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Sample records for damage mechanics model

  1. Incorporating damage mechanics into explosion simulation models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sammis, C.G.

    1993-01-01

    The source region of an underground explosion is commonly modeled as a nested series of shells. In the innermost open-quotes hydrodynamic regimeclose quotes pressures and temperatures are sufficiently high that the rock deforms as a fluid and may be described using a PVT equation of state. Just beyond the hydrodynamic regime, is the open-quotes non-linear regimeclose quotes in which the rock has shear strength but the deformation is nonlinear. This regime extends out to the open-quotes elastic radiusclose quotes beyond which the deformation is linear. In this paper, we develop a model for the non-linear regime in crystalline source rock where the nonlinearity is mostly due to fractures. We divide the non-linear regime into a open-quotes damage regimeclose quotes in which the stresses are sufficiently high to nucleate new fractures from preexisting ones and a open-quotes crack-slidingclose quotes regime where motion on preexisting cracks produces amplitude dependent attenuation and other non-linear effects, but no new cracks are nucleated. The boundary between these two regimes is called the open-quotes damage radius.close quotes The micromechanical damage mechanics recently developed by Ashby and Sammis (1990) is used to write an analytic expression for the damage radius in terms of the initial fracture spectrum of the source rock, and to develop an algorithm which may be used to incorporate damage mechanics into computer source models for the damage regime. Effects of water saturation and loading rate are also discussed

  2. Numerical Modelling and Damage Assessment of Rotary Wing Aircraft Cabin Door Using Continuum Damage Mechanics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyina, Gangadhara Rao T.; Rayavarapu, Vijaya Kumar; V. V., Subba Rao

    2017-02-01

    The prediction of ultimate strength remains the main challenge in the simulation of the mechanical response of composite structures. This paper examines continuum damage model to predict the strength and size effects for deformation and failure response of polymer composite laminates when subjected to complex state of stress. The paper also considers how the overall results of the exercise can be applied in design applications. The continuum damage model is described and the resulting prediction of size effects are compared against the standard benchmark solutions. The stress analysis for strength prediction of rotary wing aircraft cabin door is carried out. The goal of this study is to extend the proposed continuum damage model such that it can be accurately predict the failure around stress concentration regions. The finite element-based continuum damage mechanics model can be applied to the structures and components of arbitrary configurations where analytical solutions could not be developed.

  3. A Plastic Damage Mechanics Model for Engineered Cementitious Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dick-Nielsen, Lars; Stang, Henrik; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses the establishment of a plasticity-based damage mechanics model for Engineered Cementitious Composites (ECC). The present model differs from existing models by combining a matrix and fiber description in order to describe the behavior of the ECC material. The model provides...

  4. Two-scale modelling for hydro-mechanical damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frey, J.; Chambon, R.; Dascalu, C.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Excavation works for underground storage create a damage zone for the rock nearby and affect its hydraulics properties. This degradation, already observed by laboratory tests, can create a leading path for fluids. The micro fracture phenomenon, which occur at a smaller scale and affect the rock permeability, must be fully understood to minimize the transfer process. Many methods can be used in order to take into account the microstructure of heterogeneous materials. Among them a method has been developed recently. Instead of using a constitutive equation obtained by phenomenological considerations or by some homogenization techniques, the representative elementary volume (R.E.V.) is modelled as a structure and the links between a prescribed kinematics and the corresponding dual forces are deduced numerically. This yields the so called Finite Element square method (FE2). In a numerical point of view, a finite element model is used at the macroscopic level, and for each Gauss point, computations on the microstructure gives the usual results of a constitutive law. This numerical approach is now classical in order to properly model some materials such as composites and the efficiency of such numerical homogenization process has been shown, and allows numerical modelling of deformation processes associated with various micro-structural changes. The aim of this work is to describe trough such a method, damage of the rock with a two scale hydro-mechanical model. The rock damage at the macroscopic scale is directly link with an analysis on the microstructure. At the macroscopic scale a two phase's problem is studied. A solid skeleton is filled up by a filtrating fluid. It is necessary to enforce two balance equation and two mass conservation equations. A classical way to deal with such a problem is to work with the balance equation of the whole mixture, and the mass fluid conservation written in a weak form, the mass

  5. Micro-mechanics based damage mechanics for 3D Orthogonal Woven Composites: Experiment and Numerical Modelling

    KAUST Repository

    Saleh, Mohamed Nasr

    2016-01-08

    Damage initiation and evolution of three-dimensional (3D) orthogonal woven carbon fibre composite (3DOWC) is investigated experimentally and numerically. Meso-scale homogenisation of the representative volume element (RVE) is utilised to predict the elastic properties, simulate damage initiation and evolution when loaded in tension. The effect of intra-yarns transverse cracking and shear diffused damage on the in-plane transverse modulus and shear modulus is investigated while one failure criterion is introduced to simulate the matrix damage. The proposed model is based on two major assumptions. First, the effect of the binder yarns, on the in-plane properties, is neglected, so the 3DOWC unit cell can be approximated as a (0o/90o) cross-ply laminate. Second, a micro-mechanics based damage approach is used at the meso-scale, so damage indicators can be correlated, explicitly, to the density of cracks within the material. Results from the simulated RVE are validated against experimental results along the warp (0o direction) and weft (90o direction). This approach paves the road for more predictive models as damage evolution laws are obtained from micro mechanical considerations and rely on few well-defined material parameters. This largely differs from classical damage mechanics approaches in which the evolution law is obtained by retrofitting experimental observations.

  6. Micro-mechanics based damage mechanics for 3D Orthogonal Woven Composites: Experiment and Numerical Modelling

    KAUST Repository

    Saleh, Mohamed Nasr; Lubineau, Gilles; Potluri, Prasad; Withers, Philip; Soutis, Constantinos

    2016-01-01

    Damage initiation and evolution of three-dimensional (3D) orthogonal woven carbon fibre composite (3DOWC) is investigated experimentally and numerically. Meso-scale homogenisation of the representative volume element (RVE) is utilised to predict the elastic properties, simulate damage initiation and evolution when loaded in tension. The effect of intra-yarns transverse cracking and shear diffused damage on the in-plane transverse modulus and shear modulus is investigated while one failure criterion is introduced to simulate the matrix damage. The proposed model is based on two major assumptions. First, the effect of the binder yarns, on the in-plane properties, is neglected, so the 3DOWC unit cell can be approximated as a (0o/90o) cross-ply laminate. Second, a micro-mechanics based damage approach is used at the meso-scale, so damage indicators can be correlated, explicitly, to the density of cracks within the material. Results from the simulated RVE are validated against experimental results along the warp (0o direction) and weft (90o direction). This approach paves the road for more predictive models as damage evolution laws are obtained from micro mechanical considerations and rely on few well-defined material parameters. This largely differs from classical damage mechanics approaches in which the evolution law is obtained by retrofitting experimental observations.

  7. From fracture mechanics to damage mechanics: how to model structural deterioration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolet, S.; Lorentz, E.; Barbier, G.

    1998-01-01

    Modelling of structural deteriorations of thermo-mechanical origin is highly enhanced when using damage mechanics. Indeed, the latter offers both a fine description of the material behaviour and an ability to deal with any loading conditions, moving away the current limits of fracture mechanics. But new difficulties can arise, depending on the examined problem: if forecasts of rack initiation are well mastered, the study of crack propagation remains more complex and needs sophisticated modelizations, which are nevertheless on the point of being well understood too. (authors)

  8. Modeling Lightning Impact Thermo-Mechanical Damage on Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Raúl; Delgado, Sofía; González, Carlos; López-Romano, Bernardo; Wang, De-Yi; LLorca, Javier

    2014-02-01

    Carbon fiber-reinforced polymers, used in primary structures for aircraft due to an excellent strength-to-weight ratio when compared with conventional aluminium alloy counterparts, may nowadays be considered as mature structural materials. Their use has been extended in recent decades, with several aircraft manufacturers delivering fuselages entirely manufactured with carbon composites and using advanced processing technologies. However, one of the main drawbacks of using such composites entails their poor electrical conductivity when compared with aluminium alloy competitors that leads to lightning strikes being considered a significant threat during the service life of the aircraft. Traditionally, this problem was overcome with the use of a protective copper/bronze mesh that added additional weight and reduced the effectiveness of use of the material. Moreover, this traditional sizing method is based on vast experimental campaigns carried out by subjecting composite panels to simulated lightning strike events. While this method has proven its validity, and is necessary for certification of the structure, it may be optimized with the aid provided by physically based numerical models. This paper presents a model based on the finite element method that includes the sources of damage observed in a lightning strike, such as thermal damage caused by Joule overheating and electromagnetic/acoustic pressures induced by the arc around the attachment points. The results of the model are compared with lightning strike experiments carried out in a carbon woven composite.

  9. Two scale damage model and related numerical issues for thermo-mechanical high cycle fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desmorat, R.; Kane, A.; Seyedi, M.; Sermage, J.P.

    2007-01-01

    On the idea that fatigue damage is localized at the microscopic scale, a scale smaller than the mesoscopic one of the Representative Volume Element (RVE), a three-dimensional two scale damage model has been proposed for High Cycle Fatigue applications. It is extended here to aniso-thermal cases and then to thermo-mechanical fatigue. The modeling consists in the micro-mechanics analysis of a weak micro-inclusion subjected to plasticity and damage embedded in an elastic meso-element (the RVE of continuum mechanics). The consideration of plasticity coupled with damage equations at micro-scale, altogether with Eshelby-Kroner localization law, allows to compute the value of microscopic damage up to failure for any kind of loading, 1D or 3D, cyclic or random, isothermal or aniso-thermal, mechanical, thermal or thermo-mechanical. A robust numerical scheme is proposed in order to make the computations fast. A post-processor for damage and fatigue (DAMAGE-2005) has been developed. It applies to complex thermo-mechanical loadings. Examples of the representation by the two scale damage model of physical phenomena related to High Cycle Fatigue are given such as the mean stress effect, the non-linear accumulation of damage. Examples of thermal and thermo-mechanical fatigue as well as complex applications on real size testing structure subjected to thermo-mechanical fatigue are detailed. (authors)

  10. Numerical modelling of ductile damage mechanics coupled with an unconventional plasticity model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Fincato

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ductility in metals includes the material’s capability to tolerate plastic deformations before partial or total degradation of its mechanical properties. Modelling this parameter is important in structure and component design because it can be used to estimate material failure under a generic multi-axial stress state. Previous work has attempted to provide accurate descriptions of the mechanical property degradation resulting from the formation, growth, and coalescence of microvoids in the medium. Experimentally, ductile damage is inherently linked with the accumulation of plastic strain; therefore, coupling damage and elastoplasticity is necessary for describing this phenomenon accurately. In this paper, we combine the approach proposed by Lemaitre with the features of an unconventional plasticity model, the extended subloading surface model, to predict material fatigue even for loading conditions below the yield stress

  11. A coupled mechanical and chemical damage model for concrete affected by alkali–silica reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pignatelli, Rossella, E-mail: rossellapignatelli@gmail.com [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Lombardi Ingegneria S.r.l., Via Giotto 36, 20145 Milano (Italy); Comi, Claudia, E-mail: comi@stru.polimi.it [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Monteiro, Paulo J.M., E-mail: monteiro@ce.berkeley.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    To model the complex degradation phenomena occurring in concrete affected by alkali–silica reaction (ASR), we formulate a poro-mechanical model with two isotropic internal variables: the chemical and the mechanical damage. The chemical damage, related to the evolution of the reaction, is caused by the pressure generated by the expanding ASR gel on the solid concrete skeleton. The mechanical damage describes the strength and stiffness degradation induced by the external loads. As suggested by experimental results, degradation due to ASR is considered to be localized around reactive sites. The effect of the degree of saturation and of the temperature on the reaction development is also modeled. The chemical damage evolution is calibrated using the value of the gel pressure estimated by applying the electrical diffuse double-layer theory to experimental values of the surface charge density in ASR gel specimens reported in the literature. The chemo-damage model is first validated by simulating expansion tests on reactive specimens and beams; the coupled chemo-mechanical damage model is then employed to simulate compression and flexure tests results also taken from the literature. -- Highlights: •Concrete degradation due to ASR in variable environmental conditions is modeled. •Two isotropic internal variables – chemical and mechanical damage – are introduced. •The value of the swelling pressure is estimated by the diffuse double layer theory. •A simplified scheme is proposed to relate macro- and microscopic properties. •The chemo-mechanical damage model is validated by simulating tests in literature.

  12. Modelling of the mechanical behaviour and damage of clay-stones: application to the East argillite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aublive-Conil, N.

    2003-03-01

    The storage in deep geological formation is one of the solutions retained by France for the management of highly long life radioactive waste. The retained host rock is a clay-stone named East argillite located in the departments of Meuse and Haute-Marne. A thermodynamic formulation is used to propose a rheological model, which reproduces the mechanical behavior of clay-stones. Initially, an anisotropic damage plastic model was formulated in order to describe material degradations. Then, the damage plastic model is reformulated in order to taken into account the damage influence on the hydraulic behavior of porous material. The numerical simulations correctly reproduce the mechanical behavior of East Argillites but also the anisotropy of the hydraulic behavior introduced by the damage effect. (author)

  13. Model-Based Fatigue Prognosis of Fiber-Reinforced Laminates Exhibiting Concurrent Damage Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbetta, M.; Sbarufatti, C.; Saxena, A.; Giglio, M.; Goebel, K.

    2016-01-01

    Prognostics of large composite structures is a topic of increasing interest in the field of structural health monitoring for aerospace, civil, and mechanical systems. Along with recent advancements in real-time structural health data acquisition and processing for damage detection and characterization, model-based stochastic methods for life prediction are showing promising results in the literature. Among various model-based approaches, particle-filtering algorithms are particularly capable in coping with uncertainties associated with the process. These include uncertainties about information on the damage extent and the inherent uncertainties of the damage propagation process. Some efforts have shown successful applications of particle filtering-based frameworks for predicting the matrix crack evolution and structural stiffness degradation caused by repetitive fatigue loads. Effects of other damage modes such as delamination, however, are not incorporated in these works. It is well established that delamination and matrix cracks not only co-exist in most laminate structures during the fatigue degradation process but also affect each other's progression. Furthermore, delamination significantly alters the stress-state in the laminates and accelerates the material degradation leading to catastrophic failure. Therefore, the work presented herein proposes a particle filtering-based framework for predicting a structure's remaining useful life with consideration of multiple co-existing damage-mechanisms. The framework uses an energy-based model from the composite modeling literature. The multiple damage-mode model has been shown to suitably estimate the energy release rate of cross-ply laminates as affected by matrix cracks and delamination modes. The model is also able to estimate the reduction in stiffness of the damaged laminate. This information is then used in the algorithms for life prediction capabilities. First, a brief summary of the energy-based damage model

  14. Analysis of Fatigue Life of PMMA at Different Frequencies Based on a New Damage Mechanics Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aifeng Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Low-cycle fatigue tests at different frequencies and creep tests under different stress levels of Plexiglas Resist 45 were conducted. Correspondingly, the creep fracture time, S-N curves, cyclic creep, and hysteresis loop were obtained. These results showed that the fatigue life increases with frequency at low frequency domain. After analysis, it was found that fatigue life is dependent on the load rate and is affected by the creep damage. In addition, a new continuum damage mechanics (CDM model was established to analyze creep-fatigue life, where the damage increment nonlinear summation rule was proposed and the frequency modification was made on the fatigue damage evolution equation. Differential evolution (DE algorithm was employed to determine the parameters within the model. The proposed model described fatigue life under different frequencies, and the calculated results agreed well with the experimental results.

  15. Failure Mechanisms and Damage Model of Ductile Cast Iron Under Low-Cycle Fatigue Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xijia; Quan, Guangchun; MacNeil, Ryan; Zhang, Zhong; Sloss, Clayton

    2014-10-01

    Strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue (LCF) tests were conducted on ductile cast iron (DCI) at strain rates of 0.02, 0.002, and 0.0002/s in the temperature range from room temperature to 1073 K (800 °C). A constitutive-damage model was developed within the integrated creep-fatigue theory (ICFT) framework on the premise of strain decomposition into rate-independent plasticity and time-dependent creep. Four major damage mechanisms: (i) plasticity-induced fatigue, (ii) intergranular embrittlement (IE), (iii) creep, and (iv) oxidation were considered in a nonlinear creep-fatigue interaction model which represents the overall damage accumulation process consisting of oxidation-assisted fatigue crack nucleation and propagation in coalescence with internally distributed damage ( e.g., IE and creep), leading to final fracture. The model was found to agree with the experimental observations of the complex DCI-LCF phenomena, for which the linear damage summation rule would fail.

  16. Continuum Damage Mechanics Models for the Analysis of Progressive Failure in Open-Hole Tension Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kyonchan; Li, Yingyong; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    The performance of a state-of-the-art continuum damage mechanics model for interlaminar damage, coupled with a cohesive zone model for delamination is examined for failure prediction of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates. Limitations of continuum representations of intra-ply damage and the effect of mesh orientation on the analysis predictions are discussed. It is shown that accurate prediction of matrix crack paths and stress redistribution after cracking requires a mesh aligned with the fiber orientation. Based on these results, an aligned mesh is proposed for analysis of the open-hole tension specimens consisting of different meshes within the individual plies, such that the element edges are aligned with the ply fiber direction. The modeling approach is assessed by comparison of analysis predictions to experimental data for specimen configurations in which failure is dominated by complex interactions between matrix cracks and delaminations. It is shown that the different failure mechanisms observed in the tests are well predicted. In addition, the modeling approach is demonstrated to predict proper trends in the effect of scaling on strength and failure mechanisms of quasi-isotropic open-hole tension laminates.

  17. Oxidative Damage and Cellular Defense Mechanisms in Sea Urchin Models of Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Colin; Anderson, Arielle; Lortie, Mae; Parsons, Rachel; Bodnar, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    The free radical or oxidative stress theory of aging proposes that the accumulation of oxidative cellular damage is a major contributor to the aging process and a key determinant of species longevity. This study investigates the oxidative stress theory in a novel model for aging research, the sea urchin. Sea urchins present a unique model for the study of aging due to the existence of species with tremendously different natural life spans including some species with extraordinary longevity and negligible senescence. Cellular oxidative damage, antioxidant capacity and proteasome enzyme activities were measured in the tissues of three sea urchin species: short-lived Lytechinus variegatus, long-lived Strongylocentrotus franciscanus and Strongylocentrotus purpuratus which has an intermediate lifespan. Levels of protein carbonyls and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) measured in tissues (muscle, nerve, esophagus, gonad, coelomocytes, ampullae) and 8-hydroxy-2’-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) measured in cell-free coelomic fluid showed no general increase with age. The fluorescent age-pigment lipofuscin measured in muscle, nerve and esophagus, increased with age however it appeared to be predominantly extracellular. Antioxidant mechanisms (total antioxidant capacity, superoxide dismutase) and proteasome enzyme activities were maintained with age. In some instances, levels of oxidative damage were lower and antioxidant activity higher in cells or tissues of the long-lived species compared to the short-lived species, however further studies are required to determine the relationship between oxidative damage and longevity in these animals. Consistent with the predictions of the oxidative stress theory of aging, the results suggest that negligible senescence is accompanied by a lack of accumulation of cellular oxidative damage with age and maintenance of antioxidant capacity and proteasome enzyme activities may be important mechanisms to mitigate damage. PMID:23707327

  18. Failure Predictions for VHTR Core Components using a Probabilistic Contiuum Damage Mechanics Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fok, Alex

    2013-10-30

    The proposed work addresses the key research need for the development of constitutive models and overall failure models for graphite and high temperature structural materials, with the long-term goal being to maximize the design life of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). To this end, the capability of a Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM) model, which has been used successfully for modeling fracture of virgin graphite, will be extended as a predictive and design tool for the core components of the very high- temperature reactor (VHTR). Specifically, irradiation and environmental effects pertinent to the VHTR will be incorporated into the model to allow fracture of graphite and ceramic components under in-reactor conditions to be modeled explicitly using the finite element method. The model uses a combined stress-based and fracture mechanics-based failure criterion, so it can simulate both the initiation and propagation of cracks. Modern imaging techniques, such as x-ray computed tomography and digital image correlation, will be used during material testing to help define the baseline material damage parameters. Monte Carlo analysis will be performed to address inherent variations in material properties, the aim being to reduce the arbitrariness and uncertainties associated with the current statistical approach. The results can potentially contribute to the current development of American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes for the design and construction of VHTR core components.

  19. Experimental verification of a progressive damage model for composite laminates based on continuum damage mechanics. M.S. Thesis Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Timothy William

    1994-01-01

    Progressive failure is a crucial concern when using laminated composites in structural design. Therefore the ability to model damage and predict the life of laminated composites is vital. The purpose of this research was to experimentally verify the application of the continuum damage model, a progressive failure theory utilizing continuum damage mechanics, to a toughened material system. Damage due to tension-tension fatigue was documented for the IM7/5260 composite laminates. Crack density and delamination surface area were used to calculate matrix cracking and delamination internal state variables, respectively, to predict stiffness loss. A damage dependent finite element code qualitatively predicted trends in transverse matrix cracking, axial splits and local stress-strain distributions for notched quasi-isotropic laminates. The predictions were similar to the experimental data and it was concluded that the continuum damage model provided a good prediction of stiffness loss while qualitatively predicting damage growth in notched laminates.

  20. A Continuum Damage Mechanics Model to Predict Kink-Band Propagation Using Deformation Gradient Tensor Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergan, Andrew C.; Leone, Frank A., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    A new model is proposed that represents the kinematics of kink-band formation and propagation within the framework of a mesoscale continuum damage mechanics (CDM) model. The model uses the recently proposed deformation gradient decomposition approach to represent a kink band as a displacement jump via a cohesive interface that is embedded in an elastic bulk material. The model is capable of representing the combination of matrix failure in the frame of a misaligned fiber and instability due to shear nonlinearity. In contrast to conventional linear or bilinear strain softening laws used in most mesoscale CDM models for longitudinal compression, the constitutive response of the proposed model includes features predicted by detailed micromechanical models. These features include: 1) the rotational kinematics of the kink band, 2) an instability when the peak load is reached, and 3) a nonzero plateau stress under large strains.

  1. 3D Progressive Damage Modeling for Laminated Composite Based on Crack Band Theory and Continuum Damage Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, John T.; Pineda, Evan J.; Ranatunga, Vipul; Smeltzer, Stanley S.

    2015-01-01

    A simple continuum damage mechanics (CDM) based 3D progressive damage analysis (PDA) tool for laminated composites was developed and implemented as a user defined material subroutine to link with a commercially available explicit finite element code. This PDA tool uses linear lamina properties from standard tests, predicts damage initiation with an easy-to-implement Hashin-Rotem failure criteria, and in the damage evolution phase, evaluates the degradation of material properties based on the crack band theory and traction-separation cohesive laws. It follows Matzenmiller et al.'s formulation to incorporate the degrading material properties into the damaged stiffness matrix. Since nonlinear shear and matrix stress-strain relations are not implemented, correction factors are used for slowing the reduction of the damaged shear stiffness terms to reflect the effect of these nonlinearities on the laminate strength predictions. This CDM based PDA tool is implemented as a user defined material (VUMAT) to link with the Abaqus/Explicit code. Strength predictions obtained, using this VUMAT, are correlated with test data for a set of notched specimens under tension and compression loads.

  2. Fracture mechanics model of stone comminution in ESWL and implications for tissue damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhandwalla, Murtuza; Sturtevant, Bradford

    2000-07-01

    Focused shock waves administered during extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL) cause stone fragmentation. The process of stone fragmentation is described in terms of a dynamic fracture process. As is characteristic of all brittle materials, fragmentation requires nucleation, growth and coalescence of flaws, caused by a tensile or shear stress. The mechanisms, operative in the stone, inducing these stresses have been identified as spall and compression-induced tensile microcracks, nucleating at pre-existing flaws. These mechanisms are driven by the lithotripter-generated shock wave and possibly also by cavitation effects in the surrounding fluid. In this paper, the spall mechanism has been analysed, using a cohesive-zone model for the material. The influence of shock wave parameters, and physical properties of stone, on stone comminution is described. The analysis suggests a potential means to exploit the difference between the stone and tissue physical properties, so as to make stone comminution more effective, without increasing tissue damage.

  3. Towards a Universal Calving Law: Modeling Ice Shelves Using Damage Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, M.; Bassis, J. N.; Price, S. F.; Lipscomb, W. H.

    2017-12-01

    Modeling iceberg calving from ice shelves and ice tongues is a particularly difficult problem in glaciology because of the wide range of observed calving rates. Ice shelves naturally calve large tabular icebergs at infrequent intervals, but may instead calve smaller bergs regularly or disintegrate due to hydrofracturing in warmer conditions. Any complete theory of iceberg calving in ice shelves must be able to generate realistic calving rate values depending on the magnitudes of the external forcings. Here we show that a simple damage evolution law, which represents crevasse distributions as a continuum field, produces reasonable estimates of ice shelf calving rates when added to the Community Ice Sheet Model (CISM). Our damage formulation is based on a linear stability analysis and depends upon the bulk stress and strain rate in the ice shelf, as well as the surface and basal melt rates. The basal melt parameter in our model enhances crevasse growth near the ice shelf terminus, leading to an increased iceberg production rate. This implies that increasing ocean temperatures underneath ice shelves will drive ice shelf retreat, as has been observed in the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas. We show that our model predicts broadly correct calving rates for ice tongues ranging in length from 10 km (Erebus) to over 100 km (Drygalski), by matching the computed steady state lengths to observations. In addition, we apply the model to idealized Antarctic ice shelves and show that we can also predict realistic ice shelf extents. Our damage mechanics model provides a promising, computationally efficient way to compute calving fluxes and links ice shelf stability to climate forcing.

  4. Creep Tests and Modeling Based on Continuum Damage Mechanics for T91 and T92 Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, J. P.; Tu, S. H.; Zhu, X. W.; Tan, L. J.; Hu, B.; Wang, Q.

    2017-12-01

    9-11%Cr ferritic steels play an important role in high-temperature and high-pressure boilers of advanced power plants. In this paper, a continuum damage mechanics (CDM)-based creep model was proposed to study the creep behavior of T91 and T92 steels at high temperatures. Long-time creep tests were performed for both steels under different conditions. The creep rupture data and creep curves obtained from creep tests were captured well by theoretical calculation based on the CDM model over a long creep time. It is shown that the developed model is able to predict creep data for the two ferritic steels accurately up to tens of thousands of hours.

  5. A coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-damage model for concrete subjected to moderate temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bary, B.; Carpentier, O. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DPC/SCCME/LECBA, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Ranc, G. [CEA VALRHO, DEN/DTEC/L2EC/LCEC, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze, (France); Durand, S. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DM2S/SEMT/LM2S, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France)

    2008-07-01

    This study focuses on the concrete behavior subjected to moderate temperatures, with a particular emphasis on the transient thermo-hydric stage. A simplified coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical model is developed with the assumption that the gaseous phase is composed uniquely of vapor. Estimations of the mechanical parameters, Biot coefficient and permeability as a function of damage and saturation degree are provided by applying effective-medium approximation schemes. The isotherm adsorption curves are supposed to depend upon both temperature and crack-induced porosity. The effects of damage and parameters linked to transfer (in particular the adsorption curves) on the concrete structure response in the transient phase of heating are then investigated and evaluated. To this aim, the model is applied to the simulation of concrete cylinders with height and diameter of 0.80 m subjected to heating rates of 0.1 and 10 degrees C/min up to 160 degrees C. The numerical results are analyzed, commented and compared with experimental ones in terms of water mass loss, temperatures and gas pressures evolutions. A numerical study indicates that some parameters have a greater influence on the results than others, and that certain coupling terms in the mass conservation equation of water may be neglected. (authors)

  6. A coupled carbonation-rust formation mechanical damage model for steel corrosion in reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Huyen; Bary, B.; L'Hostis, Valerie; DeLarrard, T.

    2014-01-01

    This paper aims at presenting a strategy to simulate the corrosion of steel reinforcement due to carbonation of concrete in atmospheric environment. We propose a model coupling drying, carbonation, diffusion of oxygen, formation of rust and mechanics to describe these phenomena. The rust layer is assumed to be composed of two sub-layers with different elastic modulus. An unstable layer with a low modulus (from 0.1 to 5 GPa) is located next to the transformed medium, and another more stable one with a higher modulus (from 100 to 150 GPa) at the interface with steel reinforcement. This model is applied to a numerical meso-structure composed of 4 phases: mortar matrix, randomly distributed aggregates, steel rebar and rust layers to underline the effect of aggregates on damage initiation and corresponding crack pattern of concrete cover. (authors)

  7. Relations between a micro-mechanical model and a damage model for ductile failure in shear

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo; Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2010-01-01

    Gurson type constitutive models that account for void growth to coalescence are not able to describe ductile fracture in simple shear, where there is no hydrostatic tension in the material. But recent micro-mechanical studies have shown that in shear the voids are flattened out to micro-cracks, w......Gurson type constitutive models that account for void growth to coalescence are not able to describe ductile fracture in simple shear, where there is no hydrostatic tension in the material. But recent micro-mechanical studies have shown that in shear the voids are flattened out to micro...

  8. micro-mechanical experimental investigation and modelling of strain and damage of argillaceous rocks under combined hydric and mechanical loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.

    2012-01-01

    The hydro-mechanical behavior of argillaceous rocks, which are possible host rocks for underground radioactive nuclear waste storage, is investigated by means of micro-mechanical experimental investigations and modellings. Strain fields at the micrometric scale of the composite structure of this rock, are measured by the combination of environmental scanning electron microscopy, in situ testing and digital image correlation technique. The evolution of argillaceous rocks under pure hydric loading is first investigated. The strain field is strongly heterogeneous and manifests anisotropy. The observed nonlinear deformation at high relative humidity (RH) is related not only to damage, but also to the nonlinear swelling of the clay mineral itself, controlled by different local mechanisms depending on RH. Irreversible deformations are observed during hydric cycles, as well as a network of microcracks located in the bulk of the clay matrix and/or at the inclusion-matrix interface. Second, the local deformation field of the material under combined hydric and mechanical loadings is quantified. Three types of deformation bands are evidenced under mechanical loading, either normal to stress direction (compaction), parallel (microcracking) or inclined (shear). Moreover, they are strongly controlled by the water content of the material: shear bands are in particular prone to appear at high RH states. In view of understanding the mechanical interactions a local scale, the material is modeled as a composite made of non-swelling elastic inclusions embedded in an elastic swelling clay matrix. The internal stress field induced by swelling strain incompatibilities between inclusions and matrix, as well as the overall deformation, is numerically computed at equilibrium but also during the transient stage associated with a moisture gradient. An analytical micro-mechanical model based on Eshelby's solution is proposed. In addition, 2D finite element computations are performed. Results

  9. RPV steel embrittlement: Damage modeling and micro-mechanics in an engineering perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabry, A; Walle, E V; Chaouadi, R; Wannijn, J P; Werstrepen, A; Puzzolante, J L; VanRansbeeck, T H; VandeVelde, J [Sofia Univ. (Bulgaria)

    1994-12-31

    A new, consolidated strategy for improved Light Water Reactor pressure vessel surveillance is proposed. The methodology includes statistical fracture mechanics and damage modeling, while taking maximum advantage of the data generated by conventional surveillance practices. Available reconstitution and miniaturization allow to implement such strategy with minimal material inventory. The themes of the paper are: general philosophy of Belgian surveillance R D program; ductile-brittle transition temperature by use of instrumented C{sub v} load-time traces; towards an enhanced surveillance practice by combined use of instrumented C{sub v} load-time traces and uniaxial tensile tests; constraint, size and strain rate effects for C{sub v} notch impact test. 109 refs., 27 figs.

  10. Numerical simulation of self-piercing riveting process (SRP using continuum damage mechanics modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Bonora

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The extended Bonora damage model was used to investigate joinability of materials in self-piercing riveting process. This updated model formulation accounts for void nucleation and growth process and shear-controlled damage which is critical for shear fracture sensitive materials. Potential joint configurations with dissimilar materials have been investigated computationally. In particular the possible combination of DP600 steel, which is widely used in the automotive industry, with AL2024-T351, which is known to show shear fracture sensitivity, and oxygen-free pure copper, which is known to fail by void nucleation and growth, have been investigated. Preliminary numerical simulation results indicate that the damage modelling is capable to discriminate potential criticalities occurring in the SPR joining process opening the possibility for process parameters optimization and screening of candidate materials for optimum joint

  11. A Micromechanics-Based Elastoplastic Damage Model for Rocks with a Brittle-Ductile Transition in Mechanical Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kun; Zhu, Qi-zhi; Chen, Liang; Shao, Jian-fu; Liu, Jian

    2018-06-01

    As confining pressure increases, crystalline rocks of moderate porosity usually undergo a transition in failure mode from localized brittle fracture to diffused damage and ductile failure. This transition has been widely reported experimentally for several decades; however, satisfactory modeling is still lacking. The present paper aims at modeling the brittle-ductile transition process of rocks under conventional triaxial compression. Based on quantitative analyses of experimental results, it is found that there is a quite satisfactory linearity between the axial inelastic strain at failure and the confining pressure prescribed. A micromechanics-based frictional damage model is then formulated using an associated plastic flow rule and a strain energy release rate-based damage criterion. The analytical solution to the strong plasticity-damage coupling problem is provided and applied to simulate the nonlinear mechanical behaviors of Tennessee marble, Indiana limestone and Jinping marble, each presenting a brittle-ductile transition in stress-strain curves.

  12. 3D constitutive model of anisotropic damage for unidirectional ply based on physical failure mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2010-01-01

    in a computational finite element framework, which is capable of predicting initial failure, subsequent progressive damage up to final collapse. Crack band model and viscous regularization are applied to depress the convergence difficulties associated with strain softening behaviours. To verify the accuracy...

  13. Bean grain hysteresis with induced mechanical damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata C. Campos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to evaluate the effect of mechanical damage on the hysteresis of beans with induced mechanical damage under different conditions of temperature and relative humidity. Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. harvested manually with 35% water content (w.b. were used. Part of this product was subjected to induced mechanical damage by Stein Breakage Tester and controlled drying (damaged and control sample, for sorption processes. The sorption isotherms of water were analyzed for different temperature conditions: 20, 30, 40 and 50 oC; and relative humidity: 0.3; 0.4; 0.5; 0.7 and 0.9 (decimal. Equilibrium moisture content data were correlated with six mathematical models, and the Modified Oswin model was the one that best fitted to the experimental data. According to the above mentioned isotherms, it was possible to observe the phenomenon of hysteresis of damaged and control samples, and this phenomenon was more pronounced in control ones.

  14. Modeling of the fracture behavior of spot welds using advanced micro-mechanical damage models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, Silke

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the modeling of deformation and fracture behavior of resistance spot welded joints in DP600 steel sheets. Spot welding is still the most commonly used joining technique in automotive engineering. In overloading situations like crash joints are often the weakest link in a structure. For those reasons, crash simulations need reliable and applicable tools to predict the load bearing capacity of spot welded components. Two series of component tests with different spot weld diameters have shown that the diameter of the weld nugget is the main influencing factor affecting fracture mode (interfacial or pull-out fracture), load bearing capacity and energy absorption. In order to find a correlation between nugget diameter, load bearing capacity and fracture mode, the spot welds are simulated with detailed finite element models containing base metal, heat affected zone and weld metal in lap-shear loading conditions. The change in fracture mode from interfacial to pull-out or peel-out fracture with growing nugget diameter under lap-shear loading was successfully modeled using the Gologanu-Leblond model in combination with the fracture criteria of Thomason and Embury. A small nugget diameter is identified to be the main cause for interfacial fracture. In good agreement with experimental observations, the calculated pull-out fracture initiates in the base metal at the boundary to the heat affected zone.

  15. Numerical study of the EDZ by a thermo-hydro-mechanical damage model dedicated to unsaturated geo-materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arson, Chloe; Gatmiri, Behrouz

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The design of deep nuclear waste repositories requires the modelling of the effects of thermal loadings in the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ). The containers are to be stored in bentonite buffers surrounded by a geological massif. These two barriers are multi-phase porous media, in which coupled mechanical, capillary and thermal phenomena occur. The aim of this study is to develop a new damage model dedicated to non-isothermal unsaturated porous media, the 'THHMD' model. Contrary to almost all of the existing damage models dedicated to non dry media, it is formulated in independent stress state variables (net stress, suction and thermal stress). The damage variable is a second-order tensor, which gives a good approximation for the representation of anisotropic cracking in three dimensions. The behaviour laws stem from the combination of phenomenological and micromechanical principles. The total strain tensor is split into three components, each of which being conjugated to a stress state variable. The Helmholtz free energy is written as the sum of damaged elastic energies and residual-strain-potentials. The concept of effective stress, frequently used in Continuum Damaged Mechanics, is extended to the three stress state variables, by using the operator of Cordebois and Sidoroff. The damaged rigidities are computed by application of the Principle of Equivalent Elastic Energy (PEEE). The non-elastic strain components depend on the increment of damage, which is determined by an associative flow rule. Fracturing is also modelled in the transfer equations. The Representative Elementary Volume (REV) is assumed to be damaged by a microcrack network, among which liquid water and vapour flows are homogenized. A damaged intrinsic conductivity, which plays the role of an internal length parameter, is introduced. The influence of damage on air and heat flows is taken into account by means of porosity, which is also

  16. Anisotropic creep damage in the framework of continuum damage mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caboche, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    For some years, various works have shown the possibility of applying continuum mechanics to model the evolution of the damage variable, initially introduced by Kachanov. Of interest here are the complex problems posed by the anisotropy which affects both the elastic behaviour and the viscoplastic one, and also the rupture phenomenon. The main concepts of the Continuum Damage Mechanics are briefly reviewed together with some classical ways to introduce anisotropy of damage in the particular case of proportional loadings. Based on previous works, two generalizations are presented and discussed, which use different kinds of tensors to describe the anisotropy of creep damage: - The first one, by Murakami and Ohno introduces a second rank damage tensor and a net stress tensor through a net area definition. The effective stress-strain behaviour is then obtained by a fourth rank tensor. - The second theory, by the author, uses one effective stress tensor only, defined in terms of the macroscopic strain behaviour, through a fourth-order non-symmetrical damage tensor. The two theories are compared at several levels: difference and similarities are pointed out for the damage evolution during tensile creep as well as for anisotropy effects. The possibilities are discussed and compared on the basis of some existing experimental results, which leads to a partial validation of the two approaches. (orig.)

  17. Objective thermo-hydro-mechanical modelling of the damaged zone around a radioactive waste storage site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinelli, Ferdinando

    2013-01-01

    We present two different approaches to describe the hydro-mechanical behaviour of geo-materials. In the first approach the porous media is studied through an equivalent continuum media where the interaction between the fluid and solid phases characterize the coupling behaviour at the macro-scale. We take into account this approach to model experimental tests performed over a hollow cylinder sample of clay rock (Boom Clay), considered for nuclear waste storage. The experimental results clearly show that the mechanical behaviour of the material is strongly anisotropic. For this reason we chose an elasto-plastic model based on Drucker-Prager criterion where the elastic part is characterized by cross anisotropy. The numerical results of boundary value problem clearly show localised strains around the inner hollow section. In order to regularize the numerical problem we consider a second gradient local continuum media with an enriched kinematic where an internal length can be introduced making the results mesh independent. The uniqueness study is carried out showing that changing the temporal discretization of the problem leads to different solutions. In the second approach we study the hydro-mechanical behaviour of a porous media that it is characterised by the microstructure of the material. The microstructure taken into account is composed by elastic grains, cohesive interfaces and a network of fluid channels. Using a periodic media a numerical homogenization (square finite element method) is considered to compute mass flux, stress and density of the mixture. In this way a pure numerical constitutive law is built from the microstructure of the media. This method has been implemented into a finite element code (Lagamine, Universite de Liege) to obtain results at the macro-scale. A validation of this implementation is performed for a pure mechanical boundary value problem and for a hydro-mechanical one. (author)

  18. Modeling of damage generation mechanisms in silicon at energies below the displacement threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Ivan; Marques, Luis A.; Pelaz, Lourdes

    2006-01-01

    We have used molecular dynamics simulation techniques to study the generation of damage in Si within the low-energy deposition regime. We have demonstrated that energy transfers below the displacement threshold can produce a significant amount of damage, usually neglected in traditional radiation damage calculations. The formation of amorphous pockets agrees with the thermal spike concept of local melting. However, we have found that the order-disorder transition is not instantaneous, but it requires some time to reach the appropriate kinetic-potential energy redistribution for melting. The competition between the rate of this energy redistribution and the energy diffusion to the surrounding atoms determines the amount of damage generated by a given deposited energy. Our findings explain the diverse damage morphology produced by ions of different masses

  19. Ductile damage in aluminium alloy thin sheets: Correlation between micro-tomography observations and mechanical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thuillier, S.; Maire, E.; Brunet, M.

    2012-01-01

    This work deals with the characterization of ductile damage in an aluminium alloy AA6016-T4 by X-ray micro-tomography, as a function of anisotropy and triaxiality. Interrupted tensile tests on notched samples with three different geometries were performed and the void volume fraction was measured for different strain values, up to rupture. It was shown that void volume fraction evolution with the strain is rather similar at 0° and 90° to RD but at 45° to RD it shows a more rapid evolution. Moreover, for the same strain level, a higher void volume fraction was recorded for a higher triaxiality ratio. Whatever the orientation and the stress triaxiality ratio, void volume fraction values range from 5×10 −4 up to 0.04. A numerical model based on Gurson–Tvergaard–Needleman constitutive equations was used to simulate the different tests. Hardening of the material was identified from macroscopic tensile test nucleation material parameters were identified by a direct method from void volume fraction evolution. It can be seen that the influence of triaxiality on void volume fraction is underestimated, though void growth is nicely predicted for the highest triaxiality ratio, for strains below 0.5. The load level was correctly predicted, except for high strain, where coalescence seems necessary to be taken into account.

  20. Recent trends in fracture and damage mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zybell, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    This book covers a wide range of topics in fracture and damage mechanics. It presents historical perspectives as well as recent innovative developments, presented by peer reviewed contributions from internationally acknowledged authors.  The volume deals with the modeling of fracture and damage in smart materials, current industrial applications of fracture mechanics, and it explores advances in fracture testing methods. In addition, readers will discover trends in the field of local approach to fracture and approaches using analytical mechanics. Scholars in the fields of materials science, engineering and computational science will value this volume which is dedicated to Meinhard Kuna on the occasion of his 65th birthday in 2015. This book incorporates the proceedings of an international symposium that was organized to honor Meinhard Kuna’s contributions to the field of theoretical and applied fracture and damage mechanics.

  1. Modelling of pavement materials on steel decks using the five-point bending test: Thermo mechanical evolution and fatigue damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnaud, L; Houel, A

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the modelling of wearing courses on steel orthotropic decks such as the Millau viaduct in France. This is of great importance when dealing with durability: due to the softness of such a support, the pavement is subjected to considerable strains that may generate top-down cracks in the layer at right angles of the orthotropic plate stiffeners and shear cracks at the interface between pavement and steel. Therefore, a five-point bending fatigue test was developed and improved since 2003 at the ENTPE laboratory, to test different asphalt concrete mixes. This study aims at modelling the mechanical behavior of the wearing course throughout the fatigue test by a finite element method (Comsol Multiphysics software). Each material - steel, sealing sheet, asphalt concrete layer - is considered and modelled. The modelling of asphalt concrete is complex since it is a heterogeneous material, a viscoelastic medium and it thermosensitive. The actual characteristics of the asphalt concrete (thermo physical parameter and viscoelastic complex modulus) are determined experimentally on cylindrical cores. Moreover, a damage law based on Miner's damage is included in the model. The modelling of the fatigue test leads to encouraging results. Finally, results from the model are compared to the experimental data obtained from the five-point bending fatigue test device. The experimental data are very consistent with the numerical simulation.

  2. Modelling of thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings and damage of viscoplastic rocks in the context of radioactive waste storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharkhour, H.

    2002-12-01

    Trying to develop a model taking into account the complex rheology of a geologic media characterized by visco-plasticity, damage and thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings is unusual in geotechnics. This is not the case for radioactive waste storage that presents specificities from several viewpoints. Indeed, the scales of time and space concerned by this type of storage are disproportionate to those of civil engineering works or mines. Another specificity of the radioactive waste storage lies in the coupled processes involved. No effect likely to compromise the long-term security of the storage could be ignored. For example this is the case of damage, a phenomenon which does not necessarily lead to a major change of the mechanical behavior of the works but can influence the permeability of the medium in relation with a migration of radionuclides. It can be conceived that this phenomenon finds all its importance in the context of the thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings of a waste storage with high activity. However, the interaction between the damage and the THM coupled processes was the object of very few research subject up to now. This. is even more true for viscoplastic media considered as ductile, and therefore, less prone to cracking than brittle media. It is exactly in this 'original' but difficult context that took place the research presented in this report. This study was dedicated to the analysis of the phenomena and the thermal, hydraulic and mechanical couplings occurring in the near and far field of a high activity radioactive waste storage. Two examples of geological media were considered in this report: the clayey rock of Callovo-Oxfordian, called ' Argilites de l'Est ', target rock of the ANDRA project to carry out a subterranean laboratory for the study of long life radioactive waste storage; and the salt rock of the. subterranean laboratory in the old salt mine of Asse in Germany. (author)

  3. Modeling of combined physical-mechanical moisture induced damage in asphaltic mixes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kringos, N.

    2007-01-01

    Moisture induced damage in asphaltic mixes is recognized as a major issue, resulting to the need for frequent maintenance operations. This does not only imply high maintenance costs, but also temporary closure of traffic and hence increased road congestion. Given the high costs for the road

  4. Application of a Microstructure-Based ISV Plasticity Damage Model to Study Penetration Mechanics of Metals and Validation through Penetration Study of Aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangqing Dou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A developed microstructure-based internal state variable (ISV plasticity damage model is for the first time used for simulating penetration mechanics of aluminum to find out its penetration properties. The ISV damage model tries to explain the interplay between physics at different length scales that governs the failure and damage mechanisms of materials by linking the macroscopic failure and damage behavior of the materials with their micromechanical performance, such as void nucleation, growth, and coalescence. Within the continuum modeling framework, microstructural features of materials are represented using a set of ISVs, and rate equations are employed to depict damage history and evolution of the materials. For experimental calibration of this damage model, compression, tension, and torsion straining conditions are considered to distinguish damage evolutions under different stress states. To demonstrate the reliability of the presented ISV model, that model is applied for studying penetration mechanics of aluminum and the numerical results are validated by comparing with simulation results yielded from the Johnson-Cook model as well as analytical results calculated from an existing theoretical model.

  5. Achilles tendons from decorin- and biglycan-null mouse models have inferior mechanical and structural properties predicted by an image-based empirical damage model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, J A; Freedman, B R; Zuskov, A; Iozzo, R V; Birk, D E; Soslowsky, L J

    2015-07-16

    Achilles tendons are a common source of pain and injury, and their pathology may originate from aberrant structure function relationships. Small leucine rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) influence mechanical and structural properties in a tendon-specific manner. However, their roles in the Achilles tendon have not been defined. The objective of this study was to evaluate the mechanical and structural differences observed in mouse Achilles tendons lacking class I SLRPs; either decorin or biglycan. In addition, empirical modeling techniques based on mechanical and image-based measures were employed. Achilles tendons from decorin-null (Dcn(-/-)) and biglycan-null (Bgn(-/-)) C57BL/6 female mice (N=102) were used. Each tendon underwent a dynamic mechanical testing protocol including simultaneous polarized light image capture to evaluate both structural and mechanical properties of each Achilles tendon. An empirical damage model was adapted for application to genetic variation and for use with image based structural properties to predict tendon dynamic mechanical properties. We found that Achilles tendons lacking decorin and biglycan had inferior mechanical and structural properties that were age dependent; and that simple empirical models, based on previously described damage models, were predictive of Achilles tendon dynamic modulus in both decorin- and biglycan-null mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Variable Ventilation Improved Respiratory System Mechanics and Ameliorated Pulmonary Damage in a Rat Model of Lung Ischemia-Reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soluri-Martins, André; Moraes, Lillian; Santos, Raquel S; Santos, Cintia L; Huhle, Robert; Capelozzi, Vera L; Pelosi, Paolo; Silva, Pedro L; de Abreu, Marcelo Gama; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2017-01-01

    Lung ischemia-reperfusion injury remains a major complication after lung transplantation. Variable ventilation (VV) has been shown to improve respiratory function and reduce pulmonary histological damage compared to protective volume-controlled ventilation (VCV) in different models of lung injury induced by endotoxin, surfactant depletion by saline lavage, and hydrochloric acid. However, no study has compared the biological impact of VV vs. VCV in lung ischemia-reperfusion injury, which has a complex pathophysiology different from that of other experimental models. Thirty-six animals were randomly assigned to one of two groups: (1) ischemia-reperfusion (IR), in which the left pulmonary hilum was completely occluded and released after 30 min; and (2) Sham, in which animals underwent the same surgical manipulation but without hilar clamping. Immediately after surgery, the left (IR-injured) and right (contralateral) lungs from 6 animals per group were removed, and served as non-ventilated group (NV) for molecular biology analysis. IR and Sham groups were further randomized to one of two ventilation strategies: VCV ( n = 6/group) [tidal volume (V T ) = 6 mL/kg, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) = 2 cmH 2 O, fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO 2 ) = 0.4]; or VV, which was applied on a breath-to-breath basis as a sequence of randomly generated V T values ( n = 1200; mean V T = 6 mL/kg), with a 30% coefficient of variation. After 5 min of ventilation and at the end of a 2-h period (Final), respiratory system mechanics and arterial blood gases were measured. At Final, lungs were removed for histological and molecular biology analyses. Respiratory system elastance and alveolar collapse were lower in VCV than VV (mean ± SD, VCV 3.6 ± 1.3 cmH 2 0/ml and 2.0 ± 0.8 cmH 2 0/ml, p = 0.005; median [interquartile range], VCV 20.4% [7.9-33.1] and VV 5.4% [3.1-8.8], p = 0.04, respectively). In left lungs of IR animals, VCV increased the expression of interleukin-6 and

  7. Variable Ventilation Improved Respiratory System Mechanics and Ameliorated Pulmonary Damage in a Rat Model of Lung Ischemia-Reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia R. M. Rocco

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Lung ischemia-reperfusion injury remains a major complication after lung transplantation. Variable ventilation (VV has been shown to improve respiratory function and reduce pulmonary histological damage compared to protective volume-controlled ventilation (VCV in different models of lung injury induced by endotoxin, surfactant depletion by saline lavage, and hydrochloric acid. However, no study has compared the biological impact of VV vs. VCV in lung ischemia-reperfusion injury, which has a complex pathophysiology different from that of other experimental models. Thirty-six animals were randomly assigned to one of two groups: (1 ischemia-reperfusion (IR, in which the left pulmonary hilum was completely occluded and released after 30 min; and (2 Sham, in which animals underwent the same surgical manipulation but without hilar clamping. Immediately after surgery, the left (IR-injured and right (contralateral lungs from 6 animals per group were removed, and served as non-ventilated group (NV for molecular biology analysis. IR and Sham groups were further randomized to one of two ventilation strategies: VCV (n = 6/group [tidal volume (VT = 6 mL/kg, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP = 2 cmH2O, fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2 = 0.4]; or VV, which was applied on a breath-to-breath basis as a sequence of randomly generated VT values (n = 1200; mean VT = 6 mL/kg, with a 30% coefficient of variation. After 5 min of ventilation and at the end of a 2-h period (Final, respiratory system mechanics and arterial blood gases were measured. At Final, lungs were removed for histological and molecular biology analyses. Respiratory system elastance and alveolar collapse were lower in VCV than VV (mean ± SD, VCV 3.6 ± 1.3 cmH20/ml and 2.0 ± 0.8 cmH20/ml, p = 0.005; median [interquartile range], VCV 20.4% [7.9–33.1] and VV 5.4% [3.1–8.8], p = 0.04, respectively. In left lungs of IR animals, VCV increased the expression of interleukin-6 and intercellular

  8. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    Several mechanisms are proposed for radiation damage to DNA and its constituents, and a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectrometry have been used to test the proposed mechanisms. In the past we have concentrated chiefly on investigating irradiated systems of DNA constituents. In this year's effort we have concentrated on radiation effects on DNA itself. In addition studies of radiation effects on lipids and model compounds have been performed which shed light on the only other proposed site for cell kill, the membrane

  9. Combined meso-scale modeling and experimental investigation of the effect of mechanical damage on the transport properties of cementitious composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Balaji; Niknezhad, Davood; Bernard, Fabrice; Kamali-Bernard, Siham

    2016-09-01

    The transport properties of cementitious composites such as concrete are important indicators of their durability, and are known to be heavily influenced by mechanical loading. In the current work, we use meso-scale hygro-mechanical modeling with a morphological 3D two phase mortar-aggregate model, in conjunction with experimentally obtained properties, to investigate the coupling between mechanical loading and damage and the permeability of the composite. The increase in permeability of a cylindrical test specimen at 28% aggregate fraction during a uniaxial displacement-controlled compression test at 85% of the peak load was measured using a gas permeameter. The mortar's mechanical behavior is assumed to follow the well-known compression damaged plasticity (CDP) model with isotropic damage, at varying thresholds, and obtained from different envelope curves. The damaged intrinsic permeability of the mortar evolves according to a logarithmic matching law with progressive loading. We fit the matching law parameters to the experimental result for the test specimen by inverse identification using our meso-scale model. We then subject a series of virtual composite specimens to quasi-static uniaxial compressive loading with varying boundary conditions to obtain the simulated damage and strain evolutions, and use the damage data and the previously identified parameters to determine the evolution of the macroscopic permeability tensor for the specimens, using a network model. We conduct a full parameter study by varying aggregate volume fraction, granulometric distribution, loading/boundary conditions and "matching law" parameters, as well as for different strain-damage thresholds and uniaxial loading envelope curves. Based on this study, we propose Avrami equation-based upper and lower bounds for the evolution of the damaged permeability of the composite.

  10. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1993-12-01

    In this project the author has proposed several mechanisms for radiation damage to DNA and its constituents, and has detailed a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectroscopy, HPLC, GC-mass spectroscopy and ab initio molecular orbital calculations to test the proposed mechanisms. In this years work he has completed several experiments on the role of hydration water on DNA radiation damage, continued the investigation of the localization of the initial charges and their reactions on DNA, investigated protonation reactions in DNA base anions, and employed ab initio molecular orbital theory to gain insight into the initial events of radiation damage to DNA. Ab initio calculations have provided an understanding of the energetics evolved in anion and cation formation, ion radical transfer in DNA as well as proton transfer with DNA base pair radical ions. This has been extended in this years work to a consideration of ionization energies of various components of the DNA deoxyribose backbone and resulting neutral sugar radicals. This information has aided the formation of new radiation models for the effect of radiation on DNA. During this fiscal year four articles have been published, four are in press, one is submitted and several more are in preparation. Four papers have been presented at scientific meetings. This years effort will include another review article on the open-quotes Electron Spin Resonance of Radiation Damage to DNAclose quotes

  11. Simulation of Intergranular Ductile Cracking in β Titanium Alloys Based on a Micro-Mechanical Damage Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Li, Jinshan; Tang, Bin; Fan, Jiangkun; Yuan, Huang

    2017-10-30

    The intergranular crack propagation of the lamellar structure β titanium alloys is investigated by using a modified Gurson-type damage model. The representative microstructure of the lamellar alloy, which consists of the soft α phase layer surrounding the hard grain interiors, is generated based on an advanced Voronoi algorithm. Both the normal fracture due to void growth and the shear fracture associated with void shearing are considered for the grain boundary α layer. The individual phase properties are determined according to the experimental nanoindentation result and the macroscopic stress-strain curve from a uni-axial tensile test. The effects of the strain hardening exponent of the grain interiors and the void shearing mechanism of the grain boundary α layer on fracture toughness and the intergranular crack growth behavior are emphatically studied. The computational predictions indicate that fracture toughness can be increased with increasing the strain hardening ability of the grain interiors and void shearing can be deleterious to fracture toughness. Based on the current simulation technique, qualitative understanding of relationships between the individual phase features and the fracture toughness of the lamellar alloys can be obtained, which provides useful suggestions to the heat treatment process of the β titanium alloys.

  12. [Mechanisms of electromagnetic radiation damaging male reproduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Lei; Chen, Hao-Yu; Wang, Shui-Ming

    2012-08-01

    More and more evidence from over 50 years of researches on the effects of electromagnetic radiation on male reproduction show that a certain dose of electromagnetic radiation obviously damages male reproduction, particularly the structure and function of spermatogenic cells. The mechanisms of the injury may be associated with energy dysmetabolism, lipid peroxidation, abnormal expressions of apoptosis-related genes and proteins, and DNA damage.

  13. A combination of experimental measurement, constitutive damage model, and diffusion tensor imaging to characterize the mechanical properties of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Alireza; Rahmati, Seyed Mohammadali; Razaghi, Reza

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the mechanical properties of the human brain is deemed important as it may subject to various types of complex loadings during the Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). Although many studies so far have been conducted to quantify the mechanical properties of the brain, there is a paucity of knowledge on the mechanical properties of the human brain tissue and the damage of its axon fibers under the various types of complex loadings during the Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI). Although many studies so far have been conducted to quantify the mechanical properties of the brain, there is a paucity of knowledge on the mechanical properties of the human brain tissue and the damage of its axon fibers under the frontal lobe of the human brain. The constrained nonlinear minimization method was employed to identify the brain coefficients according to the axial and transversal compressive data. The pseudo-elastic damage model data was also well compared with that of the experimental data and it not only up to the primary loading but also the discontinuous softening could well address the mechanical behavior of the brain tissue.

  14. Molecular mechanisms in radiation damage to DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, R.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this work are to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for radiation-induced DNA damage. The overall goal is to understand the relationship between the chemical and structural changes produced by ionizing radiation in DNA and the resulting impairment of biological function expressed as carcinogenesis or cell death. The studies are based on theoretical explorations of possible mechanisms that link initial radiation damage in the form of base and sugar damage to conformational changes in DNA. These mechanistic explorations should lead to the formulation of testable hypothesis regarding the processes of impairment of regulation of gene expression, alternation in DNA repair, and damage to DNA structure involved in cell death or cancer

  15. Molecular mechanism of ocular surface damage: application to an in vitro dry eye model on human corneal epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Marisa; De Servi, Barbara; Marasco, Daniela; Del Prete, Salvatore

    2011-01-12

    The present study was concerned with the development of a new experimental model of dry eye using human reconstructed in vitro corneal epithelium (HCE). The model is based on the use of adapted culture conditions that induce relevant modifications at the cellular and molecular level thus mimicking dry eye. The HCE model was maintained in a controlled environmental setting (relative humidity eye. The evolution of the dry eye condition was assessed by histology, immunohistochemistry staining, scanning electron microscopy, and gene expression by using TaqMan gene assay technology (mucin-4 [MUC4], matrix metallopeptidase-9 [MMP9], tumor necrosis factor-α [TNF-α], and defensin β-2 [DEFB2). The effects of different commercially available tear substitutes on the induced dry eye condition were tested. This in vitro dry eye HCE model, that was well established within 24 h, has the characteristic features of a dry eye epithelium and could be satisfactorily used for preliminary assessment of the protective activity of some artificial tears. The transcriptional study of selected biomarkers showed an increase in MUC4, MMP9, TNF-α, and hBD-2 (DEFB2) gene expression. By using a dynamic approach, we were able to define a biomarker gene signature of dry eye-induced effects that could be predictive of corneal damage in vivo and to discriminate the efficacy among different commercial artificial tears.

  16. Multivariate pluvial flood damage models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Ootegem, Luc; Verhofstadt, Elsy; Van Herck, Kristine; Creten, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Depth–damage-functions, relating the monetary flood damage to the depth of the inundation, are commonly used in the case of fluvial floods (floods caused by a river overflowing). We construct four multivariate damage models for pluvial floods (caused by extreme rainfall) by differentiating on the one hand between ground floor floods and basement floods and on the other hand between damage to residential buildings and damage to housing contents. We do not only take into account the effect of flood-depth on damage, but also incorporate the effects of non-hazard indicators (building characteristics, behavioural indicators and socio-economic variables). By using a Tobit-estimation technique on identified victims of pluvial floods in Flanders (Belgium), we take into account the effect of cases of reported zero damage. Our results show that the flood depth is an important predictor of damage, but with a diverging impact between ground floor floods and basement floods. Also non-hazard indicators are important. For example being aware of the risk just before the water enters the building reduces content damage considerably, underlining the importance of warning systems and policy in this case of pluvial floods. - Highlights: • Prediction of damage of pluvial floods using also non-hazard information • We include ‘no damage cases’ using a Tobit model. • The damage of flood depth is stronger for ground floor than for basement floods. • Non-hazard indicators are especially important for content damage. • Potential gain of policies that increase awareness of flood risks

  17. Multivariate pluvial flood damage models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Ootegem, Luc [HIVA — University of Louvain (Belgium); SHERPPA — Ghent University (Belgium); Verhofstadt, Elsy [SHERPPA — Ghent University (Belgium); Van Herck, Kristine; Creten, Tom [HIVA — University of Louvain (Belgium)

    2015-09-15

    Depth–damage-functions, relating the monetary flood damage to the depth of the inundation, are commonly used in the case of fluvial floods (floods caused by a river overflowing). We construct four multivariate damage models for pluvial floods (caused by extreme rainfall) by differentiating on the one hand between ground floor floods and basement floods and on the other hand between damage to residential buildings and damage to housing contents. We do not only take into account the effect of flood-depth on damage, but also incorporate the effects of non-hazard indicators (building characteristics, behavioural indicators and socio-economic variables). By using a Tobit-estimation technique on identified victims of pluvial floods in Flanders (Belgium), we take into account the effect of cases of reported zero damage. Our results show that the flood depth is an important predictor of damage, but with a diverging impact between ground floor floods and basement floods. Also non-hazard indicators are important. For example being aware of the risk just before the water enters the building reduces content damage considerably, underlining the importance of warning systems and policy in this case of pluvial floods. - Highlights: • Prediction of damage of pluvial floods using also non-hazard information • We include ‘no damage cases’ using a Tobit model. • The damage of flood depth is stronger for ground floor than for basement floods. • Non-hazard indicators are especially important for content damage. • Potential gain of policies that increase awareness of flood risks.

  18. Continuum Damage Mechanics A Continuum Mechanics Approach to the Analysis of Damage and Fracture

    CERN Document Server

    Murakami, Sumio

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in engineering and technology have brought about serious and enlarged demands for reliability, safety and economy in wide range of fields such as aeronautics, nuclear engineering, civil and structural engineering, automotive and production industry.  This, in turn, has caused more interest in continuum damage mechanics and its engineering applications.   This book aims to give a concise overview of the current state of damage mechanics, and then to show the fascinating possibility of this promising branch of mechanics, and to provide researchers, engineers and graduate students with an intelligible and self-contained textbook.   The book consists of two parts and an appendix.  Part I  is concerned with the foundation of continuum damage mechanics.  Basic concepts of material damage and the mechanical representation of damage state of various kinds are described in Chapters 1 and 2.  In Chapters 3-5, irreversible thermodynamics, thermodynamic constitutive theory and its application ...

  19. 3D characterization and modeling of low cycle fatigue damage mechanisms at high temperature in a cast aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezecot, Sebastien; Maurel, Vincent; Buffiere, Jean-Yves; Szmytka, Fabien; Koster, Alain

    2017-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray tomography was used to monitor damage evolution in three dimensions during in situ Low Cycle Fatigue (LCF) tests at high temperature (250 °C) for an industrial material. The studied material is an AlSi7Cu3Mg aluminum alloy (close to ASTM A319) produced by Lost Foam Casting (LFC), a process which generates coarse microstructures but is nevertheless used for engine parts by the automotive industry. The volume analysis (3D images) has shown that cracks are extremely sensitive to microstructural features: coarse pores and hard particles of the eutectic regions are critical regarding respectively the main crack initiation and the crack growth. Finite Elements (FE) simulations, performed on meshes directly generated from 3D volumes and containing only pores, have revealed that mechanical fields also play a major role on the crack behavior. Initiation sites corresponded to areas of maximum inelastic strain while the crack path was globally correlated to high stress triaxiality and inelastic strain fields.

  20. Mechanical Behaviour of Materials Volume II Fracture Mechanics and Damage

    CERN Document Server

    François, Dominique; Zaoui, André

    2013-01-01

    Designing new structural materials, extending lifetimes and guarding against fracture in service are among the preoccupations of engineers, and to deal with these they need to have command of the mechanics of material behaviour. This ought to reflect in the training of students. In this respect, the first volume of this work deals with elastic, elastoplastic, elastoviscoplastic and viscoelastic behaviours; this second volume continues with fracture mechanics and damage, and with contact mechanics, friction and wear. As in Volume I, the treatment links the active mechanisms on the microscopic scale and the laws of macroscopic behaviour. Chapter I is an introduction to the various damage phenomena. Chapter II gives the essential of fracture mechanics. Chapter III is devoted to brittle fracture, chapter IV to ductile fracture and chapter V to the brittle-ductile transition. Chapter VI is a survey of fatigue damage. Chapter VII is devoted to hydogen embrittlement and to environment assisted cracking, chapter VIII...

  1. Damage mechanisms of pathogenic bacteria in drinking water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed at elucidating the inactivation mechanisms of pathogenic bacteria in drinking water during chlorine and solar disinfection using a simple plating method. The well-known bacterial model Escherichia coli was used as pathogenic bacteria for the experiments. The damage mechanisms of E. coli were ...

  2. A damage mechanics based approach to structural deterioration and reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattcharya, B.; Ellingwood, B. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1998-02-01

    Structural deterioration often occurs without perceptible manifestation. Continuum damage mechanics defines structural damage in terms of the material microstructure, and relates the damage variable to the macroscopic strength or stiffness of the structure. This enables one to predict the state of damage prior to the initiation of a macroscopic flaw, and allows one to estimate residual strength/service life of an existing structure. The accumulation of damage is a dissipative process that is governed by the laws of thermodynamics. Partial differential equations for damage growth in terms of the Helmholtz free energy are derived from fundamental thermodynamical conditions. Closed-form solutions to the equations are obtained under uniaxial loading for ductile deformation damage as a function of plastic strain, for creep damage as a function of time, and for fatigue damage as function of number of cycles. The proposed damage growth model is extended into the stochastic domain by considering fluctuations in the free energy, and closed-form solutions of the resulting stochastic differential equation are obtained in each of the three cases mentioned above. A reliability analysis of a ring-stiffened cylindrical steel shell subjected to corrosion, accidental pressure, and temperature is performed.

  3. A damage mechanics based approach to structural deterioration and reliability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattcharya, B.; Ellingwood, B.

    1998-02-01

    Structural deterioration often occurs without perceptible manifestation. Continuum damage mechanics defines structural damage in terms of the material microstructure, and relates the damage variable to the macroscopic strength or stiffness of the structure. This enables one to predict the state of damage prior to the initiation of a macroscopic flaw, and allows one to estimate residual strength/service life of an existing structure. The accumulation of damage is a dissipative process that is governed by the laws of thermodynamics. Partial differential equations for damage growth in terms of the Helmholtz free energy are derived from fundamental thermodynamical conditions. Closed-form solutions to the equations are obtained under uniaxial loading for ductile deformation damage as a function of plastic strain, for creep damage as a function of time, and for fatigue damage as function of number of cycles. The proposed damage growth model is extended into the stochastic domain by considering fluctuations in the free energy, and closed-form solutions of the resulting stochastic differential equation are obtained in each of the three cases mentioned above. A reliability analysis of a ring-stiffened cylindrical steel shell subjected to corrosion, accidental pressure, and temperature is performed

  4. Modeling laser damage to the retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Clifton D.

    This dissertation presents recent progress in several areas related to modeling laser damage to the retina. In Chapter 3, we consider the consequences of using the Arrhenius damage model to predict the damage thresholds of multiple pulse, or repetitive pulse, exposures. We have identified a few fundamental trends associated with the multiple pulse damage predictions made by the Arrhenius model. These trends differ from what would be expected by non-thermal mechanisms, and could prove useful in differentiating thermal and non-thermal damage. Chapter 4 presents a new rate equation damage model hypothesized to describe photochemical damage. The model adds a temperature dependent term to the simple rate equation implied by the principle of reciprocity that is characteristic of photochemical damage thresholds. A recent damage threshold study, conducted in-vitro, has revealed a very sharp transition between thermal and photochemical damage threshold trends. For the wavelength used in the experiment (413 nm), thermal damage thresholds were observed at exposure levels that were twice the expected photochemical damage threshold, based on the traditional understanding of photochemical damage. Our model accounts for this observed trend by introducing a temperature dependent quenching, or repair, rate to the photochemical damage rate. For long exposures that give a very small temperature rise, the model reduces to the principle of reciprocity. Near the transition region between thermal and photochemical damage, the model allows the damage threshold to be set by thermal mechanisms, even at exposure above the reciprocity exposure. In Chapter 5, we describe a retina damage model that includes thermal lensing in the eye by coupling beam propagation and heat transfer models together. Thermal lensing has recently been suggested as a contributing factor to the large increase in measured retinal damage thresholds in the near infrared. The transmission of the vitreous decreases

  5. Inelastic damage using continuum damage mechanics in composite plate reinforced by unidirectional fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žmindák Milan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well that a finite element method is very popular simulation method to predict the physical behavior of systems and structures. In the last years an increase of interest in a new type of numerical methods known as meshless methods was observed. The paper deals with application of radial basis functions on modelling of inelastic damage using continuum damage mechanics of layered plate composite structures reinforced with long unidirectional fibers. For numerical simulations of elastic-plastic damage of layered composite plates own computational programs were implemented in MATLAB programming language. We will use the Newton-Raphson method to solve nonlinear systems of equations. Evaluation damage during plasticity has been solved using return mapping algorithm. The results of elastic-plastic damage analysis of composite plate with unsymmetrical laminate stacking sequence are presented.

  6. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1985-07-01

    Radiation damage to DNA results from the direct interaction of radiation with DNA where positive ions, electrons and excited states are formed in the DNA, and the indirect effect where radical species formed in the surrounding medium by the radiation attack the DNA. The primary mechanism proposed for radiation damage, by the direct effect, is that positive and negative ions formed within the DNA strand migrate through the stacked DNA bases. The ions can then recombine, react with the DNA bases most likely to react by protonation of the anion and deprotonation or hydroxylation of the cation or transfer out of the DNA chain to the surrounding histone protein. This work as aimed at understanding the possible reactions of the DNA base ion radicals, as well as their initial distribution in the DNA strand. 31 refs

  7. Microstructural modeling of Vienne granite damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homand, F.; Hoxha, D.

    2002-01-01

    The microstructural approach in damage modeling, which is presented in this paper describes the evolution of micro-crack geometry as a function of history loading. If the crack geometry is known, the effective properties could then be calculated foe any cracked rock by the mean of a micro-mechanical model. The P L evolution law which is necessary in the describing of crack geometry evolution is hardly based on the crack microscope observation as well as on the theory of fabric tensors. This approach is applied in the modeling of mechanical behaviour of Vienne granite. The result of model simulations are compared with laboratory tests. (author)

  8. Digital Imaging of Pipeline Mechanical Damage and Residual Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    The purpose of this program was to enhance characterization of mechanical damage in pipelines through application of digital eddy current imaging. Lift-off maps can be used to develop quantitative representations of mechanical damage and magnetic per...

  9. The comparison of two continuum damage mechanics-based material models for formability prediction of AA6082 under hot stamping conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Z.; Li, N.; Lin, J.

    2017-09-01

    The hot stamping and cold die quenching process has experienced tremendous development in order to obtain shapes of structural components with great complexity in automotive applications. Prediction of the formability of a metal sheet is significant for practical applications of forming components in the automotive industry. Since microstructural evolution in an alloy at elevated temperature has a large effect on formability, continuum damage mechanics (CDM)-based material models can be used to characterise the behaviour of metals when a forming process is conducted at elevated temperatures. In this paper, two sets of unified multi-axial constitutive equations based on material’s stress states and strain states, respectively, were calibrated and used to effectively predict the thermo-mechanical response and forming limits of alloys under complex hot stamping conditions. In order to determine and calibrate the two material models, formability tests of AA6082 using a developed novel biaxial testing system were conducted at various temperatures and strain rates under hot stamping conditions. The determined unified constitutive equations from experimental data are presented in this paper. It is found that both of the stress-state based and strain-state based material models can predict the formability of AA6082 under hot stamping conditions.

  10. Detection of mechanical damage using the magnetic flux leakage technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clapham, L.; Babbar, V.; Byrne, J.

    2007-01-01

    Since magnetism is strongly stress dependent, Magnetic Flux Leakage (MFL) inspection tools have the potential to locate and characterize mechanical damage in pipelines. However, MFL application to mechanical damage detection faces hurdles which make signal interpretation problematic: 1) the MFL signal is a superposition of geometrical and stress effects; 2) the stress distribution around a mechanically damaged region is very complex, consisting of plastic deformation and residual (elastic) stresses; 3) the effect of stress on magnetic behaviour is not well understood. This paper summarizes recent results of experimental and modeling studies of MFL signals resulting from mechanical damage. In experimental studies, mechanical damage was simulated using a tool and die press to produce dents of varying depths in plate samples. MFL measurements were made before and after selective stress-relieving heat treatments. These annealing treatments enabled the stress and geometry components of the MFL signal to be separated. In general, geometry effects scale with dent depth and tend to dominate in deep dents, while stress contribution to the MFL signals is relatively constant and is more significant for shallow dents. The influence of other parameters such as flux density and topside/bottomside inspection was also quantified. In the finite element analysis work, stress was incorporated by modifying the magnetic permeability in the residual stress regions of the modeled dent. Both stress and geometry contributions to the MFL signal were examined separately. Despite using a number of simplifying assumptions, the modeled results matched the experimental results very closely, and were used to aid in interpretation of the MFL signals. (author)

  11. Modeling damage in concrete pavements and bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    This project focused on micromechanical modeling of damage in concrete under general, multi-axial loading. A : continuum-level, three-dimensional constitutive model based on micromechanics was developed. The model : accounts for damage in concrete by...

  12. Lightning Strike Induced Damage Mechanisms of Carbon Fiber Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Hirohide

    Composite materials have a wide application in aerospace, automotive, and other transportation industries, because of the superior structural and weight performances. Since carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites possess a much lower electrical conductivity as compared to traditional metallic materials utilized for aircraft structures, serious concern about damage resistance/tolerance against lightning has been rising. Main task of this study is to clarify the lightning damage mechanism of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy polymer composites to help further development of lightning strike protection. The research on lightning damage to carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites is quite challenging, and there has been little study available until now. In order to tackle this issue, building block approach was employed. The research was started with the development of supporting technologies such as a current impulse generator to simulate a lightning strike in a laboratory. Then, fundamental electrical properties and fracture behavior of CFRPs exposed to high and low level current impulse were investigated using simple coupon specimens, followed by extensive parametric investigations in terms of different prepreg materials frequently used in aerospace industry, various stacking sequences, different lightning intensity, and lightning current waveforms. It revealed that the thermal resistance capability of polymer matrix was one of the most influential parameters on lightning damage resistance of CFRPs. Based on the experimental findings, the semi-empirical analysis model for predicting the extent of lightning damage was established. The model was fitted through experimental data to determine empirical parameters and, then, showed a good capability to provide reliable predictions for other test conditions and materials. Finally, structural element level lightning tests were performed to explore more practical situations. Specifically, filled-hole CFRP plates and patch

  13. Modelling of the mechanical behaviour and damage of clay-stones: application to the East argillite; Modelisation du comportement mecanique des argiles raides avec prise en compte de l'endommagement: application aux argilites de l'Est

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aublive-Conil, N

    2003-03-15

    The storage in deep geological formation is one of the solutions retained by France for the management of highly long life radioactive waste. The retained host rock is a clay-stone named East argillite located in the departments of Meuse and Haute-Marne. A thermodynamic formulation is used to propose a rheological model, which reproduces the mechanical behavior of clay-stones. Initially, an anisotropic damage plastic model was formulated in order to describe material degradations. Then, the damage plastic model is reformulated in order to taken into account the damage influence on the hydraulic behavior of porous material. The numerical simulations correctly reproduce the mechanical behavior of East Argillites but also the anisotropy of the hydraulic behavior introduced by the damage effect. (author)

  14. Modelling of the mechanical behaviour and damage of clay-stones: application to the East argillite; Modelisation du comportement mecanique des argiles raides avec prise en compte de l'endommagement: application aux argilites de l'Est

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aublive-Conil, N

    2003-03-15

    The storage in deep geological formation is one of the solutions retained by France for the management of highly long life radioactive waste. The retained host rock is a clay-stone named East argillite located in the departments of Meuse and Haute-Marne. A thermodynamic formulation is used to propose a rheological model, which reproduces the mechanical behavior of clay-stones. Initially, an anisotropic damage plastic model was formulated in order to describe material degradations. Then, the damage plastic model is reformulated in order to taken into account the damage influence on the hydraulic behavior of porous material. The numerical simulations correctly reproduce the mechanical behavior of East Argillites but also the anisotropy of the hydraulic behavior introduced by the damage effect. (author)

  15. A damage mechanics based general purpose interface/contact element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Chengyong

    Most of the microelectronics packaging structures consist of layered substrates connected with bonding materials, such as solder or epoxy. Predicting the thermomechanical behavior of these multilayered structures is a challenging task in electronic packaging engineering. In a layered structure the most complex part is always the interfaces between the strates. Simulating the thermo-mechanical behavior of such interfaces, is the main theme of this dissertation. The most commonly used solder material, Pb-Sn alloy, has a very low melting temperature 180sp°C, so that the material demonstrates a highly viscous behavior. And, creep usually dominates the failure mechanism. Hence, the theory of viscoplasticity is adapted to describe the constitutive behavior. In a multilayered assembly each layer has a different coefficient of thermal expansion. Under thermal cycling, due to heat dissipated from circuits, interfaces and interconnects experience low cycle fatigue. Presently, the state-of-the art damage mechanics model used for fatigue life predictions is based on Kachanov (1986) continuum damage model. This model uses plastic strain as a damage criterion. Since plastic strain is a stress path dependent value, the criterion does not yield unique damage values for the same state of stress. In this dissertation a new damage evolution equation based on the second law of thermodynamic is proposed. The new criterion is based on the entropy of the system and it yields unique damage values for all stress paths to the final state of stress. In the electronics industry, there is a strong desire to develop fatigue free interconnections. The proposed interface/contact element can also simulate the behavior of the fatigue free Z-direction thin film interconnections as well as traditional layered interconnects. The proposed interface element can simulate behavior of a bonded interface or unbonded sliding interface, also called contact element. The proposed element was verified against

  16. Molecular mechanisms in radiation damage to DNA: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, R.

    1996-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that were responsible for radiation-induced DNA damage. The studies were based on theoretical explorations of possible mechanisms that link initial radiation damage in the form of base and sugar damage to conformational changes in DNA

  17. Micromechanical modeling of strength and damage of fiber reinforced composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishnaevsky, L. Jr.; Broendsted, P.

    2007-03-15

    The report for the first year of the EU UpWind project includes three parts: overview of concepts and methods of modelling of mechanical behavior, deformation and damage of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites, development of computational tools for the automatic generation of 3D micromechanical models of fiber reinforced composites, and micromechanical modelling of damage in FRC, and phenomenological analysis of the effect of frequency of cyclic loading on the lifetime and damage evolution in materials. (au)

  18. Fatigue and damage tolerance scatter models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raikher, Veniamin L.

    1994-09-01

    Effective Total Fatigue Life and Crack Growth Scatter Models are proposed. The first of them is based on the power form of the Wohler curve, fatigue scatter dependence on mean life value, cycle stress ratio influence on fatigue scatter, and validated description of the mean stress influence on the mean fatigue life. The second uses in addition are fracture mechanics approach, assumption of initial damage existence, and Paris equation. Simple formulas are derived for configurations of models. A preliminary identification of the parameters of the models is fulfilled on the basis of experimental data. Some new and important results for fatigue and crack growth scatter characteristics are obtained.

  19. Oxidative Damage and Its Possible Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The paper tries to assess the protective effect of fisetin against •OH-induced DNAdamage, then to investigate the possible mechanism.Methods: The protective effect was evaluated based on the content of malondialdehyde(MDA. The possible mechanism was analyzed using various antioxidant methods in vitro,including •OH scavenging (deoxyribose degradation, •O2- scavenging (pyrogallolautoxidation, DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays.Results: Fisetin increased dose-dependently its protective percentages against •OH-inducedDNA damage (IC50 value =1535.00±29.60 μM. It also increased its radical-scavengingpercentages in a dose-dependent manner in various antioxidants assays. Its IC50 values in•OH scavenging, •O2- scavenging, DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•+ scavenging, and Cu2+-reducing power assays, were 47.41±4.50 μM, 34.05±0.87 μM, 9.69±0.53 μM, 2.43±0.14μM, and 1.49±0.16 μM, respectively.Conclusion: Fisetin can effectively protect DNA against •OH-induced oxidative damagepossibly via reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenging approach, which is assumed to behydrogen atom (H• and/or single electron (e donation (HAT/SET pathways. In the HATpathway, the 3’,4’-dihydroxyl moiety in B ring of fisetin is thought to play an importantrole, because it can be ultimately oxidized to a stable ortho-benzoquinone form.

  20. Ultraviolet Radiations: Skin Defense-Damage Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohania, Dheeraj; Chandel, Shikha; Kumar, Parveen; Verma, Vivek; Digvijay, Kumar; Tripathi, Deepika; Choudhury, Khushboo; Mitten, Sandeep Kumar; Shah, Dilip

    2017-01-01

    UV-radiations are the invisible part of light spectra having a wavelength between visible rays and X-rays. Based on wavelength, UV rays are subdivided into UV-A (320-400 nm), UV-B (280-320 nm) and UV-C (200-280 nm). Ultraviolet rays can have both harmful and beneficial effects. UV-C has the property of ionization thus acting as a strong mutagen, which can cause immune-mediated disease and cancer in adverse cases. Numbers of genetic factors have been identified in human involved in inducing skin cancer from UV-radiations. Certain heredity diseases have been found susceptible to UV-induced skin cancer. UV radiations activate the cutaneous immune system, which led to an inflammatory response by different mechanisms. The first line of defense mechanism against UV radiation is melanin (an epidermal pigment), and UV absorbing pigment of skin, which dissipate UV radiation as heat. Cell surface death receptor (e.g. Fas) of keratinocytes responds to UV-induced injury and elicits apoptosis to avoid malignant transformation. In addition to the formation of photo-dimers in the genome, UV also can induce mutation by generating ROS and nucleotides are highly susceptible to these free radical injuries. Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) has been known to be implicated in different UV-induced damages such as pigmentation, adaptive tanning, and skin cancer. UV-B induces the formation of pre-vitamin D3 in the epidermal layer of skin. UV-induced tans act as a photoprotection by providing a sun protection factor (SPF) of 3-4 and epidermal hyperplasia. There is a need to prevent the harmful effects and harness the useful effects of UV radiations.

  1. Damage Models for Soft Tissues: A Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenguang

    Damage to soft tissues in the human body has been investigated for applications in healthcare, sports, and biomedical engineering. This paper reviews and classifies damage models for soft tissues to summarize achievements, identify new directions, and facilitate finite element analysis. The main ideas of damage modeling methods are illustrated and interpreted. A few key issues related to damage models, such as experimental data curve-fitting, computational effort, connection between damage and fractures/cracks, damage model applications, and fracture/crack extension simulation, are discussed. Several new challenges in the field are identified and outlined. This review can be useful for developing more advanced damage models and extending damage modeling methods to a variety of soft tissues.

  2. Modeling the damage of welded steel, using the GTN model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Ahmar Kadi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our work is the modeling of the damage in the weld metal according to the finite element method and the concepts of fracture mechanics based on local approaches using the code ABAQUS calculates. The use of the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model axisymmetric specimens AE type to three different zones (Base metal, molten metal and heat affected Zone with four levels of triaxiality (AE2, AE4, AE10 and AE80, we have used to model the behavior of damage to welded steel, which is described as being due to the growth and coalescence of cavities with high rates of triaxiality

  3. Mechanical Properties of Shock-Damaged Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Hongliang; Ahrens, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    Stress-strain tests were performed both on shock-damaged gabbro and limestone. The effective Young's modulus decreases with increasing initial damage parameter value, and an apparent work-softening process occurs prior to failure. To further characterize shock-induced microcracks, the longitudinal elastic wave velocity behavior of shock-damaged gabbro in the direction of compression up to failure was measured using an acoustic transmission technique under uniaxial loading. A dramatic increase in velocity was observed for the static compressive stress range of 0-50 MPa. Above that stress range, the velocity behavior of lightly damaged (D(sub 0) less than 0.1) gabbro is almost equal to unshocked gabbro. The failure strength of heavily-damaged (D(sub 0) greater than 0.1) gabbro is approx. 100-150 MPa, much lower than that of lightly damaged and unshocked gabbros (approx. 230-260 MPa). Following Nur's theory, the crack shape distribution was analyzed. The shock-induced cracks in gabbro appear to be largely thin penny-shaped cracks with c/a values below 5 x 10(exp -4). Moreover, the applicability of Ashby and Sammis's theory relating failure strength and damage parameter of shock-damaged rocks was examined and was found to yield a good estimate of the relation of shock-induced deficit in elastic modulus with the deficit in compressive strength.

  4. Continuum theory of fibrous tissue damage mechanics using bond kinetics: application to cartilage tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nims, Robert J; Durney, Krista M; Cigan, Alexander D; Dusséaux, Antoine; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2016-02-06

    This study presents a damage mechanics framework that employs observable state variables to describe damage in isotropic or anisotropic fibrous tissues. In this mixture theory framework, damage is tracked by the mass fraction of bonds that have broken. Anisotropic damage is subsumed in the assumption that multiple bond species may coexist in a material, each having its own damage behaviour. This approach recovers the classical damage mechanics formulation for isotropic materials, but does not appeal to a tensorial damage measure for anisotropic materials. In contrast with the classical approach, the use of observable state variables for damage allows direct comparison of model predictions to experimental damage measures, such as biochemical assays or Raman spectroscopy. Investigations of damage in discrete fibre distributions demonstrate that the resilience to damage increases with the number of fibre bundles; idealizing fibrous tissues using continuous fibre distribution models precludes the modelling of damage. This damage framework was used to test and validate the hypothesis that growth of cartilage constructs can lead to damage of the synthesized collagen matrix due to excessive swelling caused by synthesized glycosaminoglycans. Therefore, alternative strategies must be implemented in tissue engineering studies to prevent collagen damage during the growth process.

  5. Oxidative Stress as a Mechanism Involved in Kidney Damage After Subchronic Exposure to Vanadium Inhalation and Oral Sweetened Beverages in a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Zurutuza, Maribel; González-Villalva, Adriana; Albarrán-Alonso, Juan Carlos; Colín-Barenque, Laura; Bizarro-Nevares, Patricia; Rojas-Lemus, Marcela; López-Valdéz, Nelly; Fortoul, Teresa I

    Kidney diseases have notably increased in the last few years. This is partially explained by the increase in metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and systemic blood hypertension. However, there is a segment of the population that has neither of the previous risk factors, yet suffers kidney damage. Exposure to atmospheric pollutants has been suggested as a possible risk factor. Air-suspended particles carry on their surface a variety of fuel combustion-related residues such as metals, and vanadium is one of these. Vanadium might produce oxidative stress resulting in the damage of some organs such as the kidney. Additionally, in countries like Mexico, the ingestion of sweetened beverages is a major issue; whether these beverages alone are responsible for direct kidney damage or whether their ingestion promotes the progression of an existing renal damage generates controversy. In this study, we report the combined effect of vanadium inhalation and sweetened beverages ingestion in a mouse model. Forty CD-1 male mice were distributed in 4 groups: control, vanadium inhalation, 30% sucrose in drinking water, and vanadium inhalation plus sucrose 30% in drinking water. Our results support that vanadium inhalation and the ingestion of 30% sucrose induce functional and histological kidney damage and an increase in oxidative stress biomarkers, which were higher in the combined effect of vanadium plus 30% sucrose. The results also support that the ingestion of 30% sucrose alone without hyperglycemia also produces kidney damage.

  6. Enteric Neuronal Damage, Intramuscular Denervation and Smooth Muscle Phenotype Changes as Mechanisms of Chagasic Megacolon: Evidence from a Long-Term Murine Model of Trypanosoma cruzi Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila França Campos

    Full Text Available We developed a novel murine model of long-term infection with Trypanosoma cruzi with the aim to elucidate the pathogenesis of megacolon and the associated adaptive and neuromuscular intestinal disorders. Our intent was to produce a chronic stage of the disease since the early treatment should avoid 100% mortality of untreated animals at acute phase. Treatment allowed animals to be kept infected and alive in order to develop the chronic phase of infection with low parasitism as in human disease. A group of Swiss mice was infected with the Y strain of T. cruzi. At the 11th day after infection, a sub-group was euthanized (acute-phase group and another sub-group was treated with benznidazole and euthanized 15 months after infection (chronic-phase group. Whole colon samples were harvested and used for studying the histopathology of the intestinal smooth muscle and the plasticity of the enteric nerves. In the acute phase, all animals presented inflammatory lesions associated with intense and diffuse parasitism of the muscular and submucosa layers, which were enlarged when compared with the controls. The occurrence of intense degenerative inflammatory changes and increased reticular fibers suggests inflammatory-induced necrosis of muscle cells. In the chronic phase, parasitism was insignificant; however, the architecture of Aüerbach plexuses was focally affected in the inflamed areas, and a significant decrease in the number of neurons and in the density of intramuscular nerve bundles was detected. Other changes observed included increased thickness of the colon wall, diffuse muscle cell hypertrophy, and increased collagen deposition, indicating early fibrosis in the damaged areas. Mast cell count significantly increased in the muscular layers. We propose a model for studying the long-term (15 months pathogenesis of Chagasic megacolon in mice that mimics the human disease, which persists for several years and has not been fully elucidated. We

  7. Fuzzy stochastic damage mechanics (FSDM based on fuzzy auto-adaptive control theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-jun Wang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to fully interpret and describe damage mechanics, the origin and development of fuzzy stochastic damage mechanics were introduced based on the analysis of the harmony of damage, probability, and fuzzy membership in the interval of [0,1]. In a complete normed linear space, it was proven that a generalized damage field can be simulated through β probability distribution. Three kinds of fuzzy behaviors of damage variables were formulated and explained through analysis of the generalized uncertainty of damage variables and the establishment of a fuzzy functional expression. Corresponding fuzzy mapping distributions, namely, the half-depressed distribution, swing distribution, and combined swing distribution, which can simulate varying fuzzy evolution in diverse stochastic damage situations, were set up. Furthermore, through demonstration of the generalized probabilistic characteristics of damage variables, the cumulative distribution function and probability density function of fuzzy stochastic damage variables, which show β probability distribution, were modified according to the expansion principle. The three-dimensional fuzzy stochastic damage mechanical behaviors of the Longtan rolled-concrete dam were examined with the self-developed fuzzy stochastic damage finite element program. The statistical correlation and non-normality of random field parameters were considered comprehensively in the fuzzy stochastic damage model described in this paper. The results show that an initial damage field based on the comprehensive statistical evaluation helps to avoid many difficulties in the establishment of experiments and numerical algorithms for damage mechanics analysis.

  8. Continuum damage mechanics method for fatigue growth of surface cracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Xiqiao; He Shuyan

    1997-01-01

    With the background of leak-before-break (LBB) analysis of pressurized vessels and pipes in nuclear plants, the fatigue growth problem of either circumferential or longitudinal semi-elliptical surface cracks subjected to cyclic loading is studied by using a continuum damage mechanics method. The fatigue damage is described by a scalar damage variable. From the damage evolution equation at the crack tip, a crack growth equation similar to famous Paris' formula is derived, which shows the physical meaning of Paris' formula. Thereby, a continuum damage mechanics approach is developed to analyze the configuration evolution of surface cracks during fatigue growth

  9. Mechanical properties of timber from wind damaged Norway spruce

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmeyer, Preben

    2003-01-01

    A storm may subject a tree to such bending stresses that extensive compression damage develops in the lee side. The tree may survive the wind load or it may be thrown. However, the damage is inherent and it may be of a magnitude to influence the mechanical properties of boards sawn from the stem....... The paper reports on a investigation of the relation between degree of damage and mechanical proper-ties of sawn timber from wind damaged Norway spruce. The project included about 250 bolts from wind damaged trees. The majority of bolts were cut to deliver a full-diameter plank containing the pith...

  10. Surface Damage Mechanism of Monocrystalline Si Under Mechanical Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qingliang; Zhang, Quanli; To, Suet; Guo, Bing

    2017-03-01

    Single-point diamond scratching and nanoindentation on monocrystalline silicon wafer were performed to investigate the surface damage mechanism of Si under the contact loading. The results showed that three typical stages of material removal appeared during dynamic scratching, and a chemical reaction of Si with the diamond indenter and oxygen occurred under the high temperature. In addition, the Raman spectra of the various points in the scratching groove indicated that the Si-I to β-Sn structure (Si-II) and the following β-Sn structure (Si-II) to amorphous Si transformation appeared under the rapid loading/unloading condition of the diamond grit, and the volume change induced by the phase transformation resulted in a critical depth (ductile-brittle transition) of cut (˜60 nm ± 15 nm) much lower than the theoretical calculated results (˜387 nm). Moreover, it also led to abnormal load-displacement curves in the nanoindentation tests, resulting in the appearance of elbow and pop-out effects (˜270 nm at 20 s, 50 mN), which were highly dependent on the loading/unloading conditions. In summary, phase transformation of Si promoted surface deformation and fracture under both static and dynamic mechanical loading.

  11. A Hybrid Approach to Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-31

    Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combinin Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics 6. AUTHOR(S) 5b. GRANT NUMBER N00014-16-1-2173 5c...NUMBER 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Texas A&M Engineering Experiment Station (TEES) 400 Harvey Mitchell Parkway, Suite 300 College...1.3 related to Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Tasks 2.2 and 2.4 related to Peridynamics, as described in the project proposal. The activities

  12. Mechanisms of dealing with DNA damage in terminally differentiated cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortini, P. [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy); Dogliotti, E., E-mail: eugenia.dogliotti@iss.it [Department of Environment and Primary Prevention, Istituto Superiore di Sanita, Viale Regina Elena 299, 00161 Rome (Italy)

    2010-03-01

    To protect genomic integrity living cells that are continuously exposed to DNA-damaging insults are equipped with an efficient defence mechanism termed the DNA damage response. Its function is to eliminate DNA damage through DNA repair and to remove damaged cells by apoptosis. The DNA damage response has been investigated mainly in proliferating cells, in which the cell cycle machinery is integrated with the DNA damage signalling. The current knowledge of the mechanisms of DNA repair, DNA damage signalling and cell death of post-mitotic cells that have undergone irreversible cell cycle withdrawal will be reviewed. Evidence will be provided that the protection of the genome integrity in terminally differentiated cells is achieved by different strategies than in proliferating cells.

  13. Mechanisms of dealing with DNA damage in terminally differentiated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortini, P.; Dogliotti, E.

    2010-01-01

    To protect genomic integrity living cells that are continuously exposed to DNA-damaging insults are equipped with an efficient defence mechanism termed the DNA damage response. Its function is to eliminate DNA damage through DNA repair and to remove damaged cells by apoptosis. The DNA damage response has been investigated mainly in proliferating cells, in which the cell cycle machinery is integrated with the DNA damage signalling. The current knowledge of the mechanisms of DNA repair, DNA damage signalling and cell death of post-mitotic cells that have undergone irreversible cell cycle withdrawal will be reviewed. Evidence will be provided that the protection of the genome integrity in terminally differentiated cells is achieved by different strategies than in proliferating cells.

  14. Damage mechanisms in PBT-GF30 under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaaf, A.; De Monte, M.; Hoffmann, C.; Vormwald, M.; Quaresimin, M.

    2014-01-01

    The scope of this paper is the investigation of damage mechanisms at microscopic scale on a short glass fiber reinforced polybutylene terephthalate (PBT-GF30) under thermo-mechanical cyclic loading. In addition the principal mechanisms are verified through micro mechanical FE models. In order to investigate the fatigue behavior of the material both isothermal strain controlled fatigue (ISCF) tests at three different temperatures and thermo-mechanical fatigue (TMF) tests were conducted on plain and notched specimens, manufactured by injection molding. The goal of the work is to determine the damage mechanisms occurring under TMF conditions and to compare them with the mechanisms occurring under ISCF. For this reason fracture surfaces of TMF and ISCF samples loaded at different temperature levels were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy. Furthermore, specimens that failed under TMF were examined on microsections revealing insight into both crack initiation and crack propagation. The findings of this investigation give valuable information about the main damage mechanisms of PBT-GF30 under TMF loading and serve as basis for the development of a TMF life estimation methodology

  15. Continuum damage mechanics: Present state and future trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaboche, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM) has developed since the initial works of Kachanov and Rabotnov. The paper gives a review of its main features, of the present possibilities and of further developments. Several aspects are considered successively: damage definitions and measures, damage growth equations and anisotropy effects, and use of CDM for local approaches of fracture. Various materials, loading conditions and damaging processes are incorporated in the same general framework. Particular attention is given to the possible connections between different definitions of damage, especially between the CDM definition and the information obtained from material science. (orig.)

  16. Development of probabilistic fatigue curve for asphalt concrete based on viscoelastic continuum damage mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Sharma

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to its roots in fundamental thermodynamic framework, continuum damage approach is popular for modeling asphalt concrete behavior. Currently used continuum damage models use mixture averaged values for model parameters and assume deterministic damage process. On the other hand, significant scatter is found in fatigue data generated even under extremely controlled laboratory testing conditions. Thus, currently used continuum damage models fail to account the scatter observed in fatigue data. This paper illustrates a novel approach for probabilistic fatigue life prediction based on viscoelastic continuum damage approach. Several specimens were tested for their viscoelastic properties and damage properties under uniaxial mode of loading. The data thus generated were analyzed using viscoelastic continuum damage mechanics principles to predict fatigue life. Weibull (2 parameter, 3 parameter and lognormal distributions were fit to fatigue life predicted using viscoelastic continuum damage approach. It was observed that fatigue damage could be best-described using Weibull distribution when compared to lognormal distribution. Due to its flexibility, 3-parameter Weibull distribution was found to fit better than 2-parameter Weibull distribution. Further, significant differences were found between probabilistic fatigue curves developed in this research and traditional deterministic fatigue curve. The proposed methodology combines advantages of continuum damage mechanics as well as probabilistic approaches. These probabilistic fatigue curves can be conveniently used for reliability based pavement design. Keywords: Probabilistic fatigue curve, Continuum damage mechanics, Weibull distribution, Lognormal distribution

  17. Fatigue damage mechanics of notched graphite-epoxy laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearing, Mark; Beaumont, Peter W. R.; Ashby, Michael F.

    A modeling approach is presented that recognizes that the residual properties of composite laminates after any form of loading depend on the damage state. Therefore, in the case of cyclic loading, it is necessary to first derive a damage growth law and then relate the residual properties to the accumulated damage. The propagation of fatigue damage in notched laminates is investigated. A power law relationship between damage growth and the strain energy release rate is developed. The material constants used in the model have been determined in independent experiments and are invariant for all the layups investigated. The strain energy release rates are calculated using a simple finite element representation of the damaged specimen. The model is used to predict the effect of tension-tension cyclic loading on laminates of the T300/914C carbon-fiber epoxy system. The extent of damage propagation is successfully predicted in a number of cross-ply laminates.

  18. Investigation of damage mechanism by ionising radiation on biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau How Mooi

    1996-01-01

    Occupational radiation hazard is a very controversial subject. Effects from high radiation doses are well known from past experiences. However, hazard from low doses is still a subject that is hotly debated upon until now. The occupational dosimetry used now is based on a macroscopic scale. Lately, microdosimetry is fast gaining recognition as a more superior way of measuring hazard. More importantly, scientists are researching the basic damage mechanism that leads to biological effects by ionising radiation. In this report, a simulation study of the basic damage mechanism is discussed . This simulation is based upon Monte Carlo calculations and using polyuridylic acid (Poly-U) as the DNA model This simulation tries to relate the physics and chemistry of interactions of ionising radiation with biomolecules. The computer codes used in this simulation, OREC and RADLYS were created by Hamm et al. (1983) in Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The biological endpoints in this simulation are the strand break and base release of the DNA, which is the precursor of all biological effects. These results are compared with model studies that had been done experimentally to check the validity of this simulation. The G-values of strand break and base release from this simulation were -2.35 and 2.75 and compared well with results from irradiation experiments by von Sonntag (I 98 7) from Max Plank's Institute, Germany

  19. A linear model of ductile plastic damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaitre, J.

    1983-01-01

    A three-dimensional model of isotropic ductile plastic damage based on a continuum damage variable on the effective stress concept and on thermodynamics is derived. As shown by experiments on several metals and alloys, the model, integrated in the case of proportional loading, is linear with respect to the accumulated plastic strain and shows a large influence of stress triaxiality [fr

  20. Modelling low velocity impact induced damage in composite laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yu; Soutis, Constantinos

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents recent progress on modelling low velocity impact induced damage in fibre reinforced composite laminates. It is important to understand the mechanisms of barely visible impact damage (BVID) and how it affects structural performance. To reduce labour intensive testing, the development of finite element (FE) techniques for simulating impact damage becomes essential and recent effort by the composites research community is reviewed in this work. The FE predicted damage initiation and propagation can be validated by Non Destructive Techniques (NDT) that gives confidence to the developed numerical damage models. A reliable damage simulation can assist the design process to optimise laminate configurations, reduce weight and improve performance of components and structures used in aircraft construction.

  1. A Hybrid Approach to Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-30

    other provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for fai ling to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a...to Composite Damage and Fai lure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics Sb. GRANT NUMBER NOOO 14-16-1-2173 Sc. PROGRAM

  2. Non-Fourier based thermal-mechanical tissue damage prediction for thermal ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Zhong, Yongmin; Smith, Julian; Gu, Chengfan

    2017-01-02

    Prediction of tissue damage under thermal loads plays important role for thermal ablation planning. A new methodology is presented in this paper by combing non-Fourier bio-heat transfer, constitutive elastic mechanics as well as non-rigid motion of dynamics to predict and analyze thermal distribution, thermal-induced mechanical deformation and thermal-mechanical damage of soft tissues under thermal loads. Simulations and comparison analysis demonstrate that the proposed methodology based on the non-Fourier bio-heat transfer can account for the thermal-induced mechanical behaviors of soft tissues and predict tissue thermal damage more accurately than classical Fourier bio-heat transfer based model.

  3. Progressive damage analysis of carbon/epoxy laminates under couple laser and mechanical loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanlei Liu

    Full Text Available A multiscale model based bridge theory is proposed for the progressive damage analysis of carbon/epoxy laminates under couple laser and mechanical loading. The ablation model is adopted to calculate ablation temperature changing and ablation surface degradation. The polynomial strengthening model of matrix is used to improve bridging model for reducing parameter input. Stiffness degradation methods of bridging model are also improved in order to analyze the stress redistribution more accurately when the damage occurs. Thermal-mechanical analyses of the composite plate are performed using the ABAQUS/Explicit program with the developed model implemented in the VUMAT. The simulation results show that this model can be used to proclaim the mesoscale damage mechanism of composite laminates under coupled loading. Keywords: Laser irradiation, Multiscale analysis, Bridge model, Thermal-mechanical

  4. Intelligent-based Structural Damage Detection Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eric Wai Ming; Yu, K.F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the application of a novel Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for the diagnosis of structural damage. The ANN model, denoted as the GRNNFA, is a hybrid model combining the General Regression Neural Network Model (GRNN) and the Fuzzy ART (FA) model. It not only retains the important features of the GRNN and FA models (i.e. fast and stable network training and incremental growth of network structure) but also facilitates the removal of the noise embedded in the training samples. Structural damage alters the stiffness distribution of the structure and so as to change the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the system. The measured modal parameter changes due to a particular damage are treated as patterns for that damage. The proposed GRNNFA model was trained to learn those patterns in order to detect the possible damage location of the structure. Simulated data is employed to verify and illustrate the procedures of the proposed ANN-based damage diagnosis methodology. The results of this study have demonstrated the feasibility of applying the GRNNFA model to structural damage diagnosis even when the training samples were noise contaminated.

  5. Intelligent-based Structural Damage Detection Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eric Wai Ming; Yu, Kin Fung

    2010-05-01

    This paper presents the application of a novel Artificial Neural Network (ANN) model for the diagnosis of structural damage. The ANN model, denoted as the GRNNFA, is a hybrid model combining the General Regression Neural Network Model (GRNN) and the Fuzzy ART (FA) model. It not only retains the important features of the GRNN and FA models (i.e. fast and stable network training and incremental growth of network structure) but also facilitates the removal of the noise embedded in the training samples. Structural damage alters the stiffness distribution of the structure and so as to change the natural frequencies and mode shapes of the system. The measured modal parameter changes due to a particular damage are treated as patterns for that damage. The proposed GRNNFA model was trained to learn those patterns in order to detect the possible damage location of the structure. Simulated data is employed to verify and illustrate the procedures of the proposed ANN-based damage diagnosis methodology. The results of this study have demonstrated the feasibility of applying the GRNNFA model to structural damage diagnosis even when the training samples were noise contaminated.

  6. Mechanisms of subsidence for induced damage and techniques for analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drumm, E.C.; Bennett, R.M.; Kane, W.F.

    1988-01-01

    Structural damage due to mining induced subsidence is a function of the nature of the structure and its position on the subsidence profile. A point on the profile may be in the tensile zone, the compressive zone, or the no-deformation zone at the bottom of the profile. Damage to structures in the tension zone is primarily due to a reduction of support during vertical displacement of the ground surface, and to shear stresses between the soil and structure resulting from horizontal displacements. The damage mechanisms due to tension can be investigated effectively using a two-dimensional plane stress analysis. Structures in the compression zone are subjected to positive moments in the footing and large compressive horizontal stresses in the foundation walls. A plane strain analysis of the foundation wall is utilized to examine compression zone damage mechanisms. The structural aspects affecting each mechanism are identified and potential mitigation techniques are summarized

  7. Epithelial and endothelial damage induced by mechanical ventilation modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suki, Béla; Hubmayr, Rolf

    2014-02-01

    The adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a common cause of respiratory failure with substantial impact on public health. Patients with ARDS generally require mechanical ventilation, which risks further lung damage. Recent improvements in ARDS outcomes have been attributed to reductions in deforming stress associated with lung protective mechanical ventilation modes and settings. The following review details the mechanics of the lung parenchyma at different spatial scales and the response of its resident cells to deforming stress in order to provide the biologic underpinnings of lung protective care. Although lung injury is typically viewed through the lens of altered barrier properties and mechanical ventilation-associated immune responses, in this review, we call attention to the importance of heterogeneity and the physical failure of the load bearing cell and tissue elements in the pathogenesis of ARDS. Specifically, we introduce a simple elastic network model to better understand the deformations of lung regions, intra-acinar alveoli and cells within a single alveolus, and consider the role of regional distension and interfacial stress-related injury for various ventilation modes. Heterogeneity of stiffness and intercellular and intracellular stress failure are fundamental components of ARDS and their development also depends on the ventilation mode.

  8. Model of designating the critical damages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwolińska Bożena

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article consists of two parts which make for an integral body. This article depicts the method of designating the critical damages in accordance with lean maintenance method. Author considered exemplary production system (serial-parallel in which in time Δt appeared a damage on three different objects. Article depicts the mathematical model which enables determination of an indicator called “prioritized digit of the device”. In the developed model there were considered some parameters: production abilities of devices, existence of potential vicarious devices, position of damage in the production stream based on the capacity of operational buffers, time needed to remove the damages and influence of damages to the finalization of customers’ orders – CEF indicator.

  9. The involvement of oxidative stress in the mechanisms of damaging cadmium action in bone tissue: A study in a rat model of moderate and relatively high human exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brzoska, Malgorzata M.; Rogalska, Joanna; Kupraszewicz, Elzbieta

    2011-01-01

    It was investigated whether cadmium (Cd) may induce oxidative stress in the bone tissue in vivo and in this way contribute to skeleton damage. Total antioxidative status (TAS), antioxidative enzymes (glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase), total oxidative status (TOS), hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ), lipid peroxides (LPO), total thiol groups (TSH) and protein carbonyl groups (PC) as well as Cd in the bone tissue at the distal femoral epiphysis and femoral diaphysis of the male rats that received drinking water containing 0, 5, or 50 mg Cd/l for 6 months were measured. Cd, depending on the level of exposure and bone location, decreased the bone antioxidative capacity and enhanced its oxidative status resulting in oxidative stress and oxidative protein and/or lipid modification. The treatment with 5 and 50 mg Cd/l decreased TAS and activities of antioxidative enzymes as well as increased TOS and concentrations of H 2 O 2 and PC at the distal femur. Moreover, at the higher exposure, the concentration of LPO increased and that of TSH decreased. The Cd-induced changes in the oxidative/antioxidative balance of the femoral diaphysis, abundant in cortical bone, were less advanced than at the distal femur, where trabecular bone predominates. The results provide evidence that, even moderate, exposure to Cd induces oxidative stress and oxidative modifications in the bone tissue. Numerous correlations noted between the indices of oxidative/antioxidative bone status, and Cd accumulation in the bone tissue as well as indices of bone turnover and bone mineral status, recently reported by us (Toxicology 2007, 237, 89-103) in these rats, allow for the hypothesis that oxidative stress is involved in the mechanisms of damaging Cd action in the skeleton. The paper is the first report from an in vivo study indicating that Cd may affect bone tissue through disorders in its oxidative/antioxidative balance resulting in oxidative stress.

  10. High LET radiation and mechanism of DNA damage repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2004-01-01

    Clarifying the mechanism of repair from radiation damage gives most important information on radiation effects on cells. Approximately 10% of biological experiments groups in Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba (HIMAC) cooperative research group has performed the subject. They gave a lot of new findings on the mechanism, and solved some open questions. The reason to show the peak of relative biological effectiveness RBE at around 100-200 keV/μm causes miss-repair of DNA damage. Sub-lethal damage generated by high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation can be repaired fully. Potentially lethal damages by high-LET radiation also repaired, but the efficiency decreased with the LET, and so on. (author)

  11. Molecular mechanisms in radiation damage to DNA. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, R.

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of this work are to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for radiation-induced DNA damage. The overall goal is to understand the relationship between the chemical and structural changes produced by ionizing radiation in DNA and the resulting impairment of biological function expressed as carcinogenesis or cell death. The studies are based on theoretical explorations of possible mechanisms that link initial radiation damage in the form of base and sugar damage to conformational changes in DNA. These mechanistic explorations should lead to the formulation of testable hypotheses regarding the processes of impairment of regulation of gene expression, alteration in DNA repair, and damage to DNA structure involved in cell death or cancer

  12. Continuum damage mechanics analysis of crack tip zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yinchu, L.; Jianping, Z.

    1989-01-01

    The crack tip field and its intensity factor play an important role in fracture mechanics. Generally, the damage such as microcracks, microvoids etc. will initiate and grow in materials as the cracked body is subjected to external loadings, especially in the crack tip zone. The damage evolution will load to the crack tip damage field and the change of the stress, strain and displacement fields of cracks tip zone. In this paper, on the basis of continuum damage mechanics, the authors have derived the equations which the crack tip field and its intensity factor must satisfy in a loading process, calculated the angle distribution curves of stress, strain and displacement fields in a crack tip zone and have compared them with the corresponding curves of HRR field and linear elastic field in undamaged materials. The equations of crack tip field intensity factors have been solved and its solutions give the variation of the field intensity factors with the loading parameter

  13. Study on Damage Mechanism of Ductile Cast Iron Cooling Stave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cui; Zhang, Jianliang; Zuo, Haibin; Dai, Bing

    The damage mechanism of ductile cast iron cooling stave applied to No.4 blast furnace of Guofeng steel was analyzed through damage investigation in details, the damage causes: high-temperature gas flow erosion, wear of burden, high-temperature ablation, carburizing damage, improper operation on blast furnace, etc. were given out both in macroscopic and microscopic views. It can be obtained from metallographic diagrams that the diameter of graphite nodules increases, the number per unit area reduces, and roundness declines, successively, from cold to hot surface, which are not conducive to stave longevity. In summary, the material for staves manufacture should be better in comprehensive mechanical properties to prolong the service life, thus making blast furnace long campaign.

  14. Study on Excitation-triggered Damage Mechanism in Perilous Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongkai; Wang, Shengjuan

    2017-12-01

    Chain collapse is easy to happen for perilous rock aggregate locating on steep high slope, and one of the key scientific problems is the damage mechanism of perilous rock under excitation action at perilous rock rupture. This paper studies excitation-triggered damage mechanism in perilous rock by wave mechanics, which gives three conclusions. Firstly, when only the normal incidence attenuation spread of excitation wave is considered, while the energy loss is ignored for excitation wave to spread in perilous rock aggregate, the paper establishes one method to calculate peak velocity when excitation wave passes through boundary between any two perilous rock blocks in perilous rock aggregate. Secondly, following by Sweden and Canmet criteria, the paper provides one wave velocity criterion for excitation-triggered damage in the aggregate. Thirdly, assuming double parameters of volume strain of cracks or fissures in rock meet the Weibull distribution, one method to estimate micro-fissure in excitation-triggered damage zone in perilous rock aggregate is established. The studies solve the mechanical description problem for excitation-triggered damage in perilous rock, which is valuable in studies on profoundly rupture mechanism.

  15. Improving Flood Damage Assessment Models in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadio, M.; Mysiak, J.; Carrera, L.; Koks, E.

    2015-12-01

    The use of Stage-Damage Curve (SDC) models is prevalent in ex-ante assessments of flood risk. To assess the potential damage of a flood event, SDCs describe a relation between water depth and the associated potential economic damage over land use. This relation is normally developed and calibrated through site-specific analysis based on ex-post damage observations. In some cases (e.g. Italy) SDCs are transferred from other countries, undermining the accuracy and reliability of simulation results. Against this background, we developed a refined SDC model for Northern Italy, underpinned by damage compensation records from a recent flood event. Our analysis considers both damage to physical assets and production losses from business interruptions. While the first is calculated based on land use information, production losses are measured through the spatial distribution of Gross Value Added (GVA). An additional component of the model assesses crop-specific agricultural losses as a function of flood seasonality. Our results show an overestimation of asset damage from non-calibrated SDC values up to a factor of 4.5 for tested land use categories. Furthermore, we estimate that production losses amount to around 6 per cent of the annual GVA. Also, maximum yield losses are less than a half of the amount predicted by the standard SDC methods.

  16. Foam-on-Tile Damage Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koharchik, Michael; Murphy, Lindsay; Parker, Paul

    2012-01-01

    An impact model was developed to predict how three specific foam types would damage the Space Shuttle Orbiter insulating tiles. The inputs needed for the model are the foam type, the foam mass, the foam impact velocity, the foam impact incident angle, the type being impacted, and whether the tile is new or aged (has flown at least one mission). The model will determine if the foam impact will cause damage to the tile. If it can cause damage, the model will output the damage cavity dimensions (length, depth, entry angle, exit angle, and sidewall angles). It makes the calculations as soon as the inputs are entered (less than 1 second). The model allows for the rapid calculation of numerous scenarios in a short time. The model was developed from engineering principles coupled with significant impact testing (over 800 foam impact tests). This model is applicable to masses ranging from 0.0002 up to 0.4 pound (0.09 up to 181 g). A prior tool performed a similar function, but was limited to the assessment of a small range of masses and did not have the large test database for verification. In addition, the prior model did not provide outputs of the cavity damage length, entry angle, exit angle, or sidewall angles.

  17. Wheat grain mechanical vulnerability to mechanical damage in light of the recent agrophysical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundas, S.

    1995-01-01

    The paper contains basic information on mechanical damage to wheat grains. The most important causes of mechanical damage and some of its effects in manufacturing are discussed. Grain material included 5 varieties of winter wheat and 2 varieties of spring wheat. Internal mechanical damage was examined by X-ray technique; external damage was examined with the colorimeter method. The results obtained were compared with the estimation results of more important processing features of the grain: gluten quantity and quality and grain hardness. (author)

  18. Flood damage: a model for consistent, complete and multipurpose scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menoni, Scira; Molinari, Daniela; Ballio, Francesco; Minucci, Guido; Mejri, Ouejdane; Atun, Funda; Berni, Nicola; Pandolfo, Claudia

    2016-12-01

    Effective flood risk mitigation requires the impacts of flood events to be much better and more reliably known than is currently the case. Available post-flood damage assessments usually supply only a partial vision of the consequences of the floods as they typically respond to the specific needs of a particular stakeholder. Consequently, they generally focus (i) on particular items at risk, (ii) on a certain time window after the occurrence of the flood, (iii) on a specific scale of analysis or (iv) on the analysis of damage only, without an investigation of damage mechanisms and root causes. This paper responds to the necessity of a more integrated interpretation of flood events as the base to address the variety of needs arising after a disaster. In particular, a model is supplied to develop multipurpose complete event scenarios. The model organizes available information after the event according to five logical axes. This way post-flood damage assessments can be developed that (i) are multisectoral, (ii) consider physical as well as functional and systemic damage, (iii) address the spatial scales that are relevant for the event at stake depending on the type of damage that has to be analyzed, i.e., direct, functional and systemic, (iv) consider the temporal evolution of damage and finally (v) allow damage mechanisms and root causes to be understood. All the above features are key for the multi-usability of resulting flood scenarios. The model allows, on the one hand, the rationalization of efforts currently implemented in ex post damage assessments, also with the objective of better programming financial resources that will be needed for these types of events in the future. On the other hand, integrated interpretations of flood events are fundamental to adapting and optimizing flood mitigation strategies on the basis of thorough forensic investigation of each event, as corroborated by the implementation of the model in a case study.

  19. Modelling of Damage During Hot Forging of Ingots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Bay, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Ductile damage modelling in the ingot forging process is discussed. Advantages and disadvantages of both coupled and uncoupled ductile damage models are presented. Some uncoupled damage models are examined in greater detail regarding their applicability to different processes, where hydrostatic...

  20. Implementation of an anisotropic damage material model using general second order damage tensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niazi, Muhammad Sohail; Mori, K.; Wisselink, H.H.; Pietrzyk, M.; Kusiak, J.; Meinders, Vincent T.; ten Horn, Carel; Majta, J.; Hartley, P.; Lin, J.

    2010-01-01

    Damage in metals is mainly the process of the initiation and growth of voids. With the growing complexity in materials and forming proc-esses, it becomes inevitable to include anisotropy in damage (tensorial damage variable). Most of the anisotropic damage models define the damage tensor in the

  1. A Progressive Damage Model for Predicting Permanent Indentation and Impact Damage in Composite Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Zhaojie; Guan, Zhidong; Li, Zengshan

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a progressive damage model was established on the basis of ABAQUS software for predicting permanent indentation and impact damage in composite laminates. Intralaminar and interlaminar damage was modelled based on the continuum damage mechanics (CDM) in the finite element model. For the verification of the model, low-velocity impact tests of quasi-isotropic laminates with material system of T300/5228A were conducted. Permanent indentation and impact damage of the laminates were simulated and the numerical results agree well with the experiments. It can be concluded that an obvious knee point can be identified on the curve of the indentation depth versus impact energy. Matrix cracking and delamination develops rapidly with the increasing impact energy, while considerable amount of fiber breakage only occurs when the impact energy exceeds the energy corresponding to the knee point. Predicted indentation depth after the knee point is very sensitive to the parameter μ which is proposed in this paper, and the acceptable value of this parameter is in range from 0.9 to 1.0.

  2. Handbook of damage mechanics nano to macro scale for materials and structures

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This authoritative reference provides comprehensive coverage of the topics of damage and healing mechanics. Computational modeling of constitutive equations is provided as well as solved examples in engineering applications. A wide range of materials that engineers may encounter are covered, including metals, composites, ceramics, polymers, biomaterials, and nanomaterials. The internationally recognized team of contributors employ a consistent and systematic approach, offering readers a user-friendly reference that is ideal for frequent consultation. Handbook of Damage Mechanics: Nano to Macro Scale for Materials and Structures is ideal for graduate students and faculty, researchers, and professionals in the fields of Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering, Aerospace Engineering, Materials Science, and Engineering Mechanics.

  3. Subsurface damage mechanism of high speed grinding process in single crystal silicon revealed by atomistic simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jia; Fang, Qihong; Zhang, Liangchi; Liu, Youwen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Molecular dynamic model of nanoscale high speed grinding of silicon workpiece has been established. • The effect of grinding speed on subsurface damage and grinding surface integrity by analyzing the chip, dislocation movement, and phase transformation during high speed grinding process are thoroughly investigated. • Subsurface damage is studied by the evolution of surface area at first time for more obvious observation on transition from ductile to brittle. • The hydrostatic stress and von Mises stress by the established analytical model are studied subsurface damage mechanism during nanoscale grinding. - Abstract: Three-dimensional molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are performed to investigate the nanoscale grinding process of single crystal silicon using diamond tool. The effect of grinding speed on subsurface damage and grinding surface integrity by analyzing the chip, dislocation movement, and phase transformation are studied. We also establish an analytical model to calculate several important stress fields including hydrostatic stress and von Mises stress for studying subsurface damage mechanism, and obtain the dislocation density on the grinding subsurface. The results show that a higher grinding velocity in machining brittle material silicon causes a larger chip and a higher temperature, and reduces subsurface damage. However, when grinding velocity is above 180 m s −1 , subsurface damage thickness slightly increases because a higher grinding speed leads to the increase in grinding force and temperature, which accelerate dislocation nucleation and motion. Subsurface damage is studied by the evolution of surface area at first time for more obvious observation on transition from ductile to brittle, that provides valuable reference for machining nanometer devices. The von Mises stress and the hydrostatic stress play an important role in the grinding process, and explain the subsurface damage though dislocation mechanism under high

  4. Early models of DNA damage formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Śmiałek, Małgorzata A

    2012-01-01

    Quantification of DNA damage, induced by various types of incident radiation as well as chemical agents, has been the subject of many theoretical and experimental studies, supporting the development of modern cancer therapy. The primary observations showed that many factors can lead to damage of DNA molecules. It became clear that the development of experimental techniques for exploring this phenomenon is required. Another problem was simultaneously dealt with, anticipating on how the damage is distributed within the double helix of the DNA molecule and how the single strand break formation and accumulation can influence the lethal double strand break formation. In this work the most important probabilistic models for DNA strand breakage and damage propagation are summarized and compared.

  5. Early mechanisms in radiation-induced biological damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, E.L.

    1983-01-01

    An introduction to the mechanisms of radiation action in biological systems is presented. Several questions about the nature of the radiation damage process are discussed, including recognition of the oxygen effects, dose-response relationships, and the importance of the hydroxyl radical

  6. Thermomechanical fatigue and damage mechanisms in Sanicro 25 steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petráš, Roman; Škorík, Viktor; Polák, Jaroslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 650, JAN (2016), s. 52-62 ISSN 0921-5093 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0063; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-23652S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : thermomechanical fatigue * Sanicro 25 steel * damage mechanism * FIB cutting * localized oxidation-cracking Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 3.094, year: 2016

  7. Damage modelling in concrete subject to sulfate attack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Cefis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we consider the mechanical effect of the sulfate attack on concrete. The durability analysis of concrete structures in contact to external sulfate solutions requires the definition of a proper diffusion-reaction model, for the computation of the varying sulfate concentration and of the consequent ettringite formation, coupled to a mechanical model for the prediction of swelling and material degradation. In this work, we make use of a two-ions formulation of the reactive-diffusion problem and we propose a bi-phase chemo-elastic damage model aimed to simulate the mechanical response of concrete and apt to be used in structural analyses.

  8. Progressive Damage Modeling of Durable Bonded Joint Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Frank A.; Davila, Carlos G.; Lin, Shih-Yung; Smeltzer, Stan; Girolamo, Donato; Ghose, Sayata; Guzman, Juan C.; McCarville, Duglas A.

    2013-01-01

    The development of durable bonded joint technology for assembling composite structures for launch vehicles is being pursued for the U.S. Space Launch System. The present work is related to the development and application of progressive damage modeling techniques to bonded joint technology applicable to a wide range of sandwich structures for a Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle. The joint designs studied in this work include a conventional composite splice joint and a NASA-patented Durable Redundant Joint. Both designs involve a honeycomb sandwich with carbon/epoxy facesheets joined with adhesively bonded doublers. Progressive damage modeling allows for the prediction of the initiation and evolution of damage. For structures that include multiple materials, the number of potential failure mechanisms that must be considered increases the complexity of the analyses. Potential failure mechanisms include fiber fracture, matrix cracking, delamination, core crushing, adhesive failure, and their interactions. The joints were modeled using Abaqus parametric finite element models, in which damage was modeled with user-written subroutines. Each ply was meshed discretely, and layers of cohesive elements were used to account for delaminations and to model the adhesive layers. Good correlation with experimental results was achieved both in terms of load-displacement history and predicted failure mechanisms.

  9. Molecular models for DNA damaged by photoreaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearlman, D.A.; Holbrook, S.R.; Pirkle, D.H.; Kim, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    Structural models of a DNA molecule containing a radiation-induced psoralen cross-link and of a DNA containing a thymine photodimer were constructed by applying energy-minimization techniques and model-building procedures to data from x-ray crystallographic studies. The helical axes of the models show substantial kinking and unwinding at the sites of the damage, which may have long-range as well as local effects arising from the concomitant changes in the supercoiling and overall structure of the DNA. The damaged areas may also serve as recognition sites for repair enzymes. These results should help in understanding the biologic effects of radiation-induced damage on cells

  10. Mechanical damage in cotton buds caused by the boll weevil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Roseane Cavalcanti

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis Boheman causes high levels of bud abscission in cotton plants due to feeding or oviposition punctures. It has been reported that abscission is mainly due to enzymes present in the insect's saliva, but mechanical damage could also contribute to square abscission. The objective of this paper was to undertake an analysis of the morphological damages caused by the insect in cotton squares using microscopy. Anthers and ovules are the main target of boll weevil feeding. The process initiates by perforation of young sepal and petal tissues and proceeds with subsequent alimentation on stamen and ovary leading to abscission of floral structures.

  11. Impact damages modeling in laminated composite structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kreculj Dragan D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laminated composites have an important application in modern engineering structures. They are characterized by extraordinary properties, such as: high strength and stiffness and lightweight. Nevertheless, a serious obstacle to more widespread use of those materials is their sensitivity to the impact loads. Impacts cause initiation and development of certain types of damages. Failures that occur in laminated composite structures can be intralaminar and interlaminar. To date it was developed a lot of simulation models for impact damages analysis in laminates. Those models can replace real and expensive testing in laminated structures with a certain accuracy. By using specialized software the damage parameters and distributions can be determined (at certain conditions on laminate structures. With performing numerical simulation of impact on composite laminates there are corresponding results valid for the analysis of these structures.

  12. Anisotropic Elastoplastic Damage Mechanics Method to Predict Fatigue Life of the Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hualiang Wan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New damage mechanics method is proposed to predict the low-cycle fatigue life of metallic structures under multiaxial loading. The microstructure mechanical model is proposed to simulate anisotropic elastoplastic damage evolution. As the micromodel depends on few material parameters, the present method is very concise and suitable for engineering application. The material parameters in damage evolution equation are determined by fatigue experimental data of standard specimens. By employing further development on the ANSYS platform, the anisotropic elastoplastic damage mechanics-finite element method is developed. The fatigue crack propagation life of satellite structure is predicted using the present method and the computational results comply with the experimental data very well.

  13. Modelling of settlement induced building damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giardina, G.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the modelling of settlement induced damage to masonry buildings. In densely populated areas, the need for new space is nowadays producing a rapid increment of underground excavations. Due to the construction of new metro lines, tunnelling activity in urban areas is growing.

  14. Mechanisms of free radical-induced damage to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizdaroglu, Miral; Jaruga, Pawel

    2012-04-01

    Endogenous and exogenous sources cause free radical-induced DNA damage in living organisms by a variety of mechanisms. The highly reactive hydroxyl radical reacts with the heterocyclic DNA bases and the sugar moiety near or at diffusion-controlled rates. Hydrated electron and H atom also add to the heterocyclic bases. These reactions lead to adduct radicals, further reactions of which yield numerous products. These include DNA base and sugar products, single- and double-strand breaks, 8,5'-cyclopurine-2'-deoxynucleosides, tandem lesions, clustered sites and DNA-protein cross-links. Reaction conditions and the presence or absence of oxygen profoundly affect the types and yields of the products. There is mounting evidence for an important role of free radical-induced DNA damage in the etiology of numerous diseases including cancer. Further understanding of mechanisms of free radical-induced DNA damage, and cellular repair and biological consequences of DNA damage products will be of outmost importance for disease prevention and treatment.

  15. A thermal-mechanical constitutive model for rock salt with consideration of damage, failure and healing; Ein thermisch-mechanisches Stoffmodell fuer Steinsalz mit Beruecksichtigung von Schaedigung, Bruch und Verheilung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missal, Christian; Gaehrken, Andreas; Stahlmann, Joachim [Technische Univ. Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Grundbau und Bodenmechanik

    2016-03-15

    Numerous mine workings in rock salt are used in the present for the disposal of low and intermediate level radioactive waste or chemo-toxic waste. In order to get information about the integrity of the mine workings' barrier or to calculate geotechnical sealing structures, numerical tools are necessary. For this purpose, the constitutive model TUBSsalt was developed at the Institute for Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering of the Technische Universitaet Braunschweig. The constitutive model's formulation enables the simulation of the significant creeping mechanisms as well as damage, failure and healing. The influence of the temperature on the mechanical behavior is also considered. The parameters can be determined by laboratory tests. The implementation of the constitutive model is realized in two different numerical program systems. By using a uniform set of parameters for a type of salt a good match between the calculated data and the measured data can be achieved. In order to get a versatile and reliable tool for the calculation of cavities in rock salt, the validation of the constitutive model will be continued with more complex structures.

  16. Development of Numerical Analysis Techniques Based on Damage Mechanics and Fracture Mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Yoon Suk; Lee, Dock Jin; Choi, Shin Beom; Kim, Sun Hye; Cho, Doo Ho; Lee, Hyun Boo

    2010-04-01

    The scatter of measured fracture toughness data and transferability problems among different crack configurations as well as geometry and loading conditions are major obstacles for application of fracture mechanics. To address these issues, recently, concerns on the local approach employing reliable micro-mechanical damage models are being increased again in connection with a progress of computational technology. In the present research, as part of development of fracture mechanical evaluation model for material degradation of reactor pressure boundary, several investigations on fracture behaviors were carried out. Especially, a numerical scheme to determine key parameters consisting both cleavage and ductile fracture estimate models was changed efficiently by incorporating a genetic algorithm. Also, with regard to the well-known master curve, newly reported methods such as bimodal master curve, randomly inhomogeneous master curve and single point estimation were reviewed to deal with homogeneous and inhomogeneous material characteristics. A series of preliminary finite element analyses was conducted to examine the element size effect on micro-mechanical models. Then, a new thickness correction equation was derived from parametric three-dimensional numerical simulations, which was founded on the current test standard, ASTM E1921, but could lead to get more realistic fracture toughness values. As a result, promising modified master curves as well as fracture toughness diagrams to convert data between pre-cracked V-notched and compact tension specimens were generated. Moreover, a user-subroutine in relation to GTN(Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman) model was made by adopting Hill's 48 yield potential theory. By applying GTN model combined with the subroutine to small punch specimens, the effect of inhomogeneous properties on fracture behaviors of miniature specimens was confirmed. Therefore, it is anticipated that the aforementioned enhanced research results can be utilized

  17. Irreversible entropy model for damage diagnosis in resistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuadras, Angel, E-mail: angel.cuadras@upc.edu; Crisóstomo, Javier; Ovejas, Victoria J.; Quilez, Marcos [Instrumentation, Sensor and Interfaces Group, Electronic Engineering Department, Escola d' Enginyeria de Telecomunicació i Aeronàutica de Castelldefels EETAC, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Barcelona Tech (UPC), Castelldefels-Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-10-28

    We propose a method to characterize electrical resistor damage based on entropy measurements. Irreversible entropy and the rate at which it is generated are more convenient parameters than resistance for describing damage because they are essentially positive in virtue of the second law of thermodynamics, whereas resistance may increase or decrease depending on the degradation mechanism. Commercial resistors were tested in order to characterize the damage induced by power surges. Resistors were biased with constant and pulsed voltage signals, leading to power dissipation in the range of 4–8 W, which is well above the 0.25 W nominal power to initiate failure. Entropy was inferred from the added power and temperature evolution. A model is proposed to understand the relationship among resistance, entropy, and damage. The power surge dissipates into heat (Joule effect) and damages the resistor. The results show a correlation between entropy generation rate and resistor failure. We conclude that damage can be conveniently assessed from irreversible entropy generation. Our results for resistors can be easily extrapolated to other systems or machines that can be modeled based on their resistance.

  18. Irreversible entropy model for damage diagnosis in resistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuadras, Angel; Crisóstomo, Javier; Ovejas, Victoria J.; Quilez, Marcos

    2015-01-01

    We propose a method to characterize electrical resistor damage based on entropy measurements. Irreversible entropy and the rate at which it is generated are more convenient parameters than resistance for describing damage because they are essentially positive in virtue of the second law of thermodynamics, whereas resistance may increase or decrease depending on the degradation mechanism. Commercial resistors were tested in order to characterize the damage induced by power surges. Resistors were biased with constant and pulsed voltage signals, leading to power dissipation in the range of 4–8 W, which is well above the 0.25 W nominal power to initiate failure. Entropy was inferred from the added power and temperature evolution. A model is proposed to understand the relationship among resistance, entropy, and damage. The power surge dissipates into heat (Joule effect) and damages the resistor. The results show a correlation between entropy generation rate and resistor failure. We conclude that damage can be conveniently assessed from irreversible entropy generation. Our results for resistors can be easily extrapolated to other systems or machines that can be modeled based on their resistance

  19. Formability prediction for AHSS materials using damage models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, R.; Santos, Abel D.; José, César de Sá; Miranda, Sara

    2017-05-01

    Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are seeing an increased use, mostly due to lightweight design in automobile industry and strict regulations on safety and greenhouse gases emissions. However, the use of these materials, characterized by a high strength to weight ratio, stiffness and high work hardening at early stages of plastic deformation, have imposed many challenges in sheet metal industry, mainly their low formability and different behaviour, when compared to traditional steels, which may represent a defying task, both to obtain a successful component and also when using numerical simulation to predict material behaviour and its fracture limits. Although numerical prediction of critical strains in sheet metal forming processes is still very often based on the classic forming limit diagrams, alternative approaches can use damage models, which are based on stress states to predict failure during the forming process and they can be classified as empirical, physics based and phenomenological models. In the present paper a comparative analysis of different ductile damage models is carried out, in order numerically evaluate two isotropic coupled damage models proposed by Johnson-Cook and Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN), each of them corresponding to the first two previous group classification. Finite element analysis is used considering these damage mechanics approaches and the obtained results are compared with experimental Nakajima tests, thus being possible to evaluate and validate the ability to predict damage and formability limits for previous defined approaches.

  20. Formability prediction for AHSS materials using damage models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaral, R.; Miranda, Sara; Santos, Abel D.; José, César de Sá

    2017-01-01

    Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are seeing an increased use, mostly due to lightweight design in automobile industry and strict regulations on safety and greenhouse gases emissions. However, the use of these materials, characterized by a high strength to weight ratio, stiffness and high work hardening at early stages of plastic deformation, have imposed many challenges in sheet metal industry, mainly their low formability and different behaviour, when compared to traditional steels, which may represent a defying task, both to obtain a successful component and also when using numerical simulation to predict material behaviour and its fracture limits. Although numerical prediction of critical strains in sheet metal forming processes is still very often based on the classic forming limit diagrams, alternative approaches can use damage models, which are based on stress states to predict failure during the forming process and they can be classified as empirical, physics based and phenomenological models. In the present paper a comparative analysis of different ductile damage models is carried out, in order numerically evaluate two isotropic coupled damage models proposed by Johnson-Cook and Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN), each of them corresponding to the first two previous group classification. Finite element analysis is used considering these damage mechanics approaches and the obtained results are compared with experimental Nakajima tests, thus being possible to evaluate and validate the ability to predict damage and formability limits for previous defined approaches. (paper)

  1. Effect of continuum damage mechanics on spring back prediction in metal forming processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayebi, Ali; Shahabi, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    The influence of considering the variations in material properties was investigated through continuum damage mechanics according to the Lemaitre isotropic unified damage law to predict the bending force and spring back in V-bending sheet metal forming processes, with emphasis on Finite element (FE) simulation considerations. The material constants of the damage model were calibrated through a uniaxial tensile test with an appropriate and convenient repeating strategy. Holloman’s isotropic and Ziegler’s linear kinematic hardening laws were employed to describe the behavior of a hardening material. To specify the ideal FE conditions for simulating spring back, the effect of the various numerical considerations during FE simulation was investigated and compared with the experimental outcome. Results indicate that considering continuum damage mechanics decreased the predicted bending force and improved the accuracy of spring back prediction.

  2. Mechanisms of Retinal Damage after Ocular Alkali Burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschalis, Eleftherios I; Zhou, Chengxin; Lei, Fengyang; Scott, Nathan; Kapoulea, Vassiliki; Robert, Marie-Claude; Vavvas, Demetrios; Dana, Reza; Chodosh, James; Dohlman, Claes H

    2017-06-01

    Alkali burns to the eye constitute a leading cause of worldwide blindness. In recent case series, corneal transplantation revealed unexpected damage to the retina and optic nerve in chemically burned eyes. We investigated the physical, biochemical, and immunological components of retinal injury after alkali burn and explored a novel neuroprotective regimen suitable for prompt administration in emergency departments. Thus, in vivo pH, oxygen, and oxidation reduction measurements were performed in the anterior and posterior segment of mouse and rabbit eyes using implantable microsensors. Tissue inflammation was assessed by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. The experiments confirmed that the retinal damage is not mediated by direct effect of the alkali, which is effectively buffered by the anterior segment. Rather, pH, oxygen, and oxidation reduction changes were restricted to the cornea and the anterior chamber, where they caused profound uveal inflammation and release of proinflammatory cytokines. The latter rapidly diffuse to the posterior segment, triggering retinal damage. Tumor necrosis factor-α was identified as a key proinflammatory mediator of retinal ganglion cell death. Blockade, by either monoclonal antibody or tumor necrosis factor receptor gene knockout, reduced inflammation and retinal ganglion cell loss. Intraocular pressure elevation was not observed in experimental alkali burns. These findings illuminate the mechanism by which alkali burns cause retinal damage and may have importance in designing therapies for retinal protection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Continuum damage mechanics based approach to the fatigue life prediction of cast aluminium alloy with considering the effect of porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiaojia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A damage mechanics based approach is applied for the study of fatigue behaviour of high pressure die cast ADC12 aluminium alloy. A damage coupled elastoplastic constitutive model is presented according to the concept of effective stress and the hypothesis of strain equivalence. An elastic fatigue damage model taking into account the pore-induced stress concentration is developed to investigate fatigue damage evolution of the specimens subjected to cyclic loading. The predicted lives for the specimens with different sizes of pores are consistent with the experimental data. The pore-induced fatigue damage and the variation of fatigue life along with the size of pores are also investigated.

  4. A Coupled Plastic Damage Model for Concrete considering the Effect of Damage on Plastic Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Feng; Cheng, Guangxu

    2015-01-01

    A coupled plastic damage model with two damage scalars is proposed to describe the nonlinear features of concrete. The constitutive formulations are developed by assuming that damage can be represented effectively in the material compliance tensor. Damage evolution law and plastic damage coupling are described using the framework of irreversible thermodynamics. The plasticity part is developed without using the effective stress concept. A plastic yield function based on the true stress is ado...

  5. Study on radiation damage of electron and γ-rays and mechanism of nuclear hardening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing Tao

    2001-01-01

    Radiation damage effects of electrons and γ-rays are presented. The damage defects are studied by experimental methods. On the basis of these studies the damage mechanism and nuclear hardening techniques are studied

  6. Development of a Continuum Damage Mechanics Material Model of a Graphite-Kevlar(Registered Trademark) Hybrid Fabric for Simulating the Impact Response of Energy Absorbing Kevlar(Registered Trademark) Hybrid Fabric for Simulating the Impact Response of Energy Absorbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.; Littell, Justin D.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the development of input properties for a continuum damage mechanics based material model, Mat 58, within LS-DYNA(Registered Trademark) to simulate the response of a graphite-Kevlar(Registered Trademark) hybrid plain weave fabric. A limited set of material characterization tests were performed on the hybrid graphite-Kevlar(Registered Trademark) fabric. Simple finite element models were executed in LS-DYNA(Registered Trademark) to simulate the material characterization tests and to verify the Mat 58 material model. Once verified, the Mat 58 model was used in finite element models of two composite energy absorbers: a conical-shaped design, designated the "conusoid," fabricated of four layers of hybrid graphite-Kevlar(Registered Trademark) fabric; and, a sinusoidal-shaped foam sandwich design, designated the "sinusoid," fabricated of the same hybrid fabric face sheets with a foam core. Dynamic crush tests were performed on components of the two energy absorbers, which were designed to limit average vertical accelerations to 25- to 40-g, to minimize peak crush loads, and to generate relatively long crush stroke values under dynamic loading conditions. Finite element models of the two energy absorbers utilized the Mat 58 model that had been verified through material characterization testing. Excellent predictions of the dynamic crushing response were obtained.

  7. Novel Experimental Techniques to Investigate Wellbore Damage Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choens, R. C., II; Ingraham, M. D.; Lee, M.; Dewers, T. A.

    2017-12-01

    A new experimental technique with unique geometry is presented investigating deformation of simulated boreholes using standard axisymmetric triaxial deformation equipment. The Sandia WEllbore SImulation, SWESI, geometry, uses right cylinders of rock 50mm in diameter and 75mm in length. A 11.3mm hole is drilled perpendicular to the axis of the cylinder in the center of the sample to simulate a borehole. The hole is covered with a solid metal cover, and sealed with polyurethane. The metal cover can be machined with a high-pressure port to introduce different fluid chemistries into the borehole at controlled pressures. Samples are deformed in a standard load frame under confinement, allowing for a broad range of possible stresses, load paths, and temperatures. Experiments in this study are loaded to the desired confining pressure, then deformed at a constant axial strain rate or 10-5 sec-1. Two different suites of experiments are conducted in this study on sedimentary and crystalline rock types. The first series of experiments are conducted on Mancos Shale, a finely laminated transversely isotropic rock. Samples are cored at three different orientations to the laminations. A second series of experiments is conducted on Sierra White granite with different fluid chemistries inside the borehole. Numerical modelling and experimental observations including CT-microtomography demonstrate that stresses are concentrated around the simulated wellbore and recreate wellbore deformation mechanisms. Borehole strength and damage development is dependent on anisotropy orientation and fluid chemistry. Observed failure geometries, particularly for Mancos shale, can be highly asymmetric. These results demonstrate uncertainties in in situ stresses measurements using commonly-applied borehole breakout techniques in complicated borehole physico-chemical environments. Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering

  8. Tree-based flood damage modeling of companies: Damage processes and model performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieg, Tobias; Vogel, Kristin; Merz, Bruno; Kreibich, Heidi

    2017-07-01

    Reliable flood risk analyses, including the estimation of damage, are an important prerequisite for efficient risk management. However, not much is known about flood damage processes affecting companies. Thus, we conduct a flood damage assessment of companies in Germany with regard to two aspects. First, we identify relevant damage-influencing variables. Second, we assess the prediction performance of the developed damage models with respect to the gain by using an increasing amount of training data and a sector-specific evaluation of the data. Random forests are trained with data from two postevent surveys after flood events occurring in the years 2002 and 2013. For a sector-specific consideration, the data set is split into four subsets corresponding to the manufacturing, commercial, financial, and service sectors. Further, separate models are derived for three different company assets: buildings, equipment, and goods and stock. Calculated variable importance values reveal different variable sets relevant for the damage estimation, indicating significant differences in the damage process for various company sectors and assets. With an increasing number of data used to build the models, prediction errors decrease. Yet the effect is rather small and seems to saturate for a data set size of several hundred observations. In contrast, the prediction improvement achieved by a sector-specific consideration is more distinct, especially for damage to equipment and goods and stock. Consequently, sector-specific data acquisition and a consideration of sector-specific company characteristics in future flood damage assessments is expected to improve the model performance more than a mere increase in data.

  9. Mechanical properties of silicon in subsurface damage layer from nano-grinding studied by atomistic simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiwei; Chen, Pei; Qin, Fei; An, Tong; Yu, Huiping

    2018-05-01

    Ultra-thin silicon wafer is highly demanded by semi-conductor industry. During wafer thinning process, the grinding technology will inevitably induce damage to the surface and subsurface of silicon wafer. To understand the mechanism of subsurface damage (SSD) layer formation and mechanical properties of SSD layer, atomistic simulation is the effective tool to perform the study, since the SSD layer is in the scale of nanometer and hardly to be separated from underneath undamaged silicon. This paper is devoted to understand the formation of SSD layer, and the difference between mechanical properties of damaged silicon in SSD layer and ideal silicon. With the atomistic model, the nano-grinding process could be performed between a silicon workpiece and diamond tool under different grinding speed. To reach a thinnest SSD layer, nano-grinding speed will be optimized in the range of 50-400 m/s. Mechanical properties of six damaged silicon workpieces with different depths of cut will be studied. The SSD layer from each workpiece will be isolated, and a quasi-static tensile test is simulated to perform on the isolated SSD layer. The obtained stress-strain curve is an illustration of overall mechanical properties of SSD layer. By comparing the stress-strain curves of damaged silicon and ideal silicon, a degradation of Young's modulus, ultimate tensile strength (UTS), and strain at fracture is observed.

  10. Mechanical properties of silicon in subsurface damage layer from nano-grinding studied by atomistic simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiwei Zhang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-thin silicon wafer is highly demanded by semi-conductor industry. During wafer thinning process, the grinding technology will inevitably induce damage to the surface and subsurface of silicon wafer. To understand the mechanism of subsurface damage (SSD layer formation and mechanical properties of SSD layer, atomistic simulation is the effective tool to perform the study, since the SSD layer is in the scale of nanometer and hardly to be separated from underneath undamaged silicon. This paper is devoted to understand the formation of SSD layer, and the difference between mechanical properties of damaged silicon in SSD layer and ideal silicon. With the atomistic model, the nano-grinding process could be performed between a silicon workpiece and diamond tool under different grinding speed. To reach a thinnest SSD layer, nano-grinding speed will be optimized in the range of 50-400 m/s. Mechanical properties of six damaged silicon workpieces with different depths of cut will be studied. The SSD layer from each workpiece will be isolated, and a quasi-static tensile test is simulated to perform on the isolated SSD layer. The obtained stress-strain curve is an illustration of overall mechanical properties of SSD layer. By comparing the stress-strain curves of damaged silicon and ideal silicon, a degradation of Young’s modulus, ultimate tensile strength (UTS, and strain at fracture is observed.

  11. Ultraviolet-B-effects on plants: Spectra of harmful effects, primary damage and UV protective mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellmann, E.; Beggs, C.; Moehle, B.; Schneider-Ziebert, U.; Steinmetz, V.; Koch, U.

    1986-01-01

    In two model systems of higher plants, damage caused by ultraviolet-B-radiation was analysed as to its mechanism of action and the spectral quantum efficiency. These investigations were to provide information on the relevance of such UV effects in cases of increased ultraviolet-B-irradiation owing to the destruction of ozone. The results indicate the very high tolerance of the plants to ultraviolet-B-radiation which obviously is the result of very effective protective mechanisms, and show at the same time that potential damage must already be reckoned with, given the current share of ultraviolet-B-radiation in solar radiation. Should ultraviolet-B-radiation be increased, then indirect damage to the plant from the destruction of ultraviolet protective mechanisms through UV-B-radiation will probably constitute a particular risk. (orig./MG) [de

  12. An approach to modelling radiation damage by fast ionizing particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents a statistical approach to modelling radiation damage in small biological structures such as enzymes, viruses, and some cells. Irreparable damage is assumed to be caused by the occurrence of ionizations within sensitive regions. For structures containing double-stranded DNA, one or more ionizations occurring within each strand of the DNA will cause inactivation; for simpler structures without double-stranded DNA a single ionization within the structure will be sufficient for inactivation. Damaging ionizations occur along tracks of primary irradiating particles or along tracks of secondary particles released at primary ionizations. An inactivation probability is derived for each damage mechanism, expressed in integral form in terms of the radius of the biological structure (assumed spherical), rate of ionization along primary tracks, and maximum energy for secondary particles. The performance of each model is assessed by comparing results from the model with those derived from data from various experimental studies extracted from the literature. For structures where a single ionization is sufficient for inactivation, the model gives qualitatively promising results; for larger more complex structures containing double-stranded DNA, the model requires further refinements. (author)

  13. Model of designating the critical damages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zwolińska Bożena

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Managing company in the lean way presumes no breakdowns nor reserves in the whole delivery chain. However, achieving such low indicators is impossible. That is why in some production plants it is extremely important to focus on preventive actions which can limit damages. This article depicts the method of designating the critical damages in accordance with lean maintenance method. The article consists of two parts which make for an integral body. Part one depicts the characteristic of a realistic object, it also contains productions capabilities analysis of certain areas within the production structure. Part two depicts the probabilistic model of shaping maximal time loss basing on emptying and filling interoperational buffers.

  14. Effect of thermal and mechanical parameter’s damage numerical simulation cycling effects on defects in hot metal forming processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Amri, Abdelouahid; el yakhloufi Haddou, Mounir; Khamlichi, Abdellatif

    2017-10-01

    Damage mechanisms in hot metal forming processes are accelerated by mechanical stresses arising during Thermal and mechanical properties variations, because it consists of the materials with different thermal and mechanical loadings and swelling coefficients. In this work, 3D finite element models (FEM) are developed to simulate the effect of Temperature and the stresses on the model development, using a general purpose FE software ABAQUS. Explicit dynamic analysis with coupled Temperature displacement procedure is used for a model. The purpose of this research was to study the thermomechanical damage mechanics in hot forming processes. The important process variables and the main characteristics of various hot forming processes will also be discussed.

  15. Mechanical Systems, Classical Models

    CERN Document Server

    Teodorescu, Petre P

    2009-01-01

    This third volume completes the Work Mechanical Systems, Classical Models. The first two volumes dealt with particle dynamics and with discrete and continuous mechanical systems. The present volume studies analytical mechanics. Topics like Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics, the Hamilton-Jacobi method, and a study of systems with separate variables are thoroughly discussed. Also included are variational principles and canonical transformations, integral invariants and exterior differential calculus, and particular attention is given to non-holonomic mechanical systems. The author explains in detail all important aspects of the science of mechanics, regarded as a natural science, and shows how they are useful in understanding important natural phenomena and solving problems of interest in applied and engineering sciences. Professor Teodorescu has spent more than fifty years as a Professor of Mechanics at the University of Bucharest and this book relies on the extensive literature on the subject as well as th...

  16. Modeling of Corrosion-induced Concrete Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Anna Emilie A.; Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    In the present paper a finite element model is introduced to simulate corrosion-induced damage in concrete. The model takes into account the penetration of corrosion products into the concrete as well as non-uniform formation of corrosion products around the reinforcement. To ac-count for the non...... of corrosion products affects both the time-to cover cracking and the crack width at the concrete surface.......In the present paper a finite element model is introduced to simulate corrosion-induced damage in concrete. The model takes into account the penetration of corrosion products into the concrete as well as non-uniform formation of corrosion products around the reinforcement. To ac-count for the non......-uniform formation of corrosion products at the concrete/reinforcement interface, a deterministic approach is used. The model gives good estimates of both deformations in the con-crete/reinforcement interface and crack width when compared to experimental data. Further, it is shown that non-uniform deposition...

  17. Theoretical and numerical study of thermo-hydro-mechanical damage in unsaturated porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arson, Ch.

    2009-09-01

    Nuclear waste disposals are designed in multi-phase porous media. A new damage model, formulated in independent state variables (net stress, suction and thermal stress), is proposed for such geo-materials. The damage variable is a second-order tensor, which principal values grow with tensile strains. The stress/strain relations are derived from a postulated expression of the free energy. The degraded rigidities are computed by applying the Principle of Equivalent Elastic Energy for each stress state variable. Cracking effects are taken into account in transfers by introducing internal length parameters in the expressions of moisture conductivities. The damage model has been implemented in Θ-Stock Finite Element code. The mechanical model has been validated by comparing numerical results to experimental data and theoretical predictions. The qualitative evolutions given by the model in the parametric studies performed on realistic complex configurations show good trends. (author)

  18. Materials properties utilization in a cumulative mechanical damage function for LMFBR fuel pin failure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, D.C.

    1977-01-01

    An overview is presented of one of the fuel-pin analysis techniques used in the CRBRP program, the cumulative mechanical damage function. This technique, as applied to LMFBR's, was developed along with the majority of models used to describe the mechanical properties and environmental behavior of the cladding (i.e., 20 percent cold-worked, 316 stainless steel). As it relates to fuel-pin analyses the Cumulative Mechanical Damage Function (CDF) continually monitors cladding integrity through steady state and transient operation; it is a time dependent function of temperature and stress which reflects the effects of both the prior mechanical history and the variations in mechanical properties caused by exposure to the reactor environment

  19. Modelling of Damage Evolution in Braided Composites: Recent Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chen; Roy, Anish; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.; Chen, Zhong

    2017-12-01

    Composites reinforced with woven or braided textiles exhibit high structural stability and excellent damage tolerance thanks to yarn interlacing. With their high stiffness-to-weight and strength-to-weight ratios, braided composites are attractive for aerospace and automotive components as well as sports protective equipment. In these potential applications, components are typically subjected to multi-directional static, impact and fatigue loadings. To enhance material analysis and design for such applications, understanding mechanical behaviour of braided composites and development of predictive capabilities becomes crucial. Significant progress has been made in recent years in development of new modelling techniques allowing elucidation of static and dynamic responses of braided composites. However, because of their unique interlacing geometric structure and complicated failure modes, prediction of damage initiation and its evolution in components is still a challenge. Therefore, a comprehensive literature analysis is presented in this work focused on a review of the state-of-the-art progressive damage analysis of braided composites with finite-element simulations. Recently models employed in the studies on mechanical behaviour, impact response and fatigue analyses of braided composites are presented systematically. This review highlights the importance, advantages and limitations of as-applied failure criteria and damage evolution laws for yarns and composite unit cells. In addition, this work provides a good reference for future research on FE simulations of braided composites.

  20. Damage Model of Reinforced Concrete Members under Cyclic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bo Chen; Zhang, Jing Shu; Zhang, Yin Hua; Zhou, Jia Lai

    2018-06-01

    Based on the Kumar damage model, a new damage model for reinforced concrete members is established in this paper. According to the damage characteristics of reinforced concrete members subjected to cyclic loading, four judgment conditions for determining the rationality of damage models are put forward. An ideal damage index (D) is supposed to vary within a scale of zero (no damage) to one (collapse). D should be a monotone increasing function which tends to increase in the case of the same displacement amplitude. As for members under large displacement amplitude loading, the growth rate of D should be greater than that of D under small amplitude displacement loading. Subsequently, the Park-Ang damage model, the Niu-Ren damage model, the Lu-Wang damage model and the proposed damage model are analyzed for 30 experimental reinforced concrete members, including slabs, walls, beams and columns. The results show that current damage models do not fully matches the reasonable judgment conditions, but the proposed damage model does. Therefore, a conclusion can be drawn that the proposed damage model can be used for evaluating and predicting damage performance of RC members under cyclic loading.

  1. Non-local modelling of cyclic thermal shock damage including parameter estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damhof, F.; Brekelmans, W.A.M.; Geers, M.G.D.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, rate dependent evolution laws are identified and characterized to model the mechanical (elasticity-based) and thermal damage occurring in coarse grain refractory material subject to cyclic thermal shock. The interacting mechanisms for elastic deformation driven damage induced by

  2. Damage Tolerance and Mechanics of Interfaces in Nanostructured Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Daniel J.

    The concept of interface driven properties in crystalline metals has been one of the most intensely discussed topics in materials science for decades. Since the 1980s researchers have been exploring the concept of grain boundary engineering as route for tuning properties such as fracture toughness and irradiation resistance. This is especially true in ultra-fine grained and nanocrystalline materials where grain boundary mediated properties become dominant. More recently, materials composed of hierarchical nanostructures, such as amorphous-crystalline nanolaminates, have attracted considerable attention due to their favorable properties, ease of manufacture and highly tunable microstructure. While both grain boundary engineering and hierarchical nanostructures have shown promise there are still questions remaining regarding the role of specific attributes of the microstructure (such as grain boundaries, grain/layer size and inter/intralayer morphology) in determining material properties. This thesis attempts to address these questions by using atomistic simulations to perform deformation and damage loading studies on a series of nanolaminate and bicrystalline structures. During the course of this thesis the roles of layer thickness, interlayer structure and interlayer chemistry on the mechanical properties of Ni-NiX amorphous-crystalline nanolaminates were explored using atomistic simulations. This thesis found that layer thickness/thickness ratio and amorphous layer chemistry play a crucial role in yield strength and Young's modulus. Analysis of the deformation mechanisms at the atomic scale revealed that structures containing single crystalline, crystalline layers undergo plastic deformation when shear transformation zones form in the amorphous layer and impinge on the amorphous-crystalline interface, leading to dislocation emission. However, structures containing nanocrystalline, crystalline layers (both equiaxed and columnar nanocrystalline) undergo plastic

  3. Simulation of fatigue damage in ferroelectric polycrystals under mechanical/electrical loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozinov, S.; Kuna, M.

    2018-07-01

    The reliability of smart-structures made of ferroelectric ceramics is essentially reduced by the formation of cracks under the action of external electrical and/or mechanical loading. In the current research a numerical model for low-cycle fatigue in ferroelectric mesostructures is proposed. In the finite element simulations a combination of two user element routines is utilized. The first one is used to model a micromechanical ferroelectric domain switching behavior inside the grains. The second one is used to simulate fatigue damage of grain boundaries by a cohesive zone model (EMCCZM) based on an electromechanical cyclic traction-separation law (TSL). For numerical simulations a scanning electron microscope image of the ceramic's grain structure was digitalized and meshed. The response of this mesostructure to cyclic electrical or mechanical loading is systematically analyzed. As a result of the simulations, the distribution of electric potential, field, displacement and polarization as well as mechanical stresses and deformations inside the grains are obtained. At the grain boundaries, the formation and evolution of damage are analyzed until final failure and induced degradation of electric permittivity. It is found that the proposed model correctly mimics polycrystalline behavior during poling processes and progressive damage under cyclic electromechanical loading. To the authors' knowledge, it is the first model and numerical analysis of ferroelectric polycrystals taking into account both domain reorientation and cohesive modeling of intergranular fracture. It can help to understand failure mechanisms taking place in ferroelectrics during fatigue processes.

  4. Damage evolution and failure mechanisms in additively manufactured stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlton, Holly D., E-mail: carlton4@llnl.gov [Materials Engineering Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Haboub, Abdel [Lincoln University, Life and Physical Sciences Department, 820 Chestnut St, Jefferson City, MO 65101 (United States); Gallegos, Gilbert F. [Materials Engineering Division, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Parkinson, Dilworth Y.; MacDowell, Alastair A. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-01-10

    In situ tensile tests were performed on additively manufactured austenitic stainless steel to track damage evolution within the material. For these experiments Synchrotron Radiation micro-Tomography was used to measure three-dimensional pore volume, distribution, and morphology in stainless steel at the micrometer length-scale while tensile loading was applied. The results showed that porosity distribution played a larger role in affecting the fracture mechanisms than measured bulk density. Specifically, additively manufactured stainless steel specimens with large inhomogeneous void distributions displayed a flaw-dominated failure where cracks were shown to initiate at pre-existing voids, while annealed additively manufactured stainless steel specimens, which contained low porosity and randomly distributed pores, displayed fracture mechanisms that closely resembled wrought metal.

  5. Defense mechanisms against radiation induced teratogenic damage in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, F.; Ootsuyama, A.; Nomoto, S.; Norimura, T.

    2002-01-01

    Experimental studies with mice have established that fetuses at midgestational stage are highly susceptible to malformation at high, but not low, doses of radiation. When DNA damage is produced by a small amount of radiation, it is efficiently eliminated by DNA repair. However, DNA repair is not perfect. There must be defense mechanisms other than DNA repair. In order to elucidate the essential role of p53 gene in apoptotic tissue repair, we compared the incidence of radiation-induced malformations and deaths (deaths after day 10) in wild-type p53 (+/+) mice and null p53 (-/-) mice. For p53 (+/+) mice, an X-ray dose of 2 Gy given at a high dose-rate (450 mGy/min) to fetuses at 9.5 days of gestation was highly lethal and considerably teratogenic whereas it was only slightly lethal but highly teratogenic for p53 (-/-) fetuses. This reciprocal relationship of radiosensitivity to malformations and deaths supports the notion that fetal tissues have a p53 -dependent idguardianln of the tissue that aborts cells bearing radiation-induced teratogenic DNA damage. When an equal dose of 2 Gy given at a 400-fold lower dose-rate (1.2 mGy/min), this dose became not teratogenic for p53 (+/+) fetuses exhibiting p53 -dependent apoptosis, whereas this dose remained teratogenic for p53 (-/-) fetuses unable to carry out apoptosis. Furthermore, when the dose was divided into two equal dose fractions (1+1 Gy) at high dose rate, separated by 24 hours, the incidences of malformations were equal with control level for p53 (+/+), but higher for p53 (-/-) mice. Hence, complete elimination of teratogenic damage from irradiated tissues requires a concerted cooperation of two mechanisms; proficient DNA repair and p53-dependent apoptotic tissue repair

  6. Fisetin Protects DNA Against Oxidative Damage and Its Possible Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tingting; Lin, Huajuan; Tu, Qian; Liu, Jingjing; Li, Xican

    2016-06-01

    The paper tries to assess the protective effect of fisetin against •OH-induced DNA damage, then to investigate the possible mechanism. The protective effect was evaluated based on the content of malondialdehyde (MDA). The possible mechanism was analyzed using various antioxidant methods in vitro, including •OH scavenging (deoxyribose degradation), •O2 (-) scavenging (pyrogallol autoxidation), DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•(+) scavenging, and Cu(2+)-reducing power assays. Fisetin increased dose-dependently its protective percentages against •OH-induced DNA damage (IC50 value =1535.00±29.60 µM). It also increased its radical-scavenging percentages in a dose-dependent manner in various antioxidants assays. Its IC50 values in •OH scavenging, •O2(-) scavenging, DPPH• scavenging, ABTS•(+) scavenging, and Cu(2+)-reducing power assays, were 47.41±4.50 µM, 34.05±0.87 µM, 9.69±0.53 µM, 2.43±0.14 µM, and 1.49±0.16 µM, respectively. Fisetin can effectively protect DNA against •OH-induced oxidative damage possibly via reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging approach, which is assumed to be hydrogen atom (H•) and/or single electron (e) donation (HAT/SET) pathways. In the HAT pathway, the 3',4'-dihydroxyl moiety in B ring of fisetin is thought to play an important role, because it can be ultimately oxidized to a stable ortho-benzoquinone form.

  7. Statistical 3D damage accumulation model for ion implant simulators

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Mangas, J M; Enriquez, L E; Bailon, L; Barbolla, J; Jaraiz, M

    2003-01-01

    A statistical 3D damage accumulation model, based on the modified Kinchin-Pease formula, for ion implant simulation has been included in our physically based ion implantation code. It has only one fitting parameter for electronic stopping and uses 3D electron density distributions for different types of targets including compound semiconductors. Also, a statistical noise reduction mechanism based on the dose division is used. The model has been adapted to be run under parallel execution in order to speed up the calculation in 3D structures. Sequential ion implantation has been modelled including previous damage profiles. It can also simulate the implantation of molecular and cluster projectiles. Comparisons of simulated doping profiles with experimental SIMS profiles are presented. Also comparisons between simulated amorphization and experimental RBS profiles are shown. An analysis of sequential versus parallel processing is provided.

  8. Statistical 3D damage accumulation model for ion implant simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Mangas, J.M.; Lazaro, J.; Enriquez, L.; Bailon, L.; Barbolla, J.; Jaraiz, M.

    2003-01-01

    A statistical 3D damage accumulation model, based on the modified Kinchin-Pease formula, for ion implant simulation has been included in our physically based ion implantation code. It has only one fitting parameter for electronic stopping and uses 3D electron density distributions for different types of targets including compound semiconductors. Also, a statistical noise reduction mechanism based on the dose division is used. The model has been adapted to be run under parallel execution in order to speed up the calculation in 3D structures. Sequential ion implantation has been modelled including previous damage profiles. It can also simulate the implantation of molecular and cluster projectiles. Comparisons of simulated doping profiles with experimental SIMS profiles are presented. Also comparisons between simulated amorphization and experimental RBS profiles are shown. An analysis of sequential versus parallel processing is provided

  9. Characteristics and mechanisms of acrylate polymer damage to maize seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xian; Mao, Xiaoyun; Lu, Qin; Liao, Zongwen; He, Zhenli

    2016-07-01

    Superabsorbent acrylate polymers (SAPs) have been widely used to maintain soil moisture in agricultural management, but they may cause damage to plants, and the mechanisms are not well understood. In this study, seed germination, soil pot culture, hydroponic experiments, and SAPs degradation were conducted to investigate damage characteristics and mechanisms associated with SAPs application. The Results showed that SAPs inhibited maize growth and altered root morphology (irregular and loose arrangement of cells and breakage of cortex parenchyma), and the inhibitory effects were enhanced at higher SAPs rates. After 1h SAP hydrogels treatment, root malondialdehyde (MDA) content was significantly increased, while superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) content were significantly decreased. Hydroponics experiment indicated that root and shoot growth was inhibited at 2.5mgL(-1) acrylic acid (AA), and the inhibition was enhanced with increasing AA rates. This effect was exacerbated by the presence of Na(+) at a high concentration in the hydrogels. Release and degradation of AA were enhanced at higher soil moisture levels. A complete degradation of AA occurred between 15 and 20 days after incubation (DAI), but it took longer for Na(+) concentration to decrease to a safe level. These results indicate that high concentration of both AA and Na(+) present in the SAPs inhibits plant growth. The finding of this study may provide a guideline for appropriate application of SAPs in agriculture. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A Lattice-Misfit-Dependent Damage Model for Non-linear Damage Accumulations Under Monotonous Creep in Single Crystal Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Graverend, J.-B.

    2018-05-01

    A lattice-misfit-dependent damage density function is developed to predict the non-linear accumulation of damage when a thermal jump from 1050 °C to 1200 °C is introduced somewhere in the creep life. Furthermore, a phenomenological model aimed at describing the evolution of the constrained lattice misfit during monotonous creep load is also formulated. The response of the lattice-misfit-dependent plasticity-coupled damage model is compared with the experimental results obtained at 140 and 160 MPa on the first generation Ni-based single crystal superalloy MC2. The comparison reveals that the damage model is well suited at 160 MPa and less at 140 MPa because the transfer of stress to the γ' phase occurs for stresses above 150 MPa which leads to larger variations and, therefore, larger effects of the constrained lattice misfit on the lifetime during thermo-mechanical loading.

  11. Damage mechanisms and metallic materials development in multiphase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Yugui; Liu, Wei; Yao, Zhiming; Ke, Wei

    2002-01-01

    The investigation on the synergistic effects among corrosion, slurry erosion and cavitation erosion has special significance for hydraulic turbines operated in Yangtze River and Yellow River where the high concentration solid particles exist in water. Two typical metallic materials i.e. Cr-Mn-N stainless steel and Ni-Ti shapememory-alloy, and two typical materials used for hydraulic turbines 20SiMn and 0Cr13Ni5Mo as compared materials were selected in order to investigate the roles of work-hardening ability and martensitic transformation as well as pseudoelastics in damage mechanism in multiphase flow. Both modified rotating disk rig and ultrasonic vibration facility were used to simulate the possible damage mechanism of materials in multiphase flow. The effects of corrosion on cavitation erosion were investigated through adding 3wt% NaCl. The degradation mechanism was analyzed by electrochemical test, SEM observation, hardness and roughness measurement. The results showed that there was a strong synergistic interaction among electrochemical corrosion, slurry erosion and cavitation erosion for 20SiMn in liquid-solid two-phase medium. In contrast, corrosion played little role for 0Cr13Ni5Mo. Cr-Mn-N stainless steel with high Mn content showed better resistance to cavitation erosion and slurry erosion than 0Cr13Ni5Mo, which was mainly due to its good work-hardening ability as well as strain-induced martensite transformation. The cavitation micro-cracks for Cr-Mn-N stainless steel were parallel to the specimen surface in contrast with 0Cr13Ni5Mo whose micro-cracks were perpendicular to the surface. Ni-Ti alloy with pseudoelasticity showed excellent resistance to combined interaction of cavitation erosion and slurry erosion

  12. Mechanisms of mutagenesis: DNA replication in the presence of DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Binyan; Xue, Qizhen; Tang, Yong; Cao, Jia; Guengerich, F Peter; Zhang, Huidong

    2016-01-01

    Environmental mutagens cause DNA damage that disturbs replication and produces mutations, leading to cancer and other diseases. We discuss mechanisms of mutagenesis resulting from DNA damage, from the level of DNA replication by a single polymerase to the complex DNA replisome of some typical model organisms (including bacteriophage T7, T4, Sulfolobus solfataricus, Escherichia coli, yeast and human). For a single DNA polymerase, DNA damage can affect replication in three major ways: reducing replication fidelity, causing frameshift mutations, and blocking replication. For the DNA replisome, protein interactions and the functions of accessory proteins can yield rather different results even with a single DNA polymerase. The mechanism of mutation during replication performed by the DNA replisome is a long-standing question. Using new methods and techniques, the replisomes of certain organisms and human cell extracts can now be investigated with regard to the bypass of DNA damage. In this review, we consider the molecular mechanism of mutagenesis resulting from DNA damage in replication at the levels of single DNA polymerases and complex DNA replisomes, including translesion DNA synthesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Flood vulnerability assessment of residential buildings by explicit damage process modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Custer, Rocco; Nishijima, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    The present paper introduces a vulnerability modelling approach for residential buildings in flood. The modelling approach explicitly considers relevant damage processes, i.e. water infiltration into the building, mechanical failure of components in the building envelope and damage from water...

  14. Review: Wind impacts on plant growth, mechanics and damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Barry; Berry, Peter; Moulia, Bruno

    2016-04-01

    Land plants have adapted to survive under a range of wind climates and this involve changes in chemical composition, physical structure and morphology at all scales from the cell to the whole plant. Under strong winds plants can re-orientate themselves, reconfigure their canopies, or shed needles, leaves and branches in order to reduce the drag. If the wind is too strong the plants oscillate until the roots or stem fail. The mechanisms of root and stem failure are very similar in different plants although the exact details of the failure may be different. Cereals and other herbaceous crops can often recover after wind damage and even woody plants can partially recovery if there is sufficient access to water and nutrients. Wind damage can have major economic impacts on crops, forests and urban trees. This can be reduced by management that is sensitive to the local site and climatic conditions and accounts for the ability of plants to acclimate to their local wind climate. Wind is also a major disturbance in many plant ecosystems and can play a crucial role in plant regeneration and the change of successional stage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Damage modeling in Small Punch Test specimens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez Pañeda, Emilio; Cuesta, I.I.; Peñuelas, I.

    2016-01-01

    . Furthermore,Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman model predictions from a top-down approach are employed to gain insightinto the mechanisms governing crack initiation and subsequent propagation in small punch experiments.An accurate assessment of micromechanical toughness parameters from the SPT...

  16. Compressive damage mechanism of GFRP composites under off-axis loading: Experimental and numerical investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, H.W.; Li, H.Y.; Gui, L.L.

    2013-01-01

    the angle between the fiber direction and the loading vector goes from 0° to 45° (by 2.3–2.6 times), and then slightly increases (when the angle approaches 80–90°). At the low angles between the fiber and the loading vector, fiber buckling and kinking are the main mechanisms of fiber failure....... With increasing the angle between the fiber and applied loading, failure of glass fibers is mainly controlled by shear cracking. For the computational analysis of the damage mechanisms, 3D multifiber unit cell models of GFRP composites and X-FEM approach to the fracture modeling were used. The computational...

  17. Mechanisms of formation damage in matrix-permeability geothermal wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergosh, J.L.; Wiggins, R.B.; Enniss, D.O.

    1982-04-01

    Tests were conducted to determine mechanisms of formation damage that can occur in matrix permeability geothermal wells. Two types of cores were used in the testing, actual cores from the East Mesa Well 78-30RD and cores from a fairly uniform generic sandstone formation. Three different types of tests were run. The East Mesa cores were used in the testing of the sensitivity of core to filtrate chemistry. The tests began with the cores exposed to simulated East Mesa brine and then different filtrates were introduced and the effects of the fluid contrast on core permeability were measured. The East Mesa cores were also used in the second series of tests which tested formation sandstone cores were used in the third test series which investigated the effects of different sizes of entrained particles in the fluid. Tests were run with both single-particle sizes and distributions of particle mixes. In addition to the testing, core preparation techniques for simulating fracture permeability were evaluated. Three different fracture formation mechanisms were identified and compared. Measurement techniques for measuring fracture size and permeability were also developed.

  18. Mechanisms of CNS invasion and damage by parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensson, Krister; Masocha, Willias; Bentivoglio, Marina

    2013-01-01

    Invasion of the central nervous system (CNS) is a most devastating complication of a parasitic infection. Several physical and immunological barriers provide obstacles to such an invasion. In this broad overview focus is given to the physical barriers to neuroinvasion of parasites provided at the portal of entry of the parasites, i.e., the skin and epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract, and between the blood and the brain parenchyma, i.e., the blood-brain barrier (BBB). A description is given on how human pathogenic parasites can reach the CNS via the bloodstream either as free-living or extracellular parasites, by embolization of eggs, or within red or white blood cells when adapted to intracellular life. Molecular mechanisms are discussed by which parasites can interact with or pass across the BBB. The possible targeting of the circumventricular organs by parasites, as well as the parasites' direct entry to the brain from the nasal cavity through the olfactory nerve pathway, is also highlighted. Finally, examples are given which illustrate different mechanisms by which parasites can cause dysfunction or damage in the CNS related to toxic effects of parasite-derived molecules or to immune responses to the infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Exploring the potential of multivariate depth-damage and rainfall-damage models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Ootegem, Luc; van Herck, K.; Creten, T.

    2018-01-01

    In Europe, floods are among the natural catastrophes that cause the largest economic damage. This article explores the potential of two distinct types of multivariate flood damage models: ‘depth-damage’ models and ‘rainfall-damage’ models. We use survey data of 346 Flemish households that were...... victim of pluvial floods complemented with rainfall data from both rain gauges and weather radars. In the econometrical analysis, a Tobit estimation technique is used to deal with the issue of zero damage observations. The results show that in the ‘depth-damage’ models flood depth has a significant...... impact on the damage. In the ‘rainfall-damage’ models there is a significant impact of rainfall accumulation on the damage when using the gauge rainfall data as predictor, but not when using the radar rainfall data. Finally, non-hazard indicators are found to be important for explaining pluvial flood...

  20. Unified Creep Plasticity Damage (UCPD) Model for Rigid Polyurethane Foams.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilsen, Michael K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lu, Wei-Yang [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Scherzinger, William M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hinnerichs, Terry D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lo, Chi S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Numerous experiments were performed to characterize the mechanical response of several different rigid polyurethane foams (FR3712, PMDI10, PMDI20, and TufFoam35) to large deformation. In these experiments, the effects of load path, loading rate, and temperature were investigated. Results from these experiments indicated that rigid polyurethane foams exhibit significant volumetric and deviatoric plasticity when they are compressed. Rigid polyurethane foams were also found to be very strain-rate and temperature dependent. These foams are also rather brittle and crack when loaded to small strains in tension or to larger strains in compression. Thus, a new Unified Creep Plasticity Damage (UCPD) model was developed and implemented into SIERRA with the name Foam Damage to describe the mechanical response of these foams to large deformation at a variety of temperatures and strain rates. This report includes a description of recent experiments and experimental findings. Next, development of a UCPD model for rigid, polyurethane foams is described. Selection of material parameters for a variety of rigid polyurethane foams is then discussed and finite element simulations with the new UCPD model are compared with experimental results to show behavior that can be captured with this model.

  1. Modelling Cochlear Mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangjian Ni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The cochlea plays a crucial role in mammal hearing. The basic function of the cochlea is to map sounds of different frequencies onto corresponding characteristic positions on the basilar membrane (BM. Sounds enter the fluid-filled cochlea and cause deflection of the BM due to pressure differences between the cochlear fluid chambers. These deflections travel along the cochlea, increasing in amplitude, until a frequency-dependent characteristic position and then decay away rapidly. The hair cells can detect these deflections and encode them as neural signals. Modelling the mechanics of the cochlea is of help in interpreting experimental observations and also can provide predictions of the results of experiments that cannot currently be performed due to technical limitations. This paper focuses on reviewing the numerical modelling of the mechanical and electrical processes in the cochlea, which include fluid coupling, micromechanics, the cochlear amplifier, nonlinearity, and electrical coupling.

  2. Computational model for the assessment of oil spill damages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seip, K L; Heiberg, A B; Brekke, K A

    1985-06-01

    A description is given of the method and the required data of a model for calculating oil spill damages. Eleven damage attributes are defined: shorelength contaminated, shore restitution time, birds dead, restitution time for three groups of birds, open sea damages-two types, damages to recreation, economy and fisheries. The model has been applied in several cases of oil pollution assessments: in an examination of alternative models for the organization of oil spill combat in Norway, in the assessment of the damages coused by a blowout at Tromsoeflaket and in assessing a possible increase in oil spill preparedness for Svalbard. 56 references.

  3. FE Analysis of Rock with Hydraulic-Mechanical Coupling Based on Continuum Damage Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongliang Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical finite element (FE analysis technology is presented for efficient and reliable solutions of rock with hydraulic-mechanical (HM coupling, researching the seepage characteristics and simulating the damage evolution of rock. To be in accord with the actual situation, the rock is naturally viewed as heterogeneous material, in which Young’s modulus, permeability, and strength property obey the typical Weibull distribution function. The classic Biot constitutive relation for rock as porous medium is introduced to establish a set of equations coupling with elastic solid deformation and seepage flow. The rock is subsequently developed into a novel conceptual and practical model considering the damage evolution of Young’s modulus and permeability, in which comprehensive utilization of several other auxiliary technologies, for example, the Drucker-Prager strength criterion, the statistical strength theory, and the continuum damage evolution, yields the damage variable calculating technology. To this end, an effective and reliable numerical FE analysis strategy is established. Numerical examples are given to show that the proposed method can establish heterogeneous rock model and be suitable for different load conditions and furthermore to demonstrate the effectiveness and reliability in the seepage and damage characteristics analysis for rock.

  4. Damage Analysis and Evaluation of High Strength Concrete Frame Based on Deformation-Energy Damage Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang-bin Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of characterizing the damage of high strength concrete structures is presented, which is based on the deformation energy double parameters damage model and incorporates both of the main forms of damage by earthquakes: first time damage beyond destruction and energy consumption. Firstly, test data of high strength reinforced concrete (RC columns were evaluated. Then, the relationship between stiffness degradation, strength degradation, and ductility performance was obtained. And an expression for damage in terms of model parameters was determined, as well as the critical input data for the restoring force model to be used in analytical damage evaluation. Experimentally, the unloading stiffness was found to be related to the cycle number. Then, a correction for this changing was applied to better describe the unloading phenomenon and compensate for the shortcomings of structure elastic-plastic time history analysis. The above algorithm was embedded into an IDARC program. Finally, a case study of high strength RC multistory frames was presented. Under various seismic wave inputs, the structural damages were predicted. The damage model and correction algorithm of stiffness unloading were proved to be suitable and applicable in engineering design and damage evaluation of a high strength concrete structure.

  5. Multi-physics modeling of multifunctional composite materials for damage detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujidkul, Thanyawalai

    This study presents a modeling of multifunction composite materials for damage detection with its verification and validation to mechanical behavior predictions of Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymer composites (CFRPs), CFRPs laminated composites, and woven SiC/SiC matrix composites that are subjected to fracture damage. Advantages of those materials are low cost, low density, high strength-to-weight ratio, and comparable specific tensile properties, the special of SiC/SiC is good environmental stability at high temperature. Resulting in, the composite has been used for many important structures such as helicopter rotors, aerojet engines, gas turbines, hot control surfaces, sporting goods, and windmill blades. Damage or material defect detection in a mechanical component can provide vital information for the prediction of remaining useful life, which will result in the prevention of catastrophic failures. Thus the understanding of the mechanical behavior have been challenge to the prevent damage and failure of composites in different scales. The damage detection methods in composites have been investigated widely in recent years. Non-destructive techniques are the traditional methods to detect the damage such as X-ray, acoustic emission and thermography. However, due to the invisible damage in composite can be occurred, to prevent the failure in composites. The developments of damage detection methods have been considered. Due to carbon fibers are conductive materials, in resulting CFRPs can be self-sensing to detect damage. As is well known, the electrical resistance has been shown to be a sensitive measure of internal damage, and also this work study in thermal resistance can detect damage in composites. However, there is a few number of different micromechanical modeling schemes has been proposed in the published literature for various types of composites. This works will provide with a numerical, analytical, and theoretical failure models in different damages to

  6. Computational stress and damage modelling for rolling contact fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerullo, Michele

    Rolling contact fatigue in radial roller bearings is studied by means of a 2D plane strain nite element program. The Dang Van multiaxial fatigue criterion is firstly used, in a macroscopic study modeling the bearing raceway, to investigate the region where fatigue cracks are more likely to nucleate...... and of compressive residual stresses are also analyzed. The stress history of a material point at the depth where the maximum Dang Van damage factor is reached is then recorded and used in a subsequent micro-mechanical analysis. The stress history is applied as periodic boundary conditions in a representative volume...

  7. Numerical modelling in non linear fracture mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viggo Tvergaard

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Some numerical studies of crack propagation are based on using constitutive models that accountfor damage evolution in the material. When a critical damage value has been reached in a materialpoint, it is natural to assume that this point has no more carrying capacity, as is done numerically in the elementvanish technique. In the present review this procedure is illustrated for micromechanically based materialmodels, such as a ductile failure model that accounts for the nucleation and growth of voids to coalescence, and a model for intergranular creep failure with diffusive growth of grain boundary cavities leading to micro-crack formation. The procedure is also illustrated for low cycle fatigue, based on continuum damage mechanics. In addition, the possibility of crack growth predictions for elastic-plastic solids using cohesive zone models to represent the fracture process is discussed.

  8. Deformation and damage mechanisms of zinc coatings on hot-dip galvanized steel sheets: Part II. Damage modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisot, Rodolphe; Forest, Samuel; Pineau, André; Grillon, François; Demonet, Xavier; Mataigne, Jean-Michel

    2004-03-01

    Zinc-based coatings are widely used for protection against corrosion of steel-sheet products in the automotive industry. The objective of the present article is to investigate the damage modes at work in three different microstructures of a zinc coating on an interstitial-free steel substrate under tension, planestrain tension, and expansion loading. Plastic-deformation mechanisms are addressed in the companion article. Two main fracture mechanisms, namely, intergranular cracking and transgranular cleavage fracture, were identified in an untempered cold-rolled coating, a tempered cold-rolled coating, and a recrystallized coating. No fracture at the interface between the steel and zinc coating was observed that could lead to spalling, in the studied zinc alloy. A complex network of cleavage cracks and their interaction with deformation twinning is shown to develop in the material. An extensive quantitative analysis based on systematic image analysis provides the number and cumulative length of cleavage cracks at different strain levels for the three investigated microstructures and three loading conditions. Grain refinement by recrystallization is shown to lead to an improved cracking resistance of the coating. A model for crystallographic cleavage combining the stress component normal to the basal plane and the amount of plastic slip on the basal slip systems is proposed and identified from equibiaxial tension tests and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) analysis of the cracked grains. This analysis requires the computation of the nonlinear stress-strain response of each grain using a crystal-plasticity constitutive model. The model is then applied successfully to other loading conditions and is shown to account for the preferred orientations of damaged grains observed in the case of plane-strain tension.

  9. [Sea urchin embryo, DNA-damaged cell cycle checkpoint and the mechanisms initiating cancer development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellé, Robert; Le Bouffant, Ronan; Morales, Julia; Cosson, Bertrand; Cormier, Patrick; Mulner-Lorillon, Odile

    2007-01-01

    Cell division is an essential process for heredity, maintenance and evolution of the whole living kingdom. Sea urchin early development represents an excellent experimental model for the analysis of cell cycle checkpoint mechanisms since embryonic cells contain a functional DNA-damage checkpoint and since the whole sea urchin genome is sequenced. The DNA-damaged checkpoint is responsible for an arrest in the cell cycle when DNA is damaged or incorrectly replicated, for activation of the DNA repair mechanism, and for commitment to cell death by apoptosis in the case of failure to repair. New insights in cancer biology lead to two fundamental concepts about the very first origin of cancerogenesis. Cancers result from dysfunction of DNA-damaged checkpoints and cancers appear as a result of normal stem cell (NCS) transformation into a cancer stem cell (CSC). The second aspect suggests a new definition of "cancer", since CSC can be detected well before any clinical evidence. Since early development starts from the zygote, which is a primary stem cell, sea urchin early development allows analysis of the early steps of the cancerization process. Although sea urchins do not develop cancers, the model is alternative and complementary to stem cells which are not easy to isolate, do not divide in a short time and do not divide synchronously. In the field of toxicology and incidence on human health, the sea urchin experimental model allows assessment of cancer risk from single or combined molecules long before any epidemiologic evidence is available. Sea urchin embryos were used to test the worldwide used pesticide Roundup that contains glyphosate as the active herbicide agent; it was shown to activate the DNA-damage checkpoint of the first cell cycle of development. The model therefore allows considerable increase in risk evaluation of new products in the field of cancer and offers a tool for the discovery of molecular markers for early diagnostic in cancer biology

  10. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Final report, June 1, 1986--August 31, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1996-08-01

    Over the last 10 years significant advances have been made impacting the understanding of radiation damage to DNA. The principal objective of this work was the elucidation of the fundamental mechanisms of radiation damage to DNA through the direct and indirect effects. Recently the work concentrated on the direct effect of radiation damage on DNA. The objective was to elucidate the ultimate radiation chemical damage to DNA arising from the direct effect. In this effort the focus was on the application of three techniques. ESR spectroscopic measurement of initial radicals formed in DNA and its hydration layer at low temperatures. Ab initio molecular orbital calculations were employed to give highly accurate theoretical predictions of early events such as electron and hole localization sites which serve to test and to clarify the experimental observations. HPLC and GC-mass spectroscopic assays of DNA base products formation provide the ultimate chemical outcome of the initial radiation events. The bridge between the early ion radical species and the non-radical products is made in ESR studies which follow the chemistry of the early species as they react with water and or other DNA bases. The use of these techniques has resulted in a new and fundamental understanding of the radiation damage to DNA on a molecular scale. From this work, a working model for DNA damage from the initial ionization event to the eventual formation of molecular base damage products and strand breaks has been formulated. Results over the past several years which have led to the formulation of this model are described

  11. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defence: Links and Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Schumacher

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signalling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signalling. We highlight evidence gained into (i which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signalling, (ii how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans.

  12. Damage sensing and mechanical characteristics of CFRP strengthened steel plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieda, Genki; Nakano, Daiki; Fuji, Yuya; Nakamura, Hitoshi; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro; Matsui, Takahiro; Ochi, Yutaka; Matsumoto, Yukihiro

    2017-10-01

    In recent years, a large number of structures that were built during the period of high economic growth in Japan is beginning to show signs of aging. For example, the structural performance of steel structures has degraded due to corrosion. One measure that has been proposed and studied to address this issue is the adhesive bonding method, which can be used to repair and reinforce these structures. However, this method produces brittle fracture in the adhesive layer and is difficult to maintain after bonding. To solve the problem faced by this method, a clarification of the mechanical properties inside the adhesive is necessary. Then this background, a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor has been used in this study. This sensor can be embedded within the building material that needs repairing and reinforcing because an FBG sensor is extremely small. Eventually based on this, a three-point bending test of a carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) strengthened steel plate that was embedded with an FBG sensor was conducted. This paper demonstrates that an FBG sensor is effectively applicable for sensing when damage occurs.

  13. Diving bradycardia: a mechanism of defence against hypoxic damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alboni, Paolo; Alboni, Marco; Gianfranchi, Lorella

    2011-06-01

    A feature of all air-breathing vertebrates, diving bradycardia is triggered by apnoea and accentuated by immersion of the face or whole body in cold water. Very little is known about the afferents of diving bradycardia, whereas the efferent part of the reflex circuit is constituted by the cardiac vagal fibres. Diving bradycardia is associated with vasoconstriction of selected vascular beds and a reduction in cardiac output. The diving response appears to be more pronounced in mammals than in birds. In humans, the bradycardic response to diving varies greatly from person to person; the reduction in heart rate generally ranges from 15 to 40%, but a small proportion of healthy individuals can develop bradycardia below 20 beats/min. During prolonged dives, bradycardia becomes more pronounced because of activation of the peripheral chemoreceptors by a reduction in the arterial partial pressure of oxygen (O2), responsible for slowing of heart rate. The vasoconstriction is associated with a redistribution of the blood flow, which saves O2 for the O2-sensitive organs, such as the heart and brain. The results of several investigations carried out both in animals and in humans show that the diving response has an O2-conserving effect, both during exercise and at rest, thus lengthening the time to the onset of serious hypoxic damage. The diving response can therefore be regarded as an important defence mechanism for the organism.

  14. Mechanically induced tube damage in the artificial hydrosalpinx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinstein, J; Neubüser, D; Mussmann, J

    1982-01-01

    One-sided artificial hydrosalpinx was caused in mature New Zealand rabbits by proximal and distal ligature. After 2 weeks the average secretion accumulation was 2.1 ml, after 8 weeks 6.3 ml. A fold relief could no longer be detected after 8 weeks. The light-microscopical study of the epithelium showed signs of cell degeneration with cell dedifferentiation, pyknosis of the nucleus, and perinuclear aerolae. The ciliation of 66% ciliated cells for the normal oviduct (pars ampullaris) was reduced to 15% after 8 weeks of artificial hydrosalpinx. Based on the hypertrophy of the muscularis the percentage loss of E2 receptors within 4 weeks was smaller in comparison with the percentage reduction of the ciliation during the same time. Finally, after 8 weeks an amount of 15% for the estrogen receptors as well as for the ciliation was achieved--both compared to the untreated oviduct. It is possible that the oviduct damage, caused only by the mechanical influence of the secretion congestion, is the reason for the unfavorable pregnancy rate after salpingoneostomy of a chronic atrophied hydrosalpinx.

  15. Adaptive coupling between damage mechanics and peridynamics: a route for objective simulation of material degradation up to complete failure

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Fei

    2016-05-17

    The objective (mesh-independent) simulation of evolving discontinuities, such as cracks, remains a challenge. Current techniques are highly complex or involve intractable computational costs, making simulations up to complete failure difficult. We propose a framework as a new route toward solving this problem that adaptively couples local-continuum damage mechanics with peridynamics to objectively simulate all the steps that lead to material failure: damage nucleation, crack formation and propagation. Local-continuum damage mechanics successfully describes the degradation related to dispersed microdefects before the formation of a macrocrack. However, when damage localizes, it suffers spurious mesh dependency, making the simulation of macrocracks challenging. On the other hand, the peridynamic theory is promising for the simulation of fractures, as it naturally allows discontinuities in the displacement field. Here, we present a hybrid local-continuum damage/peridynamic model. Local-continuum damage mechanics is used to describe “volume” damage before localization. Once localization is detected at a point, the remaining part of the energy is dissipated through an adaptive peridynamic model capable of the transition to a “surface” degradation, typically a crack. We believe that this framework, which actually mimics the real physical process of crack formation, is the first bridge between continuum damage theories and peridynamics. Two-dimensional numerical examples are used to illustrate that an objective simulation of material failure can be achieved by this method.

  16. Adaptive coupling between damage mechanics and peridynamics: a route for objective simulation of material degradation up to complete failure

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Fei; Lubineau, Gilles; Azdoud, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The objective (mesh-independent) simulation of evolving discontinuities, such as cracks, remains a challenge. Current techniques are highly complex or involve intractable computational costs, making simulations up to complete failure difficult. We propose a framework as a new route toward solving this problem that adaptively couples local-continuum damage mechanics with peridynamics to objectively simulate all the steps that lead to material failure: damage nucleation, crack formation and propagation. Local-continuum damage mechanics successfully describes the degradation related to dispersed microdefects before the formation of a macrocrack. However, when damage localizes, it suffers spurious mesh dependency, making the simulation of macrocracks challenging. On the other hand, the peridynamic theory is promising for the simulation of fractures, as it naturally allows discontinuities in the displacement field. Here, we present a hybrid local-continuum damage/peridynamic model. Local-continuum damage mechanics is used to describe “volume” damage before localization. Once localization is detected at a point, the remaining part of the energy is dissipated through an adaptive peridynamic model capable of the transition to a “surface” degradation, typically a crack. We believe that this framework, which actually mimics the real physical process of crack formation, is the first bridge between continuum damage theories and peridynamics. Two-dimensional numerical examples are used to illustrate that an objective simulation of material failure can be achieved by this method.

  17. Epigenetic Regulators Modulate Muscle Damage in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajanca, Fernanda; Vandel, Laurence

    2017-12-21

    Histone acetyl transferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDAC) control transcription during myogenesis. HDACs promote chromatin condensation, inhibiting gene transcription in muscle progenitor cells until myoblast differentiation is triggered and HDACs are released. HATs, namely CBP/p300, activate myogenic regulatory and elongation factors promoting myogenesis. HDAC inhibitors are known to improve regeneration in dystrophic muscles through follistatin upregulation. However, the potential of directly modulating HATs remains unexplored. We tested this possibility in a well-known zebrafish model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Interestingly, CBP/p300 transcripts were found downregulated in the absence of Dystrophin. While investigating CBP rescuing potential we observed that dystrophin-null embryos overexpressing CBP actually never show significant muscle damage, even before a first regeneration cycle could occur. We found that the pan-HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) also prevents early muscle damage, however the single HAT CBP is as efficient even in low doses. The HAT domain of CBP is required for its full rescuing ability. Importantly, both CBP and TSA prevent early muscle damage without restoring endogenous CBP/p300 neither increasing follistatin transcripts. This suggests a new mechanism of action of epigenetic regulators protecting dystrophin-null muscle fibres from detaching, independent from the known improvement of regeneration upon damage of HDACs inhibitors. This study builds supporting evidence that epigenetic modulators may play a role in determining the severity of muscle dystrophy, controlling the ability to resist muscle damage. Determining the mode of action leading to muscle protection can potentially lead to new treatment options for muscular dystrophies in the future.

  18. Statistical modelling of compression and fatigue damage of unidirectional fiber reinforced composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Brøndsted, Povl

    2009-01-01

    A statistical computational model of strength and damage of unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced composites under compressive and cyclic compressive loading is presented in this paper. The model is developed on the basis of the Budiansky–Fleck fiber kinking condition, continuum damage mechanics...... concept and the Monte-Carlo method. The effects of fiber misalignment variability, fiber clustering, load sharing rules on the damage in composite are studied numerically. It is demonstrated that the clustering of fibers has a negative effect of the damage resistance of a composite. Further, the static...

  19. Continuum damage model for ferroelectric materials and its application to multilayer actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellmann, Roman; Ricoeur, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    In this paper a micromechanical continuum damage model for ferroelectric materials is presented. As a constitutive law it is implemented into a finite element (FE) code. The model is based on micromechanical considerations of domain switching and its interaction with microcrack growth and coalescence. A FE analysis of a multilayer actuator is performed, showing the initiation of damage zones at the electrode tips during the poling process. Further, the influence of mechanical pre-stressing on damage evolution and actuating properties is investigated. The results provided in this work give useful information on the damage of advanced piezoelectric devices and their optimization.

  20. A micromechanical study of the damage mechanics of acrylic particulate composites under thermomechanical loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Shihua

    The main aim of this dissertation was to characterize the damage mechanism and fatigue behavior of the acrylic particulate composite. This dissertation also investigated how the failure mechanism is influenced by changes in certain parameters including the volume fraction of particle, the interfacial bonding strength, the stiffness and thickness of the interphase, and the CTE mismatch between the particle and the matrix. Monotonic uniaxial tensile and compressive testing under various temperatures and strain rates, isothermal low-cycle mechanical testing and thermal cycling of a plate with a cutout were performed. The influence of the interfacial bonding strength between the particle and the matrix on the failure mechanism of the ATH filled PMMA was investigated using in situ observations under uniaxial loading conditions. For composites with weak interfacial bonding, the debonding is the major damage mode. For composites with strong interfacial bonding, the breakage of the agglomerate of particles is the major damage mode. Experimental studies also demonstrated the significant influence of interfacial bonding strength on the fatigue life of the ATH filled PMMA. The damage was characterized in terms of the elastic modulus degradation, the load-drop parameter, the plastic strain range and the hysteresis dissipation. Identifying the internal state variables that quantify material degradation under thermomechanical loading is an active research field. In this dissertation, the entropy production, which is a measure of the irreversibility of the thermodynamic system, is used as the metric for damage. The close correlation between the damage measured in terms of elastic modulus degradation and that obtained from the finite element simulation results validates the entropy based damage evolution function. A micromechanical model for acrylic particulate composites with imperfect interfacial bonds was proposed. Acrylic particulate composites are treated as three

  1. Damage Mechanisms and Mechanical Properties of High-Strength Multiphase Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Heibel

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The usage of high-strength steels for structural components and reinforcement parts is inevitable for modern car-body manufacture in reaching lightweight design as well as increasing passive safety. Depending on their microstructure these steels show differing damage mechanisms and various mechanical properties which cannot be classified comprehensively via classical uniaxial tensile testing. In this research, damage initiation, evolution and final material failure are characterized for commercially produced complex-phase (CP and dual-phase (DP steels in a strength range between 600 and 1000 MPa. Based on these investigations CP steels with their homogeneous microstructure are characterized as damage tolerant and hence less edge-crack sensitive than DP steels. As final fracture occurs after a combination of ductile damage evolution and local shear band localization in ferrite grains at a characteristic thickness strain, this strain measure is introduced as a new parameter for local formability. In terms of global formability DP steels display advantages because of their microstructural composition of soft ferrite matrix including hard martensite particles. Combining true uniform elongation as a measure for global formability with the true thickness strain at fracture for local formability the mechanical material response can be assessed on basis of uniaxial tensile testing incorporating all microstructural characteristics on a macroscopic scale. Based on these findings a new classification scheme for the recently developed high-strength multiphase steels with significantly better formability resulting of complex underlying microstructures is introduced. The scheme overcomes the steel designations using microstructural concepts, which provide no information about design and production properties.

  2. Experimental Damage Identification of a Model Reticulated Shell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The damage identification of a reticulated shell is a challenging task, facing various difficulties, such as the large number of degrees of freedom (DOFs, the phenomenon of modal localization and transition, and low modeling accuracy. Based on structural vibration responses, the damage identification of a reticulated shell was studied. At first, the auto-regressive (AR time series model was established based on the acceleration responses of the reticulated shell. According to the changes in the coefficients of the AR model between the damaged conditions and the undamaged condition, the damage of the reticulated shell can be detected. In addition, the damage sensitive factors were determined based on the coefficients of the AR model. With the damage sensitive factors as the inputs and the damage positions as the outputs, back-propagation neural networks (BPNNs were then established and were trained using the Levenberg–Marquardt algorithm (L–M algorithm. The locations of the damages can be predicted by the back-propagation neural networks. At last, according to the experimental scheme of single-point excitation and multi-point responses, the impact experiments on a K6 shell model with a scale of 1/10 were conducted. The experimental results verified the efficiency of the proposed damage identification method based on the AR time series model and back-propagation neural networks. The proposed damage identification method can ensure the safety of the practical engineering to some extent.

  3. In situ observation of mechanical damage within a SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saucedo-Mora, L.; Lowe, T.; Zhao, S.; Lee, P.D.; Mummery, P.M.; Marrow, T.J.

    2016-01-01

    SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composites are candidate materials for fuel cladding in Generation IV nuclear fission reactors and as accident tolerant fuel clad in current generation plant. Experimental methods are needed that can detect and quantify the development of mechanical damage, to support modelling and qualification tests for these critical components. In situ observations of damage development have been obtained of tensile and C-ring mechanical test specimens of a braided nuclear grade SiC-SiC ceramic composite tube, using a combination of ex situ and in situ computed X-ray tomography observation and digital volume correlation analysis. The gradual development of damage by matrix cracking and also the influence of non-uniform loading are examined. - Highlights: • X-ray tomography with digital volume correlation measures 3D deformation in situ. • Cracking and damage in the microstructure can be detected using the strain field. • Fracture can initiate from the monolithic coating of a SiC-SiC ceramic composite.

  4. In situ observation of mechanical damage within a SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saucedo-Mora, L. [Institute Eduardo Torroja for Construction Sciences-CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Department of Materials, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Lowe, T. [Manchester X-ray Imaging Facility, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Zhao, S. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Lee, P.D. [Research Complex at Harwell, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (United Kingdom); Mummery, P.M. [School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester (United Kingdom); Marrow, T.J., E-mail: james.marrow@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-01

    SiC-SiC ceramic matrix composites are candidate materials for fuel cladding in Generation IV nuclear fission reactors and as accident tolerant fuel clad in current generation plant. Experimental methods are needed that can detect and quantify the development of mechanical damage, to support modelling and qualification tests for these critical components. In situ observations of damage development have been obtained of tensile and C-ring mechanical test specimens of a braided nuclear grade SiC-SiC ceramic composite tube, using a combination of ex situ and in situ computed X-ray tomography observation and digital volume correlation analysis. The gradual development of damage by matrix cracking and also the influence of non-uniform loading are examined. - Highlights: • X-ray tomography with digital volume correlation measures 3D deformation in situ. • Cracking and damage in the microstructure can be detected using the strain field. • Fracture can initiate from the monolithic coating of a SiC-SiC ceramic composite.

  5. Mechanism of cavitation damage and structure of a cavitating eddy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimov, A.V.; Vorob'ev, G.A.; Filenko, Yu.I.; Petrov, K.N.

    1976-01-01

    As a result of experimental studies of the structure of a cavitating eddy and the action of single cavitation bubbles on a solid surface the assumption of double nature of cavitation damage forces depending on its regimes was made. The first type of the damage forces is shock waves, appearing around collapsing spherical bubble, the second type is hydraulic impacts of microjets making a hole in a collapsing aspherical bubble. The outward appearance of single microdents differs from each other. The damage of the first type is accompanied by corrosion. The cavitation erosion intensity of the damage of the first type exceeds that of the damage of the second type by one order of magnitude. The values of the porosity of a cavitation eddy, the bubble concentration and the distance between them, the bubble distribution according to the size and the form for the initial cavitation stage are given from holographic investigations

  6. A Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of Mechanical Damage to Rodent Sperm Generated by Microscale Ice Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, X; Critser, J K

      BACKGROUND: Rodent sperm cryopreservation is of critical importance for the maintenance of lines or strains of genetically engineered mice and rats. However, rodent sperm are extremely mechanically sensitive due to their unusual morphology, and are severely damaged using current methods of cryopreservation. Those methods result in poor post thaw motility (PTM) for mouse. To investigate the mechanism of mechanical damage introduced to rodent sperm during freezing, a micro-mechanical model was established to analyze the sperm radial and axial thermal stresses generated by microscale extracellular ice formation. PTM of mouse sperm cryopreserved in capillaries of different radii (100, 200, 344, 526, 775µm) was measured using a standard computer-assisted sperm analysis system. The model predicts that when one of the inner dimensions of the containers (the inner diameter of plastic straws or straw capillaries) is on the same order of magnitude of sperm length, axial stress is significantly increased. The experimental results showed that the value of PTM was decreased from 38 ± 8 % in the larger (775µm) capillaries to 0 ± 0 % in the smaller (100 µm) ones. Theoretical analysis based on the established model were experimentally validated and can be used to guide the design of novel devices to improve the efficiency of rodent sperm cryopreservation.

  7. Behaviour and damage of aged austenitic-ferritic steels: a micro-mechanical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bugat, St.

    2000-12-01

    The austenitic-ferritic steels are used in the PWR primary cooling system. At the running temperature (320 C), they are submitted to a slow aging, which leads to the embrittlement of the ferritic phase. This embrittlement leads to a decrease of the mechanical properties, in particular of the crack resistance of the austenitic-ferritic steels. The damage and rupture of the austenitic-ferritic steels have been approached at the ENSMP by the works of P. Joly (1992) and of L. Devilliers-Guerville (1998). These works have allowed to reveal a damage heterogeneity which induces a strong dispersion on the ductilities and the toughnesses as well as on the scale effects. Modeling including the damage growth kinetics measured experimentally, have allowed to verify these effects. Nevertheless, they do not consider the two-phase character of the material and do not include a physical model of the cleavage cracks growth which appear in the embrittled ferrite. In this study, is proposed a description of the material allowing to treat these aspects while authorizing the structure calculation. In a first part, the material is studied. The use of the ESBD allows to specify the complex morphology of these steels and crystal orientation relations between the two phases. Moreover, it is shown that the two phases keep the same crystal orientation in the zones, called bicrystals, whose size varies between 500 μm and 1 mm. The study of the sliding lines, coupled to the ESBD, allows to specify too the deformation modes of the two phases. At last, tensile and tensile-compression tests at various deformation range are carried out to characterize the macroscopic mechanical behaviour of these materials. Then, a micro-mechanical modeling of the material behaviour is proposed. This one takes into account the three scales identified at the preceding chapter. The first scale, corresponding to the laths is described as a monocrystal whose behaviour includes both an isotropic and a kinematic strain

  8. ITER transient consequences for material damage: modelling versus experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazylev, B; Janeschitz, G; Landman, I; Pestchanyi, S; Loarte, A; Federici, G; Merola, M; Linke, J; Zhitlukhin, A; Podkovyrov, V; Klimov, N; Safronov, V

    2007-01-01

    Carbon-fibre composite (CFC) and tungsten macrobrush armours are foreseen as PFC for the ITER divertor. In ITER the main mechanisms of metallic armour damage remain surface melting and melt motion erosion. In the case of CFC armour, due to rather different heat conductivities of CFC fibres a noticeable erosion of the PAN bundles may occur at rather small heat loads. Experiments carried out in the plasma gun facilities QSPA-T for the ITER like edge localized mode (ELM) heat load also demonstrated significant erosion of the frontal and lateral brush edges. Numerical simulations of the CFC and tungsten (W) macrobrush target damage accounting for the heat loads at the face and lateral brush edges were carried out for QSPA-T conditions using the three-dimensional (3D) code PHEMOBRID. The modelling results of CFC damage are in a good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the experiments. Estimation of the droplet splashing caused by the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability was performed

  9. Chemo-mechanics of salt damage in stone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatt, Robert J; Caruso, Francesco; Sanchez, Asel Maria Aguilar; Scherer, George W

    2014-09-11

    Many porous materials are damaged by pressure exerted by salt crystals growing in their pores. This is a serious issue in conservation science, geomorphology, geotechnical engineering and concrete materials science. In all cases, a central question is whether crystallization pressure will cause damage. Here we present an experiment in which the crystallization pressure and the pore saturation are varied in a controlled way. We demonstrate that a strain energy failure criterion can be used to predict when damage will occur. The experiment considered is the most widely used means to study the susceptibility to salt crystallization, so quantification of this test has far-reaching implications.

  10. Fractal mechanism for characterizing singularity of mode shape for damage detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, M. S. [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Hohai University, Nanjing 210098 (China); Ostachowicz, W. [Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Fiszera 14, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Faculty of Automotive and Construction Machinery, Warsaw University of Technology, Narbutta 84, 02-524 Warsaw (Poland); Bai, R. B., E-mail: bairunbo@gmail.com [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Shandong Agricultural University, Taian 271000 (China); Radzieński, M. [Institute of Fluid-Flow Machinery, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Fiszera 14, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland)

    2013-11-25

    Damage is an ordinary physical phenomenon jeopardizing structural safety; damage detection is an ongoing interdisciplinary issue. Waveform fractal theory has provided a promising resource for detecting damage in plates while presenting a concomitant problem: susceptibility to false features of damage. This study proposes a fractal dimension method based on affine transformation to address this problem. Physical experiments using laser measurement demonstrate that this method can substantially eliminate false features of damage and accurately identify complex cracks in plates, providing a fundamental mechanism that brings the merits of waveform fractal theory into full play in structural damage detection applications.

  11. Mesoscopic Numerical Computation of Compressive Strength and Damage Mechanism of Rubber Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. H. Xie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluations of both macroscopic and mesoscopic strengths of materials have been the topic of a great deal of recent research. This paper presents the results of a study, based on the Walraven equation of the production of a mesoscopic random aggregate structure containing various rubber contents and aggregate sizes. On a mesoscopic scale, the damage mechanism in the rubber concrete and the effects of the rubber content and aggregate-mortar interface on the rubber concrete’s compressive resistance property were studied. The results indicate that the random aggregate structural model very closely approximates the experimental results in terms of the fracture distribution and damage characteristics under uniaxial compression. The aggregate-mortar interface mechanical properties have a substantial impact on the test sample’s strength and fracture distribution. As the rubber content increases, the compressive strength and elastic modulus of the test sample decrease proportionally. This paper presents graphics of the entire process from fracture propagation to structural failure of the test piece by means of the mesoscopic finite-element method, which provides a theoretical reference for studying the damage mechanism in rubber concrete and performing parametric calculations.

  12. Hierarchical nanoreinforced composites: Computational analysis of damage mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishnaevsky, Leon; Pontefisso, Alessandro; Dai, Gaoming

    2016-01-01

    of distribution, shape, orientation of nanoparticles (carbon nanotube, graphene) in unidirectional polymer matrix composites on the strength and damage resistance of the composites is studied in computational studies. The possible directions of the improvement of nanoreinforced composites by controlling shapes...

  13. Damage Modeling Of Injection-Molded Short- And Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Kunc, Vlastimil; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Phelps, Jay; Tucker, Charles L. III

    2009-01-01

    This article applies the recent anisotropic rotary diffusion - reduced strain closure (ARD-RSC) model for predicting fiber orientation and a new damage model for injection-molded long-fiber thermoplastics (LFTs) to analyze progressive damage leading to total failure of injection-molded long-glass-fiber/polypropylene (PP) specimens. The ARD-RSC model was implemented in a research version of the Autodesk Moldflow Plastics Insight (MPI) processing code, and it has been used to simulate injection-molding of a long-glass-fiber/PP plaque. The damage model combines micromechanical modeling with a continuum damage mechanics description to predict the nonlinear behavior due to plasticity coupled with damage in LFTs. This model has been implemented in the ABAQUS finite element code via user-subroutines and has been used in the damage analyses of tensile specimens removed from the injection-molded long-glass-fiber/PP plaques. Experimental characterization and mechanical testing were performed to provide input data to support and validate both process modeling and damage analyses. The predictions are in agreement with the experimental results.

  14. The Pore Collapse “Hot-Spots” Model Coupled with Brittle Damage for Solid Explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. R. Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the building of a numerical pore collapse model with “hot-spots” formation for the impacted damage explosives. According to damage mechanical evolution of brittle material, the one-dimensional elastic-viscoplastic collapse model was improved to incorporate the impact damage during the dynamic collapse of pores. The damage of explosives was studied using the statistical crack mechanics (SCRAM. The effects of the heat conduction and the chemical reaction were taken into account in the formation of “hot-spots.” To verify the improved model, numerical simulations were carried out for different pressure states and used to model a multiple-impact experiment. The results show that repeated weak impacts can lead to the collapse of pores and the “hot-spots” may occur due to the accumulation of internal defects accompanied by the softening of explosives.

  15. Integrated geomechanical modelling for deep subsurface damage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wees, J.D. van; Orlic, B.; Zijl, W.; Jongerius, P.; Schreppers, G.J.; Hendriks, M.

    2001-01-01

    Government, E&P and mining industry increasingly demand fundamental insight and accurate predictions on subsurface and surface deformation and damage due to exploitation of subsurface natural resources, and subsurface storage of energy residues (e.g. CO2). At this moment deformation is difficult to

  16. Assessment of compressive failure process of cortical bone materials using damage-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Theng Pin; R Koloor, S S; Djuansjah, J R P; Abdul Kadir, M R

    2017-02-01

    The main failure factors of cortical bone are aging or osteoporosis, accident and high energy trauma or physiological activities. However, the mechanism of damage evolution coupled with yield criterion is considered as one of the unclear subjects in failure analysis of cortical bone materials. Therefore, this study attempts to assess the structural response and progressive failure process of cortical bone using a brittle damaged plasticity model. For this reason, several compressive tests are performed on cortical bone specimens made of bovine femur, in order to obtain the structural response and mechanical properties of the material. Complementary finite element (FE) model of the sample and test is prepared to simulate the elastic-to-damage behavior of the cortical bone using the brittle damaged plasticity model. The FE model is validated in a comparative method using the predicted and measured structural response as load-compressive displacement through simulation and experiment. FE results indicated that the compressive damage initiated and propagated at central region where maximum equivalent plastic strain is computed, which coincided with the degradation of structural compressive stiffness followed by a vast amount of strain energy dissipation. The parameter of compressive damage rate, which is a function dependent on damage parameter and the plastic strain is examined for different rates. Results show that considering a similar rate to the initial slope of the damage parameter in the experiment would give a better sense for prediction of compressive failure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Coupled Damage and Reaction Model for Simulating Energetic Material Response to Impact Hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BAER, MELVIN R.; DRUMHELLER, D.S.; MATHESON, E.R.

    1999-01-01

    The Baer-Nunziato multiphase reactive theory for a granulated bed of energetic material is extended to allow for dynamic damage processes, that generate new surfaces as well as porosity. The Second Law of Thermodynamics is employed to constrain the constitutive forms of the mass, momentum, and energy exchange functions as well as those for the mechanical damage model ensuring that the models will be dissipative. The focus here is on the constitutive forms of the exchange functions. The mechanical constitutive modeling is discussed in a companion paper. The mechanical damage model provides dynamic surface area and porosity information needed by the exchange functions to compute combustion rates and interphase momentum and energy exchange rates. The models are implemented in the CTH shock physics code and used to simulate delayed detonations due to impacts in a bed of granulated energetic material and an undamaged cylindrical sample

  18. Using Continuum Damage Mechanics to Simulate Iceberg Calving from Tidewater Outlet Glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercenier, R.; Lüthi, M.; Vieli, A.

    2017-12-01

    Many ocean terminating glaciers in the Arctic are currently undergoingrapid retreat, thinning and strong accelerations in flow. The processof iceberg calving plays a crucial role for the related dynamical masslosses and occurs when the stresses at the calving front exceed thefracture strength of ice, driving the propagation of cracks andeventually leading to the detachment of ice blocks from the glacierfront. However, the understanding of the processes involved in icebergcalving as well as the capability of flow models to represent thecalving mechanism remain limited.Here, we use a time-dependent two-dimensional finite-element flowmodel coupled to a damage model to simulate the break-off of ice atthe front of idealized tidewater outlet glaciers. The flow modelcomputes flow velocities and the resulting stresses, which are in turnused to calculate the evolution of the glacier geometry anddamage. Damage is defined as a change of rheological properties, e.g.viscosity, due to increasing material degradation. Elements of ice areremoved when the damage variable reaches a critical threshold. Theeffects of material properties and of geometrical parameters such aswater depth, ice thickness and submarine frontal melting on thesimulated calving rates are explored through systematic sensitivityanalyses.The coupled ice flow/damage model allows for successful reproductionof calving front geometries typically observed for different waterdepths. We further use detailed observations from real glaciergeometries to better constrain the model parameters. Theproposed model approach should be applicable to simulate icebergcalving on arbitrary glaciers, and thus be used to analyse theevolution of tidewater glacier variations from the past to the future.

  19. Relation among different parameters of damaged starch content, falling number and mechanical damage level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živančev Dragan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents examination of damaged starch content expressed by different parameters, which were obtained by iodometric method presented by the Chopin Company using their SD matic instrument on wheat flour samples. Two wheat samples were similar by protein level (14.6 and 14.2% on dry basis matter and different by Falling number values (409 and 121 s. Wheat flours were gained by single-stage and two-stage extraction in laboratory milling system. Eight independent measurements of every wheat flour sample were statistically analyzed by method of variance. It was found that Chopin iodometric method shows that damaged starch content expressed by different parameters is related to Falling number value and damage caused by the pressure and shear forces generated during roller milling.

  20. Experimental and Modelling Investigations of the Coupled Elastoplastic Damage of a Quasi-brittle Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiu-Chang

    2018-02-01

    Triaxial compression tests are conducted on a quasi-brittle rock, limestone. The analyses show that elastoplastic deformation is coupled with damage. Based on the experimental investigation, a coupled elastoplastic damage model is developed within the framework of irreversible thermodynamics. The coupling effects between the plastic and damage dissipations are described by introducing an isotropic damage variable into the elastic stiffness and yield criterion. The novelty of the model is in the description of the thermodynamic force associated with damage, which is formulated as a state function of both elastic and plastic strain energies. The latter gives a full consideration on the comprehensive effects of plastic strain and stress changing processes in rock material on the development of damage. The damage criterion and potential are constructed to determine the onset and evolution of damage variable. The return mapping algorithms of the coupled model are deduced for three different inelastic corrections. Comparisons between test data and numerical simulations show that the coupled elastoplastic damage model is capable of describing the main mechanical behaviours of the quasi-brittle rock.

  1. Probabilistic flood damage modelling at the meso-scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreibich, Heidi; Botto, Anna; Schröter, Kai; Merz, Bruno

    2014-05-01

    Decisions on flood risk management and adaptation are usually based on risk analyses. Such analyses are associated with significant uncertainty, even more if changes in risk due to global change are expected. Although uncertainty analysis and probabilistic approaches have received increased attention during the last years, they are still not standard practice for flood risk assessments. Most damage models have in common that complex damaging processes are described by simple, deterministic approaches like stage-damage functions. Novel probabilistic, multi-variate flood damage models have been developed and validated on the micro-scale using a data-mining approach, namely bagging decision trees (Merz et al. 2013). In this presentation we show how the model BT-FLEMO (Bagging decision Tree based Flood Loss Estimation MOdel) can be applied on the meso-scale, namely on the basis of ATKIS land-use units. The model is applied in 19 municipalities which were affected during the 2002 flood by the River Mulde in Saxony, Germany. The application of BT-FLEMO provides a probability distribution of estimated damage to residential buildings per municipality. Validation is undertaken on the one hand via a comparison with eight other damage models including stage-damage functions as well as multi-variate models. On the other hand the results are compared with official damage data provided by the Saxon Relief Bank (SAB). The results show, that uncertainties of damage estimation remain high. Thus, the significant advantage of this probabilistic flood loss estimation model BT-FLEMO is that it inherently provides quantitative information about the uncertainty of the prediction. Reference: Merz, B.; Kreibich, H.; Lall, U. (2013): Multi-variate flood damage assessment: a tree-based data-mining approach. NHESS, 13(1), 53-64.

  2. The impact of mechanical log surface damage on chip size ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mechanised harvesting operations are becoming more prevalent in South Africa with the realisation that motormanual and manual harvesting operations pose significant health and safety risks to workers. The damage inflicted by single-grip harvester feed rollers and delimbing knives on log surfaces during debranching ...

  3. DNA damage by reactive species: Mechanisms, mutation and repair

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-06-25

    Jun 25, 2012 ... crosslinks can also affect the structure of DNA significantly. ... H2O2 by converting it into water, reaction of H2O2 with ..... Damaged nucleotide flipping by (a) AGT due to intercalation of an amino acid (Arg128) (pdb 1t38) and ...

  4. [Action mechanism of electroacupuncture at stomach meridian acupoints for oxidative damage in rats with gastric ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zongbao; Wang, Yadong; Liu, Qiong; Liu, Mi; Chen, Huijuan; Chang, Xiaorong

    2016-06-12

    To observe the effects of electroacupuncture (EA) at stomach meridian acupoints on expression of oxidation damage factors in serum and gastric mucosal cells in rats with gastric ulcer, and to explore the mechanism of EA at stomach meridian acupoints for oxidative damage in rats with gastric ulcer. Forty clean-grade SD rats were randomly divided into a normal group, a model group, a stomach meridian group and a gallbladder meridian group, ten rats in each one. Except the normal group, rats in the remaining groups were applied the restraint-cold stress method to establish the model of gastric ulcer. Rats in the normal group and model group received no treatment; rats in the stomach meridian group were treated with EA at "Liangmen" (ST 21) and "Zusanli" (ST 36); rats in the gallbladder meridian group were treated with EA at "Riyue" (GB 24) and "Yanglingquan" (GB 34). The EA was given for 30 min, once a day for 7 days totally. The change of gastric mucosal morphology was observed by routine light microscope; enzyme linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect the expressions of malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-px) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-2(IL-2), interleukin-6(IL-6) in serum and gastric mucosal cells of rats. After treatment, compared with the model group, the gastric mucosal damage index was decreased in the stomach meridian group and gallbladder meridian group (both P stomach meridian group (all P stomach meridian group rats ( P stomach meridian acupoints is likely to inhibit the expressions of oxidative damage factors to promote the repair of gastric mucosal injury, which indicates the correlation between meridians and zang-fu .

  5. Prediction Of Formability In Sheet Metal Forming Processes Using A Local Damage Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, P.; Santos, Abel; Cesar Sa, J.; Andrade Pires, F.; Barata da Rocha, A.

    2007-01-01

    The formability in sheet metal forming processes is mainly conditioned by ductile fracture resulting from geometric instabilities due to necking and strain localization. The macroscopic collapse associated with ductile failure is a result of internal degradation described throughout metallographic observations by the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids and micro-cracks. Damage influences and is influenced by plastic deformation and therefore these two dissipative phenomena should be coupled at the constitutive level. In this contribution, Lemaitre's ductile damage model is coupled with Hill's orthotropic plasticity criterion. The coupling between damaging and material behavior is accounted for within the framework of Continuum Damage Mechanics (CDM). The resulting constitutive equations are implemented in the Abaqus/Explicit code, for the prediction of fracture onset in sheet metal forming processes. The damage evolution law takes into account the important effect of micro-crack closure, which dramatically decreases the rate of damage growth under compressive paths

  6. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, January 1, 1980-December 31, 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1980-09-01

    In this project several mechanisms are proposed for radiation damage to DNA constituents and DNA, and a series of experiments detailed utilizing electron spin resonance spectrometry to test the proposed mechanisms. Under current investigation are irradiated systems of DNA constituents which may shed light on indirect effects. In addition, studies of radiation effects on lipids have been undertaken which will shed light on the only other proposed site for cell kill, the membrane. Studies completed during the past year are: (1) π cations produced in DNA bases by attack of oxidizing radicals; (2) INDO studies of radicals produced in peptides and carboxylic acid model compounds; (3) electron reactions with carboxylic acids, ketones and aldehydes; and (4) γ-irradiation of esters and triglycerides. Progress has been made this year in a study of radicals generated in model compounds for the sugar-phosphate backbone

  7. Measuring damage in physical model tests of rubble mounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofland, B.; Rosa-Santos, Paulo; Taveira-Pinto, Francisco; Lemos, Rute; Mendonça, A.; Juana Fortes, C

    2017-01-01

    This paper studies novel ways to evaluate armour damage in physical models of coastal structures. High-resolution damage data for reference rubble mound breakwaters obtained under the HYDRALAB+ joint-research project are analysed and discussed. These tests are used to analyse the way to describe

  8. Use of heavy ions to model radiation damage of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirokov, S.V.; Vyshemirskij, M.P.

    2011-01-01

    The methods for modeling radiation damage of metals using heavy ions are reviewed and the results obtained are analyzed. It is shown that irradiation of metals with heavy ion can simulate neutron exposure with the equivalent dose with adequate accuracy and permits a detailed analysis of radiation damage of metals

  9. Track structure model of cell damage in space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Robert; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Shinn, Judy L.; Ngo, Duc M.

    1992-01-01

    The phenomenological track-structure model of cell damage is discussed. A description of the application of the track-structure model with the NASA Langley transport code for laboratory and space radiation is given. Comparisons to experimental results for cell survival during exposure to monoenergetic, heavy-ion beams are made. The model is also applied to predict cell damage rates and relative biological effectiveness for deep-space exposures.

  10. Fatigue damage mechanism and strength of woven laminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, J.; Bathias, C.

    1993-01-01

    The apparent secant stiffness changes with the cyclic number for both unnotched and notched woven laminated specimens (two orthotropic and one quasi-isotropic) during tensile fatigue test at a fixed ratio of maximum fatigue load to UTS were observed. The observable damage initiation and evolution as a function of the cyclic number were directly measured at the notched specimen surface with a video-camera system. The fatigue strengths of the unnotched and notched specimens were determined. The results show that the normalized apparent secant stiffness change curves as a function of cyclic numbers can be divided into three stages. For the first and the second stages in notched specimens and for total life of unnotched specimens, the damage has not been evidently observed and certainly verified with the traditional experimental methods such as radiography and microscopy although many acoustic emission signals can be obtained. The last stage for the notched specimens (N/Nf>0.4, the secant stiffness decreases fast) corresponds to the initiation and evolution of the observable damages. The fatigue strength of these woven composite laminates is dominated by the third stage during which the observable damage develops along the specimen ligament until fracture. During the third stage, a critical dimension at the specimen ligament and a life threshold can be found beyond which a final catastrophic fracture will immediately occur. The quasi-isotropic laminate is of a fatigue strength lower than the two orthotropic laminates of which the fatigue strengths are approaching to each other. The fatigue life is also influenced by the stacking sequences. (orig.)

  11. Research on borehole stability of shale based on seepage-stress-damage coupling model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Ran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In oil drilling, one of the most complicated problems is borehole stability of shale. Based on the theory of continuum damage mechanics, a modified Mohr-Coulomb failure criterion according to plastic damage evolution and the seepage-stress coupling is established. Meanwhile, the damage evolution equation which is based on equivalent plastic strain and the permeability evolution equation of shale are proposed in this paper. The physical model of borehole rock for a well in China western oilfield is set up to analyze the distribution of damage, permeability, stress, plastic strain and displacement. In the calculation process, the influence of rock damage to elastic modulus, cohesion and permeability is involved by writing a subroutine for ABAQUS. The results show that the rock damage evolution has a significant effect to the plastic strain and stress in plastic zone. Different drilling fluid density will produce different damage in its value, range and type. This study improves the theory of mechanical mechanism of borehole collapse and fracture, and provides a reference for the further research of seepage-stress-chemical-damage coupling of wall rock.

  12. Representing Matrix Cracks Through Decomposition of the Deformation Gradient Tensor in Continuum Damage Mechanics Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Frank A., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    A method is presented to represent the large-deformation kinematics of intraply matrix cracks and delaminations in continuum damage mechanics (CDM) constitutive material models. The method involves the additive decomposition of the deformation gradient tensor into 'crack' and 'bulk material' components. The response of the intact bulk material is represented by a reduced deformation gradient tensor, and the opening of an embedded cohesive interface is represented by a normalized cohesive displacement-jump vector. The rotation of the embedded interface is tracked as the material deforms and as the crack opens. The distribution of the total local deformation between the bulk material and the cohesive interface components is determined by minimizing the difference between the cohesive stress and the bulk material stress projected onto the cohesive interface. The improvements to the accuracy of CDM models that incorporate the presented method over existing approaches are demonstrated for a single element subjected to simple shear deformation and for a finite element model of a unidirectional open-hole tension specimen. The material model is implemented as a VUMAT user subroutine for the Abaqus/Explicit finite element software. The presented deformation gradient decomposition method reduces the artificial load transfer across matrix cracks subjected to large shearing deformations, and avoids the spurious secondary failure modes that often occur in analyses based on conventional progressive damage models.

  13. A plastic damage model with stress triaxiality-dependent hardening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Xinpu; Shen Guoxiao; Zhou Lin

    2005-01-01

    Emphases of this study were placed on the modelling of plastic damage behaviour of prestressed structural concrete, with special attention being paid to the stress-triaxiality dependent plastic hardening law and the corresponding damage evolution law. A definition of stress triaxiality was proposed and introduced in the model presented here. Drucker-Prager -type plasticity was adopted in the formulation of the plastic damage constitutive equations. Numerical validations were performed for the proposed plasticity-based damage model with a driver subroutine developed in this study. The predicted stress-strain behaviour seems reasonably accurate for the uniaxial tension and uniaxial compression compared with the experimental data reported in references. Numerical calculations of compressions under various hydrostatic stress confinements were carried out in order to validate the stress triaxiality dependent properties of the model. (authors)

  14. Mechanical processing of bast fibres: The occurrence of damage and its effect on fibre structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hänninen, Tuomas; Thygesen, Anders; Mehmood, Shahid

    2012-01-01

    Currently, separation processes used for natural fibres for composite reinforcing textiles cause a significant amount of damage to the fibres. Microscopic analysis showed that industrially processed flax (Linum usitassimium L.) fibres contained significantly more defects than green or retted ones...... to heterogeneous reactivity. Analogous findings were observed in hemp (Cannabis sativa L.) fibre damaged in the laboratory under controlled conditions, emphasising the need to develop extraction and separation processes that minimise mechanical damage to the fibres....

  15. Numerical modelling of damage evolution in ingot forging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter; Martins, Paulo A.F.; Bay, Niels Oluf

    2015-01-01

    The ingot forging process is numerically simulated applying both the Shima-Oyane porous plasticity model as a coupled damage model and the uncoupled normalized Cockcroft & Latham criterion. Four different cases including two different lower die angles (120º and 180º) and two different sizes of feed...... (400mm and 800mm) are analysed. Comparison of the simulation results with recommendations in literature on ingot forging, indicates the normalized Cockcroft & Latham damage criterion to be the most realistic of the two....

  16. Hysteretic MDOF Model to Quantify Damage for RC Shear Frames Subject to Earthquakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köylüoglu, H. Ugur; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Cakmak, Ahmet S.

    A hysteretic mechanical formulation is derived to quantify local, modal and overall damage in reinforced concrete (RC) shear frames subject to seismic excitation. Each interstorey is represented by a Clough and Johnston (1966) hysteretic constitutive relation with degrading elastic fraction of th...... shear frame is subject to simulated earthquake excitations, which are modelled as a stationary Gaussian stochastic process with Kanai-Tajimi spectrum, multiplied by an envelope function. The relationship between local, modal and overall damage indices is investigated statistically....

  17. Molecular and sensory mechanisms to mitigate sunlight-induced DNA damage in treefrog tadpoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuch, André P; Lipinski, Victor M; Santos, Mauricio B; Santos, Caroline P; Jardim, Sinara S; Cechin, Sonia Z; Loreto, Elgion L S

    2015-10-01

    The increased incidence of solar ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation has been proposed as an environmental stressor, which may help to explain the enigmatic decline of amphibian populations worldwide. Despite growing knowledge regarding the UV-induced biological effects in several amphibian models, little is known about the efficacy of DNA repair pathways. In addition, little attention has been given to the interplay between these molecular mechanisms with other physiological strategies that avoid the damage induced by sunlight. Here, DNA lesions induced by environmental doses of solar UVB and UVA radiation were detected in genomic DNA samples of treefrog tadpoles (Hypsiboas pulchellus) and their DNA repair activity was evaluated. These data were complemented by monitoring the induction of apoptosis in blood cells and tadpole survival. Furthermore, the tadpoles' ability to perceive and escape from UV wavelengths was evaluated as an additional strategy of photoprotection. The results show that tadpoles are very sensitive to UVB light, which could be explained by the slow DNA repair rates for both cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) and pyrimidine (6,4) pyrimidone photoproducts (6,4PPs). However, they were resistant to UVA, probably as a result of the activation of photolyases during UVA irradiation. Surprisingly, a sensory mechanism that triggers their escape from UVB and UVA light avoids the generation of DNA damage and helps to maintain the genomic integrity. This work demonstrates the genotoxic impact of both UVB and UVA radiation on tadpoles and emphasizes the importance of the interplay between molecular and sensory mechanisms to minimize the damage caused by sunlight. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Damage effects and mechanisms of proton irradiation on methyl silicone rubber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.X.; He, Sh.Y.; Xu, Zh.; Wei, Q.

    2004-01-01

    A study was performed on the damage effects and mechanisms of proton irradiation with 150 keV energy to space-grade methyl silicone rubber. The changes in surface morphology, mechanical properties, infrared attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectrum, mass spectrum and pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrum (PYGC-MS) indicated that, under lower fluence, the proton radiation would induce cross-linking effect, resulting in an increase in tensile strengths and hardness of the methyl silicon rubber. However, under higher proton fluence, the radiation-induced degradation, which decreased the tensile strengths and hardness, became a dominant effect. A macromolecular-network destruction model for the silicone rubber radiated with the protons was proposed

  19. Towards mechanism-based simulation of impact damage using exascale computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shterenlikht, Anton; Margetts, Lee; McDonald, Samuel; Bourne, Neil K.

    2017-01-01

    Over the past 60 years, the finite element method has been very successful in modelling deformation in engineering structures. However the method requires the definition of constitutive models that represent the response of the material to applied loads. There are two issues. Firstly, the models are often difficult to define. Secondly, there is often no physical connection between the models and the mechanisms that accommodate deformation. In this paper, we present a potentially disruptive two-level strategy which couples the finite element method at the macroscale with cellular automata at the mesoscale. The cellular automata are used to simulate mechanisms, such as crack propagation. The stress-strain relationship emerges as a continuum mechanics scale interpretation of changes at the micro- and meso-scales. Iterative two-way updating between the cellular automata and finite elements drives the simulation forward as the material undergoes progressive damage at high strain rates. The strategy is particularly attractive on large-scale computing platforms as both methods scale well on tens of thousands of CPUs.

  20. A cohesive plastic/damage-zone model for ductile crack analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, C.; Gross, D.

    1995-01-01

    A cohesive plastic/damage-zone model of the Dugdale-Barenblatt type (G.I. Barenblatt, Adv. Appl. Mech. 7 (1962) 55-129; D.S. Dugdale, J. Mech. Phys. Solids 8 (1960) 100-104) is presented for analyzing crack growth in ductile materials with damage evolution. A semi-infinite Mode I crack in plane stress or plane stress is considered. The damage is assumed to be present in form of dispersed microvoids which are localized into a narrow strip ahead of the crack-tip. A simple damage model of the Gurson model type (A.L. Gurson, J. Eng. Mater. Technol. 99 (1977) 2-15; V. Tvergaard, Advances in Applied Mechanics, Vol. 27, Academic Press, 1990, pp. 83-151) is developed for uniaxial tension to describe the macroscopic properties of the cohesive plastic/damage-zone. Under small-scale yielding and small-scale damage conditions, a system of nonlinear integral equations for the plastic strain and the length of the cohesive plastic/damage-zone is derived. Numerical results are presented and discussed to reveal the effect of damage evolution on the ductile crack growth. (orig.)

  1. Mechanical Damage and Combustion of TNT and Composition-B

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lieb, Robert

    2001-01-01

    ... from 0.1 to 100 s-1. The mechanical response was measured with parameters that have been used to characterize the fracture response of gun propellant during its development over the last decade...

  2. Mechanical injuries, burns and combination damage caused by reactor accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koslowski, L.

    1981-01-01

    In cases of combination damage the initial treatment of wounds is the same as with injuries without accompanying radiation exposure. In the beginning the general principles of surgical treatment apply. In case of a mass accident, the examination of the injured to decide on the necessary kind of treatment has priority. A common problem to all the decisions is that the extent of a radiation exposure that may have been sustained cannot be established at once. Whether the radiation exposure has been so heavy as to require the modification of the surgical measures can be seen only from the blood count, the bone marrow biopsy, the reticulocyte count or from a chromosome analysis. (DG) [de

  3. Investigation of DNA damage and repair mechanism using deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau How Mooi; Kikuchi, M.; Kobayashi, Y.; Narumi, I.; Watanabe, H.

    1997-01-01

    Deninococcus Radiodurans, formerly known as Micrococcus Radiodurans, is a popular bacterium because of its high resistance to damage by carcinogens such as ionizing radiation (Dean et. al. 1966; Kitayama and Matsuyama 1968) and UV radiation (Gasvon et. al., 1995; Arrange et. al. 1993). In this report, we investigated the high resistance to ionizing radiation by this bacterium. The bacteria had been exposed from I to 5 kGy of gamma radiation and then incubated in TGY medium to study their ability to repair the broken DNA. The repair time was measured by Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE) method. The repair time for each dose was determined. Also in order to ensure that the repair was perfect, the bacterium was subjected to a second exposure of ionizing radiation after it has fully repaired. It was found that the 'second' repair characteristic was similar to the first repair. This confirmed that the repair after the exposure to the ionizing radiation was perfect

  4. Modelling of creep damage development in ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, R. [Swedish Institute for Metals Research, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1998-12-31

    The physical creep damage, which is observed in fossil-fired power plants, is mainly due to the formation of cavities and their interaction. It has previously been demonstrated that both the nucleation and growth of creep cavities can be described by power functions in strain for low alloy and 12 % CrMoV creep resistant steels. It possible to show that the physical creep damage is proportional to the product of the number of cavities and their area. Hence, the physical creep damage can also be expressed in terms of the creep strain. In the presentation this physical creep damage is connected to the empirical creep damage classes (1-5). A creep strain-time function, which is known to be applicable to low alloy and 12 % CrMoV creep resistant steels, is used to describe tertiary creep. With this creep strain - time model the residual lifetime can be predicted from the observed damage. For a given damage class the remaining life is directly proportional to the service time. An expression for the time to the next inspection is proposed. This expression is a function of fraction of the total allowed damage, which is consumed till the next inspection. (orig.) 10 refs.

  5. Modelling of creep damage development in ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandstroem, R [Swedish Institute for Metals Research, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-12-31

    The physical creep damage, which is observed in fossil-fired power plants, is mainly due to the formation of cavities and their interaction. It has previously been demonstrated that both the nucleation and growth of creep cavities can be described by power functions in strain for low alloy and 12 % CrMoV creep resistant steels. It possible to show that the physical creep damage is proportional to the product of the number of cavities and their area. Hence, the physical creep damage can also be expressed in terms of the creep strain. In the presentation this physical creep damage is connected to the empirical creep damage classes (1-5). A creep strain-time function, which is known to be applicable to low alloy and 12 % CrMoV creep resistant steels, is used to describe tertiary creep. With this creep strain - time model the residual lifetime can be predicted from the observed damage. For a given damage class the remaining life is directly proportional to the service time. An expression for the time to the next inspection is proposed. This expression is a function of fraction of the total allowed damage, which is consumed till the next inspection. (orig.) 10 refs.

  6. Development of dual field magnetic flux leakage (MFL) inspection technology to detect mechanical damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    This report details the development and testing of a dual magnetization in-line inspection (ILI) : tool for detecting mechanical damage in operating pipelines, including the first field trials of a : fully operational dual-field magnetic flux leakage...

  7. A Hybrid Approach to Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-30

    manufacturing defects in the intermediately -homogenized model of fiber-reinforced composites. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Computational micromechanics; Cavitation...defects in the intermediately -homogenized model of fiber-reinforced composites. Task 1.1 Micro-level crack initiation Background and motivation In...new Intermediate Homogenization Peridynamic approach (IH-PD model) for failure in multiphase materials. We plan to apply this IH-PD model for the

  8. Contribution to the numerical study of concrete behaviour and of reinforced concrete structures submitted to coupled thermal and mechanical solicitations: a damageable thermo-elasto-plastic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nechnech, W.

    2000-12-01

    The aim of this research is the development of an Finite Element model for the analysis of reinforced concrete structures under thermal, mechanical loadings or any combination of them. An available synthesis of results on the concrete behavior under thermal solicitation is exposed. The different behavior of concrete that can be founded notably in thermo-mechanical analysis (Damage, unilateral phenomenon, thermo-mechanical interaction,...) are underlined. The various families of modeling are analyzed thereafter while underlining the important aspects of the behavior that each one can re-transcribe. A new thermo-plastic damage model for plain concrete subjected to combined thermal and cyclic loading is developed using the concept of plastic-work-hardening and stiffness degradation in continuum damage mechanics. Two damage variables are used: the first one for mechanical action and the second one for thermal action. Further, thermo-mechanical interaction strains have been introduced to describe the influence of mechanical loading on the physical process of thermal expansion of concrete. The constitutive relations for elastoplastic responses are decoupled from the degradation damage responses by using the effective stress concept. This method provides advantages in the numerical implementation. A simple and thermodynamically consistent scalar degradation model is introduced to simulate the effect of damage on elastic stiffness and its recovery during crack opening and closing. Efficient computational algorithms for the proposed model are subsequently explored and performance of this model is demonstrated with numerical examples. (author)

  9. Extended Kalman filtering for the detection of damage in linear mechanical structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Escamilla-Ambrosio, P. J.; Lieven, N. A. J.

    2009-09-01

    This paper addresses the problem of assessing the location and extent of damage in a vibrating structure by means of vibration measurements. Frequency domain identification methods (e.g. finite element model updating) have been widely used in this area while time domain methods such as the extended Kalman filter (EKF) method, are more sparsely represented. The difficulty of applying EKF in mechanical system damage identification and localisation lies in: the high computational cost, the dependence of estimation results on the initial estimation error covariance matrix P(0), the initial value of parameters to be estimated, and on the statistics of measurement noise R and process noise Q. To resolve these problems in the EKF, a multiple model adaptive estimator consisting of a bank of EKF in modal domain was designed, each filter in the bank is based on different P(0). The algorithm was iterated by using the weighted global iteration method. A fuzzy logic model was incorporated in each filter to estimate the variance of the measurement noise R. The application of the method is illustrated by simulated and real examples.

  10. Damage characterization and modeling of a 7075-T651 aluminum plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordon, J.B.; Horstemeyer, M.F.; Solanki, K.; Bernard, J.D.; Berry, J.T.; Williams, T.N.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the damage-induced anisotropy arising from material microstructure heterogeneities at two different length scales was characterized and modeled for a wrought aluminum alloy. Experiments were performed on a 7075-T651 aluminum alloy plate using sub-standard tensile specimens in three different orientations with respect to the rolling direction. Scanning electron microscopy was employed to characterize the stereology of the final damage state in terms of cracked and or debonded particles. A physically motivated internal state variable continuum model was used to predict fracture by incorporating material microstructural features. The continuum model showed good comparisons to the experimental data by capturing the damage-induced anisotropic material response. Estimations of the mechanical stress-strain response, material damage histories, and final failure were numerically calculated and experimentally validated thus demonstrating that the final failure state was strongly dependent on the constituent particle morphology.

  11. A 3D Orthotropic Elastic Continuum Damage Material Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    English, Shawn Allen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Brown, Arthur A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-08-01

    A three dimensional orthotropic elastic constitutive model with continuum damage is implemented for polymer matrix composite lamina. Damage evolves based on a quadratic homogeneous function of thermodynamic forces in the orthotropic planes. A small strain formulation is used to assess damage. In order to account for large deformations, a Kirchhoff material formulation is implemented and coded for numerical simulation in Sandia’s Sierra Finite Element code suite. The theoretical formulation is described in detail. An example of material parameter determination is given and an example is presented.

  12. Modeling of laser damage initiated by surface contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Faux, D.R.; Riddle, R.A.; Shapiro, A.; Eder, D.C.; Penetrante, B.M.; Milam, D.; Genin, F.Y.; Kozlowski, M.R.

    1996-11-01

    The authors are engaged in a comprehensive effort to understand and model the initiation and growth of laser damage initiated by surface contaminants. This includes, for example, the initial absorption by the contaminant, heating and plasma generation, pressure and thermal loading of the transparent substrate, and subsequent shockwave propagation, 'splashing' of molten material and possible spallation, optical propagation and scattering, and treatment of material fracture. The integration use of large radiation hydrodynamics codes, optical propagation codes and material strength codes enables a comprehensive view of the damage process The following picture of surface contaminant initiated laser damage is emerging from our simulations

  13. Modeling the mechanical response of PBX 9501

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragaswamy, Partha [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lewis, Matthew W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Liu, Cheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Darla G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    An engineering overview of the mechanical response of Plastic-Bonded eXplosives (PBXs), specifically PBX 9501, will be provided with emphasis on observed mechanisms associated with different types of mechanical testing. Mechanical tests in the form of uniaxial tension, compression, cyclic loading, creep (compression and tension), and Hopkinson bar show strain rate and temperature dependence. A range of mechanical behavior is observed which includes small strain recoverable response in the form of viscoelasticity; change in stiffness and softening beyond peak strength due to damage in the form microcracks, debonding, void formation and the growth of existing voids; inelastic response in the form of irrecoverable strain as shown in cyclic tests, and viscoelastic creep combined with plastic response as demonstrated in creep and recovery tests. The main focus of this paper is to elucidate the challenges and issues involved in modeling the mechanical behavior of PBXs for simulating thermo-mechanical responses in engineering components. Examples of validation of a constitutive material model based on a few of the observed mechanisms will be demonstrated against three point bending, split Hopkinson pressure bar and Brazilian disk geometry.

  14. Research on damage evolution and damage model of 316LN steel during forging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, X.W., E-mail: dxwmike1998@sina.com; Liu, J.S.

    2013-12-20

    The tensile tests and unloading tensile experiments of 316LN steel were conducted. The damage evolution processes were investigated by optical microscope. The fracture was studied using a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and optical microscope, of which, the chemical compositions were analyzed by Energy Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS). The results show that voids nucleate by decohesion of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} inclusions–matrix interface and mainly along the grain boundary, especially, at triangular grain boundary junctions. The tensile processes were simulated by Deform2D under different deformation conditions. The critical damage values were obtained. The model between the critical damage value, temperature and strain rate was established by regression analysis. A combination of numerical simulation and upsetting experiments was applied for verifying the accuracy and reliability of critical damage value. These damage values can be used to predict the initiation of voids during 316LN steel hot forging. So, they have important instructional effects on designing forging technology of 316LN steel.

  15. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, August 1, 1974--July 31, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1975-01-01

    A mechanism is proposed for radiation damage to DNA and a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectrometry to test the proposed mechanism is described. Investigations completed or nearing completion are: studies of electron transfer reactions in dinucleoside phosphates; studies of the anions of 5-nitropyrimidines and their reactions; and studies of protonation reactions at carbon sites in anion radicals of certain model compounds and aromatic amino acids. In the first study, the relative electron affinities of the DNA bases were determined in a model system of the DNA strand. In addition, study of the reactions of these anions showed that the thymine anion is the most reactive of the DNA bases in this model system. In the second study anisotropic and isotropic spectra of the anion radicals of 5-nitropyrimidines were characterized by newly developed computer simulation programs. Several of the anions were found to react to form iminoxy radicals. The third study showed that protonation reactions at carbon sites in anions are reactions which are general for molecules with unsaturated linkages. Thus, this mechanism is of significance to the radiolysis of many biological molecules, including DNA. (U.S.)

  16. Hydromechanical modeling of clay rock including fracture damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asahina, D.; Houseworth, J. E.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2012-12-01

    Argillaceous rock typically acts as a flow barrier, but under certain conditions significant and potentially conductive fractures may be present. Fracture formation is well-known to occur in the vicinity of underground excavations in a region known as the excavation disturbed zone. Such problems are of particular importance for low-permeability, mechanically weak rock such as clays and shales because fractures can be relatively transient as a result of fracture self-sealing processes. Perhaps not as well appreciated is the fact that natural fractures can form in argillaceous rock as a result of hydraulic overpressure caused by phenomena such as disequlibrium compaction, changes in tectonic stress, and mineral dehydration. Overpressure conditions can cause hydraulic fracturing if the fluid pressure leads to tensile effective stresses that exceed the tensile strength of the material. Quantitative modeling of this type of process requires coupling between hydrogeologic processes and geomechanical processes including fracture initiation and propagation. Here we present a computational method for three-dimensional, hydromechanical coupled processes including fracture damage. Fractures are represented as discrete features in a fracture network that interact with a porous rock matrix. Fracture configurations are mapped onto an unstructured, three-dimensonal, Voronoi grid, which is based on a random set of spatial points. Discrete fracture networks (DFN) are represented by the connections of the edges of a Voronoi cells. This methodology has the advantage that fractures can be more easily introduced in response to coupled hydro-mechanical processes and generally eliminates several potential issues associated with the geometry of DFN and numerical gridding. A geomechanical and fracture-damage model is developed here using the Rigid-Body-Spring-Network (RBSN) numerical method. The hydrogelogic and geomechanical models share the same geometrical information from a 3D Voronoi

  17. Using Non-linear Homogenization to Improve the Performance of Macroscopic Damage Models of Trabecular Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levrero-Florencio, Francesc; Pankaj, Pankaj

    2018-01-01

    Realistic macro-level finite element simulations of the mechanical behavior of trabecular bone, a cellular anisotropic material, require a suitable constitutive model; a model that incorporates the mechanical response of bone for complex loading scenarios and includes post-elastic phenomena, such as plasticity (permanent deformations) and damage (permanent stiffness reduction), which bone is likely to experience. Some such models have been developed by conducting homogenization-based multiscale finite element simulations on bone micro-structure. While homogenization has been fairly successful in the elastic regime and, to some extent, in modeling the macroscopic plastic response, it has remained a challenge with respect to modeling damage. This study uses a homogenization scheme to upscale the damage behavior from the tissue level (microscale) to the organ level (macroscale) and assesses the suitability of different damage constitutive laws. Ten cubic specimens were each subjected to 21 strain-controlled load cases for a small range of macroscopic post-elastic strains. Isotropic and anisotropic criteria were considered, density and fabric relationships were used in the formulation of the damage law, and a combined isotropic/anisotropic law with tension/compression asymmetry was formulated, based on the homogenized results, as a possible alternative to the currently used single scalar damage criterion. This computational study enhances the current knowledge on the macroscopic damage behavior of trabecular bone. By developing relationships of damage progression with bone's micro-architectural indices (density and fabric) the study also provides an aid for the creation of more precise macroscale continuum models, which are likely to improve clinical predictions.

  18. Survey of potential light water reactor fuel rod failure mechanisms and damage limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtright, E.L.

    1979-07-01

    The findings and conclusions are presented of a survey to evaluate current information applicable to the development of fuel rod damage and failure limits for light water reactor fuel elements. The survey includes a review of past fuel failures, and identifies potential damage and failure mechanisms for both steady state operating conditions and postulated accident events. Possible relationships between the various damage and failure mechanisms are also proposed. The report identifies limiting criteria where possible, but concludes that sufficient data are not currently available in many important areas

  19. Damage to haemopoiesis, therapeutic strategies and repair mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wangenheim, K.H. von; Peterson, H.P.; Feinendegen, L.E.

    1993-01-01

    Investigations were carried out into the question as to whether stem cells surviving irradiation remain intact, which is suggested by radiobiological experience to date, or have suffered permanent lesions. The development of a test system gauging the quality of stem cells and their progeny on the basis of their proliferation ability led to the conclusion that radiation caused long-term injuries that permanently compromised the entire haemopoietic system. Observations of the regeneration of normal and irradiated bone marrow under homogeneous conditions in animal donors subjected to high-dose radiation as well as determinations of spleen colony size, proliferation factor and number of stem cells pointed to the fact that the vast majority of stem cells were permanently damaged. It could be shown that unspecific genetic lesions remained unchanged in surviving stem cells and were passed on to their progeny. Refinements to the original proliferation test and the in vitro determination of the proliferation ability of stem cells and various blood cell lines permitted to differentiate between several causative factors. Studies on ways to diminish stem cell injuries either by influencing humoral proliferation stimuli during the regenerative phase or by the use of radiation protection substances are already in progress. In addition to the primary studies, tests were performed to examine the effects of low dose irradiation, vitamin E deficiency and a static magnetic field. (orig./MG) [de

  20. Recent changes in flood damage in the United States from observations and ACME model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, G.; Leung, L. R.

    2017-12-01

    Despite efforts to mitigate flood hazards in flood-prone areas, survey- and report-based flood databases show that flood damage has increased and emerged as one of the most costly disaster in the United States since the 1990s. Understanding the mechanism driving the changes in flood damage is therefore critical for reducing flood risk. In this study, we first conduct a comprehensive analysis of the changing characteristics of flood damage at local, state and country level. Results show a significant increasing trend in the number of flood hazards, causing economic losses of up to $7 billion per year. The ratio of flood events that caused tangible economical cost to the total flood events has exhibited a non-significant increasing trend before 2007 followed by a significant decrease, indicating a changing vulnerability to floods. Analysis also reveals distinct spatial and temporal patterns in the threshold intensity of flood hazards with tangible economical cost. To understand the mechanism behind the increasing flood damage, we develop a flood damage economic model coupled with the integrated hydrological modeling system of ACME that features a river routing model with an inundation parameterization and a water use and regulation model. The model is evaluated over the country against historical records. Several numerical experiments are then designed to explore the mechanisms behind the recent changes in flood damage from the perspective of flood hazard, exposure and vulnerability, which constitute flood damage. The role of human activities such as reservoir operations and water use in modifying regional floods are also explored using the new tool, with the goal of improving understanding and modeling of vulnerability to flood hazards.

  1. Probing multi-scale mechanical damage in connective tissues using X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Fabio; Hofmann, Felix; Smith, Andrew J; Thompson, Mark S

    2016-11-01

    The accumulation of microstructural collagen damage following repetitive loading is linked to painful and debilitating tendon injuries. As a hierarchical, semi-crystalline material, collagen mechanics can be studied using X-ray diffraction. The aim of the study was to describe multi-structural changes in tendon collagen following controlled plastic damage (5% permanent strain). We used small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to interrogate the spacing of collagen molecules within a fibril, and wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) to measure molecular strains under macroscopic loading. Simultaneous recordings of SAXS and WAXS patterns, together with whole-tissue strain in physiologically hydrated rat-tail tendons were made during increments of in situ tensile loading. Results showed that while tissue level modulus was unchanged, fibril modulus decreased significantly, and molecular modulus significantly increased. Further, analysis of higher order SAXS peaks suggested structural changes in the gap and overlap regions, possibly localising the damage to molecular cross-links. Our results provide new insight into the fundamental damage processes at work in collagenous tissues and point to new directions for their mitigation and repair. This article reports the first in situ loading synchrotron studies on mechanical damage in collagenous tissues. We provide new insight into the nano- and micro-structural mechanisms of damage processes. Pre-damaged tendons showed differential alteration of moduli at macro, micro and nano-scales as measured using X-ray scattering techniques. Detailed analysis of higher order diffraction peaks suggested damage is localised to molecular cross-links. The results are consistent with previous X-ray scattering studies of tendons and also with recent thermal stability studies on damaged material. Detailed understanding of damage mechanisms is essential in the development of new therapies promoting tissue repair. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc

  2. Mathematical modelling in solid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Sofonea, Mircea; Steigmann, David

    2017-01-01

    This book presents new research results in multidisciplinary fields of mathematical and numerical modelling in mechanics. The chapters treat the topics: mathematical modelling in solid, fluid and contact mechanics nonconvex variational analysis with emphasis to nonlinear solid and structural mechanics numerical modelling of problems with non-smooth constitutive laws, approximation of variational and hemivariational inequalities, numerical analysis of discrete schemes, numerical methods and the corresponding algorithms, applications to mechanical engineering numerical aspects of non-smooth mechanics, with emphasis on developing accurate and reliable computational tools mechanics of fibre-reinforced materials behaviour of elasto-plastic materials accounting for the microstructural defects definition of structural defects based on the differential geometry concepts or on the atomistic basis interaction between phase transformation and dislocations at nano-scale energetic arguments bifurcation and post-buckling a...

  3. 35. Conference of the DVM Working Group on Fracture Processes: Advances in fracture and damage mechanics - simulation methods of fracture mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Subjects of the meeting were: Simulation of fatigue crack growth in real strucures using FEA (M. Fulland, Paderborn); Modelling of ductile crack growth (W. Brocks, Geesthacht); Advances in non-local modelling of ductile damage (F. Reusch et al., Berlin, Dortmund); Fracture mechanics of ceramics (D. Munz, Karlsruhe); From materials testing to vehicle crash testing (J.G. Blauel, Freiburg); Analytical simulation of crack growth in thin-walled structures (U. Zerbst, Geesthacht); The influence of intrinsic stresses on fatigue crack growth (C. Dalle Donne etc., Cologne, Dortmund, Pisa, and M. Sander, Paderborn); Fracture mechanical strength calculation in case of mixed mode loads on cracks (H.A. Richard, Paderborn); Numeric simulation of intrinsic stresses during welding (C. Veneziano, Freiburg); New research fields of the Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Werkstoffmechanik (P. Gumbsch, Head of the Institute, Freiburg); Modern developments and advances in fracture and damage mechanics; Numeric and experimental simulation of crack propagation and damage processes; Exemplary damage cases; Fracture mechanics in product development; Failure characteristics of lightweight constructional materials and joints [de

  4. Fatigue damage mechanisms in short fiber reinforced PBT+PET GF30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimkeit, B.; Castagnet, S.; Nadot, Y.; Habib, A. El; Benoit, G.; Bergamo, S.; Dumas, C.; Achard, S.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Final macroscopic cracking only affects the few last percent of the lifetime → Classical approach based on fracture surface observation is not sufficient to characterize micro-mechanisms → Different techniques (scanning electron microscopy, replica technique, infra-red imaging) are compared to the macroscopic mechanical behavior evolution (stiffness, viscous damping, ratcheting effect) → The influence of surrounding fibers on some observed damage processes is being evidenced for the first time. - Abstract: The fatigue damage of a glass-reinforced PolyButylene Terephthalate and PolyEthylene Terephthalate with the fiber volume fraction of 30% (PBT+PET GF30) is investigated by means of various techniques. Fatigue tests at R = 0.1 are carried out on dogbone specimens and tubular specimens with different fiber orientations. The macroscopic evolution of the material behavior is evaluated and fatigue damage mechanisms are observed with a replica technique, Infrared imaging and scanning electron microscopy. A fatigue damage scenario is finally proposed. It is shown that the propagation of a single macroscopic crack is not the major fatigue mechanism under fatigue loading. Damage is spatially distributed in the material and the classical circular crack at the end of the fiber is confirmed as the based fatigue mechanisms. It is also shown that the damage observed alongside the fibers is related to spatial distribution of fiber rather than stress distribution around one single fiber.

  5. Rock Failure Analysis Based on a Coupled Elastoplastic-Logarithmic Damage Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdia, M.; Molladavoodi, H.; Salarirad, H.

    2017-12-01

    The rock materials surrounding the underground excavations typically demonstrate nonlinear mechanical response and irreversible behavior in particular under high in-situ stress states. The dominant causes of irreversible behavior are plastic flow and damage process. The plastic flow is controlled by the presence of local shear stresses which cause the frictional sliding. During this process, the net number of bonds remains unchanged practically. The overall macroscopic consequence of plastic flow is that the elastic properties (e.g. the stiffness of the material) are insensitive to this type of irreversible change. The main cause of irreversible changes in quasi-brittle materials such as rock is the damage process occurring within the material. From a microscopic viewpoint, damage initiates with the nucleation and growth of microcracks. When the microcracks length reaches a critical value, the coalescence of them occurs and finally, the localized meso-cracks appear. The macroscopic and phenomenological consequence of damage process is stiffness degradation, dilatation and softening response. In this paper, a coupled elastoplastic-logarithmic damage model was used to simulate the irreversible deformations and stiffness degradation of rock materials under loading. In this model, damage evolution & plastic flow rules were formulated in the framework of irreversible thermodynamics principles. To take into account the stiffness degradation and softening on post-peak region, logarithmic damage variable was implemented. Also, a plastic model with Drucker-Prager yield function was used to model plastic strains. Then, an algorithm was proposed to calculate the numerical steps based on the proposed coupled plastic and damage constitutive model. The developed model has been programmed in VC++ environment. Then, it was used as a separate and new constitutive model in DEM code (UDEC). Finally, the experimental Oolitic limestone rock behavior was simulated based on the developed

  6. Indentation damage and mechanical properties of human enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H H; Smith, D T; Jahanmir, S; Romberg, E; Kelly, J R; Thompson, V P; Rekow, E D

    1998-03-01

    Understanding the mechanical properties of human teeth is important to clinical tooth preparation and to the development of "tooth-like" restorative materials. Previous studies have focused on the macroscopic fracture behavior of enamel and dentin. In the present study, we performed indentation studies to understand the microfracture and deformation and the microcrack-microstructure interactions of teeth. It was hypothesized that crack propagation would be influenced by enamel rods and the dentino-enamel junction (DEJ), and the mechanical properties would be influenced by enamel rod orientation and tooth-to-tooth variation. Twenty-eight human third molars were used for the measurement of hardness, fracture toughness, elastic modulus, and energy absorbed during indentation. We examined the effect of enamel rod orientation by propagating cracks in the occlusal surface, and in the axial section in directions parallel and perpendicular to the occlusal surface. The results showed that the cracks in the enamel axial section were significantly longer in the direction perpendicular to the occlusal surface than parallel. The cracks propagating toward the DEJ were always arrested and unable to penetrate dentin. The fracture toughness of enamel was not single-valued but varied by a factor of three as a function of enamel rod orientation. The elastic modulus of enamel showed a significant difference between the occlusal surface and the axial section. It is concluded that the cracks strongly interact with the DEJ and the enamel rods, and that the mechanical properties of teeth are functions of microstructural orientations; hence, single values of properties (e.g., a single toughness value or a single modulus value) should not be used without information on microstructural orientation.

  7. Modelling the fragmentation mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bougault, R.; Durand, D.; Gulminelli, F.

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the role of high amplitude collective motion in the nuclear fragmentation by using semi-classical macroscopic, as well as, microscopic simulations (BUU). These studies are motivated by the search of instabilities responsible for nuclear fragmentation. Two cases were examined: the bubble formation following the collective expansion of the compressed nucleus in case of very central reactions and, in the case of the semi-central collisions, the fast fission of the two partners issued from a binary reaction, in their corresponding Coulomb field. In the two cases the fragmentation channel is dominated by the inter-relation between the Coulomb and nuclear fields, and it is possible to obtain semi-quantitative predictions as functions of interaction parameters. The transport equations of BUU type predicts for central reactions formation of a high density transient state. Of much interest is the mechanism subsequent to de-excitation. It seems reasonable to conceive that the pressure stocked in the compressional mode manifests itself as a collective expansion of the system. As the pressure is a increasing function of the available energy one can conceive a variety of energy depending exit channels, starting from the fragmentation due the amplification of fluctuations interior to the spinodal zone up to the complete vaporization of the highly excited system. If the reached pressure is sufficiently high the reaction final state may preserve the memory of the entrance channel as a collective radial energy superimposed to the thermal disordered motion. Distributions of particles in the configuration space for both central and semi-central reactions for the Pb+Au system are presented. The rupture time is estimated to the order of 300 fm/c, and is strongly dependent on the initial temperature. The study of dependence of the rupture time on the interaction parameters is under way

  8. Effect of stacking angles on mechanical properties and damage propagation of plain woven carbon fiber laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Weimin; Ao, Wenhong

    2018-03-01

    Damage propagation induced failure is a predominant damage mechanism. This study is aimed at assessing the damage state and damage propagation induced failure with different stacking angles, of woven carbon fiber/epoxy laminates subjected to quasi-static tensile and bending load. Different stages of damage processing and damage behavior under the bending load are investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The woven carbon fiber/epoxy laminates which are stacked at six different angles (0°, 15°, 30°, 45°, 60°, 75°) with eight plies have been analyzed: [0]8, [15]8, [30]8, [45]8, [60]8, [75]8. Three-point bending test and quasi-static tensile test are used in validating the woven carbon fiber/epoxy laminates’ mechanical properties. Furthermore, the damage propagation and failure modes observed under flexural loading is correlated with flexural force and load-displacement behaviour respectively for the laminates. The experimental results have indicated that [45]8 laminate exhibits the best flexural performance in terms of energy absorption duo to its pseudo-ductile behaviour but the tensile strength and flexural strength drastically decreased compared to [0]8 laminate. Finally, SEM micrographs of specimens and fracture surfaces are used to reveal the different types of damage of the laminates with different stacking angles.

  9. Two-dimensional strain gradient damage modeling: a variational approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placidi, Luca; Misra, Anil; Barchiesi, Emilio

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we formulate a linear elastic second gradient isotropic two-dimensional continuum model accounting for irreversible damage. The failure is defined as the condition in which the damage parameter reaches 1, at least in one point of the domain. The quasi-static approximation is done, i.e., the kinetic energy is assumed to be negligible. In order to deal with dissipation, a damage dissipation term is considered in the deformation energy functional. The key goal of this paper is to apply a non-standard variational procedure to exploit the damage irreversibility argument. As a result, we derive not only the equilibrium equations but, notably, also the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions. Finally, numerical simulations for exemplary problems are discussed as some constitutive parameters are varying, with the inclusion of a mesh-independence evidence. Element-free Galerkin method and moving least square shape functions have been employed.

  10. Mechanics Model of Plug Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Q. K.; Nunes, A. C., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    An analytical model has been developed for the mechanics of friction plug welding. The model accounts for coupling of plastic deformation (material flow) and thermal response (plastic heating). The model predictions of the torque, energy, and pull force on the plug were compared to the data of a recent experiment, and the agreements between predictions and data are encouraging.

  11. A new coupled elastoplastic damage model for clay-stone and its parameter identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, S.P.; Chen, W.Z.; Yu, H.D.; Li, X.L.; Sillen, X.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In Belgium, the Boom Clay is considered as a potential host rock for the geological disposal of the high level nuclear waste and is intensively studied from hydro-mechanical point of view. Laboratory tests on Boom clay shown that the Boom clay presents very complex stress strain behaviour. Undrained triaxial tests indicated often a hardening behaviour at small deformation and softening at larger deformation. It is not easy to give an explicit function to describe the stress-strain behaviour under triaxial stress state. The mechanical characteristics are obviously affected by the porosity, fractures growth, water content, and stress, etc., four stages can be usually distinguished from the stress-strain curve of Boom Clay, named as OA, AB, BC and CD. 1) Stage OA, the relation between stress and strain is linear. This stage is elastic state, and point A is called as yield strength σ c0 . 2) Stage AB, the weak fractures in the rock appear, develop and cumulate gradually. Point B is called peak strength σ cu . 3) Stage BC, peak strength is reached and stress reduces with the increasing of strain, up to the residual strength. This stage is called strain softening and point C is the residual strength σ cr . The axial pressure causes the fracture developing and strength reducing. 4) Stage CD, the final strength doesn't reduce obviously with the development of plastic deformation. This stage is called plastic flow. Obviously, The conventional elasto-plastic constitutive model can not describe the mechanical behaviours of Boom Clay. Based on damage mechanics theory, an new elasto-plastic damage constitutive model is put forward and applied to Boom Clay, which can describe the complex stress-strain behaviour of clay. It is described as follows: stage OA with an elastic model, stage AB with elastic damage model, stage BC and stage CD with plastic damage model. The complete process curve of stress-strain can be divided

  12. Bayesian inference method for stochastic damage accumulation modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Xiaomo; Yuan, Yong; Liu, Xian

    2013-01-01

    Damage accumulation based reliability model plays an increasingly important role in successful realization of condition based maintenance for complicated engineering systems. This paper developed a Bayesian framework to establish stochastic damage accumulation model from historical inspection data, considering data uncertainty. Proportional hazards modeling technique is developed to model the nonlinear effect of multiple influencing factors on system reliability. Different from other hazard modeling techniques such as normal linear regression model, the approach does not require any distribution assumption for the hazard model, and can be applied for a wide variety of distribution models. A Bayesian network is created to represent the nonlinear proportional hazards models and to estimate model parameters by Bayesian inference with Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulation. Both qualitative and quantitative approaches are developed to assess the validity of the established damage accumulation model. Anderson–Darling goodness-of-fit test is employed to perform the normality test, and Box–Cox transformation approach is utilized to convert the non-normality data into normal distribution for hypothesis testing in quantitative model validation. The methodology is illustrated with the seepage data collected from real-world subway tunnels.

  13. Beam-Induced Damage Mechanisms and their Calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A

    2016-01-01

    The rapid interaction of highly energetic particle beams with matter induces dynamic responses in the impacted component. If the beam pulse is sufficiently intense, extreme conditions can be reached, such as very high pressures, changes of material density, phase transitions, intense stress waves, material fragmentation and explosions. Even at lower intensities and longer time-scales, significant effects may be induced, such as vibrations, large oscillations, and permanent deformation of the impacted components. These lectures provide an introduction to the mechanisms that govern the thermomechanical phenomena induced by the interaction between particle beams and solids and to the analytical and numerical methods that are available for assessing the response of impacted components. An overview of the design principles of such devices is also provided, along with descriptions of material selection guidelines and the experimental tests that are required to validate materials and components exposed to interactio...

  14. Mechanical Models of Fault-Related Folding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, A. M.

    2003-01-09

    The subject of the proposed research is fault-related folding and ground deformation. The results are relevant to oil-producing structures throughout the world, to understanding of damage that has been observed along and near earthquake ruptures, and to earthquake-producing structures in California and other tectonically-active areas. The objectives of the proposed research were to provide both a unified, mechanical infrastructure for studies of fault-related foldings and to present the results in computer programs that have graphical users interfaces (GUIs) so that structural geologists and geophysicists can model a wide variety of fault-related folds (FaRFs).

  15. A Hybrid Approach to Composite Damage and Failure Analysis Combining Synergistic Damage Mechanics and Peridynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-30

    in the solder matrix material . lo Figure 3 (a) we show an example of a failed solder joint from repeated drop-tests. The fractures tend to happen...microelectronics and electronic packaging for critical mission defense applications tend to fail because of the presence of intermetallic compounds ...SEM image of a failed so lder joint; (b) selection of a sample microstructure to be used for modeling; (c) the digitized material map for the

  16. Damage in Creep Aging Process of an Al-Zn-Mg-Cu Alloy: Experiments and Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Lei

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In creep age forming (CAF, large integral panel components of high-strength aluminum alloy can be shaped and strengthened under external elastic loading at an elevated temperature through creep deformation and age hardening, simultaneously. However, the high ribbed structure on panel may induce stress concentration, inhomogeneous plastic deformation and even damage evolution on the bending rib, leading to the difficulty in controlling forming precision and material properties. Therefore, the generation and evolution of damage are necessary to be considered in the design of CAF. Taking 7050 aluminum alloy as the case material, the continuous and interrupted creep aging tests at 165 °C and three stress levels (300, 325, and 350 MPa were conducted, and the corresponding material properties, precipitate, and damage microstructures were studied by mechanical properties tests, transmission electron microscope (TEM and scanning electron microscope (SEM characterizations. With the increase of stress level, the creep deformation occurs easier, the precipitates grow up faster, the creep damage occurs earlier, the growth rate and the size of microvoids increase, the mechanical properties decrease more rapidly, and the dominant mechanism of creep fracture changes from shear to microvoid coalescence. To simulate creep aging behavior with damage, a continuum damage mechanics (CDM based model is calibrated and numerically implemented into ABAQUS solver via CREEP subroutine. The CAF of 7050 aluminum alloy panels with different height ribs were conducted by experiment and FE simulation. The forming process presents a typical stress relaxation phenomenon. The creep damage mainly occurs on the bending rib due to the severe stress concentration. With the increase of rib height, the creep strain and damage degree increase, but the springback decreases.

  17. Towards mechanisms-guided resistivity-based monitoring of damage evolution in laminated composites

    KAUST Repository

    Lubineau, Gilles

    2013-04-05

    A convenient health monitoring technique for detecting degradation in laminated composite is to monitor the change of electrical resistance along multiple conduction paths within the structure. Yet, the relations between the global modification of resistivity and the exact underlying damage map is still unclear that makes diffcult to interpret these nondestructive-testing results. The challenge is then to be able to reconstruct from these global observation the underlying damage map. This is even more diffcult due to the numerous underlying damage mechanisms that can take place either at the inter laminar of intra laminar level. This paper intends to provide some preliminary insights about strategies to recover the damage state based only on global measurements. We focus here on transverse cracking detection. We introduce the homogenization process that defines at the meso scale an equivalent homogeneous ply that is energetically equivalent to the cracked one. This can be used as a first tool to reconstruct damage maps based on global resistivity measurements.

  18. Towards the damage evaluation using Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model for hot forming processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Muhammad; Bambach, Markus

    2018-05-01

    In the production of semi-finished metal products, hot forming is used to eliminate the pores and voids from the casting process under compressive stresses and to modify the microstructure for further processing. In the case of caliber and flat rolling processes, tensile stresses occur at certain roll gap ratios which promote pore formation on nonmetallic inclusion. The formation of new pores contributes to ductile damage and reduces the load carrying capacity of the material. In the literature, the damage nucleation and growth during the hot forming process are not comprehensively described. The aim of this study is to understand the damage initiation and growth mechanism during hot forming processes. Hot tensile tests are performed at different temperatures and strain rates for 16MnCrS5 steel. To investigate the influence of geometrical variations on the damage mechanism, specimens with different stress triaxiality ratios are used. Finite element simulations using the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) damage model are performed to estimate the critical void fraction for the damage initiation and the evolution of the void volume fraction. The results showed that the GTN model underestimates the softening of the material due to the independence of the temperature and the strain rate.

  19. Radiation damage studies on the optical and mechanical properties of plastic scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizue Hamada, Margarida; Roberto Rela, Paulo; Eduardo da Costa, Fabio; Henrique de Mesquita, Carlos

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the radiation damage studies on a large volume plastic scintillator based in polystyrene doped with PPO and POPOP. The consequences on their mechanical and scintillation properties were evaluated before and after irradiation with different dose rates of 60 Co gamma radiation, in several doses. The optical results show a significant difference in the radiation susceptibility, when the plastic scintillator is irradiated at low rate (0.1 kGy/h) with that irradiated at high dose rate (85 kGy/h). The losses in the optical and mechanical properties increase as the irradiation dose is increased. The damage evaluated by the transmittance, emission intensity, pulse height and tensile strength was normalized as a damage fraction and fitted by a bi-exponential function. It was observed that the damage for irradiation is not permanent and it obeys a bi-exponential function

  20. Mechanisms of Sensorineural Cell Damage, Death and Survival in the Cochlea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Frederic Ryan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The majority of acquired hearing loss, including presbycusis, is caused by irreversible damage to the sensorineural tissues of the cochlea. This article reviews the intracellular mechanisms that contribute to sensorineural damage in the cochlea, as well as the survival signaling pathways that can provide endogenous protection and tissue rescue. These data have primarily been generated in hearing loss not directly related to age. However, there is evidence that similar mechanisms operate in presbycusis. Moreover, accumulation of damage from other causes can contribute to age-related hearing loss. Potential therapeutic interventions to balance opposing but interconnected cell damage and survival pathways, such as antioxidants, anti-apoptotics, and pro-inflammatory cytokine inhibitors, are also discussed.

  1. Impact of mechanical stress induced in silica vacuum windows on laser-induced damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingreau, Clémence; Lanternier, Thomas; Lamaignère, Laurent; Donval, Thierry; Courchinoux, Roger; Leymarie, Christophe; Néauport, Jérôme

    2018-04-15

    At the interface between vacuum and air, optical windows must keep their optical properties, despite being subjected to mechanical stress. In this Letter, we investigate the impact of such stress on the laser-induced damage of fused silica windows at the wavelength of 351 nm in the nanosecond regime. Different stress values, from 1 to 30 MPa, both tensile and compressive, were applied. No effect of the stress on the laser-induced damage was evidenced.

  2. Damage mechanism of piping welded joints made from austenitic Steel for the type RBMK reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karzov, G.; Timofeev, B.; Gorbakony, A.; Petrov, V.; Chernaenko, T.

    1999-01-01

    In the process of operation of RBMK reactors the damages were taking place on welded piping, produced from austenitic stainless steel of the type 08X18H10T. The inspection of damaged sections in piping has shown that in most cases crack-like defects are of corrosion and mechanical character. The paper considers in details the reasons of damages appearance and their development for this type of welded joints of downcomers 325xl6 mm, which were fabricated from austenitic stainless steel using TlG and MAW welding methods. (author)

  3. Mechanical Damage Detection of Indonesia Local Citrus Based on Fluorescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siregar, T. H.; Ahmad, U.; Sutrisno; Maddu, A.

    2018-05-01

    Citrus experienced physical damage in peel will produce essential oils that contain polymethoxylated flavone. Polymethoxylated flavone is fluorescence substance; thus can be detected by fluorescence imaging. This study aims to study the fluorescence spectra characteristic and to determine the damage region in citrus peel based on fluorescence image. Pulung citrus from Batu district, East Java, as a famous citrus production area in Indonesia, was used in the experiment. It was observed that the image processing could detect the mechanical damage region. Fluorescence imaging can be used to classify the citrus into two categories, sound and defect citruses.

  4. Rheological-dynamical continuum damage model for concrete under uniaxial compression and its experimental verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milašinović Dragan D.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new analytical model for the prediction of concrete response under uniaxial compression and its experimental verification is presented in this paper. The proposed approach, referred to as the rheological-dynamical continuum damage model, combines rheological-dynamical analogy and damage mechanics. Within the framework of this approach the key continuum parameters such as the creep coefficient, Poisson’s ratio and damage variable are functionally related. The critical values of the creep coefficient and damage variable under peak stress are used to describe the failure mode of the concrete cylinder. The ultimate strain is determined in the post-peak regime only, using the secant stress-strain relation from damage mechanics. The post-peak branch is used for the energy analysis. Experimental data for five concrete compositions were obtained during the examination presented herein. The principal difference between compressive failure and tensile fracture is that there is a residual stress in the specimens, which is a consequence of uniformly accelerated motion of load during the examination of compressive strength. The critical interpenetration displacements and crushing energy are obtained theoretically based on the concept of global failure analysis. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON 174027: Computational Mechanics in Structural Engineering i br. TR 36017: Utilization of by-products and recycled waste materials in concrete composites for sustainable construction development in Serbia: Investigation and environmental assessment of possible applications

  5. Assessing the Impact of Mechanical Damage on Full-Thickness Porcine and Human Skin Using an In Vitro Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinda Dabboue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For most xenobiotics, the rates of percutaneous absorption are limited by diffusion through the horny layer of skin. However, percutaneous absorption of chemicals may seriously increase when the skin is damaged. The aim of this work was to develop an in vitro representative model of mechanically damaged skins. The epidermal barrier was examined following exposure to a razor, a rotating brush, and a microneedle system in comparison to tape-stripping which acted as a reference. Excised full-thickness skins were mounted on a diffusion chamber in order to evaluate the effect of injuries and to mimic physiological conditions. The transepidermal water loss (TEWL was greatly increased when the barrier function was compromised. Measurements were made for all the damaged biopsies and observed histologically by microscopy. On human and porcine skins, the tape-stripping application (0 to 40 times showed a proportional increase in TEWL which highlights the destruction of the stratum corneum. Similar results were obtained for all cosmetic instruments. This is reflected in our study by the nonsignificant difference of the mean TEWL scores between 30 strips and mechanical damage. For a specific appreciation, damaged skins were then selected to qualitatively evaluate the absorption of a chlorogenic acid solution using fluorescence microscopy.

  6. Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment. Final coupled 3D thermo-mechanical modeling. Preliminary particle mechanical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanne, Toivo; Johansson, Erik; Potyondy, David

    2004-02-01

    SKB is planning to perform a large-scale pillar stability experiment called APSE (Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment) at Aespoe HRL. The study is focused on understanding and control of progressive rock failure in hard crystalline rock and damage caused by high stresses. The elastic thermo-mechanical modeling was carried out in three dimensions because of the complex test geometry and in-situ stress tensor by using a finite-difference modeling software FLAC3D. Cracking and damage formation were modeled in the area of interest (pillar between two large scale holes) in two dimensions by using the Particle Flow Code (PFC), which is based on particle mechanics. FLAC and PFC were coupled to minimize the computer resources and the computing time. According to the modeling the initial temperature rises from 15 deg C to about 65 deg C in the pillar area during the heating period of 120 days. The rising temperature due to thermal expansion induces stresses in the pillar area and after 120 days heating the stresses have increased about 33% from the excavation induced maximum stress of 150 MPa to 200 MPa in the end of the heating period. The results from FLAC3D model showed that only regions where the crack initiation stress has exceeded were identified and they extended to about two meters down the hole wall. These could be considered the areas where damage may occur during the in-situ test. When the other hole is pressurized with a 0.8 MPa confining pressure it yields that 5 MPa more stress is needed to damage the rock than without confining pressure. This makes the damaged area in some degree smaller. High compressive stresses in addition to some tensile stresses might induce some AE (acoustic emission) activity in the upper part of the hole from the very beginning of the test and are thus potential areas where AE activities may be detected. Monitoring like acoustic emissions will be measured during the test execution. The 2D coupled PFC-FLAC modeling indicated that

  7. Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment. Final coupled 3D thermo-mechanical modeling. Preliminary particle mechanical modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wanne, Toivo; Johansson, Erik; Potyondy, David [Saanio and Riekkola Oy, Helsinki (Finland)

    2004-02-01

    SKB is planning to perform a large-scale pillar stability experiment called APSE (Aespoe Pillar Stability Experiment) at Aespoe HRL. The study is focused on understanding and control of progressive rock failure in hard crystalline rock and damage caused by high stresses. The elastic thermo-mechanical modeling was carried out in three dimensions because of the complex test geometry and in-situ stress tensor by using a finite-difference modeling software FLAC3D. Cracking and damage formation were modeled in the area of interest (pillar between two large scale holes) in two dimensions by using the Particle Flow Code (PFC), which is based on particle mechanics. FLAC and PFC were coupled to minimize the computer resources and the computing time. According to the modeling the initial temperature rises from 15 deg C to about 65 deg C in the pillar area during the heating period of 120 days. The rising temperature due to thermal expansion induces stresses in the pillar area and after 120 days heating the stresses have increased about 33% from the excavation induced maximum stress of 150 MPa to 200 MPa in the end of the heating period. The results from FLAC3D model showed that only regions where the crack initiation stress has exceeded were identified and they extended to about two meters down the hole wall. These could be considered the areas where damage may occur during the in-situ test. When the other hole is pressurized with a 0.8 MPa confining pressure it yields that 5 MPa more stress is needed to damage the rock than without confining pressure. This makes the damaged area in some degree smaller. High compressive stresses in addition to some tensile stresses might induce some AE (acoustic emission) activity in the upper part of the hole from the very beginning of the test and are thus potential areas where AE activities may be detected. Monitoring like acoustic emissions will be measured during the test execution. The 2D coupled PFC-FLAC modeling indicated that

  8. Multiscale Modeling of Dewetting Damage in Highly Filled Particulate Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geubelle, P. H.; Inglis, H. M.; Kramer, J. D.; Patel, J. J.; Kumar, N. C.; Tan, H.

    2008-02-01

    Particle debonding or dewetting constitutes one of the key damage processes in highly filled particulate composites such as solid propellant and other energetic materials. To analyze this failure process, we have developed a multiscale finite element framework that combines, at the microscale, a nonlinear description of the binder response with a cohesive model of the damage process taking place in a representative periodic unit cell (PUC). To relate micro-scale damage to the macroscopic constitutive response of the material, we employ the mathematical theory of homogenization (MTH). After a description of the numerical scheme, we present the results of the damage response of a highly filled particulate composite subjected to a uniaxial macroscopic strain, and show the direct correlation between the complex damage processes taking place in the PUC and the nonlinear macroscopic constitutive response. We also present a detailed study of the PUC size and a comparison between the finite element MTH-based study and a micromechanics model of the dewetting process.

  9. Impaired Facilitatory Mechanisms of Auditory Attention After Damage of the Lateral Prefrontal Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Bidet-Caulet, Aurélie; Buchanan, Kelly G.; Viswanath, Humsini; Black, Jessica; Scabini, Donatella; Bonnet-Brilhault, Frédérique; Knight, Robert T.

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence that auditory selective attention operates via distinct facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms enabling selective enhancement and suppression of sound processing, respectively. The lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC) plays a crucial role in the top-down control of selective attention. However, whether the LPFC controls facilitatory, inhibitory, or both attentional mechanisms is unclear. Facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms were assessed, in patients with LPFC damage, ...

  10. Influence of Different Yield Loci on Failure Prediction with Damage Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heibel, S.; Nester, W.; Clausmeyer, T.; Tekkaya, A. E.

    2017-09-01

    Advanced high strength steels are widely used in the automotive industry to simultaneously improve crash performance and reduce the car body weight. A drawback of these multiphase steels is their sensitivity to damage effects and thus the reduction of ductility. For that reason the Forming Limit Curve is only partially suitable for this class of steels. An improvement in failure prediction can be obtained by using damage mechanics. The objective of this paper is to comparatively review the phenomenological damage model GISSMO and the Enhanced Lemaitre Damage Model. GISSMO is combined with three different yield loci, namely von Mises, Hill48 and Barlat2000 to investigate the influence of the choice of the plasticity description on damage modelling. The Enhanced Lemaitre Model is used with Hill48. An inverse parameter identification strategy for a DP1000 based on stress-strain curves and optical strain measurements of shear, uniaxial, notch and (equi-)biaxial tension tests is applied to calibrate the models. A strong dependency of fracture strains on the choice of yield locus can be observed. The identified models are validated on a cross-die cup showing ductile fracture with slight necking.

  11. Verification of flood damage modelling using insurance data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Qianqian; Petersen, Toke E. P.; Thorsen, Bo J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an analysis using insurance data for damage description and risk model verification, based on data from a Danish case. The results show that simple, local statistics of rainfall are not able to describe the variation in individual cost per claim, but are, howeve...

  12. Verification of flood damage modelling using insurance data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Qianqian; Panduro, T. E.; Thorsen, B. J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an analysis using insurance data for damage description and risk model verification, based on data from a Danish case. The results show that simple, local statistics of rainfall are not able to describe the variation in individual cost per claim, but are, howeve...

  13. Experimental data available for radiation damage modelling in reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollenberger, H.

    Radiation damage modelling requires rate constants for production, annihilation and trapping of defects. The literature is reviewed with respect to experimental determination of such constants. Useful quantitative information exists only for Cu and Al. Special emphasis is given to the temperature dependence of the rate constants

  14. Mechanical model for ductility loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, W.L.

    1980-01-01

    A mechanical model was constructed to probe into the mechanism of ductility loss. Fracture criterion based on critical localized deformation was undertaken. Two microstructure variables were considered in the model. Namely, the strength ratio of grain boundary affected area to the matrix, Ω, and the linear fraction, x, of grain boundary affected area. A parametrical study was carried out. The study shows that the ductility is very sensitive to those microstructure parameters. The functional dependence of ductility to temperature as well as strain-rate, suggested by the model, is demonstrated to be consistent with the observation

  15. Hollow Cylinder Tests on Boom Clay: Modelling of Strain Localization in the Anisotropic Excavation Damaged Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    François, Bertrand; Labiouse, Vincent; Dizier, Arnaud; Marinelli, Ferdinando; Charlier, Robert; Collin, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Boom Clay is extensively studied as a potential candidate to host underground nuclear waste disposal in Belgium. To guarantee the safety of such a disposal, the mechanical behaviour of the clay during gallery excavation must be properly predicted. In that purpose, a hollow cylinder experiment on Boom Clay has been designed to reproduce, in a small-scale test, the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) as experienced during the excavation of a disposal gallery in the underground. In this article, the focus is made on the hydro-mechanical constitutive interpretation of the displacement (experimentally obtained by medium resolution X-ray tomography scanning). The coupled hydro-mechanical response of Boom Clay in this experiment is addressed through finite element computations with a constitutive model including strain hardening/softening, elastic and plastic cross-anisotropy and a regularization method for the modelling of strain localization processes. The obtained results evidence the directional dependency of the mechanical response of the clay. The softening behaviour induces transient strain localization processes, addressed through a hydro-mechanical second grade model. The shape of the obtained damaged zone is clearly affected by the anisotropy of the materials, evidencing an eye-shaped EDZ. The modelling results agree with experiments not only qualitatively (in terms of the shape of the induced damaged zone), but also quantitatively (for the obtained displacement in three particular radial directions).

  16. Numerical modeling of the viscoplastic damage behaviour of rocks and application to underground storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajdu, A.

    2003-12-01

    The long-term behavior of large, underground works of a civil engineering nature carried out in a rock mass is currently the subject of numerous studies. The object is to attain a better understanding of complex phenomena, such as the convergence of excavated cavities or the outbreak and development of damaged zones in the rock mass neighboring the works, in order to foresee them. This Ph.D. thesis is devoted to the analysis of viscoplastic strain in rocks and to the degradation of their mechanical properties with time, often referred to as deferred damage. A bibliographical record presents the current depth of understanding as regards underlying microstructural phenomena and summarizes the main theories upon which the modeling of these phenomena at the macroscopic scale is based. The formulations enabling a coupling between the viscous effects and the deferred damage are revisited and discussed in detail. One phenomenological model in particular, Lemaitre's viscoplastic constitutive damage law is retained for the numerical modeling. The calculations were performed with the help of a finite element code (CAST3M). Designs of nuclear waste disposal structures at great depth make up the subject of different case studies. The Lemaitre model, originally designed for metallic materials, is next the subject of a theoretical development of which the aim is to better adapt it to the description of the long-term mechanical behavior of rocks. The modifications focus on several points; notably that the hypotheses of anelastic strain at constant volume and of isotropy of damage are rejected. The main characteristics of time-dependent strain in rocks; in particular the phenomena of viscoplastic dilation and contraction as well as the anisotropy induced by damage to the rock matrix are reproduced by the proposed model. A parametric study is then undertaken, using the experimental results obtained on different types of rock, in order to demonstrate the model's capabilities

  17. Cutting Modeling of Hybrid CFRP/Ti Composite with Induced Damage Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinyang; El Mansori, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    In hybrid carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP)/Ti machining, the bi-material interface is the weakest region vulnerable to severe damage formation when the tool cutting from one phase to another phase and vice versa. The interface delamination as well as the composite-phase damage is the most serious failure dominating the bi-material machining. In this paper, an original finite element (FE) model was developed to inspect the key mechanisms governing the induced damage formation when cutting this multi-phase material. The hybrid composite model was constructed by establishing three disparate physical constituents, i.e., the Ti phase, the interface, and the CFRP phase. Different constitutive laws and damage criteria were implemented to build up the entire cutting behavior of the bi-material system. The developed orthogonal cutting (OC) model aims to characterize the dynamic mechanisms of interface delamination formation and the affected interface zone (AIZ). Special focus was made on the quantitative analyses of the parametric effects on the interface delamination and composite-phase damage. The numerical results highlighted the pivotal role of AIZ in affecting the formation of interface delamination, and the significant impacts of feed rate and cutting speed on delamination extent and fiber/matrix failure. PMID:28787824

  18. Uncertainty in urban flood damage assessment due to urban drainage modelling and depth-damage curve estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freni, G; La Loggia, G; Notaro, V

    2010-01-01

    Due to the increased occurrence of flooding events in urban areas, many procedures for flood damage quantification have been defined in recent decades. The lack of large databases in most cases is overcome by combining the output of urban drainage models and damage curves linking flooding to expected damage. The application of advanced hydraulic models as diagnostic, design and decision-making support tools has become a standard practice in hydraulic research and application. Flooding damage functions are usually evaluated by a priori estimation of potential damage (based on the value of exposed goods) or by interpolating real damage data (recorded during historical flooding events). Hydraulic models have undergone continuous advancements, pushed forward by increasing computer capacity. The details of the flooding propagation process on the surface and the details of the interconnections between underground and surface drainage systems have been studied extensively in recent years, resulting in progressively more reliable models. The same level of was advancement has not been reached with regard to damage curves, for which improvements are highly connected to data availability; this remains the main bottleneck in the expected flooding damage estimation. Such functions are usually affected by significant uncertainty intrinsically related to the collected data and to the simplified structure of the adopted functional relationships. The present paper aimed to evaluate this uncertainty by comparing the intrinsic uncertainty connected to the construction of the damage-depth function to the hydraulic model uncertainty. In this way, the paper sought to evaluate the role of hydraulic model detail level in the wider context of flood damage estimation. This paper demonstrated that the use of detailed hydraulic models might not be justified because of the higher computational cost and the significant uncertainty in damage estimation curves. This uncertainty occurs mainly

  19. Predicition of the first spinning cylinder test using continuum damage mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lidbury, D.P.G.; Sherry, A.H.; Bilby, B.A.; Howard, I.C.; Li, Z.H.; Eripret, C.

    1993-01-01

    For many years large-scale experiments have been performed world-wide to validate aspects of fracture mechanics methodology. Special emphasis has been given to correlations between small- and large-scale specimen behaviour in quantifying the structural behaviour of pressure vessels, piping and closures. Within this context, the first three Spinning Cylinder Tests, performed by AEA Technology at its Risley Laboratory, addressed the phenomenon of stable crack growth by ductile tearing in contained yield and conditions simulating pressurized thermal shock loading in a PWR reactor pressure vessel. A notable feature of the test data was that the effective resistance to crack growth, as measured in terms of the J R-curve, was appreciably greater than that anticipated from small-scale testing, both at initiation and after small amounts (a few millimeters) of tearing. In the present paper, two independent finite element analyses of the First Spinning Cylinder Test (SC 1) are presented and compared. Both involved application of the Rousselier ductile damage theory in an attempt to better understand the transferability of test data from small specimens to structural validation tests. In each instance, the parameters associated with the theory's constitutive equation were calibrated in terms of data from notched-tensile and (or) fracture mechanics tests, metallographic observation and (or) chemical composition. The evolution of ductile damage local to the crack tip during SC 1 was thereby calculated and, together with a crack growth criterion based on the maximization of opening-mode stress, used as the basis for predicting cylinder R-Curves (angular velocity vs. Δa, J-integral vs. Δa). The results show the Rousselier model to be capable of correctly predicting the enhancement of tearing toughness of the cylinder relative to that of conventional test specimens, given an appropriate choice of finite element cell size in the region representing the crack tip

  20. Identification Damage Model for Thermomechanical Degradation of Ductile Heterogeneous Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amri, A. El; Yakhloufi, M. H. El; Khamlichi, A.

    2017-05-01

    The failure of ductile materials subject to high thermal and mechanical loading rates is notably affected by material inertia. The mechanisms of fatigue-crack propagation are examined with particular emphasis on the similarities and differences between cyclic crack growth in ductile materials, such as metals, and corresponding behavior in brittle materials, such as intermetallic and ceramics. Numerical simulations of crack propagation in a cylindrical specimen demonstrate that the proposed method provides an effective means to simulate ductile fracture in large scale cylindrical structures with engineering accuracy. The influence of damage on the intensity of the destruction of materials is studied as well.

  1. A gradient enhanced plasticity-damage microplane model for concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zreid, Imadeddin; Kaliske, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Computational modeling of concrete poses two main types of challenges. The first is the mathematical description of local response for such a heterogeneous material under all stress states, and the second is the stability and efficiency of the numerical implementation in finite element codes. The paper at hand presents a comprehensive approach addressing both issues. Adopting the microplane theory, a combined plasticity-damage model is formulated and regularized by an implicit gradient enhancement. The plasticity part introduces a new microplane smooth 3-surface cap yield function, which provides a stable numerical solution within an implicit finite element algorithm. The damage part utilizes a split, which can describe the transition of loading between tension and compression. Regularization of the model by the implicit gradient approach eliminates the mesh sensitivity and numerical instabilities. Identification methods for model parameters are proposed and several numerical examples of plain and reinforced concrete are carried out for illustration.

  2. Finite strain formulation of viscoelastic damage model for simulation of fabric reinforced polymers under dynamic loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treutenaere S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of fabric reinforced polymers in the automotive industry is growing significantly. The high specific stiffness and strength, the ease of shaping as well as the great impact performance of these materials widely encourage their diffusion. The present model increases the predictability of explicit finite element analysis and push the boundaries of the ongoing phenomenological model. Carbon fibre composites made up various preforms were tested by applying different mechanical load up to dynamic loading. This experimental campaign highlighted the physical mechanisms affecting the initial mechanical properties, namely intra- and interlaminar matrix damage, viscoelasticty and fibre failure. The intralaminar behaviour model is based on the explicit formulation of the matrix damage model developed by the ONERA as the given damage formulation correlates with the experimental observation. Coupling with a Maxwell-Wiechert model, the viscoelasticity is included without losing the direct explicit formulation. Additionally, the model is formulated under a total Lagrangian scheme in order to maintain consistency for finite strain. Thus, the material frame-indifference as well as anisotropy are ensured. This allows reorientation of fibres to be taken into account particularly for in-plane shear loading. Moreover, fall within the framework of the total Lagrangian scheme greatly makes the parameter identification easier, as based on the initial configuration. This intralaminar model thus relies upon a physical description of the behaviour of fabric composites and the numerical simulations show a good correlation with the experimental results.

  3. A coupled interface-body nonlocal damage model for the analysis of FRP strengthening detachment from cohesive material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Toti

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a new model of the FRP-concrete or masonry interface, which accounts for the coupling occurring between the degradation of the cohesive material and the FRP detachment, is presented; in particular, a coupled interface-body nonlocal damage model is proposed. A nonlocal damage and plasticity model is developed for the quasi-brittle material. For the interface, a model which accounts for the mode I, mode II and mixed mode of damage and for the unilateral contact and friction effects is developed. Two different ways of performing the coupling between the body damage and the interface damage are proposed and compared. Some numerical applications are carried out in order to assess the performances of the proposed model in reproducing the mechanical behavior of the masonry elements strengthened with external FRP reinforcements.

  4. Concrete model for finite element analysis of structures subjected to severe damages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jamet, Ph.; Millard, A.; Hoffmann, A.; Nahas, G.; Barbe, B.

    1984-01-01

    A specific concrete model has been developed, in order to perform mechanical analysis of civil engineering structures, when subjected to accidental loadings, leading to severe damages. Its formulation is based on the physical mechanisms, which have been observed on laboratory specimens. The model has been implemented into the CASTEM finite element system, and the case of a concrete slab perforation by a rigid missile has been considered. The qualitative behaviour of the structure is well predicted by the model. Comparison between numerical and experimental results is also performed, using two main curves: missile velocity versus penetration depth; reaction forces versus time. (Author) [pt

  5. Intrauterine infection/inflammation during pregnancy and offspring brain damages: Possible mechanisms involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golan Hava

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Intrauterine infection is considered as one of the major maternal insults during pregnancy. Intrauterine infection during pregnancy could lead to brain damage of the developmental fetus and offspring. Effects on the fetal, newborn, and adult central nervous system (CNS may include signs of neurological problems, developmental abnormalities and delays, and intellectual deficits. However, the mechanisms or pathophysiology that leads to permanent brain damage during development are complex and not fully understood. This damage may affect morphogenic and behavioral phenotypes of the developed offspring, and that mice brain damage could be mediated through a final common pathway, which includes over-stimulation of excitatory amino acid receptor, over-production of vascularization/angiogenesis, pro-inflammatory cytokines, neurotrophic factors and apoptotic-inducing factors.

  6. Repair of endogenous and ionizing radiation-induced DNA damages: mechanisms and biological functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boiteux, S.

    2002-01-01

    The cellular DNA is continuously exposed to endogenous and exogenous stress. Oxidative stress due to cellular metabolism is the major cause of endogenous DNA damage. On the other hand, ionizing radiation (IR) is an important exogenous stress. Both induce similar DNA damages: damaged bases, abasic sites and strand breakage. Most of these lesions are lethal and/or mutagenic. The survival of the cell is managed by efficient and accurate DNA repair mechanisms that remove lesions before their replication or transcription. DNA repair pathways involved in the removal of IR-induced lesions are briefly described. Base excision repair (BER) is mostly involved in the removal of base damage, abasic sites and single strand breaks. In contrast, DNA double strand breaks are mostly repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR). How DNA repair pathways prevent cancer process is also discussed. (author)

  7. Modelling of thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings and damage of viscoplastic rocks in the context of radioactive waste storage; Modelisation des couplages thermo-hydro-mecaniques et de l'endommagement des roches viscoplastiques dans le contexte du stockage de dechets radioactifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharkhour, H

    2002-12-01

    Trying to develop a model taking into account the complex rheology of a geologic media characterized by visco-plasticity, damage and thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings is unusual in geotechnics. This is not the case for radioactive waste storage that presents specificities from several viewpoints. Indeed, the scales of time and space concerned by this type of storage are disproportionate to those of civil engineering works or mines. Another specificity of the radioactive waste storage lies in the coupled processes involved. No effect likely to compromise the long-term security of the storage could be ignored. For example this is the case of damage, a phenomenon which does not necessarily lead to a major change of the mechanical behavior of the works but can influence the permeability of the medium in relation with a migration of radionuclides. It can be conceived that this phenomenon finds all its importance in the context of the thermo-hydro-mechanical couplings of a waste storage with high activity. However, the interaction between the damage and the THM coupled processes was the object of very few research subject up to now. This. is even more true for viscoplastic media considered as ductile, and therefore, less prone to cracking than brittle media. It is exactly in this 'original' but difficult context that took place the research presented in this report. This study was dedicated to the analysis of the phenomena and the thermal, hydraulic and mechanical couplings occurring in the near and far field of a high activity radioactive waste storage. Two examples of geological media were considered in this report: the clayey rock of Callovo-Oxfordian, called ' Argilites de l'Est ', target rock of the ANDRA project to carry out a subterranean laboratory for the study of long life radioactive waste storage; and the salt rock of the. subterranean laboratory in the old salt mine of Asse in Germany. (author)

  8. Smeared crack modelling approach for corrosion-induced concrete damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Anna Emilie Anusha; Michel, Alexander; Stang, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    In this paper a smeared crack modelling approach is used to simulate corrosion-induced damage in reinforced concrete. The presented modelling approach utilizes a thermal analogy to mimic the expansive nature of solid corrosion products, while taking into account the penetration of corrosion...... products into the surrounding concrete, non-uniform precipitation of corrosion products, and creep. To demonstrate the applicability of the presented modelling approach, numerical predictions in terms of corrosion-induced deformations as well as formation and propagation of micro- and macrocracks were......-induced damage phenomena in reinforced concrete. Moreover, good agreements were also found between experimental and numerical data for corrosion-induced deformations along the circumference of the reinforcement....

  9. Bread dough rheology: Computing with a damage function model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Roger I.; Qi, Fuzhong; Dai, Shaocong

    2015-01-01

    We describe an improved damage function model for bread dough rheology. The model has relatively few parameters, all of which can easily be found from simple experiments. Small deformations in the linear region are described by a gel-like power-law memory function. A set of large non-reversing deformations - stress relaxation after a step of shear, steady shearing and elongation beginning from rest, and biaxial stretching, is used to test the model. With the introduction of a revised strain measure which includes a Mooney-Rivlin term, all of these motions can be well described by the damage function described in previous papers. For reversing step strains, larger amplitude oscillatory shearing and recoil reasonable predictions have been found. The numerical methods used are discussed and we give some examples.

  10. Analysis of damage processes in short glass fibre reinforced polyamide under mechanical loading by X-ray refractometry, fracture mechanics and fractography; Analyse der Schaedigungsprozesse in einem kurzglasfaserverstaerkten Polyamid unter mechanischer Belastung mittels Roentgenrefraktometrie, Bruchmechanik und Fraktografie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenzel, Stephan

    2013-04-01

    This thesis presents an analysis of the damage behaviour in a short glass fibre reinforced polyamide. The micro cracking is investigated by X-ray refraction technique under various, mechanical in-service loadings. In this context, potentials and limits of X-ray refraction analysis for short glass fibre reinforced polyamides are compiled. In particular the influence of fibre orientation and the influence of damage mechanisms are examined according to the X-ray refraction analysis and its interpretation. The method offers a quantitative and phenomenological based characterisation of micro crack damage. For the investigated material micro crack damage emerges as fibre matrix debonding and matrix micro cracking. The state of damage correlates with a nonlinear strain portion in a linear manner and depends on the kind of loading. Absorption of moisture in the material may influence significantly the micro crack damage behaviour. Damage of micro cracking appears preferentially under tension. The macro damage due to propagation of a single crack is characterised in an automated test setup, considering the fibre orientation and content of moisture. Based on the findings an empirical assessment approach is developed. The investigations of the micro and macro damage behaviour are accompanied by fractography, in order to support the model assumptions according to damage and fracture mechanisms.

  11. Water sorption kinetics of damaged beans: GAB model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda M. Baptestini

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to model the water sorption kinetics of damaged beans. Grains with initial moisture content of 53.85%, dry basis (d.b., were used. One portion of the grains was used to obtain desorption isotherms, while the other was subjected to drying until the moisture content of 5.26% (d.b., so that it was subjected to the adsorption. For the induction of damage, a Stein Breakage Tester was used. To obtain the equilibrium moisture content, grains were placed in a climatic chamber at 20, 30, 40 and 50 ± 1 °C combined with relative humidity of 30, 40, 50, 70 and 90 ± 3%. The GAB model fitted well to the equilibrium moisture experimental data of damaged grains and control. With increasing temperature, the monolayer moisture contents decreased in adsorption and desorption processes, ranging from 9.84 to 5.10% d.b. The lower moisture content in the monolayer in damaged grains indicates that lower moisture content is necessary to ensure their conservation.

  12. The micro-mechanics of strength, durability and damage tolerance in composites: new insights from high resolution computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearing, S. Mark; Sinclair, Ian

    2016-07-01

    Recent work, led by the authors, on impact damage resistance, particle toughening and tensile fibre failure is reviewed in order to illustrate the use of high-resolution X-ray tomography to observe and quantify damage mechanisms in carbon fibre composite laminates. Using synchrotron and micro-focus X-ray sources resolutions of less than 1 μm have been routinely achieved. This enables individual broken fibres and the micromechanisms of particle toughening to be observed and quantified. The data for fibre failure, cluster formation and overall tensile strength are compared with model predictions. This allows strategies for future model development to be identified. The overall implications for using such high-resolution 3-D measurements to inform a “data-rich mechanics” approach to materials evaluation and modeling is discussed.

  13. DNA Repair Mechanisms and the Bypass of DNA Damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiteux, Serge; Jinks-Robertson, Sue

    2013-01-01

    DNA repair mechanisms are critical for maintaining the integrity of genomic DNA, and their loss is associated with cancer predisposition syndromes. Studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have played a central role in elucidating the highly conserved mechanisms that promote eukaryotic genome stability. This review will focus on repair mechanisms that involve excision of a single strand from duplex DNA with the intact, complementary strand serving as a template to fill the resulting gap. These mechanisms are of two general types: those that remove damage from DNA and those that repair errors made during DNA synthesis. The major DNA-damage repair pathways are base excision repair and nucleotide excision repair, which, in the most simple terms, are distinguished by the extent of single-strand DNA removed together with the lesion. Mistakes made by DNA polymerases are corrected by the mismatch repair pathway, which also corrects mismatches generated when single strands of non-identical duplexes are exchanged during homologous recombination. In addition to the true repair pathways, the postreplication repair pathway allows lesions or structural aberrations that block replicative DNA polymerases to be tolerated. There are two bypass mechanisms: an error-free mechanism that involves a switch to an undamaged template for synthesis past the lesion and an error-prone mechanism that utilizes specialized translesion synthesis DNA polymerases to directly synthesize DNA across the lesion. A high level of functional redundancy exists among the pathways that deal with lesions, which minimizes the detrimental effects of endogenous and exogenous DNA damage. PMID:23547164

  14. Trans-differentiation of neural stem cells: a therapeutic mechanism against the radiation induced brain damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyeung Min Joo

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is an indispensable therapeutic modality for various brain diseases. Though endogenous neural stem cells (NSCs would provide regenerative potential, many patients nevertheless suffer from radiation-induced brain damage. Accordingly, we tested beneficial effects of exogenous NSC supplementation using in vivo mouse models that received whole brain irradiation. Systemic supplementation of primarily cultured mouse fetal NSCs inhibited radiation-induced brain atrophy and thereby preserved brain functions such as short-term memory. Transplanted NSCs migrated to the irradiated brain and differentiated into neurons, astrocytes, or oligodendrocytes. In addition, neurotrophic factors such as NGF were significantly increased in the brain by NSCs, indicating that both paracrine and replacement effects could be the therapeutic mechanisms of NSCs. Interestingly, NSCs also differentiated into brain endothelial cells, which was accompanied by the restoration the cerebral blood flow that was reduced from the irradiation. Inhibition of the VEGF signaling reduced the migration and trans-differentiation of NSCs. Therefore, trans-differentiation of NSCs into brain endothelial cells by the VEGF signaling and the consequential restoration of the cerebral blood flow would also be one of the therapeutic mechanisms of NSCs. In summary, our data demonstrate that exogenous NSC supplementation could prevent radiation-induced functional loss of the brain. Therefore, successful combination of brain radiation therapy and NSC supplementation would provide a highly promising therapeutic option for patients with various brain diseases.

  15. Computational modelling in fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauguel, A.

    1985-01-01

    The modelling of the greatest part of environmental or industrial flow problems gives very similar types of equations. The considerable increase in computing capacity over the last ten years consequently allowed numerical models of growing complexity to be processed. The varied group of computer codes presented are now a complementary tool of experimental facilities to achieve studies in the field of fluid mechanics. Several codes applied in the nuclear field (reactors, cooling towers, exchangers, plumes...) are presented among others [fr

  16. Search-based model identification of smart-structure damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, B. J.; Macalou, A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the use of a combined model and parameter identification approach, based on modal analysis and artificial intelligence (AI) techniques, for identifying damage or flaws in a rotating truss structure incorporating embedded piezoceramic sensors. This smart structure example is representative of a class of structures commonly found in aerospace systems and next generation space structures. Artificial intelligence techniques of classification, heuristic search, and an object-oriented knowledge base are used in an AI-based model identification approach. A finite model space is classified into a search tree, over which a variant of best-first search is used to identify the model whose stored response most closely matches that of the input. Newly-encountered models can be incorporated into the model space. This adaptativeness demonstrates the potential for learning control. Following this output-error model identification, numerical parameter identification is used to further refine the identified model. Given the rotating truss example in this paper, noisy data corresponding to various damage configurations are input to both this approach and a conventional parameter identification method. The combination of the AI-based model identification with parameter identification is shown to lead to smaller parameter corrections than required by the use of parameter identification alone.

  17. Aerodynamic and Mechanical System Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Martin Felix

    This thesis deals with mechanical multibody-systems applied to the drivetrain of a 500 kW wind turbine. Particular focus has been on gearbox modelling of wind turbines. The main part of the present project involved programming multibody systems to investigate the connection between forces, moments...

  18. Fracture mechanics model of fragmentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenn, L.A.; Gommerstadt, B.Y.; Chudnovsky, A.

    1986-01-01

    A model of the fragmentation process is developed, based on the theory of linear elastic fracture mechanics, which predicts the average fragment size as a function of strain rate and material properties. This approach permits a unification of previous results, yielding Griffith's solution in the low-strain-rate limit and Grady's solution at high strain rates

  19. Effect of stitch density on fatigue characteristics and damage mechanisms of stitched carbon/epoxy composites

    KAUST Repository

    Yudhanto, Arief; Watanabe, Naoyuki; Iwahori, Yutaka; Hoshi, Hikaru

    2014-01-01

    The effect of stitch density (SD) on fatigue life, stiffness degradation and fatigue damage mechanisms in carbon/epoxy (T800SC/XNRH6813) stitched using Vectran thread is presented in this paper. Moderately stitched composite (SD = 0.028/mm2

  20. Towards Industrial Application of Damage Models for Sheet Metal Forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doig, M.; Roll, K.

    2011-05-01

    Due to global warming and financial situation the demand to reduce the CO2-emission and the production costs leads to the permanent development of new materials. In the automotive industry the occupant safety is an additional condition. Bringing these arguments together the preferable approach for lightweight design of car components, especially for body-in-white, is the use of modern steels. Such steel grades, also called advanced high strength steels (AHSS), exhibit a high strength as well as a high formability. Not only their material behavior but also the damage behavior of AHSS is different compared to the performances of standard steels. Conventional methods for the damage prediction in the industry like the forming limit curve (FLC) are not reliable for AHSS. Physically based damage models are often used in crash and bulk forming simulations. The still open question is the industrial application of these models for sheet metal forming. This paper evaluates the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model and the model of Lemaitre within commercial codes with a goal of industrial application.

  1. Age-related mechanical strength evolution of trabecular bone under fatigue damage for both genders: Fracture risk evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Kahla, Rabeb; Barkaoui, Abdelwahed; Merzouki, Tarek

    2018-05-04

    Bone tissue is a living composite material, providing mechanical and homeostatic functions, and able to constantly adapt its microstructure to changes in long term loading. This adaptation is conducted by a physiological process, known as "bone remodeling". This latter is manifested by interactions between osteoclasts and osteoblasts, and can be influenced by many local factors, via effects on bone cell differentiation and proliferation. In the current work, age and gender effects on damage rate evolution, throughout life, have been investigated using a mechanobiological finite element modeling. To achieve the aim, a mathematical model has been developed, coupling both cell activities and mechanical behavior of trabecular bone, under cyclic loadings. A series of computational simulations (ABAQUS/UMAT) has been performed on a 3D human proximal femur, allowing to investigate the effects of mechanical and biological parameters on mechanical strength of trabecular bone, in order to evaluate the fracture risk resulting from fatigue damage. The obtained results revealed that mechanical stimulus amplitude affects bone resorption and formation rates, and indicated that age and gender are major factors in bone response to the applied loadings. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of Mechanical Properties and Damage of High Performance Concrete Subjected to Magnesium Sulfate Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng Cang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfate attack is one of the most important problems affecting concrete structures, especially magnesium sulfate attack. This paper presents an investigation on the mechanical properties and damage evolution of high performance concrete (HPC with different contents of fly ash exposure to magnesium sulfate environment. The microstructure, porosity, mass loss, dimensional variation, compressive strength, and splitting tensile strength of HPC were investigated at various erosion times up to 392 days. The ultrasonic pulse velocity (UPV propagation in HPC at different erosion time was determined by using ultrasonic testing technique. A relationship between damage and UPV of HPC was derived according to damage mechanics, and a correlation between the damage of HPC and erosion time was obtained eventually. The results indicated that (1 the average increasing amplitude of porosity for HPCs was 34.01% before and after exposure to magnesium sulfate solution; (2 the damage evolution of HPCs under sulfate attack could be described by an exponential fitting; (3 HPC containing 20% fly ash had the strongest resistance to magnesium sulfate attack.

  3. Local stem cell depletion model for normal tissue damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaes, R.J.; Keland, A.

    1987-01-01

    The hypothesis that radiation causes normal tissue damage by completely depleting local regions of tissue of viable stem cells leads to a simple mathematical model for such damage. In organs like skin and spinal cord where destruction of a small volume of tissue leads to a clinically apparent complication, the complication probability is expressed as a function of dose, volume and stem cell number by a simple triple negative exponential function analogous to the double exponential function of Munro and Gilbert for tumor control. The steep dose response curves for radiation myelitis that are obtained with our model are compared with the experimental data for radiation myelitis in laboratory rats. The model can be generalized to include other types or organs, high LET radiation, fractionated courses of radiation, and cases where an organ with a heterogeneous stem cell population receives an inhomogeneous dose of radiation. In principle it would thus be possible to determine the probability of tumor control and of damage to any organ within the radiation field if the dose distribution in three dimensional space within a patient is known

  4. Modeling the Non-Linear Response of Fiber-Reinforced Laminates Using a Combined Damage/Plasticity Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuecker, Clara; Davila, Carlos G.; Pettermann, Heinz E.

    2008-01-01

    The present work is concerned with modeling the non-linear response of fiber reinforced polymer laminates. Recent experimental data suggests that the non-linearity is not only caused by matrix cracking but also by matrix plasticity due to shear stresses. To capture the effects of those two mechanisms, a model combining a plasticity formulation with continuum damage has been developed to simulate the non-linear response of laminates under plane stress states. The model is used to compare the predicted behavior of various laminate lay-ups to experimental data from the literature by looking at the degradation of axial modulus and Poisson s ratio of the laminates. The influence of residual curing stresses and in-situ effect on the predicted response is also investigated. It is shown that predictions of the combined damage/plasticity model, in general, correlate well with the experimental data. The test data shows that there are two different mechanisms that can have opposite effects on the degradation of the laminate Poisson s ratio which is captured correctly by the damage/plasticity model. Residual curing stresses are found to have a minor influence on the predicted response for the cases considered here. Some open questions remain regarding the prediction of damage onset.

  5. Fretting wear damage of steam generator tubes and its prediction modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Che Honglong; Lei Mingkai

    2013-01-01

    The steam generator is the key equipment used for the energy transition in nuclear power plant. Since the high-temperature and high-pressure fluid flows with high speed, the steam generator tubes will be excited and vibrate, leading to the tremendous fretting wear problem on the tubes, sometimes even leading to tube cracking. This paper introduces typical fretting wear cases, the result of corresponding simulation wear experiment and damage mechanism which combining mechanical wear and erosion-corrosion. Work rate model could give a reasonable life prediction about the steam generator tube, and this predictive model has been used in nuclear power plant safety assessment. (authors)

  6. Modelling of microstructural creep damage in welded joints of 316L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouche, G.

    2000-01-01

    Welded joints of 316L stainless steel under service conditions at elevated temperature are known to be preferential sites of creep damage, as compared to the base material. This damage results in the formation of cavities and the development of creep cracks which can lead to a premature failure of welded components. The complex two-phase microstructure of 316L welds was simulated by manually filling a mould with longitudinal deposited weld beads. The moulded material was then aged during 2000 hours at 600 deg. C. High resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy was largely used to examine the microstructure of the simulated material before and after ageing. Smooth and notched creep specimens were cut from the mould and tested at 600 deg. C under various stress levels. A comparison of the lifetime versus nominal stress curves for the base and welded materials shows a greater dependence of the welded material to creep phenomena. Observation and EBSD analysis show that damage is preferentially located along the austenite grain boundaries. The stress and strain fields in the notched specimens were calculated by finite element method. A correlation of this field to the observed damage was made in order to propose a predictive law relating the creep damage to the mechanical conditions applied locally. Further mechanical tests and simulation on CT specimens and mode II tubular specimens allowed validating the model under various multiaxial loading conditions. (author)

  7. Determination on Damage Mechanism of the Planet Gear of Heavy Vehicle Final Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdan, RD; Setiawan, R.; Sasmita, F.; Suratman, R.; Taufiqulloh

    2018-02-01

    The works focus on the investigation of damage mechanism of fractured in the form of spalling of the planet gears from the final drive assembly of 160-ton heavy vehicles. The objective of this work is to clearly understand the mechanism of damage. The work is the first stage of the on-going research on the remaining life estimation of such gears. The understanding of the damage mechanism is critical in order to provide accurate estimate of the gear’s remaining life with observed initial damage. The analysis was performed based on the metallurgy laboratory works, including visual observation, macro-micro fractography by optical stereo and optical microscope and micro-vickers hardness test. From visual observation it was observed pitting that form lining defect at common position, which is at gear flank position. From spalling sample it was observed ratchet mark at the boundary between macro pitting and the edge of fractured parts. Further observation on the cross-section of the samples by optical microscope confirm that initial micro pitting occur without spalling of the case hardened surface. Spalling occur when pitting achieve certain critical size, and occur at multiple initiation site of crack propagation. From the present research it was concluded that pitting was resulted due to repeated contact fatigue. In addition, development of micro to macro pitting as well as spalling occur at certain direction towards the top of the gear teeth.

  8. Investigation of noninvasive healing of damaged piping system using electro-magneto-mechanical methods

    KAUST Repository

    Mukherjee, Debanjan

    2014-01-01

    Virtually all engineering applications involve the use of piping, conduits and channels. In the petroleum industry, piping systems are extensively employed in upstream and downstream processes. These piping systems often carry fluids that are corrosive, which leads to wear, cavitation and cracking. The replacement of damaged piping systems can be quite expensive, both in terms of capital costs, as well as in operational downtime. This motivates the present research on noninvasive healing of cracked piping systems. In this investigation, we propose to develop computational models for characterizing noninvasive repair strategies involving electromagnetically guided particles. The objective is to heal industrial-piping systems noninvasively, from the exterior of the system, during operation, resulting in no downtime, with minimal relative cost. The particle accumulation at a target location is controlled by external electro-magneto-mechanical means. There are two primary effects that play a role for guiding the particles to the solid-fluid interface/wall: mechanical shear due to the fluid flow, and an electrical or magnetic force. In this work we develop and study a relationship that characterizes contributions of both, and ascertain how this relationship scales with characteristic physical parameters. Characteristic non-dimensional parameters that describe system behavior are derived and their role in design is illustrated. A detailed, fully 3-dimensional discrete element simulation framework is presented, and illustrated using a model problem of magnetically guided particles. The detailed particle behavior is considered to be regulated by three effects: (1) the field strength (2) the mass flow rate and (3) the wall interactions.

  9. Constitutive relations in plasticity, damage and fracture mechanics based on a work property

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marigo, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper is devoted to restrictions imposed by a work property of Drucker-Iliushin's type on the general class of mechanical systems with an elastic range which contains plastic, damaged and cracked media. The analysis is purely mechanical and quasi-static. Starting from very weak assumptions relative to this constitutive class, we obtain a fundamental inequality which generalizes Hill's maximal work principle. So we can justify, for instance: the convexity of the elastic domain and the normality rule of the plastic strain rate in stress space for the infinitesimal and some finite plasticity theories, Griffith's criterion in brittle fracture mechanics, and we obtain some original results for elastic and elastic plastic damaged materials. It must be noted that the procedure is purely deductive, the assumptions are explicit and the results are implications

  10. A method of modeling time-dependent rock damage surrounding underground excavations in multiphase groundwater flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christian-Frear, T.; Freeze, G.

    1997-01-01

    Underground excavations produce damaged zones surrounding the excavations which have disturbed hydrologic and geomechanical properties. Prediction of fluid flow in these zones must consider both the mechanical and fluid flow processes. Presented here is a methodology which utilizes a mechanical model to predict damage and disturbed rock zone (DRZ) development around the excavation and then uses the predictions to develop time-dependent DRZ porosity relationships. These relationships are then used to adjust the porosity of the DRZ in the fluid flow model based upon the time and distance from the edge of the excavation. The application of this methodology is presented using a site-specific example from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, a US Department of Energy facility in bedded salts being evaluated for demonstration of the safe underground disposal of transuranic waste from US defense-related activities

  11. Micromechanics Based Inelastic and Damage Modeling of Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. Procházka

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Micromechanics based models are considered for application to viscoelasticity and damage in metal matrix composites. The method proposes a continuation and development of Dvooák’s transformation field analysis, considering the piecewise uniform eigenstrains in each material phase. Standard applications of the method to a two-phase are considered in this study model, i.e., only one sub-volume per phase is considered. A continuous model is used, employing transformation field analysis with softening in order to prevent the tensile stress overstepping the tensile strength. At the same time shear cracking occurs in the tangential direction of the possible crack. This is considered in the principal shear stresses and they make disconnections in displacements. In this case, discontinuous models are more promising. Because discrete models, that can describe the situation more realistically have not been worked out in detail, we retain a continuous model and substitute the slip caused by overstepping the damage law by introducing eigenparameters from TFA. The various aspects of the proposed methods are systematically checked by comparing with finite element unit cell analyses, made through periodic homogenization assumptions, for SiC/Ti unidirectional lay-ups. 

  12. Simulation of delamination crack growth in composite laminates: application of local and non-local interface damage models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijaz, H.; Asad, M.

    2015-01-01

    The use of composite laminates is increasing in these days due to higher strength and low density values in comparison of metals. Delamination is a major source of failure in composite laminates. Damage mechanics based theories are employed to simulate the delamination phenomena between composite laminates. These damage models are inherently local and can cause the concentration of stresses around the crack tip. In the present study integral type non-local damage formulation is proposed to avoid the localization problem associated to damage formulation. A comprehensive study is carried out for the models and classical local damage model are performed and results are compared with available experimental data for un IMS/924 Carbon/fiber epoxy composite laminate. (author)

  13. Deformation and damage modes of deep argillaceous rocks under hydro-mechanical stresses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vales, F.

    2008-12-01

    (weight, longitudinal and transverse strains) are continuously recorded until stabilization. When sample equilibrium is reached, uniaxial compressive tests are performed. Samples brought to lower relative humidity undergo an anisotropic shrinkage associated with a water content decrease. Samples in equilibrium at 98%RH swell and store water. Depending of the clay ratio, a significant contribution to this swelling can be shown to be due to the opening of these preexisting cracks and to the creation of new cracks. The macroscopic mechanical response and in particular its linearity and the spatial homogeneity of the strain distribution, depend on the initial rock microstructure (clay ratio) and on the microstructure induced by the suction (new crack network). When suction increases from 2.8 to 150 MPa, Young modulus and strength increase with a factor respectively close to 2 and 3. For dry states, macroscopic strain fields are homogeneous while at the microstructure scale, strain are heterogeneous and clearly correlated with the local distribution of mineral constituents; clayey areas are more deformable than other mineral phase. For wet states, overall and local strain fields are heterogeneous. Strain are affected by the presence of the cracks: close to them, local strain are important but at a distance from cracks large than a few hundreds micrometers, strain distributions are similar to those in the dry states. The main behaviour difference between dry and wet states seems to be due more to the presence of cracks induced by the suctions, than to an intrinsic evolution of the mechanical properties of the clay matrix. The multi-scale quantification of strain heterogeneity by Digital Image Correlation, and the determination of the damage appearance by Acoustic Emission, are useful input data for the development and validation of multi-scale constitutive models for argillite. (author)

  14. Summary of the mechanism of U-induced renal damage and its biochemical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Rusong

    1994-05-01

    In China studies on the toxicology of uranium were systematically conducted from the 1960's. Among them the studies of the change of biochemical indicators of U-induced renal damage were involved. On the basis of summarizing the relevant information of our country and the study progress of biochemical methods in recent years, the mechanism of U-induced renal damage and its biochemical basis, the behavior of uranium in kidney and the recent progress to detect renal damage with several biochemical indexes (such as α 1 -or β 2 -microglobulin, N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase and alanine aminopeptidase etc.) are introduced respectively. Finally, the evaluation on the biochemical basis for acquired tolerance to U in kidney is performed. It should be noted that from the clinical viewpoint the tolerance cannot be considered as a practical measure of protection

  15. A transportable system of models for natural resource damage assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, M.; French, D.

    1992-01-01

    A system of computer models has been developed for assessment of natural resource economic damages resulting from spills of oil and hazardous materials in marine and fresh water environments. Under USA federal legislation, the results of the model system are presumed correct in damage litigation proceedings. The model can address a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. The equations describing the motion of both pollutants and biota are solved in three dimensions. The model can simulate continuous releases of a contaminant, with representation of complex coastal boundaries, variable bathymetry, multiple shoreline types, and spatially variable ecosystem habitats. A graphic user interface provides easy control of the system in addition to the ability to display elements of the underlying geographical information system data base. The model is implemented on a personal computer and on a UNIX workstation. The structure of the system is such that transport to new geographic regions can be accomplished relatively easily, requiring only the development of the appropriate physical, toxicological, biological, and economic data sets. Applications are currently in progress for USA inland and coastal waters, the Adriatic Sea, the Strait of Sicily, the Gulf of Suez, and the Baltic Sea. 4 refs., 2 figs

  16. An improved Corten-Dolan's model based on damage and stress state effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Huiying; Huang, Hong Zhong; Lv, Zhiqiang; Zuo, Fang Jun; Wang, Hai Kun

    2015-01-01

    The value of exponent d in Corten-Dolan's model is generally considered to be a constant. Nonetheless, the results predicted on the basis of this statement deviate significantly from the real values. In consideration of the effects of damage and stress state on fatigue life prediction, Corten-Dolan's model is improved by redefining the exponent d used in the traditional model. The improved model performs better than the traditional one with respect to the demonstration of a fatigue failure mechanism. Predictions of fatigue life on the basis of investigations into three metallic specimens indicate that the errors caused by the improved model are significantly smaller than those induced by the traditional model. Meanwhile, predictions derived according to the improved model fall into a narrower dispersion zone than those made as per Miner's rule and the traditional model. This finding suggests that the proposed model improves the life prediction accuracy of the other two models. The predictions obtained using the improved Corten-Dolan's model differ slightly from those derived according to a model proposed in previous literature; a few life predictions obtained on the basis of the former are more accurate than those derived according to the latter. Therefore, the improved model proposed in this paper is proven to be rational and reliable given the proven validity of the existing model. Therefore, the improved model can be feasibly and credibly applied to damage accumulation and fatigue life prediction to some extent.

  17. An improved Corten-Dolan's model based on damage and stress state effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Huiying; Huang, Hong Zhong; Lv, Zhiqiang; Zuo, Fang Jun; Wang, Hai Kun [University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu (China)

    2015-08-15

    The value of exponent d in Corten-Dolan's model is generally considered to be a constant. Nonetheless, the results predicted on the basis of this statement deviate significantly from the real values. In consideration of the effects of damage and stress state on fatigue life prediction, Corten-Dolan's model is improved by redefining the exponent d used in the traditional model. The improved model performs better than the traditional one with respect to the demonstration of a fatigue failure mechanism. Predictions of fatigue life on the basis of investigations into three metallic specimens indicate that the errors caused by the improved model are significantly smaller than those induced by the traditional model. Meanwhile, predictions derived according to the improved model fall into a narrower dispersion zone than those made as per Miner's rule and the traditional model. This finding suggests that the proposed model improves the life prediction accuracy of the other two models. The predictions obtained using the improved Corten-Dolan's model differ slightly from those derived according to a model proposed in previous literature; a few life predictions obtained on the basis of the former are more accurate than those derived according to the latter. Therefore, the improved model proposed in this paper is proven to be rational and reliable given the proven validity of the existing model. Therefore, the improved model can be feasibly and credibly applied to damage accumulation and fatigue life prediction to some extent.

  18. Radiation-induced effects on the mechanical properties of natural ZrSiO4: double cascade-overlap damage accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beirau, Tobias; Nix, William D.; Pöllmann, Herbert; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2017-11-01

    Several different models are known to describe the structure-dependent radiation-induced damage accumulation process in materials (e.g. Gibbons Proc IEEE 60:1062-1096, 1972; Weber Nuc Instr Met Phys Res B 166-167:98-106, 2000). In the literature, two different models of damage accumulation due to α-decay events in natural ZrSiO4 (zircon) have been described. The direct impact damage accumulation model is based on amorphization occurring directly within the collision cascade. However, the double cascade-overlap damage accumulation model predicts that amorphization will only occur due to the overlap of disordered domains within the cascade. By analyzing the dose-dependent evolution of mechanical properties (i.e., Poisson's ratios, compliance constants, elastic modulus, and hardness) as a measure of the increasing amorphization, we provide support for the double cascade-overlap damage accumulation model. We found no evidence to support the direct impact damage accumulation model. Additionally, the amount of radiation damage could be related to an anisotropic-to-isotropic transition of the Poisson's ratio for stress along and perpendicular to the four-fold c-axis and of the related compliance constants of natural U- and Th-bearing zircon. The isotropification occurs in the dose range between 3.1 × and 6.3 × 1018 α-decays/g.

  19. Radiation-induced effects on the mechanical properties of natural ZrSiO4: double cascade-overlap damage accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beirau, Tobias; Nix, William D.; Pöllmann, Herbert; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2018-05-01

    Several different models are known to describe the structure-dependent radiation-induced damage accumulation process in materials (e.g. Gibbons Proc IEEE 60:1062-1096, 1972; Weber Nuc Instr Met Phys Res B 166-167:98-106, 2000). In the literature, two different models of damage accumulation due to α-decay events in natural ZrSiO4 (zircon) have been described. The direct impact damage accumulation model is based on amorphization occurring directly within the collision cascade. However, the double cascade-overlap damage accumulation model predicts that amorphization will only occur due to the overlap of disordered domains within the cascade. By analyzing the dose-dependent evolution of mechanical properties (i.e., Poisson's ratios, compliance constants, elastic modulus, and hardness) as a measure of the increasing amorphization, we provide support for the double cascade-overlap damage accumulation model. We found no evidence to support the direct impact damage accumulation model. Additionally, the amount of radiation damage could be related to an anisotropic-to-isotropic transition of the Poisson's ratio for stress along and perpendicular to the four-fold c-axis and of the related compliance constants of natural U- and Th-bearing zircon. The isotropification occurs in the dose range between 3.1 × and 6.3 × 1018 α-decays/g.

  20. Characterization of the mechanical and hydraulic damage in the excavation damaged zone of MHM with gas permeability measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, D.

    2008-09-01

    On the feasibility evaluation of nuclear waste storage in deep formations, the essential issues are as follows: the stability of underground structures over the reversible period, the influence of cavity excavation on geomechanical properties of the wall rock and the variation of those properties during the different phases while storage realization. The work presented here covers the investigations on the variation of geomechanical properties of the approximately 500 m deep MHM in France (mudstone in the departments of Meuse/Haute-Marne), chosen as a potential medium for nuclear waste disposal by ANDRA. In order to measure the very low permeability of mudstone and to observe the dependency on saturation, a special test scheme on measurement of gas permeability has been developed. In the scheme, in situ referenced stresses have been chosen as the stresses acting on the solid matrix. The gas permeability has been determined with both analytical and numerical methods. To estimate the mechanical damage of storage induced by the excavation, laboratory tests on gas permeability have been conducted on samples recovered from different locations situated at different distances from the wall of the main access shaft of the MHM (from 0,1 m to 12,5 m). Results of gas permeability obtained under an isotropic stress of 11 MPa vary between 10 -21 and 10 -22 m 2 and do not show significant variations between damaged zones (near the wall) and intact zones (sample located 12 m from the wall). The observations in laboratory tests coincide with in situ damage characterizations. The variation of gas permeability under the cycle of loading and unloading is an order less than the initial value under the isotropic stress. Taking into account the precision of the testing system, this variation is not significant. The oviparous intact samples have been imposed different saturations by salt solutions (with a relative humidity from 25 % to 98 %) to form a cycle of de- and re-saturation. The

  1. Chewing as a forming application: A viscoplastic damage law in modelling food oral breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skamniotis, C. G.; Charalambides, M. N.; Elliott, M.

    2017-10-01

    The first bite mechanical response of a food item resembles compressive forming processes, where a tool is pressed into a workpiece. The present study addresses ongoing interests in the deformations and damage of food products, particularly during the first bite, in relation to their mechanical properties. Uniaxial tension, compression and shear tests on a starch based food reveal stress-strain response and fracture strains strongly dependent on strain rate and stress triaxiality, while damage mechanisms are identified in the form of stress softening. A pressure dependent viscoplastic constitutive law reproduces the behavior with the aid of ABAQUS subroutines, while a ductile damage initiation and evolution framework based on fracture toughness data enables accurate predictions of the product breakdown. The material model is implemented in a Finite Element (FE) chewing model based on digital pet teeth geometry where the first bite of molar teeth against a food item is simulated. The FE force displacement results match the experimental data obtained by a physical replicate of the bite model, lending weight to the approach as a powerful tool in understanding of food breakdown and product development.

  2. Molecular Mechanisms Responsible for Increased Vulnerability of the Ageing Oocyte to Oxidative Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redgrove, Kate A.; McLaughlin, Eileen A.

    2017-01-01

    In their midthirties, women experience a decline in fertility, coupled to a pronounced increase in the risk of aneuploidy, miscarriage, and birth defects. Although the aetiology of such pathologies are complex, a causative relationship between the age-related decline in oocyte quality and oxidative stress (OS) is now well established. What remains less certain are the molecular mechanisms governing the increased vulnerability of the aged oocyte to oxidative damage. In this review, we explore the reduced capacity of the ageing oocyte to mitigate macromolecular damage arising from oxidative insults and highlight the dramatic consequences for oocyte quality and female fertility. Indeed, while oocytes are typically endowed with a comprehensive suite of molecular mechanisms to moderate oxidative damage and thus ensure the fidelity of the germline, there is increasing recognition that the efficacy of such protective mechanisms undergoes an age-related decline. For instance, impaired reactive oxygen species metabolism, decreased DNA repair, reduced sensitivity of the spindle assembly checkpoint, and decreased capacity for protein repair and degradation collectively render the aged oocyte acutely vulnerable to OS and limits their capacity to recover from exposure to such insults. We also highlight the inadequacies of our current armoury of assisted reproductive technologies to combat age-related female infertility, emphasising the need for further research into mechanisms underpinning the functional deterioration of the ageing oocyte. PMID:29312475

  3. Irreversible thermodynamics models and constitutive equations of the irradiation induced deformation and damage accumulating processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wassilew, C.

    1989-11-01

    This report gives an overall evaluation of several in-reactor deformation and creep-rupture experiments performed in BR-2, FFTF, and Rapsodie on pressurised tubes of the stabilized austenitic stainless steels 1.4970, 1.4981, 1.4988, and the nickel base alloy Hastelloy-X. The irradiation induced deformation processes observed in the components operating in a neutron environment can be divided into two main groups: 1. volume conserving creep and 2. volumetric swelling. Since the observed deformation as well as damage accumulating phenomena are caused by the same constrained generated and free disposable point defects and helium atoms, it is obvious and advisable to analyze, and to model simultaneously the ensemble of the elementary mechanisms and processes effective at the same time. Phenomenological models based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes have been developed, with the aim of: 1. grasping the partial relationships between the external variables and the response functions (creep, swelling, creep driven swelling, and time to rupture), 2. fathoming the rate-controlling mechanisms, 3. providing insight into the structural details and changes occurring during the deformation and the damage accumulating processes, 4. integrating the damage accumulating processes comprehensively, and 5. formulating the constitutive equations required to describe the elementary processes that generate plastic deformations as well as damage accumulation. (orig./MM)

  4. Effect of a mechanical damage on permeability and moisture diffusivity of concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Picandet, V.

    2001-12-01

    The effect of a mechanical damage on transfer parameters of concrete is an original point of view on the coupling between damage and durability. The studied transfer parameters, permeability and moisture diffusivity, allow to characterize the transport ability of a porous media to convey gases or water (liquid and vapour). The theoretical framework of the measurement of these parameters and its applications to concrete is pointed out. The experimental studies are carried on three types of concrete: ordinary concrete, high performance concrete, and high performance steel fiber reinforced concrete. Two kinds of damage are considered and generated in samples: - A continuous damage of the medium, obtained by cyclic uniaxial loading. It is characterized by a loss of stiffness and results in a diffuse microcracking.- A discrete or localised damage, obtained by a diametrical compression of cylindrical specimens. It is characterized by the presence of identifiable and measurable cracks. Measurements of gas permeability are taken using a constant head, Cembureau type, permeameter. For cracked samples, the procedure and analysis of the results are changed in order to make the evaluation of their gas and water permeability. The simple imbibition and positive head imbibition are the disturbances of the moisture equilibrium, which allow the evaluation of the material diffusivity. The local moisture contents of the specimen are measured using a gamma-ray attenuation method. The analysis of profiles using Boltzmann's transformation leads to the moisture diffusivity and then to the water permeability coefficients. Measurements of gas and water permeability are compared in both cases of considered damage. In the first case, a damage - permeability relationship dependent on the fluid of percolation but valid for all concrete types studied could be worked out. (author)

  5. Research on spatial Model and analysis algorithm for nuclear weapons' damage effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaohong; Meng Tao; Du Maohua; Wang Weili; Ji Wanfeng

    2011-01-01

    In order to realize the three dimension visualization of nuclear weapons' damage effects. Aiming at the characteristics of the damage effects data, a new model-MRPCT model is proposed, and this model can carry out the modeling of the three dimension spatial data of the nuclear weapons' damage effects. For the sake of saving on the memory, linear coding method is used to store the MRPCT model. On the basis of Morton code, spatial analysis of the damage effects is completed. (authors)

  6. Mechanical modelling of a structural performance of a pressure vessel submitted to the creep phenomenon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taroco, E.; Feijoo, R.A.; Monteiro, Edson; Freire, J.L.F.; Bevilacqua, L.; Miranda, P.E.V. de; Silveira, T.L. da

    1982-01-01

    A pressure vessel is analized using different mechanical models for the creep phenomenon. The numerical results obtained through these models enable us to recommend on the way verifications of creep damage accumulation is structures should be made. (Author) [pt

  7. Study on radioprotection of alliin and damage mechanism in hepatocyte after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Tae Jeong; Kim, Won Tae [Dept, of Radiological Science, Kaya University, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Liver tissue damage by a radiation exposure caused a jaundice and ascitic fluid e form harden atrophy. The reason for this lies in morphological damage of a liver cells. This study tried that observe damage mechanism of the cell organelles. It was especially observed mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear membrane associated with energy metabolizable. also, This study had with a radio-protector development research at the same time. Radio-protector was used to alliin that has an blood flow increase. Cell observation make used of transmission electron microscope(TEM). The result of an experiment, 7Gy of whole body irradiation was caused an inflammation in cell organelles and hypertrophy of the nucleus membrane. After 20 days, The hepatocyte has been observed in a damaged membrane on peroxisome, mitochondria and vacuole of the cell organelles. After 30 days, The hepatocyte has been observed in disconnected ribosomes on a rough endoplasmic reticulum. There was looked a giant lipoblast. There was clearly normal observed a mitochondria and nucleus membrane in the hepatocyte after alliin injection. aslo, It was no damaged the nucleus membrane. Therefore, It was identified portion a radio-protector effect from alliin.

  8. Modeling the viscoplastic and damage behavior in deep argillaceous rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souley, M.; Armand, G.; Su, K.; Ghoreychi, M.

    2011-01-01

    In order to demonstrate the feasibility of a radioactive waste repository in the Callovo-Oxfordian clay-stone formation, the French national radioactive waste management agency (ANDRA) started in 2000 to build an underground research laboratory at Bure (East of France). One of the key issues is to understand long term behavior of the drifts. More than 400 m horizontal galleries at the main level of -490 m have been instrumented since April 2005. The continuous measurements of convergence of the galleries are available, allowing a better understanding of the time-dependent response of the clay-stone at natural scale. Results indicate that the viscoplastic strain rates observed in the undamaged area far from the gallery walls are of the same order of magnitude as those obtained on rock samples, whereas those recorded in the damaged or fractured zone near the gallery walls are one to two orders of magnitude higher, indicating the significant influence of damage or/and macro-fractures on the viscoplastic strains. Based on these observations, a macroscopic viscoplastic model which aims to improve the viscoplastic strain prediction in the EDZ is proposed and implemented in FLAC 3Dc . Both the instantaneous and the time-dependent behavior are considered in the model. The short term response is assumed to be elastoplastic with strain hardening/softening whereas the time-dependent behavior is based on the concepts of visco-plasticity (Lemaitre's model). Finally, the damage-induced viscoplastic strains changes is examined through the plastic deformation (assumed to approach the damage rate).In order to verify both constitutive equations and their implementations, several simulations are performed: (a) triaxial tests at different confining pressures; (b) single- and multi-stage creep tests; (c) relaxation tests with different total axial strain levels, etc. Finally, an example of a blind prediction of the excavation of a drift parallel to the horizontal minor stress,

  9. Transgenic Mouse Model for Reducing Oxidative Damage in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Torres, S.; Truong, T.; Moyer, E. L.; Kumar, A.; Tahimic, Candice C. G.; Alwood, J. S.; Limoli, C. L.; Globus, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    Bone loss can occur due to many challenges such age, radiation, microgravity, and Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) play a critical role in bone resorption by osteoclasts (Bartell et al. 2014). We hypothesize that suppression of excess ROS in skeletal cells, both osteoblasts and osteoclasts, regulates skeletal growth and remodeling. To test our hypothesis, we used transgenic mCAT mice which overexpress the human anti-oxidant catalase gene targeted to the mitochondria, the main site for endogenous ROS production. mCAT mice have a longer life-span than wildtype controls and have been used to study various age-related disorders. To stimulate remodeling, 16 week old mCAT mice or wildtype mice were exposed to treatment (hindlimb-unloading and total body-irradiation) or sham treatment conditions (control). Tissues were harvested 2 weeks later for skeletal analysis (microcomputed tomography), biochemical analysis (gene expression and oxidative damage measurements), and ex vivo bone marrow derived cell culture (osteoblastogenesis and osteoclastogenesis). mCAT mice expressed the transgene and displayed elevated catalase activity in skeletal tissue and marrow-derived osteoblasts and osteoclasts grown ex vivo. In addition, when challenged with treatment, bone tissues from wildtype mice showed elevated levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), indicating oxidative damage) whereas mCAT mice did not. Correlation analysis revealed that increased catalase activity significantly correlated with decreased MDA levels and that increased oxidative damage correlated with decreased percent bone volume (BVTV). In addition, ex-vivo cultured osteoblast colony growth correlated with catalase activity in the osteoblasts. Thus, we showed that these transgenic mice can be used as a model to study the relationship between markers of oxidative damage and skeletal properties. mCAT mice displayed reduced BVTV and trabecular number relative to wildtype mice, as well as increased structural model index in the

  10. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, June 1, 1994--May 31, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1994-11-01

    In this project we have proposed several mechanisms for radiation damage to DNA and its constituents, and have detailed a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectroscopy, HPLC, GC-mass spectroscopy and ab initio molecular orbital calculations to test the proposed mechanisms. The results from these various techniques have resulted in an understanding of consequences of radiation damage to DNA from the early ionization event to the production of non-radical lesions (discussed in detail in Comprehensive Report). In this year's work we have found the hydroxyl radical in DNA's hydration layer. This is an important result which impacts the hole transfer hypothesis and the understanding of the direct vs. indirect effect in DNA. Further we have found the first ESR evidence for sugar radicals as a result of direct radiation damage to DNA nucleotides in an aqueous environment. This is significant as it impacts the biological endpoint of radiation damage to DNA and suggests future work in DNA. Work with DNA-polypeptides show clear evidence for electron transfer to DNA from the polypeptide which we believe is a radioprotective mechanism. Our work with ab initio molecular orbital theory has gain insight into the initial events of radiation damage to DNA. Ab initio calculations have provided an understanding of the energetics involved in anion and cation formation, ion radical transfer in DNA as well as proton transfer with DNA base pair radical ions. This has been extended in this year's work to new, more accurate values for the electron affinities of the DNA bases, understanding of the relative stability of all possible sugar radicals formed by hydrogen abstraction on the deoxyribose group, hydration effects on, thiol radioprotectors, and an ongoing study of radical intermediates formed from initial DNA ion radicals. During this fiscal year five articles have been published, three are in press, two are submitted and several more are in preparation

  11. Modelling Of Anticipated Damage Ratio On Breakwaters Using Fuzzy Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercan, D. E.; Yagci, O.; Kabdasli, S.

    2003-04-01

    In breakwater design the determination of armour unit weight is especially important in terms of the structure's life. In a typical experimental breakwater stability study, different wave series composed of different wave heights; wave period and wave steepness characteristics are applied in order to investigate performance the structure. Using a classical approach, a regression equation is generated for damage ratio as a function of characteristic wave height. The parameters wave period and wave steepness are not considered. In this study, differing from the classical approach using a fuzzy logic, a relationship between damage ratio as a function of mean wave period (T_m), wave steepness (H_s/L_m) and significant wave height (H_s) was further generated. The system's inputs were mean wave period (T_m), wave steepness (H_s/L_m) and significant wave height (H_s). For fuzzification all input variables were divided into three fuzzy subsets, their membership functions were defined using method developed by Mandani (Mandani, 1974) and the rules were written. While for defuzzification the centroid method was used. In order to calibrate and test the generated models an experimental study was conducted. The experiments were performed in a wave flume (24 m long, 1.0 m wide and 1.0 m high) using 20 different irregular wave series (P-M spectrum). Throughout the study, the water depth was 0.6 m and the breakwater cross-sectional slope was 1V/2H. In the armour layer, a type of artificial armour unit known as antifer cubes were used. The results of the established fuzzy logic model and regression equation model was compared with experimental data and it was determined that the established fuzzy logic model gave a more accurate prediction of the damage ratio on this type of breakwater. References Mandani, E.H., "Application of Fuzzy Algorithms for Control of Simple Dynamic Plant", Proc. IEE, vol. 121, no. 12, December 1974.

  12. MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR ESTIMATION OF MECHANICAL SYSTEM CONDITION IN DYNAMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Mironov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers an estimation of a complicated mechanical system condition in dynamics with due account of material degradation and accumulation of micro-damages. An element of continuous medium has been simulated and described with the help of a discrete element. The paper contains description of a model for determination of mechanical system longevity in accordance with number of cycles and operational period.

  13. Wheat grain mechanical vulnerability to mechanical damage in light of the recent agrophysical research[X-radiation]; Podatnosc ziarna pszenicy na uszkodzenia mechaniczne w swietle dotychczasowych badan agrofizycznych

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grundas, S [Instytut Agrofizyki Polskiej Akademii Nauk, Lublin (Poland)

    1995-07-01

    The paper contains basic information on mechanical damage to wheat grains. The most important causes of mechanical damage and some of its effects in manufacturing are discussed. Grain material included 5 varieties of winter wheat and 2 varieties of spring wheat. Internal mechanical damage was examined by X-ray technique; external damage was examined with the colorimeter method. The results obtained were compared with the estimation results of more important processing features of the grain: gluten quantity and quality and grain hardness. (author)

  14. Stochastic models for predicting pitting corrosion damage of HLRW containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henshall, G.A.

    1991-10-01

    Stochastic models for predicting aqueous pitting corrosion damage of high-level radioactive-waste containers are described. These models could be used to predict the time required for the first pit to penetrate a container and the increase in the number of breaches at later times, both of which would be useful in the repository system performance analysis. Monte Carlo implementations of the stochastic models are described, and predictions of induction time, survival probability and pit depth distributions are presented. These results suggest that the pit nucleation probability decreases with exposure time and that pit growth may be a stochastic process. The advantages and disadvantages of the stochastic approach, methods for modeling the effects of environment, and plans for future work are discussed

  15. Micromechanical modeling and inverse identification of damage using cohesive approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blal, Nawfal

    2013-01-01

    In this study a micromechanical model is proposed for a collection of cohesive zone models embedded between two each elements of a standard cohesive-volumetric finite element method. An equivalent 'matrix-inclusions' composite is proposed as a representation of the cohesive-volumetric discretization. The overall behaviour is obtained using homogenization approaches (Hashin Shtrikman scheme and the P. Ponte Castaneda approach). The derived model deals with elastic, brittle and ductile materials. It is available whatever the triaxiality loading rate and the shape of the cohesive law, and leads to direct relationships between the overall material properties and the local cohesive parameters and the mesh density. First, rigorous bounds on the normal and tangential cohesive stiffnesses are obtained leading to a suitable control of the inherent artificial elastic loss induced by intrinsic cohesive models. Second, theoretical criteria on damageable and ductile cohesive parameters are established (cohesive peak stress, critical separation, cohesive failure energy,... ). These criteria allow a practical calibration of the cohesive zone parameters as function of the overall material properties and the mesh length. The main interest of such calibration is its promising capacity to lead to a mesh-insensitive overall response in surface damage. (author) [fr

  16. Prediction of irradiation damage effects by multi-scale modelling: EURATOM 3 Framework integrated project perfect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massoud, J.P.; Bugat, St.; Marini, B.; Lidbury, D.; Van Dyck, St.; Debarberis, L.

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. In nuclear PWRs, materials undergo degradation due to severe irradiation conditions that may limit their operational life. Utilities operating these reactors must quantify the aging and the potential degradations of reactor pressure vessels and also of internal structures to ensure safe and reliable plant operation. The EURATOM 6. Framework Integrated Project PERFECT (Prediction of Irradiation Damage Effects in Reactor Components) addresses irradiation damage in RPV materials and components by multi-scale modelling. This state-of-the-art approach offers potential advantages over the conventional empirical methods used in current practice of nuclear plant lifetime management. Launched in January 2004, this 48-month project is focusing on two main components of nuclear power plants which are subject to irradiation damage: the ferritic steel reactor pressure vessel and the austenitic steel internals. This project is also an opportunity to integrate the fragmented research and experience that currently exists within Europe in the field of numerical simulation of radiation damage and creates the links with international organisations involved in similar projects throughout the world. Continuous progress in the physical understanding of the phenomena involved in irradiation damage and continuous progress in computer sciences make possible the development of multi-scale numerical tools able to simulate the effects of irradiation on materials microstructure. The consequences of irradiation on mechanical and corrosion properties of materials are also tentatively modelled using such multi-scale modelling. But it requires to develop different mechanistic models at different levels of physics and engineering and to extend the state of knowledge in several scientific fields. And the links between these different kinds of models are particularly delicate to deal with and need specific works. Practically the main objective of PERFECT is to build

  17. Multiscale modelling of DNA mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dršata, Tomáš; Lankaš, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical properties of DNA are important not only in a wide range of biological processes but also in the emerging field of DNA nanotechnology. We review some of the recent developments in modeling these properties, emphasizing the multiscale nature of the problem. Modern atomic resolution, explicit solvent molecular dynamics simulations have contributed to our understanding of DNA fine structure and conformational polymorphism. These simulations may serve as data sources to parameterize rigid base models which themselves have undergone major development. A consistent buildup of larger entities involving multiple rigid bases enables us to describe DNA at more global scales. Free energy methods to impose large strains on DNA, as well as bead models and other approaches, are also briefly discussed. (topical review)

  18. Damage evolution of TBC system under in-phase thermo-mechanical tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazawa, R.; Tanaka, M.; Kagawa, Y.; Liu, Y.F.

    2010-01-01

    In-phase thermo-mechanical tests (TMF) of EB-PVD Y 2 O 3 -ZrO 2 thermal barrier coating (TBC) system (8 wt% Y 2 O 3 -ZrO 2 /CoNiCrAlY/IN-738 substrate) were done under a through-the-thick-direction thermal gradient from TBC surface temperature at 1150 deg. C to substrate temperature at 1000 deg. C. Deformation and failure behaviors of the TBC system were observed at the macroscopic and microscopic scales and damage evolution of the system under in-phase thermo-mechanical test was discussed. Special attention was paid to TBC layer cracking, thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer formation and void formation in bond coat and substrate. Effect of TMF conditions on the damage evolution behaviors was also discussed.

  19. Damage evolution of TBC system under in-phase thermo-mechanical tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitazawa, R.; Tanaka, M.; Kagawa, Y. [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan); Liu, Y.F., E-mail: yfliu@hyper.rcast.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8904 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    In-phase thermo-mechanical tests (TMF) of EB-PVD Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2} thermal barrier coating (TBC) system (8 wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-ZrO{sub 2}/CoNiCrAlY/IN-738 substrate) were done under a through-the-thick-direction thermal gradient from TBC surface temperature at 1150 deg. C to substrate temperature at 1000 deg. C. Deformation and failure behaviors of the TBC system were observed at the macroscopic and microscopic scales and damage evolution of the system under in-phase thermo-mechanical test was discussed. Special attention was paid to TBC layer cracking, thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer formation and void formation in bond coat and substrate. Effect of TMF conditions on the damage evolution behaviors was also discussed.

  20. Estimating of two different kinds of forest damage mechanisms in southeastern Finland. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jokinen, J.

    1993-01-01

    Pinus silvestris is a particularly suitable bioindicator, since it is widely distributed and sensitive to many air pollutants. In recent projects we have obtained results which support the so-called nitrogen-sulphur hypothesis. We suggest that the excess of nitrogen compounds like ammonia/ammonium, nitrogen oxides and nitrate together with gaseous sulphur compounds and anthropogenic acids, trigger severe forest damages. The basis of two different kinds of forest damage mechanisms seems to depend on the relationship of N- and S-compounds in ambient air as indicated by the different concentrations of total sulphur and nitrogen in the needles and the relationship thereof. Possible physiological mechanisms by which nitrogen compounds and sulfurcompounds can affect each other (e.g., changes in enzymatic activities) are discussed. (orig./UWA) [de

  1. Mechanical damage due to corrosion of parts of pump technology and valves of LWR power installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hron, J.; Krumpl, M.

    1986-01-01

    Two types are described of uneven corrosion of austenitic chromium-nickel steel: pitting and slit corrosion. The occurrence of slit corrosion is typical of parts of pumping technology and valves. The corrosion damage of austenitic chromium-nickel steels spreads as intergranular, transgranular or mixed corrosion. In nuclear power facilities with LWR's, intergranular corrosion is due to chlorides and sulphur compounds while transgranular corrosion is due to the presence of dissolved oxygen and chlorides. In mechanically stressed parts, stress corrosion takes place. The recommended procedures are discussed of reducing the corrosion-mechanical damage of pumping equipment of light water reactors during design, production and assembly. During the service of the equipment, corrosion cracks are detected using nondestructive methods and surface cracks are repaired by grinding and welding. (E.S.)

  2. The Estimation Modelling of Damaged Areas by Harmful Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, R.; Sung, M.; Hwang, J.; Jeon, S. W.

    2017-12-01

    The Republic of Korea has undergone rapid development and urban development without sufficient consideration of the environment. This type of growth is accompanied by a reduction in forest area and wildlife habitat. It is a phenomenon that affects the habitat of large mammals more than small. Especially in Korea, the damage caused by wild boar(Sus scrofa) is harsher than other large mammalian species like water deer(Hydropotes inermis), which also means that the number of these reported cases of this species is higher than ones of other mammals. Wild boar has three to eight cubs per year and it is possible to breed every year, which makes it more populous comparing with the fragmented habitats. It could be regarded as one of the top predators in Korea, which it is inevitable for humans to intervene this creature in population control. In addition, some individuals have been forced to be retreated from other habitats in major habitats, or to invade human activity areas for food activity, thereby destroying crops. Ultimately, this mammal species has been treated as farm pest animals through committing road kills and urban emergences. In this study, we has estimated possible farm pest animal present points from the damage district using 2,505 hazardous wildlife damage areas with four types of geological informations, four kinds of forest information, land cover, and distribution of farmland occurred in Gyeongnam province in Korea. In the estimating model, utilizing MAXENT, information of background point was set to 10,000, 70% of the damaged sites were used to construct the model, 30% was used for verification, and 10 times of crossvalidate were proceeded - verified by AUC of ROC. As a result of analyses, AUC was 0.847, and the percent contribution of the forest information was the distance toward inner-forest areas, 36.1%, the land cover, 16.5%, the distance from the field, 14.9%. Furthermore, the permutation importance was 24.9% of the cover, 12.3% of the height

  3. Incremental localized boundary-domain integro-differential equations of elastic damage mechanics for inhomogeneous body

    OpenAIRE

    Mikhailov, SE

    2006-01-01

    Copyright @ 2006 Tech Science Press A quasi-static mixed boundary value problem of elastic damage mechanics for a continuously inhomogeneous body is considered. Using the two-operator Green-Betti formula and the fundamental solution of an auxiliary homogeneous linear elasticity with frozen initial, secant or tangent elastic coe±cients, a boundary-domain integro-differential formulation of the elasto-plastic problem with respect to the displacement rates and their gradients is derived. Usin...

  4. A preventive maintenance model for leased equipment subject to internal degradation and external shock damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Xiaojun; Wu, Changjie; Li, Yanting; Xi, Lifeng

    2016-01-01

    A periodic preventive maintenance modeling method is proposed for leased equipment with continuous internal degradation and stochastic external shock damage considered simultaneously, which can facilitate the equipment lessor to optimize the maintenance schedule for the same kind of equipment rented by different lessees. A novel interactive mechanism between the continuous internal degradation and the stochastic external shock damage is established on the hazard rate of the equipment with integrating the imperfect effect of maintenance. Two improvement factors are defined for the modeling of imperfect maintenance. The number of failures resulting from internal degradation and from external shocks are both mathematically deduced based on this interactive mechanism. The optimal preventive maintenance scheme is obtained by minimizing the cumulative maintenance cost throughout the lease period. Numerical example shows that the proposed preventive maintenance model not only can reflect the reliability status of the equipment but also can clearly distinguish between the impact from internal degradation and that from external shocks. - Highlights: • We propose an imperfect periodic preventive maintenance model for leased equipment. • It can distinguish between the impact from internal degradation and that from external shocks. • An internal–external interactive mechanism is proposed. • Two improvement factors are introduced into the modeling of imperfect maintenance. • The model is helpful for the PM scheduling of the same equipment rented by different lessees.

  5. Sorption mechanisms and sorption models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedoroff, M.; Lefevre, G.; Duc, M.; Neskovic, C.; Milonjic, S.

    2004-01-01

    Sorption at the solid-liquid interfaces play a major role in many phenomena and technologies: chemical separations, catalysis, biological processes, transport of toxic and radioactive species in surface and underground waters. The long term safety of radioactive waste repositories is based on artificial and natural barriers, intended to sorb radionuclides after the moment when the storage matrixes and containers will be corroded. Predictions on the efficiency of sorption for more than 10 6 years have to be done in order to demonstrate the safety of such depositories, what is a goal never encountered in the history of sciences and technology. For all these purposes, and, especially for the long term prediction, acquiring of sorption data constitutes only a first step of studies. Modeling based on a very good knowledge of sorption mechanisms is needed. In this review, we shall examine the main approaches and models used to quantify sorption processes, including results taken from the literature and from our own studies. We shall compare sorption models and examine their adequacy with sorption mechanisms. The cited references are only a few examples of the numerous articles published in that field. (orig.)

  6. Evaluation on effects of chloride-induced deterioration on mechanical properties of RC beams with cracking damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Toyofumi; Matsumura, Takuro; Otsuka, Taku

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the influence of chloride-induced deterioration on mechanical properties of aging reinforced concrete (RC) structures and the applicability of the material degradation model that takes reinforcing steel corrosion into consideration for finite element analysis. We conducted the corrosion tests under the simulated tidal environment and the flexural loading tests for the RC beams with cracking damage and initial defects. Then, the experimental results were numerically correlated to validate the devised modeling. The obtained results were summarized as follows: (a) The cracking damage in specimens caused a minor effect on the reinforcing steel corrosion in the case where the thickness of cover concrete was 40 mm and main rebars did not yield before chloride attack. On the other hand the maximum corrosion ratio of the deteriorated part became considerably larger than that of the non-cracking part in the specimens where the cover concrete were removed partially to simulate spalling by the severe corrosion. (b) Based on the test results, we derived the corrosion velocity of reinforcing steel corresponding to cracking damage degrees. (c) In FEM analyses, we showed that the above modeling can estimate the flexural strength of RC beams in consideration of the degradation in elongation performance of reinforcing steel due to corrosion. (author)

  7. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of cigarette smoke-induced lung damage and prevention by vitamin C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Siddhartha

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cigarette smoke-induced cellular and molecular mechanisms of lung injury are not clear. Cigarette smoke is a complex mixture containing long-lived radicals, including p-benzosemiquinone that causes oxidative damage. Earlier we had reported that oxidative protein damage is an initial event in smoke-induced lung injury. Considering that p-benzosemiquinone may be a causative factor of lung injury, we have isolated p-benzosemiquinone and compared its pathophysiological effects with cigarette smoke. Since vitamin C is a strong antioxidant, we have also determined the modulatory effect of vitamin C for preventing the pathophysiological events. Methods Vitamin C-restricted guinea pigs were exposed to cigarette smoke (5 cigarettes/day; 2 puffs/cigarette for 21 days with and without supplementation of 15 mg vitamin C/guinea pig/day. Oxidative damage, apoptosis and lung injury were assessed in vitro, ex vivo in A549 cells as well as in vivo in guinea pigs. Inflammation was measured by neutrophilia in BALF. p-Benzosemiquinone was isolated from freshly prepared aqueous extract of cigarette smoke and characterized by various physico-chemical methods, including mass, NMR and ESR spectroscopy. p-Benzosemiquinone-induced lung damage was examined by intratracheal instillation in guinea pigs. Lung damage was measured by increased air spaces, as evidenced by histology and morphometric analysis. Oxidative protein damage, MMPs, VEGF and VEGFR2 were measured by western blot analysis, and formation of Michael adducts using MALDI-TOF-MS. Apoptosis was evidenced by TUNEL assay, activation of caspase 3, degradation of PARP and increased Bax/Bcl-2 ratio using immunoblot analysis and confocal microscopy. Results Exposure of guinea pigs to cigarette smoke resulted in progressive protein damage, inflammation, apoptosis and lung injury up to 21 days of the experimental period. Administration of 15 mg of vitamin C/guinea pig/day prevented all these

  8. Literature Reviews on Modeling Internal Geometry of Textile Composites and Rate-Independent Continuum Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su-Yuen, Hsu

    2011-01-01

    Textile composite materials have good potential for constructing composite structures where the effects of three-dimensional stresses are critical or geometric complexity is a manufacturing concern. There is a recent interest in advancing competence within Langley Research Center for modeling the degradation of mechanical properties of textile composites. In an initial effort, two critical areas are identified to pursue: (1) Construction of internal geometry of textile composites, and (2) Rate-independent continuum damage mechanics. This report documents reviews on the two subjects. Various reviewed approaches are categorized, their assumptions, methods, and progress are briefed, and then critiques are presented. Each review ends with recommended research.

  9. The evaluation of damage mechanism of unreinforced masonry buildings after Van (2011) and Elazig (2010) Earthquakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Güney, D; Aydin, E; Öztürk, B

    2015-01-01

    On March 8 th , 2010 Karakocan-Elazig earthquake of magnitude 6.0 occurred at a region where masonry and adobe construction is very common. Karakocan-Elazig is located in a high seismicity region on Eastern Anatolian Fault System (EAFS). Due to the earthquake, 42 people were killed and 14’113 buildings were damaged. Another city, Van located at South east of Turkey is hit by earthquakes with M = 7.2 occurred on October 23 rd , 2011 at 13:41 (local time), whose epicenter was about 16 km north of Van (Tabanli village) and M = 5.6 on November 9 th , 2011 with an epicenter near the town of Edremit, south of Van and caused the loss of life and heavy damages. Both earthquakes killed 644 people and 2608 people were injured. Approximately 10’000 buildings were seriously damaged. There are many traditional types of structures existing in the region hit by earthquakes (both Van and Elazig). These buildings were built as adobe, unreinforced masonry or mixed type. These types of buildings are very common in rural areas (especially south and east) of Turkey because of easy workmanship and cheap construction cost. Many of those traditional type structures experienced serious damages. The use of masonry is very common in some of the world's most hazard-prone regions, such as in Latin America, Africa, the Indian subcontinent and other parts of Asia, the Middle East, and southern Europe. Based on damage and failure mechanism of those buildings, the parameters affecting the seismic performance of those traditional buildings are analyzed in this paper. The foundation type, soil conditions, production method of the masonry blocks, construction method, the geometry of the masonry walls, workmanship quality, existence of wooden beams, type of roof, mortar between adobe blocks are studied in order to understand the reason of damage for these types of buildings. (paper)

  10. The evaluation of damage mechanism of unreinforced masonry buildings after Van (2011) and Elazig (2010) Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güney, D.; Aydin, E.; Öztürk, B.

    2015-07-01

    On March 8th, 2010 Karakocan-Elazig earthquake of magnitude 6.0 occurred at a region where masonry and adobe construction is very common. Karakocan-Elazig is located in a high seismicity region on Eastern Anatolian Fault System (EAFS). Due to the earthquake, 42 people were killed and 14’113 buildings were damaged. Another city, Van located at South east of Turkey is hit by earthquakes with M = 7.2 occurred on October 23rd, 2011 at 13:41 (local time), whose epicenter was about 16 km north of Van (Tabanli village) and M = 5.6 on November 9th, 2011 with an epicenter near the town of Edremit, south of Van and caused the loss of life and heavy damages. Both earthquakes killed 644 people and 2608 people were injured. Approximately 10’000 buildings were seriously damaged. There are many traditional types of structures existing in the region hit by earthquakes (both Van and Elazig). These buildings were built as adobe, unreinforced masonry or mixed type. These types of buildings are very common in rural areas (especially south and east) of Turkey because of easy workmanship and cheap construction cost. Many of those traditional type structures experienced serious damages. The use of masonry is very common in some of the world's most hazard-prone regions, such as in Latin America, Africa, the Indian subcontinent and other parts of Asia, the Middle East, and southern Europe. Based on damage and failure mechanism of those buildings, the parameters affecting the seismic performance of those traditional buildings are analyzed in this paper. The foundation type, soil conditions, production method of the masonry blocks, construction method, the geometry of the masonry walls, workmanship quality, existence of wooden beams, type of roof, mortar between adobe blocks are studied in order to understand the reason of damage for these types of buildings.

  11. Surface-structure dependence of healing radiation-damage mechanism in nanoporous tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Guohua; Li, Xiangyan; Sun, Jingjing; Hao, Congyu; Xu, Yichun; Zhang, Yange; Liu, Wei; Liu, C. S.

    2018-01-01

    Under nuclear fusion environments, displacement damage in tungsten (W) is usually caused by neutrons irradiation through producing large quantities of vacancies (Vs) and self-interstitial atoms (SIAs). These defects not only affect the mechanical properties of W, but also act as the trap sites for implanted hydrogen isotopes and helium. Nano-porous (NP) W with a high fraction of free surfaces has been developed to mitigate the radiation damage. However, the mechanism of the surface reducing defects accumulation is not well understood. By using multi-scale simulation methods, we investigated the interaction of the SIA and V with different surfaces on across length and time scales. We found that, at a typical operation temperature of 1000 K, surface (1 1 0) preferentially heals radiation damage of W compared with surface (1 0 0) and boundary (3 1 0). On surface (1 1 0), the diffusion barrier for the SIA is only 0.68 eV. The annihilation of the SIA-V happens via the coupled motion of the V segregation towards the surface from the bulk and the two-dimensional diffusion of the SIA on the surface. Such mechanism makes the surface (1 1 0) owe better healing capability. On surface (1 0 0), the diffusion energy barrier for the SIA is 2.48 eV, higher than the diffusion energy barrier of the V in bulk. The annihilation of the SIA-V occurs via the V segregation and recombination. The SIA was found to migrate one-dimensionally along a boundary (3 1 0) with a barrier of 0.21 eV, leading to a lower healing efficiency in the boundary. This study suggested that the on-surface process plays an important role in healing radiation damage of NP W in addition to surface-enhanced diffusion and annihilation near the surface. A certain surface structure renders nano-structured W more radiation-tolerant.

  12. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ducourthial, Audrey; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of $10^{15} n_{eq}/cm^2$ and the HL-HLC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is critical in order to make accurate predictions for current future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we present first predictions for basic pixel cluster properties alongside...

  13. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Rossini, Lorenzo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of 10^15 neq/cm^2 and the HL-HLC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is critical in order to make accurate predictions for current and future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time and considers both planar and 3D sensor designs. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we compare predictions for b...

  14. Modeling radiation damage to pixel sensors in the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ducourthial, Audrey; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of $10^{15}n_{eq}/cm^2$ and the HL-HLC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is critical in order to make accurate predictions for current future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we present first predictions for basic pixel cluster properties alongside ...

  15. Modeling radiation damage to pixel sensors in the ATLAS detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducourthial, A.

    2018-03-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) . As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subject to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High-Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) [1], the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of 1015 neq/cm2 and the HL-LHC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is essential in order to make accurate predictions for current and future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects on the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we present first predictions for basic pixel cluster properties alongside early studies with LHC Run 2 proton-proton collision data.

  16. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Rossini, Lorenzo; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Silicon pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). As the closest detector component to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the High- Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC), the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of 10^15 neq/cm2 and the HL-HLC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. Simulating radiation damage is critical in order to make accurate predictions for current future detector performance that will enable searches for new particles and forces as well as precision measurements of Standard Model particles such as the Higgs boson. We present a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS pixel sensors for the first time and considers both planar and 3D sensor designs. In addition to thoroughly describing the setup, we compare predictions for basic...

  17. A multistep damage recognition mechanism for global genomic nucleotide excision repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugasawa, K; Okamoto, T; Shimizu, Y; Masutani, C; Iwai, S; Hanaoka, F

    2001-03-01

    A mammalian nucleotide excision repair (NER) factor, the XPC-HR23B complex, can specifically bind to certain DNA lesions and initiate the cell-free repair reaction. Here we describe a detailed analysis of its binding specificity using various DNA substrates, each containing a single defined lesion. A highly sensitive gel mobility shift assay revealed that XPC-HR23B specifically binds a small bubble structure with or without damaged bases, whereas dual incision takes place only when damage is present in the bubble. This is evidence that damage recognition for NER is accomplished through at least two steps; XPC-HR23B first binds to a site that has a DNA helix distortion, and then the presence of injured bases is verified prior to dual incision. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) were hardly recognized by XPC-HR23B, suggesting that additional factors may be required for CPD recognition. Although the presence of mismatched bases opposite a CPD potentiated XPC-HR23B binding, probably due to enhancement of the helix distortion, cell-free excision of such compound lesions was much more efficient than expected from the observed affinity for XPC-HR23B. This also suggests that additional factors and steps are required for the recognition of some types of lesions. A multistep mechanism of this sort may provide a molecular basis for ensuring the high level of damage discrimination that is required for global genomic NER.

  18. Epiphytes modulate Posidonia oceanica photosynthetic production, energetic balance, antioxidant mechanisms and oxidative damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monya Mendes Costa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Epiphytes impose physical barriers to light penetration into seagrass leaves causing shading, which may decrease the production of oxygen reactive species (ROS, but also constitute a physical aggression that may trigger the production of ROS, leading to oxidative damage. Here we investigate the effects of epiphytes on Posidonia oceanica under both interactive perspectives, light attenuation and oxidative stress. Specifically the role of epiphytes in net photosynthesis, chlorophyll a and b, photoprotection (Violaxanthin+Anteraxanthin+Zeaxanthin cycle, soluble sugar and starch contents, enzymatic (ascorbate peroxidase (APX and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR and global (trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC and oxygen radical antioxidant capacity (ORAC antioxidant responses, phenolics and oxidative damage (malondialdehyde are tested. Leaves with epiphytes showed higher chlorophyll b and lower content in VAZ cycle carotenoids. Epiphyte shading was the probable reason for the lower VAZ de-epoxidation-ratio of leaves with epiphytes. In spite of being shaded, leaves with epiphytes showed higher antioxidant levels, indicating that epiphytes trigger the production of ROS. Both ORAC and TEAC and also APX and DHAR activities were higher in leaves with epiphytes, indicating that this response was related with its presence. Malondialdehyde concentrations also suggest oxidative damage caused by epiphytes. We conclude that the epiphyte load causes oxidative stress in P. oceanica and the mechanisms to scavenge ROS were not completely effective to avoid cell damage.

  19. Modeling of reflood of severely damaged reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachrata, A.

    2012-01-01

    The TMI-2 accident and recently Fukushima accident demonstrated that the nuclear safety philosophy has to cover accident sequences involving massive core melt in order to develop reliable mitigation strategies for both, existing and advanced reactors. Although severe accidents are low likelihood and might be caused only by multiple failures, accident management is implemented for controlling their course and mitigating their consequences. In case of severe accident, the fuel rods may be severely damaged and oxidized. Finally, they collapse and form a debris bed on core support plate. Removal of decay heat from a damaged core is a challenging issue because of the difficulty for water to penetrate inside a porous medium. The reflooding (injection of water into core) may be applied only if the availability of safety injection is recovered during accident. If the injection becomes available only in the late phase of accident, water will enter a core configuration that will differ from original rod bundle geometry and will resemble to the severe damaged core observed in TMI-2. The higher temperatures and smaller hydraulic diameters in a porous medium make the coolability more difficult than for intact fuel rods under typical loss of coolant accident conditions. The modeling of this kind of hydraulic and heat transfer is a one of key objectives of this. At IRSN, part of the studies is realized using an European thermo-hydraulic computer code for severe accident analysis ICARE-CATHARE. The objective of this thesis is to develop a 3D reflood model (implemented into ICARE-CATHARE) that is able to treat different configurations of degraded core in a case of severe accident. The proposed model is characterized by treating of non-equilibrium thermal between the solid, liquid and gas phase. It includes also two momentum balance equations. The model is based on a previously developed model but is improved in order to take into account intense boiling regimes (in particular

  20. DNA Damage: Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Study on the Oxygen Binding and Substrate Hydroxylation Step in AlkB Repair Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesne, Matthew G; Latifi, Reza; Gonzalez-Ovalle, Luis E; Kumar, Devesh; de Visser, Sam P

    2014-01-01

    AlkB repair enzymes are important nonheme iron enzymes that catalyse the demethylation of alkylated DNA bases in humans, which is a vital reaction in the body that heals externally damaged DNA bases. Its mechanism is currently controversial and in order to resolve the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes, a quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) study was performed on the demethylation of the N1-methyladenine fragment by AlkB repair enzymes. Firstly, the initial modelling identified the oxygen binding site of the enzyme. Secondly, the oxygen activation mechanism was investigated and a novel pathway was found, whereby the catalytically active iron(IV)–oxo intermediate in the catalytic cycle undergoes an initial isomerisation assisted by an Arg residue in the substrate binding pocket, which then brings the oxo group in close contact with the methyl group of the alkylated DNA base. This enables a subsequent rate-determining hydrogen-atom abstraction on competitive σ-and π-pathways on a quintet spin-state surface. These findings give evidence of different locations of the oxygen and substrate binding channels in the enzyme and the origin of the separation of the oxygen-bound intermediates in the catalytic cycle from substrate. Our studies are compared with small model complexes and the effect of protein and environment on the kinetics and mechanism is explained. PMID:24339041

  1. High-resolution measurement of the unsteady velocity field to evaluate blood damage induced by a mechanical heart valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellofiore, Alessandro; Quinlan, Nathan J

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the potential of prosthetic heart valves to generate abnormal flow and stress patterns, which can contribute to platelet activation and lysis according to blood damage accumulation mechanisms. High-resolution velocity measurements of the unsteady flow field, obtained with a standard particle image velocimetry system and a scaled-up model valve, are used to estimate the shear stresses arising downstream of the valve, accounting for flow features at scales less than one order of magnitude larger than blood cells. Velocity data at effective spatial and temporal resolution of 60 μm and 1.75 kHz, respectively, enabled accurate extraction of Lagrangian trajectories and loading histories experienced by blood cells. Non-physiological stresses up to 10 Pa were detected, while the development of vortex flow in the wake of the valve was observed to significantly increase the exposure time, favouring platelet activation. The loading histories, combined with empirical models for blood damage, reveal that platelet activation and lysis are promoted at different stages of the heart cycle. Shear stress and blood damage estimates are shown to be sensitive to measurement resolution.

  2. Process induced sub-surface damage in mechanically ground silicon wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yu; De Munck, Koen; Teixeira, Ricardo Cotrin; Swinnen, Bart; De Wolf, Ingrid; Verlinden, Bert

    2008-01-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microcopy, atomic force microscopy and preferential etching were used to characterize the sub-surface damage induced by the rough and fine grinding steps used to make ultra-thin silicon wafers. The roughly and ultra-finely ground silicon wafers were examined on both the machined (1 0 0) planes and the cross-sectional (1 1 0) planes. They reveal similar multi-layer damage structures, consisting of amorphous, plastically deformed and elastically stressed layers. However, the thickness of each layer in the roughly ground sample is much higher than its counterpart layers in the ultra-finely ground sample. The residual stress after rough and ultra-fine grinding is in the range of several hundreds MPa and 30 MPa, respectively. In each case, the top amorphous layer is believed to be the result of sequential phase transformations (Si-I to Si-II to amorphous Si). These phase transformations correspond to a ductile grinding mechanism, which is dominating in ultra-fine grinding. On the other hand, in rough grinding, a mixed mechanism of ductile and brittle grinding causes multi-layer damage and sub-surface cracks

  3. High-Temperature Performance and Multiscale Damage Mechanisms of Hollow Cellulose Fiber-Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liping Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spalling resistance properties and their damage mechanisms under high temperatures are studied in hollow cellulose fiber-reinforced concrete (CFRC used in tunnel structures. Measurements of mass loss, relative dynamic elastic modulus, compressive strength, and splitting tensile strength of CFRC held under high temperatures (300, 600, 800, and 1050°C for periods of 2.5, 4, and 5.5 h were carried out. The damage mechanism was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy, mercury intrusion porosimetry, thermal analysis, and X-ray diffraction phase analysis. The results demonstrate that cellulose fiber can reduce the performance loss of concrete at high temperatures; the effect of holding time on the performance is more noticeable below 600°C. After exposure to high temperatures, the performance of ordinary concrete deteriorates faster and spalls at 700–800°C; in contrast, cellulose fiber melts at a higher temperature, leaving a series of channels in the matrix that facilitate the release of the steam pressure inside the CFRC. Hollow cellulose fibers can thereby slow the damage caused by internal stress and improve the spalling resistance of concrete under high temperatures.

  4. Metamodel-based inverse method for parameter identification: elastic-plastic damage model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Changwu; El Hami, Abdelkhalak; Radi, Bouchaïb

    2017-04-01

    This article proposed a metamodel-based inverse method for material parameter identification and applies it to elastic-plastic damage model parameter identification. An elastic-plastic damage model is presented and implemented in numerical simulation. The metamodel-based inverse method is proposed in order to overcome the disadvantage in computational cost of the inverse method. In the metamodel-based inverse method, a Kriging metamodel is constructed based on the experimental design in order to model the relationship between material parameters and the objective function values in the inverse problem, and then the optimization procedure is executed by the use of a metamodel. The applications of the presented material model and proposed parameter identification method in the standard A 2017-T4 tensile test prove that the presented elastic-plastic damage model is adequate to describe the material's mechanical behaviour and that the proposed metamodel-based inverse method not only enhances the efficiency of parameter identification but also gives reliable results.

  5. On the formulation, parameter identification and numerical integration of the EMMI model :plasticity and isotropic damage.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bammann, Douglas J.; Johnson, G. C. (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Marin, Esteban B.; Regueiro, Richard A. (University of Colorado, Boulder, CO)

    2006-01-01

    In this report we present the formulation of the physically-based Evolving Microstructural Model of Inelasticity (EMMI) . The specific version of the model treated here describes the plasticity and isotropic damage of metals as being currently applied to model the ductile failure process in structural components of the W80 program . The formulation of the EMMI constitutive equations is framed in the context of the large deformation kinematics of solids and the thermodynamics of internal state variables . This formulation is focused first on developing the plasticity equations in both the relaxed (unloaded) and current configurations. The equations in the current configuration, expressed in non-dimensional form, are used to devise the identification procedure for the plasticity parameters. The model is then extended to include a porosity-based isotropic damage state variable to describe the progressive deterioration of the strength and mechanical properties of metals induced by deformation . The numerical treatment of these coupled plasticity-damage constitutive equations is explained in detail. A number of examples are solved to validate the numerical implementation of the model.

  6. Highlighting the DNA damage response with ultrashort laser pulses in the near infrared and kinetic modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eFerrando-May

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of the mechanisms governing the response to DNA damage in higher eucaryotes crucially depends on our ability to dissect the temporal and spatial organization of the cellular machinery responsible for maintaining genomic integrity. To achieve this goal, we need experimental tools to inflict DNA lesions with high spatial precision at pre-defined locations, and to visualize the ensuing reactions with adequate temporal resolution. Near-infrared femtosecond laser pulses focused through high-aperture objective lenses of advanced scanning microscopes offer the advantage of inducing DNA damage in a 3D-confined volume of subnuclear dimensions. This high spatial resolution results from the highly nonlinear nature of the excitation process. Here we review recent progress based on the increasing availability of widely tunable and user-friendly technology of ultrafast lasers in the near infrared. We present a critical evaluation of this approach for DNA microdamage as compared to the currently prevalent use of UV or VIS laser irradiation, the latter in combination with photosensitizers. Current and future applications in the field of DNA repair and DNA-damage dependent chromatin dynamics are outlined. Finally, we discuss the requirement for proper simulation and quantitative modeling. We focus in particular on approaches to measure the effect of DNA damage on the mobility of nuclear proteins and consider the pros and cons of frequently used analysis models for FRAP and photoactivation and their applicability to nonlinear photoperturbation experiments.

  7. Fluid mechanics and heat transfer advances in nonlinear dynamics modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Asli, Kaveh Hariri

    2015-01-01

    This valuable new book focuses on new methods and techniques in fluid mechanics and heat transfer in mechanical engineering. The book includes the research of the authors on the development of optimal mathematical models and also uses modern computer technology and mathematical methods for the analysis of nonlinear dynamic processes. It covers technologies applicable to both fluid mechanics and heat transfer problems, which include a combination of physical, mechanical, and thermal techniques. The authors develop a new method for the calculation of mathematical models by computer technology, using parametric modeling techniques and multiple analyses for mechanical system. The information in this book is intended to help reduce the risk of system damage or failure. Included are sidebar discussions, which contain information and facts about each subject area that help to emphasize important points to remember.

  8. Rotational 3D printing of damage-tolerant composites with programmable mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, Jordan R; Compton, Brett G; Mueller, Jochen; Ober, Thomas J; Shea, Kristina; Lewis, Jennifer A

    2018-02-06

    Natural composites exhibit exceptional mechanical performance that often arises from complex fiber arrangements within continuous matrices. Inspired by these natural systems, we developed a rotational 3D printing method that enables spatially controlled orientation of short fibers in polymer matrices solely by varying the nozzle rotation speed relative to the printing speed. Using this method, we fabricated carbon fiber-epoxy composites composed of volume elements (voxels) with programmably defined fiber arrangements, including adjacent regions with orthogonally and helically oriented fibers that lead to nonuniform strain and failure as well as those with purely helical fiber orientations akin to natural composites that exhibit enhanced damage tolerance. Our approach broadens the design, microstructural complexity, and performance space for fiber-reinforced composites through site-specific optimization of their fiber orientation, strain, failure, and damage tolerance. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  9. Simulation of Mechanical Behavior and Damage of a Large Composite Wind Turbine Blade under Critical Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarfaoui, M.; Nachtane, M.; Khadimallah, H.; Saifaoui, D.

    2018-04-01

    Issues such as energy generation/transmission and greenhouse gas emissions are the two energy problems we face today. In this context, renewable energy sources are a necessary part of the solution essentially winds power, which is one of the most profitable sources of competition with new fossil energy facilities. This paper present the simulation of mechanical behavior and damage of a 48 m composite wind turbine blade under critical wind loads. The finite element analysis was performed by using ABAQUS code to predict the most critical damage behavior and to apprehend and obtain knowledge of the complex structural behavior of wind turbine blades. The approach developed based on the nonlinear FE analysis using mean values for the material properties and the failure criteria of Tsai-Hill to predict failure modes in large structures and to identify the sensitive zones.

  10. Multiscale modeling of radiation damage in Fe-based alloys in the fusion environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, B.D.; Odette, G.R.; Marian, J.; Ventelon, L.; Young-Vandersall, J.A.; Zepeda-Ruiz, L.A.

    2004-01-01

    Ferritic alloys represent a technologically important class of candidate materials for fusion first wall and blanket structures. A detailed understanding of the mechanisms of defect accumulation and microstructure evolution, and the corresponding effects on mechanical properties is required to predict their in-service structural performance limits. The physical processes involved in radiation damage, and its effects on mechanical properties, are inherently multiscale and hierarchical, spanning length and time scales from the atomic nucleus to meters and picosecond to decades. In this paper, we present a multiscale modeling methodology to describe radiation effects within the fusion energy environment. Selected results from atomic scale investigation are presented, focusing on (i) the mechanisms of self-interstitial dislocation loop formation with Burgers vector of a in iron relative to vanadium, (ii) helium transport and (iii) the interaction between helium and small self-interstitial clusters in iron, and (iv) dislocation-helium bubble interactions in fcc aluminum

  11. Radiation damage of DNA. Model for direct ionization of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Kazuo; Tagawa, Seiichi

    2004-01-01

    Current aspects of radiation damage of DNA, particularly induced by the direct effect of radiation, and author's method of pulse radiolysis are described in relation to behavior of ions formed by radiation and active principles to induce the strand break. In irradiation of DNA solution in water, the direct effect of radiation is derived from ionization of DNA itself and indirect one, from the reaction between DNA and radicals generated from water molecules and the former direct one has been scarcely investigated due to difficulty of experimental approach. Radicals generated in sugar moiety of DNA are shown important in the strand break by recent studies on crystalline DNA irradiated by X-ray, DNA solution by electron and photon beams, hydrated DNA by γ-ray and by high linear energy transfer (LET) ion. Author's pulse radiolysis studies have revealed behaviors of guanine and adenine radical cations in dynamics of DNA oxidation. Since reactions described are the model, the experimental approach is thought necessary for elucidation of the actually occurring DNA damage in living cells. (N.I.)

  12. Introduction of damage in an elasto-plastic model for unsaturated geo-materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Pense, S.; Pouya, A.; Gatmiri, B.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. During the excavation of nuclear waste repository galleries, the surrounding soil is suspected to undergo structural changes as well as modification of its stress state. The desaturation due to ventilation of galleries during this stage makes it necessary to consider the unsaturated state of the host geo-material. The decompression occurring after the excavation leads to a modification of the stress state. The purpose of our work is to develop a mechanical model to simulate the non-linear stress-strain behaviour of geo-materials which will have to contain radioactivity of nuclear waste for a very long time. Two irreversible phenomena can explain the non-linear behaviour of geo-materials. Plasticity leads to irrecoverable strains. Damage, linked to the appearance and extension of microcracks, results in a deterioration of elastic and hydraulic properties. We will present here the bases of a new model coupling damage and plasticity for the stress-strain behaviour of unsaturated geo-materials. This model should be thermodynamically consistent and use only a reasonable number of parameters. Based on the work of Houlsby, (Houlsby 1997), we choose to use as constitutive variables for unsaturated soils Bishop's stress and suction. This choice as the advantage to allow for continuity at the transition between saturated and unsaturated states. Damage is taken into account by defining a damaged constitutive stress, which is similar to the effective stress principle defined by Kachanov (Kachanov 1958). A simple damage criterion is proposed and an associative flow rule is assumed. We choose to follow the principle of strain equivalence defined by Lemaitre (Lemaitre 1996). This leads to the following elasticity law giving the damaged constitutive stress as a function of elastic strain. If non-linear elasticity is considered, a pressure-dependent bulk modulus and a constant shear modulus can be chosen in order to fit

  13. Mitochondrial damage and ageing using skin as a model organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Laura; Bowman, Amy; Rashdan, Eyman; Birch-Machin, Mark A

    2016-11-01

    Ageing describes the progressive functional decline of an organism over time, leading to an increase in susceptibility to age-related diseases and eventually to death, and it is a phenomenon observed across a wide range of organisms. Despite a vast repertoire of ageing studies performed over the past century, the exact causes of ageing remain unknown. For over 50 years it has been speculated that mitochondria play a key role in the ageing process, due mainly to correlative data showing an increase in mitochondrial dysfunction, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) with age. However, the exact role of the mitochondria in the ageing process remains unknown. The skin is often used to study human ageing, due to its easy accessibility, and the observation that the ageing process is able to be accelerated in this organ via environmental insults, such as ultra violet radiation (UVR). This provides a useful tool to investigate the mechanisms regulating ageing and, in particular, the role of the mitochondria. Observations from dermatological and photoageing studies can provide useful insights into chronological ageing of the skin and other organs such as the brain and liver. Moreover, a wide range of diseases are associated with ageing; therefore, understanding the cause of the ageing process as well as regulatory mechanisms involved could provide potentially advantageous therapeutic targets for the prevention or treatment of such diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fatigue damage modeling in solder interconnects using a cohesive zone approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abdul-Baqi, A.J.J.; Schreurs, P.J.G.; Geers, M.G.D.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this work is to model the fatigue damage process in a solder bump subjected to cyclic loading conditions. Fatigue damage is simulated using the cohesive zone methodology. Damage is assumed to occur at interfaces modeled through cohesive zones in the material, while the bulk material

  15. MECHANISMS OF DAMAGING EFFECT OF MANGENESE IN TOXIC CONCENTRATIONS ON CELLULAR AND SUBCELLULAR LEVELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goncharenko A. V.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Influence of subtoxic concentration of manganese chloride in dose equal to LD 50 on condition of plasmatic membranes (model: erythrocytes and functional activity of cell power (model: the isolated liver mitochondrion of rats was studied. It was established that manganese chloride in fixed concentration caused authentic augmentation of sorption capacity of erythrocytes towards alcian blue, influenced increasing of their spontaneous haemolysis and activation of peroxide oxidation of lipids. In experiment on the isolated mitochondrion it was proved that manganese chloride caused dissociation of an oxidizing phosphorusling and complete inhibition of respiration in concentrations of 3 and 4,5mM. These dependences testify that subtoxic concentration of manganese can damage the cell energy. Thus, this pilot research indicated damaging effect of manganese on cellular (erythrocytes and subcellular (mitochondrion levels which are realized through external functioning of membrane structures and deprived them from restoration.

  16. Alternative approaches to electronic damage by ion-beam irradiation: Exciton models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agullo-Lopez, F.; Munoz-Martin, A.; Zucchiatti, A. [Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Climent-Font, A. [Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-11-15

    The paper briefly describes the main features of the damage produced by swift heavy ion (SHI) irradiation. After a short revision of the widely used thermal spike concept, it focuses on cumulative mechanisms of track formation which are alternative to those based on lattice melting (thermal spike models). These cumulative mechanisms rely on the production of point defects around the ion trajectory, and their accumulation up to a final lattice collapse or amorphization. As to the formation of point defects, the paper considers those mechanisms relying on direct local conversion of the excitation energy into atomic displacements (exciton models). A particular attention is given to processes based on the non-radiative recombination of excitons that have become self-trapped as a consequence of a strong electron-phonon interaction (STEs). These mechanisms, although operative under purely ionizing radiation in some dielectric materials, have been rarely invoked, so far, to discuss SHI damage. They are discussed in this paper together with relevant examples to materials such as Cu{sub 3}N, alkali halides, SiO{sub 2}, and LiNbO{sub 3}. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Microscale experimental investigation of deformation and damage of argillaceous rocks under cyclic hydric and mechanical loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Linlin; Yang, Diansen; Heripre, Eva; Chanchole, Serge; Bornert, Michel; Pouya, Ahmad; Halphen, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Document available in abstract form only. Argillaceous rocks are possible host rocks for underground nuclear waste repositories. They exhibit complex coupled thermo-hydro-chemo-mechanical behavior, the description of which would strongly benefit from an improved experimental insight on their deformation and damage mechanisms at microscale. We present some recent observations of the evolution of these rocks at the scale of their composite microstructure, essentially made of a clay matrix with embedded carbonates and quartz particles with sizes ranging from a few to several tens of micrometers, when they are subjected to cyclic variations of relative humidity and mechanical loading. They are based on the combination of high definition and high resolution imaging in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), in situ hydro-mechanical loading of the samples, and digital image correlation techniques. Samples, several millimeters in diameter, are held at a constant temperature of 2 deg. Celsius while the vapor pressure in the ESEM chamber is varied from a few to several hundreds of Pascals, generating a relative humidity ranging from about 10% up to 90%. Results show a strongly heterogeneous deformation field at microscale, which is the result of complex hydro-mechanical interactions. In particular, it can be shown that local swelling incompatibilities can generate irreversible deformations in the clay matrix, even if the overall hydric deformations seem reversible. In addition, local damage can be generated, in the form of a network of microcracks, located in the bulk of the clay matrix and/or at the interface between clay and other mineral particles. The morphology of this network, described in terms of crack length, orientation and preferred location, has been observed to be dependent on the speed of the variation of the relative humidity, and is different in a saturation or desaturation process. Besides studying the deformation and damage under hydric

  18. Effects of tissue mechanical properties on susceptibility to histotripsy-induced tissue damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaisavljevich, Eli; Kim, Yohan; Owens, Gabe; Roberts, William; Cain, Charles; Xu, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Histotripsy is a non-invasive tissue ablation method capable of fractionating tissue by controlling acoustic cavitation. To determine the fractionation susceptibility of various tissues, we investigated histotripsy-induced damage on tissue phantoms and ex vivo tissues with different mechanical strengths. A histotripsy bubble cloud was formed at tissue phantom surfaces using 5-cycle long ultrasound pulses with peak negative pressure of 18 MPa and PRFs of 10, 100, and 1000 Hz. Results showed significantly smaller lesions were generated in tissue phantoms of higher mechanical strength. Histotripsy was also applied to 43 different ex vivo porcine tissues with a wide range of mechanical properties. Gross morphology demonstrated stronger tissues with higher ultimate stress, higher density, and lower water content were more resistant to histotripsy damage in comparison to weaker tissues. Based on these results, a self-limiting vessel-sparing treatment strategy was developed in an attempt to preserve major vessels while fractionating the surrounding target tissue. This strategy was tested in porcine liver in vivo. After treatment, major hepatic blood vessels and bile ducts remained intact within a completely fractionated liver volume. These results identify varying susceptibilities of tissues to histotripsy therapy and provide a rational basis to optimize histotripsy parameters for treatment of specific tissues.

  19. Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Biological Molecules—Mechanisms of Damage and Emerging Methods of Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisz, Julie A.; Bansal, Nidhi; Qian, Jiang; Zhao, Weiling

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The detrimental effects of ionizing radiation (IR) involve a highly orchestrated series of events that are amplified by endogenous signaling and culminating in oxidative damage to DNA, lipids, proteins, and many metabolites. Despite the global impact of IR, the molecular mechanisms underlying tissue damage reveal that many biomolecules are chemoselectively modified by IR. Recent Advances: The development of high-throughput “omics” technologies for mapping DNA and protein modifications have revolutionized the study of IR effects on biological systems. Studies in cells, tissues, and biological fluids are used to identify molecular features or biomarkers of IR exposure and response and the molecular mechanisms that regulate their expression or synthesis. Critical Issues: In this review, chemical mechanisms are described for IR-induced modifications of biomolecules along with methods for their detection. Included with the detection methods are crucial experimental considerations and caveats for their use. Additional factors critical to the cellular response to radiation, including alterations in protein expression, metabolomics, and epigenetic factors, are also discussed. Future Directions: Throughout the review, the synergy of combined “omics” technologies such as genomics and epigenomics, proteomics, and metabolomics is highlighted. These are anticipated to lead to new hypotheses to understand IR effects on biological systems and improve IR-based therapies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21: 260–292. PMID:24382094

  20. Testicular Damage following Testicular Sperm Retrieval: A Ram Model Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Fedder

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible development of histological abnormalities such as fibrosis and microcalcifications after sperm retrieval in a ram model. Fourteen testicles in nine rams were exposed to open biopsy, multiple TESAs, or TESE, and the remaining four testicles were left unoperated on as controls. Three months after sperm retrieval, the testicles were removed, fixed, and cut into 1/2 cm thick slices and systematically put onto a glass plate exposing macroscopic abnormalities. Tissue from abnormal areas was cut into 3 μm sections and stained for histological evaluation. Pathological abnormalities were observed in testicles exposed to sperm retrieval (≥11 of 14 compared to 0 of 4 control testicles. Testicular damage was found independently of the kind of intervention used. Therefore, cryopreservation of excess sperm should be considered while retrieving sperm.

  1. Modeling Radiation Damage to Pixel Sensors in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Nachman, Benjamin Philip; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Silicon Pixel detectors are at the core of the current and planned upgrade of the ATLAS detector. As the detector in closest proximity to the interaction point, these detectors will be subjected to a significant amount of radiation over their lifetime: prior to the HL-LHC, the innermost layers will receive a fluence in excess of $10^{15}$ 1 MeV $n_\\mathrm{eq}/\\mathrm{cm}^2$ and the HL-LHC detector upgrades must cope with an order of magnitude higher fluence integrated over their lifetimes. This talk presents a digitization model that includes radiation damage effects to the ATLAS Pixel sensors for the first time. After a thorough description of the setup, predictions for basic Pixel cluster properties are presented alongside first validation studies with Run 2 collision data.

  2. Modelling Pre-eruptive Progressive Damage in Basaltic Volcanoes: Consequences for the Pre-eruptive Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Got, J. L.; Amitrano, D.; Carrier, A.; Marsan, D.; Jouanne, F.; Vogfjord, K. S.

    2017-12-01

    At Grimsvötn volcano, high-quality earthquake and continuous GPS data were recorded by the Icelandic Meteorological Office during its 2004-2011 inter-eruptive period and exhibited remarkable patterns : acceleration of the cumulated earthquake number, and a 2-year exponential decrease in displacement rate followed by a 4-year constant inflation rate. We proposed a model with one magma reservoir in a non-linear elastic damaging edifice, with incompressible magma and a constant pressure at the base of the magma conduit. We first modelled seismicity rate and damage as a function of time, and show that Kachanov's elastic brittle damage law may be used to express the decrease of the effective shear modulus with time. We then derived simple analytical expressions for the magma reservoir overpressure and the surface displacement as a function of time. We got a very good fit of the seismicity and surface displacement data by adjusting only three phenomenological parameters and computed magma reservoir overpressure, magma flow and strain power as a function of time. Overpressure decrease is controlled by damage and shear modulus decrease. Displacement increases, although overpressure is decreasing, because shear modulus decreases more than overpressure. Normalized strain power reaches a maximum 0.25 value. This maximum is a physical limit, after which the elasticity laws are no longer valid, earthquakes cluster, cumulative number of earthquakes departs from the model. State variable extrema provide four reference times that may be used to assess the mechanical state and dynamics of the volcanic edifice. We also performed the spatial modelling of the progressive damage and strain localization around a pressurized magma reservoir. We used Kachanov's damage law and finite element modelling of an initially elastic volcanic edifice pressurized by a spherical magma reservoir, with a constant pressure in the reservoir and various external boundary conditions. At each node of the

  3. A 3D Orthotropic Strain-Rate Dependent Elastic Damage Material Model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    English, Shawn Allen

    2014-09-01

    A three dimensional orthotropic elastic constitutive model with continuum damage and cohesive based fracture is implemented for a general polymer matrix composite lamina. The formulation assumes the possibility of distributed (continuum) damage followed b y localized damage. The current damage activation functions are simply partially interactive quadratic strain criteria . However, the code structure allows for changes in the functions without extraordinary effort. The material model formulation, implementation, characterization and use cases are presented.

  4. Mechanical Performance versus Corrosion Damage Indicators for Corroded Steel Reinforcing Bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Caprili

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The experimental results of a testing campaign including tensile and low-cycle fatigue tests on different reinforcing steel bar types in the as-delivered and corroded condition are presented. Experimental data were statistically analyzed adopting ANOVA technique; Performance Indicators (PIs, describing the mechanical performance characteristics of reinforcements, and Corrosion Damage Indicators (CDIs, describing the detrimental effects of corrosion phenomena, were determined and correlated in order to evaluate the influence of corrosion on the behaviour of reinforcing steels, providing useful information for designers in addition to what is presented in current standards.

  5. Damage Mechanism in Counter Pairs Caused by Bionic Non-smoothed Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Zhan-hui

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Four biomimetic non-smoothed surface specimens with different shapes were prepared by laser processing. Tests were conducted on MMU-5G wear and abrasion test machine to study the influencing rule of non-smoothed surfaces on counter pairs. The results show that the mass loss of the friction pair matching with the non-smoothed units is much greater than the ones matching with the smooth specimens. The pairs matching with different non-smoothed units suffer differently. The non-smoothed surface protruding zone exerts micro cutting on counter pairs. The striation causes the greatest mass loss of the pairs than the other non-smoothed units, which almost doubles the damage of the grid ones suffering the least. The difference in pairs damage is attributed to the different mechanism of undertaking the load in the process of wear. The damage can be alleviated effectively by changing the shapes of the units without increasing or decreasing the area ratio of the non-smoothed units.

  6. Vitamin K2 Ameliorates Damage of Blood Vessels by Glucocorticoid: a Potential Mechanism for Its Protective Effects in Glucocorticoid-induced Osteonecrosis of the Femoral Head in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuelei; Yin, Junhui; Ding, Hao; Zhang, Changqing; Gao, You-Shui

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid has been reported to decrease blood vessel number and harm the blood supply in the femoral head, which is recognized to be an important mechanism of glucocorticoid-induced osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). To prevent glucocorticoid-induced ONFH, medication that promotes both bone formation and angiogenesis would be ideal. Vitamin K2 has been revealed to play an important role in bone metabolism; however, few studies have focused on the effect of Vitamin K2 on new vascular formation. Thus, this study aimed to investigate whether Vitamin K2 promoted new blood vessel formation in the presence of glucocorticoids, both in vitro and in vivo. The effect of Vitamin K2 on viability, migration, in vitro tube formation, and VEGF, vWF, CD31, KDR, Flt and PDGFB in EAhy926 incubated with or without dexamethasone were elucidated. VEGF, TGF-β and BMP-2, angiogenesis-related proteins secreted by osteoblasts, were also detected in the osteoblast-like cell line of MG63. In addition, blood vessels of the femoral head in rats administered with or without methylprednisolone and Vitamin K2 were evaluated using angiography and CD31 staining. In vitro studies showed that Vitamin K2 significantly protected endothelial cells from dexamethasone-induced apoptosis, promoted endothelial cell migration and in vitro tube formation. Angiogenesis-related proteins both in EAhy926 and MG63 were also upregulated by Vitamin K2 when cotreated with dexamethasone. In vivo studies showed enhanced blood vessel volume and CD31-positive staining cells in rats cotreated with VK2 and methylprednisolone compared to rats treated with methylprednisolone only. Collectively, Vitamin K2 has the ability to promote angiogenesis in vitro and to ameliorate vessels of the femoral head in glucocorticoid-treated rats in vivo, indicating that Vitamin K2 is a promising drug that may be used to prevent steroid-induced ONFH.

  7. Micromechanical experimental analysis and modelling of elastic and damageable behaviour of unidirectional SiC/SiC composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chateau, C.

    2011-01-01

    Because of their potential use as a cladding material in future nuclear reactors, the complex mechanical behavior of SiC/SiC composites, which combines damage and anisotropy, must be understood and predictable. As part of a multi-scale approach, this work focuses on the first scale change: from the elementary constituents to the tow. Micromechanical approaches are implemented to describe the macroscopic behavior of the tow taking into account its microstructure heterogeneity and damage mechanisms occurring at the local scale. A representative virtual microstructure is generated based on a detailed microstructural investigation of the tow and its elastic response is studied by numerical homogenization. In addition to addressing the mechanical RVE issue, this study highlights the significant effects of residual porosity on the transverse behavior of the tow, due to the matrix infiltration process. The longitudinal damage is being studied through mini-composites, for which the evolution of microscopic damage mechanisms (matrix cracks and fiber breaks) is experimentally analyzed (in-situ SEM and tomography tensile tests). The identification of interfacial parameters of a 1D statistical damage model is based on the experimental characterization. Conventional assumptions of such models can adequately describe matrix cracking at macro and micro scale. However it is necessary to change them to get a proper prediction of ultimate failure. (author) [fr

  8. Tp53 gene mediates distinct dopaminergic neuronal damage in different dopaminergic neurotoxicant models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Lu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Tp53, a stress response gene, is involved in diverse cell death pathways and its activation is implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. However, whether the neuronal Tp53 protein plays a direct role in regulating dopaminergic (DA neuronal cell death or neuronal terminal damage in different neurotoxicant models is unknown. In our recent studies, in contrast to the global inhibition of Tp53 function by pharmacological inhibitors and in traditional Tp53 knock-out mice, we examined the effects of DA-specific Tp53 gene deletion after 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and methamphetamine exposure. Our data suggests that the Tp53 gene might be involved in both neuronal apoptosis and neuronal terminal damage caused by different neurotoxicants. Additional results from other studies also suggest that as a master regulator of many pathways that regulate apoptosis and synaptic terminal damage, it is possible that Tp53 may function as a signaling hub to integrate different signaling pathways to mediate distinctive target pathways. Tp53 protein as a signaling hub might be able to evaluate the microenvironment of neurons, assess the forms and severities of injury incurred, and determine whether apoptotic cell death or neuronal terminal degeneration occurs. Identification of the precise mechanisms activated in distinct neuronal damage caused by different forms and severities of injuries might allow for development of specific Tp53 inhibitors or ways to modulate distinct downstream target pathways involved.

  9. Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Modeling of Drug Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lonsdale, Richard; Fort, Rachel M; Rydberg, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    )-mexiletine in CYP1A2 with hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods, providing a more detailed and realistic model. Multiple reaction barriers have been calculated at the QM(B3LYP-D)/MM(CHARMM27) level for the direct N-oxidation and H-abstraction/rebound mechanisms. Our calculated barriers......The mechanism of cytochrome P450(CYP)-catalyzed hydroxylation of primary amines is currently unclear and is relevant to drug metabolism; previous small model calculations have suggested two possible mechanisms: direct N-oxidation and H-abstraction/rebound. We have modeled the N-hydroxylation of (R...... indicate that the direct N-oxidation mechanism is preferred and proceeds via the doublet spin state of Compound I. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the presence of an ordered water molecule in the active site assists in the binding of mexiletine in the active site...

  10. Determination of mechanical damage from wells under oil and gas flow condition; Determinacao de dano mecanico em pocos sob condicao de escoamento de oleo e gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marques, J. B.D. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Trevisan, O. V. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    The well bore effect is one of the most difficult variables obtained from well test analysis under two-phase condition. The presence of the gas in a well inserted in reservoir, which operates under gas drive solution, hinders the development of the analytical model to determine the mechanical damage. It is one of the reasons of the using the single phase well test analysis methodologies become suitable to the multiphase cases. The determination of the well bore effect is justified; therefore it is possible to work over in the well in order to determinate the real potential productive. The main objective of this work is to reevaluate a method of determination of the mechanical damage gotten from a well test under two-phase condition. In this work a simplified model of reservoir simulation is constructed in a commercial simulator in order to validate the methodology. The refinement of the blocks near to the well adopted in the simulation is a good representation of the well mechanical damage which occurs in a homogeneous reservoir. The types of well test analysis used in this work are two: drawdown and buildup test. The results gotten for this methodology, as will be shown, are excellent quality and the model of simulation presented here can be used for other analytical methods studies in order to determinate the mechanical damage or other variable of the reservoir. (author)

  11. Meso-Scale Modelling of Deformation, Damage and Failure in Dual Phase Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari Sarraf, Iman

    Advanced high strength steels (AHSS), such as dual phase (DP) and transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steels, offer high ductility, formability, and strength, as well as high strength-to-weight ratio and improved crash resistance. Dual phase steels belong to a family of high strength grades which consist of martensite, responsible for strengthening, distributed in a ductile ferrite matrix which accommodates the deformation throughout the forming process. It has been shown that the predominant damage mechanism and failure in DP steels depends on the ferrite and martensite grain sizes and their morphology, and can range from a mixture of brittle and ductile rupture to completely ductile rupture in a quasi-static uniaxial tension test. In this study, a hybrid finite element cellular automata model, initially proposed by Anton Shterenlikht (2003), was developed to evaluate the forming behaviour and predict the onset of instability and damage evolution in a dual phase steel. In this model, the finite element constitutive model is used to represent macro-level strain gradients and a damage variable, and two different cell arrays are designed to represent the ductile and brittle fracture modes in meso-scale. In the FE part of the model, a modified Rousselier ductile damage model is developed to account for nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids. Also, several rate-dependent hardening models were developed and evaluated to describe the work hardening flow curve of DP600. Based on statistical analysis and simulation results, a modified Johnson-Cook (JC) model and a multiplicative combination of the Voce-modified JC functions were found to be the most accurate hardening models. The developed models were then implemented in a user-defined material subroutine (VUMAT) for ABAQUS/Explicit finite element simulation software to simulate uniaxial tension tests at strain rates ranging from 0.001 1/s to 1000 1/s, Marciniak tests, and electrohydraulic free-forming (EHFF

  12. A continuum anisotropic damage model with unilateral effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alliche

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A continuum damage mechanics model has been derived within the framework of irreversible thermodynamics with internal variables in order to describe the behaviour of quasi-brittle materials under various loading paths. The anisotropic character induced by the progressive material degradation is explicitly taken into account, and the Helmholtz free energy is a scalar function of the basic invariants of the second order strain and damage tensors. The elastic response varies depending on the closed or open configuration of defects. The constitutive laws derived within the framework of irreversible thermodynamics theory display a dissymmetry as well as unilateral effects under tensile and compressive loading conditions. This approach verifies continuity and uniqueness of the potential energy. An application to uniaxial tension-compression loading shows a good adequacy with experimental results when available, and realistic evolutions for computed stresses and strains otherwise.

  13. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA, Progress report, November 1, 1977--October 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1978-06-01

    In this project we have proposed several mechanisms for radiation damage to DNA constituents and DNA, and have detailed a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectrometry to test the proposed mechanisms. In the past we have concentrated chiefly on the direct affect of radiation on DNA. We are currently investigating systems of DNA constituents and peptides which may shed light on indirect effects. Studies which we have completed during the past year are: π-cation radicals in DNA and dinucleoside phosphates, and conformational effects on the ESR Spectra of amino acids and peptides. Studies of γ-Irradiated Peptide Solutions at 77 0 K, and studies of spin transfer in γ-irradiated nucleoside--peptide solutions were also conducted

  14. The 2015 Nobel Prize in Chemistry The Discovery of Essential Mechanisms that Repair DNA Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Tomas; Modrich, Paul; Sancar, Aziz

    2016-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2015 to Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar for their discoveries in fundamental mechanisms of DNA repair. This pioneering research described three different essential pathways that correct DNA damage, safeguard the integrity of the genetic code to ensure its accurate replication through generations, and allow proper cell division. Working independently of each other, Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar delineated the mechanisms of base excision repair, mismatch repair and nucleotide excision repair, respectively. These breakthroughs challenged and dismissed the early view that the DNA molecule was very stable, paving the way for the discovery of human hereditary diseases associated with distinct DNA repair deficiencies and a susceptibility to cancer. It also brought a deeper understanding of cancer as well as neurodegenerative or neurological diseases, and let to novel strategies to treat cancer.

  15. Crack Propagation Calculations for Optical Fibers under Static Bending and Tensile Loads Using Continuum Damage Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunxia; Cui, Yuxuan; Gong, Wenjun

    2017-01-01

    Static fatigue behavior is the main failure mode of optical fibers applied in sensors. In this paper, a computational framework based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) is presented to calculate the crack propagation process and failure time of optical fibers subjected to static bending and tensile loads. For this purpose, the static fatigue crack propagation in the glass core of the optical fiber is studied. Combining a finite element method (FEM), we use the continuum damage mechanics for the glass core to calculate the crack propagation path and corresponding failure time. In addition, three factors including bending radius, tensile force and optical fiber diameter are investigated to find their impacts on the crack propagation process and failure time of the optical fiber under concerned situations. Finally, experiments are conducted and the results verify the correctness of the simulation calculation. It is believed that the proposed method could give a straightforward description of the crack propagation path in the inner glass core. Additionally, the predicted crack propagation time of the optical fiber with different factors can provide effective suggestions for improving the long-term usage of optical fibers. PMID:29140284

  16. Mechanical Properties and Elastic Constants Due to Damage Accumulation and Amorphization in SiC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Fei; Weber, William J.

    2004-01-01

    Damage accumulation due to cascade overlap, which was simulated previously, has been used to study the changes of elastic constants, bulk and elastic moduli as a function of dose. These mechanical properties generally decrease with increasing dose, and the rapid decrease at low-dose level indicates that point defects and small clusters play an important role in the changes of elastic constants rather than topological disorder. The internal strain relaxation has no effect on the elastic constants, C11 and C12, in perfect SiC, but it has a significant influence on all elastic constants calculated in damaged SiC. The elastic constants in the cascade-amorphized (CA) SiC decrease about 19%, 29% and 46% for C11, C12 and C44, respectively. The bulk modulus decrease 23% and the elastic modulus decreases 29%, which is consistent with experimental measurements. The stability of both the perfect SiC and CA-SiC under hydrostatic tension has been also investigated. All mechanical properties in the CA-SiC exhibit behavior similar to that in perfect SiC, but the critical stress at which the CA-SiC becomes structurally unstable is one order of magnitude smaller than that for perfect SiC

  17. A Kriging Model Based Finite Element Model Updating Method for Damage Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuming Yang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Model updating is an effective means of damage identification and surrogate modeling has attracted considerable attention for saving computational cost in finite element (FE model updating, especially for large-scale structures. In this context, a surrogate model of frequency is normally constructed for damage identification, while the frequency response function (FRF is rarely used as it usually changes dramatically with updating parameters. This paper presents a new surrogate model based model updating method taking advantage of the measured FRFs. The Frequency Domain Assurance Criterion (FDAC is used to build the objective function, whose nonlinear response surface is constructed by the Kriging model. Then, the efficient global optimization (EGO algorithm is introduced to get the model updating results. The proposed method has good accuracy and robustness, which have been verified by a numerical simulation of a cantilever and experimental test data of a laboratory three-story structure.

  18. A Modified Fatigue Damage Model for High-Cycle Fatigue Life Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the assumption of quasibrittle failure under high-cycle fatigue for the metal material, the damage constitutive equation and the modified damage evolution equation are obtained with continuum damage mechanics. Then, finite element method (FEM is used to describe the failure process of metal material. The increment of specimen’s life and damage state can be researched using damage mechanics-FEM. Finally, the lifetime of the specimen is got at the given stress level. The damage mechanics-FEM is inserted into ABAQUS with subroutine USDFLD and the Python language is used to simulate the fatigue process of titanium alloy specimens. The simulation results have a good agreement with the testing results under constant amplitude loading, which proves the accuracy of the method.

  19. A hybrid model of primary radiation damage in crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarin, S.I.; Dremov, V.V.

    2009-01-01

    The paper offers a hybrid model which combines molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo (MD+MC) methods to describe primary radiation damage in crystals, caused by particles whose energies are no higher than several tens of keV. The particles are tracked in accord with equations of motion with account for pair interaction. The model also considers particle interaction with the mean-field potential (MFP) of the crystal. Only particles involved in cascading are tracked. Equations of motion for these particles include dissipative forces which describe energy exchange between cascade particles and electrons. New particles - the atoms of the crystal in the cascade region - have stochastic parameters (phase coordinates); they are sampled by the Monte Carlo method from the distribution that describes the classic canonical ensemble of non-interacting particles subjected to the external MFP. The introduction of particle interaction with the MFP helps avoid difficulties related to crystal stability and the choice of an adequate interparticle interaction potential in the traditional MD methods. Our technique is many times as fast as the traditional MD methods because we consider only particles which are involved in cascading and apply special methods to speedup the calculation of forces by accounting for the short-range pair potential used

  20. Micromechanical Modeling of Grain Boundaries Damage in a Copper Alloy Under Creep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voese, Markus

    2015-01-01

    In order to include the processes on the scale of the grain structure into the description of the creep behaviour of polycrystalline materials, the damage development of a single grain boundary has been initially investigated in the present work. For this purpose, a special simulationmethod has been used, whose resolution procedure based on holomorphic functions. The mechanisms taken into account for the simulations include nucleation, growth by grain boundary diffusion, coalescence and shrinkage until complete sintering of grain boundary cavities. These studies have then been used to develop a simplified cavitation model, which describes the grain boundary damage by two state variables and the time-dependent development by a mechanism-oriented rate formulation. To include the influence of grain boundaries within continuum mechanical considerations of polycrystals, an interface model has been developed, that incorporates both damage according to the simplified cavitation model and grain boundary sliding in dependence of a phenomenological grain boundary viscosity. Furthermore a micromechanical model of a polycrystal has been developed that allows to include a material's grain structure into the simulation of the creep behaviour by means of finite element simulations. Thereby, the deformations of individual grains are expressed by a viscoplastic single crystal model and the grain boundaries are described by the proposed interface model. The grain structure is represented by a finite element model, in which the grain boundaries are modelled by cohesive elements. From the evaluation of experimental creep data, the micromechanical model of a polycrystal has been calibrated for a copper-antimony alloy at a temperature of 823 K. Thereby, the adjustment of the single crystal model has been carried out on the basis of creep rates of pure copper single crystal specimens. The experimental determination of grain boundary sliding and grain boundary porosity for coarse

  1. Inspection of the Math Model Tools for On-Orbit Assessment of Impact Damage Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Charles E.; Raju, Ivatury S.; Piascik, Robert S> KramerWhite, Julie A.; KramerWhite, Julie A.; Labbe, Steve G.; Rotter, Hank A.

    2007-01-01

    In Spring of 2005, the NASA Engineering Safety Center (NESC) was engaged by the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) to peer review the suite of analytical tools being developed to support the determination of impact and damage tolerance of the Orbiter Thermal Protection Systems (TPS). The NESC formed an independent review team with the core disciplines of materials, flight sciences, structures, mechanical analysis and thermal analysis. The Math Model Tools reviewed included damage prediction and stress analysis, aeroheating analysis, and thermal analysis tools. Some tools are physics-based and other tools are empirically-derived. Each tool was created for a specific use and timeframe, including certification, real-time pre-launch assessments. In addition, the tools are used together in an integrated strategy for assessing the ramifications of impact damage to tile and RCC. The NESC teams conducted a peer review of the engineering data package for each Math Model Tool. This report contains the summary of the team observations and recommendations from these reviews.

  2. Ductile failure analysis of high strength steel in hot forming based on micromechanical damage model

    OpenAIRE

    Ying Liang; Liu Wenquan; Wang Dantong; Hu Ping

    2016-01-01

    The damage evolution of high strength steel at elevated temperature is investigated by using the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN) model. A hybrid method integrated thermal tensile test and numerical technique is employed to identify the damage parameters. The analysis results show that the damage parameters are different at different temperature as the variation of tested material microstructure. Furthermore, the calibrated damage parameters are implemented to simulate a bugling forming at el...

  3. Damage-Based Time-Dependent Modeling of Paraglacial to Postglacial Progressive Failure of Large Rock Slopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Federico; Agliardi, Federico; Amitrano, David; Crosta, Giovanni B.

    2018-01-01

    Large alpine rock slopes undergo long-term evolution in paraglacial to postglacial environments. Rock mass weakening and increased permeability associated with the progressive failure of deglaciated slopes promote the development of potentially catastrophic rockslides. We captured the entire life cycle of alpine slopes in one damage-based, time-dependent 2-D model of brittle creep, including deglaciation, damage-dependent fluid occurrence, and rock mass property upscaling. We applied the model to the Spriana rock slope (Central Alps), affected by long-term instability after Last Glacial Maximum and representing an active threat. We simulated the evolution of the slope from glaciated conditions to present day and calibrated the model using site investigation data and available temporal constraints. The model tracks the entire progressive failure path of the slope from deglaciation to rockslide development, without a priori assumptions on shear zone geometry and hydraulic conditions. Complete rockslide differentiation occurs through the transition from dilatant damage to a compacting basal shear zone, accounting for observed hydraulic barrier effects and perched aquifer formation. Our model investigates the mechanical role of deglaciation and damage-controlled fluid distribution in the development of alpine rockslides. The absolute simulated timing of rock slope instability development supports a very long "paraglacial" period of subcritical rock mass damage. After initial damage localization during the Lateglacial, rockslide nucleation initiates soon after the onset of Holocene, whereas full mechanical and hydraulic rockslide differentiation occurs during Mid-Holocene, supporting a key role of long-term damage in the reported occurrence of widespread rockslide clusters of these ages.

  4. Monitoring and modeling the aging mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Pape, Yann; Courtois, Alexis; Ghavamian, Charles

    2006-09-01

    origin of these cracks might be caused by differential drying shrinkage for the cracks near the raft and by deviated post-tensioning near the material hatch. The bi-directional prestress limits the cracks opening when the containment is over-pressurized. However, under sustained loads, concrete creep leads to a loss of prestress due to the deformation compatibility between the grouted tendons the concrete mass. Thus the safety margin shall be affected since cracks opening may become larger with time. In order to optimize the extent of reparation, it is therefore compulsory to improve the prediction of the long-time mechanical behavior of the containment. This task requires: - the improvement of the delayed behavior understanding, the so-called aging mechanism, the development of realistic, i.e. less conservative, models specifically designed for the very specific loading conditions of the inner containment; - the integration of monitored data in the numerical or analytical simulation; - the evaluation of the impact of the concrete damage and the loss of prestress on the hydraulic behavior. The paper addresses the following items: inner containment description and in-situ monitoring; concrete shrinkage and creep modeling; laboratory testing; numerical computation and comparison with monitored data; introducing monitored data in the computation; impact of damage on the leak tightness of the containment wall. The communication illustrates the general strategy adopted by EDF in order to assess the long-term integrity of NPP inner concrete containment vessel. All analysis and computation are performed on the standard zone of the concrete vessel. On-going research and development programs are focused on the refinement of the methodology and their application to more realistic numerical model of large-scale structure

  5. Computational Modelling of Fracture Propagation in Rocks Using a Coupled Elastic-Plasticity-Damage Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isa Kolo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A coupled elastic-plasticity-damage constitutive model, AK Model, is applied to predict fracture propagation in rocks. The quasi-brittle material model captures anisotropic effects and the distinct behavior of rocks in tension and compression. Calibration of the constitutive model is realized using experimental data for Carrara marble. Through the Weibull distribution function, heterogeneity effect is captured by spatially varying the elastic properties of the rock. Favorable comparison between model predictions and experiments for single-flawed specimens reveal that the AK Model is reliable and accurate for modelling fracture propagation in rocks.

  6. Building damage assessment from PolSAR data using texture parameters of statistical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linlin; Liu, Xiuguo; Chen, Qihao; Yang, Shuai

    2018-04-01

    Accurate building damage assessment is essential in providing decision support for disaster relief and reconstruction. Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR) has become one of the most effective means of building damage assessment, due to its all-day/all-weather ability and richer backscatter information of targets. However, intact buildings that are not parallel to the SAR flight pass (termed oriented buildings) and collapsed buildings share similar scattering mechanisms, both of which are dominated by volume scattering. This characteristic always leads to misjudgments between assessments of collapsed buildings and oriented buildings from PolSAR data. Because the collapsed buildings and the intact buildings (whether oriented or parallel buildings) have different textures, a novel building damage assessment method is proposed in this study to address this problem by introducing texture parameters of statistical models. First, the logarithms of the estimated texture parameters of different statistical models are taken as a new texture feature to describe the collapse of the buildings. Second, the collapsed buildings and intact buildings are distinguished using an appropriate threshold. Then, the building blocks are classified into three levels based on the building block collapse rate. Moreover, this paper also discusses the capability for performing damage assessment using texture parameters from different statistical models or using different estimators. The RADARSAT-2 and ALOS-1 PolSAR images are used to present and analyze the performance of the proposed method. The results show that using the texture parameters avoids the problem of confusing collapsed and oriented buildings and improves the assessment accuracy. The results assessed by using the K/G0 distribution texture parameters estimated based on the second moment obtain the highest extraction accuracies. For the RADARSAT-2 and ALOS-1 data, the overall accuracy (OA) for these three types of

  7. A Damage Mechanics Source Model for Underground Nuclear Explosions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    California Institute of Technology Reston, VA 22091 Pasadena, CA 91125 Mr. William J. Best Prof. F. A. Dahlen 907 Westwood Drive Geological and Geophysical...ENSCO, Inc. Department of Geological Sciences 445 Pineda Court . , -7’- 9 Meibcurr..e, F 3940 6 William Kikendall Prof. Amos Nur Teledyne Geotech...Teledyne Geotech Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 3a¢,l Shiloh Road L-205 Garland, TX 75041 P. 0. Box 808 Livermore, CA 94550 Dr. Matthew Sibol

  8. Survey on damage mechanics models for fatigue life prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Silitonga, S.; Maljaars, J.; Soetens, F.; Snijder, H.H.

    2013-01-01

    Engineering methods to predict the fatigue life of structures have been available since the beginning of the 20th century. However, a practical problem arises from complex loading conditions and a significant concern is the accuracy of the methods under variable amplitude loading. This paper

  9. A model based bayesian solution for characterization of complex damage scenarios in aerospace composite structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, H; Leckey, Cara A C; Dick, A; Harvey, G; Dobson, J

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasonic damage detection and characterization is commonly used in nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of aerospace composite components. In recent years there has been an increased development of guided wave based methods. In real materials and structures, these dispersive waves result in complicated behavior in the presence of complex damage scenarios. Model-based characterization methods utilize accurate three dimensional finite element models (FEMs) of guided wave interaction with realistic damage scenarios to aid in defect identification and classification. This work describes an inverse solution for realistic composite damage characterization by comparing the wavenumber-frequency spectra of experimental and simulated ultrasonic inspections. The composite laminate material properties are first verified through a Bayesian solution (Markov chain Monte Carlo), enabling uncertainty quantification surrounding the characterization. A study is undertaken to assess the efficacy of the proposed damage model and comparative metrics between the experimental and simulated output. The FEM is then parameterized with a damage model capable of describing the typical complex damage created by impact events in composites. The damage is characterized through a transdimensional Markov chain Monte Carlo solution, enabling a flexible damage model capable of adapting to the complex damage geometry investigated here. The posterior probability distributions of the individual delamination petals as well as the overall envelope of the damage site are determined. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Ductile failure analysis of high strength steel in hot forming based on micromechanical damage model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The damage evolution of high strength steel at elevated temperature is investigated by using the Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman (GTN model. A hybrid method integrated thermal tensile test and numerical technique is employed to identify the damage parameters. The analysis results show that the damage parameters are different at different temperature as the variation of tested material microstructure. Furthermore, the calibrated damage parameters are implemented to simulate a bugling forming at elevated temperature. The experimental results show the availability of GTN damage model in analyzing sheet formability in hot forming.

  11. Automated 3D Damaged Cavity Model Builder for Lower Surface Acreage Tile on Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belknap, Shannon; Zhang, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The 3D Automated Thermal Tool for Damaged Acreage Tile Math Model builder was developed to perform quickly and accurately 3D thermal analyses on damaged lower surface acreage tiles and structures beneath the damaged locations on a Space Shuttle Orbiter. The 3D model builder created both TRASYS geometric math models (GMMs) and SINDA thermal math models (TMMs) to simulate an idealized damaged cavity in the damaged tile(s). The GMMs are processed in TRASYS to generate radiation conductors between the surfaces in the cavity. The radiation conductors are inserted into the TMMs, which are processed in SINDA to generate temperature histories for all of the nodes on each layer of the TMM. The invention allows a thermal analyst to create quickly and accurately a 3D model of a damaged lower surface tile on the orbiter. The 3D model builder can generate a GMM and the correspond ing TMM in one or two minutes, with the damaged cavity included in the tile material. A separate program creates a configuration file, which would take a couple of minutes to edit. This configuration file is read by the model builder program to determine the location of the damage, the correct tile type, tile thickness, structure thickness, and SIP thickness of the damage, so that the model builder program can build an accurate model at the specified location. Once the models are built, they are processed by the TRASYS and SINDA.

  12. Tool geometry and damage mechanisms influencing CNC turning efficiency of Ti6Al4V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, Sangeeth; Hamid, Darulihsan Abdul; Yazid, M. Z. A.; Nasuha, Nurdiyanah; Ain, Siti Nurul

    2017-12-01

    Ti6Al4V or Grade 5 titanium alloy is widely used in the aerospace, medical, automotive and fabrication industries, due to its distinctive combination of mechanical and physical properties. Ti6Al4V has always been perverse during its machining, strangely due to the same mix of properties mentioned earlier. Ti6Al4V machining has resulted in shorter cutting tool life which has led to objectionable surface integrity and rapid failure of the parts machined. However, the proven functional relevance of this material has prompted extensive research in the optimization of machine parameters and cutting tool characteristics. Cutting tool geometry plays a vital role in ensuring dimensional and geometric accuracy in machined parts. In this study, an experimental investigation is actualized to optimize the nose radius and relief angles of the cutting tools and their interaction to different levels of machining parameters. Low elastic modulus and thermal conductivity of Ti6Al4V contribute to the rapid tool damage. The impact of these properties over the tool tips damage is studied. An experimental design approach is utilized in the CNC turning process of Ti6Al4V to statistically analyze and propose optimum levels of input parameters to lengthen the tool life and enhance surface characteristics of the machined parts. A greater tool nose radius with a straight flank, combined with low feed rates have resulted in a desirable surface integrity. The presence of relief angle has proven to aggravate tool damage and also dimensional instability in the CNC turning of Ti6Al4V.

  13. Combined model of strain-induced phase transformation and orthotropic damage in ductile materials at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, Cedric

    2003-01-01

    Ductile materials (like stainless steel or copper) show at cryogenic temperatures three principal phenomena: serrated yielding (discontinuous in terms of dsigma/depsilon), plastic strain-induced phase transformations and evolution of ductile damage. The present paper deals exclusively with the two latter cases. Thus, it is assumed that the plastic flow is perfectly smooth. Both in the case of damage evolution and for the gamma-alpha prime phase transformation, the principal mechanism is related to the formation of plastic strain fields. In the constitutive modeling of both phenomena, a crucial role is played by the accumulated plastic strain, expressed by the Odqvist parameter p. Following the general trends, both in the literature concerning the phase transformation and the ductile damage, it is assumed that the rate of transformation and the rate of damage are proportional to the accumulated plastic strain rate. The gamma-alpha prime phase transformation converts the initially homogenous material to a two-p...

  14. Study on Creep Damage Model of 1Cr1Mo1/4V Steel for Turbine Rotor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Woo Sung; Song, Gee Wook; Kim, Bum Shin; Chang, Sung Ho; Fleury, Eric

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that the dominant damage mechanisms in high-temperature steam turbine facilities such as rotor and casing are creep and fatigue damages. Even though coupling of creep and fatigue should be considered while predicting the life of turbine facilities, the remaining life of large steam turbine facilities is generally determined on the basis of creep damage because the turbines must generate stable base-load power and because they are operated at a high temperature and pressure for a long time. Almost every large steam turbine in Korea has been operated for more than 20 years and is made of steel containing various amounts of principal alloying elements nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and vanadium. In this study, creep damage model of 1Cr1Mo1/4V steel for turbine rotor is proposed and that can assess the high temperature creep life of large steam turbine facilities is proposed

  15. Mechanisms of damage to the oxide layer of cladding of fuel rods under accident conditions like RI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busser, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    During reactivity initiated accident, the importance of cladding tube oxidation on its thermomechanical behavior has been investigated. After RIA tests in experimental reactors oxide damage including radial cracking and spallation of the outer oxide layer has been evidenced. This work aims at better understanding the key mechanisms controlling these phenomena. Laboratory air-oxidation of Zircaloy-4 cladding tubes has been performed at 470 C. SEM micrographs show that radial cracks are initiated from the outer surface of the oxide layer and propagated radially towards the oxide-metal interface. A model predicting the stress evolution within the oxide and the depth of crack has been developed and validated on literature tests and tests of this study. Ring compression tests were used for the experimental study of the oxide degradation under mechanical loading. Experimental data revealed three mechanisms: densification of the radial crack network, propagation of these radial cracks, branching and spallation of oxide fragments. The influence of the circumferential cracks, periodically distributed in the oxide layer, on the stress distribution in oxide fragments has been analysed using finite element modelling. The determining influence of these cracks on the maximum stress oxide fragments has been demonstrated. (author)

  16. A mechanical model for FRP-strengthened beams in bending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Valvo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We analyse the problem of a simply supported beam, strengthened with a fibre-reinforced polymer (FRP strip bonded to its intrados and subjected to bending couples applied to its end sections. A mechanical model is proposed, whereby the beam and FRP strip are modelled according to classical beam theory, while the adhesive and its neighbouring layers are modelled as an interface having a piecewise linear constitutive law defined over three intervals (elastic response – softening response – debonding. The model is described by a set of differential equations with appropriate boundary conditions. An analytical solution to the problem is determined, including explicit expressions for the internal forces, displacements and interfacial stresses. The model predicts an overall non-linear mechanical response for the strengthened beam, ranging over several stages: from linearly elastic behaviour to damage, until the complete detachment of the FRP reinforcement.

  17. Multi-level Quantum Mechanics and Molecular Mechanics Study of Ring Opening Process of Guanine Damage by Hydroxyl Radical in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Wang, Qiong; Niu, Meixing; Wang, Dunyou

    2017-08-10

    Combining multi-level quantum mechanics theories and molecular mechanics with an explicit water model, we investigated the ring opening process of guanine damage by hydroxyl radical in aqueous solution. The detailed, atomic-level ring-opening mechanism along the reaction pathway was revealed in aqueous solution at the CCSD(T)/MM levels of theory. The potentials of mean force in aqueous solution were calculated at both the DFT/MM and CCSD(T)/MM levels of the theory. Our study found that the aqueous solution has a significant effect on this reaction in solution. In particular, by comparing the geometries of the stationary points between in gas phase and in aqueous solution, we found that the aqueous solution has a tremendous impact on the torsion angles much more than on the bond lengths and bending angles. Our calculated free-energy barrier height 31.6 kcal/mol at the CCSD(T)/MM level of theory agrees well with the one obtained based on gas-phase reaction profile and free energies of solvation. In addition, the reaction path in gas phase was also mapped using multi-level quantum mechanics theories, which shows a reaction barrier at 19.2 kcal/mol at the CCSD(T) level of theory, agreeing very well with a recent ab initio calculation result at 20.8 kcal/mol.

  18. Effect of stitch density on fatigue characteristics and damage mechanisms of stitched carbon/epoxy composites

    KAUST Repository

    Yudhanto, Arief

    2014-05-01

    The effect of stitch density (SD) on fatigue life, stiffness degradation and fatigue damage mechanisms in carbon/epoxy (T800SC/XNRH6813) stitched using Vectran thread is presented in this paper. Moderately stitched composite (SD = 0.028/mm2; \\'stitched 6 × 6\\') and densely stitched composite (SD = 0.111/mm2; \\'stitched 3 × 3\\') are tested and compared with composite without stitch thread (SD = 0.0; \\'unstitched\\'). The experiments show that the fatigue life of stitched 3 × 3 is moderately better than that of unstitched and stitched 6 × 6. Stitched 3 × 3 pattern is also able to postpone the stiffness degradation onset. The improvement of fatigue properties and postponement of stiffness degradation onset in stitched 3 × 3 is primarily due to an effective impediment of edge-delamination. Quantification of damage at various cycles and stress levels shows that stitch density primarily affects the growth rate of delamination. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Thermal coupling and damage mechanisms of laser radiation on selected materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwirzke, F.; Jenkins, W.F.; Schmidt, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    High power laser beams interact with targets by a variety of thermal, impulse, and electrical effects. Energy coupling is considerably enhanced once surface electrical breakdown occurs. The laser heated plasma then causes surface damage via thermal evaporation, ion sputtering, and unipolar arcing. While the first two are purely thermal and mechanical effects, the last one, unipolar arcing, is an electrical plasma-surface interaction process which leads to crater formation, usually called laser-pitting, a process which was often observed but not well understood. Unipolar arcing occurs when a plasma of sufficiently high electron temperature interacts with a surface. Without an external voltage applied, many electrical micro-arcs burn between the surface and the plasma, driven by local variations of the sheath potential with the surface acting as both the cathode and anode. Laser induced unipolar arcing represents the most damaging and non-uniform plasma-surface interaction process since the energy available in the plasma concentrates towards the cathode spots. This causes cratering of the materials surface. The ejection of material in the form of small jets from the craters leads to ripples in the critical plasma density contour. This in turn contributes to the onset of plasma instabilities, small scale magnetic field generation and laser beam filamentation. The ejection of a plasma jet from the unipolar arc crater also causes highly localized shock waves to propagate into the target, softening it in the process. Thus, local surface erosion by unipolar arcing is much more severe than for uniform energy deposition

  20. Application of Deep Learning Architectures for Accurate and Rapid Detection of Internal Mechanical Damage of Blueberry Using Hyperspectral Transmittance Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaodi Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Deep learning has become a widely used powerful tool in many research fields, although not much so yet in agriculture technologies. In this work, two deep convolutional neural networks (CNN, viz. Residual Network (ResNet and its improved version named ResNeXt, are used to detect internal mechanical damage of blueberries using hyperspectral transmittance data. The original structure and size of hypercubes are adapted for the deep CNN training. To ensure that the models are applicable to hypercube, we adjust the number of filters in the convolutional layers. Moreover, a total of 5 traditional machine learning algorithms, viz. Sequential Minimal Optimization (SMO, Linear Regression (LR, Random Forest (RF, Bagging and Multilayer Perceptron (MLP, are performed as the comparison experiments. In terms of model assessment, k-fold cross validation is used to indicate that the model performance does not vary with the different combination of dataset. In real-world application, selling damaged berries will lead to greater interest loss than discarding the sound ones. Thus, precision, recall, and F1-score are also used as the evaluation indicators alongside accuracy to quantify the false positive rate. The first three indicators are seldom used by investigators in the agricultural engineering domain. Furthermore, ROC curves and Precision-Recall curves are plotted to visualize the performance of classifiers. The fine-tuned ResNet/ResNeXt achieve average accuracy and F1-score of 0.8844/0.8784 and 0.8952/0.8905, respectively. Classifiers SMO/ LR/RF/Bagging/MLP obtain average accuracy and F1-score of 0.8082/0.7606/0.7314/0.7113/0.7827 and 0.8268/0.7796/0.7529/0.7339/0.7971, respectively. Two deep learning models achieve better classification performance than the traditional machine learning methods. Classification for each testing sample only takes 5.2 ms and 6.5 ms respectively for ResNet and ResNeXt, indicating that the deep learning framework has great

  1. Application of Deep Learning Architectures for Accurate and Rapid Detection of Internal Mechanical Damage of Blueberry Using Hyperspectral Transmittance Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaodi; Hu, Menghan; Zhai, Guangtao

    2018-04-07

    Deep learning has become a widely used powerful tool in many research fields, although not much so yet in agriculture technologies. In this work, two deep convolutional neural networks (CNN), viz. Residual Network (ResNet) and its improved version named ResNeXt, are used to detect internal mechanical damage of blueberries using hyperspectral transmittance data. The original structure and size of hypercubes are adapted for the deep CNN training. To ensure that the models are applicable to hypercube, we adjust the number of filters in the convolutional layers. Moreover, a total of 5 traditional machine learning algorithms, viz. Sequential Minimal Optimization (SMO), Linear Regression (LR), Random Forest (RF), Bagging and Multilayer Perceptron (MLP), are performed as the comparison experiments. In terms of model assessment, k-fold cross validation is used to indicate that the model performance does not vary with the different combination of dataset. In real-world application, selling damaged berries will lead to greater interest loss than discarding the sound ones. Thus, precision, recall, and F1-score are also used as the evaluation indicators alongside accuracy to quantify the false positive rate. The first three indicators are seldom used by investigators in the agricultural engineering domain. Furthermore, ROC curves and Precision-Recall curves are plotted to visualize the performance of classifiers. The fine-tuned ResNet/ResNeXt achieve average accuracy and F1-score of 0.8844/0.8784 and 0.8952/0.8905, respectively. Classifiers SMO/ LR/RF/Bagging/MLP obtain average accuracy and F1-score of 0.8082/0.7606/0.7314/0.7113/0.7827 and 0.8268/0.7796/0.7529/0.7339/0.7971, respectively. Two deep learning models achieve better classification performance than the traditional machine learning methods. Classification for each testing sample only takes 5.2 ms and 6.5 ms respectively for ResNet and ResNeXt, indicating that the deep learning framework has great potential for

  2. Application of Deep Learning Architectures for Accurate and Rapid Detection of Internal Mechanical Damage of Blueberry Using Hyperspectral Transmittance Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Menghan; Zhai, Guangtao

    2018-01-01

    Deep learning has become a widely used powerful tool in many research fields, although not much so yet in agriculture technologies. In this work, two deep convolutional neural networks (CNN), viz. Residual Network (ResNet) and its improved version named ResNeXt, are used to detect internal mechanical damage of blueberries using hyperspectral transmittance data. The original structure and size of hypercubes are adapted for the deep CNN training. To ensure that the models are applicable to hypercube, we adjust the number of filters in the convolutional layers. Moreover, a total of 5 traditional machine learning algorithms, viz. Sequential Minimal Optimization (SMO), Linear Regression (LR), Random Forest (RF), Bagging and Multilayer Perceptron (MLP), are performed as the comparison experiments. In terms of model assessment, k-fold cross validation is used to indicate that the model performance does not vary with the different combination of dataset. In real-world application, selling damaged berries will lead to greater interest loss than discarding the sound ones. Thus, precision, recall, and F1-score are also used as the evaluation indicators alongside accuracy to quantify the false positive rate. The first three indicators are seldom used by investigators in the agricultural engineering domain. Furthermore, ROC curves and Precision-Recall curves are plotted to visualize the performance of classifiers. The fine-tuned ResNet/ResNeXt achieve average accuracy and F1-score of 0.8844/0.8784 and 0.8952/0.8905, respectively. Classifiers SMO/ LR/RF/Bagging/MLP obtain average accuracy and F1-score of 0.8082/0.7606/0.7314/0.7113/0.7827 and 0.8268/0.7796/0.7529/0.7339/0.7971, respectively. Two deep learning models achieve better classification performance than the traditional machine learning methods. Classification for each testing sample only takes 5.2 ms and 6.5 ms respectively for ResNet and ResNeXt, indicating that the deep learning framework has great potential for

  3. Iron-Induced Damage in Cardiomyopathy: Oxidative-Dependent and Independent Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Gammella

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The high incidence of cardiomyopathy in patients with hemosiderosis, particularly in transfusional iron overload, strongly indicates that iron accumulation in the heart plays a major role in the process leading to heart failure. In this context, iron-mediated generation of noxious reactive oxygen species is believed to be the most important pathogenetic mechanism determining cardiomyocyte damage, the initiating event of a pathologic progression involving apoptosis, fibrosis, and ultimately cardiac dysfunction. However, recent findings suggest that additional mechanisms involving subcellular organelles and inflammatory mediators are important factors in the development of this disease. Moreover, excess iron can amplify the cardiotoxic effect of other agents or events. Finally, subcellular misdistribution of iron within cardiomyocytes may represent an additional pathway leading to cardiac injury. Recent advances in imaging techniques and chelators development remarkably improved cardiac iron overload detection and treatment, respectively. However, increased understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of iron overload cardiomyopathy is needed to pave the way for the development of improved therapeutic strategies.

  4. Rupture Complexity Promoted by Damaged Fault Zones in Earthquake Cycle Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idini, B.; Ampuero, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    Pulse-like ruptures tend to be more sensitive to stress heterogeneity than crack-like ones. For instance, a stress-barrier can more easily stop the propagation of a pulse than that of a crack. While crack-like ruptures tend to homogenize the stress field within their rupture area, pulse-like ruptures develop heterogeneous stress fields. This feature of pulse-like ruptures can potentially lead to complex seismicity with a wide range of magnitudes akin to the Gutenberg-Richter law. Previous models required a friction law with severe velocity-weakening to develop pulses and complex seismicity. Recent dynamic rupture simulations show that the presence of a damaged zone around a fault can induce pulse-like rupture, even under a simple slip-weakening friction law, although the mechanism depends strongly on initial stress conditions. Here we aim at testing if fault zone damage is a sufficient ingredient to generate complex seismicity. In particular, we investigate the effects of damaged fault zones on the emergence and sustainability of pulse-like ruptures throughout multiple earthquake cycles, regardless of initial conditions. We consider a fault bisecting a homogeneous low-rigidity layer (the damaged zone) embedded in an intact medium. We conduct a series of earthquake cycle simulations to investigate the effects of two fault zone properties: damage level D and thickness H. The simulations are based on classical rate-and-state friction, the quasi-dynamic approximation and the software QDYN (https://github.com/ydluo/qdyn). Selected fully-dynamic simulations are also performed with a spectral element method. Our numerical results show the development of complex rupture patterns in some damaged fault configurations, including events of different sizes, as well as pulse-like, multi-pulse and hybrid pulse-crack ruptures. We further apply elasto-static theory to assess how D and H affect ruptures with constant stress drop, in particular the flatness of their slip profile

  5. Clusters of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation: Formation of short DNA fragments. I. Theoretical modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holley, W.R.; Chatterjee, A.

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a general theoretical model for the interaction of ionizing radiation with chromatin. Chromatin is modeled as a 30-nm-diameter solenoidal fiber composed of 20 turns of nucleosomes, 6 nucleosomes per turn. Charged-particle tracks are modeled by partitioning the energy deposition between primary track core, resulting from glancing collisions with 100 eV or less per event, and δ rays due to knock-on collisions involving energy transfers > 100 eV. A Monte Carlo simulation incorporates damages due to the following molecular mechanisms: (1) ionization of water molecules leading to the formation of circ OH, circ H, e aq , etc.; circ OH attack on sugar molecules leading to strand breaks; circ OH attack on bases; direct ionization of the sugar molecules leading to strand breaks; direct ionization of the bases. Our calculations predict significant clustering of damage both locally, over regions up to 40 hp and over regions extending to several kilobase pairs. A characteristic feature of the regional damage predicted by our model is the production of short fragments of DNA associated with multiple nearby strand breaks. Such fragments have subsequently been detected experimentally and are reported in an accompanying paper after exposure to both high- and low-LET radiation. The overall measured yields agree well quantitatively with the theoretical predictions. Our theoretical results predict the existence of a strong peak at about 85 bp, which represents the revolution period about the nucleosome. Other peaks at multiples of about 1,000 bp correspond to the periodicity of the particular solenoid model of chromatin used in these calculations. Theoretical results in combination with experimental data on fragmentation spectra may help determine the consensus or average structure of the chromatin fibers in mammalian DNA. 27 refs., 7 figs

  6. A Bayesian Decision Model for Battle Damage Assessment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Franzen, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    Battle damage assessment (BDA) is critical to success in any air campaign. However, Desert Storm highlighted numerous deficiencies in the BDA process, and operations since Desert Storm continue to point out weaknesses...

  7. Why does brain damage impair memory? A connectionist model of object recognition memory in perirhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowell, Rosemary A; Bussey, Timothy J; Saksida, Lisa M

    2006-11-22

    Object recognition is the canonical test of declarative memory, the type of memory putatively impaired after damage to the temporal lobes. Studies of object recognition memory have helped elucidate the anatomical structures involved in declarative memory, indicating a critical role for perirhinal cortex. We offer a mechanistic account of the effects of perirhinal cortex damage on object recognition memory, based on the assumption that perirhinal cortex stores representations of the conjunctions of visual features possessed by complex objects. Such representations are proposed to play an important role in memory when it is difficult to solve a task using representations of only individual visual features of stimuli, thought to be stored in regions of the ventral visual stream caudal to perirhinal cortex. The account is instantiated in a connectionist model, in which development of object representations with visual experience provides a mechanism for judgment of previous occurrence. We present simulations addressing the following empirical findings: (1) that impairments after damage to perirhinal cortex (modeled by removing the "perirhinal cortex" layer of the network) are exacerbated by lengthening the delay between presentation of to-be-remembered items and test, (2) that such impairments are also exacerbated by lengthening the list of to-be-remembered items, and (3) that impairments are revealed only when stimuli are trial unique rather than repeatedly presented. This study shows that it may be possible to account for object recognition impairments after damage to perirhinal cortex within a hierarchical, representational framework, in which complex conjunctive representations in perirhinal cortex play a critical role.

  8. Protection from Muscle Damage in the Absence of Changes in Muscle Mechanical Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Ben W; Cresswell, Andrew G; Carroll, Timothy J; Lichtwark, Glen A

    2016-08-01

    The repeated bout effect characterizes the protective adaptation after a single bout of unaccustomed eccentric exercise that induces muscle damage. Sarcomerogenesis and increased tendon compliance have been suggested as potential mechanisms for the repeated bout effect by preventing muscle fascicles from being stretched onto the descending limb of the length-tension curve (the region where sarcomere damage is thought to occur). In this study, evidence was sought for three possible mechanical changes that would support either the sarcomerogenesis or the increased tendon compliance hypotheses: a sustained rightward shift in the fascicle length-tension relationship, reduced fascicle strain amplitude, and reduced starting fascicle length. Subjects (n = 10) walked backward downhill (5 km·h, 20% incline) on a treadmill for 30 min on two occasions separated by 7 d. Kinematic data and medial gastrocnemius fascicle lengths (ultrasonography) were recorded at 10-min intervals to compare fascicle strains between bouts. Fascicle length-torque curves from supramaximal tibial nerve stimulation were constructed before, 2 h after, and 2 d after each exercise bout. Maximum torque decrement and elevated muscle soreness were present after the first, but not the second, backward downhill walking bout signifying a protective repeated bout effect. There was no sustained rightward shift in the length-torque relationship between exercise bouts, nor decreases in fascicle strain amplitude or shortening of the starting fascicle length. Protection from a repeated bout of eccentric exercise was conferred without changes in muscle fascicle strain behavior, indicating that sarcomerogenesis and increased tendon compliance were unlikely to be responsible. As fascicle strains are relatively small in humans, we suggest that changes to connective tissue structures, such as extracellular matrix remodeling, are better able to explain the repeated bout effect observed here.

  9. Biomechanics Analysis of Pressure Ulcer Using Damaged Interface Model between Bone and Muscle in the Human Buttock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slamet, Samuel Susanto; Takano, Naoki; Tanabe, Yoshiyuki; Hatano, Asako; Nagasao, Tomohisa

    This paper aims at building up a computational procedure to study the bio-mechanism of pressure ulcer using the finite element method. Pressure ulcer is a disease that occurs in the human body after 2 hours of continuous external force. In the very early stage of pressure ulcer, it is found that the tissues inside the body are damaged, even though skin surface looks normal. This study assumes that tension and/or shear strain will cause damage to loose fibril tissue between the bone and muscle and that propagation of damaged area will lead to fatal stage. Analysis was performed using the finite element method by modeling the damaged fibril tissue as a cutout. By varying the loading directions and watching both tensile and shear strains, the risk of fibril tissue damage and propagation of the damaged area is discussed, which may give new insight for the careful nursing for patients, particularly after surgical treatment. It was found that the pressure ulcer could reoccur for a surgical flap treatment. The bone cut and surgical flap surgery is not perfect to prevent the bone-muscle interfacial damage.

  10. Blasting Damage Predictions by Numerical Modeling in Siahbishe Pumped Storage Powerhouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslami, Majid; Goshtasbi, Kamran

    2018-04-01

    One of the popular methods of underground and surface excavations is the use of blasting. Throughout this method of excavation, the loading resulted from blasting can be affected by different geo-mechanical and structural parameters of rock mass. Several factors affect turbulence in underground structures some of which are explosion, vibration, and stress impulses caused by the neighbouring blasting products. In investigating the blasting mechanism one should address the processes which expand with time and cause seismic events. To protect the adjoining structures against any probable deconstruction or damage, it is very important to model the blasting process prior to any actual operation. Efforts have been taken in the present study to demonstrate the potentiality of numerical methods in predicting the specified parameters in order to prevent any probable destruction. For this purpose the blasting process was modeled, according to its natural implementation, in one of the tunnels of Siahbishe dam by the 3DEC and AUTODYN 3D codes. 3DEC was used for modeling the blasting environment as well as the blast holes and AUTODYN 3D for modeling the explosion process in the blast hole. In this process the output of AUTODYN 3D, which is a result of modeling the blast hole and is in the form of stress waves, is entered into 3DEC. For analyzing the amount of destruction made by the blasting operation, the key parameter of Peak Particle Velocity was used. In the end, the numerical modeling results have been compared with the data recorded by the seismographs planted through the tunnel. As the results indicated 3DEC and AUTODYN 3D proved appropriate for analyzing such an issue. Therefore, by means of these two softwares one can analyze explosion processes prior to their implementation and make close estimation of the damage resulting from these processes.

  11. Multi scale analysis by acoustic emission of damage mechanisms in natural fibre woven fabrics/epoxy composites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Touchard F.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes to develop an experimental program to characterize the type and the development of damage in composite with complex microstructure. A multi-scale analysis by acoustic emission has been developed and applied to hemp fibre woven fabrics/epoxy composite. The experimental program consists of tensile tests performed on single yarn, neat epoxy resin and composite materials to identify their AE amplitude signatures. A statistical analysis of AE amplitude signals has been realised and correlated with microscopic observations. Results have enabled to identify three types of damage in composites and their associated AE amplitudes: matrix cracking, interfacial debonding and reinforcement damage and fracture. Tracking of these damage mechanisms in hemp/epoxy composites has been performed to show the process of damage development in natural fibre reinforced composites.

  12. Contribution to the modeling of the anisotropic damage and the variation of the permeability of the brittle rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, J.

    2006-03-01

    This work deals with a modeling of the mechanical and hydro-mechanical behaviour of saturated rocks taking into account the variation of the permeability with damage. At first is established a function of the free enthalpy by a direct micro-mechanical approach in taking into account the distribution of the microcrack length. The opening of the closed microcracks due to the tangential gliding is taken into account because of the roughness of the cracks surfaces. This opening contributes directly to the volume expansion and to the variation of the macroscopic permeability of the material. A phenomenological approach with an approximation by a damage tensor of two order is shown too. Then, an extension of the model is proposed for describing the poro-mechanical behaviour of saturated rocks. The poro-mechanical answers in drained and undrained conditions of the Vosges sandstone have been studied. In the last part, a coupled model describing the behaviour of the coupling between the induced damage and the variation of the rocks permeability is proposed. (O.M.)

  13. Fundamental Processes of Coupled Radiation Damage and Mechanical Behavior in Nuclear Fuel Materials for High Temperature Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillpot, Simon; Tulenko, James

    2011-09-08

    The objective of this work has been to elucidate the relationship among microstructure, radiation damage and mechanical properties for nuclear fuel materials. As representative nuclear materials, we have taken an hcp metal (Mg as a generic metal, and Ti alloys for fast reactors) and UO2 (representing fuel). The degradation of the thermo-mechanical behavior of nuclear fuels under irradiation, both the fissionable material itself and its cladding, is a longstanding issue of critical importance to the nuclear industry. There are experimental indications that nanocrystalline metals and ceramics may be more resistant to radiation damage than their coarse-grained counterparts. The objective of this project look at the effect of microstructure on radiation damage and mechanical behavior in these materials. The approach to be taken was state-of-the-art, large-scale atomic-level simulation. This systematic simulation program of the effects of irradiation on the structure and mechanical properties of polycrystalline Ti and UO2 identified radiation damage mechanisms. Moreover, it will provided important insights into behavior that can be expected in nanocrystalline microstructures and, by extension, nanocomposites. The fundamental insights from this work can be expected to help in the design microstructures that are less susceptible to radiation damage and thermomechanical degradation.

  14. Fundamental Processes of Coupled Radiation Damage and Mechanical Behavior in Nuclear Fuel Materials for High Temperature Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillpot, Simon; Tulenko, James

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work has been to elucidate the relationship among microstructure, radiation damage and mechanical properties for nuclear fuel materials. As representative nuclear materials, we have taken an hcp metal (Mg as a generic metal, and Ti alloys for fast reactors) and UO2 (representing fuel). The degradation of the thermo-mechanical behavior of nuclear fuels under irradiation, both the fissionable material itself and its cladding, is a longstanding issue of critical importance to the nuclear industry. There are experimental indications that nanocrystalline metals and ceramics may be more resistant to radiation damage than their coarse-grained counterparts. The objective of this project look at the effect of microstructure on radiation damage and mechanical behavior in these materials. The approach to be taken was state-of-the-art, large-scale atomic-level simulation. This systematic simulation program of the effects of irradiation on the structure and mechanical properties of polycrystalline Ti and UO2 identified radiation damage mechanisms. Moreover, it will provided important insights into behavior that can be expected in nanocrystalline microstructures and, by extension, nanocomposites. The fundamental insights from this work can be expected to help in the design microstructures that are less susceptible to radiation damage and thermomechanical degradation.

  15. Rock mechanics models evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-08-01

    This report documents the evaluation of the thermal and thermomechanical models and codes for repository subsurface design and for design constraint analysis. The evaluation was based on a survey of the thermal and thermomechanical codes and models that are applicable to subsurface design, followed by a Kepner-Tregoe (KT) structured decision analysis of the codes and models. The primary recommendations of the analysis are that the DOT code be used for two-dimensional thermal analysis and that the STEALTH and HEATING 5/6 codes be used for three-dimensional and complicated two-dimensional thermal analysis. STEALTH and SPECTROM 32 are recommended for thermomechanical analyses. The other evaluated codes should be considered for use in certain applications. A separate review of salt creep models indicate that the commonly used exponential time law model is appropriate for use in repository design studies. 38 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs

  16. Effect of histidine on sorafenib-induced vascular damage: Analysis using novel medaka fish model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinagawa-Kobayashi, Yoko; Kamimura, Kenya; Goto, Ryo; Ogawa, Kohei; Inoue, Ryosuke; Yokoo, Takeshi; Sakai, Norihiro; Nagoya, Takuro; Sakamaki, Akira; Abe, Satoshi; Sugitani, Soichi; Yanagi, Masahiko; Fujisawa, Koichi; Nozawa, Yoshizu; Koyama, Naoto; Nishina, Hiroshi; Furutani-Seiki, Makoto; Sakaida, Isao; Terai, Shuji

    2018-02-05

    Sorafenib (SFN) is an anti-angiogenic chemotherapeutic that prolongs survival of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC); its side effects, including vascular damages such as hand-foot syndrome (HFS), are a major cause of therapy discontinuation. We previously reported that maintenance of peripheral blood flow by intake of dried bonito broth (DBB) significantly prevented HFS and prolonged the administration period. The amino acids contained in DBB probably contribute to its effects, but the mechanism has not been clarified. We hypothesized that histidine, the largest component among the amino acids contained in DBB, has effects on SFN-induced vascular damage, and evaluated this possibility using a novel medaka fish model. The fli::GFP transgenic medaka fish model has a fluorescently visible systemic vasculature. We fed the fish with SFN with and without histidine to compare blood flow and vascular structure among the differently fed models. The vascular cross-sectional area of each fish was measured to determine vascular diameter changes. Our results demonstrated that SFN-fed medaka developed a narrower vascular diameter. In addition, this narrowing was counteracted by addition of histidine to the medaka diet. We observed no positive effect of histidine on regeneration of cut vessels or on cell growth of endothelial cells and HCC cell lines. We proved the efficacy of the medaka model to assess vascular changes after administration of specific chemicals. And our results suggest that SFN causes vascular damage by narrowing peripheral vessel diameter, and that histidine effectively counteracts these changes to maintain blood flow. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparative Study of Fatigue Damage Models Using Different Number of Classes Combined with the Rainflow Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zengah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue damage increases with applied load cycles in a cumulative manner. Fatigue damage models play a key role in life prediction of components and structures subjected to random loading. The aim of this paper is the examination of the performance of the “Damaged Stress Model”, proposed and validated, against other fatigue models under random loading before and after reconstruction of the load histories. To achieve this objective, some linear and nonlinear models proposed for fatigue life estimation and a batch of specimens made of 6082T6 aluminum alloy is subjected to random loading. The damage was cumulated by Miner’s rule, Damaged Stress Model (DSM, Henry model and Unified Theory (UT and random cycles were counted with a rain-flow algorithm. Experimental data on high-cycle fatigue by complex loading histories with different mean and amplitude stress values are analyzed for life calculation and model predictions are compared.

  18. Characterization of mechanical damage mechanisms in ceramic composite materials. Technical report, 23 May 1987-24 May 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lankford, J.

    1988-09-01

    High-strain-rate compressive failure mechanisms in fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite materials were characterized. These are contrasted with composite damage development at low-strain rates, and with the dynamic failure of monolithic ceramics. It is shown that it is possible to derive major strain-rate strengthening benefits if a major fraction of the fiber reinforcement is aligned with the load axis. This effect considerably exceeds the inertial microfracture strengthening observed in monolithic ceramics, and non-aligned composites. Its basis is shown to be the trans-specimen propagation time period for heterogeneously-nucleated, high-strain kink bands. A brief study on zirconia focused on the remarkable inverse strength-strain rate result previously observed for both fully and partially-stabilized zirconia single crystals, whereby the strength decreased with increasing strain rate. Based on the hypothesis that the suppression of microplastic flow, hence, local stress relaxation, might be responsible for this behavior, fully stabilized (i.e., non-transformable) specimens were strain-gaged and subjected to compressive microstrain. The rather stunning observation was that the crystals are highly microplastic, exhibiting plastic yield on loading and anelasticity and reverse plasticity upon unloading. These results clearly support the hypothesis that with increasing strain rate, microcracking is favored at the expense of microplasticity.

  19. Bayesian nonlinear structural FE model and seismic input identification for damage assessment of civil structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astroza, Rodrigo; Ebrahimian, Hamed; Li, Yong; Conte, Joel P.

    2017-09-01

    A methodology is proposed to update mechanics-based nonlinear finite element (FE) models of civil structures subjected to unknown input excitation. The approach allows to jointly estimate unknown time-invariant model parameters of a nonlinear FE model of the structure and the unknown time histories of input excitations using spatially-sparse output response measurements recorded during an earthquake event. The unscented Kalman filter, which circumvents the computation of FE response sensitivities with respect to the unknown model parameters and unknown input excitations by using a deterministic sampling approach, is employed as the estimation tool. The use of measurement data obtained from arrays of heterogeneous sensors, including accelerometers, displacement sensors, and strain gauges is investigated. Based on the estimated FE model parameters and input excitations, the updated nonlinear FE model can be interrogated to detect, localize, classify, and assess damage in the structure. Numerically simulated response data of a three-dimensional 4-story 2-by-1 bay steel frame structure with six unknown model parameters subjected to unknown bi-directional horizontal seismic excitation, and a three-dimensional 5-story 2-by-1 bay reinforced concrete frame structure with nine unknown model parameters subjected to unknown bi-directional horizontal seismic excitation are used to illustrate and validate the proposed methodology. The results of the validation studies show the excellent performance and robustness of the proposed algorithm to jointly estimate unknown FE model parameters and unknown input excitations.

  20. Influence of microstructure of different stainless steels on their low cycle fatigue damage mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baffie, Natacha

    2002-01-01

    The present study is focused on understanding low cycle fatigue damage mechanisms in three different kind of stainless steels. In all structures, crack propagation is conditioned by microstructural barriers. In single phase austenitic alloys, short cracks initiation and growth are crystallographic. Cracks are arrested by grain and twin boundaries both at surface and in the bulk. Grain size refinement improve the fatigue life at applied Δε p . The second barrier in the bulk is shown to be very efficient because of the important number of misoriented grains. In the metastable austenitic alloy, the martensitic transformation induced by cyclic straining leads to significant modifications of damage mechanisms. The fatigue behaviour has been investigated between -50 deg. C and 120 deg. C. The γ→α' transformation takes place at the surface, in the bulk (except at 120 deg. C) and locally at the crack tip. At all temperatures, the amount of martensite formed and the fatigue life increase as the grain size decreases, even if at the same Δε p , the maximal stresses are considerably higher than in a stable γ. Short cracks growth takes place in transformed regions, γ→α' transformation being assisted by strain concentrations at the crack tip. This mechanism consumes a part of plastic deformation, which would have been available for crack propagation. Such a dynamic barrier can decrease crack propagation rate. The austenite grain size is shown to have a decisive influence both on the amount of martensite formed and on the fatigue resistance through the effect of γ grain boundaries as indirect barriers to the crack propagation. The fatigue life of the 475 deg. C aged α/γ alloy decreases sharply at high applied Δε p compared to the solution annealed one. This behaviour is explained by the modification of short cracks nucleation sites. Indeed, cleavage occurs in the hard and brittle α phase, even if plastic deformation is concentrated in γ phase. Then, easy

  1. Genipin crosslinker releasing sutures for improving the mechanical/repair strength of damaged connective tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararaj, Sharath; Slusarewicz, Paul; Brown, Matt; Hedman, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    The most common mode of surgical repair of ruptured tendons and ligaments involves the use of sutures for reattachment. However, there is a high incidence of rerupture and repair failure due to pulling out of the suture material from the damaged connective tissue. The main goal of this research was to achieve a localized delivery of crosslinking agent genipin (GP) from rapid-release biodegradable coatings on sutures, for strengthening the repair of ruptured connective tissue. Our hypothesis is that GP released from the suture coating will lead to exogenous crosslinking of native connective tissue resulting in beneficial effects on clinically relevant mechanical parameters such as tear resistance, tissue strength, and energy required to rupture the tissue (toughness). Sutures were successfully coated with a biodegradable polymer layer loaded with the crosslinking agent genipin, without compromising the mechanical properties of the suture. The rapid-release of genipin was achieved under both in vitro and ex vivo conditions. Exogenous crosslinking using these genipin releasing sutures was demonstrated using equine tendons. The tendons treated with genipin releasing sutures showed significant improvement in failure load, energy required for pull-out failure, and stiffness. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 2199-2205, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, August 1, 1975--July 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1976-01-01

    In this project we have proposed a mechanism for radiation damage to DNA and detailed a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectrometry to test the proposed mechanisms. In this past year several investigations have been completed or are nearing completion. These investigations are an ESR study of the N 1 -substituted thymine π-cation radicals; studies of electron reactions with amino acid anhydrides; and ESR and pulse radiolytic studies of electron transfer in dinucleoside phosphate anions. Studies which we have made significant progress on in this past year are positive ion radicals of the dinucleoside phosphates, and reactions of the π-cations of thymine derivatives. In the first study the spin density distribution in the cation radicals of thymidine and thymidine-5 1 -monophosphate have been elucidated. Couplings are found to the ribose group in these radicals. It is believed that these results will aid the identification of cation radicals in DNA. In study 2, the results indicate that these cyclic anhydrides can undergo reductive deamination. In study 3, the results show the order of electron affinities of the DNA bases to be thymine approximately equal to cytosine greater than adenine approximately equal to guanine

  3. Mechanisms for radiation damage in DNA. Progress report, November 1, 1978-October 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevilla, M.D.

    1979-07-01

    Several mechanisms for radiation damage to DNA constituents and DNA are proposed, and a series of experiments utilizing electron spin resonance spectrometry to test the proposed mechanisms are detailed. In the past we have concentrated chiefly on the direct affect of radiation on DNA. We are currently investigating systems of DNA constituents and peptides which may shed light on indirect effects. Studies which have been completed during the past year include: (1) studies of γ-irradiated N-acetyl amino acids and peptide solutions at 77 0 K; and (2) studies of barriers to hindered rotation in peptide radicals. Studies in which progress has been made in this past year include: (1) π cations produced in DNA bases by hydroxyl radical attack; and (2) studies of spin transfer in γ-Irradiated nucleoside-peptide solutions. These studies have shown that: (1) frozen aqueous solutions provide a suitable matrix for γ irradiation studies; (2) γ-irradiated peptides in frozen aqueous solutions follow chemistry expected from previous studies; and (3) π cations of DNA base can be produced by hydroxyl radical attack

  4. Microdosimetric constraints on specific adaptation mechanisms to reduce DNA damage caused by ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkart, W.; Heusser, P.; Vijayalaxmi

    1990-01-01

    The protective effect of pre-exposure of lymphocytes to ionising radiation indicates the presence of 'adaptive repair' in mammalian cells. Microdosimetric considerations, however, raise some doubts on the advantage of such a cellular mechanism for specifically reducing the radiation damage caused by environmental exposures. Contrary to most chemicals which endanger the integrity of the mammalian genome, the local dose and dose rate from ionising radiation at the cellular level remain quite high, even at lowest exposures. A single electron or alpha particle passing through a cell nucleus already yields nuclear doses of up to about 3 mGy and 400 mGy, respectively. Macroscopic doses below these nuclear doses from a single event will only reduce the fraction of cell nuclei encountering the passage of a particle but not the dose or dose rate in the affected volume. At environmental doses in the range of 1 to 5 mGy per annum, the time between two consecutive hits in a specific cell nucleus is in the range of months to years. Very low concentrations of bleomycin, a drug with high affinity to DNA, also triggers an adaptive response. This points to a more general stress response mechanism which may benefit the cell even at environmental levels of radioactivity, e.g. by protecting the integrity of DNA from attacks by chemicals, by endogenous radicals, by acids from anoxia, etc. (author)

  5. Revisiting the Molecular Mechanism of Neurological Manifestations in Antiphospholipid Syndrome: Beyond Vascular Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carecchio, M.; Cantello, R.; Comi, C.

    2014-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a multiorgan disease often affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Typically, neurological manifestations of APS include thrombosis of cerebral vessels leading to stroke and requiring prompt initiation of treatment with antiplatelet drugs or anticoagulant therapy. In these cases, alterations of the coagulation system at various levels caused by multiple effects of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) have been postulated to explain the vascular damage to the CNS in APS. However, several nonvascular neurological manifestations of APS have progressively emerged over the past years. Nonthrombotic, immune-mediated mechanisms altering physiological basal ganglia function have been recently suggested to play a central role in the pathogenesis of these manifestations that include, among others, movement disorders such as chorea and behavioral and cognitive alterations. Similar clinical manifestations have been described in other autoimmune CNS diseases such as anti-NMDAR and anti-VGCK encephalitis, suggesting that the spectrum of immune-mediated basal ganglia disorders is expanding, possibly sharing some pathophysiological mechanisms. In this review, we will focus on thrombotic and nonthrombotic neurological manifestations of APS with particular attention to immune-mediated actions of aPL on the vascular system and the basal ganglia. PMID:24741580

  6. Mechanical problem-solving strategies in left-brain damaged patients and apraxia of tool use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiurak, François; Jarry, Christophe; Lesourd, Mathieu; Baumard, Josselin; Le Gall, Didier

    2013-08-01

    Left brain damage (LBD) can impair the ability to use familiar tools (apraxia of tool use) as well as novel tools to solve mechanical problems. Thus far, the emphasis has been placed on quantitative analyses of patients' performance. Nevertheless, the question still to be answered is, what are the strategies employed by those patients when confronted with tool use situations? To answer it, we asked 16 LBD patients and 43 healthy controls to solve mechanical problems by means of several potential tools. To specify the strategies, we recorded the time spent in performing four kinds of action (no manipulation, tool manipulation, box manipulation, and tool-box manipulation) as well as the number of relevant and irrelevant tools grasped. We compared LBD patients' performance with that of controls who encountered difficulties with the task (controls-) or not (controls+). Our results indicated that LBD patients grasped a higher number of irrelevant tools than controls+ and controls-. Concerning time allocation, controls+ and controls- spent significantly more time in performing tool-box manipulation than LBD patients. These results are inconsistent with the possibility that LBD patients could engage in trial-and-error strategies and, rather, suggest that they tend to be perplexed. These findings seem to indicate that the inability to reason about the objects' physical properties might prevent LBD patients from following any problem-solving strategy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Mechanisms of DNA damage repair in adult stem cells and implications for cancer formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeden, Clare E; Asselin-Labat, Marie-Liesse

    2018-01-01

    Maintenance of genomic integrity in tissue-specific stem cells is critical for tissue homeostasis and the prevention of deleterious diseases such as cancer. Stem cells are subject to DNA damage induced by endogenous replication mishaps or exposure to exogenous agents. The type of DNA lesion and the cell cycle stage will invoke different DNA repair mechanisms depending on the intrinsic DNA repair machinery of a cell. Inappropriate DNA repair in stem cells can lead to cell death, or to the formation and accumulation of genetic alterations that can be transmitted to daughter cells and so is linked to cancer formation. DNA mutational signatures that are associated with DNA repair deficiencies or exposure to carcinogenic agents have been described in cancer. Here we review the most recent findings on DNA repair pathways activated in epithelial tissue stem and progenitor cells and their implications for cancer mutational signatures. We discuss how deep knowledge of early molecular events leading to carcinogenesis provides insights into DNA repair mechanisms operating in tumours and how these could be exploited therapeutically. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Skin mechanical properties and modeling: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joodaki, Hamed; Panzer, Matthew B

    2018-04-01

    The mechanical properties of the skin are important for various applications. Numerous tests have been conducted to characterize the mechanical behavior of this tissue, and this article presents a review on different experimental methods used. A discussion on the general mechanical behavior of the skin, including nonlinearity, viscoelasticity, anisotropy, loading history dependency, failure properties, and aging effects, is presented. Finally, commonly used constitutive models for simulating the mechanical response of skin are discussed in the context of representing the empirically observed behavior.

  9. Basic Modelling principles and Validation of Software for Prediction of Collision Damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup

    2000-01-01

    This report describes basic modelling principles, the theoretical background and validation examples for the collision damage prediction module in the ISESO stand-alone software.......This report describes basic modelling principles, the theoretical background and validation examples for the collision damage prediction module in the ISESO stand-alone software....

  10. Characterization of Retinal Vascular and Neural Damage in a Novel Model of Diabetic Retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasekera, Lakshini Y; Balmer, Lois A; Ram, Ramesh; Morahan, Grant

    2015-06-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a major cause of blindness globally. Investigating the underlying mechanisms of DR would be aided by a suitable mouse model that developed key features seen in the human disease, and did so without carrying genetic modifications. This study was undertaken to produce such a model. Our panel of Collaborative Cross strains was screened for DR-like features after induction of diabetes by intravenous injection with alloxan or streptozotocin. Both flat-mounted whole-retina and histologic sections were studied for the presence of retinal lesions. Progression of DR was also studied by histologic examination of the retinal vascular and neural structure at various time points after diabetes onset. In addition, microarray investigations were conducted on retinas from control and diabetic mice. Features of DR such as degenerated pericytes, acellular capillaries, minor vascular proliferation, gliosis of Müller cells, and loss of ganglion cells were noted as early as day 7 in some mice. These lesions became more evident with time. After 21 days of diabetes, severe vascular proliferation, microaneurysms, preretinal damage, increased Müller cell gliosis, and damage to the outer retina were all obvious. Microarray studies found significant differential expression of multiple genes known to be involved in DR. The FOT_FB strain provides a useful model to investigate the pathogenesis of DR and to develop treatments for this vision-threatening disease.

  11. Arctigenin Treatment Protects against Brain Damage through an Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Apoptotic Mechanism after Needle Insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jie; Li, Na; Xia, Yang; Gao, Zhong; Zou, Sa-feng; Kong, Liang; Yao, Ying-Jia; Jiao, Ya-Nan; Yan, Yu-Hui; Li, Shao-Heng; Tao, Zhen-Yu; Lian, Guan; Yang, Jing-Xian; Kang, Ting-Guo

    2016-01-01

    Convection enhanced delivery (CED) infuses drugs directly into brain tissue. Needle insertion is required and results in a stab wound injury (SWI). Subsequent secondary injury involves the release of inflammatory and apoptotic cytokines, which have dramatic consequences on the integrity of damaged tissue, leading to the evolution of a pericontusional-damaged area minutes to days after in the initial injury. The present study investigated the capacity for arctigenin (ARC) to prevent secondary brain injury and the determination of the underlying mechanism of action in a mouse model of SWI that mimics the process of CED. After CED, mice received a gavage of ARC from 30 min to 14 days. Neurological severity scores (NSS) and wound closure degree were assessed after the injury. Histological analysis and immunocytochemistry were used to evaluated the extent of brain damage and neuroinflammation. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) was used to detect universal apoptosis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) was used to test the inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-10) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) content. Gene levels of inflammation (TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-10) and apoptosis (Caspase-3, Bax and Bcl-2) were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Using these, we analyzed ARC’s efficacy and mechanism of action. Results: ARC treatment improved neurological function by reducing brain water content and hematoma and accelerating wound closure relative to untreated mice. ARC treatment reduced the levels of TNF-α and IL-6 and the number of allograft inflammatory factor (IBA)- and myeloperoxidase (MPO)-positive cells and increased the levels of IL-10. ARC-treated mice had fewer TUNEL+ apoptotic neurons and activated caspase-3-positive neurons surrounding the lesion than controls, indicating increased neuronal survival. Conclusions: ARC treatment confers

  12. Comparison of Two Models for Damage Accumulation in Simulations of System Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngblood, R. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, D. [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-11-01

    A comprehensive simulation study of system performance needs to address variations in component behavior, variations in phenomenology, and the coupling between phenomenology and component failure. This paper discusses two models of this: 1. damage accumulation is modeled as a random walk process in each time history, with component failure occurring when damage accumulation reaches a specified threshold; or 2. damage accumulation is modeled mechanistically within each time history, but failure occurs when damage reaches a time-history-specific threshold, sampled at time zero from each component’s distribution of damage tolerance. A limiting case of the latter is classical discrete-event simulation, with component failure times sampled a priori from failure time distributions; but in such models, the failure times are not typically adjusted for operating conditions varying within a time history. Nowadays, as discussed below, it is practical to account for this. The paper compares the interpretations and computational aspects of the two models mentioned above.

  13. Statistical damage constitutive model for rocks subjected to cyclic stress and cyclic temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shu-Wei; Xia, Cai-Chu; Zhao, Hai-Bin; Mei, Song-Hua; Zhou, Yu

    2017-10-01

    A constitutive model of rocks subjected to cyclic stress-temperature was proposed. Based on statistical damage theory, the damage constitutive model with Weibull distribution was extended. Influence of model parameters on the stress-strain curve for rock reloading after stress-temperature cycling was then discussed. The proposed model was initially validated by rock tests for cyclic stress-temperature and only cyclic stress. Finally, the total damage evolution induced by stress-temperature cycling and reloading after cycling was explored and discussed. The proposed constitutive model is reasonable and applicable, describing well the stress-strain relationship during stress-temperature cycles and providing a good fit to the test results. Elastic modulus in the reference state and the damage induced by cycling affect the shape of reloading stress-strain curve. Total damage induced by cycling and reloading after cycling exhibits three stages: initial slow increase, mid-term accelerated increase, and final slow increase.

  14. Comparison of the external physical damages between laser-assisted and mechanical immobilized human sperm using scanning electronic microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Y L Chan

    Full Text Available We aim to visualize the external physical damages and distinct external phenotypic effects between mechanical and laser-assisted immobilized human spermatozoa using scanning electronic microscopy (SEM. Human spermatozoa were immobilized mechanically or with laser assistance for SEM examination and the membrane integrities were checked on both types of immobilized spermatozoa. We found evidence of external damages at SEM level on mechanically kinked sperm, but not on laser-assisted immobilized sperm. Although no external damage was found on laser-assist immobilized sperm, there were two distinct types of morphological changes when spermatozoa were stricken by infra-red laser. Coiled tails were immediately formed when Laser pulse was applied to the sperm end piece area, whereas laser applied to the sperm principal piece area resulted in a sharp bend of sperm tails. Sperm immobilized by laser did not exhibit any morphological change if the laser did not hit within the on-screen central target zone or if the laser hit the sperm mid piece or head. Our modified membrane integrity assay revealed that the external membrane of more than half of the laser-assisted immobilized sperm remained intact. In conclusion, mechanical immobilization produced membrane damages whilst laser-assisted immobilization did not result in any external membrane damages besides morphological changes at SEM level.

  15. Modification of Concrete Damaged Plasticity model. Part II: Formulation and numerical tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamińska Inez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A refined model for elastoplastic damaged material is formulated based on the plastic potential introduced in Part I [1]. Considered model is an extension of Concrete Damaged Plasticity material implemented in Abaqus [2]. In the paper the stiffness tensor for elastoplastic damaged behaviour is derived. In order to validate the model, computations for the uniaxial tests are performed. Response of the model for various cases of parameter’s choice is shown and compared to the response of the CDP model.

  16. Multiscale modelling of DNA mechanics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dršata, Tomáš; Lankaš, Filip

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 32 (2015), 323102/1-323102/12 ISSN 0953-8984 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-21893S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : DNA elasticity * DNA coarse-grained models * molecular dynamics simulations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.209, year: 2015

  17. A new characterization approach for studying relationships between microstructure and creep damage mechanisms of uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iltis, X., E-mail: xaviere.iltis@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DEC, Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Ben Saada, M. [CEA, DEN, DEC, Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Laboratoire d' Etudes des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), CNRS UMR 7239, Université de Lorraine, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz Cedex 1 (France); Mansour, H.; Gey, N.; Hazotte, A.; Maloufi, N. [Laboratoire d' Etudes des Microstructures et de Mécanique des Matériaux (LEM3), CNRS UMR 7239, Université de Lorraine, Ile du Saulcy, 57045 Metz Cedex 1 (France)

    2016-06-15

    Four batches of UO{sub 2} pellets were studied comparatively, before and after creep tests, to evaluate a characterization methodology aimed to determine the links between microstructure and damage mechanisms induced by compressive creep of uranium dioxide at 1500 °C. They were observed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with image analysis, to quantify their fabrication porosity and the occurrence of inter-granular cavities after creep, and electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD), especially to characterize sub-structures development associated with plastic deformation. Electron channeling contrast imaging (ECCI) was also applied to evidence dislocations, at an exploratory stage, on one of the deformed pellets. This approach helped to identify and quantify microstructural differences between batches. Their as-fabricated microstructures differed in terms of grain size and fabrication porosity distribution. The pellets which had the lowest strain rates were those with the largest number of intra-granular pores, regardless of their grain size. They also exhibited less numerous sub-boundaries within the grains. These first results clearly illustrate the benefit of systematic examinations of crept UO{sub 2} pellets at a mesoscopic scale, by SEM and EBSD, to study their deformation process. In addition, ECCI appears as a powerful tool to evidence local dislocations arrangements, in bulk samples. Even if the sampling was limited, the results of this study also tend to indicate that the intra-granular pores population, resulting from the manufacturing of the samples by powder metallurgy, could have a significant influence on the UO{sub 2} viscoplastic deformation mechanisms. - Highlights: • Four different UO{sub 2} pellets batches are microstructurally compared, before and after compression creep tests. • Development of sub-boundaries within the original grains, in crept samples, is quantified by EBSD. • Links are observed between the intra

  18. Studying the molecular mechanisms of radiation damage : low-energy electron interactions with biomolecules and medically relevant molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanzer, K.

    2015-01-01

    were developed to enhance the radiation damage in these tumor sites, however, the molecular mechanism at which radiosensitizers operate is still unknown to this date. Investigating radiosensitizers with low-energy electrons might enlighten the mystery of their working mechanism. We performed an extensive DEA study to the proposed radiosensitizer 4-nitroimidazole (4NI) and two methylated nitroimidazoles, and found quite unexpected results. While 4NI is very sensitive towards electrons, which trigger a rich chemistry in the molecule, leading to the formation of a variety of reactive radical species at very low energies below 2 eV, these reactions are completely blocked in the methylated compounds. This means, that only small changes in the structure of this molecule can have immense effects on its radiosensitizing properties, which is an important aspect to take into consideration when searching for new radiosensitizers. Chemotherapy is also among the most efficient treatment methods for cancer and it has been shown, that the concomitant administration of chemo- and radiotherapy can have a superadditive benefit. However, also in this case the exact molecular processes responsible for this effect are not known, making further investigations necessary. In this thesis I present the study of platinum(II) bromide as a model molecule for platinum-based chemotherapeutic drugs and metal halides, that have shown good radiosensitizing abilities. It was found that the most effective reaction upon low-electron interaction is the formation of the fragment anion Br– , that is most probably coupled with ion pair formation. (author) [de

  19. Nonlinear analysis of pre-stressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV) using the damage plasticity model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokoohfar, Ahmad; Rahai, Alireza, E-mail: rahai@aut.ac.ir

    2016-03-15

    Highlights: • This paper describes nonlinear analyses of a 1:4 scale model of a (PCCV). • Coupled temp-disp. analysis and concrete damage plasticity are considered. • Temperature has limited effects on correct failure mode estimation. • Higher pre-stressing forces have limited effects on ultimate radial displacements. • Anchorage details of liner plates leads to prediction of correct failure mode. - Abstract: This paper describes the nonlinear analyses of a 1:4 scale model of a pre-stressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV). The analyses are performed under pressure and high temperature effects with considering anchorage details of liner plate. The temperature-time history of the model test is considered as an input boundary condition in the coupled temp-displacement analysis. The constitutive model developed by Chang and Mander (1994) is adopted in the model as the basis for the concrete stress–strain relation. To trace the crack pattern of the PCCV concrete faces, the concrete damage plasticity model is applied. This study includes the results of the thermal and mechanical behaviors of the PCCV subject to temperature loading and internal pressure at the same time. The test results are compared with the analysis results. The analysis results show that the temperature has little impact on the ultimate pressure capacity of the PCCV. To simulate the exact failure mode of the PCCV, the anchorage details of the liner plates around openings should be maintained in the analytical models. Also the failure mode of the PCCV structure hasn’t influenced by hoop tendons pre-stressing force variations.

  20. Statistical Damage Detection of Civil Engineering Structures using ARMAV Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    In this paper a statistically based damage detection of a lattice steel mast is performed. By estimation of the modal parameters and their uncertainties it is possible to detect whether some of the modal parameters have changed with a statistical significance. The estimation of the uncertainties ...

  1. A diagnostic ontological model for damages to historical constructions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cacciotti, Riccardo; Blaško, M.; Valach, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 1 (2015), s. 40-48 ISSN 1296-2074 R&D Projects: GA MK(CZ) DF11P01OVV002 Keywords : historical constructions * conservation * ontologies * damage Subject RIV: AL - Art, Architecture, Cultural Heritage Impact factor: 1.533, year: 2015 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1296207414000259

  2. Modeling of material properties of piezoelectric ceramics taking into account damage development under static compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, M; Nishikata, T; Okayasu, M

    2013-01-01

    We have carried out static compression tests in the poling direction for PZT ceramics and evaluated the material properties by measuring the resonance and anti-resonance frequencies and electrostatic capacity at regular intervals. Then the variation in the material properties up to fracture was clarified. Also, the development of internal damage was also clarified quantitatively by evaluating a damage variable on the basis of the continuum damage mechanics. The damage variable was calculated from the ratio of the elastic coefficient to its initial value. In the present paper, the development of internal damage was formulated as an evolution equation of the damage variable. In the formulation, a threshold stress leading to the onset of damage was considered. Moreover, the variation in material properties was related to the damage variable and formulated as material functions of the damage variable. The development of internal damage and the variation in material properties were simulated by the equations proposed in the present paper and the validity of the equations was verified by comparing the predictions with experimental results. (paper)

  3. Transgenic Mouse Model for Reducing Oxidative Damage in Bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, A.-S.; Torres, S.; Truong, T.; Kumar, A.; Alwood, J. S.; Limoli, C. L.; Globus, R. K.

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to musculoskeletal disuse and radiation result in bone loss; we hypothesized that these catabolic treatments cause excess reactive oxygen species (ROS), and thereby alter the tight balance between bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts, culminating in bone loss. To test this, we used transgenic mice which over-express the human gene for catalase, targeted to mitochondria (MCAT). Catalase is an anti-oxidant that converts the ROS hydrogen peroxide into water and oxygen. MCAT mice were shown previously to display reduced mitochondrial oxidative stress and radiosensitivity of the CNS compared to wild type controls (WT). As expected, MCAT mice expressed the transgene in skeletal tissue, and in marrow-derived osteoblasts and osteoclast precursors cultured ex vivo, and also showed greater catalase activity compared to wildtype (WT) mice (3-6 fold). Colony expansion in marrow cells cultured under osteoblastogenic conditions was 2-fold greater in the MCAT mice compared to WT mice, while the extent of mineralization was unaffected. MCAT mice had slightly longer tibiae than WT mice (2%, P less than 0.01), although cortical bone area was slightly lower in MCAT mice than WT mice (10%, p=0.09). To challenge the skeletal system, mice were treated by exposure to combined disuse (2 wk Hindlimb Unloading) and total body irradiation Cs(137) (2 Gy, 0.8 Gy/min), then bone parameters were analyzed by 2-factor ANOVA to detect possible interac