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Sample records for d3-d7 soft susy

  1. Holographic entanglement entropy and entanglement thermodynamics of 'black' non-susy D3 brane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Aranya; Roy, Shibaji

    2018-06-01

    Like BPS D3 brane, the non-supersymmetric (non-susy) D3 brane of type IIB string theory is also known to have a decoupling limit and leads to a non-supersymmetric AdS/CFT correspondence. The throat geometry in this case represents a QFT which is neither conformal nor supersymmetric. The 'black' version of the non-susy D3 brane in the decoupling limit describes a QFT at finite temperature. Here we first compute the entanglement entropy for small subsystem of such QFT from the decoupled geometry of 'black' non-susy D3 brane using holographic technique. Then we study the entanglement thermodynamics for the weakly excited states of this QFT from the asymptotically AdS geometry of the decoupled 'black' non-susy D3 brane. We observe that for small subsystem this background indeed satisfies a first law like relation with a universal (entanglement) temperature inversely proportional to the size of the subsystem and an (entanglement) pressure normal to the entangling surface. Finally we show how the entanglement entropy makes a cross-over to the thermal entropy at high temperature.

  2. Decoupling limit and throat geometry of non-susy D3 brane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayek, Kuntal, E-mail: kuntal.nayek@saha.ac.in; Roy, Shibaji, E-mail: shibaji.roy@saha.ac.in

    2017-03-10

    Recently it has been shown by us that, like BPS Dp branes, bulk gravity gets decoupled from the brane even for the non-susy Dp branes of type II string theories indicating a possible extension of AdS/CFT correspondence for the non-supersymmetric case. In that work, the decoupling of gravity on the non-susy Dp branes has been shown numerically for the general case as well as analytically for some special case. Here we discuss the decoupling limit and the throat geometry of the non-susy D3 brane when the charge associated with the brane is very large. We show that in the decoupling limit the throat geometry of the non-susy D3 brane, under appropriate coordinate change, reduces to the Constable–Myers solution and thus confirming that this solution is indeed the holographic dual of a (non-gravitational) gauge theory discussed there. We also show that when one of the parameters of the solution takes a specific value, it reduces, under another coordinate change, to the five-dimensional solution obtained by Csaki and Reece, again confirming its gauge theory interpretation.

  3. On a generalized Dirac oscillator interaction for the nonrelativistic limit 3 D generalized SUSY model oscillator Hamiltonian of Celka and Hussin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayaraman, Jambunatha; Lima Rodrigues, R. de

    1994-01-01

    In the context of the 3 D generalized SUSY model oscillator Hamiltonian of Celka and Hussin (CH), a generalized Dirac oscillator interaction is studied, that leads, in the non-relativistic limit considered for both signs of energy, to the CH's generalized 3 D SUSY oscillator. The relevance of this interaction to the CH's SUSY model and the SUSY breaking dependent on the Wigner parameter is brought out. (author). 6 refs

  4. 3D printing for soft robotics - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Jahan Zeb; Sajid, Memoon; Rehman, Muhammad Muqeet; Siddiqui, Ghayas Uddin; Shah, Imran; Kim, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Jae-Wook; Choi, Kyung Hyun

    2018-01-01

    Soft robots have received an increasing attention due to their advantages of high flexibility and safety for human operators but the fabrication is a challenge. Recently, 3D printing has been used as a key technology to fabricate soft robots because of high quality and printing multiple materials at the same time. Functional soft materials are particularly well suited for soft robotics due to a wide range of stimulants and sensitive demonstration of large deformations, high motion complexities and varied multi-functionalities. This review comprises a detailed survey of 3D printing in soft robotics. The development of key 3D printing technologies and new materials along with composites for soft robotic applications is investigated. A brief summary of 3D-printed soft devices suitable for medical to industrial applications is also included. The growing research on both 3D printing and soft robotics needs a summary of the major reported studies and the authors believe that this review article serves the purpose.

  5. 3D printed soft parallel actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolfagharian, Ali; Kouzani, Abbas Z.; Khoo, Sui Yang; Noshadi, Amin; Kaynak, Akif

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents a 3-dimensional (3D) printed soft parallel contactless actuator for the first time. The actuator involves an electro-responsive parallel mechanism made of two segments namely active chain and passive chain both 3D printed. The active chain is attached to the ground from one end and constitutes two actuator links made of responsive hydrogel. The passive chain, on the other hand, is attached to the active chain from one end and consists of two rigid links made of polymer. The actuator links are printed using an extrusion-based 3D-Bioplotter with polyelectrolyte hydrogel as printer ink. The rigid links are also printed by a 3D fused deposition modelling (FDM) printer with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) as print material. The kinematics model of the soft parallel actuator is derived via transformation matrices notations to simulate and determine the workspace of the actuator. The printed soft parallel actuator is then immersed into NaOH solution with specific voltage applied to it via two contactless electrodes. The experimental data is then collected and used to develop a parametric model to estimate the end-effector position and regulate kinematics model in response to specific input voltage over time. It is observed that the electroactive actuator demonstrates expected behaviour according to the simulation of its kinematics model. The use of 3D printing for the fabrication of parallel soft actuators opens a new chapter in manufacturing sophisticated soft actuators with high dexterity and mechanical robustness for biomedical applications such as cell manipulation and drug release.

  6. 3D printing for soft robotics – a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, Jahan Zeb; Sajid, Memoon; Rehman, Muhammad Muqeet; Siddiqui, Ghayas Uddin; Shah, Imran; Kim, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Jae-Wook; Choi, Kyung Hyun

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Soft robots have received an increasing attention due to their advantages of high flexibility and safety for human operators but the fabrication is a challenge. Recently, 3D printing has been used as a key technology to fabricate soft robots because of high quality and printing multiple materials at the same time. Functional soft materials are particularly well suited for soft robotics due to a wide range of stimulants and sensitive demonstration of large deformations, high motion complexities and varied multi-functionalities. This review comprises a detailed survey of 3D printing in soft robotics. The development of key 3D printing technologies and new materials along with composites for soft robotic applications is investigated. A brief summary of 3D-printed soft devices suitable for medical to industrial applications is also included. The growing research on both 3D printing and soft robotics needs a summary of the major reported studies and the authors believe that this review article serves the purpose. PMID:29707065

  7. 3D printing of soft robotic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallin, T. J.; Pikul, J.; Shepherd, R. F.

    2018-06-01

    Soft robots are capable of mimicking the complex motion of animals. Soft robotic systems are defined by their compliance, which allows for continuous and often responsive localized deformation. These features make soft robots especially interesting for integration with human tissues, for example, the implementation of biomedical devices, and for robotic performance in harsh or uncertain environments, for example, exploration in confined spaces or locomotion on uneven terrain. Advances in soft materials and additive manufacturing technologies have enabled the design of soft robots with sophisticated capabilities, such as jumping, complex 3D movements, gripping and releasing. In this Review, we examine the essential soft material properties for different elements of soft robots, highlighting the most relevant polymer systems. Advantages and limitations of different additive manufacturing processes, including 3D printing, fused deposition modelling, direct ink writing, selective laser sintering, inkjet printing and stereolithography, are discussed, and the different techniques are investigated for their application in soft robotic fabrication. Finally, we explore integrated robotic systems and give an outlook for the future of the field and remaining challenges.

  8. Soft SUSY breaking parameters and RG running of squark and slepton masses in large volume Swiss Cheese compactifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, Aalok; Shukla, Pramod

    2010-01-01

    We consider type IIB large volume compactifications involving orientifolds of the Swiss Cheese Calabi-Yau WCP 4 [1,1,1,6,9] with a single mobile space-time filling D3-brane and stacks of D7-branes wrapping the 'big' divisor Σ B (as opposed to the 'small' divisor usually done in the literature thus far) as well as supporting D7-brane fluxes. After reviewing our proposal of (Misra and Shukla, 2010) for resolving a long-standing tension between large volume cosmology and phenomenology pertaining to obtaining a 10 12 GeV gravitino in the inflationary era and a TeV gravitino in the present era, and summarizing our results of (Misra and Shukla, 2010) on soft supersymmetry breaking terms and open-string moduli masses, we discuss the one-loop RG running of the squark and slepton masses in mSUGRA-like models (using the running of the gaugino masses) to the EW scale in the large volume limit. Phenomenological constraints and some of the calculated soft SUSY parameters identify the D7-brane Wilson line moduli as the first two generations/families of squarks and sleptons and the D3-brane (restricted to the big divisor) position moduli as the two Higgses for MSSM-like models at TeV scale. We also discuss how the obtained open-string/matter moduli make it easier to impose FCNC constraints, as well as RG flow of off-diagonal squark mass(-squared) matrix elements.

  9. Soft SUSY breaking parameters and RG running of squark and slepton masses in large volume Swiss Cheese compactifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Aalok; Shukla, Pramod

    2010-03-01

    We consider type IIB large volume compactifications involving orientifolds of the Swiss Cheese Calabi-Yau WCP[1,1,1,6,9] with a single mobile space-time filling D3-brane and stacks of D7-branes wrapping the “big” divisor ΣB (as opposed to the “small” divisor usually done in the literature thus far) as well as supporting D7-brane fluxes. After reviewing our proposal of [1] (Misra and Shukla, 2010) for resolving a long-standing tension between large volume cosmology and phenomenology pertaining to obtaining a 10 GeV gravitino in the inflationary era and a TeV gravitino in the present era, and summarizing our results of [1] (Misra and Shukla, 2010) on soft supersymmetry breaking terms and open-string moduli masses, we discuss the one-loop RG running of the squark and slepton masses in mSUGRA-like models (using the running of the gaugino masses) to the EW scale in the large volume limit. Phenomenological constraints and some of the calculated soft SUSY parameters identify the D7-brane Wilson line moduli as the first two generations/families of squarks and sleptons and the D3-brane (restricted to the big divisor) position moduli as the two Higgses for MSSM-like models at TeV scale. We also discuss how the obtained open-string/matter moduli make it easier to impose FCNC constraints, as well as RG flow of off-diagonal squark mass(-squared) matrix elements.

  10. Axionic D3-D7 Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, C P; Postma, M

    2009-01-01

    We study the motion of a D3 brane moving within a Type IIB string vacuum compactified to 4D on K3 x T_2/Z_2 in the presence of D7 and O7 planes. We work within the effective 4D supergravity describing how the mobile D3 interacts with the lightest bulk moduli of the compactification, including the effects of modulus-stabilizing fluxes. We seek inflationary solutions to the resulting equations, performing our search numerically in order to avoid resorting to approximate parameterizations of the low-energy potential. We consider uplifting from D-terms and from the supersymmetry-breaking effects of anti-D3 branes. We find examples of slow-roll inflation (with anti-brane uplifting) with the mobile D3 moving along the toroidal directions, falling towards a D7-O7 stack starting from the antipodal point. The inflaton turns out to be a linear combination of the brane position and the axionic partner of the K3 volume modulus, and the similarity of the potential along the inflaton direction with that of racetrack inflat...

  11. Fully Soft 3D-Printed Electroactive Fluidic Valve for Soft Hydraulic Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatopa, Alex; Walker, Steph; Menguc, Yigit

    2018-06-01

    Soft robots are designed to utilize their compliance and contortionistic abilities to both interact safely with their environment and move through it in ways a rigid robot cannot. To more completely achieve this, the robot should be made of as many soft components as possible. Here we present a completely soft hydraulic control valve consisting of a 3D-printed photopolymer body with electrorheological (ER) fluid as a working fluid and gallium-indium-tin liquid metal alloy as electrodes. This soft 3D-printed ER valve weighs less than 10 g and allows for onboard actuation control, furthering the goal of an entirely soft controllable robot. The soft ER valve pressure-holding capabilities were tested under unstrained conditions, cyclic valve activation, and the strained conditions of bending, twisting, stretching, and indentation. It was found that the max holding pressure of the valve when 5 kV was applied across the electrodes was 264 kPa, and that the holding pressure deviated less than 15% from the unstrained max holding pressure under all strain conditions except for indentation, which had a 60% max pressure increase. In addition, a soft octopus-like robot was designed, 3D printed, and assembled, and a soft ER valve was used to stop the fluid flow, build pressure in the robot, and actuate six tentacle-like soft bending actuators.

  12. Clinical usefulness of facial soft tissues thickness measurement using 3D computed tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ho Gul; Kim, Kee Deog; Hu, Kyung Seok; Lee, Jae Bum; Park, Hyok; Han, Seung Ho; Choi, Seong Ho; Kim, Chong Kwan; Park, Chang Seo

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate clinical usefulness of facial soft tissue thickness measurement using 3D computed tomographic images. One cadaver that had sound facial soft tissues was chosen for the study. The cadaver was scanned with a Helical CT under following scanning protocols about slice thickness and table speed: 3 mm and 3 mm/sec, 5 mm and 5 mm/sec, 7 mm and 7 mm/sec. The acquired data were reconstructed 1.5, 2.5, 3.5 mm reconstruction interval respectively and the images were transferred to a personal computer. Using a program developed to measure facial soft tissue thickness in 3D image, the facial soft tissue thickness was measured. After the ten-time repeation of the measurement for ten times, repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) was adopted to compare and analyze the measurements using the three scanning protocols. Comparison according to the areas was analysed by Mann-Whitney test. There were no statistically significant intraobserver differences in the measurements of the facial soft tissue thickness using the three scanning protocols (p>0.05). There were no statistically significant differences between measurements in the 3 mm slice thickness and those in the 5 mm, 7 mm slice thickness (p>0.05). There were statistical differences in the 14 of the total 30 measured points in the 5 mm slice thickness and 22 in the 7 mm slice thickness. The facial soft tissue thickness measurement using 3D images of 7 mm slice thickness is acceptable clinically, but those of 5 mm slice thickness is recommended for the more accurate measurement

  13. Soft tubular microfluidics for 2D and 3D applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Wang; Kong, Fang; Yeo, Joo Chuan; Yu, Longteng; Sonam, Surabhi; Dao, Ming; Gong, Xiaobo; Teck Lim, Chwee

    2017-10-01

    Microfluidics has been the key component for many applications, including biomedical devices, chemical processors, microactuators, and even wearable devices. This technology relies on soft lithography fabrication which requires cleanroom facilities. Although popular, this method is expensive and labor-intensive. Furthermore, current conventional microfluidic chips precludes reconfiguration, making reiterations in design very time-consuming and costly. To address these intrinsic drawbacks of microfabrication, we present an alternative solution for the rapid prototyping of microfluidic elements such as microtubes, valves, and pumps. In addition, we demonstrate how microtubes with channels of various lengths and cross-sections can be attached modularly into 2D and 3D microfluidic systems for functional applications. We introduce a facile method of fabricating elastomeric microtubes as the basic building blocks for microfluidic devices. These microtubes are transparent, biocompatible, highly deformable, and customizable to various sizes and cross-sectional geometries. By configuring the microtubes into deterministic geometry, we enable rapid, low-cost formation of microfluidic assemblies without compromising their precision and functionality. We demonstrate configurable 2D and 3D microfluidic systems for applications in different domains. These include microparticle sorting, microdroplet generation, biocatalytic micromotor, triboelectric sensor, and even wearable sensing. Our approach, termed soft tubular microfluidics, provides a simple, cheaper, and faster solution for users lacking proficiency and access to cleanroom facilities to design and rapidly construct microfluidic devices for their various applications and needs.

  14. Evaluation of reproducibility and reliability of 3D soft tissue analysis using 3D stereophotogrammetry.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plooij, J.M.; Swennen, G.R.J.; Rangel, F.A.; Maal, T.J.J.; Schutyser, F.A.C.; Bronkhorst, E.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Berge, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    In 3D photographs the bony structures are neither available nor palpable, therefore, the bone-related landmarks, such as the soft tissue gonion, need to be redefined. The purpose of this study was to determine the reproducibility and reliability of 49 soft tissue landmarks, including newly defined

  15. 3D printing of soft-matter to open a new era of soft-matter MEMS/robotics (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2017-04-01

    3D printing technology is becoming useful and applicable by the progress of information and communication technology (ICT). It means 3D printer is a kind of useful robot for additive manufacturing and is controlled by computer with human-friendly software. Once user starts to use 3D printing of soft-matter, one can immediately understand computer-aided design (CAD) and engineering (CAE) technology will be more important and applicable for soft-matter systems. User can easily design soft-matter objects and 3D-print them. User can easily apply 3D-printed soft-matter objects to develop new research and application on MEMS and robotics. Here we introduce the recent progress of 3D printing (i.e. additive manufacturing), especially focusing on our 3D gel printing. We are trying to develop new advanced research and applications of 3D gel printer, including GEL-MECHANICS, GEL-PHOTONICS, and GEL-ROBOTICS. In the gel-mechanics, we are developing new gel materials for mechanical engineering. Some gels have high-mechanical strength and shape memory properties. In the gel-photonics. We are applying our original characterizing system, named `Scanning Microscopic Light Scattering (SMILS)', to analyze 3D printed gel materials. In the gel-robotics, we focus on 3D printing of soft parts for soft-robotics made form gel materials, like gel finger. Also we are challenging to apply 3D gel printing to start new company, to innovate new businesses in county side, and to create new 3D-printed foods.

  16. Neutrino masses from SUSY breaking in radiative seesaw models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Figueiredo, Antonio J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Radiatively generated neutrino masses (m ν ) are proportional to supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking, as a result of the SUSY non-renormalisation theorem. In this work, we investigate the space of SUSY radiative seesaw models with regard to their dependence on SUSY breaking (SUSY). In addition to contributions from sources of SUSY that are involved in electroweak symmetry breaking (SUSY EWSB contributions), and which are manifest from left angle F H † right angle = μ left angle anti H right angle ≠ 0 and left angle D right angle = g sum H left angle H † x H H right angle ≠ 0, radiatively generated m ν can also receive contributions from SUSY sources that are unrelated to EWSB (SUSY EWS contributions). We point out that recent literature overlooks pure-SUSY EWSB contributions (∝ μ/M) that can arise at the same order of perturbation theory as the leading order contribution from SUSY EWS . We show that there exist realistic radiative seesaw models in which the leading order contribution to m ν is proportional to SUSY EWS . To our knowledge no model with such a feature exists in the literature. We give a complete description of the simplest model topologies and their leading dependence on SUSY. We show that in one-loop realisations LLHH operators are suppressed by at least μ m soft /M 3 or m soft 2 /M 3 . We construct a model example based on a oneloop type-II seesaw. An interesting aspect of these models lies in the fact that the scale of soft-SUSY effects generating the leading order m ν can be quite small without conflicting with lower limits on the mass of new particles. (orig.)

  17. On 'light' fermions and proton stability in 'big divisor' D3/D7 large volume compactifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, Aalok; Shukla, Pramod

    2011-01-01

    Building on our earlier work (Misra and Shukla, Nucl. Phys. B 827:112, 2010; Phys. Lett. B 685:347-352, 2010), we show the possibility of generating ''light'' fermion mass scales of MeV-GeV range (possibly related to the first two generations of quarks/leptons) as well as eV (possibly related to first two generations of neutrinos) in type IIB string theory compactified on Swiss-Cheese orientifolds in the presence of a mobile space-time filling D3-brane restricted to (in principle) stacks of fluxed D7-branes wrapping the ''big'' divisor Σ B . This part of the paper is an expanded version of the latter half of Sect. 3 of a published short invited review (Misra, Mod. Phys. Lett. A 26:1, 2011) written by one of the authors [AM ]. Further, we also show that there are no SUSY GUT-type dimension-five operators corresponding to proton decay, and we estimate the proton lifetime from a SUSY GUT-type four-fermion dimension-six operator to be 10 61 years. Based on GLSM calculations in (Misra and Shukla, Nucl. Phys. B 827:112, 2010) for obtaining the geometric Kaehler potential for the ''big divisor,'' using further the Donaldson's algorithm, we also briefly discuss in the first of the two appendices the metric for the Swiss-Cheese Calabi-Yau used, which we obtain and which becomes Ricci flat in the large-volume limit. (orig.)

  18. On `light' fermions and proton stability in `big divisor' D3/ D7 large volume compactifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Aalok; Shukla, Pramod

    2011-06-01

    Building on our earlier work (Misra and Shukla, Nucl. Phys. B 827:112, 2010; Phys. Lett. B 685:347-352, 2010), we show the possibility of generating "light" fermion mass scales of MeV-GeV range (possibly related to the first two generations of quarks/leptons) as well as eV (possibly related to first two generations of neutrinos) in type IIB string theory compactified on Swiss-Cheese orientifolds in the presence of a mobile space-time filling D3-brane restricted to (in principle) stacks of fluxed D7-branes wrapping the "big" divisor Σ B . This part of the paper is an expanded version of the latter half of Sect. 3 of a published short invited review (Misra, Mod. Phys. Lett. A 26:1, 2011) written by one of the authors [AM]. Further, we also show that there are no SUSY GUT-type dimension-five operators corresponding to proton decay, and we estimate the proton lifetime from a SUSY GUT-type four-fermion dimension-six operator to be 1061 years. Based on GLSM calculations in (Misra and Shukla, Nucl. Phys. B 827:112, 2010) for obtaining the geometric Kähler potential for the "big divisor," using further the Donaldson's algorithm, we also briefly discuss in the first of the two appendices the metric for the Swiss-Cheese Calabi-Yau used, which we obtain and which becomes Ricci flat in the large-volume limit.

  19. 3D-SoftChip: A Novel Architecture for Next-Generation Adaptive Computing Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Mike Myung-Ok

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a novel architecture for next-generation adaptive computing systems, which we term 3D-SoftChip. The 3D-SoftChip is a 3-dimensional (3D vertically integrated adaptive computing system combining state-of-the-art processing and 3D interconnection technology. It comprises the vertical integration of two chips (a configurable array processor and an intelligent configurable switch through an indium bump interconnection array (IBIA. The configurable array processor (CAP is an array of heterogeneous processing elements (PEs, while the intelligent configurable switch (ICS comprises a switch block, 32-bit dedicated RISC processor for control, on-chip program/data memory, data frame buffer, along with a direct memory access (DMA controller. This paper introduces the novel 3D-SoftChip architecture for real-time communication and multimedia signal processing as a next-generation computing system. The paper further describes the advanced HW/SW codesign and verification methodology, including high-level system modeling of the 3D-SoftChip using SystemC, being used to determine the optimum hardware specification in the early design stage.

  20. ON SOFT D2-ALGEBRA AND SOFT D2-IDEALS

    OpenAIRE

    S. Subramanian; S. Seethalaksmi

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we have studied some characterization of soft D2-algebra, kernel, intersection, image, quotient D2-algebra’s and relations ship between D2-algebra and D2-ideals with suitable examples.

  1. Bound state solution of Dirac equation for 3D harmonics oscillator plus trigonometric scarf noncentral potential using SUSY QM approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cari, C., E-mail: carinln@yahoo.com; Suparmi, A., E-mail: carinln@yahoo.com [Physics Department, Sebelas Maret University, Jl. Ir. Sutami no 36A Kentingan Surakarta 57126 (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30

    Dirac equation of 3D harmonics oscillator plus trigonometric Scarf non-central potential for spin symmetric case is solved using supersymmetric quantum mechanics approach. The Dirac equation for exact spin symmetry reduces to Schrodinger like equation. The relativistic energy and wave function for spin symmetric case are simply obtained using SUSY quantum mechanics method and idea of shape invariance.

  2. Localizing softness and stress along loops in 3D topological metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baardink, Guido; Souslov, Anton; Paulose, Jayson; Vitelli, Vincenzo

    2018-01-01

    Topological states can be used to control the mechanical properties of a material along an edge or around a localized defect. The rigidity of elastic networks is characterized by a topological invariant called the polarization; materials with a well-defined uniform polarization display a dramatic range of edge softness depending on the orientation of the polarization relative to the terminating surface. However, in all 3D mechanical metamaterials proposed to date, the topological modes are mixed with bulk soft modes, which organize themselves in Weyl loops. Here, we report the design of a 3D topological metamaterial without Weyl lines and with a uniform polarization that leads to an asymmetry between the number of soft modes on opposing surfaces. We then use this construction to localize topological soft modes in interior regions of the material by including defect lines—dislocation loops—that are unique to three dimensions. We derive a general formula that relates the difference in the number of soft modes and states of self-stress localized along the dislocation loop to the handedness of the vector triad formed by the lattice polarization, Burgers vector, and dislocation-line direction. Our findings suggest a strategy for preprogramming failure and softness localized along lines in 3D, while avoiding extended soft Weyl modes.

  3. Towards Large Volume Big Divisor D3-D7 "mu-Split Supersymmetry" and Ricci-Flat Swiss-Cheese Metrics, and Dimension-Six Neutrino Mass Operators

    CERN Document Server

    Dhuria, Mansi

    2012-01-01

    We show that it is possible to realize a "mu-split SUSY" scenario [1] in the context of large volume limit of type IIB compactifications on Swiss-Cheese Calabi-Yau's in the presence of a mobile space-time filling D3-brane and a (stack of) D7-brane(s) wrapping the "big" divisor Sigma_B. For this, we investigate the possibility of getting one Higgs to be light while other to be heavy in addition to a heavy Higgsino mass parameter. Further, we examine the existence of long lived gluino that manifests one of the major consequences of mu-split SUSY scenario, by computing its decay width as well as lifetime corresponding to the 3-body decays of the gluino into a quark, a squark and a neutralino or Goldstino, as well as 2-body decays of the gluino into either a neutralino or a Goldstino and a gluon. Guided by the geometric Kaehler potential for Sigma_B obtained in [2] based on GLSM techniques, and the Donaldson's algorithm [3] for obtaining numerically a Ricci-flat metric, we give details of our calculation in [4] p...

  4. SUSY WT identity in a lattice formulation of 2D N=(2,2) SYM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadoh, Daisuke; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    We address some issues relating to a supersymmetric (SUSY) Ward-Takahashi (WT) identity in Sugino's lattice formulation of two-dimensional (2D) N=(2,2)SU(k) supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory (SYM). A perturbative argument shows that the SUSY WT identity in the continuum theory is reproduced in the continuum limit without any operator renormalization/mixing and tuning of lattice parameters. As application of the lattice SUSY WT identity, we show that a prescription for the Hamiltonian density in this lattice formulation, proposed by Kanamori, Sugino and Suzuki, is justified also from a perspective of an operator algebra among correctly-normalized supercurrents. We explicitly confirm the SUSY WT identity in the continuum limit to the first nontrivial order in a semi-perturbative expansion.

  5. 3D-printing soft sEMG sensing structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterink, Gerjan; Sanders, Remco; Muijzer, Frodo; van Beijnum, Bert-Jan; Krijnen, Gijs

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes the development and characterization of soft and flexible 3D-printed sEMG electrodes. The electrodes are printed in one go on a low cost consumer multi-material FDM printer. The printed structures do not need any further production steps to give them conductive properties.

  6. Measurement of facial soft tissues thickness using 3D computed tomographic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ho Gul; Kim, Kee Deog; Shin, Dong Won; Hu, Kyung Seok; Lee, Jae Bum; Park, Hyok; Park, Chang Seo [Yonsei Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seung Ho [Catholic Univ. of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    To evaluate accuracy and reliability of program to measure facial soft tissue thickness using 3D computed tomographic images by comparing with direct measurement. One cadaver was scanned with a Helical CT with 3 mm slice thickness and 3 mm/sec table speed. The acquired data was reconstructed with 1.5 mm reconstruction interval and the images were transferred to a personal computer. The facial soft tissue thickness were measured using a program developed newly in 3D image. For direct measurement, the cadaver was cut with a bone cutter and then a ruler was placed above the cut side. The procedure was followed by taking pictures of the facial soft tissues with a high-resolution digital camera. Then the measurements were done in the photographic images and repeated for ten times. A repeated measure analysis of variance was adopted to compare and analyze the measurements resulting from the two different methods. Comparison according to the areas was analyzed by Mann-Whitney test. There were no statistically significant differences between the direct measurements and those using the 3D images(p>0.05). There were statistical differences in the measurements on 17 points but all the points except 2 points showed a mean difference of 0.5 mm or less. The developed software program to measure the facial soft tissue thickness using 3D images was so accurate that it allows to measure facial soft tissue thickness more easily in forensic science and anthropology.

  7. Measurement of facial soft tissues thickness using 3D computed tomographic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Ho Gul; Kim, Kee Deog; Shin, Dong Won; Hu, Kyung Seok; Lee, Jae Bum; Park, Hyok; Park, Chang Seo; Han, Seung Ho

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate accuracy and reliability of program to measure facial soft tissue thickness using 3D computed tomographic images by comparing with direct measurement. One cadaver was scanned with a Helical CT with 3 mm slice thickness and 3 mm/sec table speed. The acquired data was reconstructed with 1.5 mm reconstruction interval and the images were transferred to a personal computer. The facial soft tissue thickness were measured using a program developed newly in 3D image. For direct measurement, the cadaver was cut with a bone cutter and then a ruler was placed above the cut side. The procedure was followed by taking pictures of the facial soft tissues with a high-resolution digital camera. Then the measurements were done in the photographic images and repeated for ten times. A repeated measure analysis of variance was adopted to compare and analyze the measurements resulting from the two different methods. Comparison according to the areas was analyzed by Mann-Whitney test. There were no statistically significant differences between the direct measurements and those using the 3D images(p>0.05). There were statistical differences in the measurements on 17 points but all the points except 2 points showed a mean difference of 0.5 mm or less. The developed software program to measure the facial soft tissue thickness using 3D images was so accurate that it allows to measure facial soft tissue thickness more easily in forensic science and anthropology

  8. Hybrid 3D Printing of Soft Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Alexander D; Busbee, Travis A; Boley, John William; Raney, Jordan R; Chortos, Alex; Kotikian, Arda; Berrigan, John Daniel; Durstock, Michael F; Lewis, Jennifer A

    2017-10-01

    Hybrid 3D printing is a new method for producing soft electronics that combines direct ink writing of conductive and dielectric elastomeric materials with automated pick-and-place of surface mount electronic components within an integrated additive manufacturing platform. Using this approach, insulating matrix and conductive electrode inks are directly printed in specific layouts. Passive and active electrical components are then integrated to produce the desired electronic circuitry by using an empty nozzle (in vacuum-on mode) to pick up individual components, place them onto the substrate, and then deposit them (in vacuum-off mode) in the desired location. The components are then interconnected via printed conductive traces to yield soft electronic devices that may find potential application in wearable electronics, soft robotics, and biomedical devices. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Fabrication of low cost soft tissue prostheses with the desktop 3D printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yong; Xue, Guang-huai; Fu, Jian-zhong

    2014-11-27

    Soft tissue prostheses such as artificial ear, eye and nose are widely used in the maxillofacial rehabilitation. In this report we demonstrate how to fabricate soft prostheses mold with a low cost desktop 3D printer. The fabrication method used is referred to as Scanning Printing Polishing Casting (SPPC). Firstly the anatomy is scanned with a 3D scanner, then a tissue casting mold is designed on computer and printed with a desktop 3D printer. Subsequently, a chemical polishing method is used to polish the casting mold by removing the staircase effect and acquiring a smooth surface. Finally, the last step is to cast medical grade silicone into the mold. After the silicone is cured, the fine soft prostheses can be removed from the mold. Utilizing the SPPC method, soft prostheses with smooth surface and complicated structure can be fabricated at a low cost. Accordingly, the total cost of fabricating ear prosthesis is about $30, which is much lower than the current soft prostheses fabrication methods.

  10. Stable SUSY breaking model with O(10) eV gravitino from combined D-term gauge mediation and U(1)' mediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakayama, Yu

    2008-01-01

    We show a calculable example of stable supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking models with O(10) eV gravitino mass based on the combination of D-term gauge mediation and U(1)' mediation. A potential problem of the negative mass squared for the SUSY standard model (SSM) sfermions in the D-term gauge mediation is solved by the contribution from the U(1)' mediation. On the other hand, the splitting between the SSM gauginos and sfermions in the U(1)' mediation is circumvented by the contributions from the D-term gauge mediation. Since the U(1)' mediation does not introduce any new SUSY vacua, we achieve a completely stable model under thermal effects. Our model, therefore, has no cosmological difficulty

  11. Determination of 3D magnetic reluctivity tensor of soft magnetic composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Youguang; Zhu Jianguo; Lin Zhiwei; Zhong Jinjiang; Lu Haiyan; Wang Shuhong

    2007-01-01

    Soft magnetic composite (SMC) materials are especially suitable for construction of electrical machines with complex structures and three-dimensional (3D) magnetic fluxes. In the design and optimization of such 3D flux machines, the 3D vector magnetic properties of magnetic materials should be properly determined, modeled, and applied for accurate calculation of the magnetic field distribution, parameters, and performance. This paper presents the measurement of 3D vector magnetic properties and determination of 3D reluctivity tensor of SMC. The reluctivity tensor is a key factor for accurate numerical analysis of magnetic field in a 3D flux SMC motor

  12. Peccei-Quinn invariant singlet extended SUSY with anomalous U(1) gauge symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Sang Hui; Seo, Min-Seok [Center for Theoretical Physics of the Universe, Institute for Basic Science (IBS),Daejeon 305-811 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-13

    Recent discovery of the SM-like Higgs boson with m{sub h}≃125 GeV motivates an extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM), which involves a singlet Higgs superfield with a sizable Yukawa coupling to the doublet Higgs superfields. We examine such singlet-extended SUSY models with a Peccei-Quinn (PQ) symmetry that originates from an anomalous U(1){sub A} gauge symmetry. We focus on the specific scheme that the PQ symmetry is spontaneously broken at an intermediate scale v{sub PQ}∼√(m{sub SUSY}M{sub Pl}) by an interplay between Planck scale suppressed operators and tachyonic soft scalar mass m{sub SUSY}∼√(D{sub A}) induced dominantly by the U(1){sub A}D-term D{sub A}. This scheme also results in spontaneous SUSY breaking in the PQ sector, generating the gaugino masses M{sub 1/2}∼√(D{sub A}) when it is transmitted to the MSSM sector by the conventional gauge mediation mechanism. As a result, the MSSM soft parameters in this scheme are induced mostly by the U(1){sub A}D-term and the gauge mediated SUSY breaking from the PQ sector, so that the sparticle masses can be near the present experimental bounds without causing the SUSY flavor problem. The scheme is severely constrained by the condition that a phenomenologically viable form of the low energy operators of the singlet and doublet Higgs superfields is generated by the PQ breaking sector in a way similar to the Kim-Nilles solution of the μ problem, and the resulting Higgs mass parameters allow the electroweak symmetry breaking with small tan β. We find two minimal models with two singlet Higgs superfields, satisfying this condition with a relatively simple form of the PQ breaking sector, and briefly discuss some phenomenological aspects of the model.

  13. Standardized 3D Bioprinting of Soft Tissue Models with Human Primary Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimann, Markus; Bono, Epifania; Annaheim, Helene; Bleisch, Matthias; Graf-Hausner, Ursula

    2016-08-01

    Cells grown in 3D are more physiologically relevant than cells cultured in 2D. To use 3D models in substance testing and regenerative medicine, reproducibility and standardization are important. Bioprinting offers not only automated standardizable processes but also the production of complex tissue-like structures in an additive manner. We developed an all-in-one bioprinting solution to produce soft tissue models. The holistic approach included (1) a bioprinter in a sterile environment, (2) a light-induced bioink polymerization unit, (3) a user-friendly software, (4) the capability to print in standard labware for high-throughput screening, (5) cell-compatible inkjet-based printheads, (6) a cell-compatible ready-to-use BioInk, and (7) standard operating procedures. In a proof-of-concept study, skin as a reference soft tissue model was printed. To produce dermal equivalents, primary human dermal fibroblasts were printed in alternating layers with BioInk and cultured for up to 7 weeks. During long-term cultures, the models were remodeled and fully populated with viable and spreaded fibroblasts. Primary human dermal keratinocytes were seeded on top of dermal equivalents, and epidermis-like structures were formed as verified with hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunostaining. However, a fully stratified epidermis was not achieved. Nevertheless, this is one of the first reports of an integrative bioprinting strategy for industrial routine application. © 2015 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  14. Helical 3D-CT images of soft tissue tumors in the hand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otani, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Hiraku; Tan, Akihiro; Hamanishi, Chiaki; Tanaka, Seisuke [Kinki Univ., Osaka-Sayama (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-02-01

    X-ray, ultrasonograph CT, MRI and angiography are used to detect tumoral lesions. Recently, helical CT has been revealed to be a useful method for the diagnosis and preoperative evaluation of soft tissue tumors, by which high quality and accurate three dimensional (3D) images can be obtained quickly. We analyzed the preoperative 3D-CT images of soft tissue tumors in the hands of 11 cases (hemangioma in 6 cases, giant cell tumor, lipoma, angiofibroma, chondrosarcoma and malignant fibro-histiocytoma in one case each). Enhanced 3D-CT clearly visualized hemangiomas and solid tumors from the surrounding tissues. The tumors could easily be observed from any direction and color-coded according to the CT number. Helical 3D-CT was thus confirmed to be useful for the diagnosis and preoperative planning by indicating the details of tumor expansion into surrounding tissues. (author)

  15. D-term contributions and CEDM constraints in E6 × SU(2)F × U(1)A SUSY GUT model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigekami, Yoshihiro

    2017-11-01

    We focus on E6 × SU(2)F × U(1)A supersymmetric (SUSY) grand unified theory (GUT) model. In this model, realistic Yukawa hierarchies and mixings are realized by introducing all allowed interactions with 𝓞(1) coefficients. Moreover, we can take stop mass is smaller than the other sfermion masses. This type of spectrum called by natural SUSY type sfermion mass spectrum can suppress the SUSY contributions to flavor changing neutral current (FCNC) and stabilize weak scale at the same time. However, light stop predicts large up quark CEDM and stop contributions are not decoupled. Since there is Kobayashi-Maskawa phase, stop contributions to the up quark CEDM is severely constrained even if all SUSY breaking parameters and Higgsino mass parameter μ are real. In this model, real up Yukawa couplings are realized at the GUT scale because of spontaneous CP violation. Therefore CEDM bounds are satisfied, although up Yukawa couplings are complex at the SUSY scale through the renormalization equation group effects. We calculated the CEDMs and found that EDM constraints can be satisfied even if stop mass is 𝓞(1) TeV. In addition, we investigate the size of D-terms in this model. Since these D-term contributions is flavor dependent, the degeneracy of sfermion mass spectrum is destroyed and the size of D-term is strongly constrained by FCNCs when SUSY breaking scale is the weak scale. However, SUSY breaking scale is larger than 1 TeV in order to obtain 125 GeV Higgs mass, and therefore sizable D-term contribution is allowed. Furthermore, we obtained the non-trivial prediction for the difference of squared sfermion mass.

  16. 4D constructions of supersymmetric extra dimensions and gaugino mediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csaki, Csaba; Erlich, Joshua; Grojean, Christophe; Kribs, Graham D.

    2002-01-01

    We present 4D gauge theories which at low energies coincide with higher dimensional supersymmetric (SUSY) gauge theories on a transverse lattice. We show that in the simplest case of pure 5D SUSY Yang-Mills theory there is an enhancement of SUSY in the continuum limit without fine tuning. This result no longer holds in the presence of matter fields, in which case fine tuning is necessary to ensure higher dimensional Lorentz invariance and supersymmetry. We use this construction to generate 4D models which mimic gaugino mediation of SUSY breaking. The way supersymmetry breaking is mediated in these models to the MSSM is by assuming that the physical gauginos are a mixture of a number of gauge eigenstate gauginos: one of these couples to the SUSY breaking sector, while another couples to the MSSM matter fields. The lattice can be as coarse as just two gauge groups while still obtaining the characteristic gaugino-mediated soft breaking terms

  17. 3D printing of concentrated emulsions into multiphase biocompatible soft materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Marianne R; Alison, Lauriane; Minas, Clara; Tervoort, Elena; Rühs, Patrick A; Studart, André R

    2017-03-01

    3D printing via direct ink writing (DIW) is a versatile additive manufacturing approach applicable to a variety of materials ranging from ceramics over composites to hydrogels. Due to the mild processing conditions compared to other additive manufacturing methods, DIW enables the incorporation of sensitive compounds such as proteins or drugs into the printed structure. Although emulsified oil-in-water systems are commonly used vehicles for such compounds in biomedical, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic applications, printing of such emulsions into architectured soft materials has not been fully exploited and would open new possibilities for the controlled delivery of sensitive compounds. Here, we 3D print concentrated emulsions into soft materials, whose multiphase architecture allows for site-specific incorporation of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds into the same structure. As a model ink, concentrated emulsions stabilized by chitosan-modified silica nanoparticles are studied, because they are sufficiently stable against coalescence during the centrifugation step needed to create a bridging network of droplets. The resulting ink is ideal for 3D printing as it displays high yield stress, storage modulus and elastic recovery, through the formation of networks of droplets as well as of gelled silica nanoparticles in the presence of chitosan. To demonstrate possible architectures, we print biocompatible soft materials with tunable hierarchical porosity containing an encapsulated hydrophobic compound positioned in specific locations of the structure. The proposed emulsion-based ink system offers great flexibility in terms of 3D shaping and local compositional control, and can potentially help address current challenges involving the delivery of incompatible compounds in biomedical applications.

  18. Fused filament 3D printing of ionic polymer-metal composites for soft robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrico, James D.; Leang, Kam K.

    2017-04-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques are used to create three-dimensional structures with complex shapes and features from polymer and/or metal materials. For example, fused filament three-dimensional (3D) printing utilizes non-electroactive polymers, such as acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polylactic acid (PLA), to build structures and components in a layer-by-layer fashion for a wide variety of applications. Presented here is a summary of recent work on a fused filament 3D-printing technique to create 3D ionic polymer-metal composite (IPMC) structures for applications in soft robotics. The 3D printing technique overcomes some of the limitations of existing manufacturing processes for creating IPMCs, such as limited shapes and sizes and time-consuming manufacturing steps. In the process described, first a precursor material (non-acid Nafion precursor resin) is extruded into a thermoplastic filament for 3D printing. Then, a custom-designed 3D printer is described that utilizes the precursor filament to manufacture custom-shaped structures. Finally, the 3D-printed samples are functionalized by hydrolyzing them in an aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide and dimethyl sulfoxide, followed by application of platinum electrodes. Presented are example 3D-printed single and multi-degree-of-freedom IPMC actuators and characterization results, as well as example soft-robotic devices to demonstrate the potential of this process.

  19. Comparison of 3D Scanning Versus 2D Photography for the Identification of Facial Soft-Tissue Landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zogheib, T; Jacobs, R; Bornstein, M M; Agbaje, J O; Anumendem, D; Klazen, Y; Politis, C

    2018-01-01

    Three dimensional facial scanning is an innovation that provides opportunity for digital data acquisition, smile analysis and communication of treatment plan and outcome with patients. To assess the applicability of 3D facial scanning as compared to 2D clinical photography. Sample consisted of thirty Caucasians aged between 25 and 50 years old, without any dentofacial deformities. Fifteen soft-tissue facial landmarks were identified twice by 3 observers on 2D and 3D images of the 30 subjects. Five linear proportions and nine angular measurements were established in the orbital, nasal and oral regions. These data were compared to anthropometric norms of young Caucasians. Furthermore, a questionnaire was completed by 14 other observers, according to their personal judgment of the 2D and 3D images. Quantitatively, proportions linking the three facial regions in 3D were closer to the clinical standard (for 2D 3.3% and for 3D 1.8% error rate). Qualitatively, in 67% of the cases, observers were as confident about 3D as they were about 2D. Intra-observer Correlation Coefficient (ICC) revealed a better agreement between observers in 3D for the questions related to facial form, lip step and chin posture. The laser facial scanning could be a useful and reliable tool to analyze the circumoral region for orthodontic and orthognathic treatments as well as for plastic surgery planning and outcome.

  20. Soft see-saw: Radiative origin of neutrino masses in SUSY theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luka Megrelidze

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiative neutrino mass generation within supersymmetric (SUSY construction is studied. The mechanism is considered where the lepton number violation is originating from the soft SUSY breaking terms. This requires MSSM extensions with states around the TeV scale. We present several explicit realizations based on extensions either by MSSM singlet or SU(2w triplet states. Besides some novelties of the proposed scenarios, various phenomenological implications are also discussed.

  1. Analytical Solution of Dirac Equation for q-Deformed Hyperbolic Manning-Rosen Potential in D Dimensions using SUSY QM and its Thermodynamics Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cari, C; Suparmi, A; Yunianto, M; Pratiwi, B N

    2016-01-01

    The Dirac equation of q-deformed hyperbolic Manning Rosen potential in D dimension was solved by using Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics (SUSY QM). The D dimensional relativistic energy spectra were obtained by using SUSY QM and shape invariant properties and D dimensional wave functions of q-deformed hyperbolic Manning Rosen potential were obtained by using the SUSY raising and lowering operators. In the nonrelativistic limit, the relativistic energy spectra for exact spin symmetry case reduced into nonrelativistic energy spectra and so for the wave functions. In the classical regime, the partition function, the vibrational specific heat, and the vibrational mean energy of some diatomic molecules were calculated from the non-relativistic energy spectra with the help of error function and imaginary error function. (paper)

  2. The Higgs boson mass and SUSY spectra in 10D SYM theory with magnetized extra dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Abe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We study the Higgs boson mass and the spectrum of supersymmetric (SUSY particles in the well-motivated particle physics model derived from a ten-dimensional supersymmetric Yang–Mills theory compactified on three factorizable tori with magnetic fluxes. This model was proposed in a previous work, where the flavor structures of the standard model including the realistic Yukawa hierarchies are obtained from non-hierarchical input parameters on the magnetized background. Assuming moduli- and anomaly-mediated contributions dominate the soft SUSY breaking terms, we study the precise SUSY spectra and analyze the Higgs boson mass in this mode, which are compared with the latest experimental data.

  3. Soft Somatosensitive Actuators via Embedded 3D Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truby, Ryan L; Wehner, Michael; Grosskopf, Abigail K; Vogt, Daniel M; Uzel, Sebastien G M; Wood, Robert J; Lewis, Jennifer A

    2018-04-01

    Humans possess manual dexterity, motor skills, and other physical abilities that rely on feedback provided by the somatosensory system. Herein, a method is reported for creating soft somatosensitive actuators (SSAs) via embedded 3D printing, which are innervated with multiple conductive features that simultaneously enable haptic, proprioceptive, and thermoceptive sensing. This novel manufacturing approach enables the seamless integration of multiple ionically conductive and fluidic features within elastomeric matrices to produce SSAs with the desired bioinspired sensing and actuation capabilities. Each printed sensor is composed of an ionically conductive gel that exhibits both long-term stability and hysteresis-free performance. As an exemplar, multiple SSAs are combined into a soft robotic gripper that provides proprioceptive and haptic feedback via embedded curvature, inflation, and contact sensors, including deep and fine touch contact sensors. The multimaterial manufacturing platform enables complex sensing motifs to be easily integrated into soft actuating systems, which is a necessary step toward closed-loop feedback control of soft robots, machines, and haptic devices. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Magnetic measurement of soft magnetic composites material under 3D SVPWM excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changgeng; Jiang, Baolin; Li, Yongjian; Yang, Qingxin

    2018-05-01

    The magnetic properties measurement and analysis of soft magnetic material under the rotational space-vector pulse width modulation (SVPWM) excitation are key factors in design and optimization of the adjustable speed motor. In this paper, a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic properties testing system fit for SVPWM excitation is built, which includes symmetrical orthogonal excitation magnetic circuit and cubic field-metric sensor. Base on the testing system, the vector B and H loci of soft magnetic composite (SMC) material under SVPWM excitation are measured and analyzed by proposed 3D SVPWM control method. Alternating and rotating core losses under various complex excitation with different magnitude modulation ratio are calculated and compared.

  5. Automatic extraction of soft tissues from 3D MRI head images using model driven analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Hao; Yamamoto, Shinji; Imao, Masanao.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents an automatic extraction system (called TOPS-3D : Top Down Parallel Pattern Recognition System for 3D Images) of soft tissues from 3D MRI head images by using model driven analysis algorithm. As the construction of system TOPS we developed, two concepts have been considered in the design of system TOPS-3D. One is the system having a hierarchical structure of reasoning using model information in higher level, and the other is a parallel image processing structure used to extract plural candidate regions for a destination entity. The new points of system TOPS-3D are as follows. (1) The TOPS-3D is a three-dimensional image analysis system including 3D model construction and 3D image processing techniques. (2) A technique is proposed to increase connectivity between knowledge processing in higher level and image processing in lower level. The technique is realized by applying opening operation of mathematical morphology, in which a structural model function defined in higher level by knowledge representation is immediately used to the filter function of opening operation as image processing in lower level. The system TOPS-3D applied to 3D MRI head images consists of three levels. First and second levels are reasoning part, and third level is image processing part. In experiments, we applied 5 samples of 3D MRI head images with size 128 x 128 x 128 pixels to the system TOPS-3D to extract the regions of soft tissues such as cerebrum, cerebellum and brain stem. From the experimental results, the system is robust for variation of input data by using model information, and the position and shape of soft tissues are extracted corresponding to anatomical structure. (author)

  6. Soft tissue segmentation and 3D display from computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, R.T.; Trivedi, S.S.; Fellingham, L.L.; Gamboa-Aldeco, A.; Hedgcock, M.W.

    1987-01-01

    Volume calculation and 3D display of human anatomy facilitate a physician's diagnosis, treatment, and evaluation. Accurate segmentation of soft tissue structures is a prerequisite for such volume calculations and 3D displays, but segmentation by hand-outlining structures is often tedious and time-consuming. In this paper, methods based on analysis of statistics of image gray level are applied to segmentation of soft tissue in medical images, with the goal of making segmentation automatic or semi-automatic. The resulting segmented images, volume calculations, and 3D displays are analyzed and compared with results based on physician-drawn outlines as well as actual volume measurements

  7. Soft-Template Construction of 3D Macroporous Polypyrrole Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaohua; Wang, Faxing; Dong, Renhao; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Jian; Zheng, Zhikun; Mai, Yiyong; Feng, Xinliang

    2017-04-01

    A bottom-up approach toward 3D hierarchical macroporous polypyrrole aerogels is demonstrated via soft template-directed synthesis and self-assembly of ultrathin polypyrrole nanosheets in solution, which present interconnected macropores, ultrathin walls, and large specific surface areas, thereby exhibiting a high capacity, satisfactory rate capability, and excellent cycling stability for Na-ion storage. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Supersymmetric D3/D7 for holographic flavors on curved space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karch, Andreas; Robinson, Brandon; Uhlemann, Christoph F.

    2015-01-01

    We derive a new class of supersymmetric D3/D7 brane configurations, which allow to holographically describe N=4 SYM coupled to massive N=2 flavor degrees of freedom on spaces of constant curvature. We systematically solve the κ-symmetry condition for D7-brane embeddings into AdS_4-sliced AdS_5×S"5, and find supersymmetric embeddings in a simple closed form. Up to a critical mass, these embeddings come in surprisingly diverse families, and we present a first study of their (holographic) phenomenology. We carry out the holographic renormalization, compute the one-point functions and attempt a field-theoretic interpretation of the different families. To complete the catalog of supersymmetric D3/D7 configurations, we construct analogous embeddings for flavored N=4 SYM on S"4 and dS_4.

  9. Soft but Powerful Artificial Muscles Based on 3D Graphene-CNT-Ni Heteronanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaehwan; Bae, Seok-Hu; Kotal, Moumita; Stalbaum, Tyler; Kim, Kwang J; Oh, Il-Kwon

    2017-08-01

    Bioinspired soft ionic actuators, which exhibit large strain and high durability under low input voltages, are regarded as prospective candidates for future soft electronics. However, due to the intrinsic drawback of weak blocking force, the feasible applications of soft ionic actuators are limited until now. An electroactive artificial muscle electro-chemomechanically reinforced with 3D graphene-carbon nanotube-nickel heteronanostructures (G-CNT-Ni) to improve blocking force and bending deformation of the ionic actuators is demonstrated. The G-CNT-Ni heteronanostructure, which provides an electrically conductive 3D network and sufficient contact area with mobile ions in the polymer electrolyte, is embedded as a nanofiller in both ionic polymer and conductive electrodes of the ionic actuators. An ionic exchangeable composite membrane consisting of Nafion, G-CNT-Ni and ionic liquid (IL) shows improved tensile modulus and strength of up to 166% and 98%, respectively, and increased ionic conductivity of 0.254 S m -1 . The ionic actuator exhibits enhanced actuation performances including three times larger bending deformation, 2.37 times higher blocking force, and 4 h durability. The electroactive artificial muscle electro-chemomechanically reinforced with 3D G-CNT-Ni heteronanostructures offers improvements over current soft ionic actuator technologies and can advance the practical engineering applications. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Electric dipole moments from spontaneous CP violation in SU(3)-flavoured SUSY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones Perez, J

    2009-01-01

    The SUSY flavour problem is deeply related to the origin of flavour and hence to the origin of the SM Yukawa couplings themselves. Since all CP-violation in the SM is restricted to the flavour sector, it is possible that the SUSY CP problem is related to the origin of flavour as well. In this work, we present three variations of an SU(3) flavour model with spontaneous CP violation. Such models explain the hierarchy in the fermion masses and mixings, and predict the structure of the flavoured soft SUSY breaking terms. In such a situation, both SUSY flavour and CP problems do not exist. We use electric dipole moments and lepton flavour violation processes to distinguish between these models, and place constraints on the SUSY parameter space.

  11. SU-C-213-01: 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantom Composed of Bone and Soft Tissue Substitute Plastics for Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehler, E; Sterling, D; Higgins, P

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: 3D printed phantoms constructed of multiple tissue approximating materials could be useful in both clinical and research aspects of radiotherapy. This work describes a 3D printed phantom constructed with tissue substitute plastics for both bone and soft tissue; air cavities were included as well. Methods: 3D models of an anonymized nasopharynx patient were generated for air cavities, soft tissues, and bone, which were segmented by Hounsfield Unit (HU) thresholds. HU thresholds were chosen to define air-to-soft tissue boundaries of 0.65 g/cc and soft tissue-to-bone boundaries of 1.18 g/cc based on clinical HU to density tables. After evaluation of several composite plastics, a bone tissue substitute was identified as an acceptable material for typical radiotherapy x-ray energies, composed of iron and PLA plastic. PET plastic was determined to be an acceptable soft tissue substitute. 3D printing was performed on a consumer grade dual extrusion fused deposition model 3D printer. Results: MVCT scans of the 3D printed heterogeneous phantom were acquired. Rigid image registration of the patient and the 3D printed phantom scans was performed. The average physical density of the soft tissue and bone regions was 1.02 ± 0.08 g/cc and 1.39 ± 0.14 g/cc, respectively, for the patient kVCT scan. In the 3D printed phantom MVCT scan, the average density of the soft tissue and bone was 1.01 ± 0.09 g/cc and 1.44 ± 0.12 g/cc, respectively. Conclusion: A patient specific phantom, constructed of heterogeneous tissue substitute materials was constructed by 3D printing. MVCT of the 3D printed phantom showed realistic tissue densities were recreated by the 3D printing materials. Funding provided by intra-department grant by University of Minnesota Department of Radiation Oncology

  12. SU-C-213-01: 3D Printed Patient Specific Phantom Composed of Bone and Soft Tissue Substitute Plastics for Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehler, E; Sterling, D; Higgins, P [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: 3D printed phantoms constructed of multiple tissue approximating materials could be useful in both clinical and research aspects of radiotherapy. This work describes a 3D printed phantom constructed with tissue substitute plastics for both bone and soft tissue; air cavities were included as well. Methods: 3D models of an anonymized nasopharynx patient were generated for air cavities, soft tissues, and bone, which were segmented by Hounsfield Unit (HU) thresholds. HU thresholds were chosen to define air-to-soft tissue boundaries of 0.65 g/cc and soft tissue-to-bone boundaries of 1.18 g/cc based on clinical HU to density tables. After evaluation of several composite plastics, a bone tissue substitute was identified as an acceptable material for typical radiotherapy x-ray energies, composed of iron and PLA plastic. PET plastic was determined to be an acceptable soft tissue substitute. 3D printing was performed on a consumer grade dual extrusion fused deposition model 3D printer. Results: MVCT scans of the 3D printed heterogeneous phantom were acquired. Rigid image registration of the patient and the 3D printed phantom scans was performed. The average physical density of the soft tissue and bone regions was 1.02 ± 0.08 g/cc and 1.39 ± 0.14 g/cc, respectively, for the patient kVCT scan. In the 3D printed phantom MVCT scan, the average density of the soft tissue and bone was 1.01 ± 0.09 g/cc and 1.44 ± 0.12 g/cc, respectively. Conclusion: A patient specific phantom, constructed of heterogeneous tissue substitute materials was constructed by 3D printing. MVCT of the 3D printed phantom showed realistic tissue densities were recreated by the 3D printing materials. Funding provided by intra-department grant by University of Minnesota Department of Radiation Oncology.

  13. Towards large volume big divisor D3/D7 " μ-split supersymmetry" and Ricci-flat Swiss-cheese metrics, and dimension-six neutrino mass operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhuria, Mansi; Misra, Aalok

    2012-02-01

    We show that it is possible to realize a " μ-split SUSY" scenario (Cheng and Cheng, 2005) [1] in the context of large volume limit of type IIB compactifications on Swiss-cheese Calabi-Yau orientifolds in the presence of a mobile space-time filling D3-brane and a (stack of) D7-brane(s) wrapping the "big" divisor. For this, we investigate the possibility of getting one Higgs to be light while other to be heavy in addition to a heavy higgsino mass parameter. Further, we examine the existence of long lived gluino that manifests one of the major consequences of μ-split SUSY scenario, by computing its decay width as well as lifetime corresponding to the three-body decays of the gluino into either a quark, a squark and a neutralino or a quark, squark and goldstino, as well as two-body decays of the gluino into either a neutralino and a gluon or a goldstino and a gluon. Guided by the geometric Kähler potential for Σ obtained in Misra and Shukla (2010) [2] based on GLSM techniques, and the Donaldson's algorithm (Barun et al., 2008) [3] for obtaining numerically a Ricci-flat metric, we give details of our calculation in Misra and Shukla (2011) [4] pertaining to our proposed metric for the full Swiss-cheese Calabi-Yau (the geometric Kähler potential being needed to be included in the full moduli space Kähler potential in the presence of the mobile space-time filling D3-brane), but for simplicity of calculation, close to the big divisor, which is Ricci-flat in the large volume limit. Also, as an application of the one-loop RG flow solution for the higgsino mass parameter, we show that the contribution to the neutrino masses at the EW scale from dimension-six operators arising from the Kähler potential, is suppressed relative to the Weinberg-type dimension-five operators.

  14. FUN3D Manual: 12.7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedron, Robert T.; Carlson, Jan-Renee; Derlaga, Joseph M.; Gnoffo, Peter A.; Hammond, Dana P.; Jones, William T.; Kleb, Bil; Lee-Rausch, Elizabeth M.; Nielsen, Eric J.; Park, Michael A.; hide

    2015-01-01

    This manual describes the installation and execution of FUN3D version 12.7, including optional dependent packages. FUN3D is a suite of computational fluid dynamics simulation and design tools that uses mixed-element unstructured grids in a large number of formats, including structured multiblock and overset grid systems. A discretely-exact adjoint solver enables efficient gradient-based design and grid adaptation to reduce estimated discretization error. FUN3D is available with and without a reacting, real-gas capability. This generic gas option is available only for those persons that qualify for its beta release status.

  15. SUSY Without Prejudice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, C.

    2008-01-01

    We begin an exploration of the physics associated with the general CP-conserving MSSM with Minimal Flavor Violation, the pMSSM. The 19 soft SUSY breaking parameters in this scenario are chosen so as to satisfy all existing experimental and theoretical constraints assuming that the WIMP is a thermal relic, i.e., the lightest neutralino. We scan this parameter space twice using both flat and log priors for the soft SUSY breaking mass parameters and compare the results which yield similar conclusions. Detailed constraints from both LEP and the Tevatron searches play a particularly important role in obtaining our final model samples. We find that the pMSSM leads to a much broader set of predictions for the properties of the SUSY partners as well as for a number of experimental observables than those found in any of the conventional SUSY breaking scenarios such as mSUGRA. This set of models can easily lead to atypical expectations for SUSY signals at the LHC

  16. Synthesis of 3-[D7]isopropylbenzo-2-thia-1,3-diazinon-(4)-2,2- dioxide ([D7]-bentazone)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacquemijns M; Zomer G

    1990-01-01

    D7]Bentazone was sysnthesized from methyl antranilate and [D7 isopropylsulfamoyl chloride. [D7]Isopropylsulfamoyl chloride was prepared by treatment of [D7]isopropyl amine with chlorosulfonic acid and phosphorous pentachloride. The overall yield from D7]isopropyl amine was 7% and the isotopic

  17. Towards 3D ultrasound image based soft tissue tracking: a transrectal ultrasound prostate image alignment system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Michael; Mozer, Pierre; Daanen, Vincent; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2007-01-01

    The emergence of real-time 3D ultrasound (US) makes it possible to consider image-based tracking of subcutaneous soft tissue targets for computer guided diagnosis and therapy. We propose a 3D transrectal US based tracking system for precise prostate biopsy sample localisation. The aim is to improve sample distribution, to enable targeting of unsampled regions for repeated biopsies, and to make post-interventional quality controls possible. Since the patient is not immobilized, since the prostate is mobile and due to the fact that probe movements are only constrained by the rectum during biopsy acquisition, the tracking system must be able to estimate rigid transformations that are beyond the capture range of common image similarity measures. We propose a fast and robust multi-resolution attribute-vector registration approach that combines global and local optimization methods to solve this problem. Global optimization is performed on a probe movement model that reduces the dimensionality of the search space and thus renders optimization efficient. The method was tested on 237 prostate volumes acquired from 14 different patients for 3D to 3D and 3D to orthogonal 2D slices registration. The 3D-3D version of the algorithm converged correctly in 96.7% of all cases in 6.5s with an accuracy of 1.41mm (r.m.s.) and 3.84mm (max). The 3D to slices method yielded a success rate of 88.9% in 2.3s with an accuracy of 1.37mm (r.m.s.) and 4.3mm (max).

  18. Thermoresponsive microgels containing trehalose as soft matrices for 3D cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burek, Małgorzata; Waśkiewicz, Sylwia; Lalik, Anna; Student, Sebastian; Bieg, Tadeusz; Wandzik, Ilona

    2017-01-31

    A series of thermoresponsive glycomicrogels with trehalose in the cross-links or with trehalose in the cross-links and as pending moieties was synthesized. These materials were obtained by surfactant-free precipitation copolymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide and various amounts of trehalose monomers. The resultant particles showed a spherical shape and a submicrometer hydrodynamic size with a narrow size distribution. At 25 °C, glycomicrogels in solutions with physiological ionic strength formed stable colloids, which further gelled upon heating to physiological temperature forming a macroscopic hydrogel with an interconnected porous structure. These extremely soft matrices with dynamic storage modulus in the range of 9-70 Pa were examined in 3D culture systems for HeLa cell culture in comparison to traditional 2D mode. They showed relatively low syneresis over time, especially when glycomicrogels with a high content of hydrophilic trehalose were used as building blocks. An incorporated pending trehalose composed of two α,α'-1,1'-linked d-glucose moieties was used with the intention of providing multivalent interactions with glucose transporters (GLUTs) expressed on the cell surface. A better cell viability was observed when a soft hydrogel with the highest content of trehalose and the lowest syneresis was used as a matrix compared to a 2D control assay.

  19. Validation of 3D documentation of palatal soft tissue shape, color, and irregularity with intraoral scanning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deferm, Julie T.; Schreurs, Ruud; Baan, Frank; Bruggink, Robin; Merkx, Matthijs A. W.; Xi, Tong; Bergé, Stefaan J.; Maal, Thomas J. J.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of 3D intraoral scanning for documentation of palatal soft tissue by evaluating the accuracy of shape, color, and curvature. Intraoral scans of ten participants' upper dentition and palate were acquired with the TRIOS® 3D intraoral scanner by

  20. Small metal soft tissue foreign body extraction by using 3D CT guidance: A reliable method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Kai; Xu, Sen; Liu, Xiao-yan; Liang, Jiu-long; Qiu, Tao; Tan, Jia-nan; Che, Jian-hua; Wang, Zi-hua

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To introduce a useful and accurate technique for the locating and removal of small metal foreign bodies in the soft tissues. Methods: Eight patients presented with suspected small metal foreign bodies retained in the soft tissues of various body districts. Under local anesthesia, 3–6 pieces of 5 ml syringe needles or 1 ml syringe needles were induced through three different planes around the entry point of the foreign bodies. Using these finders, the small metal FBs were confirmed under 3D CT guidance. Based on the CT findings, the soft tissues were dissected along the path of the closest needle and the FBs were easily found and removed according to the relation with the closest needle finder. Results: Eight metal foreign bodies (3 slices, 3 nails, 1 fish hook, 1 needlepoint) were successfully removed under 3D CT guidance in all patients. The procedures took between 35 min and 50 min and the operation times took between 15 min and 25 min. No complications arose after the treatment. Conclusion: 3D CT-guided technique is a good alternative for the removal of small metal foreign body retained in the soft tissues as it is relatively accurate, reliable, quick, carries a low risk of complications and can be a first-choice procedure for the extraction of small metal foreign body.

  1. Soft-tissue volumetric changes following monobloc distraction procedure: analysis using digital three-dimensional photogrammetry system (3dMD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Fuan Chiang; Kawamoto, Henry K; Federico, Christina; Bradley, James P

    2013-03-01

    We have previously reported that monobloc advancement by distraction osteogenesis resulted in decreased morbidity and greater advancement with less relapse compared with acute monobloc advancement with bone grafting. In this study, we examine the three-dimensional (3D) volumetric soft-tissue changes in monobloc distraction.Patients with syndromic craniosynostosis who underwent monobloc distraction from 2002 to 2010 at University of California-Los Angeles Craniofacial Center were studied (n = 12). We recorded diagnosis, indications for the surgery, and volumetric changes for skeletal and soft-tissue midface structures (preoperative/postoperative [6 weeks]/follow-up [>1 year]). Computed tomography scans and a digital 3D photogrammetry system were used for image analysis.Patients ranged from 6 to 14 years of age (mean, 10.1 years) at the time of the operation (follow-up 2-11 years); mean distraction advancement was 19.4 mm (range, 14-25 mm). There was a mean increase in the 3D volumetric soft-tissue changes: 99.5 ± 4.0 cm(3) (P < 0.05) at 6 weeks and 94.9 ± 3.6 cm(3) (P < 0.05) at 1-year follow-up. When comparing soft-tissue changes at 6 weeks postoperative to 1-year follow-up, there were minimal relapse changes. The overall mean 3D skeletal change was 108.9 ± 4.2 cm. For every 1 cm of skeletal gain, there was 0.78 cm(3) of soft-tissue gain.Monobloc advancement by distraction osteogenesis using internal devices resulted in increased volumetric soft-tissue changes, which remained stable at 1 year. The positive linear correlation between soft-tissue increments and bony advancement can be incorporated during the planning of osteotomies to achieve optimum surgical outcomes with monobloc distraction.

  2. Motion robust high resolution 3D free-breathing pulmonary MRI using dynamic 3D image self-navigator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenwen; Ong, Frank; Johnson, Kevin M; Nagle, Scott K; Hope, Thomas A; Lustig, Michael; Larson, Peder E Z

    2018-06-01

    To achieve motion robust high resolution 3D free-breathing pulmonary MRI utilizing a novel dynamic 3D image navigator derived directly from imaging data. Five-minute free-breathing scans were acquired with a 3D ultrashort echo time (UTE) sequence with 1.25 mm isotropic resolution. From this data, dynamic 3D self-navigating images were reconstructed under locally low rank (LLR) constraints and used for motion compensation with one of two methods: a soft-gating technique to penalize the respiratory motion induced data inconsistency, and a respiratory motion-resolved technique to provide images of all respiratory motion states. Respiratory motion estimation derived from the proposed dynamic 3D self-navigator of 7.5 mm isotropic reconstruction resolution and a temporal resolution of 300 ms was successful for estimating complex respiratory motion patterns. This estimation improved image quality compared to respiratory belt and DC-based navigators. Respiratory motion compensation with soft-gating and respiratory motion-resolved techniques provided good image quality from highly undersampled data in volunteers and clinical patients. An optimized 3D UTE sequence combined with the proposed reconstruction methods can provide high-resolution motion robust pulmonary MRI. Feasibility was shown in patients who had irregular breathing patterns in which our approach could depict clinically relevant pulmonary pathologies. Magn Reson Med 79:2954-2967, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  3. Color suppressed contributions to the decay modes Bd,s→Ds,dDs,d, Bd,s→Ds,dD*s,d, and Bd,s→D*s,d D*s,d

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eeg, J.O.; Fajfer, S.; Prapotnik, A.

    2005-01-01

    The amplitudes for decays of the type B d,s →D s,d D s,d , have no factorizable contributions, while B d,s →D s,d D * s,d , and B d,s →D * s,d D * s,d have relatively small factorizable contributions through the annihilation mechanism. The dominant contributions to the decay amplitudes arise from chiral loop contributions and tree level amplitudes which can be obtained in terms of soft gluon emissions forming a gluon condensate. We predict that the branching ratios for the processes anti B 0 dD s + D s - , anti B 0 dD s +* D s - and anti B 0 dD s + D s -* are all of order (2-3) x 10 -4 , while anti B 0 s →D d + D d - , anti B 0 s →D d +* D d - and anti B 0 s →D d + D d -* are of order (4-7) x 10 -3 . We obtain branching ratios for two D * 's in the final state of order two times bigger. (orig.)

  4. 3D MRI Modeling of Thin and Spatially Complex Soft Tissue Structures without Shrinkage: Lamprey Myosepta as an Example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Bradley M; Jia, Guang; Carmichael, Owen; McKlveen, Kevin; Homberger, Dominique G

    2018-05-12

    3D imaging techniques enable the non-destructive analysis and modeling of complex structures. Among these, MRI exhibits good soft tissue contrast, but is currently less commonly used for non-clinical research than x-ray CT, even though the latter requires contrast-staining that shrinks and distorts soft tissues. When the objective is the creation of a realistic and complete 3D model of soft tissue structures, MRI data are more demanding to acquire and visualize and require extensive post-processing because they comprise non-cubic voxels with dimensions that represent a trade-off between tissue contrast and image resolution. Therefore, thin soft tissue structures with complex spatial configurations are not always visible in a single MRI dataset, so that standard segmentation techniques are not sufficient for their complete visualization. By using the example of the thin and spatially complex connective tissue myosepta in lampreys, we developed a workflow protocol for the selection of the appropriate parameters for the acquisition of MRI data and for the visualization and 3D modeling of soft tissue structures. This protocol includes a novel recursive segmentation technique for supplementing missing data in one dataset with data from another dataset to produce realistic and complete 3D models. Such 3D models are needed for the modeling of dynamic processes, such as the biomechanics of fish locomotion. However, our methodology is applicable to the visualization of any thin soft tissue structures with complex spatial configurations, such as fasciae, aponeuroses, and small blood vessels and nerves, for clinical research and the further exploration of tensegrity. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Analysis of 3d7-3d64p transitions in the sixth spectrum of zinc: Zn VI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleef, T.A.M. van; Joshi, Y.N.; Barakat, M.M.; Meijer, F.G.

    1984-01-01

    The spectrum of zinc was photographed in the 160-550 A region on a 6.65 m grazing incidence spectrograph. The sources used were a triggered spark and a sliding spark. On the basis of our new observations, all levels of the 3d 7 configuration and 161 out of 180 levels of the 3d 6 4p configuration of Zn VI have been established. The least-squares-fit (LSF) and Hartree-Fock (HF) parameter calculations support the analysis. Two hundred and seventy seven (277) lines have been classified in the 3d 7 -3d 6 4p transition array. (orig.)

  6. SUSY Unparticle and Conformal Sequestering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Yu; Nakayama, Yu

    2007-07-17

    We investigate unparticle physics with supersymmetry (SUSY). The SUSY breaking effects due to the gravity mediation induce soft masses for the SUSY unparticles and hence break the conformal invariance. The unparticle physics observable in near future experiments is only consistent if the SUSY breakingeffects from the hidden sector to the standard model sector are dominated by the gauge mediation, or if the SUSY breaking effects to the unparticle sector are sufficiently sequestered. We argue that the natural realization of the latter possibility is the conformal sequestering scenario.

  7. 2D and 3D seismic measurements to evaluate the collapse risk of an important prehistoric cave in soft carbonate rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leucci, Giovanni; De Giorgi, Lara

    2015-02-01

    The southern part of the Apulia region (the Salento peninsula) has been the site of at least fifteen collapse events due to sinkholes in the last twenty years. The majority of these occurred in "soft" carbonate rocks (calcarenites). Man-made and/or natural cavities are sometimes assets of historical and archaeological significance. This paper provides a methodology for the evaluation of sinkhole hazard in "soft" carbonate rocks, combining seismic and mine engineering methods.Acase study of a natural cavity which is called Grotta delle Veneri is illustrated. For this example the approach was: i) 2D and 3D seismic methods to study the physical-mechanical characteristics of the rock mass that constitutes the roof of the cave; and ii) scaled span empirical analysis in order to evaluate the instability of the crown pillar's caves.

  8. A novel method for soft tissue retraction during periapical surgery using 3D technology: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, S; Aldowaisan, A; Dawood, A

    2017-08-01

    This case report describes a new approach to isolation and soft tissue retraction during endodontic surgery using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), computer-aided design (CAD) and three-dimensional (3D) printing. A 53-year-old patient presented for endodontic treatment of her maxillary left central incisor. It was decided to treat this tooth with a microsurgical approach. The data from the diagnostic CBCT scan were also used to make a physical model of the operative site, and CAD software was used to design a soft tissue retractor to be used during the patient's surgery. A custom retractor was then fabricated using a 3D printer. The custom-made retractor enhanced visualization and soft tissue handling during the patient's surgery. The patient was asymptomatic at a 1-year review. No abnormalities were detected during her clinical examination, and radiographic examination revealed complete healing of the surgical site. The significance of proper soft tissue retraction in periapical microsurgery is underemphasized. Geometric data from CBCT scans may be harvested for a variety of uses, adding value to the examination. 3D printing is a promising technology that may potentially have many uses in endodontic surgery. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Yukawa unification in moduli-dominant SUSY breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, S.; Tatsuo Kobayashi

    1997-07-01

    We study Yukawa in string models with moduli-dominant SUSY breaking. This type of SUSY breaking in general leads to non-universal soft masses, i.e. soft scalar masses and gaugino masses. Such non-universality is important for phenomenological aspects of Yukawa unification, i.e., successful electroweak breaking, SUSY corrections to the bottom mass and the branching ratio of b → sγ. We show three regions in the whole parameter space which lead to successful electroweak breaking and allow small SUSY corrections to the bottom mass. For these three regions we investigated the b → sγ decay and mass spectra. (author). 26 refs, 6 figs

  10. Influence of georeference for saturated excess overland flow modelling using 3D volumetric soft geo-objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izham, Mohamad Yusoff; Muhamad Uznir, Ujang; Alias, Abdul Rahman; Ayob, Katimon; Wan Ruslan, Ismail

    2011-04-01

    Existing 2D data structures are often insufficient for analysing the dynamism of saturation excess overland flow (SEOF) within a basin. Moreover, all stream networks and soil surface structures in GIS must be preserved within appropriate projection plane fitting techniques known as georeferencing. Inclusion of 3D volumetric structure of the current soft geo-objects simulation model would offer a substantial effort towards representing 3D soft geo-objects of SEOF dynamically within a basin by visualising saturated flow and overland flow volume. This research attempts to visualise the influence of a georeference system towards the dynamism of overland flow coverage and total overland flow volume generated from the SEOF process using VSG data structure. The data structure is driven by Green-Ampt methods and the Topographic Wetness Index (TWI). VSGs are analysed by focusing on spatial object preservation techniques of the conformal-based Malaysian Rectified Skew Orthomorphic (MRSO) and the equidistant-based Cassini-Soldner projection plane under the existing geodetic Malaysian Revised Triangulation 1948 (MRT48) and the newly implemented Geocentric Datum for Malaysia (GDM2000) datum. The simulated result visualises deformation of SEOF coverage under different georeference systems via its projection planes, which delineate dissimilar computation of SEOF areas and overland flow volumes. The integration of Georeference, 3D GIS and the saturation excess mechanism provides unifying evidence towards successful landslide and flood disaster management through envisioning the streamflow generating process (mainly SEOF) in a 3D environment.

  11. 3D Deep Learning Angiography (3D-DLA) from C-arm Conebeam CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, J C; Li, Y; Strother, C; Chen, G-H

    2018-05-01

    Deep learning is a branch of artificial intelligence that has demonstrated unprecedented performance in many medical imaging applications. Our purpose was to develop a deep learning angiography method to generate 3D cerebral angiograms from a single contrast-enhanced C-arm conebeam CT acquisition in order to reduce image artifacts and radiation dose. A set of 105 3D rotational angiography examinations were randomly selected from an internal data base. All were acquired using a clinical system in conjunction with a standard injection protocol. More than 150 million labeled voxels from 35 subjects were used for training. A deep convolutional neural network was trained to classify each image voxel into 3 tissue types (vasculature, bone, and soft tissue). The trained deep learning angiography model was then applied for tissue classification into a validation cohort of 8 subjects and a final testing cohort of the remaining 62 subjects. The final vasculature tissue class was used to generate the 3D deep learning angiography images. To quantify the generalization error of the trained model, we calculated the accuracy, sensitivity, precision, and Dice similarity coefficients for vasculature classification in relevant anatomy. The 3D deep learning angiography and clinical 3D rotational angiography images were subjected to a qualitative assessment for the presence of intersweep motion artifacts. Vasculature classification accuracy and 95% CI in the testing dataset were 98.7% (98.3%-99.1%). No residual signal from osseous structures was observed for any 3D deep learning angiography testing cases except for small regions in the otic capsule and nasal cavity compared with 37% (23/62) of the 3D rotational angiographies. Deep learning angiography accurately recreated the vascular anatomy of the 3D rotational angiography reconstructions without a mask. Deep learning angiography reduced misregistration artifacts induced by intersweep motion, and it reduced radiation exposure

  12. Dynamical compactification of D-dimensional gravity coupled to antisymmetric tensors in a 1/D expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foda, O.

    1984-12-01

    The effective potential of components of the curl of an antisymmetric tensor coupled to gravity in D dimensions is evaluated in a 1/D expansion. For large D, only highest-rank propagators contribute to leading order, while multiloop diagrams are suppressed by phase-space factors. Divergences are regulated by a cut-off LAMBDA, that we interpret as the mass-breaking scale of a larger theory that is finite. As an application we consider the bosonic sector of D=11, N=1 supergravity. If the full theory is finite, then LAMBDA is msub(SUSY): the scale below which the fermion sector decouples. For m 9 sub(SUSY)>1/akappa 2 , (kappa 2 : the D=11 Newton's coupling, a approx.= O(1)) the 11-dimensional symmetric vacuum is unstable under compactification. For m 9 sub(SUSY) 2 , it is metastable. To leading order in 1/D, all gauge dependence cancels identically, while ghosts as well as the graviton decouple. (author)

  13. Local 3d Electronic Structures of Co-Based Complexes with Medicinal Molecules Probed by Soft X-ray Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagami, Kohei; Fujiwara, Hidenori; Imada, Shin; Kadono, Toshiharu; Yamanaka, Keisuke; Muro, Takayuki; Tanaka, Arata; Itai, Takuma; Yoshinari, Nobuto; Konno, Takumi; Sekiyama, Akira

    2017-07-01

    We have examined the local 3d electronic structures of Co-Au multinuclear complexes with the medicinal molecules d-penicillaminate (d-pen) [Co{Au(PPh3)(d-pen)}2]ClO4 and [Co3{Au3(tdme)(d-pen)3}2] by Co L2,3-edge soft X-ray absorption (XAS) spectroscopy, where PPh3 denotes triphenylphosphine and tdme stands for 1,1,1-tris[(diphenylphosphino)methyl]ethane. The Co L2,3-edge XAS spectra indicate the localized ionic 3d electronic states in both materials. The experimental spectra are well explained by spectral simulation for a localized Co ion under ligand fields with the full multiplet theory, which verifies that the ions are in the low-spin Co3+ state in the former compound and in the high-spin Co2+ state in the latter.

  14. Strategic Design and Fabrication of Biomimetic 3D Scaffolds: Unique Architectures of Extracellular Matrices for Enhanced Adipogenesis and Soft Tissue Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnithan, Afeesh Rajan; Sasikala, Arathyram Ramachandra Kurup; Thomas, Shalom Sara; Nejad, Amin Ghavami; Cha, Youn Soo; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2018-04-09

    The higher rate of soft tissue impairment due to lumpectomy or other trauma greatly requires the restoration of the irreversibly lost subcutaneous adipose tissues. The nanofibers fabricated by conventional electrospinning provide only a superficial porous structure due to its sheet like 2D structure and thereby hinder the cell infiltration and differentiation throughout the scaffolds. Thus we developed a novel electrospun 3D membrane using the zwitterionic poly (carboxybetaine-co-methyl methacrylate) co-polymer (CMMA) through electrostatic repulsion based electrospinning for soft tissue engineering. The inherent charges in the CMMA will aid the nanofiber to directly transform into a semiconductor and thereby transfer the immense static electricity from the grounded collector and will impart greater fluffiness to the scaffolds. The results suggest that the fabricated 3D nanofiber (CMMA 3NF) scaffolds possess nanofibers with larger inter connected pores and less dense structure compared to the conventional 2D scaffolds. The CMMA 3NF exhibits significant cues of soft tissue engineering such as enhanced biocompatibility as well as the faster regeneration of cells. Moreover the fabricated 3D scaffolds greatly assist the cells to develop into its stereoscopic topographies with an enhanced adipogenic property.

  15. A 3D-Printable Polymer-Metal Soft-Magnetic Functional Composite—Development and Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Khatri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a 3D printed polymer–metal soft-magnetic composite was developed and characterized for its material, structural, and functional properties. The material comprises acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS as the polymer matrix, with up to 40 vol. % stainless steel micropowder as the filler. The composites were rheologically analyzed and 3D printed into tensile and flexural test specimens using a commercial desktop 3D printer. Mechanical characterization revealed a linearly decreasing trend of the ultimate tensile strength (UTS and a sharp decrease in Young’s modulus with increasing filler content. Four-point bending analysis showed a decrease of up to 70% in the flexural strength of the composite and up to a two-factor increase in the secant modulus of elasticity. Magnetic hysteresis characterization revealed retentivities of up to 15.6 mT and coercive forces of up to 4.31 kA/m at an applied magnetic field of 485 kA/m. The composite shows promise as a material for the additive manufacturing of passive magnetic sensors and/or actuators.

  16. Predicting the sparticle spectrum from GUTs via SUSY threshold corrections with SusyTC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antusch, Stefan [Department of Physics, University of Basel,Klingelbergstr. 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Max-Planck-Institut für Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut),Föhringer Ring 6, D-80805 München (Germany); Sluka, Constantin [Department of Physics, University of Basel,Klingelbergstr. 82, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland)

    2016-07-21

    Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) can feature predictions for the ratios of quark and lepton Yukawa couplings at high energy, which can be tested with the increasingly precise results for the fermion masses, given at low energies. To perform such tests, the renormalization group (RG) running has to be performed with sufficient accuracy. In supersymmetric (SUSY) theories, the one-loop threshold corrections (TC) are of particular importance and, since they affect the quark-lepton mass relations, link a given GUT flavour model to the sparticle spectrum. To accurately study such predictions, we extend and generalize various formulas in the literature which are needed for a precision analysis of SUSY flavour GUT models. We introduce the new software tool SusyTC, a major extension to the Mathematica package REAP http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1126-6708/2005/03/024, where these formulas are implemented. SusyTC extends the functionality of REAP by a full inclusion of the (complex) MSSM SUSY sector and a careful calculation of the one-loop SUSY threshold corrections for the full down-type quark, up-type quark and charged lepton Yukawa coupling matrices in the electroweak-unbroken phase. Among other useful features, SusyTC calculates the one-loop corrected pole mass of the charged (or the CP-odd) Higgs boson as well as provides output in SLHA conventions, i.e. the necessary input for external software, e.g. for performing a two-loop Higgs mass calculation. We apply SusyTC to study the predictions for the parameters of the CMSSM (mSUGRA) SUSY scenario from the set of GUT scale Yukawa relations ((y{sub e})/(y{sub d}))=−(1/2), ((y{sub μ})/(y{sub s}))=6, and ((y{sub τ})/(y{sub b}))=−(3/2), which has been proposed recently in the context of SUSY GUT flavour models.

  17. Anti-Tuberculosis Bacteriophage D29 Delivery with a Vibrating Mesh Nebulizer, Jet Nebulizer, and Soft Mist Inhaler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigy, Nicholas B; Chang, Rachel Y; Leung, Sharon S Y; Harrison, Melissa; Petrova, Zaritza; Pope, Welkin H; Hatfull, Graham F; Britton, Warwick J; Chan, Hak-Kim; Sauvageau, Dominic; Finlay, Warren H; Vehring, Reinhard

    2017-10-01

    To compare titer reduction and delivery rate of active anti-tuberculosis bacteriophage (phage) D29 with three inhalation devices. Phage D29 lysate was amplified to a titer of 11.8 ± 0.3 log 10 (pfu/mL) and diluted 1:100 in isotonic saline. Filters captured the aerosolized saline D29 preparation emitted from three types of inhalation devices: 1) vibrating mesh nebulizer; 2) jet nebulizer; 3) soft mist inhaler. Full-plate plaque assays, performed in triplicate at multiple dilution levels with the surrogate host Mycobacterium smegmatis, were used to quantify phage titer. Respective titer reductions for the vibrating mesh nebulizer, jet nebulizer, and soft mist inhaler were 0.4 ± 0.1, 3.7 ± 0.1, and 0.6 ± 0.3 log 10 (pfu/mL). Active phage delivery rate was significantly greater (p pfu/min) than for the jet nebulizer (5.4x10 4  ± 1.3x10 4 pfu/min). The soft mist inhaler delivered 4.6x10 6  ± 2.0x10 6 pfu per 11.6 ± 1.6 μL ex-actuator dose. Delivering active phage requires a prudent choice of inhalation device. The jet nebulizer was not a good choice for aerosolizing phage D29 under the tested conditions, due to substantial titer reduction likely occurring during droplet production. The vibrating mesh nebulizer is recommended for animal inhalation studies requiring large amounts of D29 aerosol, whereas the soft mist inhaler may be useful for self-administration of D29 aerosol.

  18. R-symmetry violation in N=2 SUSY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, G.G.; Maslikov, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    The present paper discusses the spontaneous R-symmetry violation in the N=2 SUSY SU(4)xU(1) model with soft SUSY breaking terms preserving finiteness. (In this case an invisible axion appears). In particular, the mechanism producting a light photino mass up to some GeV is suggested. In R-odd version of this model the mechanisms of enhancement of the neutrino decay is discussed. 10 refs.; 3 figs

  19. (N)LSP decays and gravitino dark matter relic abundance in big divisor (nearly) SLagy D3/D7μ-split SUSY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhuria, Mansi; Misra, Aalok

    2013-02-01

    Using the (nearly) Ricci-flat Swiss-Cheese metric of Misra (2012) [1], in the context of a mobile space-time filling D3-brane restricted to a nearly special Lagrangian sub-manifold (in the large volume limit, the pull-back of the Kähler form close to zero and the real part of the pull-back of e, θ=π/2 times the nowhere-vanishing holomorphic three-form providing the volume form on the three-cycle) of the "big" divisor with (fluxed stacks of) space-time filling D7-branes also wrapping the "big" divisor (corresponding to a local minimum), we provide an explicit identification of the electron and the u-quark, as well as their SU (2-singlet cousins, with fermionic superpartners of four Wilson line moduli; their superpartners turn out to be very heavy, the Higgsino-mass parameter turns out to be large, one obtains one light (with a mass of 125 GeV) and one heavy Higgs and the gluino is long lived (from a collider point of view) providing a possible realization of "μ-Split Supersymmetry". By explicitly calculating the lifetimes of decays of the co-NLSPs - the first generation squark/slepton and a neutralino - to the LSP - the gravitino - as well as gravitino decays, we verify that BBN constraints relevant to the former as well as the requirement of the latter to be (more than) the age of the universe, are satisfied. For the purpose of calculation of the gravitino relic density in terms of the neutralino/slepton relic density, we evaluate the latter by evaluating the neutralino/slepton (co-)annihilation cross sections and hence show that the former satisfies the requirement for a dark matter candidate.

  20. (N)LSP decays and gravitino dark matter relic abundance in big divisor (nearly) SLagy D3/D7μ-split SUSY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhuria, Mansi; Misra, Aalok

    2013-01-01

    Using the (nearly) Ricci-flat Swiss-Cheese metric of Misra (2012) [1], in the context of a mobile space–time filling D3-brane restricted to a nearly special Lagrangian sub-manifold (in the large volume limit, the pull-back of the Kähler form close to zero and the real part of the pull-back of e −iθ , θ=(π)/2 times the nowhere-vanishing holomorphic three-form providing the volume form on the three-cycle) of the “big” divisor with (fluxed stacks of) space–time filling D7-branes also wrapping the “big” divisor (corresponding to a local minimum), we provide an explicit identification of the electron and the u-quark, as well as their SU(2) L -singlet cousins, with fermionic superpartners of four Wilson line moduli; their superpartners turn out to be very heavy, the Higgsino-mass parameter turns out to be large, one obtains one light (with a mass of 125 GeV) and one heavy Higgs and the gluino is long lived (from a collider point of view) providing a possible realization of “μ-Split Supersymmetry”. By explicitly calculating the lifetimes of decays of the co-NLSPs – the first generation squark/slepton and a neutralino – to the LSP – the gravitino – as well as gravitino decays, we verify that BBN constraints relevant to the former as well as the requirement of the latter to be (more than) the age of the universe, are satisfied. For the purpose of calculation of the gravitino relic density in terms of the neutralino/slepton relic density, we evaluate the latter by evaluating the neutralino/slepton (co-)annihilation cross sections and hence show that the former satisfies the requirement for a dark matter candidate.

  1. (N)LSP decays and gravitino dark matter relic abundance in big divisor (nearly) SLagy D3/D7{mu}-split SUSY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhuria, Mansi, E-mail: mansidph@iitr.ernet.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247 667, Uttaranchal (India); Misra, Aalok, E-mail: aalokfph@iitr.ernet.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee 247 667, Uttaranchal (India)

    2013-02-21

    Using the (nearly) Ricci-flat Swiss-Cheese metric of Misra (2012) [1], in the context of a mobile space-time filling D3-brane restricted to a nearly special Lagrangian sub-manifold (in the large volume limit, the pull-back of the Kaehler form close to zero and the real part of the pull-back of e{sup -i{theta}}, {theta}=({pi})/2 times the nowhere-vanishing holomorphic three-form providing the volume form on the three-cycle) of the 'big' divisor with (fluxed stacks of) space-time filling D7-branes also wrapping the 'big' divisor (corresponding to a local minimum), we provide an explicit identification of the electron and the u-quark, as well as their SU(2){sub L}-singlet cousins, with fermionic superpartners of four Wilson line moduli; their superpartners turn out to be very heavy, the Higgsino-mass parameter turns out to be large, one obtains one light (with a mass of 125 GeV) and one heavy Higgs and the gluino is long lived (from a collider point of view) providing a possible realization of '{mu}-Split Supersymmetry'. By explicitly calculating the lifetimes of decays of the co-NLSPs - the first generation squark/slepton and a neutralino - to the LSP - the gravitino - as well as gravitino decays, we verify that BBN constraints relevant to the former as well as the requirement of the latter to be (more than) the age of the universe, are satisfied. For the purpose of calculation of the gravitino relic density in terms of the neutralino/slepton relic density, we evaluate the latter by evaluating the neutralino/slepton (co-)annihilation cross sections and hence show that the former satisfies the requirement for a dark matter candidate.

  2. Color suppressed contributions to the decay modes B{sub d,s}{yields}D{sub s,d}D{sub s,d}, B{sub d,s}{yields}D{sub s,d}D{sup *}{sub s,d}, and B{sub d,s}{yields}D{sup *}{sub s,d} D{sup *}{sub s,d}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eeg, J.O. [University of Oslo, Department of Physics, Blindern, Oslo (Norway); Fajfer, S. [University of Ljubljana, Department of Physics, Ljubljana (Slovenia); J. Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Prapotnik, A. [J. Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2005-07-01

    The amplitudes for decays of the type B{sub d,s}{yields}D{sub s,d}D{sub s,d}, have no factorizable contributions, while B{sub d,s}{yields}D{sub s,d}D{sup *}{sub s,d}, and B{sub d,s}{yields}D{sup *}{sub s,d}D{sup *}{sub s,d} have relatively small factorizable contributions through the annihilation mechanism. The dominant contributions to the decay amplitudes arise from chiral loop contributions and tree level amplitudes which can be obtained in terms of soft gluon emissions forming a gluon condensate. We predict that the branching ratios for the processes anti B{sup 0}{sub d}{yields}D{sub s}{sup +}D{sub s}{sup -}, anti B{sup 0}{sub d}{yields}D{sub s}{sup +*} D{sub s}{sup -} and anti B{sup 0}{sub d}{yields}D{sub s}{sup +}D{sub s}{sup -*} are all of order (2-3) x 10{sup -4}, while anti B{sup 0}{sub s}{yields}D{sub d}{sup +}D{sub d}{sup -}, anti B{sup 0}{sub s}{yields}D{sub d}{sup +*}D{sub d}{sup -} and anti B{sup 0}{sub s}{yields}D{sub d}{sup +}D{sub d}{sup -*} are of order (4-7) x 10{sup -3}. We obtain branching ratios for two D{sup *}'s in the final state of order two times bigger. (orig.)

  3. 3D Printed Wearable Sensors with Liquid Metals for the Pose Detection of Snakelike Soft Robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Luyu; Gao, Qing; Zhan, Jun-Fu; Xie, Chao-Qi; Fu, Jianzhong; He, Yong

    2018-06-18

    Liquid metal-based flexible sensors, which utilize advanced liquid conductive material to serve as sensitive element, is emerging as a promising solution to measure large deformations. Nowadays, one of the biggest challenges for precise control of soft robots is the detection of their real time positions. Existing fabrication methods are unable to fabricate flexible sensors that match the shape of soft robots. In this report, we firstly described a novel 3D printed multi-function inductance flexible and stretchable sensor with liquid metals (LMs), which is capable of measuring both axial tension and curvature. This sensor is fabricated with a developed coaxial liquid metal 3D printer by co-printing of silicone rubber and LMs. Due to the solenoid shape, this sensor can be easily installed on snakelike soft robots and can accurately distinguish different degrees of tensile and bending deformation. We determined the structural parameters of the sensor and proved its excellent stability and reliability. As a demonstration, we used this sensor to measure the curvature of a finger and feedback the position of endoscope, a typical snakelike structure. Because of its bending deformation form consistent with the actual working status of the soft robot and unique shape, this sensor has better practical application prospects in the pose detection.

  4. Identification of the transition arrays 3d74s-3d74p in Br X and 3d64s-3d64p in Br XI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng, X.T.; Jupen, C.; Bengtsson, P.; Engstroem, L.; Westerlind, M.; Martinson, I.

    1991-01-01

    We report a beam-foil study of multiply ionized bromine in the region 400-1300A, performed with 6 and 8 MeV Br ions from a tandem accelerator. At these energies transitions belonging to Fe-like Br X and Mn-like Br XI are expected to be prominent. We have identified 31 lines as 3d 7 4s-3d 7 4p transitions in Br X, from which 16 levels of the previously unknown 3d 7 4s configuration could be established. We have also added 6 new 3d 7 4p levels to the 99 previously known. For Br XI we have classified 9 lines as 3d 6 4s-3d 6 4p combinations. The line identifications have been corroborated by isoelectronic comparisons and theoretical calculations using the superposition-of-configurations technique. (orig.)

  5. Post LHC7 SUSY benchmark points for ILC physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, Howard [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States); List, Jenny [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    We re-evaluate prospects for supersymmetry at the proposed International Linear e{sup +}e{sup -} Collider (ILC) in light of the first year of serious data taking at LHC with {radical}(s)=7 TeV and {proportional_to}5 fb{sup -1} of pp collisions (LHC7). Strong new limits from LHC SUSY searches, along with a hint of a Higgs boson signal around m{sub h}{proportional_to}125 GeV, suggest a paradigm shift from previously popular models to ones with new and compelling signatures. We present a variety of new ILC benchmark models, including: natural SUSY, hidden SUSY, NUHM2 with low m{sub A}, non-universal gaugino mass (NUGM) model, pMSSM, Kallosh-Linde model, Bruemmer-Buchmueller model, normal scalar mass hierarchy (NMH) plus one surviving case from mSUGRA/CMSSM in the far focus point region. While all these models at present elude the latest LHC limits, they do offer intriguing case study possibilities for ILC operating at {radical}(s){proportional_to}0.25-1 TeV, and present a view of some of the diverse SUSY phenomena which might be expected at both LHC and ILC in the post LHC7 era.

  6. Post LHC7 SUSY benchmark points for ILC physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baer, Howard; List, Jenny

    2012-05-01

    We re-evaluate prospects for supersymmetry at the proposed International Linear e + e - Collider (ILC) in light of the first year of serious data taking at LHC with √(s)=7 TeV and ∝5 fb -1 of pp collisions (LHC7). Strong new limits from LHC SUSY searches, along with a hint of a Higgs boson signal around m h ∝125 GeV, suggest a paradigm shift from previously popular models to ones with new and compelling signatures. We present a variety of new ILC benchmark models, including: natural SUSY, hidden SUSY, NUHM2 with low m A , non-universal gaugino mass (NUGM) model, pMSSM, Kallosh-Linde model, Bruemmer-Buchmueller model, normal scalar mass hierarchy (NMH) plus one surviving case from mSUGRA/CMSSM in the far focus point region. While all these models at present elude the latest LHC limits, they do offer intriguing case study possibilities for ILC operating at √(s)∝0.25-1 TeV, and present a view of some of the diverse SUSY phenomena which might be expected at both LHC and ILC in the post LHC7 era.

  7. Nonuniversal soft parameters in the brane world and the flavor problem in supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyae, Bumseok; Shafi, Qaisar

    2002-01-01

    We consider gravity mediated supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking in 5D spacetime with two 4D branes B1 and B2 separated in the extra dimension. Using an off-shell 5D supergravity (SUGRA) formalism, we argue that the SUSY breaking scales could be nonuniversal even at the fundamental scale in a brane world setting, since SUSY breaking effects could be effectively localized. As an application, we suggest a model in which the two light chiral minimal supersymmetric standard model generations reside on B1, while the third generation is located on B2, and the Higgs multiplets as well as gravity and gauge multiplets reside in the bulk. For SUSY breaking of the order of 10-20 TeV caused by a hidden sector localized at B1, the scalars belonging to the first two generations can become sufficiently heavy to overcome the SUSY flavor problem. SUSY breaking on B2 from a different localized hidden sector gives rise to the third generation soft scalar masses of the order of 1 TeV. Gaugino masses are also of the order of 1 TeV if the size of the extra dimension is ∼10 -16 GeV -1 . As in 4D effective supersymmetric theory, an adjustment of TeV scale parameters is needed to realize the 100 GeV electroweak symmetry breaking scale

  8. TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP2-05: Breast and Soft Tissue-Equivalent 3D Printed Phantoms for Imaging and Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hintenlang, D; Terracino, B

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The study has the goal to demonstrate that breast and soft tissue-equivalent phantoms for dosimetry applications in the diagnostic energy range can be fabricated using common 3D printing methods. Methods: 3D printing provides the opportunity to rapidly prototype uniquely designed objects from a variety of materials. Common 3D printers are usually limited to printing objects based on thermoplastic materials such as PLA, or ABS. The most commonly available plastic is PLA, which has a density significantly greater than soft tissue. We utilized a popular 3D printer to demonstrate that tissue specific phantom materials can be generated through the careful selection of 3D printing parameters. A series of stepwedges were designed and printed using a Makerbot Replicator2 3D printing system. The print file provides custom adjustment of the infill density, orientation and position of the object on the printer stage, selection of infill patterns, and other control parameters. The x-ray attenuation and uniformity of fabricated phantoms were evaluated and compared to common tissue-equivalent phantom materials, acrylic and BR12. X-ray exposure measurements were made using narrow beam geometry on a clinical mammography unit at 28 kVp on the series of phantoms. The 3D printed phantoms were imaged at 28 kVp to visualize the internal structure and uniformity in different planes of the phantoms. Results: By utilizing specific in-fill density and patterns we are able to produce a phantom closely matching the attenuation characteristics of BR12 at 28 kVp. The in-fill patterns used are heterogeneous, so a judicious selection of fill pattern and the orientation of the fill pattern must be made in order to obtain homogenous attenuation along the intended direction of beam propagation. Conclusions: By careful manipulation of the printing parameters, breast and soft tissue-equivalent phantoms appropriate for use at imaging energies can be fabricated using 3D printing techniques.

  9. TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP2-05: Breast and Soft Tissue-Equivalent 3D Printed Phantoms for Imaging and Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hintenlang, D; Terracino, B [University Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The study has the goal to demonstrate that breast and soft tissue-equivalent phantoms for dosimetry applications in the diagnostic energy range can be fabricated using common 3D printing methods. Methods: 3D printing provides the opportunity to rapidly prototype uniquely designed objects from a variety of materials. Common 3D printers are usually limited to printing objects based on thermoplastic materials such as PLA, or ABS. The most commonly available plastic is PLA, which has a density significantly greater than soft tissue. We utilized a popular 3D printer to demonstrate that tissue specific phantom materials can be generated through the careful selection of 3D printing parameters. A series of stepwedges were designed and printed using a Makerbot Replicator2 3D printing system. The print file provides custom adjustment of the infill density, orientation and position of the object on the printer stage, selection of infill patterns, and other control parameters. The x-ray attenuation and uniformity of fabricated phantoms were evaluated and compared to common tissue-equivalent phantom materials, acrylic and BR12. X-ray exposure measurements were made using narrow beam geometry on a clinical mammography unit at 28 kVp on the series of phantoms. The 3D printed phantoms were imaged at 28 kVp to visualize the internal structure and uniformity in different planes of the phantoms. Results: By utilizing specific in-fill density and patterns we are able to produce a phantom closely matching the attenuation characteristics of BR12 at 28 kVp. The in-fill patterns used are heterogeneous, so a judicious selection of fill pattern and the orientation of the fill pattern must be made in order to obtain homogenous attenuation along the intended direction of beam propagation. Conclusions: By careful manipulation of the printing parameters, breast and soft tissue-equivalent phantoms appropriate for use at imaging energies can be fabricated using 3D printing techniques.

  10. Initial evaluation of image performance of a 3-D x-ray system: phantom-based comparison of 3-D tomography with conventional computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Robyn Melanie; Garcia, Meritxell Alzamora; Amsler, Felix; Voigt, Johannes; Fieselmann, Andreas; Falkowski, Anna Lucja; Stieltjes, Bram; Hirschmann, Anna

    2018-01-01

    Phantom-based initial performance assessment of a prototype three-dimensional (3-D) x-ray system and comparison of 3-D tomography with computed tomography (CT) were proposed. A 3-D image quality phantom was scanned with a prototype version of 3-D cone-beam CT imaging implemented on a twin robotic x-ray system using three trajectories (163 deg = table, 188 deg = upright, and 200 deg = side), six tube voltages (60, 70, 81, 90, 100, and 121 kV), and four detector doses (0.348, 0.696, 1.740, and [Formula: see text]). CT was obtained with a clinical protocol. Spatial resolution (line pairs/cm) and soft-tissue-contrast resolution were assessed by two independent readers. Radiation dose was assessed. Descriptive and analysis of variance (ANOVA) ([Formula: see text]) were performed. With 3-D tomography, a maximum of 16 lp/cm was visible and best soft-tissue-contrast resolution was 2 mm at 30 Hounsfield units (HU) for 160 projections. With CT, 10 lp/cm was visible and soft-tissue-contrast resolution was 4 mm at 20 HU. The upright trajectory yielded significantly better spatial resolution and soft tissue contrast, and the side trajectory yielded significantly higher soft tissue contrast than the table trajectory ([Formula: see text]). Radiation dose was higher in 3-D tomography (45 to 704 mGycm) than CT (44 mGycm). Three-dimensional tomography renders overall equal or higher spatial resolution and comparable soft tissue contrast to CT for medium- and high-dose protocols in the side and upright trajectories, but with higher radiation doses.

  11. 3-D Imaging using Row–Column-Addressed 2-D Arrays with a Diverging Lens: Phantom Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzari, Hamed; Engholm, Mathias; Beers, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    A double-curved diverging lens over a flat row– column-addressed (RCA) 2-D array can extend its inherent rectilinear 3-D imaging field-of-view (FOV) to a curvilinear volume region, which is necessary for applications such as abdominal and cardiac imaging. A concave lens with radius of 12.7 mm...... was manufactured using RTV664 silicone. The diverging properties of the lens were evaluated based on measurements on several phantoms. The measured 6 dB FOV in contact with a material similar to human soft tissue was less than 15% different from the theoretical predictions, i.e., a curvilinear FOV of 32...

  12. Coupling 2D/3D registration method and statistical model to perform 3D reconstruction from partial x-rays images data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresson, T; Chav, R; Branchaud, D; Humbert, L; Godbout, B; Aubert, B; Skalli, W; De Guise, J A

    2009-01-01

    3D reconstructions of the spine from a frontal and sagittal radiographs is extremely challenging. The overlying features of soft tissues and air cavities interfere with image processing. It is also difficult to obtain information that is accurate enough to reconstruct complete 3D models. To overcome these problems, the proposed method efficiently combines the partial information contained in two images from a patient with a statistical 3D spine model generated from a database of scoliotic patients. The algorithm operates through two simultaneous iterating processes. The first one generates a personalized vertebra model using a 2D/3D registration process with bone boundaries extracted from radiographs, while the other one infers the position and the shape of other vertebrae from the current estimation of the registration process using a statistical 3D model. Experimental evaluations have shown good performances of the proposed approach in terms of accuracy and robustness when compared to CT-scan.

  13. Supersymmetry and CP violating asymmetries in $B_{d}, s$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Barenboim, G

    1999-01-01

    We study possible effects of supersymmetry (SUSY) in CP asymmetries in non-leptonic B/sub d, s/ decays in a variety of SUSY flavour models considered in literature. We use both mass insertion and vertex mixing methods to calculate squark-gluino box diagram contribution to B/sub d, s/-B/sub d, s/ mixings. With the squark mixing parameter eta =0.22, and with large new CP phases, it turns out that the CP asymmetries to be measured in upcoming B-factories, HERA-B and LHC-B, can be completely dominated by the SUSY contribution in almost every considered model. Discrimination between the different models can be done by comparing experimental results in different decay modes. In some models squark masses up to ~5 TeV can be probed through these experiments provided the SUSY contribution to B-B mixing is at 10 3.959305e-309vel, ¦M/sub 12//sup SUSY//M/sub 12//sup SM /¦~0.1. This implies that models with heavy squarks have a fair chance to be tested in the future CP experiments before LHC. (41 refs).

  14. Soft tissue models: easy and inexpensive flexible 3D printing as a help in surgical planning of cardiovascular disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starosolski, Zbigniew; Ezon, David S.; Krishnamurthy, Rajesh; Dodd, Nicholas; Heinle, Jeffrey; Mckenzie, Dean E.; Annapragada, Ananth

    2017-03-01

    We developed a technology that allows a simple desktop 3D printer with dual extruder to fabricate 3D flexible models of Major AortoPulmonary Collateral Arteries. The study was designed to assess whether the flexible 3D printed models could help during surgical planning phase. Simple FDM 3D printers are inexpensive, versatile in use and easy to maintain, but complications arise when the designed model is complex and has tubular structures with small diameter less than 2mm. The advantages of FDM printers are cost and simplicity of use. We use precisely selected materials to overcome the obstacles listed above. Dual extruder allows to use two different materials while printing, which is especially important in the case of fragile structures like pulmonary vessels and its supporting structures. The latter should not be removed by hand to avoid a truncation of the model. We utilize the water soluble PVA as a supporting structure and Poro-Lay filament for flexible model of AortoPulmonary collateral arteries. Poro-Lay filament is different as compared to all the other flexible ones like polymer-based. Poro-Lay is rigid while printing and this allows printing of structures small in diameter. It achieves flexibility after washing out of printed model with water. It becomes soft in touch and gelatinous. Using both PVA and Poro-Lay gives a huge advantage allowing to wash out the supporting structures and achieve flexibility in one washing operation, saving time and avoiding human error with cleaning the model. We evaluated 6 models for MAPCAS surgical planning study. This approach is also cost-effective - an average cost of materials for print is less than $15; models are printed in facility without any delays. Flexibility of 3D printed models approximate soft tissues properly, mimicking Aortopulmonary collateral arteries. Second utilization models has educational value for both residents and patients' family. Simplification of 3D flexible process could help in other models

  15. Binding of 7-dehydrocholesterol to sterol carrier protein and vitamin D3 effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Sachiko; Oizumi, Kumiko; Moriuchi, Sachiko; Hosoya, Norimasa

    1975-01-01

    It was confirmed that deltasup(5,7)-sterol delta 7 -reductase activity was suppressed by cholecalciferol (vitamin D 3 ) in the enzyme system consisted of microsomes and sterol carrier protein (SCP). The enzyme activity was significantly decreased in the combination with microsomes obtained from either vitamin D-deficient or vitamin D 3 -treated rat liver and with SCP obtained from vitamin D 3 -treated rat. It was also demonstrated by the binding assay of the dextran-charcoal technique that 7-dehydrocholesterol binding to SCP could be specifically displaced by vitamin D 3 . The inhibition of cholecalciferol on 7-dehydro-cholesterol binding to liver SCP was confirmed to be non-competitive inhibition. (auth.)

  16. Determination of the 3d34d and 3d35s configurations of Fe V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azarov, V.I.

    2001-01-01

    The analysis of the spectrum of four times ionized iron, Fe V, has led to the determination of the 3d 3 4d and 3d 3 5s configurations. From 975 classified lines in the region 645-1190 A we have established 123 of 168 theoretically possible 3d 3 4d levels and 26 of 38 possible 3d 3 5s levels. The estimated accuracy of values of energy levels of these two configurations is about 0.7 cm -1 and 1.0 cm -1 , respectively. The level structure of the system of the 3d 4 , 3d 3 4s, 3d 3 4d and 3d 3 5s configurations has been theoretically interpreted and the energy parameters have been determined by a least squares fit to the observed levels. A comparison of parameters in Cr III and Fe V ions is given. (orig.)

  17. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K.; Johnson, Blake N.; McAlpine, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and ‘living’ platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with

  18. 3D Printed Bionic Nanodevices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yong Lin; Gupta, Maneesh K; Johnson, Blake N; McAlpine, Michael C

    2016-06-01

    The ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of bionic devices possessing unique and compelling geometries, properties, and functionalities. Indeed, interfacing high performance active devices with biology could impact a variety of fields, including regenerative bioelectronic medicines, smart prosthetics, medical robotics, and human-machine interfaces. Biology, from the molecular scale of DNA and proteins, to the macroscopic scale of tissues and organs, is three-dimensional, often soft and stretchable, and temperature sensitive. This renders most biological platforms incompatible with the fabrication and materials processing methods that have been developed and optimized for functional electronics, which are typically planar, rigid and brittle. A number of strategies have been developed to overcome these dichotomies. One particularly novel approach is the use of extrusion-based multi-material 3D printing, which is an additive manufacturing technology that offers a freeform fabrication strategy. This approach addresses the dichotomies presented above by (1) using 3D printing and imaging for customized, hierarchical, and interwoven device architectures; (2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for introducing high performance materials, with the potential for exhibiting properties not found in the bulk; and (3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. Further, 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This blending of 3D printing, novel nanomaterial properties, and 'living' platforms may enable next-generation bionic systems. In this review, we highlight this synergistic integration of the unique properties of nanomaterials with the

  19. Polymer structure-property requirements for stereolithographic 3D printing of soft tissue engineering scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondschein, Ryan J; Kanitkar, Akanksha; Williams, Christopher B; Verbridge, Scott S; Long, Timothy E

    2017-09-01

    This review highlights the synthesis, properties, and advanced applications of synthetic and natural polymers 3D printed using stereolithography for soft tissue engineering applications. Soft tissue scaffolds are of great interest due to the number of musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and connective tissue injuries and replacements humans face each year. Accurately replacing or repairing these tissues is challenging due to the variation in size, shape, and strength of different types of soft tissue. With advancing processing techniques such as stereolithography, control of scaffold resolution down to the μm scale is achievable along with the ability to customize each fabricated scaffold to match the targeted replacement tissue. Matching the advanced manufacturing technique to polymer properties as well as maintaining the proper chemical, biological, and mechanical properties for tissue replacement is extremely challenging. This review discusses the design of polymers with tailored structure, architecture, and functionality for stereolithography, while maintaining chemical, biological, and mechanical properties to mimic a broad range of soft tissue types. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. 3D Printing of Highly Stretchable, Shape-Memory, and Self-Healing Elastomer toward Novel 4D Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Xiao; Chen, Kaijuan; Dunn, Conner K; Wu, Jiangtao; Li, Vincent C F; Qi, H Jerry

    2018-02-28

    The three-dimensional (3D) printing of flexible and stretchable materials with smart functions such as shape memory (SM) and self-healing (SH) is highly desirable for the development of future 4D printing technology for myriad applications, such as soft actuators, deployable smart medical devices, and flexible electronics. Here, we report a novel ink that can be used for the 3D printing of highly stretchable, SM, and SH elastomer via UV-light-assisted direct-ink-write printing. An ink containing urethane diacrylate and a linear semicrystalline polymer is developed for the 3D printing of a semi-interpenetrating polymer network elastomer that can be stretched by up to 600%. The 3D-printed complex structures show interesting functional properties, such as high strain SM and SM -assisted SH capability. We demonstrate that such a 3D-printed SM elastomer has the potential application for biomedical devices, such as vascular repair devices. This research paves a new way for the further development of novel 4D printing, soft robotics, and biomedical devices.

  1. Toward high-speed 3D nonlinear soft tissue deformation simulations using Abaqus software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idkaidek, Ashraf; Jasiuk, Iwona

    2015-12-01

    We aim to achieve a fast and accurate three-dimensional (3D) simulation of a porcine liver deformation under a surgical tool pressure using the commercial finite element software Abaqus. The liver geometry is obtained using magnetic resonance imaging, and a nonlinear constitutive law is employed to capture large deformations of the tissue. Effects of implicit versus explicit analysis schemes, element type, and mesh density on computation time are studied. We find that Abaqus explicit and implicit solvers are capable of simulating nonlinear soft tissue deformations accurately using first-order tetrahedral elements in a relatively short time by optimizing the element size. This study provides new insights and guidance on accurate and relatively fast nonlinear soft tissue simulations. Such simulations can provide force feedback during robotic surgery and allow visualization of tissue deformations for surgery planning and training of surgical residents.

  2. Validation of 3D documentation of palatal soft tissue shape, color, and irregularity with intraoral scanning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deferm, Julie T; Schreurs, Ruud; Baan, Frank; Bruggink, Robin; Merkx, Matthijs A W; Xi, Tong; Bergé, Stefaan J; Maal, Thomas J J

    2018-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of 3D intraoral scanning for documentation of palatal soft tissue by evaluating the accuracy of shape, color, and curvature. Intraoral scans of ten participants' upper dentition and palate were acquired with the TRIOS® 3D intraoral scanner by two observers. Conventional impressions were taken and digitized as a gold standard. The resulting surface models were aligned using an Iterative Closest Point approach. The absolute distance measurements between the intraoral models and the digitized impression were used to quantify the trueness and precision of intraoral scanning. The mean color of the palatal soft tissue was extracted in HSV (hue, saturation, value) format to establish the color precision. Finally, the mean curvature of the surface models was calculated and used for surface irregularity. Mean average distance error between the conventional impression models and the intraoral models was 0.02 ± 0.07 mm (p = 0.30). Mean interobserver color difference was - 0.08 ± 1.49° (p = 0.864), 0.28 ± 0.78% (p = 0.286), and 0.30 ± 1.14% (p = 0.426) for respectively hue, saturation, and value. The interobserver differences for overall and maximum surface irregularity were 0.01 ± 0.03 and 0.00 ± 0.05 mm. This study supports the hypothesis that the intraoral scan can perform a 3D documentation of palatal soft tissue in terms of shape, color, and curvature. An intraoral scanner can be an objective tool, adjunctive to the clinical examination of the palatal tissue.

  3. Local ISM 3D Distribution and Soft X-ray Background Inferences for Nearby Hot Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitarini, L.; Lallement, R.; Snowden, Steven L.; Vergely, J.-L.; Snowden, S.

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) interstellar medium (ISM) maps can be used to locate not only interstellar (IS) clouds, but also IS bubbles between the clouds that are blown by stellar winds and supernovae, and are filled by hot gas. To demonstrate this, and to derive a clearer picture of the local ISM, we compare our recent 3D IS dust distribution maps to the ROSAT diffuse Xray background maps after removal of heliospheric emission. In the Galactic plane, there is a good correspondence between the locations and extents of the mapped nearby cavities and the soft (0.25 keV) background emission distribution, showing that most of these nearby cavities contribute to this soft X-ray emission. Assuming a constant dust to gas ratio and homogeneous 106 K hot gas filling the cavities, we modeled in a simple way the 0.25 keV surface brightness along the Galactic plane as seen from the Sun, taking into account the absorption by the mapped clouds. The data-model comparison favors the existence of hot gas in the solar neighborhood, the so-called Local Bubble (LB). The inferred mean pressure in the local cavities is found to be approx.9,400/cu cm K, in agreement with previous studies, providing a validation test for the method. On the other hand, the model overestimates the emission from the huge cavities located in the third quadrant. Using CaII absorption data, we show that the dust to CaII ratio is very small in those regions, implying the presence of a large quantity of lower temperature (non-X-ray emitting) ionized gas and as a consequence a reduction of the volume filled by hot gas, explaining at least part of the discrepancy. In the meridian plane, the two main brightness enhancements coincide well with the LB's most elongated parts and chimneys connecting the LB to the halo, but no particular nearby cavity is found towards the enhancement in the direction of the bright North Polar Spur (NPS) at high latitude. We searched in the 3D maps for the source regions of the higher energy

  4. Gravity mediation in 6d brane-world supergravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.M.

    2005-09-01

    We consider the gravity-mediated SUSY breaking within the effective theory of six-dimensional brane-world supergravity. We construct the supersymmetric bulk-brane action by Noether method and find the nontrivial moduli coupling of the brane F- and D-terms. We find that the low energy Kaehler potential is not of sequestered form, so gravity mediation may occur at tree level. In moduli stabilization with anomaly effects included, the scalar soft mass squared can be positive at tree level and it can be comparable to the anomaly mediation. (orig.)

  5. 3-D Whole-Core Transport Calculation with 3D/2D Rotational Plane Slicing Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Han Jong; Cho, Nam Zin [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Use of the method of characteristics (MOC) is very popular due to its capability of heterogeneous geometry treatment and widely used for 2-D core calculation, but direct extension of MOC to 3-D core is not so attractive due to huge calculational cost. 2-D/1-D fusion method was very successful for 3-D calculation of current generation reactor types (highly heterogeneous in radial direction but piece-wise homogeneous in axial direction). In this paper, 2-D MOC concept is extended to 3-D core calculation with little modification of an existing 2-D MOC code. The key idea is to suppose 3-D geometry as a set of many 2-D planes like a phone-directory book. Dividing 3-D structure into a large number of 2-D planes and solving each plane with a simple 2-D SN transport method would give the solution of a 3-D structure. This method was developed independently at KAIST but it is found that this concept is similar with that of 'plane tracing' in the MCCG-3D code. The method developed was tested on the 3-D C5G7 OECD/NEA benchmark problem and compared with the 2-D/1-D fusion method. Results show that the proposed method is worth investigating further. A new approach to 3-D whole-core transport calculation is described and tested. By slicing 3-D structure along characteristic planes and solving each 2-D plane problem, we can get 3-D solution. The numerical test results indicate that the new method is comparable with the 2D/1D fusion method and outperforms other existing methods. But more fair comparison should be done in similar discretization level.

  6. The 3d8-(3d74p + 3p53d9) transitions in Br X: A striking case of configuration interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleef, T.A.M. van; Uylings, P.H.M.; Ryabtsev, A.N.; Podobedova, L.I.; Joshi, Y.N.

    1988-01-01

    The spectrum of nine times ionized bromine (Br X) was photographed in the 90-120 A wavelength region on a variety of grazing incidence spectrographs using an open spark and a triggered spark as light sources. The analysis of the 3d 8 -(3d 7 4p + 3p 5 3d 9 ) transitions has resulted in establishing all 9 levels of the 3d 8 configuration, all 12 levels of the 3p 5 3d 9 configuration and 99 out of 110 levels of the 3d 7 4p configuration. The excitation probability of the 3p inner-shell electron increases with nuclear charge and in Br X is comparable with the excitation probability of the optical electrons resulting in a very strong configuration interaction between the 3p 5 3d 9 and 3d 7 4p configurations. Parametric calculations treating these configurations as one super configuration support the analysis. Two hundred and thirty two lines have been classified in this spectrum. (orig.)

  7. Synthesis of cefepime-d3 and cefepime-d8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamachi, Hajime; Okita, Takaaki; Tsuno, Takashi; Naito, Takayuki

    1990-01-01

    Synthesis of cefepime-d 3 (6a) and cefepime-d 8 (6b) is described. Diphenylmethyl 7-benzylideneamino-3-chloromethyl-3-cephem-4-carboxylate (2) was treated with sodium iodide to afford the iodide 3, which was without isolation, allowed to react with N-methyl-d 3 -pyrrolidine to give the quaternary salt 4a. Deblocking of 4a with HCO 2 H and HCl gave 7-amino-3-(N-methyl-d3-pyrrolidinio)methyl-3-cephem-4-carboxylate hydrochloride (5a). Acylation of 5a with benzotriazol-1-yl (Z)-2-(2-aminothiazol-4-yl)-2-methoxyiminoacetate followed by treatment with dil. H 2 SO 4 afforded 6a sulfate. In the same way, 6b was synthesized using N-methyl-pyrrolidine-d 8 . (author)

  8. 2D-Driven 3D Object Detection in RGB-D Images

    KAUST Repository

    Lahoud, Jean

    2017-12-25

    In this paper, we present a technique that places 3D bounding boxes around objects in an RGB-D scene. Our approach makes best use of the 2D information to quickly reduce the search space in 3D, benefiting from state-of-the-art 2D object detection techniques. We then use the 3D information to orient, place, and score bounding boxes around objects. We independently estimate the orientation for every object, using previous techniques that utilize normal information. Object locations and sizes in 3D are learned using a multilayer perceptron (MLP). In the final step, we refine our detections based on object class relations within a scene. When compared to state-of-the-art detection methods that operate almost entirely in the sparse 3D domain, extensive experiments on the well-known SUN RGB-D dataset [29] show that our proposed method is much faster (4.1s per image) in detecting 3D objects in RGB-D images and performs better (3 mAP higher) than the state-of-the-art method that is 4.7 times slower and comparably to the method that is two orders of magnitude slower. This work hints at the idea that 2D-driven object detection in 3D should be further explored, especially in cases where the 3D input is sparse.

  9. Highly-stretchable 3D-architected Mechanical Metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanhui; Wang, Qiming

    2016-09-01

    Soft materials featuring both 3D free-form architectures and high stretchability are highly desirable for a number of engineering applications ranging from cushion modulators, soft robots to stretchable electronics; however, both the manufacturing and fundamental mechanics are largely elusive. Here, we overcome the manufacturing difficulties and report a class of mechanical metamaterials that not only features 3D free-form lattice architectures but also poses ultrahigh reversible stretchability (strain > 414%), 4 times higher than that of the existing counterparts with the similar complexity of 3D architectures. The microarchitected metamaterials, made of highly stretchable elastomers, are realized through an additive manufacturing technique, projection microstereolithography, and its postprocessing. With the fabricated metamaterials, we reveal their exotic mechanical behaviors: Under large-strain tension, their moduli follow a linear scaling relationship with their densities regardless of architecture types, in sharp contrast to the architecture-dependent modulus power-law of the existing engineering materials; under large-strain compression, they present tunable negative-stiffness that enables ultrahigh energy absorption efficiencies. To harness their extraordinary stretchability and microstructures, we demonstrate that the metamaterials open a number of application avenues in lightweight and flexible structure connectors, ultraefficient dampers, 3D meshed rehabilitation structures and stretchable electronics with designed 3D anisotropic conductivity.

  10. SUSY searches at D0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawyer, L.; Texas Univ., Arlington, TX

    1993-06-01

    Searches for evidence of supersymmetric particles, and other phenomena beyond the Standard Model, are well underway with the D0 detector at the Tevatron. The D0 detector has good central tracking, excellent energy and missing E T resolution, hermetic calorimetry, and wide muon coverage. Preliminary results from searches for gluino/squark production and first generation leptoquark production are presented, based on a small fraction of the data taken to date

  11. The upcoming 3D-printing revolution in microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Nirveek; Urrios, Arturo; Kang, Shawn; Folch, Albert

    2016-01-01

    In the last two decades, the vast majority of microfluidic systems have been built in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) by soft lithography, a technique based on PDMS micromolding. A long list of key PDMS properties have contributed to the success of soft lithography: PDMS is biocompatible, elastomeric, transparent, gas-permeable, water-impermeable, fairly inexpensive, copyright-free, and rapidly prototyped with high precision using simple procedures. However, the fabrication process typically involves substantial human labor, which tends to make PDMS devices difficult to disseminate outside of research labs, and the layered molding limits the 3D complexity of the devices that can be produced. 3D-printing has recently attracted attention as a way to fabricate microfluidic systems due to its automated, assembly-free 3D fabrication, rapidly decreasing costs, and fast-improving resolution and throughput. Resins with properties approaching those of PDMS are being developed. Here we review past and recent efforts in 3D-printing of microfluidic systems. We compare the salient features of PDMS molding with those of 3D-printing and we give an overview of the critical barriers that have prevented the adoption of 3D-printing by microfluidic developers, namely resolution, throughput, and resin biocompatibility. We also evaluate the various forces that are persuading researchers to abandon PDMS molding in favor of 3D-printing in growing numbers. PMID:27101171

  12. Antitumor properties of (5E,7E) analogs of vitamin D3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filip, B; Milczarek, M; Wietrzyk, J; Chodyński, M; Kutner, A

    2010-07-01

    Geometric isomers (5E,7E) of major active metabolites of vitamin D3 [1alpha,25(OH)2D3 and (24R)-1,24(OH)2D3] were synthesized by a new convenient procedure. Vitamin D triene system of the metabolites was first derivatized as a Diels-Alder adduct. Removal of the triene protecting group, in a key synthetic step, yielded the title compounds PRI-2208 and PRI-2209, respectively. The analogs were examined for their antiproliferative activity in vitro against human breast cancer cells (MCF-7) and promyelocytic leukemia (HL-60) cells. The activity was compared with one of the parent compounds. Both analogs examined revealed similar or higher antiproliferative activity compared to 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 or to (24R)-1,24(OH)2D3. The studies of calcemic activity in vivo showed that analogs PRI-2208 and PRI-2209 did not influence the serum calcium level in doses, in which 1alpha,25(OH)2D3 or (24R)-1,24(OH)2D3 significantly increased this level. The antitumor activity of these analogs in the LLC mice tumor model was studied. Analog PRI-2208 was found to be more active in inhibiting LLC tumor growth than 1alpha,25(OH)2D3, as well as than PRI-2191 and PRI-2209. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Computer aided display of multiple soft tissue anatomical surfaces for simultaneous structural and area-dose appreciation in 3D-radiationtherapy planning. 115

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.J.; Mott, D.J.; Wilkinson, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    For radiotherapy applications a 3D display that includes soft tissues is required but the presentation of all anatomical structures is often unnecessary and is potentially confusing. A tumour volume and a small number of critical organs, usually embedded within other soft tissue anatomy, are likely to be all that can be clearly displayed when presented in a 3D format. The inclusion of dose data (in the form of isodose lines or surfaces) adds to the complication of any 3D display. A solution to this problem is to incorporate the presentation of dose distribution into the technique used to provide the illusion of 3D. This illusion can be provided by either depth cueing or by the hypothetical illumination of spatially defined object surfaces. The dose distribution from irradiation fields or, in the case of brachytherapy from radioactive sources, can be regarded as a source of illumination for tumour and critical organs. The intensity of illumination at any point on a tissue surface represents the dose at that point. Such an approach also allows the variation of dose over a given surface (and by extension, over the corresponding volume) to be quantified using histogram techniques. This may be of value in analysing and comparing techniques in which vulnerable tissue surfaces are irradiated. The planning of intracavitary treatments for cervical cancer is one application which might benefit from the display approach described above. Here the variation of dose over the mucosal surfaces of the bladder and the rectum is of particular interest, since dose related morbidity has often been reported following these treatments. 7 refs.; 8 figs

  14. Identification and determination of D3 vitamine, D3 vitamine 25 (OH) and D3 vitamine 1,25(OH)2 in plasma of animals treated with solanum glaucophyllum (Sg)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlak, Eva

    1997-01-01

    The enzootic calcinosis is a disease produced in the bovines by the ingestion of the toxic plant Sg, which contains vitamine D 3 glycosides and its active metabolites. This disease is characterized by the loss of weight and physical condition, motor disorders and alteration of phosphocalcic metabolism with deposition of calcium compounds in soft tissues. To contribute to the advanced diagnostic of the disease, analytic techniques to determine D vitamine, D vitamine 25 (OH) and D vitamine 1,25 (OH) 2 in plasma, by high resolution liquid chromatography and radio receptor essay are used

  15. Micro 3D printing using a digital projector and its application in the study of soft materials mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Howon; Fang, Nicholas X

    2012-11-27

    Buckling is a classical topic in mechanics. While buckling has long been studied as one of the major structural failure modes(1), it has recently drawn new attention as a unique mechanism for pattern transformation. Nature is full of such examples where a wealth of exotic patterns are formed through mechanical instability(2-5). Inspired by this elegant mechanism, many studies have demonstrated creation and transformation of patterns using soft materials such as elastomers and hydrogels(6-11). Swelling gels are of particular interest because they can spontaneously trigger mechanical instability to create various patterns without the need of external force(6-10). Recently, we have reported demonstration of full control over buckling pattern of micro-scaled tubular gels using projection micro-stereolithography (PμSL), a three-dimensional (3D) manufacturing technology capable of rapidly converting computer generated 3D models into physical objects at high resolution(12,13). Here we present a simple method to build up a simplified PμSL system using a commercially available digital data projector to study swelling-induced buckling instability for controlled pattern transformation. A simple desktop 3D printer is built using an off-the-shelf digital data projector and simple optical components such as a convex lens and a mirror(14). Cross-sectional images extracted from a 3D solid model is projected on the photosensitive resin surface in sequence, polymerizing liquid resin into a desired 3D solid structure in a layer-by-layer fashion. Even with this simple configuration and easy process, arbitrary 3D objects can be readily fabricated with sub-100 μm resolution. This desktop 3D printer holds potential in the study of soft material mechanics by offering a great opportunity to explore various 3D geometries. We use this system to fabricate tubular shaped hydrogel structure with different dimensions. Fixed on the bottom to the substrate, the tubular gel develops

  16. 3D Printing: 3D Printing of Shape Memory Polymers for Flexible Electronic Devices (Adv. Mater. 22/2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarek, Matt; Layani, Michael; Cooperstein, Ido; Sachyani, Ela; Cohn, Daniel; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2016-06-01

    On page 4449, D. Cohn, S. Magdassi, and co-workers describe a general and facile method based on 3D printing of methacrylated macromonomers to fabricate shape-memory objects that can be used in flexible and responsive electrical circuits. Such responsive objects can be used in the fabrication of soft robotics, minimal invasive medical devices, sensors, and wearable electronics. The use of 3D printing overcomes the poor processing characteristics of thermosets and enables complex geometries that are not easily accessible by other techniques. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Vitamin D3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 in pork and their relationship to vitamin D status in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burild, Anders; Lauridsen, Charlotte; Faqir, Nasrin

    2016-01-01

    The content of vitamin D in pork produced in conventional systems depends on the vitamin D concentration in the pig feed. Both vitamin D3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25(OH)D3) are essential sources of dietary vitamin D; however, bioavailability assessed by serum 25(OH)D3 concentration is reported...... of vitamin D3 and 25(OH)D3 in the pig feed for 49 d before slaughter. Concurrently, the 25(OH)D3 level in serum was investigated as a biomarker to assess the content of vitamin D3 and 25(OH)D3 in pig tissues. Adipose tissue, white and red muscle, the liver and serum were sampled from pigs fed feed containing...... either vitamin D3 or 25(OH)D3 at 5, 20, 35 or 50 µg/kg feed for 7 weeks before slaughter. The tissue 25(OH)D3 level was significantly higher in the pigs fed 25(OH)D3 compared with those fed vitamin D3, while the tissue vitamin D3 level was higher in the pigs fed vitamin D3 compared with those fed 25(OH...

  18. The TacTip Family: Soft Optical Tactile Sensors with 3D-Printed Biomimetic Morphologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward-Cherrier, Benjamin; Pestell, Nicholas; Cramphorn, Luke; Winstone, Benjamin; Giannaccini, Maria Elena; Rossiter, Jonathan; Lepora, Nathan F

    2018-04-01

    Tactile sensing is an essential component in human-robot interaction and object manipulation. Soft sensors allow for safe interaction and improved gripping performance. Here we present the TacTip family of sensors: a range of soft optical tactile sensors with various morphologies fabricated through dual-material 3D printing. All of these sensors are inspired by the same biomimetic design principle: transducing deformation of the sensing surface via movement of pins analogous to the function of intermediate ridges within the human fingertip. The performance of the TacTip, TacTip-GR2, TacTip-M2, and TacCylinder sensors is here evaluated and shown to attain submillimeter accuracy on a rolling cylinder task, representing greater than 10-fold super-resolved acuity. A version of the TacTip sensor has also been open-sourced, enabling other laboratories to adopt it as a platform for tactile sensing and manipulation research. These sensors are suitable for real-world applications in tactile perception, exploration, and manipulation, and will enable further research and innovation in the field of soft tactile sensing.

  19. Fused filament 3D printing of ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrico, James D; Traeden, Nicklaus W; Leang, Kam K; Aureli, Matteo

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new three-dimensional (3D) fused filament additive manufacturing (AM) technique in which electroactive polymer filament material is used to build soft active 3D structures, layer by layer. Specifically, the unique actuation and sensing properties of ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) are exploited in 3D printing to create electroactive polymer structures for application in soft robotics and bio-inspired systems. The process begins with extruding a precursor material (non-acid Nafion precursor resin) into a thermoplastic filament for 3D printing. The filament is then used by a custom-designed 3D printer to manufacture the desired soft polymer structures, layer by layer. Since at this stage the 3D-printed samples are not yet electroactive, a chemical functionalization process follows, consisting in hydrolyzing the precursor samples in an aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide and dimethyl sulfoxide. Upon functionalization, metal electrodes are applied on the samples through an electroless plating process, which enables the 3D-printed IPMC structures to be controlled by voltage signals for actuation (or to act as sensors). This innovative AM process is described in detail and the performance of 3D printed IPMC actuators is compared to an IPMC actuator fabricated from commercially available Nafion sheet material. The experimental results show comparable performance between the two types of actuators, demonstrating the potential and feasibility of creating functional 3D-printed IPMCs. (paper)

  20. Fused filament 3D printing of ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrico, James D.; Traeden, Nicklaus W.; Aureli, Matteo; Leang, Kam K.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes a new three-dimensional (3D) fused filament additive manufacturing (AM) technique in which electroactive polymer filament material is used to build soft active 3D structures, layer by layer. Specifically, the unique actuation and sensing properties of ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) are exploited in 3D printing to create electroactive polymer structures for application in soft robotics and bio-inspired systems. The process begins with extruding a precursor material (non-acid Nafion precursor resin) into a thermoplastic filament for 3D printing. The filament is then used by a custom-designed 3D printer to manufacture the desired soft polymer structures, layer by layer. Since at this stage the 3D-printed samples are not yet electroactive, a chemical functionalization process follows, consisting in hydrolyzing the precursor samples in an aqueous solution of potassium hydroxide and dimethyl sulfoxide. Upon functionalization, metal electrodes are applied on the samples through an electroless plating process, which enables the 3D-printed IPMC structures to be controlled by voltage signals for actuation (or to act as sensors). This innovative AM process is described in detail and the performance of 3D printed IPMC actuators is compared to an IPMC actuator fabricated from commercially available Nafion sheet material. The experimental results show comparable performance between the two types of actuators, demonstrating the potential and feasibility of creating functional 3D-printed IPMCs.

  1. Naturalness in low-scale SUSY models and "non-linear" MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, I; Ghilencea, D M

    2014-01-01

    In MSSM models with various boundary conditions for the soft breaking terms (m_{soft}) and for a higgs mass of 126 GeV, there is a (minimal) electroweak fine-tuning Delta\\approx 800 to 1000 for the constrained MSSM and Delta\\approx 500 for non-universal gaugino masses. These values, often regarded as unacceptably large, may indicate a problem of supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking, rather than of SUSY itself. A minimal modification of these models is to lower the SUSY breaking scale in the hidden sector (\\sqrt f) to few TeV, which we show to restore naturalness to more acceptable levels Delta\\approx 80 for the most conservative case of low tan_beta and ultraviolet boundary conditions as in the constrained MSSM. This is done without introducing additional fields in the visible sector, unlike other models that attempt to reduce Delta. In the present case Delta is reduced due to additional (effective) quartic higgs couplings proportional to the ratio m_{soft}/(\\sqrt f) of the visible to the hidden sector SUSY breaking...

  2. Expert-guided optimization for 3D printing of soft and liquid materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, Sara; Davis, Alexander; Miller, John H.

    2018-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has rapidly emerged as a disruptive technology to build mechanical parts, enabling increased design complexity, low-cost customization and an ever-increasing range of materials. Yet these capabilities have also created an immense challenge in optimizing the large number of process parameters in order achieve a high-performance part. This is especially true for AM of soft, deformable materials and for liquid-like resins that require experimental printing methods. Here, we developed an expert-guided optimization (EGO) strategy to provide structure in exploring and improving the 3D printing of liquid polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer resin. EGO uses three steps, starting first with expert screening to select the parameter space, factors, and factor levels. Second is a hill-climbing algorithm to search the parameter space defined by the expert for the best set of parameters. Third is expert decision making to try new factors or a new parameter space to improve on the best current solution. We applied the algorithm to two calibration objects, a hollow cylinder and a five-sided hollow cube that were evaluated based on a multi-factor scoring system. The optimum print settings were then used to print complex PDMS and epoxy 3D objects, including a twisted vase, water drop, toe, and ear, at a level of detail and fidelity previously not obtained. PMID:29621286

  3. Expert-guided optimization for 3D printing of soft and liquid materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi, Sara; Davis, Alexander; Miller, John H; Feinberg, Adam W

    2018-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has rapidly emerged as a disruptive technology to build mechanical parts, enabling increased design complexity, low-cost customization and an ever-increasing range of materials. Yet these capabilities have also created an immense challenge in optimizing the large number of process parameters in order achieve a high-performance part. This is especially true for AM of soft, deformable materials and for liquid-like resins that require experimental printing methods. Here, we developed an expert-guided optimization (EGO) strategy to provide structure in exploring and improving the 3D printing of liquid polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) elastomer resin. EGO uses three steps, starting first with expert screening to select the parameter space, factors, and factor levels. Second is a hill-climbing algorithm to search the parameter space defined by the expert for the best set of parameters. Third is expert decision making to try new factors or a new parameter space to improve on the best current solution. We applied the algorithm to two calibration objects, a hollow cylinder and a five-sided hollow cube that were evaluated based on a multi-factor scoring system. The optimum print settings were then used to print complex PDMS and epoxy 3D objects, including a twisted vase, water drop, toe, and ear, at a level of detail and fidelity previously not obtained.

  4. The 3d84s and 3d84d configurations of the fourth spectrum of zinc: Zn IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Y.N.; Van Kleef, T.A.M.

    1987-01-01

    The spectrum of zinc was photographed in the region 2000 A - 820 A on a 6.65 m and a 10.7 m normal incidence spectrograph using a sliding spark and a triggered spark source. The new measurements have helped us to confirm the earlier analysis of the 3d 8 4s-3d 8 4p transitions and locate the missing level 3d 8 4s 2 S 1/2 , and study the 3d 8 4p-3d 8 4d transitions. 59 out of 67 levels of the 3d 8 4d configuration have been established. Parametric least-squares-fitted calculations support the analysis. Two hundred and eight (208) additional lines have been classified in the Zn IV analysis. (orig.)

  5. A 2D driven 3D vessel segmentation algorithm for 3D digital subtraction angiography data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spiegel, M; Hornegger, J; Redel, T; Struffert, T; Doerfler, A

    2011-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease is among the leading causes of death in western industrial nations. 3D rotational angiography delivers indispensable information on vessel morphology and pathology. Physicians make use of this to analyze vessel geometry in detail, i.e. vessel diameters, location and size of aneurysms, to come up with a clinical decision. 3D segmentation is a crucial step in this pipeline. Although a lot of different methods are available nowadays, all of them lack a method to validate the results for the individual patient. Therefore, we propose a novel 2D digital subtraction angiography (DSA)-driven 3D vessel segmentation and validation framework. 2D DSA projections are clinically considered as gold standard when it comes to measurements of vessel diameter or the neck size of aneurysms. An ellipsoid vessel model is applied to deliver the initial 3D segmentation. To assess the accuracy of the 3D vessel segmentation, its forward projections are iteratively overlaid with the corresponding 2D DSA projections. Local vessel discrepancies are modeled by a global 2D/3D optimization function to adjust the 3D vessel segmentation toward the 2D vessel contours. Our framework has been evaluated on phantom data as well as on ten patient datasets. Three 2D DSA projections from varying viewing angles have been used for each dataset. The novel 2D driven 3D vessel segmentation approach shows superior results against state-of-the-art segmentations like region growing, i.e. an improvement of 7.2% points in precision and 5.8% points for the Dice coefficient. This method opens up future clinical applications requiring the greatest vessel accuracy, e.g. computational fluid dynamic modeling.

  6. 3-d chemical imaging using angle-scan nanotomography in a soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hitchcock, A.P.; Johansson, G.A. [McMaster, BIMR, Hamilton (Canada); Mitchell, G.E. [Dow Chemical, Analytical Science, Midland, MI (United States); Keefe, M.H. [Dow Chemical, Dow Latex, Midland, MI (United States); Tyliszcak, T. [LBNL, Advanced Light Source, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-08-15

    Three-dimensional chemical mapping using angle scan nanotomography in a soft X-ray scanning transmission X-ray microscope (STXM) has been used to investigate the spatial distributions of a low density polyacrylate polyelectrolyte ionomer inside submicron sized polystyrene microspheres. Acquisition of tomograms at multiple photon energies provides true, quantifiable 3-d chemical sensitivity. Both pre-O 1s and C 1s results are shown. The study reveals aspects of the 3-d distribution of the polyelectrolyte that were inferred indirectly or had not been known prior to this study. The potential and challenges for extension of the technique to studies of other polymeric and to biological systems is discussed. (orig.)

  7. [Accuracy of morphological simulation for orthognatic surgery. Assessment of a 3D image fusion software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzic, A; Schouman, T; Scolozzi, P

    2013-08-06

    The CT/CBCT data allows for 3D reconstruction of skeletal and untextured soft tissue volume. 3D stereophotogrammetry technology has strongly improved the quality of facial soft tissue surface texture. The combination of these two technologies allows for an accurate and complete reconstruction. The 3D virtual head may be used for orthognatic surgical planning, virtual surgery, and morphological simulation obtained with a software dedicated to the fusion of 3D photogrammetric and radiological images. The imaging material include: a multi-slice CT scan or broad field CBCT scan, a 3D photogrammetric camera. The operative image processing protocol includes the following steps: 1) pre- and postoperative CT/CBCT scan and 3D photogrammetric image acquisition; 2) 3D image segmentation and fusion of untextured CT/CBCT skin with the preoperative textured facial soft tissue surface of the 3D photogrammetric scan; 3) image fusion of the pre- and postoperative CT/CBCT data set virtual osteotomies, and 3D photogrammetric soft tissue virtual simulation; 4) fusion of virtual simulated 3D photogrammetric and real postoperative images, and assessment of accuracy using a color-coded scale to measure the differences between the two surfaces. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  8. Relative effectiveness of oral 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and vitamin D3 in raising wintertime serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashman, Kevin D; Seamans, Kelly M; Lucey, Alice J; Stöcklin, Elisabeth; Weber, Peter; Kiely, Mairead; Hill, Tom R

    2012-06-01

    The relative potency of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 to vitamin D3 needs to be better defined so that food-composition tables can better reflect the true vitamin D nutritive value of certain foods. We performed a randomized, controlled intervention study in apparently healthy, free-living adults to investigate whether the intake of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 is 5 times more potent in raising serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] during winter compared with an equivalent amount of vitamin D3. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind intervention study was conducted in adults aged ≥50 y (n = 56) who consumed a placebo, 20 μg vitamin D3, or 7 or 20 μg 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 daily throughout 10 wk of winter. Serum 25(OH)D was measured by using an enzyme-linked immunoassay, and serum albumin-corrected calcium (S-Ca) was assessed colorimetrically at the baseline, midpoint, and endpoint of the study. The mean (±SD) increases (per microgram of vitamin D compound) in serum 25(OH)D concentrations over baseline after 10 wk of supplementation were 0.96 ± 0.62, 4.02 ± 1.27, and 4.77 ± 1.04 nmol · L(-1) · μg intake(-1) for the 20-μg vitamin D3/d and 7- and 20-μg 25-hydroxyvitamin D3/d groups, respectively. A comparison of the 7- and 20-μg 25-hydroxyvitamin D3/d groups with the 20-μg vitamin D3/d group yielded conversion factors of 4.2 and 5, respectively. There was no effect of treatment on S-Ca concentrations and no incidence of hypercalcemia (S-Ca >2.6 nmol/L). Each microgram of orally consumed 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 was about 5 times more effective in raising serum 25(OH)D in older adults in winter than an equivalent amount of vitamin D3. This conversion factor could be used in food-compositional tables for relevant foods. This study was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01398202.

  9. Towards large volume big divisor D3/D7 “μ-split supersymmetry” and Ricci-flat Swiss-cheese metrics, and dimension-six neutrino mass operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhuria, Mansi; Misra, Aalok

    2012-01-01

    We show that it is possible to realize a “μ-split SUSY” scenario (Cheng and Cheng, 2005) in the context of large volume limit of type IIB compactifications on Swiss-cheese Calabi-Yau orientifolds in the presence of a mobile space-time filling D3-brane and a (stack of) D7-brane(s) wrapping the “big” divisor. For this, we investigate the possibility of getting one Higgs to be light while other to be heavy in addition to a heavy higgsino mass parameter. Further, we examine the existence of long lived gluino that manifests one of the major consequences of μ-split SUSY scenario, by computing its decay width as well as lifetime corresponding to the three-body decays of the gluino into either a quark, a squark and a neutralino or a quark, squark and goldstino, as well as two-body decays of the gluino into either a neutralino and a gluon or a goldstino and a gluon. Guided by the geometric Kähler potential for Σ B obtained in Misra and Shukla (2010) based on GLSM techniques, and the Donaldson's algorithm (Barun et al., 2008) for obtaining numerically a Ricci-flat metric, we give details of our calculation in Misra and Shukla (2011) pertaining to our proposed metric for the full Swiss-cheese Calabi-Yau (the geometric Kähler potential being needed to be included in the full moduli space Kähler potential in the presence of the mobile space-time filling D3-brane), but for simplicity of calculation, close to the big divisor, which is Ricci-flat in the large volume limit. Also, as an application of the one-loop RG flow solution for the higgsino mass parameter, we show that the contribution to the neutrino masses at the EW scale from dimension-six operators arising from the Kähler potential, is suppressed relative to the Weinberg-type dimension-five operators.

  10. 3D-Structured Stretchable Strain Sensors for Out-of-Plane Force Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyuan; Qi, Dianpeng; Leow, Wan Ru; Yu, Jiancan; Xiloyannnis, Michele; Cappello, Leonardo; Liu, Yaqing; Zhu, Bowen; Jiang, Ying; Chen, Geng; Masia, Lorenzo; Liedberg, Bo; Chen, Xiaodong

    2018-05-17

    Stretchable strain sensors, as the soft mechanical interface, provide the key mechanical information of the systems for healthcare monitoring, rehabilitation assistance, soft exoskeletal devices, and soft robotics. Stretchable strain sensors based on 2D flat film have been widely developed to monitor the in-plane force applied within the plane where the sensor is placed. However, to comprehensively obtain the mechanical feedback, the capability to detect the out-of-plane force, caused by the interaction outside of the plane where the senor is located, is needed. Herein, a 3D-structured stretchable strain sensor is reported to monitor the out-of-plane force by employing 3D printing in conjunction with out-of-plane capillary force-assisted self-pinning of carbon nanotubes. The 3D-structured sensor possesses large stretchability, multistrain detection, and strain-direction recognition by one single sensor. It is demonstrated that out-of-plane forces induced by the air/fluid flow are reliably monitored and intricate flow details are clearly recorded. The development opens up for the exploration of next-generation 3D stretchable sensors for electronic skin and soft robotics. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Soft chitosan microbeads scaffold for 3D functional neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, Maria Teresa; Di Lisa, Donatella; Massobrio, Paolo; Colistra, Nicolò; Pesce, Mattia; Catelani, Tiziano; Dellacasa, Elena; Raiteri, Roberto; Martinoia, Sergio; Pastorino, Laura

    2018-02-01

    The availability of 3D biomimetic in vitro neuronal networks of mammalian neurons represents a pivotal step for the development of brain-on-a-chip experimental models to study neuronal (dys)functions and particularly neuronal connectivity. The use of hydrogel-based scaffolds for 3D cell cultures has been extensively studied in the last years. However, limited work on biomimetic 3D neuronal cultures has been carried out to date. In this respect, here we investigated the use of a widely popular polysaccharide, chitosan (CHI), for the fabrication of a microbead based 3D scaffold to be coupled to primary neuronal cells. CHI microbeads were characterized by optical and atomic force microscopies. The cell/scaffold interaction was deeply characterized by transmission electron microscopy and by immunocytochemistry using confocal microscopy. Finally, a preliminary electrophysiological characterization by micro-electrode arrays was carried out. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Thermal cure effects on electromechanical properties of conductive wires by direct ink write for 4D printing and soft machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Quanyi; Dunn, Conner K.; Wang, Lei; Dunn, Martin L.; Qi, H. Jerry; Wang, Tiejun

    2017-04-01

    Recent developments in soft materials and 3D printing are promoting the rapid development of novel technologies and concepts, such as 4D printing and soft machines, that in turn require new methods for fabricating conductive materials. Despite the ubiquity of silver nanoparticles (NPs) in the conducting electrodes of printed electronic devices, their potential use in stretchable conductors has not been fully explored in 4D printing and soft machines. This paper studies the effect of thermal cure conditions on conductivity and electro-mechanical behaviors of silver ink by the direct ink write (DIW) printing approach. We found that the electro-mechanical properties of silver wires can be tailored by controlling cure time and cure temperature to achieve conductivity as well as stretchability. For the silver NP ink we used in the experiments, silver wires cured at 80 °C for 10-30 min have conductivity >1% bulk silver, Young’s modulus printed silver ink patterns on the surface of 3D printed polymer parts, with the future goal of constructing fully 3D printed arbitrarily formed soft and stretchable devices and of applying them to 4D printing. We demonstrated a fully printed functional soft-matter sensor and a circuit element that can be stretched by as much as 45%.

  13. Implications for new physics from fine-tuning arguments 1. Application to SUSY and seesaw cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberto Casas, J.; Hidalgo, Irene; Espinosa, Jose R.

    2004-01-01

    We revisit the standard argument to estimate the scale of new physics (NP) beyond the SM, based on the sensitivity of the Higgs mass to quadratic divergences. Although this argument is arguably naive, the corresponding estimate, Λ SM SM . One can obtain more precise implications from fine-tuning arguments in specific examples of NP. Here we consider SUSY and right-handed (seesaw) neutrinos. SUSY is a typical example for which the previous general estimate is indeed conservative: the MSSM is fine-tuned a few %, even for soft masses of a few hundred GeV. In contrast, other SUSY scenarios, in particular those with low-scale SUSY breaking, can easily saturate the general bound on Λ SM . The seesaw mechanism requires large fine-tuning if M R > or approx.10 7 GeV, unless there is additional NP (SUSY being a favourite option). (author)

  14. 3-D printing of liquid metals for stretchable and flexible conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trlica, Chris; Parekh, Dishit Paresh; Panich, Lazar; Ladd, Collin; Dickey, Michael D.

    2014-06-01

    3-D printing is an emerging technology that has been used primarily on small scales for rapid prototyping, but which could also herald a wider movement towards decentralized, highly customizable manufacturing. Polymers are the most common materials to be 3-D printed today, but there is great demand for a way to easily print metals. Existing techniques for 3-D printing metals tend to be expensive and energy-intensive, and usually require high temperatures or pressures, making them incompatible with polymers, organics, soft materials, and biological materials. Here, we describe room temperature liquid metals as complements to polymers for 3-D printing applications. These metals enable the fabrication of soft, flexible, and stretchable devices. We survey potential room temperature liquid metal candidates and describe the benefits of gallium and its alloys for these purposes. We demonstrate the direct printing of a liquid gallium alloy in both 2-D and 3-D and highlight the structures and shapes that can be fabricated using these processes.

  15. Non-linear way to supersymmetry and N-extended SUSY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akulov, V.

    2001-01-01

    In this report I give a short historical review of some of the first steps that were done towards the invention of SUSY by the Kharkov team headed by D. Volkov. This article is dedicated to the memory of Prof. Yuri Golfand, whose ideas of SUSY inspired the most active developments in High Energy Physics over thirty years

  16. Concept for a 3D-printed soft rotary actuator driven by a shape-memory alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Han; Chapelle, Frédéric; Fauroux, Jean-Christophe; Balandraud, Xavier

    2018-05-01

    In line with the recent development of soft actuators involving shape-memory alloys (SMAs) embedded in compliant structures, this paper proposes a concept for a rotary actuator driven by a SMA wire placed inside a 3D-printed helical structure. The concept consists of using the one-way memory effect of the SMA (activated by Joule heating) to create the rotation of a material point of the structure, while the inverse rotation is obtained during the return to ambient temperature thanks to the structure’s elasticity. The study was performed in three steps. First, a prototype was designed from a chain of design rules, and tested to validate the feasibility of the concept. Thermal and geometrical measurements were performed using infrared and visible-range stereo cameras. A clockwise rotation (250°) followed by an anti-clockwise rotation (‑200°) were obtained, enabling us to validate the concept despite the partial reversibility of the movement. Second, finite element simulations were performed to improve rotation reversibility. The high compliance of the mechanical system required a framework of large displacements for the calculations (in the strength of materials sense), due to the high structural flexibility. Finally, a second prototype was constructed and tested. Attention was paid to the rotation (fully reversible rotation of 150° reached) as well as to parasitic movements due to overall structural deformation. This study opens new prospects for the design and analysis of 3D-printed soft actuators activated by smart materials.

  17. 4D scattering amplitudes and asymptotic symmetries from 2D CFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Clifford; de la Fuente, Anton; Sundrum, Raman

    2017-01-01

    We reformulate the scattering amplitudes of 4D flat space gauge theory and gravity in the language of a 2D CFT on the celestial sphere. The resulting CFT structure exhibits an OPE constructed from 4D collinear singularities, as well as infinite-dimensional Kac-Moody and Virasoro algebras encoding the asymptotic symmetries of 4D flat space. We derive these results by recasting 4D dynamics in terms of a convenient foliation of flat space into 3D Euclidean AdS and Lorentzian dS geometries. Tree-level scattering amplitudes take the form of Witten diagrams for a continuum of (A)dS modes, which are in turn equivalent to CFT correlators via the (A)dS/CFT dictionary. The Ward identities for the 2D conserved currents are dual to 4D soft theorems, while the bulk-boundary propagators of massless (A)dS modes are superpositions of the leading and subleading Weinberg soft factors of gauge theory and gravity. In general, the massless (A)dS modes are 3D Chern-Simons gauge fields describing the soft, single helicity sectors of 4D gauge theory and gravity. Consistent with the topological nature of Chern-Simons theory, Aharonov-Bohm effects record the "tracks" of hard particles in the soft radiation, leading to a simple characterization of gauge and gravitational memories. Soft particle exchanges between hard processes define the Kac-Moody level and Virasoro central charge, which are thereby related to the 4D gauge coupling and gravitational strength in units of an infrared cutoff. Finally, we discuss a toy model for black hole horizons via a restriction to the Rindler region.

  18. A Novel Qualitative and Quantitative Biofilm Assay Based on 3D Soft Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodil Hakonen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lack of predictable in vitro methods to analyze antimicrobial activity could play a role in the development of resistance to antibiotics. Current used methods analyze planktonic cells but for the method to be clinically relevant, biofilm in in vivo like conditions ought to be studied. Hence, our group has developed a qualitative and quantitative method with in vivo like 3D tissue for prediction of antimicrobial activity in reality. Devices (wound dressings were applied on top of Pseudomonas aeruginosa inoculated Muller-Hinton (MH agar or 3D synthetic soft tissues (SST and incubated for 24 hours. The antibacterial activity was then analyzed visually and by viable counts. On MH agar two out of three silver containing devices showed zone of inhibitions (ZOI and on SST, ZOI were detected for all three. Corroborating results were found upon evaluating the bacterial load in SST and shown to be silver concentration dependent. In conclusion, a novel method was developed combining visual rapid screening and quantitative evaluation of the antimicrobial activity in both tissue and devices. It uses tissue allowing biofilm formation thus mimicking reality closely. These conditions are essential in order to predict antimicrobial activity of medical devices in the task to prevent device related infections.

  19. "3D fusion" echocardiography improves 3D left ventricular assessment: comparison with 2D contrast echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Daniel; Yaqub, Mohammad; Szmigielski, Cezary; Lima, Eduardo; Petersen, Steffen E; Becher, Harald; Noble, J Alison; Leeson, Paul

    2015-02-01

    Three-dimensional fusion echocardiography (3DFE) is a novel postprocessing approach that utilizes imaging data acquired from multiple 3D acquisitions. We assessed image quality, endocardial border definition, and cardiac wall motion in patients using 3DFE compared to standard 3D images (3D) and results obtained with contrast echocardiography (2DC). Twenty-four patients (mean age 66.9 ± 13 years, 17 males, 7 females) undergoing 2DC had three, noncontrast, 3D apical volumes acquired at rest. Images were fused using an automated image fusion approach. Quality of the 3DFE was compared to both 3D and 2DC based on contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and endocardial border definition. We then compared clinical wall-motion score index (WMSI) calculated from 3DFE and 3D to those obtained from 2DC images. Fused 3D volumes had significantly improved CNR (8.92 ± 1.35 vs. 6.59 ± 1.19, P echocardiography (1.06 ± 0.09 vs. 1.07 ± 0.15, P = 0.69), whereas unfused images produced significantly more variable results (1.19 ± 0.30). This was confirmed by a better intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC 0.72; 95% CI 0.32-0.88) relative to comparisons with unfused images (ICC 0.56; 95% CI 0.02-0.81). 3DFE significantly improves left ventricular image quality compared to unfused 3D in a patient population and allows noncontrast assessment of wall motion that approaches that achieved with 2D contrast echocardiography. © 2014, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Creating 3D gelatin phantoms for experimental evaluation in biomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stein Nils

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe and evaluate a setup to create gelatin phantoms by robotic 3D printing. Key aspects are the large workspace, reproducibility and resolution of the created phantoms. Given its soft tissue nature, the gelatin is kept fluid during inside the system and we present parameters for additive printing of homogeneous, solid objects. The results indicate that 3D printing of gelatin can be an alternative for quickly creating larger soft tissue phantoms without the need for casting a mold.

  1. Searching for vortex solutions in graphene within an N=2 SUSY framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abreu, Everton M.C.; Assis, Leonardo P.G. de; Helayel-Neto, Jose Abdalla; Nogueira, Alvaro L.M.A.; Paschoal, Ricardo C.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: In a recent work, we proposed an N=1-D=3 supersymmetric (SUSY) extension of Jackiw's et al. chiral gauge theory for graphene. As a first approach, we explored the idea that the chiral gauge formulation for Dirac fermions in graphene could be a sector of a wider SUSY theoretical setup, namely, the N=1 π 3 -QED. As a matter of fact, adding a superpotential operator to the N=1 π 3 -QED prescription, properly endowed with the constitutive chiral gauge and discrete symmetries that prevail in Jackiw's proposal, allows for the recognition of the Yukawa-like terms, along with spontaneous symmetry breaking configurations and corresponding non-null mass eigenvalues to the physical degrees of freedom. However, the additional requirement of invariance under a global phase transformation (GPT), meant to be associated to the electric charge, severely constrains the superpotential, leading to the exclusion of the sector that contains Jackiw's operators. As we proceed to investigate how the GP symmetry could be accommodated in a SUSY formulation, in the work of Ref. [E.M.C. Abreu, M.A. De Andrade, L.P.G. de Assis, J.A. Helayel-Neto, A.L.M.A. Nogueira and R.C. Paschoal, N=2-D=3 Supersymmetry and the Electric Charge in Graphene] we assess the straightforward N=1-generalization of Jackiw-Pi's chiral gauge theory, obtained at the cost of adding an extra superfield to the original SUSY3 -QED field content. Moreover, we are able to construct an N=2-D=3 further extension of the chiral gauge theory for electrons in graphene. Such an N=2 SUSY framework provides an algebraic structure rich enough to imply a set of equations that minimizes the energy functional, namely, the well-known Bogomol'nyi equations. In this work, by taking the action of one of the supersymmetry charges to be trivial, we obtain the proper set of Bogomol'nyi equations. We finally impose a vortex-like trial solution, as we wish to discuss the resulting non-perturbative spectrum of the present N=2 setup

  2. Searching for vortex solutions in graphene within an N=2 SUSY framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abreu, Everton M.C. [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropedica, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Andrade, Marco A. de [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Resende, RJ (Brazil); Grupo de Fisica Teorica Jose Leite Lopes (GFT-JLL), Petropolis, RJ (Brazil); Assis, Leonardo P.G. de [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Helayel-Neto, Jose Abdalla [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Grupo de Fisica Teorica Jose Leite Lopes (GFT-JLL), Petropolis, RJ (Brazil); Nogueira, Alvaro L.M.A.; Paschoal, Ricardo C. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica Celso Suckow da Fonseca (CEFET/RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Grupo de Fisica Teorica Jose Leite Lopes (GFT-JLL), Petropolis, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: In a recent work, we proposed an N=1-D=3 supersymmetric (SUSY) extension of Jackiw's et al. chiral gauge theory for graphene. As a first approach, we explored the idea that the chiral gauge formulation for Dirac fermions in graphene could be a sector of a wider SUSY theoretical setup, namely, the N=1 {pi}{sub 3}-QED. As a matter of fact, adding a superpotential operator to the N=1 {pi}{sub 3}-QED prescription, properly endowed with the constitutive chiral gauge and discrete symmetries that prevail in Jackiw's proposal, allows for the recognition of the Yukawa-like terms, along with spontaneous symmetry breaking configurations and corresponding non-null mass eigenvalues to the physical degrees of freedom. However, the additional requirement of invariance under a global phase transformation (GPT), meant to be associated to the electric charge, severely constrains the superpotential, leading to the exclusion of the sector that contains Jackiw's operators. As we proceed to investigate how the GP symmetry could be accommodated in a SUSY formulation, in the work of Ref. [E.M.C. Abreu, M.A. De Andrade, L.P.G. de Assis, J.A. Helayel-Neto, A.L.M.A. Nogueira and R.C. Paschoal, N=2-D=3 Supersymmetry and the Electric Charge in Graphene] we assess the straightforward N=1-generalization of Jackiw-Pi's chiral gauge theory, obtained at the cost of adding an extra superfield to the original SUSY-{pi}{sub 3}-QED field content. Moreover, we are able to construct an N=2-D=3 further extension of the chiral gauge theory for electrons in graphene. Such an N=2 SUSY framework provides an algebraic structure rich enough to imply a set of equations that minimizes the energy functional, namely, the well-known Bogomol'nyi equations. In this work, by taking the action of one of the supersymmetry charges to be trivial, we obtain the proper set of Bogomol'nyi equations. We finally impose a vortex-like trial solution, as we wish to discuss the resulting non

  3. Spontaneous SUSY breaking without R symmetry in supergravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Nobuhiro; Omura, Yuji; Shigekami, Yoshihiro; Yoshida, Manabu

    2018-03-01

    We discuss spontaneous supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking in a model with an anomalous U (1 )A symmetry. In this model, the size of the each term in the superpotential is controlled by the U (1 )A charge assignment and SUSY is spontaneously broken via the Fayet-Iliopoulos of U (1 )A at the metastable vacuum. In the global SUSY analysis, the gaugino masses become much smaller than the sfermion masses, because an approximate R symmetry appears at the SUSY breaking vacuum. In this paper, we show that gaugino masses can be as large as gravitino mass, taking the supergravity effect into consideration. This is because the R symmetry is not imposed so that the constant term in the superpotential, which is irrelevant to the global SUSY analysis, largely contributes to the soft SUSY breaking terms in the supergravity. As the mediation mechanism, we introduce the contributions of the field not charged under U (1 )A and the moduli field to cancel the anomaly of U (1 )A. We comment on the application of our SUSY breaking scenario to the grand unified theory.

  4. Tracking algorithms for multi-hexagonal assemblies (2D and 3D)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabha, Hem; Marleau, Guy; Hébert, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We present the method of computations of 2D and 3D fluxes in hexagonal assemblies. • Computation of fluxes requires computation of track lengths. • Equations are developed (in 2D and 3D) and are implemented in a program HX7. • The program HX7 is implemented in the NXT module of the code DRAGON. • The tracks are plotted and fluxes are compared with the EXCELT module of DRAGON. - Abstract: Background: There has been a continuous effort to design new reactors and study these reactors under different conditions. Some of these reactors have fuel pins arranged in hexagonal pitch. To study these reactors, development of computational methods and computer codes is required. For this purpose, we have developed algorithms to track two dimensional and three dimensional cluster geometries. These algorithms have been implemented in a subprogram HX7, that is implemented in the code DRAGON (Version 3.06F) to compute neutron flux distributions in these systems. Methods: Computation of the neutron flux distribution requires solution of neutron transport equation. While solving this equation, by using Carlvik’s method of collision probabilities, computation of tracks in the hexagonal geometries is required. In this paper we present equations that we have developed for the computation of tracks in two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) multi-hexagonal assemblies (with two rotational orientations). These equations have been implemented in a subprogram HX7, to compute tracks in seven hexagonal assemblies. The subprogram HX7 has been implemented in the NXT module of the DRAGON code, where tracks in the pins are computed. Results: The results of our algorithms NXT(+HX7) have been compared with the results obtained by the EXCELT module of DRAGON (Version 3.06F). Conclusions: We find that all the fluxes in 2D and fluxes in the outer pin (3D) are converging to their 3rd decimal places, in both the modules EXCELT and NXT(+HX7). For other regions 3D fluxes

  5. "Black Bone" MRI: a novel imaging technique for 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eley, Karen A; Watt-Smith, Stephen R; Golding, Stephen J

    2017-03-01

    Three-dimensionally printed anatomical models are rapidly becoming an integral part of pre-operative planning of complex surgical cases. We have previously reported the "Black Bone" MRI technique as a non-ionizing alternative to CT. Segmentation of bone becomes possible by minimizing soft tissue contrast to enhance the bone-soft tissue boundary. The objectives of this study were to ascertain the potential of utilizing this technique to produce three-dimensional (3D) printed models. "Black Bone" MRI acquired from adult volunteers and infants with craniosynostosis were 3D rendered and 3D printed. A custom phantom provided a surrogate marker of accuracy permitting comparison between direct measurements and 3D printed models created by segmenting both CT and "Black Bone" MRI data sets using two different software packages. "Black Bone" MRI was successfully utilized to produce 3D models of the craniofacial skeleton in both adults and an infant. Measurements of the cube phantom and 3D printed models demonstrated submillimetre discrepancy. In this novel preliminary study exploring the potential of 3D printing from "Black Bone" MRI data, the feasibility of producing anatomical 3D models has been demonstrated, thus offering a potential non-ionizing alterative to CT for the craniofacial skeleton.

  6. Genetic investigations in immigration cases and frequencies of DNA fragments of the VNTR systems D2S44, D5S43, D7S21, D7S22, and D12S11 in Turks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hanna Elsebeth; Morling, N

    1993-01-01

    with radiolabelled probes detecting the VNTR systems D2S44 (YNH24), D5S43 (MS8), D7S21 (MS31), D7S22 (g3), and D12S11 (MS43a). We used the matching criterion for paternity testing for the parent/child comparisons, i.e. non-match if the intra gel difference exceeded 1.25 mm. A total of 43 immigration cases involving...

  7. Potencies of vitamin D analogs, 1α-hydroxyvitamin D3 , 1α-hydroxyvitamin D2 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 , in lowering cholesterol in hypercholesterolemic mice in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quach, Holly P; Dzekic, Tamara; Bukuroshi, Paola; Pang, K Sandy

    2018-04-01

    Vitamin D 3 and the synthetic vitamin D analogs, 1α-hydroxyvitamin D 3 [1α(OH)D 3 ], 1α-hydroxyvitamin D 2 [1α(OH)D 2 ] and 25-hydroxyvitamin D 3 [25(OH)D 3 ] were appraised for their vitamin D receptor (VDR) associated-potencies as cholesterol lowering agents in mice in vivo. These precursors are activated in vivo: 1α(OH)D 3 and 1α(OH)D 2 are transformed by liver CYP2R1 and CYP27A1 to active VDR ligands, 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 [1,25(OH) 2 D 3 ] and 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 2 [1,25(OH) 2 D 2 ] , respectively. 1α(OH)D 2 may also be activated by CYP24A1 to 1α,24-dihydroxyvitamin D 2 [1,24(OH) 2 D 2 ], another active VDR ligand. 25(OH)D 3 , the metabolite formed via CYP2R1 and or CYP27A1 in liver from vitamin D 3 , is activated by CYP27B1 in the kidney to 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 . In C57BL/6 mice fed the high fat/high cholesterol Western diet for 3 weeks, vitamin D analogs were administered every other day intraperitoneally during the last week of the diet. The rank order for cholesterol lowering, achieved via mouse liver small heterodimer partner (Shp) inhibition and increased cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1) expression, was: 1.75 nmol/kg 1α(OH)D 3  > 1248 nmol/kg 25(OH)D 3 (dose ratio of 0.0014) > > 1625 nmol/kg vitamin D 3 . Except for 1.21 nmol/kg 1α(OH)D 2 that failed to lower liver and plasma cholesterol contents, a significant negative correlation was observed between the liver concentration of 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 formed from the precursors and liver cholesterol levels. The composite results show that vitamin D analogs 1α(OH)D 3 and 25(OH)D 3 exhibit cholesterol lowering properties upon activation to 1,25(OH) 2 D 3 : 1α(OH)D 3 is rapidly activated by liver enzymes and 25(OH)D 3 is slowly activated by renal Cyp27b1 in mouse. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. 4D Printed Actuators with Soft-Robotic Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Valdeolivas, María; Liu, Danqing; Broer, Dick Jan; Sánchez-Somolinos, Carlos

    2018-03-01

    Soft matter elements undergoing programed, reversible shape change can contribute to fundamental advance in areas such as optics, medicine, microfluidics, and robotics. Crosslinked liquid crystalline polymers have demonstrated huge potential to implement soft responsive elements; however, the complexity and size of the actuators are limited by the current dominant thin-film geometry processing toolbox. Using 3D printing, stimuli-responsive liquid crystalline elastomeric structures are created here. The printing process prescribes a reversible shape-morphing behavior, offering a new paradigm for active polymer system preparation. The additive character of this technology also leads to unprecedented geometries, complex functions, and sizes beyond those of typical thin-films. The fundamental concepts and devices presented therefore overcome the current limitations of actuation energy available from thin-films, thereby narrowing the gap between materials and practical applications. © 2017 The Authors. Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. 3D Printed Multimaterial Microfluidic Valve.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J Keating

    Full Text Available We present a novel 3D printed multimaterial microfluidic proportional valve. The microfluidic valve is a fundamental primitive that enables the development of programmable, automated devices for controlling fluids in a precise manner. We discuss valve characterization results, as well as exploratory design variations in channel width, membrane thickness, and membrane stiffness. Compared to previous single material 3D printed valves that are stiff, these printed valves constrain fluidic deformation spatially, through combinations of stiff and flexible materials, to enable intricate geometries in an actuated, functionally graded device. Research presented marks a shift towards 3D printing multi-property programmable fluidic devices in a single step, in which integrated multimaterial valves can be used to control complex fluidic reactions for a variety of applications, including DNA assembly and analysis, continuous sampling and sensing, and soft robotics.

  10. [Application of 3D soft print models of the kidney for treatment of patients with localized cancer of the kidney (a pilot study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyaev, Yu G; Sirota, E S; Bezrukov, E A; Fiev, D N; Bukatov, M D; Letunovskii, A V; Byadretdinov, I Sh

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the possibility of using 3D-printing in the management of patients with localized kidney cancer. The study comprised five patients with localized kidney cancer who were treated at the Urology Clinic of the I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University from January 2016 to April 2017. Along with the standard examination, the patients underwent multispiral computed tomography (MSCT) to produce patient-specific 3D-printed models of the kidney tumors using 3D modeling and 3D printing. To evaluate the effectiveness of using 3D-printed models, two-stage preoperative planning was conducted, and five surgeons were surveyed using a four-question multiple choice questionnaire. At the first stage, the planning of operations was carried out based on MSCT findings. At the second stage, the surgeons were given patient-specific soft 3D models of the kidney with a tumor for preoperative training. After preoperative training, patients underwent laparoscopic resection of the kidney with a tumor. According to the survey results, each of the participating surgeons at least once changed surgical plan based on data obtained with 3D printed models of the kidney with the tumor. The implementation of preoperative training using 3D printed models of the kidney turned out to be effective. All patients underwent laparoscopic surgery performed by a single surgeon with extensive experience in this type of surgery. The mean operative time was 187 minutes. All operations were performed with main renal artery occlusion. The men warm ischemia time was 19.5 minutes and the mean blood loss was 170 ml. There were no conversions to open surgery and organ-removing operations. There were no postoperative complications or deaths. All surgical margins were negative. Morphological examination showed that four patients had renal cell carcinoma one patient had the oncocytoma. The study demonstrated the promise of using 3D printing for preoperative planning and surgical performance due to a

  11. A woven 2D touchpad sensor and a 1D slide sensor using soft capacitor fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorgutsa, Stephan; Gu, Jian Feng; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2012-01-01

    Recently reported soft conductive-polymer-based capacitor fibers are used to build a fully woven 2D touchpad sensor and a 1D slide sensor. An individual capacitor fiber features a swiss-roll like structure having two dielectric and two conductive polymer films rolled together in a classic multilayer capacitor configuration. The soft fibers of sub-1 mm outer diameter are fabricated using a fiber drawing procedure from a macroscopic polymeric preform. An individual capacitor fiber is then demonstrated to act as a distributed sensor that allows the touch position to be determined by measuring the fiber’s AC response. In other words, a single fiber acts as a 1D slide sensor. Furthermore, we develop an electrical ladder network model to predict the distributed sensor properties of an individual fiber and show that this model describes the experimental measurements very well. Finally, a two-dimensional touchpad sensor is presented. The sensor is built by weaving a one-dimensional array of capacitor fibers in parallel to each other. The performance of the touchpad sensor is then characterized. (paper)

  12. Investigation of the C-3-epi-25(OH)D3 of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 in urban schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Samantha E; Van Rompay, Maria I; Gordon, Catherine M; Goodman, Elizabeth; Eliasziw, Misha; Holick, Michael F; Sacheck, Jennifer M

    2018-03-01

    The physiological relevance C-3 epimer of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (3-epi-25(OH)D) is not well understood among youth. The objective of this study was to assess whether demographic/physiologic characteristics were associated with 3-epi-25(OH)D 3 concentrations in youth. Associations between 3-epi-25(OH)D 3 and demographics and between 3-epi-25(OH)D 3 , total 25-hydroxyvitamin (25(OH)D) (25(OH)D 2 + 25(OH)D 3 ), total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides were examined in racially/ethnically diverse schoolchildren (n = 682; age, 8-15 years) at Boston-area urban schools. Approximately 50% of participants had detectable 3-epi-25(OH)D 3 (range 0.95-3.95 ng/mL). The percentage of 3-epi-25(OH)D 3 of total 25(OH)D ranged from 2.5% to 17.0% (median 5.5%). Males were 38% more likely than females to have detectable 3-epi-25(OH)D 3 concentrations. Both Asian and black race/ethnicity were associated with lower odds of having detectable 3-epi-25(OH)D 3 compared with non-Hispanic white children (Asian vs. white, odds ratio (OR) 0.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.14-0.53; black vs. white, OR 0.38, 95%CI 0.23-0.63, p 30 ng/mL) 25(OH)D concentration was associated with higher odds of having detectable 3-epi-25(OH)D 3 than having an inadequate (<20 ng/mL) concentration (OR 4.78, 95%CI 3.23-6.94 or OR 14.10, 95%CI 7.10-28.0, respectively). There was no association between 3-epi-25(OH)D 3 and blood lipids. However, when considering 3-epi-25(OH)D 3 as a percentage of total 25(OH)D, total cholesterol was lower in children with percent 3-epi-25(OH)D 3 above the median (mean difference -7.1 mg/dL, p = 0.01). In conclusion, among schoolchildren, sex, race/ethnicity, and total serum 25(OH)D concentration is differentially associated with 3-epi-25(OH)D. The physiological relevance of 3-epi-25(OH)D 3 may be related to the 3-epi-25(OH)D 3 as a percentage of total 25(OH)D and should be considered in future investigations.

  13. Measurement of the hyperfine structure of the 4d2D3/2,5/2 levels and isotope shifts of the 4p2P3/2->4d2D3/2 and 4p2P3/2->4d2D5/2 transitions in gallium 69 and 71

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehse, Steven J.; Fairbank, William M.; Lee, Siu Au

    2001-01-01

    The hyperfine structure of the 4d 2 D 3/2,5/2 levels of 69,71 Ga is determined. The 4p 2 P 3/2 ->4d 2 D 3/2 (294.50-nm) and 4p 2 P 3/2 ->4d 2 D 5/2 (294.45-nm) transitions are studied by laser-induced fluorescence in an atomic Ga beam. The hyperfine A constant measured for the 4d 2 D 5/2 level is 77.3±0.9 MHz for 69 Ga and 97.9± 0.7 MHz for 71 Ga (3σ errors). The A constant measured for the 4d 2 D 3/2 level is -36.3±2.2 MHz for 69 Ga and -46.2±3.8 MHz for 71 Ga. These measurements correct sign errors in the previous determination of these constants. For 69 Ga the hyperfine B constants measured for the 4d 2 D 5/2 and the 4d 2 D 3/2 levels are 5.3±4.1 MHz and 4.6±4.2 MHz, respectively. The isotope shift is determined to be 114±8 MHz for the 4p 2 P 3/2 ->4d 2 D 3/2 transition and 115±7 MHz for the 4p 2 P 3/2 ->4d 2 D 5/2 transition. The lines of 71 Ga are shifted to the blue. This is in agreement with previous measurement. [copyright] 2001 Optical Society of America

  14. 3D printing functional materials and devices (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAlpine, Michael C.

    2017-05-01

    The development of methods for interfacing high performance functional devices with biology could impact regenerative medicine, smart prosthetics, and human-machine interfaces. Indeed, the ability to three-dimensionally interweave biological and functional materials could enable the creation of devices possessing unique geometries, properties, and functionalities. Yet, most high quality functional materials are two dimensional, hard and brittle, and require high crystallization temperatures for maximal performance. These properties render the corresponding devices incompatible with biology, which is three-dimensional, soft, stretchable, and temperature sensitive. We overcome these dichotomies by: 1) using 3D printing and scanning for customized, interwoven, anatomically accurate device architectures; 2) employing nanotechnology as an enabling route for overcoming mechanical discrepancies while retaining high performance; and 3) 3D printing a range of soft and nanoscale materials to enable the integration of a diverse palette of high quality functional nanomaterials with biology. 3D printing is a multi-scale platform, allowing for the incorporation of functional nanoscale inks, the printing of microscale features, and ultimately the creation of macroscale devices. This three-dimensional blending of functional materials and `living' platforms may enable next-generation 3D printed devices.

  15. 3D-grafiikka ja pelimoottorit

    OpenAIRE

    Sillanpää, Otto

    2014-01-01

    Tässä opinnäytetyössä tutkitaan miten 3D-mallit saadaan sellaiseen muotoon, että ne olisivat käytettävissä eri pelimoottoreissa. Tutkimuksen tarkoituksena on selvittää, miten luodaan 3D-malleja pelimoottoreihin, sekä miten 3D-mallinnusohjelmat ja pelimoottorit eroavat toisistaan, kun käsitellään 3D-malleja. Tässä työssä pelimoottoreina toimivat Valven Source sekä Epic Gamesin Unreal Engine 3. 3D-mallinnusohjelmista käytössä olivat Autodeskin 3ds Max 2014 ja Blender Foundationin Blender 2.7...

  16. Dark matter and Bs→μ+μ- with minimal SO10 soft SUSY breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermisek, R.; Roszkowski, L.; Ruiz de Austri, R.; Raby, S.

    2003-01-01

    CMSSM boundary conditions are usually used when calculating cosmological dark matter densities. In this paper we calculate the cosmological density of dark matter in the MSSM using minimal SO 10 soft SUSY breaking boundary conditions. These boundary conditions incorporate several attractive features: they are consistent with SO 10 Yukawa unification, they result in a 'natural' inverted scalar mass hierarchy and they reduce the dimension 5 operator contribution to the proton decay rate. With regards to dark matter, on the other hand, this is to a large extent an unexplored territory with large squark and slepton masses m 16 , large A 0 and small {μ,M 1/2 }. We find that in most regions of parameter space the cosmological density of dark matter is considerably less than required by the data. However there is a well-defined, narrow region of parameter space which provides the observed relic density of dark matter, as well as a good fit to precision electroweak data, including top, bottom and tau masses, and acceptable bounds on the branching fraction of B s →μ + μ - . We present predictions for Higgs and SUSY spectra, the dark matter detection cross section and the branching ratio BR(B s →μ + μ - ) in this region of parameter space. (author)

  17. [D-Arg1,D-Phe5,D-Trp7,9,Leu11]substance P, a potent bombesin antagonist in murine Swiss 3T3 cells, inhibits the growth of human small cell lung cancer cells in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Woll, P J; Rozengurt, E

    1988-01-01

    In the search for a more potent bombesin antagonist, we found [D-Arg1,D-Phe5,D-Trp7,9,Leu11]substance P to be effective in mouse fibroblasts and to inhibit the growth of small cell lung cancer, a tumor that secretes bombesin-like peptides that may act as autocrine growth factors. In murine Swiss 3T3 cells, [D-Arg1,D-Phe5,D-Trp7,9,Leu11]substance P proved to be a bombesin antagonist as judged by the following criteria: (i) inhibition of DNA synthesis induced by gastrin-releasing peptide and ot...

  18. Paternity testing with VNTR DNA systems. I. Matching criteria and population frequencies of the VNTR systems D2S44, D5S43, D7S21, D7S22, and D12S11 in Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, N; Hansen, Hanna Elsebeth

    1993-01-01

    -systems D2S44 (YNH24), D5S43 (MS8), D7S21 (MS31), D7S22 (g3), and D12S11 (MS43a). The intra gel variability of 970 duplicate investigations on the same gel of DNA from 122 individuals showed no differences exceeding 1.25 mm between the positions of the corresponding DNA fragments. The comparison of 1...

  19. Paternity testing with VNTR DNA systems. II. Evaluation of 271 cases of disputed paternity with the VNTR systems D2S44, D5S43, D7S21, D7S22, and D12S11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hanna Elsebeth; Morling, N

    1993-01-01

    Paternity testing was carried out in 271 cases of disputed paternity using the 5 VNTR systems D2S44 (YNH24), D5S43 (MS8), D7S21 (MS31), D7S22 (g3), and D12S11 (MS43a), and 10-15 conventional marker systems including the HLA-A,B system. By means of the matching criteria for the VNTR systems...

  20. Case study: Beauty and the Beast 3D: benefits of 3D viewing for 2D to 3D conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handy Turner, Tara

    2010-02-01

    From the earliest stages of the Beauty and the Beast 3D conversion project, the advantages of accurate desk-side 3D viewing was evident. While designing and testing the 2D to 3D conversion process, the engineering team at Walt Disney Animation Studios proposed a 3D viewing configuration that not only allowed artists to "compose" stereoscopic 3D but also improved efficiency by allowing artists to instantly detect which image features were essential to the stereoscopic appeal of a shot and which features had minimal or even negative impact. At a time when few commercial 3D monitors were available and few software packages provided 3D desk-side output, the team designed their own prototype devices and collaborated with vendors to create a "3D composing" workstation. This paper outlines the display technologies explored, final choices made for Beauty and the Beast 3D, wish-lists for future development and a few rules of thumb for composing compelling 2D to 3D conversions.

  1. 2D-3D crossover effects on the vortex-glass phase transition in thin YBa2Cu3O7-δ films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woeltgens, P.J.M.; Dekker, C.; Koch, R.H.; Hussey, B.W.; Gupta, A.

    1994-01-01

    Nonlinear current-voltage characteristics have been measured for ultrathin (16-400 A) YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ films in high magnetic fields. A scaling analysis of these data reveals deviations from the universal vortex-glass critical scaling behavior observed for thick films. This is argued to be a dimensionality effect: At large currents, one probes length scales smaller than the film thickness, i.e., the three-dimensional (3d) vortex-glass behavior, whereas at low currents the vortex excitations involve typical length scales which exceed the film thickness, hence the 2d behavior is exhibited. Further evidence for this picture is found from the 3d vortex-glass correlation length, which appears to be cut off by the film thickness. (orig.)

  2. Agarose hydrogel induced MCF-7 and BMG-1 cell line progressive 3D and 3D revert cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniyan, Aishwarya; Ravi, Maddaly

    2018-04-01

    3D culture systems have enhanced the utility of cancer cell lines as they are considered closer to the in vivo systems. A variety of changes are induced in cells cultured in 3D systems; an apparent and striking feature being the spontaneous acquisition of distinct morphological entities. 3D reverts (3DRs) can be obtained by introducing 3D aggregates in scaffold/matrix-free culture units. It could be seen that the two cell lines used in this study exhibited differences in 3DR structures, though both were cultured on agarose hydrogels. Also, differences in 3DR formation, growth and survival were different. While 3D aggregates of several cell lines have been reported for a variety of studies, there are no studies that describe or utilize 3DRs. 3DRs can provide insights into complex events that can occur in cancer cells; especially as material to study metastasis, migration, and invasion. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Cation substitution studies in YBa2Cu3O7-d structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matacotta, F.C.; Segre, C.U.; Infante, C.; Ramos Arhuis, J.; Ma, B.; Ganguly, P.

    1990-04-01

    The suppression of superconductivity by the substitution of divalent cations such as Sr or Ca at Y and Ba sites in Y Ba 2 Cu 3 O 7-d and the substitution of Pr for La in LaCaBaCu 3 O 7-d has been examined by ac susceptibility and infra-red spectroscopy. The latter has been found to be particularly useful in obtaining information at the microscopic level regarding the influence of substitution at the planes and at the chains. The studies give support for the model of enhancement of superconductivity by charge fluctuations in the chains. the systematics of the changes in the electrical resistivity in La 1-x Pr x CaBaCu 3 O 7-d is examined in terms of the percolation models and the existence of a minimum sheet resistance for superconductivity. The role of the various substituents in stabilizing the structure and also in the mechanism for superconductivity is examined in terms of a model for the structure of the superconducting A m Cu n O y copper oxides on the basis of AX 3 close-packing and the uniaxial magnetic interaction model. (author). 12 refs, 6 figs

  4. 3D-CT angiography. Intracranial arterial lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asato, Mikio; Tong, X.Q.; Tamura, Shozo [Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan)] [and others

    1997-06-01

    Since its introduction, three dimensional CT angiography (3D-CTA) on spiral (helical) CT has played an important role in clinical imaging. Initially it was reported to be useful in depicting aortic abnormalities, afterwards the merit in detecting intracranial aneurysm by 3D-CTA was also described. We have investigated the usefullness of 3D-CTA in detecting patients of intracranial aneurysm as well as arterio-venous malformation (AVM), Moyamoya disease and stenosis of middle cerebral artery, meanwhile the MR angiography (MRA) and digital subtraction angiography (DSA) examination of these patients were also studied as comparison to the 3D-CTA results. The sensitivity and specificity on investigating intracranial aneurysm were similar with other reports so far. 3D-CTA was possible to identify the feeding artery, nidus and draining vein of AVM, although DSA showed higher detectability. Occlusion of internal carotid artery and post-operative anastomosis in Moyamoya disease were all demonstrated by 3D-CTA, however the Moyamoya collaterals were shown better on MRA. 3D-CTA revealed the site of stenosis of middle cerebral artery in all of our cases, but in general maximum intensity projection (MIP) images can provide more exact information about the degree of stenosis. Five years has passed since the emergence of spiral CT and utilizing of 3D-CTA in clinical applications. With the development of hard and soft ware in the near future, it is possible to delineate more small vessels by 3D-CTA. We predict that 3D-CTA would be widely used for detecting vasculature of the whole body, and may take the place of conventional angiography in many cases. (author)

  5. Peptide Hydrogelation and Cell Encapsulation for 3D Culture of MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiuzhi S.; Nguyen, Thu A.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture plays an invaluable role in tumor biology by providing in vivo like microenviroment and responses to therapeutic agents. Among many established 3D scaffolds, hydrogels demonstrate a distinct property as matrics for 3D cell culture. Most of the existing pre-gel solutions are limited under physiological conditions such as undesirable pH or temperature. Here, we report a peptide hydrogel that shows superior physiological properties as an in vitro matrix for 3D cell culture. The 3D matrix can be accomplished by mixing a self-assembling peptide directly with a cell culture medium without any pH or temperature adjustment. Results of dynamic rheological studies showed that this hydrogel can be delivered multiple times via pipetting without permanently destroying the hydrogel architecture, indicating the deformability and remodeling ability of the hydrogel. Human epithelial cancer cells, MCF-7, are encapsulated homogeneously in the hydrogel matrix during hydrogelation. Compared with two-dimensional (2D) monolayer culture, cells residing in the hydrogel matrix grow as tumor-like clusters in 3D formation. Relevant parameters related to cell morphology, survival, proliferation, and apoptosis were analyzed using MCF-7 cells in 3D hydrogels. Interestingly, treatment of cisplatin, an anti-cancer drug, can cause a significant decrease of cell viability of MCF-7 clusters in hydrogels. The responses to cisplatin were dose- and time-dependent, indicating the potential usage of hydrogels for drug testing. Results of confocal microscopy and Western blotting showed that cells isolated from hydrogels are suitable for downstream proteomic analysis. The results provided evidence that this peptide hydrogel is a promising 3D cell culture material for drug testing. PMID:23527204

  6. Development of adaptive bust for female soft body armour using three dimensional (3D) warp interlock fabrics: Three dimensional (3D) design process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abtew, M. A.; Bruniaux, P.; Boussu, F.

    2017-10-01

    The traditional two dimensional (2D) pattern making method for developing female body armour has a negative effect on the ballistic protective performance as well as the comfort of the wearer. This is due to, unlike the male body armour, the female body armour manufacturing involves different darts to accommodate the natural curvature of the female body, i.e. bust area, which will reveals the weak parts at the seam and stitch area while ballistic impact. Moreover, the proper bra size also plays an important role not only in bra design but also in the design of a women’s ballistic vest. The present research study tried to propose the novel 3D designing approach for developing different volumes of breast using feature points (both bust surface and outline points) in the specific 3D adaptive mannequin. Later the flattened 3D bra patterns of this method has been also compare with the 2D standard pattern making in order to modify and match with 2D traditional method. The result indicated that the proposed method which conceives the 3D patterns on the 3D bust is easier to implement and can generate patterns with satisfactory fit and comfort as compared to 2D patterns.

  7. RELAP5-3D User Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riemke, Richard Allan

    2002-09-01

    The Reactor Excursion and Leak Analysis Program with 3D capability1 (RELAP5-3D) is a reactor system analysis code that has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). The 3D capability in RELAP5-3D includes 3D hydrodynamics2 and 3D neutron kinetics3,4. Assessment, verification, and validation of the 3D capability in RELAP5-3D is discussed in the literature5,6,7,8,9,10. Additional assessment, verification, and validation of the 3D capability of RELAP5-3D will be presented in other papers in this users seminar. As with any software, user problems occur. User problems usually fall into the categories of input processing failure, code execution failure, restart/renodalization failure, unphysical result, and installation. This presentation will discuss some of the more generic user problems that have been reported on RELAP5-3D as well as their resolution.

  8. 3D-Printed Millimeter Wave Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-14

    demonstrates the resolution of the printer with a 10 micron nozzle. Figure 2: Measured loss tangent of SEBS and SBS samples. 3D - Printed Millimeter... 3D printing of styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) and styrene ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) is used to demonstrate the feasibility of 3D - printed ...Additionally, a dielectric lens is printed which improves the antenna gain of an open-ended WR-28 waveguide from 7 to 8.5 dBi. Keywords: 3D printing

  9. Air-structured optical fibre drawn from a 3D-printed preform

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Kevin; Canning, John; Leon-Saval, Sergio; Reid, Zane; Hossain, Md Arafat; Comatti, Jade-Edouard; Luo, Yanhua; Peng, Gang-Ding

    2016-01-01

    A structured optical fibre is drawn from a 3D-printed structured preform. Preforms containing a single ring of holes around the core are fabricated using filament made from a modified butadiene polymer. More broadly, 3D printers capable of processing soft glasses, silica and other materials are likely to come on line in the not-so distant future. 3D printing of optical preforms signals a new milestone in optical fibre manufacture.

  10. Embedded sensing: integrating sensors in 3-D printed structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Dijkshoorn

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Current additive manufacturing allows for the implementation of electrically interrogated 3-D printed sensors. In this contribution various technologies, sensing principles and applications are discussed. We will give both an overview of some of the sensors presented in literature as well as some of our own recent work on 3-D printed sensors. The 3-D printing methods discussed include fused deposition modelling (FDM, using multi-material printing and poly-jetting. Materials discussed are mainly thermoplastics and include thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU, both un-doped as well as doped with carbon black, polylactic acid (PLA and conductive inks. The sensors discussed are based on biopotential sensing, capacitive sensing and resistive sensing with applications in surface electromyography (sEMG and mechanical and tactile sensing. As these sensors are based on plastics they are in general flexible and therefore open new possibilities for sensing in soft structures, e.g. as used in soft robotics. At the same time they show many of the characteristics of plastics like hysteresis, drift and non-linearity. We will argue that 3-D printing of embedded sensors opens up exciting new possibilities but also that these sensors require us to rethink how to exploit non-ideal sensors.

  11. Quasi 3D dosimetry (EPID, conventional 2D/3D detector matrices)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bäck, A

    2015-01-01

    Patient specific pretreatment measurement for IMRT and VMAT QA should preferably give information with a high resolution in 3D. The ability to distinguish complex treatment plans, i.e. treatment plans with a difference between measured and calculated dose distributions that exceeds a specified tolerance, puts high demands on the dosimetry system used for the pretreatment measurements and the results of the measurement evaluation needs a clinical interpretation. There are a number of commercial dosimetry systems designed for pretreatment IMRT QA measurements. 2D arrays such as MapCHECK ® (Sun Nuclear), MatriXX Evolution (IBA Dosimetry) and OCTAVIOUS ® 1500 (PTW), 3D phantoms such as OCTAVIUS ® 4D (PTW), ArcCHECK ® (Sun Nuclear) and Delta 4 (ScandiDos) and software for EPID dosimetry and 3D reconstruction of the dose in the patient geometry such as EPIDose TM (Sun Nuclear) and Dosimetry Check TM (Math Resolutions) are available. None of those dosimetry systems can measure the 3D dose distribution with a high resolution (full 3D dose distribution). Those systems can be called quasi 3D dosimetry systems. To be able to estimate the delivered dose in full 3D the user is dependent on a calculation algorithm in the software of the dosimetry system. All the vendors of the dosimetry systems mentioned above provide calculation algorithms to reconstruct a full 3D dose in the patient geometry. This enables analyzes of the difference between measured and calculated dose distributions in DVHs of the structures of clinical interest which facilitates the clinical interpretation and is a promising tool to be used for pretreatment IMRT QA measurements. However, independent validation studies on the accuracy of those algorithms are scarce. Pretreatment IMRT QA using the quasi 3D dosimetry systems mentioned above rely on both measurement uncertainty and accuracy of calculation algorithms. In this article, these quasi 3D dosimetry systems and their use in patient specific

  12. 3D Bioprinting Human Chondrocytes with Nanocellulose-Alginate Bioink for Cartilage Tissue Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markstedt, Kajsa; Mantas, Athanasios; Tournier, Ivan; Martínez Ávila, Héctor; Hägg, Daniel; Gatenholm, Paul

    2015-05-11

    The introduction of 3D bioprinting is expected to revolutionize the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The 3D bioprinter is able to dispense materials while moving in X, Y, and Z directions, which enables the engineering of complex structures from the bottom up. In this study, a bioink that combines the outstanding shear thinning properties of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC) with the fast cross-linking ability of alginate was formulated for the 3D bioprinting of living soft tissue with cells. Printability was evaluated with concern to printer parameters and shape fidelity. The shear thinning behavior of the tested bioinks enabled printing of both 2D gridlike structures as well as 3D constructs. Furthermore, anatomically shaped cartilage structures, such as a human ear and sheep meniscus, were 3D printed using MRI and CT images as blueprints. Human chondrocytes bioprinted in the noncytotoxic, nanocellulose-based bioink exhibited a cell viability of 73% and 86% after 1 and 7 days of 3D culture, respectively. On the basis of these results, we can conclude that the nanocellulose-based bioink is a suitable hydrogel for 3D bioprinting with living cells. This study demonstrates the potential use of nanocellulose for 3D bioprinting of living tissues and organs.

  13. Comparison of 3D Echocardiogram-Derived 3D Printed Valve Models to Molded Models for Simulated Repair of Pediatric Atrioventricular Valves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Adam B; Nguyen, Alex V; Ilina, Anna; Lasso, Andras; Cripe, Linnea; Jegatheeswaran, Anusha; Silvestro, Elizabeth; McGowan, Francis X; Mascio, Christopher E; Fuller, Stephanie; Spray, Thomas L; Cohen, Meryl S; Fichtinger, Gabor; Jolley, Matthew A

    2018-03-01

    Mastering the technical skills required to perform pediatric cardiac valve surgery is challenging in part due to limited opportunity for practice. Transformation of 3D echocardiographic (echo) images of congenitally abnormal heart valves to realistic physical models could allow patient-specific simulation of surgical valve repair. We compared materials, processes, and costs for 3D printing and molding of patient-specific models for visualization and surgical simulation of congenitally abnormal heart valves. Pediatric atrioventricular valves (mitral, tricuspid, and common atrioventricular valve) were modeled from transthoracic 3D echo images using semi-automated methods implemented as custom modules in 3D Slicer. Valve models were then both 3D printed in soft materials and molded in silicone using 3D printed "negative" molds. Using pre-defined assessment criteria, valve models were evaluated by congenital cardiac surgeons to determine suitability for simulation. Surgeon assessment indicated that the molded valves had superior material properties for the purposes of simulation compared to directly printed valves (p 3D echo-derived molded valves are a step toward realistic simulation of complex valve repairs but require more time and labor to create than directly printed models. Patient-specific simulation of valve repair in children using such models may be useful for surgical training and simulation of complex congenital cases.

  14. 3D Spectroscopy in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediavilla, Evencio; Arribas, Santiago; Roth, Martin; Cepa-Nogué, Jordi; Sánchez, Francisco

    2011-09-01

    Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Introductory review and technical approaches Martin M. Roth; 2. Observational procedures and data reduction James E. H. Turner; 3. 3D Spectroscopy instrumentation M. A. Bershady; 4. Analysis of 3D data Pierre Ferruit; 5. Science motivation for IFS and galactic studies F. Eisenhauer; 6. Extragalactic studies and future IFS science Luis Colina; 7. Tutorials: how to handle 3D spectroscopy data Sebastian F. Sánchez, Begona García-Lorenzo and Arlette Pécontal-Rousset.

  15. The Plasmodium falciparum exported protein PF3D7_0402000 binds to erythrocyte ankyrin and band 4.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakya, Bikash; Penn, Wesley D.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Lacount, Douglas J.

    2017-09-01

    Plasmodium falciparum extensively modifies the infected red blood cell (RBC), resulting in changes in deformability, shape and surface properties. These alterations suggest that the RBC cytoskeleton is a major target for modification during infection. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to these changes are largely unknown. To begin to address this question, we screened for exported P. falciparum proteins that bound to the erythrocyte cytoskeleton proteins ankyrin 1 (ANK1) and band 4.1 (4.1R), which form critical interactions with other cytoskeletal proteins that contribute to the deformability and stability of RBCs. Yeast two-hybrid screens with ANK1 and 4.1R identified eight interactions with P. falciparum exported proteins, including an interaction between 4.1R and PF3D7_0402000 (PFD0090c). This interaction was first identified in a large-scale screen (Vignali et al., Malaria J, 7:211, 2008), which also reported an interaction between PF3D7_0402000 and ANK1. We confirmed the interactions of PF3D7_0402000 with 4.1R and ANK1 in pair-wise yeast two-hybrid and co-precipitation assays. In both cases, an intact PHIST domain in PF3D7_0402000 was required for binding. Complex purification followed by mass spectrometry analysis provided additional support for the interaction of PF3D7_0402000 with ANK1 and 4.1R. RBC ghost cells loaded with maltose-binding protein (MBP)-PF3D7_0402000 passed through a metal microsphere column less efficiently than mock- or MBP-loaded controls, consistent with an effect of PF3D7_0402000 on RBC rigidity or membrane stability. This study confirmed the interaction of PF3D7_0402000 with 4.1R in multiple independent assays, provided the first evidence that PF3D7_0402000 also binds to ANK1, and suggested that PF3D7_0402000 affects deformability or membrane stability of uninfected RBC ghosts.

  16. Refined 3d-3d correspondence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alday, Luis F.; Genolini, Pietro Benetti; Bullimore, Mathew; Loon, Mark van [Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Andrew Wiles Building,Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Woodstock Road, Oxford, OX2 6GG (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-28

    We explore aspects of the correspondence between Seifert 3-manifolds and 3d N=2 supersymmetric theories with a distinguished abelian flavour symmetry. We give a prescription for computing the squashed three-sphere partition functions of such 3d N=2 theories constructed from boundary conditions and interfaces in a 4d N=2{sup ∗} theory, mirroring the construction of Seifert manifold invariants via Dehn surgery. This is extended to include links in the Seifert manifold by the insertion of supersymmetric Wilson-’t Hooft loops in the 4d N=2{sup ∗} theory. In the presence of a mass parameter for the distinguished flavour symmetry, we recover aspects of refined Chern-Simons theory with complex gauge group, and in particular construct an analytic continuation of the S-matrix of refined Chern-Simons theory.

  17. The analysis of the 3d8, 3d74p and 3p53d9 configurations of Se IX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleef, T.A.M. van; Uylings, P.; Joshi, Y.N.; Podobedova, L.I.; Ryabtsev, A.N.

    1984-01-01

    The ninth spectrum of selenium (Se IX) was photographed in the region 100-140 A on a variety of grazing incidence spectrographs using a triggered spark or an open spark as sources. On the basis of these measurements all levels of the 3d 8 configuration, 11 out of 12 levels of the 3p 5 3d 9 configuration and 95 out of 110 levels of the 3d 7 4p configuration have been established. A strong configuration interaction exists between the two odd configurations. Least-squares-fit and Hartree-Fock parameter calculations support the analysis. Two hundred and twenty-five (225) lines have been classified in Se IX. (orig.)

  18. Tissue content of vitamin D3 and 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 in minipigs after cutaneous synthesis, supplementation and deprivation of vitamin D3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burild, Anders; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz; Poulsen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    storages of vitamin D3 two studies were carried out in Göttingen minipigs. In study 1 one group of minipigs (n=2) was daily exposed to UV light corresponding to 10–20min of midday sun and another group (n=2) of pigs were fed up to 60μg vitamin D3/day corresponding to 3.7–4.4μg/kg body weight.Study 1......-hydroxy vitamin D3 in serum and skin- and subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies were repeatedly monitored. Vitamin D3 and 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 were eliminated from the skin and the adipose tissue after UV-exposure was ceased. Supplementation of 13C-vitamin D3 did not seem to affect the decline...... demonstrated that daily UV-exposure of minipigs stimulated the cutaneous synthesis of vitamin D3 and resulted in increasing serum vitamin D3 and 25-hydroxy vitamin D3, but also carcasses containing vitamin D3 and 25-hydroxy vitamin D3. The vitamin D3 content in adipose tissue from the UV-exposed minipigs...

  19. Muon g - 2 through a flavor structure on soft SUSY terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flores-Baez, F.V.; Gomez Bock, M.; Mondragon, M.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we analyze the possibility to explain the muon anomalous magnetic moment discrepancy within theory and experiment through lepton-flavor violation processes. We propose a flavor extended MSSM by considering a hierarchical family structure for the trilinear scalar soft-supersymmetric terms of the Lagrangian, present at the SUSY breaking scale. We obtain analytical results for the rotation mass matrix, with the consequence of having non-universal slepton masses and the possibility of leptonic flavor mixing. The one-loop supersymmetric contributions to the leptonic flavor violating process τ → μγ are calculated in the physical basis, instead of using the well-known mass-insertion method. The flavor violating processes BR(l_i → l_jγ) are also obtained, in particular τ → μγ is well within the experimental bounds. We present the regions in parameter space where the muon g - 2 problem is either entirely solved or partially reduced through the contribution of these flavor violating processes. (orig.)

  20. Muon g - 2 through a flavor structure on soft SUSY terms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores-Baez, F.V. [Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, UANL Ciudad Universitaria, FCFM, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Gomez Bock, M. [Universidad de las Americas Puebla, UDLAP, Ex-Hacienda Sta. Catarina Martir, DAFM, Cholula, Puebla (Mexico); Mondragon, M. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Instituto de Fisica, Apdo. Postal 20-364, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2016-10-15

    In this work we analyze the possibility to explain the muon anomalous magnetic moment discrepancy within theory and experiment through lepton-flavor violation processes. We propose a flavor extended MSSM by considering a hierarchical family structure for the trilinear scalar soft-supersymmetric terms of the Lagrangian, present at the SUSY breaking scale. We obtain analytical results for the rotation mass matrix, with the consequence of having non-universal slepton masses and the possibility of leptonic flavor mixing. The one-loop supersymmetric contributions to the leptonic flavor violating process τ → μγ are calculated in the physical basis, instead of using the well-known mass-insertion method. The flavor violating processes BR(l{sub i} → l{sub j}γ) are also obtained, in particular τ → μγ is well within the experimental bounds. We present the regions in parameter space where the muon g - 2 problem is either entirely solved or partially reduced through the contribution of these flavor violating processes. (orig.)

  1. YouDash3D: exploring stereoscopic 3D gaming for 3D movie theaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, Jonas; Seele, Sven; Masuch, Maic

    2012-03-01

    Along with the success of the digitally revived stereoscopic cinema, events beyond 3D movies become attractive for movie theater operators, i.e. interactive 3D games. In this paper, we present a case that explores possible challenges and solutions for interactive 3D games to be played by a movie theater audience. We analyze the setting and showcase current issues related to lighting and interaction. Our second focus is to provide gameplay mechanics that make special use of stereoscopy, especially depth-based game design. Based on these results, we present YouDash3D, a game prototype that explores public stereoscopic gameplay in a reduced kiosk setup. It features live 3D HD video stream of a professional stereo camera rig rendered in a real-time game scene. We use the effect to place the stereoscopic effigies of players into the digital game. The game showcases how stereoscopic vision can provide for a novel depth-based game mechanic. Projected trigger zones and distributed clusters of the audience video allow for easy adaptation to larger audiences and 3D movie theater gaming.

  2. A microfluidic device for 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D cell navigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamloo, Amir; Amirifar, Leyla

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices have received wide attention and shown great potential in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Investigating cell response to various stimulations is much more accurate and comprehensive with the aid of microfluidic devices. In this study, we introduced a microfluidic device by which the matrix density as a mechanical property and the concentration profile of a biochemical factor as a chemical property could be altered. Our microfluidic device has a cell tank and a cell culture chamber to mimic both 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D migration of three types of cells. Fluid shear stress is negligible on the cells and a stable concentration gradient can be obtained by diffusion. The device was designed by a numerical simulation so that the uniformity of the concentration gradients throughout the cell culture chamber was obtained. Adult neural cells were cultured within this device and they showed different branching and axonal navigation phenotypes within varying nerve growth factor (NGF) concentration profiles. Neural stem cells were also cultured within varying collagen matrix densities while exposed to NGF concentrations and they experienced 3D to 3D collective migration. By generating vascular endothelial growth factor concentration gradients, adult human dermal microvascular endothelial cells also migrated in a 2D to 3D manner and formed a stable lumen within a specific collagen matrix density. It was observed that a minimum absolute concentration and concentration gradient were required to stimulate migration of all types of the cells. This device has the advantage of changing multiple parameters simultaneously and is expected to have wide applicability in cell studies. (paper)

  3. Non-universal SUSY breaking, hierarchy and squark degeneracty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Hitoshi.

    1995-01-01

    I discuss non-trivial effects in the soft SUSY breaking terms which appear when one integrates out heavy fields. The effects exist only when the SUSY breaking terms are non-universal. They may spoil (1) the hierarchy between the weak and high-energy scales, or (2) degeneracy among the squark masses even in the presense of a horizontal symmetry. I argue, in the end, that such new effects may be useful in probing physics at high-energy scales from TeV-scale experiments

  4. C-terminal region of MAP7 domain containing protein 3 (MAP7D3 promotes microtubule polymerization by binding at the C-terminal tail of tubulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj Yadav

    Full Text Available MAP7 domain containing protein 3 (MAP7D3, a newly identified microtubule associated protein, has been shown to promote microtubule assembly and stability. Its microtubule binding region has been reported to consist of two coiled coil motifs located at the N-terminus. It possesses a MAP7 domain near the C-terminus and belongs to the microtubule associated protein 7 (MAP7 family. The MAP7 domain of MAP7 protein has been shown to bind to kinesin-1; however, the role of MAP7 domain in MAP7D3 remains unknown. Based on the bioinformatics analysis of MAP7D3, we hypothesized that the MAP7 domain of MAP7D3 may have microtubule binding activity. Indeed, we found that MAP7 domain of MAP7D3 bound to microtubules as well as enhanced the assembly of microtubules in vitro. Interestingly, a longer fragment MDCT that contained the MAP7 domain (MD with the C-terminal tail (CT of the protein promoted microtubule polymerization to a greater extent than MD and CT individually. MDCT stabilized microtubules against dilution induced disassembly. MDCT bound to reconstituted microtubules with an apparent dissociation constant of 3.0 ± 0.5 µM. An immunostaining experiment showed that MDCT localized along the length of the preassembled microtubules. Competition experiments with tau indicated that MDCT shares its binding site on microtubules with tau. Further, we present evidence indicating that MDCT binds to the C-terminal tail of tubulin. In addition, MDCT could bind to tubulin in HeLa cell extract. Here, we report a microtubule binding region in the C-terminal region of MAP7D3 that may have a role in regulating microtubule assembly dynamics.

  5. Sub-Millimeter T2 Weighted fMRI at 7 T: Comparison of 3D-GRASE and 2D SE-EPI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin G. Kemper

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI allows studying human brain function non-invasively up to the spatial resolution of cortical columns and layers. Most fMRI acquisitions rely on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD contrast employing T2* weighted 2D multi-slice echo-planar imaging (EPI. At ultra-high magnetic field (i.e. 7 T and above, it has been shown experimentally and by simulation, that T2 weighted acquisitions yield a signal that is spatially more specific to the site of neuronal activity at the cost of functional sensitivity. This study compared two T2 weighted imaging sequences, inner-volume 3D Gradient-and-Spin-Echo (3D-GRASE and 2D Spin-Echo EPI (SE-EPI, with evaluation of their imaging point-spread function, functional specificity, and functional sensitivity at sub-millimeter resolution. Simulations and measurements of the imaging point-spread function revealed that the strongest anisotropic blurring in 3D-GRASE (along the second phase-encoding direction was about 60 % higher than the strongest anisotropic blurring in 2D SE-EPI (along the phase-encoding direction In a visual paradigm, the BOLD sensitivity of 3D-GRASE was found to be superior due to its higher temporal signal-to-noise ratio. High resolution cortical depth profiles suggested that the contrast mechanisms are similar between the two sequences, however, 2D SE-EPI had a higher surface bias owing to the higher T2* contribution of the longer in-plane EPI echo-train for full field of view compared to the reduced field of view of zoomed 3D-GRASE.

  6. Acute D2/D3 dopaminergic agonism but chronic D2/D3 antagonism prevents NMDA antagonist neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, Nuri B; Nemmers, Brian; Noguchi, Kevin K

    2006-09-15

    Antagonists of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor, most likely by producing disinhibtion in complex circuits, acutely produce psychosis and cognitive disturbances in humans, and neurotoxicity in rodents. Studies examining NMDA Receptor Hypofunction (NRHypo) neurotoxicity in animals, therefore, may provide insights into the pathophysiology of psychotic disorders. Dopaminergic D2 and/or D3 agents can modify psychosis over days to weeks, suggesting involvement of these transmitter system(s). We studied the ability of D2/D3 agonists and antagonists to modify NRHypo neurotoxicity both after a one-time acute exposure and after chronic daily exposure. Here we report that D2/D3 dopamine agonists, probably via D3 receptors, prevent NRHypo neurotoxicity when given acutely. The protective effect with D2/D3 agonists is not seen after chronic daily dosing. In contrast, the antipsychotic haloperidol does not affect NRHypo neurotoxicity when given acutely at D2/D3 doses. However, after chronic daily dosing of 1, 3, or 5 weeks, haloperidol does prevent NRHypo neurotoxicity with longer durations producing greater protection. Understanding the changes that occur in the NRHypo circuit after chronic exposure to dopaminergic agents could provide important clues into the pathophysiology of psychotic disorders.

  7. Viscoplastic Matrix Materials for Embedded 3D Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosskopf, Abigail K; Truby, Ryan L; Kim, Hyoungsoo; Perazzo, Antonio; Lewis, Jennifer A; Stone, Howard A

    2018-03-16

    Embedded three-dimensional (EMB3D) printing is an emerging technique that enables free-form fabrication of complex architectures. In this approach, a nozzle is translated omnidirectionally within a soft matrix that surrounds and supports the patterned material. To optimize print fidelity, we have investigated the effects of matrix viscoplasticity on the EMB3D printing process. Specifically, we determine how matrix composition, print path and speed, and nozzle diameter affect the yielded region within the matrix. By characterizing the velocity and strain fields and analyzing the dimensions of the yielded regions, we determine that scaling relationships based on the Oldroyd number, Od, exist between these dimensions and the rheological properties of the matrix materials and printing parameters. Finally, we use EMB3D printing to create complex architectures within an elastomeric silicone matrix. Our methods and findings will both facilitate future characterization of viscoplastic matrices and motivate the development of new materials for EMB3D printing.

  8. Metastable SUSY breaking, de Sitter moduli stabilisation and Kaehler moduli inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krippendorf, Sven; Quevedo, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    We study the influence of anomalous U(1) symmetries and their associated D-terms on the vacuum structure of global field theories once they are coupled to N = 1 supergravity and in the context of string compactifications with moduli stabilisation. In particular, we focus on a IIB string motivated construction of the ISS scenario and examine the influence of one additional U(1) symmetry on the vacuum structure. We point out that in the simplest one-Kaehler modulus compactification, the original ISS vacuum gets generically destabilised by a runaway behaviour of the potential in the modulus direction. In more general compactifications with several Kaehler moduli, we find a novel realisation of the LARGE volume scenario with D-term uplifting to de Sitter space and both D-term and F-term supersymmetry breaking. The structure of soft supersymmetry breaking terms is determined in the preferred scenario where the standard model cycle is not stabilised non-perturbatively and found to be flavour universal. Our scenario also provides a purely supersymmetric realisation of Kaehler moduli (blow-up and fibre) inflation, with similar observational properties as the original proposals but without the need to include an extra (non-SUSY) uplifting term.

  9. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  10. Synthesis of 6-O-(5-acetamido-3,5-dideoxy-α-D-glycero-D-galacto-2-nonulopyranosylonic acid)-D-galactose [6-O-(N-acetyl-α-D-neuraminyl)-D-galactose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Vleugel, D.J.M. van der; Wassenburg, F.R.; Zwikker, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    Condensation of methyl 5-acetamido-4,7,8,9-tetra-O-acetyl-2-chloro-2,3,5-trideoxy-beta-D-glycero-D-galacto-2-nonulopyranosonate with benzyl 2,3,4-tri-O-benzyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside, using silver salicylate as promoter, gave benzyl 2,3,4-tri-O-benzyl-6-O-(methyl

  11. From 2D to 3D turbulence through 2D3C configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzicotti, Michele; Biferale, Luca; Linkmann, Moritz

    2017-11-01

    We study analytically and numerically the geometry of the nonlinear interactions and the resulting energy transfer directions of 2D3C flows. Through a set of suitably designed Direct Numerical Simulations we also study the coupling between several 2D3C flows, where we explore the transition between 2D and fully 3D turbulence. In particular, we find that the coupling of three 2D3C flows on mutually orthogonal planes subject to small-scale forcing leads to a stationary 3D out-of-equilibrium dynamics at the energy containing scales where the inverse cascade is directly balanced by a forward cascade carried by a different subsets of interactions. ERC AdG Grant No 339032 NewTURB.

  12. A general 3-D nonlinear magnetostrictive constitutive model for soft ferromagnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Haomiao; Zhou Youhe; Zheng Xiaojing; Ye Qiang; Wei Jing

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a new general nonlinear magnetostrictive constitutive model is proposed for soft ferromagnetic materials, and it can predict magnetostrictive strain and magnetization curves under various pre-stresses. From the viewpoint of magnetic domain, it is based on the important physical fact that a nonlinear part of the elastic strain produced by magnetic domain wall motion under a pre-stress is responsible for the change of the maximum magnetostrictive strain in accordance with the pre-stress. Then the reduction of magnetostrictive strain from the maximum is caused by the domain rotation. Meanwhile, the magnetization under various pre-stresses in this model is introduced by magnetostrictive effect under the same pre-stress. A simplified 3-D model is put forward by means of linearizing the nonlinear function, i.e. the nonlinear part of the elastic strain produced by domain wall motion, and by using the quartic of magnetization to describe domain rotation. Besides, for the convenience of engineering applications, two-dimensional (plate or film) and one-dimensional (rod) models are also given for isotropic materials and their application ranges are discussed too. In comparison with the experimental data of Kuruzar and Jiles, it is found that this model can predict magnetostrictive strain and magnetization curves under various pre-stresses. The numerical simulation further illustrates that the new model can effectively describe the effects of the pre-stress or residual stress on the magnetization and magnetostrictive strain curves. Additionally, this model can be degenerated to the existing magnetostrictive constitutive model for giant magnetostrictive materials (GMM), i.e. a special soft ferromagnetic material

  13. 3D-Printed Models of Cleft Lip and Palate for Surgical Training and Patient Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Pang-Yun; Hallac, Rami R; Shih, Ellen; Trieu, Jenny; Penumatcha, Anjani; Das, Priyanka; Meyer, Clark A; Seaward, James R; Kane, Alex A

    2018-03-01

    Sculpted physical models and castings of the anatomy of cleft lip and palate are used for parent, patient, and trainee education of cleft lip and palate conditions. In this study, we designed a suite of digital 3-dimensional (3D) models of cleft lip and palate anatomy with additive manufacturing techniques for patient education. CT scans of subjects with isolated cleft palate, unilateral and bilateral cleft lip and palate, and a control were obtained. Soft tissue and bony structures were segmented and reconstructed into digital 3D models. The oral soft tissues overlying the cleft palate were manually molded with silicone putty and scanned using CT to create digital 3D models. These were then combined with the original model to integrate with segmentable soft tissues. Bone and soft tissues were 3D printed in different materials to mimic the rigidity/softness of the relevant anatomy. These models were presented to the parents/patients at our craniofacial clinic. Visual analog scale (VAS) surveys were obtained pertaining to the particular use of the models, to ascertain their value in parental education. A total of 30 parents of children with cleft conditions completed VAS evaluations. The models provided the parents with a better understanding of their child's condition with an overall evaluation score of 9.35 ± 0.5. We introduce a suite of 3D-printed models of cleft conditions that has a useful role in patient, parental, and allied health education with highly positive feedback.

  14. 3D-mallien muokkaus 3D-tulostamista varten CAD-ohjelmilla

    OpenAIRE

    Lehtimäki, Jarmo

    2013-01-01

    Insinöörityössäni käsitellään 3D-mallien tulostamista ja erityisesti 3D-mallien mallintamista niin, että kappaleiden valmistaminen 3D-tulostimella onnistuisi mahdollisimman hyvin. Työ tehtiin Prohoc Oy:lle, joka sijaitsee Vaasassa. 3D-tulostuspalveluun tuli jatkuvasti 3D-malleja, joiden tulostuksessa oli ongelmia. Työssäni tutkin näiden ongelmien syntyä ja tein ohjeita eri 3D-mallinnusohjelmille, joiden tarkoituksena on auttaa tekemään helpommin tulostettavia 3D-malleja. Työhön kuului myös et...

  15. Environmental Dependence of Artifact CD Peaks of Chiral Schiff Base 3d-4f Complexes in Soft Mater PMMA Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Okamoto

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Four chiral Schiff base binuclear 3d-4f complexes (NdNi, NdCu, GdNi, and GdCu have been prepared and characterized by means of electronic and CD spectra, IR spectra, magnetic measurements, and X-ray crystallography (NdNi. A so-called artifact peak of solid state CD spectra, which was characteristic of oriented molecules without free molecular rotation, appeared at about 470 nm. Magnetic data of the complexes in the solid state (powder and in PMMA cast films or solutions indicated that only GdCu preserved molecular structures in various matrixes of soft maters. For the first time, we have used the changes of intensity of artifact CD peaks to detect properties of environmental (media solid state (KBr pellets, PMMA cast films, concentration dependence of PMMA in acetone solutions, and pure acetone solution for chiral 3d-4f complexes (GdCu. Rigid matrix keeping anisotropic orientation exhibited a decrease in the intensity of the artifact CD peak toward negative values. The present results suggest that solid state artifact CD peaks can be affected by environmental viscosity of a soft mater matrix.

  16. 3D Bioprinting of Heterogeneous Aortic Valve Conduits with Alginate/Gelatin Hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Bin; Hockaday, Laura A.; Kang, Kevin H.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Heart valve disease is a serious and growing public health problem for which prosthetic replacement is most commonly indicated. Current prosthetic devices are inadequate for younger adults and growing children. Tissue engineered living aortic valve conduits have potential for remodeling, regeneration, and growth, but fabricating natural anatomical complexity with cellular heterogeneity remain challenging. In the current study, we implement 3D bioprinting to fabricate living alginate/gelatin hydrogel valve conduits with anatomical architecture and direct incorporation of dual cell types in a regionally constrained manner. Encapsulated aortic root sinus smooth muscle cells (SMC) and aortic valve leaflet interstitial cells (VIC) were viable within alginate/gelatin hydrogel discs over 7 days in culture. Acellular 3D printed hydrogels exhibited reduced modulus, ultimate strength, and peak strain reducing slightly over 7-day culture, while the tensile biomechanics of cell-laden hydrogels were maintained. Aortic valve conduits were successfully bioprinted with direct encapsulation of SMC in the valve root and VIC in the leaflets. Both cell types were viable (81.4±3.4% for SMC and 83.2±4.0% for VIC) within 3D printed tissues. Encapsulated SMC expressed elevated alpha-smooth muscle actin when printed in stiff matrix, while VIC expressed elevated vimentin in soft matrix. These results demonstrate that anatomically complex, heterogeneously encapsulated aortic valve hydrogel conduits can be fabricated with 3D bioprinting. PMID:23015540

  17. 3D imaging, 3D printing and 3D virtual planning in endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Pratik; Chong, B S

    2018-03-01

    The adoption and adaptation of recent advances in digital technology, such as three-dimensional (3D) printed objects and haptic simulators, in dentistry have influenced teaching and/or management of cases involving implant, craniofacial, maxillofacial, orthognathic and periodontal treatments. 3D printed models and guides may help operators plan and tackle complicated non-surgical and surgical endodontic treatment and may aid skill acquisition. Haptic simulators may assist in the development of competency in endodontic procedures through the acquisition of psycho-motor skills. This review explores and discusses the potential applications of 3D printed models and guides, and haptic simulators in the teaching and management of endodontic procedures. An understanding of the pertinent technology related to the production of 3D printed objects and the operation of haptic simulators are also presented.

  18. 3D printing of normal and pathologic tricuspid valves from transthoracic 3D echocardiography data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraru, Denisa; Veronesi, Federico; Maddalozzo, Anna; Dequal, Daniele; Frajhof, Leonardo; Rabischoffsky, Arnaldo; Iliceto, Sabino; Badano, Luigi P

    2017-07-01

    To explore the feasibility of using transthoracic 3D echocardiography (3DTTE) data to generate 3D patient-specific models of tricuspid valve (TV). Multi-beat 3D data sets of the TV (32 vol/s) were acquired in five subjects with various TV morphologies from the apical approach and analysed offline with custom-made software. Coordinates representing the annulus and the leaflets were imported into MeshLab (Visual Computing Lab ISTICNR) to develop solid models to be converted to stereolithographic file format and 3D print. Measurements of the TV annulus antero-posterior (AP) and medio-lateral (ML) diameters, perimeter (P), and TV tenting height (H) and volume (V) obtained from the 3D echo data set were compared with those performed on the 3D models using a caliper, a syringe and a millimeter tape. Antero-posterior (4.2 ± 0.2 cm vs. 4.2 ± 0 cm), ML (3.7 ± 0.2 cm vs. 3.6 ± 0.1 cm), P (12.6 ± 0.2 cm vs. 12.7 ± 0.1 cm), H (11.2 ± 2.1 mm vs. 10.8 ± 2.1 mm) and V (3.0 ± 0.6 ml vs. 2.8 ± 1.4 ml) were similar (P = NS for all) when measured on the 3D data set and the printed model. The two sets of measurements were highly correlated (r = 0.991). The mean absolute error (2D - 3D) for AP, ML, P and tenting H was 0.7 ± 0.3 mm, indicating accuracy of the 3D model of printing of the TV from 3DTTE data is feasible with highly conserved fidelity. This technique has the potential for rapid integration into clinical practice to assist with decision-making, surgical planning, and teaching. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. 3-D extension C5G7 MOX benchmark calculation using threedant code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H.Ch.; Han, Ch.Y.; Kim, J.K.; Na, B.Ch.

    2005-01-01

    It pursued the benchmark on deterministic 3-D MOX fuel assembly transport calculations without spatial homogenization (C5G7 MOX Benchmark Extension). The goal of this benchmark is to provide a more through test results for the abilities of current available 3-D methods to handle the spatial heterogeneities of reactor core. The benchmark requires solutions in the form of normalized pin powers as well as the eigenvalue for each of the control rod configurations; without rod, with A rods, and with B rods. In this work, the DANTSYS code package was applied to analyze the 3-D Extension C5G7 MOX Benchmark problems. The THREEDANT code within the DANTSYS code package, which solves the 3-D transport equation in x-y-z, and r-z-theta geometries, was employed to perform the benchmark calculations. To analyze the benchmark with the THREEDANT code, proper spatial and angular approximations were made. Several calculations were performed to investigate the effects of the different spatial approximations on the accuracy. The results from these sensitivity studies were analyzed and discussed. From the results, it is found that the 4*4 grid per pin cell is sufficiently refined so that very little benefit is obtained by increasing the mesh size. (authors)

  20. 3D MR cisternography to identify distal dural rings. Comparison of 3D-CISS and 3D-SPACE sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Makidono, Akari; Nakamura, Miho; Saida, Yukihisa

    2011-01-01

    The distal dural ring (DDR) is an anatomical landmark used to distinguish intra- and extradural aneurysms. We investigated identification of the DDR using 2 three-dimensional (3D) magnetic resonance (MR) cisternography sequences-3D constructive interference in steady state (CISS) and 3D sampling perfection with application optimized contrasts using different flip angle evolutions (SPACE)-at 3.0 tesla. Ten healthy adult volunteers underwent imaging with 3D-CISS, 3D-SPACE, and time-of-flight (TOF) MR angiography (TOF-MRA) sequences at 3.0T. We analyzed DDR identification and internal carotid artery (ICA) signal intensity and classified the shape of the carotid cave. We identified the DDR using both 3D-SPACE and 3D-CISS, with no significant difference between the sequences. Visualization of the outline of the ICA in the cavernous sinus (CS) was significantly clearer with 3D-SPACE than 3D-CISS. In the CS and petrous portions, signal intensity was lower with 3D-SPACE, and the flow void was poor with 3D-CISS in some subjects. We identified the DDR with both 3D-SPACE and 3D-CISS, but the superior contrast of the ICA in the CS using 3D-SPACE suggests the superiority of this sequence for evaluating the DDR. (author)

  1. D=3 unification of curious supergravities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duff, M.J. [Theoretical Physics, Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London,London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Mathematical Institute University of Oxford, Andrew Wiles Building,Woodstock Road, Radcliffe Observatory Quarter, Oxford, OX2 6GG (United Kingdom); Ferrara, S. [Theoretical Physics Department, CERN,CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); INFN - Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati,Via Enrico Fermi 40, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Department of Physics and Astronomy andMani L. Bhaumik Institute for Theoretical Physics, UCLA,Los Angeles CA 90095-1547 (United States); Marrani, A. [Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche “Enrico Fermi”,Via Panisperna 89A, I-00184, Roma (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia “Galileo Galilei”,Università di Padova and INFN, Sez. di Padova,Via Marzolo 8, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Theoretical Physics Department, CERN,CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland)

    2017-01-09

    We consider the dimensional reduction to D=3 of four maximal-rank supergravities which preserve minimal supersymmetry in D=11, 7, 5 and 4. Such “curious” theories were investigated some time ago, and the four-dimensional one corresponds to an N=1 supergravity with 7 chiral multiplets spanning the seven-disk manifold. Recently, this latter theory provided cosmological models for α-attractors, which are based on the disk geometry with possible restrictions on the parameter α. A unified picture emerges in D=3, where the Ehlers group of General Relativity merges with the S-, T- and U- dualities of the D=4 parent theories.

  2. D = 3 Unification of Curious Supergravities

    CERN Document Server

    Duff, M.J.; Marrani, A.

    2017-01-09

    We consider the dimensional reduction to D = 3 of four maximal-rank supergravities which preserve minimal supersymmetry in D = 11, 7, 5 and 4. Such "curious" theories were investigated some time ago, and the four-dimensional one corresponds to an N = 1 supergravity with 7 chiral multiplets spanning the seven-disk manifold. Recently, this latter theory was considered to provide cosmological models for alpha-attractors, which are based on the disk geometry with possible restrictions on the parameter alpha. A unified picture emerges in D = 3, where the Ehlers group of General Relativity merges with the S-, T- and U- dualities of the D = 4 parent theories.

  3. Preliminary comparison of the registration effect of 4D-CBCT and 3D-CBCT in image-guided radiotherapy of Stage IA non–small-cell lung cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Zhibo; Liu, Chuanyao; Zhou, Ying; Shen, Weixi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we compared the registration effectiveness of 4D cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and 3D-CBCT for image-guided radiotherapy in 20 Stage IA non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Patients underwent 4D-CBCT and 3D-CBCT immediately before radiotherapy, and the X-ray Volume Imaging software system was used for image registration. We performed automatic bone registration and soft tissue registration between 4D-CBCT or 3D-CBCT and 4D-CT images; the regions of inter...

  4. 3D video

    CERN Document Server

    Lucas, Laurent; Loscos, Céline

    2013-01-01

    While 3D vision has existed for many years, the use of 3D cameras and video-based modeling by the film industry has induced an explosion of interest for 3D acquisition technology, 3D content and 3D displays. As such, 3D video has become one of the new technology trends of this century.The chapters in this book cover a large spectrum of areas connected to 3D video, which are presented both theoretically and technologically, while taking into account both physiological and perceptual aspects. Stepping away from traditional 3D vision, the authors, all currently involved in these areas, provide th

  5. Effect of 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 on 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25-(OH)2D3] metabolism in vitamin D-deficient rats infused with 1,25-(OH)2D3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamato, H.; Matsumoto, T.; Fukumoto, S.; Ikeda, K.; Ishizuka, S.; Ogata, E.

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies revealed that administration of 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [24,25-(OH)2D3] to calcium (Ca)-deficient rats causes a dose-dependent reduction in markedly elevated serum 1,25-(OH)2D3 level. Although the results suggested that the metabolism of 1,25-(OH)2D3 was accelerated by 24,25-(OH)2D3, those experiments could not define whether the enhanced metabolism of 1,25-(OH)2D3 played a role in the reduction in the serum 1,25-(OH)2D3 level. In the present study, in order to address this issue more specifically, serum 1,25-(OH)2D3 was maintained solely by exogenous administration through miniosmotic pumps of 1,25-(OH)2D3 into vitamin D-deficient rats. Thus, by measuring the serum 1,25-(OH)2D3 concentration, the effect of 24,25-(OH)2D3 on the MCR of 1,25-(OH)2D3 could be examined. Administration of 24,25-(OH)2D3 caused a dose-dependent enhancement in the MCR of 1,25-(OH)2D3, and 1 microgram/100 g rat.day 24,25-(OH)2D3, which elevated serum 24,25-(OH)2D3 to 8.6 +/- 1.3 ng/ml, significantly increased MCR and suppressed serum levels of 1,25-(OH)2D3. The effect of 24,25-(OH)2D3 on 1,25-(OH)2D3 metabolism developed with a rapid time course, and the recovery of iv injected [1 beta-3H]1,25-(OH)2D3 in blood was significantly reduced within 1 h. In addition, there was an increase in radioactivity in the water-soluble fraction of serum as well as in urine, suggesting that 1,25-(OH)2D3 is rapidly degraded to a water-soluble metabolite(s). Furthermore, the reduction in serum 1,25-(OH)2D3 was associated with a reduction in both serum and urinary Ca levels. Because the conversion of [3H]24,25-(OH)2D3 to [3H]1,24,25-(OH)2D3 or other metabolites was minimal in these rats, 24,25-(OH)2D3 appears to act without being converted into other metabolites. These results demonstrate that 24,25-(OH)2D3 rapidly stimulates the metabolism of 1,25-(OH)2D3 and reduces its serum level

  6. Cassandra - D7.3.4 - M24 status report dissemination results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klievink, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    This deliverable is a status report on the dissemination activities and results in the CASSANDRA project. These status reports are made regularly, with two more to come. Together, these make up deliverable D7.3 – Dissemination results. In this fifth report, the results of the dissemination

  7. The fine-tuning cost of the likelihood in SUSY models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghilencea, D.M.; Ross, G.G.

    2013-01-01

    In SUSY models, the fine-tuning of the electroweak (EW) scale with respect to their parameters γ i ={m 0 ,m 1/2 ,μ 0 ,A 0 ,B 0 ,…} and the maximal likelihood L to fit the experimental data are usually regarded as two different problems. We show that, if one regards the EW minimum conditions as constraints that fix the EW scale, this commonly held view is not correct and that the likelihood contains all the information about fine-tuning. In this case we show that the corrected likelihood is equal to the ratio L/Δ of the usual likelihood L and the traditional fine-tuning measure Δ of the EW scale. A similar result is obtained for the integrated likelihood over the set {γ i }, that can be written as a surface integral of the ratio L/Δ, with the surface in γ i space determined by the EW minimum constraints. As a result, a large likelihood actually demands a large ratio L/Δ or equivalently, a small χ new 2 =χ old 2 +2lnΔ. This shows the fine-tuning cost to the likelihood (χ new 2 ) of the EW scale stability enforced by SUSY, that is ignored in data fits. A good χ new 2 /d.o.f.≈1 thus demands SUSY models have a fine-tuning amount Δ≪exp(d.o.f./2), which provides a model-independent criterion for acceptable fine-tuning. If this criterion is not met, one can thus rule out SUSY models without a further χ 2 /d.o.f. analysis. Numerical methods to fit the data can easily be adapted to account for this effect.

  8. Computer assisted determination of acetabular cup orientation using 2D-3D image registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Guoyan; Zhang, Xuan

    2010-01-01

    2D-3D image-based registration methods have been developed to measure acetabular cup orientation after total hip arthroplasty (THA). These methods require registration of both the prosthesis and the CT images to 2D radiographs and compute implant position with respect to a reference. The application of these methods is limited in clinical practice due to two limitations: (1) the requirement of a computer-aided design (CAD) model of the prosthesis, which may be unavailable due to the proprietary concerns of the manufacturer, and (2) the requirement of either multiple radiographs or radiograph-specific calibration, usually unavailable for retrospective studies. In this paper, we propose a new method to address these limitations. A new formulation for determination of post-operative cup orientation, which couples a radiographic measurement with 2D-3D image matching, was developed. In our formulation, the radiographic measurement can be obtained with known methods so that the challenge lies in the 2D-3D image matching. To solve this problem, a hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme combining a landmark-to-ray 2D-3D alignment with a robust intensity-based 2D-3D registration was used. The hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme allows computing both the post-operative cup orientation with respect to an anatomical reference and the pelvic tilt and rotation with respect to the X-ray imaging table/plate. The method was validated using 2D adult cadaver hips. Using the hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme, our method showed a mean accuracy of 1.0 ± 0.7 (range from 0.1 to 2.0 ) for inclination and 1.7 ± 1.2 (range from 0.0 to 3.9 ) for anteversion, taking the measurements from post-operative CT images as ground truths. Our new solution formulation and the hybrid 2D-3D registration scheme facilitate estimation of post-operative cup orientation and measurement of pelvic tilt and rotation. (orig.)

  9. The supersymmetric flavour problem in 5D GUTs and its consequences for LHC phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruemmer, F.; Fichet, S.; Kraml, S.

    2011-09-01

    We study supersymmetric models with a GUT-sized extra dimension, where both the Higgs fields and the SUSY breaking hidden sector are localized on a 4D brane. Exponential wave function profiles of the matter fields give rise to hierarchical structures in the Yukawa couplings and soft terms. Such structures can naturally explain hierarchical fermion masses and mixings, while at the same time alleviating the supersymmetric flavour problem. We discuss two sources of supersymmetry breaking, radion mediation and brane fields, and perform a detailed numerical analysis, thoroughly taking into account the proliferation of unknown O(1) coefficients that occurs in this class of models. It turns out that additional assumptions on supersymmetry breaking are necessary to evade the stringent experimental bounds on lepton flavour violation. The favourable regions of parameter space are then examined with regards to their LHC phenomenology. They generically feature heavy gluinos and squarks beyond current bounds. Lepton flavour violation in SUSY cascade decays can give interesting signatures. (orig.)

  10. The supersymmetric flavour problem in 5D GUTs and its consequences for LHC phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, F. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Fichet, S.; Kraml, S. [CNRS/IN2P3, Grenoble (France). Lab. de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie

    2011-09-15

    We study supersymmetric models with a GUT-sized extra dimension, where both the Higgs fields and the SUSY breaking hidden sector are localized on a 4D brane. Exponential wave function profiles of the matter fields give rise to hierarchical structures in the Yukawa couplings and soft terms. Such structures can naturally explain hierarchical fermion masses and mixings, while at the same time alleviating the supersymmetric flavour problem. We discuss two sources of supersymmetry breaking, radion mediation and brane fields, and perform a detailed numerical analysis, thoroughly taking into account the proliferation of unknown O(1) coefficients that occurs in this class of models. It turns out that additional assumptions on supersymmetry breaking are necessary to evade the stringent experimental bounds on lepton flavour violation. The favourable regions of parameter space are then examined with regards to their LHC phenomenology. They generically feature heavy gluinos and squarks beyond current bounds. Lepton flavour violation in SUSY cascade decays can give interesting signatures. (orig.)

  11. 3D Printing and 3D Bioprinting in Pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayavenkataraman, Sanjairaj; Fuh, Jerry Y H; Lu, Wen Feng

    2017-07-13

    Additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is a technology that builds three-dimensional structures and components layer by layer. Bioprinting is the use of 3D printing technology to fabricate tissue constructs for regenerative medicine from cell-laden bio-inks. 3D printing and bioprinting have huge potential in revolutionizing the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This paper reviews the application of 3D printing and bioprinting in the field of pediatrics.

  12. 3D Printing and 3D Bioprinting in Pediatrics

    OpenAIRE

    Vijayavenkataraman, Sanjairaj; Fuh, Jerry Y H; Lu, Wen Feng

    2017-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, commonly referred to as 3D printing, is a technology that builds three-dimensional structures and components layer by layer. Bioprinting is the use of 3D printing technology to fabricate tissue constructs for regenerative medicine from cell-laden bio-inks. 3D printing and bioprinting have huge potential in revolutionizing the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. This paper reviews the application of 3D printing and bioprinting in the field of pediatrics.

  13. Depiction of the cranial nerves around the cavernous sinus by 3D reversed FISP with diffusion weighted imaging (3D PSIF-DWI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishida, Go; Oishi, Makoto; Jinguji, Shinya; Yoneoka, Yuichiro; Fujii, Yukihiko; Sato, Mitsuya

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the anatomy of cranial nerves running in and around the cavernous sinus, we employed three-dimensional reversed fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) with diffusion weighted imaging (3D PSIF-DWI) on 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) system. After determining the proper parameters to obtain sufficient resolution of 3D PSIF-DWI, we collected imaging data of 20-side cavernous regions in 10 normal subjects. 3D PSIF-DWI provided high contrast between the cranial nerves and other soft tissues, fluid, and blood in all subjects. We also created volume-rendered images of 3D PSIF-DWI and anatomically evaluated the reliability of visualizing optic, oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal, and abducens nerves on 3D PSIF-DWI. All 20 sets of cranial nerves were visualized and 12 trochlear nerves and 6 abducens nerves were partially identified. We also presented preliminary clinical experiences in two cases with pituitary adenomas. The anatomical relationship between the tumor and cranial nerves running in and around the cavernous sinus could be three-dimensionally comprehended by 3D PSIF-DWI and the volume-rendered images. In conclusion, 3D PSIF-DWI has great potential to provide high resolution 'cranial nerve imaging', which visualizes the whole length of the cranial nerves including the parts in the blood flow as in the cavernous sinus region. (author)

  14. [Depiction of the cranial nerves around the cavernous sinus by 3D reversed FISP with diffusion weighted imaging (3D PSIF-DWI)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Go; Oishi, Makoto; Jinguji, Shinya; Yoneoka, Yuichiro; Sato, Mitsuya; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2011-10-01

    To evaluate the anatomy of cranial nerves running in and around the cavernous sinus, we employed three-dimensional reversed fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP) with diffusion weighted imaging (3D PSIF-DWI) on 3-T magnetic resonance (MR) system. After determining the proper parameters to obtain sufficient resolution of 3D PSIF-DWI, we collected imaging data of 20-side cavernous regions in 10 normal subjects. 3D PSIF-DWI provided high contrast between the cranial nerves and other soft tissues, fluid, and blood in all subjects. We also created volume-rendered images of 3D PSIF-DWI and anatomically evaluated the reliability of visualizing optic, oculomotor, trochlear, trigeminal, and abducens nerves on 3D PSIF-DWI. All 20 sets of cranial nerves were visualized and 12 trochlear nerves and 6 abducens nerves were partially identified. We also presented preliminary clinical experiences in two cases with pituitary adenomas. The anatomical relationship between the tumor and cranial nerves running in and around the cavernous sinus could be three-dimensionally comprehended by 3D PSIF-DWI and the volume-rendered images. In conclusion, 3D PSIF-DWI has great potential to provide high resolution "cranial nerve imaging", which visualizes the whole length of the cranial nerves including the parts in the blood flow as in the cavernous sinus region.

  15. Comparison of modern 3D and 2D MR imaging sequences of the wrist at 3 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehnitz, C.; Klaan, B.; Amarteifio, E.; Kauczor, H.U.; Weber, M.A.; Stillfried, F. von; Burkholder, I.

    2016-01-01

    To compare the image quality of modern 3 D and 2 D sequences for dedicated wrist imaging at 3 Tesla (T) MRI. At 3 T MRI, 18 patients (mean age: 36.2 years) with wrist pain and 16 healthy volunteers (mean age: 26.4 years) were examined using 2 D proton density-weighted fat-saturated (PDfs), isotropic 3 D TrueFISP, 3 D MEDIC, and 3 D PDfs SPACE sequences. Image quality was rated on a five-point scale (0 - 4) including overall image quality (OIQ), visibility of important structures (cartilage, ligaments, TFCC) and degree of artifacts. Signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) of cartilage/bone/muscle/fluid as well as the mean overall SNR/CNR were calculated using region-of-interest analysis. ANOVA, paired t-, and Wilcoxon-signed-rank tests were applied. The image quality of all tested sequences was superior to 3 D PDfs SPACE (p < 0.01). 3 D TrueFISP had the highest combined cartilage score (mean: 3.4) and performed better in cartilage comparisons against 3 D PDfs SPACE in both groups and 2 D PDfs in volunteers (p < 0.05). 3 D MEDIC performed better in 7 of 8 comparisons (p < 0.05) regarding ligaments and TFCC. 2 D PDfs provided constantly high scores. The mean overall SNR/CNR for 2 D PDfs, 3 D PDfs SPACE, 3 D TrueFISP, and 3 D MEDIC were 68/65, 32/27, 45/47, and 57/45, respectively. 2 D PDfs performed best in most SNR/CNR comparisons (p < 0.05) and 3 D MEDIC performed best within the 3 D sequences (p < 0.05). Except 3 D PDfs SPACE, all tested 3 D and 2 D sequences provided high image quality. 3 D TrueFISP was best for cartilage imaging, 3 D MEDIC for ligaments and TFCC and 2 D PDfs for general wrist imaging.

  16. Plasma and milk concentrations of vitamin D3 and 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 following intravenous injection of vitamin D3 or 25-hydroxy vitamin D3.

    OpenAIRE

    Hidiroglou, M; Knipfel, J E

    1984-01-01

    Plasma levels of vitamin D3 or 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 in ewes after administration of a single massive intravenous dose of vitamin D3 (2 X 10(6) IU) or 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 (5 mg) were determined at zero, one, two, three, five, ten and 20 days postinjection. In six ewes injected with vitamin D3 conversion of vitamin D3 to 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 resulted in a six-fold increase in the plasma 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 level within one day. Elevated levels were maintained until day 10 but by day 20 a s...

  17. 3D game environments create professional 3D game worlds

    CERN Document Server

    Ahearn, Luke

    2008-01-01

    The ultimate resource to help you create triple-A quality art for a variety of game worlds; 3D Game Environments offers detailed tutorials on creating 3D models, applying 2D art to 3D models, and clear concise advice on issues of efficiency and optimization for a 3D game engine. Using Photoshop and 3ds Max as his primary tools, Luke Ahearn explains how to create realistic textures from photo source and uses a variety of techniques to portray dynamic and believable game worlds.From a modern city to a steamy jungle, learn about the planning and technological considerations for 3D modelin

  18. Cd3(MoO4)(TeO3)2: A Polar 3D Compound Containing d10-d0 SCALP-Effect Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuquan; Fan, Huitao; Zhong, Zhiguo; Wang, Hongwei; Qiu, Dongfang

    2016-11-21

    The new polar 3D cadmium molybdotellurite Cd 3 (MoO 4 )(TeO 3 ) 2 was obtained by means of a high-temperature solid-state method. Cd 3 (MoO 4 )(TeO 3 ) 2 is a monoclinic crystal system, and it exhibits the polar space group P2 1 (No. 4). The structure of Cd 3 (MoO 4 )(TeO 3 ) 2 can be viewed as a complicated 3D architecture that is composed of distorted CdO n (n = 6, 7) polyhedra, TeO 3 trigonal pyramids, and MoO 4 polyhedra. The compound features the first 3D NCS cadmium molybdotellurite with 1D 4- and 6-MR channels and a polar structure originating from the TeO 3 groups, MoO 4 groups, and displacements of d 10 Cd 2+ cations. The results were further confirmed by calculations of the net polarization. The UV-vis spectrum and thermal properties indicate that Cd 3 (MoO 4 )(TeO 3 ) 2 exhibits a broad transparent region and excellent thermal stability. SHG tests of Cd 3 (MoO 4 )(TeO 3 ) 2 revealed that its response is approximately the same as that of KH 2 PO 4 at the same grain size between 105 and 150 μm and that it is phase-matchable.

  19. Non Invasive 3D Characterization of Materials at Multi scale Resolution in Correlative and 4D microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, S.H.

    2011-01-01

    We describe a suite of novel lab-based X-ray computed tomography (CT) systems for high contrast 3D characterization of hard to soft materials with resolution across length scales. The system has similar resolution and contrast range obtained from x-ray micro and nano tomography systems in synchrotron radiation facilities, except it makes use of conventional lab sources. Samples with dimensions from several cm to several microns may be imaged non invasively at varying resolution from tens of microns to 20 nm voxel. The novel multi scale CT helps bridge the resolution, scaling and 3D visualization gap in the traditional destructive 2D imaging modalities such as optical microscopes, AFM, SEM, SEM-FIB and TEM. It provides a direct non-invasive volumetric imaging technique at the macro to nano scale, making it ideal for accurate prediction and modeling of whole systems and components. For example, using 3D visualization, segmentation and computational analysis tools, pore networks, FEA, fluid, thermal and ionic transport in various systems and materials from ceramics, geo materials, composites, metals, and coatings may be characterized and modeled. The high resolution and unique phase contrast features of the novel CTs also lend themselves very well to characterize inherently low contrast soft materials such as polymers; membranes and biological tissue or to differentiate small differences in material and mineral phases in geo material and composites. Tomography of samples may be acquired at different volume vs resolution using local tomography technique, often without sample destruction. In the emerging field of 3D correlative microscopy, these larger CT volumetric data sets can be correlated at the different length scales with conventional 2D imaging modalities. For example, after a CT scan, specimen may undergo destructive sample sectioning at specific region of interest, to obtain the corresponding 2D slices with SEM and TEM or with X-ray microanalysis derive its

  20. 3D composite image, 3D MRI, 3D SPECT, hydrocephalus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mito, T.; Shibata, I.; Sugo, N.; Takano, M.; Takahashi, H.

    2002-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D)SPECT imaging technique we have studied and published for the past several years is an analytical tool that permits visual expression of the cerebral circulation profile in various cerebral diseases. The greatest drawback of SPECT is that the limitation on precision of spacial resolution makes intracranial localization impossible. In 3D SPECT imaging, intracranial volume and morphology may vary with the threshold established. To solve this problem, we have produced complimentarily combined SPECT and helical-CT 3D images by means of general-purpose visualization software for intracranial localization. In hydrocephalus, however, the key subject to be studied is the profile of cerebral circulation around the ventricles of the brain. This suggests that, for displaying the cerebral ventricles in three dimensions, CT is a difficult technique whereas MRI is more useful. For this reason, we attempted to establish the profile of cerebral circulation around the cerebral ventricles by the production of combined 3D images of SPECT and MRI. In patients who had shunt surgery for hydrocephalus, a difference between pre- and postoperative cerebral circulation profiles was assessed by a voxel distribution curve, 3D SPECT images, and combined 3D SPECT and MRI images. As the shunt system in this study, an Orbis-Sigma valve of the automatic cerebrospinal fluid volume adjustment type was used in place of the variable pressure type Medos valve currently in use, because this device requires frequent changes in pressure and a change in pressure may be detected after MRI procedure. The SPECT apparatus used was PRISM3000 of the three-detector type, and 123I-IMP was used as the radionuclide in a dose of 222 MBq. MRI data were collected with an MAGNEXa+2 with a magnetic flux density of 0.5 tesla under the following conditions: field echo; TR 50 msec; TE, 10 msec; flip, 30ueK; 1 NEX; FOV, 23 cm; 1-mm slices; and gapless. 3D images are produced on the workstation TITAN

  1. A 3d-3d appetizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pei, Du; Ye, Ke [Walter Burke Institute for Theoretical Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 91125 (United States)

    2016-11-02

    We test the 3d-3d correspondence for theories that are labeled by Lens spaces. We find a full agreement between the index of the 3d N=2 “Lens space theory” T[L(p,1)] and the partition function of complex Chern-Simons theory on L(p,1). In particular, for p=1, we show how the familiar S{sup 3} partition function of Chern-Simons theory arises from the index of a free theory. For large p, we find that the index of T[L(p,1)] becomes a constant independent of p. In addition, we study T[L(p,1)] on the squashed three-sphere S{sub b}{sup 3}. This enables us to see clearly, at the level of partition function, to what extent G{sub ℂ} complex Chern-Simons theory can be thought of as two copies of Chern-Simons theory with compact gauge group G.

  2. The 4p-5d, 6d and 4p-6s, 7s transitions of Mo IX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatoon, S.; Chaghtai, M.S.Z.; Rahimullah, K.

    1979-01-01

    The transitions 4p-5d, 6d and 4p-6s, 7s have been studied for the first time in Mo IX. The authors have identified 42 4p-5d, 36 4p-6d, 22 4p-6s and 22 4p-7s transitions, establishing 16 4p 3 5d, 14 4p 3 6d and all the ten 4p 3 6s, 7s levels of the spectrum concerned. The ionization energy is estimated to be (1 323 700 +- 700)cm -1 or (164.11 +- 0.09)eV. The spectrum was recorded in sliding and open spark discharges with a 5 m grazing incidence spectrograph of Lund University (Sweden) from about 40 A to 440 A. (Auth.)

  3. 3D Space Shift from CityGML LoD3-Based Multiple Building Elements to a 3D Volumetric Object

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Ying

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast with photorealistic visualizations, urban landscape applications, and building information system (BIM, 3D volumetric presentations highlight specific calculations and applications of 3D building elements for 3D city planning and 3D cadastres. Knowing the precise volumetric quantities and the 3D boundary locations of 3D building spaces is a vital index which must remain constant during data processing because the values are related to space occupation, tenure, taxes, and valuation. To meet these requirements, this paper presents a five-step algorithm for performing a 3D building space shift. This algorithm is used to convert multiple building elements into a single 3D volumetric building object while maintaining the precise volume of the 3D space and without changing the 3D locations or displacing the building boundaries. As examples, this study used input data and building elements based on City Geography Markup Language (CityGML LoD3 models. This paper presents a method for 3D urban space and 3D property management with the goal of constructing a 3D volumetric object for an integral building using CityGML objects, by fusing the geometries of various building elements. The resulting objects possess true 3D geometry that can be represented by solid geometry and saved to a CityGML file for effective use in 3D urban planning and 3D cadastres.

  4. Formation of heavy d-electron quasiparticles in Sr3Ru2O7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, M P; Tamai, A; Rozbicki, E; King, P D C; Meevasana, W; Perry, R S; Mercure, J F; Mackenzie, A P; Fischer, M H; Wang, M A; Lee, Jinho; Kim, E-A; Lawler, M J; Shen, K M; Voss, J; Fennie, C J; Thirupathaiah, S; Rienks, E; Fink, J; Tennant, D A

    2013-01-01

    The phase diagram of Sr 3 Ru 2 O 7 shows hallmarks of strong electron correlations despite the modest Coulomb interaction in the Ru 4d shell. We use angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy measurements to provide microscopic insight into the formation of the strongly renormalized heavy d-electron liquid that controls the physics of Sr 3 Ru 2 O 7 . Our data reveal itinerant Ru 4d-states confined over large parts of the Brillouin zone to an energy range of <6 meV, nearly three orders of magnitude lower than the bare band width. We show that this energy scale agrees quantitatively with a characteristic thermodynamic energy scale associated with quantum criticality and illustrate how it arises from a combination of back-folding due to a structural distortion and the hybridization of light and strongly renormalized, heavy quasiparticle bands. The resulting heavy Fermi liquid has a marked k-dependence of the renormalization which we relate to orbital mixing along individual Fermi surface sheets. (paper)

  5. Cassandra - D7.3.5 - M30 status : Report dissemination results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klievink, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    This deliverable is a status report on the dissemination activities and results in the CASSANDRA project. These status reports are made regularly, with one more to come at the project’s finish. Together, these make up deliverable D7.3 – Dissemination results. In this report, the results of the

  6. 3D Printed Photoresponsive Devices Based on Shape Memory Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Leow, Wan Ru; Wang, Ting; Wang, Juan; Yu, Jiancan; He, Ke; Qi, Dianpeng; Wan, Changjin; Chen, Xiaodong

    2017-09-01

    Compared with traditional stimuli-responsive devices with simple planar or tubular geometries, 3D printed stimuli-responsive devices not only intimately meet the requirement of complicated shapes at macrolevel but also satisfy various conformation changes triggered by external stimuli at the microscopic scale. However, their development is limited by the lack of 3D printing functional materials. This paper demonstrates the 3D printing of photoresponsive shape memory devices through combining fused deposition modeling printing technology and photoresponsive shape memory composites based on shape memory polymers and carbon black with high photothermal conversion efficiency. External illumination triggers the shape recovery of 3D printed devices from the temporary shape to the original shape. The effect of materials thickness and light density on the shape memory behavior of 3D printed devices is quantified and calculated. Remarkably, sunlight also triggers the shape memory behavior of these 3D printed devices. This facile printing strategy would provide tremendous opportunities for the design and fabrication of biomimetic smart devices and soft robotics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. RAG-3D: a search tool for RNA 3D substructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahran, Mai; Sevim Bayrak, Cigdem; Elmetwaly, Shereef; Schlick, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    To address many challenges in RNA structure/function prediction, the characterization of RNA's modular architectural units is required. Using the RNA-As-Graphs (RAG) database, we have previously explored the existence of secondary structure (2D) submotifs within larger RNA structures. Here we present RAG-3D—a dataset of RNA tertiary (3D) structures and substructures plus a web-based search tool—designed to exploit graph representations of RNAs for the goal of searching for similar 3D structural fragments. The objects in RAG-3D consist of 3D structures translated into 3D graphs, cataloged based on the connectivity between their secondary structure elements. Each graph is additionally described in terms of its subgraph building blocks. The RAG-3D search tool then compares a query RNA 3D structure to those in the database to obtain structurally similar structures and substructures. This comparison reveals conserved 3D RNA features and thus may suggest functional connections. Though RNA search programs based on similarity in sequence, 2D, and/or 3D structural elements are available, our graph-based search tool may be advantageous for illuminating similarities that are not obvious; using motifs rather than sequence space also reduces search times considerably. Ultimately, such substructuring could be useful for RNA 3D structure prediction, structure/function inference and inverse folding. PMID:26304547

  8. Modeling real conditions of 'Ukrytie' object in 3D measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podbereznyj, S.S.

    2001-01-01

    The article covers a technology of creation on soft products basis for designing: AutoCad, and computer graphics and animation 3D Studio, 3DS MAX, of 3D model of geometrical parameters of current conditions of building structures, technological equipment, fuel-containing materials, concrete, water of ruined Unit 4, 'Ukryttia' object, of Chernobyl NPP. The model built using the above technology will be applied in the future as a basis when automating the design and computer modeling of processes at the 'Ukryttia' object

  9. 2D to 3D conversion implemented in different hardware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Diaz, Eduardo; Gonzalez-Huitron, Victor; Ponomaryov, Volodymyr I.; Hernandez-Fragoso, Araceli

    2015-02-01

    Conversion of available 2D data for release in 3D content is a hot topic for providers and for success of the 3D applications, in general. It naturally completely relies on virtual view synthesis of a second view given by original 2D video. Disparity map (DM) estimation is a central task in 3D generation but still follows a very difficult problem for rendering novel images precisely. There exist different approaches in DM reconstruction, among them manually and semiautomatic methods that can produce high quality DMs but they demonstrate hard time consuming and are computationally expensive. In this paper, several hardware implementations of designed frameworks for an automatic 3D color video generation based on 2D real video sequence are proposed. The novel framework includes simultaneous processing of stereo pairs using the following blocks: CIE L*a*b* color space conversions, stereo matching via pyramidal scheme, color segmentation by k-means on an a*b* color plane, and adaptive post-filtering, DM estimation using stereo matching between left and right images (or neighboring frames in a video), adaptive post-filtering, and finally, the anaglyph 3D scene generation. Novel technique has been implemented on DSP TMS320DM648, Matlab's Simulink module over a PC with Windows 7, and using graphic card (NVIDIA Quadro K2000) demonstrating that the proposed approach can be applied in real-time processing mode. The time values needed, mean Similarity Structural Index Measure (SSIM) and Bad Matching Pixels (B) values for different hardware implementations (GPU, Single CPU, and DSP) are exposed in this paper.

  10. 2D-Driven 3D Object Detection in RGB-D Images

    KAUST Repository

    Lahoud, Jean; Ghanem, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a technique that places 3D bounding boxes around objects in an RGB-D scene. Our approach makes best use of the 2D information to quickly reduce the search space in 3D, benefiting from state-of-the-art 2D object detection

  11. An HTS-compatible 3D colony formation assay to identify tumor-specific chemotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horman, Shane R; To, Jeremy; Orth, Anthony P

    2013-12-01

    There has been increasing interest in the development of cellular behavior models that take advantage of three-dimensional (3D) cell culture. To enable assessment of differential perturbagen impacts on cell growth in 2D and 3D, we have miniaturized and adapted for high-throughput screening (HTS) the soft agar colony formation assay, employing a laser-scanning cytometer to image and quantify multiple cell types simultaneously. The assay is HTS compatible, providing high-quality, image-based, replicable data for multiple, co-cultured cell types. As proof of concept, we subjected colorectal carcinoma colonies in 3D soft agar to a mini screen of 1528 natural product compounds. Hit compounds from the primary screen were rescreened in an HTS 3D co-culture matrix containing colon stromal cells and cancer cells. By combining tumor cells and normal, nontransformed colon epithelial cells in one primary screening assay, we were able to obtain differential IC50 data, thereby distinguishing tumor-specific compounds from general cytotoxic compounds. Moreover, we were able to identify compounds that antagonized tumor colony formation in 3D only, highlighting the importance of this assay in identifying agents that interfere with 3D tumor structural growth. This screening platform provides a fast, simple, and robust method for identification of tumor-specific agents in a biologically relevant microenvironment.

  12. 3-D portal image analysis in clinical practice: an evaluation of 2-D and 3-D analysis techniques as applied to 30 prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remeijer, Peter; Geerlof, Erik; Ploeger, Lennert; Gilhuijs, Kenneth; Herk, Marcel van; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the clinical importance and feasibility of a 3-D portal image analysis method in comparison with a standard 2-D portal image analysis method for pelvic irradiation techniques. Methods and Materials: In this study, images of 30 patients who were treated for prostate cancer were used. A total of 837 imaged fields were analyzed by a single technologist, using automatic 2-D and 3-D techniques independently. Standard deviations (SDs) of the random, systematic, and overall variations, and the overall mean were calculated for the resulting data sets (2-D and 3-D), in the three principal directions (left-right [L-R], cranial-caudal [C-C], anterior-posterior [A-P]). The 3-D analysis included rotations as well. For the translational differences between the three data sets, the overall SD and overall mean were computed. The influence of out-of-plane rotations on the 2-D registration accuracy was determined by analyzing the difference between the 2-D and 3-D translation data as function of rotations. To assess the reliability of the 2-D and 3-D methods, the number of times the automatic match was manually adjusted was counted. Finally, an estimate of the workload was made. Results: The SDs of the random and systematic components of the rotations around the three orthogonal axes were 1.1 (L-R), 0.6 (C-C), 0.5 (A-P) and 0.9 (L-R), 0.6 (C-C), 0.8 (A-P) degrees, respectively. The overall mean rotation around the L-R axis was 0.7 deg., which deviated significantly from zero. Translational setup errors were comparable for 2-D and 3-D analysis (ranging from 1.4 to 2.2 mm SD and from 1.5 to 2.5 mm SD, respectively). The variation of the difference between the 2-D and 3-D translation data increased from 1.1 mm (SD) for zero rotations to 2.7 mm (SD) for out-of-plane rotations of 3 deg., due to a reduced 2-D registration accuracy for large rotations. The number of times the analysis was not considered acceptable and was manually adjusted was 44% for the 2-D

  13. Searches for supersymmetry and Higgs particles with D-Zero

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondai, N.K.

    1996-11-01

    We report on searches for the Supersymmetric and the neutral scalar particles with the D null detector at √s = 1.8 TeV. The three searches that we report here are: (1) SUGRA motivated SUSY search, (2) search for Charginos and neutralinos, and (3) search for heavy neutral scalar particle produced in association with W bosons

  14. Applicability of 3D-CT facial reconstruction for forensic individual identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Sara dos Santos [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Odontologia Forense; Ramos, Dalton Luiz de Paula [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. of Odontologia Social; Cavalcanti, Marcelo de Gusmao Paraiso [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia

    2003-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is used in several clinical dentistry applications even by axial slices and two and three-dimensional reconstructed images (2D-CT and 3D-CT). The purpose of the current study is to assess the precision of linear measurements made in 3D-CT using cranio metric patterns for individual identification in Forensic Dentistry. Five cadaver heads were submitted to a spiral computed tomography using axial slices, and 3D-CT reconstructions were obtained by volume rendering technique with computer graphics tools. Ten (10) cranio metric measurements were determined in 3D-CT images by two examiners independently, twice each, and the standard error of intra- and inter-examiner measurements was assessed. The results demonstrated a low standard error of those measurements, from 0.85% to 3.09%. In conclusion, the linear measurements obtained in osseous and soft tissue structures were considered to be precise in 3D-CT with high imaging quality and resolution. (author)

  15. Applicability of 3D-CT facial reconstruction for forensic individual identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Sara dos Santos; Ramos, Dalton Luiz de Paula; Cavalcanti, Marcelo de Gusmao Paraiso

    2003-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) is used in several clinical dentistry applications even by axial slices and two and three-dimensional reconstructed images (2D-CT and 3D-CT). The purpose of the current study is to assess the precision of linear measurements made in 3D-CT using cranio metric patterns for individual identification in Forensic Dentistry. Five cadaver heads were submitted to a spiral computed tomography using axial slices, and 3D-CT reconstructions were obtained by volume rendering technique with computer graphics tools. Ten (10) cranio metric measurements were determined in 3D-CT images by two examiners independently, twice each, and the standard error of intra- and inter-examiner measurements was assessed. The results demonstrated a low standard error of those measurements, from 0.85% to 3.09%. In conclusion, the linear measurements obtained in osseous and soft tissue structures were considered to be precise in 3D-CT with high imaging quality and resolution. (author)

  16. Susy seesaw inflation and NMSO(10)GUT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aulakh, Charanjit S.

    2013-01-01

    We show that Supersymmetric models with Type I seesaw neutrino masses support slow roll inflection point inflation. The inflaton is the D-flat direction labelled by the chiral invariant HLN composed of the Higgs(H), slepton(L) and conjugate sneutrino(N) superfields. The scale of inflation and fine tuning is set by the conjugate neutrino Majorana mass M ν c ∼ 10 6 - 10 12 GeV. The cubic term in the (quartic) inflaton potential is dominantly from superpotential (not soft Susy breaking) couplings. The tuning conditions are thus insensitive to soft supersymmetry breaking parameters and are generically much less stringent than for previous 'A-term' inflation scenarios controlled by mass scales ∼TeV. WMAP limits on the ratio of tensor to scalar perturbations limit the scale M controlling inflection point inflation: M 13 GeV. 'Instant preheating' is operative and dumps the inflaton energy into MSSM modes giving a high reheat temperature: T rh ≈M ν c (3/4) 10 6 GeV ∼ 10 11 - 10 15 GeV. A large gravitino mass > 50 TeV is therefore required to avoid over closure by reheat produced gravitinos. 'Instant preheating' and NLH inflaton facilitate production of right handed neutrinos during inflaton decay and thus non-thermal leptogenesis in addition to thermal leptogenesis. We show that the embedding in the fully realistic New Minimal Supersymmetric SO(10) GUT requires use of the heaviest righthanded neutrino mass as the controlling scale but the possibility of a measurable tensor scalar perturbation ratio seems marginal. We examine the parametric difficulties remaining.

  17. Short alleles revealed by PCR demonstrate no heterozygote deficiency at minisatellite loci D1S7, D7S21, and D12S11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, S.; Castro, A.; Fernandez-Fernandez, I.; Pancorbo, M.M. de [Universidad del Pais Vasco, Vizcaya (Spain)

    1997-02-01

    Short VNTR alleles that go undetected after conventional Southern blot hybridization may constitute an alternative explanation for the heterozygosity deficiency observed at some minisatellite loci. To examine this hypothesis, we have employed a screening procedure based on PCR amplification of those individuals classified as homozygotes in our databases for the loci D1S7, D7S21, and D12S11. The results obtained indicate that the frequency of these short alleles is related to the heterozygosity deficiency observed. For the most polymorphic locus, D1S7, {approximately}60% of those individuals previously classified as homozygotes were in fact heterozygotes for a short allele. After the inclusion of these new alleles, the agreement between observed and expected heterozygosity, along with other statistical tests employed, provide additional evidence for lack of population substructuring. Comparisons of allele frequency distributions reveal greater differences between racial groups than between closely related populations. 45 refs., 3 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. Variational 3D-PIV with sparse descriptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasinger, Katrin; Vogel, Christoph; Pock, Thomas; Schindler, Konrad

    2018-06-01

    3D particle imaging velocimetry (3D-PIV) aims to recover the flow field in a volume of fluid, which has been seeded with tracer particles and observed from multiple camera viewpoints. The first step of 3D-PIV is to reconstruct the 3D locations of the tracer particles from synchronous views of the volume. We propose a new method for iterative particle reconstruction, in which the locations and intensities of all particles are inferred in one joint energy minimization. The energy function is designed to penalize deviations between the reconstructed 3D particles and the image evidence, while at the same time aiming for a sparse set of particles. We find that the new method, without any post-processing, achieves significantly cleaner particle volumes than a conventional, tomographic MART reconstruction, and can handle a wide range of particle densities. The second step of 3D-PIV is to then recover the dense motion field from two consecutive particle reconstructions. We propose a variational model, which makes it possible to directly include physical properties, such as incompressibility and viscosity, in the estimation of the motion field. To further exploit the sparse nature of the input data, we propose a novel, compact descriptor of the local particle layout. Hence, we avoid the memory-intensive storage of high-resolution intensity volumes. Our framework is generic and allows for a variety of different data costs (correlation measures) and regularizers. We quantitatively evaluate it with both the sum of squared differences and the normalized cross-correlation, respectively with both a hard and a soft version of the incompressibility constraint.

  19. Structures and Biogenesis of Fallaxosides D4, D5, D6 and D7, Trisulfated Non-Holostane Triterpene Glycosides from the Sea Cucumber Cucumaria fallax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra S. Silchenko

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Four new trisulfated triterpene glycosides, fallaxosides D4 (1, D5 (2, D6 (3 and D7 (4 have been isolated from the sea cucumber Cucumaria fallax (Cucumariidae, Dendrochirotida. The structures of the glycosides have been elucidated by 2D NMR spectroscopy and HRESIMS. All the glycosides have the lanostane aglycones of a rare non-holostane type with 7(8-, 8(9- or 9(11-double bonds, one or two hydroxyl groups occupying unusual positions in the polycyclic nucleus and shortened or normal side chains. The pentasaccharide carbohydrate moieties of 1–4 have three sulfate groups. The cytotoxic activity of glycosides 1–4 against the ascite form of mouse Ehrlich carcinoma cells and mouse spleen lymphocytes and hemolytic activity against mouse erythrocytes have been studied.

  20. 3D object-oriented image analysis in 3D geophysical modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fadel, I.; van der Meijde, M.; Kerle, N.

    2015-01-01

    Non-uniqueness of satellite gravity interpretation has traditionally been reduced by using a priori information from seismic tomography models. This reduction in the non-uniqueness has been based on velocity-density conversion formulas or user interpretation of the 3D subsurface structures (objects......) based on the seismic tomography models and then forward modelling these objects. However, this form of object-based approach has been done without a standardized methodology on how to extract the subsurface structures from the 3D models. In this research, a 3D object-oriented image analysis (3D OOA......) approach was implemented to extract the 3D subsurface structures from geophysical data. The approach was applied on a 3D shear wave seismic tomography model of the central part of the East African Rift System. Subsequently, the extracted 3D objects from the tomography model were reconstructed in the 3D...

  1. Nucleon decay in a realistic SO(10) SUSY GUT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucas, V.; Raby, S.

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, we calculate neutron and proton decay rates and branching ratios in a predictive SO(10) SUSY GUT which agrees well with low energy data. We show that the nucleon lifetimes are consistent with the experimental bounds. The nucleon decay rates are calculated using all one-loop chargino and gluino-dressed diagrams regardless of their chiral structure. We show that the four-fermion operator C jk (u R d jR )(d kL ν τL ), commonly neglected in previous nucleon decay calculations, not only contributes significantly to nucleon decay, but, for many values of the initial GUT parameters and for large tanβ, actually dominates the decay rate. As a consequence, we find that τ p /τ n is often substantially larger than the prediction obtained in small tanβ models. We also find that gluino-dressed diagrams, often neglected in nucleon decay calculations, contribute significantly to nucleon decay. In addition we find that the branching ratios obtained from this realistic SO(10) SUSY GUT differ significantly from the predictions obtained from open-quotes genericclose quotes SU(5) SUSY GUT close-quote s. Thus, nucleon decay branching ratios, when observed, can be used to test theories of fermion masses. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  2. 3D Volume Rendering and 3D Printing (Additive Manufacturing).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katkar, Rujuta A; Taft, Robert M; Grant, Gerald T

    2018-07-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) volume-rendered images allow 3D insight into the anatomy, facilitating surgical treatment planning and teaching. 3D printing, additive manufacturing, and rapid prototyping techniques are being used with satisfactory accuracy, mostly for diagnosis and surgical planning, followed by direct manufacture of implantable devices. The major limitation is the time and money spent generating 3D objects. Printer type, material, and build thickness are known to influence the accuracy of printed models. In implant dentistry, the use of 3D-printed surgical guides is strongly recommended to facilitate planning and reduce risk of operative complications. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Intersecting branes, Higgs sector, and chirality from N = 4 SYM with soft SUSY breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, Marcus; Steinacker, Harold C.

    2018-04-01

    We consider SU( N ) N = 4 super Yang-Mills with cubic and quadratic soft SUSY breaking potential, such that the global SU(4) R is broken to SU(3) or further. As shown recently, this set-up supports a rich set of non-trivial vacua with the geometry of self-intersecting SU(3) branes in 6 extra dimensions. The zero modes on these branes can be interpreted as 3 generations of bosonic and chiral fermionic strings connecting the branes at their intersections. Here, we uncover a large class of exact solutions consisting of branes connected by Higgs condensates, leading to Yukawa couplings between the chiral fermionic zero modes. Under certain decoupling conditions, the backreaction of the Higgs on the branes vanishes exactly. The resulting physics is that of a spontaneously broken chiral gauge theory on branes with fluxes. In particular, we identify combined brane plus Higgs configurations which lead to gauge fields that couple to chiral fermions at low energy. This turns out to be quite close to the Standard Model and its constructions via branes in string theory. As a by-product, we construct a G 2-brane solution corresponding to a squashed fuzzy coadjoint orbit of G 2.

  4. 3D future internet media

    CERN Document Server

    Dagiuklas, Tasos

    2014-01-01

    This book describes recent innovations in 3D media and technologies, with coverage of 3D media capturing, processing, encoding, and adaptation, networking aspects for 3D Media, and quality of user experience (QoE). The main contributions are based on the results of the FP7 European Projects ROMEO, which focus on new methods for the compression and delivery of 3D multi-view video and spatial audio, as well as the optimization of networking and compression jointly across the Future Internet (www.ict-romeo.eu). The delivery of 3D media to individual users remains a highly challenging problem due to the large amount of data involved, diverse network characteristics and user terminal requirements, as well as the user’s context such as their preferences and location. As the number of visual views increases, current systems will struggle to meet the demanding requirements in terms of delivery of constant video quality to both fixed and mobile users. ROMEO will design and develop hybrid-networking solutions that co...

  5. Novel 3D media technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Dagiuklas, Tasos

    2015-01-01

    This book describes recent innovations in 3D media and technologies, with coverage of 3D media capturing, processing, encoding, and adaptation, networking aspects for 3D Media, and quality of user experience (QoE). The contributions are based on the results of the FP7 European Project ROMEO, which focuses on new methods for the compression and delivery of 3D multi-view video and spatial audio, as well as the optimization of networking and compression jointly across the future Internet. The delivery of 3D media to individual users remains a highly challenging problem due to the large amount of data involved, diverse network characteristics and user terminal requirements, as well as the user’s context such as their preferences and location. As the number of visual views increases, current systems will struggle to meet the demanding requirements in terms of delivery of consistent video quality to fixed and mobile users. ROMEO will present hybrid networking solutions that combine the DVB-T2 and DVB-NGH broadcas...

  6. Soft tissue response in orthognathic surgery patients treated by bimaxillary osteotomy: cephalometry compared with 2-D photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustemeyer, Jan; Martin, Alice

    2013-03-01

    Since improvement of facial aesthetics after orthognathic surgery moves increasingly into the focus of patients, prediction of soft tissue response to hard tissue movement becomes essential for planning. The aim of this study was to assess the facial soft tissue response in skeletal class II and III patients undergoing orthognathic surgery and to compare the potentials of cephalometry and two-dimensional (2-D) photogrammetry for predicting soft tissue changes. Twenty-eight patients with class II relationship and 33 with class III underwent bimaxillary surgery. All subjects had available both a traced lateral cephalogram and a traced lateral photogram taken pre- and postsurgery in natural head position (median follow-up, 9.4 ± 0.6 months). Facial convexity and lower lip length were highly correlated with hard tissue movements cephalometrically in class III patients and 2-D photogrammetrically in both classes. In comparison, cephalometric correlations for class II patients were weak. Correlations of hard and soft tissue movements between pre- and postoperative corresponding landmarks in horizontal and vertical planes were significant for cephalometry and 2-D photogrammetry. No significant difference was found between cephalometry and 2-D photogrammetry with respect to soft to hard tissue movement ratios. This study revealed that cephalometry is still a feasible standard for evaluating and predicting outcomes in routine orthognathic surgery cases. Accuracy could be enhanced with 2-D photogrammetry, especially in class II patients.

  7. Examining the role of dopamine D2 and D3 receptors in Pavlovian conditioned approach behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Kurt M; Haight, Joshua L; Gardner, Eliot L; Flagel, Shelly B

    2016-05-15

    Elucidating the neurobiological mechanisms underlying individual differences in the extent to which reward cues acquire the ability to act as incentive stimuli may contribute to the development of successful treatments for addiction and related disorders. We used the sign-tracker/goal-tracker animal model to examine the role of dopamine D2 and D3 receptors in the propensity to attribute incentive salience to reward cues. Following Pavlovian training, wherein a discrete lever-cue was paired with food reward, rats were classified as sign- or goal-trackers based on the resultant conditioned response. We examined the effects of D2/D3 agonists, 7-OH-DPAT (0.01-0.32mg/kg) or pramipexole (0.032-0.32mg/kg), the D2/D3 antagonist raclopride (0.1mg/kg), and the selective D3 antagonist, SB-277011A (6 or 24mg/kg), on the expression of sign- and goal-tracking conditioned responses. The lever-cue acquired predictive value and elicited a conditioned response for sign- and goal-trackers, but only for sign-trackers did it also acquire incentive value. Following administration of either 7-OH-DPAT, pramipexole, or raclopride, the performance of the previously acquired conditioned response was attenuated for both sign- and goal-trackers. For sign-trackers, the D2/D3 agonist, 7-OH-DPAT, also attenuated the conditioned reinforcing properties of the lever-cue. The selective D3 antagonist did not affect either conditioned response. Alterations in D2/D3 receptor signaling, but not D3 signaling alone, transiently attenuate a previously acquired Pavlovian conditioned response, regardless of whether the response is a result of incentive motivational processes. These findings suggest activity at the dopamine D2 receptor is critical for a reward cue to maintain either its incentive or predictive qualities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Examining the Role of Dopamine D2 and D3 Receptors in Pavlovian Conditioned Approach Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Kurt M.; Haight, Joshua L.; Gardner, Eliot L.; Flagel, Shelly B.

    2016-01-01

    Elucidating the neurobiological mechanisms underlying individual differences in the extent to which reward cues acquire the ability to act as incentive stimuli may contribute to the development of successful treatments for addiction and related disorders. We used the sign-tracker/goal-tracker animal model to examine the role of dopamine D2 and D3 receptors in the propensity to attribute incentive salience to reward cues. Following Pavlovian training, wherein a discrete lever-cue was paired with food reward, rats were classified as sign- or goal-trackers based on the resultant conditioned response. We examined the effects of D2/D3 agonists, 7-OH-DPAT (0.01–0.32 mg/kg) or pramipexole (0.032–0.32 mg/kg), the D2/D3 antagonist raclopride (0.1 mg/kg), and the selective D3 antagonist, SB-277011A (6 or 24 mg/kg), on the expression of sign- and goal-tracking conditioned responses. The lever-cue acquired predictive value and elicited a conditioned response for sign- and goal-trackers, but only for sign-trackers did it also acquire incentive value. Following administration of either 7-OH-DPAT, pramipexole, or raclopride, the performance of the previously acquired conditioned response was attenuated for both sign- and goal-trackers. For sign-trackers, the D2/D3 agonist, 7-OH-DPAT, also attenuated the conditioned reinforcing properties of the lever-cue. The selective D3 antagonist did not affect either conditioned response. Alterations in D2/D3 receptor signaling, but not D3 signaling alone, transiently attenuate a previously acquired Pavlovian conditioned response, regardless of whether the response is a result of incentive motivational processes. These findings suggest activity at the dopamine D2 receptor is critical for a reward cue to maintain either its incentive or predictive qualities. PMID:26909847

  9. 3D IBFV : Hardware-Accelerated 3D Flow Visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telea, Alexandru; Wijk, Jarke J. van

    2003-01-01

    We present a hardware-accelerated method for visualizing 3D flow fields. The method is based on insertion, advection, and decay of dye. To this aim, we extend the texture-based IBFV technique for 2D flow visualization in two main directions. First, we decompose the 3D flow visualization problem in a

  10. 3D IBFV : hardware-accelerated 3D flow visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telea, A.C.; Wijk, van J.J.

    2003-01-01

    We present a hardware-accelerated method for visualizing 3D flow fields. The method is based on insertion, advection, and decay of dye. To this aim, we extend the texture-based IBFV technique presented by van Wijk (2001) for 2D flow visualization in two main directions. First, we decompose the 3D

  11. Excitation-energy-dependent resonances in x-ray emissions under near-threshold electron excitation of the Ce 3d and 4d levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, M.B.; Baun, W.L.

    1975-01-01

    Soft x-ray appearance potential spectra of the 3d and 4d levels of polycrystalline cerium metal are reported in this paper. Resonant x-ray emissions are observed when the electron-excitation energy sweeps through the ionization energies of the 3d and 4d levels. The resonant x rays excited at the 3d-level onsets are considerably more intense, and are excited at a lower electron-excitation energy than the 3d-series characteristic x rays. In the neighborhood of the 4d-electron thresholds, four line-like structures extend to approx.8 eV below the 4d-electron binding energies, while two broad and more intense structures occur above the 4d onsets, with the largest one reaching a peak intensity at 12 eV above the 4d thresholds. The resonant emissions apparently arise from the decay of threshold-excited states which are bound to the inner vacancy and have core configurations nd 9 4f 3 , (n=3,4). The exchange interaction between the three 4f electrons and the respective d-orbital vacancy spreads the 4d-threshold structures over a 20 eV range of excitation energies and the 3d-threshold structures over a much smaller range

  12. Comparison of 2D and 3D brachytherpay planning for cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jung Hoom

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of 3-dimensional brachytherapy(BT) planning technique based on CT in cervical cancer. Patients with cervical cancer underwent 2-D BT treatment planning and then CT scan with HDR intracavitary applicators in place with same positions. Dose was prescribed to Point A with 5Gy per fraction on 2-D BT planning. For 3-D BT planning, and dose was prescribed to the High risk CTV for BT (HR CTV) with 5Gy. The 3-D BT planning goal was to cover at least 90% of the HR CTV with target 5Gy isodose surface while limiting the dose to 2 cm3 of bladder to less than 7.5 Gy, and 2cm"3 of rectum to less than 5Gy. In one patient of 10 patients, D2cm3 of rectal dose was over 5Gy and 6 patients at D2cm"3 of bladder dose on 2-D BT planning. There was a tendency to underestimate ICRU bladder dose than ICRU rectal dose. CT based 3-D BT planning for cervical cancer will enable evaluation of dose distributions for tumor and critical organs at risk. So, rectal and bladder morbidity as well as geographic miss will be reduced in case of the bulky disease or uterine malposition

  13. Comparison of 2D and 3D brachytherpay planning for cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hoom [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, KonYang University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the usefulness of 3-dimensional brachytherapy(BT) planning technique based on CT in cervical cancer. Patients with cervical cancer underwent 2-D BT treatment planning and then CT scan with HDR intracavitary applicators in place with same positions. Dose was prescribed to Point A with 5Gy per fraction on 2-D BT planning. For 3-D BT planning, and dose was prescribed to the High risk CTV for BT (HR CTV) with 5Gy. The 3-D BT planning goal was to cover at least 90% of the HR CTV with target 5Gy isodose surface while limiting the dose to 2 cm3 of bladder to less than 7.5 Gy, and 2cm{sup 3} of rectum to less than 5Gy. In one patient of 10 patients, D2cm3 of rectal dose was over 5Gy and 6 patients at D2cm{sup 3} of bladder dose on 2-D BT planning. There was a tendency to underestimate ICRU bladder dose than ICRU rectal dose. CT based 3-D BT planning for cervical cancer will enable evaluation of dose distributions for tumor and critical organs at risk. So, rectal and bladder morbidity as well as geographic miss will be reduced in case of the bulky disease or uterine malposition.

  14. F-theory and the landscape of intersecting D7-branes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, Andreas

    2010-02-05

    In this work, the moduli of D7-branes in type IIB orientifold compactifications and their stabilization by fluxes is studied from the perspective of F-theory. In F-theory, the moduli of the D7-branes and the moduli of the orientifold are unified in the moduli space of an elliptic Calabi-Yau manifold. This makes it possible to study flux the stabilization of D7-branes in an elegant manner. To answer phenomenological questions, one has to translate the deformations of the elliptic Calabi-Yau manifold of F-theory back to the positions and the shape of the D7-branes. We address this problem by constructing the homology cycles that are relevant for the deformations of the elliptic Calabi-Yau manifold.We show the viability of our approach for the case of elliptic two- and three-folds. Furthermore, we discuss a consistency conditions related to the intersections between D7-branes and orientifold planes which is automatically fulfilled in F-theory. Finally, we use our results to study the flux stabilization of D7-branes on the orientifold K3 x T{sup 2}/Z{sub 2} using F-theory on K3 x K3. In this context, we derive conditions on the fluxes to stabilize a given configuration of D7-branes. (orig.)

  15. F-theory and the landscape of intersecting D7-branes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the moduli of D7-branes in type IIB orientifold compactifications and their stabilization by fluxes is studied from the perspective of F-theory. In F-theory, the moduli of the D7-branes and the moduli of the orientifold are unified in the moduli space of an elliptic Calabi-Yau manifold. This makes it possible to study flux the stabilization of D7-branes in an elegant manner. To answer phenomenological questions, one has to translate the deformations of the elliptic Calabi-Yau manifold of F-theory back to the positions and the shape of the D7-branes. We address this problem by constructing the homology cycles that are relevant for the deformations of the elliptic Calabi-Yau manifold.We show the viability of our approach for the case of elliptic two- and three-folds. Furthermore, we discuss a consistency conditions related to the intersections between D7-branes and orientifold planes which is automatically fulfilled in F-theory. Finally, we use our results to study the flux stabilization of D7-branes on the orientifold K3 x T 2 /Z 2 using F-theory on K3 x K3. In this context, we derive conditions on the fluxes to stabilize a given configuration of D7-branes. (orig.)

  16. Soft-collinear supersymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Timothy [Institute of Theoretical Science, University of Oregon,Eugene, OR 97403 (United States); Elor, Gilly [Institute of Theoretical Science, University of Oregon,Eugene, OR 97403 (United States); Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology,Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Larkoski, Andrew J. [Physics Department, Reed College,Portland, OR 97202 (United States); Center for Fundamental Laws of Nature, Harvard University,Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2017-03-03

    Soft-Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) is a framework for modeling the infrared structure of theories whose long distance behavior is dominated by soft and collinear divergences. This paper demonstrates that SCET can be made compatible with supersymmetry (SUSY). Explicitly, the effective Lagrangian for N=1 SUSY Yang-Mills is constructed and shown to be a complete description for the infrared of this model. For contrast, we also construct the effective Lagrangian for chiral SUSY theories with Yukawa couplings, specifically the single flavor Wess-Zumino model. Only a subset of the infrared divergences are reproduced by the Lagrangian — to account for the complete low energy description requires the inclusion of local operators. SCET is formulated by expanding fields along a light-like direction and then subsequently integrating out degrees-of-freedom that are away from the light-cone. Defining the theory with respect to a specific frame obfuscates Lorentz invariance — given that SUSY is a space-time symmetry, this presents a possible obstruction. The cleanest language with which to expose the congruence between SUSY and SCET requires exploring two novel formalisms: collinear fermions as two-component Weyl spinors, and SCET in light-cone gauge. By expressing SUSY Yang-Mills in “collinear superspace', a slice of superspace derived by integrating out half the fermionic coordinates, the light-cone gauge SUSY SCET theory can be written in terms of superfields. As a byproduct, bootstrapping up to the full theory yields the first algorithmic approach for determining the SUSY Yang-Mills on-shell superspace action. This work paves the way toward discovering the effective theory for the collinear limit of N=4 SUSY Yang-Mills.

  17. Custom 3D Printable Silicones with Tunable Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durban, Matthew M; Lenhardt, Jeremy M; Wu, Amanda S; Small, Ward; Bryson, Taylor M; Perez-Perez, Lemuel; Nguyen, Du T; Gammon, Stuart; Smay, James E; Duoss, Eric B; Lewicki, James P; Wilson, Thomas S

    2018-02-01

    Silicone elastomers have broad versatility within a variety of potential advanced materials applications, such as soft robotics, biomedical devices, and metamaterials. A series of custom 3D printable silicone inks with tunable stiffness is developed, formulated, and characterized. The silicone inks exhibit excellent rheological behavior for 3D printing, as observed from the printing of porous structures with controlled architectures. Herein, the capability to tune the stiffness of printable silicone materials via careful control over the chemistry, network formation, and crosslink density of the ink formulations in order to overcome the challenging interplay between ink development, post-processing, material properties, and performance is demonstrated. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. 2D/3D/4D ULTRASOUND IN INFERTILITY MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uršula Reš-Muravec

    2018-02-01

    Ultrasound in infertility diagnostics: Ultrasound is used for examination of uterus, tubes, ovaries and peritoneal cause of infertility. It can be used in different menstrual phases: proliferative, periovulatory and secretory phase. Examination of uterus: A 2D scan can measure the size of the uterus (length, width and depth and a 2D flow (colour and power doppler. With 3D technology we can measure the whole volume with VOCAL (virtual organ computer-aided analysis and 3D circulation with the index (VI – vascular index, FI – flow index and VFI – vascular flow index in the uterus. A 2D scan can help us define uterine malformations, fibroids and adenomyosis to a certain extent. However, a 3D scan offers more accurate diagnosis of these malformations. Endometrium is examined separately. With 2D the width is measured and morphology and focal lesions (polyp, fibroids, adhesions are examined. With 3D the real sagital plane for the width measurement can be defined . We can measure the volume of endometrium and subendometrium and 3D circulation in endometrium and subendometrium. The FIS (f luid instlation sonography is very useful when examining the endometrium; saline or gel can be used for uterine instalation. We can measure and define the position of the structures in the endometrium more accurately when they are surrouned by saline or gel. We can view these structures with a surface view, similar to the one used for hysteroscopy. With this information we can explain the pathology to the patient and easily plan the surgical procedures. Examination of the tubes: With 2D US we can see the tubes in the pelvis only if there are dilatations, but sometimes it is difficult to distinguish them from the neighbouring forma- tions. With a 3D ultrasound we can define the shape and continuity of the tube and we can view the tube from different angles (inversion mode. Different contrast media are used for determining tubal patency. Tubal patency can be diagnosed with 2D Hy

  19. Predicting the mixed-mode I/II spatial damage propagation along 3D-printed soft interfacial layer via a hyperelastic softening model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lei; Li, Yaning

    2018-07-01

    A methodology was developed to use a hyperelastic softening model to predict the constitutive behavior and the spatial damage propagation of nonlinear materials with damage-induced softening under mixed-mode loading. A user subroutine (ABAQUS/VUMAT) was developed for numerical implementation of the model. 3D-printed wavy soft rubbery interfacial layer was used as a material system to verify and validate the methodology. The Arruda - Boyce hyperelastic model is incorporated with the softening model to capture the nonlinear pre-and post- damage behavior of the interfacial layer under mixed Mode I/II loads. To characterize model parameters of the 3D-printed rubbery interfacial layer, a series of scarf-joint specimens were designed, which enabled systematic variation of stress triaxiality via a single geometric parameter, the slant angle. It was found that the important model parameter m is exponentially related to the stress triaxiality. Compact tension specimens of the sinusoidal wavy interfacial layer with different waviness were designed and fabricated via multi-material 3D printing. Finite element (FE) simulations were conducted to predict the spatial damage propagation of the material within the wavy interfacial layer. Compact tension experiments were performed to verify the model prediction. The results show that the model developed is able to accurately predict the damage propagation of the 3D-printed rubbery interfacial layer under complicated stress-state without pre-defined failure criteria.

  20. Experience gained with the 3D machining of the W7-X HHF divertor target elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junghanns, P.; Boscary, J.; Peacock, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The Wendelstein 7-X surface of the actively cooled divertor is built up of 890 individually 3D machined target elements. • To date 300 target elements have been 3D machined with an accuracy of ±0.015 mm. • Copper discovered on the surface of few elements is no risk to operation. - Abstract: The high heat flux (HHF) divertor of W7-X consists of 100 target modules assembled from 890 actively water-cooled target elements protected with CFC tiles. The divertor surface will be built up of individually 3D machined target elements with 89 individual element types. To date 300 of the 890 target elements have been 3D machined with a very good accuracy. To achieve this successful result, a prototyping phase has been conducted to qualify the manufacturing route and to define the acceptance criteria with measures taken to minimize the risk of unacceptable damage during the manufacturing. After the 3D-machining, during the incoming inspection, copper infiltration from the interface between the CFC tiles and the CuCrZr heat sink to the plasma facing surface was detected in a small number of elements.

  1. 3D Vector Velocity Estimation using a 2D Phased Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2011-01-01

    of using the TO method for estimation 3D velocity vectors, and the proposed decoupling is demonstrated. A 64x64 and a 32x32 elements transducer are emulated using Field II. Plug flow with a speed of 1 m/s in a small region is rotated in the XY -plane. A binary flow example with [vx,vy]=[1,0] and [0,1] m......A method to estimate the three dimensional (3D) velocity vector is presented is this paper. 3D velocity vector techniques are needed to measure the full velocity and characterize the complicated flow patterns in the human body. The Transverse Oscillation (TO) method introduces oscillations...... matrix transducer. For the 32x32 transducer, the mean and standard deviation for the speed are 0.94 0.11 m/s and for the angle bias -0.487.7. The simulation study clearly demonstrates, that the new method can be used to estimate the 3D velocity vector using a 2D phased matrix array, and that the velocity...

  2. Fixing D7-brane positions by F-theory fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braun, A.P.; Hebecker, A.; Luedeling, C.; Valandro, R.

    2009-01-01

    To do realistic model building in type IIB supergravity, it is important to understand how to fix D7-brane positions by the choice of fluxes. More generally, F-theory model building requires the understanding of how fluxes determine the singularity structure (and hence gauge group and matter content) of the compactification. We analyse this problem in the simple setting of M-theory on K3xK3. Given a certain flux which is consistent with the F-theory limit, we can explicitly derive the positions at which D7 branes or stacks of D7 branes are stabilised. The analysis is based on a parameterization of the moduli space of type IIB string theory on T 2 /Z 2 (including D7-brane positions) in terms of the periods of integral cycles of M-theory on K3. This allows us, in particular, to select a specific desired gauge group by the choice of flux numbers.

  3. Co-expression of D-glucose isomerase and D-psicose 3-epimerase: development of an efficient one-step production of D-psicose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Yan; Zhu, Yueming; Zeng, Yan; Izumori, Ken; Sun, Yuanxia; Ma, Yanhe

    2014-10-01

    D-Psicose has been attracting attention in recent years because of its alimentary activities and is used as an ingredient in a range of foods and dietary supplements. To develop a one-step enzymatic process of D-psicose production, thermoactive D-glucose isomerase and the D-psicose 3-epimerase obtained from Bacillus sp. and Ruminococcus sp., respectively, were successfully co-expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 strain. The substrate of one-step enzymatic process was D-glucose. The co-expression system exhibited maximum activity at 65 °C and pH 7.0. Mg(2+) could enhance the output of D-psicose by 2.32 fold to 1.6 g/L from 10 g/L of D-glucose. When using high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) as substrate, 135 g/L D-psicose was produced under optimum conditions. The mass ratio of D-glucose, D-fructose, and D-psicose was almost 3.0:2.7:1.0, when the reaction reached equilibrium after an 8h incubation time. This co-expression system approaching to produce D-psicose has potential application in food and beverage products, especially softdrinks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterizing 3D sensors using the 3D modulation transfer function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, Timo; Breitbarth, Andreas; Zhang, Chen; Notni, Gunther

    2018-03-01

    The fields of optical 3D measurement system applications are continuously expanding and becoming more and more diverse. To evaluate appropriate systems for various measurement tasks, comparable parameters are necessary, whereas the 3D modulation transfer function (3D-MTF) has been established as a further criterion. Its aim is the determination of the system response between the measurement of a straight, sharp-edged cube and its opposite ideal calculated one. Within the scope of this work simulations and practical investigations regarding the 3D-MTF’s influences and its main issues are specifically investigated. Therefore, different determined edge radii representing the high-frequency spectra lead to various decreasing 3D-MTF characteristics. Furthermore, rising sampling frequencies improve its maximum transfer value to a saturation point in dependence of the radius. To approve these results of previous simulations, three fringe projection scanners were selected to determine the diversity. As the best 3D-MTF characteristic, a saturated transfer value of H_3D( f_N, 3D) = 0.79 has been identified at a sufficient sampling frequency, which is reached at four times the Nyquist limit. This high 3D resolution can mainly be achieved due to an improved camera projector interaction. Additionally, too small sampling ratios lead to uncertainties in the edge function determination, while higher ratios do not show major improvements. In conclusion, the 3D-MTF algorithm has thus been practically verified and its repeatability as well as its robustness have been confirmed.

  5. 3D membrane segmentation and quantification of intact thick cells using cryo soft X-ray transmission microscopy: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klementieva, Oxana; Werner, Stephan; Guttmann, Peter; Pratsch, Christoph; Cladera, Josep

    2017-01-01

    Structural analysis of biological membranes is important for understanding cell and sub-cellular organelle function as well as their interaction with the surrounding environment. Imaging of whole cells in three dimension at high spatial resolution remains a significant challenge, particularly for thick cells. Cryo-transmission soft X-ray microscopy (cryo-TXM) has recently gained popularity to image, in 3D, intact thick cells (∼10μm) with details of sub-cellular architecture and organization in near-native state. This paper reports a new tool to segment and quantify structural changes of biological membranes in 3D from cryo-TXM images by tracking an initial 2D contour along the third axis of the microscope, through a multi-scale ridge detection followed by an active contours-based model, with a subsequent refinement along the other two axes. A quantitative metric that assesses the grayscale profiles perpendicular to the membrane surfaces is introduced and shown to be linearly related to the membrane thickness. Our methodology has been validated on synthetic phantoms using realistic microscope properties and structure dimensions, as well as on real cryo-TXM data. Results demonstrate the validity of our algorithms for cryo-TXM data analysis. PMID:28376110

  6. Comparison of 3D TOF-MRA and 3D CE-MRA at 3 T for imaging of intracranial aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirillo, Mario; Scomazzoni, Francesco; Cirillo, Luigi; Cadioli, Marcello; Simionato, Franco; Iadanza, Antonella; Kirchin, Miles; Righi, Claudio; Anzalone, Nicoletta

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare 3 T elliptical-centric CE MRA with 3 T TOF MRA for the detection and characterization of unruptured intracranial aneurysms (UIAs), by using digital subtracted angiography (DSA) as reference. Materials and methods: Twenty-nine patients (12 male, 17 female; mean age: 62 years) with 41 aneurysms (34 saccular, 7 fusiform; mean diameter: 8.85 mm [range 2.0–26.4 mm]) were evaluated with MRA at 3 T each underwent 3D TOF-MRA examination without contrast and then a 3D contrast-enhanced (CE-MRA) examination with 0.1 mmol/kg bodyweight gadobenate dimeglumine and k-space elliptic mapping (Contrast ENhanced Timing Robust Angiography [CENTRA]). Both TOF and CE-MRA images were used to evaluate morphologic features that impact the risk of rupture and the selection of a treatment. Almost half (20/41) of UIAs were located in the internal carotid artery, 7 in the anterior communicating artery, 9 in the middle cerebral artery and 4 in the vertebro-basilar arterial system. All patients also underwent DSA before or after the MR examination. Results: The CE-MRA results were in all cases consistent with the DSA dataset. No differences were noted between 3D TOF-MRA and CE-MRA concerning the detection and location of the 41 aneurysms or visualization of the parental artery. Differences were apparent concerning the visualization of morphologic features, especially for large aneurysms (>13 mm). An irregular sac shape was demonstrated for 21 aneurysms on CE-MRA but only 13/21 aneurysms on 3D TOF-MRA. Likewise, CE-MRA permitted visualization of an aneurismal neck and calculation of the sac/neck ratio for all 34 aneurysms with a neck demonstrated at DSA. Conversely, a neck was visible for only 24/34 aneurysms at 3D TOF-MRA. 3D CE-MRA detected 15 aneurysms with branches originating from the sac and/or neck, whereas branches were recognized in only 12/15 aneurysms at 3D TOF-MRA. Conclusion: For evaluation of intracranial aneurysms at 3 T, 3D CE-MRA is superior to 3D TOF

  7. Interactive initialization of 2D/3D rigid registration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Ren Hui; Güler, Özgür [The Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, DC 20010 (United States); Kürklüoglu, Mustafa [Department of Cardiac Surgery, Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, DC 20010 (United States); Lovejoy, John [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Sports Medicine, Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, DC 20010 (United States); Yaniv, Ziv, E-mail: ZYaniv@childrensnational.org [The Sheikh Zayed Institute for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, DC 20010 and Departments of Pediatrics and Radiology, George Washington University, Washington, DC 20037 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: Registration is one of the key technical components in an image-guided navigation system. A large number of 2D/3D registration algorithms have been previously proposed, but have not been able to transition into clinical practice. The authors identify the primary reason for the lack of adoption with the prerequisite for a sufficiently accurate initial transformation, mean target registration error of about 10 mm or less. In this paper, the authors present two interactive initialization approaches that provide the desired accuracy for x-ray/MR and x-ray/CT registration in the operating room setting. Methods: The authors have developed two interactive registration methods based on visual alignment of a preoperative image, MR, or CT to intraoperative x-rays. In the first approach, the operator uses a gesture based interface to align a volume rendering of the preoperative image to multiple x-rays. The second approach uses a tracked tool available as part of a navigation system. Preoperatively, a virtual replica of the tool is positioned next to the anatomical structures visible in the volumetric data. Intraoperatively, the physical tool is positioned in a similar manner and subsequently used to align a volume rendering to the x-ray images using an augmented reality (AR) approach. Both methods were assessed using three publicly available reference data sets for 2D/3D registration evaluation. Results: In the authors' experiments, the authors show that for x-ray/MR registration, the gesture based method resulted in a mean target registration error (mTRE) of 9.3 ± 5.0 mm with an average interaction time of 146.3 ± 73.0 s, and the AR-based method had mTREs of 7.2 ± 3.2 mm with interaction times of 44 ± 32 s. For x-ray/CT registration, the gesture based method resulted in a mTRE of 7.4 ± 5.0 mm with an average interaction time of 132.1 ± 66.4 s, and the AR-based method had mTREs of 8.3 ± 5.0 mm with interaction times of 58 ± 52 s. Conclusions: Based on

  8. Interactive initialization of 2D/3D rigid registration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Ren Hui; Güler, Özgür; Kürklüoglu, Mustafa; Lovejoy, John; Yaniv, Ziv

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Registration is one of the key technical components in an image-guided navigation system. A large number of 2D/3D registration algorithms have been previously proposed, but have not been able to transition into clinical practice. The authors identify the primary reason for the lack of adoption with the prerequisite for a sufficiently accurate initial transformation, mean target registration error of about 10 mm or less. In this paper, the authors present two interactive initialization approaches that provide the desired accuracy for x-ray/MR and x-ray/CT registration in the operating room setting. Methods: The authors have developed two interactive registration methods based on visual alignment of a preoperative image, MR, or CT to intraoperative x-rays. In the first approach, the operator uses a gesture based interface to align a volume rendering of the preoperative image to multiple x-rays. The second approach uses a tracked tool available as part of a navigation system. Preoperatively, a virtual replica of the tool is positioned next to the anatomical structures visible in the volumetric data. Intraoperatively, the physical tool is positioned in a similar manner and subsequently used to align a volume rendering to the x-ray images using an augmented reality (AR) approach. Both methods were assessed using three publicly available reference data sets for 2D/3D registration evaluation. Results: In the authors' experiments, the authors show that for x-ray/MR registration, the gesture based method resulted in a mean target registration error (mTRE) of 9.3 ± 5.0 mm with an average interaction time of 146.3 ± 73.0 s, and the AR-based method had mTREs of 7.2 ± 3.2 mm with interaction times of 44 ± 32 s. For x-ray/CT registration, the gesture based method resulted in a mTRE of 7.4 ± 5.0 mm with an average interaction time of 132.1 ± 66.4 s, and the AR-based method had mTREs of 8.3 ± 5.0 mm with interaction times of 58 ± 52 s. Conclusions: Based on the

  9. NMR structural studies of the ionizing radiation adduct 7-hydro-8-oxodeoxyguanosine (8-oxo-7H-dG) opposite deoxyadenosine in a DNA duplex. 8-oxo-7H-dG(syn)·dA(anti) alignment at lesion site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouchakdjian, M.; Patel, D.J.; Bodepudi, V.; Shibutani, S.; Eisenberg, M.; Johnson, F.; Grollman, A.P.

    1991-01-01

    Proton NMR studies are reported on the complementary d(C1-C2-A3-C4-T5-A6-oxo-G7-T8-C9-A10-C11-C12)·d(G13-G14-T15-G16-A17-A18-T19-A20-G21-T22-G23-G24) dodecanucleotide duplex (designated 8-oxo-7H-dG·dA 12-mer), which contains a centrally located 7-hydro-8-oxodeoxyguanosine (8-oxo-7H-dG) residue, a group commonly found in DNA that has been exposed to ionizing radiation or oxidizing free radicals. From the NMR spectra it can be deduced that this moiety exists as two tautomers, or gives rise to two DNA conformations, that are in equilibrium and that exchange slowly. The present study focuses on the major component of the equilibrium that originates in the 6,8-dioxo tautomer of 8-oxo-7H-dG. The authors have assigned the exchangeable NH1, NH7, and NH 2 -2 base protons located on the Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen edges of 8-oxo-7H-dG7 in the 8-oxo-7H-dG·dA 12-mer duplex, using an analysis of one- and two-dimensional nuclear Overhauser enhancement (NOE) data in H 2 O solution. They were able to detect a set of intra- and interstrand NOEs between protons (exchangeable and nonexchangeable) on adjacent residues in the d(A6-oxo-G7-T8)·d(A17-A18-T19) trinucleotide segment centered about the lesion site that establishes stacking of the oxo-dG7(syn)·dA(anti) pair between stable Watson-Crick dA6·dT19 and dT8·A17 base pairs with minimal perturbation of the helix. The structural studies demonstrate that 8-oxo-7H-dG(syn)·dA(anti) forms a stable pair in the interior of the helix, providing a basis for the observed incorporation of dA opposite 8-oxo-7H-dG when readthrough occurs past this oxidized nucleoside base

  10. 3D asthenopia in horizontal deviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Hyun; Suh, Young-Woo; Yun, Cheol-Min; Yoo, Eun-Joo; Yeom, Ji-Hyun; Cho, Yoonae A

    2013-05-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the asthenopic symptoms in patients with exotropia and esotropia while watching stereoscopic 3D (S3D) television (TV). A total 77 subjects who more than 9 years of age were enrolled in this study. We divided them into three groups; Thirty-four patients with exodeviation (Exo group), 11 patients with esodeviation (Eso group) and 32 volunteers with normal binocular vision (control group). The S3D images were shown to all patients with S3D high-definition TV for a period of 20 min. Best corrected visual acuity, refractive errors, angle of strabismus, stereopsis test and history of strabismus surgery, were evaluated. After watching S3D TV for 20 min, a survey of subjective symptoms was conducted with a questionnaire to evaluate the degree of S3D perception and asthenopic symptoms such as headache, dizziness and ocular fatigue while watching 3D TV. The mean amounts of deviation in the Exo group and Eso group were 11.2 PD and 7.73PD, respectively. Mean stereoacuity was 102.7 arc sec in the the Exo group and 1389.1 arc sec in the Eso group. In the control group, it was 41.9 arc sec. Twenty-nine patients in the Exo group showed excellent stereopsis (≤60 arc sec at near), but all 11 subjects of the Eso group showed 140 arc sec or worse and showed more decreased 3D perception than the Exo and the control group (p Kruskal-Wallis test). The Exo group reported more eye fatigue (p Kruskal-Wallis test) than the Eso and the control group. However, the scores of ocular fatigue in the patients who had undergone corrective surgery were less than in the patients who had not in the Exo group (p Kruskal-Wallis test) and the amount of exodeviation was not correlated with the asthenopic symptoms (dizziness, r = 0.034, p = 0.33; headache, r = 0.320, p = 0.119; eye fatigue, r = 0.135, p = 0.519, Spearman rank correlation test, respectively). Symptoms of 3D asthenopia were related to the presence of exodeviation but not to esodeviation. This may

  11. Total body irradiation with a compensator fabricated using a 3D optical scanner and a 3D printer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So-Yeon; Kim, Jung-In; Joo, Yoon Ha; Lee, Jung Chan; Park, Jong Min

    2017-05-07

    We propose bilateral total body irradiation (TBI) utilizing a 3D printer and a 3D optical scanner. We acquired surface information of an anthropomorphic phantom with the 3D scanner and fabricated the 3D compensator with the 3D printer, which could continuously compensate for the lateral missing tissue of an entire body from the beam's eye view. To test the system's performance, we measured doses with optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) as well as EBT3 films with the anthropomorphic phantom during TBI without a compensator, conventional bilateral TBI, and TBI with the 3D compensator (3D TBI). The 3D TBI showed the most uniform dose delivery to the phantom. From the OSLD measurements of the 3D TBI, the deviations between the measured doses and the prescription dose ranged from  -6.7% to 2.4% inside the phantom and from  -2.3% to 0.6% on the phantom's surface. From the EBT3 film measurements, the prescription dose could be delivered to the entire body of the phantom within  ±10% accuracy, except for the chest region, where tissue heterogeneity is extreme. The 3D TBI doses were much more uniform than those of the other irradiation techniques, especially in the anterior-to-posterior direction. The 3D TBI was advantageous, owing to its uniform dose delivery as well as its efficient treatment procedure.

  12. D3-??????????????????????? ? ???? ?????????? ?2 ?????? ?????? ?????

    OpenAIRE

    ?????????, ????; ???????, ???????; ??????, ?????????; ?????????????, ????; ??????, ??????

    2011-01-01

    ????? ?????? ??????? ????? ????? ??????????? ?????? ?????? ????? ? ?????? ? ???????? ????? ?????????. ?????????? ???????????? ?????? ?? ?2 ?????? ?????? ????? ??????? ?? D3 ???????????????? ??????? ??????????? ?????? ????????? ????? ?????????? ??? ??? ??????????. ? ????? ????????????? ??????????? ??? ????????? ????????????? ?????????? ???? ?????????? ?????????? ????? ????????? ?????? ???????? ?? D3-????????????????? ???????.

  13. Aspects of defects in 3d-3d correspondence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gang, Dongmin; Kim, Nakwoo; Romo, Mauricio; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study supersymmetric co-dimension 2 and 4 defects in the compactification of the 6d (2,0) theory of type A_N_−_1 on a 3-manifold M. The so-called 3d-3d correspondence is a relation between complexified Chern-Simons theory (with gauge group SL(N,ℂ)) on M and a 3d N=2 theory T_N[M]. We study this correspondence in the presence of supersymmetric defects, which are knots/links inside the 3-manifold. Our study employs a number of different methods: state-integral models for complex Chern-Simons theory, cluster algebra techniques, domain wall theory T[SU(N)], 5d N=2 SYM, and also supergravity analysis through holography. These methods are complementary and we find agreement between them. In some cases the results lead to highly non-trivial predictions on the partition function. Our discussion includes a general expression for the cluster partition function, which can be used to compute in the presence of maximal and certain class of non-maximal punctures when N>2. We also highlight the non-Abelian description of the 3d N=2T_N[M] theory with defect included, when such a description is available. This paper is a companion to our shorter paper http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1751-8113/49/30/30LT02, which summarizes our main results.

  14. Programming 2D/3D shape-shifting with hobbyist 3D printers† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c7mh00269f

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Manen, Teunis; Janbaz, Shahram

    2017-01-01

    Materials and devices with advanced functionalities often need to combine complex 3D shapes with functionality-inducing surface features. Precisely controlled bio-nanopatterns, printed electronic components, and sensors/actuators are all examples of such surface features. However, the vast majority of the refined technologies that are currently available for creating functional surface features work only on flat surfaces. Here we present initially flat constructs that upon triggering by high temperatures change their shape to a pre-programmed 3D shape, thereby enabling the combination of surface-related functionalities with complex 3D shapes. A number of shape-shifting materials have been proposed during the last few years based on various types of advanced technologies. The proposed techniques often require multiple fabrication steps and special materials, while being limited in terms of the 3D shapes they could achieve. The approach presented here is a single-step printing process that requires only a hobbyist 3D printer and inexpensive off-the-shelf materials. It also lends itself to a host of design strategies based on self-folding origami, instability-driven pop-up, and ‘sequential’ shape-shifting to unprecedentedly expand the space of achievable 3D shapes. This combination of simplicity and versatility is a key to widespread applications. PMID:29308207

  15. 3D Animation Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Beane, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The essential fundamentals of 3D animation for aspiring 3D artists 3D is everywhere--video games, movie and television special effects, mobile devices, etc. Many aspiring artists and animators have grown up with 3D and computers, and naturally gravitate to this field as their area of interest. Bringing a blend of studio and classroom experience to offer you thorough coverage of the 3D animation industry, this must-have book shows you what it takes to create compelling and realistic 3D imagery. Serves as the first step to understanding the language of 3D and computer graphics (CG)Covers 3D anim

  16. Embedded 3D Graphics Core for FPGA-based System-on-Chip Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holten-Lund, Hans Erik

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a 3D graphics accelerator core for an FPGA based system, and illustrates how to build a System-on-Chip containing a Xilinx MicroBlaze soft-core CPU and our 3D graphics accelerator core. The system is capable of running uClinux and hardware accelerated 3D graphics applications......, and the video display which periodically reads from memory to display the final rendered graphics. The graphics core uses internal scratch-pad memory to reduce its external bandwidth requirement, this is achieved by implementing a tile-based rendering algorithm. Reduced external bandwidth means that the power...

  17. EUROPEANA AND 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pletinckx

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The current 3D hype creates a lot of interest in 3D. People go to 3D movies, but are we ready to use 3D in our homes, in our offices, in our communication? Are we ready to deliver real 3D to a general public and use interactive 3D in a meaningful way to enjoy, learn, communicate? The CARARE project is realising this for the moment in the domain of monuments and archaeology, so that real 3D of archaeological sites and European monuments will be available to the general public by 2012. There are several aspects to this endeavour. First of all is the technical aspect of flawlessly delivering 3D content over all platforms and operating systems, without installing software. We have currently a working solution in PDF, but HTML5 will probably be the future. Secondly, there is still little knowledge on how to create 3D learning objects, 3D tourist information or 3D scholarly communication. We are still in a prototype phase when it comes to integrate 3D objects in physical or virtual museums. Nevertheless, Europeana has a tremendous potential as a multi-facetted virtual museum. Finally, 3D has a large potential to act as a hub of information, linking to related 2D imagery, texts, video, sound. We describe how to create such rich, explorable 3D objects that can be used intuitively by the generic Europeana user and what metadata is needed to support the semantic linking.

  18. Phase correction for three-dimensional (3D) diffusion-weighted interleaved EPI using 3D multiplexed sensitivity encoding and reconstruction (3D-MUSER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hing-Chiu; Hui, Edward S; Chiu, Pui-Wai; Liu, Xiaoxi; Chen, Nan-Kuei

    2018-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) multiplexed sensitivity encoding and reconstruction (3D-MUSER) algorithm is proposed to reduce aliasing artifacts and signal corruption caused by inter-shot 3D phase variations in 3D diffusion-weighted echo planar imaging (DW-EPI). 3D-MUSER extends the original framework of multiplexed sensitivity encoding (MUSE) to a hybrid k-space-based reconstruction, thereby enabling the correction of inter-shot 3D phase variations. A 3D single-shot EPI navigator echo was used to measure inter-shot 3D phase variations. The performance of 3D-MUSER was evaluated by analyses of point-spread function (PSF), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and artifact levels. The efficacy of phase correction using 3D-MUSER for different slab thicknesses and b-values were investigated. Simulations showed that 3D-MUSER could eliminate artifacts because of through-slab phase variation and reduce noise amplification because of SENSE reconstruction. All aliasing artifacts and signal corruption in 3D interleaved DW-EPI acquired with different slab thicknesses and b-values were reduced by our new algorithm. A near-whole brain single-slab 3D DTI with 1.3-mm isotropic voxel acquired at 1.5T was successfully demonstrated. 3D phase correction for 3D interleaved DW-EPI data is made possible by 3D-MUSER, thereby improving feasible slab thickness and maximum feasible b-value. Magn Reson Med 79:2702-2712, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  19. 3D Printing by Multiphase Silicone/Water Capillary Inks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Sangchul; Parekh, Dishit P; Bharti, Bhuvnesh; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Velev, Orlin D

    2017-08-01

    3D printing of polymers is accomplished easily with thermoplastics as the extruded hot melt solidifies rapidly during the printing process. Printing with liquid polymer precursors is more challenging due to their longer curing times. One curable liquid polymer of specific interest is polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). This study demonstrates a new efficient technique for 3D printing with PDMS by using a capillary suspension ink containing PDMS in the form of both precured microbeads and uncured liquid precursor, dispersed in water as continuous medium. The PDMS microbeads are held together in thixotropic granular paste by capillary attraction induced by the liquid precursor. These capillary suspensions possess high storage moduli and yield stresses that are needed for direct ink writing. They could be 3D printed and cured both in air and under water. The resulting PDMS structures are remarkably elastic, flexible, and extensible. As the ink is made of porous, biocompatible silicone that can be printed directly inside aqueous medium, it can be used in 3D printed biomedical products, or in applications such as direct printing of bioscaffolds on live tissue. This study demonstrates a number of examples using the high softness, elasticity, and resilience of these 3D printed structures. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Patient specific 3D printed phantom for IMRT quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehler, Eric D; Higgins, Patrick D; Dusenbery, Kathryn E; Barney, Brett M

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of a patient specific phantom for patient specific dosimetric verification. Using the head and neck region of an anthropomorphic phantom as a substitute for an actual patient, a soft-tissue equivalent model was constructed with the use of a 3D printer. Calculated and measured dose in the anthropomorphic phantom and the 3D printed phantom was compared for a parallel-opposed head and neck field geometry to establish tissue equivalence. A nine-field IMRT plan was constructed and dose verification measurements were performed for the 3D printed phantom as well as traditional standard phantoms. The maximum difference in calculated dose was 1.8% for the parallel-opposed configuration. Passing rates of various dosimetric parameters were compared for the IMRT plan measurements; the 3D printed phantom results showed greater disagreement at superficial depths than other methods. A custom phantom was created using a 3D printer. It was determined that the use of patient specific phantoms to perform dosimetric verification and estimate the dose in the patient is feasible. In addition, end-to-end testing on a per-patient basis was possible with the 3D printed phantom. Further refinement of the phantom construction process is needed for routine use. (paper)

  1. What is a natural SUSY scenario?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casas, J. Alberto; Moreno, Jesús M.; Robles, Sandra; Rolbiecki, Krzysztof [Instituto de Física Teórica, IFT-UAM/CSIC, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid,Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Zaldívar, Bryan [Service de Physique Théorique, Université Libre de Bruxelles,Boulevard du Triomphe, CP225, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-06-11

    The idea of “Natural SUSY', understood as a supersymmetric scenario where the fine-tuning is as mild as possible, is a reasonable guide to explore supersymmetric phenomenology. In this paper, we re-examine this issue in the context of the MSSM including several improvements, such as the mixing of the fine-tuning conditions for different soft terms and the presence of potential extra fine-tunings that must be combined with the electroweak one. We give tables and plots that allow to easily evaluate the fine-tuning and the corresponding naturalness bounds for any theoretical model defined at any high-energy (HE) scale. Then, we analyze in detail the complete fine-tuning bounds for the unconstrained MSSM, defined at any HE scale. We show that Natural SUSY does not demand light stops. Actually, an average stop mass below 800 GeV is disfavored, though one of the stops might be very light. Regarding phenomenology, the most stringent upper bound from naturalness is the one on the gluino mass, which typically sets the present level fine-tuning at O(1%). However, this result presents a strong dependence on the HE scale. E.g. if the latter is 10{sup 7} GeV the level of fine-tuning is ∼ four times less severe. Finally, the most robust result of Natural SUSY is by far that Higgsinos should be rather light, certainly below 700 GeV for a fine-tuning of O(1%) or milder. Incidentally, this upper bound is not far from ≃1 TeV, which is the value required if dark matter is made of Higgsinos.

  2. Coupling between scattering channels with SUSY transformations for equal thresholds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pupasov, Andrey M; Samsonov, Boris F; Sparenberg, Jean-Marc; Baye, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Supersymmetric (SUSY) transformations of the multichannel Schroedinger equation with equal thresholds and arbitrary partial waves in all channels are studied. The structures of the transformation function and the superpotential are analysed. Relations between Jost and scattering matrices of superpartner potentials are obtained. In particular, we show that a special type of SUSY transformation allows us to introduce a coupling between scattering channels starting from a potential with an uncoupled scattering matrix. The possibility for this coupling to be trivial is discussed. We show that the transformation introduces bound and virtual states with a definite degeneracy at the factorization energy. A detailed study of the potential and scattering matrices is given for the 2 x 2 case. The possibility of inverting coupled-channel scattering data by such a SUSY transformation is demonstrated by several examples (s-s, s-p and s-d partial waves)

  3. Magnetic Resonance Angiography of the pulmonary veins: TOF 3D versus 2D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carriero, Alessandro; Magarelli, Nicola; Gatta, Stefania; Pinto, Dario; Bonomo, Lorenzo; Baratto, Michele; Scapati, Carmelo

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this work was to optimize the magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) technique for the selective study of the pulmonary veins. Twenty patients (13 men and 7 women; mean age: 30.5 years) were examined. MRA was performed with a 1 T superconductive magnet and the 3D time of flight (TOF) technique. Fast sequences (3D FISP : TR 58 ms, TE 6 ms, FA 20 deg, matrix 192 x 256; and 2D FLASH: TR 44 ms, TE 10 ms, FA 30 deg, matrix 192 x 256) were used. Coronal and sagittal images were submitted to MIP processing; presaturation pulses for the pulmonary arteries were located in the mediastinal region. In the right lung 3D TOF on the coronal plane well showed 124 veins, while sagittal images showed 106 veins. In the left lung, 3D TOF on the coronal plane well showed 96 vessels, while sagittal images showed 44 vessels. In the right lung, 2D TOF on the coronal plane well showed 54 veins, while sagittal images showed 36 vessels. In the left lung, 2D TOF on the coronal plane well showed 22 vessels, while sagittal images showed 21 vessels. Therefore 3D TOF yielded better than 2D TOF (p<0.05). To conclude, 3D TOF with contrast agent administration is a useful tool to study the pulmonary veins; those with a larger caliber are better depicted and the integration of coronal and sagittal images depicts more veins

  4. 4+D TechnologyTM for nuclear systems soft solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Kune Y.

    2010-10-01

    The signature in the proposal lies with the NSSS (Nuclear Systems Soft Solutions). NSSS proposed in the 3-dimensional space and time plus cost coordinates, i.e. 4 + dimensional technology, is the backbone of digital engineering in the nuclear system design and management. The NSSS is empowered by Janus (Junctional Analysis Neo dynamic Unit Soft Power), NOTUS (Neo systemic Optimization Technical Unit Soft Power), Venus (Virtual Engineering Neo cybernetic Unit Soft Power), EURUS (Engineering Utilities Research Unit Soft Power) and INUUS (Informative Neo graphic Utilities Unit Soft Power). Janus extracts the geometric data directly from the computer-aided design CAD files to import to multidimensional computational fluid and structural dynamics codes. Janus uses the joint-CAD analysis methods to eliminate the necessity of any pre- and post- processors. Starting from the 3-dimensional CAD, NOTUS contributes to reducing the construction cost of the nuclear power plants by optimizing the component manufacturing procedure and the plant construction process. Planning and scheduling construction projects can thus benefit greatly by integrating traditional management techniques with digital process simulation visualization. The 3-dimensional visualization of construction processes and resulting products intrinsically afford most of the advantages realized by the 4 + D technology. Problems with equipment positioning and manpower congestion in certain areas can readily be visualized prior to the actual operation, thus preventing accidents and safety problems such as collision between two machines and losses in productivity. Venus applied the virtual reality technology in nuclear industry. Virtual reality provides an interactive real time motion with sound and tactile and other forms of feedback. The management and workers can thus comprehend the work process crystal clear by visualizing precisely how activities relate to one another, whereby reducing conflicting

  5. Validation of single-plane fluoroscopy and 2D/3D shape-matching for quantifying shoulder complex kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Rebekah L; Ellingson, Arin M; Ludewig, Paula M

    2018-02-01

    Fluoroscopy and 2D/3D shape-matching has emerged as the standard for non-invasively quantifying kinematics. However, its accuracy has not been well established for the shoulder complex when using single-plane fluoroscopy. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of single-plane fluoroscopy and 2D/3D shape-matching for quantifying full shoulder complex kinematics. Tantalum markers were implanted into the clavicle, humerus, and scapula of four cadaveric shoulders. Biplane radiographs were obtained with the shoulder in five humerothoracic elevation positions (arm at the side, 30°, 60°, 90°, maximum). Images from both systems were used to perform marker tracking, while only those images acquired with the primary fluoroscopy system were used to perform 2D/3D shape-matching. Kinematics errors due to shape-matching were calculated as the difference between marker tracking and 2D/3D shape-matching and expressed as root mean square (RMS) error, bias, and precision. Overall RMS errors for the glenohumeral joint ranged from 0.7 to 3.3° and 1.2 to 4.2 mm, while errors for the acromioclavicular joint ranged from 1.7 to 3.4°. Errors associated with shape-matching individual bones ranged from 1.2 to 3.2° for the humerus, 0.5 to 1.6° for the scapula, and 0.4 to 3.7° for the clavicle. The results of the study demonstrate that single-plane fluoroscopy and 2D/3D shape-matching can accurately quantify full shoulder complex kinematics in static positions. Copyright © 2017 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 3D and 1D calculation of hysteresis loops and energy products for anisotropic nanocomposite films with perpendicular anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan, X.H.; Zhao, G.P.; Yue, Ming; Ye, L.N.; Xia, J.; Zhang, X.C.; Chang, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the magnetic reversal process, hysteresis loops and energy products for exchange-coupled Nd 2 Fe 14 B/α-Fe bilayers are studied systematically by a three-dimensional (3D) model. The 3D calculations are numerically solved using the finite difference method, where the results are carefully compared with those calculated by one-dimensional (1D) model. It is found that the calculated hysteresis loops and energy products based on the two methods are consistent with each other. Both nucleation fields and coercivities decrease monotonically as the soft layer thickness L s increases. In addition, the calculated spatial distributions of magnetization orientations in the thickness direction at various applied fields based on both methods signify a three-step magnetic reversal process, which are nucleation, growth and displacement of the domain wall. The calculated magnetic orientations within the film plane, however, are totally different according to the two methods. The 3D calculation exhibits a process of vortex formation and annihilation. On the other hand, the 1D calculation gives a quasi-coherent one, where magnetization orientation is coherent in the film plane and varies in the thickness direction. This new reversal mechanism displayed in the film plane has a systematic influence on the nucleation fields, coercivity and energy products. - Highlights: • Consistent hysteresis loops and energy products for 3D and 1D calculation. • Domain wall formation, evolution and displacement perpendicular to the film plane. • Vortex formation, annihilation and better loop squareness in 3D calculation. • Larger nucleation fields, remanence and smaller coercivity in 3D calculation

  7. 3D Elevation Program—Virtual USA in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, Vicki; Stoker, J.M.

    2016-04-14

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) uses a laser system called ‘lidar’ (light detection and ranging) to create a virtual reality map of the Nation that is very accurate. 3D maps have many uses with new uses being discovered all the time.  

  8. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D-3 affects vitamin D status similar to vitamin D-3 in pigs - but the meat produced has a lower content of vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jette; Maribo, H.; Bysted, Anette

    2007-01-01

    In food databases, the specific contents of vitamin D-3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D-3 in food have been implemented in the last 10 years. No consensus has yet been established on the relative activity between the components. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to assess the relative...... activity of 25-hydroxyvitamin D-3 compared to vitamin D-3. The design was a parallel study in pigs (n 24), which from an age of 12 weeks until slaughter 11 weeks later were fed approximately 55 mu g vitamin D/d, as vitamin D-3, in a mixture of vitamin D-3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D-3, or 25-hydroxyvitamin D-3....... The end-points measured were plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D-3, and in the liver and loin the content of vitamin D-3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D-3 Vitamin D-3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 in the feed did not affect 25-hydroxyvitamin D-3 in the plasma, liver or loin differently, while a significant effect was shown...

  9. Possible Applications of 3D Printing Technology on Textile Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korger, M.; Bergschneider, J.; Lutz, M.; Mahltig, B.; Finsterbusch, K.; Rabe, M.

    2016-07-01

    3D printing is a rapidly emerging additive manufacturing technology which can offer cost efficiency and flexibility in product development and production. In textile production 3D printing can also serve as an add-on process to apply 3D structures on textiles. In this study the low-cost fused deposition modeling (FDM) technique was applied using different thermoplastic printing materials available on the market with focus on flexible filaments such as thermoplastic elastomers (TPE) or Soft PLA. Since a good adhesion and stability of the 3D printed structures on textiles are essential, separation force and abrasion resistance tests were conducted with different kinds of printed woven fabrics demonstrating that a sufficient adhesion can be achieved. The main influencing factor can be attributed to the topography of the textile surface affected by the weave, roughness and hairiness offering formlocking connections followed by the wettability of the textile surface by the molten polymer, which depends on the textile surface energy and can be specifically controlled by washing (desizing), finishing or plasma treatment of the textile before the print. These basic adhesion mechanisms can also be considered crucial for 3D printing on knitwear.

  10. Classifying and Analyzing 3d Cell Motion in Jammed Microgels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Tapomoy; Sawyer, W. Gregory; Angelini, Thomas

    Soft granular polyelectrolyte microgels swell in liquid cell growth media to form a continuous elastic solid that can easily transition between solid to fluid state under a low shear stress. Such Liquid-like solids (LLS) have recently been used to create 3D cellular constructs as well as to support, culture and harvest cells in 3D. Current understanding of cell migration mechanics in 3D was established from experiments performed in natural and synthetic polymer networks. Spatial variation in network structure and the transience of degradable gels limit their usefulness in quantitative cell mechanics studies. By contrast, LLS growth media approximates a homogeneous continuum, enabling tractable cell mechanics measurements to be performed in 3D. Here, we introduce a process to understand and classify cytotoxic T cell motion in 3D by studying cellular motility in LLS media. General classification of T cell motion can be achieved with a very traditional statistical approach: the cell's mean squared displacement (MSD) as a function of delay time. We will also use Langevin approaches combined with the constitutive equations of the LLS medium to predict the statistics of T cell motion. National Science Foundation under Grant No. DMR-1352043.

  11. 3D modelling of the island divertor for W7-AS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sardei, F.; Feng, Y.; Kisslinger, J.; Grigull, P.

    1996-01-01

    Island divertors in low-shear stellarators exhibit the same basic topology (X-point diversion of field lines towards target plates) as tokamak divertors. However, the geometry is different. For island divertors, the small distance between the target and the LCFS (∼5cm for W7-AS and 8cm for W7-X) requires higher plasma densities than in comparable tokamaks to effectively decouple the target plasma and the neutrals from the core. These are basic prerequisites to realize high recycling and detachment conditions necessary for exaust. On the other hand, the island SOL can be used to confine recycling particles outside the LCFS, which may result in a density rise inside the islands, and hence in an improved screening of the neutrals. Nonlinear 3D effects are introduced in the transport equations by the non-axisymmetry of the configuration and by the segmentation of the target plates. The resulting toroidal inhomogeneities (variable connection lengths, toroidally localized recycling, poor parallel equilibration at low T) can hardly be approximated by an averaging 2D model. (orig.)

  12. PREFACE: 7th International Conference on 3D Radiation Dosimetry (IC3DDose)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thwaites, David; Baldock, Clive

    2013-06-01

    IC3DDose 2013, the 7th International Conference on 3D Radiation Dosimetry held in Sydney, Australia from 4-8 November 2012, grew out of the DosGel series, which began as DosGel99, the 1st International Workshop on Radiation Therapy Gel Dosimetry in Lexington, Kentucky. Since 1999 subsequent DoSGel conferences were held in Brisbane, Australia (2001), Ghent, Belgium (2004), Sherbrooke, Canada (2006) and Crete, Greece (2008). In 2010 the conference was held on Hilton Head Island, South Carolina and underwent a name-change to IC3DDose. The aim of the first workshop was to bring together individuals, both researchers and users, with an interest in 3D radiation dosimetry techniques, with a mix of presentations from basic science to clinical applications, which has remained an objective for all of the meetings. One rationale of DosGel99 was stated as supporting the increasing clinical implementation of gel dosimetry, as the technique appeared, at that time, to be leaving the laboratories of gel dosimetry enthusiasts and entering clinical practice. Clearly by labelling the first workshop as the 1st, there was a vision of a continuing series, which has been fulfilled. On the other hand, the expectation of widespread clinical use of gel dosimetry has perhaps not been what was hoped for and anticipated. Nevertheless the rapidly increasing demand for advanced high-precision 3D radiotherapy technology and techniques has continued apace. The need for practical and accurate 3D dosimetry methods for development and quality assurance has only increased. By the 6th meeting, held in South Carolina in 2010, the Conference Scientific Committee recognised the wider developments in 3D systems and methods and decided to widen the scope, whilst keeping the same span from basic science to applications. This was signalled by a change of name from 'Dosgel' to 'IC3DDose', a name that has continued to this latest conference. The conference objectives were: to enhance the quality and accuracy of

  13. Acquiring 3D scene information from 2D images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Ping

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, people are becoming increasingly acquainted with 3D technologies such as 3DTV, 3D movies and 3D virtual navigation of city environments in their daily life. Commercial 3D movies are now commonly available for consumers. Virtual navigation of our living environment as used on a

  14. Unification of SUSY breaking and GUT breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Tatsuo [Department of Physics, Hokkaido University,Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Omura, Yuji [Department of Physics, Nagoya University,Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2015-02-18

    We build explicit supersymmetric unification models where grand unified gauge symmetry breaking and supersymmetry (SUSY) breaking are caused by the same sector. Besides, the SM-charged particles are also predicted by the symmetry breaking sector, and they give the soft SUSY breaking terms through the so-called gauge mediation. We investigate the mass spectrums in an explicit model with SU(5) and additional gauge groups, and discuss its phenomenological aspects. Especially, nonzero A-term and B-term are generated at one-loop level according to the mediation via the vector superfields, so that the electro-weak symmetry breaking and 125 GeV Higgs mass may be achieved by the large B-term and A-term even if the stop mass is around 1 TeV.

  15. CT-image based conformal brachytherapy of breast cancer. The significance of semi-3-D and 3-D treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polgar, C.; Major, T.; Somogyi, A.; Takacsi-Nagy, Z.; Mangel, L.C.; Fodor, J.; Nemeth, G. [Orszagos Onkologiai Intezet, Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Forrai, G. [Haynal Imre Univ. of Health Sciences, Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Radiology; Sulyok, Z. [Orszagos Onkologiai Intezet, Budapest (Hungary). Dept. of Surgery

    2000-03-01

    In 103 patients with T1-2, N0-1 breast cancer the tumor bed was clipped during breast conserving surgery. Fifty-two of them received boost brachytherapy after 46 to 50 Gy teletherapy and 51 patients were treated with brachytherapy alone via flexible implant tubes. Single double and triple plane implant was used in 6,89 and 8 cases, respectively. The dose of boost brachytherapy and sole brachytherapy prescribed to dose reference points was 3 times 4.75 Gy and 7 times 5.2 Gy, respectively. The positions of dose reference points varied according to the level (2-D, semi-3-D and 3-D) of treatment planning performed. The treatment planning was based on the 3-D reconstruction of the surgical clips, implant tubes and skin points. In all cases the implantations were planned with a semi-3-D technique aided by simulator. In 10 cases a recently developed CT-guided 3-D planning system was used. The semi-3D and 3-D treatment plans were compared to hypothetical 2-D plans using dose-volume histograms and dose non-uniformity ratios. The values of mean central dose, mean skin dose, minimal clip dose, proportion of underdosaged clips and mean target surface dose were evaluated. The accuracy of tumor bed localization and the conformity of planning target volume and treated volume were also analyzed in each technique. Results: With the help of conformal semi-3D and 3D brachytherapy planning we could define reference dose points, active source positions and dwell times individually. This technique decreased the mean skin dose with 22.2% and reduced the possibility of geographical miss. We could achieve the best conformity between the planning target volume and the treated volume with the CT-image based 3-D treatment planning, at the cost of worse dose homogeneity. The mean treated volume was reduced by 25.1% with semi-3-D planning, however, its was increased by 16.2% with 3-D planning, compared to the 2-D planning. (orig.) [German] Bei 103 Patientinnen mit Mammakarzinom der Stadien T1

  16. The soft supersymmetry breaking in D=5 supergravity compactified on S_1/Z_2 orbifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Diamandis, G A; Kouroumalou, P; Lahanas, A B

    2010-01-01

    We study the origin of the supersymmetry breaking induced by the mediation of gravity and the radion multiplet from the hidden to the visible brane in the context of the N=2, D=5 supergravity compactified on S_1/Z_2 orbifolds. The soft supersymmetry breaking terms for scalar masses, trilinear scalar couplings and gaugino masses are calculated to leading order in the five dimensional Newton's constant k_5^2 and the gravitino mass m_{3/2}. These are finite and non-vanishing, with the scalar soft masses be non-tachyonic, and are all expressed in terms of the gravitino mass and the length scale R of the fifth dimension. The soft supersymmetry breaking parameters are thus correlated and the phenomenological implications are discussed.

  17. Analysis of the spectrum six times ionized zinc (Zn VII): the 3d6-3d54p transition array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hof, G.H. van het; Joshi, Y.N.; Raassen, A.J.J.; Ryabtsev, A.N.

    1993-01-01

    The spectrum of zinc was photographed in the 100-300 A region on a 10.7 m grazing incidence spectrograph using a triggered spark light source. 335 lines were classified in the Zn VII 3d 6 -3d 5 4p transition array, resulting in the establishment of 30 of the 34 levels of the 3d 6 configuration and 103 of the 214 levels of the 3d 5 4p. The ground configuration 3d 6 was described by a generalized least-squares fit (GLSF) involving orthogonal operators to a set of 3d N configurations. This yielded a mean error of 3 cm -1 for its level values. The excited configruation was described by the conventional Slater Condon parameter set, giving a mean error of 105 cm -1 . (orig.)

  18. LandSIM3D: modellazione in real time 3D di dati geografici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lambo Srl Lambo Srl

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available LandSIM3D: realtime 3D modelling of geographic data LandSIM3D allows to model in 3D an existing landscape in a few hours only and geo-referenced offering great landscape analysis and understanding tools. 3D projects can then be inserted into the existing landscape with ease and precision. The project alternatives and impact can then be visualized and studied into their immediate environmental. The complex evolution of the landscape in the future can also be simulated and the landscape model can be manipulated interactively and better shared with colleagues. For that reason, LandSIM3D is different from traditional 3D imagery solutions, normally reserved for computer graphics experts. For more information about LandSIM3D, go to www.landsim3d.com.

  19. UHPLC-PDA Assay for Simultaneous Determination of Vitamin D3 and Menaquinone-7 in Pharmaceutical Solid Dosage Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Jehangir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A newly developed method based on ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC was optimized for the simultaneous determination of vitamin D3 and menaquinone-7 (MK-7 in tablet formulation in the present study. UHPLC separation of vitamin D3 and MK-7 was performed with ACE Excel 2 C18-PFP column (2 μm, 2.1 × 100 mm at 0.6 mL min−1 flow rate, whereas the mobile phase consisted of methanol/water (19:1, v/v, phase A and isopropyl alcohol (99.9%, phase B containing 0.5% triethylamine. Isocratic separation of both the analytes was performed at 40°C by pumping the mobile phases A and B in the ratio of 50:50 (v/v, pH, 6.0. Both analytes were detected at a wavelength of 265 nm and the injection volume was 1.0 μL. The overall runtime per sample was 4.5 min with retention time of 1.26 and 3.64 min for vitamin D3 and MK-7, respectively. The calibration curve was linear from 5.0 to 100 μg mL−1 for vitamin D3 and MK-7 with a coefficient of determination (R2 ≥ 0.9981, while repeatability and reproducibility (expressed as relative standard deviation were lower than 1.46 and 2.21%, respectively. The proposed HPLC method was demonstrated to be simple and rapid for the determination of vitamin D3 and MK-7 in tablets.

  20. Identification of novel CYP2D7-2D6 hybrids: non-functional and functional variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Gaedigk

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphic expression of CYP2D6 contributes to the wide range of activity observed for this clinically important drug metabolizing enzyme. In this report we describe novel CYP2D7/2D6 hybrid genes encoding non-functional and functional CYP2D6 protein and a CYP2D7 variant that mimics a CYP2D7/2D6 hybrid gene. Five kb long PCR products encompassing the novel genes were entirely sequenced. A quantitative assay probing in different gene regions was employed to determine CYP2D6 and 2D7 copy number variations and the relative position of the hybrid genes within the locus was assessed by long-range PCR. In addition to the previously known CYP2D6*13 and *66 hybrids, we describe three novel non-functional CYP2D7-2D6 hybrids with gene switching in exon 2 (CYP2D6*79, intron 2 (CYP2D6*80 and intron 5 (CYP2D6*67. A CYP2D7-specific T-ins in exon 1 causes a detrimental frame shift. One subject revealed a CYP2D7 conversion in the 5’-flanking region of a CYP2D6*35 allele, was otherwise unaffected (designated CYP2D6*35B. Finally, three DNAs revealed a CYP2D7 gene with a CYP2D6-like region downstream of exon 9 (designated CYP2D7[REP6]. Quantitative copy number determination, sequence analyses and long-range PCR mapping were in agreement and excluded the presence of additional gene units. Undetected hybrid genes may cause over-estimation of CYP2D6 activity (CYP2D6*1/*1 vs *1/hybrid, etc, but may also cause results that may interfere with the genotype determination. Detection of hybrid events, ‘single’ and tandem, will contribute to more accurate phenotype prediction from genotype data.

  1. 3D gaze tracking system for NVidia 3D Vision®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibirama, Sunu; Hamamoto, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Inappropriate parallax setting in stereoscopic content generally causes visual fatigue and visual discomfort. To optimize three dimensional (3D) effects in stereoscopic content by taking into account health issue, understanding how user gazes at 3D direction in virtual space is currently an important research topic. In this paper, we report the study of developing a novel 3D gaze tracking system for Nvidia 3D Vision(®) to be used in desktop stereoscopic display. We suggest an optimized geometric method to accurately measure the position of virtual 3D object. Our experimental result shows that the proposed system achieved better accuracy compared to conventional geometric method by average errors 0.83 cm, 0.87 cm, and 1.06 cm in X, Y, and Z dimensions, respectively.

  2. Ex vivo 2D and 3D HSV-2 infection model using human normal vaginal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yaqi; Yang, Yan; Guo, Juanjuan; Dai, Ying; Ye, Lina; Qiu, Jianbin; Zeng, Zhihong; Wu, Xiaoting; Xing, Yanmei; Long, Xiang; Wu, Xufeng; Ye, Lin; Wang, Shubin; Li, Hui

    2017-02-28

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infects human genital mucosa and establishes life-long latent infection. It is unmet need to establish a human cell-based microphysiological system for virus biology and anti-viral drug discovery. One of barriers is lacking of culture system of normal epithelial cells in vitro over decades. In this study, we established human normal vaginal epithelial cell (HNVEC) culture using co-culture system. HNVEC cells were then propagated rapidly and stably in a defined culture condition. HNVEC cells exhibited a normal diploid karyotype and formed the well-defined and polarized spheres in matrigel three-dimension (3D) culture, while malignant cells (HeLa) formed disorganized and nonpolar solid spheres. HNVEC cells had a normal cellular response to DNA damage and had no transforming property using soft agar assays. HNVEC expressed epithelial marker cytokeratin 14 (CK14) and p63, but not cytokeratin 18 (CK18). Next, we reconstructed HNVEC-derived 3D vaginal epithelium using air-liquid interface (ALI) culture. This 3D vaginal epithelium has the basal and apical layers with expression of epithelial markers as its originated human vaginal tissue. Finally, we established an HSV-2 infection model based on the reconstructed 3D vaginal epithelium. After inoculation of HSV-2 (G strain) at apical layer of the reconstructed 3D vaginal epithelium, we observed obvious pathological effects gradually spreading from the apical layer to basal layer with expression of a viral protein. Thus, we established an ex vivo 2D and 3D HSV-2 infection model that can be used for HSV-2 virology and anti-viral drug discovery.

  3. 3D for free using the Mac's standard apps : converting raw 3D text files to QuickDraw 3D's 3DMF format using AppleScript

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djajadiningrat, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    This article introduces you to the basics of 3D files in general and the 3D Metafile (3DMF), QuickDraw 3D's native 3D format, in particular. It shows how you can use AppleScript to easily convert a raw 3D text file into a 3DMF readable by the QuickDraw 3D Viewer or any other QuickDraw 3D compatible

  4. From 3D view to 3D print

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dima, M.; Farisato, G.; Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Magrin, D.; Greggio, D.; Farinato, J.; Marafatto, L.; Ragazzoni, R.; Piazza, D.

    2014-08-01

    In the last few years 3D printing is getting more and more popular and used in many fields going from manufacturing to industrial design, architecture, medical support and aerospace. 3D printing is an evolution of bi-dimensional printing, which allows to obtain a solid object from a 3D model, realized with a 3D modelling software. The final product is obtained using an additive process, in which successive layers of material are laid down one over the other. A 3D printer allows to realize, in a simple way, very complex shapes, which would be quite difficult to be produced with dedicated conventional facilities. Thanks to the fact that the 3D printing is obtained superposing one layer to the others, it doesn't need any particular work flow and it is sufficient to simply draw the model and send it to print. Many different kinds of 3D printers exist based on the technology and material used for layer deposition. A common material used by the toner is ABS plastics, which is a light and rigid thermoplastic polymer, whose peculiar mechanical properties make it diffusely used in several fields, like pipes production and cars interiors manufacturing. I used this technology to create a 1:1 scale model of the telescope which is the hardware core of the space small mission CHEOPS (CHaracterising ExOPlanets Satellite) by ESA, which aims to characterize EXOplanets via transits observations. The telescope has a Ritchey-Chrétien configuration with a 30cm aperture and the launch is foreseen in 2017. In this paper, I present the different phases for the realization of such a model, focusing onto pros and cons of this kind of technology. For example, because of the finite printable volume (10×10×12 inches in the x, y and z directions respectively), it has been necessary to split the largest parts of the instrument in smaller components to be then reassembled and post-processed. A further issue is the resolution of the printed material, which is expressed in terms of layers

  5. Anti-3D Weapon Model Detection for Safe 3D Printing Based on Convolutional Neural Networks and D2 Shape Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giao N. Pham

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available With the development of 3D printing, weapons are easily printed without any restriction from the production managers. Therefore, anti-3D weapon model detection is necessary issue in safe 3D printing to prevent the printing of 3D weapon models. In this paper, we would like to propose an anti-3D weapon model detection algorithm to prevent the printing of anti-3D weapon models for safe 3D printing based on the D2 shape distribution and an improved convolutional neural networks (CNNs. The purpose of the proposed algorithm is to detect anti-3D weapon models when they are used in 3D printing. The D2 shape distribution is computed from random points on the surface of a 3D weapon model and their geometric features in order to construct a D2 vector. The D2 vector is then trained by improved CNNs. The CNNs are used to detect anti-3D weapon models for safe 3D printing by training D2 vectors which have been constructed from the D2 shape distribution of 3D weapon models. Experiments with 3D weapon models proved that the D2 shape distribution of 3D weapon models in the same class is the same. Training and testing results also verified that the accuracy of the proposed algorithm is higher than the conventional works. The proposed algorithm is applied in a small application, and it could detect anti-3D weapon models for safe 3D printing.

  6. Mechanical, Permeability, and Degradation Properties of 3D Designed Poly(1,8 Octanediol-co-Citrate)(POC) Scaffolds for Soft Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Claire G.; Hollister, Scott J.

    2015-01-01

    Poly(1,8-octanediol-co-citric acid) (POC) is a synthetic biodegradable elastomer that can be processed into 3D scaffolds for tissue engineering. We investigated the effect of designed porosity on the mechanical properties, permeability and degradation profiles of the POC scaffolds. For mechanical properties, scaffold compressive data was fit to a 1D nonlinear elastic model and solid tensile data was fit to a Neohookean incompressible nonlinear elastic model. Chondrocytes were seeded on scaffolds to assess the biocompatibility of POC. Increased porosity was associated with increased degradation rate, increased permeability, and decreased mechanical stiffness which also became less nonlinear. Scaffold characterization in this paper will provide design guidance for POC scaffolds to meet the mechanical and biological parameters needed for engineering soft tissues such as cartilage. PMID:20091910

  7. Recording stereoscopic 3D neurosurgery with a head-mounted 3D camera system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Brian; Chen, Brian R; Chen, Beverly B; Lu, James Y; Giannotta, Steven L

    2015-06-01

    Stereoscopic three-dimensional (3D) imaging can present more information to the viewer and further enhance the learning experience over traditional two-dimensional (2D) video. Most 3D surgical videos are recorded from the operating microscope and only feature the crux, or the most important part of the surgery, leaving out other crucial parts of surgery including the opening, approach, and closing of the surgical site. In addition, many other surgeries including complex spine, trauma, and intensive care unit procedures are also rarely recorded. We describe and share our experience with a commercially available head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system to obtain stereoscopic 3D recordings of these seldom recorded aspects of neurosurgery. The strengths and limitations of using the GoPro(®) 3D system as a head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system in the operating room are reviewed in detail. Over the past several years, we have recorded in stereoscopic 3D over 50 cranial and spinal surgeries and created a library for education purposes. We have found the head-mounted stereoscopic 3D camera system to be a valuable asset to supplement 3D footage from a 3D microscope. We expect that these comprehensive 3D surgical videos will become an important facet of resident education and ultimately lead to improved patient care.

  8. 3D printing to simulate laparoscopic choledochal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdall, Oliver C; Makin, Erica; Davenport, Mark; Ade-Ajayi, Niyi

    2016-05-01

    Laparoscopic simulation has transformed skills acquisition for many procedures. However, realistic nonbiological simulators for complex reconstructive surgery are rare. Life-like tactile feedback is particularly difficult to reproduce. Technological innovations may contribute novel solutions to these shortages. We describe a hybrid model, harnessing 3D technology to simulate laparoscopic choledochal surgery for the first time. Digital hepatic anatomy images and standard laparoscopic trainer dimensions were employed to create an entry level laparoscopic choledochal surgery model. The information was fed into a 3D systems project 660pro with visijet pxl core powder to create a free standing liver mold. This included a cuboid portal in which to slot disposable hybrid components representing hepatic and pancreatic ducts and choledochal cyst. The mold was used to create soft silicone replicas with T28 resin and T5 fast catalyst. The model was assessed at a national pediatric surgery training day. The 10 delegates that trialed the simulation felt that the tactile likeness was good (5.6/10±1.71, 10=like the real thing), was not too complex (6.2/10±1.35; where 1=too simple, 10=too complicated), and generally very useful (7.36/10±1.57, 10=invaluable). 100% stated that they felt they could reproduce this in their own centers, and 100% would recommend this simulation to colleagues. Though this first phase choledochal cyst excision simulation requires further development, 3D printing provides a useful means of creating specific and detailed simulations for rare and complex operations with huge potential for development. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. iCAVE: an open source tool for visualizing biomolecular networks in 3D, stereoscopic 3D and immersive 3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liluashvili, Vaja; Kalayci, Selim; Fluder, Eugene; Wilson, Manda; Gabow, Aaron; Gümüs, Zeynep H

    2017-08-01

    Visualizations of biomolecular networks assist in systems-level data exploration in many cellular processes. Data generated from high-throughput experiments increasingly inform these networks, yet current tools do not adequately scale with concomitant increase in their size and complexity. We present an open source software platform, interactome-CAVE (iCAVE), for visualizing large and complex biomolecular interaction networks in 3D. Users can explore networks (i) in 3D using a desktop, (ii) in stereoscopic 3D using 3D-vision glasses and a desktop, or (iii) in immersive 3D within a CAVE environment. iCAVE introduces 3D extensions of known 2D network layout, clustering, and edge-bundling algorithms, as well as new 3D network layout algorithms. Furthermore, users can simultaneously query several built-in databases within iCAVE for network generation or visualize their own networks (e.g., disease, drug, protein, metabolite). iCAVE has modular structure that allows rapid development by addition of algorithms, datasets, or features without affecting other parts of the code. Overall, iCAVE is the first freely available open source tool that enables 3D (optionally stereoscopic or immersive) visualizations of complex, dense, or multi-layered biomolecular networks. While primarily designed for researchers utilizing biomolecular networks, iCAVE can assist researchers in any field. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press.

  10. Comparative evaluation of HD 2D/3D laparoscopic monitors and benchmarking to a theoretically ideal 3D pseudodisplay: even well-experienced laparoscopists perform better with 3D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, D; Reiser, S; Kohn, N; Witte, M; Leiner, U; Mühlbach, L; Ruschin, D; Reiner, W; Feussner, H

    2014-08-01

    Though theoretically superior to standard 2D visualization, 3D video systems have not yet achieved a breakthrough in laparoscopy. The latest 3D monitors, including autostereoscopic displays and high-definition (HD) resolution, are designed to overcome the existing limitations. We performed a randomized study on 48 individuals with different experience levels in laparoscopy. Three different 3D displays (glasses-based 3D monitor, autostereoscopic display, and a mirror-based theoretically ideal 3D display) were compared to a 2D HD display by assessing multiple performance and mental workload parameters and rating the subjects during a laparoscopic suturing task. Electromagnetic tracking provided information on the instruments' pathlength, movement velocity, and economy. The usability, the perception of visual discomfort, and the quality of image transmission of each monitor were subjectively rated. Almost all performance parameters were superior with the conventional glasses-based 3D display compared to the 2D display and the autostereoscopic display, but were often significantly exceeded by the mirror-based 3D display. Subjects performed a task faster and with greater precision when visualization was achieved with the 3D and the mirror-based display. Instrument pathlength was shortened by improved depth perception. Workload parameters (NASA TLX) did not show significant differences. Test persons complained of impaired vision while using the autostereoscopic monitor. The 3D and 2D displays were rated user-friendly and applicable in daily work. Experienced and inexperienced laparoscopists profited equally from using a 3D display, with an improvement in task performance about 20%. Novel 3D displays improve laparoscopic interventions as a result of faster performance and higher precision without causing a higher mental workload. Therefore, they have the potential to significantly impact the further development of minimally invasive surgery. However, as shown by the

  11. Dielectric properties of 3D-printed materials for anatomy specific 3D-printed MRI coils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadnezhad, Bahareh; Collick, Bruce D.; Behdad, Nader; McMillan, Alan B.

    2018-04-01

    Additive manufacturing provides a low-cost and rapid means to translate 3D designs into the construction of a prototype. For MRI, this type of manufacturing can be used to construct various components including the structure of RF coils. In this paper, we characterize the material properties (dielectric constant and loss tangent) of several common 3D-printed polymers in the MRI frequency range of 63-300 MHz (for MRI magnetic field strengths of 1.5-7 T), and utilize these material properties in full-wave electromagnetic simulations to design and construct a very low-cost subject/anatomy-specific 3D-printed receive-only RF coil that fits close to the body. We show that the anatomy-specific coil exhibits higher signal-to-noise ratio compared to a conventional flat surface coil.

  12. Objective and subjective comparison of standard 2-D and fully 3-D reconstructed data on a PET/CT system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strobel, Klaus; Rüdy, Matthias; Treyer, Valerie; Veit-Haibach, Patrick; Burger, Cyrill; Hany, Thomas F

    2007-07-01

    The relative advantage of fully 3-D versus 2-D mode for whole-body imaging is currently the focus of considerable expert debate. The nature of 3-D PET acquisition for FDG PET/CT theoretically allows a shorter scan time and improved efficiency of FDG use than in the standard 2-D acquisition. We therefore objectively and subjectively compared standard 2-D and fully 3-D reconstructed data for FDG PET/CT on a research PET/CT system. In a total of 36 patients (mean 58.9 years, range 17.3-78.9 years; 21 male, 15 female) referred for known or suspected malignancy, FDG PET/CT was performed using a research PET/CT system with advanced detector technology with improved sensitivity and spatial resolution. After 45 min uptake, a low-dose CT (40 mAs) from head to thigh was performed followed by 2-D PET (emission 3 min per field) and 3-D PET (emission 1.5 min per field) with both seven slices overlap to cover the identical anatomical region. Acquisition time was therefore 50% less (seven fields; 21 min vs. 10.5 min). PET data was acquired in a randomized fashion, so in 50% of the cases 2-D data was acquired first. CT data was used for attenuation correction. 2-D (OSEM) and 3-D PET images were iteratively reconstructed. Subjective analysis of 2-D and 3-D images was performed by two readers in a blinded, randomized fashion evaluating the following criteria: sharpness of organs (liver, chest wall/lung), overall image quality and detectability and dignity of each identified lesion. Objective analysis of PET data was investigated measuring maximum standard uptake value with lean body mass (SUV(max,LBM)) of identified lesions. On average, per patient, the SUV(max) was 7.86 (SD 7.79) for 2-D and 6.96 (SD 5.19) for 3-D. On a lesion basis, the average SUV(max) was 7.65 (SD 7.79) for 2-D and 6.75 (SD 5.89) for 3-D. The absolute difference on a paired t-test of SUV 3-D-2-D based on each measured lesion was significant with an average of -0.956 (P=0.002) and an average of -0.884 on a

  13. Structure of the Human Dopamine D3 Receptor in Complex with a D2/D3 Selective Antagonist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, Ellen Y.T.; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Qiang; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Hanson, Michael A.; Shi, Lei; Newman, Amy Hauck; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C. (Cornell); (Scripps); (NIDA); (Columbia); (UCSD); (Receptos)

    2010-11-30

    Dopamine modulates movement, cognition, and emotion through activation of dopamine G protein-coupled receptors in the brain. The crystal structure of the human dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) in complex with the small molecule D2R/D3R-specific antagonist eticlopride reveals important features of the ligand binding pocket and extracellular loops. On the intracellular side of the receptor, a locked conformation of the ionic lock and two distinctly different conformations of intracellular loop 2 are observed. Docking of R-22, a D3R-selective antagonist, reveals an extracellular extension of the eticlopride binding site that comprises a second binding pocket for the aryl amide of R-22, which differs between the highly homologous D2R and D3R. This difference provides direction to the design of D3R-selective agents for treating drug abuse and other neuropsychiatric indications.

  14. Synthesis of 2-acetamido-6-O-(5-acetamido-3,5-dideoxy-β-D-glycero-D-galacto-2-nonulo-pyranosylonic acid)-2-deoxy-D-glucose [2-acetamido-6-O-(N-acetyl-β-D-neuraminyl)-2-deoxy-D-glucose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Vleugel, D.J.M. van der; Zwikker, J.W.; Boeckel, S.A.A. van; Boom, J.H. van

    1982-01-01

    Silver triflate-promoted condensation of methyl 5-acetamido-4,7,8,9-tetra-O-acetyl-2-chloro-2,3,5-trideoxy-β-D-glycero-D-galacto -2-nonulopyranosonate (9) with benzyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-3,4-O-(1,1,3,3-tetraisopropyldisiloxane-1,3-diyl)-α-D-glucopyranoside, followed by removal of the

  15. Photoaffinity labeling of serum vitamin D binding protein by 3-deoxy-3-azido-25-hydroxyvitamin D3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, R.P.; Kutner, A.; Schnoes, H.K.; DeLuca, H.F.

    1987-01-01

    3-Deoxy-3-azido-25-hydroxyvitamin D3 was covalently incorporated in the 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 binding site of purified human plasma vitamin D binding protein. Competition experiments showed that 3-deoxy-3-azido-25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 bind at the same site on the protein. Tritiated 3-deoxy-3-azido-25-hydroxyvitamin D3 was synthesized from tritiated 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, retaining the high specific activity of the parent compound. The tritiated azido label bound reversibly to human vitamin D binding protein in the dark and covalently to human vitamin D binding protein after exposure to ultraviolet light. Reversible binding of tritiated 3-deoxy-3-azido-25-hydroxyvitamin D3 was compared to tritiated 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 binding to human vitamin D binding protein. Scatchard analysis of the data indicated equivalent maximum density binding sites with a KD,app of 0.21 nM for 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 and a KD,app of 1.3 nM for the azido derivative. Covalent binding was observed only after exposure to ultraviolet irradiation, with an average of 3% of the reversibly bound label becoming covalently bound to vitamin D binding protein. The covalent binding was reduced 70-80% when 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 was present, indicating strong covalent binding at the vitamin D binding site of the protein. When tritiated 3-deoxy-3-azido-25-hydroxyvitamin D3 was incubated with human plasma in the absence and presence of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3, 12% of the azido derivative was reversibly bound to vitamin D binding protein. After ultraviolet irradiation, four plasma proteins covalently bound the azido label, but vitamin D binding protein was the only protein of the four that was unlabeled in the presence of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3

  16. [Non-biological 3D printed simulator for training in percutaneous nephro- lithotripsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alyaev, Yu G; Sirota, E S; Bezrukov, E A; Ali, S Kh; Bukatov, M D; Letunovskiy, A V; Byadretdinov, I Sh

    2018-03-01

    To develop a non-biological 3D printed simulator for training and preoperative planning in percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PCNL), which allows doctors to master and perform all stages of the operation under ultrasound and fluoroscopy guidance. The 3D model was constructed using multislice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) images of a patient with staghorn urolithiasis. The MSCT data were processed and used to print the model. The simulator consisted of two parts: a non-biological 3D printed soft model of a kidney with reproduced intra-renal vascular and collecting systems and a printed 3D model of a human body. Using this 3D printed simulator, PCNL was performed in the interventional radiology operating room under ultrasound and fluoroscopy guidance. The designed 3D printed model of the kidney completely reproduces the individual features of the intra-renal structures of the particular patient. During the training, all the main stages of PCNL were performed successfully: the puncture, dilation of the nephrostomy tract, endoscopic examination, intra-renal lithotripsy. Our proprietary 3D-printed simulator is a promising development in the field of endourologic training and preoperative planning in the treatment of complicated forms of urolithiasis.

  17. Creating physical 3D stereolithograph models of brain and skull.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Kelley

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The human brain and skull are three dimensional (3D anatomical structures with complex surfaces. However, medical images are often two dimensional (2D and provide incomplete visualization of structural morphology. To overcome this loss in dimension, we developed and validated a freely available, semi-automated pathway to build 3D virtual reality (VR and hand-held, stereolithograph models. To evaluate whether surface visualization in 3D was more informative than in 2D, undergraduate students (n = 50 used the Gillespie scale to rate 3D VR and physical models of both a living patient-volunteer's brain and the skull of Phineas Gage, a historically famous railroad worker whose misfortune with a projectile tamping iron provided the first evidence of a structure-function relationship in brain. Using our processing pathway, we successfully fabricated human brain and skull replicas and validated that the stereolithograph model preserved the scale of the VR model. Based on the Gillespie ratings, students indicated that the biological utility and quality of visual information at the surface of VR and stereolithograph models were greater than the 2D images from which they were derived. The method we developed is useful to create VR and stereolithograph 3D models from medical images and can be used to model hard or soft tissue in living or preserved specimens. Compared to 2D images, VR and stereolithograph models provide an extra dimension that enhances both the quality of visual information and utility of surface visualization in neuroscience and medicine.

  18. 3D accelerator magnet calculations using MAGNUS-3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pissanetzky, S.; Miao, Y.

    1989-01-01

    The steady trend towards increased magnetic and geometric complexity in the design of accelerator magnets has caused a need for reliable 3D computer models and a better understanding of the behavior of magnetic system in three dimensions. The capabilities of the MAGNUS-3D family of programs are ideally suited to solve this class of problems and provide insight into 3D effects. MAGNUS-3D can solve any problem of magnetostatics involving permanent magnets, nonlinear ferromagnetic materials and electric conductors. MAGNUS-3D uses the finite element method and the two-scalar-potentials formulation of Maxwell's equations to obtain the solution, which can then be used interactively to obtain tables of field components at specific points or lines, plots of field lines, function graphs representing a field component plotted against a coordinate along any line in space (such as the beam line), and views of the conductors, the mesh and the magnetic bodies. The magnetic quantities that can be calculated include the force or torque on conductors or magnetic parts, the energy, the flux through a specified surface, line integrals of any field component along any line in space, and the average field or potential harmonic coefficients. We describe the programs with emphasis placed on their use for accelerator magnet design, and present an advanced example of actual calculations. (orig.)

  19. Attila calculations for the 3-D C5G7 benchmark extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wareing, T.A.; McGhee, J.M.; Barnett, D.A.; Failla, G.A.

    2005-01-01

    The performance of the Attila radiation transport software was evaluated for the 3-D C5G7 MOX benchmark extension, a follow-on study to the MOX benchmark developed by the 'OECD/NEA Expert Group on 3-D Radiation Transport Benchmarks'. These benchmarks were designed to test the ability of modern deterministic transport methods to model reactor problems without spatial homogenization. Attila is a general purpose radiation transport software package with an integrated graphical user interface (GUI) for analysis, set-up and postprocessing. Attila provides solutions to the discrete-ordinates form of the linear Boltzmann transport equation on a fully unstructured, tetrahedral mesh using linear discontinuous finite-element spatial differencing in conjunction with diffusion synthetic acceleration of inner iterations. The results obtained indicate that Attila can accurately solve the benchmark problem without spatial homogenization. (authors)

  20. 3D-printed soft-tissue physical models of renal malignancies for individualized surgical simulation: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddox, Michael M; Feibus, Allison; Liu, James; Wang, Julie; Thomas, Raju; Silberstein, Jonathan L

    2018-03-01

    To construct patient-specific physical three-dimensional (3D) models of renal units with materials that approximates the properties of renal tissue to allow pre-operative and robotic training surgical simulation, 3D physical kidney models were created (3DSystems, Rock Hill, SC) using computerized tomography to segment structures of interest (parenchyma, vasculature, collection system, and tumor). Images were converted to a 3D surface mesh file for fabrication using a multi-jet 3D printer. A novel construction technique was employed to approximate normal renal tissue texture, printers selectively deposited photopolymer material forming the outer shell of the kidney, and subsequently, an agarose gel solution was injected into the inner cavity recreating the spongier renal parenchyma. We constructed seven models of renal units with suspected malignancies. Partial nephrectomy and renorrhaphy were performed on each of the replicas. Subsequently all patients successfully underwent robotic partial nephrectomy. Average tumor diameter was 4.4 cm, warm ischemia time was 25 min, RENAL nephrometry score was 7.4, and surgical margins were negative. A comparison was made between the seven cases and the Tulane Urology prospectively maintained robotic partial nephrectomy database. Patients with surgical models had larger tumors, higher nephrometry score, longer warm ischemic time, fewer positive surgical margins, shorter hospitalization, and fewer post-operative complications; however, the only significant finding was lower estimated blood loss (186 cc vs 236; p = 0.01). In this feasibility study, pre-operative resectable physical 3D models can be constructed and used as patient-specific surgical simulation tools; further study will need to demonstrate if this results in improvement of surgical outcomes and robotic simulation education.

  1. Model-based meta-analysis for comparing Vitamin D2 and D3 parent-metabolite pharmacokinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo-Pelland, Alanna S; Gastonguay, Marc R; Riggs, Matthew M

    2017-08-01

    Association of Vitamin D (D3 & D2) and its 25OHD metabolite (25OHD3 & 25OHD2) exposures with various diseases is an active research area. D3 and D2 dose-equivalency and each form's ability to raise 25OHD concentrations are not well-defined. The current work describes a population pharmacokinetic (PK) model for D2 and 25OHD2 and the use of a previously developed D3-25OHD3 PK model [1] for comparing D3 and D2-related exposures. Public-source D2 and 25OHD2 PK data in healthy or osteoporotic populations, including 17 studies representing 278 individuals (15 individual-level and 18 arm-level units), were selected using search criteria in PUBMED. Data included oral, single and multiple D2 doses (400-100,000 IU/d). Nonlinear mixed effects models were developed simultaneously for D2 and 25OHD2 PK (NONMEM v7.2) by considering 1- and 2-compartment models with linear or nonlinear clearance. Unit-level random effects and residual errors were weighted by arm sample size. Model simulations compared 25OHD exposures, following repeated D2 and D3 oral administration across typical dosing and baseline ranges. D2 parent and metabolite were each described by 2-compartment models with numerous parameter estimates shared with the D3-25OHD3 model [1]. Notably, parent D2 was eliminated (converted to 25OHD) through a first-order clearance whereas the previously published D3 model [1] included a saturable non-linear clearance. Similar to 25OHD3 PK model results [1], 25OHD2 was eliminated by a first-order clearance, which was almost twice as fast as the former. Simulations at lower baselines, following lower equivalent doses, indicated that D3 was more effective than D2 at raising 25OHD concentrations. Due to saturation of D3 clearance, however, at higher doses or baselines, the probability of D2 surpassing D3's ability to raise 25OHD concentrations increased substantially. Since 25OHD concentrations generally surpassed 75 nmol/L at these higher baselines by 3 months, there would be no

  2. Drug: D05286 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available D05286 Drug Simple syrup (JP17); Syrup (NF); Simple syrup (TN) ... Therapeutic ...category: 7142 ... Simple syrup is solution of White soft sugar [DR:D00025] ... CAS: 68131-37-3 PubChem: 17398267 ...

  3. Needle segmentation using 3D Hough transform in 3D TRUS guided prostate transperineal therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu Wu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, Western University, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada); Yuchi Ming; Ding Mingyue [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Tessier, David; Fenster, Aaron [Imaging Research Laboratories, Robarts Research Institute, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5K8 (Canada)

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Prostate adenocarcinoma is the most common noncutaneous malignancy in American men with over 200 000 new cases diagnosed each year. Prostate interventional therapy, such as cryotherapy and brachytherapy, is an effective treatment for prostate cancer. Its success relies on the correct needle implant position. This paper proposes a robust and efficient needle segmentation method, which acts as an aid to localize the needle in three-dimensional (3D) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate therapy. Methods: The procedure of locating the needle in a 3D TRUS image is a three-step process. First, the original 3D ultrasound image containing a needle is cropped; the cropped image is then converted to a binary format based on its histogram. Second, a 3D Hough transform based needle segmentation method is applied to the 3D binary image in order to locate the needle axis. The position of the needle endpoint is finally determined by an optimal threshold based analysis of the intensity probability distribution. The overall efficiency is improved through implementing a coarse-fine searching strategy. The proposed method was validated in tissue-mimicking agar phantoms, chicken breast phantoms, and 3D TRUS patient images from prostate brachytherapy and cryotherapy procedures by comparison to the manual segmentation. The robustness of the proposed approach was tested by means of varying parameters such as needle insertion angle, needle insertion length, binarization threshold level, and cropping size. Results: The validation results indicate that the proposed Hough transform based method is accurate and robust, with an achieved endpoint localization accuracy of 0.5 mm for agar phantom images, 0.7 mm for chicken breast phantom images, and 1 mm for in vivo patient cryotherapy and brachytherapy images. The mean execution time of needle segmentation algorithm was 2 s for a 3D TRUS image with size of 264 Multiplication-Sign 376 Multiplication-Sign 630 voxels. Conclusions

  4. Needle segmentation using 3D Hough transform in 3D TRUS guided prostate transperineal therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Wu; Yuchi Ming; Ding Mingyue; Tessier, David; Fenster, Aaron

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate adenocarcinoma is the most common noncutaneous malignancy in American men with over 200 000 new cases diagnosed each year. Prostate interventional therapy, such as cryotherapy and brachytherapy, is an effective treatment for prostate cancer. Its success relies on the correct needle implant position. This paper proposes a robust and efficient needle segmentation method, which acts as an aid to localize the needle in three-dimensional (3D) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) guided prostate therapy. Methods: The procedure of locating the needle in a 3D TRUS image is a three-step process. First, the original 3D ultrasound image containing a needle is cropped; the cropped image is then converted to a binary format based on its histogram. Second, a 3D Hough transform based needle segmentation method is applied to the 3D binary image in order to locate the needle axis. The position of the needle endpoint is finally determined by an optimal threshold based analysis of the intensity probability distribution. The overall efficiency is improved through implementing a coarse-fine searching strategy. The proposed method was validated in tissue-mimicking agar phantoms, chicken breast phantoms, and 3D TRUS patient images from prostate brachytherapy and cryotherapy procedures by comparison to the manual segmentation. The robustness of the proposed approach was tested by means of varying parameters such as needle insertion angle, needle insertion length, binarization threshold level, and cropping size. Results: The validation results indicate that the proposed Hough transform based method is accurate and robust, with an achieved endpoint localization accuracy of 0.5 mm for agar phantom images, 0.7 mm for chicken breast phantom images, and 1 mm for in vivo patient cryotherapy and brachytherapy images. The mean execution time of needle segmentation algorithm was 2 s for a 3D TRUS image with size of 264 × 376 × 630 voxels. Conclusions: The proposed needle segmentation

  5. From 2D Lithography to 3D Patterning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Zeijl, H.W.; Wei, J.; Shen, C.; Verhaar, T.M.; Sarro, P.M.

    2010-01-01

    Lithography as developed for IC device fabrication is a high volume high accuracy patterning technology with strong 2 dimensional (2D) characteristics. This 2D nature makes it a challenge to integrate this technology in a 3 dimensional (3D) manufacturing environment. This article addresses the

  6. 3D Printed Models of Cleft Palate Pathology for Surgical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lioufas, Peter A; Quayle, Michelle R; Leong, James C; McMenamin, Paul G

    2016-09-01

    To explore the potential viability and limitations of 3D printed models of children with cleft palate deformity. The advantages of 3D printed replicas of normal anatomical specimens have previously been described. The creation of 3D prints displaying patient-specific anatomical pathology for surgical planning and interventions is an emerging field. Here we explored the possibility of taking rare pediatric radiographic data sets to create 3D prints for surgical education. Magnetic resonance imaging data of 2 children (8 and 14 months) were segmented, colored, and anonymized, and stereolothographic files were prepared for 3D printing on either multicolor plastic or powder 3D printers and multimaterial 3D printers. Two models were deemed of sufficient quality and anatomical accuracy to print unamended. One data set was further manipulated digitally to artificially extend the length of the cleft. Thus, 3 models were printed: 1 incomplete soft-palate deformity, 1 incomplete anterior palate deformity, and 1 complete cleft palate. All had cleft lip deformity. The single-material 3D prints are of sufficient quality to accurately identify the nature and extent of the deformities. Multimaterial prints were subsequently created, which could be valuable in surgical training. Improvements in the quality and resolution of radiographic imaging combined with the advent of multicolor multiproperty printer technology will make it feasible in the near future to print 3D replicas in materials that mimic the mechanical properties and color of live human tissue making them potentially suitable for surgical training.

  7. Zero-point energy of massless scalar fields in the presence of soft and semihard boundaries in D dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caruso, F.; De Paola, R.; Svaiter, N.F.

    1998-06-01

    The renormalized energy density of a massless scalar field defined in a D-dimensional flat spacetime is computed in the presence of 'soft'and 'semihard'boundaries, modeled by some smoothly increasing potential functions. The sign of the renormalized energy densities for these different confining situations is investigated. The dependence of this energy on D for the cases of 'hard'and 'soft/semihard'boundaries area compared. (author)

  8. Innovations in 3D printing: a 3D overview from optics to organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Carl; van Langeveld, Mark C; Donoso, Larry A

    2014-02-01

    3D printing is a method of manufacturing in which materials, such as plastic or metal, are deposited onto one another in layers to produce a three dimensional object, such as a pair of eye glasses or other 3D objects. This process contrasts with traditional ink-based printers which produce a two dimensional object (ink on paper). To date, 3D printing has primarily been used in engineering to create engineering prototypes. However, recent advances in printing materials have now enabled 3D printers to make objects that are comparable with traditionally manufactured items. In contrast with conventional printers, 3D printing has the potential to enable mass customisation of goods on a large scale and has relevance in medicine including ophthalmology. 3D printing has already been proved viable in several medical applications including the manufacture of eyeglasses, custom prosthetic devices and dental implants. In this review, we discuss the potential for 3D printing to revolutionise manufacturing in the same way as the printing press revolutionised conventional printing. The applications and limitations of 3D printing are discussed; the production process is demonstrated by producing a set of eyeglass frames from 3D blueprints.

  9. E3D, 3-D Elastic Seismic Wave Propagation Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsen, S.; Harris, D.; Schultz, C.; Maddix, D.; Bakowsky, T.; Bent, L.

    2004-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: E3D is capable of simulating seismic wave propagation in a 3D heterogeneous earth. Seismic waves are initiated by earthquake, explosive, and/or other sources. These waves propagate through a 3D geologic model, and are simulated as synthetic seismograms or other graphical output. 2 - Methods: The software simulates wave propagation by solving the elasto-dynamic formulation of the full wave equation on a staggered grid. The solution scheme is 4-order accurate in space, 2-order accurate in time

  10. The crystal structure of γ-AlD3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brinks, H.W.; Brown, C.; Jensen, C.M.; Graetz, J.; Reilly, J.J.; Hauback, B.C.

    2007-01-01

    γ-AlD 3 was synthesized from LiAlD 4 and AlCl 3 via thermal decomposition of aluminum hydride etherate in presence of excess LiAlD 4 . γ-AlD 3 was determined by powder neutron diffraction and synchrotron X-ray diffraction to crystallize in the space group Pnnm. The orthorhombic structure has unit-cell dimensions a = 7.3360(3) A, b = 5.3672(2) A and c = 5.7562(1) A, and it consists of both corner- and edge-sharing AlD 6 octahedra where each hydrogen is shared between two octahedra. The average Al-D distances in octahedra with edge-sharing is 1.706 A and in the octahedra with only corner-sharing 1.719 A

  11. Calibration of a dedicated software for 3D rendering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrantes, Marcos E.S.; Felix, Warley F.; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F., E-mail: marcos.nuclear@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: warleyferreirafelix@gmail.com, E-mail: mdora@nuclear.ufmg.br [Faculdade Ciencias Medicas de Minas Gerais (FCMMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-11-01

    With the increasing use of 3D reconstruction techniques, to assist in diagnosis, dedicated programs are being widely used. For this they must be calibrated in order to encounter the values of the real volumes of the human tissues. The purpose of this work is to indicate correction and calibration values for true volumes, read in a 3D reconstruction system dedicated, using DICOM images of Computed Tomography. This work utilized a PMMA thorax phantom associated with the DICOM image and the volume found by a program of a tomograph. The physical volume of the PMMA phantom found was 10359.0 cm³. For the volumes found according to the structures of interest, the values are 11005.5 cm³, 10249.3 cm³ and 10205.1 cm³ and the correction values are -6.2%, +1.1% e +1.5% respectively for tissues: pulmonary, bony and soft tissues. The procedure performed can be used for calibration in other 3D reconstruction programs, observing the necessary corrections and the methodology used. (author)

  12. Calibration of a dedicated software for 3D rendering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrantes, Marcos E.S.; Felix, Warley F.; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F.; Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais

    2017-01-01

    With the increasing use of 3D reconstruction techniques, to assist in diagnosis, dedicated programs are being widely used. For this they must be calibrated in order to encounter the values of the real volumes of the human tissues. The purpose of this work is to indicate correction and calibration values for true volumes, read in a 3D reconstruction system dedicated, using DICOM images of Computed Tomography. This work utilized a PMMA thorax phantom associated with the DICOM image and the volume found by a program of a tomograph. The physical volume of the PMMA phantom found was 10359.0 cm³. For the volumes found according to the structures of interest, the values are 11005.5 cm³, 10249.3 cm³ and 10205.1 cm³ and the correction values are -6.2%, +1.1% e +1.5% respectively for tissues: pulmonary, bony and soft tissues. The procedure performed can be used for calibration in other 3D reconstruction programs, observing the necessary corrections and the methodology used. (author)

  13. CT-image based conformal brachytherapy of breast cancer. The significance of semi-3-D and 3-D treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polgar, C.; Major, T.; Somogyi, A.; Takacsi-Nagy, Z.; Mangel, L.C.; Fodor, J.; Nemeth, G.; Forrai, G.; Sulyok, Z.

    2000-01-01

    In 103 patients with T1-2, N0-1 breast cancer the tumor bed was clipped during breast conserving surgery. Fifty-two of them received boost brachytherapy after 46 to 50 Gy teletherapy and 51 patients were treated with brachytherapy alone via flexible implant tubes. Single double and triple plane implant was used in 6,89 and 8 cases, respectively. The dose of boost brachytherapy and sole brachytherapy prescribed to dose reference points was 3 times 4.75 Gy and 7 times 5.2 Gy, respectively. The positions of dose reference points varied according to the level (2-D, semi-3-D and 3-D) of treatment planning performed. The treatment planning was based on the 3-D reconstruction of the surgical clips, implant tubes and skin points. In all cases the implantations were planned with a semi-3-D technique aided by simulator. In 10 cases a recently developed CT-guided 3-D planning system was used. The semi-3D and 3-D treatment plans were compared to hypothetical 2-D plans using dose-volume histograms and dose non-uniformity ratios. The values of mean central dose, mean skin dose, minimal clip dose, proportion of underdosaged clips and mean target surface dose were evaluated. The accuracy of tumor bed localization and the conformity of planning target volume and treated volume were also analyzed in each technique. Results: With the help of conformal semi-3D and 3D brachytherapy planning we could define reference dose points, active source positions and dwell times individually. This technique decreased the mean skin dose with 22.2% and reduced the possibility of geographical miss. We could achieve the best conformity between the planning target volume and the treated volume with the CT-image based 3-D treatment planning, at the cost of worse dose homogeneity. The mean treated volume was reduced by 25.1% with semi-3-D planning, however, its was increased by 16.2% with 3-D planning, compared to the 2-D planning. (orig.) [de

  14. 3s--3p, 3p--3d, and 3d--4f transitions of sodiumlike ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reader, J.; Kaufman, V.; Sugar, J.; Olof Ekberg, J.; Feldman, U.; Brown, C.M.; Seely, J.F.; Rowan, W.L.

    1987-01-01

    New measurements have been made for wavelengths of the 3s--3p, 3p--3d, and 3d--4f transitions of the sodiumlike ions Cu/sup 18+/, Zn/sup 19+/, Ga/sup 20+/, Ge/sup 21+/, As/sup 22+/, Se/sup 23+/, Br/sup 24+/, Kr/sup 25+/, Y/sup 28+/, Zr/sup 29+/, Nb/sup 30+/, Mo/sup 31+/, Ru/sup 33+/, Rh/sup 34+/, Pd/sup 35+/, Ag/sup 36+/, and Sn/sup 39+/. The measurements were made by photographing laser-produced plasmas and tokamak plasmas with grazing-incidence spectrographs. The energies of the transitions were also calculated with Dirac--Fock computer codes. By fitting the differences between the observed and calculated wave numbers to simple formulas, least-squares-fitted wavelengths for all sodiumlike ions from Ar 7+ to Xe/sup 43+/ were determined. The estimated uncertainty of the fitted wavelengths is +- 0.007 A, which makes them useful as reference values. The wavelengths range from 9 to 713 A

  15. Dose fractionation theorem in 3-D reconstruction (tomography)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaeser, R.M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    It is commonly assumed that the large number of projections for single-axis tomography precludes its application to most beam-labile specimens. However, Hegerl and Hoppe have pointed out that the total dose required to achieve statistical significance for each voxel of a computed 3-D reconstruction is the same as that required to obtain a single 2-D image of that isolated voxel, at the same level of statistical significance. Thus a statistically significant 3-D image can be computed from statistically insignificant projections, as along as the total dosage that is distributed among these projections is high enough that it would have resulted in a statistically significant projection, if applied to only one image. We have tested this critical theorem by simulating the tomographic reconstruction of a realistic 3-D model created from an electron micrograph. The simulations verify the basic conclusions of high absorption, signal-dependent noise, varying specimen contrast and missing angular range. Furthermore, the simulations demonstrate that individual projections in the series of fractionated-dose images can be aligned by cross-correlation because they contain significant information derived from the summation of features from different depths in the structure. This latter information is generally not useful for structural interpretation prior to 3-D reconstruction, owing to the complexity of most specimens investigated by single-axis tomography. These results, in combination with dose estimates for imaging single voxels and measurements of radiation damage in the electron microscope, demonstrate that it is feasible to use single-axis tomography with soft X-ray microscopy of frozen-hydrated specimens.

  16. Dose fractionation theorem in 3-D reconstruction (tomography)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaeser, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that the large number of projections for single-axis tomography precludes its application to most beam-labile specimens. However, Hegerl and Hoppe have pointed out that the total dose required to achieve statistical significance for each voxel of a computed 3-D reconstruction is the same as that required to obtain a single 2-D image of that isolated voxel, at the same level of statistical significance. Thus a statistically significant 3-D image can be computed from statistically insignificant projections, as along as the total dosage that is distributed among these projections is high enough that it would have resulted in a statistically significant projection, if applied to only one image. We have tested this critical theorem by simulating the tomographic reconstruction of a realistic 3-D model created from an electron micrograph. The simulations verify the basic conclusions of high absorption, signal-dependent noise, varying specimen contrast and missing angular range. Furthermore, the simulations demonstrate that individual projections in the series of fractionated-dose images can be aligned by cross-correlation because they contain significant information derived from the summation of features from different depths in the structure. This latter information is generally not useful for structural interpretation prior to 3-D reconstruction, owing to the complexity of most specimens investigated by single-axis tomography. These results, in combination with dose estimates for imaging single voxels and measurements of radiation damage in the electron microscope, demonstrate that it is feasible to use single-axis tomography with soft X-ray microscopy of frozen-hydrated specimens

  17. 3D reconstruction from X-ray fluoroscopy for clinical veterinary medicine using differential volume rendering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khongsomboon, K.; Hamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kondo, Shozo

    2007-01-01

    3D reconstruction from ordinary X-ray equipment which is not CT or MRI is required in clinical veterinary medicine. Authors have already proposed a 3D reconstruction technique from X-ray photograph to present bone structure. Although the reconstruction is useful for veterinary medicine, the technique has two problems. One is about exposure of X-ray and the other is about data acquisition process. An x-ray equipment which is not special one but can solve the problems is X-ray fluoroscopy. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a method for 3D-reconstruction from X-ray fluoroscopy for clinical veterinary medicine. Fluoroscopy is usually used to observe a movement of organ or to identify a position of organ for surgery by weak X-ray intensity. Since fluoroscopy can output a observed result as movie, the previous two problems which are caused by use of X-ray photograph can be solved. However, a new problem arises due to weak X-ray intensity. Although fluoroscopy can present information of not only bone structure but soft tissues, the contrast is very low and it is very difficult to recognize some soft tissues. It is very useful to be able to observe not only bone structure but soft tissues clearly by ordinary X-ray equipment in the field of clinical veterinary medicine. To solve this problem, this paper proposes a new method to determine opacity in volume rendering process. The opacity is determined according to 3D differential coefficient of 3D reconstruction. This differential volume rendering can present a 3D structure image of multiple organs volumetrically and clearly for clinical veterinary medicine. This paper shows results of simulation and experimental investigation of small dog and evaluation by veterinarians. (author)

  18. Applications of 2D to 3D conversion for educational purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koido, Yoshihisa; Morikawa, Hiroyuki; Shiraishi, Saki; Takeuchi, Soya; Maruyama, Wataru; Nakagori, Toshio; Hirakata, Masataka; Shinkai, Hirohisa; Kawai, Takashi

    2013-03-01

    There are three main approaches creating stereoscopic S3D content: stereo filming using two cameras, stereo rendering of 3D computer graphics, and 2D to S3D conversion by adding binocular information to 2D material images. Although manual "off-line" conversion can control the amount of parallax flexibly, 2D material images are converted according to monocular information in most cases, and the flexibility of 2D to S3D conversion has not been exploited. If the depth is expressed flexibly, comprehensions and interests from converted S3D contents are anticipated to be differed from those from 2D. Therefore, in this study we created new S3D content for education by applying 2D to S3D conversion. For surgical education, we created S3D surgical operation content under a surgeon using a partial 2D to S3D conversion technique which was expected to concentrate viewers' attention on significant areas. And for art education, we converted Ukiyoe prints; traditional Japanese artworks made from a woodcut. The conversion of this content, which has little depth information, into S3D, is expected to produce different cognitive processes from those evoked by 2D content, e.g., the excitation of interest, and the understanding of spatial information. In addition, the effects of the representation of these contents were investigated.

  19. 3D Modelling and Printing Technology to Produce Patient-Specific 3D Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birbara, Nicolette S; Otton, James M; Pather, Nalini

    2017-11-10

    A comprehensive knowledge of mitral valve (MV) anatomy is crucial in the assessment of MV disease. While the use of three-dimensional (3D) modelling and printing in MV assessment has undergone early clinical evaluation, the precision and usefulness of this technology requires further investigation. This study aimed to assess and validate 3D modelling and printing technology to produce patient-specific 3D MV models. A prototype method for MV 3D modelling and printing was developed from computed tomography (CT) scans of a plastinated human heart. Mitral valve models were printed using four 3D printing methods and validated to assess precision. Cardiac CT and 3D echocardiography imaging data of four MV disease patients was used to produce patient-specific 3D printed models, and 40 cardiac health professionals (CHPs) were surveyed on the perceived value and potential uses of 3D models in a clinical setting. The prototype method demonstrated submillimetre precision for all four 3D printing methods used, and statistical analysis showed a significant difference (p3D printed models, particularly using multiple print materials, were considered useful by CHPs for preoperative planning, as well as other applications such as teaching and training. This study suggests that, with further advances in 3D modelling and printing technology, patient-specific 3D MV models could serve as a useful clinical tool. The findings also highlight the potential of this technology to be applied in a variety of medical areas within both clinical and educational settings. Copyright © 2017 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. ¿Es equivalente la suplementación diaria con vitamina D2 o vitamina D3 en adultos mayores? Is daily supplementation with vitamin D2 equivalent to daily supplementation with vitamin D3 in the elderly?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Seijo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Tanto la equivalencia entre colecalciferol (D3 y ergocalciferol (D2, como las dosis y forma de administración de ambos, son actualmente un tema controvertido. El objetivo de este estudio fue comparar la efectividad de 800 UI/día de D2 (gotas y D3 (comprimidos para alcanzar niveles adecuados de 25 hidroxivitamina D (25OHD (= 30 ng/ml. Veintiún mujeres posmenopáusicas que vivían en la Ciudad de Buenos Aires, edad promedio ( ± DS 77.1 ± 6.8 años fueron incluidas y asignadas en forma aleatoria a uno de los siguientes grupos: GD2 (n = 13: 800 UI (gotas y GD3 (n = 8: 800 UI (comprimidos. Se midió 25OHD sérica (RIA-DIASORIN basal y a los 7, 28 y 45 días del estudio. Basalmente, 19 de las 21 mujeres presentaron niveles de deficiencia de 25(OHD (The equivalence of cholecalciferol (D3 and ergocalciferol (D2 as well as their corresponding doses and administration route remain controversial to date. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of daily supplementation with 800 IU of D2 (drops and D3 (pills on 25-hydroxivitamin D (25OHD levels (= 30 ng/ml. Twenty-one ambulatory postmenopausal women from Buenos Aires City with a mean ( ± SD age of 77.1 ± 6.8 years were included. The participants were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: GD2 (n = 13: 800 IU (drops and GD3 (n = 8: 800 IU (pills. Serum 25OHD levels were measured (RIA-DIASORIN at baseline, and at 7, 28 and 45 days. Nineteen out of twenty one women showed deficient levels of 25OHD at baseline (< 20 ng/ml: GD2: 14.0 ± 4.8 ng/ml and GD3: 13.2 ± 4.9 ng/ml (NS. Whereas only GD3 exhibited an increase (~25% at 7 days, both groups showed a significant increase at the end of the study. However, neither attained adequate 25OHD levels (GD2: 17.4 ± 5.5 vs. GD3:22.9 ± 4.6 ng/ml; p < 0.001. Administration of 800 IU of vitamin D3 during 45 days was more effective than D2 in increasing 25OHD, but both failed to achieve adequate levels of 25OHD (= 30 ng/ml. but neither

  1. On Alternative Approaches to 3D Image Perception: Monoscopic 3D Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blundell, Barry G.

    2015-06-01

    In the eighteenth century, techniques that enabled a strong sense of 3D perception to be experienced without recourse to binocular disparities (arising from the spatial separation of the eyes) underpinned the first significant commercial sales of 3D viewing devices and associated content. However following the advent of stereoscopic techniques in the nineteenth century, 3D image depiction has become inextricably linked to binocular parallax and outside the vision science and arts communities relatively little attention has been directed towards earlier approaches. Here we introduce relevant concepts and terminology and consider a number of techniques and optical devices that enable 3D perception to be experienced on the basis of planar images rendered from a single vantage point. Subsequently we allude to possible mechanisms for non-binocular parallax based 3D perception. Particular attention is given to reviewing areas likely to be thought-provoking to those involved in 3D display development, spatial visualization, HCI, and other related areas of interdisciplinary research.

  2. Accurate and reproducible reconstruction of coronary arteries and endothelial shear stress calculation using 3D OCT: comparative study to 3D IVUS and 3D QCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutouzas, Konstantinos; Chatzizisis, Yiannis S; Riga, Maria; Giannopoulos, Andreas; Antoniadis, Antonios P; Tu, Shengxian; Fujino, Yusuke; Mitsouras, Dimitrios; Doulaverakis, Charalampos; Tsampoulatidis, Ioannis; Koutkias, Vassilis G; Bouki, Konstantina; Li, Yingguang; Chouvarda, Ioanna; Cheimariotis, Grigorios; Maglaveras, Nicos; Kompatsiaris, Ioannis; Nakamura, Sunao; Reiber, Johan H C; Rybicki, Frank; Karvounis, Haralambos; Stefanadis, Christodoulos; Tousoulis, Dimitris; Giannoglou, George D

    2015-06-01

    Geometrically-correct 3D OCT is a new imaging modality with the potential to investigate the association of local hemodynamic microenvironment with OCT-derived high-risk features. We aimed to describe the methodology of 3D OCT and investigate the accuracy, inter- and intra-observer agreement of 3D OCT in reconstructing coronary arteries and calculating ESS, using 3D IVUS and 3D QCA as references. 35 coronary artery segments derived from 30 patients were reconstructed in 3D space using 3D OCT. 3D OCT was validated against 3D IVUS and 3D QCA. The agreement in artery reconstruction among 3D OCT, 3D IVUS and 3D QCA was assessed in 3-mm-long subsegments using lumen morphometry and ESS parameters. The inter- and intra-observer agreement of 3D OCT, 3D IVUS and 3D QCA were assessed in a representative sample of 61 subsegments (n = 5 arteries). The data processing times for each reconstruction methodology were also calculated. There was a very high agreement between 3D OCT vs. 3D IVUS and 3D OCT vs. 3D QCA in terms of total reconstructed artery length and volume, as well as in terms of segmental morphometric and ESS metrics with mean differences close to zero and narrow limits of agreement (Bland-Altman analysis). 3D OCT exhibited excellent inter- and intra-observer agreement. The analysis time with 3D OCT was significantly lower compared to 3D IVUS. Geometrically-correct 3D OCT is a feasible, accurate and reproducible 3D reconstruction technique that can perform reliable ESS calculations in coronary arteries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Embryonic staging using a 3D virtual reality system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Verwoerd-Dikkeboom (Christine); A.H.J. Koning (Anton); P.J. van der Spek (Peter); N. Exalto (Niek); R.P.M. Steegers-Theunissen (Régine)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to demonstrate that Carnegie Stages could be assigned to embryos visualized with a 3D virtual reality system. METHODS: We analysed 48 3D ultrasound scans of 19 IVF/ICSI pregnancies at 7-10 weeks' gestation. These datasets were visualized as 3D

  4. Effect of 3D radiotherapy planning compared to 2D planning within a conventional treatment schedule of advanced lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schraube, P.; Spahn, U.; Oetzel, D.; Wannenmacher, M.

    2000-01-01

    Background: The effect of 3D radiotherapy planning (3D RTP) in comparison to 2D radiotherapy planning (2D RTP) was evaluated in a usually practiced treatment schedule (starting by v./d. opposing portals, continued with computer-planned portals) for non-small-cell lung cancer. Patients and Methods: In 20 patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer the computer-planned part of the treatment schedule was calculated 2- and 3-dimensionally. Target volume were the primary tumor, the involved and the electively irradiated mediastinal lymph nodes. The results of the 2D RTP were recalculated 3-dimensionally and the mean doses to target volume and organs at risk were defined. Further, the normal tissue complications were calculated. Results: Under the prerequisite of 44 Gy maximally allowed to the spinal cord and a dose to the reference point of 50 Gy a small, but significant advantage with 2.1 Gy to the target (p=0.004) and a reduction of 3.6 Gy to the heart (p=0.05) was achievable for 3D RTP. The dose to the lungs did not differ significantly (19.7 Gy for 2D RTP, 20.3 Gy for 3D RTP). The dose to the heart was not estimated critical by NTCP (normal tissue complication probability). The NTCP for the ipsilateral lung was 16.1 and 18.7% for 2D RTP and 3D RTP, respectively. Regarding the simulator-planned ap/pa fields at the start of the radiotherapy the advantage of 3D RTP was further reduced but remained significant. Favorable with respect to the mean lung dose and the NTCP (18.7% NTCP ipsilateral lung for early onset of 3D planned radiotherapy vs 31.7% for late onset of 3D planned radiotherapy) but not significantly measurable is the early start of the treatment by computerized RTP. Conclusion: The main advantage of 3D RTP in treatment of advanced lung cancer is the better coverage of the target volume. A reduction of the mean lung dose cannot be expected. A dose escalation by 3D RTP to target volumes as described here seems not to be possible because of

  5. Contributions in compression of 3D medical images and 2D images; Contributions en compression d'images medicales 3D et d'images naturelles 2D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudeau, Y

    2006-12-15

    The huge amounts of volumetric data generated by current medical imaging techniques in the context of an increasing demand for long term archiving solutions, as well as the rapid development of distant radiology make the use of compression inevitable. Indeed, if the medical community has sided until now with compression without losses, most of applications suffer from compression ratios which are too low with this kind of compression. In this context, compression with acceptable losses could be the most appropriate answer. So, we propose a new loss coding scheme based on 3D (3 dimensional) Wavelet Transform and Dead Zone Lattice Vector Quantization 3D (DZLVQ) for medical images. Our algorithm has been evaluated on several computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance image volumes. The main contribution of this work is the design of a multidimensional dead zone which enables to take into account correlations between neighbouring elementary volumes. At high compression ratios, we show that it can out-perform visually and numerically the best existing methods. These promising results are confirmed on head CT by two medical patricians. The second contribution of this document assesses the effect with-loss image compression on CAD (Computer-Aided Decision) detection performance of solid lung nodules. This work on 120 significant lungs images shows that detection did not suffer until 48:1 compression and still was robust at 96:1. The last contribution consists in the complexity reduction of our compression scheme. The first allocation dedicated to 2D DZLVQ uses an exponential of the rate-distortion (R-D) functions. The second allocation for 2D and 3D medical images is based on block statistical model to estimate the R-D curves. These R-D models are based on the joint distribution of wavelet vectors using a multidimensional mixture of generalized Gaussian (MMGG) densities. (author)

  6. CT-image-based conformal brachytherapy of breast cancer. The significance of semi-3-D and 3-D treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polgár, C; Major, T; Somogyi, A; Takácsi-Nagy, Z; Mangel, L C; Forrai, G; Sulyok, Z; Fodor, J; Németh, G

    2000-03-01

    To compare the conventional 2-D, the simulator-guided semi-3-D and the recently developed CT-guided 3-D brachytherapy treatment planning in the interstitial radiotherapy of breast cancer. In 103 patients with T1-2, N0-1 breast cancer the tumor bed was clipped during breast conserving surgery. Fifty-two of them received boost brachytherapy after 46 to 50 Gy teletherapy and 51 patients were treated with brachytherapy alone via flexible implant tubes. Single, double and triple plane implant was used in 6, 89 and 8 cases, respectively. The dose of boost brachytherapy and sole brachytherapy prescribed to dose reference points was 3 times 4.75 Gy and 7 times 5.2 Gy, respectively. The positions of dose reference points varied according to the level (2-D, semi-3-D and 3-D) of treatment planning performed. The treatment planning was based on the 3-D reconstruction of the surgical clips, implant tubes and skin points. In all cases the implantations were planned with a semi-3-D technique aided by simulator. In 10 cases a recently developed CT-guided 3-D planning system was used. The semi-3-D and 3-D treatment plans were compared to hypothetical 2-D plans using dose-volume histograms and dose non-uniformity ratios. The values of mean central dose, mean skin dose, minimal clip dose, proportion of underdosaged clips and mean target surface dose were evaluated. The accuracy of tumor bed localization and the conformity of planning target volume and treated volume were also analyzed in each technique. With the help of conformal semi-3-D and 3-D brachytherapy planning we could define reference dose points, active source positions and dwell times individually. This technique decreased the mean skin dose with 22.2% and reduced the possibility of geographical miss. We could achieve the best conformity between the planning target volume and the treated volume with the CT-image based 3-D treatment planning, at the cost of worse dose homogeneity. The mean treated volume was reduced by 25

  7. Crystal structures of D-tagatose 3-epimerase from Pseudomonas cichorii and its complexes with D-tagatose and D-fructose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiromi; Yamada, Mitsugu; Nishitani, Takeyori; Takada, Goro; Izumori, Ken; Kamitori, Shigehiro

    2007-11-23

    Pseudomonas cichoriiid-tagatose 3-epimerase (P. cichoriid-TE) can efficiently catalyze the epimerization of not only d-tagatose to d-sorbose, but also d-fructose to d-psicose, and is used for the production of d-psicose from d-fructose. The crystal structures of P. cichoriid-TE alone and in complexes with d-tagatose and d-fructose were determined at resolutions of 1.79, 2.28, and 2.06 A, respectively. A subunit of P. cichoriid-TE adopts a (beta/alpha)(8) barrel structure, and a metal ion (Mn(2+)) found in the active site is coordinated by Glu152, Asp185, His211, and Glu246 at the end of the beta-barrel. P. cichoriid-TE forms a stable dimer to give a favorable accessible surface for substrate binding on the front side of the dimer. The simulated omit map indicates that O2 and O3 of d-tagatose and/or d-fructose coordinate Mn(2+), and that C3-O3 is located between carboxyl groups of Glu152 and Glu246, supporting the previously proposed mechanism of deprotonation/protonation at C3 by two Glu residues. Although the electron density is poor at the 4-, 5-, and 6-positions of the substrates, substrate-enzyme interactions can be deduced from the significant electron density at O6. The O6 possibly interacts with Cys66 via hydrogen bonding, whereas O4 and O5 in d-tagatose and O4 in d-fructose do not undergo hydrogen bonding to the enzyme and are in a hydrophobic environment created by Phe7, Trp15, Trp113, and Phe248. Due to the lack of specific interactions between the enzyme and its substrates at the 4- and 5-positions, P. cichoriid-TE loosely recognizes substrates in this region, allowing it to efficiently catalyze the epimerization of d-tagatose and d-fructose (C4 epimer of d-tagatose) as well. Furthermore, a C3-O3 proton-exchange mechanism for P. cichoriid-TE is suggested by X-ray structural analysis, providing a clear explanation for the regulation of the ionization state of Glu152 and Glu246.

  8. Development of low-cost open source 3D gel printer "RepRap SWIM-ER"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kei; Basher, Samiul; Ota, Takafumi; Tase, Taishi; Takamatsu, Kyuichiro; Saito, Azusa; Khosla, Ajit; Kawakami, Masaru; Furuawa, Hidemitsu

    2017-04-01

    Gels are soft and wet materials having low friction, good biocompatibility, and material permeability. It is expected that gel materials will be used as new kinds of industrial materials in the engineering and medical applications. But it cannot build a complicated shape. Soft & Wet Matter Engineering Laboratory developed a 3D gel Printer "SWIM-ER", has enabled modeling of complex shapes of the gel. However, this is expensive. Therefore not all of the gel researchers and the companies have such a device. To solve this problem, we manufacture a low-cost open-source 3D gel printer "RepRap SWIM-ER" from the RepRap. We made the components required to manufacture the "RepRap SWIM-ER" from the 3D printer and chose a light source. In addition, we produced the P-DN gel for RepRap SWIM-ER and conducted the molding test to confirm whether RepRap SWIM-ER can used it.

  9. Soft supersymmetry breaking in KKLT flux compactification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, K.; Falkowski, A.; Nilles, H.P.; Olechowski, M.

    2005-01-01

    We examine the structure of soft supersymmetry breaking terms in KKLT models of flux compactification with low energy supersymmetry. Moduli are stabilized by fluxes and nonperturbative dynamics while a de Sitter vacuum is obtained by adding supersymmetry breaking anti-branes. We discuss the characteristic pattern of mass scales in such a set-up as well as some features of 4D N=1 supergravity breakdown by anti-branes. Anomaly mediation is found to always give an important contribution and one can easily arrange for flavor-independent soft terms. In its most attractive realization, the modulus mediation is comparable to the anomaly mediation, yielding a quite distinctive sparticle spectrum. In addition, the axion component of the modulus/dilaton superfield dynamically cancels the relative CP phase between the contributions of anomaly and modulus mediation, thereby avoiding dangerous SUSY CP violation

  10. 3D-Printed ABS and PLA Scaffolds for Cartilage and Nucleus Pulposus Tissue Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenzweig, Derek H.; Carelli, Eric; Steffen, Thomas; Jarzem, Peter; Haglund, Lisbet

    2015-01-01

    Painful degeneration of soft tissues accounts for high socioeconomic costs. Tissue engineering aims to provide biomimetics recapitulating native tissues. Biocompatible thermoplastics for 3D printing can generate high-resolution structures resembling tissue extracellular matrix. Large-pore 3D-printed acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) and polylactic acid (PLA) scaffolds were compared for cell ingrowth, viability, and tissue generation. Primary articular chondrocytes and nucleus pulposus (N...

  11. 3DSEM: A 3D microscopy dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad P. Tafti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM as a 2D imaging instrument has been widely used in many scientific disciplines including biological, mechanical, and materials sciences to determine the surface attributes of microscopic objects. However the SEM micrographs still remain 2D images. To effectively measure and visualize the surface properties, we need to truly restore the 3D shape model from 2D SEM images. Having 3D surfaces would provide anatomic shape of micro-samples which allows for quantitative measurements and informative visualization of the specimens being investigated. The 3DSEM is a dataset for 3D microscopy vision which is freely available at [1] for any academic, educational, and research purposes. The dataset includes both 2D images and 3D reconstructed surfaces of several real microscopic samples. Keywords: 3D microscopy dataset, 3D microscopy vision, 3D SEM surface reconstruction, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM

  12. 3D motion graphics for 2D artists conquering the 3rd dimension

    CERN Document Server

    Byrne, Bill

    2011-01-01

    Add 3D to your mograph skillset! For the experienced 2D artist, this lavishly illustrated, 4 color book presents the essentials to building and compositing 3D elements into your 2D world of film and broadcast. Concepts and techniques are presented in concise, step-by-step tutorials, hundreds of which are featured throughout. Featured applications include Photoshop, Illustrator, After Effects, and Cinema 4D. Lessons include exploring the expanded 3D functionality of the Adobe Creative Suite applications (After Effects, Photoshop, and Illustrator) through a series of practical tutorials. More

  13. A CANDELS-3D-HST synergy : Resolved Star Formation Patterns at 0.7

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wuyts, S.; , van, Dokkum P.G.; , van der, Wel A.

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the resolved stellar populations of 473 massive star-forming galaxies at 0.7 {lt} z {lt} 1.5, with multi-wavelength broadband imaging from CANDELS and H{$α$} surface brightness profiles at the same kiloparsec resolution from 3D-HST. Together, this unique data set sheds light on how the

  14. The cutaneous photosynthesis of previtamin D3: a unique photoendocrine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holick, M.F.

    1981-01-01

    The skin has been recognized as the site for the sun-mediated photosynthesis of vitamin D3; until recently, however, very little was known about either the sequence of events leading to the formation of vitamin D3 in human skin or the factors that regulate the synthesis of this hormone. It is now established that, during exposure to sunlight, the cutaneous reservoir of 7-dehydrocholesterol (principally in the stratum Malpighii) converts to previtamin D3. Once this thermally labile previtamin is formed, it undergoes a temperature-dependent isomerization to vitamin D3 over a period of 3 days. The plasma vitamin-D binding protein preferentially translocates vitamin D3 from the skin into the circulation. During prolonged exposure to the sun, the accumulation of previtamin D3 is limited to about 10 to 15% of the original 7-dehydrocholesterol content because the previtamin photoisomerizes to 2 biologically inert photoproducts, lumisterol3 and tachysterol3. Increases in either latitude or the melanin concentration in the skin diminish the epidermal synthesis of previtamin D3. A single total body exposure to 3 minimal erythemal doses of ultraviolet radiation increased the vitamin-D3 levels in the serum 25-hydroxyvitamin-D levels after 7 days. The unique mechanism for the cutaneous synthesis, storage, and steady release of vitamin D3 into the circulation prompted an investigation into the potential therapeutic benefits of using the skin as the site for the synthesis and absorption of vitamin-D3 metabolites

  15. Using one hybrid 3D-1D-3D approach for the conceptual design of WCCB blanket for CFETR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Kecheng; Zhang, Xiaokang [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Li, Jia [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Ma, Xuebin [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Liu, Songlin, E-mail: slliu@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • The Hybrid 3D-1D-3D approach is used for radial building design of WCCB. • Nuclear heat obtained by this method agrees well with 3D neutronics results. • The final results of temperature and TBR satisfy with the requirements. • All the results show that this approach is high efficiency and high reliability. - Abstract: A hybrid 3D-1D-3D approach is proposed for the conceptual design of a blanket. Firstly, the neutron wall loading (NWL) of each blanket module is obtained through a neutronics calculation employing a 3D model, which contains the geometry outline of in-vacuum vessel components and the exact neutron source distribution. Secondly, a 1D cylindrical model with the blanket module containing a detailed radial building is adopted for the neutronics analysis, with the aim of calculating the tritium breeding ratio (TBR) and nuclear heating. Being normalized to the NWL, the nuclear heating is transferred to a 2D model for thermal-hydraulics analysis using the FLUENT code. Through a series analysis of nuclear-thermal iterations that considers the tritium breeding ratio (TBR) and thermal performance as optimization objectives, the optimized radial building of each module surrounding plasma can be obtained. Thirdly, the 3D structural design of each module is established by adding side walls, cover plates, stiffening plates, and other components based on the radial building. The 3D neutronics and thermal-hydraulics using the detailed blanket modules are re-analyzed. This approach has been successfully applied to the design of a water-cooled ceramic breeder blanket for the Chinese Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR). The radial building of each blanket module surrounding plasma is optimized. The global tritium breeding ratio (TBR) calculated by the 3D neutronics analysis is 1.21, and the temperature of all materials in the 3D blanket structure is below the upper limits. As indicated by the comparison of the 1D and 3D neutronics and thermal

  16. Minimally invasive vascular imaging using 3D-CTA and 3D-MRA. Update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Hiromitsu; Kawamata, Hiroshi; Takagi, Ryo; Amano, Yasuo; Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Ichikawa, Kazuo; Kumazaki, Tatsuo

    1998-01-01

    Conventional angiography is considered the standard of reference for diagnostic imaging of vascular diseases with respect to its temporal and spatial resolution. This procedure, however is invasive and repeated studies are difficult, and arterial complications are occasionally associated in catheter-based conventional angiography. Recent advances in diagnostic imaging have facilitated three-dimensional CT angiography (3D-CTA) using the volumetric acquisition capabilities inherent in spiral CT and three-dimensional MR angiography (3D-MRA) using the 3D gradient-echo sequence with a bolus injection of Gd-DTPA. These techniques can provide vascular images exceedingly similar to conventional angiograms within a short acquisition time. 3D-CTA and 3D-MRA are considered to be promising, minimally invasive methods for obtaining images of the vasculature, and alternatives to catheter angiography. This study reviews the current status of 3D-CTA and 3D-MRA, with emphasis on the clinical usefulness of three-dimensional diagnostic imaging for the evaluation of diverse vascular pathologies. (author)

  17. ROOFN3D: DEEP LEARNING TRAINING DATA FOR 3D BUILDING RECONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wichmann

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Machine learning methods have gained in importance through the latest development of artificial intelligence and computer hardware. Particularly approaches based on deep learning have shown that they are able to provide state-of-the-art results for various tasks. However, the direct application of deep learning methods to improve the results of 3D building reconstruction is often not possible due, for example, to the lack of suitable training data. To address this issue, we present RoofN3D which provides a new 3D point cloud training dataset that can be used to train machine learning models for different tasks in the context of 3D building reconstruction. It can be used, among others, to train semantic segmentation networks or to learn the structure of buildings and the geometric model construction. Further details about RoofN3D and the developed data preparation framework, which enables the automatic derivation of training data, are described in this paper. Furthermore, we provide an overview of other available 3D point cloud training data and approaches from current literature in which solutions for the application of deep learning to unstructured and not gridded 3D point cloud data are presented.

  18. Efficient Sample Delay Calculation for 2-D and 3-D Ultrasound Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Aya; Hager, Pascal A; Bartolini, Andrea; Angiolini, Federico; Arditi, Marcel; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Benini, Luca; De Micheli, Giovanni

    2017-08-01

    Ultrasound imaging is a reference medical diagnostic technique, thanks to its blend of versatility, effectiveness, and moderate cost. The core computation of all ultrasound imaging methods is based on simple formulae, except for those required to calculate acoustic propagation delays with high precision and throughput. Unfortunately, advanced three-dimensional (3-D) systems require the calculation or storage of billions of such delay values per frame, which is a challenge. In 2-D systems, this requirement can be four orders of magnitude lower, but efficient computation is still crucial in view of low-power implementations that can be battery-operated, enabling usage in numerous additional scenarios. In this paper, we explore two smart designs of the delay generation function. To quantify their hardware cost, we implement them on FPGA and study their footprint and performance. We evaluate how these architectures scale to different ultrasound applications, from a low-power 2-D system to a next-generation 3-D machine. When using numerical approximations, we demonstrate the ability to generate delay values with sufficient throughput to support 10 000-channel 3-D imaging at up to 30 fps while using 63% of a Virtex 7 FPGA, requiring 24 MB of external memory accessed at about 32 GB/s bandwidth. Alternatively, with similar FPGA occupation, we show an exact calculation method that reaches 24 fps on 1225-channel 3-D imaging and does not require external memory at all. Both designs can be scaled to use a negligible amount of resources for 2-D imaging in low-power applications and for ultrafast 2-D imaging at hundreds of frames per second.

  19. Vitamin D3 increases in abdominal subcutaneous fat tissue after supplementation with vitamin D3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Didriksen, Allan; Burild, Anders; Jakobsen, Jette

    2015-01-01

    stored in all adipose tissue in the body, the median body store was 6.6 mg vitamin D-3 and 0.12 mg 25(OH)D-3 in those given vitamin D-3. Conclusions: Subcutaneous adipose tissue may store large amounts of vitamin D-3. The clinical importance of this storage needs to be determined.......Objective: The objective was to assess the amount of vitamin D-3 stored in adipose tissue after long-term supplementation with high dose vitamin D-3. Design: A cross-sectional study on 29 subjects with impaired glucose tolerance who had participated in a randomized controlled trial with vitamin D-3...... 20 000 IU (500 mu g) per week vs placebo for 3-5 years. Methods: Abdominal subcutaneous fat tissue was obtained by needle biopsy for the measurements of vitamin D-3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D-3 (25(OH)D-3). Body fat was measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and serum 25(OH)D-3 level...

  20. Automatic segmentation of MRI head images by 3-D region growing method which utilizes edge information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Hao; Suzuki, Hidetomo; Toriwaki, Jun-ichiro

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents a 3-D segmentation method that automatically extracts soft tissue from multi-sliced MRI head images. MRI produces a sequence of two-dimensional (2-D) images which contains three-dimensional (3-D) information of organs. To utilize such information we need effective algorithms to treat 3-D digital images and to extract organs and tissues of interest. We developed a method to extract the brain from MRI images which uses a region growing procedure and integrates information of uniformity of gray levels and information of the presence of edge segments in the local area around the pixel of interest. First we generate a kernel region which is a part of brain tissue by simple thresholding. Then we grow the region by means of a region growing algorithm under the control of 3-D edge existence to obtain the region of the brain. Our method is rather simple because it uses basic 3-D image processing techniques like spatial difference. It is robust for variation of gray levels inside a tissue since it also refers to the edge information in the process of region growing. Therefore, the method is flexible enough to be applicable to the segmentation of other images including soft tissues which have complicated shapes and fluctuation in gray levels. (author)

  1. 3dRPC: a web server for 3D RNA-protein structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yangyu; Li, Haotian; Xiao, Yi

    2018-04-01

    RNA-protein interactions occur in many biological processes. To understand the mechanism of these interactions one needs to know three-dimensional (3D) structures of RNA-protein complexes. 3dRPC is an algorithm for prediction of 3D RNA-protein complex structures and consists of a docking algorithm RPDOCK and a scoring function 3dRPC-Score. RPDOCK is used to sample possible complex conformations of an RNA and a protein by calculating the geometric and electrostatic complementarities and stacking interactions at the RNA-protein interface according to the features of atom packing of the interface. 3dRPC-Score is a knowledge-based potential that uses the conformations of nucleotide-amino-acid pairs as statistical variables and that is used to choose the near-native complex-conformations obtained from the docking method above. Recently, we built a web server for 3dRPC. The users can easily use 3dRPC without installing it locally. RNA and protein structures in PDB (Protein Data Bank) format are the only needed input files. It can also incorporate the information of interface residues or residue-pairs obtained from experiments or theoretical predictions to improve the prediction. The address of 3dRPC web server is http://biophy.hust.edu.cn/3dRPC. yxiao@hust.edu.cn.

  2. Status of SUSY searches at the LHC (including SUSY Higgs bosons)

    CERN Document Server

    Marshall, Zach; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We review the status of SUSY searches at the LHC, including searches for SUSY Higgs Bosons. ATLAS and CMS have both prepared a large number of search results on the full 2015+2016 dataset, pushing the bounds on SUSY further than ever before.

  3. Annular dynamics of memo3D annuloplasty ring evaluated by 3D transesophageal echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Hiroyuki; Toda, Koichi; Miyagawa, Shigeru; Yoshikawa, Yasushi; Fukushima, Satsuki; Yoshioka, Daisuke; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2018-04-01

    We assessed the mitral annular motion after mitral valve repair with the Sorin Memo 3D® (Sorin Group Italia S.r.L., Saluggia, Italy), which is a unique complete semirigid annuloplasty ring intended to restore the systolic profile of the mitral annulus while adapting to the physiologic dynamism of the annulus, using transesophageal real-time three-dimensional echocardiography. 17 patients (12 male; mean age 60.4 ± 14.9 years) who underwent mitral annuloplasty using the Memo 3D ring were investigated. Mitral annular motion was assessed using QLAB®version8 allowing for a full evaluation of the mitral annulus dynamics. The mitral annular dimensions were measured throughout the cardiac cycle using 4D MV assessment2® while saddle shape was assessed through sequential measurements by RealView®. Saddle shape configuration of the mitral annulus and posterior and anterior leaflet motion could be observed during systole and diastole. The mitral annular area changed during the cardiac cycle by 5.7 ± 1.8%.The circumference length and diameter also changed throughout the cardiac cycle. The annular height was significantly higher in mid-systole than in mid-diastole (p 3D ring maintained a physiological saddle-shape configuration throughout the cardiac cycle. Real-time three-dimensional echocardiography analysis confirmed the motion and flexibility of the Memo 3D ring upon implantation.

  4. Where is SUSY?

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    Recent information from the LHC experiments, the relatively low mass of the new boson and other data coming from experiments looking for dark matter worldwide are placing new constraints on the existence of supersymmetry (SUSY). However, there is a large community of scientists that still believes that SUSY particles are out there. Like lost keys at night, perhaps we have been looking for SUSY under the wrong lamp-posts…   Can you work out this rebus? Source: Caroline Duc. So far, SUSY is “just” a theoretical physics model, which could solve problems beyond the Standard Model by accounting for dark matter and other phenomena in the Universe. However, SUSY has not been spotted so far, and might be hiding because of features different from what physicists previously expected. “Currently, there is no evidence for SUSY, but neither has any experimental data ruled it out. Many searches have focused on simplified versions of the theory but, given the recen...

  5. Large volume syringe pump extruder for desktop 3D printers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira Pusch

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Syringe pump extruders are required for a wide range of 3D printing applications, including bioprinting, embedded printing, and food printing. However, the mass of the syringe becomes a major challenge for most printing platforms, requiring compromises in speed, resolution and/or volume. To address these issues, we have designed a syringe pump large volume extruder (LVE that is compatible with low-cost, open source 3D printers, and herein demonstrate its performance on a PrintrBot Simple Metal. Key aspects of the LVE include: (1 it is open source and compatible with open source hardware and software, making it inexpensive and widely accessible to the 3D printing community, (2 it utilizes a standard 60 mL syringe as its ink reservoir, effectively increasing print volume of the average bioprinter, (3 it is capable of retraction and high speed movements, and (4 it can print fluids using nozzle diameters as small as 100 μm, enabling the printing of complex shapes/objects when used in conjunction with the freeform reversible embedding of suspended hydrogels (FRESH 3D printing method. Printing performance of the LVE is demonstrated by utilizing alginate as a model biomaterial ink to fabricate parametric CAD models and standard calibration objects. Keywords: Additive manufacturing, 3D bioprinting, Embedded printing, FRESH, Soft materials extrusion

  6. DNA origami design of 3D nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ebbe Sloth; Nielsen, Morten Muhlig

    2009-01-01

    , several dedicated 3D editors for computer-aided design of DNA structures have been developed [4-7]. However, many of these tools are not efficient for designing DNA origami structures that requires the design of more than 200 unique DNA strands to be folded along a scaffold strand into a defined 3D shape...... [8]. We have recently developed a semi-automated DNA origami software package [9] that uses a 2D sequence editor in conjunction with several automated tools to facilitate the design process. Here we extend the use of the program for designing DNA origami structures in 3D and show the application...... by the construction of a DNA box with dimensions of 42 × 36 × 36 nm3. The software is available at www.cdna.dk/origami/ ....

  7. Direct cell writing of 3D microorgan for in vitro pharmacokinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Robert; Nam, Jae; Sun, Wei

    2008-06-01

    A novel targeted application of tissue engineering is the development of an in vitro pharmacokinetic model for drug screening and toxicology. An in vitro pharmacokinetic model is needed to realistically and reliably predict in vivo human response to drug administrations and potential toxic exposures. This paper details the fabrication process development and adaptation of microfluidic devices for the creation of such a physiologically relevant pharmacokinetic model. First, an automated syringe-based, layered direct cell writing (DCW) bioprinting process creates a 3D microorgan that biomimics the cell's natural microenvironment with enhanced functionality. Next, soft lithographic micropatterning techniques are used to fabricate a microscale in vitro device to house the 3D microorgan. This paper demonstrates the feasibility of the DCW process for freeform biofabrication of 3D cell-encapsulated hydrogel-based tissue constructs with defined reproducible patterns, direct integration of 3D constructs onto a microfluidic device for continuous perfusion drug flow, and characterization of 3D tissue constructs with predictable cell viability/proliferation outcomes and enhanced functionality over traditional culture methods.

  8. 2D-3D rigid registration to compensate for prostate motion during 3D TRUS-guided biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Silva, Tharindu; Fenster, Aaron; Cool, Derek W; Gardi, Lori; Romagnoli, Cesare; Samarabandu, Jagath; Ward, Aaron D

    2013-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) transrectal ultrasound (TRUS)-guided systems have been developed to improve targeting accuracy during prostate biopsy. However, prostate motion during the procedure is a potential source of error that can cause target misalignments. The authors present an image-based registration technique to compensate for prostate motion by registering the live two-dimensional (2D) TRUS images acquired during the biopsy procedure to a preacquired 3D TRUS image. The registration must be performed both accurately and quickly in order to be useful during the clinical procedure. The authors implemented an intensity-based 2D-3D rigid registration algorithm optimizing the normalized cross-correlation (NCC) metric using Powell's method. The 2D TRUS images acquired during the procedure prior to biopsy gun firing were registered to the baseline 3D TRUS image acquired at the beginning of the procedure. The accuracy was measured by calculating the target registration error (TRE) using manually identified fiducials within the prostate; these fiducials were used for validation only and were not provided as inputs to the registration algorithm. They also evaluated the accuracy when the registrations were performed continuously throughout the biopsy by acquiring and registering live 2D TRUS images every second. This measured the improvement in accuracy resulting from performing the registration, continuously compensating for motion during the procedure. To further validate the method using a more challenging data set, registrations were performed using 3D TRUS images acquired by intentionally exerting different levels of ultrasound probe pressures in order to measure the performance of our algorithm when the prostate tissue was intentionally deformed. In this data set, biopsy scenarios were simulated by extracting 2D frames from the 3D TRUS images and registering them to the baseline 3D image. A graphics processing unit (GPU)-based implementation was used to improve the

  9. 3D deblending of simultaneous source data based on 3D multi-scale shaping operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Shaohuan; Zhou, Hui; Mao, Weijian; Gong, Fei; Huang, Weilin

    2018-04-01

    We propose an iterative three-dimensional (3D) deblending scheme using 3D multi-scale shaping operator to separate 3D simultaneous source data. The proposed scheme is based on the property that signal is coherent, whereas interference is incoherent in some domains, e.g., common receiver domain and common midpoint domain. In two-dimensional (2D) blended record, the coherency difference of signal and interference is in only one spatial direction. Compared with 2D deblending, the 3D deblending can take more sparse constraints into consideration to obtain better performance, e.g., in 3D common receiver gather, the coherency difference is in two spatial directions. Furthermore, with different levels of coherency, signal and interference distribute in different scale curvelet domains. In both 2D and 3D blended records, most coherent signal locates in coarse scale curvelet domain, while most incoherent interference distributes in fine scale curvelet domain. The scale difference is larger in 3D deblending, thus, we apply the multi-scale shaping scheme to further improve the 3D deblending performance. We evaluate the performance of 3D and 2D deblending with the multi-scale and global shaping operators, respectively. One synthetic and one field data examples demonstrate the advantage of the 3D deblending with 3D multi-scale shaping operator.

  10. Hybrid 3D-2D printing for bone scaffolds fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seleznev, V. A.; Prinz, V. Ya

    2017-02-01

    It is a well-known fact that bone scaffold topography on micro- and nanometer scale influences the cellular behavior. Nano-scale surface modification of scaffolds allows the modulation of biological activity for enhanced cell differentiation. To date, there has been only a limited success in printing scaffolds with micro- and nano-scale features exposed on the surface. To improve on the currently available imperfect technologies, in our paper we introduce new hybrid technologies based on a combination of 2D (nano imprint) and 3D printing methods. The first method is based on using light projection 3D printing and simultaneous 2D nanostructuring of each of the layers during the formation of the 3D structure. The second method is based on the sequential integration of preliminarily created 2D nanostructured films into a 3D printed structure. The capabilities of the developed hybrid technologies are demonstrated with the example of forming 3D bone scaffolds. The proposed technologies can be used to fabricate complex 3D micro- and nanostructured products for various fields.

  11. Vitamin D(3) is more potent than vitamin D(2) in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heaney, Robert P; Recker, Robert R; Grote, James; Horst, Ronald L; Armas, Laura A G

    2011-03-01

    Current unitage for the calciferols suggests that equimolar quantities of vitamins D(2) (D2) and D(3) (D3) are biologically equivalent. Published studies yield mixed results. The aim of the study was to compare the potencies of D2 and D3. The trial used a single-blind, randomized design in 33 healthy adults. Calciferols were dosed at 50,000 IU/wk for 12 wk. Principal outcome variables were area under the curve for incremental total 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and change in calciferol content of sc fat. Incremental mean (sd) 25(OH)D area under the curve at 12 wk was 1366 ng · d/ml (516) for the D2-treated group and 2136 (606) for the D3 (P < 0.001). Mean (sd) steady-state 25(OH)D increments showed similar differences: 24 ng/ml for D2 (10.3) and 45 ng/ml (16.2) for D3 (P <0.001). Subcutaneous fat content of D2 rose by 50 μg/kg in the D2-treated group, and D3 content rose by 104 μg/kg in the D3-treated group. Total calciferol in fat rose by only 33 ng/kg in the D2-treated, whereas it rose by 104 μg/kg in the D3-treated group. Extrapolating to total body fat D3, storage amounted to just 17% of the administered dose. D3 is approximately 87% more potent in raising and maintaining serum 25(OH)D concentrations and produces 2- to 3-fold greater storage of vitamin D than does equimolar D2. For neither was there evidence of sequestration in fat, as had been postulated for doses in this range. Given its greater potency and lower cost, D3 should be the preferred treatment option when correcting vitamin D deficiency.

  12. CASTLE3D - A Computer Aided System for Labelling Archaeological Excavations in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houshiar, H.; Borrmann, D.; Elseberg, J.; Nüchter, A.; Näth, F.; Winkler, S.

    2015-08-01

    Documentation of archaeological excavation sites with conventional methods and tools such as hand drawings, measuring tape and archaeological notes is time consuming. This process is prone to human errors and the quality of the documentation depends on the qualification of the archaeologist on site. Use of modern technology and methods in 3D surveying and 3D robotics facilitate and improve this process. Computer-aided systems and databases improve the documentation quality and increase the speed of data acquisition. 3D laser scanning is the state of the art in modelling archaeological excavation sites, historical sites and even entire cities or landscapes. Modern laser scanners are capable of data acquisition of up to 1 million points per second. This provides a very detailed 3D point cloud of the environment. 3D point clouds and 3D models of an excavation site provide a better representation of the environment for the archaeologist and for documentation. The point cloud can be used both for further studies on the excavation and for the presentation of results. This paper introduces a Computer aided system for labelling archaeological excavations in 3D (CASTLE3D). Consisting of a set of tools for recording and georeferencing the 3D data from an excavation site, CASTLE3D is a novel documentation approach in industrial archaeology. It provides a 2D and 3D visualisation of the data and an easy-to-use interface that enables the archaeologist to select regions of interest and to interact with the data in both representations. The 2D visualisation and a 3D orthogonal view of the data provide cuts of the environment that resemble the traditional hand drawings. The 3D perspective view gives a realistic view of the environment. CASTLE3D is designed as an easy-to-use on-site semantic mapping tool for archaeologists. Each project contains a predefined set of semantic information that can be used to label findings in the data. Multiple regions of interest can be joined under

  13. 3D analysis of semiconductor devices: A combination of 3D imaging and 3D elemental analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Bianzhu; Gribelyuk, Michael A.

    2018-04-01

    3D analysis of semiconductor devices using a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) Z-contrast tomography and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) elemental tomography is presented. 3D STEM Z-contrast tomography is useful in revealing the depth information of the sample. However, it suffers from contrast problems between materials with similar atomic numbers. Examples of EDS elemental tomography are presented using an automated EDS tomography system with batch data processing, which greatly reduces the data collection and processing time. 3D EDS elemental tomography reveals more in-depth information about the defect origin in semiconductor failure analysis. The influence of detector shadowing and X-rays absorption on the EDS tomography's result is also discussed.

  14. Fusion blankets for catalyzed D--D and D--He3 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    Blanket designs are presented for catalyzed D-D (Cat-D) and D-He 3 fusion reactors. Because of relatively low neutron wall loads and the flexibility due to non-tritium breeding, blankets potentially should operate for reactor life-times of approximately 30 years. Unscheduled replacement of failed blanket modules should be relatively rapid, due to very low residual activity, by operators working either through access ports in the shield (option 1) or directly in the plasma chamber (option 2). Cat-D blanket designs are presented for high (approximately 30%) and low (approximately 12%) β noncircular Tokamak reactors. The blankets are thick graphite screens, operating at high temperature to anneal radiation damage; the deposited neutron and gamma energy is thermally radiated along internal cavities and conducted to a bank of internal SiC coolant tubes (approximately 4 cm. ID) containing high pressure helium. In the D-He 3 Tokamak reactor design, the blanket consists of multiple layers (e.g., three) of thin (approximately 10 cm.) high strength aluminum (e.g., SAP), modular plates, cooled by organic terphynyl coolant

  15. Fusion blankets for catalyzed D--D and D--3He reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R.

    1977-01-01

    Blanket designs are presented for catalyzed D-D (Cat-D) and D-He 3 fusion reactors. Because of relatively low neutron wall loads and the flexibility due to non-tritium breeding, blankets potentially should operate for reactor life-times of approximately 30 years. Unscheduled replacement of failed blanket modules should be relatively rapid, due to very low residual activity, by operators working either through access ports in the shield (option 1) or directly in the plasma chamber (option 2). Cat-D blanket designs are presented for high (approximately 30%) and low (approximately 12%) β non-circular Tokamak reactors. The blankets are thick graphite screens, operating at high temperature to anneal radiation damage; the deposited neutron and gamma energy is thermally radiated along internal cavities and conducted to a bank of internal SiC coolant tubes (approximately 4 cm. ID) containing high pressure helium. In the D-He 3 Tokamak reactor design, the blanket consists of multiple layers (e.g., three) of thin (approximately 10 cm.) high strength aluminum (e.g., SAP), modular plates, cooled by organic terphenyl coolant

  16. Hybrid UV Lithography for 3D High-Aspect-Ratio Microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sungmin; Nam, Gyungmok; Kim, Jonghun; Yoon, Sang-Hee [Inha Univ, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) high-aspect-ratio (HAR) microstructures for biomedical applications (e.g., microneedle, microadhesive, etc.) are microfabricated using the hybrid ultraviolet (UV) lithography in which inclined, rotational, and reverse-side UV exposure processes are combined together. The inclined and rotational UV exposure processes are intended to fabricate tapered axisymmetric HAR microstructures; the reverse-side UV exposure process is designed to sharpen the end tip of the microstructures by suppressing the UV reflection on a bottom substrate which is inevitable in conventional UV lithography. Hybrid UV lithography involves fabricating 3D HAR microstructures with an epoxy-based negative photoresist, SU-8, using our customized UV exposure system. The effects of hybrid UV lithography parameters on the geometry of the 3D HAR microstructures (aspect ratio, radius of curvature of the end tip, etc.) are measured. The dependence of the end-tip shape on SU-8 soft-baking condition is also discussed.

  17. Hybrid UV Lithography for 3D High-Aspect-Ratio Microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sungmin; Nam, Gyungmok; Kim, Jonghun; Yoon, Sang-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) high-aspect-ratio (HAR) microstructures for biomedical applications (e.g., microneedle, microadhesive, etc.) are microfabricated using the hybrid ultraviolet (UV) lithography in which inclined, rotational, and reverse-side UV exposure processes are combined together. The inclined and rotational UV exposure processes are intended to fabricate tapered axisymmetric HAR microstructures; the reverse-side UV exposure process is designed to sharpen the end tip of the microstructures by suppressing the UV reflection on a bottom substrate which is inevitable in conventional UV lithography. Hybrid UV lithography involves fabricating 3D HAR microstructures with an epoxy-based negative photoresist, SU-8, using our customized UV exposure system. The effects of hybrid UV lithography parameters on the geometry of the 3D HAR microstructures (aspect ratio, radius of curvature of the end tip, etc.) are measured. The dependence of the end-tip shape on SU-8 soft-baking condition is also discussed

  18. Slope instability in complex 3D topography promoted by convergent 3D groundwater flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, M. E.; Brien, D. L.

    2012-12-01

    headlands and re-entrants to minimize slope effects on stability. Despite these equal slopes, our analyses, given dry conditions, illustrated that the headlands can be 5-7% less stable than the re-entrants, owing to the geometry of the 3D failure mass with the lowest stability. We then simulated groundwater flow in these landscapes; flow was caused by recharge perching on a horizontal low permeability layer with discharge at the bluff faces. By systematically varying recharge, hydraulic conductivity of the material, and conductance at the bluffs, we created different 3D pore-pressure fields. Recharge rates and hydraulic conductivities controlled the height of the water table, whereas bluff conductance influenced the gradient of the water table near the bluff face. Given elevated water tables with steep gradients, bluffs in the re-entrants became unstable where flow converged. Thus, with progressively stronger effects from water flow, overall instability evolved from relatively unstable headlands to more uniform stability to relatively unstable re-entrants. Larger re-entrants led to more 3D flow convergence and greater localized instability. One- or two-dimensional models cannot fully characterize slope instability in complex topography.

  19. IMRT vs. 2D-radiotherapy or 3D-conformal radiotherapy of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Survival outcome in a Korean multi-institutional retrospective study (KROG 11-06)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Ho; Cho, Kwan Ho [Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Ilsandong-gu, Goyang-si Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang-Geol; Keum, Ki Chang [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yeon-Sil [Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, the Catholic University of Korea, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Wu, Hong-Gyun; Kim, Jin Ho [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Yong Chan; Oh, Dongryul [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Hoon [The Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Paldal-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    We compared treatment outcomes of two-dimensional radiotherapy (2D-RT), three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). In total, 1237 patients with cT1-4N0-3M0 NPC were retrospectively analyzed. Of these, 350, 390, and 497 were treated with 2D-RT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT, respectively. 3D-CRT and IMRT showed better 5-year overall survival (OS) rates (73.6 and 76.7 %, respectively) than did 2D-RT (5-year OS of 59.7 %, all p < 0.001). In T3-4 subgroup, IMRT was associated with a significantly better 5-year OS than was 2D-RT (70.7 vs. 50.4 %, respectively; p ≤ 0.001) and 3D-CRT (70.7 vs. 57.8 %, respectively; p = 0.011); however, the difference between the 2D-RT and 3D-CRT groups did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.063). In multivariate analyses of all patients, IMRT was a predictive factor for OS when compared with 2D-RT or 3D-CRT, as was 3D-CRT when compared with 2D-RT. Our study showed that 3D-CRT and IMRT were associated with a better local progression-free survival and OS than was 2D-RT in NPC. IMRT was significantly superior in terms of OS for advanced primary tumors (T3-4). (orig.) [German] Wir verglichen die Behandlungsergebnisse von zweidimensionaler Strahlentherapie (2D-RT), dreidimensionaler konformer Strahlentherapie (3D-CRT) und intensitaetsmodulierter Strahlentherapie (IMRT) bei Patienten mit Nasopharynxkarzinom (NPC). Insgesamt 1237 Patienten mit NPC im Stadium cT1-4/N0-3/M0 wurden rueckwirkend analysiert. Von diesen wurden jeweils 350, 390 und 497 mit 2D-RT, 3D-CRT und IMRT behandelt. 3D-CRT und IMRT zeigten eine bessere 5-Jahres-Gesamtueberlebensrate (5y-OS; jeweils 73,6 und 76,7%) als 2D-RT (59,7%; alle p < 0,001). In der Untergruppe T3-4 war die IMRT mit einer erheblich besseren 5y-OS verbunden als 2D-RT (jeweils 70,7 vs. 50,4%; p ≤ 0,001) und 3D-CRT (jeweils 70,7 vs. 57,8%; p = 0,011); jedoch gab es keinen Unterschied zwischen den Gruppen 2D

  20. Open 3D Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felician ALECU

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many professionals and 3D artists consider Blender as being the best open source solution for 3D computer graphics. The main features are related to modeling, rendering, shading, imaging, compositing, animation, physics and particles and realtime 3D/game creation.

  1. 3D histomorphometric quantification from 3D computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, L.F. de; Lopes, R.T.

    2004-01-01

    The histomorphometric analysis is based on stereologic concepts and was originally applied to biologic samples. This technique has been used to evaluate different complex structures such as ceramic filters, net structures and cancellous objects that are objects with inner connected structures. The measured histomorphometric parameters of structure are: sample volume to total reconstructed volume (BV/TV), sample surface to sample volume (BS/BV), connection thickness (Tb Th ), connection number (Tb N ) and connection separation (Tb Sp ). The anisotropy was evaluated as well. These parameters constitute the base of histomorphometric analysis. The quantification is realized over cross-sections recovered by cone beam reconstruction, where a real-time microfocus radiographic system is used as tomographic system. The three-dimensional (3D) histomorphometry, obtained from tomography, corresponds to an evolution of conventional method that is based on 2D analysis. It is more coherent with morphologic and topologic context of the sample. This work shows result from 3D histomorphometric quantification to characterize objects examined by 3D computer tomography. The results, which characterizes the internal structures of ceramic foams with different porous density, are compared to results from conventional methods

  2. Scoops3D: software to analyze 3D slope stability throughout a digital landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Mark E.; Christian, Sarah B.; Brien, Dianne L.; Henderson, Scott T.

    2015-01-01

    The computer program, Scoops3D, evaluates slope stability throughout a digital landscape represented by a digital elevation model (DEM). The program uses a three-dimensional (3D) method of columns approach to assess the stability of many (typically millions) potential landslides within a user-defined size range. For each potential landslide (or failure), Scoops3D assesses the stability of a rotational, spherical slip surface encompassing many DEM cells using a 3D version of either Bishop’s simplified method or the Ordinary (Fellenius) method of limit-equilibrium analysis. Scoops3D has several options for the user to systematically and efficiently search throughout an entire DEM, thereby incorporating the effects of complex surface topography. In a thorough search, each DEM cell is included in multiple potential failures, and Scoops3D records the lowest stability (factor of safety) for each DEM cell, as well as the size (volume or area) associated with each of these potential landslides. It also determines the least-stable potential failure for the entire DEM. The user has a variety of options for building a 3D domain, including layers or full 3D distributions of strength and pore-water pressures, simplistic earthquake loading, and unsaturated suction conditions. Results from Scoops3D can be readily incorporated into a geographic information system (GIS) or other visualization software. This manual includes information on the theoretical basis for the slope-stability analysis, requirements for constructing and searching a 3D domain, a detailed operational guide (including step-by-step instructions for using the graphical user interface [GUI] software, Scoops3D-i) and input/output file specifications, practical considerations for conducting an analysis, results of verification tests, and multiple examples illustrating the capabilities of Scoops3D. Easy-to-use software installation packages are available for the Windows or Macintosh operating systems; these packages

  3. Vitamin D-3 and 25-hydroxyvitamin D-3 in raw and cooked pork cuts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Ina; Jakobsen, Jette; Leth, Torben

    2003-01-01

    The contents of vitamin D-3 and its metabolically active metabolite 25-hydroxyvitamin D-3 (25OHD(3)) were examined by HPLC in different parts of four common raw pork cuts (loin boneless, leg inside, thin belly, neck) and in cooked meat (loin boneless). In whole raw pork cuts, varying in fat content......, and that rind, despite its limited fat content, has a high concentration of vitamin D-3 and 25OHD(3). Cooking increased vitamin D-3 and 25OHD(3) calculated per 100 g of tissue in all parts and in the whole cut (in whole cuts in raw and cooked meat, respectively: vitamin D-3: 0.15 (0.08-0.24) mug/100 g and 0...... 25OHD(3) contributes significantly to vitamin D activity. Food databases should include concentrations of both vitamin D and 25OHD(3). (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  4. Enabling personalized implant and controllable biosystem development through 3D printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Neerajha; Dupret-Bories, Agnes; Karabulut, Erdem; Zorlutuna, Pinar; Vrana, Nihal Engin

    The impact of additive manufacturing in our lives has been increasing constantly. One of the frontiers in this change is the medical devices. 3D printing technologies not only enable the personalization of implantable devices with respect to patient-specific anatomy, pathology and biomechanical properties but they also provide new opportunities in related areas such as surgical education, minimally invasive diagnosis, medical research and disease models. In this review, we cover the recent clinical applications of 3D printing with a particular focus on implantable devices. The current technical bottlenecks in 3D printing in view of the needs in clinical applications are explained and recent advances to overcome these challenges are presented. 3D printing with cells (bioprinting); an exciting subfield of 3D printing, is covered in the context of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine and current developments in bioinks are discussed. Also emerging applications of bioprinting beyond health, such as biorobotics and soft robotics, are introduced. As the technical challenges related to printing rate, precision and cost are steadily being solved, it can be envisioned that 3D printers will become common on-site instruments in medical practice with the possibility of custom-made, on-demand implants and, eventually, tissue engineered organs with active parts developed with biorobotics techniques. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 3D high-resolution anorectal manometry in patients with perianal fistulas: comparison with 3D-anal ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felt-Bersma, Richelle J F; Vlietstra, Maarten S; Vollebregt, Paul F; Han-Geurts, Ingrid J M; Rempe-Sorm, Vera; Vander Mijnsbrugge, Grietje J H; Molenaar, Charlotte B H

    2018-04-04

    Perianal fistula surgery can damage the anal sphincters which may cause faecal incontinence. By measuring regional pressures, 3D-HRAM potentially provides better guidance for surgical strategy in patients with perianal fistulas. The aim was to measure regional anal pressures with 3D-HRAM and to compare these with 3D-EUS findings in patients with perianal fistulas. Consecutive patients with active perianal fistulas who underwent both 3D-EUS and 3D-HRAM at a clinic specialised in proctology were included. A group of 30 patients without fistulas served as controls. Data regarding demographics, complaints, previous perianal surgical procedures and obstetric history were collected. The mean and regional anal pressures were measured with 3D-HRAM. Fistula tract areas detected with 3D-EUS were analysed with 3D-HRAM by visual coding and the regional pressures of the corresponding and surrounding area of the fistula tract areas were measured. The study was granted by the VUmc Medical Ethical Committee. Forty patients (21 males, mean age 47) were included. Four patients had a primary fistula, 19 were previously treated with a seton/abscess drainage and 17 had a recurrence after previously performed fistula surgery. On 3D-HRAM, 24 (60%) fistula tract areas were good and 8 (20%) moderately visible. All but 7 (18%) patients had normal mean resting pressures. The mean resting pressure of the fistula tract area was significantly lower compared to the surrounding area (47 vs. 76 mmHg; p < 0.0001). Only 2 (5%) patients had a regional mean resting pressure < 10 mmHg of the fistula tract area. Using a Δ mean resting pressure ≥ 30 mmHg difference between fistula tract area and non-fistula tract area as alternative cut-off, 21 (53%) patients were identified. In 6 patients 3D-HRAM was repeated after surgery: a local pressure drop was detected in one patient after fistulotomy with increased complaints of faecal incontinence. Profound local anal pressure drops are found

  6. Underwater 3D filming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Rinaldi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available After an experimental phase of many years, 3D filming is now effective and successful. Improvements are still possible, but the film industry achieved memorable success on 3D movie’s box offices due to the overall quality of its products. Special environments such as space (“Gravity” and the underwater realm look perfect to be reproduced in 3D. “Filming in space” was possible in “Gravity” using special effects and computer graphic. The underwater realm is still difficult to be handled. Underwater filming in 3D was not that easy and effective as filming in 2D, since not long ago. After almost 3 years of research, a French, Austrian and Italian team realized a perfect tool to film underwater, in 3D, without any constrains. This allows filmmakers to bring the audience deep inside an environment where they most probably will never have the chance to be.

  7. Comparing an accelerated 3D fast spin-echo sequence (CS-SPACE) for knee 3-T magnetic resonance imaging with traditional 3D fast spin-echo (SPACE) and routine 2D sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altahawi, Faysal F.; Blount, Kevin J.; Omar, Imran M. [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Chicago, IL (United States); Morley, Nicholas P. [Marshfield Clinic, Department of Radiology, Marshfield, WI (United States); Raithel, Esther [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    To compare a faster, new, high-resolution accelerated 3D-fast-spin-echo (3D-FSE) acquisition sequence (CS-SPACE) to traditional 2D and high-resolution 3D sequences for knee 3-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Twenty patients received knee MRIs that included routine 2D (T1, PD ± FS, T2-FS; 0.5 x 0.5 x 3 mm{sup 3}; ∝10 min), traditional 3D FSE (SPACE-PD-FS; 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 mm{sup 3}; ∝7.5 min), and accelerated 3D-FSE prototype (CS-SPACE-PD-FS; 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 mm{sup 3}; ∝5 min) acquisitions on a 3-T MRI system (Siemens MAGNETOM Skyra). Three musculoskeletal radiologists (MSKRs) prospectively and independently reviewed the studies with graded surveys comparing image and diagnostic quality. Tissue-specific signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratios (CNR) were also compared. MSKR-perceived diagnostic quality of cartilage was significantly higher for CS-SPACE than for SPACE and 2D sequences (p < 0.001). Assessment of diagnostic quality of menisci and synovial fluid was higher for CS-SPACE than for SPACE (p < 0.001). CS-SPACE was not significantly different from SPACE but had lower assessments than 2D sequences for evaluation of bones, ligaments, muscles, and fat (p ≤ 0.004). 3D sequences had higher spatial resolution, but lower overall assessed contrast (p < 0.001). Overall image quality from CS-SPACE was assessed as higher than SPACE (p = 0.007), but lower than 2D sequences (p < 0.001). Compared to SPACE, CS-SPACE had higher fluid SNR and CNR against all other tissues (all p < 0.001). The CS-SPACE prototype allows for faster isotropic acquisitions of knee MRIs over currently used protocols. High fluid-to-cartilage CNR and higher spatial resolution over routine 2D sequences may present a valuable role for CS-SPACE in the evaluation of cartilage and menisci. (orig.)

  8. 3D Systems” ‘Stuck in the Middle’ of the 3D Printer Boom?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hoffmann (Alan)

    2014-01-01

    textabstract3D Systems, the pioneer of 3D printing, predicted a future where "kids from 8 to 80" could design and print their ideas at home. By 2013, 9 years after the creation of the first working 3D printer, there were more than 30 major 3D printing companies competing for market share. 3DS and

  9. Hyperbolically Patterned 3D Graphene Metamaterial with Negative Poisson's Ratio and Superelasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiangqiang; Xu, Xiang; Lin, Dong; Chen, Wenli; Xiong, Guoping; Yu, Yikang; Fisher, Timothy S; Li, Hui

    2016-03-16

    A hyperbolically patterned 3D graphene metamaterial (GM) with negative Poisson's ratio and superelasticity is highlighted. It is synthesized by a modified hydrothermal approach and subsequent oriented freeze-casting strategy. GM presents a tunable Poisson's ratio by adjusting the structural porosity, macroscopic aspect ratio (L/D), and freeze-casting conditions. Such a GM suggests promising applications as soft actuators, sensors, robust shock absorbers, and environmental remediation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Moduli stabilization, large-volume dS minimum without D3-branes, (non-)supersymmetric black hole attractors and two-parameter Swiss cheese Calabi–Yau’s

    CERN Document Server

    Misra, A

    2008-01-01

    We consider two sets of issues in this paper. The first has to do with moduli stabilization, existence of “area codes” [A. Giryavets, New attractors and area codes, JHEP 0603 (2006) 020, hep-th/0511215] and the possibility of getting a non-supersymmetric dS minimum without the addition of -branes as in KKLT for type II flux compactifications. The second has to do with the “inverse problem” [K. Saraikin, C. Vafa, Non-supersymmetric black holes and topological strings, hep-th/0703214] and “fake superpotentials” [A. Ceresole, G. Dall'Agata, Flow equations for non-BPS extremal black holes, JHEP 0703 (2007) 110, hep-th/0702088] for extremal (non-)supersymmetric black holes in type II compactifications. We use (orientifold of) a “Swiss cheese” Calabi–Yau [J.P. Conlon, F. Quevedo, K. Suruliz, Large-volume flux compactifications: Moduli spectrum and D3/D7 soft supersymmetry breaking, JHEP 0508 (2005) 007, hep-th/0505076] expressed as a degree-18 hypersurface in WCP4[1,1,1,6,9] in the “large-volume...

  11. Modification of 3D milling machine to 3D printer

    OpenAIRE

    Taska, Abraham

    2014-01-01

    Tato práce se zabývá přestavbou gravírovací frézky na 3D tiskárnu. V první části se práce zabývá možnými technologiemi 3D tisku a možností jejich využití u přestavby. Dále jsou popsány a vybrány vhodné součásti pro přestavbu. V další části je realizováno řízení ohřevu podložky, trysky a řízení posuvu drátu pomocí softwaru TwinCat od společnosti Beckhoff na průmyslovém počítači. Výsledkem práce by měla být oživená 3D tiskárna. This thesis deals with rebuilding of engraving machine to 3D pri...

  12. Low bioaccessibility of vitamin D2 from yeast-fortified bread compared to crystalline D2 bread and D3 from fluid milks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipkie, Tristan E; Ferruzzi, Mario G; Weaver, Connie M

    2016-11-09

    The assessment of the efficacy of dietary and supplemental vitamin D tends to be confounded by differences in the serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D response between vitamin D 2 and vitamin D 3 . Serum response differences from these vitamers may be due to differences in bioavailability. To address this specifically, the bioaccessibility was assessed for vitamin D 2 from breads fortified with UV-treated yeast, and a benchmark against staple vitamin D 3 fortified foods including bovine milks and infant formula, as well as crystalline vitamin D 2 fortified bread. Fortified foods were subjected to a three-stage static in vitro digestion model, and vitamin D was analyzed by HPLC-MS. Vitamin D bioaccessibility was significantly greater from bovine milks and infant formula (71-85%) than from yeast-fortified sandwich breads (6-7%). Bioaccessibility was not different between whole wheat and white wheat bread (p > 0.05), but was ∼4× lower from yeast-fortified bread than from crystalline vitamin D 2 fortified bread (p yeast cells were observed in the digesta of yeast fortified bread. These results indicate that the low bioavailability of yeast D 2 in comparison to other vitamin D 2 sources is likely due to entrapment within a less digestible yeast matrix and not only to metabolic differences between vitamins D 2 and D 3 .

  13. 19 CFR 4.7d - Container status messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Container status messages. 4.7d Section 4.7d... TREASURY VESSELS IN FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC TRADES Arrival and Entry of Vessels § 4.7d Container status messages. (a) Container status messages required. In addition to the advance filing requirements pursuant...

  14. 3D-printed gelatin scaffolds of differing pore geometry modulate hepatocyte function and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Phillip L; Green, Richard M; Shah, Ramille N

    2018-03-15

    Three dimensional (3D) printing is highly amenable to the fabrication of tissue-engineered organs of a repetitive microstructure such as the liver. The creation of uniform and geometrically repetitive tissue scaffolds can also allow for the control over cellular aggregation and nutrient diffusion. However, the effect of differing geometries, while controlling for pore size, has yet to be investigated in the context of hepatocyte function. In this study, we show the ability to precisely control pore geometry of 3D-printed gelatin scaffolds. An undifferentiated hepatocyte cell line (HUH7) demonstrated high viability and proliferation when seeded on 3D-printed scaffolds of two different geometries. However, hepatocyte specific functions (albumin secretion, CYP activity, and bile transport) increases in more interconnected 3D-printed gelatin cultures compared to a less interconnected geometry and to 2D controls. Additionally, we also illustrate the disparity between gene expression and protein function in simple 2D culture modes, and that recreation of a physiologically mimetic 3D environment is necessary to induce both expression and function of cultured hepatocytes. Three dimensional (3D) printing provides tissue engineers the ability spatially pattern cells and materials in precise geometries, however the biological effects of scaffold geometry on soft tissues such as the liver have not been rigorously investigated. In this manuscript, we describe a method to 3D print gelatin into well-defined repetitive geometries that show clear differences in biological effects on seeded hepatocytes. We show that a relatively simple and widely used biomaterial, such as gelatin, can significantly modulate biological processes when fabricated into specific 3D geometries. Furthermore, this study expands upon past research into hepatocyte aggregation by demonstrating how it can be manipulated to enhance protein function, and how function and expression may not precisely correlate in

  15. Study on mechanism controlling {sup 5}D{sub 3}/{sup 5}D{sub 4}emissions of Tb{sup 3+} in glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yang; Liu, Siyuan; Mao, Jiayi; Li, Xinxi; Li, Lei; Zeng, Huidan; Chen, Guorong, E-mail: grchen@ecust.edu.cn

    2017-05-15

    Tb{sup 3+} doped SiO{sub 2}-ZnO-BaO glasses are prepared by melting quenching method and their unique photoluminescent properties for the UV excitation are studied by using emission/excitation spectra and decay curves. Glasses in the composition (mol%) of 60SiO{sub 2}-xZnO-(40-x)BaO-0.2Tb{sup 3+}(x=30, 20, 10) show the strongest emission peaking at 436 nm which is different from majority of other reported work. Lower content of the free OH groups mainly contribute to this phenomenon due to the decreased probability of the multi-phonon aided non-radiative relaxation process from {sup 5}D{sub 3} to {sup 5}D{sub 4} energy levels of Tb{sup 3+} ions. The Tb{sup 3+} concentration also affects the {sup 5}D{sub 3}/{sup 5}D{sub 4} emissions as a result of the cross-relaxation effect on two nearby Tb{sup 3+} ions ({sup 5}D{sub 3}-{sup 5}D{sub 4}⇒{sup 7}F{sub 6}-{sup 7}F{sub 0}). Moreover, by adjusting Tb{sup 3+} concentration and/or ZnO/BaO concentration ratio of the host glass we obtained the adjustable emission with the required CIE chromaticity from blue to green, suggesting that the present Tb{sup 3+}-doped SiO{sub 2}-ZnO-BaO glasses are potential as blue/green dual-color luminescent materials for different applications.

  16. Natural inflation in SUSY and gauge-mediated curvature of the flat directions

    CERN Document Server

    Dvali, Gia

    1996-01-01

    Supersymmetric theories often include the non-compact directions in the field space along which the tree level potential grows only up to a certain limited value (determined by the mass scale of the theory) and then stays constant for the arbitrarily large expectation value of the field parametrizing the direction. Above the critical value, the tree-level curvature is large and positive in the other directions. Such plateaux are natural candidates for the hybrid inflaton. The non-zero F-term density along the plateau spontaneously breaks SUSY and induces the one-loop logarithmic slope for the inflaton potential. The coupling of the inflaton to the Higgs fields in the complex representations of the gauge group, may result in a radiatively induced Fayet--Iliopoulos D-term during inflation, which destabilizes some of the squark and slepton flat directions. Corresponding soft masses can be larger than the Hubble parameter and thus, play a crucial role for the Affleck--Dine baryogenesis.

  17. 3D FaceCam: a fast and accurate 3D facial imaging device for biometrics applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jason; Zhuang, Ping; May, Patrick; Yi, Steven; Tunnell, David

    2004-08-01

    Human faces are fundamentally three-dimensional (3D) objects, and each face has its unique 3D geometric profile. The 3D geometric features of a human face can be used, together with its 2D texture, for rapid and accurate face recognition purposes. Due to the lack of low-cost and robust 3D sensors and effective 3D facial recognition (FR) algorithms, almost all existing FR systems use 2D face images. Genex has developed 3D solutions that overcome the inherent problems in 2D while also addressing limitations in other 3D alternatives. One important aspect of our solution is a unique 3D camera (the 3D FaceCam) that combines multiple imaging sensors within a single compact device to provide instantaneous, ear-to-ear coverage of a human face. This 3D camera uses three high-resolution CCD sensors and a color encoded pattern projection system. The RGB color information from each pixel is used to compute the range data and generate an accurate 3D surface map. The imaging system uses no moving parts and combines multiple 3D views to provide detailed and complete 3D coverage of the entire face. Images are captured within a fraction of a second and full-frame 3D data is produced within a few seconds. This described method provides much better data coverage and accuracy in feature areas with sharp features or details (such as the nose and eyes). Using this 3D data, we have been able to demonstrate that a 3D approach can significantly improve the performance of facial recognition. We have conducted tests in which we have varied the lighting conditions and angle of image acquisition in the "field." These tests have shown that the matching results are significantly improved when enrolling a 3D image rather than a single 2D image. With its 3D solutions, Genex is working toward unlocking the promise of powerful 3D FR and transferring FR from a lab technology into a real-world biometric solution.

  18. MAP3D: a media processor approach for high-end 3D graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darsa, Lucia; Stadnicki, Steven; Basoglu, Chris

    1999-12-01

    Equator Technologies, Inc. has used a software-first approach to produce several programmable and advanced VLIW processor architectures that have the flexibility to run both traditional systems tasks and an array of media-rich applications. For example, Equator's MAP1000A is the world's fastest single-chip programmable signal and image processor targeted for digital consumer and office automation markets. The Equator MAP3D is a proposal for the architecture of the next generation of the Equator MAP family. The MAP3D is designed to achieve high-end 3D performance and a variety of customizable special effects by combining special graphics features with high performance floating-point and media processor architecture. As a programmable media processor, it offers the advantages of a completely configurable 3D pipeline--allowing developers to experiment with different algorithms and to tailor their pipeline to achieve the highest performance for a particular application. With the support of Equator's advanced C compiler and toolkit, MAP3D programs can be written in a high-level language. This allows the compiler to successfully find and exploit any parallelism in a programmer's code, thus decreasing the time to market of a given applications. The ability to run an operating system makes it possible to run concurrent applications in the MAP3D chip, such as video decoding while executing the 3D pipelines, so that integration of applications is easily achieved--using real-time decoded imagery for texturing 3D objects, for instance. This novel architecture enables an affordable, integrated solution for high performance 3D graphics.

  19. arXiv Measurement of the $CP$ asymmetry in $B^-\\to D_s^-D^0$ and $B^-\\to D^-D^0$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R.; LHCb Collaboration; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albicocco, Pietro; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Alfonso Albero, Alejandro; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Atzeni, Michele; Auriemma, Giulio; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Baker, Sophie; Balagura, Vladislav; Baldini, Wander; Baranov, Alexander; Barlow, Roger; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baryshnikov, Fedor; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Beiter, Andrew; Bel, Lennaert; Beliy, Nikita; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Beranek, Sarah; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Berninghoff, Daniel; Bertholet, Emilie; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betancourt, Christopher; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Bjørn, Mikkel; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boente Garcia, Oscar; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Brodski, Michael; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brundu, Davide; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Byczynski, Wiktor; Cadeddu, Sandro; Cai, Hao; Calabrese, Roberto; Calladine, Ryan; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Cattaneo, Marco; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Chamont, David; Chapman, Matthew George; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Chitic, Stefan-Gabriel; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Chubykin, Alexsei; Ciambrone, Paolo; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collins, Paula; Colombo, Tommaso; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Coombs, George; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Da Silva, Cesar Luiz; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; Danilina, Anna; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Del Buono, Luigi; Delaney, Blaise; Dembinski, Hans Peter; Demmer, Moritz; Dendek, Adam; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Nezza, Pasquale; Didenko, Sergey; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Douglas, Lauren; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Durante, Paolo; Durham, John Matthew; Dutta, Deepanwita; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziewiecki, Michal; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Ely, Scott; Ene, Alexandru; Escher, Stephan; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fazzini, Davide; Federici, Luca; Fernandez, Gerard; Fernandez Declara, Placido; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Lopes, Lino; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Funk, Wolfgang; Färber, Christian; Gabriel, Emmy; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; Garcia Plana, Beatriz; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, Vladimir; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Govorkova, Ekaterina; Grabowski, Jascha Peter; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greim, Roman; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruber, Lukas; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hancock, Thomas Henry; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Hasse, Christoph; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Hecker, Malte; Heinicke, Kevin; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henry, Louis; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hopchev, Plamen Hristov; Hu, Wenhua; Huang, Wenqian; Huard, Zachary; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hutchcroft, David; Ibis, Philipp; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Ivshin, Kuzma; Jacobsson, Richard; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jiang, Feng; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Karacson, Matthias; Kariuki, James Mwangi; Karodia, Sarah; Kazeev, Nikita; Kecke, Matthieu; Keizer, Floris; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kim, Kyung Eun; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Koliiev, Serhii; Kolpin, Michael; Kopecna, Renata; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kotriakhova, Sofia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreps, Michal; Kress, Felix Johannes; Krokovny, Pavel; Krupa, Wojciech; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Lenisa, Paolo; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Pei-Rong; Li, Tenglin; Li, Zhuoming; Liang, Xixin; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Lionetto, Federica; Lisovskyi, Vitalii; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Loi, Angelo; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Macko, Vladimir; Mackowiak, Patrick; Maddrell-Mander, Samuel; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Maisuzenko, Dmitrii; Majewski, Maciej Witold; Malde, Sneha; Malecki, Bartosz; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Marangotto, Daniele; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marinangeli, Matthieu; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurice, Emilie; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Mead, James Vincent; Meadows, Brian; Meaux, Cedric; Meier, Frank; Meinert, Nis; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Millard, Edward James; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Minzoni, Luca; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Mombächer, Titus; Monroy, Igancio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morello, Gianfranco; Morello, Michael Joseph; Morgunova, Olga; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Thi Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nogay, Alla; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Ossowska, Anna; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Palano, Antimo; Palutan, Matteo; Panshin, Gennady; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Pereima, Dmitrii; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pietrzyk, Guillaume; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pisani, Flavio; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Placinta, Vlad-Mihai; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Polci, Francesco; Poli Lener, Marco; Poluektov, Anton; Polukhina, Natalia; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Ponce, Sebastien; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Pullen, Hannah Louise; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Qin, Jia-Jia; Quagliani, Renato; Quintana, Boris; Rachwal, Bartlomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Ratnikov, Fedor; Raven, Gerhard; Ravonel Salzgeber, Melody; Reboud, Meril; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rinnert, Kurt; Robbe, Patrick; Robert, Arnaud; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Rollings, Alexandra Paige; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Vidal, Joan; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarpis, Gediminas; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schreiner, HF; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sepulveda, Eduardo Enrique; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Mark; Soares Lavra, Lais; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavomira; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stepanova, Margarita; Stevens, Holger; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Strokov, Sergey; Sun, Jiayin; Sun, Liang; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szumlak, Tomasz; Szymanski, Maciej Pawel; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tang, Zhipeng; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Tourinho Jadallah Aoude, Rafael; Tournefier, Edwige; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Usachov, Andrii; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagner, Alexander; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valassi, Andrea; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Verlage, Tobias Anton; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viana Barbosa, Joao Vitor; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Viemann, Harald; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Vitkovskiy, Arseniy; Vitti, Marcela; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Wang, Mengzhen; Wang, Yilong; Wang, Zhenzi; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Weisser, Constantin; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Winn, Michael Andreas; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xiao, Dong; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Ao; Xu, Menglin; Xu, Qingnian; Xu, Zehua; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yang, Zishuo; Yao, Yuezhe; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zonneveld, Jennifer Brigitta; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2018-05-25

    The $CP$ asymmetry in $B^-\\to D_s^-D^0$ and $B^-\\to D^-D^0$ decays is measured using LHCb data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb$^{-1}$, collected in $pp$ collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. The results are $A^{CP}(B^-\\to D_s^-D^0)=(-0.4\\pm 0.5\\pm 0.5)\\%$ and $A^{CP}(B^-\\to D^-D^0)=( 2.3\\pm 2.7\\pm 0.4)\\%$, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second systematic. This is the first measurement of $A^{CP}(B^-\\to D_s^-D^0)$ and the most precise determination of $A^{CP}(B^-\\to D^-D^0)$. Neither result shows evidence of $CP$ violation.

  20. Do-It-Yourself: 3D Models of Hydrogenic Orbitals through 3D Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Kaitlyn M.; de Cataldo, Riccardo; Fogarty, Keir H.

    2016-01-01

    Introductory chemistry students often have difficulty visualizing the 3-dimensional shapes of the hydrogenic electron orbitals without the aid of physical 3D models. Unfortunately, commercially available models can be quite expensive. 3D printing offers a solution for producing models of hydrogenic orbitals. 3D printing technology is widely…

  1. Holomorphic D7-branes and flavored N=1 gauge theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouyang, Peter

    2004-01-01

    We consider D7-branes in the gauge theory/string theory correspondence, using a probe approximation. The D7-branes have four directions embedded holomorphically in a non-compact Calabi-Yau 3-fold (which for specificity we take to be the conifold) and their remaining four directions are parallel to a stack of D3-branes transverse to the Calabi-Yau space. The dual gauge theory, which has N=1 supersymmetry, contains quarks which transform in the fundamental representation of the gauge group, and we identify the interactions of these quarks in terms of a superpotential. By activating three-form fluxes in the gravity background, we obtain a dual gauge theory with a cascade of Seiberg dualities. We find a supersymmetric supergravity solution for the leading backreaction effects of the D7-branes, valid for large radius. The cascading theory with flavors exhibits the interesting phenomenon that the rate of the cascade slows and can stop as the theory flows to the infrared

  2. A soft robot capable of 2D mobility and self-sensing for obstacle detection and avoidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lei; Tang, Yucheng; Gupta, Ujjaval; Zhu, Jian

    2018-04-01

    Soft robots have shown great potential for surveillance applications due to their interesting attributes including inherent flexibility, extreme adaptability, and excellent ability to move in confined spaces. High mobility combined with the sensing systems that can detect obstacles plays a significant role in performing surveillance tasks. Extensive studies have been conducted on movement mechanisms of traditional hard-bodied robots to increase their mobility. However, there are limited efforts in the literature to explore the mobility of soft robots. In addition, little attempt has been made to study the obstacle-detection capability of a soft mobile robot. In this paper, we develop a soft mobile robot capable of high mobility and self-sensing for obstacle detection and avoidance. This robot, consisting of a dielectric elastomer actuator as the robot body and four electroadhesion actuators as the robot feet, can generate 2D mobility, i.e. translations and turning in a 2D plane, by programming the actuation sequence of the robot body and feet. Furthermore, we develop a self-sensing method which models the robot body as a deformable capacitor. By measuring the real-time capacitance of the robot body, the robot can detect an obstacle when the peak capacitance drops suddenly. This sensing method utilizes the robot body itself instead of external sensors to achieve detection of obstacles, which greatly reduces the weight and complexity of the robot system. The 2D mobility and self-sensing capability ensure the success of obstacle detection and avoidance, which paves the way for the development of lightweight and intelligent soft mobile robots.

  3. 2D to 3D transition of polymeric carbon nitride nanosheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamorro-Posada, Pedro [Dpto. de Teoría de la Señal y Comunicaciones e IT, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicación, Paseo Belén 15, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Vázquez-Cabo, José [Dpto. de Teoría de la Señal y Comunicaciones, Universidad de Vigo, ETSI Telecomunicación, Lagoas Marcosende s/n, Vigo (Spain); Sánchez-Arévalo, Francisco M. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales (IIM), Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 70–360, Cd. Universitaria, México D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Martín-Ramos, Pablo [Dpto. de Teoría de la Señal y Comunicaciones e IT, Universidad de Valladolid, ETSI Telecomunicación, Paseo Belén 15, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Laboratorio de Materiales Avanzados (Advanced Materials Laboratory) ETSIIAA, Universidad de Valladolid, Avenida de Madrid 44, 34004 Palencia (Spain); Martín-Gil, Jesús; Navas-Gracia, Luis M. [Laboratorio de Materiales Avanzados (Advanced Materials Laboratory) ETSIIAA, Universidad de Valladolid, Avenida de Madrid 44, 34004 Palencia (Spain); Dante, Roberto C., E-mail: rcdante@yahoo.com [Laboratorio de Materiales Avanzados (Advanced Materials Laboratory) ETSIIAA, Universidad de Valladolid, Avenida de Madrid 44, 34004 Palencia (Spain)

    2014-11-15

    The transition from a prevalent turbostratic arrangement with low planar interactions (2D) to an array of polymeric carbon nitride nanosheets with stronger interplanar interactions (3D), occurring for samples treated above 650 °C, was detected by terahertz-time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). The simulated 3D material made of stacks of shifted quasi planar sheets composed of zigzagged polymer ribbons, delivered a XRD simulated pattern in relatively good agreement with the experimental one. The 2D to 3D transition was also supported by the simulation of THz-TDS spectra obtained from quantum chemistry calculations, in which the same broad bands around 2 THz and 1.5 THz were found for 2D and 3D arrays, respectively. This transition was also in accordance with the tightening of the interplanar distance probably due to an interplanar π bond contribution, as evidenced also by a broad absorption around 2.6 eV in the UV–vis spectrum, which appeared in the sample treated at 650 °C, and increased in the sample treated at 700 °C. The band gap was calculated for 1D and 2D cases. The value of 3.374 eV for the 2D case is, within the model accuracy and precision, in a relative good agreement with the value of 3.055 eV obtained from the experimental results. - Graphical abstract: 2D lattice mode vibrations and structural changes correlated with the so called “2D to 3D transition”. - Highlights: • A 2D to 3D transition has been detected for polymeric carbon nitride. • THz-TDS allowed us to discover and detect the 2D to 3D transition of polymeric carbon nitride. • We propose a structure for polymeric carbon nitride confirming it with THz-TDS.

  4. 2D to 3D transition of polymeric carbon nitride nanosheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamorro-Posada, Pedro; Vázquez-Cabo, José; Sánchez-Arévalo, Francisco M.; Martín-Ramos, Pablo; Martín-Gil, Jesús; Navas-Gracia, Luis M.; Dante, Roberto C.

    2014-01-01

    The transition from a prevalent turbostratic arrangement with low planar interactions (2D) to an array of polymeric carbon nitride nanosheets with stronger interplanar interactions (3D), occurring for samples treated above 650 °C, was detected by terahertz-time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). The simulated 3D material made of stacks of shifted quasi planar sheets composed of zigzagged polymer ribbons, delivered a XRD simulated pattern in relatively good agreement with the experimental one. The 2D to 3D transition was also supported by the simulation of THz-TDS spectra obtained from quantum chemistry calculations, in which the same broad bands around 2 THz and 1.5 THz were found for 2D and 3D arrays, respectively. This transition was also in accordance with the tightening of the interplanar distance probably due to an interplanar π bond contribution, as evidenced also by a broad absorption around 2.6 eV in the UV–vis spectrum, which appeared in the sample treated at 650 °C, and increased in the sample treated at 700 °C. The band gap was calculated for 1D and 2D cases. The value of 3.374 eV for the 2D case is, within the model accuracy and precision, in a relative good agreement with the value of 3.055 eV obtained from the experimental results. - Graphical abstract: 2D lattice mode vibrations and structural changes correlated with the so called “2D to 3D transition”. - Highlights: • A 2D to 3D transition has been detected for polymeric carbon nitride. • THz-TDS allowed us to discover and detect the 2D to 3D transition of polymeric carbon nitride. • We propose a structure for polymeric carbon nitride confirming it with THz-TDS

  5. Therapeutic response assessment using 3D ultrasound for hepatic metastasis from colorectal cancer: Application of a personalized, 3D-printed tumor model using CT images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Ra Choi

    Full Text Available To evaluate accuracy and reliability of three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US for response evaluation of hepatic metastasis from colorectal cancer (CRC using a personalized 3D-printed tumor model.Twenty patients with liver metastasis from CRC who underwent baseline and after chemotherapy CT, were retrospectively included. Personalized 3D-printed tumor models using CT were fabricated. Two radiologists measured volume of each 3D printing model using 3D US. With CT as a reference, we compared difference between CT and US tumor volume. The response evaluation was based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST criteria.3D US tumor volume showed no significant difference from CT volume (7.18 ± 5.44 mL, 8.31 ± 6.32 mL vs 7.42 ± 5.76 mL in CT, p>0.05. 3D US provided a high correlation coefficient with CT (r = 0.953, r = 0.97 as well as a high inter-observer intraclass correlation (0.978; 0.958-0.988. Regarding response, 3D US was in agreement with CT in 17 and 18 out of 20 patients for observer 1 and 2 with excellent agreement (κ = 0.961.3D US tumor volume using a personalized 3D-printed model is an accurate and reliable method for the response evaluation in comparison with CT tumor volume.

  6. Creation of 3D Multi-Body Orthodontic Models by Using Independent Imaging Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Viviano Razionale

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the field of dental health care, plaster models combined with 2D radiographs are widely used in clinical practice for orthodontic diagnoses. However, complex malocclusions can be better analyzed by exploiting 3D digital dental models, which allow virtual simulations and treatment planning processes. In this paper, dental data captured by independent imaging sensors are fused to create multi-body orthodontic models composed of teeth, oral soft tissues and alveolar bone structures. The methodology is based on integrating Cone-Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT and surface structured light scanning. The optical scanner is used to reconstruct tooth crowns and soft tissues (visible surfaces through the digitalization of both patients’ mouth impressions and plaster casts. These data are also used to guide the segmentation of internal dental tissues by processing CBCT data sets. The 3D individual dental tissues obtained by the optical scanner and the CBCT sensor are fused within multi-body orthodontic models without human supervisions to identify target anatomical structures. The final multi-body models represent valuable virtual platforms to clinical diagnostic and treatment planning.

  7. From 3 d duality to 2 d duality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharony, Ofer; Razamat, Shlomo S.; Willett, Brian

    2017-11-01

    In this paper we discuss 3 d N = 2 supersymmetric gauge theories and their IR dualities when they are compactified on a circle of radius r, and when we take the 2 d limit in which r → 0. The 2 d limit depends on how the mass parameters are scaled as r → 0, and often vacua become infinitely distant in the 2 d limit, leading to a direct sum of different 2 d theories. For generic mass parameters, when we take the same limit on both sides of a duality, we obtain 2 d dualities (between gauge theories and/or Landau-Ginzburg theories) that pass all the usual tests. However, when there are non-compact branches the discussion is subtle because the metric on the moduli space, which is not controlled by supersymmetry, plays an important role in the low-energy dynamics after compactification. Generally speaking, for IR dualities of gauge theories, we conjecture that dualities involving non-compact Higgs branches survive. On the other hand when there is a non-compact Coulomb branch on at least one side of the duality, the duality fails already when the 3 d theories are compactified on a circle. Using the valid reductions we reproduce many known 2 d IR dualities, giving further evidence for their validity, and we also find new 2 d dualities.

  8. Measurement of BETA(B sup 0 -> D* sub s sup + D* sup -) and Determination of the D sub s sup + -> phi pi sup + Branching Fraction with a Partial-Reconstruction Method

    CERN Document Server

    Covarelli, R

    2003-01-01

    The present model-independent measurements of the branching fractions BETA(B sup 0 -> D* sub s sup + D* sup -) and BETA(D sub s sup + -> phi pi sup +) based on 19.3 fb sup - sup 1 of data collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e sup + e sup - B Factory. Neutral B-meson decays to the D* sub s sup + D* sup - final state are selected with a partial reconstruction of the D* sub s sup +; that is, only the D* sup - and the soft photon from the decay D* sub s sup + -> D sub s sup +gamma are reconstructed. The branching fraction BETA(B sup 0 -> D* sub s sup + D* sup -) is extracted from these event yields, while BETA(D sub s sup + -> phi pi sup +) is determined by combining this result with a previous measurement of the product BETA(B sup 0 -> D* sub s sup + D* sup -) x BETA(D sub s sup + -> phi pi sup +) with partial reconstruction of the D* sup -. They obtain the following preliminary results: BETA(B sup 0 -> D* sub s sup + D* sup -) = (1.50 +- 0.16 +- 0.12)%, BETA(D sub s sup + -> phi pi sup +) = (4.7 +- 0....

  9. Novel Materials for 3D Printing by Photopolymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layani, Michael; Wang, Xiaofeng; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2018-05-13

    The field of 3D printing, also known as additive manufacturing (AM), is developing rapidly in both academic and industrial research environments. New materials and printing technologies, which enable rapid and multimaterial printing, have given rise to new applications and utilizations. However, the main bottleneck for achieving many more applications is the lack of materials with new physical properties. Here, some of the recent reports on novel materials in this field, such as ceramics, glass, shape-memory polymers, and electronics, are reviewed. Although new materials have been reported for all three main printing approaches-fused deposition modeling, binder jetting or laser sintering/melting, and photopolymerization-based approaches, apparently, most of the novel physicochemical properties are associated with materials printed by photopolymerization approaches. Furthermore, the high resolution that can be achieved using this type of 3D printing, together with the new properties, has resulted in new implementations such as microfluidic, biomedical devices, and soft robotics. Therefore, the focus here is on photopolymerization-based additive manufacturing including the recent development of new methods, novel monomers, and photoinitiators, which result in previously inaccessible applications such as complex ceramic structures, embedded electronics, and responsive 3D objects. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Kuvaus 3D-tulostamisesta hammastekniikassa

    OpenAIRE

    Munne, Mauri; Mustonen, Tuomas; Vähäjylkkä, Jaakko

    2013-01-01

    3D-tulostaminen kehittyy nopeasti ja yleistyy koko ajan. Tulostimien tarkkuuksien kehittyessä 3D-tulostus on ottamassa myös jalansijaa hammastekniikan alalta. Tämän opinnäytetyön tarkoituksena on kuvata 3D-tulostamisen tilaa hammastekniikassa. 3D-tulostaminen on Suomessa vielä melko harvinaista, joten opinnäytetyön tavoitteena on koota yhteen kaikki mahdollinen tieto liittyen 3D-tulostamiseen hammastekniikassa. Tavoitteena on myös 3D-tulostimen testaaminen käytännössä aina suun skannaami...

  11. SU-C-213-03: Custom 3D Printed Boluses for Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, B; Yang, M; Yan, Y; Rahimi, A; Chopra, R; Jiang, S [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a clinical workflow and to commission the process of creating custom 3d printed boluses for radiation therapy. Methods: We designed a workflow to create custom boluses using a commercial 3D printer. Contours of several patients were deformably mapped to phantoms where the test bolus contours were designed. Treatment plans were created on the phantoms following our institutional planning guideline. The DICOM file of the bolus contours were then converted to stereoLithography (stl) file for the 3d printer. The boluses were printed on a commercial 3D printer using polylactic acid (PLA) material. Custom printing parameters were optimized in order to meet the requirement of bolus composition. The workflow was tested on multiple anatomical sites such as skull, nose and chest wall. The size of boluses varies from 6×9cm2 to 12×25cm2. To commission the process, basic CT and dose properties of the printing materials were measured in photon and electron beams and compared against water and soft superflab bolus. Phantoms were then scanned to confirm the placement of custom boluses. Finally dose distributions with rescanned CTs were compared with those computer-generated boluses. Results: The relative electron density(1.08±0.006) of the printed boluses resemble those of liquid tap water(1.04±0.004). The dosimetric properties resemble those of liquid tap water(1.04±0.004). The dosimetric properties were measured at dmax with an ion chamber in electron and photon open beams. Compared with solid water and soft bolus, the output difference was within 1% for the 3D printer material. The printed boluses fit well to the phantom surfaces on CT scans. The dose distribution and DVH based on the printed boluses match well with those based on TPS generated boluses. Conclusion: 3d printing provides a cost effective and convenient solution for patient-specific boluses in radiation therapy.

  12. SU-C-213-03: Custom 3D Printed Boluses for Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, B; Yang, M; Yan, Y; Rahimi, A; Chopra, R; Jiang, S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a clinical workflow and to commission the process of creating custom 3d printed boluses for radiation therapy. Methods: We designed a workflow to create custom boluses using a commercial 3D printer. Contours of several patients were deformably mapped to phantoms where the test bolus contours were designed. Treatment plans were created on the phantoms following our institutional planning guideline. The DICOM file of the bolus contours were then converted to stereoLithography (stl) file for the 3d printer. The boluses were printed on a commercial 3D printer using polylactic acid (PLA) material. Custom printing parameters were optimized in order to meet the requirement of bolus composition. The workflow was tested on multiple anatomical sites such as skull, nose and chest wall. The size of boluses varies from 6×9cm2 to 12×25cm2. To commission the process, basic CT and dose properties of the printing materials were measured in photon and electron beams and compared against water and soft superflab bolus. Phantoms were then scanned to confirm the placement of custom boluses. Finally dose distributions with rescanned CTs were compared with those computer-generated boluses. Results: The relative electron density(1.08±0.006) of the printed boluses resemble those of liquid tap water(1.04±0.004). The dosimetric properties resemble those of liquid tap water(1.04±0.004). The dosimetric properties were measured at dmax with an ion chamber in electron and photon open beams. Compared with solid water and soft bolus, the output difference was within 1% for the 3D printer material. The printed boluses fit well to the phantom surfaces on CT scans. The dose distribution and DVH based on the printed boluses match well with those based on TPS generated boluses. Conclusion: 3d printing provides a cost effective and convenient solution for patient-specific boluses in radiation therapy

  13. Target localization of 3D versus 4D cone beam computed tomography in lipiodol-guided stereotactic radiotherapy of hepatocellular carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mark; Chiang, Chi Leung; Lee, Venus; Cheung, Steven; Leung, Ronnie; Wong, Matthew; Lee, Frankle; Blanck, Oliver

    2017-01-01

    Aim of this study was to comparatively evaluate the accuracy of respiration-correlated (4D) and uncorrelated (3D) cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in localizing lipiodolized hepatocellular carcinomas during stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). 4D-CBCT scans of eighteen HCCs were acquired during free-breathing SBRT following trans-arterial chemo-embolization (TACE) with lipiodol. Approximately 1320 x-ray projections per 4D-CBCT were collected and phase-sorted into ten bins. A 4D registration workflow was followed to register the reconstructed time-weighted average CBCT with the planning mid-ventilation (MidV) CT by an initial bone registration of the vertebrae and then tissue registration of the lipiodol. For comparison, projections of each 4D-CBCT were combined to synthesize 3D-CBCT without phase-sorting. Using the lipiodolized tumor, uncertainties of the treatment setup estimated from the absolute and relative lipiodol position to bone were analyzed separately for 4D- and 3D-CBCT. Qualitatively, 3D-CBCT showed better lipiodol contrast than 4D-CBCT primarily because of a tenfold increase of projections used for reconstruction. Motion artifact was observed to subside in 4D-CBCT compared to 3D-CBCT. Group mean, systematic and random errors estimated from 4D- and 3D-CBCT agreed to within 1 mm in the cranio-caudal (CC) and 0.5 mm in the anterior-posterior (AP) and left-right (LR) directions. Systematic and random errors are largest in the CC direction, amounting to 4.7 mm and 3.7 mm from 3D-CBCT and 5.6 mm and 3.8 mm from 4D-CBCT, respectively. Safety margin calculated from 3D-CBCT and 4D-CBCT differed by 2.1, 0.1 and 0.0 mm in the CC, AP, and LR directions. 3D-CBCT is an adequate alternative to 4D-CBCT when lipoid is used for localizing HCC during free-breathing SBRT. Similar margins are anticipated with 3D- and 4D-CBCT.

  14. Contributions in compression of 3D medical images and 2D images; Contributions en compression d'images medicales 3D et d'images naturelles 2D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudeau, Y

    2006-12-15

    The huge amounts of volumetric data generated by current medical imaging techniques in the context of an increasing demand for long term archiving solutions, as well as the rapid development of distant radiology make the use of compression inevitable. Indeed, if the medical community has sided until now with compression without losses, most of applications suffer from compression ratios which are too low with this kind of compression. In this context, compression with acceptable losses could be the most appropriate answer. So, we propose a new loss coding scheme based on 3D (3 dimensional) Wavelet Transform and Dead Zone Lattice Vector Quantization 3D (DZLVQ) for medical images. Our algorithm has been evaluated on several computerized tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance image volumes. The main contribution of this work is the design of a multidimensional dead zone which enables to take into account correlations between neighbouring elementary volumes. At high compression ratios, we show that it can out-perform visually and numerically the best existing methods. These promising results are confirmed on head CT by two medical patricians. The second contribution of this document assesses the effect with-loss image compression on CAD (Computer-Aided Decision) detection performance of solid lung nodules. This work on 120 significant lungs images shows that detection did not suffer until 48:1 compression and still was robust at 96:1. The last contribution consists in the complexity reduction of our compression scheme. The first allocation dedicated to 2D DZLVQ uses an exponential of the rate-distortion (R-D) functions. The second allocation for 2D and 3D medical images is based on block statistical model to estimate the R-D curves. These R-D models are based on the joint distribution of wavelet vectors using a multidimensional mixture of generalized Gaussian (MMGG) densities. (author)

  15. 3D printing for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Hausman, Kalani Kirk

    2014-01-01

    Get started printing out 3D objects quickly and inexpensively! 3D printing is no longer just a figment of your imagination. This remarkable technology is coming to the masses with the growing availability of 3D printers. 3D printers create 3-dimensional layered models and they allow users to create prototypes that use multiple materials and colors.  This friendly-but-straightforward guide examines each type of 3D printing technology available today and gives artists, entrepreneurs, engineers, and hobbyists insight into the amazing things 3D printing has to offer. You'll discover methods for

  16. 3D-modeling and 3D-printing explorations on Japanese tea ceremony utensils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levy, P.D.; Yamada, Shigeru

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we inquire aesthetical aspects of the Japanese tea ceremony, described as the aesthetics in the imperfection, based on novel fabrication technologies: 3D-modeling and 3D-printing. To do so, 3D-printed utensils (chashaku and chasen) were iteratively designed for the ceremony and were

  17. Thermodynamics properties study of diatomic molecules with q-deformed modified Poschl-Teller plus Manning Rosen non-central potential in D dimensions using SUSYQM approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suparmi, A.; Cari, C.; Pratiwi, B. N.

    2016-04-01

    D-dimensional Dirac equation of q-deformed modified Poschl-Teller plus Manning Rosen non-central potential was solved using supersymmetric quantum mechanics (SUSY QM). The relativistic energy spectra were analyzed by using SUSY QM and shape invariant properties from radial part of D dimensional Dirac equation and the angular quantum numbers were obtained from angular part of D dimensional Dirac equation. The SUSY operators was used to generate the D dimensional relativistic wave functions both for radial and angular parts. In the non-relativistic limit, the relativistic energy equation was reduced to the non-relativistic energy. In the classical limit, the partition function of vibrational, the specific heat of vibrational, and the mean energy of vibrational of some diatomic molecules were calculated from the equation of non-relativistic energy with the help of error function and Mat-lab 2011.

  18. The dimension added by 3D scanning and 3D printing of meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vet, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    An overview for the 3D photodocumentation of meteorites is presented, focussing on two 3D scanning methods in relation to 3D printing. The 3D photodocumention of meteorites provides new ways for the digital preservation of culturally, historically or scientifically unique meteorites. It has the potential for becoming a new documentation standard of meteorites that can exist complementary to traditional photographic documentation. Notable applications include (i.) use of physical properties in dark flight-, strewn field-, or aerodynamic modelling; (ii.) collection research of meteorites curated by different museum collections, and (iii.) public dissemination of meteorite models as a resource for educational users. The possible applications provided by the additional dimension of 3D illustrate the benefits for the meteoritics community.

  19. 3D Model Optimization of Four-Facet Drill for 3D Drilling Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buranský Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is focused on optimization of four-facet drill for 3D drilling numerical modelling. For optimization, the process of reverse engineering by PowerShape software was used. The design of four-facet drill was created in NumrotoPlus software. The modified 3D model of the drill was used in the numerical analysis of cutting forces. Verification of the accuracy of 3D models for reverse engineering was implemented using the colour deviation maps. The CAD model was in the STEP format. For simulation software, 3D model in the STEP format is ideal. STEP is a solid model. Simulation software automatically splits the 3D model into finite elements. The STEP model was therefore more suitable than the STL model.

  20. Measurement of $D^{*\\pm}$, $D^\\pm$ and $D_s^\\pm$ meson production cross sections in $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans~Peter; Becker, Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozic, Ivan; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminada, Lea Michaela; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapleau, Bertrand; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Childers, John Taylor; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; 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Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; French, Sky; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghazlane, Hamid; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonell