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Sample records for cytoskeletal proteins mediating

  1. Reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins of mouse oocytes mediated by integrins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE Limin; ZHANG Lei; HE Yaping; ZHANG Jinhu; ZHENG Jie; HE Yanfang; ZHENG Yu; ZHANG Jie; ZHANG Li

    2004-01-01

    To study whether integrins on cell membrane ligate with intracellular cytoskeletal proteins and mediate their reorganization in egg activation, female mice were used for superovulation. The zona-free oocytes were incubated separately with specific ligand of integrins,an active RGD peptide, in vitro for certain period of time. RGE peptide and mouse capacitated sperm were used as controls. Freshly ovulated oocytes and those treated with different factors were immunostained with FITC-labeled anti-actin antibody, then detected with confocal microscope. The results demonstrated that freshly ovulated mouse oocytes, oocytes incubated for 2 h in vitro and those treated with control RGE peptide for 15 min showed hardly visible fluorescene or only thin fluorescence in plasma membrane region. Oocytes coincubated with sperms for 15 min and those treated with active RGD peptide for 10 min, 30 min and 2 hours respectively had strong and thick fluorescence in the plasma membrane and cortical region of oocytes, and some of them showed asymmetrically fluorescent distribution. It is proved that integrins on membrane are ligated directly with cytoskeletal protein. Integrins binding with their ligands regulate reorganization of cytoskelal protein, which may be involved in transmembrane signaling in egg activation.

  2. Reorganization of cytoskeletal proteins of mouse oocytes mediated by integrins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE; Limin; ZHANG; Lei; HE; Yaping; ZHANG; Jinhu; ZHENG; Ji

    2004-01-01

    To study whether integrins on cell membrane ligate with intracellular cytoskeletal proteins and mediate their reorganization in egg activation, female mice were used for superovulation. The zona-free oocytes were incubated separately with specific ligand of integrins,an active RGD peptide, in vitro for certain period of time. RGE peptide and mouse capacitated sperm were used as controls. Freshly ovulated oocytes and those treated with different factors were immunostained with FITC-labeled anti-actin antibody, then detected with confocal microscope. The results demonstrated that freshly ovulated mouse oocytes, oocytes incubated for 2 h in vitro and those treated with control RGE peptide for 15 min showed hardly visible fluorescene or only thin fluorescence in plasma membrane region. Oocytes coincubated with sperms for 15 min and those treated with active RGD peptide for 10 min, 30 min and 2 hours respectively had strong and thick fluorescence in the plasma membrane and cortical region of oocytes, and some of them showed asymmetrically fluorescent distribution. It is proved that integrins on membrane are ligated directly with cytoskeletal protein. Integrins binding with their ligands regulate reorganization of cytoskelal protein, which may be involved in transmembrane signaling in egg activation.

  3. Connecting G protein signaling to chemoattractant-mediated cell polarity and cytoskeletal reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Youtao; Lacal, Jesus; Firtel, Richard A; Kortholt, Arjan

    2016-10-07

    The directional movement towards extracellular chemical gradients, a process called chemotaxis, is an important property of cells. Central to eukaryotic chemotaxis is the molecular mechanism by which chemoattractant-mediated activation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) induces symmetry breaking in the activated downstream signaling pathways. Studies with mainly Dictyostelium and mammalian neutrophils as experimental systems have shown that chemotaxis is mediated by a complex network of signaling pathways. Recently, several labs have used extensive and efficient proteomic approaches to further unravel this dynamic signaling network. Together these studies showed the critical role of the interplay between heterotrimeric G-protein subunits and monomeric G proteins in regulating cytoskeletal rearrangements during chemotaxis. Here we highlight how these proteomic studies have provided greater insight into the mechanisms by which the heterotrimeric G protein cycle is regulated, how heterotrimeric G proteins-induced symmetry breaking is mediated through small G protein signaling, and how symmetry breaking in G protein signaling subsequently induces cytoskeleton rearrangements and cell migration.

  4. Purification of Tetrahymena cytoskeletal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honts, Jerry E

    2012-01-01

    Like all eukaryotic cells, Tetrahymena thermophila contains a rich array of cytoskeletal proteins, some familiar and some novel. A detailed analysis of the structure, function, and interactions of these proteins requires procedures for purifying the individual protein components. Procedures for the purification of actin and tubulin from Tetrahymena are reviewed, followed by a description of a procedure that yields proteins from the epiplasmic layer and associated structures, including the tetrins. Finally, the challenges and opportunities for future advances are assessed.

  5. Connecting G protein signaling to chemoattractant-mediated cell polarity and cytoskeletal reorganization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Youtao; Lacal, Jesus; Firtel, Richard A; Kortholt, Arjan

    2016-01-01

    The directional movement towards extracellular chemical gradients, a process called chemotaxis, is an important property of cells. Central to eukaryotic chemotaxis is the molecular mechanism by which chemoattractant-mediated activation of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) induces symmetry breaking

  6. Suppression of adenylyl cyclase-mediated cAMP production by plasma membrane associated cytoskeletal protein 4.1G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Toshihiro; Chiba, Ayano; Sukegawa, Jun; Yanagisawa, Teruyuki; Saito, Masaki; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2013-03-01

    It has been shown lately that activity of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) is regulated by an array of proteins binding to carboxy (C)-terminus of GPCRs. Proteins of 4.1 family are subsets of subcortical cytoskeletal proteins and are known to stabilize cellular structures and proteins at the plasma membrane. One of the 4.1 family proteins, 4.1G has been shown to interact with the C-terminus of GPCRs and regulate intracellular distribution of the receptors, including parathyroid hormone (PTH)/PTH-related protein receptor (PTHR). PTHR is coupled to trimeric G proteins G(s) and G(q), which activate the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway and phospholipase C pathway, respectively. During the course of investigation of the role of 4.1G on adenylyl cyclase/cAMP signaling pathway, we found that 4.1G suppressed forskolin-induced cAMP production in cells. The cAMP accumulation induced by forskolin was decreased in HEK293 cells overexpressing 4.1G or increased in 4.1G-knockdown cells. Furthermore, PTH -(1-34)-stimulated cAMP production was also suppressed in the presence of exogenously expressed 4.1G despite its activity to increase the distribution of PTHR to the cell surface. In cells overexpressing FERM domain-deleted 4.1G, a mutant form of the protein deficient in plasma membrane distribution, neither forskolin-induced nor PTH -(1-34)-stimulated cAMP production was not altered. The suppression of the forskolin-induced cAMP production was observed even in membrane preparations of 4.1G-overexpressing cells. In 4.1G-knockdown HEK293 cells, plasma membrane distribution of adenylyl cyclase 6, one of the major subtypes of the enzyme in the cells, showed a slight decrease, in spite of the increased production of cAMP in those cells when stimulated by forskolin. Also, cytochalasin D treatment did not cause any influence on forskolin-induced cAMP production in HEK293 cells. These data indicate that plasma membrane-associated 4.1G regulates GPCR-mediated G(s) signaling

  7. Nonlinear electrodynamics in cytoskeletal protein lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hameroff, S.R.; Smith, S.A.; Watt, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    Cytoskeletal lattice proteins including microtubules are particularly involved in dynamic regulation of intracellular movements and activities. This paper considers possibilities and implications of biological information processing due to coupling of Davydov solitons, Frohlich coherent oscillations and other nonlinear electrodynamic phenomena to conformational states of the grid-like polymer subunits of cytoskeletal microtubules. 39 references.

  8. IQGAP proteins are integral components of cytoskeletal regulation

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    IQGAP1 is a scaffolding protein that binds to a diverse array of signalling and structural molecules. By interacting with its target proteins, human IQGAP1 participates in multiple cellular functions, including Ca2+/calmodulin signalling, cytoskeletal architecture, CDC42 and Rac signalling, E-cadherin-mediated cell–cell adhesion and β-catenin-mediated transcription. Yeast IQGAP homologues are important regulators of cellular morphogenesis because they are required for budding and cytokinesis....

  9. Persistent oxygen-glucose deprivation induces astrocytic death through two different pathways and calpain-mediated proteolysis of cytoskeletal proteins during astrocytic oncosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xu; Zhang, Ying; Zou, Liangyu; Xiao, Haibing; Chu, Yinghao; Chu, Xiaofan

    2010-07-26

    Astrocytes are thought to play a role in the maintenance of homeostasis and the provision of metabolic substrates for neurons as well as the coupling of cerebral blood flow to neuronal activity. Accordingly, astrocytic death due to various types of injury can critically influence neuronal survival. The exact pathway of cell death after brain ischemia is under debate. In the present study, we used astrocytes from rat primary culture treated with persistent oxygen-glucose-deprivation (OGD) as a model of ischemia to examine the pathway of cell death and the relevant mechanisms. We observed changes in the cellular morphology, the energy metabolism of astrocytes, and the percentage of apoptosis or oncosis of the astrocytes induced by OGD. Electron microscopy revealed the co-existence of ultrastructural features in both apoptosis and oncosis in individual cells. The cellular ATP content was gradually decreased and the percentages of apoptotic and oncotic cells were increased during OGD. After 4h of OGD, ATP depletion to less than 35% of the control was observed, and oncosis became the primary pathway for astrocytic death. Increased plasma membrane permeability due to oncosis was associated with increased calpain-mediated degradation of several cytoskeletal proteins, including paxillin, vinculin, vimentin and GFAP. Pre-treatment with the calpain inhibitor 3-(4-iodophenyl)-2-mercapto-(Z)-2-propenoic acid (PD150606) could delay the OGD-induced astrocytic oncosis. These results suggest that there is a narrow range of ATP that determines astrocytic oncotic death induced by persistent OGD and that calpain-mediated hydrolysis of the cytoskeletal-associated proteins may contribute to astrocytes oncosis.

  10. IQGAP proteins are integral components of cytoskeletal regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Michael W; Sacks, David B

    2003-06-01

    IQGAP1 is a scaffolding protein that binds to a diverse array of signalling and structural molecules. By interacting with its target proteins, human IQGAP1 participates in multiple cellular functions, including Ca(2+)/calmodulin signalling, cytoskeletal architecture, CDC42 and Rac signalling, E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion and beta-catenin-mediated transcription. Yeast IQGAP homologues are important regulators of cellular morphogenesis because they are required for budding and cytokinesis. Here we discuss the structure and function of IQGAP1 as a member of the family of IQGAP proteins and summarize the current knowledge about IQGAP1 and IQGAP2. Collectively, these data reveal that IQGAP1 is a fundamental regulator of cytoskeletal function.

  11. Bactofilins, a ubiquitous class of cytoskeletal proteins mediating polar localization of a cell wall synthase in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühn, Juliane; Briegel, Ariane; Mörschel, Erhard; Kahnt, Jörg; Leser, Katja; Wick, Stephanie; Jensen, Grant J; Thanbichler, Martin

    2010-01-20

    The cytoskeleton has a key function in the temporal and spatial organization of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Here, we report the identification of a new class of polymer-forming proteins, termed bactofilins, that are widely conserved among bacteria. In Caulobacter crescentus, two bactofilin paralogues cooperate to form a sheet-like structure lining the cytoplasmic membrane in proximity of the stalked cell pole. These assemblies mediate polar localization of a peptidoglycan synthase involved in stalk morphogenesis, thus complementing the function of the actin-like cytoskeleton and the cell division machinery in the regulation of cell wall biogenesis. In other bacteria, bactofilins can establish rod-shaped filaments or associate with the cell division apparatus, indicating considerable structural and functional flexibility. Bactofilins polymerize spontaneously in the absence of additional cofactors in vitro, forming stable ribbon- or rod-like filament bundles. Our results suggest that these structures have evolved as an alternative to intermediate filaments, serving as versatile molecular scaffolds in a variety of cellular pathways.

  12. Mactinin, a fragment of cytoskeletal α-actinin, is a novel inducer of heat shock protein (Hsp-90 mediated monocyte activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perri Robert T

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monocytes, their progeny such as dendritic cells and osteoclasts and products including tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interleukin (IL-1α and IL-1β play important roles in cancer, inflammation, immune response and atherosclerosis. We previously showed that mactinin, a degradative fragment of the cytoskeletal protein α-actinin, is present at sites of monocytic activation in vivo, has chemotactic activity for monocytes and promotes monocyte/macrophage maturation. We therefore sought to determine the mechanism by which mactinin stimulates monocytes. Results Radiolabeled mactinin bound to a heterocomplex on monocytes comprised of at least 3 proteins of molecular weight 88 kD, 79 kD and 68 kD. Affinity purification, mass spectroscopy and Western immunoblotting identified heat shock protein (Hsp-90 as the 88 kD component of this complex. Hsp90 was responsible for mediating the functional effects of mactinin on monocytes, since Hsp90 inhibitors (geldanamycin and its analogues 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin [17-AAG] and 17-(dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin [17-DMAG] almost completely abrogated the stimulatory activity of mactinin on monocytes (production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β and TNF-α, as well as monocyte chemotaxis. Conclusion Mactinin is a novel inducer of Hsp90 activity on monocytes and may serve to perpetuate and augment monocytic activation, thereby functioning as a "matrikine." Blockage of this function of mactinin may be useful in diseases where monocyte/macrophage activation and/or Hsp90 activity are detrimental.

  13. Run-and-pause dynamics of cytoskeletal motor proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, Anne E.; Santen, Ludger; Rieger, Heiko; Shaebani, M. Reza

    2016-11-01

    Cytoskeletal motor proteins are involved in major intracellular transport processes which are vital for maintaining appropriate cellular function. When attached to cytoskeletal filaments, the motor exhibits distinct states of motility: active motion along the filaments, and pause phase in which it remains stationary for a finite time interval. The transition probabilities between motion and pause phases are asymmetric in general, and considerably affected by changes in environmental conditions which influences the efficiency of cargo delivery to specific targets. By considering the motion of individual non-interacting molecular motors on a single filament as well as a dynamic filamentous network, we present an analytical model for the dynamics of self-propelled particles which undergo frequent pause phases. The interplay between motor processivity, structural properties of filamentous network, and transition probabilities between the two states of motility drastically changes the dynamics: multiple transitions between different types of anomalous diffusive dynamics occur and the crossover time to the asymptotic diffusive or ballistic motion varies by several orders of magnitude. We map out the phase diagrams in the space of transition probabilities, and address the role of initial conditions of motion on the resulting dynamics.

  14. Towards Experimental Tests of Quantum Effects in Cytoskeletal Proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Mershin, A; Miller, J H; Nawarathna, D; Skoulakis, E M C; Mavromatos, Nikolaos E; Kolomenskij, A A; Schüssler, H A; Luduena, R F; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V; Mershin, Andreas; Sanabria, Hugo; Miller, John H.; Nawarathna, Dharmakeerthna; Skoulakis, Efthimios M.C.; Mavromatos, Nikolaos E.; Kolomenskii, Alexadre A.; Schuessler, Hans A.; Luduena, Richard F.; Nanopoulos, Dimitri V.

    2005-01-01

    It has become increasingly evident that fabrication of novel biomaterials through molecular self-assembly is going to play a significant role in material science and possibly the information technology of the future. Tubulin, microtubules (MTs) and the cytoskeleton are dynamic, self-assembling systems and we asked whether their structure and function contain the clues on how to fabricate biomolecular information processing devices. Here we review our neurobiological studies of transgenic Drosophila that strongly suggest the microtubular cytoskeleton is near the 'front lines' of intracellular information manipulation and storage. We also establish that spectroscopic techniques such as refractometry, surface plasmon resonance sensing and dielectric spectroscopy, coupled with molecular dynamic simulations and (quantum) electrodynamic analytical theory are useful tools in the study of the electrodynamic and possible quantum effects in cytoskeletal proteins. Implicit in our driving question is the possibility that...

  15. Run-and-tumble dynamics of cytoskeletal motor proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Hafner, Anne E; Rieger, Heiko; Shaebani, M Reza

    2016-01-01

    Cytoskeletal motor proteins are involved in major intracellular transport processes which are vital for maintaining appropriate cellular function. The motor exhibits distinct states of motility: active motion along filaments, and effectively stationary phase in which it detaches from the filaments and performs passive diffusion in the vicinity of the detachment point due to cytoplasmic crowding. The transition rates between motion and pause phases are asymmetric in general, and considerably affected by changes in environmental conditions which influences the efficiency of cargo delivery to specific targets. By considering the motion of molecular motor on a single filament as well as a dynamic filamentous network, we present an analytical model for the dynamics of self-propelled particles which undergo frequent pause phases. The interplay between motor processivity, structural properties of filamentous network, and transition rates between the two states of motility drastically changes the dynamics: multiple t...

  16. CYP1A-immunopositive proteins in bivalves identified as cytoskeletal and major vault proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøsvik, Bjørn Einar; Jonsson, Henrik; Rodríguez-Ortega, Manuel J;

    2006-01-01

    To identify possible CYP1A-immunopositive proteins in bivalves, we used anti-fish CYP1A antibodies combined with one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, and found that two of the main CYP1A-immunopositive proteins in digestive gland of Mytilus edulis, were cytoskeletal...

  17. Cytoskeletal proteins participate in conserved viral strategies across kingdoms of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erb, Marcella L; Pogliano, Joe

    2013-12-01

    The discovery of tubulin-like cytoskeletal proteins carried on the genomes of bacteriophages that are actively used for phage propagation during both the lytic and lysogenic cycle have revealed that there at least two ways that viruses can utilize a cytoskeleton; co-opt the host cytoskeleton or bring their own homologues. Either strategy underscores the deep evolutionary relationship between viruses and cytoskeletal proteins and points to a conservation of viral strategies that crosses the kingdoms of life. Here we review some of the most recent discoveries about tubulin cytoskeletal elements encoded by phages and compare them to some of the strategies utilized by the gammaherpesvirues of mammalian cells.

  18. Regulation of protein kinase C by the cytoskeletal protein calponin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinweber, B; Parissenti, A M; Gallant, C; Gangopadhyay, S S; Kirwan-Rhude, A; Leavis, P C; Morgan, K G

    2000-12-22

    Previous studies from this laboratory have shown that, upon agonist activation, calponin co-immunoprecipitates and co-localizes with protein kinase Cepsilon (PKCepsilon) in vascular smooth muscle cells. In the present study we demonstrate that calponin binds directly to the regulatory domain of PKC both in overlay assays and, under native conditions, by sedimentation with lipid vesicles. Calponin was found to bind to the C2 region of both PKCepsilon and PKCalpha with possible involvement of C1B. The C2 region of PKCepsilon binds to the calponin repeats with a requirement for the region between amino acids 160 and 182. We have also found that calponin can directly activate PKC autophosphorylation. By using anti-phosphoantibodies to residue Ser-660 of PKCbetaII, we found that calponin, in a lipid-independent manner, increased auto-phosphorylation of PKCalpha, -epsilon, and -betaII severalfold compared with control conditions. Similarly, calponin was found to increase the amount of (32)P-labeled phosphate incorporated into PKC from [gamma-(32)P]ATP. We also observed that calponin addition strongly increased the incorporation of radiolabeled phosphate into an exogenous PKC peptide substrate, suggesting an activation of enzyme activity. Thus, these results raise the possibility that calponin may function in smooth muscle to regulate PKC activity by facilitating the phosphorylation of PKC.

  19. Oestradiol and progesterone differentially alter cytoskeletal protein expression and flame cell morphology in Taenia crassiceps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosio, Javier R; Ostoa-Saloma, Pedro; Palacios-Arreola, M Isabel; Ruíz-Rosado, Azucena; Sánchez-Orellana, Pedro L; Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Nava-Castro, Karen E; Martínez-Velázquez, Nancy; Escobedo, Galileo; Ibarra-Coronado, Elizabeth G; Valverde-Islas, Laura; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2014-09-01

    We examined the effects of oestradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) on cytoskeletal protein expression in the helminth Taenia crassiceps - specifically actin, tubulin and myosin. These proteins assemble into flame cells, which constitute the parasite excretory system. Total protein extracts were obtained from E2- and P4-treated T. crassiceps cysticerci and untreated controls, and analysed by one- and two-dimensional protein electrophoresis, flow cytometry, immunofluorescence and videomicroscopy. Exposure of T. crassiceps cysticerci to E2 and P4 induced differential protein expression patterns compared with untreated controls. Changes in actin, tubulin and myosin expression were confirmed by flow cytometry of parasite cells and immunofluorescence. In addition, parasite morphology was altered in response to E2 and P4 versus controls. Flame cells were primarily affected at the level of the ciliary tuft, in association with the changes in actin, tubulin and myosin. We conclude that oestradiol and progesterone act directly on T. crassiceps cysticerci, altering actin, tubulin and myosin expression and thus affecting the assembly and function of flame cells. Our results increase our understanding of several aspects of the molecular crosstalk between host and parasite, which might be useful in designing anthelmintic drugs that exclusively impair parasitic proteins which mediate cell signaling and pathogenic reproduction and establishment.

  20. p-Chloromercuribenzoate-induced dissociation of cytoskeletal proteins in red blood cells of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunimoto, M; Shibata, K; Miura, T

    1987-12-11

    Effects of p-chloromercuribenzoate (PCMB) on the cytoskeletal organization of rat red blood cells were studied. Upon incubation with 50 microM PCMB in 10 mM Tris-HCl (pH 7.4) at 37 degrees C for 30 min, 80% of actin and 45% of spectrin were released from the ghosts, resulting in the fragmentation of ghost membranes. Addition of 2 mM Mg2+ or 0.1 M KCl, or lowering incubation temperature to 0 degree C substantially inhibited the solubilization of the cytoskeletal proteins and the fragmentation of ghost membranes, which enable to examine the effects of PCMB on the interaction between transmembrane proteins and the peripheral cytoskeletal network. Decreased recoveries of transmembrane proteins, such as band 3 and glycophorin, in Triton shell fraction were observed in the ghosts incubated with PCMB either in the presence of Mg2+ or at 0 degree C. PCMB also inhibited the in vitro association of purified spectrin with spectrin-depleted inside-out vesicles through interaction with proteins in the vesicle, such as bands 2.1 and 3. In the PCMB-treated ghosts, intramembrane particles were highly aggregated, which further supports the PCMB-induced dissociation of the transmembrane proteins from the cytoskeletal network. The decreased recovery of glycophorin in the Triton shell fraction also observed in intact red blood cells upon incubation with PCMB. These results suggest that the main action of PCMB on red cell membranes under physiological condition, at higher ionic strength and in the presence of Mg2+, is to dissociate transmembrane proteins from the peripheral cytoskeletal network, which may modify functions of these proteins.

  1. Lidocaine action and conformational changes in cytoskeletal protein network in human red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiguchi, E; Hamada, N; Shindo, J

    1995-11-03

    The mechanism of action of lidocaine, which is commonly used clinically as a local anesthetic, was studied in human red blood cells. The influx of [14C]lidocaine through the cell membrane induced reversible transformation of human red blood cells from discocytes to stomatocytes. This change in shape depended on the lidocaine concentration and required both ATP and carbonic anhydrase. The lidocaine-induced shape change occurred as a result of spectrin aggregation, which altered the intracellular environment of the human red blood cells, mediated by carbonic anhydrase and activation of vacuolar type H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase). Lidocaine controlled the influx of 22Na into the human red blood cells in a concentration-dependent manner. When incubated in media containing 6-chloro-9-[(4-diethylamino)-1-methyl-butyl]amino-2-methoxyacridine (mepacrine), an inhibitor of Na+ channels, human red blood cells changed shape from discocytes to stomatocytes and the intracellular pH decreased. This phenomenon was very similar to the shape change induced by lidocaine. These results suggest that the mode of action of lidocaine is related to a conformational change in the cytoskeletal protein network.

  2. Early cytoskeletal protein modifications precede overt structural degeneration in the DBA/2J mouse model of glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Nicole Wilson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Axonal transport deficits precede structural loss in glaucoma and other neurodegenerations. Impairments in structural support, including modified cytoskeletal proteins and microtubule-destabilizing elements, could be initiating factors in glaucoma pathogenesis. We investigated the time course of changes in protein levels and post-translational modifications in the DBA/2J mouse model of glaucoma. Using anterograde tract tracing of the retinal projection, we assessed major cytoskeletal and transported elements as a function of transport integrity in different stages of pathological progression. Using capillary-based electrophoresis, single- and multiplex immunosorbent assays, and immunofluorescence, we quantified hyperphosphorylated neurofilament-heavy chain, phosphorylated tau (ptau, calpain-mediated spectrin breakdown product (145/150kDa, β –tubulin, and amyloid-β42 proteins based on age and transport outcome to the superior colliculus (SC, the main retinal target in mice. Phosphorylated neurofilament-heavy chain (pNF-H was elevated within the optic nerve (ON and SC of 8-10 month-old DBA/2J mice, but was not evident in the retina until 12-15 months, suggesting that cytoskeletal modifications first appear in the distal retinal projection. As expected, higher pNF-H levels in the SC and retina were correlated with axonal transport deficits. Elevations in hyperphosphorylated tau (ptau occurred in ON and SC between 3-8 month of age while retinal ptau accumulations occurred at 12-15 months in DBA/2J mice. In vitro co-immunoprecipitation experiments suggested increased affinity of ptau for the retrograde motor complex protein, dynactin. We observed a transport-related decrease of β-tubulin in ON of 10-12 month-old DBA/2J mice, suggesting destabilized microtubule array. Elevations in calpain-mediated spectrin breakdown product were seen in ON and SC at the earliest age examined, well before axonal transport loss is evident. Finally, transport

  3. [Cytoskeletal actin and its associated proteins. Some examples in Protista].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillén, N; Carlier, M F; Brugerolle, G; Tardieux, I; Ausseil, J

    1998-06-01

    Many processes, cell motility being an example, require cells to remodel the actin cytoskeleton in response to both intracellular and extracellular signals. Reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton involves the rapid disassembly and reassembly of actin filaments, a phenomenon regulated by the action of particular actin-binding proteins. In recent years, an interest in studying actin regulation in unicellular organisms has arisen. Parasitic protozoan are among these organisms and studies of the cytoskeleton functions of these protozoan are relevant related to either cell biology or pathogenicity. To discuss recent data in this field, a symposium concerning "Actin and actin-binding proteins in protists" was held on May 8-11 in Paris, France, during the XXXV meeting of the French Society of Protistology. As a brief summary of the symposium we report here findings concerning the in vitro actin dynamic assembly, as well as the characterization of several actin-binding proteins from the parasitic protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, Trichomonas vaginalis and Plasmodium knowlesi. In addition, localization of actin in non-pathogen protists such as Prorocentrum micans and Crypthecodinium cohnii is also presented. The data show that some actin-binding proteins facilitate organization of filaments into higher order structures as pseudopods, while others have regulatory functions, indicating very particular roles for actin-binding proteins. One of the proteins discussed during the symposium, the actin depolymerizing factor ADF, was shown to enhance the treadmilling rate of actin filaments. In vitro, ADF binds to the ADP-bound forms of G-actin and F-actin, thereby participating in and changing the rate of actin assembly. Biochemical approaches allowed the identification of a protein complex formed by HSP/C70-cap32-34 which might also be involved in depolymerization of F-actin in P. knowlesi. Molecular and cellular approaches were used to identify proteins such as ABP-120 and myosin

  4. HBV X protein interacts with cytoskeletal signaling proteins through SH3 binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Huixing; Tan, Tuan Lin; Niu, Dandan; Chen, Wei Ning

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate interactions between cellular SH3-containing proteins and the proline-rich domain in Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) X protein (HBx) The proline-rich domain of HBx (amino acids 19-58) as well as the relevant site-directed mutagenesis (proline to alanine residues) were cloned into pGEX-5X-1 and expressed as GST-PXXP and GST-AXXA probes. Panomics SH3 domain arrays were probed using both GST-PXXP and GST-AXXA to identify potential interacting SH3 domain containing proteins. The specific interactions were confirmed by the immunoprecipitation of the full-length SH3 domain-containing protein. We report here the binding assay which demonstrated interaction between PXXP domain in HBx and the SH3-domain containing proteins, in particular various signaling proteins involved in cytoskeletal reorganization. Our findings were consistent with similar virus-host interactions via SH3 binding for other viruses such as hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Further characterization of the proline-rich binding to SH3 domains could yield important information for the design of novel therapeutic measures against downstream disease causative effects of HBx in the liver cells.

  5. Cooperation of the BTB-Zinc finger protein, Abrupt, with cytoskeletal regulators in Drosophila epithelial tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezaket Turkel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The deregulation of cell polarity or cytoskeletal regulators is a common occurrence in human epithelial cancers. Moreover, there is accumulating evidence in human epithelial cancer that BTB-ZF genes, such as Bcl6 and ZBTB7A, are oncogenic. From our previous studies in the vinegar fly, Drosophila melanogaster, we have identified a cooperative interaction between a mutation in the apico-basal cell polarity regulator Scribble (Scrib and overexpression of the BTB-ZF protein Abrupt (Ab. Herein, we show that co-expression of ab with actin cytoskeletal regulators, RhoGEF2 or Src64B, in the developing eye-antennal epithelial tissue results in the formation of overgrown amorphous tumours, whereas ab and DRac1 co-expression leads to non-cell autonomous overgrowth. Together with ab, these genes affect the expression of differentiation genes, resulting in tumours locked in a progenitor cell fate. Finally, we show that the expression of two mammalian genes related to ab, Bcl6 and ZBTB7A, which are oncogenes in mammalian epithelial cancers, significantly correlate with the upregulation of cytoskeletal genes or downregulation of apico-basal cell polarity neoplastic tumour suppressor genes in colorectal, lung and other human epithelial cancers. Altogether, this analysis has revealed that upregulation of cytoskeletal regulators cooperate with Abrupt in Drosophila epithelial tumorigenesis, and that high expression of human BTB-ZF genes, Bcl6 and ZBTB7A, shows significant correlations with cytoskeletal and cell polarity gene expression in specific epithelial tumour types. This highlights the need for further investigation of the cooperation between these genes in mammalian systems.

  6. Distinct contractile and cytoskeletal protein patterns in the Antarctic midge are elicited by desiccation and rehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Aiqing; Benoit, Joshua B; Lopez-Martinez, Giancarlo; Elnitsky, Michael A; Lee, Richard E; Denlinger, David L

    2009-05-01

    Desiccation presents a major challenge for the Antarctic midge, Belgica antarctica. In this study, we use proteomic profiling to evaluate protein changes in the larvae elicited by dehydration and rehydration. Larvae were desiccated at 75% relative humidity (RH) for 12 h to achieve a body water loss of 35%, approximately half of the water that can be lost before the larvae succumb to dehydration. To evaluate the rehydration response, larvae were first desiccated, then rehydrated for 6 h at 100% RH and then in water for 6 h. Controls were held continuously at 100% RH. Protein analysis was performed using 2-DE and nanoscale capillary LC/MS/MS. Twenty-four identified proteins changed in abundance in response to desiccation: 16 were more abundant and 8 were less abundant; 84% of these proteins were contractile or cytoskeletal proteins. Thirteen rehydration-regulated proteins were identified: 8 were more abundant and 5 were less abundant, and 69% of these proteins were also contractile or cytoskeletal proteins. Additional proteins responsive to desiccation and rehydration were involved in functions including stress responses, energy metabolism, protein synthesis, glucogenesis and membrane transport. We conclude that the major protein responses elicited by both desiccation and rehydration are linked to body contraction and cytoskeleton rearrangements.

  7. Vimentin contributes to epithelial-mesenchymal transition cancer cell mechanics by mediating cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ching-Yi; Lin, Hsi-Hui; Tang, Ming-Jer; Wang, Yang-Kao

    2015-06-30

    Modulations of cytoskeletal organization and focal adhesion turnover correlate to tumorigenesis and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), the latter process accompanied by the loss of epithelial markers and the gain of mesenchymal markers (e.g., vimentin). Clinical microarray results demonstrated that increased levels of vimentin mRNA after chemotherapy correlated to a poor prognosis of breast cancer patients. We hypothesized that vimentin mediated the reorganization of cytoskeletons to maintain the mechanical integrity in EMT cancer cells. By using knockdown strategy, the results showed reduced cell proliferation, impaired wound healing, loss of directional migration, and increased large membrane extension in MDA-MB 231 cells. Vimentin depletion also induced reorganization of cytoskeletons and reduced focal adhesions, which resulted in impaired mechanical strength because of reduced cell stiffness and contractile force. In addition, overexpressing vimentin in MCF7 cells increased cell stiffness, elevated cell motility and directional migration, reoriented microtubule polarity, and increased EMT phenotypes due to the increased β1-integrin and the loss of junction protein E-cadherin. The EMT-related transcription factor slug was also mediated by vimentin. The current study demonstrated that vimentin serves as a regulator to maintain intracellular mechanical homeostasis by mediating cytoskeleton architecture and the balance of cell force generation in EMT cancer cells.

  8. The cytoskeletal protein Ndel1 regulates dynamin 2 GTPase activity.

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    Mathieu Chansard

    Full Text Available Cytoskeleton dynamics, membranes trafficking and positioning are essential for the proper functioning of any mammalian cell. The identification of the molecules and mechanisms that allow these cellular processes to interface is vital for understanding cell behaviors. Ndel1, the mammalian homolog of the Aspergillus nidulans NudE, organizes the cytoskeleton and regulates molecular motors, thereby impacting on the positioning of membranes. Hypothetically, Ndel1 can act in concert with enzymes controlling membrane trafficking (vesicle-mediated transport per se, but this idea has never been investigated. We now report that a pool of Ndel1 associates directly with Dynamin 2 (Dyn2, a large cytosolic GTPase involved in the trafficking of the AMPA receptor subunit GluR1. In vitro, Ndel1 enhances Dyn2 GTPase activity in its unassembled and assembled forms, without promoting oligomerization of the enzyme. In cells, gain and loss of function of Ndel1 recapitulate the effects of overexpression of Dyn2 and Dyn2 dominant negative with reduced GTPase activity on the intracellular localization of GluR1, respectively, without affecting the stability of microtubules. Together, these results indicate that Ndel1 regulates Dyn2 GTPase activity and impacts GluR1-containing membranes distribution in a manner reminiscent of Dyn2.

  9. Distribution of cytoskeletal proteins, integrins, leukocyte adhesion molecules and extracellular matrix proteins in plastic-embedded human and rat kidneys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, H; Coers, W; van der Horst, MLC; Suurmeijer, AJH

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the distribution of cytoskeletal proteins (actin, alpha -actinin, vinculin, beta -tubulin, keratin, vimentin, desmin), adhesion molecules for cell-matrix interations (very later antigens [VLA1-6], beta1, beta2 [CD18], vitronectin receptor [alphav beta3], CD 11b), leukocyte adhesi

  10. Analysis of the expression of cytoskeletal proteins of Taenia crassiceps ORF strain cysticerci (Cestoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynoso-Ducoing, Olivia; Valverde-Islas, Laura; Paredes-Salomon, Cristina; Pérez-Reyes, América; Landa, Abraham; Robert, Lilia; Mendoza, Guillermo; Ambrosio, Javier R

    2014-05-01

    The Taenia crassiceps ORF strain is used to generate a murine model of cysticercosis, which is used for diagnosis, evaluation of drugs, and vaccination. This particular strain only exists as cysticerci, is easily maintained under in vivo and in vitro conditions, and offers an excellent model for studying the cytoskeletons of cestodes. In this study, several experimental approaches were used to determine the tissue expression of its cytoskeletal proteins. The techniques used were microscopy (video, confocal, and transmission electron), one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis, immunochemistry, and mass spectrometry. The tissue expression of actin, tubulin, and paramyosin was assessed using microscopy, and their protein isoforms were determined with 1D and 2D electrophoresis and immunochemistry. Nineteen spots were excised from a proteomic gel and identified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and immunochemistry. The proteins identified were classic cytoskeletal proteins, metabolic enzymes, and proteins with diverse biological functions, but mainly involved in detoxification activities. Research suggests that most noncytoskeletal proteins interact with actin or tubulin, and the results of the present study suggest that the proteins identified may be involved in supporting the dynamics and plasticity of the cytoskeleton of T. crassiceps cysticerci. These results contribute to our knowledge of the cellular biology and physiology of cestodes.

  11. Cytoskeletal proteins: shaping progression of hepatitis C virus-induced liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sriparna; Kaplan, Keith J; Schrum, Laura W; Bonkovsky, Herbert L

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, which results in chronic hepatitis C (CHC) in most patients (70-85%), is a major cause of liver disease and remains a major therapeutic challenge. The mechanisms determining liver damage and the key factors that lead to a high rate of CHC remain imperfectly understood. The precise role of cytoskeletal (CS) proteins in HCV infection remains to be determined. Some studies including our recent study have demonstrated that changes occur in the expression of CS proteins in HCV-infected hepatocytes. A variety of host proteins interact with HCV proteins. Association between CS and HCV proteins may have implications in future design of CS protein-targeted therapy for the treatment for HCV infection. This chapter will focus on the interaction between host CS and viral proteins to signify the importance of this event in HCV entry, replication and transportation.

  12. Differential impact of REM sleep deprivation on cytoskeletal proteins of brain regions involved in sleep regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, Jennifer; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio; Velázquez-Moctezuma, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is involved in memory consolidation, which implies synaptic plasticity. This process requires protein synthesis and the reorganization of the neural cytoskeleton. REM sleep deprivation (REMSD) has an impact on some neuronal proteins involved in synaptic plasticity, such as glutamate receptors and postsynaptic density protein 95, but its effects on cytoskeletal proteins is unknown. In this study, the effects of REMSD on the content of the cytoskeletal proteins MAP2 and TAU were analyzed. Adult female rats were submitted to selective REMSD by using the multiple platform technique. After 24, 48 or 72 h of REMSD, rats were decapitated and the following brain areas were dissected: pons, preoptic area, hippocampus and frontal cortex. Protein extraction and Western blot were performed. Results showed an increase in TAU content in the pons, preoptic area and hippocampus after 24 h of REMSD, while in the frontal cortex a significant increase in TAU content was observed after 72 h of REMSD. A TAU content decrease was observed in the hippocampus after 48 h of REMSD. Interestingly, a marked increase in TAU content was observed after 72 h of REMSD. MAP2 content only increased in the preoptic area at 24 h, and in the frontal cortex after 24 and 72 h of REMSD, without significant changes in the pons and hippocampus. These results support the idea that REM sleep plays an important role in the organization of neural cytoskeleton, and that this effect is tissue-specific.

  13. Cytoskeletal proteins in the follicular wall of normal andcystic ovaries of sows

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    Fabiano J.F. de Sant'Ana

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The expression of cytoskeletal proteins was evaluated immunohistochemically in 36 normal ovaries sampled from 18 sows and 44 cystic ovaries sampled from of 22 sows, was evaluated. All sows had history of reproductive problems, such as infertility or subfertility. The immunohistochemically stained area (IHCSA was quantified through image analysis to evaluate the expression of these proteins in the follicular wall of secondary, tertiary, and cystic follicles. Cytokeratins (CK immunoreactivity was strong in the granulosa cell layer (GC and mild in the theca interna (TI and externa (TE of the normal follicles. There was severe reduction of the reaction to CK in the GC in the cystic follicles, mainly in the luteinized cysts. The immunoreactivity for vimentin was higher in the GC from normal and cystic follicles in contrast with the other follicular structures. In the luteinized cysts, the IHCSA for vimentin was significantly higher in TI and in both observed cysts, the labeling was more accentuated in TE. Immunohistochemical detection of desmin and α-SMA was restricted to the TE, without differences between the normal and cystic follicles. The results of the current study show that the development of ovarian cysts in sows is associated to changes in the expression of the cytoskeletal proteins CK and vimentin.

  14. Membrane and cytoskeletal changes associated with IgE-mediated serotonin release from rat basophilic leukemia cells

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Binding of antigen to IgE-receptor complexes on the surface of RBL-2H3 rat basophilic leukemia cells is the first event leading to the release of cellular serotonin, histamine, and other mediators of allergic, asthmatic, and inflammatory responses. We have used dinitrophenol- conjugated bovine serum albumin (DNP-BSA) as well as the fluorescent antigen, DNP-B-phycoerythrin, and the electron-dense antigen, DNP-BSA- gold, to investigate dynamic membrane and cytoskeletal events associated with th...

  15. Characterization of cytoskeletal and junctional proteins expressed by cells cultured from human arachnoid granulation tissue

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    Mehta Bhavya C

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The arachnoid granulations (AGs are projections of the arachnoid membrane into the dural venous sinuses. They function, along with the extracranial lymphatics, to circulate the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF to the systemic venous circulation. Disruption of normal CSF dynamics may result in increased intracranial pressures causing many problems including headaches and visual loss, as in idiopathic intracranial hypertension and hydrocephalus. To study the role of AGs in CSF egress, we have grown cells from human AG tissue in vitro and have characterized their expression of those cytoskeletal and junctional proteins that may function in the regulation of CSF outflow. Methods Human AG tissue was obtained at autopsy, and explanted to cell culture dishes coated with fibronectin. Typically, cells migrated from the explanted tissue after 7–10 days in vitro. Second or third passage cells were seeded onto fibronectin-coated coverslips at confluent densities and grown to confluency for 7–10 days. Arachnoidal cells were tested using immunocytochemical methods for the expression of several common cytoskeletal and junctional proteins. Second and third passage cultures were also labeled with the common endothelial markers CD-31 or VE-cadherin (CD144 and their expression was quantified using flow cytometry analysis. Results Confluent cultures of arachnoidal cells expressed the intermediate filament protein vimentin. Cytokeratin intermediate filaments were expressed variably in a subpopulation of cells. The cultures also expressed the junctional proteins connexin43, desmoplakin 1 and 2, E-cadherin, and zonula occludens-1. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that second and third passage cultures failed to express the endothelial cell markers CD31 or VE-cadherin in significant quantities, thereby showing that these cultures did not consist of endothelial cells from the venous sinus wall. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report of

  16. Pfarao: a web application for protein family analysis customized for cytoskeletal and motor proteins (CyMoBase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kollmar Martin

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Annotation of protein sequences of eukaryotic organisms is crucial for the understanding of their function in the cell. Manual annotation is still by far the most accurate way to correctly predict genes. The classification of protein sequences, their phylogenetic relation and the assignment of function involves information from various sources. This often leads to a collection of heterogeneous data, which is hard to track. Cytoskeletal and motor proteins consist of large and diverse superfamilies comprising up to several dozen members per organism. Up to date there is no integrated tool available to assist in the manual large-scale comparative genomic analysis of protein families. Description Pfarao (Protein Family Application for Retrieval, Analysis and Organisation is a database driven online working environment for the analysis of manually annotated protein sequences and their relationship. Currently, the system can store and interrelate a wide range of information about protein sequences, species, phylogenetic relations and sequencing projects as well as links to literature and domain predictions. Sequences can be imported from multiple sequence alignments that are generated during the annotation process. A web interface allows to conveniently browse the database and to compile tabular and graphical summaries of its content. Conclusion We implemented a protein sequence-centric web application to store, organize, interrelate, and present heterogeneous data that is generated in manual genome annotation and comparative genomics. The application has been developed for the analysis of cytoskeletal and motor proteins (CyMoBase but can easily be adapted for any protein.

  17. Kingdom Chromista and its eight phyla: a new synthesis emphasising periplastid protein targeting, cytoskeletal and periplastid evolution, and ancient divergences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalier-Smith, Thomas

    2017-09-05

    In 1981 I established kingdom Chromista, distinguished from Plantae because of its more complex chloroplast-associated membrane topology and rigid tubular multipartite ciliary hairs. Plantae originated by converting a cyanobacterium to chloroplasts with Toc/Tic translocons; most evolved cell walls early, thereby losing phagotrophy. Chromists originated by enslaving a phagocytosed red alga, surrounding plastids by two extra membranes, placing them within the endomembrane system, necessitating novel protein import machineries. Early chromists retained phagotrophy, remaining naked and repeatedly reverted to heterotrophy by losing chloroplasts. Therefore, Chromista include secondary phagoheterotrophs (notably ciliates, many dinoflagellates, Opalozoa, Rhizaria, heliozoans) or walled osmotrophs (Pseudofungi, Labyrinthulea), formerly considered protozoa or fungi respectively, plus endoparasites (e.g. Sporozoa) and all chromophyte algae (other dinoflagellates, chromeroids, ochrophytes, haptophytes, cryptophytes). I discuss their origin, evolutionary diversification, and reasons for making chromists one kingdom despite highly divergent cytoskeletons and trophic modes, including improved explanations for periplastid/chloroplast protein targeting, derlin evolution, and ciliary/cytoskeletal diversification. I conjecture that transit-peptide-receptor-mediated 'endocytosis' from periplastid membranes generates periplastid vesicles that fuse with the arguably derlin-translocon-containing periplastid reticulum (putative red algal trans-Golgi network homologue; present in all chromophytes except dinoflagellates). I explain chromist origin from ancestral corticates and neokaryotes, reappraising tertiary symbiogenesis; a chromist cytoskeletal synapomorphy, a bypassing microtubule band dextral to both centrioles, favoured multiple axopodial origins. I revise chromist higher classification by transferring rhizarian subphylum Endomyxa from Cercozoa to Retaria; establishing retarian

  18. Increase in cell-surface localization of parathyroid hormone receptor by cytoskeletal protein 4.1G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Masaki; Sugai, Maki; Katsushima, Yuriko; Yanagisawa, Teruyuki; Sukegawa, Jun; Nakahata, Norimichi

    2005-11-15

    The cell-surface localization of GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors) has emerged as one of critical factors of the GPCR-mediated signal transduction. It has been reported that the C-termini of GPCRs contain the sequences for sorting the receptors to cell surface. In the present study, we have searched for proteins that interact with the C-terminus of PTH (parathyroid hormone)/PTH-related protein receptor (PTHR) by using the yeast two-hybrid system, and identified a cytoskeletal protein 4.1G (generaltype 4.1 protein) as an interactant with the C-terminus. Immunohistochemical study revealed that both PTHR and 4.1G were co-localized on plasma membranes, when they were transiently expressed in COS-7 cells. When 4.1G or the C-terminal domain of 4.1G (4.1G-CTD), a dominant-negative form of 4.1G, was co-expressed with PTHR in COS-7 cells, 4.1G, but not 4.1G-CTD, facilitated the cell-surface localization of PTHR, determined by cell-surface biotinylation assay. PTH-(1-34) caused phosphorylation of ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) 1/2 in PTHR-expressed cells mainly mediated through EGF (epidermal growth factor) receptor. The phosphorylation was enhanced by the expression of 4.1G, but not 4.1G-CTD. PTH-(1-34) elevated [Ca2+]i (intracellular Ca2+ concentration) independent of EGF receptor activation, and the elevation was enhanced by the expression of 4.1G, but not 4.1G-CTD. These data indicate that 4.1G facilitates the cell-surface localization of PTHR through its interaction with the C-terminus of the receptor, resulting in the potentiation of PTHR-mediated signal transduction.

  19. ECM-dependent HIF induction directs trophoblast stem cell fate via LIMK1-mediated cytoskeletal rearrangement.

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    Hwa J Choi

    Full Text Available The Hypoxia-inducible Factor (HIF family of transcriptional regulators coordinates the expression of dozens of genes in response to oxygen deprivation. Mammalian development occurs in a hypoxic environment and HIF-null mice therefore die in utero due to multiple embryonic and placental defects. Mouse embryonic stem cells do not differentiate into placental cells; therefore, trophoblast stem cells (TSCs are used to study mouse placental development. Consistent with a requirement for HIF activity during placental development in utero, TSCs derived from HIF-null mice exhibit severe differentiation defects and fail to form trophoblast giant cells (TGCs in vitro. Interestingly, differentiating TSCs induce HIF activity independent of oxygen tension via unclear mechanisms. Here, we show that altering the extracellular matrix (ECM composition upon which TSCs are cultured changes their differentiation potential from TGCs to multinucleated syncytiotropholasts (SynTs and blocks oxygen-independent HIF induction. We further find that modulation of Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Kinase-1/2 (MAP2K1/2, MEK-1/2 signaling by ECM composition is responsible for this effect. In the absence of ECM-dependent cues, hypoxia-signaling pathways activate this MAPK cascade to drive HIF induction and redirect TSC fate along the TGC lineage. In addition, we show that integrity of the microtubule and actin cytoskeleton is critical for TGC fate determination. HIF-2α ensures TSC cytoskeletal integrity and promotes invasive TGC formation by interacting with c-MYC to induce non-canonical expression of Lim domain kinase 1-an enzyme that regulates microtubule and actin stability, as well as cell invasion. Thus, we find that HIF can integrate positional and metabolic cues from within the TSC niche to regulate placental development by modulating the cellular cytoskeleton via non-canonical gene expression.

  20. Cytoskeletal Linker Protein Dystonin Is Not Critical to Terminal Oligodendrocyte Differentiation or CNS Myelination.

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    Samantha F Kornfeld

    Full Text Available Oligodendrocyte differentiation and central nervous system myelination require massive reorganization of the oligodendrocyte cytoskeleton. Loss of specific actin- and tubulin-organizing factors can lead to impaired morphological and/or molecular differentiation of oligodendrocytes, resulting in a subsequent loss of myelination. Dystonin is a cytoskeletal linker protein with both actin- and tubulin-binding domains. Loss of function of this protein results in a sensory neuropathy called Hereditary Sensory Autonomic Neuropathy VI in humans and dystonia musculorum in mice. This disease presents with severe ataxia, dystonic muscle and is ultimately fatal early in life. While loss of the neuronal isoforms of dystonin primarily leads to sensory neuron degeneration, it has also been shown that peripheral myelination is compromised due to intrinsic Schwann cell differentiation abnormalities. The role of this cytoskeletal linker in oligodendrocytes, however, remains unclear. We sought to determine the effects of the loss of neuronal dystonin on oligodendrocyte differentiation and central myelination. To address this, primary oligodendrocytes were isolated from a severe model of dystonia musculorum, Dstdt-27J, and assessed for morphological and molecular differentiation capacity. No defects could be discerned in the differentiation of Dstdt-27J oligodendrocytes relative to oligodendrocytes from wild-type littermates. Survival was also compared between Dstdt-27J and wild-type oligodendrocytes, revealing no significant difference. Using a recently developed migration assay, we further analysed the ability of primary oligodendrocyte progenitor cell motility, and found that Dstdt-27J oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were able to migrate normally. Finally, in vivo analysis of oligodendrocyte myelination was done in phenotype-stage optic nerve, cerebral cortex and spinal cord. The density of myelinated axons and g-ratios of Dstdt-27J optic nerves was normal, as

  1. Location of and post-mortem changes in some cytoskeletal proteins in pork and cod muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, E.H.; Bremner, Allan; Purslow, P.P.

    2000-01-01

    The cytoskeletal proteins actin, nebulin, spectrin, desmin, vinculin and talin were labelled immunohistochemically in sections of muscle from commercially available pigs and cod (Gadus morhua) taken pre-rigor and from samples stored for several days. Actin, nebulin and spectrin gave similar...... labelling in fish. Labelling for talin in pork muscle was intense at the sarcolemma but was not present in samples stored for 4 days. In contrast, the label for talin was concentrated at the myotendinous junction of the cod muscle throughout the storage period. These are the first reports of the detection...... and location of spectrin and vinculin in fish muscle and of the location of talin. The results are discussed in terms of muscle structure, function and post-mortem tenderisation. (C) 2000 Society of Chemical Industry....

  2. Giardia duodenalis Surface Cysteine Proteases Induce Cleavage of the Intestinal Epithelial Cytoskeletal Protein Villin via Myosin Light Chain Kinase.

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    Amol Bhargava

    Full Text Available Giardia duodenalis infections are among the most common causes of waterborne diarrhoeal disease worldwide. At the height of infection, G. duodenalis trophozoites induce multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells that contribute to the development of diarrhoeal disease. To date, our understanding of pathophysiological processes in giardiasis remains incompletely understood. The present study reveals a previously unappreciated role for G. duodenalis cathepsin cysteine proteases in intestinal epithelial pathophysiological processes that occur during giardiasis. Experiments first established that Giardia trophozoites indeed produce cathepsin B and L in strain-dependent fashion. Co-incubation of G. duodenalis with human enterocytes enhanced cathepsin production by Assemblage A (NF and S2 isolates trophozoites, but not when epithelial cells were exposed to Assemblage B (GSM isolate trophozoites. Direct contact between G. duodenalis parasites and human intestinal epithelial monolayers resulted in the degradation and redistribution of the intestinal epithelial cytoskeletal protein villin; these effects were abolished when parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases were inhibited. Interestingly, inhibition of parasite proteases did not prevent degradation of the intestinal tight junction-associated protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1, suggesting that G. duodenalis induces multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells. Finally, this study demonstrates that G. duodenalis-mediated disruption of villin is, at least, in part dependent on activation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK. Taken together, this study indicates a novel role for parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases in the pathophysiology of G. duodenalis infections.

  3. Length-Dependent Modulation of Cytoskeletal Remodeling and Mechanical Energetics in Airway Smooth Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hak Rim; Liu, Katrina; Roberts, Thomas J.; Hai, Chi-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Actin cytoskeletal remodeling is an important mechanism of airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction. We tested the hypothesis that mechanical strain modulates the cholinergic receptor–mediated cytoskeletal recruitment of actin-binding and integrin-binding proteins in intact airway smooth muscle, thereby regulating the mechanical energetics of airway smooth muscle. We found that the carbachol-stimulated cytoskeletal recruitment of actin-related protein-3 (Arp3), metavinculin, and talin were up-r...

  4. Sex hormones and expression pattern of cytoskeletal proteins in the rat brain throughout pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Arenas, Aliesha; Piña-Medina, Ana Gabriela; González-Flores, Oscar; Galván-Rosas, Agustín; Porfirio Gómora-Arrati; Camacho-Arroyo, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Pregnancy involves diverse changes in brain function that implicate a re-organization in neuronal cytoskeleton. In this physiological state, the brain is in contact with several hormones that it has never been exposed, as well as with very high levels of hormones that the brain has been in touch throughout life. Among the latter hormones are progesterone and estradiol which regulate several brain functions, including learning, memory, neuroprotection, and the display of sexual and maternal behavior. These functions involve changes in the structure and organization of neurons and glial cells that require the participation of cytoskeletal proteins whose expression and activity is regulated by estradiol and progesterone. We have found that the expression pattern of Microtubule Associated Protein 2, Tau, and Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein changes in a tissue-specific manner in the brain of the rat throughout gestation and the start of lactation, suggesting that these proteins participate in the plastic changes observed in the brain during pregnancy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Pregnancy and Steroids'.

  5. Drosophila comes of age as a model system for understanding the function of cytoskeletal proteins in cells, tissues, and organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodal, Avital A; Del Signore, Steven J; Martin, Adam C

    2015-05-01

    For the last 100 years, Drosophila melanogaster has been a powerhouse genetic system for understanding mechanisms of inheritance, development, and behavior in animals. In recent years, advances in imaging and genetic tools have led to Drosophila becoming one of the most effective systems for unlocking the subcellular functions of proteins (and particularly cytoskeletal proteins) in complex developmental settings. In this review, written for non-Drosophila experts, we will discuss critical technical advances that have enabled these cell biological insights, highlighting three examples of cytoskeletal discoveries that have arisen as a result: (1) regulation of Arp2/3 complex in myoblast fusion, (2) cooperation of the actin filament nucleators Spire and Cappuccino in establishment of oocyte polarity, and (3) coordination of supracellular myosin cables. These specific examples illustrate the unique power of Drosophila both to uncover new cytoskeletal structures and functions, and to place these discoveries in a broader in vivo context, providing insights that would have been impossible in a cell culture model or in vitro. Many of the cellular structures identified in Drosophila have clear counterparts in mammalian cells and tissues, and therefore elucidating cytoskeletal functions in Drosophila will be broadly applicable to other organisms.

  6. Flat cells come full sphere: Are mutant cytoskeletal-related proteins oncoprotein-monsters or useful immunogens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Michele L; Blanck, George

    2016-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta is inherited as a dominant disease because if one allele is mutated, it contributes a mutant, destructive subunit polypeptide to collagen, which requires many subunits to form normal, polymeric, collagenous structures. Recent cancer genome atlas (TCGA) data indicate that cytoskeletal-related proteins are among the most commonly mutated proteins in human cancers, in distinct mutation frequency groups, i.e., including low mutation frequency groups. Part of the explanation for this observation is likely to be the fact that many of the coding regions for these proteins are very large, and indeed, it is likely these coding regions are mutated in many cells that never become cancerous. However, it would not be surprising if mutations in cytoskeletal proteins, when combined with oncoprotein or tumor suppressor protein mutations, had significant impacts on cancer development, for a number of reasons, including results obtained almost 5 decades ago indicating that well-spread cells in tissue culture, with well-formed cytoskeletons, were less tumorigenic than spherical cells with disrupted cytoskeletons. This raises the question, are mutant cytoskeletal proteins, which would likely interfere with polymer formation, a new class of oncoproteins, in particular, dominant negative oncoproteins? If these proteins are so commonly mutant, could they be the bases for common cancer vaccines?

  7. [Contractile properties of fibers and cytoskeletal proteins of gerbil's hindlimb muscles after space flight].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipets, E N; Ponomareva, E V; Ogneva, I V; Vikhliantsev, I M; Karaduleva, E V; Kratashkina, N L; Kuznetsov, S L; Podlubnaia, Z A; Shenkman, B S

    2009-01-01

    The work had the goal to compare the microgravity effects on gerbil's muscles-antagonists, m. soleus and m. tibialis anterior. The animals were exposed in 12-d space microgravity aboard Earth's artificial satellite "Foton-M3". Findings of the analysis of single skinned fibers contractility are 19.7% diminution of the diameter and 21.8% loss of the total contractive force of m. soleus fibers post flight. However, there was no significant difference in calcium sensitivity which agrees with the absence of changes in the relative content of several major cytoskeletal proteins (titin and nebulin ratios to heavy chains of myosin were identical in the flight and control groups) and a slight shifting of the myosin phenotype toward the "fast type" (9%, p < 0.05). These parameters were mostly unaffected by the space flight in m. tibialis anterior. To sum up, the decline of contractility and diminution of gerbil's myofibers after the space flight were less significant as compared with rats and did not impact the sytoskeletal protein ratios.

  8. RBC-NOS-dependent S-nitrosylation of cytoskeletal proteins improves RBC deformability.

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    Marijke Grau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Red blood cells (RBC possess a nitric oxide synthase (RBC-NOS whose activation depends on the PI3-kinase/Akt kinase pathway. RBC-NOS-produced NO exhibits important biological functions like maintaining RBC deformability. Until now, the cellular target structure for NO, to exert its influence on RBC deformability, remains unknown. In the present study we analyzed the modification of RBC-NOS activity by pharmacological treatments, the resulting influence on RBC deformability and provide first evidence for possible target proteins of RBC-NOS-produced NO in the RBC cytoskeletal scaffold. METHODS/FINDINGS: Blood from fifteen male subjects was incubated with the NOS substrate L-arginine to directly stimulate enzyme activity. Direct inhibition of enzyme activity was induced by L-N5-(1-Iminoethyl-ornithin (L-NIO. Indirect stimulation and inhibition of RBC-NOS were achieved by applying insulin and wortmannin, respectively, substances known to affect PI3-kinase/Akt kinase pathway. The NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP and the NO scavenger 2-(4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO were additionally applied as NO positive and negative controls, respectively. Immunohistochemical staining was used to determine phosphorylation and thus activation of RBC-NOS. As a marker for NO synthesis nitrite was measured in plasma and RBCs using chemiluminescence detection. S-nitrosylation of erythrocyte proteins was determined by biotin switch assay and modified proteins were identified using LC-MS. RBC deformability was determined by ektacytometry. The data reveal that activated RBC-NOS leads to increased NO production, S-nitrosylation of RBC proteins and RBC deformability, whereas RBC-NOS inhibition resulted in contrary effects. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study first-time provides strong evidence that RBC-NOS-produced NO modifies RBC deformability through direct S-nitrosylation of cytoskeleton proteins, most likely α- and

  9. Cytoskeletal protein translation and expression in the rat brain are stressor-dependent and region-specific.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Sántha

    Full Text Available Stress is an integral component of life that can sometimes cause a critical overload, depending on the qualitative and quantitative natures of the stressors. The involvement of actin, the predominant component of dendritic integrity, is a plausible candidate factor in stress-induced neuronal cytoskeletal changes. The major aim of this study was to compare the effects of three different stress conditions on the transcription and translation of actin-related cytoskeletal genes in the rat brain. Male Wistar rats were exposed to one or other of the frequently used models of physical stress, i.e. electric foot shock stress (EFSS, forced swimming stress (FSS, or psychosocial stress (PSS for periods of 3, 7, 14, or 21 days. The relative mRNA and protein expressions of β-actin, cofilin and mitogen-activated protein kinase 1 (MAPK-1 were determined by qRT- PCR and western blotting from hippocampus and frontal cortex samples. Stressor-specific alterations in both β-actin and cofilin expression levels were seen after stress. These alterations were most pronounced in response to EFSS, and exhibited a U-shaped time course. FSS led to a significant β-actin mRNA expression elevation in the hippocampus and the frontal cortex after 3 and 7 days, respectively, without any subsequent change. PSS did not cause any change in β-actin or cofilin mRNA or protein expression in the examined brain regions. EFSS, FSS and PSS had no effect on the expression of MAPK-1 mRNA at any tested time point. These findings indicate a very delicate, stress type-dependent regulation of neuronal cytoskeletal components in the rat hippocampus and frontal cortex.

  10. Adenosine Diphosphate Ribosylation Factor-GTPaseActivating Protein Stimulates the Transport of AUX1Endosome, Which Relies on Actin Cytoskeletal Organization in Rice Root DevelopmentF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Du; Yunyuan XU; Yingdian Wang; Kang Chong

    2011-01-01

    Polar auxin transport,which depends on polarized subcellular distribution of AUXIN RESISTANT 1/LIKE AUX1 (AUX1/LAX) influx carriers and PIN-FORMED (PIN) efflux carriers,mediates various processes of plant growth and development.Endosomal recycling of PIN1 is mediated by an adenosine diphosphate (ADP)ribosylation factor (ARF)-GTPase exchange factor protein,GNOM.However,the mediation of auxin influx carrier recycling is poorly understood.Here,we report that overexpression of OsAGAP,an ARF-GTPase-activating protein in rice,stimulates vesicle transport from the plasma membrane to the Golgi apparatus in protoplasts and transgenic plants and induces the accumulation of early endosomes and AUX1.AUX1 endosomes could partially colocalize with FM4-64 labeled early endosome after actin disruption.Furthermore,OsAGAP is involved in actin cytoskeletal organization,and its overexpression tends to reduce the thickness and bundling of actin filaments.Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis revealed exocytosis of the AUX1 recycling endosome was not affected in the OsAGAP overexpression cells,and was only slightly promoted when the actin filaments were completely disrupted by Lat B.Thus,we propose that AUX1 accumulation in the OsAGAP overexpression and actin disrupted cells may be due to the fact that endocytosis of the auxin influx carrier AUX1 early endosome was greatly promoted by actin cytoskeleton disruption.

  11. Antibody-based analysis reveals “filamentous vs. non-filamentous” and “cytoplasmic vs. nuclear” crosstalk of cytoskeletal proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumeta, Masahiro, E-mail: kumeta@lif.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Hirai, Yuya; Yoshimura, Shige H. [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Horigome, Tsuneyoshi [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Takeyasu, Kunio [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2013-12-10

    To uncover the molecular composition and dynamics of the functional scaffold for the nucleus, three fractions of biochemically-stable nuclear protein complexes were extracted and used as immunogens to produce a variety of monoclonal antibodies. Many helix-based cytoskeletal proteins were identified as antigens, suggesting their dynamic contribution to nuclear architecture and function. Interestingly, sets of antibodies distinguished distinct subcellular localization of a single isoform of certain cytoskeletal proteins; distinct molecular forms of keratin and actinin were found in the nucleus. Their nuclear shuttling properties were verified by the apparent nuclear accumulations under inhibition of CRM1-dependent nuclear export. Nuclear keratins do not take an obvious filamentous structure, as was revealed by non-filamentous cytoplasmic keratin-specific monoclonal antibody. These results suggest the distinct roles of the helix-based cytoskeletal proteins in the nucleus. - Highlights: • A set of monoclonal antibodies were raised against nuclear scaffold proteins. • Helix-based cytoskeletal proteins were involved in nuclear scaffold. • Many cytoskeletal components shuttle into the nucleus in a CRM1-dependent manner. • Sets of antibodies distinguished distinct subcellular localization of a single isoform. • Nuclear keratin is soluble and does not form an obvious filamentous structure.

  12. A conserved proline-rich region of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein binds SH3 domains and modulates cytoskeletal localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, N L; Lila, T; Mintzer, K A; Chen, Z; Pahk, A J; Ren, R; Drubin, D G; Field, J

    1996-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cyclase-associated protein (CAP or Srv2p) is multifunctional. The N-terminal third of CAP binds to adenylyl cyclase and has been implicated in adenylyl cyclase activation in vivo. The widely conserved C-terminal domain of CAP binds to monomeric actin and serves an important cytoskeletal regulatory function in vivo. In addition, all CAP homologs contain a centrally located proline-rich region which has no previously identified function. Recently, SH3 (Src homology 3) domains were shown to bind to proline-rich regions of proteins. Here we report that the proline-rich region of CAP is recognized by the SH3 domains of several proteins, including the yeast actin-associated protein Abp1p. Immunolocalization experiments demonstrate that CAP colocalizes with cortical actin-containing structures in vivo and that a region of CAP containing the SH3 domain binding site is required for this localization. We also demonstrate that the SH3 domain of yeast Abp1p and that of the yeast RAS protein guanine nucleotide exchange factor Cdc25p complex with adenylyl cyclase in vitro. Interestingly, the binding of the Cdc25p SH3 domain is not mediated by CAP and therefore may involve direct binding to adenylyl cyclase or to an unidentified protein which complexes with adenylyl cyclase. We also found that CAP homologous from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and humans bind SH3 domains. The human protein binds most strongly to the SH3 domain from the abl proto-oncogene. These observations identify CAP as an SH3 domain-binding protein and suggest that CAP mediates interactions between SH3 domain proteins and monomeric actin.

  13. Microcystin-LR induced reactive oxygen species mediate cytoskeletal disruption and apoptosis of hepatocytes in Cyprinus carpio L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlin Jiang

    Full Text Available Microcystins (MCs are a group of cyclic hepatotoxic peptides produced by cyanobacteria. Microcystin-LR (MC-LR contains Leucine (L and Arginine (R in the variable positions, and is one of the most common and potently toxic peptides. MC-LR can inhibit protein phosphatase type 1 and type 2A (PP1 and PP2A activities and induce excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. The underlying mechanism of the inhibition of PP1 and PP2A has been extensively studied. The over-production of ROS is considered to be another main mechanism behind MC-LR toxicity; however, the detailed toxicological mechanism involved in over-production of ROS in carp (Cyprinus carpio L. remains largely unclear. In our present study, the hydroxyl radical (•OH was significantly induced in the liver of carp after a relatively short-term exposure to MC-LR. The elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS production may play an important role in the disruption of microtubule structure. Pre-injection of the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC provided significant protection to the cytoskeleton, however buthionine sulfoximine (BSO exacerbated cytoskeletal destruction. In addition, the elevated ROS formation induced the expression of apoptosis-related genes, including p38, JNKa, and bcl-2. A significant increase in apoptotic cells was observed at 12-48 hours. Our study further supports evidence that ROS are involved in MC-LR induced damage to liver cells in carp, and indicates the need for further study of the molecular mechanisms behind MC-LR toxicity.

  14. Recruitment of septin cytoskeletal proteins by botulinum toxin A protease determines its remarkable stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagin, Olga; Tokhtaeva, Elmira; Garay, Patton E; Souda, Puneet; Bassilian, Sara; Whitelegge, Julian P; Lewis, Ramilla; Sachs, George; Wheeler, Larry; Aoki, Roger; Fernandez-Salas, Ester

    2014-08-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of synaptosomal-associated protein 25 by the light chain of botulinum neurotoxin type A (LCA) results in a blockade of neurotransmitter release that persists for several months in motor neurons. The L428A/L429A mutation in LCA is known to significantly shorten both the proteolytic and neuroparalytic effects of the neurotoxin in mice. To elucidate the cellular mechanism for LCA longevity, we studied the effects of L428A/L429A mutation on the interactome, localization and stability of LCA expressed in cultured neuronal cells. Mass spectrometry analysis of the LCA interactome showed that the mutation prevented the interaction of LCA with septins. The wild-type LCA was concentrated in plasma-membrane-associated clusters, colocalizing with septins-2 and septin-7, which accumulated in these clusters only in the presence of LCA. The L428A/L429A mutation decreased co-clustering of LCA and septins and accelerated proteasomal and non-proteasomal degradation of LCA. Similarly, the impairment of septin oligomerization by forchlorfenuron or silencing of septin-2 prevented LCA interaction and clustering with septins and increased LCA degradation. Therefore, the dileucine-mediated LCA-septin co-clustering is crucial for the long-lasting stabilization of LCA-related proteolytic and presumably neuroparalytic activity. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Protein- mediated enamel mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Enamel is a hard nanocomposite bioceramic with significant resilience that protects the mammalian tooth from external physical and chemical damages. The remarkable mechanical properties of enamel are associated with its hierarchical structural organization and its thorough connection with underlying dentin. This dynamic mineralizing system offers scientists a wealth of information that allows the study of basic principals of organic matrix-mediated biomineralization and can potentially be utilized in the fields of material science and engineering for development and design of biomimetic materials. This chapter will provide a brief overview of enamel hierarchical structure and properties as well as the process and stages of amelogenesis. Particular emphasis is given to current knowledge of extracellular matrix protein and proteinases, and the structural chemistry of the matrix components and their putative functions. The chapter will conclude by discussing the potential of enamel for regrowth. PMID:22652761

  16. Overexpression of dishevelled-1 attenuates wortmannin-induced hyperphosphorylation of cytoskeletal proteins in N2a cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-hong WANG; Ai-hong ZHANG; Ling-qiang ZHU; Qun WANG; Jian-zhi WANG

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of dishevelled- 1 (DVL- 1) on wortmannin-induced Alzheimer-like hyperphosphorylation of cytoskeletal proteins in mouse neuroblastoma 2a (N2a) cells. Methods: Cultured N2a cells were transitorily transfected with DVL-1 expression plasmid using LipofectamineTM 2000. Western blot and immunofluorescence microscopy were used to measure the phosphorylation of neurofilament and tau. Results: Level of phosphorylated neurofilament at SMI31 epitope and phosphorylated tau determined by PHF-1 was increased at 1 h and 3 h and back to normal at 6 h after wortmannin 1 μmol/L treatment. The highest level of phosphorylated neurofilament and phosphorylated tau was seen at 1 h and 3 h after wortmannin treatment, respectively. When DVL- 1 protein was overexpressed,the hyperphosphorylation of neurofilament at SMI31 and SMI32 epitopes and tau at PHF- 1 (Ser-396/404), M4 (Thr-231/Ser-235), and Tau- 1 (Ser- 198/199/202) epitopes was attenuated. Conclusion: Overexpression of mouse DVL-1 protein inhibits wortmannin-induced hyperphosphorylation of neurofilament and tau in N2a cells.

  17. The repetitive cytoskeletal protein H49 of Trypanosoma cruzi is a calpain-like protein located at the flagellum attachment zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galetović, Alexandra; Souza, Renata T; Santos, Marcia R M; Cordero, Esteban M; Bastos, Izabela M D; Santana, Jaime M; Ruiz, Jeronimo C; Lima, Fabio M; Marini, Marjorie M; Mortara, Renato A; da Silveira, José Franco

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi has a single flagellum attached to the cell body by a network of specialized cytoskeletal and membranous connections called the flagellum attachment zone. Previously, we isolated a DNA fragment (clone H49) which encodes tandemly arranged repeats of 68 amino acids associated with a high molecular weight cytoskeletal protein. In the current study, the genomic complexity of H49 and its relationships to the T. cruzi calpain-like cysteine peptidase family, comprising active calpains and calpain-like proteins, is addressed. Immunofluorescence analysis and biochemical fractionation were used to demonstrate the cellular location of H49 proteins. All of H49 repeats are associated with calpain-like sequences. Sequence analysis demonstrated that this protein, now termed H49/calpain, consists of an amino-terminal catalytic cysteine protease domain II, followed by a large region of 68-amino acid repeats tandemly arranged and a carboxy-terminal segment carrying the protease domains II and III. The H49/calpains can be classified as calpain-like proteins as the cysteine protease catalytic triad has been partially conserved in these proteins. The H49/calpains repeats share less than 60% identity with other calpain-like proteins in Leishmania and T. brucei, and there is no immunological cross reaction among them. It is suggested that the expansion of H49/calpain repeats only occurred in T. cruzi after separation of a T. cruzi ancestor from other trypanosomatid lineages. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting experiments demonstrated that H49/calpain is located along the flagellum attachment zone adjacent to the cell body. H49/calpain contains large central region composed of 68-amino acid repeats tandemly arranged. They can be classified as calpain-like proteins as the cysteine protease catalytic triad is partially conserved in these proteins. H49/calpains could have a structural role, namely that of ensuring that the cell body remains attached to the flagellum by

  18. Estrogen effects on actin cytoskeletal and endocytic proteins associated with tubulobulbar complex disruption in rat testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Rahul D; Kumar, Anita V; Sonawane, Shobha; Gaonkar, Reshma; Balasinor, Nafisa H

    2013-10-01

    Tubulobulbar complexes (TBCs), evaginations of mature spermatids, penetrate into the surrounding Sertoli cell cytoplasm of testis seminiferous epithelium during rat spermatogenesis. These structures prepare mature spermatids for their release into the seminiferous tubular lumen via a process called spermiation. Based on their functions of transient attachment and endocytosis, many actin-regulatory and endocytic proteins are associated with TBCs. Previously, exogenous 17β-estradiol administration to adult male rats showed spermiation failure that was attributed to TBC disruption. To determine the molecular basis of estrogen-induced TBC disruption, we examined the expressions and localizations of actin-regulatory proteins, endocytic proteins, Rho-GTPases, and phosphorylation in TBCs during sperm release. Results demonstrated absence of neural Wiscott Aldrich syndrome protein, cortactin, adaptor-related protein complex 2 sigma-1 subunit, dynamin 2, cell division control protein 42, and phosphocortactin in the concavity of spermatid head where TBCs are present without change in their protein expression levels. Absence of these proteins could have led to collapse of the TBC structure which is involved in its formation and function.

  19. Identification of TgCBAP, a novel cytoskeletal protein that localizes to three distinct subcompartments of the Toxoplasma gondii pellicle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Lucas D; Krishnamurthy, Shruthi; Westwood, Nicholas J; Ward, Gary E

    2014-01-01

    The cytoskeletons of Toxoplasma gondii and related apicomplexan parasites are highly polarized, with apical and basal regions comprised of distinct protein complexes. Components of these complexes are known to play important roles in parasite shape, cell division, and host cell invasion. During an effort to discover the biologically relevant target of a small-molecule inhibitor of T. gondii invasion (Conoidin A), we discovered a novel cytoskeletal protein that we named TgCBAP (Conserved Basal Apical Peripheral protein). Orthologs of TgCBAP are only found in the genomes of other apicomplexans; they contain no identifiable domains or motifs and their function(s) is unknown. As a first step toward elucidating the function of this highly conserved family of proteins, we disrupted the TgCBAP gene by double homologous recombination. Parasites lacking TgCBAP are as sensitive to the effects of Conoidin A as wild-type parasites, demonstrating that TgCBAP is not the biologically relevant target of Conoidin A. However, ΔTgCBAP parasites are significantly shorter than wild-type parasites and have a growth defect in culture. Furthermore, TgCBAP has an unusual subcellular localization, forming small rings at the apical and basal ends of the parasite and localizing to punctate, ring-like structures around the parasite periphery. These data identify a new marker of the apical and basal subcompartments of T. gondii, reveal a potentially novel compartment along the parasite periphery, and identify TgCBAP as a determinant of parasite size that is required for a maximally efficient lytic cycle.

  20. Identification of TgCBAP, a novel cytoskeletal protein that localizes to three distinct subcompartments of the Toxoplasma gondii pellicle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas D Tilley

    Full Text Available The cytoskeletons of Toxoplasma gondii and related apicomplexan parasites are highly polarized, with apical and basal regions comprised of distinct protein complexes. Components of these complexes are known to play important roles in parasite shape, cell division, and host cell invasion. During an effort to discover the biologically relevant target of a small-molecule inhibitor of T. gondii invasion (Conoidin A, we discovered a novel cytoskeletal protein that we named TgCBAP (Conserved Basal Apical Peripheral protein. Orthologs of TgCBAP are only found in the genomes of other apicomplexans; they contain no identifiable domains or motifs and their function(s is unknown. As a first step toward elucidating the function of this highly conserved family of proteins, we disrupted the TgCBAP gene by double homologous recombination. Parasites lacking TgCBAP are as sensitive to the effects of Conoidin A as wild-type parasites, demonstrating that TgCBAP is not the biologically relevant target of Conoidin A. However, ΔTgCBAP parasites are significantly shorter than wild-type parasites and have a growth defect in culture. Furthermore, TgCBAP has an unusual subcellular localization, forming small rings at the apical and basal ends of the parasite and localizing to punctate, ring-like structures around the parasite periphery. These data identify a new marker of the apical and basal subcompartments of T. gondii, reveal a potentially novel compartment along the parasite periphery, and identify TgCBAP as a determinant of parasite size that is required for a maximally efficient lytic cycle.

  1. Active components of ginger potentiate β-agonist-induced relaxation of airway smooth muscle by modulating cytoskeletal regulatory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Elizabeth A; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Carrie; Wakita, Ryo; Emala, Charles W

    2014-01-01

    β-Agonists are the first-line therapy to alleviate asthma symptoms by acutely relaxing the airway. Purified components of ginger relax airway smooth muscle (ASM), but the mechanisms are unclear. By elucidating these mechanisms, we can explore the use of phytotherapeutics in combination with traditional asthma therapies. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine if 6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, or 6-shogaol potentiate β-agonist-induced ASM relaxation; and (2) define the mechanism(s) of action responsible for this potentiation. Human ASM was contracted in organ baths. Tissues were relaxed dose dependently with β-agonist, isoproterenol, in the presence of vehicle, 6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, or 6-shogaol (100 μM). Primary human ASM cells were used for cellular experiments. Purified phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4D or phospholipase C β enzyme was used to assess inhibitory activity of ginger components using fluorescent assays. A G-LISA assay was used to determine the effects of ginger constituents on Ras homolog gene family member A activation. Significant potentiation of isoproterenol-induced relaxation was observed with each of the ginger constituents. 6-Shogaol showed the largest shift in isoproterenol half-maximal effective concentration. 6-Gingerol, 8-gingerol, or 6-shogaol significantly inhibited PDE4D, whereas 8-gingerol and 6-shogaol also inhibited phospholipase C β activity. 6-Shogaol alone inhibited Ras homolog gene family member A activation. In human ASM cells, these constituents decreased phosphorylation of 17-kD protein kinase C-potentiated inhibitory protein of type 1 protein phosphatase and 8-gingerol decreased myosin light chain phosphorylation. Isolated components of ginger potentiate β-agonist-induced relaxation in human ASM. This potentiation involves PDE4D inhibition and cytoskeletal regulatory proteins. Together with β-agonists, 6-gingerol, 8-gingerol, or 6-shogaol may augment existing asthma therapy, resulting in relief of symptoms through

  2. The actin binding cytoskeletal protein Moesin is involved in nuclear mRNA export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristó, Ildikó; Bajusz, Csaba; Borsos, Barbara N; Pankotai, Tibor; Dopie, Joseph; Jankovics, Ferenc; Vartiainen, Maria K; Erdélyi, Miklós; Vilmos, Péter

    2017-10-01

    Current models imply that the evolutionarily conserved, actin-binding Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin (ERM) proteins perform their activities at the plasma membrane by anchoring membrane proteins to the cortical actin network. Here we show that beside its cytoplasmic functions, the single ERM protein of Drosophila, Moesin, has a novel role in the nucleus. The activation of transcription by heat shock or hormonal treatment increases the amount of nuclear Moesin, indicating biological function for the protein in the nucleus. The distribution of Moesin in the nucleus suggests a function in transcription and the depletion of mRNA export factors Nup98 or its interacting partner, Rae1, leads to the nuclear accumulation of Moesin, suggesting that the nuclear function of the protein is linked to mRNA export. Moesin localizes to mRNP particles through the interaction with the mRNA export factor PCID2 and knock down of Moesin leads to the accumulation of mRNA in the nucleus. Based on our results we propose that, beyond its well-known, manifold functions in the cytoplasm, the ERM protein of Drosophila is a new, functional component of the nucleus where it participates in mRNA export. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Fibronectin in cultured rat keratinocytes: distribution, synthesis, and relationship to cytoskeletal proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gibson, W T; Couchman, J R; Badley, R A;

    1983-01-01

    immunofluorescence staining of cultures grown in the absence of a feeder layer using an antiserum which had been cross-adsorbed with foetal calf serum proteins to remove antibodies which recognised serum fibronectin. The distribution of fibronectin in areas of cell-cell and cell-substratum contact...

  4. Phosphorylation of the cytoskeletal protein CAP1 controls its association with cofilin and actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guo-Lei; Zhang, Haitao; Wu, Huhehasi; Ghai, Pooja; Field, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    Cell signaling can control the dynamic balance between filamentous and monomeric actin by modulating actin regulatory proteins. One family of actin regulating proteins that controls actin dynamics comprises cyclase-associated proteins 1 and 2 (CAP1 and 2, respectively). However, cell signals that regulate CAPs remained unknown. We mapped phosphorylation sites on mouse CAP1 and found S307 and S309 to be regulatory sites. We further identified glycogen synthase kinase 3 as a kinase phosphorylating S309. The phosphomimetic mutant S307D/S309D lost binding to its partner cofilin and, when expressed in cells, caused accumulation of actin stress fibers similar to that in cells with reduced CAP expression. In contrast, the non-phosphorylatable S307A/S309A mutant showed drastically increased cofilin binding and reduced binding to actin. These results suggest that the phosphorylation serves to facilitate release of cofilin for a subsequent cycle of actin filament severing. Moreover, our results suggest that S307 and S309 function in tandem; neither the alterations in binding cofilin and/or actin, nor the defects in rescuing the phenotype of the enlarged cell size in CAP1 knockdown cells was observed in point mutants of either S307 or S309. In summary, we identify a novel regulatory mechanism of CAP1 through phosphorylation.

  5. Cytoskeletal architecture of isolated mitotic spindle with special reference to microtubule-associated proteins and cytoplasmic dynein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirokawa, N; Takemura, R; Hisanaga, S

    1985-11-01

    We have studied cytoskeletal architectures of isolated mitotic apparatus from sea urchin eggs using quick-freeze, deep-etch electron microscopy. This method revealed the existence of an extensive three-dimensional network of straight and branching crossbridges between spindle microtubules. The surface of the spindle microtubules was almost entirely covered with hexagonally packed, small, round button-like structures which were very uniform in shape and size (approximately 8 nm in diameter), and these microtubule buttons frequently provided bases for crossbridges between adjacent microtubules. These structures were removed from the surface of microtubules by high salt (0.6 M NaCl) extraction. Microtubule-associated proteins (MAPs) and microtubules isolated from mitotic spindles which were mainly composed of a large amount of 75-kD protein and some high molecular mass (250 kD, 245 kD) proteins were polymerized in vitro and examined by quick-freeze, deep-etch electron microscopy. The surfaces of microtubules were entirely covered with the same hexagonally packed round buttons, the arrangement of which is intimately related to that of tubulin dimers. Short crossbridges and some longer crossbridges were also observed. High salt treatment (0.6 M NaCl) extracted both 75-kD protein and high molecular weight proteins and removed microtubule buttons and most of crossbridges from the surface of microtubules. Considering the relatively high amount of 75-kD protein among MAPs isolated from mitotic spindles, it is concluded that these microtubule buttons probably consist of 75-kD MAP and that some of the crossbridges in vivo could belong to MAPs. Another kind of granule, larger in size (11-26 nm in diameter), was also on occasion associated with the surface of microtubules of mitotic spindles. A fine sidearm sometimes connected the larger granule to adjacent microtubules. Localization of cytoplasmic dynein ATPase in the mitotic spindle was investigated by electron microscopic

  6. Protein Kinase CK2 Regulates Cytoskeletal Reorganization during Ionizing Radiation-Induced Senescence of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Daojing; Jang, Deok-Jin

    2009-08-21

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) are critical for tissue regeneration. How hMSC respond to genotoxic stresses and potentially contribute to aging and cancer remain underexplored. We demonstrated that ionizing radiation induced cellular senescence of hMSC over a period of 10 days, showing a critical transition between day 3 and day 6. This was confirmed by senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal) staining, protein expression profiles of key cell cycle regulators (retinoblastoma (Rb) protein, p53, p21{sup waf1/Cip1}, and p16{sup INK4A}), and senescence-associated secretory phenotypes (SASPs) (IL-8, IL-12, GRO, and MDC). We observed dramatic cytoskeletal reorganization of hMSC through reduction of myosin-10, redistribution of myosin-9, and secretion of profilin-1. Using a SILAC-based phosphoproteomics method, we detected significant reduction of myosin-9 phosphorylation at Ser1943, coinciding with its redistribution. Importantly, through treatment with cell permeable inhibitors (4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzotriazole (TBB) and 2-dimethylamino-4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole (DMAT)), and gene knockdown using RNA interference, we identified CK2, a kinase responsible for myosin-9 phosphorylation at Ser1943, as a key factor contributing to the radiation-induced senescence of hMSC. We showed that individual knockdown of CK2 catalytic subunits CK2{alpha} and CK2{alpha}{prime} induced hMSC senescence. However, only knockdown of CK2{alpha} resulted in morphological phenotypes resembling those of radiation-induced senescence. These results suggest that CK2{alpha} and CK2{alpha}{prime} play differential roles in hMSC senescence progression, and their relative expression might represent a novel regulatory mechanism for CK2 activity.

  7. Loss of the cytoskeletal protein Pdlim7 predisposes mice to heart defects and hemostatic dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Krcmery

    Full Text Available The actin-associated protein Pdlim7 is essential for heart and fin development in zebrafish; however, the expression and function of this PDZ-LIM family member in the mammal has remained unclear. Here, we show that Pdlim7 predominantly localizes to actin-rich structures in mice including the heart, vascular smooth muscle, and platelets. To test the requirement for Pdlim7 in mammalian development and function, we analyzed a mouse strain with global genetic inactivation of Pdlim7. We demonstrate that Pdlim7 loss-of-function leads to significant postnatal mortality. Inactivation of Pdlim7 does not disrupt cardiac development, but causes mild cardiac dysfunction in adult mice. Adult Pdlim7(-/- mice displayed increased mitral and tricuspid valve annulus to body weight ratios. These structural aberrations in Pdlim7(-/- mice were supported by three-dimensional reconstructions of adult cardiac valves, which revealed increased surface area to volume ratios for the mitral and tricuspid valve leaflets. Unexpectedly, we found that loss of Pdlim7 triggers systemic venous and arterial thrombosis, leading to significant mortality shortly after birth in Pdlim7(+/- (11/60 and Pdlim7(-/- (19/35 mice. In line with a prothrombotic phenotype, adult Pdlim7(-/- mice exhibit dramatically decreased tail bleed times compared to controls. These findings reveal a novel and unexpected function for Pdlim7 in maintaining proper hemostasis in neonatal and adult mice.

  8. Improved immunoelectron microscopic method for localizing cytoskeletal proteins in Lowicryl K4M embedded tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesser, K E; Doane, K J; Wilson, F J; Roisen, F J; Malamed, S

    1986-11-01

    We have modified the Lowicryl K4M low-temperature dehydration and embedding procedure for immunoelectron microscopy to provide improved ultrastructural detail and facilitate the localization of actin and tubulin in isolated rat adrenocortical cells, chick spinal cord with attached dorsal root ganglia (SC-DRG), and cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Cells and tissues were fixed for immunocytochemistry either in a mixture of 2% paraformaldehyde and 0.25% glutaraldehyde (0.1 M PIPES buffer, pH 7.3) or in a mixture of 0.3% glutaraldehyde and 1.0% ethyldimethylaminopropylcarbodiimide (0.1 M phosphate buffered saline, pH 7.3). Dehydration was in ethanol at progressively lower temperatures to -35 degrees C. Infiltration at -35 degrees C was followed by ultraviolet polymerization at -20 degrees C. Comparable samples were fixed in glutaraldehyde and osmium tetroxide and embedded in Epon 812 or Epon-Araldite. Post-embedding immunostaining of thin sections utilized commercially available monoclonal antibodies to tubulin and actin followed by the protein A-gold technique (Roth et al., Endocrinology 108:247, 1981). Actin immunoreactivity was observed at the periphery of mitochondria and between mitochondria and lipid droplets in rat adrenocortical cells and at the periphery of neuronal cell processes of SC-DRG. Tubulin immunoreactivity was associated with microtubules throughout neurites of cultured DRG. Our modified technique allows preservation of ultrastructural details as well as localization of antigens by immunoelectron microscopy.

  9. The repetitive cytoskeletal protein H49 of Trypanosoma cruzi is a calpain-like protein located at the flagellum attachment zone.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Galetović

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Trypanosoma cruzi has a single flagellum attached to the cell body by a network of specialized cytoskeletal and membranous connections called the flagellum attachment zone. Previously, we isolated a DNA fragment (clone H49 which encodes tandemly arranged repeats of 68 amino acids associated with a high molecular weight cytoskeletal protein. In the current study, the genomic complexity of H49 and its relationships to the T. cruzi calpain-like cysteine peptidase family, comprising active calpains and calpain-like proteins, is addressed. Immunofluorescence analysis and biochemical fractionation were used to demonstrate the cellular location of H49 proteins. METHODS AND FINDINGS: All of H49 repeats are associated with calpain-like sequences. Sequence analysis demonstrated that this protein, now termed H49/calpain, consists of an amino-terminal catalytic cysteine protease domain II, followed by a large region of 68-amino acid repeats tandemly arranged and a carboxy-terminal segment carrying the protease domains II and III. The H49/calpains can be classified as calpain-like proteins as the cysteine protease catalytic triad has been partially conserved in these proteins. The H49/calpains repeats share less than 60% identity with other calpain-like proteins in Leishmania and T. brucei, and there is no immunological cross reaction among them. It is suggested that the expansion of H49/calpain repeats only occurred in T. cruzi after separation of a T. cruzi ancestor from other trypanosomatid lineages. Immunofluorescence and immunoblotting experiments demonstrated that H49/calpain is located along the flagellum attachment zone adjacent to the cell body. CONCLUSIONS: H49/calpain contains large central region composed of 68-amino acid repeats tandemly arranged. They can be classified as calpain-like proteins as the cysteine protease catalytic triad is partially conserved in these proteins. H49/calpains could have a structural role, namely that of

  10. Down-regulation of Slit-Robo pathway mediating neuronal cytoskeletal remodeling processes facilitates the antidepressive-like activity of Gastrodia elata Blume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Hang; Chen, Wei-Cheng; Lu, Kuan-Hung; Chen, Pei-Ju; Hsieh, Shu-Chen; Pan, Tzu-Ming; Chen, Shui-Tein; Sheen, Lee-Yan

    2014-10-29

    Nowadays, depression is a serious psychological disorder that causes extreme economic loss and social problems. Previously, we discovered that the water extract of Gastrodia elata Blume (WGE) improved depressive-like behavior by influencing neurotransmitters in rats subjected to the forced swimming test. To elucidate possible mechanisms, in the present study, we performed a proteomics and bioinformatics analysis to identify the related pathways. Western blot-validated results indicated that the core protein network modulated by WGE administration was closely associated with down-regulation of the Slit-Robo pathway, which modulates neuronal cytoskeletal remodeling processes. Although Slit-Robo signaling has been well investigated in neuronal development, its relationship with depression is not fully understood. We provide a potential hint on the mechanism responsible for the antidepressive-like activity of WGE. In conclusion, we suggest that the Slit-Robo pathway and neuronal cytoskeleton remodeling are possibly one of the pathways associated with the antidepressive-like effects of WGE.

  11. Smoking correlates with increased cytoskeletal protein-related coding region mutations in the lung and head and neck datasets of the cancer genome atlas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavorski, John M; Blanck, George

    2016-12-01

    Cancer from smoking tobacco is considered dependent on mutagens, but significant molecular aspects of smoking-specific, cancer development remain unknown. We defined sets of coding regions for oncoproteins, tumor suppressor proteins, and cytoskeletal-related proteins that were compared between nonsmokers and smokers, for mutation occurrences, in the lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD), head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSC), bladder carcinoma (BLCA), and pancreatic adenocarcinoma ( PAAD) datasets from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). We uncovered significant differences in overall mutation rates, and in mutation rates in cytoskeletal protein-related coding regions (CPCRs, including extracellular matrix protein coding regions), between nonsmokers and smokers in LUAD and HNSC (P < 0.001), raising the question of whether the CPCR mutation differences lead to different clinical courses for nonsmoker and smoker cancers. Another important question inspired by these results is, whether high smoker cancer mutation rates would facilitate genotoxicity or neoantigen-based therapies. No significant, mutation-based differences were found in the BLCA or PAAD datasets, between nonsmokers and smokers. However, a significant difference was uncovered for the average number of overall cancer mutations, in LUAD, for persons who stopped smoking more than 15 years ago, compared with more recent smokers (P < 0.032).

  12. Apo and calcium-bound crystal structures of cytoskeletal protein alpha-14 giardin (annexin E1) from the intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathuri, Puja; Nguyen, Emily Tam; Ozorowski, Gabriel; Svärd, Staffan G; Luecke, Hartmut

    2009-01-30

    Alpha-14 giardin (annexin E1), a member of the alpha giardin family of annexins, has been shown to localize to the flagella of the intestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia. Alpha giardins show a common ancestry with the annexins, a family of proteins most of which bind to phospholipids and cellular membranes in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner and are implicated in numerous membrane-related processes including cytoskeletal rearrangements and membrane organization. It has been proposed that alpha-14 giardin may play a significant role during the cytoskeletal rearrangement during differentiation of Giardia. To gain a better understanding of alpha-14 giardin's mode of action and its biological role, we have determined the three-dimensional structure of alpha-14 giardin and its phospholipid-binding properties. Here, we report the apo crystal structure of alpha-14 giardin determined in two different crystal forms as well as the Ca(2+)-bound crystal structure of alpha-14 giardin, refined to 1.9, 1.6 and 1.65 A, respectively. Although the overall fold of alpha-14 giardin is similar to that of alpha-11 giardin, multiwavelength anomalous dispersion phasing was required to solve the alpha-14 giardin structure, indicating significant structural differences between these two members of the alpha giardin family. Unlike most annexin structures, which typically possess N-terminal domains, alpha-14 giardin is composed of only a core domain, followed by a C-terminal extension that may serve as a ligand for binding to cytoskeletal protein partners in Giardia. In the Ca(2+)-bound structure we detected five bound calcium ions, one of which is a novel, highly coordinated calcium-binding site not previously observed in annexin structures. This novel high-affinity calcium-binding site is composed of seven protein donor groups, a feature rarely observed in crystal structures. In addition, phospholipid-binding assays suggest that alpha-14 giardin exhibits calcium-dependent binding to

  13. Toxaphene, but not beryllium, induces human neutrophil chemotaxis and apoptosis via reactive oxygen species (ROS): involvement of caspases and ROS in the degradation of cytoskeletal proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavastre, Valérie; Roberge, Charles J; Pelletier, Martin; Gauthier, Marc; Girard, Denis

    2002-07-01

    Chemicals of environmental concern are known to alter the immune system. Recent data indicate that some contaminants possess proinflammatory properties by activating neutrophils, an area of research that is still poorly investigated. We have previously documented that toxaphene activates human neutrophils to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and accelerates apoptosis by a yet unknown mechanism. In this study, we found that toxaphene induces another neutrophil function, chemotaxis. Furthermore, we found that toxaphene induces both chemotaxis and apoptosis via a ROS-dependent mechanism, since these responses were blocked by the addition of catalase to the culture. In addition, toxaphene was found to induce the degradation of the cytoskeletal proteins gelsolin, paxillin, and vimentin during apoptosis, and this was reversed by the addition of z-VAD-FMK (caspase inhibitor) or catalase, demonstrating the importance of caspases and ROS in this process. In contrast to toxaphene, we found that beryllium does not induce superoxide production, and, this correlates with its inability to induce chemotaxis and apoptosis. We conclude that toxaphene induces chemotaxis and apoptosis via ROS and that caspases and ROS are involved in the degradation of cytoskeletal proteins.

  14. The cytoskeletal protein Zyxin inhibits Shh signaling during the CNS patterning in Xenopus laevis through interaction with the transcription factor Gli1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynova, Natalia Y; Ermolina, Ludmila V; Ermakova, Galina V; Eroshkin, Fedor M; Gyoeva, Fatima K; Baturina, Natalia S; Zaraisky, Andrey G

    2013-08-01

    Zyxin is a cytoskeletal protein that controls cell movements by regulating actin filaments assembly, but it can also modulate gene expression owing to its interactions with the proteins involved in signaling cascades. Therefore, identification of proteins that interact with Zyxin in embryonic cells is a promising way to unravel mechanisms responsible for coupling of two major components of embryogenesis: morphogenetic movements and cell differentiation. Now we show that in Xenopus laevis embryos Zyxin can bind to and suppress activity of the primary effector of Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling cascade, the transcription factor Gli1. By using loss- and gain-of-function approaches, we demonstrate that Zyxin is essential for reduction of Shh signaling within the dorsal part of the neural tube of X. laevis embryo. Thus, our finding discloses a novel function of Zyxin in fine tuning of the central neural system patterning which is based on the ventral-to-dorsal gradient of Shh signaling.

  15. Proteomic screen in the simple metazoan Hydra identifies 14-3-3 binding proteins implicated in cellular metabolism, cytoskeletal organisation and Ca2+ signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imhof Axel

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 14-3-3 proteins have been implicated in many signalling mechanisms due to their interaction with Ser/Thr phosphorylated target proteins. They are evolutionarily well conserved in eukaryotic organisms from single celled protozoans and unicellular algae to plants and humans. A diverse array of target proteins has been found in higher plants and in human cell lines including proteins involved in cellular metabolism, apoptosis, cytoskeletal organisation, secretion and Ca2+ signalling. Results We found that the simple metazoan Hydra has four 14-3-3 isoforms. In order to investigate whether the diversity of 14-3-3 target proteins is also conserved over the whole animal kingdom we isolated 14-3-3 binding proteins from Hydra vulgaris using a 14-3-3-affinity column. We identified 23 proteins that covered most of the above-mentioned groups. We also isolated several novel 14-3-3 binding proteins and the Hydra specific secreted fascin-domain-containing protein PPOD. In addition, we demonstrated that one of the 14-3-3 isoforms, 14-3-3 HyA, interacts with one Hydra-Bcl-2 like protein in vitro. Conclusion Our results indicate that 14-3-3 proteins have been ubiquitous signalling components since the start of metazoan evolution. We also discuss the possibility that they are involved in the regulation of cell numbers in response to food supply in Hydra.

  16. Classic 18.5- and 21.5-kDa myelin basic protein isoforms associate with cytoskeletal and SH3-domain proteins in the immortalized N19-oligodendroglial cell line stimulated by phorbol ester and IGF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Graham S T; Homchaudhuri, Lopamudra; Boggs, Joan M; Harauz, George

    2012-06-01

    The 18.5-kDa classic myelin basic protein (MBP) is an intrinsically disordered protein arising from the Golli (Genes of Oligodendrocyte Lineage) gene complex and is responsible for compaction of the myelin sheath in the central nervous system. This MBP splice isoform also has a plethora of post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, deimination, methylation, and deamidation, that reduce its overall net charge and alter its protein and lipid associations within oligodendrocytes (OLGs). It was originally thought that MBP was simply a structural component of myelin; however, additional investigations have demonstrated that MBP is multi-functional, having numerous protein-protein interactions with Ca²⁺-calmodulin, actin, tubulin, and proteins with SH3-domains, and it can tether these proteins to a lipid membrane in vitro. Here, we have examined cytoskeletal interactions of classic 18.5-kDa MBP, in vivo, using early developmental N19-OLGs transfected with fluorescently-tagged MBP, actin, tubulin, and zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1). We show that MBP redistributes to distinct 'membrane-ruffled' regions of the plasma membrane where it co-localizes with actin and tubulin, and with the SH3-domain-containing proteins cortactin and ZO-1, when stimulated with PMA, a potent activator of the protein kinase C pathway. Moreover, using phospho-specific antibody staining, we show an increase in phosphorylated Thr98 MBP (human sequence numbering) in membrane-ruffled OLGs. Previously, Thr98 phosphorylation of MBP has been shown to affect its conformation, interactions with other proteins, and tethering of other proteins to the membrane in vitro. Here, MBP and actin were also co-localized in new focal adhesion contacts induced by IGF-1 stimulation in cells grown on laminin-2. This study supports a role for classic MBP isoforms in cytoskeletal and other protein-protein interactions during membrane and cytoskeletal remodeling in OLGs.

  17. Cytoskeletal heart-enriched actin-associated protein (CHAP) is expressed in striated and smooth muscle cells in chick and mouse during embryonic and adult stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eldik, Willemijn; Beqqali, Abdelaziz; Monshouwer-Kloots, Jantine; Mummery, Christine; Passier, Robert

    2011-01-01

    We recently identified a new Z-disc protein, CHAP (Cytoskeletal Heart-enriched Actin-associated Protein), which is expressed in striated muscle and plays an important role during embryonic muscle development in mouse and zebrafish. Here, we confirm and further extend these findings by (i) the identification and characterization of the CHAP orthologue in chick and (ii) providing a detailed analysis of CHAP expression in mouse during embryonic and adult stages. Chick CHAP contains a PDZ domain and a nuclear localization signal, resembling the human and mouse CHAPa. CHAP is expressed in the developing heart and somites, as well as muscle precursors of the limb buds in mouse and chick embryos. CHAP expression in heart and skeletal muscle is maintained in adult mice, both in slow and fast muscle fibers. Moreover, besides expression in striated muscle, we demonstrate that CHAP is expressed in smooth muscle cells of aorta, carotid and coronary arteries in adult mice, but not during embryonic development.

  18. Differential expression of cytoskeletal proteins in the dendrites of parvalbumin-positive interneurons versus granule cells in the adult rat dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haas Ratzliff, A; Soltesz, I

    2000-01-01

    Parvalbumin-positive interneurons and granule cells of the dentate gyrus exhibit characteristic differences in morphological, cytochemical, physiological, and pathophysiological properties. Several of these defining features, including dendritic morphology, spine density, and sensitivity to insults, are likely to be influenced by the neuronal cytoskeleton. The data in this paper demonstrate striking differences in the expression levels of all three neurofilament triplet proteins, as well as alpha-internexin and beta-tubulin III, between the parvalbumin-positive interneurons and dentate granule cells. Therefore, the molecular composition of intermediate filaments and microtubules in the dendritic domain of parvalbumin-positive dentate interneurons is distinct from the cytoskeleton of neighboring granule cells, indicating the existence of highly cell type-specific cytoskeletal architecture within the dentate gyrus.

  19. Length-dependent modulation of cytoskeletal remodeling and mechanical energetics in airway smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak Rim; Liu, Katrina; Roberts, Thomas J; Hai, Chi-Ming

    2011-06-01

    Actin cytoskeletal remodeling is an important mechanism of airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction. We tested the hypothesis that mechanical strain modulates the cholinergic receptor-mediated cytoskeletal recruitment of actin-binding and integrin-binding proteins in intact airway smooth muscle, thereby regulating the mechanical energetics of airway smooth muscle. We found that the carbachol-stimulated cytoskeletal recruitment of actin-related protein-3 (Arp3), metavinculin, and talin were up-regulated at short muscle lengths and down-regulated at long muscle lengths, suggesting that the actin cytoskeleton--integrin complex becomes enriched in cross-linked and branched actin filaments in shortened ASM. The mechanical energy output/input ratio during sinusoidal length oscillation was dependent on muscle length, oscillatory amplitude, and cholinergic activation. The enhancing effect of cholinergic stimulation on mechanical energy output/input ratio at short and long muscle lengths may be explained by the length-dependent modulation of cytoskeletal recruitment and crossbridge cycling, respectively. We postulate that ASM functions as a hybrid biomaterial, capable of switching between operating as a cytoskeleton-based mechanical energy store at short muscle lengths to operating as an actomyosin-powered mechanical energy generator at long muscle lengths. This postulate predicts that targeting the signaling molecules involved in cytoskeletal recruitment may provide a novel approach to dilating collapsed airways in obstructive airway disease.

  20. Tyrosine kinase activity, cytoskeletal organization, and motility in human vascular endothelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation of cytoskeletal proteins occurs during integrin-mediated cell adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins. We have investigated the role of tyrosine phosphorylation in the migration and initial spreading of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Elevated phosphotyrosine concentrations were noted in the focal adhesions of HUVEC migrating into wounds. Anti-phosphotyrosine Western blots of extracts of wounded HUVEC monolayers demonstrated increased phosphorylation...

  1. Bni1p implicated in cytoskeletal control is a putative target of Rho1p small GTP binding protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohno, H; Tanaka, K; Mino, A; Umikawa, M; Imamura, H; Fujiwara, T; Fujita, Y; Hotta, K; Qadota, H; Watanabe, T; Ohya, Y; Takai, Y

    1996-11-15

    The RHO1 gene encodes a homolog of mammalian RhoA small GTP binding protein in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Rho1p is localized at the growth sites, including the bud tip and the cytokinesis site, and is required for bud formation. We have recently shown that Pkc1p, a yeast homolog of mammalian protein kinase C, and glucan synthase are targets of Rho1p. Using the two-hybrid screening system, we cloned a gene encoding a protein which interacted with the GTP-bound form of Rho1p. This gene was identified as BNI1, known to be implicated in cytokinesis or establishment of cell polarity in S.cerevisiae. Bni1p shares homologous domains (FH1 and FH2 domains) with proteins involved in cytokinesis or establishment of cell polarity, including formin of mouse, capu and dia of Drosophila and FigA of Aspergillus. A temperature-sensitive mutation in which the RHO1 gene was replaced by the mammalian RhoA gene showed a synthetically lethal interaction with the bni1 mutation and the RhoA bni1 mutant accumulated cells with a deficiency in cytokinesis. Furthermore, this synthetic lethality was caused by the incapability of RhoA to activate Pkc1p, but not glucan synthase. These results suggest that Rho1p regulates cytoskeletal reorganization at least through Bni1p and Pkc1p.

  2. Biotechnological aspects of cytoskeletal regulation in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komis, George; Luptovciak, Ivan; Doskocilova, Anna; Samaj, Jozef

    2015-11-01

    The cytoskeleton is a protein-based intracellular superstructure that evolved early after the appearance of bacterial prokaryotes. Eventually cytoskeletal proteins and their macromolecular assemblies were established in eukaryotes and assumed critical roles in cell movements, intracellular organization, cell division and cell differentiation. In biomedicine the small-molecules targeting cytoskeletal elements are in the frontline of anticancer research with plant-derived cytoskeletal drugs such as Vinca alkaloids and toxoids, being routinely used in the clinical practice. Moreover, plants are also major material, food and energy resources for human activities ranging from agriculture, textile industry, carpentry, energy production and new material development to name some few. Most of these inheritable traits are associated with cell wall synthesis and chemical modification during primary and secondary plant growth and inevitably are associated with the dynamics, organization and interactions of the plant cytoskeleton. Taking into account the vast intracellular spread of microtubules and actin microfilaments the cytoskeleton collectively assumed central roles in plant growth and development, in determining the physical stance of plants against the forces of nature and becoming a battleground between pathogenic invaders and the defense mechanisms of plant cells. This review aims to address the role of the plant cytoskeleton in manageable features of plants including cellulose biosynthesis with implications in wood and fiber properties, in biofuel production and the contribution of plant cytoskeletal elements in plant defense responses against pathogens or detrimental environmental conditions. Ultimately the present work surveys the potential of cytoskeletal proteins as platforms of plant genetic engineering, nominating certain cytoskeletal proteins as vectors of favorable traits in crops and other economically important plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All

  3. Mechanics and dynamics of reconstituted cytoskeletal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Mikkel H; Morris, Eliza J; Weitz, David A

    2015-11-01

    The intracellular cytoskeleton is an active dynamic network of filaments and associated binding proteins that control key cellular properties, such as cell shape and mechanics. Due to the inherent complexity of the cell, reconstituted model systems have been successfully employed to gain an understanding of the fundamental physics governing cytoskeletal processes. Here, we review recent advances and key aspects of these reconstituted systems. We focus on the importance of assembly kinetics and dynamic arrest in determining network mechanics, and highlight novel emergent behavior occurring through interactions between cytoskeletal components in more complex networks incorporating multiple biopolymers and molecular motors.

  4. A cytoskeletal localizing domain in the cyclase-associated protein, CAP/Srv2p, regulates access to a distant SH3-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, J; Wang, C; Palmieri, S J; Haarer, B K; Field, J

    1999-07-09

    In the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, adenylyl cyclase consists of a 200-kDa catalytic subunit (CYR1) and a 70-kDa subunit (CAP/SRV2). CAP/Srv2p assists the small G protein Ras to activate adenylyl cyclase. CAP also regulates the cytoskeleton through an actin sequestering activity and is directed to cortical actin patches by a proline-rich SH3-binding site (P2). In this report we analyze the role of the actin cytoskeleton in Ras/cAMP signaling. Two alleles of CAP, L16P(Srv2) and R19T (SupC), first isolated in genetic screens for mutants that attenuate cAMP levels, reduced adenylyl cyclase binding, and cortical actin patch localization. A third mutation, L27F, also failed to localize but showed no loss of either cAMP signaling or adenylyl cyclase binding. However, all three N-terminal mutations reduced CAP-CAP multimer formation and SH3 domain binding, although the SH3-binding site is about 350 amino acids away. Finally, disruption of the actin cytoskeleton with latrunculin-A did not affect the cAMP phenotypes of the hyperactive Ras2(Val19) allele. These data identify a novel region of CAP that controls access to the SH3-binding site and demonstrate that cytoskeletal localization of CAP or an intact cytoskeleton per se is not necessary for cAMP signaling.

  5. Novelty-induced activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc) expression in frontal cortex requires serotonin 2A receptor activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santini, Martin; Klein, A B; El-Sayed, M;

    2011-01-01

    )R antagonists ketanserin and MDL100907, but not with the selective 5-HT(2C)R antagonist SB242084. Novelty-exposure also induced Arc mRNA expression in hippocampus (∼150%), but not in cerebellum or brainstem. Pretreatment with 5-HT(2A)R antagonist ketanserin did not repress the Arc induction in hippocampus...... environment. As an output of FC activation we measured expression of activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc). Novelty-exposure (open-field arena) robustly up-regulated FC Arc mRNA expression (∼160%) in mice compared to home-cage controls. This response was inhibited with the 5-HT(2A......, indicating that the involvement of 5-HT(2A)R in this response is restricted to the FC. Similarly, the novelty-induced stress as determined by increasing levels of plasma corticosterone, was not influenced by 5-HT(2A)R antagonism suggesting that Arc mRNA and stress are activated via distinct mechanisms. Taken...

  6. Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) induces actin cytoskeletal reorganization and apoptotic-like blebbing in lens cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, S.; Shimizu, M.; Balasubramanyam, A.; Epstein, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    DMPK, the product of the DM locus, is a member of the same family of serine-threonine protein kinases as the Rho-associated enzymes. In DM, membrane inclusions accumulate in lens fiber cells producing cataracts. Overexpression of DMPK in cultured lens epithelial cells led to apoptotic-like blebbing of the plasma membrane and reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton. Enzymatically active DMPK was necessary for both effects; inactive mutant DMPK protein did not produce either effect. Active RhoA but not constitutive GDP-state mutant protein produced similar effects as DMPK. The similar actions of DMPK and RhoA suggest that they may function in the same regulatory network. The observed effects of DMPK may be relevant to the removal of membrane organelles during normal lens differentiation and the retention of intracellular membranes in DM lenses. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Structures of the nucleoid occlusion protein SlmA bound to DNA and the C-terminal domain of the cytoskeletal protein FtsZ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Maria A; Zeng, Wenjie

    2016-05-03

    Cell division in most prokaryotes is mediated by FtsZ, which polymerizes to create the cytokinetic Z ring. Multiple FtsZ-binding proteins regulate FtsZ polymerization to ensure the proper spatiotemporal formation of the Z ring at the division site. The DNA-binding protein SlmA binds to FtsZ and prevents Z-ring formation through the nucleoid in a process called "nucleoid occlusion" (NO). As do most FtsZ-accessory proteins, SlmA interacts with the conserved C-terminal domain (CTD) that is connected to the FtsZ core by a long, flexible linker. However, SlmA is distinct from other regulatory factors in that it must be DNA-bound to interact with the FtsZ CTD. Few structures of FtsZ regulator-CTD complexes are available, but all reveal the CTD bound as a helix. To deduce the molecular basis for the unique SlmA-DNA-FtsZ CTD regulatory interaction and provide insight into FtsZ-regulator protein complex formation, we determined structures of Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholera, and Klebsiella pneumonia SlmA-DNA-FtsZ CTD ternary complexes. Strikingly, the FtsZ CTD does not interact with SlmA as a helix but binds as an extended conformation in a narrow, surface-exposed pocket formed only in the DNA-bound state of SlmA and located at the junction between the DNA-binding and C-terminal dimer domains. Binding studies are consistent with the structure and underscore key interactions in complex formation. Combined, these data reveal the molecular basis for the SlmA-DNA-FtsZ interaction with implications for SlmA's NO function and underscore the ability of the FtsZ CTD to adopt a wide range of conformations, explaining its ability to bind diverse regulatory proteins.

  8. Exposure to brominated flame retardant PBDE-99 affects cytoskeletal protein expression in the neonatal mouse cerebral cortex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alm, Henrik; Kultima, Kim; Scholz, Birger

    2008-01-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are environmental contaminants found in human and animal tissues worldwide. Neonatal exposure to the flame retardant 2,2', 4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (PBDE-99) disrupts normal brain development in mice, and results in disturbed spontaneous behavior...... in the adult. The mechanisms underlying the late effects of early exposure are not clear. To gain insight into the initial neurodevelopmental damage inflicted by PBDE-99, we investigated the short-term effects of PBDE-99 on protein expression in the developing cerebral cortex of neonatal mice...... are known to be cytoskeleton-related. Similar to previous findings in the striatum, we found elevated levels of the neuron growth-associated protein Gap43 in the cortex. In cultured cortical cells, a high concentration of PBDE-99 (30 microM) induced cell death without any apparent increase in caspase-3...

  9. The cytotoxic effect of memantine and its effect on cytoskeletal proteins expression in metastatic breast cancer cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifabadi, Sima; Vaseghi, Golnaz; Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjooy; Omidi, Elham; Tajadini, Mohammadhasan; Zarrin, Bahareh

    2017-01-01

    Objective(s): Breast cancer is an important leading cause of death from cancer. Stathmin and tau proteins are regulators of cell motility, and their overexpression is associated with the progression and bad prognosis of breast cancer. Memantine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, is the potential inhibitor of tau protein in neurons. This study determines the effect of memantine on breast cancer cell migration and proliferation, tau and stathmin gene expression in cancer cells and its synergistic effect with paclitaxel. Materials and Methods: The cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay and for this purpose, MCF-7 breast cancer cells were treated with various concentration of memantine (2, 20 and 100 μg/ml). Tau and stathmin mRNA expression was evaluated through quantitative real time RT-PCR method. The migration of cancer cells treated with memantine for 24 hr was compared to non-treated cells using an in vitro transmembrane migration assay. Results: Incubation of breast cancer cells with memantine resulted in a dose dependent reduction in cell survival (P=0.0001). Paclitaxel (100 nM) showed synergistic effect with memantine (P=0.0001). Memantine significantly decreased tau and stathmin mRNA expression (by RT-PCR), so that 100 µmol/l of memantine decreased tau and stathmin expression by 46% (P=0.0341) and 33% (P=0.043), respectively. Migration of cells was also decreased by memantine (P=0.0001). Conclusion: The presented data shows that memantine reduced mRNA levels of tau and stathmin proteins and also reduced cellular migration. PMID:28133523

  10. The cytotoxic effect of memantine and its effect on cytoskeletal proteins expression in metastatic breast cancer cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Seifabadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Breast cancer is an important leading cause of death from cancer. Stathmin and tau proteins are regulators of cell motility, and their overexpression is associated with the progression and bad prognosis of breast cancer. Memantine, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist, is the potential inhibitor of tau protein in neurons. This study determines the effect of memantine on breast cancer cell migration and proliferation, tau and stathmin gene expression in cancer cells and its synergistic effect with paclitaxel.   Materials and Methods: The cell proliferation was evaluated by MTT assay and for this purpose, MCF-7 breast cancer cells were treated with various concentration of memantine (2, 20 and 100 μg/ml. Tau and stathmin mRNA expression was evaluated through quantitative real time RT-PCR method. The migration of cancer cells treated with memantine for 24 hr was compared to non-treated cells using an in vitro transmembrane migration assay. Results: Incubation of breast cancer cells with memantine resulted in a dose dependent reduction in cell survival (P=0.0001. Paclitaxel (100 nM showed synergistic effect with memantine (P=0.0001. Memantine significantly decreased tau and stathmin mRNA expression (by RT-PCR, so that 100 µmol/l of memantine decreased tau and stathmin expression by 46% (P=0.0341 and 33% (P=0.043, respectively. Migration of cells was also decreased by memantine (P=0.0001. Conclusion: The presented data shows that memantine reduced mRNA levels of tau and stathmin proteins and also reduced cellular migration.

  11. Effects of sub-lethal neurite outgrowth inhibitory concentrations of chlorpyrifos oxon on cytoskeletal proteins and acetylcholinesterase in differentiating N2a cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaskos, J., E-mail: flaskos@vet.auth.gr [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Nikolaidis, E. [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Harris, W. [School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Lane, Nottingham NG11 8NS (United Kingdom); Sachana, M. [Laboratory of Biochemistry and Toxicology, School of Veterinary Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Hargreaves, A.J., E-mail: alan.hargreaves@ntu.ac.uk [School of Science and Technology, Nottingham Trent University, Clifton Lane, Nottingham NG11 8NS (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    protein are reduced Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neurofilament heavy chain forms aggregates in cell bodies Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thus at least two axon-associated cytoskeletal proteins are disrupted by this agent.

  12. The pH dependence of polymerization and bundling by the essential bacterial cytoskeletal protein FtsZ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Pacheco-Gómez

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of evidence that bacterial cell division is an intricate coordinated process of comparable complexity to that seen in eukaryotic cells. The dynamic assembly of Escherichia coli FtsZ in the presence of GTP is fundamental to its activity. FtsZ polymerization is a very attractive target for novel antibiotics given its fundamental and universal function. In this study our aim was to understand further the GTP-dependent FtsZ polymerization mechanism and our main focus is on the pH dependence of its behaviour. A key feature of this work is the use of linear dichroism (LD to follow the polymerization of FtsZ monomers into polymeric structures. LD is the differential absorption of light polarized parallel and perpendicular to an orientation direction (in this case that provided by shear flow. It thus readily distinguishes between FtsZ polymers and monomers. It also distinguishes FtsZ polymers and less well-defined aggregates, which light scattering methodologies do not. The polymerization of FtsZ over a range of pHs was studied by right-angled light scattering to probe mass of FtsZ structures, LD to probe real-time formation of linear polymeric fibres, a specially developed phosphate release assay to relate guanosine triphosphate (GTP hydrolysis to polymer formation, and electron microscopy (EM imaging of reaction products as a function of time and pH. We have found that lowering the pH from neutral to 6.5 does not change the nature of the FtsZ polymers in solution--it simply facilitates the polymerization so the fibres present are longer and more abundant. Conversely, lowering the pH to 6.0 has much the same effect as introducing divalent cations or the FtsZ-associated protein YgfE (a putative ZapA orthologue in E. coli--it stabilizes associations of protofilaments.

  13. Novelty-induced activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc) expression in frontal cortex requires serotonin 2A receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, M A; Klein, A B; El-Sayed, M; Ratner, C; Knudsen, G M; Mikkelsen, J D; Aznar, S

    2011-09-08

    Many psychiatric disorders are characterized by cognitive and emotional alterations that are related to abnormal function of the frontal cortex (FC). FC is involved in working memory and decision making and is activated following exposure to a novel environment. The serotonin 2A receptor (5-HT(2A)R) is highly expressed in the FC where its activation induces hallucinations, while blockade of 5-HT(2A)Rs contributes to the therapeutic effects of atypical antipsychotic drugs. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the involvement of 5-HT(2A)R in FC activation following exposure to a novel environment. As an output of FC activation we measured expression of activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc). Novelty-exposure (open-field arena) robustly up-regulated FC Arc mRNA expression (∼160%) in mice compared to home-cage controls. This response was inhibited with the 5-HT(2A)R antagonists ketanserin and MDL100907, but not with the selective 5-HT(2C)R antagonist SB242084. Novelty-exposure also induced Arc mRNA expression in hippocampus (∼150%), but not in cerebellum or brainstem. Pretreatment with 5-HT(2A)R antagonist ketanserin did not repress the Arc induction in hippocampus, indicating that the involvement of 5-HT(2A)R in this response is restricted to the FC. Similarly, the novelty-induced stress as determined by increasing levels of plasma corticosterone, was not influenced by 5-HT(2A)R antagonism suggesting that Arc mRNA and stress are activated via distinct mechanisms. Taken together, our results demonstrate that the induction of Arc in the FC following exposure to a novel environment is dependent on the 5-HT(2A)R, and that the simultaneous release of corticosterone is regulated via another system independent of 5-HT(2A)R activation.

  14. Involvement of cytoskeletal proteins in the barrier function of the human erythrocyte membrane. III. Permeability of spectrin-depleted inside-out membrane vesicles to hydrophilic nonelectrolytes. Formation of leaks by chemical or enzymatic modification of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonk, S; Deuticke, B

    1992-04-29

    Spectrin-depleted inside-out vesicles (IOV's) prepared from human erythrocyte membranes were characterized in terms of size, ground permeability to hydrophilic nonelectrolytes and their sensitivity to modification by SH reagents, DIDS and trypsin. IOV's proved to have the same permeability of their lipid domain to erythritol as native erythrocytes, in contrast to resealed ghosts (Klonk, S. and Deuticke, B. (1992) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1106, 126-136 (Part I in this series)), which have a residual leak. On the other hand, IOV's have a slightly elevated permeability for mannitol and sucrose, nonelectrolytes which are almost (mannitol) or fully (sucrose) impermeant in the native membrane. These increased fluxes, which have a high activation energy and can be stimulated by phloretin, are, however, also much smaller than the corresponding leak fluxes observed in resealed ghosts. In view of these differences, formation of IOV's can be concluded to go along with partial annealing of barrier defects persisting in the erythrocyte membrane after preparation of resealed ghosts. Oxidation of SH groups of the IOV membrane by diamide produces an enhancement of permeability for hydrophilic nonelectrolytes which is much less pronounced than that induced by a similar treatment of erythrocytes or ghosts (Klonk, S. and Deuticke, B. (1992) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1106, 126-136 (Part I in this series)). Moreover, proteolytic treatment of the vesicle membrane, although leading to a marked digestion of integral membrane proteins, only induces a minor, saturating increase of permeability, much lower than that in trypsinized resealed ghosts (Klonk, S. and Deuticke, B. (1992) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1106, 137-142 (Part II of this series)). Since absence of the cytoskeletal proteins, spectrin and actin, is the major difference between IOV's and resealed ghosts, these results may be taken as further evidence for a dependence of the barrier properties of the erythrocyte membrane bilayer domain

  15. Cytosolic Proteins From Tobacco Pollen Tubes That Crosslink Microtubules and Actin Filaments In Vitro Are Metabolic Enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romagnoli, Silvia; Faleri, Claudia; Bini, Luca; Baskin, Tobias I.; Cresti, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    In plant cells, many processes require cooperative action of both microtubules and actin filaments, but proteins mediating interactions between these cytoskeletal members are mostly undiscovered. Here, we attempt to identify such proteins by affinity purification. Cytosol from Nicotiana tabacum (tob

  16. Intracellular cytoskeletal elements and cytoskeletons in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madkour, Mohamed H F; Mayer, Frank

    2007-01-01

    Within a short period of time after the discovery of bacterial cytoskletons, major progress had been made in areas such as general spatial layout of cytoskeletons, their involvement in a variety of cellfunctions (shape control, cell division, chromosome segregation, cell motility). This progress was achieved by application of advanced investigation techniques. Homologs of eukaryotic actin, tubulin, and intermediate filaments were found in bacteria; cytoskeletal proteins not closely or not at all related to any of these major cytoskeletal proteins were discovered in a number of bacteria such as Mycoplasmas, Spiroplasmas, Spirochetes, Treponema, Caulobacter. A structural role for bacterial elongation factor Tu was indicated. On the basis of this new thinking, new approaches in biotechnology and new drugs are on the way.

  17. Differential regulation of protein-tyrosine phosphatases by integrin alpha IIb beta 3 through cytoskeletal reorganization and tyrosine phosphorylation in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezumi, Y; Takayama, H; Okuma, M

    1995-05-19

    The major platelet integrin alpha IIb beta 3 (glycoprotein IIb-IIIa) has been implicated in the regulation of tyrosine phosphorylation and dephosphorylation in activated platelets. To investigate the mechanisms of the alpha IIb beta 3-dependent tyrosine dephosphorylation, normal platelets or thrombasthenic platelets lacking alpha IIb beta 3 were stimulated with thrombin and fractionated into Triton X-100-soluble or -insoluble subcellular matrices. We then examined the kinetics of the tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins and distribution of protein-tyrosine phosphatases in these fractions and whole cell lysates. First, alpha IIb beta 3-dependent tyrosine dephosphorylation was recovered mainly in the cytoskeleton with similar kinetics to the whole cell lysate. Second, protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) 1B and its cleaved 42-kDa form were associated with the cytoskeleton in an aggregation-dependent manner, whereas association of PTP1C with the cytoskeleton was regulated differentially both by thrombin stimulation and by alpha IIb beta 3-mediated aggregation. Several calpain inhibitors did not affect either tyrosine phosphorylation and dephosphorylation or relocation of PTP1B, but they did inhibit cleavage of PTP1B. Cytochalasin D blocked relocation of both PTP1B and PTP1C but not PTP1B cleavage. SH-PTP2 was distributed in the other fractions than the cytoskeleton and showed no relocation on thrombin stimulation. Finally, the cytoskeleton-associated PTP1C became tyrosine-phosphorylated in an alpha IIb beta 3-mediated aggregation-dependent manner. Thus, integrin alpha IIb beta 3 was involved differentially in the regulation of PTP1B and PTP1C.

  18. Cytoskeletal Mechanics Regulating Amoeboid Cell Locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-González, Begoña; Bastounis, Effie; Meili, Ruedi; del Álamo, Juan C.; Firtel, Richard; Lasheras, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Migrating cells exert traction forces when moving. Amoeboid cell migration is a common type of cell migration that appears in many physiological and pathological processes and is performed by a wide variety of cell types. Understanding the coupling of the biochemistry and mechanics underlying the process of migration has the potential to guide the development of pharmacological treatment or genetic manipulations to treat a wide range of diseases. The measurement of the spatiotemporal evolution of the traction forces that produce the movement is an important aspect for the characterization of the locomotion mechanics. There are several methods to calculate the traction forces exerted by the cells. Currently the most commonly used ones are traction force microscopy methods based on the measurement of the deformation induced by the cells on elastic substrate on which they are moving. Amoeboid cells migrate by implementing a motility cycle based on the sequential repetition of four phases. In this paper, we review the role that specific cytoskeletal components play in the regulation of the cell migration mechanics. We investigate the role of specific cytoskeletal components regarding the ability of the cells to perform the motility cycle effectively and the generation of traction forces. The actin nucleation in the leading edge of the cell, carried by the ARP2/3 complex activated through the SCAR/WAVE complex, has shown to be fundamental to the execution of the cyclic movement and to the generation of the traction forces. The protein PIR121, a member of the SCAR/WAVE complex, is essential to the proper regulation of the periodic movement and the protein SCAR, also included in the SCAR/WAVE complex, is necessary for the generation of the traction forces during migration. The protein Myosin II, an important F-actin cross-linker and motor protein, is essential to cytoskeletal contractility and to the generation and proper organization of the traction forces during

  19. Protein-mediated surface structuring in biomembranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggio B.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The lipids and proteins of biomembranes exhibit highly dissimilar conformations, geometrical shapes, amphipathicity, and thermodynamic properties which constrain their two-dimensional molecular packing, electrostatics, and interaction preferences. This causes inevitable development of large local tensions that frequently relax into phase or compositional immiscibility along lateral and transverse planes of the membrane. On the other hand, these effects constitute the very codes that mediate molecular and structural changes determining and controlling the possibilities for enzymatic activity, apposition and recombination in biomembranes. The presence of proteins constitutes a major perturbing factor for the membrane sculpturing both in terms of its surface topography and dynamics. We will focus on some results from our group within this context and summarize some recent evidence for the active involvement of extrinsic (myelin basic protein, integral (Folch-Lees proteolipid protein and amphitropic (c-Fos and c-Jun proteins, as well as a membrane-active amphitropic phosphohydrolytic enzyme (neutral sphingomyelinase, in the process of lateral segregation and dynamics of phase domains, sculpturing of the surface topography, and the bi-directional modulation of the membrane biochemical reactivity.

  20. Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) Is Expressed in Spermatogenic Cells, and It Altered the Expression of Several Nucleic-Acid-Binding and Cytoskeletal Proteins in Germ Cell 1 Spermatogonial (GC1-spg) Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Karthika; Bhagya, Kongattu P.; Kumar, Anil TR; Devi, Anandavalli N.; Sengottaiyan, Jeeva; Kumar, Pradeep G.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune regulator (AIRE) is a gene associated with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED). AIRE is expressed heavily in the thymic epithelial cells and is involved in maintaining self-tolerance through regulating the expression of tissue-specific antigens. The testes are the most predominant extrathymic location where a heavy expression of AIRE is reported. Homozygous Aire-deficient male mice were infertile, possibly due to impaired spermatogenesis, deregulated germ cell apoptosis, or autoimmunity. We report that AIRE is expressed in the testes of neonatal, adolescent, and adult mice. AIRE expression was detected in glial cell derived neurotrophic factor receptor alpha (GFRα)+ (spermatogonia), GFRα−/synaptonemal complex protein (SCP3)+ (meiotic), and GFRα−/Phosphoglycerate kinase 2 (PGK2)+ (postmeiotic) germ cells in mouse testes. GC1-spg, a germ-cell-derived cell line, did not express AIRE. Retinoic acid induced AIRE expression in GC1-spg cells. Ectopic expression of AIRE in GC1-spg cells using label-free LC-MS/MS identified a total of 371 proteins that were differentially expressed. 100 proteins were up-regulated, and 271 proteins were down-regulated. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002511. Functional analysis of the differentially expressed proteins showed increased levels of various nucleic-acid-binding proteins and transcription factors and a decreased level of various cytoskeletal and structural proteins in the AIRE overexpressing cells as compared with the empty vector-transfected controls. The transcripts of a select set of the up-regulated proteins were also elevated. However, there was no corresponding decrease in the mRNA levels of the down-regulated set of proteins. Molecular function network analysis indicated that AIRE influenced gene expression in GC1-spg cells by acting at multiple levels, including transcription, translation, RNA processing, protein transport, protein localization

  1. Research progress on specific cytoskeletal proteins-giardins in Giardia lamblia%蓝氏贾第鞭毛虫特异性细胞骨架蛋白——贾第素研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏超君; 田喜凤; 卢思奇

    2014-01-01

    蓝氏贾第鞭毛虫具有由微管、微丝和骨架蛋白构成的高度发达的细胞骨架系统.近年来,贾第虫的细胞骨架与其致病力的密切关系已经得到证实.在参与细胞骨架构成的众多蛋白质中,特异性细胞骨架蛋白——贾第素是其中重要的成分之一.对贾第素的研究不仅可为贾第虫细胞骨架的研究增添新的知识和研究资料,还可为贾第虫病的致病机制及抗贾第虫药物靶点的选择提供实验依据.%The most significant features of Giardia lamblia are the highly developed cytoskeleton system which is composed of tubulin and a variety of microtubules.In recent years,the strong link between the cytoskeleton and virulence has been confirmed.Among a number of cytoskeletal proteins involved in composition,the specific cytoskeletal protein-giardin is one of the important ingredients.The study of the giardins will not only add new knowledge and research data to the cytoskeleton research but also provide an empirical basis for investigating the pathogenic mechanisms of giardiasis and searching for new drug targets.

  2. The reversible increase in tight junction permeability induced by capsaicin is mediated via cofilin-actin cytoskeletal dynamics and decreased level of occludin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Shiobara

    Full Text Available Previous results demonstrated that capsaicin induces the reversible tight junctions (TJ opening via cofilin activation. The present study investigated the mechanisms underlying the reversible TJ opening and compared the effect to the irreversible opening induced by actin inhibitors. Capsaicin treatment induced the F-actin alteration unique to capsaicin compared to actin-interacting agents such as latrunculin A, which opens TJ irreversibly. Along with TJ opening, capsaicin decreased the level of F-actin at bicellular junctions but increased it at tricellular junctions accompanied with its concentration on the apical side of the lateral membrane. No change in TJ protein localization was observed upon exposure to capsaicin, but the amount of occludin was decreased significantly. In addition, cosedimentation analyses suggested a decrease in the interactions forming TJ, thereby weakening TJ tightness. Introduction of cofilin, LIMK and occludin into the cell monolayers confirmed their contribution to the transepithelial electrical resistance decrease. Finally, exposure of monolayers to capsaicin augmented the paracellular passage of both charged and uncharged compounds, as well as of insulin, indicating that capsaicin can be employed to modulate epithelial permeability. Our results demonstrate that capsaicin induces TJ opening through a unique mechanism, and suggest that it is a new type of paracellular permeability enhancer.

  3. Chorein Sensitive Arrangement of Cytoskeletal Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Honisch

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Chorein is a protein expressed in various cell types. Loss of function mutations of the chorein encoding gene VPS13A lead to chorea-acanthocytosis, an autosomal recessive genetic disease characterized by movement disorder and behavioral abnormalities. Recent observations revealed that chorein is a powerful regulator of actin cytoskeleton in erythrocytes, platelets, K562 and endothelial HUVEC cells. Methods: In the present study we have used Western blotting to study actin polymerization dynamics, laser scanning microscopy to evaluate in detail the role of chorein in microfilaments, microtubules and intermediate filaments cytoskeleton architecture and RT-PCR to assess gene transcription of the cytoskeletal proteins. Results: We report here powerful depolymerization of actin microfilaments both, in erythrocytes and fibroblasts isolated from chorea-acanthocytosis patients. Along those lines, morphological analysis of fibroblasts from chorea-acanthocytosis patients showed disarranged microtubular network, when compared to fibroblasts from healthy donors. Similarly, the intermediate filament networks of desmin and cytokeratins showed significantly disordered organization with clearly diminished staining in patient's fibroblasts. In line with this, RT-PCR analysis revealed significant downregulation of desmin and cytokeratin gene transcripts. Conclusion: Our results provide for the first time evidence that defective chorein is accompanied by significant structural disorganization of all cytoskeletal structures in human fibroblasts from chorea-acanthocytosis patients.

  4. LIM and SH3 protein-1 modulates CXCR2-mediated cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayanidhi Raman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The chemokine receptor CXCR2 plays a pivotal role in migration of neutrophils, macrophages and endothelial cells, modulating several biological responses such as angiogenesis, wound healing and acute inflammation. CXCR2 is also involved in pathogenesis of chronic inflammation, sepsis and atherosclerosis. The ability of CXCR2 to associate with a variety of proteins dynamically is responsible for its effects on directed cell migration or chemotaxis. The dynamic network of such CXCR2 binding proteins is termed as "CXCR2 chemosynapse". Proteomic analysis of proteins that co-immunoprecipitated with CXCR2 in neutrophil-like dHL-60 cells revealed a novel protein, LIM and SH3 protein 1 (LASP-1, binds CXCR2 under both basal and ligand activated conditions. LASP-1 is an actin binding cytoskeletal protein, involved in the cell migration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We demonstrate that CXCR2 and LASP-1 co-immunoprecipitate and co-localize at the leading edge of migrating cells. The LIM domain of LASP-1 directly binds to the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD of CXCR2. Moreover, LASP-1 also directly binds the CTD of CXCR1, CXCR3 and CXCR4. Using a site-directed and deletion mutagenesis approach, Iso323-Leu324 of the conserved LKIL motif on CXCR2-CTD was identified as the binding site for LASP-1. Interruption of the interaction between CXCR2-CTD and LIM domain of LASP-1 by dominant negative and knock down approaches inhibited CXCR2-mediated chemotaxis. Analysis for the mechanism for inhibition of CXCR2-mediated chemotaxis indicated that LASP-1/CXCR2 interaction is essential for cell motility and focal adhesion turnover involving activation of Src, paxillin, PAK1, p130CAS and ERK1/2. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate here for the first time that LASP-1 is a key component of the "CXCR2 chemosynapse" and LASP-1 interaction with CXCR2 is critical for CXCR2-mediated chemotaxis. Furthermore, LASP-1 also directly binds the CTD of CXCR1, CXCR3 and

  5. LIM and SH3 protein-1 modulates CXCR2-mediated cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Dayanidhi; Sai, Jiqing; Neel, Nicole F; Chew, Catherine S; Richmond, Ann

    2010-04-19

    The chemokine receptor CXCR2 plays a pivotal role in migration of neutrophils, macrophages and endothelial cells, modulating several biological responses such as angiogenesis, wound healing and acute inflammation. CXCR2 is also involved in pathogenesis of chronic inflammation, sepsis and atherosclerosis. The ability of CXCR2 to associate with a variety of proteins dynamically is responsible for its effects on directed cell migration or chemotaxis. The dynamic network of such CXCR2 binding proteins is termed as "CXCR2 chemosynapse". Proteomic analysis of proteins that co-immunoprecipitated with CXCR2 in neutrophil-like dHL-60 cells revealed a novel protein, LIM and SH3 protein 1 (LASP-1), binds CXCR2 under both basal and ligand activated conditions. LASP-1 is an actin binding cytoskeletal protein, involved in the cell migration. We demonstrate that CXCR2 and LASP-1 co-immunoprecipitate and co-localize at the leading edge of migrating cells. The LIM domain of LASP-1 directly binds to the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of CXCR2. Moreover, LASP-1 also directly binds the CTD of CXCR1, CXCR3 and CXCR4. Using a site-directed and deletion mutagenesis approach, Iso323-Leu324 of the conserved LKIL motif on CXCR2-CTD was identified as the binding site for LASP-1. Interruption of the interaction between CXCR2-CTD and LIM domain of LASP-1 by dominant negative and knock down approaches inhibited CXCR2-mediated chemotaxis. Analysis for the mechanism for inhibition of CXCR2-mediated chemotaxis indicated that LASP-1/CXCR2 interaction is essential for cell motility and focal adhesion turnover involving activation of Src, paxillin, PAK1, p130CAS and ERK1/2. We demonstrate here for the first time that LASP-1 is a key component of the "CXCR2 chemosynapse" and LASP-1 interaction with CXCR2 is critical for CXCR2-mediated chemotaxis. Furthermore, LASP-1 also directly binds the CTD of CXCR1, CXCR3 and CXCR4, suggesting that LASP-1 is a general mediator of CXC chemokine mediated chemotaxis

  6. The phosphorylation status and cytoskeletal remodeling of striatal astrocytes treated with quinolinic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierozan, Paula; Ferreira, Fernanda; Ortiz de Lima, Bárbara; Gonçalves Fernandes, Carolina [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS 90035-003 (Brazil); Totarelli Monteforte, Priscila; Castro Medaglia, Natalia de; Bincoletto, Claudia; Soubhi Smaili, Soraya [Departamento de Farmacologia, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Pessoa-Pureur, Regina, E-mail: rpureur@ufrgs.br [Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS 90035-003 (Brazil)

    2014-04-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is a glutamate agonist which markedly enhances the vulnerability of neural cells to excitotoxicity. QUIN is produced from the amino acid tryptophan through the kynurenine pathway (KP). Dysregulation of this pathway is associated with neurodegenerative conditions. In this study we treated striatal astrocytes in culture with QUIN and assayed the endogenous phosphorylating system associated with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin as well as cytoskeletal remodeling. After 24 h incubation with 100 µM QUIN, cells were exposed to {sup 32}P-orthophosphate and/or protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase dependent of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin II (PKCaMII) or protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors, H89 (20 μM), KN93 (10 μM) and staurosporin (10 nM), respectively. Results showed that hyperphosphorylation was abrogated by PKA and PKC inhibitors but not by the PKCaMII inhibitor. The specific antagonists to ionotropic NMDA and non-NMDA (50 µM DL-AP5 and CNQX, respectively) glutamate receptors as well as to metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGLUR; 50 µM MCPG), mGLUR1 (100 µM MPEP) and mGLUR5 (10 µM 4C3HPG) prevented the hyperphosphorylation provoked by QUIN. Also, intra and extracellular Ca{sup 2+} quelators (1 mM EGTA; 10 µM BAPTA-AM, respectively) prevented QUIN-mediated effect, while Ca{sup 2+} influx through voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} channel type L (L-VDCC) (blocker: 10 µM verapamil) is not implicated in this effect. Morphological analysis showed dramatically altered actin cytoskeleton with concomitant change of morphology to fusiform and/or flattened cells with retracted cytoplasm and disruption of the GFAP meshwork, supporting misregulation of actin cytoskeleton. Both hyperphosphorylation and cytoskeletal remodeling were reversed 24 h after QUIN removal. Astrocytes are highly plastic cells and the vulnerability of astrocyte cytoskeleton may have important implications for understanding the neurotoxicity of QUIN in neurodegenerative

  7. Fluvastatin mediated breast cancer cell death: a proteomic approach to identify differentially regulated proteins in MDA-MB-231 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anantha Koteswararao Kanugula

    Full Text Available Statins are increasingly being recognized as anti-cancer agents against various cancers including breast cancer. To understand the molecular pathways targeted by fluvastatin and its differential sensitivity against metastatic breast cancer cells, we analyzed protein alterations in MDA-MB-231 cells treated with fluvastatin using 2-DE in combination with LC-MS/MS. Results revealed dys-regulation of 39 protein spots corresponding to 35 different proteins. To determine the relevance of altered protein profiles with breast cancer cell death, we mapped these proteins to major pathways involved in the regulation of cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cell cycle, Rho GDI and proteasomal pathways using IPA analysis. Highly interconnected sub networks showed that vimentin and ERK1/2 proteins play a central role in controlling the expression of altered proteins. Fluvastatin treatment caused proteolysis of vimentin, a marker of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. This effect of fluvastatin was reversed in the presence of mevalonate, a downstream product of HMG-CoA and caspase-3 inhibitor. Interestingly, fluvastatin neither caused an appreciable cell death nor did modulate vimentin expression in normal mammary epithelial cells. In conclusion, fluvastatin alters levels of cytoskeletal proteins, primarily targeting vimentin through increased caspase-3- mediated proteolysis, thereby suggesting a role for vimentin in statin-induced breast cancer cell death.

  8. Fluvastatin mediated breast cancer cell death: a proteomic approach to identify differentially regulated proteins in MDA-MB-231 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanugula, Anantha Koteswararao; Dhople, Vishnu M; Völker, Uwe; Ummanni, Ramesh; Kotamraju, Srigiridhar

    2014-01-01

    Statins are increasingly being recognized as anti-cancer agents against various cancers including breast cancer. To understand the molecular pathways targeted by fluvastatin and its differential sensitivity against metastatic breast cancer cells, we analyzed protein alterations in MDA-MB-231 cells treated with fluvastatin using 2-DE in combination with LC-MS/MS. Results revealed dys-regulation of 39 protein spots corresponding to 35 different proteins. To determine the relevance of altered protein profiles with breast cancer cell death, we mapped these proteins to major pathways involved in the regulation of cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, cell cycle, Rho GDI and proteasomal pathways using IPA analysis. Highly interconnected sub networks showed that vimentin and ERK1/2 proteins play a central role in controlling the expression of altered proteins. Fluvastatin treatment caused proteolysis of vimentin, a marker of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. This effect of fluvastatin was reversed in the presence of mevalonate, a downstream product of HMG-CoA and caspase-3 inhibitor. Interestingly, fluvastatin neither caused an appreciable cell death nor did modulate vimentin expression in normal mammary epithelial cells. In conclusion, fluvastatin alters levels of cytoskeletal proteins, primarily targeting vimentin through increased caspase-3- mediated proteolysis, thereby suggesting a role for vimentin in statin-induced breast cancer cell death.

  9. Vitreous-induced cytoskeletal rearrangements via the Rac1 GTPase-dependent signaling pathway in human retinal pigment epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xionggao [State Key Ophthalmic Laboratory, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Department of Ophthalmology, Hainan Medical College, Haikou (China); Wei, Yantao; Ma, Haizhi [State Key Ophthalmic Laboratory, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, Shaochong, E-mail: zhshaochong@163.com [State Key Ophthalmic Laboratory, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vitreous induces morphological changes and cytoskeletal rearrangements in RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac1 is activated in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac inhibition prevents morphological changes in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rac inhibition suppresses cytoskeletal rearrangements in vitreous-transformed RPE cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The vitreous-induced effects are mediated by a Rac1 GTPase/LIMK1/cofilin pathway. -- Abstract: Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is mainly caused by retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell migration, invasion, proliferation and transformation into fibroblast-like cells that produce the extracellular matrix (ECM). The vitreous humor is known to play an important role in PVR. An epithelial-to-mesenchymal transdifferentiation (EMT) of human RPE cells induced by 25% vitreous treatment has been linked to stimulation of the mesenchymal phenotype, migration and invasion. Here, we characterized the effects of the vitreous on the cell morphology and cytoskeleton in human RPE cells. The signaling pathway that mediates these effects was investigated. Serum-starved RPE cells were incubated with 25% vitreous, and the morphological changes were examined by phase-contrast microscopy. Filamentous actin (F-actin) was examined by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Protein phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2, Smad2/3, LIM kinase (LIMK) 1 and cofilin was analyzed by Western blot analysis. Vitreous treatment induced cytoskeletal rearrangements, activated Rac1 and enhanced the phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2 and Smad2/3. When the cells were treated with a Rac activation-specific inhibitor, the cytoskeletal rearrangements were prevented, and the phosphorylation of Smad2/3 was blocked. Vitreous treatment also enhanced the phosphorylation of LIMK1 and cofilin and the Rac inhibitor blocked this effect. We propose that vitreous

  10. Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) Is Expressed in Spermatogenic Cells, and It Altered the Expression of Several Nucleic-Acid-Binding and Cytoskeletal Proteins in Germ Cell 1 Spermatogonial (GC1-spg) Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Karthika; Bhagya, Kongattu P; Kumar, Anil Tr; Devi, Anandavalli N; Sengottaiyan, Jeeva; Kumar, Pradeep G

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune regulator (AIRE) is a gene associated with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED). AIRE is expressed heavily in the thymic epithelial cells and is involved in maintaining self-tolerance through regulating the expression of tissue-specific antigens. The testes are the most predominant extrathymic location where a heavy expression of AIRE is reported. Homozygous Aire-deficient male mice were infertile, possibly due to impaired spermatogenesis, deregulated germ cell apoptosis, or autoimmunity. We report that AIRE is expressed in the testes of neonatal, adolescent, and adult mice. AIRE expression was detected in glial cell derived neurotrophic factor receptor alpha (GFRα)(+) (spermatogonia), GFRα(-)/synaptonemal complex protein (SCP3)(+) (meiotic), and GFRα(-)/Phosphoglycerate kinase 2 (PGK2)(+) (postmeiotic) germ cells in mouse testes. GC1-spg, a germ-cell-derived cell line, did not express AIRE. Retinoic acid induced AIRE expression in GC1-spg cells. Ectopic expression of AIRE in GC1-spg cells using label-free LC-MS/MS identified a total of 371 proteins that were differentially expressed. 100 proteins were up-regulated, and 271 proteins were down-regulated. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002511. Functional analysis of the differentially expressed proteins showed increased levels of various nucleic-acid-binding proteins and transcription factors and a decreased level of various cytoskeletal and structural proteins in the AIRE overexpressing cells as compared with the empty vector-transfected controls. The transcripts of a select set of the up-regulated proteins were also elevated. However, there was no corresponding decrease in the mRNA levels of the down-regulated set of proteins. Molecular function network analysis indicated that AIRE influenced gene expression in GC1-spg cells by acting at multiple levels, including transcription, translation, RNA processing, protein transport, protein

  11. Collective dynamics of active cytoskeletal networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Köhler

    Full Text Available Self organization mechanisms are essential for the cytoskeleton to adapt to the requirements of living cells. They rely on the intricate interplay of cytoskeletal filaments, crosslinking proteins and molecular motors. Here we present an in vitro minimal model system consisting of actin filaments, fascin and myosin-II filaments exhibiting pulsatile collective dynamics and superdiffusive transport properties. Both phenomena rely on the complex competition of crosslinking molecules and motor filaments in the network. They are only observed if the relative strength of the binding of myosin-II filaments to the actin network allows exerting high enough forces to unbind actin/fascin crosslinks. This is shown by varying the binding strength of the acto-myosin bond and by combining the experiments with phenomenological simulations based on simple interaction rules.

  12. Collective dynamics of active cytoskeletal networks

    CERN Document Server

    Köhler, Simone; Bausch, Andreas R

    2011-01-01

    Self organization mechanisms are essential for the cytoskeleton to adapt to the requirements of living cells. They rely on the intricate interplay of cytoskeletal filaments, crosslinking proteins and molecular motors. Here we present an in vitro minimal model system consisting of actin filaments, fascin and myosin-II filaments exhibiting pulsative collective long range dynamics. The reorganizations in the highly dynamic steady state of the active gel are characterized by alternating periods of runs and stalls resulting in a superdiffusive dynamics of the network's constituents. They are dominated by the complex competition of crosslinking molecules and motor filaments in the network: Collective dynamics are only observed if the relative strength of the binding of myosin-II filaments to the actin network allows exerting high enough forces to unbind actin/fascin crosslinks. The feedback between structure formation and dynamics can be resolved by combining these experiments with phenomenological simulations base...

  13. Microinjection of antibodies to the calpactin I light chain in MDBK cells causes precipition of the cytoskeletal calpactin I complex without affecting the distribution of related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenney, J R

    1990-01-01

    The calpactin I complex is composed of two heavy chain (39K) and two light chain (11K) subunits. The heavy chain is a member of a protein family that includes lipocortins, endonexin and chromobindins while the light chain is a member of the S100 family (7 distinct members are known). We have found that the kidney epithelial cell line MDBK expresses four members of the heavy chain family and two members of the light chain protein family. Antibodies to the light chain of calpactin I were found to cause the precipitation of injected antibody together with the associated heavy chain without apparent effect on the distribution of related proteins. This suggests a differential targeting of various members of the calpactin heavy and light chain families even within the same cell.

  14. Antibody to collapsin response mediator protein 1 promotes neurite outgrowth from rat hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongsheng Lin; Jing Chen; Wenbin Zhang; Xiaobing Gong; Biao Chen; Guoqing Guo

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the role of collapsin response mediator protein 1 (CRMP-1) on neurite outgrowth from rat hippocampal neurons by blocking its function using an antibody. Hippocampal neurons, cultured in vitro, were treated (blocked) using a polyclonal antibody to CRMP-1, and neurite outgrowth and cytoskeletal changes w ere captured using atomic force microscopy and laser confocal microscopy. Control cells, treated with normal rabbit IgG, established their characteristic morphology and had a large number of processes emerging from the soma, including numerous branches. Microtubules were clearly visible in the soma, formed an elaborate network, and were aligned in parallel arrays to form bundles which projected into neurites. After blocking with CRMP-1 antibody, the number of branches emerging from axons and dendrites significantly increased and were substantially longer, compared with control cells. However, the microtubule network nearly disappeared and only a few remnants were visible. When CRMP-1 antibody-blocked neurons were treated with the Rho inhibitor, Y27632, numerous neurites emerged from the soma, and branches were more abundant than in control neurons. Although the microtubules were not as clearly visible compared with neurons cultured in control medium, the microtubule network recovered in cells treated with Y27632, when compared with cells that were blocked by CRMP-1 antibody (but not treated with Y27632). These results demonstrate that neurite outgrowth from hippocampal neurons can be promoted by blocking CRMP-1 with a polyclonal antibody.

  15. Quinolinic acid induces disrupts cytoskeletal homeostasis in striatal neurons. Protective role of astrocyte-neuron interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierozan, Paula; Ferreira, Fernanda; de Lima, Bárbara Ortiz; Pessoa-Pureur, Regina

    2015-02-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is an endogenous metabolite of the kynurenine pathway involved in several neurological disorders. Among the several mechanisms involved in QUIN-mediated toxicity, disruption of the cytoskeleton has been demonstrated in striatally injected rats and in striatal slices. The present work searched for the actions of QUIN in primary striatal neurons. Neurons exposed to 10 µM QUIN presented hyperphosphorylated neurofilament (NF) subunits (NFL, NFM, and NFH). Hyperphosphorylation was abrogated in the presence of protein kinase A and protein kinase C inhibitors H89 (20 μM) and staurosporine (10 nM), respectively, as well as by specific antagonists to N-methyl-D-aspartate (50 µM DL-AP5) and metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (100 µM MPEP). Also, intra- and extracellular Ca(2+) chelators (10 µM BAPTA-AM and 1 mM EGTA, respectively) and Ca(2+) influx through L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel (10 µM verapamil) are implicated in QUIN-mediated effects. Cells immunostained for the neuronal markers βIII-tubulin and microtubule-associated protein 2 showed altered neurite/neuron ratios and neurite outgrowth. NF hyperphosphorylation and morphological alterations were totally prevented by conditioned medium from QUIN-treated astrocytes. Cocultured astrocytes and neurons interacted with one another reciprocally, protecting them against QUIN injury. Cocultured cells preserved their cytoskeletal organization and cell morphology together with unaltered activity of the phosphorylating system associated with the cytoskeleton. This article describes cytoskeletal disruption as one of the most relevant actions of QUIN toxicity in striatal neurons in culture with soluble factors secreted by astrocytes, with neuron-astrocyte interaction playing a role in neuroprotection.

  16. Mussel inspired protein-mediated surface modification to electrospun fibers and their potential biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jingwei; Michael, Praveesuda Lorwattanapongsa; Zhong, Shaoping; Ma, Bing; MacEwan, Matthew R; Lim, Chwee Teck

    2012-04-01

    Mussel inspired proteins have been demonstrated to serve as a versatile biologic adhesive with numerous applications. The present study illustrates the use of such Mussel inspired proteins (polydopamine) in the fabrication of functionalized bio-inspired nanomaterials capable of both improving cell response and sustained delivery of model probes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed the ability of dopamine to polymerize on the surface of plasma-treated, electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) fiber mats to form polydopamine coating. Transmission electron microscopy images demonstrated that self-polymerization of dopamine was induced by pH shift and that the thickness of polydopamine coating was readily modulated by adjusting the concentration of dopamine and reaction time. Polydopamine coatings were noted to affect the mechanical properties of underlying fiber mats, as mechanical testing demonstrated a decrease in elasticity and increase in stiffness of polydopamine-coated fiber mats. Polydopamine coatings were also utilized to effectively immobilize extracellular matrix proteins (i.e., fibronectin) on the surface of polydopamine-coated, electrospun fibers, resulting in enhancement of NIH3T3 cell attachment, spreading, and cytoskeletal development. Comparison of release rates of rhodamine 6G encapsulated in coated and uncoated PCL fibers also confirmed that polydopamine coatings modulate the release rate of loaded payloads. The authors further demonstrate the significant difference of rhodamine 6G adsorption kinetics in water between PCL fibers and polydopamine-coated PCL fibers. Taken together, polydopamine-mediated surface modification to electrospun fibers may be an effective means of fabricating a wide range of bio-inspired nanomaterials with unique properties for use in tissue engineering, drug delivery, and advanced biomedical applications.

  17. The time course of activity-regulated cytoskeletal (ARC) gene and protein expression in the whisker-barrel circuit using two paradigms of whisker stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadad, Aida; Adelson, P David; Lifshitz, Jonathan; Thomas, Theresa Currier

    2015-05-01

    Immediate early genes have previously demonstrated a rapid increase in gene expression after various behavioral paradigms. The main focus of this article is to identify a molecular marker of circuit activation after manual whisker stimulation or exploration of a novel environment. To this end, we investigated the dynamics of ARC transcription in adult male rats during whisker somatosensation throughout the whisker barrel circuit. At various time points, tissue was biopsied from the ventral posterior medial nucleus (VPM) of the thalamus, primary somatosensory barrel field (S1BF) cortex and hippocampus for quantification using real-time PCR and western blot. Our results show that there were no significant differences in ARC gene or protein expression in the VPM after both types of stimulation. However, manual whisker stimulation resulted in increased ARC gene expression at 15, 30, 60 and 300 min in the S1BF, and 15 min in the hippocampus (pwhisker sensation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Biochemistry and pathology of radical-mediated protein oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dean, R T; Fu, S; Stocker, R

    1997-01-01

    Radical-mediated damage to proteins may be initiated by electron leakage, metal-ion-dependent reactions and autoxidation of lipids and sugars. The consequent protein oxidation is O2-dependent, and involves several propagating radicals, notably alkoxyl radicals. Its products include several catego...

  19. Bilayer-thickness-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Osman; Koch, Peter D; Klug, William S; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-04-01

    Hydrophobic thickness mismatch between integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer can produce lipid bilayer thickness deformations. Experiment and theory have shown that protein-induced lipid bilayer thickness deformations can yield energetically favorable bilayer-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins, and large-scale organization of integral membrane proteins into protein clusters in cell membranes. Within the continuum elasticity theory of membranes, the energy cost of protein-induced bilayer thickness deformations can be captured by considering compression and expansion of the bilayer hydrophobic core, membrane tension, and bilayer bending, resulting in biharmonic equilibrium equations describing the shape of lipid bilayers for a given set of bilayer-protein boundary conditions. Here we develop a combined analytic and numerical methodology for the solution of the equilibrium elastic equations associated with protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Our methodology allows accurate prediction of thickness-mediated protein interactions for arbitrary protein symmetries at arbitrary protein separations and relative orientations. We provide exact analytic solutions for cylindrical integral membrane proteins with constant and varying hydrophobic thickness, and develop perturbative analytic solutions for noncylindrical protein shapes. We complement these analytic solutions, and assess their accuracy, by developing both finite element and finite difference numerical solution schemes. We provide error estimates of our numerical solution schemes and systematically assess their convergence properties. Taken together, the work presented here puts into place an analytic and numerical framework which allows calculation of bilayer-mediated elastic interactions between integral membrane proteins for the complicated protein shapes suggested by structural biology and at the small protein separations most relevant for the crowded membrane

  20. Membrane-mediated interaction between strongly anisotropic protein scaffolds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonatan Schweitzer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Specialized proteins serve as scaffolds sculpting strongly curved membranes of intracellular organelles. Effective membrane shaping requires segregation of these proteins into domains and is, therefore, critically dependent on the protein-protein interaction. Interactions mediated by membrane elastic deformations have been extensively analyzed within approximations of large inter-protein distances, small extents of the protein-mediated membrane bending and small deviations of the protein shapes from isotropic spherical segments. At the same time, important classes of the realistic membrane-shaping proteins have strongly elongated shapes with large and highly anisotropic curvature. Here we investigated, computationally, the membrane mediated interaction between proteins or protein oligomers representing membrane scaffolds with strongly anisotropic curvature, and addressed, quantitatively, a specific case of the scaffold geometrical parameters characterizing BAR domains, which are crucial for membrane shaping in endocytosis. In addition to the previously analyzed contributions to the interaction, we considered a repulsive force stemming from the entropy of the scaffold orientation. We computed this interaction to be of the same order of magnitude as the well-known attractive force related to the entropy of membrane undulations. We demonstrated the scaffold shape anisotropy to cause a mutual aligning of the scaffolds and to generate a strong attractive interaction bringing the scaffolds close to each other to equilibrium distances much smaller than the scaffold size. We computed the energy of interaction between scaffolds of a realistic geometry to constitute tens of kBT, which guarantees a robust segregation of the scaffolds into domains.

  1. Water-mediated ionic interactions in protein structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Sabarinathan; K Aishwarya; R Sarani; M Kirti Vaishnavi; K Sekar

    2011-06-01

    It is well known that water molecules play an indispensable role in the structure and function of biological macromolecules. The water-mediated ionic interactions between the charged residues provide stability and plasticity and in turn address the function of the protein structures. Thus, this study specifically addresses the number of possible water-mediated ionic interactions, their occurrence, distribution and nature found in 90% non-redundant protein chains. Further, it provides a statistical report of different charged residue pairs that are mediated by surface or buried water molecules to form the interactions. Also, it discusses its contributions in stabilizing various secondary structural elements of the protein. Thus, the present study shows the ubiquitous nature of the interactions that imparts plasticity and flexibility to a protein molecule.

  2. A set of fluorescent protein-based markers expressed from constitutive and arbuscular mycorrhiza-inducible promoters to label organelles, membranes and cytoskeletal elements in Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Sergey; Harrison, Maria J

    2014-12-01

    Medicago truncatula is widely used for analyses of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis and nodulation. To complement the genetic and genomic resources that exist for this species, we generated fluorescent protein fusions that label the nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, trans-Golgi network, plasma membrane, apoplast, late endosome/multivesicular bodies (MVB), transitory late endosome/ tonoplast, tonoplast, plastids, mitochondria, peroxisomes, autophagosomes, plasmodesmata, actin, microtubules, periarbuscular membrane (PAM) and periarbuscular apoplastic space (PAS) and expressed them from the constitutive AtUBQ10 promoter and the AM symbiosis-specific MtBCP1 promoter. All marker constructs showed the expected expression patterns and sub-cellular locations in M. truncatula root cells. As a demonstration of their utility, we used several markers to investigate AM symbiosis where root cells undergo major cellular alterations to accommodate their fungal endosymbiont. We demonstrate that changes in the position and size of the nuclei occur prior to hyphal entry into the cortical cells and do not require DELLA signaling. Changes in the cytoskeleton, tonoplast and plastids also occur in the colonized cells and in contrast to previous studies, we show that stromulated plastids are abundant in cells with developing and mature arbuscules, while lens-shaped plastids occur in cells with degenerating arbuscules. Arbuscule development and secretion of the PAM creates a periarbuscular apoplastic compartment which has been assumed to be continuous with apoplast of the cell. However, fluorescent markers secreted to the periarbuscular apoplast challenge this assumption. This marker resource will facilitate cell biology studies of AM symbiosis, as well as other aspects of legume biology. © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Reinforcement versus fluidization in cytoskeletal mechanoresponsiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramaswamy Krishnan

    Full Text Available Every adherent eukaryotic cell exerts appreciable traction forces upon its substrate. Moreover, every resident cell within the heart, great vessels, bladder, gut or lung routinely experiences large periodic stretches. As an acute response to such stretches the cytoskeleton can stiffen, increase traction forces and reinforce, as reported by some, or can soften and fluidize, as reported more recently by our laboratory, but in any given circumstance it remains unknown which response might prevail or why. Using a novel nanotechnology, we show here that in loading conditions expected in most physiological circumstances the localized reinforcement response fails to scale up to the level of homogeneous cell stretch; fluidization trumps reinforcement. Whereas the reinforcement response is known to be mediated by upstream mechanosensing and downstream signaling, results presented here show the fluidization response to be altogether novel: it is a direct physical effect of mechanical force acting upon a structural lattice that is soft and fragile. Cytoskeletal softness and fragility, we argue, is consistent with early evolutionary adaptations of the eukaryotic cell to material properties of a soft inert microenvironment.

  4. Reinforcement versus fluidization in cytoskeletal mechanoresponsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Park, Chan Young; Lin, Yu-Chun; Mead, Jere; Jaspers, Richard T; Trepat, Xavier; Lenormand, Guillaume; Tambe, Dhananjay; Smolensky, Alexander V; Knoll, Andrew H; Butler, James P; Fredberg, Jeffrey J

    2009-01-01

    Every adherent eukaryotic cell exerts appreciable traction forces upon its substrate. Moreover, every resident cell within the heart, great vessels, bladder, gut or lung routinely experiences large periodic stretches. As an acute response to such stretches the cytoskeleton can stiffen, increase traction forces and reinforce, as reported by some, or can soften and fluidize, as reported more recently by our laboratory, but in any given circumstance it remains unknown which response might prevail or why. Using a novel nanotechnology, we show here that in loading conditions expected in most physiological circumstances the localized reinforcement response fails to scale up to the level of homogeneous cell stretch; fluidization trumps reinforcement. Whereas the reinforcement response is known to be mediated by upstream mechanosensing and downstream signaling, results presented here show the fluidization response to be altogether novel: it is a direct physical effect of mechanical force acting upon a structural lattice that is soft and fragile. Cytoskeletal softness and fragility, we argue, is consistent with early evolutionary adaptations of the eukaryotic cell to material properties of a soft inert microenvironment.

  5. Sortase A-mediated multi-functionalization of protein nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qi; Sun, Qing; Molino, Nicholas M; Wang, Szu-Wen; Boder, Eric T; Chen, Wilfred

    2015-08-01

    We report here a new strategy to enable fast, covalent, and site-directed functionalization of protein nanoparticles using Sortase A-mediated ligation using functional proteins ranging from monomeric to large tetrameric structures. Easy purification of the modified E2 nanoparticles is achieved by functionalization with a thermo-responsive elastin-like-peptide. The resulting protein nanoparticles remained intact and active even after repeated phase transitions, suggesting their use in biocatalysis, biosensing, and imaging applications.

  6. Orm family proteins mediate sphingolipid homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breslow, David K; Collins, Sean R; Bodenmiller, Bernd;

    2010-01-01

    in humans)-a conserved gene family that includes ORMDL3, which has recently been identified as a potential risk factor for childhood asthma. Starting from an unbiased functional genomic approach in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we identify Orm proteins as negative regulators of sphingolipid synthesis that form...... a conserved complex with serine palmitoyltransferase, the first and rate-limiting enzyme in sphingolipid production. We also define a regulatory pathway in which phosphorylation of Orm proteins relieves their inhibitory activity when sphingolipid production is disrupted. Changes in ORM gene expression...

  7. Cytoskeletal and membrane dynamics during higher plant cytokinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, Colleen M; Bednarek, Sebastian Y

    2013-03-01

    Following mitosis, cytoplasm, organelles and genetic material are partitioned into daughter cells through the process of cytokinesis. In somatic cells of higher plants, two cytoskeletal arrays, the preprophase band and the phragmoplast, facilitate the positioning and de novo assembly of the plant-specific cytokinetic organelle, the cell plate, which develops across the division plane and fuses with the parental plasma membrane to yield distinct new cells. The coordination of cytoskeletal and membrane dynamics required to initiate, assemble and shape the cell plate as it grows toward the mother cell cortex is dependent upon a large array of proteins, including molecular motors, membrane tethering, fusion and restructuring factors and biosynthetic, structural and regulatory elements. This review focuses on the temporal and molecular requirements of cytokinesis in somatic cells of higher plants gleaned from recent studies using cell biology, genetics, pharmacology and biochemistry.

  8. Bilayer-thickness-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Kahraman, Osman; Klug, William S; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic thickness mismatch between integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer can produce lipid bilayer thickness deformations. Experiment and theory have shown that protein-induced lipid bilayer thickness deformations can yield energetically favorable bilayer-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins, and large-scale organization of integral membrane proteins into protein clusters in cell membranes. Within the continuum elasticity theory of membranes, the energy cost of protein-induced bilayer thickness deformations can be captured by considering compression and expansion of the bilayer hydrophobic core, membrane tension, and bilayer bending, resulting in biharmonic equilibrium equations describing the shape of lipid bilayers for a given set of bilayer-protein boundary conditions. Here we develop a combined analytic and numerical methodology for the solution of the equilibrium elastic equations associated with protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Our methodology al...

  9. Simulated Microgravity Induced Cytoskeletal Rearrangements are Modulated by Protooncogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melhado, C. D.; Sanford, G. L.; Bosah, F.; Harris-Hooker, S.

    1998-01-01

    Microgravity is the environment living systems encounter during space flight and gravitational unloading is the effect of this environment on living systems. The cell, being a multiphasic chemical system, is a useful starting point to study the potential impact of gravity unloading on physiological function. In the absence of gravity, sedimentation of organelles including chromosomes, mitochondria, nuclei, the Golgi apparatus, vacuoles, and the endoplasmic reticulum may be affected. Most of these organelles, however, are somewhat held in place by cytoskeleton. Hansen and Igber suggest that intermediate filaments act to stabilize the nuleus against rotational movement, and integrate cell and nuclear structure. The tensegrity theory supports the idea that mechanical or physical forces alters the cytoskeletal structures of a cell resulting in the changes in cell: matrix interactions and receptor-signaling coupling. This type of stress to the cytoskeleton may be largely responsible regulating cell shape, growth, movement and metabolism. Mouse MC3T3 El cells under microgravity exhibited significant cytoskeletal changes and alterations in cell growth. The alterations in cytoskeleton architecture may be due to changes in the expression of actin related proteins or integrins. Philopott and coworkers reported on changes in the distribution of microtubule and cytoskeleton elements in the cells of heart tissue from space flight rats and those centrifuged at 1.7g. Other researchers have showed that microgravity reduced EGF-induced c-fos and c-jun expression compared to 1 g controls. Since c-fos and c-jun are known regulators of cell growth, it is likely that altered signal transduction involving protooncogenes may play a crucial role in the reduced growth and alterations in cytoskeletal arrangements found during space flight. It is clear that a microgravity environment induces a number of changes in cell shape, cell surface molecules, gene expression, and cytoskeletal

  10. c-myc mRNA in cytoskeletal-bound polysomes in fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesketh, J E; Campbell, G P; Whitelaw, P F

    1991-03-01

    3T3 fibroblasts were treated sequentially with 25 mM-KCl/0.05% Nonidet P40, 130 mM-KCl/0.05% Nonidet P40 and finally with 1% Nonidet P40/1% deoxycholate in order to release free, cytoskeletal-bound and membrane-bound polysomes respectively. The membrane-bound fraction was enriched in the mRNA for the membrane protein beta 2-microglobulin, whereas the cytoskeletal-bound polysomes were enriched in c-myc mRNA. Actin mRNA was present in both free and cytoskeletal-bound polysomes. The results suggest that cytoskeletal-bound polysomes are involved in the translation of specific mRNA species.

  11. Cytoskeletal vimentin protein expression in rats with exhaustive eccentric exercise injury%一次力竭性离心运动损伤模型大鼠骨骼肌波形蛋白的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘向东; 李阳

    2014-01-01

    背景:由于不同学者采用的实验方法不同,对离心运动后细胞骨架蛋白的变化仍有争议。  目的:构建一次力竭性离心运动损伤大鼠模型,观察不同时刻骨骼肌细胞骨架波形蛋白表达的变化。  方法:雄性48只 SD 大鼠建立下坡跑运动损伤模型,按运动时间分为安静对照组、运动后即刻组、运动后12 h组、运动后24 h组、运动后48 h组和运动后72 h组,每组8只。各运动组大鼠以速度16 m/min,坡度-16°进行跑台运动,运动100 min后,休息5 min,然后再运动100 min;安静对照组不做运动。应用抗波形蛋白抗体对大鼠骨骼肌波形蛋白进行免疫组化染色,通过观察其目标面积百分比的变化反映在一次力竭性离心运动后不同时刻大鼠骨骼肌细胞骨架波形蛋白的表达水平。  结果与结论:大鼠骨骼肌细胞骨架波形蛋白目标面积百分比结果显示,安静对照组和运动后即刻组两组间差异无显著性意义(P >0.05);与运动后即刻组相比,运动后12 h组目标面积百分比略有增加,但差异无显著性意义(P >0.05);与运动后12 h组相比,运动后24 h组目标面积百分比略有增加,但差异无显著性意义(P>0.05);与安静对照组和运动后即刻组相比,运动后24 h组目标面积百分比有所增加(P OBJECTIVE:To establish exhaustive eccentric exercise injury model in rats and to observe cytoskeletal vimentin protein expression at different time. METHODS:A total of 48 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly and equal y divided into six groups:quiet control group, immediately after exercise group, and 12, 24, 48, 72 hours after exercise groups. In the exercise groups, the rats were subject treadmil exercise at the speed of 16 m/min in a-16° slope, for 100 minutes at the interval of 5 minutes. The quiet control group maintained unchanged, without exercise. The cytoskeletal vimentin was detected with

  12. Megalin binds and mediates cellular internalization of folate binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birn, Henrik; Zhai, Xiaoyue; Holm, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Folate is an essential vitamin involved in a number of biological processes. High affinity folate binding proteins (FBPs) exist both as glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked, membrane associated folate binding proteins and as soluble FBPs in plasma and some secretory fluids such as milk, saliva...... to bind and mediate cellular uptake of FBP. Surface plasmon resonance analysis shows binding of bovine and human milk FBP to immobilized megalin, but not to low density lipoprotein receptor related protein. Binding of (125)I-labeled folate binding protein (FBP) to sections of kidney proximal tubule, known...

  13. Plant LysM proteins: modules mediating symbiosis and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Andrea A; Willmann, Roland; Desaki, Yoshitake; Grabherr, Heini M; Nürnberger, Thorsten

    2012-08-01

    Microbial glycans, such as bacterial peptidoglycans, fungal chitin or rhizobacterial Nod factors (NFs), are important signatures for plant immune activation or for the establishment of beneficial symbioses. Plant lysin motif (LysM) domain proteins serve as modules mediating recognition of these different N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc)-containing ligands, suggesting that this class of proteins evolved from an ancient sensor for GlcNAc. During early plant evolution, these glycans probably served as immunogenic patterns activating LysM protein receptor-mediated plant immunity and stopping microbial infection. The biochemical potential of plant LysM proteins for sensing microbial GlcNAc-containing glycans has probably since favored the evolution of receptors facilitating microbial infection and symbiosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Thrombopoietin potentiates the protein-kinase-C-mediated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinases and extracellular signal-regulated kinases in human platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezumi, Y; Uchiyama, T; Takayama, H

    1998-12-15

    The thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor is expressed in the megakaryocytic lineage from late progenitors to platelets. We investigated the effect of TPO on the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation pathway in human platelets. TPO by itself did not activate ERK1, ERK2 and protein kinase C (PKC), whereas TPO directly enhanced the PKC-dependent activation of ERKs induced by other agonists including thrombin and phorbol esters, without affecting the PKC activation by those agonists. TPO did not activate the mitogen-activated protein kinase/ERK kinases, MEK1 and MEK2, but activated Raf-1 and directly augmented the PKC-mediated MEK activation, suggesting that TPO primarily potentiates the ERK pathway through regulating MEKs or upstream steps of MEKs including Raf-1. The MEK inhibitor PD098059 failed to affect not only thrombin-induced or phorbol ester-induced aggregation, but also potentiation of aggregation by TPO, denying the primary involvement of ERKs and MEKs in those events. ERKs and MEKs were located mainly in the detergent-soluble/non-cytoskeletal fractions. ERKs but not MEKs were relocated to the cytoskeleton following platelet aggregation and actin polymerization. These data indicate that TPO synergizes with other agonists in the ERK activation pathway of platelets and that this synergy might affect functions of the cytoskeleton possibly regulated by ERKs.

  15. Protein-mediated energy-dissipating pathways in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkov, Anatoly A

    2006-10-27

    Mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a well-established fact of fundamental importance to aging and etiology of many pathologies with serious public health implications. The ROS production is an innate property of mitochondrial biochemistry inseparable from the oxidative metabolism. Recent discoveries indicate that in addition to several ROS-detoxifying enzyme systems, which remove ROS, mitochondria may also be able to limit their ROS production by the mechanism comprising several protein-mediated energy-dissipating ("uncoupling") pathways. Although the physiological significance and in vivo modus operandi of these pathways remain to be elucidated, several proteins potentially capable of energy dissipation are known. This mini-review addresses the identity of mitochondrial protein-mediated energy-dissipating pathways and the experimental evidence to their role in controlling ROS production.

  16. Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase alpha activates Src-family kinases and controls integrin-mediated responses in fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Su, J; Muranjan, M; Sap, J

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fyn and c-Src are two of the most widely expressed Src-family kinases. Both are strongly implicated in the control of cytoskeletal organization and in the generation of integrin-dependent signalling responses in fibroblasts. These proteins are representative of a large family of tyros...

  17. Cytoskeletal Requirements for Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) RNA Synthesis in the HCV Replicon Cell Culture System

    OpenAIRE

    Bost, Anne G.; Venable, Daryl; Liu, Lifei; Heinz, Beverly A.

    2003-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces microtubule aggregates in infected hepatocytes. To determine if cytoskeletal elements are important for HCV RNA synthesis, we examined the effect of cytoskeleton inhibitors on HCV replicon transcription in Huh7 cells. The data demonstrate that HCV replication complex-mediated RNA synthesis requires microtubule and actin polymerization.

  18. Cytoskeletal requirements for hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA synthesis in the HCV replicon cell culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bost, Anne G; Venable, Daryl; Liu, Lifei; Heinz, Beverly A

    2003-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) induces microtubule aggregates in infected hepatocytes. To determine if cytoskeletal elements are important for HCV RNA synthesis, we examined the effect of cytoskeleton inhibitors on HCV replicon transcription in Huh7 cells. The data demonstrate that HCV replication complex-mediated RNA synthesis requires microtubule and actin polymerization.

  19. Role of protein-protein interactions in cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandel, Sylvie E; Lampe, Jed N

    2014-09-15

    Through their unique oxidative chemistry, cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs) catalyze the elimination of most drugs and toxins from the human body. Protein-protein interactions play a critical role in this process. Historically, the study of CYP-protein interactions has focused on their electron transfer partners and allosteric mediators, cytochrome P450 reductase and cytochrome b5. However, CYPs can bind other proteins that also affect CYP function. Some examples include the progesterone receptor membrane component 1, damage resistance protein 1, human and bovine serum albumin, and intestinal fatty acid binding protein, in addition to other CYP isoforms. Furthermore, disruption of these interactions can lead to altered paths of metabolism and the production of toxic metabolites. In this review, we summarize the available evidence for CYP protein-protein interactions from the literature and offer a discussion of the potential impact of future studies aimed at characterizing noncanonical protein-protein interactions with CYP enzymes.

  20. ABC-F Proteins Mediate Antibiotic Resistance through Ribosomal Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Liam K R; Edwards, Thomas A; O'Neill, Alex J

    2016-03-22

    Members of the ABC-F subfamily of ATP-binding cassette proteins mediate resistance to a broad array of clinically important antibiotic classes that target the ribosome of Gram-positive pathogens. The mechanism by which these proteins act has been a subject of long-standing controversy, with two competing hypotheses each having gained considerable support: antibiotic efflux versus ribosomal protection. Here, we report on studies employing a combination of bacteriological and biochemical techniques to unravel the mechanism of resistance of these proteins, and provide several lines of evidence that together offer clear support to the ribosomal protection hypothesis. Of particular note, we show that addition of purified ABC-F proteins to anin vitrotranslation assay prompts dose-dependent rescue of translation, and demonstrate that such proteins are capable of displacing antibiotic from the ribosomein vitro To our knowledge, these experiments constitute the first direct evidence that ABC-F proteins mediate antibiotic resistance through ribosomal protection.IMPORTANCEAntimicrobial resistance ranks among the greatest threats currently facing human health. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which microorganisms resist the effect of antibiotics is central to understanding the biology of this phenomenon and has the potential to inform the development of new drugs capable of blocking or circumventing resistance. Members of the ABC-F family, which includelsa(A),msr(A),optr(A), andvga(A), collectively yield resistance to a broader range of clinically significant antibiotic classes than any other family of resistance determinants, although their mechanism of action has been controversial since their discovery 25 years ago. Here we present the first direct evidence that proteins of the ABC-F family act to protect the bacterial ribosome from antibiotic-mediated inhibition. Copyright © 2016 Sharkey et al.

  1. Rho GTPase-formin pairs in cytoskeletal remodelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenmann, Kathryn M; Peng, Jun; Wallar, Bradley J; Alberts, Arthur S

    2005-01-01

    Diaphanous-related formins (Drfs) are members of a conserved formin family of actin-nucleating proteins and are thought to act as Rho GTPase effectors in signal transduction pathways that govern gene expression, cytoskeletal remodelling and cell division. In vitro evidence suggests that the three mammalian Drf proteins--mDia1, mDia2 and mDia3-have distinct GTPase-binding specificities. However, much of our current understanding of GTPase-Drf partnerships in mammalian cell signalling is based on expression studies using Drfs missing their unique GTPase-binding domains. We have employed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and gene targeting approaches to identify the function of different GTPase-formin pairs in cell signalling. These studies have allowed us to uncover new roles for Drf proteins in cytoskeletal remodelling and novel regulatory mechanisms whereby GTPases influence formin function. Our genetic experiments strongly suggest that Drfs cooperate with other GTPase effector proteins, including the gene product of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome gene, WASP, during the regulation of cell proliferation. Further, the Drf gene knockout experiments indicate that this family of formins has a role in cancer pathophysiology.

  2. Efficient isolation and elution of cellular proteins using aptamer-mediated protein precipitation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kiseok; Lee, SeungJin; Ryu, Sungho; Han, Dongil

    2014-05-23

    Protein precipitation is one of the most widely used methods for antigen detection and purification in biological research. We developed a reproducible aptamer-mediated magnetic protein precipitation method that is able to efficiently capture, purify and isolate the target proteins. We discovered DNA aptamers having individually high affinity and specificity against human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human insulin receptor (INSR). Using aptamers and magnetic beads, we showed it is highly efficient technique to enrich endogenous proteins complex and is applicable to identify physiologically relevant protein-protein interactions with minimized nonspecific binding of proteins. The results presented here indicate that aptamers would be applicable as a useful and cost-effective tool to identify the presence of the particular target protein with their specific protein partners.

  3. Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mediated Protein Quality Control in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming eLi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A correct three-dimensional structure is crucial for the physiological functions of a protein, yet the folding of proteins to acquire native conformation is a fundamentally error-prone process. Eukaryotic organisms have evolved a highly conserved endoplasmic reticulum-mediated protein quality control (ERQC mechanism to monitor folding processes of secretory and membrane proteins, allowing export of only correctly folded proteins to their physiological destinations, retaining incompletely/mis-folded ones in the ER for additional folding attempts, marking and removing terminally-misfolded ones via a unique multiple-step degradation process known as ER-associate degradation (ERAD. Most of our current knowledge on ERQC and ERAD came from genetic and biochemical investigations in yeast and mammalian cells. Recent studies in the reference plant Arabidopsis thaliana uncovered homologous components and similar mechanisms in plants for monitoring protein folding and for retaining, repairing, and removing misfolded proteins. These studies also revealed critical roles of the plant ERQC/ERAD systems in regulating important biochemical/physiological processes, such as abiotic stress tolerance and plant defense. In this review, we discuss our current understanding about the molecular components and biochemical mechanisms of the plant ERQC/ERAD system in comparison to yeast and mammalian systems.

  4. Semisynthesis of Ribonuclease A using Intein-Mediated Protein Ligation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Arnold

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of non-natural amino acid residues or modules into proteins provides a new means to explore the basis for conformational stability, folding/unfolding behavior, or biological function. We exploited intein-mediated protein ligation to produce a semisynthetic ribonuclease A. Of the 124 residues of RNase A, residues 1–94 were linked to an intein. After expression of the fusion protein and thiol-induced cleavage, the RNase A(1–94 fragment possessed a C-terminal thioester. A peptide identical to the C-terminal residues 95–124 of RNase A (with residue 95 being cysteine was successfully ligated to that thioester thereby reconstituting full-length wild-type RNase A. In mass spectrometry, this semisynthetic RNase A proved to be undistinguishable from the control protein, namely recombinant wild-type RNase A. Recombinant wild-type RNase A was obtained by expression of RNase A(1–124–intein fusion protein followed by thiol-induced cleavage and hydrolysis of the thioester. Both proteins showed thermal stabilities (Tm and catalytic activities comparable to the wild-type enzyme, indicating that both proteins folded properly. These results might serve as basis for the semisynthesis of RNase A variants containing non-natural modules in the aforementioned peptide.

  5. Morphology, biophysical properties and protein-mediated fusion of archaeosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vid Šuštar

    Full Text Available As variance from standard phospholipids of eubacteria and eukaryotes, archaebacterial diether phospholipids contain branched alcohol chains (phytanol linked to glycerol exclusively with ether bonds. Giant vesicles (GVs constituted of different species of archaebacterial diether phospholipids and glycolipids (archaeosomes were prepared by electroformation and observed under a phase contrast and/or fluorescence microscope. Archaebacterial lipids and different mixtures of archaebacterial and standard lipids formed GVs which were analysed for size, yield and ability to adhere to each other due to the mediating effects of certain plasma proteins. GVs constituted of different proportions of archaeal or standard phosphatidylcholine were compared. In nonarchaebacterial GVs (in form of multilamellar lipid vesicles, MLVs the main transition was detected at T(m = 34. 2°C with an enthalpy of ΔH = 0.68 kcal/mol, whereas in archaebacterial GVs (MLVs we did not observe the main phase transition in the range between 10 and 70°C. GVs constituted of archaebacterial lipids were subject to attractive interaction mediated by beta 2 glycoprotein I and by heparin. The adhesion constant of beta 2 glycoprotein I-mediated adhesion determined from adhesion angle between adhered GVs was in the range of 10(-8 J/m(2. In the course of protein mediated adhesion, lateral segregation of the membrane components and presence of thin tubular membranous structures were observed. The ability of archaebacterial diether lipids to combine with standard lipids in bilayers and their compatibility with adhesion-mediating molecules offer further evidence that archaebacterial lipids are appropriate for the design of drug carriers.

  6. Modeling Cytoskeletal Active Matter Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Robert

    Active networks of filamentous proteins and crosslinking motor proteins play a critical role in many important cellular processes. One of the most important microtubule-motor protein assemblies is the mitotic spindle, a self-organized active liquid-crystalline structure that forms during cell division and that ultimately separates chromosomes into two daughter cells. Although the spindle has been intensively studied for decades, the physical principles that govern its self-organization and function remain mysterious. To evolve a better understanding of spindle formation, structure, and dynamics, I investigate course-grained models of active liquid-crystalline networks composed of microtubules, modeled as hard spherocylinders, in diffusive equilibrium with a reservoir of active crosslinks, modeled as hookean springs that can adsorb to microtubules and and translocate at finite velocity along the microtubule axis. This model is investigated using a combination of brownian dynamics and kinetic monte carlo simulation. I have further refined this model to simulate spindle formation and kinetochore capture in the fission yeast S. pombe. I then make predictions for experimentally realizable perturbations in motor protein presence and function in S. pombe.

  7. Modulators of cytoskeletal reorganization in CA1 hippocampal neurons show increased expression in patients at mid-stage Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia F Kao

    Full Text Available During the progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD, hippocampal neurons undergo cytoskeletal reorganization, resulting in degenerative as well as regenerative changes. As neurofibrillary tangles form and dystrophic neurites appear, sprouting neuronal processes with growth cones emerge. Actin and tubulin are indispensable for normal neurite development and regenerative responses to injury and neurodegenerative stimuli. We have previously shown that actin capping protein beta2 subunit, Capzb2, binds tubulin and, in the presence of tau, affects microtubule polymerization necessary for neurite outgrowth and normal growth cone morphology. Accordingly, Capzb2 silencing in hippocampal neurons resulted in short, dystrophic neurites, seen in neurodegenerative diseases including AD. Here we demonstrate the statistically significant increase in the Capzb2 expression in the postmortem hippocampi in persons at mid-stage, Braak and Braak stage (BB III-IV, non-familial AD in comparison to controls. The dynamics of Capzb2 expression in progressive AD stages cannot be attributed to reactive astrocytosis. Moreover, the increased expression of Capzb2 mRNA in CA1 pyramidal neurons in AD BB III-IV is accompanied by an increased mRNA expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB, mediator of synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons. Thus, the up-regulation of Capzb2 and TrkB may reflect cytoskeletal reorganization and/or regenerative response occurring in hippocampal CA1 neurons at a specific stage of AD progression.

  8. Purinoreceptor P2X7 Regulation of Ca(2+) Mobilization and Cytoskeletal Rearrangement Is Required for Corneal Reepithelialization after Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minns, Martin S; Teicher, Gregory; Rich, Celeste B; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery

    2016-02-01

    The process of wound healing involves a complex network of signaling pathways working to promote rapid cell migration and wound closure. Activation of purinergic receptors by secreted nucleotides plays a major role in calcium mobilization and the subsequent calcium-dependent signaling that is essential for proper healing. The role of the purinergic receptor P2X7 in wound healing is still relatively unknown. We demonstrate that P2X7 expression increases at the leading edge of corneal epithelium after injury in an organ culture model, and that this change occurs despite an overall decrease in P2X7 expression throughout the epithelium. Inhibition of P2X7 prevents this change in localization after injury and impairs wound healing. In cell culture, P2X7 inhibition attenuates the amplitude and duration of injury-induced calcium mobilization in cells at the leading edge. Immunofluorescence analysis of scratch-wounded cells reveals that P2X7 inhibition results in an overall decrease in the number of focal adhesions along with a concentration of focal adhesions at the wound margin. Live cell imaging of green fluorescent protein-labeled actin and talin shows that P2X7 inhibition alters actin cytoskeletal rearrangements and focal adhesion dynamics after injury. Together, these data demonstrate that P2X7 plays a critical role in mediating calcium signaling and coordinating cytoskeletal rearrangement at the leading edge, both of which processes are early signaling events necessary for proper epithelial wound healing.

  9. Contextual specificity in peptide-mediated protein interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelie Stein

    Full Text Available Most biological processes are regulated through complex networks of transient protein interactions where a globular domain in one protein recognizes a linear peptide from another, creating a relatively small contact interface. Although sufficient to ensure binding, these linear motifs alone are usually too short to achieve the high specificity observed, and additional contacts are often encoded in the residues surrounding the motif (i.e. the context. Here, we systematically identified all instances of peptide-mediated protein interactions of known three-dimensional structure and used them to investigate the individual contribution of motif and context to the global binding energy. We found that, on average, the context is responsible for roughly 20% of the binding and plays a crucial role in determining interaction specificity, by either improving the affinity with the native partner or impeding non-native interactions. We also studied and quantified the topological and energetic variability of interaction interfaces, finding a much higher heterogeneity in the context residues than in the consensus binding motifs. Our analysis partially reveals the molecular mechanisms responsible for the dynamic nature of peptide-mediated interactions, and suggests a global evolutionary mechanism to maximise the binding specificity. Finally, we investigated the viability of non-native interactions and highlight cases of potential cross-reaction that might compensate for individual protein failure and establish backup circuits to increase the robustness of cell networks.

  10. Infectious Keratitis: Secreted Bacterial Proteins That Mediate Corneal Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E. Marquart

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ocular bacterial infections are universally treated with antibiotics, which can eliminate the organism but cannot reverse the damage caused by bacterial products already present. The three very common causes of bacterial keratitis—Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus pneumoniae—all produce proteins that directly or indirectly cause damage to the cornea that can result in reduced vision despite antibiotic treatment. Most, but not all, of these proteins are secreted toxins and enzymes that mediate host cell death, degradation of stromal collagen, cleavage of host cell surface molecules, or induction of a damaging inflammatory response. Studies of these bacterial pathogens have determined the proteins of interest that could be targets for future therapeutic options for decreasing corneal damage.

  11. The Transmembrane Adaptor Protein SIT Inhibits TCR-Mediated Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Börge; Krieger, Tina; Kalinski, Thomas; Thielitz, Anja; Reinhold, Dirk; Roessner, Albert; Schraven, Burkhart; Simeoni, Luca

    2011-01-01

    Transmembrane adaptor proteins (TRAPs) organize signaling complexes at the plasma membrane, and thus function as critical linkers and integrators of signaling cascades downstream of antigen receptors. We have previously shown that the transmembrane adaptor protein SIT regulates the threshold for thymocyte selection. Moreover, T cells from SIT-deficient mice are hyperresponsive to CD3 stimulation and undergo enhanced lymphopenia-induced homeostatic proliferation, thus indicating that SIT inhibits TCR-mediated signaling. Here, we have further addressed how SIT regulates signaling cascades in T cells. We demonstrate that the loss of SIT enhances TCR-mediated Akt activation and increased phosphorylation/inactivation of Foxo1, a transcription factor of the Forkhead family that inhibits cell cycle progression and regulates T-cell homeostasis. We have also shown that CD4+ T cells from SIT-deficient mice display increased CD69 and CD40L expression indicating an altered activation status. Additional biochemical analyses further revealed that suppression of SIT expression by RNAi in human T cells resulted in an enhanced proximal TCR signaling. In summary, the data identify SIT as an important modulator of TCR-mediated signaling that regulates T-cell activation, homeostasis and tolerance. PMID:21957439

  12. The cytoskeletal binding domain of band 3 is required for multiprotein complex formation and retention during erythropoiesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satchwell, Timothy J; Hawley, Bethan R; Bell, Amanda J; Ribeiro, M. Leticia; Toye, Ashley M

    2015-01-01

    Band 3 is the most abundant protein in the erythrocyte membrane and forms the core of a major multiprotein complex. The absence of band 3 in human erythrocytes has only been reported once, in the homozygous band 3 Coimbra patient. We used in vitro culture of erythroblasts derived from this patient, and separately short hairpin RNA-mediated depletion of band 3, to investigate the development of a band 3-deficient erythrocyte membrane and to specifically assess the stability and retention of band 3 dependent proteins in the absence of this core protein during terminal erythroid differentiation. Further, using lentiviral transduction of N-terminally green fluorescent protein-tagged band 3, we demonstrated the ability to restore expression of band 3 to normal levels and to rescue secondary deficiencies of key proteins including glycophorin A, protein 4.2, CD47 and Rh proteins arising from the absence of band 3 in this patient. By transducing band 3-deficient erythroblasts from this patient with band 3 mutants with absent or impaired ability to associate with the cytoskeleton we also demonstrated the importance of cytoskeletal connectivity for retention both of band 3 and of its associated dependent proteins within the reticulocyte membrane during the process of erythroblast enucleation. PMID:25344524

  13. Cubilin and amnionless mediate protein reabsorption in Drosophila nephrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fujian; Zhao, Ying; Chao, Yufang; Muir, Katherine; Han, Zhe

    2013-02-01

    The insect nephrocyte and the mammalian glomerular podocyte are similar with regard to filtration, but it remains unclear whether there is an organ or cell type in flies that reabsorbs proteins. Here, we show that the Drosophila nephrocyte has molecular, structural, and functional similarities to the renal proximal tubule cell. We screened for genes required for nephrocyte function and identified two Drosophila genes encoding orthologs of mammalian cubilin and amnionless (AMN), two major receptors for protein reabsorption in the proximal tubule. In Drosophila, expression of dCubilin and dAMN is specific to nephrocytes, where they function as co-receptors for protein uptake. Targeted expression of human AMN in Drosophila nephrocytes was sufficient to rescue defective protein uptake induced by dAMN knockdown, suggesting evolutionary conservation of Cubilin/AMN co-receptors function from flies to humans. Furthermore, we found that Cubilin/AMN-mediated protein reabsorption is required for the maintenance of nephrocyte ultrastructure and fly survival under conditions of toxic stress. In conclusion, the insect nephrocyte combines filtration with protein reabsorption, using evolutionarily conserved genes and subcellular structures, suggesting that it can serve as a simplified model for both podocytes and the renal proximal tubule.

  14. Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy Protein BAG3 Negatively Regulates Ebola and Marburg VP40-Mediated Egress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jingjing; Sagum, Cari A.; Bedford, Mark T.; Sudol, Marius; Han, Ziying

    2017-01-01

    Ebola (EBOV) and Marburg (MARV) viruses are members of the Filoviridae family which cause outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever. The filovirus VP40 matrix protein is essential for virus assembly and budding, and its PPxY L-domain motif interacts with WW-domains of specific host proteins, such as Nedd4 and ITCH, to facilitate the late stage of virus-cell separation. To identify additional WW-domain-bearing host proteins that interact with VP40, we used an EBOV PPxY-containing peptide to screen an array of 115 mammalian WW-domain-bearing proteins. Using this unbiased approach, we identified BCL2 Associated Athanogene 3 (BAG3), a member of the BAG family of molecular chaperone proteins, as a specific VP40 PPxY interactor. Here, we demonstrate that the WW-domain of BAG3 interacts with the PPxY motif of both EBOV and MARV VP40 and, unexpectedly, inhibits budding of both eVP40 and mVP40 virus-like particles (VLPs), as well as infectious VSV-EBOV recombinants. BAG3 is a stress induced protein that regulates cellular protein homeostasis and cell survival through chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA). Interestingly, our results show that BAG3 alters the intracellular localization of VP40 by sequestering VP40 away from the plasma membrane. As BAG3 is the first WW-domain interactor identified that negatively regulates budding of VP40 VLPs and infectious virus, we propose that the chaperone-mediated autophagy function of BAG3 represents a specific host defense strategy to counteract the function of VP40 in promoting efficient egress and spread of virus particles. PMID:28076420

  15. Revisiting Apoplastic Auxin Signaling Mediated by AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Mingxiao; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2015-10-01

    It has been suggested that AUXIN BINDING PROTEIN 1 (ABP1) functions as an apoplastic auxin receptor, and is known to be involved in the post-transcriptional process, and largely independent of the already well-known SKP-cullin-F-box-transport inhibitor response (TIR1) /auxin signaling F-box (AFB) (SCF(TIR1/AFB)) pathway. In the past 10 years, several key components downstream of ABP1 have been reported. After perceiving the auxin signal, ABP1 interacts, directly or indirectly, with plasma membrane (PM)-localized transmembrane proteins, transmembrane kinase (TMK) or SPIKE1 (SPK1), or other unidentified proteins, which transfer the signal into the cell to the Rho of plants (ROP). ROPs interact with their effectors, such as the ROP interactive CRIB motif-containing protein (RIC), to regulate the endocytosis/exocytosis of the auxin efflux carrier PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins to mediate polar auxin transport across the PM. Additionally, ABP1 is a negative regulator of the traditional SCF(TIR1/AFB) auxin signaling pathway. However, Gao et al. (2015) very recently reported that ABP1 is not a key component in auxin signaling, and the famous abp1-1 and abp1-5 mutant Arabidopsis lines are being called into question because of possible additional mutantion sites, making it necessary to reevaluate ABP1. In this review, we will provide a brief overview of the history of ABP1 research.

  16. A conserved patch of hydrophobic amino acids modulates Myb activity by mediating protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukare, Sandeep; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb plays a key role in the control of proliferation and differentiation in hematopoietic progenitor cells and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and certain non-hematopoietic tumors. c-Myb activity is highly dependent on the interaction with the coactivator p300 which is mediated by the transactivation domain of c-Myb and the KIX domain of p300. We have previously observed that conservative valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions in a conserved stretch of hydrophobic amino acids have a profound effect on Myb activity. Here, we have explored the function of the hydrophobic region as a mediator of protein-protein interactions. We show that the hydrophobic region facilitates Myb self-interaction and binding of the histone acetyl transferase Tip60, a previously identified Myb interacting protein. We show that these interactions are affected by the valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions and suppress Myb activity by interfering with the interaction of Myb and the KIX domain of p300. Taken together, our work identifies the hydrophobic region in the Myb transactivation domain as a binding site for homo- and heteromeric protein interactions and leads to a picture of the c-Myb transactivation domain as a composite protein binding region that facilitates interdependent protein-protein interactions of Myb with regulatory proteins.

  17. Cytoskeletal network morphology regulates intracellular transport dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Ando, David; Huang, Kerwyn Casey; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular transport is essential for maintaining proper cellular function in most eukaryotic cells, with perturbations in active transport resulting in several types of disease. Efficient delivery of critical cargos to specific locations is accomplished through a combination of passive diffusion and active transport by molecular motors that ballistically move along a network of cytoskeletal filaments. Although motor-based transport is known to be necessary to overcome cytoplasmic crowding and the limited range of diffusion within reasonable time scales, the topological features of the cytoskeletal network that regulate transport efficiency and robustness have not been established. Using a continuum diffusion model, we observed that the time required for cellular transport was minimized when the network was localized near the nucleus. In simulations that explicitly incorporated network spatial architectures, total filament mass was the primary driver of network transit times. However, filament traps that r...

  18. Electron-mediating Cu(A) centers in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epel, Boris; Slutter, Claire S; Neese, Frank

    2002-01-01

    High field (W-band, 95 GHz) pulsed electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) measurements were carried out on a number of proteins that contain the mixed-valence, binuclear electron-mediating Cu(A) center. These include nitrous oxide reductase (N(2)OR), the recombinant water-soluble fragment...... of subunit II of Thermus thermophilus cytochrome c oxidase (COX) ba(3) (M160T9), its M160QT0 mutant, where the weak axial methionine ligand has been replaced by a glutamine, and the engineered "purple" azurin (purpAz). The three-dimensional (3-D) structures of these proteins, apart from the mutant, are known......-D structures and compared with the experimental spectra. It was found that the width of the powder patterns of the weakly coupled protons recorded at g(perpendicular) is mainly determined by the histidine H(epsilon)(1) protons. Furthermore, the splitting in the outer wings of these powder patterns...

  19. Nitrosative stress and nitrated proteins in trichloroethene-mediated autoimmunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangduo Wang

    Full Text Available Exposure to trichloroethene (TCE, a ubiquitous environmental contaminant, has been linked to a variety of autoimmune diseases (ADs including SLE, scleroderma and hepatitis. Mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of ADs are largely unknown. Earlier studies from our laboratory in MRL+/+ mice suggested the contribution of oxidative/nitrosative stress in TCE-induced autoimmunity, and N-acetylcysteine (NAC supplementation provided protection by attenuating oxidative stress. This study was undertaken to further evaluate the contribution of nitrosative stress in TCE-mediated autoimmunity and to identify proteins susceptible to nitrosative stress. Groups of female MRL +/+ mice were given TCE, NAC or TCE + NAC for 6 weeks (TCE, 10 mmol/kg, i.p., every 4th day; NAC, ∼ 250 mg/kg/day via drinking water. TCE exposure led to significant increases in serum anti-nuclear and anti-histone antibodies together with significant induction of iNOS and increased formation of nitrotyrosine (NT in sera and livers. Proteomic analysis identified 14 additional nitrated proteins in the livers of TCE-treated mice. Furthermore, TCE exposure led to decreased GSH levels and increased activation of NF-κB. Remarkably, NAC supplementation not only ameliorated TCE-induced nitrosative stress as evident from decreased iNOS, NT, nitrated proteins, NF-κB p65 activation and increased GSH levels, but also the markers of autoimmunity, as evident from decreased levels of autoantibodies in the sera. These findings provide support to the role of nitrosative stress in TCE-mediated autoimmune response and identify specific nitrated proteins which could have autoimmune potential. Attenuation of TCE-induced autoimmunity in mice by NAC provides an approach for designing therapeutic strategies.

  20. Effects of oridonin on cytoskeletal protein F-actin in human pancreatic carcinoma cells%冬凌草甲素对胰腺癌细胞骨架蛋白F-actin的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘军楼; 沈洪; 徐力; 杨继兵; 于希忠; 孙志岭

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose:Traditional Chinese medicine with notable effect and little adverse reaction is increasingly concerned about the medical profession because of its great potential and advantage in treating pancreatic carcinoma. In this experiment, we studied the effects of oridonin on apoptosis and cytoskeletal protein F-actin in human pancreatic carcinoma SW1990 cells. Methods:SW1990 cells in culture medium were treated with different concentrations of oridonin. The inhibitory rate of the cells was measured by MTT assay. Morphology of cell apoptosis was observed by DAPI stain and cell apoptotic rate was detected by lfow cytometry (FCM). The morphological changes of F-actin were observed by laser confocal microscopy. Results:The growth of human pancreatic carcinoma SW1990 cells was signiifcantly inhibited by oridonin. Apoptosis morphological changes including condensation of chromatin and nuclear fragmentation were observed clearly by DAPI stain. The early apoptotic rate of SW1990 cells treated with 25, 50μmol/L oridonin was signiifcantly higher than that of the control group (3.78±0.46, 9.51±0.63 vs 0.73±0.06, P<0.05), and the late apoptotic rate and cell necrosis rate were also signiifcantly higher than that of the control group (14.40±1.78, 20.53±2.54 vs 4.16±0.31, P<0.05). F-actin was showed from polymerization to depolymerization after oridonin treatment. Conclusion:Oridonin can obviously inhibit the proliferation and induce apoptosis of SW1990 cells. The mechanisms may involve the depolymerization of F-actin after treatment with oridonin.%背景与目的:中医药治疗肿瘤不良反应低且疗效显著,在防治胰腺癌方面有较大的潜力与优势,日益受到国内、外医学界的关注。本研究观察中草药冬凌草的有效成分冬凌草甲素对人胰腺癌SW1990凋亡及细胞骨架蛋白F-actin的影响。方法:以不同浓度的冬凌草甲素作用于体外培养的SW1990细胞,采用MTT法检测细胞生长

  1. Cytoskeletal pinning controls phase separation in multicomponent lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arumugam, Senthil; Petrov, Eugene P; Schwille, Petra

    2015-03-10

    We study the effect of a minimal cytoskeletal network formed on the surface of giant unilamellar vesicles by the prokaryotic tubulin homolog, FtsZ, on phase separation in freestanding lipid membranes. FtsZ has been modified to interact with the membrane through a membrane targeting sequence from the prokaryotic protein MinD. FtsZ with the attached membrane targeting sequence efficiently forms a highly interconnected network on membranes with a concentration-dependent mesh size, much similar to the eukaryotic cytoskeletal network underlying the plasma membrane. Using giant unilamellar vesicles formed from a quaternary lipid mixture, we demonstrate that the artificial membrane-associated cytoskeleton, on the one hand, suppresses large-scale phase separation below the phase transition temperature, and, on the other hand, preserves phase separation above the transition temperature. Our experimental observations support the ideas put forward in our previous simulation study: In particular, the picket fence effect on phase separation may explain why micrometer-scale membrane domains are observed in isolated, cytoskeleton-free giant plasma membrane vesicles, but not in intact cell membranes. The experimentally observed suppression of large-scale phase separation much below the transition temperatures also serves as an argument in favor of the cryoprotective role of the cytoskeleton. Copyright © 2015 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Altered cytoskeletal structures in transformed cells exhibiting obviously metastatic capabilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LINZHONGXIANG; WUBINGQUAN; 等

    1990-01-01

    Cytoskeletal changes in transformed cells (LM-51) eshibiting obviously metastatic capabilities were investigated by utilization of double-fluorescent labelling through combinations of:(1) tubulin indirect immunofluorescence plus Rhodamine-phalloidin staining of F-actins;(2) indirect immunofluorescent staining with α-actinin polyclonal-and vinculin monoclonal antibodies.The LM-51 cells which showed metastatic index of >50% were derived from lung metastasis in nude mice after subcutaneous inoculation of human highly metastatic tumor DNA transfected NIH3T3 cell transformants.The parent NIH3T3 cells exhibited well-organized microtubules,prominent stress fibers and adhesion plaques while their transformants showed remarkable cytoskeletal alterations:(1)reduced microtubules but increased MTOC fluorescence;(2)disrupted stress fibers and fewer adhesion plaques with their protein components redistributed in the cytoplasm;(3)Factin-and α-actinin/vinculin aggregates appeared in the cytoplasm.These aggregates were dot-like,varied in size(0.1-0.4μm) and number,located near the ventral surface of the cells.TPA-induced actin/vinculin bodies were studied too.Indications that actin and α-actinin/vinculin redistribution might be important alterations involved in the expression of metastatic capabilities of LM-51 transformed cells were discussed.

  3. Cytoskeletal Reorganization Drives Mesenchymal Condensation and Regulates Downstream Molecular Signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poulomi Ray

    Full Text Available Skeletal condensation occurs when specified mesenchyme cells self-organize over several days to form a distinctive cartilage template. Here, we determine how and when specified mesenchyme cells integrate mechanical and molecular information from their environment, forming cartilage condensations in the pharyngeal arches of chick embryos. By disrupting cytoskeletal reorganization, we demonstrate that dynamic cell shape changes drive condensation and modulate the response of the condensing cells to Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF, Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP and Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β signaling pathways. Rho Kinase (ROCK-driven actomyosin contractions and Myosin II-generated differential cell cortex tension regulate these cell shape changes. Disruption of the condensation process inhibits the differentiation of the mesenchyme cells into chondrocytes, demonstrating that condensation regulates the fate of the mesenchyme cells. We also find that dorsal and ventral condensations undergo distinct cell shape changes. BMP signaling is instructive for dorsal condensation-specific cell shape changes. Moreover, condensations exhibit ventral characteristics in the absence of BMP signaling, suggesting that in the pharyngeal arches ventral morphology is the ground pattern. Overall, this study characterizes the interplay between cytoskeletal dynamics and molecular signaling in a self-organizing system during tissue morphogenesis.

  4. Prostacyclin-induced hyperthermia - Implication of a protein mediator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, S. B.; Williams, B. A.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanism of the prostacyclin-linked hyperthermia is studied in rabbits. Results show that intracerebroventricular administration of prostacyclin (PGI2) induces dose-related hyperthermia at room temperature (21 C), as well as at low (4 C) and high (30 C) ambient temperatures. It is found that this PGI2-induced hyperthermia is not mediated by its stable metabolite 6-keto prostaglandin F-1(alpha). Only one of the three anion transport systems, the liver transport system, appears to be important to the central inactivation of pyrogen, prostaglandin E2, and PGI2. Phenoxybenzamine and pimozide have no thermolytic effect on PGI2-induced hyperthermia, while PGI2 still induces hyperthermia after norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine levels are depleted by 6-hydroxydopamine. Indomethacin and SC-19220 (a PG antagonist) do not antagonize PGI2 induced hyperthermia, while theophylline does not accentuate the PGI2-induced hyperthermia. However, the hyperthermic response to PGI2 is attenuated by central administration of the protein synthesis inhibitor, anisomycin. It is concluded that PGI2-induced hyperthermia is not induced by NE, dopamine, or cyclic AMP, but rather that a protein mediator is implicated in the induction of fever by PG12.

  5. Lipid-mediated protein functionalization of electrospun polycaprolactone fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Cohn

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL fibers are plasma-treated and chemically conjugated with cholesteryl succinyl silane (CSS. In addition to Raman spectroscopy, an immobilization study of DiO as a fluorescent probe of lipid membranes provides evidence supporting the CSS coating of plasma-treated PCL fibers. Further, anti-CD20 antibodies are used as a model protein to evaluate the potential of lipid-mediated protein immobilization as a mechanism to functionalize the CSS-PCL fiber scaffolds. Upon anti-CD20 functionalization, the CSS-PCL fiber scaffolds capture Granta-22 cells 2.4 times more than the PCL control does, although the two fiber scaffolds immobilize a comparable amount of anti-CD20. Taken together, results from the present study demonstrate that the CSS coating and CSS-mediated antibody immobilization offers an appealing strategy to functionalize electrospun synthetic polymer fibers and confer cell-specific functions on the fiber scaffolds, which can be mechanically robust but often lack biological functions.

  6. PACRG, a protein linked to ciliary motility, mediates cellular signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, Catrina M; Bialas, Nathan J; Dekkers, Martijn P J; Walker, Denise S; Grundy, Laura J; Li, Chunmei; Inglis, P Nick; Kida, Katarzyna; Schafer, William R; Blacque, Oliver E; Jansen, Gert; Leroux, Michel R

    2016-07-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from nearly all mammalian cell types. Motile cilia generate fluid flow, whereas nonmotile (primary) cilia are required for sensory physiology and modulate various signal transduction pathways. Here we investigate the nonmotile ciliary signaling roles of parkin coregulated gene (PACRG), a protein linked to ciliary motility. PACRG is associated with the protofilament ribbon, a structure believed to dictate the regular arrangement of motility-associated ciliary components. Roles for protofilament ribbon-associated proteins in nonmotile cilia and cellular signaling have not been investigated. We show that PACRG localizes to a small subset of nonmotile cilia in Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting an evolutionary adaptation for mediating specific sensory/signaling functions. We find that it influences a learning behavior known as gustatory plasticity, in which it is functionally coupled to heterotrimeric G-protein signaling. We also demonstrate that PACRG promotes longevity in C. elegans by acting upstream of the lifespan-promoting FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 and likely upstream of insulin/IGF signaling. Our findings establish previously unrecognized sensory/signaling functions for PACRG and point to a role for this protein in promoting longevity. Furthermore, our work suggests additional ciliary motility-signaling connections, since EFHC1 (EF-hand containing 1), a potential PACRG interaction partner similarly associated with the protofilament ribbon and ciliary motility, also positively regulates lifespan.

  7. 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts: Key mediator in Rett syndrome oxinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valacchi, Giuseppe; Pecorelli, Alessandra; Cervellati, Carlo; Hayek, Joussef

    2017-01-05

    In the last 15 years a strong correlation between oxidative stress (OxS) and Rett syndrome (RTT), a rare neurodevelopmental disorder known to be caused in 95% of the cases, by a mutation in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene, has been well documented. Here, we revised, summarized and discussed the current knowledge on the role of lipid peroxidation byproducts, with special emphasis on 4-hydroxynonenal (4HNE), in RTT pathophysiology. The posttranslational modifications of proteins via 4HNE, known as 4HNE protein adducts (4NHE-PAs), causing detrimental effects on protein functions, appear to contribute to the clinical severity of the syndrome, since their levels increase significantly during the subsequent 4 clinical stages, reaching the maximum degree at stage 4, represented by a late motor deterioration. In addition, 4HNE-PA are only partially removed due to the compromised functionality of the proteasome activity, contributing therefore to the cellular damage in RTT. All this will lead to a characteristic subclinical inflammation, defined "OxInflammation", derived by a positive feedback loop between OxS byproducts and inflammatory mediators that in a long run further aggravates the clinical features of RTT patients. Therefore, in a pathology completely orphan of any therapy, aiming 4HNE as a therapeutic target could represent a coadjuvant treatment with some beneficial impact in these patients.‬‬‬.

  8. Myeloperoxidase-mediated protein oxidation: its possible biological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naskalski, Jerzy W; Marcinkiewicz, Janusz; Drozdz, Ryszard

    2002-05-01

    Oxidation of proteins occurs both as a side-effect of aerobic energy metabolism and as an effect of specific metabolism of phagocytic polymorphonuclear granulocytes producing O2- and H2O2. In contrast to other cells, which control their H2O2 level by degrading it to O2 and H2O, polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes (PMN) use H2O2 as a substrate for oxidizing chloride ions to HOCl which rapidly react with all neighboring thiol, disulfide and amino residues. Chloramines, which are the most abundant HOCl reaction products, react with proteins, modifying only certain exposed methionine and cysteine residues. This may account for selective inactivation of a number of enzymes, carrier proteins and peptide mediators, including the alpha1-proteinase inhibitor, alpha2-macroglobulin and plasminogen activator inhibitor. Inactivaton of plasma proteinase inhibitors protects PMN elastase, collagenase, cathepsin G and other serine proteases in the inflammatory foci. This promotes proteolytic degradation of damaged tissue, removal of bacterial debris and wound healing, as well as tissue remodeling related to the inflammatory processes. Oxidative control of protease-anti-protease balance affects the development of the inflammatory processes. Moreover, inactivation of plasma proteinase inhibitors facilitates primary antigen processing, upregulates lymphocyte proliferative response and activates the local immune response. Oxidation produces a specific protein tagging which attracts and stimulates immune active cells. Therefore, humoral response against oxidatively modified proteins occurs more effectively than that of the native proteins. The effect is dose-dependent with respect to the amount of oxidant employed. Glycol aldehyde, which is the serine chloramine spontaneous decay product, in mice immunized with glycol aldehyde-modified egg-white albumin, yields specific IgG production manifold higher than that in mice immunized with native albumin. Immunopotentiation is produced

  9. Calpain-mediated cleavage of collapsin response mediator protein-2 drives acute axonal degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Nan; Michel, Uwe; Lenz, Christof; Friedel, Caroline C.; Köster, Sarah; d’Hedouville, Zara; Tönges, Lars; Urlaub, Henning; Bähr, Mathias; Lingor, Paul; Koch, Jan C.

    2016-01-01

    Axonal degeneration is a key initiating event in many neurological diseases. Focal lesions to axons result in a rapid disintegration of the perilesional axon by acute axonal degeneration (AAD) within several hours. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of AAD are only incompletely understood. Here, we studied AAD in vivo through live-imaging of the rat optic nerve and in vitro in primary rat cortical neurons in microfluidic chambers. We found that calpain is activated early during AAD of the optic nerve and that calpain inhibition completely inhibits axonal fragmentation on the proximal side of the crush while it attenuates AAD on the distal side. A screening of calpain targets revealed that collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2) is a main downstream target of calpain activation in AAD. CRMP2-overexpression delayed bulb formation and rescued impairment of axonal mitochondrial transport after axotomy in vitro. In vivo, CRMP2-overexpression effectively protected the proximal axon from fragmentation within 6 hours after crush. Finally, a proteomic analysis of the optic nerve was performed at 6 hours after crush, which identified further proteins regulated during AAD, including several interactors of CRMP2. These findings reveal CRMP2 as an important mediator of AAD and define it as a putative therapeutic target. PMID:27845394

  10. Neurofibromatosis type 2 tumor suppressor protein, NF2, induces proteasome-mediated degradation of JC virus T-antigen in human glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Beltrami

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis type 2 protein (NF2 has been shown to act as tumor suppressor primarily through its functions as a cytoskeletal scaffold. However, NF2 can also be found in the nucleus, where its role is less clear. Previously, our group has identified JC virus (JCV tumor antigen (T-antigen as a nuclear binding partner for NF2 in tumors derived from JCV T-antigen transgenic mice. The association of NF2 with T-antigen in neuronal origin tumors suggests a potential role for NF2 in regulating the expression of the JCV T-antigen. Here, we report that NF2 suppresses T-antigen protein expression in U-87 MG human glioblastoma cells, which subsequently reduces T-antigen-mediated regulation of the JCV promoter. When T-antigen mRNA was quantified, it was determined that increasing expression of NF2 correlated with an accumulation of T-antigen mRNA; however, a decrease in T-antigen at the protein level was observed. NF2 was found to promote degradation of ubiquitin bound T-antigen protein via a proteasome dependent pathway concomitant with the accumulation of the JCV early mRNA encoding T-antigen. The interaction between T-antigen and NF2 maps to the FERM domain of NF2, which has been shown previously to be responsible for its tumor suppressor activity. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed a ternary complex among NF2, T-antigen, and the tumor suppressor protein, p53 within a glioblastoma cell line. Further, these proteins were detected in various degrees in patient tumor tissue, suggesting that these associations may occur in vivo. Collectively, these results demonstrate that NF2 negatively regulates JCV T-antigen expression by proteasome-mediated degradation, and suggest a novel role for NF2 as a suppressor of JCV T-antigen-induced cell cycle regulation.

  11. Temporal changes in cytoskeletal organisation within isolated chondrocytes quantified using a novel image analysis technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, M M; Idowu, B D; Lee, D A; Bader, D L

    2001-05-01

    This paper examines temporal changes in the organisation of the cytoskeleton within isolated articular chondrocytes cultured for up to 7 days in agarose constructs. Fluorescent labelling and confocal microscopy were employed to visualise microtubules (MT), vimentin intermediate filaments (VIF) and actin microfilaments (AMF). To quantify the degree of cytoskeletal organisation within populations of cells, a novel image analysis technique has been developed and fully characterised. Organisation was quantified in terms of an Edge Index, which reflects the density of 'edges' present within the confocal images as defined by a Sobel digital filter. This parameter was shown to be independent of image intensity and, for all three cytoskeletal components, was validated statistically against a visual assessment of organisation. Both MT and VIF exhibited fibrous networks extending throughout the cytoplasm, while AMF appeared as punctate units associated with the cell membrane. The use of the Edge Index parameter revealed statistical significant temporal variation, in particular associated with VIF and AMF. These findings indicate the possibility of cytoskeletal mediated temporal variation in many aspects of cell behaviour following isolation from the intact tissue. Furthermore, the image analysis techniques are likely to be useful for future studies aiming to quantify changes in cytoskeletal organisation.

  12. Early changes in Huntington's disease patient brains involve alterations in cytoskeletal and synaptic elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiProspero, Nicholas A; Chen, Er-Yun; Charles, Vinod; Plomann, Markus; Kordower, Jeffrey H; Tagle, Danilo A

    2004-09-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by a polyglutamine repeat expansion in the N-terminus of the huntingtin protein. Huntingtin is normally present in the cytoplasm where it may interact with structural and synaptic elements. The mechanism of HD pathogenesis remains unknown but studies indicate a toxic gain-of-function possibly through aberrant protein interactions. To investigate whether early degenerative changes in HD involve alterations of cytoskeletal and vesicular components, we examined early cellular changes in the frontal cortex of HD presymptomatic (PS), early pathological grade (grade 1) and late-stage (grade 3 and 4) patients as compared to age-matched controls. Morphologic analysis using silver impregnation revealed a progressive decrease in neuronal fiber density and organization in pyramidal cell layers beginning in presymptomatic HD cases. Immunocytochemical analyses for the cytoskeletal markers alpha -tubulin, microtubule-associated protein 2, and phosphorylated neurofilament demonstrated a concomitant loss of staining in early grade cases. Immunoblotting for synaptic proteins revealed a reduction in complexin 2, which was marked in some grade 1 HD cases and significantly reduced in all late stage cases. Interestingly, we demonstrate that two synaptic proteins, dynamin and PACSIN 1, which were unchanged by immunoblotting, showed a striking loss by immunocytochemistry beginning in early stage HD tissue suggesting abnormal distribution of these proteins. We propose that mutant huntingtin affects proteins involved in synaptic function and cytoskeletal integrity before symptoms develop which may influence early disease onset and/or progression.

  13. Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans lipopolysaccharide affects human gingival fibroblast cytoskeletal organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Venegas, Gloria; Contreras-Marmolejo, Luis Arturo; Román-Alvárez, Patricia; Barajas-Torres, Carolina

    2008-04-01

    The cytoskeleton is a dynamic structure that plays a key role in maintaining cell morphology and function. This study investigates the effect of bacterial wall lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a strong inflammatory agent, on the dynamics and organization of actin, tubulin, vimentin, and vinculin proteins in human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). A time-dependent study showed a noticeable change in actin architecture after 1.5 h of incubation with LPS (1 microg/ml) with the formation of orthogonal fibers and further accumulation of actin filament at the cell periphery by 24 h. When 0.01-10 microg/ml of LPS was added to human gingival fibroblast cultures, cells acquired a round, flat shape and gradually developed cytoplasmic ruffling. Lipopolysaccharides extracted from Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans periodontopathogenic bacteria promoted alterations in F-actin stress fibres of human gingival cells. Normally, human gingival cells have F-actin fibres that are organized in linear distribution throughout the cells, extending along the cell's length. LPS-treated cells exhibited changes in cytoskeletal protein organization, and F-actin was reorganized by the formation of bundles underneath and parallel to the cell membrane. We also found the reorganization of the vimentin network into vimentin bundling after 1.5 h of treatment. HGF cells exhibited diffuse and granular gamma-tubulin stain. There was no change in LPS-treated HGF. However, vinculin plaques distributed in the cell body diminished after LPS treatment. We conclude that the dynamic and structured organization of cytoskeletal filaments and actin assembly in human gingival fibroblasts is altered by LPS treatment and is accompanied by a decrease in F-actin pools.

  14. The Gas2 family protein Pigs is a microtubule +TIP that affects cytoskeleton organisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girdler, Gemma C; Applewhite, Derek A; Perry, Wick M G; Rogers, Stephen L; Röper, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Coordination between different cytoskeletal systems is crucial for many cell biological functions, including cell migration and mitosis, and also plays an important role during tissue morphogenesis. Proteins of the class of cytoskeletal crosslinkers, or cytolinkers, have the ability to interact with more than one cytoskeletal system at a time and are prime candidates to mediate any coordination. One such class comprises the Gas2-like proteins, combining a conserved calponin-homology-type actin-binding domain and a Gas2 domain predicted to bind microtubules (MTs). This domain combination is also found in spectraplakins, huge cytolinkers that play important roles in many tissues in both invertebrates and vertebrates. Here, we dissect the ability of the single Drosophila Gas2-like protein Pigs to interact with both actin and MT cytoskeletons, both in vitro and in vivo, and illustrate complex regulatory interactions that determine the localisation of Pigs to and its effects on the cytoskeleton.

  15. Protein-spanning water networks and implications for prediction of protein-protein interactions mediated through hydrophobic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Di; Ou, Shuching; Patel, Sandeep

    2014-12-01

    Hydrophobic effects, often conflated with hydrophobic forces, are implicated as major determinants in biological association and self-assembly processes. Protein-protein interactions involved in signaling pathways in living systems are a prime example where hydrophobic effects have profound implications. In the context of protein-protein interactions, a priori knowledge of relevant binding interfaces (i.e., clusters of residues involved directly with binding interactions) is difficult. In the case of hydrophobically mediated interactions, use of hydropathy-based methods relying on single residue hydrophobicity properties are routinely and widely used to predict propensities for such residues to be present in hydrophobic interfaces. However, recent studies suggest that consideration of hydrophobicity for single residues on a protein surface require accounting of the local environment dictated by neighboring residues and local water. In this study, we use a method derived from percolation theory to evaluate spanning water networks in the first hydration shells of a series of small proteins. We use residue-based water density and single-linkage clustering methods to predict hydrophobic regions of proteins; these regions are putatively involved in binding interactions. We find that this simple method is able to predict with sufficient accuracy and coverage the binding interface residues of a series of proteins. The approach is competitive with automated servers. The results of this study highlight the importance of accounting of local environment in determining the hydrophobic nature of individual residues on protein surfaces.

  16. Glycoprotein Ib-IX-V Complex Transmits Cytoskeletal Forces That Enhance Platelet Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feghhi, Shirin; Munday, Adam D; Tooley, Wes W; Rajsekar, Shreya; Fura, Adriane M; Kulman, John D; López, Jose A; Sniadecki, Nathan J

    2016-08-09

    Platelets bind to exposed vascular matrix at a wound site through a highly specialized surface receptor, glycoprotein (GP) Ib-IX-V complex, which recognizes von Willebrand factor (VWF) in the matrix. GPIb-IX-V is a catch bond for it becomes more stable as force is applied to it. After attaching to the wound site, platelets generate cytoskeletal forces to compact and reinforce the hemostatic plug. Here, we evaluated the role of the GPIb-IX-V complex in the transmission of cytoskeletal forces. We used arrays of flexible, silicone nanoposts to measure the contractility of individual platelets on VWF. We found that a significant proportion of cytoskeletal forces were transmitted to VWF through GPIb-IX-V, an unexpected finding given the widely held notion that platelet forces are transmitted exclusively through its integrins. In particular, we found that the interaction between GPIbα and the A1 domain of VWF mediates this force transmission. We also demonstrate that the binding interaction between GPIbα and filamin A is involved in force transmission. Furthermore, our studies suggest that cytoskeletal forces acting through GPIbα are involved in maintaining platelet adhesion when external forces are absent. Thus, the GPIb-IX-V/VWF bond is able to transmit force, and uses this force to strengthen the bond through a catch-bond mechanism. This finding expands our understanding of how platelets attach to sites of vascular injury, describing a new, to the best of our knowledge, mechanism in which the catch bonds of GPIb-IX-V/VWF can be supported by internal forces produced by cytoskeletal tension.

  17. Hypochlorous acid-mediated protein oxidation: how important are chloramine transfer reactions and protein tertiary structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, David I; Hawkins, Clare L; Davies, Michael J

    2007-08-28

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a powerful oxidant generated from H2O2 and Cl- by the heme enzyme myeloperoxidase, which is released from activated leukocytes. HOCl possesses potent antibacterial properties, but excessive production can lead to host tissue damage that occurs in numerous human pathologies. As proteins and amino acids are highly abundant in vivo and react rapidly with HOCl, they are likely to be major targets for HOCl. In this study, two small globular proteins, lysozyme and insulin, have been oxidized with increasing excesses of HOCl to determine whether the pattern of HOCl-mediated amino acid consumption is consistent with reported kinetic data for isolated amino acids and model compounds. Identical experiments have been carried out with mixtures of N-acetyl amino acids (to prevent reaction at the alpha-amino groups) that mimic the protein composition to examine the role of protein structure on reactivity. The results indicate that tertiary structure facilitates secondary chlorine transfer reactions of chloramines formed on His and Lys side chains. In light of these data, second-order rate constants for reactions of Lys side chain and Gly chloramines with Trp side chains and disulfide bonds have been determined, together with those for further oxidation of Met sulfoxide by HOCl and His side chain chloramines. Computational kinetic models incorporating these additional rate constants closely predict the experimentally observed amino acid consumption. These studies provide insight into the roles of chloramine formation and three-dimensional structure on the reactions of HOCl with isolated proteins and demonstrate that kinetic models can predict the outcome of HOCl-mediated protein oxidation.

  18. The extracellular EXO protein mediates cell expansion in Arabidopsis leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Florian; Lisso, Janina; Lange, Peggy; Müssig, Carsten

    2009-02-13

    The EXO (EXORDIUM) gene was identified as a potential mediator of brassinosteroid (BR)-promoted growth. It is part of a gene family with eight members in Arabidopsis. EXO gene expression is under control of BR, and EXO overexpression promotes shoot and root growth. In this study, the consequences of loss of EXO function are described. The exo loss of function mutant showed diminished leaf and root growth and reduced biomass production. Light and scanning electron microscopy analyses revealed that impaired leaf growth is due to reduced cell expansion. Epidermis, palisade, and spongy parenchyma cells were smaller in comparison to the wild-type. The exo mutant showed reduced brassinolide-induced cotyledon and hypocotyl growth. In contrast, exo roots were significantly more sensitive to the inhibitory effect of synthetic brassinolide. Apart from reduced growth, exo did not show severe morphological abnormalities. Gene expression analyses of leaf material identified genes that showed robust EXO-dependent expression. Growth-related genes such as WAK1, EXP5, and KCS1, and genes involved in primary and secondary metabolism showed weaker expression in exo than in wild-type plants. However, the vast majority of BR-regulated genes were normally expressed in exo. HA- and GFP-tagged EXO proteins were targeted to the apoplast. The EXO gene is essential for cell expansion in leaves. Gene expression patterns and growth assays suggest that EXO mediates BR-induced leaf growth. However, EXO does not control BR-levels or BR-sensitivity in the shoot. EXO presumably is involved in a signalling process which coordinates BR-responses with environmental or developmental signals. The hypersensitivity of exo roots to BR suggests that EXO plays a diverse role in the control of BR responses in the root.

  19. Computational connectionism within neurons: A model of cytoskeletal automata subserving neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Steen; Karampurwala, Hasnain; Vaidyanath, Rajesh; Jensen, Klaus S.; Hameroff, Stuart

    1990-06-01

    “Neural network” models of brain function assume neurons and their synaptic connections to be the fundamental units of information processing, somewhat like switches within computers. However, neurons and synapses are extremely complex and resemble entire computers rather than switches. The interiors of the neurons (and other eucaryotic cells) are now known to contain highly ordered parallel networks of filamentous protein polymers collectively termed the cytoskeleton. Originally assumed to provide merely structural “bone-like” support, cytoskeletal structures such as microtubules are now recognized to organize cell interiors dynamically. The cytoskeleton is the internal communication network for the eucaryotic cell, both by means of simple transport and by means of coordinating extremely complicated events like cell division, growth and differentiation. The cytoskeleton may therefore be viewed as the cell's “nervous system”. Consequently the neuronal cytoskeleton may be involved in molecular level information processing which subserves higher, collective neuronal functions ultimately relating to cognition. Numerous models of information processing within the cytoskeleton (in particular, microtubules) have been proposed. We have utilized cellular automata as a means to model and demonstrate the potential for information processing in cytoskeletal microtubules. In this paper, we extend previous work and simulate associative learning in a cytoskeletal network as well as assembly and disassembly of microtubules. We also discuss possible relevance and implications of cytoskeletal information processing to cognition.

  20. Phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 mediates compensatory renal hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinxian; Chen, Jianchun; Dong, Zheng; Meyuhas, Oded; Chen, Jian-Kang

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying renal hypertrophy and progressive nephron damage remains poorly understood. Here we generated congenic ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) knockin mice expressing non-phosphorylatable rpS6 and found that uninephrectomy-induced renal hypertrophy was significantly blunted in these knockin mice. Uninephrectomy-induced increases in cyclin D1 and decreases in cyclin E in the remaining kidney were attenuated in the knockin mice compared to their wild-type littermates. Uninephrectomy induced rpS6 phosphorylation in the wild type mice; however, no rpS6 phosphorylation was detected in uninephrectomized or sham-operated knockin mice. Nonetheless, uninephrectomy stimulated comparable 4E-BP1 phosphorylation in both knockin and wild type mice, indicating that mTORC1 was still activated in the knockin mice. Moreover, the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin prevented both rpS6 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, significantly blunted uninephrectomy-induced renal hypertrophy in wild type mice, but did not prevent residual renal hypertrophy despite inhibiting 4E-BP1 phosphorylation in uninephrectomized knockin mice. Thus, both genetic and pharmacological approaches unequivocally demonstrate that phosphorylated rpS6 is a downstream effector of the mTORC1-S6K1 signaling pathway mediating renal hypertrophy. Hence, rpS6 phosphorylation facilitates the increase in cyclin D1 and decrease in cyclin E1 that underlie the hypertrophic nature of uninephrectomy-induced kidney growth. PMID:25229342

  1. Nonlinear pharmacokinetics of therapeutic proteins resulting from receptor mediated endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krippendorff, Ben-Fillippo; Kuester, Katharina; Kloft, Charlotte; Huisinga, Wilhelm

    2009-06-01

    Receptor mediated endocytosis (RME) plays a major role in the disposition of therapeutic protein drugs in the body. It is suspected to be a major source of nonlinear pharmacokinetic behavior observed in clinical pharmacokinetic data. So far, mostly empirical or semi-mechanistic approaches have been used to represent RME. A thorough understanding of the impact of the properties of the drug and of the receptor system on the resulting nonlinear disposition is still missing, as is how to best represent RME in pharmacokinetic models. In this article, we present a detailed mechanistic model of RME that explicitly takes into account receptor binding and trafficking inside the cell and that is used to derive reduced models of RME which retain a mechanistic interpretation. We find that RME can be described by an extended Michaelis-Menten model that accounts for both the distribution and the elimination aspect of RME. If the amount of drug in the receptor system is negligible a standard Michaelis-Menten model is capable of describing the elimination by RME. Notably, a receptor system can efficiently eliminate drug from the extracellular space even if the total number of receptors is small. We find that drug elimination by RME can result in substantial nonlinear pharmacokinetics. The extent of nonlinearity is higher for drug/receptor systems with higher receptor availability at the membrane, or faster internalization and degradation of extracellular drug. Our approach is exemplified for the epidermal growth factor receptor system.

  2. Mitochondrial protein acetylation mediates nutrient sensing of mitochondrial protein synthesis and mitonuclear protein balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Domenico, Antonella; Hofer, Annette; Tundo, Federica; Wenz, Tina

    2014-11-01

    Changes in nutrient supply require global metabolic reprogramming to optimize the utilization of the nutrients. Mitochondria as a central component of the cellular metabolism play a key role in this adaptive process. Since mitochondria harbor their own genome, which encodes essential enzymes, mitochondrial protein synthesis is a determinant of metabolic adaptation. While regulation of cytoplasmic protein synthesis in response to metabolic challenges has been studied in great detail, mechanisms which adapt mitochondrial translation in response to metabolic challenges remain elusive. Our results suggest that the mitochondrial acetylation status controlled by Sirt3 and its proposed opponent GCN5L1 is an important regulator of the metabolic adaptation of mitochondrial translation. Moreover, both proteins modulate regulators of cytoplasmic protein synthesis as well as the mitonuclear protein balance making Sirt3 and GCN5L1 key players in synchronizing mitochondrial and cytoplasmic translation. Our results thereby highlight regulation of mitochondrial translation as a novel component in the cellular nutrient sensing scheme and identify mitochondrial acetylation as a new regulatory principle for the metabolic competence of mitochondrial protein synthesis.

  3. Fisetin antagonizes cell fusion, cytoskeletal organization and bone resorption in RANKL-differentiated murine macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yun-Ho; Kim, Jung-Lye; Lee, Eun-Jung; Park, Sin-Hye; Han, Seon-Young; Kang, Soon Ah; Kang, Young-Hee

    2014-03-01

    Osteoclastogenesis is comprised of several stage s including progenitor survival, differentiation to mononuclear preosteoclasts, cell fusion to multinuclear mature osteoclasts, and activation to osteoclasts with bone resorbing activity. Botanical antioxidants are now being increasingly investigated for their health-promoting effects on bone. This study investigated that fisetin, a flavonol found naturally in many fruits and vegetables, suppressed osteoclastogenesis by disturbing receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-κB ligand (RANKL)-mediated signaling pathway and demoting osteoclastogenic protein induction. Nontoxic fisetin at ≤10 μM inhibited the induction of RANK, tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and the activation of NF-κB in RANKL-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages. In RANKL-differentiated osteoclasts cell fusion protein of E-cadherin was induced, which was dampened by fisetin. The formation of tartrate-resistance acid phosphatase-positive multinucleated osteoclasts was suppressed by adding fisetin to RANKL-exposed macrophages. It was also found that fisetin reduced actin ring formation and gelsolin induction of osteclasts enhanced by RANKL through disturbing c-Src-proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 signaling. Fisetin deterred preosteoclasts from the cell-cell fusion and the organization of the cytoskeleton to seal the resorbing area and to secret protons for bone resorption. Consistently, the 5 day-treatment of fisetin diminished RANKL-induced cellular expression of carbonic anhydrase II and integrin β3 concurrently with a reduction of osteoclast bone-resorbing activity. Therefore, fisetin was a natural therapeutic agent retarding osteoclast fusion and cytoskeletal organization such as actin rings and ruffled boarder, which is a property of mature osteoclasts and is required for osteoclasts to resorb bone. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 mediates compensatory renal hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinxian; Chen, Jianchun; Dong, Zheng; Meyuhas, Oded; Chen, Jian-Kang

    2015-03-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying renal hypertrophy and progressive nephron damage remains poorly understood. Here we generated congenic ribosomal protein S6 (rpS6) knock-in mice expressing nonphosphorylatable rpS6 and found that uninephrectomy-induced renal hypertrophy was significantly blunted in these knock-in mice. Uninephrectomy-induced increases in cyclin D1 and decreases in cyclin E in the remaining kidney were attenuated in the knock-in mice compared with their wild-type littermates. Uninephrectomy induced rpS6 phosphorylation in the wild-type mice; however, no rpS6 phosphorylation was detected in uninephrectomized or sham-operated knock-in mice. Nonetheless, uninephrectomy stimulated comparable 4E-BP1 phosphorylation in both knock-in and wild-type mice, indicating that mTORC1 was still activated in the knock-in mice. Moreover, the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin prevented both rpS6 and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, significantly blunted uninephrectomy-induced renal hypertrophy in wild-type mice, but did not prevent residual renal hypertrophy despite inhibiting 4E-BP1 phosphorylation in uninephrectomized knock-in mice. Thus, both genetic and pharmacological approaches unequivocally demonstrate that phosphorylated rpS6 is a downstream effector of the mTORC1-S6K1 signaling pathway mediating renal hypertrophy. Hence, rpS6 phosphorylation facilitates the increase in cyclin D1 and decrease in cyclin E1 that underlie the hypertrophic nature of uninephrectomy-induced kidney growth.

  5. Translocator protein mediates the anxiolytic and antidepressant effects of midazolam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhi-Kun; Li, Ming-Sheng; He, Jia-Li; Liu, Xu; Zhang, Guan-Hua; Lai, Sha; Ma, Jian-Chun; Zeng, Jia; Li, Yan; Wu, Hong-Wei; Chen, Yong; Shen, Yong-Gang; Chen, Ji-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    The translocator protein (18 kDa) (TSPO) plays an important role in stress-related disorders, such as anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), caused by neurosteroids (e.g. allopregnanolone). The present study sought to evaluate the significance of TSPO in anxiolytic and antidepressant effects induced by midazolam. The animals were administrated midazolam (0.25, 0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.) and subjected to behavioral tests, including Vogel-type conflict test, elevated plus-maze test, forced swimming test. Midazolam produced anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects Vogel-type conflict test (1 mg/kg, i.p.), elevated plus-maze test (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.), and forced swimming test (0.5 and 1 mg/kg, i.p.). These effects of Midazolam were totally blocked by the TSPO antagonist PK11195 (3 mg/kg, i.p.). To evaluate the role of allopregnanolone in the anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects of midazolam, the animals were decapitated at the end of the behavioral tests. The allopregnanolone levels of the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The allopregnanolone level of the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus was increased by midazolam (0.5, 1 mg/kg, i.p.) and the increase was reversed by PK11195 (3 mg/kg, i.p.). Overall, the results indicated that the anxiolytic- and antidepressant-like effects of midazolam were mediated by TSPO, via stimulation of allopregnanolone biosynthesis.

  6. High mobility group box 1 protein as a late-acting mediator of acute lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Waldemar; Stetkiewicz, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Acute inflammatory lung injury is often a delayed complication of critical illness and is associated with increased mortality. High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, in addition to its role as a transcriptional regulator factor, has been identified as a late mediator of endotoxin lethality and might be also involved in the development and progression of acute lung injury. HMGB1 protein itself can cause an acute inflammatory response manifested by increased production of proinflammatory cytokines and neutrophil accumulation. The delayed kinetics of HMGB1 protein release indicate that this protein is a distal mediator of acute inflamatory lung injury. Anti-HMGB1 protein antibodies attenuated endotoxin-induced lung injury, but not the early release of TNF-alpha and IL-1beta, indicating that HMGB1 protein is a late mediator of endotoxin-induced acute lung injury. HMGB1 protein is not released by apoptotic cells but is passively released by necrotic or damaged somatic and immune cells and it functions as a major stimulus of necrosis-induced inflammation. HMGB1 protein is also released by activated monocytes/macrophages and induces delayed and biphasic release of proinflammatory mediators from these cells. HMGB1 protein failed to stimulate cytokines release in lymphocytes, indicating that cellular stimulation is specific. We would like to suggest that HMGB1 protein may be also a primary mediator of the inflammatory responses to lung cells injury caused by toxic environmental chemicals.

  7. SNX-BAR proteins in phosphoinositide-mediated, tubular-based endosomal sorting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Weering, Jan R T; Verkade, Paul; Cullen, Peter J

    2010-06-01

    The endocytic network is morphologically characterized by a wide variety of membrane bound compartments that are able to undergo dynamic re-modeling through tubular and vesicular structures. The precise molecular mechanisms governing such re-modeling, and the events that co-ordinated this with the major role of endosomes, cargo sorting, remain unclear. That said, recent work on a protein family of sorting nexins (SNX) - especially a subfamily of SNX that contain a BAR domain (SNX-BARs) - has begun to shed some much needed light on these issues and in particular the process of tubular-based endosomal sorting. SNX-BARs are evolutionary conserved in endosomal protein complexes such as retromer, where they co-ordinate membrane deformation with cargo selection. Furthermore a central theme emerges of SNX-BARs linking the forming membrane carrier to cytoskeletal elements for transport through motor proteins such as dynein. By studying these SNX-BARs, we are gaining an increasingly detailed appreciation of the mechanistic basis of endosomal sorting and how this highly dynamic process functions in health and disease.

  8. Spy1 Protein Mediates Phosphorylation and Degradation of SCG10 Protein in Axonal Degeneration*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yonghua; Wang, Youhua; Chen, Ying; Li, Xiaohong; Yang, Jiao; Liu, Yang; Shen, Aiguo

    2015-01-01

    Axon loss is a destructive consequence of a wide range of neurological diseases without a clearly defined mechanism. Recent data demonstrate that SCG10 is a novel axonal maintenance factor and that rapid SCG10 loss after injury requires JNK activity; how JNK induces degradation of SCG10 is not well known. Here we showed that SCG10 was a binding partner of Spy1, a Speedy/RINGO family protein, which participated in cellular response to sciatic nerve injury. During the early stage of axonal injury, Spy1 expression was inversely correlated with SCG10. Spy1 mediated SCG10 phosphorylation and degradation partly in a JNK-dependent manner. Inhibition of Spy1 attenuated SCG10 phosphorylation and delayed injury-induced axonal degeneration. Taken together, these data suggest that Spy1 is an important regulator of SCG10 and can be targeted in future axo-protective therapeutics. PMID:25869138

  9. Conformational phases of membrane bound cytoskeletal filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quint, David A.; Grason, Gregory; Gopinathan, Ajay

    2013-03-01

    Membrane bound cytoskeletal filaments found in living cells are employed to carry out many types of activities including cellular division, rigidity and transport. When these biopolymers are bound to a membrane surface they may take on highly non-trivial conformations as compared to when they are not bound. This leads to the natural question; What are the important interactions which drive these polymers to particular conformations when they are bound to a surface? Assuming that there are binding domains along the polymer which follow a periodic helical structure set by the natural monomeric handedness, these bound conformations must arise from the interplay of the intrinsic monomeric helicity and membrane binding. To probe this question, we study a continuous model of an elastic filament with intrinsic helicity and map out the conformational phases of this filament for various mechanical and structural parameters in our model, such as elastic stiffness and intrinsic twist of the filament. Our model allows us to gain insight into the possible mechanisms which drive real biopolymers such as actin and tubulin in eukaryotes and their prokaryotic cousins MreB and FtsZ to take on their functional conformations within living cells.

  10. Emerging functions of multi-protein complex Mediator with special emphasis on plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Naveen; Agarwal, Pinky; Tyagi, Akhilesh

    2017-10-01

    Mediator is a multi-subunit protein complex which is involved in transcriptional regulation in yeast and other eukaryotes. As a co-activator, it connects information from transcriptional activators/repressors to transcriptional machinery including RNA polymerase II and general transcription factors. It is not only involved in transcription initiation but also has important roles to play in transcription elongation and termination. Functional attributes of different Mediator subunits have been largely defined in yeast and mammalian systems earlier, while such studies in plants have gained momentum recently. Mediator regulates various processes related to plant development and is also involved in biotic and abiotic stress response. Thus, plant Mediator, like yeast and mammalian Mediator complex, is indispensable for plant growth and survival. Interaction of its multiple subunits with other regulatory proteins and their ectopic expression or knockdown in model plant like Arabidopsis and certain crop plants are paving the way to biochemical analysis and unravel molecular mechanisms of action of Mediator in plants.

  11. Cyclin G2 Promotes Hypoxia- Driven Local Invasion of Glioblastoma by Orchestrating Cytoskeletal Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Fujimura

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Microenvironmental conditions such as hypoxia potentiate the local invasion of malignant tumors including glioblastomas by modulating signal transduction and protein modification, yet the mechanism by which hypoxia controls cytoskeletal dynamics to promote the local invasion is not well defined. Here, we show that cyclin G2 plays pivotal roles in the cytoskeletal dynamics in hypoxia-driven invasion by glioblastoma cells. Cyclin G2 is a hypoxia-induced and cytoskeleton-associated protein and is required for glioblastoma expansion. Mechanistically, cyclin G2 recruits cortactin to the juxtamembrane through its SH3 domain-binding motif and consequently promotes the restricted tyrosine phosphorylation of cortactin in concert with src. Moreover, cyclin G2 interacts with filamentous actin to facilitate the formation of membrane ruffles. In primary glioblastoma, cyclin G2 is abundantly expressed in severely hypoxic regions such as pseudopalisades, which consist of actively migrating glioma cells. Furthermore, we show the effectiveness of dasatinib against hypoxia-driven, cyclin G2-involved invasion in vitro and in vivo. Our findings elucidate the mechanism of cytoskeletal regulation by which severe hypoxia promotes the local invasion and may provide a therapeutic target in glioblastoma.

  12. Polycomb group protein-mediated repression of transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morey, Lluís; Helin, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    The polycomb group (PcG) proteins are essential for the normal development of multicellular organisms. They form multi-protein complexes that work as transcriptional repressors of several thousand genes controlling differentiation pathways during development. How the PcG proteins work...

  13. Transition metal complexes as mediator-titrants in protein redox potentiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Paul V; Chen, Kuan-I; Sharpe, Philip C

    2006-10-01

    A selection of nine macrocyclic Fe(III/II) and Co(III/II) transition metal complexes has been chosen to serve as a universal set of mediator-titrants in redox potentiometry of protein samples. The potential range spanned by these mediators is approximately from +300 to -700 mV vs the normal hydrogen electrode, which covers the range of most protein redox potentials accessible in aqueous solution. The complexes employed exhibit stability in both their oxidized and their reduced forms as well as pH-independent redox potentials within the range 6 < pH < 9. The mediators were also chosen on the basis of their very weak visible absorption maxima in both oxidation states, which will enable (for the first time) optical redox potentiometric titrations of proteins with relatively low extinction coefficients. This has previously been impractical with organic mediators, such as indoles, viologens and quinones, whose optical spectra interfere strongly with those of the protein.

  14. Neutrophils and the calcium-binding protein MRP-14 mediate carrageenan-induced antinociception in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana L. Pagano

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We have previously shown that the calcium-binding protein MRP-14 secreted by neutrophils mediates the antinociceptive response in an acute inflammatory model induced by the intraperitoneal injection of glycogen in mice.

  15. Random walks of cytoskeletal motors in open and closed compartments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lipowsky, R.; Klumpp, S.

    2001-01-01

    Random walks of molecular motors, which bind to and unbind from cytoskeletal filaments, are studied theoretically. The bound and unbound motors undergo directed and nondirected motion, respectively. Motors in open compartments exhibit anomalous drift velocities. Motors in closed compartments generat

  16. Cytoskeletal forces during signaling activation in Jurkat T-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, King Lam; Balagopalan, Lakshmi; Samelson, Lawrence E.; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2015-01-01

    T-cells are critical for the adaptive immune response in the body. The binding of the T-cell receptor (TCR) with antigen on the surface of antigen-presenting cells leads to cell spreading and signaling activation. The underlying mechanism of signaling activation is not completely understood. Although cytoskeletal forces have been implicated in this process, the contribution of different cytoskeletal components and their spatial organization are unknown. Here we use traction force microscopy to measure the forces exerted by Jurkat T-cells during TCR activation. Perturbation experiments reveal that these forces are largely due to actin assembly and dynamics, with myosin contractility contributing to the development of force but not its maintenance. We find that Jurkat T-cells are mechanosensitive, with cytoskeletal forces and signaling dynamics both sensitive to the stiffness of the substrate. Our results delineate the cytoskeletal contributions to interfacial forces exerted by T-cells during activation. PMID:25518938

  17. Negative regulation of RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling by TRK-fused gene (TFG) protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Na-Rae; Shin, Han-Bo; Kim, Hye-In; Choi, Myung-Soo; Inn, Kyung-Soo, E-mail: innks@khu.ac.kr

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •TRK-fused gene product (TFG) interacts with TRIM25 upon viral infection. •TFG negatively regulates RIG-I mediated antiviral signaling. •TFG depletion leads to enhanced viral replication. •TFG act downstream of MAVS. -- Abstract: RIG-I (retinoic acid inducible gene I)-mediated antiviral signaling serves as the first line of defense against viral infection. Upon detection of viral RNA, RIG-I undergoes TRIM25 (tripartite motif protein 25)-mediated K63-linked ubiquitination, leading to type I interferon (IFN) production. In this study, we demonstrate that TRK-fused gene (TFG) protein, previously identified as a TRIM25-interacting protein, binds TRIM25 upon virus infection and negatively regulates RIG-I-mediated type-I IFN signaling. RIG-I-mediated IFN production and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathways were upregulated by the suppression of TFG expression. Furthermore, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replication was significantly inhibited by small inhibitory hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of TFG, supporting the suppressive role of TFG in RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling. Interestingly, suppression of TFG expression increased not only RIG-I-mediated signaling but also MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein)-induced signaling, suggesting that TFG plays a pivotal role in negative regulation of RNA-sensing, RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) family signaling pathways.

  18. Chemotaxis to cyclic AMP and folic acid is mediated by different G proteins in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kesbeke, Fanja; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Wit, René J.W. de; Snaar-Jagalska, B. Ewa

    1990-01-01

    Mutant Frigid A (fgdA) of Dictyostelium discoideum is defective in a functional Gα2 subunit of a G protein and is characterized by a complete blockade of the cyclic AMP-mediated sensory transduction steps, including cyclic AMP relay, chemotaxis and the cyclic GMP response. Folic acid-mediated transm

  19. Cross talk between tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein-mediated transport and L1-mediated adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Philipp; Rudge, Rachel; Hinners, Ina; Muzerelle, Aude; Martinez-Arca, Sonia; Irinopoulou, Theano; Marthiens, Veronique; Tooze, Sharon; Rathjen, Fritz; Gaspar, Patricia; Galli, Thierry

    2003-10-01

    The membrane-trafficking pathway mediated by tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP) in neurons is still unknown. We show herein that TI-VAMP expression is necessary for neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells and hippocampal neurons in culture. TI-VAMP interacts with plasma membrane and endosomal target soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors, suggesting that TI-VAMP mediates a recycling pathway. L1, a cell-cell adhesion molecule involved in axonal outgrowth, colocalized with TI-VAMP in the developing brain, neurons in culture, and PC12 cells. Plasma membrane L1 was internalized into the TI-VAMP-containing compartment. Silencing of TI-VAMP resulted in reduced expression of L1 at the plasma membrane. Finally, using the extracellular domain of L1 and N-cadherin immobilized on beads, we found that the silencing of TI-VAMP led to impaired L1- but not N-cadherin-mediated adhesion. Furthermore, TI-VAMP- but not synaptobrevin 2-containing vesicles accumulated at the site of the L1 bead-cell junction. We conclude that TI-VAMP mediates the intracellular transport of L1 and that L1-mediated adhesion controls this membrane trafficking, thereby suggesting an important cross talk between membrane trafficking and cell-cell adhesion.

  20. Imaging multiple intermediates of single-virus membrane fusion mediated by distinct fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Kye-Il; Tai, April; Lee, Chi-Lin; Wong, Clement; Wang, Pin

    2010-09-01

    Membrane fusion plays an essential role in the entry of enveloped viruses into target cells. The merging of viral and target cell membranes is catalyzed by viral fusion proteins, which involves multiple sequential steps in the fusion process. However, the fusion mechanisms mediated by different fusion proteins involve multiple transient intermediates that have not been well characterized. Here, we report a synthetic virus platform that allows us to better understand the different fusion mechanisms driven by the diverse types fusion proteins. The platform consists of lentiviral particles coenveloped with a surface antibody, which serves as the binding protein, along with a fusion protein derived from either influenza virus (HAmu) or Sindbis virus (SINmu). By using a single virus tracking technique, we demonstrated that both HAmu- and SINmu-bearing viruses enter cells through clathrin-dependent endocytosis, but they required different endosomal trafficking routes to initiate viral fusion. Direct observation of single viral fusion events clearly showed that hemifusion mediated by SINmu upon exposure to low pH occurs faster than that mediated by HAmu. Monitoring sequential fusion processes by dual labeling the outer and inner leaflets of viral membranes also revealed that the SINmu-mediated hemifusion intermediate is relatively long-lived as compared with that mediated by HAmu. Taken together, we have demonstrated that the combination of this versatile viral platform with the techniques of single virus tracking can be a powerful tool for revealing molecular details of fusion mediated by various fusion proteins.

  1. The Sec translocon mediated protein transport in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denks, Kärt; Vogt, Andreas; Sachelaru, Ilie; Petriman, Narcis-Adrian; Kudva, Renuka; Koch, Hans-Georg

    2014-01-01

    Protein transport via the Sec translocon represents an evolutionary conserved mechanism for delivering cytosolically-synthesized proteins to extra-cytosolic compartments. The Sec translocon has a three-subunit core, termed Sec61 in Eukaryotes and SecYEG in Bacteria. It is located in the endoplasmic reticulum of Eukaryotes and in the cytoplasmic membrane of Bacteria where it constitutes a channel that can be activated by multiple partner proteins. These partner proteins determine the mechanism of polypeptide movement across the channel. During SRP-dependent co-translational targeting, the ribosome threads the nascent protein directly into the Sec channel. This pathway is in Bacteria mainly dedicated for membrane proteins but in Eukaryotes also employed by secretory proteins. The alternative pathway, leading to post-translational translocation across the Sec translocon engages an ATP-dependent pushing mechanism by the motor protein SecA in Bacteria and a ratcheting mechanism by the lumenal chaperone BiP in Eukaryotes. Protein transport and biogenesis is also assisted by additional proteins at the lateral gate of SecY/Sec61α and in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum or in the periplasm of bacterial cells. The modular assembly enables the Sec complex to transport a vast array of substrates. In this review we summarize recent biochemical and structural information on the prokaryotic and eukaryotic Sec translocons and we describe the remarkably complex interaction network of the Sec complexes.

  2. Translocator protein-mediated pharmacology of cholesterol transport and steroidogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Vassilios; Aghazadeh, Yasaman; Fan, Jinjiang; Campioli, Enrico; Zirkin, Barry; Midzak, Andrew

    2015-06-15

    Steroidogenesis begins with cholesterol transfer into mitochondria through the transduceosome, a complex composed of cytosolic proteins that include steroidogenesis acute regulatory protein (STAR), 14-3-3 adaptor proteins, and the outer mitochondrial membrane proteins Translocator Protein (TSPO) and Voltage-Dependent Anion Channel (VDAC). TSPO is a drug- and cholesterol-binding protein found at particularly high levels in steroid synthesizing cells. Its aberrant expression has been linked to cancer, neurodegeneration, neuropsychiatric disorders and primary hypogonadism. Brain steroids serve as local regulators of neural development and excitability. Reduced levels of these steroids have been linked to depression, anxiety and neurodegeneration. Reduced serum testosterone is common among subfertile young men and aging men, and is associated with depression, metabolic syndrome and reduced sexual function. Although testosterone-replacement therapy is available, there are undesired side-effects. TSPO drug ligands have been proposed as therapeutic agents to regulate steroid levels in the brain and testis.

  3. Protein tyrosine kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathways contribute to differences in heterophil-mediated innate immune responsiveness between two lines of broilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation mediates signal transduction of cellular processes, with protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) regulating virtually all signaling events. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) super-family consists of three conserved pathways that convert receptor activation into ce...

  4. The BRO proteins of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus are nucleocytoplasmic shuttling proteins that utilize the CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, WonKyung; Kurihara, Masaaki; Matsumoto, Shogo

    2006-06-20

    The BRO proteins of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) display a biphasic pattern of intracellular localization during infection. At early times, they reside in the nucleus but then show both cytoplasmic and nuclear localization as the infection proceeds. Therefore, we examined the possibility of nuclear export. Using inhibitors, we reveal that BmNPV BRO proteins shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Mutations on the leucine-rich region of BRO proteins resulted in nuclear accumulation of transiently expressed proteins, suggesting that this region functions as a CRM1-dependent nuclear export signal (NES). On the contrary, mutant BRO-D with an altered NES did not show nuclear accumulation in infected cells, although protein production seemed to be reduced. RT-PCR analysis showed that the lower level of protein production was due to a reduction in RNA synthesis. Taken together, our results suggest that BRO proteins are nucleocytoplasmic shuttling proteins that utilize the CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway.

  5. Electrocatalytic assay for monitoring methylglyoxal-mediated protein glycation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havlikova, Marika; Zatloukalova, Martina; Ulrichova, Jitka; Dobes, Petr; Vacek, Jan

    2015-02-03

    Protein glycation is a complex process that plays an important role in diabetes mellitus, aging, and the regulation of protein function in general. As a result, current methodological research on proteins is focused on the development of novel approaches for investigating glycation and the possibility of monitoring its modulation and selective inhibition. In this paper, a first sensing strategy for protein glycation is proposed, based on protein electroactivity measurement. Concretely, the label-free method proposed is based on the application of a constant-current chronopotentiometric stripping (CPS) analysis at Hg-containing electrodes. The glycation process was monitored as the decrease in the electrocatalytic protein signal, peak H, observed at highly negative potentials at around -1.8 V (vs Ag/AgCl3 M KCl), which was previously ascribed to a catalytic hydrogen evolution reaction (CHER). Using this method, a model protein bovine serum albumin was investigated over 3 days of incubation with the glycation agent methylglyoxal in the absence or presence of the glycation inhibitor aminoguanidine (pimagedine). The electrochemical methodology presented here could open up new possibilities in research on protein glycation and oxidative modification. The methodology developed also provides a new option for the analysis of protein intermolecular interactions using electrochemical sensors, which was demonstrated by the application of a silver solid amalgam electrode (AgSAE) for monitoring the glycation process in samples of bovine serum albumin, human serum albumin, and lysozyme.

  6. Signaling via G proteins mediates tumorigenic effects of GPR87

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arfelt, Kristine Niss; Fares, Suzan; Sparre-Ulrich, Alexander H.;

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute a large protein family of seven transmembrane (7TM) spanning proteins that regulate multiple physiological functions. GPR87 is overexpressed in several cancers and plays a role in tumor cell survival. Here, the basal activity of GPR87 was investigated...... in transiently transfected HEK293 cells, revealing ligand-independent coupling to Gαi, Gαq and Gα12/13. Furthermore, GPR87 showed a ligand-independent G protein-dependent activation of the downstream transcription factors CREB, NFκB, NFAT and SRE. In tetracycline-induced Flp-In T-Rex-293 cells, GPR87 induced...

  7. Nucleation of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Mediated by Mms6 Protein in Situ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashyap, Sanjay [Ames Laboratory; Woehl, Taylor J [Ames Laboratory; Liu, Xunpei [Iowa State University; Mallapragada, Surya K [Ames Laboratory; Prozorov, Tanya [Ames Laboratory

    2014-09-23

    Biomineralization proteins are widely used as templating agents in biomimetic synthesis of a variety of organic–inorganic nanostructures. However, the role of the protein in controlling the nucleation and growth of biomimetic particles is not well understood, because the mechanism of the bioinspired reaction is often deduced from ex situ analysis of the resultant nanoscale mineral phase. Here we report the direct visualization of biomimetic iron oxide nanoparticle nucleation mediated by an acidic bacterial recombinant protein, Mms6, during an in situ reaction induced by the controlled addition of sodium hydroxide to solution-phase Mms6 protein micelles incubated with ferric chloride. Using in situ liquid cell scanning transmission electron microscopy we observe the liquid iron prenucleation phase and nascent amorphous nanoparticles forming preferentially on the surface of protein micelles. Our results provide insight into the early steps of protein-mediated biomimetic nucleation of iron oxide and point to the importance of an extended protein surface during nanoparticle formation.

  8. Singlet oxygen-mediated damage to proteins and its consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    on the identification of reactive peroxide intermediates formed on Tyr, His, and Trp residues is discussed. These peroxides may be important propagating species in protein oxidation as they can initiate further oxidation via both radical and non-radical reactions. Such processes can result in the transmittal of damage......Proteins comprise approximately 68% of the dry weight of cells and tissues and are therefore potentially major targets for oxidative damage. Two major types of processes can occur during the exposure of proteins to UV or visible light. The first of these involves direct photo-oxidation arising from...... the absorption of UV radiation by the protein, or bound chromophore groups, thereby generating excited states (singlet or triplets) or radicals via photo-ionisation. The second major process involves indirect oxidation of the protein via the formation and subsequent reactions of singlet oxygen generated...

  9. Androgen-mediated regulation of skeletal muscle protein balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Michael L; Steiner, Jennifer L; Gordon, Bradley S

    2017-02-22

    Androgens significantly alter muscle mass in part by shifting protein balance in favor of net protein accretion. During various atrophic conditions, the clinical impact of decreased production or bioavailability of androgens (termed hypogonadism) is important as a loss of muscle mass is intimately linked with survival outcome. While androgen replacement therapy increases muscle mass in part by restoring protein balance, this is not a comprehensive treatment option due to potential side effects. Therefore, an understanding of the mechanisms by which androgens alter protein balance is needed for the development of androgen-independent therapies. While the data in humans suggest androgens alter protein balance (both synthesis and breakdown) in the fasted metabolic state, a predominant molecular mechanism(s) behind this observation is still lacking. This failure is likely due in part to inconsistent experimental design between studies including failure to control nutrient/feeding status, the method of altering androgens, and the model systems utilized.

  10. ZEB1 drives prometastatic actin cytoskeletal remodeling by downregulating miR-34a expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Young-Ho; Gibbons, Don L.; Chakravarti, Deepavali; Creighton, Chad J.; Rizvi, Zain H.; Adams, Henry P.; Pertsemlidis, Alexander; Gregory, Philip A.; Wright, Josephine A.; Goodall, Gregory J.; Flores, Elsa R.; Kurie, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    Metastatic cancer is extremely difficult to treat, and the presence of metastases greatly reduces a cancer patient’s likelihood of long-term survival. The ZEB1 transcriptional repressor promotes metastasis through downregulation of microRNAs (miRs) that are strong inducers of epithelial differentiation and inhibitors of stem cell factors. Given that each miR can target multiple genes with diverse functions, we posited that the prometastatic network controlled by ZEB1 extends beyond these processes. We tested this hypothesis using a mouse model of human lung adenocarcinoma metastasis driven by ZEB1, human lung carcinoma cells, and human breast carcinoma cells. Transcriptional profiling studies revealed that ZEB1 controls the expression of numerous oncogenic and tumor-suppressive miRs, including miR-34a. Ectopic expression of miR-34a decreased tumor cell invasion and metastasis, inhibited the formation of promigratory cytoskeletal structures, suppressed activation of the RHO GTPase family, and regulated a gene expression signature enriched in cytoskeletal functions and predictive of outcome in human lung adenocarcinomas. We identified several miR-34a target genes, including Arhgap1, which encodes a RHO GTPase activating protein that was required for tumor cell invasion. These findings demonstrate that ZEB1 drives prometastatic actin cytoskeletal remodeling by downregulating miR-34a expression and provide a compelling rationale to develop miR-34a as a therapeutic agent in lung cancer patients. PMID:22850877

  11. Endothelin and calciotropic hormones share regulatory pathways in multidrug resistance protein 2-mediated transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wever, K.E.; Masereeuw, R.; Miller, D.S.; Hang, X.M.; Flik, G.

    2006-01-01

    The kidney of vertebrates plays a key role in excretion of endogenous waste products and xenobiotics. Active secretion in the proximal nephron is at the basis of this excretion, mediated by carrier proteins including multidrug resistance protein 2 (Mrp2). We previously showed that Mrp2 function is

  12. Protein Mediated Oxidative Stress in Patients with Diabetes and its Associated Neuropathy: Correlation with Protein Carbonylation and Disease Activity Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almogbel, Ebtehal

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Free radicals have been implicated as Diabetes Mellitus (DM) contributors in type 2 DM and its associated Diabetes Mellitus Neuropathy (DMN). However, the potential for protein mediated oxidative stress to contribute disease pathogenesis remains largely unexplored. Aim To investigate the status and contribution of protein mediated oxidative stress in patients with DM or DMN and to explore whether oxidative protein modification has a role in DM progression to DM associated neuropathy. Materials and Methods Sera from 42 DM and 37 DMN patients with varying levels of disease activities biomarkers (HbA1C, patients’ age or disease duration) and 21 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were evaluated for serum levels of protein mediated oxidative stress. Results Serum analysis showed significantly higher levels of protein carbonyl contents in both DM and DMN patients compared with healthy controls. Importantly, not only was there an increased number of subjects positive for protein carbonylation, but also the levels of protein carbonyl contents were significantly higher among DM and DMN patients, whose HbA1C were ≥8.8 as compared with patients with lower HbA1C (HbA1Cdiabetes to diabetes neuropathy. Conclusion These findings support an association between protein oxidation and DM or DMN progression. The stronger response observed in patients with higher HbA1C or patients’ ages or disease durations suggests, that protein mediated oxidative stress may be useful in evaluating the progression of DM and its associated DMN and in elucidating the mechanisms of these disorders pathogenesis.

  13. On the ion-mediated interaction between protein and DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Barbi, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism allowing a protein to search of a target sequence on DNA is currently described as an intermittent process composed of 3D diffusion in bulk and 1D diffusion along the DNA molecule. Due to the relevant charge of protein and DNA, electrostatic interaction should play a crucial role during this search. In this paper, we explicitly derive the mean field theory allowing for a description of the protein-DNA electrostatics in solution. This approach leads to a unified model of the search process, where 1D and 3D diffusion appear as a natural consequence of the diffusion on an extended interaction energy profile.

  14. THE REGULATORY EFFECT OF NUCLEOSIDE DIPHOSPHATE KINASE ON G-PROTEIN AND G-PROTEIN MEDIATED PHOSPHOLIPASE C

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张德昌; 张宽仁

    1995-01-01

    The effect of nueleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) on the activity of guanine nueleotide regulatory protein (G-protein) mediated phospholipase C (PLC) and on the [35S ] GTPTτS binding of G-protein was investigated in this work in order to demonstrate the mechanism behind the regulation of G-protein and its effector PLC by NDPK. The stimulation of PLC in turkey erythrocyte membrane by both GTP and GTPτS indicated that the PLC stimulation was msdiated by G-protein, NDPK alone stimulated PLC activity, as well as the stimulation in the presence of GTP and GDP, in a dose-dependent manner. However, NDPK inhibited GTPτS-stimulated PLC, Furthermore, NDPK inhibited [35S] GTPτS binding of purified Gi-protein in a non-competitive manner. A hypothesis implying an important role of direct interaction of G-protein and NDPK in the regulation of their functions is suggested and discussed.

  15. The Role of Cgrp-Receptor Component Protein (Rcp) in Cgrp-Mediated Signal Transduction

    OpenAIRE

    Prado, M.A.; B. Evans-Bain; Santi, S. L.; Dickerson, I M

    2001-01-01

    The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-receptor component protein (RCP) is a 17-kDa intracellular peripheral membrane protein required for signal transduction at CGRP receptors. To determine the role of RCP in CGRP-mediated signal transduction, RCP was depleted from NIH3T3 cells using antisense strategy. Loss of RCP protein correlated with loss of cAMP production by CGRP in the antisense cells. In contrast, loss of RCP had no effect on CGRP-mediated binding; therefore RCP is not acting as...

  16. Alternatively spliced myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2s) protein inhibits TLR4-mediated lung inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumurkhuu, Gantsetseg; Dagvadorj, Jargalsaikhan; Jones, Heather D.; Chen, Shuang; Shimada, Kenichi; Crother, Timothy R.; Arditi, Moshe

    2014-01-01

    We previously identified a novel alternatively spliced isoform of human myeloid differentiation protein-2 (MD-2s) that competitively inhibits binding of MD-2 to TLR4 in vitro. Here we investigated the protective role of MD-2s in LPS-induced acute lung injury by delivering intracheally (i.t.) an adenovirus construct that expressed MD-2s (Ad-MD-2s). After adenovirus-mediated gene transfer, MD-2s was strongly expressed in lung epithelial cells and readily detected in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). Compared to Ad-EV control mice, Ad-MD-2s delivery resulted in significantly less LPS-induced inflammation in the lungs, including less protein leakage, cell recruitment, and expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, such as IL-6, KC, and MIP-2. BALF from Ad-MD-2s mice transferred into lungs of naive mice before i.t. LPS challenge diminished pro-inflammatory cytokine levels. As house dust mite (HDM) sensitization is dependent on TLR4 and HDM Der p 2, a structural homolog of MD-2, we also investigated the effect of MD-2s on house dust mite (HDM)-induced allergic airway inflammation. Ad-MD-2s given before HDM sensitization significantly inhibited subsequent allergic airway inflammation after HDM challenge, including reductions in eosinophils, goblet cell hyperplasia, and IL-5 levels. Our study indicates that the alternatively spliced short isoform of human MD-2 could be a potential therapeutic candidate to treat human diseases induced or exacerbated by TLR4 signaling, such as Gram-negative bacterial endotoxin-induced lung injury and house dust mite-triggered allergic lung inflammation. PMID:25576596

  17. DMPD: Protein kinase C epsilon: a new target to control inflammation andimmune-mediated disorders. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 14643884 Protein kinase C epsilon: a new target to control inflammation andimmune-mediated disorder...g) (.html) (.csml) Show Protein kinase C epsilon: a new target to control inflammation andimmune-mediated disorder...l inflammation andimmune-mediated disorders. Authors Aksoy E, Goldman M, Willems F. Publication Int J Bioche

  18. Evidence for a fragile X mental retardation protein-mediated translational switch in metabotropic glutamate receptor-triggered Arc translation and long-term depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niere, Farr; Wilkerson, Julia R; Huber, Kimberly M

    2012-04-25

    Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)-stimulated protein synthesis and long-term synaptic depression (mGluR-LTD) are altered in the mouse model of fragile X syndrome, Fmr1 knock-out (KO) mice. Fmr1 encodes fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), a dendritic RNA binding protein that functions, in part, as a translational suppressor. It is unknown whether and how FMRP acutely regulates LTD and/or the rapid synthesis of new proteins required for LTD, such as the activity-regulated cytoskeletal-associated protein (Arc). The protein phosphatase PP2A dephosphorylates FMRP, which contributes to translational activation of some target mRNAs. Here, we report that PP2A and dephosphorylation of FMRP at S500 are required for an mGluR-induced, rapid (5 min) increase in dendritic Arc protein and LTD in rat and mouse hippocampal neurons. In Fmr1 KO neurons, basal, dendritic Arc protein levels and mGluR-LTD are enhanced, but mGluR-triggered Arc synthesis is absent. Lentiviral-mediated expression of wild-type FMRP in Fmr1 KO neurons suppresses basal dendritic Arc levels and mGluR-LTD, and restores rapid mGluR-triggered Arc synthesis. A phosphomimic of FMRP (S500D) suppresses steady-state dendritic Arc levels but does not rescue mGluR-induced Arc synthesis. A dephosphomimic of FMRP (S500A) neither suppresses dendritic Arc nor supports mGluR-induced Arc synthesis. Accordingly, S500D-FMRP expression in Fmr1 KO neurons suppresses mGluR-LTD, whereas S500A-FMRP has no effect. These data support a model in which phosphorylated FMRP functions to suppress steady-state translation of Arc and LTD. Upon mGluR activation of PP2A, FMRP is rapidly dephosphorylated, which contributes to rapid new synthesis of Arc and mGluR-LTD.

  19. Light-regulated stapled peptides to inhibit protein-protein interactions involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevola, Laura; Martín-Quirós, Andrés; Eckelt, Kay; Camarero, Núria; Tosi, Sébastien; Llobet, Artur; Giralt, Ernest; Gorostiza, Pau

    2013-07-22

    Control of membrane traffic: Photoswitchable inhibitors of protein-protein interactions were applied to photoregulate clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in living cells. Traffic light (TL) peptides acting as "stop" and "go" signals for membrane traffic can be used to dissect the role of CME in receptor internalization and in cell growth, division, and differentiation. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Protein-mediated autoreduction of gold salts to gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Nivedita; Bhattacharya, Resham; Mukherjee, Priyabrata [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)], E-mail: Mukherjee.Priyabrata@mayo.edu

    2008-09-01

    Here we report for the first time that proteins can function as unique reducing agents to produce gold nanoparticles from gold salts. We demonstrate that three different proteins, namely, bovine serum albumin (BSA), Rituximab (RIT-an anti-CD20 antibody) and Cetuximab (C225-anti-EGFR antibody), reduce gold salts to gold nanoparticles (GNP). Interestingly, among all the three proteins tested, only BSA can reduce gold salts to gold nanotriangles (GNT). BSA-induced formation of GNT can be controlled by carefully selecting the reaction condition. Heating or using excess of ascorbic acid (AA) as additional reducing agent shifts the reaction towards the formation of GNP with flower-like morphology, whereas slowing down the reaction either by cooling or by adding small amount of AA directs the synthesis towards GNT formation. GNT is formed only at pH 3; higher pHs (pH 7 and pH 10) did not produce any nanoparticles, suggesting the involvement of specific protein conformation in GNT formation. The nanomaterials formed by this method were characterized using UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This is an important finding that will have uses in various nanotechnological applications, particularly in the green synthesis of novel nanomaterials based on protein structure.

  1. Involvement of cytoskeletal proteins in the barrier function of the human erythrocyte membrane. I. Impairment of resealing and formation of aqueous pores in the ghost membrane after modification of SH groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonk, S; Deuticke, B

    1992-04-29

    Resealed human erythrocyte ghosts prepared by a two-step procedure were shown to have small residual barrier defects with the properties of aqueous pores, such as size discrimination of hydrophilic nonelectrolytes (erythritol to sucrose), indicative of an apparent pore radius of about 0.7 nm, and a low activation energy (about 12-20 kJ/mol (mannitol, sucrose)) of the leak fluxes. As in other cases (Deuticke et al. (1991) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1067, 111-122) these leak fluxes can be inhibited by phloretin. Treatment of such resealed ghosts with the mild SH oxidizing agent, diamide, induces additional membrane leaks to the same extent and with the same properties as in native erythrocytes (Deuticke et al. (1983) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 731, 196-210), including reversibility of the leak by SH reducing agents, inhibition by phloretin and stimulation by alkanols. In contrast, resealed ghosts prepared either from diamide-treated erythrocytes or by adding diamide to the 'open' membranes prior to reconstitution of high ionic strength and raising the temperature, exhibit a state of greater leakiness. This leakiness is somewhat different in its origin from the former class of leaks, since it can also be produced by N-ethylmaleimide, which is essentially ineffective when added to the membrane in its 'tight' state. The leaks induced in the 'open' state of the membrane, which can be regarded as a consequence of an impaired resealing, are nevertheless reversible by reducing agents added after resealing and are comparable in many, but not all their characteristics to leaks induced in the 'tight' state of the membrane. Resealing in the presence of the isothiocyanostilbenes DIDS or SITS mimicks the leak forming effect of diamide by modifying a small population of SH groups, while amino groups seem not to be involved. The findings indicate and substantiate an important role of the redox state of membrane skeletal protein sulfhydryls in the maintenance and the re-establishment of the

  2. Control of high affinity interactions in the talin C terminus: how talin domains coordinate protein dynamics in cell adhesions.

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    In cell-extracellular matrix junctions (focal adhesions), the cytoskeletal protein talin is central to the connection of integrins to the actin cytoskeleton. Talin is thought to mediate this connection via its two integrin, (at least) three actin, and several vinculin binding sites. The binding sites are cryptic in the head-to-rod autoinhibited cytoplasmic form of the protein and require (stepwise) conformational activation. This activation process, however, remains poorly understood, and the...

  3. Compartmentalization Role of A-Kinase Anchoring Proteins (AKAPs in Mediating Protein Kinase A (PKA Signaling and Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Rababa'h

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Beta-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs stimulation enhances contractility through protein kinase-A (PKA substrate phosphorylation. This PKA signaling is conferred in part by PKA binding to A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs. AKAPs coordinate multi-protein signaling networks that are targeted to specific intracellular locations, resulting in the localization of enzyme activity and transmitting intracellular actions of neurotransmitters and hormones to its target substrates. In particular, mAKAP (muscle-selective AKAP has been shown to be present on the nuclear envelope of cardiomyocytes with various proteins including: PKA-regulatory subunit (RIIα, phosphodiesterase-4D3, protein phosphatase-2A, and ryanodine receptor (RyR2. Therefore, through the coordination of spatial-temporal signaling of proteins and enzymes, mAKAP controls cyclic-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP levels very tightly and functions as a regulator of PKA-mediated substrate phosphorylation leading to changes in calcium availability and myofilament calcium sensitivity. The goal of this review is to elucidate the critical compartmentalization role of mAKAP in mediating PKA signaling and regulating cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by acting as a scaffolding protein. Based on our literature search and studying the structure–function relationship between AKAP scaffolding protein and its binding partners, we propose possible explanations for the mechanism by which mAKAP promotes cardiac hypertrophy.

  4. Systematic discovery of new recognition peptides mediating protein interaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neduva, Victor; Linding, Rune; Su-Angrand, Isabelle

    2005-01-01

    Many aspects of cell signalling, trafficking, and targeting are governed by interactions between globular protein domains and short peptide segments. These domains often bind multiple peptides that share a common sequence pattern, or "linear motif" (e.g., SH3 binding to PxxP). Many domains are kn...

  5. The Role of Cgrp-Receptor Component Protein (Rcp in Cgrp-Mediated Signal Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Prado

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP is a 17-kDa intracellular peripheral membrane protein required for signal transduction at CGRP receptors. To determine the role of RCP in CGRP-mediated signal transduction, RCP was depleted from NIH3T3 cells using antisense strategy. Loss of RCP protein correlated with loss of cAMP production by CGRP in the antisense cells. In contrast, loss of RCP had no effect on CGRP-mediated binding; therefore RCP is not acting as a chaperone for the CGRP receptor. Instead, RCP is a novel signal transduction molecule that couples the CGRP receptor to the cellular signal transduction machinery. RCP thus represents a prototype for a new class of signal transduction proteins that are required for regulation of G protein-coupled receptors.

  6. Ca2+ channels as integrators of G protein-mediated signaling in neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strock, Jesse; Diversé-Pierluissi, María A

    2004-11-01

    The observations from Dunlap and Fischbach that transmitter-mediated shortening of the duration of action potentials could be caused by a decrease in calcium conductance led to numerous studies of the mechanisms of modulation of voltage-dependent calcium channels. Calcium channels are well known targets for inhibition by receptor-G protein pathways, and multiple forms of inhibition have been described. Inhibition of Ca(2+) channels can be mediated by G protein betagamma-subunits or by kinases, such as protein kinase C and tyrosine kinases. In the last few years, it has been shown that integration of G protein signaling can take place at the level of the calcium channel by regulation of the interaction of the channel pore-forming subunit with different cellular proteins.

  7. Structural mechanism of nuclear transport mediated by importin β and flexible amphiphilic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Shige H; Kumeta, Masahiro; Takeyasu, Kunio

    2014-12-02

    Karyopherin β family proteins mediate the nuclear/cytoplasmic transport of various proteins through the nuclear pore complex (NPC), although they are substantially larger than the size limit of the NPC.To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this paradoxical function, we focused on the unique structures called HEAT repeats, which consist of repetitive amphiphilic α helices. An in vitro transport assay and FRAP analyses demonstrated that not only karyopherin β family proteins but also other proteins with HEAT repeats could pass through the NPC by themselves, and serve as transport mediators for their binding partners. Biochemical and spectroscopic analyses and molecular dynamics simulations of purified HEAT-rich proteins revealed that they interact with hydrophobic groups, including phenyl and alkyl groups, and undergo reversible conformational changes in tertiary structures, but not in secondary structures. These results show that conformational changes in the flexible amphiphilic motifs play a critical role in translocation through the NPC.

  8. The kinesin-like proteins, KAC1/2, regulate actin dynamics underlying chloroplast light-avoidance in Physcomitrella patens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiyuan Shen; Yen-Chen Liu; Jeffrey P Bibeau; Kyle P Lemoi; Erkan Tzel; Luis Vidali

    2015-01-01

    In plants, light determines chloroplast position;these organelles show avoidance and accumulation re-sponses in high and low fluence-rate light, respectively. Chloroplast motility in response to light is driven by cytoskeletal elements. The actin cytoskeleton mediates chloroplast photorelocation responses in Arabidopsis thali-ana. In contrast, in the moss Physcomitrella patens, both, actin filaments and microtubules can transport chloroplasts. Because of the surprising evidence that two kinesin-like proteins (called KACs) are important for actin-dependent chloroplast photorelocation in vascular plants, we wanted to determine the cytoskeletal system responsible for the function of these proteins in moss. We performed gene-specific silencing using RNA interference in P. patens. We confirmed existing reports using gene knockouts, that PpKAC1 and PpKAC2 are required for chloroplast dispersion under uniform white light conditions, and that the two proteins are functionally equivalent. To address the specific cytoskeletal elements responsible for motility, this loss-of-function approach was combined with cytoskeleton-targeted drug studies. We found that, in P. patens, these KACs mediate the chloroplast light-avoidance response in an actin filament-dependent, rather than a microtubule-dependent manner. Using correlation-decay analysis of cytoskeletal dynamics, we found that PpKAC stabilizes cortical actin filaments, but has no effect on microtubule dynamics.

  9. Two kinesin-like proteins mediate actin-based chloroplast movement in Arabidopsis thaliana

    OpenAIRE

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Yamada, Noboru; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Yonekura, Hisashi; Uyeda, Taro Q. P.; Kadota, Akeo; Wada, Masamitsu

    2010-01-01

    Organelle movement is essential for efficient cellular function in eukaryotes. Chloroplast photorelocation movement is important for plant survival as well as for efficient photosynthesis. Chloroplast movement generally is actin dependent and mediated by blue light receptor phototropins. In Arabidopsis thaliana, phototropins mediate chloroplast movement by regulating short actin filaments on chloroplasts (cp-actin filaments), and the chloroplast outer envelope protein CHUP1 is necessary for c...

  10. Residue 182 influences the second step of protein-tyrosine phosphatase-mediated catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A.K.; Guo, X.; Møller, K.B.

    2004-01-01

    Previous enzyme kinetic and structural studies have revealed a critical role for Asp(181) (PTP1B numbering) in PTP (protein-tyrosine phosphatase)-mediated catalysis. In the E-P (phosphoenzyme) formation step, Asp(181) functions as a general acid, while in the E-P hydrolysis step it acts...... conclude that residue 182 can modulate the functionality of both Asp(181) and Gln(262). and therefore affect the E-P hydrolysis step of PTP-mediated catalysis....

  11. The involvement of XPC protein in the cisplatin DNA damaging treatment-mediated cellular response

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gan WANG; Alan DOMBKOWSKI; Lynn CHUANG; Xiao Xin S XU

    2004-01-01

    Recognition of DNA damage is a critical step for DNA damage-mediated cellular response. XPC is an important DNA damage recognition protein involved in nucleotide excision repair (NER). We have studied the XPC protein in cisplatin DNA damaging treatment-mediated cellular response. Comparison of the microarray data from both normal and XPCdefective human fibroblasts identified 861 XPC-responsive genes in the cisplatin treatment (with minimum fold change≥1.5).The cell cycle and cell proliferation-related genes are the most affected genes by the XPC defect in the treatment. Many other cellular function genes, especially the DNA repair and signal transduction-related genes, were also affected by the XPC defect in the treatment. To validate the microarray data, the transcription levels of some microarray-identified genes were also determined by an RT-PCR based real time PCR assay. The real time PCR results are consistent with the microarray data for most of the tested genes, indicating the reliability of the microarray data. To further validate the microarray data, the cisplatin treatment-mediated caspase-3 activation was also determined. The Western blot hybridization results indicate that the XPC defect greatly attenuates the cisplatin treatment-mediated Caspase-3 activation. We elucidated the role of p53 protein in the XPC protein DNA damage recognition-mediated signaling process. The XPC defect reduces the cisplatin treatment-mediated p53 response. These results suggest that the XPC protein plays an important role in the cisplatin treatment-mediated cellular response. It may also suggest a possible mechanism of cancer cell drug resistance.

  12. PACRG, a protein linked to ciliary motility, mediates cellular signaling.

    OpenAIRE

    Loucks, Catrina M.; Bialas, Nathan J.; Dekkers, Martijn; Walker, Denise S.; Grundy, Laura J.; Li, Chunmei; Inglis, P. Nick; Kida, Katarzyna; Schafer, William R; Blacque, Oliver E; Jansen, Gert; Michel R Leroux

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from nearly all mammalian cell types. Motile cilia generate fluid flow, whereas nonmotile (primary) cilia are required for sensory physiology and modulate various signal transduction pathways. Here we investigate the nonmotile ciliary signaling roles of parkin coregulated gene (PACRG), a protein linked to ciliary motility. PACRG is associated with the protofilament ribbon, a structure believed to dictate the regular arrangement of motility-a...

  13. PACRG, a protein linked to ciliary motility, mediates cellular signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Loucks, Catrina M.; Bialas, Nathan J.; Dekkers, Martijn P. J.; Walker, Denise S.; Grundy, Laura J.; Li, Chunmei; Inglis, P. Nick; Kida, Katarzyna; Schafer, William R; Blacque, Oliver E; Jansen, Gert; Michel R Leroux

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based organelles that project from nearly all mammalian cell types. Motile cilia generate fluid flow, whereas nonmotile (primary) cilia are required for sensory physiology and modulate various signal transduction pathways. Here we investigate the nonmotile ciliary signaling roles of parkin coregulated gene (PACRG), a protein linked to ciliary motility. PACRG is associated with the protofilament ribbon, a structure believed to dictate the regular arrangement of motility-a...

  14. A versatile framework for simulating the dynamic mechanical structure of cytoskeletal networks

    CERN Document Server

    Freedman, Simon L; Hocky, Glen M; Dinner, Aaron R

    2016-01-01

    Computer simulations can aid in our understanding of how collective materials properties emerge from interactions between simple constituents. Here, we introduce a coarse- grained model of networks of actin filaments, myosin motors, and crosslinking proteins that enables simulation at biologically relevant time and length scales. We demonstrate that the model, with a consistent parameterization, qualitatively and quantitatively captures a suite of trends observed experimentally, including the statistics of filament fluctuations, mechanical responses to shear, motor motilities, and network rearrangements. The model can thus serve as a platform for interpretation and design of cytoskeletal materials experiments, as well as for further development of simulations incorporating active elements.

  15. Diverse Roles of Lysin-Motif (LysM Proteins in Mediating Plant-Microbe Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinrong WAN

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Lysin-motif (LysM is a protein domain initially identified in a phage protein responsible for binding peptidoglycan, an important component of bacterial cell walls. LysM-containing proteins are distributed in diverse organisms, ranging from microbes to plants and animals (including human beings. Recent studies demonstrated that this group of proteins plays different roles in mediating plant-microbe interactions, leading to defense, symbiosis, or suppression of host defense. These roles are probably related to their potential ability to recognize and bind a specific signal molecule, such as chitooligosaccharides, peptidoglycan, nodulation factors (NFs, and mycorrhization factors (MFs.

  16. DOMMINO 2.0: integrating structurally resolved protein-, RNA-, and DNA-mediated macromolecular interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Xingyan; Dhroso, Andi; Han, Jing Ginger; Shyu, Chi-Ren; Korkin, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    Macromolecular interactions are formed between proteins, DNA and RNA molecules. Being a principle building block in macromolecular assemblies and pathways, the interactions underlie most of cellular functions. Malfunctioning of macromolecular interactions is also linked to a number of diseases. Structural knowledge of the macromolecular interaction allows one to understand the interaction's mechanism, determine its functional implications and characterize the effects of genetic variations, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms, on the interaction. Unfortunately, until now the interactions mediated by different types of macromolecules, e.g. protein-protein interactions or protein-DNA interactions, are collected into individual and unrelated structural databases. This presents a significant obstacle in the analysis of macromolecular interactions. For instance, the homogeneous structural interaction databases prevent scientists from studying structural interactions of different types but occurring in the same macromolecular complex. Here, we introduce DOMMINO 2.0, a structural Database Of Macro-Molecular INteractiOns. Compared to DOMMINO 1.0, a comprehensive database on protein-protein interactions, DOMMINO 2.0 includes the interactions between all three basic types of macromolecules extracted from PDB files. DOMMINO 2.0 is automatically updated on a weekly basis. It currently includes ∼1,040,000 interactions between two polypeptide subunits (e.g. domains, peptides, termini and interdomain linkers), ∼43,000 RNA-mediated interactions, and ∼12,000 DNA-mediated interactions. All protein structures in the database are annotated using SCOP and SUPERFAMILY family annotation. As a result, protein-mediated interactions involving protein domains, interdomain linkers, C- and N- termini, and peptides are identified. Our database provides an intuitive web interface, allowing one to investigate interactions at three different resolution levels: whole subunit network

  17. Nucleic acid-mediated intracellular protein delivery by lipid-like nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eltoukhy, Ahmed A; Chen, Delai; Veiseh, Omid; Pelet, Jeisa M; Yin, Hao; Dong, Yizhou; Anderson, Daniel G

    2014-08-01

    Intracellular protein delivery has potential biotechnological and therapeutic application, but remains technically challenging. In contrast, a plethora of nucleic acid carriers have been developed, with lipid-based nanoparticles (LNPs) among the most clinically advanced reagents for oligonucleotide delivery. Here, we validate the hypothesis that oligonucleotides can serve as packaging materials to facilitate protein entrapment within and intracellular delivery by LNPs. Using two distinct model proteins, horseradish peroxidase and NeutrAvidin, we demonstrate that LNPs can yield efficient intracellular protein delivery in vitro when one or more oligonucleotides have been conjugated to the protein cargo. Moreover, in experiments with NeutrAvidin in vivo, we show that oligonucleotide conjugation significantly enhances LNP-mediated protein uptake within various spleen cell populations, suggesting that this approach may be particularly suitable for improved delivery of protein-based vaccines to antigen-presenting cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Computational Framework for Prediction of Peptide Sequences That May Mediate Multiple Protein Interactions in Cancer-Associated Hub Proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debasree Sarkar

    Full Text Available A considerable proportion of protein-protein interactions (PPIs in the cell are estimated to be mediated by very short peptide segments that approximately conform to specific sequence patterns known as linear motifs (LMs, often present in the disordered regions in the eukaryotic proteins. These peptides have been found to interact with low affinity and are able bind to multiple interactors, thus playing an important role in the PPI networks involving date hubs. In this work, PPI data and de novo motif identification based method (MEME were used to identify such peptides in three cancer-associated hub proteins-MYC, APC and MDM2. The peptides corresponding to the significant LMs identified for each hub protein were aligned, the overlapping regions across these peptides being termed as overlapping linear peptides (OLPs. These OLPs were thus predicted to be responsible for multiple PPIs of the corresponding hub proteins and a scoring system was developed to rank them. We predicted six OLPs in MYC and five OLPs in MDM2 that scored higher than OLP predictions from randomly generated protein sets. Two OLP sequences from the C-terminal of MYC were predicted to bind with FBXW7, component of an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase complex involved in proteasomal degradation of MYC. Similarly, we identified peptides in the C-terminal of MDM2 interacting with FKBP3, which has a specific role in auto-ubiquitinylation of MDM2. The peptide sequences predicted in MYC and MDM2 look promising for designing orthosteric inhibitors against possible disease-associated PPIs. Since these OLPs can interact with other proteins as well, these inhibitors should be specific to the targeted interactor to prevent undesired side-effects. This computational framework has been designed to predict and rank the peptide regions that may mediate multiple PPIs and can be applied to other disease-associated date hub proteins for prediction of novel therapeutic targets of small molecule PPI

  19. Golgi-specific DHHC Zinc Finger Protein GODZ Mediates Membrane Ca2+ Transport*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Rochelle M.; Kang, Rujun; Goytain, Angela; Quamme, Gary A.

    2010-01-01

    The Golgi-specific zinc finger protein GODZ (palmitoyl acyltransferase/DHHC-3) mediates the palmitoylation and post-translational modification of many protein substrates that regulate membrane-protein interactions. Here, we show that GODZ also mediates Ca2+ transport in expressing Xenopus laevis oocytes. Two-electrode voltage-clamp, fluorescence, and 45Ca2+ isotopic uptake determinations demonstrated voltage- and concentration-dependent, saturable, and substrate-inhibitable Ca2+ transport in oocytes expressing GODZ cRNA but not in oocytes injected with water alone. Moreover, we show that GODZ-mediated Ca2+ transport is regulated by palmitoylation, as the palmitoyl acyltransferase inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate or alteration of the acyltransferase DHHC motif (GODZ-DHHS) diminished GODZ-mediated Ca2+ transport by ∼80%. The GODZ mutation V61R abolished Ca2+ transport but did not affect palmitoyl acyltransferase activity. Coexpression of GODZ-V61R with GODZ-DHHS restored GODZ-DHHS-mediated Ca2+ uptake to values observed with wild-type GODZ, excluding an endogenous effect of palmitoylation. Coexpression of an independent palmitoyl acyltransferase (HIP14) with the GODZ-DHHS mutant also rescued Ca2+ transport. HIP14 did not mediate Ca2+ transport when expressed alone. Immunocytochemistry studies showed that GODZ and HIP14 co-localized to the Golgi and the same post-Golgi vesicles, suggesting that heteropalmitoylation might play a physiological role in addition to a biochemical function. We conclude that GODZ encodes a Ca2+ transport protein in addition to its ability to palmitoylate protein substrates. PMID:19955568

  20. Fluids as Dynamic Templates for Cytoskeletal Proteins in Plant Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Lofthouse, J T

    2008-01-01

    The Dynamic Template model of biological cell membranes and the cytoplasm as spatially organised fluid layers is extended to plant cells, and is shown to offer a feasible shear driven mechanism for the co-alignment of internal and external fibres observed during growth and tropic responses

  1. Cytoskeletal dynamics and cell signaling during planar polarity establishment in the Drosophila embryonic denticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Meredith H; Roberts, David M; McCartney, Brooke M; Jezuit, Erin; Peifer, Mark

    2006-02-01

    Many epithelial cells are polarized along the plane of the epithelium, a property termed planar cell polarity. The Drosophila wing and eye imaginal discs are the premier models of this process. Many proteins required for polarity establishment and its translation into cytoskeletal polarity were identified from studies of those tissues. More recently, several vertebrate tissues have been shown to exhibit planar cell polarity. Striking similarities and differences have been observed when different tissues exhibiting planar cell polarity are compared. Here we describe a new tissue exhibiting planar cell polarity - the denticles, hair-like projections of the Drosophila embryonic epidermis. We describe in real time the changes in the actin cytoskeleton that underlie denticle development, and compare this with the localization of microtubules, revealing new aspects of cytoskeletal dynamics that may have more general applicability. We present an initial characterization of the localization of several actin regulators during denticle development. We find that several core planar cell polarity proteins are asymmetrically localized during the process. Finally, we define roles for the canonical Wingless and Hedgehog pathways and for core planar cell polarity proteins in denticle polarity.

  2. Iron Regulatory Proteins Mediate Host Resistance to Salmonella Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nairz, Manfred; Ferring-Appel, Dunja; Casarrubea, Daniela; Sonnweber, Thomas; Viatte, Lydie; Schroll, Andrea; Haschka, David; Fang, Ferric C; Hentze, Matthias W; Weiss, Guenter; Galy, Bruno

    2015-08-12

    Macrophages are essential for systemic iron recycling, and also control iron availability to pathogens. Iron metabolism in mammalian cells is orchestrated posttranscriptionally by iron-regulatory proteins (IRP)-1 and -2. Here, we generated mice with selective and combined ablation of both IRPs in macrophages to investigate the role of IRPs in controlling iron availability. These animals are hyperferritinemic but otherwise display normal clinical iron parameters. However, mutant mice rapidly succumb to systemic infection with Salmonella Typhimurium, a pathogenic bacterium that multiplies within macrophages, with increased bacterial burdens in liver and spleen. Ex vivo infection experiments indicate that IRP function restricts bacterial access to iron via the EntC and Feo bacterial iron-acquisition systems. Further, IRPs contain Salmonella by promoting the induction of lipocalin 2, a host antimicrobial factor that inhibits bacterial uptake of iron-laden siderophores, and by suppressing the ferritin iron pool. This work reveals the importance of the IRPs in innate immunity.

  3. Anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-19 inhibits smooth muscle cell migration and activation of cytoskeletal regulators of VSMC motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabunia, Khatuna; Jain, Surbhi; England, Ross N.

    2011-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration is an important cellular event in multiple vascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, restenosis, and transplant vasculopathy. Little is known regarding the effects of anti-inflammatory interleukins on VSMC migration. This study tested the hypothesis that an anti-inflammatory Th2 interleukin, interleukin-19 (IL-19), could decrease VSMC motility. IL-19 significantly decreased platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-stimulated VSMC chemotaxis in Boyden chambers and migration in scratch wound assays. IL-19 significantly decreased VSMC spreading in response to PDGF. To determine the molecular mechanism(s) for these cellular effects, we examined the effect of IL-19 on activation of proteins that regulate VSMC cytoskeletal dynamics and locomotion. IL-19 decreased PDGF-driven activation of several cytoskeletal regulatory proteins that play an important role in smooth muscle cell motility, including heat shock protein-27 (HSP27), myosin light chain (MLC), and cofilin. IL-19 decreased PDGF activation of the Rac1 and RhoA GTPases, important integrators of migratory signals. IL-19 was unable to inhibit VSMC migration nor was able to inhibit activation of cytoskeletal regulatory proteins in VSMC transduced with a constitutively active Rac1 mutant (RacV14), suggesting that IL-19 inhibits events proximal to Rac1 activation. Together, these data are the first to indicate that IL-19 can have important inhibitory effects on VSMC motility and activation of cytoskeletal regulatory proteins. This has important implications for the use of anti-inflammatory cytokines in the treatment of vascular occlusive disease. PMID:21209363

  4. Enhanced green fluorescent protein-mediated synthesis of biocompatible graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Woong Han, Jae; Kim, Eunsu; Kwon, Deug-Nam; Park, Jin-Ki; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2014-10-03

    Graphene is the 2D form of carbon that exists as a single layer of atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice and has attracted great interest in the last decade in view of its physical, chemical, electrical, elastic, thermal, and biocompatible properties. The objective of this study was to synthesize an environmentally friendly and simple methodology for the preparation of graphene using a recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). The successful reduction of GO to graphene was confirmed using UV-vis spectroscopy, and FT-IR. DLS and SEM were employed to demonstrate the particle size and surface morphology of GO and EGFP-rGO. The results from Raman spectroscopy suggest the removal of oxygen-containing functional groups from the surface of GO and formation of graphene with defects. The biocompatibility analysis of GO and EGFP-rGO in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells suggests that GO induces significant concentration-dependent cell toxicity in HEK cells, whereas graphene exerts no adverse effects on HEK cells even at a higher concentration (100 μg/mL). Altogether, our findings suggest that recombinant EGFP can be used as a reducing and stabilizing agent for the preparation of biocompatible graphene. The novelty and originality of this work is that it describes a safe, simple, and environmentally friendly method for the production of graphene using recombinant enhanced green fluorescent protein. Furthermore, the synthesized graphene shows excellent biocompatibility with HEK cells; therefore, biologically synthesized graphene can be used for biomedical applications. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first and novel report describing the synthesis of graphene using recombinant EGFP.

  5. G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Extranuclear Mediators for the Non-Genomic Actions of Steroids

    OpenAIRE

    Chen Wang; Yi Liu; Ji-Min Cao

    2014-01-01

    Steroids hormones possess two distinct actions, a delayed genomic effect and a rapid non-genomic effect. Rapid steroid-triggered signaling is mediated by specific receptors localized most often to the plasma membrane. The nature of these receptors is of great interest and accumulated data suggest that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are appealing candidates. Increasing evidence regarding the interaction between steroids and specific membrane proteins, as well as the involvement of G prot...

  6. Calcium binding protein-mediated regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels linked to human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasrin NFJATBAKHSH; Zhong-ping FENG

    2011-01-01

    Calcium ion entry through voltage-gated calcium channels is essential for cellular signalling in a wide variety of cells and multiple physiological processes. Perturbations of voltage-gated calcium channel function can lead to pathophysiological consequences. Calcium binding proteins serve as calcium sensors and regulate the calcium channel properties via feedback mechanisms. This review highlights the current evidences of calcium binding protein-mediated channel regulation in human diseases.

  7. Computational Framework for Prediction of Peptide Sequences That May Mediate Multiple Protein Interactions in Cancer-Associated Hub Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Debasree; Patra, Piya; Ghosh, Abhirupa; Saha, Sudipto

    2016-01-01

    A considerable proportion of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) in the cell are estimated to be mediated by very short peptide segments that approximately conform to specific sequence patterns known as linear motifs (LMs), often present in the disordered regions in the eukaryotic proteins. These peptides have been found to interact with low affinity and are able bind to multiple interactors, thus playing an important role in the PPI networks involving date hubs. In this work, PPI data and de novo motif identification based method (MEME) were used to identify such peptides in three cancer-associated hub proteins—MYC, APC and MDM2. The peptides corresponding to the significant LMs identified for each hub protein were aligned, the overlapping regions across these peptides being termed as overlapping linear peptides (OLPs). These OLPs were thus predicted to be responsible for multiple PPIs of the corresponding hub proteins and a scoring system was developed to rank them. We predicted six OLPs in MYC and five OLPs in MDM2 that scored higher than OLP predictions from randomly generated protein sets. Two OLP sequences from the C-terminal of MYC were predicted to bind with FBXW7, component of an E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase complex involved in proteasomal degradation of MYC. Similarly, we identified peptides in the C-terminal of MDM2 interacting with FKBP3, which has a specific role in auto-ubiquitinylation of MDM2. The peptide sequences predicted in MYC and MDM2 look promising for designing orthosteric inhibitors against possible disease-associated PPIs. Since these OLPs can interact with other proteins as well, these inhibitors should be specific to the targeted interactor to prevent undesired side-effects. This computational framework has been designed to predict and rank the peptide regions that may mediate multiple PPIs and can be applied to other disease-associated date hub proteins for prediction of novel therapeutic targets of small molecule PPI modulators. PMID

  8. Inhibition of nitric oxide mediated protein nitration: therapeutic implications in experimental radiculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong Jae; Kim, Tae Uk; Park, Jeong-Soo; Ra, Jong Yun

    2013-09-15

    Experimental animal study. This study investigated whether nitric oxide (NO) mediated protein nitration is involved in the pathogenesis of radiculopathy and whether the symptoms can be relieved by its suppression. It has been reported that nitration of protein mediated by NO is involved in the degenerative neurological disorders, but its involvement is not clear in the radiculopathy. Two kinds of rat models of radiculopathy were used. Radiculopathy was induced either by ligation of spinal nerve roots or transplantation of autologous nucleus pulposus. In separate groups of rats, aminoguanidine, a potent nitric oxide synthetase inhibitor, was administered just before induction of radiculopathy, to suppress NO production and resultant nitration of protein. Sensation of the hind limb was evaluated by plantar stimulation test, and motor weakness was assessed by observation of gait pattern. Nitrotyrosine, product of protein nitration, was assayed quantitatively by Western immunoblotting. Mechanical allodynia was observed in both compression and nucleus pulposus groups, but motor weakness was observed only in the compression group. Preoperative administration of aminoguanidine attenuated mechanical allodynia and motor weakness. Optical densities of nitrotyrosine bands increased significantly in radiculopathy groups, but they were lowered by administration of aminoguanidine. NO mediated protein nitration contributes to the development of both types of radiculopathies. Suppression of NO production can decrease protein nitration and relieve neural dysfunctions of radiculopathy. N/A.

  9. Sulforaphane-induced autophagy flux prevents prion protein-mediated neurotoxicity through AMPK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J-H; Jeong, J-K; Park, S-Y

    2014-10-10

    Prion diseases are neurodegenerative and infectious disorders that involve accumulation of misfolded scrapie prion protein, and which are characterized by spongiform degeneration. Autophagy, a major homeostatic process responsible for the degradation of cytoplasmic components, has garnered attention as the potential target for neurodegenerative diseases such as prion disease. We focused on protective effects of sulforaphane found in cruciferous vegetables on prion-mediated neurotoxicity and the mechanism of sulforaphane related to autophagy. In human neuroblastoma cells, sulforaphane protected prion protein (PrP) (106-126)-mediated neurotoxicity and increased autophagy flux marker microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3-II protein levels, following a decrease of p62 protein level. Pharmacological and genetical inhibition of autophagy by 3MA, wortmannin and knockdown of autophagy-related 5 (ATG5) led to block the effect of sulforaphane against PrP (106-126)-induced neurotoxicity. Furthermore we demonstrated that both sulforaphane-induced autophagy and protective effect of sulforaphane against PrP (106-126)-induced neurotoxicity are dependent on the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling. The present results indicated that sulforaphane of cruciferous vegetables enhanced autophagy flux led to the protection effects against prion-mediated neurotoxicity, which was regulated by AMPK signaling pathways in human neuron cells. Our data also suggest that sulforaphane has a potential value as a therapeutic tool in neurodegenerative disease including prion diseases. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of the proteins related to SET-mediated hepatic cytotoxicity of trichloroethylene by proteomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaohu; Yang, Xifei; Hong, Wen-Xu; Huang, Peiwu; Wang, Yong; Liu, Wei; Ye, Jinbo; Huang, Haiyan; Huang, Xinfeng; Shen, Liming; Yang, Linqing; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Liu, Jianjun

    2014-05-16

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is an effective solvent for a variety of organic materials. Since the wide use of TCE as industrial degreasing of metals, adhesive paint and polyvinyl chloride production, TCE has turned into an environmental and occupational toxicant. Exposure to TCE could cause severe hepatotoxicity; however, the toxic mechanisms of TCE remain poorly understood. Recently, we reported that SET protein mediated TCE-induced cytotoxicity in L-02 cells. Here, we further identified the proteins related to SET-mediated hepatic cytotoxicity of TCE using the techniques of DIGE (differential gel electrophoresis) and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS. Among the 20 differential proteins identified, 8 were found to be modulated by SET in TCE-induced cytotoxicity and three of them (cofilin-1, peroxiredoxin-2 and S100-A11) were validated by Western-blot analysis. The functional analysis revealed that most of the identified SET-modulated proteins are apoptosis-associated proteins. These data indicated that these proteins may be involved in SET-mediated hepatic cytotoxicity of TCE in L-02 cells.

  11. The cytoskeletal inhibitors latrunculin A and blebbistatin exert antitumorigenic properties in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by interfering with intracellular HuR trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doller, Anke; Badawi, Amel [Pharmazentrum Frankfurt/ZAFES, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Schmid, Tobias; Brauß, Thilo [Institut für Biochemie I (Pathobiochemie), Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Pleli, Thomas [Medizinische Klinik 1, Schwerpunkt Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Meyer zu Heringdorf, Dagmar [Pharmazentrum Frankfurt/ZAFES, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Piiper, Albrecht [Medizinische Klinik 1, Schwerpunkt Gastroenterologie und Hepatologie, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Pfeilschifter, Josef [Pharmazentrum Frankfurt/ZAFES, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Eberhardt, Wolfgang, E-mail: w.eberhardt@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Pharmazentrum Frankfurt/ZAFES, Klinikum der Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    The impact of the RNA-binding protein HuR for the post-transcriptional deregulation of tumor-relevant genes is well established. Despite of elevations in HuR expression levels, an increase in cytoplasmic HuR abundance in many cases correlates with a high grade of malignancy. Here, we demonstrated that administration of the actin-depolymerizing macrolide latrunculin A, or blebbistatin, an inhibitor of myosin II ATPase activity, caused a dose- and time-dependent reduction in the high cytoplasmic HuR content of HepG2 and Huh7 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Subcellular fractionation revealed that in addition, both inhibitors strongly attenuated cytoskeletal and membrane-bound HuR abundance and conversely increased the HuR amount in nuclear cell fractions. Concomitant with changes in intracellular HuR localization, both cytoskeletal inhibitors markedly decreased the half-lives of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), cyclin A and cyclin D{sub 1} encoding mRNAs resulting in a significant reduction in their expression levels in HepG2 cells. Importantly, a similar reduction in the expression of these HuR targets was achieved by a RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of either HuR or nonmuscle myoin IIA. Using polysomal fractionation, we further demonstrate that the decrease in cytoplasmic HuR by latrunculin A or blebbistatin is accompanied by a marked change in the allocation of HuR and its mRNA cargo from polysomes to ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles. Functionally, the basal migration and prostaglandin E{sub 2} synthesis are similarly impaired in inhibitor-treated and stable HuR-knockdown HepG2 cells. Our data demonstrate that interfering with the actomyosin-dependent HuR trafficking may comprise a valid therapeutic option for antagonizing pathologic posttranscriptional gene expression by HuR and furthermore emphasize the potential benefit of HuR inhibitory strategies for treatment of HCC. - Highlights: • We tested the effects of latrunculin A and blebbistatin on

  12. FIBROBLAST CYTOSKELETAL REMODELING CONTRIBUTES TO CONNECTIVE TISSUE TENSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Helene M.; Bouffard, Nicole A.; Fox, James R.; Palmer, Bradley M.; Wu, Junru; Iatridis, James C.; Barnes, William D.; Badger, Gary J.; Howe, Alan K.

    2011-01-01

    The viscoelastic behavior of connective tissue is generally attributed to the material properties of the extracellular matrix rather than cellular activity. We have previously shown that fibroblasts within areolar connective tissue exhibit dynamic cytoskeletal remodeling within minutes in response to tissue stretch ex vivo and in vivo. Here, we tested the hypothesis that fibroblasts, through this cytoskeletal remodeling, actively contribute to the viscoelastic behavior of the whole tissue. We measured significantly increased tissue tension when cellular function was broadly inhibited by sodium azide and when cytoskeletal dynamics were compromised by disrupting microtubules (with colchicine) or actomyosin contractility (via Rho kinase inhibition). These treatments led to a decrease in cell body cross-sectional area and cell field perimeter (obtained by joining the end of all of a fibroblast’s processes). Suppressing lamellipodia formation by inhibiting Rac-1 decreased cell body cross-sectional area but did not affect cell field perimeter or tissue tension. Thus, by changing shape, fibroblasts can dynamically modulate the viscoelastic behavior of areolar connective tissue through Rho-dependent cytoskeletal mechanisms. These results have broad implications for our understanding of the dynamic interplay of forces between fibroblasts and their surrounding matrix, as well as for the neural, vascular and immune cell populations residing within connective tissue. PMID:20945345

  13. Fibroblast cytoskeletal remodeling contributes to connective tissue tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Helene M; Bouffard, Nicole A; Fox, James R; Palmer, Bradley M; Wu, Junru; Iatridis, James C; Barnes, William D; Badger, Gary J; Howe, Alan K

    2011-05-01

    The visco-elastic behavior of connective tissue is generally attributed to the material properties of the extracellular matrix rather than cellular activity. We have previously shown that fibroblasts within areolar connective tissue exhibit dynamic cytoskeletal remodeling within minutes in response to tissue stretch ex vivo and in vivo. Here, we tested the hypothesis that fibroblasts, through this cytoskeletal remodeling, actively contribute to the visco-elastic behavior of the whole tissue. We measured significantly increased tissue tension when cellular function was broadly inhibited by sodium azide and when cytoskeletal dynamics were compromised by disrupting microtubules (with colchicine) or actomyosin contractility (via Rho kinase inhibition). These treatments led to a decrease in cell body cross-sectional area and cell field perimeter (obtained by joining the end of all of a fibroblast's processes). Suppressing lamellipodia formation by inhibiting Rac-1 decreased cell body cross-sectional area but did not affect cell field perimeter or tissue tension. Thus, by changing shape, fibroblasts can dynamically modulate the visco-elastic behavior of areolar connective tissue through Rho-dependent cytoskeletal mechanisms. These results have broad implications for our understanding of the dynamic interplay of forces between fibroblasts and their surrounding matrix, as well as for the neural, vascular, and immune cell populations residing within connective tissue.

  14. High expression level of soluble SARS spike protein mediated by adenovirus in HEK293 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei Zhong; Zhen-Yu Zhong; Shuang Liang; Xiu-Jin Li

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To develop a highly efficacious method for preparation of soluble SARS S-protein using adenovirus vector to meet the requirement for S-protein investigation.METHODS: The human adenovirus vector was used to express the soluble S-protein (corresponding to 1~1190 amino acids) fused with Myc/His tag using codon-optimized gene construct in HEK239 cells. The recombinant adenovirus bearing S-protein gene was generated by ligation method. The expressed S-protein with Myc/His tag was purified from culture medium with Ni-NTA agarose beads followed by dialysis. The S-protein was detected by Western blot and its biologic activity was analyzed by binding to Vero cells.RESULTS: Under the conditions of infection dose (MOI of 50) and expression time (48 h), the high-level expression of S-protein was obtained. The expression level was determined to be approximately 75 μg/106cells after purification. Purified soluble S-protein was readily detected by Western blot with anti-Myc antibody and showed the ability to bind to surface of Vero cells,demonstrating that the soluble S-protein could remain the biologic activity in the native molecule.CONCLUSION: The high-level expression of S-protein in HEK293 cells mediated by adenovirus can be achieved under the optimized expression conditions. The proteins possess the biologic activity, which lays a foundation for further investigation of S-protein biological function.

  15. High-throughput prediction of RNA, DNA and protein binding regions mediated by intrinsic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Zhenling; Kurgan, Lukasz

    2015-10-15

    Intrinsically disordered proteins and regions (IDPs and IDRs) lack stable 3D structure under physiological conditions in-vitro, are common in eukaryotes, and facilitate interactions with RNA, DNA and proteins. Current methods for prediction of IDPs and IDRs do not provide insights into their functions, except for a handful of methods that address predictions of protein-binding regions. We report first-of-its-kind computational method DisoRDPbind for high-throughput prediction of RNA, DNA and protein binding residues located in IDRs from protein sequences. DisoRDPbind is implemented using a runtime-efficient multi-layered design that utilizes information extracted from physiochemical properties of amino acids, sequence complexity, putative secondary structure and disorder and sequence alignment. Empirical tests demonstrate that it provides accurate predictions that are competitive with other predictors of disorder-mediated protein binding regions and complementary to the methods that predict RNA- and DNA-binding residues annotated based on crystal structures. Application in Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster proteomes reveals that RNA- and DNA-binding proteins predicted by DisoRDPbind complement and overlap with the corresponding known binding proteins collected from several sources. Also, the number of the putative protein-binding regions predicted with DisoRDPbind correlates with the promiscuity of proteins in the corresponding protein-protein interaction networks. Webserver: http://biomine.ece.ualberta.ca/DisoRDPbind/.

  16. FAX1, a Novel Membrane Protein Mediating Plastid Fatty Acid Export

    OpenAIRE

    Roland G Roberts

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids made in chloroplasts must be exported into the rest of the cell to be converted into commercially important plant oils. A new study identifies FAX1 as a protein that mediates this crucial transport step. Read the Research Article.

  17. Role of macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha in T-cell-mediated immunity to viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas N; Nansen, Anneline; Christensen, Jan P

    2003-01-01

    The immune response to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in mice lacking macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha) was evaluated. Generation of virus-specific effector T cells is unimpaired in MIP-1alpha-deficient mice. Furthermore, MIP-1alpha is not required for T-cell-mediated virus...

  18. Site-specific N-terminal labeling of proteins using sortase-mediated reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theile, Christopher S.; Witte, Martin D.; Blom, Annet E. M.; Kundrat, Lenka; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Guimaraes, Carla P.

    2013-01-01

    This protocol describes the use of sortase-mediated reactions to label the N terminus of any given protein of interest. The sortase recognition sequence, LPXTG (for Streptococcus aureus sortase A) or LPXTA (for Staphylococcus pyogenes sortase A), can be appended to a variety of probes such as fluoro

  19. Adult neurogenesis requires Smad4-mediated bone morphogenic protein signaling in stem cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colak, D.; Mori, T.; Brill, M.S; Pfeifer, A.; Falk, S.; Deng, C.; Monteiro, R.; Mummery, C.L.; Sommer, L.; Gotz, M.

    2008-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, neurogenesis continues only in few regions of the forebrain. The molecular signals governing neurogenesis in these unique neurogenic niches, however, are still ill defined. Here, we show that bone morphogenic protein (BMP)-mediated signaling is active in adult neural stem cel

  20. Role of bacterial virulence proteins in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Aspergillus awamori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michielse, C.B.; Ram, A.F.J.; Hooykaas, P.J.J.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den

    2004-01-01

    The Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Aspergillus awamori was optimized using defined co-cultivation conditions, which resulted in a reproducible and efficient transformation system. Optimal co-cultivation conditions were used to study the role of Agrobacterium tumefaciens virulence proteins

  1. Residue 182 influences the second step of protein-tyrosine phosphatase-mediated catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A.K.; Guo, X.; Møller, K.B.

    2004-01-01

    Previous enzyme kinetic and structural studies have revealed a critical role for Asp(181) (PTP1B numbering) in PTP (protein-tyrosine phosphatase)-mediated catalysis. In the E-P (phosphoenzyme) formation step, Asp(181) functions as a general acid, while in the E-P hydrolysis step it acts as a gene...

  2. Visualizing virulence proteins and their translocation into the host during agrobacterium-mediated transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakalis, Philippe Alexandre

    2013-01-01

    The project focuses on visualizing Agrobacterium Mediated Transformation (AMT) of host cells by real time microscopy. With new visualization techniques the function of several proteins, which have recently been discovered in our lab to play a role during AMT, are studied.

  3. The ESX system in Bacillus subtilis mediates protein secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A Huppert

    Full Text Available Esat-6 protein secretion systems (ESX or Ess are required for the virulence of several human pathogens, most notably Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Staphylococcus aureus. These secretion systems are defined by a conserved FtsK/SpoIIIE family ATPase and one or more WXG100 family secreted substrates. Gene clusters coding for ESX systems have been identified amongst many organisms including the highly tractable model system, Bacillus subtilis. In this study, we demonstrate that the B. subtilis yuk/yue locus codes for a nonessential ESX secretion system. We develop a functional secretion assay to demonstrate that each of the locus gene products is specifically required for secretion of the WXG100 virulence factor homolog, YukE. We then employ an unbiased approach to search for additional secreted substrates. By quantitative profiling of culture supernatants, we find that YukE may be the sole substrate that depends on the FtsK/SpoIIIE family ATPase for secretion. We discuss potential functional implications for secretion of a unique substrate.

  4. Aegeline from Aegle marmelos stimulates glucose transport via Akt and Rac1 signaling, and contributes to a cytoskeletal rearrangement through PI3K/Rac1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Sudeep; Ishrat, Nayab; Singh, Rohit; Narender, Tadigoppula; Srivastava, Arvind K

    2015-09-01

    Aegeline is an alkaloidal-amide, isolated from the leaves of Aegle marmelos and have shown antihyperglycemic as well as antidyslipidemic activities in the validated animal models of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Here we delineate, aegeline enhanced GLUT4 translocation mediated 2-deoxy-glucose uptake in both time and concentration-dependent manner. 2-deoxy-glucose uptake was completely stymied by the transport inhibitors (wortmannin and genistein) in C2C12 myotubes. Pharmacological inhibition of Akt (also known as protein kinase B) and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1) suggest that both Akt and Rac1 operate aegeline-stimulated glucose transport via distinct parallel pathways. Moreover, aegeline activates p21 protein-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) and cofilin (an actin polymerization regulator). Rac1 inhibitor (Rac1 inhib II) and PAK1 inhibitor (IPA-3) completely blocked aegeline-induced phosphorylation of cofilin and p21 protein-activated kinase 1 (PAK1). In summary, these findings suggest that aegeline stimulates the glucose transport through Akt and Rac1 dependent distinct parallel pathways and have cytoskeletal roles via stimulation of the PI3-kinase-Rac1-PAK1-cofilin pathway in the skeletal muscle cells. Therefore, multiple targets of aegeline in the improvement of insulin sensitivity of the skeletal muscle cells may be suggested.

  5. PDZ domain-mediated interactions of G protein-coupled receptors with postsynaptic density protein 95

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thor C; Wirth, Volker F; Roberts, Nina Ingerslev;

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane proteins in the human genome. Their signaling is regulated by scaffold proteins containing PDZ domains, but although these interactions are important for GPCR function, they are still poorly understood. We here present...

  6. Cytoskeletal regulation dominates temperature-sensitive proteomic changes of hibernation in forebrain of 13-lined ground squirrels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allyson G Hindle

    Full Text Available 13-lined ground squirrels, Ictidomys tridecemlineatus, are obligate hibernators that transition annually between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy - wherein they exploit episodic torpor bouts. Despite cerebral ischemia during torpor and rapid reperfusion during arousal, hibernator brains resist damage and the animals emerge neurologically intact each spring. We hypothesized that protein changes in the brain underlie winter neuroprotection. To identify candidate proteins, we applied a sensitive 2D gel electrophoresis method to quantify protein differences among forebrain extracts prepared from ground squirrels in two summer, four winter and fall transition states. Proteins that differed among groups were identified using LC-MS/MS. Only 84 protein spots varied significantly among the defined states of hibernation. Protein changes in the forebrain proteome fell largely into two reciprocal patterns with a strong body temperature dependence. The importance of body temperature was tested in animals from the fall; these fall animals use torpor sporadically with body temperatures mirroring ambient temperatures between 4 and 21°C as they navigate the transition between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy. Unlike cold-torpid fall ground squirrels, warm-torpid individuals strongly resembled the homeotherms, indicating that the changes observed in torpid hibernators are defined by body temperature, not torpor per se. Metabolic enzymes were largely unchanged despite varied metabolic activity across annual and torpor-arousal cycles. Instead, the majority of the observed changes were cytoskeletal proteins and their regulators. While cytoskeletal structural proteins tended to differ seasonally, i.e., between summer homeothermy and winter heterothermy, their regulatory proteins were more strongly affected by body temperature. Changes in the abundance of various isoforms of the microtubule assembly and disassembly regulatory proteins

  7. Cotranslational Coat Protein-Mediated Inhibition of Potyviral RNA Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besong-Ndika, Jane; Ivanov, Konstantin I.; Hafrèn, Anders; Michon, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Potato virus A (PVA) is a single-stranded positive-sense RNA virus and a member of the family Potyviridae. The PVA coat protein (CP) has an intrinsic capacity to self-assemble into filamentous virus-like particles, but the mechanism responsible for the initiation of viral RNA encapsidation in vivo remains unclear. Apart from virion assembly, PVA CP is also involved in the inhibition of viral RNA translation. In this study, we show that CP inhibits PVA RNA translation in a dose-dependent manner, through a mechanism involving the CP-encoding region. Analysis of this region, however, failed to identify any RNA secondary structure(s) preferentially recognized by CP, suggesting that the inhibition depends on CP-CP rather than CP-RNA interactions. In agreement with this possibility, insertion of an in-frame stop codon upstream of the CP sequence led to a marked decrease in the inhibition of viral RNA translation. Based on these results, we propose a model in which the cotranslational interactions between excess CP accumulating in trans and CP translated from viral RNA in cis are required to initiate the translational repression. This model suggests a mechanism for how viral RNA can be sequestered from translation and specifically selected for encapsidation at the late stages of viral infection. IMPORTANCE The main functions of the CP during potyvirus infection are to protect viral RNA from degradation and to transport it locally, systemically, and from host to host. Although virion assembly is a key step in the potyviral infectious cycle, little is known about how it is initiated and how viral RNA is selected for encapsidation. The results presented here suggest that CP-CP rather than CP-RNA interactions are predominantly involved in the sequestration of viral RNA away from translation. We propose that the cotranslational nature of these interactions may represent a mechanism for the selection of viral RNA for encapsidation. A better understanding of the

  8. Ras protein participated in histone acetylation-mediated cell cycle control in Physarum polycephalum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiaoxue; LU Jun; ZHAO Yanmei; WANG Xiuli; HUANG Baiqu

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that in Physarum polycephalum, a naturally synchronized slime mold, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA), arrestes the cell cycle at the checkpoints of S/G2, G2/M and mitosis exit, and influences the transcription of two ras genes Ppras1 and Pprap1, as well as the Ras protein level. Antibody neutralization experiment using anti-Ras antibody treatment showed that Ras protein played an important role in cell cycle checkpoint control through regulation of the level of Cyclin B1, suggesting that Ras protein might be a key factor for histone acetylation-mediated cell cycle regulation in P. polycephalum.

  9. Mechanics of composite cytoskeletal and extracellular networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Moumita

    2014-03-01

    Living cells sense and respond to mechanical forces in their surroundings. This mechanical response is mainly due to the cell cytoskeleton, and its interaction with the extracellular matrix (ECM). The cell cytoskeleton is a composite polymeric scaffold made of many different types of protein filaments and crosslinking proteins. Two major filament systems in the cytoskeleton are actin filaments (F-actin) and microtubules (MTs). Actin filaments are semiflexible, while the much stiffer MTs behave as rigid rods. I shall discuss theories that help understand how the direct coupling to the surrounding F-actin matrix allows intracellular MTs to bear large compressive forces and controls the range of force transmission along the MTs, and how the MTs not only enhance the stiffness of the cell cytoskeleton, but can also dramatically endow an initially nearly incompressible F-actin matrix with enhanced compressibility relative to its shear compliance. A second source of compositeness in the cytoskeleton is the presences of different types of crosslinkers that can interact cooperatively leading to enhanced mechanical rigidity and tunable response. Like the cytoskeleton, the ECM is also a polymeric composite. It is primarily composed of a mesh of fibrous proteins, mainly stiff collagen filaments, and a comparatively flexible gel of proteoglycans and hyaluronan. I shall discuss a model that shows how the interplay between the collagen network and the background elastic gel leads to a mechanically robust ECM.

  10. GRIM-19 inhibits v-Src-induced cell motility by interfering with cytoskeletal restructuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peng; Nallar, Shreeram C.; Kalakonda, Sudhakar; Lindner, Daniel J.; Martin, Stuart S.; Kalvakolanu, Dhananjaya V.

    2008-01-01

    GRIM-19 (Gene associated with Retinoid-Interferon-induced Mortality 19) is a novel tumor suppressor regulated by Interferon/retinoid combination. We have recently shown that GRIM-19 inhibits v-Src-induced oncogenic transformation and metastatic behavior of cells. Oncogenic v-Src induces cell motility by cytoskeletal remodeling especially the formation of podosomes and. Here we show that GRIM-19 inhibited the v-Src-induced cell motility by inhibiting cytoskeletal remodeling i.e., podosome formation. We also show that the N-terminus of GRIM-19 played a major role in this process and identified critical residues in this region. More importantly, we show that tumor-associated GRIM-19 mutations disrupted its ability to inhibit v-Src-induced cell motility. These actions appear to occur independently of STAT3, a known target of GRIM-19-mediated inhibition. Lastly, tumor-associated GRIM-19 mutants significantly lost their ability to control v-Src-induced metastases in vivo, indicating the biological and pathological significance of these observations. PMID:19151760

  11. Protein Corona Modulates Uptake and Toxicity of Nanoceria via Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzolini, Julie; Weber, Ralf J M; Chen, Hsueh-Shih; Khan, Abdullah; Guggenheim, Emily; Shaw, Robert K; Chipman, James K; Viant, Mark R; Rappoport, Joshua Z

    2016-08-01

    Particles present in diesel exhaust have been proposed as a significant contributor to the development of acute and chronic lung diseases, including respiratory infection and allergic asthma. Nanoceria (CeO2 nanoparticles) are used to increase fuel efficiency in internal combustion engines, are present in exhaust fumes, and could affect cells of the airway. Components from the environment such as biologically derived proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids can form a dynamic layer, commonly referred to as the "protein corona" which alters cellular nanoparticle interactions and internalization. Using confocal reflectance microscopy, we quantified nanoceria uptake by lung-derived cells in the presence and absence of a serum-derived protein corona. Employing mass spectrometry, we identified components of the protein corona, and demonstrated that the interaction between transferrin in the protein corona and the transferrin receptor is involved in mediating the cellular entry of nanoceria via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Furthermore, under these conditions nanoceria does not affect cell growth, viability, or metabolism, even at high concentration. Alternatively, despite the antioxidant capacity of nanoceria, in serum-free conditions these nanoparticles induce plasma membrane disruption and cause changes in cellular metabolism. Thus, our results identify a specific receptor-mediated mechanism for nanoceria entry, and provide significant insight into the potential for nanoparticle-dependent toxicity.

  12. RNA-binding proteins in microsatellite expansion disorders: mediators of RNA toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverria, Gloria V; Cooper, Thomas A

    2012-06-26

    Although protein-mediated toxicity in neurological disease has been extensively characterized, RNA-mediated toxicity is an emerging mechanism of pathogenesis. In microsatellite expansion disorders, expansion of repeated sequences in noncoding regions gives rise to RNA that produces a toxic gain of function, while expansions in coding regions can disrupt protein function as well as produce toxic RNA. The toxic RNA typically aggregates into nuclear foci and contributes to disease pathogenesis. In many cases, toxicity of the RNA is caused by the disrupted functions of RNA-binding proteins. We will discuss evidence for RNA-mediated toxicity in microsatellite expansion disorders. Different microsatellite expansion disorders are linked with alterations in the same as well as disease-specific RNA-binding proteins. Recent studies have shown that microsatellite expansions can encode multiple repeat-containing toxic RNAs through bidirectional transcription and protein species through repeat-associated non-ATG translation. We will discuss approaches that have characterized the toxic contributions of these various factors.

  13. Reactive oxygen species-mediated unfolded protein response pathways in preimplantation embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ihsan; Shah, Syed Zahid Ali; Jin, Yi; Li, Zhong-Shu; Ullah, Obaid

    2017-01-01

    Excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated responses are critical to embryonic development in the challenging in vitro environment. ROS production increases during early embryonic development with the increase in protein requirements for cell survival and growth. The ER is a multifunctional cellular organelle responsible for protein folding, modification, and cellular homeostasis. ER stress is activated by a variety of factors including ROS. Such stress leads to activation of the adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR), which restores homeostasis. However, chronic stress can exceed the toleration level of the ER, resulting in cellular apoptosis. In this review, we briefly describe the generation and impact of ROS in preimplantation embryo development, the ROS-mediated activation mechanism of the UPR via the ER, and the subsequent activation of signaling pathways following ER stress in preimplantation embryos. PMID:28057903

  14. Atomic-resolution structure of cytoskeletal bactofilin by solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chaowei; Fricke, Pascal; Lin, Lin; Chevelkov, Veniamin; Wegstroth, Melanie; Giller, Karin; Becker, Stefan; Thanbichler, Martin; Lange, Adam

    2015-12-01

    Bactofilins are a recently discovered class of cytoskeletal proteins of which no atomic-resolution structure has been reported thus far. The bacterial cytoskeleton plays an essential role in a wide range of processes, including morphogenesis, cell division, and motility. Among the cytoskeletal proteins, the bactofilins are bacteria-specific and do not have a eukaryotic counterpart. The bactofilin BacA of the species Caulobacter crescentus is not amenable to study by x-ray crystallography or solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) because of its inherent noncrystallinity and insolubility. We present the atomic structure of BacA calculated from solid-state NMR-derived distance restraints. We show that the core domain of BacA forms a right-handed β helix with six windings and a triangular hydrophobic core. The BacA structure was determined to 1.0 Å precision (heavy-atom root mean square deviation) on the basis of unambiguous restraints derived from four-dimensional (4D) HN-HN and 2D C-C NMR spectra.

  15. Transcriptional networks regulating the costamere, sarcomere, and other cytoskeletal structures in striated muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrella, Nelsa L; Naya, Francisco J

    2014-05-01

    Structural abnormalities in striated muscle have been observed in numerous transcription factor gain- and loss-of-function phenotypes in animal and cell culture model systems, indicating that transcription is important in regulating the cytoarchitecture. While most characterized cytoarchitectural defects are largely indistinguishable by histological and ultrastructural criteria, analysis of dysregulated gene expression in each mutant phenotype has yielded valuable information regarding specific structural gene programs that may be uniquely controlled by each of these transcription factors. Linking the formation and maintenance of each subcellular structure or subset of proteins within a cytoskeletal compartment to an overlapping but distinct transcription factor cohort may enable striated muscle to control cytoarchitectural function in an efficient and specific manner. Here we summarize the available evidence that connects transcription factors, those with established roles in striated muscle such as MEF2 and SRF, as well as other non-muscle transcription factors, to the regulation of a defined cytoskeletal structure. The notion that genes encoding proteins localized to the same subcellular compartment are coordinately transcriptionally regulated may prompt rationally designed approaches that target specific transcription factor pathways to correct structural defects in muscle disease.

  16. Mitogen-activated protein kinases mediate Mycobacterium tuberculosis–induced CD44 surface expression in monocytes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Natarajan Palaniappan; S Anbalagan; Sujatha Narayanan

    2012-03-01

    CD44, an adhesion molecule, has been reported to be a binding site for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) in macrophages and it also mediates mycobacterial phagocytosis, macrophage recruitment and protective immunity against pulmonary tuberculosis in vivo. However, the signalling pathways that are involved in M. tuberculosis–induced CD44 surface expression in monocytic cells are currently unknown. Exposure of THP-1 human monocytes to M. tuberculosis H37Rv and H37Ra induced distinct, time-dependent, phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1, extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3/6, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-jun N-terminal kinases. The strains also differed in their usage of CD14 and human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR) receptors in mediating mitogen-activated protein kinase activation. M. tuberculosis H37Rv strain induced lower CD44 surface expression and tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels, whereas H37Ra the reverse. Using highly specific inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-jun N-terminal kinase, we report that inhibition of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 and c-jun N-terminal kinases increases, but that inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase decreases M. tuberculosis–induced CD44 surface expression in THP-1 human monocytes.

  17. A subset of FG-nucleoporins is necessary for efficient Msn5-mediated nuclear protein export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Erin M.; DeRoo, Elise P.; Clement, George W.; Rao, Sheila; Kruse, Sarah E.; Kokanovich, Kate M.; Belanger, Kenneth D.

    2013-01-01

    The transport of proteins between the cytoplasm and nucleus requires interactions between soluble transport receptors (karyopherins) and phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeat domains on nuclear pore complex proteins (nucleoporins). However, the role of specific FG repeat-containing nucleoporins in nuclear protein export has not been carefully investigated. We have developed a novel kinetic assay to investigate the relative export kinetics mediated by the karyopherin Msn5/Kap142 in yeast containing specific FG-Nup mutations. Using the Msn5 substrate Crz1 as a marker for Msn5-mediated protein export, we observe that deletions of NUP100 or NUP2 result in decreased rates of Crz1 export, while nup60Δ and nup42Δ mutants do not vary significantly from wild type. The decreased Msn5 export rate in nup100Δ was confirmed using Mig1-GFP as a transport substrate. A nup100ΔGLFG mutant shows defects in nuclear export kinetics similar to a nup100Δ deletion. Removal of FG-repeats from Nsp1 also decreases export kinetics, while a loss of Nup1 FXFGs does not. To confirm that our export data reflected functional differences in protein localization, we performed Crz1 transcription activation assays using a CDRE::LacZ reporter gene that is upregulated upon increased transcription activation by Crz1 in vivo. We observe that expression from this reporter increases in nup100ΔGLFG and nsp1ΔFGΔFXFG strains that exhibit decreased Crz1 export kinetics but resembles wild-type levels in nup1ΔFXFG strains that do not exhibit export defects. These data provide evidence that the export of Msn5 is likely mediated by a specific subset of FG-Nups and that the GLFG repeat domain of Nup100 is important for Msn5-mediated nuclear protein export. PMID:23295456

  18. A subset of FG-nucleoporins is necessary for efficient Msn5-mediated nuclear protein export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Erin M; DeRoo, Elise P; Clement, George W; Rao, Sheila; Kruse, Sarah E; Kokanovich, Kate M; Belanger, Kenneth D

    2013-05-01

    The transport of proteins between the cytoplasm and nucleus requires interactions between soluble transport receptors (karyopherins) and phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeat domains on nuclear pore complex proteins (nucleoporins). However, the role of specific FG repeat-containing nucleoporins in nuclear protein export has not been carefully investigated. We have developed a novel kinetic assay to investigate the relative export kinetics mediated by the karyopherin Msn5/Kap142 in yeast containing specific FG-Nup mutations. Using the Msn5 substrate Crz1 as a marker for Msn5-mediated protein export, we observe that deletions of NUP100 or NUP2 result in decreased rates of Crz1 export, while nup60Δ and nup42Δ mutants do not vary significantly from wild type. The decreased Msn5 export rate in nup100Δ was confirmed using Mig1-GFP as a transport substrate. A nup100ΔGLFG mutant shows defects in nuclear export kinetics similar to a nup100Δ deletion. Removal of FG-repeats from Nsp1 also decreases export kinetics, while a loss of Nup1 FXFGs does not. To confirm that our export data reflected functional differences in protein localization, we performed Crz1 transcription activation assays using a CDRE::LacZ reporter gene that is upregulated upon increased transcription activation by Crz1 in vivo. We observe that expression from this reporter increases in nup100ΔGLFG and nsp1ΔFGΔFXFG strains that exhibit decreased Crz1 export kinetics but resembles wild-type levels in nup1ΔFXFG strains that do not exhibit export defects. These data provide evidence that the export of Msn5 is likely mediated by a specific subset of FG-Nups and that the GLFG repeat domain of Nup100 is important for Msn5-mediated nuclear protein export.

  19. Biogenesis of the trypanosome endo-exocytotic organelle is cytoskeleton mediated.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélanie Bonhivers

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite that is used as a model organism to study such biological phenomena as gene expression, protein trafficking, and cytoskeletal biogenesis. In T. brucei, endocytosis and exocytosis occur exclusively through a sequestered organelle called the flagellar pocket (FP, an invagination of the pellicular membrane. The pocket is the sole site for specific receptors thus maintaining them inaccessible to components of the innate immune system of the mammalian host. The FP is also responsible for the sorting of protective parasite glycoproteins targeted to, or recycling from, the pellicular membrane, and for the removal of host antibodies from the cell surface. Here, we describe the first characterisation of a flagellar pocket cytoskeletal protein, BILBO1. BILBO1 functions to form a cytoskeleton framework upon which the FP is made and which is also required and essential for FP biogenesis and cell survival. Remarkably, RNA interference (RNAi-mediated ablation of BILBO1 in insect procyclic-form parasites prevents FP biogenesis and induces vesicle accumulation, Golgi swelling, the aberrant repositioning of the new flagellum, and cell death. Cultured bloodstream-form parasites are also nonviable when subjected to BILBO1 RNAi. These results provide the first molecular evidence for cytoskeletally mediated FP biogenesis.

  20. Surfactant protein A regulates IgG-mediated phagocytosis in inflammatory neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, Jessica A; Wright, Jo Rae

    2007-12-01

    Surfactant proteins (SP)-A and SP-D have been shown to affect the functions of a variety of innate immune cells and to interact with various immune proteins such as complement and immunoglobulins. The goal of the current study is to test the hypothesis that SP-A regulates IgG-mediated phagocytosis by neutrophils, which are major effector cells of the innate immune response that remove invading pathogens by phagocytosis and by extracellular killing mediated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen. We have previously shown that SP-A stimulates chemotaxis by inflammatory, but not peripheral, neutrophils. To evaluate the ability of SP-A to modulate IgG-mediated phagocytosis, polystyrene beads were coated with BSA and treated with anti-BSA IgG. SP-A significantly and specifically enhanced IgG-mediated phagocytosis by inflammatory neutrophils, but it had no effect on beads not treated with IgG. SP-A bound to IgG-coated beads and enhanced their uptake via direct interactions with the beads as well as direct interactions with the neutrophils. SP-A did not affect reactive oxygen production or binding of IgG to neutrophils and had modest effects on polymerization of actin. These data suggest that SP-A plays an important role in mediating the phagocytic response of neutrophils to IgG-opsonized particles.

  1. PDZ domain-mediated interactions of G protein-coupled receptors with postsynaptic density protein 95

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thor C; Wirth, Volker F; Roberts, Nina Ingerslev;

    2013-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of membrane proteins in the human genome. Their signaling is regulated by scaffold proteins containing PDZ domains, but although these interactions are important for GPCR function, they are still poorly understood. We here present...... with colocalization of the full-length proteins in cells and with previous studies, we suggest that the range of relevant interactions might extend to interactions with K i = 450 µM in the in vitro assays. Within this range, we identify novel PSD-95 interactions with the chemokine receptor CXCR2, the neuropeptide Y...

  2. Protein phosphatase 5 is necessary for ATR-mediated DNA repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Yoonsung [Department of Pharmacology, DNA Repair Research Center, Chosun University School of Medicine, 375 Seosuk-Dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, Hyang-Min [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Chung-Ang University, 221 Heuksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jung-Hee [Department of Pharmacology, DNA Repair Research Center, Chosun University School of Medicine, 375 Seosuk-Dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Peter I. [Department of Dermatology, University of Arkansas for Medical Science, 4301 West Markham, Slot 576, Little Rock, AR 72205 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kwang-Ho [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Science, Chung-Ang University, 221 Heuksuk-Dong, Dongjak-Ku, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang-Yong [Division of Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, Chosun University School of Medicine, 375 Seosuk-Dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); Jun, Jae Yeoul [Department of Physiology, Chosun University School of Medicine, 375 Seosuk-Dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of); You, Ho Jin, E-mail: hjyou@chosun.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology, DNA Repair Research Center, Chosun University School of Medicine, 375 Seosuk-Dong, Gwangju 501-759 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Serine/threonine protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) has been shown to participate in ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)- and ATR (ATM- and Rad3-related)-mediated checkpoint pathways, which plays an important role in the DNA damage response and maintenance of genomic stability. {yields} However, it is not clear exactly how PP5 participates in this process. {yields} Our results indicate that PP5 is more closely related with ATR-mediated pathway than ATM-mediated pathway in DNA damage repair. -- Abstract: Several recent studies have shown that protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) participates in cell cycle arrest after DNA damage, but its roles in DNA repair have not yet been fully characterized. We investigated the roles of PP5 in the repair of ultraviolet (UV)- and neocarzinostatin (NCS)-induced DNA damage. The results of comet assays revealed different repair patterns in UV- and NCS-exposed U2OS-PS cells. PP5 is only essential for Rad3-related (ATR)-mediated DNA repair. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of 53BP1 and BRCA1, important mediators of DNA damage repair, and substrates of ATR and ATM decreased in U2OS-PS cells exposed to UV radiation. In contrast, the cell cycle arrest proteins p53, CHK1, and CHK2 were normally phosphorylated in U2OS and U2OS-PS cells exposed to UV radiation or treated with NCS. In view of these results, we suggest that PP5 plays a crucial role in ATR-mediated repair of UV-induced DNA damage.

  3. Mediatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjarvard, Stig

    2017-01-01

    Mediatization research shares media effects studies' ambition of answering the difficult questions with regard to whether and how media matter and influence contemporary culture and society. The two approaches nevertheless differ fundamentally in that mediatization research seeks answers...... to these general questions by distinguishing between two concepts: mediation and mediatization. The media effects tradition generally considers the effects of the media to be a result of individuals being exposed to media content, i.e. effects are seen as an outcome of mediated communication. Mediatization...... research is concerned with long-term structural changes involving media, culture, and society, i.e. the influences of the media are understood in relation to how media are implicated in social and cultural changes and how these processes come to create new conditions for human communication and interaction...

  4. Conformational flexibility and structural dynamics in GPCR-mediated G protein activation: a perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preininger, Anita M.; Meiler, Jens; Hamm, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Structure and dynamics of G proteins and their cognate receptors, both alone and in complex, are becoming increasingly accessible to experimental techniques. Understanding the conformational changes and timelines which govern these changes can lead to new insights into the processes of ligand binding and associated G protein activation. Experimental systems may involve the use of, or otherwise stabilize, non-native environments. This can complicate our understanding of structural and dynamical features of processes such as the ionic lock, Tryptophan toggle, and G protein flexibility. While elements in the receptor’s transmembrane helices and the C-terminal α5 helix of Gα undergo well defined structural changes, regions subject to conformational flexibility may be important in fine-tuning the interactions between activated receptors and G proteins. The pairing of computational and experimental approaches will continue to provide powerful tools to probe the conformation and dynamics of receptor-mediated G protein activation. PMID:23602809

  5. Methods for the Analysis of Protein Phosphorylation-Mediated Cellular Signaling Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Forest M.; Wolf-Yadlin, Alejandro

    2016-06-01

    Protein phosphorylation-mediated cellular signaling networks regulate almost all aspects of cell biology, including the responses to cellular stimulation and environmental alterations. These networks are highly complex and comprise hundreds of proteins and potentially thousands of phosphorylation sites. Multiple analytical methods have been developed over the past several decades to identify proteins and protein phosphorylation sites regulating cellular signaling, and to quantify the dynamic response of these sites to different cellular stimulation. Here we provide an overview of these methods, including the fundamental principles governing each method, their relative strengths and weaknesses, and some examples of how each method has been applied to the analysis of complex signaling networks. When applied correctly, each of these techniques can provide insight into the topology, dynamics, and regulation of protein phosphorylation signaling networks.

  6. Role of Streptococcus pneumoniae Proteins in Evasion of Complement-Mediated Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Greiciely O.; Converso, Thiago R.; Politano, Walter R.; Ferraz, Lucio F. C.; Ribeiro, Marcelo L.; Leite, Luciana C. C.; Darrieux, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    The complement system plays a central role in immune defense against Streptococcus pneumoniae. In order to evade complement attack, pneumococci have evolved a number of mechanisms that limit complement mediated opsonization and subsequent phagocytosis. This review focuses on the strategies employed by pneumococci to circumvent complement mediated immunity, both in vitro and in vivo. At last, since many of the proteins involved in interactions with complement components are vaccine candidates in different stages of validation, we explore the use of these antigens alone or in combination, as potential vaccine approaches that aim at elimination or drastic reduction in the ability of this bacterium to evade complement. PMID:28265264

  7. Ubiquitination-mediated degradation of cell cycle-related proteins by F-box proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Nana; Wang, Zhiwei; Wei, Wenyi

    2016-04-01

    F-box proteins, subunits of SKP1-cullin 1-F-box protein (SCF) type of E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes, have been validated to play a crucial role in governing various cellular processes such as cell cycle, cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration, invasion and metastasis. Recently, a wealth of evidence has emerged that F-box proteins is critically involved in tumorigenesis in part through governing the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of cell cycle proteins, and dysregulation of this process leads to aberrant cell cycle progression and ultimately, tumorigenesis. Therefore, in this review, we describe the critical role of F-box proteins in the timely regulation of cell cycle. Moreover, we discuss how F-box proteins involve in tumorigenesis via targeting cell cycle-related proteins using biochemistry studies, engineered mouse models, and pathological gene alternations. We conclude that inhibitors of F-box proteins could have promising therapeutic potentials in part through controlling of aberrant cell cycle progression for cancer therapies.

  8. Simulated cytoskeletal collapse via tau degradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin Sendek

    Full Text Available We present a coarse-grained two dimensional mechanical model for the microtubule-tau bundles in neuronal axons in which we remove taus, as can happen in various neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimers disease, tauopathies, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Our simplified model includes (i taus modeled as entropic springs between microtubules, (ii removal of taus from the bundles due to phosphorylation, and (iii a possible depletion force between microtubules due to these dissociated phosphorylated taus. We equilibrate upon tau removal using steepest descent relaxation. In the absence of the depletion force, the transverse rigidity to radial compression of the bundles falls to zero at about 60% tau occupancy, in agreement with standard percolation theory results. However, with the attractive depletion force, spring removal leads to a first order collapse of the bundles over a wide range of tau occupancies for physiologically realizable conditions. While our simplest calculations assume a constant concentration of microtubule intercalants to mediate the depletion force, including a dependence that is linear in the detached taus yields the same collapse. Applying percolation theory to removal of taus at microtubule tips, which are likely to be the protective sites against dynamic instability, we argue that the microtubule instability can only obtain at low tau occupancy, from 0.06-0.30 depending upon the tau coordination at the microtubule tips. Hence, the collapse we discover is likely to be more robust over a wide range of tau occupancies than the dynamic instability. We suggest in vitro tests of our predicted collapse.

  9. Two kinesin-like proteins mediate actin-based chloroplast movement in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Yamada, Noboru; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Yonekura, Hisashi; Uyeda, Taro Q P; Kadota, Akeo; Wada, Masamitsu

    2010-05-11

    Organelle movement is essential for efficient cellular function in eukaryotes. Chloroplast photorelocation movement is important for plant survival as well as for efficient photosynthesis. Chloroplast movement generally is actin dependent and mediated by blue light receptor phototropins. In Arabidopsis thaliana, phototropins mediate chloroplast movement by regulating short actin filaments on chloroplasts (cp-actin filaments), and the chloroplast outer envelope protein CHUP1 is necessary for cp-actin filament accumulation. However, other factors involved in cp-actin filament regulation during chloroplast movement remain to be determined. Here, we report that two kinesin-like proteins, KAC1 and KAC2, are essential for chloroplasts to move and anchor to the plasma membrane. A kac1 mutant showed severely impaired chloroplast accumulation and slow avoidance movement. A kac1kac2 double mutant completely lacked chloroplast photorelocation movement and showed detachment of chloroplasts from the plasma membrane. KAC motor domains are similar to those of the kinesin-14 subfamily (such as Ncd and Kar3) but do not have detectable microtubule-binding activity. The C-terminal domain of KAC1 could interact with F-actin in vitro. Instead of regulating microtubules, KAC proteins mediate chloroplast movement via cp-actin filaments. We conclude that plants have evolved a unique mechanism to regulate actin-based organelle movement using kinesin-like proteins.

  10. Comparative mechanisms of protein transduction mediated by cell-penetrating peptides in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Betty Revon; Huang, Yue-Wern; Aronstam, Robert S; Lee, Han-Jung

    2015-04-01

    Bacterial and archaeal cell envelopes are complex multilayered barriers that serve to protect these microorganisms from their extremely harsh and often hostile environments. Import of exogenous proteins and nanoparticles into cells is important for biotechnological applications in prokaryotes. In this report, we demonstrate that cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), both bacteria-expressed nona-arginine peptide (R9) and synthetic R9 (SR9), are able to deliver noncovalently associated proteins or quantum dots into four representative species of prokaryotes: cyanobacteria (Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803), bacteria (Escherichia coli DH5α and Arthrobacter ilicis D-50), and archaea (Thermus aquaticus). Although energy-dependent endocytosis is generally accepted as a hallmark that distinguishes eukaryotes from prokaryotes, cellular uptake of uncomplexed green fluorescent protein (GFP) by cyanobacteria was mediated by classical endocytosis. Mechanistic studies revealed that macropinocytosis plays a critical and major role in CPP-mediated protein transduction in all four prokaryotes. Membrane damage was not observed when cyanobacterial cells were treated with R9/GFP complexes, nor was cytotoxicity detected when bacteria or archaea were treated with SR9/QD complexes in the presence of macropinocytic inhibitors. These results indicate that the uptake of protein is not due to a compromise of membrane integrity in cyanobacteria, and that CPP can be an effective and safe carrier for membrane trafficking in prokaryotic cells. Our investigation provides important new insights into the transport of exogenous proteins and nanoparticles across the complex membrane systems of prokaryotes.

  11. Heterotrimeric G-protein is involved in phytochrome A-mediated cell death of Arabidopsis hypocotyls

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Wei; Wenbin Zhou; Guangzhen Hu; Jiamian Wei; Hongquan Yang; Jirong Huang

    2008-01-01

    The heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G-protein) has been demonstrated to mediate various signaling pathways in plants. However,its role in phytochrome A (phyA) signaling remains elusive. In this study,we discover a new phyA-mediated phenotype designated far-red irradiation (FR) preconditioned cell death,which occurs only in the hypocotyls of FR-grown seedlings following exposure to white light (WL). The cell death is mitigated in the Ga mutant gpal but aggravated in the Gβ mutant agbl in comparison with the wild type (WT),indicative of antagonistic roles of GPAI and AGB1 in the phyA-mediated cell-death pathway. Further investigation indicates that FR-induced accumulation of nonphotoconvertible protochlorophyllide (Pchlide633),which generates reactive oxygen species (ROS)on exposure to WL,is required for FR-preconditioned cell death. Moreover,ROS is mainly detected in chloroplasts using the fluorescent probe. Interestingly,the application of H2O2 to dark-grown seedlings results in a phenotype similar to FR-preconditioned cell death. This reveals that ROS is a critical mediator for the cell death. In addition,we observe that agbl is more sensitive to H2O2 than WT seedlings,indicating that the G-protein may also modify the sensitivity of the seedlings to ROS stress. Taking these results together,we infer that the G-protein may be involved in the phyA signaling pathway to regulate FR-preconditioned cell death of Arabidopsis hypocotyls.Apossible mechanism underlying the involvement of the G-protein in phyA signaling is discussed in this study.

  12. Quinone-induced protein handling changes: Implications for major protein handling systems in quinone-mediated toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Rui; Siegel, David; Ross, David, E-mail: david.ross@ucdenver.edu

    2014-10-15

    Para-quinones such as 1,4-Benzoquinone (BQ) and menadione (MD) and ortho-quinones including the oxidation products of catecholamines, are derived from xenobiotics as well as endogenous molecules. The effects of quinones on major protein handling systems in cells; the 20/26S proteasome, the ER stress response, autophagy, chaperone proteins and aggresome formation, have not been investigated in a systematic manner. Both BQ and aminochrome (AC) inhibited proteasomal activity and activated the ER stress response and autophagy in rat dopaminergic N27 cells. AC also induced aggresome formation while MD had little effect on any protein handling systems in N27 cells. The effect of NQO1 on quinone induced protein handling changes and toxicity was examined using N27 cells stably transfected with NQO1 to generate an isogenic NQO1-overexpressing line. NQO1 protected against BQ–induced apoptosis but led to a potentiation of AC- and MD-induced apoptosis. Modulation of quinone-induced apoptosis in N27 and NQO1-overexpressing cells correlated only with changes in the ER stress response and not with changes in other protein handling systems. These data suggested that NQO1 modulated the ER stress response to potentiate toxicity of AC and MD, but protected against BQ toxicity. We further demonstrated that NQO1 mediated reduction to unstable hydroquinones and subsequent redox cycling was important for the activation of the ER stress response and toxicity for both AC and MD. In summary, our data demonstrate that quinone-specific changes in protein handling are evident in N27 cells and the induction of the ER stress response is associated with quinone-mediated toxicity. - Highlights: • Unstable hydroquinones contributed to quinone-induced ER stress and toxicity.

  13. Thioflavin S (NSC71948) interferes with Bcl-2-associated athanogene (BAG-1)-mediated protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Adam; Crabb, Simon J; Johnson, Peter W M; Hague, Angela; Cutress, Ramsey; Townsend, Paul A; Ganesan, A; Packham, Graham

    2009-11-01

    The C-terminal BAG domain is thought to play a key role in BAG-1-induced survival and proliferation by mediating protein-protein interactions, for example, with heat shock proteins HSC70 and HSP70, and with RAF-1 kinase. Here, we have identified thioflavin S (NSC71948) as a potential small-molecule chemical inhibitor of these interactions. NSC71948 inhibited the interaction of BAG-1 and HSC70 in vitro and decreased BAG-1:HSC70 and BAG-1:HSP70 binding in intact cells. NSC71948 also reduced binding between BAG-1 and RAF-1, but had no effect on the interaction between two unrelated proteins, BIM and MCL-1. NSC71948 functionally reversed the ability of BAG-1 to promote vitamin D3 receptor-mediated transactivation, an activity of BAG-1 that depends on HSC70/HSP70 binding, and reduced phosphorylation of p44/42 mitogen-activate protein kinase. NSC71948 can be used to stain amyloid fibrils; however, structurally related compounds, thioflavin T and BTA-1, had no effect on BAG-1:HSC70 binding, suggesting that structural features important for amyloid fibril binding and inhibition of BAG-1:HSC70 binding may be separable. We demonstrated that NSC71948 inhibited the growth of BAG-1 expressing human ZR-75-1 breast cancer cells and wild-type, but not BAG-1-deficient, mouse embryo fibroblasts. Taken together, these data suggest that NSC71948 may be a useful molecule to investigate the functional significance of BAG-1 C-terminal protein interactions. However, it is important to recognize that NSC71948 may exert additional "off-target" effects. Inhibition of BAG-1 function may be an attractive strategy to inhibit the growth of BAG-1-overexpressing cancers, and further screens of additional compound collections may be warranted.

  14. Intracellular cholesterol-binding proteins enhance HDL-mediated cholesterol uptake in cultured primary mouse hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Stephen M; McIntosh, Avery L; Huang, Huan; Landrock, Kerstin K; Martin, Gregory G; Landrock, Danilo; Payne, H Ross; Atshaves, Barbara P; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2012-04-15

    A major gap in our knowledge of rapid hepatic HDL cholesterol clearance is the role of key intracellular factors that influence this process. Although the reverse cholesterol transport pathway targets HDL to the liver for net elimination of free cholesterol from the body, molecular details governing cholesterol uptake into hepatocytes are not completely understood. Therefore, the effects of sterol carrier protein (SCP)-2 and liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), high-affinity cholesterol-binding proteins present in hepatocyte cytosol, on HDL-mediated free cholesterol uptake were examined using gene-targeted mouse models, cultured primary hepatocytes, and 22-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-amino]-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3β-ol (NBD-cholesterol). While SCP-2 overexpression enhanced NBD-cholesterol uptake, counterintuitively, SCP-2/SCP-x gene ablation also 1) enhanced the rapid molecular phase of free sterol uptake detectable in cholesterol and 2) differentially enhanced free cholesterol uptake mediated by the HDL3, rather than the HDL2, subfraction. The increased HDL free cholesterol uptake was not due to increased expression or distribution of the HDL receptor [scavenger receptor B1 (SRB1)], proteins regulating SRB1 [postsynaptic density protein (PSD-95)/Drosophila disk large tumor suppressor (dlg)/tight junction protein (ZO1) and 17-kDa membrane-associated protein], or other intracellular cholesterol trafficking proteins (steroidogenic acute response protein D, Niemann Pick C, and oxysterol-binding protein-related proteins). However, expression of L-FABP, the single most prevalent hepatic cytosolic protein that binds cholesterol, was upregulated twofold in SCP-2/SCP-x null hepatocytes. Double-immunogold electron microscopy detected L-FABP sufficiently close to SRB1 for direct interaction, similar to SCP-2. These data suggest a role for L-FABP in HDL cholesterol uptake, a finding confirmed with SCP-2/SCP-x/L-FABP null mice and hepatocytes. Taken together

  15. Intracellular cholesterol-binding proteins enhance HDL-mediated cholesterol uptake in cultured primary mouse hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Stephen M.; McIntosh, Avery L.; Huang, Huan; Landrock, Kerstin K.; Martin, Gregory G.; Landrock, Danilo; Payne, H. Ross; Atshaves, Barbara P.; Kier, Ann B.

    2012-01-01

    A major gap in our knowledge of rapid hepatic HDL cholesterol clearance is the role of key intracellular factors that influence this process. Although the reverse cholesterol transport pathway targets HDL to the liver for net elimination of free cholesterol from the body, molecular details governing cholesterol uptake into hepatocytes are not completely understood. Therefore, the effects of sterol carrier protein (SCP)-2 and liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP), high-affinity cholesterol-binding proteins present in hepatocyte cytosol, on HDL-mediated free cholesterol uptake were examined using gene-targeted mouse models, cultured primary hepatocytes, and 22-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)-amino]-23,24-bisnor-5-cholen-3β-ol (NBD-cholesterol). While SCP-2 overexpression enhanced NBD-cholesterol uptake, counterintuitively, SCP-2/SCP-x gene ablation also 1) enhanced the rapid molecular phase of free sterol uptake detectable in cholesterol and 2) differentially enhanced free cholesterol uptake mediated by the HDL3, rather than the HDL2, subfraction. The increased HDL free cholesterol uptake was not due to increased expression or distribution of the HDL receptor [scavenger receptor B1 (SRB1)], proteins regulating SRB1 [postsynaptic density protein (PSD-95)/Drosophila disk large tumor suppressor (dlg)/tight junction protein (ZO1) and 17-kDa membrane-associated protein], or other intracellular cholesterol trafficking proteins (steroidogenic acute response protein D, Niemann Pick C, and oxysterol-binding protein-related proteins). However, expression of L-FABP, the single most prevalent hepatic cytosolic protein that binds cholesterol, was upregulated twofold in SCP-2/SCP-x null hepatocytes. Double-immunogold electron microscopy detected L-FABP sufficiently close to SRB1 for direct interaction, similar to SCP-2. These data suggest a role for L-FABP in HDL cholesterol uptake, a finding confirmed with SCP-2/SCP-x/L-FABP null mice and hepatocytes. Taken together

  16. Ribosomal protein S6 associates with alphavirus nonstructural protein 2 and mediates expression from alphavirus messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Stephanie A; Berglund, Peter; Beard, Clayton W; Johnston, Robert E

    2006-08-01

    Although alphaviruses dramatically alter cellular function within hours of infection, interactions between alphaviruses and specific host cellular proteins are poorly understood. Although the alphavirus nonstructural protein 2 (nsP2) is an essential component of the viral replication complex, it also has critical auxiliary functions that determine the outcome of infection in the host. To gain a better understanding of nsP2 function, we sought to identify cellular proteins with which Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus nsP2 interacted. We demonstrate here that nsP2 associates with ribosomal protein S6 (RpS6) and that nsP2 is present in the ribosome-containing fractions of a polysome gradient, suggesting that nsP2 associates with RpS6 in the context of the whole ribosome. This result was noteworthy, since viral replicase proteins have seldom been described in direct association with components of the ribosome. The association of RpS6 with nsP2 was detected throughout the course of infection, and neither the synthesis of the viral structural proteins nor the presence of the other nonstructural proteins was required for RpS6 interaction with nsP2. nsP1 also was associated with RpS6, but other nonstructural proteins were not. RpS6 phosphorylation was dramatically diminished within hours after infection with alphaviruses. Furthermore, a reduction in the level of RpS6 protein expression led to diminished expression from alphavirus subgenomic messages, whereas no dramatic diminution in cellular translation was observed. Taken together, these data suggest that alphaviruses alter the ribosome during infection and that this alteration may contribute to differential translation of host and viral messages.

  17. Integrins mediating bone signal transduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Chuanglong; WANG Yuanliang; YANG Lihua; ZHANG Jun

    2004-01-01

    Integrin-mediated adhesions play critical roles in diverse cell functions. Integrins offers a platform on which mechanical stimuli, cytoskeletal organization, biochemical signals can concentrate. Mechanical stimuli transmitted by integrins influence the cytoskeleton, in turn, the cytoskeleton influences cell adhesion via integrins, then cell adhesion results in a series of signal transduction cascades. In skeleton, integrins also have a key role for bone resoption by osteoclasts and reformation by osteoblasts. In present review, the proteins involved in integrin signal transduction and integrin signal transduction pathways were discussed, mainly on the basic mechanisms of integrin signaling and the roles of integrins in bone signal transduction, which may give insight into new therapeutic agents to all kinds of skeletal diseases and new strategies for bone tissue engineering.

  18. Use of intein-mediated phosphoprotein arrays to study substrate specificity of protein phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochinyan, Samvel; Sun, Luo; Ghosh, Inca; Barshevsky, Tanya; Xu, Jie; Xu, Ming-Qun

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic peptides incorporating various chemical moieties, for example, phosphate groups, are convenient tools for investigating protein modification enzymes, such as protein phosphatases (PPs). However, short peptides are sometimes poor substrates, and their binding to commonly used matrices is unpredictable and variable. In general, protein substrates for PPs are superior for enzymatic assays, binding to various matrices, and Western blot analysis. The preparation and characterization of phosphoproteins, however can be difficult and technically demanding. In this study, the intein-mediated protein ligation (IPL) technique was used to readily generate phosphorylated protein substrates by ligating a synthetic phosphopeptide to an intein-generated carrier protein (CP) possessing a carboxyl-terminal thioester with a one-to-one stoichiometry. The ligated phosphoprotein (LPP) substrate was treated with a PP and subsequently subjected to array or Western blot analysis with a phospho-specific antibody. This approach is highly effective in producing arrays of protein substrates containing phosphorylated amino acid residues and has been applied for screening of PPs with specificity toward phosphorylated tyrosine, serine, or threonine residues, resulting in an approximately 240-fold increase in sensitivity in dot blot analysis compared with the use of synthetic peptides. The IPL technique overcomes the disadvantages of current methods and is a versatile system for the facile production of protein substrates containing well-defined structural motifs for the study of protein modification enzymes.

  19. Quantum optical coherence in cytoskeletal microtubules: implications for brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jibu, M; Hagan, S; Hameroff, S R; Pribram, K H; Yasue, K

    1994-01-01

    'Laser-like,' long-range coherent quantum phenomena may occur biologically within cytoskeletal microtubules. This paper presents a theoretical prediction of the occurrence in biological media of the phenomena which we term 'superradiance' and 'self-induced transparency'. Interactions between the electric dipole field of water molecules confined within the hollow core of microtubules and the quantized electromagnetic radiation field are considered, and microtubules are theorized to play the roles of non-linear coherent optical devices. Superradiance is a specific quantum mechanical ordering phenomenon with characteristic times much shorter than those of thermal interaction. Consequently, optical signalling (and computation) in microtubules would be free from both thermal noise and loss. Superradiant optical computing in networks of microtubules and other cytoskeletal structures may provide a basis for biomolecular cognition and a substrate for consciousness.

  20. Intracellular transport driven by cytoskeletal motors: General mechanisms and defects

    CERN Document Server

    Appert-Rolland, Cecile; Santen, Ludger

    2015-01-01

    Cells are strongly out-of-equilibrium systems driven by continuous energy supply. They carry out many vital functions requiring active transport of various ingredients and organelles, some being small, others being large. The cytoskeleton, composed of three types of filaments, determines the shape of the cell and plays a role in cell motion. It also serves as a road network for the so-called cytoskeletal motors. These molecules can attach to a cytoskeletal filament, perform directed motion, possibly carrying along some cargo, and then detach. It is a central issue to understand how intracellular transport driven by molecular motors is regulated, in particular because its breakdown is one of the signatures of some neuronal diseases like the Alzheimer. We give a survey of the current knowledge on microtubule based intracellular transport. We first review some biological facts obtained from experiments, and present some modeling attempts based on cellular automata. We start with background knowledge on the origi...

  1. Monitoring the cytoskeletal EGF response in live gastric carcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Felkl

    Full Text Available Altered cell motility is considered to be a key factor in determining tumor invasion and metastasis. Epidermal growth factor (EGF signaling has been implicated in this process by affecting cytoskeletal organization and dynamics in multiple ways. To sort the temporal and spatial regulation of EGF-dependent cytoskeletal re-organization in relation to a cell's motile behavior time-lapse microscopy was performed on EGF-responsive gastric carcinoma-derived MKN1 cells co-expressing different fluorescently labeled cytoskeletal filaments and focal adhesion components in various combinations. The experiments showed that EGF almost instantaneously induces a considerable increase in membrane ruffling and lamellipodial activity that can be inhibited by Cetuximab EGF receptor antibodies and is not elicited in non-responsive gastric carcinoma Hs746T cells. The transient cell extensions are rich in actin but lack microtubules and keratin intermediate filaments. We show that this EGF-induced increase in membrane motility can be measured by a simple image processing routine. Microtubule plus-ends subsequently invade growing cell extensions, which start to accumulate focal complexes at the lamellipodium-lamellum junction. Such paxillin-positive complexes mature into focal adhesions by tyrosine phosphorylation and recruitment of zyxin. These adhesions then serve as nucleation sites for keratin filaments which are used to enlarge the neighboring peripheral keratin network. Focal adhesions are either disassembled or give rise to stable zyxin-rich fibrillar adhesions which disassemble in the presence of EGF to support formation of new focal adhesion sites in the cell periphery. Taken together the results serve as a basis for modeling the early cytoskeletal EGF response as a tightly coordinated and step-wise process which is relevant for the prediction of the effectiveness of anti-EGF receptor-based tumor therapy.

  2. Cytoskeletal actin gates a Cl- channel in neocortical astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascola, C D; Nelson, D J; Kraig, R P

    1998-03-01

    Increases in astroglial Cl- conductance accompany changes in cell morphology and disassembly of cytoskeletal actin, but Cl- channels underlying these conductance increases have not been described. We characterize an outwardly rectifying Cl- channel in rodent neocortical cultured astrocytes and describe how cell shape and cytoskeletal actin modulate channel gating. In inside-out patch-clamp recordings from cultured astrocytes, outwardly rectifying Cl- channels either were spontaneously active or inducible in quiescent patches by depolarizing voltage steps. Average single-channel conductance was 36 pS between -60 and -80 mV and was 75 pS between 60 and 80 mV in symmetrical (150 mM NaCl) solutions. The permeability ratio (PNa/PCl) was 0.14 at lower ionic strength but increased at higher salt concentrations. Both ATP and 4, 4-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid produced a flicker block, whereas Zn2+ produced complete inhibition of channel activity. The frequency of observing both spontaneous and inducible Cl- channel activity was markedly higher in stellate than in flat, polygonally shaped astrocytes. In addition, cytoskeletal actin modulated channel open-state probability (PO) and conductance at negative membrane potentials, controlling the degree of outward rectification. Direct application of phalloidin, which stabilizes actin, preserved low PO and promoted lower conductance levels at negative potentials. Lower PO also was induced by direct application of polymerized actin. The actions of phalloidin and actin were reversed by coapplication of gelsolin and cytochalasin D, respectively. These results provide the first report of an outwardly rectifying Cl- channel in neocortical astrocytes and demonstrate how changes in cell shape and cytoskeletal actin may control Cl- conductance in these cells.

  3. Cytoskeletal Actin Gates a Cl− Channel in Neocortical Astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lascola, Christopher D.; Nelson, Deborah J.; Kraig, Richard P.

    2009-01-01

    Increases in astroglial Cl− conductance accompany changes in cell morphology and disassembly of cytoskeletal actin, but Cl− channels underlying these conductance increases have not been described. We characterize an outwardly rectifying Cl− channel in rodent neocortical cultured astrocytes and describe how cell shape and cytoskeletal actin modulate channel gating. In inside-out patch-clamp recordings from cultured astrocytes, outwardly rectifying Cl− channels either were spontaneously active or inducible in quiescent patches by depolarizing voltage steps. Average single-channel conductance was 36 pS between −60 and −80 mV and was 75 pS between 60 and 80 mV in symmetrical (150 mm NaCl) solutions. The permeability ratio (PNa/PCl) was 0.14 at lower ionic strength but increased at higher salt concentrations. Both ATP and 4,4-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid produced a flicker block, whereas Zn2+ produced complete inhibition of channel activity. The frequency of observing both spontaneous and inducible Cl− channel activity was markedly higher in stellate than in flat, polygonally shaped astrocytes. In addition, cytoskeletal actin modulated channel open-state probability (PO) and conductance at negative membrane potentials, controlling the degree of outward rectification. Direct application of phalloidin, which stabilizes actin, preserved low PO and promoted lower conductance levels at negative potentials. Lower PO also was induced by direct application of polymerized actin. The actions of phalloidin and actin were reversed by coapplication of gelsolin and cytochalasin D, respectively. These results provide the first report of an outwardly rectifying Cl− channel in neocortical astrocytes and demonstrate how changes in cell shape and cytoskeletal actin may control Cl− conductance in these cells. PMID:9464993

  4. A single peroxisomal targeting signal mediates matrix protein import in diatoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola H Gonzalez

    Full Text Available Peroxisomes are single membrane bound compartments. They are thought to be present in almost all eukaryotic cells, although the bulk of our knowledge about peroxisomes has been generated from only a handful of model organisms. Peroxisomal matrix proteins are synthesized cytosolically and posttranslationally imported into the peroxisomal matrix. The import is generally thought to be mediated by two different targeting signals. These are respectively recognized by the two import receptor proteins Pex5 and Pex7, which facilitate transport across the peroxisomal membrane. Here, we show the first in vivo localization studies of peroxisomes in a representative organism of the ecologically relevant group of diatoms using fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. By expression of various homologous and heterologous fusion proteins we demonstrate that targeting of Phaeodactylum tricornutum peroxisomal matrix proteins is mediated only by PTS1 targeting signals, also for proteins that are in other systems imported via a PTS2 mode of action. Additional in silico analyses suggest this surprising finding may also apply to further diatoms. Our data suggest that loss of the PTS2 peroxisomal import signal is not reserved to Caenorhabditis elegans as a single exception, but has also occurred in evolutionary divergent organisms. Obviously, targeting switching from PTS2 to PTS1 across different major eukaryotic groups might have occurred for different reasons. Thus, our findings question the widespread assumption that import of peroxisomal matrix proteins is generally mediated by two different targeting signals. Our results implicate that there apparently must have been an event causing the loss of one targeting signal even in the group of diatoms. Different possibilities are discussed that indicate multiple reasons for the detected targeting switching from PTS2 to PTS1.

  5. Integrin extension enables ultrasensitive regulation by cytoskeletal force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Springer, Timothy A

    2017-05-02

    Integrins undergo large-scale conformational changes upon activation. Signaling events driving integrin activation have previously been discussed conceptually, but not quantitatively. Here, recent measurements of the intrinsic ligand-binding affinity and free energy of each integrin conformational state on the cell surface, together with the length scales of conformational change, are used to quantitatively compare models of activation. We examine whether binding of cytoskeletal adaptors to integrin cytoplasmic domains is sufficient for activation or whether exertion of tensile force by the actin cytoskeleton across the integrin-ligand complex is also required. We find that only the combination of adaptor binding and cytoskeletal force provides ultrasensitive regulation. Moreover, switch-like activation by force depends on the large, >130 Å length-scale change in integrin extension, which is well tailored to match the free-energy difference between the inactive (bent-closed) and active (extended-open) conformations. The length scale and energy cost in integrin extension enable activation by force in the low pN range and appear to be the key specializations that enable cell adhesion through integrins to be coordinated with cytoskeletal dynamics.

  6. Functional Roles of p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase in Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanyan Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a natural host defensive process that is largely regulated by macrophages during the innate immune response. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs are proline-directed serine and threonine protein kinases that regulate many physiological and pathophysiological cell responses. p38 MAPKs are key MAPKs involved in the production of inflammatory mediators, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2. p38 MAPK signaling plays an essential role in regulating cellular processes, especially inflammation. In this paper, we summarize the characteristics of p38 signaling in macrophage-mediated inflammation. In addition, we discuss the potential of using inhibitors targeting p38 expression in macrophages to treat inflammatory diseases.

  7. C-reactive protein enhances IgG-mediated phagocyte responses and thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Rick; Heitink-Pollé, Katja M J; Porcelijn, Leendert; Bentlage, Arthur E H; Bruin, Marrie C A; Visser, Remco; Roos, Dirk; Schasfoort, Richard B M; de Haas, Masja; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Vidarsson, Gestur

    2015-03-12

    Immune-mediated platelet destruction is most frequently caused by allo- or autoantibodies via Fcγ receptor-dependent phagocytosis. Disease severity can be predicted neither by antibody isotype nor by titer, indicating that other factors play a role. Here we show that the acute phase protein C-reactive protein (CRP), a ligand for Fc receptors on phagocytes, enhances antibody-mediated platelet destruction by human phagocytes in vitro and in vivo in mice. Without antiplatelet antibodies, CRP was found to be inert toward platelets, but it bound to phosphorylcholine exposed after oxidation triggered by antiplatelet antibodies, thereby enhancing platelet phagocytosis. CRP levels were significantly elevated in patients with allo- and autoantibody-mediated thrombocytopenias compared with healthy controls. Within a week, intravenous immunoglobulin treatment in children with newly diagnosed immune thrombocytopenia led to significant decrease of CRP levels, increased platelet numbers, and clinically decreased bleeding severity. Furthermore, the higher the level of CRP at diagnosis, the longer it took before stable platelet counts were reached. These data suggest that CRP amplifies antibody-mediated platelet destruction and may in part explain the aggravation of thrombocytopenia on infections. Hence, targeting CRP could offer new therapeutic opportunities for these patients.

  8. Melatonin attenuates hypochlorous acid-mediated heme destruction, free iron release, and protein aggregation in hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitra, Dhiman; Abdulhamid, Ibrahim; Diamond, Michael P; Saed, Ghassan M; Abu-Soud, Husam M

    2012-09-01

    In inflammatory diseases, where hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is elevated, iron homeostasis is disturbed, resulting in accumulation of free iron. Free iron is toxic by virtue of its ability to generate free radicals through the Fenton reaction. HOCl is generated by myeloperoxidase, (MPO) using chloride and hydrogen peroxide as substrates. Recent studies demonstrate that HOCl binds to the heme moiety of hemoglobin (Hb), which generates a transient ferric species whose formation and decay kinetics indicate it participates in protein aggregation, heme destruction, and free iron release. Here, we show that melatonin prevents HOCl-mediated Hb heme destruction and protein aggregation, using a combination of UV-vis spectrophotometry, ferrozine colorimetric assay, and in-gel heme staining. We also show that melatonin treatment prevents HOCl-mediated loss of red blood cell (RBC) viability, indicating biologic relevance of this finding. The mechanism by which melatonin prevents HOCl-mediated Hb heme destruction is by direct scavenging of HOCl and/or through the destabilization of the higher Hb oxidative states intermediates, ferryl porphyrin radical cation Hb-Fe(IV)=O(+π•) and Hb-Fe(IV)=O, which are formed through the reaction of HOCl with Hb. Our work establishes a direct mechanistic link between melatonin and its protective effect in chronic inflammatory diseases. Collectively, in addition to acting as an antioxidant and as a MPO inhibitor, melatonin can also exert its protective effect by inhibiting HOCl-mediated heme destruction of hemoproteins and subsequent free iron release.

  9. Insulin receptors mediate growth effects in cultured fetal neurons. I. Rapid stimulation of protein synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidenreich, K.A.; Toledo, S.P. (Univ. of California-San Diego, La Jolla (USA))

    1989-09-01

    In this study we have examined the effects of insulin on protein synthesis in cultured fetal chick neurons. Protein synthesis was monitored by measuring the incorporation of (3H)leucine (3H-leu) into trichloroacetic acid (TCA)-precipitable protein. Upon addition of 3H-leu, there was a 5-min lag before radioactivity occurred in protein. During this period cell-associated radioactivity reached equilibrium and was totally recovered in the TCA-soluble fraction. After 5 min, the incorporation of 3H-leu into protein was linear for 2 h and was inhibited (98%) by the inclusion of 10 micrograms/ml cycloheximide. After 24 h of serum deprivation, insulin increased 3H-leu incorporation into protein by approximately 2-fold. The stimulation of protein synthesis by insulin was dose dependent (ED50 = 70 pM) and seen within 30 min. Proinsulin was approximately 10-fold less potent than insulin on a molar basis in stimulating neuronal protein synthesis. Insulin had no effect on the TCA-soluble fraction of 3H-leu at any time and did not influence the uptake of (3H)aminoisobutyric acid into neurons. The isotope ratio of 3H-leu/14C-leu in the leucyl tRNA pool was the same in control and insulin-treated neurons. Analysis of newly synthesized proteins by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that insulin uniformly increased the incorporation of 14C-leu into all of the resolved neuronal proteins. We conclude from these data that (1) insulin rapidly stimulates overall protein synthesis in fetal neurons independent of amino acid uptake and aminoacyl tRNA precursor pools; (2) stimulation of protein synthesis is mediated by the brain subtype of insulin receptor; and (3) insulin is potentially an important in vivo growth factor for fetal central nervous system neurons.

  10. Distribution of Cytoskeletal Components in Endothelial Cells in the Guinea Pig Renal Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Katoh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The cytoskeletal components of endothelial cells in the renal artery were examined by analysis of en face preparations under confocal laser scanning microscopy. Renal arterial endothelial cells were shown to be elongated along the direction of blood flow, while stress fibers ran perpendicular to the flow in the basal portion. Focal adhesions were observed along the stress fibers in dot-like configurations. On the other hand, stress fibers in the apical portion of cells ran along the direction of flow. The localizations of stress fibers and focal adhesions in endothelial cells in the renal artery differed from those of unperturbed aortic and venous endothelial cells. Tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins were mainly detected at the sites of cell-to-cell apposition, but not in focal adhesions. Pulsatile pressure and fluid shear stress applied over endothelial cells in the renal artery induce stress fiber organization and localization of focal adhesions. These observations suggest that the morphological alignment of endothelial cells along the direction of blood flow and the organization of cytoskeletal components are independently regulated.

  11. Molecular Pathways: New Signaling Considerations When Targeting Cytoskeletal Balance to Reduce Tumor Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Kristi R; Hessler, Lindsay; Bhandary, Lekhana; Martin, Stuart S

    2015-12-01

    The dynamic balance between microtubule extension and actin contraction regulates mammalian cell shape, division, and motility, which has made the cytoskeleton an attractive and very successful target for cancer drugs. Numerous compounds in clinical use to reduce tumor growth cause microtubule breakdown (vinca alkaloids, colchicine-site, and halichondrins) or hyperstabilization of microtubules (taxanes and epothilones). However, both of these strategies indiscriminately alter the assembly and dynamics of all microtubules, which causes significant dose-limiting toxicities on normal tissues. Emerging data are revealing that posttranslational modifications of tubulin (detyrosination, acetylation) or microtubule-associated proteins (Tau, Aurora kinase) may allow for more specific targeting of microtubule subsets, thereby avoiding the broad disruption of all microtubule polymerization. Developing approaches to reduce tumor cell migration and invasion focus on disrupting actin regulation by the kinases SRC and ROCK. Because the dynamic balance between microtubule extension and actin contraction also regulates cell fate decisions and stem cell characteristics, disrupting this cytoskeletal balance could yield unexpected effects beyond tumor growth. This review will examine recent data demonstrating that cytoskeletal cancer drugs affect wound-healing responses, microtentacle-dependent reattachment efficiency, and stem cell characteristics in ways that could affect the metastatic potential of tumor cells, both beneficially and detrimentally. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Evaluating the Role of Viral Proteins in HIV-Mediated Neurotoxicity Using Primary Human Neuronal Cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Vasudev R; Eugenin, Eliseo A; Prasad, Vinayaka R

    2016-01-01

    Despite the inability of HIV-1 to infect neurons, over half of the HIV-1-infected population in the USA suffers from neurocognitive dysfunction. HIV-infected immune cells in the periphery enter the central nervous system by causing a breach in the blood-brain barrier. The damage to the neurons is mediated by viral and host toxic products released by activated and infected immune and glial cells. To evaluate the toxicity of any viral isolate, viral protein, or host inflammatory protein, we describe a protocol to assess the neuronal apoptosis and synaptic compromise in primary cultures of human neurons and astrocytes.

  13. Protein mediated synthesis of fluorescent Au-nanoclusters for metal sensory coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Manja; Raff, Johannes [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biogeochemistry

    2017-06-01

    Fluorescent Au-nanocluster were successfully synthesized and used for the selective detection of Cu{sup 2} {sup +}. The synthesized Au-BSA-nanoclusters remain functional also after immobilization and show high thermal stability. Additionally, the transfer of the protein mediated Au-nanocluster synthesis route to S-layer proteins was achieved. (The presented work is part of the project BIONEWS dealing with long-term stable cells for the set-up and regeneration of sensor and actor materials for strategic relevant metals, in particular rare earth elements).

  14. G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Extranuclear Mediators for the Non-Genomic Actions of Steroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Wang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Steroids hormones possess two distinct actions, a delayed genomic effect and a rapid non-genomic effect. Rapid steroid-triggered signaling is mediated by specific receptors localized most often to the plasma membrane. The nature of these receptors is of great interest and accumulated data suggest that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are appealing candidates. Increasing evidence regarding the interaction between steroids and specific membrane proteins, as well as the involvement of G protein and corresponding downstream signaling, have led to identification of physiologically relevant GPCRs as steroid extranuclear receptors. Examples include G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30 for estrogen, membrane progestin receptor for progesterone, G protein-coupled receptor family C group 6 member A (GPRC6A and zinc transporter member 9 (ZIP9 for androgen, and trace amine associated receptor 1 (TAAR1 for thyroid hormone. These receptor-mediated biological effects have been extended to reproductive development, cardiovascular function, neuroendocrinology and cancer pathophysiology. However, although great progress have been achieved, there are still important questions that need to be answered, including the identities of GPCRs responsible for the remaining steroids (e.g., glucocorticoid, the structural basis of steroids and GPCRs’ interaction and the integration of extranuclear and nuclear signaling to the final physiological function. Here, we reviewed the several significant developments in this field and highlighted a hypothesis that attempts to explain the general interaction between steroids and GPCRs.

  15. RBAP96 Mediates Radiosensitivity of Breast Cancer Cells via Interacting with Retinoblastoma Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junling Zhang; Xiaolei Xue; Qinghui Meng; Lu Lu; Ming Cui; Saijun Fan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify a novel retinoblastoma protein(RB)-associated protein(RBAP 96)and to explore the impact of RBAP96 on radiosensitivity of human breast cancer cells.Methods An in vivo and in vitro association of RBAP96 with RB was determined by immunoprecipitation-Western blotting and GST pull-down assay.Protein expression was measured by Western blot assay.Cellular survival was evaluated by using a colony formation assay.Results In both in vitro and in vivo assays,we found that the RBAP96 and RB interaction required a 513LXCXE517 motif on the RBAP96 protein and an intact A/B binding pocket of RB.RBAP96 enhances RB-mediated transcriptional repression.Finally,enforced expression of RBAP96 caused an elevated radiosensitivity of human breast cancer cells bearing wtRB,but did not affect radiosensitivity of breast cancer cells bearing mutant RB.Expression of a full-length RBAP96 with an 513LXCXE517 inactivating mutation(LXCXE→RXRXH) failed to result in any radiosensitivity alteration.Conclusion This study for the first time characterizes a novel RB-interacting protein RBAP96 and demonstrates that enforced expression of RBAP96 causes an increase of RBAP96-mediated transcription activation and radiosensitivity via a RB-interacting dependent manner.

  16. The TIM Barrel Architecture Facilitated the Early Evolution of Protein-Mediated Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Aaron David; Beatty, Joshua T; Landweber, Laura F

    2016-01-01

    The triosephosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel protein fold is a structurally repetitive architecture that is present in approximately 10% of all enzymes. It is generally assumed that this ubiquity in modern proteomes reflects an essential historical role in early protein-mediated metabolism. Here, we provide quantitative and comparative analyses to support several hypotheses about the early importance of the TIM barrel architecture. An information theoretical analysis of protein structures supports the hypothesis that the TIM barrel architecture could arise more easily by duplication and recombination compared to other mixed α/β structures. We show that TIM barrel enzymes corresponding to the most taxonomically broad superfamilies also have the broadest range of functions, often aided by metal and nucleotide-derived cofactors that are thought to reflect an earlier stage of metabolic evolution. By comparison to other putatively ancient protein architectures, we find that the functional diversity of TIM barrel proteins cannot be explained simply by their antiquity. Instead, the breadth of TIM barrel functions can be explained, in part, by the incorporation of a broad range of cofactors, a trend that does not appear to be shared by proteins in general. These results support the hypothesis that the simple and functionally general TIM barrel architecture may have arisen early in the evolution of protein biosynthesis and provided an ideal scaffold to facilitate the metabolic transition from ribozymes, peptides, and geochemical catalysts to modern protein enzymes.

  17. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK mediates nutrient regulation of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP in pancreatic beta-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maayan Shaked

    Full Text Available Thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP regulates critical biological processes including inflammation, stress and apoptosis. TXNIP is upregulated by glucose and is a critical mediator of hyperglycemia-induced beta-cell apoptosis in diabetes. In contrast, the saturated long-chain fatty acid palmitate, although toxic to the beta-cell, inhibits TXNIP expression. The mechanisms involved in the opposing effects of glucose and fatty acids on TXNIP expression are unknown. We found that both palmitate and oleate inhibited TXNIP in a rat beta-cell line and islets. Palmitate inhibition of TXNIP was independent of fatty acid beta-oxidation or esterification. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK has an important role in cellular energy sensing and control of metabolic homeostasis; therefore we investigated its involvement in nutrient regulation of TXNIP. As expected, glucose inhibited whereas palmitate stimulated AMPK. Pharmacologic activators of AMPK mimicked fatty acids by inhibiting TXNIP. AMPK knockdown increased TXNIP expression in presence of high glucose with and without palmitate, indicating that nutrient (glucose and fatty acids effects on TXNIP are mediated in part via modulation of AMPK activity. TXNIP is transcriptionally regulated by carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP. Palmitate inhibited glucose-stimulated ChREBP nuclear entry and recruitment to the Txnip promoter, thereby inhibiting Txnip transcription. We conclude that AMPK is an important regulator of Txnip transcription via modulation of ChREBP activity. The divergent effects of glucose and fatty acids on TXNIP expression result in part from their opposing effects on AMPK activity. In light of the important role of TXNIP in beta-cell apoptosis, its inhibition by fatty acids can be regarded as an adaptive/protective response to glucolipotoxicity. The finding that AMPK mediates nutrient regulation of TXNIP may have important implications for the pathophysiology and treatment

  18. Sonic Hedgehog Guides Axons via Zipcode Binding Protein 1-Mediated Local Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepelletier, Léa; Langlois, Sébastien D; Kent, Christopher B; Welshhans, Kristy; Morin, Steves; Bassell, Gary J; Yam, Patricia T; Charron, Frédéric

    2017-02-15

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) attracts spinal cord commissural axons toward the floorplate. How Shh elicits changes in the growth cone cytoskeleton that drive growth cone turning is unknown. We find that the turning of rat commissural axons up a Shh gradient requires protein synthesis. In particular, Shh stimulation increases β-actin protein at the growth cone even when the cell bodies have been removed. Therefore, Shh induces the local translation of β-actin at the growth cone. We hypothesized that this requires zipcode binding protein 1 (ZBP1), an mRNA-binding protein that transports β-actin mRNA and releases it for local translation upon phosphorylation. We found that Shh stimulation increases phospho-ZBP1 levels in the growth cone. Disruption of ZBP1 phosphorylation in vitro abolished the turning of commissural axons toward a Shh gradient. Disruption of ZBP1 function in vivo in mouse and chick resulted in commissural axon guidance errors. Therefore, ZBP1 is required for Shh to guide commissural axons. This identifies ZBP1 as a new mediator of noncanonical Shh signaling in axon guidance.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Sonic hedgehog (Shh) guides axons via a noncanonical signaling pathway that is distinct from the canonical Hedgehog signaling pathway that specifies cell fate and morphogenesis. Axon guidance is driven by changes in the growth cone in response to gradients of guidance molecules. Little is known about the molecular mechanism of how Shh orchestrates changes in the growth cone cytoskeleton that are required for growth cone turning. Here, we show that the guidance of axons by Shh requires protein synthesis. Zipcode binding protein 1 (ZBP1) is an mRNA-binding protein that regulates the local translation of proteins, including actin, in the growth cone. We demonstrate that ZBP1 is required for Shh-mediated axon guidance, identifying a new member of the noncanonical Shh signaling pathway.

  19. Structural basis for cAMP-mediated allosteric control of the catabolite activator protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovych, Nataliya; Tzeng, Shiou-Ru; Tonelli, Marco; Ebright, Richard H; Kalodimos, Charalampos G

    2009-04-28

    The cAMP-mediated allosteric transition in the catabolite activator protein (CAP; also known as the cAMP receptor protein, CRP) is a textbook example of modulation of DNA-binding activity by small-molecule binding. Here we report the structure of CAP in the absence of cAMP, which, together with structures of CAP in the presence of cAMP, defines atomic details of the cAMP-mediated allosteric transition. The structural changes, and their relationship to cAMP binding and DNA binding, are remarkably clear and simple. Binding of cAMP results in a coil-to-helix transition that extends the coiled-coil dimerization interface of CAP by 3 turns of helix and concomitantly causes rotation, by approximately 60 degrees , and translation, by approximately 7 A, of the DNA-binding domains (DBDs) of CAP, positioning the recognition helices in the DBDs in the correct orientation to interact with DNA. The allosteric transition is stabilized further by expulsion of an aromatic residue from the cAMP-binding pocket upon cAMP binding. The results define the structural mechanisms that underlie allosteric control of this prototypic transcriptional regulatory factor and provide an illustrative example of how effector-mediated structural changes can control the activity of regulatory proteins.

  20. Vascular endothelin ET(B) receptor-mediated contraction requires phosphorylation of ERK1/2 proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Guogang; Jamali, Roya; Cao, Yong-Xiao;

    2006-01-01

    RNA and protein expressions. The endothelin ET(B) receptor-mediated contraction was associated with increase in phosphorylation of extracellular regulation kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) proteins and elevated levels of intracellular calcium. The elevation curve of intracellular calcium consisted of two phases: one rapid...... and one sustained. Inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by SB386023 or blockage of calcium channels by nifedipine significantly reduced the endothelin ET(B) receptor-mediated contraction (P..., phosphorylation of ERK1/2 proteins and elevation of intracellular calcium level are required for endothelin ET(B) receptor-mediated contraction in rat mesenteric artery....

  1. The unfolded protein response mediates fibrogenesis and collagen I secretion through regulating TANGO1 in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiers, Jessica L; Kostallari, Enis; Mushref, Malek; deAssuncao, Thiago M; Li, Haiyang; Jalan-Sakrikar, Nidhi; Huebert, Robert C; Cao, Sheng; Malhi, Harmeet; Shah, Vijay H

    2017-03-01

    Fibrogenesis encompasses the deposition of matrix proteins, such as collagen I, by hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) that culminates in cirrhosis. Fibrogenic signals drive transcription of procollagen I, which enters the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), is trafficked through the secretory pathway, and released to generate extracellular matrix. Alternatively, disruption of procollagen I ER export could activate the unfolded protein response (UPR) and drive HSC apoptosis. Using a small interfering RNA screen, we identified Transport and Golgi organization 1 (TANGO1) as a potential participant in collagen I secretion. We investigated the role of TANGO1 in procollagen I secretion in HSCs and liver fibrogenesis. Depletion of TANGO1 in HSCs blocked collagen I secretion without affecting other matrix proteins. Disruption of secretion led to procollagen I retention within the ER, induction of the UPR, and HSC apoptosis. In wild-type (WT) HSCs, both TANGO1 and the UPR were induced by transforming growth factor β (TGFβ). As the UPR up-regulates proteins involved in secretion, we studied whether TANGO1 was a target of the UPR. We found that UPR signaling is responsible for up-regulating TANGO1 in response to TGFβ, and this mechanism is mediated by the transcription factor X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1). In vivo, murine and human cirrhotic tissue displayed increased TANGO1 messenger RNA levels. Finally, TANGO1(+/-) mice displayed less hepatic fibrosis compared to WT mice in two separate murine models: CCl4 and bile duct ligation. Loss of TANGO1 leads to procollagen I retention in the ER, which promotes UPR-mediated HSC apoptosis. TANGO1 regulation during HSC activation occurs through a UPR-dependent mechanism that requires the transcription factor, XBP1. Finally, TANGO1 is critical for fibrogenesis through mediating HSC homeostasis. The work reveals a unique role for TANGO1 and the UPR in facilitating collagen I secretion and fibrogenesis. (Hepatology 2017;65:983-998). © 2016 by

  2. Molecular design and nanoparticle-mediated intracellular delivery of functional proteins to target cellular pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dhiral Ashwin

    Intracellular delivery of specific proteins and peptides represents a novel method to influence stem cells for gain-of-function and loss-of-function. Signaling control is vital in stem cells, wherein intricate control of and interplay among critical pathways directs the fate of these cells into either self-renewal or differentiation. The most common route to manipulate cellular function involves the introduction of genetic material such as full-length genes and shRNA into the cell to generate (or prevent formation of) the target protein, and thereby ultimately alter cell function. However, viral-mediated gene delivery may result in relatively slow expression of proteins and prevalence of oncogene insertion into the cell, which can alter cell function in an unpredictable fashion, and non-viral delivery may lead to low efficiency of genetic delivery. For example, the latter case plagues the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and hinders their use for in vivo applications. Alternatively, introducing proteins into cells that specifically recognize and influence target proteins, can result in immediate deactivation or activation of key signaling pathways within the cell. In this work, we demonstrate the cellular delivery of functional proteins attached to hydrophobically modified silica (SiNP) nanoparticles to manipulate specifically targeted cell signaling proteins. In the Wnt signaling pathway, we have targeted the phosphorylation activity of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK-3beta) by designing a chimeric protein and delivering it in neural stem cells. Confocal imaging indicates that the SiNP-chimeric protein conjugates were efficiently delivered to the cytosol of human embryonic kidney cells and rat neural stem cells, presumably via endocytosis. This uptake impacted the Wnt signaling cascade, indicated by the elevation of beta-catenin levels, and increased transcription of Wnt target genes, such as c-MYC. The results presented here suggest that

  3. Chikungunya virus non-structural protein 2-mediated host shut-off disables the unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fros, Jelke J; Major, Lee D; Scholte, Florine E M; Gardner, Joy; van Hemert, Martijn J; Suhrbier, Andreas; Pijlman, Gorben P

    2015-03-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a cellular defence mechanism against high concentrations of misfolded protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In the presence of misfolded proteins, ER-transmembrane proteins PERK and IRE1α become activated. PERK phosphorylates eIF2α leading to a general inhibition of cellular translation, whilst the expression of transcription factor ATF4 is upregulated. Active IRE1α splices out an intron from XBP1 mRNA, to produce a potent transcription factor. Activation of the UPR increases the production of several proteins involved in protein folding, degradation and apoptosis. Here, we demonstrated that transient expression of chikungunya virus (CHIKV) (family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus) envelope glycoproteins induced the UPR and that CHIKV infection resulted in the phosphorylation of eIF2α and partial splicing of XBP1 mRNA. However, infection with CHIKV did not increase the expression of ATF4 and known UPR target genes (GRP78/BiP, GRP94 and CHOP). Moreover, nuclear XBP1 was not observed during CHIKV infection. Even upon stimulation with tunicamycin, the UPR was efficiently inhibited in CHIKV-infected cells. Individual expression of CHIKV non-structural proteins (nsPs) revealed that nsP2 alone was sufficient to inhibit the UPR. Mutations that rendered nsP2 unable to cause host-cell shut-off prevented nsP2-mediated inhibition of the UPR. This indicates that initial UPR induction takes place in the ER but that expression of functional UPR transcription factors and target genes is efficiently inhibited by CHIKV nsP2.

  4. Lectin receptor kinases participate in protein-protein interactions to mediate plasma membrane-cell wall adhesions in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouget, Anne; Senchou, Virginie; Govers, Francine; Sanson, Arnaud; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Canut, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between plant cell walls and plasma membranes are essential for cells to function properly, but the molecules that mediate the structural continuity between wall and membrane are unknown. Some of these interactions, which are visualized upon tissue plasmolysis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are disrupted by the RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) tripeptide sequence, a characteristic cell adhesion motif in mammals. In planta induced-O (IPI-O) is an RGD-containing protein from the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans that can disrupt cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions through its RGD motif. To identify peptide sequences that specifically bind the RGD motif of the IPI-O protein and potentially play a role in receptor recognition, we screened a heptamer peptide library displayed in a filamentous phage and selected two peptides acting as inhibitors of the plasma membrane RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis. Moreover, the two peptides also disrupted cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions. Sequence comparison of the RGD-binding peptides with the Arabidopsis proteome revealed 12 proteins containing amino acid sequences in their extracellular domains common with the two RGD-binding peptides. Eight belong to the receptor-like kinase family, four of which have a lectin-like extracellular domain. The lectin domain of one of these, At5g60300, recognized the RGD motif both in peptides and proteins. These results imply that lectin receptor kinases are involved in protein-protein interactions with RGD-containing proteins as potential ligands, and play a structural and signaling role at the plant cell surfaces.

  5. Lectin Receptor Kinases Participate in Protein-Protein Interactions to Mediate Plasma Membrane-Cell Wall Adhesions in Arabidopsis1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouget, Anne; Senchou, Virginie; Govers, Francine; Sanson, Arnaud; Barre, Annick; Rougé, Pierre; Pont-Lezica, Rafael; Canut, Hervé

    2006-01-01

    Interactions between plant cell walls and plasma membranes are essential for cells to function properly, but the molecules that mediate the structural continuity between wall and membrane are unknown. Some of these interactions, which are visualized upon tissue plasmolysis in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), are disrupted by the RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) tripeptide sequence, a characteristic cell adhesion motif in mammals. In planta induced-O (IPI-O) is an RGD-containing protein from the plant pathogen Phytophthora infestans that can disrupt cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions through its RGD motif. To identify peptide sequences that specifically bind the RGD motif of the IPI-O protein and potentially play a role in receptor recognition, we screened a heptamer peptide library displayed in a filamentous phage and selected two peptides acting as inhibitors of the plasma membrane RGD-binding activity of Arabidopsis. Moreover, the two peptides also disrupted cell wall-plasma membrane adhesions. Sequence comparison of the RGD-binding peptides with the Arabidopsis proteome revealed 12 proteins containing amino acid sequences in their extracellular domains common with the two RGD-binding peptides. Eight belong to the receptor-like kinase family, four of which have a lectin-like extracellular domain. The lectin domain of one of these, At5g60300, recognized the RGD motif both in peptides and proteins. These results imply that lectin receptor kinases are involved in protein-protein interactions with RGD-containing proteins as potential ligands, and play a structural and signaling role at the plant cell surfaces. PMID:16361528

  6. Protein Kinase C-{delta} mediates down-regulation of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K protein: involvement in apoptosis induction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Feng-Hou [NO.3 People' s Hospital affiliated to Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 201900 (China); The Department of Pathophysiology, Key Laboratory of Cell Differentiation and Apoptosis of National Ministry of Education, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Wu, Ying-Li [The Department of Pathophysiology, Key Laboratory of Cell Differentiation and Apoptosis of National Ministry of Education, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Zhao, Meng [Institute of Health Science, SJTU-SM/Shanghai Institutes for Biological Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Liu, Chuan-Xu; Wang, Li-Shun [The Department of Pathophysiology, Key Laboratory of Cell Differentiation and Apoptosis of National Ministry of Education, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Guo-Qiang, E-mail: chengq@shsmu.edu.cn [The Department of Pathophysiology, Key Laboratory of Cell Differentiation and Apoptosis of National Ministry of Education, Shanghai Jiao-Tong University School of Medicine (SJTU-SM), Shanghai 200025 (China); Institute of Health Science, SJTU-SM/Shanghai Institutes for Biological Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China)

    2009-11-15

    We reported previously that NSC606985, a camptothecin analogue, induces apoptosis of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells through proteolytic activation of protein kinase C delta ({Delta}PKC-{delta}). By subcellular proteome analysis, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) was identified as being significantly down-regulated in NSC606985-treated leukemic NB4 cells. HnRNP K, a docking protein for DNA, RNA, and transcriptional or translational molecules, is implicated in a host of processes involving the regulation of gene expression. However, the molecular mechanisms of hnRNP K reduction and its roles during apoptosis are still not understood. In the present study, we found that, following the appearance of the {Delta}PKC-{delta}, hnRNP K protein was significantly down-regulated in NSC606985, doxorubicin, arsenic trioxide and ultraviolet-induced apoptosis. We further provided evidence that {Delta}PKC-{delta} mediated the down-regulation of hnRNP K protein during apoptosis: PKC-{delta} inhibitor could rescue the reduction of hnRNP K; hnRNP K failed to be decreased in PKC-{delta}-deficient apoptotic KG1a cells; conditional induction of {Delta}PKC-{delta} in U937T cells directly down-regulated hnRNP K protein. Moreover, the proteasome inhibitor also inhibited the down-regulation of hnRNP K protein by apoptosis inducer and the conditional expression of {Delta}PKC-{delta}. More intriguingly, the suppression of hnRNP K with siRNA transfection significantly induced apoptosis. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that proteolytically activated PKC-{delta} down-regulates hnRNP K protein in a proteasome-dependent manner, which plays an important role in apoptosis induction.

  7. Protein kinases: mechanisms and downstream targets in inflammation-mediated obesity and insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandipati, Kalyana C; Subramanian, Saravanan; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2017-02-01

    Obesity-induced low-grade inflammation (metaflammation) impairs insulin receptor signaling. This has been implicated in the development of insulin resistance. Insulin signaling in the target tissues is mediated by stress kinases such as p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase, inhibitor of NF-kB kinase complex β (IKKβ), AMP-activated protein kinase, protein kinase C, Rho-associated coiled-coil containing protein kinase, and RNA-activated protein kinase. Most of these kinases phosphorylate several key regulators in glucose homeostasis. The phosphorylation of serine residues in the insulin receptor and IRS-1 molecule results in diminished enzymatic activity in the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. This has been one of the key mechanisms observed in the tissues that are implicated in insulin resistance especially in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2-DM). Identifying the specific protein kinases involved in obesity-induced chronic inflammation may help in developing the targeted drug therapies to minimize the insulin resistance. This review is focused on the protein kinases involved in the inflammatory cascade and molecular mechanisms and their downstream targets with special reference to obesity-induced T2-DM.

  8. Protein nanoparticle: A unique system as drug delivery vehicles

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-29

    . ... contributions in the field of protein nanoparticles used as drug delivery systems. .... tic guidance. ..... response of cytoskeletal organization and adhesion ..... Helicobacter Pylori Effect of Mucoadhesive Nanoparticles Bearing.

  9. TAT-mediated intracellular protein delivery to primary brain cells is dependent on glycosaminoglycan expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Melissa J; Gao, Shan; Kang, Woo Hyeun; Banta, Scott; Morrison, Barclay

    2009-09-01

    Although some studies have shown that the cell penetrating peptide (CPP) TAT can enter a variety of cell lines with high efficiency, others have observed little or no transduction in vivo or in vitro under conditions mimicking the in vivo environment. The mechanisms underlying TAT-mediated transduction have been investigated in cell lines, but not in primary brain cells. In this study we demonstrate that transduction of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-TAT fusion protein is dependent on glycosaminoglycan (GAG) expression in both the PC12 cell line and primary astrocytes. GFP-TAT transduced PC12 cells and did so with even higher efficiency following NGF differentiation. In cultures of primary brain cells, TAT significantly enhanced GFP delivery into astrocytes grown under different conditions: (1) monocultures grown in serum-containing medium; (2) monocultures grown in serum-free medium; (3) cocultures with neurons in serum-free medium. The efficiency of GFP-TAT transduction was significantly higher in the monocultures than in the cocultures. The GFP-TAT construct did not significantly enter neurons. Experimental modulation of GAG content correlated with alterations in TAT transduction in PC12 cells and astrocyte monocultures grown in the presence of serum. In addition, this correlation was predictive of TAT-mediated transduction in astrocyte monocultures grown in serum free medium and in coculture. We conclude that culture conditions affect cellular GAG expression, which in turn dictates TAT-mediated transduction efficiency, extending previous results from cell lines to primary cells. These results highlight the cell-type and phenotype-dependence of TAT-mediated transduction, and underscore the necessity of controlling the phenotype of the target cell in future protein engineering efforts aimed at creating more efficacious CPPs.

  10. Extracellular Matrix Proteins Mediate HIV-1 gp120 Interactions with α4β7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnik, David; Guo, Wenjin; Cleveland, Brad; von Haller, Priska; Eng, Jimmy K; Guttman, Miklos; Lee, Kelly K; Arthos, James; Hu, Shiu-Lok

    2017-08-16

    Gut-homing α4β7(high) CD4(+) T lymphocytes have been shown to be preferentially targeted by Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV), and are implicated in HIV pathogenesis. Previous studies demonstrated that HIV envelope protein gp120 binds and signals through α4β7, and that this likely contributes to the infection of α4β7(high) T cells and promotes cell-to-cell virus transmission. Structures within the second variable loop (V2) of gp120, including the tripeptide motif LDV/I, are thought to mediate gp120-α4β7 binding. However, lack of α4β7 binding has been reported in gp120 proteins containing LDV/I, and the precise determinants of gp120-α4β7 binding are not fully defined. In this work, we report the novel finding that fibronectins mediate indirect gp120-α4β7 interactions. We show that Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells used to express recombinant gp120 produced fibronectins and other extracellular matrix proteins that co-purified with gp120. CHO fibronectins were able to mediate the binding of a diverse panel of gp120 proteins to α4β7 in an in vitro cell binding assay. The V2 loop was not required for fibronectin-mediated binding of gp120 to α4β7, nor did V2-specific antibodies block this interaction. Removal of fibronectin through anion exchange chromatography abrogated V2-independent gp120-α4β7 binding. Additionally, we showed a recombinant human fibronectin fragment mediated gp120-α4β7 interactions in a similar manner to CHO fibronectin. These findings provide an explanation for the apparent contradictory observations regarding the gp120-α4β7 interaction and offer new insights into the potential role of fibronectin and other extracellular matrix proteins in HIV-1 biology.IMPORTANCE Immune tissues within the gut are severely damaged by HIV, and this plays an important role in the development of AIDS. Integrin α4β7 plays a major role in the trafficking of lymphocytes, including CD4(+) T cells, into gut lymphoid tissues. Previous reports

  11. Role of Rab GTPases and their interacting proteins in mediating metabolic signalling and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Christelle En Lin; Tang, Bor Luen

    2015-06-01

    The vesicular transport pathways, which shuttle materials to and from the cell surface and within the cell, and the metabolic (growth factor and nutrient) signalling pathways, which integrate a variety of extracellular and intracellular signals to mediate growth, proliferation or survival, are both important for cellular physiology. There is evidence to suggest that the transport and metabolic signalling pathways intersect-vesicular transport can affect the regulation of metabolic signals and vice versa. The Rab family GTPases regulate the specificity of vesicular transport steps in the cell. Together with their interacting proteins, Rabs would likely constitute the points of intersection between vesicular transport and metabolic signalling pathways. Examples of these points would include growth factor signalling, glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as autophagy. Many of these processes involve mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) in downstream cascades, or are regulated by TORC signalling. A general functionality of the vesicular transport processes controlled by the Rabs is also important for spatial and temporal regulation of the transmission of metabolic signals between the cell surface and the nucleus. In other cases, specific Rabs and their interacting proteins are known to function in recruiting metabolism-related proteins to target membranes, or may compete with other factors in the TORC signalling pathway as a means of metabolic regulation. We review and discuss herein examples of how Rabs and their interacting proteins can mediate metabolic signalling and regulation in cells.

  12. Mitochondria-Mediated Protein Regulation Mechanism of Polymorphs-Dependent Inhibition of Nanoselenium on Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ge; Guo, Yuming; Yang, Gai; Yang, Lin; Ma, Xiaoming; Wang, Kui; Zhu, Lin; Sun, Jiaojiao; Wang, Xiaobing; Zhang, Hua

    2016-08-01

    The present study was (i) to prepare two types of selenium nanoparticles, namely an amorphous form of selenium quantum dots (A-SeQDs) and a crystalline form of selenium quantum dots (C-SeQDs); and (ii) to investigate the nano-bio interactions of A-SeQDs and C-SeQDs in MCF-7, HepG2, HeLa, NIH/3T3, L929 cells and BRL-3A cells. It was found that A-SeQDs could induce the mitochondria-mediated apoptosis, necrosis and death of cells, while C-SeQDs had much weaker effects. This polymorphs-dependent anti-proliferative activity of nano-selenium was scarcely reported. Further investigation demonstrated that A-SeQDs could differentially regulate 61 proteins and several pathways related to stress response, protein synthesis, cell migration and cell cycle, including “p38 MAPK Signaling”, “p53 Signaling”, “14-3-3-mediated Signaling”, “p70S6K Signaling” and “Protein Ubiquitination Pathway”. This was the first report to demonstrate the involvement of protein synthesis and post-translational modification pathways in the anti-proliferative activity associated with NMs. Compared with previously fragmentary studies, this study use a nanomics approach combining bioinformatics and proteomics to systematically investigate the nano-bio interactions of selenium nanoparticles in cancer cells.

  13. IBR5 Modulates Temperature-Dependent, R Protein CHS3-Mediated Defense Responses in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyan Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Plant responses to low temperature are tightly associated with defense responses. We previously characterized the chilling-sensitive mutant chs3-1 resulting from the activation of the Toll and interleukin 1 receptor-nucleotide binding-leucine-rich repeat (TIR-NB-LRR-type resistance (R protein harboring a C-terminal LIM (Lin-11, Isl-1 and Mec-3 domains domain. Here we report the identification of a suppressor of chs3, ibr5-7 (indole-3-butyric acid response 5, which largely suppresses chilling-activated defense responses. IBR5 encodes a putative dual-specificity protein phosphatase. The accumulation of CHS3 protein at chilling temperatures is inhibited by the IBR5 mutation. Moreover, chs3-conferred defense phenotypes were synergistically suppressed by mutations in HSP90 and IBR5. Further analysis showed that IBR5, with holdase activity, physically associates with CHS3, HSP90 and SGT1b (Suppressor of the G2 allele of skp1 to form a complex that protects CHS3. In addition to the positive role of IBR5 in regulating CHS3, IBR5 is also involved in defense responses mediated by R genes, including SNC1 (Suppressor of npr1-1, Constitutive 1, RPS4 (Resistance to P. syringae 4 and RPM1 (Resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola 1. Thus, the results of the present study reveal a role for IBR5 in the regulation of multiple R protein-mediated defense responses.

  14. Multi-PAS domain-mediated protein oligomerization of PpsR from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, Udo; Meinhart, Anton; Winkler, Andreas, E-mail: andreas.winkler@mpimf-heidelberg.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-03-01

    Crystal structures of two truncated variants of the transcription factor PpsR from R. sphaeroides are presented that enabled the phasing of a triple PAS domain construct. Together, these structures reveal the importance of α-helical PAS extensions for multi-PAS domain-mediated protein oligomerization and function. Per–ARNT–Sim (PAS) domains are essential modules of many multi-domain signalling proteins that mediate protein interaction and/or sense environmental stimuli. Frequently, multiple PAS domains are present within single polypeptide chains, where their interplay is required for protein function. Although many isolated PAS domain structures have been reported over the last decades, only a few structures of multi-PAS proteins are known. Therefore, the molecular mechanism of multi-PAS domain-mediated protein oligomerization and function is poorly understood. The transcription factor PpsR from Rhodobacter sphaeroides is such a multi-PAS domain protein that, in addition to its three PAS domains, contains a glutamine-rich linker and a C-terminal helix–turn–helix DNA-binding motif. Here, crystal structures of two N-terminally and C-terminally truncated PpsR variants that comprise a single (PpsR{sub Q-PAS1}) and two (PpsR{sub N-Q-PAS1}) PAS domains, respectively, are presented and the multi-step strategy required for the phasing of a triple PAS domain construct (PpsR{sub ΔHTH}) is illustrated. While parts of the biologically relevant dimerization interface can already be observed in the two shorter constructs, the PpsR{sub ΔHTH} structure reveals how three PAS domains enable the formation of multiple oligomeric states (dimer, tetramer and octamer), highlighting that not only the PAS cores but also their α-helical extensions are essential for protein oligomerization. The results demonstrate that the long helical glutamine-rich linker of PpsR results from a direct fusion of the N-cap of the PAS1 domain with the C-terminal extension of the N-domain that

  15. EWS-FLI1 perturbs MRTFB/YAP-1/TEAD target gene regulation inhibiting cytoskeletal autoregulatory feedback in Ewing sarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katschnig, A M; Kauer, M O; Schwentner, R; Tomazou, E M; Mutz, C N; Linder, M; Sibilia, M; Alonso, J; Aryee, D N T; Kovar, H

    2017-07-03

    Ewing sarcoma (EWS) is a paediatric bone cancer with high metastatic potential. Cellular plasticity resulting from dynamic cytoskeletal reorganization, typically regulated via the Rho pathway, is a prerequisite for metastasis initiation. Here, we interrogated the role of the Ewing sarcoma driver oncogene EWS-FLI1 in cytoskeletal reprogramming. We report that EWS-FLI1 strongly represses the activity of the Rho-F-actin signal pathway transcriptional effector MRTFB, affecting the expression of a large number of EWS-FLI1-anticorrelated genes including structural and regulatory cytoskeletal genes. Consistent with this finding, chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) revealed strong overlaps in myocardin-related transcription factor B (MRTFB) and EWS-FLI1 chromatin occupation, especially for EWS-FLI1-anticorrelated genes. Binding of the transcriptional co-activator Yes-associated protein (YAP)-1, enrichment of TEAD-binding motifs in these shared genomic binding regions and overlapping transcriptional footprints of MRTFB and TEAD factors led us to propose synergy between MRTFB and the YAP/TEAD complex in the regulation of EWS-FLI1-anticorrelated genes. We propose that EWS-FLI1 suppresses the Rho-actin pathway by perturbation of a MRTFB/YAP-1/TEAD transcriptional module, which directly affects the actin-autoregulatory feedback loop. As spontaneous fluctuations in EWS-FLI1 levels of Ewing sarcoma cells in vitro and in vivo, associated with a switch between a proliferative, non-migratory EWS-FLI1-high and a non-proliferative highly migratory EWS-FLI1-low state, were recently described, our data provide a mechanistic basis for the underlying EWS-FLI1-dependent reversible cytoskeletal reprogramming of Ewing sarcoma cells.Oncogene advance online publication, 3 July 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2017.202.

  16. Debra, a protein mediating lysosomal degradation, is required for long-term memory in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottler, Benjamin; Lampin-Saint-Amaux, Aurélie; Comas, Daniel; Preat, Thomas; Goguel, Valérie

    2011-01-01

    A central goal of neuroscience is to understand how neural circuits encode memory and guide behavior changes. Many of the molecular mechanisms underlying memory are conserved from flies to mammals, and Drosophila has been used extensively to study memory processes. To identify new genes involved in long-term memory, we screened Drosophila enhancer-trap P(Gal4) lines showing Gal4 expression in the mushroom bodies, a specialized brain structure involved in olfactory memory. This screening led to the isolation of a memory mutant that carries a P-element insertion in the debra locus. debra encodes a protein involved in the Hedgehog signaling pathway as a mediator of protein degradation by the lysosome. To study debra's role in memory, we achieved debra overexpression, as well as debra silencing mediated by RNA interference. Experiments conducted with a conditional driver that allowed us to specifically restrict transgene expression in the adult mushroom bodies led to a long-term memory defect. Several conclusions can be drawn from these results: i) debra levels must be precisely regulated to support normal long-term memory, ii) the role of debra in this process is physiological rather than developmental, and iii) debra is specifically required for long-term memory, as it is dispensable for earlier memory phases. Drosophila long-term memory is the only long-lasting memory phase whose formation requires de novo protein synthesis, a process underlying synaptic plasticity. It has been shown in several organisms that regulation of proteins at synapses occurs not only at translation level of but also via protein degradation, acting in remodeling synapses. Our work gives further support to a role of protein degradation in long-term memory, and suggests that the lysosome plays a role in this process.

  17. S100A8/A9 Proteins Mediate Neutrophilic Inflammation and Lung Pathology during Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Radha; Monin, Leticia; Torres, Diana; Slight, Samantha; Mehra, Smriti; McKenna, Kyle C.; Fallert Junecko, Beth A.; Reinhart, Todd A.; Kolls, Jay; Báez-Saldaña, Renata; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Rodríguez-Reyna, Tatiana S.; Kumar, Nathella Pavan; Tessier, Phillipe; Roth, Johannes; Selman, Moisés; Becerril-Villanueva, Enrique; Baquera-Heredia, Javier; Cumming, Bridgette; Kasprowicz, Victoria O.; Steyn, Adrie J. C.; Babu, Subash; Kaushal, Deepak; Zúñiga, Joaquín; Vogl, Thomas; Rangel-Moreno, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: A hallmark of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is the formation of granulomas. However, the immune factors that drive the formation of a protective granuloma during latent TB, and the factors that drive the formation of inflammatory granulomas during active TB, are not well defined. Objectives: The objective of this study was to identify the underlying immune mechanisms involved in formation of inflammatory granulomas seen during active TB. Methods: The immune mediators involved in inflammatory granuloma formation during TB were assessed using human samples and experimental models of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, using molecular and immunologic techniques. Measurements and Main Results: We demonstrate that in human patients with active TB and in nonhuman primate models of M. tuberculosis infection, neutrophils producing S100 proteins are dominant within the inflammatory lung granulomas seen during active TB. Using the mouse model of TB, we demonstrate that the exacerbated lung inflammation seen as a result of neutrophilic accumulation is dependent on S100A8/A9 proteins. S100A8/A9 proteins promote neutrophil accumulation by inducing production of proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines, and influencing leukocyte trafficking. Importantly, serum levels of S100A8/A9 proteins along with neutrophil-associated chemokines, such as keratinocyte chemoattractant, can be used as potential surrogate biomarkers to assess lung inflammation and disease severity in human TB. Conclusions: Our results thus show a major pathologic role for S100A8/A9 proteins in mediating neutrophil accumulation and inflammation associated with TB. Thus, targeting specific molecules, such as S100A8/A9 proteins, has the potential to decrease lung tissue damage without impacting protective immunity against TB. PMID:24047412

  18. Debra, a protein mediating lysosomal degradation, is required for long-term memory in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Kottler

    Full Text Available A central goal of neuroscience is to understand how neural circuits encode memory and guide behavior changes. Many of the molecular mechanisms underlying memory are conserved from flies to mammals, and Drosophila has been used extensively to study memory processes. To identify new genes involved in long-term memory, we screened Drosophila enhancer-trap P(Gal4 lines showing Gal4 expression in the mushroom bodies, a specialized brain structure involved in olfactory memory. This screening led to the isolation of a memory mutant that carries a P-element insertion in the debra locus. debra encodes a protein involved in the Hedgehog signaling pathway as a mediator of protein degradation by the lysosome. To study debra's role in memory, we achieved debra overexpression, as well as debra silencing mediated by RNA interference. Experiments conducted with a conditional driver that allowed us to specifically restrict transgene expression in the adult mushroom bodies led to a long-term memory defect. Several conclusions can be drawn from these results: i debra levels must be precisely regulated to support normal long-term memory, ii the role of debra in this process is physiological rather than developmental, and iii debra is specifically required for long-term memory, as it is dispensable for earlier memory phases. Drosophila long-term memory is the only long-lasting memory phase whose formation requires de novo protein synthesis, a process underlying synaptic plasticity. It has been shown in several organisms that regulation of proteins at synapses occurs not only at translation level of but also via protein degradation, acting in remodeling synapses. Our work gives further support to a role of protein degradation in long-term memory, and suggests that the lysosome plays a role in this process.

  19. PI3K-mTOR-S6K Signaling Mediates Neuronal Viability via Collapsin Response Mediator Protein-2 Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun J. Na

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Collapsin response mediator protein (CRMP-2 and the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1 signaling pathway are associated with common physiological functions such as neuronal polarity, axonal outgrowth and synaptic strength, as well as various brain disorders including epilepsy. But, their regulatory and functional links are unclear. Alterations in CRMP-2 expression that lead to its functional changes are implicated in brain disorders such as epilepsy. Here, we investigate whether changes in CRMP-2 expression, possibly regulated by mTOR-related signaling, correlates with neuronal growth and viability. Inhibition of mTOR and/or phosphoinositol-3-kinase (PI3K led to deceased p-S6K, and p-S6 signals also reduced CRMP-2 expression. These changes corresponded to inhibition of neuronal viability and proliferation in cultured hippocampal HT-22 cells under both basal serum-free and serum- or insulin-induced mTOR pathway-activated conditions. CRMP-2 expression tended to be increased by mTOR activation, indicated by an increase in p-S6/S6 level, in pentylentetrazole (PTZ-induced epileptic rat hippocampal tissues was also significantly reduced by mTOR inhibition. Knockdown of CRMP-2 by si-RNA reduced the neuronal viability without changes in mTOR signaling, and overexpression of CRMP-2 recovered the glutamate-induced neurotoxicity and decrease of mTOR signaling in HT-22 cells. In conclusion, CRMP-2 protein expression controlled by the PI3K-mTOR-S6K signaling axis exerts its important functional roles in neuronal growth and survival.

  20. Cytokine-mediated inhibition of ketogenesis is unrelated to nitric oxide or protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pailla, K; El-Mir, M Y; Cynober, L; Blonde-Cynober, F

    2001-08-01

    Cytokines play an important role in the lipid disturbances commonly associated with sepsis. Ketogenesis is inhibited during sepsis, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF alpha) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) have been suggested to mediate this impairment, irrespective of the ketogenic substrate (fatty acid or branched chain ketoacid). However, the underlying mechanism of cytokine action is still unknown. First we investigated the possible role of the induction of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, using rat hepatocyte monolayers. Hepatocytes were incubated for 6 h, with either alpha -ketoisocaproate (KIC) (1 mM) or oleic acid (0.5 mM) in the presence or absence of TNF alpha (25 microg/L) and IL-6 (15 microg/L). In some experiments, cells were incubated with NO synthase (NOS) inhibitors. The ketone body (beta -hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate) production and nitrite production were measured in the incubation medium. Our results indicated no involvement of nitric oxide in the inhibitory action of cytokines on ketogenesis. Secondly, we showed that cycloheximide (10(-4)M) did not counteract the cytokine-mediated ketogenesis decrease; hence, the effects of cytokines on ketogenesis are not protein synthesis-dependent. The cytokine-mediated inhibition of ketogenesis is therefore unrelated to either NO production or protein synthesis.

  1. The TEAD/TEF Family Protein Scalloped Mediates Transcriptional Output of the Hippo Growth-Regulatory Pathway

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Shian; Liu, Yi; Zheng, Yonggang; Dong, Jixin; Pan, Duojia

    2008-01-01

    .... Here we identify the TEAD/TEF family protein Scalloped (Sd) as a DNA-binding transcription factor that partners with Yki to mediate the transcriptional output of the Hpo growth-regulatory pathway. The diap1 (th...

  2. Alternative electron transport mediated by flavodiiron proteins is operational in organisms from cyanobacteria up to gymnosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilík, Petr; Pavlovič, Andrej; Kouřil, Roman; Alboresi, Alessandro; Morosinotto, Tomas; Allahverdiyeva, Yagut; Aro, Eva-Mari; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Shikanai, Toshiharu

    2017-05-01

    Photo-reduction of O2 to water mediated by flavodiiron proteins (FDPs) represents a safety valve for the photosynthetic electron transport chain in fluctuating light. So far, the FDP-mediated O2 photo-reduction has been evidenced only in cyanobacteria and the moss Physcomitrella; however, a recent phylogenetic analysis of transcriptomes of photosynthetic organisms has also revealed the presence of FDP genes in several nonflowering plant groups. What remains to be clarified is whether the FDP-dependent O2 photo-reduction is actually operational in these organisms. We have established a simple method for the monitoring of FDP-mediated O2 photo-reduction, based on the measurement of redox kinetics of P700 (the electron donor of photosystem I) upon dark-to-light transition. The O2 photo-reduction is manifested as a fast re-oxidation of P700. The validity of the method was verified by experiments with transgenic organisms, namely FDP knock-out mutants of Synechocystis and Physcomitrella and transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing FDPs from Physcomitrella. We observed the fast P700 re-oxidation in representatives of all green plant groups excluding angiosperms. Our results provide strong evidence that the FDP-mediated O2 photo-reduction is functional in all nonflowering green plant groups. This finding suggests a major change in the strategy of photosynthetic regulation during the evolution of angiosperms. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Redox regulation of actin by thioredoxin-1 is mediated by the interaction of the proteins via cysteine 62.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaogang; Ling, Shukuan; Zhao, Dingsheng; Sun, Qiao; Li, Qi; Wu, Feng; Nie, Jielin; Qu, Lina; Wang, Bo; Shen, Xun; Bai, Yanqiang; Li, Yingxian; Li, Yinghui

    2010-09-01

    Actin is a highly conserved protein in eukaryotic cells, and has been identified as one of the main redox targets by redox proteomics under oxidative stress. However, little is known about the mechanisms of regulation of the redox state of actin. In this study, we investigated how thioredoxin-1 (Trx1) affected the redox state of actin and its polymerization under oxidative stress in SH-SY5Y cells. Trx1 decreased the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cells, and cysteine residues at positions 32, 35, and 69 of the Trx1 protein were active sites for redox regulation. Actin could be kept in a reduced state by Trx1 under H(2)O(2) stimulation. A physical interaction was found to exist between actin and Trx1. Cysteine 62 in Trx1 was the key site that interacted with actin, and it was required to maintain cellular viability and anti-apoptotic function. Taken together, these results suggested that Trx1 could protect cells from apoptosis under oxidative stress not only by increasing the total antioxidant capability and decreasing the ROS levels, but also by stabilizing the actin cytoskeletal system, which cooperatively contributed to the enhancement of cell viability and worked against apoptosis.

  4. Role of cyclic nucleotide-dependent actin cytoskeletal dynamics:Ca(2+](i and force suppression in forskolin-pretreated porcine coronary arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle M Hocking

    Full Text Available Initiation of force generation during vascular smooth muscle contraction involves a rise in intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+]i and phosphorylation of myosin light chains (MLC. However, reversal of these two processes alone does not account for the force inhibition that occurs during relaxation or inhibition of contraction, implicating that other mechanisms, such as actin cytoskeletal rearrangement, play a role in the suppression of force. In this study, we hypothesize that forskolin-induced force suppression is dependent upon changes in actin cytoskeletal dynamics. To focus on the actin cytoskeletal changes, a physiological model was developed in which forskolin treatment of intact porcine coronary arteries (PCA prior to treatment with a contractile agonist resulted in complete suppression of force. Pretreatment of PCA with forskolin suppressed histamine-induced force generation but did not abolish [Ca(2+]i rise or MLC phosphorylation. Additionally, forskolin pretreatment reduced filamentous actin in histamine-treated tissues, and prevented histamine-induced changes in the phosphorylation of the actin-regulatory proteins HSP20, VASP, cofilin, and paxillin. Taken together, these results suggest that forskolin-induced complete force suppression is dependent upon the actin cytoskeletal regulation initiated by the phosphorylation changes of the actin regulatory proteins and not on the MLC dephosphorylation. This model of complete force suppression can be employed to further elucidate the mechanisms responsible for smooth muscle tone, and may offer cues to pathological situations, such as hypertension and vasospasm.

  5. Cytoskeletal mechanics in pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, H.; Wang, N.; Narishige, T.; Ingber, D. E.; Zile, M. R.; Cooper, G. 4th

    1997-01-01

    We have shown that the cellular contractile dysfunction characteristic of pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy results not from an abnormality intrinsic to the myofilament portion of the cardiocyte cytoskeleton but rather from an increased density of the microtubule component of the extramyofilament portion of the cardiocyte cytoskeleton. To determine how, in physical terms, this increased microtubule density mechanically overloads the contractile apparatus at the cellular level, we measured cytoskeletal stiffness and apparent viscosity in isolated cardiocytes via magnetic twisting cytometry, a technique by which magnetically induced force is applied directly to the cytoskeleton through integrin-coupled ferromagnetic beads coated with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide. Measurements were made in two groups of cardiocytes from cats with right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy induced by pulmonary artery banding: (1) those from the pressure-overloaded RV and (2) those from the normally loaded same-animal control left ventricle (LV). Cytoskeletal stiffness increased almost twofold, from 8.53 +/- 0.77 dyne/cm2 in the normally loaded LV cardiocytes to 16.46 +/- 1.32 dyne/cm2 in the hypertrophied RV cardiocytes. Cytoskeletal apparent viscosity increased almost fourfold, from 20.97 +/- 1.92 poise in the normally loaded LV cardiocytes to 87.85 +/- 6.95 poise in the hypertrophied RV cardiocytes. In addition to these baseline data showing differing stiffness and, especially, apparent viscosity in the two groups of cardiocytes, microtubule depolymerization by colchicine was found to return both the stiffness and the apparent viscosity of the pressure overload-hypertrophied RV cells fully to normal. Conversely, microtubule hyperpolymerization by taxol increased the stiffness and apparent viscosity values of normally loaded LV cardiocytes to the abnormal values given above for pressure-hypertrophied RV cardiocytes. Thus, increased microtubule density constitutes primarily a viscous load on

  6. Cytoskeletal mechanics in pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, H.; Wang, N.; Narishige, T.; Ingber, D. E.; Zile, M. R.; Cooper, G. 4th

    1997-01-01

    We have shown that the cellular contractile dysfunction characteristic of pressure-overload cardiac hypertrophy results not from an abnormality intrinsic to the myofilament portion of the cardiocyte cytoskeleton but rather from an increased density of the microtubule component of the extramyofilament portion of the cardiocyte cytoskeleton. To determine how, in physical terms, this increased microtubule density mechanically overloads the contractile apparatus at the cellular level, we measured cytoskeletal stiffness and apparent viscosity in isolated cardiocytes via magnetic twisting cytometry, a technique by which magnetically induced force is applied directly to the cytoskeleton through integrin-coupled ferromagnetic beads coated with Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) peptide. Measurements were made in two groups of cardiocytes from cats with right ventricular (RV) hypertrophy induced by pulmonary artery banding: (1) those from the pressure-overloaded RV and (2) those from the normally loaded same-animal control left ventricle (LV). Cytoskeletal stiffness increased almost twofold, from 8.53 +/- 0.77 dyne/cm2 in the normally loaded LV cardiocytes to 16.46 +/- 1.32 dyne/cm2 in the hypertrophied RV cardiocytes. Cytoskeletal apparent viscosity increased almost fourfold, from 20.97 +/- 1.92 poise in the normally loaded LV cardiocytes to 87.85 +/- 6.95 poise in the hypertrophied RV cardiocytes. In addition to these baseline data showing differing stiffness and, especially, apparent viscosity in the two groups of cardiocytes, microtubule depolymerization by colchicine was found to return both the stiffness and the apparent viscosity of the pressure overload-hypertrophied RV cells fully to normal. Conversely, microtubule hyperpolymerization by taxol increased the stiffness and apparent viscosity values of normally loaded LV cardiocytes to the abnormal values given above for pressure-hypertrophied RV cardiocytes. Thus, increased microtubule density constitutes primarily a viscous load on

  7. Efficient expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) mediated by a chimeric promoter in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    To improve the expression efficiency of exogenous genes in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a high efficient expression vector was constructed. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) was expressed in C. Reinhardtii under the control of promoters: RBCS2 and HSP70A-RBCS2. Efficiency of transformation and expression were compared between two transgenic algae: RBCS2 mediated strain Tran-I and HSP70A-RBCS2 mediated strain Tran-II. Results show that HSP70A-RBCS2 could improve greatly the transformation efficiency by approximately eightfold of RBCS2, and the expression efficiency of GFP in Tran-II was at least double of that in Tran-I. In addition, a threefold increase of GFP in Tran-II was induced by heat shock at 40°C. All of the results demonstrated that HSP70A-RBCS2 was more efficient than RBCS2 in expressing exogenous gene in C. Reinhardtii.

  8. The CEK1-mediated mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in the fungal pathogen Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Román

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK mediated signal transduction pathways are essential for the adaptation of living organisms to environmental changes. In pathogenic fungi, these MAPK cascades govern the response to many types of situations, and are essential for the successful establishment of the fungus within the host. Therefore, they influence virulence and can be considered as promising therapeutic targets. In the opportunistic pathogen Candida albicans, the Cek1-mediated pathway was identified long time ago as an important virulence determinant in certain animal models. We will review here the recent work that reveals the role that this route plays in three important processes for the cell: osmotic adaptation, fungal morphogenesis and cell wall remodeling. We will also show the complementary (and sometimes opposite roles that under specific circumstances the high osmolarity glycerol and CEK1 pathways play in C. albicans biology, especially in the context of the interaction with the mammalian host.

  9. BLNK: molecular scaffolding through 'cis'-mediated organization of signaling proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Christopher W; Dalton, Mark; Ishiai, Masamichi; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Chan, Andrew C

    2002-12-02

    Assembly of intracellular macromolecular complexes is thought to provide an important mechanism to coordinate the generation of second messengers upon receptor activation. We have previously identified a B cell linker protein, termed BLNK, which serves such a scaffolding function in B cells. We demonstrate here that phosphorylation of five tyrosine residues within human BLNK nucleates distinct signaling effectors following B cell antigen receptor activation. The phosphorylation of multiple tyrosine residues not only amplifies PLCgamma-mediated signaling but also supports 'cis'-mediated interaction between distinct signaling effectors within a large molecular complex. These data demonstrate the importance of coordinate phosphorylation of molecular scaffolds, and provide insights into how assembly of macromolecular complexes is required for normal receptor function.

  10. A MYB-domain protein EFM mediates flowering responses to environmental cues in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yuanyuan; Shen, Lisha; Chen, Ying; Bao, Shengjie; Thong, Zhonghui; Yu, Hao

    2014-08-25

    Plants adjust the timing of the transition to flowering to ensure their reproductive success in changing environments. Temperature and light are major environmental signals that affect flowering time through converging on the transcriptional regulation of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) encoding the florigen in Arabidopsis. Here, we show that a MYB transcription factor EARLY FLOWERING MYB PROTEIN (EFM) plays an important role in directly repressing FT expression in the leaf vasculature. EFM mediates the effect of ambient temperature on flowering and is directly promoted by another major FT repressor, SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE. EFM interacts with an H3K36me2 demethylase JMJ30, which forms a negative feedback regulatory loop with the light-responsive circadian clock, to specifically demethylate an active mark H3K36me2 at FT. Our results suggest that EFM is an important convergence point that mediates plant responses to temperature and light to determine the timing of reproduction.

  11. Coiled coils and SAH domains in cytoskeletal molecular motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, Michelle

    2011-10-01

    Cytoskeletal motors include myosins, kinesins and dyneins. Myosins move along tracks of actin filaments, whereas kinesins and dyneins move along microtubules. Many of these motors are involved in trafficking cargo in cells. However, myosins are mostly monomeric, whereas kinesins are mostly dimeric, owing to the presence of a coiled coil. Some myosins (myosins 6, 7 and 10) contain an SAH (single α-helical) domain, which was originally thought to be a coiled coil. These myosins are now known to be monomers, not dimers. The differences between SAH domains and coiled coils are described and the potential roles of SAH domains in molecular motors are discussed.

  12. On the significance of microtubule flexural behavior in cytoskeletal mechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Mehrbod

    Full Text Available Quantitative description of cell mechanics has challenged biological scientists for the past two decades. Various structural models have been attempted to analyze the structure of the cytoskeleton. One important aspect that has been largely ignored in all these modeling approaches is related to the flexural and buckling behavior of microtubular filaments. The objective of this paper is to explore the influence of this flexural and buckling behavior in cytoskeletal mechanics.In vitro the microtubules are observed to buckle in the first mode, reminiscent of a free, simply-supported beam. In vivo images of microtubules, however, indicate that the buckling mostly occurs in higher modes. This buckling mode switch takes place mostly because of the lateral support of microtubules via their connections to actin and intermediate filaments. These lateral loads are exerted throughout the microtubule length and yield a considerable bending behavior that, unless properly accounted for, would produce erroneous results in the modeling and analysis of the cytoskeletal mechanics.One of the promising attempts towards mechanical modeling of the cytoskeleton is the tensegrity model, which simplifies the complex network of cytoskeletal filaments into a combination merely of tension-bearing actin filaments and compression-bearing microtubules. Interestingly, this discrete model can qualitatively explain many experimental observations in cell mechanics. However, evidence suggests that the simplicity of this model may undermine the accuracy of its predictions, given the model's underlying assumption that "every single member bears solely either tensile or compressive behavior," i.e. neglecting the flexural behavior of the microtubule filaments. We invoke an anisotropic continuum model for microtubules and compare the bending energy stored in a single microtubule with its axial strain energy at the verge of buckling. Our results suggest that the bending energy can

  13. DOCK8 Immune Deficiency as a Model for Primary Cytoskeletal Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean A. McGhee

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DOCK8 deficiency is a newly described primary immune deficiency resulting in profound susceptibility to cutaneous viral infections, elevated IgE levels, and eosinophilia, but lacking in the skeletal manifestations commonly seen in hyper IgE syndrome, which it otherwise resembles. Although little is known about the DOCK8 protein, it resembles other atypical guanine exchange factors in the DOCK family, and is known to bind to CDC42. This suggests that a likely role for DOCK8 is in modulating signals that trigger cytoskeletal reorganization. As a result, DOCK8 may also be related to other immune deficiencies that involve the cytoskeleton and Rho GTPase signaling pathways, such as Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome and Rac2 deficiency.

  14. Mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways are required for melatonin-mediated defense responses in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyoung Yool; Back, Kyoungwhan

    2016-04-01

    Melatonin enhances pathogen resistance by inducing the expression of a number of plant defense-related genes. To examine whether the melatonin-mediated pathogen resistance is associated with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades, Arabidopsis and tobacco leaves were treated with melatonin and investigated for MAPK activation using an antiphospho-p44/42 MAPK (Erk1/2) monoclonal antibody. Two MAPKs, MPK3 and MPK6, were activated rapidly and transiently by 1 μm melatonin treatment in Arabidopsis. Its tobacco ortholog MAPKs were also activated. The activation of MPK3 and MPK6 by 2-hydroxymelatonin and N-acetylserotonin was also observed, albeit to a lesser degree than that by melatonin. Furthermore, MAPK activation by melatonin was uncoupled from G-protein signaling, because melatonin efficiently activated two MAPKs in a G-protein β knockout mutant (agb1). Suppression of both MPK3 and MPK6 in transgenic Arabidopsis exhibited significant decreases in the induction of defense-related gene expression and pathogen resistance relative to wild-type plants. Using an array of MAP kinase kinase (MKK) knockout mutants, we found that four MKKs, namely MKK4, MKK5, MKK7, and MKK9, are responsible for the activation of MPK3 and MPK6 by melatonin, indicating that melatonin-mediated innate immunity is triggered by MAPK signaling through MKK4/5/7/9-MPK3/6 cascades.

  15. Natural Products Induce a G Protein-Mediated Calcium Pathway Activating p53 in Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ginkel, Paul R.; Yan, Michael B.; Bhattacharya, Saswati; Polans, Arthur S.; Kenealey, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Paclitaxel, etoposide, vincristine and doxorubicin are examples of natural products being used as chemotherapeutics but with adverse side effects that limit their therapeutic window. Natural products derived from plants and having low toxicity, such as quercetin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate and piceatannol, have been shown to inhibit tumor cell growth both in vitro and in pre-clinical models of cancer, but their mechanisms of action have not been fully elucidated, thus restricting their use as prototypes for developing synthetic analogs with improved anti-cancer properties. We and others have demonstrated that one of the earliest and consistent events upon exposure of tumor cells to these less toxic natural products is a rise in cytoplasmic calcium, activating several pro-apoptotic pathways. We describe here a G protein/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate pathway (InsP3) in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells that mediates between these less toxic natural products and the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Further, we demonstrate that this elevation of intracellular calcium modulates p53 activity and the subsequent transcription of several pro-apoptotic genes encoding PIG8, CD95, PIDD, TP53INP, RRM2B, Noxa, p21 and PUMA. We conclude from our findings that less toxic natural products likely bind to a G protein coupled receptor that activates a G protein-mediated and calcium-dependent pathway resulting selectively in tumor cell death. PMID:26341291

  16. Natural products induce a G protein-mediated calcium pathway activating p53 in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Ginkel, Paul R; Yan, Michael B; Bhattacharya, Saswati; Polans, Arthur S; Kenealey, Jason D

    2015-11-01

    Paclitaxel, etoposide, vincristine and doxorubicin are examples of natural products being used as chemotherapeutics but with adverse side effects that limit their therapeutic window. Natural products derived from plants and having low toxicity, such as quercetin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate and piceatannol, have been shown to inhibit tumor cell growth both in vitro and in pre-clinical models of cancer, but their mechanisms of action have not been fully elucidated, thus restricting their use as prototypes for developing synthetic analogs with improved anti-cancer properties. We and others have demonstrated that one of the earliest and consistent events upon exposure of tumor cells to these less toxic natural products is a rise in cytoplasmic calcium, activating several pro-apoptotic pathways. We describe here a G protein/inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate pathway (InsP3) in MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells that mediates between these less toxic natural products and the release of calcium from the endoplasmic reticulum. Further, we demonstrate that this elevation of intracellular calcium modulates p53 activity and the subsequent transcription of several pro-apoptotic genes encoding PIG8, CD95, PIDD, TP53INP, RRM2B, Noxa, p21 and PUMA. We conclude from our findings that less toxic natural products likely bind to a G protein coupled receptor that activates a G protein-mediated and calcium-dependent pathway resulting selectively in tumor cell death.

  17. A Single Herpesvirus Protein Can Mediate Vesicle Formation in the Nuclear Envelope*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Michael; Vollmer, Benjamin; Unsay, Joseph D.; Klupp, Barbara G.; García-Sáez, Ana J.; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.; Antonin, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Herpesviruses assemble capsids in the nucleus and egress by unconventional vesicle-mediated trafficking through the nuclear envelope. Capsids bud at the inner nuclear membrane into the nuclear envelope lumen. The resulting intralumenal vesicles fuse with the outer nuclear membrane, delivering the capsids to the cytoplasm. Two viral proteins are required for vesicle formation, the tail-anchored pUL34 and its soluble interactor, pUL31. Whether cellular proteins are involved is unclear. Using giant unilamellar vesicles, we show that pUL31 and pUL34 are sufficient for membrane budding and scission. pUL34 function can be bypassed by membrane tethering of pUL31, demonstrating that pUL34 is required for pUL31 membrane recruitment but not for membrane remodeling. pUL31 can inwardly deform membranes by oligomerizing on their inner surface to form buds that constrict to vesicles. Therefore, a single viral protein can mediate all events necessary for membrane budding and abscission. PMID:25605719

  18. Inhibition of myeloperoxidase-mediated protein nitration by tempol: Kinetics, mechanism, and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz, Sandra M; Augusto, Ohara

    2008-06-17

    Despite the therapeutic potential of tempol (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetra-methyl-1-piperidinyloxy) and related nitroxides as antioxidants, their effects on peroxidase-mediated protein tyrosine nitration remain unexplored. This posttranslational protein modification is a biomarker of nitric oxide-derived oxidants, and, relevantly, it parallels tissue injury in animal models of inflammation and is attenuated by tempol treatment. Here, we examine tempol effects on ribonuclease (RNase) nitration mediated by myeloperoxidase (MPO), a mammalian enzyme that plays a central role in various inflammatory processes. Some experiments were also performed with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). We show that tempol efficiently inhibits peroxidase-mediated RNase nitration. For instance, 10 muM tempol was able to inhibit by 90% the yield of 290 muM 3-nitrotyrosine produced from 370 muM RNase. The effect of tempol was not completely catalytic because part of it was consumed by recombination with RNase-tyrosyl radicals. The second-order rate constant of the reaction of tempol with MPO compound I and II were determined by stopped-flow kinetics as 3.3 x 10(6) and 2.6 x 10(4) M(-1) s(-1), respectively (pH 7.4, 25 degrees C); the corresponding HRP constants were orders of magnitude smaller. Time-dependent hydrogen peroxide and nitrite consumption and oxygen production in the incubations were quantified experimentally and modeled by kinetic simulations. The results indicate that tempol inhibits peroxidase-mediated RNase nitration mainly because of its reaction with nitrogen dioxide to produce the oxammonium cation, which, in turn, recycles back to tempol by reacting with hydrogen peroxide and superoxide radical to produce oxygen and regenerate nitrite. The implications for nitroxide antioxidant mechanisms are discussed.

  19. Protein phosphatase 2A mediates resensitization of the neurokinin 1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jane E; Roosterman, Dirk; Cottrell, Graeme S; Padilla, Benjamin E; Feld, Micha; Brand, Eva; Cedron, Wendy J; Bunnett, Nigel W; Steinhoff, Martin

    2011-10-01

    Activated G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are phosphorylated and interact with β-arrestins, which mediate desensitization and endocytosis. Endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1) degrades neuropeptides in endosomes and can promote recycling. Although endocytosis, dephosphorylation, and recycling are accepted mechanisms of receptor resensitization, a large proportion of desensitized receptors can remain at the cell surface. We investigated whether reactivation of noninternalized, desensitized (phosphorylated) receptors mediates resensitization of the substance P (SP) neurokinin 1 receptor (NK(1)R). Herein, we report a novel mechanism of resensitization by which protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is recruited to dephosphorylate noninternalized NK(1)R. A desensitizing concentration of SP reduced cell-surface SP binding sites by only 25%, and SP-induced Ca(2+) signals were fully resensitized before cell-surface binding sites started to recover, suggesting resensitization of cell-surface-retained NK(1)R. SP induced association of β-arrestin1 and PP2A with noninternalized NK(1)R. β-Arrestin1 small interfering RNA knockdown prevented SP-induced association of cell-surface NK(1)R with PP2A, indicating that β-arrestin1 mediates this interaction. ECE-1 inhibition, by trapping β-arrestin1 in endosomes, also impeded SP-induced association of cell-surface NK(1)R with PP2A. Resensitization of NK(1)R signaling required both PP2A and ECE-1 activity. Thus, after stimulation with SP, PP2A interacts with noninternalized NK(1)R and mediates resensitization. PP2A interaction with NK(1)R requires β-arrestin1. ECE-1 promotes this process by releasing β-arrestin1 from NK(1)R in endosomes. These findings represent a novel mechanism of PP2A- and ECE-1-dependent resensitization of GPCRs.

  20. Negative Regulation of STAT3 Protein-mediated Cellular Respiration by SIRT1 Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernier, Michel; Paul, Rajib K; Martin-Montalvo, Alejandro;

    2011-01-01

    In mammals, the transcriptional activity of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is regulated by the deacetylase SIRT1. However, whether the newly described nongenomic actions of STAT3 toward mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation are dependent on SIRT1 is unclear....... In this study, Sirt1 gene knock-out murine embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells were used to delineate the role of SIRT1 in the regulation of STAT3 mitochondrial function. Here, we show that STAT3 mRNA and protein levels and the accumulation of serine-phosphorylated STAT3 in mitochondria were increased...... significantly in Sirt1-KO cells as compared with wild-type MEFs. Various mitochondrial bioenergetic parameters, such as the oxygen consumption rate in cell cultures, enzyme activities of the electron transport chain complexes in isolated mitochondria, and production of ATP and lactate, indicated that Sirt1-KO...

  1. A Legionella Effector Disrupts Host Cytoskeletal Structure by Cleaving Actin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yao; Zhu, Wenhan; Tan, Yunhao; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Staiger, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila, the etiological agent of Legionnaires’ disease, replicates intracellularly in protozoan and human hosts. Successful colonization and replication of this pathogen in host cells requires the Dot/Icm type IVB secretion system, which translocates approximately 300 effector proteins into the host cell to modulate various cellular processes. In this study, we identified RavK as a Dot/Icm substrate that targets the host cytoskeleton and reduces actin filament abundance in mammalian cells upon ectopic expression. RavK harbors an H95EXXH99 motif associated with diverse metalloproteases, which is essential for the inhibition of yeast growth and for the induction of cell rounding in HEK293T cells. We demonstrate that the actin protein itself is the cellular target of RavK and that this effector cleaves actin at a site between residues Thr351 and Phe352. Importantly, RavK-mediated actin cleavage also occurs during L. pneumophila infection. Cleavage by RavK abolishes the ability of actin to form polymers. Furthermore, an F352A mutation renders actin resistant to RavK-mediated cleavage; expression of the mutant in mammalian cells suppresses the cell rounding phenotype caused by RavK, further establishing that actin is the physiological substrate of RavK. Thus, L. pneumophila exploits components of the host cytoskeleton by multiple effectors with distinct mechanisms, highlighting the importance of modulating cellular processes governed by the actin cytoskeleton in the intracellular life cycle of this pathogen. PMID:28129393

  2. Free fatty acid transport across adipocytes is mediated by an unknown membrane protein pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, J Patrick; Parmley, Danielle; Kleinfeld, Alan M

    2007-11-01

    The role of cell membranes in regulating the flux of long chain free fatty acids (FFA) into and out of adipocytes is intensely debated. Four different membrane proteins including, FABPpm, CD36/FAT, caveolin-1, and FATP have been identified as facilitating FFA transport. Moreover, CD36 and caveolin-1 are also reported to mediate transport in conjunction with lipid rafts. The principal evidence for these findings is a correlation of the level of FFA uptake with the expression level of these proteins and with the integrity of lipid rafts. The 3T3-L1 and 3T3-F442A cell lines in their preadipocyte states reveal little or no expression of these proteins and correspondingly low levels of uptake. Here we have microinjected the adipocyte and preadipocyte cell lines with ADIFAB, the fluorescent indicator of FFA. The ADIFAB fluorescence allowed us to monitor the intracellular unbound FFA concentration during FFA influx and efflux. We show that these measurements of transport, in contrast to FFA uptake measurements, correlate neither with expression of these proteins nor with lipid raft integrity in preadipocytes and adipocytes. Transport characteristics, including the generation of an ATP-dependent FFA concentration gradient, are virtually identical in adipocytes and preadipocytes. We suggest that the origin of the discrepancy between uptake and our measurements is that most of the FFA transported into the cells is lost during the uptake but not in the transport protocols. We conclude that long chain fatty acid transport in adipocytes is very likely mediated by an as-yet-unidentified membrane protein pump.

  3. Agrobacterium delivers VirE2 protein into host cells via clathrin-mediated endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyang; Pan, Shen Q.

    2017-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens can cause crown gall tumors on a wide range of host plants. As a natural genetic engineer, the bacterium can transfer both single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) [transferred DNA (T-DNA)] molecules and bacterial virulence proteins into various recipient cells. Among Agrobacterium-delivered proteins, VirE2 is an ssDNA binding protein that is involved in various steps of the transformation process. However, it is not clear how plant cells receive the T-DNA or protein molecules. Using a split–green fluorescent protein approach, we monitored the VirE2 delivery process inside plant cells in real time. We observed that A. tumefaciens delivered VirE2 from the bacterial lateral sides that were in close contact with plant membranes. VirE2 initially accumulated on plant cytoplasmic membranes at the entry points. VirE2-containing membranes were internalized through clathrin-mediated endocytosis to form endomembrane compartments. VirE2 colocalized with the early endosome marker SYP61 but not with the late endosome marker ARA6, suggesting that VirE2 escaped from early endosomes for subsequent trafficking inside the cells. Dual endocytic motifs at the carboxyl-terminal tail of VirE2 were involved in VirE2 internalization and could interact with the μ subunit of the plant clathrin-associated adaptor AP2 complex (AP2M). Both the VirE2 cargo motifs and AP2M were important for the transformation process. Because AP2-mediated endocytosis is well conserved, our data suggest that the A. tumefaciens pathogen hijacks conserved endocytic pathways to facilitate the delivery of virulence factors. This might be important for Agrobacterium to achieve both a wide host range and a high transformation efficiency.

  4. Stress and strain in the contractile and cytoskeletal filaments of airway smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Linhong; Bosse, Ynuk; Brown, Nathan; Chin, Leslie Y M; Connolly, Sarah C; Fairbank, Nigel J; King, Greg G; Maksym, Geoffrey N; Paré, Peter D; Seow, Chun Y; Stephen, Newman L

    2009-10-01

    Stress and strain are omnipresent in the lung due to constant lung volume fluctuation associated with respiration, and they modulate the phenotype and function of all cells residing in the airways including the airway smooth muscle (ASM) cell. There is ample evidence that the ASM cell is very sensitive to its physical environment, and can alter its structure and/or function accordingly, resulting in either desired or undesired consequences. The forces that are either conferred to the ASM cell due to external stretching or generated inside the cell must be borne and transmitted inside the cytoskeleton (CSK). Thus, maintaining appropriate levels of stress and strain within the CSK is essential for maintaining normal function. Despite the importance, the mechanisms regulating/dysregulating ASM cytoskeletal filaments in response to stress and strain remained poorly understood until only recently. For example, it is now understood that ASM length and force are dynamically regulated, and both can adapt over a wide range of length, rendering ASM one of the most malleable living tissues. The malleability reflects the CSK's dynamic mechanical properties and plasticity, both of which strongly interact with the loading on the CSK, and all together ultimately determines airway narrowing in pathology. Here we review the latest advances in our understanding of stress and strain in ASM cells, including the organization of contractile and cytoskeletal filaments, range and adaptation of functional length, structural and functional changes of the cell in response to mechanical perturbation, ASM tone as a mediator of strain-induced responses, and the novel glassy dynamic behaviors of the CSK in relation to asthma pathophysiology.

  5. Digoxin-Mediated Upregulation of RGS2 Protein Protects against Cardiac Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjögren, Benita; Parra, Sergio; Atkins, Kevin B; Karaj, Behirda; Neubig, Richard R

    2016-05-01

    Regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins have emerged as novel drug targets since their discovery almost two decades ago. RGS2 has received particular interest in cardiovascular research due to its role in regulating Gqsignaling in the heart and vascular smooth muscle. RGS2(-/-)mice are hypertensive, prone to heart failure, and display accelerated kidney fibrosis. RGS2 is rapidly degraded through the proteasome, and human mutations leading to accelerated RGS2 protein degradation correlate with hypertension. Hence, stabilizing RGS2 protein expression could be a novel route in treating cardiovascular disease. We previously identified cardiotonic steroids, including digoxin, as selective stabilizers of RGS2 protein in vitro. In the current study we investigated the functional effects of digoxin-mediated RGS2 protein stabilization in vivo. Using freshly isolated myocytes from wild-type and RGS2(-/-)mice treated with vehicle or low-dose digoxin (2µg/kg/day for 7 days) we demonstrated that agonist-induced cAMP levels and cardiomyocyte contractility was inhibited by digoxin in wild-type but not in RGS2(-/-)mice. This inhibition was accompanied by an increase in RGS2 protein levels in cardiomyocytes as well as in whole heart tissue. Furthermore, digoxin had protective effects in a model of cardiac injury in wild-type mice and this protection was lost in RGS2(-/-)mice. Digoxin is the oldest known therapy for heart failure; however, beyond its activity at the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase, the exact mechanism of action is not known. The current study adds a novel mechanism, whereby through stabilizing RGS2 protein levels digoxin could exert its protective effects in the failing heart.

  6. Comparative time-courses of copper-ion-mediated protein and lipid oxidation in low-density lipoprotein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knott, Heather M; Baoutina, Anna; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    Free radicals damage both lipids and proteins and evidence has accumulated for the presence of both oxidised lipids and proteins in aged tissue samples as well as those from a variety of pathologies including atherosclerosis, diabetes, and Parkinson's disease. Oxidation of the protein and lipid...... moieties of low-density lipoprotein is of particular interest due to its potential role in the unregulated uptake of lipids and cholesterol by macrophages; this may contribute to the initial stage of foam cell formation in atherosclerosis. In the study reported here, we examined the comparative time......-courses of lipid and protein oxidation during copper-ion-mediated oxidation of low-density lipoprotein. We show that there is an early, lipid-mediated loss of 40-50% of the Trp residues of the apoB100 protein. There is no comparable loss over an identical period during the copper-ion-mediated oxidation of lipid...

  7. Cell-Surface Receptors Transactivation Mediated by G Protein-Coupled Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Cattaneo

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are seven transmembrane-spanning proteins belonging to a large family of cell-surface receptors involved in many intracellular signaling cascades. Despite GPCRs lack intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity, tyrosine phosphorylation of a tyrosine kinase receptor (RTK occurs in response to binding of specific agonists of several such receptors, triggering intracellular mitogenic cascades. This suggests that the notion that GPCRs are associated with the regulation of post-mitotic cell functions is no longer believable. Crosstalk between GPCR and RTK may occur by different molecular mechanism such as the activation of metalloproteases, which can induce the metalloprotease-dependent release of RTK ligands, or in a ligand-independent manner involving membrane associated non-receptor tyrosine kinases, such as c-Src. Reactive oxygen species (ROS are also implicated as signaling intermediates in RTKs transactivation. Intracellular concentration of ROS increases transiently in cells stimulated with GPCR agonists and their deliberated and regulated generation is mainly catalyzed by enzymes that belong to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase family. Oxidation and/or reduction of cysteine sulfhydryl groups of phosphatases tightly controls the activity of RTKs and ROS-mediated inhibition of cellular phosphatases results in an equilibrium shift from the non-phosphorylated to the phosphorylated state of RTKs. Many GPCR agonists activate phospholipase C, which catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bis-phosphate to produce inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate and diacylglicerol. The consequent mobilization of Ca2+ from endoplasmic reticulum leads to the activation of protein kinase C (PKC isoforms. PKCα mediates feedback inhibition of RTK transactivation during GPCR stimulation. Recent data have expanded the coverage of transactivation to include Serine/Threonine kinase receptors and Toll-like receptors

  8. IgE-mediated soy protein sensitization in children with cow`s milk allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustina Santi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Soy-based formula as an alternative to cow’s milk formula is preferable to extensively hydrolyzed protein formula because of the lower cost and more acceptable taste. However, cow’s milk allergy patients can subsequently develop a sensitivity to soy protein. Objective To compare soy protein sensitization in children with and without an allergy to cow’s milk. Methods This study was conducted in Yogyakarta from September 2007 until March 2008. Subjects were children aged below 4 years with an atopic history. Subjects were divided into 2 groups: those with a positive skin prick test to cow’s milk and those with a negative skin prick test to cow’s milk (control group. Both groups were given soy formula and tested at 6 weeks for sensitization to soy. Results There were 45 children in each group. Age, sex, and atopic history were similar in both groups. We found no soy protein sensitization (negative skin prick results in all subjects from both groups. Conclusion Risk of immunoglobulin E-mediated sensitization to soy protein was not proven in children with cow’s milk allergy. [Paediatr Indones. 2012;52:67-71].

  9. Nanodiamond-Mediated Intercellular Transport of Proteins through Membrane Tunneling Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epperla, Chandra Prakash; Mohan, Nitin; Chang, Che-Wei; Chen, Chia-Chun; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2015-12-02

    Recently discovered tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) are capable of creating intercellular communication pathways through which transport of proteins and other cytoplasmic components occurs. Intercellular transport is related to many diseases and nanotubes are potentially useful as drug-delivery channels for cancer therapy. Here, we apply fluorescent nanodiamond (FND) as a photostable tracker, as well as a protein carrier, to illustrate the transport events in TNTs of human cells. Proteins, including bovine serum albumin and green fluorescent protein, are first coated on 100-nm FNDs by physical adsorption and then single-particle tracking of the bioconjugates in the transient membrane connections is carried out by fluorescence microscopy. Stop-and-go and to-and-fro motions mediated by molecular motors are found for the active transport of protein-loaded FNDs trapped in the endosomal vehicles of human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293T). Quantitative analysis of the heterotypical transport between HEK293T and SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells by flow cytometry confirm the formation of open-ended nanotubes between them, despite that their TNTs differ in structural components. Our results demonstrate the promising applications of this novel carbon-based nanomaterial for intercellular delivery of biomolecular cargo down to the single-particle level.

  10. Bacterial resistance to complement killing mediated by the Ail protein of Yersinia enterocolitica.

    OpenAIRE

    Bliska, J B; Falkow, S

    1992-01-01

    Ail is a 17-kDa outer membrane Yersinia protein that mediates bacterial attachment to, and invasion of, cultured epithelial cells. We report here an alternative role for Ail in the pathogenesis of Yersinia infection. We found that Escherichia coli HB101 harboring the 4-kilobase recombinant ail clone pVM102 were highly resistant to killing in up to 50% normal human serum. A 674-base-pair fragment of DNA from pVM102, which encodes the ail gene, was inserted into pUC18 and shown to promote full ...

  11. Modulation of breast cancer resistance protein mediated atypical multidrug resistance using RNA interference delivered by adenovirus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Wen-tong; ZHOU Geng-yin; WANG Chun-ling; GUO Cheng-hao; SONG Xian-rang; CHI Wei-ling

    2005-01-01

    @@ Clinical multidrug resistance (MDR) of malignancies to many antineoplastic agents is the major obstacle in the successful treatment of cancer. The emergence of breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), a member of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette (ABC) transporter family, has necessitated the development of antagonists. To overcome the BCRP-mediated atypical MDR, RNA interference (RNAi) delivered by adenovirus targeting BCRP mRNA was used to inhibit the atypical MDR expression by infecting MCF-7/MX100 cell lines with constructed RNAi adenovirus.

  12. Fourier and fractal analysis of cytoskeletal morphology altered by xenobiotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosta, Giovanni F.; Urani, Chiara; Fumarola, Laura

    2003-06-01

    The cytoskeletal microtubules (MTs) of rat hepatocytes treated by Benomyl (a fungicide) were imaged by means of immunofluorescent staining and optical microscopy. Images of untreated, or control (C), and of treated (T) cells were processed both by fractal and Fourier analysis. The C-MTs had contour fractal dimensions higher (>= 1.4) than those of T-MTs (enhancement," which corresponds to the application of a (pseudo)differential operator to the image. Enhanced spectra were interpolated by a polynomial, q, of degree 39, from which morphological descriptors were extracted. Descriptors from Fourier analysis made image classification possible. Principal components analysis was applied to the descriptors. In the plane of the first two components, {z1,z2}, the minimum spanning tree was drawn. Images of T-MTs formed a single cluster, whereas images of C-MTs formed two clusters, C1 and C2. The component z1 correlated positively with the local maxima and minima of q, which reflected differences between T and C in power spectral density in the 1 to 2000 cycles/mm spatial frequency band. The difference between C1 and C2 was ascribed to anisotropy of the MT bundles. The implemented image classifier is capable of telling differences in cytoskeletal organization. As a consequence the method can become a tool for testing cytotoxicity and for extracting quantitative information about intracellular alterations of various origin.

  13. IRES-mediated translation of membrane proteins and glycoproteins in eukaryotic cell-free systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas K Brödel

    Full Text Available Internal ribosome entry site (IRES elements found in the 5' untranslated region of mRNAs enable translation initiation in a cap-independent manner, thereby representing an alternative to cap-dependent translation in cell-free protein expression systems. However, IRES function is largely species-dependent so their utility in cell-free systems from different species is rather limited. A promising approach to overcome these limitations would be the use of IRESs that are able to recruit components of the translation initiation apparatus from diverse origins. Here, we present a solution to this technical problem and describe the ability of a number of viral IRESs to direct efficient protein expression in different eukaryotic cell-free expression systems. The IRES from the intergenic region (IGR of the Cricket paralysis virus (CrPV genome was shown to function efficiently in four different cell-free systems based on lysates derived from cultured Sf21, CHO and K562 cells as well as wheat germ. Our results suggest that the CrPV IGR IRES-based expression vector is universally applicable for a broad range of eukaryotic cell lysates. Sf21, CHO and K562 cell-free expression systems are particularly promising platforms for the production of glycoproteins and membrane proteins since they contain endogenous microsomes that facilitate the incorporation of membrane-spanning proteins and the formation of post-translational modifications. We demonstrate the use of the CrPV IGR IRES-based expression vector for the enhanced synthesis of various target proteins including the glycoprotein erythropoietin and the membrane proteins heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor receptor as well as epidermal growth factor receptor in the above mentioned eukaryotic cell-free systems. CrPV IGR IRES-mediated translation will facilitate the development of novel eukaryotic cell-free expression platforms as well as the high-yield synthesis of desired proteins in already established

  14. Hepatic inflammation mediated by hepatitis C virus core protein is ameliorated by blocking complement activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Chen-Ming

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathogenesis of inflammation and fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection remains unclear. Transgenic mice with constitutive HCV core over-expression display steatosis only. While the reasons for this are unclear, it may be important that core protein production in these models begins during gestation, in contrast to human hepatitis C virus infection, which occurs post-natally and typically in adults. AIMS: To more realistically model the effect of core protein production in the adult liver, we developed a mouse with conditional expression of HCV core and examined the effect of core protein production in the adult liver. Methods Liver biopsy samples from transgenic mice with tetracycline(tet-regulated conditional core protein expression were evaluated immunohistologically. Microarray analysis of HCV core transgenic mice with steatohepatitis pointed to a role of the complement pathway. This was further explored by blocking complement activation by in vivo administration of CD55 (decay accelerating factor for complement, which inhibits activation of C3. Results Transgenic mice exhibited low, intermediate, or high HCV core protein expression when fed a permissive diet of standard chow. Aside from hepatic steatosis, hepatic inflammation and fibrosis were seen in mice with intermediate levels of core protein. Microarray analyses of inflamed liver demonstrated activation of both the complement (C3 up-regulation and coagulation pathways (fibrinogen B up-regulation. Administration of CD55 reduced hepatic inflammation. Conclusion Transgenic mice that conditionally express intermediate HCV core protein develop inflammation, steatosis, and fibrosis. These effects mediated by HCV core are reduced by administration of CD55, a regulator of the complement pathway. The model may be valuable in investigating the pathogenesis of liver inflammation in chronic hepatitis C.

  15. Pri sORF peptides induce selective proteasome-mediated protein processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanet, J; Benrabah, E; Li, T; Pélissier-Monier, A; Chanut-Delalande, H; Ronsin, B; Bellen, H J; Payre, F; Plaza, S

    2015-09-18

    A wide variety of RNAs encode small open-reading-frame (smORF/sORF) peptides, but their functions are largely unknown. Here, we show that Drosophila polished-rice (pri) sORF peptides trigger proteasome-mediated protein processing, converting the Shavenbaby (Svb) transcription repressor into a shorter activator. A genome-wide RNA interference screen identifies an E2-E3 ubiquitin-conjugating complex, UbcD6-Ubr3, which targets Svb to the proteasome in a pri-dependent manner. Upon interaction with Ubr3, Pri peptides promote the binding of Ubr3 to Svb. Ubr3 can then ubiquitinate the Svb N terminus, which is degraded by the proteasome. The C-terminal domains protect Svb from complete degradation and ensure appropriate processing. Our data show that Pri peptides control selectivity of Ubr3 binding, which suggests that the family of sORF peptides may contain an extended repertoire of protein regulators.

  16. Nitric oxide-mediated protein modification in cardiovascular physiology and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gödecke, Axel; Schrader, Jürgen; Reinartz, Michael

    2008-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a key regulator of cardiovascular functions including the control of vascular tone, anti-inflammatory properties of the endothelium, cardiac contractility, and thrombocyte activation and aggregation. Numerous experimental data support the view that NO not only acts via cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent mechanisms but also modulates protein function by nitrosation, nitrosylation, glutathiolation, and nitration, respectively. To understand how NO regulates all of these diverse biological processes on the molecular level a comprehensive assessment of NO-mediated cGMP-dependent and independent targets is required. Novel proteomic approaches allow the simultaneous identification of large quantities of proteins modified in an NO-dependent manner and thereby will considerably deepen our understanding of the role NO plays in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology.

  17. Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways promote low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1-mediated internalization of beta-amyloid protein in primary cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei-Na; Ma, Kai-Ge; Qian, Yi-Hua; Zhang, Jian-Shui; Feng, Gai-Feng; Shi, Li-Li; Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Liu, Zhao-Hui

    2015-07-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that the pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are caused by the intraneuronal accumulation of beta-amyloid protein (Aβ). Reuptake of extracellular Aβ is believed to contribute significantly to the intraneuronal Aβ pool in the early stages of AD. Published reports have claimed that the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) mediates Aβ1-42 uptake and lysosomal trafficking in GT1-7 neuronal cells and mouse embryonic fibroblast non-neuronal cells. However, there is no direct evidence supporting the role of LRP1 in Aβ internalization in primary neurons. Our recent study indicated that p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways are involved in regulating α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7nAChR)-mediated Aβ1-42 uptake in SH-SY5Y cells. This study was designed to explore the regulation of MAPK signaling pathways on LRP1-mediated Aβ internalization in neurons. We found that extracellular Aβ1-42 oligomers could be internalized into endosomes/lysosomes and mitochondria in cortical neurons. Aβ1-42 and LRP1 were also found co-localized in neurons during Aβ1-42 internalization, and they could form Aβ1-42-LRP1 complex. Knockdown of LRP1 expression significantly decreased neuronal Aβ1-42 internalization. Finally, we identified that p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 signaling pathways regulated the internalization of Aβ1-42 via LRP1. Therefore, these results demonstrated that LRP1, p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 mediated the internalization of Aβ1-42 in neurons and provided evidence that blockade of LRP1 or inhibitions of MAPK signaling pathways might be a potential approach to lowering brain Aβ levels and served a potential therapeutic target for AD.

  18. Mammalian Tead proteins regulate cell proliferation and contact inhibition as transcriptional mediators of Hippo signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, Mitsunori; Sasaki, Hiroshi

    2008-12-01

    Regulation of organ size is important for development and tissue homeostasis. In Drosophila, Hippo signaling controls organ size by regulating the activity of a TEAD transcription factor, Scalloped, through modulation of its co-activator protein Yki. Here, we show that mouse Tead proteins regulate cell proliferation by mediating Hippo signaling. In NIH3T3 cells, cell density and Hippo signaling regulated the activity of endogenous Tead proteins by modulating nuclear localization of a Yki homolog, Yap1, and the resulting change in Tead activity altered cell proliferation. Tead2-VP16 mimicked Yap1 overexpression, including increased cell proliferation, reduced cell death, promotion of EMT, lack of cell contact inhibition and promotion of tumor formation. Growth-promoting activities of various Yap1 mutants correlated with their Tead-co-activator activities. Tead2-VP16 and Yap1 regulated largely overlapping sets of genes. However, only a few of the Tead/Yap1-regulated genes in NIH3T3 cells were affected in Tead1(-/-);Tead2(-/-) or Yap1(-/-) embryos. Most of the previously identified Yap1-regulated genes were not affected in NIH3T3 cells or mutant mice. In embryos, levels of nuclear Yap1 and Tead1 varied depending on cell type. Strong nuclear accumulation of Yap1 and Tead1 were seen in myocardium, correlating with requirements of Tead1 for proliferation. However, their distribution did not always correlate with proliferation. Taken together, mammalian Tead proteins regulate cell proliferation and contact inhibition as a transcriptional mediator of Hippo signaling, but the mechanisms by which Tead/Yap1 regulate cell proliferation differ depending on the cell type, and Tead, Yap1 and Hippo signaling may play multiple roles in mouse embryos.

  19. Modification of the Campylobacter jejuni N-linked glycan by EptC protein-mediated addition of phosphoethanolamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scott, Nichollas E; Nothaft, Harald; Edwards, Alistair V G

    2012-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the major worldwide cause of bacterial gastroenteritis. C. jejuni possesses an extensive repertoire of carbohydrate structures that decorate both protein and non-protein surface-exposed structures. An N-linked glycosylation system encoded by the pgl gene cluster mediates...

  20. An auxilin-like J-domain protein, JAC1, regulates phototropin-mediated chloroplast movement in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Wada, Masamitsu

    2005-09-01

    The ambient-light conditions mediate chloroplast relocation in plant cells. Under the low-light conditions, chloroplasts accumulate in the light (accumulation response), while under the high-light conditions, they avoid the light (avoidance response). In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the accumulation response is mediated by two blue-light receptors, termed phototropins (phot1 and phot2) that act redundantly, and the avoidance response is mediated by phot2 alone. A mutant, J-domain protein required for chloroplast accumulation response 1 (jac1), lacks the accumulation response under weak blue light but shows a normal avoidance response under strong blue light. In dark-adapted wild-type cells, chloroplasts accumulate on the bottom of cells. Both the jac1 and phot2 mutants are defective in this chloroplast movement in darkness. Positional cloning of JAC1 reveals that this gene encodes a J-domain protein, resembling clathrin-uncoating factor auxilin at its C terminus. The amounts of JAC1 transcripts and JAC1 proteins are not regulated by light and by phototropins. A green fluorescent protein-JAC1 fusion protein showed a similar localization pattern to green fluorescent protein alone in a transient expression assay using Arabidopsis mesophyll cells and onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells, suggesting that the JAC1 protein may be a soluble cytosolic protein. Together, these results suggest that JAC1 is an essential component of phototropin-mediated chloroplast movement.

  1. MST kinases monitor actin cytoskeletal integrity and signal via c-Jun N-terminal kinase stress-activated kinase to regulate p21Waf1/Cip1 stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Densham, Ruth M; O'Neill, Eric; Munro, June; König, Ireen; Anderson, Kurt; Kolch, Walter; Olson, Michael F

    2009-12-01

    As well as providing a structural framework, the actin cytoskeleton plays integral roles in cell death, survival, and proliferation. The disruption of the actin cytoskeleton results in the activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) pathway; however, the sensor of actin integrity that couples to the JNK pathway has not been characterized in mammalian cells. We now report that the mammalian Ste20-like (MST) kinases mediate the activation of the JNK pathway in response to the disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. One consequence of actin disruption is the JNK-mediated stabilization of p21(Waf1/Cip1) (p21) via the phosphorylation of Thr57. The expression of MST1 or MST2 was sufficient to stabilize p21 in a JNK- and Thr57-dependent manner, while the stabilization of p21 by actin disruption required MST activity. These data indicate that, in addition to being components of the Salvador-Warts-Hippo tumor suppressor network and binding partners of c-Raf and the RASSF1A tumor suppressor, MST kinases serve to monitor cytoskeletal integrity and couple via the JNK SAPK pathway to the regulation of a key cell cycle regulatory protein.

  2. Cobalt(III)-Mediated Permanent and Stable Immobilization of Histidine-Tagged Proteins on NTA-Functionalized Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Seraphine V; Schenk, Franziska C; Spatz, Joachim P

    2016-02-24

    We present the cobalt(III)-mediated interaction between polyhistidine (His)-tagged proteins and nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-modified surfaces as a general approach for a permanent, oriented, and specific protein immobilization. In this approach, we first form the well-established Co(2+) -mediated interaction between NTA and His-tagged proteins and subsequently oxidize the Co(2+) center in the complex to Co(3+) . Unlike conventionally used Ni(2+) - or Co(2+) -mediated immobilization, the resulting Co(3+) -mediated immobilization is resistant toward strong ligands, such as imidazole and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), and washing off over time because of the high thermodynamic and kinetic stability of the Co(3+) complex. This immobilization method is compatible with a wide variety of surface coatings, including silane self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on glass, thiol SAMs on gold surfaces, and supported lipid bilayers. Furthermore, once the cobalt center has been oxidized, it becomes inert toward reducing agents, specific and unspecific interactions, so that it can be used to orthogonally functionalize surfaces with multiple proteins. Overall, the large number of available His-tagged proteins and materials with NTA groups make the Co(3+) -mediated interaction an attractive and widely applicable platform for protein immobilization.

  3. Environmental stress-mediated changes in transcriptional and translational regulation of protein synthesis in crop plants. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The research described in this final report focused on the influence of stress agents on protein synthesis in crop plants (primarily soybean). Investigations into the `heat shock` (HS) stress mediated changes in transcriptional and translocational regulation of protein synthesis coupled with studies on anaerobic water deficit and other stress mediated alterations in protein synthesis in plants provided the basis of the research. Understanding of the HS gene expression and function(s) of the HSPs may clarify regulatory mechanisms operative in development. Since the reproductive systems of plants if often very temperature sensitive, it may be that the system could be manipulated to provide greater thermotolerance.

  4. Arctigenin suppresses unfolded protein response and sensitizes glucose deprivation-mediated cytotoxicity of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shengrong; Wang, Xiong; Wang, Changhua; Nawaz, Ahmed; Wei, Wen; Li, Juanjuan; Wang, Lijun; Yu, De-Hua

    2011-01-01

    The involvement of unfolded protein response (UPR) activation in tumor survival and resistance to chemotherapies suggests a new anticancer strategy targeting UPR pathway. Arctigenin, a natural product, has been recently identified for its antitumor activity with selective toxicity against cancer cells under glucose starvation with unknown mechanism. Here we found that arctigenin specifically blocks the transcriptional induction of two potential anticancer targets, namely glucose-regulated protein-78 (GRP78) and its analog GRP94, under glucose deprivation, but not by tunicamycin. The activation of other UPR pathways, e.g., XBP-1 and ATF4, by glucose deprivation was also suppressed by arctigenin. A further transgene experiment showed that ectopic expression of GRP78 at least partially rescued arctigenin/glucose starvation-mediated cell growth inhibition, suggesting the causal role of UPR suppression in arctigenin-mediated cytotoxicity under glucose starvation. These observations bring a new insight into the mechanism of action of arctigenin and may lead to the design of new anticancer therapeutics.

  5. SET9-Mediated Regulation of TGF-β Signaling Links Protein Methylation to Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilianos Elkouris

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available TGF-β signaling regulates a variety of cellular processes, including proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, immune responses, and fibrogenesis. Here, we describe a lysine methylation-mediated mechanism that controls the pro-fibrogenic activity of TGF-β. We find that the methyltransferase Set9 potentiates TGF-β signaling by targeting Smad7, an inhibitory downstream effector. Smad7 methylation promotes interaction with the E3 ligase Arkadia and, thus, ubiquitination-dependent degradation. Depletion or pharmacological inhibition of Set9 results in elevated Smad7 protein levels and inhibits TGF-β-dependent expression of genes encoding extracellular matrix components. The inhibitory effect of Set9 on TGF-β-mediated extracellular matrix production is further demonstrated in mouse models of pulmonary fibrosis. Lung fibrosis induced by bleomycin or Ad-TGF-β treatment was highly compromised in Set9-deficient mice. These results uncover a complex regulatory interplay among multiple Smad7 modifications and highlight the possibility that protein methyltransferases may represent promising therapeutic targets for treating lung fibrosis.

  6. Glucose-6-phosphate mediates activation of the carbohydrate responsive binding protein (ChREBP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ming V. [Program of Cardiovascular Sciences, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Departments of Medicine and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Chen, Weiqin [Departments of Medicine and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Harmancey, Romain N. [Division of Cardiology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Nuotio-Antar, Alli M.; Imamura, Minako; Saha, Pradip [Departments of Medicine and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Taegtmeyer, Heinrich [Division of Cardiology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Chan, Lawrence, E-mail: lchan@bcm.tmc.edu [Program of Cardiovascular Sciences, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Departments of Medicine and Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); St. Luke' s Episcopal Hospital, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2010-05-07

    Carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) is a Mondo family transcription factor that activates a number of glycolytic and lipogenic genes in response to glucose stimulation. We have previously reported that high glucose can activate the transcriptional activity of ChREBP independent of the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-mediated increase in nuclear entry and DNA binding. Here, we found that formation of glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P) is essential for glucose activation of ChREBP. The glucose response of GAL4-ChREBP is attenuated by D-mannoheptulose, a potent hexokinase inhibitor, as well as over-expression of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase); kinetics of activation of GAL4-ChREBP can be modified by exogenously expressed GCK. Further metabolism of G-6-P through the two major glucose metabolic pathways, glycolysis and pentose-phosphate pathway, is not required for activation of ChREBP; over-expression of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) diminishes, whereas RNAi knockdown of the enzyme enhances, the glucose response of GAL4-ChREBP, respectively. Moreover, the glucose analogue 2-deoxyglucose (2-DG), which is phosphorylated by hexokinase, but not further metabolized, effectively upregulates the transcription activity of ChREBP. In addition, over-expression of phosphofructokinase (PFK) 1 and 2, synergistically diminishes the glucose response of GAL4-ChREBP. These multiple lines of evidence support the conclusion that G-6-P mediates the activation of ChREBP.

  7. Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PRL2 Mediates Notch and Kit Signals in Early T Cell Progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Michihiro; Nabinger, Sarah C; Bai, Yunpeng; Yoshimoto, Momoko; Gao, Rui; Chen, Sisi; Yao, Chonghua; Dong, Yuanshu; Zhang, Lujuan; Rodriguez, Sonia; Yashiro-Ohtani, Yumi; Pear, Warren S; Carlesso, Nadia; Yoder, Mervin C; Kapur, Reuben; Kaplan, Mark H; Daniel Lacorazza, Hugo; Zhang, Zhong-Yin; Liu, Yan

    2017-04-01

    The molecular pathways regulating lymphoid priming, fate, and development of multipotent bone marrow hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) that continuously feed thymic progenitors remain largely unknown. While Notch signal is indispensable for T cell specification and differentiation, the downstream effectors are not well understood. PRL2, a protein tyrosine phosphatase that regulates hematopoietic stem cell proliferation and self-renewal, is highly expressed in murine thymocyte progenitors. Here we demonstrate that protein tyrosine phosphatase PRL2 and receptor tyrosine kinase c-Kit are critical downstream targets and effectors of the canonical Notch/RBPJ pathway in early T cell progenitors. While PRL2 deficiency resulted in moderate defects of thymopoiesis in the steady state, de novo generation of T cells from Prl2 null hematopoietic stem cells was significantly reduced following transplantation. Prl2 null HSPCs also showed impaired T cell differentiation in vitro. We found that Notch/RBPJ signaling upregulated PRL2 as well as c-Kit expression in T cell progenitors. Further, PRL2 sustains Notch-mediated c-Kit expression and enhances stem cell factor/c-Kit signaling in T cell progenitors, promoting effective DN1-DN2 transition. Thus, we have identified a critical role for PRL2 phosphatase in mediating Notch and c-Kit signals in early T cell progenitors. Stem Cells 2017;35:1053-1064.

  8. The intact CFTR protein mediates ATPase rather than adenylate kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramjeesingh, Mohabir; Ugwu, Francisca; Stratford, Fiona L L; Huan, Ling-Jun; Li, Canhui; Bear, Christine E

    2008-06-01

    The two NBDs (nucleotide-binding domains) of ABC (ATP-binding-cassette) proteins function in a complex to mediate ATPase activity and this activity has been linked to their regulated transport activity. A similar model has been proposed for CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator), the chloride channel defective in cystic fibrosis, wherein ATP binding and hydrolysis regulate the channel gate. Recently, it was shown that the individual NBDs isolated from CFTR primarily mediate adenylate kinase activity, raising the possibility that this activity may also contribute to gating of the CFTR channel. However, this present study shows that whereas the isolated NBDs exhibit adenylate kinase activity, the full-length purified and reconstituted CFTR protein functions as an ATPase, arguing that the enzymatic activity of the NBDs is dependent on their molecular context and appropriate domain-domain assembly. As expected, the disease-causing mutant bearing a mutation in the ABC signature motif, CFTR-G551D, exhibited a markedly reduced ATPase activity. Furthermore, mutation of the putative catalytic base in CFTR caused a reduction in ATPase activity, with the CFTR-E1371Q mutant supporting a low level of residual activity. Neither of these mutants exhibited detectable adenylate kinase activity. Together, these findings support the concept that the molecular mechanism of action of CFTR is dependent on ATP binding and hydrolysis, and that the structure of prokaryotic ABC ATPases provide a useful template for understanding their mechanism of action.

  9. Poly(C)-binding protein 1 (PCBP1) mediates housekeeping degradation of mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Zhou; Fuping You; Huihui Chen; Zhengfan Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) is a key adaptor in cellular antiviral innate immunity.We previously identified poly(C)-binding protein 2 (PCBP2) as a feedback inhibitor of MAVS that facilitates its degradation after viral infection,but little is known about the regulatory potential of poly(C)-binding protein 1 (PCBP1),which highly resembles PCBP2.Here we report that PCBP1 mediates housekeeping degradation of MAVS using the same mechanism as PCBP2 employs.Overexpression of PCBP1 impairs MAVS-mediated antiviral responses,while knockdown of PCBP1 exerts the opposite effect.The suppression is due to PCBP1-induced MAVS degradation.We observe that PCBP1 and PCBP2 show synergy in MAVS inhibition,but their expression patterns are distinct:PCBP1 is stably and abundantly expressed,while PCBP2 shows low basal expression with rapid induction after infection.Individual knockdown and subcellular fractionation analyses reveal that unlike the postinfection inhibitor PCBP2,PCBP1 continuously eliminates cellular MAVS.Our findings unravel a critical role of PCBP1 in regulating MAVS for both finetuning the antivirai immunity and preventing inflammation.

  10. 5-ALA mediated photodynamic therapy induces autophagic cell death via AMP-activated protein kinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yu-Hsin

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Photodynamic therapy (PDT has been developed as an anticancer treatment, which is based on the tumor-specific accumulation of a photosensitizer that induces cell death after irradiation of light with a specific wavelength. Depending on the subcellular localization of the photosensitizer, PDT could trigger various signal transduction cascades and induce cell death such as apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis. In this study, we report that both AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling cascades are activated following 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA-mediated PDT in both PC12 and CL1-0 cells. Although the activities of caspase-9 and -3 are elevated, the caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk did not protect cells against ALA-PDT-induced cell death. Instead, autophagic cell death was found in PC12 and CL1-0 cells treated with ALA-PDT. Most importantly, we report here for the first time that it is the activation of AMPK, but not MAPKs that plays a crucial role in mediating autophagic cell death induced by ALA-PDT. This novel observation indicates that the AMPK pathway play an important role in ALA-PDT-induced autophagy.

  11. Cherry Valley ducks mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS mediated signaling pathway and antiviral activity research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS, an adaptor protein of retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I like receptors (RLRs-mediated signal pathway, is involved in innate immunity. In this study, Cherry Valley duck MAVS (duMAVS was cloned from the spleen and analyzed. duMAVS was determined to have a caspase activation and recruitment domain at N-terminal, followed by a proline rich domain and a transmembrane domain at C-terminal. Quantitative real time PCR indicated that duMAVS was expressed in all tissues tested across a broad expression spectrum. The expression of duMAVS was significantly up-regulated after infection with duck Tembusu virus. Overexpression of duMAVS could drive the activation of interferon-β, nuclear factor-κB, interferon regulatory factor 7, and many downstream factors (such as Mx, PKR, OAS, and IL-8 in duck embryo fibroblast cells. What’s more, RNA interference further confirmed that duMAVS was an important adaptor for IFN-β activation. The antiviral assay showed that duMAVS could suppress the various viral replications (duck Tembusu virus, novel reovirus, and duck plague virus at early stages of infection. Overall, these results showed that the main signal pathway mediated by duMAVS and it had a broad-spectrum antiviral ability. This research will be helpful to better understanding the innate immune system of ducks.

  12. THE SURFACE-MEDIATED UNFOLDING KINETICS OF GLOBULAR PROTEINS IS DEPENDENT ON MOLECULAR WEIGHT AND TEMPERATURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patananan, A.N.; Goheen, S.C.

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption and unfolding pathways of proteins on rigid surfaces are essential in numerous complex processes associated with biomedical engineering, nanotechnology, and chromatography. It is now well accepted that the kinetics of unfolding are characterized by chemical and physical interactions dependent on protein deformability and structure, as well as environmental pH, temperature, and surface chemistry. Although this fundamental process has broad implications in medicine and industry, little is known about the mechanism because of the atomic lengths and rapid time scales involved. Therefore, the unfolding kinetics of myoglobin, β-glucosidase, and ovalbumin were investigated by adsorbing the globular proteins to non-porous cationic polymer beads. The protein fractions were adsorbed at different residence times (0, 9, 10, 20, and 30 min) at near-physiological conditions using a gradient elution system similar to that in high-performance liquid chromatography. The elution profi les and retention times were obtained by ultraviolet/visible spectrophotometry. A decrease in recovery was observed with time for almost all proteins and was attributed to irreversible protein unfolding on the non-porous surfaces. These data, and those of previous studies, fi t a positively increasing linear trend between percent unfolding after a fi xed (9 min) residence time (71.8%, 31.1%, and 32.1% of myoglobin, β-glucosidase, and ovalbumin, respectively) and molecular weight. Of all the proteins examined so far, only myoglobin deviated from this trend with higher than predicted unfolding rates. Myoglobin also exhibited an increase in retention time over a wide temperature range (0°C and 55°C, 4.39 min and 5.74 min, respectively) whereas ovalbumin and β-glucosidase did not. Further studies using a larger set of proteins are required to better understand the physiological and physiochemical implications of protein unfolding kinetics. This study confi rms that surface-mediated

  13. Genistein induces apoptosis by stabilizing intracellular p53 protein through an APE1-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianwu; Zhang, Chong; Qing, Yi; Cheng, Yi; Jiang, Xiaolin; Li, Mengxia; Yang, Zhenzhou; Wang, Dong

    2015-09-01

    Genistein (GEN) has been previously shown to have a proapoptotic effect on cancer cells through a p53-dependent pathway, the mechanism of which remains unclear. One of its intracellular targets, APE1, protects against apoptosis under genotoxic stress and interacts with p53. In this current study, we explored the mechanism of the proapoptotic effect of GEN by examining the APE1-p53 protein-protein interaction. We initially showed that the p53 protein level was elevated in GEN-treated human non-small lung cancer A549 cells and cervical cancer HeLa cells. By examining both protein synthesis and degradation, we found that GEN enhances p53 intracellular stability by interfering with the interaction of APE1 and p53, which provided a plausible explanation for how GEN initiates apoptosis. Furthermore, we found that the interaction between APE1 and p53 is important for the degradation of p53 and is dependent on the redox domain of APE1 by utilizing the redox domain mutant APE1 C65A. Our data suggest that the degradation of wild-type p53 is blocked when the redox domain of APE1 is masked or interrupted. Based on this evidence, we hereby report a novel mechanism of p53 degradation through an APE1-mediated, redox-dependent pathway.

  14. 6-Thioguanine inhibition of parathyroid hormone-related protein expression is mediated by GLI2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rachelle W; Merkel, Alyssa R; Danilin, Sabrina; Nguyen, Mai P; Mundy, Gregory R; Sterling, Julie A

    2011-09-01

    Breast cancer cells frequently metastasize to bone, where they up-regulate their expression of the transcription factor GLI2 and the downstream osteolytic factor parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP). The guanosine nucleotide 6-thioguanine (6-TG) inhibits PTHrP expression and blocks osteolytic bone destruction in mice inoculated with bone metastatic cells; however, the mechanism by which 6-TG inhibits PTHrP remains unclear. We hypothesized that 6-TG inhibition of PTHrP is mediated through GLI2 signaling. Human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and RWGT2 squamous-cell lung carcinoma cells were treated with 100 μM 6-TG and examined for GLI2 mRNA expression and stability by Q-PCR, promoter activity by luciferase assay, and protein expression by Western blot. 6-TG significantly blocked GLI2 mRNA and protein expression, but did not affect stability. Additionally, 6-TG directly inhibited GLI2 promoter activity, and when cells were transfected with constitutively expressed GLI2, the inhibitory effect of 6-TG on PTHrP expression was abolished. Taken together, these data indicate that 6-TG regulates PTHrP in part through GLI2 transcription, and therefore the clinical use of 6-TG or other guanosine nucleotides may be a viable therapeutic option in tumor types expressing elevated levels of GLI proteins.

  15. PAS domain of the deduced Org35 protein mediates the interaction with NifA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TU Ran; CUI Yanhua; CHEN Sanfeng; LI Jilun

    2006-01-01

    NifA in Azospirillum brasilense plays a key role in regulating the synthesis of nitrogenase in response to ammonia and oxygen available. Recently,our laboratory has identified four clones, whose gene prodcuts interact with NifA, from A. brasilense Sp7genomic libraries by using the yeast two-hybrid system with NifA as bait. We are interested in clone S35,one of the four clones, because it contains a PAS-domain coding region. The entire open reading frame (ORF) for the PAS domain-containing protein was isolated and designated as org35 here. org35gene is 2211-bp long and encodes a protein of 736aa with a predicted molecular weight of about 78.4 kD.The predicted amino acid sequence of org35 has similarity to some two-component sensor kinase/response regulator hybrids of bacteria. Structural analyses showed that Org35 comprises at least three discrete conserved domains: the N-terminal PAS, the central histidine protein kinase (HPK) and the C-terminal response regulator (RR). The PAS domain of the deduced Org35 protein was found to interact directly with NifA, but the central HPK and the C-terminal RR domains of Org35 were not. These results indicated that interaction between NifA and Org35 was mediated by PAS domain.

  16. Urea-mediated cross-presentation of soluble Epstein-Barr virus BZLF1 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha Barabas

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Soluble extracellular proteins usually do not enter the endogenous human leukocyte antigen (HLA I-dependent presentation pathway of antigen-presenting cells, strictly impeding their applicability for the re-stimulation of protein-specific CD8(+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL. Here we present for the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV BZLF1 a novel strategy that facilitates protein translocation into antigen-presenting cells by its solubilisation in high molar urea and subsequent pulsing of cells in presence of low molar urea. Stimulation of PBMC from HLA-matched EBV-seropositive individuals with urea-treated BZLF1 but not untreated BZLF1 induces an efficient reactivation of BZLF1-specific CTL. Urea-treated BZLF1 (uBZLF1 enters antigen-presenting cells in a temperature-dependent manner by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and is processed by the proteasome into peptides that are bound to nascent HLA I molecules. Dendritic cells and monocytes but also B cells can cross-present uBZLF1 in vitro. The strategy described here has potential for use in the development of improved technologies for the monitoring of protein-specific CTL.

  17. Association of triclosan to casein proteins through solvent-mediated high-pressure homogenization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, A; Dunlap, J; Harte, F

    2009-03-01

    The association of triclosan (TCS), a widely used hydrophobic compound, to the bovine casein micelle is investigated in this study. The use of high-pressure homogenization (HPH) at 0, 100, 200, and 300 MPa was introduced as a method for the dissociation of casein micelles in a skim milk/ethanol solution (1: 1, v/v) in the presence of TCS at 20, 80, and 160 mg/L where ethanol evaporation served as the final step for TCS association to caseins. The majority of TCS (over 80%) was associated with the caseins regardless of initial TCS concentration or applied pressure. TCS association to caseins was enhanced by 30% with continued pressurization to 300 MPa. Micellar dissociation and reassociation was found to be an irreversible process as evidenced by microscopy images. Pressurization to 300 MPa resulted in the formation of an integrated protein network of casein proteins and noncovalently linked whey proteins where the solubility of TCS was enhanced up to 40 times its reported water solubility at the highest initial TCS level of 160 mg/L. Reformed micelles exhibited Newtonian flow behavior at all pressure levels. This study provides evidence for the solubility enhancing quality of TCS through the solvent-mediated pressure/shear-induced dissociation of casein proteins.

  18. Inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export of transcription factors by leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Akiko; Sarma, Nayan J; Abdul-Nabi, Anmaar M; Yaseen, Nabeel R

    2010-05-21

    NUP98 is a nucleoporin that plays complex roles in the nucleocytoplasmic trafficking of macromolecules. Rearrangements of the NUP98 gene in human leukemia result in the expression of numerous fusion oncoproteins whose effect on nucleocytoplasmic trafficking is poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to determine the effects of leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins on CRM1-mediated nuclear export. NUP98-HOXA9, a prototypic NUP98 fusion, inhibited the nuclear export of two known CRM1 substrates: mutated cytoplasmic nucleophosmin and HIV-1 Rev. In vitro binding assays revealed that NUP98-HOXA9 binds CRM1 through the FG repeat motif in a Ran-GTP-dependent manner similar to but stronger than the interaction between CRM1 and its export substrates. Two NUP98 fusions, NUP98-HOXA9 and NUP98-DDX10, whose fusion partners are structurally and functionally unrelated, interacted with endogenous CRM1 in myeloid cells as shown by co-immunoprecipitation. These leukemogenic NUP98 fusion proteins interacted with CRM1, Ran, and the nucleoporin NUP214 in a manner fundamentally different from that of wild-type NUP98. NUP98-HOXA9 and NUP98-DDX10 formed characteristic aggregates within the nuclei of a myeloid cell line and primary human CD34+ cells and caused aberrant localization of CRM1 to these aggregates. These NUP98 fusions caused nuclear accumulation of two transcription factors, NFAT and NFkappaB, that are regulated by CRM1-mediated export. The nuclear entrapment of NFAT and NFkappaB correlated with enhanced transcription from promoters responsive to these transcription factors. Taken together, the results suggest a new mechanism by which NUP98 fusions dysregulate transcription and cause leukemia, namely, inhibition of CRM1-mediated nuclear export with aberrant nuclear retention of transcriptional regulators.

  19. Cryptococcus neoformans is resistant to surfactant protein A mediated host defense mechanisms.

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    Steven S Giles

    Full Text Available Initiation of a protective immune response to infection by the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is mediated in part by host factors that promote interactions between immune cells and C. neoformans yeast. Surfactant protein A (SP-A contributes positively to pulmonary host defenses against a variety of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in part by promoting the recognition and phagocytosis of these pathogens by alveolar macrophages. In the present study we investigated the role of SP-A as a mediator of host defense against the pulmonary pathogen, C. neoformans. Previous studies have shown that SP-A binds to acapsular and minimally encapsulated strains of C. neoformans. Using in vitro binding assays we confirmed that SP-A does not directly bind to a fully encapsulated strain of C. neoformans (H99. However, we observed that when C. neoformans was incubated in bronchoalveolar fluid, SP-A binding was detected, suggesting that another alveolar host factor may enable SP-A binding. Indeed, we discovered that SP-A binds encapsulated C. neoformans via a previously unknown IgG dependent mechanism. The consequence of this interaction was the inhibition of IgG-mediated phagocytosis of C. neoformans by alveolar macrophages. Therefore, to assess the contribution of SP-A to the pulmonary host defenses we compared in vivo infections using SP-A null mice (SP-A-/- and wild-type mice in an intranasal infection model. We found that the immune response assessed by cellular counts, TNFalpha cytokine production, and fungal burden in lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids during early stages of infection were equivalent. Furthermore, the survival outcome of C. neoformans infection was equivalent in SP-A-/- and wild-type mice. Our results suggest that unlike a variety of bacteria, viruses, and other fungi, progression of disease with an inhalational challenge of C. neoformans does not appear to be negatively or positively affected by SP-A mediated mechanisms of

  20. NBR1-mediated selective autophagy targets insoluble ubiquitinated protein aggregates in plant stress responses.

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    Jie Zhou

    Full Text Available Plant autophagy plays an important role in delaying senescence, nutrient recycling, and stress responses. Functional analysis of plant autophagy has almost exclusively focused on the proteins required for the core process of autophagosome assembly, but little is known about the proteins involved in other important processes of autophagy, including autophagy cargo recognition and sequestration. In this study, we report functional genetic analysis of Arabidopsis NBR1, a homolog of mammalian autophagy cargo adaptors P62 and NBR1. We isolated two nbr1 knockout mutants and discovered that they displayed some but not all of the phenotypes of autophagy-deficient atg5 and atg7 mutants. Like ATG5 and ATG7, NBR1 is important for plant tolerance to heat, oxidative, salt, and drought stresses. The role of NBR1 in plant tolerance to these abiotic stresses is dependent on its interaction with ATG8. Unlike ATG5 and ATG7, however, NBR1 is dispensable in age- and darkness-induced senescence and in resistance to a necrotrophic pathogen. A selective role of NBR1 in plant responses to specific abiotic stresses suggest that plant autophagy in diverse biological processes operates through multiple cargo recognition and delivery systems. The compromised heat tolerance of atg5, atg7, and nbr1 mutants was associated with increased accumulation of insoluble, detergent-resistant proteins that were highly ubiquitinated under heat stress. NBR1, which contains an ubiquitin-binding domain, also accumulated to high levels with an increasing enrichment in the insoluble protein fraction in the autophagy-deficient mutants under heat stress. These results suggest that NBR1-mediated autophagy targets ubiquitinated protein aggregates most likely derived from denatured or otherwise damaged nonnative proteins generated under stress conditions.

  1. CAML mediates survival of Myc-induced lymphoma cells independent of tail-anchored protein insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shing, Jennifer C; Lindquist, Lonn D; Borgese, Nica; Bram, Richard J

    2017-01-01

    Calcium-modulating cyclophilin ligand (CAML) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein that functions, along with WRB and TRC40, to mediate tail-anchored (TA) protein insertion into the ER membrane. Physiologic roles for CAML include endocytic trafficking, intracellular calcium signaling, and the survival and proliferation of specialized immune cells, recently attributed to its requirement for TA protein insertion. To identify a possible role for CAML in cancer cells, we generated Eμ-Myc transgenic mice that carry a tamoxifen-inducible deletion allele of Caml. In multiple B-cell lymphoma cell lines derived from these mice, homozygous loss of Caml activated apoptosis. Cell death was blocked by Bcl-2/Bcl-xL overexpression; however, rescue from apoptosis was insufficient to restore proliferation. Tumors established from an Eμ-Myc lymphoma cell line completely regressed after tamoxifen administration, suggesting that CAML is also required for these cancer cells to survive and grow in vivo. Cell cycle analyses of Caml-deleted lymphoma cells revealed an arrest in G2/M, accompanied by low expression of the mitotic marker, phospho-histone H3 (Ser10). Surprisingly, lymphoma cell viability did not depend on the domain of CAML required for its interaction with TRC40. Furthermore, a small protein fragment consisting of the C-terminal 111 amino acid residues of CAML, encompassing the WRB-binding domain, was sufficient to rescue growth and survival of Caml-deleted lymphoma cells. Critically, this minimal region of CAML did not restore TA protein insertion in knockout cells. Taken together, these data reveal an essential role for CAML in supporting survival and mitotic progression in Myc-driven lymphomas that is independent of its TA protein insertion function.

  2. Nogo-B is associated with cytoskeletal structures in human monocyte-derived macrophages

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    Gredler Viktoria

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reticulon Nogo-B participates in cellular and immunological processes in murine macrophages. Since leukocytes are an essential part of the immune system in health and disease, we decided to investigate the expression of Nogo-A, Nogo-B and Nogo-C in different human immune cell subpopulations. Furthermore, we analyzed the localization of Nogo-B in human monocyte-derived macrophages by indirect immunofluorescence stainings to gain further insight into its possible function. Findings We describe an association of Nogo-B with cytoskeletal structures and the base of filopodia, but not with focal or podosomal adhesion sites of monocyte-derived macrophages. Nogo-B positive structures are partially co-localized with RhoA staining and Rac1 positive membrane ruffles. Furthermore, Nogo-B is associated with the tubulin network, but not accumulated in the Golgi region. Although Nogo-B is present in the endoplasmic reticulum, it can also be translocated to large cell protrusions or the trailing end of migratory cells, where it is homogenously distributed. Conclusions Two different Nogo-B staining patterns can be distinguished in macrophages: firstly we observed ER-independent Nogo-B localization in cell protrusions and at the trailing end of migrating cells. Secondly, the localization of Nogo-B in actin/RhoA/Rac1 positive regions supports an influence on cytoskeletal organization. To our knowledge this is the first report on Nogo-B expression at the base of filopodia, thus providing further insight into the distribution of this protein.

  3. Cell shape, cytoskeletal mechanics, and cell cycle control in angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Sun, Z.; Betensky, H.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    Capillary endothelial cells can be switched between growth and differentiation by altering cell-extracellular matrix interactions and thereby, modulating cell shape. Studies were carried out to determine when cell shape exerts its growth-regulatory influence during cell cycle progression and to explore the role of cytoskeletal structure and mechanics in this control mechanism. When G0-synchronized cells were cultured in basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-containing defined medium on dishes coated with increasing densities of fibronectin or a synthetic integrin ligand (RGD-containing peptide), cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis all increased in parallel. To determine the minimum time cells must be adherent and spread on extracellular matrix (ECM) to gain entry into S phase, cells were removed with trypsin or induced to retract using cytochalasin D at different times after plating. Both approaches revealed that cells must remain extended for approximately 12-15 h and hence, most of G1, in order to enter S phase. After this restriction point was passed, normally 'anchorage-dependent' endothelial cells turned on DNA synthesis even when round and in suspension. The importance of actin-containing microfilaments in shape-dependent growth control was confirmed by culturing cells in the presence of cytochalasin D (25-1000 ng ml-1): dose-dependent inhibition of cell spreading, nuclear extension, and DNA synthesis resulted. In contrast, induction of microtubule disassembly using nocodazole had little effect on cell or nuclear spreading and only partially inhibited DNA synthesis. Interestingly, combination of nocodazole with a suboptimal dose of cytochalasin D (100 ng ml-1) resulted in potent inhibition of both spreading and growth, suggesting that microtubules are redundant structural elements which can provide critical load-bearing functions when microfilaments are partially compromised. Similar synergism between nocodazole and cytochalasin D was observed

  4. Multiple protein domains mediate interaction between Bcl10 and MALT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langel, Felicia D; Jain, Nidhi A; Rossman, Jeremy S; Kingeter, Lara M; Kashyap, Anuj K; Schaefer, Brian C

    2008-11-21

    Bcl10 and MALT1 are essential mediators of NF-kappaB activation in response to the triggering of a diverse array of transmembrane receptors, including antigen receptors. Additionally, both proteins are translocation targets in MALT lymphoma. Thus, a detailed understanding of the interaction between these mediators is of considerable biological importance. Previous studies have indicated that a 13-amino acid region downstream of the Bcl10 caspase recruitment domain (CARD) is responsible for interacting with the immunoglobulin-like domains of MALT1. We now provide evidence that the death domain of MALT1 and the CARD of Bcl10 also contribute to Bcl10-MALT1 interactions. Although a direct interaction between the MALT1 death domain and Bcl10 cannot be detected via immunoprecipitation, FRET data strongly suggest that the death domain of MALT1 contributes significantly to the association between Bcl10 and MALT1 in T cells in vivo. Furthermore, analysis of point mutants of conserved residues of Bcl10 shows that the Bcl10 CARD is essential for interaction with the MALT1 N terminus. Mutations that disrupt proper folding of the Bcl10 CARD strongly impair Bcl10-MALT1 interactions. Molecular modeling and functional analyses of Bcl10 point mutants suggest that residues Asp(80) and Glu(84) of helix 5 of the Bcl10 CARD directly contact MALT1. Together, these data demonstrate that the association between Bcl10 and MALT1 involves a complex interaction between multiple protein domains. Moreover, the Bcl10-MALT1 interaction is the second reported example of interactions between a CARD and a non-CARD protein region, which suggests that many signaling cascades may utilize CARD interactions with non-CARD domains.

  5. Unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling regulates arsenic trioxide-mediated macrophage innate immune function disruption

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    Srivastava, Ritesh K.; Li, Changzhao; Chaudhary, Sandeep C. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Ballestas, Mary E. [Department of Pediatrics Infectious Disease, Children' s of Alabama, School of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, AL (United States); Elmets, Craig A. [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Robbins, David J. [Department of Surgery, Molecular Oncology Program, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami (United States); Matalon, Sadis [Department of Anesthesiology, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Deshane, Jessy S. [Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Afaq, Farrukh [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States); Bickers, David R. [Department of Dermatology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York (United States); Athar, Mohammad, E-mail: mathar@uab.edu [Department of Dermatology and Skin Diseases Research Center, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Arsenic exposure is known to disrupt innate immune functions in humans and in experimental animals. In this study, we provide a mechanism by which arsenic trioxide (ATO) disrupts macrophage functions. ATO treatment of murine macrophage cells diminished internalization of FITC-labeled latex beads, impaired clearance of phagocytosed fluorescent bacteria and reduced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These impairments in macrophage functions are associated with ATO-induced unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway characterized by the enhancement in proteins such as GRP78, p-PERK, p-eIF2α, ATF4 and CHOP. The expression of these proteins is altered both at transcriptional and translational levels. Pretreatment with chemical chaperon, 4-phenylbutyric acid (PBA) attenuated the ATO-induced activation in UPR signaling and afforded protection against ATO-induced disruption of macrophage functions. This treatment also reduced ATO-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Interestingly, treatment with antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) prior to ATO exposure, not only reduced ROS production and UPR signaling but also improved macrophage functions. These data demonstrate that UPR signaling and ROS generation are interdependent and are involved in the arsenic-induced pathobiology of macrophage. These data also provide a novel strategy to block the ATO-dependent impairment in innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Inorganic arsenic to humans and experimental animals disrupt innate immune responses. • The mechanism underlying arsenic impaired macrophage functions involves UPR signaling. • Chemical chaperon attenuates arsenic-mediated macrophage function impairment. • Antioxidant, NAC blocks impairment in arsenic-treated macrophage functions.

  6. FRNK negatively regulates IL-4-mediated inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ritu; Colarusso, Pina; Zhang, Hong; Stevens, Katarzyna M; Patel, Kamala D

    2015-02-15

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-related nonkinase (PTK2 isoform 6 in humans, hereafter referred to as FRNK) is a cytoskeletal regulatory protein that has recently been shown to dampen lung fibrosis, yet its role in inflammation is unknown. Here, we show for the first time that expression of FRNK negatively regulates IL-4-mediated inflammation in a human model of eosinophil recruitment. Mechanistically, FRNK blocks eosinophil accumulation, firm adhesion and transmigration by preventing transcription and protein expression of VCAM-1 and CCL26. IL-4 activates STAT6 to induce VCAM-1 and CCL26 transcription. We now show that IL-4 also increases GATA6 to induce VCAM-1 expression. FRNK blocks IL-4-induced GATA6 transcription but has little effect on GATA6 protein expression and no effect on STAT6 activation. FRNK can block FAK or Pyk2 signaling and we, thus, downregulated these proteins using siRNA to determine whether signaling from either protein is involved in the regulation of VCAM-1 and CCL26. Knockdown of FAK, Pyk2 or both had no effect on VCAM-1 or CCL26 expression, which suggests that FRNK acts independently of FAK and Pyk2 signaling. Finally, we found that IL-4 induces the late expression of endogenous FRNK. In summary, FRNK represents a novel mechanism to negatively regulate IL-4-mediated inflammation.

  7. Cell adhesion controlled by adhesion G protein-coupled receptor GPR124/ADGRA2 is mediated by a protein complex comprising intersectins and Elmo-Dock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Vásquez, Magda Nohemí; Adame-García, Sendi Rafael; Hamoud, Noumeira; Chidiac, Rony; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; Gratton, Jean Philippe; Côté, Jean-François; Vázquez-Prado, José

    2017-07-21

    Developmental angiogenesis and the maintenance of the blood-brain barrier involve endothelial cell adhesion, which is linked to cytoskeletal dynamics. GPR124 (also known as TEM5/ADGRA2) is an adhesion G protein-coupled receptor family member that plays a pivotal role in brain angiogenesis and in ensuring a tight blood-brain barrier. However, the signaling properties of GPR124 remain poorly defined. Here, we show that ectopic expression of GPR124 promotes cell adhesion, additive to extracellular matrix-dependent effect, coupled with filopodia and lamellipodia formation and an enrichment of a pool of the G protein-coupled receptor at actin-rich cellular protrusions containing VASP, a filopodial marker. Accordingly, GPR124-expressing cells also displayed increased activation of both Rac and Cdc42 GTPases. Mechanistically, we uncover novel direct interactions between endogenous GPR124 and the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors Elmo/Dock and intersectin (ITSN). Small fragments of either Elmo or ITSN1 that bind GPR124 blocked GPR124-induced cell adhesion. In addition, Gβγ interacts with the C-terminal tail of GPR124 and promotes the formation of a GPR124-Elmo complex. Furthermore, GPR124 also promotes the activation of the Elmo-Dock complex, as measured by Elmo phosphorylation on a conserved C-terminal tyrosine residue. Interestingly, Elmo and ITSN1 also interact with each other independently of their GPR124-recognition regions. Moreover, endogenous phospho-Elmo and ITSN1 co-localize with GPR124 at lamellipodia of adhering endothelial cells, where GPR124 expression contributes to polarity acquisition during wound healing. Collectively, our results indicate that GPR124 promotes cell adhesion via Elmo-Dock and ITSN. This constitutes a previously unrecognized complex formed of atypical and conventional Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors for Rac and Cdc42 that is putatively involved in GPR124-dependent angiogenic responses. © 2017 by The American Society for

  8. Selective ablation of the androgen receptor in mouse sertoli cells affects sertoli cell maturation, barrier formation and cytoskeletal development.

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    Ariane Willems

    Full Text Available The observation that mice with a selective ablation of the androgen receptor (AR in Sertoli cells (SC (SCARKO mice display a complete block in meiosis supports the contention that SC play a pivotal role in the control of germ cell development by androgens. To delineate the physiological and molecular mechanism responsible for this control, we compared tubular development in pubertal SCARKO mice and littermate controls. Particular attention was paid to differences in SC maturation, SC barrier formation and cytoskeletal organization and to the molecular mediators potentially involved. Functional analysis of SC barrier development by hypertonic perfusion and lanthanum permeation techniques and immunohistochemical analysis of junction formation showed that SCARKO mice still attempt to produce a barrier separating basal and adluminal compartment but that barrier formation is delayed and defective. Defective barrier formation was accompanied by disturbances in SC nuclear maturation (immature shape, absence of prominent, tripartite nucleoli and SC polarization (aberrant positioning of SC nuclei and cytoskeletal elements such as vimentin. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to study the transcript levels of genes potentially related to the described phenomena between day 8 and 35. Differences in the expression of SC genes known to play a role in junction formation could be shown from day 8 for Cldn11, from day 15 for Cldn3 and Espn, from day 20 for Cdh2 and Jam3 and from day 35 for ZO-1. Marked differences were also noted in the transcript levels of several genes that are also related to cell adhesion and cytoskeletal dynamics but that have not yet been studied in SC (Actn3, Ank3, Anxa9, Scin, Emb, Mpzl2. It is concluded that absence of a functional AR in SC impedes the remodeling of testicular tubules expected at the onset of spermatogenesis and interferes with the creation of the specific environment needed for germ cell development.

  9. Phospholipase D1 mediates AMP-activated protein kinase signaling for glucose uptake.

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    Jong Hyun Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glucose homeostasis is maintained by a balance between hepatic glucose production and peripheral glucose utilization. In skeletal muscle cells, glucose utilization is primarily regulated by glucose uptake. Deprivation of cellular energy induces the activation of regulatory proteins and thus glucose uptake. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is known to play a significant role in the regulation of energy balances. However, the mechanisms related to the AMPK-mediated control of glucose uptake have yet to be elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we found that AMPK-induced phospholipase D1 (PLD1 activation is required for (14C-glucose uptake in muscle cells under glucose deprivation conditions. PLD1 activity rather than PLD2 activity is significantly enhanced by glucose deprivation. AMPK-wild type (WT stimulates PLD activity, while AMPK-dominant negative (DN inhibits it. AMPK regulates PLD1 activity through phosphorylation of the Ser-505 and this phosphorylation is increased by the presence of AMP. Furthermore, PLD1-S505Q, a phosphorylation-deficient mutant, shows no changes in activity in response to glucose deprivation and does not show a significant increase in (14C-glucose uptake when compared to PLD1-WT. Taken together, these results suggest that phosphorylation of PLD1 is important for the regulation of (14C-glucose uptake. In addition, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK is stimulated by AMPK-induced PLD1 activation through the formation of phosphatidic acid (PA, which is a product of PLD. An ERK pharmacological inhibitor, PD98059, and the PLD inhibitor, 1-BtOH, both attenuate (14C-glucose uptake in muscle cells. Finally, the extracellular stresses caused by glucose deprivation or aminoimidazole carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR; AMPK activator regulate (14C-glucose uptake and cell surface glucose transport (GLUT 4 through ERK stimulation by AMPK-mediated PLD1 activation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results

  10. Investigation of a potential force-generation machinery driven by a cytoskeletal Walker-type ATPase in prokaryotic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbe, Andeas; Hou, Sing-Yi; Chen, Chen-Yun; Lin, Yi-Lih; Shen, Jie-Pan; Lin, Li-Jing; Chou, Chia-Fu; Shih, Yu-Ling

    2008-03-01

    Cytoskeletal proteins are often involved in generating mechanical force to drive various cellular processes. A subgroup of the Walker-type ATPases acts as cytoskeletal proteins that show highly dynamic behavior in bacterial cells. One of the most prominent examples is MinD that works with other cellular components to prevent cell division at unwanted polar sites through cycles of pole-to-pole oscillation in E. coli cells. We use fluorescence microscopy techniques to study the process of MinD assembly and disassembly on a lipid bilayer membrane surface and any possible change of membrane properties caused by MinD association with the membrane. To form a supported bilayer membrane, vesicles of the polar or total extract of E. coli membrane or synthetic lipids of defined composition are adsorbed to a treated glass coverslip. Ca^2+ is added to enable vesicle fusion to form a continuous bilayer on a glass surface. Formation of a bilayer is examined using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. The results on the protein assembly on membranes present an important step in understanding the intermediate stages that occur during the dynamic movement of MinD in cells.

  11. Cell-penetrating peptide-mediated delivery of TALEN proteins via bioconjugation for genome engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Gaj, Thomas; Patterson, James T; Sirk, Shannon J; Barbas, Carlos F

    2014-01-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs) have enabled the introduction of targeted genetic alterations into a broad range of cell lines and organisms. These customizable nucleases are comprised of programmable sequence-specific DNA-binding modules derived from TAL effector proteins fused to the non-specific FokI cleavage domain. Delivery of these nucleases into cells has proven challenging as the large size and highly repetitive nature of the TAL effector DNA-binding domain precludes their incorporation into many types of viral vectors. Furthermore, viral and non-viral gene delivery methods carry the risk of insertional mutagenesis and have been shown to increase the off-target activity of site-specific nucleases. We previously demonstrated that direct delivery of zinc-finger nuclease proteins enables highly efficient gene knockout in a variety of mammalian cell types with reduced off-target effects. Here we show that conjugation of cell-penetrating poly-Arg peptides to a surface-exposed Cys residue present on each TAL effector repeat imparted cell-penetrating activity to purified TALEN proteins. These modifications are reversible under reducing conditions and enabled TALEN-mediated gene knockout of the human CCR5 and BMPR1A genes at rates comparable to those achieved with transient transfection of TALEN expression vectors. These findings demonstrate that direct protein delivery, facilitated by conjugation of chemical functionalities onto the TALEN protein surface, is a promising alternative to current non-viral and viral-based methods for TALEN delivery into mammalian cells.

  12. Cell-penetrating peptide-mediated delivery of TALEN proteins via bioconjugation for genome engineering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Liu

    Full Text Available Transcription activator-like (TAL effector nucleases (TALENs have enabled the introduction of targeted genetic alterations into a broad range of cell lines and organisms. These customizable nucleases are comprised of programmable sequence-specific DNA-binding modules derived from TAL effector proteins fused to the non-specific FokI cleavage domain. Delivery of these nucleases into cells has proven challenging as the large size and highly repetitive nature of the TAL effector DNA-binding domain precludes their incorporation into many types of viral vectors. Furthermore, viral and non-viral gene delivery methods carry the risk of insertional mutagenesis and have been shown to increase the off-target activity of site-specific nucleases. We previously demonstrated that direct delivery of zinc-finger nuclease proteins enables highly efficient gene knockout in a variety of mammalian cell types with reduced off-target effects. Here we show that conjugation of cell-penetrating poly-Arg peptides to a surface-exposed Cys residue present on each TAL effector repeat imparted cell-penetrating activity to purified TALEN proteins. These modifications are reversible under reducing conditions and enabled TALEN-mediated gene knockout of the human CCR5 and BMPR1A genes at rates comparable to those achieved with transient transfection of TALEN expression vectors. These findings demonstrate that direct protein delivery, facilitated by conjugation of chemical functionalities onto the TALEN protein surface, is a promising alternative to current non-viral and viral-based methods for TALEN delivery into mammalian cells.

  13. TAT-Mediated Delivery of Tousled Protein to Salivary Glands Protects Against Radiation-Induced Hypofunction

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    Sunavala-Dossabhoy, Gulshan, E-mail: gsunav@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Palaniyandi, Senthilnathan; Richardson, Charles; De Benedetti, Arrigo [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Schrott, Lisa [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Neuroscience, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States); Caldito, Gloria [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Patients treated with radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer invariably suffer its deleterious side effect, xerostomia. Salivary hypofunction ensuing from the irreversible destruction of glands is the most common and debilitating oral complication affecting patients undergoing regional radiotherapy. Given that the current management of xerostomia is palliative and ineffective, efforts are now directed toward preventive measures to preserve gland function. The human homolog of Tousled protein, TLK1B, facilitates chromatin remodeling at DNA repair sites and improves cell survival against ionizing radiation (IR). Therefore, we wanted to determine whether a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to rat salivary glands could protect against IR-induced salivary hypofunction. Methods: The cell-permeable TAT-TLK1B fusion protein was generated. Rat acinar cell line and rat salivary glands were pretreated with TAT peptide or TAT-TLK1B before IR. The acinar cell survival in vitro and salivary function in vivo were assessed after radiation. Results: We demonstrated that rat acinar cells transduced with TAT-TLK1B were more resistant to radiation (D{sub 0} = 4.13 {+-} 1.0 Gy; {alpha}/{beta} = 0 Gy) compared with cells transduced with the TAT peptide (D{sub 0} = 4.91 {+-} 1.0 Gy; {alpha}/{beta} = 20.2 Gy). Correspondingly, retroductal instillation of TAT-TLK1B in rat submandibular glands better preserved salivary flow after IR (89%) compared with animals pretreated with Opti-MEM or TAT peptide (31% and 39%, respectively; p < 0.01). Conclusions: The results demonstrate that a direct transfer of TLK1B protein to the salivary glands effectively attenuates radiation-mediated gland dysfunction. Prophylactic TLK1B-protein therapy could benefit patients undergoing radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer.

  14. Hydrophobic enhancement of Dopa-mediated adhesion in a mussel foot protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Yu, Jing; Broomell, Christopher; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2013-01-09

    Dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is recognized as a key chemical signature of mussel adhesion and has been adopted into diverse synthetic polymer systems. Dopa's notorious susceptibility to oxidation, however, poses significant challenges to the practical translation of mussel adhesion. Using a surface forces apparatus to investigate the adhesion of mussel foot protein 3 (Mfp3) "slow", a hydrophobic protein variant of the Mfp3 family in the plaque, we have discovered a subtle molecular strategy correlated with hydrophobicity that appears to compensate for Dopa instability. At pH 3, where Dopa is stable, Mfp3 slow, like Mfp3 "fast" adhesion to mica, is directly proportional to the mol % of Dopa present in the protein. At pH of 5.5 and 7.5, however, loss of adhesion in Mfp3 slow was less than half that occurring in Mfp3 fast, purportedly because Dopa in Mfp3 slow is less prone to oxidation. Indeed, cyclic voltammetry showed that the oxidation potential of Dopa in Mfp3 slow is significantly higher than in Mfp3 fast at pH of 7.5. A much greater difference between the two variants was revealed in the interaction energy of two symmetric Mfp3 slow films (E(ad) = -3 mJ/m(2)). This energy corresponds to the energy of protein cohesion which is notable for its reversibility and pH independence. Exploitation of aromatic hydrophobic sequences to protect Dopa against oxidation as well as to mediate hydrophobic and H-bonding interactions between proteins provides new insights for developing effective artificial underwater adhesives.

  15. Screening and identification of proteins mediating senna induced gastrointestinal motility enhancement in mouse colon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Wang; Bo-Rong Pan; Dai-Min Fan; Yue-Xia Zhong; Mei Lan; Zong-You Zhang; Yong-Quan Shi; Ju Lu; Jie Ding; Kai-Cun Wu; Jian-Ping Jin

    2002-01-01

    .CONCLUSION: SE causes diarrhea and enhancesgastrointestinal motility through digestive tractadministration. Long-term gastric administration of SEinduces inflammatory changes and cell damage in the wholegastrointestinal tract. The differential proteins screened fromthe colonic tissues of the model mice might mediate theenhancing effect of SE on gastrointestinal motility.

  16. Coagulation factor V mediates inhibition of tissue factor signaling by activated protein C in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hai Po H; Kerschen, Edward J; Basu, Sreemanti; Hernandez, Irene; Zogg, Mark; Jia, Shuang; Hessner, Martin J; Toso, Raffaella; Rezaie, Alireza R; Fernández, José A; Camire, Rodney M; Ruf, Wolfram; Griffin, John H; Weiler, Hartmut

    2015-11-19

    The key effector molecule of the natural protein C pathway, activated protein C (aPC), exerts pleiotropic effects on coagulation, fibrinolysis, and inflammation. Coagulation-independent cell signaling by aPC appears to be the predominant mechanism underlying its highly reproducible therapeutic efficacy in most animal models of injury and infection. In this study, using a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis, we demonstrate marked disease stage-specific effects of the anticoagulant and cell signaling functions of aPC. aPC resistance of factor (f)V due to the R506Q Leiden mutation protected against detrimental anticoagulant effects of aPC therapy but also abrogated the anti-inflammatory and mortality-reducing effects of the signaling-selective 5A-aPC variant that has minimal anticoagulant function. We found that procofactor V (cleaved by aPC at R506) and protein S were necessary cofactors for the aPC-mediated inhibition of inflammatory tissue-factor signaling. The anti-inflammatory cofactor function of fV involved the same structural features that govern its cofactor function for the anticoagulant effects of aPC, yet its anti-inflammatory activities did not involve proteolysis of activated coagulation factors Va and VIIIa. These findings reveal a novel biological function and mechanism of the protein C pathway in which protein S and the aPC-cleaved form of fV are cofactors for anti-inflammatory cell signaling by aPC in the context of endotoxemia and infection.

  17. INCREASE IN ACTIVATED PROTEIN C MEDIATES ACUTE TRAUMATIC COAGULOPATHY IN MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesebro, Brian B.; Rahn, Pamela; Carles, Michel; Esmon, Charles T.; Xu, Jun; Brohi, Karim; Frith, Daniel; Pittet, Jean-François; Cohen, Mitchell J.

    2013-01-01

    In severely injured and hypoperfused trauma patients, endogenous acute coagulopathy (EAC) is associated with an increased morbidity and mortality. Recent human data correlate this coagulopathy with activation of the protein C pathway. To examine the mechanistic role of protein C in the development of EAC, we used a mouse model of trauma and hemorrhagic shock, characterized by the combination of tissue injury and severe metabolic acidosis. Mice were subjected to one of four treatment groups: 1) C, control; 2) T, trauma (laparotomy); 3) H, hemorrhage (MAP, 35 mmHg × 60 min); 4) TH, trauma + hemorrhage. After 60 min, blood was drawn for analysis. Compared with C mice, the TH mice had a significantly elevated activated partial thromboplastin time (23.3 vs. 34.5 s) and significantly increased levels of activated protein C (aPC; 2.30 vs. 13.58 ng/mL). In contrast, T and H mice did not develop an elevated activated partial thromboplastin time or increased aPC. Selective inhibition of the anticoagulant property of aPC prevented the coagulopathy seen in response to trauma/hemorrhage (23.5 vs. 38.6 s [inhibitory vs. control monoclonal antibody]) with no impact on survival during the shock period. However, complete blockade of both the anticoagulant and cytoprotective functions of aPC caused 100% mortality within 45 min of shock, with histopathology evidence of pulmonary thrombosis and perivascular hemorrhage. These results indicate that our unique mouse model of T/H shock mimics our previous observations in trauma patients and demonstrates that EAC is mediated by the activation of the protein C pathway. In addition, the cytoprotective effect of protein C activation seems to be necessary for survival of the initial shock injury. PMID:19333141

  18. Conformational diversity in the TPR domain-mediated interaction of protein phosphatase 5 with Hsp90.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliff, Matthew J; Harris, Richard; Barford, David; Ladbury, John E; Williams, Mark A

    2006-03-01

    Protein phosphatase 5 (Ppp5) is one of several proteins that bind to the Hsp90 chaperone via a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. We report the solution structure of a complex of the TPR domain of Ppp5 with the C-terminal pentapeptide of Hsp90. This structure has the "two-carboxylate clamp" mechanism of peptide binding first seen in the Hop-TPR domain complexes with Hsp90 and Hsp70 peptides. However, NMR data reveal that the Ppp5 clamp is highly dynamic, and that there are multiple modes of peptide binding and mobility throughout the complex. Although this interaction is of very high affinity, relatively few persistent contacts are found between the peptide and the Ppp5-TPR domain, thus explaining its promiscuity in binding both Hsp70 and Hsp90 in vivo. We consider the possible implications of this dynamic structure for the mechanism of relief of autoinhibition in Ppp5 and for the mechanisms of TPR-mediated recognition of Hsp90 by other proteins.

  19. Molecular basis for TPR domain-mediated regulation of protein phosphatase 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Roe, S Mark; Cliff, Matthew J; Williams, Mark A; Ladbury, John E; Cohen, Patricia T W; Barford, David

    2005-01-12

    Protein phosphatase 5 (Ppp5) is a serine/threonine protein phosphatase comprising a regulatory tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain N-terminal to its phosphatase domain. Ppp5 functions in signalling pathways that control cellular responses to stress, glucocorticoids and DNA damage. Its phosphatase activity is suppressed by an autoinhibited conformation maintained by the TPR domain and a C-terminal subdomain. By interacting with the TPR domain, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and fatty acids including arachidonic acid stimulate phosphatase activity. Here, we describe the structure of the autoinhibited state of Ppp5, revealing mechanisms of TPR-mediated phosphatase inhibition and Hsp90- and arachidonic acid-induced stimulation of phosphatase activity. The TPR domain engages with the catalytic channel of the phosphatase domain, restricting access to the catalytic site. This autoinhibited conformation of Ppp5 is stabilised by the C-terminal alphaJ helix that contacts a region of the Hsp90-binding groove on the TPR domain. Hsp90 activates Ppp5 by disrupting TPR-phosphatase domain interactions, permitting substrate access to the constitutively active phosphatase domain, whereas arachidonic acid prompts an alternate conformation of the TPR domain, destabilising the TPR-phosphatase domain interface.

  20. Blood Group Antigen Recognition via the Group A Streptococcal M Protein Mediates Host Colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, David M. P.; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren; Everest-Dass, Arun; Day, Christopher J.; Dabbs, Rebecca A.; Ve, Thomas; Kobe, Bostjan; Nizet, Victor; Packer, Nicolle H.; Walker, Mark J.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GAS]) is responsible for over 500,000 deaths worldwide each year. The highly virulent M1T1 GAS clone is one of the most frequently isolated serotypes from streptococcal pharyngitis and invasive disease. The oral epithelial tract is a niche highly abundant in glycosylated structures, particularly those of the ABO(H) blood group antigen family. Using a high-throughput approach, we determined that a strain representative of the globally disseminated M1T1 GAS clone 5448 interacts with numerous, structurally diverse glycans. Preeminent among GAS virulence factors is the surface-expressed M protein. M1 protein showed high affinity for several terminal galactose blood group antigen structures. Deletion mutagenesis shows that M1 protein mediates glycan binding via its B repeat domains. Association of M1T1 GAS with oral epithelial cells varied significantly as a result of phenotypic differences in blood group antigen expression, with significantly higher adherence to those cells expressing H antigen structures compared to cells expressing A, B, or AB antigen structures. These data suggest a novel mechanism for GAS attachment to host cells and propose a link between host blood group antigen expression and M1T1 GAS colonization. PMID:28119471

  1. Influenza C virus NS1 protein counteracts RIG-I-mediated IFN signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasak Reinhard

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The nonstructural proteins 1 (NS1 from influenza A and B viruses are known as the main viral factors antagonising the cellular interferon (IFN response, inter alia by inhibiting the retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I signalling. The cytosolic pattern-recognition receptor RIG-I senses double-stranded RNA and 5'-triphosphate RNA produced during RNA virus infections. Binding to these ligands activates RIG-I and in turn the IFN signalling. We now report that the influenza C virus NS1 protein also inhibits the RIG-I-mediated IFN signalling. Employing luciferase-reporter assays, we show that expression of NS1-C proteins of virus strains C/JJ/50 and C/JHB/1/66 considerably reduced the IFN-β promoter activity. Mapping of the regions from NS1-C of both strains involved in IFN-β promoter inhibition showed that the N-terminal 49 amino acids are dispensable, while the C-terminus is required for proper modulation of the IFN response. When a mutant RIG-I, which is constitutively active without ligand binding, was employed, NS1-C still inhibited the downstream signalling, indicating that IFN inhibitory properties of NS1-C are not necessarily linked to an RNA binding mechanism.

  2. Cinnamic Acid and Its Derivatives Inhibit Fructose-Mediated Protein Glycation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirintorn Yibchok-anun

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Cinnamic acid and its derivatives have shown a variety of pharmacologic properties. However, little is known about the antiglycation properties of cinnamic acid and its derivatives. The present study sought to characterize the protein glycation inhibitory activity of cinnamic acid and its derivatives in a bovine serum albumin (BSA/fructose system. The results demonstrated that cinnamic acid and its derivatives significantly inhibited the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs by approximately 11.96–63.36% at a concentration of 1 mM. The strongest inhibitory activity against the formation of AGEs was shown by cinnamic acid. Furthermore, cinnamic acid and its derivatives reduced the level of fructosamine, the formation of Nε-(carboxymethyl lysine (CML, and the level of amyloid cross β-structure. Cinnamic acid and its derivatives also prevented oxidative protein damages, including effects on protein carbonyl formation and thiol oxidation of BSA. Our findings may lead to the possibility of using cinnamic acid and its derivatives for preventing AGE-mediated diabetic complications.

  3. Phospholipase C-related catalytically inactive protein (PRIP controls KIF5B-mediated insulin secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Asano

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported that phospholipase C-related catalytically inactive protein (PRIP-knockout mice exhibited hyperinsulinemia. Here, we investigated the role of PRIP in insulin granule exocytosis using Prip-knockdown mouse insulinoma (MIN6 cells. Insulin release from Prip-knockdown MIN6 cells was higher than that from control cells, and Prip knockdown facilitated movement of GFP-phogrin-labeled insulin secretory vesicles. Double-immunofluorescent staining and density step-gradient analyses showed that the KIF5B motor protein co-localized with insulin vesicles in Prip-knockdown MIN6 cells. Knockdown of GABAA-receptor-associated protein (GABARAP, a microtubule-associated PRIP-binding partner, by Gabarap silencing in MIN6 cells reduced the co-localization of insulin vesicles with KIF5B and the movement of vesicles, resulting in decreased insulin secretion. However, the co-localization of KIF5B with microtubules was not altered in Prip- and Gabarap-knockdown cells. The presence of unbound GABARAP, freed either by an interference peptide or by Prip silencing, in MIN6 cells enhanced the co-localization of insulin vesicles with microtubules and promoted vesicle mobility. Taken together, these data demonstrate that PRIP and GABARAP function in a complex to regulate KIF5B-mediated insulin secretion, providing new insights into insulin exocytic mechanisms.

  4. Popeye domain containing proteins are essential for stress-mediated modulation of cardiac pacemaking in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froese, Alexander; Breher, Stephanie S; Waldeyer, Christoph; Schindler, Roland F R; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Rinné, Susanne; Wischmeyer, Erhard; Schlueter, Jan; Becher, Jan; Simrick, Subreena; Vauti, Franz; Kuhtz, Juliane; Meister, Patrick; Kreissl, Sonja; Torlopp, Angela; Liebig, Sonja K; Laakmann, Sandra; Müller, Thomas D; Neumann, Joachim; Stieber, Juliane; Ludwig, Andreas; Maier, Sebastian K; Decher, Niels; Arnold, Hans-Henning; Kirchhof, Paulus; Fabritz, Larissa; Brand, Thomas

    2012-03-01

    Cardiac pacemaker cells create rhythmic pulses that control heart rate; pacemaker dysfunction is a prevalent disorder in the elderly, but little is known about the underlying molecular causes. Popeye domain containing (Popdc) genes encode membrane proteins with high expression levels in cardiac myocytes and specifically in the cardiac pacemaking and conduction system. Here, we report the phenotypic analysis of mice deficient in Popdc1 or Popdc2. ECG analysis revealed severe sinus node dysfunction when freely roaming mutant animals were subjected to physical or mental stress. In both mutants, bradyarrhythmia developed in an age-dependent manner. Furthermore, we found that the conserved Popeye domain functioned as a high-affinity cAMP-binding site. Popdc proteins interacted with the potassium channel TREK-1, which led to increased cell surface expression and enhanced current density, both of which were negatively modulated by cAMP. These data indicate that Popdc proteins have an important regulatory function in heart rate dynamics that is mediated, at least in part, through cAMP binding. Mice with mutant Popdc1 and Popdc2 alleles are therefore useful models for the dissection of the mechanisms causing pacemaker dysfunction and could aid in the development of strategies for therapeutic intervention.

  5. SRA-domain proteins required for DRM2-mediated de novo DNA methylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianna M Johnson

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available De novo DNA methylation and the maintenance of DNA methylation in asymmetrical sequence contexts is catalyzed by homologous proteins in plants (DRM2 and animals (DNMT3a/b. In plants, targeting of DRM2 depends on small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, although the molecular details are still unclear. Here, we show that two SRA-domain proteins (SUVH9 and SUVH2 are also essential for DRM2-mediated de novo and maintenance DNA methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana. At some loci, SUVH9 and SUVH2 act redundantly, while at other loci only SUVH2 is required, and this locus specificity correlates with the differing DNA-binding affinity of the SRA domains within SUVH9 and SUVH2. Specifically, SUVH9 preferentially binds methylated asymmetric sites, while SUVH2 preferentially binds methylated CG sites. The suvh9 and suvh2 mutations do not eliminate siRNAs, suggesting a role for SUVH9 and SUVH2 late in the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway. With these new results, it is clear that SRA-domain proteins are involved in each of the three pathways leading to DNA methylation in Arabidopsis.

  6. Modulation of Wound Healing and Scar Formation by MG53 Protein-mediated Cell Membrane Repair*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haichang; Duann, Pu; Lin, Pei-Hui; Zhao, Li; Fan, Zhaobo; Tan, Tao; Zhou, Xinyu; Sun, Mingzhai; Fu, Minghuan; Orange, Matthew; Sermersheim, Matthew; Ma, Hanley; He, Duofen; Steinberg, Steven M.; Higgins, Robert; Zhu, Hua; John, Elizabeth; Zeng, Chunyu; Guan, Jianjun; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-01-01

    Cell membrane repair is an important aspect of physiology, and disruption of this process can result in pathophysiology in a number of different tissues, including wound healing, chronic ulcer and scarring. We have previously identified a novel tripartite motif family protein, MG53, as an essential component of the cell membrane repair machinery. Here we report the functional role of MG53 in the modulation of wound healing and scarring. Although MG53 is absent from keratinocytes and fibroblasts, remarkable defects in skin architecture and collagen overproduction are observed in mg53−/− mice, and these animals display delayed wound healing and abnormal scarring. Recombinant human MG53 (rhMG53) protein, encapsulated in a hydrogel formulation, facilitates wound healing and prevents scarring in rodent models of dermal injuries. An in vitro study shows that rhMG53 protects against acute injury to keratinocytes and facilitates the migration of fibroblasts in response to scratch wounding. During fibrotic remodeling, rhMG53 interferes with TGF-β-dependent activation of myofibroblast differentiation. The resulting down-regulation of α smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix proteins contributes to reduced scarring. Overall, these studies establish a trifunctional role for MG53 as a facilitator of rapid injury repair, a mediator of cell migration, and a modulator of myofibroblast differentiation during wound healing. Targeting the functional interaction between MG53 and TGF-β signaling may present a potentially effective means for promoting scarless wound healing. PMID:26306047

  7. Ribosomal protein s15 phosphorylation mediates LRRK2 neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Ian; Kim, Jungwoo Wren; Lee, Byoung Dae; Kang, Ho Chul; Xu, Jin-Chong; Jia, Hao; Stankowski, Jeannette; Kim, Min-Sik; Zhong, Jun; Kumar, Manoj; Andrabi, Shaida A.; Xiong, Yulan; Dickson, Dennis W.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are a common cause of familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). Elevated LRRK2 kinase activity and neurodegeneration are linked, but the phosphosubstrate that connects LRRK2 kinase activity to neurodegeneration is not known. Here, we show that ribosomal protein s15 is a key pathogenic LRRK2 substrate in Drosophila and human neuron PD models. Phospho-deficient s15 carrying a threonine 136 to alanine substitution rescues dopamine neuron degeneration and age-related locomotor deficits in G2019S LRRK2 transgenic Drosophila and substantially reduces G2019S LRRK2-mediated neurite loss and cell death in human dopamine and cortical neurons. Remarkably, pathogenic LRRK2 stimulates both cap-dependent and cap-independent mRNA translation, and induces a bulk increase in protein synthesis in Drosophila, which can be prevented by phospho-deficient T136A s15. These results reveal a novel mechanism of PD pathogenesis linked to elevated LRRK2 kinase activity and aberrant protein synthesis in vivo. PMID:24725412

  8. Materials Nanoarchitecturing via Cation-Mediated Protein Assembly: Making Limpet Teeth without Mineral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukmar-Godec, Tina; Bertinetti, Luca; Dunlop, John W C; Godec, Aljaž; Grabiger, Michal A; Masic, Admir; Nguyen, Huynh; Zlotnikov, Igor; Zaslansky, Paul; Faivre, Damien

    2017-07-01

    Teeth are designed to deliver high forces while withstanding the generated stresses. Aside from isolated mineral-free exception (e.g., marine polychaetes and squids), minerals are thought to be indispensable for tooth-hardening and durability. Here, the unmineralized teeth of the giant keyhole limpet (Megathura crenulata) are shown to attain a stiffness, which is twofold higher than any known organic biogenic structures. In these teeth, protein and chitin fibers establish a stiff compact outer shell enclosing a less compact core. The stiffness and its gradients emerge from a concerted interaction across multiple length-scales: packing of hydrophobic proteins and folding into secondary structures mediated by Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) together with a strong spatial control in the local fiber orientation. These results integrating nanoindentation, acoustic microscopy, and finite-element modeling for probing the tooth's mechanical properties, spatially resolved small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering for probing the material ordering on the micrometer scale, and energy-dispersive X-ray scattering combined with confocal Raman microscopy to study structural features on the molecular scale, reveal a nanocomposite structure hierarchically assembled to form a versatile damage-tolerant protein-based tooth, with a stiffness similar to mineralized mammalian bone, but without any mineral. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. DBC2 resistance is achieved by enhancing 26S proteasome-mediated protein degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collado, Denise; Yoshihara, Takashi; Hamaguchi, Masaaki

    2007-08-31

    Tumor suppressor gene DBC2 stops growth of tumor cells through regulation of CCND1. Interference of CCND1 down-regulation prevented growth arrest caused by DBC2 [T. Yoshihara, D. Collado, M. Hamaguchi, Cyclin D1 down-regulation is essential for DBC2's tumor suppressor function, Biochemical and biophysical research communications 358 (2007) 1076-1079]. It was also noted that DBC2 resistant cells eventually arose after repeated induction of DBC2 with muristerone A treatment [M. Hamaguchi, J.L. Meth, C. Von Klitzing, W. Wei, D. Esposito, L. Rodgers, T. Walsh, P. Welcsh, M.C. King, M.H. Wigler, DBC2, a candidate for a tumor suppressor gene involved in breast cancer, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99 (2002) 13647-13652]. In order to elucidate the mechanism of resistance acquisition, we analyzed DBC2 sensitive and resistant cells derived from the same progenitor cells (T-47D). We discovered that DBC2 protein was abundantly expressed in the sensitive cells when DBC2 was induced. In contrast, it was undetectable by western blot analysis in the resistant cells. We confirmed that the inducible gene expression system was responsive in both cells by detecting induced GFP. Additionally, inhibition of 26S proteasome by MG132 revealed production of DBC2 protein in the resistant cells. These findings indicate that the resistant T-47D cells survive DBC2 induction by rapid destruction of DBC2 through 26S proteasome-mediated protein degradation.

  10. Yeast Actin-Related Protein ARP6 Negatively Regulates Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Yeast Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumei Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The yeasts, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris, are single-cell eukaryotic organisms that can serve as models for human genetic diseases and hosts for large scale production of recombinant proteins in current biopharmaceutical industry. Thus, efficient genetic engineering tools for yeasts are of great research and economic values. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (AMT can transfer T-DNA into yeast cells as a method for genetic engineering. However, how the T-DNA is transferred into the yeast cells is not well established yet. Here our genetic screening of yeast knockout mutants identified a yeast actin-related protein ARP6 as a negative regulator of AMT. ARP6 is a critical member of the SWR1 chromatin remodeling complex (SWR-C; knocking out some other components of the complex also increased the transformation efficiency, suggesting that ARP6 might regulate AMT via SWR-C. Moreover, knockout of ARP6 led to disruption of microtubule integrity, higher uptake and degradation of virulence proteins, and increased DNA stability inside the cells, all of which resulted in enhanced transformation efficiency. Our findings have identified molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating AMT and a potential target for enhancing the transformation efficiency in yeast cells.

  11. Metal-Mediated Affinity and Orientation Specificity in a Computationally Designed Protein Homodimer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Der, Bryan S.; Machius, Mischa; Miley, Michael J.; Mills, Jeffrey L.; Szyperski, Thomas; Kuhlman, Brian (UNC); (Buffalo)

    2015-10-15

    Computationally designing protein-protein interactions with high affinity and desired orientation is a challenging task. Incorporating metal-binding sites at the target interface may be one approach for increasing affinity and specifying the binding mode, thereby improving robustness of designed interactions for use as tools in basic research as well as in applications from biotechnology to medicine. Here we describe a Rosetta-based approach for the rational design of a protein monomer to form a zinc-mediated, symmetric homodimer. Our metal interface design, named MID1 (NESG target ID OR37), forms a tight dimer in the presence of zinc (MID1-zinc) with a dissociation constant <30 nM. Without zinc the dissociation constant is 4 {micro}M. The crystal structure of MID1-zinc shows good overall agreement with the computational model, but only three out of four designed histidines coordinate zinc. However, a histidine-to-glutamate point mutation resulted in four-coordination of zinc, and the resulting metal binding site and dimer orientation closely matches the computational model (C{alpha} rmsd = 1.4 {angstrom}).

  12. Yeast Actin-Related Protein ARP6 Negatively Regulates Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Yeast Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yumei; Chen, Zikai; Zhu, Detu; Tu, Haitao; Pan, Shen Quan

    2015-01-01

    The yeasts, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris, are single-cell eukaryotic organisms that can serve as models for human genetic diseases and hosts for large scale production of recombinant proteins in current biopharmaceutical industry. Thus, efficient genetic engineering tools for yeasts are of great research and economic values. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (AMT) can transfer T-DNA into yeast cells as a method for genetic engineering. However, how the T-DNA is transferred into the yeast cells is not well established yet. Here our genetic screening of yeast knockout mutants identified a yeast actin-related protein ARP6 as a negative regulator of AMT. ARP6 is a critical member of the SWR1 chromatin remodeling complex (SWR-C); knocking out some other components of the complex also increased the transformation efficiency, suggesting that ARP6 might regulate AMT via SWR-C. Moreover, knockout of ARP6 led to disruption of microtubule integrity, higher uptake and degradation of virulence proteins, and increased DNA stability inside the cells, all of which resulted in enhanced transformation efficiency. Our findings have identified molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating AMT and a potential target for enhancing the transformation efficiency in yeast cells.

  13. Form, Fabric, and Function of a Flagellum-Associated Cytoskeletal Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke Morriswood

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei is a uniflagellated protist and the causative agent of African trypanosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease. The single flagellum of T. brucei is essential to a number of cellular processes such as motility, and has been a longstanding focus of scientific enquiry. A number of cytoskeletal structures are associated with the flagellum in T. brucei, and one such structure—a multiprotein complex containing the repeat motif protein TbMORN1—is the focus of this review. The TbMORN1-containing complex, which was discovered less than ten years ago, is essential for the viability of the mammalian-infective form of T. brucei. The complex has an unusual asymmetric morphology, and is coiled around the flagellum to form a hook shape. Proteomic analysis using the proximity-dependent biotin identification (BioID technique has elucidated a number of its components. Recent work has uncovered a role for TbMORN1 in facilitating protein entry into the cell, thus providing a link between the cytoskeleton and the endomembrane system. This review summarises the extant data on the complex, highlights the outstanding questions for future enquiry, and provides speculation as to its possible role in a size-exclusion mechanism for regulating protein entry. The review additionally clarifies the nomenclature associated with this topic, and proposes the adoption of the term “hook complex” to replace the former name “bilobe” to describe the complex.

  14. Gene expression profiles of human liver cells mediated by hepatitis B virus X protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-ying ZHANG; Fu-qing XU; Chang-liang SHAN; Rong XIANG; Li-hong YE; Xiao-dong ZHANG

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To demonstrate the gene expression profiles mediated by hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx), we characterized the molecular features of pathogenesis associated with HBx in a human liver cell model.Methods: We examined gene expression profiles in L-O2-X cells, an engineered L-O2 cell line that constitutively expresses HBx, relative to L-O2 cells using an Agilent 22 K human 70-mer oligonucleotide microarray representing more than 21,329 unique, well-characterized Homo sapiens genes, Western blot analysis and RNA interference (RNAi) targeting HBx mRNA validated the overexpression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Bcl-2 in L-O2-X cells. Meanwhile, the BrdU incorporation assay was used to test cell proliferation mediated by upregulated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2).Results: The microarray showed that the expression levels of 152 genes were remarkably altered; 82 of the genes were upregulated and 70 genes were downregulated in L-O2-X cells. The altered genes were associated with signal transduction pathways, cell cycle, metastasis, transcriptional regulation, immune response, metabolism, and other processes. PCNA and Bcl-2 were upregulated in L-O2-X cells. Furthermore, we found that COX-2 upregulation in L-O2-X cells enhanced proliferation using the BrdU incorporation assay, whereas indomethacin (an inhibitor of COX-2) abolished the promotion.Conclusion: Our findings provide new evidence that HBx is able to regulate many genes that may be involved in the car-cinogenesis. These regulated genes mediated by HBx may serve as molecular targets for the prevention and treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  15. Coat protein-mediated resistance against an Indian isolate of the Cucumber mosaic virus subgroup IB in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Srivastava; S K Raj

    2008-06-01

    Coat protein (CP)-mediated resistance against an Indian isolate of the Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) subgroup IB was demonstrated in transgenic lines of Nicotiana benthamiana through Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Out of the fourteen independently transformed lines developed, two lines were tested for resistance against CMV by challenge inoculations. The transgenic lines exhibiting complete resistance remained symptomless throughout life and showed reduced or no virus accumulation in their systemic leaves after virus challenge. These lines also showed virus resistance against two closely related strains of CMV. This is the first report of CP-mediated transgenic resistance against a CMV subgroup IB member isolated from India.

  16. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene editing in human zygotes using Cas9 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Lichun; Zeng, Yanting; Du, Hongzi; Gong, Mengmeng; Peng, Jin; Zhang, Buxi; Lei, Ming; Zhao, Fang; Wang, Weihua; Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Jianqiao

    2017-03-01

    Previous works using human tripronuclear zygotes suggested that the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9 system could be a tool in correcting disease-causing mutations. However, whether this system was applicable in normal human (dual pronuclear, 2PN) zygotes was unclear. Here we demonstrate that CRISPR/Cas9 is also effective as a gene-editing tool in human 2PN zygotes. By injection of Cas9 protein complexed with the appropriate sgRNAs and homology donors into one-cell human embryos, we demonstrated efficient homologous recombination-mediated correction of point mutations in HBB and G6PD. However, our results also reveal limitations of this correction procedure and highlight the need for further research.

  17. Metabolism. AMP-activated protein kinase mediates mitochondrial fission in response to energy stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Erin Quan; Herzig, Sébastien; Courchet, Julien; Lewis, Tommy L; Losón, Oliver C; Hellberg, Kristina; Young, Nathan P; Chen, Hsiuchen; Polleux, Franck; Chan, David C; Shaw, Reuben J

    2016-01-15

    Mitochondria undergo fragmentation in response to electron transport chain (ETC) poisons and mitochondrial DNA-linked disease mutations, yet how these stimuli mechanistically connect to the mitochondrial fission and fusion machinery is poorly understood. We found that the energy-sensing adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is genetically required for cells to undergo rapid mitochondrial fragmentation after treatment with ETC inhibitors. Moreover, direct pharmacological activation of AMPK was sufficient to rapidly promote mitochondrial fragmentation even in the absence of mitochondrial stress. A screen for substrates of AMPK identified mitochondrial fission factor (MFF), a mitochondrial outer-membrane receptor for DRP1, the cytoplasmic guanosine triphosphatase that catalyzes mitochondrial fission. Nonphosphorylatable and phosphomimetic alleles of the AMPK sites in MFF revealed that it is a key effector of AMPK-mediated mitochondrial fission.

  18. RNA- and protein-mediated control of Listeria monocytogenes virulence gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, Alice; Cossart, Pascale

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The model opportunistic pathogen Listeria monocytogenes has been the object of extensive research, aiming at understanding its ability to colonize diverse environmental niches and animal hosts. Bacterial transcriptomes in various conditions reflect this efficient adaptability. We review here our current knowledge of the mechanisms allowing L. monocytogenes to respond to environmental changes and trigger pathogenicity, with a special focus on RNA-mediated control of gene expression. We highlight how these studies have brought novel concepts in prokaryotic gene regulation, such as the ‘excludon’ where the 5′-UTR of a messenger also acts as an antisense regulator of an operon transcribed in opposite orientation, or the notion that riboswitches can regulate non-coding RNAs to integrate complex metabolic stimuli into regulatory networks. Overall, the Listeria model exemplifies that fine RNA tuners act together with master regulatory proteins to orchestrate appropriate transcriptional programmes. PMID:27217337

  19. Protein kinase D1 signaling in angiogenic gene expression and VEGF-mediated angiogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin eRen MD, Phd, FAHA

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinase D 1 (PKD-1 is a signaling kinase important in fundamental cell functions including migration, proliferation and differentiation. PKD-1 is also a key regulator of gene expression and angiogenesis that is essential for cardiovascular development and tumor progression. Further understanding molecular aspects of PKD-1 signaling in the regulation of angiogenesis may have translational implications in obesity, cardiovascular disease and cancer. The author will summarize and provide the insights into molecular mechanisms by which PKD-1 regulates transcriptional expression of angiogenic genes, focusing on the transcriptional regulation of CD36 by PKD-1-FoxO1 signaling axis along with the potential implications of this axis in arterial differentiation and morphogenesis. He will also discuss a new concept of dynamic balance between proangiogenic and antiangiogenic signaling in determining angiogenic switch, and stress how PKD-1 signaling regulates VEGF signaling-mediated angiogenesis.

  20. Mechanism of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B-mediated inhibition of leptin signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, I K; Hansen, J A; Andersen, H S

    2005-01-01

    Upon leptin binding, the leptin receptor is activated, leading to stimulation of the JAK/STAT signal transduction cascade. The transient character of the tyrosine phosphorylation of JAK2 and STAT3 suggests the involvement of protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) as negative regulators...... of this signalling pathway. Specifically, recent evidence has suggested that PTP1B might be a key regulator of leptin signalling, based on the resistance to diet-induced obesity and increased leptin signalling observed in PTP1B-deficient mice. The present study was undertaken to investigate the mechanism by which...... PTP1B mediates the cessation of the leptin signal transduction. Leptin-induced activation of a STAT3 responsive reporter was dose-dependently inhibited by co-transfection with PTP1B. No inhibition was observed when a catalytically inactive mutant of PTP1B was used or when other PTPs were co...

  1. Ultramild protein-mediated click chemistry creates efficient oligonucleotide probes for targeting and detecting nucleic acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nåbo, Lina J.; Madsen, Charlotte Stahl; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    results by electronic structure calculations. Functionalized oligonucleotides were prepared in good yields by protein-mediated CuAAC click reactions for the first time with a human copper-binding chaperon. The carbohydrate, peptide, and fluorescent derivatives display high binding affinity and selectivity...... targeting and detection properties. We focus in particular on the pH sensitivity of these new probes and their high target specificity. For the first time, human copper(I)-binding chaperon Cox17 was applied to effectively catalyze click labeling of oligonucleotides. This was performed under ultramild...... conditions with fluorophore, peptide, and carbohydrate azide derivatives. In thermal denaturation studies, the modified probes showed specific binding to complementary DNA and RNA targets. Finally, we demonstrated the pH sensitivity of the new rhodamine-based fluorescent probes in vitro and rationalize our...

  2. Generation of an affinity column for antibody purification by intein-mediated protein ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Luo; Ghosh, Inca; Xu, Ming-Qun

    2003-11-01

    Coupling an antigenic peptide to a solid support is a crucial step in the affinity purification of a peptide-specific antibody. Conventional methods for generating reactive agarose, cellulose or other matrices for peptide conjugation are laborious and can result in a significant amount of chemical waste. In this report, we present a novel method for the facile production of a peptide affinity column by employing intein-mediated protein ligation (IPL) in conjunction with chitin affinity chromatography. A reactive thioester was generated at the C-terminal of the chitin binding domain (CBD) from the chitinase A1 of Bacillus circulans WL-2 by thiol-induced cleavage of the peptide bond between the CBD and a modified intein. Peptide epitopes possessing an N-terminal cysteine were ligated to the chitin bound CBD tag. We demonstrate that the resulting peptide columns permit the highly specific and efficient affinity purification of antibodies from animal sera.

  3. Folate receptor mediated intracellular protein delivery using PLL-PEG-FOL conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa Kim, Sun; Hoon Jeong, Ji; Joe, Cheol O; Gwan Park, Tae

    2005-04-18

    To develop a receptor-mediated intracellular delivery system that can transport therapeutic proteins or other bioactive macromolecules into a specific cell, a di-block copolymer conjugate, poly(L-lysine)-poly(ethylene glycol)-folate (PLL-PEG-FOL), was synthesized. The PLL-PEG-FOL conjugate was physically complexed with fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugated bovine serum albumin (FITC-BSA) in an aqueous phase by ionic interactions. Cellular uptake of PLL-PEG-FOL/FITC-BSA complexes was greatly enhanced against a folate receptor over-expressing cell line (KB cells) compared to a folate receptor deficient cell line (A549 cells). The presence of an excess amount of free folate (1 mM) in the medium inhibited the intracellular delivery of PLL-PEG-FOL/FITC-BSA complexes. This suggests that the enhanced cellular uptake of FITC-BSA by KB cells in a specific manner was attributed to folate receptor-mediated endocytosis of the complexes having folate moieties on the surface. The PLL-PEG-FOL di-block copolymer could be potentially applied for intracellular delivery of a wide range of other biological active agents that have negative charges on the surface.

  4. Yes-associated protein regulates endothelial cell contact-mediated expression of angiopoietin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyun-Jung; Zhang, Haiying; Park, Hongryeol; Choi, Kyu-Sung; Lee, Heon-Woo; Agrawal, Vijayendra; Kim, Young-Myeong; Kwon, Young-Guen

    2015-05-12

    Angiogenesis is regulated by the dynamic interaction between endothelial cells (ECs). Hippo-Yes-associated protein (YAP) signalling has emerged as a key pathway that controls organ size and tissue growth by mediating cell contact inhibition. However, the role of YAP in EC has not been defined yet. Here, we show expression of YAP in the developing front of mouse retinal vessels. YAP subcellular localization, phosphorylation and activity are regulated by VE-cadherin-mediated-EC contacts. This VE-cadherin-dependent YAP phosphorylation requires phosphoinositide 3-kinase-Akt activation. We further identify angiopoietin-2 (ANG-2) as a potential transcriptional target of YAP in regulating angiogenic activity of EC in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of YAP-active form in EC enhances angiogenic sprouting, and this effect is blocked by ANG-2 depletion or soluble Tie-2 treatment. These findings implicate YAP as a critical regulator in angiogenesis and provide new insights into the mechanism coordinating junctional stability and angiogenic activation of ECs.

  5. Ultrafast glycerophospholipid-selective transbilayer motion mediated by a protein in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buton, X; Morrot, G; Fellmann, P; Seigneuret, M

    1996-03-22

    A relatively rapid transbilayer motion of phospholipids in the microsomal membrane seems to be required due to their asymmetric synthesis in the cytoplasmic leaflet. Marked discrepancies exist with regard to the rate and specificity of this flip-flop process. To reinvestigate this problem, we have used both spin-labeled and radioactively labeled long chain phospholipids with a new fast translocation assay. Identical results were obtained with both types of probes. Transbilayer motion of glycerophospholipids was found to be much more rapid than previously reported (half-time less than 25 s) and to occur identically for phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylethanolamine. Such transport is nonvectorial and leads to a symmetric transbilayer distribution of phospholipids. In contrast, transverse diffusion of sphingomyelin was 1 order of magnitude slower. Phospholipid flip-flop appears to occur by a protein-mediated transport process displaying saturable and competitive behavior. Proteolysis, chemical modification, and competition experiments suggest that this transport process may be related to that previously described in the endoplasmic reticulum for short-chain phosphatidylcholine (Bishop, W. R., and Bell, R. M. (1985) Cell 42, 51-60). The relationship between phospholipid flip-flop and nonbilayer structures occurring in the endoplasmic reticulum was also investigated by 31P-NMR. Several conditions were found under which the 31P isotropic NMR signal previously attributed to nonbilayer structures is decreased or abolished, whereas transbilayer diffusion is unaffected, suggesting that the flip-flop process is independent of such structures. It is concluded that flip-flop in the endoplasmic reticulum is mediated by a bidirectional protein transporter with a high efficiency for glycerophospholipids and a low efficiency for sphingomyelin. In vivo, the activity of this transporter would be able to redistribute all changes in phospholipid composition due

  6. T cell proliferative responses to malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde haptenated protein are scavenger receptor mediated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Monte S; Thiele, Geoffrey M; Tuma, Dean J; Klassen, Lynell W

    2003-10-01

    Malondialdehyde-acetaldehyde (MAA) haptenated proteins have been described in disease processes related to prolonged oxidative stress (via malondialdehyde production), such as alcohol liver disease (ALD), non-alcoholic non-steatohepatitis (NASH) and atherosclerosis. Experimentally, high titer IgG1 antibody responses are seen after immunization without adjuvant; however, T cell proliferative responses and the role of scavenger receptors in this immunogenicity has not previously been described. In this study, T cell proliferative responses to the carrier protein, but not the MAA hapten itself, were identified in vitro. Moreover, these T proliferative responses were inhibited when MAA-hen egg lysozyme (HEL) was co-immunized with excess scavenger receptor ligand polyG (poly-guanylic acid), implicating the role of (a) scavenger receptor(s) in initiating the T helper cell response. Activated B cells were unable to process and present MAA-HEL preferentially to T cells, while thioglycollate-elicited (but not Con A-elicited) macrophages and dendritic cells (DC) did so with approximately 32-fold less MAA-HEL than native antigen necessary to initiate equal proliferative responses. While this preferential processing and presentation may be related to several factors, preferential binding of MAA haptenated proteins mediated by scavenger receptors may be one mechanism. IL-4 was absent from the supernatants of T proliferative assays despite a strong IgG1 response in vivo, although the TH2 cytokines IL-6 and IL-10 were expressed. Since the modification of proteins by the MAA have previously been shown to occur after ethanol consumption in vivo, the ability of MAA haptens to experimentally enhance immune responses, specifically humoral and T cell responses, may represent mechanisms by which autoimmune phenomena found in ALD occur.

  7. Kinetic analysis of the role of histidine chloramines in hypochlorous acid mediated protein oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael J

    2005-05-17

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is a powerful oxidant generated from H(2)O(2) and chloride ions by the heme enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) released from activated leukocytes. In addition to its potent antibacterial effects, excessive HOCl production can lead to host tissue damage, with this implicated in human diseases such as atherosclerosis, cystic fibrosis, and arthritis. HOCl reacts rapidly with biological materials, with proteins being major targets. Chlorinated amines (chloramines) formed from Lys and His side chains and alpha-amino groups on proteins are major products of these reactions; these materials are however also oxidants and can undergo further reactions. In this study, the kinetics of reaction of His side-chain chloramines with other protein components have been investigated by UV/visible spectroscopy and stopped flow methods at pH 7.4 and 22 degrees C, using the chloramines of the model compound 4-imidazoleacetic acid and N-alpha-acetyl-histidine. The second-order rate constants decrease in a similar order (Cys > Met > disulfide bonds > Trp approximately alpha-amino > Lys > Tyr > backbone amides > Arg) to the corresponding reactions of HOCl, but are typically 5-25 times slower. These rate constants are consistent with His side-chain chloramines being important secondary oxidants in HOCl-mediated damage. These studies suggest that formation and subsequent reactions of His side-chain chloramines may be responsible for the targeted secondary modification of selected protein residues by HOCl that has previously been observed experimentally and highlight the importance of chloramine structure on their subsequent reactivity.

  8. OSBP-Related Protein Family: Mediators of Lipid Transport and Signaling at Membrane Contact Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentala, Henriikka; Weber-Boyvat, Marion; Olkkonen, Vesa M

    2016-01-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) and its related protein homologs, ORPs, constitute a conserved family of lipid-binding/transfer proteins (LTPs) expressed ubiquitously in eukaryotes. The ligand-binding domain of ORPs accommodates cholesterol and oxysterols, but also glycerophospholipids, particularly phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P). ORPs have been implicated as intracellular lipid sensors or transporters. Most ORPs carry targeting determinants for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and non-ER organelle membrane. ORPs are located and function at membrane contact sites (MCSs), at which ER is closely apposed with other organelle limiting membranes. Such sites have roles in lipid transport and metabolism, control of Ca(2+) fluxes, and signaling events. ORPs are postulated either to transport lipids over MCSs to maintain the distinct lipid compositions of organelle membranes, or to control the activity of enzymes/protein complexes with functions in signaling and lipid metabolism. ORPs may transfer PI4P and another lipid class bidirectionally. Transport of PI4P followed by its hydrolysis would in this model provide the energy for transfer of the other lipid against its concentration gradient. Control of organelle lipid compositions by OSBP/ORPs is important for the life cycles of several pathogenic viruses. Targeting ORPs with small-molecular antagonists is proposed as a new strategy to combat viral infections. Several ORPs are reported to modulate vesicle transport along the secretory or endocytic pathways. Moreover, antagonists of certain ORPs inhibit cancer cell proliferation. Thus, ORPs are LTPs, which mediate interorganelle lipid transport and coordinate lipid signals with a variety of cellular regimes.

  9. Antibody-dependent SARS coronavirus infection is mediated by antibodies against spike proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Fan; Tseng, Sung-Pin; Yen, Chia-Hung; Yang, Jyh-Yuan; Tsao, Ching-Han; Shen, Chun-Wei; Chen, Kuan-Hsuan; Liu, Fu-Tong; Liu, Wu-Tse; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur; Huang, Jason C

    2014-08-22

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) still carries the potential for reemergence, therefore efforts are being made to create a vaccine as a prophylactic strategy for control and prevention. Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) is a mechanism through which dengue viruses, feline coronaviruses, and HIV viruses take advantage of anti-viral humoral immune responses to infect host target cells. Here we describe our observations of SARS-CoV using ADE to enhance the infectivity of a HL-CZ human promonocyte cell line. Quantitative-PCR and immunofluorescence staining results indicate that SARS-CoV is capable of replication in HL-CZ cells, and of displaying virus-induced cytopathic effects and increased levels of TNF-α, IL-4 and IL-6 two days post-infection. According to flow cytometry data, the HL-CZ cells also expressed angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2, a SARS-CoV receptor) and higher levels of the FcγRII receptor. We found that higher concentrations of anti-sera against SARS-CoV neutralized SARS-CoV infection, while highly diluted anti-sera significantly increased SARS-CoV infection and induced higher levels of apoptosis. Results from infectivity assays indicate that SARS-CoV ADE is primarily mediated by diluted antibodies against envelope spike proteins rather than nucleocapsid proteins. We also generated monoclonal antibodies against SARS-CoV spike proteins and observed that most of them promoted SARS-CoV infection. Combined, our results suggest that antibodies against SARS-CoV spike proteins may trigger ADE effects. The data raise new questions regarding a potential SARS-CoV vaccine, while shedding light on mechanisms involved in SARS pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Constitutive Photomorphogensis Protein1 (COP1 mediated p53 pathway and its oncogenic role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Golam Rabbani

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We have reviewed the COP1 mediated tumor suppressor protein p53 pathway and its oncogenic role. COP1 is a negative regulator of p53 and acts as a pivotal controller of p53-Akt death-live switch (Protein kinase B. In presence of p53, COP1 is overexpressed in breast, ovarian, gastric cancers, even without MDM2 (Mouse double minute-2 amplification. Following DNA damage, COP1 is phosphorylated instantly by ATM (Ataxia telangiectasia mutated and degraded by 14-3-3 and #963; following nuclear export and enhancing ubiquitination. In ATM lacking cell, other kinases, i.e. ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein, Jun kinases and DNA-PK (DNA-dependent protein kinase cause COP1 and CSN3 (COP9 signalosome complex subunit-3 phosphorylation and initiate COP1's down regulation. Although, it has been previously found that co-knockout of MDM2 and COP1 enhance p53's half life by eight fold, the reason is still unknown. Additionally, while interacting with p53, COP1 upregulate MDM2's E3 ubiquitin ligase, Akt, CSN6 (COP9 signalosome 6 activity and inhibit 14-3-3 and #963;'s negative regulation on MDM2 and COP1 itself. Conclusively, there persists an amplification loop among COP1, MDM2, Akt and 14-3-3 and #963; to regulate p53's stability and activity. However, the role of another tumor suppressor PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue is yet to be discovered. This study provides insight on the molecular genetic pathways related to cancer and might be helpful for therapeutic inventions. [Biomed Res Ther 2014; 1(5.000: 142-151

  11. Signal transduction across cellular membranes can be mediated by coupling of the clustering of anchored proteins in both leaflets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Tongtao; Zhang, Xianren

    2012-01-01

    One key question in signal transduction is how the signal is relayed from the outer leaflet of a cellular membrane to the inner leaflet. Using a simulation model, a mechanism for the mediation of signal transduction is proposed here in which the coupling between membrane proteins in different leaflets can be achieved by the clustering of anchored proteins, without recruiting transmembrane proteins. Depending on the hydrophobic length of the anchored proteins, three coupling patterns, including face-to-face clustering, interdigitated clustering, and weak-coupled clustering, are observed in this work. This observation provides a possible explanation of how a particular downstream signaling pathway is selected.

  12. Small-molecule intramimics of formin autoinhibition: a new strategy to target the cytoskeletal remodeling machinery in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lash, L Leanne; Wallar, Bradley J; Turner, Julie D; Vroegop, Steven M; Kilkuskie, Robert E; Kitchen-Goosen, Susan M; Xu, H Eric; Alberts, Arthur S

    2013-11-15

    Although the cancer cell cytoskeleton is a clinically validated target, few new strategies have emerged for selectively targeting cell division by modulating the cytoskeletal structure, particularly ways that could avoid the cardiotoxic and neurotoxic effects of current agents such as taxanes. We address this gap by describing a novel class of small-molecule agonists of the mammalian Diaphanous (mDia)-related formins, which act downstream of Rho GTPases to assemble actin filaments, and their organization with microfilaments to establish and maintain cell polarity during migration and asymmetric division. GTP-bound Rho activates mDia family members by disrupting the interaction between the DID and DAD autoregulatory domains, which releases the FH2 domain to modulate actin and microtubule dynamics. In screening for DID-DAD disruptors that activate mDia, we identified two molecules called intramimics (IMM-01 and -02) that were sufficient to trigger actin assembly and microtubule stabilization, serum response factor-mediated gene expression, cell-cycle arrest, and apoptosis. In vivo analysis of IMM-01 and -02 established their ability to slow tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model of colon cancer. Taken together, our work establishes the use of intramimics and mDia-related formins as a new general strategy for therapeutic targeting of the cytoskeletal remodeling machinery of cancer cells.

  13. Purinoreceptor P2X7 Regulation of Ca2+ Mobilization and Cytoskeletal Rearrangement Is Required for Corneal Reepithelialization after Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minns, Martin S.; Teicher, Gregory; Rich, Celeste B.; Trinkaus-Randall, Vickery

    2017-01-01

    The process of wound healing involves a complex network of signaling pathways working to promote rapid cell migration and wound closure. Activation of purinergic receptors by secreted nucleotides plays a major role in calcium mobilization and the subsequent calcium-dependent signaling that is essential for proper healing. The role of the purinergic receptor P2X7 in wound healing is still relatively unknown. We demonstrate that P2X7 expression increases at the leading edge of corneal epithelium after injury in an organ culture model, and that this change occurs despite an overall decrease in P2X7 expression throughout the epithelium. Inhibition of P2X7 prevents this change in localization after injury and impairs wound healing. In cell culture, P2X7 inhibition attenuates the amplitude and duration of injury-induced calcium mobilization in cells at the leading edge. Immunofluorescence analysis of scratch-wounded cells reveals that P2X7 inhibition results in an overall decrease in the number of focal adhesions along with a concentration of focal adhesions at the wound margin. Live cell imaging of green fluorescent protein–labeled actin and talin shows that P2X7 inhibition alters actin cytoskeletal rearrangements and focal adhesion dynamics after injury. Together, these data demonstrate that P2X7 plays a critical role in mediating calcium signaling and coordinating cytoskeletal rearrangement at the leading edge, both of which processes are early signaling events necessary for proper epithelial wound healing. PMID:26683661

  14. Surfactant protein-A suppresses eosinophil-mediated killing of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in allergic lungs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie G Ledford

    Full Text Available Surfactant protein-A (SP-A has well-established functions in reducing bacterial and viral infections but its role in chronic lung diseases such as asthma is unclear. Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp frequently colonizes the airways of chronic asthmatics and is thought to contribute to exacerbations of asthma. Our lab has previously reported that during Mp infection of non-allergic airways, SP-A aides in maintaining airway homeostasis by inhibiting an overzealous TNF-alpha mediated response and, in allergic mice, SP-A regulates eosinophilic infiltration and inflammation of the airway. In the current study, we used an in vivo model with wild type (WT and SP-A(-/- allergic mice challenged with the model antigen ovalbumin (Ova that were concurrently infected with Mp (Ova+Mp to test the hypothesis that SP-A ameliorates Mp-induced stimulation of eosinophils. Thus, SP-A could protect allergic airways from injury due to release of eosinophil inflammatory products. SP-A deficient mice exhibit significant increases in inflammatory cells, mucus production and lung damage during concurrent allergic airway disease and infection (Ova+Mp as compared to the WT mice of the same treatment group. In contrast, SP-A deficient mice have significantly decreased Mp burden compared to WT mice. The eosinophil specific factor, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO, which has been implicated in pathogen killing and also in epithelial dysfunction due to oxidative damage of resident lung proteins, is enhanced in samples from allergic/infected SP-A(-/- mice as compared to WT mice. In vitro experiments using purified eosinophils and human SP-A suggest that SP-A limits the release of EPO from Mp-stimulated eosinophils thereby reducing their killing capacity. These findings are the first to demonstrate that although SP-A interferes with eosinophil-mediated biologic clearance of Mp by mediating the interaction of Mp with eosinophils, SP-A simultaneously benefits the airway by limiting inflammation

  15. Cell cycle regulation and cytoskeletal remodelling are critical processes in the nutritional programming of embryonic development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelina Swali

    Full Text Available Many mechanisms purport to explain how nutritional signals during early development are manifested as disease in the adult offspring. While these describe processes leading from nutritional insult to development of the actual pathology, the initial underlying cause of the programming effect remains elusive. To establish the primary drivers of programming, this study aimed to capture embryonic gene and protein changes in the whole embryo at the time of nutritional insult rather than downstream phenotypic effects. By using a cross-over design of two well established models of maternal protein and iron restriction we aimed to identify putative common "gatekeepers" which may drive nutritional programming.Both protein and iron deficiency in utero reduced the nephron complement in adult male Wistar and Rowett Hooded Lister rats (P<0.05. This occurred in the absence of damage to the glomerular ultrastructure. Microarray, proteomic and pathway analyses identified diet-specific and strain-specific gatekeeper genes, proteins and processes which shared a common association with the regulation of the cell cycle, especially the G1/S and G2/M checkpoints, and cytoskeletal remodelling. A cell cycle-specific PCR array confirmed the down-regulation of cyclins with protein restriction and the up-regulation of apoptotic genes with iron deficiency.The timing and experimental design of this study have been carefully controlled to isolate the common molecular mechanisms which may initiate the sequelae of events involved in nutritional programming of embryonic development. We propose that despite differences in the individual genes and proteins affected in each strain and with each diet, the general response to nutrient deficiency in utero is perturbation of the cell cycle, at the level of interaction with the cytoskeleton and the mitotic checkpoints, thereby diminishing control over the integrity of DNA which is allowed to replicate. These findings offer novel

  16. Tomato 14-3-3 protein TFT7 interacts with a MAP kinase kinase to regulate immunity-associated programmed cell death mediated by diverse disease resistance proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Chang-Sik; Martin, Gregory B

    2011-04-22

    Programmed cell death (PCD) associated with immunity is triggered when a plant disease resistance (R) protein recognizes a corresponding pathogen virulence protein. In tomato, detection by the host Pto kinase of the Pseudomonas syringae proteins AvrPto or AvrPtoB causes localized PCD. Previously, we reported that both MAPKKKα (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase) and the tomato 14-3-3 protein 7 (TFT7) positively regulate Pto-mediated PCD in tomato and Nicotiana benthamiana. In addition, in contrast to MAPKKKα, TFT7 is required for PCD mediated by four other R proteins. Here we investigate why TFT7 is required for PCD induced by diverse R proteins in plants. We discovered that a MAPKK, SlMKK2, which acts downstream of SlMAPKKKα, also interacts with TFT7 in plant cells. Gene silencing experiments revealed that the orthologous genes of both SlMKK2 and TFT7 in N. benthamiana are required for PCD mediated by the same set of R proteins. SlMKK2 and its orthologs contain a 14-3-3 binding site in their N terminus, and Thr(33) in this site is required for interaction with TFT7 in vivo. Like the structurally similar human 14-3-3ε protein, TFT7 forms a homodimer in vivo. Because TFT7 interacts with both SlMAPKKKα and SlMKK2 and also forms a homodimer, we propose that TFT7 may coordinately recruit these client proteins for efficient signal transfer, leading to PCD induction.