of 346 Flemish households that were...... victim of pluvial floods complemented with rainfall data from both rain gauges and weather radars. In the econometrical analysis, a Tobit estimation technique is used to deal with the issue of zero damage observations. The results show that in the ‘depth-damage’ models flood depth has a significant...... impact on the damage. In the ‘rainfall-damage’ models there is a significant impact of rainfall accumulation on the damage when using the gauge rainfall data as predictor, but not when using the radar rainfall data. Finally, non-hazard indicators are found to be important for explaining pluvial flood...

  2. Computational model for the assessment of oil spill damages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seip, K L; Heiberg, A B; Brekke, K A

    1985-06-01

    A description is given of the method and the required data of a model for calculating oil spill damages. Eleven damage attributes are defined: shorelength contaminated, shore restitution time, birds dead, restitution time for three groups of birds, open sea damages-two types, damages to recreation, economy and fisheries. The model has been applied in several cases of oil pollution assessments: in an examination of alternative models for the organization of oil spill combat in Norway, in the assessment of the damages coused by a blowout at Tromsoeflaket and in assessing a possible increase in oil spill preparedness for Svalbard. 56 references.

  3. A Lattice-Misfit-Dependent Damage Model for Non-linear Damage Accumulations Under Monotonous Creep in Single Crystal Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Graverend, J.-B.

    2018-05-01

    A lattice-misfit-dependent damage density function is developed to predict the non-linear accumulation of damage when a thermal jump from 1050 °C to 1200 °C is introduced somewhere in the creep life. Furthermore, a phenomenological model aimed at describing the evolution of the constrained lattice misfit during monotonous creep load is also formulated. The response of the lattice-misfit-dependent plasticity-coupled damage model is compared with the experimental results obtained at 140 and 160 MPa on the first generation Ni-based single crystal superalloy MC2. The comparison reveals that the damage model is well suited at 160 MPa and less at 140 MPa because the transfer of stress to the γ' phase occurs for stresses above 150 MPa which leads to larger variations and, therefore, larger effects of the constrained lattice misfit on the lifetime during thermo-mechanical loading.

  4. Frequency Response Function Based Damage Identification for Aerospace Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Joseph Acton

    Structural health monitoring technologies continue to be pursued for aerospace structures in the interests of increased safety and, when combined with health prognosis, efficiency in life-cycle management. The current dissertation develops and validates damage identification technology as a critical component for structural health monitoring of aerospace structures and, in particular, composite unmanned aerial vehicles. The primary innovation is a statistical least-squares damage identification algorithm based in concepts of parameter estimation and model update. The algorithm uses frequency response function based residual force vectors derived from distributed vibration measurements to update a structural finite element model through statistically weighted least-squares minimization producing location and quantification of the damage, estimation uncertainty, and an updated model. Advantages compared to other approaches include robust applicability to systems which are heavily damped, large, and noisy, with a relatively low number of distributed measurement points compared to the number of analytical degrees-of-freedom of an associated analytical structural model (e.g., modal finite element model). Motivation, research objectives, and a dissertation summary are discussed in Chapter 1 followed by a literature review in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 gives background theory and the damage identification algorithm derivation followed by a study of fundamental algorithm behavior on a two degree-of-freedom mass-spring system with generalized damping. Chapter 4 investigates the impact of noise then successfully proves the algorithm against competing methods using an analytical eight degree-of-freedom mass-spring system with non-proportional structural damping. Chapter 5 extends use of the algorithm to finite element models, including solutions for numerical issues, approaches for modeling damping approximately in reduced coordinates, and analytical validation using a composite

  5. Research on FBG-Based CFRP Structural Damage Identification Using BP Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xiangyi; Lu, Shizeng; Jiang, Mingshun; Sui, Qingmei; Lv, Shanshan; Xiao, Hang; Jia, Yuxi; Jia, Lei

    2018-06-01

    A damage identification system of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) structures is investigated using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors and back propagation (BP) neural network. FBG sensors are applied to construct the sensing network to detect the structural dynamic response signals generated by active actuation. The damage identification model is built based on the BP neural network. The dynamic signal characteristics extracted by the Fourier transform are the inputs, and the damage states are the outputs of the model. Besides, damages are simulated by placing lumped masses with different weights instead of inducing real damages, which is confirmed to be feasible by finite element analysis (FEA). At last, the damage identification system is verified on a CFRP plate with 300 mm × 300 mm experimental area, with the accurate identification of varied damage states. The system provides a practical way for CFRP structural damage identification.

  6. Fuzzy stochastic damage mechanics (FSDM based on fuzzy auto-adaptive control theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-jun Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to fully interpret and describe damage mechanics, the origin and development of fuzzy stochastic damage mechanics were introduced based on the analysis of the harmony of damage, probability, and fuzzy membership in the interval of [0,1]. In a complete normed linear space, it was proven that a generalized damage field can be simulated through β probability distribution. Three kinds of fuzzy behaviors of damage variables were formulated and explained through analysis of the generalized uncertainty of damage variables and the establishment of a fuzzy functional expression. Corresponding fuzzy mapping distributions, namely, the half-depressed distribution, swing distribution, and combined swing distribution, which can simulate varying fuzzy evolution in diverse stochastic damage situations, were set up. Furthermore, through demonstration of the generalized probabilistic characteristics of damage variables, the cumulative distribution function and probability density function of fuzzy stochastic damage variables, which show β probability distribution, were modified according to the expansion principle. The three-dimensional fuzzy stochastic damage mechanical behaviors of the Longtan rolled-concrete dam were examined with the self-developed fuzzy stochastic damage finite element program. The statistical correlation and non-normality of random field parameters were considered comprehensively in the fuzzy stochastic damage model described in this paper. The results show that an initial damage field based on the comprehensive statistical evaluation helps to avoid many difficulties in the establishment of experiments and numerical algorithms for damage mechanics analysis.

  7. Towards Industrial Application of Damage Models for Sheet Metal Forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doig, M.; Roll, K.

    2011-05-01

    Due to global warming and financial situation the demand to reduce the CO2-emission and the production costs leads to the permanent development of new materials. In the automotive industry the occupant safety is an additional condition. Bringing these arguments together the preferable approach for lightweight design of car components, especially for body-in-white, is the use of modern steels. Such steel grades, also called advanced high strength steels (AHSS), exhibit a high strength as well as a high formability. Not only their material behavior but also the damage behavior of AHSS is different compared to the performances of standard steels. Conventional methods for the damage prediction in the industry like the forming limit curve (FLC) are not reliable for AHSS. Physically based damage models are often used in crash and bulk forming simulations. The still open question is the industrial application of these models for sheet metal forming. This paper evaluates the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model and the model of Lemaitre within commercial codes with a goal of industrial application.

  8. Micromechanical modeling of strength and damage of fiber reinforced composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishnaevsky, L. Jr.; Broendsted, P.

    2007-03-15

    The report for the first year of the EU UpWind project includes three parts: overview of concepts and methods of modelling of mechanical behavior, deformation and damage of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites, development of computational tools for the automatic generation of 3D micromechanical models of fiber reinforced composites, and micromechanical modelling of damage in FRC, and phenomenological analysis of the effect of frequency of cyclic loading on the lifetime and damage evolution in materials. (au)

  9. Development of probabilistic fatigue curve for asphalt concrete based on viscoelastic continuum damage mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Sharma

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to its roots in fundamental thermodynamic framework, continuum damage approach is popular for modeling asphalt concrete behavior. Currently used continuum damage models use mixture averaged values for model parameters and assume deterministic damage process. On the other hand, significant scatter is found in fatigue data generated even under extremely controlled laboratory testing conditions. Thus, currently used continuum damage models fail to account the scatter observed in fatigue data. This paper illustrates a novel approach for probabilistic fatigue life prediction based on viscoelastic continuum damage approach. Several specimens were tested for their viscoelastic properties and damage properties under uniaxial mode of loading. The data thus generated were analyzed using viscoelastic continuum damage mechanics principles to predict fatigue life. Weibull (2 parameter, 3 parameter and lognormal distributions were fit to fatigue life predicted using viscoelastic continuum damage approach. It was observed that fatigue damage could be best-described using Weibull distribution when compared to lognormal distribution. Due to its flexibility, 3-parameter Weibull distribution was found to fit better than 2-parameter Weibull distribution. Further, significant differences were found between probabilistic fatigue curves developed in this research and traditional deterministic fatigue curve. The proposed methodology combines advantages of continuum damage mechanics as well as probabilistic approaches. These probabilistic fatigue curves can be conveniently used for reliability based pavement design. Keywords: Probabilistic fatigue curve, Continuum damage mechanics, Weibull distribution, Lognormal distribution

  10. Experimental Study on Damage Detection in Timber Specimens Based on an Electromechanical Impedance Technique and RMSD-Based Mahalanobis Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dansheng Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the electromechanical impedance (EMI method, the PZT patch performs the functions of both sensor and exciter. Due to the high frequency actuation and non-model based characteristics, the EMI method can be utilized to detect incipient structural damage. In recent years EMI techniques have been widely applied to monitor the health status of concrete and steel materials, however, studies on application to timber are limited. This paper will explore the feasibility of using the EMI technique for damage detection in timber specimens. In addition, the conventional damage index, namely root mean square deviation (RMSD is employed to evaluate the level of damage. On that basis, a new damage index, Mahalanobis distance based on RMSD, is proposed to evaluate the damage severity of timber specimens. Experimental studies are implemented to detect notch and hole damage in the timber specimens. Experimental results verify the availability and robustness of the proposed damage index and its superiority over the RMSD indexes.

  11. Risk based decision aid for damage control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meesters, J.L.; Keijer, W.; Gillis, M.P.W.

    2003-01-01

    The current trend in ship design is to reduce the crew. Special attention should be paid to damage control, which is a labour intensive task. Having less crew members implies that more tasks have to be automated. It also means a reduction of the available 'human sensors’, which leads to difficulties

  12. Modeling Lightning Impact Thermo-Mechanical Damage on Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Raúl; Delgado, Sofía; González, Carlos; López-Romano, Bernardo; Wang, De-Yi; LLorca, Javier

    2014-02-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced polymers, used in primary structures for aircraft due to an excellent strength-to-weight ratio when compared with conventional aluminium alloy counterparts, may nowadays be considered as mature structural materials. Their use has been extended in recent decades, with several aircraft manufacturers delivering fuselages entirely manufactured with carbon composites and using advanced processing technologies. However, one of the main drawbacks of using such composites entails their poor electrical conductivity when compared with aluminium alloy competitors that leads to lightning strikes being considered a significant threat during the service life of the aircraft. Traditionally, this problem was overcome with the use of a protective copper/bronze mesh that added additional weight and reduced the effectiveness of use of the material. Moreover, this traditional sizing method is based on vast experimental campaigns carried out by subjecting composite panels to simulated lightning strike events. While this method has proven its validity, and is necessary for certification of the structure, it may be optimized with the aid provided by physically based numerical models. This paper presents a model based on the finite element method that includes the sources of damage observed in a lightning strike, such as thermal damage caused by Joule overheating and electromagnetic/acoustic pressures induced by the arc around the attachment points. The results of the model are compared with lightning strike experiments carried out in a carbon woven composite.

  13. Structural damage detection based on stochastic subspace identification and statistical pattern recognition: I. Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, W. X.; Lin, Y. Q.; Fang, S. E.

    2011-11-01

    One of the key issues in vibration-based structural health monitoring is to extract the damage-sensitive but environment-insensitive features from sampled dynamic response measurements and to carry out the statistical analysis of these features for structural damage detection. A new damage feature is proposed in this paper by using the system matrices of the forward innovation model based on the covariance-driven stochastic subspace identification of a vibrating system. To overcome the variations of the system matrices, a non-singularity transposition matrix is introduced so that the system matrices are normalized to their standard forms. For reducing the effects of modeling errors, noise and environmental variations on measured structural responses, a statistical pattern recognition paradigm is incorporated into the proposed method. The Mahalanobis and Euclidean distance decision functions of the damage feature vector are adopted by defining a statistics-based damage index. The proposed structural damage detection method is verified against one numerical signal and two numerical beams. It is demonstrated that the proposed statistics-based damage index is sensitive to damage and shows some robustness to the noise and false estimation of the system ranks. The method is capable of locating damage of the beam structures under different types of excitations. The robustness of the proposed damage detection method to the variations in environmental temperature is further validated in a companion paper by a reinforced concrete beam tested in the laboratory and a full-scale arch bridge tested in the field.

  14. Roller Bearing Monitoring by New Subspace-Based Damage Indicator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gautier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A frequency-band subspace-based damage identification method for fault diagnosis in roller bearings is presented. Subspace-based damage indicators are obtained by filtering the vibration data in the frequency range where damage is likely to occur, that is, around the bearing characteristic frequencies. The proposed method is validated by considering simulated data of a damaged bearing. Also, an experimental case is considered which focuses on collecting the vibration data issued from a run-to-failure test. It is shown that the proposed method can detect bearing defects and, as such, it appears to be an efficient tool for diagnosis purpose.

  15. Integrated geomechanical modelling for deep subsurface damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wees, J.D. van; Orlic, B.; Zijl, W.; Jongerius, P.; Schreppers, G.J.; Hendriks, M.

    2001-01-01

    Government, E&P and mining industry increasingly demand fundamental insight and accurate predictions on subsurface and surface deformation and damage due to exploitation of subsurface natural resources, and subsurface storage of energy residues (e.g. CO2). At this moment deformation is difficult to

  16. A transportable system of models for natural resource damage assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, M.; French, D.

    1992-01-01

    A system of computer models has been developed for assessment of natural resource economic damages resulting from spills of oil and hazardous materials in marine and fresh water environments. Under USA federal legislation, the results of the model system are presumed correct in damage litigation proceedings. The model can address a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The equations describing the motion of both pollutants and biota are solved in three dimensions. The model can simulate continuous releases of a contaminant, with representation of complex coastal boundaries, variable bathymetry, multiple shoreline types, and spatially variable ecosystem habitats. A graphic user interface provides easy control of the system in addition to the ability to display elements of the underlying geographical information system data base. The model is implemented on a personal computer and on a UNIX workstation. The structure of the system is such that transport to new geographic regions can be accomplished relatively easily, requiring only the development of the appropriate physical, toxicological, biological, and economic data sets. Applications are currently in progress for USA inland and coastal waters, the Adriatic Sea, the Strait of Sicily, the Gulf of Suez, and the Baltic Sea. 4 refs., 2 figs

  17. Modelling low velocity impact induced damage in composite laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yu; Soutis, Constantinos

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents recent progress on modelling low velocity impact induced damage in fibre reinforced composite laminates. It is important to understand the mechanisms of barely visible impact damage (BVID) and how it affects structural performance. To reduce labour intensive testing, the development of finite element (FE) techniques for simulating impact damage becomes essential and recent effort by the composites research community is reviewed in this work. The FE predicted damage initiation and propagation can be validated by Non Destructive Techniques (NDT) that gives confidence to the developed numerical damage models. A reliable damage simulation can assist the design process to optimise laminate configurations, reduce weight and improve performance of components and structures used in aircraft construction.

  18. Modeling the viscoplastic and damage behavior in deep argillaceous rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souley, M.; Armand, G.; Su, K.; Ghoreychi, M.

    2011-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the feasibility of a radioactive waste repository in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone formation, the French national radioactive waste management agency (ANDRA) started in 2000 to build an underground research laboratory at Bure (East of France). One of the key issues is to understand long term behavior of the drifts. More than 400 m horizontal galleries at the main level of -490 m have been instrumented since April 2005. The continuous measurements of convergence of the galleries are available, allowing a better understanding of the time-dependent response of the clay-stone at natural scale. Results indicate that the viscoplastic strain rates observed in the undamaged area far from the gallery walls are of the same order of magnitude as those obtained on rock samples, whereas those recorded in the damaged or fractured zone near the gallery walls are one to two orders of magnitude higher, indicating the significant influence of damage or/and macro-fractures on the viscoplastic strains. Based on these observations, a macroscopic viscoplastic model which aims to improve the viscoplastic strain prediction in the EDZ is proposed and implemented in FLAC 3Dc . Both the instantaneous and the time-dependent behavior are considered in the model. The short term response is assumed to be elastoplastic with strain hardening/softening whereas the time-dependent behavior is based on the concepts of visco-plasticity (Lemaitre's model). Finally, the damage-induced viscoplastic strains changes is examined through the plastic deformation (assumed to approach the damage rate).In order to verify both constitutive equations and their implementations, several simulations are performed: (a) triaxial tests at different confining pressures; (b) single- and multi-stage creep tests; (c) relaxation tests with different total axial strain levels, etc. Finally, an example of a blind prediction of the excavation of a drift parallel to the horizontal minor stress,

  19. A damage mechanics based approach to structural deterioration and reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattcharya, B.; Ellingwood, B. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1998-02-01

    Structural deterioration often occurs without perceptible manifestation. Continuum damage mechanics defines structural damage in terms of the material microstructure, and relates the damage variable to the macroscopic strength or stiffness of the structure. This enables one to predict the state of damage prior to the initiation of a macroscopic flaw, and allows one to estimate residual strength/service life of an existing structure. The accumulation of damage is a dissipative process that is governed by the laws of thermodynamics. Partial differential equations for damage growth in terms of the Helmholtz free energy are derived from fundamental thermodynamical conditions. Closed-form solutions to the equations are obtained under uniaxial loading for ductile deformation damage as a function of plastic strain, for creep damage as a function of time, and for fatigue damage as function of number of cycles. The proposed damage growth model is extended into the stochastic domain by considering fluctuations in the free energy, and closed-form solutions of the resulting stochastic differential equation are obtained in each of the three cases mentioned above. A reliability analysis of a ring-stiffened cylindrical steel shell subjected to corrosion, accidental pressure, and temperature is performed.

  20. A damage mechanics based approach to structural deterioration and reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattcharya, B.; Ellingwood, B.

    1998-02-01

    Structural deterioration often occurs without perceptible manifestation. Continuum damage mechanics defines structural damage in terms of the material microstructure, and relates the damage variable to the macroscopic strength or stiffness of the structure. This enables one to predict the state of damage prior to the initiation of a macroscopic flaw, and allows one to estimate residual strength/service life of an existing structure. The accumulation of damage is a dissipative process that is governed by the laws of thermodynamics. Partial differential equations for damage growth in terms of the Helmholtz free energy are derived from fundamental thermodynamical conditions. Closed-form solutions to the equations are obtained under uniaxial loading for ductile deformation damage as a function of plastic strain, for creep damage as a function of time, and for fatigue damage as function of number of cycles. The proposed damage growth model is extended into the stochastic domain by considering fluctuations in the free energy, and closed-form solutions of the resulting stochastic differential equation are obtained in each of the three cases mentioned above. A reliability analysis of a ring-stiffened cylindrical steel shell subjected to corrosion, accidental pressure, and temperature is performed

  1. New fatigue damage analysis of complex engineering components based on FEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, W.

    1987-05-01

    A new type of fatigue damage analysis for multiaxial elastoplastic conditions based on a three-dimensional finite element analysis has been developed. The analysis includes the material model after Mroz. The fatigue life evaluation in the critical areas is based on plastic work at these locations. The proposed damage concept can be applied to arbitrary multiaxial stress-strain paths. For the evaluation of the damage cycles in terms of closed stress-strain hysteresis loops are not required. The damage is determined on the basis of uniaxial material data (stress-strain curve, life to crack iniation curve). (orig./HP) [de

  2. Modification of Concrete Damaged Plasticity model. Part II: Formulation and numerical tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamińska Inez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A refined model for elastoplastic damaged material is formulated based on the plastic potential introduced in Part I [1]. Considered model is an extension of Concrete Damaged Plasticity material implemented in Abaqus [2]. In the paper the stiffness tensor for elastoplastic damaged behaviour is derived. In order to validate the model, computations for the uniaxial tests are performed. Response of the model for various cases of parameter’s choice is shown and compared to the response of the CDP model.

  3. An elastic-visco-plastic damage model: from theory to application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X.C.; Habraken, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    An energy-based two-variable damage theory is applied to Bodner's model. It gives an elastic-viscoplastic damage model. Some theoretical details are described in this paper. The parameters identification procedure is discussed and a complete set of parameters for an aluminium is presented. Numerical modelling of the laboratory tests are used to validate the model. An industrial aeronautic rod fabrication process is simulated and some numerical results are presented in this paper. (orig.)

  4. Continuum damage model for ferroelectric materials and its application to multilayer actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellmann, Roman; Ricoeur, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    In this paper a micromechanical continuum damage model for ferroelectric materials is presented. As a constitutive law it is implemented into a finite element (FE) code. The model is based on micromechanical considerations of domain switching and its interaction with microcrack growth and coalescence. A FE analysis of a multilayer actuator is performed, showing the initiation of damage zones at the electrode tips during the poling process. Further, the influence of mechanical pre-stressing on damage evolution and actuating properties is investigated. The results provided in this work give useful information on the damage of advanced piezoelectric devices and their optimization.

  5. Measuring damage in physical model tests of rubble mounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofland, B.; Rosa-Santos, Paulo; Taveira-Pinto, Francisco; Lemos, Rute; Mendonça, A.; Juana Fortes, C

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies novel ways to evaluate armour damage in physical models of coastal structures. High-resolution damage data for reference rubble mound breakwaters obtained under the HYDRALAB+ joint-research project are analysed and discussed. These tests are used to analyse the way to describe

  6. Use of heavy ions to model radiation damage of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirokov, S.V.; Vyshemirskij, M.P.

    2011-01-01

    The methods for modeling radiation damage of metals using heavy ions are reviewed and the results obtained are analyzed. It is shown that irradiation of metals with heavy ion can simulate neutron exposure with the equivalent dose with adequate accuracy and permits a detailed analysis of radiation damage of metals

  7. Track structure model of cell damage in space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Robert; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Shinn, Judy L.; Ngo, Duc M.

    1992-01-01

    The phenomenological track-structure model of cell damage is discussed. A description of the application of the track-structure model with the NASA Langley transport code for laboratory and space radiation is given. Comparisons to experimental results for cell survival during exposure to monoenergetic, heavy-ion beams are made. The model is also applied to predict cell damage rates and relative biological effectiveness for deep-space exposures.

  8. Statistical damage constitutive model for rocks subjected to cyclic stress and cyclic temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shu-Wei; Xia, Cai-Chu; Zhao, Hai-Bin; Mei, Song-Hua; Zhou, Yu

    2017-10-01

    A constitutive model of rocks subjected to cyclic stress-temperature was proposed. Based on statistical damage theory, the damage constitutive model with Weibull distribution was extended. Influence of model parameters on the stress-strain curve for rock reloading after stress-temperature cycling was then discussed. The proposed model was initially validated by rock tests for cyclic stress-temperature and only cyclic stress. Finally, the total damage evolution induced by stress-temperature cycling and reloading after cycling was explored and discussed. The proposed constitutive model is reasonable and applicable, describing well the stress-strain relationship during stress-temperature cycles and providing a good fit to the test results. Elastic modulus in the reference state and the damage induced by cycling affect the shape of reloading stress-strain curve. Total damage induced by cycling and reloading after cycling exhibits three stages: initial slow increase, mid-term accelerated increase, and final slow increase.

  9. Non-local modelling of cyclic thermal shock damage including parameter estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damhof, F.; Brekelmans, W.A.M.; Geers, M.G.D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, rate dependent evolution laws are identified and characterized to model the mechanical (elasticity-based) and thermal damage occurring in coarse grain refractory material subject to cyclic thermal shock. The interacting mechanisms for elastic deformation driven damage induced by

  10. Numerical modelling of damage evolution in ingot forging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter; Martins, Paulo A.F.; Bay, Niels Oluf

    2015-01-01

    The ingot forging process is numerically simulated applying both the Shima-Oyane porous plasticity model as a coupled damage model and the uncoupled normalized Cockcroft & Latham criterion. Four different cases including two different lower die angles (120º and 180º) and two different sizes of feed...... (400mm and 800mm) are analysed. Comparison of the simulation results with recommendations in literature on ingot forging, indicates the normalized Cockcroft & Latham damage criterion to be the most realistic of the two....

  11. Categorizing natural disaster damage assessment using satellite-based geospatial techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, S.W.; Yuan, M.; Cerveny, R.S.; Giri, C.

    2008-01-01

    Remote sensing of a natural disaster's damage offers an exciting backup and/or alternative to traditional means of on-site damage assessment. Although necessary for complete assessment of damage areas, ground-based damage surveys conducted in the aftermath of natural hazard passage can sometimes be potentially complicated due to on-site difficulties (e.g., interaction with various authorities and emergency services) and hazards (e.g., downed power lines, gas lines, etc.), the need for rapid mobilization (particularly for remote locations), and the increasing cost of rapid physical transportation of manpower and equipment. Satellite image analysis, because of its global ubiquity, its ability for repeated independent analysis, and, as we demonstrate here, its ability to verify on-site damage assessment provides an interesting new perspective and investigative aide to researchers. Using one of the strongest tornado events in US history, the 3 May 1999 Oklahoma City Tornado, as a case example, we digitized the tornado damage path and co-registered the damage path using pre- and post-Landsat Thematic Mapper image data to perform a damage assessment. We employed several geospatial approaches, specifically the Getis index, Geary's C, and two lacunarity approaches to categorize damage characteristics according to the original Fujita tornado damage scale (F-scale). Our results indicate strong relationships between spatial indices computed within a local window and tornado F-scale damage categories identified through the ground survey. Consequently, linear regression models, even incorporating just a single band, appear effective in identifying F-scale damage categories using satellite imagery. This study demonstrates that satellite-based geospatial techniques can effectively add spatial perspectives to natural disaster damages, and in particular for this case study, tornado damages.

  12. Electrical impedance tomography-based sensing skin for quantitative imaging of damage in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallaji, Milad; Pour-Ghaz, Mohammad; Seppänen, Aku

    2014-01-01

    This paper outlines the development of a large-area sensing skin for damage detection in concrete structures. The developed sensing skin consists of a thin layer of electrically conductive copper paint that is applied to the surface of the concrete. Cracking of the concrete substrate results in the rupture of the sensing skin, decreasing its electrical conductivity locally. The decrease in conductivity is detected with electrical impedance tomography (EIT) imaging. In previous works, electrically based sensing skins have provided only qualitative information on the damage on the substrate surface. In this paper, we study whether quantitative imaging of the damage is possible. We utilize application-specific models and computational methods in the image reconstruction, including a total variation (TV) prior model for the damage and an approximate correction of the modeling errors caused by the inhomogeneity of the painted sensing skin. The developed damage detection method is tested experimentally by applying the sensing skin to polymeric substrates and a reinforced concrete beam under four-point bending. In all test cases, the EIT-based sensing skin provides quantitative information on cracks and/or other damages on the substrate surface: featuring a very low conductivity in the damage locations, and a reliable indication of the lengths and shapes of the cracks. The results strongly support the applicability of the painted EIT-based sensing skin for damage detection in reinforced concrete elements and other substrates. (paper)

  13. Experimental and Modelling Investigations of the Coupled Elastoplastic Damage of a Quasi-brittle Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiu-Chang

    2018-02-01

    Triaxial compression tests are conducted on a quasi-brittle rock, limestone. The analyses show that elastoplastic deformation is coupled with damage. Based on the experimental investigation, a coupled elastoplastic damage model is developed within the framework of irreversible thermodynamics. The coupling effects between the plastic and damage dissipations are described by introducing an isotropic damage variable into the elastic stiffness and yield criterion. The novelty of the model is in the description of the thermodynamic force associated with damage, which is formulated as a state function of both elastic and plastic strain energies. The latter gives a full consideration on the comprehensive effects of plastic strain and stress changing processes in rock material on the development of damage. The damage criterion and potential are constructed to determine the onset and evolution of damage variable. The return mapping algorithms of the coupled model are deduced for three different inelastic corrections. Comparisons between test data and numerical simulations show that the coupled elastoplastic damage model is capable of describing the main mechanical behaviours of the quasi-brittle rock.

  14. Modelling of creep damage development in ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, R. [Swedish Institute for Metals Research, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1998-12-31

    The physical creep damage, which is observed in fossil-fired power plants, is mainly due to the formation of cavities and their interaction. It has previously been demonstrated that both the nucleation and growth of creep cavities can be described by power functions in strain for low alloy and 12 % CrMoV creep resistant steels. It possible to show that the physical creep damage is proportional to the product of the number of cavities and their area. Hence, the physical creep damage can also be expressed in terms of the creep strain. In the presentation this physical creep damage is connected to the empirical creep damage classes (1-5). A creep strain-time function, which is known to be applicable to low alloy and 12 % CrMoV creep resistant steels, is used to describe tertiary creep. With this creep strain - time model the residual lifetime can be predicted from the observed damage. For a given damage class the remaining life is directly proportional to the service time. An expression for the time to the next inspection is proposed. This expression is a function of fraction of the total allowed damage, which is consumed till the next inspection. (orig.) 10 refs.

  15. Modelling of creep damage development in ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, R [Swedish Institute for Metals Research, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-12-31

    The physical creep damage, which is observed in fossil-fired power plants, is mainly due to the formation of cavities and their interaction. It has previously been demonstrated that both the nucleation and growth of creep cavities can be described by power functions in strain for low alloy and 12 % CrMoV creep resistant steels. It possible to show that the physical creep damage is proportional to the product of the number of cavities and their area. Hence, the physical creep damage can also be expressed in terms of the creep strain. In the presentation this physical creep damage is connected to the empirical creep damage classes (1-5). A creep strain-time function, which is known to be applicable to low alloy and 12 % CrMoV creep resistant steels, is used to describe tertiary creep. With this creep strain - time model the residual lifetime can be predicted from the observed damage. For a given damage class the remaining life is directly proportional to the service time. An expression for the time to the next inspection is proposed. This expression is a function of fraction of the total allowed damage, which is consumed till the next inspection. (orig.) 10 refs.

  16. Damage identification in beams by a response surface based technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teidj S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, identification of damage in uniform homogeneous metallic beams was considered through the propagation of non dispersive elastic torsional waves. The proposed damage detection procedure consisted of the following sequence. Giving a localized torque excitation, having the form of a short half-sine pulse, the first step was calculating the transient solution of the resulting torsional wave. This torque could be generated in practice by means of asymmetric laser irradiation of the beam surface. Then, a localized defect assumed to be characterized by an abrupt reduction of beam section area with a given height and extent was placed at a known location of the beam. Next, the response in terms of transverse section rotation rate was obtained for a point situated afterwards the defect, where the sensor was positioned. This last could utilize in practice the concept of laser vibrometry. A parametric study has been conducted after that by using a full factorial design of experiments table and numerical simulations based on a finite difference characteristic scheme. This has enabled the derivation of a response surface model that was shown to represent adequately the response of the system in terms of the following factors: defect extent and severity. The final step was performing the inverse problem solution in order to identify the defect characteristics by using measurement.

  17. Scenario based approach to structural damage detection and its value in a risk and reliability perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, Mads Knude; Hansen, Jannick Balleby; Brincker, Rune

    2013-01-01

    A scenario- and vibration based structural damage detection method is demonstrated though simulation. The method is Finite Element (FE) based. The value of the monitoring is calculated using structural reliability theory. A high cycle fatigue crack propagation model is assumed as the damage mecha......- and without monitoring. Monte Carlo Sampling (MCS) is used to estimate the probabilities and the tower of an onshore NREL 5MW wind turbine is given as a calculation case......A scenario- and vibration based structural damage detection method is demonstrated though simulation. The method is Finite Element (FE) based. The value of the monitoring is calculated using structural reliability theory. A high cycle fatigue crack propagation model is assumed as the damage...

  18. Frequency of damage by external hazards based on geographical information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, G. [RISA Sicherheitsanalysen GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Camarinopoulos, A.; Karali, T. [ERRA, Athens (Greece); Camarinopoulos, L. [Piraeus Univ. (Greece); Schubert, B. [VENE, Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    External explosions can significantly contribute to risk of damage for industrial plants. External explosions may origin from other plants in the neighborhood, which store and operate with explosive substances, or from transport of such substances on road, rail, or water. In all cases, some accident is a necessary condition for a hazard. Another probabilistic element is the probability of ignition. If transport causes the explosion, the location of the accident will influence the consequences. If deflagration is involved, ignition will not necessarily occur at the place of the accident, but a cloud of a combustible gas-air mixture may develop, which will ignite at some distance depending on wind velocity. In order to avoid unnecessarily pessimistic approaches, geographical information can be used in addition to local weather statistics. Geographical information systems provide map material for sites, roads, rail and rivers on a computer. This information can be used to find frequencies of damage based on numerical integration or on Monte Carlo simulation. A probabilistic model has been developed. It is based on: - A joint probability density function for wind direction and wind speed, which has been estimated from local weather statistics, - Frequency of hazards for neighboring plants and various types of traffic, - Statistics on the amounts and types of explosive materials, - The model has been implemented using one numerical integrations method and two variants of Monte Carlo method. Data has been collected and applied for a nuclear power plant in Northern Germany as an example. The method, however, can be used for any type of plant subject to external explosion hazards. In its present form, it makes use of design criteria specific for nuclear power plants, but these could be replaced by different criteria. (orig.)

  19. Frequency of damage by external hazards based on geographical information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, G.; Camarinopoulos, A.; Karali, T.; Camarinopoulos, L.; Schubert, B.

    2013-01-01

    External explosions can significantly contribute to risk of damage for industrial plants. External explosions may origin from other plants in the neighborhood, which store and operate with explosive substances, or from transport of such substances on road, rail, or water. In all cases, some accident is a necessary condition for a hazard. Another probabilistic element is the probability of ignition. If transport causes the explosion, the location of the accident will influence the consequences. If deflagration is involved, ignition will not necessarily occur at the place of the accident, but a cloud of a combustible gas-air mixture may develop, which will ignite at some distance depending on wind velocity. In order to avoid unnecessarily pessimistic approaches, geographical information can be used in addition to local weather statistics. Geographical information systems provide map material for sites, roads, rail and rivers on a computer. This information can be used to find frequencies of damage based on numerical integration or on Monte Carlo simulation. A probabilistic model has been developed. It is based on: - A joint probability density function for wind direction and wind speed, which has been estimated from local weather statistics, - Frequency of hazards for neighboring plants and various types of traffic, - Statistics on the amounts and types of explosive materials, - The model has been implemented using one numerical integrations method and two variants of Monte Carlo method. Data has been collected and applied for a nuclear power plant in Northern Germany as an example. The method, however, can be used for any type of plant subject to external explosion hazards. In its present form, it makes use of design criteria specific for nuclear power plants, but these could be replaced by different criteria. (orig.)

  20. Modeling of laser damage initiated by surface contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Faux, D.R.; Riddle, R.A.; Shapiro, A.; Eder, D.C.; Penetrante, B.M.; Milam, D.; Genin, F.Y.; Kozlowski, M.R.

    1996-11-01

    The authors are engaged in a comprehensive effort to understand and model the initiation and growth of laser damage initiated by surface contaminants. This includes, for example, the initial absorption by the contaminant, heating and plasma generation, pressure and thermal loading of the transparent substrate, and subsequent shockwave propagation, 'splashing' of molten material and possible spallation, optical propagation and scattering, and treatment of material fracture. The integration use of large radiation hydrodynamics codes, optical propagation codes and material strength codes enables a comprehensive view of the damage process The following picture of surface contaminant initiated laser damage is emerging from our simulations

  1. Modeling of reflood of severely damaged reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachrata, A.

    2012-01-01

    The TMI-2 accident and recently Fukushima accident demonstrated that the nuclear safety philosophy has to cover accident sequences involving massive core melt in order to develop reliable mitigation strategies for both, existing and advanced reactors. Although severe accidents are low likelihood and might be caused only by multiple failures, accident management is implemented for controlling their course and mitigating their consequences. In case of severe accident, the fuel rods may be severely damaged and oxidized. Finally, they collapse and form a debris bed on core support plate. Removal of decay heat from a damaged core is a challenging issue because of the difficulty for water to penetrate inside a porous medium. The reflooding (injection of water into core) may be applied only if the availability of safety injection is recovered during accident. If the injection becomes available only in the late phase of accident, water will enter a core configuration that will differ from original rod bundle geometry and will resemble to the severe damaged core observed in TMI-2. The higher temperatures and smaller hydraulic diameters in a porous medium make the coolability more difficult than for intact fuel rods under typical loss of coolant accident conditions. The modeling of this kind of hydraulic and heat transfer is a one of key objectives of this. At IRSN, part of the studies is realized using an European thermo-hydraulic computer code for severe accident analysis ICARE-CATHARE. The objective of this thesis is to develop a 3D reflood model (implemented into ICARE-CATHARE) that is able to treat different configurations of degraded core in a case of severe accident. The proposed model is characterized by treating of non-equilibrium thermal between the solid, liquid and gas phase. It includes also two momentum balance equations. The model is based on a previously developed model but is improved in order to take into account intense boiling regimes (in particular

  2. Research on damage evolution and damage model of 316LN steel during forging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, X.W., E-mail: dxwmike1998@sina.com; Liu, J.S.

    2013-12-20

    The tensile tests and unloading tensile experiments of 316LN steel were conducted. The damage evolution processes were investigated by optical microscope. The fracture was studied using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and optical microscope, of which, the chemical compositions were analyzed by Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS). The results show that voids nucleate by decohesion of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} inclusions–matrix interface and mainly along the grain boundary, especially, at triangular grain boundary junctions. The tensile processes were simulated by Deform2D under different deformation conditions. The critical damage values were obtained. The model between the critical damage value, temperature and strain rate was established by regression analysis. A combination of numerical simulation and upsetting experiments was applied for verifying the accuracy and reliability of critical damage value. These damage values can be used to predict the initiation of voids during 316LN steel hot forging. So, they have important instructional effects on designing forging technology of 316LN steel.

  3. Damage Identification of a Derrick Steel Structure Based on the HHT Marginal Spectrum Amplitude Curvature Difference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongying Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For the damage identification of derrick steel structures, traditional methods often require high-order vibration information of structures to identify damage accurately. However, the high-order vibration information of structures is difficult to acquire. Based on the technology of signal feature extraction, only using the low-order vibration information, taking the right front leg as an example, we analyzed the selection of HHT marginal spectrum amplitude and the calculation process of its curvature in practical application, designed the damage conditions of a derrick steel structure, used the index and intrinsic mode function (IMF instantaneous energy curvature method to perform the damage simulation calculation and comparison, and verified the effect of identifying the damage location in a noisy environment. The results show that the index can accurately determine the location of the damage element and weak damage element and can be used to qualitatively analyze the damage degree of the element; under the impact load, the noise hardly affects the identification of the damage location. Finally, this method was applied to the ZJ70 derrick steel structure laboratory model and compared with the IMF instantaneous energy curvature method. We verified the feasibility of this method in the damage location simulation experiment.

  4. Micromechanics-Based Damage Analysis of Fracture in Ti5553 Alloy with Application to Bolted Sectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettaieb, Mohamed Ben; Van Hoof, Thibaut; Minnebo, Hans; Pardoen, Thomas; Dufour, Philippe; Jacques, Pascal J.; Habraken, Anne Marie

    2015-03-01

    A physics-based, uncoupled damage model is calibrated using cylindrical notched round tensile specimens made of Ti5553 and Ti-6Al-4V alloys. The fracture strain of Ti5553 is lower than for Ti-6Al-4V in the full range of stress triaxiality. This lower ductility originates from a higher volume fraction of damage sites. By proper heat treatment, the fracture strain of Ti5553 increases by almost a factor of two, as a result of a larger damage nucleation stress. This result proves the potential for further optimization of the damage resistance of the Ti5553 alloy. The damage model is combined with an elastoviscoplastic law in order to predict failure in a wide range of loading conditions. In particular, a specific application involving bolted sectors is addressed in order to determine the potential of replacing the Ti-6Al-4V by the Ti5553 alloy.

  5. Damage modeling in Small Punch Test specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez Pañeda, Emilio; Cuesta, I.I.; Peñuelas, I.

    2016-01-01

    . Furthermore,Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model predictions from a top-down approach are employed to gain insightinto the mechanisms governing crack initiation and subsequent propagation in small punch experiments.An accurate assessment of micromechanical toughness parameters from the SPT...

  6. Non-Fourier based thermal-mechanical tissue damage prediction for thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhong, Yongmin; Smith, Julian; Gu, Chengfan

    2017-01-02

    Prediction of tissue damage under thermal loads plays important role for thermal ablation planning. A new methodology is presented in this paper by combing non-Fourier bio-heat transfer, constitutive elastic mechanics as well as non-rigid motion of dynamics to predict and analyze thermal distribution, thermal-induced mechanical deformation and thermal-mechanical damage of soft tissues under thermal loads. Simulations and comparison analysis demonstrate that the proposed methodology based on the non-Fourier bio-heat transfer can account for the thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues and predict tissue thermal damage more accurately than classical Fourier bio-heat transfer based model.

  7. Two-dimensional strain gradient damage modeling: a variational approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placidi, Luca; Misra, Anil; Barchiesi, Emilio

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we formulate a linear elastic second gradient isotropic two-dimensional continuum model accounting for irreversible damage. The failure is defined as the condition in which the damage parameter reaches 1, at least in one point of the domain. The quasi-static approximation is done, i.e., the kinetic energy is assumed to be negligible. In order to deal with dissipation, a damage dissipation term is considered in the deformation energy functional. The key goal of this paper is to apply a non-standard variational procedure to exploit the damage irreversibility argument. As a result, we derive not only the equilibrium equations but, notably, also the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions. Finally, numerical simulations for exemplary problems are discussed as some constitutive parameters are varying, with the inclusion of a mesh-independence evidence. Element-free Galerkin method and moving least square shape functions have been employed.

  8. A detailed physical model for ion implant induced damage in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, S.; Morris, M.F.; Morris, S.J.; Obradovic, B.; Wang, G.; Tasch, A.F.

    1998-01-01

    A unified physically based ion implantation damage model has been developed which successfully predicts both the impurity profiles and the damage profiles for a wide range of implant conditions for arsenic, phosphorus, BF 2 , and boron implants into single-crystal silicon. In addition, the amorphous layer thicknesses predicted by this new damage model are also in excellent agreement with experimental measurements. This damage model is based on the physics of point defects in silicon, and explicitly simulates the defect production, diffusion, and their interactions which include interstitial-vacancy recombination, clustering of same type of defects, defect-impurity complex formation, emission of mobile defects from clusters, and surface effects for the first time. New computationally efficient algorithms have been developed to overcome the barrier of the excessive computational requirements. In addition, the new model has been incorporated in the UT-MARLOWE ion implantation simulator, and has been developed primarily for use in engineering workstations. This damage model is the most physical model in the literature to date within the framework of the binary collision approximation (BCA), and provides the required, accurate as-implanted impurity profiles and damage profiles for transient enhanced diffusion (TED) simulation

  9. Progressive Damage Modeling of Durable Bonded Joint Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Frank A.; Davila, Carlos G.; Lin, Shih-Yung; Smeltzer, Stan; Girolamo, Donato; Ghose, Sayata; Guzman, Juan C.; McCarville, Duglas A.

    2013-01-01

    The development of durable bonded joint technology for assembling composite structures for launch vehicles is being pursued for the U.S. Space Launch System. The present work is related to the development and application of progressive damage modeling techniques to bonded joint technology applicable to a wide range of sandwich structures for a Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle. The joint designs studied in this work include a conventional composite splice joint and a NASA-patented Durable Redundant Joint. Both designs involve a honeycomb sandwich with carbon/epoxy facesheets joined with adhesively bonded doublers. Progressive damage modeling allows for the prediction of the initiation and evolution of damage. For structures that include multiple materials, the number of potential failure mechanisms that must be considered increases the complexity of the analyses. Potential failure mechanisms include fiber fracture, matrix cracking, delamination, core crushing, adhesive failure, and their interactions. The joints were modeled using Abaqus parametric finite element models, in which damage was modeled with user-written subroutines. Each ply was meshed discretely, and layers of cohesive elements were used to account for delaminations and to model the adhesive layers. Good correlation with experimental results was achieved both in terms of load-displacement history and predicted failure mechanisms.

  10. Continuum damage mechanics based approach to the fatigue life prediction of cast aluminium alloy with considering the effect of porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiaojia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A damage mechanics based approach is applied for the study of fatigue behaviour of high pressure die cast ADC12 aluminium alloy. A damage coupled elastoplastic constitutive model is presented according to the concept of effective stress and the hypothesis of strain equivalence. An elastic fatigue damage model taking into account the pore-induced stress concentration is developed to investigate fatigue damage evolution of the specimens subjected to cyclic loading. The predicted lives for the specimens with different sizes of pores are consistent with the experimental data. The pore-induced fatigue damage and the variation of fatigue life along with the size of pores are also investigated.

  11. A comparative assessment of different frequency based damage detection in unidirectional composite plates using MFC sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Medeiros, Ricardo; Sartorato, Murilo; Vandepitte, Dirk; Tita, Volnei

    2016-11-01

    The basic concept of the vibration based damage identification methods is that the dynamic behaviour of a structure can change if damage occurs. Damage in a structure can alter the structural integrity, and therefore, the physical properties like stiffness, mass and/or damping may change. The dynamic behaviour of a structure is a function of these physical properties and will, therefore, directly be affected by the damage. The dynamic behaviour can be described in terms of time, frequency and modal domain parameters. The changes in these parameters (or properties derived from these parameters) are used as indicators of damage. Hence, this work has two main objectives. The first one is to provide an overview of the structural vibration based damage identification methods. For this purpose, a fundamental description of the structural vibration based damage identification problem is given, followed by a short literature overview of the damage features, which are commonly addressed. The second objective is to create a damage identification method for detection of the damage in composite structures. To aid in this process, two basic principles are discussed, namely the effect of the potential damage case on the dynamic behaviour, and the consequences involved with the information reduction in the signal processing. Modal properties from the structural dynamic output response are obtained. In addition, experimental and computational results are presented for the application of modal analysis techniques applied to composite specimens with and without damage. The excitation of the structures is performed using an impact hammer and, for measuring the output data, accelerometers as well as piezoelectric sensors. Finite element models are developed by shell elements, and numerical results are compared to experimental data, showing good correlation for the response of the specimens in some specific frequency range. Finally, FRFs are analysed using suitable metrics, including a

  12. Probabilistic, multi-variate flood damage modelling using random forests and Bayesian networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreibich, Heidi; Schröter, Kai

    2015-04-01

    Decisions on flood risk management and adaptation are increasingly based on risk analyses. Such analyses are associated with considerable uncertainty, even more if changes in risk due to global change are expected. Although uncertainty analysis and probabilistic approaches have received increased attention recently, they are hardly applied in flood damage assessments. Most of the damage models usually applied in standard practice have in common that complex damaging processes are described by simple, deterministic approaches like stage-damage functions. This presentation will show approaches for probabilistic, multi-variate flood damage modelling on the micro- and meso-scale and discuss their potential and limitations. Reference: Merz, B.; Kreibich, H.; Lall, U. (2013): Multi-variate flood damage assessment: a tree-based data-mining approach. NHESS, 13(1), 53-64. Schröter, K., Kreibich, H., Vogel, K., Riggelsen, C., Scherbaum, F., Merz, B. (2014): How useful are complex flood damage models? - Water Resources Research, 50, 4, p. 3378-3395.

  13. FRF-based structural damage detection of controlled buildings with podium structures: Experimental investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y. L.; Huang, Q.; Zhan, S.; Su, Z. Q.; Liu, H. J.

    2014-06-01

    How to use control devices to enhance system identification and damage detection in relation to a structure that requires both vibration control and structural health monitoring is an interesting yet practical topic. In this study, the possibility of using the added stiffness provided by control devices and frequency response functions (FRFs) to detect damage in a building complex was explored experimentally. Scale models of a 12-storey main building and a 3-storey podium structure were built to represent a building complex. Given that the connection between the main building and the podium structure is most susceptible to damage, damage to the building complex was experimentally simulated by changing the connection stiffness. To simulate the added stiffness provided by a semi-active friction damper, a steel circular ring was designed and used to add the related stiffness to the building complex. By varying the connection stiffness using an eccentric wheel excitation system and by adding or not adding the circular ring, eight cases were investigated and eight sets of FRFs were measured. The experimental results were used to detect damage (changes in connection stiffness) using a recently proposed FRF-based damage detection method. The experimental results showed that the FRF-based damage detection method could satisfactorily locate and quantify damage.

  14. An approach to modelling radiation damage by fast ionizing particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents a statistical approach to modelling radiation damage in small biological structures such as enzymes, viruses, and some cells. Irreparable damage is assumed to be caused by the occurrence of ionizations within sensitive regions. For structures containing double-stranded DNA, one or more ionizations occurring within each strand of the DNA will cause inactivation; for simpler structures without double-stranded DNA a single ionization within the structure will be sufficient for inactivation. Damaging ionizations occur along tracks of primary irradiating particles or along tracks of secondary particles released at primary ionizations. An inactivation probability is derived for each damage mechanism, expressed in integral form in terms of the radius of the biological structure (assumed spherical), rate of ionization along primary tracks, and maximum energy for secondary particles. The performance of each model is assessed by comparing results from the model with those derived from data from various experimental studies extracted from the literature. For structures where a single ionization is sufficient for inactivation, the model gives qualitatively promising results; for larger more complex structures containing double-stranded DNA, the model requires further refinements. (author)

  15. A model for damage load and its implications for the evolution of bacterial aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chao

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Deleterious mutations appearing in a population increase in frequency until stopped by natural selection. The ensuing equilibrium creates a stable frequency of deleterious mutations or the mutational load. Here I develop the comparable concept of a damage load, which is caused by harmful non-heritable changes to the phenotype. A damage load also ensues when the increase of damage is opposed by selection. The presence of a damage load favors the evolution of asymmetrical transmission of damage by a mother to her daughters. The asymmetry is beneficial because it increases fitness variance, but it also leads to aging or senescence. A mathematical model based on microbes reveals that a cell lineage dividing symmetrically is immortal if lifetime damage rates do not exceed a threshold. The evolution of asymmetry allows the lineage to persist above the threshold, but the lineage becomes mortal. In microbes with low genomic mutation rates, it is likely that the damage load is much greater than the mutational load. In metazoans with higher genomic mutation rates, the damage and the mutational load could be of the same magnitude. A fit of the model to experimental data shows that Escherichia coli cells experience a damage rate that is below the threshold and are immortal under the conditions examined. The model estimates the asymmetry level of E. coli to be low but sufficient for persisting at higher damage rates. The model also predicts that increasing asymmetry results in diminishing fitness returns, which may explain why the bacterium has not evolved higher asymmetry.

  16. An approach for the modeling of interface-body coupled nonlocal damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Toti

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Fiber Reinforced Plastic (FRP can be used for strengthening concrete or masonry constructions. One of the main problem in the use of FRP is the possible detachment of the reinforcement from the support material. This paper deals with the modeling of the FRP-concrete or masonry damage interface, accounting for the coupling occurring between the degradation of the cohesive material and the FRP detachment. To this end, a damage model is considered for the quasi-brittle material. In order to prevent strain localization and strong mesh sensitivity of the solution, an integral-type of nonlocal model based on the weighted spatial averaging of a strain-like quantity is developed. Regarding the interface, the damage is governed by the relative displacement occurring at bond. A suitable interface model which accounts for the mode I, mode II and mixed mode of damage is developed. The coupling between the body damage and the interface damage is performed computing the body damage on the bond surface. Numerical examples are presented.

  17. Micromechanics-Based Damage Analysis of Fracture in Ti5553 Alloy with Application to Bolted Sectors

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Bettaieb, Mohamed; Van Hoof, Thibaut; Minnebo, Hans; Pardoen, Thomas; Dufour, Philippe; Jacques, Pascal; Habraken, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    A physics-based, uncoupled damage model is calibrated using cylindrical notched round tensile specimens made of Ti5553 and Ti-6Al-4V alloys. The fracture strain of Ti5553 is lower than for Ti-6Al-4V in the full range of stress triaxiality. This lower ductility originates from a higher volume fraction of damage sites. By proper heat treatment, the fracture strain of Ti5553 increases by almost a factor of two, as a result of a larger damage nucleation stress. This result proves the potential fo...

  18. The current state of eukaryotic DNA base damage and repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Nicholas C; Corbett, Anita H; Doetsch, Paul W

    2015-12-02

    DNA damage is a natural hazard of life. The most common DNA lesions are base, sugar, and single-strand break damage resulting from oxidation, alkylation, deamination, and spontaneous hydrolysis. If left unrepaired, such lesions can become fixed in the genome as permanent mutations. Thus, evolution has led to the creation of several highly conserved, partially redundant pathways to repair or mitigate the effects of DNA base damage. The biochemical mechanisms of these pathways have been well characterized and the impact of this work was recently highlighted by the selection of Tomas Lindahl, Aziz Sancar and Paul Modrich as the recipients of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for their seminal work in defining DNA repair pathways. However, how these repair pathways are regulated and interconnected is still being elucidated. This review focuses on the classical base excision repair and strand incision pathways in eukaryotes, considering both Saccharomyces cerevisiae and humans, and extends to some important questions and challenges facing the field of DNA base damage repair. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Fatigue Damage Estimation and Data-based Control for Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barradas Berglind, Jose de Jesus; Wisniewski, Rafal; Soltani, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    based on hysteresis operators, which can be used in control loops. The authors propose a data-based model predictive control (MPC) strategy that incorporates an online fatigue estimation method through the objective function, where the ultimate goal in mind is to reduce the fatigue damage of the wind......The focus of this work is on fatigue estimation and data-based controller design for wind turbines. The main purpose is to include a model of the fatigue damage of the wind turbine components in the controller design and synthesis process. This study addresses an online fatigue estimation method...... turbine components. The outcome is an adaptive or self-tuning MPC strategy for wind turbine fatigue damage reduction, which relies on parameter identification on previous measurement data. The results of the proposed strategy are compared with a baseline model predictive controller....

  20. Spectral algorithm for non-destructive damage localisation: Application to an ancient masonry arch model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masciotta, Maria-Giovanna; Ramos, Luís F.; Lourenço, Paulo B.; Vasta, Marcello

    2017-02-01

    Structural monitoring and vibration-based damage identification methods are fundamental tools for condition assessment and early-stage damage identification, especially when dealing with the conservation of historical constructions and the maintenance of strategic civil structures. However, although the substantial advances in the field, several issues must still be addressed to broaden the application range of such tools and to assert their reliability. This study deals with the experimental validation of a novel method for non-destructive damage identification purposes. This method is based on the use of spectral output signals and has been recently validated by the authors through a numerical simulation. After a brief insight into the basic principles of the proposed approach, the spectral-based technique is applied to identify the experimental damage induced on a masonry arch through statically increasing loading. Once the direct and cross spectral density functions of the nodal response processes are estimated, the system's output power spectrum matrix is built and decomposed in eigenvalues and eigenvectors. The present study points out how the extracted spectral eigenparameters contribute to the damage analysis allowing to detect the occurrence of damage and to locate the target points where the cracks appear during the experimental tests. The sensitivity of the spectral formulation to the level of noise in the modal data is investigated and discussed. As a final evaluation criterion, the results from the spectrum-driven method are compared with the ones obtained from existing non-model based damage identification methods.

  1. Experimental data available for radiation damage modelling in reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollenberger, H.

    Radiation damage modelling requires rate constants for production, annihilation and trapping of defects. The literature is reviewed with respect to experimental determination of such constants. Useful quantitative information exists only for Cu and Al. Special emphasis is given to the temperature dependence of the rate constants

  2. Using Non-linear Homogenization to Improve the Performance of Macroscopic Damage Models of Trabecular Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levrero-Florencio, Francesc; Pankaj, Pankaj

    2018-01-01

    Realistic macro-level finite element simulations of the mechanical behavior of trabecular bone, a cellular anisotropic material, require a suitable constitutive model; a model that incorporates the mechanical response of bone for complex loading scenarios and includes post-elastic phenomena, such as plasticity (permanent deformations) and damage (permanent stiffness reduction), which bone is likely to experience. Some such models have been developed by conducting homogenization-based multiscale finite element simulations on bone micro-structure. While homogenization has been fairly successful in the elastic regime and, to some extent, in modeling the macroscopic plastic response, it has remained a challenge with respect to modeling damage. This study uses a homogenization scheme to upscale the damage behavior from the tissue level (microscale) to the organ level (macroscale) and assesses the suitability of different damage constitutive laws. Ten cubic specimens were each subjected to 21 strain-controlled load cases for a small range of macroscopic post-elastic strains. Isotropic and anisotropic criteria were considered, density and fabric relationships were used in the formulation of the damage law, and a combined isotropic/anisotropic law with tension/compression asymmetry was formulated, based on the homogenized results, as a possible alternative to the currently used single scalar damage criterion. This computational study enhances the current knowledge on the macroscopic damage behavior of trabecular bone. By developing relationships of damage progression with bone's micro-architectural indices (density and fabric) the study also provides an aid for the creation of more precise macroscale continuum models, which are likely to improve clinical predictions.

  3. Dose-rate and temperature dependent statistical damage accumulation model for ion implantation into silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Mangas, J.M. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain)]. E-mail: jesus.hernandez.mangas@tel.uva.es; Arias, J. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain); Marques, L.A. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain); Ruiz-Bueno, A. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain); Bailon, L. [Dpto. de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicaciones, Campus Miguel Delibes, Valladolid E-47011 (Spain)

    2005-01-01

    Currently there are extensive atomistic studies that model some characteristics of the damage buildup due to ion irradiation (e.g. L. Pelaz et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 82 (2003) 2038-2040). Our interest is to develop a novel statistical damage buildup model for our BCA ion implant simulator (IIS) code in order to extend its ranges of applicability. The model takes into account the abrupt regime of the crystal-amorphous transition. It works with different temperatures and dose-rates and also models the transition temperature. We have tested it with some projectiles (Ge, P) implanted into silicon. In this work we describe the new statistical damage accumulation model based on the modified Kinchin-Pease model. The results obtained have been compared with existing experimental results.

  4. Dose-rate and temperature dependent statistical damage accumulation model for ion implantation into silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Mangas, J.M.; Arias, J.; Marques, L.A.; Ruiz-Bueno, A.; Bailon, L.

    2005-01-01

    Currently there are extensive atomistic studies that model some characteristics of the damage buildup due to ion irradiation (e.g. L. Pelaz et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 82 (2003) 2038-2040). Our interest is to develop a novel statistical damage buildup model for our BCA ion implant simulator (IIS) code in order to extend its ranges of applicability. The model takes into account the abrupt regime of the crystal-amorphous transition. It works with different temperatures and dose-rates and also models the transition temperature. We have tested it with some projectiles (Ge, P) implanted into silicon. In this work we describe the new statistical damage accumulation model based on the modified Kinchin-Pease model. The results obtained have been compared with existing experimental results

  5. A new model for fatigue damage accumulation of austenitic stainless steel under variable amplitude loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taheri, S.; Vincent, L.; Le-Roux, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    The application of Miner's rule using a loading issued from a mock-up of a RHR system (removal heat system) of PWR plant, made of 304 steel gives a very important non-conservative fatigue life in strain control when strain fatigue curve is used. This result is due to the absence of sequence effect in Miner's rule. Many non linear damage accumulation models have been proposed to get a sequence effect. Shortcomings of some non linear damage accumulation models are discussed. So Smith-Watson-Topper and Fatemi-Socie criterions with a linear damage accumulation rule are then applied to experimental data. A major issue is the need for an elastic-plastic constitutive law which is difficult to propose in the presence of high cycle secondary hardening observed in austenitic stainless steels. A conservative model for fatigue damage accumulation under variable amplitude loading is then proposed for austenitic stainless steels in strain control, which does not need a constitutive law, but takes into account plasticity through cyclic strain stress curve. The model uses a linear damage accumulation rule. This model is based on the fact that for stainless steels, pre-hardening is detrimental for fatigue life in strain control, while it is beneficial in stress control. In the presence of low mean stress, the model is approved based on a large number of tests. Moreover the model allows to explain the larger detrimental effect of a tension mean stress in strain control tests than in stress control tests. (authors)

  6. A Tensor-Based Structural Damage Identification and Severity Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaissi, Ali; Makki Alamdari, Mehrisadat; Rakotoarivelo, Thierry; Khoa, Nguyen Lu Dang

    2018-01-01

    Early damage detection is critical for a large set of global ageing infrastructure. Structural Health Monitoring systems provide a sensor-based quantitative and objective approach to continuously monitor these structures, as opposed to traditional engineering visual inspection. Analysing these sensed data is one of the major Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) challenges. This paper presents a novel algorithm to detect and assess damage in structures such as bridges. This method applies tensor analysis for data fusion and feature extraction, and further uses one-class support vector machine on this feature to detect anomalies, i.e., structural damage. To evaluate this approach, we collected acceleration data from a sensor-based SHM system, which we deployed on a real bridge and on a laboratory specimen. The results show that our tensor method outperforms a state-of-the-art approach using the wavelet energy spectrum of the measured data. In the specimen case, our approach succeeded in detecting 92.5% of induced damage cases, as opposed to 61.1% for the wavelet-based approach. While our method was applied to bridges, its algorithm and computation can be used on other structures or sensor-data analysis problems, which involve large series of correlated data from multiple sensors. PMID:29301314

  7. Damage Level Prediction of Reinforced Concrete Building Based on Earthquake Time History Using Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryanita Reni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The strong motion earthquake could cause the building damage in case of the building not considered in the earthquake design of the building. The study aims to predict the damage-level of building due to earthquake using Artificial Neural Networks method. The building model is a reinforced concrete building with ten floors and height between floors is 3.6 m. The model building received a load of the earthquake based on nine earthquake time history records. Each time history scaled to 0,5g, 0,75g, and 1,0g. The Artificial Neural Networks are designed in 4 architectural models using the MATLAB program. Model 1 used the displacement, velocity, and acceleration as input and Model 2 used the displacement only as the input. Model 3 used the velocity as input, and Model 4 used the acceleration just as input. The output of the Neural Networks is the damage level of the building with the category of Safe (1, Immediate Occupancy (2, Life Safety (3 or in a condition of Collapse Prevention (4. According to the results, Neural Network models have the prediction rate of the damage level between 85%-95%. Therefore, one of the solutions for analyzing the structural responses and the damage level promptly and efficiently when the earthquake occurred is by using Artificial Neural Network

  8. A gradient enhanced plasticity-damage microplane model for concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zreid, Imadeddin; Kaliske, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Computational modeling of concrete poses two main types of challenges. The first is the mathematical description of local response for such a heterogeneous material under all stress states, and the second is the stability and efficiency of the numerical implementation in finite element codes. The paper at hand presents a comprehensive approach addressing both issues. Adopting the microplane theory, a combined plasticity-damage model is formulated and regularized by an implicit gradient enhancement. The plasticity part introduces a new microplane smooth 3-surface cap yield function, which provides a stable numerical solution within an implicit finite element algorithm. The damage part utilizes a split, which can describe the transition of loading between tension and compression. Regularization of the model by the implicit gradient approach eliminates the mesh sensitivity and numerical instabilities. Identification methods for model parameters are proposed and several numerical examples of plain and reinforced concrete are carried out for illustration.

  9. Statistical Damage Detection of Civil Engineering Structures using ARMAV Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    In this paper a statistically based damage detection of a lattice steel mast is performed. By estimation of the modal parameters and their uncertainties it is possible to detect whether some of the modal parameters have changed with a statistical significance. The estimation of the uncertainties ...

  10. Hydromechanical modeling of clay rock including fracture damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahina, D.; Houseworth, J. E.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2012-12-01

    Argillaceous rock typically acts as a flow barrier, but under certain conditions significant and potentially conductive fractures may be present. Fracture formation is well-known to occur in the vicinity of underground excavations in a region known as the excavation disturbed zone. Such problems are of particular importance for low-permeability, mechanically weak rock such as clays and shales because fractures can be relatively transient as a result of fracture self-sealing processes. Perhaps not as well appreciated is the fact that natural fractures can form in argillaceous rock as a result of hydraulic overpressure caused by phenomena such as disequlibrium compaction, changes in tectonic stress, and mineral dehydration. Overpressure conditions can cause hydraulic fracturing if the fluid pressure leads to tensile effective stresses that exceed the tensile strength of the material. Quantitative modeling of this type of process requires coupling between hydrogeologic processes and geomechanical processes including fracture initiation and propagation. Here we present a computational method for three-dimensional, hydromechanical coupled processes including fracture damage. Fractures are represented as discrete features in a fracture network that interact with a porous rock matrix. Fracture configurations are mapped onto an unstructured, three-dimensonal, Voronoi grid, which is based on a random set of spatial points. Discrete fracture networks (DFN) are represented by the connections of the edges of a Voronoi cells. This methodology has the advantage that fractures can be more easily introduced in response to coupled hydro-mechanical processes and generally eliminates several potential issues associated with the geometry of DFN and numerical gridding. A geomechanical and fracture-damage model is developed here using the Rigid-Body-Spring-Network (RBSN) numerical method. The hydrogelogic and geomechanical models share the same geometrical information from a 3D Voronoi

  11. Stochastic output error vibration-based damage detection and assessment in structures under earthquake excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, J. S.; Fassois, S. D.

    2006-11-01

    A stochastic output error (OE) vibration-based methodology for damage detection and assessment (localization and quantification) in structures under earthquake excitation is introduced. The methodology is intended for assessing the state of a structure following potential damage occurrence by exploiting vibration signal measurements produced by low-level earthquake excitations. It is based upon (a) stochastic OE model identification, (b) statistical hypothesis testing procedures for damage detection, and (c) a geometric method (GM) for damage assessment. The methodology's advantages include the effective use of the non-stationary and limited duration earthquake excitation, the handling of stochastic uncertainties, the tackling of the damage localization and quantification subproblems, the use of "small" size, simple and partial (in both the spatial and frequency bandwidth senses) identified OE-type models, and the use of a minimal number of measured vibration signals. Its feasibility and effectiveness are assessed via Monte Carlo experiments employing a simple simulation model of a 6 storey building. It is demonstrated that damage levels of 5% and 20% reduction in a storey's stiffness characteristics may be properly detected and assessed using noise-corrupted vibration signals.

  12. A prediction and damage assessment model for snowmelt flood events in middle and high latitudes Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, C.; Huang, Q.; Chen, T.; Zhang, X.

    2017-12-01

    In the context of global warming, the snowmelt flood events in the mountainous area of the middle and high latitudes are increasingly frequent and create severe casualties and property damages. Carrying out the prediction and risk assessment of the snowmelt flood is of great importance in the water resources management, the flood warning and prevention. Based on the remote sensing and GIS techniques, the relationships of the variables influencing the snowmelt flood such as the snow area, the snow depth, the air temperature, the precipitation, the land topography and land covers are analyzed and a prediction and damage assessment model for snowmelt floods is developed. This model analyzes and predicts the flood submerging area, flood depth, flood grade, and the damages of different underlying surfaces in the study area in a given time period based on the estimation of snowmelt amount, the snowmelt runoff, the direction and velocity of the flood. Then it was used to predict a snowmelt flood event in the Ertis River Basin in northern Xinjiang, China, during March and June, 2005 and to assess its damages including the damages of roads, transmission lines, settlements caused by the floods and the possible landslides using the hydrological and meteorological data, snow parameter data, DEM data and land use data. A comparison was made between the prediction results from this model and observation data including the flood measurement and its disaster loss data, which suggests that this model performs well in predicting the strength and impact area of snowmelt flood and its damage assessment. This model will be helpful for the prediction and damage assessment of snowmelt flood events in the mountainous area in the middle and high latitudes in spring, which has great social and economic significance because it provides a relatively reliable method for snowmelt flood prediction and reduces the possible damages caused by snowmelt floods.

  13. Identification of damage in composite structures using Gaussian mixture model-processed Lamb waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Ma, Shuxian; Yue, Dong

    2018-04-01

    Composite materials have comprehensively better properties than traditional materials, and therefore have been more and more widely used, especially because of its higher strength-weight ratio. However, the damage of composite structures is usually varied and complicated. In order to ensure the security of these structures, it is necessary to monitor and distinguish the structural damage in a timely manner. Lamb wave-based structural health monitoring (SHM) has been proved to be effective in online structural damage detection and evaluation; furthermore, the characteristic parameters of the multi-mode Lamb wave varies in response to different types of damage in the composite material. This paper studies the damage identification approach for composite structures using the Lamb wave and the Gaussian mixture model (GMM). The algorithm and principle of the GMM, and the parameter estimation, is introduced. Multi-statistical characteristic parameters of the excited Lamb waves are extracted, and the parameter space with reduced dimensions is adopted by principal component analysis (PCA). The damage identification system using the GMM is then established through training. Experiments on a glass fiber-reinforced epoxy composite laminate plate are conducted to verify the feasibility of the proposed approach in terms of damage classification. The experimental results show that different types of damage can be identified according to the value of the likelihood function of the GMM.

  14. UAV-based urban structural damage assessment using object-based image analysis and semantic reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez Galarreta, J.; Kerle, N.; Gerke, M.

    2015-06-01

    Structural damage assessment is critical after disasters but remains a challenge. Many studies have explored the potential of remote sensing data, but limitations of vertical data persist. Oblique imagery has been identified as more useful, though the multi-angle imagery also adds a new dimension of complexity. This paper addresses damage assessment based on multi-perspective, overlapping, very high resolution oblique images obtained with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). 3-D point-cloud assessment for the entire building is combined with detailed object-based image analysis (OBIA) of façades and roofs. This research focuses not on automatic damage assessment, but on creating a methodology that supports the often ambiguous classification of intermediate damage levels, aiming at producing comprehensive per-building damage scores. We identify completely damaged structures in the 3-D point cloud, and for all other cases provide the OBIA-based damage indicators to be used as auxiliary information by damage analysts. The results demonstrate the usability of the 3-D point-cloud data to identify major damage features. Also the UAV-derived and OBIA-processed oblique images are shown to be a suitable basis for the identification of detailed damage features on façades and roofs. Finally, we also demonstrate the possibility of aggregating the multi-perspective damage information at building level.

  15. Smeared crack modelling approach for corrosion-induced concrete damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Anna Emilie Anusha; Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    In this paper a smeared crack modelling approach is used to simulate corrosion-induced damage in reinforced concrete. The presented modelling approach utilizes a thermal analogy to mimic the expansive nature of solid corrosion products, while taking into account the penetration of corrosion...... products into the surrounding concrete, non-uniform precipitation of corrosion products, and creep. To demonstrate the applicability of the presented modelling approach, numerical predictions in terms of corrosion-induced deformations as well as formation and propagation of micro- and macrocracks were......-induced damage phenomena in reinforced concrete. Moreover, good agreements were also found between experimental and numerical data for corrosion-induced deformations along the circumference of the reinforcement....

  16. Bread dough rheology: Computing with a damage function model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Roger I.; Qi, Fuzhong; Dai, Shaocong

    2015-01-01

    We describe an improved damage function model for bread dough rheology. The model has relatively few parameters, all of which can easily be found from simple experiments. Small deformations in the linear region are described by a gel-like power-law memory function. A set of large non-reversing deformations - stress relaxation after a step of shear, steady shearing and elongation beginning from rest, and biaxial stretching, is used to test the model. With the introduction of a revised strain measure which includes a Mooney-Rivlin term, all of these motions can be well described by the damage function described in previous papers. For reversing step strains, larger amplitude oscillatory shearing and recoil reasonable predictions have been found. The numerical methods used are discussed and we give some examples.

  17. Water sorption kinetics of damaged beans: GAB model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda M. Baptestini

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to model the water sorption kinetics of damaged beans. Grains with initial moisture content of 53.85%, dry basis (d.b., were used. One portion of the grains was used to obtain desorption isotherms, while the other was subjected to drying until the moisture content of 5.26% (d.b., so that it was subjected to the adsorption. For the induction of damage, a Stein Breakage Tester was used. To obtain the equilibrium moisture content, grains were placed in a climatic chamber at 20, 30, 40 and 50 ± 1 °C combined with relative humidity of 30, 40, 50, 70 and 90 ± 3%. The GAB model fitted well to the equilibrium moisture experimental data of damaged grains and control. With increasing temperature, the monolayer moisture contents decreased in adsorption and desorption processes, ranging from 9.84 to 5.10% d.b. The lower moisture content in the monolayer in damaged grains indicates that lower moisture content is necessary to ensure their conservation.

  18. Modelling of Damage Evolution in Braided Composites: Recent Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Roy, Anish; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.; Chen, Zhong

    2017-12-01

    Composites reinforced with woven or braided textiles exhibit high structural stability and excellent damage tolerance thanks to yarn interlacing. With their high stiffness-to-weight and strength-to-weight ratios, braided composites are attractive for aerospace and automotive components as well as sports protective equipment. In these potential applications, components are typically subjected to multi-directional static, impact and fatigue loadings. To enhance material analysis and design for such applications, understanding mechanical behaviour of braided composites and development of predictive capabilities becomes crucial. Significant progress has been made in recent years in development of new modelling techniques allowing elucidation of static and dynamic responses of braided composites. However, because of their unique interlacing geometric structure and complicated failure modes, prediction of damage initiation and its evolution in components is still a challenge. Therefore, a comprehensive literature analysis is presented in this work focused on a review of the state-of-the-art progressive damage analysis of braided composites with finite-element simulations. Recently models employed in the studies on mechanical behaviour, impact response and fatigue analyses of braided composites are presented systematically. This review highlights the importance, advantages and limitations of as-applied failure criteria and damage evolution laws for yarns and composite unit cells. In addition, this work provides a good reference for future research on FE simulations of braided composites.

  19. Laser-based structural sensing and surface damage detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guldur, Burcu

    Damage due to age or accumulated damage from hazards on existing structures poses a worldwide problem. In order to evaluate the current status of aging, deteriorating and damaged structures, it is vital to accurately assess the present conditions. It is possible to capture the in situ condition of structures by using laser scanners that create dense three-dimensional point clouds. This research investigates the use of high resolution three-dimensional terrestrial laser scanners with image capturing abilities as tools to capture geometric range data of complex scenes for structural engineering applications. Laser scanning technology is continuously improving, with commonly available scanners now capturing over 1,000,000 texture-mapped points per second with an accuracy of ~2 mm. However, automatically extracting meaningful information from point clouds remains a challenge, and the current state-of-the-art requires significant user interaction. The first objective of this research is to use widely accepted point cloud processing steps such as registration, feature extraction, segmentation, surface fitting and object detection to divide laser scanner data into meaningful object clusters and then apply several damage detection methods to these clusters. This required establishing a process for extracting important information from raw laser-scanned data sets such as the location, orientation and size of objects in a scanned region, and location of damaged regions on a structure. For this purpose, first a methodology for processing range data to identify objects in a scene is presented and then, once the objects from model library are correctly detected and fitted into the captured point cloud, these fitted objects are compared with the as-is point cloud of the investigated object to locate defects on the structure. The algorithms are demonstrated on synthetic scenes and validated on range data collected from test specimens and test-bed bridges. The second objective of

  20. Damage Detection for Historical Architectures Based on Tls Intensity Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q.; Cheng, X.

    2018-04-01

    TLS (Terrestrial Laser Scanner) has long been preferred in the cultural heritage field for 3D documentation of historical sites thanks to its ability to acquire the geometric information without any physical contact. Besides the geometric information, most TLS systems also record the intensity information, which is considered as an important measurement of the spectral property of the scanned surface. Recent studies have shown the potential of using intensity for damage detection. However, the original intensity is affected by scanning geometry such as range and incidence angle and other factors, thus making the results less accurate. Therefore, in this paper, we present a method to detect certain damage areas using the corrected intensity data. Firstly, two data-driven models have been developed to correct the range and incidence angle effect. Then the corrected intensity is used to generate 2D intensity images for classification. After the damage areas being detected, they are re-projected to the 3D point cloud for better visual representation and further investigation. The experiment results indicate the feasibility and validity of the corrected intensity for damage detection.

  1. Lamb Wave Damage Quantification Using GA-Based LS-SVM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuqiang Sun

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lamb waves have been reported to be an efficient tool for non-destructive evaluations (NDE for various application scenarios. However, accurate and reliable damage quantification using the Lamb wave method is still a practical challenge, due to the complex underlying mechanism of Lamb wave propagation and damage detection. This paper presents a Lamb wave damage quantification method using a least square support vector machine (LS-SVM and a genetic algorithm (GA. Three damage sensitive features, namely, normalized amplitude, phase change, and correlation coefficient, were proposed to describe changes of Lamb wave characteristics caused by damage. In view of commonly used data-driven methods, the GA-based LS-SVM model using the proposed three damage sensitive features was implemented to evaluate the crack size. The GA method was adopted to optimize the model parameters. The results of GA-based LS-SVM were validated using coupon test data and lap joint component test data with naturally developed fatigue cracks. Cases of different loading and manufacturer were also included to further verify the robustness of the proposed method for crack quantification.

  2. Lamb Wave Damage Quantification Using GA-Based LS-SVM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fuqiang; Wang, Ning; He, Jingjing; Guan, Xuefei; Yang, Jinsong

    2017-06-12

    Lamb waves have been reported to be an efficient tool for non-destructive evaluations (NDE) for various application scenarios. However, accurate and reliable damage quantification using the Lamb wave method is still a practical challenge, due to the complex underlying mechanism of Lamb wave propagation and damage detection. This paper presents a Lamb wave damage quantification method using a least square support vector machine (LS-SVM) and a genetic algorithm (GA). Three damage sensitive features, namely, normalized amplitude, phase change, and correlation coefficient, were proposed to describe changes of Lamb wave characteristics caused by damage. In view of commonly used data-driven methods, the GA-based LS-SVM model using the proposed three damage sensitive features was implemented to evaluate the crack size. The GA method was adopted to optimize the model parameters. The results of GA-based LS-SVM were validated using coupon test data and lap joint component test data with naturally developed fatigue cracks. Cases of different loading and manufacturer were also included to further verify the robustness of the proposed method for crack quantification.

  3. A Damage Prognosis Method of Girder Structures Based on Wavelet Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumian Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the basic theory of wavelet neural networks and finite element model updating method, a basic framework of damage prognosis method is proposed in this paper. Firstly, a damaged I-steel beam model testing is used to verify the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed damage prognosis method. The results show that the predicted results of the damage prognosis method and the measured results are very well consistent, and the maximum error is less than 5%. Furthermore, Xinyihe Bridge in the Beijing-Shanghai Highway is selected as the engineering background, and the damage prognosis is conducted based on the data from the structural health monitoring system. The results show that the traffic volume will increase and seasonal differences will decrease in the next year and a half. The displacement has a slight increase and seasonal characters in the critical section of mid span, but the strain will increase distinctly. The analysis results indicate that the proposed method can be applied to the damage prognosis of girder bridge structures and has the potential for the bridge health monitoring and safety prognosis.

  4. Fretting-wear damage of heat exchanger tubes: a proposed damage criterion based on tube vibration response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yetisir, M.; McKerrow, E.; Pettigrew, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    A simple criterion is proposed to estimate fretting-wear damage in heat exchanger tubes with clearance supports. The criterion is based on parameters such as vibration frequency, mid-span vibration amplitude, span length, tube mass and an empirical wear coefficient. It is generally accepted that fretting-wear damage is proportional to a parameter called work-rate. Work-rate is a measure of the dynamic interaction between a vibrating tube and its supports. Due to the complexity of the impact-sliding behavior at the clearance-supports, work-rate calculations for heat exchanger tubes require specialized non-linear finite element codes. These codes include contact models for various clearance-support geometries. Such non-linear finite element analyses are complex, expensive and time consuming. The proposed criterion uses the results of linear vibration analysis (i.e., vibration frequency and mid-span vibration amplitude due to turbulence) and does not require a non-linear analysis. It can be used by non-specialists for a quick evaluation of the expected work-rate, and hence, the fretting-wear damage of heat exchanger tubes. The proposed criterion was obtained from an extensive parametric study that was conducted using a non-linear finite element program. It is shown that, by using the proposed work-rate criteria, work-rate can be estimated within a factor of two. This result, however, requires further testing with more complicated flow patterns. (author)

  5. Aircraft ground damage and the use of predictive models to estimate costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromphardt, Benjamin D.

    Aircraft are frequently involved in ground damage incidents, and repair costs are often accepted as part of doing business. The Flight Safety Foundation (FSF) estimates ground damage to cost operators $5-10 billion annually. Incident reports, documents from manufacturers or regulatory agencies, and other resources were examined to better understand the problem of ground damage in aviation. Major contributing factors were explained, and two versions of a computer-based model were developed to project costs and show what is possible. One objective was to determine if the models could match the FSF's estimate. Another objective was to better understand cost savings that could be realized by efforts to further mitigate the occurrence of ground incidents. Model effectiveness was limited by access to official data, and assumptions were used if data was not available. However, the models were determined to sufficiently estimate the costs of ground incidents.

  6. Multiphysics model of thermomechanical and helium-induced damage of tungsten during plasma heat transients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crosby, Tamer, E-mail: tcrosby@ucla.edu; Ghoniem, Nasr M., E-mail: ghoniem@ucla.edu

    2013-11-15

    A combination of transient heating and bombardment by helium and hydrogen atoms has been experimentally proven to lead to severe surface and sub-surface damage. We developed a computational model to determine the relationship between the thermomechanical loading conditions and the onset of damage and failure of tungsten surfaces. The model is based on a thermoelasticity fracture damage approach that was developed using the phase field method. The model simulates the distribution of helium bubbles inside the grains and on grain boundaries using space-dependent rate theory. In addition, the model is coupled with a transient heat conduction analysis for temperature distributions inside the material. The results show the effects of helium bubbles on reducing tungsten surface energy. Further, a temperature gradient in the material equals to 10 K/μm, resulted in deep cracks propagating from the tungsten surface.

  7. Damage assessment using flexibility and flexibility-based curvature for structural health monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catbas, F N; Gul, M; Burkett, J L

    2008-01-01

    As a result of the recent advances in sensors, information technologies and material science, a considerable amount of research has been conducted in the area of smart infrastructures. While there are many important components of a smart infrastructure, an automated and continuous structural health monitoring (SHM) system is a critical one. SHM is typically used to track and evaluate the performance of a structure, symptoms of operational incidents, anomalies due to deterioration and damage during regular operation as well as after an extreme event. Successful health monitoring applications can be achieved by integrating experimental, analytical and information technologies on real-life operating structures. However, real-life investigations must be backed up by laboratory benchmark studies for validating theory, concepts, and new technologies. For this reason, a physical bridge model is developed to implement SHM methods and technologies. In this study, different aspects of model development are outlined in terms of design considerations, instrumentation, finite element modeling, and simulating damage scenarios. Different damage detection methods are evaluated using the numerical and the physical models. Modal parameter estimation studies are carried out to reliably identify the eigenvalues, eigenvectors and modal scaling from the measurement data. To assess the simulated damage, modal flexibility-based displacements and curvatures are employed. Structural behavior after damage is evaluated by inspecting the deflected shapes obtained using modal flexibility. More localized damage simulations such as stiffness reduction at a joint yield a very subtle stiffness decrease. In this case, the writers use a baseline to identify damage and also investigate the use of curvature as a complementary index. Curvature is advantageous for certain cases where the displacement results do not provide substantial changes. Issues related to using curvature as a damage identification

  8. Damage modelling in concrete subject to sulfate attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Cefis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider the mechanical effect of the sulfate attack on concrete. The durability analysis of concrete structures in contact to external sulfate solutions requires the definition of a proper diffusion-reaction model, for the computation of the varying sulfate concentration and of the consequent ettringite formation, coupled to a mechanical model for the prediction of swelling and material degradation. In this work, we make use of a two-ions formulation of the reactive-diffusion problem and we propose a bi-phase chemo-elastic damage model aimed to simulate the mechanical response of concrete and apt to be used in structural analyses.

  9. Life management of power plant based on structural damage testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallermo, H.; Klevtsov, I. [Thermal Engineering Department of Tallinn Technical University, Tallinn (Estonia); Arras, V. [Eesti Energia, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1998-12-31

    Life management system is based on the valid nowadays in Estonian power plants regulation documentation. The system allows to estimate stress distribution in components, find computational assessment of cumulated creep damage, determine when and where it is necessary to cut off the particular number of microsamples or take replicas. Finally, the real metal condition may be assessed on the basis of metallographic specimen research and reasonable 3-R decision - run, repair, replacement - made on further component use. (orig.) 6 refs.

  10. Life management of power plant based on structural damage testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tallermo, H; Klevtsov, I [Thermal Engineering Department of Tallinn Technical University, Tallinn (Estonia); Arras, V [Eesti Energia, Tallinn (Estonia)

    1999-12-31

    Life management system is based on the valid nowadays in Estonian power plants regulation documentation. The system allows to estimate stress distribution in components, find computational assessment of cumulated creep damage, determine when and where it is necessary to cut off the particular number of microsamples or take replicas. Finally, the real metal condition may be assessed on the basis of metallographic specimen research and reasonable 3-R decision - run, repair, replacement - made on further component use. (orig.) 6 refs.

  11. Influence of Different Yield Loci on Failure Prediction with Damage Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heibel, S.; Nester, W.; Clausmeyer, T.; Tekkaya, A. E.

    2017-09-01

    Advanced high strength steels are widely used in the automotive industry to simultaneously improve crash performance and reduce the car body weight. A drawback of these multiphase steels is their sensitivity to damage effects and thus the reduction of ductility. For that reason the Forming Limit Curve is only partially suitable for this class of steels. An improvement in failure prediction can be obtained by using damage mechanics. The objective of this paper is to comparatively review the phenomenological damage model GISSMO and the Enhanced Lemaitre Damage Model. GISSMO is combined with three different yield loci, namely von Mises, Hill48 and Barlat2000 to investigate the influence of the choice of the plasticity description on damage modelling. The Enhanced Lemaitre Model is used with Hill48. An inverse parameter identification strategy for a DP1000 based on stress-strain curves and optical strain measurements of shear, uniaxial, notch and (equi-)biaxial tension tests is applied to calibrate the models. A strong dependency of fracture strains on the choice of yield locus can be observed. The identified models are validated on a cross-die cup showing ductile fracture with slight necking.

  12. Comprehensive flood economic losses: review of the potential damage and implementation of an agricultural impact model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao Gwladys

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With an annual loss averaging 580 M€ between 1990 and 2014, floods are the main natural catastrophe (Nat Cat risk for the French Nat Cat compensation scheme. As part of its role in this scheme, the Caisse Centrale de Réassurance (CCR offers state guaranteed reinsurance programs and has been modelling the risk of flooding since 2003. This model is based on the traditional valuation approach of direct tangible costs which pairs a physical model with exposure through damage curves. CCR wishes now to widen the studied damage scope to insured and noninsured economic costs and has been collaborating with the SAF research laboratory from the Institute of Financial and Insurance Sciences (ISFA since 2014. CCR’s model has been used to estimate the insured direct damage to residential and non-residential properties and it is now being developed to include damage to vehicles, agriculture and network infrastructures. Research is also being carried out to take into account business interruptions and indirect losses using an Input-Output model. This article describes the undergoing work on model development to estimate the damage to agriculture.

  13. A New Equivalent Statistical Damage Constitutive Model on Rock Block Mixed Up with Fluid Inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available So far, there are few studies concerning the effect of closed “fluid inclusions” on the macroscopic constitutive relation of deep rock. Fluid-matrix element (FME is defined based on rock element in statistical damage model. The properties of FME are related to the size of inclusions, fluid properties, and pore pressure. Using FME, the equivalent elastic modulus of rock block containing fluid inclusions is obtained with Eshelby inclusion theory and the double M-T homogenization method. The new statistical damage model of rock is established on the equivalent elastic modulus. Besides, the porosity and confining pressure are important influencing factors of the model. The model reflects the initial damage (void and fluid inclusion and the macroscopic deformation law of rock, which is an improvement of the traditional statistical damage model. Additionally, the model can not only be consistent with the rock damage experiment date and three-axis compression experiment date of rock containing pore water but also describe the locked-in stress experiment in rock-like material. It is a new fundamental study of the constitutive relation of locked-in stress in deep rock mass.

  14. Local stem cell depletion model for normal tissue damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaes, R.J.; Keland, A.

    1987-01-01

    The hypothesis that radiation causes normal tissue damage by completely depleting local regions of tissue of viable stem cells leads to a simple mathematical model for such damage. In organs like skin and spinal cord where destruction of a small volume of tissue leads to a clinically apparent complication, the complication probability is expressed as a function of dose, volume and stem cell number by a simple triple negative exponential function analogous to the double exponential function of Munro and Gilbert for tumor control. The steep dose response curves for radiation myelitis that are obtained with our model are compared with the experimental data for radiation myelitis in laboratory rats. The model can be generalized to include other types or organs, high LET radiation, fractionated courses of radiation, and cases where an organ with a heterogeneous stem cell population receives an inhomogeneous dose of radiation. In principle it would thus be possible to determine the probability of tumor control and of damage to any organ within the radiation field if the dose distribution in three dimensional space within a patient is known

  15. Damage Detection of Structures for Ambient Loading Based on Cross Correlation Function Amplitude and SVM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin-sheng Huo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An effective method for the damage detection of skeletal structures which combines the cross correlation function amplitude (CCFA with the support vector machine (SVM is presented in this paper. The proposed method consists of two stages. Firstly, the data features are extracted from the CCFA, which, calculated from dynamic responses and as a representation of the modal shapes of the structure, changes when damage occurs on the structure. The data features are then input into the SVM with the one-against-one (OAO algorithm to classify the damage status of the structure. The simulation data of IASC-ASCE benchmark model and a vibration experiment of truss structure are adopted to verify the feasibility of proposed method. The results show that the proposed method is suitable for the damage identification of skeletal structures with the limited sensors subjected to ambient excitation. As the CCFA based data features are sensitive to damage, the proposed method demonstrates its reliability in the diagnosis of structures with damage, especially for those with minor damage. In addition, the proposed method shows better noise robustness and is more suitable for noisy environments.

  16. Epigenetic Regulators Modulate Muscle Damage in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajanca, Fernanda; Vandel, Laurence

    2017-12-21

    Histone acetyl transferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDAC) control transcription during myogenesis. HDACs promote chromatin condensation, inhibiting gene transcription in muscle progenitor cells until myoblast differentiation is triggered and HDACs are released. HATs, namely CBP/p300, activate myogenic regulatory and elongation factors promoting myogenesis. HDAC inhibitors are known to improve regeneration in dystrophic muscles through follistatin upregulation. However, the potential of directly modulating HATs remains unexplored. We tested this possibility in a well-known zebrafish model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Interestingly, CBP/p300 transcripts were found downregulated in the absence of Dystrophin. While investigating CBP rescuing potential we observed that dystrophin-null embryos overexpressing CBP actually never show significant muscle damage, even before a first regeneration cycle could occur. We found that the pan-HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) also prevents early muscle damage, however the single HAT CBP is as efficient even in low doses. The HAT domain of CBP is required for its full rescuing ability. Importantly, both CBP and TSA prevent early muscle damage without restoring endogenous CBP/p300 neither increasing follistatin transcripts. This suggests a new mechanism of action of epigenetic regulators protecting dystrophin-null muscle fibres from detaching, independent from the known improvement of regeneration upon damage of HDACs inhibitors. This study builds supporting evidence that epigenetic modulators may play a role in determining the severity of muscle dystrophy, controlling the ability to resist muscle damage. Determining the mode of action leading to muscle protection can potentially lead to new treatment options for muscular dystrophies in the future.

  17. Recent changes in flood damage in the United States from observations and ACME model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, G.; Leung, L. R.

    2017-12-01

    Despite efforts to mitigate flood hazards in flood-prone areas, survey- and report-based flood databases show that flood damage has increased and emerged as one of the most costly disaster in the United States since the 1990s. Understanding the mechanism driving the changes in flood damage is therefore critical for reducing flood risk. In this study, we first conduct a comprehensive analysis of the changing characteristics of flood damage at local, state and country level. Results show a significant increasing trend in the number of flood hazards, causing economic losses of up to $7 billion per year. The ratio of flood events that caused tangible economical cost to the total flood events has exhibited a non-significant increasing trend before 2007 followed by a significant decrease, indicating a changing vulnerability to floods. Analysis also reveals distinct spatial and temporal patterns in the threshold intensity of flood hazards with tangible economical cost. To understand the mechanism behind the increasing flood damage, we develop a flood damage economic model coupled with the integrated hydrological modeling system of ACME that features a river routing model with an inundation parameterization and a water use and regulation model. The model is evaluated over the country against historical records. Several numerical experiments are then designed to explore the mechanisms behind the recent changes in flood damage from the perspective of flood hazard, exposure and vulnerability, which constitute flood damage. The role of human activities such as reservoir operations and water use in modifying regional floods are also explored using the new tool, with the goal of improving understanding and modeling of vulnerability to flood hazards.

  18. Evaluation of nuclear power plant component failure probability and core damage probability using simplified PSA model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Yoshio

    2000-01-01

    It is anticipated that the change of frequency of surveillance tests, preventive maintenance or parts replacement of safety related components may cause the change of component failure probability and result in the change of core damage probability. It is also anticipated that the change is different depending on the initiating event frequency or the component types. This study assessed the change of core damage probability using simplified PSA model capable of calculating core damage probability in a short time period, which is developed by the US NRC to process accident sequence precursors, when various component's failure probability is changed between 0 and 1, or Japanese or American initiating event frequency data are used. As a result of the analysis, (1) It was clarified that frequency of surveillance test, preventive maintenance or parts replacement of motor driven pumps (high pressure injection pumps, residual heat removal pumps, auxiliary feedwater pumps) should be carefully changed, since the core damage probability's change is large, when the base failure probability changes toward increasing direction. (2) Core damage probability change is insensitive to surveillance test frequency change, since the core damage probability change is small, when motor operated valves and turbine driven auxiliary feed water pump failure probability changes around one figure. (3) Core damage probability change is small, when Japanese failure probability data are applied to emergency diesel generator, even if failure probability changes one figure from the base value. On the other hand, when American failure probability data is applied, core damage probability increase is large, even if failure probability changes toward increasing direction. Therefore, when Japanese failure probability data is applied, core damage probability change is insensitive to surveillance tests frequency change etc. (author)

  19. Impedance-based damage assessment using piezoelectric sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Mi-Sun; Yoo, Seung-Jae; Lee, In; Song, Jae-Hoon; Yang, Jae-Won

    2011-04-01

    Recently structural health monitoring (SHM) systems are being focused because they make it possible to assess the health of structures at real-time in many application fields such as aircraft, aerospace, civil and so on. Piezoelectric materials are widely used for sensors of SHM system to monitor damage of critical parts such as bolted joints. Bolted joints could be loosened by vibration, thermal cycling, shock, corrosion, and they cause serious mechanical failures. In this paper, impedance-based method using piezoelectric sensors was applied for real-time SHM. A steel beam specimen fastened by bolts was tested, and polymer type piezoelectric materials, PVDFs were used for sensors to monitor the condition of bolted joint connections. When structure has some damage, for example loose bolts, the impedance of PVDF sensors showed different tendency with normal structure which has no loose bolts. In the case of loose bolts, impedance values are decreased and admittance values are increased.

  20. Damage Model for Reliability Assessment of Solder Joints in Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostandyan, Erik; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2012-01-01

    environmental factors. Reliability assessment for such type of products conventionally is performed by classical reliability techniques based on test data. Usually conventional reliability approaches are time and resource consuming activities. Thus in this paper we choose a physics of failure approach to define...... damage model by Miner’s rule. Our attention is focused on crack propagation in solder joints of electrical components due to the temperature loadings. Based on the proposed method it is described how to find the damage level for a given temperature loading profile. The proposed method is discussed...

  1. Unified continuum damage model for matrix cracking in composite rotor blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollayi, Hemaraju; Harursampath, Dineshkumar [Nonlinear Multifunctional Composites - Analysis and Design Lab (NMCAD Lab) Department of Aerospace Engineering Indian Institute of Science Bangalore - 560012, Karnataka (India)

    2015-03-10

    This paper deals with modeling of the first damage mode, matrix micro-cracking, in helicopter rotor/wind turbine blades and how this effects the overall cross-sectional stiffness. The helicopter/wind turbine rotor system operates in a highly dynamic and unsteady environment leading to severe vibratory loads present in the system. Repeated exposure to this loading condition can induce damage in the composite rotor blades. These rotor/turbine blades are generally made of fiber-reinforced laminated composites and exhibit various competing modes of damage such as matrix micro-cracking, delamination, and fiber breakage. There is a need to study the behavior of the composite rotor system under various key damage modes in composite materials for developing Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system. Each blade is modeled as a beam based on geometrically non-linear 3-D elasticity theory. Each blade thus splits into 2-D analyzes of cross-sections and non-linear 1-D analyzes along the beam reference curves. Two different tools are used here for complete 3-D analysis: VABS for 2-D cross-sectional analysis and GEBT for 1-D beam analysis. The physically-based failure models for matrix in compression and tension loading are used in the present work. Matrix cracking is detected using two failure criterion: Matrix Failure in Compression and Matrix Failure in Tension which are based on the recovered field. A strain variable is set which drives the damage variable for matrix cracking and this damage variable is used to estimate the reduced cross-sectional stiffness. The matrix micro-cracking is performed in two different approaches: (i) Element-wise, and (ii) Node-wise. The procedure presented in this paper is implemented in VABS as matrix micro-cracking modeling module. Three examples are presented to investigate the matrix failure model which illustrate the effect of matrix cracking on cross-sectional stiffness by varying the applied cyclic load.

  2. Unified continuum damage model for matrix cracking in composite rotor blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollayi, Hemaraju; Harursampath, Dineshkumar

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with modeling of the first damage mode, matrix micro-cracking, in helicopter rotor/wind turbine blades and how this effects the overall cross-sectional stiffness. The helicopter/wind turbine rotor system operates in a highly dynamic and unsteady environment leading to severe vibratory loads present in the system. Repeated exposure to this loading condition can induce damage in the composite rotor blades. These rotor/turbine blades are generally made of fiber-reinforced laminated composites and exhibit various competing modes of damage such as matrix micro-cracking, delamination, and fiber breakage. There is a need to study the behavior of the composite rotor system under various key damage modes in composite materials for developing Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system. Each blade is modeled as a beam based on geometrically non-linear 3-D elasticity theory. Each blade thus splits into 2-D analyzes of cross-sections and non-linear 1-D analyzes along the beam reference curves. Two different tools are used here for complete 3-D analysis: VABS for 2-D cross-sectional analysis and GEBT for 1-D beam analysis. The physically-based failure models for matrix in compression and tension loading are used in the present work. Matrix cracking is detected using two failure criterion: Matrix Failure in Compression and Matrix Failure in Tension which are based on the recovered field. A strain variable is set which drives the damage variable for matrix cracking and this damage variable is used to estimate the reduced cross-sectional stiffness. The matrix micro-cracking is performed in two different approaches: (i) Element-wise, and (ii) Node-wise. The procedure presented in this paper is implemented in VABS as matrix micro-cracking modeling module. Three examples are presented to investigate the matrix failure model which illustrate the effect of matrix cracking on cross-sectional stiffness by varying the applied cyclic load

  3. Gamma radiation damage in pixelated detector based on carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyva, A.; Pinnera, I.; Leyva, D.; Abreu, Y.; Cruz, C. M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the possible gamma radiation damage in high pixelated based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes detectors, grown on two different substrata, when it is operating in aggressive radiational environments. The radiation damage in displacements per atom (dpa) terms were calculated using the MCCM algorithm, which takes into account the McKinley-Feshbach approach with the Kinchin-Pease approximation for the damage function. Was observed that with increasing of the gamma energy the displacement total number grows monotonically reaching values of 0.39 displacements for a 10 MeV incident photon. The profiles of point defects distributions inside the carbon nanotube pixel linearly rise with depth, increasing its slope with photon energy. In the 0.1 MeV - 10 MeV studied energy interval the electron contribution to the total displacement number become higher than the positron ones, reaching this last one a maximum value of 12% for the 10 MeV incident photons. Differences between the calculation results for the two used different substrata were not observed. (Author)

  4. Crack diagnosis of metallic profiles based on structural damage indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preisler, A; Schröder, K-U; Steenbock, C

    2015-01-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) faces several challenges before large-scale industrial application. First of all damage diagnosis has to be reliable. Therefore, common SHM approaches use highly advanced sensor techniques to monitor the whole structure on all possible failures. This results in an enormous amount of data gathered during service. The general effort can be drastically reduced, if the knowledge achieved during the sizing process is used. During sizing, potential failure modes and critical locations, so called hot spots, are already evaluated. A very sensitive SHM system can be developed, when the monitoring effort shifts from the damage to its impact on the structural behaviour and the so called damage indicators. These are the two main components of the SmartSHM approach, which reduces the monitoring effort significantly. Not only the amount of data is minimized, but also reliability and robustness are ensured by the SmartSHM approach.This contribution demonstrates the SmartSHM approach by a cracked four point bending beam. To show general applicability a parametric study considering different profiles (bar, box, I, C, T, L, Z), crack positions and lengths has been performed. Questions of sensitivity and minimum size of the sensor network are discussed based on the results of the parametric study. (paper)

  5. Research on spatial Model and analysis algorithm for nuclear weapons' damage effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaohong; Meng Tao; Du Maohua; Wang Weili; Ji Wanfeng

    2011-01-01

    In order to realize the three dimension visualization of nuclear weapons' damage effects. Aiming at the characteristics of the damage effects data, a new model-MRPCT model is proposed, and this model can carry out the modeling of the three dimension spatial data of the nuclear weapons' damage effects. For the sake of saving on the memory, linear coding method is used to store the MRPCT model. On the basis of Morton code, spatial analysis of the damage effects is completed. (authors)

  6. Transgenic Mouse Model for Reducing Oxidative Damage in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Torres, S.; Truong, T.; Moyer, E. L.; Kumar, A.; Tahimic, Candice C. G.; Alwood, J. S.; Limoli, C. L.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Bone loss can occur due to many challenges such age, radiation, microgravity, and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) play a critical role in bone resorption by osteoclasts (Bartell et al. 2014). We hypothesize that suppression of excess ROS in skeletal cells, both osteoblasts and osteoclasts, regulates skeletal growth and remodeling. To test our hypothesis, we used transgenic mCAT mice which overexpress the human anti-oxidant catalase gene targeted to the mitochondria, the main site for endogenous ROS production. mCAT mice have a longer life-span than wildtype controls and have been used to study various age-related disorders. To stimulate remodeling, 16 week old mCAT mice or wildtype mice were exposed to treatment (hindlimb-unloading and total body-irradiation) or sham treatment conditions (control). Tissues were harvested 2 weeks later for skeletal analysis (microcomputed tomography), biochemical analysis (gene expression and oxidative damage measurements), and ex vivo bone marrow derived cell culture (osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis). mCAT mice expressed the transgene and displayed elevated catalase activity in skeletal tissue and marrow-derived osteoblasts and osteoclasts grown ex vivo. In addition, when challenged with treatment, bone tissues from wildtype mice showed elevated levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), indicating oxidative damage) whereas mCAT mice did not. Correlation analysis revealed that increased catalase activity significantly correlated with decreased MDA levels and that increased oxidative damage correlated with decreased percent bone volume (BVTV). In addition, ex-vivo cultured osteoblast colony growth correlated with catalase activity in the osteoblasts. Thus, we showed that these transgenic mice can be used as a model to study the relationship between markers of oxidative damage and skeletal properties. mCAT mice displayed reduced BVTV and trabecular number relative to wildtype mice, as well as increased structural model index in the

  7. Modelling Of Anticipated Damage Ratio On Breakwaters Using Fuzzy Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercan, D. E.; Yagci, O.; Kabdasli, S.

    2003-04-01

    In breakwater design the determination of armour unit weight is especially important in terms of the structure's life. In a typical experimental breakwater stability study, different wave series composed of different wave heights; wave period and wave steepness characteristics are applied in order to investigate performance the structure. Using a classical approach, a regression equation is generated for damage ratio as a function of characteristic wave height. The parameters wave period and wave steepness are not considered. In this study, differing from the classical approach using a fuzzy logic, a relationship between damage ratio as a function of mean wave period (T_m), wave steepness (H_s/L_m) and significant wave height (H_s) was further generated. The system's inputs were mean wave period (T_m), wave steepness (H_s/L_m) and significant wave height (H_s). For fuzzification all input variables were divided into three fuzzy subsets, their membership functions were defined using method developed by Mandani (Mandani, 1974) and the rules were written. While for defuzzification the centroid method was used. In order to calibrate and test the generated models an experimental study was conducted. The experiments were performed in a wave flume (24 m long, 1.0 m wide and 1.0 m high) using 20 different irregular wave series (P-M spectrum). Throughout the study, the water depth was 0.6 m and the breakwater cross-sectional slope was 1V/2H. In the armour layer, a type of artificial armour unit known as antifer cubes were used. The results of the established fuzzy logic model and regression equation model was compared with experimental data and it was determined that the established fuzzy logic model gave a more accurate prediction of the damage ratio on this type of breakwater. References Mandani, E.H., "Application of Fuzzy Algorithms for Control of Simple Dynamic Plant", Proc. IEE, vol. 121, no. 12, December 1974.

  8. Core damage frequency perspectives based on IPE results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dingman, S.E.; Camp, A.L.; LaChance, J.L.; Drouin, M.T.

    1996-01-01

    In November 1988, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued Generic Letter 88-20 requesting that all licensees perform an individual Plant Examination (IPE) to identify any plant-specific vulnerability to severe accidents and report the results to the Commission. This paper provides perspectives gained from reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals covering 108 nuclear power plant units. Variability both within and among reactor types is examined to provide perspectives regarding plant-specific design and operational features, and modeling assumptions that play a significant role in the estimates of core damage frequencies in the IPEs

  9. Core damage frequency (reactor design) perspectives based on IPE results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, A.L.; Dingman, S.E.; Forester, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides perspectives gained from reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals covering 108 nuclear power plant units. Variability both within and among reactor types is examined to provide perspectives regarding plant-specific design and operational features, and C, modeling assumptions that play a significant role in the estimates of core damage frequencies in the IPEs. Human actions found to be important in boiling water reactors (BWRs) and in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are presented and the events most frequently found important are discussed

  10. Lightning Strike Ablation Damage Influence Factors Analysis of Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite Based on Coupled Electrical-Thermal Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, J. J.; Chang, F.; Li, S. L.; Yao, X. L.; Sun, J. R.; Xiao, Y.

    2017-10-01

    According to the mathematical analysis model constructed on the basis of energy-balance relationship in lightning strike, and accompany with the simplified calculation strategy of composite resin pyrolysis degree dependent electrical conductivity, an effective three dimensional thermal-electrical coupling analysis finite element model of composite laminate suffered from lightning current was established based on ABAQUS, to elucidate the effects of lighting current waveform parameters and thermal/electrical properties of composite laminate on the extent of ablation damage. Simulated predictions agree well with the composite lightning strike directed effect experimental data, illustrating the potential accuracy of the constructed model. The analytical results revealed that extent of composite lightning strike ablation damage can be characterized by action integral validly, there exist remarkable power function relationships between action integral and visual damage area, projected damage area, maximum damage depth and damage volume of ablation damage, and enhancing the electrical conductivity and specific heat of composite, ablation damage will be descended obviously, power function relationships also exist between electrical conductivity, specific heat and ablation damage, however, the impact of thermal conductivity on the extent of ablation damage is not notable. The conclusions obtained provide some guidance for composite anti-lightning strike structure-function integration design.

  11. Stochastic models for predicting pitting corrosion damage of HLRW containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henshall, G.A.

    1991-10-01

    Stochastic models for predicting aqueous pitting corrosion damage of high-level radioactive-waste containers are described. These models could be used to predict the time required for the first pit to penetrate a container and the increase in the number of breaches at later times, both of which would be useful in the repository system performance analysis. Monte Carlo implementations of the stochastic models are described, and predictions of induction time, survival probability and pit depth distributions are presented. These results suggest that the pit nucleation probability decreases with exposure time and that pit growth may be a stochastic process. The advantages and disadvantages of the stochastic approach, methods for modeling the effects of environment, and plans for future work are discussed

  12. Unified Creep Plasticity Damage (UCPD) Model for Rigid Polyurethane Foams.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilsen, Michael K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lu, Wei-Yang [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Scherzinger, William M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hinnerichs, Terry D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lo, Chi S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Numerous experiments were performed to characterize the mechanical response of several different rigid polyurethane foams (FR3712, PMDI10, PMDI20, and TufFoam35) to large deformation. In these experiments, the effects of load path, loading rate, and temperature were investigated. Results from these experiments indicated that rigid polyurethane foams exhibit significant volumetric and deviatoric plasticity when they are compressed. Rigid polyurethane foams were also found to be very strain-rate and temperature dependent. These foams are also rather brittle and crack when loaded to small strains in tension or to larger strains in compression. Thus, a new Unified Creep Plasticity Damage (UCPD) model was developed and implemented into SIERRA with the name Foam Damage to describe the mechanical response of these foams to large deformation at a variety of temperatures and strain rates. This report includes a description of recent experiments and experimental findings. Next, development of a UCPD model for rigid, polyurethane foams is described. Selection of material parameters for a variety of rigid polyurethane foams is then discussed and finite element simulations with the new UCPD model are compared with experimental results to show behavior that can be captured with this model.

  13. Micromechanical modeling and inverse identification of damage using cohesive approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blal, Nawfal

    2013-01-01

    In this study a micromechanical model is proposed for a collection of cohesive zone models embedded between two each elements of a standard cohesive-volumetric finite element method. An equivalent 'matrix-inclusions' composite is proposed as a representation of the cohesive-volumetric discretization. The overall behaviour is obtained using homogenization approaches (Hashin Shtrikman scheme and the P. Ponte Castaneda approach). The derived model deals with elastic, brittle and ductile materials. It is available whatever the triaxiality loading rate and the shape of the cohesive law, and leads to direct relationships between the overall material properties and the local cohesive parameters and the mesh density. First, rigorous bounds on the normal and tangential cohesive stiffnesses are obtained leading to a suitable control of the inherent artificial elastic loss induced by intrinsic cohesive models. Second, theoretical criteria on damageable and ductile cohesive parameters are established (cohesive peak stress, critical separation, cohesive failure energy,... ). These criteria allow a practical calibration of the cohesive zone parameters as function of the overall material properties and the mesh length. The main interest of such calibration is its promising capacity to lead to a mesh-insensitive overall response in surface damage. (author) [fr

  14. Numerical modeling of the viscoplastic damage behaviour of rocks and application to underground storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajdu, A.

    2003-12-01

    The long-term behavior of large, underground works of a civil engineering nature carried out in a rock mass is currently the subject of numerous studies. The object is to attain a better understanding of complex phenomena, such as the convergence of excavated cavities or the outbreak and development of damaged zones in the rock mass neighboring the works, in order to foresee them. This Ph.D. thesis is devoted to the analysis of viscoplastic strain in rocks and to the degradation of their mechanical properties with time, often referred to as deferred damage. A bibliographical record presents the current depth of understanding as regards underlying microstructural phenomena and summarizes the main theories upon which the modeling of these phenomena at the macroscopic scale is based. The formulations enabling a coupling between the viscous effects and the deferred damage are revisited and discussed in detail. One phenomenological model in particular, Lemaitre's viscoplastic constitutive damage law is retained for the numerical modeling. The calculations were performed with the help of a finite element code (CAST3M). Designs of nuclear waste disposal structures at great depth make up the subject of different case studies. The Lemaitre model, originally designed for metallic materials, is next the subject of a theoretical development of which the aim is to better adapt it to the description of the long-term mechanical behavior of rocks. The modifications focus on several points; notably that the hypotheses of anelastic strain at constant volume and of isotropy of damage are rejected. The main characteristics of time-dependent strain in rocks; in particular the phenomena of viscoplastic dilation and contraction as well as the anisotropy induced by damage to the rock matrix are reproduced by the proposed model. A parametric study is then undertaken, using the experimental results obtained on different types of rock, in order to demonstrate the model's capabilities

  15. A new coupled elastoplastic damage model for clay-stone and its parameter identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, S.P.; Chen, W.Z.; Yu, H.D.; Li, X.L.; Sillen, X.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In Belgium, the Boom Clay is considered as a potential host rock for the geological disposal of the high level nuclear waste and is intensively studied from hydro-mechanical point of view. Laboratory tests on Boom clay shown that the Boom clay presents very complex stress strain behaviour. Undrained triaxial tests indicated often a hardening behaviour at small deformation and softening at larger deformation. It is not easy to give an explicit function to describe the stress-strain behaviour under triaxial stress state. The mechanical characteristics are obviously affected by the porosity, fractures growth, water content, and stress, etc., four stages can be usually distinguished from the stress-strain curve of Boom Clay, named as OA, AB, BC and CD. 1) Stage OA, the relation between stress and strain is linear. This stage is elastic state, and point A is called as yield strength σ c0 . 2) Stage AB, the weak fractures in the rock appear, develop and cumulate gradually. Point B is called peak strength σ cu . 3) Stage BC, peak strength is reached and stress reduces with the increasing of strain, up to the residual strength. This stage is called strain softening and point C is the residual strength σ cr . The axial pressure causes the fracture developing and strength reducing. 4) Stage CD, the final strength doesn't reduce obviously with the development of plastic deformation. This stage is called plastic flow. Obviously, The conventional elasto-plastic constitutive model can not describe the mechanical behaviours of Boom Clay. Based on damage mechanics theory, an new elasto-plastic damage constitutive model is put forward and applied to Boom Clay, which can describe the complex stress-strain behaviour of clay. It is described as follows: stage OA with an elastic model, stage AB with elastic damage model, stage BC and stage CD with plastic damage model. The complete process curve of stress-strain can be divided

  16. ITER transient consequences for material damage: modelling versus experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazylev, B; Janeschitz, G; Landman, I; Pestchanyi, S; Loarte, A; Federici, G; Merola, M; Linke, J; Zhitlukhin, A; Podkovyrov, V; Klimov, N; Safronov, V

    2007-01-01

    Carbon-fibre composite (CFC) and tungsten macrobrush armours are foreseen as PFC for the ITER divertor. In ITER the main mechanisms of metallic armour damage remain surface melting and melt motion erosion. In the case of CFC armour, due to rather different heat conductivities of CFC fibres a noticeable erosion of the PAN bundles may occur at rather small heat loads. Experiments carried out in the plasma gun facilities QSPA-T for the ITER like edge localized mode (ELM) heat load also demonstrated significant erosion of the frontal and lateral brush edges. Numerical simulations of the CFC and tungsten (W) macrobrush target damage accounting for the heat loads at the face and lateral brush edges were carried out for QSPA-T conditions using the three-dimensional (3D) code PHEMOBRID. The modelling results of CFC damage are in a good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the experiments. Estimation of the droplet splashing caused by the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability was performed

  17. Analysis and Characterization of Damage and Failure Utilizing a Generalized Composite Material Model Suitable for Use in Impact Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Carney, Kelly S.; DuBois, Paul; Khaled, Bilal; Hoffarth, Canio; Rajan, Subramaniam; Blankenhorn, Gunther

    2016-01-01

    A material model which incorporates several key capabilities which have been identified by the aerospace community as lacking in state-of-the art composite impact models is under development. In particular, a next generation composite impact material model, jointly developed by the FAA and NASA, is being implemented into the commercial transient dynamic finite element code LS-DYNA. The material model, which incorporates plasticity, damage, and failure, utilizes experimentally based tabulated input to define the evolution of plasticity and damage and the initiation of failure as opposed to specifying discrete input parameters (such as modulus and strength). The plasticity portion of the orthotropic, three-dimensional, macroscopic composite constitutive model is based on an extension of the Tsai-Wu composite failure model into a generalized yield function with a non-associative flow rule. For the damage model, a strain equivalent formulation is utilized to allow for the uncoupling of the deformation and damage analyses. In the damage model, a semi-coupled approach is employed where the overall damage in a particular coordinate direction is assumed to be a multiplicative combination of the damage in that direction resulting from the applied loads in the various coordinate directions. Due to the fact that the plasticity and damage models are uncoupled, test procedures and methods to both characterize the damage model and to covert the material stress-strain curves from the true (damaged) stress space to the effective (undamaged) stress space have been developed. A methodology has been developed to input the experimentally determined composite failure surface in a tabulated manner. An analytical approach is then utilized to track how close the current stress state is to the failure surface.

  18. The Estimation Modelling of Damaged Areas by Harmful Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, R.; Sung, M.; Hwang, J.; Jeon, S. W.

    2017-12-01

    The Republic of Korea has undergone rapid development and urban development without sufficient consideration of the environment. This type of growth is accompanied by a reduction in forest area and wildlife habitat. It is a phenomenon that affects the habitat of large mammals more than small. Especially in Korea, the damage caused by wild boar(Sus scrofa) is harsher than other large mammalian species like water deer(Hydropotes inermis), which also means that the number of these reported cases of this species is higher than ones of other mammals. Wild boar has three to eight cubs per year and it is possible to breed every year, which makes it more populous comparing with the fragmented habitats. It could be regarded as one of the top predators in Korea, which it is inevitable for humans to intervene this creature in population control. In addition, some individuals have been forced to be retreated from other habitats in major habitats, or to invade human activity areas for food activity, thereby destroying crops. Ultimately, this mammal species has been treated as farm pest animals through committing road kills and urban emergences. In this study, we has estimated possible farm pest animal present points from the damage district using 2,505 hazardous wildlife damage areas with four types of geological informations, four kinds of forest information, land cover, and distribution of farmland occurred in Gyeongnam province in Korea. In the estimating model, utilizing MAXENT, information of background point was set to 10,000, 70% of the damaged sites were used to construct the model, 30% was used for verification, and 10 times of crossvalidate were proceeded - verified by AUC of ROC. As a result of analyses, AUC was 0.847, and the percent contribution of the forest information was the distance toward inner-forest areas, 36.1%, the land cover, 16.5%, the distance from the field, 14.9%. Furthermore, the permutation importance was 24.9% of the cover, 12.3% of the height

  19. Vibration measurement-based simple technique for damage detection of truss bridges: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudath C. Siriwardane

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The bridges experience increasing traffic volume and weight, deteriorating of components and large number of stress cycles. Therefore, assessment of the current condition of steel railway bridges becomes necessary. Most of the commonly available approaches for structural health monitoring are based on visual inspection and non-destructive testing methods. The visual inspection is unreliable as those depend on uncertainty behind inspectors and their experience. Also, the non-destructive testing methods are found to be expensive. Therefore, recent researches have noticed that dynamic modal parameters or vibration measurement-based structural health monitoring methods are economical and may also provide more realistic predictions to damage state of civil infrastructure. Therefore this paper proposes a simple technique to locate the damage region of railway truss bridges based on measured modal parameters. The technique is discussed with a case study. Initially paper describes the details of considered railway bridge. Then observations of visual inspection, material testing and in situ load testing are discussed under separate sections. Development of validated finite element model of the considered bridge is comprehensively discussed. Hence, variations of modal parameters versus position of the damage are plotted. These plots are considered as the main reference for locating the damage of the railway bridge in future periodical inspection by comparing the measured corresponding modal parameters. Finally the procedure of periodical vibration measurement and damage locating technique are clearly illustrated.

  20. Damage Localization of Severely Damaged RC-Structures Based on Measured Eigenperiods from a Single Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjærbæk, P. S.; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Cakmak, A. S.

    This paper deals with the estimation of the damage location of severely damaged Reinforced Concrete (RC) structures excited by earthquakes. It is assumed that the building is instrumented with a sensor measuring the earthquake acceleration signal at ground surface and a sensor measuring only...

  1. Computational stress and damage modelling for rolling contact fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerullo, Michele

    Rolling contact fatigue in radial roller bearings is studied by means of a 2D plane strain nite element program. The Dang Van multiaxial fatigue criterion is firstly used, in a macroscopic study modeling the bearing raceway, to investigate the region where fatigue cracks are more likely to nucleate...... and of compressive residual stresses are also analyzed. The stress history of a material point at the depth where the maximum Dang Van damage factor is reached is then recorded and used in a subsequent micro-mechanical analysis. The stress history is applied as periodic boundary conditions in a representative volume...

  2. Damage and failure modeling of lotus-type porous material subjected to low-cycle fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kramberger

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of low-cycle fatigue behaviour of lotus-type porous material is presented in this paper. Porous materials exhibit some unique features which are useful for a number of various applications. This paper evaluates a numerical approach for determining of damage initiation and evolution of lotus-type porous material with computational simulations, where the considered computational models have different pore topology patterns. The low-cycle fatigue analysis was performed by using a damage evolution law. The damage state was calculated and updated based on the inelastic hysteresis energy for stabilized cycle. Degradation of the elastic stifness was modeled using scalar damage variable. In order to examine crack propagation path finite elements with severe damage were deleted and removed from the mesh during simulation. The direct cyclic analysis capability in Abaqus/Standard was used for low-cycle fatigue analysis to obtain the stabilized response of a model subjected to the periodic loading. The computational results show a qualitative understanding of pores topology influence on low-cycle fatigue under transversal loading conditions in relation to pore orientation.

  3. Natural resource damage assessment models for Great Lakes, coastal, and marine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    French, D.P.; Reed, M.

    1993-01-01

    A computer model of the physical fates, biological effects, and economic damages resulting from releases of oil and other hazardous materials has been developed by Applied Science Associates to be used in Type A natural resource damage assessments under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). Natural resource damage assessment models for great lakes environments and for coastal and marine environments will become available. A coupled geographical information system allows gridded representation of complex coastal boundaries, variable bathymetry, shoreline types, and multiple biological habitats. The physical and biological models are three dimensional. Direct mortality from toxic concentrations and oiling, impacts of habitat loss, and food web losses are included in the model. Estimation of natural resource damages is based both on the lost value of injured resources and on the costs of restoring or replacing those resources. The models are implemented on a personal computer, with a VGA graphical user interface. Following public review, the models will become a formal part of the US regulatory framework. The models are programmed in a modular and generic fashion, to facilitate transportability and application to new areas. The model has several major components. Physical fates and biological effects submodels estimate impacts or injury resulting from a spill. The hydrodynamic submodel calculates currents that transport contaminant(s) or organisms. The compensable value submodel values injuries to help assess damages. The restoration submodel determines what restoration actions will most cost-effectively reduce injuries as measured by compensable values. Injury and restoration costs are assessed for each of a series of habitats (environments) affected by the spill. Environmental, chemical, and biological databases supply required information to the model for computing fates and effects (injury)

  4. Two-scale modelling for hydro-mechanical damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, J.; Chambon, R.; Dascalu, C.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Excavation works for underground storage create a damage zone for the rock nearby and affect its hydraulics properties. This degradation, already observed by laboratory tests, can create a leading path for fluids. The micro fracture phenomenon, which occur at a smaller scale and affect the rock permeability, must be fully understood to minimize the transfer process. Many methods can be used in order to take into account the microstructure of heterogeneous materials. Among them a method has been developed recently. Instead of using a constitutive equation obtained by phenomenological considerations or by some homogenization techniques, the representative elementary volume (R.E.V.) is modelled as a structure and the links between a prescribed kinematics and the corresponding dual forces are deduced numerically. This yields the so called Finite Element square method (FE2). In a numerical point of view, a finite element model is used at the macroscopic level, and for each Gauss point, computations on the microstructure gives the usual results of a constitutive law. This numerical approach is now classical in order to properly model some materials such as composites and the efficiency of such numerical homogenization process has been shown, and allows numerical modelling of deformation processes associated with various micro-structural changes. The aim of this work is to describe trough such a method, damage of the rock with a two scale hydro-mechanical model. The rock damage at the macroscopic scale is directly link with an analysis on the microstructure. At the macroscopic scale a two phase's problem is studied. A solid skeleton is filled up by a filtrating fluid. It is necessary to enforce two balance equation and two mass conservation equations. A classical way to deal with such a problem is to work with the balance equation of the whole mixture, and the mass fluid conservation written in a weak form, the mass

  5. MEMS-based sensors for post-earthquake damage assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozzi, M; Zonta, D; Trapani, D [DIMS, University of Trento, Via Mesiano 77, 38123, Trento (Italy); Athanasopoulos, N; Garetsos, A; Stratakos, Y E [Advanced Microwave Systems Ltd, 2, 25th Martiou Street, 17778 Athens (Greece); Amditis, A J; Bimpas, M [ICCS, National Technical University of Athens, 9 Iroon Polytechniou Street, 15773 Zografou (Greece); Ulieru, D, E-mail: daniele.zonta@unitn.it [SITEX 45 SRL, 114 Ghica Tei Blvd, 72235 Bucharest (Romania)

    2011-07-19

    The evaluation of seismic damage is today almost exclusively based on visual inspection, as building owners are generally reluctant to install permanent sensing systems, due to their high installation, management and maintenance costs. To overcome this limitation, the EU-funded MEMSCON project aims to produce small size sensing nodes for measurement of strain and acceleration, integrating Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) based sensors and Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags in a single package that will be attached to reinforced concrete buildings and will transmit data using a wireless interface. During the first phase of the project completed so far, sensor prototypes were produced by assembling preexisting components. This paper outlines the device operating principles, production scheme and operation at both unit and network levels. It also reports on validation campaigns conducted in the laboratory to assess system performance. Accelerometer sensors were tested on a reduced scale metal frame mounted on a shaking table, while strain sensors were embedded in both reduced and full-scale reinforced concrete specimens undergoing increasing deformation cycles up to extensive damage and collapse. The performance of the sensors developed for the project and their applicability to long-term seismic monitoring are discussed.

  6. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ducourthial, Audrey; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of $10^{15} n_{eq}/cm^2$ and the HL-HLC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is critical in order to make accurate predictions for current future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we present first predictions for basic pixel cluster properties alongside...

  7. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Rossini, Lorenzo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of 10^15 neq/cm^2 and the HL-HLC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is critical in order to make accurate predictions for current and future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time and considers both planar and 3D sensor designs. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we compare predictions for b...

  8. Modeling radiation damage to pixel sensors in the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ducourthial, Audrey; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of $10^{15}n_{eq}/cm^2$ and the HL-HLC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is critical in order to make accurate predictions for current future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we present first predictions for basic pixel cluster properties alongside ...

  9. Modeling radiation damage to pixel sensors in the ATLAS detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducourthial, A.

    2018-03-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) . As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subject to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) [1], the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of 1015 neq/cm2 and the HL-LHC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is essential in order to make accurate predictions for current and future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects on the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we present first predictions for basic pixel cluster properties alongside early studies with LHC Run 2 proton-proton collision data.

  10. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Rossini, Lorenzo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High- Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of 10^15 neq/cm2 and the HL-HLC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is critical in order to make accurate predictions for current future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time and considers both planar and 3D sensor designs. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we compare predictions for basic...

  11. On-Line Multi-Damage Scanning Spatial-Wavenumber Filter Based Imaging Method for Aircraft Composite Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanqiang Ren

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Structural health monitoring (SHM of aircraft composite structure is helpful to increase reliability and reduce maintenance costs. Due to the great effectiveness in distinguishing particular guided wave modes and identifying the propagation direction, the spatial-wavenumber filter technique has emerged as an interesting SHM topic. In this paper, a new scanning spatial-wavenumber filter (SSWF based imaging method for multiple damages is proposed to conduct on-line monitoring of aircraft composite structures. Firstly, an on-line multi-damage SSWF is established, including the fundamental principle of SSWF for multiple damages based on a linear piezoelectric (PZT sensor array, and a corresponding wavenumber-time imaging mechanism by using the multi-damage scattering signal. Secondly, through combining the on-line multi-damage SSWF and a PZT 2D cross-shaped array, an image-mapping method is proposed to conduct wavenumber synthesis and convert the two wavenumber-time images obtained by the PZT 2D cross-shaped array to an angle-distance image, from which the multiple damages can be directly recognized and located. In the experimental validation, both simulated multi-damage and real multi-damage introduced by repeated impacts are performed on a composite plate structure. The maximum localization error is less than 2 cm, which shows good performance of the multi-damage imaging method. Compared with the existing spatial-wavenumber filter based damage evaluation methods, the proposed method requires no more than the multi-damage scattering signal and can be performed without depending on any wavenumber modeling or measuring. Besides, this method locates multiple damages by imaging instead of the geometric method, which helps to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. Thus, it can be easily applied to on-line multi-damage monitoring of aircraft composite structures.

  12. Research on Damage Identification of Bridge Based on Digital Image Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yingjing; Huan, Shi; Tao, Weijun

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, the number of the damage bridge due to excessive deformation gradually increased, which caused significant property damage and casualties. Hence health monitoring and the damage detection of the bridge structure based on the deflection measurement are particularly important. The current conventional deflection measurement methods, such as total station, connected pipe, GPS, etc., have many shortcomings as low efficiency, heavy workload, low degree of automation, operating frequency and working time constrained. GPS has a low accuracy in the vertical displacement measurement and cannot meet the dynamic measured requirements of the current bridge engineering. This paper presents a bridge health monitoring and damage detection technology based on digital image measurement method in which the measurement accuracy is sub-millimeter level and can achieve the 24-hour automatic non-destructive monitoring for the deflection. It can be concluded from this paper that it is feasible to use digital image measurement method for identification of the damage in the bridge structure, because it has been validated by the theoretical analysis, the laboratory model and the application of the real bridge.

  13. Finite strain formulation of viscoelastic damage model for simulation of fabric reinforced polymers under dynamic loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treutenaere S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of fabric reinforced polymers in the automotive industry is growing significantly. The high specific stiffness and strength, the ease of shaping as well as the great impact performance of these materials widely encourage their diffusion. The present model increases the predictability of explicit finite element analysis and push the boundaries of the ongoing phenomenological model. Carbon fibre composites made up various preforms were tested by applying different mechanical load up to dynamic loading. This experimental campaign highlighted the physical mechanisms affecting the initial mechanical properties, namely intra- and interlaminar matrix damage, viscoelasticty and fibre failure. The intralaminar behaviour model is based on the explicit formulation of the matrix damage model developed by the ONERA as the given damage formulation correlates with the experimental observation. Coupling with a Maxwell-Wiechert model, the viscoelasticity is included without losing the direct explicit formulation. Additionally, the model is formulated under a total Lagrangian scheme in order to maintain consistency for finite strain. Thus, the material frame-indifference as well as anisotropy are ensured. This allows reorientation of fibres to be taken into account particularly for in-plane shear loading. Moreover, fall within the framework of the total Lagrangian scheme greatly makes the parameter identification easier, as based on the initial configuration. This intralaminar model thus relies upon a physical description of the behaviour of fabric composites and the numerical simulations show a good correlation with the experimental results.

  14. Damage in Creep Aging Process of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Alloy: Experiments and Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Lei

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In creep age forming (CAF, large integral panel components of high-strength aluminum alloy can be shaped and strengthened under external elastic loading at an elevated temperature through creep deformation and age hardening, simultaneously. However, the high ribbed structure on panel may induce stress concentration, inhomogeneous plastic deformation and even damage evolution on the bending rib, leading to the difficulty in controlling forming precision and material properties. Therefore, the generation and evolution of damage are necessary to be considered in the design of CAF. Taking 7050 aluminum alloy as the case material, the continuous and interrupted creep aging tests at 165 °C and three stress levels (300, 325, and 350 MPa were conducted, and the corresponding material properties, precipitate, and damage microstructures were studied by mechanical properties tests, transmission electron microscope (TEM and scanning electron microscope (SEM characterizations. With the increase of stress level, the creep deformation occurs easier, the precipitates grow up faster, the creep damage occurs earlier, the growth rate and the size of microvoids increase, the mechanical properties decrease more rapidly, and the dominant mechanism of creep fracture changes from shear to microvoid coalescence. To simulate creep aging behavior with damage, a continuum damage mechanics (CDM based model is calibrated and numerically implemented into ABAQUS solver via CREEP subroutine. The CAF of 7050 aluminum alloy panels with different height ribs were conducted by experiment and FE simulation. The forming process presents a typical stress relaxation phenomenon. The creep damage mainly occurs on the bending rib due to the severe stress concentration. With the increase of rib height, the creep strain and damage degree increase, but the springback decreases.

  15. Rheological-dynamical continuum damage model for concrete under uniaxial compression and its experimental verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milašinović Dragan D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new analytical model for the prediction of concrete response under uniaxial compression and its experimental verification is presented in this paper. The proposed approach, referred to as the rheological-dynamical continuum damage model, combines rheological-dynamical analogy and damage mechanics. Within the framework of this approach the key continuum parameters such as the creep coefficient, Poisson’s ratio and damage variable are functionally related. The critical values of the creep coefficient and damage variable under peak stress are used to describe the failure mode of the concrete cylinder. The ultimate strain is determined in the post-peak regime only, using the secant stress-strain relation from damage mechanics. The post-peak branch is used for the energy analysis. Experimental data for five concrete compositions were obtained during the examination presented herein. The principal difference between compressive failure and tensile fracture is that there is a residual stress in the specimens, which is a consequence of uniformly accelerated motion of load during the examination of compressive strength. The critical interpenetration displacements and crushing energy are obtained theoretically based on the concept of global failure analysis. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON 174027: Computational Mechanics in Structural Engineering i br. TR 36017: Utilization of by-products and recycled waste materials in concrete composites for sustainable construction development in Serbia: Investigation and environmental assessment of possible applications

  16. Simulation of delamination crack growth in composite laminates: application of local and non-local interface damage models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijaz, H.; Asad, M.

    2015-01-01

    The use of composite laminates is increasing in these days due to higher strength and low density values in comparison of metals. Delamination is a major source of failure in composite laminates. Damage mechanics based theories are employed to simulate the delamination phenomena between composite laminates. These damage models are inherently local and can cause the concentration of stresses around the crack tip. In the present study integral type non-local damage formulation is proposed to avoid the localization problem associated to damage formulation. A comprehensive study is carried out for the models and classical local damage model are performed and results are compared with available experimental data for un IMS/924 Carbon/fiber epoxy composite laminate. (author)

  17. Modelling of microstructural creep damage in welded joints of 316L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouche, G.

    2000-01-01

    Welded joints of 316L stainless steel under service conditions at elevated temperature are known to be preferential sites of creep damage, as compared to the base material. This damage results in the formation of cavities and the development of creep cracks which can lead to a premature failure of welded components. The complex two-phase microstructure of 316L welds was simulated by manually filling a mould with longitudinal deposited weld beads. The moulded material was then aged during 2000 hours at 600 deg. C. High resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy was largely used to examine the microstructure of the simulated material before and after ageing. Smooth and notched creep specimens were cut from the mould and tested at 600 deg. C under various stress levels. A comparison of the lifetime versus nominal stress curves for the base and welded materials shows a greater dependence of the welded material to creep phenomena. Observation and EBSD analysis show that damage is preferentially located along the austenite grain boundaries. The stress and strain fields in the notched specimens were calculated by finite element method. A correlation of this field to the observed damage was made in order to propose a predictive law relating the creep damage to the mechanical conditions applied locally. Further mechanical tests and simulation on CT specimens and mode II tubular specimens allowed validating the model under various multiaxial loading conditions. (author)

  18. Assessment of mean annual flood damage using simple hydraulic modeling and Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oubennaceur, K.; Agili, H.; Chokmani, K.; Poulin, J.; Marceau, P.

    2016-12-01

    Floods are the most frequent and the most damaging natural disaster in Canada. The issue of assessing and managing the risk related to this disaster has become increasingly crucial for both local and national authorities. Brigham, a municipality located in southern Quebec Province, is one of the heavily affected regions by this disaster because of frequent overflows of the Yamaska River reaching two to three times per year. Since Irene Hurricane which struck the region in 2011, causing considerable socio-economic damage, the implementation of mitigation measures has become a major priority for this municipality. To do this, a preliminary study to evaluate the risk to which this region is exposed is essential. Conventionally, approaches only based on the characterization of the hazard (e.g. floodplains extensive, flood depth) are generally adopted to study the risk of flooding. In order to improve the knowledge of this risk, a Monte Carlo simulation approach combining information on the hazard with vulnerability-related aspects has been developed. This approach integrates three main components: (1) hydrologic modelling aiming to establish a probability-discharge function which associate each measured discharge to its probability of occurrence (2) hydraulic modeling that aims to establish the relationship between the discharge and the water stage at each building (3) damage study that aims to assess the buildings damage using damage functions. The damage is estimated according to the water depth defined as the difference between the water level and the elevation of the building's first floor. The application of the proposed approach allows estimating the annual average cost of damage caused by floods on buildings. The obtained results will be useful for authorities to support their decisions on risk management and prevention against this disaster.

  19. Simulating damage for wind storms in the land surface model ORCHIDEE-CAN (revision 4262)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Ying; Gardiner, Barry; Pasztor, Ferenc; Blennow, Kristina; Ryder, James; Valade, Aude; Naudts, Kim; Otto, Juliane; McGrath, Matthew J.; Planque, Carole; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan

    2018-03-01

    Earth system models (ESMs) are currently the most advanced tools with which to study the interactions among humans, ecosystem productivity, and the climate. The inclusion of storm damage in ESMs has long been hampered by their big-leaf approach, which ignores the canopy structure information that is required for process-based wind-throw modelling. Recently the big-leaf assumptions in the large-scale land surface model ORCHIDEE-CAN were replaced by a three-dimensional description of the canopy structure. This opened the way to the integration of the processes from the small-scale wind damage risk model ForestGALES into ORCHIDEE-CAN. The integration of ForestGALES into ORCHIDEE-CAN required, however, developing numerically efficient solutions to deal with (1) landscape heterogeneity, i.e. account for newly established forest edges for the parameterization of gusts; (2) downscaling spatially and temporally aggregated wind fields to obtain more realistic wind speeds that would represents gusts; and (3) downscaling storm damage within the 2500 km2 pixels of ORCHIDEE-CAN. This new version of ORCHIDEE-CAN was parameterized over Sweden. Subsequently, the performance of the model was tested against data for historical storms in southern Sweden between 1951 and 2010 and south-western France in 2009. In years without big storms, here defined as a storm damaging less than 15 × 106 m3 of wood in Sweden, the model error is 1.62 × 106 m3, which is about 100 % of the observed damage. For years with big storms, such as Gudrun in 2005, the model error increased to 5.05 × 106 m3, which is between 10 and 50 % of the observed damage. When the same model parameters were used over France, the model reproduced a decrease in leaf area index and an increase in albedo, in accordance with SPOT-VGT and MODIS records following the passing of Cyclone Klaus in 2009. The current version of ORCHIDEE-CAN (revision 4262) is therefore expected to have the capability to capture the dynamics of

  20. Radiation damage of DNA. Model for direct ionization of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Kazuo; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2004-01-01

    Current aspects of radiation damage of DNA, particularly induced by the direct effect of radiation, and author's method of pulse radiolysis are described in relation to behavior of ions formed by radiation and active principles to induce the strand break. In irradiation of DNA solution in water, the direct effect of radiation is derived from ionization of DNA itself and indirect one, from the reaction between DNA and radicals generated from water molecules and the former direct one has been scarcely investigated due to difficulty of experimental approach. Radicals generated in sugar moiety of DNA are shown important in the strand break by recent studies on crystalline DNA irradiated by X-ray, DNA solution by electron and photon beams, hydrated DNA by γ-ray and by high linear energy transfer (LET) ion. Author's pulse radiolysis studies have revealed behaviors of guanine and adenine radical cations in dynamics of DNA oxidation. Since reactions described are the model, the experimental approach is thought necessary for elucidation of the actually occurring DNA damage in living cells. (N.I.)

  1. Fatigue damage modeling in solder interconnects using a cohesive zone approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdul-Baqi, A.J.J.; Schreurs, P.J.G.; Geers, M.G.D.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this work is to model the fatigue damage process in a solder bump subjected to cyclic loading conditions. Fatigue damage is simulated using the cohesive zone methodology. Damage is assumed to occur at interfaces modeled through cohesive zones in the material, while the bulk material

  2. Optimal policies for cumulative damage models with maintenance last and first

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Xufeng; Qian, Cunhua; Nakagawa, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    From the economical viewpoint of several combined PM policies in reliability theory, this paper takes up a standard cumulative damage model in which the notion of maintenance last is applied, i.e., the unit undergoes preventive maintenances before failure at a planned time T, at a damage level Z, or at a shock number N, whichever occurs last. Expected cost rates are detailedly formulated, and optimal problems of two alternative policies which combine time-based with condition-based preventive maintenances are discussed, i.e., optimal T L ⁎ for N, Z L ⁎ for T, and N L ⁎ for T are rigorously obtained. Comparison methods between such maintenance last and conventional maintenance first are explored. It is determined theoretically and numerically which policy should be adopted, according to the different methods in different cases when the time-based or the condition-based PM policy is optimized.

  3. Enhancement of global flood damage assessments using building material based vulnerability curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englhardt, Johanna; de Ruiter, Marleen; de Moel, Hans; Aerts, Jeroen

    2017-04-01

    This study discusses the development of an enhanced approach for flood damage and risk assessments using vulnerability curves that are based on building material information. The approach draws upon common practices in earthquake vulnerability assessments, and is an alternative for land-use or building occupancy approach in flood risk assessment models. The approach is of particular importance for studies where there is a large variation in building material, such as large scale studies or studies in developing countries. A case study of Ethiopia is used to demonstrate the impact of the different methodological approaches on direct damage assessments due to flooding. Generally, flood damage assessments use damage curves for different land-use or occupancy types (i.e. urban or residential and commercial classes). However, these categories do not necessarily relate directly to vulnerability of damage by flood waters. For this, the construction type and building material may be more important, as is used in earthquake risk assessments. For this study, we use building material classification data of the PAGER1 project to define new building material based vulnerability classes for flood damage. This approach will be compared to the widely applied land-use based vulnerability curves such as used by De Moel et al. (2011). The case of Ethiopia demonstrates and compares the feasibility of this novel flood vulnerability method on a country level which holds the potential to be scaled up to a global level. The study shows that flood vulnerability based on building material also allows for better differentiation between flood damage in urban and rural settings, opening doors to better link to poverty studies when such exposure data is available. Furthermore, this new approach paves the road to the enhancement of multi-risk assessments as the method enables the comparison of vulnerability across different natural hazard types that also use material-based vulnerability curves

  4. Satellite imagery-based monitoring of archaeological site damage in the Syrian civil war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casana, Jesse; Laugier, Elise Jakoby

    2017-01-01

    Since the start of the Syrian civil war in 2011, the rich archaeological heritage of Syria and northern Iraq has faced severe threats, including looting, combat-related damage, and intentional demolition of monuments. However, the inaccessibility of the conflict zone to archaeologists or cultural heritage specialists has made it difficult to produce accurate damage assessments, impeding efforts to develop mitigation strategies and policies. This paper presents results of a project, undertaken in collaboration with the American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR) and the US Department of State, to monitor damage to archaeological sites in Syria, northern Iraq, and southern Turkey using recent, high-resolution satellite imagery. Leveraging a large database of archaeological and heritage sites throughout the region, as well as access to continually updated satellite imagery from DigitalGlobe, this project has developed a flexible and efficient methodology to log observations of damage in a manner that facilitates spatial and temporal queries. With nearly 5000 sites carefully evaluated, analysis reveals unexpected patterns in the timing, severity, and location of damage, helping us to better understand the evolving cultural heritage crisis in Syria and Iraq. Results also offer a model for future remote sensing-based archaeological and heritage monitoring efforts in the Middle East and beyond.

  5. Satellite imagery-based monitoring of archaeological site damage in the Syrian civil war.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Casana

    Full Text Available Since the start of the Syrian civil war in 2011, the rich archaeological heritage of Syria and northern Iraq has faced severe threats, including looting, combat-related damage, and intentional demolition of monuments. However, the inaccessibility of the conflict zone to archaeologists or cultural heritage specialists has made it difficult to produce accurate damage assessments, impeding efforts to develop mitigation strategies and policies. This paper presents results of a project, undertaken in collaboration with the American Schools of Oriental Research (ASOR and the US Department of State, to monitor damage to archaeological sites in Syria, northern Iraq, and southern Turkey using recent, high-resolution satellite imagery. Leveraging a large database of archaeological and heritage sites throughout the region, as well as access to continually updated satellite imagery from DigitalGlobe, this project has developed a flexible and efficient methodology to log observations of damage in a manner that facilitates spatial and temporal queries. With nearly 5000 sites carefully evaluated, analysis reveals unexpected patterns in the timing, severity, and location of damage, helping us to better understand the evolving cultural heritage crisis in Syria and Iraq. Results also offer a model for future remote sensing-based archaeological and heritage monitoring efforts in the Middle East and beyond.

  6. Testicular Damage following Testicular Sperm Retrieval: A Ram Model Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Fedder

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible development of histological abnormalities such as fibrosis and microcalcifications after sperm retrieval in a ram model. Fourteen testicles in nine rams were exposed to open biopsy, multiple TESAs, or TESE, and the remaining four testicles were left unoperated on as controls. Three months after sperm retrieval, the testicles were removed, fixed, and cut into 1/2 cm thick slices and systematically put onto a glass plate exposing macroscopic abnormalities. Tissue from abnormal areas was cut into 3 μm sections and stained for histological evaluation. Pathological abnormalities were observed in testicles exposed to sperm retrieval (≥11 of 14 compared to 0 of 4 control testicles. Testicular damage was found independently of the kind of intervention used. Therefore, cryopreservation of excess sperm should be considered while retrieving sperm.

  7. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Nachman, Benjamin Philip; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon Pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector. As the detector in closest proximity to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the HL-LHC, the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of $10^{15}$ 1 MeV $n_\\mathrm{eq}/\\mathrm{cm}^2$ and the HL-LHC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. This talk presents a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS Pixel sensors for the first time. After a thorough description of the setup, predictions for basic Pixel cluster properties are presented alongside first validation studies with Run 2 collision data.

  8. On the formulation, parameter identification and numerical integration of the EMMI model :plasticity and isotropic damage.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bammann, Douglas J.; Johnson, G. C. (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Marin, Esteban B.; Regueiro, Richard A. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO)

    2006-01-01

    In this report we present the formulation of the physically-based Evolving Microstructural Model of Inelasticity (EMMI) . The specific version of the model treated here describes the plasticity and isotropic damage of metals as being currently applied to model the ductile failure process in structural components of the W80 program . The formulation of the EMMI constitutive equations is framed in the context of the large deformation kinematics of solids and the thermodynamics of internal state variables . This formulation is focused first on developing the plasticity equations in both the relaxed (unloaded) and current configurations. The equations in the current configuration, expressed in non-dimensional form, are used to devise the identification procedure for the plasticity parameters. The model is then extended to include a porosity-based isotropic damage state variable to describe the progressive deterioration of the strength and mechanical properties of metals induced by deformation . The numerical treatment of these coupled plasticity-damage constitutive equations is explained in detail. A number of examples are solved to validate the numerical implementation of the model.

  9. A Progressive Damage Model for unidirectional Fibre Reinforced Composites with Application to Impact and Penetration Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerschbaum, M.; Hopmann, C.

    2016-06-01

    The computationally efficient simulation of the progressive damage behaviour of continuous fibre reinforced plastics is still a challenging task with currently available computer aided engineering methods. This paper presents an original approach for an energy based continuum damage model which accounts for stress-/strain nonlinearities, transverse and shear stress interaction phenomena, quasi-plastic shear strain components, strain rate effects, regularised damage evolution and consideration of load reversal effects. The physically based modelling approach enables experimental determination of all parameters on ply level to avoid expensive inverse analysis procedures. The modelling strategy, implementation and verification of this model using commercially available explicit finite element software are detailed. The model is then applied to simulate the impact and penetration of carbon fibre reinforced cross-ply specimens with variation of the impact speed. The simulation results show that the presented approach enables a good representation of the force-/displacement curves and especially well agreement with the experimentally observed fracture patterns. In addition, the mesh dependency of the results were assessed for one impact case showing only very little change of the simulation results which emphasises the general applicability of the presented method.

  10. Irreversible thermodynamics models and constitutive equations of the irradiation induced deformation and damage accumulating processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wassilew, C.

    1989-11-01

    This report gives an overall evaluation of several in-reactor deformation and creep-rupture experiments performed in BR-2, FFTF, and Rapsodie on pressurised tubes of the stabilized austenitic stainless steels 1.4970, 1.4981, 1.4988, and the nickel base alloy Hastelloy-X. The irradiation induced deformation processes observed in the components operating in a neutron environment can be divided into two main groups: 1. volume conserving creep and 2. volumetric swelling. Since the observed deformation as well as damage accumulating phenomena are caused by the same constrained generated and free disposable point defects and helium atoms, it is obvious and advisable to analyze, and to model simultaneously the ensemble of the elementary mechanisms and processes effective at the same time. Phenomenological models based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes have been developed, with the aim of: 1. grasping the partial relationships between the external variables and the response functions (creep, swelling, creep driven swelling, and time to rupture), 2. fathoming the rate-controlling mechanisms, 3. providing insight into the structural details and changes occurring during the deformation and the damage accumulating processes, 4. integrating the damage accumulating processes comprehensively, and 5. formulating the constitutive equations required to describe the elementary processes that generate plastic deformations as well as damage accumulation. (orig./MM)

  11. Introduction of damage in an elasto-plastic model for unsaturated geo-materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Pense, S.; Pouya, A.; Gatmiri, B.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. During the excavation of nuclear waste repository galleries, the surrounding soil is suspected to undergo structural changes as well as modification of its stress state. The desaturation due to ventilation of galleries during this stage makes it necessary to consider the unsaturated state of the host geo-material. The decompression occurring after the excavation leads to a modification of the stress state. The purpose of our work is to develop a mechanical model to simulate the non-linear stress-strain behaviour of geo-materials which will have to contain radioactivity of nuclear waste for a very long time. Two irreversible phenomena can explain the non-linear behaviour of geo-materials. Plasticity leads to irrecoverable strains. Damage, linked to the appearance and extension of microcracks, results in a deterioration of elastic and hydraulic properties. We will present here the bases of a new model coupling damage and plasticity for the stress-strain behaviour of unsaturated geo-materials. This model should be thermodynamically consistent and use only a reasonable number of parameters. Based on the work of Houlsby, (Houlsby 1997), we choose to use as constitutive variables for unsaturated soils Bishop's stress and suction. This choice as the advantage to allow for continuity at the transition between saturated and unsaturated states. Damage is taken into account by defining a damaged constitutive stress, which is similar to the effective stress principle defined by Kachanov (Kachanov 1958). A simple damage criterion is proposed and an associative flow rule is assumed. We choose to follow the principle of strain equivalence defined by Lemaitre (Lemaitre 1996). This leads to the following elasticity law giving the damaged constitutive stress as a function of elastic strain. If non-linear elasticity is considered, a pressure-dependent bulk modulus and a constant shear modulus can be chosen in order to fit

  12. A model for the induction of DNA damages and their evolution into cell clonogenic inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Ohara, Hiroshi; Waker, A.J.

    2006-01-01

    The dependence of the initial production of DNA damages on radiation quality was examined by using a proposed new model on the basis of target theory. For the estimation of DNA damage-production by different radiation qualities, five possible modes of radiation action, including both direct and indirect effects, were assumed inside a target the molecular structure of which was defined to consist of 10 base-pairs of DNA surrounded by water molecules. The induction of DNA damage was modeled on the basis of comparisons between the primary ionization mean free path and the distance between pairs of ionized atoms, such distance being characteristic on the mode of radiation action. The OH radicals per average energy to produce an ion pair on the nanosecond time scale was estimated and used for indirect action. Assuming a relation between estimated yields of DNA damages and experimental inactivation cross sections for AT-cells, the present model enabled the quantitative reproduction of experimental results for AT-cell killing under aerobic or hypoxic conditions. The results suggest a higher order organization of DNA in a way that there will be at least two types of water environment, one filling half the space surrounding DNA with a depth of 3.7-4.3 nm and the other filling all space with a depth 4.6-4.9 nm. (author)

  13. A comparison of two different approaches for mapping potential ozone damage to vegetation. A model study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, D.; Ashmore, M.R.; Emberson, L.; Tuovinen, J.-P.

    2007-01-01

    Two very different types of approaches are currently in use today for indicating risk of ozone damage to vegetation in Europe. One approach is the so-called AOTX (accumulated exposure over threshold of X ppb) index, which is based upon ozone concentrations only. The second type of approach entails an estimate of the amount of ozone entering via the stomates of vegetation, the AFstY approach (accumulated stomatal flux over threshold of Y nmol m -2 s -1 ). The EMEP chemical transport model is used to map these different indicators of ozone damage across Europe, for two illustrative vegetation types, wheat and beech forests. The results show that exceedences of critical levels for either type of indicator are widespread, but that the indicators give very different spatial patterns across Europe. Model simulations for year 2020 scenarios suggest reductions in risks of vegetation damage whichever indicator is used, but suggest that AOT40 is much more sensitive to emission control than AFstY values. - Model calculations of AOT40 and AFstY show very different spatial variations in the risks of ozone damage to vegetation

  14. Development of a Nondestructive Impulse Device and Damage Model for Unreinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane D. Boone

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Unconstrained compression waves were measured using a newly developed, nondestructive, short impulse excitation device developed for long-term structural health monitoring. The measurements, using this innovative device, were used to determine the variation in the first longitudinal modal frequency as a function of loading magnitude and loading cycles to failure of various concrete mixes. Longitudinal frequency and cumulative energy variations were found to be a function of concrete compressive strength. These results imply that higher-strength concrete more easily absorbs energy and restricts the growth of microcracks. Based on the results, a new damage model is proposed that was shown to correlate with measured values to within 7%. This proposed model was found to have a closer correlation than Miner’s hypothesis and damage index models from other reviewed research.

  15. Comparative analysis among deterministic and stochastic collision damage models for oil tanker and bulk carrier reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Campanile

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of collision damage models on oil tanker and bulk carrier reliability is investigated considering the IACS deterministic model against GOALDS/IMO database statistics for collision events, substantiating the probabilistic model. Statistical properties of hull girder residual strength are determined by Monte Carlo simulation, based on random generation of damage dimensions and a modified form of incremental-iterative method, to account for neutral axis rotation and equilibrium of horizontal bending moment, due to cross-section asymmetry after collision events. Reliability analysis is performed, to investigate the incidence of collision penetration depth and height statistical properties on hull girder sagging/hogging failure probabilities. Besides, the incidence of corrosion on hull girder residual strength and reliability is also discussed, focussing on gross, hull girder net and local net scantlings, respectively. The ISSC double hull oil tanker and single side bulk carrier, assumed as test cases in the ISSC 2012 report, are taken as reference ships.

  16. Finite element model updating and damage detection for bridges using vibration measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    In this report, the results of a study on developing a damage detection methodology based on Statistical Pattern Recognition are : presented. This methodology uses a new damage sensitive feature developed in this study that relies entirely on modal :...

  17. Determination of the numerical parameters of a continuous damage model for the structural analysis of clay brick masonry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Barbosa Mangueira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Models based on the continuous damage theory present good responses in representing the nonlinear behavior of reinforced concrete structures with loss of strength and stiffness of the material. However, damage theory is rarely employed in the analysis of masonry structures and numerical simulations are currently performed mostly by Finite Element Method formulations. A computational program was designed to determine the numerical parameters of a damage model of the physical properties of masonry components, solid clay brick and mortar. The model was formulated based on the composition of tensile and compressive surface strengths in the plane stress state. The numerical parameters, the corresponding curves of the activation surfaces and the evolution of the surfaces are presented. The results were fed into the computational program based on the Boundary Element Method (BEM for the simulation of masonry walls, and two types of masonry were simulated. The results confirm the good performance of the model and the program based on the BEM.

  18. Chewing as a forming application: A viscoplastic damage law in modelling food oral breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skamniotis, C. G.; Charalambides, M. N.; Elliott, M.

    2017-10-01

    The first bite mechanical response of a food item resembles compressive forming processes, where a tool is pressed into a workpiece. The present study addresses ongoing interests in the deformations and damage of food products, particularly during the first bite, in relation to their mechanical properties. Uniaxial tension, compression and shear tests on a starch based food reveal stress-strain response and fracture strains strongly dependent on strain rate and stress triaxiality, while damage mechanisms are identified in the form of stress softening. A pressure dependent viscoplastic constitutive law reproduces the behavior with the aid of ABAQUS subroutines, while a ductile damage initiation and evolution framework based on fracture toughness data enables accurate predictions of the product breakdown. The material model is implemented in a Finite Element (FE) chewing model based on digital pet teeth geometry where the first bite of molar teeth against a food item is simulated. The FE force displacement results match the experimental data obtained by a physical replicate of the bite model, lending weight to the approach as a powerful tool in understanding of food breakdown and product development.

  19. Probability-based assessment and maintenance of welded joints damaged by fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremona, C.; Lukic, M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents a probabilistic reliability assessment procedure for steel components damaged by fatigue. The study combines the structural reliability theory with a maintenance strategy. The fatigue assessment model is based on a modelisation of the fatigue phenomenon issued from the principles of fracture mechanics theory. The safety margin includes the crack growth propagation and allows to treat fatigue damage in a general manner. Damaging cycles and non damaging cycles are distinguished. The sensitivity study of the different parameters shows that some variables can be taken as deterministic. Applications are made on a welded joint 'stiffener/bottom-plate' of a typical steel bridge. The model is then used for taking into account inspection results. Non destructive inspection (NDI) techniques are also used for updating failure probabilities. The results show their ability to be inserted in a maintenance strategy for optimizing the next inspection time. This has led to define cost functions related to the total maintenance cost; this cost is then minimized for determining the optimal next inspection time. An example of welded joint cracked by fatigue highlights the different concepts. The approach presented in the paper is not only restrained to fatigue problems, but can be applied to a wide variety of degrading phenomena. (orig.)

  20. Concrete model for finite element analysis of structures subjected to severe damages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamet, Ph.; Millard, A.; Hoffmann, A.; Nahas, G.; Barbe, B.

    1984-01-01

    A specific concrete model has been developed, in order to perform mechanical analysis of civil engineering structures, when subjected to accidental loadings, leading to severe damages. Its formulation is based on the physical mechanisms, which have been observed on laboratory specimens. The model has been implemented into the CASTEM finite element system, and the case of a concrete slab perforation by a rigid missile has been considered. The qualitative behaviour of the structure is well predicted by the model. Comparison between numerical and experimental results is also performed, using two main curves: missile velocity versus penetration depth; reaction forces versus time. (Author) [pt

  1. Physically-based Assessment of Tropical Cyclone Damage and Economic Losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, N.

    2012-12-01

    Estimating damage and economic losses caused by tropical cyclones (TC) is a topic of considerable research interest in many scientific fields, including meteorology, structural and coastal engineering, and actuarial sciences. One approach is based on the empirical relationship between TC characteristics and loss data. Another is to model the physical mechanism of TC-induced damage. In this talk we discuss about the physically-based approach to predict TC damage and losses due to extreme wind and storm surge. We first present an integrated vulnerability model, which, for the first time, explicitly models the essential mechanisms causing wind damage to residential areas during storm passage, including windborne-debris impact and the pressure-debris interaction that may lead, in a chain reaction, to structural failures (Lin and Vanmarcke 2010; Lin et al. 2010a). This model can be used to predict the economic losses in a residential neighborhood (with hundreds of buildings) during a specific TC (Yau et al. 2011) or applied jointly with a TC risk model (e.g., Emanuel et al 2008) to estimate the expected losses over long time periods. Then we present a TC storm surge risk model that has been applied to New York City (Lin et al. 2010b; Lin et al. 2012; Aerts et al. 2012), Miami-Dade County, Florida (Klima et al. 2011), Galveston, Texas (Lickley, 2012), and other coastal areas around the world (e.g., Tampa, Florida; Persian Gulf; Darwin, Australia; Shanghai, China). These physically-based models are applicable to various coastal areas and have the capability to account for the change of the climate and coastal exposure over time. We also point out that, although made computationally efficient for risk assessment, these models are not suitable for regional or global analysis, which has been a focus of the empirically-based economic analysis (e.g., Hsiang and Narita 2012). A future research direction is to simplify the physically-based models, possibly through

  2. Analysis and Characterization of Damage Utilizing an Orthotropic Generalized Composite Material Model Suitable for Use in Impact Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Carney, Kelly S.; DuBois, Paul; Hoffarth, Canio; Rajan, Subramaniam; Blankenhorn, Gunther

    2016-01-01

    The need for accurate material models to simulate the deformation, damage and failure of polymer matrix composites under impact conditions is becoming critical as these materials are gaining increased usage in the aerospace and automotive communities. In order to address a series of issues identified by the aerospace community as being desirable to include in a next generation composite impact model, an orthotropic, macroscopic constitutive model incorporating both plasticity and damage suitable for implementation within the commercial LS-DYNA computer code is being developed. The plasticity model is based on extending the Tsai-Wu composite failure model into a strain hardening-based orthotropic plasticity model with a non-associative flow rule. The evolution of the yield surface is determined based on tabulated stress-strain curves in the various normal and shear directions and is tracked using the effective plastic strain. To compute the evolution of damage, a strain equivalent semi-coupled formulation is used in which a load in one direction results in a stiffness reduction in multiple material coordinate directions. A detailed analysis is carried out to ensure that the strain equivalence assumption is appropriate for the derived plasticity and damage formulations that are employed in the current model. Procedures to develop the appropriate input curves for the damage model are presented and the process required to develop an appropriate characterization test matrix is discussed

  3. Prediction of Seismic Damage-Based Degradation in RC Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Gupta, Vinay K.; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    Estimation of structural damage from known increase in the fundamental period of a structure after an earthquake or prediction of degradation of stiffness and strength for known damage requires reliable correlations between these response functionals. This study proposes a modified Clough-Johnsto...

  4. Flexibility-based structural damage identification using Gauss ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... structural damages in civil infrastructure, such as high-rise buildings, long-span ... tion is widely used in bridges and buildings today because it is easy and ..... The objective of this paper is to design a mathematical algo- ..... Single damage.

  5. A new model for anisotropic damage in concrete and its application to the prediction of failure of some containment vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badel, P.-B.; Godard, V.; Leblond, J.-B.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a new model for damage in concrete structures which incorporates such complex features as damage anisotropy and asymmetry between tension and compression, while being expressed in a format well suited for numerical applications and involving a limited number of material parameters which can be determined from standard experiments. A crude version of the model involving a single tonsorial internal variable representing damage in tension, and a single material parameter, is presented first. The predictions of this simple model are satisfactory in simple tension, but not so in simple compression. As a remedy, various refinements are then introduced in a second version of the model involving an additional tonsorial or scalar internal variable representing damage in compression, and five additional material parameters. An example of determination of the model parameters using experimental stress-strain curves in simple tension and compression, plus failure envelopes in biaxial tension/compression, is presented next. The model is finally applied to the numerical prediction of the failure of some containment vessel subjected to some large internal pressure, with a comparison with calculations based on a simpler isotropic variant of the model using a single scalar damage variable. The results illustrate the relevance of models incorporating both asymmetry between tension and compression and anisotropy of damage for simulations of industrial concrete structures. (authors)

  6. A hybrid model of primary radiation damage in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarin, S.I.; Dremov, V.V.

    2009-01-01

    The paper offers a hybrid model which combines molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo (MD+MC) methods to describe primary radiation damage in crystals, caused by particles whose energies are no higher than several tens of keV. The particles are tracked in accord with equations of motion with account for pair interaction. The model also considers particle interaction with the mean-field potential (MFP) of the crystal. Only particles involved in cascading are tracked. Equations of motion for these particles include dissipative forces which describe energy exchange between cascade particles and electrons. New particles - the atoms of the crystal in the cascade region - have stochastic parameters (phase coordinates); they are sampled by the Monte Carlo method from the distribution that describes the classic canonical ensemble of non-interacting particles subjected to the external MFP. The introduction of particle interaction with the MFP helps avoid difficulties related to crystal stability and the choice of an adequate interparticle interaction potential in the traditional MD methods. Our technique is many times as fast as the traditional MD methods because we consider only particles which are involved in cascading and apply special methods to speedup the calculation of forces by accounting for the short-range pair potential used

  7. Radiation damage prediction system using damage function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yoshihisa; Mori, Seiji

    1979-01-01

    The irradiation damage analysis system using a damage function was investigated. This irradiation damage analysis system consists of the following three processes, the unfolding of a damage function, the calculation of the neutron flux spectrum of the object of damage analysis and the estimation of irradiation effect of the object of damage analysis. The damage function is calculated by applying the SAND-2 code. The ANISN and DOT3, 5 codes are used to calculate neutron flux. The neutron radiation and the allowable time of reactor operation can be estimated based on these calculations of the damage function and neutron flux. The flow diagram of the process of analyzing irradiation damage by a damage function and the flow diagram of SAND-2 code are presented, and the analytical code for estimating damage, which is determined with a damage function and a neutron spectrum, is explained. The application of the irradiation damage analysis system using a damage function was carried out to the core support structure of a fast breeder reactor for the damage estimation and the uncertainty evaluation. The fundamental analytical conditions and the analytical model for this work are presented, then the irradiation data for SUS304, the initial estimated values of a damage function, the error analysis for a damage function and the analytical results are explained concerning the computation of a damage function for 10% total elongation. Concerning the damage estimation of FBR core support structure, the standard and lower limiting values of damage, the permissible neutron flux and the allowable years of reactor operation are presented and were evaluated. (Nakai, Y.)

  8. Highlighting the DNA damage response with ultrashort laser pulses in the near infrared and kinetic modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eFerrando-May

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the mechanisms governing the response to DNA damage in higher eucaryotes crucially depends on our ability to dissect the temporal and spatial organization of the cellular machinery responsible for maintaining genomic integrity. To achieve this goal, we need experimental tools to inflict DNA lesions with high spatial precision at pre-defined locations, and to visualize the ensuing reactions with adequate temporal resolution. Near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses focused through high-aperture objective lenses of advanced scanning microscopes offer the advantage of inducing DNA damage in a 3D-confined volume of subnuclear dimensions. This high spatial resolution results from the highly nonlinear nature of the excitation process. Here we review recent progress based on the increasing availability of widely tunable and user-friendly technology of ultrafast lasers in the near infrared. We present a critical evaluation of this approach for DNA microdamage as compared to the currently prevalent use of UV or VIS laser irradiation, the latter in combination with photosensitizers. Current and future applications in the field of DNA repair and DNA-damage dependent chromatin dynamics are outlined. Finally, we discuss the requirement for proper simulation and quantitative modeling. We focus in particular on approaches to measure the effect of DNA damage on the mobility of nuclear proteins and consider the pros and cons of frequently used analysis models for FRAP and photoactivation and their applicability to nonlinear photoperturbation experiments.

  9. Characterization factors for global warming in life cycle assessment based on damages to humans and ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schryver, An M; Brakkee, Karin W; Goedkoop, Mark J; Huijbregts, Mark A J

    2009-03-15

    Human and ecosystem health damage due to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is generally poorly quantified in the life cycle assessment of products, preventing an integrated comparison of the importance of GHGs with other stressor types, such as ozone depletion and acidifying emissions. In this study, we derived new characterization factors for 63 GHGs that quantify the impact of an emission change on human and ecosystem health damage. For human health damage, the Disability Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) per unit emission related to malaria, diarrhea, malnutrition, drowning, and cardiovascular diseases were quantified. For ecosystem health damage, the Potentially Disappeared Fraction (PDF) over space and time of various species groups, including plants, butterflies, birds, and mammals, per unit emission was calculated. The influence of value choices in the modeling procedure was analyzed by defining three coherent scenarios, based on Cultural theory perspectives. It was found that the characterization factor for human health damage by carbon dioxide (CO2) ranges from 1.1 x 10(-2) to 1.8 x 10(+1) DALY per kton of emission, while the characterization factor for ecosystem damage by CO2 ranges from 5.4 x 10(-2) to 1.2 x 10(+1) disappeared fraction of species over space and time ((km2 x year)/kton), depending on the scenario chosen. The characterization factor of a GHG can change up to 4 orders of magnitude, depending on the scenario. The scenario-specific differences are mainly explained by the choice for a specific time horizon and stresses the importance of dealing with value choices in the life cycle impact assessment of GHG emissions.

  10. Cellular track model of biological damage to mammalian cell cultures from galactic cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Katz, Robert; Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Nealy, John E.; Shinn, Judy L.

    1991-01-01

    The assessment of biological damage from the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a current interest for exploratory class space missions where the highly ionizing, high-energy, high-charge ions (HZE) particles are the major concern. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values determined by ground-based experiments with HZE particles are well described by a parametric track theory of cell inactivation. Using the track model and a deterministic GCR transport code, the biological damage to mammalian cell cultures is considered for 1 year in free space at solar minimum for typical spacecraft shielding. Included are the effects of projectile and target fragmentation. The RBE values for the GCR spectrum which are fluence-dependent in the track model are found to be more severe than the quality factors identified by the International Commission on Radiological Protection publication 26 and seem to obey a simple scaling law with the duration period in free space.

  11. Cellular track model of biological damage to mammalian cell cultures from galactic cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cucinotta, F.A.; Katz, R.; Wilson, J.W.; Townsend, L.W.; Nealy, J.E.; Shinn, J.L.

    1991-02-01

    The assessment of biological damage from the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) is a current interest for exploratory class space missions where the highly ionizing, high-energy, high-charge ions (HZE) particles are the major concern. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values determined by ground-based experiments with HZE particles are well described by a parametric track theory of cell inactivation. Using the track model and a deterministic GCR transport code, the biological damage to mammalian cell cultures is considered for 1 year in free space at solar minimum for typical spacecraft shielding. Included are the effects of projectile and target fragmentation. The RBE values for the GCR spectrum which are fluence-dependent in the track model are found to be more severe than the quality factors identified by the International Commission on Radiological Protection publication 26 and seem to obey a simple scaling law with the duration period in free space

  12. A method of modeling time-dependent rock damage surrounding underground excavations in multiphase groundwater flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christian-Frear, T.; Freeze, G.

    1997-01-01

    Underground excavations produce damaged zones surrounding the excavations which have disturbed hydrologic and geomechanical properties. Prediction of fluid flow in these zones must consider both the mechanical and fluid flow processes. Presented here is a methodology which utilizes a mechanical model to predict damage and disturbed rock zone (DRZ) development around the excavation and then uses the predictions to develop time-dependent DRZ porosity relationships. These relationships are then used to adjust the porosity of the DRZ in the fluid flow model based upon the time and distance from the edge of the excavation. The application of this methodology is presented using a site-specific example from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, a US Department of Energy facility in bedded salts being evaluated for demonstration of the safe underground disposal of transuranic waste from US defense-related activities

  13. Predictive modeling of interfacial damage in substructured steels: application to martensitic microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maresca, F; Kouznetsova, V G; Geers, M G D

    2016-01-01

    Metallic composite phases, like martensite present in conventional steels and new generation high strength steels exhibit microscale, locally lamellar microstructures characterized by alternating layers of phases or crystallographic variants. The layers can be sub-micron down to a few nanometers thick, and they are often characterized by high contrasts in plastic properties. As a consequence, fracture in these lamellar microstructures generally occurs along the layer interfaces or within one of the layers, typically parallel to the interface. This paper presents a computational framework that addresses the lamellar nature of these microstructures, by homogenizing the plastic deformation at the mesoscale by using the microscale response of the laminates. Failure is accounted for by introducing a family of damaging planes that are parallel to the layer interface. Mode I, mode II and mixed-mode opening are incorporated. The planes along which failure occurs are captured using a smeared damage approach. Coupling of damage with isotropic or anisotropic plasticity models, like crystal plasticity, is straightforward. The damaging planes and directions do not need to correspond to crystalline slip planes, and normal opening is also included. Focus is given on rate-dependent formulations of plasticity and damage, i.e. converged results can be obtained without further regularization techniques. The validation of the model using experimental observations in martensite-austenite lamellar microstructures in steels reveals that the model correctly predicts the main features of the onset of failure, e.g. the necking point, the failure initiation region and the failure mode. Finally, based on the qualitative results obtained, some material design guidelines are provided for martensitic and multi-phase steels. (paper)

  14. Modelling Pre-eruptive Progressive Damage in Basaltic Volcanoes: Consequences for the Pre-eruptive Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Got, J. L.; Amitrano, D.; Carrier, A.; Marsan, D.; Jouanne, F.; Vogfjord, K. S.

    2017-12-01

    At Grimsvötn volcano, high-quality earthquake and continuous GPS data were recorded by the Icelandic Meteorological Office during its 2004-2011 inter-eruptive period and exhibited remarkable patterns : acceleration of the cumulated earthquake number, and a 2-year exponential decrease in displacement rate followed by a 4-year constant inflation rate. We proposed a model with one magma reservoir in a non-linear elastic damaging edifice, with incompressible magma and a constant pressure at the base of the magma conduit. We first modelled seismicity rate and damage as a function of time, and show that Kachanov's elastic brittle damage law may be used to express the decrease of the effective shear modulus with time. We then derived simple analytical expressions for the magma reservoir overpressure and the surface displacement as a function of time. We got a very good fit of the seismicity and surface displacement data by adjusting only three phenomenological parameters and computed magma reservoir overpressure, magma flow and strain power as a function of time. Overpressure decrease is controlled by damage and shear modulus decrease. Displacement increases, although overpressure is decreasing, because shear modulus decreases more than overpressure. Normalized strain power reaches a maximum 0.25 value. This maximum is a physical limit, after which the elasticity laws are no longer valid, earthquakes cluster, cumulative number of earthquakes departs from the model. State variable extrema provide four reference times that may be used to assess the mechanical state and dynamics of the volcanic edifice. We also performed the spatial modelling of the progressive damage and strain localization around a pressurized magma reservoir. We used Kachanov's damage law and finite element modelling of an initially elastic volcanic edifice pressurized by a spherical magma reservoir, with a constant pressure in the reservoir and various external boundary conditions. At each node of the

  15. Failure Predictions for VHTR Core Components using a Probabilistic Contiuum Damage Mechanics Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fok, Alex

    2013-10-30

    The proposed work addresses the key research need for the development of constitutive models and overall failure models for graphite and high temperature structural materials, with the long-term goal being to maximize the design life of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). To this end, the capability of a Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM) model, which has been used successfully for modeling fracture of virgin graphite, will be extended as a predictive and design tool for the core components of the very high- temperature reactor (VHTR). Specifically, irradiation and environmental effects pertinent to the VHTR will be incorporated into the model to allow fracture of graphite and ceramic components under in-reactor conditions to be modeled explicitly using the finite element method. The model uses a combined stress-based and fracture mechanics-based failure criterion, so it can simulate both the initiation and propagation of cracks. Modern imaging techniques, such as x-ray computed tomography and digital image correlation, will be used during material testing to help define the baseline material damage parameters. Monte Carlo analysis will be performed to address inherent variations in material properties, the aim being to reduce the arbitrariness and uncertainties associated with the current statistical approach. The results can potentially contribute to the current development of American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes for the design and construction of VHTR core components.

  16. Computational Modelling of Fracture Propagation in Rocks Using a Coupled Elastic-Plasticity-Damage Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isa Kolo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A coupled elastic-plasticity-damage constitutive model, AK Model, is applied to predict fracture propagation in rocks. The quasi-brittle material model captures anisotropic effects and the distinct behavior of rocks in tension and compression. Calibration of the constitutive model is realized using experimental data for Carrara marble. Through the Weibull distribution function, heterogeneity effect is captured by spatially varying the elastic properties of the rock. Favorable comparison between model predictions and experiments for single-flawed specimens reveal that the AK Model is reliable and accurate for modelling fracture propagation in rocks.

  17. Damage Detection for Continuous Bridge Based on Static-Dynamic Condensation and Extended Kalman Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haoxiang He

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As an effective and classical method about physical parameter identification, extended Kalman filtering (EKF algorithm is widely used in structural damage identification, but the equations and solutions for the structure with bending deformation are not established based on EKF. The degrees of freedom about rotation can be eliminated by the static condensation method, and the dynamic condensation method considering Rayleigh damping is proposed in order to establish the equivalent and simplified modal based on complex finite element model such as continuous girder bridge. According to the requirement of bridge inspection and health monitoring, the online and convenient damage detection method based on EKF is presented. The impact excitation can be generated only on one location by one hammer actuator, and the signal in free vibration is analyzed. The deficiency that the complex excitation information is needed based on the traditional method is overcome. As a numerical example, a three-span continuous girder bridge is simulated, and the corresponding stiffness, the damage location and degree, and the damping parameter are identified accurately. It is verified that the method is suitable for the dynamic signal with high noise-signal ratio; the convergence speed is fast and this method is feasible for application.

  18. Modeled changes in 100 year Flood Risk and Asset Damages within Mapped Floodplains of the Contiguous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wobus, C. W.; Gutmann, E. D.; Jones, R.; Rissing, M.; Mizukami, N.; Lorie, M.; Mahoney, H.; Wood, A.; Mills, D.; Martinich, J.

    2017-12-01

    A growing body of recent work suggests that the extreme weather events that drive inland flooding are likely to increase in frequency and magnitude in a warming climate, thus increasing monetary damages from flooding in the future. We use hydrologic projections based on the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) to estimate changes in the frequency of modeled 1% annual exceedance probability flood events at 57,116 locations across the contiguous United States (CONUS). We link these flood projections to a database of assets within mapped flood hazard zones to model changes in inland flooding damages throughout the CONUS over the remainder of the 21st century, under two greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions scenarios. Our model generates early 21st century flood damages that reasonably approximate the range of historical observations, and trajectories of future damages that vary substantially depending on the GHG emissions pathway. The difference in modeled flood damages between higher and lower emissions pathways approaches $4 billion per year by 2100 (in undiscounted 2014 dollars), suggesting that aggressive GHG emissions reductions could generate significant monetary benefits over the long-term in terms of reduced flood risk. Although the downscaled hydrologic data we used have been applied to flood impacts studies elsewhere, this research expands on earlier work to quantify changes in flood risk by linking future flood exposure to assets and damages at a national scale. Our approach relies on a series of simplifications that could ultimately affect damage estimates (e.g., use of statistical downscaling, reliance on a nationwide hydrologic model, and linking damage estimates only to 1% AEP floods). Although future work is needed to test the sensitivity of our results to these methodological choices, our results suggest that monetary damages from inland flooding could be substantially reduced through more aggressive GHG mitigation policies.

  19. Automated 3D Damaged Cavity Model Builder for Lower Surface Acreage Tile on Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belknap, Shannon; Zhang, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The 3D Automated Thermal Tool for Damaged Acreage Tile Math Model builder was developed to perform quickly and accurately 3D thermal analyses on damaged lower surface acreage tiles and structures beneath the damaged locations on a Space Shuttle Orbiter. The 3D model builder created both TRASYS geometric math models (GMMs) and SINDA thermal math models (TMMs) to simulate an idealized damaged cavity in the damaged tile(s). The GMMs are processed in TRASYS to generate radiation conductors between the surfaces in the cavity. The radiation conductors are inserted into the TMMs, which are processed in SINDA to generate temperature histories for all of the nodes on each layer of the TMM. The invention allows a thermal analyst to create quickly and accurately a 3D model of a damaged lower surface tile on the orbiter. The 3D model builder can generate a GMM and the correspond ing TMM in one or two minutes, with the damaged cavity included in the tile material. A separate program creates a configuration file, which would take a couple of minutes to edit. This configuration file is read by the model builder program to determine the location of the damage, the correct tile type, tile thickness, structure thickness, and SIP thickness of the damage, so that the model builder program can build an accurate model at the specified location. Once the models are built, they are processed by the TRASYS and SINDA.

  20. Continuum Damage Mechanics Models for the Analysis of Progressive Failure in Open-Hole Tension Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyonchan; Li, Yingyong; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of a state-of-the-art continuum damage mechanics model for interlaminar damage, coupled with a cohesive zone model for delamination is examined for failure prediction of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates. Limitations of continuum representations of intra-ply damage and the effect of mesh orientation on the analysis predictions are discussed. It is shown that accurate prediction of matrix crack paths and stress redistribution after cracking requires a mesh aligned with the fiber orientation. Based on these results, an aligned mesh is proposed for analysis of the open-hole tension specimens consisting of different meshes within the individual plies, such that the element edges are aligned with the ply fiber direction. The modeling approach is assessed by comparison of analysis predictions to experimental data for specimen configurations in which failure is dominated by complex interactions between matrix cracks and delaminations. It is shown that the different failure mechanisms observed in the tests are well predicted. In addition, the modeling approach is demonstrated to predict proper trends in the effect of scaling on strength and failure mechanisms of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates.

  1. Fatigue damage evolution in quasi-unidirectional non-crimp fabric based composite materials for wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    scales, the 3D x-ray computer tomography technique is used non-destructive to observe the fatigue damage evolution on the fiber and bundle scale. Those observations are then linked to the larger scales through mechanical testing of representative volumes of the non-crimp fabric bundle structure....... Numerically, those non-crimp fabric bundle structures extracted from the 3D x-ray scans can be used in a multi-scale based finite element models used for understanding the parameters controlling the fatigue damage evolutions. During tensiontension fatigue testing, the damage mechanism is shown...

  2. Sandy Damage Estimates Based on FEMA IA Registrant Inspection Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — A FEMA housing inspection for renters is used to assess personal property loss and for owners to assess damage to their home as well as personal property. This...

  3. A comprehensive analysis of earthquake damage patterns using high dimensional model representation feature selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşkin Kaya, Gülşen

    2013-10-01

    Recently, earthquake damage assessment using satellite images has been a very popular ongoing research direction. Especially with the availability of very high resolution (VHR) satellite images, a quite detailed damage map based on building scale has been produced, and various studies have also been conducted in the literature. As the spatial resolution of satellite images increases, distinguishability of damage patterns becomes more cruel especially in case of using only the spectral information during classification. In order to overcome this difficulty, textural information needs to be involved to the classification to improve the visual quality and reliability of damage map. There are many kinds of textural information which can be derived from VHR satellite images depending on the algorithm used. However, extraction of textural information and evaluation of them have been generally a time consuming process especially for the large areas affected from the earthquake due to the size of VHR image. Therefore, in order to provide a quick damage map, the most useful features describing damage patterns needs to be known in advance as well as the redundant features. In this study, a very high resolution satellite image after Iran, Bam earthquake was used to identify the earthquake damage. Not only the spectral information, textural information was also used during the classification. For textural information, second order Haralick features were extracted from the panchromatic image for the area of interest using gray level co-occurrence matrix with different size of windows and directions. In addition to using spatial features in classification, the most useful features representing the damage characteristic were selected with a novel feature selection method based on high dimensional model representation (HDMR) giving sensitivity of each feature during classification. The method called HDMR was recently proposed as an efficient tool to capture the input

  4. Gaas Displacement Damage Dosimeter Based on Diode Dark Currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warner Jeffrey H.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available GaAs diode dark currents are correlated over a very large proton energy range as a function of displacement damage dose (DDD. The linearity of the dark current increase with DDD over a wide range of applied voltage bias deems this device an excellent candidate for a displacement damage dosimeter. Additional proton testing performed in situ enabled error estimate determination to within 10% for simulated space use.

  5. Comparison of various structural damage tracking techniques with unknown excitations based on experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hongwei; Yang, Jann N.; Zhou, Li

    2009-03-01

    An early detection of structural damages is critical for the decision making of repair and replacement maintenance in order to guarantee a specified structural reliability. Consequently, the structural damage detection, based on vibration data measured from the structural health monitoring (SHM) system, has received considerable attention recently. The traditional time-domain analysis techniques, such as the least square estimation (LSE) method and the extended Kalman filter (EKF) approach, require that all the external excitations (inputs) be available, which may not be the case for some SHM systems. Recently, these two approaches have been extended to cover the general case where some of the external excitations (inputs) are not measured, referred to as the LSE with unknown inputs (LSE-UI) and the EKF with unknown inputs (EKF-UI). Also, new analysis methods, referred to as the sequential non-linear least-square estimation with unknown inputs and unknown outputs (SNLSE-UI-UO) and the quadratic sum-square error with unknown inputs (QSSE-UI), have been proposed for the damage tracking of structures when some of the acceleration responses are not measured and the external excitations are not available. In this paper, these newly proposed analysis methods will be compared in terms of accuracy, convergence and efficiency, for damage identification of structures based on experimental data obtained through a series of experimental tests using a small-scale 3-story building model with white noise excitation. The capability of the LSE-UI, EKF-UI, SNLSE-UI-UO and QSSE-UI approaches in tracking the structural damages will be demonstrated.

  6. Stochastic-Strength-Based Damage Simulation Tool for Ceramic Matrix and Polymer Matrix Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pineda, Evan J.; Walton, Owen J.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Stochastic-based, discrete-event progressive damage simulations of ceramic-matrix composite and polymer matrix composite material structures have been enabled through the development of a unique multiscale modeling tool. This effort involves coupling three independently developed software programs: (1) the Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC), (2) the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life Prediction Program (CARES/ Life), and (3) the Abaqus finite element analysis (FEA) program. MAC/GMC contributes multiscale modeling capabilities and micromechanics relations to determine stresses and deformations at the microscale of the composite material repeating unit cell (RUC). CARES/Life contributes statistical multiaxial failure criteria that can be applied to the individual brittle-material constituents of the RUC. Abaqus is used at the global scale to model the overall composite structure. An Abaqus user-defined material (UMAT) interface, referred to here as "FEAMAC/CARES," was developed that enables MAC/GMC and CARES/Life to operate seamlessly with the Abaqus FEA code. For each FEAMAC/CARES simulation trial, the stochastic nature of brittle material strength results in random, discrete damage events, which incrementally progress and lead to ultimate structural failure. This report describes the FEAMAC/CARES methodology and discusses examples that illustrate the performance of the tool. A comprehensive example problem, simulating the progressive damage of laminated ceramic matrix composites under various off-axis loading conditions and including a double notched tensile specimen geometry, is described in a separate report.

  7. Vibration-based damage detection of structural joints in presence of uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Bugharbee Hussein

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Early damage detection of structure’s joints is essential in order to ensure the integrity of structures. Vibration-based methods are the most popular way of diagnosing damage in machinery joints. Any technique that is used for such a purpose requires dealing with the variability inherent to the system due to manufacturing tolerances, environmental conditions or aging. The level of variability in vibrational response can be very high for mass-produced complex structures that possess a large number of components. In this study, a simple and efficient time frequency method is proposed for detection of damage in connecting joints. The method suggests using singular spectrum analysis for building a reference space from the signals measured on a healthy structure and then compares all other signals to that reference space in order to detect the presence of faults. A model of two plates connected by a series of mounts is used to examine the effectiveness of the method where the uncertainty in the mount properties is taken into account to model the variability in the built-up structure. The motivation behind the simplified model is to identify the faulty mounts in trim-structure joints of an automotive vehicle where a large number of simple plastic clips are used to connect the trims to the vehicle structure.

  8. A model of nonlinear strain and damage accumulation in polymer composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Ruslantsev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model to predict a nonlinear strain of the carbon laminate; the model is based on the relations between the theory of laminated plates and the non-linear approximation of deformation curve of unidirectional layer at the shear in the layer plane. The explicit expressions of stiffness and compliance matrices were obtained via multiplying the matrices that correspond to the elastic characteristics by the matrices, considering the non-linear properties of the laminate. The paper suggests an approximation option for the non-linear properties of the layer at the shear using an exponential function. Some considerations on damage accumulation in carbon laminates were made.

  9. Linking asphalt binder fatigue to asphalt mixture fatigue performance using viscoelastic continuum damage modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaei, Farinaz; Castorena, Cassie; Kim, Y. Richard

    2016-08-01

    Fatigue cracking is a major form of distress in asphalt pavements. Asphalt binder is the weakest asphalt concrete constituent and, thus, plays a critical role in determining the fatigue resistance of pavements. Therefore, the ability to characterize and model the inherent fatigue performance of an asphalt binder is a necessary first step to design mixtures and pavements that are not susceptible to premature fatigue failure. The simplified viscoelastic continuum damage (S-VECD) model has been used successfully by researchers to predict the damage evolution in asphalt mixtures for various traffic and climatic conditions using limited uniaxial test data. In this study, the S-VECD model, developed for asphalt mixtures, is adapted for asphalt binders tested under cyclic torsion in a dynamic shear rheometer. Derivation of the model framework is presented. The model is verified by producing damage characteristic curves that are both temperature- and loading history-independent based on time sweep tests, given that the effects of plasticity and adhesion loss on the material behavior are minimal. The applicability of the S-VECD model to the accelerated loading that is inherent of the linear amplitude sweep test is demonstrated, which reveals reasonable performance predictions, but with some loss in accuracy compared to time sweep tests due to the confounding effects of nonlinearity imposed by the high strain amplitudes included in the test. The asphalt binder S-VECD model is validated through comparisons to asphalt mixture S-VECD model results derived from cyclic direct tension tests and Accelerated Loading Facility performance tests. The results demonstrate good agreement between the asphalt binder and mixture test results and pavement performance, indicating that the developed model framework is able to capture the asphalt binder's contribution to mixture fatigue and pavement fatigue cracking performance.

  10. Nondestructive Damage Assessment of Composite Structures Based on Wavelet Analysis of Modal Curvatures: State-of-the-Art Review and Description of Wavelet-Based Damage Assessment Benchmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Katunin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of composite structures as elements of machines and vehicles working under various operational conditions causes degradation and occurrence of damage. Considering that composites are often used for responsible elements, for example, parts of aircrafts and other vehicles, it is extremely important to maintain them properly and detect, localize, and identify the damage occurring during their operation in possible early stage of its development. From a great variety of nondestructive testing methods developed to date, the vibration-based methods seem to be ones of the least expensive and simultaneously effective with appropriate processing of measurement data. Over the last decades a great popularity of vibration-based structural testing has been gained by wavelet analysis due to its high sensitivity to a damage. This paper presents an overview of results of numerous researchers working in the area of vibration-based damage assessment supported by the wavelet analysis and the detailed description of the Wavelet-based Structural Damage Assessment (WavStructDamAs Benchmark, which summarizes the author’s 5-year research in this area. The benchmark covers example problems of damage identification in various composite structures with various damage types using numerous wavelet transforms and supporting tools. The benchmark is openly available and allows performing the analysis on the example problems as well as on its own problems using available analysis tools.

  11. Quantification of LOCA core damage frequency based on thermal-hydraulics analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jaehyun; Park, Jin Hee; Kim, Dong-San; Lim, Ho-Gon

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We quantified the LOCA core damage frequency based on the best-estimated success criteria analysis. • The thermal-hydraulic analysis using MARS code has been applied to Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plants. • Five new event trees with new break size boundaries and new success criteria were developed. • The core damage frequency is 5.80E−07 (/y), which is 12% less than the conventional PSA event trees. - Abstract: A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) has always been significantly considered one of the most important initiating events. However, most probabilistic safety assessment models, up to now, have undoubtedly adopted the three groups of LOCA, and even an exact break size boundary that used in WASH-1400 reports was published in 1975. With an awareness of the importance of a realistic PSA for a risk-informed application, several studies have tried to find the realistic thermal-hydraulic behavior of a LOCA, and improve the PSA model. The purpose of this research is to obtain realistic results of the LOCA core damage frequency based on a success criteria analysis using the best-estimate thermal-hydraulics code. To do so, the Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNP) was selected for this study. The MARS code was used for a thermal hydraulics analysis and the AIMS code was used for the core damage quantification. One of the major findings in the thermal hydraulics analysis was that the decay power is well removed by only a normal secondary cooling in LOCAs of below 1.4 in and by only a high pressure safety injection in LOCAs of 0.8–9.4 in. Based on the thermal hydraulics results regarding new break size boundaries and new success criteria, five new event trees (ETs) were developed. The core damage frequency of new LOCA ETs is 5.80E−07 (/y), which is 12% less than the conventional PSA ETs. In this research, we obtained not only thermal-hydraulics characteristics for the entire break size of a LOCA in view of the deterministic safety

  12. Quantification of LOCA core damage frequency based on thermal-hydraulics analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Jaehyun, E-mail: chojh@kaeri.re.kr; Park, Jin Hee; Kim, Dong-San; Lim, Ho-Gon

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • We quantified the LOCA core damage frequency based on the best-estimated success criteria analysis. • The thermal-hydraulic analysis using MARS code has been applied to Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plants. • Five new event trees with new break size boundaries and new success criteria were developed. • The core damage frequency is 5.80E−07 (/y), which is 12% less than the conventional PSA event trees. - Abstract: A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) has always been significantly considered one of the most important initiating events. However, most probabilistic safety assessment models, up to now, have undoubtedly adopted the three groups of LOCA, and even an exact break size boundary that used in WASH-1400 reports was published in 1975. With an awareness of the importance of a realistic PSA for a risk-informed application, several studies have tried to find the realistic thermal-hydraulic behavior of a LOCA, and improve the PSA model. The purpose of this research is to obtain realistic results of the LOCA core damage frequency based on a success criteria analysis using the best-estimate thermal-hydraulics code. To do so, the Korea Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNP) was selected for this study. The MARS code was used for a thermal hydraulics analysis and the AIMS code was used for the core damage quantification. One of the major findings in the thermal hydraulics analysis was that the decay power is well removed by only a normal secondary cooling in LOCAs of below 1.4 in and by only a high pressure safety injection in LOCAs of 0.8–9.4 in. Based on the thermal hydraulics results regarding new break size boundaries and new success criteria, five new event trees (ETs) were developed. The core damage frequency of new LOCA ETs is 5.80E−07 (/y), which is 12% less than the conventional PSA ETs. In this research, we obtained not only thermal-hydraulics characteristics for the entire break size of a LOCA in view of the deterministic safety

  13. A Bayesian Decision Model for Battle Damage Assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Franzen, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Battle damage assessment (BDA) is critical to success in any air campaign. However, Desert Storm highlighted numerous deficiencies in the BDA process, and operations since Desert Storm continue to point out weaknesses...

  14. Building damage assessment from PolSAR data using texture parameters of statistical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linlin; Liu, Xiuguo; Chen, Qihao; Yang, Shuai

    2018-04-01

    Accurate building damage assessment is essential in providing decision support for disaster relief and reconstruction. Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) has become one of the most effective means of building damage assessment, due to its all-day/all-weather ability and richer backscatter information of targets. However, intact buildings that are not parallel to the SAR flight pass (termed oriented buildings) and collapsed buildings share similar scattering mechanisms, both of which are dominated by volume scattering. This characteristic always leads to misjudgments between assessments of collapsed buildings and oriented buildings from PolSAR data. Because the collapsed buildings and the intact buildings (whether oriented or parallel buildings) have different textures, a novel building damage assessment method is proposed in this study to address this problem by introducing texture parameters of statistical models. First, the logarithms of the estimated texture parameters of different statistical models are taken as a new texture feature to describe the collapse of the buildings. Second, the collapsed buildings and intact buildings are distinguished using an appropriate threshold. Then, the building blocks are classified into three levels based on the building block collapse rate. Moreover, this paper also discusses the capability for performing damage assessment using texture parameters from different statistical models or using different estimators. The RADARSAT-2 and ALOS-1 PolSAR images are used to present and analyze the performance of the proposed method. The results show that using the texture parameters avoids the problem of confusing collapsed and oriented buildings and improves the assessment accuracy. The results assessed by using the K/G0 distribution texture parameters estimated based on the second moment obtain the highest extraction accuracies. For the RADARSAT-2 and ALOS-1 data, the overall accuracy (OA) for these three types of

  15. Determination of ion track and shapes with damage simulations on the base of ellipsometric and backscattering spectrometric measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polgar, O.; Fried, M.; Khanh, N.; Petrik, P.; Barsony, I. [Research Institute for Technical Phisycs and Materials Science, Budapest (Hungary)

    2008-05-15

    On the base of geometrical and statistical considerations a damage simulator was created in order to determine the ion track-radius and -shape of ion-implantation caused damage in single-crystalline Si. Damage vs. dose curves calculated by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectrometry (RBS/C) measurements, using different doses of 100 keV Xe implantation, gave information about the damage profile in depth. Both methods are required, because of dose-dependent discrepancies of SE compared with RBS/C [Fried et al., Thin Solid Films 455/456, 404 (2004)]. Different kinds of damage models were investigated to calculate the ion track-radius and to describe the damages in depth and the shape of ion track. Comparing directly the simulated and the measured damage vs. dose curves, the damage function and the other simulation parameters were optimized and hence the ion track size and even the shape can be determined. The dose dependent mean size of the unchanged crystalline regions, obtained from the simulation was correlated with the complex dielectric functions, obtained from the SE analysis. The results clearly show the effect of decreasing size of the unchanged crystalline regions. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  16. Evaluating the Human Damage of Tsunami at Each Time Frame in Aggregate Units Based on GPS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Ogawa

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Assessments of the human damage caused by the tsunami are required in order to consider disaster prevention at such a regional level. Hence, there is an increasing need for the assessments of human damage caused by earthquakes. However, damage assessments in japan currently usually rely on static population distribution data, such as statistical night time population data obtained from national census surveys. Therefore, human damage estimation that take into consideration time frames have not been assessed yet. With these backgrounds, the objectives of this study are: to develop a method for estimating the population distribution of the for each time frame, based on location positioning data observed with mass GPS loggers of mobile phones, to use a evacuation and casualties models for evaluating human damage due to the tsunami, and evaluate each time frame by using the data developed in the first objective, and 3 to discuss the factors which cause the differences in human damage for each time frame. By visualizing the results, we clarified the differences in damage depending on time frame, day and area. As this study enables us to assess damage for any time frame in and high resolution, it will be useful to consider provision for various situations when an earthquake may hit, such as during commuting hours or working hours and week day or holiday.

  17. Simple estimating method of damages of concrete gravity dam based on linear dynamic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, T.; Kanenawa, K.; Yamaguchi, Y. [Public Works Research Institute, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan). Hydraulic Engineering Research Group

    2004-07-01

    Due to the occurrence of large earthquakes like the Kobe Earthquake in 1995, there is a strong need to verify seismic resistance of dams against much larger earthquake motions than those considered in the present design standard in Japan. Problems exist in using nonlinear analysis to evaluate the safety of dams including: that the influence which the set material properties have on the results of nonlinear analysis is large, and that the results of nonlinear analysis differ greatly according to the damage estimation models or analysis programs. This paper reports the evaluation indices based on a linear dynamic analysis method and the characteristics of the progress of cracks in concrete gravity dams with different shapes using a nonlinear dynamic analysis method. The study concludes that if simple linear dynamic analysis is appropriately conducted to estimate tensile stress at potential locations of initiating cracks, the damage due to cracks would be predicted roughly. 4 refs., 1 tab., 13 figs.

  18. Frequency of damage by external explosion hazards based on geographical information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, Guenter; Camarinopoulos, Alexis; Theodora, Karali; Camarinopoulos, Leonidas; Schubert, B.

    2013-01-01

    External explosions can significantly contribute to risk of damage for industrial plants. External explosions may origin from other plants in the neighbourhood, which store and operate with explosive substances, or from transport of such substances on road, rail, or water. If deflagration is involved, ignition will not necessarily occur at the place of the accident, but a cloud of a combustible gas-air mixture may develop, which will ignite at some distance depending on wind velocity. A probabilistic model has been developed to calculate frequencies of damage based on numerical integration or on Monte Carlo simulation. Geographical information systems provide map material for sites, roads, rail and rivers on a computer. Data has been collected and applied for a nuclear power plant in Germany as an example. The method, however, can be used for any type of plant subject to external explosion hazards. (orig.)

  19. Frequency of damage by external explosion hazards based on geographical information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Guenter [Risa Sicherheitsanalysen GmbH, Berlin-Charlottenburg (Germany); Camarinopoulos, Alexis; Theodora, Karali [Environment Reliability and Risk Analysis (ERRA), Athens (Greece); Camarinopoulos, Leonidas [Piraeus Univ. (Greece); Schubert, B. [VENE, Hamburg (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    External explosions can significantly contribute to risk of damage for industrial plants. External explosions may origin from other plants in the neighbourhood, which store and operate with explosive substances, or from transport of such substances on road, rail, or water. If deflagration is involved, ignition will not necessarily occur at the place of the accident, but a cloud of a combustible gas-air mixture may develop, which will ignite at some distance depending on wind velocity. A probabilistic model has been developed to calculate frequencies of damage based on numerical integration or on Monte Carlo simulation. Geographical information systems provide map material for sites, roads, rail and rivers on a computer. Data has been collected and applied for a nuclear power plant in Germany as an example. The method, however, can be used for any type of plant subject to external explosion hazards. (orig.)

  20. Detecting Damaged Building Regions Based on Semantic Scene Change from Multi-Temporal High-Resolution Remote Sensing Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jihui Tu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The detection of damaged building regions is crucial to emergency response actions and rescue work after a disaster. Change detection methods using multi-temporal remote sensing images are widely used for this purpose. Differing from traditional methods based on change detection for damaged building regions, semantic scene change can provide a new point of view since it can indicate the land-use variation at the semantic level. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for detecting damaged building regions based on semantic scene change in a visual Bag-of-Words model. Pre- and post-disaster scene change in building regions are represented by a uniform visual codebook frequency. The scene change of damaged and non-damaged building regions is discriminated using the Support Vector Machine (SVM classifier. An evaluation of experimental results, for a selected study site of the Longtou hill town of Yunnan, China, which was heavily damaged in the Ludian earthquake of 14 March 2013, shows that this method is feasible and effective for detecting damaged building regions. For the experiments, WorldView-2 optical imagery and aerial imagery is used.

  1. Comparative Study of Fatigue Damage Models Using Different Number of Classes Combined with the Rainflow Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zengah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue damage increases with applied load cycles in a cumulative manner. Fatigue damage models play a key role in life prediction of components and structures subjected to random loading. The aim of this paper is the examination of the performance of the “Damaged Stress Model”, proposed and validated, against other fatigue models under random loading before and after reconstruction of the load histories. To achieve this objective, some linear and nonlinear models proposed for fatigue life estimation and a batch of specimens made of 6082T6 aluminum alloy is subjected to random loading. The damage was cumulated by Miner’s rule, Damaged Stress Model (DSM, Henry model and Unified Theory (UT and random cycles were counted with a rain-flow algorithm. Experimental data on high-cycle fatigue by complex loading histories with different mean and amplitude stress values are analyzed for life calculation and model predictions are compared.

  2. A trivariate optimal replacement policy for a deteriorating system based on cumulative damage and inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Hsin-Nan; Sheu, Shey-Huei; Zhang, Zhe George

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we study a trivariate replacement model for a deteriorating system consisting of two units. Failures of unit 1 can be classified into two types. Type I failure (minor failure) is fixed by a minimal repair and type II failure (catastrophic failure) is removed by a replacement. Both types of failures can only be detected through inspection. Each type I failure of unit 1 will result in a random amount of damage to unit 2 and the damages are cumulative. The probability of type I failure or type II failure is assumed to depend on the number of failures since the last replacement. We formulate a replacement policy based on the number of type I failure, the occurrence of the first type II failure, and the amount of accumulative damages. Hence the system is replaced either preventively or correctively at any of the following four conditions depend on whichever occurs first; preventively (a) at the Nth type I failure; or (b) when the total damage of unit 2 exceeds a pre-specified level Z (but less than the failure level l); and, correctively (c) at the first type II failure; or (d) when the total damage of unit 2 exceeds a failure level l, where Z and l represent the thresholds of total damage level for unit 2 to preventive and corrective replacements, respectively. Although a type I failure can be fixed by a minimal repair, but the operating period is stochastically decreasing and repair time is stochastically increasing as time goes on. The minimal total expected long-run net cost per unit time of the system is derived and a computational algorithm for determining the optimal policy is developed. A real-world application from electric power industry is provided. Several past studied are shown to be special cases of our model. Finally, a numerical example is presented. - Highlights: • A trivariate replacement policy for a deteriorating system with two units is proposed. • A real-world application from the electric power industry is provided. • The

  3. Methodology for a GIS-based damage assessment for researchers following large scale disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Patrick Shane

    The 1990s were designated the International Decade for Natural Disaster Reduction by the United Nations General Assembly. This push for decrease of loss of life, property destruction, and social and economic disruption brought advancements in disaster management, including damage assessment. Damage assessment in the wake of natural and manmade disasters is a useful tool for government agencies, insurance companies, and researchers. As technologies evolve damage assessment processes constantly evolve as well. Alongside the advances in Geographic Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing, and Global Positioning System (GPS) technology, as well as the growing awareness of the needs of a standard operating procedure for GIS-based damage assessment and a need to make the damage assessment process as quick and accurate as possible, damage assessment procedures are becoming easier to execute and the results are becoming more accurate and robust. With these technological breakthroughs, multi-disciplinary damage assessment reconnaissance teams have become more efficient in their assessment methods through better organization and more robust through addition of new datasets. Damage assessment personnel are aided by software tools that offer high-level analysis and increasingly rapid damage assessment methods. GIS software has advanced the damage assessment methods of these teams by combining remotely sensed aerial imagery, GPS, and other technologies to expand the uses of the data. GIS allows researchers to use aerial imagery to show field collected data in the geographic location that it was collected so that information can be revisited, measurements can be taken, and data can be disseminated to other researchers and the public. The GIS-based data available to the reconnaissance team includes photographs of damage, worksheets, calculations, voice messages collected while studying the affected area, and many other datasets which are based on the type of disaster and the

  4. Interfacial damage identification of steel and concrete composite beams based on piezoceramic wave method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shi; Dai, Yong; Zhao, Putian; Liu, Weiling

    2018-01-01

    Steel-concrete composite structures are playing an increasingly important role in economic construction because of a series of advantages of great stiffness, good seismic performance, steel material saving, cost efficiency, convenient construction, etc. However, in service process, due to the long-term effects of environmental impacts and dynamic loading, interfaces of a composite structure might generate debonding cracks, relative slips or separations, and so on, lowering the composite effect of the composite structure. In this paper, the piezoceramics (PZT) are used as transducers to perform experiments on interface debonding slips and separations of composite beams, respectively, aimed at proposing an interface damage identification model and a relevant damage detection innovation method based on PZT wave technology. One part of various PZT patches was embedded in concrete as "smart aggregates," and another part of the PZT patches was pasted on the surface of the steel beam flange, forming a sensor array. A push-out test for four specimens was carried out and experimental results showed that, under the action of the external loading, the received signal amplitudes will increasingly decrease with increase of debonding slips along the interface. The proposed signal energy-based interface damage detection algorithm is highly efficient in surface state evaluations of composite beams.

  5. Clusters of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation: Formation of short DNA fragments. I. Theoretical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holley, W.R.; Chatterjee, A.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a general theoretical model for the interaction of ionizing radiation with chromatin. Chromatin is modeled as a 30-nm-diameter solenoidal fiber composed of 20 turns of nucleosomes, 6 nucleosomes per turn. Charged-particle tracks are modeled by partitioning the energy deposition between primary track core, resulting from glancing collisions with 100 eV or less per event, and δ rays due to knock-on collisions involving energy transfers > 100 eV. A Monte Carlo simulation incorporates damages due to the following molecular mechanisms: (1) ionization of water molecules leading to the formation of circ OH, circ H, e aq , etc.; circ OH attack on sugar molecules leading to strand breaks; circ OH attack on bases; direct ionization of the sugar molecules leading to strand breaks; direct ionization of the bases. Our calculations predict significant clustering of damage both locally, over regions up to 40 hp and over regions extending to several kilobase pairs. A characteristic feature of the regional damage predicted by our model is the production of short fragments of DNA associated with multiple nearby strand breaks. Such fragments have subsequently been detected experimentally and are reported in an accompanying paper after exposure to both high- and low-LET radiation. The overall measured yields agree well quantitatively with the theoretical predictions. Our theoretical results predict the existence of a strong peak at about 85 bp, which represents the revolution period about the nucleosome. Other peaks at multiples of about 1,000 bp correspond to the periodicity of the particular solenoid model of chromatin used in these calculations. Theoretical results in combination with experimental data on fragmentation spectra may help determine the consensus or average structure of the chromatin fibers in mammalian DNA. 27 refs., 7 figs

  6. A preventive maintenance model for leased equipment subject to internal degradation and external shock damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Xiaojun; Wu, Changjie; Li, Yanting; Xi, Lifeng

    2016-01-01

    A periodic preventive maintenance modeling method is proposed for leased equipment with continuous internal degradation and stochastic external shock damage considered simultaneously, which can facilitate the equipment lessor to optimize the maintenance schedule for the same kind of equipment rented by different lessees. A novel interactive mechanism between the continuous internal degradation and the stochastic external shock damage is established on the hazard rate of the equipment with integrating the imperfect effect of maintenance. Two improvement factors are defined for the modeling of imperfect maintenance. The number of failures resulting from internal degradation and from external shocks are both mathematically deduced based on this interactive mechanism. The optimal preventive maintenance scheme is obtained by minimizing the cumulative maintenance cost throughout the lease period. Numerical example shows that the proposed preventive maintenance model not only can reflect the reliability status of the equipment but also can clearly distinguish between the impact from internal degradation and that from external shocks. - Highlights: • We propose an imperfect periodic preventive maintenance model for leased equipment. • It can distinguish between the impact from internal degradation and that from external shocks. • An internal–external interactive mechanism is proposed. • Two improvement factors are introduced into the modeling of imperfect maintenance. • The model is helpful for the PM scheduling of the same equipment rented by different lessees.

  7. Self healing of damage in Fe-based alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, S.

    2015-01-01

    Steel components can exhibit premature and low-ductility creep fracture, when exposed to high temperatures for long times. The failure arises from the formation, growth and coalescence of ultra-fine cracks and cavities. Self healing of damage is a promising new approach to enhance the lifetime of

  8. Three job stress models/concepts and oxidative DNA damage in a sample of workers in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Akiomi; Kawakami, Norito; Ishizaki, Masao; Tabata, Masaji; Tsuchiya, Masao; Akiyama, Miki; Kitazume, Akiko; Kuroda, Mitsuyo; Shimazu, Akihito

    2009-04-01

    Three job stress models/concepts (the job demands-control [DC] model, the effort-reward imbalance [ERI] model, and organizational justice) have been linked to coronary heart disease (CHD) at work. In recent years, oxidative DNA damage has been identified as a new risk factor for CHD. However, evidence for the association between these job stressors and oxidative DNA damage is limited. The present cross-sectional study investigated the association between these job stress models/concepts and oxidative DNA damage as a possible mediator of the adverse health effects of job stress. A total of 166 male and 51 female workers of a manufacturing factory in Japan were surveyed using a mailed questionnaire regarding job stressors and demographic, occupational, and lifestyle variables. Urinary concentrations of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), a biomarker of oxidative DNA damage, were also measured. In male subjects, the urinary concentrations of 8-OHdG were significantly higher among the group with lower interactional justice, one of the two components of organizational justice; however, no association was observed with the DC model or the ERI model. In female subjects, high job demands/control ratio was significantly and positively associated with the urinary concentrations of 8-OHdG. Interactional justice among male workers and the DC model-based strain among female workers may be associated with increased urinary concentrations of 8-OHdG which possibly reflects oxidative DNA damage.

  9. Viscoelastic-damage interface model formulation with friction to simulate the delamination growth in mode II shear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodarzi, Mohammad Saeed; Hosseini-Toudeshky, Hossein

    2017-11-01

    In this paper a formulation of a viscoelastic-damage interface model with friction in mode-II is presented. The cohesive constitutive law contains elastic and damage regimes. It has been assumed that the shear stress in the elastic regime follows the viscoelastic properties of the matrix material. The three element Voigt model has been used for the formulation of relaxation modulus of the material. Damage evolution proceeds according to the bilinear cohesive constitutive law combined with friction stress consideration. Combination of damage and friction is based on the presumption that the damaged area, related to an integration point, can be dismembered into the un-cracked area with the cohesive damage and cracked area with friction. Samples of a one element model have been presented to see the effect of parameters on the cohesive constitutive law. A comparison between the predicted results with available results of end-notched flexure specimens in the literature is also presented to verify the model. Transverse crack tension specimens are also simulated for different applied displacement velocities.

  10. Basic Modelling principles and Validation of Software for Prediction of Collision Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    2000-01-01

    This report describes basic modelling principles, the theoretical background and validation examples for the collision damage prediction module in the ISESO stand-alone software.......This report describes basic modelling principles, the theoretical background and validation examples for the collision damage prediction module in the ISESO stand-alone software....

  11. Flood vulnerability assessment of residential buildings by explicit damage process modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Custer, Rocco; Nishijima, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    The present paper introduces a vulnerability modelling approach for residential buildings in flood. The modelling approach explicitly considers relevant damage processes, i.e. water infiltration into the building, mechanical failure of components in the building envelope and damage from water...

  12. ANALYTICAL MODEL OF DAMAGED AIRCRAFT SKIN BONDED REPAIRS ASSUMING THE MATERIAL PROPERTIES DEGRADATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The search of optimal variants for composite repair patches allows to increase the service life of a damaged air- plane structure. To sensibly choose the way of repair, it is necessary to have a computational complex to predict the stress- strain condition of "structure-adhesive-patch" system and to take into account the damage growth considering the material properties change. The variant of the computational complex based on inclusion method is proposed.For calculation purposes the repair bonded joint is divided into two areas: a metal plate with patch-shaped hole and a "patch-adhesive layer-skin" composite plate (inclusion.Calculation stages:Evaluation of the patch influence to the skin stress-strain condition, stress distribution between skin and patch in the case of no damage. Calculation of the stress-strain condition is performed separately for the skin with hole and for the inclusion; solutions are coupled based on strain compatibility.Definition of the damage growth parameters at new stress-strain condition due to bonded patch existence. Skincrack stress intensity factors are found to identify the crack growth velocity. Patch is modelled as a set of "springs" bridging the crack.Degradation analysis of elasticity properties for the patch material.Repair effectiveness is evaluated with respect to crack growth velocity reduction in the initial material in compari- son with the case of the patch absence.Calculation example for the crack repair effectiveness depending on number of loading cycles for the 7075-T6 aluminum skin is given. Repair patches are carbon-epoxy, glass-epoxy and boron-epoxy material systems with quasi- isotropic layup and GLARE hybrid metal-polymeric material.The analysis shows the high effectiveness of the carbon-epoxy patch. Due to low stiffness, the glass-epoxy patchdemonstrates the least effectiveness. GLARE patch containing the fiberglass plies oriented across the crack has the same effectiveness as the carbon and

  13. Vendor-based laser damage metrology equipment supporting the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, J. H; Jennings, R. T.; Kimmons, J. F.; Kozlowski, M. R.; Mouser, R. P.; Schwatz, S.; Stolz, C. J.; Weinzapfel, C. L.

    1998-01-01

    A sizable laser damage metrology effort is required as part of optics production and installation for the 192 beam National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser. The large quantities, high damage thresholds, and large apertures of polished and coated optics necessitates vendor-based metrology equipment to assure component quality during production. This equipment must be optimized to provide the required information as rapidly as possible with limited operator experience. The damage metrology tools include: (1) platinum inclusion damage test systems for laser amplifier slabs, (2) laser conditioning stations for mirrors and polarizers, and (3) mapping and damage testing stations for UV transmissive optics. Each system includes a commercial Nd:YAG laser, a translation stage for the optics, and diagnostics to evaluate damage. The scanning parameters, optical layout, and diagnostics vary with the test fluences required and the damage morphologies expected. This paper describes the technical objectives and milestones involved in fulfilling these metrology requirements

  14. Inspection of the Math Model Tools for On-Orbit Assessment of Impact Damage Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Charles E.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Piascik, Robert S> KramerWhite, Julie A.; KramerWhite, Julie A.; Labbe, Steve G.; Rotter, Hank A.

    2007-01-01

    In Spring of 2005, the NASA Engineering Safety Center (NESC) was engaged by the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) to peer review the suite of analytical tools being developed to support the determination of impact and damage tolerance of the Orbiter Thermal Protection Systems (TPS). The NESC formed an independent review team with the core disciplines of materials, flight sciences, structures, mechanical analysis and thermal analysis. The Math Model Tools reviewed included damage prediction and stress analysis, aeroheating analysis, and thermal analysis tools. Some tools are physics-based and other tools are empirically-derived. Each tool was created for a specific use and timeframe, including certification, real-time pre-launch assessments. In addition, the tools are used together in an integrated strategy for assessing the ramifications of impact damage to tile and RCC. The NESC teams conducted a peer review of the engineering data package for each Math Model Tool. This report contains the summary of the team observations and recommendations from these reviews.

  15. Assessment of creep-fatigue damage using the UK strain based procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bate, S.K.

    1997-01-01

    The UK strain based procedures have been developed for the evaluation of damage in structures, arising from fatigue cycles and creep processes. The fatigue damage is assessed on the basis of modelling crack growth from about one grain depth to an allowable limit which represents an engineering definition of crack formation. Creep damage is based up on the exhaustion of available ductility by creep strain accumulation. The procedures are applicable only when level A and B service conditions apply, as defined in RCC-MR or ASME Code Case N47. The procedures require the components of strain to be evaluated separately, thus they may be used with either full inelastic analysis or simplified methods. To support the development of the UK strain based creep-fatigue procedures an experimental program was undertaken by NNC to study creep-fatigue interaction of structures operating at high temperature. These tests, collectively known as the SALTBATH tests considered solid cylinder and tube-plate specimens, manufactured from Type 316 stainless steel. These specimens were subjected to thermal cycles between 250 deg. C and 600 deg. C. In all the cases the thermal cycle produces tensile residual stresses during dwells at 600 deg. C. One of the tube-plate specimens was used as a benchmark for validating the strain based creep fatigue procedures and subsequently as part of a CEC co-operative study. This benchmark work is described in this paper. A thermal and inelastic stress analysis was carried out using the finite element code ABAQUS. The inelastic behaviour of the material was described using the ORNL constitutive equations. A creep fatigue assessment using the strain based procedures has been compared with an assessment using the RCC-MR inelastic rules. The analyses indicated that both the UK strain based procedures and the RCC-MR rules were conservative, but the conservatism was greater for the RCC-MR rules. (author). 8 refs, 8 figs, 4 tabs

  16. Numerical modelling of ductile damage mechanics coupled with an unconventional plasticity model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Fincato

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ductility in metals includes the material’s capability to tolerate plastic deformations before partial or total degradation of its mechanical properties. Modelling this parameter is important in structure and component design because it can be used to estimate material failure under a generic multi-axial stress state. Previous work has attempted to provide accurate descriptions of the mechanical property degradation resulting from the formation, growth, and coalescence of microvoids in the medium. Experimentally, ductile damage is inherently linked with the accumulation of plastic strain; therefore, coupling damage and elastoplasticity is necessary for describing this phenomenon accurately. In this paper, we combine the approach proposed by Lemaitre with the features of an unconventional plasticity model, the extended subloading surface model, to predict material fatigue even for loading conditions below the yield stress

  17. Towards a Universal Calving Law: Modeling Ice Shelves Using Damage Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, M.; Bassis, J. N.; Price, S. F.; Lipscomb, W. H.

    2017-12-01

    Modeling iceberg calving from ice shelves and ice tongues is a particularly difficult problem in glaciology because of the wide range of observed calving rates. Ice shelves naturally calve large tabular icebergs at infrequent intervals, but may instead calve smaller bergs regularly or disintegrate due to hydrofracturing in warmer conditions. Any complete theory of iceberg calving in ice shelves must be able to generate realistic calving rate values depending on the magnitudes of the external forcings. Here we show that a simple damage evolution law, which represents crevasse distributions as a continuum field, produces reasonable estimates of ice shelf calving rates when added to the Community Ice Sheet Model (CISM). Our damage formulation is based on a linear stability analysis and depends upon the bulk stress and strain rate in the ice shelf, as well as the surface and basal melt rates. The basal melt parameter in our model enhances crevasse growth near the ice shelf terminus, leading to an increased iceberg production rate. This implies that increasing ocean temperatures underneath ice shelves will drive ice shelf retreat, as has been observed in the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas. We show that our model predicts broadly correct calving rates for ice tongues ranging in length from 10 km (Erebus) to over 100 km (Drygalski), by matching the computed steady state lengths to observations. In addition, we apply the model to idealized Antarctic ice shelves and show that we can also predict realistic ice shelf extents. Our damage mechanics model provides a promising, computationally efficient way to compute calving fluxes and links ice shelf stability to climate forcing.

  18. Comparison of Two Models for Damage Accumulation in Simulations of System Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngblood, R. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, D. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-11-01

    A comprehensive simulation study of system performance needs to address variations in component behavior, variations in phenomenology, and the coupling between phenomenology and component failure. This paper discusses two models of this: 1. damage accumulation is modeled as a random walk process in each time history, with component failure occurring when damage accumulation reaches a specified threshold; or 2. damage accumulation is modeled mechanistically within each time history, but failure occurs when damage reaches a time-history-specific threshold, sampled at time zero from each component’s distribution of damage tolerance. A limiting case of the latter is classical discrete-event simulation, with component failure times sampled a priori from failure time distributions; but in such models, the failure times are not typically adjusted for operating conditions varying within a time history. Nowadays, as discussed below, it is practical to account for this. The paper compares the interpretations and computational aspects of the two models mentioned above.

  19. A modal H∞-norm-based performance requirement for damage-tolerant active controller design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genari, Helói F. G.; Mechbal, Nazih; Coffignal, Gérard; Nóbrega, Eurípedes G. O.

    2017-04-01

    Damage-tolerant active control (DTAC) is a recent research area that encompasses control design methodologies resulting from the application of fault-tolerant control methods to vibration control of structures subject to damage. The possibility of damage occurrence is not usually considered in the active vibration control design requirements. Damage changes the structure dynamics, which may produce unexpected modal behavior of the closed-loop system, usually not anticipated by the controller design approaches. A modal H∞ norm and a respective robust controller design framework were recently introduced, and this method is here extended to face a new DTAC strategy implementation. Considering that damage affects each vibration mode differently, this paper adopts the modal H∞ norm to include damage as a design requirement. The basic idea is to create an appropriate energy distribution over the frequency range of interest and respective vibration modes, guaranteeing robustness, damage tolerance, and adequate overall performance, taking into account that it is common to have previous knowledge of the structure regions where damage may occur during its operational life. For this purpose, a structural health monitoring technique is applied to evaluate modal modifications caused by damage. This information is used to create modal weighing matrices, conducting to the modal H∞ controller design. Finite element models are adopted for a case study structure, including different damage severities, in order to validate the proposed control strategy. Results show the effectiveness of the proposed methodology with respect to damage tolerance.

  20. Statistical modelling of compression and fatigue damage of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Brøndsted, Povl

    2009-01-01

    A statistical computational model of strength and damage of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced composites under compressive and cyclic compressive loading is presented in this paper. The model is developed on the basis of the Budiansky–Fleck fiber kinking condition, continuum damage mechanics...... concept and the Monte-Carlo method. The effects of fiber misalignment variability, fiber clustering, load sharing rules on the damage in composite are studied numerically. It is demonstrated that the clustering of fibers has a negative effect of the damage resistance of a composite. Further, the static...

  1. Meso-Scale Modelling of Deformation, Damage and Failure in Dual Phase Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari Sarraf, Iman

    Advanced high strength steels (AHSS), such as dual phase (DP) and transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steels, offer high ductility, formability, and strength, as well as high strength-to-weight ratio and improved crash resistance. Dual phase steels belong to a family of high strength grades which consist of martensite, responsible for strengthening, distributed in a ductile ferrite matrix which accommodates the deformation throughout the forming process. It has been shown that the predominant damage mechanism and failure in DP steels depends on the ferrite and martensite grain sizes and their morphology, and can range from a mixture of brittle and ductile rupture to completely ductile rupture in a quasi-static uniaxial tension test. In this study, a hybrid finite element cellular automata model, initially proposed by Anton Shterenlikht (2003), was developed to evaluate the forming behaviour and predict the onset of instability and damage evolution in a dual phase steel. In this model, the finite element constitutive model is used to represent macro-level strain gradients and a damage variable, and two different cell arrays are designed to represent the ductile and brittle fracture modes in meso-scale. In the FE part of the model, a modified Rousselier ductile damage model is developed to account for nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids. Also, several rate-dependent hardening models were developed and evaluated to describe the work hardening flow curve of DP600. Based on statistical analysis and simulation results, a modified Johnson-Cook (JC) model and a multiplicative combination of the Voce-modified JC functions were found to be the most accurate hardening models. The developed models were then implemented in a user-defined material subroutine (VUMAT) for ABAQUS/Explicit finite element simulation software to simulate uniaxial tension tests at strain rates ranging from 0.001 1/s to 1000 1/s, Marciniak tests, and electrohydraulic free-forming (EHFF

  2. Damage Detection on Sudden Stiffness Reduction Based on Discrete Wavelet Transform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The sudden stiffness reduction in a structure may cause the signal discontinuity in the acceleration responses close to the damage location at the damage time instant. To this end, the damage detection on sudden stiffness reduction of building structures has been actively investigated in this study. The signal discontinuity of the structural acceleration responses of an example building is extracted based on the discrete wavelet transform. It is proved that the variation of the first level detail coefficients of the wavelet transform at damage instant is linearly proportional to the magnitude of the stiffness reduction. A new damage index is proposed and implemented to detect the damage time instant, location, and severity of a structure due to a sudden change of structural stiffness. Numerical simulation using a five-story shear building under different types of excitation is carried out to assess the effectiveness and reliability of the proposed damage index for the building at different damage levels. The sensitivity of the damage index to the intensity and frequency range of measurement noise is also investigated. The made observations demonstrate that the proposed damage index can accurately identify the sudden damage events if the noise intensity is limited.

  3. Rupture Complexity Promoted by Damaged Fault Zones in Earthquake Cycle Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idini, B.; Ampuero, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    Pulse-like ruptures tend to be more sensitive to stress heterogeneity than crack-like ones. For instance, a stress-barrier can more easily stop the propagation of a pulse than that of a crack. While crack-like ruptures tend to homogenize the stress field within their rupture area, pulse-like ruptures develop heterogeneous stress fields. This feature of pulse-like ruptures can potentially lead to complex seismicity with a wide range of magnitudes akin to the Gutenberg-Richter law. Previous models required a friction law with severe velocity-weakening to develop pulses and complex seismicity. Recent dynamic rupture simulations show that the presence of a damaged zone around a fault can induce pulse-like rupture, even under a simple slip-weakening friction law, although the mechanism depends strongly on initial stress conditions. Here we aim at testing if fault zone damage is a sufficient ingredient to generate complex seismicity. In particular, we investigate the effects of damaged fault zones on the emergence and sustainability of pulse-like ruptures throughout multiple earthquake cycles, regardless of initial conditions. We consider a fault bisecting a homogeneous low-rigidity layer (the damaged zone) embedded in an intact medium. We conduct a series of earthquake cycle simulations to investigate the effects of two fault zone properties: damage level D and thickness H. The simulations are based on classical rate-and-state friction, the quasi-dynamic approximation and the software QDYN (https://github.com/ydluo/qdyn). Selected fully-dynamic simulations are also performed with a spectral element method. Our numerical results show the development of complex rupture patterns in some damaged fault configurations, including events of different sizes, as well as pulse-like, multi-pulse and hybrid pulse-crack ruptures. We further apply elasto-static theory to assess how D and H affect ruptures with constant stress drop, in particular the flatness of their slip profile

  4. A diagnostic ontological model for damages to historical constructions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cacciotti, Riccardo; Blaško, M.; Valach, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 1 (2015), s. 40-48 ISSN 1296-2074 R&D Projects: GA MK(CZ) DF11P01OVV002 Keywords : historical constructions * conservation * ontologies * damage Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage Impact factor: 1.533, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1296207414000259

  5. Transgenic Mouse Model for Reducing Oxidative Damage in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, A.-S.; Torres, S.; Truong, T.; Kumar, A.; Alwood, J. S.; Limoli, C. L.; Globus, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to musculoskeletal disuse and radiation result in bone loss; we hypothesized that these catabolic treatments cause excess reactive oxygen species (ROS), and thereby alter the tight balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts, culminating in bone loss. To test this, we used transgenic mice which over-express the human gene for catalase, targeted to mitochondria (MCAT). Catalase is an anti-oxidant that converts the ROS hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. MCAT mice were shown previously to display reduced mitochondrial oxidative stress and radiosensitivity of the CNS compared to wild type controls (WT). As expected, MCAT mice expressed the transgene in skeletal tissue, and in marrow-derived osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors cultured ex vivo, and also showed greater catalase activity compared to wildtype (WT) mice (3-6 fold). Colony expansion in marrow cells cultured under osteoblastogenic conditions was 2-fold greater in the MCAT mice compared to WT mice, while the extent of mineralization was unaffected. MCAT mice had slightly longer tibiae than WT mice (2%, P less than 0.01), although cortical bone area was slightly lower in MCAT mice than WT mice (10%, p=0.09). To challenge the skeletal system, mice were treated by exposure to combined disuse (2 wk Hindlimb Unloading) and total body irradiation Cs(137) (2 Gy, 0.8 Gy/min), then bone parameters were analyzed by 2-factor ANOVA to detect possible interaction effects. Treatment caused a 2-fold increase (p=0.015) in malondialdehyde levels of bone tissue (ELISA) in WT mice, but had no effect in MCAT mice. These findings indicate that the transgene conferred protection from oxidative damage caused by treatment. Unexpected differences between WT and MCAT mice emerged in skeletal responses to treatment.. In WT mice, treatment did not alter osteoblastogenesis, cortical bone area, moment of inertia, or bone perimeter, whereas in MCAT mice, treatment increased these

  6. Formulation and computational aspects of plasticity and damage models with application to quasi-brittle materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z.; Schreyer, H.L. [New Mexico Engineering Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The response of underground structures and transportation facilities under various external loadings and environments is critical for human safety as well as environmental protection. Since quasi-brittle materials such as concrete and rock are commonly used for underground construction, the constitutive modeling of these engineering materials, including post-limit behaviors, is one of the most important aspects in safety assessment. From experimental, theoretical, and computational points of view, this report considers the constitutive modeling of quasi-brittle materials in general and concentrates on concrete in particular. Based on the internal variable theory of thermodynamics, the general formulations of plasticity and damage models are given to simulate two distinct modes of microstructural changes, inelastic flow and degradation of material strength and stiffness, that identify the phenomenological nonlinear behaviors of quasi-brittle materials. The computational aspects of plasticity and damage models are explored with respect to their effects on structural analyses. Specific constitutive models are then developed in a systematic manner according to the degree of completeness. A comprehensive literature survey is made to provide the up-to-date information on prediction of structural failures, which can serve as a reference for future research.

  7. Account of the effect of nuclear collision cascades in model of radiation damage of RPV steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kevorkyan, Yu.R.; Nikolaev, Yu.A.

    1997-01-01

    A kinetic model is proposed for describing the effect of collision cascades in model of radiation damage of reactor pressure vessel steels. This is a closed system of equations which can be solved only by numerical methods in general case

  8. Multi-physics modeling of multifunctional composite materials for damage detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujidkul, Thanyawalai

    This study presents a modeling of multifunction composite materials for damage detection with its verification and validation to mechanical behavior predictions of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer composites (CFRPs), CFRPs laminated composites, and woven SiC/SiC matrix composites that are subjected to fracture damage. Advantages of those materials are low cost, low density, high strength-to-weight ratio, and comparable specific tensile properties, the special of SiC/SiC is good environmental stability at high temperature. Resulting in, the composite has been used for many important structures such as helicopter rotors, aerojet engines, gas turbines, hot control surfaces, sporting goods, and windmill blades. Damage or material defect detection in a mechanical component can provide vital information for the prediction of remaining useful life, which will result in the prevention of catastrophic failures. Thus the understanding of the mechanical behavior have been challenge to the prevent damage and failure of composites in different scales. The damage detection methods in composites have been investigated widely in recent years. Non-destructive techniques are the traditional methods to detect the damage such as X-ray, acoustic emission and thermography. However, due to the invisible damage in composite can be occurred, to prevent the failure in composites. The developments of damage detection methods have been considered. Due to carbon fibers are conductive materials, in resulting CFRPs can be self-sensing to detect damage. As is well known, the electrical resistance has been shown to be a sensitive measure of internal damage, and also this work study in thermal resistance can detect damage in composites. However, there is a few number of different micromechanical modeling schemes has been proposed in the published literature for various types of composites. This works will provide with a numerical, analytical, and theoretical failure models in different damages to

  9. Damage Evaluation of Concrete Column under Impact Load Using a Piezoelectric-Based EMI Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shuli; Zhao, Shaoyu; Qi, Baoxin; Kong, Qingzhao

    2018-05-17

    One of the major causes of damage to column-supported concrete structures, such as bridges and highways, are collisions from moving vehicles, such as cars and ships. It is essential to quantify the collision damage of the column so that appropriate actions can be taken to prevent catastrophic events. A widely used method to assess structural damage is through the root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) damage index established by the collected data; however, the RMSD index does not truly provide quantitative information about the structure. Conversely, the damage volume ratio that can only be obtained via simulation provides better detail about the level of damage in a structure. Furthermore, as simulation can also provide the RMSD index relating to that particular damage volume ratio, the empirically obtained RMSD index can thus be related to the structural damage degree through comparison of the empirically obtained RMSD index to numerically-obtained RMSD. Thus, this paper presents a novel method in which the impact-induced damage to a structure is simulated in order to obtain the relationship between the damage volume ratio to the RMSD index, and the relationship can be used to predict the true damage degree by comparison to the empirical RMSD index. In this paper, the collision damage of a bridge column by moving vehicles was simulated by using a concrete beam model subjected to continuous impact loadings by a freefalling steel ball. The variation in admittance signals measured by the surface attached lead zirconate titanate (PZT) patches was used to establish the RMSD index. The results demonstrate that the RMSD index and the damage ratio of concrete have a linear relationship for the particular simulation model.

  10. Estimated damage from the Cascadia Subduction Zone tsunami: A model comparisons using fragility curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, D. M.; Cox, D. T.; Chen, Y.; Weber, B. A.; Chen, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Building damage from a hypothetical Cascadia Subduction Zone tsunami was estimated using two methods and applied at the community scale. The first method applies proposed guidelines for a new ASCE 7 standard to calculate the flow depth, flow velocity, and momentum flux from a known runup limit and estimate of the total tsunami energy at the shoreline. This procedure is based on a potential energy budget, uses the energy grade line, and accounts for frictional losses. The second method utilized numerical model results from previous studies to determine maximum flow depth, velocity, and momentum flux throughout the inundation zone. The towns of Seaside and Canon Beach, Oregon, were selected for analysis due to the availability of existing data from previously published works. Fragility curves, based on the hydrodynamic features of the tsunami flow (inundation depth, flow velocity, and momentum flux) and proposed design standards from ASCE 7 were used to estimate the probability of damage to structures located within the inundations zone. The analysis proceeded at the parcel level, using tax-lot data to identify construction type (wood, steel, and reinforced-concrete) and age, which was used as a performance measure when applying the fragility curves and design standards. The overall probability of damage to civil buildings was integrated for comparison between the two methods, and also analyzed spatially for damage patterns, which could be controlled by local bathymetric features. The two methods were compared to assess the sensitivity of the results to the uncertainty in the input hydrodynamic conditions and fragility curves, and the potential advantages of each method discussed. On-going work includes coupling the results of building damage and vulnerability to an economic input output model. This model assesses trade between business sectors located inside and outside the induction zone, and is used to measure the impact to the regional economy. Results highlight

  11. Intervention of Peiyuan Huayu Decoction on the neuron damage in model rats with acute subdural hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xuan Fan

    2017-07-01

    : Peiyuan Huayu Decoction has obvious protective effect on the neurons in ASDH model rats, and this effect may be based on the inhibition of secondary neuron damage.

  12. Why does brain damage impair memory? A connectionist model of object recognition memory in perirhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowell, Rosemary A; Bussey, Timothy J; Saksida, Lisa M

    2006-11-22

    Object recognition is the canonical test of declarative memory, the type of memory putatively impaired after damage to the temporal lobes. Studies of object recognition memory have helped elucidate the anatomical structures involved in declarative memory, indicating a critical role for perirhinal cortex. We offer a mechanistic account of the effects of perirhinal cortex damage on object recognition memory, based on the assumption that perirhinal cortex stores representations of the conjunctions of visual features possessed by complex objects. Such representations are proposed to play an important role in memory when it is difficult to solve a task using representations of only individual visual features of stimuli, thought to be stored in regions of the ventral visual stream caudal to perirhinal cortex. The account is instantiated in a connectionist model, in which development of object representations with visual experience provides a mechanism for judgment of previous occurrence. We present simulations addressing the following empirical findings: (1) that impairments after damage to perirhinal cortex (modeled by removing the "perirhinal cortex" layer of the network) are exacerbated by lengthening the delay between presentation of to-be-remembered items and test, (2) that such impairments are also exacerbated by lengthening the list of to-be-remembered items, and (3) that impairments are revealed only when stimuli are trial unique rather than repeatedly presented. This study shows that it may be possible to account for object recognition impairments after damage to perirhinal cortex within a hierarchical, representational framework, in which complex conjunctive representations in perirhinal cortex play a critical role.

  13. Bayesian nonlinear structural FE model and seismic input identification for damage assessment of civil structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astroza, Rodrigo; Ebrahimian, Hamed; Li, Yong; Conte, Joel P.

    2017-09-01

    A methodology is proposed to update mechanics-based nonlinear finite element (FE) models of civil structures subjected to unknown input excitation. The approach allows to jointly estimate unknown time-invariant model parameters of a nonlinear FE model of the structure and the unknown time histories of input excitations using spatially-sparse output response measurements recorded during an earthquake event. The unscented Kalman filter, which circumvents the computation of FE response sensitivities with respect to the unknown model parameters and unknown input excitations by using a deterministic sampling approach, is employed as the estimation tool. The use of measurement data obtained from arrays of heterogeneous sensors, including accelerometers, displacement sensors, and strain gauges is investigated. Based on the estimated FE model parameters and input excitations, the updated nonlinear FE model can be interrogated to detect, localize, classify, and assess damage in the structure. Numerically simulated response data of a three-dimensional 4-story 2-by-1 bay steel frame structure with six unknown model parameters subjected to unknown bi-directional horizontal seismic excitation, and a three-dimensional 5-story 2-by-1 bay reinforced concrete frame structure with nine unknown model parameters subjected to unknown bi-directional horizontal seismic excitation are used to illustrate and validate the proposed methodology. The results of the validation studies show the excellent performance and robustness of the proposed algorithm to jointly estimate unknown FE model parameters and unknown input excitations.

  14. Entropy-based Probabilistic Fatigue Damage Prognosis and Algorithmic Performance Comparison

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this paper, a maximum entropy-based general framework for probabilistic fatigue damage prognosis is investigated. The proposed methodology is based on an...

  15. Entropy-based probabilistic fatigue damage prognosis and algorithmic performance comparison

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this paper, a maximum entropy-based general framework for probabilistic fatigue damage prognosis is investigated. The proposed methodology is based on an...

  16. A simplified baseline prediction model for joint damage progression in rheumatoid arthritis: a step toward personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Punder, Yvonne M R; van Riel, Piet L C M; Fransen, Jaap

    2015-03-01

    To compare the performance of an extended model and a simplified prognostic model for joint damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) based on 3 baseline risk factors: anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (anti-CCP), erosions, and acute-phase reaction. Data were used from the Nijmegen early RA cohort. An extended model and a simplified baseline prediction model were developed to predict joint damage progression between 0 and 3 years. Joint damage progression was assessed using the Ratingen score. In the extended model, prediction factors were positivity for anti-CCP and/or rheumatoid factor, the level of erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and the quantity of erosions. The prediction score was calculated as the sum of the regression coefficients. In the simplified model, the prediction factors were dichotomized and the number of risk factors was counted. Performances of both models were compared using discrimination and calibration. The models were internally validated using bootstrapping. The extended model resulted in a prediction score between 0 and 5.6 with an area under the receiver-operation characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.77 (95% CI 0.72-0.81). The simplified model resulted in a prediction score between 0 and 3. This model had an area under the ROC curve of 0.75 (95% CI 0.70-0.80). In internal validation, the 2 models showed reasonably well the agreement between observed and predicted probabilities for joint damage progression (Hosmer-Lemeshow test p > 0.05 and calibration slope near 1.0). A simple prediction model for joint damage progression in early RA, by only counting the number of risk factors, has adequate performance. This facilitates the translation of the theoretical prognostic models to daily clinical practice.

  17. Influence of frost damage and sample preconditioning on the porosity characterization of cement based materials using low temperature calorimetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Min; Fridh, Katja; Johannesson, Björn

    2015-01-01

    Low temperature calorimetry (LTC) can be used to study the meso-porosity of cement based materials. The influence of frost damage on the meso-porosity determination by LTC was explored on a model material MCM-41 and two cement pastes by conducting repeated cycles of freezing and melting measureme...

  18. Probabilistic Fatigue Damage Prognosis Using a Surrogate Model Trained Via 3D Finite Element Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leser, Patrick E.; Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Newman, John A.; Leser, William P.; Warner, James E.; Wawrzynek, Paul A.; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo

    2015-01-01

    Utilizing inverse uncertainty quantification techniques, structural health monitoring can be integrated with damage progression models to form probabilistic predictions of a structure's remaining useful life. However, damage evolution in realistic structures is physically complex. Accurately representing this behavior requires high-fidelity models which are typically computationally prohibitive. In the present work, a high-fidelity finite element model is represented by a surrogate model, reducing computation times. The new approach is used with damage diagnosis data to form a probabilistic prediction of remaining useful life for a test specimen under mixed-mode conditions.

  19. Vibration-Based Damage Detection in Beams by Cooperative Coevolutionary Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kittipong Boonlong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Vibration-based damage detection, a nondestructive method, is based on the fact that vibration characteristics such as natural frequencies and mode shapes of structures are changed when the damage happens. This paper presents cooperative coevolutionary genetic algorithm (CCGA, which is capable for an optimization problem with a large number of decision variables, as the optimizer for the vibration-based damage detection in beams. In the CCGA, a minimized objective function is a numerical indicator of differences between vibration characteristics of the actual damage and those of the anticipated damage. The damage detection in a uniform cross-section cantilever beam, a uniform strength cantilever beam, and a uniform cross-section simply supported beam is used as the test problems. Random noise in the vibration characteristics is also considered in the damage detection. In the simulation analysis, the CCGA provides the superior solutions to those that use standard genetic algorithms presented in previous works, although it uses less numbers of the generated solutions in solution search. The simulation results reveal that the CCGA can efficiently identify the occurred damage in beams for all test problems including the damage detection in a beam with a large number of divided elements such as 300 elements.

  20. Study on Creep Damage Model of 1Cr1Mo1/4V Steel for Turbine Rotor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Woo Sung; Song, Gee Wook; Kim, Bum Shin; Chang, Sung Ho; Fleury, Eric

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that the dominant damage mechanisms in high-temperature steam turbine facilities such as rotor and casing are creep and fatigue damages. Even though coupling of creep and fatigue should be considered while predicting the life of turbine facilities, the remaining life of large steam turbine facilities is generally determined on the basis of creep damage because the turbines must generate stable base-load power and because they are operated at a high temperature and pressure for a long time. Almost every large steam turbine in Korea has been operated for more than 20 years and is made of steel containing various amounts of principal alloying elements nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and vanadium. In this study, creep damage model of 1Cr1Mo1/4V steel for turbine rotor is proposed and that can assess the high temperature creep life of large steam turbine facilities is proposed

  1. Two scale damage model and related numerical issues for thermo-mechanical high cycle fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desmorat, R.; Kane, A.; Seyedi, M.; Sermage, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    On the idea that fatigue damage is localized at the microscopic scale, a scale smaller than the mesoscopic one of the Representative Volume Element (RVE), a three-dimensional two scale damage model has been proposed for High Cycle Fatigue applications. It is extended here to aniso-thermal cases and then to thermo-mechanical fatigue. The modeling consists in the micro-mechanics analysis of a weak micro-inclusion subjected to plasticity and damage embedded in an elastic meso-element (the RVE of continuum mechanics). The consideration of plasticity coupled with damage equations at micro-scale, altogether with Eshelby-Kroner localization law, allows to compute the value of microscopic damage up to failure for any kind of loading, 1D or 3D, cyclic or random, isothermal or aniso-thermal, mechanical, thermal or thermo-mechanical. A robust numerical scheme is proposed in order to make the computations fast. A post-processor for damage and fatigue (DAMAGE-2005) has been developed. It applies to complex thermo-mechanical loadings. Examples of the representation by the two scale damage model of physical phenomena related to High Cycle Fatigue are given such as the mean stress effect, the non-linear accumulation of damage. Examples of thermal and thermo-mechanical fatigue as well as complex applications on real size testing structure subjected to thermo-mechanical fatigue are detailed. (authors)

  2. Modelling of damage development and ductile failure in welded joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau

    , a study of the damage development in Resistance SpotWelded joints, when subject to the commonly used static shear-lab or cross-tension testing techniques, has been carried out ([P3]-[P6]). The focus in thesis is on the Advanced High Strength Steels, Dual-Phase 600, which is used in for example......This thesis focuses on numerical analysis of damage development and ductile failure in welded joints. Two types of welds are investigated here. First, a study of the localization of plastic flow and failure in aluminum sheets, welded by the relatively new Friction Stir (FS) Welding method, has been...... conducted ([P1], [P2], [P7]-[P9]). The focus in the thesis is on FS-welded 2xxx and 6xxx series of aluminum alloys, which are attractive, for example, to the aerospace industry, since the 2024 aluminum in particular, is typically classified as un-weldable by conventional fusion welding techniques. Secondly...

  3. Phase-field modelling of ductile fracture: a variational gradient-extended plasticity-damage theory and its micromorphic regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miehe, C; Teichtmeister, S; Aldakheel, F

    2016-04-28

    This work outlines a novel variational-based theory for the phase-field modelling of ductile fracture in elastic-plastic solids undergoing large strains. The phase-field approach regularizes sharp crack surfaces within a pure continuum setting by a specific gradient damage modelling. It is linked to a formulation of gradient plasticity at finite strains. The framework includes two independent length scales which regularize both the plastic response as well as the crack discontinuities. This ensures that the damage zones of ductile fracture are inside of plastic zones, and guarantees on the computational side a mesh objectivity in post-critical ranges. © 2016 The Author(s).

  4. Moisture damage susceptibility of asphalt mixtures: Experimental characterization and modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Varveri, A.

    2017-01-01

    A well-functioning, long-lasting and safe highway infrastructure network ensures the mobility of people and facilitates the transport of goods, promoting thus environmental, economic, and social sustainability. The development of sustainable highway infrastructure requires, among other activities, the construction of pavement systems with enhanced durability. Moisture damage in asphalt pavements is associated with inferior performance, unexpected failures and reduced service life. All of thes...

  5. Thermomechanics of damageable materials under diffusion: modelling and analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roubíček, Tomáš; Tomassetti, G.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 6 (2015), s. 3535-3572 ISSN 0044-2275 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP201/10/0357 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : visco-elastic porous solids * incomplete damage * diffusion driven by chemical-potential gradient Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.560, year: 2015 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00033-015-0566-2

  6. Micromechanical Modeling of Grain Boundaries Damage in a Copper Alloy Under Creep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voese, Markus

    2015-01-01

    In order to include the processes on the scale of the grain structure into the description of the creep behaviour of polycrystalline materials, the damage development of a single grain boundary has been initially investigated in the present work. For this purpose, a special simulationmethod has been used, whose resolution procedure based on holomorphic functions. The mechanisms taken into account for the simulations include nucleation, growth by grain boundary diffusion, coalescence and shrinkage until complete sintering of grain boundary cavities. These studies have then been used to develop a simplified cavitation model, which describes the grain boundary damage by two state variables and the time-dependent development by a mechanism-oriented rate formulation. To include the influence of grain boundaries within continuum mechanical considerations of polycrystals, an interface model has been developed, that incorporates both damage according to the simplified cavitation model and grain boundary sliding in dependence of a phenomenological grain boundary viscosity. Furthermore a micromechanical model of a polycrystal has been developed that allows to include a material's grain structure into the simulation of the creep behaviour by means of finite element simulations. Thereby, the deformations of individual grains are expressed by a viscoplastic single crystal model and the grain boundaries are described by the proposed interface model. The grain structure is represented by a finite element model, in which the grain boundaries are modelled by cohesive elements. From the evaluation of experimental creep data, the micromechanical model of a polycrystal has been calibrated for a copper-antimony alloy at a temperature of 823 K. Thereby, the adjustment of the single crystal model has been carried out on the basis of creep rates of pure copper single crystal specimens. The experimental determination of grain boundary sliding and grain boundary porosity for coarse

  7. Vibration based structural health monitoring of an arch bridge: From automated OMA to damage detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães, F.; Cunha, A.; Caetano, E.

    2012-04-01

    In order to evaluate the usefulness of approaches based on modal parameters tracking for structural health monitoring of bridges, in September of 2007, a dynamic monitoring system was installed in a concrete arch bridge at the city of Porto, in Portugal. The implementation of algorithms to perform the continuous on-line identification of modal parameters based on structural responses to ambient excitation (automated Operational Modal Analysis) has permitted to create a very complete database with the time evolution of the bridge modal characteristics during more than 2 years. This paper describes the strategy that was followed to minimize the effects of environmental and operational factors on the bridge natural frequencies, enabling, in a subsequent stage, the identification of structural anomalies. Alternative static and dynamic regression models are tested and complemented by a Principal Components Analysis. Afterwards, the identification of damages is tried with control charts. At the end, it is demonstrated that the adopted processing methodology permits the detection of realistic damage scenarios, associated with frequency shifts around 0.2%, which were simulated with a numerical model.

  8. Damage Modeling Of Injection-Molded Short- And Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Phelps, Jay; Tucker, Charles L. III

    2009-01-01

    This article applies the recent anisotropic rotary diffusion - reduced strain closure (ARD-RSC) model for predicting fiber orientation and a new damage model for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs) to analyze progressive damage leading to total failure of injection-molded long-glass-fiber/polypropylene (PP) specimens. The ARD-RSC model was implemented in a research version of the Autodesk Moldflow Plastics Insight (MPI) processing code, and it has been used to simulate injection-molding of a long-glass-fiber/PP plaque. The damage model combines micromechanical modeling with a continuum damage mechanics description to predict the nonlinear behavior due to plasticity coupled with damage in LFTs. This model has been implemented in the ABAQUS finite element code via user-subroutines and has been used in the damage analyses of tensile specimens removed from the injection-molded long-glass-fiber/PP plaques. Experimental characterization and mechanical testing were performed to provide input data to support and validate both process modeling and damage analyses. The predictions are in agreement with the experimental results.

  9. Damage detection in rotating machinery by means of entropy-based parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocarciuc, Alexandru; Bereteu, Liviu; ǎgǎnescu, Gheorghe Eugen, Dr

    2014-11-01

    The paper is proposing two new entropy-based parameters, namely Renyi Entropy Index (REI) and Sharma-Mittal Entropy Index (SMEI), for detecting the presence of failures (or damages) in rotating machinery, namely: belt structural damage, belt wheels misalignment, failure of the fixing bolt of the machine to its baseplate and eccentricities (i.e.: due to detaching a small piece of material or bad mounting of the rotating components of the machine). The algorithms to obtain the proposed entropy-based parameters are described and test data is used in order to assess their sensitivity. A vibration test bench is used for measuring the levels of vibration while artificially inducing damage. The deviation of the two entropy-based parameters is compared in two states of the vibration test bench: not damaged and damaged. At the end of the study, their sensitivity is compared to Shannon Entropic Index.

  10. Strain-Based Damage Determination Using Finite Element Analysis for Structural Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochhalter, Jacob D.; Krishnamurthy, Thiagaraja; Aguilo, Miguel A.

    2016-01-01

    A damage determination method is presented that relies on in-service strain sensor measurements. The method employs a gradient-based optimization procedure combined with the finite element method for solution to the forward problem. It is demonstrated that strains, measured at a limited number of sensors, can be used to accurately determine the location, size, and orientation of damage. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the general procedure. This work is motivated by the need to provide structural health management systems with a real-time damage characterization. The damage cases investigated herein are characteristic of point-source damage, which can attain critical size during flight. The procedure described can be used to provide prognosis tools with the current damage configuration.

  11. Validation of Lifetime Prediction of IGBT Modules Based on Linear Damage Accumulation by Means of Superimposed Power Cycling Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Ui-Min; Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, the lifetime prediction of power device modules based on the linear damage accumulation is studied in conjunction with simple mission profiles of converters. Superimposed power cycling conditions, which are called simple mission profiles in this paper, are made based on a lifetime ...... prediction of IGBT modules under power converter applications.......In this paper, the lifetime prediction of power device modules based on the linear damage accumulation is studied in conjunction with simple mission profiles of converters. Superimposed power cycling conditions, which are called simple mission profiles in this paper, are made based on a lifetime...... model in respect to junction temperature swing duration. This model has been built based on 39 power cycling test results of 600-V 30-A three-phase-molded IGBT modules. Six tests are performed under three superimposed power cycling conditions using an advanced power cycling test setup. The experimental...

  12. Vibro-acoustic modulation–based damage identification in a composite skin–stiffener structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooijevaar, T.H.; Rogge, M.D.; Loendersloot, Richard; Warnet, Laurent; Akkerman, Remko; Tinga, Tiedo

    2016-01-01

    Vibro-acoustic modulation–based damage identification relies on the modulation of a high-frequency carrier signal by an intenser low-frequency vibration signal due to damage-induced structural nonlinearities. A time domain analysis of the vibro-acoustic modulation phenomena was presented at multiple

  13. Real-time vibration-based structural damage detection using one-dimensional convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeljaber, Osama; Avci, Onur; Kiranyaz, Serkan; Gabbouj, Moncef; Inman, Daniel J.

    2017-02-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) and vibration-based structural damage detection have been a continuous interest for civil, mechanical and aerospace engineers over the decades. Early and meticulous damage detection has always been one of the principal objectives of SHM applications. The performance of a classical damage detection system predominantly depends on the choice of the features and the classifier. While the fixed and hand-crafted features may either be a sub-optimal choice for a particular structure or fail to achieve the same level of performance on another structure, they usually require a large computation power which may hinder their usage for real-time structural damage detection. This paper presents a novel, fast and accurate structural damage detection system using 1D Convolutional Neural Networks (CNNs) that has an inherent adaptive design to fuse both feature extraction and classification blocks into a single and compact learning body. The proposed method performs vibration-based damage detection and localization of the damage in real-time. The advantage of this approach is its ability to extract optimal damage-sensitive features automatically from the raw acceleration signals. Large-scale experiments conducted on a grandstand simulator revealed an outstanding performance and verified the computational efficiency of the proposed real-time damage detection method.

  14. Comet assay for rapid detection of base damage in foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Zubaidi, I. A.; Abdullah, T. S.; Qasim, S. R.

    2012-12-01

    Single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) or comet assay technique a sensitive, reliable and rapid method for DNA double and single strand break, alkali- labile site and delayed repair site detection in individual cells. In recent years, this method has been widely used for studies of DNA repair, genetic toxicology, and environmental biomontoring, however, this technique serves as an important tool for detection of DNA damage in living organism and is increasing being used in genetic testing of industrial chemicals, environmental agent's contaminations. This research paper helps to evaluate the oxidant agent's effects of exposure to organic pollutants by using comet assay techniques. This study used five samples of each food sample (Meat, Chicken, Rice, Fruits, Vegetables and Tea) to evaluate the genotoxic effects of exposure, to environmental agent's pollutants. The experimental data suggest that the DNA damage parameters ( Tail length, Tail width 1 ) were found higher value in exposed population when compared with the ratio of the length to width that cells exhibiting no migration having a ratio of 1. The percentage and distribution of cells in exposed population of cells also increases with the increase in values. This study demonstrates that, using sensitive techniques, it is possible to detect environmental agent's risks at an early stage. (Author)

  15. Prediction Of Formability In Sheet Metal Forming Processes Using A Local Damage Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, P.; Santos, Abel; Cesar Sa, J.; Andrade Pires, F.; Barata da Rocha, A.

    2007-01-01

    The formability in sheet metal forming processes is mainly conditioned by ductile fracture resulting from geometric instabilities due to necking and strain localization. The macroscopic collapse associated with ductile failure is a result of internal degradation described throughout metallographic observations by the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids and micro-cracks. Damage influences and is influenced by plastic deformation and therefore these two dissipative phenomena should be coupled at the constitutive level. In this contribution, Lemaitre's ductile damage model is coupled with Hill's orthotropic plasticity criterion. The coupling between damaging and material behavior is accounted for within the framework of Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM). The resulting constitutive equations are implemented in the Abaqus/Explicit code, for the prediction of fracture onset in sheet metal forming processes. The damage evolution law takes into account the important effect of micro-crack closure, which dramatically decreases the rate of damage growth under compressive paths

  16. Targeted detection of in vivo endogenous DNA base damage reveals preferential base excision repair in the transcribed strand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, António M C; Mills, Wilbur K; Ramachandran, Ilangovan; Friedberg, Errol C; Thompson, David; Queimado, Lurdes

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous DNA damage is removed mainly via base excision repair (BER), however, whether there is preferential strand repair of endogenous DNA damage is still under intense debate. We developed a highly sensitive primer-anchored DNA damage detection assay (PADDA) to map and quantify in vivo endogenous DNA damage. Using PADDA, we documented significantly higher levels of endogenous damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells in stationary phase than in exponential phase. We also documented that yeast BER-defective cells have significantly higher levels of endogenous DNA damage than isogenic wild-type cells at any phase of growth. PADDA provided detailed fingerprint analysis at the single-nucleotide level, documenting for the first time that persistent endogenous nucleotide damage in CAN1 co-localizes with previously reported spontaneous CAN1 mutations. To quickly and reliably quantify endogenous strand-specific DNA damage in the constitutively expressed CAN1 gene, we used PADDA on a real-time PCR setting. We demonstrate that wild-type cells repair endogenous damage preferentially on the CAN1 transcribed strand. In contrast, yeast BER-defective cells accumulate endogenous damage preferentially on the CAN1 transcribed strand. These data provide the first direct evidence for preferential strand repair of endogenous DNA damage and documents the major role of BER in this process.

  17. Alternative approaches to electronic damage by ion-beam irradiation: Exciton models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agullo-Lopez, F.; Munoz-Martin, A.; Zucchiatti, A. [Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Climent-Font, A. [Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-11-15

    The paper briefly describes the main features of the damage produced by swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. After a short revision of the widely used thermal spike concept, it focuses on cumulative mechanisms of track formation which are alternative to those based on lattice melting (thermal spike models). These cumulative mechanisms rely on the production of point defects around the ion trajectory, and their accumulation up to a final lattice collapse or amorphization. As to the formation of point defects, the paper considers those mechanisms relying on direct local conversion of the excitation energy into atomic displacements (exciton models). A particular attention is given to processes based on the non-radiative recombination of excitons that have become self-trapped as a consequence of a strong electron-phonon interaction (STEs). These mechanisms, although operative under purely ionizing radiation in some dielectric materials, have been rarely invoked, so far, to discuss SHI damage. They are discussed in this paper together with relevant examples to materials such as Cu{sub 3}N, alkali halides, SiO{sub 2}, and LiNbO{sub 3}. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Incorporation of Damage and Failure into an Orthotropic Elasto-Plastic Three-Dimensional Model with Tabulated Input Suitable for Use in Composite Impact Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Carney, Kelly S.; Dubois, Paul; Hoffarth, Canio; Khaled, Bilal; Rajan, Subramaniam; Blankenhorn, Gunther

    2016-01-01

    A material model which incorporates several key capabilities which have been identified by the aerospace community as lacking in the composite impact models currently available in LS-DYNA(Registered Trademark) is under development. In particular, the material model, which is being implemented as MAT 213 into a tailored version of LS-DYNA being jointly developed by the FAA and NASA, incorporates both plasticity and damage within the material model, utilizes experimentally based tabulated input to define the evolution of plasticity and damage as opposed to specifying discrete input parameters (such as modulus and strength), and is able to analyze the response of composites composed with a variety of fiber architectures. The plasticity portion of the orthotropic, three-dimensional, macroscopic composite constitutive model is based on an extension of the Tsai-Wu composite failure model into a generalized yield function with a non-associative flow rule. The capability to account for the rate and temperature dependent deformation response of composites has also been incorporated into the material model. For the damage model, a strain equivalent formulation is utilized to allow for the uncoupling of the deformation and damage analyses. In the damage model, a diagonal damage tensor is defined to account for the directionally dependent variation of damage. However, in composites it has been found that loading in one direction can lead to damage in multiple coordinate directions. To account for this phenomena, the terms in the damage matrix are semi-coupled such that the damage in a particular coordinate direction is a function of the stresses and plastic strains in all of the coordinate directions. The onset of material failure, and thus element deletion, is being developed to be a function of the stresses and plastic strains in the various coordinate directions. Systematic procedures are being developed to generate the required input parameters based on the results of

  19. Identification Damage Model for Thermomechanical Degradation of Ductile Heterogeneous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amri, A. El; Yakhloufi, M. H. El; Khamlichi, A.

    2017-05-01

    The failure of ductile materials subject to high thermal and mechanical loading rates is notably affected by material inertia. The mechanisms of fatigue-crack propagation are examined with particular emphasis on the similarities and differences between cyclic crack growth in ductile materials, such as metals, and corresponding behavior in brittle materials, such as intermetallic and ceramics. Numerical simulations of crack propagation in a cylindrical specimen demonstrate that the proposed method provides an effective means to simulate ductile fracture in large scale cylindrical structures with engineering accuracy. The influence of damage on the intensity of the destruction of materials is studied as well.

  20. A Modified Fatigue Damage Model for High-Cycle Fatigue Life Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the assumption of quasibrittle failure under high-cycle fatigue for the metal material, the damage constitutive equation and the modified damage evolution equation are obtained with continuum damage mechanics. Then, finite element method (FEM is used to describe the failure process of metal material. The increment of specimen’s life and damage state can be researched using damage mechanics-FEM. Finally, the lifetime of the specimen is got at the given stress level. The damage mechanics-FEM is inserted into ABAQUS with subroutine USDFLD and the Python language is used to simulate the fatigue process of titanium alloy specimens. The simulation results have a good agreement with the testing results under constant amplitude loading, which proves the accuracy of the method.

  1. A cohesive plastic/damage-zone model for ductile crack analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, C.; Gross, D.

    1995-01-01

    A cohesive plastic/damage-zone model of the Dugdale-Barenblatt type (G.I. Barenblatt, Adv. Appl. Mech. 7 (1962) 55-129; D.S. Dugdale, J. Mech. Phys. Solids 8 (1960) 100-104) is presented for analyzing crack growth in ductile materials with damage evolution. A semi-infinite Mode I crack in plane stress or plane stress is considered. The damage is assumed to be present in form of dispersed microvoids which are localized into a narrow strip ahead of the crack-tip. A simple damage model of the Gurson model type (A.L. Gurson, J. Eng. Mater. Technol. 99 (1977) 2-15; V. Tvergaard, Advances in Applied Mechanics, Vol. 27, Academic Press, 1990, pp. 83-151) is developed for uniaxial tension to describe the macroscopic properties of the cohesive plastic/damage-zone. Under small-scale yielding and small-scale damage conditions, a system of nonlinear integral equations for the plastic strain and the length of the cohesive plastic/damage-zone is derived. Numerical results are presented and discussed to reveal the effect of damage evolution on the ductile crack growth. (orig.)

  2. Study on creep damage behaviors of Ni-based alloy C276

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Xueping; Guo Qi; Zhang Shengyuan; Hu Suyang; Lu Daogang; Xu Hong

    2013-01-01

    High temperature creep tests were carried out for Ni-based alloy C276 at 650℃, 700℃ and 750℃, which is one of the candidate materials for the fuel cladding of the supercritical water reactor. Methods of damage mechanics were adopted to calculate and analyze these data. Damage factors calculated by Kachanov formula and Norton formula based on θ projection method were compared. The results show that the damage factors about the material are similar at the three temperatures according to Kachanov formula. The predicted creep curves calculated by θ projection method have a close agreement with the experimental data. The damages calculated by Norton formula start at about 0.3 - 0.4 lifetime, and the damage factors calculated by Kachanov formula are relatively conservative. (authors)

  3. Towards mechanisms-guided resistivity-based monitoring of damage evolution in laminated composites

    KAUST Repository

    Lubineau, Gilles

    2013-04-05

    A convenient health monitoring technique for detecting degradation in laminated composite is to monitor the change of electrical resistance along multiple conduction paths within the structure. Yet, the relations between the global modification of resistivity and the exact underlying damage map is still unclear that makes diffcult to interpret these nondestructive-testing results. The challenge is then to be able to reconstruct from these global observation the underlying damage map. This is even more diffcult due to the numerous underlying damage mechanisms that can take place either at the inter laminar of intra laminar level. This paper intends to provide some preliminary insights about strategies to recover the damage state based only on global measurements. We focus here on transverse cracking detection. We introduce the homogenization process that defines at the meso scale an equivalent homogeneous ply that is energetically equivalent to the cracked one. This can be used as a first tool to reconstruct damage maps based on global resistivity measurements.

  4. Dislocation dynamics modelling of radiation damage in thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferroni, Francesco; Tarleton, Edmund; Fitzgerald, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy is a key tool for the extraction of information on radiation damage, the understanding of which is critical for materials development for nuclear fusion and fission reactors. Dislocations in TEM samples are subject to strong image forces, owing to the nanometric sample thicknesses, which may introduce artifacts in the damage analysis. Using dislocation dynamics, we elucidate the roles played by dislocation–surface interactions, dislocation–dislocation interactions and self-interactions due to climb for loop types observed in TEM. Comparisons with analytic solutions for a dislocation loop and an edge dislocation in a half-space are included, and the relationship between glide force and loop tilt examined. The parameters for convergence of the zero-traction boundary conditions are obtained, after which the evolution of dislocation structures in a thin film is studied. It is found that three main length scales govern the physical processes: the image force is governed by the distance of the loop from the surface and scales with the film thickness; the glide force is governed by the image stress as well as the loop–loop interaction stress which is in turn governed by the loop spacing L∼1/√ρ, where ρ is the loop density; finally, the climb force depends on the loop size. The three forces compete and their relative magnitudes define the evolution pathway of the dislocation structure. (paper)

  5. Computer simulation of radiation damage in NaCl using a kinetic rate reaction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soppe, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    Sodium chloride and other alkali halides are known to be very susceptible to radiation damage in the halogen sublattice when exposed to ionizing radiation. The formation of radiation damage in NaCl has generated interest because of the relevance of this damage to the disposal of radioactive waste in rock salt formations. In order to estimate the long-term behaviour of a rock salt repository, an accurate theory describing the major processes of radiation damage in NaCl is required. The model presented in this paper is an extended version of the Jain-Lidiard model; its extensions comprise the effect of impurities and the colloid nucleation stage on the formation of radiation damage. The new model has been tested against various experimental data obtained from the literature and accounts for several well known aspects of radiation damage in alkali halides which were not covered by the original Jain-Lidiard model. The new model thus may be expected to provide more reliable predictions for the build-up of radiation damage in a rock salt nuclear waste repository. (Author)

  6. Stochastic-Strength-Based Damage Simulation of Ceramic Matrix Composite Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Mital, Subodh K.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pineda, Evan J.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    The Finite Element Analysis-Micromechanics Analysis Code/Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures (FEAMAC/CARES) program was used to characterize and predict the progressive damage response of silicon-carbide-fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix (SiC/RBSN) composite laminate tensile specimens. Studied were unidirectional laminates [0] (sub 8), [10] (sub 8), [45] (sub 8), and [90] (sub 8); cross-ply laminates [0 (sub 2) divided by 90 (sub 2),]s; angled-ply laminates [plus 45 (sub 2) divided by -45 (sub 2), ]s; doubled-edge-notched [0] (sub 8), laminates; and central-hole laminates. Results correlated well with the experimental data. This work was performed as a validation and benchmarking exercise of the FEAMAC/CARES program. FEAMAC/CARES simulates stochastic-based discrete-event progressive damage of ceramic matrix composite and polymer matrix composite material structures. It couples three software programs: (1) the Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC), (2) the Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures Life Prediction Program (CARES/Life), and (3) the Abaqus finite element analysis program. MAC/GMC contributes multiscale modeling capabilities and micromechanics relations to determine stresses and deformations at the microscale of the composite material repeating-unit-cell (RUC). CARES/Life contributes statistical multiaxial failure criteria that can be applied to the individual brittle-material constituents of the RUC, and Abaqus is used to model the overall composite structure. For each FEAMAC/CARES simulation trial, the stochastic nature of brittle material strength results in random, discrete damage events that incrementally progress until ultimate structural failure.

  7. Micromechanical experimental analysis and modelling of elastic and damageable behaviour of unidirectional SiC/SiC composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chateau, C.

    2011-01-01

    Because of their potential use as a cladding material in future nuclear reactors, the complex mechanical behavior of SiC/SiC composites, which combines damage and anisotropy, must be understood and predictable. As part of a multi-scale approach, this work focuses on the first scale change: from the elementary constituents to the tow. Micromechanical approaches are implemented to describe the macroscopic behavior of the tow taking into account its microstructure heterogeneity and damage mechanisms occurring at the local scale. A representative virtual microstructure is generated based on a detailed microstructural investigation of the tow and its elastic response is studied by numerical homogenization. In addition to addressing the mechanical RVE issue, this study highlights the significant effects of residual porosity on the transverse behavior of the tow, due to the matrix infiltration process. The longitudinal damage is being studied through mini-composites, for which the evolution of microscopic damage mechanisms (matrix cracks and fiber breaks) is experimentally analyzed (in-situ SEM and tomography tensile tests). The identification of interfacial parameters of a 1D statistical damage model is based on the experimental characterization. Conventional assumptions of such models can adequately describe matrix cracking at macro and micro scale. However it is necessary to change them to get a proper prediction of ultimate failure. (author) [fr

  8. Application of a Brittle Damage Model to Normal Plate-on-Plate Impact

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raftenberg, Martin N

    2005-01-01

    .... For a range of values for the material constants introduced by the damage model, the target's free-surface velocity showed a gradual increase over time following the arrival of the initial compressive shock.

  9. Application of a Brittle Damage Model to Normal Plate-on-Plate Impact

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Raftenberg, Martin N

    2005-01-01

    A brittle damage model presented by Grinfeld and Wright of the U.S. Army Research Laboratory was implemented in the LS-DYNA finite element code and applied to the simulation of normal plate-on-plate impact...

  10. Damage Propagation Modeling for Aircraft Engine Run-to-Failure Simulation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This paper describes how damage propagation can be modeled within the modules of aircraft gas turbine engines. To that end, response surfaces of all sensors are...

  11. The Pore Collapse “Hot-Spots” Model Coupled with Brittle Damage for Solid Explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. R. Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the building of a numerical pore collapse model with “hot-spots” formation for the impacted damage explosives. According to damage mechanical evolution of brittle material, the one-dimensional elastic-viscoplastic collapse model was improved to incorporate the impact damage during the dynamic collapse of pores. The damage of explosives was studied using the statistical crack mechanics (SCRAM. The effects of the heat conduction and the chemical reaction were taken into account in the formation of “hot-spots.” To verify the improved model, numerical simulations were carried out for different pressure states and used to model a multiple-impact experiment. The results show that repeated weak impacts can lead to the collapse of pores and the “hot-spots” may occur due to the accumulation of internal defects accompanied by the softening of explosives.

  12. Dynamic In Vivo Profiling of DNA Damage and Repair after Radiotherapy Using Canine Patients as a Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadine Schulz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Time resolved data of DNA damage and repair after radiotherapy elucidates the relation between damage, repair, and cell survival. While well characterized in vitro, little is known about the time-course of DNA damage response in tumors sampled from individual patients. Kinetics of DNA damage after radiotherapy was assessed in eight dogs using repeated in vivo samples of tumor and co-irradiated normal tissue analyzed with comet assay and phosphorylated H2AX (γH2AX immunohistochemistry. In vivo results were then compared (in silico with a dynamic mathematical model for DNA damage formation and repair. Maximum %DNA in tail was observed at 15–60 min after irradiation, with a rapid decrease. Time-courses of γH2AX-foci paralleled these findings with a small time delay and were not influenced by covariates. The evolutionary parameter search based on %DNA in tail revealed a good fit of the DNA repair model to in vivo data for pooled sarcoma time-courses, but fits for individual sarcoma time-courses suffer from the heterogeneous nature of the in vivo data. It was possible to follow dynamics of comet tail intensity and γH2AX-foci during a course of radiation using a minimally invasive approach. DNA repair can be quantitatively investigated as time-courses of individual patients by integrating this resulting data into a dynamic mathematical model.

  13. Smart aggregate based damage detection of circular RC columns under cyclic combined loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moslehy, Yashar; Belarbi, Abdeldjelil; Mo, Y L; Gu, Haichang; Song, Gangbing

    2010-01-01

    Structural health monitoring is an important issue for the maintenance of large-scale civil infrastructures, especially for bridge columns. In this paper, an innovative piezoceramic-based approach is developed for the structural health monitoring of reinforced concrete columns. An innovative piezoceramic-based device, the smart aggregate, is utilized as a transducer for the purpose of health monitoring. To investigate the seismic behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) bridge columns, structural health monitoring tests were performed on two bridge columns under combined reversed cyclic loading at the Missouri University of Science and Technology. The proposed smart aggregate based approach successfully evaluated the health status of concrete columns during the loading procedure. Sensor energy plots and 3D normalized sensor energy plots demonstrated that the damage inside attenuated the transmitted energy. The wavelet packet based damage index and sensor history damage index evaluate the damage development in concrete columns under cyclic loading

  14. Damage spreading for one-dimensional, non-equilibrium models with parity conserving phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Ódor, G; Odor, Geza; Menyhard, Nora

    1998-01-01

    The damage spreading (DS) transitions of two one-dimensional stochastic cellular automata suggested by Grassberger (A and B) and the kinetic Ising model of Menyhárd (NEKIM) have been investigated on the level of kinks and spins. On the level of spins the parity conservation is not satisfied and therefore studying these models provides a convenient tool to understand the dependence of DS properties on symmetries. For the model B the critical point and the DS transition point is well separated and directed percolation damage spreading transition universality was found for spin damage as well as for kink damage in spite of the conservation of damage variables modulo 2 in the latter case. For the A stochastic cellular automaton, and the NEKIM model the two transition points coincide with drastic effects on the damage of spin and kink variables showing different time dependent behaviours. While the kink DS transition is continuous and shows regular PC class universality, the spin damage exhibits a discontinuous p...

  15. A new surface fractal dimension for displacement mode shape-based damage identification of plate-type structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Binkai; Qiao, Pizhong

    2018-03-01

    Vibration-based nondestructive testing is an area of growing interest and worthy of exploring new and innovative approaches. The displacement mode shape is often chosen to identify damage due to its local detailed characteristic and less sensitivity to surrounding noise. Requirement for baseline mode shape in most vibration-based damage identification limits application of such a strategy. In this study, a new surface fractal dimension called edge perimeter dimension (EPD) is formulated, from which an EPD-based window dimension locus (EPD-WDL) algorithm for irregularity or damage identification of plate-type structures is established. An analytical notch-type damage model of simply-supported plates is proposed to evaluate notch effect on plate vibration performance; while a sub-domain of notch cases with less effect is selected to investigate robustness of the proposed damage identification algorithm. Then, fundamental aspects of EPD-WDL algorithm in term of notch localization, notch quantification, and noise immunity are assessed. A mathematical solution called isomorphism is implemented to remove false peaks caused by inflexions of mode shapes when applying the EPD-WDL algorithm to higher mode shapes. The effectiveness and practicability of the EPD-WDL algorithm are demonstrated by an experimental procedure on damage identification of an artificially-induced notched aluminum cantilever plate using a measurement system of piezoelectric lead-zirconate (PZT) actuator and scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV). As demonstrated in both the analytical and experimental evaluations, the new surface fractal dimension technique developed is capable of effectively identifying damage in plate-type structures.

  16. Mathematical modeling of damage function when attacking file server

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, V. G.; Skrypnikov, A. V.; Chernyshova, E. V.; Mogutnov, R. V.; Levushkin, D. M.

    2018-05-01

    The development of information technologies in Russia and the prospects for their further improvement allow us to identify a stable trend of expansion of both functions of the corresponding automated information systems (AIS) and the spheres of their application. At the same time, many threats to information processes in the AIS are expanding, which in turn stimulates the development of adequate means and systems for ensuring the information security of the AS and methods for assessing their protection. It is necessary to assess the ability of the system to continue its normal functioning under the conditions of permanent destructive influences and to resist them, to adapt the functioning algorithms to new conditions and to organize functional restoration or to ensure functioning with a gradual process of degradation, possibly without losing the most significant “critical” information functions. The analysis and evaluation of reliability are needed to be transformed into the analysis and evaluation of survivability. Survivability can be considered as the ability of the information system to store and restore the performance of basic functions in a given volume and for a given time in the case of a change in the system structure and / or algorithms and the conditions of its functioning due to adverse effects. One of the system survivability indicators is the reserve of survivability (S-survivability) that is the critical number of defects reduced by a unit. The authors will consider defect as a unit of measurement of damage to the information system by adverse impact. U is denoted as the critical number of defects, then S = 1-U is the index of S-survivability. The article gives the definition of an analytical formula for the function of damage and risk.

  17. Slow elimination of DNA damaged bases in the liver of old gamma-irradiated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaziev, A I; Malakhova, L V; Fomenko, L A [AN SSSR, Pushchino-na-Oke. Inst. Biologicheskoj Fiziki

    1981-01-01

    Elimination of the DNA damaged bases in the liver of old and young mice after their gamma-irradiation is studied. It is established that the incision rate of DNA gamma-damaged bases in the liver of old mice is lower than in the liver of the young ones. It is supposed to be connected with the decrease of the activity of DNA reparation ferments or with the presence of limitations in chromatin for the access of these ferments to the damaged parts of DNA in the cells of old animals.

  18. A data fusion based approach for damage detection in linear systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Grande

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper is to propose innovative approaches able to improve the capability of classical damage indicators in detecting the damage position in linear systems. In particular, starting from classical indicators based on the change of the flexibility matrix and on the change of the modal strain energy, the proposed approaches consider two data fusion procedures both based on the Dempster-Shafer theory. Numerical applications are reported in the paper in order to assess the reliability of the proposed approaches considering different damage scenarios, different sets of modes of vibration and the presence of errors affecting the accounted modes of vibrations.

  19. Seismic behavior of an Italian Renaissance Sanctuary: Damage assessment by numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clementi, Francesco; Nespeca, Andrea; Lenci, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    The paper deals with modelling and analysis of architectural heritage through the discussion of an illustrative case study: the Medieval Sanctuary of Sant'Agostino (Offida, Italy). Using the finite element technique, a 3D numerical model of the sanctuary is built, and then used to identify the main sources of the damages. The work shows that advanced numerical analyses could offer significant information for the understanding of the causes of existing damage and, more generally, on the seismic vulnerability.

  20. Damages detection in cylindrical metallic specimens by means of statistical baseline models and updated daily temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamizar-Mejia, Rodolfo; Mujica-Delgado, Luis-Eduardo; Ruiz-Ordóñez, Magda-Liliana; Camacho-Navarro, Jhonatan; Moreno-Beltrán, Gustavo

    2017-05-01

    In previous works, damage detection of metallic specimens exposed to temperature changes has been achieved by using a statistical baseline model based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA), piezodiagnostics principle and taking into account temperature effect by augmenting the baseline model or by using several baseline models according to the current temperature. In this paper a new approach is presented, where damage detection is based in a new index that combine Q and T2 statistical indices with current temperature measurements. Experimental tests were achieved in a carbon-steel pipe of 1m length and 1.5 inches diameter, instrumented with piezodevices acting as actuators or sensors. A PCA baseline model was obtained to a temperature of 21º and then T2 and Q statistical indices were obtained for a 24h temperature profile. Also, mass adding at different points of pipe between sensor and actuator was used as damage. By using the combined index the temperature contribution can be separated and a better differentiation of damages respect to undamaged cases can be graphically obtained.

  1. Pathophysiology of white-nose syndrome in bats: a mechanistic model linking wing damage to mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnecke, Lisa; Turner, James M; Bollinger, Trent K; Misra, Vikram; Cryan, Paul M; Blehert, David S; Wibbelt, Gudrun; Willis, Craig K R

    2013-08-23

    White-nose syndrome is devastating North American bat populations but we lack basic information on disease mechanisms. Altered blood physiology owing to epidermal invasion by the fungal pathogen Geomyces destructans (Gd) has been hypothesized as a cause of disrupted torpor patterns of affected hibernating bats, leading to mortality. Here, we present data on blood electrolyte concentration, haematology and acid-base balance of hibernating little brown bats, Myotis lucifugus, following experimental inoculation with Gd. Compared with controls, infected bats showed electrolyte depletion (i.e. lower plasma sodium), changes in haematology (i.e. increased haematocrit and decreased glucose) and disrupted acid-base balance (i.e. lower CO2 partial pressure and bicarbonate). These findings indicate hypotonic dehydration, hypovolaemia and metabolic acidosis. We propose a mechanistic model linking tissue damage to altered homeostasis and morbidity/mortality.

  2. Comparison of Model Calculations of Biological Damage from Exposure to Heavy Ions with Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The space environment consists of a varying field of radiation particles including high-energy ions, with spacecraft shielding material providing the major protection to astronauts from harmful exposure. Unlike low-LET gamma or X rays, the presence of shielding does not always reduce the radiation risks for energetic charged-particle exposure. Dose delivered by the charged particle increases sharply at the Bragg peak. However, the Bragg curve does not necessarily represent the biological damage along the particle path since biological effects are influenced by the track structures of both primary and secondary particles. Therefore, the ''biological Bragg curve'' is dependent on the energy and the type of the primary particle and may vary for different biological end points. Measurements of the induction of micronuclei (MN) have made across the Bragg curve in human fibroblasts exposed to energetic silicon and iron ions in vitro at two different energies, 300 MeV/nucleon and 1 GeV/nucleon. Although the data did not reveal an increased yield of MN at the location of the Bragg peak, the increased inhibition of cell progression, which is related to cell death, was found at the Bragg peak location. These results are compared to the calculations of biological damage using a stochastic Monte-Carlo track structure model, Galactic Cosmic Ray Event-based Risk Model (GERM) code (Cucinotta, et al., 2011). The GERM code estimates the basic physical properties along the passage of heavy ions in tissue and shielding materials, by which the experimental set-up can be interpreted. The code can also be used to describe the biophysical events of interest in radiobiology, cancer therapy, and space exploration. The calculation has shown that the severely damaged cells at the Bragg peak are more likely to go through reproductive death, the so called "overkill".

  3. Modeling of displacement damage in silicon carbide detectors resulting from neutron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorsandi, Behrooz

    There is considerable interest in developing a power monitor system for Generation IV reactors (for instance GT-MHR). A new type of semiconductor radiation detector is under development based on silicon carbide (SiC) technology for these reactors. SiC has been selected as the semiconductor material due to its superior thermal-electrical-neutronic properties. Compared to Si, SiC is a radiation hard material; however, like Si, the properties of SiC are changed by irradiation by a large fluence of energetic neutrons, as a consequence of displacement damage, and that irradiation decreases the life-time of detectors. Predictions of displacement damage and the concomitant radiation effects are important for deciding where the SiC detectors should be placed. The purpose of this dissertation is to develop computer simulation methods to estimate the number of various defects created in SiC detectors, because of neutron irradiation, and predict at what positions of a reactor, SiC detectors could monitor the neutron flux with high reliability. The simulation modeling includes several well-known---and commercial---codes (MCNP5, TRIM, MARLOWE and VASP), and two kinetic Monte Carlo codes written by the author (MCASIC and DCRSIC). My dissertation will highlight the displacement damage that may happen in SiC detectors located in available positions in the OSURR, GT-MHR and IRIS. As extra modeling output data, the count rates of SiC for the specified locations are calculated. A conclusion of this thesis is SiC detectors that are placed in the thermal neutron region of a graphite moderator-reflector reactor have a chance to survive at least one reactor refueling cycle, while their count rates are acceptably high.

  4. Structural damage identification based on laser ultrasonic propagation imaging technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Chen-Ciang; Jang, Si-Gwang; Lee, Jung-Ryul; Yoon, Dong-Jin

    2009-06-01

    An ultrasonic propagation imaging (UPI) system consisted of a Q-switched Nd-YAG pulsed laser and a galvanometer laser mirror scanner was developed. The system which requires neither reference data nor fixed focal length could be used for health monitoring of curved structures. If combined with a fiber acoustic wave PZT (FAWPZT) sensor, it could be used to inspect hot target structures that present formidable challenges to the usage of contact piezoelectric transducers mainly due to the operating temperature limitation of transducers and debonding problem due to the mismatch of coefficient of thermal expansion between the target, transducer and bonding material. The inspection of a stainless steel plate with a curvature radius of about 4 m, having 2mm×1mm open-crack was demonstrated at 150°C using a FAWPZT sensor welded on the plate. Highly-curved surfaces scanning capability and adaptivity of the system for large laser incident angle up to 70° was demonstrated on a stainless steel cylinder with 2mm×1mm open-crack. The imaging results were presented in ultrasonic propagation movie which was a moving wavefield emerged from an installed ultrasonic sensor. Damages were localized by the scattering wavefields. The result images enabled easy detection and interpretation of structural defects as anomalies during ultrasonic wave propagation.

  5. Space Radiation Effects on Human Cells: Modeling DNA Breakage, DNA Damage Foci Distribution, Chromosomal Aberrations and Tissue Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, A. L.; Huff, J. L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    Future long-tem space travel will face challenges from radiation concerns as the space environment poses health risk to humans in space from radiations with high biological efficiency and adverse post-flight long-term effects. Solar particles events may dramatically affect the crew performance, while Galactic Cosmic Rays will induce a chronic exposure to high-linear-energy-transfer (LET) particles. These types of radiation, not present on the ground level, can increase the probability of a fatal cancer later in astronaut life. No feasible shielding is possible from radiation in space, especially for the heavy ion component, as suggested solutions will require a dramatic increase in the mass of the mission. Our research group focuses on fundamental research and strategic analysis leading to better shielding design and to better understanding of the biological mechanisms of radiation damage. We present our recent effort to model DNA damage and tissue damage using computational models based on the physics of heavy ion radiation, DNA structure and DNA damage and repair in human cells. Our particular area of expertise include the clustered DNA damage from high-LET radiation, the visualization of DSBs (DNA double strand breaks) via DNA damage foci, image analysis and the statistics of the foci for different experimental situations, chromosomal aberration formation through DSB misrepair, the kinetics of DSB repair leading to a model-derived spectrum of chromosomal aberrations, and, finally, the simulation of human tissue and the pattern of apoptotic cell damage. This compendium of theoretical and experimental data sheds light on the complex nature of radiation interacting with human DNA, cells and tissues, which can lead to mutagenesis and carcinogenesis later in human life after the space mission.

  6. Modeling Damage Modes in 3-D Woven Armor Composite Systems

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Valisetty, R; Rajendran, A. M; Grove, D; Namburu, R; Bahei-El-Din, Y; Hody, A; Seever, L

    2006-01-01

    .... This effect is considered in the RVE via a transformation field analysis (TFA). Since the model is computationally intensive, its numerical requirements in modeling the local microstructure, e.g...

  7. Damaging process of graphite - new model and its impact on degradation of materials performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, T.; Muto, S.

    1999-01-01

    The most widely accepted model for development of defect structure in neutron irradiated graphite has been such that following the first production of a pair of an interstitial and vacancy, di-interstitials and vacancies are formed and their subsequent growth would result in the production of an interstitial plane or loop in-between the basal planes and vacancy clusters, respectively, which could cause the loss of thermal conductivity and dimensional change. Recently we have claimed that the formation of vacancy clusters and growth of the interstitial planes are not necessarily a unique interpretation of the damaging process. Instead, the damaging process is described by orientational disordering within the basal planes, i.e. fragmentation into small crystallites and rotation of their crystalline axes, change of stacking order and elongation of the interplanar spacing. The orientational disordering within the basal planes proceeds coordinately over a few layers with their layered correlation maintained. This process accompanies changes in bonding nature producing 5 member- and 7 member-atomic rings as appeared in fullerenes. This is so to speak ''self-restoring or reconstruction'' to maintain resonance bonds as strict as possible without the formation of dangling bonds. This paper reviews irradiation effects in graphite such as increase of hydrogen retention, loss of thermal conductivity and dimensional change on the bases of our new model, taking account of the changes of the bonding nature in irradiated graphite. (orig.)

  8. Validation of formability of laminated sheet metal for deep drawing process using GTN damage model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Yongbin; Cha, Wan-gi; Kim, Naksoo [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sogang University, 1 Sinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul, 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Sangjin [Mold/die and forming technology team, Product prestige research lab, LG electronics, 222, LG-ro, Jinwi-myeon, Pyeongtaek-si, Gyeonggi-do, 451-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-16

    In this study, we studied formability of PET/PVC laminated sheet metal which named VCM (Vinyl Coated Metal). VCM offers various patterns and good-looking metal steel used for appliances such as refrigerator and washing machine. But, this sheet has problems which are crack and peeling of film when the material is formed by deep drawing process. To predict the problems, we used finite element method and GTN (Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman) damage model to represent damage of material. We divided the VCM into 3 layers (PET film, adhesive and steel added PVC) in finite element analysis model to express the crack and peeling phenomenon. The material properties of each layer are determined by reverse engineering based on tensile test result. Furthermore, we performed the simple rectangular deep drawing and simulated it. The simulation result shows good agreement with drawing experiment result in position, punch stroke of crack occurrence. Also, we studied the fracture mechanism of PET film on VCM by comparing the width direction strain of metal and PET film.

  9. ON THE ISSUE OF "MEMORY" MARKOV MODEL OF DAMAGE ACCUMULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Lantuh-Lyaschenko

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of a probabilistic approach for the modeling of service life of highway bridge elements. The focus of this paper is on the Markov stochastic deterioration models. These models can be used as effective tool for technical state assessments and prediction of residual resource of a structure. For the bridge maintenance purpose these models can give quantitative criteria of a reliability level, risk and prediction algorithms of the residual resource.

  10. A coupled mechanical and chemical damage model for concrete affected by alkali–silica reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pignatelli, Rossella, E-mail: rossellapignatelli@gmail.com [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Lombardi Ingegneria S.r.l., Via Giotto 36, 20145 Milano (Italy); Comi, Claudia, E-mail: comi@stru.polimi.it [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Monteiro, Paulo J.M., E-mail: monteiro@ce.berkeley.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    To model the complex degradation phenomena occurring in concrete affected by alkali–silica reaction (ASR), we formulate a poro-mechanical model with two isotropic internal variables: the chemical and the mechanical damage. The chemical damage, related to the evolution of the reaction, is caused by the pressure generated by the expanding ASR gel on the solid concrete skeleton. The mechanical damage describes the strength and stiffness degradation induced by the external loads. As suggested by experimental results, degradation due to ASR is considered to be localized around reactive sites. The effect of the degree of saturation and of the temperature on the reaction development is also modeled. The chemical damage evolution is calibrated using the value of the gel pressure estimated by applying the electrical diffuse double-layer theory to experimental values of the surface charge density in ASR gel specimens reported in the literature. The chemo-damage model is first validated by simulating expansion tests on reactive specimens and beams; the coupled chemo-mechanical damage model is then employed to simulate compression and flexure tests results also taken from the literature. -- Highlights: •Concrete degradation due to ASR in variable environmental conditions is modeled. •Two isotropic internal variables – chemical and mechanical damage – are introduced. •The value of the swelling pressure is estimated by the diffuse double layer theory. •A simplified scheme is proposed to relate macro- and microscopic properties. •The chemo-mechanical damage model is validated by simulating tests in literature.

  11. Cointegration approach for temperature effect compensation in Lamb-wave-based damage detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, Phong B; Staszewski, Wieslaw J

    2013-01-01

    Lamb waves are often used in smart structures with integrated, low-profile piezoceramic transducers for damage detection. However, it is well known that the method is prone to contamination from a variety of interference sources including environmental and operational conditions. The paper demonstrates how to remove the undesired temperature effect from Lamb wave data. The method is based on the concept of cointegration that is partially built on the analysis of the non-stationary behaviour of time series. Instead of directly using Lamb wave responses for damage detection, two approaches are proposed: (i) analysis of cointegrating residuals obtained from the cointegration process of Lamb wave responses, (ii) analysis of stationary characteristics of Lamb wave responses before and after cointegration. The method is tested on undamaged and damaged aluminium plates exposed to temperature variations. The experimental results show that the method can: isolate damage-sensitive features from temperature variations, detect the existence of damage and classify its severity. (paper)

  12. Damage characterization and modeling of a 7075-T651 aluminum plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordon, J.B.; Horstemeyer, M.F.; Solanki, K.; Bernard, J.D.; Berry, J.T.; Williams, T.N.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the damage-induced anisotropy arising from material microstructure heterogeneities at two different length scales was characterized and modeled for a wrought aluminum alloy. Experiments were performed on a 7075-T651 aluminum alloy plate using sub-standard tensile specimens in three different orientations with respect to the rolling direction. Scanning electron microscopy was employed to characterize the stereology of the final damage state in terms of cracked and or debonded particles. A physically motivated internal state variable continuum model was used to predict fracture by incorporating material microstructural features. The continuum model showed good comparisons to the experimental data by capturing the damage-induced anisotropic material response. Estimations of the mechanical stress-strain response, material damage histories, and final failure were numerically calculated and experimentally validated thus demonstrating that the final failure state was strongly dependent on the constituent particle morphology.

  13. Modelling of the mechanical behaviour and damage of clay-stones: application to the East argillite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aublive-Conil, N.

    2003-03-01

    The storage in deep geological formation is one of the solutions retained by France for the management of highly long life radioactive waste. The retained host rock is a clay-stone named East argillite located in the departments of Meuse and Haute-Marne. A thermodynamic formulation is used to propose a rheological model, which reproduces the mechanical behavior of clay-stones. Initially, an anisotropic damage plastic model was formulated in order to describe material degradations. Then, the damage plastic model is reformulated in order to taken into account the damage influence on the hydraulic behavior of porous material. The numerical simulations correctly reproduce the mechanical behavior of East Argillites but also the anisotropy of the hydraulic behavior introduced by the damage effect. (author)

  14. Nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics for prediction of gastric damage induced by indomethacin in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Um, So Young; Park, Jung Hyun; Chung, Myeon Woo; Kim, Kyu-Bong; Kim, Seon Hwa; Choi, Ki Hwan; Lee, Hwa Jeong

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► NMR based metabolomics – gastric damage by indomethacin. ► Pattern recognition analysis was performed to biomarkers of gastric damage. ► 2-Oxoglutarate, acetate, taurine and hippurate were selected as putative biomarkers. ► The gastric damage induced by NSAIDs can be screened in the preclinical step of drug. - Abstract: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have side effects including gastric erosions, ulceration and bleeding. In this study, pattern recognition analysis of the 1 H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of urine was performed to develop surrogate biomarkers related to the gastrointestinal (GI) damage induced by indomethacin in rats. Urine was collected for 5 h after oral administration of indomethacin (25 mg kg −1 ) or co-administration with cimetidine (100 mg kg −1 ), which protects against GI damage. The 1 H-NMR urine spectra were divided into spectral bins (0.04 ppm) for global profiling, and 36 endogenous metabolites were assigned for targeted profiling. The level of gastric damage in each animal was also determined. Indomethacin caused severe gastric damage; however, indomethacin administered with cimetidine did not. Simultaneously, the patterns of changes in their endogenous metabolites were different. Multivariate data analyses were carried out to recognize the spectral pattern of endogenous metabolites related to indomethacin using partial least square-discrimination analysis. In targeted profiling, a few endogenous metabolites, 2-oxoglutarate, acetate, taurine and hippurate, were selected as putative biomarkers for the gastric damage induced by indomethacin. These metabolites changed depending on the degree of GI damage, although the same dose of indomethacin (10 mg kg −1 ) was administered to rats. The results of global and targeted profiling suggest that the gastric damage induced by NSAIDs can be screened in the preclinical stage of drug development using a NMR based metabolomics approach.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolomics for prediction of gastric damage induced by indomethacin in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Um, So Young [Department of Pharmacology, National Institute of Toxicological Research, Korea Food and Drug Administration, 643 Yeonje-ri, Gangoe-myeon, Cheongwon-gun, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Division of Life and Pharmaceutical Science and College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, 52 Ewahyeodae-gil, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jung Hyun [Division of Life and Pharmaceutical Science and College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, 52 Ewahyeodae-gil, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Myeon Woo [Department of Pharmacology, National Institute of Toxicological Research, Korea Food and Drug Administration, 643 Yeonje-ri, Gangoe-myeon, Cheongwon-gun, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyu-Bong [College of Pharmacy, Dankook University, Dandae-ro, Cheonan, Chungnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seon Hwa [Department of Pharmacology, National Institute of Toxicological Research, Korea Food and Drug Administration, 643 Yeonje-ri, Gangoe-myeon, Cheongwon-gun, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Division of Life and Pharmaceutical Science and College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, 52 Ewahyeodae-gil, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); College of Pharmacy, Dankook University, Dandae-ro, Cheonan, Chungnam (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ki Hwan, E-mail: hyokwa11@korea.kr [Department of Pharmacology, National Institute of Toxicological Research, Korea Food and Drug Administration, 643 Yeonje-ri, Gangoe-myeon, Cheongwon-gun, Chungbuk (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hwa Jeong, E-mail: hwalee@ewha.ac.kr [Division of Life and Pharmaceutical Science and College of Pharmacy, Ewha Womans University, 52 Ewahyeodae-gil, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NMR based metabolomics - gastric damage by indomethacin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pattern recognition analysis was performed to biomarkers of gastric damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 2-Oxoglutarate, acetate, taurine and hippurate were selected as putative biomarkers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The gastric damage induced by NSAIDs can be screened in the preclinical step of drug. - Abstract: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have side effects including gastric erosions, ulceration and bleeding. In this study, pattern recognition analysis of the {sup 1}H-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of urine was performed to develop surrogate biomarkers related to the gastrointestinal (GI) damage induced by indomethacin in rats. Urine was collected for 5 h after oral administration of indomethacin (25 mg kg{sup -1}) or co-administration with cimetidine (100 mg kg{sup -1}), which protects against GI damage. The {sup 1}H-NMR urine spectra were divided into spectral bins (0.04 ppm) for global profiling, and 36 endogenous metabolites were assigned for targeted profiling. The level of gastric damage in each animal was also determined. Indomethacin caused severe gastric damage; however, indomethacin administered with cimetidine did not. Simultaneously, the patterns of changes in their endogenous metabolites were different. Multivariate data analyses were carried out to recognize the spectral pattern of endogenous metabolites related to indomethacin using partial least square-discrimination analysis. In targeted profiling, a few endogenous metabolites, 2-oxoglutarate, acetate, taurine and hippurate, were selected as putative biomarkers for the gastric damage induced by indomethacin. These metabolites changed depending on the degree of GI damage, although the same dose of indomethacin (10 mg kg{sup -1}) was administered to rats. The results of global and targeted profiling suggest that the gastric damage induced by

  16. Base Station Performance Model

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, Barbara; Farrell, Ronan

    2005-01-01

    At present the testing of power amplifiers within base station transmitters is limited to testing at component level as opposed to testing at the system level. While the detection of catastrophic failure is possible, that of performance degradation is not. This paper proposes a base station model with respect to transmitter output power with the aim of introducing system level monitoring of the power amplifier behaviour within the base station. Our model reflects the expe...

  17. Mitochondrial damage and ageing using skin as a model organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Laura; Bowman, Amy; Rashdan, Eyman; Birch-Machin, Mark A

    2016-11-01

    Ageing describes the progressive functional decline of an organism over time, leading to an increase in susceptibility to age-related diseases and eventually to death, and it is a phenomenon observed across a wide range of organisms. Despite a vast repertoire of ageing studies performed over the past century, the exact causes of ageing remain unknown. For over 50 years it has been speculated that mitochondria play a key role in the ageing process, due mainly to correlative data showing an increase in mitochondrial dysfunction, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) with age. However, the exact role of the mitochondria in the ageing process remains unknown. The skin is often used to study human ageing, due to its easy accessibility, and the observation that the ageing process is able to be accelerated in this organ via environmental insults, such as ultra violet radiation (UVR). This provides a useful tool to investigate the mechanisms regulating ageing and, in particular, the role of the mitochondria. Observations from dermatological and photoageing studies can provide useful insights into chronological ageing of the skin and other organs such as the brain and liver. Moreover, a wide range of diseases are associated with ageing; therefore, understanding the cause of the ageing process as well as regulatory mechanisms involved could provide potentially advantageous therapeutic targets for the prevention or treatment of such diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Numerical Predictions of Damage and Failure in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Laminates Using a Thermodynamically-Based Work Potential Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda, Evan Jorge; Waas, Anthony M.

    2013-01-01

    A thermodynamically-based work potential theory for modeling progressive damage and failure in fiber-reinforced laminates is presented. The current, multiple-internal state variable (ISV) formulation, referred to as enhanced Schapery theory (EST), utilizes separate ISVs for modeling the effects of damage and failure. Consistent characteristic lengths are introduced into the formulation to govern the evolution of the failure ISVs. Using the stationarity of the total work potential with respect to each ISV, a set of thermodynamically consistent evolution equations for the ISVs are derived. The theory is implemented into a commercial finite element code. The model is verified against experimental results from two laminated, T800/3900-2 panels containing a central notch and different fiber-orientation stacking sequences. Global load versus displacement, global load versus local strain gage data, and macroscopic failure paths obtained from the models are compared against the experimental results.

  19. Flood Damage and Loss Estimation for Iowa on Web-based Systems using HAZUS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, E.; Sermet, M. Y.; Demir, I.

    2016-12-01

    Importance of decision support systems for flood emergency response and loss estimation increases with its social and economic impacts. To estimate the damage of the flood, there are several software systems available to researchers and decision makers. HAZUS-MH is one of the most widely used desktop program, developed by FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency), to estimate economic loss and social impacts of disasters such as earthquake, hurricane and flooding (riverine and coastal). HAZUS used loss estimation methodology and implements through geographic information system (GIS). HAZUS contains structural, demographic, and vehicle information across United States. Thus, it allows decision makers to understand and predict possible casualties and damage of the floods by running flood simulations through GIS application. However, it doesn't represent real time conditions because of using static data. To close this gap, an overview of a web-based infrastructure coupling HAZUS and real time data provided by IFIS (Iowa Flood Information System) is presented by this research. IFIS is developed by the Iowa Flood Center, and a one-stop web-platform to access community-based flood conditions, forecasts, visualizations, inundation maps and flood-related data, information, and applications. Large volume of real-time observational data from a variety of sensors and remote sensing resources (radars, rain gauges, stream sensors, etc.) and flood inundation models are staged on a user-friendly maps environment that is accessible to the general public. Providing cross sectional analyses between HAZUS-MH and IFIS datasets, emergency managers are able to evaluate flood damage during flood events easier and more accessible in real time conditions. With matching data from HAZUS-MH census tract layer and IFC gauges, economical effects of flooding can be observed and evaluated by decision makers. The system will also provide visualization of the data by using augmented reality for

  20. Modeling base excision repair in Escherichia coli bacterial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, O.V.

    2011-01-01

    A model describing the key processes in Escherichia coli bacterial cells during base excision repair is developed. The mechanism is modeled of damaged base elimination involving formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (the Fpg protein), which possesses several types of activities. The modeling of the transitions between DNA states is based on a stochastic approach to the chemical reaction description

  1. Nanotechnology-based system for damage-resistant concrete pavements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The focus of this study was to explore the use of nanotechnology-based nanofilaments, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nanofibers (CNFs), as reinforcement for improving the mechanical properties of Portland cement paste and creating multifunctiona...

  2. Photoshop-based image analysis of canine articular cartilage after subchondral damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahm, A; Uhl, M; Lehr, H A; Ihling, C; Kreuz, P C; Haberstroh, J

    2004-09-01

    The validity of histopathological grading is a major problem in the assessment of articular cartilage. Calculating the cumulative strength of signal intensity of different stains gives information regarding the amount of proteoglycan, glycoproteins, etc. Using this system, we examined the medium-term effect of subchondral lesions on initially healthy articular cartilage. After cadaver studies, an animal model was created to produce pure subchondral damage without affecting the articular cartilage in 12 beagle dogs under MRI control. Quantification of the different stains was provided using a Photoshop-based image analysis (pixel analysis) with the histogram command 6 months after subchondral trauma. FLASH 3D sequences revealed intact cartilage after impact in all cases. The best detection of subchondral fractures was achieved with fat-suppressed TIRM sequences. Semiquantitative image analysis showed changes in proteoglycan and glycoprotein quantities in 9 of 12 samples that had not shown any evidence of damage during the initial examination. Correlation analysis showed a loss of the physiological distribution of proteoglycans and glycoproteins in the different zones of articular cartilage. Currently available software programs can be applied for comparative analysis of histologic stains of hyaline cartilage. After subchondral fractures, significant changes in the cartilage itself occur after 6 months.

  3. Earthquake Building Damage Mapping Based on Feature Analyzing Method from Synthetic Aperture Radar Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, L.; Zhang, J.; Gong, L.

    2018-04-01

    Playing an important role in gathering information of social infrastructure damage, Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) remote sensing is a useful tool for monitoring earthquake disasters. With the wide application of this technique, a standard method, comparing post-seismic to pre-seismic data, become common. However, multi-temporal SAR processes, are not always achievable. To develop a post-seismic data only method for building damage detection, is of great importance. In this paper, the authors are now initiating experimental investigation to establish an object-based feature analysing classification method for building damage recognition.

  4. Mechanical Damage Detection of Indonesia Local Citrus Based on Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siregar, T. H.; Ahmad, U.; Sutrisno; Maddu, A.

    2018-05-01

    Citrus experienced physical damage in peel will produce essential oils that contain polymethoxylated flavone. Polymethoxylated flavone is fluorescence substance; thus can be detected by fluorescence imaging. This study aims to study the fluorescence spectra characteristic and to determine the damage region in citrus peel based on fluorescence image. Pulung citrus from Batu district, East Java, as a famous citrus production area in Indonesia, was used in the experiment. It was observed that the image processing could detect the mechanical damage region. Fluorescence imaging can be used to classify the citrus into two categories, sound and defect citruses.

  5. Pipeline Structural Damage Detection Using Self-Sensing Technology and PNN-Based Pattern Recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Gil; Park, Woong Ki; Park, Seung Hee

    2011-01-01

    In a structure, damage can occur at several scales from micro-cracking to corrosion or loose bolts. This makes the identification of damage difficult with one mode of sensing. Hence, a multi-mode actuated sensing system is proposed based on a self-sensing circuit using a piezoelectric sensor. In the self sensing-based multi-mode actuated sensing, one mode provides a wide frequency-band structural response from the self-sensed impedance measurement and the other mode provides a specific frequency-induced structural wavelet response from the self-sensed guided wave measurement. In this study, an experimental study on the pipeline system is carried out to verify the effectiveness and the robustness of the proposed structural health monitoring approach. Different types of structural damage are artificially inflicted on the pipeline system. To classify the multiple types of structural damage, a supervised learning-based statistical pattern recognition is implemented by composing a two-dimensional space using the damage indices extracted from the impedance and guided wave features. For more systematic damage classification, several control parameters to determine an optimal decision boundary for the supervised learning-based pattern recognition are optimized. Finally, further research issues will be discussed for real-world implementation of the proposed approach

  6. An accurate fatigue damage model for welded joints subjected to variable amplitude loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeran, A.; Siriwardane, S. C.; Mikkelsen, O.; Langen, I.

    2017-12-01

    Researchers in the past have proposed several fatigue damage models to overcome the shortcomings of the commonly used Miner’s rule. However, requirements of material parameters or S-N curve modifications restricts their practical applications. Also, application of most of these models under variable amplitude loading conditions have not been found. To overcome these restrictions, a new fatigue damage model is proposed in this paper. The proposed model can be applied by practicing engineers using only the S-N curve given in the standard codes of practice. The model is verified with experimentally derived damage evolution curves for C 45 and 16 Mn and gives better agreement compared to previous models. The model predicted fatigue lives are also in better correlation with experimental results compared to previous models as shown in earlier published work by the authors. The proposed model is applied to welded joints subjected to variable amplitude loadings in this paper. The model given around 8% shorter fatigue lives compared to Eurocode given Miner’s rule. This shows the importance of applying accurate fatigue damage models for welded joints.

  7. A Coupled Damage and Reaction Model for Simulating Energetic Material Response to Impact Hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BAER, MELVIN R.; DRUMHELLER, D.S.; MATHESON, E.R.

    1999-01-01

    The Baer-Nunziato multiphase reactive theory for a granulated bed of energetic material is extended to allow for dynamic damage processes, that generate new surfaces as well as porosity. The Second Law of Thermodynamics is employed to constrain the constitutive forms of the mass, momentum, and energy exchange functions as well as those for the mechanical damage model ensuring that the models will be dissipative. The focus here is on the constitutive forms of the exchange functions. The mechanical constitutive modeling is discussed in a companion paper. The mechanical damage model provides dynamic surface area and porosity information needed by the exchange functions to compute combustion rates and interphase momentum and energy exchange rates. The models are implemented in the CTH shock physics code and used to simulate delayed detonations due to impacts in a bed of granulated energetic material and an undamaged cylindrical sample

  8. Avoiding thermal striping damage: Experimentally-based design procedures for high-cycle thermal fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betts, C.; Judd, A.M.; Lewis, M.W.J.

    1994-01-01

    -like defects up to 0.1 mm deep. If the surface temperature-time history for points on the component is known, the procedure allows the calculation of allowable surface temperature amplitudes such that crack initiation will not occur before the end of the component life. This imposes a less restrictive limit, but it still might be 65 K for a life of 300,000 hours. It is also dependent on the nature of the surface temperature fluctuations, in particular the infrequent large fluctuations. In practice it is difficult to ensure that a structure as built is free from defects greater than 0.1 mm deep, and it has to be recognised that such defects may grow under the imposed thermal loading. A procedure based on limited crack growth and arrest at a depth of about 0.5 mm has been developed. It requires a knowledge of the maximum surface temperature amplitude and the frequency spectrum if the fluctuations, as well as the stress state of the component and the postulated crack shape. For a nominally unstressed structure this procedure is less restrictive and can give allowable amplitudes (though a design safety factor is not included). Detailed information on the temperature fluctuations can in principle be obtained from measurements on the plant or in a liquid metal rig, but it has been shown that if the modelling is correct an air model can provide reliable and conservative information, and can provide it more quickly and economically

  9. Radiation damage studies on polystyrene-based scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britvich, G.I.; Peresypkin, A.I.; Rykalin, V.I.

    1991-01-01

    The radiation resistance of polystyrene-based scintillators containing various scintillation dopes is reported. All samples were irradiated to 137 Cs gamma rays in air at room temperature. The examination of radiation resistance of about thirty fluorescence compounds has been made. The most radiation-hard fluores are X25, X31, 3HF and M3HF. 1 fig.; 6 tabs

  10. Crushing damage estimation for pavement with lightly cementitious bases

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Beer, Morris

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available . Department of Transport. Pretoria, South Africa. Litwinowicz and De Beer., 2013. Long term crushing performance of lightly cementitious pavement materials – update to the South African procedures. Road Materials and Pavement Design. Maina, J.W., De... Beer, M. and van Rensburg, Y., 2013. Modelling Tyre-Road Contact Stresses in Pavement Design and Analysis. Proceedings of 32nd Southern Africa transport conference, Pretoria, July 2013. pp 336-345: SAPDM, (2014). http://www.sapdm.co.za/, last...

  11. Sequential projection pursuit for optimised vibration-based damage detection in an experimental wind turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoell, Simon; Omenzetter, Piotr

    2018-02-01

    To advance the concept of smart structures in large systems, such as wind turbines (WTs), it is desirable to be able to detect structural damage early while using minimal instrumentation. Data-driven vibration-based damage detection methods can be competitive in that respect because global vibrational responses encompass the entire structure. Multivariate damage sensitive features (DSFs) extracted from acceleration responses enable to detect changes in a structure via statistical methods. However, even though such DSFs contain information about the structural state, they may not be optimised for the damage detection task. This paper addresses the shortcoming by exploring a DSF projection technique specialised for statistical structural damage detection. High dimensional initial DSFs are projected onto a low-dimensional space for improved damage detection performance and simultaneous computational burden reduction. The technique is based on sequential projection pursuit where the projection vectors are optimised one by one using an advanced evolutionary strategy. The approach is applied to laboratory experiments with a small-scale WT blade under wind-like excitations. Autocorrelation function coefficients calculated from acceleration signals are employed as DSFs. The optimal numbers of projection vectors are identified with the help of a fast forward selection procedure. To benchmark the proposed method, selections of original DSFs as well as principal component analysis scores from these features are additionally investigated. The optimised DSFs are tested for damage detection on previously unseen data from the healthy state and a wide range of damage scenarios. It is demonstrated that using selected subsets of the initial and transformed DSFs improves damage detectability compared to the full set of features. Furthermore, superior results can be achieved by projecting autocorrelation coefficients onto just a single optimised projection vector.

  12. Experimental verifications of a structural damage identification technique using reduced order finite-element model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Zhou, Li; Yang, Jann N.

    2010-04-01

    An objective of the structural health monitoring system is to identify the state of the structure and to detect the damage when it occurs. Analysis techniques for the damage identification of structures, based on vibration data measured from sensors, have received considerable attention. Recently, a new damage tracking technique, referred to as the adaptive quadratic sum-square error (AQSSE) technique, has been proposed, and simulation studies demonstrated that the AQSSE technique is quite effective in identifying structural damages. In this paper, the adaptive quadratic sumsquare error (AQSSE) along with the reduced-order finite-element method is proposed to identify the damages of complex structures. Experimental tests were conducted to verify the capability of the proposed damage detection approach. A series of experimental tests were performed using a scaled cantilever beam subject to the white noise and sinusoidal excitations. The capability of the proposed reduced-order finite-element based adaptive quadratic sum-square error (AQSSE) method in detecting the structural damage is demonstrated by the experimental results.

  13. Hysteretic MDOF Model to Quantify Damage for RC Shear Frames Subject to Earthquakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köylüoglu, H. Ugur; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Cakmak, Ahmet S.

    A hysteretic mechanical formulation is derived to quantify local, modal and overall damage in reinforced concrete (RC) shear frames subject to seismic excitation. Each interstorey is represented by a Clough and Johnston (1966) hysteretic constitutive relation with degrading elastic fraction of th...... shear frame is subject to simulated earthquake excitations, which are modelled as a stationary Gaussian stochastic process with Kanai-Tajimi spectrum, multiplied by an envelope function. The relationship between local, modal and overall damage indices is investigated statistically....

  14. The Use of Sphere Indentation Experiments to Characterize Ceramic Damage Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    cracking patterns ob- served in spherical indentation data indirectly quantify microheterogeneity. The evolution of damage in ceramics due to projectile...Kayenta model’s damage evolution and variability parameters. Figure 5 illustrates the relationship between the model implementation of variability...Materials by Design, ed., J. W. McCauley. Vol. 134, 11–18. Ceramic Transactions, Cocoa Beach, FL, 2002. 3. G. E. Hauver, et al. Interface Defeat of Long-Rod

  15. Model for visualizing high energy laser (HEL) damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erten, Gail

    2017-11-01

    This paper describes and presents results from a model created in MATLAB® to calculate and display the time dependent temperature profile on a target aimpoint as it is being engaged by a high energy laser (HEL) beam. The model uses public domain information namely physics equations of heat conduction and phase changes and material properties such as thermal conductivity/diffusivity, latent heat, specific heat, melting and evaporation points as well as user input material type and thickness. The user also provides time varying characteristics of the HEL beam on the aimpoint, including beam size and intensity distribution (in Watts per centimeter square). The model calculates the temperature distribution at and around the aimpoint and also shows the phase changes of the aimpoint with the material first melting and then evaporating. User programmable features (selecting materials and thickness, erosion rates for melting) make the model highly versatile. The objective is to bridge the divide between remaining faithful to theoretical formulations such as the partial differential equations of heat conduction and at the same time serving practical concerns of the model user who needs to rapidly evaluate HEL thermal effects. One possible use of the tool is to assess lethality values of different aimpoints without costly (as well as often dangerous and destructive) experiments.

  16. Damage Detection Based on Cross-Term Extraction from Bilinear Time-Frequency Distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Yuchao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abundant damage information is implicated in the bilinear time-frequency distribution of structural dynamic signals, which could provide effective support for structural damage identification. Signal time-frequency analysis methods are reviewed, and the characters of linear time-frequency distribution and bilinear time-frequency distribution typically represented by the Wigner-Ville distribution are compared. The existence of the cross-term and its application in structural damage detection are demonstrated. A method of extracting the dominant term is proposed, which combines the short-time Fourier spectrum and Wigner-Ville distribution; then two-dimensional time-frequency transformation matrix is constructed and the complete cross-term is extracted finally. The distribution character of which could be applied to the structural damage identification. Through theoretical analysis, model experiment and numerical simulation of the girder structure, the change rate of cross-term amplitude is validated to identify the damage location and degree. The effectiveness of the cross-term of bilinear time-frequency distribution for damage detection is confirmed and the analytical method of damage identification used in structural engineering is available.

  17. Modeling of damage evaluation in thin composite plate loaded by pressure loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudinský M.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of numerical analysis of elastic damage of thin laminated long fiber-reinforced composite plate consisting of unidirectional layers which is loaded by uniformly distributed pressure. The analysis has been performed by means of the finite element method (FEM. The numerical implementation uses layered plate finite elements based on the Kirchhoff plate theory. System of nonlinear equations has been solved by means of the Newton- Raphson procedure. Evolution of damage has been solved using the return-mapping algorithm based on the continuum damage mechanics (CDM. The analysis was performed using own program created in MATLAB. Problem of laminated fiber-reinforced composite plate fixed on edges for two different materials and three different laminate stacking sequences (LSS was simulated. Evolution of stresses vs. strains and also evolution of damage variables in critical points of the structure are shown.

  18. Modeling of response, socioeconomic, and natural resource damage costs for hypothetical oil spill scenarios in San Francisco Bay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etkin, D.S.; French McCay, D.; Whittier, N.; Sankaranarayanan, S.; Jennings, J.

    2002-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the influence of oil type, spill size, response strategy and location factors on oil spill response costs, with particular reference to the cost benefits of the use of dispersants. Modeling has been conducted for a hypothetical oil spill in San Francisco Bay to determine biological impacts, damages to natural resources and response costs. The SIMAP modeling software by the Applied Science Associates was used to model 3 spill sizes (20, 50 and 95 percentile by volume) and 4 types of oil (gasoline, diesel, heavy fuel oil, and crude oil). Response costs, natural resource damages and socioeconomic impact were determined based on spill trajectory and fate. Mechanical recovery-based operations carry higher response costs than dispersant-based operations. Response costs for diesel and gasoline spills make up 20 per cent of the total costs, compared to 43 per cent for crude and heavy fuel oil spills. Damages to natural resources are higher for spills of toxic lighter fuels such as gasoline and diesel because gasoline has a greater impact on the water column with less shoreline oiling, resulting in more damages to natural resources. Heavier oils have a greater impact on shorelines and higher response and socioeconomic costs. Although socioeconomic costs varied by location, they tend to be greater than response costs and natural resource damage costs. Proportions of the different costs were described with reference to various spill factors. Socioeconomic costs are 61, 76, 45 and 53 per cent respectively for gasoline, diesel, crude oil, and heavy fuel oil spills. 27 refs., 23 tabs., 5 figs

  19. Decision making model for Foreign Object Debris/Damage (FOD) elimination in aeronautics using quantitative modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafon, Jose J.

    (FOD) Foreign Object Debris/Damage has been a costly issue for the commercial and military aircraft manufacturers at their production lines every day. FOD can put pilots, passengers and other crews' lives into high-risk. FOD refers to any type of foreign object, particle, debris or agent in the manufacturing environment, which could contaminate/damage the product or otherwise undermine quality standards. Nowadays, FOD is currently addressed with prevention programs, elimination techniques, and designation of FOD areas, controlled access to FOD areas, restrictions of personal items entering designated areas, tool accountability, etc. All of the efforts mentioned before, have not shown a significant reduction in FOD occurrence in the manufacturing processes. This research presents a Decision Making Model approach based on a logistic regression predictive model that was previously made by other researchers. With a general idea of the FOD expected, elimination plans can be put in place and start eradicating the problem minimizing the cost and time spend on the prediction, detection and/or removal of FOD.

  20. Damage detection strategies for aircraft shell-like structures based on propagation guided elastic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zak, A; Ostachowicz, W; Krawczuk, M

    2011-01-01

    Damage of aircraft structural elements in any form always present high risks. Failures of these elements can be caused by various reasons including material fatigue or impact leading to damage initiation and growth. Detection of these failures at their earliest stage of development, estimation of their size and location, are one of the most crucial factors for each damage detection method. Structural health monitoring strategies based on propagation of guided elastic waves in structures and wave interaction with damage related discontinuities are very promising tools that offer not only damage detection capabilities, but are also meant to provide precise information about the state of the structures and their remaining lifetime. Because of that various techniques are employed to simulate and mimic the wave-discontinuity interactions. The use of various types of sensors, their networks together with sophisticated contactless measuring techniques are investigated both numerically and experimentally. Certain results of numerical simulations obtained by the use of the spectral finite element method are presented by the authors and related with propagation of guided elastic waves in shell-type aircraft structures. Two types of structures are considered: flat 2D panels with or without stiffeners and 3D shell structures. The applicability of two different damage detection approaches is evaluated in order to detect and localise damage in these structures. Selected results related with the use of laser scanning vibrometry are also presented and discussed by the authors.

  1. Flexibility-based damage detection for in-service highway bridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahal, Sushil; Jang, Shinae; Mensah-Bonsu, Priscilla

    2012-04-01

    Highway bridges are the backbones of a country's road network infrastructure. In order to efficiently maintain these important structures, structural health monitoring (SHM) can be implemented to impart a more deterministic management procedure. To date, many damage detection strategies have been developed and implemented on lab-scale or simple bridge structures however, damage detection research has rarely been conducted taking full scale in-service structures into account with ambient vibration. Among the different approaches modal flexibility method is one of the sensitive tools for damage detection which has been widely used over the last two decades. This paper presents a damage detection based on the stochastic damage locating vector (SDLV) method for an in-service highway bridge using ambient vibration data from long-term SHM. The target bridge was equipped with a long-term SHM system as a part of a research project of the University of Connecticut. The ambient vibration data during 2001 and 2005 are used to identify the damage on the highway bridge. Finally, the potential damage locations are determined using the SDLV method with the limited number of sensors.

  2. Biomechanical models of damage and healing processes for voice health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granados Corsellas, Alba; Brunskog, Jonas; Jacobsen, Finn

    2013-01-01

    the vocal-fold plane are available. This data is used to improve existing continuum biomechanical models of the vocal-folds by analyzing the injury processes. The project is expected to result in methods that objectively demonstrate the impact of high voice-load on voice. A detailed description...

  3. A ductile fracture analysis using a local damage model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benseddiq, N. [Laboratoire de Mecanique et de Rheologie de Tours, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs du Val de Loire (ENIVL), Rue de la Chocolaterie, 41000 Blois Cedex (France)], E-mail: nbensedd@polytech-lille.fr; Imad, A. [Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille (UMR CNRS 8107), USTL, Ecole Polytechnique Universitaire de Lille Cite Scientifique, Avenue P. Langevin, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France)

    2008-04-15

    In this study, the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model is used to investigate ductile tearing. The sensitivity of the model parameters has been examined from literature data. Three types of parameters have been reported: the 'constitutive parameters'q{sub 1}, q{sub 2} and q{sub 3}, the 'initial material and nucleation parameters' and the 'critical and final failure parameters'. Each parameter in this model has been analysed in terms of various results in the literature. Both experimental and numerical results have been obtained for notched round and CT specimens to characterize ductile failure in a NiCr steel (12NC6) with a small initial void volume fraction f{sub 0} (f{sub 0}=0.001%). Ductile crack growth, defined by the J-{delta}a curve, has been correctly simulated using the numerical calculations by adjusting the different parameters of the GTN model in the calibration procedure.

  4. Vibration-Based Damage Identification in Wind Turbine Blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulriksen, Martin Dalgaard; Tcherniak, Dmitri; Damkilde, Lars

    Due to the existing trend of placing wind turbines in impassable terrain, for example, offshore, these structures constitute prime candidates for being subjected to structural health monitoring (SHM). The wind turbine blades have in particular been paid research attention [1] as these compose one...... of the most common and critical components to fail in the turbines [2]. The standard structural integrity assessment of blades is based on visual inspection, which requires the turbine in question to be stopped while inspections are conducted. This procedure is extremely costly and tedious, hence emphasizing...

  5. Web Based VRML Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiss, S.; Sarfraz, M.

    2004-01-01

    Presents a method to connect VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language) and Java components in a Web page using EAI (External Authoring Interface), which makes it possible to interactively generate and edit VRML meshes. The meshes used are based on regular grids, to provide an interaction and modeling

  6. Modelling multi-hazard hurricane damages on an urbanized coast with a Bayesian Network approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Verseveld, H.C.W.; Van Dongeren, A. R.; Plant, Nathaniel G.; Jäger, W.S.; den Heijer, C.

    2015-01-01

    Hurricane flood impacts to residential buildings in coastal zones are caused by a number of hazards, such as inundation, overflow currents, erosion, and wave attack. However, traditional hurricane damage models typically make use of stage-damage functions, where the stage is related to flooding depth only. Moreover, these models are deterministic and do not consider the large amount of uncertainty associated with both the processes themselves and with the predictions. This uncertainty becomes increasingly important when multiple hazards (flooding, wave attack, erosion, etc.) are considered simultaneously. This paper focusses on establishing relationships between observed damage and multiple hazard indicators in order to make better probabilistic predictions. The concept consists of (1) determining Local Hazard Indicators (LHIs) from a hindcasted storm with use of a nearshore morphodynamic model, XBeach, and (2) coupling these LHIs and building characteristics to the observed damages. We chose a Bayesian Network approach in order to make this coupling and used the LHIs ‘Inundation depth’, ‘Flow velocity’, ‘Wave attack’, and ‘Scour depth’ to represent flooding, current, wave impacts, and erosion related hazards.The coupled hazard model was tested against four thousand damage observations from a case site at the Rockaway Peninsula, NY, that was impacted by Hurricane Sandy in late October, 2012. The model was able to accurately distinguish ‘Minor damage’ from all other outcomes 95% of the time and could distinguish areas that were affected by the storm, but not severely damaged, 68% of the time. For the most heavily damaged buildings (‘Major Damage’ and ‘Destroyed’), projections of the expected damage underestimated the observed damage. The model demonstrated that including multiple hazards doubled the prediction skill, with Log-Likelihood Ratio test (a measure of improved accuracy and reduction in uncertainty) scores between 0.02 and 0

  7. Wireless vibration-based SHM of caisson-type breakwater under foundation damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, So-Young; Nguyen, Khac-Duy; Kim, Jeong-Tae; Yi, Jin-Hak

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a vibration-based structural health monitoring (SHM) technique using a high sensitive wireless sensor node for caisson-type breakwater. To achieve the objective, the following approaches are implemented. Firstly, vibration-based SHM method is selected for caisson-type breakwater. The feasibility of the vibration-based SHM method is examined for the caisson structure by FE analysis. Foundation loss damage is considered as the damage of caisson-type breakwater. Secondly, a wireless SHM system with a high sensitive wireless sensor node is designed. The sensor node is built on an imote2 platform. The vibration-based SHM method is embedded on the sensor node. Finally, the performance of the wireless SHM technique is estimated from experimental tests on a lab-scaled caisson. The vibration responses and damage monitoring results are compared with the proposed wireless system and conventional wired system.

  8. Asymmetrical Damage Partitioning in Bacteria: A Model for the Evolution of Stochasticity, Determinism, and Genetic Assimilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Lin; Rang, Camilla Ulla; Proenca, Audrey Menegaz; Chao, Jasper Ubirajara

    2016-01-01

    Non-genetic phenotypic variation is common in biological organisms. The variation is potentially beneficial if the environment is changing. If the benefit is large, selection can favor the evolution of genetic assimilation, the process by which the expression of a trait is transferred from environmental to genetic control. Genetic assimilation is an important evolutionary transition, but it is poorly understood because the fitness costs and benefits of variation are often unknown. Here we show that the partitioning of damage by a mother bacterium to its two daughters can evolve through genetic assimilation. Bacterial phenotypes are also highly variable. Because gene-regulating elements can have low copy numbers, the variation is attributed to stochastic sampling. Extant Escherichia coli partition asymmetrically and deterministically more damage to the old daughter, the one receiving the mother's old pole. By modeling in silico damage partitioning in a population, we show that deterministic asymmetry is advantageous because it increases fitness variance and hence the efficiency of natural selection. However, we find that symmetrical but stochastic partitioning can be similarly beneficial. To examine why bacteria evolved deterministic asymmetry, we modeled the effect of damage anchored to the mother's old pole. While anchored damage strengthens selection for asymmetry by creating additional fitness variance, it has the opposite effect on symmetry. The difference results because anchored damage reinforces the polarization of partitioning in asymmetric bacteria. In symmetric bacteria, it dilutes the polarization. Thus, stochasticity alone may have protected early bacteria from damage, but deterministic asymmetry has evolved to be equally important in extant bacteria. We estimate that 47% of damage partitioning is deterministic in E. coli. We suggest that the evolution of deterministic asymmetry from stochasticity offers an example of Waddington's genetic assimilation

  9. Asymmetrical Damage Partitioning in Bacteria: A Model for the Evolution of Stochasticity, Determinism, and Genetic Assimilation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-genetic phenotypic variation is common in biological organisms. The variation is potentially beneficial if the environment is changing. If the benefit is large, selection can favor the evolution of genetic assimilation, the process by which the expression of a trait is transferred from environmental to genetic control. Genetic assimilation is an important evolutionary transition, but it is poorly understood because the fitness costs and benefits of variation are often unknown. Here we show that the partitioning of damage by a mother bacterium to its two daughters can evolve through genetic assimilation. Bacterial phenotypes are also highly variable. Because gene-regulating elements can have low copy numbers, the variation is attributed to stochastic sampling. Extant Escherichia coli partition asymmetrically and deterministically more damage to the old daughter, the one receiving the mother's old pole. By modeling in silico damage partitioning in a population, we show that deterministic asymmetry is advantageous because it increases fitness variance and hence the efficiency of natural selection. However, we find that symmetrical but stochastic partitioning can be similarly beneficial. To examine why bacteria evolved deterministic asymmetry, we modeled the effect of damage anchored to the mother's old pole. While anchored damage strengthens selection for asymmetry by creating additional fitness variance, it has the opposite effect on symmetry. The difference results because anchored damage reinforces the polarization of partitioning in asymmetric bacteria. In symmetric bacteria, it dilutes the polarization. Thus, stochasticity alone may have protected early bacteria from damage, but deterministic asymmetry has evolved to be equally important in extant bacteria. We estimate that 47% of damage partitioning is deterministic in E. coli. We suggest that the evolution of deterministic asymmetry from stochasticity offers an example of Waddington

  10. Radiation-damage measurements on PVT-based plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilie, S.; Schoenbacher, H.; Tavlet, M.

    1993-01-01

    Samples of PVT-based plastic scintillators produced by Nuclear Enterprise Technology Ltd. (NET) were irradiated up to 9 kGy, both with a gamma source and within a typical accelerator radiation field (CERN PS ACOL Irradiation Facility). The consequent reduction of scintillating efficiency and light transmission were measured, as well as subsequent recovery, over a period of several months. The main results show that irradiation affects more the light transmission than the light emission. The radiation type does not affect either the amount of transmission reduction or the recovery. Observations were also made by means of polarized light. Non-uniformities and internal stresses were observed in scintillator bulks which were polymerized too quickly. These defects influence the light transmission. (orig.)

  11. Automated laser-based barely visible impact damage detection in honeycomb sandwich composite structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girolamo, D.; Yuan, F. G.; Girolamo, L.

    2015-01-01

    Nondestructive evaluation (NDE) for detection and quantification of damage in composite materials is fundamental in the assessment of the overall structural integrity of modern aerospace systems. Conventional NDE systems have been extensively used to detect the location and size of damages by propagating ultrasonic waves normal to the surface. However they usually require physical contact with the structure and are time consuming and labor intensive. An automated, contactless laser ultrasonic imaging system for barely visible impact damage (BVID) detection in advanced composite structures has been developed to overcome these limitations. Lamb waves are generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser, raster scanned by a set of galvano-mirrors over the damaged area. The out-of-plane vibrations are measured through a laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDV) that is stationary at a point on the corner of the grid. The ultrasonic wave field of the scanned area is reconstructed in polar coordinates and analyzed for high resolution characterization of impact damage in the composite honeycomb panel. Two methodologies are used for ultrasonic wave-field analysis: scattered wave field analysis (SWA) and standing wave energy analysis (SWEA) in the frequency domain. The SWA is employed for processing the wave field and estimate spatially dependent wavenumber values, related to discontinuities in the structural domain. The SWEA algorithm extracts standing waves trapped within damaged areas and, by studying the spectrum of the standing wave field, returns high fidelity damage imaging. While the SWA can be used to locate the impact damage in the honeycomb panel, the SWEA produces damage images in good agreement with X-ray computed tomographic (X-ray CT) scans. The results obtained prove that the laser-based nondestructive system is an effective alternative to overcome limitations of conventional NDI technologies

  12. Fuselage Versus Subcomponent Panel Response Correlation Based on ABAQUS Explicit Progressive Damage Analysis Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Kevin E.; Satyanarayana, Arunkumar; Bogert, Philip B.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis performed in this study substantiates the need for high fidelity vehicle level progressive damage analyses (PDA) structural models for use in the verification and validation of proposed sub-scale structural models and to support required full-scale vehicle level testing. PDA results are presented that capture and correlate the responses of sub-scale 3-stringer and 7-stringer panel models and an idealized 8-ft diameter fuselage model, which provides a vehicle level environment for the 7-stringer sub-scale panel model. Two unique skin-stringer attachment assumptions are considered and correlated in the models analyzed: the TIE constraint interface versus the cohesive element (COH3D8) interface. Evaluating different interfaces allows for assessing a range of predicted damage modes, including delamination and crack propagation responses. Damage models considered in this study are the ABAQUS built-in Hashin procedure and the COmplete STress Reduction (COSTR) damage procedure implemented through a VUMAT user subroutine using the ABAQUS/Explicit code.

  13. Weibull Parameters Estimation Based on Physics of Failure Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostandyan, Erik; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2012-01-01

    Reliability estimation procedures are discussed for the example of fatigue development in solder joints using a physics of failure model. The accumulated damage is estimated based on a physics of failure model, the Rainflow counting algorithm and the Miner’s rule. A threshold model is used...... for degradation modeling and failure criteria determination. The time dependent accumulated damage is assumed linearly proportional to the time dependent degradation level. It is observed that the deterministic accumulated damage at the level of unity closely estimates the characteristic fatigue life of Weibull...

  14. Story damage index of seismically-excited buildings based on modal parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang J.-F.; Lin, C.-C.; Yen, S.-M.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a story damage index (SDI) for buildings is developed and expressed as a simple formula based on modal parameters extracted from real earthquake response records. It is useful because only one set of modal parameters is required for the calculation of the SDI to show the degree of damage of the story in question. According to numerical simulation results of five-story buildings with various story stiffness reductions and floor mass distributions, it is proven that the proposed SDI has both high accuracy and high reliability. This SDI is also applied to the damage assessment of a 7-story reinforced concrete hotel building in Van Nuys, California, which experienced severe structural damage during the 1994 Northridge earthquake. With both its fundamental frequency and mode shape identified by the SRIM (System Realization using Information Matrix) identification technique, it is shown that the SDI agrees fairly well with the results of the visual inspection, and is valuable in practical application. (authors)

  15. Modeling of beam-induced damage of the LHC tertiary collimators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Quaranta

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern hadron machines with high beam intensity may suffer from material damage in the case of large beam losses and even beam-intercepting devices, such as collimators, can be harmed. A systematic method to evaluate thresholds of damage owing to the impact of high energy particles is therefore crucial for safe operation and for predicting possible limitations in the overall machine performance. For this, a three-step simulation approach is presented, based on tracking simulations followed by calculations of energy deposited in the impacted material and hydrodynamic simulations to predict the thermomechanical effect of the impact. This approach is applied to metallic collimators at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC, which in standard operation intercept halo protons, but risk to be damaged in the case of extraction kicker malfunction. In particular, tertiary collimators protect the aperture bottlenecks, their settings constrain the reach in β^{*} and hence the achievable luminosity at the LHC experiments. Our calculated damage levels provide a very important input on how close to the beam these collimators can be operated without risk of damage. The results of this approach have been used already to push further the performance of the present machine. The risk of damage is even higher in the upgraded high-luminosity LHC with higher beam intensity, for which we quantify existing margins before equipment damage for the proposed baseline settings.

  16. Modeling of beam-induced damage of the LHC tertiary collimators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, E.; Bertarelli, A.; Bruce, R.; Carra, F.; Cerutti, F.; Lechner, A.; Redaelli, S.; Skordis, E.; Gradassi, P.

    2017-09-01

    Modern hadron machines with high beam intensity may suffer from material damage in the case of large beam losses and even beam-intercepting devices, such as collimators, can be harmed. A systematic method to evaluate thresholds of damage owing to the impact of high energy particles is therefore crucial for safe operation and for predicting possible limitations in the overall machine performance. For this, a three-step simulation approach is presented, based on tracking simulations followed by calculations of energy deposited in the impacted material and hydrodynamic simulations to predict the thermomechanical effect of the impact. This approach is applied to metallic collimators at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which in standard operation intercept halo protons, but risk to be damaged in the case of extraction kicker malfunction. In particular, tertiary collimators protect the aperture bottlenecks, their settings constrain the reach in β* and hence the achievable luminosity at the LHC experiments. Our calculated damage levels provide a very important input on how close to the beam these collimators can be operated without risk of damage. The results of this approach have been used already to push further the performance of the present machine. The risk of damage is even higher in the upgraded high-luminosity LHC with higher beam intensity, for which we quantify existing margins before equipment damage for the proposed baseline settings.

  17. On the need for data for the verification of service life models for frost damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geiker, Mette Rica; Engelund, Sven

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to draw the attention to the need for the verification of service life models for frost attack on concrete and the collection of relevant data. To illustrate the type of data needed the paper presents models for internal freeze/thaw damage (internal cracking including...

  18. A 3D multilevel model of damage and strength of wood: Analysis of microstructural effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2011-01-01

    A 3D hierarchical computational model of damage and strength of wood is developed. The model takes into account the four scale microstructures of wood, including the microfibril reinforced structure at nanoscale, multilayered cell walls at microscale, hexagon-shape-tube cellular structure...

  19. Towards the damage evaluation using Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model for hot forming processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Muhammad; Bambach, Markus

    2018-05-01

    In the production of semi-finished metal products, hot forming is used to eliminate the pores and voids from the casting process under compres