WorldWideScience

Sample records for damage cerebral nerve

  1. Femoral nerve damage (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The femoral nerve is located in the leg and supplies the muscles that assist help straighten the leg. It supplies sensation ... leg. One risk of damage to the femoral nerve is pelvic fracture. Symptoms of femoral nerve damage ...

  2. Diabetes and nerve damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diabetic neuropathy; Diabetes - neuropathy; Diabetes - peripheral neuropathy ... In people with diabetes, the body's nerves can be damaged by decreased blood flow and a high blood sugar level. This condition is ...

  3. Ulnar nerve damage (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ulnar nerve originates from the brachial plexus and travels down arm. The nerve is commonly injured at the elbow because of elbow fracture or dislocation. The ulnar nerve is near the surface of the body where ...

  4. Nerve damage from diabetes - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000326.htm Nerve damage from diabetes - self-care To use the ... or at other unusual times. Treating and Preventing Nerve Damage from Diabetes Treating diabetic neuropathy can make ...

  5. CEREBRAL CORTEX DAMAGE INDUCED BY ACUTE ORAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-28

    Feb 28, 2018 ... This study examines alcohol-induced cerebral cortex damage and the association with oxidative ... alcohol has profound effects on the function ... Chronic use of ..... Alcohol induced brain damage and liver damage in young.

  6. The role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy in facial nerve damage

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Limei; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Facial nerve is easy to be damaged, and there are many reconstructive methods for facial nerve reconstructive, such as facial nerve end to end anastomosis, the great auricular nerve graft, the sural nerve graft, or hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis. However, there is still little study about great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy and the mechanism. Methods: Rat models of facia...

  7. Multiple Cranial Nerve Palsy Due to Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Eruyar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT is a rare clinical condition between cerebrovasculer diases. The most common findings are headache, seizure and focal neurological deficit. Multiple cranial nerve palsy due to CVT is rarely seen and it is not clear pathology. A pathology that could explain the lack of cranial nerve imaging is carrying suspected diagnosis but the disease is known to provide early diagnosis and treatment. We want to emphasize with this case multipl cranial nerve palsy due to CVT is seen rarely and good response to treatment.

  8. Curative effect of surgery combined with nerve growth factor preparation treatment of acute cerebral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Luo

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Surgery combined with nerve growth factor preparation treatment of acute cerebral hemorrhage can improve neural nutritional status and reduce nerve injury degree, and it is beneficial to the recovery of neural function.

  9. The role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy in facial nerve damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Limei; Han, Yuechen; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Daogong; Wang, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Facial nerve is easy to be damaged, and there are many reconstructive methods for facial nerve reconstructive, such as facial nerve end to end anastomosis, the great auricular nerve graft, the sural nerve graft, or hypoglossal-facial nerve anastomosis. However, there is still little study about great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy and the mechanism. Rat models of facial nerve cut (FC), facial nerve end to end anastomosis (FF), facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy (FG), and control (Ctrl) were established. Apex nasi amesiality observation, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays were employed to investigate the function and mechanism. In apex nasi amesiality observation, it was found apex nasi amesiality of FG group was partly recovered. Additionally, electrophysiology and immunofluorescence assays revealed that facial-great auricular neurorrhaphy could transfer nerve impulse and express AChR which was better than facial nerve cut and worse than facial nerve end to end anastomosis. The present study indicated that great auricular-facial nerve neurorrhaphy is a substantial solution for facial lesion repair, as it is efficiently preventing facial muscles atrophy by generating neurotransmitter like ACh.

  10. [Cranial nerve damage after neuroaxial methods of anesthesia in puerperas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floka, S E; Shifman, E M

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes cranial nerve damage, a rare complication of neuroaxial anesthesia in obstetric care. In the literature, there are summarized data on 17 cases of neurological deficit developing after subarachnoidal or epidural anesthesia in puerperas. The etiological and pathogenetic factors of the above complications may be suggested to be the high disposition of a local anesthetic, arterial hypotension due to neuroaxial anesthetics, the outflow of cerebrospinal fluid after pachymeningeal puncture (including after unintended puncture during epidural anesthesia), and ischemic injury after the blood packing performed to relieve postpuncture headache. Closer consideration of these risk factors seems to reduce the incidence of cranial nerve damage in puerperas.

  11. Transient nerve damage following intubation for trans-sphenoidal hypophysectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evers, KA; Eindhoven, GB; Wierda, JMKH

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a case of transient lingual and hypoglossal nerve damage following intubation for a transsphenoidal hypophysectomy. Clinical features: A 56-yr-old acromegalic man was scheduled for trans-sphenoidal hypophysectomy. He had been treated with octreotide six months previously which

  12. Microfasciculation: a morphological pattern in leprosy nerve damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Sérgio L G; Medeiros, Mildred F; Corte-Real, Suzana; Jardim, Márcia R; Nery, José A da Costa; Hacker, Mariana A V B; Valentim, Vânia da Costa; Amadeu, Thaís Porto; Sarno, Euzenir N

    2011-01-01

    To study Microfasciculation, a perineurial response found in neuropathies, emphasizing its frequency, detailed morphological characteristics and biological significance in pure neural leprosy (PNL), post-treatment leprosy neuropathy (PTLN) and non-leprosy neuropathies (NLN). Morphological characteristics of microfascicles were examined via histological staining methods, immunohistochemical expression of neural markers and transmission electronmicroscopy. The detection of microfasciculation in 18 nerve biopsy specimens [12 PNL, six PTLN but not in the NLN group, was associated strongly with perineurial damage and the presence of a multibacillary inflammatory process in the nerves, particularly in the perineurium. Immunoreactivity to anti-S100 protein, anti-neurofilament, anti-nerve growth receptor and anti-myelin basic protein immunoreactivity was found within microfascicles. Ultrastructural examination of three biopsies showed that fibroblast-perineurial cells were devoid of basement membrane despite perineurial-like NGFr immunoreactivity. Morphological evidence demonstrated that multipotent pericytes from inflammation-activated microvessels could be the origin of fibroblast-perineurial cells. A microfasciculation pattern was found in 10% of leprosy-affected nerves. The microfascicles were composed predominantly of unmyelinated fibres and denervated Schwann cells (SCs) surrounded by fibroblast-perineurial cells. This pattern was found more frequently in leprosy nerves with acid-fast bacilli (AFB) and perineurial damage while undergoing an inflammatory process. Further experimental studies are necessary to elucidate microfascicle formation. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  13. Sodium transport through the cerebral sodium-glucose transporter exacerbates neuron damage during cerebral ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yui; Harada, Shinichi; Wada, Tetsuyuki; Yoshida, Shigeru; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2016-07-01

    We recently demonstrated that the cerebral sodium-glucose transporter (SGLT) is involved in postischaemic hyperglycaemia-induced exacerbation of cerebral ischaemia. However, the associated SGLT-mediated mechanisms remain unclear. Thus, we examined the involvement of cerebral SGLT-induced excessive sodium ion influx in the development of cerebral ischaemic neuronal damage. [Na+]i was estimated according to sodium-binding benzofuran isophthalate fluorescence. In the in vitro study, primary cortical neurons were prepared from fetuses of ddY mice. Primary cortical neurons were cultured for 5 days before each treatment with reagents, and these survival rates were assessed using biochemical assays. In in vivo study, a mouse model of focal ischaemia was generated using middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). In these experiments, treatment with high concentrations of glucose induced increment in [Na+]i, and this phenomenon was suppressed by the SGLT-specific inhibitor phlorizin. SGLT-specific sodium ion influx was induced using a-methyl-D-glucopyranoside (a-MG) treatments, which led to significant concentration-dependent declines in neuronal survival rates and exacerbated hydrogen peroxide-induced neuronal cell death. Moreover, phlorizin ameliorated these effects. Finally, intracerebroventricular administration of a-MG exacerbated the development of neuronal damage induced by MCAO, and these effects were ameliorated by the administration of phlorizin. Hence, excessive influx of sodium ions into neuronal cells through cerebral SGLT may exacerbate the development of cerebral ischaemic neuronal damage. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  14. Recovery of colonic transit following extrinsic nerve damage in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolfi, Timothy J; Tong, Wei Dong; Kosinski, Lauren; Takahashi, Toku; Ludwig, Kirk A

    2011-06-01

    Injury to pelvic sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves from surgical and obstetrical trauma has long been cited as a cause for abnormal colorectal motility in humans. Using a rat model, acute transaction of these extrinsic nerves has been shown to effect colorectal motility. The aim of this study is to determine in a rat model how transection of these extrinsic nerves affects colonic transit over time. Eighty-two Sprague-Dawley rats underwent placement of a tunneled catheter into the proximal colon. Bilateral hypogastric, pelvic nerves (HGN and PN) or both were transected in 66 rats. The remaining 16 rats received a sham operation. Colonic transit was evaluated at postoperative days (PODs) 1, 3, and 7 by injecting and calculating the geometric center (GC) of the distribution of (51)Cr after 3 h of propagation. At POD 1, transection of PNs significantly delayed colonic transit (GC = 4.9, p < 0.05), while transection of HGNs (GC = 8.5, p < 0.05) or transection of both nerves (GC = 7.8, p < 0.05) significantly accelerated colonic transit, when compared with sham operation (GC = 6.0). A significant trend toward recovery was noted in both the HGN and PN transection groups at POD 7. Damage to the extrinsic sympathetic and/or parasympathetic PNs affects colonic transit acutely. These changes in large bowel motor function normalize over time implicating a compensatory mechanism within the bowel itself.

  15. Rehabilitation, Using Guided Cerebral Plasticity, of a Brachial Plexus Injury Treated with Intercostal and Phrenic Nerve Transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlin, Lars B; Andersson, Gert; Backman, Clas; Svensson, Hampus; Björkman, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Recovery after surgical reconstruction of a brachial plexus injury using nerve grafting and nerve transfer procedures is a function of peripheral nerve regeneration and cerebral reorganization. A 15-year-old boy, with traumatic avulsion of nerve roots C5-C7 and a non-rupture of C8-T1, was operated 3 weeks after the injury with nerve transfers: (a) terminal part of the accessory nerve to the suprascapular nerve, (b) the second and third intercostal nerves to the axillary nerve, and (c) the fourth to sixth intercostal nerves to the musculocutaneous nerve. A second operation-free contralateral gracilis muscle transfer directly innervated by the phrenic nerve-was done after 2 years due to insufficient recovery of the biceps muscle function. One year later, electromyography showed activation of the biceps muscle essentially with coughing through the intercostal nerves, and of the transferred gracilis muscle by deep breathing through the phrenic nerve. Voluntary flexion of the elbow elicited clear activity in the biceps/gracilis muscles with decreasing activity in intercostal muscles distal to the transferred intercostal nerves (i.e., corresponding to eighth intercostal), indicating cerebral plasticity, where neural control of elbow flexion is gradually separated from control of breathing. To restore voluntary elbow function after nerve transfers, the rehabilitation of patients operated with intercostal nerve transfers should concentrate on transferring coughing function, while patients with phrenic nerve transfers should focus on transferring deep breathing function.

  16. Mycolactone cytotoxicity in Schwann cells could explain nerve damage in Buruli ulcer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junichiro En

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Buruli ulcer is a chronic painless skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. The local nerve damage induced by M. ulcerans invasion is similar to the nerve damage evoked by the injection of mycolactone in a Buruli ulcer mouse model. In order to elucidate the mechanism of this nerve damage, we tested and compared the cytotoxic effect of synthetic mycolactone A/B on cultured Schwann cells, fibroblasts and macrophages. Mycolactone induced much higher cell death and apoptosis in Schwann cell line SW10 than in fibroblast line L929. These results suggest that mycolactone is a key substance in the production of nerve damage of Buruli ulcer.

  17. Interventions for skin changes caused by nerve damage in leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liv Merete Reinar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND More than three million persons are disabled by leprosy worldwide. The main complication of sensory nerve damage is neuropathic ulceration, particularly of the feet. In this review we explored interventions that can prevent and treat secondary damage to skin and limbs. OBJECTIVE To assess the effects of self-care, dressings and footwear in preventing and healing secondary damage to the skin in persons affected by leprosy. METHODS Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register (April 2008, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library Issue 1, 2008, MEDLINE (from 2003 to April 2008, EMBASE (from 2005 to April 2008, CINAHL (1982-2006 and LILACS (1982- April 2008 as well as online registers of ongoing trials (April 2008. Selection criteria: Randomised controlled trials involving anyone with leprosy and damage to peripheral nerves treated with any measures designed to prevent damage with the aim of healing existing ulcers and preventing development of new ulcers. Data collection and analysis: Two authors assessed trial quality and extracted data. MAIN RESULTS Eight trials with a total of 557 participants were included. The quality of the trials was generally poor. The interventions and outcome measures were diverse. Although three studies that compared zinc tape to more traditional dressings found some benefit, none of these showed a statistically significant effect. One trial indicated that topical ketanserin had a better effect on wound healing than clioquinol cream or zinc paste, RR was 6.00 (95% CI 1.45 to 24.75. We did not combine the results of the two studies that compared topical phenytoin to saline dressing, but both studies found statistically significant effects in favour of phenytoin for healing of ulcer (SMD -2.34; 95% CI -3.30 to -1.39; and SMD -0.79; 95% CI -1.20 to 0.39. Canvas shoes were not much better than PVC-boots, and double rocker shoes did not promote healing

  18. Interventions for skin changes caused by nerve damage in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinar, Liv Merete; Forsetlund, Louise; Bjørndal, Arild; Lockwood, Diana

    2008-07-16

    More than three million persons are disabled by leprosy worldwide. The main complication of sensory nerve damage is neuropathic ulceration, particularly of the feet. In this review we explored interventions that can prevent and treat secondary damage to skin and limbs. To assess the effects of self-care, dressings and footwear in preventing and healing secondary damage to the skin in persons affected by leprosy. We searched the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register (April 2008), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library Issue 1, 2008), MEDLINE (from 2003 to April 2008), EMBASE (from 2005 to April 2008), CINAHL (1982-2006) and LILACS (1982- April 2008 ) as well as online registers of ongoing trials (April 2008). Randomised controlled trials involving anyone with leprosy and damage to peripheral nerves treated with any measures designed to prevent damage with the aim of healing existing ulcers and preventing development of new ulcers. Two authors assessed trial quality and extracted data. Eight trials with a total of 557 participants were included. The quality of the trials was generally poor. The interventions and outcome measures were diverse. Although three studies that compared zinc tape to more traditional dressings found some benefit, none of these showed a statistically significant effect. One trial indicated that topical ketanserin had a better effect on wound healing than clioquinol cream or zinc paste, RR was 6.00 (95% CI 1.45 to 24.75). We did not combine the results of the two studies that compared topical phenytoin to saline dressing, but both studies found statistically significant effects in favour of phenytoin for healing of ulcer (SMD -2.34; 95% CI -3.30 to -1.39; and SMD -0.79; 95% CI -1.20 to 0.39). Canvas shoes were not much better than PVC-boots, and double rocker shoes did not promote healing much more than below-knee plasters. One study suggested that topical ketanserin is more effective than clioquinol cream

  19. [Damage to cranial and peripheral nerves following patency restoration of the internal carotid artery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrcha, P; Ciostek, P; Szopiński, P; Noszczyk, W

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the study was an assessment of the incidence of injury to cranial and peripheral nerves as complication of patency restoration of the internal carotid artery, and analysis of the effect of peripheral nerve injury on the results of carotid patency restoration. From Oct 1987 to Sept 1999 543 procedures were carried out for restoration of patency of the internal carotid artery. After the operation hypoglossus nerve injury was found in 7 cases (1.4%), vagus injury in 9 (1.8%). Signs of exclusively recurrent laryngeal nerve damage were found in 6 cases (1.2%). Glossopharyngeus nerve was damaged in 2 cases (0.4%), transient phrenic nerve palsy as a result of conduction anaesthesia was noted in 2 cases (0.4%). Damage to the transverse cervical nerve was found in 96 cases (60%). In 2 patients (1.2%) lower position of mouth angle was due to section of the mandibular ramus of the facial nerve. In another 2 cases skin sensation disturbances were a consequence of lesion of the auricularis magnus nerve and always they coexisted with signs of transverse cervical nerve damage. damage to the cranial nerves during operation for carotid patency restoration are frequent but mostly they are not connected with any health risks and often they regress spontaneously.

  20. Photodynamic damage of glial cells in crayfish ventral nerve cord

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolosov, M. S.; Duz, E.; Uzdensky, A. B.

    2011-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising method for treatment of brain tumors, the most of which are of glial origin. In the present work we studied PDT-mediated injury of glial cells in nerve tissue, specifically, in abdominal connectives in the crayfish ventral nerve cord. The preparation was photosensitized with alumophthalocyanine Photosens and irradiated 30 min with the diode laser (670 nm, 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2). After following incubation in the darkness during 1- 10 hours it was fluorochromed with Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide to reveal nuclei of living, necrotic and apoptotic cells. The chain-like location of the glial nuclei allowed visualization of those enveloping giant axons and blood vessels. The level of glial necrosis in control preparations was about 2-5 %. Apoptosis was not observed in control preparations. PDT significantly increased necrosis of glial cells to 52 or 67 % just after irradiation with 0.1 or 0.15 W/cm2, respectively. Apoptosis of glial cells was observed only at 10 hours after light exposure. Upper layers of the glial envelope of the connectives were injured stronger comparing to deep ones: the level of glial necrosis decreased from 100 to 30 % upon moving from the connective surface to the plane of the giant axon inside the connective. Survival of glial cells was also high in the vicinity of blood vessels. One can suggest that giant axons and blood vessels protect neighboring glial cells from photodynamic damage. The mechanism of such protective action remains to be elucidated.

  1. Cerebral Dysfunctions Related to Perinatal Organic Damage: Clinical-Neuropathologic Correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towbin, Abraham

    1978-01-01

    Recent neuropathology studies identify hypoxia as the main cause of perinatal cerebral damage. Cerebral lesions present at birth, with transition to chronic scar lesions, are correlated to mental retardation, cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and minimal brain dysfunction. Gestation age and severity of hypoxic exposure essentially determine the cerebral…

  2. Physical analysis on laser-induced cerebral damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiaosen; Liu, Jiangang; Tao, Chunkan; Lan, Xiufeng; Cao, Lingyan; Pan, Weimin; Shen, Zhonghua; Lu, Jian; Ni, Xiaowu

    2005-01-01

    Experimental investigation on cerebral damage of adult SD rats induced by 532nm CW laser was performed. Tissue heat conductive equation was set up based on two-layered structure model. Finite difference algorithm was utilized to numerically simulate the temperature distribution in the brain tissue. Allowing for tissue response to temperature variation, free boundary model was used to discuss tissue thermal coagulation formation in brain. Experimental observations show that thermal coagulation and necrosis can be caused due to laser light absorption. The result of the calculation shows that the process of the thermal coagulation of the given mode comprises two stages: fast and slow. At the first stage, necrosis domain grows fast. Then necrosis domain growth becomes slower because of the competition between the heat diffusion into the surrounding undamaged tissue and the heat dissipation caused by blood perfusion. At the center of coagulation area no neuron was observed and at the transitional zone few nervous cells were seen by microscope. The research can provide reference data for developing clinical therapy of some kind of encephalic diseases by using 532nm laser, and for making cerebral infarction models in animal experiment.

  3. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve protects against cerebral ischemic injury through an anti-infammatory mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-xian Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vagus nerve stimulation exerts protective effects against ischemic brain injury; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia was established using the occlusion method, and the right vagus nerve was given electrical stimulation (constant current of 0.5 mA; pulse width, 0.5 ms; frequency, 20 Hz; duration, 30 seconds; every 5 minutes for a total of 60 minutes 30 minutes, 12 hours, and 1, 2, 3, 7 and 14 days after surgery. Electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve substantially reduced infarct volume, improved neurological function, and decreased the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor-and interleukin- 6 in rats with focal cerebral ischemia. The experimental findings indicate that the neuroprotective effect of vagus nerve stimulation following cerebral ischemia may be associated with the inhibition of tumor necrosis factor- and interleukin-6 expression.

  4. Combined Ipsilateral Oculomotor Nerve Palsy and Contralateral Downbeat Nystagmus in a Case of Cerebral Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Matsuzono

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient with acute cerebral infarction of the left paramedian thalamus, upper mesencephalon and cerebellum who exhibited ipsilateral oculomotor nerve palsy and contralateral downbeat nystagmus. The site of the infarction was considered to be the paramedian thalamopeduncular and cerebellar regions, which are supplied by the superior cerebellar artery containing direct perforating branches or both the superior cerebellar artery and the superior mesencephalic and posterior thalamosubthalamic arteries. Contralateral and monocular downbeat nystagmus is very rare. Our case suggests that the present downbeat nystagmus was due to dysfunction of cerebellar-modulated crossed oculovestibular fibers of the superior cerebellar peduncle or bilateral downbeat nystagmus with one-sided oculomotor nerve palsy.

  5. Neuroprotection for Nerve Agent-Induced Brain Damage

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Newmark, Jonathan; Ballough, Gerald P; Filbert, Margaret G

    2002-01-01

    ... secondary to exposure to nerve agents. Preliminary work in this laboratory has demonstrated proof of concept using a compound not yet approved for clinical use by the US Food and Drug Administration...

  6. Epicardial Ablation: Prevention of Phrenic Nerve Damage by Pericardial Injection of Saline and the Use of a Steerable Sheath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kars Neven, MD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Because of the close proximity of the phrenic nerve to the pericardium, phrenic nerve damage caused by epicardial ablation can easily occur. We report two cases of epicardial VT ablation where pericardial injection of saline, combined with the use of a steerable sheath, successfully prevents the phrenic nerve from being damaged.

  7. Effect of early rehabilitation training on oxygen free radical generation and nerve injury in patients with cerebral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao-Shu Liu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of early rehabilitation training combined with edaravone on oxygen free radical generation and nerve injury in patients with cerebral hemorrhage. Methods: A total of 56 patients with acute cerebral hemorrhage who were treated in Zigong Third People’s Hospital between July 2014 and March 2017 were selected and randomly divided into early rehabilitation group and routine rehabilitation group, the early rehabilitation group began the rehabilitation training 2 d after cerebral hemorrhage condition was stabilized, and routine rehabilitation group began the rehabilitation training 14 d after cerebral hemorrhage. Serum contents of oxygen free radicals, nerve injury markers and neurotrophic molecules were detected 28 d and 56 d after cerebral hemorrhage. Results: 28 d and 56 d after cerebral hemorrhage, serum MDA, AOPP, 8-OHdG, GFAP, NSE, Tf, Ft and S100B levels of early rehabilitation group were significantly lower than those of routine rehabilitation group while BDNF, NGF, NTF-α and IGF-I levels were significantly higher than those of routine rehabilitation group. Conclusion: Early rehabilitation training combined with edaravone for cerebral hemorrhage can inhibit the oxygen free radical generation, reduce the degree of nerve injury and improve the neurotrophic state.

  8. Localization of Basal Ganglia and Thalamic Damage in Dyskinetic Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravamuthan, Bhooma R; Waugh, Jeff L

    2016-01-01

    Dyskinetic cerebral palsy affects 15%-20% of patients with cerebral palsy. Basal ganglia injury is associated with dyskinetic cerebral palsy, but the patterns of injury within the basal ganglia predisposing to dyskinetic cerebral palsy are unknown, making treatment difficult. For example, deep brain stimulation of the globus pallidus interna improves dystonia in only 40% of patients with dyskinetic cerebral palsy. Basal ganglia injury heterogeneity may explain this variability. To investigate this, we conducted a qualitative systematic review of basal ganglia and thalamic damage in dyskinetic cerebral palsy. Reviews and articles primarily addressing genetic or toxic causes of cerebral palsy were excluded yielding 22 studies (304 subjects). Thirteen studies specified the involved basal ganglia nuclei (subthalamic nucleus, caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, or lentiform nuclei, comprised by the putamen and globus pallidus). Studies investigating the lentiform nuclei (without distinguishing between the putamen and globus pallidus) showed that all subjects (19 of 19) had lentiform nuclei damage. Studies simultaneously but independently investigating the putamen and globus pallidus also showed that all subjects (35 of 35) had lentiform nuclei damage (i.e., putamen or globus pallidus damage); this was followed in frequency by damage to the putamen alone (70 of 101, 69%), the subthalamic nucleus (17 of 25, 68%), the thalamus (88 of 142, 62%), the globus pallidus (7/35, 20%), and the caudate (6 of 47, 13%). Globus pallidus damage was almost always coincident with putaminal damage. Noting consistent involvement of the lentiform nuclei in dyskinetic cerebral palsy, these results could suggest two groups of patients with dyskinetic cerebral palsy: those with putamen-predominant damage and those with panlenticular damage involving both the putamen and the globus pallidus. Differentiating between these groups could help predict response to therapies such as deep brain

  9. ABDUCENS NERVE PALSY AND THROMBOSIS OF THE CEREBRAL VEINS AND SINUSES - A DIAGNOSTIC PITFALL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra J. Tzoukeva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Thrombosis of the cerebral veins and sinuses is an infrequent cerebrovascular disorder. Because the highly variable symptoms, recent neuroimaging plays a key role in the diagnosis. Abducens nerve palsy as a focal neurological deficit is a rare clinical manifestation in these patients. We present two cases with sudden onset of diplopia and headache. Case 1: A 3-year old girl with B cell lymphoblastic leukemia developed bilateral abducens deficit and bilateral optic disc edema after treatment including L-asparaginase. Thrombosis of the right jugular vein, sagittal and right sigmoid sinuses was visualized on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and magnetic resonance venography (MRV. Symptoms gradually resolved after treatment with enoxiparine and MRV demonstrated recanalization.Case 2: A 75-year old female with medical history of arterial hypertension presented with headache and sudden left abduction deficit. Computerized tomography (CT scan was normal. MRI and MRV revealed aging brain and disruption of venous flow at the left internal jugular vein, suspecting thrombosis. Extracranial colour duplex sonography and CT angiography proved haemodinamic equivalent of left internal jugular vein thrombosis due to sclerotic pathology of aortic arch.Our first case illustrates the role of improved neuroimaging techniques as the best method for diagnosis of cerebral veins and sinuses thrombosis, presenting with abducens nerve palsy. With second case the potential neuroimaging pitfalls concerning the accurate diagnosis of these cerebrovascular disorders with neuro-ophthalmologic manifestation are discussed.

  10. Effect of acupuncture combined with drug therapy on the nerve cytokine secretion and oxidative stress in convalescence of cerebral infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Jie Dai

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effect of acupuncture combined with drug therapy on the nerve cytokine secretion and oxidative stress in convalescence of cerebral infarction. Methods: A total of 118 patients in convalescence of cerebral infarction who were treated in the affiliated hospital of our school between August 2014 and December 2016 were divided into control group (n=59 and observation group (n=59 according to the random number table method. Control group received routine drug therapy, and the observation group received acupuncture combined with drug therapy. The differences in serum levels of neurotrophic factors, nerve injury factors and oxidative stress indexes were compared between the two groups before and after treatment. Results: The differences in serum levels of neurotrophic factors, nerve injury factors and oxidative stress indexes were not statistically significant between the two groups before treatment. After treatment, serum neurotrophic factors IGF-1, BDNF and NGF levels of observation group were higher than those of control group; nerve injury factors S-100β, NSE, GFAP and UCH-L1 levels were lower than those of control group; oxidative stress indexes MDA, AOPPs and LHP levels were lower than those of control group while SOD and GSH-Px levels were higher than those of control group. Conclusion: Acupuncture combined with drug therapy can effectively optimize the nerve function, reduce the nerve injury and suppress the systemic oxidative stress response of patients in convalescence of cerebral infarction.

  11. Impacts of Simulated Weightlessness by Dry Immersion on Optic Nerve Sheath Diameter and Cerebral Autoregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Kermorgant

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dry immersion (DI is used to simulate weightlessness. We investigated in healthy volunteers if DI induces changes in ONSD, as a surrogate marker of intracranial pressure (ICP and how these changes could affect cerebral autoregulation (CA. Changes in ICP were indirectly measured by changes in optic nerve sheath diameter (ONSD. 12 healthy male volunteers underwent 3 days of DI. ONSD was indirectly assessed by ocular ultrasonography. Cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFV of the middle cerebral artery was gauged using transcranial Doppler ultrasonography. CA was evaluated by two methods: (1 transfer function analysis was calculated to determine the relationship between mean CBFV and mean arterial blood pressure (ABP and (2 correlation index Mxa between mean CBFV and mean ABP.ONSD increased significantly during the first day, the third day and the first day of recovery of DI (P < 0.001.DI induced a reduction in Mxa index (P < 0.001 and an elevation in phase shift in low frequency bandwidth (P < 0.05. After DI, Mxa and coherence were strongly correlated with ONSD (P < 0.05 but not before DI. These results indicate that 3 days of DI induces significant changes in ONSD most likely reflecting an increase in ICP. CA was improved but also negatively correlated with ONSD suggesting that a persistent elevation ICP favors poor CA recovery after simulated microgravity.

  12. Comparison of renal artery, soft tissue, and nerve damage after irrigated versus nonirrigated radiofrequency ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakura, Kenichi; Ladich, Elena; Fuimaono, Kristine; Grunewald, Debby; O'Fallon, Patrick; Spognardi, Anna-Maria; Markham, Peter; Otsuka, Fumiyuki; Yahagi, Kazuyuki; Shen, Kai; Kolodgie, Frank D; Joner, Michael; Virmani, Renu

    2015-01-01

    The long-term efficacy of radiofrequency ablation of renal autonomic nerves has been proven in nonrandomized studies. However, long-term safety of the renal artery (RA) is of concern. The aim of our study was to determine if cooling during radiofrequency ablation preserved the RA while allowing equivalent nerve damage. A total of 9 swine (18 RAs) were included, and allocated to irrigated radiofrequency (n=6 RAs, temperature setting: 50°C), conventional radiofrequency (n=6 RAs, nonirrigated, temperature setting: 65°C), and high-temperature radiofrequency (n=6 RAs, nonirrigated, temperature setting: 90°C) groups. RAs were harvested at 10 days, serially sectioned from proximal to distal including perirenal tissues and examined after paraffin embedding, and staining with hematoxylin-eosin and Movat pentachrome. RAs and periarterial tissue including nerves were semiquantitatively assessed and scored. A total of 660 histological sections from 18 RAs were histologically examined by light microscopy. Arterial medial injury was significantly less in the irrigated radiofrequency group (depth of medial injury, circumferential involvement, and thinning) than that in the conventional radiofrequency group (Pradiofrequency group (Pradiofrequency group and conventional radiofrequency group (P=0.36), there was a trend toward less nerve damage in the irrigated compared with conventional. Compared to conventional radiofrequency, circumferential medial damage in highest-temperature nonirrigated radiofrequency group was significantly greater (Pradiofrequency ablation, and there is a trend toward less nerve damage. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  13. Damage to the superior gluteal nerve after the Hardinge approach to the hip.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ramesh, M

    2012-02-03

    We studied prospectively 81 consecutive patients undergoing hip surgery using the Hardinge (1982) approach. The abductor muscles of the hip in these patients were assessed electrophysiologically and clinically by the modified Trendelenburg test. Power was measured using a force plate. We performed assessment at two weeks, and at three and nine months after operation. At two weeks we found that 19 patients (23%) showed evidence of damage to the superior gluteal nerve. By three months, five of these had recovered. The nine patients with complete denervation at three months showed no signs of recovery when reassessed at nine months. Persistent damage to the nerve was associated with a positive Trendelenburg test.

  14. Cranial nerve damage in patients after alpha (heavy)-particle radiation to the pituitary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, J.; Wei, W.C.; Chong, C.Y.

    1979-01-01

    The records of 161 patients were reviewed to determine if radiation damage had occurred following cranial irradiation. All of these patients had received alpha-particle radiation to their pituitary glands for diabetic retinopathy. Extraocular muscle palsy developed in 11 of these patients, iridoplegia in six, and fifth nerve damage in six. All of the palsies developed within a short period following their irradiation, and a definite dose relationship was present. The estimated doses to the third, fourth, fifth, and sixth cranial nerves was calculated at a saggital plane 13 to 15 mm from the pituitary by using computer-drawn dosimetry charts for the respective aperture size

  15. Preliminary findings of cerebral responses on transcutaneous vagal nerve stimulation on experimental heat pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usichenko, Taras; Laqua, René; Leutzow, Bianca; Lotze, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Transcutaneous vagal nerve stimulation (TVNS) is a promising complementary method of pain relief. However, the neural networks associated with its analgesic effects are still to be elucidated. Therefore, we conducted two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) sessions, in a randomized order, with twenty healthy subjects who were exposed to experimental heat pain stimulation applied to the right forearm using a Contact Heat-Evoked Potential Stimulator. While in one session TVNS was administered bilaterally to the concha auriculae with maximal, non-painful intensity, the stimulation device was switched off in the other session (placebo condition). Pain thresholds were measured before and after each session. Heat stimulation elicited fMRI activation in cerebral pain processing regions. Activation magnitude in the secondary somatosensory cortex, posterior insula, anterior cingulate and caudate nucleus was associated with heat stimulation without TVNS. During TVNS, this association was only seen for the right anterior insula. TVNS decreased fMRI signals in the anterior cingulate cortex in comparison with the placebo condition; however, there was no relevant pain reducing effect over the group as a whole. In contrast, TVNS compared to the placebo condition showed an increased activation in the primary motor cortex, contralateral to the site of heat stimulation, and in the right amygdala. In conclusion, in the protocol used here, TVNS specifically modulated the cerebral response to heat pain, without having a direct effect on pain thresholds.

  16. Unilateral hypoglossal nerve atrophy as a late complication of radiation therapy of head and neck carcinoma: a report of four cases and a review of the literature on peripheral and cranial nerve damages after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, V.S.T.; Schulz, M.D.

    1975-01-01

    The case histories of four patients who developed hemiatrophy of the tongue from 3 to 9 years after a course of curative radiation therapy for carcinomas of the head and neck are presented. These patients were subsequently followed from 1 1 / 2 to 6 years without local recurrence of the tumor, distant metastasis, or involvement of other cranial nerves, indicative of only a unilateral hypoglossal nerve atrophy. A review of the literature showed that peripheral and cranial nerve damages after radiation therapy have been reported for the optic nerve, hypoglossal nerve, oculomotor nerve, abducens nerve, recurrent laryngeal nerve, brachial plexus nerves, and peripheral nerves of the extremities. Review of clinical and experimental data indicated that in most cases, the damages were probably caused by extensive connective tissue fibrosis around and infiltrating the nerve trunks. Three possible types of peripheral and cranial nerve damages after radiation therapy are identified. (U.S.)

  17. Experience on treatment of acute head injury combined with optic nerve damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Heng; Feng Dongxia; Ma Yuanpin; Chen Jinqing

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the therapeutic principle for the management of acute head injury combined with optic nerve damage. Method: the clinical data of treatment and prognosis from 24 patients, in which 15 received operative and 9 conservative measures were collected and analyzed. Results: In 15 operated cases, the vision of 10 cases including one with blindness before operation was improved obviously, while those of other 5 did not get any improvement. In 9 conservatively treated cases, the vision was improved in 4 cases, deteriorated in 4 case and no change in 1 case with blindness after injury. Conclusion: One the optic nerve damage has been manifested by clinical or radiological evidences in acute head injury patients, despite it was primary or secondary reason, surgical optic nerve bone canal decompression should be done as soon as possible

  18. Ulnar nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropathy - ulnar nerve; Ulnar nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy; Cubital tunnel syndrome ... Damage to one nerve group, such as the ulnar nerve, is called mononeuropathy . Mononeuropathy means there is damage to a single nerve. Both ...

  19. Radial nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuropathy - radial nerve; Radial nerve palsy; Mononeuropathy ... Damage to one nerve group, such as the radial nerve, is called mononeuropathy . Mononeuropathy means there is damage to a single nerve. Both ...

  20. Rutin protects against cognitive deficits and brain damage in rats with chronic cerebral hypoperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jie; Zhou, Qiong; Du, Ying; Zhang, Wei; Bai, Miao; Zhang, Zhuo; Xi, Ye; Li, Zhuyi; Miao, Jianting

    2014-08-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion is a critical causative factor for the development of cognitive decline and dementia in the elderly, which involves many pathophysiological processes. Consequently, inhibition of several pathophysiological pathways is an attractive therapeutic strategy for this disorder. Rutin, a biologically active flavonoid, protects the brain against several insults through its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, but its effect on cognitive deficits and brain damage caused by chronic cerebral hypoperfusion remains unknown. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of rutin on cognitive impairments and the potential mechanisms underlying its action in rats with chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. We used Sprague-Dawley rats with permanent bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO), a well-established model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion. After rutin treatment for 12 weeks, the neuroprotective effect of rutin in rats was evaluated by behavioural tests, biochemical and histopathological analyses. BCCAO rats showed marked cognitive deficits, which were improved by rutin treatment. Moreover, BCCAO rats exhibited central cholinergic dysfunction, oxidative damage, inflammatory responses and neuronal damage in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, compared with sham-operated rats. All these effects were significantly alleviated by treatment with rutin. Our results provide new insights into the pharmacological actions of rutin and suggest that rutin has multi-targeted therapeutical potential on cognitive deficits associated with conditions with chronic cerebral hypoperfusion such as vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  1. Exercise preconditioning exhibits neuroprotective effects on hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage after cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nabi Shamsaei; Mehdi Khaksari; Sohaila Erfani; Hamid Rajabi; Nahid Aboutaleb

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested the neuroprotective effects of physical exercise on cerebral isch-emic injury. However, the role of physical exercise in cerebral ischemia-induced hippocampal damage remains controversial. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of pre-ischemia treadmill training on hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage after cerebral ischemia. Male adult rats were randomly divided into control, ischemia and exercise + ischemia groups. In the exercise + ischemia group, rats were subjected to running on a treadmill in a designated time schedule (5 days per week for 4 weeks). Then rats underwent cerebral ischemia induction th rough occlusion of common carotids followed by reperfusion. At 4 days after cerebral ischemia, rat learning and memory abilities were evaluated using passive avoidance memory test and rat hippocampal neuronal damage was detected using Nissl and TUNEL staining. Pre-ischemic ex-ercise signiifcantly reduced the number of TUNEL-positive cells and necrotic cell death in the hippocampal CA1 region as compared to the ischemia group. Moreover, pre-ischemic exercise significantly prevented ischemia-induced memory dysfunction. Pre-ischemic exercise mighct prevent memory deficits after cerebral ischemia through rescuing hippocampal CA1 neurons from ischemia-induced degeneration.

  2. Actualities on molecular pathogenesis and repairing processes of cerebral damage in perinatal hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praticò Andrea D

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE is the most important cause of cerebral damage and long-term neurological sequelae in the perinatal period both in term and preterm infant. Hypoxic-ischemic (H-I injuries develop in two phases: the ischemic phase, dominated by necrotic processes, and the reperfusion phase, dominated by apoptotic processes extending beyond ischemic areas. Due to selective ischemic vulnerability, cerebral damage affects gray matter in term newborns and white matter in preterm newborns with the typical neuropathological aspects of laminar cortical necrosis in the former and periventricular leukomalacia in the latter. This article summarises the principal physiopathological and biochemical processes leading to necrosis and/or apoptosis of neuronal and glial cells and reports recent insights into some endogenous and exogenous cellular and molecular mechanisms aimed at repairing H-I cerebral damage.

  3. Zingiber officinale Mitigates Brain Damage and Improves Memory Impairment in Focal Cerebral Ischemic Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Jittiwat, Jinatta; Tongun, Terdthai; Muchimapura, Supaporn; Ingkaninan, Kornkanok

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral ischemia is known to produce brain damage and related behavioral deficits including memory. Recently, accumulating lines of evidence showed that dietary enrichment with nutritional antioxidants could reduce brain damage and improve cognitive function. In this study, possible protective effect of Zingiber officinale, a medicinal plant reputed for neuroprotective effect against oxidative stress-related brain damage, on brain damage and memory deficit induced by focal cerebral ischemia was elucidated. Male adult Wistar rats were administrated an alcoholic extract of ginger rhizome orally 14 days before and 21 days after the permanent occlusion of right middle cerebral artery (MCAO). Cognitive function assessment was performed at 7, 14, and 21 days after MCAO using the Morris water maze test. The brain infarct volume and density of neurons in hippocampus were also determined. Furthermore, the level of malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) in cerebral cortex, striatum, and hippocampus was also quantified at the end of experiment. The results showed that cognitive function and neurons density in hippocampus of rats receiving ginger rhizome extract were improved while the brain infarct volume was decreased. The cognitive enhancing effect and neuroprotective effect occurred partly via the antioxidant activity of the extract. In conclusion, our study demonstrated the beneficial effect of ginger rhizome to protect against focal cerebral ischemia. PMID:21197427

  4. Zingiber officinale Mitigates Brain Damage and Improves Memory Impairment in Focal Cerebral Ischemic Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jintanaporn Wattanathorn

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral ischemia is known to produce brain damage and related behavioral deficits including memory. Recently, accumulating lines of evidence showed that dietary enrichment with nutritional antioxidants could reduce brain damage and improve cognitive function. In this study, possible protective effect of Zingiber officinale, a medicinal plant reputed for neuroprotective effect against oxidative stress-related brain damage, on brain damage and memory deficit induced by focal cerebral ischemia was elucidated. Male adult Wistar rats were administrated an alcoholic extract of ginger rhizome orally 14 days before and 21 days after the permanent occlusion of right middle cerebral artery (MCAO. Cognitive function assessment was performed at 7, 14, and 21 days after MCAO using the Morris water maze test. The brain infarct volume and density of neurons in hippocampus were also determined. Furthermore, the level of malondialdehyde (MDA, superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px in cerebral cortex, striatum, and hippocampus was also quantified at the end of experiment. The results showed that cognitive function and neurons density in hippocampus of rats receiving ginger rhizome extract were improved while the brain infarct volume was decreased. The cognitive enhancing effect and neuroprotective effect occurred partly via the antioxidant activity of the extract. In conclusion, our study demonstrated the beneficial effect of ginger rhizome to protect against focal cerebral ischemia.

  5. M. leprae components induce nerve damage by complement activation: identification of lipoarabinomannan as the dominant complement activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahia El Idrissi, Nawal; Das, Pranab K; Fluiter, Kees; Rosa, Patricia S; Vreijling, Jeroen; Troost, Dirk; Morgan, B Paul; Baas, Frank; Ramaglia, Valeria

    2015-05-01

    Peripheral nerve damage is the hallmark of leprosy pathology but its etiology is unclear. We previously identified the membrane attack complex (MAC) of the complement system as a key determinant of post-traumatic nerve damage and demonstrated that its inhibition is neuroprotective. Here, we determined the contribution of the MAC to nerve damage caused by Mycobacterium leprae and its components in mouse. Furthermore, we studied the association between MAC and the key M. leprae component lipoarabinomannan (LAM) in nerve biopsies of leprosy patients. Intraneural injections of M. leprae sonicate induced MAC deposition and pathological changes in the mouse nerve, whereas MAC inhibition preserved myelin and axons. Complement activation occurred mainly via the lectin pathway and the principal activator was LAM. In leprosy nerves, the extent of LAM and MAC immunoreactivity was robust and significantly higher in multibacillary compared to paucibacillary donors (p = 0.01 and p = 0.001, respectively), with a highly significant association between LAM and MAC in the diseased samples (r = 0.9601, p = 0.0001). Further, MAC co-localized with LAM on axons, pointing to a role for this M. leprae antigen in complement activation and nerve damage in leprosy. Our findings demonstrate that MAC contributes to nerve damage in a model of M. leprae-induced nerve injury and its inhibition is neuroprotective. In addition, our data identified LAM as the key pathogen associated molecule that activates complement and causes nerve damage. Taken together our data imply an important role of complement in nerve damage in leprosy and may inform the development of novel therapeutics for patients.

  6. Sildenafil Attenuates Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Pelvic Ganglia Neurons after Bilateral Cavernosal Nerve Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah A. Garcia

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Erectile dysfunction is a common complication for patients undergoing surgeries for prostate, bladder, and colorectal cancers, due to damage of the nerves associated with the major pelvic ganglia (MPG. Functional re-innervation of target organs depends on the capacity of the neurons to survive and switch towards a regenerative phenotype. PDE5 inhibitors (PDE5i have been successfully used in promoting the recovery of erectile function after cavernosal nerve damage (BCNR by up-regulating the expression of neurotrophic factors in MPG. However, little is known about the effects of PDE5i on markers of neuronal damage and oxidative stress after BCNR. This study aimed to investigate the changes in gene and protein expression profiles of inflammatory, anti-inflammatory cytokines and oxidative stress related-pathways in MPG neurons after BCNR and subsequent treatment with sildenafil. Our results showed that BCNR in Fisher-344 rats promoted up-regulation of cytokines (interleukin- 1 (IL-1 β, IL-6, IL-10, transforming growth factor β 1 (TGFβ1, and oxidative stress factors (Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase, Myeloperoxidase (MPO, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, TNF receptor superfamily member 5 (CD40 that were normalized by sildenafil treatment given in the drinking water. In summary, PDE5i can attenuate the production of damaging factors and can up-regulate the expression of beneficial factors in the MPG that may ameliorate neuropathic pain, promote neuroprotection, and favor nerve regeneration.

  7. Effect of PAS triple therapy on nerve injury, oxidative stress and inflammatory response in patients with cerebral infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Jun Deng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of probucol + aspirin + atorvastatin (PAS triple therapy on nerve injury, oxidative stress and inflammatory response in patients with cerebral infarction. Methods: Patients with acute cerebral infarction who were treated in Affiliated Hospital of Jianghan University between February 2015 and January 2015 were selected and randomly divided into the PAS group who received probucol + aspirin + atorvastatin triple therapy and the control group who received aspirin + atorvastatin double therapy. The markers of nerve injury, oxidative stress and inflammatory response were determined before treatment and 15 d after treatment. Results: 15 d after treatment, peripheral blood Keap-1 expression and serum GPX1 contents of both groups of patients were significantly higher than those before treatment while peripheral blood Nrf-2 and ARE expression as well as serum S100B, NSE, sTRAIL, FKN, HMGB-1, sICAM-1, Chemerin and 8-iso-PGF2α contents were significantly lower than those before treatment, and peripheral blood Keap-1 expression and serum GPX1 content of PAS group were significantly higher than those of control group while peripheral blood Nrf-2 and ARE expression as well as serum S100B, NSE, sTRAIL, FKN, HMGB-1, sICAM-1, Chemerin and 8-iso-PGF2α contents were significantly lower than those of control group. Conclusion: PAS triple therapy can reduce the nerve injury as well as oxidative stress response and inflammatory response in patients with cerebral infarction.

  8. Novel Combinatory Approaches to Repair Visual System after Optic Nerve Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Novel Combinatory Approaches to Repair Visual System After Optic Nerve Damage 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...biological functions such as metabolism, growth, cell cycle, and survival ( Cardone et al., 1998; Diehl, Cheng, Roussel, & Sherr, 1998; Hers, Vincent...of injured adult sensory neurons. The Journal of Neuroscience, 21, 7161–7170. Cardone , M. H., Roy, N., Stennicke, H. R., Salvesen, G. S., Franke, T. F

  9. Early corneal nerve damage and recovery following small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) and laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed-Noriega, Karim; Riau, Andri K; Lwin, Nyein C; Chaurasia, Shyam S; Tan, Donald T; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2014-03-25

    We compared early corneal nerve changes after small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) and laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). A total of 12 rabbits underwent LASIK in one eye and SMILE in the fellow eye. Baseline and follow-up evaluations at 1, 2, and 4 weeks postoperatively were performed with in vivo confocal microscopy to evaluate 5 different areas within the treated zone: center, superior, inferior, nasal, and temporal. Cryosections of the corneas and whole mount of the extracted SMILE lenticules were analyzed with immunostaining of βIII-tubulin. One week after SMILE and LASIK, a decrease in nerve length and density was observed in all evaluated areas. A trend toward greater subbasal nerve length and density (SLD), more eyes with subbasal nerves (ESN), more eyes with subbasal nerves longer than 200 μm (SNL), and higher mean number of subbasal nerves by frame (NSN) in SMILE than in LASIK groups was observed at subsequent follow-up time points. Only the SMILE group showed a recovery of SLD, ESN, and NSN by week 4 (P > 0.05). A trend toward more eyes with sprouting subbasal nerves and greater mean number of sprouting nerves was observed in LASIK than in SMILE, indicating that more subbasal nerves were disrupted and undergoing regeneration after LASIK. Immunostaining at postoperative week 4 revealed a faster stromal nerve recovery in post-SMILE eyes compared to post-LASIK eyes. Our findings suggest that SMILE results in less nerve damage and faster nerve recovery than LASIK.

  10. Cranial nerve damage in patients after alpha (heavy)-particle radiation to the pituitary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, J.; Wei, W.C.; Chong, C.Y.

    1979-01-01

    The records of 161 patients were reviewed to determine if radiation damage had occurred following cranial irradiation. All of these patients had received alpha-particle radiation to their pituitary glands during the period when this form of therapy was given for diabetic retinopathy. Extraocular muscle palsy developed in 11 of these patients, iridoplegia in six, and fifth nerve damage in six. All of the palsies developed within a short period following their irradiation, and a definite dose relationship was present. The dose rate was approximately 100 rads/min for all cases. Fractionation varied but it is known for all cases

  11. Protective Effect of Alpha Lipoic Acid on Rat Sciatic Nerve Ischemia Reperfusion Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozan Turamanlar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alpha lipoic acid is a potent antioxidant that plays numerous roles in human health. This study examined the effect of ALA on rat sciatic nerve ischemia reperfusion damage. Aims: Protective effect of alpha lipoic acid (ALA on sciatic nerve following ischemia-reperfusion in rats was investigated by using light microscopy and biochemical methods. Provided that the protective effect of ALA on sciatic nerve is proven, we think the damage to the sciatic nerve that has already occurred or might occur in patients for various reasons maybe prevented or stopped by giving ALA in convenient doses. Study Design: Animal experiment. Methods: Forty-two adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-300 grams were used in this study. Rats were randomly divided into six groups including one control (Group 1, one sham (Group 2, two ischemia-reperfusion (Groups 3 and 4 and two treatment groups (Groups5 and 6. Doses of 60 and 100 mg/kg ALA were given (Group 5 and 6 intra peritoneally twice, 1 and 24 hours before the ischemia to each treatment group. Ischemia was carried out the abdominal aorta starting from the distal part of the renal vein for two hours followed by reperfusion for three hours. In immunohistochemical methods, fibronectin immunoreactivity was analyzed. For biochemical analyses, the tissues were taken in eppendorf microtubes and superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx enzyme activities as well as malondialdehyde (MDA and nitricoxide (NO levels were measured. Results: Fibronectin was observed to have increased significantly in the ischemia group; on the other hand, it was observed to have decreased in parallel to the doses in the ALA groups. Biochemical studies showed that SOD and GSHPx declined with ischemia-reperfusion, but the activities of these enzymes were increased in the treatment groups in parallel with the dose. It was found that increased MDA levels with ischemia-reperfusion were decreased in parallel with ALA dose

  12. A Macrophage Response to Mycobacterium leprae Phenolic Glycolipid Initiates Nerve Damage in Leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madigan, Cressida A; Cambier, C J; Kelly-Scumpia, Kindra M; Scumpia, Philip O; Cheng, Tan-Yun; Zailaa, Joseph; Bloom, Barry R; Moody, D Branch; Smale, Stephen T; Sagasti, Alvaro; Modlin, Robert L; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2017-08-24

    Mycobacterium leprae causes leprosy and is unique among mycobacterial diseases in producing peripheral neuropathy. This debilitating morbidity is attributed to axon demyelination resulting from direct interaction of the M. leprae-specific phenolic glycolipid 1 (PGL-1) with myelinating glia and their subsequent infection. Here, we use transparent zebrafish larvae to visualize the earliest events of M. leprae-induced nerve damage. We find that demyelination and axonal damage are not directly initiated by M. leprae but by infected macrophages that patrol axons; demyelination occurs in areas of intimate contact. PGL-1 confers this neurotoxic response on macrophages: macrophages infected with M. marinum-expressing PGL-1 also damage axons. PGL-1 induces nitric oxide synthase in infected macrophages, and the resultant increase in reactive nitrogen species damages axons by injuring their mitochondria and inducing demyelination. Our findings implicate the response of innate macrophages to M. leprae PGL-1 in initiating nerve damage in leprosy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Association between Serum Cytokines and Damage to Large and Small Nerve Fibers in Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Magrinelli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN is a frequent complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM and may involve small and large peripheral nerve fibers. Recent evidence suggests a role of cytokines in DPN. The paper is aimed at exploring whether the serum concentration of cytokines is associated with small and large nerve fiber function and with neuropathic pain (NP. We recruited a group of 32 type 2 DM patients who underwent serum cytokines (TNF-α, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, and IL-10 dosage as well as electrodiagnostic and quantitative sensory testing (QST assessment to explore damage to large and small nerve fibers. Raised serum levels of IL-6 and IL-10 correlated with markers of large nerve fiber sensory and motor axonal damage. Raised IL-10 serum level was associated with signs of motor nerve demyelination. No differences were found in pain characteristics and electrodiagnostic and QST markers of small nerve fiber function in relation to cytokines serum levels. IL-6 and IL-10 serum levels were associated with large nerve fiber damage but not to small fibers function or NP. IL-6 and IL-10 cytokines might play a role in the pathogenesis of nerve fiber damage or represent a compensatory or neuroprotective mechanism.

  14. Pudendal Nerve and Internal Pudendal Artery Damage May Contribute to Radiation-Induced Erectile Dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolan, Michael W., E-mail: mwnolan@ncsu.edu [Department of Clinical Sciences, and Center for Comparative Medicine and Translational Research, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (United States); Department of Environmental and Radiologic Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado (United States); Marolf, Angela J. [Department of Environmental and Radiologic Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado (United States); Ehrhart, E.J. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado (United States); Rao, Sangeeta [Department of Clinical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado (United States); Kraft, Susan L. [Department of Environmental and Radiologic Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado (United States); Engel, Stephanie [Department of Clinical Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado (United States); Yoshikawa, Hiroto; Golden, Anne E. [Department of Environmental and Radiologic Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado (United States); Wasserman, Todd H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); LaRue, Susan M. [Department of Environmental and Radiologic Health Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose/Objectives: Erectile dysfunction is common after radiation therapy for prostate cancer; yet, the etiopathology of radiation-induced erectile dysfunction (RI-ED) remains poorly understood. A novel animal model was developed to study RI-ED, wherein stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) was used to irradiate the prostate, neurovascular bundles (NVB), and penile bulb (PB) of dogs. The purpose was to describe vascular and neurogenic injuries after the irradiation of only the NVB or the PB, and after irradiation of all 3 sites (prostate, NVB, and PB) with varying doses of radiation. Methods and Materials: Dogs were treated with 50, 40, or 30 Gy to the prostate, NVB, and PB, or 50 Gy to either the NVB or the PB, by 5-fraction SBRT. Electrophysiologic studies of the pudendal nerve and bulbospongiosus muscles and ultrasound studies of pelvic perfusion were performed before and after SBRT. The results of these bioassays were correlated with histopathologic changes. Results: SBRT caused slowing of the systolic rise time, which corresponded to decreased arterial patency. Alterations in the response of the internal pudendal artery to vasoactive drugs were observed, wherein SBRT caused a paradoxical response to papaverine, slowing the systolic rise time after 40 and 50 Gy; these changes appeared to have some dose dependency. The neurofilament content of penile nerves was also decreased at high doses and was more profound when the PB was irradiated than when the NVB was irradiated. These findings are coincident with slowing of motor nerve conduction velocities in the pudendal nerve after SBRT. Conclusions: This is the first report in which prostatic irradiation was shown to cause morphologic arterial damage that was coincident with altered internal pudendal arterial tone, and in which decreased motor function in the pudendal nerve was attributed to axonal degeneration and loss. Further investigation of the role played by damage to these structures in RI-ED is

  15. Relation between hippocampal damage and cerebral cortical function in Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Asano, Tetsuichi; Kogure, Daiji; Sakurai, Hirofumi; Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Takasaki, Masaru

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the relation between hippocampal damage and cerebral cortical dysfunction in Alzheimer's disease (AD) using MRI and SPECT. Nineteen patients with AD and 10 control subjects were studied. Hippocampal damage (including hippocampal formation, entorhinal cortex, and parahippocampal white matter) was assessed to evaluate the severity of atrophy and the magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) and cerebral cortical dysfunction was evaluated by quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurements using SPECT with 99mTc-ECD. Compared with controls, patients with AD had significantly more atrophy of the medial temporal lobe and a decrease in MTRs of the hippocampus and parahippocampus. There were significant correlations between the severity of hippocampal damage and regional CBF in temporoparietal lobes. Mini-Mental State Examination scores significantly correlated with the severity of hippocampal damage and regional CBFs in temporoparietal lobes. These results suggest that the functional effect of hippocampal damage occurs in temporoparietal lobes in AD, probably due to neuronal disconnections between hippocampal areas (including the entorhinal cortex) and temporoparietal lobes. (author)

  16. Single-cell resolution mapping of neuronal damage in acute focal cerebral ischemia using thallium autometallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöber, Franziska; Baldauf, Kathrin; Ziabreva, Iryna; Harhausen, Denise; Zille, Marietta; Neubert, Jenni; Reymann, Klaus G; Scheich, Henning; Dirnagl, Ulrich; Schröder, Ulrich H; Wunder, Andreas; Goldschmidt, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal damage shortly after onset or after brief episodes of cerebral ischemia has remained difficult to assess with clinical and preclinical imaging techniques as well as with microscopical methods. We here show, in rodent models of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), that neuronal damage in acute focal cerebral ischemia can be mapped with single-cell resolution using thallium autometallography (TlAMG), a histochemical technique for the detection of the K(+)-probe thallium (Tl(+)) in the brain. We intravenously injected rats and mice with thallium diethyldithiocarbamate (TlDDC), a lipophilic chelate complex that releases Tl(+) after crossing the blood-brain barrier. We found, within the territories of the affected arteries, areas of markedly reduced neuronal Tl(+) uptake in all animals at all time points studied ranging from 15 minutes to 24 hours after MCAO. In large lesions at early time points, areas with neuronal and astrocytic Tl(+) uptake below thresholds of detection were surrounded by putative penumbral zones with preserved but diminished Tl(+) uptake. At 24 hours, the areas of reduced Tl(+)uptake matched with areas delineated by established markers of neuronal damage. The results suggest the use of (201)TlDDC for preclinical and clinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of hyperacute alterations in brain K(+) metabolism and prediction of tissue viability in cerebral ischemia.

  17. Cerebral Damage May Be the Primary Risk Factor for Visual Impairment in Preschool Children Born Extremely Premature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slidsborg, Carina; Bangsgaard, Regitze; Fledelius, Hans Callø

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To investigate the importance of cerebral damage and retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) for visual impairment in preschool children born extremely premature and to determine the primary risk factor of the two. METHODS A clinical follow-up study of a Danish national cohort of children born......, 3.0-25.2; P visual impairment in children born extremely premature, and cerebral damage may be the primary risk...... participants were identified through the National Birth Register and invited to participate in a clinical examination. The children were evaluated with regard to visual acuity, foveal sequelae, and maximum ROP stage and the presence of global developmental deficits (an indicator for cerebral damage...

  18. Edaravone, a Free Radical Scavenger, Mitigates Both Gray and White Matter Damages after Global Cerebral Ischemia in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Kozue; Nakao, Shinichi; Jomura, Sachiko; Sakamoto, Sachiyo; Miyamoto, Etsuko; Xu, Yan; Tomimoto, Hidekazu; Inada, Takefumi; Shingu, Koh

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that similar to cerebral gray matter (mainly composed of neuronal perikarya), white matter (composed of axons and glias) is vulnerable to ischemia. Edaravone, a free radical scavenger, has neuroprotective effects against focal cerebral ischemia even in humans. In this study, we investigated the time course and the severity of both gray and white matter damage following global cerebral ischemia by cardiac arrest, and examined whether edaravone protected the gray and the white matter. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used. Global cerebral ischemia was induced by 5 minutes of cardiac arrest and resuscitation (CAR). Edaravone, 3 mg/kg, was administered intravenously either immediately or 60 minutes after CAR. The morphological damage was assessed by cresyl violet staining. The microtubule-associated protein 2 (a maker of neuronal perikarya and dendrites), the β amyloid precursor protein (the accumulation of which is a maker of axonal damage), and the ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (a marker of microglia) were stained for immunohistochemical analysis. Significant neuronal perikaryal damage and marked microglial activation were observed in the hippocampal CA1 region with little axonal damage one week after CAR. Two weeks after CAR, the perikaryal damage and microglial activation were unchanged, but obvious axonal damage occurred. Administration of edaravone 60 minutes after CAR significantly mitigated the perikaryal damage, the axonal damage, and the microglial activation. Our results show that axonal damage develops slower than perikaryal damage and that edaravone can protect both gray and white matter after CAR in rats. PMID:19410562

  19. Cholinergic Potentiation of Restoration of Visual Function after Optic Nerve Damage in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Chamoun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing cortical plasticity and brain connectivity may improve residual vision following a visual impairment. Since acetylcholine plays an important role in attention and neuronal plasticity, we explored whether potentiation of the cholinergic transmission has an effect on the visual function restoration. To this end, we evaluated for 4 weeks the effect of the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor donepezil on brightness discrimination, visually evoked potentials, and visual cortex reactivity after a bilateral and partial optic nerve crush in adult rats. Donepezil administration enhanced brightness discrimination capacity after optic nerve crush compared to nontreated animals. The visually evoked activation of the primary visual cortex was not restored, as measured by evoked potentials, but the cortical neuronal activity measured by thallium autometallography was not significantly affected four weeks after the optic nerve crush. Altogether, the results suggest a role of the cholinergic system in postlesion cortical plasticity. This finding agrees with the view that restoration of visual function may involve mechanisms beyond the area of primary damage and opens a new perspective for improving visual rehabilitation in humans.

  20. Oxidative stress and nerve damage: Role in chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparna Areti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral neuropathy is a severe dose limiting toxicity associated with cancer chemotherapy. Ever since it was identified, the clear pathological mechanisms underlying chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN remain sparse and considerable involvement of oxidative stress and neuroinflammation has been realized recently. Despite the empirical use of antioxidants in the therapy of CIPN, the oxidative stress mediated neuronal damage in peripheral neuropathy is still debatable. The current review focuses on nerve damage due to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction as key pathogenic mechanisms involved in CIPN. Oxidative stress as a central mediator of apoptosis, neuroinflammation, metabolic disturbances and bioenergetic failure in neurons has been highlighted in this review along with a summary of research on dietary antioxidants and other nutraceuticals which have undergone prospective controlled clinical trials in patients undergoing chemotherapy.

  1. Influence of minimally invasive hematoma evacuation combined with nerve growth factor preparation on neurological function injury in patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang Tao; Feng Ai-Ping; Liu Lun-Bo; Huang Qi-Jun; Du Chen

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study the influence of minimally invasive hematoma evacuation combined with nerve growth factor preparation on neurological function injury in patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage. Methods: A total of 112 patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage who were treated in our hospital between July 2013 and February 2016 were collected, and according to random number table, they were divided into the control group (n=56) who underwent minimally invasive he...

  2. Wisdom tooth extraction causing lingual nerve and styloglossus muscle damage: a mimic of multiple cranial nerve palsies

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, A. S.; Evans, M.; Shah, S.; Catania, S.; Warren, J. D.; Gleeson, M. J.; Reilly, M. M.

    2017-01-01

    The combination of tongue hemianaesthesia, dysgeusia, dysarthria and dysphagia suggests the involvement of multiple cranial nerves. We present a case with sudden onset of these symptoms immediately following wisdom tooth extraction and highlight the clinical features that allowed localisation of the lesion to a focal, iatrogenic injury of the lingual nerve and adjacent styloglossus muscle.

  3. Post-traumatic Unilateral Avulsion of the Abducens Nerve with Damage to Cranial Nerves VII and VIII: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Fumiyuki; Akiyama, Yuji; Tsumura, Ryu; Kolakshyapati, Manish; Adhikari, Rupendra Bahadur; Takayasu, Takeshi; Nosaka, Ryo; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic injuries of the abducens nerve as a consequence of facial and/or head trauma occur with or without associated cervical or skull base fracture. This is the first report on unilateral avulsion of the abducens nerve in a 29-year-old man with severe right facial trauma. In addition, he exhibited mild left facial palsy, and moderate left hearing disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) revealed avulsion of left sixth cranial nerve. We recommend thin-slice MR examination in patients with abducens palsy after severe facial and/or head trauma.

  4. Molecular Imaging on the Cerebral Pathological Damage Target of Ketamine Dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Hong-jie1,2;HU Shu1;JIA Shao-wei1;GAO Zhou1;WANG Tong3;ZHAO Zheng-qin1

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available To study the cerebral pathological damage target which result from abusing ketamine through molecular imaging techniques, 20 cases of ketamine dependent patients looking for treatment at the Peking University Shenzhen Hospital and 31 healthy volunteers were included in this study, all of them got brain SPECT DAT imaging. The results were analyzed by SPSS 16.0. The bilateral caudate nucleus and putamen of healthy volunteers were roughly equally large, and the radioactive distribution of DAT in healthy volunteers were uniform and symmetrical. The bilateral corpora striatum showed typical “panda eyes” pattern. But the bilateral corpora striatum of ketamine dependent patients got smaller in shape, got disorders in pattern, and the radioactive distribution of DAT reduced or defected or even got disturbance and with much more non-specific radioactive. The V, m and Ra of bilateral corpora striatum in ketamine dependent patients were (21.03±3.15) cm3, (22.08±3.31) g and (5.37±1.08) %, respectively, which were significantly lower than the healthy volunteers (p<0.01. The cerebral pathological damage target which resulted from abusing ketamine was similar to those of compound codeine phosphate antitussive solution dependence, heroin dependence and MDMA dependence, all of these psychoactive substances damaged the function of DAT.

  5. Post-traumatic Unilateral Avulsion of the Abducens Nerve with Damage to Cranial Nerves VII and VIII: Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Yamasaki, Fumiyuki; Akiyama, Yuji; Tsumura, Ryu; Kolakshyapati, Manish; Adhikari, Rupendra Bahadur; Takayasu, Takeshi; Nosaka, Ryo; Kurisu, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic injuries of the abducens nerve as a consequence of facial and/or head trauma occur with or without associated cervical or skull base fracture. This is the first report on unilateral avulsion of the abducens nerve in a 29-year-old man with severe right facial trauma. In addition, he exhibited mild left facial palsy, and moderate left hearing disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) revealed avulsion of left sixth cra...

  6. Influence of minimally invasive hematoma evacuation combined with nerve growth factor preparation on neurological function injury in patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Tao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the influence of minimally invasive hematoma evacuation combined with nerve growth factor preparation on neurological function injury in patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage. Methods: A total of 112 patients with hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage who were treated in our hospital between July 2013 and February 2016 were collected, and according to random number table, they were divided into the control group (n=56 who underwent minimally invasive hematoma evacuation therapy and the observation group (n=56 who underwent minimally invasive hematoma evacuation combined with nerve growth factor preparation therapy. Serum contents of inflammatory mediators, nerve injury indexes and neurotransmitters were compared between two groups of patients before and after treatment. Results: Before treatment, there were no significant differences in serum contents of inflammatory mediators, nerve injury indexes and neurotransmitters between the two groups. After treatment, serum contents of inflammatory mediators such as CRP, PCT, IL-1β and IL-6 in observation group were lower than those in control group; serum contents of nerve injury indexes such as NSE, S100B, GEAP and MBP were lower than those in control group; serum contents of neurotransmitters such as SP, NPY, Glu and Asp were lower than those in control group while GABA and Gly were higher than those in control group. Conclusion: Minimally invasive hematoma evacuation combined with nerve growth factor preparation can effectively reduce neurological function injury, and has positive clinical significance.

  7. [Positional damage of the sciatic nerve during neurosurgical intervention into the posterior cranial fossa in the sitting position].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, A N; Lubnin, A Iu; Shimanskiĭ, V N; Kolycheva, M V; Ogurtsova, A A; Grigorian, A A

    2009-01-01

    The paper describes a rare case of severe, but reversible bilateral damage to the sciatic nerve (compression neuropathy) in a patient with Blumenbach's clivus meningioma developing during 12-hour operation removing the tumor in the patient's sitting position on the operating table. The etiology and prevention of this complication are discussed.

  8. Protective effect of Kombucha tea on brain damage induced by transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in rat

    OpenAIRE

    Najmeh Kabiri; Mahbubeh Setorki

    2016-01-01

    The aim of study was to investigate the potential neuroprotective effects of Kombucha on cerebral damage induced by ischemia in rats (n=99). Cerebral infarct volume in the ischemic rats received Kombucha solution showed no significance alteration. However, the permeability of blood-brain barrier significantly decreased in both ischemic rats received 15 mg/kg Kombucha tea and Sham group. In addition, brain water content in the ischemic groups treated with Kombucha solution was significantly hi...

  9. Wisdom tooth extraction causing lingual nerve and styloglossus muscle damage: a mimic of multiple cranial nerve palsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Aisling S; Evans, Matthew; Shah, Sachit; Catania, Santi; Warren, Jason D; Gleeson, Michael J; Reilly, Mary M

    2017-06-01

    The combination of tongue hemianaesthesia, dysgeusia, dysarthria and dysphagia suggests the involvement of multiple cranial nerves. We present a case with sudden onset of these symptoms immediately following wisdom tooth extraction and highlight the clinical features that allowed localisation of the lesion to a focal, iatrogenic injury of the lingual nerve and adjacent styloglossus muscle. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Characterization of neuronal damage by iomazenil binding and cerebral blood flow in an ischemic rat model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Hiroshi; Takeuchi, Akira; Koga, Sukehiko; Matsumura, Kaname; Nakashima, Hiromichi; Takeda, Kan; Yoshida, Toshimichi; Ichise, Masanori

    1998-01-01

    I-123-iomazenil is a SPECT probe for central benzodiazepine receptors (BZR) which may reflect intact cortical neuron density after ischemic insults. We evaluated whether neuronal damage in rats could be characterized by iomazenil as compared with cerebral blood flow (CBF). Serial changes in I-125-iomazenil for BZR and I-123-IMP for CBF were analyzed after the unilateral middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats by using an in vivo dualtracer technique. Uptake ratios of affected to contralateral regions were calculated. The iomazenil as well as IMP were decreased in all regions except for the cerebellum (remote area). Both iomazenil and IMP increased over time except in the temporal region (ischemic core). The iomazenil uptake was higher than IMP except in the ischemic core between 1 and 3-4 wk when iomazenil was lower than IMP. Iomazenil showed a moderate decrease in the proximal and middle parietal regions (peri-infarct areas) at 3-4 wk. The triphenyl-tetrazolium-chloride (TTC) stain at 1 wk demonstrated unstained tissue in the temporal region indicating tissue necrosis. With hematoxylin-eosin (HE) stain at 1 wk, widespread neuronal necrosis with occasional intact neurons were found in the proximal parietal region, and isolated necrotic neurons were represented in the distal parietal region. Iomazenil correlated well with the neuron distribution and the finding of a discrepancy between iomazenil and IMP might be useful in evaluating the neuronal damage. (author)

  11. Nimodipine Effects on Cerebral Microvessels and Sciatic Nerve in Aging Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Giena; Jansen, Arthur; Horvath, E.; Gispen, W.H.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1992-01-01

    At the ultrastructural level different anomalies of the cerebral microvasculature were encountered in the brains of aged rats. These aberrations can either be attributed to degeneration processes or to the perivascular deposition of, e.g., collagen fibrils and other, unidentified, proteinous debris.

  12. Attenuation of early phase inflammation by cannabidiol prevents pain and nerve damage in rat osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, Holly T; OʼBrien, Melissa; McDougall, Jason J

    2017-12-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a multifactorial joint disease, which includes joint degeneration, intermittent inflammation, and peripheral neuropathy. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a noneuphoria producing constituent of cannabis that has the potential to relieve pain. The aim of this study was to determine whether CBD is anti-nociceptive in OA, and whether inhibition of inflammation by CBD could prevent the development of OA pain and joint neuropathy. Osteoarthritis was induced in male Wistar rats (150-175 g) by intra-articular injection of sodium monoiodoacetate (MIA; 3 mg). On day 14 (end-stage OA), joint afferent mechanosensitivity was assessed using in vivo electrophysiology, whereas pain behaviour was measured by von Frey hair algesiometry and dynamic incapacitance. To investigate acute joint inflammation, blood flow and leukocyte trafficking were measured on day 1 after MIA. Joint nerve myelination was calculated by G-ratio analysis. The therapeutic and prophylactic effects of peripheral CBD (100-300 μg) were assessed. In end-stage OA, CBD dose-dependently decreased joint afferent firing rate, and increased withdrawal threshold and weight bearing (P < 0.0001; n = 8). Acute, transient joint inflammation was reduced by local CBD treatment (P < 0.0001; n = 6). Prophylactic administration of CBD prevented the development of MIA-induced joint pain at later time points (P < 0.0001; n = 8), and was also found to be neuroprotective (P < 0.05; n = 6-8). The data presented here indicate that local administration of CBD blocked OA pain. Prophylactic CBD treatment prevented the later development of pain and nerve damage in these OA joints. These findings suggest that CBD may be a safe, useful therapeutic for treating OA joint neuropathic pain.

  13. [Identification of early irreversible damage area in a rat model of cerebral ischemia and reperfusion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S; Guo, Y

    2000-02-01

    To observe the early neuron ischemic damage in focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion with histostaining methods of argyrophil III (AG III), Toludine blue(TB), and H&E, and to make out the 'separating line' between the areas of reversible and irreversible early ischemic damage. Forty-two male Wistar rats were randomly divided into the following groups: pseudo-surgical, blank-control, O2R0(occluded for 2 hours and reperfused for 0 hour), O2R0.5, O2R2, O2R4, O2R24. There were 6 rats in each group. Rats in experimental groups were suffered focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion through a nylon suture method. After a special processor for tissue manage, the brain were coronal sectioned and stained with H&E, TB, and AG III. The area where dark neurons dwell in (ischemic core) were calculated with image analysis system. The success rate of ischemic model for this experiment is 90%. After being stained with argyrophil III method, normal neurons appear yellow or pale brown, which is hardly distinguished from the pale brown background. The ischemic neuron stained black, and has collapsed body and "corkscrew-like" axon or dentries, which were broken to some extent. The neuropil in the dark neurons dwelt area appears gray or pale black, which is apparently different from the pale brown neighborhood area. The distribution of dark neurons in cortex varies according to different layers, and has a character of columnar form. The dark neurons present as early as 2 hours ischemia without reperfusion with AG III method. AG III stain could selectively display early ischemic neurons, the area dwelt by dark neurons represent early ischemic core. Dark neuron is possibly the irreversibly damaged neuron. Identification of dark neurons could be helpful in the discrimination between early ischemic center and penumbra.

  14. Neuroprotective effects of NAP against excitotoxic brain damage in the newborn mice: implications for cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowska, P; Passemard, S; Mok, A; Schwendimann, L; Gozes, I; Gressens, P

    2011-01-26

    Activity-dependent neuroprotective protein (ADNP) was shown to be essential for embryogenesis and brain development while NAP, an active motif of ADNP, is neuroprotective in a broad range of neurodegenerative disorders. In the present study, we examined the protective potential of ADNP/NAP in a mouse model of excitotoxic brain lesion mimicking brain damage associated with cerebral palsy. We demonstrated that NAP had a potent neuroprotective effect against ibotenate-induced excitotoxic damage in the cortical plate and the white matter of P5 mice, and moderate against brain lesions of P0 mice. In contrast, endogenous ADNP appears not to be involved in the response to excitotoxic challenge in the studied model. Our findings further show that NAP reduced the number of apoptotic neurons through activation of PI-3K/Akt pathway in the cortical plate or both PI-3K/Akt and MAPK/MEK1 kinases in the white matter. In addition, NAP prevented ibotenate-induced loss of pre-oligodendrocytes without affecting the number of astrocytes or activated microglia around the site of injection. These findings indicate that protective actions of NAP are mediated by triggering transduction pathways that are crucial for neuronal and oligodendroglial survival, thus, NAP might be a promising therapeutic agent for treating developing brain damage. © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. PPARγ agonist pioglitazone reduces matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity and neuronal damage after focal cerebral ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seong-Ryong; Kim, Hahn-Young; Hong, Jung-Suk; Baek, Won-Ki; Park, Jong-Wook

    2009-01-01

    Pioglitazone, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonist, has shown protective effects against ischemic insult in various tissues. Pioglitazone is also reported to reduce matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. MMPs can remodel extracellular matrix components in many pathological conditions. The current study was designed to investigate whether the neuroprotection of pioglitazone is related to its MMP inhibition in focal cerebral ischemia. Mice were subjected to 90 min focal ischemia and reperfusion. In gel zymography, pioglitazone reduced the upregulation of active form of MMP-9 after ischemia. In in situ zymograms, pioglitazone also reduced the gelatinase activity induced by ischemia. After co-incubation with pioglitazone, in situ gelatinase activity was directly reduced. Pioglitazone reduced the infarct volume significantly compared with controls. These results demonstrate that pioglitazone may reduce MMP-9 activity and neuronal damage following focal ischemia. The reduction of MMP-9 activity may have a possible therapeutic effect for the management of brain injury after focal ischemia.

  16. Protective effect of Kombucha tea on brain damage induced by transient cerebral ischemia and reperfusion in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najmeh Kabiri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was to investigate the potential neuroprotective effects of Kombucha on cerebral damage induced by ischemia in rats (n=99. Cerebral infarct volume in the ischemic rats received Kombucha solution showed no significance alteration. However, the permeability of blood-brain barrier significantly decreased in both ischemic rats received 15 mg/kg Kombucha tea and Sham group. In addition, brain water content in the ischemic groups treated with Kombucha solution was significantly higher than the Sham group, although right hemispheres in all of the treated groups illustrated higher brain water content than the left ones. Brain anti-oxidant capacity elevated in the ischemic rats treated with Kombucha and in the Sham group. Brain and plasma malondialdehyde concentrations significantly decreased in both of the ischemic groups injected with Kombucha. The findings suggest that Kombucha tea could be useful for the prevention of cerebral damage.

  17. Testing the Language of German Cerebral Palsy Patients with Right Hemispheric Language Organization after Early Left Hemispheric Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwilling, Eleonore; Krageloh-Mann, Ingeborg; Konietzko, Andreas; Winkler, Susanne; Lidzba, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Language functions are generally represented in the left cerebral hemisphere. After early (prenatally acquired or perinatally acquired) left hemispheric brain damage language functions may be salvaged by reorganization into the right hemisphere. This is different from brain lesions acquired in adulthood which normally lead to aphasia. Right…

  18. Effect of Pre-nutrion of Flax Seed Oil (Linum Usitatissimum on the amount of Cerebral ischemic lesion and motor nerve disorders in animal model rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SV Hosseini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Stroke is the third death agent (factor in industrial countries after cardiovascular disease and cancer. With regard to high content of antioxidant materials in flax seed oil like &alpha-linolenic acid, lignan as well as phenolic combinations like secoisolarisirsinol (SDG, this study performed for studding relationship between of cerebral ischemic lesion and motor-nerve disorders in model of stroke in rat. Methods: in the study, 35 male mice from strain Wistar divided to 5 groups. The groups included control, sham and 3 experimental groups. They received doses 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75 ml/kg from flax seed oil orally. By gavage for 30 days two control and sham groups received aqua distillate (distil water. Two hours after the last gavaged dose, overly group with 7 pieces operated for measurement of the amount of cerebral lesion and motor-nerve disorders. (Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion Model. Middle cerebral Artery Occlusion by the model resulted in local ischemic stroke in animal. Data analyzed by software SPSS, test ANOVA and disorders by test mann-Whitney. Findings: Average of records of motor-nerve disorders decreased significantly in group with dose 0.5 and 0.75 using flax seed oil (P<0.05. The amount of cerebral ischemic lesion in doses 0.5 and 0.75 than to control group is indicated meaning full different, but percent of the total cerebral lesion in control group in compared group with dose 0.25 is not indicated meaningful different. Percent of the amount of ischemic lesion in region penumbra in group 0.75 and 0.5 than to control group is indicated meaningful different, but percent of the amount of lesion in region penumbra in control group in compared region penumbra in group with dose 0.25 is not indicated meaning full different. Results: Findings of the study indicated that flax seed oil, particular in doses 0.5 and 0.75 resulted to decrease of the amount of cerebral ischemic lesion and decrease of motor-nerve disorders in

  19. Effect of rehabilitation training combined with hyperbaric oxygen therapy on the nerve cytokine secretion and oxidative stress in rehabilitation period of patients with cerebral infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Kong

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To discuss the influence of rehabilitation training combined with hyperbaric oxygen therapy on the nerve cytokine secretion and oxidative stress in rehabilitation period of patients with cerebral infarction. Methods: A total of 110 patients with cerebral infarction who received rehabilitation therapy in the hospital between January 2015 and May 2017 were divided into routine group (n=55 and hyperbaric oxygen group (n=55 according to random number table. Routine group received regular rehabilitation training, and hyperbaric oxygen group underwent rehabilitation training combined with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The differences in the serum contents of nerve factors, neurotransmitters and oxidative stress indexes were compared between the two groups at immediately after admission (T0 and after 14 d of treatment (T1. Results: At T0, there was no statistically significant difference in the serum contents of nerve factors, neurotransmitters and oxidative stress indexes between the two groups. At T1, serum nerve factors MBP and NSE contents of hyperbaric oxygen group were lower than those of routine group while NGF content was higher than that of routine group; serum neurotransmitter Glu content was lower than that of routine group while GABA content was higher than that of routine group; serum oxidative stress indexes ROS and LHP contents were lower than those of routine group while CAT and SOD contents were higher than those of routine group. Conclusion: Rehabilitation training combined with hyperbaric oxygen therapy can effectively optimize the nerve function and inhibit the systemic oxidative stress response in rehabilitation period of patients with cerebral infarction.

  20. Terminal nerve: cranial nerve zero

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eduardo Duque Parra

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been stated, in different types of texts, that there are only twelve pairs of cranial nerves. Such texts exclude the existence of another cranial pair, the terminal nerve or even cranial zero. This paper considers the mentioned nerve like a cranial pair, specifying both its connections and its functional role in the migration of liberating neurons of the gonadotropic hormone (Gn RH. In this paper is also stated the hypothesis of the phylogenetic existence of a cerebral sector and a common nerve that integrates the terminal nerve with the olfactory nerves and the vomeronasals nerves which seem to carry out the odors detection function as well as in the food search, pheromone detection and nasal vascular regulation.

  1. Damaged Neocortical Perineuronal Nets Due to Experimental Focal Cerebral Ischemia in Mice, Rats and Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Härtig

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available As part of the extracellular matrix (ECM, perineuronal nets (PNs are polyanionic, chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG-rich coatings of certain neurons, known to be affected in various neural diseases. Although these structures are considered as important parts of the neurovascular unit (NVU, their role during evolution of acute ischemic stroke and subsequent tissue damage is poorly understood and only a few preclinical studies analyzed PNs after acute ischemic stroke. By employing three models of experimental focal cerebral ischemia, this study was focused on histopathological alterations of PNs and concomitant vascular, glial and neuronal changes according to the NVU concept. We analyzed brain tissues obtained 1 day after ischemia onset from: (a mice after filament-based permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO; (b rats subjected to thromboembolic MACO; and (c sheep at 14 days after electrosurgically induced focal cerebral ischemia. Multiple fluorescence labeling was applied to explore simultaneous alterations of NVU and ECM. Serial mouse sections labeled with the net marker Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA displayed largely decomposed and nearly erased PNs in infarcted neocortical areas that were demarcated by up-regulated immunoreactivity for vascular collagen IV (Coll IV. Subsequent semi-quantitative analyses in mice confirmed significantly decreased WFA-staining along the ischemic border zone and a relative decrease in the directly ischemia-affected neocortex. Triple fluorescence labeling throughout the three animal models revealed up-regulated Coll IV and decomposed PNs accompanied by activated astroglia and altered immunoreactivity for parvalbumin, a calcium-binding protein in fast-firing GABAergic neurons which are predominantly surrounded by neocortical PNs. Furthermore, ischemic neocortical areas in rodents simultaneously displayed less intense staining of WFA, aggrecan, the net components neurocan, versican and the

  2. Boric acid reduces axonal and myelin damage in experimental sciatic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahir Kizilay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of boric acid in experimental acute sciatic nerve injury. Twenty-eight adult male rats were randomly divided into four equal groups (n = 7: control (C, boric acid (BA, sciatic nerve injury (I , and sciatic nerve injury + boric acid treatment (BAI. Sciatic nerve injury was generated using a Yasargil aneurysm clip in the groups I and BAI. Boric acid was given four times at 100 mg/kg to rats in the groups BA and BAI after injury (by gavage at 0, 24, 48 and 72 hours but no injury was made in the group BA. In vivo electrophysiological tests were performed at the end of the day 4 and sciatic nerve tissue samples were taken for histopathological examination. The amplitude of compound action potential, the nerve conduction velocity and the number of axons were significantly lower and the myelin structure was found to be broken in group I compared with those in groups C and BA. However, the amplitude of the compound action potential, the nerve conduction velocity and the number of axons were significantly greater in group BAI than in group I. Moreover, myelin injury was significantly milder and the intensity of nuclear factor kappa B immunostaining was significantly weaker in group BAI than in group I. The results of this study show that administration of boric acid at 100 mg/kg after sciatic nerve injury in rats markedly reduces myelin and axonal injury and improves the electrophysiological function of injured sciatic nerve possibly through alleviating oxidative stress reactions.

  3. β2-Adrenergic Receptor-Mediated HIF-1α Upregulation Mediates Blood Brain Barrier Damage in Acute Cerebral Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyun Sun

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Disruption of the blood brain barrier (BBB within the thrombolytic time window is an antecedent event to intracerebral hemorrhage in ischemic stroke. Our recent studies showed that 2-h cerebral ischemia induced BBB damage in non-infarcted area and secreted matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 accounted for this disruption. However, the factors that affect MMP-2 secretion and regulate BBB damage remains unknown. Since hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α was discovered as a mater regulator in hypoxia, we sought to investigate the roles of HIF-1α in BBB damage as well as the factors regulating HIF-1α expression in the ischemic brain. in vivo rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO and in vitro oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD models were used to mimic ischemia. Pretreatment with HIF-1α inhibitor YC-1 significantly inhibited 2-h MCAO-induced BBB damage, which was accompanied by suppressed occludin degradation and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF mRNA upregulation. Interestingly, β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR antagonist ICI 118551 attenuated ischemia-induced BBB damage by regulating HIF-1α expression. Double immunostaining showed that HIF-1α was upregulated in ischemic neurons but not in astrocytes andendothelial cells. Of note, HIF-1α inhibition with inhibitor YC-1 or siRNA significantly prevented OGD-induced VEGF upregulation as well as the secretion of VEGF and MMP-2 in neurons. More importantly, blocking β2-AR with ICI 118551 suppressedHIF-1α upregulation in ischemic neurons and attenuated occludin degradation induced by the conditioned media of OGD-treatedneurons. Taken together, blockade of β2-AR-mediated HIF-1α upregulation mediates BBB damage during acute cerebral ischemia. These findings provide new mechanistic understanding of early BBB damage in ischemic stroke and may help reduce thrombolysis-related hemorrhagic complications.

  4. Structural Brain Damage and Upper Limb Kinematics in Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Mailleux

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In children with unilateral cerebral palsy (uCP virtually nothing is known on the relation between structural brain damage and upper limb (UL kinematics quantified with three-dimensional movement analysis (3DMA. This explorative study aimed to (1 investigate differences in UL kinematics between children with different lesion timings, i.e., periventricular white matter (PWM vs. cortical and deep gray matter (CDGM lesions and (2 to explore the relation between UL kinematics and lesion location and extent within each lesion timing group.Methods: Forty-eight children (age 10.4 ± 2.7 year; 29 boys; 21 right-sided; 33 PWM; 15 CDGM underwent an UL 3DMA during a reach-to-grasp task. Spatiotemporal parameters [movement duration, (timing of maximum velocity, trajectory straightness], the Arm Profile Score (APS and Arm Variable Scores (AVS were extracted. The APS and AVS refer to the total amount of movement pathology and movement deviations of the wrist, elbow, shoulder, scapula and trunk respectively. Brain lesion location and extent were scored based on FLAIR-images using a semi-quantitative MRI-scale.Results: Children with CDGM lesions showed more aberrant spatiotemporal parameters (p < 0.03 and more movement pathology (APS, p = 0.003 compared to the PWM group, mostly characterized by increased wrist flexion (p = 0.01. In the CDGM group, moderate to high correlations were found between lesion location and extent and duration, timing of maximum velocity and trajectory straightness (r = 0.53–0.90. Lesion location and extent were further moderately correlated with distal UL movement pathology (wrist flexion/extension, elbow pronation/supination, elbow flexion/extension; r = 0.50–0.65 and with the APS (r = 0.51–0.63. In the PWM group, only a few and low correlations were observed, mostly between damage to the PLIC and higher AVS of elbow flexion/extension, shoulder elevation and trunk rotation (r = 0.35–0.42. Regression analysis

  5. Green tea polyphenols alleviate early BBB damage during experimental focal cerebral ischemia through regulating tight junctions and PKCalpha signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaobai; Wang, Zhenhua; Wang, Ping; Yu, Bo; Liu, Yunhui; Xue, Yixue

    2013-07-21

    It has been supposed that green tea polyphenols (GTPs) have neuroprotective effects on brain damage after brain ischemia in animal experiments. Little is known regarding GTPs' protective effects against the blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption after ischemic stroke. We investigated the effects of GTPs on the expression of claudin-5, occludin, and ZO-1, and the corresponding cellular mechanisms involved in the early stage of cerebral ischemia. Male Wistar rats were subjected to a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 0, 30, 60, and 120 min. GTPs (400 mg/kg/day) or vehicle was administered by intragastric gavage twice a day for 30 days prior to MCAO. At different time points, the expression of claudin-5, occludin, ZO-1, and PKCα signaling pathway in microvessel fragments of cerebral ischemic tissue were evaluated. GTPs reduced BBB permeability at 60 min and 120 min after ischemia as compared with the vehicle group. Transmission electron microscopy also revealed that GTPs could reverse the opening of tight junction (TJ) barrier at 60 min and 120 min after MACO. The decreased mRNA and protein expression levels of claudin-5, occludin, and ZO-1 in microvessel fragments of cerebral ischemic tissue were significantly prevented by treatment with GTPs at the same time points after ischemia in rats. Furthermore, GTPs could attenuate the increase in the expression levels of PKCα mRNA and protein caused by cerebral ischemia. These results demonstrate that GTPs may act as a potential neuroprotective agent against BBB damage at the early stage of focal cerebral ischemia through the regulation of TJ and PKCα signaling.

  6. Optic Nerve Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    The optic nerve is a bundle of more than 1 million nerve fibers that carry visual messages. You have one connecting ... retina) to your brain. Damage to an optic nerve can cause vision loss. The type of vision ...

  7. Optic Nerve Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News About Us Donate In This Section Optic Nerve Imaging email Send this article to a friend ... measurements of nerve fiber damage (or loss). The Nerve Fiber Analyzer (GDx) uses laser light to measure ...

  8. Defective motion processing in children with cerebral visual impairment due to periventricular white matter damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Joel M; Gilmore, Rick O; Shaikh, Sumera M; Kunselman, Allen R; Trescher, William V; Tashima, Lauren M; Boltz, Marianne E; McAuliffe, Matthew B; Cheung, Albert; Fesi, Jeremy D

    2012-07-01

    We sought to characterize visual motion processing in children with cerebral visual impairment (CVI) due to periventricular white matter damage caused by either hydrocephalus (eight individuals) or periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) associated with prematurity (11 individuals). Using steady-state visually evoked potentials (ssVEP), we measured cortical activity related to motion processing for two distinct types of visual stimuli: 'local' motion patterns thought to activate mainly primary visual cortex (V1), and 'global' or coherent patterns thought to activate higher cortical visual association areas (V3, V5, etc.). We studied three groups of children: (1) 19 children with CVI (mean age 9y 6mo [SD 3y 8mo]; 9 male; 10 female); (2) 40 neurologically and visually normal comparison children (mean age 9y 6mo [SD 3y 1mo]; 18 male; 22 female); and (3) because strabismus and amblyopia are common in children with CVI, a group of 41 children without neurological problems who had visual deficits due to amblyopia and/or strabismus (mean age 7y 8mo [SD 2y 8mo]; 28 male; 13 female). We found that the processing of global as opposed to local motion was preferentially impaired in individuals with CVI, especially for slower target velocities (p=0.028). Motion processing is impaired in children with CVI. ssVEP may provide useful and objective information about the development of higher visual function in children at risk for CVI. © The Authors. Journal compilation © Mac Keith Press 2011.

  9. PLACD-7T Study: Atherosclerotic Carotid Plaque Components Correlated with Cerebral Damage at 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, A G; Bovens, S M; Koning, W; Hendrikse, J; Pasterkamp, G; Moll, F L; de Borst, G J

    2011-02-01

    In patients with carotid artery stenosis histological plaque composition is associated with plaque stability and with presenting symptomatology. Preferentially, plaque vulnerability should be taken into account in pre-operative work-up of patients with severe carotid artery stenosis. However, currently no appropriate and conclusive (non-) invasive technique to differentiate between the high and low risk carotid artery plaque in vivo is available. We propose that 7 Tesla human high resolution MRI scanning will visualize carotid plaque characteristics more precisely and will enable correlation of these specific components with cerebral damage. The aim of the PlaCD-7T study is 1: to correlate 7T imaging with carotid plaque histology (gold standard); and 2: to correlate plaque characteristics with cerebral damage ((clinically silent) cerebral (micro) infarcts or bleeds) on 7 Tesla high resolution (HR) MRI. We propose a single center prospective study for either symptomatic or asymptomatic patients with haemodynamic significant (70%) stenosis of at least one of the carotid arteries. The Athero-Express (AE) biobank histological analysis will be derived according to standard protocol. Patients included in the AE and our prospective study will undergo a pre-operative 7 Tesla HR-MRI scan of both the head and neck area. We hypothesize that the 7 Tesla MRI scanner will allow early identification of high risk carotid plaques being associated with micro infarcted cerebral areas, and will thus be able to identify patients with a high risk of periprocedural stroke, by identification of surrogate measures of increased cardiovascular risk.

  10. Chronic ethanol exposure during adolescence in rats induces motor impairments and cerebral cortex damage associated with oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Francisco Bruno; Santana, Luana Nazaré da Silva; Bezerra, Fernando Romualdo; De Carvalho, Sabrina; Fontes-Júnior, Enéas Andrade; Prediger, Rui Daniel; Crespo-López, Maria Elena; Maia, Cristiane Socorro Ferraz; Lima, Rafael Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Binge drinking is common among adolescents, and this type of ethanol exposure may lead to long-term nervous system damage. In the current study, we evaluated motor performance and tissue alterations in the cerebral cortex of rats subjected to intermittent intoxication with ethanol from adolescence to adulthood. Adolescent male Wistar rats (35 days old) were treated with distilled water or ethanol (6.5 g/kg/day, 22.5% w/v) during 55 days by gavage to complete 90 days of age. The open field, inclined plane and the rotarod tests were used to assess the spontaneous locomotor activity and motor coordination performance in adult animals. Following completion of behavioral tests, half of animals were submitted to immunohistochemical evaluation of NeuN (marker of neuronal bodies), GFAP (a marker of astrocytes) and Iba1 (microglia marker) in the cerebral cortex while the other half of the animals were subjected to analysis of oxidative stress markers by biochemical assays. Chronic ethanol intoxication in rats from adolescence to adulthood induced significant motor deficits including impaired spontaneous locomotion, coordination and muscle strength. These behavioral impairments were accompanied by marked changes in all cellular populations evaluated as well as increased levels of nitrite and lipid peroxidation in the cerebral cortex. These findings indicate that continuous ethanol intoxication from adolescence to adulthood is able to provide neurobehavioral and neurodegenerative damage to cerebral cortex.

  11. Protective effect of green tea polyphenol EGCG against neuronal damage and brain edema after unilateral cerebral ischemia in gerbils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyung; Bae, Jae Hoon; Lee, Seong-Ryong

    2004-09-15

    Previous studies have demonstrated that a green tea polyphenol, (-)-epigallocatechine gallate (EGCG), has a potent free radical scavenging and antioxidant effect. Glutamate leads to excitotoxicity and oxidative stress, which are important pathophysiologic responses to cerebral ischemia resulting in brain edema and neuronal damage. We investigated the effect of EGCG on excitotoxic neuronal damage in a culture system and the effect on brain edema formation and lesion after unilateral cerebral ischemia in gerbils. In vitro, excitotoxicity was induced by 24-hr incubation with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA; 10 microM), AMPA (10 microM), or kainate (20 microM). EGCG (5 microM) was added to the culture media alone or with excitotoxins. We examined malondialdehyde (MDA) level and neuronal viability to evaluate the effect of EGCG. In vivo, unilateral cerebral ischemia was induced by occlusion of the right common carotid artery for 30, 60, or 90 min and followed by reperfusion of 24 hr. Brain edema, MDA, and infarction were examined to evaluate the protective effect of EGCG. EGCG (25 or 50 mg/kg, intraperitoneally) was administered twice, at 30 min before and immediately after ischemia. EGCG reduced excitotoxin-induced MDA production and neuronal damage in the culture system. In the in vivo study, treatment of gerbils with the lower EGCG dose failed to show neuroprotective effects; however, the higher EGCG dose attenuated the increase in MDA level caused by cerebral ischemia. EGCG also reduced the formation of postischemic brain edema and infarct volume. These results demonstrate EGCG may have future possibilities as a neuroprotective agent against excitotoxicity-related neurologic disorders such as brain ischemia.

  12. Diabetic microangiopathy: impact of impaired cerebral vasoreactivity and delayed angiogenesis after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion on stroke damage and cerebral repair in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poittevin, Marine; Bonnin, Philippe; Pimpie, Cynthia; Rivière, Léa; Sebrié, Catherine; Dohan, Anthony; Pocard, Marc; Charriaut-Marlangue, Christiane; Kubis, Nathalie

    2015-03-01

    Diabetes increases the risk of stroke by three, increases related mortality, and delays recovery. We aimed to characterize functional and structural alterations in cerebral microvasculature before and after experimental cerebral ischemia in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes. We hypothesized that preexisting brain microvascular disease in patients with diabetes might partly explain increased stroke severity and impact on outcome. Diabetes was induced in 4-week-old C57Bl/6J mice by intraperitoneal injections of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg). After 8 weeks of diabetes, the vasoreactivity of the neurovascular network to CO2 was abolished and was not reversed by nitric oxide (NO) donor administration; endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) mRNA, phospho-eNOS protein, nNOS, and phospho-nNOS protein were significantly decreased; angiogenic and vessel maturation factors (vascular endothelial growth factor a [VEGFa], angiopoietin 1 (Ang1), Ang2, transforming growth factor-β [TGF-β], and platelet-derived growth factor-β [PDGF-β]) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) occludin and zona occludens 1 (ZO-1) expression were significantly decreased; and microvessel density was increased without changes in ultrastructural imaging. After permanent focal cerebral ischemia induction, infarct volume and neurological deficit were significantly increased at D1 and D7, and neuronal death (TUNEL+ / NeuN+ cells) and BBB permeability (extravasation of Evans blue) at D1. At D7, CD31+ / Ki67+ double-immunolabeled cells and VEGFa and Ang2 expression were significantly increased, indicating delayed angiogenesis. We show that cerebral microangiopathy thus partly explains stroke severity in diabetes. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  13. MicroRNA-381 Favors Repair of Nerve Injury Through Regulation of the SDF-1/CXCR4 Signaling Pathway via LRRC4 in Acute Cerebral Ischemia after Cerebral Lymphatic Blockage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Min Piao

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Acute cerebral ischemia is a manifestation of cerebral vascular insufficiency and has a high mortality. However, the therapy for acute cerebral ischemia is still limited. This study aimed to investigate the effect of microRNA-381 (miR-381 on the repair of nerve injury in rats with acute cerebral ischemia after cerebral lymphatic blockage (CLB by targeting leucine-rich repeat C4 protein (LRRC4 through the Stromal cell-derived factor-1/CXC chemokine receptor-4 signaling pathway. Methods: Rat models of CLB and middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO were established, and 56 Wistar rats were divided into sham, MCAO, CLB + MCAO, CLB + MCAO + miR-381 inhibitor, CLB + MCAO + miR-381 mimic, CLB + MCAO + AMD3100 and CLB + MCAO + miR-381 mimic + AMD3100 groups. Modified neurological severity score (mNSS was used to determine nerve injury, TTC staining to measure infarction volume, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL staining and flow cytometry to evaluate cell apoptosis, immunofluorescence to measure BrdU-positive cell number, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA to determine contents of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β, interleukin-6 (IL-6, interleukin-10 (IL-10, nerve growth factor (NGF and neurite outgrowth inhibitor -A (Nogo-A, Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR and Western blotting to evaluate expression of miR-381, LRRC4, SDF-1, CXCR4, pERK, Slit2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Results: LRRC4 was a target gene of miR-381. Compared with the results in the CLB + MCAO group, mNSS, infarction volume, apoptosis rate and TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and Nogo-A contents as well as LRRC4 expression in the CLB + MCAO + miR-381 inhibitor and CLB + MCAO + AMD3100 groups were increased (those in the CLB + MCAO + AMD3100 group > those in the CLB + MCAO + miR-381 mimic + AMD3100 group, while BrdU-positive cell number, contents of NGF and

  14. Early MEK1/2 Inhibition after Global Cerebral Ischemia in Rats Reduces Brain Damage and Improves Outcome by Preventing Delayed Vasoconstrictor Receptor Upregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Sara Ellinor; Larsen, Stine Schmidt; Povlsen, Gro Klitgaard

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Global cerebral ischemia following cardiac arrest is associated with increased cerebral vasoconstriction and decreased cerebral blood flow, contributing to delayed neuronal cell death and neurological detriments in affected patients. We hypothesize that upregulation of contractile ETB...... and 5-HT1B receptors, previously demonstrated in cerebral arteries after experimental global ischemia, are a key mechanism behind insufficient perfusion of the post-ischemic brain, proposing blockade of this receptor upregulation as a novel target for prevention of cerebral hypoperfusion and delayed...... neuronal cell death after global cerebral ischemia. The aim was to characterize the time-course of receptor upregulation and associated neuronal damage after global ischemia and investigate whether treatment with the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 can prevent cerebrovascular receptor upregulation and thereby...

  15. Diffuse damage to central nervous system in progressive rheumatoid arthritis complicated by cerebral hermorrhage after radioisotope cisternography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarnowska-Dziduszko, E.; Lazarowicz, J.

    1980-01-01

    Presented case reveals unusual reaction of central nervous system in the course of progressive rheumatoid arthritis and cerebral hemorrhage as a rare complication after radioisotope investigation of cerebro-spinal fluid spaces. Female, 58 years old which was treated for 22 years for progressive rheumatoid arthritis developed during last 3 years of life a psychoorganic syndrome with temporal epilepsy and slight left sided hemiparesis. After radioisotope cisternography appeared decerebration followed by death. On autopsy the hemorrhagic foci were found in left cerebral hemisphere and in the brain stem. Histological finding was generalized severe damage to interstitial vessels diagnosed as fibrinotic, necrotizing degeneration of capillary and arteriolar wall, significant proliferation of microglia in the white matter and brain stem. Chronic inflammatory infiltrates were present in leptomeninges. Pathogenesis of findings in connection with progressive rheumatoid arthritis and complications due to cisternography is discussed. (author)

  16. After facial nerve damage, regenerating axons become aberrant throughout the length of the nerve and not only at the site of the lesion: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, D; Raisman, G

    2004-02-01

    After facial nerve trauma, aberrant regeneration is associated with synkinesis. Animal models of mechanical nerve guides or reparative cell transplants at the site of a lesion have not been shown to improve disorganized regeneration. We examined whether this is because regenerating axons become disorganized throughout the length of the nerve and not only at the site of the lesion. In rats (n = 12), retrograde fluorescent tracer techniques were used to establish that most of the temporal branch fibres were carried in the superior half of the facial nerve trunk. In two further groups of rats (n = 24) a complete proximal facial nerve lesion was made, and the nerve immediately repaired by suture. After 4 weeks, at a second operation, the superior half of the facial nerve trunk was cut, either proximal or distal to the original lesion, and retrograde tracers were applied to distal branches of the nerve. It was possible to localize the points at which regenerating fibres became aberrant in their course by studying the number of labelled motoneurons in the facial nucleus after application of the tracer to the temporal branch of the nerve: this was similar in the distal and proximal hemisection groups, suggesting that aberrant axonal development occurred throughout the length of the nerve. Future strategies aimed at improving the organization of regeneration need to provide guidance cues not only at the site of the lesion as previously thought, but also throughout the length of the nerve.

  17. PLACD-7T Study: Atherosclerotic Carotid Plaque Components Correlated with Cerebral Damage at 7 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Hartog, A.G; Bovens, S.M; Koning, W; Hendrikse, J; Pasterkamp, G; Moll, F.L; de Borst, G.J

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: In patients with carotid artery stenosis histological plaque composition is associated with plaque stability and with presenting symptomatology. Preferentially, plaque vulnerability should be taken into account in pre-operative work-up of patients with severe carotid artery stenosis. However, currently no appropriate and conclusive (non-) invasive technique to differentiate between the high and low risk carotid artery plaque in vivo is available. We propose that 7 Tesla human high resolution MRI scanning will visualize carotid plaque characteristics more precisely and will enable correlation of these specific components with cerebral damage. Study objective: The aim of the PlaCD-7T study is 1: to correlate 7T imaging with carotid plaque histology (gold standard); and 2: to correlate plaque characteristics with cerebral damage ((clinically silent) cerebral (micro) infarcts or bleeds) on 7 Tesla high resolution (HR) MRI. Design: We propose a single center prospective study for either symptomatic or asymptomatic patients with haemodynamic significant (70%) stenosis of at least one of the carotid arteries. The Athero-Express (AE) biobank histological analysis will be derived according to standard protocol. Patients included in the AE and our prospective study will undergo a pre-operative 7 Tesla HR-MRI scan of both the head and neck area. Discussion: We hypothesize that the 7 Tesla MRI scanner will allow early identification of high risk carotid plaques being associated with micro infarcted cerebral areas, and will thus be able to identify patients with a high risk of periprocedural stroke, by identification of surrogate measures of increased cardiovascular risk. PMID:22294972

  18. Closure of laryngotracheal cavity and tracheostomy for intractable aspiration secondary to radiation encephalopathy or radiation damage of cranial nerve after radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Shenhong; Su, Zhengzhong; He, Xiaoguang; Li, Min; Li, Tianying

    2006-09-01

    Closure of the laryngotracheal cavity and tracheostomy is especially suitable for intractable aspiration secondary to radiation encephalopathy or damage of cranial nerve after radiation for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). To investigate the clinical value, technique, indications and contraindications of closure of the laryngotracheal cavity and tracheostomy for intractable aspiration secondary to radiation encephalopathy (REP) or radiation damage of cranial nerve after radiotherapy of NPC. Thirty patients, suffering from intractable aspiration secondary to radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma, were treated with closure of the laryngotracheal cavity and tracheostomy and were observed for at least 1 year. Intractable aspiration and dyspnea were completely eradicated in all patients. The quality of their life was greatly improved.

  19. Effects of different musical stimuli in vital signs and facial expressions in patients with cerebral damage: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Ana Sofia Fernandes; Ramos, Antonio; Bermejo, Emilia; Casero, Mónica; Corrales, José Manuel; Grantham, Sarah

    2014-04-01

    Along history, music has been used in a variety of ways for therapeutic purposes and has long been recognized for its physiological and psychological effects. Music listening can be an effective nursing intervention, to enhance relaxation, provide distraction, and reduce pain. The aims of this study were to identify changes produced by different musical stimuli in blood pressure (BP), heart rate (HR), respiratory rate (RR), and oxygen saturations (SpO2) and to verify the influence of music listening on patients' facial expressions with severe cerebral damage. A quasiexperimental study was performed in 26 patients with severe cerebral damage, divided into control and case groups. Patients belonging to the case group were exposed to musical stimuli, radio, classical relaxing music (CRM), and relaxing music with nature sounds (RMNS). Patients were evaluated by measuring vital signs before and after exposure to each musical stimulus, as were the patients within the control group. Patients in the control group were exempt from any musical stimulus. Facial expressions were observed in each patient within the case group during the intervention. The results show that radio produced a slight increase in systolic BP, HR, RR, and SpO2. The CRM induced a decrease of RR and an increase of SpO2 and also produced alterations of the facial expression. When RMNS was played, a decrease was displayed in BP, HR, and RR and an increase was displayed in SpO2. Alterations in facial expression were displayed in each patient. The results of the study suggest that the application of musical stimuli such as CRM and RMNS can be used to provide a state of relaxation in patients with severe cerebral damage.

  20. Nerve Damage in Young Patients with Leprosy Diagnosed in an Endemic Area of the Brazilian Amazon: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandeira, Sabrina Sampaio; Pires, Carla Avelar; Quaresma, Juarez Antonio Simões

    2017-06-01

    To describe nerve damage and its association with clinical and epidemiologic characteristics in young patients with leprosy diagnosed in an endemic area of the Brazilian Amazon. All 45 patients with leprosy younger than 15 years of age and diagnosed at a health referral unit in northern Brazil were invited to participate in a cross-sectional, descriptive, analytical study. Subjects were submitted to a templated simple neurologic examination of the peripheral nerves and answered a structured questionnaire. Of 41 cases, referral was the mode of detection in 33 participants (80.5%); 19 (46.3%) had been seen by 3 or more physicians to obtain a diagnosis, and 26 (63.4%) had received other diagnoses. The interval between the onset of symptoms and diagnosis was more than 1 year in 30 cases (73.2%). Borderline leprosy was the predominant clinical form (48.8%); 63.4% of the participants had multibacillary leprosy, 31.7% had nerve damage, and 17.1% exhibited disabilities. The following variables showed a statistically significant association (P???.05) with nerve damage at diagnosis: home visit by the community health worker, number of doctors seen, number of skin lesions (>5), and lesions along the path of nerve trunks. Centralized healthcare, a low frequency of home visits by community health workers, and the difficulty in diagnosing leprosy in children are factors that contribute to late treatment initiation and an increased risk of peripheral nerve damage. In addition, multiple skin lesions and lesions along the path of nerve trunks require rigorous monitoring. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. AZALEP a randomized controlled trial of azathioprine to treat leprosy nerve damage and Type 1 reactions in India: Main findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Diana N J; Darlong, Joydeepa; Govindharaj, Pitchaimani; Kurian, Royce; Sundarrao, Pamidipani; John, Annamma S

    2017-03-01

    Leprosy Type 1 reactions are difficult to treat and only 70% of patients respond to steroid treatment. Azathioprine has been used as an immune-suppressant and we tested its efficacy in treating leprosy T1R. Randomised controlled trial adding azathioprine to steroid treatment for leprosy reactions. This trial was conducted in four leprosy hospitals in India. Patients with a new leprosy Type 1 reaction affecting either skin or nerve were recruited. They were given a 20 week course of oral prednisolone either with placebo or azathioprine 50mg for 24, 36 or 48 weeks. Outcomes were measured using a verified combined clinical reaction severity score (CCS) and the score difference between baseline and end of study calculated. An intention to treat analysis was done on the 279 patients who had an outcome. 345 patients were recruited, 145 were lost due to adverse events, loss to follow up or death. 36% needed extra steroids due to a recurrence of their skin and/or nerve reaction. 76% of patients had improvements in their CCS the end of the study, 22% had no change and 1.1% deteriorated. Adding azathioprine to steroid treatment did not improve CCS. So the improvements were attributable to treatment with steroids. We analysed the skin, sensory and motor scores separately and found that skin improvement contributed most with 78.9% of patients having skin improvement, azathioprine treatment for 48 weeks improved sensory scores it also improved motor scores but so did treatment with prednisolone alone. We identified significant adverse effects attributable to steroid treatment. When azathioprine and Dapsone were given together significant numbers of patients developed significant anaemia. Azathioprine is not recommended for the treatment of leprosy reactions and does not improve steroid treatment. Recurrent reactions are a major challenge. We have also identified that 65% of patients with sensory and 50% with motor nerve damage do not improve. Future studies should test giving

  2. Sympathetic nerve damage and restoration after ischemia-reperfusion injury as assessed by {sup 11}C-hydroxyephedrine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, Rudolf A.; Higuchi, Takahiro [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); University of Wuerzburg, Comprehensive Heart Failure Center, Wuerzburg (Germany); Maya, Yoshifumi [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Nihon Medi-Physics Co., Ltd., Research Centre, Chiba (Japan); Rischpler, Christoph [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Javadi, Mehrbod S. [Johns Hopkins University, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Fukushima, Kazuhito [Hyogo College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Hyogo (Japan); Lapa, Constantin [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Herrmann, Ken [University of Wuerzburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    An altered state of the cardiac sympathetic nerves is an important prognostic factor in patients with coronary artery disease. The aim of this study was to investigate regional sympathetic nerve damage and restoration utilizing a rat model of myocardial transient ischemia and a catecholamine analog PET tracer, {sup 11}C-hydroxyephedrine ({sup 11}C-HED). Transient myocardial ischemia was induced by coronary occlusion for 20 min and reperfusion in male Wistar rats. Dual-tracer autoradiography was performed subacutely (7 days) and chronically (2 months) after ischemia, and in control rats without ischemia using {sup 11}C-HED as a marker of sympathetic innervation and {sup 201}TI for perfusion. Additional serial in vivo cardiac {sup 11}C-HED and {sup 18}F-FDG PET scans were performed in the subacute and chronic phases after ischemia. After transient ischemia, the {sup 11}C-HED uptake defect areas in both the subacute and chronic phases were clearly larger than the perfusion defect areas in the midventricular wall. The subacute {sup 11}C-HED uptake defect showed a transmural pattern, whereas uptake recovered in the subepicardial portion in the chronic phase. Tyrosine hydroxylase antibody nerve staining confirmed regional denervation corresponding to areas of decreased {sup 11}C-HED uptake. Serial in vivo PET imaging visualized reductions in the area of the {sup 11}C-HED uptake defects in the chronic phase consistent with autoradiography and histology. Higher susceptibility of sympathetic neurons compared to myocytes was confirmed by a larger {sup 11}C-HED defect with a corresponding histologically identified region of denervation. Furthermore, partial reinnervation was observed in the chronic phase as shown by recovery of subepicardial {sup 11}C-HED uptake. (orig.)

  3. Evaluating Glaucomatous Retinal Nerve Fiber Damage by GDx VCC Polarimetry in Taiwan Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Mei-Ling; Huang, Wei-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To study the capability of scanning laser polarimetry with variable corneal compensation (GDx VCC) to detect differences in retinal nerve fiber layer thickness between normal and glaucomatous eyes in a Taiwan Chinese population. Methods This study included 44 normal eyes and 107 glaucomatous eyes. The glaucomatous eyes were divided into three subgroups on the basis of its visual field defects (early, moderate, severe). Each subject underwent a GDx-VCC exam and visual field testing. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AROC) of each relevant parameter was used to differentiate normal from each glaucoma subgroup, respectively. The correlation between visual field index and each parameter was evaluated for the eyes in the glaucoma group. Results For normal vs. early glaucoma, the parameter with the best AROC was Nerve fiber indicator (NFI) (0.942). For normal vs. moderate glaucoma, the parameter showing the best AROC was NFI (0.985). For normal vs. severe glaucoma, the parameter that had the best AROC was NFI (1.000). For early vs. moderate glaucoma, the parameter with the best AROC was NFI (0.732). For moderate vs. severe, the parameter showing the best AROC was temporal-superior-nasal-inferior-temporal average (0.652). For early vs. severe, the parameter with the best AROC was NFI (0.852). Conclusions GDx-VCC-measured parameters may serve as a useful tool to distinguish normal from glaucomatous eyes; in particular, NFI turned out to be the best discriminating parameter.

  4. Vascular mechanism of axonal degeneration in peripheral nerves in hemiplegic sides after cerebral hemorrhage: An experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bayram Ednan

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Though retrograde neuronal death and vascular insufficiency have been well established in plegics following intracerebral hemorrhage, the effects of plegia on arterial nervorums of peripheral nerves have not been reported. In this study, the histopathological effects of the intracerebral hemorrhage on the dorsal root ganglions and sciatic nerves via affecting the arterial nervorums were investigated. Methods This study was conducted on 13 male hybrid rabbits. Three animals were taken as control group and did not undergo surgery. The remaining 10 subjects were anesthetized and were injected with 0.50 ml of autologous blood into their right sensory-motor region. All rabbits were followed-up for two months and then sacrificed. Endothelial cell numbers and volume values were estimated a three dimensionally created standardized arterial nervorums model of lumbar 3. Neuron numbers of dorsal root ganglions, and axon numbers in the lumbar 3 nerve root and volume values of arterial nervorums were examined histopathologically. The results were analyzed by using a Mann-Whitney-U test. Results Left hemiplegia developed in 8 animals. On the hemiplegic side, degenerative vascular changes and volume reduction in the arterial nervorums of the sciatic nerves, neuronal injury in the dorsal root ganglions, and axonal injury in the lumbar 3 were detected. Statistical analyses showed a significant correlation between the normal or nonplegic sides and plegic sides in terms of the neurodegeneration in the dorsal root ganglions (p Conclusion Intracerebral hemorrhage resulted in neurodegeneration in the dorsal root ganglion and axonolysis in the sciatic nerves, endothelial injury, and volume reduction of the arterial nervorums in the sciatic nerves. The interruption of the neural network connection in the walls of the arterial nervorums in the sciatic nerves may be responsible for circulation disorders of the arterial nervorums, and arterial

  5. Activation of muscarinic receptors protects against retinal neurons damage and optic nerve degeneration in vitro and in vivo models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Pan-Pan; Yuan, Hai-Hong; Zhu, Xu; Cui, Yong-Yao; Li, Hui; Feng, Xue-Mei; Qiu, Yu; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Zhou, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist pilocarpine reduces intraocular pressure (IOP) of glaucoma mainly by stimulating ciliary muscle contraction and then increasing aqueous outflow. It is of our great interest to know whether pilocarpine has the additional properties of retinal neuroprotection independent of IOP lowering in vitro and in vivo models. In rat primary retinal cultures, cell viability was measured using an MTT assay and the trypan blue exclusion method, respectively. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) were identified by immunofluorescence and quantified by flow cytometry. For the in vivo study, the retinal damage after retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats was evaluated by histopathological study using hematoxylin and eosin staining, transmission electron microscopy, and immunohistochemical study on cleaved caspase-3, caspase-3, and ChAT. Pretreatment of pilocarpine attenuated glutamate-induced neurotoxicity of primary retinal neurons in a dose-dependent manner. Protection of pilocarpine in both retinal neurons and RGCs was largely abolished by the nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine and the M1-selective muscarinic receptor antagonist pirenzepine. After ischemia/reperfusion injury in retina, the inner retinal degeneration occurred including ganglion cell layer thinning and neuron lost, and the optic nerve underwent vacuolar changes. These degenerative changes were significantly lessened by topical application of 2% pilocarpine. In addition, the protective effect of pilocarpine on the ischemic rat retina was favorably reflected by downregulating the expression of activated apoptosis marker cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-3 and upregulating the expression of cholinergic cell marker ChAT. Taken together, this highlights pilocarpine through the activation of muscarinic receptors appear to afford significant protection against retinal neurons damage and optic nerve degeneration at clinically relevant concentrations. These data also

  6. Analysis of cranial nerve growthine improving quality of life in cerebral infarction%脑神经生长素治疗脑梗死患者生存质量分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴建农; 刘建新

    2002-01-01

    Background: Cranial nerve growthine (CNG) is a kind of new biochemical drug containing many special neuroactive substances which have a good therapeutic effect in cerebrovascular diseases, and can distinctly improve quality of life for patients with cerebral infarction. The quality of life is an improtant factor for rehabilitation,it is life satisfaction, psychological well being,happiness,adaptation and mental health.

  7. [Three-month rehabilitation of a patient with the III, IV and VI cranial nerve damage caused by a neurosurgery of the left internal carotid artery aneurysm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosiński, Eliasz; Kikowski, Łukasz; Irzmański, Robert

    Introduction: Oculomotor nerve palsy is an eye condition resulting from damage to the third cranial nerve or a branch thereof. Third nerve damage weakens the muscles innervated by the nerve . Also adversely affect the fourth and sixth nerve , causing impairment of their activity. Rehabilitation third nerve palsy is rarely described in the available literature . The whole process is very difficult , but the effects of physiotherapy is very beneficial for the patient. The aim:The assessment of the influence of the outpatient rehabilitation on the patient's condition after a three-month treatment and the use of physical therapy. Material and methods:Case studies of the 38-yerar-old patient after having operated a big aneurism of the left ICA, which was clipped. After the procedure, the III, IV and VI cranial nerves were deeply impaired and the amnesic aphasia occurred. The patient started the rehabilitation a month after the incident. To assess the process of rehabilitation, the own movement examination of the eyeball was implemented. Active and passive exercises, Tigger Point therapy, kinesiotaping, laser and electrostimulation were inserted. Results: The significant improvement of the eyeball movement has been proved on the basis of the same own examination. A physiotherapy has had a positive influence on the speech disorder, namely amnesic aphasia, and after the month of the rehabilitation it has been completely removed. The positive influence of the rehabilitation, which has been pointed out, is clinically essential. Conclusions: Obtained results have not been described in literature yet, that is why it is essential to widen further research and emphasise the importance of the rehabilitation, which is rarely implemented in an intense way in such medical conditions.

  8. Reinnervation of the diaphragm by the inferior laryngeal nerve to the phrenic nerve in ventilator-dependent tetraplegic patients with C3-5 damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verin, Eric; Morelot-Panzini, Capucine; Gonzalez-Bermejo, Jesus; Veber, Benoit; Perrouin Verbe, Brigitte; Soudrie, Brigitte; Leroi, Anne Marie; Marie, Jean Paul; Similowski, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of unilateral diaphragmatic reinnervation in humans by the inferior laryngeal nerve. This pilot study included chronically ventilated tetraplegic patients with destruction of phrenic nerve motoneurons. Five patients were included. They all had a high level of tetraplegia, with phrenic nerve motor neuron destruction. They were highly dependent on ventilation, without any possibility of weaning. They did not have other chronic pathologies, especially laryngeal disease. They all had diaphragmatic explorations to diagnose the destruction of the motoneurons of the phrenic nerves and nasoendoscopy to be sure that they did not have laryngeal or pharyngeal disease. Then, surgical anastomosis of the right phrenic nerve was performed with the inferior laryngeal nerve, by a cervical approach. A laryngeal reinnervation was performed at the same time, using the ansa hypoglossi. One patient was excluded because of a functional phrenic nerve and one patient died 6 months after the surgery of a cardiac arrest. The remaining three patients were evaluated after the anastomosis every 6 months. They did not present any swallowing or vocal alterations. In these three patients, the diaphragmatic explorations showed that there was a recovery of the diaphragmatic electromyogram of the right and left hemidiaphragms after 1 year. Two patients had surgical diaphragmatic explorations for diaphragmatic pacing 18-24 months after the reinnervation with excellent results. At 36 months, none of the patients could restore their automatic ventilation. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that diaphragmatic reinnervation by the inferior laryngeal nerve is effective, without any vocal or swallowing complications.

  9. Analysis of Antibody and Cytokine Markers for Leprosy Nerve Damage and Reactions in the INFIR Cohort in India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jadhav, R.; Suneetha, L.; Kamble, R.; Shinde, V.; Devi, K.; Chaduvula, M.V.; Raju, R.; Suneetha, S.; Nicholls, P.G.; van Brakel, W.H.; Lockwood, D.N.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The ILEP Nerve Function Impairment in Reaction (INFIR) is a cohort study designed to identify predictors of reactions and nerve function impairment (NFI) in leprosy. Aim of the Study: Antibodies to mycobacteria, nerve components and serum cytokine were measured as potential markers for

  10. Effects of microRNA-21 on Nerve Cell Regeneration and Neural Function Recovery in Diabetes Mellitus Combined with Cerebral Infarction Rats by Targeting PDCD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yun-Bao; Ji, Tie-Feng; Zhou, Hong-Wei; Yu, Jin-Lu

    2018-03-01

    We aimed to determine the effect and mechanism of microRNA-21 (miR-21) on nerve cell regeneration and nerve functional recovery in diabetes mellitus combined with cerebral infarction (DM + CI) rats by targeting PDCD4. A total of 125 male Wistar rats were selected for DM + CI rat model construction and assigned into the blank, miR-21 mimics, mimics control, miR-21 inhibitor, inhibitor control, miR-21 inhibitor + si-PDCD4 and si-PDCD4 groups. And, 20 healthy rats were selected for the normal group. Triphenylterazolium chloride (TTC) staining and HE staining were used for determination of the area of CI and pathological changes, respectively. Behaviors of rats in the eight groups were determined by forelimb placement test and balance beam walking test. Immunohistochemical staining, double immunofluorescence staining assay, Western blotting, and qRT-PCR were used to detect expressions of miR-21, PDCD4, HNA, Nestin, NeuN, β-III-Tub, PTEN, FasL, and GFAP. DNA laddering and TUNEL staining was used for cell apoptosis. TTC and HE staining confirmed that 87.5% rats were induced into CI + DM models successfully. Results of forelimb placement test and balance beam walking test showed that miR-21 mimics, and si-PCDC4 improved the nerve defect of model rats. Comparing with the blank group at the same time, rats in the miR-21 inhibitor group displayed significant decrease in the forelimb placement test score, significant increase in the balance beam walking test score, and exacerbation of nerve defect, while rats in the miR-21 mimics and si-PCDC4 groups displayed significant increase in forelimb placement test score and significant decrease in the balance beam walking test score and improvement of nerve defect situation. The HNA, Nestin, and PDCD4 expressions were decreased and the NeuN, β-III-Tub, and GFAP expressions were increased in the miR-21 mimics and si-PDCD4 groups comparing with the blank group. The results of miR-21 inhibitor group were on the contrary. In

  11. Reno-Cerebral Reflex Activates the Renin-Angiotensin System, Promoting Oxidative Stress and Renal Damage After Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wei; Li, Aiqing; Li, Jiawen; Wu, Chunyi; Cui, Shuang; Zhou, Zhanmei; Liu, Youhua; Wilcox, Christopher S; Hou, Fan Fan

    2017-09-01

    A kidney-brain interaction has been described in acute kidney injury, but the mechanisms are uncertain. Since we recently described a reno-cerebral reflex, we tested the hypothesis that renal ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) activates a sympathetic reflex that interlinks the renal and cerebral renin-angiotensin axis to promote oxidative stress and progression of the injury. Bilateral ischemia-reperfusion activated the intrarenal and cerebral, but not the circulating, renin-angiotensin system (RAS), increased sympathetic activity in the kidney and the cerebral sympathetic regulatory regions, and induced brain inflammation and kidney injury. Selective renal afferent denervation with capsaicin or renal denervation significantly attenuated IRI-induced activation of central RAS and brain inflammation. Central blockade of RAS or oxidative stress by intracerebroventricular (ICV) losartan or tempol reduced the renal ischemic injury score by 65% or 58%, respectively, and selective renal afferent denervation or reduction of sympathetic tone by ICV clonidine decreased the score by 42% or 52%, respectively (all p renal damage and dysfunction persisted after controlling blood pressure with hydralazine. This study uncovered a novel reflex pathway between ischemic kidney and the brain that sustains renal oxidative stress and local RAS activation to promote ongoing renal damage. These data suggest that the renal and cerebral renin-angiotensin axes are interlinked by a reno-cerebral sympathetic reflex that is activated by ischemia-reperfusion, which contributes to ischemia-reperfusion-induced brain inflammation and worsening of the acute renal injury. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 415-432.

  12. Glatiramer Acetate administration does not reduce damage after cerebral ischemia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poittevin, Marine; Deroide, Nicolas; Azibani, Feriel; Delcayre, Claude; Giannesini, Claire; Levy, Bernard I; Pocard, Marc; Kubis, Nathalie

    2013-01-15

    Inflammation plays a key role in ischemic stroke pathophysiology: microglial/macrophage cells and type-1 helper cells (Th1) seem deleterious, while type-2 helper cells (Th2) and regulatory T cells (Treg) seem protective. CD4 Th0 differentiation is modulated by microglial cytokine secretion. Glatiramer Acetate (GA) is an immunomodulatory drug that has been approved for the treatment of human multiple sclerosis by means of a number of mechanisms: reduced microglial activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, Th0 differentiation shifting from Th2 to Th2 and Treg with anti-inflammatory cytokine production and increased neurogenesis. We induced permanent (pMCAo) or transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAo) and GA (2 mg) or vehicle was injected subcutaneously immediately after cerebral ischemia. Mice were sacrificed at D3 to measure neurological deficit, infarct volume, microglial cell density and qPCR of TNFα and IL-1β (pro-inflammatory microglial cytokines), IFNγ (Th2 cytokine), IL-4 (Th2 cytokine), TGFβ and IL-10 (Treg cytokines), and at D7 to evaluate neurological deficit, infarct volume and neurogenesis assessment. We showed that in GA-treated pMCAo mice, infarct volume, microglial cell density and cytokine secretion were not significantly modified at D3, while neurogenesis was enhanced at D7 without significant infarct volume reduction. In GA-treated tMCAo mice, microglial pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNFα were significantly decreased without modification of microglial/macrophage cell density, cytokine secretion, neurological deficit or infarct volume at D3, or modification of neurological deficit, neurogenesis or infarct volume at D7. In conclusion, Glatiramer Acetate administered after cerebral ischemia does not reduce infarct volume or improve neurological deficit in mice despite a significant increase in neurogenesis in pMCAo and a microglial pro-inflammatory cytokine reduction in tMCAo. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  13. Confocal Adaptive Optics Imaging of Peripapillary Nerve Fiber Bundles: Implications for Glaucomatous Damage Seen on Circumpapillary OCT Scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Donald C; Chen, Monica F; Lee, Dongwon; Epstein, Benjamin; Alhadeff, Paula; Rosen, Richard B; Ritch, Robert; Dubra, Alfredo; Chui, Toco Y P

    2015-04-01

    To improve our understanding of glaucomatous damage as seen on circumpapillary disc scans obtained with frequency-domain optical coherence tomography (fdOCT), fdOCT scans were compared to images of the peripapillary retinal nerve fiber (RNF) bundles obtained with an adaptive optics-scanning light ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO). The AO-SLO images and fdOCT scans were obtained on 6 eyes of 6 patients with deep arcuate defects (5 points ≤-15 db) on 10-2 visual fields. The AO-SLO images were montaged and aligned with the fdOCT images to compare the RNF bundles seen with AO-SLO to the RNF layer thickness measured with fdOCT. All 6 eyes had an abnormally thin (1% confidence limit) RNF layer (RNFL) on fdOCT and abnormal (hyporeflective) regions of RNF bundles on AO-SLO in corresponding regions. However, regions of abnormal, but equal, RNFL thickness on fdOCT scans varied in appearance on AO-SLO images. These regions could be largely devoid of RNF bundles (5 eyes), have abnormal-appearing bundles of lower contrast (6 eyes), or have isolated areas with a few relatively normal-appearing bundles (2 eyes). There also were local variations in reflectivity of the fdOCT RNFL that corresponded to the variations in AO-SLO RNF bundle appearance. Relatively similar 10-2 defects with similar fdOCT RNFL thickness profiles can have very different degrees of RNF bundle damage as seen on fdOCT and AO-SLO. While the results point to limitations of fdOCT RNFL thickness as typically analyzed, they also illustrate the potential for improving fdOCT by attending to variations in local intensity.

  14. 5-HMF attenuates striatum oxidative damage via Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway following transient global cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ya, Bai-Liu; Li, Hong-Fang; Wang, Hai-Ying; Wu, Fei; Xin, Qing; Cheng, Hong-Ju; Li, Wen-Juan; Lin, Na; Ba, Zai-Hua; Zhang, Ru-Juan; Liu, Qian; Li, Ya-Nan; Bai, Bo; Ge, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have shown 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (5-HMF) has favorable biological effects, and its neuroprotection in a variety of neurological diseases has been noted. Our previous study showed that treatment of 5-HMF led to protection against permanent global cerebral ischemia. However, the underlying mechanisms in cerebral ischemic injury are not fully understood. This study was conducted to investigate the neuroprotective effect of 5-HMF and elucidate the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)/antioxidant response element (ARE) signaling pathway mechanism in the striatum after transient global cerebral ischemia. C57BL/6 mice were subjected to bilateral common carotid artery occlusion for 20 min and sacrificed 24 h after reperfusion. 5-HMF (12 mg/kg) or an equal volume of vehicle was intraperitoneally injected 30 min before ischemia and 5 min after the onset of reperfusion. At 24 h after reperfusion, neurological function was evaluated by neurological disability status scale, locomotor activity test and inclined beam walking test. Histological injury of the striatum was observed by cresyl violet staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dNTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Oxidative stress was evaluated by the carbonyl groups introduced into proteins, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based measurement was used to detect Nrf2 DNA binding activity. Nrf2 and its downstream ARE pathway protein expression such as heme oxygenase-1, NAD (P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1, glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit and glutamate-cysteine ligase modulatory subunit were detected by western blot. Our results showed that 5-HMF treatment significantly ameliorated neurological deficits, reduced brain water content, attenuated striatum neuronal damage, decreased the carbonyl groups and MDA levels, and activated Nrf2/ARE signaling pathway. Taken together, these results demonstrated that

  15. Age-dependent loss of cholinergic neurons in learning and memory-related brain regions and impaired learning in SAMP8 mice with trigeminal nerve damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yifan He; Jihong Zhu; Fang Huang; Liu Qin; Wenguo Fan; Hongwen He

    2014-01-01

    The tooth belongs to the trigeminal sensory pathway. Dental damage has been associated with impairments in the central nervous system that may be mediated by injury to the trigeminal nerve. In the present study, we investigated the effects of damage to the inferior alveolar nerve, an important peripheral nerve in the trigeminal sensory pathway, on learning and memory be-haviors and structural changes in related brain regions, in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. Inferior alveolar nerve transection or sham surgery was performed in middle-aged (4-month-old) or elderly (7-month-old) senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) mice. When the middle-aged mice reached 8 months (middle-aged group 1) or 11 months (middle-aged group 2), and the elderly group reached 11 months, step-down passive avoidance and Y-maze tests of learn-ing and memory were performed, and the cholinergic system was examined in the hippocampus (Nissl staining and acetylcholinesterase histochemistry) and basal forebrain (choline acetyltrans-ferase immunohistochemistry). In the elderly group, animals that underwent nerve transection had fewer pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 regions, fewer cholinergic ifbers in the CA1 and dentate gyrus, and fewer cholinergic neurons in the medial septal nucleus and vertical limb of the diagonal band, compared with sham-operated animals, as well as showing impairments in learning and memory. Conversely, no signiifcant differences in histology or be-havior were observed between middle-aged group 1 or group 2 transected mice and age-matched sham-operated mice. The present ifndings suggest that trigeminal nerve damage in old age, but not middle age, can induce degeneration of the septal-hippocampal cholinergic system and loss of hippocampal pyramidal neurons, and ultimately impair learning ability. Our results highlight the importance of active treatment of trigeminal nerve damage in elderly patients and those with Alzheimer’s disease, and

  16. Forced treadmill exercise can induce stress and increase neuronal damage in a mouse model of global cerebral ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Svensson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Physical exercise is known to be a beneficial factor by increasing the cellular stress tolerance. In ischemic stroke, physical exercise is suggested to both limit the brain injury and facilitate behavioral recovery. In this study we investigated the effect of physical exercise on brain damage following global cerebral ischemia in mice. We aimed to study the effects of 4.5 weeks of forced treadmill running prior to ischemia on neuronal damage, neuroinflammation and its effect on general stress by measuring corticosterone in feces. We subjected C57bl/6 mice (n = 63 to either treadmill running or a sedentary program prior to induction of global ischemia. Anxious, depressive, and cognitive behaviors were analyzed. Stress levels were analyzed using a corticosterone ELISA. Inflammatory and neurological outcomes were analyzed using immunohistochemistry, multiplex electrochemoluminescence ELISA and Western blot. To our surprise, we found that forced treadmill running induced a stress response, with increased anxiety in the Open Field test and increased levels of corticosterone. In accordance, mice subjected to forced exercise prior to ischemia developed larger neuronal damage in the hippocampus and showed higher cytokine levels in the brain and blood compared to non-exercised mice. The extent of neuronal damage correlated with increased corticosterone levels. To compare forced treadmill with voluntary wheel running, we used a different set of mice that exercised freely on running wheels. These mice did not show any anxiety or increased corticosterone levels. Altogether, our results indicate that exercise pre-conditioning may not be beneficial if the animals are forced to run as it can induce a detrimental stress response.

  17. A Study of Tapping by the Unaffected Finger of Patients Presenting with Central and Peripheral Nerve Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Lingli; Han, Xiuying; Li, Peihong; Liu, Yang; Zhu, Yulian; Zou, Jun; Yu, Zhusheng

    2015-01-01

    Aim Whether the unaffected function of the hand of patients presenting with nerve injury is affected remains inconclusive. We aimed to evaluate whether there are differences in finger tapping following central or peripheral nerve injury compared with the unaffected hand and the ipsilateral hand of a healthy subject. Methods Thirty right brain stroke patients with hemiplegia, 30 left arm peripheral nerve injury cases, and 60 healthy people were selected. We tested finger tapping of ...

  18. A Study of Tapping by the Unaffected Finger of Patients Presenting with Central and Peripheral Nerve Damage

    OpenAIRE

    Lingli eZhang; Xiuying eHan; peihong eli; yang eliu; yulian ezhu; zhusheng eyu

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Whether the unaffected function of the hand of patients presenting with nerve injury is affected remains inconclusive. We aimed to evaluate whether there are differences in finger tapping following central or peripheral nerve injury compared with the unaffected hand and the ipsilateral hand of a healthy subject.Methods: 30 right brain stroke patients with hemiplegia, 30 left arm peripheral nerve injury cases and 60 healthy people were selected. We tested finger tapping of the right hands...

  19. Markers of cerebral damage during delirium in elderly patients with hip fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Munster, Barbara C.; Korse, Catharina M.; de Rooij, Sophia E.; Bonfrer, Johannes M.; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Korevaar, Johanna C.

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: S100B protein and Neuron Specific Enolase (NSE) can increase due to brain cell damage and/or increased permeability of the blood-brain-barrier. Elevation of these proteins has been shown after various neurological diseases with cognitive dysfunction. Delirium is characterized

  20. 3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone prevents while methylone enhances methamphetamine-induced damage to dopamine nerve endings: β-ketoamphetamine modulation of neurotoxicity by the dopamine transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anneken, John H.; Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2016-01-01

    Methylone, 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV), and mephedrone are psychoactive ingredients of ‘bath salts’ and their abuse represents a growing public health care concern. These drugs are cathinone derivatives and are classified chemically as β-ketoamphetamines. Because of their close structural similarity to the amphetamines, methylone, MDPV, and mephedrone share most of their pharmacological, neurochemical, and behavioral properties. One point of divergence in their actions is the ability to cause damage to the CNS. Unlike methamphetamine, the β-ketoamphetamines do not damage dopamine (DA) nerve endings. However, mephedrone has been shown to significantly accentuate methamphetamine neurotoxicity. Bath salt formulations contain numerous different psychoactive ingredients, and individuals who abuse bath salts also coabuse other illicit drugs. Therefore, we have evaluated the effects of methylone, MDPV, mephedrone, and methamphetamine on DA nerve endings. The β-ketoamphetamines alone or in all possible two-drug combinations do not result in damage to DA nerve endings but do cause hyperthermia. MDPV completely protects against the neurotoxic effects of methamphetamine while methylone accentuates it. Neither MDPV nor methylone attenuates the hyperthermic effects of methamphetamine. The potent neuroprotective effects of MDPV extend to amphetamine-, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine-, and MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. These results indicate that β-ketoamphetamine drugs that are non-substrate blockers of the DA transporter (i.e., MDPV) protect against methamphetamine neurotoxicity, whereas those that are substrates for uptake by the DA transporter and which cause DA release (i.e., methylone, mephedrone) accentuate neurotoxicity. PMID:25626880

  1. Latent X-ray damage in the rat sciatic nerve results in delay in functional recovery after a heat treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vrind, H. H.; van Dam, W. M.; Wondergem, J.; Haveman, J.

    1993-01-01

    The influence of X-irradiation on the sensitivity of the rat sciatic nerve to local hyperthermia was investigated. A 10 or 20 mm long segment of the nerve was irradiated intraoperatively using 50 kV X-rays. Hyperthermia (30 min at 45 degrees C), was applied to the irradiated part (over a length of 5

  2. Effect of dietary γ-aminobutyric acid on the nerve growth factor and the choline acetyltransferase in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of ovariectomized female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tujioka, Kazuyo; Thanapreedawat, Panicha; Yamada, Takashi; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko; Horie, Kenji; Kim, Mujo; Tsutsui, Kazumi; Hayase, Kazutoshi

    2014-01-01

    The brain protein synthesis and the plasma concentration of growth hormone (GH) is sensitive to the dietary γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in ovariectomized female rats; however, the role of dietary GABA on biomarkers including nerve growth factor (NGF) and choline acetyltransferase for the function of cholinergic neurons remains unknown in ovariectomized female rats. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the dietary GABA affects the concentration and mRNA level of NGF, and the activity of choline acetyltransferase in the brains of ovariectomized female rats. Experiments were done on two groups of 24-wk-old ovariectomized female rats given 0 or 0.5% GABA added to a 20% casein diet. The concentrations of NGF and activities of choline acetyltransferase in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and mRNA level of NGF in the hippocampus increased significantly with the 20% casein+0.5% GABA compared with the 20% casein diet alone. In the hippocampus, the mRNA level of NGF significantly correlated with the NGF concentration (r=0.714, pGABA to ovariectomized female rats is likely to control the mRNA level and concentration of NGF and cause an increase in the activity of choline acetyltransferase in the brains.

  3. Studies on cerebral protection of digoxin against hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Kaiwei; Tan, Danfeng; He, Miao; Guo, Dandan; Huang, Juan; Wang, Xia; Liu, Chentao; Zheng, Xiangrong

    2016-08-17

    Hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD) is a major cause of neonatal acute deaths and chronic nervous system damage. Our present study was designed to investigate the possible neuroprotective effect of digoxin-induced pharmacological preconditioning after hypoxia-ischemia and underlying mechanisms. Neonatal rats were assigned randomly to control, HIBD, or HIBD+digoxin groups. Pharmacological preconditioning was induced by administration of digoxin 72 h before inducing HIBD by carotid occlusion+hypoxia. Behavioral assays, and neuropathological and apoptotic assessments were performed to examine the effects; the expression of Na/K ATPase was also assessed. Rats in the HIBD group showed deficiencies on the T-maze, radial water maze, and postural reflex tests, whereas the HIBD+digoxin group showed significant improvements on all behavioral tests. The rats treated with digoxin showed recovery of pathological conditions, increased number of neural cells and proliferative cells, and decreased number of apoptotic cells. Meanwhile, an increased expression level of Na/K ATPase was observed after digoxin preconditioning treatment. The preconditioning treatment of digoxin contributed toward an improved functional recovery and exerted a marked neuroprotective effect including promotion of cell proliferation and reduction of apoptosis after HIBD, and the neuroprotective action was likely associated with increased expression of Na/K ATPase.

  4. Characterization of nerve and microvessel damage and recovery in type 1 diabetic mice after permanent femoral artery ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozeron, Pierre; Mantsounga, Chris S; Broqueres-You, Dong; Dohan, Anthony; Polivka, Marc; Deroide, Nicolas; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Kubis, Nathalie; Lévy, Bernard I

    2015-09-01

    Neuropathy is the most common complication of the peripheral nervous system during the progression of diabetes. The pathophysiology is unclear but may involve microangiopathy, reduced endoneurial blood flow, and tissue ischemia. We used a mouse model of type 1 diabetes to study parallel alterations of nerves and microvessels following tissue ischemia. We designed an easily reproducible model of ischemic neuropathy induced by irreversible ligation of the femoral artery. We studied the evolution of behavioral function, epineurial and endoneurial vessel impairment, and large nerve myelinated fiber as well as small cutaneous unmyelinated fiber impairment for 1 month following the onset of ischemia. We observed a more severe hindlimb dysfunction and delayed recovery in diabetic animals. This was associated with reduced density of large arteries in the hindlimb and reduced sciatic nerve epineurial blood flow. A reduction in sciatic nerve endoneurial capillary density was also observed, associated with a reduction in small unmyelinated epidermal fiber number and large myelinated sciatic nerve fiber dysfunction. Moreover, vascular recovery was delayed, and nerve dysfunction was still present in diabetic animals at day 28. This easily reproducible model provides clear insight into the evolution over time of the impact of ischemia on nerve and microvessel homeostasis in the setting of diabetes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Cranial nerve palsies in Nigerian children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... Introduction. Cranial nerve palsy is a common clinical problem ... Methodology ... The two cases with three-nerve involvement were re- lated to viral encephalitis and cerebral contusion from ... RTA = road traffic accident.

  6. Nerve Damage (Diabetic Neuropathies)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kidney Disease Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition Blood Diseases Diagnostic Tests La información ... Kidney Disease Weight Management Liver Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition Blood Diseases Diagnostic Tests La información ...

  7. The vestibulocochlear nerve (VIII).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoudiba, F; Toulgoat, F; Sarrazin, J-L

    2013-10-01

    The vestibulocochlear nerve (8th cranial nerve) is a sensory nerve. It is made up of two nerves, the cochlear, which transmits sound and the vestibular which controls balance. It is an intracranial nerve which runs from the sensory receptors in the internal ear to the brain stem nuclei and finally to the auditory areas: the post-central gyrus and superior temporal auditory cortex. The most common lesions responsible for damage to VIII are vestibular Schwannomas. This report reviews the anatomy and various investigations of the nerve. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  8. Nicotinamide mononucleotide inhibits post-ischemic NAD(+) degradation and dramatically ameliorates brain damage following global cerebral ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji H; Long, Aaron; Owens, Katrina; Kristian, Tibor

    2016-11-01

    Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) is an essential cofactor for multiple cellular metabolic reactions and has a central role in energy production. Brain ischemia depletes NAD(+) pools leading to bioenergetics failure and cell death. Nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) is utilized by the NAD(+) salvage pathway enzyme, nicotinamide adenylyltransferase (Nmnat) to generate NAD(+). Therefore, we examined whether NMN could protect against ischemic brain damage. Mice were subjected to transient forebrain ischemia and treated with NMN or vehicle at the start of reperfusion or 30min after the ischemic insult. At 2, 4, and 24h of recovery, the proteins poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR), hippocampal NAD(+) levels, and expression levels of NAD(+) salvage pathway enzymes were determined. Furthermore, animal's neurologic outcome and hippocampal CA1 neuronal death was assessed after six days of reperfusion. NMN (62.5mg/kg) dramatically ameliorated the hippocampal CA1 injury and significantly improved the neurological outcome. Additionally, the post-ischemic NMN treatment prevented the increase in PAR formation and NAD(+) catabolism. Since the NMN administration did not affect animal's temperature, blood gases or regional cerebral blood flow during recovery, the protective effect was not a result of altered reperfusion conditions. These data suggest that administration of NMN at a proper dosage has a strong protective effect against ischemic brain injury. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. White Matter Damage Relates to Oxygen Saturation in Children With Sickle Cell Anemia Without Silent Cerebral Infarcts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawadler, Jamie M; Kirkham, Fenella J; Clayden, Jonathan D; Hollocks, Matthew J; Seymour, Emma L; Edey, Rosanna; Telfer, Paul; Robins, Andrew; Wilkey, Olu; Barker, Simon; Cox, Tim C S; Clark, Chris A

    2015-07-01

    Sickle cell anemia is associated with compromised oxygen-carrying capability of hemoglobin and a high incidence of overt and silent stroke. However, in children with no evidence of cerebral infarction, there are changes in brain morphometry relative to healthy controls, which may be related to chronic anemia and oxygen desaturation. A whole-brain tract-based spatial statistics analysis was carried out in 25 children with sickle cell anemia with no evidence of abnormality on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (13 male, age range: 8-18 years) and 14 age- and race-matched controls (7 male, age range: 10-19 years) to determine the extent of white matter injury. The hypotheses that white matter damage is related to daytime peripheral oxygen saturation and steady-state hemoglobin were tested. Fractional anisotropy was found to be significantly lower in patients in the subcortical white matter (corticospinal tract and cerebellum), whereas mean diffusivity and radial diffusivity were higher in patients in widespread areas. There was a significant negative relationship between radial diffusivity and oxygen saturation (Plevel negative relationship between radial diffusivity and hemoglobin (Pcell anemia, and provides for the first time direct evidence of a relationship between brain microstructure and markers of disease severity (eg, peripheral oxygen saturation and steady-state hemoglobin). This study suggests that diffusion tensor imaging metrics may serve as a biomarker for future trials of reducing hypoxic exposure. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Benfotiamine alleviates diabetes-induced cerebral oxidative damage independent of advanced glycation end-product, tissue factor and TNF-alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shan; Ren, Jun

    2006-02-13

    Diabetes mellitus leads to thiamine deficiency and multiple organ damage including diabetic neuropathy. This study was designed to examine the effect of benfotiamine, a lipophilic derivative of thiamine, on streptozotocin (STZ)-induced cerebral oxidative stress. Adult male FVB mice were made diabetic with a single injection of STZ (200 mg/kg, i.p.). Fourteen days later, control and diabetic (fasting blood glucose >13.9 mM) mice received benfotiamine (100 mg/kg/day, i.p.) for 14 days. Oxidative stress and protein damage were evaluated by glutathione/glutathione disulfide (GSH/GSSG) assay and protein carbonyl formation, respectively. Pro-oxidative or pro-inflammatory factors including advanced glycation end-product (AGE), tissue factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were evaluated by immunoblot analysis. Four weeks STZ treatment led to hyperglycemia, enhanced cerebral oxidative stress (reduced GSH/GSSG ratio), elevated TNF-alpha and AGE levels without changes in protein carbonyl or tissue factor. Benfotiamine alleviated diabetes-induced cerebral oxidative stress without affecting levels of AGE, protein carbonyl, tissue factor and TNF-alpha. Collectively, our results indicated benfotiamine may antagonize diabetes-induced cerebral oxidative stress through a mechanism unrelated to AGE, tissue factor and TNF-alpha.

  11. Intranasal Nerve Growth Factor administration improves cerebral functions in a child with severe traumatic brain injury: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaretti, Antonio; Conti, Giorgio; Falsini, Benedetto; Buonsenso, Danilo; Crasti, Matteo; Manni, Luigi; Soligo, Marzia; Fantacci, Claudia; Genovese, Orazio; Calcagni, Maria Lucia; Di Giuda, Daniela; Mattoli, Maria Vittoria; Cocciolillo, Fabrizio; Ferrara, Pietro; Ruggiero, Antonio; Staccioli, Susanna; Colafati, Giovanna Stefania; Riccardi, Riccardo

    2017-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes neural recovery after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) supporting neuronal growth, differentiation and survival of brain cells and up-regulating the neurogenesis-associated protein Doublecortin (DCX). Only a few studies reported NGF administration in paediatric patients with severe TBI. A four-year-old boy in a persistent unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (UWS) was treated with intranasal murine NGF administration 6 months after severe TBI. The patient received four cycles of intranasal NGF (0.1 mg/kg, twice a day for 10 consecutive days). NGF administration improved functional [Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT); Single photon emission/Computed Tomography (SPECT/CT) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)] assessment, electrophysiological [Electroencephalogram (EEG) and Visual Evoked Potential (VEP)] studies and clinical conditions. He showed improvements in voluntary movements, facial mimicry, phonation, attention and verbal comprehension, ability to cry, cough reflex, oral motility, feeding capacity, and bowel and urinary functions. After NGF administration, raised levels of both NGF and DCX were found in the cerebrospinal fluid of the patient. No side effects were reported. Although further studies are needed for better understanding the neuroprotective role of this neurotrophin, intranasal NGF administration appears to be a promising and safe rescuing strategy treatment in children with neurological impairment after TBI.

  12. A study of tapping by the unaffected finger of patients presenting with central and peripheral nerve damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingli; Han, Xiuying; Li, Peihong; Liu, Yang; Zhu, Yulian; Zou, Jun; Yu, Zhusheng

    2015-01-01

    Whether the unaffected function of the hand of patients presenting with nerve injury is affected remains inconclusive. We aimed to evaluate whether there are differences in finger tapping following central or peripheral nerve injury compared with the unaffected hand and the ipsilateral hand of a healthy subject. Thirty right brain stroke patients with hemiplegia, 30 left arm peripheral nerve injury cases, and 60 healthy people were selected. We tested finger tapping of the right hands, and each subject performed the test twice. Finger tapping following peripheral nerve injury as compared with the unaffected hand and the dominant hand of a healthy person was markedly higher than was found for central nerve injury (P tapping of the male peripheral group's unaffected hand and the control group's dominant hand was significantly higher than the central group (P tapping of the female control group's dominant hand was significantly higher than the central group's unaffected hand (P < 0.01, P = 0.002), the peripheral group's unaffected hand (P < 0.05, P = 0.034). The unaffected function of the hand of patients with central and peripheral nerve injury was different as compared with the ipsilateral hand of healthy individuals. The rehabilitation therapist should intensify the practice of normal upper limb fine activities and coordination of the patient.

  13. A Study of Tapping by the Unaffected Finger of Patients Presenting with Central and Peripheral Nerve Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingli eZhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Whether the unaffected function of the hand of patients presenting with nerve injury is affected remains inconclusive. We aimed to evaluate whether there are differences in finger tapping following central or peripheral nerve injury compared with the unaffected hand and the ipsilateral hand of a healthy subject.Methods: 30 right brain stroke patients with hemiplegia, 30 left arm peripheral nerve injury cases and 60 healthy people were selected. We tested finger tapping of the right hands, and each subject performed the test twice.Results: Finger tapping following peripheral nerve injury as compared with the unaffected hand and the dominant hand of a healthy person was significantly higher than was found for central nerve injury (P<0.05. Finger tapping of the male peripheral group’s unaffected hand and the control group’s dominant hand was significantly higher than the central group (P<0.001. However, finger tapping of the female control group’s dominant hand was markedly higher than the central group’s unaffected hand (P<0.01, P=0.002, the peripheral group’s unaffected hand (P<0.05, P=0.034. Conclusion: The unaffected function of the hand of patients with central and peripheral nerve injury was different as compared with the ipsilateral hand of healthy individuals. The rehabilitation therapist should intensify the practice of normal upper limb fine activities and coordination of the patient.

  14. Gum tragacanth/poly(l-lactic acid) nanofibrous scaffolds for application in regeneration of peripheral nerve damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar-Mohammadi, Marziyeh; Prabhakaran, Molamma P; Bahrami, S Hajir; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2016-04-20

    Nanofibrous nerve guides have gained huge interest in supporting the peripheral nerve regeneration due to their abilities to simulate the topography, mechanical, biological and extracellular matrix morphology of native tissue. Gum tragacanth (GT) is a biocompatible mixture of polysaccharides that has been used in biomedical applications. During this study, we fabricated aligned and random nanofibers from poly(l-lactic acid) and gum tragacanth (PLLA/GT) in various ratios (100:0, 75:25, and 50:50) by electrospinning. Scanning electron microscope demonstrated smooth and uniform nanofibers with diameters in the range of 733±65nm and 226±73nm for align PLLA and random PLLA/GT 50:50 nanofibers, respectively. FTIR analysis, contact angle, in vitro biodegradation and tensile measurements were carried out to evaluate the chemical and mechanical properties of the different scaffolds. PLLA/GT 75:25 exhibited the most balanced properties compared to other scaffolds and was used for in vitro culture of nerve cells (PC12) to assess the potential of using these scaffolds as a substrate for nerve regeneration. The cells were found to attach and proliferate on aligned PLLA/GT 75:25 scaffolds, expressing bi-polar neurite extensions and the orientation of nerve cells was along the direction of the fiber alignment. Results of 8 days of in vitro culture of PC12 cells on aligned PLLA/GT 75:25 nanofibers, showed 20% increase in cell proliferation compared to PLLA/GT 75:25 random nanofibers. PLLA/GT 75:25 aligned nanofibers acted as a favorable cue to support neurite outgrowth and nerve cell elongation compared with PLLA nanofibers. Our results showed that aligned PLLA/GT 75:25 nanofibers are promising substrates for application as bioengineered grafts for nerve tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cerebral Vasculitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariborz Khorvash

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Vasculitis is an inflammation systems may be involved of blood vessels due to various origins. Vessels of the peripheral and/or central nervous. Vasculitis of the CNS is rare and occurs in the context of systemic diseases or as primary angiitis of the CNS. Epidemiology: The overall incidence of primary vasculitis is about 40/1,000,000 persons [excluding giant cell (temporal arteritis, GCA]. Its incidence increases with age. The incidence of GCA is much higher (around 200/1,000,000 persons in the age group[50 years. Clinical Presentation: Clinical and pathological presentation in CNS vasculitis represents a wide spectrum. Among others, headache, cranial nerve affections, encephalopathy, seizures, psychosis, myelitis, stroke, intracranial haemorrhage and aseptic meningoencephalitis are described. Primary and secondary vasculitides leading more frequently to CNS manifestations are discussed. Primary and secondary Vasculitides: Including Giant Cell (Temporal Arteritis , Takayasu arteritis, Polyarteritis nodosa, Primary angiitis of the CNS, Wegener’s granulomatosis, and Connective tissue diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis, mixed connective disease and Sjögren syndrome, are systemic immune-mediated diseases that lead to multiple organ affections. Cerebral Vasculitis: Imaging and Differential Diagnosis: Vasculitides represent a heterogeneous group of inflammatory diseases that affect blood vessel walls of varying calibers (inflammatory vasculopathy. Since the devastating symptoms of CNS vasculitis are at least partially reversible, early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are important. In order to establish a differential diagnosis clinical features, disease progression, age of onset, blood results, as well as CSF examinations have to be taken into consideration. Neuroimaging techniques, such as MRI and DSA, play a central role in the diagnosis and disease monitoring .The diagnostic

  16. BDNF Increases Survival and Neuronal Differentiation of Human Neural Precursor Cells Cotransplanted with a Nanofiber Gel to the Auditory Nerve in a Rat Model of Neuronal Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To study possible nerve regeneration of a damaged auditory nerve by the use of stem cell transplantation. Methods. We transplanted HNPCs to the rat AN trunk by the internal auditory meatus (IAM. Furthermore, we studied if addition of BDNF affects survival and phenotypic differentiation of the grafted HNPCs. A bioactive nanofiber gel (PA gel, in selected groups mixed with BDNF, was applied close to the implanted cells. Before transplantation, all rats had been deafened by a round window niche application of β-bungarotoxin. This neurotoxin causes a selective toxic destruction of the AN while keeping the hair cells intact. Results. Overall, HNPCs survived well for up to six weeks in all groups. However, transplants receiving the BDNF-containing PA gel demonstrated significantly higher numbers of HNPCs and neuronal differentiation. At six weeks, a majority of the HNPCs had migrated into the brain stem and differentiated. Differentiated human cells as well as neurites were observed in the vicinity of the cochlear nucleus. Conclusion. Our results indicate that human neural precursor cells (HNPC integration with host tissue benefits from additional brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF treatment and that these cells appear to be good candidates for further regenerative studies on the auditory nerve (AN.

  17. Quantitative MRI shows cerebral microstructural damage in hemolytic-uremic syndrome patients with severe neurological symptoms but no changes in conventional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissenborn, Karin; Worthmann, Hans; Heeren, Meike [Hannover Medical School, Clinic for Neurology, Hannover (Germany); Bueltmann, Eva; Donnerstag, Frank; Giesemann, Anja M.; Goetz, Friedrich; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Ding, Xiao-Qi [Hannover Medical School, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Neuroradiology, Hannover (Germany); Kielstein, Jan; Schwarz, Anke [Hannover Medical School, Clinic for Nephrology and Hypertension, Hannover (Germany)

    2013-07-15

    Severe neurological symptoms in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli infection associated hemolytic-uremic syndrome (STEC-HUS) are often accompanied by none or only mild alterations of cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This study aims to analyze if quantitative MRI is able to reveal cerebral pathological alterations invisible for conventional MRI. In nine patients with STEC-HUS associated severe neurological symptoms but inconspicuous cerebral MRI findings maps of the parameters T2 relaxation time, relative proton density (PD), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and fractional anisotropy (FA) were generated. Quantitative values of these parameters were measured at the basal ganglia, thalamus, and white matter of the frontal and parietal lobe and compared to those of nine age- and sex-matched controls. Significant T2 prolongation (p < 0.01) was found in the basal ganglia of all patients compared to controls. PD and ADC were not significantly altered. A significant reduction of FA in patients was seen at caput nuclei caudati (p < 0.01). Prolonged T2 relaxation time indicates cerebral microstructural damages in these patients despite their inconspicuous MRI findings. T2 relaxometry could be used as a complementary tool for the assessment of metabolic-toxic brain syndromes. (orig.)

  18. High dose infusion of activated protein C (rhAPC) fails to improve neuronal damage and cognitive deficit after global cerebral ischemia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, Melanie; Lasarzik, Irina; Jahn-Eimermacher, Antje; Peetz, Dirk; Werner, Christian; Engelhard, Kristin; Thal, Serge C

    2013-09-13

    Recent studies demonstrated anticoagulatory, antiinflammatory, antiapoptotic, and neuroprotective properties of activated protein C (APC) in rodent models of acute neurodegenerative diseases, suggesting APC as promising broad acting therapeutic agent. Unfortunately, continuous infusion of recombinant human APC (rhAPC) failed to improve brain damage following cardiac arrest in rats. The present study was designed to investigate the neuroprotective effect after global cerebral ischemia (GI) with an optimized infusion protocol. Rats were subjected to bilateral clip occlusion of the common carotid arteries (BCAO) and controlled hemorrhagic hypotension to 40 mm Hg for 14 min and a subsequent 5h-infusion of rhAPC (2mg/kg bolus+6 mg/kg/h continuous IV) or vehicle (0.9% NaCl). The dosage was calculated to maintain plasma hAPC activity at 150%. Cerebral inflammation, apoptosis and neuronal survival was determined at day 10. rhAPC infusion did not influence cortical cerebral perfusion during reperfusion and failed to reduce neuronal cell loss, microglia activation, and caspase 3 activity. Even an optimized rhAPC infusion protocol designed to maintain a high level of APC plasma activity failed to improve the sequels following GI. Despite positive reports about protective effects of APC following, e.g., ischemic stroke, the present study supports the notion that infusion of APC during the early reperfusion phase does not result in sustained neuroprotection and fails to improve outcome after global cerebral ischemia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of antibody and cytokine markers for leprosy nerve damage and reactions in the INFIR cohort in India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupendra Jadhav

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The ILEP Nerve Function Impairment in Reaction (INFIR is a cohort study designed to identify predictors of reactions and nerve function impairment (NFI in leprosy.Antibodies to mycobacteria, nerve components and serum cytokine were measured as potential markers for their possible association with reactions and NFI.303 newly diagnosed leprosy patients from two centres in North India were enrolled. Antibodies to PGL-1, LAM (IgG1 and IgG3, ceramide, S100 and TNFα levels were measured using ELISA techniques.S-100, PGL IgG and IgM antibody levels were lowest in patients with BT leprosy and highest in patients with lepromatous leprosy. LAM IgG1 and LAM IgG3 antibody levels were highest in patients with BL leprosy. Ceramide antibody levels were not correlated with type of leprosy. Levels of all the antibodies tested and TNF α were lowest in patients with only skin reaction. PGL IgM antibody levels were elevated in patients with skin reactions and NFI. Old sensory NFI is associated with significant elevation of PGL IgG, LAM IgG and S100 antibody levels.These results reveal that the antibody response to mycobacterial antigens, nerve antigens and cytokines are in a dynamic flux and could collectively contribute to NFI in leprosy. The association of multiple markers with old NFI may indicate the contribution of different pathological processes.

  20. Ameliorating effects of traditional Chinese medicine preparation, Chinese materia medica and active compounds on ischemia/reperfusion-induced cerebral microcirculatory disturbances and neuron damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Fan, Jingyu; Han, Jingyan

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic stroke and ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury induced by thrombolytic therapy are conditions with high mortality and serious long-term physical and cognitive disabilities. They have a major impact on global public health. These disorders are associated with multiple insults to the cerebral microcirculation, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction, leukocyte adhesion and infiltration, brain blood barrier (BBB) disruption, and capillary hypoperfusion, ultimately resulting in tissue edema, hemorrhage, brain injury and delayed neuron damage. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been used in China, Korea, Japan and other Asian countries for treatment of a wide range of diseases. In China, the usage of compound TCM preparation to treat cerebrovascular diseases dates back to the Han Dynasty. Even thousands of years earlier, the medical formulary recorded many classical prescriptions for treating cerebral I/R-related diseases. This review summarizes current information and underlying mechanisms regarding the ameliorating effects of compound TCM preparation, Chinese materia medica, and active components on I/R-induced cerebral microcirculatory disturbances, brain injury and neuron damage. PMID:26579420

  1. Nerve Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Nerve Blocks A nerve block is an injection to ... the limitations of Nerve Block? What is a Nerve Block? A nerve block is an anesthetic and/ ...

  2. Transgenic inhibition of astroglial NF-κB protects from optic nerve damage and retinal ganglion cell loss in experimental optic neuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brambilla Roberta

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optic neuritis is an acute, demyelinating neuropathy of the optic nerve often representing the first appreciable symptom of multiple sclerosis. Wallerian degeneration of irreversibly damaged optic nerve axons leads to death of retinal ganglion cells, which is the cause of permanent visual impairment. Although the specific mechanisms responsible for triggering these events are unknown, it has been suggested that a key pathological factor is the activation of immune-inflammatory processes secondary to leukocyte infiltration. However, to date, there is no conclusive evidence to support such a causal role for infiltrating peripheral immune cells in the etiopathology of optic neuritis. Methods To dissect the contribution of the peripheral immune-inflammatory response versus the CNS-specific inflammatory response in the development of optic neuritis, we analyzed optic nerve and retinal ganglion cells pathology in wild-type and GFAP-IκBα-dn transgenic mice, where NF-κB is selectively inactivated in astrocytes, following induction of EAE. Results We found that, in wild-type mice, axonal demyelination in the optic nerve occurred as early as 8 days post induction of EAE, prior to the earliest signs of leukocyte infiltration (20 days post induction. On the contrary, GFAP-IκBα-dn mice were significantly protected and showed a nearly complete prevention of axonal demyelination, as well as a drastic attenuation in retinal ganglion cell death. This correlated with a decrease in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, adhesion molecules, as well as a prevention of NAD(PH oxidase subunit upregulation. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that astrocytes, not infiltrating immune cells, play a key role in the development of optic neuritis and that astrocyte-mediated neurotoxicity is dependent on activation of a transcriptional program regulated by NF-κB. Hence, interventions targeting the NF-κB transcription

  3. Intraoperative cranial nerve monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, C Michel

    2004-03-01

    The purpose of intraoperative monitoring is to preserve function and prevent injury to the nervous system at a time when clinical examination is not possible. Cranial nerves are delicate structures and are susceptible to damage by mechanical trauma or ischemia during intracranial and extracranial surgery. A number of reliable electrodiagnostic techniques, including nerve conduction studies, electromyography, and the recording of evoked potentials have been adapted to the study of cranial nerve function during surgery. A growing body of evidence supports the utility of intraoperative monitoring of cranial nerve nerves during selected surgical procedures.

  4. Mephedrone Does not Damage Dopamine Nerve Endings of the Striatum but Enhances the Neurotoxicity of Methamphetamine, Amphetamine and MDMA

    OpenAIRE

    Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Kane, Michael J.; Briggs, Denise I.; Francescutti, Dina M.; Sykes, Catherine E.; Shah, Mrudang M.; Thomas, David M.; Kuhn, Donald M.

    2013-01-01

    Mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone) is a β-ketoamphetamine stimulant drug of abuse with close structural and mechanistic similarities to methamphetamine. One of the most powerful actions associated with mephedrone is the ability to stimulate dopamine (DA) release and block its reuptake through its interaction with the dopamine transporter (DAT). Although mephedrone does not cause toxicity to DA nerve endings, its ability to serve as a DAT blocker could provide protection against methamphetamin...

  5. Mephedrone does not damage dopamine nerve endings of the striatum, but enhances the neurotoxicity of methamphetamine, amphetamine, and MDMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angoa-Pérez, Mariana; Kane, Michael J; Briggs, Denise I; Francescutti, Dina M; Sykes, Catherine E; Shah, Mrudang M; Thomas, David M; Kuhn, Donald M

    2013-04-01

    Mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone) is a β-ketoamphetamine stimulant drug of abuse with close structural and mechanistic similarities to methamphetamine. One of the most powerful actions associated with mephedrone is the ability to stimulate dopamine (DA) release and block its re-uptake through its interaction with the dopamine transporter (DAT). Although mephedrone does not cause toxicity to DA nerve endings, its ability to serve as a DAT blocker could provide protection against methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity like other DAT inhibitors. To test this possibility, mice were treated with mephedrone (10, 20, or 40 mg/kg) prior to each injection of a neurotoxic regimen of methamphetamine (four injections of 2.5 or 5.0 mg/kg at 2 h intervals). The integrity of DA nerve endings of the striatum was assessed through measures of DA, DAT, and tyrosine hydroxylase levels. The moderate to severe DA toxicity associated with the different doses of methamphetamine was not prevented by any dose of mephedrone but was, in fact, significantly enhanced. The hyperthermia caused by combined treatment with mephedrone and methamphetamine was the same as seen after either drug alone. Mephedrone also enhanced the neurotoxic effects of amphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine on DA nerve endings. In contrast, nomifensine protected against methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity. As mephedrone increases methamphetamine neurotoxicity, the present results suggest that it interacts with the DAT in a manner unlike that of other typical DAT inhibitors. The relatively innocuous effects of mephedrone alone on DA nerve endings mask a potentially dangerous interaction with drugs that are often co-abused with it, leading to heightened neurotoxicity. © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  6. Effects of the combined treatment of bone marrow stromal cells with mild exercise and thyroid hormone on brain damage and apoptosis in a mouse focal cerebral ischemia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhoundzadeh, Kobar; Vakili, Abedin; Sameni, Hamid Reza; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Safari, Manouchehr; Mohammadkhani, Razieh

    2017-08-01

    This study examined whether post-stroke bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) therapy combined with exercise (EX) and/or thyroid hormone (TH) could reduce brain damage in an experimental ischemic stroke in mice. Focal cerebral ischemia was induced under Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) guide by 45 min of middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), followed by 7 days of reperfusion in albino mice. BMSCs were injected into the right cerebral ventricle 24 h after MCAO, followed by daily injection of T3 (20 μg/100 g weight S.C) and 6 days of running on a treadmill. Infarct size, neurobehavioral test, TUNEL and BrdU positive cells were evaluated at 7 days after MCAO. Treatment with BMSCs and mild EX alone significantly reduced the infarct volume by 23% and 44%, respectively (both, p cells (a marker of apoptosis) was significantly reduced in the EX, BMSCs, BMSCs + EX, BMSCs + TH, and BMSCs + EX + TH groups (all, p cells in the subventricular zone (SVZ) (p cells and the attenuation of apoptosis in ischemia stroke in young mice.

  7. Imaging diagnosis and clinical findings of cerebral venous thrombosis in full-term neonates without brain damage: a ten-year review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro, Alexandra Maria Vieira; Lima, Claudio Marcio Amaral de Oliveira; Ribeiro, Erica Barreiros; Lins, Maria Cristina; Miranda, Silvia; Miranda, Luis Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: to describe and compare imaging methods and clinical findings of cerebral venous thrombosis in four full-term neonates without brain damage, admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit. Materials and methods: ten-year review of four cases diagnosed with cerebral venous thrombosis by transfontanellar ultrasonography associated with Doppler fluxometry and confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging/magnetic resonance angiography in correlation with clinical findings and neurological progression. Results: ultrasonography presented normal results in 75% of cases and magnetic resonance imaging in 100%. Doppler fluxometry and magnetic resonance angiography were abnormal in 100% of cases. Hypoxia (100%) and early seizures (100%) were predominant among clinical findings with evoked potential changes in 50% of cases. In the assessment of the neuro development all the areas remained within normality parameters up to the conclusion of the present study. Conclusion: ultrasonography in association with Doppler can identify changes related to cerebral venous thrombosis and should be complemented with magnetic resonance imaging that is the gold standard for diagnosis in these cases. (author)

  8. Axillary nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... changes in sensation or movement No history of injury to the area No signs of nerve damage These medicines reduce swelling and pressure on the nerve. They may be injected directly into the area or taken by mouth. Other medicines include: Over-the-counter pain ...

  9. Tibial nerve (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nerve is commonly injured by fractures or other injury to the back of the knee or the lower leg. It may be affected by systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus. The nerve can also be damaged by pressure from a tumor, abscess, or bleeding into the ...

  10. Effect of fast-track cardiac anesthesia on myocardial oxidative damage, inflammation and nerve related peptides of patients undergoing cardiac operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing-Tao Cai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of fast-track cardiac anesthesia on myocardial oxidative damage, inflammation and nerve related peptides of patients undergoing cardiac operation. Methods: Sixty patients with rheumatic heart disease undergoing heart valve surgery were randomly divided into the fast track group (n=30 and conventional group (n=30. Then myocardial injury indicators, mitochondrial oxidative stress indicators, inflammation indicators and nerverelated peptides of both groups were analyzed. Results: cTnI contents at T2-T4 points in time of both groups showed an increasing trend and the increasing trend of fast track group was weaker than that of conventional group; SOD contents as well as mitochondrial tristate respiratory function, respiratory control ratios and phosphorus oxygen ratios in myocardial tissue of fast track group were higher than those of conventional group, and MDA contents was lower than those of conventional group; plasma TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, NSE, S100β and Aβ contents of fast track group were lower than those of conventional group. Conclusions: Fasttrack cardiac anesthesia can protect myocardial cells, reduce mitochondrial oxidative stress, relieve inflammation and improve nerve function; it is an ideal anesthesia method for cardiac operation.

  11. Diabetic Nerve Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at the wrong times. This damage is called diabetic neuropathy. Over half of people with diabetes get ... you change positions quickly Your doctor will diagnose diabetic neuropathy with a physical exam and nerve tests. ...

  12. Increased protein damage in renal glomeruli, retina, nerve, plasma and urine and its prevention by thiamine and benfotiamine therapy in a rat model of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karachalias, N; Babaei-Jadidi, R; Rabbani, N; Thornalley, P J

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify protein damage by glycation, oxidation and nitration in a rat model of diabetes at the sites of development of microvascular complications, including the effects of thiamine and benfotiamine therapy. Diabetes was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by 55 mg/kg streptozotocin and moderated by insulin (2 U twice daily). Diabetic and control rats were given thiamine or benfotiamine (7 or 70 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) over 24 weeks. Plasma, urine and tissues were collected and analysed for protein damage by stable isotopic dilution analysis MS. There were two- to fourfold increases in fructosyl-lysine and AGE content of glomerular, retinal, sciatic nerve and plasma protein in diabetes. Increases in AGEs were reversed by thiamine and benfotiamine therapy but increases in fructosyl-lysine were not. Methionine sulfoxide content of plasma protein and 3-nitrotyrosine content of sciatic nerve protein were increased in diabetes. Plasma glycation free adducts were increased up to twofold in diabetes; the increases were reversed by thiamine. Urinary excretion of glycation, oxidation and nitration free adducts was increased by seven- to 27-fold in diabetes. These increases were reversed by thiamine and benfotiamine therapy. AGEs, particularly arginine-derived hydroimidazolones, accumulate at sites of microvascular complication development and have markedly increased urinary excretion rates in experimental diabetes. Thiamine and benfotiamine supplementation prevented tissue accumulation and increased urinary excretion of protein glycation, oxidation and nitration adducts. Similar effects may contribute to the reversal of early-stage clinical diabetic nephropathy by thiamine.

  13. Comprehensive visual impairment evaluation for cerebral palsy children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the visual impairment in cerebral palsy children with series objective indicators, and conclude their clinical features of visual function.METHODS: Objective tests including following pursuing test, optokinetic nystagmus(OKNdrum test, refractive error examination, fundus examination, ocular deviation examination, pattern visual evoked potential(P-VEPtests and brain magnetic resonance imaging(MRIwere carried out in 43 cerebral palsy children(86 eyeswith ocular visual dysfunction; The visual impairment data of the cerebral palsy children were collected, and the clinical features and possible mechanism were analyzed.RESULTS: 1. Of the 43 cerebral palsy children(86 eyeswith the visual impairment presented diversified, 25(50 eyes, 58.1%of refractive error, 24(48 eyes, 55.8%of strabismus, 12(24 eyes, 27.9%with nystagmus, 19(38 eyes, 44.2%of optical nerve atrophy or hyperplasia, 35(70 eyes, 81.4%of VEP abnormality. Among children with spastic cerebral palsy, the incidence of visual impairment was statistically significant difference compared with other groups(PP>0.05, no nystagmus in patients with severe occipital cortex damage.CONCLUSION: Cerebral palsy children were usually with visual impairment, and presented with special clinical features; Comprehensive objective visual tests are accurate and reliable for evaluation of the visual function in cerebral palsy children.

  14. Role of apoptosis in the рathogenesis of glaucomatous optic nerve damage during primary open-angle glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Frolov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to the study of the molecular mechanisms of programmed cell death or apoptosis in primary open-angleglaucoma. As one of the main factors in the pathogenesis of this disease appears the loss of retinal ganglion cells. Their death occursby apoptosis — programmed suicide mechanism. We consider two major apoptotic pathways, which are described in the literature —Fas-mediated and Bcl-2-dependent or mitochondrial. The existence of these paths and their regulators in many organs and tissues isdescribed, including the retina and optic nerve. Based on the analysis of domestic and foreign literature is presented modern view ofthe stages of this process in glaucoma. A thorough understanding of the mechanisms of apoptosis and their regulation may contribute to the development of new pharmacological methods of prevention and treatment of eye diseases

  15. The role of regional nerve block anesthesia for carotid endarterectomy: an experimental comparison with previous series with the use of general anesthesia and barbiturates for cerebral protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrifoglio, G; Agus, G B; Bonalumi, F; Costantini, A; Carlesi, R

    1987-01-01

    A retrospective analysis was performed on a consecutive series of 60 cases divided into two groups given carotid endarterectomy (C.E.) for atherosclerotic disease. In the first group general anesthesia and barbiturate cerebral protection were employed; in group two, loco-regional anesthesia. Indications and risk factors were similar in the two groups; the surgical procedure was identical. The differences in the results are reported and factors contributing to cerebral protection or reduction in the risk of stroke are analyzed. The analysis indicates that loco-regional anesthesia for C.E. is a reliable method for detecting cerebral ischemia and guaranteeing cerebral protection by means of a temporary shunt when strictly necessary.

  16. Effects of hyperbaric oxygen and nerve growth factor on the long-term neural behavior of neonatal rats with hypoxic ischemic brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lixia; Ren, Qing; Zhang, Yongjun; Wang, Jiwen

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of HBO (Hyperbaric oxygen) and NGF (Nerve growth factor) on the long-term neural behavior of neonatal rats with HIBD (Neonatal hypoxic ischemic brain damage). The HIBD model was produced by ligating the right common carotid artery of 7 days old SD (Sprague-Dawley) rats followed by 8% O2 + 92% N2 for 2h. Totally 40 rats were randomly divided into 5 groups including sham-operated group, HIBD control group, HBO treated group, NGF treated group and NGF + HBO treated group. The learning and memory ability of these rats was evaluated by Morris water maze at 30 days after birth, and sensory motor function was assessed by experiments of foot error and limb placement at 42 days after birth. The escape latency of HBO treated group, NGF treated group and NGF + HBO treated group was shorter than that of HIBD control group (pmemory ability and sensory motor function in neonatal rats after hypoxic ischemic brain damage.

  17. Therapeutic potential of Mucuna pruriens (Linn.) on ageing induced damage in dorsal nerve of the penis and its implication on erectile function: an experimental study using albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppan, Prakash; Muhammed, Ibrahim; Mohanraj, Karthik Ganesh; Lakshmanan, Ganesh; Premavathy, Dinesh; Muthu, Sakthi Jothi; Wungmarong Shimray, Khayinmi; Sathyanathan, Sathya Bharathy

    2018-02-15

    To study the effect of ethanolic seed extract of Mucuna pruriens on damaged dorsal nerve of the penis (DNP) in aged rat in relation to penile erection. The rats were divided into four groups Young (3 months), Aged (24 - 28 months), Aged + M. pruriens, and Young + M. pruriens (200 mg/kg b.w/60 days) and were subjected to the hypophysial - gonadal axis, nerve conduction velocity (NCV), and penile reflex. DNP sections were stained with nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NaDPH) diaphorase, androgen receptor (AR), and osmium tetroxide. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT) dUTP Nick-End Labeling (TUNEL) staining, electron microscopy(EM) and histometric analyses were done. Significant disturbance in hypophysial - gonadal axis was noted in aged rat. With reduced number of myelinated fibers, diameter, vacuolization, indentation of the myelin sheath, and degeneration. nNOS and its cofactor (NaDPH diaphorase) were reduced in aged rat DNP. NCV was slow in aged rats and concomitant poor penile reflex was also noted. AR showed reduced expression in aged rat DNP when compared to young and control groups. TUNEL positive cells were increased in aged rat DNP. These pathological changes were remarkably reduced or recovered in M. pruriens treated aged rats. The results indicate a multi-factorial therapeutic activity in penile innervations towards sustaining the penile erection in the presence of the extract in aged rats and justifying the claim of traditional usage.

  18. Study of the damage induced by radiations with different linear energy transfer in the nerve cells of the rat cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasavin, E.A.; Mashinskaya, T.E.; Ryzhov, N.I.

    1978-01-01

    The increase in space flight duration suggests the study of damage induced by high-fluxes of ionizing radiations in the tissues of the nervous system of the man. The quantitative and qualitative changes in the cerebellar granular cells of the rats of early postnatal period, affected by 25 and 50 MeV protons, 180 kV X-rays and Co 60 gamma-rays have been studied. It has been found that the radiosensitivity of neurons in different compartments of the cerebellar cortex varies significantly. Radiosensitivity of the inner and outer granular layers of the cerebellum to irradiation with 25 MeV protons was similar

  19. [Cerebral protection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, A D

    1993-09-01

    Cerebral protection means prevention of cerebral neuronal damage. Severe brain damage extinguishes the very "human" functions such as speech, consciousness, intellectual capacity, and emotional integrity. Many pathologic conditions may inflict injuries to the brain, therefore the protection and salvage of cerebral neuronal function must be the top priorities in the care of critically ill patients. Brain tissue has unusually high energy requirements, its stores of energy metabolites are small and, as a result, the brain is totally dependent on a continuous supply of substrates and oxygen, via the circulation. In complete global ischemia (cardiac arrest) reperfusion is characterized by an immediate reactive hyperemia followed within 20-30 min by a delayed hypoperfusion state. It has been postulated that the latter contributes to the ultimate neurologic outcome. In focal ischemia (stroke) the primary focus of necrosis is encircled by an area (ischemic penumbra) that is underperfused and contains neurotoxic substances such as free radicals, prostaglandins, calcium, and excitatory neurotransmitters. The variety of therapeutic effort that have addressed the question of protecting the brain reflects their limited success. 1) Barbiturates. After an initial enthusiastic endorsement by many clinicians and years of vigorous controversy, it can now be unequivocally stated that there is no place for barbiturate therapy following resuscitation from cardiac arrest. One presumed explanation for this negative statement is that cerebral metabolic suppression by barbiturates (and other anesthetics) is impossible in the absence of an active EEG. Conversely, in the event of incomplete ischemia EEG activity in usually present (albeit altered) and metabolic suppression and hence possibly protection can be induced with barbiturates. Indeed, most of the animal studies led to a number of recommendations for barbiturate therapy in man for incomplete ischemia. 2) Isoflurane. From a cerebral

  20. Molecular mimicry between Mycobacterium leprae proteins (50S ribosomal protein L2 and Lysyl-tRNA synthetase) and myelin basic protein: a possible mechanism of nerve damage in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Itu; Yadav, Asha Ram; Mohanty, Keshar Kunja; Katoch, Kiran; Sharma, Prashant; Mishra, Bishal; Bisht, Deepa; Gupta, U D; Sengupta, Utpal

    2015-04-01

    Autoantibodies against various components of host are known to occur in leprosy. Nerve damage is the primary cause of disability associated with leprosy. The aim of this study was to detect the level of autoantibodies and lympho-proliferative response against myelin basic protein (MBP) in leprosy patients (LPs) and their correlation with clinical phenotypes of LPs. Further, probable role of molecular mimicry in nerve damage of LPs was investigated. We observed significantly high level of anti-MBP antibodies in LPs across the spectrum and a positive significant correlation between the level of anti-MBP antibodies and the number of nerves involved in LPs. We report here that 4 B cell epitopes of myelin A1 and Mycobacterium leprae proteins, 50S ribosomal L2 and lysyl tRNA synthetase are cross-reactive. Further, M. leprae sonicated antigen hyperimmunization was responsible for induction of autoantibody response in mice which could be adoptively transferred to naive mice. For the first time our findings suggest the role of molecular mimicry in nerve damage in leprosy. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Chronic restraint stress in rats causes sustained increase in urinary corticosterone excretion without affecting cerebral or systemic oxidatively generated DNA/RNA damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Anders; Maigaard, Katrine; Wörtwein, Gitta

    2013-01-01

    acids, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo), respectively, in rats subjected to chronic restraint stress. To reliably collect 24h urine samples, the full 3-week restraint stress paradigm was performed in metabolism cages. We further determined frontal...... and Tnf). The metabolism cage housing in itself did not significantly influence a range of biological stress markers. In the restraint stress group, there was a sustained 2.5 fold increase in 24h corticosterone excretion from day 2 after stress initiation. However, neither whole-body nor cerebral measures......Increased oxidatively generated damage to nucleic acids (DNA/RNA) may be a common mechanism underlying accelerated aging in psychological stress states and mental disorders. In the present study, we measured the urinary excretion of corticosterone and markers of systemic oxidative stress on nucleic...

  2. The CT manifestations and clinical analysis of traumatic cerebral infarction in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tianbo; Lin Shunfa; Huang Xiaohui; Xiao Zhe; Lu Sifang

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate pathogenesis, CT manifestations, diagnosis and treatment, and prognosis of traumatic cerebral infarction in children. Methods: Axial head CT scanning was performed in 35 cases, meanwhile the treatment included vessel dilatation, anti-spasm, nerve nourishment and anti-coagulation. Results: The traumatic cerebral infarction in children was commonly located in the basal ganglia. CT scan revealed low dense lesions in all cases. 33 patients out of 35 convalesced gradually, when no anomaly was shown on CT. The rest 2 patients improved, whose lesions decreased in size on CT images. Conclusion: The major pathophysiology of traumatic cerebral infarction in children is occlusion of cerebral microcirculation and convulsion of vein after trauma. CT scan and follow-up are of great value in monitoring the damages. Early diagnosis and treatment result in good prognosis

  3. Genistein attenuates brain damage induced by transient cerebral ischemia through up-regulation of ERK activity in ovariectomized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiquan; Wei, Haidong; Cai, Min; Lu, Yan; Hou, Wugang; Yang, Qianzi; Dong, Hailong; Xiong, Lize

    2014-01-01

    Stroke has severe consequences in postmenopausal women. As replacement therapy of estrogen have various adverse effects and the undermined outcomes. Genistein, a natural phytoestrogen, has been suggested to be a potential neuroprotective agent for such stroke patients. However, the role of genistein and its underlying mechanism in ovariectomized mice has not yet been evaluated. In the present study, ovariectomized mice were treated with genistein (10 mg/kg) or vehicle daily for two weeks before developing transient cerebral ischemia (middle cerebral artery occlusion). The neurological manifestation was evaluated, and infarct volumes were demonstrated by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride staining at 24 h after reperfusion. In addition, phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was detected by Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining, and cellular apoptosis was evaluated in the ischemic penumbra. We found that treatment with genistein reduced infarct volumes, improved neurological outcomes and attenuated cellular apoptosis at 24 h after reperfusion. ERK1/2 showed increased phosphorylation by genistein treatment after reperfusion, and an ERK1/2 inhibitor U0126 abolished this protective effect of genistein in terms of infarct volumes, neurological scores and cellular apoptosis. Our findings indicate that treatment with genistein can reduce the severity of subsequent stroke episodes, and that this beneficial function is associated with ERK activation.

  4. Pinched Nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Pinched Nerve Information Page Pinched Nerve Information Page What research is being done? Within the NINDS research programs, pinched nerves are addressed primarily through studies associated with pain ...

  5. Cobalt-57 as a SPET tracer in the visualization of ischaemic brain damage in patients with middle cerebral artery stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, H; Knollema, S; Piers, DA; Van de Wiele, C; Jansen, HML; De Jager, AEJ; De Reuck, J; Dierckx, RA; Korf, J

    In PET studies we have shown the usefulness of cobalt radionuclides for the visualization and quantification of ischaemic damage in stroke. In the present study, we explored Co-57(2+) as a SPET tracer. Uptake of radioactivity was estimated by using a cobalt enhancement ratio defined as the ratio of

  6. Assessment of damage to cerebral white matter fiber in the subacute phase after carbon monoxide poisoning using fractional anisotropy in diffusion tensor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beppu, Takaaki [Iwate Medical University, Departments of Neurosurgery, Morioka (Japan); Iwate Medical University, Department of Hyperbaric Medicine, Morioka (Japan); Nishimoto, Hideaki; Ishigaki, Daiya [Iwate Medical University, Departments of Neurosurgery, Morioka (Japan); Iwate Medical University, Advanced Medical Research Center, Morioka (Japan); Fujiwara, Shunrou; Sasaki, Makoto [Iwate Medical University, Advanced Medical Research Center, Morioka (Japan); Yoshida, Tomoyuki [Iwate Medical University, Department of Psychiatry, Morioka (Japan); Oikawa, Hirotaka [Iwate Prefectural Advanced Critical Care and Emergency, Morioka (Japan); Kamada, Katsura [Iwate Medical University, Department of Hyperbaric Medicine, Morioka (Japan); Ogasawara, Kuniaki [Iwate Medical University, Departments of Neurosurgery, Morioka (Japan)

    2010-08-15

    Chronic neuropsychiatric symptoms after carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning are caused by demyelination of cerebral white matter fibers. We examined whether diffusion tensor imaging can sensitively represent damage to fibers of the centrum semiovale in the subacute phase after CO intoxication. Subjects comprised 13 adult patients with CO poisoning, classified into three groups according to clinical behaviors: group A, patients with transit acute symptoms only; group P, patients with persistent neurological symptoms; and group D, patients with ''delayed neuropsychiatric sequelae'' occurring after a lucid interval. Median fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the centrum semiovale bilaterally at 2 weeks were compared between these groups and a control group of ten healthy volunteers. Myelin basic protein (MBP) concentration in cerebrospinal fluid was examined at 2 weeks to evaluate the degree of demyelination in patients. MBP concentration was abnormal or detectable for all group P and group D patients but was undetectable for all patients assigned to group A. Low FA values in groups P and D displaying chronic neurological symptoms clearly differed from those in controls and group A without chronic neurological symptoms, but ADC showed no significant differences between patient groups. MBP concentration at 2 weeks after CO inhalation confirmed a certain extent of demyelination in the central nervous system of patients who would develop chronic neurological symptoms. In these patients, FA sensitively represented damage to white matter fibers in the centrum semiovale in the subacute phase after CO intoxication. (orig.)

  7. Assessment of damage to cerebral white matter fiber in the subacute phase after carbon monoxide poisoning using fractional anisotropy in diffusion tensor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beppu, Takaaki; Nishimoto, Hideaki; Ishigaki, Daiya; Fujiwara, Shunrou; Sasaki, Makoto; Yoshida, Tomoyuki; Oikawa, Hirotaka; Kamada, Katsura; Ogasawara, Kuniaki

    2010-01-01

    Chronic neuropsychiatric symptoms after carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning are caused by demyelination of cerebral white matter fibers. We examined whether diffusion tensor imaging can sensitively represent damage to fibers of the centrum semiovale in the subacute phase after CO intoxication. Subjects comprised 13 adult patients with CO poisoning, classified into three groups according to clinical behaviors: group A, patients with transit acute symptoms only; group P, patients with persistent neurological symptoms; and group D, patients with ''delayed neuropsychiatric sequelae'' occurring after a lucid interval. Median fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the centrum semiovale bilaterally at 2 weeks were compared between these groups and a control group of ten healthy volunteers. Myelin basic protein (MBP) concentration in cerebrospinal fluid was examined at 2 weeks to evaluate the degree of demyelination in patients. MBP concentration was abnormal or detectable for all group P and group D patients but was undetectable for all patients assigned to group A. Low FA values in groups P and D displaying chronic neurological symptoms clearly differed from those in controls and group A without chronic neurological symptoms, but ADC showed no significant differences between patient groups. MBP concentration at 2 weeks after CO inhalation confirmed a certain extent of demyelination in the central nervous system of patients who would develop chronic neurological symptoms. In these patients, FA sensitively represented damage to white matter fibers in the centrum semiovale in the subacute phase after CO intoxication. (orig.)

  8. Unilateral traumatic oculomotor nerve paralysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asari, Syoji; Satoh, Toru; Yamamoto, Yuji

    1982-01-01

    The present authors report a case of unilateral traumatic oculomotor nerve paralysis which shows interesting CT findings which suggest its mechanism. A 60-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a cerebral concussion soon after a traffic accident. A CT scan was performed soon after admission. A high-density spot was noted at the medial aspect of the left cerebral peduncle, where the oculomotor nerve emerged from the midbrain, and an irregular, slender, high-density area was delineated in the right dorsolateral surface of the midbrain. Although the right hemiparesis had already improved by the next morning, the function of the left oculomotor nerve has been completely disturbed for the three months since the injury. In our case, it is speculated that an avulsion of the left oculomotor nerve rootlet occurred at the time of impact as the mechanism of the oculomotor nerve paralysis. A CT taken soon after the head injury showed a high-density spot; this was considered to be a hemorrhage occurring because of the avulsion of the nerve rootlet at the medial surface of the cerebral peduncle. (J.P.N.)

  9. Detecting damaged regions of cerebral white matter in the subacute phase after carbon monoxide poisoning using voxel-based analysis with diffusion tensor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Shunrou; Nishimoto, Hideaki; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Beppu, Takaaki; Sanjo, Katsumi; Koeda, Atsuhiko; Mori, Kiyoshi; Kudo, Kohsuke; Sasaki, Makoto

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed to detect the main regions of cerebral white matter (CWM) showing damage in the subacute phase for CO-poisoned patients with chronic neurological symptoms using voxel-based analysis (VBA) with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Subjects comprised 22 adult CO-poisoned patients and 16 age-matched healthy volunteers as controls. Patients were classified into patients with transient acute symptoms only (group A) and patients with chronic neurological symptoms (group S). In all patients, DTI covering the whole brain was performed with a 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging system at 2 weeks after CO exposure. As procedures for VBA, all fractional anisotropy (FA) maps obtained from DTI were spatially normalized, and FA values for all voxels in the whole CWM on normalized FA maps were statistically compared among the two patient groups and controls. Voxels with significant differences in FA were detected at various regions in comparisons between groups S and A and between group S and controls. In these comparisons, more voxels were detected in deep CWM, including the centrum semiovale, than in other regions. A few voxels were detected between group A and controls. Absolute FA values in the centrum semiovale were significantly lower in group S than in group A or controls. VBA demonstrated that CO-poisoned patients with chronic neurological symptoms had already suffered damage to various CWM regions in the subacute phase. In these regions, the centrum semiovale was suggested to be the main region damaged in the subacute phase after CO inhalation. (orig.)

  10. Cerebral activations during viewing of food stimuli in adult patients with acquired structural hypothalamic damage: a functional neuroimaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, C A; Powell, J L; Kemp, G J; Halford, J C G; Wilding, J P; Harrold, J A; Kumar, S V D; Cuthbertson, D J; Cross, A A; Javadpour, M; MacFarlane, I A; Stancak, A A; Daousi, C

    2015-09-01

    Obesity is common following hypothalamic damage due to tumours. Homeostatic and non-homeostatic brain centres control appetite and energy balance but their interaction in the presence of hypothalamic damage remains unknown. We hypothesized that abnormal appetite in obese patients with hypothalamic damage results from aberrant brain processing of food stimuli. We sought to establish differences in activation of brain food motivation and reward neurocircuitry in patients with hypothalamic obesity (HO) compared with patients with hypothalamic damage whose weight had remained stable. In a cross-sectional study at a University Clinical Research Centre, we studied 9 patients with HO, 10 age-matched obese controls, 7 patients who remained weight-stable following hypothalamic insult (HWS) and 10 non-obese controls. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was performed in the fasted state, 1 h and 3 h after a test meal, while subjects were presented with images of high-calorie foods, low-calorie foods and non-food objects. Insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1, Peptide YY and ghrelin were measured throughout the experiment, and appetite ratings were recorded. Mean neural activation in the posterior insula and lingual gyrus (brain areas linked to food motivation and reward value of food) in HWS were significantly lower than in the other three groups (P=0.001). A significant negative correlation was found between insulin levels and posterior insula activation (P=0.002). Neural pathways associated with food motivation and reward-related behaviour, and the influence of insulin on their activation may be involved in the pathophysiology of HO.

  11. Role of the NMDA receptor and iron on free radical production and brain damage following transient middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Doo Soon; Jeon, Jeong Wook; Lee, Jin Soo; Won, Seok Joon; Cho, Sung Ig; Lee, Yong Beom; Gwag, Byoung Joo

    2012-05-21

    Excess activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors and iron is believed to contribute to free radical production and neuronal death following hypoxic ischemia. We examined the possibility that both NMDA receptor activation and iron overload determine spatial and temporal patterns of free radical production after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO) in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Mitochondrial free radical (MFR) levels were maximally increased in neurons in the core at 1 h and 24 h after tMCAO. Early MFR production was blocked by administration of MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist, but not deferoxamine, an iron chelator. Neither MK-801 nor deferoxamine attenuated late MFR production in the core. Increased MFRs were observed in penumbral neurons within 6 h and gradually increased over 24 h after tMCAO. Slowly-evolving MFRs in the core and penumbra were accompanied by iron overload. Deferoxamine blocked iron overload but reduced MFR production only in the penumbra. Combined MK-801/deferoxamine reduced late MFR production in both core and penumbra in an additive manner. Combination therapy significantly ameliorated infarction compared with monotherapy. These findings suggest that the NMDA receptor activation and iron overload mediate late MFR production and infarction after tMCAO. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Esophageal gel-shifting technique facilitating eradicative boost or reirradiation to upper mediastinal targets of recurrent nerve lymph node without damaging esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Kazushi; Iida, Takeshi; Ojima, Toshiyasu; Sonomura, Tetsuo; Shirai, Shintaro; Nakai, Motoki; Sato, Morio; Yamaue, Hiroki

    2013-01-01

    We developed a new technique using hyaluronic gel injection as a spacer to safely move the esophagus away from the high-dose area during interstitial brachytherapy of a mediastinal target close to the esophagus. We percutaneously injected a high-molecular-weight hyaluronic gel mixed with contrast medium to create a space between the esophagus and the target during interstitial brachytherapy. We applied this technique to two cases of relapsed recurrent nerve lymph node metastasis from esophageal cancer: one refractory tumor after 50 Gy of radiotherapy, and one recurrence after mediastinal radiotherapy of total 64 Gy. We prescribed 20 Gy and 18 Gy in one fraction to each target, with calculated esophageal D 2cc (the minimum dose to the most irradiated volume of 2 cc) of 4.0 Gy and 6.8 Gy, respectively. Calculated enhancement factor by gel shifting in equivalent dose was 2.69 and 2.34, respectively. In each patient, accumulated esophageal D 1cc (minimum dose to the most irradiated volume of p cc. minimum dose to the most irradiated volume of 1 cc) was 74.4 Gy and 85.6 Gy without shifting, and 59.1 Gy and 37.6 Gy with shifting, respectively. There were no procedure-related complications. Four months after the brachytherapy, each tumor was remarkably diminished. No evidence of recurrences or late complications were observed 8 months and 9 months after the procedure, respectively. The esophageal gel-shifting technique may facilitate eradicative brachytherapy to upper mediastinal targets without damaging the esophagus, and can be used in conjunction with boost irradiation or reirradiation to overcome the problem of salvage failure. (author)

  13. Cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truwit, C.L.; Barkovich, A.J.; Koch, T.; Ferreiro, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews cranial MR findings in patients with cerebral palsy (CP) to clarify and categorize this disorder. The MR images of 40 patients with clinical CP were retrospectively reviewed. All patients suffered either varying spastic plegias, hypotonicity, or choreoathetosis. Concomitantly, the patients suffered from static encephalopathy, developmental delay, and/or microcephaly. Twenty-four patients were born at or near term, 10 were premature, and incomplete birth histories were available in six. The MR images revealed mild to severe degrees of white matter damage in 24 patients (12 term, nine premature, three unknown)

  14. Prophylactic administration of melatonin to the mother throughout pregnancy can protect against oxidative cerebral damage in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kazushi; Hamada, Fumiaki; Wakatsuki, Akihiko; Nagai, Ryuhei; Shinohara, Koichi; Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Imamura, Rina; Fukaya, Takao

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether prophylactic administration of melatonin to the mother throughout pregnancy could protect against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R)-induced oxidative brain damage in neonatal rats. The utero-ovarian arteries were occluded bilaterally for 30 min in female Wistar rats on day 16 of pregnancy to induce fetal ischemia. Reperfusion was achieved by releasing the occlusion and restoring circulation. A sham operation was performed in control rats. Melatonin solution or vehicle alone was administrated orally throughout pregnancy. We collected brain mitochondria from neonatal rats, evaluated mitochondrial structure by electron microscopy, and measured the respiratory control index (RCI) as an indicator of mitochondrial respiratory activity as well as the concentration of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS), a marker of oxidative stress. Histological analysis was performed at the Cornu Ammonis 1 (CA1) and Cornu Ammonis 3 (CA3) regions of the hippocampus. I/R significantly reduced the RCI and significantly elevated the concentration of TBARS. Melatonin treatment reversed these effects, resulting in values similar to that in untreated, sham-ischemic animals. Electron microscopic evaluation showed that the number of intact mitochondria decreased in the I/R group, while melatonin treatment preserved them. Histological analysis revealed a decrease in the ratio of normal to whole pyramidal cell number in the CA1 and CA3 regions in the I/R group. While melatonin administration protected against degeneration. These results indicate that prophylactic administration of melatonin to the mother throughout pregnancy may prevent I/R-induced oxidative brain damage in neonatal rats.

  15. Electroacupuncture ameliorates post-stroke learning and memory through minimizing ultrastructural brain damage and inhibiting the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injured rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ruhui; Yu, Kunqiang; Li, Xiaojie; Tao, Jing; Lin, Yukun; Zhao, Congkuai; Li, Chunyan; Chen, Li-Dian

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the potential neuroprotective effects of electroacupuncture (EA) in the treatment of cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury, and to elucidate the association between this neuroprotective effect and brain ultrastructure and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)‑2 and 9. Rats underwent focal cerebral I/R injury by arterial ligation and received in vivo therapeutic EA at the Baihui (DU20) and Shenting (DU24) acupoints. The therapeutic efficacy was then evaluated following the surgery. The results of the current study demonstrated that EA treatment significantly ameliorated neurological deficits and reduced cerebral infarct volume compared with I/R injured rats. Furthermore, EA improved the learning and memory ability of rats following I/R injury, inhibited blood brain barrier breakdown and reduced neuronal damage in the ischemic penumbra. Furthermore, EA attenuated ultrastructural changes in the brain tissue following ischemia and inhibited MMP‑2/MMP‑9 expression in cerebral I/R injured rats. The results suggest that EA ameliorates anatomical deterioration, and learning and memory deficits in rats with cerebral I/R injury.

  16. Inferior alveolar nerve injury with laryngeal mask airway: a case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanumanthaiah, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of damage to the individual cranial nerves and their branches associated with laryngeal mask airway use is low; there have been case reports of damage to the lingual nerve, hypoglossal nerve and recurrent laryngeal nerve. To the best of our knowledge we present the first reported case of inferior alveolar nerve injury associated with laryngeal mask airway use.

  17. Diffusion measures indicate fight exposure-related damage to cerebral white matter in boxers and mixed martial arts fighters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, W; Mahmoud, S Y; Sakaie, K; Banks, S J; Lowe, M J; Phillips, M; Modic, M T; Bernick, C

    2014-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury is common in fighting athletes such as boxers, given the frequency of blows to the head. Because DTI is sensitive to microstructural changes in white matter, this technique is often used to investigate white matter integrity in patients with traumatic brain injury. We hypothesized that previous fight exposure would predict DTI abnormalities in fighting athletes after controlling for individual variation. A total of 74 boxers and 81 mixed martial arts fighters were included in the analysis and scanned by use of DTI. Individual information and data on fight exposures, including number of fights and knockouts, were collected. A multiple hierarchical linear regression model was used in region-of-interest analysis to test the hypothesis that fight-related exposure could predict DTI values separately in boxers and mixed martial arts fighters. Age, weight, and years of education were controlled to ensure that these factors would not account for the hypothesized effects. We found that the number of knockouts among boxers predicted increased longitudinal diffusivity and transversal diffusivity in white matter and subcortical gray matter regions, including corpus callosum, isthmus cingulate, pericalcarine, precuneus, and amygdala, leading to increased mean diffusivity and decreased fractional anisotropy in the corresponding regions. The mixed martial arts fighters had increased transversal diffusivity in the posterior cingulate. The number of fights did not predict any DTI measures in either group. These findings suggest that the history of fight exposure in a fighter population can be used to predict microstructural brain damage.

  18. Facial nerve palsy due to birth trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seventh cranial nerve palsy due to birth trauma; Facial palsy - birth trauma; Facial palsy - neonate; Facial palsy - infant ... An infant's facial nerve is also called the seventh cranial nerve. It can be damaged just before or at the time of delivery. ...

  19. A preconditioning nerve lesion inhibits mechanical pain hypersensitivity following subsequent neuropathic injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Ann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A preconditioning stimulus can trigger a neuroprotective phenotype in the nervous system - a preconditioning nerve lesion causes a significant increase in axonal regeneration, and cerebral preconditioning protects against subsequent ischemia. We hypothesized that a preconditioning nerve lesion induces gene/protein modifications, neuronal changes, and immune activation that may affect pain sensation following subsequent nerve injury. We examined whether a preconditioning lesion affects neuropathic pain and neuroinflammation after peripheral nerve injury. Results We found that a preconditioning crush injury to a terminal branch of the sciatic nerve seven days before partial ligation of the sciatic nerve (PSNL; a model of neuropathic pain induced a significant attenuation of pain hypersensitivity, particularly mechanical allodynia. A preconditioning lesion of the tibial nerve induced a long-term significant increase in paw-withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimuli and paw-withdrawal latency to thermal stimuli, after PSNL. A preconditioning lesion of the common peroneal induced a smaller but significant short-term increase in paw-withdrawal threshold to mechanical stimuli, after PSNL. There was no difference between preconditioned and unconditioned animals in neuronal damage and macrophage and T-cell infiltration into the dorsal root ganglia (DRGs or in astrocyte and microglia activation in the spinal dorsal and ventral horns. Conclusions These results suggest that prior exposure to a mild nerve lesion protects against adverse effects of subsequent neuropathic injury, and that this conditioning-induced inhibition of pain hypersensitivity is not dependent on neuroinflammation in DRGs and spinal cord. Identifying the underlying mechanisms may have important implications for the understanding of neuropathic pain due to nerve injury.

  20. Carcinoma de células escamosas no olho de bovino com invasão cerebral através dos nervos cranianos Ocular squamous cell carcinoma in a cow with cerebral invasion through cranial nerves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Rocha de Barros

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Um carcinoma de células escamosas foi removido do olho de uma vaca de 7 anos de idade que apresentava ptose da orelha esquerda, salivação e perda de peso progressiva. Devido ao mau prognóstico, a vaca foi submetida à eutanásia 9 meses após a cirurgia. Na necropsia e no exame histopatológico, foi observado que o tumor havia invadido o tronco encefálico através dos nervos cranianos. Outros achados de necropsia significativos incluíam pneumonia de aspiração e atrofia por desnervação do músculo temporal esquerdo.A squamous cell carcinoma of the eye was removed from a 7-year-old cow which presented drooping of left ear, drooling and progressive loss of weight. Due to poor prognosis it was euthanatized 9 months after surgery. At necropsy and histopathological examination it was found that the tumor had invaded the brain stem through the cranial nerves. Additional necropsy significant findings included aspiration pneumonia and denervation atrophy of the left temporal muscle.

  1. Multiple Cranial Nerve Involvement In Cryptococcal Meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahadevan A

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon cause of multiple cranial nerve palsies. This case report illustrates one such case of cryptococcal meningitis clinically manifesting with extensive cranial nerve involvement in an HIV seronegative individual. Histology revealed infiltration of the cranial nerves by cryptococci causing axonal disruption with secondary demyelination in the absence of any evidence of inflammation or vasculitis. We believe that axonal damage underlies the pathogenesis of cranial nerve involvement in cryptococcal meningitis.

  2. Vascularized nerve grafts for lower extremity nerve reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzis, Julia K; Kostopoulos, Vasileios K

    2010-02-01

    Vascularized nerve grafts (VNG) were introduced in 1976 but since then, there have been no reports of their usage in lower extremity reconstruction systematically. The factors influencing outcomes as well as a comparison with conventional nerve grafts will be presented.Since 1981, 14 lower extremity nerve injuries in 12 patients have been reconstructed with VNG. Common peroneal nerve was injured in 12 and posterior tibial nerve in 5 patients. The level of the injury was at the knee or thigh. Twelve sural nerves were used as VNG with or without concomitant vascularized posterior calf fascia.All patients regained improved sensibility and adequate posterior tibial nerve function. For common peroneal nerve reconstructions, all patients with denervation time less than 6 months regained muscle strength of grade at least 4, even when long grafts were used for defects of 20 cm or more. Late cases, yielded inadequate muscle function even with the use of VNG.Denervation time of 6 months or less was critical for reconstruction with vascularized nerve graft. Not only the results were statistically significant compared with late cases, but also all early operated patients achieved excellent results. VNG are strongly recommended in traction avulsion injuries of the lower extremity with lengthy nerve damage.

  3. Scaffoldless tissue-engineered nerve conduit promotes peripheral nerve regeneration and functional recovery after tibial nerve injury in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aaron M. Adams; Keith W. VanDusen; Tatiana Y. Kostrominova; Jacob P. Mertens; Lisa M. Larkin

    2017-01-01

    Damage to peripheral nerve tissue may cause loss of function in both the nerve and the targeted muscles it innervates. This study compared the repair capability of engineered nerve conduit (ENC), engineered fibroblast conduit (EFC), and autograft in a 10-mm tibial nerve gap. ENCs were fabricated utilizing primary fibroblasts and the nerve cells of rats on embryonic day 15 (E15). EFCs were fabricated utilizing primary fi-broblasts only. Following a 12-week recovery, nerve repair was assessed by measuring contractile properties in the medial gastrocnemius muscle, distal motor nerve conduction velocity in the lateral gastrocnemius, and histology of muscle and nerve. The autografts, ENCs and EFCs reestablished 96%, 87% and 84% of native distal motor nerve conduction velocity in the lateral gastrocnemius, 100%, 44% and 44% of native specific force of medical gastrocnemius, and 63%, 61% and 67% of native medial gastrocnemius mass, re-spectively. Histology of the repaired nerve revealed large axons in the autograft, larger but fewer axons in the ENC repair, and many smaller axons in the EFC repair. Muscle histology revealed similar muscle fiber cross-sectional areas among autograft, ENC and EFC repairs. In conclusion, both ENCs and EFCs promot-ed nerve regeneration in a 10-mm tibial nerve gap repair, suggesting that the E15 rat nerve cells may not be necessary for nerve regeneration, and EFC alone can suffice for peripheral nerve injury repair.

  4. Regeneration of Optic Nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok-Fai So

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The optic nerve is part of the central nervous system (CNS and has a structure similar to other CNS tracts. The axons that form the optic nerve originate in the ganglion cell layer of the retina and extend through the optic tract. As a tissue, the optic nerve has the same organization as the white matter of the brain in regard to its glia. There are three types of glial cells: Oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, and microglia. Little structural and functional regeneration of the CNS takes place spontaneously following injury in adult mammals. In contrast, the ability of the mammalian peripheral nervous system (PNS to regenerate axons after injury is well documented. A number of factors are involved in the lack of CNS regeneration, including: (i the response of neuronal cell bodies against the damage; (ii myelin-mediated inhibition by oligodendrocytes; (iii glial scarring, by astrocytes; (iv macrophage infiltration; and (v insufficient trophic factor support. The fundamental difference in the regenerative capacity between CNS and PNS neuronal cell bodies has been the subject of intensive research. In the CNS the target normally conveys a retrograde trophic signal to the cell body. CNS neurons die because of trophic deprivation. Damage to the optic nerve disconnects the neuronal cell body from its target-derived trophic peptides, leading to the death of retinal ganglion cells. Furthermore, the axontomized neurons become less responsive to the peptide trophic signals they do receive. On the other hand, adult PNS neurons are intrinsically responsive to neurotrophic factors and do not lose trophic responsiveness after axotomy. In this talk different strategies to promote optic-nerve regeneration in adult mammals are reviewed. Much work is still needed to resolve many issues. This is a very important area of neuroregeneration and neuroprotection, as currently there is no cure after traumatic optic nerve injury or retinal disease such as glaucoma, which

  5. The association atorvastatin-meloxicam reduces brain damage, attenuating reactive gliosis subsequent to arterial embolism = La asociación atorvastatina-meloxicam reduce el daño cerebral, atenuando la gliosis reactiva consecuente a embolismo arterial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Hernández Torres

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The association atorvastatin-meloxicam reduces brain damage, attenuating reactive gliosis subsequent to arterial embolism Introduction: Stroke is the leading cause of disability and the third of death in Colombia and in the world and it is associated with neurodegenerative and mental diseases. Objective: To determine the effects of the atorvastatin- meloxicam association on reactive gliosis in a model of cerebral ischemia produced by arterial embolization. Materials and methods: 56 adult male Wistar rats were used, divided into four ischemic and four control groups, plus 10 additional animals to determine the distribution and extent of infarction by injury in six of them and simulation (sham in the remaining four. The treatments were: placebo, atorvastatin (ATV, meloxicam (MELOX and ATV + MELOX in ischemic and simulated animals. 24 hours post-ischemia mitochondrial enzymatic activity was evaluated with triphenyl- tetrazolium (TTC, and at 120 hours astrocytic reactivity (anti-GFAP was analyzed by conventional immunohistochemistry. Results: The association ATV + MELOX favored the modulation of the response of protoplasmatic and fibrous astrocytes in both the hippocampus and the paraventricular zone by reducing their hypereactivity. Conclusion: Atorvastatin and meloxicam, either individually or associated, reduce cerebral damage by lessening the reactive gliosis produced by arterial embolization; this suggests new mechanisms of neuroprotection against thromboembolic cerebral ischemia, and opens new perspectives in its early treatment.

  6. Anti-Seizure Medications: Relief from Nerve Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anti-seizure medications: Relief from nerve pain Anti-seizure drugs often are used to help control the type of ... by damaged nerves. By Mayo Clinic Staff Anti-seizure medications were originally designed to treat people with ...

  7. Symptomatic unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Features and surgical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Date, Isao

    2010-01-01

    Development of less invasive imaging studies, such as magnetic resonance angiography, has increased the chances that unruptured cerebral aneurysms are found. The rupture risk of 'symptomatic' aneurysms is higher than for 'asymptomatic' aneurysms; so 'symptomatic' aneurysms are more often surgically treated. Many reviews examine 'asymptomatic' unruptured cerebral aneurysms, but few evaluate 'symptomatic' aneurysms. The author has treated many patients with symptomatic unruptured cerebral aneurysms and found that improved cranial nerve signs can be expected if the surgical treatment is performed before the symptoms become irreversible; the critical period is approximately 3 months. It is important to suppress the pulsation of the aneurysms compressing the cranial nerves; both a clipping procedure and endovascular coiling are effective. Cranial nerve signs are more commonly the symptoms of unruptured cerebral aneurysms, but large to giant aneurysms can also be the causes of hemiparesis, hydrocephalus, epilepsy, or even cerebral infarction. This review summarizes the features and surgical outcome of symptomatic unruptured cerebral aneurysms. (author)

  8. Aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, U D; Adhikari, S

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve is most commonly due to its damage by trauma. A ten-month old child presented with the history of a fall from a four-storey building. She developed traumatic third nerve palsy and eventually the clinical features of aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve. The adduction of the eye improved over time. She was advised for patching for the strabismic amblyopia as well. Traumatic third nerve palsy may result in aberrant regeneration of the third cranial nerve. In younger patients, motility of the eye in different gazes may improve over time. © NEPjOPH.

  9. [Localized invasive intracranial aspergillosis with multiple cranial nerve failure -- case report and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, F; Seelos, K; Hempel, J M; Pfister, H-W

    2002-12-01

    Contrary to the more frequent hematogenously spread cerebral aspergillosis, localized invasive intracranial aspergillosis is a fungal infection that can also occur in patients who are not severely immunosuppressed. This illness can be effectively treated in some of these patients by early and rigorous therapy. Localized invasion of the fungus, generally from one of the nasal sinuses, causes intracranial growth mainly along the base of the skull and larger vessels,where fibrous, granulomatous tissue develops. This generally leads to damage of the cranial nerves (primarily I-VI) as well as localized pain syndromes. We report on the clinical course documented by MRI of a patient with localized invasive intracranial aspergillosis who had multiple failure of cranial nerves following surgery for an aspergilloma of the maxillary sinus. Clinical course, imaging findings, and treatment of the illness are discussed with a review of the relevant literature.

  10. Optic nerve hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savleen Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Optic nerve hypoplasia (ONH is a congenital anomaly of the optic disc that might result in moderate to severe vision loss in children. With a vast number of cases now being reported, the rarity of ONH is obviously now refuted. The major aspects of ophthalmic evaluation of an infant with possible ONH are visual assessment, fundus examination, and visual electrophysiology. Characteristically, the disc is small, there is a peripapillary double-ring sign, vascular tortuosity, and thinning of the nerve fiber layer. A patient with ONH should be assessed for presence of neurologic, radiologic, and endocrine associations. There may be maternal associations like premature births, fetal alcohol syndrome, maternal diabetes. Systemic associations in the child include endocrine abnormalities, developmental delay, cerebral palsy, and seizures. Besides the hypoplastic optic nerve and chiasm, neuroimaging shows abnormalities in ventricles or white- or gray-matter development, septo-optic dysplasia, hydrocephalus, and corpus callosum abnormalities. There is a greater incidence of clinical neurologic abnormalities in patients with bilateral ONH (65% than patients with unilateral ONH. We present a review on the available literature on the same to urge caution in our clinical practice when dealing with patients with ONH. Fundus photography, ocular coherence tomography, visual field testing, color vision evaluation, neuroimaging, endocrinology consultation with or without genetic testing are helpful in the diagnosis and management of ONH. (Method of search: MEDLINE, PUBMED.

  11. Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerebral palsy is a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance ... do not get worse over time. People with cerebral palsy may have difficulty walking. They may also have ...

  12. Malaria cerebral Cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Hugo Zapata Zapata

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available La malaria Cerebral (MC es la complicación más frecuente de la malaria por P. falciparum; aproximadamente el 90% de las personas que la han padecido se recuperan completamente sin secuelas neurológicas. Aún no se conoce con claridad su patogénesis pero se han postulado cuatro hipótesis o mecanismos posibles: 1 citoadherencia y secuestro de glóbulos rojos parasitados en la microvasculatura cerebral; 2 formación de rosetas y aglutinación de glóbulos rojos parasitados; 3 producción de citoquinas y activación de segundos mensajeros y, 4 apertura de la barrera hematoencefálica. Sin embargo, queda un interrogante sin resolver aún: ¿qué proceso se lleva a cabo para que el parásito, desde el espacio microvascular, pueda interferir transitoriamente con la función cerebral? Recientemente se ha utilizado el precursor de la proteína b-Amiloide como un marcador de daño neuronal en MC; este precursor será de gran ayuda en futuras investigaciones realizadas en nuestro medio que aporten información para comprender la patogénesis de la MC. Is the most common complication of P. falciparum malaria; nearly 90% of people who have suffered CM can recover without neurological problems. Currently there are four hypotheses that explain pathogenesis of CM: cytoadherence and sequestering of parasitized red blood cells to cerebral capillaries; rosette formation and parasitized red blood cells agglutination; production of cytokines and activation of second messengers and opening of the blood-brain barrier. However the main question remains to be answered; how the host-parasite interaction in the vascular space interferes transiently with cerebral function? Recently, the beta amyloid precursor peptide has been employed as marker of neural injury in CM. It is expected that the beta amyloid precursor peptide will help to understand the pathogenesis of CM in complicated patients of endemic areas of Colombia.

  13. Arterial supply of the upper cranial nerves: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Philipp; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Foreman, Paul; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Loukas, Marios; Tubbs, R Shane

    2014-11-01

    The arterial supply to the upper cranial nerves is derived from a complex network of branches derived from the anterior and posterior cerebral circulations. We performed a comprehensive literature review of the arterial supply of the upper cranial nerves with an emphasis on clinical considerations. Arteries coursing in close proximity to the cranial nerves regularly give rise to small vessels that supply the nerve. Knowledge of the arteries supplying the cranial nerves is of particular importance during surgical approaches to the skull base. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Cerebral microangiopathies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linn, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral microangiopathies are a very heterogenous group of diseases characterized by pathological changes of the small cerebral vessels. They account for 20 - 30 % of all ischemic strokes. Degenerative microangiopathy and sporadic cerebral amyloid angiography represent the typical acquired cerebral microangiopathies, which are found in over 90 % of cases. Besides, a wide variety of rare, hereditary microangiopathy exists, as e.g. CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy), Fabrys disease and MELAS syndrome (Mitochondrial myopathy, Encephalopathy, Lactic Acidosis, and Stroke-like episodes). (orig.)

  15. Cerebral localization in antiquity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, F Clifford

    2009-07-01

    Fragments of neurology can be found in the oldest medical writings in antiquity. Recognizable cerebral localization is seen in Egyptian medical papyri. Most notably, the Edwin Smith papyrus describes hemiplegia after a head injury. Similar echoes can be seen in Homer, the Bible, and the pre-Hippocratic writer Alcmaeon of Croton. While Biblical writers thought that the heart was the seat of the soul, Hippocratic writers located it in the head. Alexandrian anatomists described the nerves, and Galen developed the ventricular theory of cognition whereby mental functions are classified and localized in one of the cerebral ventricles. Medieval scholars, including the early Church Fathers, modified Galenic ventricular theory so as to make it a dynamic model of cognition. Physicians in antiquity subdivided the brain into separate areas and attributed to them different functions, a phenomenon that connects them with modern neurologists.

  16. [Acute palsy of twelfth cranial nerve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz del Castillo, F; Molina Nieto, T; De la Riva Aguilar, A; Triviño Tarradas, F; Bravo-Rodríguez, F; Ramos Jurado, A

    2005-01-01

    The hypoglossal nerve or Twelfth-nerve palsy is a rare damage with different causes: tumors or metastases in skull base, cervicals tumors, schwannoma, dissection or aneurysm carotid arteries, stroke, trauma, idiopathic cause, radiation, infections (mononucleosis) or multiple cranial neuropathy. Tumors were responsible for nearly half of the cases in different studies. We studied a female with hypoglossal nerve acute palsy. We made a differential diagnostic with others causes and a review of the literature.

  17. Multiple Cranial Nerve Involvement In Cryptococcal Meningitis

    OpenAIRE

    Mahadevan A; Kumar A; Santosh V; Satishchandra P; Shankar S.K

    2000-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningitis is an uncommon cause of multiple cranial nerve palsies. This case report illustrates one such case of cryptococcal meningitis clinically manifesting with extensive cranial nerve involvement in an HIV seronegative individual. Histology revealed infiltration of the cranial nerves by cryptococci causing axonal disruption with secondary demyelination in the absence of any evidence of inflammation or vasculitis. We believe that axonal damage underlies the pathogenesis of...

  18. Caring for patientssuffered from cranial nerve damage caused dysphagia%后组颅神经损伤致吞咽障碍的康复护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚莉娟

    2014-01-01

    目的:对后组颅神经损伤导致吞咽障碍的患者早期进行康复护理的效果观察。方法对35例神经外科手术术后,后组颅神经损伤患者进行吞咽功能康复护理,4周后观察患者吞咽功能的改善情况。结果35例患者中基本痊愈15例,明显好转11例,好转5例,无效4例,总有效率88.6%。结论系统、早期康复护理对患者吞咽功能的恢复有促进作用。%Objective To observe the effects of early rehabilitation nursing for patients suffered from dysphagia caused by the injury of lower cranial nerves .Methods The swallowing rehabilitation care were used on 35 cases of patients who suffered from dysphagia caused by the injury of lower cranial nerves .The improvement degrees in swallowing function of patients were observed and analyzed after 4 weeks of care .Results 15 cases in all the 35 patients were recovery , 11 cases were improved obviously , 5 cases were improved , and the remaining 4 cases were invalid.The total effective rate was 88.6%.Conclusions The systematic and early rehabilitation nursing care could promote swallowing recovery significantly on the patients with dysphagia .

  19. Genetic modification of cerebral arterial wall: implications for prevention and treatment of cerebral vasospasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Anantha; Santhanam, R; Katusic, Zvonimir S

    2006-10-01

    Genetic modification of cerebral vessels represents a promising and novel approach for prevention and/or treatment of various cerebral vascular disorders, including cerebral vasospasm. In this review, we focus on the current understanding of the use of gene transfer to the cerebral arteries for prevention and/or treatment of cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). We also discuss the recent developments in vascular therapeutics, involving the autologous use of progenitor cells for repair of damaged vessels, as well as a cell-based gene delivery approach for the prevention and treatment of cerebral vasospasm.

  20. Magnetoneurographic evaluation of peripheral nerve regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.D.L. Kuypers (Paul)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractWhen a peripheral nerve is reconstructed after it has been damaged. it is important to assess, in an early stage, whether the nerve is regenerating across the lesion. However, at present for this purpose an adequate method is not available. In this study short term changes in the

  1. VIP/PACAP receptors in cerebral arteries of rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdling, André; Sheykhzade, Majid; Maddahi, Aida

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP)-containing nerves surround cerebral blood vessels. The peptides have potent vasodilator properties via smooth muscle cell receptors and activation of adenylate cyclase. The purpose of this s......BACKGROUND: Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate cyclase activating peptide (PACAP)-containing nerves surround cerebral blood vessels. The peptides have potent vasodilator properties via smooth muscle cell receptors and activation of adenylate cyclase. The purpose...

  2. Neuroimaging of cerebral vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wengenroth, M.; Saam, T.; Haehnel, S.

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral vasculitis can have a variety of origins. Furthermore, there are no vasculitis-specific symptoms or imaging signs and vasculitis of the CNS can mimic many other neurological diseases, which require different treatment approaches. Thus, the clinical and radiological diagnosis of cerebral vasculitis is challenging. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and MR angiography (MRA) should be the radiological imaging methods of choice to assess the degree of parenchymal damage and to detect vessel wall changes. If the results are unclear digital subtraction angiography (DSA) should be pursued in order to also detect changes in medium sized vessels. Vasculitis of small vessels cannot be detected by vascular imaging and requires brain or leptomeningeal biopsy. In this review we present the current diagnostic approach and a variety of imaging findings in cerebral vasculitis and discuss the main radiological differential diagnoses. (orig.) [de

  3. Protective effects of alkaloid extract from Leonurus heterophyllus on cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury by middle cerebral ischemic injury (MCAO) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hao; Liu, Ping; Wang, Yunshan; Song, Shuliang; Ji, Aiguo

    2011-07-15

    The neuronal damage following cerebral ischemia is a serious risk to stroke patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the neuroprotective effects of alkaloid extract from Leonurus heterophyllus (LHAE) on cerebral ischemic injury. After 24 h of reperfusion following ischemia for 2 h induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO), some rats were intraperitoneally administered different doses of LHAE (3.6, 7.2, 14.4 mg/kg, respectively). Neurological examination was measured in all animals. Infarct volume, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, levels of nitrate/nitrite metabolite (NO) and apoptosis ratio of nerve fiber in brain were determined. The results showed that LHAE at 7.2 mg/kg or 14.4 mg/kg exerted significantly decreasing neurological deficit scores and reducing the infarct volume on rats with focal cerebral ischemic injury (pagent. Further studies are warranted to assess the efficacy and safety of LHAE in patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Microsurgical anatomy of the abducens nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Wonil; Yoshioka, Fumitaka; Funaki, Takeshi; Rhoton, Albert L

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to demonstrate and review the detailed microsurgical anatomy of the abducens nerve and surrounding structures along its entire course and to provide its topographic measurements. Ten cadaveric heads were examined using ×3 to ×40 magnification after the arteries and veins were injected with colored silicone. Both sides of each cadaveric head were dissected using different skull base approaches to demonstrate the entire course of the abducens nerve from the pontomedullary sulcus to the lateral rectus muscle. The anatomy of the petroclival area and the cavernous sinus through which the abducens nerve passes are complex due to the high density of critically important neural and vascular structures. The abducens nerve has angulations and fixation points along its course that put the nerve at risk in many clinical situations. From a surgical viewpoint, the petrous tubercle of the petrous apex is an intraoperative landmark to avoid damage to the abducens nerve. The abducens nerve is quite different from the other nerves. No other cranial nerve has a long intradural path with angulations and fixations such as the abducens nerve in petroclival venous confluence. A precise knowledge of the relationship between the abducens nerve and surrounding structures has allowed neurosurgeon to approach the clivus, petroclival area, cavernous sinus, and superior orbital fissure without surgical complications. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Facial nerve problems and Bell's palsy

    OpenAIRE

    Sala, DV; Venter, C; Valenas, O

    2015-01-01

    Bell's palsy is paralysis or weakness of muscle at the hemifacial level, a form of temporary facial paralysis, probable a virus infection or trauma, to one or two facial nerves. Damage to the facial nerve innervating the muscles on one side of the face result in a flabby appearance, fell the respective hemiface. Nerve damage can also affect the sense of taste and salivary and lacrimal secretion. This condition begins suddenly, often overnight, and usually gets better on its own within a few w...

  6. MicroRNA-126 Priming Enhances Functions of Endothelial Progenitor Cells under Physiological and Hypoxic Conditions and Their Therapeutic Efficacy in Cerebral Ischemic Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qunwen Pan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs have shown the potential for treating ischemic stroke (IS, while microRNA-126 (miR-126 is reported to have beneficial effects on endothelial function and angiogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of miR-126 overexpression on EPCs and explore the efficacy of miR-126-primed EPCs (EPCmiR-126 in treating IS. The effects of miR-126 overexpression on EPC proliferation, migratory, tube formation capacity, reactive oxygen species (ROS production, and nitric oxide (NO generation were determined. In in vivo study, the effects of EPCmiR-126 on the cerebral blood flow (CBF, neurological deficit score (NDS, infarct volume, cerebral microvascular density (cMVD, and angiogenesis were determined. Moreover, the levels of circulating EPCs (cEPCs and their contained miR-126 were measured. We found (1 miR-126 overexpression promoted the proliferation, migration, and tube formation abilities of EPCs; decreased ROS; and increased NO production of EPCs via activation of PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway; (2 EPCmiR-126 was more effective than EPCs in attenuating infarct volume and NDS and enhancing cMVD, CBF, and angiogenesis; and (3 infusion of EPCmiR-126 increased the number and the level of miR-126 in cEPCs. Our data indicate that miR-126 overexpression enhanced the function of EPCs in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Developmental Changes in the Connective Tissues of the Porcine Recurrent Laryngeal Nerve

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Ellen O.; Samlan, Robin A.; McMullen, Nathaniel T.; Cook, Sarah; Smiley-Jewell, Suzette; Barkmeier-Kraemer, Julie

    2013-01-01

    The recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) branches from the vagus cranial nerve to innervate structures important for voicing and swallowing. Damage to this nerve, commonly associated with surgery or idiopathic etiologies that largely occur with aging, results in impaired voicing and swallowing. Sunderland proposed a model of peripheral nerve damage whereby a nerve’s ability to resist damage from stretch and compression is determined by the quantity and composition of its epineurial connective tiss...

  8. Cerebral metabolism in experimental hydrocephalus: an in vivo 1H and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braun, K. P.; van Eijsden, P.; Vandertop, W. P.; de Graaf, R. A.; Gooskens, R. H.; Tulleken, K. A.; Nicolay, K.

    1999-01-01

    Brain damage in patients with hydrocephalus is caused by mechanical forces and cerebral ischemia. The severity and localization of impaired cerebral blood flow and metabolism are still largely unknown. Magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy offers the opportunity to investigate cerebral energy

  9. Cerebral vasculitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenan, T.J.; Grossman, R.I.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews retrospectively MR, CT, and angiographic findings in patients with cerebral vasculitis in order to understand the strengths and weaknesses of the various imaging modalities, as well as the spectrum of imaging abnormalities in this disease entity. Studies were retrospectively reviewed in 12 patients with cerebral vasculitis proved by means of angiography and/or brain biopsy

  10. Transfusion of CXCR4-primed endothelial progenitor cells reduces cerebral ischemic damage and promotes repair in db/db diabetic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Chen

    Full Text Available This study investigated the role of stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α/CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4 axis in brain and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs, and explored the efficacy of CXCR4 primed EPCs in treating ischemic stroke in diabetes. The db/db diabetic and db/+ mice were used in this study. Levels of plasma SDF-1α and circulating CD34+CXCR4+ cells were measured. Brain SDF-1α and CXCR4 expression were quantified at basal and after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO. In in vitro study, EPCs were transfected with adenovirus carrying null (Ad-null or CXCR4 (Ad-CXCR4 followed with high glucose (HG treatment for 4 days. For pathway block experiments, cells were pre-incubated with PI3K inhibitor or nitric oxide synthase (NOS inhibitor for two hours. The CXCR4 expression, function and apoptosis of EPCs were determined. The p-Akt/Akt and p-eNOS/eNOS expression in EPCs were also measured. In in vivo study, EPCs transfected with Ad-null or Ad-CXCR4 were infused into mice via tail vein. On day 2 and 7, the cerebral blood flow, neurologic deficit score, infarct volume, cerebral microvascular density, angiogenesis and neurogenesis were determined. We found: 1 The levels of plasma SDF-1α and circulating CD34+CXCR4+ cells were decreased in db/db mice; 2 The basal level of SDF-1α and MCAO-induced up-regulation of SDF-1α/CXCR4 axis were reduced in the brain of db/db mice; 3 Ad-CXCR4 transfection increased CXCR4 expression in EPCs and enhanced EPC colonic forming capacity; 4 Ad-CXCR4 transfection prevented EPCs from HG-induced dysfunction (migration and tube formation and apoptosis via activation of PI3K/Akt/eNOS signal pathway; 4 Ad-CXCR4 transfection enhanced the efficacy of EPC infusion in attenuating infarct volume and promoting angiogenesis and neurogenesis. Our data suggest that Ad-CXCR4 primed EPCs have better therapeutic effects for ischemia stroke in diabetes than unmodified EPCs do.

  11. Cerebral energy metabolism during induced mitochondrial dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, T H; Bindslev, TT; Pedersen, S M

    2013-01-01

    In patients with traumatic brain injury as well as stroke, impaired cerebral oxidative energy metabolism may be an important factor contributing to the ultimate degree of tissue damage. We hypothesize that mitochondrial dysfunction can be diagnosed bedside by comparing the simultaneous changes...... in brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO(2)) and cerebral cytoplasmatic redox state. The study describes cerebral energy metabolism during mitochondrial dysfunction induced by sevoflurane in piglets....

  12. Acupuncture inhibits Notch1 and Hes1 protein expression in the basal ganglia of rats with cerebral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Notch pathway activation maintains neural stem cells in a proliferating state and increases nerve repair capacity. To date, studies have rarely focused on changes or damage to signal transduction pathways during cerebral hemorrhage. Here, we examined the effect of acupuncture in a rat model of cerebral hemorrhage. We examined four groups: in the control group, rats received no treatment. In the model group, cerebral hemorrhage models were established by infusing non-heparinized blood into the brain. In the acupuncture group, modeled rats had Baihui (DU20 and Qubin (GB7 acupoints treated once a day for 30 minutes. In the DAPT group, modeled rats had 0.15 μg/mL DAPT solution (10 mL infused into the brain. Immunohistochemistry and western blot results showed that acupuncture effectively inhibits Notch1 and Hes1 protein expression in rat basal ganglia. These inhibitory effects were identical to DAPT, a Notch signaling pathway inhibitor. Our results suggest that acupuncture has a neuroprotective effect on cerebral hemorrhage by inhibiting Notch-Hes signaling pathway transduction in rat basal ganglia after cerebral hemorrhage.

  13. Improvement of oxygen supply by an artificial carrier in combination with normobaric oxygenation decreases the volume of tissue hypoxia and tissue damage from transient focal cerebral ischemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seiffge, David J.; Lapina, Natalia E.; Tsagogiorgas, Charalambos; Theisinger, Bastian; Henning, Robert H.; Schilling, Lothar

    Tissue hypoxia may play an important role in the development of ischemic brain damage. In the present study we investigated in a rat model of transient focal brain ischemia the neuroprotective effects of increasing the blood oxygen transport capacity by applying a semifluorinated alkane

  14. The number of insults and the cerebral damage after hypoxia/ischemia are altered after acute pretreatment with corticosterone and metyrapone.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knollema, S; Kemper, RHA; Korf, J; Wiersma, A; Ter Horst, GJ; Krugers, HJ

    1997-01-01

    The role of glucocorticoids in neuronal viability is controversial. Most studies which describe the effects of glucocorticoids on ischemic brain damage use surgical adrenalectomy to induce a reduction in plasma corticosterone levels. In the present study we used metyrapone, a corticosterone

  15. Cerebral oxygen desaturation during beach chair position

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerman, Annelies T.; de Hert, Stefan G.; Jacobs, Tom F.; de Wilde, Lieven F.; Wouters, Patrick F.

    2012-01-01

    Cases of ischaemic brain damage have been reported in relatively healthy patients undergoing shoulder surgery in the beach chair position. Unrecognised cerebral hypoperfusion may have contributed to these catastrophic events, indicating that routine anaesthesia monitoring may not suffice.

  16. Utilidad de un programa de rehabilitación neuropsicológica de la memoria en daño cerebral adquirido (Usefulness of a Program of Neuropsychological Rehabilitation of Memory in Acquired Brain Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos José De los Reyes-Aragón

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN: Este estudio evaluó la utilidad de un programa de rehabilitación cognitiva y funcional de memoria para pacientes con daño cerebral adquirido. Diez participantes con deterioro cognitivo leve o moderado participaron en el estudio, cinco de ellos asistieron durante cuatro meses a un programa semanal de rehabilitación, mientras que los otros cinco no recibieron intervención neuropsicológica. Los resultados mostraron que el grupo de rehabilitación mejoró la puntuación en la Escala de Memoria de Wechsler III. De igual forma, se encontró que la puntuación en la escala de fallos de memoria de la vida diaria solo mejoró en el grupo que recibió rehabilitación. Los resultados sugieren que el programa de rehabilitación de la memoria resulta útil en el tratamiento de las secuelas tanto cognitivas como funcionales resultantes del daño cerebral adquirido. ABSTRACT: This study evaluated the usefulness of a cognitive and functional rehabilitation of memory program for patients with acquired brain injury. Ten participants with mild- to -moderate cognitive impairment participated in the study; five of them for four months attended a weekly rehabilitation program, while the other five did not receive any neuropsychological intervention. The results showed that the rehabilitation group improved the score in the Wechsler III Memory Scale. Similarly, it was found that the score on the memory scale of failure of the daily life only improved in the group that received rehabilitation. The results suggest that memory rehabilitation program is useful in the treatment of both cognitive and functional sequels resulting from acquired brain damage.

  17. Cranial nerve injury after Le Fort I osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J-W; Chin, B-R; Park, H-S; Lee, S-H; Kwon, T-G

    2011-03-01

    A Le Fort I osteotomy is widely used to correct dentofacial deformity because it is a safe and reliable surgical method. Although rare, various complications have been reported in relation to pterygomaxillary separation. Cranial nerve damage is one of the serious complications that can occur after Le Fort I osteotomy. In this report, a 19-year-old man with unilateral cleft lip and palate underwent surgery to correct maxillary hypoplasia, asymmetry and mandibular prognathism. After the Le Fort I maxillary osteotomy, the patient showed multiple cranial nerve damage; an impairment of outward movement of the eye (abducens nerve), decreased vision (optic nerve), and paraesthesia of the frontal and upper cheek area (ophthalmic and maxillary nerve). The damage to the cranial nerve was related to an unexpected sphenoid bone fracture and subsequent trauma in the cavernous sinus during the pterygomaxillary osteotomy. Copyright © 2010 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Preoperative percutaneous cranial nerve mapping in head and neck surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung I

    2003-01-01

    To identify and map the course of the peripheral branches of the cranial nerve preoperatively and percutaneously. Prospective study. Preoperative percutaneous nerve mapping performed prior to the operation under deep sedation or general anesthesia without muscle paralysis. Private office surgery suite, freestanding surgery center, and regional medical centers. A total of 142 patients undergoing head and neck surgery and facial plastic surgery between August 1994 and July 1999. Monopolar probe was used for nerve stimulation. Electromyographic reading was done through intramuscular bipolar recording electrodes. The equipment used was a nerve monitor. The mandibular divisions were tested in 142 cases, the frontal division in 60 cases, the accessory nerve in 12 cases, and the hypoglossal nerve in 3 cases. Satisfactory mappings were obtained in 115 cases of the mandibular division, 49 cases of the frontal division, 8 cases of the accessory division, and 1 case of the hypoglossal nerve. Preoperative percutaneous nerve mapping is a new method of identifying the location of the peripheral branches of the cranial nerves. Identifying and mapping the course of peripheral branches of the cranial nerves safely assists the head and neck surgeon in the placement of incisions in a favorable location and in the dissection of the area involving the nerves. Mapping alerts the surgeon to an area containing a nerve and allows the surgeon to avoid just the specific area where a nerve is present, preventing large-scale abandonment of unmapped areas for fear of potential nerve damage.

  19. Post traumatic facial nerve palsy without temporal bone fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scuotto, A.; Cappabianca, S.; Capasso, R.; Porto, A.; D'Oria, S.; Rotondo, M.

    2016-01-01

    Facial nerve injury following head trauma is a frequent event with or without temporal bone fractures. Computed tomography is the imaging modality of choice for assessing the possible bone disruption of the facial nerve canal. Magnetic resonance is helpful in presence of a facial nerve paralysis, unexplained by computed tomography findings. We present a case of delayed post-traumatic facial nerve palsy without radiological evidence of temporal bone fractures, in which magnetic resonance was crucial for diagnosing the nerve impairment. Radiological findings in accordance both with electrodiagnostic tests and clinical presentation suggested the successful conservative management. - Highlights: • Facial nerve is more prone to damage than any other cranial nerve after trauma. • Facial nerve trauma is usually associated with temporal bone fractures. • MRI is mandatory in case of no evidence of bone disruption at CT.

  20. Fabrication of nerve guidance conduit with luminal filler as scaffold for peripheral nerve repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aranilla, Charito T.; Wach, Rodoslaw; Ulanski, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a serious health concern for society, affecting trauma patients, many of whom acquire life-long disability. The gold standard of treatment for peripheral nerve injury is the use of nerve grafts, wherein nerve autograft or allograft is used to bridge the gap in the damaged nerve. Nerve guidance conduits (NGCs) are an attractive alternative to nerve autografts for aiding in the regeneration of peripheral nerve tissue. NGCs are small cylinders or tubes composed of either natural or synthetic biomaterials that are used to axon regeneration. The ends of the damaged nerve are inserted into either end of the cylinder and the NGC acts both as a connecting bridge for the severed nerve ends as well as a protective shelter for the regenerating nerve. This study aims at fabricating nerve guidance conduits with luminal structure based on synthetic biodegradable and biocompatible polymers such as poly (trimethylene carbonate ) (PTMC), poly (lactic acid) (PLA) and poly (caprolactone) (PCL). Initial base materials for fabrication were PLA acid tubes compared to PCL tubes when prepared by spray and dip-coating methods. The morphology of the tubes where examined by SEM and results showed better porosity of PLA acid tubes compared to PCL tubes when prepared by spraying technique. Poly(lactic acid) was then blended with poly(trimethylene carbonate) at a ratio of 1:4 (5% total polymer content) for further fabrication. Electron beam radiation (25 and 50 kGy) was employed for sterilization and the changes in properties induced by irradiation in comprising polymers were evaluated. The wettability, mechanical thermal properties were not significantly changed by irradiation.In a separate experiment, synthesis of carboxymethyl chitosan hydrogel crosslinked by electron beam radiation was studied to create a luminal filler for PTMC-PLA tubes. Based on proper viscosity of solution before crosslinking, sufficient gel fraction and swelling, 10% w/v concentration of

  1. CT diagnosis of lumbosacral conjoined nerve roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torricelli, P.; Martinelli, C.; Spina, V.

    1987-01-01

    The authors report the observations derived from CT evaluation of 19 cases of lumbosacral conjoined nerve roots; 11 of these have been confirmed by lumbar myelography and/or at surgery. They conclude that CT without intrathecal metrizamide allows the recognition in most cases the presence of conjoined nerve roots and to differentiate them from a herniated disk fragment; this is especially usefull avoid surgical damage of anomalous roots. (orig.)

  2. Electroacupuncture and Acupuncture Promote the Rat’s Transected Median Nerve Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, C. Y.; Yao, C. H.; Chen, W. C.; Shen, W. C.; Bau, D. T.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Acupuncture and electroacupuncture treatments of damaged nerves may aid nerve regeneration related to hindlimb function, but the effects on the forelimb-related median nerve were not known. Methods. A gap was made in the median nerve of each rat by suturing the stumps into silicone rubber tubes. The influences of acupuncture and electroacupuncture treatments on transected median nerve regeneration were evaluated from morphological, electrophysiological, and functional angles. Resu...

  3. Neuroprotective role of nanoencapsulated quercetin in combating ischemia-reperfusion induced neuronal damage in young and aged rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparajita Ghosh

    Full Text Available Cerebral stroke is the leading cause of death and permanent disability among elderly people. In both humans and animals, cerebral ischemia damages the nerve cells in vulnerable regions of the brain, viz., hippocampus, cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and hypothalamus. The present study was conducted to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of nanoencapsulated quercetin (QC in combating ischemia-reperfusion-induced neuronal damage in young and aged Swiss Albino rats. Cerebral ischemia was induced by occlusion of the common carotid arteries of both young and aged rats followed by reperfusion. Nanoencapsulated quercetin (2.7 mg/kg b wt was administered to both groups of animals via oral gavage two hours prior to ischemic insults as well as post-operation till day 3. Cerebral ischemia and 30 min consecutive reperfusion caused a substantial increase in lipid peroxidation, decreased antioxidant enzyme activities and tissue osmolality in different brain regions of both groups of animals. It also decreased mitochondrial membrane microviscosity and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS generation in different brain regions of young and aged rats. Among the brain regions studied, the hippocampus appeared to be the worst affected region showing increased upregulation of iNOS and caspase-3 activity with decreased neuronal count in the CA1 and CA3 subfields of both young and aged rats. Furthermore, three days of continuous reperfusion after ischemia caused massive damage to neuronal cells. However, it was observed that oral treatment of nanoencapsulated quercetin (2.7 mg/kg b wt resulted in downregulation of iNOS and caspase-3 activities and improved neuronal count in the hippocampal subfields even 3 days after reperfusion. Moreover, the nanoformulation imparted a significant level of protection in the antioxidant status in different brain regions, thus contributing to a better understanding of the given pathophysiological processes causing ischemic neuronal damage.

  4. Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Sections What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? ... Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy Treatment What Is Microvascular Cranial Nerve Palsy? Leer en Español: ¿Qué es una parálisis ...

  5. Anatomical relationship between the optic nerve and posterior paranasal sinuses on ostiomeatal unit CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, June Il; Kim, Hong In; Seol, Hae Young; Lee, Nam Joon; Kim, Jung Hyuk; Cha, In Ho

    1997-01-01

    To determine the anatomic variations that can lead to optic nerve damage during the sugical treatment of posterior paranasal sinus lesions two hundred optic nerves of 100 persons were examined using ostiomeatal unit CT(OMU CT). The anatomical features of this nerve and posterior paranasal sinuses were classified into four types:the optic nerve adjacent to the sphenoid sinus without indentation of the sinus wall (type 1);the optic nerve adjacent to the sphenoid sinus, causing indentation of the sinus wall (type 2);the optic nerve passing through the sphenoid sinus (type 3);and the optic nerve adjacent to the sphenoid sinus and posterior ethmoid sinus (type 4). Bony dehiscence around the optic nerve and pneumatization of the anterior clinoid process were also evaluated. The anatomical classification of the optic nerve and posterior paranasal sinuses was as follows:type 1, 1326(66%); type 2, 60(30%); type 3, 6(3%), and type 4, 2(1%). Bony dehiscence around the optic nerve had developed in 58 cases (29%) and pneumatization of the anterior clinoid process in 13(6.5%). These conditions were most common in type 3 optic nerve, and second most common in type 2. The 2 and 3 optic nerves, bony dehiscence around the optic nerve and pneumatization of the anterior clinoid process are the anatomic variations that can lead to optic nerve damage during the surgical treatment of posterior paranasal sinus lesions. To prevent optic nerve damage, these factors should be carefully evaluated by OMU CT

  6. MR findings of cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang Hum; Chang, Seung Kuk; Cho, Mee Young; Park, Dong Woo; Kim, Jong Deok; Eun, Choong Ki

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the MR findings of brain damage in cerebral palised patients and to correlate it with gestational age and the time of damage. A retrospective analysis was performed in 40 patients who underwent MR scanning for evaluation of brain lesion in clinically diagnosed cerebral palsy. Authors classified the patients into two groups as premature and full-term and compared MR findings of the two groups. Abnormal MR findings were noted in 28 cases (70%). Five out of 6 patients who had been born prematurely showed isolate periventricular white matter lesions. Twenty-three out of 34 patients who had been born at full-term showed abnormal MR findings. Of these 23 patients, migration anomalies in 7 patients, isolate periventricular white matter lesions in 3 patients, and other combined periventricular subcortical white matter and deep gray matter lesions in 14 patients were seen. At least, 10 patients(43%) of full term group showed abnormal MRI findings reflecting intrauterine brain damage and all 5 patients of premature group showed isolate periventricular white matter lesions suggesting immaturity of brain. MRI is thought to be very useful in the assessment of brain damage for the patients with cerebral palsy by recognizing the location of the lesion and estimating the time of damage

  7. MR findings of cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sang Hum; Chang, Seung Kuk; Cho, Mee Young; Park, Dong Woo; Kim, Jong Deok; Eun, Choong Ki [Pusan Paik Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-11-15

    To evaluate the MR findings of brain damage in cerebral palised patients and to correlate it with gestational age and the time of damage. A retrospective analysis was performed in 40 patients who underwent MR scanning for evaluation of brain lesion in clinically diagnosed cerebral palsy. Authors classified the patients into two groups as premature and full-term and compared MR findings of the two groups. Abnormal MR findings were noted in 28 cases (70%). Five out of 6 patients who had been born prematurely showed isolate periventricular white matter lesions. Twenty-three out of 34 patients who had been born at full-term showed abnormal MR findings. Of these 23 patients, migration anomalies in 7 patients, isolate periventricular white matter lesions in 3 patients, and other combined periventricular subcortical white matter and deep gray matter lesions in 14 patients were seen. At least, 10 patients(43%) of full term group showed abnormal MRI findings reflecting intrauterine brain damage and all 5 patients of premature group showed isolate periventricular white matter lesions suggesting immaturity of brain. MRI is thought to be very useful in the assessment of brain damage for the patients with cerebral palsy by recognizing the location of the lesion and estimating the time of damage.

  8. Directional character of spreading of vasogenic cerebral edema after radiation damage in rhesus monkeys, and effects of removal of the primary lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakisaka, Shinichiro; Iguchi, Takahiko; Nakagaki, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Akira; Black, P.; O'Neill, R.R.; Caveness, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    Five pubescent rhesus monkeys were exposed to 35 Gy of orthovoltage x-irradiation in a single dose to the right visual cortex. Twenty to 36 weeks later the irradiated region broke down rather abruptly. Steep rise of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) indicated disruption of blood brain barrier (BBB) and tissue breakdown. Visual evoked response (VER), funduscopic and clinical findings suggested disfunction of neural tissues and increased intracranial pressure. Extraordinary brain swelling and distortion were observed at the time of sacrifice. The most striking finding was that the ipsilateral middle and inferior temporal gyri, where radiation did not affect directly, were selectively swollen and edematous sparing the superior temporal gyrus. Corticocortical neuronal connections between visual cortex and inferior convexity of the temporal lobe has been demonstrated by Kuypers et al. Our previous studies also disclosed selective swelling of other remote visual association areas, i. e., ipsilateral lateral geniculate body and uncinate fasciculus. Thus, edema fluid might propagate from the site of the lesion through the anatomic pathways. In the group of monkeys, which received surgical removals of damaged right occipital lobes where BBB was disrupted, CSF protein and LDH drastically returned to the normal base line values after the surgery. Furthermore, no swelling of ipsilateral middle and inferior temporal gyri was observed in this group at the time of sacrifice, indicating that spreaded vasogenic edema could be subdued by removing the primary lesion. (author)

  9. Effect of total flavonoids of Radix Ilicis pubescentis on cerebral ischemia reperfusion model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Yan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to observe the effects of total flavonoids of Radix Ilicis pubescentis on mouse model of cerebral ischemia reperfusion. Mice were orally given different doses of total flavonoids of Radix Ilicis pubescentis 10 d, and were administered once daily. On the tenth day after the administration of 1 h in mice after anesthesia, we used needle to hook the bilateral common carotid artery (CCA for 10 min, with 10 min ischemia reperfusion, 10 min ischemia. Then we restored their blood supply, copy the model of cerebral ischemia reperfusion; We then had all mice reperfused for 24 h, and then took their orbital blood samples and measured blood rheology. We quickly removed the brain, with half of the brain having sagittal incision. Then we fixed the brains and sectioned them to observe the pathological changes of brain cells in the hippocampus and cortex. We also measured the other half sample which was made of brain homogenate of NO, NOS, Na+-K+-, ATP enzyme Mg2+-ATPase and Ca2+-ATPase. Acupuncture needle hook occlusion of bilateral common carotid arteries can successfully establish the model of cerebral ischemia reperfusion. After comparing with the model mice, we concluded that Ilex pubescens flavonoids not only reduce damage to the brain nerve cells in the hippocampus and cortex, but also significantly reduce the content of NO in brain homogenate, the activity of nitric oxide synthase (NOS and increases ATP enzyme activity (P < 0.05, P < 0.01. In this way, cerebral ischemia reperfusion injury is improved. Different dosages of Ilex pubescens flavonoids on mouse cerebral ischemia reperfusion model have good effects.

  10. [Isolated palsy of the hypoglossal nerve complicating infectious mononucleosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carra-Dallière, C; Mernes, R; Juntas-Morales, R

    2011-01-01

    Neurological complications of infectious mononucleosis are rare. Various disorders have been described: meningitis, encephalitis, peripheral neuropathy. Isolated cranial nerve palsy has rarely been reported. A 16-year-old man was admitted for isolated and unilateral hypoglossal nerve palsy, four weeks after infectious mononucleosis. Cerebral MRI, cerebrospinal fluid study and electromyography were normal. IgM anti-VCA were positive. Two months later, without treatment, the tongue had almost fully recovered. To the best of our knowledge, only seven cases of isolated palsy of the hypoglossal nerve complicating infectious mononucleosis have been previously reported. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. The course of the superficial peroneal nerve in relation to the ankle position: anatomical study with ankle arthroscopic implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leeuw, Peter A. J.; Golanó, Pau; Sierevelt, Inger N.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2010-01-01

    Despite the fact that the superficial peroneal nerve is the only nerve in the human body that can be made visible; iatrogenic damage to this nerve is the most frequently reported complication in anterior ankle arthroscopy. One of the methods to visualize the nerve is combined ankle plantar flexion

  12. Effect of alprostadil combined with conventional therapy on serum markers in patients with acute cerebral infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Lan Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of alprostadil combined with conventional therapy on serum markers in patients with acute cerebral infarction. Methods: Patients with acute cerebral infarction treated in our hospital from May 2012 to August 2014 were enrolled and randomly divided into two groups. Observation group received alprostadil combined with conventional therapy and control group received conventional treatment. Then serum markers of both groups were compared. Results: (1 contents of serum nerve function related molecules: serum NSE and S100β contents of observation group showed a decreasing trend, and BDNF and NGF contents showed an increasing trend; (2 contents of atherosclerosis related enzymes: serum GGT, iNOS and MPO contents of observation group showed a decreasing trend, and PON1 and PON2 contents showed an increasing trend; (3 platelet activation related molecules: serum PPARγ, CD62p, YKL-40, sCD40L and Fibulin-5 contents of observation group all showed a decreasing trend. Conclusions: Alprostadil combined with conventional treatment is helpful to alleviate neuronal damage and inhibit the processes of atherosclerosis and platelet activation; it’s an ideal method for treating acute cerebral infarction.

  13. Electrophysiologic analysis of injury to cranial nerve XI during neck dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanisnik, Bostjan; Zargi, Miha; Rodi, Zoran

    2016-04-01

    Despite preservation of the accessory nerve, a considerable number of patients report partial nerve damage after modified radical neck dissection (MRND) and selective neck dissection. Accessory nerve branches for the trapezius muscle were stimulated during neck dissection, and the M wave amplitude was measured during distinct surgical phases. The accessory nerve was mapped in 20 patients. The M wave recordings indicated that major nerve damage occurred during dissection at levels IIa and IIb in the most proximal segment of the nerve. The M waves evoked from this nerve segment decreased significantly during surgery (analysis of variance; p = .001). The most significant intraoperative injury to the accessory nerve during neck dissection occurs at anatomic nerve levels IIa and IIb. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: E372-E376, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Cerebral oximetry in preterm infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Gorm; Andresen, Bjørn; Plomgaard, Anne Mette

    2016-01-01

    Preterm birth constitutes a major cause of death before 5 years of age and it is a major cause of neurodevelopmental impairment across the world. Preterm infants are most unstable during the transition between fetal and newborn life during the first days of life and most brain damage occurs...... in this period. The brain of the preterm infant is accessible for tissue oximetry by near-infrared spectroscopy. Cerebral oximetry has the potential to improve the long-term outcome by helping to tailor the support of respiration and circulation to the individual infant's needs, but the evidence is still lacking....... The goals for research include testing the benefit and harms of cerebral oximetry in large-scale randomized trials, improved definition of the hypoxic threshold, better understanding the effects of intensive care on cerebral oxygenation, as well as improved precision of oximeters and calibration among...

  15. NEYROPSYCHOLOGICAL CONSECUENCES OF CEREBRAL PALSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA MARÍA NAVARRO MELENDRO

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral Palsy is defined as a movement alteration result of a non progressive damage witch is permanent in anencephalon that has not acquired its final maturation. Patients that suffer cerebral palsy present learning disabilities,that varies between being completely normal to severe as a consequence of memory, gnosis, praxis, perceptive andlanguage impairments. Nevertheless the consequences of this disease are not always predictable. This paper pretendsto make a description of the cognitive and behavioral deficits that overcomes along with the manifestation of thecerebral palsy and its possible treatment. We used a complete neuropsychological battery to evaluate a 7 years oldpatient who was diagnosed of cerebral palsy and spastic diplegia finding some cognitive impairment in fields such asmnesic, gnosic and attention processes.

  16. Tributyltin induces oxidative damage, inflammation and apoptosis via disturbance in blood-brain barrier and metal homeostasis in cerebral cortex of rat brain: an in vivo and in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sumonto; Gera, Ruchi; Siddiqui, Waseem A; Khandelwal, Shashi

    2013-08-09

    Tributyltin (TBT), a member of the organotin family, is primarily used for its biocidal activity. Persistent environmental levels of TBT pose threat to the ecosystem. Since neurotoxic influence of TBT remains elusive, we therefore, studied its effect on cerebral cortex of male Wistar rats. A single oral dose of Tributyltin-Chloride (TBTC) (10, 20, 30mg/kg) was administered and the animals were sacrificed on day 3 and day 7. Blood-brain barrier permeability remained disrupted significantly till day 7 with all the doses of TBTC. Pro-oxidant metal levels (Fe, Cu) were increased with a concomitant decrease in Zn. ROS generation was substantially raised resulting in oxidative damage (increased protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation) with marked decline in tissue antioxidant status (GSH/GSSG levels). Protein expression studies indicated astrocyte activation, upregulation of inflammatory molecules (IL-6, Cox-2 and NF-κB) and simultaneous elevation in the apoptotic index (Bax/Bcl2). Neurodegeneration was evident by reduced neurofilament expression and increased calpain cleaved Tau levels. The in-vitro study demonstrated involvement of calcium and signaling molecules (p38), with downstream activation of caspase-3 and -8, and apoptotic cell death was evident by nuclear fragmentation, DNA laddering and Annexin V binding experiments. Ca(2+) inhibitors (BAPTA-AM, EGTA, and RR) and free radical scavengers (NAC and biliprotein [C-PC]) increased cell viability (MTT assay), signifying specific roles of Ca(2+) and ROS. Significance of p38 signaling was evaluated on pro-apoptotic proteins by using SB203580, a selective p38 inhibitor. Our data collectively illustrates that TBTC can disrupt BBB, induce oxidative stress, cause cell death and initiate neurodegeneration in rat brain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Old people's extensive traumatic cerebral infarction (analysis of 48 cases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Wenhui

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To analyse clinically the genetic mechanism, clinical characteristics and the prognosis of old people's extensive traumatic cerebral infarction. Method: Forty eight such cases have been observed and analysed. Results: Old people's extensive traumatic cerebral infarction had its characteristics, which occurred mostly in the blood supply area of big branch blood vessels, and had observed nerve function defect. Conclusion: It has more clinical complication and bad prognosis. The death rate is high

  18. United Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your local affiliate Find your local affiliate United Cerebral Palsy United Cerebral Palsy (UCP) is a trusted resource for individuals with Cerebral Palsy and other disabilities and their networks. Individuals with ...

  19. Employees with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Home | Accommodation and Compliance Series: Employees with Cerebral Palsy (CP) By Eddie Whidden, MA Preface Introduction Information ... SOAR) at http://AskJAN.org/soar. Information about Cerebral Palsy (CP) What is CP? Cerebral palsy is a ...

  20. Birth Defects: Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss > Birth defects & other health conditions > Cerebral palsy Cerebral palsy E-mail to a friend Please fill in ... this page It's been added to your dashboard . Cerebral palsy (also called CP) is a group of conditions ...

  1. MR imaging of cerebral palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saginoya, Toshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Keiichiro; Kuniyoshi, Kazuhide

    1996-01-01

    We evaluated 35 patients with cerebral palsy on the basis of MR imaging findings in the brain. The types of palsy were spastic quadriplegia (n=11), spastic diplegia (n=9), spastic hemiplegia (n=2), double hemiplegia (n=1), athetosis (n=10) and mixed (n=2). Of all patients, 28 (80%) generated abnormal findings. In spastic quadriplegia, although eight cases revealed severe brain damage, two cases showed no abnormal findings in the brain. One of the three had cervical cord compression caused by atlanto-axial subluxation. In spastic diplegia, the findings were divided according to whether the patient was born at term or preterm. If the patient had been born prematurely, the findings showed periventricular leukomalacia and abnormally high intensity in the posterior limbs of the internal capsule on T2-weighted images. MR imaging in spastic hemiplegia revealed cerebral infarction. In the athetoid type, half of all cases showed either no abnormal findings or slight widening of the lateral ventricle. Three cases showed abnormal signals of the basal ganglia. The reason why athetoid-type palsy did not show severe abnormality is unknown. We believe that MR imaging is a useful diagnostic modality to detect damage in the brain in cerebral palsy and plays an important role in the differentiation of cerebral palsy from the spastic palsy disease. (author)

  2. MR imaging of cerebral palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saginoya, Toshiyuki [Urasoe General Hospital, Okinawa (Japan); Yamaguchi, Keiichiro; Kuniyoshi, Kazuhide [and others

    1996-06-01

    We evaluated 35 patients with cerebral palsy on the basis of MR imaging findings in the brain. The types of palsy were spastic quadriplegia (n=11), spastic diplegia (n=9), spastic hemiplegia (n=2), double hemiplegia (n=1), athetosis (n=10) and mixed (n=2). Of all patients, 28 (80%) generated abnormal findings. In spastic quadriplegia, although eight cases revealed severe brain damage, two cases showed no abnormal findings in the brain. One of the three had cervical cord compression caused by atlanto-axial subluxation. In spastic diplegia, the findings were divided according to whether the patient was born at term or preterm. If the patient had been born prematurely, the findings showed periventricular leukomalacia and abnormally high intensity in the posterior limbs of the internal capsule on T2-weighted images. MR imaging in spastic hemiplegia revealed cerebral infarction. In the athetoid type, half of all cases showed either no abnormal findings or slight widening of the lateral ventricle. Three cases showed abnormal signals of the basal ganglia. The reason why athetoid-type palsy did not show severe abnormality is unknown. We believe that MR imaging is a useful diagnostic modality to detect damage in the brain in cerebral palsy and plays an important role in the differentiation of cerebral palsy from the spastic palsy disease. (author)

  3. Radial nerve dysfunction (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The radial nerve travels down the arm and supplies movement to the triceps muscle at the back of the upper arm. ... the wrist and hand. The usual causes of nerve dysfunction are direct trauma, prolonged pressure on the ...

  4. Degenerative Nerve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degenerative nerve diseases affect many of your body's activities, such as balance, movement, talking, breathing, and heart function. Many ... viruses. Sometimes the cause is not known. Degenerative nerve diseases include Alzheimer's disease Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis Friedreich's ...

  5. Nerve conduction velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003927.htm Nerve conduction velocity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see ...

  6. Distal median nerve dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... later on. Inflammation of the tendons ( tendonitis ) or joints ( arthritis ) can also put pressure on the nerve. ... how fast electrical signals move through a nerve Neuromuscular ultrasound to view problems with the muscles and ...

  7. Protective Mechanism of STAT3-siRNA on Cerebral Ischemia Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jinting; Yang, Le; Liang, Wenzhao

    2018-01-01

    Nerve cells in ischemic brain injury will occur a series of complex signal transduction pathway changes and produce the corresponding biological function, thus affecting the central nervous system functionally different cells in the ischemic brain injury metabolism, division, Differentiation and death process, while changes in signal pathways also play an important role in the repair process of the post-ischemic nervous system. JAK/STAT pathway and vascular lesions have some relevance, but its exact mechanism after cerebral ischemia is not yet fully understood. This study is intended to further explore the JAK / STAT pathway in the functional site of STAT3 in neuronal ischemia Hypoxic injury and related molecular mechanisms, targeting these targets design intervention strategies to block the signal pathway, in order to provide a theoretical basis for the treatment of ischemic brain damage in this pathway.

  8. Varicose vein therapy and nerve lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Tobias

    2017-03-01

    Treating varicose veins using endovenous thermal techniques - especially laser and radio frequency ablation - has emerged as an effective alternative to open surgery with stripping and high ligation. Even though these methods are very gentle and patient-friendly, they are nevertheless accompanied by risks and side effects. Compared to open surgical therapy, the risk of damage to peripheral and motor nerves is reduced; however, it still exists as a result of heat exposure and tumescent anaesthesia. Non-thermal methods that can be applied without tumescent anaesthesia have been introduced to the market. They pose a considerably lower risk of nerve lesions while proving to be much more effective. This paper investigates data on postoperative nerve damage and paraesthesia using internet research (PubMed). It analyses the current state of knowledge regarding non-thermal treatment methods and takes into account the latest developments in the use of cyanoacrylate to close insufficient saphenous veins.

  9. Animal models of cerebral ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodanovich, M. Yu.; Kisel, A. A.

    2015-11-01

    Cerebral ischemia remains one of the most frequent causes of death and disability worldwide. Animal models are necessary to understand complex molecular mechanisms of brain damage as well as for the development of new therapies for stroke. This review considers a certain range of animal models of cerebral ischemia, including several types of focal and global ischemia. Since animal models vary in specificity for the human disease which they reproduce, the complexity of surgery, infarct size, reliability of reproduction for statistical analysis, and adequate models need to be chosen according to the aim of a study. The reproduction of a particular animal model needs to be evaluated using appropriate tools, including the behavioral assessment of injury and non-invasive and post-mortem control of brain damage. These problems also have been summarized in the review.

  10. Tendon transfers in radial nerve palsy with fractures of the humerus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    regarding nerve repair or tendon transfers. b). Stabilisation of the fracture by internal fixation protects the radial nerve from further damage. c). Early exploration is technically easier and safer. Khan and Birch in their study of iatropathic injuries of peripheral nerves 26 out of 48 (56%) developed lesion following open reduction ...

  11. Optic Nerve Pit

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Optic Nerve Pit What is optic nerve pit? An optic nerve pit is a ... may be seen in both eyes. How is optic pit diagnosed? If the pit is not affecting ...

  12. Diagnostic nerve ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeumer, T.; Grimm, A.; Schelle, T.

    2017-01-01

    For the diagnostics of nerve lesions an imaging method is necessary to visualize peripheral nerves and their surrounding structures for an etiological classification. Clinical neurological and electrophysiological investigations provide functional information about nerve lesions. The information provided by a standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination is inadequate for peripheral nerve diagnostics; however, MRI neurography is suitable but on the other hand a resource and time-consuming method. Using ultrasonography for peripheral nerve diagnostics. With ultrasonography reliable diagnostics of entrapment neuropathies and traumatic nerve lesions are possible. The use of ultrasonography for neuropathies shows that a differentiation between different forms is possible. Nerve ultrasonography is an established diagnostic tool. In addition to the clinical examination and clinical electrophysiology, structural information can be obtained, which results in a clear improvement in the diagnostics. Ultrasonography has become an integral part of the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in neurophysiological departments. Nerve ultrasonography is recommended for the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in addition to clinical and electrophysiological investigations. It should be used in the clinical work-up of entrapment neuropathies, traumatic nerve lesions and spacy-occupying lesions of nerves. (orig.) [de

  13. US and MR imaging of peripheral nerves in leprosy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinoli, C.; Derchi, L.E.; Gandolfo, N.; Bertolotto, M.; Bianchi, S.; Fiallo, P.; Nunzi, E.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To analyze peripheral nerves with ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MR) in leprosy and assess the role of imaging in leprosy patients. Results. Leprosy nerves were classified into three groups based on imaging appearance: group I consisted of 17 normal-appearing nerves; group II, of 30 enlarged nerves with fascicular abnormalities; group III, of 11 nerves with absent fascicular structure. Group II nerves were from patients subjected to reversal reactions; 75% of patients with group III nerves had a history of erythema nodosum leprosum. Nerve compression in osteofibrous tunnels was identified in 33% of group II and 18% of group III nerves. Doppler US and MR imaging were 74% and 92% sensitive in identifying active reactions, based on detection of endoneural color flow signals, long T2 and Gd enhancement. In 64% of cases, follow-up studies showed decreased color flow and Gd uptake after steroids and decompressive surgery.Conclusions. US and MR imaging are able to detect nerves abnormalities in leprosy. Active reversal reactions are indicated by endoneural color flow signals as well as by an increased T2 signal and Gd enhancement. These signs would suggest rapid progression of nerve damage and a poor prognosis unless antireactional treatment is started. (orig.)

  14. US and MR imaging of peripheral nerves in leprosy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinoli, C. [Department of Radiology ' ' R' ' , DICMI, University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy); Cattedra di Radiologia ' ' R' ' , Universita di Genova, Largo Rosanna Benzi, 8, I-16132 Genoa (Italy); Derchi, L.E.; Gandolfo, N. [Department of Radiology ' ' R' ' , DICMI, University of Genoa, Genoa (Italy); Bertolotto, M. [Department of Radiology, University of Trieste, Strada di Fiume, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Bianchi, S. [Division de Radiodiagnostic. Hopital Cantonal Huniversitaire, Rue Micheli du Crest, Geneva (Switzerland); Fiallo, P.; Nunzi, E. [Department of Tropical Medicine, University of Genoa, Largo Rosanna Benzi 8, I-16132 Genoa (Italy)

    2000-03-30

    Objective. To analyze peripheral nerves with ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MR) in leprosy and assess the role of imaging in leprosy patients. Results. Leprosy nerves were classified into three groups based on imaging appearance: group I consisted of 17 normal-appearing nerves; group II, of 30 enlarged nerves with fascicular abnormalities; group III, of 11 nerves with absent fascicular structure. Group II nerves were from patients subjected to reversal reactions; 75% of patients with group III nerves had a history of erythema nodosum leprosum. Nerve compression in osteofibrous tunnels was identified in 33% of group II and 18% of group III nerves. Doppler US and MR imaging were 74% and 92% sensitive in identifying active reactions, based on detection of endoneural color flow signals, long T2 and Gd enhancement. In 64% of cases, follow-up studies showed decreased color flow and Gd uptake after steroids and decompressive surgery.Conclusions. US and MR imaging are able to detect nerves abnormalities in leprosy. Active reversal reactions are indicated by endoneural color flow signals as well as by an increased T2 signal and Gd enhancement. These signs would suggest rapid progression of nerve damage and a poor prognosis unless antireactional treatment is started. (orig.)

  15. Nerve regeneration with aid of nanotechnology and cellular engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedaghati, Tina; Yang, Shi Yu; Mosahebi, Afshin; Alavijeh, Mohammad S; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2011-01-01

    Repairing nerve defects with large gaps remains one of the most operative challenges for surgeons. Incomplete recovery from peripheral nerve injuries can produce a diversity of negative outcomes, including numbness, impairment of sensory or motor function, possibility of developing chronic pain, and devastating permanent disability. In the last few years, numerous microsurgical techniques, such as coaptation, nerve autograft, and different biological or polymeric nerve conduits, have been developed to reconstruct a long segment of damaged peripheral nerve. A few of these techniques are promising and have become popular among surgeons. Advancements in the field of tissue engineering have led to development of synthetic nerve conduits as an alternative for the nerve autograft technique, which is the current practice to bridge nerve defects with gaps larger than 30 mm. However, to date, despite significant progress in this field, no material has been found to be an ideal alternative to the nerve autograft. This article briefly reviews major up-to-date published studies using different materials as an alternative to the nerve autograft to bridge peripheral nerve gaps in an attempt to assess their ability to support and enhance nerve regeneration and their prospective drawbacks, and also highlights the promising hope for nerve regeneration with the next generation of nerve conduits, which has been significantly enhanced with the tissue engineering approach, especially with the aid of nanotechnology in development of the three-dimensional scaffold. The goal is to determine potential alternatives for nerve regeneration and repair that are simply and directly applicable in clinical conditions. Copyright © 2011 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Optogenetic probing of nerve and muscle function after facial nerve lesion in the mouse whisker system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandi, Akhil; Vajtay, Thomas J.; Upadhyay, Aman; Yiantsos, S. Olga; Lee, Christian R.; Margolis, David J.

    2018-02-01

    Optogenetic modulation of neural circuits has opened new avenues into neuroscience research, allowing the control of cellular activity of genetically specified cell types. Optogenetics is still underdeveloped in the peripheral nervous system, yet there are many applications related to sensorimotor function, pain and nerve injury that would be of great benefit. We recently established a method for non-invasive, transdermal optogenetic stimulation of the facial muscles that control whisker movements in mice (Park et al., 2016, eLife, e14140)1. Here we present results comparing the effects of optogenetic stimulation of whisker movements in mice that express channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) selectively in either the facial motor nerve (ChAT-ChR2 mice) or muscle (Emx1-ChR2 or ACTA1-ChR2 mice). We tracked changes in nerve and muscle function before and up to 14 days after nerve transection. Optogenetic 460 nm transdermal stimulation of the distal cut nerve showed that nerve degeneration progresses rapidly over 24 hours. In contrast, the whisker movements evoked by optogenetic muscle stimulation were up-regulated after denervation, including increased maximum protraction amplitude, increased sensitivity to low-intensity stimuli, and more sustained muscle contractions (reduced adaptation). Our results indicate that peripheral optogenetic stimulation is a promising technique for probing the timecourse of functional changes of both nerve and muscle, and holds potential for restoring movement after paralysis induced by nerve damage or motoneuron degeneration.

  17. An update-tissue engineered nerve grafts for the repair of peripheral nerve injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nitesh P; Lyon, Kristopher A; Huang, Jason H

    2018-05-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries (PNI) are caused by a range of etiologies and result in a broad spectrum of disability. While nerve autografts are the current gold standard for the reconstruction of extensive nerve damage, the limited supply of autologous nerve and complications associated with harvesting nerve from a second surgical site has driven groups from multiple disciplines, including biomedical engineering, neurosurgery, plastic surgery, and orthopedic surgery, to develop a suitable or superior alternative to autografting. Over the last couple of decades, various types of scaffolds, such as acellular nerve grafts (ANGs), nerve guidance conduits, and non-nervous tissues, have been filled with Schwann cells, stem cells, and/or neurotrophic factors to develop tissue engineered nerve grafts (TENGs). Although these have shown promising effects on peripheral nerve regeneration in experimental models, the autograft has remained the gold standard for large nerve gaps. This review provides a discussion of recent advances in the development of TENGs and their efficacy in experimental models. Specifically, TENGs have been enhanced via incorporation of genetically engineered cells, methods to improve stem cell survival and differentiation, optimized delivery of neurotrophic factors via drug delivery systems (DDS), co-administration of platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and pretreatment with chondroitinase ABC (Ch-ABC). Other notable advancements include conduits that have been bioengineered to mimic native nerve structure via cell-derived extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition, and the development of transplantable living nervous tissue constructs from rat and human dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons. Grafts composed of non-nervous tissues, such as vein, artery, and muscle, will be briefly discussed.

  18. [Does intraoperative nerve monitoring reduce the rate of recurrent nerve palsies during thyroid surgery?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermann, W; Dralle, H; Hamelmann, W; Thomusch, O; Sekulla, C; Meyer, Th; Timm, S; Thiede, A

    2002-05-01

    Two different aspects of the influence of neuromonitoring on the possible reduction of post-operative recurrent laryngeal nerve palsies require critical examination: the nerve identification and the monitoring of it's functions. Due to the additional information from the EMG signals, neuromonitoring is the best method for identifying the nerves as compared to visual identification alone. There are still no randomized studies available that compare the visual and electrophysiological recurrent laryngeal nerve detection in thyroid operations with respect to the postoperative nerve palsies. Nevertheless, comparisons with historical collectives show that a constant low nerve-palsy-rate was achieved with electrophysiological detection in comparison to visual detection. The rate of nerve identification is normally very high and amounts to 99 % in our own patients. The data obtained during the "Quality assurance of benign and malignant Goiter" study show that in hemithyreoidectomy and subtotal resection, lower nerve-palsy-rates are achieved with neuromonitoring as compared to solely visual detection. Following subtotal resection, this discrepancy becomes even statistically significant. While monitoring the nerve functions with the presently used neuromonitoring technique, it is possible to observe the EMG-signal remaining constant or decreasing in volume. Assuming that a constant neuromonitoring signal represents a normal vocal cord, our evaluation shows that there is a small percentage of false negative and positive results. Looking at the permanent recurrent nerve palsy rates, this method has a specificity of 98 %, a sensitivity of 100 %, a positive prognostic value of 10 %, and a negative prognostic value of 100 %. Although an altered neuromonitoring signal can be taken as a clear indication of eventual nerve damage, an absolutely reliable statement about the postoperative vocal cord function is presently not possible with intraoperative neuromonitoring.

  19. CEREBRAL CORTEX DAMAGE INDUCED BY ACUTE ORAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-28

    Feb 28, 2018 ... At the end of the experiment, animals' hearts were perfused with normal saline and formal saline, ... RESULTS. The result shows whole and healthy neurons with very minimal distortion of the layer of ... shows vacuolation of neuron with nucleus not centralized. There is distortion of cortical layer. H&E X400.

  20. Cerebral damage caused by nail gun injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Background Accidents with nail guns are rather common, especially in the construction industry. Most injuries involve the extremities and several present with intracerebral injuries. When the patient is unconscious, it can be a big challenge to determine whether the injury is an accident, self....... The forensic examination showed lesions of intracranial surgery and minor bruises on the arms. No sign of defense injuries was found. There were no signs of malfunction of the nail gun-wielding robot. On the side of the machine, there were a handheld nail gun and the police investigated the case as a possible...... criminal act. They found bloodstains on the back of the machine. When awake, the man explained, that by accident, he had hit his head against a nail gun and as a result of this, the nail gun delivered a nail into his skull. Conclusion Sometimes, the circumstances of a case are not clear...

  1. Cerebral damage caused by nail gun injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersen Chris Hedeman

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background Accidents with nail guns are rather common, especially in the construction industry. Most injuries involve the extremities and several present with intracerebral injuries. When the patient is unconscious, it can be a big challenge to determine whether the injury is an accident, self-inflicted or a criminal act.

  2. Hepatic branch vagus nerve plays a critical role in the recovery of post-ischemic glucose intolerance and mediates a neuroprotective effect by hypothalamic orexin-A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Harada

    Full Text Available Orexin-A (a neuropeptide in the hypothalamus plays an important role in many physiological functions, including the regulation of glucose metabolism. We have previously found that the development of post-ischemic glucose intolerance is one of the triggers of ischemic neuronal damage, which is suppressed by hypothalamic orexin-A. Other reports have shown that the communication system between brain and peripheral tissues through the autonomic nervous system (sympathetic, parasympathetic and vagus nerve is important for maintaining glucose and energy metabolism. The aim of this study was to determine the involvement of the hepatic vagus nerve on hypothalamic orexin-A-mediated suppression of post-ischemic glucose intolerance development and ischemic neuronal damage. Male ddY mice were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO for 2 h. Intrahypothalamic orexin-A (5 pmol/mouse administration significantly suppressed the development of post-ischemic glucose intolerance and neuronal damage on day 1 and 3, respectively after MCAO. MCAO-induced decrease of hepatic insulin receptors and increase of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes on day 1 after was reversed to control levels by orexin-A. This effect was reversed by intramedullary administration of the orexin-1 receptor antagonist, SB334867, or hepatic vagotomy. In the medulla oblongata, orexin-A induced the co-localization of cholin acetyltransferase (cholinergic neuronal marker used for the vagus nerve with orexin-1 receptor and c-Fos (activated neural cells marker. These results suggest that the hepatic branch vagus nerve projecting from the medulla oblongata plays an important role in the recovery of post-ischemic glucose intolerance and mediates a neuroprotective effect by hypothalamic orexin-A.

  3. Hepatic Branch Vagus Nerve Plays a Critical Role in the Recovery of Post-Ischemic Glucose Intolerance and Mediates a Neuroprotective Effect by Hypothalamic Orexin-A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Shinichi; Yamazaki, Yui; Koda, Shuichi; Tokuyama, Shogo

    2014-01-01

    Orexin-A (a neuropeptide in the hypothalamus) plays an important role in many physiological functions, including the regulation of glucose metabolism. We have previously found that the development of post-ischemic glucose intolerance is one of the triggers of ischemic neuronal damage, which is suppressed by hypothalamic orexin-A. Other reports have shown that the communication system between brain and peripheral tissues through the autonomic nervous system (sympathetic, parasympathetic and vagus nerve) is important for maintaining glucose and energy metabolism. The aim of this study was to determine the involvement of the hepatic vagus nerve on hypothalamic orexin-A-mediated suppression of post-ischemic glucose intolerance development and ischemic neuronal damage. Male ddY mice were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) for 2 h. Intrahypothalamic orexin-A (5 pmol/mouse) administration significantly suppressed the development of post-ischemic glucose intolerance and neuronal damage on day 1 and 3, respectively after MCAO. MCAO-induced decrease of hepatic insulin receptors and increase of hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes on day 1 after was reversed to control levels by orexin-A. This effect was reversed by intramedullary administration of the orexin-1 receptor antagonist, SB334867, or hepatic vagotomy. In the medulla oblongata, orexin-A induced the co-localization of cholin acetyltransferase (cholinergic neuronal marker used for the vagus nerve) with orexin-1 receptor and c-Fos (activated neural cells marker). These results suggest that the hepatic branch vagus nerve projecting from the medulla oblongata plays an important role in the recovery of post-ischemic glucose intolerance and mediates a neuroprotective effect by hypothalamic orexin-A. PMID:24759941

  4. Optic nerve oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefánsson, Einar; Pedersen, Daniella Bach; Jensen, Peter Koch

    2005-01-01

    The oxygen tension of the optic nerve is regulated by the intraocular pressure and systemic blood pressure, the resistance in the blood vessels and oxygen consumption of the tissue. The oxygen tension is autoregulated and moderate changes in intraocular pressure or blood pressure do not affect...... the optic nerve oxygen tension. If the intraocular pressure is increased above 40 mmHg or the ocular perfusion pressure decreased below 50 mmHg the autoregulation is overwhelmed and the optic nerve becomes hypoxic. A disturbance in oxidative metabolism in the cytochromes of the optic nerve can be seen...... at similar levels of perfusion pressure. The levels of perfusion pressure that lead to optic nerve hypoxia in the laboratory correspond remarkably well to the levels that increase the risk of glaucomatous optic nerve atrophy in human glaucoma patients. The risk for progressive optic nerve atrophy in human...

  5. Toll-like receptors in cerebral ischemic inflammatory injury

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yan-Chun; Lin, Sen; Yang, Qing-Wu

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Cerebral ischemia triggers acute inflammation, which has been associated with an increase in brain damage. The mechanisms that regulate the inflammatory response after cerebral ischemia are multifaceted. An important component of this response is the activation of the innate immune system. However, details of the role of the innate immune system within the complex array of mechanisms in cerebral ischemia remain unclear. There have been recent great strides in our understanding of the...

  6. Cerebral microcirculation during experimental normovolaemic anaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith eBellapart

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Anaemia is accepted amongst critically ill patients as an alternative to elective blood transfusion. This practice has been extrapolated to head injury patients with only one study comparing the effects of mild anaemia on neurological outcome. There are no studies quantifying microcirculation during anaemia. Experimental studies suggest that anaemia leads to cerebral hypoxia and increased rates of infarction, but the lack of clinical equipoise when testing the cerebral effects of transfusion amongst critically injured patients, supports the need of experimental studies. The aim of this study was to quantify cerebral microcirculation and the potential presence of axonal damage in an experimental model exposed to normovolaemic anaemia, with the intention of describing possible limitations within management practices in critically ill patients. Under non-recovered anaesthesia, six Merino sheep were instrumented using an intracardiac transeptal catheter to inject coded microspheres into the left atrium to ensure systemic and non-chaotic distribution. Cytometric analyses quantified cerebral microcirculation at specific regions of the brain. Amyloid precursor protein staining was used as an indicator of axonal damage. Animals were exposed to normovolaemic anaemia by blood extractions from the indwelling arterial catheter with simultaneous fluid replacement through a venous central catheter. Simultaneous data recording from cerebral tissue oxygenation, intracranial pressure and cardiac output was monitored. A regression model was used to examine the effects of anaemia on microcirculation with a mixed model to control for repeated measures. Homogeneous and normal cerebral microcirculation with no evidence of axonal damage was present in all cerebral regions, with no temporal variability, concluding that acute normovolaemic anaemia does not result in short term effects on cerebral microcirculation in the ovine brain.

  7. Facial Pain Followed by Unilateral Facial Nerve Palsy: A Case Report with Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    GV, Sowmya; BS, Manjunatha; Goel, Saurabh; Singh, Mohit Pal; Astekar, Madhusudan

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy is the commonest cranial nerve motor neuropathy. The causes range from cerebrovascular accident to iatrogenic damage, but there are few reports of facial nerve paralysis attributable to odontogenic infections. In majority of the cases, recovery of facial muscle function begins within first three weeks after onset. This article reports a unique case of 32-year-old male patient who developed facial pain followed by unilateral facial nerve paralysis due to odontogen...

  8. Mental nerve paresthesia secondary to initiation of endodontic therapy: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Andrabi, Syed Mukhtar-Un-Nisar; Alam, Sharique; Zia, Afaf; Khan, Masood Hasan; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Whenever endodontic therapy is performed on mandibular posterior teeth, damage to the inferior alveolar nerve or any of its branches is possible. Acute periapical infection in mandibular posterior teeth may also sometimes disturb the normal functioning of the inferior alveolar nerve. The most common clinical manifestation of these insults is the paresthesia of the inferior alveolar nerve or mental nerve paresthesia. Paresthesia usually manifests as burning, prickling, tingling, numbness, itch...

  9. Tributyltin induces oxidative damage, inflammation and apoptosis via disturbance in blood–brain barrier and metal homeostasis in cerebral cortex of rat brain: An in vivo and in vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitra, Sumonto; Gera, Ruchi; Siddiqui, Waseem A.; Khandelwal, Shashi

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Sustainable blood–brain barrier disruption was found by single acute dose of TBTC (up to 1 week). • Imbalance in essential metal homeostasis in the cortical tissue may lead to oxidative stress. • Astroglial activation and inflammation resulted in neuronal loss. • TBTC primarily induced apoptosis as found in in-vitro study via activation of calcium, p38 signaling, ROS and caspases. • Calcium inhibitors and anti-oxidants showed protective efficacy in TBTC induced cell death. - Abstract: Tributyltin (TBT), a member of the organotin family, is primarily used for its biocidal activity. Persistent environmental levels of TBT pose threat to the ecosystem. Since neurotoxic influence of TBT remains elusive, we therefore, studied its effect on cerebral cortex of male Wistar rats. A single oral dose of Tributyltin-Chloride (TBTC) (10, 20, 30 mg/kg) was administered and the animals were sacrificed on day 3 and day 7. Blood–brain barrier permeability remained disrupted significantly till day 7 with all the doses of TBTC. Pro-oxidant metal levels (Fe, Cu) were increased with a concomitant decrease in Zn. ROS generation was substantially raised resulting in oxidative damage (increased protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation) with marked decline in tissue antioxidant status (GSH/GSSG levels). Protein expression studies indicated astrocyte activation, upregulation of inflammatory molecules (IL-6, Cox-2 and NF-κB) and simultaneous elevation in the apoptotic index (Bax/Bcl2). Neurodegeneration was evident by reduced neurofilament expression and increased calpain cleaved Tau levels. The in-vitro study demonstrated involvement of calcium and signaling molecules (p38), with downstream activation of caspase-3 and -8, and apoptotic cell death was evident by nuclear fragmentation, DNA laddering and Annexin V binding experiments. Ca 2+ inhibitors (BAPTA-AM, EGTA, and RR) and free radical scavengers (NAC and biliprotein [C-PC]) increased cell viability (MTT

  10. Optical stimulation of peripheral nerves in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jonathon D.

    This dissertation documents the emergence and validation of a new clinical tool that bridges the fields of biomedical optics and neuroscience. The research herein describes an innovative method for direct neurostimulation with pulsed infrared laser light. Safety and effectiveness of this technique are first demonstrated through functional stimulation of the rat sciatic nerve in vivo. The Holmium:YAG laser (lambda = 2.12 mum) is shown to operate at an optimal wavelength for peripheral nerve stimulation with advantages over standard electrical neural stimulation; including contact-free stimulation, high spatial selectivity, and lack of a stimulation artifact. The underlying biophysical mechanism responsible for transient optical nerve stimulation appears to be a small, absorption driven thermal gradient sustained at the axonal layer of nerve. Results explicitly prove that low frequency optical stimulation can reliably stimulate without resulting in tissue thermal damage. Based on the positive results from animal studies, these optimal laser parameters were utilized to move this research into the clinic with a combined safety and efficacy study in human subjects undergoing selective dorsal rhizotomy. The clinical Holmium:YAG laser was used to effectively stimulate human dorsal spinal roots and elicit functional muscle responses recorded during surgery without evidence of nerve damage. Overall these results predict that this technology can be a valuable clinical tool in various neurosurgical applications.

  11. Cerebral Palsy (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Cerebral Palsy KidsHealth / For Teens / Cerebral Palsy What's in this ... do just what everyone else does. What Is Cerebral Palsy? Cerebral palsy (CP) is a disorder of the ...

  12. Laser-activated solid protein bands for peripheral nerve repair: an vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauto, A; Trickett, R; Malik, R; Dawes, J M; Owen, E R

    1997-01-01

    Severed tibial nerves in rats were repaired using a novel technique, utilizing a semiconductor diode-laser-activated protein solder applied longitudinally across the join. Welding was produced by selective laser denaturation of solid solder bands containing the dye indocyanine green. An in vivo study, using 48 adult male Wistar rats, compared conventional microsuture-repaired tibial nerves with laser solder-repaired nerves. Nerve repairs were characterised immediately after surgery and after 3 months. Successful regeneration with average compound muscle action potentials of 2.5 +/- 0.5 mV and 2.7 +/- 0.3 mV (mean and standard deviation) was demonstrated for the laser-soldered nerves and the sutured nerves, respectively. Histopathology confirmed comparable regeneration of axons in laser- and suture-operated nerves. The laser-based nerve repair technique was easier and faster than microsuture repair, minimising manipulation damage to the nerve.

  13. Delayed repair of the peripheral nerve: a novel model in the rat sciatic nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Peng; Spinner, Robert J; Gu, Yudong; Yaszemski, Michael J; Windebank, Anthony J; Wang, Huan

    2013-03-30

    Peripheral nerve reconstruction is seldom done in the acute phase of nerve injury due to concomitant injuries and the uncertainty of the extent of nerve damage. A proper model that mimics true clinical scenarios is critical but lacking. The aim of this study is to develop a standardized, delayed sciatic nerve repair model in rats and validate the feasibility of direct secondary neurrorraphy after various delay intervals. Immediately or 1, 4, 6, 8 and 12 weeks after sciatic nerve transection, nerve repair was carried out. A successful tension-free direct neurorraphy (TFDN) was defined when the gap was shorter than 4.0 mm and the stumps could be reapproximated with 10-0 stitches without detachment. Compound muscle action potential (CMAP) was recorded postoperatively. Gaps between the two nerve stumps ranged from 0 to 9 mm, the average being 1.36, 2.85, 3.43, 3.83 and 6.4 mm in rats with 1, 4, 6, 8 and 12 week delay, respectively. The rate of successful TFDN was 78% overall. CMAP values of 1 and 4 week delay groups were not different from the immediate repair group, whereas CMAP amplitudes of 6, 8 and 12 week delay groups were significantly lower. A novel, standardized delayed nerve repair model is established. For this model to be sensitive, the interval between nerve injury and secondary repair should be at least over 4 weeks. Thereafter the longer the delay, the more challenging the model is for nerve regeneration. The choice of delay intervals can be tailored to meet specific requirements in future studies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Alexandra; Casselman, Jan

    2010-01-01

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  15. Imaging the trigeminal nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Alexandra [Radiology Department, Instituto Portugues de Oncologia Francisco Gentil, Centro de Lisboa, Rua Prof. Lima Basto, 1093, Lisboa (Portugal)], E-mail: borgalexandra@gmail.com; Casselman, Jan [Department of Radiology, A. Z. St Jan Brugge and A. Z. St Augustinus Antwerpen Hospitals (Belgium)

    2010-05-15

    Of all cranial nerves, the trigeminal nerve is the largest and the most widely distributed in the supra-hyoid neck. It provides sensory input from the face and motor innervation to the muscles of mastication. In order to adequately image the full course of the trigeminal nerve and its main branches a detailed knowledge of neuroanatomy and imaging technique is required. Although the main trunk of the trigeminal nerve is consistently seen on conventional brain studies, high-resolution tailored imaging is mandatory to depict smaller nerve branches and subtle pathologic processes. Increasing developments in imaging technique made possible isotropic sub-milimetric images and curved reconstructions of cranial nerves and their branches and led to an increasing recognition of symptomatic trigeminal neuropathies. Whereas MRI has a higher diagnostic yield in patients with trigeminal neuropathy, CT is still required to demonstrate the bony anatomy of the skull base and is the modality of choice in the context of traumatic injury to the nerve. Imaging of the trigeminal nerve is particularly cumbersome as its long course from the brainstem nuclei to the peripheral branches and its rich anastomotic network impede, in most cases, a topographic approach. Therefore, except in cases of classic trigeminal neuralgia, in which imaging studies can be tailored to the root entry zone, the full course of the trigeminal nerve has to be imaged. This article provides an update in the most recent advances on MR imaging technique and a segmental imaging approach to the most common pathologic processes affecting the trigeminal nerve.

  16. Gait Trainer for Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Urhan, Oguzhan

    2001-01-01

    A device is developed to improve the walking ability of children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy, who have damages to the area of their brain which controls the muscle tone and that causes trouble walking...

  17. Cerebral aspects of neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation: a review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, A.C. de; Liem, K.D.; Heijst, A.F.J. van

    2013-01-01

    Background: Neonatal extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a lifesaving therapeutic approach in newborns suffering from severe, but potentially reversible, respiratory insufficiency, mostly complicated by neonatal persistent pulmonary hypertension. However, cerebral damage, intracerebral

  18. Neurophysiologic intraoperative monitoring of the vestibulocochlear nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Mirela V

    2011-12-01

    Neurosurgical procedures involving the skull base and structures within can pose a significant risk of damage to the brain stem and cranial nerves. This can have life-threatening consequences and/or result in devastating neurologic deficits. Over the past decade, intraoperative neurophysiology has significantly evolved and currently offers a great tool for live monitoring of the integrity of nervous structures. Thus, dysfunction can be identified early and prompt modification of the surgical management or operating conditions, leads to avoidance of permanent structural damage.Along these lines, the vestibulocochlear nerve (CN VIII) and, to a greater extent, the auditory pathways as they pass through the brain stem are especially at risk during cerebelopontine angle (CPA), posterior/middle fossa, or brain stem surgery. CN VIII can be damaged by several mechanisms, from vascular compromise to mechanical injury by stretch, compression, dissection, and heat injury. Additionally, cochlea itself can be significantly damaged during temporal bone drilling, by noise, mechanical destruction, or infarction, and because of rupture, occlusion, or vasospasm of the internal auditory artery.CN VIII monitoring can be successfully achieved by live recording of the function of one of its parts, the cochlear or auditory nerve (AN), using the brain stem auditory evoked potentials (BAEPs), electrocochleography (ECochG), and compound nerve action potentials (CNAPs) of the cochlear nerve.This is a review of these techniques, their principle, applications, methodology, interpretation of the evoked responses, and their change from baseline, within the context of surgical and anesthesia environments, and finally the appropriate management of these changes.

  19. Injury of the Inferior Alveolar Nerve during Implant Placement: a Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gintaras Juodzbalys

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of present article was to review aetiological factors, mechanism, clinical symptoms, and diagnostic methods as well as to create treatment guidelines for the management of inferior alveolar nerve injury during dental implant placement.Material and Methods: Literature was selected through a search of PubMed, Embase and Cochrane electronic databases. The keywords used for search were inferior alveolar nerve injury, inferior alveolar nerve injuries, inferior alveolar nerve injury implant, inferior alveolar nerve damage, inferior alveolar nerve paresthesia and inferior alveolar nerve repair. The search was restricted to English language articles, published from 1972 to November 2010. Additionally, a manual search in the major anatomy, dental implant, periodontal and oral surgery journals and books were performed. The publications there selected by including clinical, human anatomy and physiology studies.Results: In total 136 literature sources were obtained and reviewed. Aetiological factors of inferior alveolar nerve injury, risk factors, mechanism, clinical sensory nerve examination methods, clinical symptoms and treatment were discussed. Guidelines were created to illustrate the methods used to prevent and manage inferior alveolar nerve injury before or after dental implant placement.Conclusions: The damage of inferior alveolar nerve during the dental implant placement can be a serious complication. Clinician should recognise and exclude aetiological factors leading to nerve injury. Proper presurgery planning, timely diagnosis and treatment are the key to avoid nerve sensory disturbances management.

  20. Facilitation of facial nerve regeneration using chitosan-β-glycerophosphate-nerve growth factor hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Xiuhua; Xu, Lei; Li, Jianfeng; Han, Yuechen; Li, Xiaofei; Mao, YanYan; Shang, Haiqiong; Fan, Zhaomin; Wang, Haibo

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion C/GP hydrogel was demonstrated to be an ideal drug delivery vehicle and scaffold in the vein conduit. Combined use autologous vein and NGF continuously delivered by C/GP-NGF hydrogel can improve the recovery of facial nerve defects. Objective This study investigated the effects of chitosan-β-glycerophosphate-nerve growth factor (C/GP-NGF) hydrogel combined with autologous vein conduit on the recovery of damaged facial nerve in a rat model. Methods A 5 mm gap in the buccal branch of a rat facial nerve was reconstructed with an autologous vein. Next, C/GP-NGF hydrogel was injected into the vein conduit. In negative control groups, NGF solution or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) was injected into the vein conduits, respectively. Autologous implantation was used as a positive control group. Vibrissae movement, electrophysiological assessment, and morphological analysis of regenerated nerves were performed to assess nerve regeneration. Results NGF continuously released from C/GP-NGF hydrogel in vitro. The recovery rate of vibrissae movement and the compound muscle action potentials of regenerated facial nerve in the C/GP-NGF group were similar to those in the Auto group, and significantly better than those in the NGF group. Furthermore, larger regenerated axons and thicker myelin sheaths were obtained in the C/GP-NGF group than those in the NGF group.

  1. Conjoined lumbosacral nerve roots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyoshima, Kazumitsu; Nishiura, Iwao; Koyama, Tsunemaro

    1986-01-01

    Several kinds of the lumbosacral nerve root anomalies have already been recognized, and the conjoined nerve roots is the most common among them. It does not make symptoms by itself, but if there is a causation of neural entrapment, for example, disc herniation, lateral recessus stenosis, spondylolisthesis, etc., so called ''biradicular syndrome'' should occur. Anomalies of the lumbosacral nerve roots, if not properly recognized, may lead to injury of these nerves during operation of the lumbar spine. Recently, the chance of finding these anomalous roots has been increased more and more with the use of metrizamide myelography and metrizamide CT, because of the improvement of the opacification of nerve roots. We describe the findings of the anomalous roots as revealed by these two methods. They demonstrate two nerve roots running parallel and the asymmetrical wide root sleeve. Under such circumstances, it is important to distinguish the anomalous roots from the normal ventral and dorsal roots. (author)

  2. [Facial nerve neurinomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokołowski, Jacek; Bartoszewicz, Robert; Morawski, Krzysztof; Jamróz, Barbara; Niemczyk, Kazimierz

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of diagnostic, surgical technique, treatment results facial nerve neurinomas and its comparison with literature was the main purpose of this study. Seven cases of patients (2005-2011) with facial nerve schwannomas were included to retrospective analysis in the Department of Otolaryngology, Medical University of Warsaw. All patients were assessed with history of the disease, physical examination, hearing tests, computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging, electronystagmography. Cases were observed in the direction of potential complications and recurrences. Neurinoma of the facial nerve occurred in the vertical segment (n=2), facial nerve geniculum (n=1) and the internal auditory canal (n=4). The symptoms observed in patients were analyzed: facial nerve paresis (n=3), hearing loss (n=2), dizziness (n=1). Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography allowed to confirm the presence of the tumor and to assess its staging. Schwannoma of the facial nerve has been surgically removed using the middle fossa approach (n=5) and by antromastoidectomy (n=2). Anatomical continuity of the facial nerve was achieved in 3 cases. In the twelve months after surgery, facial nerve paresis was rated at level II-III° HB. There was no recurrence of the tumor in radiological observation. Facial nerve neurinoma is a rare tumor. Currently surgical techniques allow in most cases, the radical removing of the lesion and reconstruction of the VII nerve function. The rate of recurrence is low. A tumor of the facial nerve should be considered in the differential diagnosis of nerve VII paresis. Copyright © 2013 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  3. Somatosensory discrimination deficits following pediatric cerebral malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugbartey, A T; Spellacy, F J; Dugbartey, M T

    1998-09-01

    Pathologic studies of central nervous system damage in human falciparum malaria indicate primary localization in the cerebral white matter. We report a sensory-perceptual investigation of 20 Ghanaian children with a recent history of cerebral malaria who were age-, gender-, and education-matched with 20 healthy control subjects. Somatosensory examinations failed to show any evidence of hemianesthesia, pseudohemianesthesia, or extinction to double simultaneous tactile stimulation. While unilateral upper limb testing revealed intact unimanual tactile roughness discrimination, bimanual tactile discrimination, however, was significantly impaired in the cerebral malaria group. A strong negative correlation (r = -0.72) between coma duration and the bimanual tactile roughness discrimination test was also found. An inefficiency in the integrity of callosal fibers appear to account for our findings, although alternative subcortical mechanisms known to be involved in information transfer across the cerebral hemispheres may be compromised as well.

  4. Cerebral formation of free radicals during hypoxia does not cause structural damage and is associated with a reduction in mitochondrial PO2; evidence of O2-sensing in humans?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Damian M; Taudorf, Sarah; Berg, Ronan M G

    2011-01-01

    Cellular hypoxia triggers a homeostatic increase in mitochondrial free radical signaling. In this study, blood was obtained from the radial artery and jugular venous bulb in 10 men during normoxia and 9¿ hours hypoxia (12.9% O(2)). Mitochondrial oxygen tension (p(O(2))(mit)) was derived from...... cerebral blood flow and blood gases. The ascorbate radical (A(•-)) was detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and neuron-specific enolase (NSE), a biomarker of neuronal injury, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hypoxia increased the cerebral output of A(•-) in proportion...

  5. Cerebral formation of free radicals during hypoxia does not cause structural damage and is associated with a reduction in mitochondrial PO2; evidence of O2-sensing in humans?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Damian M; Taudorf, Sarah; Berg, Ronan M G

    2011-01-01

    Cellular hypoxia triggers a homeostatic increase in mitochondrial free radical signaling. In this study, blood was obtained from the radial artery and jugular venous bulb in 10 men during normoxia and 9  hours hypoxia (12.9% O(2)). Mitochondrial oxygen tension (p(O(2))(mit)) was derived from...... cerebral blood flow and blood gases. The ascorbate radical (A(•-)) was detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and neuron-specific enolase (NSE), a biomarker of neuronal injury, by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hypoxia increased the cerebral output of A(•-) in proportion...

  6. Cerebral vasculitis associated with Schistosoma mansoni infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camuset Guillaume

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cerebral involvement in schistosomiasis is not rare, but it is underdiagnosed because of the lack of clinical suspicion and the frequency of asymptomatic forms. Neurologic complications are generally supported by granuloma formation around ectopic eggs which have migrated to the brain. Moreover, vascular lesions and cerebral arteritis have been well documented in histopathological studies. Nevertheless, cerebral vasculitis in later stages of the Schistosoma mansoni infection have not yet been described in living subjects. Case presentation A 28-year-old french woman had a stroke linked with cerebral vasculitis, 6 monthes after returning from Burkina-Faso. At the same time, a S. mansoni disseminated infection was diagnosed. She suffered from a new stroke after undertaking praziquantel therapy, which lead us to associate the S. mansoni infection and cerebral vasculitis. Conclusion This is the first report of such association, since cerebral vasculitis has never been described in later stages of the S. mansoni infection. Although the causal link between the two pathologies could not be proved, we suggest that S. mansoni is able to cause severe vascular damage in cerebral vessels. Schistosomiasis must be investigated in the event of a brain infarct in young people, particularly in patients originating or returning from an endemic area.

  7. Laser-activated protein solder for peripheral nerve repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trickett, Rodney I.; Lauto, Antonio; Dawes, Judith M.; Owen, Earl R.

    1995-05-01

    A 100 micrometers core optical fiber-coupled 75 mW diode laser operating at a wavelength of 800 nm has been used in conjunction with a protein solder to stripe weld severed rat tibial nerves, reducing the long operating time required for microsurgical nerve repair. Welding is produced by selective laser denaturation of the albumin based solder which contains the dye indocyanine green. Operating time for laser soldering was 10 +/- 5 min. (n equals 20) compared to 23 +/- 9 min. (n equals 10) for microsuturing. The laser solder technique resulted in patent welds with a tensile strength of 15 +/- 5 g, while microsutured nerves had a tensile strength of 40 +/- 10 g. Histopathology of the laser soldered nerves, conducted immediately after surgery, displayed solder adhesion to the outer membrane with minimal damage to the inner axons of the nerves. An in vivo study is under way comparing laser solder repaired tibial nerves to conventional microsuture repair. At the time of submission 15 laser soldered nerves and 7 sutured nerves were characterized at 3 months and showed successful regeneration with compound muscle action potentials of 27 +/- 8 mV and 29 +/- 8 mW respectively. A faster, less damaging and long lasting laser based anastomotic technique is presented.

  8. Neurophysiological intraoperative monitoring during an optic nerve schwannoma removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Juan, Daniel; Escanio Cortés, Manuel; Tena-Suck, Martha; Orozco Garduño, Adolfo Josué; López Pizano, Jesús Alejandro; Villanueva Domínguez, Jonathan; Fernández Gónzalez-Aragón, Maricarmen; Gómez-Amador, Juan Luis

    2017-10-01

    This paper reports the case of a patient with optic nerve schwannoma and the first use of neurophysiological intraoperative monitoring of visual evoked potentials during the removal of such tumor with no postoperative visual damage. Schwannomas are benign neoplasms of the peripheral nervous system arising from the neural crest-derived Schwann cells, these tumors are rarely located in the optic nerve and the treatment consists on surgical removal leading to high risk of damage to the visual pathway. Case report of a thirty-year-old woman with an optic nerve schwannoma. The patient underwent surgery for tumor removal on the left optic nerve through a left orbitozygomatic approach with intraoperative monitoring of left II and III cranial nerves. We used Nicolet Endeavour CR IOM (Carefusion, Middleton WI, USA) to performed visual evoked potentials stimulating binocularly with LED flash goggles with the patient´s eyes closed and direct epidural optic nerve stimulation delivering rostral to the tumor a rectangular current pulse. At follow up examinations 7 months later, the left eye visual acuity was 20/60; Ishihara score was 8/8 in both eyes; the right eye photomotor reflex was normal and left eye was mydriatic and arreflectic; optokinetic reflex and ocular conjugate movements were normal. In this case, the epidural direct electrical stimulation of optic nerve provided stable waveforms during optic nerve schwannoma resection without visual loss.

  9. Deoxycholic Acid and the Marginal Mandibular Nerve: A Cadaver Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandford, Alexander D; Ansari, Waseem; Young, Jason M; Maley, Bruce; Plesec, Thomas P; Hwang, Catherine J; Perry, Julian D

    2018-06-04

    One of the rare but serious complications observed with deoxycholic acid administration is damage to the marginal mandibular nerve. In this study, we evaluated if deoxycholic acid directly induces histologic damage to fresh cadaveric marginal mandibular nerve. A segment of marginal mandibular nerve was harvested from 12 hemifaces of 6 fresh cadavers. The nerve specimen was exposed to either 0.9% sterile saline for 24 h, deoxycholic acid (10 mg/ml) for 20 min, or deoxycholic acid (10 mg/ml) for 24 h. The nerve specimens were then fixed in glutaraldehyde for a minimum of 24 h. Toluidine blue stained sections were evaluated for stain intensity using light microscopy and color deconvolution image analysis. Supraplatysmal fat was harvested as a positive control and exposed to the same treatments as the marginal mandibular nerve specimens, then evaluated using transmission electron microscopy. Toluidine blue staining was less in the marginal mandibular nerve exposed to deoxycholic acid when compared to saline. The specimen exposed to deoxycholic acid for 24 h showed less toluidine blue staining than that of the nerve exposed to deoxycholic acid for 20 min. Transmission electron microscopy of submental fat exposed to deoxycholic acid revealed disruption of adipocyte cell membrane integrity and loss of cellular organelles when compared to specimens only exposed to saline. Deoxycholic acid (10 mg/ml) damages the marginal mandibular nerve myelin sheath in fresh human cadaver specimens. Direct deoxycholic acid neurotoxicity may cause marginal mandibular nerve injury clinically. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  10. A clinical study of cerebral vaso paralysis during a period of cerebral vasospasm after subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Toshiichi; Sasaki, Takehiko; Nakagawara, Jyoji

    2011-01-01

    We employ the 123 I-infinitum (Imp) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) dual table autoradiography (Arg) method and stereotactic extraction estimation (SEE) analysis 7 or 8 days after subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) onset to predict cerebral vasospasm. We report new findings of cerebral vasoparalysis during a period of cerebral vasospasm after SAH. From January 1, 2005 to April 30, 2008, we encountered 330 cases of aneurysmal SAH, and treated 285 cases. Of these, 65 were excluded as unsuitable for this study, for reasons such as lack of SPECT data, external decompression, admission over 7 days from SAH onset. We studied 220 cases treated by microsurgical clipping (n=178) or endovascular coil embolization (n=42). Vasoparalysis was defined as a rise in resting cerebral blood flow (CBF) and a loss of vascular reserve on SEE analysis of CBF-SPECT. Vasoparalysis occurred in 15 cases (6.8%). Of these, 9 cases (60.0%) had cerebral hematoma, temporary clips had been used in the operation for 8 cases (53.3%), 9 cases (60.0%) experienced postoperative cerebral infarction, and 3 cases (20.0%) had postoperative convulsions. Vasoparalysis occurs in relation to perioperative cerebral damage. In terms of the loss of vascular reserve following SAH, vasoparalysis resembles hemodynamic cerebral ischemia, although the conditions are quite different. Differentiating between these 2 conditions is important, as different forms of management are required. Dual table ARG and SEE analysis are very useful for the evaluating these 2 conditions. (author)

  11. Engineering a multimodal nerve conduit for repair of injured peripheral nerve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, A. F.; Bulluss, K. J.; Kyratzis, I. L. B.; Gilmore, K.; Mysore, T.; Schirmer, K. S. U.; Kennedy, E. L.; O'Shea, M.; Truong, Y. B.; Edwards, S. L.; Peeters, G.; Herwig, P.; Razal, J. M.; Campbell, T. E.; Lowes, K. N.; Higgins, M. J.; Moulton, S. E.; Murphy, M. A.; Cook, M. J.; Clark, G. M.; Wallace, G. G.; Kapsa, R. M. I.

    2013-02-01

    Injury to nerve tissue in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) results in long-term impairment of limb function, dysaesthesia and pain, often with associated psychological effects. Whilst minor injuries can be left to regenerate without intervention and short gaps up to 2 cm can be sutured, larger or more severe injuries commonly require autogenous nerve grafts harvested from elsewhere in the body (usually sensory nerves). Functional recovery is often suboptimal and associated with loss of sensation from the tissue innervated by the harvested nerve. The challenges that persist with nerve repair have resulted in development of nerve guides or conduits from non-neural biological tissues and various polymers to improve the prognosis for the repair of damaged nerves in the PNS. This study describes the design and fabrication of a multimodal controlled pore size nerve regeneration conduit using polylactic acid (PLA) and (PLA):poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) fibers within a neurotrophin-enriched alginate hydrogel. The nerve repair conduit design consists of two types of PLGA fibers selected specifically for promotion of axonal outgrowth and Schwann cell growth (75:25 for axons; 85:15 for Schwann cells). These aligned fibers are contained within the lumen of a knitted PLA sheath coated with electrospun PLA nanofibers to control pore size. The PLGA guidance fibers within the nerve repair conduit lumen are supported within an alginate hydrogel impregnated with neurotrophic factors (NT-3 or BDNF with LIF, SMDF and MGF-1) to provide neuroprotection, stimulation of axonal growth and Schwann cell migration. The conduit was used to promote repair of transected sciatic nerve in rats over a period of 4 weeks. Over this period, it was observed that over-grooming and self-mutilation (autotomy) of the limb implanted with the conduit was significantly reduced in rats implanted with the full-configuration conduit compared to rats implanted with conduits containing only an alginate

  12. Communication between radial nerve and medial cutaneous nerve of forearm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R R Marathe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radial nerve is usually a branch of the posterior cord of the brachial plexus. It innervates triceps, anconeous, brachialis, brachioradialis, extensor carpi radialis longus muscles and gives the posterior cutaneous nerve of the arm, lower lateral cutaneous nerve of arm, posterior cutaneous nerve of forearm; without exhibiting any communication with the medial cutaneous nerve of forearm or any other nerve. We report communication between the radial nerve and medial cutaneous nerve of forearm on the left side in a 58-year-old male cadaver. The right sided structures were found to be normal. Neurosurgeons should keep such variations in mind while performing the surgeries of axilla and upper arm.

  13. Function and mechanism of toll-like receptors in cerebral ischemic tolerance: from preconditioning to treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Peng-Fei; Xiong, Xiao-Yi; Chen, Jing; Wang, Yan-Chun; Duan, Wei; Yang, Qing-Wu

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that toll-like receptors (TLRs) play an important role in cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. The endogenous ligands released from ischemic neurons activate the TLR signaling pathway, resulting in the production of a large number of inflammatory cytokines, thereby causing secondary inflammation damage following cerebral ischemia. However, the preconditioning for minor cerebral ischemia or the preconditioning with TLR ligands can reduce cerebral ischemic injury b...

  14. Excessive oral intake caffeine altered cerebral cortex ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Caffeine is commonly consumed in an effort to enhance speed in performance and wakefulness. However, little is known about the deleterious effects it can produce on the brain, this study aimed at determining the extents of effects and damage that can be caused by excessive consumption of caffeine on the cerebral cortex ...

  15. MR of experimental cerebral ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLaPaz, R.; Steinberg, G.; Rocklage, S.; Glover, G.H.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on MR imaging of cerebral ischemia and treatment with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonists in an animal model. Forty-four New Zealand white rabbits underwent 1-hour transorbital ICA-MCA-ACA occlusion and pretreatment or immediate posttreatment with systemic dextromethorphan (DM, n = 14), dextrorphan (DX, n = 14), or normal saline (NS, n = 16). Serial MR studies (1.5 T) were performed 1--6 hours after occlusion with T1- and T2-weighted spinecho, IVIM (b = 1,352), gradient recalled acquisition in a steady-state, and chemical shift sequences (for magnetic susceptibility, T2* and T2') and DyDTPA-BMA intravenous contrast material (Salutar). Spatial correlation between MR findings, histologic findings (ischemic neuronal damage), and regional cerebral blood flow (microspheres) was done

  16. Nerve stimulator-guided sciatic-femoral nerve block in raptors undergoing surgical treatment of pododermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Ovidio, Dario; Noviello, Emilio; Adami, Chiara

    2015-07-01

    To describe the nerve stimulator-guided sciatic-femoral nerve block in raptors undergoing surgical treatment of pododermatitis. Prospective clinical trial. Five captive raptors (Falco peregrinus) aged 6.7 ± 1.3 years. Anaesthesia was induced and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. The sciatic-femoral nerve block was performed with 2% lidocaine (0.05 mL kg(-1) per nerve) as the sole intra-operative analgesic treatment. Intraoperative physiological variables were recorded every 10 minutes from endotracheal intubation until the end of anaesthesia. Assessment of intraoperative nociception was based on changes in physiological variables above baseline values, while evaluation of postoperative pain relied on species-specific behavioural indicators. The sciatic-femoral nerve block was feasible in raptors and the motor responses following electrical stimulation of both nerves were consistent with those reported in mammalian species. During surgery no rescue analgesia was required. The anaesthesia plane was stable and cardiorespiratory variables did not increase significantly in response to surgical stimulation. Iatrogenic complications, namely nerve damage and local anaesthetic toxicity, did not occur. Recovery was smooth and uneventful. The duration (mean ± SD) of the analgesic effect provided by the nerve block was 130 ± 20 minutes. The sciatic-femoral nerve block as described in dogs and rabbits can be performed in raptors as well. Further clinical trials with a control groups are required to better investigate the analgesic efficacy and the safety of this technique in raptors. © 2014 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  17. Forces necessary for the disruption of the cisternal segments of cranial nerves II through XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Wellons, John C; Blount, Jeffrey P; Salter, E George; Oakes, W Jerry

    2007-04-01

    Manipulation of the cisternal segment of cranial nerves is often performed by the neurosurgeon. To date, attempts at quantifying the forces necessary to disrupt these nerves in situ, to our knowledge, has not been performed. The present study seeks to further elucidate the forces necessary to disrupt the cranial nerves while within the subarachnoid space. The cisternal segments of cranial nerves II through XII were exposed in six unfixed cadavers, all less than 6 hr postmortem. Forces to failure were then measured. Mean forces necessary to disrupt nerves for left sides in increasing order were found for cranial nerves IX, VII, IV, X, XII, III, VIII, XI, VI, V, and II, respectively. Mean forces for right-sided cranial nerves in increasing order were found for cranial nerves IX, VII, IV, X, XII, VIII, V, VI, XI, III, and II, respectively. Overall, cranial nerves requiring the least amount of force prior to failure included cranial nerves IV, VII, and IX. Those requiring the highest amount of force included cranial nerves II, V, VI, and XI. There was an approximately ten-fold difference between the least and greatest forces required to failure. Cranial nerve III was found to require significantly (P cranial nerves II through XII. We found that cranial nerve IX consistently took the least amount of force until its failure and cranial nerve II took the greatest. Other cranial nerves that took relatively small amount of force prior to failure included cranial nerves IV and VII. Although in vivo damage can occur prior to failure of a cranial nerve, our data may serve to provide a rough estimation for the maximal amount of tension that can be applied to a cranial nerve that is manipulated while within its cistern.

  18. Frequency of lingual nerve injury in mandibular third molar extraction: A comparison of two surgical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shad, S.; Abbasi, M.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Surgical removal of impacted mandibular third molar is associated with a number of complications including postoperative bleeding, dry socket, postoperative infection, and injury to regional nerves. Lingual nerve damage is one of the main complications. To prevent this complication different techniques had been used. Lingual flap reflection is one of these procedures in which lingual soft tissue is reflected and retracted deliberately, the nerve is identified and is kept out of the surgical field. The objective of this study was to evaluate a surgical technique for third molar removal which is associated with minimum frequency of lingual nerve damage. Method: A randomized controlled trial was performed. A total of 380 patients with impacted mandibular third molars were included in this study. Each patient was allotted randomly by blocked randomization to group A where procedure was performed by reflection and retraction of lingual flap in addition to buccal flap and group B where procedure was performed by retraction of buccal flap only. Results: Lingual nerve damage occurred in 8.94 percentage in Group A in which lingual flap retraction was performed but damage was reversible. In group B, 2.63 percentage lingual nerve damage was observed and nature of damage was permanent. The difference was statistically significant (p=0.008). Conclusions: Lingual flap retraction poses 3.4 times increased risk of lingual nerve damage during extraction of mandibular third molar when lingual flap is retracted but the nature of damage is reversible. (author)

  19. Isolated optic nerve pseudotumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patankar, T.; Prasad, S.; Krishnan, A.; Laxminarayan, R.

    2000-01-01

    Isolated optic nerve involvement by the idiopathic inflammatory process is a rare finding and very few reports are available. Here a case of an isolated optic nerve inflammatory pseudotumour presenting with gradually progressive unilateral loss of vision is described. It showed dramatic response to a trial of steroids and its differential diagnoses are discussed. Copyright (1999) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  20. Migraine can be induced by sildenafil without changes in middle cerebral artery diameter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruuse, Christina Rostrup; Thomsen, Lars Lykke; Birk, Steffen

    2003-01-01

    -controlled crossover study, in which placebo or sildenafil 100 mg was administered orally on two separate days. Blood flow velocity in the middle cerebral artery (V(mca)) was recorded by transcranial Doppler ultrasonography and regional cerebral blood flow in the territory of the middle cerebral artery (r...... that this occurs without initial dilatation of the middle cerebral artery. We propose that triggering mechanisms may reside within the perivascular sensory nerve terminals or the brainstem. However, other sites of action may also be possible and future studies are needed to elucidate this. In the clinical use...

  1. [Cerebral aspergillosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattevin, P; Jauréguiberry, S; Gangneux, J-P

    2004-05-01

    The brain is almost always a localization of invasive aspergillosis, after hematogenous spread from pulmonary aspergillosis. Brain aspergilosis is not rare and is one of the worst prognosis factors of invasive aspergillosis. The incidence of this severe mycosis is currently on the rise due to the development of major immunosuppressive treatments. Brain aspergillosis is noteworthy for its vascular tropism, leading to infectious cerebral vasculitis, mainly involving thalamoperforating and lenticulostriate arteries, with a high frequency of thalamic or basal nuclei lesions. Extra-neurologic features that suggest this diagnosis are: i) risk factors for invasive aspergillosis (major or prolonged neutropenia, hematologic malignancies, prolonged corticosteroid treatment, bone marrow or solid organ transplant, AIDS); ii) persistent fever not responding to presumptive antibacterial treatment; iii) respiratory signs (brain aspergillosis is associated with pulmonary aspergillosis in 80 to 95 p. 100 of cases). Perspectives. Two recent major improvements in brain aspergillosis management must be outlined: i) for diagnostic purposes, the development of testing for Aspergillus antigenemia (a non-invasive procedure with good diagnostic value for invasive aspergillosis); ii) for therapeutic purposes, the demonstration that voriconazole is better than amphotericin B in terms of clinical response, tolerance and survival, for all types of invasive aspergillosis, the benefit being probably even greater in case of brain aspergillosis because of the good diffusion of voriconazole into the central nervous system. Brain aspergillosis is a severe emerging opportunistic infection for which diagnostic and therapeutic tools have recently improved. Thus, this diagnostic must be suspected early, especially in the immunocompromised patient, in the event of respiratory symptoms and when the brain lesions are localized in the central nuclei and the thalamus.

  2. Anatomical Research of the Three-dimensional Route of the Thoracodorsal Nerve, Artery, and Veins in Latissimus Dorsi Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagahiro Takahashi, MD

    2013-05-01

    Conclusions: The thoracodorsal nerves ran in a shallower layer, and the depth to the nerve in the muscle flap in actual facial reanimation surgery is safe enough to avoid damage to the nerves. The LD muscle may be thinned to half its original thickness safely.

  3. Cigarette smoking impairs nitric oxide-mediated cerebral blood flow increase: Implications for Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noboru Toda

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral blood flow is mainly regulated by nitrergic (parasympathetic, postganglionic nerves and nitric oxide (NO liberated from endothelial cells in response to shear stress and stretch of vasculature, whereas sympathetic vasoconstrictor control is quite weak. On the other hand, peripheral vascular resistance and blood flow are mainly controlled by adrenergic vasoconstrictor nerves; endothelium-derived NO and nitrergic nerves play some roles as vasodilator factors. Cigarette smoking impairs NO synthesis in cerebral vascular endothelial cells and nitrergic nerves leading to interference with cerebral blood flow and glucose metabolism in the brain. Smoking-induced cerebral hypoperfusion is induced by impairment of synthesis and actions of NO via endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS/neuronal NOS (nNOS inhibition and by increased production of oxygen radicals, resulting in decreased actions of NO on vascular smooth muscle. Nicotine acutely and chronically impairs the action of endothelial NO and also inhibits nitrergic nerve function in chronic use. Impaired cerebral blood supply promotes the synthesis of amyloid β that accelerates blood flow decrease. This vicious cycle is thought to be one of the important factors involving in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Quitting smoking is undoubtedly one of the important ways to prevent and delay the genesis or slow the progress of impaired cognitive function and AD.

  4. Facial nerve mapping and monitoring in lymphatic malformation surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiara, Jospeh; Kinney, Greg; Slimp, Jefferson; Lee, Gi Soo; Oliaei, Sepehr; Perkins, Jonathan A

    2009-10-01

    Establish the efficacy of preoperative facial nerve mapping and continuous intraoperative EMG monitoring in protecting the facial nerve during resection of cervicofacial lymphatic malformations. Retrospective study in which patients were clinically followed for at least 6 months postoperatively, and long-term outcome was evaluated. Patient demographics, lesion characteristics (i.e., size, stage, location) were recorded. Operative notes revealed surgical techniques, findings, and complications. Preoperative, short-/long-term postoperative facial nerve function was standardized using the House-Brackmann Classification. Mapping was done prior to incision by percutaneously stimulating the facial nerve and its branches and recording the motor responses. Intraoperative monitoring and mapping were accomplished using a four-channel, free-running EMG. Neurophysiologists continuously monitored EMG responses and blindly analyzed intraoperative findings and final EMG interpretations for abnormalities. Seven patients collectively underwent 8 lymphatic malformation surgeries. Median age was 30 months (2-105 months). Lymphatic malformation diagnosis was recorded in 6/8 surgeries. Facial nerve function was House-Brackmann grade I in 8/8 cases preoperatively. Facial nerve was abnormally elongated in 1/8 cases. EMG monitoring recorded abnormal activity in 4/8 cases--two suggesting facial nerve irritation, and two with possible facial nerve damage. Transient or long-term facial nerve paresis occurred in 1/8 cases (House-Brackmann grade II). Preoperative facial nerve mapping combined with continuous intraoperative EMG and mapping is a successful method of identifying the facial nerve course and protecting it from injury during resection of cervicofacial lymphatic malformations involving the facial nerve.

  5. Cerebral Sinovenous Thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Ichord

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis (CSVT is a rare but serious cerebrovascular disorder affecting children from the newborn period through childhood and adolescence. The incidence is estimated at 0.6/100,000/year, with 30–50% occurring in newborns. Causes are diverse and are highly age dependent. Acute systemic illness is the dominant risk factor among newborns. In childhood CSVT, acute infections of the head and neck such as mastoiditis are most common, followed by chronic underlying diseases such as nephrotic syndrome, cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. Signs and symptoms are also age related. Seizures and altered mental status are the commonest manifestations in newborns. Headache, vomiting, and lethargy, sometimes with 6th nerve palsy, are the most common symptoms in children and adolescents. Recent multicenter cohort studies from North America and Europe have provided updated information on risk factors, clinical presentations, treatment practices, and outcomes. While systemic anticoagulation is the most common specific treatment used, there are wide variations and many uncertainties even among experts concerning best practice. The treatment dilemma is especially pronounced for neonatal CSVT. This is due in part to the higher prevalence of intracranial hemorrhage among newborns on the one hand, and the clear evidence that newborns suffer greater long-term neurologic morbidity on the other hand. With the advent of widespread availability and acceptance of acute endovascular therapy for arterial ischemic stroke, there is renewed interest in this therapy for children with CSVT. Limited published evidence exists regarding the benefits and risks of these invasive therapies. Therefore, the authors of current guidelines advise reserving this therapy for children with progressive and severe disease who have failed optimal medical management. As research focused on childhood cerebrovascular disease continues to grow rapidly, the future prospects

  6. Dynamic digitized cerebral parenchymography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theron, J.; Alachkar, F.; Nelson, M.; Mazia, D.

    1992-01-01

    Aortic arch injections centred on the head have been performed routinely in patients with cerebral ischaemia. Digital angiograms with modified windowing (low and narrow) have been used. This 'cerebral' arch injection allows much improved analysis of the cerebral parenchymal vascularization, giving better understanding of hemispheric ischaemia and making the decision about revascularization more rational. (orig.)

  7. Neuroprotective effects of ultrasound-guided nerve growth factor injections after sciatic nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-fei Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nerve growth factor (NGF plays an important role in promoting neuroregeneration after peripheral nerve injury. However, its effects are limited by its short half-life; it is therefore important to identify an effective mode of administration. High-frequency ultrasound (HFU is increasingly used in the clinic for high-resolution visualization of tissues, and has been proposed as a method for identifying and evaluating peripheral nerve damage after injury. In addition, HFU is widely used for guiding needle placement when administering drugs to a specific site. We hypothesized that HFU guiding would optimize the neuroprotective effects of NGF on sciatic nerve injury in the rabbit. We performed behavioral, ultrasound, electrophysiological, histological, and immunohistochemical evaluation of HFU-guided NGF injections administered immediately after injury, or 14 days later, and compared this mode of administration with intramuscular NGF injections. Across all assessments, HFU-guided NGF injections gave consistently better outcomes than intramuscular NGF injections administered immediately or 14 days after injury, with immediate treatment also yielding better structural and functional results than when the treatment was delayed by 14 days. Our findings indicate that NGF should be administered as early as possible after peripheral nerve injury, and highlight the striking neuroprotective effects of HFU-guided NGF injections on peripheral nerve injury compared with intramuscular administration.

  8. Gradual nerve elongation affects nerve cell bodies and neuro-muscular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazuo Ikeda, K I; Masaki Matsuda, M M; Daisuke Yamauchi, D Y; Katsuro Tomita, K T; Shigenori Tanaka, S T

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to clarify the reactions of the neuro-muscular junction and nerve cell body to gradual nerve elongation. The sciatic nerves of Japanese white rabbits were lengthened by 30 mm in increments of 0.8 mm/day, 2.0 mm/day and 4.0 mm/day. A scanning electron microscopic examination showed no degenerative change at the neuro-muscular junction, even eight weeks after elongation in the 4-mm group. Hence, neuro-muscular junction is not critical for predicting damage from gradual nerve elongation. There were no axon reaction cells in the 0.8-mm group, a small amount in the 2-mm group, and a large amount in the 4-mm group. The rate of growth associated protein-43 positive nerve cells was significant in the 4-mm group. Hence, the safe speed for nerve cells appeared to be 0.8-mm/day, critical speed to be 2.0-mm/day, and dangerous speed to be 4.0-mm/day in this elongation model.

  9. Facial Nerve Schwannoma: A Case Report, Radiological Features and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilloni, Giulia; Mico, Barbara Massa; Altieri, Roberto; Zenga, Francesco; Ducati, Alessandro; Garbossa, Diego; Tartara, Fulvio

    2017-12-22

    Facial nerve schwannoma localized in the middle fossa is a rare lesion. We report a case of a facial nerve schwannoma in a 30-year-old male presenting with facial nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed a 3 cm diameter tumor of the right middle fossa. The tumor was removed using a sub-temporal approach. Intraoperative monitoring allowed for identification of the facial nerve, so it was not damaged during the surgical excision. Neurological clinical examination at discharge demonstrated moderate facial nerve improvement (Grade III House-Brackmann).

  10. Optical stimulation of the facial nerve: a surgical tool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Claus-Peter; Teudt, Ingo Ulrik; Nevel, Adam E.; Izzo, Agnella D.; Walsh, Joseph T., Jr.

    2008-02-01

    One sequela of skull base surgery is the iatrogenic damage to cranial nerves. Devices that stimulate nerves with electric current can assist in the nerve identification. Contemporary devices have two main limitations: (1) the physical contact of the stimulating electrode and (2) the spread of the current through the tissue. In contrast to electrical stimulation, pulsed infrared optical radiation can be used to safely and selectively stimulate neural tissue. Stimulation and screening of the nerve is possible without making physical contact. The gerbil facial nerve was irradiated with 250-μs-long pulses of 2.12 μm radiation delivered via a 600-μm-diameter optical fiber at a repetition rate of 2 Hz. Muscle action potentials were recorded with intradermal electrodes. Nerve samples were examined for possible tissue damage. Eight facial nerves were stimulated with radiant exposures between 0.71-1.77 J/cm2, resulting in compound muscle action potentials (CmAPs) that were simultaneously measured at the m. orbicularis oculi, m. levator nasolabialis, and m. orbicularis oris. Resulting CmAP amplitudes were 0.3-0.4 mV, 0.15-1.4 mV and 0.3-2.3 mV, respectively, depending on the radial location of the optical fiber and the radiant exposure. Individual nerve branches were also stimulated, resulting in CmAP amplitudes between 0.2 and 1.6 mV. Histology revealed tissue damage at radiant exposures of 2.2 J/cm2, but no apparent damage at radiant exposures of 2.0 J/cm2.

  11. Peripheral nerve injury in developing rats reorganizes representation pattern in motor cortex.

    OpenAIRE

    Donoghue, J P; Sanes, J N

    1987-01-01

    We investigated the effect of neonatal nerve lesions on cerebral motor cortex organization by comparing the cortical motor representation of normal adult rats with adult rats that had one forelimb removed on the day of birth. Mapping of cerebral neocortex with electrical stimulation revealed an altered relationship between the motor cortex and the remaining muscles. Whereas distal forelimb movements are normally elicited at the lowest threshold in the motor cortex forelimb area, the same stim...

  12. Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the oculomotor nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozic, D; Nagulic, M; Ostojic, J

    2006-01-01

    We present the short-term follow-up magnetic resonance (MR) studies and 1H-MR spectroscopy in a child with malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the oculomotor nerve associated with other less aggressive cranial nerve schwannomas. The tumor revealed perineural extension and diffuse nerve...

  13. High-intensity facial nerve lesions on T2-weighted images in chronic persistent facial nerve palsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Sendai City Hospital, Sendai (Japan); Dept. of Radiology, Tottori Univ. (Japan); Ishii, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Sendai City Hospital, Sendai (Japan); Okitsu, T. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Sendai City Hospital (Japan); Ogawa, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Tottori Univ. (Japan); Okudera, T. [Dept. of Radiology, Research Inst. of Brain and Blood Vessels-Akita, Akita (Japan)

    2001-05-01

    Our aim was to estimate the value of MRI in detecting irreversibly paralysed facial nerves. We examined 95 consecutive patients with a facial nerve palsy (14 with a persistent palsy, and 81 with good recovery), using a 1.0 T unit, with T2-weighted and contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images. The geniculate ganglion and tympanic segment had gave high signal on T2-weighted images in the chronic stage of persistent palsy, but not in acute palsy. The enhancement pattern of the facial nerve in the chronic persistent facial nerve palsy is similar to that in the acute palsy with good recovery. These findings suggest that T2-weighted MRI can be used to show severely damaged facial nerves. (orig.)

  14. Morphologic Changes in Autonomic Nerves in Diabetic Autonomic Neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heung Yong Jin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathy is one of the major complications of diabetes, and it increases morbidity and mortality in patients with both type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Because the autonomic nervous system, for example, parasympathetic axons, has a diffuse and wide distribution, we do not know the morphological changes that occur in autonomic neural control and their exact mechanisms in diabetic patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN. Although the prevalence of sympathetic and parasympathetic neuropathy is similar in T1DM versus T2DM patients, sympathetic nerve function correlates with parasympathetic neuropathy only in T1DM patients. The explanation for these discrepancies might be that parasympathetic nerve function was more severely affected among T2DM patients. As parasympathetic nerve damage seems to be more advanced than sympathetic nerve damage, it might be that parasympathetic neuropathy precedes sympathetic neuropathy in T2DM, which was Ewing's concept. This could be explained by the intrinsic morphologic difference. Therefore, the morphological changes in the sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves of involved organs in T1DM and T2DM patients who have DAN should be evaluated. In this review, evaluation methods for morphological changes in the epidermal nerves of skin, and the intrinsic nerves of the stomach will be discussed.

  15. Effects of Milrinone continuous intravenous infusion on global cerebral oxygenation and cerebral vasospasm after cerebral aneurysm surgical clipping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Ghanem

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Milrinone improved significantly the global cerebral oxygenation and reduced the incidence of cerebral vasospasm during the dangerous period of cerebral spasm after cerebral aneurysm clipping.

  16. Changes in the blood-nerve barrier after sciatic nerve cold injury: indications supporting early treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe edema in the endoneurium can occur after non-freezing cold injury to the peripheral nerve, which suggests damage to the blood-nerve barrier. To determine the effects of cold injury on the blood-nerve barrier, the sciatic nerve on one side of Wistar rats was treated with low temperatures (3-5°C for 2 hours. The contralateral sciatic nerve was used as a control. We assessed changes in the nerves using Evans blue as a fluid tracer and morphological methods. Excess fluid was found in the endoneurium 1 day after cold injury, though the tight junctions between cells remained closed. From 3 to 5 days after the cold injury, the fluid was still present, but the tight junctions were open. Less tracer leakage was found from 3 to 5 days after the cold injury compared with 1 day after injury. The cold injury resulted in a breakdown of the blood-nerve barrier function, which caused endoneurial edema. However, during the early period, the breakdown of the blood-nerve barrier did not include the opening of tight junctions, but was due to other factors. Excessive fluid volume produced a large increase in the endoneurial fluid pressure, prevented liquid penetration into the endoneurium from the microvasculature. These results suggest that drug treatment to patients with cold injuries should be administered during the early period after injury because it may be more difficult for the drug to reach the injury site through the microcirculation after the tissue fluid pressure becomes elevated.

  17. Microembolism after cerebral angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manaka, Hiroshi; Sakai, Hideki; Nagata, Izumi

    2000-01-01

    Acute microemboli are detected more precisely with the recently developed diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI). We happened to obtain 24 DWIs after 350 diagnostic cerebral angiographies in 1999. DWIs after cerebral angiographies showed bright lesions in 7 patients (28%), of whom 6 had no neurological symptoms after cerebral angiography. Seven of the 24 patients had risk factors for arteriosclerosis. Only one patient had embolic events due to angiography. Microemboli related to cerebral angiographies are inevitable in some patients. Most are silent, however, we should investigate the cause of microemboli and should make cerebral angiography safer. (author)

  18. Nanofiber Nerve Guide for Peripheral Nerve Repair and Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    1 Award Number: W81XWH-11-2-0047 TITLE: Nanofiber Nerve Guide for Peripheral Nerve Repair and Regeneration PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ahmet Höke...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-11-2-0047 Nanofiber nerve guide for peripheral nerve repair and regeneration 5b. GRANT NUMBER...goal of this collaborative research project was to develop next generation engineered nerve guide conduits (NGCs) with aligned nanofibers and

  19. Tumors of peripheral nerves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Michael; Lutz, Amelie M.

    2017-01-01

    Differentiation between malignant and benign tumors of peripheral nerves in the early stages is challenging; however, due to the unfavorable prognosis of malignant tumors early identification is required. To show the possibilities for detection, differential diagnosis and clinical management of peripheral nerve tumors by imaging appearance in magnetic resonance (MR) neurography. Review of current literature available in PubMed and MEDLINE, supplemented by the authors' own observations in clinical practice. Although not pathognomonic, several imaging features have been reported for a differentiation between distinct peripheral nerve tumors. The use of MR neurography enables detection and initial differential diagnosis in tumors of peripheral nerves. Furthermore, it plays an important role in clinical follow-up, targeted biopsy and surgical planning. (orig.) [de

  20. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, M; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Eysteinsson, T

    2000-01-01

    To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide.......To investigate the influence of acute changes in intraocular pressure on the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the optic nerve head under control conditions and after intravenous administration of 500 mg of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor dorzolamide....

  1. Pathological and MRI study on experimental heroin-induced brain damage in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long Yu; Kong Xiangquan; Xu Haibo; Liu Dingxi; Yuan Ren; Yu Qun; Xiong Yin; Deng Xianbo

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To study the pathological characteristics of the heroin-induced brain damage in rats, and to assess the diagnostic value of MRI. Methods: A total of 40 adult Wistar rats were studied, 32 rats were used for injecting heroin as heroin group and 8 were used for injecting saline as control group. The heroin dependent rat model was established by administering heroin (ip) in the ascending dosage schedule (0.5 mg/kg), three times a day (at 8:00, 12:00, and 18:00). The control group was established by the same way by injection with saline. The withdrawal scores were evaluated with imp roved criterion in order to estimate the degree of addiction after administering naloxone. Based on the rat model of heroin dependence, the rat model of heroin-induced brain damage was established by the same way with increasing heroin dosage everyday. Two groups were examined by using MRI, light microscope, and electron microscope, respectively in different heroin accumulated dosage (918, 1580, 2686, 3064, 4336, and 4336 mg/kg withdrawal after 2 weeks). Results: There was statistically significant difference (t=9.737, P<0.01) of the withdrawal scores between the heroin dependent group and the saline group (23.0 ± 4.4 and 1.4 ± 0.5, respectively). It suggested that the heroin dependent rat model be established successfully. In different accumulated dosage ( from 1580 mg/kg to 4336 mg/kg), there were degeneration and death of nerve cells in cerebrum and cerebellum of heroin intoxicated rats, and it suggested that the rat model of heroin-induced brain damage was established successfully. The light microscope and electron microscope features of heroin-induced brain damage in rats included: (1) The nerve cells of cerebral cortex degenerated and died. According to the heroin accumulated dosage, there were statistically significant difference of the nerve cell deaths between 4336 mg/kg group and 1580 mg/kg group or control group (P=0.024 and P=0.032, respectively); (2) The main

  2. Exposure to As, Cd and Pb-mixture impairs myelin and axon development in rat brain, optic nerve and retina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Nagendra Kumar; Ashok, Anushruti [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (India); Developmental Toxicology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR) (India); Rai, Asit; Tripathi, Sachin [Developmental Toxicology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR) (India); Nagar, Geet Kumar [Endocrinology, CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute (CSIR-CDRI) (India); Mitra, Kalyan [Electron Microscopy Unit, CSIR-CDRI, Lucknow 226001 (India); Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra, E-mail: sanghmitra@iitr.res.in [Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (India); Developmental Toxicology, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR) (India)

    2013-12-01

    Arsenic (As), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) are the major metal contaminants of ground water in India. We have reported the toxic effect of their mixture (metal mixture, MM), at human relevant doses, on developing rat astrocytes. Astrocyte damage has been shown to be associated with myelin disintegration in CNS. We, therefore, hypothesized that the MM would perturb myelinating white matter in cerebral cortex, optic nerve (O.N.) and retina. We observed modulation in the levels of myelin and axon proteins, such as myelin basic protein (MBP), proteolipid protein, 2′-, 3′-cyclic-nucleotide-3′-phosphodiesterase, myelin-associated glycoprotein and neurofilament (NF) in the brain of developing rats. Dose and time-dependent synergistic toxic effect was noted. The MBP- and NF-immunolabeling, as well as luxol-fast blue (LFB) staining demonstrated a reduction in the area of intact myelin-fiber, and an increase in vacuolated axons, especially in the corpus-callosum. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of O.N. revealed a reduction in myelin thickness and axon-density. The immunolabeling with MBP, NF, and LFB staining in O.N. supported the TEM data. The hematoxylin and eosin staining of retina displayed a decrease in the thickness of nerve-fiber, plexiform-layer, and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) count. Investigating the mechanism revealed a loss in glutamine synthetase activity in the cerebral cortex and O.N., and a fall in the brain derived neurotrophic factor in retina. An enhanced apoptosis in MBP, NF and Brn3b-containing cells justified the diminution in myelinating axons in CNS. Our findings for the first time indicate white matter damage by MM, which may have significance in neurodevelopmental-pediatrics, neurotoxicology and retinal-cell biology. - Highlights: • As, Cd and Pb-mixture, at human relevant dose, demyelinate developing rat CNS. • The attenuation in myelin and axon is synergistic. • The optic nerve and brain demonstrate reduced glutamine synthetase.

  3. Exposure to As, Cd and Pb-mixture impairs myelin and axon development in rat brain, optic nerve and retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rai, Nagendra Kumar; Ashok, Anushruti; Rai, Asit; Tripathi, Sachin; Nagar, Geet Kumar; Mitra, Kalyan; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra

    2013-01-01

    Arsenic (As), lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) are the major metal contaminants of ground water in India. We have reported the toxic effect of their mixture (metal mixture, MM), at human relevant doses, on developing rat astrocytes. Astrocyte damage has been shown to be associated with myelin disintegration in CNS. We, therefore, hypothesized that the MM would perturb myelinating white matter in cerebral cortex, optic nerve (O.N.) and retina. We observed modulation in the levels of myelin and axon proteins, such as myelin basic protein (MBP), proteolipid protein, 2′-, 3′-cyclic-nucleotide-3′-phosphodiesterase, myelin-associated glycoprotein and neurofilament (NF) in the brain of developing rats. Dose and time-dependent synergistic toxic effect was noted. The MBP- and NF-immunolabeling, as well as luxol-fast blue (LFB) staining demonstrated a reduction in the area of intact myelin-fiber, and an increase in vacuolated axons, especially in the corpus-callosum. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of O.N. revealed a reduction in myelin thickness and axon-density. The immunolabeling with MBP, NF, and LFB staining in O.N. supported the TEM data. The hematoxylin and eosin staining of retina displayed a decrease in the thickness of nerve-fiber, plexiform-layer, and retinal ganglion cell (RGC) count. Investigating the mechanism revealed a loss in glutamine synthetase activity in the cerebral cortex and O.N., and a fall in the brain derived neurotrophic factor in retina. An enhanced apoptosis in MBP, NF and Brn3b-containing cells justified the diminution in myelinating axons in CNS. Our findings for the first time indicate white matter damage by MM, which may have significance in neurodevelopmental-pediatrics, neurotoxicology and retinal-cell biology. - Highlights: • As, Cd and Pb-mixture, at human relevant dose, demyelinate developing rat CNS. • The attenuation in myelin and axon is synergistic. • The optic nerve and brain demonstrate reduced glutamine synthetase.

  4. Utilização da veia glicerolada na regeneração neural: Estudo experimental em ratos The use of glycerol-treated venous graft in damaged nerves repair: an experimental study in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando dos Santos Cunha

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A auto-enxertia de nervo é o tratamento de escolha para grandes perdas de tecido neural que não podem ser reparadas por meio de rafia primária. A utilização do enxerto venoso previamente conservado em glicerol seria uma alternativa para diminuir o tempo operatório e a morbidade cirúrgica nesses casos. Os vasos preservados em glicerol não apresentam destruição de sua estrutura, o que permite seu uso na microcirurgia vascular, tendo a vantagem de diminuir a imunogenicidade do enxerto. O objetivo deste trabalho experimental foi comparar o grau de reparação nervosa, utilizando análise histológica, contagem do número de axônios mielinizados regenerados e análise funcional, obtida com a interposição de enxerto autógeno (grupo A e de tubo de veia glicerolada (grupo B em defeitos de 5 mm no nervo fibular de ratos Wistar. Somente no grupo A foi observado a formação de neuroma. O grupo B apresentou padrões histológicos compatíveis com diminuição quantitativa do número de axônios mielinizados regenerados em menor número em relação ao grupo A (controle. Na recuperação funcional, não houve diferença estatisticamente significativa entre os dois grupos.Autografting is the treatment of choice for cases of major nervous tissue loss where the ruptured nerve ends cannot be reduced. The use of a venous autograft previously treated with glycerol may be an alternative treatment, as it reduces surgery time duration and level of morbidity. Blood vessel explants, used in vascular microsurgery, kept in glycerol maintain their original biological structure, and when used in autografting, present reduced levels of patient's immune response. The aim of this study was to compare the level of nervous tissue regeneration by using histological analysis, regenerated myelinized axons counts, and functional analysis, obtained with the interposition of autologous graft (group A and glycerol-treated vein tube (group B in 5-mm defects on Wistar

  5. Treatment of soft-tissue loss with nerve defect in the finger using the boomerang nerve flap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chao; Tang, Peifu; Zhang, Xu

    2013-01-01

    This study reports simultaneous repair of soft-tissue loss and proper digital nerve defect in the finger using a boomerang nerve flap including nerve graft from the dorsal branch of the proper digital nerve. From July of 2007 to May of 2010, the flap was used in 17 fingers in 17 patients. The injured fingers included five index, seven long, and five ring fingers. The mean soft-tissue loss was 2.5 × 1.9 cm. The mean flap size was 2.8 × 2.1 cm. Proper digital nerve defects were reconstructed using nerve graft harvested from the dorsal branch of the adjacent finger's proper digital nerve. The average nerve graft length was 2.5 cm. The comparison group included 32 patients treated using a cross-finger flap and a secondary free nerve graft. In the study group, 15 flaps survived completely. Partial necrosis at the distal edge of the flap occurred in two cases. At a mean follow-up of 22 months, the average static two-point discrimination and Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test results on the pulp of the reconstructed finger were 7.5 mm and 3.86, respectively. In the comparison group, the results were 9.3 mm and 3.91, respectively. The study group presented better discriminatory sensation on the pulp and milder pain and cold intolerance in the reconstructed finger. The boomerang nerve flap is useful and reliable for reconstructing complicated finger damage involving soft-tissue loss and nerve defect, especially in difficult anatomical regions. Therapeutic, II.

  6. Bilateral abducens nerve and right facial nerve palsy occuring after head trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ismail Boyraz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lesions of the nervus abducens, the 6th cranial nerve tend to be rare, usually occur suddenly following head injuries. A 43-year-old male patient presented with a history of fall from a height due to an occupational accident on the date of 11.01.2014. Cranial tomography demonstrated bilateral epidural hematoma. The epidural hematoma was drained during the operation. After the surgery, eye examination showed no vision loss, except limited bilateral lateral gaze. When the patient was unable to walk due to diplopia, he was advised to close one eye. On the right side, there were findings suggesting central facial paralysis. There may be multiple cranial nerve damage following head injury. Therefore, all cranial nerves should be thoroughly examined. [J Contemp Med 2016; 6(2.000: 110-113

  7. Laser-activated protein bands for peripheral nerve repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauto, Antonio; Trickett, Rodney I.; Malik, Richard; Dawes, Judith M.; Owen, Earl R.

    1996-01-01

    A 100 micrometer core optical fiber-coupled 75 mW diode laser operating at a wavelength of 800 nm has been used in conjunction with a protein solder to stripe weld severed rat tibial nerves, reducing the long operating time required for microsurgical nerve repair. Welding is produced by selective laser denaturation of the protein based solder which contains the dye indocyanine green. Operating time for laser soldering was 10 plus or minus 5 min. (n equals 24) compared to 23 plus or minus 9 min (n equals 13) for microsuturing. The laser solder technique resulted in patent welds with a tensile strength of 15 plus or minus 5 g, while microsutured nerves had a tensile strength of 40 plus or minus 10 g. Histopathology of the laser soldered nerves, conducted immediately after surgery, displayed solder adhesion to the outer membrane with minimal damage to the inner axons of the nerves. An in vivo study, with a total of fifty-seven adult male wistar rats, compared laser solder repaired tibial nerves to conventional microsuture repair. Twenty-four laser soldered nerves and thirteen sutured nerves were characterized at three months and showed successful regeneration with average compound muscle action potentials (CMAP) of 2.4 plus or minus 0.7 mV and 2.7 plus or minus 0.8 mV respectively. Histopathology of the in vivo study, confirmed the comparable regeneration of axons in laser and suture operated nerves. A faster, less damaging and long lasting laser based anastomotic technique is presented.

  8. End-to-side neurorrhaphy repairs peripheral nerve injury: sensory nerve induces motor nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qing; Zhang, She-Hong; Wang, Tao; Peng, Feng; Han, Dong; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2017-10-01

    End-to-side neurorrhaphy is an option in the treatment of the long segment defects of a nerve. It involves suturing the distal stump of the disconnected nerve (recipient nerve) to the side of the intimate adjacent nerve (donor nerve). However, the motor-sensory specificity after end-to-side neurorrhaphy remains unclear. This study sought to evaluate whether cutaneous sensory nerve regeneration induces motor nerves after end-to-side neurorrhaphy. Thirty rats were randomized into three groups: (1) end-to-side neurorrhaphy using the ulnar nerve (mixed sensory and motor) as the donor nerve and the cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve as the recipient nerve; (2) the sham group: ulnar nerve and cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve were just exposed; and (3) the transected nerve group: cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve was transected and the stumps were turned over and tied. At 5 months, acetylcholinesterase staining results showed that 34% ± 16% of the myelinated axons were stained in the end-to-side group, and none of the myelinated axons were stained in either the sham or transected nerve groups. Retrograde fluorescent tracing of spinal motor neurons and dorsal root ganglion showed the proportion of motor neurons from the cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve of the end-to-side group was 21% ± 5%. In contrast, no motor neurons from the cutaneous antebrachii medialis nerve of the sham group and transected nerve group were found in the spinal cord segment. These results confirmed that motor neuron regeneration occurred after cutaneous nerve end-to-side neurorrhaphy.

  9. Vagus nerve stimulation and stereotactic radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Kensuke

    2005-01-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation and stereotactic radiosurgery represent novel and less invasive therapeutics for medically intractable epilepsy. Chronic stimulation of the left vagus nerve with implanted generator and electrodes inhibits seizure susceptibility of the cerebral cortices. While the underlying mechanisms of the effect remains to be further elucidated, the efficacy and safety of vagus nerve stimulation have been established by randomized clinical trials in the United States and European countries. It has been widely accepted as a treatment option for patients with medically intractable epilepsy and for whom brain surgery is not indicated. The primary indication of vagus nerve stimulation in the clinical trials was localization-related epilepsy in adult patients but efficacy in a wide range of patient groups such as generalized epilepsy and children has been reported. Improvements in daytime alertness, mood, higher cognitive functions and overall quality of life have been reported other than the effect on epileptic seizures. Since the devices are not approved for clinical use in Japan by the Health, Labor and Welfare Ministry, there exist barriers to provide this treatment to patients at present. Stereotactic radiosurgery has been used for temporal lobe epilepsy and hypothalamic hamartoma, but it is still controversial whether the therapy is more effective and less invasive than brain surgery. Promising results of gamma knife radiosurgery for medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy with unilateral hippocampal sclerosis have been reported essentially from one French center. Results from others were not as favorable. There seems to be an unignorable risk of brain edema and radiation necrosis when the delivered dose over the medial temporal structures is high enough to abolish epileptic seizures. A randomized clinical trial comparing different marginal doses is ongoing in the United States. Clinical trials like this, technical advancement and standardization

  10. An unusual case of isolated sixth cranial nerve palsy in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishampayan, Sanjeev; Borde, Priyanka

    2012-08-15

    Cranial nerve involvement is not common in leprosy. The fifth and seventh cranial nerves are the most commonly affected in leprosy. Herein we present a patient with Hansen disease (BL) with type I reaction who developed isolated involvement of the sixth cranial nerve leading to lateral rectus muscle palsy. He responded to timely anti-reactional therapy and it produced a good response. Careful observation of patients with lepra reaction is needed to avoid damage to important organs.

  11. Reinnervation of Paralyzed Muscle by Nerve-Muscle-Endplate Band Grafting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Antoniadis G, Braun V, Rath SA, Richter HP. Evaluation of iatrogenic lesions in 722 surgically treated cases of peripheral nerve trauma. J Neurosurg...achieved by end-to-end approximation: review of 2,181 nerve lesions . Microsurgery. 1993;14(4):244- 246. 18 25. McAllister RM, Gilbert SE, Calder JS...innervation through irreparable damage to its nerve . DNI has been used for selective reinnervation of paralyzed laryngeal and facial muscles [15,16] as well

  12. MRI enhancement of the facial nerve with Gd-DTPA, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagida, Masahiro

    1993-01-01

    Although there have recently been numerous reports of enhanced MRI in patients with facial palsy, the mechanism of enhancement remains largely unknown. In the present study, animal models with experimentally induced facial paralysis were prepared, and the vascular permeabilities of normal and damaged facial nerves were assessed using Evans blue albumin (EBA) as a tracer. The Gd-DTPA contents in normal and compressively damaged facial nerves were also investigated. In the normal intratemporal facial nerve, EBA remained in the vessels, and did not leak into the endoneurium. In contrast, vascular permeability was very high in the epineurium and the geniculate ganglion which showed leakage of large amounts of EBA from vessels. At the site of compression in the damaged nerve, EBA leakage was also seen in the endoneurism, indicating accentuated vascular permeability. This accentuation of vascular permeability shifted toward the distal side. However, no EBA leakage was seen on the side proximal to the site of compression. Significantly higher Gd-DTPA contents were obtained in the facial nerve on the paralytic side than in that on the normal side (p<0.001). As for differences between the distal and proximal sides, the distal side had a significantly higher Gd-DTPA content (p<0.01). Assessment of vascular permeability with EBA revealed accentuated vascular permeability on the side distal to the site of compression. These results showed the presence of a blood nerve barrier (BNB) in the facial nerve. Furthermore, the present findings suggest that the enhancement of the facial nerve on the affected side is caused by BNB destruction due to nerve damage and subsequent Gd-DTPA leakage from the vessels. Furthermore, it is suggested that the facial nerve enhancement appears to occur mainly on the distal side of the damaged portion of the nerve. (author)

  13. Clinical applied value of brain stem auditory evoked potential in facial neuritis patients combined the damage of other cranial nerves%伴其他颅神经症状的面神经炎患者治疗前后的脑干听觉诱发电位研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金风; 王民

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical applied value of brain stem auditoryk evoed potential (BAEP)in facial neuritis patients combined with damage of other cranial nerves. Methods: Fifty facial neuritis patients combined with damage of other cranial nerves were selected to get BAEP information) the results before and after treatment were analyzed. Results;The inter-peak latencies (IPL) of Ⅰ -- Ⅲ, Ⅲ - V . Ⅰ - V were significantly shorten(P<0. 01)after treatment of the. More than one IPL shortened IPL took up 84%. 74% cases had prolonged potential latencies (PL) of Wave I , Ⅲ and V with more than one shortened or disappeared waveform. In 69 % cases with amplitude of wave V increased and ratio of V/ I more than 0. 5 or ILD of bilateral Wave V was less than 0. 3 ms, IPL of Ⅲ - V shorter than that of Ⅰ - Ⅲ. Conclusion:Facial neuritis involves not only medial surface nerves of foramen stylomastoi-deum but also brainstem and/or other cranial nerves . BAEP can objectively reflect the function of audi-tory system and brain stem, and can be used to follow-up with patients with facial neuritis.%目的:观察伴其他颅神经症状的面神经炎患者治疗前后的脑干听觉诱发电位(BAEP)表现.方法:选择50例面神经炎伴其他颅神经症状的患者进行BAEP检测,并进行治疗前后对比.结果:与治疗前相比,治疗后Ⅱ-Ⅲ、Ⅲ-Ⅴ、Ⅰ-Ⅴ波IPL明显缩短(P<0.01),其中有一个以上的IPL缩短者42例占84%;Ⅰ、Ⅲ、Ⅴ波PL有一个以上缩短或治疗前BAEP波形消失而于治疗后出现者37例占74%;Ⅴ波波幅增高并且Ⅴ/Ⅰ IPL比大于0.5或双侧Ⅴ波侧间潜伏期差(IDL)小于0.3 ms,Ⅲ-Ⅴ波IPL小于Ⅰ-Ⅲ波IPL的35例占70%.结论:面神经炎不仅累及茎乳孔内面神经,还可累及脑干和其他颅神经.BAEP可以客观地反映面神经炎患者听觉系统和脑干功能,因此可以用于对该类患者进行疗效观察.

  14. Acellular Nerve Allografts in Peripheral Nerve Regeneration: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Amy M.; MacEwan, Matthew; Santosa, Katherine B.; Chenard, Kristofer E.; Ray, Wilson Z.; Hunter, Daniel A.; Mackinnon, Susan E.; Johnson, Philip J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Processed nerve allografts offer a promising alternative to nerve autografts in the surgical management of peripheral nerve injuries where short deficits exist. Methods Three established models of acellular nerve allograft (cold-preserved, detergent-processed, and AxoGen® -processed nerve allografts) were compared to nerve isografts and silicone nerve guidance conduits in a 14 mm rat sciatic nerve defect. Results All acellular nerve grafts were superior to silicone nerve conduits in support of nerve regeneration. Detergent-processed allografts were similar to isografts at 6 weeks post-operatively, while AxoGen®-processed and cold-preserved allografts supported significantly fewer regenerating nerve fibers. Measurement of muscle force confirmed that detergent-processed allografts promoted isograft-equivalent levels of motor recovery 16 weeks post-operatively. All acellular allografts promoted greater amounts of motor recovery compared to silicone conduits. Conclusions These findings provide evidence that differential processing for removal of cellular constituents in preparing acellular nerve allografts affects recovery in vivo. PMID:21660979

  15. Neuromuscular ultrasound of cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Eman A; Walker, Francis O; Cartwright, Michael S

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound of cranial nerves is a novel subdomain of neuromuscular ultrasound (NMUS) which may provide additional value in the assessment of cranial nerves in different neuromuscular disorders. Whilst NMUS of peripheral nerves has been studied, NMUS of cranial nerves is considered in its initial stage of research, thus, there is a need to summarize the research results achieved to date. Detailed scanning protocols, which assist in mastery of the techniques, are briefly mentioned in the few reference textbooks available in the field. This review article focuses on ultrasound scanning techniques of the 4 accessible cranial nerves: optic, facial, vagus and spinal accessory nerves. The relevant literatures and potential future applications are discussed.

  16. A Novel Method to Prevent Phrenic Nerve Injury During Catheter Ablation

    OpenAIRE

    Buch, Eric; Vaseghi, Marmar; Cesario, David A; Shivkumar, Kalyanam

    2006-01-01

    Epicardial catheter ablation is increasingly important in the treatment of ventricular arrhythmias. Collateral damage to adjacent structures like the phrenic nerve is an important concern with epicardial ablation. This report describes the use of a novel method to prevent phrenic nerve injury during epicardial ablation of ventricular tachycardia.

  17. Chitin biological absorbable catheters bridging sural nerve grafts transplanted into sciatic nerve defects promote nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Jian-Wei; Qin, Li-Hua; Zhang, Wei-Guang; Zhang, Pei-Xun; Jiang, Bao-Guo

    2018-06-01

    To investigate the efficacy of chitin biological absorbable catheters in a rat model of autologous nerve transplantation. A segment of sciatic nerve was removed to produce a sciatic nerve defect, and the sural nerve was cut from the ipsilateral leg and used as a graft to bridge the defect, with or without use of a chitin biological absorbable catheter surrounding the graft. The number and morphology of regenerating myelinated fibers, nerve conduction velocity, nerve function index, triceps surae muscle morphology, and sensory function were evaluated at 9 and 12 months after surgery. All of the above parameters were improved in rats in which the nerve graft was bridged with chitin biological absorbable catheters compared with rats without catheters. The results of this study indicate that use of chitin biological absorbable catheters to surround sural nerve grafts bridging sciatic nerve defects promotes recovery of structural, motor, and sensory function and improves muscle fiber morphology. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. 142 Key words: Brachialis, radial nerve, musculocutaneous nerve.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AWORI KIRSTEEN

    The innervation of brachialis muscle by the musculocutaneous nerve has been described as either type I or type II and the main trunk to this muscle is rarely absent. The contribution .... brachialis muscle by fiber analysis of supply nerves].

  19. Nerve conduction and excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Moldovan, Mihai

    2009-01-01

    counterparts in the peripheral nervous system, in some instances without peripheral nervous system symptoms. Both hereditary and acquired demyelinating neuropathies have been studied and the effects on nerve pathophysiology have been compared with degeneration and regeneration of axons. SUMMARY: Excitability......PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The review is aimed at providing information about the role of nerve excitability studies in peripheral nerve disorders. It has been known for many years that the insight into peripheral nerve pathophysiology provided by conventional nerve conduction studies is limited. Nerve...... excitability studies are relatively novel but are acquiring an increasingly important role in the study of peripheral nerves. RECENT FINDINGS: By measuring responses in nerve that are related to nodal function (strength-duration time constant, rheobase and recovery cycle) and internodal function (threshold...

  20. [Raman spectra of monkey cerebral cortex tissue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ji-chun; Guo, Jian-yu; Cai, Wei-ying; Wang, Zu-geng; Sun, Zhen-rong

    2010-01-01

    Monkey cerebral cortex, an important part in the brain to control action and thought activities, is mainly composed of grey matter and nerve cell. In the present paper, the in situ Raman spectra of the cerebral cortex of the birth, teenage and aged monkeys were achieved for the first time. The results show that the Raman spectra for the different age monkey cerebral cortex exhibit most obvious changes in the regions of 1000-1400 and 2800-3000 cm(-1). With monkey growing up, the relative intensities of the Raman bands at 1313 and 2885 cm(-1) mainly assigned to CH2 chain vibrational mode of lipid become stronger and stronger whereas the relative intensities of the Raman bands at 1338 and 2932 cm(-1) mainly assigned to CH3 chain vibrational mode of protein become weaker and weaker. In addition, the two new Raman bands at 1296 and 2850 cm(-1) are only observed in the aged monkey cerebral cortex, therefore, the two bands can be considered as a character or "marker" to differentiate the caducity degree with monkey growth In order to further explore the changes, the relative intensity ratios of the Raman band at 1313 cm(-1) to that at 1338 cm(-1) and the Raman band at 2885 cm(-1) to that at 2 932 cm(-1), I1313/I1338 and I2885/I2932, which are the lipid-to-protein ratios, are introduced to denote the degree of the lipid content. The results show that the relative intensity ratios increase significantly with monkey growth, namely, the lipid content in the cerebral cortex increases greatly with monkey growth. So, the authors can deduce that the overmuch lipid is an important cause to induce the caducity. Therefore, the results will be a powerful assistance and valuable parameter to study the order of life growth and diagnose diseases.

  1. Pathological review of late cerebral radionecrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Yoshihiko

    2008-01-01

    Late cerebral radionecrosis may be considered to be a specific chronic inflammatory response, although it is unknown whether the initial damage by brain irradiation is to an endothelial cell or a glial cell. I discuss the pathological specificity of late cerebral radionecrosis by studying the published literature and a case that I experienced. In late cerebral radionecrosis, there are typical coagulation necrosis areas containing fibrinoid necrosis with occlusion of the lumina and poorly active inflammatory areas with many inflammatory ghost cells, focal perivascular lymphocytes, hyalinized vessels, and telangiectatic vascularization near and in the necrotic tissue, and more active inflammatory areas formed as a partial rim of the reactive zone by perivascular lymphocytes, much vascularization, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive astrocytes at the corticomedullary border adjacent to necrotic tissue in the white matter. It is difficult to believe that coagulation necrosis occurs without first disordering the vascular endothelial cells because fibrinoid necrosis is a main feature and a diffusely multiple lesion in late cerebral radionecrosis. Because various histological findings do develop, progress, and extend sporadically at different areas and times in the irradiated field of the brain for a long time after radiation, uncontrolled chronic inflammation containing various cytokine secretions may also play a key role in progression of this radionecrosis. Evaluation of the mechanism of the development/aggravation of late cerebral radionecrosis requires a further study for abnormal cytokine secretions and aberrant inflammatory reactions. (author)

  2. Cavernous sinus syndrome due to rhino-orbital-cerebral mucormycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagner Moyses Vilela

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The present report describes the case of a 43-year-old diabetic patient with facial pain, protruding eyes, nasal congestion and decreased right vision (involvement of the ipsilateral cranial nerves III, IV and V. Computed tomography showed diffuse sinusitis at right, cribriform plate erosion and presence of a hypodense collection in the frontal lobe with peripheral enhancement. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the presence of a cerebral abscess. Samples were collected from the lesion, confirming hyphae compatible with mucormycosis.

  3. Cranial nerve palsies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggieri, P.; Adelizzi, J.; Modic, M.T.; Ross, J.S.; Tkach, J.; Masaryk, T.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates the utility of multiplanar reconstructions (MPRs) of three-dimensional (3D) MR angiography data sets in the examination of patients with cranial nerve palsies. The authors hypothesis was that 3D data could be reformatted to highlight the intricate spatial relationships of vessels to adjacent neural tissues by taking advantage of the high vessel-parenchyma contrast in high-resolution 3D time-of-flight sequences. Twenty patients with cranial nerve palsies and 10 asymptomatic patients were examined with coronal T1-weighted and axial T2-weighted imaging plus a gadolinium-enhanced 3D MRA sequence (40/7/15 degrees, axial 60-mm volume, 0.9-mm isotropic resolution). Cranial nerves II-VIII were subsequently evaluated on axial and reformatted coronal and/or sagittal images

  4. Effect of β-nerve growth factor on differentiation of endothelial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (Ad-EGFP-hβ-NGF) on the differentiation of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in rats. Methods: The successfully ... may contribute to angiopoiesis or vascular repair. Keywords: β-Nerve ... angiogenesis in damaged tissues [6]. In this study ...

  5. Hyperdense middle cerebral artery CT sign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastianello, S.; Pierallini, A.; Colonnese, C.; Brughitta, G.; Angeloni, U.; Antonelli, M.; Fantozzi, L.M.; Fieschi, C.; Bozzao, L.

    1991-01-01

    The early CT finding of an hyperdensity of a portion of the middle cerebral artery Hyperdense Middle Cerebral Artery Sign (HMCAS), in patients with supratentorial stroke, is often indicative of an embolic occlusion. Aim of this study was to verify the incidence and reliability of the HMCAS and its possible correlation with early CT findings and with the extent of late brain damage. We studied 36 patients presenting with symptoms of stroke in the MCA territory, by means of CT and angiography performed respectively within 4 and 6 hours. Follow-up CT scans were then obtained after one week and three months from the ischemic event. The HMCAS was present in 50% of our patients and in this group it always correlated positively with the angiographic finding of occlusion. The same group presented a high incidence of early CT hypodensity (88%). Finally the presence of HMCAS might be considered a negative prognostic sign for the development of extensive brain damage. (orig.)

  6. Neurovascular compression syndrome of the eighth cranial nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Akinori

    2010-01-01

    Neurovascular compression syndrome (NVCS) involves neuropathy due to intracranial blood vessels compressing the cranial nerves. NVCS of the eighth cranial nerve is less reportedly established as a clinical entity than that of the fifth and seventh cranial nerves. We report 17 cases of NVCS of the eighth cranial nerve and their clinical features. Clinical symptoms and test findings among our subjects indicated that most were aged more than 65 years, were unilateral, had intermittent tinnitus, suffered attacks lasting a few seconds dozens of times a day, experienced dizziness concomitantly with tinnitus, aggravated tinnitus and dizziness when tilting the head toward the affected side and looking downward (positional tinnitus, positional dizziness), heard specific tinnitus sounds such as crackling differing from those in cochlear tinnitus, had mild or no hearing loss, were diagnosed with retrocochlear hearing disturbance due to an interpeak latency delay between waves I and III of the auditory brainstem response (ABR), often had no nystagmus or canal paresis (CP), were found in constructive interference steady state magnetic resonance imaging (CISS MRI) to have compression of the eighth cranial nerve by the vertebral artery (VA) or the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), rarely had concomitant facial spasms, and had tinnitus and dizziness markedly suppressed by carbamazepine. With the number of elderly individuals continuing to increase, cases of NVCS due to arteriosclerotic changes in cerebral blood vessels are expected to increase, making it necessary to consider NVCS in elderly subjects with dizziness, tinnitus, and hearing loss. (author)

  7. Neurovascular compression syndrome of the eighth cranial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Akinori [Saitama Medical Univ., Faculty of Medicine, Moroyama, Saitama (Japan)

    2010-04-15

    Neurovascular compression syndrome (NVCS) involves neuropathy due to intracranial blood vessels compressing the cranial nerves. NVCS of the eighth cranial nerve is less reportedly established as a clinical entity than that of the fifth and seventh cranial nerves. We report 17 cases of NVCS of the eighth cranial nerve and their clinical features. Clinical symptoms and test findings among our subjects indicated that most were aged more than 65 years, were unilateral, had intermittent tinnitus, suffered attacks lasting a few seconds dozens of times a day, experienced dizziness concomitantly with tinnitus, aggravated tinnitus and dizziness when tilting the head toward the affected side and looking downward (positional tinnitus, positional dizziness), heard specific tinnitus sounds such as crackling differing from those in cochlear tinnitus, had mild or no hearing loss, were diagnosed with retrocochlear hearing disturbance due to an interpeak latency delay between waves I and III of the auditory brainstem response (ABR), often had no nystagmus or canal paresis (CP), were found in constructive interference steady state magnetic resonance imaging (CISS MRI) to have compression of the eighth cranial nerve by the vertebral artery (VA) or the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA), rarely had concomitant facial spasms, and had tinnitus and dizziness markedly suppressed by carbamazepine. With the number of elderly individuals continuing to increase, cases of NVCS due to arteriosclerotic changes in cerebral blood vessels are expected to increase, making it necessary to consider NVCS in elderly subjects with dizziness, tinnitus, and hearing loss. (author)

  8. Facial nerve palsy: Evaluation by contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinoshita, T.; Ishii, K.; Okitsu, T.; Okudera, T.; Ogawa, T.

    2001-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to investigate the value of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with peripheral facial nerve palsy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MR imaging was performed in 147 patients with facial nerve palsy, using a 1.0 T unit. All of 147 patients were evaluated by contrast-enhanced MR imaging and the pattern of enhancement was compared with that in 300 control subjects evaluated for suspected acoustic neurinoma. RESULTS: The intrameatal and labyrinthine segments of the normal facial nerve did not show enhancement, whereas enhancement of the distal intrameatal segment and the labyrinthine segment was respectively found in 67% and 43% of patients with Bell's palsy. The geniculate ganglion or the tympanic-mastoid segment was enhanced in 21% of normal controls versus 91% of patients with Bell's palsy. Abnormal enhancement of the non-paralyzed facial nerve was found in a patient with bilateral temporal bone fracture. CONCLUSION: Enhancement of the distal intrameatal and labyrinthine segments is specific for facial nerve palsy. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging can reveal inflammatory facial nerve lesions and traumatic nerve injury, including clinically silent damage in trauma. Kinoshita T. et al. (2001)

  9. Facial nerve palsy: Evaluation by contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, T.; Ishii, K.; Okitsu, T.; Okudera, T.; Ogawa, T

    2001-11-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to investigate the value of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in patients with peripheral facial nerve palsy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MR imaging was performed in 147 patients with facial nerve palsy, using a 1.0 T unit. All of 147 patients were evaluated by contrast-enhanced MR imaging and the pattern of enhancement was compared with that in 300 control subjects evaluated for suspected acoustic neurinoma. RESULTS: The intrameatal and labyrinthine segments of the normal facial nerve did not show enhancement, whereas enhancement of the distal intrameatal segment and the labyrinthine segment was respectively found in 67% and 43% of patients with Bell's palsy. The geniculate ganglion or the tympanic-mastoid segment was enhanced in 21% of normal controls versus 91% of patients with Bell's palsy. Abnormal enhancement of the non-paralyzed facial nerve was found in a patient with bilateral temporal bone fracture. CONCLUSION: Enhancement of the distal intrameatal and labyrinthine segments is specific for facial nerve palsy. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging can reveal inflammatory facial nerve lesions and traumatic nerve injury, including clinically silent damage in trauma. Kinoshita T. et al. (2001)

  10. Injectable systems and implantable conduits for peripheral nerve repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Yen-Chih; Marra, Kacey G

    2012-01-01

    Acute sensory problems following peripheral nerve injury include pain and loss of sensation. Approximately 360 000 people in the United States suffer from upper extremity paralytic syndromes every year. Restoration of sufficient functional recovery after long-gap peripheral nerve damage remains a clinical challenge. Potential nerve repair therapies have increased in the past decade as the field of tissue engineering expands. The following review describes the use of biomaterials in nerve tissue engineering. Namely, the use of both synthetic and natural biomaterials, including non-degradable and degradable nerve grafts, is addressed. The enhancement of axonal regeneration can be achieved by further modification of the nerve guides. These approaches include injectable hydrogel fillers, controlled drug delivery systems, and cell incorporation. Hydrogels are a class of liquid–gel biomaterials with high water content. Injectable and gelling hydrogels can serve as growth factor delivery vehicles and cell carriers for tissue engineering applications. While natural hydrogels and polymers are suitable for short gap nerve repair, the use of polymers for relatively long gaps remains a clinical challenge. (paper)

  11. Literature review of cranial nerve injuries during carotid endarterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, M S; Vijaynagar, B; Singh, P; Hamilton, G

    2007-01-01

    In the recent prospective randomised trials on carotid endarterectomy (CEA), the incidence of cranial nerve injuries (CNI) are reported to be higher than in previously published studies. The objective of this study is to review the incidence of post CEA cranial nerve injury and to discover whether it has changed in the last 25 years after many innovations in vascular surgery. Generic terms including carotid endarterectomy, cranial nerve injuries, post CEA complications and cranial nerve deficit after neck surgery were used to search a variety of electronic databases. Based on selection criteria, decisions regarding inclusion and exclusion of primary studies were made. The incidence of CNI before and after 1995 was compared. We found 31 eligible studies from the literature. Patients who underwent CEA through any approach were included in the study. All patients had cranial nerves examined both before and after surgery. The total number of patients who had CEA before 1995 was 3521 with 10.6% CNI (352 patients) and after 1995, 7324 patients underwent CEA with 8.3% CNI (614 patients). Cranial nerves XII, X and VII were most commonly involved (rarely IX and XI). Statistical analysis showed that the incidence of CNI has decreased (X(2) = 5.89 + 0.74 = 6.63 => p-value = 0.0100). CNI is still a significant postoperative complication of carotid endarterectomy. Despite increasing use of CEA, the incidence of CNI has decreased probably because of increased awareness of the possibility of cranial nerve damage.

  12. Lower cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatos, Theodoros; Batra, Kiran; Blitz, Ari M; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2014-02-01

    Imaging evaluation of cranial neuropathies requires thorough knowledge of the anatomic, physiologic, and pathologic features of the cranial nerves, as well as detailed clinical information, which is necessary for tailoring the examinations, locating the abnormalities, and interpreting the imaging findings. This article provides clinical, anatomic, and radiological information on lower (7th to 12th) cranial nerves, along with high-resolution magnetic resonance images as a guide for optimal imaging technique, so as to improve the diagnosis of cranial neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Tumors of the optic nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen

    2009-01-01

    A variety of lesions may involve the optic nerve. Mainly, these lesions are inflammatory or vascular lesions that rarely necessitate surgery but may induce significant visual morbidity. Orbital tumors may induce proptosis, visual loss, relative afferent pupillary defect, disc edema and optic...... atrophy, but less than one-tenth of these tumors are confined to the optic nerve or its sheaths. No signs or symptoms are pathognomonic for tumors of the optic nerve. The tumors of the optic nerve may originate from the optic nerve itself (primary tumors) as a proliferation of cells normally present...... in the nerve (e.g., astrocytes and meningothelial cells). The optic nerve may also be invaded from tumors originating elsewhere (secondary tumors), invading the nerve from adjacent structures (e.g., choroidal melanoma and retinoblastoma) or from distant sites (e.g., lymphocytic infiltration and distant...

  14. Cerebral specialization. [greater performance efficiency for certain mental abilities or processes by one cerebral hemisphere over another

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Robin D.; Hopkins, William D.; Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1991-01-01

    The concept of greater performance efficiency for certain mental abilities or processes in one cerebral hemisphere rather than the other is referred to as 'cerebral lateralization'. The experimental paradigm for lateralization research involves the study of patients with one damaged hemisphere, which prevents their performance of a certain task or function; this approach, however, presents many difficulties in extrapolating to brain function in normal patients. Attention is presently given to gender differences in lateralization, cerebral asymmetries in other species, and the evolutionary bases of hemispheric specialization.

  15. Effect of bupivacaine and adjuvant drugs for regional anesthesia on nerve tissue oximetry and nerve blood flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiesmann T

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Wiesmann,1 Stefan Müller,1,2 Hans-Helge Müller,3 Hinnerk Wulf,1 Thorsten Steinfeldt1,4 1Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University Hospital Marburg, Philipps University, Marburg, 2Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, University Hospital Giessen, Justus-Liebig-University, Giessen, 3Institute of Medical Biometry and Epidemiology, Philipps University, Marburg, 4Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Diakoniekrankenhaus Schwäbisch Hall, Schwäbisch Hall, Germany Background: Nerve blood flow has a critical role in acute and chronic pathologies in peripheral nerves. Influences of local anesthetics and adjuvants on tissue perfusion and oxygenation are deemed as relevant factors for nerve damage after peripheral regional anesthesia. The link between low tissue perfusion due to local anesthetics and resulting tissue oxygenation is unclear.Methods: Combined tissue spectrophotometry and laser-Doppler flowmetry were used to assess nerve blood flow in 40 surgically exposed median nerves in pigs, as well as nerve tissue oximetry for 60 min. After baseline measurements, test solutions saline (S, bupivacaine (Bupi, bupivacaine with epinephrine (BupiEpi, and bupivacaine with clonidine (BupiCloni were applied topically.Results: Bupivacaine resulted in significant decrease in nerve blood flow, as well as tissue oximetry values, compared with saline control. Addition of epinephrine resulted in a rapid, but nonsignificant, reduction of nerve blood flow and extensive lowering of tissue oximetry levels. The use of clonidine resulted in a reduction of nerve blood flow, comparable to bupivacaine alone (relative blood flow at T60 min compared with baseline, S: 0.86 (0.67–1.18, median (25th–75th percentile; Bupi: 0.33 (0.25–0.60; BupiCloni: 0.43 (0.38–0.63; and BupiEpi: 0.41(0.30–0.54. The use of adjuvants did not result in any relevant impairment of tissue oximetry

  16. Histopathology of cryoballoon ablation-induced phrenic nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Jason G; Dubuc, Marc; Ferreira, Jose; Guerra, Peter G; Landry, Evelyn; Coulombe, Nicolas; Rivard, Lena; Macle, Laurent; Thibault, Bernard; Talajic, Mario; Roy, Denis; Khairy, Paul

    2014-02-01

    Hemi-diaphragmatic paralysis is the most common complication associated with cryoballoon ablation for atrial fibrillation, yet the histopathology of phrenic nerve injury has not been well described. A preclinical randomized study was conducted to characterize the histopathology of phrenic nerve injury induced by cryoballoon ablation and assess the potential for electromyographic (EMG) monitoring to limit phrenic nerve damage. Thirty-two dogs underwent cryoballoon ablation of the right superior pulmonary vein with the objective of inducing phrenic nerve injury. Animals were randomized 1:1 to standard monitoring (i.e., interruption of ablation upon reduction in diaphragmatic motion) versus EMG guidance (i.e., cessation of ablation upon a 30% reduction in the diaphragmatic compound motor action potential [CMAP] amplitude). The acute procedural endpoint was achieved in all dogs. Phrenic nerve injury was characterized by Wallerian degeneration, with subperineural injury to large myelinated axons and evidence of axonal regeneration. The degree of phrenic nerve injury paralleled the reduction in CMAP amplitude (P = 0.007). Animals randomized to EMG guidance had a lower incidence of acute hemi-diaphragmatic paralysis (50% vs 100%; P = 0.001), persistent paralysis at 30 days (21% vs 75%; multivariate odds ratio 0.12, 95% confidence interval [0.02, 0.69], P = 0.017), and a lesser severity of histologic injury (P = 0.001). Mature pulmonary vein ablation lesion characteristics, including circumferentiality and transmurality, were similar in both groups. Phrenic nerve injury induced by cryoballoon ablation is axonal in nature and characterized by Wallerian degeneration, with potential for recovery. An EMG-guided approach is superior to standard monitoring in limiting phrenic nerve damage. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Cerebral venous angioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagawa, Tetsuji; Taguchi, Haruyoshi; Kamiya, Kazuko; Yano, Takashi; Nakajima, Reiko

    1984-01-01

    This report presents a 27-year-old male patient who was diagnosed as having cerebral venous angioma in the postero-temporal area by CT scan and cerebral angiography. The patient improved by removing angioma with electrocoagulation of medullary veins. (Namekawa, K.)

  18. Perceptual consequences of disrupted auditory nerve activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Kong, Ying-Yee; Michalewski, Henry J; Starr, Arnold

    2005-06-01

    Perceptual consequences of disrupted auditory nerve activity were systematically studied in 21 subjects who had been clinically diagnosed with auditory neuropathy (AN), a recently defined disorder characterized by normal outer hair cell function but disrupted auditory nerve function. Neurological and electrophysical evidence suggests that disrupted auditory nerve activity is due to desynchronized or reduced neural activity or both. Psychophysical measures showed that the disrupted neural activity has minimal effects on intensity-related perception, such as loudness discrimination, pitch discrimination at high frequencies, and sound localization using interaural level differences. In contrast, the disrupted neural activity significantly impairs timing related perception, such as pitch discrimination at low frequencies, temporal integration, gap detection, temporal modulation detection, backward and forward masking, signal detection in noise, binaural beats, and sound localization using interaural time differences. These perceptual consequences are the opposite of what is typically observed in cochlear-impaired subjects who have impaired intensity perception but relatively normal temporal processing after taking their impaired intensity perception into account. These differences in perceptual consequences between auditory neuropathy and cochlear damage suggest the use of different neural codes in auditory perception: a suboptimal spike count code for intensity processing, a synchronized spike code for temporal processing, and a duplex code for frequency processing. We also proposed two underlying physiological models based on desynchronized and reduced discharge in the auditory nerve to successfully account for the observed neurological and behavioral data. These methods and measures cannot differentiate between these two AN models, but future studies using electric stimulation of the auditory nerve via a cochlear implant might. These results not only show the unique

  19. Anatomy of the trigeminal nerve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijden, T.M.G.J.; Langenbach, G.E.J.; Baart, J.A.; Brand, H.S.

    2017-01-01

    The trigeminal nerve is the fifth cranial nerve (n. V), which plays an important role in the innervation of the head and neck area, together with other cranial and spinal nerves. Knowledge of the nerve’s anatomy is very important for the correct application of local anaesthetics.

  20. Imaging the ocular motor nerves.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, T.; Verbist, B.M.; Buchem, M. van; Osch, T. van; Webb, A.

    2010-01-01

    The ocular motor nerves (OMNs) comprise the oculomotor, trochlear and the abducens nerves. According to their course, they are divided into four or five anatomic segments: intra-axial, cisternal, cavernous and intra-orbital and, for the abducens nerve, an additional interdural segment. Magnetic

  1. Evoked electromyography to rocuronium in orbicularis oris and gastrocnemius in facial nerve injury in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yian; Chen, Lianhua; Li, Shitong

    2013-11-01

    Muscles innervated by the facial nerve show different sensitivities to muscle relaxants than muscles innervated by somatic nerves, especially in the presence of facial nerve injury. We compared the evoked electromyography (EEMG) response of orbicularis oris and gastrocnemius in with and without a non-depolarizing muscle relaxant in a rabbit model of graded facial nerve injury. Differences in EEMG response and inhibition by rocuronium were measured in the orbicularis oris and gastrocnemius muscles 7 to 42 d after different levels of facial nerve crush injuries in adult rabbits. Baseline EEMG of orbicularis oris was significantly smaller than those of the gastrocnemius. Gastrocnemius was more sensitive to rocuronium than the facial muscles (P rocuronium was negatively correlated with the magnitude of facial nerve injury but the sensitivity to rocuronium was not. No significant difference was found in the onset time and the recovery time of rocuronium among gastrocnemius and normal or damaged facial muscles. Muscles innervated by somatic nerves are more sensitive to rocuronium than those innervated by the facial nerve, but while facial nerve injury reduced EEMG responses, the sensitivity to rocuronium is not altered. Partial neuromuscular blockade may be a suitable technique for conducting anesthesia and surgery safely when EEMG monitoring is needed to preserve and protect the facial nerve. Additional caution should be used if there is a risk of preexisting facial nerve injury. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Neural stem cells promote nerve regeneration through IL12-induced Schwann cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Don-Ching; Chen, Jong-Hang; Hsu, Tai-Yu; Chang, Li-Hsun; Chang, Hsu; Chi, Ya-Hui; Chiu, Ing-Ming

    2017-03-01

    Regeneration of injured peripheral nerves is a slow, complicated process that could be improved by implantation of neural stem cells (NSCs) or nerve conduit. Implantation of NSCs along with conduits promotes the regeneration of damaged nerve, likely because (i) conduit supports and guides axonal growth from one nerve stump to the other, while preventing fibrous tissue ingrowth and retaining neurotrophic factors; and (ii) implanted NSCs differentiate into Schwann cells and maintain a growth factor enriched microenvironment, which promotes nerve regeneration. In this study, we identified IL12p80 (homodimer of IL12p40) in the cell extracts of implanted nerve conduit combined with NSCs by using protein antibody array and Western blotting. Levels of IL12p80 in these conduits are 1.6-fold higher than those in conduits without NSCs. In the sciatic nerve injury mouse model, implantation of NSCs combined with nerve conduit and IL12p80 improves motor recovery and increases the diameter up to 4.5-fold, at the medial site of the regenerated nerve. In vitro study further revealed that IL12p80 stimulates the Schwann cell differentiation of mouse NSCs through the phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3). These results suggest that IL12p80 can trigger Schwann cell differentiation of mouse NSCs through Stat3 phosphorylation and enhance the functional recovery and the diameter of regenerated nerves in a mouse sciatic nerve injury model. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Right-sided vagus nerve stimulation inhibits induced spinal cord seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Salter, E George; Killingsworth, Cheryl; Rollins, Dennis L; Smith, William M; Ideker, Raymond E; Wellons, John C; Blount, Jeffrey P; Oakes, W Jerry

    2007-01-01

    We have previously shown that left-sided vagus nerve stimulation results in cessation of induced spinal cord seizures. To test our hypothesis that right-sided vagus nerve stimulation will also abort seizure activity, we have initiated seizures in the spinal cord and then performed right-sided vagus nerve stimulation in an animal model. Four pigs were anesthetized and placed in the lateral position and a small laminectomy performed in the lumbar region. Topical penicillin, a known epileptogenic drug to the cerebral cortex and spinal cord, was next applied to the dorsal surface of the exposed cord. With the exception of the control animal, once seizure activity was discernible via motor convulsion or increased electrical activity, the right vagus nerve previously isolated in the neck was stimulated. Following multiple stimulations of the vagus nerve and with seizure activity confirmed, the cord was transected in the midthoracic region and vagus nerve stimulation performed. Right-sided vagus nerve stimulation resulted in cessation of spinal cord seizure activity in all animals. Transection of the spinal cord superior to the site of seizure induction resulted in the ineffectiveness of vagus nerve stimulation in causing cessation of seizure activity in all study animals. As with left-sided vagus nerve stimulation, right-sided vagus nerve stimulation results in cessation of induced spinal cord seizures. Additionally, the effects of right-sided vagus nerve stimulation on induced spinal cord seizures involve descending spinal pathways. These data may aid in the development of alternative mechanisms for electrical stimulation for patients with medically intractable seizures and add to our knowledge regarding the mechanism for seizure cessation following peripheral nerve stimulation.

  4. Optic nerve oxygen tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Pedersen, D B; Eysteinsson, T

    2004-01-01

    The authors have previously reported that carbonic anhydrase inhibitors such as acetazolamide and dorzolamide raise optic nerve oxygen tension (ONPO(2)) in pigs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether timolol, which belongs to another group of glaucoma drugs called beta...

  5. Neuroprotective Role of Nerve Growth Factor in Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Chiaretti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic brain injuries (HIBI in childhood are frequently associated with poor clinical and neurological outcome. Unfortunately, there is currently no effective therapy to restore neuronal loss and to determine substantial clinical improvement. Several neurotrophins, such as Nerve Growth Factor (NGF, Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF, and Glial Derived Neurotrophic Factor (GDNF, play a key role in the development, differentiation, and survival of the neurons of the peripheral and central nervous system. Experimental animal studies demonstrated their neuroprotective role in HIBI, while only a few studies examined the neuroprotective mechanisms in patients with severe HIBI. We report two cases of children with HIBI and prolonged comatose state who showed a significant improvement after intraventricular NGF administration characterized by amelioration of electroencephalogram (EEG and cerebral perfusion at single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT. The improvement in motor and cognitive functions of these children could be related to the neuroprotective role exerted by NGF in residual viable cholinergic neurons, leading to the restoration of neuronal networks in the damaged brain.

  6. [Accident-induced lesions of the facial nerve in relation to the extent of pyramidal pneumatization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoori, S; Limberg, C

    1985-12-01

    Perilabyrinthine pneumatisation of the petrous pyramid constitutes a risk factor for the facial nerve in its labyrinthine part in a fracture of the temporal bone because serious splintering of bone is possible. Splinters dislocated into the Fallopian canal may damage the nerve seriously. On the other hand a perineural haematoma can flow out of the canal into the neighbouring cells through dehiscences or through the fractured canal walls and a compression of the nerve may be avoided. The decision to undertake early surgical intervention must take into account the degree of pneumatisation of the pyramid in posttraumatic lesions of the facial nerve. The timing and extent of recovery cannot be predicted.

  7. Biomedical engineering strategies for peripheral nerve repair: surgical applications, state of the art, and future challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, Bryan J; Gordon, Tessa; Loverde, Joseph R; Kochar, Arshneel S; Mackinnon, Susan E; Cullen, D Kacy

    2011-01-01

    Damage to the peripheral nervous system is surprisingly common and occurs primarily from trauma or a complication of surgery. Although recovery of nerve function occurs in many mild injuries, outcomes are often unsatisfactory following severe trauma. Nerve repair and regeneration presents unique clinical challenges and opportunities, and substantial contributions can be made through the informed application of biomedical engineering strategies. This article reviews the clinical presentations and classification of nerve injuries, in addition to the state of the art for surgical decision-making and repair strategies. This discussion presents specific challenges that must be addressed to realistically improve the treatment of nerve injuries and promote widespread recovery. In particular, nerve defects a few centimeters in length use a sensory nerve autograft as the standard technique; however, this approach is limited by the availability of donor nerve and comorbidity associated with additional surgery. Moreover, we currently have an inadequate ability to noninvasively assess the degree of nerve injury and to track axonal regeneration. As a result, wait-and-see surgical decisions can lead to undesirable and less successful "delayed" repair procedures. In this fight for time, degeneration of the distal nerve support structure and target progresses, ultimately blunting complete functional recovery. Thus, the most pressing challenges in peripheral nerve repair include the development of tissue-engineered nerve grafts that match or exceed the performance of autografts, the ability to noninvasively assess nerve damage and track axonal regeneration, and approaches to maintain the efficacy of the distal pathway and targets during the regenerative process. Biomedical engineering strategies can address these issues to substantially contribute at both the basic and applied levels, improving surgical management and functional recovery following severe peripheral nerve injury.

  8. Assessment of nerve regeneration across nerve allografts treated with tacrolimus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haisheng, Han; Songjie, Zuo; Xin, Li

    2008-01-01

    Although regeneration of nerve allotransplant is a major concern in the clinic, there have been few papers quantitatively assessing functional recovery of animals' nerve allografts in the long term. In this study, functional recovery, histopathological study, and immunohistochemistry changes of rat nerve allograft with FK506 were investigated up to 12 weeks without slaughtering. C57 and SD rats were used for transplantation. The donor's nerve was sliced and transplanted into the recipient. The sciatic nerve was epineurally sutured with 10-0 nylon. In total, 30 models of transplantation were performed and divided into 3 groups that were either treated with FK506 or not. Functional recovery of the grafted nerve was serially assessed by the pin click test, walking track analysis and electrophysiological evaluations. A histopathological study and immunohistochemistry study were done in the all of the models. Nerve allografts treated with FK506 have no immune rejection through 12 weeks. Sensibility had similarly improved in both isografts and allografts. There has been no difference in each graft. Walk track analysis demonstrates significant recovery of motor function of the nerve graft. No histological results of difference were found up to 12 weeks in each graft. In the rodent nerve graft model, FK506 prevented nerve allograft rejection across a major histocompatibility barrier. Sensory recovery seems to be superior to motor function. Nerve isograft and allograft treated with FK506 have no significant difference in function recovery, histopathological result, and immunohistochemistry changes.

  9. Phrenic nerve protection via packing of gauze into the pericardial space during ablation of cristal atrial tachycardia in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Fuchigami, Tai; Nabeshima, Taisuke; Sashinami, Arata; Nakayashiro, Mami

    2016-03-01

    The success of catheter ablation of focal atrial tachycardia is limited by possible collateral damage to the phrenic nerve. Protection of the phrenic nerve is required. Here we present a case of a 9-year-old girl having a history of an unsuccessful catheter ablation of a focal atrial tachycardia near the crista terminalis (because of proximity of the phrenic nerve) who underwent a successful ablation by means of a novel technique for phrenic nerve protection: packing of gauze into the pericardial space. This method is a viable approach for patients with a failed endocardial ablation due to the proximity of the phrenic nerve.

  10. Biocompatibility of Different Nerve Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stang, Felix; Keilhoff, Gerburg; Fansa, Hisham

    2009-01-01

    Bridging nerve gaps with suitable grafts is a major clinical problem. The autologous nerve graft is considered to be the gold standard, providing the best functional results; however, donor site morbidity is still a major disadvantage. Various attempts have been made to overcome the problems of autologous nerve grafts with artificial nerve tubes, which are “ready-to-use” in almost every situation. A wide range of materials have been used in animal models but only few have been applied to date clinically, where biocompatibility is an inevitable prerequisite. This review gives an idea about artificial nerve tubes with special focus on their biocompatibility in animals and humans.

  11. Pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Foer, Bert [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: bert.defoer@GZA.be; Kenis, Christoph [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: christophkenis@hotmail.com; Van Melkebeke, Deborah [Department of Neurology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Deborah.vanmelkebeke@Ugent.be; Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: jphver@yahoo.com; Somers, Thomas [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Thomas.somers@GZA.be; Pouillon, Marc [Department of Radiology, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: marc.pouillon@GZA.be; Offeciers, Erwin [University Department of ENT, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)], E-mail: Erwin.offeciers@GZA.be; Casselman, Jan W. [Department of Radiology, AZ Sint-Jan AV Hospital, Ruddershove 10, Bruges (Belgium); Consultant Radiologist, Sint-Augustinus Hospital, Oosterveldlaan 24, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Academic Consultent, University of Ghent (Belgium)], E-mail: jan.casselman@azbrugge.be

    2010-05-15

    There is a large scala of pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the investigation of pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Congenital pathology mainly consists of agenesis or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Tumoral pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve is most frequently located in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. Schwannoma of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the most frequently found tumoral lesion followed by meningeoma, arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The most frequently encountered pathologies as well as some more rare entities are discussed in this chapter.

  12. Pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Foer, Bert; Kenis, Christoph; Van Melkebeke, Deborah; Vercruysse, Jean-Philippe; Somers, Thomas; Pouillon, Marc; Offeciers, Erwin; Casselman, Jan W.

    2010-01-01

    There is a large scala of pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging is the method of choice for the investigation of pathology of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Congenital pathology mainly consists of agenesis or hypoplasia of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Tumoral pathology affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve is most frequently located in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. Schwannoma of the vestibulocochlear nerve is the most frequently found tumoral lesion followed by meningeoma, arachnoid cyst and epidermoid cyst. The most frequently encountered pathologies as well as some more rare entities are discussed in this chapter.

  13. Mental nerve paresthesia secondary to initiation of endodontic therapy: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Sharique; Zia, Afaf; Khan, Masood Hasan; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Whenever endodontic therapy is performed on mandibular posterior teeth, damage to the inferior alveolar nerve or any of its branches is possible. Acute periapical infection in mandibular posterior teeth may also sometimes disturb the normal functioning of the inferior alveolar nerve. The most common clinical manifestation of these insults is the paresthesia of the inferior alveolar nerve or mental nerve paresthesia. Paresthesia usually manifests as burning, prickling, tingling, numbness, itching or any deviation from normal sensation. Altered sensation and pain in the involved areas may interfere with speaking, eating, drinking, shaving, tooth brushing and other events of social interaction which will have a disturbing impact on the patient. Paresthesia can be short term, long term or even permanent. The duration of the paresthesia depends upon the extent of the nerve damage or persistence of the etiology. Permanent paresthesia is the result of nerve trunk laceration or actual total nerve damage. Paresthesia must be treated as soon as diagnosed to have better treatment outcomes. The present paper describes a case of mental nerve paresthesia arising after the start of the endodontic therapy in left mandibular first molar which was managed successfully by conservative treatment. PMID:25110646

  14. Ancillary procedure for early diagnosis of brain damage in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumi, Masatoshi; Sha, Tenei; Ryo, Fukko; Kagawa, Kotaro.

    1979-01-01

    CT scan of the head was performed on 14 patients with cerebral palsy, 16 with central coordination disorders, and 16 controls, and findings showing cerebral atrophy and enlargement of the cerebral ventricle were obtained in cases both of cerebral palsy and of central coordination disorders. To objectify these findings, 10 items were selected and evaluated according to 4 grades (0 - 3) and were compared. As a result, it was concluded that CT scan is an excellent ancillary procedure for early diagnosis of brain damages. (Tsunoda, M.)

  15. Unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayakawa, Katsumi [Department of Radiology, Kyoto City Hospital, 1-2 Higashi-Takada-cho, Mibu, Nakagyo-ku, 604-8845 Kyoto (Japan); Kanda, Toyoko; Yamori, Yuriko [Department of Pediatric Neurology, St. Joseph Hospital for Handicapped Children, 603-8323 Kyoto (Japan)

    2002-10-01

    We evaluated six children in whom MR imaging showed unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral atrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy. The aim of this study was to clarify whether this disorder based on neuroimaging constitutes a new homogeneous clinical entity. The subjects were six children whose ages at the time of MR imaging ranged from 8 months to 11 years. Their clinical and MR features were analyzed. All of the children were born between 38 and 42 weeks gestation, without any significant perinatal events. Spastic hemiplegia and epilepsy were observed in all of the patients, and mental retardation was observed in four. The MR findings included unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy in all patients. The ipsilateral sylvian fissure was hypoplastic in four patients. These patients showed relatively homogeneous clinical and neuroimaging features. Although the additional clinical features varied according to the site and the extent affected by the polymicrogyria, this disorder could constitute a new relatively homogeneous clinical entity. (orig.)

  16. Unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Katsumi; Kanda, Toyoko; Yamori, Yuriko

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated six children in whom MR imaging showed unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral atrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy. The aim of this study was to clarify whether this disorder based on neuroimaging constitutes a new homogeneous clinical entity. The subjects were six children whose ages at the time of MR imaging ranged from 8 months to 11 years. Their clinical and MR features were analyzed. All of the children were born between 38 and 42 weeks gestation, without any significant perinatal events. Spastic hemiplegia and epilepsy were observed in all of the patients, and mental retardation was observed in four. The MR findings included unilateral cerebral polymicrogyria associated with ipsilateral cerebral hemiatrophy and ipsilateral brain stem atrophy in all patients. The ipsilateral sylvian fissure was hypoplastic in four patients. These patients showed relatively homogeneous clinical and neuroimaging features. Although the additional clinical features varied according to the site and the extent affected by the polymicrogyria, this disorder could constitute a new relatively homogeneous clinical entity. (orig.)

  17. Compreensão leitora pós-lesão cerebral de hemisfério direito: um estudo de caso = Reading comprehension after right hemisphere brain damage: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerônimo, Gislaine Machado

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A compreensão leitora é uma das habilidades linguísticas mais deficitárias na população brasileira (SCLIAR-CABRAL, 2009. Pesquisadores da área de Neuropsicolinguística, através de um estudo de interface, vêm buscando compreender a forma como os hemisférios cerebrais processam o texto. Mas os estudos, principalmente no que tange à integração textual, ainda são controversos, pois alguns apontam o hemisfério esquerdo e outros o hemisfério direito como responsável por essa função. No intuito de contribuir para esse debate, propomos a presente pesquisa. Trata-se de um estudo de caso com um sujeito acometido de lesão cerebral no hemisfério direito, onde verificamos os três níveis de compreensão textual propostos por Kintsch e Van Dijk (1983; Van Dijk (2010: microestrutura, macroestrutura e modelo situacional. Com esse estudo queremos ampliar nossa compreensão sobre o funcionamento da linguagem na patologia, sua relação com os hemisférios cerebrais e outros componentes cognitivos

  18. High Spatial Resolution Imaging Mass Spectrometry of Human Optic Nerve Lipids and Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David M. G.; Spraggins, Jeffrey M.; Rose, Kristie L.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2015-06-01

    The human optic nerve carries signals from the retina to the visual cortex of the brain. Each optic nerve is comprised of approximately one million nerve fibers that are organized into bundles of 800-1200 fibers surrounded by connective tissue and supportive glial cells. Damage to the optic nerve contributes to a number of blinding diseases including: glaucoma, neuromyelitis optica, optic neuritis, and neurofibromatosis; however, the molecular mechanisms of optic nerve damage and death are incompletely understood. Herein we present high spatial resolution MALDI imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) analysis of lipids and proteins to define the molecular anatomy of the human optic nerve. The localization of a number of lipids was observed in discrete anatomical regions corresponding to myelinated and unmyelinated nerve regions as well as to supporting connective tissue, glial cells, and blood vessels. A protein fragment from vimentin, a known intermediate filament marker for astrocytes, was observed surrounding nerved fiber bundles in the lamina cribrosa region. S100B was also found in supporting glial cell regions in the prelaminar region, and the hemoglobin alpha subunit was observed in blood vessel areas. The molecular anatomy of the optic nerve defined by MALDI IMS provides a firm foundation to study biochemical changes in blinding human diseases.

  19. Regulatory mechanism of endothelin receptor B in the cerebral arteries after focal cerebral ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grell, Anne-Sofie; Thigarajah, Rushani; Edvinsson, Lars

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Increased expression of endothelin receptor type B (ETBR), a vasoactive receptor, has recently been implied in the reduced cerebral blood flow and exacerbated neuronal damage after ischemia-reperfusion (I/R). The study explores the regulatory mechanisms of ETBR to identify...... drug targets to restore normal cerebral artery contractile function as part of successful neuroprotective therapy. METHODS: We have employed in vitro methods on human and rat cerebral arteries to study the regulatory mechanisms and the efficacy of target selective inhibitor, Mithramycin A (Mit...... the ETBR mRNA and protein levels. It also significantly reduced the ETBR mediated cerebrovascular contractility. Detailed analysis indicated that ERK1/2 mediated phosphorylation of Sp1 might be essential for ETBR transcription. CONCLUSION: Transcription factor Sp1 regulates the ETBR mediated...

  20. On the CT-diagnosis of optic nerve lesions. Differential diagnostic criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unsoeld, R.

    1982-01-01

    Computed tomograms of 166 optic nerve lesions were analyzed: 97 were mainly orbital and 69 mainly intracranial. The criteria were clinical course, size, density and delineation of the optic nerve shadow, orbital and cerebral soft tissue abnormalities, and bony changes in the optic canal. Characteristic CT features are described of individual disease entities such as optic gliomas, optic nerve sheath meningiomas, neoplastic and inflammatory infiltrations. The differential diagnostic importance of individual CT criteria is evaluated and discussed. Simultaneous visualization of orbital and intracranial soft tissue changes as well as bony changes in the optic canal allow the location and identification of the majority of optic nerve lesions based on the criteria mentioned above, and optic nerve tumors can be differentiated. In 9 patients with optic neuritis due to clinically proven encephalitis and in 17 patients with total optic atrophy, no changes in the size of the optic nerve could be found. CT evaluation of the intraorbital portion of the optic nerve requires special examination techniques. Oblique computer reformations through the optic canal provide excellent visualization of bony changes in the optic canal. The exclusion of intracranial causes of optic nerve lesions requires intravenous injection of contrast material. (orig.) [de

  1. Embodying Investigations of Cerebral Palsy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Kristian Møller Moltke

    to understand what it means for persons to live with CP and then figure out how we should help them . Based on his method of open - minded cognitive science, Martiny presents data on neuro - physiological, psychological and social aspects of living with CP. From this theoretical work, Martiny develops......The main question of Kristian Martiny’s dissertation is: how do we help persons living with the brain damage, cerebral palsy (CP)? This question is as complex and difficult to answer as any healthcare question. Martiny argues that we need to ‘open up’ how we do ( cognitive ) science in order...... an embodied - based model of intervention for CP, focusing on the experience of self control as a way to help people with CP. In addition, a theatre performance, Humane Liquidation , and a documentary film, Natural Disorder, are developed so as to both communicate what it means to live with CP and empower...

  2. Cerebral microbleeds in a neonatal rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianna Carusillo Theriault

    Full Text Available In adult humans, cerebral microbleeds play important roles in neurodegenerative diseases but in neonates, the consequences of cerebral microbleeds are unknown. In rats, a single pro-angiogenic stimulus in utero predisposes to cerebral microbleeds after birth at term, a time when late oligodendrocyte progenitors (pre-oligodendrocytes dominate in the rat brain. We hypothesized that two independent pro-angiogenic stimuli in utero would be associated with a high likelihood of perinatal microbleeds that would be severely damaging to white matter.Pregnant Wistar rats were subjected to intrauterine ischemia (IUI and low-dose maternal lipopolysaccharide (mLPS at embryonic day (E 19. Pups were born vaginally or abdominally at E21-22. Brains were evaluated for angiogenic markers, microhemorrhages, myelination and axonal development. Neurological function was assessed out to 6 weeks.mRNA (Vegf, Cd31, Mmp2, Mmp9, Timp1, Timp2 and protein (CD31, MMP2, MMP9 for angiogenic markers, in situ proteolytic activity, and collagen IV immunoreactivity were altered, consistent with an angiogenic response. Vaginally delivered pups exposed to prenatal IUI+mLPS had spontaneous cerebral microbleeds, abnormal neurological function, and dysmorphic, hypomyelinated white matter and axonopathy. Pups exposed to the same pro-angiogenic stimuli in utero but delivered abdominally had minimal cerebral microbleeds, preserved myelination and axonal development, and neurological function similar to naïve controls.In rats, pro-angiogenic stimuli in utero can predispose to vascular fragility and lead to cerebral microbleeds. The study of microbleeds in the neonatal rat brain at full gestation may give insights into the consequences of microbleeds in human preterm infants during critical periods of white matter development.

  3. Neuro-Ophthalmological Disorders in Cerebral Palsy: Ophthalmological, Oculomotor, and Visual Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazzi, Elisa; Signorini, Sabrina G.; La Piana, Roberta; Bertone, Chiara; Misefari, Walter; Galli, Jessica; Balottin, Umberto; Bianchi, Paolo Emilio

    2012-01-01

    Aim: Cerebral visual impairment (CVI) is a disorder caused by damage to the retrogeniculate visual pathways. Cerebral palsy (CP) and CVI share a common origin: 60 to 70% of children with CP also have CVI. We set out to describe visual dysfunction in children with CP. A further aim was to establish whether different types of CP are associated with…

  4. Preterm birth and cerebral palsy. Predictive value of pregnancy complications, mode of delivery, and Apgar scores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topp, Monica Wedell; Langhoff-Roos, J; Uldall, P

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preterm infants are at 8 times higher risk than term infants for pre- and perinatal brain damage, resulting in cerebral palsy. In this paper we have analysed the influence of prenatal and birth-related risk factors on cerebral palsy in preterm infants. METHODS: In a register-based stu...

  5. Acetazolamide as a vasodilatory stimulus in cerebrovascular diseases and in conditions affecting the cerebral vasculature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Settakis, G.; Molnár, C.; Kerényi, L.; Kollár, J.; Legemate, D.; Csiba, L.; Fülesdi, B.

    2003-01-01

    Pathologic processes affecting the brain vessels may damage cerebral vasodilatory capacity. Early detection of cerebral dysfunction plays an important role in the prevention of cerebrovascular diseases. In recent decades acetazolamide (AZ) has frequently been used for this purpose. In the present

  6. Cerebral lesions on 7 tesla MRI in patients with sickle cell anemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Land, Veronica; Zwanenburg, Jaco J. M.; Fijnvandraat, Karin; Biemond, Bart J.; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Mutsaerts, Henri J. M. M.; Visser, Fredy; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Nederveen, Aart J.; Majoie, Charles B. L. M.; Nederkoorn, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with sickle cell anemia (SCA) are at a high risk to develop cerebral damage. Most common are silent cerebral infarctions (SCIs), visible as white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) on MRI in a patient without neurological deficits. The etiology of SCIs remains largely unclear. In addition,

  7. Sensory action potentials of the maxillary nerve: a methodologic study with clinical implications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Torben; Baad-Hansen, Lene; Svensson, Peter

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: Recently, recording of sensory nerve action potentials (SNAPs) of the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) was described and is used as a diagnostic test of traumatic neuropathic trigeminal disorders. The technique is limited to IAN damage; therefore, we adapted the technique to the maxillary...... nerve, which is also frequently injured by either trauma or orthognathic surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Fourteen healthy volunteers participated in this methodologic study in which the infraorbital nerve (ION) was stimulated with 2 needle electrodes. The SNAPs were recorded from the maxillary nerve...... difference. Repeated tests within a session test demonstrated no significant differences in the latency data (ANOVA: P= .225) or amplitude data (ANOVA: P= .44). Stimulus-response curves indicated that the SNAPs saturated at 5.1+/-4.4 mA stimulus intensity. In 1 subject, stimulation of the mental nerve...

  8. Optic Nerve Injury in a Patient with Chronic Allergic Conjunctivitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ribhi Hazin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Manipulation of the optic nerve can lead to irreversible vision changes. We present a patient with a past medical history of skin allergy and allergic conjunctivitis (AC who presented with insidious unexplained unilateral vision loss. Physical exam revealed significant blepharospasm, mild lid edema, bulbar conjunctival hyperemia, afferent pupillary defect, and slight papillary hypertrophy. Slit lamp examination demonstrated superior and inferior conjunctival scarring as well as superior corneal scarring but no signs of external trauma or neurological damage were noted. Conjunctival cultures and cytologic evaluation demonstrated significant eosinophilic infiltration. Subsequent ophthalmoscopic examination revealed optic nerve atrophy. Upon further questioning, the patient admitted to vigorous itching of the affected eye for many months. Given the presenting symptoms, history, and negative ophthalmological workup, it was determined that the optic nerve atrophy was likely secondary to digital pressure from vigorous itching. Although AC can be a significant source of decreased vision via corneal ulceration, no reported cases have ever described AC-induced vision loss of this degree from vigorous itching and chronic pressure leading to optic nerve damage. Despite being self-limiting in nature, allergic conjunctivitis should be properly managed as extreme cases can result in mechanical compression of the optic nerve and compromise vision.

  9. Reduction of cerebral injury in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats by amlodipine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blezer, E.L.A.; Nicolaij, K.; Goldschmeding, R.C.; Koomans, H.A.; Joles, Jaap

    2002-01-01

    Dihydropyridine Ca2+ channel antagonists, initiated together with high salt intake, prevent the development of hypertension and subsequent cerebral damage in stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRSP). We hypothesized that the dihydropyridine Ca2+ channel antagonist amlodipine

  10. Changes in regional cerebral blood flow in the right cortex homologous to left language areas are directly affected by left hemispheric damage in aphasic stroke patients: evaluation by Tc-ECD SPECT and novel analytic software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uruma, G; Kakuda, W; Abo, M

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this study was to clarify the influence of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) changes in language-relevant areas of the dominant hemisphere on rCBF in each region in the non-dominant hemisphere in post-stroke aphasic patients. The study subjects were 27 aphasic patients who suffered their first symptomatic stroke in the left hemisphere. In each subject, we measured rCBF by means of 99mTc-ethylcysteinate dimmer single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The SPECT images were analyzed by the statistical imaging analysis programs easy Z-score Imaging System (eZIS) and voxel-based stereotactic extraction estimation (vbSEE). Segmented into Brodmann Area (BA) levels, Regions of Interest (ROIs) were set in language-relevant areas bilaterally, and changes in the relative rCBF as average negative and positive Z-values were computed fully automatically. To assess the relationship between rCBF changes of each ROIs in the left and right hemispheres, the Spearman ranked correlation analysis and stepwise multiple regression analysis were applied. Globally, a negative and asymmetric influence of rCBF changes in the language-relevant areas of the dominant hemisphere on the right hemisphere was found. The rCBF decrease in left BA22 significantly influenced the rCBF increase in right BA39, BA40, BA44 and BA45. The results suggested that the chronic increase in rCBF in the right language-relevant areas is due at least in part to reduction in the trancallosal inhibitory activity of the language-dominant left hemisphere caused by the stroke lesion itself and that these relationships are not always symmetric.

  11. Detection of the symptomatic nerve root

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyone, Tomoaki; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamagata, Masayasu

    1993-01-01

    Twenty-five patients with lumbar disc herniation with a chief complaint of unilateral leg pain underwent gadolinium-DTPA enhanced MRI, particularly to examine the nerve root in the distal area of hernia. MRI appearance fell into three grades: 0 - no visualization (n=7), 1 - heterogeneous visualization (n=7), and 2 - homogeneous visualization (n=10). In the quantitative evaluation of the severity of sciatica using SLR and JOA scores, it was found to be associated with the degree of visualization. All patients of grade 2 were required to receive surgery because pain relief was not attained in spite of 3 months or more conservative treatment. These findings indicatd the usefulness of MRI in predicting prognosis, as well as in diagnosing the responsible level. Since blood-nerve barrier damage and intraneural edema are considered to be involved in the visualization of the nerve root on MRI, MRI will help in diagnosing radicular sciatica and elucidating the pathophysiology of the disease. (N.K.)

  12. Cranial nerve monitoring during subpial dissection in temporomesial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortler, Martin; Fiegele, Thomas; Walser, Gerald; Trinka, Eugen; Eisner, Wilhelm

    2011-06-01

    Cranial nerves (CNs) crossing between the brainstem and skull base at the level of the tentorial hiatus may be at risk in temporomesial surgery involving subpial dissection and/or tumorous growth leading to distorted anatomy. We aimed to identify the surgical steps most likely to result in CN damage in this type of surgery. Electromyographic responses obtained with standard neuromonitoring techniques and a continuous free-running EMG were graded as either contact activity or pathological spontaneous activity (PSA) during subpial resection of temporomesial structures in 16 selective amygdalohippocampectomy cases. Integrity of peripheral motor axons was tested by transpial/transarachnoidal electrical stimulation while recording compound muscle action potentials from distal muscle(s). Continuous EMG showed pathological activity in five (31.2%) patients. Nine events with PSA (slight activity, n = 8; strong temporary activity, n = 1) were recorded. The oculomotor nerve was involved three times, the trochlear nerve twice, the facial nerve once, and all monitored nerves on three occasions. Surgical maneuvers associated with PSA were the resection of deep parts of the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus (CN IV, twice; CN III, once), lining with or removing cotton patties from the resection cavity (III, twice; all channels, once) and indirect exertion of tension on the intact pia/arachnoid of the uncal region while mobilizing the hippocampus and parahippocampal gyrus en bloc (all channels, once; III, once). CMAPs were observed at 0.3 mA in two patients and at 0.6 mA in one patient, and without registering the exact amount of intensity in three patients. The most dangerous steps leading to cranial nerve damage during mesial temporal lobe surgery are the final stages of the intervention while the resection is being completed in the deep posterior part and the resection cavity is being lined with patties. Distant traction may act on nerves crossing the tentorial

  13. A Rare Variation of the Human Median Nerve Direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barfi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The brachial plexus, a complex network of nerves, innervates to the upper limbs. Variation in the course of the nerves in the upper limb is common. Case Presentation This paper describes two cases of upper limb variations in a cadaver dissected at Lorestan University of Medical Sciences. In the first variation, the median nerve in the arm has a different route, so that the median moves deep into the brachialis muscle. In the latter case, after piercing the coracobrachialis muscle a musculocutaneous nerve exists between the brachialis and biceps and goes to the lateral region of the forearm. This is known as the lateral cutaneous nerve of the forearm nerve, and innervates the skin of the lateral part of the forearm and the dorsal part of the hand. Conclusions Because of the possibility of damage to the brachial plexus branches is high in upper limb injuries and surgeries, full knowledge of normal anatomy and variations of these branches is essential for orthopedic specialists, neurosurgeons, radiologists, and anatomists.

  14. Exploring vocal recovery after cranial nerve injury in Bengalese finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano, Catherine M; Peterson, Jennifer R; Cooper, Brenton G

    2013-02-08

    Songbirds and humans use auditory feedback to acquire and maintain their vocalizations. The Bengalese finch (Lonchura striata domestica) is a songbird species that rapidly modifies its vocal output to adhere to an internal song memory. In this species, the left side of the bipartite vocal organ is specialized for producing louder, higher frequencies (≥2.2kHz) and denervation of the left vocal muscles eliminates these notes. Thus, the return of higher frequency notes after cranial nerve injury can be used as a measure of vocal recovery. Either the left or right side of the syrinx was denervated by resection of the tracheosyringeal portion of the hypoglossal nerve. Histologic analyses of syringeal muscle tissue showed significant muscle atrophy in the denervated side. After left nerve resection, songs were mainly composed of lower frequency syllables, but three out of five birds recovered higher frequency syllables. Right nerve resection minimally affected phonology, but it did change song syntax; syllable sequence became abnormally stereotyped after right nerve resection. Therefore, damage to the neuromuscular control of sound production resulted in reduced motor variability, and Bengalese finches are a potential model for functional vocal recovery following cranial nerve injury. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cerebral Palsy (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Going to an Occupational Therapist Scoliosis In the Band: Jens' Story Cerebral ... KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- ...

  16. Cerebral Contusions and Lacerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Contusions and Lacerations Concussion Diffuse Axonal Injury Intracranial Hematomas Skull Fracture Sports-Related Concussion Cerebral contusions are ... Contusions and Lacerations Concussion Diffuse Axonal Injury Intracranial Hematomas Skull Fracture Sports-Related Concussion NOTE: This is ...

  17. Reduced Renshaw Recurrent Inhibition after Neonatal Sciatic Nerve Crush in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Shu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Renshaw recurrent inhibition (RI plays an important gated role in spinal motion circuit. Peripheral nerve injury is a common disease in clinic. Our current research was designed to investigate the change of the recurrent inhibitory function in the spinal cord after the peripheral nerve crush injury in neonatal rat. Sciatic nerve crush was performed on 5-day-old rat puppies and the recurrent inhibition between lateral gastrocnemius-soleus (LG-S and medial gastrocnemius (MG motor pools was assessed by conditioning monosynaptic reflexes (MSR elicited from the sectioned dorsal roots and recorded either from the LG-S and MG nerves by antidromic stimulation of the synergist muscle nerve. Our results demonstrated that the MSR recorded from both LG-S or MG nerves had larger amplitude and longer latency after neonatal sciatic nerve crush. The RI in both LG-S and MG motoneuron pools was significantly reduced to virtual loss (15–20% of the normal RI size even after a long recovery period upto 30 weeks after nerve crush. Further, the degree of the RI reduction after tibial nerve crush was much less than that after sciatic nerve crush indicatig that the neuron-muscle disconnection time is vital to the recovery of the spinal neuronal circuit function during reinnervation. In addition, sciatic nerve crush injury did not cause any spinal motor neuron loss but severally damaged peripheral muscle structure and function. In conclusion, our results suggest that peripheral nerve injury during neonatal early development period would cause a more sever spinal cord inhibitory circuit damage, particularly to the Renshaw recurrent inhibition pathway, which might be the target of neuroregeneration therapy.

  18. Sensation, mechanoreceptor, and nerve fiber function after nerve regeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Christian; Rosén, Birgitta; Boeckstyns, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Sensation is essential for recovery after peripheral nerve injury. However, the relationship between sensory modalities and function of regenerated fibers is uncertain. We have investigated the relationships between touch threshold, tactile gnosis, and mechanoreceptor and sensory fiber...... function after nerve regeneration. Methods: Twenty-one median or ulnar nerve lesions were repaired by a collagen nerve conduit or direct suture. Quantitative sensory hand function and sensory conduction studies by near-nerve technique, including tactile stimulation of mechanoreceptors, were followed for 2...... years, and results were compared to noninjured hands. Results: At both repair methods, touch thresholds at the finger tips recovered to 81 ± 3% and tactile gnosis only to 20 ± 4% (p nerve action potentials (SNAPs) remained dispersed and areas recovered to 23 ± 2...

  19. Electrophysiology of Cranial Nerve Testing: Spinal Accessory and Hypoglossal Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stino, Amro M; Smith, Benn E

    2018-01-01

    Multiple techniques have been developed for the electrodiagnostic evaluation of cranial nerves XI and XII. Each of these carries both benefits and limitations, with more techniques and data being available in the literature for spinal accessory than hypoglossal nerve evaluation. Spinal accessory and hypoglossal neuropathy are relatively uncommon cranial mononeuropathies that may be evaluated in the outpatient electrodiagnostic laboratory setting. A review of available literature using PubMed was conducted regarding electrodiagnostic technique in the evaluation of spinal accessory and hypoglossal nerves searching for both routine nerve conduction studies and repetitive nerve conduction studies. The review provided herein provides a resource by which clinical neurophysiologists may develop and implement clinical and research protocols for the evaluation of both of these lower cranial nerves in the outpatient setting.

  20. Cerebral venous angiomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agnoli, A.L.; Hildebrandt, G.

    1985-01-01

    Clinical symptoms and radiological signs in 15 patients with cerebral venous malformations are presented and the diagnostic problems discussed. The circulation time in combination with cerebral malformations and angiomas of the scalp are described. CT findings in cases of venous malformations of the brain stem are evaluated. Spot-like enhancement, as well as sharply demarcated round shaped enhancement are characteristic for venous angiomas. Cavernous angiomas usually present as homogenous or inhomogenous round shaped enhanced areas. (Author)

  1. Cerebral cartography and connectomics

    OpenAIRE

    Sporns, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral cartography and connectomics pursue similar goals in attempting to create maps that can inform our understanding of the structural and functional organization of the cortex. Connectome maps explicitly aim at representing the brain as a complex network, a collection of nodes and their interconnecting edges. This article reflects on some of the challenges that currently arise in the intersection of cerebral cartography and connectomics. Principal challenges concern the temporal dynamic...

  2. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nance, Elizabeth; Johnston, Michael V; Kannan, Rangaramanujam; Kannan, Sujatha

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed. PMID:24204146

  3. Nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amakiri, S F; Ozoya, S E; Ogunnaike, P O

    1978-01-01

    The nerves and nerve endings in the skin of tropical cattle were studied using histological and histochemical techniques. Many nerve trunks and fibres were present in the reticular and papillary dermis in both hairy and non-hairy skin sites. In non-hairy skin locations such as the muzzle and lower lip, encapsulated endings akin to Krause and Ruffini end bulbs, which arise from myelinated nerve trunks situated lower down the dermis were observed at the upper papillary layer level. Some fibre trunks seen at this level extended upwards to terminate within dermal papillae as bulb-shaped longitudinally lamellated Pacinian-type endings, while other onion-shaped lamellated nerve structures were located either within dermal papillae or near the dermo-epidermal area. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. Intraepidermal free-ending nerve fibres, appearing non-myelinated were observed in areas with thick epidermis. On hairy skin sites, however, organized nerve endings or intraepidermal nerve endings were not readily identifiable.

  4. Electrophysiology of Cranial Nerve Testing: Cranial Nerves IX and X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Alberto R M; Martins, Melina P; Moreira, Ana Lucila; Martins, Carlos R; Kimaid, Paulo A T; França, Marcondes C

    2018-01-01

    The cranial nerves IX and X emerge from medulla oblongata and have motor, sensory, and parasympathetic functions. Some of these are amenable to neurophysiological assessment. It is often hard to separate the individual contribution of each nerve; in fact, some of the techniques are indeed a composite functional measure of both nerves. The main methods are the evaluation of the swallowing function (combined IX and X), laryngeal electromyogram (predominant motor vagal function), and heart rate variability (predominant parasympathetic vagal function). This review describes, therefore, the techniques that best evaluate the major symptoms presented in IX and X cranial nerve disturbance: dysphagia, dysphonia, and autonomic parasympathetic dysfunction.

  5. Effect of PACAP in Central and Peripheral Nerve Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andras Buki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP is a bioactive peptide with diverse effects in the nervous system. In addition to its more classic role as a neuromodulator, PACAP functions as a neurotrophic factor. Several neurotrophic factors have been shown to play an important role in the endogenous response following both cerebral ischemia and traumatic brain injury and to be effective when given exogenously. A number of studies have shown the neuroprotective effect of PACAP in different models of ischemia, neurodegenerative diseases and retinal degeneration. The aim of this review is to summarize the findings on the neuroprotective potential of PACAP in models of different traumatic nerve injuries. Expression of endogenous PACAP and its specific PAC1 receptor is elevated in different parts of the central and peripheral nervous system after traumatic injuries. Some experiments demonstrate the protective effect of exogenous PACAP treatment in different traumatic brain injury models, in facial nerve and optic nerve trauma. The upregulation of endogenous PACAP and its receptors and the protective effect of exogenous PACAP after different central and peripheral nerve injuries show the important function of PACAP in neuronal regeneration indicating that PACAP may also be a promising therapeutic agent in injuries of the nervous system.

  6. Peripheral nerve blocks in pediatric anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novaković Dejan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Most children undergoing surgery can benefit from regional anesthetic techniques, either as the sole anesthetic regimen or, as usual in pediatric practice, in combination with general anesthesia. The use of peripheral nerve blocks (PNBs in pediatric anesthesia is an effective way to decrease the side-effects and complications associated with central blocks. In spite of their many advantages, including easy performance end efficacy, peripheral nerve blocks are still underused. Objective This article discusses a general approach to PNBs in children and provides data concerning the practice of this regional technique in different age groups. Methods Data from 1,650 procedures were prospectively collected during the period from March 1, 2007 to February 29, 2008. The type of PNB, if any, as well as the patient age were noted. Our patients were divided into four groups: 0-3 years, 4-7 years, 8-12 years and 13-18 years. Results During the investigated period, PNBs as a sole technique or in anesthetized children were performed in 7.45% of cases. Ilioingunal/iliohypogastric nerve block and penile block were the most common (70% of all PNBs distributed mainly among the children between 4-7 years of age (p<0.05. In older children, extremity PNBs predominate in regard to other types of blocks. PNBs are most frequently performed under general anesthesia (85%, so the perineural approach requires a safe technique to avoid nerve damage. Conclusion The observed differences in PNB usage seem to be related to patient age and correlate with common pathology and also with technical availability of PNB performance.

  7. Irreversible brain damage caused by methamphetamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Moeller

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine is an addictive scene substance usage of which is increasing rapidly. While methamphetamine often causes neuropsychiatric symptoms like anxiety, psychosis and hallucinations, reports of structural ongoing cerebral alterations are rare. We here report a case of this kind of damage caused through methamphetamine use.

  8. Cerebral palsy and congenital malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garne, Ester; Dolk, Helen; Krägeloh-Mann, Inge

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To determine the proportion of children with cerebral palsy (CP) who have cerebral and non-cerebral congenital malformations. METHODS: Data from 11 CP registries contributing to the European Cerebral Palsy Database (SCPE), for children born in the period 1976-1996. The malformations were...... classified as recognized syndromes, chromosomal anomalies, cerebral malformations or non-cerebral malformations. Prevalence of malformations was compared to published data on livebirths from a European database of congenital malformations (EUROCAT). RESULTS: Overall 547 out of 4584 children (11.9%) with CP...... were reported to have a congenital malformation. The majority (8.6% of all children) were diagnosed with a cerebral malformation. The most frequent types of cerebral malformations were microcephaly and hydrocephaly. Non-cerebral malformations were present in 97 CP children and in further 14 CP children...

  9. Nerve Cross-Bridging to Enhance Nerve Regeneration in a Rat Model of Delayed Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no available options to promote nerve regeneration through chronically denervated distal nerve stumps. Here we used a rat model of delayed nerve repair asking of prior insertion of side-to-side cross-bridges between a donor tibial (TIB) nerve and a recipient denervated common peroneal (CP) nerve stump ameliorates poor nerve regeneration. First, numbers of retrogradely-labelled TIB neurons that grew axons into the nerve stump within three months, increased with the size of the perineurial windows opened in the TIB and CP nerves. Equal numbers of donor TIB axons regenerated into CP stumps either side of the cross-bridges, not being affected by target neurotrophic effects, or by removing the perineurium to insert 5-9 cross-bridges. Second, CP nerve stumps were coapted three months after inserting 0-9 cross-bridges and the number of 1) CP neurons that regenerated their axons within three months or 2) CP motor nerves that reinnervated the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle within five months was determined by counting and motor unit number estimation (MUNE), respectively. We found that three but not more cross-bridges promoted the regeneration of axons and reinnervation of EDL muscle by all the CP motoneurons as compared to only 33% regenerating their axons when no cross-bridges were inserted. The same 3-fold increase in sensory nerve regeneration was found. In conclusion, side-to-side cross-bridges ameliorate poor regeneration after delayed nerve repair possibly by sustaining the growth-permissive state of denervated nerve stumps. Such autografts may be used in human repair surgery to improve outcomes after unavoidable delays. PMID:26016986

  10. Mechanisms of Acupuncture Therapy for Cerebral Ischemia: an Evidence-Based Review of Clinical and Animal Studies on Cerebral Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wen; Ye, Yang; Liu, Yi; Wang, Xue-Rui; Shi, Guang-Xia; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2017-12-01

    Ischemic stroke is a major cause of mortality and disability worldwide. As a part of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), acupuncture has been shown to be effective in promoting recovery after stroke. In this article, we review the clinical and experimental studies that demonstrated the mechanisms of acupuncture treatment for cerebral ischemia. Clinical studies indicated that acupuncture activated relevant brain regions, modulated cerebral blood flow and related molecules in stroke patients. Evidence from laboratory indicated that acupuncture regulates cerebral blood flow and metabolism after the interrupt of blood supply. Acupuncture regulates multiple molecules and signaling pathways that lead to excitoxicity, oxidative stress, inflammation, neurons death and survival. Acupuncture also promotes neurogenesis, angiogenesis as well as neuroplasticity after ischemic damage. The evidence provided from clinical and laboratory suggests that acupuncture induces multi-level regulation via complex mechanisms and a single factor may not be enough to explain the beneficial effects against cerebral ischemia.

  11. Involvement of peripheral III nerve in multiple sclerosis patient: Report of a new case and discussion of the underlying mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shor, Natalia; Amador, Maria Del Mar; Dormont, Didier; Lubetzki, Catherine; Bertrand, Anne

    2017-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic disorder that affects the central nervous system myelin. However, a few radiological cases have documented an involvement of peripheral cranial nerves, within the subarachnoid space, in MS patients. We report the case of a 36-year-old female with a history of relapsing-remitting (RR) MS who consulted for a subacute complete paralysis of the right III nerve. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination showed enhancement and thickening of the cisternal right III nerve, in continuity with a linear, mesencephalic, acute demyelinating lesion. Radiological involvement of the cisternal part of III nerve has been reported only once in MS patients. Radiological involvement of the cisternal part of V nerve occurs more frequently, in almost 3% of MS patients. In both situations, the presence of a central demyelinating lesion, in continuity with the enhancement of the peripheral nerve, suggests that peripheral nerve damage is a secondary process, rather than a primary target of demyelination.

  12. Ramsay Hunt syndrome with unilateral polyneuropathy involving cranial nerves V, VII, VIII, and XII in a diabetic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei-Lian; Yan, Jian-Liang; Chen, Li-Li

    2011-01-01

    Ramsay Hunt syndrome is a rare complication of the varicella zoster virus, defined as a peripheral facial palsy that typically results from involvement of the facial and auditory nerves. Ramsay Hunt syndrome can be associated with cranial nerves V, VI, IX, and X but rarely with XII. We describe an atypical case of Ramsay Hunt syndrome with multiple cranial nerve involvement of nerves V, VII, VIII, and XII. Antiviral drugs, antibiotics, insulin, and traditional Chinese drugs were administered immediately after admission. After 3 months of combination therapy, the patient had recovered satisfactorily. Herpes zoster can cause severe infections in diabetic patients and should be treated as soon after detection as possible. Ramsay Hunt syndrome should be recognized as a polycranial neuritis characterized by damage to sensory and motor nerves. In addition to facial and vestibular nerve paralysis, Ramsay Hunt syndrome may also involve cranial nerves V and XII.

  13. [Imaging anatomy of cranial nerves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermier, M; Leal, P R L; Salaris, S F; Froment, J-C; Sindou, M

    2009-04-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy of the cranial nerves is mandatory for optimal radiological exploration and interpretation of the images in normal and pathological conditions. CT is the method of choice for the study of the skull base and its foramina. MRI explores the cranial nerves and their vascular relationships precisely. Because of their small size, it is essential to obtain images with high spatial resolution. The MRI sequences optimize contrast between nerves and surrounding structures (cerebrospinal fluid, fat, bone structures and vessels). This chapter discusses the radiological anatomy of the cranial nerves.

  14. Traumatic superior orbital fissure syndrome: assessment of cranial nerve recovery in 33 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Tzung; Wang, Theresa Y; Tsay, Pei-Kwei; Huang, Faye; Lai, Jui-Pin; Chen, Yu-Ray

    2010-07-01

    Superior orbital fissure syndrome is a rare complication that occurs in association with craniofacial trauma. The characteristics of superior orbital fissure syndrome are attributable to a constellation of cranial nerve III, IV, and VI palsies. This is the largest series describing traumatic superior orbital fissure syndrome that assesses the recovery of individual cranial nerve function after treatment. In a review from 1988 to 2002, 33 patients with superior orbital fissure syndrome were identified from 11,284 patients (0.3 percent) with skull and facial fractures. Severity of cranial nerve injury and functional recovery were evaluated by extraocular muscle movement. Patients were evaluated on average 6 days after initial injury, and average follow-up was 11.8 months. There were 23 male patients. The average age was 31 years. The major mechanism of injury was motorcycle accident (67 percent). Twenty-two received conservative treatment, five were treated with steroids, and six patients underwent surgical decompression of the superior orbital fissure. After initial injury, cranial nerve VI suffered the most damage, whereas cranial nerve IV sustained the least. In the first 3 months, recovery was greatest in cranial nerve VI. At 9 months, function was lowest in cranial nerve VI and highest in cranial nerve IV. Eight patients (24 percent) had complete recovery of all cranial nerves. Functional recovery of all cranial nerves reached a plateau at 6 months after trauma. Cranial nerve IV suffered the least injury, whereas cranial nerve VI experienced the most neurologic deficits. Cranial nerve palsies improved to their final recovery endpoints by 6 months. Surgical decompression is considered when there is evidence of bony compression of the superior orbital fissure.

  15. Nanomedicine in cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balakrishnan B

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bindu Balakrishnan,1 Elizabeth Nance,1 Michael V Johnston,2 Rangaramanujam Kannan,3 Sujatha Kannan1 1Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine, Johns Hopkins University; Baltimore, MD, USA; 2Department of Neurology and Pediatrics, Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD, USA; 3Department of Ophthalmology, Center for Nanomedicine, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Cerebral palsy is a chronic childhood disorder that can have diverse etiologies. Injury to the developing brain that occurs either in utero or soon after birth can result in the motor, sensory, and cognitive deficits seen in cerebral palsy. Although the etiologies for cerebral palsy are variable, neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of the brain injury irrespective of the etiology. Currently, there is no effective cure for cerebral palsy. Nanomedicine offers a new frontier in the development of therapies for prevention and treatment of brain injury resulting in cerebral palsy. Nanomaterials such as dendrimers provide opportunities for the targeted delivery of multiple drugs that can mitigate several pathways involved in injury and can be delivered specifically to the cells that are responsible for neuroinflammation and injury. These materials also offer the opportunity to deliver agents that would promote repair and regeneration in the brain, resulting not only in attenuation of injury, but also enabling normal growth. In this review, the current advances in nanotechnology for treatment of brain injury are discussed with specific relevance to cerebral palsy. Future directions that would facilitate clinical translation in neonates and children are also addressed. Keywords: dendrimer, cerebral palsy, neuroinflammation, nanoparticle, neonatal brain injury, G4OH-PAMAM

  16. Prevalence of Cerebral Palsy in Children (Under Five) in and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a non-progressive disorder of posture and movement due to brain damage/insult/lesion before birth, during delivery or in the perinatal period. It is a neurological disorder of childhood with significant medico-social implications. A retrospective hospital based cross sectional study was conducted to ...

  17. Cerebral energy metabolism in streptozotocin-diabetic rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biessels, G.J.; Braun, K.P.J.; Graaf, de R.A.; Eijsden, van P.; Gispen, W.H.; Nicolaij, K.

    2001-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis. It is increasingly evident that the brain is another site of diabetic end-organ damage. The pathogenesis has not been fully explained, but seems to involve an interplay between aberrant glucose metabolism and vascular changes. Vascular changes, such as deficits in cerebral blood

  18. Diagnostic value of dynamic CT in early cerebral infarct

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, K.-M.; Shih, T.T.F.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have tried to demonstrate early cerebral infarct by dynamic CT scanning without any CT change. They also have tried to find a correlation between the clinical outcome and the hemodynamic change of the damaged brain tissue supplied by the occluded vessels. (author) 14 refs.; 3 figs

  19. Monitoring of cerebral haemodynamics in newborn infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liem, K Djien; Greisen, Gorm

    2010-01-01

    The most important cerebrovascular injuries in newborn infants, particularly in preterm infants, are cerebral haemorrhage and ischemic injury. The typical cerebral vascular anatomy and the disturbance of cerebral haemodynamics play important roles in the pathophysiology. The term 'cerebral haemod...

  20. Treatment and Follow Up Outcomes of Patients with Peroneal Nerve Injury: A Single Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasar Dagistan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Trap neuropathy is characterized by compression of the peripheral nerve into fibro osseous channels in trespassing areas of body segments. Peroneal nerve is the most frequently injured nerve in traumatic injuries of the lower extremities. In the present study, we investigated functional results of surgical treatment of patients with peroneal nerve injury who delayed visiting our clinics after the damage; we also aimed to observe the effects of this delay on prognosis. We interpreted postoperative results of the patients with EMG and physical examination findings. Material and Method: Subjects with peroneal nerve damage who visited our clinics between 2012 and 2015 were included in the present study. EMG and muscle motor strength tests were conducted pre and postoperatively for clinical assessment. Results: Of the 16 patients in the study population, 7 were men and 9 were women. The median age of the subjects was 49.6 years (14-77 years. Admission time was 9 months after injury. Causes of the peroneal nerve damage were as follows: prosthesis surgery in 4 (25%, ankle damage in 2 (12.5%, excessive squatting by agriculture workers in 4 (25%, aggressive exercise in 2 (12.5%, bone fracture in 2 (12.5%, and unknown origin in 2 (12.5%. Discussion: Peroneal nerve injury usually occurs by compression of the nerve at the head or neck of the fibula. Results of decompression surgery are usually compromising in non-traumatic nerve palsies. Period of duration between injury and diagnosis and muscular atrophy are main factors associated with success of treatment.

  1. Transient femoral nerve palsy following ilioinguinal nerve block for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Surgery ... Background: Elective inguinal hernia repair in young fit patients is preferably done under ilioinguinal nerve block anesthesia in the ambulatory setting to improve ... Conclusion: TFNP is a rare complication of ilioinguinal nerve block which delays patient discharge postambulatory hernioplasty.

  2. Sacral nerve stimulation increases activation of the primary somatosensory cortex by anal canal stimulation in an experimental model.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Griffin, K M

    2011-08-01

    Sacral and posterior tibial nerve stimulation may be used to treat faecal incontinence; however, the mechanism of action is unknown. The aim of this study was to establish whether sensory activation of the cerebral cortex by anal canal stimulation was increased by peripheral neuromodulation.

  3. Phrenic Nerve Palsy as Initial Presentation of Large Retrosternal Goitre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakeem, Arsheed Hussain; Hakeem, Imtiyaz Hussain; Wani, Fozia Jeelani

    2016-12-01

    Unilateral phrenic nerve palsy as initial presentation of the retrosternal goitre is extremely rare event. This is a case report of a 57-year-old woman with history of cough and breathlessness of 3 months duration, unaware of the thyroid mass. She had large cervico-mediastinal goiter and chest radiograph revealed raised left sided hemidiaphragm. Chest CT scan did not reveal any lung parenchymal or mediastinal pathology. The patient underwent a total thyroidectomy through a cervical approach. The final pathology was in favor of multinodular goitre. Even after 1 year of follow up, phrenic nerve palsy did not improve indicating permanent damage. Phrenic nerve palsy as initial presentation of the retrosternal goitre is unusual event. This case is reported not only because of the rare nature of presentation, but also to make clinicians aware of the entity so that early intervention may prevent attendant morbidity.

  4. Electrophysiology of Cranial Nerve Testing: Trigeminal and Facial Nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzyka, Iryna M; Estephan, Bachir

    2018-01-01

    The clinical examination of the trigeminal and facial nerves provides significant diagnostic value, especially in the localization of lesions in disorders affecting the central and/or peripheral nervous system. The electrodiagnostic evaluation of these nerves and their pathways adds further accuracy and reliability to the diagnostic investigation and the localization process, especially when different testing methods are combined based on the clinical presentation and the electrophysiological findings. The diagnostic uniqueness of the trigeminal and facial nerves is their connectivity and their coparticipation in reflexes commonly used in clinical practice, namely the blink and corneal reflexes. The other reflexes used in the diagnostic process and lesion localization are very nerve specific and add more diagnostic yield to the workup of certain disorders of the nervous system. This article provides a review of commonly used electrodiagnostic studies and techniques in the evaluation and lesion localization of cranial nerves V and VII.

  5. Metabolite changes in the ipsilateral and contralateral cerebral hemispheres in rats with middle cerebral artery occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ruan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral ischemia not only causes pathological changes in the ischemic areas but also induces a series of secondary changes in more distal brain regions (such as the contralateral cerebral hemisphere. The impact of supratentorial lesions, which are the most common type of lesion, on the contralateral cerebellum has been studied in patients by positron emission tomography, single photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. In the present study, we investigated metabolite changes in the contralateral cerebral hemisphere after supratentorial unilateral ischemia using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-based metabonomics. The permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion model of ischemic stroke was established in rats. Rats were randomly divided into the middle cerebral artery occlusion 1-, 3-, 9- and 24-hour groups and the sham group. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to detect metabolites in the left and right cerebral hemispheres. Compared with the sham group, the concentrations of lactate, alanine, γ-aminobutyric acid, choline and glycine in the ischemic cerebral hemisphere were increased in the acute stage, while the concentrations of N-acetyl aspartate, creatinine, glutamate and aspartate were decreased. This demonstrates that there is an upregulation of anaerobic glycolysis (shown by the increase in lactate, a perturbation of choline metabolism (suggested by the increase in choline, neuronal cell damage (shown by the decrease in N-acetyl aspartate and neurotransmitter imbalance (evidenced by the increase in γ-aminobutyric acid and glycine and by the decrease in glutamate and aspartate in the acute stage of cerebral ischemia. In the contralateral hemisphere, the concentrations of lactate, alanine, glycine, choline and aspartate were increased, while the concentrations of γ-aminobutyric acid, glutamate and creatinine were decreased. This suggests that there is a

  6. Inhibitory action of antioxidants (ascorbic acid or α-tocopherol on seizures and brain damage induced by pilocarpine in rats Ação inibitória de antioxidantes (ácido ascórbico e α-tocoferol nas convulsões e dano cerebral em ratos induzidos pela pilocarpina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana da Rocha Tomé

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Temporal lobe epilepsy is the most common form of epilepsy in humans. Oxidative stress is a mechanism of cell death induced by seizures. Antioxidant compounds have neuroprotective effects due to their ability to inhibit free radical production. The objectives of this work were to comparatively study the inhibitory action of antioxidants (ascorbic acid or α-tocopherol on behavioral changes and brain damage induced by high doses of pilocarpine, aiming to further clarify the mechanism of action of these antioxidant compounds. In order to determinate neuroprotective effects, we studied the effects of ascorbic acid (250 or 500 mg/kg, i.p. and α-tocopherol (200 or 400 mg/kg, i.p. on the behavior and brain lesions observed after seizures induced by pilocarpine (400 mg/kg, i.p., P400 model in rats. Ascorbic acid or α-tocopherol injections prior to pilocarpine suppressed behavioral seizure episodes. These findings suggested that free radicals can be produced during brain damage induced by seizures. In the P400 model, ascorbic acid and α-tocopherol significantly decreased cerebral damage percentage. Antioxidant compounds can exert neuroprotective effects associated with inhibition of free radical production. These results highlighted the promising therapeutic potential of ascorbic acid and α-tocopherol in treatments for neurodegenerative diseases.A epilepsia de lobo temporal é a mais comum forma de epilepsia em humanos. O estresse oxidativo é um dos mecanismos de morte celular induzida pelas crises convulsivas. Os compostos antioxidantes apresentam efeitos neuroprotetores devido à sua capacidade de inibir a produção de radicais livres. Os objetivos do presente trabalho foram estudar de forma comparativa a ação inibitória de antioxidantes (ácido ascórbico e α-tocoferol sobre as alterações comportamentais e histopatológicas no hipocampo de ratos após convulsões induzidas pela pilocarpina. A fim de determinar os efeitos neuroprotetores

  7. Side Effects: Nerve Problems (Peripheral Neuropathy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerve problems, such as peripheral neuropathy, can be caused by cancer treatment. Learn about signs and symptoms of nerve changes. Find out how to prevent or manage nerve problems during cancer treatment.

  8. Hydrogen sulfide intervention in focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-juan Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to explore the mechanism underlying the protective effects of hydrogen sulfide against neuronal damage caused by cerebral ischemia/reperfusion. We established the middle cerebral artery occlusion model in rats via the suture method. Ten minutes after middle cerebral artery occlusion, the animals were intraperitoneally injected with hydrogen sulfide donor compound sodium hydrosulfide. Immunofluorescence revealed that the immunoreactivity of P2X 7 in the cerebral cortex and hippocampal CA1 region in rats with cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury decreased with hydrogen sulfide treatment. Furthermore, treatment of these rats with hydrogen sulfide significantly lowered mortality, the Longa neurological deficit scores, and infarct volume. These results indicate that hydrogen sulfide may be protective in rats with local cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury by down-regulating the expression of P2X 7 receptors.

  9. Involvement of hypoglossal and recurrent laryngeal nerves on swallowing pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimura, Takanori; Suzuki, Taku; Yoshihara, Midori; Sakai, Shogo; Koshi, Naomi; Ashiga, Hirokazu; Shiraishi, Naru; Tsuji, Kojun; Magara, Jin; Inoue, Makoto

    2018-05-01

    Swallowing pressure generation is important to ensure safe transport of an ingested bolus without aspiration or leaving residue in the pharynx. To clarify the mechanism, we measured swallowing pressure at the oropharynx (OP), upper esophageal sphincter (UES), and cervical esophagus (CE) using a specially designed manometric catheter in anesthetized rats. A swallow, evoked by punctate mechanical stimulation to the larynx, was identified by recording activation of the suprahyoid and thyrohyoid muscles using electromyography (EMG). Areas under the curve of the swallowing pressure at the OP, UES, and CE from two trials indicated high intrasubject reproducibility. Effects of transecting the hypoglossal nerve (12N) and recurrent laryngeal nerve (RLN) on swallowing were investigated. Following bilateral hypoglossal nerve transection (Bi-12Nx), OP pressure was significantly decreased, and time intervals between peaks of thyrohyoid EMG bursts and OP pressure were significantly shorter. Decreased OP pressure and shortened times between peaks of thyrohyoid EMG bursts and OP pressure following Bi-12Nx were significantly increased and longer, respectively, after covering the hard and soft palates with acrylic material. UES pressure was significantly decreased after bilateral RLN transection compared with that before transection. These results suggest that the 12N and RLN play crucial roles in OP and UES pressure during swallowing, respectively. We speculate that covering the palates with a palatal augmentation prosthesis may reverse the reduced swallowing pressure in patients with 12N or tongue damage by the changes of the sensory information and of the contact between the tongue and a palates. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Hypoglossal nerve transection reduced swallowing pressure at the oropharynx. Covering the hard and soft palates with acrylic material may reverse the reduced swallowing function caused by hypoglossal nerve damage. Recurrent laryngeal nerve transection reduced upper

  10. Duplicated middle cerebral artery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Jesus; Machado, Calixto; Scherle, Claudio; Hierro, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Duplicated middle cerebral artery (DMCA) is an anomalous vessel arising from the internal carotid artery. The incidence DMCA is relatively law, and an association between this anomaly and cerebral aneurysms has been documented. There is a controversy whether DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is an important fact to consider in aneurysm surgery. We report the case of a 34-year-old black woman who suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage and the angiography a left DMCA, and an aneurysm in an inferior branch of the main MCA. The DMCA and the MCA had perforating arteries. The aneurysm was clipped without complications. The observation of perforating arteries in our patient confirms that the DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is very important to be considered in cerebral aneurysms surgery. Moreover, the DMCA may potentially serve as a collateral blood supply to the MCA territory in cases of MCA occlusion. PMID:22140405

  11. Diaschisis with cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, R.; Reivich, M.; Goldberg, H.; Banka, R.; Greenberg, J.

    1977-01-01

    Fifteen patients admitted to Philadelphia General Hospital with acute strokes had repeated measurements of cerebral blood flow measured by the /sup 133/X inhalation method. A progressive decline in cerebral blood flow in both hemispheres was observed during the first week after infarction in twelve of these patients. This decline could be partially explained by loss of autoregulation, but could not be correlated with level of consciousness, clinical status of PCO2. This progressive decline in flow in the non-ischemic hemisphere indicates a process more complex than a simple destruction of axonal afferants to neurons as implied by the term diaschisis. The flow changes in the non-ischemic hemisphere are likely caused by a combination of the immediate effects of decreased neuronal stimulation modified by loss of autoregulation, release of vasoactive substances, cerebral edema, and other factors.

  12. Cerebral hemodynamics in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hachinski, V C; Olesen, Jes; Norris, J W

    1977-01-01

    Clinical and angiographic findings in migraine are briefly reviewed in relation to cerebral hemodynamic changes shown by regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) studies. Three cases of migraine studied by the intracarotid xenon 133 method during attacks are reported. In classic migraine, with typical...... prodromal symptoms, a decrease in cerebral blood flow has been demonstrated during the aura. Occasionally, this flow decrease persists during the headache phase. In common migraine, where such prodromata are not seen, a flow decrease has not been demonstrated. During the headache phase of both types...... of migraine, rCBF has usually been found to be normal or in the high range of normal values. The high values may represent postischemic hyperemia, but are probably more frequently secondary to arousal caused by pain. Thus, during the headache phase rCBF may be subnormal, normal or high. These findings do...

  13. Cerebral fat embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamoto, Toshihisa; Sawada, Yusuke; Yukioka, Tetsuo; Nishide, Kazuyuki; Yoshioka, Toshiharu

    1982-01-01

    A case of cerebral fat embolism is reported. A 18-year-old patient with multiple bone fractures was in semiconma immediately after an injury. Brain CT showed no brain swelling or intracranial hematoma. Hypoxemia and alcoholemia were noted on admission, which returned to normal without improvement of consciousness level. In addition, respiratory symptoms with positive radiographic changes, tachycardia, pyrexia, sudden drop in hemoglobin level, and sudden thrombocytopenia developed. These symptoms were compatible with Gurd's criteria of systemic fat embolism. Eight days after injury, multiple low density areas appeared on CT and disappeared within the subsequent two weeks, and subdural effusion with cerebral atrophy developed. These CT findings were not considered due to cerebral trauma. Diagnosis of cerebral fat embolism was made. The subdural effusion was drained. Neurologic and pulmonary recoveries took place slowly and one month following the injury the patient became alert and exhibited fully coordinated limb movement. The CT scans of the present case well corresponded with hitherto reported pathological findings. Petechiae in the white matter must have developed on the day of injury, which could not be detected by CT examination. It is suggested that some petechial regions fused to purpuras and then gradually resolved when they were detected as multiple low density areas on CT. CT in the purpuras phase would have shown these lesions as high density areas. These lesions must have healed with formation of tiny scars and blood pigment which were demonstrated as the disappearance of multiple low density areas by CT examination. Cerebral atrophy and subsequent subdural effusion developed as a result of demyelination. The patient took the typical clinical course of cerebral fat embolism and serial CT scans served for its assessment. (author)

  14. Diagnostic nerve ultrasonography; Diagnostische Nervensonographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeumer, T. [Universitaet zu Luebeck CBBM, Haus 66, Institut fuer Neurogenetik, Luebeck (Germany); Grimm, A. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Neurologie, Tuebingen (Germany); Schelle, T. [Staedtisches Klinikum Dessau, Neurologische Klinik, Dessau (Germany)

    2017-03-15

    For the diagnostics of nerve lesions an imaging method is necessary to visualize peripheral nerves and their surrounding structures for an etiological classification. Clinical neurological and electrophysiological investigations provide functional information about nerve lesions. The information provided by a standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination is inadequate for peripheral nerve diagnostics; however, MRI neurography is suitable but on the other hand a resource and time-consuming method. Using ultrasonography for peripheral nerve diagnostics. With ultrasonography reliable diagnostics of entrapment neuropathies and traumatic nerve lesions are possible. The use of ultrasonography for neuropathies shows that a differentiation between different forms is possible. Nerve ultrasonography is an established diagnostic tool. In addition to the clinical examination and clinical electrophysiology, structural information can be obtained, which results in a clear improvement in the diagnostics. Ultrasonography has become an integral part of the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in neurophysiological departments. Nerve ultrasonography is recommended for the diagnostic work-up of peripheral nerve lesions in addition to clinical and electrophysiological investigations. It should be used in the clinical work-up of entrapment neuropathies, traumatic nerve lesions and spacy-occupying lesions of nerves. (orig.) [German] Fuer die Diagnostik von Nervenlaesionen ist ein bildgebendes Verfahren zur Darstellung des peripheren Nervs und seiner ihn umgebenden Strukturen fuer eine aetiologische Einordnung erforderlich. Mit der klinisch-neurologischen Untersuchung und Elektrophysiologie ist eine funktionelle Aussage ueber die Nervenlaesion moeglich. In der Standard-MRT-Untersuchung wird der periphere Nerv nur unzureichend gut dargestellt. Die MRT-Neurographie ist ein sehr gutes, aber auch zeit- und ressourcenintensives Verfahren. Nutzung des Ultraschalls fuer die

  15. Gammagraphy of cerebral perfusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, Silvia

    2003-01-01

    Important aspects of the gammagraphy of cerebral perfusion and the diverse clinical applications in the neurological diseases are comment in this article. We focus in the usefulness of the photon emission cerebral tomography (SPECT) and its capacity to cross the hemato encephalic barrier through the use of radiopharmacons like 99 mTc-H M-PAO and 99mTc-EDC, thus managing to offer functional data on the captantes neurons of the radiopharmacon. The clinical applications of SPECT are studied; cerebrovascular disease, transient ischemic attacks, dementias, Alzheimer disease, as well as other neurological diseases are referred. (The author)

  16. Experimental Focal Cerebral Ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Focal cerebral ischemia due to occlusion of a major cerebral artery is the cause of ischemic stroke which is a major reason of mortality, morbidity and disability in the populations of the developed countries. In the seven studies summarized in the thesis focal ischemia in rats induced by occlusion...... in the penumbra is recruited in the infarction process leading to a progressive growth of the infarct. The penumbra hence constitutes an important target for pharmacological treatment because of the existence of a therapeutic time window during which treatment with neuroprotective compounds may prevent...

  17. Peripheral nerve conduits: technology update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslantunali, D; Dursun, T; Yucel, D; Hasirci, N; Hasirci, V

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury is a worldwide clinical problem which could lead to loss of neuronal communication along sensory and motor nerves between the central nervous system (CNS) and the peripheral organs and impairs the quality of life of a patient. The primary requirement for the treatment of complete lesions is a tension-free, end-to-end repair. When end-to-end repair is not possible, peripheral nerve grafts or nerve conduits are used. The limited availability of autografts, and drawbacks of the allografts and xenografts like immunological reactions, forced the researchers to investigate and develop alternative approaches, mainly nerve conduits. In this review, recent information on the various types of conduit materials (made of biological and synthetic polymers) and designs (tubular, fibrous, and matrix type) are being presented. PMID:25489251

  18. Correlation between synaptic plasticity, associated proteins, and rehabilitation training in a rat model of cerebral infarction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan Yang; Qian Yu

    2008-01-01

    All motions provide sensory, motoric, and reflexive input to the central nervous system, as well as playing an important role in cerebral functional plasticity and compensation. Cerebral plasticity has become the theoretical basis of neurorehabilitation. Studies of cerebrovascular disease, in particular, demonstrate that regeneration is accompanied by multiple forms of plasticity, such as functional and structural, in different phases of stroke rehabilitation. This study was designed to measure synaptic plasticity and expression of associated proteins to analyze the effect of rehabilitation training on learning and memory in a rat model of cerebral infarction. Results suggest that rehabilitation training increases expression of nerve growth factor associated protein 43, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and neural cell adhesion molecules, and also promotes cerebral functional plasticity.

  19. An unusual case of suprascapular nerve neuropathy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriakides Theodoros

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Suprascapular nerve neuropathy constitutes an unusual cause of shoulder weakness, with the most common etiology being nerve compression from a ganglion cyst at the suprascapular or spinoglenoid notch. We present a puzzling case of a man with suprascapular nerve neuropathy that may have been associated with an appendectomy. The case was attributed to nerve injury as the most likely cause that may have occurred during improper post-operative patient mobilization. Case presentation A 23-year-old Caucasian man presented to an orthopedic surgeon with a history of left shoulder weakness of several weeks' duration. The patient complained of pain and inability to lift minimal weight, such as a glass of water, following an appendectomy. His orthopedic clinical examination revealed obvious atrophy of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles and 2 of 5 muscle strength scores on flexion resistance and external rotation resistance. Magnetic resonance imaging showed diffuse high signal intensity within the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles and early signs of minimal fatty infiltration consistent with denervation changes. No compression of the suprascapular nerve in the suprascapular or spinoglenoid notch was noted. Electromyographic studies showed active denervation effects in the supraspinatus muscle and more prominent in the left infraspinatus muscle. The findings were compatible with damage to the suprascapular nerve, especially the part supplying the infraspinatus muscle. On the basis of the patient's history, clinical examination, and imaging studies, the diagnosis was suspected to be associated with a possible traction injury of the suprascapular nerve that could have occurred during the patient's transfer from the operating table following an appendectomy. Conclusion Our case report may provide important insight into patient transfer techniques used by hospital personnel, may elucidate the clinical significance of careful

  20. Transnasal Endoscopic Optic Nerve Decompression in Post Traumatic Optic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Devang; Gadodia, Monica

    2018-03-01

    To quantify the successful outcome in patients following optic nerve decompression in post traumatic unilateral optic neuropathy in form of improvement in visual acuity. A prospective study was carried out over a period of 5 years (January 2011 to June 2016) at civil hospital Ahmedabad. Total 20 patients were selected with optic neuropathy including patients with direct and indirect trauma to unilateral optic nerve, not responding to conservative management, leading to optic neuropathy and subsequent impairment in vision and blindness. Decompression was done via Transnasal-Ethmo-sphenoidal route and outcome was assessed in form of post-operative visual acuity improvement at 1 month, 6 months and 1 year follow up. After surgical decompression complete recovery of visual acuity was achieved in 16 (80%) patients and partial recovery in 4 (20%). Endoscopic transnasal approach is beneficial in traumatic optic neuropathy not responding to steroid therapy and can prevent permanent disability if earlier intervention is done prior to irreversible damage to the nerve. Endoscopic optic nerve surgery can decompress the traumatic and oedematous optic nerve with proper exposure of orbital apex and optic canal without any major intracranial, intraorbital and transnasal complications.

  1. Noninvasive transcranial stimulation of rat abducens nerve by focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyungmin; Taghados, Seyed Javid; Fischer, Krisztina; Maeng, Lee-So; Park, Shinsuk; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2012-09-01

    Nonpharmacologic and nonsurgical transcranial modulation of the nerve function may provide new opportunities in evaluation and treatment of cranial nerve diseases. This study investigates the possibility of using low-intensity transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) to selectively stimulate the rat abducens nerve located above the base of the skull. FUS (frequencies of 350 kHz and 650 kHz) operating in a pulsed mode was applied to the abducens nerve of Sprague-Dawley rats under stereotactic guidance. The abductive eyeball movement ipsilateral to the side of sonication was observed at 350 kHz, using the 0.36-msec tone burst duration (TBD), 1.5-kHz pulse repetition frequency (PRF), and the overall sonication duration of 200 msec. Histologic and behavioral monitoring showed no signs of disruption in the blood brain barrier (BBB), as well as no damage to the nerves and adjacent brain tissue resulting from the sonication. As a novel functional neuro-modulatory modality, the pulsed application of FUS has potential for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in diseases of the peripheral nervous system. Copyright © 2012 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Selectivity and Longevity of Peripheral-Nerve and Machine Interfaces: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usman Ghafoor

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available For those individuals with upper-extremity amputation, a daily normal living activity is no longer possible or it requires additional effort and time. With the aim of restoring their sensory and motor functions, theoretical and technological investigations have been carried out in the field of neuroprosthetic systems. For transmission of sensory feedback, several interfacing modalities including indirect (non-invasive, direct-to-peripheral-nerve (invasive, and cortical stimulation have been applied. Peripheral nerve interfaces demonstrate an edge over the cortical interfaces due to the sensitivity in attaining cortical brain signals. The peripheral nerve interfaces are highly dependent on interface designs and are required to be biocompatible with the nerves to achieve prolonged stability and longevity. Another criterion is the selection of nerves that allows minimal invasiveness and damages as well as high selectivity for a large number of nerve fascicles. In this paper, we review the nerve-machine interface modalities noted above with more focus on peripheral nerve interfaces, which are responsible for provision of sensory feedback. The invasive interfaces for recording and stimulation of electro-neurographic signals include intra-fascicular, regenerative-type interfaces that provide multiple contact channels to a group of axons inside the nerve and the extra-neural-cuff-type interfaces that enable interaction with many axons around the periphery of the nerve. Section Current Prosthetic Technology summarizes the advancements made to date in the field of neuroprosthetics toward the achievement of a bidirectional nerve-machine interface with more focus on sensory feedback. In the Discussion section, the authors propose a hybrid interface technique for achieving better selectivity and long-term stability using the available nerve interfacing techniques.

  3. Selectivity and Longevity of Peripheral-Nerve and Machine Interfaces: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafoor, Usman; Kim, Sohee; Hong, Keum-Shik

    2017-01-01

    For those individuals with upper-extremity amputation, a daily normal living activity is no longer possible or it requires additional effort and time. With the aim of restoring their sensory and motor functions, theoretical and technological investigations have been carried out in the field of neuroprosthetic systems. For transmission of sensory feedback, several interfacing modalities including indirect (non-invasive), direct-to-peripheral-nerve (invasive), and cortical stimulation have been applied. Peripheral nerve interfaces demonstrate an edge over the cortical interfaces due to the sensitivity in attaining cortical brain signals. The peripheral nerve interfaces are highly dependent on interface designs and are required to be biocompatible with the nerves to achieve prolonged stability and longevity. Another criterion is the selection of nerves that allows minimal invasiveness and damages as well as high selectivity for a large number of nerve fascicles. In this paper, we review the nerve-machine interface modalities noted above with more focus on peripheral nerve interfaces, which are responsible for provision of sensory feedback. The invasive interfaces for recording and stimulation of electro-neurographic signals include intra-fascicular, regenerative-type interfaces that provide multiple contact channels to a group of axons inside the nerve and the extra-neural-cuff-type interfaces that enable interaction with many axons around the periphery of the nerve. Section Current Prosthetic Technology summarizes the advancements made to date in the field of neuroprosthetics toward the achievement of a bidirectional nerve-machine interface with more focus on sensory feedback. In the Discussion section, the authors propose a hybrid interface technique for achieving better selectivity and long-term stability using the available nerve interfacing techniques. PMID:29163122

  4. Triple Peripheral Nerve Injury Accompanying to Traumatic Brain Injury: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ižlknur Can

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Secondary injuries especially extremity fractures may be seen concurrently with traumatic brain injury (TBI. Peripheral nerve damages may accompany to these fractures and may be missed out, especially in acute stage. In this case report; damage of radial, ulnar and median nerves which was developed secondarily to distal humerus fracture that could not be detected in acute stage, in a patient who had motor vehicle accident (MVA. 29-year-old male patient was admitted with weakness in the right upper extremity. 9 months ago, he had traumatic brain injury because of MVA, and fracture of distal humerus was detected in follow-ups. Upon the suspect of the peripheral nerve injury, the diagnosis was confirmed with ENMG. The patient responded well to the rehabilitation program treatment. In a TBI patient, it must be kept in mind that there might be a secondary trauma and therefore peripheral nerve lesions may accompany to TBI.

  5. Storage and allogeneic transplantation of peripheral nerve using a green tea polyphenol solution in a canine model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noguchi Takashi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In our previous study, allogeneic-transplanted peripheral nerve segments preserved for one month in a polyphenol solution at 4°C could regenerate nerves in rodents demonstrated the same extent of nerve regeneration as isogeneic fresh nerve grafts. The present study investigated whether the same results could be obtained in a canine model. Methods A sciatic nerve was harvested from a male beagle dog, divided into fascicules of Sry and β-actin to investigate whether cells of donor origin remained in the allogeneic nerve segments. FK506 concentration was measured in blood samples taken before the animals were killed. Results The total myelinated axon numbers and amplitudes of the muscle action potentials correlated significantly with the blood FK506 concentration. Few axons were observed in the allogeneic-transplanted nerve segments in the PA0.025 group. PCR showed clear Sry-specific bands in specimens from the PA0.1 and PA0.05 groups but not from the PA0.025 group. Conclusions Successful nerve regeneration was observed in the polyphenol-treated nerve allografts when transplanted in association with a therapeutic dose of FK506. The data indicate that polyphenols can protect nerve tissue from ischemic damage for one month; however, the effects of immune suppression seem insufficient to permit allogeneic transplantation of peripheral nerves in a canine model.

  6. Sulforaphane exerts neuroprotective effects via suppression of the inflammatory response in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Li-Li; Xing, Guo-Ping; Yu, Yin; Liang, Hui; Yu, Tian-Xia; Zheng, Wei-Hong; Lai, Tian-Bao

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory damage plays an important role in cerebral ischemic pathogenesis and may represent a promising target for treatment. Sulforaphane exerts protective effects in a rat model of focal cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury by alleviating brain edema. However, the possible mechanisms of sulforaphane after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury have not been fully elucidated. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effect of sulforaphane on inflammatory reaction and the potent...

  7. Cerebral atrophic and degenerative changes following various cerebral diseases, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kino, Masao; Anno, Izumi; Yano, Yuhiko; Anno, Yasuro.

    1980-01-01

    Patients having cerebral atrophic and degenerative changes following hypoglycemia, cerebral contusion, or cerebral hypoxia including cerebrovascular disorders were reported. Description was made as to cerebral changes visualized on CT images and clinical courses of a patient who revived 10 minutes after heart stoppage during neurosurgery, a newborn with asphyxia, a patient with hypoglycemia, a patient who suffered from asphyxia by an accident 10 years before, a patient with carbon monoxide poisoning at an acute stage, a patient who had carbon monoxide poisoning 10 years before, a patient with diffuse cerebral ischemic changes, a patient with cerebral edema around metastatic tumor, a patient with respiration brain, a patient with neurological sequelae after cerebral contusion, a patient who had an operation to excise right parietal lobe artery malformation, and a patient who was shooted by a machine gun and had a lead in the brain for 34 years. (Tsunoda, M.)

  8. Peripheral Nerve Injury in Developing Rats Reorganizes Representation Pattern in Motor Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, John P.; Sanes, Jerome N.

    1987-02-01

    We investigated the effect of neonatal nerve lesions on cerebral motor cortex organization by comparing the cortical motor representation of normal adult rats with adult rats that had one forelimb removed on the day of birth. Mapping of cerebral neocortex with electrical stimulation revealed an altered relationship between the motor cortex and the remaining muscles. Whereas distal forelimb movements are normally elicited at the lowest threshold in the motor cortex forelimb area, the same stimuli activated shoulder and trunk muscles in experimental animals. In addition, an expanded cortical representation of intact body parts was present and there was an absence of a distinct portion of motor cortex. These data demonstrate that representation patterns in motor cortex can be altered by peripheral nerve injury during development.

  9. The surgical anatomy of the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve in relation to incisions for anteromedial knee surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerver, A L A; Leliveld, M S; den Hartog, D; Verhofstad, M H J; Kleinrensink, G J

    2013-12-04

    Iatrogenic injury to the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve is a common complication of surgical approaches to the anteromedial side of the knee. A detailed description of the relative anatomic course of the nerve is important to define clinical guidelines and minimize iatrogenic damage during anterior knee surgery. In twenty embalmed knees, the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve was dissected. With use of a computer-assisted surgical anatomy mapping tool, safe and risk zones, as well as the location-dependent direction of the nerve, were calculated. The location of the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve is highly variable, and no definite safe zone could be identified. The infrapatellar branch runs in neither a purely horizontal nor a vertical course. The course of the branch is location-dependent. Medially, it runs a nearly vertical course; medial to the patellar tendon, it has a -45° distal-lateral course; and on the patella and patellar tendon, it runs a close to horizontal-lateral course. Three low risk zones for iatrogenic nerve injury were identified: one is on the medial side of the knee, at the level of the tibial tuberosity, where a -45° oblique incision is least prone to damage the nerves, and two zones are located medial to the patellar apex (cranial and caudal), where close to horizontal incisions are least prone to damage the nerves. The infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve is at risk for iatrogenic damage in anteromedial knee surgery, especially when longitudinal incisions are made. There are three low risk zones for a safer anterior approach to the knee. The direction of the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve is location-dependent. To minimize iatrogenic damage to the nerve, the direction of incisions should be parallel to the direction of the nerve when technically possible. These findings suggest that iatrogenic damage of the infrapatellar branch of the saphenous nerve can be minimized in anteromedial

  10. Effectiveness of sugammadex for cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbilgin, Sule; Yılmaz, Osman; Ergur, Bekir Ugur; Hancı, Volkan; Ozbal, Seda; Yurtlu, Serhan; Gunenc, Sakize Ferim; Kuvaki, Bahar; Kucuk, Burcu Ataseven; Sisman, Ali Rıza

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral ischemia may cause permanent brain damage and behavioral dysfunction. The efficacy and mechanisms of pharmacological treatments administered immediately after cerebral damage are not fully known. Sugammadex is a licensed medication. As other cyclodextrins have not passed the necessary phase tests, trade preparations are not available, whereas sugammadex is frequently used in clinical anesthetic practice. Previous studies have not clearly described the effects of the cyclodextrin family on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) damage. The aim of this study was to determine whether sugammadex had a neuroprotective effect against transient global cerebral ischemia. Animals were assigned to control, sham-operated, S 16 and S 100 groups. Transient global cerebral ischemia was induced by 10-minute occlusion of the bilateral common carotid artery, followed by 24-hour reperfusion. At the end of the experiment, neurological behavior scoring was performed on the rats, followed by evaluation of histomorphological and biochemical measurements. Sugammadex 16 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg improved neurological outcome, which was associated with reductions in both histological and neurological scores. The hippocampus TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling) and caspase results in the S 16 and S 100 treatment groups were significantly lower than those of the I/R group. Neurological scores in the treated groups were significantly higher than those of the I/R group. The study showed that treatment with 16 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg sugammadex had a neuroprotective effect in a transient global cerebral I/R rat model. However, 100 mg/kg sugammadex was more neuroprotective in rats. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  11. Effectiveness of sugammadex for cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sule Ozbilgin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral ischemia may cause permanent brain damage and behavioral dysfunction. The efficacy and mechanisms of pharmacological treatments administered immediately after cerebral damage are not fully known. Sugammadex is a licensed medication. As other cyclodextrins have not passed the necessary phase tests, trade preparations are not available, whereas sugammadex is frequently used in clinical anesthetic practice. Previous studies have not clearly described the effects of the cyclodextrin family on cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R damage. The aim of this study was to determine whether sugammadex had a neuroprotective effect against transient global cerebral ischemia. Animals were assigned to control, sham-operated, S 16 and S 100 groups. Transient global cerebral ischemia was induced by 10-minute occlusion of the bilateral common carotid artery, followed by 24-hour reperfusion. At the end of the experiment, neurological behavior scoring was performed on the rats, followed by evaluation of histomorphological and biochemical measurements. Sugammadex 16 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg improved neurological outcome, which was associated with reductions in both histological and neurological scores. The hippocampus TUNEL (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling and caspase results in the S 16 and S 100 treatment groups were significantly lower than those of the I/R group. Neurological scores in the treated groups were significantly higher than those of the I/R group. The study showed that treatment with 16 mg/kg and 100 mg/kg sugammadex had a neuroprotective effect in a transient global cerebral I/R rat model. However, 100 mg/kg sugammadex was more neuroprotective in rats.

  12. Cranio-cerebral gunshot wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Majer1, G. Iacob2

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Cranio-cerebral gunshots wounds(CCGW are the most devastating injuriesto the central nervous system, especiallymade by high velocity bullets, the mostdevastating, severe and usually fatal type ofmissile injury to the head.Objective: To investigate and compare,using a retrospective study on five cases theclinical outcomes of CCGW. Predictors ofpoor outcome were: older age, delayedmode of transportation, low admissionCGS score with haemodynamic instability,CT visualization of diffuse brain damage,bihemispheric, multilobar injuries withlateral and midline sagittal planestrajectories made by penetrating highvelocity bullets fired from a very closerange, brain stem and ventricular injurywith intraventricular and/or subarachnoidhemorrhage, mass effect and midline shift,evidence of herniation and/or hematomas,high ICP and/or hypotension, abnormalcoagulation states on admission ordisseminated intravascular coagulation. Lessharmful effects were generated by retainedmissiles, bone fragments with CNSinfection, DAI lesions and neuronaldamages associated to cavitation, seizures.Material and methods: 5 patients (4 maleand 1 female, age ranged 22-65 years, withCCGW, during the period 2004-2009,caused by military conflict and accidentalfiring. After initial resuscitation all patientswere assessed on admission by the GlasgowComa Scale (GCS. After investigations: Xrayskull, brain CT, Angio-CT, cerebralMRI, SPECT; baseline investigations,neurological, haemodynamic andcoagulability status all patients underwentsurgical treatment following emergencyintervention. The survival, mortality andfunctional outcome were evaluated byGlasgow Outcome Scale (GOS score.Results: Referring on five cases weevaluate on a retrospective study the clinicaloutcome, imagistics, microscopic studies onneuronal and axonal damage generated bytemporary cavitation along the cerebralbullet’s track, therapeutics, as the review ofthe literature. Two patients with anadmission CGS 9 and 10

  13. Cerebral malaria: susceptibility weighted MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinit Baliyan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral malaria is one of the fatal complications of Plasmodium falciparum infection. Pathogenesis involves cerebral microangiopathy related to microvascular plugging by infected red blood cells. Conventional imaging with MRI and CT do not reveal anything specific in case of cerebral malaria. Susceptibility weighted imaging, a recent advance in the MRI, is very sensitive to microbleeds related to microangiopathy. Histopathological studies in cerebral malaria have revealed microbleeds in brain parenchyma secondary to microangiopathy. Susceptibility weighted imaging, being exquisitely sensitive to microbleeds may provide additional information and improve the diagnostic accuracy of MRI in cerebral malaria.

  14. High Altitude Cerebral Edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-01

    described neuropathological findings of cerebral edema and wi4espread petechial hemorrhages in two HAPE fatalities and later reported (52...lethargy, thirst, indigestion, hysterical outburst o: other behavior disturbances, decreased concentration, fever , couhh and peripheral edema (52...autopsy results from the two fatalities in their series. In both cases multiple, widespread petechial hemorrhages were noted throughout the brain. One

  15. Ultrasound assessment on selected peripheral nerve pathologies. Part I: Entrapment neuropathies of the upper limb – excluding carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berta Kowalska

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US is one of the methods for imaging entrapment neuropathies, post-trau‑ matic changes to nerves, nerve tumors and postoperative complications to nerves. This type of examination is becoming more and more popular, not only for economic reasons, but also due to its value in making accurate diagnosis. It provides a very precise assess‑ ment of peripheral nerve trunk pathology – both in terms of morphology and localization. During examination there are several options available to the specialist: the making of a dynamic assessment, observation of pain radiation through the application of precise palpation and the comparison of resultant images with the contra lateral limb. Entrap‑ ment neuropathies of the upper limb are discussed in this study, with the omission of median nerve neuropathy at the level of the carpal canal, as extensive literature on this subject exists. The following pathologies are presented: pronator teres muscle syndrome, anterior interosseus nerve neuropathy, ulnar nerve groove syndrome and cubital tun‑ nel syndrome, Guyon’s canal syndrome, radial nerve neuropathy, posterior interosseous nerve neuropathy, Wartenberg’s disease, suprascapular nerve neuropathy and thoracic outlet syndrome. Peripheral nerve examination technique has been presented in previous articles presenting information about peripheral nerve anatomy [Journal of Ultrasonog‑ raphy 2012; 12 (49: 120–163 – Normal and sonographic anatomy of selected peripheral nerves. Part I: Sonohistology and general principles of examination, following the exam‑ ple of the median nerve; Part II: Peripheral nerves of the upper limb; Part III: Peripheral nerves of the lower limb]. In this article potential compression sites of particular nerves are discussed, taking into account pathomechanisms of damage, including predisposing anatomical variants (accessory muscles. The parameters of ultrasound assessment have been established – echogenicity and

  16. Sensory nerve function and auto-mutilation after reconstruction of various gap lengths with nerve guides and autologous nerve grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Dunnen, WFA; Meek, MF

    The aim of this study was to evaluate sensory nerve recovery and auto-mutilation after reconstruction of various lengths of nerve gaps in the sciatic nerve of the rat, using different techniques. Group 4, in which the longest nerve gap (15 mm) was reconstructed with a thin-walled

  17. Functional neuroimaging in the assessment of cerebral ischaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartor, K.; Heiland, S.

    1997-01-01

    Cerebral infarct causes over 170, 000 deaths per year in the United States. Recent developments in neuroimaging are providing an insight into focal cerebral ischaemia, including its pathophysiology and the area of brain at risk. Perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) allows evaluation of the blood supply to the ischaemic area, and diffusion-weighted MR permits assessment of tissue damage. Although both functional imaging techniques require some refinement, it is likely that they will soon become part of the normal clinical routine and allow accurate characterisation of pathology. It is expected that this may eventually lead to the development of new treatments. (orig.)

  18. Hyperventilation, cerebral perfusion, and syncope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Immink, R V; Pott, F C; Secher, N H

    2014-01-01

    dioxide (PaCO2) and oxygen (PaO2) partial pressures so that hypercapnia/hypoxia increases and hypocapnia/hyperoxia reduces global cerebral blood flow. Cerebral hypoperfusion and TLOC have been associated with hypocapnia related to HV. Notwithstanding pronounced cerebrovascular effects of PaCO2...... the contribution of a low PaCO2 to the early postural reduction in middle cerebral artery blood velocity is transient. HV together with postural stress does not reduce cerebral perfusion to such an extent that TLOC develops. However when HV is combined with cardiovascular stressors like cold immersion or reduced...... cardiac output brain perfusion becomes jeopardized. Whether, in patients with cardiovascular disease and/or defect, cerebral blood flow cerebral control HV-induced hypocapnia elicits cerebral hypoperfusion, leading to TLOC, remains to be established....

  19. Recurrent cerebral thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwamoto, Toshihiko; Abe, Shin-e; Kubo, Hideki; Hanyu, Haruo; Takasaki, Masaru

    1992-01-01

    Neuroradiological techniques were used to elucidate pathophysiology of recurrent cerebral thrombosis. Twenty-two patients with cerebral thrombosis who suffered a second attack under stable conditions more than 22 days after the initial stroke were studied. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolemia were also seen in 20, 8, and 12 patients, respectively. The patients were divided into three groups according to their symptoms: (I) symptoms differed between the first and second strokes (n=12); (II) initial symptoms were suddenly deteriorated (n=6); and (III) symptoms occurring in groups I and II were seen (n=4). In group I, contralateral hemiparesis or suprabulbar palsy was often associated with the initial hemiparesis. The time of recurrent stroke varied from 4 months to 9 years. CT and MRI showed not only lacunae in both hemispheres, but also deep white-matter ischemia of the centrum semi-ovale. In group II, hemiparesis or visual field defect was deteriorated early after the initial stroke. In addition, neuroimaging revealed that infarction in the posterior cerebral artery was progressed on the contralateral side, or that white matter lesion in the middle artery was enlarged in spite of small lesion in the left cerebral hemisphere. All patients in group III had deterioration of right hemiparesis associated with aphasia. CT, MRI, SPECT, and angiography indicated deep white-matter ischemia caused by main trunk lesions in the left hemisphere. Group III seemed to be equivalent to group II, except for laterality of the lesion. Neuroradiological assessment of the initial stroke may help to predict the mode of recurrence, although pathophysiology of cerebral thrombosis is complicated and varies from patient to patient. (N.K.)

  20. The ischemic perinatal brain damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crisi, G.; Mauri, C.; Canossi, G.; Della Giustina, E.

    1986-01-01

    The term ''hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy'' covers a large part of neonatal neuropathology including the various forms of intracerebral haemorrhage. In the present work the term is confined to ischemic brain edema and actual infarction, be it diffuse or focal. Eighteen newborns with CT evidence of ischemic brain lesions and infarctual necrosis were selected. Emphasis is placed on current data on neuropathology of ischemic brain edema and its CT appearance. Particular entities such as periventricular leukomalacia and multicystic encephalopathy are discussed. Relationship between CT and temporal profile of cerebral damage is emphasized in order to predict the structural sequelae and the longterm prognosis

  1. Intravenous DSA as a screening method for cerebral aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukaya, Hiroyuki; Sunami, Kaneo; Hoshi, Seiichiro; Komiya, Hirokazu; Saeki, Naokatsu.

    1990-01-01

    Intravenous DSA (IVDSA) was evaluated as a screening method for cerebral aneurysms. It was performed 390 times in 372 cases. Clinically useful images were obtained in 94.1% in all examinations. Nineteen aneurysms were visualized in cerebral angiography among 21 cases with SAH or 3rd nerve palsy, whereas in IVDSA 15 aneurysms were noted. Aneurysms not visualized in IVDSA were all 4 mm or less in size. Therefore, aneurysms, more than 4 mm in size, which have higher risks for rupture, were detectable in IVDSA. Based on these findings, IVDSA is considered to be clinically useful in screening for aneurysms. In all 372 cases, 33 aneurysms were suspected in IVDSA findings, whereas in cerebral angiography 21 of them turned to be aneurysms. Such 12 false positive cases were distributed mainly at anterior communicating and middle cerebral arteries. Improvement of image resolution, avoidance of vessel overlapping and proper selection of screened cases should be investigated for further development of this screening method. (author)

  2. The prognostic value of histopathology on lingual nerve neurosensory recovery after micro-neurosurgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hørberg, Mette; Reibel, Jesper; Kragelund, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Micro-neurosurgical repair is considered in permanent nerve damage but the outcome is unpredictable. We examined if histopathologic parameters of traumatic neuromas have a prognostic value for recovery in relation to lingual nerve micro-neurosurgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Retrospective...... case study on neurosensory recovery after micro-neurosurgery. Outcome variables were as follows: pain perception, two-point discrimination, and sum score of perception, before and 12 months after micro-neurosurgery. Predictive histopathology variables included size, nerve tissue, and inflammation...

  3. Unusual facial pain secondary to inferior alveolar nerve compression caused by impacted mandibular second molar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urvashi Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Symptoms of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN compression are reported during endodontic procedures, placement of implants, third molar surgeries, inferior alveolar nerve block injections, trauma, orthognathic injuries, ablative surgeries or use of medicaments. Presented is a rare case of a 15-year-old girl who reported severe pain in relation to an impacted permanent mandibular left second molar, the roots of which had entrapped the mandibular canal causing compression of IAN. Timely surgical intervention and sectional removal of the impacted molar is indicated to relieve the symptoms and avoid permanent damage to the nerve.

  4. Radiation-induced ocular motor cranial nerve palsies in patients with pituitary tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaphiades, Michael S; Spencer, Sharon A; Riley, Kristen; Francis, Courtney; Deitz, Luke; Kline, Lanning B

    2011-09-01

    Radiation therapy is often used in the treatment of pituitary tumor. Diplopia due to radiation damage to the ocular motor cranial nerves has been infrequently reported as a complication in this clinical setting. Retrospective case series of 6 patients (3 men and 3 women) with pituitary adenoma, all of whom developed diplopia following transsphenoidal resection of pituitary adenoma with subsequent radiation therapy. None had evidence of tumor involvement of the cavernous sinus. Five patients developed sixth nerve palsies, 3 unilateral and 2 bilateral, and in 1 patient, a sixth nerve palsy was preceded by a fourth cranial nerve palsy. One patient developed third nerve palsy. Five of the 6 patients had a growth hormone-secreting pituitary tumor with acromegaly. Following transsphenoidal surgery in all 6 patients (2 had 2 surgeries), 4 had 2 radiation treatments consisting of either radiosurgery (2 patients) or external beam radiation followed by radiosurgery (2 patients). Patients with pituitary tumors treated multiple times with various forms of radiation therapy are at risk to sustain ocular motor cranial nerve injury. The prevalence of acromegalic patients in this study reflects an aggressive attempt to salvage patients with recalcitrant growth hormone elevation and may place the patient at a greater risk for ocular motor cranial nerve damage.

  5. Different dose-dependent effects of ebselen in sciatic nerve ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyigit, Filiz; Kucuk, Aysegul; Akcer, Sezer; Tosun, Murat; Kocak, Fatma Emel; Kocak, Cengiz; Kocak, Ahmet; Metineren, Hasan; Genc, Osman

    2015-08-26

    Ebselen is an organoselenium compound which has strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. We investigated the neuroprotective role of ebselen pretreatment in rats with experimental sciatic nerve ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury. Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four groups (N = 7 in each group). Before sciatic nerve I/R was induced, ebselen was injected intraperitoneally at doses of 15 and 30 mg/kg. After a 2 h ischemia and a 3 h reperfusion period, sciatic nerve tissues were excised. Tissue levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and nitric oxide (NO), and activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase (CAT) were measured. Sciatic nerve tissues were also examined histopathologically. The 15 mg/kg dose of ebselen reduced sciatic nerve damage and apoptosis (pebselen. Conversely, the 30 mg/kg dose of ebselen increased sciatic nerve damage, apoptosis, iNOS positive cells (pebselen may cause different effects depending on the dose employed. Ebselen may be protective against sciatic nerve I/R injury via antioxidant and antiapoptotic activities at a 15 mg/kg dose, conversely higher doses may cause detrimental effects.

  6. Reperfusion promotes mitochondrial dysfunction following focal cerebral ischemia in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the cell death observed after cerebral ischemia, and several mechanisms for this dysfunction have been proposed. Reperfusion after transient cerebral ischemia may cause continued and even more severe damage to the brain. Many lines of evidence have shown that mitochondria suffer severe damage in response to ischemic injury. The purpose of this study was to observe the features of mitochondrial dysfunction in isolated mitochondria during the reperfusion period following focal cerebral ischemia. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were subjected to focal cerebral ischemia. Mitochondria were isolated using Percoll density gradient centrifugation. The isolated mitochondria were fixed for electron microscopic examination; calcium-induced mitochondrial swelling was quantified using spectrophotometry. Cyclophilin D was detected by Western blotting. Fluorescent probes were used to selectively stain mitochondria to measure their membrane potential and to measure reactive oxidative species production using flow cytometric analysis. RESULTS: Signs of damage were observed in the mitochondrial morphology after exposure to reperfusion. The mitochondrial swelling induced by Ca(2+ increased gradually with the increasing calcium concentration, and this tendency was exacerbated as the reperfusion time was extended. Cyclophilin D protein expression peaked after 24 hours of reperfusion. The mitochondrial membrane potential was decreased significantly during the reperfusion period, with the greatest decrease observed after 24 hours of reperfusion. The surge in mitochondrial reactive oxidative species occurred after 2 hours of reperfusion and was maintained at a high level during the reperfusion period. CONCLUSIONS: Reperfusion following focal cerebral ischemia induced significant mitochondrial morphological damage and Ca(2+-induced mitochondrial swelling. The mechanism of this swelling may be mediated by

  7. Microsurgical reconstruction of large nerve defects using autologous nerve grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoutis, N K; Gerostathopoulos, N E; Efstathopoulos, D G; Misitizis, D P; Bouchlis, G N; Anagnostou, S K

    1994-01-01

    Between 1986 and 1993, 643 patients with peripheral nerve trauma were treated in our clinic. Primary neurorraphy was performed in 431 of these patients and nerve grafting in 212 patients. We present the functional results after nerve grafting in 93 patients with large nerve defects who were followed for more than 2 years. Evaluation of function was based on the Medical Research Council (MRC) classification for motor and sensory recovery. Factors affecting functional outcome, such as age of the patient, denervation time, length of the defect, and level of the injury were noted. Good results according to the MRC classification were obtained in the majority of cases, although function remained less than that of the uninjured side.

  8. Electrophysiology of Extraocular Cranial Nerves: Oculomotor, Trochlear, and Abducens Nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, Praveen; Balzer, Jeffery R; Anetakis, Katherine; Crammond, Donald J; Thirumala, Parthasarathy D

    2018-01-01

    The utility of extraocular cranial nerve electrophysiologic recordings lies primarily in the operating room during skull base surgeries. Surgical manipulation during skull base surgeries poses a risk of injury to multiple cranial nerves, including those innervating extraocular muscles. Because tumors distort normal anatomic relationships, it becomes particularly challenging to identify cranial nerve structures. Studies have reported the benefits of using intraoperative spontaneous electromyographic recordings and compound muscle action potentials evoked by electrical stimulation in preventing postoperative neurologic deficits. Apart from surgical applications, electromyography of extraocular muscles has also been used to guide botulinum toxin injections in patients with strabismus and as an adjuvant diagnostic test in myasthenia gravis. In this article, we briefly review the rationale, current available techniques to monitor extraocular cranial nerves, technical difficulties, clinical and surgical applications, as well as future directions for research.

  9. Intrapontine malignant nerve sheath tumor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozić, Dusko; Nagulić, Mirjana; Samardzić, Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    . On pathological examination, the neoplasm appeared to be an intrapontine nerve sheath tumor originating most likely from the intrapontine segment of one of the cranial nerve fibres. The tumor showed exophytic growth, with consequent spread to adjacent subaracnoid space. MR spectroscopy revealed the presence......The primary source of malignant intracerebral nerve sheath tumors is still unclear We report the imaging and MR spectroscopic findings in a 39-year-old man with a very rare brain stem tumor MR examination revealed the presence of intraaxial brain stem tumor with a partial exophytic growth...

  10. Involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine: regional cerebral blood flow and blood flow velocity in migraine patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, L.H.; Jacobsen, V.B.; Haderslev, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves are closely associated with cranial blood vessels. CGRP is the most potent vasodilator known in isolated cerebral blood vessels. CGRP can induce migraine attacks, and two selective CGRP receptor antagonists are effective in the treatment...

  11. Electrical modulation of the sympathetic nervous system in order to augment cerebral blood flow : a protocol for an experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Laan, Mark; van Dijk, J. Marc C.; Staal, Michiel J.; Elting, Jan-Willem J.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Cerebral blood flow (CBF) is regulated by several mechanisms. Neurogenic control has been a matter of debate, even though several publications reported the effects of changes in sympathetic tone on CBF. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation and spinal-cord stimulation have been

  12. Radiation damage

    CERN Document Server

    Heijne, Erik H M; CERN. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    a) Radiation damage in organic materials. This series of lectures will give an overview of radiation effects on materials and components frequently used in accelerator engineering and experiments. Basic degradation phenomena will be presented for organic materials with comprehensive damage threshold doses for commonly used rubbers, thermoplastics, thermosets and composite materials. Some indications will be given for glass, scintillators and optical fibres. b) Radiation effects in semiconductor materials and devices. The major part of the time will be devoted to treat radiation effects in semiconductor sensors and the associated electronics, in particular displacement damage, interface and single event phenomena. Evaluation methods and practical aspects will be shown. Strategies will be developed for the survival of the materials under the expected environmental conditions of the LHC machine and detectors. I will describe profound revolution in our understanding of black holes and their relation to quantum me...

  13. POROSITY OF THE WALL OF A NEUROLAC (R) NERVE CONDUIT HAMPERS NERVE REGENERATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, Marcel F.; Den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.

    2009-01-01

    One way to improve nerve regeneration and bridge longer nerve gaps may be the use of semipermeable/porous conduits. With porosity less biomaterial is used for the nerve conduit. We evaluated the short-term effects of porous Neurolac (R) nerve conduits for in vivo peripheral nerve regeneration. In 10

  14. Poly(DL-lactide-epsilon-caprolactone) nerve guides perform better than autologous nerve grafts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DenDunnen, WFA; VanderLei, B; Schakenraad, JM; Stokroos, [No Value; Blaauw, E; Pennings, AJ; Robinson, PH; Bartels, H.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the speed and quality of nerve regeneration after reconstruction using a biodegradable nerve guide or an autologous nerve graft. We evaluated nerve regeneration using light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and morphometric analysis. Nerve regeneration

  15. The methods of PET cerebral imaging in focus localizing of epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Xia; Wang Xuemei

    2009-01-01

    Epilepsy is a very complicate and synthetic disease which influence patients intelligence and daily life acutely. But the cure rate of epilepsy is much low. One of the results is precise localization of disease which result in epilepsy. Today the main methods are electroencephalogram, magnetic resonance imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and PET cerebral imaging. PET cerebral imaging can locate epileptic foci of epilepsy from the brain organization metabolism, blood, the bio-chemical, function and oxygen consume, the chemistry pass quality and nerve receptor. It raises the rate of checking the epileptic foci and indicates a direction for the next treatments of epilepsy. (authors)

  16. Cerebral hypoxia and ischemia in preterm infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Ravarino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Premature birth is a major public health issue internationally affecting 13 million babies worldwide. Hypoxia and ischemia is probably the commonest type of acquired brain damage in preterm infants. The clinical manifestations of hypoxic-ischemic injury in survivors of premature birth include a spectrum of cerebral palsy and intellectual disabilities. Until recently, the extensive brain abnormalities in preterm neonates appeared to be related mostly to destructive processes that lead to substantial deletion of neurons, axons, and glia from necrotic lesions in the developing brain. Advances in neonatal care coincide with a growing body of evidence that the preterm gray and white matter frequently sustain less severe insults, where tissue destruction is the minor component. Periventricular leukomalacia (PVL is the major form of white matter injury and consists classically of focal necrotic lesions, with subsequent cyst formation, and a less severe but more diffuse injury to cerebral white mater, with prominent astrogliosis and microgliosis but without overt necrosis. With PVL a concomitant injury occurs to subplate neurons, located in the subcortical white matter. Severe hypoxic-ischemic insults that trigger significant white matter necrosis are accompanied by neuronal degeneration in cerebral gray and white matter. This review aims to illustrate signs of cerebral embryology of the second half of fetal life and correlate hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in the premature infant. This should help us better understand the symptoms early and late and facilitate new therapeutic strategies. Proceedings of the International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · Cagliari (Italy · October 25th, 2014 · The role of the clinical pathological dialogue in problem solving Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Peter Van Eyken

  17. Dynamic CT scan in cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Shigeki; Oka, Nobuo; Mitsuhashi, Hiromitsu

    1984-01-01

    Forty-two dynamic CT studies were performed on 27 patients with cerebral infarction (11 to 75 years of age), and perfusion patterns of low density areas on plain CT were evaluated. The initial studies were performed 1.5 hours to 60 days after acute onset. The following results were obtained. 1) The perfusion pattern in the low density area on plain CT varies among patients at any periods after onset, ranging from absent perfusion pattern to hyperfusion pattern. No consisitent perfusion pattern was obtained at any given time after onset. 2) Repeat dynamic CT revealed that the perfusion pattern in the low density area changed with time variously. 3) The perfusion pattern or change of perfusion pattern did not correlate with outcome of the patient. 4) At an acute stage, when no abnormal findings were obtained on plain CT, dynamic CT revealed abnormal perfusion pattern, enabling early diagnosis of cerebral infarction and estimation of blood perfusion in the infarcted area. In determining the treatment for the cerebral infarction at an acute stage, it is important to know the condition of the blood perfusion in the infarcted area. For the patients in whom recanalization has already taken place, mannitol or steroid might be effective, providing protection against severe brain edema and hemorrhagic infarction. On the other hand, if recanalization has not taken place, revascularization therapy might be worth trying within 6 hours since the onset. It has been said that ischemic brain damage may not be reversed by the revascularization after 6 hours. Dynamic CT is safe, less invasive, convenient and very useful for early diagnosis of the cerebral infarction and determination of the treatment at the acute stage. (J.P.N.)

  18. Bilateral absence of musculocutaneous nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathada V Ravishankar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Brachial plexus is an important group of spinal nerve plexus that supplies the muscles of the upper limb via the ventral rami of the Cervical 5 - Thoracic 1 fibers of the spinal nerves. It is not uncommon to notice the variations during cadaveric dissections in many regions of the body, at different levels, such as, roots, trunks, division, cords, communications, and branches as reported in the literature. Although the nerve supply of the body musculature takes place in the fetal life itself, its course, branching pattern, innervations, and communication can show variable patterns as the fetal development progresses. One such anomaly was noticed during our routine cadaveric dissection in the Department of Anatomy, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Belgaum, showing bilateral absence of the musculocutaneous nerve, which obviously drew the attention of the students of medicine, physiotherapy, and learning clinicians as well.

  19. Imaging of the facial nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veillon, F. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France)], E-mail: Francis.Veillon@chru-strasbourg.fr; Ramos-Taboada, L.; Abu-Eid, M. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Charpiot, A. [Service d' ORL, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Riehm, S. [Service de Radiologie I, Hopital de Hautepierre, 67098 Strasbourg Cedex (France)

    2010-05-15

    The facial nerve is responsible for the motor innervation of the face. It has a visceral motor function (lacrimal, submandibular, sublingual glands and secretion of the nose); it conveys a great part of the taste fibers, participates to the general sensory of the auricle (skin of the concha) and the wall of the external auditory meatus. The facial mimic, production of tears, nasal flow and salivation all depend on the facial nerve. In order to image the facial nerve it is mandatory to be knowledgeable about its normal anatomy including the course of its efferent and afferent fibers and about relevant technical considerations regarding CT and MR to be able to achieve high-resolution images of the nerve.

  20. Trigeminal nerve anatomy in neuropathic and non-neuropathic orofacial pain patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Sophie L; Gustin, Sylvia M; Eykman, Elizabeth N; Fowler, Gordon; Peck, Christopher C; Murray, Greg M; Henderson, Luke A

    2013-08-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia, painful trigeminal neuropathy, and painful temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are chronic orofacial pain conditions that are thought to have fundamentally different etiologies. Trigeminal neuralgia and neuropathy are thought to arise from damage to or pressure on the trigeminal nerve, whereas TMD results primarily from peripheral nociceptor activation. This study sought to assess the volume and microstructure of the trigeminal nerve in these 3 conditions. In 9 neuralgia, 18 neuropathy, 20 TMD, and 26 healthy controls, the trigeminal root entry zone was selected on high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance images and the volume (mm(3)) calculated. Additionally, using diffusion-tensor images (DTIs), the mean diffusivity and fractional anisotropy values of the trigeminal nerve root were calculated. Trigeminal neuralgia patients displayed a significant (47%) decrease in nerve volume but no change in DTI values. Conversely, trigeminal neuropathy subjects displayed a significant (40%) increase in nerve volume but again no change in DTI values. In contrast, TMD subjects displayed no change in volume or DTI values. The data suggest that the changes occurring within the trigeminal nerve are not uniform in all orofacial pain conditions. These structural and volume changes may have implications in diagnosis and management of different forms of chronic orofacial pain. This study reveals that neuropathic orofacial pain conditions are associated with changes in trigeminal nerve volume, whereas non-neuropathic orofacial pain is not associated with any change in nerve volume. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Vagus nerve stimulation delivered during motor rehabilitation improves recovery in a rat model of stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodaparast, Navid; Hays, Seth A; Sloan, Andrew M; Fayyaz, Tabbassum; Hulsey, Daniel R; Rennaker, Robert L; Kilgard, Michael P

    2014-09-01

    Neural plasticity is widely believed to support functional recovery following brain damage. Vagus nerve stimulation paired with different forelimb movements causes long-lasting map plasticity in rat primary motor cortex that is specific to the paired movement. We tested the hypothesis that repeatedly pairing vagus nerve stimulation with upper forelimb movements would improve recovery of motor function in a rat model of stroke. Rats were separated into 3 groups: vagus nerve stimulation during rehabilitation (rehab), vagus nerve stimulation after rehab, and rehab alone. Animals underwent 4 training stages: shaping (motor skill learning), prelesion training, postlesion training, and therapeutic training. Rats were given a unilateral ischemic lesion within motor cortex and implanted with a left vagus nerve cuff. Animals were allowed 1 week of recovery before postlesion baseline training. During the therapeutic training stage, rats received vagus nerve stimulation paired with each successful trial. All 17 trained rats demonstrated significant contralateral forelimb impairment when performing a bradykinesia assessment task. Forelimb function was recovered completely to prelesion levels when vagus nerve stimulation was delivered during rehab training. Alternatively, intensive rehab training alone (without stimulation) failed to restore function to prelesion levels. Delivering the same amount of stimulation after rehab training did not yield improvements compared with rehab alone. These results demonstrate that vagus nerve stimulation repeatedly paired with successful forelimb movements can improve recovery after motor cortex ischemia and may be a viable option for stroke rehabilitation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Prognosis of phrenic nerve injury following thoracic interventions: four new cases and a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowska, Monika; de Carvalho, Mamede

    2012-04-01

    Phrenic nerve lesion is a known complication of thoracic surgical intervention, but it is rarely described following thymectomy and lung surgery. To review the literature on thoracic intervention and phrenic nerve lesion and to describe four new cases, in which regular neurophysiological studies were performed. We reviewed the literature concerning phrenic nerve lesion after cardiac, lung and thymus surgical interventions. We described four cases of phrenic nerve lesion, three associated with thymectomy and one in lung surgery. The review shows that cryogenic or thermal injuries during cardiac surgeries are associated with good prognosis. The information on the outcome of phrenic nerve lesion in thymectomy or lung surgery is insufficient. Our cases and this review suggest that phrenic lesion in the last two interventions are associated with a poor recovery. Our data suggests that the prognosis of phrenic nerve lesion following thoracic intervention depends on the nature of the damage. Probably, in thymectomy and lung surgery, nerve stretch or laceration are involved, consequently the outcome is poorer in comparison with cardiac surgery, where cold lesion is more frequent. Neurophysiological tests give a direct, quantified and reliable assessment of nerve regeneration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cerebral Palsy for the Pediatric Eye Care Team Part III: Diagnosis and Management of Associated Visual and Sensory Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoldi, Kyle A; Pendarvis, Lauren; Jackson, Jorie; Batra, Noopur Nikki Agarwal

    2006-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) is a term used to describe a spectrum of deficits of muscle tone and posture resulting from damage to the developing nervous system. Though considered a motor disorder, CP can be associated with disorders of the sensory visual pathway. This paper, the final in a series of three articles, will present frequency, diagnosis, and management of the visual and binocular vision deficits associated with CP. Topics for discussion will include the prevalence and etiology of decreased acuity, the effect of CP on sensory and motor fusion, and the response to treatment for these sensory deficits. A retrospective chart review of all cases of cerebral palsy referred to the St. Louis Children's Hospital Eye Center was done. Detailed data on the sensory and motor deficits documented in these children was collected. Also recorded was the management strategy and response to treatment. Of the 131 cases reviewed (mean age 5.2 years at presentation), 46% had decreased vision in at least one eye due to amblyopia (24%), optic nerve abnormality (16%), cortical visual impairment (14%), or a combination. Forty-nine (37%) had significant refractive error. Sixty-four percent of those with significant refractive error responded to spectacle correction. Forty-three percent of those with amblyopia responded to conventional therapies. Of the nonstrabismic patients, 89% demonstrated sensory fusion, 90% had stereopsis, and 91% had motor fusion. No patient lacking fusion or stereopsis prior to strabismus surgery gained these abilities with realignment of the eyes. While children with CP are capable of age-appropriate acuity and binocular vision, they are at increased risk for sensory visual deficits. These deficits are not the direct result of CP itself, but either share a common underlying cause, or occur as sequelae to the strabismus that is prevalent in CP. Most importantly, some sensory deficits may respond to standard treatment methods.

  4. Large Extremity Peripheral Nerve Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    These antimicrobial peptides are implicated in the resistance of epithelial surfaces to microbial colonisation and have been shown to be upregulated...be equivalent to standard autograft repair in rodent models. Outcomes have now been validated in a large animal (swine) model with 5 cm ulnar nerve...Goals of the Project Task 1– Determine mechanical properties, seal strength and resistance to biodegradation of candidate photochemical nerve wrap

  5. Outcome of different facial nerve reconstruction techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Aboshanif; Omi, Eigo; Honda, Kohei; Suzuki, Shinsuke; Ishikawa, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: There is no technique of facial nerve reconstruction that guarantees facial function recovery up to grade III. Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of different facial nerve reconstruction techniques. Methods: Facial nerve reconstruction was performed in 22 patients (facial nerve interpositional graft in 11 patients and hypoglossal-facial nerve transfer in another 11 patients). All patients had facial function House-Brackmann (HB) grade VI, either caused by...

  6. Neurophysiological approach to disorders of peripheral nerve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crone, Clarissa; Krarup, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Disorders of the peripheral nerve system (PNS) are heterogeneous and may involve motor fibers, sensory fibers, small myelinated and unmyelinated fibers and autonomic nerve fibers, with variable anatomical distribution (single nerves, several different nerves, symmetrical affection of all nerves......, plexus, or root lesions). Furthermore pathological processes may result in either demyelination, axonal degeneration or both. In order to reach an exact diagnosis of any neuropathy electrophysiological studies are crucial to obtain information about these variables. Conventional electrophysiological...

  7. Optic nerve invasion of uveal melanoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegaard, Jens; Isager, Peter; Prause, Jan Ulrik

    2007-01-01

    in Denmark between 1942 and 2001 were reviewed (n=157). Histopathological characteristics and depth of optic nerve invasion were recorded. The material was compared with a control material from the same period consisting of 85 cases randomly drawn from all choroidal/ciliary body melanomas without optic nerve...... juxtapapillary tumors invading the optic nerve because of simple proximity to the nerve. A neurotropic subtype invades the optic nerve and retina in a diffuse fashion unrelated to tumor size or location. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Jan...

  8. The role of exogenous neural stem cells transplantation in cerebral ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lukui; Qiu, Rong; Li, Lushen; He, Dan; Lv, Haiqin; Wu, Xiaojing; Gu, Ning

    2014-11-01

    transplantation group. The Nissl dyeing showed that there was a large area of neuronal necrosis and apoptosis in the ischemia and PBS transplantation groups, and damage was mainly focused in the striatum. Degeneration and damage of nerve cells were significantly reduced in the NSCs transplantation group. The Tunel assay showed that the number of apoptosis-positive cells in the NSCs transplantation group was less than that in the PBS transplantation group at each time point. Double immunofluorescent labeling showed that the proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells began at the third day, reaching the peak at the 7th day, and was significantly reduced at the 14th day in the SVZ. The number of BrdU/NeuN increased significantly in the NSCs transplantation group compared to that in the PBS transplantation group (P < 0.05). The number of BrdU/GFAP decreased significantly in the NSCs transplantation group compared to that of PBS transplantation group (P < 0.05). The number of BrdU/GFAP-positive cells in the striatum was observed to be much more in the PBS transplantation group than in the NSCs transplantation group. Both neurological deficits and coordination capacity of rats with cerebral ischemia were significantly improved via transplantation of the neural stem cells. In conclusion, transplantation of neural stem cells can therefore possibly promote the differentiation of endogenous NSCs into neurons and reduce their differentiation towards glial cells. Transplantation of the neural stem cells may also change the ischemic microenvironment of striatum, possibly inhibiting the proliferation of glial cells.

  9. Tort Damages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.T. Visscher (Louis)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: In this Chapter, I provide an overview of Law and Economics literature regarding tort damages. Where necessary, attention is also spent to rules of tort liability. Both types of rules provide behavioral incentives to both injurers and victims, with respect to their level of

  10. Value of cerebral blood flow rate and regional oxygen consumption studies in cerebral ischaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clanet, M

    1987-06-18

    Studies of experimentally-induced ischaemia have shown that the intensity of neuronal suffering is related to the fall in perfusion rate. Below a certain level, called functional threshold, cerebral function is reversibly altered, whereas at a lower level (tissue necrosis threshold) the damage inflicted on neurons is irreversible. Between these two thresholds lies a ''penumbra zone''. This concept of thresholds must be mitigated by 2 parameters: duration of ischaemia and selective vulnerability of the various structures affected. Variations in blood flow rate only indirectly affect the state of tissues. Techniques developed from positron emission tomography make it possible to evaluate the metabolic activity of brain tissue in vivo: oxygen consumption (CMRO/sub 2/), oxygen extraction (EO/sub 2/) and glucose consumption (CMRG) which are thus correlated to cerebral blood flow and cerebral blood volume, sometimes also to tissue pH. Normal relations between blood flow rate and metabolism may be altered. Misery perfusion reflects a fall in cerebral blood flow with an increase in EO/sub 2/ and often a decrease in CMRO/sub 2/, whereas luxury perfusion reflects an increase in cerebral blood flow rate with reduction of CMRO/sub 2/, EO/sub 2/ and CMRG. The type of alteration encountered in human ischaemia varies according to the nature of the accident: studies of transient accidents emphasize the different haemodynamic aspects of occlusion of the wider arteries. The metabolic and haemodynamic profiles of established ischaemic accidents vary according to their type and to the time of the study, reflecting the complexity of the physiopathological mechanisms involved; they are frequently associated with metabolic repercussions at a distance from the ischaemic focus, which supports the concept of diaschisis.

  11. Value of cerebral blood flow rate and regional oxygen consumption studies in cerebral ischaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clanet, M.

    1987-01-01

    Studies of experimentally-induced ischaemia have shown that the intensity of neuronal suffering is related to the fall in perfusion rate. Below a certain level, called functional threshold, cerebral function is reversibly altered, whereas at a lower level (tissue necrosis threshold) the damage inflicted on neurons is irreversible. Between these two thresholds lies a ''penumbra zone''. This concept of thresholds must be mitigated by 2 parameters: duration of ischaemia and selective vulnerability of the various structures affected. Variations in blood flow rate only indirectly affect the state of tissues. Techniques developed from positron emission tomography make it possible to evaluate the metabolic activity of brain tissue in vivo: oxygen consumption (CMRO 2 ), oxygen extraction (EO 2 ) and glucose consumption (CMRG) which are thus correlated to cerebral blood flow and cerebral blood volume, sometimes also to tissue pH. Normal relations between blood flow rate and metabolism may be altered. Misery perfusion reflects a fall in cerebral blood flow with an increase in EO 2 and often a decrease in CMRO 2 , whereas luxury perfusion reflects an increase in cerebral blood flow rate with reduction of CMRO 2 , EO 2 and CMRG. The type of alteration encountered in human ischaemia varies according to the nature of the accident: studies of transient accidents emphasize the different haemodynamic aspects of occlusion of the wider arteries. The metabolic and haemodynamic profiles of established ischaemic accidents vary according to their type and to the time of the study, reflecting the complexity of the physiopathological mechanisms involved; they are frequently associated with metabolic repercussions at a distance from the ischaemic focus, which supports the concept of diaschisis [fr

  12. Klotho upregulation contributes to the neuroprotection of ligustilide against cerebral ischemic injury in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Fang-Yi; Shi, Meng-Qi; Zhou, Hong-Jing; Liu, Dong-Ling; Sang, Na; Du, Jun-Rong

    2018-02-05

    Klotho, an aging-suppressor gene, encodes a protein that potentially acts as a neuroprotective factor. Our previous studies showed that ligustilide minimizes the cognitive dysfunction and brain damage induced by cerebral ischemia; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. This study aims to investigate whether klotho is involved in the protective effects of ligustilide against cerebral ischemic injury in mice. Cerebral ischemia was induced by bilateral common carotid arterial occlusion. Neurobehavioral tests as well as Nissl and Fluoro-Jade B staining were used to evaluate the protective effects of ligustilide in cerebral ischemia, and Western blotting and ELISA approaches were used to investigate the underlying mechanisms. Administration of ligustilide prevented the development of neurological deficits and reduced neuronal loss in the hippocampal CA1 region and the caudate putamen after cerebral ischemia. The protective effects were associated with inhibition of the RIG-I/NF-κB p65 and Akt/FoxO1 pathways and with prevention of inflammation and oxidative stress in the brain. Further, downregulation of klotho could attenuate the neuroprotection of ligustilide against cerebral ischemic injury. Ligustilide exerted neuroprotective effects in mice after cerebral ischemia by regulating anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant signaling pathways. Furthermore, klotho upregulation contributes to the neuroprotection of LIG against cerebral ischemic injury. These results indicated that ligustilide may be a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of cerebral ischemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A novel method of lengthening the accessory nerve for direct coaptation during nerve repair and nerve transfer procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Maldonado, Andrés A; Stoves, Yolanda; Fries, Fabian N; Li, Rong; Loukas, Marios; Oskouian, Rod J; Spinner, Robert J

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The accessory nerve is frequently repaired or used for nerve transfer. The length of accessory nerve available is often insufficient or marginal (under tension) for allowing direct coaptation during nerve repair or nerve transfer (neurotization), necessitating an interpositional graft. An attractive maneuver would facilitate lengthening of the accessory nerve for direct coaptation. The aim of the present study was to identify an anatomical method for such lengthening. METHODS In 20 adult cadavers, the C-2 or C-3 connections to the accessory nerve were identified medial to the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle and the anatomy of the accessory nerve/cervical nerve fibers within the SCM was documented. The cervical nerve connections were cut. Lengths of the accessory nerve were measured. Samples of the cut C-2 and C-3 nerves were examined using immunohistochemistry. RESULTS The anatomy and adjacent neural connections within the SCM are complicated. However, after the accessory nerve was "detethered" from within the SCM and following transection, the additional length of the accessory nerve increased from a mean of 6 cm to a mean of 10.5 cm (increase of 4.5 cm) after cutting the C-2 connections, and from a mean of 6 cm to a mean length of 9 cm (increase of 3.5 cm) after cutting the C-3 connections. The additional length of accessory nerve even allowed direct repair of an infraclavicular target (i.e., the proximal musculocutaneous nerve). The cervical nerve connections were shown not to contain motor fibers. CONCLUSIONS An additional length of the accessory nerve made available in the posterior cervical triangle can facilitate direct repair or neurotization procedures, thus eliminating the need for an interpositional nerve graft, decreasing the time/distance for regeneration and potentially improving clinical outcomes.

  14. Subclavian vein pacing and venous pressure waveform measurement for phrenic nerve monitoring during cryoballoon ablation of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Justin; Singarayar, Suresh; Kabunga, Peter; McGuire, Mark A

    2015-06-01

    The phrenic nerves may be damaged during catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation. Phrenic nerve function is routinely monitored during ablation by stimulating the right phrenic nerve from a site in the superior vena cava (SVC) and manually assessing the strength of diaphragmatic contraction. However the optimal stimulation site, method of assessing diaphragmatic contraction, and techniques for monitoring the left phrenic nerve have not been established. We assessed novel techniques to monitor phrenic nerve function during cryoablation procedures. Pacing threshold and stability of phrenic nerve capture were assessed when pacing from the SVC, left and right subclavian veins. Femoral venous pressure waveforms were used to monitor the strength of diaphragmatic contraction. Stable capture of the left phrenic nerve by stimulation in the left subclavian vein was achieved in 96 of 100 patients, with a median capture threshold of 2.5 mA [inter-quartile range (IQR) 1.4-5.0 mA]. Stimulation of the right phrenic nerve from the subclavian vein was superior to stimulation from the SVC with lower pacing thresholds (1.8 mA IQR 1.4-3.3 vs. 6.0 mA IQR 3.4-8.0, P phrenic nerve palsy. The left phrenic nerve can be stimulated from the left subclavian vein. The subclavian veins are the optimal sites for phrenic nerve stimulation. Monitoring the femoral venous pressure waveform is a novel technique for detecting impending phrenic nerve damage. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Cerebral venous thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soralova, T.; Sevcikova, H.; Petersky, D.

    2014-01-01

    We decided to process this theme due to its nonspecific clinical features as they often cause diagnostic problems not only to clinicians but also to diagnostic. It is important to think of this disease mainly in young women who administer hormonal contraception. Imaging methods play the crucial role in diagnostic of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The gold standard is a native CT of brain which shows the venous sinus thrombosis as a hyperdense lesion in the locus of the sinus (dense triangle sign), CT venography shows the sinus thrombosis as a defect in a contrast filling of the venous sinus (empty delta sign). Other investigative methods are magnetic resonance imaging or MRA. In short we also mention quite a rare but more serious thrombosis of profound cerebral veins v. cerebri magna-Galeni, vv. cerebri internae). The importance of early diagnostic and non specificity of symptoms is presented in 3 clinical cases that are the part of this work. (author)

  16. Applications of cerebral SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McArthur, C., E-mail: claire.mcarthur@nhs.net [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Jampana, R.; Patterson, J.; Hadley, D. [Department of Neuroradiology, Institute of Neurological Sciences, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can provide three-dimensional functional images of the brain following the injection of one of a series of radiopharmaceuticals that crosses the blood-brain barrier and distributes according to cerebral perfusion, neurotransmitter, or cell density. Applications include differentiating between the dementias, evaluating cerebrovascular disease, preoperative localization of epileptogenic foci, diagnosing movement disorders, and evaluation of intracerebral tumours, while also proving a useful research tool. Unlike positronemission tomography (PET), SPECT imaging is widely available and can be performed in any department that has access to a rotating gamma camera. The purpose of this review is to demonstrate the utility of cerebral SPECT and increase awareness of its role in the investigation of neurological and psychiatric disorders.

  17. Cerebral ketone body metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A A M

    2005-01-01

    Ketone bodies (KBs) are an important source of energy for the brain. During the neonatal period, they are also precursors for the synthesis of lipids (especially cholesterol) and amino acids. The rate of cerebral KB metabolism depends primarily on the concentration in blood; high concentrations occur during fasting and on a high-fat diet. Cerebral KB metabolism is also regulated by the permeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which depends on the abundance of monocarboxylic acid transporters (MCT1). The BBB's permeability to KBs increases with fasting in humans. In rats, permeability increases during the suckling period, but human neonates have not been studied. Monocarboxylic acid transporters are also present in the plasma membranes of neurons and glia but their role in regulating KB metabolism is uncertain. Finally, the rate of cerebral KB metabolism depends on the activities of the relevant enzymes in brain. The activities vary with age in rats, but reliable results are not available for humans. Cerebral KB metabolism in humans differs from that in the rat in several respects. During fasting, for example, KBs supply more of the brain's energy in humans than in the rat. Conversely, KBs are probably used more extensively in the brain of suckling rats than in human neonates. These differences complicate the interpretation of rodent studies. Most patients with inborn errors of ketogenesis develop normally, suggesting that the only essential role for KBs is as an alternative fuel during illness or prolonged fasting. On the other hand, in HMG-CoA lyase deficiency, imaging generally shows asymptomatic white-matter abnormalities. The ability of KBs to act as an alternative fuel explains the effectiveness of the ketogenic diet in GLUT1 deficiency, but its effectiveness in epilepsy remains unexplained.

  18. Radiopharmaceuticals for cerebral studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon Cabana, Alba

    1994-01-01

    For obtain good brain scintillation images in nuclear medicine must be used several radiopharmaceuticals. Cerebral studies give a tumors visual image as well as brain anomalities detection and are helpful in the diagnostic diseases . Are described in this work: a cerebrum radiopharmaceuticals classification,labelled compounds proceeding and Tc 99m good properties in for your fast caption, post administration and blood purification for renal way

  19. Comparative Evaluation of Chitosan Nerve Guides with Regular or Increased Bendability for Acute and Delayed Peripheral Nerve Repair: A Comprehensive Comparison with Autologous Nerve Grafts and Muscle-in-Vein Grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stößel, Maria; Wildhagen, Vivien M; Helmecke, Olaf; Metzen, Jennifer; Pfund, Charlotte B; Freier, Thomas; Haastert-Talini, Kirsten

    2018-05-08

    Reconstruction of joint-crossing digital nerves requires the application of nerve guides with a much higher flexibility than used for peripheral nerve repair along larger bones. Nevertheless, collapse-resistance should be preserved to avoid secondary damage to the regrowing nerve tissue. In recent years, we presented chitosan nerve guides (CNGs) to be highly supportive for the regeneration of critical gap length peripheral nerve defects in the rat. Now, we evidently increased the bendability of regular CNGs (regCNGs) by developing a wavy wall structure, that is, corrugated CNGs (corrCNGs). In a comprehensive in vivo study, we compared both types of CNGs with clinical gold standard autologous nerve grafts (ANGs) and muscle-in-vein grafts (MVGs) that have recently been highlighted in the literature as a suitable alternative to ANGs. We reconstructed rat sciatic nerves over a critical gap length of 15 mm either immediately upon transection or after a delay period of 45 days. Electrodiagnostic measurements were applied to monitor functional motor recovery at 60, 90, 120, and 150 (only delayed repair) days postreconstruction. Upon explanation, tube properties were analyzed. Furthermore, distal nerve ends were evaluated using histomorphometry, while connective tissue specimens were subjected to immunohistological stainings. After 120 days (acute repair) or 150 days (delayed repair), respectively, compression-stability of regCNGs was slightly increased while it remained stable in corrCNGs. In both substudies, regCNGs and corrCNGs supported functional recovery of distal plantar muscles in a similar way and to a greater extent when compared with MVGs, while ANGs demonstrated the best support of regeneration. Anat Rec, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The First Experience of Triple Nerve Transfer in Proximal Radial Nerve Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emamhadi, Mohammadreza; Andalib, Sasan

    2018-01-01

    Injury to distal portion of posterior cord of brachial plexus leads to palsy of radial and axillary nerves. Symptoms are usually motor deficits of the deltoid muscle; triceps brachii muscle; and extensor muscles of the wrist, thumb, and fingers. Tendon transfers, nerve grafts, and nerve transfers are options for surgical treatment of proximal radial nerve palsy to restore some motor functions. Tendon transfer is painful, requires a long immobilization, and decreases donor muscle strength; nevertheless, nerve transfer produces promising outcomes. We present a patient with proximal radial nerve palsy following a blunt injury undergoing triple nerve transfer. The patient was involved in a motorcycle accident with complete palsy of the radial and axillary nerves. After 6 months, on admission, he showed spontaneous recovery of axillary nerve palsy, but radial nerve palsy remained. We performed triple nerve transfer, fascicle of ulnar nerve to long head of the triceps branch of radial nerve, flexor digitorum superficialis branch of median nerve to extensor carpi radialis brevis branch of radial nerve, and flexor carpi radialis branch of median nerve to posterior interosseous nerve, for restoration of elbow, wrist, and finger extensions, respectively. Our experience confirmed functional elbow, wrist, and finger extensions in the patient. Triple nerve transfer restores functions of the upper limb in patients with debilitating radial nerve palsy after blunt injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.