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Sample records for cytr repressor antagonizes

  1. The CytR repressor antagonizes cyclic AMP-cyclic AMP receptor protein activation of the deoCp2 promoter of Escherichia coli K-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard-Andersen, L; Martinussen, J; Møllegaard, N E

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of the Escherichia coli deoCp2 promoter by the CytR repressor and the cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) complexed to cAMP. Promoter regions controlled by these two proteins characteristically contain tandem cAMP-CRP binding sites. Here we show that (i) Cyt...

  2. Tandem DNA-bound cAMP-CRP complexes are required for transcriptional repression of the deoP2 promoter by the CytR repressor in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Møllegaard, N E; Douthwaite, S R

    1990-01-01

    region, and is sufficient for activation; the second site, CRP-2, centred around -93, is indispensable for repression. Here we demonstrate, by means of in vivo titration, that CytR interaction with deoP2 depends not only on CRP-2, but also on CRP-1 and the length and possibly the sequence separating...... these two sites. Also, point mutations in either CRP site reduce or abolish CytR titration; however, no co-operativity is observed in the interaction of CytR with the two CRP binding sites. Furthermore, the reduction in CytR titration parallels the reduction in binding of cAMP-CRP to the mutated CRP sites...

  3. Identification of the subunit of cAMP receptor protein (CRP) that functionally interacts with CytR in CRP-CytR-mediated transcriptional repression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meibom, K L; Kallipolitis, B H; Ebright, R H

    2000-01-01

    At promoters of the Escherichia coli CytR regulon, the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) interacts with the repressor CytR to form transcriptionally inactive CRP-CytR-promoter or (CRP)(2)-CytR-promoter complexes. Here, using "oriented heterodimer" analysis, we show that only one subunit of the CRP dimer......, the subunit proximal to CytR, functionally interacts with CytR in CRP-CytR-promoter and (CRP)(2)-CytR-promoter complexes. Our results provide information about the architecture of CRP-CytR-promoter and (CRP)(2)-CytR-promoter complexes and rule out the proposal that masking of activating region 2 of CRP...

  4. Rce1, a novel transcriptional repressor, regulates cellulase gene expression by antagonizing the transactivator Xyr1 in Trichoderma reesei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanli; Zheng, Fanglin; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Guolei; Chen, Guanjun; Zhang, Weixin; Liu, Weifeng

    2017-07-01

    Cellulase gene expression in the model cellulolytic fungus Trichoderma reesei is supposed to be controlled by an intricate regulatory network involving multiple transcription factors. Here, we identified a novel transcriptional repressor of cellulase gene expression, Rce1. Disruption of the rce1 gene not only facilitated the induced expression of cellulase genes but also led to a significant delay in terminating the induction process. However, Rce1 did not participate in Cre1-mediated catabolite repression. Electrophoretic mobility shift (EMSA) and DNase I footprinting assays in combination with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) demonstrated that Rce1 could bind directly to a cbh1 (cellobiohydrolase 1-encoding) gene promoter region containing a cluster of Xyr1 binding sites. Furthermore, competitive binding assays revealed that Rce1 antagonized Xyr1 from binding to the cbh1 promoter. These results indicate that intricate interactions exist between a variety of transcription factors to ensure tight and energy-efficient regulation of cellulase gene expression in T. reesei. This study also provides important clues regarding increased cellulase production in T. reesei. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The global repressor FliZ antagonizes gene expression by σS-containing RNA polymerase due to overlapping DNA binding specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, Christina; Hengge, Regine

    2012-06-01

    FliZ, a global regulatory protein under the control of the flagellar master regulator FlhDC, was shown to antagonize σ(S)-dependent gene expression in Escherichia coli. Thereby it plays a pivotal role in the decision between alternative life-styles, i.e. FlhDC-controlled flagellum-based motility or σ(S)-dependent curli fimbriae-mediated adhesion and biofilm formation. Here, we show that FliZ is an abundant DNA-binding protein that inhibits gene expression mediated by σ(S) by recognizing operator sequences that resemble the -10 region of σ(S)-dependent promoters. FliZ does so with a structural element that is similar to region 3.0 of σ(S). Within this element, R108 in FliZ corresponds to K173 in σ(S), which contacts a conserved cytosine at the -13 promoter position that is specific for σ(S)-dependent promoters. R108 as well as C(-13) are also crucial for DNA binding by FliZ. However, while a number of FliZ binding sites correspond to known σ(S)-dependent promoters, promoter activity is not a prerequisite for FliZ binding and repressor function. Thus, we demonstrate that FliZ also feedback-controls flagellar gene expression by binding to a site in the flhDC control region that shows similarity only to a -10 element of a σ(S)-dependent promoter, but does not function as a promoter.

  6. CytR Is a Global Positive Regulator of Competence, Type VI Secretion, and Chitinases in Vibrio cholerae.

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    Samit S Watve

    Full Text Available The facultative pathogen Vibrio cholerae transitions between its human host and aquatic reservoirs where it colonizes chitinous surfaces. Growth on chitin induces expression of chitin utilization genes, genes involved in DNA uptake by natural transformation, and a type VI secretion system that allows contact-dependent killing of neighboring bacteria. We have previously shown that the transcription factor CytR, thought to primarily regulate the pyrimidine nucleoside scavenging response, is required for natural competence in V. cholerae. Through high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq, we show that CytR positively regulates the majority of competence genes, the three type VI secretion operons, and the four known or predicted chitinases. We used transcriptional reporters and phenotypic analysis to determine the individual contributions of quorum sensing, which is controlled by the transcription factors HapR and QstR; chitin utilization that is mediated by TfoX; and pyrimidine starvation that is orchestrated by CytR, toward each of these processes. We find that in V. cholerae, CytR is a global regulator of multiple behaviors affecting fitness and adaptability in the environment.

  7. Comparative genomics of CytR, an unusual member of the LacI family of transcription factors.

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    Natalia V Sernova

    Full Text Available CytR is a transcription regulator from the LacI family, present in some gamma-proteobacteria including Escherichia coli and known not only for its cellular role, control of transport and utilization of nucleosides, but for a number of unusual structural properties. The present study addressed three related problems: structure of CytR-binding sites and motifs, their evolutionary conservation, and identification of new members of the CytR regulon. While the majority of CytR-binding sites are imperfect inverted repeats situated between binding sites for another transcription factor, CRP, other architectures were observed, in particular, direct repeats. While the similarity between sites for different genes in one genome is rather low, and hence the consensus motif is weak, there is high conservation of orthologous sites in different genomes (mainly in the Enterobacteriales arguing for the presence of specific CytR-DNA contacts. On larger evolutionary distances candidate CytR sites may migrate but the approximate distance between flanking CRP sites tends to be conserved, which demonstrates that the overall structure of the CRP-CytR-DNA complex is gene-specific. The analysis yielded candidate CytR-binding sites for orthologs of known regulon members in less studied genomes of the Enterobacteriales and Vibrionales and identified a new candidate member of the CytR regulon, encoding a transporter named NupT (YcdZ.

  8. Bacterial Associations: Antagonism to Symbiosis

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, S.

    mutualism through commensalisms and competition, to antagonism, determined ultimately by balancing the cost of the association against the benefits received (Pianka, 1994). A continuum can be envisioned that spans a dynamic bridge from antagonism... when two organisms form a relationship, which provides an advantage for both the partners at least temporarily. In commensalisms only one partner derives benefit and the other does not. Symbiosis The word, ?symbiosis? is derived from the Greek word...

  9. Assessing the Role of ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR Transcriptional Repressors in Salicylic Acid-Mediated Suppression of Jasmonic Acid-Responsive Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caarls, Lotte; Van der Does, Dieuwertje; Hickman, Richard; Jansen, Wouter; Verk, Marcel C Van; Proietti, Silvia; Lorenzo, Oscar; Solano, Roberto; Pieterse, Corné M J; Van Wees, Saskia C M

    2017-02-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) cross-communicate in the plant immune signaling network to finely regulate induced defenses. In Arabidopsis, SA antagonizes many JA-responsive genes, partly by targeting the ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR (ERF)-type transcriptional activator ORA59. Members of the ERF transcription factor family typically bind to GCC-box motifs in the promoters of JA- and ethylene-responsive genes, thereby positively or negatively regulating their expression. The GCC-box motif is sufficient for SA-mediated suppression of JA-responsive gene expression. Here, we investigated whether SA-induced ERF-type transcriptional repressors, which may compete with JA-induced ERF-type activators for binding at the GCC-box, play a role in SA/JA antagonism. We selected ERFs that are transcriptionally induced by SA and/or possess an EAR transcriptional repressor motif. Several of the 16 ERFs tested suppressed JA-dependent gene expression, as revealed by enhanced JA-induced PDF1.2 or VSP2 expression levels in the corresponding erf mutants, while others were involved in activation of these genes. However, SA could antagonize JA-induced PDF1.2 or VSP2 in all erf mutants, suggesting that the tested ERF transcriptional repressors are not required for SA/JA cross-talk. Moreover, a mutant in the co-repressor TOPLESS, that showed reduction in repression of JA signaling, still displayed SA-mediated antagonism of PDF1.2 and VSP2. Collectively, these results suggest that SA-regulated ERF transcriptional repressors are not essential for antagonism of JA-responsive gene expression by SA. We further show that de novo SA-induced protein synthesis is required for suppression of JA-induced PDF1.2, pointing to SA-stimulated production of an as yet unknown protein that suppresses JA-induced transcription. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Heterodimerization of Msx and Dlx homeoproteins results in functional antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H; Hu, G; Wang, H; Sciavolino, P; Iler, N; Shen, M M; Abate-Shen, C

    1997-05-01

    Protein-protein interactions are known to be essential for specifying the transcriptional activities of homeoproteins. Here we show that representative members of the Msx and Dlx homeoprotein families form homo- and heterodimeric complexes. We demonstrate that dimerization by Msx and Dlx proteins is mediated through their homeodomains and that the residues required for this interaction correspond to those necessary for DNA binding. Unlike most other known examples of homeoprotein interactions, association of Msx and Dlx proteins does not promote cooperative DNA binding; instead, dimerization and DNA binding are mutually exclusive activities. In particular, we show that Msx and Dlx proteins interact independently and noncooperatively with homeodomain DNA binding sites and that dimerization is specifically blocked by the presence of such DNA sites. We further demonstrate that the transcriptional properties of Msx and Dlx proteins display reciprocal inhibition. Specifically, Msx proteins act as transcriptional repressors and Dlx proteins act as activators, while in combination, Msx and Dlx proteins counteract each other's transcriptional activities. Finally, we show that the expression patterns of representative Msx and Dlx genes (Msx1, Msx2, Dlx2, and Dlx5) overlap in mouse embryogenesis during limb bud and craniofacial development, consistent with the potential for their protein products to interact in vivo. Based on these observations, we propose that functional antagonism through heterodimer formation provides a mechanism for regulating the transcriptional actions of Msx and Dlx homeoproteins in vivo.

  11. Antagonism of acetylcholine by adrenaline antagonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benfey, B. G.; Grillo, S. A.

    1963-01-01

    Phenoxybenzamine antagonized the inhibitory action of acetylcholine on the guinea-pig isolated atrium. The antagonism was slow in onset, very slowly reversible, and could be overcome by increased concentrations of acetylcholine. In contrast, atropine inhibited the action of acetylcholine quickly, and the effect disappeared soon after withdrawal. The pA10 of phenoxybenzamine (2 hr of contact) was 6.8, and that of atropine (30 min of contact) was 8.4. In the presence of atropine phenoxybenzamine did not exert a slowly reversible antagonism, and the dose-ratio of acetylcholine returned to normal soon after withdrawal of both drugs. Phenoxybenzamine also antagonized acetylcholine in the guinea-pig isolated ileum, but with higher concentrations acetylcholine did not overcome the antagonism. The pA10 (60 min of contact) was 6.6. The pA10 of chlorpromazine in the atrium (2 hr of contact) and ileum (60 min of contact) was 5.9. Phentolamine, 2-diethylaminomethylbenzo-1,4-dioxan hydrochloride (883 F), and yohimbine antagonized acetylcholine in the atrium and ileum but required higher concentrations than chlorpromazine. PMID:13967429

  12. Repressor-mediated tissue-specific gene expression in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Richard B [Athens, GA; Balish, Rebecca S [Oxford, OH; Tehryung, Kim [Athens, GA; McKinney, Elizabeth C [Athens, GA

    2009-02-17

    Plant tissue specific gene expression by way of repressor-operator complexes, has enabled outcomes including, without limitation, male sterility and engineered plants having root-specific gene expression of relevant proteins to clean environmental pollutants from soil and water. A mercury hyperaccumulation strategy requires that mercuric ion reductase coding sequence is strongly expressed. The actin promoter vector, A2pot, engineered to contain bacterial lac operator sequences, directed strong expression in all plant vegetative organs and tissues. In contrast, the expression from the A2pot construct was restricted primarily to root tissues when a modified bacterial repressor (LacIn) was coexpressed from the light-regulated rubisco small subunit promoter in above-ground tissues. Also provided are analogous repressor operator complexes for selective expression in other plant tissues, for example, to produce male sterile plants.

  13. An Unusual Phage Repressor Encoded by Mycobacteriophage BPs.

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    Valerie M Villanueva

    Full Text Available Temperate bacteriophages express transcription repressors that maintain lysogeny by down-regulating lytic promoters and confer superinfection immunity. Repressor regulation is critical to the outcome of infection-lysogenic or lytic growth-as well as prophage induction into lytic replication. Mycobacteriophage BPs and its relatives use an unusual integration-dependent immunity system in which the phage attachment site (attP is located within the repressor gene (33 such that site-specific integration leads to synthesis of a prophage-encoded product (gp33103 that is 33 residues shorter at its C-terminus than the virally-encoded protein (gp33136. However, the shorter form of the repressor (gp33103 is stable and active in repression of the early lytic promoter PR, whereas the longer virally-encoded form (gp33136 is inactive due to targeted degradation via a C-terminal ssrA-like tag. We show here that both forms of the repressor bind similarly to the 33-34 intergenic regulatory region, and that BPs gp33103 is a tetramer in solution. The BPs gp33103 repressor binds to five regulatory regions spanning the BPs genome, and regulates four promoters including the early lytic promoter, PR. BPs gp33103 has a complex pattern of DNA recognition in which a full operator binding site contains two half sites separated by a variable spacer, and BPs gp33103 induces a DNA bend at the full operator site but not a half site. The operator site structure is unusual in that one half site corresponds to a 12 bp palindrome identified previously, but the other half site is a highly variable variant of the palindrome.

  14. The biotin repressor: modulation of allostery by corepressor analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Patrick H; Cronan, John E; Grøtli, Morten; Beckett, Dorothy

    2004-04-02

    The Escherichia coli biotin repressor functions in biotin retention and regulation of biotin biosynthesis. Biotin retention is accomplished via the two-step biotinylation of the biotin-dependent enzyme, acetyl-CoA carboxylase. In the first step of this reaction the substrates biotin and ATP are utilized in synthesis of the activated biotin, biotinyl-5'-AMP, while in the second step this activated biotin is transferred to a unique lysine residue of the biotin carboxyl carrier protein subunit of the carboxylase. Regulation of biotin biosynthesis is accomplished through binding of the repressor to the transcription control region of the biotin biosynthetic operon. The adenylated or activated biotin functions as the corepressor in this DNA binding process. The activated biotin is a mixed anhydride and thus labile. In efforts to develop tools for structural and thermodynamic studies of the biotin regulatory interactions, two analogs of the adenylate, a sulfamoyl derivative and an ester derivative, have been synthesized and functionally characterized. Results of fluorescence measurements indicate that both analogs bind with high affinity to the repressor and that both are inactive in biotin transfer to the acceptor protein. Functional studies of their corepressor properties indicate that while the sulfamoyl is a weak allosteric activator, the ester closely mimics the physiological corepressor in activation of assembly of the transcription repression complex. Results of these studies also provide further insight into the allosteric mechanism of the biotin repressor.

  15. The Antagonism Mechanism Of Trichoderma spp. Towards Fusarium solani Mold

    OpenAIRE

    Utami Sri Hastuti; Indriana Rahmawati

    2016-01-01

    The antagonism ability of seven Trichoderma isolates towards F.solani have been observed and tested by dual culture technique. The antagonism mechanism observed by microscopic observation with light microscope and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The research result showed seven species of Trichoderma molds have different antagonism ability towards F.solani each other. The antagonism mechanism observed by light microscope and Scanning Electron Microscopy were mycoparasitism, antibiosis, an...

  16. The Antagonism Mechanism Of Trichoderma spp. Towards Fusarium solani Mold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Utami Sri Hastuti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The antagonism ability of seven Trichoderma isolates towards F.solani have been observed and tested by dual culture technique. The antagonism mechanism observed by microscopic observation with light microscope and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM. The research result showed seven species of Trichoderma molds have different antagonism ability towards F.solani each other. The antagonism mechanism observed by light microscope and Scanning Electron Microscopy were mycoparasitism, antibiosis, and competition.

  17. Chemical modification of arginine residues in the lactose repressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitson, P.A.; Matthews, K.S.

    1987-01-01

    The lactose repressor protein was chemically modified with 2,3-butanedione and phenylglyoxal. Arginine reaction was quantitated by either amino aced analysis or incorporation of 14 C-labeled phenylglyoxal. Inducer binding activity was unaffected by the modification of arginine residues, while both operator and nonspecific DNA binding activities were diminished, although to differing degrees. The correlation of the decrease in DNA binding activities with the modification of ∼ 1-2 equiv of arginine per monomer suggests increased reactivity of a functionally essential residue(s). For both reagents, operator DNA binding activity was protected by the presence of calf thymus DNA, and the extent of reaction with phenylglyoxal was simultaneously diminished. This protection presumably results from steric restriction of reagent access to an arginine(s) that is (are) essential for DNA binding interactions. These experiments suggest that there is (are) an essential reactive arginine(s) critical for repressor binding to DNA

  18. Reconceptualizing synergism and antagonism among multiple stressors

    OpenAIRE

    Piggott, Jeremy J; Townsend, Colin R; Matthaei, Christoph D

    2015-01-01

    The potential for complex synergistic or antagonistic interactions between multiple stressors presents one of the largest uncertainties when predicting ecological change but, despite common use of the terms in the scientific literature, a consensus on their operational definition is still lacking. The identification of synergism or antagonism is generally straightforward when stressors operate in the same direction, but if individual stressor effects oppose each other, the definition of syner...

  19. Triclosan antagonizes fluconazole activity against Candida albicans.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Higgins, J

    2012-01-01

    Triclosan is a broad-spectrum antimicrobial compound commonly used in oral hygiene products. Investigation of its activity against Candida albicans showed that triclosan was fungicidal at concentrations of 16 mg\\/L. However, at subinhibitory concentrations (0.5-2 mg\\/L), triclosan antagonized the activity of fluconazole. Although triclosan induced CDR1 expression in C. albicans, antagonism was still observed in cdr1Δ and cdr2Δ strains. Triclosan did not affect fluconazole uptake or alter total membrane sterol content, but did induce the expression of FAS1 and FAS2, indicating that its mode of action may involve inhibition of fatty acid synthesis, as it does in prokaryotes. However, FAS2 mutants did not exhibit increased susceptibility to triclosan, and overexpression of both FAS1 and FAS2 alleles did not alter triclosan susceptibility. Unexpectedly, the antagonistic effect was specific for C. albicans under hypha-inducing conditions and was absent in the non-filamentous efg1Δ strain. This antagonism may be due to the membranotropic activity of triclosan and the unique composition of hyphal membranes.

  20. Bacillus subtilis IolQ (DegA) is a transcriptional repressor of iolX encoding NAD+-dependent scyllo-inositol dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dong-Min; Michon, Christophe; Morinaga, Tetsuro; Tanaka, Kosei; Takenaka, Shinji; Ishikawa, Shu; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi

    2017-07-11

    Bacillus subtilis is able to utilize at least three inositol stereoisomers as carbon sources, myo-, scyllo-, and D-chiro-inositol (MI, SI, and DCI, respectively). NAD + -dependent SI dehydrogenase responsible for SI catabolism is encoded by iolX. Even in the absence of functional iolX, the presence of SI or MI in the growth medium was found to induce the transcription of iolX through an unknown mechanism. Immediately upstream of iolX, there is an operon that encodes two genes, yisR and iolQ (formerly known as degA), each of which could encode a transcriptional regulator. Here we performed an inactivation analysis of yisR and iolQ and found that iolQ encodes a repressor of the iolX transcription. The coding sequence of iolQ was expressed in Escherichia coli and the gene product was purified as a His-tagged fusion protein, which bound to two sites within the iolX promoter region in vitro. IolQ is a transcriptional repressor of iolX. Genetic evidences allowed us to speculate that SI and MI might possibly be the intracellular inducers, however they failed to antagonize DNA binding of IolQ in in vitro experiments.

  1. Radiation-induced tetramer-to-dimer transition of Escherichia coli lactose repressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goffinont, S.; Davidkova, M.; Spotheim-Maurizot, M.

    2009-01-01

    The wild type lactose repressor of Escherichia coli is a tetrameric protein formed by two identical dimers. They are associated via a C-terminal 4-helix bundle (called tetramerization domain) whose stability is ensured by the interaction of leucine zipper motifs. Upon in vitro γ-irradiation the repressor losses its ability to bind the operator DNA sequence due to damage of its DNA-binding domains. Using an engineered dimeric repressor for comparison, we show here that irradiation induces also the change of repressor oligomerisation state from tetramer to dimer. The splitting of the tetramer into dimers can result from the oxidation of the leucine residues of the tetramerization domain.

  2. Natural Protection of Wood with Antagonism Fungi

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    Alba ZAREMSKI

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Biological environments contain a certain number of microbial populations which, within a givenecological niche, display various relations ranging from symbiosis to parasitism. Researchers have beeninterested in these types of relations for around fifty years, especially in one very particular type ofrelationship: the antagonism exerted between individuals of the same microbial population.Today, the role played by biological agents, bringing into play inhibitive or destructive antibioticsubstances, reveals a certain potential for their use in controlling microorganisms associated with suchdegradation processes.The work undertaken by HydroQuébec and CIRAD involved two types of experiment: 1 in Petri dishes toassess and characterize the antagonistic capacity of Trichoderma against white rot and brown rot fungi; 2on pieces taken from untreated poles in order to study confrontation between the basidiomycete and theantagonistic strain in wood.This study investigated the antagonism of three ascomycetes of the genus Trichoderma against two whiterot basidiomycetes, Pycnoporus sanguineus and Coriolus versicolor, and two brown rot basidiomycetes,Antrodia sp. and Coniophora puteana, through direct confrontation in Petri dishes and in the wood ofHydroQuébec poles.The results obtained seemed to complete each other coherently. They revealed that the Trichodermagroup of fungi was not aggressive to wood and the results obtained after direct confrontation in Petri disheswere confirmed in wood.By directly exposing the different basidiomycetes and antagonists to each other in Petri dishes, two bytwo, we effectively revealed an antagonism effect for a large majority of the pairs. However, there wassubstantial variability in reactions from one pair to the next.

  3. Reconceptualizing synergism and antagonism among multiple stressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piggott, Jeremy J; Townsend, Colin R; Matthaei, Christoph D

    2015-04-01

    The potential for complex synergistic or antagonistic interactions between multiple stressors presents one of the largest uncertainties when predicting ecological change but, despite common use of the terms in the scientific literature, a consensus on their operational definition is still lacking. The identification of synergism or antagonism is generally straightforward when stressors operate in the same direction, but if individual stressor effects oppose each other, the definition of synergism is paradoxical because what is synergistic to one stressor's effect direction is antagonistic to the others. In their highly cited meta-analysis, Crain et al. (Ecology Letters, 11, 2008: 1304) assumed in situations with opposing individual effects that synergy only occurs when the cumulative effect is more negative than the additive sum of the opposing individual effects. We argue against this and propose a new systematic classification based on an additive effects model that combines the magnitude and response direction of the cumulative effect and the interaction effect. A new class of "mitigating synergism" is identified, where cumulative effects are reversed and enhanced. We applied our directional classification to the dataset compiled by Crain et al. (Ecology Letters, 11, 2008: 1304) to determine the prevalence of synergistic, antagonistic, and additive interactions. Compared to their original analysis, we report differences in the representation of interaction classes by interaction type and we document examples of mitigating synergism, highlighting the importance of incorporating individual stressor effect directions in the determination of synergisms and antagonisms. This is particularly pertinent given a general bias in ecology toward investigating and reporting adverse multiple stressor effects (double negative). We emphasize the need for reconsideration by the ecological community of the interpretation of synergism and antagonism in situations where

  4. Conscious and Unconscious Emotions in Alexithymics and Repressors

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    Tsvetelina Slavchova Hadzhieva

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the nature, evolution and characteristics of conscious and unconscious emotions which determine the internal regulation of behavior are traced. Definitions of the nature of emotions and feelings of other authors are presented, and studies which reflect the cognitive relationship of emotional processes are cited. A classification of two different personality types has been considered (alexithymic and repressor, who differently express their emotions, because of their cognitive peculiarities. The main idea of ​​the article is based on tracing the specifics of emotional expression and intensity.

  5. MDM2 Associates with Polycomb Repressor Complex 2 and Enhances Stemness-Promoting Chromatin Modifications Independent of p53

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wienken, Magdalena; Dickmanns, Antje; Nemajerova, Alice

    2016-01-01

    The MDM2 oncoprotein ubiquitinates and antagonizes p53 but may also carry out p53-independent functions. Here we report that MDM2 is required for the efficient generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from murine embryonic fibroblasts, in the absence of p53. Similarly, MDM2 depletion...... in the context of p53 deficiency also promoted the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells and diminished clonogenic survival of cancer cells. Most of the MDM2-controlled genes also responded to the inactivation of the Polycomb Repressor Complex 2 (PRC2) and its catalytic component EZH2. MDM2 physically...... associated with EZH2 on chromatin, enhancing the trimethylation of histone 3 at lysine 27 and the ubiquitination of histone 2A at lysine 119 (H2AK119) at its target genes. Removing MDM2 simultaneously with the H2AK119 E3 ligase Ring1B/RNF2 further induced these genes and synthetically arrested cell...

  6. MDM2 Associates with Polycomb Repressor Complex 2 and Enhances Stemness-Promoting Chromatin Modifications Independent of p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienken, Magdalena; Dickmanns, Antje; Nemajerova, Alice; Kramer, Daniela; Najafova, Zeynab; Weiss, Miriam; Karpiuk, Oleksandra; Kassem, Moustapha; Zhang, Yanping; Lozano, Guillermina; Johnsen, Steven A; Moll, Ute M; Zhang, Xin; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2016-01-07

    The MDM2 oncoprotein ubiquitinates and antagonizes p53 but may also carry out p53-independent functions. Here we report that MDM2 is required for the efficient generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from murine embryonic fibroblasts, in the absence of p53. Similarly, MDM2 depletion in the context of p53 deficiency also promoted the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells and diminished clonogenic survival of cancer cells. Most of the MDM2-controlled genes also responded to the inactivation of the Polycomb Repressor Complex 2 (PRC2) and its catalytic component EZH2. MDM2 physically associated with EZH2 on chromatin, enhancing the trimethylation of histone 3 at lysine 27 and the ubiquitination of histone 2A at lysine 119 (H2AK119) at its target genes. Removing MDM2 simultaneously with the H2AK119 E3 ligase Ring1B/RNF2 further induced these genes and synthetically arrested cell proliferation. In conclusion, MDM2 supports the Polycomb-mediated repression of lineage-specific genes, independent of p53. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The MogR Transcriptional Repressor Regulates Nonhierarchal Expression of Flagellar Motility Genes and Virulence in Listeria monocytogenes.

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    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Flagella are surface structures critical for motility and virulence of many bacterial species. In Listeria monocytogenes, MogR tightly represses expression of flagellin (FlaA during extracellular growth at 37 degrees C and during intracellular infection. MogR is also required for full virulence in a murine model of infection. Using in vitro and in vivo infection models, we determined that the severe virulence defect of MogR-negative bacteria is due to overexpression of FlaA. Specifically, overproduction of FlaA in MogR-negative bacteria caused pleiotropic defects in bacterial division (chaining phenotype, intracellular spread, and virulence in mice. DNA binding and microarray analyses revealed that MogR represses transcription of all known flagellar motility genes by binding directly to a minimum of two TTTT-N(5-AAAA recognition sites positioned within promoter regions such that RNA polymerase binding is occluded. Analysis of MogR protein levels demonstrated that modulation of MogR repression activity confers the temperature-specificity to flagellar motility gene expression. Epistasis analysis revealed that MogR repression of transcription is antagonized in a temperature-dependent manner by the DegU response regulator and that DegU further regulates FlaA levels through a posttranscriptional mechanism. These studies provide the first known example to our knowledge of a transcriptional repressor functioning as a master regulator controlling nonhierarchal expression of flagellar motility genes.

  8. Identification and mechanism of ABA receptor antagonism

    KAUST Repository

    Melcher, Karsten; Xu, Yong; Ng, Ley-Moy; Zhou, X. Edward; Soon, Fen-Fen; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Suino-Powell, Kelly M.; Kovach, Amanda; Tham, Fook S.; Cutler, Sean R.; Li, Jun; Yong, Eu-Leong; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Xu, H. Eric

    2010-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) functions through a family of fourteen PYR/PYL receptors, which were identified by resistance to pyrabactin, a synthetic inhibitor of seed germination. ABA activates these receptors to inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases, such as ABI1, yet it remains unclear whether these receptors can be antagonized. Here we demonstrate that pyrabactin is an agonist of PYR1 and PYL1 but is unexpectedly an antagonist of PYL2. Crystal structures of the PYL2-pyrabactin and PYL1-pyrabactin-ABI1 complexes reveal the mechanism responsible for receptor-selective activation and inhibition, which enables us to design mutations that convert PYL1 to a pyrabactin-inhibited receptor and PYL2 to a pyrabactin-activated receptor and to identify new pyrabactin-based ABA receptor agonists. Together, our results establish a new concept of ABA receptor antagonism, illustrate its underlying mechanisms and provide a rational framework for discovering novel ABA receptor ligands. © 2010 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Identification and mechanism of ABA receptor antagonism

    KAUST Repository

    Melcher, Karsten

    2010-08-22

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) functions through a family of fourteen PYR/PYL receptors, which were identified by resistance to pyrabactin, a synthetic inhibitor of seed germination. ABA activates these receptors to inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases, such as ABI1, yet it remains unclear whether these receptors can be antagonized. Here we demonstrate that pyrabactin is an agonist of PYR1 and PYL1 but is unexpectedly an antagonist of PYL2. Crystal structures of the PYL2-pyrabactin and PYL1-pyrabactin-ABI1 complexes reveal the mechanism responsible for receptor-selective activation and inhibition, which enables us to design mutations that convert PYL1 to a pyrabactin-inhibited receptor and PYL2 to a pyrabactin-activated receptor and to identify new pyrabactin-based ABA receptor agonists. Together, our results establish a new concept of ABA receptor antagonism, illustrate its underlying mechanisms and provide a rational framework for discovering novel ABA receptor ligands. © 2010 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Brassinosteroids Antagonize Gibberellin- and Salicylate-Mediated Root Immunity in Rice1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vleesschauwer, David; Van Buyten, Evelien; Satoh, Kouji; Balidion, Johny; Mauleon, Ramil; Choi, Il-Ryong; Vera-Cruz, Casiana; Kikuchi, Shoshi; Höfte, Monica

    2012-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are a unique class of plant steroid hormones that orchestrate myriad growth and developmental processes. Although BRs have long been known to protect plants from a suite of biotic and abiotic stresses, our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms is still rudimentary. Aiming to further decipher the molecular logic of BR-modulated immunity, we have examined the dynamics and impact of BRs during infection of rice (Oryza sativa) with the root oomycete Pythium graminicola. Challenging the prevailing view that BRs positively regulate plant innate immunity, we show that P. graminicola exploits BRs as virulence factors and hijacks the rice BR machinery to inflict disease. Moreover, we demonstrate that this immune-suppressive effect of BRs is due, at least in part, to negative cross talk with salicylic acid (SA) and gibberellic acid (GA) pathways. BR-mediated suppression of SA defenses occurred downstream of SA biosynthesis, but upstream of the master defense regulators NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1 and OsWRKY45. In contrast, BR alleviated GA-directed immune responses by interfering at multiple levels with GA metabolism, resulting in indirect stabilization of the DELLA protein and central GA repressor SLENDER RICE1 (SLR1). Collectively, these data favor a model whereby P. graminicola coopts the plant BR pathway as a decoy to antagonize effectual SA- and GA-mediated defenses. Our results highlight the importance of BRs in modulating plant immunity and uncover pathogen-mediated manipulation of plant steroid homeostasis as a core virulence strategy. PMID:22353574

  11. Brassinosteroids antagonize gibberellin- and salicylate-mediated root immunity in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vleesschauwer, David; Van Buyten, Evelien; Satoh, Kouji; Balidion, Johny; Mauleon, Ramil; Choi, Il-Ryong; Vera-Cruz, Casiana; Kikuchi, Shoshi; Höfte, Monica

    2012-04-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are a unique class of plant steroid hormones that orchestrate myriad growth and developmental processes. Although BRs have long been known to protect plants from a suite of biotic and abiotic stresses, our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms is still rudimentary. Aiming to further decipher the molecular logic of BR-modulated immunity, we have examined the dynamics and impact of BRs during infection of rice (Oryza sativa) with the root oomycete Pythium graminicola. Challenging the prevailing view that BRs positively regulate plant innate immunity, we show that P. graminicola exploits BRs as virulence factors and hijacks the rice BR machinery to inflict disease. Moreover, we demonstrate that this immune-suppressive effect of BRs is due, at least in part, to negative cross talk with salicylic acid (SA) and gibberellic acid (GA) pathways. BR-mediated suppression of SA defenses occurred downstream of SA biosynthesis, but upstream of the master defense regulators NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED GENES1 and OsWRKY45. In contrast, BR alleviated GA-directed immune responses by interfering at multiple levels with GA metabolism, resulting in indirect stabilization of the DELLA protein and central GA repressor SLENDER RICE1 (SLR1). Collectively, these data favor a model whereby P. graminicola coopts the plant BR pathway as a decoy to antagonize effectual SA- and GA-mediated defenses. Our results highlight the importance of BRs in modulating plant immunity and uncover pathogen-mediated manipulation of plant steroid homeostasis as a core virulence strategy.

  12. RecA-mediated cleavage reaction of Lambda repressor and DNA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2010-01-11

    Jan 11, 2010 ... hydrolyze ATP at all, but fulfills RecA functions such as cleavage of Lambda repressor and strand .... DNA binding properties of RecA and may result in an in- .... AMP-PNP there is no cleavage of Lambda repressor (Figure.

  13. Forced Normalization: Antagonism Between Epilepsy and Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Itoh, Yasuhiko

    2017-05-01

    The antagonism between epilepsy and psychosis has been discussed for a long time. Landolt coined the term "forced normalization" in the 1950s to describe psychotic episodes associated with the remission of seizures and disappearance of epileptiform activity on electroencephalograms in individuals with epilepsy. Since then, neurologists and psychiatrists have been intrigued by this phenomenon. However, although collaborative clinical studies and basic experimental researches have been performed, the mechanism of forced normalization remains unknown. In this review article, we present a historical overview of the concept of forced normalization, and discuss potential pathogenic mechanisms and clinical diagnosis. We also discuss the role of dopamine, which appears to be a key factor in the mechanism of forced normalization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Agonism and antagonism at the insulin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Louise; Hansen, Bo Falck; Jensen, Pia

    2012-01-01

    Insulin can trigger metabolic as well as mitogenic effects, the latter being pharmaceutically undesirable. An understanding of the structure/function relationships between insulin receptor (IR) binding and mitogenic/metabolic signalling would greatly facilitate the preclinical development of new...... insulin analogues. The occurrence of ligand agonism and antagonism is well described for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and other receptors but in general, with the exception of antibodies, not for receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). In the case of the IR, no natural ligand or insulin analogue has been...... shown to exhibit antagonistic properties, with the exception of a crosslinked insulin dimer (B29-B'29). However, synthetic monomeric or dimeric peptides targeting sites 1 or 2 of the IR were shown to be either agonists or antagonists. We found here that the S961 peptide, previously described to be an IR...

  15. PML-associated repressor of transcription (PAROT), a novel KRAB-zinc finger repressor, is regulated through association with PML nuclear bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischer, Sandra; Wiemann, Stefan; Will, Hans; Hofmann, Thomas G.

    2006-01-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) are implicated in transcriptional regulation. Here we identify a novel transcriptional repressor, PML-associated repressor of transcription (PAROT), which is regulated in its repressor activity through recruitment to PML-NBs. PAROT is a Krueppel-associated box ( KRAB) zinc-finger (ZNF) protein, which comprises an amino terminal KRAB-A and KRAB-B box, a linker domain and 8 tandemly repeated C 2 H 2 -ZNF motifs at its carboxy terminus. Consistent with its domain structure, when tethered to DNA, PAROT represses transcription, and this is partially released by the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A. PAROT colocalizes with members of the heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1) family and with transcriptional intermediary factor-1β/KRAB-associated protein 1 (TIF-1β/KAP1), a transcriptional corepressor for the KRAB-ZNF family. Interestingly, PML isoform IV, in contrast to PML-III, efficiently recruits PAROT and TIF-1β from heterochromatin to PML-NBs. PML-NB recruitment of PAROT partially releases its transcriptional repressor activity, indicating that PAROT can be regulated through subnuclear compartmentalization. Taken together, our data identify a novel transcriptional repressor and provide evidence for its regulation through association with PML-NBs

  16. TBLR1 regulates the expression of nuclear hormone receptor co-repressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Stuart

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription is regulated by a complex interaction of activators and repressors. The effectors of repression are large multimeric complexes which contain both the repressor proteins that bind to transcription factors and a number of co-repressors that actually mediate transcriptional silencing either by inhibiting the basal transcription machinery or by recruiting chromatin-modifying enzymes. Results TBLR1 [GenBank: NM024665] is a co-repressor of nuclear hormone transcription factors. A single highly conserved gene encodes a small family of protein molecules. Different isoforms are produced by differential exon utilization. Although the ORF of the predominant form contains only 1545 bp, the human gene occupies ~200 kb of genomic DNA on chromosome 3q and contains 16 exons. The genomic sequence overlaps with the putative DC42 [GenBank: NM030921] locus. The murine homologue is structurally similar and is also located on Chromosome 3. TBLR1 is closely related (79% homology at the mRNA level to TBL1X and TBL1Y, which are located on Chromosomes X and Y. The expression of TBLR1 overlaps but is distinct from that of TBL1. An alternatively spliced form of TBLR1 has been demonstrated in human material and it too has an unique pattern of expression. TBLR1 and the homologous genes interact with proteins that regulate the nuclear hormone receptor family of transcription factors. In resting cells TBLR1 is primarily cytoplasmic but after perturbation the protein translocates to the nucleus. TBLR1 co-precipitates with SMRT, a co-repressor of nuclear hormone receptors, and co-precipitates in complexes immunoprecipitated by antiserum to HDAC3. Cells engineered to over express either TBLR1 or N- and C-terminal deletion variants, have elevated levels of endogenous N-CoR. Co-transfection of TBLR1 and SMRT results in increased expression of SMRT. This co-repressor undergoes ubiquitin-mediated degradation and we suggest that the stabilization of

  17. Fur is a repressor of biofilm formation in Yersinia pestis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengjun Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Yersinia pestis synthesizes the attached biofilms in the flea proventriculus, which is important for the transmission of this pathogen by fleas. The hmsHFRS operons is responsible for the synthesis of exopolysaccharide (the major component of biofilm matrix, which is activated by the signaling molecule 3', 5'-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP synthesized by the only two diguanylate cyclases HmsT, and YPO0449 (located in a putative operonYPO0450-0448. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The phenotypic assays indicated that the transcriptional regulator Fur inhibited the Y. pestis biofilm production in vitro and on nematode. Two distinct Fur box-like sequences were predicted within the promoter-proximal region of hmsT, suggesting that hmsT might be a direct Fur target. The subsequent primer extension, LacZ fusion, electrophoretic mobility shift, and DNase I footprinting assays disclosed that Fur specifically bound to the hmsT promoter-proximal region for repressing the hmsT transcription. In contrast, Fur had no regulatory effect on hmsHFRS and YPO0450-0448 at the transcriptional level. The detection of intracellular c-di-GMP levels revealed that Fur inhibited the c-di-GMP production. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Y. pestis Fur inhibits the c-di-GMP production through directly repressing the transcription of hmsT, and thus it acts as a repressor of biofilm formation. Since the relevant genetic contents for fur, hmsT, hmsHFRS, and YPO0450-0448 are extremely conserved between Y. pestis and typical Y. pseudotuberculosis, the above regulatory mechanisms can be applied to Y. pseudotuberculosis.

  18. Lactose repressor protein modified with dansyl chloride: activity effects and fluorescence properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, W.T.; Matthews, K.S.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical modification using 5-(dimethylamino)naphthalene-1-sulfonyl chloride (dansyl chloride) has been used to explore the importance of lysine residues involved in the binding activities of the lactose repressor and to introduce a fluorescent probe into the protein. Dansyl chloride modification of lac repressor resulted in loss of operator DNA binding at low molar ratios of reagent/monomer. Loss of nonspecific DNA binding was observed only at higher molar ratios, while isopropyl beta-D-thiogalactoside binding was not affected at any of the reagent levels studied. Lysine residues were the only modified amino acids detected. Protection of lysines-33 and -37 from modification by the presence of nonspecific DNA correlated with maintenance of operator DNA binding activity, and reaction of lysine-37 paralleled operator binding activity loss. Energy transfer between dansyl incorporated in the core region of the repressor protein and tryptophan-201 was observed, with an approximate distance of 23 A calculated between these two moieties

  19. Lysogenic induction in Lex Al Escherichia coli mutants: characterization of the induction and prophage repressor influence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, R.E.S.

    1982-01-01

    SOS functions require new synthesis of protein and have been described as dependent on both the rec A and lex A genes. The induction of prophage was studied in bacterial strains lysogenic for a series of phages which synthesize different levels of repressor (λ, λ i m m 4 3 4 J and λ i m m 4 3 4 T ) and was compared to W-reactivation. Prophage induction was detected in lex Al mutants although at a slightly lower level and requiring two times longer when compared with wild-type. The optimum UV-dose for induction differed for each lysogenic strain and correlated with the level of repressor

  20. Rhubarb Antagonizes Matrix Metalloproteinase-9-induced Vascular Endothelial Permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Liang Cui

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: The rhubarb mixture of emodin, 3,8-dihydroxy-1-methyl-anthraquinone-2-carboxylic acid, 1-O-caffeoyl-2-(4-hydroxyl-O-cinnamoyl-β-D-glucose, daucosterol linoleate, and rhein, at a low concentration, antagonized the MMP9-induced HUVEC monolayer permeability by promoting HUVEC proliferation and reducing extracellular VE-cadherin concentrations.

  1. Analysis of Determinants in Filovirus Glycoproteins Required for Tetherin Antagonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Gnirß

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The host cell protein tetherin can restrict the release of enveloped viruses from infected cells. The HIV-1 protein Vpu counteracts tetherin by removing it from the site of viral budding, the plasma membrane, and this process depends on specific interactions between the transmembrane domains of Vpu and tetherin. In contrast, the glycoproteins (GPs of two filoviruses, Ebola and Marburg virus, antagonize tetherin without reducing surface expression, and the domains in GP required for tetherin counteraction are unknown. Here, we show that filovirus GPs depend on the presence of their authentic transmembrane domains for virus-cell fusion and tetherin antagonism. However, conserved residues within the transmembrane domain were dispensable for membrane fusion and tetherin counteraction. Moreover, the insertion of the transmembrane domain into a heterologous viral GP, Lassa virus GPC, was not sufficient to confer tetherin antagonism to the recipient. Finally, mutation of conserved residues within the fusion peptide of Ebola virus GP inhibited virus-cell fusion but did not ablate tetherin counteraction, indicating that the fusion peptide and the ability of GP to drive host cell entry are not required for tetherin counteraction. These results suggest that the transmembrane domains of filoviral GPs contribute to tetherin antagonism but are not the sole determinants.

  2. Antagonism in the carbon footprint between beef and dairy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The higher increase in production (milk) of intensive dairy cows, compared to the increase in production (calf weight) of intensive beef cows, explains the antagonism in the carbon footprint between different beef and dairy production systems. Unfortunately, carbon sequestration estimates have been neglected and thus the ...

  3. Exploitative and hierarchical antagonism in a cooperative bacterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Fiegna

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Social organisms that cooperate with some members of their own species, such as close relatives, may fail to cooperate with other genotypes of the same species. Such noncooperation may take the form of outright antagonism or social exploitation. Myxococcus xanthus is a highly social prokaryote that cooperatively develops into spore-bearing, multicellular fruiting bodies in response to starvation. Here we have characterized the nature of social interactions among nine developmentally proficient strains of M. xanthus isolated from spatially distant locations. Strains were competed against one another in all possible pairwise combinations during starvation-induced development. In most pairings, at least one competitor exhibited strong antagonism toward its partner and a majority of mixes showed bidirectional antagonism that decreased total spore production, even to the point of driving whole populations to extinction. Differential response to mixing was the primary determinant of competitive superiority rather than the sporulation efficiencies of unmixed populations. In some competitive pairings, the dominant partner sporulated more efficiently in mixed populations than in clonal isolation. This finding represents a novel form of exploitation in bacteria carried out by socially competent genotypes and is the first documentation of social exploitation among natural bacterial isolates. Patterns of antagonistic superiority among these strains form a highly linear dominance hierarchy. At least some competition pairs construct chimeric, rather than segregated, fruiting bodies. The cooperative prokaryote M. xanthus has diverged into a large number of distinct social types that cooperate with clone-mates but exhibit intense antagonism toward distinct social types of the same species. Most lengthy migration events in nature may thus result in strong antagonism between migratory and resident populations, and this antagonism may have large effects on local

  4. Identification of Quaternary Structure and Functional Domains of the CI Repressor from Bacteriophage TP901-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Margit; Lo Leggio, Leila; Grossmann, J. Günter

    2008-01-01

    is involved in the interaction with host proteins. By using small-angle X-ray scattering, we show for the first time the overall solution structure of a full-length wild-type bacteriophage repressor at low resolution revealing that the TP901-1 repressor forms a flat oligomer, most probably a trimer of dimers....

  5. Processing bias in anxious subjects and repressors, measured by emotional Stroop interference and attentional allocation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brosschot, J.F.; de Ruiter, C.; Kindt, M.

    1999-01-01

    Hypothesized that repressors (Ss high in defensiveness with low trait anxiety) would show cognitive avoidance of threatening information in an attention deployment task, but an attentional bias for the same information in an emotional interference task, while Ss high in anxiety would show a

  6. Whi7 is an unstable cell-cycle repressor of the Start transcriptional program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomar-Alba, Mercè; Méndez, Ester; Quilis, Inma; Bañó, M Carmen; Igual, J Carlos

    2017-08-24

    Start is the main decision point in eukaryotic cell cycle in which cells commit to a new round of cell division. It involves the irreversible activation of a transcriptional program by G1 CDK-cyclin complexes through the inactivation of Start transcriptional repressors, Whi5 in yeast or Rb in mammals. Here we provide novel keys of how Whi7, a protein related at sequence level to Whi5, represses Start. Whi7 is an unstable protein, degraded by the SCF Grr1 ubiquitin-ligase, whose stability is cell cycle regulated by CDK1 phosphorylation. Importantly, Whi7 associates to G1/S gene promoters in late G1 acting as a repressor of SBF-dependent transcription. Our results demonstrate that Whi7 is a genuine paralog of Whi5. In fact, both proteins collaborate in Start repression bringing to light that yeast cells, as occurs in mammalian cells, rely on the combined action of multiple transcriptional repressors to block Start transition.The commitment of cells to a new cycle of division involves inactivation of the Start transcriptional repressor Whi5. Here the authors show that the sequence related protein Whi7 associates to G1/S gene promoters in late G1 and collaborates with Whi5 in Start repression.

  7. In vitro transcription accurately predicts lac repressor phenotype in vivo in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Almond Sochor

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A multitude of studies have looked at the in vivo and in vitro behavior of the lac repressor binding to DNA and effector molecules in order to study transcriptional repression, however these studies are not always reconcilable. Here we use in vitro transcription to directly mimic the in vivo system in order to build a self consistent set of experiments to directly compare in vivo and in vitro genetic repression. A thermodynamic model of the lac repressor binding to operator DNA and effector is used to link DNA occupancy to either normalized in vitro mRNA product or normalized in vivo fluorescence of a regulated gene, YFP. An accurate measurement of repressor, DNA and effector concentrations were made both in vivo and in vitro allowing for direct modeling of the entire thermodynamic equilibrium. In vivo repression profiles are accurately predicted from the given in vitro parameters when molecular crowding is considered. Interestingly, our measured repressor–operator DNA affinity differs significantly from previous in vitro measurements. The literature values are unable to replicate in vivo binding data. We therefore conclude that the repressor-DNA affinity is much weaker than previously thought. This finding would suggest that in vitro techniques that are specifically designed to mimic the in vivo process may be necessary to replicate the native system.

  8. Radiation-induced oxidative damage to the DNA-binding domain of the lactose repressor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gillard, N.; Goffinont, S.; Buré, C.; Davídková, Marie; Maurizot, J. C.; Cadene, M.; Spotheim-Maurizot, M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 403, part 3 (2007), s. 463-472 ISSN 0264-6021 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P05OC085 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : ionizing radiation * oxidative damage * DNA binding domain * lac repressor Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.009, year: 2007

  9. Radiation-induced tetramer-to-dimer transition of Esterichia coli lactose repressor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Goffinont, S.; Davídková, Marie; Spotheim-Maurizot, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 386, č. 2 (2009), s. 300-304 ISSN 0006-291X R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC09012 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : protein * DNA * radiation * oxidation * tetramer * dimer * lactose repressor Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.548, year: 2009

  10. Mechanism of Metal Ion Activation of the Diphtheria Toxin Repressor DtxR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Aquino,J.; Tetenbaum-Novatt, J.; White, A.; Berkovitch, F.; Ringe, D.

    2005-01-01

    The diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR) is a metal ion-activated transcriptional regulator that has been linked to the virulence of Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Structure determination has shown that there are two metal ion binding sites per repressor monomer, and site-directed mutagenesis has demonstrated that binding site 2 (primary) is essential for recognition of the target DNA repressor, leaving the role of binding site 1 (ancillary) unclear. Calorimetric techniques have demonstrated that although binding site 1 (ancillary) has high affinity for metal ion with a binding constant of 2 x 10{sup -7}, binding site 2 (primary) is a low-affinity binding site with a binding constant of 6.3 x 10{sup -4}. These two binding sites act in an independent fashion, and their contribution can be easily dissected by traditional mutational analysis. Our results clearly demonstrate that binding site 1 (ancillary) is the first one to be occupied during metal ion activation, playing a critical role in stabilization of the repressor. In addition, structural data obtained for the mutants Ni-DtxR(H79A, C102D), reported here, and the previously reported DtxR(H79A) have allowed us to propose a mechanism of metal activation for DtxR.

  11. FILAMENTOUS FLOWER controls lateral organ development by acting as both an activator and a repressor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonaccorso Oliver

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The YABBY (YAB family of transcription factors participate in a diverse range of processes that include leaf and floral patterning, organ growth, and the control of shoot apical meristem organisation and activity. How these disparate functions are regulated is not clear, but based on interactions with the LEUNIG-class of co-repressors, it has been proposed that YABs act as transcriptional repressors. In the light of recent work showing that DNA-binding proteins associated with the yeast co-repressor TUP1 can also function as activators, we have examined the transcriptional activity of the YABs. Results Of the four Arabidopsis YABs tested in yeast, only FILAMENTOUS FLOWER (FIL activated reporter gene expression. Similar analysis with Antirrhinum YABs identified the FIL ortholog GRAMINIFOLIA as an activator. Plant-based transactivation assays not only confirmed the potential of FIL to activate transcription, but also extended this property to the FIL paralog YABBY3 (YAB3. Subsequent transcriptomic analysis of lines expressing a steroid-inducible FIL protein revealed groups of genes that responded either positively or negatively to YAB induction. Included in the positively regulated group of genes were the polarity regulators KANADI1 (KAN1, AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 4 (ARF4 and ASYMMETRIC LEAVES1 (AS1. We also show that modifying FIL to function as an obligate repressor causes strong yab loss-of-function phenotypes. Conclusions Collectively these data show that FIL functions as a transcriptional activator in plants and that this activity is involved in leaf patterning. Interestingly, our study also supports the idea that FIL can act as a repressor, as transcriptomic analysis identified negatively regulated FIL-response genes. To reconcile these observations, we propose that YABs are bifunctional transcription factors that participate in both positive and negative regulation. These findings fit a model of leaf development in which

  12. Molecular chaperone complexes with antagonizing activities regulate stability and activity of the tumor suppressor LKB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaude, H; Aznar, N; Delay, A; Bres, A; Buchet-Poyau, K; Caillat, C; Vigouroux, A; Rogon, C; Woods, A; Vanacker, J-M; Höhfeld, J; Perret, C; Meyer, P; Billaud, M; Forcet, C

    2012-03-22

    LKB1 is a tumor suppressor that is constitutionally mutated in a cancer-prone condition, called Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, as well as somatically inactivated in a sizeable fraction of lung and cervical neoplasms. The LKB1 gene encodes a serine/threonine kinase that associates with the pseudokinase STRAD (STE-20-related pseudokinase) and the scaffolding protein MO25, the formation of this heterotrimeric complex promotes allosteric activation of LKB1. We have previously reported that the molecular chaperone heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) binds to and stabilizes LKB1. Combining pharmacological studies and RNA interference approaches, we now provide evidence that the co-chaperone Cdc37 participates to the regulation of LKB1 stability. It is known that the Hsp90-Cdc37 complex recognizes a surface within the N-terminal catalytic lobe of client protein kinases. In agreement with this finding, we found that the chaperones Hsp90 and Cdc37 interact with an LKB1 isoform that differs in the C-terminal region, but not with a novel LKB1 variant that lacks a portion of the kinase N-terminal lobe domain. Reconstitution of the two complexes LKB1-STRAD and LKB1-Hsp90-Cdc37 with recombinant proteins revealed that the former is catalytically active whereas the latter is inactive. Furthermore, consistent with a documented repressor function of Hsp90, LKB1 kinase activity was transiently stimulated upon dissociation of Hsp90. Finally, disruption of the LKB1-Hsp90 complex favors the recruitment of both Hsp/Hsc70 and the U-box dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP (carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein) that triggers LKB1 degradation. Taken together, our results establish that the Hsp90-Cdc37 complex controls both the stability and activity of the LKB1 kinase. This study further shows that two chaperone complexes with antagonizing activities, Hsp90-Cdc37 and Hsp/Hsc70-CHIP, finely control the cellular level of LKB1 protein.

  13. Platformed antagonism: Racist discourses on fake Muslim Facebook pages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farkas, Johan; Schou, Jannick; Neumayer, Christina

    2018-01-01

    This research examines how fake identities on social media create and sustain antagonistic and racist discourses. It does so by analysing 11 Danish Facebook pages, disguised as Muslim extremists living in Denmark, conspiring to kill and rape Danish citizens. It explores how anonymous content...... producers utilize Facebook's socio-technical characteristics to construct, what we propose to term as, platformed antagonism. This term refers to socio-technical and discursive practices that produce new modes of antagonistic relations on social media platforms. Through a discourse-theoretical analysis...... of posts, images, 'about' sections and user comments on the studied Facebook pages, the article highlights how antagonism between ethno-cultural identities is produced on social media through fictitious social media accounts, prompting thousands of user reactions. These findings enhance our current...

  14. Interleukin-1 Antagonism Decreases Cortisol Levels in Obese Individuals

    OpenAIRE

    Urwyler, Sandrine Andrea; Schuetz, Philipp; Ebrahimi, Fahim; Donath, Marc Y.; Christ-Crain, Mirjam

    2017-01-01

    Increased cortisol levels in obesity may contribute to the associated metabolic syndrome. In obesity, the activated innate immune system leads to increased interleukin (IL)-1β, which is known to stimulate the release of adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH).; We hypothesized that in obesity IL-1 antagonism would result in downregulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, leading to decreased cortisol levels.; In this prospective intervention study, we included 73 patients with obesity (b...

  15. Antagonism of Innate Immunity by Paramyxovirus Accessory Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raychel Chambers

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Paramyxovirinae, a subfamily of Paramyxoviridae, are negative strand RNA viruses comprised of many important human and animal pathogens, which share a high degree of genetic and structural homology. The accessory proteins expressed from the P/V/C gene are major factors in the pathogenicity of the viruses, because of their ability to abrogate various facets of type I interferon (IFN induction and signaling. Most of the paramyxoviruses exhibit a commonality in their ability to antagonize innate immunity by blocking IFN induction and the Jak/STAT pathway. However, the manner in which the accessory proteins inhibit the pathway differs among viruses. Similarly, there are variations in the capability of the viruses to counteract intracellular detectors (RNA helicases, mda-5 and RIG-I. Furthermore, a functional specificity in the antagonism of the IFN response has been reported, suggesting that specificity in the circumvention of innate immunity restricts viral host range. Available evidence indicates that paramyxoviruses employ specific strategies to antagonize the IFN response of their specific hosts, which is one of the major factors that determine viral pathogenicity and host range.

  16. Targeted transcriptional repression using a chimeric TALE-SRDX repressor protein

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2011-12-14

    Transcriptional activator-like effectors (TALEs) are proteins secreted by Xanthomonas bacteria when they infect plants. TALEs contain a modular DNA binding domain that can be easily engineered to bind any sequence of interest, and have been used to provide user-selected DNA-binding modules to generate chimeric nucleases and transcriptional activators in mammalian cells and plants. Here we report the use of TALEs to generate chimeric sequence-specific transcriptional repressors. The dHax3 TALE was used as a scaffold to provide a DNA-binding module fused to the EAR-repression domain (SRDX) to generate a chimeric repressor that targets the RD29A promoter. The dHax3. SRDX protein efficiently repressed the transcription of the RD29A

  17. Lac repressor: Crystallization of intact tetramer and its complexes with inducer and operator DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pace, H.C.; Lu, P.; Lewis, M.

    1990-01-01

    The intact lac repressor tetramer, which regulates expression of the lac operon in Escherichia coli, has been crystallized in the native form, with an inducer, and in a ternary complex with operator DNA and an anti-inducer. The crystals without DNA diffract to better than 3.5 angstrom. They belong to the monoclinic space group C2 and have cell dimensions a = 164.7 angstrom, b = 75.6 angstrom, and c = 161.2 angstrom, with α = γ = 90 degree and β = 125.5 degree. Cocrystals have been obtained with a number of different lac operator-related DNA fragments. The complex with a blunt-ended 16-base-pair strand yielded tetragonal bipyramids that diffract to 6.5 angstrom. These protein-DNA cocrystals crack upon exposure to the gratuitous inducer isopropyl β-D-thiogalactoside, suggesting a conformational change in the repressor-operator complex

  18. Targeted transcriptional repression using a chimeric TALE-SRDX repressor protein

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.; Li, Lixin; Piatek, Marek J.; Fang, Xiaoyun; Mansour, Hicham; Bangarusamy, Dhinoth K.; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional activator-like effectors (TALEs) are proteins secreted by Xanthomonas bacteria when they infect plants. TALEs contain a modular DNA binding domain that can be easily engineered to bind any sequence of interest, and have been used to provide user-selected DNA-binding modules to generate chimeric nucleases and transcriptional activators in mammalian cells and plants. Here we report the use of TALEs to generate chimeric sequence-specific transcriptional repressors. The dHax3 TALE was used as a scaffold to provide a DNA-binding module fused to the EAR-repression domain (SRDX) to generate a chimeric repressor that targets the RD29A promoter. The dHax3. SRDX protein efficiently repressed the transcription of the RD29A

  19. Situational Discrimination in Repressor-type and Sensitizer-type Approval Seekers and the Birth Order by Subject Sex Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Gilbert

    1970-01-01

    Five experiments are reported. One conclusion in that repressor-type high need-for-approval subjects made the discrimination and permitted less favorable self-description, but sensitizer-type high need-for-approval subjects did not. (DB)

  20. The role of the leukemia-associated ETO homologue repressors in hematopoiesis

    OpenAIRE

    Olsson, André

    2006-01-01

    The fusion protein AML1-ETO is observed in acute myeloid patients with the chromosomal translocation t(8;21). Cells with this chimeric protein have impaired granulocytic and erythroid differentiation with accumulation of myeloblasts. The transcriptional co-repressor ETO (Eight Twenty One) was identified from the cloning of AML1-ETO. Subsequently, MTGR1 (Myeloid Translocation Gene-Related protein 1) and MTG16 (Myeloid Translocation Gene on chromosome 16) were found to be homologues to ETO, all...

  1. Loss of the RNA polymerase III repressor MAF1 confers obesity resistance.

    OpenAIRE

    Bonhoure, N.; Byrnes, A.; Moir, R.D.; Hodroj, W.; Preitner, F.; Praz, V.; Marcelin, G.; Chua, S.C.; Martinez-Lopez, N.; Singh, R.; Moullan, N.; Auwerx, J.; Willemin, G.; Shah, H.; Hartil, K.

    2015-01-01

    MAF1 is a global repressor of RNA polymerase III transcription that regulates the expression of highly abundant noncoding RNAs in response to nutrient availability and cellular stress. Thus, MAF1 function is thought to be important for metabolic economy. Here we show that a whole-body knockout of Maf1 in mice confers resistance to diet-induced obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by reducing food intake and increasing metabolic inefficiency. Energy expenditure in Maf1(-/-) mice is inc...

  2. Histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A enhances myogenesis by coordinating muscle regulatory factors and myogenic repressors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagiwara, Hiroki; Saito, Fumiaki; Masaki, Toshihiro; Ikeda, Miki; Nakamura-Ohkuma, Ayami; Shimizu, Teruo; Matsumura, Kiichiro

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► We investigated the effect of TSA, one of most potent HDACIs, on myogenesis using the C2C12 skeletal muscle cell line. ► TSA enhances the expression of myosin heavy chain without affecting DAPC expression. ► TSA enhances the expression of the early MRFs, Myf5 and MEF2, and suppresses the late MRF, myogenin, after 24 h treatment. ► TSA enhances the expression of the myogenic repressors, Ids, which inhibit myogenic differentiation. ► TSA promotes myogenesis by coordinating the expression of MRFs and myogenic repressors. -- Abstract: Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) are known to promote skeletal muscle formation. However, their mechanisms that include effects on the expression of major muscle components such as the dystrophin-associated proteins complex (DAPC) or myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs) remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the effects of HDACIs on skeletal muscle formation using the C2C12 cell culture system. C2C12 myoblasts were exposed to trichostatin A (TSA), one of the most potent HDACIs, and differentiation was subsequently induced. We found that TSA enhances the expression of myosin heavy chain without affecting DAPC expression. In addition, TSA increases the expression of the early MRFs, Myf5 and MEF2, whereas it suppresses the expression of the late MRF, myogenin. Interestingly, TSA also enhances the expression of Id1, Id2, and Id3 (Ids). Ids are myogenic repressors that inhibit myogenic differentiation. These findings suggest that TSA promotes gene expression in proliferation and suppresses it in the differentiation stage of muscle formation. Taken together, our data demonstrate that TSA enhances myogenesis by coordinating the expression of MRFs and myogenic repressors.

  3. Regulation of crp gene expression by the catabolite repressor/activator, Cra, in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongge; Aboulwafa, Mohammad; Saier, Milton H

    2014-01-01

    Growth of E. coli on several carbon sources is dependent on the catabolite repressor/activator (Cra) protein although a Cra consensus DNA-binding site is not present in the control regions of the relevant catabolic operons. We show that Cra regulates growth by activating expression of the crp gene. It thereby mediates catabolite repression of catabolic operons by an indirect mechanism. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. DWARF 53 acts as a repressor of strigolactone signalling in rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Liang; Liu, Xue; Xiong, Guosheng; Liu, Huihui; Chen, Fulu; Wang, Lei; Meng, Xiangbing; Liu, Guifu; Yu, Hong; Yuan, Yundong; Yi, Wei; Zhao, Lihua; Ma, Honglei; He, Yuanzheng; Wu, Zhongshan; Melcher, Karsten; Qian, Qian; Xu, H. Eric; Wang, Yonghong; Li, Jiayang

    2013-12-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are a group of newly identified plant hormones that control plant shoot branching. SL signalling requires the hormone-dependent interaction of DWARF 14 (D14), a probable candidate SL receptor, with DWARF 3 (D3), an F-box component of the Skp-Cullin-F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Here we report the characterization of a dominant SL-insensitive rice (Oryza sativa) mutant dwarf 53 (d53) and the cloning of D53, which encodes a substrate of the SCFD3 ubiquitination complex and functions as a repressor of SL signalling. Treatments with GR24, a synthetic SL analogue, cause D53 degradation via the proteasome in a manner that requires D14 and the SCFD3 ubiquitin ligase, whereas the dominant form of D53 is resistant to SL-mediated degradation. Moreover, D53 can interact with transcriptional co-repressors known as TOPLESS-RELATED PROTEINS. Our results suggest a model of SL signalling that involves SL-dependent degradation of the D53 repressor mediated by the D14-D3 complex.

  5. Regulation of gene expression by manipulating transcriptional repressor activity using a novel CoSRI technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yue; Li, Song Feng; Parish, Roger W

    2017-07-01

    Targeted gene manipulation is a central strategy for studying gene function and identifying related biological processes. However, a methodology for manipulating the regulatory motifs of transcription factors is lacking as these factors commonly possess multiple motifs (e.g. repression and activation motifs) which collaborate with each other to regulate multiple biological processes. We describe a novel approach designated conserved sequence-guided repressor inhibition (CoSRI) that can specifically reduce or abolish the repressive activities of transcription factors in vivo. The technology was evaluated using the chimeric MYB80-EAR transcription factor and subsequently the endogenous WUS transcription factor. The technology was employed to develop a reversible male sterility system applicable to hybrid seed production. In order to determine the capacity of the technology to regulate the activity of endogenous transcription factors, the WUS repressor was chosen. The WUS repression motif could be inhibited in vivo and the transformed plants exhibited the wus-1 phenotype. Consequently, the technology can be used to manipulate the activities of transcriptional repressor motifs regulating beneficial traits in crop plants and other eukaryotic organisms. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Interleukin-1 Antagonism Decreases Cortisol Levels in Obese Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urwyler, Sandrine Andrea; Schuetz, Philipp; Ebrahimi, Fahim; Donath, Marc Y; Christ-Crain, Mirjam

    2017-05-01

    Increased cortisol levels in obesity may contribute to the associated metabolic syndrome. In obesity, the activated innate immune system leads to increased interleukin (IL)-1β, which is known to stimulate the release of adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH). We hypothesized that in obesity IL-1 antagonism would result in downregulation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, leading to decreased cortisol levels. In this prospective intervention study, we included 73 patients with obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥30 kg/m2) and at least one additional feature of the metabolic syndrome. The primary end point was change in morning cortisol from baseline to after the administration of the IL-1 receptor antagonist (anakinra/Kineret®, total dose 3 × 100 mg). Secondary end points were effects on salivary cortisol and ACTH. Median age was 56 years, 50.7% of patients were female, and median BMI was 36.3 kg/m2. Median morning serum cortisol levels (nmol/L) decreased significantly after IL-1 antagonism [from baseline, 452 to 423; absolute difference, -38.7; 95% confidence interval (CI), -64 to -13.4; P = 0.0019]. Similar effects were found for salivary cortisol levels (-2.8; 95% CI, -4.4 to -1.3; P = 0.0007), ACTH levels (-2.2; 95% CI; -4.2 to -0.1; P = 0.038), systolic blood pressure (-5.2, 95% CI, -8.5 to -1.8; P = 0.0006), and heart rate (-2.9; 95% CI, -4.7 to -1.0; P = 0.0029). IL-1 antagonism in obese individuals with features of the metabolic syndrome leads to a decrease in serum cortisol, salivary cortisol, and ACTH levels along with a reduction in systolic blood pressure and heart rate. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  7. Evaluation of novel inducible promoter/repressor systems for recombinant protein expression in Lactobacillus plantarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Silvia; Hörmann, Angelika; Tauer, Christopher; Sonnleitner, Margot; Egger, Esther; Grabherr, Reingard; Heinl, Stefan

    2016-03-10

    Engineering lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is of growing importance for food and feed industry as well as for in vivo vaccination or the production of recombinant proteins in food grade organisms. Often, expression of a transgene is only desired at a certain time point or period, e.g. to minimize the metabolic burden for the host cell or to control the expression time span. For this purpose, inducible expression systems are preferred, though cost and availability of the inducing agent must be feasible. We selected the plasmid free strain Lactobacillus plantarum 3NSH for testing and characterization of novel inducible promoters/repressor systems. Their feasibility in recombinant protein production was evaluated. Expression of the reporter protein mCherry was monitored with the BioLector(®) micro-fermentation system. Reporter gene mCherry expression was compared under the control of different promoter/repressor systems: PlacA (an endogenous promoter/repressor system derived from L. plantarum 3NSH), PxylA (a promoter/repressor system derived from Bacillus megaterium DSMZ 319) and PlacSynth (synthetic promoter and codon-optimized repressor gene based on the Escherichia coli lac operon). We observed that PlacA was inducible solely by lactose, but not by non-metabolizable allolactose analoga. PxylA was inducible by xylose, yet showed basal expression under non-induced conditions. Growth on galactose (as compared to exponential growth phase on glucose) reduced basal mCherry expression at non-induced conditions. PlacSynth was inducible with TMG (methyl β-D-thiogalactopyranoside) and IPTG (isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside), but also showed basal expression without inducer. The promoter PlacSynth was used for establishment of a dual plasmid expression system, based on T7 RNA polymerase driven expression in L. plantarum. Comparative Western blot supported BioLector(®) micro-fermentation measurements. Conclusively, overall expression levels were moderate (compared to a

  8. Flumazenil antagonizes the central effects of zolpidem, an imidazopyridine hypnotic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patat, A; Naef, M M; van Gessel, E; Forster, A; Dubruc, C; Rosenzweig, P

    1994-10-01

    Zolpidem is a new imidazopyridine-hypnotic that selectively binds to the central omega 1-receptor subtype. A double-blind, randomized, three-way, crossover placebo-controlled study was carried out in nine healthy male volunteers to assess the possible antagonism of central nervous system--depressant effects of zolpidem by flumazenil. Subjects received zolpidem (0.21 mg/kg) or placebo, intravenously, followed 17 minutes later by flumazenil (0.04 mg/kg) or placebo. Vigilance and performance were assessed by a trained anesthetist with use of ciliary reflex, response to a verbal instruction, subjective sedation, a tracking task, and a free recall task. Zolpidem produced a clinically relevant hypnotic effect in five subjects and significantly impaired performance in all nine subjects up to 90 minutes after dosing. Flumazenil rapidly antagonized clinical sedation in the five subjects who were asleep and significantly reversed the performance decrement within 3 minutes, without any escape phenomenon. Flumazenil did not change zolpidem plasma concentrations, confirming the pharmacodynamic nature of the interaction. Flumazenil may thus be a safe and effective antidote in patients with zolpidem overdosage.

  9. The N-terminal domain of the repressor of Staphylococcus aureus phage Φ11 possesses an unusual dimerization ability and DNA binding affinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anindya Biswas

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage Φ11 uses Staphylococcus aureus as its host and, like lambdoid phages, harbors three homologous operators in between its two divergently oriented repressor genes. None of the repressors of Φ11, however, showed binding to all three operators, even at high concentrations. To understand why the DNA binding mechanism of Φ11 repressors does not match that of lambdoid phage repressors, we studied the N-terminal domain of the Φ11 lysogenic repressor, as it harbors a putative helix-turn-helix motif. Our data revealed that the secondary and tertiary structures of the N-terminal domain were different from those of the full-length repressor. Nonetheless, the N-terminal domain was able to dimerize and bind to the operators similar to the intact repressor. In addition, the operator base specificity, binding stoichiometry, and binding mechanism of this domain were nearly identical to those of the whole repressor. The binding affinities of the repressor and its N-terminal domain were reduced to a similar extent when the temperature was increased to 42°C. Both proteins also adequately dislodged a RNA polymerase from a Φ11 DNA fragment carrying two operators and a promoter. Unlike the intact repressor, the binding of the N-terminal domain to two adjacent operator sites was not cooperative in nature. Taken together, we suggest that the dimerization and DNA binding abilities of the N-terminal domain of the Φ11 repressor are distinct from those of the DNA binding domains of other phage repressors.

  10. FOXP3 is a novel transcriptional repressor for the breast cancer oncogene SKP2

    OpenAIRE

    Zuo, Tao; Liu, Runhua; Zhang, Huiming; Chang, Xing; Liu, Yan; Wang, Lizhong; Zheng, Pan; Liu, Yang

    2007-01-01

    S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (SKP2) is a component of the E3 ubiquitin ligase SKP1-Cul1-Fbox complex. Overexpression of SKP2 results in cell cycle dysregulation and carcinogenesis; however, the genetic lesions that cause this upregulation are poorly understood. We recently demonstrated that forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) is an X-linked breast cancer suppressor and an important repressor of the oncogene ERBB2/HER2. Since FOXP3 suppresses tumor growth regardless of whether the tumors overexpres...

  11. Calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonism and cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, Håkan; Newman, Lawrence; Ashina, Sait

    2017-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a key signaling molecule involved in migraine pathophysiology. Efficacy of CGRP monoclonal antibodies and antagonists in migraine treatment has fueled an increasing interest in the prospect of treating cluster headache (CH) with CGRP antagonism. The exact...... role of CGRP and its mechanism of action in CH have not been fully clarified. A search for original studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in English was performed in PubMed and in ClinicalTrials.gov . The search term used was "cluster headache and calcitonin gene related peptide......" and "primary headaches and calcitonin gene related peptide." Reference lists of identified articles were also searched for additional relevant papers. Human experimental studies have reported elevated plasma CGRP levels during both spontaneous and glyceryl trinitrate-induced cluster attacks. CGRP may play...

  12. Interferon Induction by RNA Viruses and Antagonism by Viral Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchen Nan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Interferons are a group of small proteins that play key roles in host antiviral innate immunity. Their induction mainly relies on host pattern recognition receptors (PRR. Host PRR for RNA viruses include Toll-like receptors (TLR and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I like receptors (RLR. Activation of both TLR and RLR pathways can eventually lead to the secretion of type I IFNs, which can modulate both innate and adaptive immune responses against viral pathogens. Because of the important roles of interferons, viruses have evolved multiple strategies to evade host TLR and RLR mediated signaling. This review focuses on the mechanisms of interferon induction and antagonism of the antiviral strategy by RNA viruses.

  13. Extinction antagonizes olfactory memory at the subcellular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaerzel, Martin; Heisenberg, Martin; Zars, Troy

    2002-08-29

    Memory loss occurs by diverse mechanisms, as different time constants of performance decrement and sensitivities to experimental manipulations suggest. While the phenomena of memory decay, interference, and extinction are well established behaviorally, little is known about them at the circuit or molecular level. In Drosophila, odorant memories lasting up to 3 hr can be localized to mushroom body Kenyon cells, a single neuronal level in the olfactory pathway. The plasticity underlying this memory trace can be induced without Kenyon cell synaptic output. Experimental extinction, i.e., presentation of the conditioned stimulus without the reinforcer, reduces memory performance and does so at the same circuit level as memory formation. Thus, unreinforced presentation of learned odorants antagonizes intracellularly the signaling cascade underlying memory formation.

  14. Animal-specific C-terminal domain links myeloblastosis oncoprotein (Myb) to an ancient repressor complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrejka, Laura; Wen, Hong; Ashton, Jonathan; Grant, Megan; Iori, Kevin; Wang, Amy; Manak, J. Robert; Lipsick, Joseph S.

    2011-01-01

    Members of the Myb oncoprotein and E2F-Rb tumor suppressor protein families are present within the same highly conserved multiprotein transcriptional repressor complex, named either as Myb and synthetic multivuval class B (Myb-MuvB) or as Drosophila Rb E2F and Myb-interacting proteins (dREAM). We now report that the animal-specific C terminus of Drosophila Myb but not the more highly conserved N-terminal DNA-binding domain is necessary and sufficient for (i) adult viability, (ii) proper localization to chromosomes in vivo, (iii) regulation of gene expression in vivo, and (iv) interaction with the highly conserved core of the MuvB/dREAM transcriptional repressor complex. In addition, we have identified a conserved peptide motif that is required for this interaction. Our results imply that an ancient function of Myb in regulating G2/M genes in both plants and animals appears to have been transferred from the DNA-binding domain to the animal-specific C-terminal domain. Increased expression of B-MYB/MYBL2, the human ortholog of Drosophila Myb, correlates with poor prognosis in human patients with breast cancer. Therefore, our results imply that the specific interaction of the C terminus of Myb with the MuvB/dREAM core complex may provide an attractive target for the development of cancer therapeutics. PMID:21969598

  15. DAX1 suppresses FXR transactivity as a novel co-repressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jin; Lu, Yan; Liu, Ruya; Xiong, Xuelian; Zhang, Zhijian; Zhang, Xianfeng [Shanghai Clinical Center for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Shanghai Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Rui-Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Ning, Guang, E-mail: guangning@gmail.com.cn [Shanghai Clinical Center for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Shanghai Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Rui-Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); The Key Laboratory of Endocrine Tumors and The Division of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, E-Institute of Shanghai Universities, Shanghai 200025 (China); Li, Xiaoying, E-mail: lixy@sibs.ac.cn [Shanghai Clinical Center for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Shanghai Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Rui-Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); The Key Laboratory of Endocrine Tumors and The Division of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, E-Institute of Shanghai Universities, Shanghai 200025 (China)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} DAX1 is co-localized with FXR and interacts with FXR. {yields} DAX1 acts as a negative regulator of FXR. {yields} Three LXXLL motifs in the N-terminus of DAX1 were required. {yields} DAX1 suppresses FXR transactivation by competing with co-activators. -- Abstract: Bile acid receptor FXR (farnesoid X receptor) is a key regulator of hepatic bile acid, glucose and lipid homeostasis through regulation of numerous genes involved in the process of bile acid, triglyceride and glucose metabolism. DAX1 (dosage-sensitive sex reversal adrenal hypoplasia congenital critical region on X chromosome, gene 1) is an atypical member of the nuclear receptor family due to lack of classical DNA-binding domains and acts primarily as a co-repressor of many nuclear receptors. Here, we demonstrated that DAX1 is co-localized with FXR in the nucleus and acted as a negative regulator of FXR through a physical interaction with FXR. Our study showed that over-expression of DAX1 down-regulated the expression of FXR target genes, whereas knockdown of DAX1 led to their up-regulation. Furthermore, three LXXLL motifs in the N-terminus of DAX1 were required for the full repression of FXR transactivation. In addition, our study characterized that DAX1 suppresses FXR transactivation via competing with co-activators such as SRC-1 and PGC-1{alpha}. In conclusion, DAX1 acts as a co-repressor to negatively modulate FXR transactivity.

  16. DAX1 suppresses FXR transactivity as a novel co-repressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jin; Lu, Yan; Liu, Ruya; Xiong, Xuelian; Zhang, Zhijian; Zhang, Xianfeng; Ning, Guang; Li, Xiaoying

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → DAX1 is co-localized with FXR and interacts with FXR. → DAX1 acts as a negative regulator of FXR. → Three LXXLL motifs in the N-terminus of DAX1 were required. → DAX1 suppresses FXR transactivation by competing with co-activators. -- Abstract: Bile acid receptor FXR (farnesoid X receptor) is a key regulator of hepatic bile acid, glucose and lipid homeostasis through regulation of numerous genes involved in the process of bile acid, triglyceride and glucose metabolism. DAX1 (dosage-sensitive sex reversal adrenal hypoplasia congenital critical region on X chromosome, gene 1) is an atypical member of the nuclear receptor family due to lack of classical DNA-binding domains and acts primarily as a co-repressor of many nuclear receptors. Here, we demonstrated that DAX1 is co-localized with FXR in the nucleus and acted as a negative regulator of FXR through a physical interaction with FXR. Our study showed that over-expression of DAX1 down-regulated the expression of FXR target genes, whereas knockdown of DAX1 led to their up-regulation. Furthermore, three LXXLL motifs in the N-terminus of DAX1 were required for the full repression of FXR transactivation. In addition, our study characterized that DAX1 suppresses FXR transactivation via competing with co-activators such as SRC-1 and PGC-1α. In conclusion, DAX1 acts as a co-repressor to negatively modulate FXR transactivity.

  17. Crystal Structure of the CLOCK Transactivation Domain Exon19 in Complex with a Repressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Zhiqiang; Su, Lijing; Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V.; Zhang, Hong (UTSMC)

    2017-08-01

    In the canonical clock model, CLOCK:BMAL1-mediated transcriptional activation is feedback regulated by its repressors CRY and PER and, in association with other coregulators, ultimately generates oscillatory gene expression patterns. How CLOCK:BMAL1 interacts with coregulator(s) is not well understood. Here we report the crystal structures of the mouse CLOCK transactivating domain Exon19 in complex with CIPC, a potent circadian repressor that functions independently of CRY and PER. The Exon19:CIPC complex adopts a three-helical coiled-coil bundle conformation containing two Exon19 helices and one CIPC. Unique to Exon19:CIPC, three highly conserved polar residues, Asn341 of CIPC and Gln544 of the two Exon19 helices, are located at the mid-section of the coiled-coil bundle interior and form hydrogen bonds with each other. Combining results from protein database search, sequence analysis, and mutagenesis studies, we discovered for the first time that CLOCK Exon19:CIPC interaction is a conserved transcription regulatory mechanism among mammals, fish, flies, and other invertebrates.

  18. Solution NMR investigation of the response of the lactose repressor core domain dimer to hydrostatic pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuglestad, Brian; Stetz, Matthew A; Belnavis, Zachary; Wand, A Joshua

    2017-12-01

    Previous investigations of the sensitivity of the lac repressor to high-hydrostatic pressure have led to varying conclusions. Here high-pressure solution NMR spectroscopy is used to provide an atomic level view of the pressure induced structural transition of the lactose repressor regulatory domain (LacI* RD) bound to the ligand IPTG. As the pressure is raised from ambient to 3kbar the native state of the protein is converted to a partially unfolded form. Estimates of rotational correlation times using transverse optimized relaxation indicates that a monomeric state is never reached and that the predominate form of the LacI* RD is dimeric throughout this pressure change. Spectral analysis suggests that the pressure-induced transition is localized and is associated with a volume change of approximately -115mlmol -1 and an average pressure dependent change in compressibility of approximately 30mlmol -1 kbar -1 . In addition, a subset of resonances emerge at high-pressures indicating the presence of a non-native but folded alternate state. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. FOXP3 is a novel transcriptional repressor for the breast cancer oncogene SKP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Tao; Liu, Runhua; Zhang, Huiming; Chang, Xing; Liu, Yan; Wang, Lizhong; Zheng, Pan; Liu, Yang

    2007-12-01

    S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (SKP2) is a component of the E3 ubiquitin ligase SKP1-Cul1-Fbox complex. Overexpression of SKP2 results in cell cycle dysregulation and carcinogenesis; however, the genetic lesions that cause this upregulation are poorly understood. We recently demonstrated that forkhead box P3 (FOXP3) is an X-linked breast cancer suppressor and an important repressor of the oncogene ERBB2/HER2. Since FOXP3 suppresses tumor growth regardless of whether the tumors overexpress ERBB2/HER2, additional FOXP3 targets may be involved in its tumor suppressor activity. Here, we show that mammary carcinomas from mice heterozygous for a Foxp3 mutation exhibited increased Skp2 expression. Ectopic expression of FOXP3 in mouse mammary cancer cells repressed SKP2 expression with a corresponding increase in p27 and polyploidy. Conversely, siRNA silencing of the FOXP3 gene in human mammary epithelial cells increased SKP2 expression. We also show that Foxp3 directly interacted with and repressed the Skp2 promoter. Moreover, the analysis of over 200 primary breast cancer samples revealed an inverse correlation between FOXP3 and SKP2 levels. Finally, we demonstrated that downregulation of SKP2 was critical for FOXP3-mediated growth inhibition in breast cancer cells that do not overexpress ERBB2/HER2. Our data provide genetic, biochemical, and functional evidence that FOXP3 is a novel transcriptional repressor for the oncogene SKP2.

  20. Safety mechanism assisted by the repressor of tetracycline (SMART) vaccinia virus vectors for vaccines and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, Patricia; Titong, Allison; Jones, Leslie A; Yilma, Tilahun D; Verardi, Paulo H

    2013-09-17

    Replication-competent viruses, such as Vaccinia virus (VACV), are powerful tools for the development of oncolytic viral therapies and elicit superior immune responses when used as vaccine and immunotherapeutic vectors. However, severe complications from uncontrolled viral replication can occur, particularly in immunocompromised individuals or in those with other predisposing conditions. VACVs constitutively expressing interferon-γ (IFN-γ) replicate in cell culture indistinguishably from control viruses; however, they replicate in vivo to low or undetectable levels, and are rapidly cleared even in immunodeficient animals. In an effort to develop safe and highly effective replication-competent VACV vectors, we established a system to inducibly express IFN-γ. Our SMART (safety mechanism assisted by the repressor of tetracycline) vectors are designed to express the tetracycline repressor under a constitutive VACV promoter and IFN-γ under engineered tetracycline-inducible promoters. Immunodeficient SCID mice inoculated with VACVs not expressing IFN-γ demonstrated severe weight loss, whereas those given VACVs expressing IFN-γ under constitutive VACV promoters showed no signs of infection. Most importantly, mice inoculated with a VACV expressing the IFN-γ gene under an inducible promoter remained healthy in the presence of doxycycline, but exhibited severe weight loss in the absence of doxycycline. In this study, we developed a safety mechanism for VACV based on the conditional expression of IFN-γ under a tightly controlled tetracycline-inducible VACV promoter for use in vaccines and oncolytic cancer therapies.

  1. The evolution of reduced antagonism--A role for host-parasite coevolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, A K; Stoy, K S; Gelarden, I A; Penley, M J; Lively, C M; Morran, L T

    2015-11-01

    Why do some host-parasite interactions become less antagonistic over evolutionary time? Vertical transmission can select for reduced antagonism. Vertical transmission also promotes coevolution between hosts and parasites. Therefore, we hypothesized that coevolution itself may underlie transitions to reduced antagonism. To test the coevolution hypothesis, we selected for reduced antagonism between the host Caenorhabditis elegans and its parasite Serratia marcescens. This parasite is horizontally transmitted, which allowed us to study coevolution independently of vertical transmission. After 20 generations, we observed a response to selection when coevolution was possible: reduced antagonism evolved in the copassaged treatment. Reduced antagonism, however, did not evolve when hosts or parasites were independently selected without coevolution. In addition, we found strong local adaptation for reduced antagonism between replicate host/parasite lines in the copassaged treatment. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that coevolution was critical to the rapid evolution of reduced antagonism. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  2. Cooperation, Trust, and Antagonism: How Public Goods Are Promoted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Craig D; Joireman, Jeff; Van Lange, Paul A M

    2013-12-01

    One of the most continually vexing problems in society is the variability with which citizens support endeavors that are designed to help a great number of people. In this article, we examine the twin roles of cooperative and antagonistic behavior in this variability. We find that each plays an important role, though their contributions are, understandably, at odds. It is this opposition that produces seeming unpredictability in citizen response to collective need. In fact, we suggest that careful consideration of the research allows one to often predict when efforts to provide a collectively beneficial good will succeed and when they will fail. To understand the dynamics of participation in response to collective need, it is necessary to distinguish between the primary types of need situations. A public good is an entity that relies in whole or in part on contributions to be provided. Examples of public goods are charities and public broadcasting. Public goods require that citizens experience a short-term loss (of their contribution) in order to realize a long-term gain (of the good). However, because everyone can use the good once it is provided, there is also an incentive to not contribute, let others give, and then take advantage of their efforts. This state of affairs introduces a conflict between doing what is best for oneself and what is best for the group. In a public goods situation, cooperation and antagonism impact how one resolves this conflict. The other major type of need situation is a common-pool resource problem. Here, a good is fully provided at the outset, and citizens may sample from it. The resource is usually, but not necessarily, partially replenished. Examples of replenished resources are drinking water and trees; examples of resources that are functionally not replenished are oil and minerals. Common-pool resources allow citizens to experience a short-term gain (by getting what they want in the early life of the resource) but also present

  3. SirR, a Novel Iron-Dependent Repressor in Staphylococcus epidermidis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Philip J.; Cockayne, Alan; Landers, Patrick; Morrissey, Julie A.; Sims, Catriona M.; Williams, Paul

    1998-01-01

    In Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus, a number of cell wall- and cytoplasmic membrane-associated lipoproteins are induced in response to iron starvation. To gain insights into the molecular basis of iron-dependent gene regulation in the staphylococci, we sequenced the DNA upstream of the 3-kb S. epidermidis sitABC operon, which Northern blot analysis indicates is transcriptionally regulated by the growth medium iron content. We identified two DNA sequences which are homologous to elements of the Corynebacterium diphtheriae DtxR regulon, which controls, in response to iron stress, for example, production of diphtheria toxin, siderophore, and a heme oxygenase. Upstream of the sitABC operon and divergently transcribed lies a 645-bp open reading frame (ORF), which codes for a polypeptide of approximately 25 kDa with homology to the DtxR family of metal-dependent repressor proteins. This ORF has been designated SirR (staphylococcal iron regulator repressor). Within the sitABC promoter/operator region, we also located a region of dyad symmetry overlapping the transcriptional start of sitABC which shows high homology to the DtxR operator consensus sequence, suggesting that this region, termed the Sir box, is the SirR-binding site. The SirR protein was overexpressed, purified, and used in DNA mobility shift assays; SirR retarded the migration of a synthetic oligonucleotide based on the Sir box in a metal (Fe2+ or Mn2+)-dependent manner, providing confirmatory evidence that this motif is the SirR-binding site. Furthermore, Southern blot analysis of staphylococcal chromosomal DNA with the synthetic Sir box as a probe confirmed that there are at least five Sir boxes in the S. epidermidis genome and at least three in the genome of S. aureus, suggesting that SirR controls the expression of multiple target genes. Using a monospecific polyclonal antibody raised against SirR to probe Western blots of whole-cell lysates of S. aureus, S. carnosus, S. epidermidis

  4. Kefiran antagonizes cytopathic effects of Bacillus cereus extracellular factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Micaela; Pérez, Pablo Fernando; Abraham, Analía Graciela

    2008-02-29

    Kefiran, the polysaccharide produced by microorganisms present in kefir grains, is a water-soluble branched glucogalactan containing equal amounts of D-glucose and D-galactose. In this study, the effect of kefiran on the biological activity of Bacillus cereus strain B10502 extracellular factors was assessed by using cultured human enterocytes (Caco-2 cells) and human erythrocytes. In the presence of kefiran concentrations ranging from 300 to 1000 mg/L, the ability of B. cereus B10502 spent culture supernatants to detach and damage cultured human enterocytes was significantly abrogated. In addition, mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity was higher when kefiran was present during the cell toxicity assays. Protection was also demonstrated in hemolysis and apoptosis/necrosis assays. Scanning electron microscopy showed the protective effect of kefiran against structural cell damages produced by factors synthesized by B. cereus strain B10502. Protective effect of kefiran depended on strain of B. cereus. Our findings demonstrate the ability of kefiran to antagonize key events of B. cereus B10502 virulence. This property, although strain-specific, gives new perspectives for the role of bacterial exopolysaccharides in functional foods.

  5. Requirements within the Ebola Viral Glycoprotein for Tetherin Antagonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan H. Vande Burgt

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Tetherin is an interferon-induced, intrinsic cellular response factor that blocks release of numerous viruses, including Ebola virus, from infected cells. As with many viruses targeted by host factors, Ebola virus employs a tetherin antagonist, the viral glycoprotein (EboGP, to counteract restriction and promote virus release. Unlike other tetherin antagonists such as HIV-1 Vpu or KSHV K5, the features within EboGP needed to overcome tetherin are not well characterized. Here, we describe sequences within the EboGP ectodomain and membrane spanning domain (msd as necessary to relieve tetherin restriction of viral particle budding. Fusing the EboGP msd to a normally secreted form of the glycoprotein effectively promotes Ebola virus particle release. Cellular protein or lipid anchors could not substitute for the EboGP msd. The requirement for the EboGP msd was not specific for filovirus budding, as similar results were seen with HIV particles. Furthermore trafficking of chimeric proteins to budding sites did not correlate with an ability to counter tetherin. Additionally, we find that a glycoprotein construct, which mimics the cathepsin-activated species by proteolytic removal of the EboGP glycan cap and mucin domains, is unable to counteract tetherin. Combining these results suggests an important role for the EboGP glycan cap and msd in tetherin antagonism.

  6. Antagonism of rice phylloplane fungi against Cercospora oryzae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardani, A.; Hadiwiyono

    2018-03-01

    Narrow brown leaf spot (NBLS) caused by Cercospora oryzae Miyake is one of the important obstacle in rice cultivation that can decrease the productivity up to 40%. It has been known well that some phylloplane fungi are antagonistic to some leaf diseases. Phylloplane fungi of rice however haven’t been studied much and poorly understood as biological control agent of rice pathogen such C. oryzae. The research aimed to study the antagonism of some phylloplane fungi of rice against C. oryzae. At least 14 isolates of phylloplane fungi were collected which consisted of six pathogenic and eight nonpathogenic variants. All of nonpathogenic isolates were antagonistic against C. oryzae both in vitro and only one isolate could not inhibit the infection of the pathogen in vivo. Some isolates were identified as Aspergillus, Mucor, Penicillium, Fusarium, and Trichoderma. The isolate of Mucor and Fusarium could inhibit the highest growth of pathogen on potato dextrose medium that were at 36.0% and 35.5% respectively. Whereas on artificial inoculation on rice, some isolates such Penicillium and Fusarium could inhibit most effectively and were significantly different to Mencozeb application with dosage 5g L-1.

  7. Caffeine antagonism of alcohol-induced driving impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, A; Robinson, J H

    2001-07-01

    The extent to which caffeine antagonizes alcohol-induced impairment of simulated automobile driving at the current lowest legal American limit (0.08% BrAC) was the focus of this study. Fifteen adults swallowed a capsule (0, 200, or 400 mg caffeine) then drank a beverage (0.0 or 0.6 g/kg ethanol) in a within-subject, double-blind, randomized procedure. Forty-five minutes later, participants completed a test battery of subjective effects scales, dynamic posturography, critical flicker fusion (CFF), choice reaction time (CRT), divided attention (Stroop test), and simulated driving. Alcohol alone increased ratings of 'dizzy', 'drug effect', and 'high', slowed CRT and brake latency, and increased body sway. Caffeine alone increased ratings of 'alert' and 'jittery', but did not significantly affect body sway or psychomotor performance. Both caffeine doses comparably counteracted alcohol impairment of brake latency but not CRT or body sway. Brake latency with either alcohol-caffeine combination remained significantly longer than that with placebo. Stroop and CFF performance were unaffected by any drug condition. The results suggest that caffeine may increase alertness and improve reaction time after alcohol use but will not completely counteract alcohol impairment in a driver.

  8. Notch pathway signaling in the skin antagonizes Merkel cell development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Gregory J; Wright, Margaret C; Kubicki, Adam C; Maricich, Stephen M

    2018-02-15

    Merkel cells are mechanosensitive skin cells derived from the epidermal lineage whose development requires expression of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Atoh1. The genes and pathways involved in regulating Merkel cell development during embryogenesis are poorly understood. Notch pathway signaling antagonizes Atoh1 expression in many developing body regions, so we hypothesized that Notch signaling might inhibit Merkel cell development. We found that conditional, constitutive overexpression of the Notch intracellular domain (NICD) in mouse epidermis significantly decreased Merkel cell numbers in whisker follicles and touch domes of hairy skin. Conversely, conditional deletion of the obligate NICD binding partner RBPj in the epidermis significantly increased Merkel cell numbers in whisker follicles, led to the development of ectopic Merkel cells outside of touch domes in hairy skin epidermis, and altered the distribution of Merkel cells in touch domes. Deletion of the downstream Notch effector gene Hes1 also significantly increased Merkel cell numbers in whisker follicles. Together, these data demonstrate that Notch signaling regulates Merkel cell production and patterning. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Mouse Hobit is a homolog of the transcriptional repressor Blimp-1 that regulates NKT cell effector differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gisbergen, Klaas P. J. M.; Kragten, Natasja A. M.; Hertoghs, Kirsten M. L.; Wensveen, Felix M.; Jonjic, Stipan; Hamann, Jörg; Nolte, Martijn A.; van Lier, Rene A. W.

    2012-01-01

    The transcriptional repressor Blimp-1 mediates the terminal differentiation of many cell types, including T cells. Here we identified Hobit (Znf683) as a previously unrecognized homolog of Blimp-1 that was specifically expressed in mouse natural killer T cells (NKT cells). Through studies of

  10. Identification of PNG kinase substrates uncovers interactions with the translational repressor TRAL in the oocyte-to-embryo transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Masatoshi; Lourido, Sebastian; Petrova, Boryana; Lou, Hua Jane; Von Stetina, Jessica R; Kashevsky, Helena; Turk, Benjamin E; Orr-Weaver, Terry L

    2018-02-26

    The Drosophila Pan Gu (PNG) kinase complex regulates hundreds of maternal mRNAs that become translationally repressed or activated as the oocyte transitions to an embryo. In a previous paper (Hara et al., 2017), we demonstrated PNG activity is under tight developmental control and restricted to this transition. Here, examination of PNG specificity showed it to be a Thr-kinase yet lacking a clear phosphorylation site consensus sequence. An unbiased biochemical screen for PNG substrates identified the conserved translational repressor Trailer Hitch (TRAL). Phosphomimetic mutation of the PNG phospho-sites in TRAL reduced its ability to inhibit translation in vitro. In vivo, mutation of tral dominantly suppressed png mutants and restored Cyclin B protein levels. The repressor Pumilio (PUM) has the same relationship with PNG, and we also show that PUM is a PNG substrate. Furthermore, PNG can phosphorylate BICC and ME31B, repressors that bind TRAL in cytoplasmic RNPs. Therefore, PNG likely promotes translation at the oocyte-to-embryo transition by phosphorylating and inactivating translational repressors. © 2018, Hara et al.

  11. Structure of the effector-binding domain of the arabinose repressor AraR from Bacillus subtilis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Procházková, Kateřina; Čermáková, Kateřina; Pachl, Petr; Sieglová, Irena; Fábry, Milan; Otwinowski, Z.; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 2 (2012), s. 176-185 ISSN 0907-4449 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME08016 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : repressor * dimerization * effector binding * isothermal titration calorimetry Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 14.103, year: 2012

  12. Identification of operator sites of the CI repressor of phage TP901-1: evolutionary link to other phages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, Annette H.; Broendsted, Lone; Hammer, Karin

    2003-01-01

    The repressor encoded by the cI gene of the temperate Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris bacteriophage TP901-1 has been purified. Gel-retardation and footprinting analyses identified three palindromic operator sites (O R , O L , and O D ). The operator site O R is located between the two divergent early promoters P R and P L , O L overlaps the transcriptional start of the lytic P L promoter, and O D is located downstream of the mor gene, the first gene in the lytic gene cluster. The function of O L was verified by mutational analysis. Binding was found to be specific and cooperative. Multimeric forms of the repressor were observed, thus indicating that the repressor may bind simultaneously to all three operator sites. Inverted repeats with homology to the operator sites of TP901-1 were identified in phage genomes encoding repressors homologous to CI of TP901-1. Interestingly, the locations of these repeats on the phage genomes correspond to those found in TP901-1, indicating that the same system of cooperative repression of early phage promoters has been inherited by modular evolution

  13. A homozygous mutation in HESX1 is associated with evolving hypopituitarism due to impaired repressor-corepressor interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carvalho, Luciani R; Woods, Kathryn S; Mendonca, Berenice B

    2003-01-01

    repressor domain (eh1) of HESX1, the first, to our knowledge, to be described in humans, in a girl with evolving combined pituitary hormone deficiency born to consanguineous parents. Neuroimaging revealed a thin pituitary stalk with anterior pituitary hypoplasia and an ectopic posterior pituitary...

  14. Female Infertility Caused by Mutations in the Oocyte-Specific Translational Repressor PATL2

    KAUST Repository

    Maddirevula, Sateesh

    2017-09-29

    Infertility is a relatively common disorder of the reproductive system and remains unexplained in many cases. In vitro fertilization techniques have uncovered previously unrecognized infertility phenotypes, including oocyte maturation arrest, the molecular etiology of which remains largely unknown. We report two families affected by female-limited infertility caused by oocyte maturation failure. Positional mapping and whole-exome sequencing revealed two homozygous, likely deleterious variants in PATL2, each of which fully segregates with the phenotype within the respective family. PATL2 encodes a highly conserved oocyte-specific mRNP repressor of translation. Previous data have shown the strict requirement for PATL2 in oocyte-maturation in model organisms. Data gathered from the families in this study suggest that the role of PATL2 is conserved in humans and expand our knowledge of the factors that are necessary for female meiosis.

  15. Comprehensive Interrogation of Natural TALE DNA Binding Modules and Transcriptional Repressor Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Le; Zhou, Ruhong; Kuo, Yu-chi; Cunniff, Margaret; Zhang, Feng

    2012-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALE) are sequence-specific DNA binding proteins that harbor modular, repetitive DNA binding domains. TALEs have enabled the creation of customizable designer transcriptional factors and sequence-specific nucleases for genome engineering. Here we report two improvements of the TALE toolbox for achieving efficient activation and repression of endogenous gene expression in mammalian cells. We show that the naturally occurring repeat variable diresidue (RVD) Asn-His (NH) has high biological activity and specificity for guanine, a highly prevalent base in mammalian genomes. We also report an effective TALE transcriptional repressor architecture for targeted inhibition of transcription in mammalian cells. These findings will improve the precision and effectiveness of genome engineering that can be achieved using TALEs. PMID:22828628

  16. Plastic downregulation of the transcriptional repressor BCL6 during maturation of human dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantano, Serafino; Jarrossay, David; Saccani, Simona; Bosisio, Daniela; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) maturation links peripheral events initiated by the encounter with pathogens to the activation and expansion of antigen-specific T lymphocytes in secondary lymphoid organs. Here, we describe an as yet unrecognized modulator of human DC maturation, the transcriptional repressor BCL6. We found that both myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs constitutively express BCL6, which is rapidly downregulated following maturation triggered by selected stimuli. Both in unstimulated and maturing DCs, control of BCL6 protein levels reflects the convergence of several mechanisms regulating BCL6 stability, mRNA transcription and nuclear export. By regulating the induction of several genes implicated in the immune response, including inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and survival genes, BCL6 may represent a pivotal modulator of the afferent branch of the immune response

  17. Drosophila arginine methyltransferase 1 (DART1) is an ecdysone receptor co-repressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Shuhei; Sawatsubashi, Shun; Ito, Saya; Kouzmenko, Alexander; Suzuki, Eriko; Zhao, Yue; Yamagata, Kaoru; Tanabe, Masahiko; Ueda, Takashi; Fujiyama, Sari; Murata, Takuya; Matsukawa, Hiroyuki; Takeyama, Ken-ichi; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2008-01-01

    Histone arginine methylation is an epigenetic marker that regulates gene expression by defining the chromatin state. Arginine methyltransferases, therefore, serve as transcriptional co-regulators. However, unlike other transcriptional co-regulators, the physiological roles of arginine methyltransferases are poorly understood. Drosophila arginine methyltransferase 1 (DART1), the mammalian PRMT1 homologue, methylates the arginine residue of histone H4 (H4R3me2). Disruption of DART1 in Drosophila by imprecise P-element excision resulted in low viability during metamorphosis in the pupal stages. In the pupal stage, an ecdysone hormone signal is critical for developmental progression. DART1 interacted with the nuclear ecdysone receptor (EcR) in a ligand-dependent manner, and co-repressed EcR in intact flies. These findings suggest that DART1, a histone arginine methyltransferase, is a co-repressor of EcR that is indispensable for normal pupal development in the intact fly

  18. Brain REST/NRSF Is Not Only a Silent Repressor but Also an Active Protector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yangang; Zhu, Min; Yu, Yanlan; Qiu, Linli; Zhang, Yuanyuan; He, Li; Zhang, Jiqiang

    2017-01-01

    During neurogenesis, specific transcription factors are needed to repress neuronal genes in nonneuronal cells to ensure precise development. Repressor element-1 binding transcription factor (REST), or neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF), has been shown to be an important regulator for the establishment of neuronal specificity. It restricts the expression of neuronal genes by binding to the neuron-restrictive silencer element (NRSE/RE1) domain in neuron-specific genes. REST/NRSF regulates many target genes in stem cells, nonneural cells, and neurons, which are involved in neuronal differentiation, axonal growth, vesicular transport, and release as well as ionic conductance. However, it is also regulated by some cytokines/regulators such as epigenetic factors (microRNAs) and even its truncated isoform. REST/NRSF is widely detected in brain regions and has been shown to be highly expressed in nonneuronal cells, but current findings also reveal that, at least in the human brain, it is also highly expressed in neurons and increases with ageing. However, its loss in expression and cytoplasmic translocation seems to play a pivotal role in several human dementias. Additionally, REST/NRSF knockdown leads to malformations in nerve and nonneural tissues and embryonic lethality. Altered REST/NRSF expression has been not only related to deficient brain functions such as neurodegenerative diseases, mental disorders, brain tumors, and neurobehavioral disorders but also highly correlated to brain injuries such as alcoholism and stroke. Encouragingly, several compounds such as valproic acid and X5050 that target REST/NRSF have been shown to be clinically effective at rescuing seizures or Niemann-Pick type C disease. Surprisingly, studies have also shown that REST/NRSF can function as an activator to induce neuronal differentiation. These findings strongly indicate that REST/NRSF is not only a classical repressor to maintain normal neurogenesis, but it is also a fine

  19. recA+-dependent inactivation of the lambda repressor in Escherichia coli lysogens by γ-radiation and by tif expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, S.C.; Powell, K.A.; Emmerson, P.T.

    1975-01-01

    When lambda lysogens of E. coli are induced by γ-radiation the lambda repressor, as measured by its specific binding to lambda DNA, is rapidly inactivated by a recA + -dependent process which does not require new protein synthesis. This rapid inactivation is similar to inactivation of repressor by expression of the temperature sensitive E. coli mutation tif. In contrast, induction by UV irradiation or mitomycin C treatment requires new protein synthesis and there is a lag before the repressor is inactivated (Tomizawa and Ogawa, 1967; Shinagawa and Itoh, 1973). (orig.) [de

  20. APETALA 2-domain-containing transcription factors: focusing on abscisic acid and gibberellins antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Kai; Zhou, Wenguan; Yang, Wenyu

    2018-02-01

    The phytohormones abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellin (GA) antagonistically mediate diverse plant developmental processes including seed dormancy and germination, root development, and flowering time control, and thus the optimal balance between ABA and GA is essential for plant growth and development. Although more than a half and one century have passed since the initial discoveries of ABA and GA, respectively, the precise mechanisms underlying ABA-GA antagonism still need further investigation. Emerging evidence indicates that two APETALA 2 (AP2)-domain-containing transcription factors (ATFs), ABI4 in Arabidopsis and OsAP2-39 in rice, play key roles in ABA and GA antagonism. These two transcription factors precisely regulate the transcription pattern of ABA and GA biosynthesis or inactivation genes, mediating ABA and GA levels. In this Viewpoint article, we try to shed light on the effects of ATFs on ABA-GA antagonism, and summarize the overlapping but distinct biological functions of these ATFs in the antagonism between ABA and GA. Finally, we strongly propose that further research is needed into the detailed roles of additional numerous ATFs in ABA and GA crosstalk, which will improve our understanding of the antagonism between these two phytohormones. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Antagonism of morphine-induced central respiratory depression by donepezil in the anesthetized rabbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIKI TSUJITA

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Morphine is often used in cancer pain and postoperative analgesic management but induces respiratory depression. Therefore, there is an ongoing search for drug candidates that can antagonize morphine-induced respiratory depression but have no effect on morphine-induced analgesia. Acetylcholine is an excitatory neurotransmitter in central respiratory control and physostigmine antagonizes morphine-induced respiratory depression. However, physostigmine has not been applied in clinical practice because it has a short action time, among other characteristics. We therefore asked whether donepezil (a long-acting acetylcholinesterase inhibitor used in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease can antagonize morphine-induced respiratory depression. Using the anesthetized rabbit as our model, we measured phrenic nerve discharge as an index of respiratory rate and amplitude. We compared control indices with discharges after the injection of morphine and after the injection of donepezil. Morphine-induced depression of respiratory rate and respiratory amplitude was partly antagonized by donepezil without any effect on blood pressure and end-tidal C0(2. In the other experiment, apneic threshold PaC0(2 was also compared. Morphine increased the phrenic nerve apnea threshold but this was antagonized by donepezil. These findings indicate that systemically administered donepezil partially restores morphine-induced respiratory depression and morphine-deteriorated phrenic nerve apnea threshold in the anesthetized rabbit

  2. P22 Arc repressor: enhanced expression of unstable mutants by addition of polar C-terminal sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Milla, M. E.; Brown, B. M.; Sauer, R. T.

    1993-01-01

    Many mutant variants of the P22 Arc repressor are subject to intracellular proteolysis in Escherichia coli, which precludes their expression at levels sufficient for purification and subsequent biochemical characterization. Here we examine the effects of several different C-terminal extension sequences on the expression and activity of a set of Arc mutants. We show that two tail sequences, KNQHE (st5) and H6KNQHE (st11), increase the expression levels of most mutants from 10- to 20-fold and, ...

  3. Human Freud-2/CC2D1B: a novel repressor of postsynaptic serotonin-1A receptor expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjighassem, Mahmoud R; Austin, Mark C; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Daigle, Mireille; Stockmeier, Craig A; Albert, Paul R

    2009-08-01

    Altered expression of serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptors, both presynaptic in the raphe nuclei and post-synaptic in limbic and cortical target areas, has been implicated in mood disorders such as major depression and anxiety. Within the 5-HT1A receptor gene, a powerful dual repressor element (DRE) is regulated by two protein complexes: Freud-1/CC2D1A and a second, unknown repressor. Here we identify human Freud-2/CC2D1B, a Freud-1 homologue, as the second repressor. Freud-2 distribution was examined with Northern and Western blot, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, and immunohistochemistry/immunofluorescence; Freud-2 function was examined by electrophoretic mobility shift, reporter assay, and Western blot. Freud-2 RNA was widely distributed in brain and peripheral tissues. Freud-2 protein was enriched in the nuclear fraction of human prefrontal cortex and hippocampus but was weakly expressed in the dorsal raphe nucleus. Freud-2 immunostaining was co-localized with 5-HT1A receptors, neuronal and glial markers. In prefrontal cortex, Freud-2 was expressed at similar levels in control and depressed male subjects. Recombinant hFreud-2 protein bound specifically to 5' or 3' human DRE adjacent to the Freud-1 site. Human Freud-2 showed strong repressor activity at the human 5-HT1A or heterologous promoter in human HEK-293 5-HT1A-negative cells and neuronal SK-N-SH cells, a model of postsynaptic 5-HT1A receptor-positive cells. Furthermore, small interfering RNA knockdown of endogenous hFreud-2 expression de-repressed 5-HT1A promoter activity and increased levels of 5-HT1A receptor protein in SK-N-SH cells. Human Freud-2 binds to the 5-HT1A DRE and represses the human 5-HT1A receptor gene to regulate its expression in non-serotonergic cells and neurons.

  4. Drosophila melanogaster cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes is a lysosomal protein essential for fly development

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalewski-Nimmerfall, Elisabeth; Sch?hs, Philipp; Maresch, Daniel; Rendic, Dubravko; Kr?mer, Helmut; Mach, Lukas

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes is a lysosomal glycoprotein implicated in cellular growth and differentiation. The genome of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster encodes a putative orthologue (dCREG), suggesting evolutionarily conserved physiological functions of this protein. In D. melanogaster S2 cells, dCREG was found to localize in lysosomes. Further studies revealed that intracellular dCREG is subject of proteolytic maturation. Processing and turnover could be subst...

  5. Regulator of G-protein signaling - 5 (RGS5 is a novel repressor of hedgehog signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William M Mahoney

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh signaling plays fundamental roles in morphogenesis, tissue repair, and human disease. Initiation of Hh signaling is controlled by the interaction of two multipass membrane proteins, patched (Ptc and smoothened (Smo. Recent studies identify Smo as a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR-like protein that signals through large G-protein complexes which contain the Gαi subunit. We hypothesize Regulator of G-Protein Signaling (RGS proteins, and specifically RGS5, are endogenous repressors of Hh signaling via their ability to act as GTPase activating proteins (GAPs for GTP-bound Gαi, downstream of Smo. In support of this hypothesis, we demonstrate that RGS5 over-expression inhibits sonic hedgehog (Shh-mediated signaling and osteogenesis in C3H10T1/2 cells. Conversely, signaling is potentiated by siRNA-mediated knock-down of RGS5 expression, but not RGS4 expression. Furthermore, using immuohistochemical analysis and co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP, we demonstrate that RGS5 is present with Smo in primary cilia. This organelle is required for canonical Hh signaling in mammalian cells, and RGS5 is found in a physical complex with Smo in these cells. We therefore conclude that RGS5 is an endogenous regulator of Hh-mediated signaling and that RGS proteins are potential targets for novel therapeutics in Hh-mediated diseases.

  6. Zic-Proteins Are Repressors of Dopaminergic Forebrain Fate in Mice and C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiveron, Marie-Catherine; Beclin, Christophe; Murgan, Sabrina; Wild, Stefan; Angelova, Alexandra; Marc, Julie; Coré, Nathalie; de Chevigny, Antoine; Herrera, Eloisa; Bosio, Andreas; Bertrand, Vincent; Cremer, Harold

    2017-11-01

    In the postnatal forebrain regionalized neural stem cells along the ventricular walls produce olfactory bulb (OB) interneurons with varying neurotransmitter phenotypes and positions. To understand the molecular basis of this region-specific variability we analyzed gene expression in the postnatal dorsal and lateral lineages in mice of both sexes from stem cells to neurons. We show that both lineages maintain transcription factor signatures of their embryonic site of origin, the pallium and subpallium. However, additional factors, including Zic1 and Zic2, are postnatally expressed in the dorsal stem cell compartment and maintained in the lineage that generates calretinin-positive GABAergic neurons for the OB. Functionally, we show that Zic1 and Zic2 induce the generation of calretinin-positive neurons while suppressing dopaminergic fate in the postnatal dorsal lineage. We investigated the evolutionary conservation of the dopaminergic repressor function of Zic proteins and show that it is already present in C. elegans SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The vertebrate brain generates thousands of different neuron types. In this work we investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying this variability. Using a genomics approach we identify the transcription factor signatures of defined neural stem cells and neuron populations. Based thereon we show that two related transcription factors, Zic1 and Zic2, are essential to control the balance between two defined neuron types in the postnatal brain. We show that this mechanism is conserved in evolutionary very distant species. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/3710611-13$15.00/0.

  7. Activation of pur Gene Expression by a Homologue of the Bacillus subtilis PurR repressor:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilstrup, Mogens; Martinussen, Jan

    1998-01-01

    R encoded repressor from Bacillus subtilis. The wildtype purR gene complements the purine auxotrophy of a purR::Iss1mutant, and it was shown that the purR::Iss1 mutation lowers transcription from the purine regulated L. lactis purD promoter. In a parallel study on the regulation of purC and purD expression....... We have identified a PurBox sequence overlapping the -35 region of the L. lactis purR promoter and found, by studies of a purR-lacLM fusion plasmid, that purR is autoregulated. Because of the high similarity of the PurR proteins from B. subtilis and L. lactis, we looked for PurBox sequences...... in the promoter regions of the PurR regulated genes in B. subtilis, and identified a perfectly matching PurBox in the purA promoter region, and slightly degenerate PurBox like sequences in the promoter regions for the pur operon and the purR gene....

  8. A-type nuclear lamins act as transcriptional repressors when targeted to promoters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Damian C.; Welton, K. Linnea; Smith, Erica D.; Kennedy, Brian K.

    2009-01-01

    Regions of heterochromatin are often found at the periphery of the mammalian nucleus, juxtaposed to the nuclear lamina. Genes in these regions are likely maintained in a transcriptionally silent state, although other locations at the nuclear periphery associated with nuclear pores are sites of active transcription. As primary components of the nuclear lamina, A- and B-type nuclear lamins are intermediate filament proteins that interact with DNA, histones and known transcriptional repressors, leading to speculation that they may promote establishment of repressive domains. However, no direct evidence of a role for nuclear lamins in transcriptional repression has been reported. Here we find that human lamin A, when expressed in yeast and cultured human cells as a fusion protein to the Gal4 DNA-binding domain (DBD), can mediate robust transcriptional repression of promoters with Gal4 binding sites. Full repression by lamin A requires both the coiled-coil rod domain and the C-terminal tail domain. In human cells, other intermediate filament proteins such as lamin B and vimentin are unable to confer robust repression as Gal4-DBD fusions, indicating that this property is specific to A-type nuclear lamins. These findings indicate that A-type lamins can promote transcriptional repression when in proximity of a promoter

  9. Loss of the RNA polymerase III repressor MAF1 confers obesity resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhoure, Nicolas; Byrnes, Ashlee; Moir, Robyn D; Hodroj, Wassim; Preitner, Frédéric; Praz, Viviane; Marcelin, Genevieve; Chua, Streamson C; Martinez-Lopez, Nuria; Singh, Rajat; Moullan, Norman; Auwerx, Johan; Willemin, Gilles; Shah, Hardik; Hartil, Kirsten; Vaitheesvaran, Bhavapriya; Kurland, Irwin; Hernandez, Nouria; Willis, Ian M

    2015-05-01

    MAF1 is a global repressor of RNA polymerase III transcription that regulates the expression of highly abundant noncoding RNAs in response to nutrient availability and cellular stress. Thus, MAF1 function is thought to be important for metabolic economy. Here we show that a whole-body knockout of Maf1 in mice confers resistance to diet-induced obesity and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by reducing food intake and increasing metabolic inefficiency. Energy expenditure in Maf1(-/-) mice is increased by several mechanisms. Precursor tRNA synthesis was increased in multiple tissues without significant effects on mature tRNA levels, implying increased turnover in a futile tRNA cycle. Elevated futile cycling of hepatic lipids was also observed. Metabolite profiling of the liver and skeletal muscle revealed elevated levels of many amino acids and spermidine, which links the induction of autophagy in Maf1(-/-) mice with their extended life span. The increase in spermidine was accompanied by reduced levels of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase, which promotes polyamine synthesis, enables nicotinamide salvage to regenerate NAD(+), and is associated with obesity resistance. Consistent with this, NAD(+) levels were increased in muscle. The importance of MAF1 for metabolic economy reveals the potential for MAF1 modulators to protect against obesity and its harmful consequences. © 2015 Bonhoure et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  10. A GntR-type transcriptional repressor controls sialic acid utilization in Bifidobacterium breve UCC2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Muireann; O'Connell Motherway, Mary; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2015-02-01

    Bifidobacterium breve strains are numerically prevalent among the gut microbiota of healthy, breast-fed infants. The metabolism of sialic acid, a ubiquitous monosaccharide in the infant and adult gut, by B. breve UCC2003 is dependent on a large gene cluster, designated the nan/nag cluster. This study describes the transcriptional regulation of the nan/nag cluster and thus sialic acid metabolism in B. breve UCC2003. Insertion mutagenesis and transcriptome analysis revealed that the nan/nag cluster is regulated by a GntR family transcriptional repressor, designated NanR. Crude cell extract of Escherichia coli EC101 in which the nanR gene had been cloned and overexpressed was shown to bind to two promoter regions within this cluster, each of which containing an imperfect inverted repeat that is believed to act as the NanR operator sequence. Formation of the DNA-NanR complex is prevented in the presence of sialic acid, which we had previously shown to induce transcription of this gene cluster. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Recognition of AT-Rich DNA Binding Sites by the MogR Repressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Aimee; Higgins, Darren E.; Panne, Daniel; (Harvard-Med); (EMBL)

    2009-07-22

    The MogR transcriptional repressor of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes recognizes AT-rich binding sites in promoters of flagellar genes to downregulate flagellar gene expression during infection. We describe here the 1.8 A resolution crystal structure of MogR bound to the recognition sequence 5' ATTTTTTAAAAAAAT 3' present within the flaA promoter region. Our structure shows that MogR binds as a dimer. Each half-site is recognized in the major groove by a helix-turn-helix motif and in the minor groove by a loop from the symmetry-related molecule, resulting in a 'crossover' binding mode. This oversampling through minor groove interactions is important for specificity. The MogR binding site has structural features of A-tract DNA and is bent by approximately 52 degrees away from the dimer. The structure explains how MogR achieves binding specificity in the AT-rich genome of L. monocytogenes and explains the evolutionary conservation of A-tract sequence elements within promoter regions of MogR-regulated flagellar genes.

  12. Crystal Structure and Regulation of the Citrus Pol III Repressor MAF1 by Auxin and Phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soprano, Adriana Santos; Giuseppe, Priscila Oliveira de; Shimo, Hugo Massayoshi; Lima, Tatiani Brenelli; Batista, Fernanda Aparecida Heleno; Righetto, Germanna Lima; Pereira, José Geraldo de Carvalho; Granato, Daniela Campos; Nascimento, Andrey Fabricio Ziem; Gozzo, Fabio Cesar; de Oliveira, Paulo Sérgio Lopes; Figueira, Ana Carolina Migliorini; Smetana, Juliana Helena Costa; Paes Leme, Adriana Franco; Murakami, Mario Tyago; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2017-09-05

    MAF1 is the main RNA polymerase (Pol) III repressor that controls cell growth in eukaryotes. The Citrus ortholog, CsMAF1, was shown to restrict cell growth in citrus canker disease but its role in plant development and disease is still unclear. We solved the crystal structure of the globular core of CsMAF1, which reveals additional structural elements compared with the previously available structure of hMAF1, and explored the dynamics of its flexible regions not present in the structure. CsMAF1 accumulated in the nucleolus upon leaf excision, and this translocation was inhibited by auxin and by mutation of the PKA phosphorylation site, S45, to aspartate. Additionally, mTOR phosphorylated recombinant CsMAF1 and the mTOR inhibitor AZD8055 blocked canker formation in normal but not CsMAF1-silenced plants. These results indicate that the role of TOR on cell growth induced by Xanthomonas citri depends on CsMAF1 and that auxin controls CsMAF1 interaction with Pol III in citrus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetic separation of Escherichia coli recA functions for SOS mutagenesis and repressor cleavage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ennis, D.G.; Ossanna, N.; Mount, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    Evidence is presented that recA functions which promote the SOS functions of mutagenesis, LexA protein proteolysis, and lambda cI repressor proteolysis are each genetically separable from the others. This separation was observed in recombination-proficient recA mutants and rec+ (F' recA56) heterodiploids. recA430, recA433, and recA435 mutants and recA+ (F' recA56) heterodiploids were inducible for only one or two of the three functions and defective for mutagenesis. recA80 and recA432 mutants were constitutively activated for two of the three functions in that these mutants did not have to be induced to express the functions. We propose that binding of RecA protein to damaged DNA and subsequent interaction with small inducer molecules gives rise to conformational changes in RecA protein. These changes promote surface-surface interactions with other target proteins, such as cI and LexA proteins. By this model, the recA mutants are likely to have incorrect amino acids substituted as sites in the RecA protein structure which affect surface regions required for protein-protein interactions. The constitutively activated mutants could likewise insert altered amino acids at sites in RecA which are involved in the activation of RecA protein by binding small molecules or polynucleotides which metabolically regulate RecA protein

  14. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis transcriptional repressor EthR is negatively regulated by Serine/Threonine phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiba, Jade; Carrère-Kremer, Séverine; Blondiaux, Nicolas; Dimala, Martin Moune; Wohlkönig, Alexandre; Baulard, Alain; Kremer, Laurent; Molle, Virginie

    2014-04-18

    Recent efforts have underlined the role of Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases (STPKs) in growth, pathogenesis and cell wall metabolism in mycobacteria. Herein, we demonstrated that the Mycobacterium tuberculosis EthR, a transcriptional repressor that regulates the activation process of the antitubercular drug ethionamide (ETH) is a specific substrate of the mycobacterial kinase PknF. ETH is a prodrug that must undergo bioactivation by the monooxygenease EthA to exert its antimycobacterial activity and previous studies reported that EthR represses transcription of ethA by binding to the ethA-ethR intergenic region. Mass spectrometry analyses and site-directed mutagenesis identified a set of four phosphoacceptors, namely Thr2, Thr3, Ser4 and Ser7. This was further supported by the complete loss of PknF-dependent phosphorylation of a phosphoablative EthR mutant protein. Importantly, a phosphomimetic version of EthR, in which all phosphosites were replaced by Asp residues, exhibited markedly decreased DNA-binding activity compared with the wild-type protein. Together, these findings are the first demonstration of EthR phosphorylation and indicate that phosphorylation negatively affects its DNA-binding activity, which may impact ETH resistance levels in M. tb. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Investigation of arc repressor DNA-binding specificity by comparative molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Wei; Guo, Jun-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors regulate gene expression through binding to specific DNA sequences. How transcription factors achieve high binding specificity is still not well understood. In this paper, we investigated the role of protein flexibility in protein-DNA-binding specificity by comparative molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Protein flexibility has been considered as a key factor in molecular recognition, which is intrinsically a dynamic process involving fine structural fitting between binding components. In this study, we performed comparative MD simulations on wild-type and F10V mutant P22 Arc repressor in both free and complex conformations. The F10V mutant has lower DNA-binding specificity though both the bound and unbound main-chain structures between the wild-type and F10V mutant Arc are highly similar. We found that the DNA-binding motif of wild-type Arc is structurally more flexible than the F10V mutant in the unbound state, especially for the six DNA base-contacting residues in each dimer. We demonstrated that the flexible side chains of wild-type Arc lead to a higher DNA-binding specificity through forming more hydrogen bonds with DNA bases upon binding. Our simulations also showed a possible conformational selection mechanism for Arc-DNA binding. These results indicate the important roles of protein flexibility and dynamic properties in protein-DNA-binding specificity.

  16. NMR assignments for the amino-terminal residues of trp repressor and their role in DNA binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrowsmith, C.H.; Carey, J.; Treat-Clemons, L.; Jardetzky, O.

    1989-01-01

    The trp repressor of Escherichia coli specifically binds to operator DNAs in three operons involved in tryptophan metabolism. The NMR spectra of repressor and a chymotryptic fragment lacking the six amino-terminal residues are compared. Two-dimensional J-correlated spectra of the two forms of the protein are superimposable except for cross-peaks that are associated with the N-terminal region. The chemical shifts and relaxation behavior of the N-terminal resonances suggest mobile arms. Spin-echo experiments on a ternary complex of repressor with L-tryptophan and operator DNA indicate that the termini are also disordered in the complex, although removal of the arms reduces the DNA binding energy. Relaxation measurements on the armless protein show increased mobility for several residues, probably due to helix fraying in the newly exposed N-terminal region. DNA binding by the armless protein does not reduce the mobility of these residues. Thus, it appears that the arms serve to stabilize the N-terminal helix but that this structural role does not explain their contribution to the DNA binding energy. These results suggest that the promiscuous DNA binding by the arms seen in the X-ray crystal structure is found in solution as well

  17. TcNPR3 from Theobroma cacao functions as a repressor of the pathogen defense response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zi; Zhang, Yufan; Maximova, Siela N; Guiltinan, Mark J

    2013-12-06

    Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis) NON-EXPRESSOR OF PR1 (NPR1) is a transcription coactivator that plays a central role in regulating the transcriptional response to plant pathogens. Developing flowers of homozygous npr3 mutants are dramatically more resistant to infection by the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae, suggesting a role of NPR3 as a repressor of NPR1-mediated defense response with a novel role in flower development. We report here the characterization of a putative NPR3 gene from the tropical tree species Theobroma cacao (TcNPR3). Like in Arabidopsis, TcNPR3 was constitutively expressed across a wide range of tissue types and developmental stages but with some differences in relative levels compared to Arabidopsis. To test the function of TcNPR3, we performed transgenic complementation analysis by introducing a constitutively expressing putative TcNPR3 transgene into an Arabidopsis npr3 mutant. TcNPR3 expressing Arabidopsis plants were partially restored to the WT pathogen phenotype (immature flowers susceptible to bacterial infection). To test TcNPR3 function directly in cacao tissues, a synthetic microRNA targeting TcNPR3 mRNA was transiently expressed in cacao leaves using an Agrobacterium-infiltration method. TcNPR3 knock down leaf tissues were dramatically more resistance to infection with Phytophthora capsici in a leaf bioassay, showing smaller lesion sizes and reduced pathogen replication. We conclude that TcNPR3 functions similar to the Arabidopsis NPR3 gene in the regulation of the cacao defense response. Since TcNPR3 did not show a perfect complementation of the Arabidopsis NPR3 mutation, the possibility remains that other functions of TcNPR3 remain to be found. This novel knowledge can contribute to the breeding of resistant cacao varieties against pathogens through molecular markers based approaches or biotechnological strategies.

  18. BTG2 is an LXXLL-dependent co-repressor for androgen receptor transcriptional activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Xu-Dong; Meng, Qing-Hui; Xu, Jia-Ying; Jiao, Yang; Ge, Chun-Min; Jacob, Asha; Wang, Ping; Rosen, Eliot M; Fan, Saijun

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → BTG2 associates with AR, androgen causes an increase of the interaction. → BTG2 as a co-repressor inhibits the AR-mediated transcription activity. → BTG2 inhibits the transcription activity and expression of PSA. → An intact 92 LxxLL 96 motif is essential and necessary for these activities of BTG2, while the 20 LxxLL 24 motif is not required. → Ectopic expression of BTG2 reduces proliferation of prostate cancer cells. -- Abstract: The tumor suppressor gene, BTG2 has been down-regulated in prostate cancer and the ectopic expression of this gene has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth. Sequence analysis revealed that the BTG2 protein contains two leucine-rich motifs ( 20 LxxLL 24 and 92 LxxLL 96 ), which are usually found in nuclear receptor co-factors. Based on this, we postulated that there will be an association between BTG2 and AR. In this study, we discovered that BTG2 directly bound to the androgen receptor (AR) in the absence of 5α-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and in the presence of the androgen, this interaction was increased. BTG2 bearing the mutant 20 LxxLL 24 motif bound to AR equally efficient as the wild-type BTG2, while BTG2 bearing the mutant 92 LxxLL 96 motif failed to interact with AR. Functional studies indicated that ectopic expression of BTG2 caused a significant inhibition of AR-mediated transcriptional activity and a decreased growth of prostate cancer cells. Androgen-induced promoter activation and expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) are significantly attenuated by BTG2. The intact 92 LxxLL 96 motif is required for these activities. These findings, for the first time, demonstrate that BTG2 complexes with AR via an LxxLL-dependent mechanism and may play a role in prostate cancer via modulating the AR signaling pathway.

  19. JAZ repressors: Possible Involvement in Nutrients Deficiency Response in Rice and Chickpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajit P. Singh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Jasmonates (JA are well-known phytohormones which play important roles in plant development and defence against pathogens. Jasmonate ZIM domain (JAZ proteins are plant-specific proteins and act as transcriptional repressors of JA-responsive genes. JA regulates both biotic and abiotic stress responses in plants; however, its role in nutrient deficiency responses is very elusive. Although, JA is well-known for root growth inhibition, little is known about behaviour of JAZ genes in response to nutrient deficiencies, under which root architectural alteration is an important adaptation. Using protein sequence homology and a conserved-domains approach, here we identify ten novel JAZ genes from the recently sequenced Chickpea genome, which is one of the most nutrient efficient crops. Both rice and chickpea JAZ genes express in tissue- and stimuli-specific manners. Many of which are preferentially expressed in root. Our analysis further showed differential expression of JAZ genes under macro (NPK and micronutrients (Zn, Fe deficiency in rice and chickpea roots. While both rice and chickpea JAZ genes showed a certain level of specificity towards type of nutrient deficiency, generally majority of them showed induction under K deficiency. Generally, JAZ genes showed an induction at early stages of stress and expression declined at later stages of macro-nutrient deficiency. Our results suggest that JAZ genes might play a role in early nutrient deficiency response both in monocot and dicot roots, and information generated here can be further used for understanding the possible roles of JA in root architectural alterations for nutrient deficiency adaptations

  20. Antagonism between penicillin and erythromycin against Streptococcus pneumoniae in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H K; Jensen, T G; Dessau, R B

    2000-01-01

    The combination of beta-lactam antibiotics and macrolides is often recommended for the initial empirical treatment of acute pneumonia in order to obtain activity against the most important pathogens. Theoretically, this combination may be inexpedient, as the bacteriostatic agent may antagonize th...

  1. [Antagonism of Trichoderma spp. to fungi caused root rot of Sophora tonkinensis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Liu-yan; Jiang, Ni; Tang, Mei-qiong; Miao, Jian-hua; Li, Lin-xuan

    2011-04-01

    To study the antagonism of Trichoderma spp. to fungi S9(Fusarium solani)which caused root rot of Sophora tonkinensis and discuss the further develop prospects of microbial biological control in soil-borne diseases on Chinese herbal medicines. Antagonism of H2 (Trichoderma harsianum), M6 (Trichoderma viride) and K1 (Trichoderma koningii) to Fusarium solani were researched by growth rate and confront culture. And their mechanisms were discussed. H2 and M6 had obvious competitive advantage, the growth rate of which were 1.43-2.72 times and 1.43-1.95 times as S9 respectively. The space competitive advantage of K1 was relatively weak; the growth rate was slower than S9. The antagonism of three species of Trichoderma spp. to S9 was in varying degrees. The antagonism to S9 of M6 and H2 was better,the inhibition rate were 100% and 82.35% respectively, even cultivated S9 for three days in advance. And their inhibition indexes were both reached class I. The inhibition index and inhibition rate of K1 was respectively 46.36% and class IV. The Trichoderma spp. could cause S9 mycelium to appear some phenomenon just like fracture, constriction reduced, digestion, etc. which were observed under the microscope. Trichoderma harsianum and Trichoderma viride showed the further develop prospects in the fight against soil-borne disease on Chinese herbal medicines.

  2. Mutualism and Antagonism: Ecological Interactions Among Bark Beetles, Mite and Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.D. Klepzig; J.C. Moser; M.J. Lombardero; M.P. Ayres; R.W. Hofstetter; C.J. Walkinshaw

    2001-01-01

    Insect-fungal complexes provide challenging and fascinating systems for the study of biotic interactions between plants. plant pathogens, insect vectors and other associated organisms. The types of interactions among these organisms (mutualism. antagonism. parasitism. phoresy. etc.) are as variable as the range of organisms involved (plants, fungi, insects. mites. etc...

  3. FoxO3A promotes metabolic adaptation to hypoxia by antagonizing Myc function

    OpenAIRE

    Jensen, Kim Steen; Binderup, Tina; Jensen, Klaus Thorleif; Therkelsen, Ib; Borup, Rehannah; Nilsson, Elise; Multhaupt, Hinke; Bouchard, Caroline; Quistorff, Bjørn; Kjær, Andreas; Landberg, Göran; Staller, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This paper characterizes FoxO3A as required for hypoxic suppression of mitochondrial mass, oxygen consumption, and ROS production. Mechanistically, FoxO3A is shown to promote hypoxic cell survival by directly antagonizing c-Myc at nuclear encoded mitochondrial genes.

  4. Isolation, Characterization and Identification of Environmental Bacterial Isolates with Screening for Antagonism Against Three Bacterial Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    ISOLATES WITH SCREENING FOR ANTAGONISM AGAINST THREE BACTERIAL TARGETS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...Identification of environmental isolates followed the flowchart from “Bergey’s Manual of Determinative Bacteriology” (Holt et al. 1994), which

  5. Vitamin D Is a Multilevel Repressor of Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling in Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larriba, María Jesús; González-Sancho, José Manuel; Barbáchano, Antonio; Niell, Núria; Ferrer-Mayorga, Gemma; Muñoz, Alberto, E-mail: amunoz@iib.uam.es [Instituto de Investigaciones Biomédicas “Alberto Sols”, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Arturo Duperier 4, Madrid 28029 (Spain)

    2013-10-21

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is abnormally activated in most colorectal cancers and in a proportion of other neoplasias. This activation initiates or contributes to carcinogenesis by regulating the expression of a large number of genes in tumor cells. The active vitamin D metabolite 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3}) inhibits Wnt/β-catenin signaling by several mechanisms at different points along the pathway. Additionally, paracrine actions of 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} on stromal cells may also repress this pathway in neighbouring tumor cells. Here we review the molecular basis for the various mechanisms by which 1,25(OH){sub 2}D{sub 3} antagonizes Wnt/β-catenin signaling, preferentially in human colon carcinoma cells, and the consequences of this inhibition for the phenotype and proliferation rate. The effect of the vitamin D system on Wnt/β-catenin signaling and tumor growth in animal models will also be commented in detail. Finally, we revise existing data on the relation between vitamin D receptor expression and vitamin D status and the expression of Wnt/β-catenin pathway genes and targets in cancer patients.

  6. NF-Y recruits both transcription activator and repressor to modulate tissue- and developmental stage-specific expression of human γ-globin gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingguo Zhu

    Full Text Available The human embryonic, fetal and adult β-like globin genes provide a paradigm for tissue- and developmental stage-specific gene regulation. The fetal γ-globin gene is expressed in fetal erythroid cells but is repressed in adult erythroid cells. The molecular mechanism underlying this transcriptional switch during erythroid development is not completely understood. Here, we used a combination of in vitro and in vivo assays to dissect the molecular assemblies of the active and the repressed proximal γ-globin promoter complexes in K562 human erythroleukemia cell line and primary human fetal and adult erythroid cells. We found that the proximal γ-globin promoter complex is assembled by a developmentally regulated, general transcription activator NF-Y bound strongly at the tandem CCAAT motifs near the TATA box. NF-Y recruits to neighboring DNA motifs the developmentally regulated, erythroid transcription activator GATA-2 and general repressor BCL11A, which in turn recruit erythroid repressor GATA-1 and general repressor COUP-TFII to form respectively the NF-Y/GATA-2 transcription activator hub and the BCL11A/COUP-TFII/GATA-1 transcription repressor hub. Both the activator and the repressor hubs are present in both the active and the repressed γ-globin promoter complexes in fetal and adult erythroid cells. Through changes in their levels and respective interactions with the co-activators and co-repressors during erythroid development, the activator and the repressor hubs modulate erythroid- and developmental stage-specific transcription of γ-globin gene.

  7. Complex Binding of the FabR Repressor of Bacterial Unsaturated Fatty Acid Biosynthesis to its Cognate Promoters

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Youjun; Cronan, John E.

    2011-01-01

    Two transcriptional regulators, the FadR activator and the FabR repressor control biosynthesis of unsaturated fatty acids in Escherichia coli. FabR represses expression of the two genes, fabA and fabB, required for unsaturated fatty acid synthesis and has been reported to require the presence of an unsaturated thioester (of either acyl carrier protein or CoA) in order to bind the fabA and fabB promoters in vitro. We report in vivo experiments in which unsaturated fatty acid synthesis was bloc...

  8. An Autocrine Proliferation Repressor Regulates Dictyostelium discoideum Proliferation and Chemorepulsion Using the G Protein-Coupled Receptor GrlH

    OpenAIRE

    Yu Tang; Yuantai Wu; Sarah E. Herlihy; Francisco J. Brito-Aleman; Jose H. Ting; Chris Janetopoulos; Richard H. Gomer; Scott D. Emr

    2018-01-01

    In eukaryotic microbes, little is known about signals that inhibit the proliferation of the cells that secrete the signal, and little is known about signals (chemorepellents) that cause cells to move away from the source of the signal. Autocrine proliferation repressor protein A (AprA) is a protein secreted by the eukaryotic microbe Dictyostelium discoideum. AprA is a chemorepellent for and inhibits the proliferation of D. discoideum. We previously found that cells sense AprA using G proteins...

  9. Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) Conjugation Impedes Transcriptional Silencing by the Polycomb Group Repressor Sex Comb on Midleg*

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Matthew; Mallin, Daniel R.; Simon, Jeffrey A.; Courey, Albert J.

    2011-01-01

    The Drosophila protein Sex Comb on Midleg (Scm) is a member of the Polycomb group (PcG), a set of transcriptional repressors that maintain silencing of homeotic genes during development. Recent findings have identified PcG proteins both as targets for modification by the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protein and as catalytic components of the SUMO conjugation pathway. We have found that the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 binds to Scm and that this interaction, which requires the Scm C-te...

  10. Conservation of the LexA repressor binding site in Deinococcus radiodurans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Feroz

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The LexA protein is a transcriptional repressor of the bacterial SOS DNA repair system, which comprises a set of DNA repair and cellular survival genes that are induced in response to DNA damage. Its varied DNA binding motifs have been characterized and reported in the Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, rhizobia family members, marine magnetotactic bacterium, Salmonella typhimurium and recently in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and this motifs information has been used in our theoretical analysis to detect its novel regulated genes in radio-resistant Deinococcus radiodurans genome. This bacterium showed presence of SOS-box like consensus sequence in the upstream sequences of 3166 genes with >60% motif score similarity percentage (MSSP on both strands. Attempts to identify LexA-binding sites and the composition of the putative SOS regulon in D. radiodurans have been unsuccessful so far. To resolve the problem we performed theoretical analysis with modifications on reported data set of genes related to DNA repair (61 genes, stress response (145 genes and some unusual predicted operons (21 clusters. Expression of some of the predicted SOS-box regulated operon members then was examined through the previously reported microarray data which confirm the expression of only single predicted operon i.e. DRB0143 (AAA superfamily NTPase related to 5-methylcytosine specific restriction enzyme subunit McrB and DRB0144 (homolog of the McrC subunit of the McrBC restriction modification system. The methodology involved weight matrix construction through CONSENSUS algorithm using information of conserved upstream sequences of eight known genes including dinB, tagC, lexA, recA, uvrB, yneA of B. subtilis while lexA and recA of D. radiodurans through phylogenetic footprinting method and later detection of similar conserved SOS-box like LexA binding motifs through both RSAT & PoSSuMsearch programs. The resultant DNA consensus sequence had highly conserved 14 bp SOS

  11. BTG2 is an LXXLL-dependent co-repressor for androgen receptor transcriptional activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Xu-Dong [School of Radiation Medicine and Public Health, Medical College of Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Meng, Qing-Hui [Department of Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057 (United States); Xu, Jia-Ying; Jiao, Yang [School of Radiation Medicine and Public Health, Medical College of Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Ge, Chun-Min [Department of Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057 (United States); Jacob, Asha; Wang, Ping [North Shore University Hospital-Long Island Jewish Medical Center and The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research, Manhasset, NY 11030 (United States); Rosen, Eliot M [Department of Oncology, Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC 20057 (United States); Fan, Saijun, E-mail: sjfan@suda.edu.cn [School of Radiation Medicine and Public Health, Medical College of Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2011-01-28

    Research highlights: {yields} BTG2 associates with AR, androgen causes an increase of the interaction. {yields} BTG2 as a co-repressor inhibits the AR-mediated transcription activity. {yields} BTG2 inhibits the transcription activity and expression of PSA. {yields} An intact {sup 92}LxxLL{sup 96} motif is essential and necessary for these activities of BTG2, while the {sup 20}LxxLL{sup 24} motif is not required. {yields} Ectopic expression of BTG2 reduces proliferation of prostate cancer cells. -- Abstract: The tumor suppressor gene, BTG2 has been down-regulated in prostate cancer and the ectopic expression of this gene has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth. Sequence analysis revealed that the BTG2 protein contains two leucine-rich motifs ({sup 20}LxxLL{sup 24} and {sup 92}LxxLL{sup 96}), which are usually found in nuclear receptor co-factors. Based on this, we postulated that there will be an association between BTG2 and AR. In this study, we discovered that BTG2 directly bound to the androgen receptor (AR) in the absence of 5{alpha}-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and in the presence of the androgen, this interaction was increased. BTG2 bearing the mutant {sup 20}LxxLL{sup 24} motif bound to AR equally efficient as the wild-type BTG2, while BTG2 bearing the mutant {sup 92}LxxLL{sup 96} motif failed to interact with AR. Functional studies indicated that ectopic expression of BTG2 caused a significant inhibition of AR-mediated transcriptional activity and a decreased growth of prostate cancer cells. Androgen-induced promoter activation and expression of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) are significantly attenuated by BTG2. The intact {sup 92}LxxLL{sup 96} motif is required for these activities. These findings, for the first time, demonstrate that BTG2 complexes with AR via an LxxLL-dependent mechanism and may play a role in prostate cancer via modulating the AR signaling pathway.

  12. Elk-3 is a transcriptional repressor of nitric-oxide synthase 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Hsu; Layne, Matthew D; Chung, Su Wol; Ejima, Kuniaki; Baron, Rebecca M; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Perrella, Mark A

    2003-10-10

    The inducible isoform of nitric-oxide synthase (NOS2), a key enzyme catalyzing the dramatic increase in nitric oxide by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), plays an important role in the pathophysiology of endotoxemia and sepsis. Recent evidence suggests that Ets transcription factors may contribute to NOS2 induction by inflammatory stimuli. In this study, we investigated the role of Ets transcription factors in the regulation of NOS2 by LPS and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1. Transient transfection assays in macrophages showed that Ets-2 produced an increase in NOS2 promoter activity, whereas the induction by Ets-1 was modest and NERF2 had no effect. Elk-3 (Net/Erp/Sap-2a) markedly repressed NOS2 promoter activity in a dose-dependent fashion, and overexpression of Elk-3 blunted the induction of endogenous NOS2 message. Mutation of the Net inhibitory domain of Elk-3, but not the C-terminal-binding protein interaction domain, partially alleviated this repressive effect. We also found that deletion of the Ets domain of Elk-3 completely abolished its repressive effect on the NOS2 promoter. LPS administration to macrophages led to a dose-dependent decrease in endogenous Elk-3 mRNA levels, and this decrease in Elk-3 preceded the induction of NOS2 mRNA. In a mouse model of endotoxemia, the expression of Elk-3 in kidney, lung, and heart was significantly down-regulated after systemic administration of LPS, and this down-regulation also preceded NOS2 induction. Moreover, TGF-beta 1 significantly increased endogenous Elk-3 mRNA levels that had been down-regulated by LPS in macrophages. This increase in Elk-3 correlated with a TGF-beta 1-induced down-regulation of NOS2. Taken together, our data suggest that Elk-3 is a strong repressor of NOS2 promoter activity and mRNA levels and that endogenous expression of Elk-3 inversely correlates with NOS2. Thus, Elk-3 may serve as an important mediator of NOS2 gene expression.

  13. Transcriptional repressor role of PocR on the 1,3-propanediol biosynthetic pathway by Lactobacillus panis PM1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Tae Sun; Korber, Darren R; Tanaka, Takuji

    2014-06-01

    The regulatory role of a transcriptional regulator (PocR) in the 1,3-propanediol biosynthetic pathway of Lactobacillus panis PM1 contributes to the optimization of 1,3-propanediol production by this strain, which potentially will lead to 1,3-propanediol manufacturing efficiencies. Lactobacillus panis PM1 can utilize a 1,3-propanediol (1,3-PDO) biosynthetic pathway, consisting of diol dehydratase (PduCDE) and 1,3-PDO dehydrogenase, as a NADH recycling system, to survive under various environmental conditions. In this study, we identified a key transcriptional repressor (PocR) which was annotated as a transcriptional factor of AraC family as part of the 1,3-PDO biosynthetic pathway of L. panis PM1. The over-expression of the PocR gene resulted in the significant repression (81 %) of pduC (PduCDE large subunit) transcription, and subsequently, the decreased activity of PduCDE by 22 %. As a result of the regulation of PduCDE, production of both 3-hydroxypropionaldehyde and 1,3-PDO in the PocR over-expressing strain were significantly decreased by 40 % relative to the control strain. These results clearly demonstrate the transcriptional repressor role of PocR in the 1,3-PDO biosynthetic pathway.

  14. Structural and dynamics studies of a truncated variant of CI repressor from bacteriophage TP901-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Kim Krighaar; Frandsen, Kristian E. H.; Erba, Elisabetta Boeri

    2016-01-01

    The CI repressor from the temperate bacteriophage TP901-1 consists of two folded domains, an N-terminal helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain (NTD) and a C-terminal oligomerization domain (CTD), which we here suggest to be further divided into CTD1 and CTD2. Full-length CI is a hexameric protein......, whereas a truncated version, CIΔ58, forms dimers. We identify the dimerization region of CIΔ58 as CTD1 and determine its secondary structure to be helical both within the context of CIΔ58 and in isolation. To our knowledge this is the first time that a helical dimerization domain has been found in a phage...... repressor. We also precisely determine the length of the flexible linker connecting the NTD to the CTD. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays and native mass spectrometry, we show that CIΔ58 interacts with the O-L operator site as one dimer bound to both half-sites, and with much higher affinity than...

  15. Structure of the effector-binding domain of the arabinose repressor AraR from Bacillus subtilis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Procházková, Kateřina; Čermáková, Kateřina [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Flemingovo nam. 2, Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Pachl, Petr; Sieglová, Irena [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Flemingovo nam. 2, Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Videnska 1083, Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Fábry, Milan [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Videnska 1083, Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Otwinowski, Zbyszek [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Řezáčová, Pavlína, E-mail: rezacova@uochb.cas.cz [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Flemingovo nam. 2, Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Videnska 1083, Prague 4 (Czech Republic)

    2012-02-01

    The crystal structure of the effector-binding domain of the transcriptional repressor AraR from B. subtilis in complex with the effector molecule (l-arabinose) was determined at 2.2 Å resolution. A detailed analysis of the crystal identified a dimer organization that is distinctive from that of other members of the GalR/LacI family. In Bacillus subtilis, the arabinose repressor AraR negatively controls the expression of genes in the metabolic pathway of arabinose-containing polysaccharides. The protein is composed of two domains of different phylogenetic origin and function: an N-terminal DNA-binding domain belonging to the GntR family and a C-terminal effector-binding domain that shows similarity to members of the GalR/LacI family. The crystal structure of the C-terminal effector-binding domain of AraR in complex with the effector l-arabinose has been determined at 2.2 Å resolution. The l-arabinose binding affinity was characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry and differential scanning fluorimetry; the K{sub d} value was 8.4 ± 0.4 µM. The effect of l-arabinose on the protein oligomeric state was investigated in solution and detailed analysis of the crystal identified a dimer organization which is distinctive from that of other members of the GalR/LacI family.

  16. O-GlcNAcylation of master growth repressor DELLA by SECRET AGENT modulates multiple signaling pathways in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentella, Rodolfo; Hu, Jianhong; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Matsumoto, Peter A; Dawdy, Andrew; Barnhill, Benjamin; Oldenhof, Harriëtte; Hartweck, Lynn M; Maitra, Sushmit; Thomas, Stephen G; Cockrell, Shelley; Boyce, Michael; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F; Olszewski, Neil E; Sun, Tai-Ping

    2016-01-15

    The DELLA family of transcription regulators functions as master growth repressors in plants by inhibiting phytohormone gibberellin (GA) signaling in response to developmental and environmental cues. DELLAs also play a central role in mediating cross-talk between GA and other signaling pathways via antagonistic direct interactions with key transcription factors. However, how these crucial protein-protein interactions can be dynamically regulated during plant development remains unclear. Here, we show that DELLAs are modified by the O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) transferase (OGT) SECRET AGENT (SEC) in Arabidopsis. O-GlcNAcylation of the DELLA protein REPRESSOR OF ga1-3 (RGA) inhibits RGA binding to four of its interactors-PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR3 (PIF3), PIF4, JASMONATE-ZIM DOMAIN1, and BRASSINAZOLE-RESISTANT1 (BZR1)-that are key regulators in light, jasmonate, and brassinosteroid signaling pathways, respectively. Consistent with this, the sec-null mutant displayed reduced responses to GA and brassinosteroid and showed decreased expression of several common target genes of DELLAs, BZR1, and PIFs. Our results reveal a direct role of OGT in repressing DELLA activity and indicate that O-GlcNAcylation of DELLAs provides a fine-tuning mechanism in coordinating multiple signaling activities during plant development. © 2016 Zentella et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  17. Transcriptional repressor domain of MBD1 is intrinsically disordered and interacts with its binding partners in a selective manner.

    KAUST Repository

    Hameed, Umar Farook Shahul

    2014-05-09

    Methylation of DNA CpG sites is a major mechanism of epigenetic gene silencing and plays important roles in cell division, development and carcinogenesis. One of its regulators is the 64-residue C-terminal Transcriptional Repressor Domain (the TRD) of MBD1, which recruits several repressor proteins such as MCAF1, HDAC3 and MPG that are essential for the gene silencing. Using NMR spectroscopy, we have characterized the solution structure of the C-terminus of MBD1 (MBD1-c, residues D507 to Q605), which included the TRD (A529 to P592). Surprisingly, the MBD1-c is intrinsically disordered. Despite its lack of a tertiary folding, MBD1-c could still bind to different partner proteins in a selective manner. MPG and MCAF1Δ8 showed binding to both the N-terminal and C-terminal residues of MBD1-c but HDAC3 preferably bound to the C-terminal region. This study reveals how MBD1-c discriminates different binding partners, and thus, expands our understanding of the mechanisms of gene regulation by MBD1.

  18. The CsoR-like sulfurtransferase repressor (CstR) is a persulfide sensor in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebke, Justin L; Shen, Jiangchuan; Bruce, Kevin E; Kehl-Fie, Thomas E; Peng, Hui; Skaar, Eric P; Giedroc, David P

    2014-12-01

    How cells regulate the bioavailability of utilizable sulfur while mitigating the effects of hydrogen sulfide toxicity is poorly understood. CstR [Copper-sensing operon repressor (CsoR)-like sulfurtransferase repressor] represses the expression of the cst operon encoding a putative sulfide oxidation system in Staphylococcus aureus. Here, we show that the cst operon is strongly and transiently induced by cellular sulfide stress in an acute phase and specific response and that cst-encoded genes are necessary to mitigate the effects of sulfide toxicity. Growth defects are most pronounced when S. aureus is cultured in chemically defined media with thiosulfate (TS) as a sole sulfur source, but are also apparent when cystine is used or in rich media. Under TS growth conditions, cells fail to grow as a result of either unregulated expression of the cst operon in a ΔcstR strain or transformation with a non-inducible C31A/C60A CstR that blocks cst induction. This suggests that the cst operon contributes to cellular sulfide homeostasis. Tandem high-resolution mass spectrometry reveals derivatization of CstR by both inorganic tetrasulfide and an organic persulfide, glutathione persulfide, to yield a mixture of Cys31-Cys60' interprotomer cross-links, including di-, tri- and tetrasulfide bonds, which allosterically inhibit cst operator DNA binding by CstR. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. E-cadherin is transcriptionally activated via suppression of ZEB1 transcriptional repressor by small RNA-mediated gene silencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minami Mazda

    Full Text Available RNA activation has been reported to be induced by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs that act on the promoters of several genes containing E-cadherin. In this study, we present an alternative mechanism of E-cadherin activation in human PC-3 cells by siRNAs previously reported to possess perfect-complementary sequences to E-cadherin promoter. We found that activation of E-cadherin can be also induced via suppression of ZEB1, which is a transcriptional repressor of E-cadherin, by seed-dependent silencing mechanism of these siRNAs. The functional seed-complementary sites of the siRNAs were found in the coding region in addition to the 3' untranslated region of ZEB1 mRNA. Promoter analyses indicated that E-boxes, which are ZEB1-binding sites, in the upstream promoter region are indispensable for E-cadherin transcription by the siRNAs. Thus, the results caution against ignoring siRNA seed-dependent silencing effects in genome-wide transcriptional regulation. In addition, members of miR-302/372/373/520 family, which have the same seed sequences with one of the siRNAs containing perfect-complementarity to E-cadherin promoter, are also found to activate E-cadherin transcription. Thus, E-cadherin could be upregulated by the suppression of ZEB1 transcriptional repressor by miRNAs in vivo.

  20. Silencing the Transcriptional Repressor, ZCT1, Illustrates the Tight Regulation of Terpenoid Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus Hairy Roots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noreen F Rizvi

    Full Text Available The Catharanthus roseus plant is the source of many valuable terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs, including the anticancer compounds vinblastine and vincristine. Transcription factors (TFs are promising metabolic engineering targets due to their ability to regulate multiple biosynthetic pathway genes. To increase TIA biosynthesis, we elicited the TIA transcriptional activators (ORCAs and other unidentified TFs with the plant hormone, methyl jasmonate (MJ, while simultaneously silencing the expression of the transcriptional repressor ZCT1. To silence ZCT1, we developed transgenic hairy root cultures of C. roseus that expressed an estrogen-inducible Zct1 hairpin for activating RNA interference. The presence of 17β-estradiol (5μM effectively depleted Zct1 in hairy root cultures elicited with MJ dosages that either optimize or inhibit TIA production (250 or 1000μM. However, silencing Zct1 was not sufficient to increase TIA production or the expression of the TIA biosynthetic genes (G10h, Tdc, and Str, illustrating the tight regulation of TIA biosynthesis. The repression of the TIA biosynthetic genes at the inhibitory MJ dosage does not appear to be solely regulated by ZCT1. For instance, while Zct1 and Zct2 levels decreased through activating the Zct1 hairpin, Zct3 levels remained elevated. Since ZCT repressors have redundant yet distinct functions, silencing all three ZCTs may be necessary to relieve their repression of alkaloid biosynthesis.

  1. Inducible cAMP early repressor acts as a negative regulator for kindling epileptogenesis and long-term fear memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Nobuhiko; Borlikova, Gilyana; Sakamoto, Toshiro; Yamada, Kazuyuki; Ikeda, Toshio; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Niki, Hiroaki; Endo, Shogo

    2008-06-18

    Long-lasting neuronal plasticity as well as long-term memory (LTM) requires de novo synthesis of proteins through dynamic regulation of gene expression. cAMP-responsive element (CRE)-mediated gene transcription occurs in an activity-dependent manner and plays a pivotal role in neuronal plasticity and LTM in a variety of species. To study the physiological role of inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER), a CRE-mediated gene transcription repressor, in neuronal plasticity and LTM, we generated two types of ICER mutant mice: ICER-overexpressing (OE) mice and ICER-specific knock-out (KO) mice. Both ICER-OE and ICER-KO mice show no apparent abnormalities in their development and reproduction. A comprehensive battery of behavioral tests revealed no robust changes in locomotor activity, sensory and motor functions, and emotional responses in the mutant mice. However, long-term conditioned fear memory was attenuated in ICER-OE mice and enhanced in ICER-KO mice without concurrent changes in short-term fear memory. Furthermore, ICER-OE mice exhibited retardation of kindling development, whereas ICER-KO mice exhibited acceleration of kindling. These results strongly suggest that ICER negatively regulates the neuronal processes required for long-term fear memory and neuronal plasticity underlying kindling epileptogenesis, possibly through suppression of CRE-mediated gene transcription.

  2. A chimeric repressor of petunia PH4 R2R3-MYB family transcription factor generates margined flowers in torenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasajima, Ichiro; Sasaki, Katsutomo

    2016-05-03

    The development of new phenotypes is key to the commercial development of the main floricultural species and cultivars. Important new phenotypes include features such as multiple-flowers, color variations, increased flower size, new petal shapes, variegation and distinctive petal margin colourations. Although their commercial use is not yet common, the transgenic technologies provide a potentially rapid means of generating interesting new phenotypes. In this report, we construct 5 vectors which we expected to change the color of the flower anthocyanins, from purple to blue, regulating vacuolar pH. When these constructs were transformed into purple torenia, we unexpectedly recovered some genotypes having slightly margined petals. These transgenic lines expressed a chimeric repressor of the petunia PhPH4 gene under the control of Cauliflower mosaic virus 35 S RNA promoter. PhPH4 is an R2R3-type MYB transcription factor. The transgenic lines lacked pigmentation in the petal margin cells both on the adaxial and abaxial surfaces. Expressions of Flavanone 3-hydroxylase (F3H), Flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H) and Flavonoid 3'5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H) genes were reduced in the margins of these transgenic lines, suggesting an inhibitory effect of PhPH4 repressor on anthocyanin synthesis.

  3. Transcriptional repressor domain of MBD1 is intrinsically disordered and interacts with its binding partners in a selective manner.

    KAUST Repository

    Hameed, Umar Farook Shahul; Lim, Jackwee; Zhang, Qian; Wasik, Mariusz A; Yang, Daiwen; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam

    2014-01-01

    Methylation of DNA CpG sites is a major mechanism of epigenetic gene silencing and plays important roles in cell division, development and carcinogenesis. One of its regulators is the 64-residue C-terminal Transcriptional Repressor Domain (the TRD) of MBD1, which recruits several repressor proteins such as MCAF1, HDAC3 and MPG that are essential for the gene silencing. Using NMR spectroscopy, we have characterized the solution structure of the C-terminus of MBD1 (MBD1-c, residues D507 to Q605), which included the TRD (A529 to P592). Surprisingly, the MBD1-c is intrinsically disordered. Despite its lack of a tertiary folding, MBD1-c could still bind to different partner proteins in a selective manner. MPG and MCAF1Δ8 showed binding to both the N-terminal and C-terminal residues of MBD1-c but HDAC3 preferably bound to the C-terminal region. This study reveals how MBD1-c discriminates different binding partners, and thus, expands our understanding of the mechanisms of gene regulation by MBD1.

  4. Does gestrinone antagonize the effects of estrogen on endometrial implants upon the peritoneum of rats?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia Rodrigues Lobo

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effects of estrogen treatment in combination with gestrinone on an experimental rat model of endometriosis. METHODS: Uterine transplants were attached to the peritoneum of female Wistar rats via a surgical autotransplantation technique. The implanted area was measured during the proestrus phase and after hormonal treatment. We performed morphometric analysis and examined the macroscopic and morphometric alterations of endometrial implants after hormonal treatment in ovariectomized rats. RESULTS: The high dose of estrogen caused macroscopic increases in the endometrial implant group compared with other groups, which were similar to increases in the proestrus phase. The low dose showed morphometric development of implants, such as an increase in number of endometrial glands, leukocyte infiltration and mitosis. Gestrinone antagonized both doses of estrogen. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that gestrinone antagonizes estrogen's effects on rat peritoneal endometrial implants.

  5. Complement C5a receptor antagonism by protamine and poly-L-Arg on human leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, U B; Selmer, J; Kahl, J U

    1988-01-01

    It is shown that protamine selectively and dose-dependently inhibits complement C5a-induced leukocyte responses such as histamine release from basophils, chemiluminescence and beta-glucuronidase release from neutrophils. Protamine produces parallel rightward displacements of the C5a dose-response curves. The inhibitory capacity of the polypeptide is reversible and disappears following repeated washing of exposed cells. In neutrophils poly-L-Arg similarly and specifically antagonizes C5a-induced chemiluminescence and enzyme release. This polymer alone, however, degranulates basophils and neutrophils, leading to histamine and enzyme release, respectively. It is concluded that on human neutrophils the arginine-rich polycations protamine and poly-L-Arg exhibit a competitive C5a receptor antagonism. In addition, protamine inhibits the C5a receptors on basophils. It is hypothesized that molecular conformations of the arginine-rich polycations might bind reversibly to, and block negatively charged groups at the C5a-receptor sites.

  6. [Antagonism in vitro among phytopathogenic and saprobic fungi from horticultural soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alippi, H E; Monaco, C

    1990-01-01

    Two methods were tested in order to determine the existence of in vitro antagonism among saprobic and pathogenic fungi. These microorganisms were the most common isolates from horticultural soils of La Plata (Buenos Aires). Trichoderma harzianum; T. koningii and Penicillium sp. were antagonistic to all the pathogenic fungi tested, Fusarium solani; F. oxysporum; Alternaria solani; Colletotrichum sp. and Sclerotium rolfsii Spicaria sp., Paecilomyces sp. and Chaetomiun sp. were antagonistic only to Colletotrichum sp. and Fusarium solani.

  7. Evaluation of the antagonism of nicotine by mecamylamine and pempidine in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.J.

    1989-01-01

    Antagonists have been crucial in the characterization of nicotine's pharmacology. Initial evidence for the existence of central nicotinic receptors was based on the fact that nicotine produced a number of behavioral effects that were antagonized by ganglionic blockers that crossed the blood-brain barrier, such as mecamylamine and pempidine. These compounds are thought to be noncompetitive antagonists due to the fact that they do not compete for agonist binding to brain homogenate in vitro. However, pharmacological evidence in support of noncompetitive antagonism is lacking. Dose-response curves for nicotine were determined in the presence of various doses of pempidine for depression of spontaneous activity and antinociception in mice. Pempidine was found to shift the dose response curves for these effects of nicotine in a manner consistent with noncompetitive antagonism. A number of mecamylamine analogs were investigated for antagonism of these central effects of nicotine as well. These studies revealed that the N-, 2-, and 3-methyls were crucial for optimal efficacy and potency and suggests that these compounds possess a specific mechanism of action, possibly involving a receptor. Furthermore, the structure-activity relationships for the mecamylamine analogs were found to be different than that previously reported for the agonists, suggesting that they do not act at the same site. The binding of [ 3 H]-L-nicotine and [ 3 H]-pempidine was studied in vitro to mouse brain homogentate and in situ to rat brain slices. The in situ binding of [ 3 H]-L-nicotine to rat brain slices was quantitated autoradiographically to discrete brain areas in the presence and absence of 1, 10 and 100 μM nicotine and pempidine. Pempidine did not effectively displace [ 3 H]-L-nicotine binding

  8. In vitro antagonism of Trichoderma harzianum Rifai against Mycosphaerella fijiensis Morelet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Acosta-Suárez

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro antagonism of Trichoderma harzianum against Mycosphaerella fijiensis, foliar pathogen of banana and plantain, was evaluated. The assays were performed using the dual culture method. Competition for space and nutrients, the antagonistic capacity and forms and intensity of antagonism were determined considering the invasion of the surface of the colony, colonization and sporulation of T. harzianum on M. fijiensis after seven days of inoculation. Finally, the effect of volatile metabolites of T. harzianum was evaluated. The results showed in vitro antagonism of T. harzianum against M. fijiensis by competition for space and nutrients of the culture medium. Trichoderma grew over the pathogen colony with hyperparasitism and high intensity. Also, it completely covered the surface of the culture medium. T. harzianum not inhibited the growth of M. fijiensis by volatile metabolites. Damage was observed in the integrity of the cell wall of M. fijiensis hyphae and the cell content exit. The use of antagonistic fungi, could contribute to the design of strategies for integrated management of this disease. Key words: banana and plantain, biocontrol, mechanisms of action

  9. Arctigenin antagonizes mineralocorticoid receptor to inhibit the transcription of Na/K-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ye; Zhou, Meili; Wang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the most important risk factors in cardiovascular disease and is the most common chronic disease. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists have been successfully used in clinic for the treatment of hypertension. Our study aims to investigate whether Arctigenin can antagonize MR and inhibit the transcription of Na/K-ATPase. The yeast two-hybrid assay was used to screen natural products and Arctigenin was identified as an MR antagonist. The direct binding of Arctigenin to MR was determined using assays based on surface plasmon resonance, differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence quenching. Furthermore, results from mammalian one-hybrid and transcriptional activation experiments also confirmed that Arctigenin can potently antagonize MR in cells. We demonstrated that Arctigenin can decrease the level of Na/K-ATPase mRNA by antagonizing MR in HK-2 cells. Our findings show that Arctigenin can effectively decrease Na/K-ATPase transcription; thus highlight its potential as an anti-hypertensive drug lead compound. Our current findings demonstrate that Arctigenin is an antagonist of MR and effectively decreases the Na/K-ATPase 1 gene expression. Our work provides a hint for the drug discovery against cardiovascular disease.

  10. Antagonism of Sorafenib and Regorafenib actions by platelet factors in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D’Alessandro, Rosalba; Refolo, Maria G; Lippolis, Catia; Giannuzzi, Grazia; Carella, Nicola; Messa, Caterina; Cavallini, Aldo; Carr, Brian I

    2014-01-01

    Platelets are frequently altered in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. Platelet lysates (hPL) can enhance HCC cell growth and decrease apoptosis. The aims were to evaluate whether hPL can modulate the actions of Sorafenib or Regorafenib, two clinical HCC multikinase antagonists. Several human HCC cell lines were grown in the presence and absence of Sorafenib or Regorafenib, with or without hPL. Growth was measured by MTT assay, apoptosis was assessed by Annexin V and by western blot, and autophagy and MAPK growth signaling were also measured by western blot, and migration and invasion were measured by standard in vitro assays. Both Sorafenib and Regorafenib-mediated inhibition of cell growth, migration and invasion were all antagonized by hPL. Drug-mediated apoptosis and decrease in phospho-ERK levels were both blocked by hPL, which also increased anti-apoptotic phospho-STAT, Bax and Bcl-xL levels. Preliminary data, obtained with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), included in hPL, revealed that these factors were able to antagonized Sorafenib in a proliferation assay, in particular when used in combination. Platelet factors can antagonize Sorafenib or Regorafenib-mediated growth inhibition and apoptosis in HCC cells. The modulation of platelet activity or numbers has the potential to enhance multikinase drug actions

  11. [Antagonism against Beauveria bassiana by lipopeptide metabolites produced by entophyte Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain SWB16].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjie; Zhao, Dongyang; Liu, Yonggui; Ao, Xiang; Fan, Rui; Duan, Zhengqiao; Liu, Yanping; Chen, Qianqian; Jin, Zhixiong; Wan, Yongji

    2014-07-04

    We screened bacterial strains that have strong antagonism against Beauveria bassiana, an important pathogen of silkworm industry, and detected the antagonistic activity of lipopeptide metabolites. We identified bacterium SWB16 by morphological observation, physiological and biochemical experiments, 16SrRNA, and gyrA gene sequence analysis, tested antagonistic activity of strain SWB16 against Beauveria bassiana by measuring the inhibition zone diameter using filter paper diffusion method (Kirby-Bauer method), obtained lipopeptide metabolites of the strain using methanol extraction and observed the antagonism of strain SWB16 lipopeptide extracts against the conidia and hyphae of Beauveria bassiana, detected main ingredients and genes of lipopeptide metabolites by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and PCR amplification. SWB16 isolated from tissue of plant Dioscorea zingiberensis C. H. Wright belongs to Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and showed high antagonistic activity to Beauveria bassiana, and the lipopeptide extracts of isolate SWB16 exhibited significant inhibition to conidial germination and mycelial growth of Beauveria bassiana. The result of mass spectrometric detection indicated main component of the lipopeptide metabolites were fengcin and iturin, and genes fenB, ituA involved in the synthesis of them were amplified in the genome. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain SWB16 could produce lipopeptide antibiotics with strong antagonism to the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana, and the results suggested that strain SWB16 has potential application value for controlling white muscardine of economic insects including silkworm.

  12. Haploinsufficiency of MeCP2-interacting transcriptional co-repressor SIN3A causes mild intellectual disability by affecting the development of cortical integrity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, Josefine S.; Willemsen, Marjolein H.; Dombroski, Thais C. D.; van Bakel, Nick H. M.; Nillesen, Willy M.; van Hulten, Josephus A.; Jansen, Eric J. R.; Verkaik, Dave; Veenstra-Knol, Hermine E.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M. A.; Wassink-Ruiter, Jolien S. Klein; Vincent, Marie; David, Albert; Le Caignec, Cedric; Schieving, Jolanda; Gilissen, Christian; Foulds, Nicola; Rump, Patrick; Strom, Tim; Cremer, Kirsten; Zink, Alexander M.; Engels, Hartmut; de Munnik, Sonja A.; Visser, Jasper E.; Brunner, Han G.; Martens, Gerard J. M.; Pfundt, Rolph; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Kolk, Sharon M.

    Numerous genes are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders such as intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder ( ASD), but their dysfunction is often poorly characterized. Here we identified dominant mutations in the gene encoding the transcriptional repressor and MeCP2 interactor

  13. Haploinsufficiency of MeCP2-interacting transcriptional co-repressor SIN3A causes mild intellectual disability by affecting the development of cortical integrity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witteveen, J.S.; Willemsen, M.H.; Dombroski, T.C.; Bakel, N.H. van; Nillesen, W.M.; Hulten, J.A. van; Jansen, E.J.; Verkaik, D.; Veenstra-Knol, H.E.; Ravenswaaij-Arts, C.M.A. van; Wassink-Ruiter, J.S.; Vincent, M.; David, A.; Le Caignec, C.; Schieving, J.; Gilissen, C.; Foulds, N.; Rump, P.; Strom, T.; Cremer, K.; Zink, A.M.; Engels, H.; Munnik, S.A. de; Visser, J.E.; Brunner, H.G.; Martens, G.J.; Pfundt, R.P.; Kleefstra, T.; Kolk, S.M.

    2016-01-01

    Numerous genes are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders such as intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but their dysfunction is often poorly characterized. Here we identified dominant mutations in the gene encoding the transcriptional repressor and MeCP2 interactor

  14. The basic helix-loop-helix region of the transcriptional repressor hairy and enhancer of split 1 is preorganized to bind DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popovic, Matija; Wienk, Hans; Coglievina, Maristella; Boelens, Rolf; Pongor, Sándor; Pintar, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Hairy and enhancer of split 1, one of the main downstream effectors in Notch signaling, is a transcriptional repressor of the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) family. Using nuclear magnetic resonance methods, we have determined the structure and dynamics of a recombinant protein, H1H, which includes an

  15. The Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells (Nfat) Transcription Factor Nfatp (Nfatc2) Is a Repressor of Chondrogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranger, Ann M.; Gerstenfeld, Louis C.; Wang, Jinxi; Kon, Tamiyo; Bae, Hyunsu; Gravallese, Ellen M.; Glimcher, Melvin J.; Glimcher, Laurie H.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) transcription factors regulate gene expression in lymphocytes and control cardiac valve formation. Here, we report that NFATp regulates chondrogenesis in the adult animal. In mice lacking NFATp, resident cells in the extraarticular connective tissues spontaneously differentiate to cartilage. These cartilage cells progressively differentiate and the tissue undergoes endochondral ossification, recapitulating the development of endochondral bone. Proliferation of already existing articular cartilage cells also occurs in some older animals. At both sites, neoplastic changes in the cartilage cells occur. Consistent with these data, NFATp expression is regulated in mesenchymal stem cells induced to differentiate along a chondrogenic pathway. Lack of NFATp in articular cartilage cells results in increased expression of cartilage markers, whereas overexpression of NFATp in cartilage cell lines extinguishes the cartilage phenotype. Thus, NFATp is a repressor of cartilage cell growth and differentiation and also has the properties of a tumor suppressor. PMID:10620601

  16. The general transcriptional repressor Tup1 is required for dimorphism and virulence in a fungal plant pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Elías-Villalobos

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A critical step in the life cycle of many fungal pathogens is the transition between yeast-like growth and the formation of filamentous structures, a process known as dimorphism. This morphological shift, typically triggered by multiple environmental signals, is tightly controlled by complex genetic pathways to ensure successful pathogenic development. In animal pathogenic fungi, one of the best known regulators of dimorphism is the general transcriptional repressor, Tup1. However, the role of Tup1 in fungal dimorphism is completely unknown in plant pathogens. Here we show that Tup1 plays a key role in orchestrating the yeast to hypha transition in the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis. Deletion of the tup1 gene causes a drastic reduction in the mating and filamentation capacity of the fungus, in turn leading to a reduced virulence phenotype. In U. maydis, these processes are controlled by the a and b mating-type loci, whose expression depends on the Prf1 transcription factor. Interestingly, Δtup1 strains show a critical reduction in the expression of prf1 and that of Prf1 target genes at both loci. Moreover, we observed that Tup1 appears to regulate Prf1 activity by controlling the expression of the prf1 transcriptional activators, rop1 and hap2. Additionally, we describe a putative novel prf1 repressor, named Pac2, which seems to be an important target of Tup1 in the control of dimorphism and virulence. Furthermore, we show that Tup1 is required for full pathogenic development since tup1 deletion mutants are unable to complete the sexual cycle. Our findings establish Tup1 as a key factor coordinating dimorphism in the phytopathogen U. maydis and support a conserved role for Tup1 in the control of hypha-specific genes among animal and plant fungal pathogens.

  17. Non-equilibrium repressor binding kinetics link DNA damage dose to transcriptional timing within the SOS gene network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culyba, Matthew J; Kubiak, Jeffrey M; Mo, Charlie Y; Goulian, Mark; Kohli, Rahul M

    2018-06-01

    Biochemical pathways are often genetically encoded as simple transcription regulation networks, where one transcription factor regulates the expression of multiple genes in a pathway. The relative timing of each promoter's activation and shut-off within the network can impact physiology. In the DNA damage repair pathway (known as the SOS response) of Escherichia coli, approximately 40 genes are regulated by the LexA repressor. After a DNA damaging event, LexA degradation triggers SOS gene transcription, which is temporally separated into subsets of 'early', 'middle', and 'late' genes. Although this feature plays an important role in regulating the SOS response, both the range of this separation and its underlying mechanism are not experimentally defined. Here we show that, at low doses of DNA damage, the timing of promoter activities is not separated. Instead, timing differences only emerge at higher levels of DNA damage and increase as a function of DNA damage dose. To understand mechanism, we derived a series of synthetic SOS gene promoters which vary in LexA-operator binding kinetics, but are otherwise identical, and then studied their activity over a large dose-range of DNA damage. In distinction to established models based on rapid equilibrium assumptions, the data best fit a kinetic model of repressor occupancy at promoters, where the drop in cellular LexA levels associated with higher doses of DNA damage leads to non-equilibrium binding kinetics of LexA at operators. Operators with slow LexA binding kinetics achieve their minimal occupancy state at later times than operators with fast binding kinetics, resulting in a time separation of peak promoter activity between genes. These data provide insight into this remarkable feature of the SOS pathway by demonstrating how a single transcription factor can be employed to control the relative timing of each gene's transcription as a function of stimulus dose.

  18. Expression, crystallization and preliminary diffraction studies of the Pseudomonas putida cytochrome P450cam operon repressor CamR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maenaka, Katsumi; Fukushi, Kouji; Aramaki, Hironori; Shirakihara, Yasuo

    2005-01-01

    The P. putida cytochrome P450cam operon repressor CamR has been expressed in E. coli and crystallized in space group P2 1 2 1 2. The Pseudomonas putida cam repressor (CamR) is a homodimeric protein that binds to the camO DNA operator to inhibit the transcription of the cytochrome P450cam operon camDCAB. CamR has two functional domains: a regulatory domain and a DNA-binding domain. The binding of the inducer d-camphor to the regulatory domain renders the DNA-binding domain unable to bind camO. Native CamR and its selenomethionyl derivative have been overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified. Native CamR was crystallized under the following conditions: (i) 12–14% PEG 4000, 50 mM Na PIPES, 0.1 M KCl, 1% glycerol pH 7.3 at 288 K with and without camphor and (ii) 1.6 M P i , 50 mM Na PIPES, 2 mM camphor pH 6.7 at 278 K. The selenomethionyl derivative CamR did not crystallize under either of these conditions, but did crystallize using 12.5% PEG MME 550, 25 mM Na PIPES, 2.5 mM MgCl 2 pH 7.3 at 298 K. Preliminary X-ray diffraction studies revealed the space group to be orthorhombic (P2 1 2 1 2), with unit-cell parameters a = 48.0, b = 73.3, c = 105.7 Å. Native and selenomethionyl derivative data sets were collected to 3 Å resolution at SPring-8 and the Photon Factory

  19. Sp1 is a transcription repressor to stanniocalcin-1 expression in TSA-treated human colon cancer cells, HT29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Alice Y S; Yeung, B H Y; Ching, L Y; Wong, Chris K C

    2011-08-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that, stanniocalcin-1 (STC1) was a target of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors and was involved in trichostatin A (TSA) induced apoptosis in the human colon cancer cells, HT29. In this study, we reported that the transcriptional factor, specificity protein 1 (Sp1) in association with retinoblastoma (Rb) repressed STC1 gene transcription in TSA-treated HT29 cells. Our data demonstrated that, a co-treatment of the cells with TSA and Sp1 inhibitor, mithramycin A (MTM) led to a marked synergistic induction of STC1 transcript levels, STC1 promoter (1 kb)-driven luciferase activity and an increase of apoptotic cell population. The knockdown of Sp1 gene expression in TSA treated cells, revealed the repressor role of Sp1 in STC1 transcription. Using a protein phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid (OKA), an increase of Sp1 hyperphosphorylation and so a reduction of its transcriptional activity, led to a significant induction of STC1 gene expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay revealed that Sp1 binding on STC1 proximal promoter in TSA treated cells. The binding of Sp1 to STC1 promoter was abolished by the co-treatment of MTM or OKA in TSA-treated cells. Re-ChIP assay illustrated that Sp1-mediated inhibition of STC1 transcription was associated with the recruitment of another repressor molecule, Rb. Collectively our findings identify STC1 is a downstream target of Sp1. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Genome-wide RIP-Chip analysis of translational repressor-bound mRNAs in the Plasmodium gametocyte

    KAUST Repository

    Guerreiro, Ana

    2014-11-03

    Background Following fertilization, the early proteomes of metazoans are defined by the translation of stored but repressed transcripts; further embryonic development relies on de novo transcription of the zygotic genome. During sexual development of Plasmodium berghei, a rodent model for human malaria species including P. falciparum, the stability of repressed mRNAs requires the translational repressors DOZI and CITH. When these repressors are absent, Plasmodium zygote development and transmission to the mosquito vector is halted, as hundreds of transcripts become destabilized. However, which mRNAs are direct targets of these RNA binding proteins, and thus subject to translational repression, is unknown. Results We identify the maternal mRNA contribution to post-fertilization development of P. berghei using RNA immunoprecipitation and microarray analysis. We find that 731 mRNAs, approximately 50% of the transcriptome, are associated with DOZI and CITH, allowing zygote development to proceed in the absence of RNA polymerase II transcription. Using GFP-tagging, we validate the repression phenotype of selected genes and identify mRNAs relying on the 5′ untranslated region for translational control. Gene deletion reveals a novel protein located in the ookinete crystalloid with an essential function for sporozoite development. Conclusions Our study details for the first time the P. berghei maternal repressome. This mRNA population provides the developing ookinete with coding potential for key molecules required for life-cycle progression, and that are likely to be critical for the transmission of the malaria parasite from the rodent and the human host to the mosquito vector.

  1. Alteration of light-dependent gene regulation by the absence of the RCO-1/RCM-1 repressor complex in the fungus Neurospora crassa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Ruger-Herreros

    Full Text Available The activation of transcription by light in the fungus Neurospora crassa requires the White Collar Complex (WCC, a photoreceptor and transcription factor complex. After light reception two WCCs interact and bind the promoters of light-regulated genes to activate transcription. This process is regulated by VVD, a small photoreceptor that disrupts the interaction between WCCs and leads to a reduction in transcription after long exposures to light. The N. crassa RCO-1/RCM-1 repressor complex is the homolog of the Tup1-Ssn6 repressor complex in yeast, and its absence modifies photoadaptation. We show that the absence of the RCO-1/RCM-1 repressor complex leads to several alterations in transcription that are gene-specific: an increase in the accumulation of mRNAs in the dark, a repression of transcription, and a derepression of transcription after long exposures to light. The absence of the RCO-1/RCM-1 repressor complex leads to lower VVD levels that are available for the regulation of the activity of the WCC. The reduction in the amount of VVD results in increased WCC binding to the promoters of light-regulated genes in the dark and after long exposures to light, leading to the modification of photoadaptation that has been observed in rco-1 and rcm-1 mutants. Our results show that the photoadaptation phenotype of mutants in the RCO-1/RCM-1 repressor complex is, at least in part, an indirect consequence of the reduction of vvd transcription, and the resulting modification in the regulation of transcription by the WCC.

  2. Effects of transgenic sterilization constructs and their repressor compounds on hatch, developmental rate and early survival of electroporated channel catfish embryos and fry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Baofeng; Shang, Mei; Li, Chao; Perera, Dayan A; Pinkert, Carl A; Irwin, Michael H; Peatman, Eric; Grewe, Peter; Patil, Jawahar G; Dunham, Rex A

    2015-04-01

    Channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) embryos were electroporated with sterilization constructs targeting primordial germ cell proteins or with buffer. Some embryos then were treated with repressor compounds, cadmium chloride, copper sulfate, sodium chloride or doxycycline, to prevent expression of the transgene constructs. Promoters included channel catfish nanos and vasa, salmon transferrin (TF), modified yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae copper transport protein (MCTR) and zebrafish racemase (RM). Knock-down systems were the Tet-off (nanos and vasa constructs), MCTR, RM and TF systems. Knock-down genes included shRNAi targeting 5' nanos (N1), 3' nanos (N2) or dead end (DND), or double-stranded nanos RNA (dsRNA) for overexpression of nanos mRNA. These constructs previously were demonstrated to knock down nanos, vasa and dead end, with the repressors having variable success. Exogenous DNA affected percentage hatch (% hatch), as all 14 constructs, except for the TF dsRNA, TF N1 (T), RM DND (C), vasa DND (C), vasa N1 (C) and vasa N2 (C), had lower % hatch than the control electroporated with buffer. The MCTR and RM DND (T) constructs resulted in delayed hatch, and the vasa and nanos constructs had minimal effects on time of hatch (P nanos constructs, doxycycline greatly delayed hatch (P < 0.05). Adverse effects of the transgenes and repressors continued for several treatments for the first 6 days after hatch, but only in a few treatments during the next 10 days. Repressors and gene expression impacted the yield of putative transgenic channel catfish fry, and need to be considered and accounted for in the hatchery phase of producing transgenically sterilized catfish fry and their fertile counterparts. This fry output should be considered to ensure that sufficient numbers of transgenic fish are produced for future applications and for defining repressor systems that are the most successful.

  3. Antagonism of a (+)N-allylnormetazocine stimulus by (-)PPAP and several structurally related analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennon, R A; Young, R; Herndon, J L

    1993-08-01

    Employing rats trained to discriminate 5 mg/kg of the benzomorphan opioid (+)N-allylnormetazocine [(+)NANM] from vehicle, tests of stimulus generalization and antagonism were conducted to determine the influence of several potential sigma-receptor ligands. It has been previously suggested that the (+)NANM stimulus may involve concurrent action at sigma- and phencyclidine (PCP) receptors. Although the low-affinity sigma-antagonist rimcazole was without stimulus-attenuating effect, three novel sigma-ligands--(-)PPAP, CNS 3018, and CNS 3093 (ID50 doses = 3.2, 6.7, and 4.5 mg/kg, respectively)--antagonized the (+)NANM stimulus in a dose-related fashion. The nonselective serotonergic agent 1-(3-trifluoromethyl)phenylpiperazine (TFMPP) produced partial generalization in (+)NANM-trained animals whereas buspirone, a 5-hydroxytryptamine1A (5-HT1A) agonist, attenuated (to 27% drug-appropriate responding) the (+)NANM stimulus. Because the prototypic 5-HT1A agonist 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propylamino)tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) failed to attenuate the (+)NANM stimulus at pharmacologically relevant doses, it seems unlikely that the (+)NANM stimulus involves a 5-HT1A mechanism. TFMPP and buspirone display modest affinity for sigma-receptors and this may account for the present findings with these agents. The present results neither establish a role for sigma involvement in the stimulus properties of (+)NANM nor eliminate a role for PCP receptors. They do, however, demonstrate that sigma-ligands with little to no affinity for PCP receptors are capable of antagonizing the (+)NANM stimulus.

  4. Alcohol-Induced Impairment of Balance is Antagonized by Energy Drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczinski, Cecile A; Fillmore, Mark T; Stamates, Amy L; Maloney, Sarah F

    2018-01-01

    The acute administration of alcohol reliably impairs balance and motor coordination. While it is common for consumers to ingest alcohol with other stimulant drugs (e.g., caffeine, nicotine), little is known whether prototypical alcohol-induced balance impairments are altered by stimulant drugs. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the coadministration of a high-caffeine energy drink with alcohol can antagonize expected alcohol-induced increases in body sway. Sixteen social drinkers (of equal gender) participated in 4 separate double-blind dose administration sessions that involved consumption of alcohol and energy drinks, alone and in combination. Following dose administration, participants completed automated assessments of balance stability (both eyes open and eyes closed) measured using the Biosway Portable Balance System. Participants completed several subjective measures including self-reported ratings of sedation, stimulation, fatigue, and impairment. Blood pressure and pulse rate were recorded repeatedly. The acute administration of alcohol increased body sway, and the coadministration of energy drinks antagonized this impairment. When participants closed their eyes, alcohol-induced body sway was similar whether or not energy drinks were ingested. While alcohol administration increased ratings of sedation and fatigue, energy drink administration increased ratings of stimulation and reduced ratings of fatigue. Modest increases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure following energy drink administration were also observed. Visual assessment of balance impairment is frequently used to indicate that an individual has consumed too much alcohol (e.g., as part of police-standardized field sobriety testing or by a bartender assessing when someone should no longer be served more alcohol). The current findings suggest that energy drinks can antagonize alcohol-induced increases in body sway, indicating that future work is needed to determine whether this

  5. Design of the Magnetic Resonance Imaging Evaluation of Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonism in Diabetic Atherosclerosis (MAGMA) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, Sanjay; Alaiti, M Amer; Broadwater, Kylene; Goud, Aditya; Gaztanaga, Juan; Connelly, Kim; Fares, Anas; Shirazian, Shayan; Kreatsoulas, Catherine; Farkouh, Michael; Dobre, Mirela; Fink, Jeffrey C; Weir, Matthew R

    2017-09-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) activation plays an essential role in promoting inflammation, fibrosis, and target organ damage. Currently, no studies are investigating MR antagonism in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) with chronic kidney disease, at high risk for cardiovascular complications, who are otherwise not candidates for MR antagonism by virtue of heart failure. Further, there is limited information on candidate therapies that may demonstrate differential benefit from this therapy. We hypothesized that MR antagonism may provide additional protection from atherosclerosis progression in higher-risk patients who otherwise may not be candidates for such a therapeutic approach. In this double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, subjects with T2DM with chronic kidney disease (≥ stage 3) will be randomized in a 1:1 manner to placebo or spironolactone (12.5 mg with eventual escalation to 25 mg daily over a 4-week period). The co-primary efficacy endpoint will be percentage change in total atheroma volume in thoracic aorta and left ventricular mass at 52 weeks in patients treated with spironolactone vs placebo. Secondary outcomes include 24-hour mean systolic blood pressure, central aortic blood pressure, and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) at 6 weeks. A novel measure in the study will be changes in candidate miRNAs that regulate expression of NR3C2 (MR gene) as well as measuring monocyte/macrophage polarization in response to therapy with spironolactone. We envision that our strategy of simultaneously probing the effects of a drug combined with analysis of mechanisms of action and predictive response will likely provide key information with which to design event-based trials. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Bacterial Seed Endophytes of Domesticated Cucurbits Antagonize Fungal and Oomycete Pathogens Including Powdery Mildew

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Eman M.; Raizada, Manish N.

    2018-01-01

    The cucurbit vegetables, including cucumbers, melons and pumpkins, have been cultivated for thousands of years without fungicides. However, their seed germination stage is prone to be infected by soil-borne fungal and oomycete pathogens. Endophytes are symbionts that reside inside plant tissues including seeds. Seed endophytes are founders of the juvenile plant microbiome and can promote host defense at seed germination and later stages. We previously isolated 169 bacterial endophytes associated with seeds of diverse cultivated cucurbits. We hypothesized that these endophytes can antagonize major fungal and oomycete pathogens. Here we tested the endophytes for in vitro antagonism (dual culture assays) against important soil-borne pathogens (Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium graminearum, Phytophthora capsici, Pythium aphanideratum). The endophytes were also assayed in planta (leaf disk and detached leaf bioassays) for antagonism against a foliar pathogen of global importance, Podosphaera fuliginea, the causative agent of cucurbit powdery mildew. The endophytes were further tested in vitro for secretion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) known to induce plant defense. Extracellular ribonuclease activity was also tested, as a subset of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins of plant hosts implicated in suppression of fungal pathogens, displays ribonuclease activity. An unexpected majority of the endophytes (70%, 118/169) exhibited antagonism to the five phytopathogens, of which 68% (50/73) of in vitro antagonists belong to the genera Bacillus and Paenibacillus. All Lactococcus and Pantoea endophytes exhibited anti-oomycete activity. However, amongst the most effective inoculants against Podosphaera fuliginea were Pediococcus and Pantoea endophytes. Interestingly, 67% (113/169) of endophytes emitted host defense inducing VOCs (acetoin/diacetyl) and 62% (104/169) secreted extracellular ribonucleases in vitro, respectively. These results show that seeds of cultivated cucurbits

  7. Bacterial Seed Endophytes of Domesticated Cucurbits Antagonize Fungal and Oomycete Pathogens Including Powdery Mildew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman M. Khalaf

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The cucurbit vegetables, including cucumbers, melons and pumpkins, have been cultivated for thousands of years without fungicides. However, their seed germination stage is prone to be infected by soil-borne fungal and oomycete pathogens. Endophytes are symbionts that reside inside plant tissues including seeds. Seed endophytes are founders of the juvenile plant microbiome and can promote host defense at seed germination and later stages. We previously isolated 169 bacterial endophytes associated with seeds of diverse cultivated cucurbits. We hypothesized that these endophytes can antagonize major fungal and oomycete pathogens. Here we tested the endophytes for in vitro antagonism (dual culture assays against important soil-borne pathogens (Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium graminearum, Phytophthora capsici, Pythium aphanideratum. The endophytes were also assayed in planta (leaf disk and detached leaf bioassays for antagonism against a foliar pathogen of global importance, Podosphaera fuliginea, the causative agent of cucurbit powdery mildew. The endophytes were further tested in vitro for secretion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs known to induce plant defense. Extracellular ribonuclease activity was also tested, as a subset of pathogenesis-related (PR proteins of plant hosts implicated in suppression of fungal pathogens, displays ribonuclease activity. An unexpected majority of the endophytes (70%, 118/169 exhibited antagonism to the five phytopathogens, of which 68% (50/73 of in vitro antagonists belong to the genera Bacillus and Paenibacillus. All Lactococcus and Pantoea endophytes exhibited anti-oomycete activity. However, amongst the most effective inoculants against Podosphaera fuliginea were Pediococcus and Pantoea endophytes. Interestingly, 67% (113/169 of endophytes emitted host defense inducing VOCs (acetoin/diacetyl and 62% (104/169 secreted extracellular ribonucleases in vitro, respectively. These results show that seeds of cultivated

  8. ANTAGONISM OF PROGESTERONE RECEPTOR SUPPRESSES CAROTID BODY RESPONSES TO HYPOXIA AND NICOTINE IN RAT PUPS

    OpenAIRE

    JOSEPH, V.; NIANE, L. M.; BAIRAM, A.

    2012-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that antagonism of progesterone receptor (PR) in newborn rats alters carotid body and respiratory responses to hypoxia and nicotinic receptor agonists. Rats were treated with the PR antagonist mifepristone (daily oral gavage 40 μg/g/d) or vehicle between post-natal days 3 and 15. In 11–14-day-old rats, we used in vitro carotid body/carotid sinus nerve preparation and whole body plethysmography to assess the carotid body and ventilatory responses to hypoxia (65 mmHg in...

  9. SPOC1-mediated antiviral host cell response is antagonized early in human adenovirus type 5 infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schreiner, Sabrina; Kinkley, Sarah; Bürck, Carolin

    2013-01-01

    , and playing a role in DNA damage response. SPOC1 co-localized with viral replication centers in the host cell nucleus, interacted with Ad DNA, and repressed viral gene expression at the transcriptional level. We discovered that this SPOC1-mediated restriction imposed upon Ad growth is relieved by its...... viruses (HSV-1, HSV-2, HIV-1, and HCV) also depleted SPOC1 in infected cells. Our findings provide a general model for how pathogenic human viruses antagonize intrinsic SPOC1-mediated antiviral responses in their host cells. A better understanding of viral entry and early restrictive functions in host...

  10. An effector of the Irish potato famine pathogen antagonizes a host autophagy cargo receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdas, Yasin F; Belhaj, Khaoula; Maqbool, Abbas; Chaparro-Garcia, Angela; Pandey, Pooja; Petre, Benjamin; Tabassum, Nadra; Cruz-Mireles, Neftaly; Hughes, Richard K; Sklenar, Jan; Win, Joe; Menke, Frank; Findlay, Kim; Banfield, Mark J; Kamoun, Sophien; Bozkurt, Tolga O

    2016-01-01

    Plants use autophagy to safeguard against infectious diseases. However, how plant pathogens interfere with autophagy-related processes is unknown. Here, we show that PexRD54, an effector from the Irish potato famine pathogen Phytophthora infestans, binds host autophagy protein ATG8CL to stimulate autophagosome formation. PexRD54 depletes the autophagy cargo receptor Joka2 out of ATG8CL complexes and interferes with Joka2's positive effect on pathogen defense. Thus, a plant pathogen effector has evolved to antagonize a host autophagy cargo receptor to counteract host defenses. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10856.001 PMID:26765567

  11. Bacterial Seed Endophytes of Domesticated Cucurbits Antagonize Fungal and Oomycete Pathogens Including Powdery Mildew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman M. Khalaf

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The cucurbit vegetables, including cucumbers, melons and pumpkins, have been cultivated for thousands of years without fungicides. However, their seed germination stage is prone to be infected by soil-borne fungal and oomycete pathogens. Endophytes are symbionts that reside inside plant tissues including seeds. Seed endophytes are founders of the juvenile plant microbiome and can promote host defense at seed germination and later stages. We previously isolated 169 bacterial endophytes associated with seeds of diverse cultivated cucurbits. We hypothesized that these endophytes can antagonize major fungal and oomycete pathogens. Here we tested the endophytes for in vitro antagonism (dual culture assays against important soil-borne pathogens (Rhizoctonia solani, Fusarium graminearum, Phytophthora capsici, Pythium aphanidermatum. The endophytes were also assayed in planta (leaf disk and detached leaf bioassays for antagonism against a foliar pathogen of global importance, Podosphaera fuliginea, the causative agent of cucurbit powdery mildew. The endophytes were further tested in vitro for secretion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs known to induce plant defense. Extracellular ribonuclease activity was also tested, as a subset of pathogenesis-related (PR proteins of plant hosts implicated in suppression of fungal pathogens, displays ribonuclease activity. An unexpected majority of the endophytes (70%, 118/169 exhibited antagonism to the five phytopathogens, of which 68% (50/73 of in vitro antagonists belong to the genera Bacillus and Paenibacillus. All Lactococcus and Pantoea endophytes exhibited anti-oomycete activity. However, amongst the most effective inoculants against Podosphaera fuliginea were Pediococcus and Pantoea endophytes. Interestingly, 67% (113/169 of endophytes emitted host defense inducing VOCs (acetoin/diacetyl and 62% (104/169 secreted extracellular ribonucleases in vitro, respectively. These results show that seeds of cultivated

  12. Experimental testing of Mackay's model for functional antagonism in the isolated costo-uterus of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, P. J.; Lulich, K. M.; Paterson, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Several key predictions of a recently developed model for functional antagonism (Mackay, 1981) were experimentally tested using the rat isolated costo-uterine preparation. In the presence of the functional antagonist fenoterol (Fen), the functional constants (KAF) for carbachol and oxotremorine (Oxo) were respectively 9.9 and 3.4 fold greater than their corresponding affinity constants (KA). According to Mackay's model for functional antagonism, the higher KAF/KA ratio for carbachol indicates that this cholinoceptor agonist has a greater efficacy than Oxo. This was confirmed by using conventional pharmacological methods. As predicted from the model of functional antagonism, the plot of KAF/KA-1 against the fraction of cholinoceptors not irreversibly blocked by phenoxybenzamine (Pbz) was linear for both carbachol and Oxo and the lines of best fit crossed the axes at a point not significantly different from the origin. The value of 4.6 for the relative efficacy of carbachol to Oxo estimated from functional antagonism studies was comparable to the value of 5.6 calculated using the method of irreversible antagonism proposed by Furchgott (1966). PMID:3840396

  13. Sexual antagonism and meiotic drive cause stable linkage disequilibrium and favour reduced recombination on the X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydzewski, W T; Carioscia, S A; Liévano, G; Lynch, V D; Patten, M M

    2016-06-01

    Sexual antagonism and meiotic drive are sex-specific evolutionary forces with the potential to shape genomic architecture. Previous theory has found that pairing two sexually antagonistic loci or combining sexual antagonism with meiotic drive at linked autosomal loci augments genetic variation, produces stable linkage disequilibrium (LD) and favours reduced recombination. However, the influence of these two forces has not been examined on the X chromosome, which is thought to be enriched for sexual antagonism and meiotic drive. We investigate the evolution of the X chromosome under both sexual antagonism and meiotic drive with two models: in one, both loci experience sexual antagonism; in the other, we pair a meiotic drive locus with a sexually antagonistic locus. We find that LD arises between the two loci in both models, even when the two loci freely recombine in females and that driving haplotypes will be enriched for male-beneficial alleles, further skewing sex ratios in these populations. We introduce a new measure of LD, Dz', which accounts for population allele frequencies and is appropriate for instances where these are sex specific. Both models demonstrate that natural selection favours modifiers that reduce the recombination rate. These results inform observed patterns of congealment found on driving X chromosomes and have implications for patterns of natural variation and the evolution of recombination rates on the X chromosome. © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2016 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  14. Antagonism by hemoglobin of effects induced by L-arginine in neuromuscular preparations from rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.R. Ambiel

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO-synthase is present in diaphragm, phrenic nerve and vascular smooth muscle. It has been shown that the NO precursor L-arginine (L-Arg at the presynaptic level increases the amplitude of muscular contraction (AMC and induces tetanic fade when the muscle is indirectly stimulated at low and high frequencies, respectively. However, the precursor in muscle reduces AMC and maximal tetanic fade when the preparations are stimulated directly. In the present study the importance of NO synthesized in different tissues for the L-Arg-induced neuromuscular effects was investigated. Hemoglobin (50 nM did not produce any neuromuscular effect, but antagonized the increase in AMC and tetanic fade induced by L-Arg (9.4 mM in rat phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparations. D-Arg (9.4 mM did not produce any effect when preparations were stimulated indirectly at low or high frequency. Hemoglobin did not inhibit the decrease of AMC or the reduction in maximal tetanic tension induced by L-Arg in preparations previously paralyzed with d-tubocurarine and directly stimulated. Since only the presynaptic effects induced by L-Arg were antagonized by hemoglobin, the present results suggest that NO synthesized in muscle acts on nerve and skeletal muscle. Nevertheless, NO produced in nerve and vascular smooth muscle does not seem to act on skeletal muscle.

  15. IFITM Proteins Restrict HIV-1 Infection by Antagonizing the Envelope Glycoprotein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyou Yu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM proteins have been recently shown to restrict HIV-1 and other viruses. Here, we provide evidence that IFITM proteins, particularly IFITM2 and IFITM3, specifically antagonize the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env, thereby inhibiting viral infection. IFITM proteins interact with HIV-1 Env in viral producer cells, leading to impaired Env processing and virion incorporation. Notably, the level of IFITM incorporation into HIV-1 virions does not strictly correlate with the extent of inhibition. Prolonged passage of HIV-1 in IFITM-expressing T lymphocytes leads to emergence of Env mutants that overcome IFITM restriction. The ability of IFITMs to inhibit cell-to-cell infection can be extended to HIV-1 primary isolates, HIV-2 and SIVs; however, the extent of inhibition appears to be virus-strain dependent. Overall, our study uncovers a mechanism by which IFITM proteins specifically antagonize HIV-1 Env to restrict HIV-1 infection and provides insight into the specialized role of IFITMs in HIV infection.

  16. Analysis of agonist dissociation constants as assessed by functional antagonism in guinea pig left atria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molenaar, P.; Malta, E.

    1986-01-01

    In electrically driven guinea pig left atria, positive inotropic responses to (-)-isoprenaline and the selective beta 1-adrenoceptor agonist RO363 were obtained in the absence and in the presence of the functional antagonists adenosine, carbachol, gallopamil, nifedipine, and Ro 03-7894. Each of the functional antagonists reduced the maximum response to both agonists and produced nonparallel rightward shifts in the cumulative concentration effect curves. For both agonists, dissociation constants (KA) were calculated using the equation described by Furchgott (1966) for irreversible antagonism. For RO363, which is a partial agonist with high agonist activity, the equations outlined for functional interaction by Mackay (1981) were also employed to calculate KA values. The KA values obtained by each method were compared with the dissociation constants (KD) for the two agonists determined from their ability to displace the radioligand (-)-[ 125 I]iodocyanopindolol from beta 1-adrenoceptors in guinea pig left atrial membrane preparations. The estimates of KA varied substantially from KD values. The KD values were taken as more accurate estimates of the true values for the dissociation constants because a high degree of correlation exists between pKD and pD2 values for a number of other beta-adrenoceptor agonists that behave as partial agonists and between pKD and pKB values for a number of beta-adrenoceptor antagonists. Thus, it appears that there are serious limitations in the current theory for using functional antagonism as a means of obtaining agonist dissociation constants

  17. Antagonism of Trichoderma harzianum ETS 323 on Botrytis cinerea mycelium in culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chi-Hua; Yang, Chia-Ann; Peng, Kou-Cheng

    2012-11-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies have shown that the extracellular proteins of Trichoderma harzianum ETS 323 grown in the presence of deactivated Botrytis cinerea in culture include a putative l-amino acid oxidase and have suggested the involvement of this enzyme in the antagonistic mechanism. Here, we hypothesized that the mycoparasitic process of Trichoderma spp. against B. cinerea involves two steps; that is, an initial hyphal coiling stage and a subsequent hyphal coiling stage, with different coiling rates. The two-step antagonism of T. harzianum ETS 323 against B. cinerea during the mycoparasitic process in culture was evaluated using a biexponential equation. In addition, an l-amino acid oxidase (Th-l-AAO) was identified from T. harzianum ETS 323. The secretion of Th-l-AAO was increased when T. harzianum ETS 323 was grown with deactivated hyphae of B. cinerea. Moreover, in vitro assays indicated that Th-l-AAO effectively inhibited B. cinerea hyphal growth, caused cytosolic vacuolization in the hyphae, and led to hyphal lysis. Th-l-AAO also showed disease control against the development of B. cinerea on postharvest apple fruit and tobacco leaves. Furthermore, an apoptosis-like response, including the generation of reactive oxygen species, was observed in B. cinerea after treatment with Th-l-AAO, suggesting that Th-l-AAO triggers programmed cell death in B. cinerea. This may be associated with the two-step antagonism of T. harzianum ETS 323 against B. cinerea.

  18. Effect of endothelin antagonism on apnea frequency following chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Lucas M; Liu, Yuzhen; Weiss, J Woodrow

    2014-04-01

    Chronic hypoxia increases the hypoxic ventilatory response (HVR). Augmented HVR contributes to central apneas seen in heart failure and complex sleep apnea. Endothelin receptor (ETR) antagonism decreases carotid body afferent activity following chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH). We speculated ETR antagonism would reduce HVR and apneas following CIH. HVR and apneas were measured after exposure to CIH and room air sham (SHAM). ETR blocker Ambrisentan was administered via the chow of CIH-exposed animals from days 1 to 12 of CIH (CIH/AMB). A separate crossover group was exposed to CIH and fed normal chow (placebo) days 1-6, and Ambrisentan days 7-12 (CIH/PLA-AMB). SHAM and CIH/PLA animals were fed placebo days 1-12. The CIH/AMB and CIH/PLA-AMB rats had reduced HVR compared to CIH/PLA, similar HVR compared to sham exposed animals, and reduced apnea frequency compared to CIH/PLA animals. The reduced HVR and post-hypoxic apneas resulting from Ambrisentan administration suggests ETR antagonists may have utility in reducing central apneas following CIH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Dynamical transitions in a pollination-herbivory interaction: a conflict between mutualism and antagonism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás A Revilla

    Full Text Available Plant-pollinator associations are often seen as purely mutualistic, while in reality they can be more complex. Indeed they may also display a diverse array of antagonistic interactions, such as competition and victim-exploiter interactions. In some cases mutualistic and antagonistic interactions are carried-out by the same species but at different life-stages. As a consequence, population structure affects the balance of inter-specific associations, a topic that is receiving increased attention. In this paper, we developed a model that captures the basic features of the interaction between a flowering plant and an insect with a larval stage that feeds on the plant's vegetative tissues (e.g. leaves and an adult pollinator stage. Our model is able to display a rich set of dynamics, the most remarkable of which involves victim-exploiter oscillations that allow plants to attain abundances above their carrying capacities and the periodic alternation between states dominated by mutualism or antagonism. Our study indicates that changes in the insect's life cycle can modify the balance between mutualism and antagonism, causing important qualitative changes in the interaction dynamics. These changes in the life cycle could be caused by a variety of external drivers, such as temperature, plant nutrients, pesticides and changes in the diet of adult pollinators.

  20. Benzodiazepine antagonism by harmane and other beta-carbolines in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommelspacher, H; Nanz, C; Borbe, H O; Fehske, K J; Müller, W E; Wollert, U

    1981-03-26

    Harmane and other related beta-carbolines are putative endogenous ligands of the benzodiazepine receptor. Since the compounds are potent convulsants they may have agonist activities at the benzodiazepine receptor while the benzodiazepines may be antagonists. This hypothesis was proved by comparing the in vivo and in vitro antagonism of benzodiazepines by harmane and other beta-carbolines. Harmane is clearly a competitive inhibitor of benzodiazepine receptor binding in vitro. Moreover, harmane-induced convulsions can be inhibited reversibly by diazepam in a manner which is consistent with the assumption of competitive antagonism in vivo. For some beta-carboline derivatives a correlation was found between the affinity for the benzodiazepine receptor in vitro and the convulsive potency in vivo. Thus, the data reported suggest that harmane or other related beta-carbolines are putative endogenous agonists of the benzodiazepine receptor. This suggestion is further supported by the observation that diazepam is equally potent in inhibiting harmane- or picrotoxin-induced convulsions, indicating a convulsive mechanism within the GABA receptor-benzodiazepine receptor system.

  1. FCJ-156 Hacking the Social: Internet Memes, Identity Antagonism, and the Logic of Lulz.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M. Milner

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 4chan and reddit are participatory media collectives undergirded by a “logic of lulz” that favours distanced irony and critique. It often works at the expense of core identity categories like race and gender. However, the logic need not be entirely counterproductive to public discourse. Provided that diverse identities find voice instead of exclusion, these sites may facilitate vibrant, agonistic discussion instead of disenfranchising antagonism. In order to assess this potential for productive agonism, I undertook a critical discourse analysis of these collectives. Emphasising the image memes they produce, I evaluated discourses on race and gender. Both race and gender representations were dominated by familiar stereotypes and partial representations. However, while dissenting perspectives on race were repressed or excluded, dissenting perspectives on gender were vocalised and contested. The ‘logic of lulz’ facilitated both dominance and counter, each articulated with heavy reliance on irony and critique. This logic ambiguously balanced agonism and antagonism, but contestation provided sharper engagement than repression.

  2. Antagonism between abscisic acid and gibberellins is partially mediated by ascorbic acid during seed germination in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Nenghui; Zhang, Jianhua

    2012-05-01

    The antagonism between abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellin (GA) plays a key role in controlling seed germination, but the mechanism of antagonism during this process is not known. In the associated study, we investigated the relationship among ABA, reactive oxygen species (ROS), ascorbic acid (ASC) and GA during rice seed germination. ROS production is reduced by ABA, which hence results in decreasing ASC accumulation during imbibition. GA accumulation was also suppressed by a reduced ROS and ASC level, whereas application of exogenous ASC can partially rescue seed germination from ABA treatment. Further results show that production of ASC, which acts as a substrate in GA biosynthesis, was significantly inhibited by lycorine which thus suppressed the accumulation of GA. Consequently, expression of GA biosynthesis genes was suppressed by the low levels of ROS and ASC in ABA-treated seeds. These studies reveal a new role for ASC in mediating the antagonism between ABA and GA during seed germination in rice.

  3. Progranulin shows cytoprotective effects on trophoblast cells in vitro but does not antagonize TNF-α-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubert, Johannes; Waldmann, Kathrin; Dieterich, Max; Richter, Dagmar-Ulrike; Briese, Volker

    2014-11-01

    The glycoprotein progranulin directly binds to TNF-receptors and thereby can antagonize the inflammatory effects of TNF-α. Here we analyzed the impact of both cytokines on cytotoxicity and viability of trophoblast cells. Isolated villous first trimester human trophoblast cells and the human choriocarcinoma cell line BeWo were treated with recombinant human progranulin and TNF-α. Analyses were performed by LDH- and MTT-assay and measurement of caspase-8-activity. Progranulin treatment showed some cytoprotective effects on isolated trophoblast cells. However, TNF-α-induced apoptosis was not antagonized by addition of progranulin. Effects were similar, but more pronounced in BeWo cells. The cytoprotective activity of progranulin on trophoblast cells in vitro was only weak and of doubtful biologic relevance. It was not able to antagonize TNF-α. Future studies should focus on possible paracrine activities of progranulin.

  4. Aggression, Sibling Antagonism, and Theory-of-Mind During the First Year of Siblinghood: A Developmental Cascade Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ju-Hyun; Volling, Brenda L.; Lane, Jonathan D.; Wellman, Henry M.

    2016-01-01

    A developmental cascade model was tested to examine longitudinal associations among firstborn children’s aggression, Theory-of-Mind, and antagonism toward their younger sibling during the first year of siblinghood. Aggression and Theory-of-Mind were assessed before the birth of a sibling, and 4 and 12 months after the birth, and antagonism was examined at 4 and 12 months in a sample of 208 firstborn children (initial M age = 30 months, 56% girls) from primarily European American, middle- class families. Firstborns’ aggression consistently predicted high sibling antagonism both directly and through poorer Theory-of-Mind. Results highlight the importance of examining longitudinal influences across behavioral, social-cognitive, and relational factors that are closely intertwined even from the early years of life. PMID:27096923

  5. Symbiont interactions in a tripartite mutualism: exploring the presence and impact of antagonism between two fungus-growing ant mutualists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Poulsen

    Full Text Available Mutualistic associations are shaped by the interplay of cooperation and conflict among the partners involved, and it is becoming increasingly clear that within many mutualisms multiple partners simultaneously engage in beneficial interactions. Consequently, a more complete understanding of the dynamics within multipartite mutualism communities is essential for understanding the origin, specificity, and stability of mutualisms. Fungus-growing ants cultivate fungi for food and maintain antibiotic-producing Pseudonocardia actinobacteria on their cuticle that help defend the cultivar fungus from specialized parasites. Within both ant-fungus and ant-bacterium mutualisms, mixing of genetically distinct strains can lead to antagonistic interactions (i.e., competitive conflict, which may prevent the ants from rearing multiple strains of either of the mutualistic symbionts within individual colonies. The success of different ant-cultivar-bacterium combinations could ultimately be governed by antagonistic interactions between the two mutualists, either as inhibition of the cultivar by Pseudonocardia or vice versa. Here we explore cultivar-Pseudonocardia antagonism by evaluating in vitro interactions between strains of the two mutualists, and find frequent antagonistic interactions both from cultivars towards Pseudonocardia and vice versa. To test whether such in vitro antagonistic interactions affect ant colonies in vivo, we performed sub-colony experiments using species of Acromyrmex leaf-cutting ants. We created novel ant-fungus-bacterium pairings in which there was antagonism from one, both, or neither of the ants' microbial mutualists, and evaluated the effect of directional antagonism on cultivar biomass and Pseudonocardia abundance on the cuticle of workers within sub-colonies. Despite the presence of frequent in vitro growth suppression between cultivars and Pseudonocardia, antagonism from Pseudonocardia towards the cultivar did not reduce sub

  6. Chick Hairy1 protein interacts with Sap18, a component of the Sin3/HDAC transcriptional repressor complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrade Raquel P

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vertebrate adult axial skeleton, trunk and limb skeletal muscles and dermis of the back all arise from early embryonic structures called somites. Somites are symmetrically positioned flanking the embryo axial structures (neural tube and notochord and are periodically formed in a anterior-posterior direction from the presomitic mesoderm. The time required to form a somite pair is constant and species-specific. This extraordinary periodicity is proposed to depend on an underlying somitogenesis molecular clock, firstly evidenced by the cyclic expression of the chick hairy1 gene in the unsegmented presomitic mesoderm with a 90 min periodicity, corresponding to the time required to form a somite pair in the chick embryo. The number of hairy1 oscillations at any given moment is proposed to provide the cell with both temporal and positional information along the embryo's anterior-posterior axis. Nevertheless, how this is accomplished and what biological processes are involved is still unknown. Aiming at understanding the molecular events triggered by the somitogenesis clock Hairy1 protein, we have employed the yeast two-hybrid system to identify Hairy1 interaction partners. Results Sap18, an adaptor molecule of the Sin3/HDAC transcriptional repressor complex, was found to interact with the C-terminal portion of the Hairy1 protein in a yeast two-hybrid assay and the Hairy1/Sap18 interaction was independently confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. We have characterized the expression patterns of both sap18 and sin3a genes during chick embryo development, using in situ hybridization experiments. We found that both sap18 and sin3a expression patterns co-localize in vivo with hairy1 expression domains in chick rostral presomitic mesoderm and caudal region of somites. Conclusion Hairy1 belongs to the hairy-enhancer-of-split family of transcriptional repressor proteins. Our results indicate that during chick somitogenesis

  7. Inhibition of protein synthesis does not antagonize induction of UV-induced sister-chromatid exchange in xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sono, Akira; Sakaguchi, Kengo.

    1988-01-01

    Cycloheximide strongly antagonizes the induction of sisterchromatid exchanges by ethyl methanesulfonate or mitomycin C in human skin fibroblast and xeroderma pigmentosum cells (group A). Analogous behavior has been observed in several other species including Chinese hamster and plant cells. This report documents an exception to that pattern: cycloheximide fails to antagonize UV-induced sister chromatid exchange in xeroderma pigmentosum cells, whereas it does in normal human skin fibroblast cells. A genetic defect in these cells is postulated to alter the UV-mediated DNA recombination process. (author)

  8. Disruption of Cell-to-Cell Signaling Does Not Abolish the Antagonism of Phaeobacter gallaeciensis toward the Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum in Algal Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prol García, María Jesús; D'Alvise, Paul; Gram, Lone

    2013-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) regulates Phaeobacter gallaeciensis antagonism in broth systems; however, we demonstrate here that QS is not important for antagonism in algal cultures. QS mutants reduced Vibrio anguillarum to the same extent as the wild type. Consequently, a combination of probiotic Phaeobac...... Phaeobacter and QS inhibitors is a feasible strategy for aquaculture disease control....

  9. Involvement of co-repressor LUH and the adapter proteins SLK1 and SLK2 in the regulation of abiotic stress response genes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Barsha; Guragain, Bhuwan; Sridhar, Vaniyambadi V

    2014-02-24

    During abiotic stress many genes that are important for growth and adaptation to stress are expressed at elevated levels. However, the mechanisms that keep the stress responsive genes from expressing under non stress conditions remain elusive. Recent genetic characterization of the co-repressor LEUNIG_HOMOLOG (LUH) and transcriptional adaptor proteins SEUSS-LIKE1 (SLK1) and SLK2 have been proposed to function redundantly in diverse developmental processes; however their function in the abiotic stress response is unknown. Moreover, the molecular functions of LUH, SLK1 and SLK2 remain obscure. Here, we show the molecular function of LUH, SLK1 and SLK2 and the role of this complex in the abiotic stress response. The luh, slk1 and slk2 mutant plants shows enhanced tolerance to salt and osmotic stress conditions. SLK1 and SLK2 interact physically with the LUFS domain in LUH forming SLK1-LUH and SLK2-LUH co-repressor complexes to inhibit the transcription. LUH has repressor activity, whereas SLK1 and SLK2 function as adaptors to recruit LUH, which in turn recruits histone deacetylase to the target sequences to repress transcription. The stress response genes RD20, MYB2 and NAC019 are expressed at elevated levels in the luh, slk1 and slk2 mutant plants. Furthermore, these stress response genes are associated with decreased nucleosome density and increased acetylation levels at H3K9 and H3K14 in the luh, slk1 and slk2 mutant plants. Our results indicate that SLK1, SLK2 and LUH form a co-repressor complex. LUH represses by means of an epigenetic process involving histone modification to facilitate the condensation of chromatin thus preventing transcription at the target genes.

  10. A phospho-sugar binding domain homologous to NagB enzymes regulates the activity of the central glycolytic genes repressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Thierry; Martin, Laetitia; Zorrilla, Silvia; Chaix, Denis; Aymerich, Stéphane; Labesse, Gilles; Declerck, Nathalie

    2008-06-01

    CggR belongs to the SorC family of bacterial transcriptional regulators which control the expression of genes and operons involved in carbohydrate catabolism. CggR was first identified in Bacillus subtilis where it represses the gapA operon encoding the five enzymes that catalyze the central part of glycolysis. Here we present a structure/function study demonstrating that the C-terminal region of CggR regulates the DNA binding activity of this repressor in response to binding of a phosphorylated sugar. Molecular modeling of CggR revealed a winged-helix DNA-binding motif followed by a C-terminal domain presenting weak but significant homology with glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminases from the NagB family. In silico ligand screening suggested that the CggR C-terminal domain would bind preferentially bi-phosphorylated compounds, in agreement with previous studies that proposed fructuose-1,6-biphosphate (FBP) as the inducer metabolite. In vitro, FBP was the only sugar compound capable of interfering with CggR cooperative binding to DNA. FBP was also found to protect CggR against trypsin degradation at two arginine residues predicted to reside in a mobile loop forming the active site lid of the NagB enzymes. Replacement of residues predicted to interact with FBP led to mutant CggR with altered repressor activity in vivo but retaining their structural integrity and DNA binding activity in vitro. Interestingly, some of the mutant repressors responded with different specificity towards mono- and di-phospho-fructosides. Based on these results, we propose that the activity of the CggR-like repressors is controlled by a phospho-sugar binding (PSB) domain presenting structural and functional homology with NagB enzymes. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. CB1 receptor antagonism increases hippocampal acetylcholine release: site and mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degroot, Aldemar; Köfalvi, Attila; Wade, Mark R; Davis, Richard J; Rodrigues, Ricardo J; Rebola, Nelson; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Nomikos, George G

    2006-10-01

    Evidence indicates that blockade of cannabinoid receptors increases acetylcholine (ACh) release in brain cortical regions. Although it is assumed that this type of effect is mediated through CB1 receptor (CB1R) antagonism, several in vitro functional studies recently have suggested non-CB1R involvement. In addition, neither the precise neuroanatomical site nor the exact mechanisms underlying this effect are known. We thoroughly examined these issues using a combination of systemic and local administration of CB1R antagonists, different methods of in vivo microdialysis, CB1R knockout (KO) mice, tissue measurements of ACh, and immunochemistry. First, we showed that systemic injections of the CB1R antagonists N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboximide hydrochloride (SR-141716A) and N-(piperidin-1-yl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-1-(2, 4-dichlorophenyl)-4-methyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251) dose-dependently increased hippocampal ACh efflux. Likewise, local hippocampal, but not septal, infusions of SR141716A or AM251 increased hippocampal ACh release. It is noteworthy that the stimulatory effects of systemically administered CB1R antagonists on hippocampal ACh release were completely abolished in CB1R KO mice. CB1R KO mice had similar basal but higher stress-enhanced hippocampal ACh levels compared with wild-type controls. It is interesting that dopamine D1 receptor antagonism counteracted the stimulatory effect of CB1R blockade on hippocampal ACh levels. Finally, immunohistochemical methods revealed that a high proportion of CB1R-positive nerve terminals were found in hippocampus and confirmed the colocalization of CB1 receptors with cholinergic and dopaminergic nerve terminals. In conclusion, hippocampal ACh release may specifically be controlled through CB1Rs located on both cholinergic and dopaminergic neuronal projections, and CB1R antagonism increases hippocampal ACh release, probably through both a direct

  12. Regulatory T cells with reduced repressor capacities are extensively amplified in pulmonary sarcoid lesions and sustain granuloma formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappl, Gunter; Pabst, Stefan; Riemann, Dagmar; Schmidt, Annette; Wickenhauser, Claudia; Schütte, Wolfgang; Hombach, Andreas A; Seliger, Barbara; Grohé, Christian; Abken, Hinrich

    2011-07-01

    Sarcoidosis can evolve into a chronic disease with persistent granulomas accompanied by progressive fibrosis. While an unlimited inflammatory response suggests an impaired immune control in sarcoid lesions, it stands in contrast to the massive infiltration with CD4(+)CD25(high)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells. We here revealed that those Treg cells in affected lung lesions were mainly derived from activated natural Treg cells with GARP (LRRC32)-positive phenotype but exhibited reduced repressor capacities despite high IL-10 and TGF-beta 1 levels. The repressive capacity of blood Treg cells, in contrast, was not impaired compared to age-matched healthy donors. Treg derived cells in granuloma lesions have undergone extensive rounds of amplifications indicated by shortened telomeres compared to blood Treg cells of the same patient. Lesional Treg derived cells moreover secreted pro-inflammatory cytokines including IL-4 which sustains granuloma formation through fibroblast amplification and the activation of mast cells, the latter indicated by the expression of membrane-bound oncostatin M. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Overexpression of a repressor MdMYB15L negatively regulates anthocyanin and cold tolerance in red-fleshed callus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haifeng; Yang, Guanxian; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Yicheng; Zhang, Tianliang; Wang, Nan; Jiang, Shenghui; Zhang, Zongying; Chen, Xuesen

    2018-04-14

    The cold-induced metabolic pathway and anthocyanin biosynthesis play important roles in plant growth. In this study, we identified a bHLH binding motif in the MdMYB15L protein using protein sequence analyses. Yeast two-hybrid and pull-down assays showed that MdMYB15L could interact with MdbHLH33. Overexpressing MdMYB15L in red-fleshed callus inhibited the expression of MdCBF2 and resulted in reduced cold tolerance but did not affect anthocyanin levels. Chip-PCR and EMSA analysis showed that MdMYB15L could bind the type II cis-acting element found in the MdCBF2 promoter. Overexpressing MdMYB15L in red-fleshed callus overexpressing MdbHLH33 also reduced cold tolerance and reduced MdbHLH33-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis. Knocking out the bHLH binding sequence of MdMYB15L (LBSMdMYB15L) prevented LBSMdMYB15L from interacting with MdbHLH33. Overexpressing LBSMdMYB15L in red-fleshed callus overexpressing MdbHLH33 also reduced cold tolerance and reduced MdbHLH33-induced anthocyanin biosynthesis. Together, these results suggested that an apple repressor MdMYB15L might play a key role in the cold signaling and anthocyanin metabolic pathways. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Transcriptional Repressor MYB2 Regulates Both Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Proanthocyandin and Anthocyanin Pigmentation in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Ji Hyung; Liu, Chenggang; Xiao, Xirong; Dixon, Richard A

    2015-10-01

    Accumulation of anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins (PAs) is limited to specific cell types and developmental stages, but little is known about how antagonistically acting transcriptional regulators work together to determine temporal and spatial patterning of pigmentation at the cellular level, especially for PAs. Here, we characterize MYB2, a transcriptional repressor regulating both anthocyanin and PA biosynthesis in the model legume Medicago truncatula. MYB2 was strongly upregulated by MYB5, a major regulator of PA biosynthesis in M. truncatula and a component of MYB-basic helix loop helix-WD40 (MBW) activator complexes. Overexpression of MYB2 abolished anthocyanin and PA accumulation in M. truncatula hairy roots and Arabidopsis thaliana seeds, respectively. Anthocyanin deposition was expanded in myb2 mutant seedlings and flowers accompanied by increased anthocyanin content. PA mainly accumulated in the epidermal layer derived from the outer integument in the M. truncatula seed coat, starting from the hilum area. The area of PA accumulation and ANTHOCYANIDIN REDUCTASE expression was expanded into the seed body at the early stage of seed development in the myb2 mutant. Genetic, biochemical, and cell biological evidence suggests that MYB2 functions as part of a multidimensional regulatory network to define the temporal and spatial pattern of anthocyanin and PA accumulation linked to developmental processes. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  15. The transcriptional repressor protein NsrR senses nitric oxide directly via a [2Fe-2S] cluster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas P Tucker

    Full Text Available The regulatory protein NsrR, a member of the Rrf2 family of transcription repressors, is specifically dedicated to sensing nitric oxide (NO in a variety of pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria. It has been proposed that NO directly modulates NsrR activity by interacting with a predicted [Fe-S] cluster in the NsrR protein, but no experimental evidence has been published to support this hypothesis. Here we report the purification of NsrR from the obligate aerobe Streptomyces coelicolor. We demonstrate using UV-visible, near UV CD and EPR spectroscopy that the protein contains an NO-sensitive [2Fe-2S] cluster when purified from E. coli. Upon exposure of NsrR to NO, the cluster is nitrosylated, which results in the loss of DNA binding activity as detected by bandshift assays. Removal of the [2Fe-2S] cluster to generate apo-NsrR also resulted in loss of DNA binding activity. This is the first demonstration that NsrR contains an NO-sensitive [2Fe-2S] cluster that is required for DNA binding activity.

  16. The Response Regulator YycF Inhibits Expression of the Fatty Acid Biosynthesis Repressor FabT in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohedano, Maria L.; Amblar, Mónica; de la Fuente, Alicia; Wells, Jerry M.; López, Paloma

    2016-01-01

    The YycFG (also known as WalRK, VicRK, MicAB, or TCS02) two-component system (TCS) is highly conserved among Gram-positive bacteria with a low G+C content. In Streptococcus pneumoniae the YycF response regulator has been reported to be essential due to its control of pcsB gene expression. Previously we showed that overexpression of yycF in S. pneumoniae TIGR4 altered the transcription of genes involved in cell wall metabolism and fatty acid biosynthesis, giving rise to anomalous cell division and increased chain length of membrane fatty acids. Here, we have overexpressed the yycFG system in TIGR4 wild-type strain and yycF in a TIGR4 mutant depleted of YycG, and analyzed their effects on expression of proteins involved in fatty acid biosynthesis during activation of the TCS. We demonstrate that transcription of the fab genes and levels of their products were only altered in the YycF overexpressing strain, indicating that the unphosphorylated form of YycF is involved in the regulation of fatty acid biosynthesis. In addition, DNA-binding assays and in vitro transcription experiments with purified YycF and the promoter region of the FabTH-acp operon support a direct inhibition of transcription of the FabT repressor by YycF, thus confirming the role of the unphosphorylated form in transcriptional regulation. PMID:27610104

  17. An Autocrine Proliferation Repressor Regulates Dictyostelium discoideum Proliferation and Chemorepulsion Using the G Protein-Coupled Receptor GrlH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Tang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic microbes, little is known about signals that inhibit the proliferation of the cells that secrete the signal, and little is known about signals (chemorepellents that cause cells to move away from the source of the signal. Autocrine proliferation repressor protein A (AprA is a protein secreted by the eukaryotic microbe Dictyostelium discoideum. AprA is a chemorepellent for and inhibits the proliferation of D. discoideum. We previously found that cells sense AprA using G proteins, suggesting the existence of a G protein-coupled AprA receptor. To identify the AprA receptor, we screened mutants lacking putative G protein-coupled receptors. We found that, compared to the wild-type strain, cells lacking putative receptor GrlH (grlH{macron} cells show rapid proliferation, do not have large numbers of cells moving away from the edges of colonies, are insensitive to AprA-induced proliferation inhibition and chemorepulsion, and have decreased AprA binding. Expression of GrlH in grlH{macron} cells (grlH{macron}/grlHOE rescues the phenotypes described above. These data indicate that AprA signaling may be mediated by GrlH in D. discoideum.

  18. Quaternary re-arrangement analysed by spectral enhancement: the interaction of a sporulation repressor with its antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, D J; Leejeerajumnean, S; Brannigan, J A; Lewis, R J; Wilkinson, A J; Hoggett, J G

    1999-11-12

    The protein/protein interaction between SinI and SinR has been studied by analytical ultracentrifugation and gel electrophoresis in an attempt to understand how these proteins contribute to developmental control of sporulation in Bacillus subtilis. SinR was found to be tetrameric, while SinI was found to exist as monomers and dimers in a rapidly reversible equilibrium. Labelling of SinR by incorporating the tryptophan analogue 7-azatryptophan (7AW) into the protein in place of tryptophan shifts the UV absorbance spectrum, thus allowing selective monitoring of 7AWSinR at 315 nm using the UV absorption optics of the analytical ultracentrifuge. Selective monitoring of SinR in mixtures of SinR and SinI enables the binding and stoichiometry of the interaction to be investigated quantitatively and unambiguously. We demonstrate that the oligomeric forms of SinR and SinI re-arrange to form a tight 1:1 SinR:SinI complex, with no stable intermediate species. A fragment of SinR, SinR(1-69), which contains only the DNA-binding domain, was found to be monomeric, showing that the protein appears not to oligomerise in a similar manner to the Cro repressor, a protein with which it shares a marked structural similarity. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  19. High-throughput cell-based screening reveals a role for ZNF131 as a repressor of ERalpha signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Peige

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Estrogen receptor α (ERα is a transcription factor whose activity is affected by multiple regulatory cofactors. In an effort to identify the human genes involved in the regulation of ERα, we constructed a high-throughput, cell-based, functional screening platform by linking a response element (ERE with a reporter gene. This allowed the cellular activity of ERα, in cells cotransfected with the candidate gene, to be quantified in the presence or absence of its cognate ligand E2. Results From a library of 570 human cDNA clones, we identified zinc finger protein 131 (ZNF131 as a repressor of ERα mediated transactivation. ZNF131 is a typical member of the BTB/POZ family of transcription factors, and shows both ubiquitous expression and a high degree of sequence conservation. The luciferase reporter gene assay revealed that ZNF131 inhibits ligand-dependent transactivation by ERα in a dose-dependent manner. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay clearly demonstrated that the interaction between ZNF131 and ERα interrupts or prevents ERα binding to the estrogen response element (ERE. In addition, ZNF131 was able to suppress the expression of pS2, an ERα target gene. Conclusion We suggest that the functional screening platform we constructed can be applied for high-throughput genomic screening candidate ERα-related genes. This in turn may provide new insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms of ERα regulation in mammalian cells.

  20. Cloning and characterization of GETS-1, a goldfish Ets family member that functions as a transcriptional repressor in muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, D; Sapru, M K; Stewart, S; Plotkin, J; Libermann, T A; Wasylyk, B; Guan, K

    1998-10-15

    An Ets transcription factor family member, GETS-1, was cloned from a goldfish retina cDNA library. GETS-1 contains a conserved Ets DNA-binding domain at its N-terminus and is most similar to ternary complex factor (TCF) serum-response-factor protein-1a (SAP-1a). GETS-1 is expressed in many tissues, but is enriched in retina and brain. As with the TCFs SAP-1a and ets-related protein (ERP), overexpression of the GETS-1 promoter suppresses nicotinic acetylcholine receptor epsilon-subunit gene expression in cultured muscle cells. A consensus Ets binding site sequence in the promoter of the epsilon-subunit gene is required for GETS-1-mediated repression. GETS-1 repressor activity is abrogated by overexpression of an activated Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase) or by mutation of Ser-405, a MAP kinase phosphorylation site in GETS-1. Fusion proteins created between GETS-1 and the Gal4 DNA-binding domain show that, like other TCFs, GETS-1 contains a C-terminal activation domain that is activated by a Ras/MAP kinase signalling cascade. Interestingly, mutation of Ser-405 located within this activation domain abrogated transcriptional activation of the fusion protein.

  1. Functional analysis of the global repressor Tup1 for maltose metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: different roles of the functional domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xue; Yu, Ai-Qun; Zhang, Cui-Ying; Pi, Li; Bai, Xiao-Wen; Xiao, Dong-Guang

    2017-11-09

    Tup1 is a general transcriptional repressor of diverse gene families coordinately controlled by glucose repression, mating type, and other mechanisms in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several functional domains of Tup1 have been identified, each of which has differing effects on transcriptional repression. In this study, we aim to investigate the role of Tup1 and its domains in maltose metabolism of industrial baker's yeast. To this end, a battery of in-frame truncations in the TUP1 gene coding region were performed in the industrial baker's yeasts with different genetic background, and the maltose metabolism, leavening ability, MAL gene expression levels, and growth characteristics were investigated. The results suggest that the TUP1 gene is essential to maltose metabolism in industrial baker's yeast. Importantly, different domains of Tup1 play different roles in glucose repression and maltose metabolism of industrial baker's yeast cells. The Ssn6 interaction, N-terminal repression and C-terminal repression domains might play roles in the regulation of MAL transcription by Tup1 for maltose metabolism of baker's yeast. The WD region lacking the first repeat could influence the regulation of maltose metabolism directly, rather than indirectly through glucose repression. These findings lay a foundation for the optimization of industrial baker's yeast strains for accelerated maltose metabolism and facilitate future research on glucose repression in other sugar metabolism.

  2. Enhancing succinic acid biosynthesis in Escherichia coli by engineering its global transcription factor, catabolite repressor/activator (Cra).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li-Wen; Xia, Shi-Tao; Wei, Li-Na; Li, Hong-Mei; Yuan, Zhan-Peng; Tang, Ya-Jie

    2016-11-04

    This study was initiated to improve E. coli succinate production by engineering the E. coli global transcription factor, Cra (catabolite repressor/activator). Random mutagenesis libraries were generated through error-prone PCR of cra. After re-screening and mutation site integration, the best mutant strain was Tang1541, which provided a final succinate concentration of 79.8 ± 3.1 g/L: i.e., 22.8% greater than that obtained using an empty vector control. The genes and enzymes involved in phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) carboxylation and the glyoxylate pathway were activated, either directly or indirectly, through the mutation of Cra. The parameters for interaction of Cra and DNA indicated that the Cra mutant was bound to aceBAK, thereby activating the genes involved in glyoxylate pathway and further improving succinate production even in the presence of its effector fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP). It suggested that some of the negative effect of FBP on Cra might have been counteracted through the enhanced binding affinity of the Cra mutant for FBP or the change of Cra structure. This work provides useful information about understanding the transcriptional regulation of succinate biosynthesis.

  3. Second-hit mosaic mutation in mTORC1 repressor DEPDC5 causes focal cortical dysplasia-associated epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribierre, Théo; Deleuze, Charlotte; Bacq, Alexandre; Baldassari, Sara; Marsan, Elise; Chipaux, Mathilde; Muraca, Giuseppe; Roussel, Delphine; Navarro, Vincent; Leguern, Eric; Miles, Richard; Baulac, Stéphanie

    2018-04-30

    DEP domain-containing 5 protein (DEPDC5) is a repressor of the recently recognized amino acid-sensing branch of the mTORC1 pathway. So far, its function in the brain remains largely unknown. Germline loss-of-function mutations in DEPDC5 have emerged as a major cause of familial refractory focal epilepsies, with case reports of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). Remarkably, a fraction of patients also develop focal cortical dysplasia (FCD), a neurodevelopmental cortical malformation. We therefore hypothesized that a somatic second-hit mutation arising during brain development may support the focal nature of the dysplasia. Here, using postoperative human tissue, we provide the proof of concept that a biallelic 2-hit - brain somatic and germline - mutational mechanism in DEPDC5 causes focal epilepsy with FCD. We discovered a mutation gradient with a higher rate of mosaicism in the seizure-onset zone than in the surrounding epileptogenic zone. Furthermore, we demonstrate the causality of a Depdc5 brain mosaic inactivation using CRISPR-Cas9 editing and in utero electroporation in a mouse model recapitulating focal epilepsy with FCD and SUDEP-like events. We further unveil a key role of Depdc5 in shaping dendrite and spine morphology of excitatory neurons. This study reveals promising therapeutic avenues for treating drug-resistant focal epilepsies with mTORC1-targeting molecules.

  4. Drosophila melanogaster cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes is a lysosomal protein essential for fly development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalewski-Nimmerfall, Elisabeth; Schähs, Philipp; Maresch, Daniel; Rendic, Dubravko; Krämer, Helmut; Mach, Lukas

    2014-12-01

    Mammalian cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes is a lysosomal glycoprotein implicated in cellular growth and differentiation. The genome of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster encodes a putative orthologue (dCREG), suggesting evolutionarily conserved physiological functions of this protein. In D. melanogaster S2 cells, dCREG was found to localize in lysosomes. Further studies revealed that intracellular dCREG is subject of proteolytic maturation. Processing and turnover could be substantially reduced by RNAi-mediated silencing of cathepsin L. In contrast to mammalian cells, lysosomal delivery of dCREG does not depend on its carbohydrate moiety. Furthermore, depletion of the putative D. melanogaster lysosomal sorting receptor lysosomal enzyme receptor protein did not compromise cellular retention of dCREG. We also investigated the developmental consequences of dCREG ablation in whole D. melanogaster flies. Ubiquitous depletion of dCREG proved lethal at the late pupal stage once a knock-down efficiency of >95% was achieved. These results demonstrate that dCREG is essential for proper completion of fly development. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) conjugation impedes transcriptional silencing by the polycomb group repressor Sex Comb on Midleg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew; Mallin, Daniel R; Simon, Jeffrey A; Courey, Albert J

    2011-04-01

    The Drosophila protein Sex Comb on Midleg (Scm) is a member of the Polycomb group (PcG), a set of transcriptional repressors that maintain silencing of homeotic genes during development. Recent findings have identified PcG proteins both as targets for modification by the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protein and as catalytic components of the SUMO conjugation pathway. We have found that the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 binds to Scm and that this interaction, which requires the Scm C-terminal sterile α motif (SAM) domain, is crucial for the efficient sumoylation of Scm. Scm is associated with the major Polycomb response element (PRE) of the homeotic gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx), and efficient PRE recruitment requires an intact Scm SAM domain. Global reduction of sumoylation augments binding of Scm to the PRE. This is likely to be a direct effect of Scm sumoylation because mutations in the SUMO acceptor sites in Scm enhance its recruitment to the PRE, whereas translational fusion of SUMO to the Scm N terminus interferes with this recruitment. In the metathorax, Ubx expression promotes haltere formation and suppresses wing development. When SUMO levels are reduced, we observe decreased expression of Ubx and partial haltere-to-wing transformation phenotypes. These observations suggest that SUMO negatively regulates Scm function by impeding its recruitment to the Ubx major PRE.

  6. Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) Conjugation Impedes Transcriptional Silencing by the Polycomb Group Repressor Sex Comb on Midleg*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew; Mallin, Daniel R.; Simon, Jeffrey A.; Courey, Albert J.

    2011-01-01

    The Drosophila protein Sex Comb on Midleg (Scm) is a member of the Polycomb group (PcG), a set of transcriptional repressors that maintain silencing of homeotic genes during development. Recent findings have identified PcG proteins both as targets for modification by the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protein and as catalytic components of the SUMO conjugation pathway. We have found that the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 binds to Scm and that this interaction, which requires the Scm C-terminal sterile α motif (SAM) domain, is crucial for the efficient sumoylation of Scm. Scm is associated with the major Polycomb response element (PRE) of the homeotic gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx), and efficient PRE recruitment requires an intact Scm SAM domain. Global reduction of sumoylation augments binding of Scm to the PRE. This is likely to be a direct effect of Scm sumoylation because mutations in the SUMO acceptor sites in Scm enhance its recruitment to the PRE, whereas translational fusion of SUMO to the Scm N terminus interferes with this recruitment. In the metathorax, Ubx expression promotes haltere formation and suppresses wing development. When SUMO levels are reduced, we observe decreased expression of Ubx and partial haltere-to-wing transformation phenotypes. These observations suggest that SUMO negatively regulates Scm function by impeding its recruitment to the Ubx major PRE. PMID:21278366

  7. Gli2 activator function in preosteoblasts is sufficient to mediate Ihh-dependent osteoblast differentiation, whereas the repressor function of Gli2 is dispensable for endochondral ossification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesper, Dörthe Andrea; Didt-Koziel, Lydia; Vortkamp, Andrea

    2010-06-01

    Signaling of Indian hedgehog (Ihh), one of the key regulators of endochondral ossification is mediated by transcription factors of the Gli family, Gli1, Gli2, and Gli3. Gli3 and to a lesser extent Gli2 can be proteolytically processed into short repressor proteins. Upon Ihh signaling, processing is inhibited and the full-length proteins function as activators of transcription. Gli3 has been shown to mainly act as a repressor of Ihh target genes in chondrocytes, but the role of other Gli isoforms is less clear. Analyzing mouse mutants deficient for Ihh;Gli2 or Gli3;Gli2, we show here that the Gli2 repressor has no detectable function in chondrocyte or osteoblast differentiation. Instead, Gli2 seems to act as an activator to fully induce the expression of Ihh target genes in skeletal tissues. Furthermore, we show that, in the absence of Gli3, the activator function of Gli2 is sufficient to induce Ihh-dependent osteoblast differentiation.

  8. Loss of the co-repressor GPS2 sensitizes macrophage activation upon metabolic stress induced by obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Rongrong; Toubal, Amine; Goñi, Saioa; Drareni, Karima; Huang, Zhiqiang; Alzaid, Fawaz; Ballaire, Raphaelle; Ancel, Patricia; Liang, Ning; Damdimopoulos, Anastasios; Hainault, Isabelle; Soprani, Antoine; Aron-Wisnewsky, Judith; Foufelle, Fabienne; Lawrence, Toby; Gautier, Jean-Francois; Venteclef, Nicolas; Treuter, Eckardt

    2016-07-01

    Humans with obesity differ in their susceptibility to developing insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D). This variation may relate to the extent of adipose tissue (AT) inflammation that develops as their obesity progresses. The state of macrophage activation has a central role in determining the degree of AT inflammation and thus its dysfunction, and these states are driven by epigenomic alterations linked to gene expression. The underlying mechanisms that regulate these alterations, however, are poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that a co-repressor complex containing G protein pathway suppressor 2 (GPS2) crucially controls the macrophage epigenome during activation by metabolic stress. The study of AT from humans with and without obesity revealed correlations between reduced GPS2 expression in macrophages, elevated systemic and AT inflammation, and diabetic status. The causality of this relationship was confirmed by using macrophage-specific Gps2-knockout (KO) mice, in which inappropriate co-repressor complex function caused enhancer activation, pro-inflammatory gene expression and hypersensitivity toward metabolic-stress signals. By contrast, transplantation of GPS2-overexpressing bone marrow into two mouse models of obesity (ob/ob and diet-induced obesity) reduced inflammation and improved insulin sensitivity. Thus, our data reveal a potentially reversible disease mechanism that links co-repressor-dependent epigenomic alterations in macrophages to AT inflammation and the development of T2D.

  9. Impairments of exploration and memory after systemic or prelimbic D1-receptor antagonism in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Bettina; Schachtman, Todd R.; Mark, Louise T.

    2011-01-01

    to examine the effects on memory: cross-maze and object recognition task. Systemic administration reduced spatial exploration in cross-maze as well as in an open field test, and also reduced object exploration. Spatial (hippocampus-dependent) short-term memory was inhibited in the cross-maze and non......-spatial short-term object retention was also impaired. In contrast to these systemic effects, bilateral injections of SCH23390 into the prelimbic cortices altered neither spatial nor object exploration, but did inhibit short-term memory in both cross-maze and object recognition task. Therefore, the inhibiting......D1-receptor antagonism is known to impair rodent memory but also inhibits spontaneous exploration of stimuli to be remembered. Hypo-exploration could contribute to impaired memory by influencing event processing. In order to explore this effect, the D1 receptor antagonist, SCH23390...

  10. GIP-(3-42) does not antagonize insulinotropic effects of GIP at physiological concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deacon, Carolyn F; Plamboeck, Astrid; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2006-01-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide [GIP-(1-42)] is degraded by dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP IV), forming GIP-(3-42). In mice, high concentrations of synthetic GIP-(3-42) may function as a GIP receptor antagonist, but it is unclear whether this occurs at physiological concentrations...... GIP, GIP-(3-42) behaved as a weak antagonist (IC(50), 92 and 731 nM for inhibition of cAMP accumulation elicited by 10 pM and 1 nM native GIP, respectively). In the isolated perfused rat pancreas, GIP-(3-42) alone had no effect on insulin output and only reduced the response to GIP (1 nM) when......-42) can weakly antagonize cAMP accumulation and insulin output in vitro, it does not behave as a physiological antagonist in vivo....

  11. USP10 Antagonizes c-Myc Transcriptional Activation through SIRT6 Stabilization to Suppress Tumor Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenghong Lin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The reduced protein expression of SIRT6 tumor suppressor is involved in tumorigenesis. The molecular mechanisms underlying SIRT6 protein downregulation in human cancers remain unknown. Using a proteomic approach, we have identified the ubiquitin-specific peptidase USP10, another tumor suppressor, as one of the SIRT6-interacting proteins. USP10 suppresses SIRT6 ubiquitination to protect SIRT6 from proteasomal degradation. USP10 antagonizes the transcriptional activity of the c-Myc oncogene through SIRT6, as well as p53, to inhibit cell-cycle progression, cancer cell growth, and tumor formation. To support this conclusion, we detected significant reductions in both USP10 and SIRT6 protein expression in human colon cancers. Our study discovered crosstalk between two tumor-suppressive genes in regulating cell-cycle progression and proliferation and showed that dysregulated USP10 function promotes tumorigenesis through SIRT6 degradation.

  12. Isolation of Fungi from Heterodera glycines and in vitro Bioassays for Their Antagonism to Eggs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, S L; Huettel, R N; Sayre, R M

    1990-10-01

    Twenty fungi were assayed in vitro for antagonism to eggs of Heterodera glycines. Eight of the fungi were isolated from cysts or eggs of H. glycines during the current study, one was isolated from Panagrellus redivivus, and eleven were obtained from other researchers or collections. The bioassays were conducted on eggs from nematodes that had been grown monoxenically on excised root tips. Phoma chrysanthemicola, one strain of Verticillium chlamydosporium, and one strain of V. lecanii caused a decrease (P Trichoderma polysporum infected live eggs but enhanced (P Fusarium sp., Neocosmospora vasinfecta, Scytalidium fulvum, Trichoderma harzianum (two strains), V. chlamydosporium (one strain), V. lecanii (three strains), and an unidentified fungus did not measurably affect egg viability, even though hyphae of five of these fungi were seen in live eggs. The bioassay provides a useful step in the selection of a biological control agent for this major nematode pest.

  13. Neuropeptide Y Y5 receptor antagonism attenuates cocaine-induced effects in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gunnar; Jensen, Morten; Weikop, Pia

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Several studies suggest a role for neuropeptide Y (NPY) in addiction to drugs of abuse, including cocaine. However, the NPY receptors mediating addiction-related effects remain to be determined. Objectives To explore the potential role of Y5 NPY receptors in cocaine-induced behavioural...... effects. Methods The Y5 antagonist L-152,804 and Y5-knockout (Y5-KO) mice were tested in two models of cocaine addiction-related behaviour: acute self-administration and cocaine-induced hyperactivity. We also studied effects of Y5 receptor antagonism on cocaine-induced c-fos expression and extracellular...... effects, suggesting that Y5 receptors could be a potential therapeutic target in cocaine addiction....

  14. Combining climate and energy policies: synergies or antagonism? Modeling interactions with energy efficiency instruments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecuyer, Oskar; Bibas, Ruben

    2012-01-01

    In addition to the already present Climate and Energy package, the European Union (EU) plans to include a binding target to reduce energy consumption. We analyze the rationales the EU invokes to justify such an overlapping and develop a minimal common framework to study interactions arising from the combination of instruments reducing emissions, promoting renewable energy (RE) production and reducing energy demand through energy efficiency (EE) investments. We find that although all instruments tend to reduce GHG emissions and although a price on carbon tends also to give the right incentives for RE and EE, the combination of more than one instrument leads to significant antagonisms regarding major objectives of the policy package. The model allows to show in a single framework and to quantify the antagonistic effects of the joint promotion of RE and EE. We also show and quantify the effects of this joint promotion on ETS permit price, on wholesale market price and on energy production levels. (authors)

  15. What Do Structures Tell Us About Chemokine Receptor Function and Antagonism?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kufareva, Irina; Gustavsson, Martin; Zheng, Yi; Stephens, Bryan S.; Handel, Tracy M. (UCSD)

    2017-05-22

    Chemokines and their cell surface G protein–coupled receptors are critical for cell migration, not only in many fundamental biological processes but also in inflammatory diseases and cancer. Recent X-ray structures of two chemokines complexed with full-length receptors provided unprecedented insight into the atomic details of chemokine recognition and receptor activation, and computational modeling informed by new experiments leverages these insights to gain understanding of many more receptor:chemokine pairs. In parallel, chemokine receptor structures with small molecules reveal the complicated and diverse structural foundations of small molecule antagonism and allostery, highlight the inherent physicochemical challenges of receptor:chemokine interfaces, and suggest novel epitopes that can be exploited to overcome these challenges. The structures and models promote unique understanding of chemokine receptor biology, including the interpretation of two decades of experimental studies, and will undoubtedly assist future drug discovery endeavors.

  16. An ibuprofen-antagonized plasmin inhibitor released by human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, W B; Ehrlich, H P

    1991-02-01

    Serum-free culture medium harvested from endothelial cell monolayer cultures derived from human scars and dermis was examined for inhibition of fibrinolysis using a fibrin plate assay. Human cultured fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells did not produce any detectable inhibitory activity. The inhibitor is spontaneously released from the cultured endothelial cells over time. In the fibrin plate assay of plasmin-induced fibrinolysis, one nonsteroidal antiinflammatory (NSAI) drug, ibuprofen, was demonstrated to antagonize the inhibition of fibrinolysis. The antagonistic activity of ibuprofen appears unrelated to its NSAI drug activity because other NSAI drugs such as indomethacin and tolmetin have minimal antagonistic activity. Heating the cultured endothelial cells to 42 degrees C stimulates greater release of the inhibitor in a shorter period of time. This plasmin inhibitor, which is produced by endothelial cells, may contribute to postburn vascular occlusion, leading to secondary progressive necrosis in burn-traumatized patients.

  17. Silencing the alarms: innate immune antagonism by rotavirus NSP1 and VP3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Marco; Ogden, Kristen M.; Patton, John T.

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune response involves a broad array of pathogen sensors that stimulate the production of interferons (IFN) to induce an antiviral state. Rotavirus, a significant cause of childhood gastroenteritis and a member of the Reoviridae family of segmented, double-stranded RNA viruses, encodes at least two direct antagonists of host innate immunity: NSP1 and VP3. NSP1, a putative E3 ubiquitin ligase, mediates the degradation of cellular factors involved in both IFN induction and downstream signaling. VP3, the viral capping enzyme, utilizes a 2H-phosphodiesterase domain to prevent activation of the cellular oligoadenylate synthase (OAS)-RNase L pathway. Computational, molecular, and biochemical studies have provided key insights into the structural and mechanistic basis of innate immune antagonism by NSP1 and VP3 of group A rotaviruses (RVA). Future studies with non-RVA isolates will be essential to understand how other RV species evade host innate immune responses. PMID:25724417

  18. Interleukin-1 antagonism moderates the inflammatory state associated with Type 1 diabetes during clinical trials conducted at disease onset

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cabrera, Susanne M; Wang, Xujing; Chen, Yi-Guang

    2016-01-01

    It was hypothesized that IL-1 antagonism would preserve β-cell function in new onset Type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, the Anti-Interleukin-1 in Diabetes Action (AIDA) and TrialNet Canakinumab (TN-14) trials failed to show efficacy of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) or canakinumab, as measured...

  19. Small molecule antagonism of oxysterol-induced Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 2 (EBI2) activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Madsen, Christian M; Arfelt, Kristine N

    2013-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 2 (EBI2) was recently identified as the first oxysterol-activated 7TM receptor. EBI2 is essential for B cell trafficking within lymphoid tissues and thus the humoral immune response in general. Here we characterize the antagonism of the non-peptide molecule GSK...

  20. Comparison of vascular alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonism of tamsulosin in oral controlled absorption system (OCAS) and modified release (MR) formulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michel, M. C.; Korstanje, C.; Krauwinkel, W.; Shear, M.; Davies, J.; Quartel, A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The cardiovascular a-l-adrenoceptor (AR) antagonism of the new oral controlled absorption system (OCAS) 0.4 mg tablet formulation of tamsulosin was compared with that of the modified release (MR) 0.4 mg capsule formulation in healthy male volunteers after a single dose in the fasted

  1. Ghrelin receptor antagonism of hyperlocomotion in cocaine-sensitized mice requires βarrestin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Krisztian; Slosky, Lauren M; Pack, Thomas F; Urs, Nikhil M; Boone, Peter; Mao, Lan; Abraham, Dennis; Caron, Marc G; Barak, Lawrence S

    2018-01-01

    The "brain-gut" peptide ghrelin, which mediates food-seeking behaviors, is recognized as a very strong endogenous modulator of dopamine (DA) signaling. Ghrelin binds the G protein-coupled receptor GHSR1a, and administration of ghrelin increases the rewarding properties of psychostimulants while ghrelin receptor antagonists decrease them. In addition, the GHSR1a signals through βarrestin-2 to regulate actin/stress fiber rearrangement, suggesting βarrestin-2 participation in the regulation of actin-mediated synaptic plasticity for addictive substances like cocaine. The effects of ghrelin receptor ligands on reward strongly suggest that modulation of ghrelin signaling could provide an effective strategy to ameliorate undesirable behaviors arising from addiction. To investigate this possibility, we tested the effects of ghrelin receptor antagonism in a cocaine behavioral sensitization paradigm using DA neuron-specific βarrestin-2 KO mice. Our results show that these mice sensitize to cocaine as well as wild-type littermates. The βarrestin-2 KO mice, however, no longer respond to the locomotor attenuating effects of the GHSR1a antagonist YIL781. The data presented here suggest that the separate stages of addictive behavior differ in their requirements for βarrestin-2 and show that pharmacological inhibition of βarrestin-2 function through GHSR1a antagonism is not equivalent to the loss of βarrestin-2 function achieved by genetic ablation. These data support targeting GHSR1a signaling in addiction therapy but indicate that using signaling biased compounds that modulate βarrestin-2 activity differentially from G protein activity may be required. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Comparative analyses of reproductive structures in harvestmen (opiliones reveal multiple transitions from courtship to precopulatory antagonism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes M Burns

    Full Text Available Explaining the rapid, species-specific diversification of reproductive structures and behaviors is a long-standing goal of evolutionary biology, with recent research tending to attribute reproductive phenotypes to the evolutionary mechanisms of female mate choice or intersexual conflict. Progress in understanding these and other possible mechanisms depends, in part, on reconstructing the direction, frequency and relative timing of phenotypic evolution of male and female structures in species-rich clades. Here we examine evolution of reproductive structures in the leiobunine harvestmen or "daddy long-legs" of eastern North America, a monophyletic group that includes species in which males court females using nuptial gifts and other species that are equipped for apparent precopulatory antagonism (i.e., males with long, hardened penes and females with sclerotized pregenital barriers. We used parsimony- and Bayesian likelihood-based analyses to reconstruct character evolution in categorical reproductive traits and found that losses of ancestral gift-bearing penile sacs are strongly associated with gains of female pregenital barriers. In most cases, both events occur on the same internal branch of the phylogeny. These coevolutionary changes occurred at least four times, resulting in clade-specific designs in the penis and pregenital barrier. The discovery of convergent origins and/or enhancements of apparent precopulatory antagonism among closely related species offers an unusual opportunity to investigate how major changes in reproductive morphology have occurred. We propose new hypotheses that attribute these enhancements to changes in ecology or life history that reduce the duration of breeding seasons, an association that is consistent with female choice, sexual conflict, and/or an alternative evolutionary mechanism.

  3. SB-224289 Antagonizes the Antifungal Mechanism of the Marine Depsipeptide Papuamide A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsi D Cassilly

    Full Text Available In order to expand the repertoire of antifungal compounds a novel, high-throughput phenotypic drug screen targeting fungal phosphatidylserine (PS synthase (Cho1p was developed based on antagonism of the toxin papuamide A (Pap-A. Pap-A is a cyclic depsipeptide that binds to PS in the membrane of wild-type Candida albicans, and permeabilizes its plasma membrane, ultimately causing cell death. Organisms with a homozygous deletion of the CHO1 gene (cho1ΔΔ do not produce PS and are able to survive in the presence of Pap-A. Using this phenotype (i.e. resistance to Pap-A as an indicator of Cho1p inhibition, we screened over 5,600 small molecules for Pap-A resistance and identified SB-224289 as a positive hit. SB-224289, previously reported as a selective human 5-HT1B receptor antagonist, also confers resistance to the similar toxin theopapuamide (TPap-A, but not to other cytotoxic depsipeptides tested. Structurally similar molecules and truncated variants of SB-224289 do not confer resistance to Pap-A, suggesting that the toxin-blocking ability of SB-224289 is very specific. Further biochemical characterization revealed that SB-224289 does not inhibit Cho1p, indicating that Pap-A resistance is conferred by another undetermined mechanism. Although the mode of resistance is unclear, interaction between SB-224289 and Pap-A or TPap-A suggests this screening assay could be adapted for discovering other compounds which could antagonize the effects of other environmentally- or medically-relevant depsipeptide toxins.

  4. Vascular permeabilization by intravenous arachidonate in the rat peritoneal cavity: antagonism by ethamsylate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannaert, Patrick; Alvarez-Guerra, Miriam; Hider, Hamida; Chiavaroli, Carlo; Garay, Ricardo P

    2003-04-11

    The hemostatic agent, ethamsylate, inhibits arachidonic acid metabolism by a mechanism independent of cyclooxygenase activity and blocks carrageenan-induced rat paw edema. Here, ethamsylate was investigated for (i) in vivo actions on the free radical-dependent, permeabilizing responses to arachidonic acid and (ii) its antioxidant potential in vitro. Vascular permeability was equated to the extravasation rate of Evans blue from plasma into the rat peritoneal cavity. Antioxidant potential was investigated by classical in vitro tests for superoxide radicals, hydroxyl radicals (OH(.)), and nitric oxide. Intravenous ethamsylate induced a very important and significant reduction of permeability responses to arachidonate, both when given preventively and cumulatively. Thus, (i) ethamsylate significantly reversed arachidonate-induced permeabilization, even at the lowest dose tested (44+/-5% at 10 mg/kg) and (ii) a maximal reversal (about 70%) was reached between 50 and 200 mg/kg ethamsylate. In contrast, ethamsylate (100 mg/kg) was unable to antagonize the vascular permeabilization induced by serotonin (5-HT). In antioxidant assays, ethamsylate showed scavenging properties against hydroxyl radicals generated by the Fenton reaction (H(2)O(2)/Fe(2+)) even at 0.1 microM (-20+/-3%). OH(.) scavenging by ethamsylate reached 42+/-8% at 10 microM and 57+/-7% at 1 mM and was comparable to that of reference compounds (vitamin E, troxerutin, and mannitol). Conversely, ethamsylate was a poor scavenger of superoxide and nitric oxide radicals. In conclusion, intravenous ethamsylate potently antagonized the peritoneal vascular permeabilization induced by arachidonate, an action likely due to its antioxidant properties, particularly against hydroxyl radical. Such a mechanism can explain previous observations that ethamsylate inhibits carrageenan-induced rat paw edema. Whether it also participates in the hemostatic action of ethamsylate deserves further investigation.

  5. Environmental variation shifts the relationship between trees and scatterhoarders along the continuum from mutualism to antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaya, Gina M; Goldberg, Adam S; Steele, Michael A; Dalgleish, Harmony J

    2018-05-01

    The conditional mutualism between scatterhoarders and trees varies on a continuum from mutualism to antagonism and can change across time and space, and among species. We examined 4 tree species (red oak [Quercus rubra], white oak [Quercus alba], American chestnut [Castanea dentata] and hybrid chestnut [C. dentata × Castanea mollissima) across 5 sites and 3 years to quantify the variability in this conditional mutualism. We used a published model to compare the rates of seed emergence with and without burial to the probability that seeds will be cached and left uneaten by scatterhoarders to quantify variation in the conditional mutualism that can be explained by environmental variation among sites, years, species, and seed provenance within species. All species tested had increased emergence when buried. However, comparing benefits of burial to the probability of caching by scatterhoarders indicated a mutualism in red oak, while white oak was nearly always antagonistic. Chestnut was variable around the boundary between mutualism and antagonism, indicating a high degree of context dependence in the relationship with scatterhoarders. We found that different seed provenances did not vary in their potential for mutualism. Temperature did not explain microsite differences in seed emergence in any of the species tested. In hybrid chestnut only, emergence on the surface declined with soil moisture in the fall. By quantifying the variation in the conditional mutualism that was not caused by changes in scatterhoarder behavior, we show that environmental conditions and seed traits are an important and underappreciated component of the variation in the relationship between trees and scatterhoarders. © 2018 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. The analgesic effects of intrathecal xylazine and detomidine in sheep and their antagonism with systemic atipamezole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christina Haerdi-Landerer, M; Schlegel, Urs; Neiger-Aeschbacher, Gina

    2005-09-01

    To evaluate the analgesic and adverse side effects of intrathecal (IT) xylazine (XYL) and detomidine (DET) and the subsequent effects of two doses of intravenous (IV) atipamezole (ATI). Prospective, randomized, cross-over. Five adult healthy female sheep with mean body mass of 55 +/- 2.3 kg. Material and methods Each sheep underwent four treatments: 1) 50 microg kg(-1) XYL IT and 5 microg kg(-1) ATI IV, 2) 50 microg kg(-1) XYL IT and 2.5 microg kg(-1) ATI IV, 3) 10 microg kg(-1) DET IT and 5 microg kg(-1) ATI IV, 4) 10 microg kg(-1) DET IT and 2.5 microg kg(-1) ATI IV. Pain threshold (TH) was tested by applying pulsed and stepwise incremental direct current to the skin overlying the pastern. The current at the point of foot lift was recorded as the TH. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial pressure, arterial oxygen (PO(2)) and carbon dioxide (PCO(2)) tensions were monitored. Outcomes were derived as differences between baseline assessment and measurements after treatment. Two-way anova was used to analyse drug effects, treatment differences between groups were examined with an F-test or Wilcoxon's rank sum test in case of non-parametric data distribution. p was set at 0.05. Both drugs increased the pain TH, caused small increases in PCO(2), and small decreases in HR, the latter was only significant for XYL recipients. Xylazine produced a significantly higher TH, more rapidly and for longer than DET. Atipamezole only significantly affected PaCO(2) in the XYL group 2. The pain TH was not affected in either group after IV ATI. At the doses used, IT XYL, and to a lesser extent DET, induced pastern analgesia. Atipamezole 5 microg kg(-1) IV antagonized some side effects without affecting analgesia. Intrathecal XYL may be useful as an analgesic in sheep. Its safety is increased because IV ATI antagonizes side effects, but not analgesia.

  7. Antagonism pattern detection between microRNA and target expression in Ewing's sarcoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Martignetti

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs have emerged as fundamental regulators that silence gene expression at the post-transcriptional and translational levels. The identification of their targets is a major challenge to elucidate the regulated biological processes. The overall effect of miRNA is reflected on target mRNA expression, suggesting the design of new investigative methods based on high-throughput experimental data such as miRNA and transcriptome profiles. We propose a novel statistical measure of non-linear dependence between miRNA and mRNA expression, in order to infer miRNA-target interactions. This approach, which we name antagonism pattern detection, is based on the statistical recognition of a triangular-shaped pattern in miRNA-target expression profiles. This pattern is observed in miRNA-target expression measurements since their simultaneously elevated expression is statistically under-represented in the case of miRNA silencing effect. The proposed method enables miRNA target prediction to strongly rely on cellular context and physiological conditions reflected by expression data. The procedure has been assessed on synthetic datasets and tested on a set of real positive controls. Then it has been applied to analyze expression data from Ewing's sarcoma patients. The antagonism relationship is evaluated as a good indicator of real miRNA-target biological interaction. The predicted targets are consistently enriched for miRNA binding site motifs in their 3'UTR. Moreover, we reveal sets of predicted targets for each miRNA sharing important biological function. The procedure allows us to infer crucial miRNA regulators and their potential targets in Ewing's sarcoma disease. It can be considered as a valid statistical approach to discover new insights in the miRNA regulatory mechanisms.

  8. Assessing the Role of ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR Transcriptional Repressors in Salicylic Acid-Mediated Suppression of Jasmonic Acid-Responsive Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caarls, Lotte; van der Does, Adriana; Hickman, Richard; Jansen, Wouter; van Verk, Marcel; Proietti, Silvia; Lorenzo, Oscar; Solano, Roberto; Pieterse, Corné M J; Van Wees, Saskia C M

    2017-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) cross-communicate in the plant immune signaling network to finely regulate induced defenses. In Arabidopsis, SA antagonizes many JA-responsive genes, partly by targeting the ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR (ERF)-type transcriptional activator ORA59. Members of the

  9. Differential effects of early-life NMDA receptor antagonism on aspartame-impaired insulin tolerance and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, Kate S; Inglis, Angela; Shibin, Sherin; Andres, Bernard; Ubungen, Rosario; Thiam, Jennifer; Mata, Princess; Al-Mohanna, Futwan A

    2016-12-01

    We have previously showed that lifetime exposure to aspartame, commencing in utero via the mother's diet, may impair insulin tolerance and cause behavioral deficits in adulthood via mechanisms which are incompletely understood. The role of the CNS in regulating glucose homeostasis has been highlighted by recent delineation of the gut-brain axis, in which N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptors (NMDARs) are important in maintaining glucose homeostasis, in addition to regulating certain aspects of behavior. Since the gut-brain axis can be modulated by fetal programming, we hypothesized that early-life NMDAR antagonism may affect aspartame-induced glucose deregulation in adulthood, and may alter the aspartame behavioral phenotype. Accordingly, C57Bl/6J mice were chronically exposed to aspartame commencing in utero, in the presence and absence of maternal administration of the competitive NMDAR antagonist CGP 39551, from conception until weaning. Drug/diet interactions in adulthood glucocentric and behavioral parameters were assessed. Aspartame exposure elevated blood glucose and impaired insulin-induced glucose disposal during an insulin tolerance test, which could be normalized by NMDAR antagonism. The same effects were not observed in control diet mice, suggesting an early-life drug/diet interaction. Behavioral analysis of adult offspring indicated that NMDAR antagonism of control diet mice caused hyperlocomotion and impaired spatial navigation. Conversely hypolocomotion, reduced exploratory activity and increased anxiety-related behavior were apparent in aspartame diet mice with early-life NMDAR antagonism. significant drug/diet interactions in glucocentric and behavioral parameters were identified in aspartame-exposed mice with early-life NMDAR antagonism. This suggests a possible involvement of early NMDAR interactions in aspartame-impaired glucose homeostasis and behavioral deficits. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The Bacterial Effector HopX1 Targets JAZ Transcriptional Repressors to Activate Jasmonate Signaling and Promote Infection in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez-Ibanez, Selena; Boter, Marta; Fernández-Barbero, Gemma; Chini, Andrea; Rathjen, John P.; Solano, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenicity of Pseudomonas syringae is dependent on a type III secretion system, which secretes a suite of virulence effector proteins into the host cytoplasm, and the production of a number of toxins such as coronatine (COR), which is a mimic of the plant hormone jasmonate-isoleuce (JA-Ile). Inside the plant cell, effectors target host molecules to subvert the host cell physiology and disrupt defenses. However, despite the fact that elucidating effector action is essential to understanding bacterial pathogenesis, the molecular function and host targets of the vast majority of effectors remain largely unknown. Here, we found that effector HopX1 from Pseudomonas syringae pv. tabaci (Pta) 11528, a strain that does not produce COR, interacts with and promotes the degradation of JAZ proteins, a key family of JA-repressors. We show that hopX1 encodes a cysteine protease, activity that is required for degradation of JAZs by HopX1. HopX1 associates with JAZ proteins through its central ZIM domain and degradation occurs in a COI1-independent manner. Moreover, ectopic expression of HopX1 in Arabidopsis induces the expression of JA-dependent genes, represses salicylic acid (SA)-induced markers, and complements the growth of a COR-deficient P. syringae pv. tomato (Pto) DC3000 strain during natural bacterial infections. Furthermore, HopX1 promoted susceptibility when delivered by the natural type III secretion system, to a similar extent as the addition of COR, and this effect was dependent on its catalytic activity. Altogether, our results indicate that JAZ proteins are direct targets of bacterial effectors to promote activation of JA-induced defenses and susceptibility in Arabidopsis. HopX1 illustrates a paradigm of an alternative evolutionary solution to COR with similar physiological outcome. PMID:24558350

  11. An Autocrine Proliferation Repressor Regulates Dictyostelium discoideum Proliferation and Chemorepulsion Using the G Protein-Coupled Receptor GrlH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yu; Wu, Yuantai; Herlihy, Sarah E; Brito-Aleman, Francisco J; Ting, Jose H; Janetopoulos, Chris; Gomer, Richard H

    2018-02-13

    In eukaryotic microbes, little is known about signals that inhibit the proliferation of the cells that secrete the signal, and little is known about signals (chemorepellents) that cause cells to move away from the source of the signal. Autocrine proliferation repressor protein A (AprA) is a protein secreted by the eukaryotic microbe Dictyostelium discoideum AprA is a chemorepellent for and inhibits the proliferation of D. discoideum We previously found that cells sense AprA using G proteins, suggesting the existence of a G protein-coupled AprA receptor. To identify the AprA receptor, we screened mutants lacking putative G protein-coupled receptors. We found that, compared to the wild-type strain, cells lacking putative receptor GrlH ( grlH¯ cells) show rapid proliferation, do not have large numbers of cells moving away from the edges of colonies, are insensitive to AprA-induced proliferation inhibition and chemorepulsion, and have decreased AprA binding. Expression of GrlH in grlH¯ cells ( grlH¯/grlH OE ) rescues the phenotypes described above. These data indicate that AprA signaling may be mediated by GrlH in D. discoideum IMPORTANCE Little is known about how eukaryotic cells can count themselves and thus regulate the size of a tissue or density of cells. In addition, little is known about how eukaryotic cells can sense a repellant signal and move away from the source of the repellant, for instance, to organize the movement of cells in a developing embryo or to move immune cells out of a tissue. In this study, we found that a eukaryotic microbe uses G protein-coupled receptors to mediate both cell density sensing and chemorepulsion. Copyright © 2018 Tang et al.

  12. Gli3 acts as a repressor downstream of Ihh in regulating two distinct steps of chondrocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziel, Lydia; Wuelling, Manuela; Schneider, Sabine; Vortkamp, Andrea

    2005-12-01

    During endochondral ossification, the secreted growth factor Indian hedgehog (Ihh) regulates several differentiation steps. It interacts with a second secreted factor, parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), to regulate the onset of hypertrophic differentiation, and it regulates chondrocyte proliferation and ossification of the perichondrium independently of PTHrP. To investigate how the Ihh signal is translated in the different target tissues, we analyzed the role of the zinc-finger transcription factor Gli3, which acts downstream of hedgehog signals in other organs. Loss of Gli3 in Ihh mutants restores chondrocyte proliferation and delays the accelerated onset of hypertrophic differentiation observed in Ihh-/- mutants. Furthermore the expression of the Ihh target genes patched (Ptch) and PTHrP is reactivated in Ihh-/-;Gli3-/- mutants. Gli3 seems thus to act as a strong repressor of Ihh signals in regulating chondrocyte differentiation. In addition, loss of Gli3 in mice that overexpress Ihh in chondrocytes accelerates the onset of hypertrophic differentiation by reducing the domain and possibly the level of PTHrP expression. Careful analysis of chondrocyte differentiation in Gli3-/- mutants revealed that Gli3 negatively regulates the differentiation of distal, low proliferating chondrocytes into columnar, high proliferating cells. Our results suggest a model in which the Ihh/Gli3 system regulates two distinct steps of chondrocyte differentiation: (1) the switch from distal into columnar chondrocytes is repressed by Gli3 in a PTHrP-independent mechanism; (2) the transition from proliferating into hypertrophic chondrocytes is regulated by Gli3-dependent expression of PTHrP. Furthermore, by regulating distal chondrocyte differentiation, Gli3 seems to position the domain of PTHrP expression.

  13. Sequence of ligand binding and structure change in the diphtheria toxin repressor upon activation by divalent transition metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangachari, Vijayaraghavan; Marin, Vedrana; Bienkiewicz, Ewa A; Semavina, Maria; Guerrero, Luis; Love, John F; Murphy, John R; Logan, Timothy M

    2005-04-19

    The diphtheria toxin repressor (DtxR) is an Fe(II)-activated transcriptional regulator of iron homeostatic and virulence genes in Corynebacterium diphtheriae. DtxR is a two-domain protein that contains two structurally and functionally distinct metal binding sites. Here, we investigate the molecular steps associated with activation by Ni(II)Cl(2) and Cd(II)Cl(2). Equilibrium binding energetics for Ni(II) were obtained from isothermal titration calorimetry, indicating apparent metal dissociation constants of 0.2 and 1.7 microM for two independent sites. The binding isotherms for Ni(II) and Cd(II) exhibited a characteristic exothermic-endothermic pattern that was used to infer the metal binding sequence by comparing the wild-type isotherm with those of several binding site mutants. These data were complemented by measuring the distance between specific backbone amide nitrogens and the first equivalent of metal through heteronuclear NMR relaxation measurements. Previous studies indicated that metal binding affects a disordered to ordered transition in the metal binding domain. The coupling between metal binding and structure change was investigated using near-UV circular dichroism spectroscopy. Together, the data show that the first equivalent of metal is bound by the primary metal binding site. This binding orients the DNA binding helices and begins to fold the N-terminal domain. Subsequent binding at the ancillary site completes the folding of this domain and formation of the dimer interface. This model is used to explain the behavior of several mutants.

  14. Structure-guided approach to site-specific fluorophore labeling of the lac repressor LacI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalle Kipper

    Full Text Available The lactose operon repressor protein LacI has long served as a paradigm of the bacterial transcription factors. However, the mechanisms whereby LacI rapidly locates its cognate binding site on the bacterial chromosome are still elusive. Single-molecule fluorescence imaging approaches are well suited for the study of these mechanisms but rely on a functionally compatible fluorescence labeling of LacI. Particularly attractive for protein fluorescence labeling are synthetic fluorophores due to their small size and favorable photophysical characteristics. Synthetic fluorophores are often conjugated to natively occurring cysteine residues using maleimide chemistry. For a site-specific and functionally compatible labeling with maleimide fluorophores, the target protein often needs to be redesigned to remove unwanted native cysteines and to introduce cysteines at locations better suited for fluorophore attachment. Biochemical screens can then be employed to probe for the functional activity of the redesigned protein both before and after dye labeling. Here, we report a mutagenesis-based redesign of LacI to enable a functionally compatible labeling with maleimide fluorophores. To provide an easily accessible labeling site in LacI, we introduced a single cysteine residue at position 28 in the DNA-binding headpiece of LacI and replaced two native cysteines with alanines where derivatization with bulky substituents is known to compromise the protein's activity. We find that the redesigned LacI retains a robust activity in vitro and in vivo, provided that the third native cysteine at position 281 is retained in LacI. In a total internal reflection microscopy assay, we observed individual Cy3-labeled LacI molecules bound to immobilized DNA harboring the cognate O1 operator sequence, indicating that the dye-labeled LacI is functionally active. We have thus been able to generate a functional fluorescently labeled LacI that can be used to unravel mechanistic

  15. Dissociation of SERPINE1 mRNA from the translational repressor proteins Ago2 and TIA-1 upon platelet activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corduan, Aurélie; Plé, Hélène; Laffont, Benoit; Wallon, Thérèse; Plante, Isabelle; Landry, Patricia; Provost, Patrick

    2015-05-01

    Platelets play an important role in haemostasis, as well as in thrombosis and coagulation processes. They harbour a wide variety of messenger RNAs (mRNAs), that can template de novo protein synthesis, and an abundant array of microRNAs, which are known to mediate mRNA translational repression through proteins of the Argonaute (Ago) family. The relationship between platelet microRNAs and proteins capable of mediating translational repression, however, remains unclear. Here, we report that half of platelet microRNAs is associated to mRNA-regulatory Ago2 protein complexes, in various proportions. Associated to these Ago2 complexes are platelet mRNAs known to support de novo protein synthesis. Reporter gene activity assays confirmed the capacity of the platelet microRNAs, found to be associated to Ago2 complexes, to regulate translation of these platelet mRNAs through their 3'UTR. Neither the microRNA repertoire nor the microRNA composition of Ago2 complexes of human platelets changed upon activation with thrombin. However, under conditions favoring de novo synthesis of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) protein, we documented a rapid dissociation of the encoding platelet SERPINE1 mRNA from Ago2 protein complexes as well as from the translational repressor protein T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1). These findings are consistent with a scenario by which lifting of the repressive effects of Ago2 and TIA-1 protein complexes, involving a rearrangement of proteinmRNA complexes rather than disassembly of Ago2microRNA complexes, would allow translation of SERPINE1 mRNA into PAI-1 in response to platelet activation.

  16. The translational repressor Crc controls the Pseudomonas putida benzoate and alkane catabolic pathways using a multi-tier regulation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Arranz, Sofía; Moreno, Renata; Rojo, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Metabolically versatile bacteria usually perceive aromatic compounds and hydrocarbons as non-preferred carbon sources, and their assimilation is inhibited if more preferable substrates are available. This is achieved via catabolite repression. In Pseudomonas putida, the expression of the genes allowing the assimilation of benzoate and n-alkanes is strongly inhibited by catabolite repression, a process controlled by the translational repressor Crc. Crc binds to and inhibits the translation of benR and alkS mRNAs, which encode the transcriptional activators that induce the expression of the benzoate and alkane degradation genes respectively. However, sequences similar to those recognized by Crc in benR and alkS mRNAs exist as well in the translation initiation regions of the mRNA of several structural genes of the benzoate and alkane pathways, which suggests that Crc may also regulate their translation. The present results show that some of these sites are functional, and that Crc inhibits the induction of both pathways by limiting not only the translation of their transcriptional activators, but also that of genes coding for the first enzyme in each pathway. Crc may also inhibit the translation of a gene involved in benzoate uptake. This multi-tier approach probably ensures the rapid regulation of pathway genes, minimizing the assimilation of non-preferred substrates when better options are available. A survey of possible Crc sites in the mRNAs of genes associated with other catabolic pathways suggested that targeting substrate uptake, pathway induction and/or pathway enzymes may be a common strategy to control the assimilation of non-preferred compounds. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. The switch from fermentation to respiration in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is regulated by the Ert1 transcriptional activator/repressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasmi, Najla; Jacques, Pierre-Etienne; Klimova, Natalia; Guo, Xiao; Ricciardi, Alessandra; Robert, François; Turcotte, Bernard

    2014-10-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, fermentation is the major pathway for energy production, even under aerobic conditions. However, when glucose becomes scarce, ethanol produced during fermentation is used as a carbon source, requiring a shift to respiration. This adaptation results in massive reprogramming of gene expression. Increased expression of genes for gluconeogenesis and the glyoxylate cycle is observed upon a shift to ethanol and, conversely, expression of some fermentation genes is reduced. The zinc cluster proteins Cat8, Sip4, and Rds2, as well as Adr1, have been shown to mediate this reprogramming of gene expression. In this study, we have characterized the gene YBR239C encoding a putative zinc cluster protein and it was named ERT1 (ethanol regulated transcription factor 1). ChIP-chip analysis showed that Ert1 binds to a limited number of targets in the presence of glucose. The strongest enrichment was observed at the promoter of PCK1 encoding an important gluconeogenic enzyme. With ethanol as the carbon source, enrichment was observed with many additional genes involved in gluconeogenesis and mitochondrial function. Use of lacZ reporters and quantitative RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that Ert1 regulates expression of its target genes in a manner that is highly redundant with other regulators of gluconeogenesis. Interestingly, in the presence of ethanol, Ert1 is a repressor of PDC1 encoding an important enzyme for fermentation. We also show that Ert1 binds directly to the PCK1 and PDC1 promoters. In summary, Ert1 is a novel factor involved in the regulation of gluconeogenesis as well as a key fermentation gene. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  18. Regulation of nif expression in Methanococcus maripaludis: roles of the euryarchaeal repressor NrpR, 2-oxoglutarate, and two operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, Thomas J; Wood, Gwendolyn E; Leigh, John A

    2005-02-18

    The methanogenic archaean Methanococcus maripaludis can use ammonia, alanine, or dinitrogen as a nitrogen source for growth. The euryarchaeal nitrogen repressor NrpR controls the expression of the nif (nitrogen fixation) operon, resulting in full repression with ammonia, intermediate repression with alanine, and derepression with dinitrogen. NrpR binds to two tandem operators in the nif promoter region, nifOR(1) and nifOR(2). Here we have undertaken both in vivo and in vitro approaches to study the way in which NrpR, nifOR(1), nifOR(2), and the effector 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) combine to regulate nif expression, leading to a comprehensive understanding of this archaeal regulatory system. We show that NrpR binds as a dimer to nifOR(1) and cooperatively as two dimers to both operators. Cooperative binding occurs only with both operators present. nifOR(1) has stronger binding and by itself can mediate the repression of nif transcription during growth on ammonia, unlike the weakly binding nifOR(2). However, nifOR(2) in combination with nifOR(1) is critical for intermediate repression during growth on alanine. Accordingly, NrpR binds to both operators together with higher affinity than to nifOR(1) alone. NrpR responds directly to 2OG, which weakens its binding to the operators. Hence, 2OG is an intracellular indicator of nitrogen deficiency and acts as an inducer of nif transcription via NrpR. This model is upheld by the recent finding (J. A. Dodsworth and J. A. Leigh, submitted for publication) in our laboratory that 2OG levels in M. maripaludis vary with growth on different nitrogen sources.

  19. Isolation and Functional Characterization of a Floral Repressor, BcMAF1, From Pak-choi (Brassica rapa ssp. Chinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Feiyi; Liu, Tongkun; Hou, Xilin

    2018-01-01

    MADS-box genes form a large gene family in plants and are involved in multiple biological processes, such as flowering. However, the regulation mechanism of MADS-box genes in flowering remains unresolved, especially under short-term cold conditions. In the present study, we isolated BcMAF1 , a Pak-choi ( Brassica rapa ssp. Chinensis ) MADS AFFECTING FLOWERING ( MAF ), as a floral repressor and functionally characterized BcMAF1 in Arabidopsis and Pak-choi. Subcellular localization and sequence analysis indicated that BcMAF1 was a nuclear protein and contained a conserved MADS-box domain. Expression analysis revealed that BcMAF1 had higher expression levels in leaves, stems, and petals, and could be induced by short-term cold conditions in Pak-choi. Overexpressing BcMAF1 in Arabidopsis showed that BcMAF1 had a negative function in regulating flowering, which was further confirmed by silencing endogenous BcMAF1 in Pak-choi. In addition, qPCR results showed that AtAP3 expression was reduced and AtMAF2 expression was induced in BcMAF1 -overexpressing Arabidopsis . Meanwhile, BcAP3 transcript was up-regulated and BcMAF2 transcript was down-regulated in BcMAF1 -silencing Pak-choi. Yeast one-hybrid and dual luciferase transient assays showed that BcMAF1 could bind to the promoters of BcAP3 and BcMAF2 . These results indicated that BcAP3 and BcMAF2 might be the targets of BcMAF1. Taken together, our results suggested that BcMAF1 could negatively regulate flowering by directly activating BcMAF2 and repressing BcAP3 .

  20. Reducing the 2, 4 D+MCPA Antagonism from Hard Spray Waters by Ammonium Sulfate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Hossein Torabi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Water is the main carrier of herbicides (HC that its quality plays an important role in herbicide performance hard water has a high concentration of Ca++ and Mg++ and reviews have shown that calcium, manganese and zinc are the main factors reducing the effectiveness of weak acid herbicides. Weak acid herbicides such as glyphosate, paraquat, clethodim and 2, 4 D are compounds that release the H+ ions once dissolved in water, but just slightly. Therefore, herbicides that are weak acids partially dissociate. Herbicides not dissociated (the compound remains whole are more readily absorbed by plant foliage than those that dissociate. Dissociated herbicide molecules have a negative charge. After being dissociated, herbicides might remain as negatively charged molecules, or they might bind with other positively charged cations. Binding to some cations improves herbicide uptake and absorption, binding to others such as Ca++ and Mg++ antagonizes herbicide activity by decreasing absorption or activity in the cell. To correct such carriers, the use of adjuvants, such as ammonium sulphate (AMS, is recommended, which can reduce the use of herbicides and cause economic savings. The aim of this study was to investigate the simple effects and interactions between different amounts of AMS and carrier hardness (CH levels on 2, 4 D + MCPA herbicide efficacy in controlling white clover (Trifolium repens L. in turf grass. Materials and Methods: The experiment was laid out in a RCBD with three replications for each treatment during spring-summer 2013 in 10 years old mixed cold season turf grass (Festuca rubra + Poa pratensis + Poa pratensis dominated by white clover in Mashhad (Iran. The treatments were the factorial combination of four carrier hardness (CH rates (Deionized, 45, 90 and 180 ppm of Ca++ +Mg++ and three Ammonium Sulfate (AMS rates (0, 2, 3 and 4 Kg per100 L of carrier water were studied. The turf was sprayed with 2, 4 D + MCPA (67.5% SL at

  1. The parental antagonism theory of language evolution: preliminary evidence for the proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William M

    2011-04-01

    not maternally silenced Alu elements are positively correlated with language diversity. Furthermore, there is a much higher than expected frequency of Alu elements inserted into the protein-coding machinery of imprinted and X-chromosomal language loci compared with nonimprinted language loci. Taken together these findings provide some support for parental antagonism theory. Unlike previous theories for language evolution, parental antagonism theory generates testable predictions at the proximate (e.g., neurocognitive areas important for social transmission and language capacities), ontogenetic (e.g., the function of language at different points of development), ultimate (e.g., inclusive fitness), and phylogenetic levels (e.g., the spread of maternally derived brain components in mammals, particularly in the hominin lineage), thus making human capacities for culture more tractable than previously thought.

  2. Feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoproteins antagonize tetherin through a distinctive mechanism that requires virion incorporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, James H; Guevara, Rebekah B; Marcano, Adriana C; Saenz, Dyana T; Fadel, Hind J; Rogstad, Daniel K; Poeschla, Eric M

    2014-03-01

    BST2/tetherin inhibits the release of enveloped viruses from cells. Primate lentiviruses have evolved specific antagonists (Vpu, Nef, and Env). Here we characterized tetherin proteins of species representing both branches of the order Carnivora. Comparison of tiger and cat (Feliformia) to dog and ferret (Caniformia) genes demonstrated that the tiger and cat share a start codon mutation that truncated most of the tetherin cytoplasmic tail early in the Feliformia lineage (19 of 27 amino acids, including the dual tyrosine motif). Alpha interferon (IFN-α) induced tetherin and blocked feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) replication in lymphoid and nonlymphoid feline cells. Budding of bald FIV and HIV particles was blocked by carnivore tetherins. However, infectious FIV particles were resistant, and spreading FIV replication was uninhibited. Antagonism mapped to the envelope glycoprotein (Env), which rescued FIV from carnivore tetherin restriction when expressed in trans but, in contrast to known antagonists, did not rescue noncognate particles. Also unlike the primate lentiviral antagonists, but similar to the Ebola virus glycoprotein, FIV Env did not reduce intracellular or cell surface tetherin levels. Furthermore, FIV-enveloped FIV particles actually required tetherin for optimal release from cells. The results show that FIV Envs mediate a distinctive tetherin evasion. Well adapted to a phylogenetically ancient tetherin tail truncation in the Felidae, it requires functional virion incorporation of Env, and it shields the budding particle without downregulating plasma membrane tetherin. Moreover, FIV has evolved dependence on this protein: particles containing FIV Env need tetherin for optimal release from the cell, while Env(-) particles do not. HIV-1 antagonizes the restriction factor tetherin with the accessory protein Vpu, while HIV-2 and the filovirus Ebola use their envelope (Env) glycoproteins for this purpose. It turns out that the FIV tetherin antagonist is

  3. The Phenylpropanoid Pathway Is Controlled at Different Branches by a Set of R2R3-MYB C2 Repressors in Grapevine1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallini, Erika; Matus, José Tomás; Finezzo, Laura; Zenoni, Sara; Loyola, Rodrigo; Guzzo, Flavia; Schlechter, Rudolf; Ageorges, Agnès; Arce-Johnson, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Because of the vast range of functions that phenylpropanoids possess, their synthesis requires precise spatiotemporal coordination throughout plant development and in response to the environment. The accumulation of these secondary metabolites is transcriptionally controlled by positive and negative regulators from the MYB and basic helix-loop-helix protein families. We characterized four grapevine (Vitis vinifera) R2R3-MYB proteins from the C2 repressor motif clade, all of which harbor the ethylene response factor-associated amphiphilic repression domain but differ in the presence of an additional TLLLFR repression motif found in the strong flavonoid repressor Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) AtMYBL2. Constitutive expression of VvMYB4a and VvMYB4b in petunia (Petunia hybrida) repressed general phenylpropanoid biosynthetic genes and selectively reduced the amount of small-weight phenolic compounds. Conversely, transgenic petunia lines expressing VvMYBC2-L1 and VvMYBC2-L3 showed a severe reduction in petal anthocyanins and seed proanthocyanidins together with a higher pH of crude petal extracts. The distinct function of these regulators was further confirmed by transient expression in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) leaves and grapevine plantlets. Finally, VvMYBC2-L3 was ectopically expressed in grapevine hairy roots, showing a reduction in proanthocyanidin content together with the down-regulation of structural and regulatory genes of the flavonoid pathway as revealed by a transcriptomic analysis. The physiological role of these repressors was inferred by combining the results of the functional analyses and their expression patterns in grapevine during development and in response to ultraviolet B radiation. Our results indicate that VvMYB4a and VvMYB4b may play a key role in negatively regulating the synthesis of small-weight phenolic compounds, whereas VvMYBC2-L1 and VvMYBC2-L3 may additionally fine tune flavonoid levels, balancing the inductive effects of

  4. The Transcriptional Repressor TupA in Aspergillus niger Is Involved in Controlling Gene Expression Related to Cell Wall Biosynthesis, Development, and Nitrogen Source Availability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schachtschabel, Doreen; Arentshorst, Mark; Nitsche, Benjamin M

    2013-01-01

    The Tup1-Cyc8 (Ssn6) complex is a well characterized and conserved general transcriptional repressor complex in eukaryotic cells. Here, we report the identification of the Tup1 (TupA) homolog in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger in a genetic screen for mutants with a constitutive expression...... of the agsA gene. The agsA gene encodes a putative alpha-glucan synthase, which is induced in response to cell wall stress in A. niger. Apart from the constitutive expression of agsA, the selected mutant was also found to produce an unknown pigment at high temperatures. Complementation analysis...

  5. Comparative Analysis of Chromatin Binding by Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) and Other Polycomb Group Repressors at a Drosophila Hox Gene▿

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Liangjun; Jahren, Neal; Miller, Ellen L.; Ketel, Carrie S.; Mallin, Daniel R.; Simon, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) is a transcriptional repressor in the Polycomb group (PcG), but its molecular role in PcG silencing is not known. Although SCM can interact with Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) in vitro, biochemical studies have indicated that SCM is not a core constituent of PRC1 or PRC2. Nevertheless, SCM is just as critical for Drosophila Hox gene silencing as canonical subunits of these well-characterized PcG complexes. To address functional relationships between SCM and othe...

  6. Prediction of DtxR regulon: Identification of binding sites and operons controlled by Diphtheria toxin repressor in Corynebacterium diphtheriae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasnain Seyed

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The diphtheria toxin repressor, DtxR, of Corynebacterium diphtheriae has been shown to be an iron-activated transcription regulator that controls not only the expression of diphtheria toxin but also of iron uptake genes. This study aims to identify putative binding sites and operons controlled by DtxR to understand the role of DtxR in patho-physiology of Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Result Positional Shannon relative entropy method was used to build the DtxR-binding site recognition profile and the later was used to identify putative regulatory sites of DtxR within C. diphtheriae genome. In addition, DtxR-regulated operons were also identified taking into account the predicted DtxR regulatory sites and genome annotation. Few of the predicted motifs were experimentally validated by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The analysis identifies motifs upstream to the novel iron-regulated genes that code for Formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (FpG, an enzyme involved in DNA-repair and starvation inducible DNA-binding protein (Dps which is involved in iron storage and oxidative stress defense. In addition, we have found the DtxR motifs upstream to the genes that code for sortase which catalyzes anchoring of host-interacting proteins to the cell wall of pathogenic bacteria and the proteins of secretory system which could be involved in translocation of various iron-regulated virulence factors including diphtheria toxin. Conclusions We have used an in silico approach to identify the putative binding sites and genes controlled by DtxR in Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Our analysis shows that DtxR could provide a molecular link between Fe+2-induced Fenton's reaction and protection of DNA from oxidative damage. DtxR-regulated Dps prevents lethal combination of Fe+2 and H2O2 and also protects DNA by nonspecific DNA-binding. In addition DtxR could play an important role in host interaction and virulence by regulating the levels of sortase

  7. Abscisic Acid-Cytokinin Antagonism Modulates Resistance Against Pseudomonas syringae in Tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Großkinsky, Dominik K; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Phytohormones are known as essential regulators of plant defenses, with ethylene, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid as the central immunity backbone, while other phytohormones have been demonstrated to interact with this. Only recently, a function of the classic phytohormone cytokinin in plant immunity has been described in Arabidopsis, rice, and tobacco. Although interactions of cytokinins with salicylic acid and auxin have been indicated, the complete network of cytokinin interactions with other immunity-relevant phytohormones is not yet understood. Therefore, we studied the interaction of kinetin and abscisic acid as a negative regulator of plant immunity to modulate resistance in tobacco against Pseudomonas syringae. By analyzing infection symptoms, pathogen proliferation, and accumulation of the phytoalexin scopoletin as a key mediator of kinetin-induced resistance in tobacco, antagonistic interaction of these phytohormones in plant immunity was identified. Kinetin reduced abscisic acid levels in tobacco, while increased abscisic acid levels by exogenous application or inhibition of abscisic acid catabolism by diniconazole neutralized kinetin-induced resistance. Based on these results, we conclude that reduction of abscisic acid levels by enhanced abscisic acid catabolism strongly contributes to cytokinin-mediated resistance effects. Thus, the identified cytokinin-abscisic acid antagonism is a novel regulatory mechanism in plant immunity.

  8. Salicylic acid antagonizes abscisic acid inhibition of shoot growth and cell cycle progression in rice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meguro, Ayano; Sato, Yutaka

    2014-04-01

    We analysed effects of abscisic acid (ABA, a negative regulatory hormone), alone and in combination with positive or neutral hormones, including salicylic acid (SA), on rice growth and expression of cell cycle-related genes. ABA significantly inhibited shoot growth and induced expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6. A yeast two-hybrid assay showed that OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6 interacted with OsCDKA;1 and/or OsCDKA;2. When SA was simultaneously supplied with ABA, the antagonistic effect of SA completely blocked ABA inhibition. SA also blocked ABA inhibition of DNA replication and thymidine incorporation in the shoot apical meristem. These results suggest that ABA arrests cell cycle progression by inducing expression of OsKRP4, OsKRP5, and OsKRP6, which inhibit the G1/S transition, and that SA antagonizes ABA by blocking expression of OsKRP genes.

  9. Conditions that Stabilize Membrane Domains Also Antagonize n-Alcohol Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machta, Benjamin B.; Gray, Ellyn; Nouri, Mariam; McCarthy, Nicola L. C.; Gray, Erin M.; Miller, Ann L.; Brooks, Nicholas J.; Veatch, Sarah L.

    2016-08-01

    Diverse molecules induce general anesthesia with potency strongly correlated both with their hydrophobicity and their effects on certain ion channels. We recently observed that several n-alcohol anesthetics inhibit heterogeneity in plasma membrane derived vesicles by lowering the critical temperature ($T_c$) for phase separation. Here we exploit conditions that stabilize membrane heterogeneity to further test the correlation between the anesthetic potency of n-alcohols and effects on $T_c$. First we show that hexadecanol acts oppositely to n-alcohol anesthetics on membrane mixing and antagonizes ethanol induced anesthesia in a tadpole behavioral assay. Second, we show that two previously described `intoxication reversers' raise $T_c$ and counter ethanol's effects in vesicles, mimicking the findings of previous electrophysiological and behavioral measurements. Third, we find that hydrostatic pressure, long known to reverse anesthesia, also raises $T_c$ in vesicles with a magnitude that counters the effect of butanol at relevant concentrations and pressures. Taken together, these results demonstrate that $\\Delta T_c$ predicts anesthetic potency for n-alcohols better than hydrophobicity in a range of contexts, supporting a mechanistic role for membrane heterogeneity in general anesthesia.

  10. TRPV1 Antagonism by Capsazepine Modulates Innate Immune Response in Mice Infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth S. Fernandes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thousands of people suffer from severe malaria every year. The innate immune response plays a determinant role in host’s defence to malaria. Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1 modulates macrophage-mediated responses in sepsis, but its role in other pathogenic diseases has never been addressed. We investigated the effects of capsazepine, a TRPV1 antagonist, in malaria. C57BL/6 mice received 105 red blood cells infected with Plasmodium berghei ANKA intraperitoneally. Noninfected mice were used as controls. Capsazepine or vehicle was given intraperitoneally for 6 days. Mice were culled on day 7 after infection and blood and spleen cell phenotype and activation were evaluated. Capsazepine decreased circulating but not spleen F4/80+Ly6G+ cell numbers as well as activation of both F4/80+and F4/80+Ly6G+ cells in infected animals. In addition, capsazepine increased circulating but not spleen GR1+ and natural killer (NK population, without interfering with natural killer T (NKT cell numbers and blood NK and NKT activation. However, capsazepine diminished CD69 expression in spleen NKT but not NK cells. Infection increased lipid peroxidation and the release of TNFα and IFNγ, although capsazepine-treated group exhibited lower levels of lipid peroxidation and TNFα. Capsazepine treatment did not affect parasitaemia. Overall, TRPV1 antagonism modulates the innate immune response to malaria.

  11. A Soluble Fluorescent Binding Assay Reveals PIP2 Antagonism of TREK-1 Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerrone Cabanos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Lipid regulation of ion channels by low-abundance signaling lipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2 and phosphatidic acid (PA has emerged as a central cellular mechanism for controlling ion channels and the excitability of nerves. A lack of robust assays suitable for facile detection of a lipid bound to a channel has hampered the probing of the lipid binding sites and measuring the pharmacology of putative lipid agonists for ion channels. Here, we show a fluorescent PIP2 competition assay for detergent-purified potassium channels, including TWIK-1-related K+-channel (TREK-1. Anionic lipids PA and phosphatidylglycerol (PG bind dose dependently (9.1 and 96 μM, respectively and agonize the channel. Our assay shows PIP2 binds with high affinity (0.87 μM but surprisingly can directly antagonize TREK-1 in liposomes. We propose a model for TREK-1 lipid regulation where PIP2 can compete with PA and PG agonism based on the affinity of the lipid for a site within the channel.

  12. Equilibrium switching and mathematical properties of nonlinear interaction networks with concurrent antagonism and self-stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabajante, Jomar Fajardo; Talaue, Cherryl Ortega

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •Properties of n-dimensional decision model of competitive interaction networks. •Graphical technique for component-wise and steady state stability analysis. •Search for parameter conditions that control equilibrium switching. •Illustrations of multi-stable systems and repressilators. -- Abstract: Concurrent decision-making model (CDM) of interaction networks with more than two antagonistic components represents various biological systems, such as gene interaction, species competition and mental cognition. The CDM model assumes sigmoid kinetics where every component stimulates itself but concurrently represses the others. Here we prove generic mathematical properties (e.g., location and stability of steady states) of n-dimensional CDM with either symmetric or asymmetric reciprocal antagonism between components. Significant modifications in parameter values serve as biological regulators for inducing steady state switching by driving a temporal state to escape an undesirable equilibrium. Increasing the maximal growth rate and decreasing the decay rate can expand the basin of attraction of a steady state that contains the desired dominant component. Perpetually adding an external stimulus could shut down multi-stability of the system which increases the robustness of the system against stochastic noise. We further show that asymmetric interaction forming a repressilator-type network generates oscillatory behavior

  13. Plant Essential Oils Synergize and Antagonize Toxicity of Different Conventional Insecticides against Myzus persicae (Hemiptera: Aphididae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraone, Nicoletta; Hillier, N. Kirk; Cutler, G. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Plant-derived products can play an important role in pest management programs. Essential oils from Lavandula angustifolia (lavender) and Thymus vulgaris (thyme) and their main constituents, linalool and thymol, respectively, were evaluated for insecticidal activity and synergistic action in combination with insecticides against green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Hemiptera: Aphididae). The essential oils and their main constituents exerted similar insecticidal activity when aphids were exposed by direct sprays, but were non-toxic by exposure to treated leaf discs. In synergism experiments, the toxicity of imidacloprid was synergized 16- to 20-fold by L. angustifolia and T. vulgaris essential oils, but far less synergism occurred with linalool and thymol, indicating that secondary constituents of the oils were probably responsible for the observed synergism. In contrast to results with imidacloprid, the insecticidal activity of spirotetramat was antagonized by L. angustifolia and T. vulgaris essential oils, and linalool and thymol. Our results demonstrate the potential of plant essential oils as synergists of insecticides, but show that antagonistic action against certain insecticides may occur. PMID:26010088

  14. Biological activity of the non-microbial fraction of kefir: antagonism against intestinal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraporda, Carolina; Abatemarco Júnior, Mário; Neumann, Elisabeth; Nunes, Álvaro Cantini; Nicoli, Jacques R; Abraham, Analía G; Garrote, Graciela L

    2017-08-01

    Kefir is a fermented milk obtained by the activity of kefir grains which are composed of lactic and acetic acid bacteria, and yeasts. Many beneficial health effects have been associated with kefir consumption such as stimulation of the immune system and inhibition of pathogenic microorganisms. The biological activity of kefir may be attributed to the presence of a complex microbiota as well as the microbial metabolites that are released during fermentation. The aim of this work was to characterise the non-microbial fraction of kefir and to study its antagonism against Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. and Bacillus cereus. During milk fermentation there was a production of organic acids, mainly lactic and acetic acid, with a consequent decrease in pH and lactose content. The non-microbial fraction of kefir added to nutrient broth at concentrations above 75% v/v induced a complete inhibition of pathogenic growth that could be ascribed to the presence of un-dissociated lactic acid. In vitro assays using an intestinal epithelial cell model indicated that pre-incubation of cells with the non-microbial fraction of kefir did not modify the association/invasion of Salmonella whereas pre-incubation of Salmonella with this fraction under conditions that did not affect their viability significantly decreased the pathogen's ability to invade epithelial cells. Lactate exerted a protective effect against Salmonella in a mouse model, demonstrating the relevance of metabolites present in the non-microbial fraction of kefir produced during milk fermentation.

  15. Glucocorticoid Antagonism Reduces Insulin Resistance and Associated Lipid Abnormalities in High-Fructose-Fed Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyadarshini, Emayavaramban; Anuradha, Carani Venkatraman

    2017-02-01

    High intake of dietary fructose causes perturbation in lipid metabolism and provokes lipid-induced insulin resistance. A rise in glucocorticoids (GCs) has recently been suggested to be involved in fructose-induced insulin resistance. The objective of the study was to investigate the effect of GC blockade on lipid abnormalities in insulin-resistant mice. Insulin resistance was induced in mice by administering a high-fructose diet (HFrD) for 60 days. Mifepristone (RU486), a GC antagonist, was administered to HFrD-fed mice for the last 18 days, and the intracellular and extracellular GC levels, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) activation and the expression of GC-regulated genes involved in lipid metabolism were examined. HFrD elevated the intracellular GC content in both liver and adipose tissue and enhanced the GR nuclear translocation. The plasma GC level remained unchanged. The levels of free fatty acids and triglycerides in plasma were elevated, accompanied by increased plasma insulin and glucose levels and decreased hepatic glycogen content. Treatment with RU486 reduced plasma lipid levels, tissue GC levels and the expression of GC-targeted genes involved in lipid accumulation, and it improved insulin sensitivity. This study demonstrated that HFrD-induced lipid accumulation and insulin resistance are mediated by enhanced GC in liver and adipose tissue and that GC antagonism might reduce fructose-induced lipid abnormalities and insulin resistance. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Prolongevity medicine: Antagonic-Stress drug in distress, geriatrics, and related diseases. II. Clinical review--2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riga, S; Riga, D; Schneider, F

    2004-06-01

    Distress and senescence, their reciprocal aggravating-quickening connections, and their related pathologies have a large worldwide impact on healthcare systems in this new millennium. For this reason, Antagonic-Stress (AS)--an advanced integrative therapy, with specific synergistic composition, and patented internationally--represents a significant strategy in health, aging, and longevity. Clinical research with AS proves the drug's efficacy in the management of distress (neurotic, stress-related, and affective disorders; behavioral syndromes associated with physiological disturbances and physical factors; mental and behavioral disorders due to psychoactive substance uses) and psychogeriatrics [organic, including symptomatic, mental disorders (OMD)]. Specific multiaxial psychopathological instruments and psychometric tests in multiple assessments used for gerontopsychiatry demonstrated strong improvements after AS administration in early-moderate stages of Alzheimer or vascular dementia, as well as in other OMD. In addition, comparative clinical studies evinced the superiority of AS (synergistic multitherapy) versus monotherapy [meclofenoxate (MF), piracetam (PA), pyritinol (PT), and nicergoline (NE), respectively]. These comparative clinical trials agreed closely with comparative preclinical research and confirmed AS synergistic homeostatic, adaptogenic, antioxidative, cerebrovascular, neurometabolic, and nootropic actions. Also, the AS protective actions against oxidative stress recommend this orthomolecular therapy in stress, aging, and free radical pathology.

  17. Innate immune restriction and antagonism of viral RNA lacking 2'-O methylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyde, Jennifer L. [Departments of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis., MO 63110 (United States); Diamond, Michael S., E-mail: diamond@borcim.wustl.edu [Departments of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis., MO 63110 (United States); Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis., MO 63110 (United States); Pathology & Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis., MO 63110 (United States); The Center for Human Immunology and Immunotherapy Programs, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis., MO 63110 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    N-7 and 2′-O methylation of host cell mRNA occurs in the nucleus and results in the generation of cap structures (cap 0, m{sup 7}GpppN; cap 1, m{sup 7}GpppNm) that control gene expression by modulating nuclear export, splicing, turnover, and protein synthesis. Remarkably, RNA cap modification also contributes to mammalian cell host defense as viral RNA lacking 2′-O methylation is sensed and inhibited by IFIT1, an interferon (IFN) stimulated gene (ISG). Accordingly, pathogenic viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm have evolved mechanisms to circumvent IFIT1 restriction and facilitate infection of mammalian cells. These include: (a) generating cap 1 structures on their RNA through cap-snatching or virally-encoded 2′-O methyltransferases, (b) using cap-independent means of translation, or (c) using RNA secondary structural motifs to antagonize IFIT1 binding. This review will discuss new insights as to how specific modifications at the 5′-end of viral RNA modulate host pathogen recognition responses to promote infection and disease.

  18. Endocannabinoid antagonism: blocking the excess in the treatment of high-risk abdominal obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Danielle; Rader, Daniel

    2007-02-01

    Abdominal obesity is a prevalent, worldwide problem linked to cardiometabolic comorbidities and an increased risk of coronary heart disease. First-line therapy to reduce such risk revolves around diet and exercise; however, such changes are often difficult to implement and unsuccessful. Understanding the underlying pathophysiology of underlying metabolic derangements could provide new targets for pharmacologic therapy. One system that has gained recent attention is the endocannabinoid system. The endocannabinoid system has a significant role in central appetite control and peripheral lipogenesis and is up-regulated in diet-induced obesity. Rimonabant is a selective cannabinoid-1 receptor antagonist and is the first compound of its type to test the hypothesis that down-regulating an overactive endocannabinoid system could have therapeutic benefit not only for weight loss but also for the atherogenic dyslipidemia and insulin resistance that cluster with abdominal obesity in particular. Animal models have been critical for elucidating the role of the endocannabinoid system in obesity and in demonstrating that antagonism with rimonabant can induce loss of visceral fat and improve insulin sensitivity. Early human trials with rimonabant have confirmed significant reductions in weight, as well as favorable changes in atherogenic dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and markers of inflammation. Interestingly, some of these beneficial metabolic effects are partially weight-loss-independent, confirming the importance of peripheral endocannabinoid system effects in addition to central effects.

  19. How does the antagonism between capping and anti-capping proteins affect actin network dynamics?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Longhua; Papoian, Garegin A

    2011-01-01

    Actin-based cell motility is essential to many biological processes. We built a simplified, three-dimensional computational model and subsequently performed stochastic simulations to study the growth dynamics of lamellipodia-like branched networks. In this work, we shed light on the antagonism between capping and anti-capping proteins in regulating actin dynamics in the filamentous network. We discuss detailed mechanisms by which capping and anti-capping proteins affect the protrusion speed of the actin network and the rate of nucleation of filaments. We computed a phase diagram showing the regimes of motility enhancement and inhibition by these proteins. Our work shows that the effects of capping and anti-capping proteins are mainly transmitted by modulation of the filamentous network density and local availability of monomeric actin. We discovered that the combination of the capping/anti-capping regulatory network with nucleation-promoting proteins introduces robustness and redundancy in cell motility machinery, allowing the cell to easily achieve maximal protrusion speeds under a broader set of conditions. Finally, we discuss distributions of filament lengths under various conditions and speculate on their potential implication for the emergence of filopodia from the lamellipodial network.

  20. Repurposing Hsp104 to Antagonize Seminal Amyloid and Counter HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Laura M; Bart, Stephen M; Holmes, Veronica M; Weissman, Drew; Shorter, James

    2015-08-20

    Naturally occurring proteolytic fragments of prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP248-286 and PAP85-120) and semenogelins (SEM1 and SEM2) form amyloid fibrils in seminal fluid, which capture HIV virions and promote infection. For example, PAP248-286 fibrils, termed SEVI (semen-derived enhancer of viral infection), can potentiate HIV infection by several orders of magnitude. Here, we design three disruptive technologies to rapidly antagonize seminal amyloid by repurposing Hsp104, an amyloid-remodeling nanomachine from yeast. First, Hsp104 and an enhanced engineered variant, Hsp104(A503V), directly remodel SEVI and PAP85-120 fibrils into non-amyloid forms. Second, we elucidate catalytically inactive Hsp104 scaffolds that do not remodel amyloid structure, but cluster SEVI, PAP85-120, and SEM1(45-107) fibrils into larger assemblies. Third, we modify Hsp104 to interact with the chambered protease ClpP, which enables coupled remodeling and degradation to irreversibly clear SEVI and PAP85-120 fibrils. Each strategy diminished the ability of seminal amyloid to promote HIV infection, and could have therapeutic utility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Androgen Receptor Antagonism By Divalent Ethisterone Conjugates In Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Paul M.; Lee, Eugine; Greenfield, Alex; Bonneau, Richard; Logan, Susan K.; Garabedian, Michael J.; Kirshenbaum, Kent

    2013-01-01

    Sustained treatment of prostate cancer with Androgen Receptor (AR) antagonists can evoke drug resistance, leading to castrate-resistant disease. Elevated activity of the AR is often associated with this highly aggressive disease state. Therefore, new therapeutic regimens that target and modulate AR activity could prove beneficial. We previously introduced a versatile chemical platform to generate competitive and non-competitive multivalent peptoid oligomer conjugates that modulate AR activity. In particular, we identified a linear and a cyclic divalent ethisterone conjugate that exhibit potent anti-proliferative properties in LNCaP-abl cells, a model of castrate-resistant prostate cancer. Here, we characterize the mechanism of action of these compounds utilizing confocal microscopy, time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer, chromatin immunoprecipitation, flow cytometry, and microarray analysis. The linear conjugate competitively blocks AR action by inhibiting DNA binding. In addition, the linear conjugate does not promote AR nuclear localization or co-activator binding. In contrast, the cyclic conjugate promotes AR nuclear localization and induces cell-cycle arrest, despite its inability to compete against endogenous ligand for binding to AR in vitro. Genome-wide expression analysis reveals that gene transcripts are differentially affected by treatment with the linear or cyclic conjugate. Although the divalent ethisterone conjugates share extensive chemical similarities, we illustrate that they can antagonize the AR via distinct mechanisms of action, establishing new therapeutic strategies for potential applications in AR pharmacology. PMID:22871957

  2. ANTAGONISM OF PROGESTERONE RECEPTOR SUPPRESSES CAROTID BODY RESPONSES TO HYPOXIA AND NICOTINE IN RAT PUPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    JOSEPH, V.; NIANE, L. M.; BAIRAM, A.

    2013-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that antagonism of progesterone receptor (PR) in newborn rats alters carotid body and respiratory responses to hypoxia and nicotinic receptor agonists. Rats were treated with the PR antagonist mifepristone (daily oral gavage 40 μg/g/d) or vehicle between post-natal days 3 and 15. In 11–14-day-old rats, we used in vitro carotid body/carotid sinus nerve preparation and whole body plethysmography to assess the carotid body and ventilatory responses to hypoxia (65 mmHg in vitro, 10% O2 in vivo) and to nicotinic receptor agonists (as an excitatory modulator of carotid body activity—nicotine 100 μM for in vitro studies, and epibatidine 5 μg/kg, i.p., which mainly acts on peripheral nicotinic receptors, for in vivo studies). The carotid body responses to hypoxia and nicotine were drastically reduced by mifepristone. Compared with vehicle, mifepristone-treated rats had a reduced body weight. The ventilatory response to epibatidine was attenuated; however, the hypoxic ventilatory response was similar between vehicle and mifepristone-treated pups. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that mifepristone treatment did not change carotid body morphology. We conclude that PR activity is a critical factor ensuring proper carotid body function in newborn rats. PMID:22326965

  3. FoxO3A promotes metabolic adaptation to hypoxia by antagonizing Myc function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kim Steen; Binderup, Tina; Jensen, Klaus Thorleif

    2011-01-01

    Exposure of metazoan organisms to hypoxia engages a metabolic switch orchestrated by the hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). HIF-1 mediates induction of glycolysis and active repression of mitochondrial respiration that reduces oxygen consumption and inhibits the production of potentially harmful...... tumour tissue in vivo and that FoxO3A short-hairpin RNA (shRNA)-expressing xenograft tumours are decreased in size and metabolically changed. Our findings define a novel mechanism by which FoxO3A promotes metabolic adaptation and stress resistance in hypoxia....... reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we show that FoxO3A is activated in hypoxia downstream of HIF-1 and mediates the hypoxic repression of a set of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes. FoxO3A is required for hypoxic suppression of mitochondrial mass, oxygen consumption, and ROS production and promotes...... cell survival in hypoxia. FoxO3A is recruited to the promoters of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes where it directly antagonizes c-Myc function via a mechanism that does not require binding to the consensus FoxO recognition element. Furthermore, we show that FoxO3A is activated in human hypoxic...

  4. Amyloid β-sheet mimics that antagonize protein aggregation and reduce amyloid toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pin-Nan; Liu, Cong; Zhao, Minglei; Eisenberg, David; Nowick, James S.

    2012-11-01

    The amyloid protein aggregation associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and type II diabetes (among many others) features a bewildering variety of β-sheet-rich structures in transition from native proteins to ordered oligomers and fibres. The variation in the amino-acid sequences of the β-structures presents a challenge to developing a model system of β-sheets for the study of various amyloid aggregates. Here, we introduce a family of robust β-sheet macrocycles that can serve as a platform to display a variety of heptapeptide sequences from different amyloid proteins. We have tailored these amyloid β-sheet mimics (ABSMs) to antagonize the aggregation of various amyloid proteins, thereby reducing the toxicity of amyloid aggregates. We describe the structures and inhibitory properties of ABSMs containing amyloidogenic peptides from the amyloid-β peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease, β2-microglobulin associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease, islet amyloid polypeptide associated with type II diabetes, human and yeast prion proteins, and Tau, which forms neurofibrillary tangles.

  5. Glutathione and the Antioxidant Potential of Binary Mixtures with Flavonoids: Synergisms and Antagonisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Valentão

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Polyphenols are able to trap free radicals, which contributes to their known antioxidant capacity. In plant extracts, these secondary metabolites may act in concert, in a way that their combined activities will be superior to their individual effects (synergistic interaction. Several polyphenols have demonstrated clear antioxidant properties in vitro, and many of their biological actions have been attributed to their intrinsic reducing capabilities. As so, the intake of these compounds at certain concentrations in the diet and/or supplementation may potentiate the activity of reduced form glutathione (GSH, thus better fighting oxidative stress. The aim of this work was to predict a structure-antioxidant activity relationship using different classes of flavonoids and to assess, for the first time, possible synergisms and antagonisms with GSH. For these purposes a screening microassay involving the scavenging of DPPH• was applied. In general, among the tested compounds, those lacking the catechol group in B ring showed antagonistic behaviour with GSH. Myricetin displayed additive effect, while quercetin, fisetin, luteolin, luteolin-7-O-glucoside, taxifolin and (+-catechin demonstrated synergistic actions. Furthermore, adducts formed at C2′ and C5′ of the B ring seem to be more important for the antioxidant capacity than adducts formed at C6 and C8 of the A ring.

  6. Action of Bacopa monnieri to antagonize cisplatin-induced emesis in Suncus murinus (house musk shrew

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    Ihsan Ullah

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Bacopa monnieri (BM, family Scrophulariaceae is used in several traditional systems of medicine for the management of epilepsy, depression, neuropathic pain, sleep disorders and memory deficits. The present study investigated the potential of BM methanol (BM-MetFr and BM n-butanol fractions (BM-ButFr to reduce chemotherapy-induced emesis in Suncus murinus (house musk shrew. Cisplatin (30 mg/kg, i.p. reliably induced retching and/or vomiting over a 2 day period. BM-MetFr (10–40 mg/kg, s.c. and BM-ButFr (5–20 mg/kg, s.c. antagonized the retching and/or vomiting response by ∼59.4% (p  0.05. In conclusion, the n-butanol fractions of BM have anti-emetic activity comparable with palonosetron and MPG. BM may be useful alone or in combination with other anti-emetic drugs for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced emesis in man.

  7. Accumulation of the Vitamin D Precursor Cholecalciferol Antagonizes Hedgehog Signaling to Impair Hemogenic Endothelium Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Cortes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs are born from hemogenic endothelium in the dorsal aorta. Specification of this hematopoietic niche is regulated by a signaling axis using Hedgehog (Hh and Notch, which culminates in expression of Runx1 in the ventral wall of the artery. Here, we demonstrate that the vitamin D precursor cholecalciferol (D3 modulates HSPC production by impairing hemogenic vascular niche formation. Accumulation of D3 through exogenous treatment or inhibition of Cyp2r1, the enzyme required for D3 25-hydroxylation, results in Hh pathway antagonism marked by loss of Gli-reporter activation, defects in vascular niche identity, and reduced HSPCs. Mechanistic studies indicated the effect was specific to D3, and not active 1,25-dihydroxy vitamin D3, acting on the extracellular sterol-binding domain of Smoothened. These findings highlight a direct impact of inefficient vitamin D synthesis on cell fate commitment and maturation in Hh-regulated tissues, which may have implications beyond hemogenic endothelium specification.

  8. Metformin Antagonizes Cancer Cell Proliferation by Suppressing Mitochondrial-Dependent Biosynthesis.

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    Takla Griss

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Metformin is a biguanide widely prescribed to treat Type II diabetes that has gained interest as an antineoplastic agent. Recent work suggests that metformin directly antagonizes cancer cell growth through its actions on complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC. However, the mechanisms by which metformin arrests cancer cell proliferation remain poorly defined. Here we demonstrate that the metabolic checkpoint kinases AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and LKB1 are not required for the antiproliferative effects of metformin. Rather, metformin inhibits cancer cell proliferation by suppressing mitochondrial-dependent biosynthetic activity. We show that in vitro metformin decreases the flow of glucose- and glutamine-derived metabolic intermediates into the Tricarboxylic Acid (TCA cycle, leading to reduced citrate production and de novo lipid biosynthesis. Tumor cells lacking functional mitochondria maintain lipid biosynthesis in the presence of metformin via glutamine-dependent reductive carboxylation, and display reduced sensitivity to metformin-induced proliferative arrest. Our data indicate that metformin inhibits cancer cell proliferation by suppressing the production of mitochondrial-dependent metabolic intermediates required for cell growth, and that metabolic adaptations that bypass mitochondrial-dependent biosynthesis may provide a mechanism of tumor cell resistance to biguanide activity.

  9. Antagonizing beta-amyloid peptide neurotoxicity of the anti-aging fungus Ganoderma lucidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cora Sau-Wan; Yu, Man-Shan; Yuen, Wai-Hung; So, Kwok-Fai; Zee, Sze-Yong; Chang, Raymond Chuen-Chung

    2008-01-23

    Ganoderma lucidum (Leyss. ex Fr.) Karst. (Lingzhi) is a medicinal fungus used clinically in many Asian countries to promote health and longevity. Synaptic degeneration is another key mode of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies have shown the loss of synaptic density proteins in each individual neuron during the progression of AD. It was recently reported that beta-amyloid (Abeta) could cause synaptic dysfunction and contribute to AD pathology. In this study, we reported that aqueous extract of G. lucidum significantly attenuated Abeta-induced synaptotoxicity by preserving the synaptic density protein, synaptophysin. In addition, G. lucidum aqueous extract antagonized Abeta-triggered DEVD cleavage activities in a dose-dependent manner. Further studies elucidated that phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase, c-Jun, and p38 MAP kinase was attenuated by G. lucidum in Abeta-stressed neurons. Taken together, the results prove a hypothesis that anti-aging G. lucidum can prevent harmful effects of the exterminating toxin Abeta in AD.

  10. Effect of blockage of the endocannabinoid system by CB(1) antagonism on cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mach, François; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Steffens, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system is a crucial player in the inflammatory processes underlying atherosclerosis. Recently, basic research studies and animal models have strongly supported the role of the endocannabinoid system not only in the regulation of classical cardiovascular risk factors (including lipid profile and glucose homeostasis), but also in the activation of immune cells and inflammatory mediators. Clinical trials investigating treatment with rimonabant (a selective antagonist of the cannabinoid type 1 receptor) have suggested a beneficial effect of this drug in the management of obesity. Further studies are needed to explore a possible use for rimonabant in treating type 2 diabetes and acute and chronic cardiovascular disease. Despite the slight increase in adverse events (mainly psychiatric), which has led to the recent withdrawal of rimonabant from the market, CB(1) receptor antagonism might represent a very promising therapeutic strategy to reduce the cardiovascular risk. In the present review, we focused on the most important experimental investigations into the role of the endocannabinoid system in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular risk.

  11. Antagonism of Apis mellifera and Melipona beecheii for the sources of feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ailyn Leal-Ramos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The competition is defined as the interrelation among species that influence negatively in the abundance or the growth of the population of an or both species. They can be defined two competition types: competition of exploitation for the use of a resource shared as the food and the competition by interference when decreases the efficiency of exploitation of another species for the competition for the territory. With the objective of determining the possible antagonism of A. mellifera and M. beecheii for the source of pollen, the origin of the pollen stored in the reservations of foods of the beehives of A. mellifera and M. beecheii through palinologic analysis carried out to samples of pollen of both species of bees settled down. The diversity of pollen found in the samples is superior in A. mellifera with regard to M. beecheii being Mimosa pudica and Mimosa pigra the identified species with a high frequency. On the other hand, 71,4% of the vegetable identified species coincides in the pollen found in the samples of A. mellifera and M. beecheii, being a half similarity among the grains of pollen of the beehives of both species expressed by a coefficient of similarity of Jaccard 0,5219.

  12. Activating PTEN by COX-2 inhibitors antagonizes radiation-induced AKT activation contributing to radiosensitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Zhen [Central Laboratory, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun Avenue South, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China); Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun Avenue South, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China); Gan, Ye-Hua, E-mail: kqyehuagan@bjmu.edu.cn [Central Laboratory, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun Avenue South, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China); Department of Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, 22 Zhongguancun Avenue South, Haidian District, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2015-05-01

    Radiotherapy is still one of the most effective nonsurgical treatments for many tumors. However, radioresistance remains a major impediment to radiotherapy. Although COX-2 inhibitors can induce radiosensitization, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. In this study, we showed that COX-2 selective inhibitor celecoxib enhanced the radiation-induced inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis in HeLa and SACC-83 cells. Treatment with celecoxib alone dephosphorylated phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome ten (PTEN), promoted PTEN membrane translocation or activation, and correspondingly dephosphorylated or inactivated protein kinase B (AKT). By contrast, treatment with radiation alone increased PTEN phosphorylation, inhibited PTEN membrane translocation and correspondingly activated AKT in the two cell lines. However, treatment with celecoxib or another COX-2 selective inhibitor (valdecoxib) completely blocked radiation-induced increase of PTEN phosphorylation, rescued radiation-induced decrease in PTEN membrane translocation, and correspondingly inactivated AKT. Moreover, celecoxib could also upregulate PTEN protein expression by downregulating Sp1 expression, thereby leading to the activation of PTEN transcription. Our results suggested that COX-2 inhibitors could enhance radiosensitization at least partially by activating PTEN to antagonize radiation-induced AKT activation. - Highlights: • COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib, could enhance radiosensitization. • Radiation induced PTEN inactivation (phosphorylation) and AKT activation. • COX-2 inhibitor induced PTEN expression and activation, and inactivated AKT. • COX-2 inhibitor enhanced radiosensitization through activating PTEN.

  13. Mxi1 and Mxi1-0 Antagonize N-Myc Function and Independently Mediate Apoptosis in Neuroblastoma

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    David A. Erichsen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuroblastoma (NB is the third most common malignancy of childhood, and outcomes for children with advanced disease remain poor; amplification of the MYCN gene portends a particularly poor prognosis. Mxi1 antagonizes N-Myc by competing for binding to Max and E-boxes. Unlike N-Myc, Mxi1 mediates transcriptional repression and suppresses cell proliferation. Mxi1 and Mxi1-0 (an alternatively transcribed Mxi1 isoform share identical Max and DNA binding domains but differ in amino-terminal sequences. Because of the conservation of these critical binding domains, we hypothesized that Mxi1-0 antagonizes N-Myc activity similar to Mxi1. SHEP NB cells and SHEP cells stably transfected with MYCN (SHEP/MYCN were transiently transfected with vectors containing full-length Mxi1, full-length Mxi1-0, or the common Mxi domain encoded by exons 2 to 6 (ex2-6. After incubation in low serum, parental SHEP/MYCN cell numbers were reduced compared with SHEP cells. Activated caspase-3 staining and DNA fragmentation ELISA confirmed that SHEP/MYCN cells undergo apoptosis in low serum, while SHEP/MYCN cells transfected with Mxi1 or Mxi1-0 do not. However, SHEP/MYCN cells transfected with Mxi1 or Mxi1-0 and grown in normal serum showed proliferation rates similar to SHEP cells. Mxi ex2-6 did not affect cell number in low or normal serum, suggesting that amino terminal domains of Mxi1 and Mxi1-0 are critical for antagonism. In the absence of N-Myc, Mxi1 and Mxi1-0 induce apoptosis independently through the caspase-8–dependent extrinsic pathway, while N-Myc activates the caspase-9–dependent intrinsic pathway. Together, these data indicate that Mxi1 and Mxi1-0 antagonize N-Myc but also independently impact NB cell survival.

  14. Injection anaesthesia with fentanyl-midazolam-medetomidine in adult female mice: importance of antagonization and perioperative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischmann, Thea; Jirkof, Paulin; Henke, Julia; Arras, Margarete; Cesarovic, Nikola

    2016-08-01

    Injection anaesthesia is commonly used in laboratory mice; however, a disadvantage is that post-anaesthesia recovery phases are long. Here, we investigated the potential for shortening the recovery phase after injection anaesthesia with fentanyl-midazolam-medetomidine by antagonization with naloxone-flumazenil-atipamezole. In order to monitor side-effects, the depth of anaesthesia, heart rate (HR), core body temperature (BT) and concentration of blood gases, as well as reflex responses, were assessed during a 50 min anaesthesia. Mice were allowed to recover from the anaesthesia in their home cages either with or without antagonization, while HR, core BT and spontaneous home cage behaviours were recorded for 24 h. Mice lost righting reflex at 330 ± 47 s after intraperitoneal injection of fentanyl-midazolam-medetomidine. During anaesthesia, HR averaged 225 ± 23 beats/min, respiratory rate and core BT reached steady state at 131 ± 15 breaths/min and 34.3 ± 0.25℃, respectively. Positive pedal withdrawal reflex, movement triggered by tail pinch and by toe pinch, still occurred in 25%, 31.2% and 100% of animals, respectively. Arterial blood gas analysis revealed acidosis, hypoxia, hypercapnia and a marked increase in glucose concentration. After anaesthesia reversal by injection with naloxone-flumazenil-atipamezole, animals regained consciousness after 110 ± 18 s and swiftly returned to physiological baseline values, yet they displayed diminished levels of locomotion and disrupted circadian rhythm. Without antagonization, mice showed marked hypothermia (22 ± 1.9℃) and bradycardia (119 ± 69 beats/min) for several hours. Fentanyl-midazolam-medetomidine provided reliable anaesthesia in mice with reasonable intra-anaesthetic side-effects. Post-anaesthetic period and related adverse effects were both reduced substantially by antagonization with naloxone-flumazenil-atipamezole. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Antagonism in the extraction of uranium(VI) by the binary mixture of PC88A and benzimidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, A.; Kamila, S.; Chakravortty, V.

    1999-01-01

    Extraction studies of uranium(VI) by the binary mixture of PC88A and benzimidazole show an antagonistic behavior in the concentration range 10 -5 -10 -6 M of PC88A and 0.005M of benzimidazole. Antagonism is observed due to the deprotonation of PC88A by benzimidazole forming an adduct resulting in the virtual removal of PC88A from the system. (author)

  16. P2X7 Receptor Antagonism Attenuates the Intermittent Hypoxia-induced Spatial Deficits in a Murine Model of Sleep Apnea Via Inhibiting Neuroinflammation and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Deng

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: The P2X7R antagonism attenuates the CIH-induced neuroinflammation, oxidative stress, and spatial deficits, demonstrating that the P2X7R is an important therapeutic target in the cognition deficits accompanied OSAS.

  17. Antagonizing Arachidonic Acid-Derived Eicosanoids Reduces Inflammatory Th17 and Th1 Cell-Mediated Inflammation and Colitis Severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Monk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During colitis, activation of two inflammatory T cell subsets, Th17 and Th1 cells, promotes ongoing intestinal inflammatory responses. n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid- (PUFA- derived eicosanoids, such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, promote Th17 cell-mediated inflammation, while n-3 PUFA antagonize both Th17 and Th1 cells and suppress PGE2 levels. We utilized two genetic mouse models, which differentially antagonize PGE2 levels, to examine the effect on Th17 cells and disease outcomes in trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- (TNBS- induced colitis. Fat-1 mice contain the ω3 desaturase gene from C. elegans and synthesize n-3 PUFA de novo, thereby reducing the biosynthesis of n-6 PUFA-derived eicosanoids. In contrast, Fads1 Null mice contain a disrupted Δ5 desaturase gene and produce lower levels of n-6 PUFA-derived eicosanoids. Compared to Wt littermates, Fat-1 and Fads1 Null mice exhibited a similar colitic phenotype characterized by reduced colonic mucosal inflammatory eicosanoid levels and mRNA expression of Th17 cell markers (IL-17A, RORγτ, and IL-23, decreased percentages of Th17 cells and, improved colon injury scores (P≤0.05. Thus, during colitis, similar outcomes were obtained in two genetically distinct models, both of which antagonize PGE2 levels via different mechanisms. Our data highlight the critical impact of n-6 PUFA-derived eicosanoids in the promotion of Th17 cell-mediated colonic inflammation.

  18. Histamine H3 receptors and its antagonism as a novel mechanism for antipsychotic effect: a current preclinical & clinical perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Danish

    2016-10-01

    Histamine H 3 receptors are present as autoreceptors on histaminergic neurons and as heteroreceptors on nonhistaminergic neurones. They control the release and synthesis of histamine and several other key neurotransmitters in the brain. H 3 antagonism may be a novel approach to develop a new class of antipsychotic medications given the gathering evidence reporting therapeutic efficacy in several central nervous system disorders. Several medications such as cariprazine, lurasidone, LY214002, bexarotene, rasagiline, raloxifene, BL-1020 and ITI-070 are being developed to treat the negative symptoms and cognitive impairments of schizophrenia. These medications works through diverse mechanisms which include agonism at metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2/3), partial agonism at dopamine D 2 , D 3 and serotonin 5-HT 1A receptors, antagonism at D 2 , 5-HT 2A, 5-HT 2B and 5-HT 7 receptors, combined dopamine antagonism with GABA agonist activity, inhibition of monoamine oxidase-B, modulation of oestrogen receptor, and activation of nuclear retinoid X receptor. However, still specific safe therapy for psychosis remains at large. Schizophrenia is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder result both from hyper- and hypo-dopaminergic transmission causing positive and negative symptoms, respectively. Pharmacological stimulation of dopamine release in the prefrontal cortex has been a viable approach in treating negative symptoms and cognitive deficits of schizophrenia symptoms that are currently not well treated and continue to represent significant unmet medical challenges. Administration of H 3 antagonists/inverse agonists increase extracellular dopamine concentrations in rat prefrontal cortex, but not in the striatum suggesting that antagonism via H 3 receptor may be a potential target for treating negative symptoms and cognitive deficits associated with schizophrenia. Further, insights are emerging into the potential role of histamine H 3 receptors as a target of antiobesity

  19. ANTAGONISM OF A. VIRIDANS TO CONDITIONALLY - PATHOGENIC MICROFLORA OF THE NOSE AND OROPHARYNX OF CHILDREN WITH CARDIAC PATOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stepansky D.O.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Search for harmless and simultaneously effective probiotics, which could be successfully used for treatment and prevention of infectious deseases, is currently important. A. viridans is of particular interest, as it is representative of the normal microflora of human with broad spectrum of antibacterial action. The use of this microorganism has a number of advantages: the absence of side effects on the body; high adhesive abilities; resistance to lysozyme in saliva; the ability of use in patients, sensitized to antibiotics and chemotherapeutic drugs; stimulation effects on the human immune system. Material and methods. The purpose of the study was to investigate the antagonism of A. viridans № 167 and autostrains of aerococcuses, isolated at patients, to conditionally - pathogenic microflora of the nose and oropharynx of children with cardiac patology. At the first stage of the study the microflora of the of the nose and oropharynx of 2 investigated categories was examined – 40 children 4-14 years with cardiac patology and 40 healthy children 4-5 years old. The second stage of work was to study the effect of A. viridans on the explored strains. Results and discussion. A. viridans manifests the antagonism to all studied strains of gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms, except C. albisans. A. viridans antagonistic activity to staphylococci (10 + 3 mm and streptococci (10 + 2mm is at the approximately same level. It is interesting to compare the antagonism of aerococcuses to clinical isolates of S. pyogenes and similar strains from carriers (healthy children category. Impact of aerococcuses on P. mirabilis strain appeared at the highest level. Autosimbionts of A. viridans, isolated from healthy children, are more antagonistic to CPM strains, isolated from these children, than autostrains of A. viridans, isolated from children with with cardiac patology, and higher than the museum strain of A. viridans № 167 antagonism

  20. bHLH003, bHLH013 and bHLH017 are new targets of JAZ repressors negatively regulating JA responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Fonseca

    Full Text Available Cell reprogramming in response to jasmonates requires a tight control of transcription that is achieved by the activity of JA-related transcription factors (TFs. Among them, MYC2, MYC3 and MYC4 have been described as activators of JA responses. Here we characterized the function of bHLH003, bHLH013 and bHLH017 that conform a phylogenetic clade closely related to MYC2, MYC3 and MYC4. We found that these bHLHs form homo- and heterodimers and also interact with JAZ repressors in vitro and in vivo. Phenotypic analysis of JA-regulated processes, including root and rosette growth, anthocyanin accumulation, chlorophyll loss and resistance to Pseudomonas syringae, on mutants and overexpression lines, suggested that these bHLHs are repressors of JA responses. bHLH003, bHLH013 and bHLH017 are mainly nuclear proteins and bind DNA with similar specificity to that of MYC2, MYC3 and MYC4, but lack a conserved activation domain, suggesting that repression is achieved by competition for the same cis-regulatory elements. Moreover, expression of bHLH017 is induced by JA and depends on MYC2, suggesting a negative feed-back regulation of the activity of positive JA-related TFs. Our results suggest that the competition between positive and negative TFs determines the output of JA-dependent transcriptional activation.

  1. Cloning and characterization of the c1 repressor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage D3: a functional analog of phage lambda cI protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.V.; Kokjohn, T.A.

    1987-05-01

    We cloned the gene (c1) which encodes the repressor of vegetative function of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage D3. The cloned gene was shown to inhibit plating of D3 and the induction of D3 lysogens by UV irradiation. The efficiency of plating and prophage induction of the heteroimmune P. aeruginosa phage F116L were not affected by the presence of the cloned c1 gene of D3. When the D3 DNA fragment containing c1 was subcloned into pBR322 and introduced into Escherichia coli, it was shown to specifically inhibit the plating of phage lambda and the induction of the lambda prophage by mitomycin C. The plating of lambda imm434 phage was not affected. Analysis in minicells indicated that these effects correspond to the presence of a plasmid-encoded protein of 36,000 molecular weight. These data suggest the possibility that coliphage lambda and the P. aeruginosa phage D3 evolved from a common ancestor. The conservation of the functional similarities of their repressors may have occurred because of the advantage to these temperate phages of capitalizing on the potential of the evolutionarily conserved RecA protein to monitor the level of damage to the host genome.

  2. Cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of a putative multiple antibiotic resistance repressor protein (MarR) from Xanthomonas campestris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tu, Zhi-Le; Li, Juo-Ning; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Chou, Chia-Cheng; Lee, Cheng-Chung; Shr, Hui-Lin; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Gao, Fei Philip; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2005-01-01

    A putative repressor for the multiple antibiotic resistance operon from a plant pathogen X. campestris pv. campestris has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. The crystals diffracted to 2.3 Å with good quality. The multiple antibiotic resistance operon (marRAB) is a member of the multidrug-resistance system. When induced, this operon enhances resistance of bacteria to a variety of medically important antibiotics, causing a serious global health problem. MarR is a marR-encoded protein that represses the transcription of the marRAB operon. Through binding with salicylate and certain antibiotics, however, MarR can derepress and activate the marRAB operon. In this report, the cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of XC1739, a putative MarR repressor protein present in the Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, a Gram-negative bacterium causing major worldwide disease of cruciferous crops, are described. The XC1739 crystals diffracted to a resolution of at least 1.8 Å. They are orthorhombic and belong to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 39.5, b = 54.2 and c = 139.5 Å, respectively. They contain two molecules in the asymmetric unit from calculation of the self-rotation function

  3. The co-repressor SMRT delays DNA damage-induced caspase activation by repressing pro-apoptotic genes and modulating the dynamics of checkpoint kinase 2 activation.

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    Claudio Scafoglio

    Full Text Available Checkpoint kinase 2 (Chk2 is a major regulator of DNA damage response and can induce alternative cellular responses: cell cycle arrest and DNA repair or programmed cell death. Here, we report the identification of a new role of Chk2 in transcriptional regulation that also contributes to modulating the balance between survival and apoptosis following DNA damage. We found that Chk2 interacts with members of the NCoR/SMRT transcriptional co-regulator complexes and serves as a functional component of the repressor complex, being required for recruitment of SMRT on the promoter of pro-apoptotic genes upon DNA damage. Thus, the co-repressor SMRT exerts a critical protective action against genotoxic stress-induced caspase activation, repressing a functionally important cohort of pro-apoptotic genes. Amongst them, SMRT is responsible for basal repression of Wip1, a phosphatase that de-phosphorylates and inactivates Chk2, thus affecting a feedback loop responsible for licensing the correct timing of Chk2 activation and the proper execution of the DNA repair process.

  4. Cloning and characterization of the c1 repressor of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage D3: a functional analog of phage lambda cI protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.V.; Kokjohn, T.A.

    1987-01-01

    We cloned the gene (c1) which encodes the repressor of vegetative function of Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteriophage D3. The cloned gene was shown to inhibit plating of D3 and the induction of D3 lysogens by UV irradiation. The efficiency of plating and prophage induction of the heteroimmune P. aeruginosa phage F116L were not affected by the presence of the cloned c1 gene of D3. When the D3 DNA fragment containing c1 was subcloned into pBR322 and introduced into Escherichia coli, it was shown to specifically inhibit the plating of phage lambda and the induction of the lambda prophage by mitomycin C. The plating of lambda imm434 phage was not affected. Analysis in minicells indicated that these effects correspond to the presence of a plasmid-encoded protein of 36,000 molecular weight. These data suggest the possibility that coliphage lambda and the P. aeruginosa phage D3 evolved from a common ancestor. The conservation of the functional similarities of their repressors may have occurred because of the advantage to these temperate phages of capitalizing on the potential of the evolutionarily conserved RecA protein to monitor the level of damage to the host genome

  5. Copper Induces Vasorelaxation and Antagonizes Noradrenaline -Induced Vasoconstriction in Rat Mesenteric Artery

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    Yu-Chun Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Copper is an essential trace element for normal cellular function and contributes to critical physiological or pathological processes. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of copper on vascular tone of rat mesenteric artery and compare the effects of copper on noradrenaline (NA and high K+ induced vasoconstriction. Methods: The rat mesenteric arteries were isolated and the vessel tone was measured by using multi wire myograph system in vitro. Blood pressure of carotid artery in rabbits was measured by using physiological data acquisition and analysis system in vivo. Results: Copper dose-dependently blunted NA-induced vasoconstriction of rat mesenteric artery. Copper-induced vasorelaxation was inhibited when the vessels were pretreated with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME. Copper did not blunt high K+-induced vasoconstriction. Copper preincubation inhibited NA-evoked vasoconstriction and the inhibition was not affected by the presence of L-NAME. Copper preincubation showed no effect on high K+-evoked vasoconstriction. Copper chelator diethyldithiocarbamate trihydrate (DTC antagonized the vasoactivity induced by copper in rat mesenteric artery. In vivo experiments showed that copper injection (iv significantly decreased blood pressure of rabbits and NA or DTC injection (iv did not rescue the copper-induced hypotension and animal death. Conclusion: Copper blunted NA but not high K+-induced vasoconstriction of rat mesenteric artery. The acute effect of copper on NA-induced vasoconstriction was depended on nitric oxide (NO, but the effect of copper pretreatment on NA-induced vasoconstriction was independed on NO, suggesting that copper affected NA-induced vasoconstriction by two distinct mechanisms.

  6. Dwarfism and insulin resistance in male offspring caused by α1-adrenergic antagonism during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelkrug, Rebecca; Herrmann, Beate; Geissler, Cathleen; Harder, Lisbeth; Koch, Christiane; Lehnert, Hendrik; Oster, Henrik; Kirchner, Henriette; Mittag, Jens

    2017-10-01

    Maternal and environmental factors control the epigenetic fetal programming of the embryo, thereby defining the susceptibility for metabolic or endocrine disorders in the offspring. Pharmacological interventions required as a consequence of gestational problems, e.g. hypertension, can potentially interfere with correct fetal programming. As epigenetic alterations are usually only revealed later in life and not detected in studies focusing on early perinatal outcomes, little is known about the long-term epigenetic effects of gestational drug treatments. We sought to test the consequences of maternal α1-adrenergic antagonism during pregnancy, which can occur e.g. during hypertension treatment, for the endocrine and metabolic phenotype of the offspring. We treated C57BL/6NCrl female mice with the α1-adrenergic antagonist prazosin during pregnancy and analyzed the male and female offspring for endocrine and metabolic abnormalities. Our data revealed that maternal α1-adrenergic blockade caused dwarfism, elevated body temperature, and insulin resistance in male offspring, accompanied by reduced IGF-1 serum concentrations as the result of reduced hepatic growth hormone receptor (Ghr) expression. We subsequently identified increased CpG DNA methylation at the transcriptional start site of the alternative Ghr promotor caused by the maternal treatment, which showed a strong inverse correlation to hepatic Ghr expression. Our results demonstrate that maternal α1-adrenergic blockade can constitute an epigenetic cause for dwarfism and insulin resistance. The findings are of immediate clinical relevance as combined α/β-adrenergic blockers are first-line treatment of maternal hypertension. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  7. Differential effects of prednisone and growth hormone on fuel metabolism and insulin antagonism in humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horber, F.F.; Marsh, H.M.; Haymond, M.W.

    1991-01-01

    Human growth hormone (hGH) and prednisone cause insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. However, it is unknown whether hGH and prednisone antagonize insulin action on protein, fat, and carbohydrate metabolism by a common or independent mechanism. Therefore, protein, fat, and carbohydrate metabolism was assessed simultaneously in four groups of eight subjects each after 7 days of placebo, recombinant DNA hGH (rhGH; 0.1 mg.kg-1.day-1), prednisone (0.8 mg.kg-1.day-1), or rhGH and prednisone administration after an 18-h fast and during gut infusion of glucose and amino acids (fed state). Fasting plasma glucose concentrations were similar during placebo and rhGH but elevated (P less than 0.001) during combined treatment, whereas plasma insulin concentrations were higher (237 +/- 57 pmol/ml, P less than 0.001) during combined than during placebo, rhGH, or prednisone treatment (34, 52, and 91 pM, respectively). In the fed state, plasma glucose concentrations were elevated only during combined treatment (11.3 +/- 2.1 mM, P less than 0.001). Plasma insulin concentrations were elevated during therapy with prednisone alone and rhGH alone (667 +/- 72 and 564 +/- 65 pmol/ml, respectively, P less than 0.001) compared with placebo (226 +/- 44 pmol/ml) but lower than with the combined rhGH and prednisone treatment (1249 +/- 54 pmol/ml, P less than 0.01). Protein oxidation 14 C leucine increased (P less than 0.001) with prednisone therapy, decreased (P less than 0.001) with rhGH treatment, and was normal during the combined treatment

  8. MafB antagonizes phenotypic alteration induced by GM-CSF in microglia

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    Koshida, Ryusuke, E-mail: rkoshida-myz@umin.ac.jp; Oishi, Hisashi, E-mail: hoishi@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Hamada, Michito; Takahashi, Satoru

    2015-07-17

    Microglia are tissue-resident macrophages which are distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies suggest that microglia are a unique myeloid population distinct from peripheral macrophages in terms of origin and gene expression signature. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a pleiotropic cytokine regulating myeloid development, has been shown to stimulate proliferation and alter phenotype of microglia in vitro. However, how its signaling is modulated in microglia is poorly characterized. MafB, a bZip transcriptional factor, is highly expressed in monocyte-macrophage lineage cells including microglia, although its role in microglia is largely unknown. We investigated the crosstalk between GM-CSF signaling and MafB by analyzing primary microglia. We found that Mafb-deficient microglia grew more rapidly than wild-type microglia in response to GM-CSF. Moreover, the expression of genes associated with microglial differentiation was more downregulated in Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF. Notably, such differences between the genotypes were not observed in the presence of M-CSF. In addition, we found that Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF barely extended their membrane protrusions, probably due to abnormal activation of RhoA, a key regulator of cytoskeletal remodeling. Altogether, our study reveals that MafB is a negative regulator of GM-CSF signaling in microglia. These findings could provide new insight into the modulation of cytokine signaling by transcription factors in microglia. - Highlights: • GM-CSF alters the phenotype of microglia in vitro more potently than M-CSF. • Transcription factor MafB antagonizes the effect of GM-CSF on microglia in vitro. • MafB deficiency leads to RhoA activation in microglia in response to GM-CSF. • We show for the first time the function of MafB in microglia.

  9. Antagonism of CD11b with neutrophil inhibitory factor (NIF inhibits vascular lesions in diabetic retinopathy.

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    Alexander A Veenstra

    Full Text Available Leukocytes and proteins that govern leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells play a causal role in retinal abnormalities characteristic of the early stages of diabetic retinopathy, including diabetes-induced degeneration of retinal capillaries. Leukocyte integrin αmβ2 (CD11b/CD18, MAC1, a protein mediating adhesion, has been shown to mediate damage to endothelial cells by activated leukocytes in vitro. We hypothesized that Neutrophil Inhibitory Factor (NIF, a selective antagonist of integrin αmβ2, would inhibit the diabetes-induced degeneration of retinal capillaries by inhibiting the excessive interaction between leukocytes and retinal endothelial cells in diabetes. Wild type animals and transgenic animals expressing NIF were made diabetic with streptozotocin and assessed for diabetes-induced retinal vascular abnormalities and leukocyte activation. To assess if the leukocyte blocking therapy compromised the immune system, animals were challenged with bacteria. Retinal superoxide production, leukostasis and leukocyte superoxide production were increased in wild type mice diabetic for 10 weeks, as was the ability of leukocytes isolated from diabetic animals to kill retinal endothelial cells in vitro. Retinal capillary degeneration was significantly increased in wild type mice diabetic 40 weeks. In contrast, mice expressing NIF did not develop any of these abnormalities, with the exception that non-diabetic and diabetic mice expressing NIF generated greater amounts of superoxide than did similar mice not expressing NIF. Importantly, NIF did not significantly impair the ability of mice to clear an opportunistic bacterial challenge, suggesting that NIF did not compromise immune surveillance. We conclude that antagonism of CD11b (integrin αmβ2 by NIF is sufficient to inhibit early stages of diabetic retinopathy, while not compromising the basic immune response.

  10. 5-HT(1A) receptor antagonism reverses and prevents fluoxetine-induced sexual dysfunction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukoff Rizzo, Stacey J; Pulicicchio, Claudine; Malberg, Jessica E; Andree, Terrance H; Stack, Gary P; Hughes, Zoë A; Schechter, Lee E; Rosenzweig-Lipson, Sharon

    2009-09-01

    Sexual dysfunction associated with antidepressant treatment continues to be a major compliance issue for antidepressant therapies. 5-HT(1A) antagonists have been suggested as beneficial adjunctive treatment in respect of antidepressant efficacy; however, the effects of 5-HT(1A) antagonism on antidepressant-induced side-effects has not been fully examined. The present study was conducted to evaluate the ability of acute or chronic treatment with 5-HT(1A) antagonists to alter chronic fluoxetine-induced impairments in sexual function. Chronic 14-d treatment with fluoxetine resulted in a marked reduction in the number of non-contact penile erections in sexually experienced male rats, relative to vehicle-treated controls. Acute administration of the 5-HT(1A) antagonist WAY-101405 resulted in a complete reversal of chronic fluoxetine-induced deficits on non-contact penile erections at doses that did not significantly alter baselines. Chronic co-administration of the 5-HT(1A) antagonists WAY-100635 or WAY-101405 with fluoxetine prevented fluoxetine-induced deficits in non-contact penile erections in sexually experienced male rats. Moreover, withdrawal of WAY-100635 from co-treatment with chonic fluoxetine, resulted in a time-dependent reinstatement of chronic fluoxetine-induced deficits in non-contact penile erections. Additionally, chronic administration of SSA-426, a molecule with dual activity as both a SSRI and 5-HT(1A) antagonist, did not produce deficits in non-contact penile erections at doses demonstrated to have antidepressant-like activity in the olfactory bulbectomy model. Taken together, these data suggest that 5-HT(1A) antagonist treatment may have utility for the management of SSRI-induced sexual dysfunction.

  11. Zika Virus Antagonizes Type I Interferon Responses during Infection of Human Dendritic Cells.

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    James R Bowen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus that is causally linked to severe neonatal birth defects, including microcephaly, and is associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome in adults. Dendritic cells (DCs are an important cell type during infection by multiple mosquito-borne flaviviruses, including dengue virus, West Nile virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, and yellow fever virus. Despite this, the interplay between ZIKV and DCs remains poorly defined. Here, we found human DCs supported productive infection by a contemporary Puerto Rican isolate with considerable variability in viral replication, but not viral binding, between DCs from different donors. Historic isolates from Africa and Asia also infected DCs with distinct viral replication kinetics between strains. African lineage viruses displayed more rapid replication kinetics and infection magnitude as compared to Asian lineage viruses, and uniquely induced cell death. Infection of DCs with both contemporary and historic ZIKV isolates led to minimal up-regulation of T cell co-stimulatory and MHC molecules, along with limited secretion of inflammatory cytokines. Inhibition of type I interferon (IFN protein translation was observed during ZIKV infection, despite strong induction at the RNA transcript level and up-regulation of other host antiviral proteins. Treatment of human DCs with RIG-I agonist potently restricted ZIKV replication, while type I IFN had only modest effects. Mechanistically, we found all strains of ZIKV antagonized type I IFN-mediated phosphorylation of STAT1 and STAT2. Combined, our findings show that ZIKV subverts DC immunogenicity during infection, in part through evasion of type I IFN responses, but that the RLR signaling pathway is still capable of inducing an antiviral state, and therefore may serve as an antiviral therapeutic target.

  12. The therapeutic promise of ATP antagonism at P2X3 receptors in respiratory & urological disorders

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    Anthony eFord

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A sensory role for ATP was proposed long before general acceptance of its extracellular role. ATP activates & sensitizes signal transmission at multiple sites along the sensory axis, across multiple synapses. P2X & P2Y receptors mediate ATP modulation of sensory pathways & participate in dysregulation, where ATP action directly on primary afferent neurons (PANs, linking receptive field to CNS, has received much attention. Many PANs, especially C-fibers, are activated by ATP, via P2X3-containing trimers. P2X3 knock-out mice & knock-down in rats led to reduced nocifensive activity & visceral reflexes, suggesting that antagonism may offer benefit in sensory disorders. Recently, drug-like P2X3 antagonists, active in a many inflammatory & visceral pain models, have emerged. Significantly, these compounds have no overt CNS action & are inactive versus acute nociception. Selectively targeting ATP sensitization of PANs may lead to therapies that block inappropriate chronic signals at their source, decreasing drivers of peripheral & central wind-up, yet leaving defensive nociceptive and brain functions unperturbed. This article reviews this evidence, focusing on how ATP sensitization of PANs in visceral hollow organs primes them to chronic discomfort, irritation & pain (symptoms as well as exacerbated autonomic reflexes (signs, & how the use of isolated organ-nerve preparations has revealed this mechanism. Urinary & airways systems share many features: dependence on continuous afferent traffic to brainstem centers to coordinate efferent autonomic outflow; loss of descending inhibitory influence in functional & sensory disorders; dependence on ATP in mediating sensory responses to diverse mechanical and chemical stimuli; a mechanistically overlapping array of existing medicines for pathological conditions. These similarities may also play out in terms of future treatment of signs & symptoms, in the potential for benefit of P2X3 antagonists.

  13. Substance P Receptor Antagonism: A Potential Novel Treatment Option for Viral-Myocarditis

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    Prema Robinson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Viral-myocarditis is an important cause of heart failure for which no specific treatment is available. We previously showed the neuropeptide substance P (SP is associated with the pathogenesis of murine myocarditis caused by encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV. The current studies determined if pharmacological inhibition of SP-signaling via its high affinity receptor, NK1R and downstream G-protein, Ras homolog gene family, member-A (RhoA, will be beneficial in viral-myocarditis. Aprepitant (1.2 mg/kg, a SP-receptor antagonist, or fasudil (10 mg/kg, a RhoA inhibitor, or saline control was administered daily to mice orally for 3 days, prior to, or 5 days following, intraperitoneal infection with and without 50 PFU of EMCV, following which disease assessment studies, including echocardiogram and cardiac Doppler were performed in day 14 after infection. Pretreatment and posttreatment with aprepitant significantly reduced mortality, heart and cardiomyocyte size, and cardiac viral RNA levels (P<0.05 all, ANOVA. Only aprepitant pretreatment improved heart functions; it significantly decreased end systolic diameter, improved fractional shortening, and increased peak aortic flow velocity (P<0.05 all, ANOVA. Pre- or posttreatment with fasudil did not significantly impact disease manifestations. These findings indicate that SP contributes to cardiac-remodeling and dysfunction following ECMV infection via its high affinity receptor, but not through the Rho-A pathway. These studies suggest that SP-receptor antagonism may be a novel therapeutic-option for patients with viral-myocarditis.

  14. ROS inhibitor N-acetyl-L-cysteine antagonizes the activity of proteasome inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halasi, Marianna; Wang, Ming; Chavan, Tanmay S; Gaponenko, Vadim; Hay, Nissim; Gartel, Andrei L

    2013-09-01

    NAC (N-acetyl-L-cysteine) is commonly used to identify and test ROS (reactive oxygen species) inducers, and to inhibit ROS. In the present study, we identified inhibition of proteasome inhibitors as a novel activity of NAC. Both NAC and catalase, another known scavenger of ROS, similarly inhibited ROS levels and apoptosis associated with H₂O₂. However, only NAC, and not catalase or another ROS scavenger Trolox, was able to prevent effects linked to proteasome inhibition, such as protein stabilization, apoptosis and accumulation of ubiquitin conjugates. These observations suggest that NAC has a dual activity as an inhibitor of ROS and proteasome inhibitors. Recently, NAC was used as a ROS inhibitor to functionally characterize a novel anticancer compound, piperlongumine, leading to its description as a ROS inducer. In contrast, our own experiments showed that this compound depicts features of proteasome inhibitors including suppression of FOXM1 (Forkhead box protein M1), stabilization of cellular proteins, induction of ROS-independent apoptosis and enhanced accumulation of ubiquitin conjugates. In addition, NAC, but not catalase or Trolox, interfered with the activity of piperlongumine, further supporting that piperlongumine is a proteasome inhibitor. Most importantly, we showed that NAC, but not other ROS scavengers, directly binds to proteasome inhibitors. To our knowledge, NAC is the first known compound that directly interacts with and antagonizes the activity of proteasome inhibitors. Taken together, the findings of the present study suggest that, as a result of the dual nature of NAC, data interpretation might not be straightforward when NAC is utilized as an antioxidant to demonstrate ROS involvement in drug-induced apoptosis.

  15. Dynamics of bounded confidence opinion in heterogeneous social networks: Concord against partial antagonism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurmyshev, Evguenii; Juárez, Héctor A.; González-Silva, Ricardo A.

    2011-08-01

    Bounded confidence models of opinion dynamics in social networks have been actively studied in recent years, in particular, opinion formation and extremism propagation along with other aspects of social dynamics. In this work, after an analysis of limitations of the Deffuant-Weisbuch (DW) bounded confidence, relative agreement model, we propose the mixed model that takes into account two psychological types of individuals. Concord agents (C-agents) are friendly people; they interact in a way that their opinions always get closer. Agents of the other psychological type show partial antagonism in their interaction (PA-agents). Opinion dynamics in heterogeneous social groups, consisting of agents of the two types, was studied on different social networks: Erdös-Rényi random graphs, small-world networks and complete graphs. Limit cases of the mixed model, pure C- and PA-societies, were also studied. We found that group opinion formation is, qualitatively, almost independent of the topology of networks used in this work. Opinion fragmentation, polarization and consensus are observed in the mixed model at different proportions of PA- and C-agents, depending on the value of initial opinion tolerance of agents. As for the opinion formation and arising of “dissidents”, the opinion dynamics of the C-agents society was found to be similar to that of the DW model, except for the rate of opinion convergence. Nevertheless, mixed societies showed dynamics and bifurcation patterns notably different to those of the DW model. The influence of biased initial conditions over opinion formation in heterogeneous social groups was also studied versus the initial value of opinion uncertainty, varying the proportion of the PA- to C-agents. Bifurcation diagrams showed an impressive evolution of collective opinion, in particular, radical changes of left to right consensus or vice versa at an opinion uncertainty value equal to 0.7 in the model with the PA/C mixture of population near 50/50.

  16. Antagonism of CD11b with neutrophil inhibitory factor (NIF) inhibits vascular lesions in diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenstra, Alexander A; Tang, Jie; Kern, Timothy S

    2013-01-01

    Leukocytes and proteins that govern leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells play a causal role in retinal abnormalities characteristic of the early stages of diabetic retinopathy, including diabetes-induced degeneration of retinal capillaries. Leukocyte integrin αmβ2 (CD11b/CD18, MAC1), a protein mediating adhesion, has been shown to mediate damage to endothelial cells by activated leukocytes in vitro. We hypothesized that Neutrophil Inhibitory Factor (NIF), a selective antagonist of integrin αmβ2, would inhibit the diabetes-induced degeneration of retinal capillaries by inhibiting the excessive interaction between leukocytes and retinal endothelial cells in diabetes. Wild type animals and transgenic animals expressing NIF were made diabetic with streptozotocin and assessed for diabetes-induced retinal vascular abnormalities and leukocyte activation. To assess if the leukocyte blocking therapy compromised the immune system, animals were challenged with bacteria. Retinal superoxide production, leukostasis and leukocyte superoxide production were increased in wild type mice diabetic for 10 weeks, as was the ability of leukocytes isolated from diabetic animals to kill retinal endothelial cells in vitro. Retinal capillary degeneration was significantly increased in wild type mice diabetic 40 weeks. In contrast, mice expressing NIF did not develop any of these abnormalities, with the exception that non-diabetic and diabetic mice expressing NIF generated greater amounts of superoxide than did similar mice not expressing NIF. Importantly, NIF did not significantly impair the ability of mice to clear an opportunistic bacterial challenge, suggesting that NIF did not compromise immune surveillance. We conclude that antagonism of CD11b (integrin αmβ2) by NIF is sufficient to inhibit early stages of diabetic retinopathy, while not compromising the basic immune response.

  17. Selective augmentation of striatal functional connectivity following NMDA receptor antagonism: implications for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandash, Orwa; Harrison, Ben J; Adapa, Ram; Gaillard, Raphael; Giorlando, Francesco; Wood, Stephen J; Fletcher, Paul C; Fornito, Alex

    2015-02-01

    The psychotomimetic effect of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist ketamine is thought to arise from a functional modulation of the brain's fronto-striato-thalamic (FST) circuits. Animal models suggest a pronounced effect on ventral 'limbic' FST systems, although recent work in patients with psychosis and high-risk individuals suggests specific alterations of dorsal 'associative' FST circuits. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the effects of a subanesthetic dose of ketamine on measures of functional connectivity as indexed by the temporal coherence of spontaneous neural activity in both dorsal and ventral FST circuits, as well as their symptom correlates. We adopted a placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized, repeated-measures design in which 19 healthy participants received either an intravenous saline infusion or a racemic mixture of ketamine (100 ng/ml) separated by at least 1 week. Compared with placebo, ketamine increased functional connectivity between the dorsal caudate and both the thalamus and midbrain bilaterally. Ketamine additionally increased functional connectivity of the ventral striatum/nucleus accumbens and ventromedial prefrontal cortex. Both connectivity increases significantly correlated with the psychosis-like and dissociative symptoms under ketamine. Importantly, dorsal caudate connectivity with the ventrolateral thalamus and subthalamic nucleus showed inverse correlation with ketamine-induced symptomatology, pointing to a possible resilience role to disturbances in FST circuits. Although consistent with the role of FST in mediating psychosis, these findings contrast with previous research in clinical samples by suggesting that acute NMDAR antagonism may lead to psychosis-like experiences via a mechanism that is distinct from that implicated in frank psychotic illness.

  18. Cerebral, spinal and peripheral inhibition of gastrointestinal transit by PI017: differential antagonism by naloxonazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, C.L.; Heyman, J.S.; Porreca, F.; Burks, T.F.

    1986-03-05

    The authors were interested in characterizing the relative importance of central (cerebral, spinal) and peripheral opioid receptors in inhibition of gastrointestinal transit. The mu-receptor selective agonist, (NMePhe/sup 3/,D-Pro/sup 4/)morphiceptin (PL017), was evaluated for its effectiveness in slowing gastrointestinal transit after subcutaneous, intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) or intrathecal (i.th.) administration when given alone or after pretreatment with naloxonazine, an irreversible mu/sub 1/ selective opioid receptor antagonist. Male, ICR mice (20-25 g) were pretreated with saline, naloxone or naloxonazine (35 mg/kg, s.c.) 25 hr prior to testing. Gastrointestinal transit was evaluated in previously fasted (18 hr) mice by oral administration of a liquid radiolabelled marker (Na/sub 2//sup 51/CrO/sub 4/). I.th. PL017 (100-1000 ng) was effective in slowing transit, but was essentially insensitive to naloxone or naloxonazine pretreatment. PL017 produced a dose-related inhibition of transit when given by either the i.c.v. (100-1000 ng) or s.c.(1-10 mg/kg) route; this effect was not sensitive to naloxone pretreatment but was antagonized by naloxonazine. These results indicate that the opioid receptors mediating gastrointestinal transit in the brain and periphery may be mu/sub 1/. In contrast, the insensitivity to naloxonazine suggests that the gastrointestinal effects of PL017 in the spinal cord may be the result of activation of mu/sub 2/ or possibly delta opioid receptors.

  19. ANTAGONISM AGAINST VIBRIO CHOLERAE BY BACTERIAL DIFFUSIBLE COMPOUND IN THE FECAL MICROBIOTA OF RODENTS

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    Silva Simone Helena da

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available In an ex vivo agar plate assay, we monitored the appearance of an inhibitory halo against Vibrio cholerae from the feces of Wistar and Fischer rats aged 10 to 42 days. The frequency of Wistar rats showing halo increased from 0% (10 days to a maximum of 80.0% (29 days and then decreased to 53.3% (42 days. A similar pattern was obtained with Fischer rats but with a lower intensity (maximum frequency of 50.0% by day 36. In a separate experiment, when Wistar rats were fed a low-protein diet for 7 days, the inhibitory halo decreased drastically. Three apparently different colony morphologies were isolated from the dominant fecal microbiota: a facultative anaerobe (FAN and two strict anaerobes (SAN. The ex vivo inhibitory test showed a halo around the feces of germfree mice monoassociated with the FAN bacterium or one of the SAN bacterium but not of the germfree ones. After oral challenge of all groups with V. cholerae, a permissive and a drastic barrier effects were observed in mice with FAN and SAN associated bacteria, respectively. The FAN and one SAN bacteria used in the in vivo challenges were identified as Escherichia coli and Streptococcus intermedius, respectively. The potent antagonism developed by the rat intestinal microbiota against V. cholerae seems to be due, in part, to diffusible compounds and this phenomenon depends apparently on age, strain and nutrition of the animals. These preliminary results also suggest that this effect was due to more than one bacterial component at any given moment.

  20. Design of a PROTAC that antagonizes and destroys the cancer-forming X-protein of the hepatitis B virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montrose, Kristopher; Krissansen, Geoffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A novel proteolysis targeting chimeric molecule (PROTAC) to treat hepatitis B. • The PROTAC antagonizes and destroys the X-protein of the hepatitis B virus. • The PROTAC is a fusion of the X-protein oligomerization and instability domains. • The oligomerization domain is a dominant-negative inhibitor of X-protein function. • X-protein-targeting PROTACs have potential to prevent hepatocellular carcinoma. - Abstract: The X-protein of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is essential for virus infection and contributes to the development of HBV-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a disease which causes more than one million deaths each year. Here we describe the design of a novel PROTAC (proteolysis targeting chimeric molecule) capable of simultaneously inducing the degradation of the X-protein, and antagonizing its function. The PROTAC was constructed by fusing the N-terminal oligomerization and C-terminal instability domains of the X-protein to each other, and rendering them cell-permeable by the inclusion of a polyarginine cell-penetrating peptide (CPP). It was predicted that the oligomerization domain would bind the X-protein, and that the instability domain would cause the X-protein to be targeted for proteasomal degradation. Addition of the PROTAC to HepG2 liver cancer cells, engineered to express full-length and C-terminally truncated forms of the X-protein, resulted in the degradation of both forms of the X-protein. A cell-permeable stand-alone form of the oligomerization domain was taken up by HepG2 cells, and acted as a dominant-negative inhibitor, causing inhibition of X-protein-induced apoptosis. In summary, the PROTAC described here induces the degradation of the X-protein, and antagonizes its function, and warrants investigation in a preclinical study for its ability to prevent or treat HBV infection and/or the development of HCC

  1. Diversifying selection and functional analysis of interleukin-4 suggests antagonism-driven evolution at receptor-binding interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Scott

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin-4 (IL4 is a secreted immunoregulatory cytokine critically involved in host protection from parasitic helminths 1. Reasoning that helminths may have evolved mechanisms to antagonize IL4 to maximize their dispersal, we explored mammalian IL4 evolution. Results This analysis revealed evidence of diversifying selection at 15 residues, clustered in epitopes responsible for IL4 binding to its Type I and Type II receptors. Such a striking signature of selective pressure suggested either recurrent episodes of pathogen antagonism or ligand/receptor co-evolution. To test the latter possibility, we performed detailed functional analysis of IL4 allotypes expressed by Mus musculus musculus and Mus musculus castaneus, which happen to differ at 5 residues (including three at positively selected sites in and adjacent to the site 1 epitope that binds the IL4Rα subunit shared by the Type I and Type II IL4 receptors. We show that this intra-species variation affects the ability of IL4 neither to bind IL4 receptor alpha (IL4Rα nor to signal biological responses through its Type I receptor. Conclusions Our results -- reminiscent of clustered positively selected sites revealing functionally important residues at host-virus interaction interfaces -- are consistent with IL4 having evolved to avoid recurrent pathogen antagonism, while maintaining the capacity to bind and signal through its cognate receptor. This work exposes what may be a general feature of evolutionary conflicts fought by pathogen antagonists at host protein-protein interaction interfaces involved in immune signaling: the emergence of receptor-binding ligand epitopes capable of buffering amino acid variation.

  2. Design of a PROTAC that antagonizes and destroys the cancer-forming X-protein of the hepatitis B virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montrose, Kristopher; Krissansen, Geoffrey W., E-mail: gw.krissansen@auckland.ac.nz

    2014-10-31

    Highlights: • A novel proteolysis targeting chimeric molecule (PROTAC) to treat hepatitis B. • The PROTAC antagonizes and destroys the X-protein of the hepatitis B virus. • The PROTAC is a fusion of the X-protein oligomerization and instability domains. • The oligomerization domain is a dominant-negative inhibitor of X-protein function. • X-protein-targeting PROTACs have potential to prevent hepatocellular carcinoma. - Abstract: The X-protein of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is essential for virus infection and contributes to the development of HBV-induced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a disease which causes more than one million deaths each year. Here we describe the design of a novel PROTAC (proteolysis targeting chimeric molecule) capable of simultaneously inducing the degradation of the X-protein, and antagonizing its function. The PROTAC was constructed by fusing the N-terminal oligomerization and C-terminal instability domains of the X-protein to each other, and rendering them cell-permeable by the inclusion of a polyarginine cell-penetrating peptide (CPP). It was predicted that the oligomerization domain would bind the X-protein, and that the instability domain would cause the X-protein to be targeted for proteasomal degradation. Addition of the PROTAC to HepG2 liver cancer cells, engineered to express full-length and C-terminally truncated forms of the X-protein, resulted in the degradation of both forms of the X-protein. A cell-permeable stand-alone form of the oligomerization domain was taken up by HepG2 cells, and acted as a dominant-negative inhibitor, causing inhibition of X-protein-induced apoptosis. In summary, the PROTAC described here induces the degradation of the X-protein, and antagonizes its function, and warrants investigation in a preclinical study for its ability to prevent or treat HBV infection and/or the development of HCC.

  3. Hydrogen sulfide alleviates postharvest ripening and senescence of banana by antagonizing the effect of ethylene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Ge

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence shows that hydrogen sulfide (H2S acts as a multifunctional signaling molecule in plants, whereas the interaction between H2S and ethylene is still unclear. In the present study we investigated the role of H2S in ethylene-promoted banana ripening and senescence by the application of ethylene released from 1.0 g·L-1 ethephon solution or H2S with 1 mM sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS as the donor or in combination. Fumigation with ethylene was found to accelerate banana ripening and H2S treatment effectively alleviated ethylene-induced banana peel yellowing and fruit softening in parallel with decreased activity of polygalacturonase (PG. Ethylene+H2S treatment also delayed the decreases in chlorophyll and total phenolics, and increased the accumulation of flavonoid, whereas decreased the contents of carotenoid, soluble protein in banana peel and reducing sugar in pulp compared with ethylene treatment alone. Besides, ethylene+H2S treatment suppressed the accumulation of superoxide radicals (·O2-, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA which accumulated highly in ethylene-treated banana peels. Furthermore H2S enhanced total antioxidant capacity in ethylene-treated banana peels with the 2,2'-azobis(3-ethylbenz-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS assay. The result of quantitative real-time PCR showed that the combined treatment of ethylene with H2S down-regulated the expression of ethylene synthesis genes MaACS1, MaACS2 and MaACO1 and pectate lyase MaPL compared with ethylene treatment, while the expression of ethylene receptor genes MaETR, MaERS1 and MaERS2 was enhanced in combination treatment compared with ethylene alone. In all, it can be concluded that H2S alleviates banana fruit ripening and senescence by antagonizing the effect of ethylene through reduction of oxidative stress and inhibition of ethylene signaling pathway.

  4. Hydrogen sulfide alleviates postharvest ripening and senescence of banana by antagonizing the effect of ethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yun; Hu, Kang-Di; Wang, Sha-Sha; Hu, Lan-Ying; Chen, Xiao-Yan; Li, Yan-Hong; Yang, Ying; Yang, Feng; Zhang, Hua

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that hydrogen sulfide (H2S) acts as a multifunctional signaling molecule in plants, whereas the interaction between H2S and ethylene is still unclear. In the present study we investigated the role of H2S in ethylene-promoted banana ripening and senescence by the application of ethylene released from 1.0 g·L-1 ethephon solution or H2S with 1 mM sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) as the donor or in combination. Fumigation with ethylene was found to accelerate banana ripening and H2S treatment effectively alleviated ethylene-induced banana peel yellowing and fruit softening in parallel with decreased activity of polygalacturonase (PG). Ethylene+H2S treatment also delayed the decreases in chlorophyll and total phenolics, and increased the accumulation of flavonoid, whereas decreased the contents of carotenoid, soluble protein in banana peel and reducing sugar in pulp compared with ethylene treatment alone. Besides, ethylene+H2S treatment suppressed the accumulation of superoxide radicals (·O2-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde (MDA) which accumulated highly in ethylene-treated banana peels. Furthermore H2S enhanced total antioxidant capacity in ethylene-treated banana peels with the 2,2'-azobis(3-ethylbenz-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS) assay. The result of quantitative real-time PCR showed that the combined treatment of ethylene with H2S down-regulated the expression of ethylene synthesis genes MaACS1, MaACS2 and MaACO1 and pectate lyase MaPL compared with ethylene treatment, while the expression of ethylene receptor genes MaETR, MaERS1 and MaERS2 was enhanced in combination treatment compared with ethylene alone. In all, it can be concluded that H2S alleviates banana fruit ripening and senescence by antagonizing the effect of ethylene through reduction of oxidative stress and inhibition of ethylene signaling pathway.

  5. Novel anti-HER2 monoclonal antibodies: synergy and antagonism with tumor necrosis factor-α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ceran Ceyhan

    2012-10-01

    , but antagonistically on BT-474 cells. A representative anti-HER2 antibody inhibited Akt and ERK1/2 phosphorylation leading to cyclin D1 accumulation and growth arrest in SK-BR-3 cells, independently from TNF-α. Conclusions Novel antibodies against extracellular domain of HER2 may serve as potent anti-cancer bioactive molecules. Cell-dependent synergy and antagonism between anti-HER2 antibodies and TNF-α provide evidence for a complex interplay between HER2 and TNF-α signaling pathways. Such complexity may drastically affect the outcome of HER2-directed therapeutic interventions.

  6. Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Evolutionarily Acquires Two Proteins, Vif and Protease, Capable of Antagonizing Feline APOBEC3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Takeuchi, Junko S; Yamada, Eri; Nakano, Yusuke; Misawa, Naoko; Kimura, Yuichi; Ren, Fengrong; Miyazawa, Takayuki; Koyanagi, Yoshio; Sato, Kei

    2017-06-01

    The interplay between viral and host proteins has been well studied to elucidate virus-host interactions and their relevance to virulence. Mammalian genes encode apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (APOBEC3) proteins, which act as intrinsic restriction factors against lentiviruses. To overcome APOBEC3-mediated antiviral actions, lentiviruses have evolutionarily acquired an accessory protein, viral infectivity factor (Vif), and Vif degrades host APOBEC3 proteins via a ubiquitin/proteasome-dependent pathway. Although the Vif-APOBEC3 interaction and its evolutionary significance, particularly those of primate lentiviruses (including HIV) and primates (including humans), have been well investigated, those of nonprimate lentiviruses and nonprimates are poorly understood. Moreover, the factors that determine lentiviral pathogenicity remain unclear. Here, we focus on feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a pathogenic lentivirus in domestic cats, and the interaction between FIV Vif and feline APOBEC3 in terms of viral virulence and evolution. We reveal the significantly reduced diversity of FIV subtype B compared to that of other subtypes, which may associate with the low pathogenicity of this subtype. We also demonstrate that FIV subtype B Vif is less active with regard to feline APOBEC3 degradation. More intriguingly, we further reveal that FIV protease cleaves feline APOBEC3 in released virions. Taken together, our findings provide evidence that a lentivirus encodes two types of anti-APOBEC3 factors, Vif and viral protease. IMPORTANCE During the history of mammalian evolution, mammals coevolved with retroviruses, including lentiviruses. All pathogenic lentiviruses, excluding equine infectious anemia virus, have acquired the vif gene via evolution to combat APOBEC3 proteins, which are intrinsic restriction factors against exogenous lentiviruses. Here we demonstrate that FIV, a pathogenic lentivirus in domestic cats, antagonizes feline APOBEC3

  7. Detection of Fusarium spp. and Trichoderma spp. and antagonism of Trichoderma sp. in soybean under no-tillage

    OpenAIRE

    Paola Mendes Milanesi; Elena Blume; Marlove Fátima Brião Muniz; Lia Rejane Silveira Reiniger; Zaida Inês Antoniolli; Emanuele Junges; Manoeli Lupatini

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed i) to quantify the occurrence of Fusarium spp. and Trichoderma spp. in rhizospheric soil, with and without symptoms of Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS) in eight soybean genotypes; ii) morphologically identify isolates of Fusarium spp. from roots with SDS; iii) evaluate the antagonism between Trichoderma spp. and Fusarium spp. isolates from rhizospheric soil and roots from with and without SDS, respectively; and iv) characterize through the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of rDNA the isolate...

  8. Binding of the N-Terminal Domain of the Lactococcal Bacteriophage TP901-1 CI Repressor to Its Target DNA: A Crystallography, Small Angle Scattering, and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Kristian Erik Høpfner; Rasmussen, Kim K.; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing

    2013-01-01

    In most temperate bacteriophages, regulation of the choice of lysogenic or lytic life cycle is controlled by a CI repressor protein. Inhibition of transcription is dependent on a helix–turn–helix motif, often located in the N-terminal domain (NTD), which binds to specific DNA sequences (operator ...

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of BigR, a transcription repressor from Xylella fastidiosa involved in biofilm formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, Rosicler Lázaro; Rinaldi, Fábio Cupri; Guimarães, Beatriz Gomes; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    In order to gain new insights into the protein structure and its possible interaction with a metal ion or effector ligand, BigR from X. fastidiosa was crystallized in native and selenomethionine (SeMet) labelled forms using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. BigR (biofilm growth-associated repressor) is a novel repressor protein that regulates the transcription of an operon implicated in biofilm growth in both Xylella fastidiosa and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. This protein binds to a palindromic TA-rich element located in the promoter of the BigR operon and strongly represses transcription of the operon. BigR contains a helix–turn–helix (HTH) domain that is found in some members of the ArsR/SmtB family of metal sensors, which control metal resistance in bacteria. Although functional studies have suggested that BigR does not act as a metal sensor, the presence of two cysteines and a methionine in its primary structure raised the possibility of BigR being a metal-ligand protein. In order to gain new insights into the protein structure and its possible interaction with a metal ion or effector ligand, BigR from X. fastidiosa was crystallized in native and selenomethionine (SeMet) labelled forms using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data were collected from native and SeMet crystals to resolutions of 1.95 and 2.2 Å, respectively. Both crystals belong to space group P321 and contain one molecule per asymmetric unit

  10. Functional characterization of a cadmium resistance operon in Staphylococcus aureus ATCC12600: CadC does not function as a repressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogewerf, Arlene J; Dyk, Lisa A Van; Buit, Tyler S; Roukema, David; Resseguie, Emily; Plaisier, Christina; Le, Nga; Heeringa, Lee; Griend, Douglas A Vander

    2015-02-01

    Sequencing of a cadmium resistance operon from a Staphylococcus aureus ATCC12600 plasmid revealed that it is identical to a cadCA operon found in MRSA strains. Compared to plasmid-cured and cadC-mutant strains, cadC-positive ATCC12600 cells had increased resistance to cadmium (1 mg ml(-1) cadmium sulfate) and zinc (4 mg ml(-1) zinc sulfate), but not to other metal ions. After growth in media containing 20 µg ml(-1) cadmium sulfate, cadC-mutant cells contained more intracellular cadmium than cadC-positive ATCC12600 cells, suggesting that cadC absence results in impaired cadmium efflux. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays were performed with CadC proteins encoded by the S. aureus ATCC12600 plasmid and by the cadC gene of pI258, which is known to act as a transcriptional repressor and shares only 47% protein sequence identity with ATCC12600 CadC. Mobility shifts occurred when pI258 CadC protein was incubated with the promoter DNA-regions from the pI258 and S. aureus ATCC12600 cadCA operons, but did not occur with S. aureus ATCC12600 CadC protein, indicating that the ATCC12600 CadC protein does not interact with promoter region DNA. This cadCA operon, found in MRSA strains and previously functionally uncharacterized, increases resistance to cadmium and zinc by an efflux mechanism, and CadC does not function as a transcriptional repressor. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Sequence-specific 1H NMR assignments and secondary structure of the Arc repressor of bacteriophage P22, as determined by two-dimensional 1H NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breg, J.N.; Boelens, R.; George, A.V.E.; Kaptein, R.

    1989-01-01

    The Arc repressor of bacteriophage P22 is a DNA binding protein that does not belong to any of the known classes of such proteins. The authors have undertaken a 1 H NMR study of the protein with the aim of elucidating its three-dimensional structure in solution and its mode of binding of operator DNA. Here the authors present the 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) assignments of all backbone protons an most of the side-chain protons of Arc repressor. Elements of secondary structure have been identified on the basis of networks of characteristics sequential and medium-range nuclear Overhauser enhancements (NOEs). Two α-helical regions have been found in the peptide regions 16-29 and 35-45. The ends of the helices could not yet be firmly established and could extend to residue 31 for the first helix and to residue 49 for the second. Immediately before the first helix, between residues 8 and 14, a region is present with β-sheet characteristics dominated by a close proximity of the α-protons of residues 9 and 13. Because of the dimeric nature of the protein there are still two possible ways in which the NOEs in the β-sheet region can be interpreted. While the data presently do not allow an unambiguous choice between these two possibilities, some evidence is discussed that favors the latter (β-sheet between monomers). Since the N-terminal region of Arc is responsible for the sequence-specific recognition of its operator, the findings suggest the existence of a DNA binding motif in which a β-sheet region is present

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of BigR, a transcription repressor from Xylella fastidiosa involved in biofilm formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Rosicler Lázaro; Rinaldi, Fábio Cupri; Guimarães, Beatriz Gomes, E-mail: beatriz@lnls.br; Benedetti, Celso Eduardo, E-mail: beatriz@lnls.br [Center for Molecular and Structural Biology, Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory, Campinas, SP, CP 6192, CEP 13083-970 (Brazil)

    2007-07-01

    In order to gain new insights into the protein structure and its possible interaction with a metal ion or effector ligand, BigR from X. fastidiosa was crystallized in native and selenomethionine (SeMet) labelled forms using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. BigR (biofilm growth-associated repressor) is a novel repressor protein that regulates the transcription of an operon implicated in biofilm growth in both Xylella fastidiosa and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. This protein binds to a palindromic TA-rich element located in the promoter of the BigR operon and strongly represses transcription of the operon. BigR contains a helix–turn–helix (HTH) domain that is found in some members of the ArsR/SmtB family of metal sensors, which control metal resistance in bacteria. Although functional studies have suggested that BigR does not act as a metal sensor, the presence of two cysteines and a methionine in its primary structure raised the possibility of BigR being a metal-ligand protein. In order to gain new insights into the protein structure and its possible interaction with a metal ion or effector ligand, BigR from X. fastidiosa was crystallized in native and selenomethionine (SeMet) labelled forms using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. X-ray diffraction data were collected from native and SeMet crystals to resolutions of 1.95 and 2.2 Å, respectively. Both crystals belong to space group P321 and contain one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  13. THAP5 is a DNA-binding transcriptional repressor that is regulated in melanoma cells during DNA damage-induced cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakrishnan, Meenakshi P.; Cilenti, Lucia; Ambivero, Camilla [Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Goto, Yamafumi [Department of Dermatology, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto (Japan); Takata, Minoru [Department of Dermatology, Okayama University Graduate School of Medical Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama (Japan); Turkson, James; Li, Xiaoman Shawn [Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Zervos, Antonis S., E-mail: azervos@mail.ucf.edu [Biomolecular Science Center, Burnett School of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. {yields} THAP5 is induced in melanoma cells upon exposure to UV or treatment with cisplatin. {yields} THAP5 induction correlates with the degree of apoptosis in melanoma cell population. {yields} THAP5 is a pro-apoptotic protein involved in melanoma cell death. -- Abstract: THAP5 was originally isolated as a specific interactor and substrate of the mitochondrial pro-apoptotic Omi/HtrA2 protease. It is a human zinc finger protein characterized by a restricted pattern of expression and the lack of orthologs in mouse and rat. The biological function of THAP5 is unknown but our previous studies suggest it could regulate G2/M transition in kidney cells and could be involved in human cardiomyocyte cell death associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). In this report, we expanded our studies on the properties and function of THAP5 in human melanoma cells. THAP5 was expressed in primary human melanocytes as well as in all melanoma cell lines that were tested. THAP5 protein level was significantly induced by UV irradiation or cisplatin treatment, conditions known to cause DNA damage. The induction of THAP5 correlated with a significant increase in apoptotic cell death. In addition, we show that THAP5 is a nuclear protein that could recognize and bind a specific DNA motif. THAP5 could also repress the transcription of a reporter gene in a heterologous system. Our work suggests that THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. Furthermore, THAP5 has a pro-apoptotic function and it was induced in melanoma cells under conditions that promoted cell death.

  14. Overexpression of the novel MATE fluoroquinolone efflux pump FepA in Listeria monocytogenes is driven by inactivation of its local repressor FepR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Guérin

    Full Text Available Whereas fluoroquinolone resistance mainly results from target modifications in gram-positive bacteria, it is primarily due to active efflux in Listeria monocytogenes. The aim of this study was to dissect a novel molecular mechanism of fluoroquinolone resistance in this important human pathogen. Isogenic L. monocytogenes clinical isolates BM4715 and BM4716, respectively susceptible and resistant to fluoroquinolones, were studied. MICs of norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin were determined in the presence or in the absence of reserpine (10 mg/L. Strain BM4715 was susceptible to norfloxacin (MIC, 4 mg/L and ciprofloxacin (MIC, 0.5 mg/L whereas BM4716 was highly resistant to both drugs (MICs 128 and 32 mg/L, respectively. Reserpine was responsible for a 16-fold decrease in both norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin MICs against BM4716 suggesting efflux associated resistance. Whole-genome sequencing of the strains followed by comparative genomic analysis revealed a single point mutation in the gene for a transcriptional regulator, designated fepR (for fluoroquinolone efflux protein regulator belonging to the TetR family. The frame-shift mutation was responsible for the introduction of a premature stop codon resulting in an inactive truncated protein. Just downstream from fepR, the structural gene for an efflux pump of the MATE family (named FepA was identified. Gene expression was quantified by qRT-PCR and demonstrated that fepA expression was more than 64-fold higher in BM4716 than in BM4715. The clean deletion of the fepR gene from BM4715 was responsible for an overexpression of fepA with resistance to norfloxacin and ciprofloxacin, confirming the role of FepR as a local repressor of fepA. In conclusion, we demonstrated that overexpression of the new MATE efflux pump FepA is responsible for fluoroquinolone resistance in L. monocytogenes and secondary to inactivation of the FepR repressor.

  15. THAP5 is a DNA-binding transcriptional repressor that is regulated in melanoma cells during DNA damage-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balakrishnan, Meenakshi P.; Cilenti, Lucia; Ambivero, Camilla; Goto, Yamafumi; Takata, Minoru; Turkson, James; Li, Xiaoman Shawn; Zervos, Antonis S.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. → THAP5 is induced in melanoma cells upon exposure to UV or treatment with cisplatin. → THAP5 induction correlates with the degree of apoptosis in melanoma cell population. → THAP5 is a pro-apoptotic protein involved in melanoma cell death. -- Abstract: THAP5 was originally isolated as a specific interactor and substrate of the mitochondrial pro-apoptotic Omi/HtrA2 protease. It is a human zinc finger protein characterized by a restricted pattern of expression and the lack of orthologs in mouse and rat. The biological function of THAP5 is unknown but our previous studies suggest it could regulate G2/M transition in kidney cells and could be involved in human cardiomyocyte cell death associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). In this report, we expanded our studies on the properties and function of THAP5 in human melanoma cells. THAP5 was expressed in primary human melanocytes as well as in all melanoma cell lines that were tested. THAP5 protein level was significantly induced by UV irradiation or cisplatin treatment, conditions known to cause DNA damage. The induction of THAP5 correlated with a significant increase in apoptotic cell death. In addition, we show that THAP5 is a nuclear protein that could recognize and bind a specific DNA motif. THAP5 could also repress the transcription of a reporter gene in a heterologous system. Our work suggests that THAP5 is a DNA-binding protein and a transcriptional repressor. Furthermore, THAP5 has a pro-apoptotic function and it was induced in melanoma cells under conditions that promoted cell death.

  16. Functional regulation of Q by microRNA172 and transcriptional co-repressor TOPLESS in controlling bread wheat spikelet density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pan; Liu, Jie; Dong, Huixue; Sun, Jiaqiang

    2018-02-01

    Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) spike architecture is an important agronomic trait. The Q gene plays a key role in the domestication of bread wheat spike architecture. However, the regulatory mechanisms of Q expression and transcriptional activity remain largely unknown. In this study, we show that overexpression of bread wheat tae-miR172 caused a speltoid-like spike phenotype, reminiscent of that in wheat plants with the q gene. The reduction in Q transcript levels in the tae-miR172 overexpression transgenic bread wheat lines suggests that the Q expression can be suppressed by tae-miR172 in bread wheat. Indeed, our RACE analyses confirmed that the Q mRNA is targeted by tae-miR172 for cleavage. According to our analyses, the Q protein is localized in nucleus and confers transcriptional repression activity. Meanwhile, the Q protein could physically interact with the bread wheat transcriptional co-repressor TOPLESS (TaTPL). Specifically, the N-terminal ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) (LDLNVE) motif but not the C-terminal EAR (LDLDLR) motif of Q protein mediates its interaction with the CTLH motif of TaTPL. Moreover, we show that the N-terminal EAR motif of Q protein is also essentially required for the transcriptional repression activity of Q protein. Taken together, we reveal the functional regulation of Q protein by tae-miR172 and transcriptional co-repressor TaTPL in controlling the bread wheat spike architecture. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Heme-dependent up-regulation of the α-globin gene expression by transcriptional repressor Bach1 in erythroid cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahara, Tsuyoshi; Sun Jiying; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Taketani, Shigeru

    2004-01-01

    The transcriptional factor Bach1 forms a heterodimer with small Maf family, and functions as a repressor of the Maf recognition element (MARE) in vivo. To investigate the involvement of Bach1 in the heme-dependent regulation of the expression of the α-globin gene, human erythroleukemia K562 cells were cultured with succinylacetone (SA), a heme biosynthetic inhibitor, and the level of α-globin mRNA was examined. A decrease of α-globin mRNA was observed in SA-treated cells, which was restored by the addition of hemin. The heme-dependent expression of α-globin occurred at the transcriptional level since the expression of human α-globin gene promoter-reporter gene containing hypersensitive site-40 (HS-40) was decreased when K562 cells were cultured with SA. Hemin treatment restored the decrease of the promoter activity by SA. The regulation of the HS-40 activity by heme was dependent on the NF-E2/AP-1 (NA) site, which is similar to MARE. The NA site-binding activity of Bach1 in K562 increased upon SA-treatment, and the increase was diminished by the addition of hemin. The transient expression of Bach1 and mutated Bach1 lacking CP motifs suppressed the HS-40 activity, and cancellation of the repressor activity by hemin was observed when wild-type Bach1 was expressed. The expression of NF-E2 strengthened the restoration of the Bach1-effect by hemin. Interestingly, nuclear localization of Bach1 increased when cells were treated with SA, while hemin induced the nuclear export of Bach1. These results indicated that heme plays an important role in the induction of α-globin gene expression through disrupting the interaction of Bach1 and the NA site in HS-40 enhancer in erythroid cells

  18. Disruption of a Transcriptional Repressor by an Insertion Sequence Element Integration Leads to Activation of a Novel Silent Cellobiose Transporter in Lactococcus lactis MG1363.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solopova, Ana; Kok, Jan; Kuipers, Oscar P

    2017-12-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris strains typically carry many dairy niche-specific adaptations. During adaptation to the milk environment these former plant strains have acquired various pseudogenes and insertion sequence elements indicative of ongoing genome decay and frequent transposition events in their genomes. Here we describe the reactivation of a silenced plant sugar utilization cluster in an L. lactis MG1363 derivative lacking the two main cellobiose transporters, PtcBA-CelB and PtcBAC, upon applying selection pressure to utilize cellobiose. A disruption of the transcriptional repressor gene llmg_1239 by an insertion sequence (IS) element allows expression of the otherwise silent novel cellobiose transporter Llmg_1244 and leads to growth of mutant strains on cellobiose. Llmg_1239 was labeled CclR, for c ellobiose cl uster r epressor. IMPORTANCE Insertion sequences (ISs) play an important role in the evolution of lactococci and other bacteria. They facilitate DNA rearrangements and are responsible for creation of new genetic variants with selective advantages under certain environmental conditions. L. lactis MG1363 possesses 71 copies in a total of 11 different types of IS elements. This study describes yet another example of an IS-mediated adaptive evolution. An integration of IS 981 or IS 905 into a gene coding for a transcriptional repressor led to activation of the repressed gene cluster coding for a plant sugar utilization pathway. The expression of the gene cluster allowed assembly of a novel cellobiose-specific transporter and led to cell growth on cellobiose. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. The B-subdomain of the Xenopus laevis XFIN KRAB-AB domain is responsible for its weaker transcriptional repressor activity compared to human ZNF10/Kox1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Nadine; Thiesen, Hans-Jürgen; Lorenz, Peter

    2014-01-01

    The Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) domain interacts with the nuclear hub protein TRIM28 to initiate or mediate chromatin-dependent processes like transcriptional repression, imprinting or suppression of endogenous retroviruses. The prototype KRAB domain initially identified in ZNF10/KOX1 encompasses two subdomains A and B that are found in hundreds of zinc finger transcription factors studied in human and murine genomes. Here we demonstrate for the first time transcriptional repressor activity of an amphibian KRAB domain. After sequence correction, the updated KRAB-AB domain of zinc finger protein XFIN from the frog Xenopus laevis was found to confer transcriptional repression in reporter assays in Xenopus laevis A6 kidney cells as well as in human HeLa, but not in the minnow Pimephales promelas fish cell line EPC. Binding of the XFIN KRAB-AB domain to human TRIM28 was demonstrated in a classical co-immunoprecipitation approach and visualized in a single-cell compartmentalization assay. XFIN-AB displayed reduced potency in repression as well as lower strength of interaction with TRIM28 compared to ZNF10 KRAB-AB. KRAB-B subdomain swapping between the two KRAB domains indicated that it was mainly the KRAB-B subdomain of XFIN that was responsible for its lower capacity in repression and binding to human TRIM28. In EPC fish cells, ZNF10 and XFIN KRAB repressor activity could be partially restored to low levels by adding exogenous human TRIM28. In contrast to XFIN, we did not find any transcriptional repression activity for the KRAB-like domain of human PRDM9 in HeLa cells. PRDM9 is thought to harbor an evolutionary older domain related to KRAB whose homologs even occur in invertebrates. Our results support the notion that functional bona fide KRAB domains which confer transcriptional repression and interact with TRIM28 most likely co-evolved together with TRIM28 at the beginning of tetrapode evolution.

  20. Interleukin-1 antagonism moderates the inflammatory state associated with Type 1 diabetes during clinical trials conducted at disease onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, Susanne M; Wang, Xujing; Chen, Yi-Guang; Jia, Shuang; Kaldunski, Mary L; Greenbaum, Carla J; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; Hessner, Martin J

    2016-04-01

    It was hypothesized that IL-1 antagonism would preserve β-cell function in new onset Type 1 diabetes (T1D). However, the Anti-Interleukin-1 in Diabetes Action (AIDA) and TrialNet Canakinumab (TN-14) trials failed to show efficacy of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) or canakinumab, as measured by stimulated C-peptide response. Additional measures are needed to define immune state changes associated with therapeutic responses. Here, we studied these trial participants with plasma-induced transcriptional analysis. In blinded analyses, 70.2% of AIDA and 68.9% of TN-14 participants were correctly called to their treatment arm. While the transcriptional signatures from the two trials were distinct, both therapies achieved varying immunomodulation consistent with IL-1 inhibition. On average, IL-1 antagonism resulted in modest normalization relative to healthy controls. At endpoint, signatures were quantified using a gene ontology-based inflammatory index, and an inverse relationship was observed between measured inflammation and stimulated C-peptide response in IL-1Ra- and canakinumab-treated patients. Cytokine neutralization studies showed that IL-1α and IL-1β additively contribute to the T1D inflammatory state. Finally, analyses of baseline signatures were indicative of later therapeutic response. Despite the absence of clinical efficacy by IL-1 antagonist therapy, transcriptional analysis detected immunomodulation and may yield new insight when applied to other clinical trials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Mdm2 is a novel activator of ApoCIII promoter which is antagonized by p53 and SHP inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhihong; Zhang, Yuxia [Departments of Medicine and Oncological Sciences, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States); Wang, Li, E-mail: l.wang@hsc.utah.edu [Departments of Medicine and Oncological Sciences, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT 84132 (United States)

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mdm2 enhances HNF4{alpha} activation of the ApoCIII promoter via interaction with HNF4{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p53 antagonizes the effect of Mdm2 activation of the ApoCIII promoter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SHP strengthens p53 inhibition but abolishes Mdm2 activation of the ApoCIII promoter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mdm2 alters the enrichment of HNF4{alpha}, p53 and SHP to the ApoCIII promoter. -- Abstract: We examined the effect of Mdm2 on regulation of the ApoCIII promoter and its cross-talk with p53 and nuclear receptor SHP. Overexpression of Mdm2 markedly enhanced ApoCIII promoter activity by HNF4{alpha}. A direct association of Mdm2 protein with the HNF4{alpha} protein was observed by co-immunoprecipitation. Ectopic expression of p53 decreased HNF4{alpha} activation of the ApoCIII promoter and antagonized the effect of Mdm2. Co-expression of SHP further strengthened p53 inhibition and abolished Mdm2 activation of the ApoCIII promoter. Mdm2 inhibited p53-mediated enrichment of HNF4{alpha} to the ApoCIII promoter while simultaneously reducing p53 binding and increasing recruitment of SHP to the ApoCIII promoter. The results from this study implicate a potentially important function of Mdm2 in regulation of lipoprotein metabolism.

  2. Mdm2 is a novel activator of ApoCIII promoter which is antagonized by p53 and SHP inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhihong; Zhang, Yuxia; Wang, Li

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Mdm2 enhances HNF4α activation of the ApoCIII promoter via interaction with HNF4α. ► p53 antagonizes the effect of Mdm2 activation of the ApoCIII promoter. ► SHP strengthens p53 inhibition but abolishes Mdm2 activation of the ApoCIII promoter. ► Mdm2 alters the enrichment of HNF4α, p53 and SHP to the ApoCIII promoter. -- Abstract: We examined the effect of Mdm2 on regulation of the ApoCIII promoter and its cross-talk with p53 and nuclear receptor SHP. Overexpression of Mdm2 markedly enhanced ApoCIII promoter activity by HNF4α. A direct association of Mdm2 protein with the HNF4α protein was observed by co-immunoprecipitation. Ectopic expression of p53 decreased HNF4α activation of the ApoCIII promoter and antagonized the effect of Mdm2. Co-expression of SHP further strengthened p53 inhibition and abolished Mdm2 activation of the ApoCIII promoter. Mdm2 inhibited p53-mediated enrichment of HNF4α to the ApoCIII promoter while simultaneously reducing p53 binding and increasing recruitment of SHP to the ApoCIII promoter. The results from this study implicate a potentially important function of Mdm2 in regulation of lipoprotein metabolism.

  3. MERS-CoV and H5N1 influenza virus antagonize antigen presentation by altering the epigenetic landscape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menachery, Vineet D.; Schafer, Alexandra; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Eisfeld-Fenney, Amie J.; Walters, Kevin B.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Casey, Cameron P.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Weitz, Karl K.; Stratton, Kelly G.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Gralinski, Lisa; Metz, Thomas O.; Smith, Richard D.; Waters, Katrina M.; Sims, Amy C.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Baric, Ralph

    2018-01-16

    Convergent evolution dictates that diverse groups of viruses will target both similar and distinct host pathways in order to manipulate the immune response and improve infection. In this study, we sought to leverage this uneven viral antagonism to identify critical host factors that govern disease outcome. Utilizing a systems based approach, we examined differential regulation of IFNγ dependent genes following infection with highly pathogenic viruses including influenza (H5N1-VN1203, H1N1-CA04) and coronaviruses (SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV). Categorizing by function, we observed down regulation of genes associated with antigen presentation following both H5N1-VN1203 and MERS-CoV infection. Further examination revealed global down regulation of antigen presentation genes and was confirmed by proteomics for both H5N1-VN1203 and MERS-CoV infection. Importantly, epigenetic analysis suggested that DNA methylation rather than histone modification plays a crucial role in MERS-CoV mediated antagonism of antigen presentation genes; in contrast, H5N1-VN1203 likely utilizes a combination of epigenetic mechanisms to target antigen presentation. Together, the results indicate a common approach utilized by H5N1-VN1203 and MERS-CoV to modulate antigen presentation and the host adaptive immune response.

  4. Prenatal NMDA Receptor Antagonism Impaired Proliferation of Neuronal Progenitor, Leading to Fewer Glutamatergic Neurons in the Prefrontal Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toriumi, Kazuya; Mouri, Akihiro; Narusawa, Shiho; Aoyama, Yuki; Ikawa, Natsumi; Lu, Lingling; Nagai, Taku; Mamiya, Takayoshi; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2012-01-01

    N-methyl--aspartate (NMDA) receptor is a glutamate receptor which has an important role on mammalian brain development. We have reported that prenatal treatment with phencyclidine (PCP), a NMDA receptor antagonist, induces long-lasting behavioral deficits and neurochemical changes. However, the mechanism by which the prenatal antagonism of NMDA receptor affects neurodevelopment, resulting in behavioral deficits, has remained unclear. Here, we report that prenatal NMDA receptor antagonism impaired the proliferation of neuronal progenitors, leading to a decrease in the progenitor pool in the ventricular and the subventricular zone. Furthermore, using a PCR array focused on neurogenesis and neuronal stem cells, we evaluated changes in gene expression causing the impairment of neuronal progenitor proliferation and found aberrant gene expression, such as Notch2 and Ntn1, in prenatal PCP-treated mice. Consequently, the density of glutamatergic neurons in the prefrontal cortex was decreased, probably resulting in glutamatergic hypofunction. Prenatal PCP-treated mice displayed behavioral deficits in cognitive memory and sensorimotor gating until adulthood. These findings suggest that NMDA receptors regulate the proliferation and maturation of progenitor cells for glutamatergic neuron during neurodevelopment, probably via the regulation of gene expression. PMID:22257896

  5. Structural basis for antagonizing a host restriction factor by C7 family of poxvirus host-range proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiangzhi; Krumm, Brian; Li, Yongchao; Deng, Junpeng; Xiang, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Human sterile alpha motif domain-containing 9 (SAMD9) protein is a host restriction factor for poxviruses, but it can be overcome by some poxvirus host-range proteins that share homology with vaccinia virus C7 protein. To understand the mechanism of action for this important family of host-range factors, we determined the crystal structures of C7 and myxoma virus M64, a C7 family member that is unable to antagonize SAMD9. Despite their different functions and only 23% sequence identity, the two proteins have very similar overall structures, displaying a previously unidentified fold comprised of a compact 12-stranded antiparallel β-sandwich wrapped in two short α helices. Extensive structure-guided mutagenesis of C7 identified three loops clustered on one edge of the β sandwich as critical for viral replication and binding with SAMD9. The loops are characterized with functionally important negatively charged, positively charged, and hydrophobic residues, respectively, together forming a unique "three-fingered molecular claw." The key residues of the claw are not conserved in two C7 family members that do not antagonize SAMD9 but are conserved in distantly related C7 family members from four poxvirus genera that infect diverse mammalian species. Indeed, we found that all in the latter group of proteins bind SAMD9. Taken together, our data indicate that diverse mammalian poxviruses use a conserved molecular claw in a C7-like protein to target SAMD9 and overcome host restriction.

  6. Alternative binding modes identified for growth and differentiation factor-associated serum protein (GASP) family antagonism of myostatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ryan G; Angerman, Elizabeth B; Kattamuri, Chandramohan; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Se-Jin; Thompson, Thomas B

    2015-03-20

    Myostatin, a member of the TGF-β family of ligands, is a strong negative regulator of muscle growth. As such, it is a prime therapeutic target for muscle wasting disorders. Similar to other TGF-β family ligands, myostatin is neutralized by binding one of a number of structurally diverse antagonists. Included are the antagonists GASP-1 and GASP-2, which are unique in that they specifically antagonize myostatin. However, little is known from a structural standpoint describing the interactions of GASP antagonists with myostatin. Here, we present the First low resolution solution structure of myostatin-free and myostatin-bound states of GASP-1 and GASP-2. Our studies have revealed GASP-1, which is 100 times more potent than GASP-2, preferentially binds myostatin in an asymmetrical 1:1 complex, whereas GASP-2 binds in a symmetrical 2:1 complex. Additionally, C-terminal truncations of GASP-1 result in less potent myostatin inhibitors that form a 2:1 complex, suggesting that the C-terminal domains of GASP-1 are the primary mediators for asymmetric complex formation. Overall, this study provides a new perspective on TGF-β antagonism, where closely related antagonists can utilize different ligand-binding strategies. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Alternative Binding Modes Identified for Growth and Differentiation Factor-associated Serum Protein (GASP) Family Antagonism of Myostatin*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ryan G.; Angerman, Elizabeth B.; Kattamuri, Chandramohan; Lee, Yun-Sil; Lee, Se-Jin; Thompson, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Myostatin, a member of the TGF-β family of ligands, is a strong negative regulator of muscle growth. As such, it is a prime therapeutic target for muscle wasting disorders. Similar to other TGF-β family ligands, myostatin is neutralized by binding one of a number of structurally diverse antagonists. Included are the antagonists GASP-1 and GASP-2, which are unique in that they specifically antagonize myostatin. However, little is known from a structural standpoint describing the interactions of GASP antagonists with myostatin. Here, we present the First low resolution solution structure of myostatin-free and myostatin-bound states of GASP-1 and GASP-2. Our studies have revealed GASP-1, which is 100 times more potent than GASP-2, preferentially binds myostatin in an asymmetrical 1:1 complex, whereas GASP-2 binds in a symmetrical 2:1 complex. Additionally, C-terminal truncations of GASP-1 result in less potent myostatin inhibitors that form a 2:1 complex, suggesting that the C-terminal domains of GASP-1 are the primary mediators for asymmetric complex formation. Overall, this study provides a new perspective on TGF-β antagonism, where closely related antagonists can utilize different ligand-binding strategies. PMID:25657005

  8. Neuropeptide Y Y5 receptor antagonism causes faster extinction and attenuates reinstatement in cocaine-induced place preference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Gunnar; Wörtwein, Gitta; Fink-Jensen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have suggested a role for neuropeptide Y (NPY) in addiction to drugs of abuse, including cocaine. Recently, our group showed a role for the NPY Y5 receptor in the modulation of acute reinforcing effects of cocaine using self-administration and hyperlocomotion paradigms. In the pre......Several studies have suggested a role for neuropeptide Y (NPY) in addiction to drugs of abuse, including cocaine. Recently, our group showed a role for the NPY Y5 receptor in the modulation of acute reinforcing effects of cocaine using self-administration and hyperlocomotion paradigms....... In the present study, we further explored potential anti-addiction-related effects of Y5 antagonism in another murine model of cocaine addiction-related behavior: conditioned place-preference (CPP). Using this model, it was tested whether blockade or deficiency of the NPY Y5 receptor could influence......, and reinstatement of cocaine-induced CPP was absent. The development of CPP for cocaine was similar between Y5-KO and WT mice. Taken together, the present data show that Y5 antagonism attenuates relapse to cocaine addiction-related behavior. Prevention of relapse is considered to be of pivotal importance...

  9. Antagonism between the transcription factors NANOG and OTX2 specifies rostral or caudal cell fate during neural patterning transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhenghui; Zhang, Yanqi; Liao, Baojian; Zhong, Xiaofen; Chen, Xin; Wang, Haitao; Guo, Yiping; Shan, Yongli; Wang, Lihui; Pan, Guangjin

    2018-03-23

    During neurogenesis, neural patterning is a critical step during which neural progenitor cells differentiate into neurons with distinct functions. However, the molecular determinants that regulate neural patterning remain poorly understood. Here we optimized the "dual SMAD inhibition" method to specifically promote differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into forebrain and hindbrain neural progenitor cells along the rostral-caudal axis. We report that neural patterning determination occurs at the very early stage in this differentiation. Undifferentiated hPSCs expressed basal levels of the transcription factor orthodenticle homeobox 2 (OTX2) that dominantly drove hPSCs into the "default" rostral fate at the beginning of differentiation. Inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) through CHIR99021 application sustained transient expression of the transcription factor NANOG at early differentiation stages through Wnt signaling. Wnt signaling and NANOG antagonized OTX2 and, in the later stages of differentiation, switched the default rostral cell fate to the caudal one. Our findings have uncovered a mutual antagonism between NANOG and OTX2 underlying cell fate decisions during neural patterning, critical for the regulation of early neural development in humans. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Baseline characteristics in PRIORITY study: Proteomics and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism for prevention of diabetic nephropathy in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tofte, Nete

    diabetic nephRopathy In TYpe 2 diabetic patients with normoalbuminuria) trial, the aim is to confirm that CKD273 can predict microalbuminuria prospectively, and to test whether mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism (MRA) delays progression to microalbuminuria. Here we report the association between CKD273...... and traditional risk factors for diabetic nephropathy at baseline. Materials and methods PRIORITY is an investigator-initiated, prospective, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled multicentre clinical trial and observational study in normoalbuminuric type 2 diabetic patients. Patients are stratified...... is development of microalbuminuria. Results In total 2277 type 2 diabetic patients have been screened over a time period of 2.5 years and 1811 are included from 15 sites. Table 1 shows the baseline characteristics. 224 (12.4%) have the high-risk CKD273 pattern. The high- and low-risk populations differ...

  11. The effects of conformational constraints and steric bulk in the amino acid moiety of philanthotoxins on AMPAR antagonism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Malene; Olsen, Christian A; Mellor, Ian R

    2005-01-01

    , establishing general protocols for philanthotoxin solution- and solid-phase synthesis (39-90% and 42-54% overall yields, respectively). The analogues were tested for their ability to antagonize kainate-induced currents of 2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazoyl)propanoic acid receptors (AMPAR) expressed...... in Xenopus oocytes from rat brain mRNA. This showed that steric bulk in the amino acid moiety is well tolerated and suggests that binding to AMPAR does not involve the alpha-NHCO group as a donor in hydrogen bonding.......Philanthotoxin-343 (PhTX-343), a synthetic analogue of wasp toxin PhTX-433, is a noncompetitive antagonist at ionotropic receptors (e.g., AChR or iGluR). To determine possible effects of variations of the amino acid side chain, a library consisting of seventeen PhTX-343 analogues was prepared. Thus...

  12. Three New Soil-inhabiting Species of Trichoderma in the Stromaticum Clade with Test of Their Antagonism to Pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Zhuang, Wen-Ying

    2017-09-01

    Trichoderma is a dominant component of the soil mycoflora. During the field investigations of northern, central, and southwestern China, three new species in the Stromaticum clade were encountered from soil, and named as T. hebeiense, T. sichuanense, and T. verticillatum. Their phylogenetic positions were determined by analyses of the combined two genes: partial sequences of translation elongation factor 1-alpha and the second largest RNA polymerase subunit-encoding genes. Distinctions between the new species and their close relatives were discussed. Trichoderma hebeiense appeared as a separate terminal branch. The species is distinctive by its oblong conidia and aggregated pustules in culture. Trichoderma sichuanense features in concentric colony and produces numerous clean exudates on aerial mycelium in culture. Trichoderma verticillatum is characterized by its verticillium-like synanamorph and production of abundant chlamydospores. In vitro antagonism towards the new species was tested by dual culture technique.

  13. Antagonism by supidimide of haloperidol-induced augmentation of [3H]-spiperone binding in rat striatum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennies, H.H.; Hess, V.; Flohe, L.

    1984-01-01

    Rats were treated for two weeks with haloperidol alone or with additional test drugs and the D 2 receptor density in the striatum was investigated after a drug-free period of five days. The D 2 receptor system as analysed by [ 3 H]-spinerone binding was best characterized by a model with two binding sites of different affinity. Chronic haloperidol treatment substantially augmented the total binding capacity 2-(2-Oxo-3-piperidyl)-1,2-benzisothiazoline-3-one-1,1-dioxide (supidimide), a functional synergist of neuroleptics in acute experiments, surprisingly antagonized the haloperidol-induced receptor augmentation, whereas other CNS depressants (diazepam and phenobarbital) were ineffective. (orig./MG) [de

  14. Antagonism by supidimide of haloperidol-induced augmentation of (/sup 3/H)-spiperone binding in rat striatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennies, H H; Hess, V; Flohe, L

    1984-01-01

    Rats were treated for two weeks with haloperidol alone or with additional test drugs and the D/sub 2/ receptor density in the striatum was investigated after a drug-free period of five days. The D/sub 2/ receptor system as analysed by (/sup 3/H)-spinerone binding was best characterized by a model with two binding sites of different affinity. Chronic haloperidol treatment substantially augmented the total binding capacity 2-(2-Oxo-3-piperidyl)-1,2-benzisothiazoline-3-one-1,1-dioxide (supidimide), a functional synergist of neuroleptics in acute experiments, surprisingly antagonized the haloperidol-induced receptor augmentation, whereas other CNS depressants (diazepam and phenobarbital) were ineffective.

  15. SSX2 is a novel DNA-binding protein that antagonizes polycomb group body formation and gene repression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, Morten Frier; Relster, Mette Marie; Greve, Katrine Buch Viden

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) complexes regulate cellular identity through epigenetic programming of chromatin. Here, we show that SSX2, a germline-specific protein ectopically expressed in melanoma and other types of human cancers, is a chromatin-associated protein that antagonizes BMI1 and EZH2 PcG body...... formation and derepresses PcG target genes. SSX2 further negatively regulates the level of the PcG-associated histone mark H3K27me3 in melanoma cells, and there is a clear inverse correlation between SSX2/3 expression and H3K27me3 in spermatogenesis. However, SSX2 does not affect the overall composition...

  16. Antagonism of the prostaglandin D2 receptor CRTH2 attenuates asthma pathology in mouse eosinophilic airway inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uller, Lena; Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff; Alenmyr, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mast cell-derived prostaglandin D2 (PGD2), may contribute to eosinophilic inflammation and mucus production in allergic asthma. Chemoattractant receptor homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells (CRTH2), a high affinity receptor for prostaglandin D2, mediates trafficking of TH2-cells......, mast cells, and eosinophils to inflammatory sites, and has recently attracted interest as target for treatment of allergic airway diseases. The present study involving mice explores the specificity of CRTH2 antagonism of TM30089, which is structurally closely related to the dual TP/CRTH2 antagonist...... in recombinant expression systems in vitro. In vivo effects of TM30089 and ramatroban on tissue eosinophilia and mucus cell histopathology were examined in a mouse asthma model. RESULTS: TM30089, displayed high selectivity for and antagonistic potency on mouse CRTH2 but lacked affinity to TP and many other...

  17. Prophage Rs551 and Its Repressor Gene orf14 Reduce Virulence and Increase Competitive Fitness of Its Ralstonia solanacearum Carrier Strain UW551.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Abdelmonim Ali; Stulberg, Michael J; Huang, Qi

    2017-01-01

    We previously characterized a filamentous lysogenic bacteriophage, ϕRs551, isolated directly from the race 3 biovar 2 phylotype IIB sequevar 1 strain UW551 of Ralstonia solanacearum grown under normal culture conditions. The genome of ϕRs551 was identified with 100% identity in the deposited genomes of 11 race 3 biovar 2 phylotype IIB sequevar 1 strains of R. solanacearum , indicating evolutionary and biological importance, and ORF14 of ϕRs551 was annotated as a putative type-2 repressor. In this study, we determined the effect of the prophage and its ORF14 on the virulence and competitive fitness of its carrier strain UW551 by deleting the orf14 gene only (the UW551 orf14 mutant), and nine of the prophage's 14 genes including orf14 and six out of seven structural genes (the UW551 prophage mutant), respectively, from the genome of UW551. The two mutants were increased in extracellular polysaccharide production, twitching motility, expression of targeted virulence and virulence regulatory genes ( pilT, egl, pehC, hrPB, and phcA ), and virulence, suggesting that the virulence of UW551 was negatively regulated by ϕRs551, at least partially through ORF14. Interestingly, we found that the wt ϕRs551-carrying strain UW551 of R. solanacearum significantly outcompeted the wt strain RUN302 which lacks the prophage in tomato plants co-inoculated with the two strains. When each of the two mutant strains was co-inoculated with RUN302, however, the mutants were significantly out-competed by RUN302 for the same colonization site. Our results suggest that ecologically, ϕRs551 may play an important role by regulating the virulence of and offering a competitive fitness advantage to its carrier bacterial strain for persistence of the bacterium in the environment, which in turn prolongs the symbiotic relationship between the phage ϕRs551 and the R. solanacearum strain UW551. Our study is the first toward a better understanding of the co-existence between a lysogenic phage and

  18. Prophage Rs551 and Its Repressor Gene orf14 Reduce Virulence and Increase Competitive Fitness of Its Ralstonia solanacearum Carrier Strain UW551

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmonim Ali Ahmad

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We previously characterized a filamentous lysogenic bacteriophage, ϕRs551, isolated directly from the race 3 biovar 2 phylotype IIB sequevar 1 strain UW551 of Ralstonia solanacearum grown under normal culture conditions. The genome of ϕRs551 was identified with 100% identity in the deposited genomes of 11 race 3 biovar 2 phylotype IIB sequevar 1 strains of R. solanacearum, indicating evolutionary and biological importance, and ORF14 of ϕRs551 was annotated as a putative type-2 repressor. In this study, we determined the effect of the prophage and its ORF14 on the virulence and competitive fitness of its carrier strain UW551 by deleting the orf14 gene only (the UW551 orf14 mutant, and nine of the prophage’s 14 genes including orf14 and six out of seven structural genes (the UW551 prophage mutant, respectively, from the genome of UW551. The two mutants were increased in extracellular polysaccharide production, twitching motility, expression of targeted virulence and virulence regulatory genes (pilT, egl, pehC, hrPB, and phcA, and virulence, suggesting that the virulence of UW551 was negatively regulated by ϕRs551, at least partially through ORF14. Interestingly, we found that the wt ϕRs551-carrying strain UW551 of R. solanacearum significantly outcompeted the wt strain RUN302 which lacks the prophage in tomato plants co-inoculated with the two strains. When each of the two mutant strains was co-inoculated with RUN302, however, the mutants were significantly out-competed by RUN302 for the same colonization site. Our results suggest that ecologically, ϕRs551 may play an important role by regulating the virulence of and offering a competitive fitness advantage to its carrier bacterial strain for persistence of the bacterium in the environment, which in turn prolongs the symbiotic relationship between the phage ϕRs551 and the R. solanacearum strain UW551. Our study is the first toward a better understanding of the co-existence between a

  19. Prophage Rs551 and Its Repressor Gene orf14 Reduce Virulence and Increase Competitive Fitness of Its Ralstonia solanacearum Carrier Strain UW551

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Abdelmonim Ali; Stulberg, Michael J.; Huang, Qi

    2017-01-01

    We previously characterized a filamentous lysogenic bacteriophage, ϕRs551, isolated directly from the race 3 biovar 2 phylotype IIB sequevar 1 strain UW551 of Ralstonia solanacearum grown under normal culture conditions. The genome of ϕRs551 was identified with 100% identity in the deposited genomes of 11 race 3 biovar 2 phylotype IIB sequevar 1 strains of R. solanacearum, indicating evolutionary and biological importance, and ORF14 of ϕRs551 was annotated as a putative type-2 repressor. In this study, we determined the effect of the prophage and its ORF14 on the virulence and competitive fitness of its carrier strain UW551 by deleting the orf14 gene only (the UW551 orf14 mutant), and nine of the prophage’s 14 genes including orf14 and six out of seven structural genes (the UW551 prophage mutant), respectively, from the genome of UW551. The two mutants were increased in extracellular polysaccharide production, twitching motility, expression of targeted virulence and virulence regulatory genes (pilT, egl, pehC, hrPB, and phcA), and virulence, suggesting that the virulence of UW551 was negatively regulated by ϕRs551, at least partially through ORF14. Interestingly, we found that the wt ϕRs551-carrying strain UW551 of R. solanacearum significantly outcompeted the wt strain RUN302 which lacks the prophage in tomato plants co-inoculated with the two strains. When each of the two mutant strains was co-inoculated with RUN302, however, the mutants were significantly out-competed by RUN302 for the same colonization site. Our results suggest that ecologically, ϕRs551 may play an important role by regulating the virulence of and offering a competitive fitness advantage to its carrier bacterial strain for persistence of the bacterium in the environment, which in turn prolongs the symbiotic relationship between the phage ϕRs551 and the R. solanacearum strain UW551. Our study is the first toward a better understanding of the co-existence between a lysogenic phage and

  20. Antagonism of the Phosphatase PP1 by the Measles Virus V Protein Is Required for Innate Immune Escape of MDA5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davis, Meredith E.; Wang, May K.; Rennick, Linda J.; Full, Florian; Gableske, Sebastian; Mesman, Annelies W.; Gringhuis, Sonja I.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Duprex, W. Paul; Gack, Michaela U.

    2014-01-01

    The cytosolic sensor MDA5 is crucial for antiviral innate immune defense against various RNA viruses including measles virus; as such, many viruses have evolved strategies to antagonize the antiviral activity of MDA5. Here, we show that measles virus escapes MDA5 detection by targeting the

  1. Analogues of neuroactive polyamine wasp toxins that lack inner basic sites exhibit enhanced antagonism toward a muscle-type mammalian nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stromgaard, K; Brierley, M J; Andersen, K

    1999-01-01

    noncompetitively antagonized the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in a concentration-, time-, and voltage-dependent manner. The amplitudes of acetylcholine-induced currents were compared at their peaks and at the end of a 1 s application in the presence or absence of the analogues. Most of the analogues...

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Streptomyces sp. Strain Wb2n-11, a Desert Isolate with Broad-Spectrum Antagonism against Soilborne Phytopathogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Köberl, Martina; White, Richard A.; Erschen, Sabine; El-Arabi, Tarek F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Berg, Gabriele

    2015-08-06

    Streptomyces sp. strain Wb2n-11, isolated from native desert soil, exhibited broad-spectrum antagonism against plant pathogenic fungi, bacteria and nematodes. The 8.2 Mb draft genome reveals genes putatively responsible for its promising biocontrol activity and genes which enable the soil bacterium to directly interact beneficially with plants.

  3. [Antagonism between hospital strains of Staphylococcus aureus and lactic acid bacteria in vitro and the use of the latter as a sanitary agent].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambartsumian, A D; Dekhtsunian, K M; Atopek, S Ia; Erzinkian, L A

    1983-08-01

    The study of antagonism between S. aureus hospital strains and lactic acid bacteria, strain 317/402 "Nariné", revealed that the latter possessed high antagonistic activity. A new method for the sanitation of carriers of S. aureus hospital strains was developed; this method made it possible to limit the epidemiological significance of 82% of these strains.

  4. Unsurmountable antagonism of brain 5-hydroxytryptamine2 receptors by (+)-lysergic acid diethylamide and bromo-lysergic acid diethylamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burris, K D; Sanders-Bush, E

    1992-11-01

    Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and its structural analogue 2-bromo-lysergic acid diethylamide (BOL) act as unsurmountable antagonists of serotonin-elicited contractions in smooth muscle preparations. Two different models, allosteric and kinetic, have been invoked to explain these findings. The present studies investigate the mechanism of antagonism of brain 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT)2 receptors, utilizing cells transfected with 5HT2 receptor cDNA cloned from rat brain. A proximal cellular response, phosphoinositide hydrolysis, was examined in order to minimize possible postreceptor effects. Even though LSD behaved as a partial agonist and BOL as a pure antagonist, both drugs blocked the effect of serotonin in an unsurmountable manner, i.e., increasing concentrations of serotonin could not overcome the blocking effect of LSD or BOL. Radioligand binding studies showed that preincubation of membranes with either LSD or BOL reduced the density of [3H]ketanserin binding sites, suggesting that the drugs bind tightly to the 5HT2 receptor and are not displaced during the binding assay. Two additional experiments supported this hypothesis. First, the off-rate of [3H] LSD was slow (20 min), relative to that of [3H]ketanserin (approximately 4 min). Second, when the length of incubation with [3H]ketanserin was increased to 60 min, the LSD-induced decrease in Bmax was essentially eliminated. The possibility that LSD and BOL decrease [3H]ketanserin binding by interacting with an allosteric site was rejected, because neither drug altered the rate of dissociation of [3H]ketanserin. The most parsimonious interpretation of these results is that unsurmountable antagonism reflects prolonged occupancy of the receptor by slowly reversible antagonists.

  5. Sugammadex antagonism of rocuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade in patients with liver cirrhosis undergoing liver resection: a randomized controlled study.

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    Abdulatif, Mohamed; Lotfy, Maha; Mousa, Mahmoud; Afifi, Mohamed H; Yassen, Khaled

    2018-02-05

    This randomized controlled study compared the recovery times of sugammadex and neostigmine as antagonists of moderate rocuroniuminduced neuromuscular block in patients with liver cirrhosis and controls undergoing liver resection. The study enrolled 27 adult patients with Child class "A" liver cirrhosis and 28 patients with normal liver functions. Normal patients and patients with liver cirrhosis were randomized according to the type of antagonist (sugammadex 2mg/kg or neostigmine 50μg/kg). The primary outcome was the time from antagonist administration to a trainoffour (TOF) ratio of 0.9 using mechanosensor neuromuscular transmission module. The durations of the intubating and topup doses of rocuronium, the length of stay in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU), and the incidence of postoperative re curarization were recorded. The durations of the intubating and topup doses of rocuronium were prolonged in patients with liver cirrhosis than controls. The times to a TOF ratio of 0.9 were 3.1 (1.0) and 2.6 (1.0) min after sugammadex administration in patients with liver cirrhosis and controls, respectively, p=1.00. The corresponding times after neostigmine administration were longer than sugammadex 14.5 (3.6) and 15.7 (3.6) min, respectively, psugammadex compared to neostigmine. We did not encounter postoperative recurarization after sugammadex or neostigmine. Sugammadex rapidly antagonize moderate residual rocuronium induced neuromuscular block in patients with Child class "A" liver cirrhosis undergoing liver resection. Sugammadex antagonism is associated with 80% reduction in the time to adequate neuromuscular recovery compared to neostigmine.

  6. Detection of Fusarium spp. and Trichoderma spp. and antagonism of Trichoderma sp. in soybean under no-tillage

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    Paola Mendes Milanesi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed i to quantify the occurrence of Fusarium spp. and Trichoderma spp. in rhizospheric soil, with and without symptoms of Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS in eight soybean genotypes; ii morphologically identify isolates of Fusarium spp. from roots with SDS; iii evaluate the antagonism between Trichoderma spp. and Fusarium spp. isolates from rhizospheric soil and roots from with and without SDS, respectively; and iv characterize through the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of rDNA the isolates of Trichoderma spp. with better performance in the direct confrontation. The sampling of soil and roots was performed in an experimental area located in Cruz Alta, RS, Brazil. In the laboratory, serial dilutions of soil samples, counting of the number of Colony Forming Units (UFCs/g-1 of rhizospheric soil were performed as well as isolation for identification of isolates of Fusarium spp. and Trichoderma spp. and testing of direct confrontation. There were significant differences between the population of Trichoderma spp. in the rhizosphere of plants with and without symptoms of SDS. For the population of Fusarium spp., significant difference was observed only in the rhizosphere of plants without symptoms of SDS. In diseased roots the following species were identified: F. solani, F. avenaceum, F. graminearum, F. oxysporum and F. verticillioides. In the test of direct confrontation, eight isolates of Trichoderma spp. achieved the best performance in the antagonism to Fusarium spp. and Trichoderma spp. from areas with symptoms of SDS had a higher control efficiency in vitro. These isolates showed high similarity to the species of T. koningii agregate.

  7. The Effect of Active Principles of Cilantro and Spirulina Powder on Lead Antagonism to Copper and Chromium in Carassius gibelio

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    Mărioara Nicula

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The goal of our work was to highlight the detoxifying potential of the active principles from lyophilized cilantro and spirulina in experimental contamination with lead, to Carassius gibelio, and their effect on lead antagonism to copper and chromium. 120 Prussian carps, weighing 22-25 g each were divided according to the following treatments for 21 days: C group (without treatment, E1 group (75 ppm Pb into water as Pb(NO32x ½H2O, E2 group (75 ppm Pb into water+2% lyophilized cilantro in feed, E3 group (75 ppm Pb into water+2% lyophilized spirulina in feed. At the end of the experimental period, tissue samples (gills, muscles myotome– epaxial, heart, skin and scales, intestine, liver, brain, gonads, kidney were collected after a starving for 12 hours, and fish euthanasia with clove oil. Determination of Cu and Cr concentration in biological samples was performed using atomic absorption spectrophotometer AAS-VARIAN. Pb addition into water in dose of 75 ppm, has resulted in Cu and Cr mobilization from fish tissues. Decreasing of Cu tissue level occurred less intensive in tissues sampled from groups receiving cilantro and spiriulina powder in feed, maximum efficiency in the counteracting the antagonism against Pb showing spirulina on the heart, liver, and kidney. Cr was maintained at relatively low values, although, cilantro powder has induced in some wise the Pb complexing. In contrast, the freeze-dried spirulina brought the tissue level of Cr close to that of the control group or even has determined its more efficient takeover from the feed.

  8. Chiral recognition of pinacidil and its 3-pyridyl isomer by canine cardiac and smooth muscle: Antagonism by sulfonylureas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinberg, M.I.; Wiest, S.A.; Zimmerman, K.M.; Ertel, P.J.; Bemis, K.G.; Robertson, D.W.

    1991-01-01

    Pinacidil, a potassium channel opener (PCO), relaxes vascular smooth muscle by increasing potassium ion membrane conductance, thereby causing membrane hyperpolarization. PCOs also act on cardiac muscle to decrease action potential duration (APD) selectively. To examine the enantiomeric selectivity of pinacidil, the stereoisomers of pinacidil (a 4-pyridylcyanoguanidine) and its 3-pyridyl isomer (LY222675) were synthesized and studied in canine Purkinje fibers and cephalic veins. The (-)-enantiomers of both pinacidil and LY222675 were more potent in relaxing phenylephrine-contracted cephalic veins and decreasing APD than were their corresponding (+)-enantiomers. The EC50 values for (-)-pinacidil and (-)-LY222675 in relaxing cephalic veins were 0.44 and 0.09 microM, respectively. In decreasing APD, the EC50 values were 3.2 microM for (-)-pinacidil and 0.43 microM for (-)-LY222675. The eudismic ratio was greater for the 3-pyridyl isomer than for pinacidil in both cardiac (71 vs. 22) and vascular (53 vs. 17) tissues. (-)-LY222675 and (-)-pinacidil (0.1-30 microM) also increased 86Rb efflux from cephalic veins to a greater extent than did their respective optical antipodes. The antidiabetic sulfonylurea, glyburide (1-30 microM), shifted the vascular concentration-response curve of (-)-pinacidil to the right by a similar extent at each inhibitor concentration. Glipizide also antagonized the response to (-)-pinacidil, but was about 1/10 as potent with a maximal shift occurring at 10 and 30 microM. Glyburide antagonized the vascular relaxant effects of 0.3 microM (-)-LY222675 (EC50, 2.3 microM) and reversed the decrease in APD caused by 3 microM (-)-LY222675 (EC50, 1.9 microM). Nitroprusside did not alter 86Rb efflux, and vascular relaxation induced by sodium nitroprusside was unaffected by sulfonylureas

  9. Antagonism of the prostaglandin D2 receptor CRTH2 attenuates asthma pathology in mouse eosinophilic airway inflammation

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    Högberg Thomas

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mast cell-derived prostaglandin D2 (PGD2, may contribute to eosinophilic inflammation and mucus production in allergic asthma. Chemoattractant receptor homologous molecule expressed on TH2 cells (CRTH2, a high affinity receptor for prostaglandin D2, mediates trafficking of TH2-cells, mast cells, and eosinophils to inflammatory sites, and has recently attracted interest as target for treatment of allergic airway diseases. The present study involving mice explores the specificity of CRTH2 antagonism of TM30089, which is structurally closely related to the dual TP/CRTH2 antagonist ramatroban, and compares the ability of ramatroban and TM30089 to inhibit asthma-like pathology. Methods Affinity for and antagonistic potency of TM30089 on many mouse receptors including thromboxane A2 receptor mTP, CRTH2 receptor, and selected anaphylatoxin and chemokines receptors were determined in recombinant expression systems in vitro. In vivo effects of TM30089 and ramatroban on tissue eosinophilia and mucus cell histopathology were examined in a mouse asthma model. Results TM30089, displayed high selectivity for and antagonistic potency on mouse CRTH2 but lacked affinity to TP and many other receptors including the related anaphylatoxin C3a and C5a receptors, selected chemokine receptors and the cyclooxygenase isoforms 1 and 2 which are all recognized players in allergic diseases. Furthermore, TM30089 and ramatroban, the latter used as a reference herein, similarly inhibited asthma pathology in vivo by reducing peribronchial eosinophilia and mucus cell hyperplasia. Conclusion This is the first report to demonstrate anti-allergic efficacy in vivo of a highly selective small molecule CRTH2 antagonist. Our data suggest that CRTH2 antagonism alone is effective in mouse allergic airway inflammation even to the extent that this mechanism can explain the efficacy of ramatroban.

  10. The Tetherin Antagonism of the Ebola Virus Glycoprotein Requires an Intact Receptor-Binding Domain and Can Be Blocked by GP1-Specific Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkmann, Constantin; Nehlmeier, Inga; Walendy-Gnirß, Kerstin; Nehls, Julia; González Hernández, Mariana; Hoffmann, Markus; Qiu, Xiangguo; Takada, Ayato; Schindler, Michael; Pöhlmann, Stefan

    2016-12-15

    The glycoprotein of Ebola virus (EBOV GP), a member of the family Filoviridae, facilitates viral entry into target cells. In addition, EBOV GP antagonizes the antiviral activity of the host cell protein tetherin, which may otherwise restrict EBOV release from infected cells. However, it is unclear how EBOV GP antagonizes tetherin, and it is unknown whether the GP of Lloviu virus (LLOV), a filovirus found in dead bats in Northern Spain, also counteracts tetherin. Here, we show that LLOV GP antagonizes tetherin, indicating that tetherin may not impede LLOV spread in human cells. Moreover, we demonstrate that appropriate processing of N-glycans in tetherin/GP-coexpressing cells is required for tetherin counteraction by EBOV GP. Furthermore, we show that an intact receptor-binding domain (RBD) in the GP1 subunit of EBOV GP is a prerequisite for tetherin counteraction. In contrast, blockade of Niemann-Pick disease type C1 (NPC1), a cellular binding partner of the RBD, did not interfere with tetherin antagonism. Finally, we provide evidence that an antibody directed against GP1, which protects mice from a lethal EBOV challenge, may block GP-dependent tetherin antagonism. Our data, in conjunction with previous reports, indicate that tetherin antagonism is conserved among the GPs of all known filoviruses and demonstrate that the GP1 subunit of EBOV GP plays a central role in tetherin antagonism. Filoviruses are reemerging pathogens that constitute a public health threat. Understanding how Ebola virus (EBOV), a highly pathogenic filovirus responsible for the 2013-2016 Ebola virus disease epidemic in western Africa, counteracts antiviral effectors of the innate immune system might help to define novel targets for antiviral intervention. Similarly, determining whether Lloviu virus (LLOV), a filovirus detected in bats in northern Spain, is inhibited by innate antiviral effectors in human cells might help to determine whether the virus constitutes a threat to humans. The

  11. The Transcriptional Repressor MYB2 Regulates Both Spatial and Temporal Patterns of Proanthocyandin and Anthocyanin Pigmentation in Medicago truncatula[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins (PAs) is limited to specific cell types and developmental stages, but little is known about how antagonistically acting transcriptional regulators work together to determine temporal and spatial patterning of pigmentation at the cellular level, especially for PAs. Here, we characterize MYB2, a transcriptional repressor regulating both anthocyanin and PA biosynthesis in the model legume Medicago truncatula. MYB2 was strongly upregulated by MYB5, a major regulator of PA biosynthesis in M. truncatula and a component of MYB-basic helix loop helix-WD40 (MBW) activator complexes. Overexpression of MYB2 abolished anthocyanin and PA accumulation in M. truncatula hairy roots and Arabidopsis thaliana seeds, respectively. Anthocyanin deposition was expanded in myb2 mutant seedlings and flowers accompanied by increased anthocyanin content. PA mainly accumulated in the epidermal layer derived from the outer integument in the M. truncatula seed coat, starting from the hilum area. The area of PA accumulation and ANTHOCYANIDIN REDUCTASE expression was expanded into the seed body at the early stage of seed development in the myb2 mutant. Genetic, biochemical, and cell biological evidence suggests that MYB2 functions as part of a multidimensional regulatory network to define the temporal and spatial pattern of anthocyanin and PA accumulation linked to developmental processes. PMID:26410301

  12. Sestrin-2, a repressor of PDGFRβ signalling, promotes cigarette-smoke-induced pulmonary emphysema in mice and is upregulated in individuals with COPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidler, Juliana; Fysikopoulos, Athanasios; Wempe, Frank; Seimetz, Michael; Bangsow, Thorsten; Tomasovic, Ana; Veit, Florian; Scheibe, Susan; Pichl, Alexandra; Weisel, Friederike; Lloyd, K. C. Kent; Jaksch, Peter; Klepetko, Walter; Weissmann, Norbert; von Melchner, Harald

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. COPD is caused by chronic exposure to cigarette smoke and/or other environmental pollutants that are believed to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that gradually disrupt signalling pathways responsible for maintaining lung integrity. Here we identify the antioxidant protein sestrin-2 (SESN2) as a repressor of PDGFRβ signalling, and PDGFRβ signalling as an upstream regulator of alveolar maintenance programmes. In mice, the mutational inactivation of Sesn2 prevents the development of cigarette-smoke-induced pulmonary emphysema by upregulating PDGFRβ expression via a selective accumulation of intracellular superoxide anions (O2−). We also show that SESN2 is overexpressed and PDGFRβ downregulated in the emphysematous lungs of individuals with COPD and to a lesser extent in human lungs of habitual smokers without COPD, implicating a negative SESN2-PDGFRβ interrelationship in the pathogenesis of COPD. Taken together, our results imply that SESN2 could serve as both a biomarker and as a drug target in the clinical management of COPD. PMID:24046361

  13. Haploinsufficiency of MeCP2-interacting transcriptional co-repressor SIN3A causes mild intellectual disability by affecting the development of cortical integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witteveen, Josefine S; Willemsen, Marjolein H; Dombroski, Thaís C D; van Bakel, Nick H M; Nillesen, Willy M; van Hulten, Josephus A; Jansen, Eric J R; Verkaik, Dave; Veenstra-Knol, Hermine E; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny M A; Wassink-Ruiter, Jolien S Klein; Vincent, Marie; David, Albert; Le Caignec, Cedric; Schieving, Jolanda; Gilissen, Christian; Foulds, Nicola; Rump, Patrick; Strom, Tim; Cremer, Kirsten; Zink, Alexander M; Engels, Hartmut; de Munnik, Sonja A; Visser, Jasper E; Brunner, Han G; Martens, Gerard J M; Pfundt, Rolph; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Kolk, Sharon M

    2016-08-01

    Numerous genes are associated with neurodevelopmental disorders such as intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but their dysfunction is often poorly characterized. Here we identified dominant mutations in the gene encoding the transcriptional repressor and MeCP2 interactor switch-insensitive 3 family member A (SIN3A; chromosome 15q24.2) in individuals who, in addition to mild intellectual disability and ASD, share striking features, including facial dysmorphisms, microcephaly and short stature. This phenotype is highly related to that of individuals with atypical 15q24 microdeletions, linking SIN3A to this microdeletion syndrome. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed subtle abnormalities, including corpus callosum hypoplasia and ventriculomegaly. Intriguingly, in vivo functional knockdown of Sin3a led to reduced cortical neurogenesis, altered neuronal identity and aberrant corticocortical projections in the developing mouse brain. Together, our data establish that haploinsufficiency of SIN3A is associated with mild syndromic intellectual disability and that SIN3A can be considered to be a key transcriptional regulator of cortical brain development.

  14. Lymphoid Progenitor Cells from Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Are Functionally Deficient and Express High Levels of the Transcriptional Repressor Gfi-1

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    Jessica Purizaca

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most frequent malignancy of childhood. Substantial progress on understanding the cell hierarchy within ALL bone marrow (BM has been recorded in the last few years, suggesting that both primitive cell fractions and committed lymphoid blasts with immature stem cell-like properties contain leukemia-initiating cells. Nevertheless, the biology of the early progenitors that initiate the lymphoid program remains elusive. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of lymphoid progenitors from B-cell precursor ALL BM to proliferate and undergo multilineage differentiation. By phenotype analyses, in vitro proliferation assays, and controlled culture systems, the lymphoid differentiation potentials were evaluated in BM primitive populations from B-cell precursor ALL pediatric patients. When compared to their normal counterparts, functional stem and progenitor cell contents were substantially reduced in ALL BM. Moreover, neither B nor NK or dendritic lymphoid-cell populations developed recurrently from highly purified ALL-lymphoid progenitors, and their proliferation and cell cycle status revealed limited proliferative capacity. Interestingly, a number of quiescence-associated transcription factors were elevated, including the transcriptional repressor Gfi-1, which was highly expressed in primitive CD34+ cells. Together, our findings reveal major functional defects in the primitive hematopoietic component of ALL BM. A possible contribution of high levels of Gfi-1 expression in the regulation of the stem/progenitor cell biology is suggested.

  15. SCF Ubiquitin Ligase F-box Protein Fbx15 Controls Nuclear Co-repressor Localization, Stress Response and Virulence of the Human Pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus.

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    Bastian Jöhnk

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available F-box proteins share the F-box domain to connect substrates of E3 SCF ubiquitin RING ligases through the adaptor Skp1/A to Cul1/A scaffolds. F-box protein Fbx15 is part of the general stress response of the human pathogenic mold Aspergillus fumigatus. Oxidative stress induces a transient peak of fbx15 expression, resulting in 3x elevated Fbx15 protein levels. During non-stress conditions Fbx15 is phosphorylated and F-box mediated interaction with SkpA preferentially happens in smaller subpopulations in the cytoplasm. The F-box of Fbx15 is required for an appropriate oxidative stress response, which results in rapid dephosphorylation of Fbx15 and a shift of the cellular interaction with SkpA to the nucleus. Fbx15 binds SsnF/Ssn6 as part of the RcoA/Tup1-SsnF/Ssn6 co-repressor and is required for its correct nuclear localization. Dephosphorylated Fbx15 prevents SsnF/Ssn6 nuclear localization and results in the derepression of gliotoxin gene expression. fbx15 deletion mutants are unable to infect immunocompromised mice in a model for invasive aspergillosis. Fbx15 has a novel dual molecular function by controlling transcriptional repression and being part of SCF E3 ubiquitin ligases, which is essential for stress response, gliotoxin production and virulence in the opportunistic human pathogen A. fumigatus.

  16. Regulation of MntH by a dual Mn(II- and Fe(II-dependent transcriptional repressor (DR2539 in Deinococcus radiodurans.

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    Hongxing Sun

    Full Text Available The high intracellular Mn/Fe ratio observed within the bacteria Deinococcus radiodurans may contribute to its remarkable resistance to environmental stresses. We isolated DR2539, a novel regulator of intracellular Mn/Fe homeostasis in D. radiodurans. Electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays (EMSAs revealed that DR2539 binds specifically to the promoter of the manganese acquisition transporter (MntH gene, and that DR0865, the only Fur homologue in D. radiodurans, cannot bind to the promoter of mntH, but it can bind to the promoter of another manganese acquisition transporter, MntABC. β-galactosidase expression analysis indicated that DR2539 acts as a manganese- and iron-dependent transcriptional repressor. Further sequence alignment analysis revealed that DR2539 has evolved some special characteristics. Site-directed mutagenesis suggested that His98 plays an important role in the activities of DR2539, and further protein-DNA binding activity assays showed that the activity of H98Y mutants decreased dramatically relative to wild type DR2539. Our study suggests that D. radiodurans has evolved a very efficient manganese regulation mechanism that involves its high intracellular Mn/Fe ratio and permits resistance to extreme conditions.

  17. Comparative analysis of chromatin binding by Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) and other polycomb group repressors at a Drosophila Hox gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangjun; Jahren, Neal; Miller, Ellen L; Ketel, Carrie S; Mallin, Daniel R; Simon, Jeffrey A

    2010-06-01

    Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) is a transcriptional repressor in the Polycomb group (PcG), but its molecular role in PcG silencing is not known. Although SCM can interact with Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) in vitro, biochemical studies have indicated that SCM is not a core constituent of PRC1 or PRC2. Nevertheless, SCM is just as critical for Drosophila Hox gene silencing as canonical subunits of these well-characterized PcG complexes. To address functional relationships between SCM and other PcG components, we have performed chromatin immunoprecipitation studies using cultured Drosophila Schneider line 2 (S2) cells and larval imaginal discs. We find that SCM associates with a Polycomb response element (PRE) upstream of the Ubx gene which also binds PRC1, PRC2, and the DNA-binding PcG protein Pleiohomeotic (PHO). However, SCM is retained at this Ubx PRE despite genetic disruption or knockdown of PHO, PRC1, or PRC2, suggesting that SCM chromatin targeting does not require prior association of these other PcG components. Chromatin immunoprecipitations (IPs) to test the consequences of SCM genetic disruption or knockdown revealed that PHO association is unaffected, but reduced levels of PRE-bound PRC2 and PRC1 were observed. We discuss these results in light of current models for recruitment of PcG complexes to chromatin targets.

  18. Comparative Analysis of Chromatin Binding by Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) and Other Polycomb Group Repressors at a Drosophila Hox Gene▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangjun; Jahren, Neal; Miller, Ellen L.; Ketel, Carrie S.; Mallin, Daniel R.; Simon, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) is a transcriptional repressor in the Polycomb group (PcG), but its molecular role in PcG silencing is not known. Although SCM can interact with Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) in vitro, biochemical studies have indicated that SCM is not a core constituent of PRC1 or PRC2. Nevertheless, SCM is just as critical for Drosophila Hox gene silencing as canonical subunits of these well-characterized PcG complexes. To address functional relationships between SCM and other PcG components, we have performed chromatin immunoprecipitation studies using cultured Drosophila Schneider line 2 (S2) cells and larval imaginal discs. We find that SCM associates with a Polycomb response element (PRE) upstream of the Ubx gene which also binds PRC1, PRC2, and the DNA-binding PcG protein Pleiohomeotic (PHO). However, SCM is retained at this Ubx PRE despite genetic disruption or knockdown of PHO, PRC1, or PRC2, suggesting that SCM chromatin targeting does not require prior association of these other PcG components. Chromatin immunoprecipitations (IPs) to test the consequences of SCM genetic disruption or knockdown revealed that PHO association is unaffected, but reduced levels of PRE-bound PRC2 and PRC1 were observed. We discuss these results in light of current models for recruitment of PcG complexes to chromatin targets. PMID:20351181

  19. In vivo estradiol-dependent dephosphorylation of the repressor MDBP-2-H1 correlates with the loss of in vitro preferential binding to methylated DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhat, A; Jost, J P

    1995-01-01

    We have previously shown that estradiol treatment of roosters resulted in a rapid loss of binding activity of the repressor MDBP-2-H1 (a member of the histone H1 family) to methylated DNA that was not due to a decrease in MDBP-2-H1 concentration. Here we demonstrate that MDBP-2-H1 from rooster liver nuclear extracts is a phosphoprotein. Phosphoamino acid analysis reveals that the phosphorylation occurs exclusively on serine residues. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and tryptic phosphopeptide analysis show that MDBP-2-H1 is phosphorylated at several sites. Treatment of roosters with estradiol triggers a dephosphorylation of at least two sites in the protein. Phosphatase treatment of purified rooster MDBP-2-H1 combined with gel mobility shift assay indicates that phosphorylation of MDBP-2-H1 is essential for the binding to methylated DNA and that the dephosphorylation can occur on the protein bound to methylated DNA causing its release from DNA. Thus, these results suggest that in vivo modification of the phosphorylation status of MDBP-2-H1 caused by estradiol treatment may be a key step for the down regulation of its binding to methylated DNA. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7731964

  20. Tunable Control of an Escherichia coli Expression System for the Overproduction of Membrane Proteins by Titrated Expression of a Mutant lac Repressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong Keun; Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Oh Cheol; Kim, Jihyun F; Yoon, Sung Ho

    2017-09-15

    Most inducible expression systems suffer from growth defects, leaky basal induction, and inhomogeneous expression levels within a host cell population. These difficulties are most prominent with the overproduction of membrane proteins that are toxic to host cells. Here, we developed an Escherichia coli inducible expression system for membrane protein production based on titrated expression of a mutant lac repressor (mLacI). Performance of the mLacI inducible system was evaluated in conjunction with commonly used lac operator-based expression vectors using a T7 or tac promoter. Remarkably, expression of a target gene can be titrated by the dose-dependent addition of l-rhamnose, and the expression levels were homogeneous in the cell population. The developed system was successfully applied to overexpress three membrane proteins that were otherwise difficult to produce in E. coli. This gene expression control system can be easily applied to a broad range of existing protein expression systems and should be useful in constructing genetic circuits that require precise output signals.

  1. A genetic link between epigenetic repressor AS1-AS2 and a putative small subunit processome in leaf polarity establishment of Arabidopsis

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    Yoko Matsumura

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Although the DEAD-box RNA helicase family is ubiquitous in eukaryotes, its developmental role remains unelucidated. Here, we report that cooperative action between the Arabidopsis nucleolar protein RH10, an ortholog of human DEAD-box RNA helicase DDX47, and the epigenetic repressor complex of ASYMMETRIC-LEAVES1 (AS1 and AS2 (AS1-AS2 is critical to repress abaxial (ventral genes ETT/ARF3 and ARF4, which leads to adaxial (dorsal development in leaf primordia at shoot apices. Double mutations of rh10-1 and as2 (or as1 synergistically up-regulated the abaxial genes, which generated abaxialized filamentous leaves with loss of the adaxial domain. DDX47 is part of the small subunit processome (SSUP that mediates rRNA biogenesis. In rh10-1 we found various defects in SSUP-related events, such as: accumulation of 35S/33S rRNA precursors; reduction in the 18S/25S ratio; and nucleolar hypertrophy. Double mutants of as2 with mutations of genes that encode other candidate SSUP-related components such as nucleolin and putative rRNA methyltransferase exhibited similar synergistic defects caused by up-regulation of ETT/ARF3 and ARF4. These results suggest a tight link between putative SSUP and AS1-AS2 in repression of the abaxial-determining genes for cell fate decisions for adaxial development.

  2. Cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes is a bona fide lysosomal protein which undergoes proteolytic maturation during its biosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaehs, Philipp; Weidinger, Petra; Probst, Olivia C.; Svoboda, Barbara; Stadlmann, Johannes; Beug, Hartmut; Waerner, Thomas; Mach, Lukas

    2008-01-01

    Cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes (CREG) has been reported to be a secretory glycoprotein implicated in cellular growth and differentiation. We now show that CREG is predominantly localized within intracellular compartments. Intracellular CREG was found to lack an N-terminal peptide present in the secreted form of the protein. In contrast to normal cells, CREG is largely secreted by fibroblasts missing both mannose 6-phosphate receptors. This is not observed in cells lacking only one of them. Mass spectrometric analysis of recombinant CREG revealed that the protein contains phosphorylated oligosaccharides at either of its two N-glycosylation sites. Cellular CREG was found to cosediment with lysosomal markers upon subcellular fractionation by density-gradient centrifugation. In fibroblasts expressing a CREG-GFP fusion construct, the heterologous protein was detected in compartments containing lysosomal proteins. Immunolocalization of endogenous CREG confirmed that intracellular CREG is localized in lysosomes. Proteolytic processing of intracellular CREG involves the action of lysosomal cysteine proteinases. These results establish that CREG is a lysosomal protein that undergoes proteolytic maturation in the course of its biosynthesis, carries the mannose 6-phosphate recognition marker and depends on the interaction with mannose 6-phosphate receptors for efficient delivery to lysosomes

  3. Mixed Beam Murine Harderian Gland Tumorigenesis: Predicted Dose-Effect Relationships if neither Synergism nor Antagonism Occurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siranart, Nopphon; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Cheng, Alden; Handa, Naval; Sachs, Rainer K.

    2016-12-01

    Complex mixed radiation fields exist in interplanetary space, and not much is known about their latent effects on space travelers. In silico synergy analysis default predictions are useful when planning relevant mixed-ion-beam experiments and interpreting their results. These predictions are based on individual dose-effect relationships (IDER) for each component of the mixed-ion beam, assuming no synergy or antagonism. For example, a default hypothesis of simple effect additivity has often been used throughout the study of biology. However, for more than a century pharmacologists interested in mixtures of therapeutic drugs have analyzed conceptual, mathematical and practical questions similar to those that arise when analyzing mixed radiation fields, and have shown that simple effect additivity often gives unreasonable predictions when the IDER are curvilinear. Various alternatives to simple effect additivity proposed in radiobiology, pharmacometrics, toxicology and other fields are also known to have important limitations. In this work, we analyze upcoming murine Harderian gland (HG) tumor prevalence mixed-beam experiments, using customized open-source software and published IDER from past single-ion experiments. The upcoming experiments will use acute irradiation and the mixed beam will include components of high atomic number and energy (HZE). We introduce a new alternative to simple effect additivity, "incremental effect additivity", which is more suitable for the HG analysis and perhaps for other end points. We use incremental effect additivity to calculate default predictions for mixture dose-effect relationships, including 95% confidence intervals. We have drawn three main conclusions from this work. 1. It is important to supplement mixed-beam experiments with single-ion experiments, with matching end point(s), shielding and dose timing. 2. For HG tumorigenesis due to a mixed beam, simple effect additivity and incremental effect additivity sometimes give

  4. Global Analysis of the Fungal Microbiome in Cystic Fibrosis Patients Reveals Loss of Function of the Transcriptional Repressor Nrg1 as a Mechanism of Pathogen Adaptation.

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    Kim, Sang Hu; Clark, Shawn T; Surendra, Anuradha; Copeland, Julia K; Wang, Pauline W; Ammar, Ron; Collins, Cathy; Tullis, D Elizabeth; Nislow, Corey; Hwang, David M; Guttman, David S; Cowen, Leah E

    2015-11-01

    The microbiome shapes diverse facets of human biology and disease, with the importance of fungi only beginning to be appreciated. Microbial communities infiltrate diverse anatomical sites as with the respiratory tract of healthy humans and those with diseases such as cystic fibrosis, where chronic colonization and infection lead to clinical decline. Although fungi are frequently recovered from cystic fibrosis patient sputum samples and have been associated with deterioration of lung function, understanding of species and population dynamics remains in its infancy. Here, we coupled high-throughput sequencing of the ribosomal RNA internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1) with phenotypic and genotypic analyses of fungi from 89 sputum samples from 28 cystic fibrosis patients. Fungal communities defined by sequencing were concordant with those defined by culture-based analyses of 1,603 isolates from the same samples. Different patients harbored distinct fungal communities. There were detectable trends, however, including colonization with Candida and Aspergillus species, which was not perturbed by clinical exacerbation or treatment. We identified considerable inter- and intra-species phenotypic variation in traits important for host adaptation, including antifungal drug resistance and morphogenesis. While variation in drug resistance was largely between species, striking variation in morphogenesis emerged within Candida species. Filamentation was uncoupled from inducing cues in 28 Candida isolates recovered from six patients. The filamentous isolates were resistant to the filamentation-repressive effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, implicating inter-kingdom interactions as the selective force. Genome sequencing revealed that all but one of the filamentous isolates harbored mutations in the transcriptional repressor NRG1; such mutations were necessary and sufficient for the filamentous phenotype. Six independent nrg1 mutations arose in Candida isolates from different patients

  5. Global Analysis of the Fungal Microbiome in Cystic Fibrosis Patients Reveals Loss of Function of the Transcriptional Repressor Nrg1 as a Mechanism of Pathogen Adaptation.

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    Sang Hu Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The microbiome shapes diverse facets of human biology and disease, with the importance of fungi only beginning to be appreciated. Microbial communities infiltrate diverse anatomical sites as with the respiratory tract of healthy humans and those with diseases such as cystic fibrosis, where chronic colonization and infection lead to clinical decline. Although fungi are frequently recovered from cystic fibrosis patient sputum samples and have been associated with deterioration of lung function, understanding of species and population dynamics remains in its infancy. Here, we coupled high-throughput sequencing of the ribosomal RNA internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1 with phenotypic and genotypic analyses of fungi from 89 sputum samples from 28 cystic fibrosis patients. Fungal communities defined by sequencing were concordant with those defined by culture-based analyses of 1,603 isolates from the same samples. Different patients harbored distinct fungal communities. There were detectable trends, however, including colonization with Candida and Aspergillus species, which was not perturbed by clinical exacerbation or treatment. We identified considerable inter- and intra-species phenotypic variation in traits important for host adaptation, including antifungal drug resistance and morphogenesis. While variation in drug resistance was largely between species, striking variation in morphogenesis emerged within Candida species. Filamentation was uncoupled from inducing cues in 28 Candida isolates recovered from six patients. The filamentous isolates were resistant to the filamentation-repressive effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, implicating inter-kingdom interactions as the selective force. Genome sequencing revealed that all but one of the filamentous isolates harbored mutations in the transcriptional repressor NRG1; such mutations were necessary and sufficient for the filamentous phenotype. Six independent nrg1 mutations arose in Candida isolates from

  6. Multi-domain CGFS-type glutaredoxin Grx4 regulates iron homeostasis via direct interaction with a repressor Fep1 in fission yeast

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    Kim, Kyoung-Dong; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Kyung-Chang [Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences and Institute of Microbiology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Roe, Jung-Hye, E-mail: jhroe@snu.ac.kr [Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences and Institute of Microbiology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Monothiol glutaredoxin Grx4 allows Fep1-mediated de-repression of iron uptake genes at low iron. {yields} Grx4 directly interacts with Fep1 in vivo and in vitro. {yields} The Cys172 in the CGFS motif of Grx4 is necessary for cell proliferation and iron regulation. {yields} The Cys172 of Grx4 is required for normal interaction with Fep1. -- Abstract: The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe contains two CGFS-type monothiol glutaredoxins, Grx4 and Grx5, which are localized primarily in the nucleus and mitochondria, respectively. We observed involvement of Grx4 in regulating iron-responsive gene expression, which is modulated by a repressor Fep1. Lack of Grx4 caused defects not only in growth but also in the expression of both iron-uptake and iron-utilizing genes regardless of iron availability. In order to unravel how Grx4 is involved in Fep1-mediated regulation, interaction between them was investigated. Co-immunoprecipitation and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) revealed that Grx4 physically interacts with Fep1 in vivo. BiFC revealed localized nuclear dots produced by interaction of Grx4 with Fep1. Mutation of cysteine-172 in the CGFS motif to serine (C172S) produced effects similarly observed under Grx4 depletion, such as the loss of iron-dependent gene regulation and the absence of nuclear dots in BiFC analysis. These results suggest that the ability of Grx4 to bind iron, most likely Fe-S cofactor, could be critical in interacting with and modulating the activity of Fep1.

  7. Identification of DNA-binding protein target sequences by physical effective energy functions: free energy analysis of lambda repressor-DNA complexes.

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    Caselle Michele

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Specific binding of proteins to DNA is one of the most common ways gene expression is controlled. Although general rules for the DNA-protein recognition can be derived, the ambiguous and complex nature of this mechanism precludes a simple recognition code, therefore the prediction of DNA target sequences is not straightforward. DNA-protein interactions can be studied using computational methods which can complement the current experimental methods and offer some advantages. In the present work we use physical effective potentials to evaluate the DNA-protein binding affinities for the λ repressor-DNA complex for which structural and thermodynamic experimental data are available. Results The binding free energy of two molecules can be expressed as the sum of an intermolecular energy (evaluated using a molecular mechanics forcefield, a solvation free energy term and an entropic term. Different solvation models are used including distance dependent dielectric constants, solvent accessible surface tension models and the Generalized Born model. The effect of conformational sampling by Molecular Dynamics simulations on the computed binding energy is assessed; results show that this effect is in general negative and the reproducibility of the experimental values decreases with the increase of simulation time considered. The free energy of binding for non-specific complexes, estimated using the best energetic model, agrees with earlier theoretical suggestions. As a results of these analyses, we propose a protocol for the prediction of DNA-binding target sequences. The possibility of searching regulatory elements within the bacteriophage λ genome using this protocol is explored. Our analysis shows good prediction capabilities, even in absence of any thermodynamic data and information on the naturally recognized sequence. Conclusion This study supports the conclusion that physics-based methods can offer a completely complementary

  8. Positive Regulation of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin H by Rot (Repressor of Toxin) Protein and Its Importance in Clonal Complex 81 Subtype 1 Lineage-Related Food Poisoning.

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    Sato'o, Yusuke; Hisatsune, Junzo; Nagasako, Yuria; Ono, Hisaya K; Omoe, Katsuhiko; Sugai, Motoyuki

    2015-11-01

    We previously demonstrated the clonal complex 81 (CC81) subtype 1 lineage is the major staphylococcal food poisoning (SFP)-associated lineage in Japan (Y. Sato'o et al., J Clin Microbiol 52:2637-2640, 2014, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JCM.00661-14). Strains of this lineage produce staphylococcal enterotoxin H (SEH) in addition to SEA. However, an evaluation of the risk for the recently reported SEH has not been sufficiently conducted. We first searched for staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) genes and SE proteins in milk samples that caused a large SFP outbreak in Japan. Only SEA and SEH were detected, while there were several SE genes detected in the samples. We next designed an experimental model using a meat product to assess the productivity of SEs and found that only SEA and SEH were detectably produced in situ. Therefore, we investigated the regulation of SEH production using a CC81 subtype 1 isolate. Through mutant analysis of global regulators, we found the repressor of toxin (Rot) functioned oppositely as a stimulator of SEH production. SEA production was not affected by Rot. seh mRNA expression correlated with rot both in media and on the meat product, and the Rot protein was shown to directly bind to the seh promoter. The seh promoter sequence was predicted to form a loop structure and to hide the RNA polymerase binding sequences. We propose Rot binds to the promoter sequence of seh and unfolds the secondary structure that may lead the RNA polymerase to bind the promoter, and then seh mRNA transcription begins. This alternative Rot regulation for SEH may contribute to sufficient toxin production by the CC81 subtype 1 lineage in foods to induce SFP. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Downregulation of the Repressor Element 1-Silencing Transcription Factor (REST Is Associated with Akt-mTOR and Wnt-β-Catenin Signaling in Prion Diseases Models

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    Zhiqi Song

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are a group of infectious diseases characterized by multiple neuropathological changes, yet the mechanisms that preserve function and protect against prion-associated neurodegeneration are still unclear. We previously reported that the repressor element 1-silencing transcription factor (REST alleviates neurotoxic prion peptide (PrP106-126-induced toxicity in primary neurons. Here we confirmed the findings of the in vitro model in 263K infected hamsters, an in vivo model of prion diseases and further showed the relationships between REST and related signaling pathways. REST was depleted from the nucleus in prion infected brains and taken up by autophagosomes in the cytoplasm, co-localizing with LC3-II. Importantly, downregulation of the Akt–mTOR and at least partially inactivation of LRP6-Wnt-β-catenin signaling pathways correlated with the decreased levels of REST in vivo in the brain of 263K-infected hamsters and in vitro in PrP106-126-treated primary neurons. Overexpression of REST in primary cortical neurons alleviated PrP106-126 peptide-induced neuronal oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and partly inhibition of the LRP6-Wnt-β-catenin and Akt–mTOR signaling. Based on our findings, a model of REST-mediated neuroprotection in prion infected animals is proposed, with Akt–mTOR and Wnt-β-catenin signaling as the key pathways. REST-mediated neuronal survival signaling could be explored as a viable therapeutic target for prion diseases and related neurodegenerative diseases.

  10. Sulforaphane ameliorates the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by antagonizing oxidative stress and Th17-related inflammation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Cui, Wei; Liu, Jia; Li, Ru; Liu, Qian; Xie, Xiao-Hua; Ge, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Jing; Song, Xiu-Juan; Wang, Ying; Guo, Li

    2013-12-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN) is an organosulfur compound present in vegetables and has potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. This study was aimed at investigating the effect of treatment with SFN on inflammation and oxidative stress, and the potential mechanisms underlying the action of SFN in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in C57BL/6 mice. Treatment with SFN significantly inhibited the development and severity of EAE in mice, accompanied by mitigating inflammatory infiltration and demyelination in the spinal cord of mice. The protective effect of SFN was associated with significantly improved distribution of claudin-5 and occludin, and decreased levels of MMP-9 expression, preserving the blood-brain barrier. Furthermore, the protection of SFN was also related to decreased levels of oxidative stress in the brains of mice by enhanced activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway and increased levels of anti-oxidant HO-1 and NQO1 expression. In addition, treatment with SFN inhibited antigen-specific Th17 responses and enhanced IL-10 responses. Our data indicated that treatment with SFN inhibited EAE development and severity in mice by its anti-oxidant activity and antagonizing autoimmune inflammation. Our findings suggest that SFN and its analogues may be promising reagents for intervention of multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases. © 2013.

  11. Icotinib antagonizes ABCG2-mediated multidrug resistance, but not the pemetrexed resistance mediated by thymidylate synthase and ABCG2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, De-Shen; Patel, Atish; Shukla, Suneet; Zhang, Yun-Kai; Wang, Yi-Jun; Kathawala, Rishil J; Robey, Robert W; Zhang, Li; Yang, Dong-Hua; Talele, Tanaji T; Bates, Susan E; Ambudkar, Suresh V; Xu, Rui-Hua; Chen, Zhe-Sheng

    2014-06-30

    ABCG2 is a potential biomarker causing multidrug resistance (MDR) in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC). We conducted this study to investigate whether Icotinib, a small-molecule inhibitor of EGFR tyrosine kinase, could interact with ABCG2 transporter in NSCLC. Our results showed that Icotinib reversed ABCG2-mediated MDR by antagonizing the drug efflux function of ABCG2. Icotinib stimulated the ATPase activity in a concentration-dependent manner and inhibited the photolabeling of ABCG2 with [125I]-Iodoarylazidoprazosin, demonstrating that it interacts at the drug-binding pocket. Homology modeling predicted the binding conformation of Icotinib at Asn629 centroid-based grid of ABCG2. However, Icotinib at reversal concentration did not affect the expression levels of AKT and ABCG2. Furthermore, a combination of Icotinib and topotecan exhibited significant synergistic anticancer activity against NCI-H460/MX20 tumor xenografts. However, the inhibition of transport activity of ABCG2 was insufficient to overcome pemetrexed resistance in NCI-H460/MX20 cells, which was due to the co-upregulated thymidylate synthase (TS) and ABCG2 expression. This is the first report to show that the up-regulation of TS in ABCG2-overexpressing cell line NCI-H460/MX20 may play a role of resistance to pemetrexate. Our findings suggested different possible strategies of overcoming the resistance of topotecan and pemetrexed in the NSCLC patients.

  12. Antagonizing SET augments the effects of radiotherapy in hepatocellular carcinoma through reactivating PP2A-mediated AKT downregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao-Yuan; Hung, Man-Hsin; Shih, Chi-Ting; Hsieh, Feng-Shu; Kuo, Chiung-Wen; Tsai, Ming-Hsien; Chang, Shih-Shin; Hsiao, Yung-Jen; Chen, Li-Ju; Chao, Tzu-I; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2018-06-18

    Increasing evidence suggests that SET functions as an oncoprotein and promotes cancer survival and therapeutic resistance. However, whether SET affects radiotherapy (RT)-mediated anti-cancer effects has not yet been explored. Here, we investigated the impact of SET on RT sensitivity in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Using colony and hepatosphere formation assay, we found that RT-induced proliferative inhibition was critically associated with SET expression. Next, we tested a novel SET antagonist, EMQA, in combination with RT. We showed that additive use of EMQA significantly enhanced the effects of RT against HCC in vitro and in vivo. Notably, compared to mice receiving either RT or EMQA alone, the growth of PLC5 xenografted tumor in mice receiving RT plus EMQA was significantly reduced without compromising treatment tolerability. Furthermore, we proved that antagonizing SET to restore PP2A-mediated p-AKT downregulation was responsible for the synergism between EMQA and RT. Our data demonstrate a new oncogenic property of SET, and provide preclinical evidence that combining a SET antagonist and RT may be effective for treatment of HCC. Further investigation is warranted to validate the clinical relevance of this approach. The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  13. Cytoplasmic isoforms of Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus LANA recruit and antagonize the innate immune DNA sensor cGAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guigen; Chan, Baca; Samarina, Naira; Abere, Bizunesh; Weidner-Glunde, Magdalena; Buch, Anna; Pich, Andreas; Brinkmann, Melanie M; Schulz, Thomas F

    2016-02-23

    The latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) of Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) is mainly localized and functions in the nucleus of latently infected cells, playing a pivotal role in the replication and maintenance of latent viral episomal DNA. In addition, N-terminally truncated cytoplasmic isoforms of LANA, resulting from internal translation initiation, have been reported, but their function is unknown. Using coimmunoprecipitation and MS, we found the cGMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), an innate immune DNA sensor, to be a cellular interaction partner of cytoplasmic LANA isoforms. By directly binding to cGAS, LANA, and particularly, a cytoplasmic isoform, inhibit the cGAS-STING-dependent phosphorylation of TBK1 and IRF3 and thereby antagonize the cGAS-mediated restriction of KSHV lytic replication. We hypothesize that cytoplasmic forms of LANA, whose expression increases during lytic replication, inhibit cGAS to promote the reactivation of the KSHV from latency. This observation points to a novel function of the cytoplasmic isoforms of LANA during lytic replication and extends the function of LANA from its role during latency to the lytic replication cycle.

  14. Antagonism between salicylic and abscisic acid reflects early host-pathogen conflict and moulds plant defence responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Torres Zabala, Marta; Bennett, Mark H; Truman, William H; Grant, Murray R

    2009-08-01

    The importance of phytohormone balance is increasingly recognized as central to the outcome of plant-pathogen interactions. Recently it has been demonstrated that abscisic acid signalling pathways are utilized by the bacterial phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae to promote pathogenesis. In this study, we examined the dynamics, inter-relationship and impact of three key acidic phytohormones, salicylic acid, abscisic acid and jasmonic acid, and the bacterial virulence factor, coronatine, during progression of P. syringae infection of Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that levels of SA and ABA, but not JA, appear to play important early roles in determining the outcome of the infection process. SA is required in order to mount a full innate immune responses, while bacterial effectors act rapidly to activate ABA biosynthesis. ABA suppresses inducible innate immune responses by down-regulating SA biosynthesis and SA-mediated defences. Mutant analyses indicated that endogenous ABA levels represent an important reservoir that is necessary for effector suppression of plant-inducible innate defence responses and SA synthesis prior to subsequent pathogen-induced increases in ABA. Enhanced susceptibility due to loss of SA-mediated basal resistance is epistatically dominant over acquired resistance due to ABA deficiency, although ABA also contributes to symptom development. We conclude that pathogen-modulated ABA signalling rapidly antagonizes SA-mediated defences. We predict that hormonal perturbations, either induced or as a result of environmental stress, have a marked impact on pathological outcomes, and we provide a mechanistic basis for understanding priming events in plant defence.

  15. Lipoxin A4 stable analogs reduce allergic airway responses via mechanisms distinct from CysLT1 receptor antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Bruce D; Lukacs, Nicholas W; Berlin, Aaron A; Schmidt, Birgitta; Guilford, William J; Serhan, Charles N; Parkinson, John F

    2007-12-01

    Cellular recruitment during inflammatory/immune responses is tightly regulated. The ability to dampen inflammation is imperative for prevention of chronic immune responses, as in asthma. Here we investigated the ability of lipoxin A4 (LXA4) stable analogs to regulate airway responses in two allergen-driven models of inflammation. A 15-epi-LXA4 analog (ATLa) and a 3-oxa-15-epi-LXA4 analog (ZK-994) prevented excessive eosinophil and T lymphocyte accumulation and activation after mice were sensitized and aerosol-challenged with ovalbumin. At 50% and to a greater extent than equivalent doses of the CysLT1 receptor antagonist montelukast. Distinct from montelukast, ATLa treatment led to marked reductions in cysteinyl leukotrienes, interleukin-4 (IL-4), and IL-10, and both ATLa and ZK-994 inhibited levels of IL-13. In cockroach allergen-induced airway responses, both intraperitoneal and oral administration of ZK-994 significantly reduced parameters of airway inflammation and hyper-responsiveness in a dose-dependent manner. ZK-994 also significantly changed the balance of Th1/Th2-specific cytokine levels. Thus, the ATLa/LXA4 analog actions are distinct from CysLT1 antagonism and potently block both allergic airway inflammation and hyper-reactivity. Moreover, these results demonstrate these analogs' therapeutic potential as new agonists for the resolution of inflammation.

  16. Stat1-Vitamin D Receptor Interactions Antagonize 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D Transcriptional Activity and Enhance Stat1-Mediated Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Marcos; Ramana, Chilakamarti V.; Dusso, Adriana S.

    2002-01-01

    The cytokine gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and the calcitropic steroid hormone 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25D) are activators of macrophage immune function. In sarcoidosis, tuberculosis, and several granulomatoses, IFN-γ induces 1,25D synthesis by macrophages and inhibits 1,25D induction of 24-hydroxylase, a key enzyme in 1,25D inactivation, causing high levels of 1,25D in serum and hypercalcemia. This study delineates IFN-γ-1,25D cross talk in human monocytes-macrophages. Nuclear accumulation of Stat1 and vitamin D receptor (VDR) by IFN-γ and 1,25D promotes protein-protein interactions between Stat1 and the DNA binding domain of the VDR. This prevents VDR-retinoid X receptor (RXR) binding to the vitamin D-responsive element, thus diverting the VDR from its normal genomic target on the 24-hydroxylase promoter and antagonizing 1,25D-VDR transactivation of this gene. In contrast, 1,25D enhances IFN-γ action. Stat1-VDR interactions, by preventing Stat1 deactivation by tyrosine dephosphorylation, cooperate with IFN-γ/Stat1-induced transcription. This novel 1,25D-IFN-γ cross talk explains the pathogenesis of abnormal 1,25D homeostasis in granulomatous processes and provides new insights into 1,25D immunomodulatory properties. PMID:11909970

  17. A novel TNFα antagonizing peptide-Fc fusion protein designed based on CDRs of TNFα neutralizing monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Weisong; Feng Jiannan; Zhang Wei; Li Yan; Shen, Beifen

    2004-01-01

    The variable regions of antibody molecules bind antigens with high affinity and specificity. The binding sites are imparted largely to the hypervariable portions (i.e., CDRs) of the variable region. Peptides derived from CDRs can bind antigen with similar specificity acting as mimic of antibody and become drug-designing core, although with markedly lower affinity. In order to increase the affinity and bioactivity, in this study, a novel peptide (PT) designed on CDRs of a TNFα neutralizing monoclonal antibody Z12 was linked with Fc fragment of human IgG1. The interaction mode of PT-linker-Fc (PLF) with TNFα was analyzed with computer-guided molecular modeling method. After expression in Escherichia coli and purification, recombinant PT-linker-Fc could bind directly with the TNFα coated on the ELISA plates. Furthermore, PLF could competitively inhibit the binding of Z12 to TNFα and also inhibit the TNFα-induced cytotoxicity on L929 cells. The TNFα antagonizing activity of PLF was significantly higher than that of the free peptide. This study highlights the potential of human Fc to enhance the potency of peptides designed on the CDRs of antibodies and could be useful in developing new TNFα antagonists

  18. Facilitation of Contextual Fear Extinction by Orexin-1 Receptor Antagonism Is Associated with the Activation of Specific Amygdala Cell Subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, África; Herry, Cyril; Maldonado, Rafael; Berrendero, Fernando

    2017-08-01

    Orexins are hypothalamic neuropeptides recently involved in the regulation of emotional memory. The basolateral amygdala, an area orchestrating fear memory processes, appears to be modulated by orexin transmission during fear extinction. However, the neuronal types within the basolateral amygdala involved in this modulation remain to be elucidated. We used retrograde tracing combined with immunofluorescence techniques in mice to identify basolateral amygdala projection neurons and cell subpopulations in this brain region influenced by orexin transmission during contextual fear extinction consolidation. Treatment with the orexin-1 receptor antagonist SB334867 increased the activity of basolateral amygdala neurons projecting to infralimbic medial prefrontal cortex during fear extinction. GABAergic interneurons expressing calbindin, but not parvalbumin, were also activated by orexin-1 receptor antagonism in the basolateral amygdala. These data identify neuronal circuits and cell populations of the amygdala associated with the facilitation of fear extinction consolidation induced by the orexin-1 receptor antagonist SB334867. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  19. Biological role of Trichoderma harzianum-derived platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) on stress response and antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chuanjin; Fan, Lili; Wu, Qiong; Fu, Kehe; Gao, Shigang; Wang, Meng; Gao, Jinxin; Li, Yaqian; Chen, Jie

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the properties of platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) derived from Trichoderma harzianum. The enzyme, comprised of 572 amino acids, shares high homology with PAF-AH proteins from T. koningii and other microbial species. The optimum enzymatic activity of PAF-AH occurred at pH 6 in the absence of Ca2+ and it localized in the cytoplasm, and we observed the upregulation of PAF-AH expression in response to carbon starvation and strong heat shock. Furthermore, PAF-AH knockout transformant growth occurred more slowly than wild type cells and over-expression strains grown in SM medium at 37°C and 42°C. In addition, PAF-AH expression significantly increased under a series of maize root induction assay. Eicosanoic acid and ergosterol levels decreased in the PAF-AH knockouts compared to wild type cells, as revealed by GC/MS analysis. We also determined stress responses mediated by PAF-AH were related to proteins HEX1, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, and cytochrome c. Finally, PAF-AH exhibited antagonistic activity against Rhizoctonia solani in plate confrontation assays. Our results indicate PAF-AH may play an important role in T. harzianum stress response and antagonism under diverse environmental conditions.

  20. Mapping the fitness landscape of gene expression uncovers the cause of antagonism and sign epistasis between adaptive mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hung Chou

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available How do adapting populations navigate the tensions between the costs of gene expression and the benefits of gene products to optimize the levels of many genes at once? Here we combined independently-arising beneficial mutations that altered enzyme levels in the central metabolism of Methylobacterium extorquens to uncover the fitness landscape defined by gene expression levels. We found strong antagonism and sign epistasis between these beneficial mutations. Mutations with the largest individual benefit interacted the most antagonistically with other mutations, a trend we also uncovered through analyses of datasets from other model systems. However, these beneficial mutations interacted multiplicatively (i.e., no epistasis at the level of enzyme expression. By generating a model that predicts fitness from enzyme levels we could explain the observed sign epistasis as a result of overshooting the optimum defined by a balance between enzyme catalysis benefits and fitness costs. Knowledge of the phenotypic landscape also illuminated that, although the fitness peak was phenotypically far from the ancestral state, it was not genetically distant. Single beneficial mutations jumped straight toward the global optimum rather than being constrained to change the expression phenotypes in the correlated fashion expected by the genetic architecture. Given that adaptation in nature often results from optimizing gene expression, these conclusions can be widely applicable to other organisms and selective conditions. Poor interactions between individually beneficial alleles affecting gene expression may thus compromise the benefit of sex during adaptation and promote genetic differentiation.

  1. Baicalein antagonizes rotenone-induced apoptosis in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells related to Parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ju-Xian; Choi, Mandy Yuen-Man; Wong, Kavin Chun-Kit; Chung, Winkie Wing-Yan; Sze, Stephen Cho-Wing; Ng, Tzi-Bun; Zhang, Kalin Yan-Bo

    2012-01-21

    Two active compounds, baicalein and its glycoside baicalin were found in the dried root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, and reported to be neuroprotective in vitro and in vivo. This study aims to evaluate the protective effects of baicalein on the rotenone-induced apoptosis in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells related to parkinsonism. Cell viability and cytotoxicity were determined by MTT assay. The degree of nuclear apoptosis was evaluated with a fluorescent DNA-binding probe Hoechst 33258. The production of reactive oxidative species (ROS) and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) were determined by fluorescent staining with DCFH-DA and Rhodanmine 123, respectively. The expression of Bax, Bcl-2, cleaved caspase-3 and phosphorylated ERK1/2 was determined by the Western blots. Baicalein significantly increased viability and decreased rotenone-induced death of SH-SY5Y cells in a dose-dependent manner. Pre- and subsequent co-treatment with baicalein preserved the cell morphology and attenuated the nuclear apoptotic characteristics triggered by rotenone. Baicalein antagonized rotenone-induced overproduction of ROS, loss of ΔΨm, the increased expression of Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and phosphorylated ERK1/2 and the decreased expression of Bcl-2. The antioxidative effect, mitochondrial protection and modulation of anti-and pro-apoptotic proteins are related to the neuroprotective effects of baicalein against rotenone induced cell death in SH-SY5Y cells.

  2. Baicalein antagonizes rotenone-induced apoptosis in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells related to Parkinsonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Ju-Xian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two active compounds, baicalein and its glycoside baicalin were found in the dried root of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, and reported to be neuroprotective in vitro and in vivo. This study aims to evaluate the protective effects of baicalein on the rotenone-induced apoptosis in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells related to parkinsonism. Methods Cell viability and cytotoxicity were determined by MTT assay. The degree of nuclear apoptosis was evaluated with a fluorescent DNA-binding probe Hoechst 33258. The production of reactive oxidative species (ROS and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm were determined by fluorescent staining with DCFH-DA and Rhodanmine 123, respectively. The expression of Bax, Bcl-2, cleaved caspase-3 and phosphorylated ERK1/2 was determined by the Western blots. Results Baicalein significantly increased viability and decreased rotenone-induced death of SH-SY5Y cells in a dose-dependent manner. Pre- and subsequent co-treatment with baicalein preserved the cell morphology and attenuated the nuclear apoptotic characteristics triggered by rotenone. Baicalein antagonized rotenone-induced overproduction of ROS, loss of ΔΨm, the increased expression of Bax, cleaved caspase-3 and phosphorylated ERK1/2 and the decreased expression of Bcl-2. Conclusion The antioxidative effect, mitochondrial protection and modulation of anti-and pro-apoptotic proteins are related to the neuroprotective effects of baicalein against rotenone induced cell death in SH-SY5Y cells.

  3. Mutual antagonism between the Ebola virus VP35 protein and the RIG-I activator PACT determines infection outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luthra, Priya; Ramanan, Parameshwaran; Mire, Chad E; Weisend, Carla; Tsuda, Yoshimi; Yen, Benjamin; Liu, Gai; Leung, Daisy W; Geisbert, Thomas W; Ebihara, Hideki; Amarasinghe, Gaya K; Basler, Christopher F

    2013-07-17

    The cytoplasmic pattern recognition receptor RIG-I is activated by viral RNA and induces type I IFN responses to control viral replication. The cellular dsRNA binding protein PACT can also activate RIG-I. To counteract innate antiviral responses, some viruses, including Ebola virus (EBOV), encode proteins that antagonize RIG-I signaling. Here, we show that EBOV VP35 inhibits PACT-induced RIG-I ATPase activity in a dose-dependent manner. The interaction of PACT with RIG-I is disrupted by wild-type VP35, but not by VP35 mutants that are unable to bind PACT. In addition, PACT-VP35 interaction impairs the association between VP35 and the viral polymerase, thereby diminishing viral RNA synthesis and modulating EBOV replication. PACT-deficient cells are defective in IFN induction and are insensitive to VP35 function. These data support a model in which the VP35-PACT interaction is mutually antagonistic and plays a fundamental role in determining the outcome of EBOV infection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Antagonism of serotonin receptor 1B decreases viability and promotes apoptosis in the COS canine osteosarcoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viall, A K; Goodall, C P; Stang, B; Marley, K; Chappell, P E; Bracha, S

    2016-06-01

    Serotonin receptor 1B (5HTR1B) traditionally exhibits anti-proliferative activity in osteoblasts. We examined the expression and function of 5HTR1B in the COS canine osteosarcoma cell line and normal canine osteoblasts. Equal levels of 5HTR1B gene and protein expression were found between normal and malignant osteoblasts. Treatment with serotonin enhanced viability of osteosarcoma cells but not normal osteoblasts. Challenge with the 5HTR1B agonist anpirtoline caused no change in cell viability. Rather incubation with the specific receptor antagonist SB224289 caused reduction in osteoblast viability, with this effect more substantial in osteosarcoma cells. Investigation of this inhibitory activity showed 5HTR1B antagonism induces apoptosis in malignant cells. Evaluation of phosphorylated levels of CREB and ERK, transcriptional regulators associated with serotonin receptor signalling in osteoblasts, revealed aberrant 5HTR1B signalling in COS. Our results confirm the presence of 5HTR1B in a canine osteosarcoma cell line and highlight this receptor as a possible novel therapeutic target. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Potential antagonism of some Trichoderma strains isolated from Moroccan soil against three phytopathogenic fungi of great economic importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wafaa MOKHTARI

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, 17 Trichoderma strains were isolated from different soils (crop fields and Argan forests in Morocco. Purified monospore cultures were identified using molecular methods and tested for their potential antagonism against three phytopathogenic fungi (Fusarium oxyxporum, verticillium dahlia and rhizoctonia solani. After DNA extraction, translation elongation factor (tef1 was amplified in extracts of 17 strains, sequenced and compared with their ex-types. As a result, three species were identified among the strains, which clustered in two different subclades of Trichoderma: the species T. afroharzianum, and T. guizhouense belong to the Harzianum clade, while T. longibrachiatum belongs to the Longibrachiatum clade. Investigation of potential antagonistic effects of these strains against the soil-borne phytopathogens F. oxysporum, R. solani and V. dahliae was conducted in a dual culture plate assay, using 17 promising Trichoderma strains that have been selected based on a polymerase chain reaction (PCR screening approach. In vitro, Trichoderma isolates showed effective antagonistic performance by decreasing soil borne pathogens mycelium radial growth. Trichoderma afroharzianum showed the highest Percentage of Radial Inhibition Growth (PRIG %. The highest PRIG% = 98% was for 8A2.3 isolate against R. solani and the lowest PRIG%= 67% for T9i10 against F. oxysporum. On the other hand, T9i12, which is T. reesei species, led to a high radial inhibition of pathogens’ mycelium.

  6. Antagonism of botulinum toxin-induced muscle weakness by aminopyridines in rat phrenic nerve-hemidiaphragm preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, M.; Scovill, J.; Deshpande, S.S.

    1993-05-13

    The effects of the potassium channel inhibitor and putative botulinum toxin antagonists 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) and 3,4-diaminopyridine (3,4-DAP) were investigated in vitro on the contractile and electrophysiological properties of rat diaphragm muscle. In the presence of 300 pM botulinum toxin A (BoTx A), twitches elicited by supramaximal nerve stimulation (0. 1 Hz) were reduced by over 80% in 3 hr. The time to block decreased with increases in temperature, toxin concentration and stimulation frequency. Addition of 4-AP or 3,4-DAP led to a prompt reversal of the BoTx A-induced depression of twitch tension. This reversal was concentration-dependent such that, in the presence of 1 mM 4-AP, reversal of the BoTx A-induced blockade was complete in 6.7 min. The beneficial effect of the APs were well maintained and persisted for up to 6 hr after addition. Application of 1 microns M neostigmine 1 hr after 3,4-DAP produced a further potentiation of twitch tensions, but this action lasted for < 5 min and led to the appearance of tetanic fade during repetitive stimulation. It is concluded that the APs are of benefit in antagonizing the muscle paralysis following exposure to botulinum toxin. Co-application of neostigmine, however, appears to confer no additional benefit.

  7. Isobolographic Analysis for Additive, Synergism and Antagonism Effects in Binary Mixture of Mesosulfuron + Iodosulfuron and Clodinafop-Propargyl

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    A. A Chitband

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The reduction of herbicide applications is a main research priority in recent years for herbicide reducing the risk of side-effects and costs from herbicides. Therefore To predicting additive, synergism or antagonism effects mesosulfuron + iodosulfuron and clodinafop-propargyl two herbicides mixture on wild oat with isobole curvatures, greenhouse experimental in completely randomized design with 36 treatments (in dose-response arrangements and four replicates for each experiment treatments were conducted at Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. Treatments included mesosulfuron + iodosulfuron alone at doses of 0 , 2.4, 6, 12, 18 and 24 g ai ha-1, clodinafop alone at doses of 0, 6.4, 16, 32, 48 and 64 g ai ha-1 and six mixtures ratio of doses of two herbicides above mentioned as 100:0%,75:25%, 50:50%, 25:75% , 10:90% and 0:100%. The results showed mesosulfuron + iodosulfuron and clodinafop-propargyl at high dose rates showed complete control of wild oat. In addition Concentration Addition (CA model describe Fitted the data better than Hewlett and Voelund models. On the other hand, herbicides combination with each other showed additive effects on wild oat control, As by increasing the clodinafop-propargyl ratio in mixtures (90% clodinafop-propargyl + 10% mesosulfuron + iodosulfuron increased wild oat control compared with other mixing ratios remarkably.

  8. The elongin complex antagonizes the chromatin factor Corto for vein versus intervein cell identity in Drosophila wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rougeot, Julien; Renard, Myrtille; Randsholt, Neel B; Peronnet, Frédérique; Mouchel-Vielh, Emmanuèle

    2013-01-01

    Drosophila wings mainly consist of two cell types, vein and intervein cells. Acquisition of either fate depends on specific expression of genes that are controlled by several signaling pathways. The nuclear mechanisms that translate signaling into regulation of gene expression are not completely understood, but they involve chromatin factors from the Trithorax (TrxG) and Enhancers of Trithorax and Polycomb (ETP) families. One of these is the ETP Corto that participates in intervein fate through interaction with the Drosophila EGF Receptor--MAP kinase ERK pathway. Precise mechanisms and molecular targets of Corto in this process are not known. We show here that Corto interacts with the Elongin transcription elongation complex. This complex, that consists of three subunits (Elongin A, B, C), increases RNA polymerase II elongation rate in vitro by suppressing transient pausing. Analysis of phenotypes induced by EloA, B, or C deregulation as well as genetic interactions suggest that the Elongin complex might participate in vein vs intervein specification, and antagonizes corto as well as several TrxG genes in this process. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that Elongin C and Corto bind the vein-promoting gene rhomboid in wing imaginal discs. We propose that Corto and the Elongin complex participate together in vein vs intervein fate, possibly through tissue-specific transcriptional regulation of rhomboid.

  9. The elongin complex antagonizes the chromatin factor Corto for vein versus intervein cell identity in Drosophila wings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Rougeot

    Full Text Available Drosophila wings mainly consist of two cell types, vein and intervein cells. Acquisition of either fate depends on specific expression of genes that are controlled by several signaling pathways. The nuclear mechanisms that translate signaling into regulation of gene expression are not completely understood, but they involve chromatin factors from the Trithorax (TrxG and Enhancers of Trithorax and Polycomb (ETP families. One of these is the ETP Corto that participates in intervein fate through interaction with the Drosophila EGF Receptor--MAP kinase ERK pathway. Precise mechanisms and molecular targets of Corto in this process are not known. We show here that Corto interacts with the Elongin transcription elongation complex. This complex, that consists of three subunits (Elongin A, B, C, increases RNA polymerase II elongation rate in vitro by suppressing transient pausing. Analysis of phenotypes induced by EloA, B, or C deregulation as well as genetic interactions suggest that the Elongin complex might participate in vein vs intervein specification, and antagonizes corto as well as several TrxG genes in this process. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that Elongin C and Corto bind the vein-promoting gene rhomboid in wing imaginal discs. We propose that Corto and the Elongin complex participate together in vein vs intervein fate, possibly through tissue-specific transcriptional regulation of rhomboid.

  10. Kappa opioid receptor antagonism and chronic antidepressant treatment have beneficial activities on social interactions and grooming deficits during heroin abstinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalanne, L; Ayranci, G; Filliol, D; Gavériaux-Ruff, C; Befort, K; Kieffer, B L; Lutz, P-E

    2017-07-01

    Addiction is a chronic brain disorder that progressively invades all aspects of personal life. Accordingly, addiction to opiates severely impairs interpersonal relationships, and the resulting social isolation strongly contributes to the severity and chronicity of the disease. Uncovering new therapeutic strategies that address this aspect of addiction is therefore of great clinical relevance. We recently established a mouse model of heroin addiction in which, following chronic heroin exposure, 'abstinent' mice progressively develop a strong and long-lasting social avoidance phenotype. Here, we explored and compared the efficacy of two pharmacological interventions in this mouse model. Because clinical studies indicate some efficacy of antidepressants on emotional dysfunction associated with addiction, we first used a chronic 4-week treatment with the serotonergic antidepressant fluoxetine, as a reference. In addition, considering prodepressant effects recently associated with kappa opioid receptor signaling, we also investigated the kappa opioid receptor antagonist norbinaltorphimine (norBNI). Finally, we assessed whether fluoxetine and norBNI could reverse abstinence-induced social avoidance after it has established. Altogether, our results show that two interspaced norBNI administrations are sufficient both to prevent and to reverse social impairment in heroin abstinent animals. Therefore, kappa opioid receptor antagonism may represent a useful approach to alleviate social dysfunction in addicted individuals. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  11. Trithorax monomethylates histone H3K4 and interacts directly with CBP to promote H3K27 acetylation and antagonize Polycomb silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tie, Feng; Banerjee, Rakhee; Saiakhova, Alina R.; Howard, Benny; Monteith, Kelsey E.; Scacheri, Peter C.; Cosgrove, Michael S.; Harte, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Trithorax (TRX) antagonizes epigenetic silencing by Polycomb group (PcG) proteins, stimulates enhancer-dependent transcription, and establishes a ‘cellular memory’ of active transcription of PcG-regulated genes. The mechanisms underlying these TRX functions remain largely unknown, but are presumed to involve its histone H3K4 methyltransferase activity. We report that the SET domains of TRX and TRX-related (TRR) have robust histone H3K4 monomethyltransferase activity in vitro and that Tyr3701 of TRX and Tyr2404 of TRR prevent them from being trimethyltransferases. The trxZ11 missense mutation (G3601S), which abolishes H3K4 methyltransferase activity in vitro, reduces the H3K4me1 but not the H3K4me3 level in vivo. trxZ11 also suppresses the impaired silencing phenotypes of the Pc3 mutant, suggesting that H3K4me1 is involved in antagonizing Polycomb silencing. Polycomb silencing is also antagonized by TRX-dependent H3K27 acetylation by CREB-binding protein (CBP). We show that perturbation of Polycomb silencing by TRX overexpression requires CBP. We also show that TRX and TRR are each physically associated with CBP in vivo, that TRX binds directly to the CBP KIX domain, and that the chromatin binding patterns of TRX and TRR are highly correlated with CBP and H3K4me1 genome-wide. In vitro acetylation of H3K27 by CBP is enhanced on K4me1-containing H3 substrates, and independently altering the H3K4me1 level in vivo, via the H3K4 demethylase LSD1, produces concordant changes in H3K27ac. These data indicate that the catalytic activities of TRX and CBP are physically coupled and suggest that both activities play roles in antagonizing Polycomb silencing, stimulating enhancer activity and cellular memory. PMID:24550119

  12. Quantification of the uncertainties in extrapolating from in vitro androgen receptor (AR) antagonism to key events in in vivo screening assays and adverse reproductive outcomes in F1 male rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    There are multiple molecular initiating events (MIEs) that can disrupt male sexual differentiation including AR antagonism and inhibition of synthesis, and metabolism of fetal testosterone. Disruption of this event by pesticides like vinclozolin that act as AR antagonists and ph...

  13. A novel ion-beam-mutation effect application in identification of gene involved in bacterial antagonism to fungal infection of ornamental crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahadtanapuk, S. [Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Phayao, Maeka, Muang, Phayao 56000 (Thailand); Teraarusiri, W. [Central Laboratory, University of Phayao, Maeka, Muang, Phayao 56000 (Thailand); Nanakorn, W. [The Crown Property Bureau, 173 Nakhonratchasrima Road, Dusit, Bangkok 10300 (Thailand); Yu, L.D., E-mail: yuld@thep-center.org [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Thongkumkoon, P. [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Anuntalabhochai, S., E-mail: soanu.1@gmail.com [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Ion beam bombardment induced mutation in bacterial B. licheniformis. • A mutant lost antifungal activity. • DNA fingerprint of the mutant was analyzed. • The lost gene was indentified to code for TrxR gene. • TrxR gene from B. licheniformis expressed the flower antagonism to fungi. - Abstract: This work is on a novel application of ion beam effect on biological mutation. Bacillus licheniformis (B. licheniformis) is a common soil bacterium with an antagonistic effect on Curcuma alismatifolia Gagnep. and Chrysanthemum indicum Linn. In an attempt to control fungal diseases of local crops by utilizing B. licheniformis, we carried out gene analysis of the bacterium to understand the bacterial antagonistic mechanism. The bacterial cells were bombarded to induce mutations using nitrogen ion beam. After ion bombardment, DNA analysis revealed that the modified polymorphism fragment present in the wild type was missing in a bacterial mutant which lost the antifungal activity. The fragments conserved in the wild type but lost in the mutant bacteria was identified to code for the thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) gene. The gene analysis showed that the TrxR gene from B. licheniformis had the expression of the antagonism to fungi in a synchronous time evolution with the fungus inhibition when the bacteria were co-cultivated with the fungi. The collective results indicate the TrxR gene responsible for the antagonism of bacteria B. licheniformis to fungal infection.

  14. Antagonizing Effects of Aspartic Acid against Ultraviolet A-Induced Downregulation of the Stemness of Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwangseon Jung

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet A (UVA irradiation is responsible for a variety of changes in cell biology. The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of aspartic acid on UVA irradiation-induced damages in the stemness properties of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs. Furthermore, we elucidated the UVA-antagonizing mechanisms of aspartic acid. The results of this study showed that aspartic acid attenuated the UVA-induced reduction of the proliferative potential and stemness of hAMSCs, as evidenced by increased proliferative activity in the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay and upregulation of stemness-related genes OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2 in response to the aspartic acid treatment. UVA-induced reduction in the mRNA level of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α was also significantly recovered by aspartic acid. In addition, the antagonizing effects of aspartic acid against the UVA effects were found to be mediated by reduced production of PGE2 through the inhibition of JNK and p42/44 MAPK. Taken together, these findings show that aspartic acid improves reduced stemness of hAMSCs induced by UVA and its effects are mediated by upregulation of HIF-1α via the inhibition of PGE2-cAMP signaling. In addition, aspartic acid may be used as an antagonizing agent to mitigate the effects of UVA.

  15. Antagonizing Effects of Aspartic Acid against Ultraviolet A-Induced Downregulation of the Stemness of Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kwangseon; Cho, Jae Youl; Soh, Young-Jin; Lee, Jienny; Shin, Seoung Woo; Jang, Sunghee; Jung, Eunsun; Kim, Min Hee; Lee, Jongsung

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation is responsible for a variety of changes in cell biology. The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of aspartic acid on UVA irradiation-induced damages in the stemness properties of human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs). Furthermore, we elucidated the UVA-antagonizing mechanisms of aspartic acid. The results of this study showed that aspartic acid attenuated the UVA-induced reduction of the proliferative potential and stemness of hAMSCs, as evidenced by increased proliferative activity in the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and upregulation of stemness-related genes OCT4, NANOG, and SOX2 in response to the aspartic acid treatment. UVA-induced reduction in the mRNA level of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α was also significantly recovered by aspartic acid. In addition, the antagonizing effects of aspartic acid against the UVA effects were found to be mediated by reduced production of PGE2 through the inhibition of JNK and p42/44 MAPK. Taken together, these findings show that aspartic acid improves reduced stemness of hAMSCs induced by UVA and its effects are mediated by upregulation of HIF-1α via the inhibition of PGE2-cAMP signaling. In addition, aspartic acid may be used as an antagonizing agent to mitigate the effects of UVA.

  16. A novel ion-beam-mutation effect application in identification of gene involved in bacterial antagonism to fungal infection of ornamental crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadtanapuk, S.; Teraarusiri, W.; Nanakorn, W.; Yu, L.D.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Ion beam bombardment induced mutation in bacterial B. licheniformis. • A mutant lost antifungal activity. • DNA fingerprint of the mutant was analyzed. • The lost gene was indentified to code for TrxR gene. • TrxR gene from B. licheniformis expressed the flower antagonism to fungi. - Abstract: This work is on a novel application of ion beam effect on biological mutation. Bacillus licheniformis (B. licheniformis) is a common soil bacterium with an antagonistic effect on Curcuma alismatifolia Gagnep. and Chrysanthemum indicum Linn. In an attempt to control fungal diseases of local crops by utilizing B. licheniformis, we carried out gene analysis of the bacterium to understand the bacterial antagonistic mechanism. The bacterial cells were bombarded to induce mutations using nitrogen ion beam. After ion bombardment, DNA analysis revealed that the modified polymorphism fragment present in the wild type was missing in a bacterial mutant which lost the antifungal activity. The fragments conserved in the wild type but lost in the mutant bacteria was identified to code for the thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) gene. The gene analysis showed that the TrxR gene from B. licheniformis had the expression of the antagonism to fungi in a synchronous time evolution with the fungus inhibition when the bacteria were co-cultivated with the fungi. The collective results indicate the TrxR gene responsible for the antagonism of bacteria B. licheniformis to fungal infection

  17. INTERAKSI ANTARA Trichoderma Harzianum, Penicillium SP. DAN Pseudomonas SP. SERTA KAPASITAS ANTAGONISMENYA TERHADAP Phytophthora CapsicilN VITRO*[Interaction Among Trichoderma Harzianum, Penicillium SP., Pseudomonas SP. and Antagonism Capacities Against Phy

    OpenAIRE

    Suharna, Nandang

    2003-01-01

    A preliminary study has been done to know antagonism capacities of three isolates of Trichoderma harzianum, two isolates of Penicillium sp.and one isolate of Pseudomonas sp.against Phytophthora capsici in vitro and interaction among those six antagonists.The highest antagonism capacity possessed by Penicillium sp. KN1, respectively followed by Penicillium sp.KN2,Pseudomonas sp. GH1 and the three T. harzianum isolates. Except for those three T. harzianum isolates, the two Penicillium sp.isolat...

  18. Pentachlorophenol induction of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa mexAB-oprM efflux operon: involvement of repressors NalC and MexR and the antirepressor ArmR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa M Starr

    Full Text Available Pentachlorophenol (PCP induced expression of the NalC repressor-regulated PA3720-armR operon and the MexR repressor-controlled mexAB-oprM multidrug efflux operon of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. PCP's induction of PA3720-armR resulted from its direct modulation of NalC, the repressor's binding to PA3720-armR promoter-containing DNA as seen in electromobility shift assays (EMSAs being obviated in the presence of this agent. The NalC binding site was localized to an inverted repeat (IR sequence upstream of PA3720-armR and overlapping a promoter region whose transcription start site was mapped. While modulation of MexR by the ArmR anti-repressor explains the upregulation of mexAB-oprM in nalC mutants hyperexpressing PA3720-armR, the induction of mexAB-oprM expression by PCP is not wholly explainable by PCP induction of PA3720-armR and subsequent ArmR modulation of MexR, inasmuch as armR deletion mutants still showed PCP-inducible mexAB-oprM expression. PCP failed, however, to induce mexAB-oprM in a mexR deletion strain, indicating that MexR was required for this, although PCP did not modulate MexR binding to mexAB-oprM promoter-containing DNA in vitro. One possibility is that MexR responds to PCP-generated in vivo effector molecules in controlling mexAB-oprM expression in response to PCP. PCP is an unlikely effector and substrate for NalC and MexAB-OprM--its impact on NalC binding to the PA3720-armR promoter DNA occurred only at high µM levels--suggesting that it mimics an intended phenolic effector/substrate(s. In this regard, plants are an abundant source of phenolic antimicrobial compounds and, so, MexAB-OprM may function to protect P. aeruginosa from plant antimicrobials that it encounters in nature.

  19. Loss of the Caenorhabditis elegans pocket protein LIN-35 reveals MuvB's innate function as the repressor of DREAM target genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul D Goetsch

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The DREAM (Dp/Retinoblastoma(Rb-like/E2F/MuvB transcriptional repressor complex acts as a gatekeeper of the mammalian cell cycle by establishing and maintaining cellular quiescence. How DREAM's three functional components, the E2F-DP heterodimer, the Rb-like pocket protein, and the MuvB subcomplex, form and function at target gene promoters remains unknown. The current model invokes that the pocket protein links E2F-DP and MuvB and is essential for gene repression. We tested this model by assessing how the conserved yet less redundant DREAM system in Caenorhabditis elegans is affected by absence of the sole C. elegans pocket protein LIN-35. Using a LIN-35 protein null mutant, we analyzed the assembly of E2F-DP and MuvB at promoters that are bound by DREAM and the level of expression of those "DREAM target genes" in embryos. We report that LIN-35 indeed mediates the association of E2F-DP and MuvB, a function that stabilizes DREAM subunit occupancy at target genes. In the absence of LIN-35, the occupancy of E2F-DP and MuvB at most DREAM target genes decreases dramatically and many of those genes become upregulated. The retention of E2F-DP and MuvB at some target gene promoters in lin-35 null embryos allowed us to test their contribution to DREAM target gene repression. Depletion of MuvB, but not E2F-DP, in the sensitized lin-35 null background caused further upregulation of DREAM target genes. We conclude that the pocket protein functions primarily to support MuvB-mediated repression of DREAM targets and that transcriptional repression is the innate function of the evolutionarily conserved MuvB complex. Our findings provide important insights into how mammalian DREAM assembly and disassembly may regulate gene expression and the cell cycle.

  20. MicroRNA-31 controls phenotypic modulation of human vascular smooth muscle cells by regulating its target gene cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jie; Yan, Cheng-Hui; Li, Yang; Xu, Kai; Tian, Xiao-Xiang; Peng, Cheng-Fei; Tao, Jie; Sun, Ming-Yu; Han, Ya-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Phenotypic modulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of a variety of proliferative vascular diseases. The cellular repressor of E1A-stimulated genes (CREG) has been shown to play an important role in phenotypic modulation of VSMCs. However, the mechanism regulating CREG upstream signaling remains unclear. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently been found to play a critical role in cell differentiation via target-gene regulation. This study aimed to identify a miRNA that binds directly to CREG, and may thus be involved in CREG-mediated VSMC phenotypic modulation. Computational analysis indicated that miR-31 bound to the CREG mRNA 3′ untranslated region (3′-UTR). miR-31 was upregulated in quiescent differentiated VSMCs and downregulated in proliferative cells stimulated by platelet-derived growth factor and serum starvation, demonstrating a negative relationship with the VSMC differentiation marker genes, smooth muscle α-actin, calponin and CREG. Using gain-of-function and loss-of-function approaches, CREG and VSMC differentiation marker gene expression levels were shown to be suppressed by a miR-31 mimic, but increased by a miR-31 inhibitor at both protein and mRNA levels. Notably, miR-31 overexpression or inhibition affected luciferase expression driven by the CREG 3′-UTR containing the miR-31 binding site. Furthermore, miR-31-mediated VSMC phenotypic modulation was inhibited in CREG-knockdown human VSMCs. We also determined miR-31 levels in the serum of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), with or without in stent restenosis and in healthy controls. miR-31 levels were higher in the serum of CAD patients with restenosis compared to CAD patients without restenosis and in healthy controls. In summary, these data demonstrate that miR-31 not only directly binds to its target gene CREG and modulates the VSMC phenotype through this interaction, but also can be an important biomarker in diseases involving VSMC

  1. Nutrient-induced stimulation of protein synthesis in mouse skeletal muscle is limited by the mTORC1 repressor REDD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Bradley S; Williamson, David L; Lang, Charles H; Jefferson, Leonard S; Kimball, Scot R

    2015-04-01

    In skeletal muscle, the nutrient-induced stimulation of protein synthesis requires signaling through the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). Expression of the repressor of mTORC1 signaling, regulated in development and DNA damage 1 (REDD1), is elevated in muscle during various atrophic conditions and diminished under hypertrophic conditions. The question arises as to what extent REDD1 limits the nutrient-induced stimulation of protein synthesis. The objective was to examine the role of REDD1 in limiting the response of muscle protein synthesis and mTORC1 signaling to a nutrient stimulus. Wild type REDD1 gene (REDD1(+/+)) and disruption in the REDD1 gene (REDD1(-/-)) mice were feed deprived for 16 h and randomized to remain feed deprived or refed for 15 or 60 min. The tibialis anterior was then removed for analysis of protein synthesis and mTORC1 signaling. In feed-deprived mice, protein synthesis and mTORC1 signaling were significantly lower in REDD1(+/+) than in REDD1(-/-) mice. Thirty minutes after the start of refeeding, protein synthesis in REDD1(+/+) mice was stimulated by 28%, reaching a value similar to that observed in feed-deprived REDD1(-/-) mice, and was accompanied by increased phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser2448), p70S6K1 (Thr389), and 4E-BP1 (Ser65) by 81%, 167%, and 207%, respectively. In refed REDD1(-/-) mice, phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser2448), p70S6K1 (Thr389), and 4E-BP1 (Ser65) were significantly augmented above the values observed in refed REDD1(+/+) mice by 258%, 405%, and 401%, respectively, although protein synthesis was not coordinately increased. Seventy-five minutes after refeeding, REDD1 expression in REDD1(+/+) mice was reduced (∼15% of feed-deprived REDD1(+/+) values), and protein synthesis and mTORC1 signaling were not different between refed REDD1(+/+) mice and REDD1(-/-) mice. The results show that REDD1 expression limits protein synthesis in mouse skeletal muscle by inhibiting mTORC1 signaling during periods of feed

  2. Recruitment by the Repressor Freud-1 of Histone Deacetylase-Brg1 Chromatin Remodeling Complexes to Strengthen HTR1A Gene Repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souslova, Tatiana; Mirédin, Kim; Millar, Anne M; Albert, Paul R

    2017-12-01

    Five-prime repressor element under dual repression binding protein-1 (Freud-1)/CC2D1A is genetically linked to intellectual disability and implicated in neuronal development. Freud-1 represses the serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptor gene HTR1A by histone deacetylase (HDAC)-dependent or HDAC-independent mechanisms in 5-HT1A-negative (e.g., HEK-293) or 5-HT1A-expressing cells (SK-N-SH), respectively. To identify the underlying mechanisms, Freud-1-associated proteins were affinity-purified from HEK-293 nuclear extracts and members of the Brg1/SMARCCA chromatin remodeling and Sin3A-HDAC corepressor complexes were identified. Pull-down assays using recombinant proteins showed that Freud-1 interacts directly with the Brg1 carboxyl-terminal domain; interaction with Brg1 required the carboxyl-terminal of Freud-1. Freud-1 complexes in HEK-293 and SK-N-SH cells differed, with low levels of BAF170/SMARCC2 and BAF57/SMARCE1 in HEK-293 cells and low-undetectable BAF155/SMARCC1, Sin3A, and HDAC1/2 in SK-N-SH cells. Similarly, by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation, Brg1-BAF170/57 and Sin3A-HDAC complexes were observed at the HTR1A promoter in HEK-293 cells, whereas in SK-N-SH cells, Sin3A-HDAC proteins were not detected. Quantifying 5-HT1A receptor mRNA levels in cells treated with siRNA to Freud-1, Brg1, or both RNAs addressed the functional role of the Freud-1-Brg1 complex. In HEK-293 cells, 5-HT1A receptor mRNA levels were increased only when both Freud-1 and Brg1 were depleted, but in SK-N-SH cells, depletion of either protein upregulated 5-HT1A receptor RNA. Thus, recruitment by Freud-1 of Brg1, BAF155, and Sin3A-HDAC complexes appears to strengthen repression of the HTR1A gene to prevent its expression inappropriate cell types, while recruitment of the Brg1-BAF170/57 complex is permissive to 5-HT1A receptor expression. Alterations in Freud-1-Brg1 interactions in mutants associated with intellectual disability could impair gene repression leading to altered neuronal

  3. Metabolic Reprogramming Regulates the Proliferative and Inflammatory Phenotype of Adventitial Fibroblasts in Pulmonary Hypertension Through the Transcriptional Co-Repressor C-terminal Binding Protein-1

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    Li, Min; Riddle, Suzette; Zhang, Hui; D’Alessandro, Angelo; Flockton, Amanda; Serkova, Natalie J.; Hansen, Kirk C.; Moldvan, Radu; McKeon, B. Alexandre; Frid, Maria; Kumar, Sushil; Li, Hong; Liu, Hongbing; Cánovas, Angela; Medrano, Juan F.; Thomas, Milton G.; Iloska, Dijana; Plecita-Hlavata, Lydie; Ježek, Petr; Pullamsetti, Soni; Fini, Mehdi A.; El Kasmi, Karim C.; Zhang, Qinghong; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Changes in metabolism have been suggested to contribute to the aberrant phenotype of vascular wall cells including fibroblasts in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Herein, we test the hypothesis that metabolic reprogramming to aerobic glycolysis is a critical adaptation of fibroblasts in the hypertensive vessel wall that drives proliferative and pro-inflammatory activation through a mechanism involving increased activity of the NADH-sensitive transcriptional co-repressor C-terminal binding protein 1 (CtBP1). Methods RNA-Sequencing, qPCR, 13C-NMR, fluorescence-lifetime imaging, mass spectrometry-based metabolomics and tracing experiments with U-13C-glucose were used to assess glycolytic reprogramming and to measure NADH/NAD+ ratio in bovine and human adventitial fibroblasts, and mouse lung tissues. Immunohistochemistry was utilized to assess CtBP1 expression in the whole lung tissues. CtBP1 siRNA and the pharmacologic inhibitor 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyric acid (MTOB) were utilized to abrogate CtBP1 activity in cells and hypoxic mice. Results We found adventitial fibroblasts from calves with severe hypoxia-induced PH and humans with IPAH (PH-Fibs) displayed aerobic glycolysis when cultured under normoxia, accompanied by increased free NADH and NADH/NAD+ ratios. Expression of the NADH sensor CtBP1 was increased in vivo and in vitro in fibroblasts within the pulmonary adventitia of humans with IPAH and animals with PH and cultured PH-Fibs, respectively. Decreasing NADH pharmacologically with MTOB, or genetically blocking CtBP1 using siRNA, upregulated the cyclin-dependent genes (p15 and p21) and pro-apoptotic regulators (NOXA and PERP), attenuated proliferation, corrected the glycolytic reprogramming phenotype of PH-Fibs, and augmented transcription of the anti-inflammatory gene HMOX1. ChIP analysis demonstrated that CtBP1 directly binds the HMOX1 promoter. Treatment of hypoxic mice with MTOB decreased glycolysis and expression of inflammatory genes, attenuated

  4. FACT, the Bur kinase pathway, and the histone co-repressor HirC have overlapping nucleosome-related roles in yeast transcription elongation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer R Stevens

    Full Text Available Gene transcription is constrained by the nucleosomal nature of chromosomal DNA. This nucleosomal barrier is modulated by FACT, a conserved histone-binding heterodimer. FACT mediates transcription-linked nucleosome disassembly and also nucleosome reassembly in the wake of the RNA polymerase II transcription complex, and in this way maintains the repression of 'cryptic' promoters found within some genes. Here we focus on a novel mutant version of the yeast FACT subunit Spt16 that supplies essential Spt16 activities but impairs transcription-linked nucleosome reassembly in dominant fashion. This Spt16 mutant protein also has genetic effects that are recessive, which we used to show that certain Spt16 activities collaborate with histone acetylation and the activities of a Bur-kinase/Spt4-Spt5/Paf1C pathway that facilitate transcription elongation. These collaborating activities were opposed by the actions of Rpd3S, a histone deacetylase that restores a repressive chromatin environment in a transcription-linked manner. Spt16 activity paralleling that of HirC, a co-repressor of histone gene expression, was also found to be opposed by Rpd3S. Our findings suggest that Spt16, the Bur/Spt4-Spt5/Paf1C pathway, and normal histone abundance and/or stoichiometry, in mutually cooperative fashion, facilitate nucleosome disassembly during transcription elongation. The recessive nature of these effects of the mutant Spt16 protein on transcription-linked nucleosome disassembly, contrasted to its dominant negative effect on transcription-linked nucleosome reassembly, indicate that mutant FACT harbouring the mutant Spt16 protein competes poorly with normal FACT at the stage of transcription-linked nucleosome disassembly, but effectively with normal FACT for transcription-linked nucleosome reassembly. This functional difference is consistent with the idea that FACT association with the transcription elongation complex depends on nucleosome disassembly, and that the

  5. An analysis of the binding of repressor protein ModE to modABCD (molybdate transport) operator/promoter DNA of Escherichia coli.

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    Grunden, A M; Self, W T; Villain, M; Blalock, J E; Shanmugam, K T

    1999-08-20

    Expression of the modABCD operon in Escherichia coli, which codes for a molybdate-specific transporter, is repressed by ModE in vivo in a molybdate-dependent fashion. In vitro DNase I-footprinting experiments identified three distinct regions of protection by ModE-molybdate on the modA operator/promoter DNA, GTTATATT (-15 to -8; region 1), GCCTACAT (-4 to +4; region 2), and GTTACAT (+8 to +14; region 3). Within the three regions of the protected DNA, a pentamer sequence, TAYAT (Y = C or T), can be identified. DNA-electrophoretic mobility experiments showed that the protected regions 1 and 2 are essential for binding of ModE-molybdate to DNA, whereas the protected region 3 increases the affinity of the DNA to the repressor. The stoichiometry of this interaction was found to be two ModE-molybdate per modA operator DNA. ModE-molybdate at 5 nM completely protected the modABCD operator/promoter DNA from DNase I-catalyzed hydrolysis, whereas ModE alone failed to protect the DNA even at 100 nM. The apparent K(d) for the interaction between the modA operator DNA and ModE-molybdate was 0.3 nM, and the K(d) increased to 8 nM in the absence of molybdate. Among the various oxyanions tested, only tungstate replaced molybdate in the repression of modA by ModE, but the affinity of ModE-tungstate for modABCD operator DNA was 6 times lower than with ModE-molybdate. A mutant ModE(T125I) protein, which repressed modA-lac even in the absence of molybdate, protected the same region of modA operator DNA in the absence of molybdate. The apparent K(d) for the interaction between modA operator DNA and ModE(T125I) was 3 nM in the presence of molybdate and 4 nM without molybdate. The binding of molybdate to ModE resulted in a decrease in fluorescence emission, indicating a conformational change of the protein upon molybdate binding. The fluorescence emission spectra of mutant ModE proteins, ModE(T125I) and ModE(Q216*), were unaffected by molybdate. The molybdate-independent mutant Mod

  6. Wheat TILLING mutants show that the vernalization gene VRN1 down-regulates the flowering repressor VRN2 in leaves but is not essential for flowering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Chen

    Full Text Available Most of the natural variation in wheat vernalization response is determined by allelic differences in the MADS-box transcription factor VERNALIZATION1 (VRN1. Extended exposures to low temperatures during the winter (vernalization induce VRN1 expression and promote the transition of the apical meristem to the reproductive phase. In contrast to its Arabidopsis homolog (APETALA1, which is mainly expressed in the apical meristem, VRN1 is also expressed at high levels in the leaves, but its function in this tissue is not well understood. Using tetraploid wheat lines with truncation mutations in the two homoeologous copies of VRN1 (henceforth vrn1-null mutants, we demonstrate that a central role of VRN1 in the leaves is to maintain low transcript levels of the VRN2 flowering repressor after vernalization. Transcript levels of VRN2 were gradually down-regulated during vernalization in both mutant and wild-type genotypes, but were up-regulated after vernalization only in the vrn1-null mutants. The up-regulation of VRN2 delayed flowering by repressing the transcription of FT, a flowering-integrator gene that encodes a mobile protein that is transported from the leaves to the apical meristem to induce flowering. The role of VRN2 in the delayed flowering of the vrn1-null mutant was confirmed using double vrn1-vrn2-null mutants, which flowered two months earlier than the vrn1-null mutants. Both mutants produced normal flowers and seeds demonstrating that VRN1 is not essential for wheat flowering, which contradicts current flowering models. This result does not diminish the importance of VRN1 in the seasonal regulation of wheat flowering. The up-regulation of VRN1 during winter is required to maintain low transcript levels of VRN2, accelerate the induction of FT in the leaves, and regulate a timely flowering in the spring. Our results also demonstrate the existence of redundant wheat flowering genes that may provide new targets for engineering wheat

  7. 3-Bromopyruvate antagonizes effects of lactate and pyruvate, synergizes with citrate and exerts novel anti-glioma effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sayed, S M; El-Magd, R M Abou; Shishido, Y; Chung, S P; Diem, T H; Sakai, T; Watanabe, H; Kagami, S; Fukui, K

    2012-02-01

    Oxidative stress-energy depletion therapy using oxidative stress induced by D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) and energy depletion induced by 3-bromopyruvate (3BP) was reported recently (El Sayed et al., Cancer Gene Ther., 19, 1-18, 2012). Even in the presence of oxygen, cancer cells oxidize glucose preferentially to produce lactate (Warburg effect) which seems vital for cancer microenvironment and progression. 3BP is a closely related structure to lactate and pyruvate and may antagonize their effects as a novel mechanism of its action. Pyruvate exerted a potent H(2)O(2) scavenging effect to exogenous H(2)O(2), while lactate had no scavenging effect. 3BP induced H(2)O(2) production. Pyruvate protected against H(2)O(2)-induced C6 glioma cell death, 3BP-induced C6 glioma cell death but not against DAO/D-serine-induced cell death, while lactate had no protecting effect. Lactate and pyruvate protected against 3BP-induced C6 glioma cell death and energy depletion which were overcome with higher doses of 3BP. Lactate and pyruvate enhanced migratory power of C6 glioma which was blocked by 3BP. Pyruvate and lactate did not protect against C6 glioma cell death induced by other glycolytic inhibitors e.g. citrate (inhibitor of phosphofructokinase) and sodium fluoride (inhibitor of enolase). Serial doses of 3BP were synergistic with citrate in decreasing viability of C6 glioma cells and spheroids. Glycolysis subjected to double inhibition using 3BP with citrate depleted ATP, clonogenic power and migratory power of C6 glioma cells. 3BP induced a caspase-dependent cell death in C6 glioma. 3BP was powerful in decreasing viability of human glioblastoma multiforme cells (U373MG) and C6 glioma in a dose- and time-dependent manner.

  8. Ihh enhances differentiation of CFK-2 chondrocytic cells and antagonizes PTHrP-mediated activation of PKA.

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    Deckelbaum, Ron A; Chan, George; Miao, Dengshun; Goltzman, David; Karaplis, Andrew C

    2002-07-15

    Indian Hedgehog (Ihh), a member of the hedgehog (HH) family of secreted morphogens, and parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP) are key regulators of cartilage cell (chondrocyte) differentiation. We have investigated, in vitro, the actions of HH signalling and its possible interplay with PTHrP using rat CFK-2 chondrocytic cells. Markers of chondrocyte differentiation [alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, and type II (Col2a1) and type X collagen (Col10a1) expression] were enhanced by overexpression of Ihh or its N-terminal domain (N-Ihh), effects mimicked by exogenous administration of recombinant N-terminal HH peptide. Moreover, a missense mutation mapping to the N-terminal domain of Ihh (W160G) reduces the capacity of N-Ihh to induce differentiation. Prolonged exposure of CFK-2 cells to exogenous N-Shh (5x10(-9) M) in the presence of PTHrP (10(-8) M) or forskolin (10(-7) M) resulted in perturbation of HH-mediated differentiation. In addition, overexpression of a constitutively active form of the PTHrP receptor (PTHR1 H223R) inhibited Ihh-mediated differentiation, implicating activation of protein kinase A (PKA) by PTHR1 as a probable mediator of the antagonistic effects of PTHrP. Conversely, overexpression of Ihh/N-Ihh or exogenous treatment with N-Shh led to dampening of PTHrP-mediated activation of PKA. Taken together, our data suggest that Ihh harbors the capacity to induce rather than inhibit chondrogenic differentiation, that PTHrP antagonizes HH-mediated differentiation through a PKA-dependent mechanism and that HH signalling, in turn, modulates PTHrP action through functional inhibition of signalling by PTHR1 to PKA.

  9. Pharmacologic antagonism of dopamine receptor D3 attenuates neurodegeneration and motor impairment in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgueta, Daniela; Aymerich, María S; Contreras, Francisco; Montoya, Andro; Celorrio, Marta; Rojo-Bustamante, Estefanía; Riquelme, Eduardo; González, Hugo; Vásquez, Mónica; Franco, Rafael; Pacheco, Rodrigo

    2017-02-01

    Neuroinflammation involves the activation of glial cells, which is associated to the progression of neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease. Recently, we and other researchers demonstrated that dopamine receptor D3 (D3R)-deficient mice are completely refractory to neuroinflammation and consequent neurodegeneration associated to the acute intoxication with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). In this study we examined the therapeutic potential and underlying mechanism of a D3R-selective antagonist, PG01037, in mice intoxicated with a chronic regime of administration of MPTP and probenecid (MPTPp). Biodistribution analysis indicated that intraperitoneally administered PG01037 crosses the blood-brain barrier and reaches the highest concentration in the brain 40 min after the injection. Furthermore, the drug was preferentially distributed to the brain in comparison to the plasma. Treatment of MPTPp-intoxicated mice with PG01037 (30 mg/kg, administrated twice a week for five weeks) attenuated the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, as evaluated by stereological analysis, and the loss of striatal dopaminergic terminals, as determined by densitometric analyses of tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter immunoreactivities. Accordingly, the treatment resulted in significant improvement of motor performance of injured animals. Interestingly, the therapeutic dose of PG01037 exacerbated astrogliosis and resulted in increased ramification density of microglial cells in the striatum of MPTPp-intoxicated mice. Further analyses suggested that D3R expressed in astrocytes favours a beneficial astrogliosis with anti-inflammatory consequences on microglia. Our findings indicate that D3R-antagonism exerts a therapeutic effect in parkinsonian animals by reducing the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the nigrostriatal pathway, alleviating motor impairments and modifying the pro-inflammatory phenotype of glial cells. Copyright

  10. Selenium antagonizes cadmium-induced apoptosis in chicken spleen but not involving Nrf2-regulated antioxidant response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Menghao; Li, Xiaojing; Fan, Ruifeng; Cao, Changyu; Yao, Haidong; Xu, Shiwen

    2017-11-01

    The nuclear transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) binds to antioxidant response elements (AREs) and is involved in the regulation of genes participated in defending cells against oxidative damage, which have been confirmed in animal models. Selenium (Se), known as an important element in the regulation of antioxidant activity, can antagonize Cadmium (Cd) toxicity in birds. However, the role of Nrf2 in selenium-cadmium interaction has not been reported in birds. To further explore the mechanism of selenium attenuating spleen toxicity induced by cadmium in chickens, cadmium chloride (CdCl 2 , 150mg/kg) and sodium selenite (Na 2 SeO 3 , 2mg/kg) were co-administrated or individually administered in the diet of chickens for 90 days. The results showed that Cd exposure increased the level of hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) and malondialdehyde (MDA) and decreased the antioxidant enzyme activities, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (Gpx), total antioxidative capacity (T-AOC), catalase (CAT). Cd exposure increased obviously nuclear accumulation of Nrf2, and the expression of Nrf2 downstream heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H: quinine oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), reduced the expression of Kelch-like ECH-associated protein (keap1), Gpx-1 and thioredoxin reductase-1 (TrxR1). In addition, Cd induced the increase of bak, caspase9, p53, Cyt c mRNA levels, increased bax/bcl-2 ratio, increased caspase3 mRNA and protein levels. Selenium treatment reduced the accumulation of Cd in the spleen, attenuates Cd-induced Nrf2 nuclear accumulation, enhanced antioxidant enzyme activities, ameliorated Cd-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in the spleen. In summary, our results demonstrate that Se ameliorated spleen toxicity induced by cadmium by modulating the antioxidant system, independently of Nrf2-regulated antioxidant response pathway. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Concentration-Dependent Synergy and Antagonism of Linezolid and Moxifloxacin in the Treatment of Childhood Tuberculosis: The Dynamic Duo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Devyani; Srivastava, Shashikant; Nuermberger, Eric; Pasipanodya, Jotam G; Swaminathan, Soumya; Gumbo, Tawanda

    2016-11-01

     No treatment regimens have been specifically designed for children, in whom tuberculosis is predominantly intracellular. Given their activity as monotherapy and their ability to penetrate many diseased anatomic sites that characterize disseminated tuberculosis, linezolid and moxifloxacin could be combined to form a regimen for this need.  We examined microbial kill of intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) by the combination of linezolid and moxifloxacin multiple exposures in a 7-by-7 mathematical matrix. We then used the hollow fiber system (HFS) model of intracellular tuberculosis to identify optimal dose schedules and exposures of moxifloxacin and linezolid in combination. We mimicked pediatric half-lives and concentrations achieved by each drug. We sampled the peripheral compartment on days 0, 7, 14, 21, and 28 for Mtb quantification, and compared the slope of microbial kill of Mtb by these regimens to the standard regimen of isoniazid, rifampin, and pyrazinamide, based on exponential decline regression.  The full exposure-response surface identified linezolid-moxifloxacin zones of synergy, antagonism, and additivity. A regimen based on each of these zones was then used in the HFS model, with observed half-lives of 4.08 ± 0.66 for linezolid and 3.80 ± 1.34 hours for moxifloxacin. The kill rate constant was 0.060 ± 0.012 per day with the moxifloxacin-linezolid regimen in the additivity zone vs 0.083 ± 0.011 per day with standard therapy, translating to a bacterial burden half-life of 11.52 days vs 8.53 days, respectively.  We identified doses and dose schedules of a linezolid and moxifloxacin backbone regimen that could be highly efficacious in disseminated tuberculosis in children. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  12. Antagonism between the dynein and Ndc80 complexes at kinetochores controls the stability of kinetochore-microtubule attachments during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Mohammed A; McKenney, Richard J; Varma, Dileep

    2018-04-20

    Chromosome alignment and segregation during mitosis require kinetochore-microtubule (kMT) attachments that are mediated by the molecular motor dynein and the kMT-binding complex Ndc80. The Rod-ZW10-Zwilch (RZZ) complex is central to this coordination as it has an important role in dynein recruitment and has recently been reported to have a key function in the regulation of stable kMT attachments in Caenorhabditis elegans besides its role in activating the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). However, the mechanism by which these protein complexes control kMT attachments to drive chromosome motility during early mitosis is still unclear. Here, using in vitro total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, we observed that higher concentrations of Ndc80 inhibited dynein binding to MTs, providing evidence that Ndc80 and dynein antagonize each other's function. High-resolution microscopy and siRNA-mediated functional disruption revealed that severe defects in chromosome alignment induced by depletion of dynein or the dynein adapter Spindly are rescued by codepletion of the RZZ component Rod in human cells. Interestingly, rescue of the chromosome alignment defects was independent of Rod function in SAC activation and was accompanied by a remarkable restoration of stable kMT attachments. Furthermore, the chromosome alignment rescue depended on the plus-end-directed motility of centromere protein E (CENP-E) because cells codepleted of CENP-E, Rod, and dynein could not establish stable kMT attachments or align their chromosomes properly. Our findings support the idea that dynein may control the function of the Ndc80 complex in stabilizing kMT attachments directly by interfering with Ndc80-MT binding or indirectly by controlling the Rod-mediated inhibition of Ndc80. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. SFRP2 enhances the osteogenic differentiation of apical papilla stem cells by antagonizing the canonical WNT pathway.

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    Jin, Luyuan; Cao, Yu; Yu, Guoxia; Wang, Jinsong; Lin, Xiao; Ge, Lihua; Du, Juan; Wang, Liping; Diao, Shu; Lian, Xiaomeng; Wang, Songlin; Dong, Rui; Shan, Zhaochen

    2017-01-01

    Exploring the molecular mechanisms underlying directed differentiation is helpful in the development of clinical applications of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Our previous study on dental tissue-derived MSCs demonstrated that secreted frizzled-related protein 2 (SFRP2), a Wnt inhibitor, could enhance osteogenic differentiation in stem cells from the apical papilla (SCAPs). However, how SFRP2 promotes osteogenic differentiation of dental tissue-derived MSCs remains unclear. In this study, we used SCAPs to investigate the underlying mechanisms. SCAPs were isolated from the apical papilla of immature third molars. Western blot and real-time RT-PCR were applied to detect the expression of β-catenin and Wnt target genes. Alizarin Red staining, quantitative calcium analysis, transwell cultures and in vivo transplantation experiments were used to study the osteogenic differentiation potential of SCAPs. SFRP2 inhibited canonical Wnt signaling by enhancing phosphorylation and decreasing the expression of nuclear β-catenin in vitro and in vivo . In addition, the target genes of the Wnt signaling pathway, AXIN2 (axin-related protein 2) and MMP7 (matrix metalloproteinase-7), were downregulated by SFRP2 . WNT1 inhibited the osteogenic differentiation potential of SCAPs. SFRP2 could rescue this WNT1 -impaired osteogenic differentiation potential. The results suggest that SFRP2 could bind to locally present Wnt ligands and alter the balance of intracellular Wnt signaling to antagonize the canonical Wnt pathway in SCAPs. This elucidates the molecular mechanism underlying the SFRP2-mediated directed differentiation of SCAPs and indicates potential target genes for improving dental tissue regeneration.

  14. Neurokinin B receptor antagonism decreases luteinising hormone pulse frequency and amplitude and delays puberty onset in the female rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S Y; Li, X F; Hu, M H; Shao, B; Poston, L; Lightman, S L; O'Byrne, K T

    2014-08-01

    The neural mechanisms controlling puberty onset remain enigmatic. Humans with loss of function mutations in TAC3 or TACR3, the genes encoding neurokinin B (NKB) or its receptor, neurokinin-3 receptor (NK3R), respectively, present with severe congenital gonadotrophin deficiency and pubertal failure. Animal studies have shown ambiguous actions of NKB-NK3R signalling with respect to controlling puberty onset. The present study aimed to determine the role of endogenous NKB-NK3R signalling in the control of pulsatile luteinising hormone (LH) secretion and the timing of puberty onset, and also whether precocious pubertal onset as a result of an obesogenic diet is similarly regulated by this neuropeptide system. Prepubertal female rats, chronically implanted with i.c.v. cannulae, were administered SB222200, a NK3R antagonist, or artificial cerebrospinal fluid via an osmotic mini-pump for 14 days. SB222200 significantly delayed the onset of vaginal opening and first oestrus (as markers of puberty) compared to controls in both normal and high-fat diet fed animals. Additionally, serial blood sampling, via chronic indwelling cardiac catheters, revealed that the increase in LH pulse frequency was delayed and that the LH pulse amplitude was reduced in response to NK3R antagonism, regardless of dietary status. These data suggest that endogenous NKB-NK3R signalling plays a role in controlling the timing of puberty and the associated acceleration of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone pulse generator frequency in the female rat. © 2014 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  15. Autotaxin is induced by TSA through HDAC3 and HDAC7 inhibition and antagonizes the TSA-induced cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Song; Wang, Baolu; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Junjie

    2011-02-12

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a secreted glycoprotein with the lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity to convert lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) into lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a bioactive lysophospholipid involved in diverse biological actions. ATX is highly expressed in some cancer cells and contributes to their tumorigenesis, invasion, and metastases, while in other cancer cells ATX is silenced or expressed at low level. The mechanism of ATX expression regulation in cancer cells remains largely unknown. In the present study, we demonstrated that trichostatin A (TSA), a well-known HDAC inhibitor (HDACi), significantly induced ATX expression in SW480 and several other cancer cells with low or undetectable endogenous ATX expression. ATX induction could be observed when HDAC3 and HDAC7 were down-regulated by their siRNAs. It was found that HDAC7 expression levels were low in the cancer cells with high endogenous ATX expression. Exogenous over-expression of HDAC7 inhibited ATX expression in these cells in a HDAC3-dependent manner. These data indicate that HDAC3 and HDAC7 collaboratively suppress ATX expression in cancer cells, and suggest that TSA induce ATX expression by inhibiting HDAC3 and HDAC7. The biological significance of this regulation mechanism was revealed by demonstrating that TSA-induced ATX protected cancer cells against TSA-induced apoptosis by producing LPA through its lysoPLD activity, which could be reversed by BrP-LPA and S32826, the inhibitors of the ATX-LPA axis. We have demonstrated that ATX expression is repressed by HDAC3 and HDAC7 in cancer cells. During TSA treatment, ATX is induced due to the HDAC3 and HDAC7 inhibition and functionally antagonizes the TSA-induced apoptosis. These results reveal an internal HDACi-resistant mechanism in cancer cells, and suggest that the inhibition of ATX-LPA axis would be helpful to improve the efficacy of HDACi-based therapeutics against cancer.

  16. Agmatine, an endogenous ligand at imidazoline binding sites, does not antagonize the clonidine-mediated blood pressure reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raasch, Walter; Schäfer, Ulrich; Qadri, Fatimunnisa; Dominiak, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Since agmatine has been identified as a clonidine displacing substance (CDS), the aim of this study was to investigate whether agmatine can mimic CDS-induced cardiovascular reactions in organ bath experiments, pithed spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and anaesthetized SHR.Intravenously-administered agmatine significantly reduced the blood pressure and heart rate of anaesthetized SHR at doses higher than 1 and 3 mg kg−1, respectively. These effects are probably mediated via central mechanisms, since there was an approximate 8 fold rightward shift of the dose-response curve in the pithed SHR (indicating a weakened cardiovascular effect). Moreover, in organ bath experiments, agmatine failed to alter the contractility of intact or endothelium-denuded aortal rings. When agmatine was administered i.c.v. to anaesthetized SHR, blood pressure was increased without any alteration of heart rate, whereas blood pressure was unchanged and heart rate was increased after injection into the 4th brain ventricle. This suggests that haemodynamic reaction patterns after central application are related to distinct influences on central cardiovascular mechanisms.Agmatine reduces noradrenaline release in pithed SHR while α2-adrenoceptors are irreversibly blocked with phenoxybenzamine, but not while I1-binding sites are selectively blocked with AGN192403. This suggests that agmatine may modulate noradrenaline release in the same way that clonidine does, i.e. via imidazoline binding sites; this involves a reduction in sympathetic tone which in turn reduces blood pressure and heart rate.Finally, CDS-like cardiovascular activity appears not to be due to agmatine, since (i) blood pressure in anaesthetized SHR is decreased by agmatine and clonidine, and (ii) agmatine did not antagonize the blood pressure reaction to clonidine in pithed or anaesthetized SHR. PMID:11834614

  17. A preliminary report on the contact-independent antagonism of Pseudogymnoascus destructans by Rhodococcus rhodochrous strain DAP96253.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelison, Christopher T; Keel, M Kevin; Gabriel, Kyle T; Barlament, Courtney K; Tucker, Trudy A; Pierce, George E; Crow, Sidney A

    2014-09-26

    The recently-identified causative agent of White-Nose Syndrome (WNS), Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has been responsible for the mortality of an estimated 5.5 million North American bats since its emergence in 2006. A primary focus of the National Response Plan, established by multiple state, federal and tribal agencies in 2011, was the identification of biological control options for WNS. In an effort to identify potential biological control options for WNS, multiply induced cells of Rhodococcus rhodochrous strain DAP96253 was screened for anti-P. destructans activity. Conidia and mycelial plugs of P. destructans were exposed to induced R. rhodochrous in a closed air-space at 15°C, 7°C and 4°C and were evaluated for contact-independent inhibition of conidia germination and mycelial extension with positive results. Additionally, in situ application methods for induced R. rhodochrous, such as fixed-cell catalyst and fermentation cell-paste in non-growth conditions, were screened with positive results. R. rhodochrous was assayed for ex vivo activity via exposure to bat tissue explants inoculated with P. destructans conidia. Induced R. rhodochrous completely inhibited growth from conidia at 15°C and had a strong fungistatic effect at 4°C. Induced R. rhodochrous inhibited P. destructans growth from conidia when cultured in a shared air-space with bat tissue explants inoculated with P. destructans conidia. The identification of inducible biological agents with contact-independent anti- P. destructans activity is a major milestone in the development of viable biological control options for in situ application and provides the first example of contact-independent antagonism of this devastating wildlife pathogen.

  18. Effect of the adenosine A2A receptor antagonist MSX-3 on motivational disruptions of maternal behavior induced by dopamine antagonism in the early postpartum rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Mariana; Farrar, Andrew M; Hockemeyer, Jörg; Müller, Christa E; Salamone, John D; Morrell, Joan I

    2011-01-01

    Mesolimbic dopamine (DA), particularly in the nucleus accumbens, importantly regulates activational aspects of maternal responsiveness. DA antagonism and accumbens DA depletions interfere with early postpartum maternal motivation by selectively affecting most forms of active maternal behaviors, while leaving nursing behavior relatively intact. Considerable evidence indicates that there is a functional interaction between DA D2 and adenosine A(2A) receptors in striatal areas, including the nucleus accumbens. This study was conducted to determine if adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonism could reverse the effects of DA receptor antagonism on early postpartum maternal behavior. The adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonist MSX-3 (0.25-2.0 mg/kg, IP) was investigated for its ability to reverse the effects of the DA D2 receptor antagonist haloperidol (0.1 mg/kg, IP) on the maternal behavior of early postpartum female rats. Haloperidol severely impaired the expression of active maternal components, including retrieval and grouping the pups at the nest site, pup licking, and nest building. Co-administration of MSX-3 (0.25-2.0 mg/kg, IP) with haloperidol produced a dose-related attenuation of the haloperidol-induced behavioral deficits in early postpartum females. Doses of MSX-3 that effectively reversed the effects of haloperidol (0.5, 1.0 mg/kg), when administered in the absence of haloperidol, did not affect maternal responding or locomotor activity. Adenosine and DA systems interact to regulate early postpartum maternal responsiveness. This research may potentially contribute to the development of strategies for treatments of psychiatric disorders during the postpartum period, with particular emphasis in maintaining or restoring the mother-infant relationship.

  19. Peptide IC-20, encoded by skin kininogen-1 of the European yellow-bellied toad, Bombina variegata, antagonizes bradykinin-induced arterial smooth muscle relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objectives were to determine if the skin secretion of the European yellow-bellied toad (Bombina variegata, in common with other related species, contains a bradykinin inhibitor peptide and to isolate and structurally characterize this peptide. Materials and Methods: Lyophilized skin secretion obtained from this toad was subjected to reverse phase HPLC fractionation with subsequent bioassay of fractions for antagonism of the bradykinin activity using an isolated rat tail artery smooth muscle preparation. Subsequently, the primary structure of the peptide was established by a combination of microsequencing, mass spectroscopy, and molecular cloning, following which a synthetic replicate was chemically synthesised for bioassay. Results: A single peptide of molecular mass 2300.92 Da was resolved in HPLC fractions of skin secretion and its primary structure determined as IYNAIWP-KH-NK-KPGLL-. Database interrogation with this sequence indicated that this peptide was encoded by skin kininogen-1 previously cloned from B. variegata. The blank cycles were occupied by cysteinyl (C residues and the peptide was located toward the C-terminus of the skin kininogen, and flanked N-terminally by a classical -KR- propeptide convertase processing site. The peptide was named IC-20 in accordance (I = N-terminal isoleucine, C = C-terminal cysteine, 20 = number of residues. Like the natural peptide, its synthetic replicate displayed an antagonism of bradykinin-induced arterial smooth muscle relaxation. Conclusion: IC-20 represents a novel bradykinin antagonizing peptide from amphibian skin secretions and is the third such peptide found to be co-encoded with bradykinins within skin kininogens.

  20. [Agonism and antagonism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Anne-Lise

    2016-12-01

    This essay considers dissensus as the starting point for the construction of a common epistemic space rather than as the acknowledgement of an irreducible disagreement. In the argumentative confrontation and disagreements, we do not want to identify a process which might lead to agreement through rational debate. The aim of this essay is rather to understand how dissensus leads to the constitution of plural communities. It discusses a certain number of texts of political philosophy (Habermas, Mouffe, etc.), where the notion of agreement is crucial to an analysis of argumentative confrontations. This essay uses the hypothesis to analyse the circulation of Leibniz's dynamics in his correspondence with De Volder. This perspective shows eventually that dissensus is not an obstacle but the basis on which multiple circulations of theories are possible.

  1. Lysosomotropic cationic drugs induce cytostatic and cytotoxic effects: Role of liposolubility and autophagic flux and antagonism by cholesterol ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, Alexandre; Marceau, François, E-mail: francois.marceau@crchul.ulaval.ca

    2016-08-15

    Cation trapping in acidic cell compartments determines an antiproliferative effect that has a potential interest in oncology, as shown by clinical data and trials involving chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine. To further characterize the mechanism of this effect, we studied a series of 6 substituted triethylamine (s-Et{sub 3}N) drugs that encompasses a wide range of liposolubility (amiodarone, quinacrine, chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine, lidocaine, and procainamide). Three tumor cell lines and primary human endothelial cells were exploited in proliferation assays (48 h, cell counts). Accumulation of the autophagic effector LC3 II and the apoptotic marker cleaved PARP1 (immunoblots), cytotoxicity, cell cycle analysis and endocytic function were further tested in the p53-null histiocytic lymphoma U937 line. A profound and desynchronized antiproliferative effect was observed in response to all s-Et{sub 3}Ns with essentially no cell type specificity. Predictors of s-Et{sub 3}N potency were liposolubility and the acute accumulation of the autophagic effector LC3 II (6 h-treatments). For each s-Et{sub 3}N, there was an antiproliferative concentration range where cytotoxicity and apoptosis were not triggered in U937 cells (24–48 h-treatments). Quinacrine was the most potent cytostatic drug (1–5 μM). Co-treatment of cells with inhibitors of cholesterol, β-cyclodextrin or lovastatin, partially reversed the antiproliferative effect of each s-Et{sub 3}N. The cytopathology induced by cationic drug accumulation includes a cytostatic effect. Its intensity is cell type- and p53-independent, but predicted by the inhibition of autophagic flux and by the liposolubility of individual drugs and alleviated by cholesterol ablation. The superiority of quinacrine, biomarker value of LC3 II and antagonism by a statin may be clinically relevant. - Highlights: • Cation trapping in acidic cell compartments induces a cytostatic effect. • A series of substituted triethylamines has been

  2. Dual interaction of agmatine with the rat α2D-adrenoceptor: competitive antagonism and allosteric activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molderings, G J; Menzel, S; Kathmann, M; Schlicker, E; Göthert, M

    2000-01-01

    In segments of rat vena cava preincubated with [3H]-noradrenaline and superfused with physiological salt solution, the influence of agmatine on the electrically evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release, the EP3 prostaglandin receptor-mediated and the α2D-adrenoceptor-mediated inhibition of evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release was investigated. Agmatine (0.1–10 μM) by itself was without effect on evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release. In the presence of 10 μM agmatine, the prostaglandin E2(PGE2)-induced EP3-receptor-mediated inhibition of [3H]-noradrenaline release was not modified, whereas the α2D-adrenoceptor-mediated inhibition of [3H]-noradrenaline release induced by noradrenaline, moxonidine or clonidine was more pronounced than in the absence of agmatine. However, 1 mM agmatine antagonized the moxonidine-induced inhibition of [3H]-noradrenaline release. Agmatine concentration-dependently inhibited the binding of [3H]-clonidine and [3H]-rauwolscine to rat brain cortex membranes (Ki values 6 μM and 12 μM, respectively). In addition, 30 and 100 μM agmatine increased the rate of association and decreased the rate of dissociation of [3H]-clonidine resulting in an increased affinity of the radioligand for the α2D-adrenoceptors. [14C]-agmatine labelled specific binding sites on rat brain cortex membranes. In competition experiments. [14C]-agmatine was inhibited from binding to its specific recognition sites by unlabelled agmatine, but not by rauwolscine and moxonidine. In conclusion, the present data indicate that agmatine both acts as an antagonist at the ligand recognition site of the α2D-adrenoceptor and enhances the effects of α2-adrenoceptor agonists probably by binding to an allosteric binding site of the α2D-adrenoceptor which seems to be labelled by [14C]-agmatine. PMID:10928978

  3. Lysosomotropic cationic drugs induce cytostatic and cytotoxic effects: Role of liposolubility and autophagic flux and antagonism by cholesterol ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, Alexandre; Marceau, François

    2016-01-01

    Cation trapping in acidic cell compartments determines an antiproliferative effect that has a potential interest in oncology, as shown by clinical data and trials involving chloroquine and hydroxychloroquine. To further characterize the mechanism of this effect, we studied a series of 6 substituted triethylamine (s-Et 3 N) drugs that encompasses a wide range of liposolubility (amiodarone, quinacrine, chloroquine, hydroxychloroquine, lidocaine, and procainamide). Three tumor cell lines and primary human endothelial cells were exploited in proliferation assays (48 h, cell counts). Accumulation of the autophagic effector LC3 II and the apoptotic marker cleaved PARP1 (immunoblots), cytotoxicity, cell cycle analysis and endocytic function were further tested in the p53-null histiocytic lymphoma U937 line. A profound and desynchronized antiproliferative effect was observed in response to all s-Et 3 Ns with essentially no cell type specificity. Predictors of s-Et 3 N potency were liposolubility and the acute accumulation of the autophagic effector LC3 II (6 h-treatments). For each s-Et 3 N, there was an antiproliferative concentration range where cytotoxicity and apoptosis were not triggered in U937 cells (24–48 h-treatments). Quinacrine was the most potent cytostatic drug (1–5 μM). Co-treatment of cells with inhibitors of cholesterol, β-cyclodextrin or lovastatin, partially reversed the antiproliferative effect of each s-Et 3 N. The cytopathology induced by cationic drug accumulation includes a cytostatic effect. Its intensity is cell type- and p53-independent, but predicted by the inhibition of autophagic flux and by the liposolubility of individual drugs and alleviated by cholesterol ablation. The superiority of quinacrine, biomarker value of LC3 II and antagonism by a statin may be clinically relevant. - Highlights: • Cation trapping in acidic cell compartments induces a cytostatic effect. • A series of substituted triethylamines has been studied in 4 cell

  4. Ant-caterpillar antagonism at the community level: interhabitat variation of tritrophic interactions in a neotropical savanna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendoya, Sebastián F; Oliveira, Paulo S

    2015-03-01

    Ant foraging on foliage can substantially affect how phytophagous insects use host plants and represents a high predation risk for caterpillars, which are important folivores. Ant-plant-herbivore interactions are especially pervasive in cerrado savanna due to continuous ant visitation to liquid food sources on foliage (extrafloral nectaries, insect honeydew). While searching for liquid rewards on plants, aggressive ants frequently attack or kill insect herbivores, decreasing their numbers. Because ants vary in diet and aggressiveness, their effect on herbivores also varies. Additionally, the differential occurrence of ant attractants (plant and insect exudates) on foliage produces variable levels of ant foraging within local floras and among localities. Here, we investigate how variation of ant communities and of traits among host plant species (presence or absence of ant attractants) can change the effect of carnivores (predatory ants) on herbivore communities (caterpillars) in a cerrado savanna landscape. We sampled caterpillars and foliage-foraging ants in four cerrado localities (70-460 km apart). We found that: (i) caterpillar infestation was negatively related with ant visitation to plants; (ii) this relationship depended on local ant abundance and species composition, and on local preference by ants for plants with liquid attractants; (iii) this was not related to local plant richness or plant size; (iv) the relationship between the presence of ant attractants and caterpillar abundance varied among sites from negative to neutral; and (v) caterpillars feeding on plants with ant attractants are more resistant to ant predation than those feeding on plants lacking attractants. Liquid food on foliage mediates host plant quality for lepidopterans by promoting generalized ant-caterpillar antagonism. Our study in cerrado shows that the negative effects of generalist predatory ants on herbivores are detectable at a community level, affecting patterns of abundance and

  5. BCL-x{sub L}/MCL-1 inhibition and RARγ antagonism work cooperatively in human HL60 leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perri, Mariarita; Yap, Jeremy L.; Yu, Jianshi [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, 20 N Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Cione, Erika [Department of Pharmacy, Health and Nutritional Sciences, Ed. Polifunzionale, University of Calabria, 87036 Rende, CS (Italy); Fletcher, Steven [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, 20 N Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Kane, Maureen A., E-mail: mkane@rx.umaryland.edu [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, 20 N Pine Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by chromosomal translocations that result in fusion proteins, including the promyelocytic leukemia–retinoic acid receptor, alpha fusion protein (PML–RARα). All-trans retinoic acid (atRA) treatment is the standard drug treatment for APL yielding cure rates >80% by activating transcription and proteasomal degradation of retinoic acid receptor, alpha (RARα). Whereas combination therapy with As{sub 2}O{sub 3} has increased survival further, patients that experience relapse and are refractory to atRA and/or As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a clinically significant problem. BCL-2 family proteins regulate apoptosis and over-expression of anti-apoptotic B-cell leukemia/lymphoma 2 (BCL-2) family proteins has been associated with chemotherapeutic resistance in APL including impairment of the ability of atRA to induce growth arrest and differentiation. Here we investigated the novel BH3 domain mimetic, JY-1-106, which antagonizes the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family members B-cell lymphoma-extra large (BCL-x{sub L}) and myeloid cell leukemia-1 (MCL-1) alone and in combination with retinoids including atRA, AM580 (RARα agonist), and SR11253 (RARγ antagonist). JY-1-106 reduced cell viability in HL-60 cells alone and in combination with retinoids. The combination of JY-1-106 and SR11253 had the greatest impact on cell viability by stimulating apoptosis. These studies indicate that dual BCL-x{sub L}/MCL-1 inhibitors and retinoids could work cooperatively in leukemia treatment. - Highlights: • Novel Bcl-x{sub L}/Mcl-1 inhibitor JY-1-106 reduces HL60 cell viability. • JY-1-106 is investigated in combination with retinoic acid, AM580, and SR11253. • AM580 is an RARα agonist; SR11253 is an RARγ antagonist. • Combined use of JY-1-106/SR11253 exhibited the greatest cell viability reduction. • JY-1-106 alone or in combination with retinoids induces apoptosis.

  6. Utility of the ceftazidime-imipenem antagonism test (CIAT to detect and confirm the presence of inducible AmpC beta-lactamases among enterobacteriaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlademir Vicente Cantarelli

    Full Text Available Detection of AmpC beta-lactamase production by enterobacteria has been problematic. Contrary to ESBLs, no specific guidelines are available for detection and confirmation of AmpC production by clinical relevant microorganisms. Moreover, some bacterial species may produce inducible AmpC beta-lactamases that can be easily overlooked by routine susceptibility tests. We reported here a new test based on the strong inducible effect of imipenem on AmpC genes and the consequent antagonism with ceftazidime. This test is very simple and proved to be helpful in detecting AmpC-inducible enzymes among several species of clinical isolates.

  7. Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor I (mGluR1) Antagonism Impairs Cocaine-Induced Conditioned Place Preference via Inhibition of Protein Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Fei; Zhong, Peng; Liu, Xiaojie; Sun, Dalong; Gao, Hai-qing; Liu, Qing-song

    2013-01-01

    Antagonism of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1 and mGluR5) reduces behavioral effects of drugs of abuse, including cocaine. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Activation of mGluR5 increases protein synthesis at synapses. Although mGluR5-induced excessive protein synthesis has been implicated in the pathology of fragile X syndrome, it remains unknown whether group I mGluR-mediated protein synthesis is involved in any behavioral effects of drugs of abus...

  8. Bliss and Loewe interaction analyses of clinically relevant drug combinations in human colon cancer cell lines reveal complex patterns of synergy and antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashif, Muhammad; Andersson, Claes; Mansoori, Sharmineh; Larsson, Rolf; Nygren, Peter; Gustafsson, Mats G

    2017-11-28

    We analyzed survival effects for 15 different pairs of clinically relevant anti-cancer drugs in three iso-genic pairs of human colorectal cancer carcinoma cell lines, by applying for the first time our novel software (R package) called COMBIA. In our experiments iso-genic pairs of cell lines were used, differing only with respect to a single clinically important KRAS or BRAF mutation. Frequently, concentration dependent but mutation independent joint Bliss and Loewe synergy/antagonism was found statistically significant. Four combinations were found synergistic/antagonistic specifically to the parental (harboring KRAS or BRAF mutation) cell line of the corresponding iso-genic cell lines pair. COMBIA offers considerable improvements over established software for synergy analysis such as MacSynergy™ II as it includes both Bliss (independence) and Loewe (additivity) analyses, together with a tailored non-parametric statistical analysis employing heteroscedasticity, controlled resampling, and global (omnibus) testing. In many cases Loewe analyses found significant synergistic as well as antagonistic effects in a cell line at different concentrations of a tested drug combination. By contrast, Bliss analysis found only one type of significant effect per cell line. In conclusion, the integrated Bliss and Loewe interaction analysis based on non-parametric statistics may provide more robust interaction analyses and reveal complex patterns of synergy and antagonism.

  9. The Netrin-related domain of Sfrp1 interacts with Wnt ligands and antagonizes their activity in the anterior neural plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteve Pilar

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secreted frizzled related proteins (SFRPs are multifunctional modulators of Wnt and BMP (Bone Morphogenetic Protein signalling necessary for the development of most organs and the homeostasis of different adult tissues. SFRPs fold in two independent domains: the cysteine rich domain (SfrpCRD related to the extracellular portion of Frizzled (Fz, Wnt receptors and the Netrin module (SfrpNTR defined by homologies with molecules such as Netrin-1, inhibitors of metalloproteinases and complement proteins. Due to its structural relationship with Fz, it is believed that SfrpCRD interferes with Wnt signalling by binding and sequestering the ligand. In contrast, the functional relevance of the SfrpNTR has been barely addressed. Results Here, we combine biochemical studies, mutational analysis and functional assays in cell culture and medaka-fish embryos to show that the Sfrp1NTR mimics the function of the entire molecule, binds to Wnt8 and antagonizes Wnt canonical signalling. This activity requires intact tertiary structure and is shared by the distantly related Netrin-1NTR. In contrast, the Sfrp1CRD cannot mirror the function of the entire molecule in vivo but interacts with Fz receptors and antagonizes Wnt8-mediated β-catenin transcriptional activity. Conclusion On the basis of these results, we propose that SFRP modulation of Wnt signalling may involve multiple and differential interactions among Wnt, Fz and SFRPs.

  10. Captodiamine, a putative antidepressant, enhances hypothalamic BDNF expression in vivo by synergistic 5-HT2c receptor antagonism and sigma-1 receptor agonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, Rebecca M; Regan, Ciaran M

    2013-10-01

    The putative antidepressant captodiamine is a 5-HT2c receptor antagonist and agonist at sigma-1 and D3 dopamine receptors, exerts an anti-immobility action in the forced swim paradigm, and enhances dopamine turnover in the frontal cortex. Captodiamine has also been found to ameliorate stress-induced anhedonia, reduce the associated elevations of hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and restore the reductions in hypothalamic BDNF expression. Here we demonstrate chronic administration of captodiamine to have no significant effect on hypothalamic CRF expression through sigma-1 receptor agonism; however, both sigma-1 receptor agonism or 5-HT2c receptor antagonism were necessary to enhance BDNF expression. Regulation of BDNF expression by captodiamine was associated with increased phosphorylation of transcription factor CREB and mediated through sigma-1 receptor agonism but blocked by 5-HT2c receptor antagonism. The existence of two separate signalling pathways was confirmed by immunolocalisation of each receptor to distinct cell populations in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. Increased BDNF induced by captodiamine was also associated with enhanced expression of synapsin, but not PSD-95, suggesting induction of long-term structural plasticity between hypothalamic synapses. These unique features of captodiamine may contribute to its ability to ameliorate stress-induced anhedonia as the hypothalamus plays a prominent role in regulating HPA axis activity.

  11. A novel ion-beam-mutation effect application in identification of gene involved in bacterial antagonism to fungal infection of ornamental crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadtanapuk, S.; Teraarusiri, W.; Nanakorn, W.; Yu, L. D.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2014-05-01

    This work is on a novel application of ion beam effect on biological mutation. Bacillus licheniformis (B. licheniformis) is a common soil bacterium with an antagonistic effect on Curcuma alismatifolia Gagnep. and Chrysanthemum indicum Linn. In an attempt to control fungal diseases of local crops by utilizing B. licheniformis, we carried out gene analysis of the bacterium to understand the bacterial antagonistic mechanism. The bacterial cells were bombarded to induce mutations using nitrogen ion beam. After ion bombardment, DNA analysis revealed that the modified polymorphism fragment present in the wild type was missing in a bacterial mutant which lost the antifungal activity. The fragments conserved in the wild type but lost in the mutant bacteria was identified to code for the thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) gene. The gene analysis showed that the TrxR gene from B. licheniformis had the expression of the antagonism to fungi in a synchronous time evolution with the fungus inhibition when the bacteria were co-cultivated with the fungi. The collective results indicate the TrxR gene responsible for the antagonism of bacteria B. licheniformis to fungal infection.

  12. Antagonism of the morphine-induced locomotor activation of mice by fructose: comparison with other opiates and sugars, and sugar effects on brain morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brase, D A; Ward, C R; Bey, P S; Dewey, W L

    1991-01-01

    The mouse locomotor activation test of opiate action in a 2+2 dose parallel line assay was used in a repeated testing paradigm to determine the test, opiate and hexose specificities of a previously reported antagonism of morphine-induced antinocociception by hyperglycemia. In opiate specificity studies, fructose (5 g/kg, i.p.) significantly reduced the potency ratio for morphine and methadone, but not for levorphanol, meperidine or phenazocine when intragroup comparisons were made. In intergroup comparisons, fructose significantly reduced the potencies of levorphanol and phenazocine, but not methadone or meperidine. In hexose/polyol specificity studies, tagatose and fructose significantly reduced the potency ratio for morphine, whereas glucose, galactose, mannose and the polyols, sorbitol and xylitol, caused no significant decrease in potency. Fructose, tagatose, glucose and mannose (5 g/kg, i.p.) were tested for effects on brain morphine levels 30 min after morphine (60 min after sugar), and all four sugars significantly increased brain morphine relative to saline-pretreated controls. It is concluded that the antagonism of morphine by acute sugar administration shows specificity for certain sugars and occurs despite sugar-induced increases in the distribution of morphine to the brain. Furthermore, the effects of fructose show an opiate specificity similar to that of glucose on antinociception observed previously in our laboratory, except that methadone was also significantly inhibited in the present study, when a repeated-testing experimental design was used.

  13. Activated RecA protein may induce expression of a gene that is not controlled by the LexA repressor and whose function is required for mutagenesis and repair of UV-irradiated bacteriophage lambda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calsou, P.; Villaverde, A.; Defais, M.

    1987-01-01

    The activated form of the RecA protein (RecA) is known to be involved in the reactivation and mutagenesis of UV-irradiated bacteriophage lambda and in the expression of the SOS response in Escherichia coli K-12. The expression of the SOS response requires cleavage of the LexA repressor by RecA and the subsequent expression of LexA-controlled genes. The evidence presented here suggests that RecA induces the expression of a gene(s) that is not under LexA control and that is also necessary for maximal repair and mutagenesis of damaged phage. This conclusion is based on the chloramphenicol sensitivity of RecA -dependent repair and mutagenesis of damaged bacteriophage lambda in lexA(Def) hosts

  14. Lysines 72, 80 and 213 and aspartic acid 210 of the Lactococcus lactis LacR repressor are involved in the response to the inducer tagatose-6-phosphate leading to induction of lac operon expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooijen, R J; Dechering, K J; Niek, C; Wilmink, J; de Vos, W M

    1993-02-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis of the Lactococcus lactis lacR gene was performed to identify residues in the LacR repressor that are involved in the induction of lacABCDFEGX operon expression by tagatose-6-phosphate. A putative inducer binding domain located near the C-terminus was previously postulated based on homology studies with the Escherichia coli DeoR family of repressors, which all have a phosphorylated sugar as inducer. Residues within this domain and lysine residues that are charge conserved in the DeoR family were changed into alanine or arginine. The production of the LacR mutants K72A, K80A, K80R, D210A, K213A and K213R in the LacR-deficient L.lactis strain NZ3015 resulted in repressed phospho-beta-galactosidase (LacG) activities and decreased growth rates on lactose. Gel mobility shift assays showed that the complex between a DNA fragment carrying the lac operators and LacR mutants K72A, K80A, K213A and D210A did not dissociate in the presence of tagatose-6-phosphate, in contrast to wild type LacR. Other mutations (K62A/K63A, K72R, K73A, K73R, T212A, F214R, R216R and R216K) exhibited no gross effects on inducer response. The results strongly suggest that the lysines at positions 72, 80 and 213 and aspartic acid at position 210 are involved in the induction of lac operon expression by tagatose-6-phosphate.

  15. Estudio del antagonismo de algunas especies de Trichoderma sobre Fusarium Oxysporum y Rhizoctonia Solani Antagonism studies of Trichoderma sp.p.. with Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Ricardo

    1989-12-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se estudió el antagonismo de algunos aislamientos del hongo Trichoderma obtenidos de suelos colornbianos en el control de Fusarium oxysporum y Rhizoctonia solani. En los ensayos "in vitre" se observó un marcado antagonismo entre las colonias de los aislamientos de Trichoderma sobre R. sotsni, con una reducción apreciable
    del tamaño de la colonia y un antaqonismo menor sobre F. oxysporum. En los ensayos de parasitismo a nivel microscópico, se observó una gran interacción entre alqunos
    de los aislamientos de T. harzianum y T. hamatum y el patógéno R. solani rnanifestado por el enrollamiento, penetración, fragmentación y lisis de las hifas del patoqeno.
    Los aislamientos de Trichoderma causaron un retraso en la aparición de los síntomas, una reducción en la severidad de la
    enfermedad. y un menor número de plantas enfermas ocasionadas por F. oxysporum f. sp, cucumerinum en pepino cohombro, y su efecto fue superior en todos los casos a la
    aplicación del fungicida benomil. Los aislamientos del antagonista aumentaron la qerminación de las semillas, la emergencia y el tamaño de las plántulas y redujeron la severidad de la enfermedad ocasionada por R. solani en fríjol.Several experiments were conducted to study the antagonism of 17 isolates of Trichoderma from Colombian soils with Fusarium oxysporum and Rhizoctonia solani. In "in vitro" tests, a high antagonism between colonies was found being greater the antagonism of Trichoderma with R. solani. At the microscopic level it was observed a great interaction between T. harzianum and T. hamatum with R. solani in such a way that the hyphae of the pathogen showed coiling, penetration, fragmentation and lysis. The Trichoderma isolates caused reduction in the disease severity, in the incubation period and a lower number of diseased cucumber plants when they were inoeulated with F. oxysporum f. sp, cucumerinum and these effects were better than Benomyl

  16. GIP receptor antagonism reverses obesity, insulin resistance, and associated metabolic disturbances induced in mice by prolonged consumption of high-fat diet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McClean, Paula L; Irwin, Nigel; Cassidy, Roslyn S

    2007-01-01

    The gut hormone gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) plays a key role in glucose homeostasis and lipid metabolism. This study investigated the effects of administration of a stable and specific GIP receptor antagonist, (Pro(3))GIP, in mice previously fed a high-fat diet for 160 days to induce...... obesity and related diabetes. Daily intraperitoneal injection of (Pro(3))GIP over 50 days significantly decreased body weight compared with saline-treated controls, with a modest increase in locomotor activity but no change of high-fat diet intake. Plasma glucose, glycated hemoglobin, and pancreatic......))GIP concentrations peaked rapidly and remained elevated 24 h after injection. These data indicate that GIP receptor antagonism using (Pro(3))GIP provides an effective means of countering obesity and related diabetes induced by consumption of a high-fat, energy-rich diet....

  17. Erythromycin antagonizes the deceleration of gastric emptying by glucagon-like peptide 1 and unmasks its insulinotropic effect in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Juris J; Kemmeries, Guido; Holst, Jens Juul

    2005-01-01

    . On separate occasions, the prokinetic drugs metoclopramide (10 mg), domperidone (10 mg), cisapride (10 mg, all at -30 min per oral), or erythromycin (200 mg intravenously from -30 to -15 min) were administered in addition to GLP-1. A liquid test meal (50 g sucrose and 8% mixed amino acids in 400 ml......, we aimed to antagonize the deceleration of gastric emptying by GLP-1 to study its effects on insulin secretion after a meal. Nine healthy male volunteers (age 25 +/- 4 years, BMI 25.0 +/- 4.9 kg/m2) were studied with an infusion of GLP-1 (0.8 pmol.kg(-1).min(-1) from -30 to 240 min) or placebo...... technique. Statistical analyses were performed using repeated-measures ANOVA and Duncan's post hoc test. GLP-1 significantly decelerated the velocity of gastric emptying (P drugs used had no effect. Postprandial...

  18. Bacillus species (BT42) isolated from Coffea arabica L. rhizosphere antagonizes Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and Fusarium oxysporum and also exhibits multiple plant growth promoting activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kejela, Tekalign; Thakkar, Vasudev R; Thakor, Parth

    2016-11-18

    Colletotrichum and Fusarium species are among pathogenic fungi widely affecting Coffea arabica L., resulting in major yield loss. In the present study, we aimed to isolate bacteria from root rhizosphere of the same plant that is capable of antagonizing Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and Fusarium oxysporum as well as promotes plant growth. A total of 42 Bacillus species were isolated, one of the isolates named BT42 showed maximum radial mycelial growth inhibition against Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (78%) and Fusarium oxysporum (86%). BT42 increased germination of Coffee arabica L. seeds by 38.89%, decreased disease incidence due to infection of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides to 2.77% and due to infection of Fusarium oxysporum to 0 (p Fusarium oxysporum. The mechanism of action of inhibition of the pathogenic fungi found to be synergistic effects of secondary metabolites, lytic enzymes, and siderophores. The major inhibitory secondary metabolite identified as harmine (β-carboline alkaloids).

  19. Pathophysiological Consequences of a Break in S1P1-Dependent Homeostasis of Vascular Permeability Revealed by S1P1 Competitive Antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigaud, Marc; Dincer, Zuhal; Bollbuck, Birgit; Dawson, Janet; Beckmann, Nicolau; Beerli, Christian; Fishli-Cavelti, Gina; Nahler, Michaela; Angst, Daniela; Janser, Philipp; Otto, Heike; Rosner, Elisabeth; Hersperger, Rene; Bruns, Christian; Quancard, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Homeostasis of vascular barriers depends upon sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling via the S1P1 receptor. Accordingly, S1P1 competitive antagonism is known to reduce vascular barrier integrity with still unclear pathophysiological consequences. This was explored in the present study using NIBR-0213, a potent and selective S1P1 competitive antagonist. NIBR-0213 was tolerated at the efficacious oral dose of 30 mg/kg BID in the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AiA) model, with no sign of labored breathing. However, it induced dose-dependent acute vascular pulmonary leakage and pleural effusion that fully resolved within 3-4 days, as evidenced by MRI monitoring. At the supra-maximal oral dose of 300 mg/kg QD, NIBR-0213 impaired lung function (with increased breathing rate and reduced tidal volume) within the first 24 hrs. Two weeks of NIBR-0213 oral dosing at 30, 100 and 300 mg/kg QD induced moderate pulmonary changes, characterized by alveolar wall thickening, macrophage accumulation, fibrosis, micro-hemorrhage, edema and necrosis. In addition to this picture of chronic inflammation, perivascular edema and myofiber degeneration observed in the heart were also indicative of vascular leakage and its consequences. Overall, these observations suggest that, in the rat, the lung is the main target organ for the S1P1 competitive antagonism-induced acute vascular leakage, which appears first as transient and asymptomatic but could lead, upon chronic dosing, to lung remodeling with functional impairments. Hence, this not only raises the question of organ specificity in the homeostasis of vascular barriers, but also provides insight into the pre-clinical evaluation of a potential safety window for S1P1 competitive antagonists as drug candidates.

  20. Inhibition of Dengue Virus Replication by a Class of Small-Molecule Compounds That Antagonize Dopamine Receptor D4 and Downstream Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jessica L.; Stein, David A.; Shum, David; Fischer, Matthew A.; Radu, Constantin; Bhinder, Bhavneet; Djaballah, Hakim; Nelson, Jay A.; Früh, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Dengue viruses (DENV) are endemic pathogens of tropical and subtropical regions that cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. To date, no vaccines or antiviral therapeutics have been approved for combating DENV-associated disease. In this paper, we describe a class of tricyclic small-molecule compounds—dihydrodibenzothiepines (DHBTs), identified through high-throughput screening—with potent inhibitory activity against DENV serotype 2. SKI-417616, a highly active representative of this class, displayed activity against all four serotypes of DENV, as well as against a related flavivirus, West Nile virus (WNV), and an alphavirus, Sindbis virus (SINV). This compound was characterized to determine its mechanism of antiviral activity. Investigation of the stage of the viral life cycle affected revealed that an early event in the life cycle is inhibited. Due to the structural similarity of the DHBTs to known antagonists of the dopamine and serotonin receptors, we explored the roles of two of these receptors, serotonin receptor 2A (5HTR2A) and the D4 dopamine receptor (DRD4), in DENV infection. Antagonism of DRD4 and subsequent downstream phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-related kinase (ERK) were found to impact DENV infection negatively, and blockade of signaling through this network was confirmed as the mechanism of anti-DENV activity for this class of compounds. IMPORTANCE The dengue viruses are mosquito-borne, reemerging human pathogens that are the etiological agents of a spectrum of febrile diseases. Currently, there are no approved therapeutic treatments for dengue-associated disease, nor is there a vaccine. This study identifies a small molecule, SKI-417616, with potent anti-dengue virus activity. Further analysis revealed that SKI-417616 acts through antagonism of the host cell dopamine D4 receptor and subsequent repression of the ERK phosphorylation pathway. These results suggest that SKI-417616, or other

  1. Metabotropic glutamate receptor I (mGluR1) antagonism impairs cocaine-induced conditioned place preference via inhibition of protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fei; Zhong, Peng; Liu, Xiaojie; Sun, Dalong; Gao, Hai-Qing; Liu, Qing-Song

    2013-06-01

    Antagonism of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1 and mGluR5) reduces behavioral effects of drugs of abuse, including cocaine. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Activation of mGluR5 increases protein synthesis at synapses. Although mGluR5-induced excessive protein synthesis has been implicated in the pathology of fragile X syndrome, it remains unknown whether group I mGluR-mediated protein synthesis is involved in any behavioral effects of drugs of abuse. We report that group I mGluR agonist DHPG induced more pronounced initial depression of inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) followed by modest long-term depression (I-LTD) in dopamine neurons of rat ventral tegmental area (VTA) through the activation of mGluR1. The early component of DHPG-induced depression of IPSCs was mediated by the cannabinoid CB1 receptors, while DHPG-induced I-LTD was dependent on protein synthesis. Western blotting analysis indicates that mGluR1 was coupled to extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways to increase translation. We also show that cocaine conditioning activated translation machinery in the VTA via an mGluR1-dependent mechanism. Furthermore, intra-VTA microinjections of mGluR1 antagonist JNJ16259685 and protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide significantly attenuated or blocked the acquisition of cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) and activation of translation elongation factors. Taken together, these results suggest that mGluR1 antagonism inhibits de novo protein synthesis; this effect may block the formation of cocaine-cue associations and thus provide a mechanism for the reduction in CPP to cocaine.

  2. Lack of association between dopaminergic antagonism and negative symptoms in schizophrenia: a positron emission tomography dopamine D2/3 receptor occupancy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fervaha, Gagan; Caravaggio, Fernando; Mamo, David C.; Mulsant, Benoit H.; Pollock, Bruce G.; Nakajima, Shinichiro; Gerretsen, Philip; Rajji, Tarek K.; Mar, Wanna; Iwata, Yusuke; Plitman, Eric; Chung, Jun Ku; Remington, Gary; Graff-Guerrero, Ariel

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Several pre-clinical studies suggest that antipsychotic medications cause secondary negative symptoms. However, direct evidence for a relationship among antipsychotic medications, their direct effects on neurotransmitter systems, and negative symptoms in schizophrenia remains controversial. Objective The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between antipsychotic-related dopamine D2/3 receptor occupancy and negative symptoms in patients with schizophrenia. Methods Forty-one clinically stable outpatients with schizophrenia participated in this prospective dose reduction positron emission tomography (PET) study. Clinical assessments and [11C]-raclopride PET scans were performed before and after participants underwent gradual dose reduction of their antipsychotic medication by up to 40% from the baseline dose. Results No significant relationship was found between antipsychotic-related dopamine D2/3 receptor occupancy and negative symptom severity at baseline or follow-up. Similar null findings were found for subdomains of negative symptoms (amotivation and diminished expression). Occupancy was significantly lower following dose reduction; however, negative symptom severity did not change significantly, though a trend toward reduction was noted. Examination of change scores between these two variables revealed no systematic relationship. Conclusions Our cross-sectional and longitudinal results failed to find a significant dose-dependent relationship between severity of negative symptoms and antipsychotic-related dopaminergic antagonism in schizophrenia. These findings argue against the notion that antipsychotics necessarily cause secondary negative symptoms. Our results are also in contrast with the behavioural effects of dopaminergic antagonism routinely reported in pre-clinical investigations, suggesting that the role of this variable in the context of chronic treatment and schizophrenia needs to be re-examined. PMID:27557949

  3. The relative potency of inverse opioid agonists and a neutral opioid antagonist in precipitated withdrawal and antagonism of analgesia and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirohi, Sunil; Dighe, Shveta V; Madia, Priyanka A; Yoburn, Byron C

    2009-08-01

    Opioid antagonists can be classified as inverse agonists and neutral antagonists. In the opioid-dependent state, neutral antagonists are significantly less potent in precipitating withdrawal than inverse agonists. Consequently, neutral opioid antagonists may offer advantages over inverse agonists in the management of opioid overdose. In this study, the relative potency of three opioid antagonists to block opioid analgesia and toxicity and precipitate withdrawal was examined. First, the potency of two opioid inverse agonists (naltrexone and naloxone) and a neutral antagonist (6beta-naltrexol) to antagonize fentanyl-induced analgesia and lethality was determined. The order of potency to block analgesia was naltrexone > naloxone > 6beta-naltrexol (17, 4, 1), which was similar to that to block lethality (13, 2, 1). Next, the antagonists were compared using withdrawal jumping in fentanyl-dependent mice. The order of potency to precipitate withdrawal jumping was naltrexone > naloxone 6beta-naltrexol (1107, 415, 1). The relative potencies to precipitate withdrawal for the inverse agonists compared with the neutral antagonist were dramatically different from that for antagonism of analgesia and lethality. Finally, the effect of 6beta-naltrexol pretreatment on naloxone-precipitated jumping was determined in morphine and fentanyl-dependent mice. 6beta-Naltrexol pretreatment decreased naloxone precipitated withdrawal, indicating that 6beta-naltrexol is a neutral antagonist. These data demonstrate that inverse agonists and neutral antagonists have generally comparable potencies to block opioid analgesia and lethality, whereas the neutral opioid antagonist is substantially less potent in precipitating opioid withdrawal. These results support suggestions that neutral antagonists may have advantages over inverse agonists in the management of opioid overdose.

  4. Sorghum phytochrome B inhibits flowering in long days by activating expression of SbPRR37 and SbGHD7, repressors of SbEHD1, SbCN8 and SbCN12.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanshan Yang

    Full Text Available Light signaling by phytochrome B in long days inhibits flowering in sorghum by increasing expression of the long day floral repressors PSEUDORESPONSE REGULATOR PROTEIN (SbPRR37, Ma1 and GRAIN NUMBER, PLANT HEIGHT AND HEADING DATE 7 (SbGHD7, Ma6. SbPRR37 and SbGHD7 RNA abundance peaks in the morning and in the evening of long days through coordinate regulation by light and output from the circadian clock. 58 M, a phytochrome B deficient (phyB-1, ma3R genotype, flowered ∼60 days earlier than 100 M (PHYB, Ma3 in long days and ∼11 days earlier in short days. Populations derived from 58 M (Ma1, ma3R, Ma5, ma6 and R.07007 (Ma1, Ma3, ma5, Ma6 varied in flowering time due to QTL aligned to PHYB/phyB-1 (Ma3, Ma5, and GHD7/ghd7-1 (Ma6. PHYC was proposed as a candidate gene for Ma5 based on alignment and allelic variation. PHYB and Ma5 (PHYC were epistatic to Ma1 and Ma6 and progeny recessive for either gene flowered early in long days. Light signaling mediated by PhyB was required for high expression of the floral repressors SbPRR37 and SbGHD7 during the evening of long days. In 100 M (PHYB the floral activators SbEHD1, SbCN8 and SbCN12 were repressed in long days and de-repressed in short days. In 58 M (phyB-1 these genes were highly expressed in long and short days. Furthermore, SbCN15, the ortholog of rice Hd3a (FT, is expressed at low levels in 100 M but at high levels in 58 M (phyB-1 regardless of day length, indicating that PhyB regulation of SbCN15 expression may modify flowering time in a photoperiod-insensitive manner.

  5. Decreased expression of Freud-1/CC2D1A, a transcriptional repressor of the 5-HT1A receptor, in the prefrontal cortex of subjects with major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Albert, Paul R; Rogaeva, Anastasia; Fitzgibbon, Heidi; May, Warren L; Rajkowska, Grazyna; Miguel-Hidalgo, Jose J; Stockmeier, Craig A; Woolverton, William L; Kyle, Patrick B; Wang, Zhixia; Austin, Mark C

    2010-09-01

    Serotonin1A (5-HT(1A)) receptors are reported altered in the brain of subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD). Recent studies have identified transcriptional regulators of the 5-HT(1A) receptor and have documented gender-specific alterations in 5-HT(1A) transcription factor and 5-HT(1A) receptors in female MDD subjects. The 5' repressor element under dual repression binding protein-1 (Freud-1) is a calcium-regulated repressor that negatively regulates the 5-HT(1A) receptor gene. This study documented the cellular expression of Freud-1 in the human prefrontal cortex (PFC) and quantified Freud-1 protein in the PFC of MDD and control subjects as well as in the PFC of rhesus monkeys chronically treated with fluoxetine. Freud-1 immunoreactivity was present in neurons and glia and was co-localized with 5-HT(1A) receptors. Freud-1 protein level was significantly decreased in the PFC of male MDD subjects (37%, p=0.02) relative to gender-matched control subjects. Freud-1 protein was also reduced in the PFC of female MDD subjects (36%, p=0.18) but was not statistically significant. When the data was combined across genders and analysed by age, the decrease in Freud-1 protein level was greater in the younger MDD subjects (48%, p=0.01) relative to age-matched controls as opposed to older depressed subjects. Similarly, 5-HT(1A) receptor protein was significantly reduced in the PFC of the younger MDD subjects (48%, p=0.01) relative to age-matched controls. Adult male rhesus monkeys administered fluoxetine daily for 39 wk revealed no significant change in cortical Freud-1 or 5-HT(1A) receptor proteins compared to vehicle-treated control monkeys. Reduced protein expression of Freud-1 in MDD subjects may reflect dysregulation of this transcription factor, which may contribute to the altered regulation of 5-HT(1A) receptors observed in subjects with MDD. These data may also suggest that reductions in Freud-1 protein expression in the PFC may be associated with early onset of

  6. TG-interacting factor transcriptionally induced by AKT/FOXO3A is a negative regulator that antagonizes arsenic trioxide-induced cancer cell apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zi-Miao; Tseng, Hong-Yu; Cheng, Ya-Ling [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Bi-Wen [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Wu, Wen-Jeng [Department of Urology, Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Kaohsiung Medical University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Huang, Huei-Sheng, E-mail: huanghs@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Medical Laboratory Science and Biotechnology, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China)

    2015-05-15

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is a multi-target drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration as the first-line chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. In addition, several clinical trials are being conducted with arsenic-based drugs for the treatment of other hematological malignancies and solid tumors. However, ATO's modest clinical efficacy on some cancers, and potential toxic effects on humans have been reported. Determining how best to reduce these adverse effects while increasing its therapeutic efficacy is obviously a critical issue. Previously, we demonstrated that the JNK-induced complex formation of phosphorylated c-Jun and TG-interacting factor (TGIF) antagonizes ERK-induced cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor CDKN1A (p21{sup WAF1/CIP1}) expression and resultant apoptosis in response to ATO in A431 cells. Surprisingly, at low-concentrations (0.1–0.2 μM), ATO increased cellular proliferation, migration and invasion, involving TGIF expression, however, at high-concentrations (5–20 μM), ATO induced cell apoptosis. Using a promoter analysis, TGIF was transcriptionally regulated by ATO at the FOXO3A binding site (− 1486 to − 1479 bp) via the c-Src/EGFR/AKT pathway. Stable overexpression of TGIF promoted advancing the cell cycle into the S phase, and attenuated 20 μM ATO-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, blockage of the AKT pathway enhanced ATO-induced CDKN1A expression and resultant apoptosis in cancer cells, but overexpression of AKT1 inhibited CDKN1A expression. Therefore, we suggest that TGIF is transcriptionally regulated by the c-Src/EGFR/AKT pathway, which plays a role as a negative regulator in antagonizing ATO-induced CDKN1A expression and resultant apoptosis. Suppression of these antagonistic effects might be a promising therapeutic strategy toward improving clinical efficacy of ATO. - Highlights: • ATO-induced biphasic survival responses of cancer cells depend on low- or high-concentrations. • TGIF

  7. TG-interacting factor transcriptionally induced by AKT/FOXO3A is a negative regulator that antagonizes arsenic trioxide-induced cancer cell apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zi-Miao; Tseng, Hong-Yu; Cheng, Ya-Ling; Yeh, Bi-Wen; Wu, Wen-Jeng; Huang, Huei-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is a multi-target drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration as the first-line chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia. In addition, several clinical trials are being conducted with arsenic-based drugs for the treatment of other hematological malignancies and solid tumors. However, ATO's modest clinical efficacy on some cancers, and potential toxic effects on humans have been reported. Determining how best to reduce these adverse effects while increasing its therapeutic efficacy is obviously a critical issue. Previously, we demonstrated that the JNK-induced complex formation of phosphorylated c-Jun and TG-interacting factor (TGIF) antagonizes ERK-induced cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor CDKN1A (p21 WAF1/CIP1 ) expression and resultant apoptosis in response to ATO in A431 cells. Surprisingly, at low-concentrations (0.1–0.2 μM), ATO increased cellular proliferation, migration and invasion, involving TGIF expression, however, at high-concentrations (5–20 μM), ATO induced cell apoptosis. Using a promoter analysis, TGIF was transcriptionally regulated by ATO at the FOXO3A binding site (− 1486 to − 1479 bp) via the c-Src/EGFR/AKT pathway. Stable overexpression of TGIF promoted advancing the cell cycle into the S phase, and attenuated 20 μM ATO-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, blockage of the AKT pathway enhanced ATO-induced CDKN1A expression and resultant apoptosis in cancer cells, but overexpression of AKT1 inhibited CDKN1A expression. Therefore, we suggest that TGIF is transcriptionally regulated by the c-Src/EGFR/AKT pathway, which plays a role as a negative regulator in antagonizing ATO-induced CDKN1A expression and resultant apoptosis. Suppression of these antagonistic effects might be a promising therapeutic strategy toward improving clinical efficacy of ATO. - Highlights: • ATO-induced biphasic survival responses of cancer cells depend on low- or high-concentrations. • TGIF mediates

  8. Proto-oncogene FBI-1 (Pokemon/ZBTB7A) Represses Transcription of the Tumor Suppressor Rb Gene via Binding Competition with Sp1 and Recruitment of Co-repressors*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Bu-Nam; Yoo, Jung-Yoon; Choi, Won-Il; Lee, Choong-Eun; Yoon, Ho-Geun; Hur, Man-Wook

    2008-01-01

    FBI-1 (also called Pokemon/ZBTB7A) is a BTB/POZ-domain Krüppel-like zinc-finger transcription factor. Recently, FBI-1 was characterized as a proto-oncogenic protein, which represses tumor suppressor ARF gene transcription. The expression of FBI-1 is increased in many cancer tissues. We found that FBI-1 potently represses transcription of the Rb gene, a tumor suppressor gene important in cell cycle arrest. FBI-1 binds to four GC-rich promoter elements (FREs) located at bp –308 to –188 of the Rb promoter region. The Rb promoter also contains two Sp1 binding sites: GC-box 1 (bp –65 to –56) and GC-box 2 (bp –18 to –9), the latter of which is also bound by FBI-1. We found that FRE3 (bp –244 to –236) is also a Sp1 binding element. FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene not only by binding to the FREs, but also by competing with Sp1 at the GC-box 2 and the FRE3. By binding to the FREs and/or the GC-box, FBI-1 represses transcription of the Rb gene through its POZ-domain, which recruits a co-repressor-histone deacetylase complex and deacetylates histones H3 and H4 at the Rb gene promoter. FBI-1 inhibits C2C12 myoblast cell differentiation by repressing Rb gene expression. PMID:18801742

  9. The translational repressor T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) is a key modulator of Th2 and Th17 responses driving pulmonary inflammation induced by exposure to house dust mite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simarro, Maria; Giannattasio, Giorgio; Xing, Wei; Lundequist, Emma-Maria; Stewart, Samantha; Stevens, Richard L; Orduña, Antonio; Boyce, Joshua A; Anderson, Paul J

    2012-08-30

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) is a translational repressor that dampens the production of proinflammatory cytokines and enzymes. In this study we investigated the role of TIA-1 in a mouse model of pulmonary inflammation induced by exposure to the allergenic extract (Df) of the house dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae. When intranasally challenged with a low dose of Df, mice lacking TIA-1 protein (Tia-1(-/-)) showed more severe airway and tissue eosinophilia, infiltration of lung bronchovascular bundles, and goblet cell metaplasia than wild-type littermates. Tia-1(-/-) mice also had higher levels of Df-specific IgE and IgG(1) in serum and ex vivo restimulated Tia-1(-/-) lymph node cells and splenocytes transcribed and released more Th2/Th17 cytokines. To evaluate the site of action of TIA-1, we studied the response to Df in bone marrow chimeras. These experiments revealed that TIA-1 acts on both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells to dampen pulmonary inflammation. Our results identify TIA-1 as a negative regulator of allergen-mediated pulmonary inflammation in vivo. Thus, TIA-1 might be an important player in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. CalA, a Cyanobacterial AbrB Protein, Interacts with the Upstream Region of hypC and Acts as a Repressor of Its Transcription in the Cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. Strain PCC 7120▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agervald, Åsa; Zhang, Xiaohui; Stensjö, Karin; Devine, Ellenor; Lindblad, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The filamentous, heterocystous, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. strain PCC 7120 may contain, depending on growth conditions, up to two hydrogenases directly involved in hydrogen metabolism. HypC is one out of at least seven auxiliary gene products required for synthesis of a functional hydrogenase, specifically involved in the maturation of the large subunit. In this study we present a protein, CalA (Alr0946 in the genome), belonging to the transcription regulator family AbrB, which in protein-DNA assays was found to interact with the upstream region of hypC. Transcriptional investigations showed that calA is cotranscribed with the downstream gene alr0947, which encodes a putative protease from the abortive infection superfamily, Abi. CalA was shown to interact specifically not only with the upstream region of hypC but also with its own upstream region, acting as a repressor on hypC. The bidirectional hydrogenase activity was significantly downregulated when CalA was overexpressed, demonstrating a correlation with the transcription factor, either direct or indirect. In silico studies showed that homologues to both CalA and Alr0947 are highly conserved proteins within cyanobacteria with very similar physical organizations of the corresponding structural genes. Possible functions of the cotranscribed downstream protein Alr0947 are presented. In addition, we present a three-dimensional (3D) model of the DNA binding domain of CalA and putative DNA binding mechanisms are discussed. PMID:20023111

  11. mTORC1 Targets the Translational Repressor 4E-BP2, but Not S6 Kinase 1/2, to Regulate Neural Stem Cell Self-Renewal In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel W. Hartman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 integrates signals important for cell growth, and its dysregulation in neural stem cells (NSCs is implicated in several neurological disorders associated with abnormal neurogenesis and brain size. However, the function of mTORC1 on NSC self-renewal and the downstream regulatory mechanisms are ill defined. Here, we found that genetically decreasing mTORC1 activity in neonatal NSCs prevented their differentiation, resulting in reduced lineage expansion and aborted neuron production. Constitutive activation of the translational repressor 4E-BP1, which blocked cap-dependent translation, had similar effects and prevented hyperactive mTORC1 induction of NSC differentiation and promoted self-renewal. Although 4E-BP2 knockdown promoted NSC differentiation, p70 S6 kinase 1 and 2 (S6K1/S6K2 knockdown did not affect NSC differentiation but reduced NSC soma size and prevented hyperactive mTORC1-induced increase in soma size. These data demonstrate a crucial role of mTORC1 and 4E-BP for switching on and off cap-dependent translation in NSC differentiation.

  12. The Transcriptional Repressor, MtrR, of the mtrCDE Efflux Pump Operon of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Can Also Serve as an Activator of “off Target” Gene (glnE Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. T. Johnson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available MtrR is a well-characterized repressor of the Neisseria gonorrhoeae mtrCDE efflux pump operon. However, results from a previous transcriptional profiling study suggested that MtrR also represses or activates expression of at least sixty genes outside of the mtr locus. Evidence that MtrR can directly repress so-called “off target” genes has previously been reported; in particular, MtrR was shown to directly repress glnA, which encodes glutamine synthetase. In contrast, evidence for the ability of MtrR to directly activate expression of gonococcal genes has been lacking; herein, we provide such evidence. We now report that MtrR has the ability to directly activate expression of glnE, which encodes the dual functional adenyltransferase/deadenylase enzyme GlnE that modifies GlnA resulting in regulation of its role in glutamine biosynthesis. With its capacity to repress expression of glnA, the results presented herein emphasize the diverse and often opposing regulatory properties of MtrR that likely contributes to the overall physiology and metabolism of N. gonorrhoeae.

  13. PigZ, a TetR/AcrR family repressor, modulates secondary metabolism via the expression of a putative four-component resistance-nodulation-cell-division efflux pump, ZrpADBC, in Serratia sp. ATCC 39006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gristwood, Tamzin; Fineran, Peter C; Everson, Lee; Salmond, George P C

    2008-07-01

    The Gram-negative enterobacterium, Serratia sp. ATCC 39006 synthesizes several secondary metabolites, including prodigiosin (Pig) and a carbapenem antibiotic (Car). A complex hierarchical network of regulatory proteins control Pig and Car production. In this study we characterize a TetR family regulator, PigZ, which represses transcription of a divergently transcribed putative resistance-nodulation-cell-division (RND) efflux pump, encoded by zrp (PigZ repressed pump) ADBC, via direct binding to the zrpA-pigZ intergenic region. Unusually, this putative RND pump contains two predicted membrane fusion proteins (MFPs), ZrpA and ZrpD. A mutation in pigZ resulted in multiple phenotypic changes, including exoenzyme production, motility and differential regulation of Pig and Car production. A polar suppressor mutation, within zrpA, restored all tested phenotypes to parental strain levels, indicating that the changes observed are due to the increase in expression of ZrpADBC in the absence of the repressor, PigZ. Genomic deletions of zrpA and zrpD indicate that the MFP ZrpD, but not ZrpA, is essential for activity of the putative pump. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that putative RND efflux pumps encoding two MFP components are not uncommon, particularly among plant-associated, Gram-negative bacteria. In addition, based on phylogenetic analysis, we propose that these pairs of MFPs consist of two distinct subtypes.

  14. Antagonism of microRNA-122 in mice by systemically administered LNA-antimiR leads to up-regulation of a large set of predicted target mRNAs in the liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmen, Joachim; Lindow, Morten; Silahtaroglu, Asli

    2008-01-01

    ’end of miR-122 leads to specific, dose-dependent silencing of miR-122 and shows no hepatotoxicity in mice. Antagonism of miR-122 is due to formation of stable heteroduplexes between the LNA-antimiR and miR-122 as detected by northern analysis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrated uptake...... of the LNA-antimiR in mouse liver cells, which was accompanied by markedly reduced hybridization signals for mature miR-122 in treated mice. Functional antagonism of miR-122 was inferred from a low cholesterol phenotype and derepression within 24 h of 199 liver mRNAs showing significant enrichment for mi...

  15. Crystal structure of Lymnaea stagnalis AChBP complexed with the potent nAChR antagonist DHβE suggests a unique mode of antagonism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Shahsavar

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs are pentameric ligand-gated ion channels that belong to the Cys-loop receptor superfamily. These receptors are allosteric proteins that exist in different conformational states, including resting (closed, activated (open, and desensitized (closed states. The acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP is a structural homologue of the extracellular ligand-binding domain of nAChRs. In previous studies, the degree of the C-loop radial extension of AChBP has been assigned to different conformational states of nAChRs. It has been suggested that a closed C-loop is preferred for the active conformation of nAChRs in complex with agonists whereas an open C-loop reflects an antagonist-bound (closed state. In this work, we have determined the crystal structure of AChBP from the water snail Lymnaea stagnalis (Ls in complex with dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE, which is a potent competitive antagonist of nAChRs. The structure reveals that binding of DHβE to AChBP imposes closure of the C-loop as agonists, but also a shift perpendicular to previously observed C-loop movements. These observations suggest that DHβE may antagonize the receptor via a different mechanism compared to prototypical antagonists and toxins.

  16. NatB domain-containing CRA-1 antagonizes hydrolase ACER-1 linking acetyl-CoA metabolism to the initiation of recombination during C. elegans meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinmin Gao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs must take place during meiosis to ensure the formation of crossovers, which are required for accurate chromosome segregation, therefore avoiding aneuploidy. However, DSB formation must be tightly regulated to maintain genomic integrity. How this regulation operates in the context of different chromatin architectures and accessibility, and how it is linked to metabolic pathways, is not understood. We show here that global histone acetylation levels undergo changes throughout meiotic progression. Moreover, perturbations to global histone acetylation levels are accompanied by changes in the frequency of DSB formation in C. elegans. We provide evidence that the regulation of histone acetylation requires CRA-1, a NatB domain-containing protein homologous to human NAA25, which controls the levels of acetyl-Coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA by antagonizing ACER-1, a previously unknown and conserved acetyl-CoA hydrolase. CRA-1 is in turn negatively regulated by XND-1, an AT-hook containing protein. We propose that this newly defined protein network links acetyl-CoA metabolism to meiotic DSB formation via modulation of global histone acetylation.

  17. An in vitro study of peptide-loaded alginate nanospheres for antagonizing the inhibitory effect of Nogo-A protein on axonal growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhai, Peng; Chen, X B; Schreyer, David J

    2015-01-01

    The adult mammalian central nervous system has limited ability to regenerate after injury. This is due, in part, to the presence of myelin-associated axon growth inhibitory proteins such as Nogo-A that bind and activate the Nogo receptor, leading to profound inhibition of actin-based motility within the growing axon tip. This paper presents an in vitro study of the use of a Nogo receptor-blocking peptide to antagonize the inhibitory effect of Nogo-A on axon growth. Alginate nanospheres were fabricated using an emulsion technique and loaded with Nogo receptor-blocking peptide, or with other model proteins. Protein release profiles were studied, and retention of the bioactivity of released proteins was verified. Primary dorsal root ganglion neurons were cultured and their ability to grow neurites was challenged with Nogo-A chimeric protein in the absence or presence of Nogo receptor antagonist peptide-loaded alginate nanospheres. Our results demonstrate that peptide released from alginate nanospheres could overcome the growth inhibitory effect of Nogo-A, suggesting that a similar peptide delivery strategy using alginate nanospheres might be used to improve axon regeneration within the injured central nervous system. (paper)

  18. Zinc finger protein 521 antagonizes early B-cell factor 1 and modulates the B-lymphoid differentiation of primary hematopoietic progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mega, Tiziana; Lupia, Michela; Amodio, Nicola; Horton, Sarah J; Mesuraca, Maria; Pelaggi, Daniela; Agosti, Valter; Grieco, Michele; Chiarella, Emanuela; Spina, Raffaella; Moore, Malcolm A S; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Bond, Heather M; Morrone, Giovanni

    2011-07-01

    Zinc finger protein 521 (EHZF/ZNF521) is a multi-functional transcription co-factor containing 30 zinc fingers and an amino-terminal motif that binds to the nucleosome remodelling and histone deacetylase (NuRD) complex. ZNF521 is believed to be a relevant player in the regulation of the homeostasis of the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell compartment, however the underlying molecular mechanisms are still largely unknown. Here, we show that this protein plays an important role in the control of B-cell development by inhibiting the activity of early B-cell factor-1 (EBF1), a master factor in B-lineage specification. In particular, our data demonstrate that: (1) ZNF521 binds to EBF1 via its carboxyl-terminal portion and this interaction is required for EBF1 inhibition; (2) NuRD complex recruitment by ZNF521 is not essential for the inhibition of transactivation of EBF1-dependent promoters; (3) ZNF521 represses EBF1 target genes in a human B-lymphoid molecular context; and (4) RNAi-mediated silencing of ZNF521/Zfp521 in primary human and murine hematopoietic progenitors strongly enhances the generation of B-lymphocytes in vitro. Taken together, our data indicate that ZNF521 can antagonize B-cell development and lend support to the notion that it may contribute to conserve the multipotency of primitive lympho-myeloid progenitors by preventing or delaying their EBF1-driven commitment toward the B-cell lineage.

  19. Menstrual phase-related differences in the pulsatility index on the central retinal artery suggest an oestrogen vasodilatation effect that antagonizes with progesterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Luiz Carlos; Faria, Marcos; Pettersen, Heverton; Sampaio, Marcos; Geber, Selmo

    2011-03-01

    The actual effect of steroid hormones on cerebral microcirculation is still controversial. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate vascular flow variations in the central retinal artery that may exist during the ovulatory menstrual cycle. A total of 34 healthy women were included in this observational, longitudinal, and prospective study. All participants were submitted to dopplerfluxometric evaluation of the eyes in order to study the pulsatility index (PI) of the central retinal arteries, during four phases of the menstrual cycle: early follicular, mid follicular, periovulatory, and mid luteal phases. Subjects' ages ranged from 14 to 47 years old (mean: 29.7 ± 10.1) and PI did not differ among age groups. The PI of the central retinal artery was different among the four phases of the menstrual cycle. PI showed a significant decrease from early follicular phase (1.72) to mid follicular phase (1.57) (p = 0.037), and was similar during periovulatory phase (1.56) and significantly increased in mid luteal phase (1.70). After that it returned to the values observed in the early follicular phase. Our results suggest the existence of an oestrogen vasodilatation effect on the central retinal artery that is menstrual phase-related and antagonized by progesterone.

  20. Optimization of Liposomal Lipid Composition for a New, Reactive Sulfur Donor, and In Vivo Efficacy Studies on Mice to Antagonize Cyanide Intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilona Petrikovics

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Present studies have focused on a novel cyanide antidotal system, on the coencapsulation of a new sulfur donor DTO with rhodanese within sterically stabilized liposomes. The optimal lipid composition for coencapsulation of DTO with rhodanese is the combination of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, cholesterol, cationic lipid (DOTAP, and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol-2000] ammonium salt (with molar ratios of 82.7 : 9.2 : 3.0 : 5.1. With the optimized compositions, prophylactic and therapeutic in vivo efficacy studies were carried out in a mice model. When DTO was coencapsulated with rhodanese and thiosulfate the prophylactic antidotal protection was 4.9×LD50. Maximum antidotal protection against cyanide intoxication (15×LD50 was achieved with coencapsulated rhodanese and DTO/thiosulfate in combination with sodium nitrite. When applied therapeutically, 100% survival rate (6/6 was achieved at 20 mg/kg cyanide doses with the encapsulated DTO-rhodanese-thiosulfate antidotal systems with and without sodium nitrite. These data are indicating that the appropriately formulated DTO is a promising sulfur donor for cyanide antagonism.

  1. Antagonism at combined effects of chemical fertilizers and carbamate insecticides on the rice-field N2-fixing cyanobacterium Cylindrospermum sp. in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padhy Rabindra N.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Effects of chemical fertilizers (urea, super phosphate and potash on toxicities of two carbamate insecticides, carbaryl and carbofuran, individually to the N2-fixing cyanobacterium, Cylindrospermum sp. were studied in vitro at partially lethal levels (below highest permissive concentrations of each insecticide. The average number of vegetative cells between two polar heterocysts was 16.3 in control cultures, while the mean value of filament length increased in the presence of chemical fertilizers, individually. Urea at the 10 ppm level was growth stimulatory and at the 50 ppm level it was growth inhibitory in control cultures, while at 100 ppm it was antagonistic, i.e. toxicity-enhancing along with carbaryl, individually to the cyanobacterium, antagonism was recorded. Urea at 50 ppm had toxicity reducing effect with carbaryl or carbofuran. At 100 and 250 ppm carbofuran levels, 50 ppm urea only had a progressive growth enhancing effect, which was marked well at 250 ppm carbofuran level, a situation of synergism. Super phosphate at the 10 ppm level only was growth promoting in control cultures, but it was antagonistic at its higher levels (50 and 100 ppm along with both insecticides, individually. Potash (100, 200, 300 and 400 ppm reduced toxicity due to carbaryl 20 and carbofuran 250 ppm levels, but potash was antagonistic at the other insecticide levels. The data clearly showed that the chemical fertilizers used were antagonistic with both the insecticides during toxicity to Cylindrospermum sp.

  2. Antagonism at combined effects of chemical fertilizers and carbamate insecticides on the rice-field N2-fixing cyanobacterium Cylindrospermum sp. in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Nabakishore; Rath, Shakti

    2014-01-01

    Effects of chemical fertilizers (urea, super phosphate and potash) on toxicities of two carbamate insecticides, carbaryl and carbofuran, individually to the N2-fixing cyanobacterium, Cylindrospermum sp. were studied in vitro at partially lethal levels (below highest permissive concentrations) of each insecticide. The average number of vegetative cells between two polar heterocysts was 16.3 in control cultures, while the mean value of filament length increased in the presence of chemical fertilizers, individually. Urea at the 10 ppm level was growth stimulatory and at the 50 ppm level it was growth inhibitory in control cultures, while at 100 ppm it was antagonistic, i.e. toxicity-enhancing along with carbaryl, individually to the cyanobacterium, antagonism was recorded. Urea at 50 ppm had toxicity reducing effect with carbaryl or carbofuran. At 100 and 250 ppm carbofuran levels, 50 ppm urea only had a progressive growth enhancing effect, which was marked well at 250 ppm carbofuran level, a situation of synergism. Super phosphate at the 10 ppm level only was growth promoting in control cultures, but it was antagonistic at its higher levels (50 and 100 ppm) along with both insecticides, individually. Potash (100, 200, 300 and 400 ppm) reduced toxicity due to carbaryl 20 and carbofuran 250 ppm levels, but potash was antagonistic at the other insecticide levels. The data clearly showed that the chemical fertilizers used were antagonistic with both the insecticides during toxicity to Cylindrospermum sp. PMID:26038669

  3. NatB domain-containing CRA-1 antagonizes hydrolase ACER-1 linking acetyl-CoA metabolism to the initiation of recombination during C. elegans meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinmin; Kim, Hyun-Min; Elia, Andrew E; Elledge, Stephen J; Colaiácovo, Monica P

    2015-03-01

    The formation of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) must take place during meiosis to ensure the formation of crossovers, which are required for accurate chromosome segregation, therefore avoiding aneuploidy. However, DSB formation must be tightly regulated to maintain genomic integrity. How this regulation operates in the context of different chromatin architectures and accessibility, and how it is linked to metabolic pathways, is not understood. We show here that global histone acetylation levels undergo changes throughout meiotic progression. Moreover, perturbations to global histone acetylation levels are accompanied by changes in the frequency of DSB formation in C. elegans. We provide evidence that the regulation of histone acetylation requires CRA-1, a NatB domain-containing protein homologous to human NAA25, which controls the levels of acetyl-Coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) by antagonizing ACER-1, a previously unknown and conserved acetyl-CoA hydrolase. CRA-1 is in turn negatively regulated by XND-1, an AT-hook containing protein. We propose that this newly defined protein network links acetyl-CoA metabolism to meiotic DSB formation via modulation of global histone acetylation.

  4. Paenibacillus polymyxa A26 sfp-type phosphopantetheinyl transferase inactivation limits bacterial antagonism against Fusarium graminearum but not of F. culmorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam A eAbd El Daim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium graminearum and F. culmorum are the causing agents of a destructive disease known as Fusarium head blight (FHB. FHB is a re-emerging disease in small grain cereals which impairs both the grain yield and the quality. Most serious consequence is the contamination of grain with Fusarium mycotoxins that are severe threat to humans and animals. Biological control has been suggested as one of the integrated management strategies to control FHB. Paenibacillus polymyxa is considered as a promising biocontrol agent due to its unique antibiotic spectrum. In order to optimize strain A26 production, formulation and application strategies traits important for its compatibility need to be revealed. Here we developed a toolbox comprising of dual culture plate assays and wheat kernel assays including simultaneous monitoring of FHB causing pathogens A26 and mycotoxins produced. Using this system we show that, besides generally known lipopeptide antibiotic production by P. polymyxa, biofilm formation ability may play a crucial role in the case of stain A26 F. culmorum antagonism.

  5. In Vivo Neurometabolic Profiling to Characterize the Effects of Social Isolation and Ketamine-Induced NMDA Antagonism: A Rodent Study at 7.0 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Continued efforts are undertaken to develop animal models of schizophrenia with translational value in the quest for much needed novel drugs. Existing models mimic specific neurobiological aspects of schizophrenia, but not its full complexity. Here, we used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) to assess the metabolic profile in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of two established models, rearing in social isolation and acute N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) antagonism and their combination. Rats reared in social isolation or group housed underwent ​1H-MRS at baseline and dynamically after ketamine challenge (25mg/kg, intraperitoneal) under isoflurane anesthe sia. A 7 T animal scanner was used to perform spectra acquisition from the anterior cingulate/medial PFC. LCModel was used for metabolite quantification and effects of rearing and ketamine injection were analyzed. Social isolation did not lead to significant differences in the metabolic profile of the PFC at baseline. Ketamine induced a significant increase in glutamine in both groups with significance specifically reached by the group-housed animals alone. Only rats reared in social isolation showed a significant 11% γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) decrease. This study provides preliminary evidence that social interactions in early life predict the glutamatergic and GABAergic response to acute NMDA-R blockade. The similarity between the prefrontal GABA reduction in patients with schizophrenia and in rats reared as social isolates after challenge with ketamine suggests good potential translational value of this combined animal model for drug development. PMID:23671195

  6. A cellular system for quantitation of vitamin K cycle activity: structure-activity effects on vitamin K antagonism by warfarin metabolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Jamil A.; McDonald, Matthew G.; Kulman, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Warfarin and other 4-hydroxycoumarins inhibit vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) by depleting reduced vitamin K that is required for posttranslational modification of vitamin K–dependent clotting factors. In vitro prediction of the in vivo potency of vitamin K antagonists is complicated by the complex multicomponent nature of the vitamin K cycle. Here we describe a sensitive assay that enables quantitative analysis of γ-glutamyl carboxylation and its antagonism in live cells. We engineered a human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293–derived cell line (HEK 293-C3) to express a chimeric protein (F9CH) comprising the Gla domain of factor IX fused to the transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions of proline-rich Gla protein 2. Maximal γ-glutamyl carboxylation of F9CH required vitamin K supplementation, and was dose-dependently inhibited by racemic warfarin at a physiologically relevant concentration. Cellular γ-glutamyl carboxylation also exhibited differential VKOR inhibition by warfarin enantiomers (S > R) consistent with their in vivo potencies. We further analyzed the structure-activity relationship for inhibition of γ-glutamyl carboxylation by warfarin metabolites, observing tolerance to phenolic substitution at the C-5 and especially C-6, but not C-7 or C-8, positions on the 4-hydroxycoumarin nucleus. After correction for in vivo concentration and protein binding, 10-hydroxywarfarin and warfarin alcohols were predicted to be the most potent inhibitory metabolites in vivo. PMID:24297869

  7. In vivo neurometabolic profiling to characterize the effects of social isolation and ketamine-induced NMDA antagonism: a rodent study at 7.0 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, Antonio; Shah, Khalid; Schubert, Mirjam I; Porkess, Veronica; Fone, Kevin C F; Auer, Dorothee P

    2014-05-01

    Continued efforts are undertaken to develop animal models of schizophrenia with translational value in the quest for much needed novel drugs. Existing models mimic specific neurobiological aspects of schizophrenia, but not its full complexity. Here, we used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) to assess the metabolic profile in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of two established models, rearing in social isolation and acute N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDA-R) antagonism and their combination. Rats reared in social isolation or group housed underwent (1)H-MRS at baseline and dynamically after ketamine challenge (25mg/kg, intraperitoneal) under isoflurane anesthesia. A 7 T animal scanner was used to perform spectra acquisition from the anterior cingulate/medial PFC. LCModel was used for metabolite quantification and effects of rearing and ketamine injection were analyzed. Social isolation did not lead to significant differences in the metabolic profile of the PFC at baseline. Ketamine induced a significant increase in glutamine in both groups with significance specifically reached by the group-housed animals alone. Only rats reared in social isolation showed a significant 11% γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) decrease. This study provides preliminary evidence that social interactions in early life predict the glutamatergic and GABAergic response to acute NMDA-R blockade. The similarity between the prefrontal GABA reduction in patients with schizophrenia and in rats reared as social isolates after challenge with ketamine suggests good potential translational value of this combined animal model for drug development.

  8. Biochanin-A antagonizes the interleukin-1β-induced catabolic inflammation through the modulation of NFκB cellular signaling in primary rat chondrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Ji-Su [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Chosun University, Gwangju, 61452 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, In-A; Kang, Kyeong-Rok [Department of Dental Bioengineering, Chosun University, Gwangju, 61452 (Korea, Republic of); You, Jae-Seek [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Chosun University, Gwangju, 61452 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Sang-Joun [Department of Periodontology, Chosun University, Gwangju, 61452 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gyeong-Je [Department of Prosthodontics, Chosun University, Gwangju, 61452 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Yo-Seob [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology, Chosun University, Gwangju, 61452 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chun Sung; Kim, Do Kyung [Pre-Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju, 61452 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Su-Gwan [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Chosun University, Gwangju, 61452 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Young-Woo [Korea Basic Science Institute, Gwangju Center, Chonnam National University, Gwangju, 61186 (Korea, Republic of); Im, Hee-Jeong [Department of Biochemistry, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, 60612 (United States); Kim, Jae-Sung, E-mail: js_kim@chosun.ac.kr [Pre-Dentistry, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju, 61452 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-02

    Biochanin-A, a phytoestrogen derived from herbal plants, protected from the IL-1β-induced loss of proteoglycans through the suppression of matrix degrading enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, MMP-3, MMP-1, and ADAMTS-5 in primary rat chondrocytes and the knee articular cartilage. It also suppressed the expression of IL-1β-induced catabolic factors such as nitric oxide synthase 2, cyclooxygenase-2, prostaglandin E{sub 2}, and inflammatory cytokines. Furthermore, biochanin-A suppressed the IL-1β-induced phosphorylation of NFκB, and inhibited its nuclear translocation in primary rat chondrocytes. These results indicate that biochanin-A antagonizes the IL-1β-induced catabolic effects through its anti-inflammatory activity that involves the modulation of NFκB signaling. - Highlights: • Biochanin-A is a phytoestrogen derived from medicinal plants. • It suppressed the IL-1β-induced matrix degrading enzymes and catabolic factors. • It inhibited IL-1β-induced proteoglycan loss in chondrocytes and cartilage tissues. • Its anti-catabolic effects were mediated by modulation of NFκB signaling. • It may be used as a potential anti-catabolic biomaterial for osteoarthritis.

  9. Enterovirus 71 antagonizes the antiviral activity of host STAT3 and IL-6R with partial dependence on virus-induced miR-124.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Zhangmei; Wang, Yan; Bian, Liang; Liu, Qingqing; Long, Jian-Er

    2017-12-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) has caused major outbreaks of hand, foot and mouth disease. EV71 infections increase the production of many host cytokines and pro-inflammatory factors, including interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10 and COX-2. Some of these molecules could stimulate the signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), which plays a key role in regulating host immune responses and several viral diseases. However, the role of STAT3 in EV71 infection remains unknown. This study found that the phosphorylation levels of STAT3 (p Y705 -STAT3) are closely related to EV71 infection. Further experiments revealed that STAT3 exerts an anti-EV71 activity. However, the antiviral activity of STAT3 is partially antagonized by EV71-induced miR-124, which directly targets STAT3 mRNA. Similarly, IL-6R, the α-subunit of the IL-6 receptor complex, exhibits anti-EV71 activity and is directly targeted by the virus-induced miR-124. These results indicate that EV71 can evade host IL-6R- and STAT3-mediated antiviral activities by EV71-induced miR-124. This suggests that controlling miR-124 and the downstream targets, IL-6R and STAT3, might benefit the antiviral treatment of EV71 infection.

  10. Late Pleistocene steppe lion Panthera leo spelaea (Goldfuss, 1810) footprints and bone records from open air sites in northern Germany - Evidence of hyena-lion antagonism and scavenging in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrich, Cajus G.

    2011-07-01

    Bone remains and a trackway of Pantheraichnus bottropensis nov. ichg. ichnsp. of the Late Pleistocene lion Panthera leo spelaea ( Goldfuss, 1810) have been recovered from Bottrop and other open air sites in northern Germany. Some of these bones are from open air hyena den sites. A relative high proportion of lion bones (20%) exhibit bite, chew or nibble marks, or bone crushing and nibbling caused by a large carnivore. Repeated patterns of similar bone damage have been compared to bone remains found at hyena dens in gypsum karst areas and cave sites in northern Germany. Ice Age spotted hyenas have been the main antagonists and the main scavengers on lion carcasses. The remains appear to have been imported often by hyenas into their communal dens, supporting the theory of strong hyena-lion antagonism, similar to the well documented antagonism between modern African lions and spotted hyenas. Most of the lion bones from the open air hyena den at Bottrop are probably a result of such antagonism, as are the rare remains of these carnivores found within large hyena prey bone accumulations along the Pleistocene rivers. The Emscher River terrace also has the largest quantity of hyena remains from open air river terrace sites in northern Germany. Their cub remains, and incomplete chewed prey bones from mammoths and woolly rhinoceroses, typical of hyena activity, underline the character of these sites as cub-raising and communal dens, where their prey was accumulated along the riverbanks in a similar manner to modern African hyenas.

  11. The murine cytomegalovirus M35 protein antagonizes type I IFN induction downstream of pattern recognition receptors by targeting NF-κB mediated transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baca Chan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The type I interferon (IFN response is imperative for the establishment of the early antiviral immune response. Here we report the identification of the first type I IFN antagonist encoded by murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV that shuts down signaling following pattern recognition receptor (PRR sensing. Screening of an MCMV open reading frame (ORF library identified M35 as a novel and strong negative modulator of IFNβ promoter induction following activation of both RNA and DNA cytoplasmic PRR. Additionally, M35 inhibits the proinflammatory cytokine response downstream of Toll-like receptors (TLR. Using a series of luciferase-based reporters with specific transcription factor binding sites, we determined that M35 targets NF-κB-, but not IRF-mediated, transcription. Expression of M35 upon retroviral transduction of immortalized bone marrow-derived macrophages (iBMDM led to reduced IFNβ transcription and secretion upon activation of stimulator of IFN genes (STING-dependent signaling. On the other hand, M35 does not antagonize interferon-stimulated gene (ISG 56 promoter induction or ISG transcription upon exogenous stimulation of the type I IFN receptor (IFNAR. M35 is present in the viral particle and, upon MCMV infection of fibroblasts, is immediately shuttled to the nucleus where it exerts its immunomodulatory effects. Deletion of M35 from the MCMV genome and hence from the viral particle resulted in elevated type I IFN transcription and secretion in vitro and in vivo. In the absence of M35, lower viral titers are observed during acute infection of the host, and productive infection in the salivary glands was not detected. In conclusion, the M35 protein is released by MCMV immediately upon infection in order to deftly inhibit the antiviral type I IFN response by targeting NF-κB-mediated transcription. The identification of this novel viral protein reinforces the importance of timely countermeasures in the complex relationship between virus and host.

  12. Antagonism at the NR2B subunit of NMDA receptors induces increased connectivity of the prefrontal and subcortical regions regulating reward behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gass, Natalia; Becker, Robert; Sack, Markus; Schwarz, Adam J; Reinwald, Jonathan; Cosa-Linan, Alejandro; Zheng, Lei; von Hohenberg, Christian Clemm; Inta, Dragos; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Weber-Fahr, Wolfgang; Gass, Peter; Sartorius, Alexander

    2018-04-01

    Evidence indicates that ketamine's rapid antidepressant efficacy likely results from its antagonism of NR2B-subunit-containing NMDA receptors (NMDAR). Since ketamine equally blocks NR2A- and NR2B-containing NMDAR, and has affinity to other receptors, NR2B-selective drugs might have improved therapeutic efficiency and side effect profile. We aimed to compare the effects of (S)-ketamine and two different types of NR2B-selective antagonists on functional brain networks in rats, in order to find common circuits, where their effects intersect, and that might explain their antidepressant action. The experimental design comprised four parallel groups of rats (N = 37), each receiving (S)-Ketamine, CP-101,606, Ro 25-6981 or saline. After compound injection, we acquired resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging time series. We used graph theoretical approach to calculate brain network properties. Ketamine and CP-101,606 diminished the global clustering coefficient and small-worldness index. At the nodal level, all compounds induced increased connectivity of the regions mediating reward and cognitive aspects of emotional processing, such as ventromedial prefrontal cortex, septal nuclei, and nucleus accumbens. The dorsal hippocampus and regions involved in sensory processing and aversion, such as superior and inferior colliculi, exhibited an opposite effect. The effects common to ketamine and NR2B-selective compounds were localized to the same brain regions as those reported in depression, but in the opposite direction. The upregulation of the reward circuitry might partially underlie the antidepressant and anti-anhedonic effects of the antagonists and could potentially serve as a translational imaging phenotype for testing putative antidepressants, especially those targeting the NR2B receptor subtype.

  13. Antagonism of bradykinin B2 receptor prevents inflammatory responses in human endothelial cells by quenching the NF-kB pathway activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Terzuoli

    Full Text Available Bradykinin (BK induces angiogenesis by promoting vessel permeability, growth and remodeling. This study aimed to demonstrate that the B2R antagonist, fasitibant, inhibits the BK pro-angiogenic effects.We assesed the ability of fasibitant to antagonize the BK stimulation of cultured human cells (HUVEC and circulating pro-angiogenic cells (PACs, in producing cell permeability (paracellular flux, migration and pseocapillary formation. The latter parameter was studied in vitro (matrigel assay and in vivo in mice (matrigel plug and in rat model of experimental osteoarthritis (OA. We also evaluated NF-κB activation in cultured cells by measuring its nuclear translocation and its downstream effectors such as the proangiogenic ciclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, prostaglandin E-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF.HUVEC, exposed to BK (1-10 µM, showed increased permeability, disassembly of adherens and tight-junction, increased cell migration, and pseudocapillaries formation. We observed a significant increase of vessel density in the matrigel assay in mice and in rats OA model. Importantly, B2R stimulation elicited, both in HUVEC and PACs, NF-κB activation, leading to COX-2 overexpression, enhanced prostaglandin E-2 production. and VEGF output. The BK/NF-κB axis, and the ensuing amplification of inflammatory/angiogenic responses were fully prevented by fasitibant as well as by IKK VII, an NF-κB. Inhibitor.This work illustrates the role of the endothelium in the inflammation provoked by the BK/NF-κB axis. It also demonstates that B2R blockade by the antaogonist fasibitant, abolishes both the initial stimulus and its amplification, strongly attenuating the propagation of inflammation.

  14. Synergism and Antagonism between Bacillus thuringiensis Vip3A and Cry1 Proteins in Heliothis virescens, Diatraea saccharalis and Spodoptera frugiperda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemes, Ana Rita Nunes; Davolos, Camila Chiaradia; Legori, Paula Cristina Brunini Crialesi; Fernandes, Odair Aparecido; Ferré, Juan; Lemos, Manoel Victor Franco; Desiderio, Janete Apparecida

    2014-01-01

    Second generation Bt crops (insect resistant crops carrying Bacillus thuringiensis genes) combine more than one gene that codes for insecticidal proteins in the same plant to provide better control of agricultural pests. Some of the new combinations involve co-expression of cry and vip genes. Because Cry and Vip proteins have different midgut targets and possibly different mechanisms of toxicity, it is important to evaluate possible synergi