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Sample records for cytoplasmic domain regulates

  1. Regulation of the Incorporation of Tissue Factor into Microparticles by Serine Phosphorylation of the Cytoplasmic Domain of Tissue Factor*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Mary E. W.; Ettelaie, Camille

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms that regulate the incorporation and release of tissue factors (TFs) into cell-derived microparticles are as yet unidentified. In this study, we have explored the regulation of TF release into microparticles by the phosphorylation of serine residues within the cytoplasmic domain of TF. Wild-type and mutant forms of TF, containing alanine and aspartate substitutions at Ser253 and Ser258, were overexpressed in coronary artery and dermal microvascular endothelial cells and microparticle release stimulated with PAR2 agonist peptide (PAR2-AP). The release of TF antigen and activity was then monitored. In addition, the phosphorylation state of the two serine residues within the released microparticles and the cells was monitored for 150 min. The release of wild-type TF as procoagulant microparticles peaked at 90 min and declined thereafter in both cell types. The TF within these microparticles was phosphorylated at Ser253 but not at Ser258. Aspartate substitution of Ser253 resulted in rapid release of TF antigen but not activity, whereas TF release was reduced and delayed by alanine substitution of Ser253 or aspartate substitution of Ser258. Alanine substitution of Ser258 prolonged the release of TF following PAR2-AP activation. The release of TF was concurrent with phosphorylation of Ser253 and was followed by dephosphorylation at 120 min and phosphorylation of Ser258. We propose a sequential mechanism in which the phosphorylation of Ser253 through PAR2 activation results in the incorporation of TF into microparticles, simultaneously inducing Ser258 phosphorylation. Phosphorylation of Ser258 in turn promotes the dephosphorylation of Ser253 and suppresses the release of TF. PMID:21310953

  2. Cation diffusion facilitators transport initiation and regulation is mediated by cation induced conformational changes of the cytoplasmic domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Zeytuni

    Full Text Available Cation diffusion facilitators (CDF are part of a highly conserved protein family that maintains cellular divalent cation homeostasis in all domains of life. CDF's were shown to be involved in several human diseases, such as Type-II diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases. In this work, we employed a multi-disciplinary approach to study the activation mechanism of the CDF protein family. For this we used MamM, one of the main ion transporters of magnetosomes--bacterial organelles that enable magnetotactic bacteria to orientate along geomagnetic fields. Our results reveal that the cytosolic domain of MamM forms a stable dimer that undergoes distinct conformational changes upon divalent cation binding. MamM conformational change is associated with three metal binding sites that were identified and characterized. Altogether, our results provide a novel auto-regulation mode of action model in which the cytosolic domain's conformational changes upon ligand binding allows the priming of the CDF into its transport mode.

  3. The Nonreceptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase PTP1B Binds to the Cytoplasmic Domain of N-Cadherin and Regulates the Cadherin–Actin Linkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsamo, Janne; Arregui, Carlos; Leung, TinChung; Lilien, Jack

    1998-01-01

    Cadherin-mediated adhesion depends on the association of its cytoplasmic domain with the actin-containing cytoskeleton. This interaction is mediated by a group of cytoplasmic proteins: α-and β- or γ- catenin. Phosphorylation of β-catenin on tyrosine residues plays a role in controlling this association and, therefore, cadherin function. Previous work from our laboratory suggested that a nonreceptor protein tyrosine phosphatase, bound to the cytoplasmic domain of N-cadherin, is responsible for removing tyrosine-bound phosphate residues from β-catenin, thus maintaining the cadherin–actin connection (Balsamo et al., 1996). Here we report the molecular cloning of the cadherin-associated tyrosine phosphatase and identify it as PTP1B. To definitively establish a causal relationship between the function of cadherin-bound PTP1B and cadherin-mediated adhesion, we tested the effect of expressing a catalytically inactive form of PTP1B in L cells constitutively expressing N-cadherin. We find that expression of the catalytically inactive PTP1B results in reduced cadherin-mediated adhesion. Furthermore, cadherin is uncoupled from its association with actin, and β-catenin shows increased phosphorylation on tyrosine residues when compared with parental cells or cells transfected with the wild-type PTP1B. Both the transfected wild-type and the mutant PTP1B are found associated with N-cadherin, and recombinant mutant PTP1B binds to N-cadherin in vitro, indicating that the catalytically inactive form acts as a dominant negative, displacing endogenous PTP1B, and rendering cadherin nonfunctional. Our results demonstrate a role for PTP1B in regulating cadherin-mediated cell adhesion. PMID:9786960

  4. Affinity between TBC1D4 (AS160 phosphotyrosine-binding domain and insulin-regulated aminopeptidase cytoplasmic domain measured by isothermal titration calorimetry

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    SangYoun Park*, Keon Young Kim, Sunmin Kim & Young Seok Yu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Uptake of circulating glucose into the cells happens via the insulin-mediated signalling pathway, which translocates the glucosetransporter 4 (GLUT4 vesicles from the intracellular compartmentto the plasma membrane. RabㆍGTPases are involvedin this vesicle trafficking, where RabㆍGTPase-activatingproteins (RabGAP enhance the GTP to GDP hydrolysis.TBC1D4 (AS160 and TBC1D1 are functional RabGAPs in theadipocytes and the skeletonal myocytes, respectively. Theseproteins contain two phosphotyrosine-binding domains (PTBsat the amino-terminus of the catalytic RabGAP domain. Thesecond PTB has been shown to interact with the cytoplasmicregion of the insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP of theGLUT4 vesicle. In this study, we quantitatively measured the∼μM affinity (KD between TBC1D4 PTB and IRAP using isothermaltitration calorimetry, and further showed that IRAP residues1-49 are the major region mediating this interaction. Wealso demonstrated that the IRAP residues 1-15 are necessarybut not sufficient for the PTB interaction.

  5. The cytoplasmic domain close to the transmembrane region of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor contains sequence elements that regulate agonist-dependent internalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Patricia; Roncero, Isabel; Blázquez, Enrique; Alvarez, Elvira

    2005-07-01

    In order to gain better insight into the molecular events involved in the signal transduction generated through glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptors, we tested the effect of deletions and point mutations within the cytoplasmic tail of this receptor with a view to establishing relationships between signal transduction desensitisation and receptor internalisation. Wild-type and truncated (deletion of the last 27 amino acids (GLPR 435R) and deletion of 44 amino acids (GLPR 418R)) GLP-1 receptors bound the agonist with similar affinity. Deletion of the last 27 amino acids decreased the internalisation rate by 78%, while deletion of 44 amino acids containing all the phosphorylation sites hitherto described in this receptor decreased the internalisation rate by only 47%. Binding of the ligand to both receptors stimulated adenylyl cyclase. In contrast, deletion of the region containing amino acids 419 to 435 (GLPR 419delta435) increased the internalisation rate by 268%, and the replacement of EVQ(408-410) by alanine (GLPR A(408-410)) increased this process to 296%. In both receptors, the efficacy in stimulating adenylate cyclase was decreased. All the receptors studied were internalised by coated pits, except for the receptor with a deletion of the last 44 amino acids, which also had a faster resensitisation rate. Our findings indicate that the neighbouring trans-membrane domain of the carboxyl-terminal tail of the GLP-1 receptor contains sequence elements that regulate agonist-dependent internalisation and transmembrane signalling.

  6. Cytoplasmic Domains and Voltage-Dependent Potassium Channel Gating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Francisco; Domínguez, Pedro; de la Peña, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    The basic architecture of the voltage-dependent K+ channels (Kv channels) corresponds to a transmembrane protein core in which the permeation pore, the voltage-sensing components and the gating machinery (cytoplasmic facing gate and sensor–gate coupler) reside. Usually, large protein tails are attached to this core, hanging toward the inside of the cell. These cytoplasmic regions are essential for normal channel function and, due to their accessibility to the cytoplasmic environment, constitute obvious targets for cell-physiological control of channel behavior. Here we review the present knowledge about the molecular organization of these intracellular channel regions and their role in both setting and controlling Kv voltage-dependent gating properties. This includes the influence that they exert on Kv rapid/N-type inactivation and on activation/deactivation gating of Shaker-like and eag-type Kv channels. Some illustrative examples about the relevance of these cytoplasmic domains determining the possibilities for modulation of Kv channel gating by cellular components are also considered. PMID:22470342

  7. Regulation of autophagy by cytoplasmic p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, M Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Vitale, Ilio; Djavaheri-Mergny, Mojgan; D'Amelio, Marcello; Criollo, Alfredo; Morselli, Eugenia; Zhu, Changlian; Harper, Francis; Nannmark, Ulf; Samara, Chrysanthi; Pinton, Paolo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Carnuccio, Rosa; Moll, Ute M; Madeo, Frank; Paterlini-Brechot, Patrizia; Rizzuto, Rosario; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Pierron, Gérard; Blomgren, Klas; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Codogno, Patrice; Cecconi, Francesco; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-06-01

    Multiple cellular stressors, including activation of the tumour suppressor p53, can stimulate autophagy. Here we show that deletion, depletion or inhibition of p53 can induce autophagy in human, mouse and nematode cells subjected to knockout, knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of p53. Enhanced autophagy improved the survival of p53-deficient cancer cells under conditions of hypoxia and nutrient depletion, allowing them to maintain high ATP levels. Inhibition of p53 led to autophagy in enucleated cells, and cytoplasmic, not nuclear, p53 was able to repress the enhanced autophagy of p53(-/-) cells. Many different inducers of autophagy (for example, starvation, rapamycin and toxins affecting the endoplasmic reticulum) stimulated proteasome-mediated degradation of p53 through a pathway relying on the E3 ubiquitin ligase HDM2. Inhibition of p53 degradation prevented the activation of autophagy in several cell lines, in response to several distinct stimuli. These results provide evidence of a key signalling pathway that links autophagy to the cancer-associated dysregulation of p53.

  8. Specific residues of the cytoplasmic domains of cardiac inward rectifier potassium channels are effective antifibrillatory targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noujaim, Sami F.; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Ponce-Balbuena, Daniela; Ferrer-Villada, Tania; López-Izquierdo, Angelica; Pandit, Sandeep; Calvo, Conrado J.; Grzeda, Krzysztof R.; Berenfeld, Omer; Sánchez Chapula, José A.; Jalife, José

    2010-01-01

    Atrial and ventricular tachyarrhythmias can be perpetuated by up-regulation of inward rectifier potassium channels. Thus, it may be beneficial to block inward rectifier channels under conditions in which their function becomes arrhythmogenic (e.g., inherited gain-of-function mutation channelopathies, ischemia, and chronic and vagally mediated atrial fibrillation). We hypothesize that the antimalarial quinoline chloroquine exerts potent antiarrhythmic effects by interacting with the cytoplasmic domains of Kir2.1 (IK1), Kir3.1 (IKACh), or Kir6.2 (IKATP) and reducing inward rectifier potassium currents. In isolated hearts of three different mammalian species, intracoronary chloroquine perfusion reduced fibrillatory frequency (atrial or ventricular), and effectively terminated the arrhythmia with resumption of sinus rhythm. In patch-clamp experiments chloroquine blocked IK1, IKACh, and IKATP. Comparative molecular modeling and ligand docking of chloroquine in the intracellular domains of Kir2.1, Kir3.1, and Kir6.2 suggested that chloroquine blocks or reduces potassium flow by interacting with negatively charged amino acids facing the ion permeation vestibule of the channel in question. These results open a novel path toward discovering antiarrhythmic pharmacophores that target specific residues of the cytoplasmic domain of inward rectifier potassium channels.—Noujaim, S. F., Stuckey, J. A., Ponce-Balbuena, D., Ferrer-Villada, T., López-Izquierdo, A., Pandit, S., Calvo, C. J., Grzeda, K. R., Berenfeld, O., Sánchez Chapula, J. A., Jalife, J. Specific residues of the cytoplasmic domains of cardiac inward rectifier potassium channels are effective antifibrillatory targets. PMID:20585026

  9. SH2 and SH3 domains: elements that control interactions of cytoplasmic signaling proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, C A; Anderson, D; Moran, M F; Ellis, C; Pawson, T

    1991-05-03

    Src homology (SH) regions 2 and 3 are noncatalytic domains that are conserved among a series of cytoplasmic signaling proteins regulated by receptor protein-tyrosine kinases, including phospholipase C-gamma, Ras GTPase (guanosine triphosphatase)-activating protein, and Src-like tyrosine kinases. The SH2 domains of these signaling proteins bind tyrosine phosphorylated polypeptides, implicated in normal signaling and cellular transformation. Tyrosine phosphorylation acts as a switch to induce the binding of SH2 domains, thereby mediating the formation of heteromeric protein complexes at or near the plasma membrane. The formation of these complexes is likely to control the activation of signal transduction pathways by tyrosine kinases. The SH3 domain is a distinct motif that, together with SH2, may modulate interactions with the cytoskeleton and membrane. Some signaling and transforming proteins contain SH2 and SH3 domains unattached to any known catalytic element. These noncatalytic proteins may serve as adaptors to link tyrosine kinases to specific target proteins. These observations suggest that SH2 and SH3 domains participate in the control of intracellular responses to growth factor stimulation.

  10. Pleckstrin Homology Domain Diffusion in Dictyostelium Cytoplasm Studied Using Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, Ruchira; Hink, Mark A.; Bosgraaf, Leonard; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Visser, Antonie J.W.G.

    2004-01-01

    The translocation of pleckstrin homology (PH) domain-containing proteins from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane plays an important role in the chemotaxis mechanism of Dictyostelium cells. The diffusion of three PH domain-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions (PH2-GFP, PH10-GFP, and PH-CRAC

  11. Pleckstrin homology domain diffusion in Dictyostelium cytoplasm studied using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruchira, A.; Hink, M.A.; Bosgraaf, L.; Haastert, van P.J.M.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2004-01-01

    The translocation of pleckstrin homology (PH) domain-containing proteins from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane plays an important role in the chemotaxis mechanism of Dictyostelium cells. The diffusion of three PH domain-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions (PH2-GFP, PH10-GFP, and PH-CRAC

  12. The Cytoplasmic Tail Domain of Epstein-Barr Virus gH Regulates Membrane Fusion Activity through Altering gH Binding to gp42 and Epithelial Cell Attachment

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    Jia Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is associated with infectious mononucleosis and a variety of cancers as well as lymphoproliferative disorders in immunocompromised patients. EBV mediates viral entry into epithelial and B cells using fusion machinery composed of four glycoproteins: gB, the gH/gL complex, and gp42. gB and gH/gL are required for both epithelial and B cell fusion. The specific role of gH/gL in fusion has been the most elusive among the required herpesvirus entry glycoproteins. Previous mutational studies have focused on the ectodomain of EBV gH and not on the gH cytoplasmic tail domain (CTD. In this study, we chose to examine the function of the gH CTD by making serial gH truncation mutants as well as amino acid substitution mutants to determine the importance of the gH CTD in epithelial and B cell fusion. Truncation of 8 amino acids (aa 698 to 706 of the gH CTD resulted in diminished fusion activity using a virus-free syncytium formation assay and fusion assay. The importance of the amino acid composition of the gH CTD was also investigated by amino acid substitutions that altered the hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity of the CTD. These mutations also resulted in diminished fusion activity. Interestingly, some of the gH CTD truncation mutants and hydrophilic tail substitution mutants lost the ability to bind to gp42 and epithelial cells. In summary, our studies indicate that the gH CTD is an important functional domain.

  13. DMPD: Negative regulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 18703349 Negative regulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. Komur...Show Negative regulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. PubmedID 18703349 Title Negative r...egulation of cytoplasmic RNA-mediated antiviral signaling. Authors Komuro A, Bamm

  14. Phosphorylation of the dimeric cytoplasmic domain of the phytosulfokine receptor, PSKR1

    KAUST Repository

    Muleya, V.; Marondedze, Claudius; Wheeler, J. I.; Thomas, Ludivine; Mok, Y.-F.; Griffin, M. D. W.; Manallack, D. T.; Kwezi, L.; Lilley, K. S.; Gehring, Christoph A; Irving, H. R.

    2016-01-01

    Phytosulfokines (PSKs) are plant peptide hormones that co-regulate plant growth, differentiation and defense responses. PSKs signal through a plasma membrane localized leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (phytosulfokine receptor 1, PSKR1) that also contains a functional cytosolic guanylate cyclase with its cyclase catalytic center embedded within the kinase domain. To functionally characterize this novel type of overlapping dual catalytic function, we investigated the phosphorylation of PSKR1 in vitro Tandem mass spectrometry of the cytoplasmic domain of PSKR1 (PSKR1cd) revealed at least 11 phosphorylation sites (8 serines, 2 threonines and 1 tyrosine) within the PSKR1cd. Phosphomimetic mutations of three serine residues (Ser686, Ser696 and Ser698) in tandem at the juxta-membrane position resulted in enhanced kinase activity in the on-mutant that was suppressed in the off-mutant, but both mutations reduced guanylate cyclase activity. Both the on and off phosphomimetic mutations of the phosphotyrosine (Tyr888) residue in the activation loop suppressed kinase activity, while neither mutation affected guanylate cyclase activity. Size exclusion and analytical ultracentrifugation analysis of the PSKR1cd suggest that it is reversibly dimeric in solution, which was further confirmed by biflourescence complementation. Taken together, these data suggest that in this novel type of receptor domain architecture, specific phosphorylation and dimerization are possibly essential mechanisms for ligand-mediated catalysis and signaling.

  15. Phosphorylation of the dimeric cytoplasmic domain of the phytosulfokine receptor, PSKR1

    KAUST Repository

    Muleya, V.

    2016-08-04

    Phytosulfokines (PSKs) are plant peptide hormones that co-regulate plant growth, differentiation and defense responses. PSKs signal through a plasma membrane localized leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (phytosulfokine receptor 1, PSKR1) that also contains a functional cytosolic guanylate cyclase with its cyclase catalytic center embedded within the kinase domain. To functionally characterize this novel type of overlapping dual catalytic function, we investigated the phosphorylation of PSKR1 in vitro Tandem mass spectrometry of the cytoplasmic domain of PSKR1 (PSKR1cd) revealed at least 11 phosphorylation sites (8 serines, 2 threonines and 1 tyrosine) within the PSKR1cd. Phosphomimetic mutations of three serine residues (Ser686, Ser696 and Ser698) in tandem at the juxta-membrane position resulted in enhanced kinase activity in the on-mutant that was suppressed in the off-mutant, but both mutations reduced guanylate cyclase activity. Both the on and off phosphomimetic mutations of the phosphotyrosine (Tyr888) residue in the activation loop suppressed kinase activity, while neither mutation affected guanylate cyclase activity. Size exclusion and analytical ultracentrifugation analysis of the PSKR1cd suggest that it is reversibly dimeric in solution, which was further confirmed by biflourescence complementation. Taken together, these data suggest that in this novel type of receptor domain architecture, specific phosphorylation and dimerization are possibly essential mechanisms for ligand-mediated catalysis and signaling.

  16. Nuclear translocation of the cytoplasmic domain of HB-EGF induces gastric cancer invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, Takaya; Yoshida, Michihiro; Fukuda, Shinji; Ebi, Masahide; Hirata, Yoshikazu; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Tanida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Hiromi; Kamiya, Takeshi; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Joh, Takashi

    2012-05-30

    Membrane-anchored heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (proHB-EGF) yields soluble HB-EGF, which is an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligand, and a carboxy-terminal fragment of HB-EGF (HB-EGF-CTF) after ectodomain shedding. We previously reported that HB-EGF-CTF and unshed proHB-EGF which has the cytoplasmic domain of proHB-EGF (HB-EGF-C), translocate from the plasma membrane to the nucleus and regulate cell cycle after shedding stimuli. However, the significance of nuclear exported HB-EGF-C in human gastric cancer is unclear. We investigated the relationship between intracellular localization of HB-EGF-C and clinical outcome in 96 gastric cancer patients treated with gastrectomy. Moreover, we established stable gastric cancer cell lines overexpressing wild-type HB-EGF (wt-HB-EGF) and mutated HB-EGF (HB-EGF-mC), which prevented HB-EGF-C nuclear translocation after shedding. Cell motility between these 2 gastric cancer cell lines was investigated using a transwell invasion assay and a wound healing assay. Of the 96 gastric cancer cases, HB-EGF-C immunoreactivity was detected in both the nucleus and cytoplasm in 19 cases (19.8 %) and in the cytoplasm only in 25 cases (26.0 %). The nuclear immunoreactivity of HB-EGF-C was significantly increased in stage pT3/4 tumors compared with pT1/2 tumors (T1/2 vs. T3/4: 11.1 % vs. 36.4 %, P Gastric cancer cell invasion obviously increased in wt-HB-EGF-expressing cells, but invasion in HB-EGF-mC-expressing cells showed a slight increase compared with control cells. Moreover, wt-HB-EGF overexpression increased the effectiveness of wound healing, but had no significant effect in HB-EGF-mC-expressing cells. Both the function of HB-EGF as an EGFR ligand and a novel signal for HB-EGF-C nuclear translocation induce gastric cancer growth, whereas HB-EGF-C nuclear translocation independently plays a critical role in gastric cancer invasion. The present study demonstrated that HB-EGF-C nuclear translocation

  17. Nuclear translocation of the cytoplasmic domain of HB-EGF induces gastric cancer invasion

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    Shimura Takaya

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Membrane-anchored heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (proHB-EGF yields soluble HB-EGF, which is an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR ligand, and a carboxy-terminal fragment of HB-EGF (HB-EGF-CTF after ectodomain shedding. We previously reported that HB-EGF-CTF and unshed proHB-EGF which has the cytoplasmic domain of proHB-EGF (HB-EGF-C, translocate from the plasma membrane to the nucleus and regulate cell cycle after shedding stimuli. However, the significance of nuclear exported HB-EGF-C in human gastric cancer is unclear. Methods We investigated the relationship between intracellular localization of HB-EGF-C and clinical outcome in 96 gastric cancer patients treated with gastrectomy. Moreover, we established stable gastric cancer cell lines overexpressing wild-type HB-EGF (wt-HB-EGF and mutated HB-EGF (HB-EGF-mC, which prevented HB-EGF-C nuclear translocation after shedding. Cell motility between these 2 gastric cancer cell lines was investigated using a transwell invasion assay and a wound healing assay. Results Of the 96 gastric cancer cases, HB-EGF-C immunoreactivity was detected in both the nucleus and cytoplasm in 19 cases (19.8 % and in the cytoplasm only in 25 cases (26.0 %. The nuclear immunoreactivity of HB-EGF-C was significantly increased in stage pT3/4 tumors compared with pT1/2 tumors (T1/2 vs. T3/4: 11.1 % vs. 36.4 %, P  Conclusions Both the function of HB-EGF as an EGFR ligand and a novel signal for HB-EGF-C nuclear translocation induce gastric cancer growth, whereas HB-EGF-C nuclear translocation independently plays a critical role in gastric cancer invasion. The present study demonstrated that HB-EGF-C nuclear translocation might be crucial in gastric cancer invasion. HB-EGF-C nuclear translocation may offer a prognostic marker and a new molecular target for gastric cancer therapy.

  18. Nuclear translocation of the cytoplasmic domain of HB-EGF induces gastric cancer invasion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimura, Takaya; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Joh, Takashi; Yoshida, Michihiro; Fukuda, Shinji; Ebi, Masahide; Hirata, Yoshikazu; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Tanida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Hiromi; Kamiya, Takeshi

    2012-01-01

    Membrane-anchored heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (proHB-EGF) yields soluble HB-EGF, which is an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligand, and a carboxy-terminal fragment of HB-EGF (HB-EGF-CTF) after ectodomain shedding. We previously reported that HB-EGF-CTF and unshed proHB-EGF which has the cytoplasmic domain of proHB-EGF (HB-EGF-C), translocate from the plasma membrane to the nucleus and regulate cell cycle after shedding stimuli. However, the significance of nuclear exported HB-EGF-C in human gastric cancer is unclear. We investigated the relationship between intracellular localization of HB-EGF-C and clinical outcome in 96 gastric cancer patients treated with gastrectomy. Moreover, we established stable gastric cancer cell lines overexpressing wild-type HB-EGF (wt-HB-EGF) and mutated HB-EGF (HB-EGF-mC), which prevented HB-EGF-C nuclear translocation after shedding. Cell motility between these 2 gastric cancer cell lines was investigated using a transwell invasion assay and a wound healing assay. Of the 96 gastric cancer cases, HB-EGF-C immunoreactivity was detected in both the nucleus and cytoplasm in 19 cases (19.8 %) and in the cytoplasm only in 25 cases (26.0 %). The nuclear immunoreactivity of HB-EGF-C was significantly increased in stage pT3/4 tumors compared with pT1/2 tumors (T1/2 vs. T3/4: 11.1 % vs. 36.4 %, P < 0.01). The growth of wt-HB-EGF- and HB-EGF-mC-expressing cells significantly increased compared with control cells, but the growth of HB-EGF-mC-expressing cells was significantly decreased compared with wt-HB-EGF-expressing cells. Gastric cancer cell invasion obviously increased in wt-HB-EGF-expressing cells, but invasion in HB-EGF-mC-expressing cells showed a slight increase compared with control cells. Moreover, wt-HB-EGF overexpression increased the effectiveness of wound healing, but had no significant effect in HB-EGF-mC-expressing cells. Both the function of HB-EGF as an EGFR ligand and a novel signal for

  19. Integrin cytoplasmic domain-associated protein-1 (ICAP-1) interacts with the ROCK-I kinase at the plasma membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroeken, Peter J. M.; Alvarez, Belén; van Rheenen, Jacco; Wijnands, Yvonne M.; Geerts, Dirk; Jalink, Kees; Roos, Ed

    2006-01-01

    The integrin cytoplasmic domain-associated protein-1 (ICAP-1) binds via its C-terminal PTB (phosphotyrosine-binding) domain to the cytoplasmic tails of beta1 but not other integrins. Using the yeast two-hybrid assay, we found that ICAP-1 binds the ROCK-I kinase, an effector of the RhoA GTPase. By

  20. Glycoprotein cytoplasmic domain sequences required for rescue of a vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein mutant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitt, M.A.; Chong, L.; Rose, J.K.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have used transient expression of the wild-type vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) glycoprotein (G protein) from cloned cDNA to rescue a temperature-sensitive G protein mutant of VSV in cells at the nonpermissive temperature. Using cDNAs encoding G proteins with deletions in the normal 29-amino-acid cytoplasmic domain, they determined that the presence of either the membrane-proximal 9 amino acids or the membrane-distal 12 amino acids was sufficient for rescue of the temperature-sensitive mutant. G proteins with cytoplasmic domains derived from other cellular or viral G proteins did not rescue the mutant, nor did G proteins with one or three amino acids of the normal cytoplasmic domain. Rescue correlated directly with the ability of the G proteins to be incorporated into virus particles. This was shown by analysis of radiolabeled particles separated on sucrose gradients as well as by electron microscopy of rescued virus after immunogold labeling. Quantitation of surface expression showed that all of the mutated G proteins were expressed less efficiently on the cell surface than was wild-type G protein. However, they were able to correct for differences in rescue efficiency resulting from differences in the level of surface expression by reducing wild-type G protein expression to levels equivalent to those observed for the mutated G proteins. The results provide evidence that at least a portion of the cytoplasmic domain is required for efficient assembly of the VSV G protein into virions during virus budding

  1. Replacement of the cytoplasmic domain alters sorting of a viral glycoprotein in polarized cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Puddington, L; Woodgett, C; Rose, J K

    1987-01-01

    The envelope glycoprotein (G protein) of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) is transported to the basolateral plasma membrane of polarized epithelial cells, whereas the hemagglutinin glycoprotein (HA protein) of influenza virus is transported to the apical plasma membrane. To determine if the cytoplasmic domain of VSV G protein might be important in directing G protein to the basolateral membrane, we derived polarized Madin-Darby canine kidney cell lines expressing G protein or G protein with i...

  2. Activation gating kinetics of GIRK channels are mediated by cytoplasmic residues adjacent to transmembrane domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadja, Rona; Reuveny, Eitan

    2009-01-01

    G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRK/Kir3.x) are involved in neurotransmission-mediated reduction of excitability. The gating mechanism following G protein activation of these channels likely proceeds from movement of inner transmembrane helices to allow K(+) ions movement through the pore of the channel. There is limited understanding of how the binding of G-protein betagamma subunits to cytoplasmic regions of the channel transduces the signal to the transmembrane regions. In this study, we examined the molecular basis that governs the activation kinetics of these channels, using a chimeric approach. We identified two regions as being important in determining the kinetics of activation. One region is the bottom of the outer transmembrane helix (TM1) and the cytoplasmic domain immediately adjacent (the slide helix); and the second region is the bottom of the inner transmembrane helix (TM2) and the cytoplasmic domain immediately adjacent. Interestingly, both of these regions are sufficient in mediating the kinetics of fast activation gating. This result suggests that there is a cooperative movement of either one of these domains to allow fast and efficient activation gating of GIRK channels.

  3. Cytoplasmic tethering of a RING protein RBCK1 by its splice variant lacking the RING domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Tatematsu, Kenji; Koyanagi, Tomoyoshi; Okajima, Toshihide; Tanizawa, Katsuyuki; Kuroda, Shun'ichi

    2005-01-01

    RBCC protein interacting with PKC 1 (RBCK1) is a transcription factor belonging to the RING-IBR protein family and has been shown to shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm, possessing both the nuclear export and localization signals within its amino acid sequence. RBCK2, lacking the C-terminal half of RBCK1 including the RING-IBR domain, has also been identified as an alternative splice variant of RBCK1. RBCK2 shows no transcriptional activity and instead it represses the transcriptional activity of RBCK1. Here, we show that RBCK2 is present usually in the cytoplasm containing two Leu-rich regions that presumably serve as a nuclear export signal (NES). Moreover, an NES-disrupted RBCK1 that is mostly localized within the nucleus is translocated to the cytoplasm when coexpressed with RBCK2, suggesting that RBCK2 serves as a cytoplasmic tethering protein for RBCK1. We propose a novel and general function of RING-lacking splice variants of RING proteins to control the intracellular localization and functions of the parental RING proteins by forming a hetero-oligomeric complex

  4. Cytoplasmic tail domain of glycoprotein B is essential for HHV-6 infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, Nora F.; Jasirwan, Chyntia; Kanemoto, Satoshi; Wakata, Aika; Wang, Bochao; Hata, Yuuki; Nagamata, Satoshi; Kawabata, Akiko; Tang, Huamin; Mori, Yasuko

    2016-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) glycoprotein B (gB) is an abundantly expressed viral glycoprotein required for viral entry and cell fusion, and is highly conserved among herpesviruses. The present study examined the function of HHV-6 gB cytoplasmic tail domain (CTD). A gB CTD deletion mutant was constructed which, in contrast to its revertant, could not be reconstituted. Moreover, deletion of gB cytoplasmic tail impaired the intracellular transport of gB protein to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Taken together, these results suggest that gB CTD is critical for HHV-6 propagation and important for intracellular transportation. - Highlights: • Glycoprotein B (gB) is highly conserved among herpesviruses. • HHV-6 gB is also abundantly expressed in virions. • In the present study, we showed the function of HHV-6 gB cytoplasmic tail domain (CTD). • We found that deletion of gB CTD impairs the intracellular transport of gB protein to the trans-Golgi network (TGN), and CTD of gB is critical for HHV-6 propagation.

  5. Cytoplasmic tail domain of glycoprotein B is essential for HHV-6 infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, Nora F. [Division of Clinical Virology, Center for Infectious Diseases, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Faculty of Pharmacy, Suez Canal University, Ismailia (Egypt); Jasirwan, Chyntia [Division of Clinical Virology, Center for Infectious Diseases, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Division of Hepatobiliary, Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Indonesia (Indonesia); Kanemoto, Satoshi; Wakata, Aika; Wang, Bochao; Hata, Yuuki [Division of Clinical Virology, Center for Infectious Diseases, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Nagamata, Satoshi [Division of Clinical Virology, Center for Infectious Diseases, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Kawabata, Akiko [Division of Clinical Virology, Center for Infectious Diseases, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Tang, Huamin [Division of Clinical Virology, Center for Infectious Diseases, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan); Department of Immunology, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing (China); Mori, Yasuko, E-mail: ymori@med.kobe-u.ac.jp [Division of Clinical Virology, Center for Infectious Diseases, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) glycoprotein B (gB) is an abundantly expressed viral glycoprotein required for viral entry and cell fusion, and is highly conserved among herpesviruses. The present study examined the function of HHV-6 gB cytoplasmic tail domain (CTD). A gB CTD deletion mutant was constructed which, in contrast to its revertant, could not be reconstituted. Moreover, deletion of gB cytoplasmic tail impaired the intracellular transport of gB protein to the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Taken together, these results suggest that gB CTD is critical for HHV-6 propagation and important for intracellular transportation. - Highlights: • Glycoprotein B (gB) is highly conserved among herpesviruses. • HHV-6 gB is also abundantly expressed in virions. • In the present study, we showed the function of HHV-6 gB cytoplasmic tail domain (CTD). • We found that deletion of gB CTD impairs the intracellular transport of gB protein to the trans-Golgi network (TGN), and CTD of gB is critical for HHV-6 propagation.

  6. Coordinated movement of cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains of RyR1 upon gating.

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    Montserrat Samsó

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Ryanodine receptor type 1 (RyR1 produces spatially and temporally defined Ca2+ signals in several cell types. How signals received in the cytoplasmic domain are transmitted to the ion gate and how the channel gates are unknown. We used EGTA or neuroactive PCB 95 to stabilize the full closed or open states of RyR1. Single-channel measurements in the presence of FKBP12 indicate that PCB 95 inverts the thermodynamic stability of RyR1 and locks it in a long-lived open state whose unitary current is indistinguishable from the native open state. We analyzed two datasets of 15,625 and 18,527 frozen-hydrated RyR1-FKBP12 particles in the closed and open conformations, respectively, by cryo-electron microscopy. Their corresponding three-dimensional structures at 10.2 A resolution refine the structure surrounding the ion pathway previously identified in the closed conformation: two right-handed bundles emerging from the putative ion gate (the cytoplasmic "inner branches" and the transmembrane "inner helices". Furthermore, six of the identifiable transmembrane segments of RyR1 have similar organization to those of the mammalian Kv1.2 potassium channel. Upon gating, the distal cytoplasmic domains move towards the transmembrane domain while the central cytoplasmic domains move away from it, and also away from the 4-fold axis. Along the ion pathway, precise relocation of the inner helices and inner branches results in an approximately 4 A diameter increase of the ion gate. Whereas the inner helices of the K+ channels and of the RyR1 channel cross-correlate best with their corresponding open/closed states, the cytoplasmic inner branches, which are not observed in the K+ channels, appear to have at least as important a role as the inner helices for RyR1 gating. We propose a theoretical model whereby the inner helices, the inner branches, and the h1 densities together create an efficient novel gating mechanism for channel opening by relaxing two right

  7. Systematic characterization of the specificity of the SH2 domains of cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bing; Tan, Pauline H; Li, Shawn S C; Pei, Dehua

    2013-04-09

    Cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases (CTK) generally contain a Src-homology 2 (SH2) domain, whose role in the CTK family is not fully understood. Here we report the determination of the specificity of 25 CTK SH2 domains by screening one-bead-one-compound (OBOC) peptide libraries. Based on the peptide sequences selected by the SH2 domains, we built Support Vector Machine (SVM) models for the prediction of binding ligands for the SH2 domains. These models yielded support for the progressive phosphorylation model for CTKs in which the overlapping specificity of the CTK SH2 and kinase domains has been proposed to facilitate targeting of the CTK substrates with at least two potential phosphotyrosine (pTyr) sites. We curated 93 CTK substrates with at least two pTyr sites catalyzed by the same CTK, and showed that 71% of these substrates had at least two pTyr sites predicted to bind a common CTK SH2 domain. More importantly, we found 34 instances where there was at least one pTyr site predicted to be recognized by the SH2 domain of the same CTK, suggesting that the SH2 and kinase domains of the CTKs may cooperate to achieve progressive phosphorylation of a protein substrate. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: From protein structures to clinical applications. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Nuclear translocation of the cytoplasmic domain of HB-EGF induces gastric cancer invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Membrane-anchored heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (proHB-EGF) yields soluble HB-EGF, which is an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligand, and a carboxy-terminal fragment of HB-EGF (HB-EGF-CTF) after ectodomain shedding. We previously reported that HB-EGF-CTF and unshed proHB-EGF which has the cytoplasmic domain of proHB-EGF (HB-EGF-C), translocate from the plasma membrane to the nucleus and regulate cell cycle after shedding stimuli. However, the significance of nuclear exported HB-EGF-C in human gastric cancer is unclear. Methods We investigated the relationship between intracellular localization of HB-EGF-C and clinical outcome in 96 gastric cancer patients treated with gastrectomy. Moreover, we established stable gastric cancer cell lines overexpressing wild-type HB-EGF (wt-HB-EGF) and mutated HB-EGF (HB-EGF-mC), which prevented HB-EGF-C nuclear translocation after shedding. Cell motility between these 2 gastric cancer cell lines was investigated using a transwell invasion assay and a wound healing assay. Results Of the 96 gastric cancer cases, HB-EGF-C immunoreactivity was detected in both the nucleus and cytoplasm in 19 cases (19.8 %) and in the cytoplasm only in 25 cases (26.0 %). The nuclear immunoreactivity of HB-EGF-C was significantly increased in stage pT3/4 tumors compared with pT1/2 tumors (T1/2 vs. T3/4: 11.1 % vs. 36.4 %, P HB-EGF- and HB-EGF-mC-expressing cells significantly increased compared with control cells, but the growth of HB-EGF-mC-expressing cells was significantly decreased compared with wt-HB-EGF-expressing cells. Gastric cancer cell invasion obviously increased in wt-HB-EGF-expressing cells, but invasion in HB-EGF-mC-expressing cells showed a slight increase compared with control cells. Moreover, wt-HB-EGF overexpression increased the effectiveness of wound healing, but had no significant effect in HB-EGF-mC-expressing cells. Conclusions Both the function of HB-EGF as an EGFR ligand

  9. Divergent evolution in the cytoplasmic domains of PRLR and GHR genes in Artiodactyla

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    Li Meng-Hua

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prolactin receptor (PRLR and growth hormone receptor (GHR belong to the large superfamily of class 1 cytokine receptors. Both of them have been identified as candidate genes affecting key quantitative traits, like growth and reproduction in livestock. We have previously studied the molecular anatomy of the cytoplasmic domain of GHR in different cattle breeds and artiodactyl species. In this study we have analysed the corresponding cytoplasmic signalling region of PRLR. Results We sequenced PRLR gene exon 10, coding for the major part of the cytoplasmic domain, from cattle, American bison, European bison, yak, sheep, pig and wild boar individuals. We found different patterns of variation in the two receptors within and between ruminants and pigs. Pigs and bison species have no variation within GHR exon 10, but show high haplotype diversity for the PRLR exon 10. In cattle, PRLR shows lower diversity than GHR. The Bovinae PRLR haplotype network fits better the known phylogenetic relationships between the species than that of the GHR, where differences within cattle breeds are larger than between the different species in the subfamily. By comparison with the wild boar haplotypes, a high number of subsequent nonsynonymous substitutions seem to have accumulated in the pig PRLR exon 10 after domestication. Conclusion Both genes affect a multitude of traits that have been targets of selection after domestication. The genes seem to have responded differently to different selection pressures imposed by human artificial selection. The results suggest possible effects of selective sweeps in GHR before domestication in the pig lineage or species divergence in the Bison lineage. The PRLR results may be explained by strong directional selection in pigs or functional switching.

  10. The Robo4 cytoplasmic domain is dispensable for vascular permeability and neovascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Prahst, Claudia; Mathivet, Thomas; Pibouin-Fragner, Laurence; Zhang, Jiasheng; Genet, Gael; Tong, Raymond; Dubrac, Alexandre; Eichmann, Anne

    2016-11-24

    Vascular permeability and neovascularization are implicated in many diseases including retinopathies and diabetic wound healing. Robo4 is an endothelial-specific transmembrane receptor that stabilizes the vasculature, as shown in Robo4 -/- mice that develop hyperpermeability, but how Robo4 signals remained unclear. Here we show that Robo4 deletion enhances permeability and revascularization in oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) and accelerates cutaneous wound healing. To determine Robo4 signalling pathways, we generated transgenic mice expressing a truncated Robo4 lacking the cytoplasmic domain (Robo4ΔCD). Robo4ΔCD expression is sufficient to prevent permeability, and inhibits OIR revascularization and wound healing in Robo4 -/- mice. Mechanistically, Robo4 does not affect Slit2 signalling, but Robo4 and Robo4ΔCD counteract Vegfr2-Y949 (Y951 in human VEGFR2) phosphorylation by signalling through the endothelial UNC5B receptor. We conclude that Robo4 inhibits angiogenesis and vessel permeability independently of its cytoplasmic domain, while activating VEGFR2-Y951 via ROBO4 inhibition might accelerate tissue revascularization in retinopathy of prematurity and in diabetic patients.

  11. Characterization of phosphorylation sites in the cytoplasmic domain of the 300 kDa mannose-6-phosphate receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosorius, O; Mieskes, G; Issinger, O G

    1993-01-01

    The human 300 kDa mannose-6-phosphate receptor (MPR 300) is phosphorylated in vivo at serine residues of its cytoplasmic domain. Two-dimensional separation can resolve tryptic phosphopeptides into four major species. To identify the kinases involved in MPR 300 phosphorylation and the phosphorylat......The human 300 kDa mannose-6-phosphate receptor (MPR 300) is phosphorylated in vivo at serine residues of its cytoplasmic domain. Two-dimensional separation can resolve tryptic phosphopeptides into four major species. To identify the kinases involved in MPR 300 phosphorylation...... and the phosphorylation sites the entire coding sequence of the cytoplasmic tail was expressed in Escherichia coli. The isolated cytoplasmic domain was used as a substrate for four purified serine/threonine kinases [casein kinase II (CK II), protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C and Ca2+/calmodulin kinase]. All...... kinases phosphorylate the cytoplasmic tail exclusively on serine residues. Inhibition studies using synthetic peptides, partial sequencing of isolated tryptic phosphopeptides and co-migration with tryptic phosphopeptides from MPR 300 labelled in vivo showed that (i) PKA phosphorylates the cytoplasmic MPR...

  12. Alba-domain proteins of Trypanosoma brucei are cytoplasmic RNA-binding proteins that interact with the translation machinery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Mani

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei and related pathogens transcribe most genes as polycistronic arrays that are subsequently processed into monocistronic mRNAs. Expression is frequently regulated post-transcriptionally by cis-acting elements in the untranslated regions (UTRs. GPEET and EP procyclins are the major surface proteins of procyclic (insect midgut forms of T. brucei. Three regulatory elements common to the 3' UTRs of both mRNAs regulate mRNA turnover and translation. The glycerol-responsive element (GRE is unique to the GPEET 3' UTR and regulates its expression independently from EP. A synthetic RNA encompassing the GRE showed robust sequence-specific interactions with cytoplasmic proteins in electromobility shift assays. This, combined with column chromatography, led to the identification of 3 Alba-domain proteins. RNAi against Alba3 caused a growth phenotype and reduced the levels of Alba1 and Alba2 proteins, indicative of interactions between family members. Tandem-affinity purification and co-immunoprecipitation verified these interactions and also identified Alba4 in sub-stoichiometric amounts. Alba proteins are cytoplasmic and are recruited to starvation granules together with poly(A RNA. Concomitant depletion of all four Alba proteins by RNAi specifically reduced translation of a reporter transcript flanked by the GPEET 3' UTR. Pulldown of tagged Alba proteins confirmed interactions with poly(A binding proteins, ribosomal protein P0 and, in the case of Alba3, the cap-binding protein eIF4E4. In addition, Alba2 and Alba3 partially cosediment with polyribosomes in sucrose gradients. Alba-domain proteins seem to have exhibited great functional plasticity in the course of evolution. First identified as DNA-binding proteins in Archaea, then in association with nuclear RNase MRP/P in yeast and mammalian cells, they were recently described as components of a translationally silent complex containing stage-regulated mRNAs in Plasmodium. Our results are

  13. The nectin-1α transmembrane domain, but not the cytoplasmic tail, influences cell fusion induced by HSV-1 glycoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subramanian, Ravi P.; Dunn, Jennifer E.; Geraghty, Robert J.

    2005-01-01

    Nectin-1 is a receptor for herpes simplex virus (HSV), a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily, and a cellular adhesion molecule. To study domains of nectin-1α involved in cell fusion, we measured the ability of nectin-1α/nectin-2α chimeras, nectin-1α/CD4 chimeras, and transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail mutants of nectin-1α to promote cell fusion induced by HSV-1 glycoproteins. Our results demonstrate that only chimeras and mutants containing the entire V-like domain and a link to the plasma membrane conferred cell-fusion activity. The transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail of nectin-1 were not required for any viral receptor or cell adhesion function tested. Cellular cytoplasmic factors that bind to the nectin-1α cytoplasmic tail, therefore, did not influence virus entry or cell fusion. Interestingly, the efficiency of cell fusion was reduced when membrane-spanning domains of nectin-1α and gD were replaced by glycosylphosphatidylinositol tethers, indicating that transmembrane domains may play a modulatory role in the gD/nectin-1α interaction in fusion

  14. Molecular determinants of tetramerization in the KcsA cytoplasmic domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamnesky, Guy; Hirschhorn, Orel; Shaked, Hadassa; Chen, Jingfei; Yao, Lishan; Chill, Jordan H

    2014-10-01

    The cytoplasmic C-terminal domain (CTD) of KcsA, a bacterial homotetrameric potassium channel, is an amphiphilic domain that forms a helical bundle with four-fold symmetry mediated by hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. Previously we have established that a CTD-derived 34-residue peptide associates into a tetramer in a pH-dependent manner (Kamnesky et al., JMB 2012;418:237-247). Here we further investigate the molecular determinants of tetramer formation in the CTD by characterizing the kinetics of monomer-tetramer equilibrium for 10 alanine mutants using NMR, sedimentation equilibrium (SE) and molecular dynamics simulation. NMR and SE concur in finding single-residue contributions to tetramer stability to be in the 0.5 to 3.5 kcal/mol range. Hydrophobic interactions between residues lining the tetramer core generally contributed more to formation of tetramer than electrostatic interactions between residues R147, D149 and E152. In particular, alanine replacement of residue R147, a key contributor to inter-subunit salt bridges, resulted in only a minor effect on tetramer dissociation. Mutations outside of the inter-subunit interface also influenced tetramer stability by affecting the tetramerization on-rate, possibly by changing the inherent helical propensity of the peptide. These findings are interpreted in the context of established paradigms of protein-protein interactions and protein folding, and lay the groundwork for further studies of the CTD in full-length KcsA channels. © 2014 The Protein Society.

  15. Cytoplasmic Dynein Regulation by Subunit Heterogeneity and Its Role in Apical Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Andrew W.; Chuang, Jen-Zen; Sung, Ching-Hwa

    2001-01-01

    Despite the existence of multiple subunit isoforms for the microtubule motor cytoplasmic dynein, it has not yet been directly shown that dynein complexes with different compositions exhibit different properties. The 14-kD dynein light chain Tctex-1, but not its homologue RP3, binds directly to rhodopsin's cytoplasmic COOH-terminal tail, which encodes an apical targeting determinant in polarized epithelial Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. We demonstrate that Tctex-1 and RP3 compete for binding to dynein intermediate chain and that overexpressed RP3 displaces endogenous Tctex-1 from dynein complexes in MDCK cells. Furthermore, replacement of Tctex-1 by RP3 selectively disrupts the translocation of rhodopsin to the MDCK apical surface. These results directly show that cytoplasmic dynein function can be regulated by its subunit composition and that cytoplasmic dynein is essential for at least one mode of apical transport in polarized epithelia. PMID:11425878

  16. Functional role of the cytoplasmic tail domain of the major envelope fusion protein of group II baculoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, G.; Pan, M.; Westenberg, M.; Vlak, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    F proteins from baculovirus nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) group II members are the major budded virus (BV) viral envelope fusion proteins. They undergo furin-like proteolysis processing in order to be functional. F proteins from different baculovirus species have a long cytoplasmic tail domain (CTD),

  17. Susceptibility to virus-cell fusion at the plasma membrane is reduced through expression of HIV gp41 cytoplasmic domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinowsky, Katharina; Luksza, Julia; Dittmar, Matthias T.

    2008-01-01

    The cytoplasmic tail of the HIV transmembrane protein plays an important role in viral infection. In this study we analyzed the role of retroviral cytoplasmic tails in modulating the cytoskeleton and interfering with virus-cell fusion. HeLaP4 cells expressing different HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs showed reduced acetylated tubulin levels whereas the cytoplasmic tail of MLV did not alter microtubule stability indicating a unique function for the lentiviral cytoplasmic tail. The effect on tubulin is mediated through the membrane proximal region of the HIV cytoplasmic tail and was independent of membrane localization. Site-directed mutagenesis identified three motifs in the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail required to effect the reduction in acetylated tubulin. Both the YxxΦ domain and amino acids 21 to 45 of the HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail need to be present to change the level of acetylated tubulin in transfected cells. T-cells stably expressing one HIV-2 cytoplasmic tail derived construct showed also a reduction in acetylated tubulin thus confirming the importance of this effect not only for HeLaP4 and 293T cells. Challenge experiments using transiently transfected HeLaP4 cells and T cells stably expressing an HIV cytoplasmic tail construct revealed both reduced virus-cell fusion and replication of HIV-1 NL4.3 compared to control cells. In the virus-cell fusion assay only virions pseudotyped with either HIV or MLV envelopes showed reduced fusion efficiency, whereas VSV-G pseudotyped virions where not affected by the expression of HIV derived cytoplasmic tail constructs, indicating that fusion at the plasma but not endosomal membrane is affected. Overexpression of human histone-deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) and constitutively active RhoA resulted in a reduction of acetylated tubulin and reduced virus-cell fusion as significant as that observed following expression of HIV cytoplasmic tail constructs. Inhibition of HDAC6 showed a strong increase in acetylated tubulin and increase of

  18. Cryo-EM structure of the cytoplasmic domain of murine transient receptor potential cation channel subfamily C member 6 (TRPC6).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azumaya, Caleigh M; Sierra-Valdez, Francisco; Cordero-Morales, Julio F; Nakagawa, Terunaga

    2018-05-11

    The kidney maintains the internal milieu by regulating the retention and excretion of proteins, ions, and small molecules. The glomerular podocyte forms the slit diaphragm of the ultrafiltration filter, whose damage leads to progressive kidney failure and focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS). The canonical transient receptor potential 6 (TRPC6) ion channel is expressed in the podocyte and mutations in its cytoplasmic domain cause FSGS in humans. In vitro evaluation of disease-causing mutations in TRPC6 has revealed that these genetic alterations result in abnormal ion channel gating. However, the mechanism whereby the cytoplasmic domain modulates TRPC6 function is largely unknown. Here we report a cryoEM structure of the cytoplasmic domain of murine TRPC6 at 3.8Å resolution. The cytoplasmic fold of TRPC6 is characterized by an inverted dome-like chamber pierced by four radial horizontal helices that converge into a vertical coiled-coil at the central axis. Unlike in other TRP channels, TRPC6 displays a unique domain swap that occurs at the junction of the horizontal helices and coiled-coil. Multiple FSGS mutations converge at the buried interface between the vertical coiled-coil and the ankyrin repeats, which form the dome, suggesting these regions are critical for allosteric gating modulation. This functionally critical interface is a potential target for drug design. Importantly, dysfunction in other family members leads to learning deficits (TRPC1/4/5) and ataxia (TRPC3). Our data provide a structural framework for the mechanistic investigation of the TRPC family. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Solution structure of a syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain and its interaction with phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, D; Oh, E S; Woods, A

    1998-01-01

    Syndecan-4, a transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan, is a coreceptor with integrins in cell adhesion. It has been suggested to form a ternary signaling complex with protein kinase Calpha and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). Syndecans each have a unique, central, and variable (V......) region in their cytoplasmic domains, and that of syndecan-4 is critical to its interaction with protein kinase C and PIP2. Two oligopeptides corresponding to the variable region (4V) and whole domain (4L) of syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain were synthesized for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies. Data...... and dynamical simulated annealing calculations. The 4V peptide in the presence of PIP2 formed a compact dimer with two twisted strands packed parallel to each other and the exposed surface of the dimer consisted of highly charged and polar residues. The overall three-dimensional structure in solution exhibits...

  20. Functional Architecture of the Cytoplasmic Entrance to the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel Pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2015-06-19

    As an ion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator must form a continuous pathway for the movement of Cl(-) and other anions between the cytoplasm and the extracellular solution. Both the structure and the function of the membrane-spanning part of this pathway are well defined. In contrast, the structure of the pathway that connects the cytoplasm to the membrane-spanning regions is unknown, and functional roles for different parts of the protein forming this pathway have not been described. We used patch clamp recording and substituted cysteine accessibility mutagenesis to identify positively charged amino acid side chains that attract cytoplasmic Cl(-) ions to the inner mouth of the pore. Our results indicate that the side chains of Lys-190, Arg-248, Arg-303, Lys-370, Lys-1041, and Arg-1048, located in different intracellular loops of the protein, play important roles in the electrostatic attraction of Cl(-) ions. Mutation and covalent modification of these residues have charge-dependent effects on the rate of Cl(-) permeation, demonstrating their functional role in maximization of Cl(-) flux. Other nearby positively charged side chains were not involved in electrostatic interactions with Cl(-). The location of these Cl(-)-attractive residues suggests that cytoplasmic Cl(-) ions enter the pore via a lateral portal located between the cytoplasmic extensions to the fourth and sixth transmembrane helices; a secondary, functionally less relevant portal might exist between the extensions to the 10th and 12th transmembrane helices. These results define the cytoplasmic mouth of the pore and show how it attracts Cl(-) ions from the cytoplasm. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. The D Domain of LRRC4 anchors ERK1/2 in the cytoplasm and competitively inhibits MEK/ERK activation in glioma cells

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    Zeyou Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As a well-characterized key player in various signal transduction networks, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2 has been widely implicated in the development of many malignancies. We previously found that Leucine-rich repeat containing 4 (LRRC4 was a tumor suppressor and a negative regulator of the ERK/MAPK pathway in glioma tumorigenesis. However, the precise molecular role of LRRC4 in ERK signal transmission is unclear. Methods The interaction between LRRC4 and ERK1/2 was assessed by co-immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assays in vivo and in vitro. We also investigated the interaction of LRRC4 and ERK1/2 and the role of the D domain in ERK activation in glioma cells. Results Here, we showed that LRRC4 and ERK1/2 interact via the D domain and CD domain, respectively. Following EGF stimuli, the D domain of LRRC4 anchors ERK1/2 in the cytoplasm and abrogates ERK1/2 activation and nuclear translocation. In glioblastoma cells, ectopic LRRC4 expression competitively inhibited the interaction of endogenous mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK and ERK1/2. Mutation of the D domain decreased the LRRC4-mediated inhibition of MAPK signaling and its anti-proliferation and anti-invasion roles. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that the D domain of LRRC4 anchors ERK1/2 in the cytoplasm and competitively inhibits MEK/ERK activation in glioma cells. These findings identify a new mechanism underlying glioblastoma progression and suggest a novel therapeutic strategy by restoring the activity of LRRC4 to decrease MAPK cascade activation.

  2. Detergent/nanodisc screening for high-resolution NMR studies of an integral membrane protein containing a cytoplasmic domain.

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    Christos Tzitzilonis

    Full Text Available Because membrane proteins need to be extracted from their natural environment and reconstituted in artificial milieus for the 3D structure determination by X-ray crystallography or NMR, the search for membrane mimetic that conserve the native structure and functional activities remains challenging. We demonstrate here a detergent/nanodisc screening study by NMR of the bacterial α-helical membrane protein YgaP containing a cytoplasmic rhodanese domain. The analysis of 2D [(15N,(1H]-TROSY spectra shows that only a careful usage of low amounts of mixed detergents did not perturb the cytoplasmic domain while solubilizing in parallel the transmembrane segments with good spectral quality. In contrast, the incorporation of YgaP into nanodiscs appeared to be straightforward and yielded a surprisingly high quality [(15N,(1H]-TROSY spectrum opening an avenue for the structural studies of a helical membrane protein in a bilayer system by solution state NMR.

  3. Entry into the nuclear pore complex is controlled by a cytoplasmic exclusion zone containing dynamic GLFG-repeat nucleoporin domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiserova, Jindriska; Spink, Matthew; Richards, Shane A; Saunter, Christopher; Goldberg, Martin W

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) mediate nucleocytoplasmic movement. The central channel contains proteins with phenylalanine-glycine (FG) repeats, or variations (GLFG, glycine-leucine-phenylalanine-glycine). These are 'intrinsically disordered' and often represent weak interaction sites that become ordered upon interaction. We investigated this possibility during nuclear transport. Using electron microscopy of S. cerevisiae, we show that NPC cytoplasmic filaments form a dome-shaped structure enclosing GLFG domains. GLFG domains extend out of this structure and are part of an 'exclusion zone' that might act as a partial barrier to entry of transport-inert proteins. The anchor domain of a GLFG nucleoporin locates exclusively to the central channel. By contrast, the localisation of the GLFG domains varied between NPCs and could be cytoplasmic, central or nucleoplasmic and could stretch up to 80 nm. These results suggest a dynamic exchange between ordered and disordered states. In contrast to diffusion through the NPC, transport cargoes passed through the exclusion zone and accumulated near the central plane. We also show that movement of cargo through the NPC is accompanied by relocation of GLFG domains, suggesting that binding, restructuring and movement of these domains could be part of the translocation mechanism.

  4. Pyridoxal phosphate as a probe of the cytoplasmic domains of transmembrane proteins: Application to the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Ramirez, B.; Martinez-Carrion, M.

    1989-01-01

    A novel procedure has been developed to specifically label the cytoplasmic domains of transmembrane proteins with the aldehyde pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP). Torpedo californica acetylcholine receptor (AcChR) vesicles were loaded with [ 3 H]pyridoxine 5-phosphate ([ 3 H]PNP) and pyridoxine-5-phosphate oxidase, followed by intravesicular enzymatic oxidation of [ 3 H]PNP at 37 degree C in the presence of externally added cytochrome c as a scavenger of possible leaking PLP product. The four receptor subunits were labeled whether the reaction was carried out on the internal surface or separately designed to mark the external one. On the other hand, the relative pyridoxylation of the subunits differed in both cases, reflecting differences in accessible lysyl residues in each side of the membrane. Even though there are no large differences in the total lysine content among the subunits and there are two copies of the α-subunit, internal surface labeling by PLP was greatest for the highest molecular weight (δ) subunit, reinforcing the concept that the four receptor subunits are transmembranous and may protrude into the cytoplasmic face in a fashion that is proportional to their subunit molecular weight. Yet, the labeling data do not fit well to any of the models proposed for AcChR subunit folding. The method described can be used for selective labeling of the cytoplasmic domains of transmembrane proteins in sealed membrane vesicles

  5. Regulation of H+ Extrusion and Cytoplasmic pH in Maize Root Tips Acclimated to a Low-Oxygen Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, J. H.; Roberts, JKM.

    1996-05-01

    We tested the hypothesis that H+ extrusion contributes to cytoplasmic pH regulation and tolerance of anoxia in maize (Zea mays) root tips. We studied root tips of whole seedlings that were acclimated to a low-oxygen environment by pretreatment in 3% (v/v) O2. Acclimated root tips characteristically regulate cytoplasmic pH near neutrality and survive prolonged anoxia, whereas nonacclimated tips undergo severe cytoplasmic acidosis and die much more quickly. We show that the plasma membrane H+-ATPase can operate under anoxia and that net H+ extrusion increases when cytoplasmic pH falls. However, at an external pH near 6.0, H+ extrusion contributes little to cytoplasmic pH regulation. At more acidic external pH values, net H+ flux into root tips increases dramatically, leading to a decrease in cytoplasmic pH and reduced tolerance of anoxia. We present evidence that, under these conditions, H+ pumps are activated to partly offset acidosis due to H+ influx and, thereby, contribute to cytoplasmic pH regulation and tolerance of anoxia. The regulation of H+ extrusion under anoxia is discussed with respect to the acclimation response and mechanisms of intracellular pH regulation in aerobic plant cells.

  6. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana BRI1-associated kinase 1 (BAK1) cytoplasmic domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Jian; Ma, Yuanyuan; Sun, Yuna; Zhao, Huadong; Hong, Dapeng; Yan, Liming; Lou, Zhiyong

    2012-01-01

    The cytoplasmic domain of BRI1-associated kinase 1 from A. thaliana has been overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.6 Å resolution. BRI1-associated kinase 1 (BAK1) is a member of the plant receptor-like kinase (RLK) superfamily. BAK1 has been shown to initiate brassinosteroid (BR) signalling and innate immune responses in plants by forming receptor complexes with both brassinosteroid-insensitive 1 (BRI1) and flagellin-sensing 2 (FLS2). To gain a better understanding of the structural details and the mechanism of action of the BAK1 kinase domain, recombinant BAK1 cytoplasmic domain has been expressed, purified and crystallized at 291 K using PEG 3350 as a precipitant. A 2.6 Å resolution data set was collected from a single flash-cooled crystal at 100 K. This crystal belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 70.3, b = 75.6, c = 71.9 Å, β = 93.1°. Assuming the presence of one molecule in the asymmetric unit, the Matthews coefficient was 2.6 Å 3 Da −1

  7. A structural analysis of the AAA+ domains in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cytoplasmic dynein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleave, Emma S; Schmidt, Helgo; Carter, Andrew P

    2014-06-01

    Dyneins are large protein complexes that act as microtubule based molecular motors. The dynein heavy chain contains a motor domain which is a member of the AAA+ protein family (ATPases Associated with diverse cellular Activities). Proteins of the AAA+ family show a diverse range of functionalities, but share a related core AAA+ domain, which often assembles into hexameric rings. Dynein is unusual because it has all six AAA+ domains linked together, in one long polypeptide. The dynein motor domain generates movement by coupling ATP driven conformational changes in the AAA+ ring to the swing of a motile element called the linker. Dynein binds to its microtubule track via a long antiparallel coiled-coil stalk that emanates from the AAA+ ring. Recently the first high resolution structures of the dynein motor domain were published. Here we provide a detailed structural analysis of the six AAA+ domains using our Saccharomycescerevisiae crystal structure. We describe how structural similarities in the dynein AAA+ domains suggest they share a common evolutionary origin. We analyse how the different AAA+ domains have diverged from each other. We discuss how this is related to the function of dynein as a motor protein and how the AAA+ domains of dynein compare to those of other AAA+ proteins. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Lacking deoxygenation-linked interaction between cytoplasmic domain of band 3 and HbF from fetal red blood cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Roy E.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: Several of the red blood cell's metabolic and membrane functions display dependence on haemoglobin oxygenation. In adult human red cells, the increased glycolytic rate at low O2 tension results from binding of deoxygenated HbA at negatively charged, N-terminal, cytoplasmic domain of the memb......Aim: Several of the red blood cell's metabolic and membrane functions display dependence on haemoglobin oxygenation. In adult human red cells, the increased glycolytic rate at low O2 tension results from binding of deoxygenated HbA at negatively charged, N-terminal, cytoplasmic domain...... of the membrane protein band 3, which liberates glycolytic enzymes from this site. This study aims to investigate the role of fetal HbF (that has lower anion-binding capacity than HbA) in fetal red cells (that are subjected to low O2 tensions), and to elucidate possible linkage (e.g. via the major red cell...... membrane organising centre, band 3) between the individual oxygenation-linked reactions encountered in red cells. Methods: The interaction between band 3 and Hb is analysed in terms of the effects, measured under different conditions, of a 10-mer peptide that corresponds to the N-terminus of human band 3...

  9. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK-2) mediated phosphorylation regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling and cell growth control of Ras-associated tumor suppressor protein, RASSF2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumari, Gita; Mahalingam, S.

    2009-01-01

    Ras GTPase controls the normal cell growth through binding with an array of effector molecules, such as Raf and PI3-kinase in a GTP-dependent manner. RASSF2, a member of the Ras association domain family, is known to be involved in the suppression of cell growth and is frequently down-regulated in various tumor tissues by promoter hypermethylation. In the present study, we demonstrate that RASSF2 shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm by a signal-mediated process and its export from the nucleus is sensitive to leptomycin B. Amino acids between 240 to 260 in the C-terminus of RASSF2 harbor a functional nuclear export signal (NES), which is necessary and sufficient for efficient export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. Substitution of conserved Ile254, Val257 and Leu259 within the minimal NES impaired RASSF2 export from the nucleus. In addition, wild type but not the nuclear export defective RASSF2 mutant interacts with export receptor, CRM-1 and exported from the nucleus. Surprisingly, we observed nucleolar localization for the nuclear export defective mutant suggesting the possibility that RASSF2 may localize in different cellular compartments transiently in a cell cycle dependent manner and the observed nuclear localization for wild type protein may be due to faster export kinetics from the nucleolus. Furthermore, our data suggest that RASSF2 is specifically phosphorylated by MAPK/ERK-2 and the inhibitors of MAPK pathway impair the phosphorylation and subsequently block the export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. These data clearly suggest that ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of RASSF2. Interestingly, nuclear import defective mutant of RASSF2 failed to induce cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase and apoptosis suggesting that RASSF2 regulates cell growth in a nuclear localization dependent manner. Collectively, these data provided evidence for the first time that MAPK/ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation regulates

  10. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK-2) mediated phosphorylation regulates nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling and cell growth control of Ras-associated tumor suppressor protein, RASSF2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Gita [Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad 500076 (India); Mahalingam, S., E-mail: mahalingam@iitm.ac.in [Laboratory of Molecular Virology, Centre for DNA Fingerprinting and Diagnostics, Hyderabad 500076 (India); Department of Biotechnology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Cell Biology, Indian Institute of Technology-Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India)

    2009-10-01

    Ras GTPase controls the normal cell growth through binding with an array of effector molecules, such as Raf and PI3-kinase in a GTP-dependent manner. RASSF2, a member of the Ras association domain family, is known to be involved in the suppression of cell growth and is frequently down-regulated in various tumor tissues by promoter hypermethylation. In the present study, we demonstrate that RASSF2 shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm by a signal-mediated process and its export from the nucleus is sensitive to leptomycin B. Amino acids between 240 to 260 in the C-terminus of RASSF2 harbor a functional nuclear export signal (NES), which is necessary and sufficient for efficient export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. Substitution of conserved Ile254, Val257 and Leu259 within the minimal NES impaired RASSF2 export from the nucleus. In addition, wild type but not the nuclear export defective RASSF2 mutant interacts with export receptor, CRM-1 and exported from the nucleus. Surprisingly, we observed nucleolar localization for the nuclear export defective mutant suggesting the possibility that RASSF2 may localize in different cellular compartments transiently in a cell cycle dependent manner and the observed nuclear localization for wild type protein may be due to faster export kinetics from the nucleolus. Furthermore, our data suggest that RASSF2 is specifically phosphorylated by MAPK/ERK-2 and the inhibitors of MAPK pathway impair the phosphorylation and subsequently block the export of RASSF2 from the nucleus. These data clearly suggest that ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation plays an important role in regulating the nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling of RASSF2. Interestingly, nuclear import defective mutant of RASSF2 failed to induce cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase and apoptosis suggesting that RASSF2 regulates cell growth in a nuclear localization dependent manner. Collectively, these data provided evidence for the first time that MAPK/ERK-2 mediated phosphorylation regulates

  11. Truncating variants in the majority of the cytoplasmic domain of PCDH15 are unlikely to cause Usher syndrome 1F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault-Micale, Cynthia; Frieden, Alexander; Kennedy, Caleb J; Neitzel, Dana; Sullivan, Jessica; Faulkner, Nicole; Hallam, Stephanie; Greger, Valerie

    2014-11-01

    Loss of function variants in the PCDH15 gene can cause Usher syndrome type 1F, an autosomal recessive disease associated with profound congenital hearing loss, vestibular dysfunction, and retinitis pigmentosa. The Ashkenazi Jewish population has an increased incidence of Usher syndrome type 1F (founder variant p.Arg245X accounts for 75% of alleles), yet the variant spectrum in a panethnic population remains undetermined. We sequenced the coding region and intron-exon borders of PCDH15 using next-generation DNA sequencing technology in approximately 14,000 patients from fertility clinics. More than 600 unique PCDH15 variants (single nucleotide changes and small indels) were identified, including previously described pathogenic variants p.Arg3X, p.Arg245X (five patients), p.Arg643X, p.Arg929X, and p.Arg1106X. Novel truncating variants were also found, including one in the N-terminal extracellular domain (p.Leu877X), but all other novel truncating variants clustered in the exon 33 encoded C-terminal cytoplasmic domain (52 patients, 14 variants). One variant was observed predominantly in African Americans (carrier frequency of 2.3%). The high incidence of truncating exon 33 variants indicates that they are unlikely to cause Usher syndrome type 1F even though many remove a large portion of the gene. They may be tolerated because PCDH15 has several alternate cytoplasmic domain exons and differentially spliced isoforms may function redundantly. Effects of some PCDH15 truncating variants were addressed by deep sequencing of a panethnic population. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Actin and myosin regulate cytoplasm stiffness in plant cells: a study using optical tweezers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honing, van der H.S.; Ruijter, de N.C.A.; Emons, A.M.C.; Ketelaar, T.

    2010-01-01

    Here, we produced cytoplasmic protrusions with optical tweezers in mature BY-2 suspension cultured cells to study the parameters involved in the movement of actin filaments during changes in cytoplasmic organization and to determine whether stiffness is an actin-related property of plant cytoplasm.

  13. Phosphorylation of the dimeric cytoplasmic domain of the phytosulfokine receptor, PSKR1

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Muleya, V

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Phytosulfokines (PSKs) are plant peptide hormones that co-regulate plant growth, differentiation and defense responses. PSKs signal through a plasma membrane localized leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (phytosulfokine receptor 1, PSKR1...

  14. Hydroxychloroquine binding to cytoplasmic domain of Band 3 in human erythrocytes: Novel mechanistic insights into drug structure, efficacy and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Mizuki; Sugawara, Kotomi; Goto, Tatsufumi; Wakui, Hideki; Nunomura, Wataru

    2016-05-13

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is a widely used drug in the treatment of autoimmune diseases, such as arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. It has also been prescribed for the treatment of malaria owing to its lower toxicity compared to its closely related compound chloroquine (CQ). However, the mechanisms of action of HCQ in erythrocytes (which bind preferentially this drug) have not been documented and the reasons underlying the lower side effects of HCQ compared to CQ remain unclear. Here we show that, although the activity of erythrocyte lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), but not GAPDH, was inhibited by both HCQ and CQ in vitro, LDH activity in erythrocytes incubated with 20 mM HCQ was not significantly reduced within 5 h in contrast to CQ did. Using HCQ coupled Sepharose chromatography (HCQ-Sepharose), we identified Band 3, spectrin, ankyrin, protein 4.1R and protein 4.2 as HCQ binding proteins in human erythrocyte plasma membrane. Recombinant cytoplasmic N-terminal 43 kDa domain of Band 3 bound to HCQ-Sepharose and was eluted with 40 mM (but not 20 mM) HCQ. Band 3 transport activity was reduced by only 23% in the presence of 20 mM HCQ. Taken together, these data demonstrate that HCQ binds to the cytoplasmic N-terminal domain of Band 3 in human erythrocytes but does not inhibit dramatically its transport activity. We hypothesize that the trapping of HCQ on Band 3 contributes to the lower side effects of the drug on energy production in erythrocytes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. An MHC-I cytoplasmic domain/HIV-1 Nef fusion protein binds directly to the mu subunit of the AP-1 endosomal coat complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra Kumar Singh

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The down-regulation of the major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I from the surface of infected cells by the Nef proteins of primate immunodeficiency viruses likely contributes to pathogenesis by providing evasion of cell-mediated immunity. HIV-1 Nef-induced down-regulation involves endosomal trafficking and a cooperative interaction between the cytoplasmic domain (CD of MHC-I, Nef, and the clathrin adaptor protein complex-1 (AP-1. The CD of MHC-I contains a key tyrosine within the sequence YSQA that is required for down-regulation by Nef, but this sequence does not conform to the canonical AP-binding tyrosine-based motif Yxxphi, which mediates binding to the medium (micro subunits of AP complexes. We previously proposed that Nef allows the MHC-I CD to bind the mu subunit of AP-1 (micro1 as if it contained a Yxxphimotif.Here, we show that a direct interaction between the MHC-I CD/Nef and micro1 plays a primary role in the down-regulation of MHC-I: GST pulldown assays using recombinant proteins indicated that most of the MHC-I CD and Nef residues that are required for the down-regulation in human cells contribute to direct interactions with a truncated version of micro1. Specifically, the tyrosine residue of the YSQA sequence in the MHC-I CD as well as Nef residues E62-65 and P78 each contributed to the interaction between MHC-I CD/Nef and micro1 in vitro, whereas Nef M20 had little to no role. Conversely, residues F172/D174 and V392/L395 of the binding pocket on micro1 for Yxxphi motifs were required for a robust interaction.These data indicate that the MHC-I cytoplasmic domain, Nef, and the C-terminal two thirds of the mu subunit of AP-1 are sufficient to constitute a biologically relevant interaction. The data also reveal an unexpected role for a hydrophobic pocket in micro1 for interaction with MHC-I CD/Nef.

  16. p38α phosphorylates serine 258 within the cytoplasmic domain of tissue factor and prevents its incorporation into cell-derived microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettelaie, Camille; Elkeeb, Azza M; Maraveyas, Anthony; Collier, Mary Elizabeth W

    2013-03-01

    We previously showed that the phosphorylation of Ser253 within the cytoplasmic domain of human tissue factor (TF) initiates the incorporation and release of this protein into cell-derived microparticles. Furthermore, subsequent phosphorylation of Ser258 terminates this process. However, the identity of the kinase responsible for the phosphorylation of Ser258 and mode of action of this enzyme remain unknown. In this study, p38α was identified as the proline-directed kinase capable of phosphorylating Ser258 specifically, and without any detectable activity towards Ser253. Furthermore, using synthetic peptides, it was shown that the Km for the reaction decreased by approximately 10 fold on substitution of Ser253 with phospho-Ser253. Either inhibition of p38 using SB202190 or knockdown of p38α expression in coronary artery endothelial cells overexpressing wild-type TF, resulted in decreased phosphorylation of Ser258, following activation of cells with PAR2-agonist peptide (PAR2-AP). In agreement with our previous data, inhibition of phosphorylation of this residue maintained the release of TF. Activation of PAR2 in cells transfected to overexpress TF, resulted in two separate peaks of p38 activity at approximately 40 and 120 min post-activation. Furthermore, overexpression of Ala253-substituted TF enhanced the second p38 activation peak. However, the second peak was absent in cells devoid of TF or in cells overexpressing the Asp253-substituted TF. Our data clearly identifies p38α as a kinase capable of phosphorylating Ser258 within the cytoplasmic domain of TF. Moreover, it appears that the presence of TF within the cells regulates the late activation of p38 and consequently the termination of TF release into microparticles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Conformational alterations resulting from mutations in cytoplasmic domains of the alpha subunit of the Na,K-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blostein, R; Daly, S E; MacAulay, Nanna

    1998-01-01

    This paper summarizes experiments concerned with the functional consequences of mutations in cytoplasmic regions of the alpha 1 subunit of the Na,K-ATPase, in particular the amino terminus, the first cytoplasmic loop between transmembrane segments M2 and M3, and the major cytoplasmic loop between...

  18. A conserved domain in type III secretion links the cytoplasmic domain of InvA to elements of the basal body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lilic, Mirjana; Quezada, Cindy M.; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2010-01-01

    The cytoplasmic domain of Salmonella InvA shares homology to a recurring scaffold in the membrane-spanning components of the type II and type III secretion systems. Protein type III secretion systems (T3SSs) are organic nanosyringes that achieve an energy-dependent translocation of bacterial proteins through the two membranes of Gram-negative organisms. Examples include the pathogenic systems of animals, plants and symbiotic bacteria that inject factors into eukaryotic cells, and the flagellar export system that secretes flagellin. T3SSs possess a core of several membrane-associated proteins that are conserved across all known bacterial species that use this system. The Salmonella protein InvA is one of the most highly conserved proteins of this core of critical T3SS components. The crystal structure of a C-terminal domain of InvA reveals an unexpected homology to domains that have been repeatedly found as building blocks of other elements of the T3SS apparatus. This suggests the surprising hypothesis that evolution has produced a significant component of the apparatus structure through a series of gene-duplication and gene-rearrangement events

  19. BAR domain proteins regulate Rho GTPase signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspenström, Pontus

    2014-01-01

    BAR proteins comprise a heterogeneous group of multi-domain proteins with diverse biological functions. The common denominator is the Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain that not only confers targeting to lipid bilayers, but also provides scaffolding to mold lipid membranes into concave or convex surfaces. This function of BAR proteins is an important determinant in the dynamic reconstruction of membrane vesicles, as well as of the plasma membrane. Several BAR proteins function as linkers between cytoskeletal regulation and membrane dynamics. These links are provided by direct interactions between BAR proteins and actin-nucleation-promoting factors of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family and the Diaphanous-related formins. The Rho GTPases are key factors for orchestration of this intricate interplay. This review describes how BAR proteins regulate the activity of Rho GTPases, as well as how Rho GTPases regulate the function of BAR proteins. This mutual collaboration is a central factor in the regulation of vital cellular processes, such as cell migration, cytokinesis, intracellular transport, endocytosis, and exocytosis.

  20. Coupled Ca2+/H+ transport by cytoplasmic buffers regulates local Ca2+ and H+ ion signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swietach, Pawel; Youm, Jae-Boum; Saegusa, Noriko; Leem, Chae-Hun; Spitzer, Kenneth W; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D

    2013-05-28

    Ca(2+) signaling regulates cell function. This is subject to modulation by H(+) ions that are universal end-products of metabolism. Due to slow diffusion and common buffers, changes in cytoplasmic [Ca(2+)] ([Ca(2+)]i) or [H(+)] ([H(+)]i) can become compartmentalized, leading potentially to complex spatial Ca(2+)/H(+) coupling. This was studied by fluorescence imaging of cardiac myocytes. An increase in [H(+)]i, produced by superfusion of acetate (salt of membrane-permeant weak acid), evoked a [Ca(2+)]i rise, independent of sarcolemmal Ca(2+) influx or release from mitochondria, sarcoplasmic reticulum, or acidic stores. Photolytic H(+) uncaging from 2-nitrobenzaldehyde also raised [Ca(2+)]i, and the yield was reduced following inhibition of glycolysis or mitochondrial respiration. H(+) uncaging into buffer mixtures in vitro demonstrated that Ca(2+) unloading from proteins, histidyl dipeptides (HDPs; e.g., carnosine), and ATP can underlie the H(+)-evoked [Ca(2+)]i rise. Raising [H(+)]i tonically at one end of a myocyte evoked a local [Ca(2+)]i rise in the acidic microdomain, which did not dissipate. The result is consistent with uphill Ca(2+) transport into the acidic zone via Ca(2+)/H(+) exchange on diffusible HDPs and ATP molecules, energized by the [H(+)]i gradient. Ca(2+) recruitment to a localized acid microdomain was greatly reduced during intracellular Mg(2+) overload or by ATP depletion, maneuvers that reduce the Ca(2+)-carrying capacity of HDPs. Cytoplasmic HDPs and ATP underlie spatial Ca(2+)/H(+) coupling in the cardiac myocyte by providing ion exchange and transport on common buffer sites. Given the abundance of cellular HDPs and ATP, spatial Ca(2+)/H(+) coupling is likely to be of general importance in cell signaling.

  1. Importance of the short cytoplasmic domain of the feline immunodeficiency virus transmembrane glycoprotein for fusion activity and envelope glycoprotein incorporation into virions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celma, Cristina C.P.; Paladino, Monica G.; Gonzalez, Silvia A.; Affranchino, Jose L.

    2007-01-01

    The mature form of the envelope (Env) glycoprotein of lentiviruses is a heterodimer composed of the surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) subunits. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) possesses a TM glycoprotein with a cytoplasmic tail of approximately 53 amino acids which is unusually short compared with that of the other lentiviral glycoproteins (more than 100 residues). To investigate the relevance of the FIV TM cytoplasmic domain to Env-mediated viral functions, we characterized the biological properties of a series of Env glycoproteins progressively shortened from the carboxyl terminus. All the mutant Env proteins were efficiently expressed in feline cells and processed into the SU and TM subunits. Deletion of 5 or 11 amino acids from the TM C-terminus did not significantly affect Env surface expression, fusogenic activity or Env incorporation into virions, whereas removal of 17 or 23 residues impaired Env-mediated cell-to-cell fusion. Further truncation of the FIV TM by 29 residues resulted in an Env glycoprotein that was poorly expressed at the cell surface, exhibited only 20% of the wild-type Env fusogenic capacity and was inefficiently incorporated into virions. Remarkably, deletion of the TM C-terminal 35 or 41 amino acids restored or even enhanced Env biological functions. Indeed, these mutant Env glycoproteins bearing cytoplasmic domains of 18 or 12 amino acids were found to be significantly more fusogenic than the wild-type Env and were efficiently incorporated into virions. Interestingly, truncation of the TM cytoplasmic domain to only 6 amino acids did not affect Env incorporation into virions but abrogated Env fusogenicity. Finally, removal of the entire TM cytoplasmic tail or deletion of as many as 6 amino acids into the membrane-spanning domain led to a complete loss of Env functions. Our results demonstrate that despite its relatively short length, the FIV TM cytoplasmic domain plays an important role in modulating Env-mediated viral functions

  2. Crystallographic characterization of the radixin FERM domain bound to the cytoplasmic tail of membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terawaki, Shin-ichi; Kitano, Ken; Aoyama, Miki; Hakoshima, Toshio

    2008-01-01

    The radixin FERM domain was shown to bind the MT1-MMP cytoplasmic peptide and crystals of the complex were obtained. ERM proteins play a role in the cross-linking found between plasma membranes and actin filaments. The N-terminal FERM domains of ERM proteins are responsible for membrane association through direct interaction with the cytoplasmic tails of integral membrane proteins. During cell migration and movement, membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) on plasma membranes sheds adhesion molecule CD44 in addition to degrading the extracellular matrix. Here, the interaction between the radixin FERM domain and the MT1-MMP cytoplasmic tail is reported and preliminary crystallographic characterization of crystals of the radixin FERM domain bound to the cytoplasmic tail of MT1-MMP is presented. The crystals belong to space group P6 1 22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 122.7, c = 128.3 Å, and contain one complex in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. The diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.4 Å

  3. Regulation of Cytoplasmic and Vacuolar Volumes by Plant Cells in Suspension Culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Trevor; Poole, Ronald J

    1979-01-01

    Quantitative microscopical measurements have been made of the proportion of cell volume occupied by cytoplasm in a cell suspension culture derived from cotyledons of bush bean (cv. Contender). On a 7-day culture cycle, the content of cytoplasm varies from 25% at the time of transfer to 45% at the...

  4. A cataract-causing connexin 50 mutant is mislocalized to the ER due to loss of the fourth transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somaraju Chalasani, Madhavi Latha; Muppirala, Madhavi; G Ponnam, Surya Prakash; Kannabiran, Chitra; Swarup, Ghanshyam

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the eye lens gap junction protein connexin 50 cause cataract. Earlier we identified a frameshift mutant of connexin 50 (c.670insA; p.Thr203AsnfsX47) in a family with autosomal recessive cataract. The mutant protein is smaller and contains 46 aberrant amino acids at the C-terminus after amino acid 202. Here, we have analysed this frameshift mutant and observed that it localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) but not in the plasma membrane. Moreover, overexpression of the mutant resulted in disintegration of the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC), reduction in the level of ERGIC-53 protein and breakdown of the Golgi in many cells. Overexpression of the frameshift mutant partially inhibited the transport of wild type connexin 50 to the plasma membrane. A deletion mutant lacking the aberrant sequence showed predominant localization in the ER and inhibited anterograde protein transport suggesting, therefore, that the aberrant sequence is not responsible for improper localization of the frameshift mutant. Further deletion analysis showed that the fourth transmembrane domain and a membrane proximal region (231-294 amino acids) of the cytoplasmic domain are needed for transport from the ER and localization to the plasma membrane. Our results show that a frameshift mutant of connexin 50 mislocalizes to the ER and causes disintegration of the ERGIC and Golgi. We have also identified a sequence of connexin 50 crucial for transport from the ER and localization to the plasma membrane.

  5. A cytoplasmic serine protein kinase binds and may regulate the Fanconi anemia protein FANCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagasaki, H; Adachi, D; Oda, T; Garcia-Higuera, I; Tetteh, N; D'Andrea, A D; Futaki, M; Asano, S; Yamashita, T

    2001-12-15

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive disease with congenital anomalies, bone marrow failure, and susceptibility to leukemia. Patient cells show chromosome instability and hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents. At least 8 complementation groups (A-G) have been identified and 6 FA genes (for subtypes A, C, D2, E, F, and G) have been cloned. Increasing evidence indicates that a protein complex assembly of multiple FA proteins, including FANCA and FANCG, plays a crucial role in the FA pathway. Previously, it was reported that FANCA was phosphorylated in lymphoblasts from normal controls, whereas the phosphorylation was defective in those derived from patients with FA of multiple complementation groups. The present study examined phosphorylation of FANCA ectopically expressed in FANCA(-) cells. Several patient-derived mutations abrogated in vivo phosphorylation of FANCA in this system, suggesting that FANCA phosphorylation is associated with its function. In vitro phosphorylation studies indicated that a physiologic protein kinase for FANCA (FANCA-PK) forms a complex with the substrate. Furthermore, at least a part of FANCA-PK as well as phosphorylated FANCA were included in the FANCA/FANCG complex. Thus, FANCA-PK appears to be another component of the FA protein complex and may regulate function of FANCA. FANCA-PK was characterized as a cytoplasmic serine kinase sensitive to wortmannin. Identification of the protein kinase is expected to elucidate regulatory mechanisms that control the FA pathway.

  6. Structural Basis for Redox Regulation of Cytoplasmic and Chloroplastic Triosephosphate Isomerases from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Margarita López-Castillo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In plants triosephosphate isomerase (TPI interconverts glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (G3P and dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP during glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, and the Calvin-Benson cycle. The nuclear genome of land plants encodes two tpi genes, one gene product is located in the cytoplasm and the other is imported into the chloroplast. Herein we report the crystal structures of the TPIs from the vascular plant Arabidopsis thaliana (AtTPIs and address their enzymatic modulation by redox agents. Cytoplasmic TPI (cTPI and chloroplast TPI (pdTPI share more than 60% amino acid identity and assemble as (β-α8 dimers with high structural homology. cTPI and pdTPI harbor two and one accessible thiol groups per monomer respectively. cTPI and pdTPI present a cysteine at an equivalent structural position (C13 and C15 respectively and cTPI also contains a specific solvent accessible cysteine at residue 218 (cTPI-C218. Site directed mutagenesis of residues pdTPI-C15, cTPI-C13 and cTPI-C218 to serine substantially decreases enzymatic activity, indicating that the structural integrity of these cysteines is necessary for catalysis. AtTPIs exhibit differential responses to oxidative agents, cTPI is susceptible to oxidative agents such as diamide and H2O2, whereas pdTPI is resistant to inhibition. Incubation of AtTPIs with the sulfhydryl conjugating reagents methylmethane thiosulfonate (MMTS and glutathione inhibits enzymatic activity. However, the concentration necessary to inhibit pdTPI is at least two orders of magnitude higher than the concentration needed to inhibit cTPI. Western-blot analysis indicates that residues cTPI-C13, cTPI-C218, and pdTPI-C15 conjugate with glutathione. In summary, our data indicate that AtTPIs could be redox regulated by the derivatization of specific AtTPI cysteines (cTPI-C13 and pdTPI-C15 and cTPI-C218. Since AtTPIs have evolved by gene duplication, the higher resistance of pdTPI to redox agents may be an adaptive consequence to

  7. Epidermal Growth Factor Cytoplasmic Domain Affects ErbB Protein Degradation by the Lysosomal and Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway in Human Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Glogowska

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The cytoplasmic domains of EGF-like ligands, including EGF cytoplasmic domain (EGFcyt, have important biological functions. Using specific constructs and peptides of human EGF cytoplasmic domain, we demonstrate that EGFcyt facilitates lysosomal and proteasomal protein degradation, and this coincided with growth inhibition of human thyroid and glioma carcinoma cells. EGFcyt and exon 22–23-encoded peptide (EGF22.23 enhanced procathepsin B (procathB expression and procathB-mediated lysosomal degradation of EGFR/ErbB1 as determined by inhibitors for procathB and the lysosomal ATPase inhibitor BafA1. Presence of mbEGFctF, EGFcyt, EGF22.23, and exon 23-encoded peptides suppressed the expression of the deubiqitinating enzyme ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1. This coincided with hyperubiquitination of total cellular proteins and ErbB1/2 and reduced proteasome activity. Upon small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of endogenously expressed UCH-L1, a similar hyperubiquitinylation phenotype, reduced ErbB1/2 content, and attenuated growth was observed. The exon 23-encoded peptide region of EGFcyt was important for these biologic actions. Structural homology modeling of human EGFcyt showed that this molecular region formed an exposed surface loop. Peptides derived from this EGFcyt loop structure may aid in the design of novel peptide therapeutics aimed at inhibiting growth of cancer cells.

  8. The early noncoding region of human papillomavirus type 16 is regulated by cytoplasmic polyadenylation factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glahder, Jacob-Andreas Harald; Kristiansen, Karen; Durand, Marjorie

    2010-01-01

    All human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) early mRNAs are polyadenylated at the poly(A) signal within the early 3' untranslated region (3'UTR). The 3'end of the early E5 open reading frame and the 3'UTR of HPV-16 is very AU-rich, with five regions similar to cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements (...

  9. Crystal structure of the cytoplasmic phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-like region of Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensing phosphatase provides insight into substrate specificity and redox regulation of the phosphoinositide phosphatase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Makoto; Takeshita, Kohei; Kurokawa, Tatsuki; Sakata, Souhei; Suzuki, Mamoru; Yamashita, Eiki; Okamura, Yasushi; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2011-07-01

    Ciona intestinalis voltage-sensing phosphatase (Ci-VSP) has a transmembrane voltage sensor domain and a cytoplasmic region sharing similarity to the phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN). It dephosphorylates phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate upon membrane depolarization. The cytoplasmic region is composed of a phosphatase domain and a putative membrane interaction domain, C2. Here we determined the crystal structures of the Ci-VSP cytoplasmic region in three distinct constructs, wild-type (248-576), wild-type (236-576), and G365A mutant (248-576). The crystal structure of WT-236 and G365A-248 had the disulfide bond between the catalytic residue Cys-363 and the adjacent residue Cys-310. On the other hand, the disulfide bond was not present in the crystal structure of WT-248. These suggest the possibility that Ci-VSP is regulated by reactive oxygen species as found in PTEN. These structures also revealed that the conformation of the TI loop in the active site of the Ci-VSP cytoplasmic region was distinct from the corresponding region of PTEN; Ci-VSP has glutamic acid (Glu-411) in the TI loop, orienting toward the center of active site pocket. Mutation of Glu-411 led to acquirement of increased activity toward phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate, suggesting that this site is required for determining substrate specificity. Our results provide the basic information of the enzymatic mechanism of Ci-VSP.

  10. Cytoplasmic pH and the regulation of the dictyostelium cell cycle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aerts, R.J.; Durston, A.J.; Moolenaar, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    Cytoplasmic pH (pHl) was monitored during the cell cycle of synchronous populations of Dictyostelium discoideum by means of a pH “null point” method. There is a cycle of pHl that closely corresponds to the DNA replication cycle, with a minimum of pH 7.20 in interphase and a peak of pH 7.45 during S

  11. Ubiquitin-regulated nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of the Nipah virus matrix protein is important for viral budding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao E Wang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Paramyxoviruses are known to replicate in the cytoplasm and bud from the plasma membrane. Matrix is the major structural protein in paramyxoviruses that mediates viral assembly and budding. Curiously, the matrix proteins of a few paramyxoviruses have been found in the nucleus, although the biological function associated with this nuclear localization remains obscure. We report here that the nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of the Nipah virus matrix (NiV-M protein and associated post-translational modification play a critical role in matrix-mediated virus budding. Nipah virus (NiV is a highly pathogenic emerging paramyxovirus that causes fatal encephalitis in humans, and is classified as a Biosafety Level 4 (BSL4 pathogen. During live NiV infection, NiV-M was first detected in the nucleus at early stages of infection before subsequent localization to the cytoplasm and the plasma membrane. Mutations in the putative bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS and the leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES found in NiV-M impaired its nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking and also abolished NiV-M budding. A highly conserved lysine residue in the NLS served dual functions: its positive charge was important for mediating nuclear import, and it was also a potential site for monoubiquitination which regulates nuclear export of the protein. Concordantly, overexpression of ubiquitin enhanced NiV-M budding whereas depletion of free ubiquitin in the cell (via proteasome inhibitors resulted in nuclear retention of NiV-M and blocked viral budding. Live Nipah virus budding was exquisitely sensitive to proteasome inhibitors: bortezomib, an FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor for treating multiple myeloma, reduced viral titers with an IC(50 of 2.7 nM, which is 100-fold less than the peak plasma concentration that can be achieved in humans. This opens up the possibility of using an "off-the-shelf" therapeutic against acute NiV infection.

  12. Nonsecreted cytoplasmic alpha-fetoprotein: a newly discovered role in intracellular signaling and regulation. An update and commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizejewski, G J

    2015-12-01

    The concept of a non-secreted cytoplasmic-bound form of alpha-fetoprotein is not a new notion in AFP biological activities. Cytoplasmic AFP (CyAFP) is a long known but forgotten protein in search of a function other than a histochemical biomarker. In this report, CyAFP is presented as an "old" protein with a newly described intracellular function. In 1976, CyAFP was shown to be a product of hepatoma cells utilizing 14Cleucine incorporation and demonstrated by autoradiographic procedures. The synthesis of CyAFP without secretion was demonstrated to occur in both malignant and non-malignant cells encompassing hepatomas, ascite fluid cells, immature rodent uterus, MCF-7 breast cancers, and cytosols from human breast cancer patients. Using computer protein matching and alignments in AFP versus members of the nuclear receptor superfamily, a consecutive series of leucine zipper (heptad) repeats in AFP was previously reported, suggesting the possibility for protein-to-protein interactions. The potential for heptad heterodimerization between protein-binding partners provided the rationale for proposing that CyAFP might have the capability to form molecular hetero-complexes with cytoplasmic based transcription factors. More recent investigations have now provided experimental evidence that CyAFP is capable of colocalizing and interacting with transcription-associated factors. Such proteins can modulate intracellular signaling leading to regulation of transcription factors and initiation of growth in human cancer cells. Although circulating serum AFP is known as a growth-enhancing factor during development, cytoplasmic AFP has a lethal role in the oncogenesis, growth, and metastasis of adult liver cancer.

  13. Senescence-related functional nuclear barrier by down-regulation of nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Young; Ryu, Sung Jin; Ahn, Hong Ju; Choi, Hae Ri; Kang, Hyun Tae; Park, Sang Chul

    2010-01-01

    One of the characteristic natures of senescent cells is the hypo- or irresponsiveness not only to growth factors but also to apoptotic stress. In the present study, we confirmed the inhibition of nuclear translocation of activated p-ERK1/2 and NF-kB p50 in response to growth stimuli or LPS in the senescent human diploid fibroblasts. In order to elucidate the underlying mechanism for the senescence-associated hypo-responsiveness, we carried out the comparison study for gene expression profiles through microarray analysis. In consequence, we observed the vast reduction in expression of nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking genes in senescent cells, when compared with those in young cells. Expression levels of several nucleoporins, karyopherin α, karyopherin β, Ran, and Ran-regulating factors were confirmed to be down-regulated in senescent HDFs by using RT-PCR and Western blot methods. Taken together, these data suggest the operation of certain senescence-associated functional nuclear barriers by down-regulation of the nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking genes in the senescent cells.

  14. Senescence-related functional nuclear barrier by down-regulation of nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Young; Ryu, Sung Jin; Ahn, Hong Ju; Choi, Hae Ri; Kang, Hyun Tae [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Aging and Apoptosis Research Center, Institute on Aging, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Chul, E-mail: scpark@snu.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Aging and Apoptosis Research Center, Institute on Aging, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-01

    One of the characteristic natures of senescent cells is the hypo- or irresponsiveness not only to growth factors but also to apoptotic stress. In the present study, we confirmed the inhibition of nuclear translocation of activated p-ERK1/2 and NF-kB p50 in response to growth stimuli or LPS in the senescent human diploid fibroblasts. In order to elucidate the underlying mechanism for the senescence-associated hypo-responsiveness, we carried out the comparison study for gene expression profiles through microarray analysis. In consequence, we observed the vast reduction in expression of nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking genes in senescent cells, when compared with those in young cells. Expression levels of several nucleoporins, karyopherin {alpha}, karyopherin {beta}, Ran, and Ran-regulating factors were confirmed to be down-regulated in senescent HDFs by using RT-PCR and Western blot methods. Taken together, these data suggest the operation of certain senescence-associated functional nuclear barriers by down-regulation of the nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking genes in the senescent cells.

  15. Profound regulation of Na/K pump activity by transient elevations of cytoplasmic calcium in murine cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fang-Min; Deisl, Christine; Hilgemann, Donald W

    2016-09-14

    Small changes of Na/K pump activity regulate internal Ca release in cardiac myocytes via Na/Ca exchange. We now show conversely that transient elevations of cytoplasmic Ca strongly regulate cardiac Na/K pumps. When cytoplasmic Na is submaximal, Na/K pump currents decay rapidly during extracellular K application and multiple results suggest that an inactivation mechanism is involved. Brief activation of Ca influx by reverse Na/Ca exchange enhances pump currents and attenuates current decay, while repeated Ca elevations suppress pump currents. Pump current enhancement reverses over 3 min, and results are similar in myocytes lacking the regulatory protein, phospholemman. Classical signaling mechanisms, including Ca-activated protein kinases and reactive oxygen, are evidently not involved. Electrogenic signals mediated by intramembrane movement of hydrophobic ions, such as hexyltriphenylphosphonium (C6TPP), increase and decrease in parallel with pump currents. Thus, transient Ca elevation and Na/K pump inactivation cause opposing sarcolemma changes that may affect diverse membrane processes.

  16. A role for chromatin topology in imprinted domain regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, William A; Sachani, Saqib S; White, Carlee R; Mann, Mellissa R W

    2016-02-01

    Recently, many advancements in genome-wide chromatin topology and nuclear architecture have unveiled the complex and hidden world of the nucleus, where chromatin is organized into discrete neighbourhoods with coordinated gene expression. This includes the active and inactive X chromosomes. Using X chromosome inactivation as a working model, we utilized publicly available datasets together with a literature review to gain insight into topologically associated domains, lamin-associated domains, nucleolar-associating domains, scaffold/matrix attachment regions, and nucleoporin-associated chromatin and their role in regulating monoallelic expression. Furthermore, we comprehensively review for the first time the role of chromatin topology and nuclear architecture in the regulation of genomic imprinting. We propose that chromatin topology and nuclear architecture are important regulatory mechanisms for directing gene expression within imprinted domains. Furthermore, we predict that dynamic changes in chromatin topology and nuclear architecture play roles in tissue-specific imprint domain regulation during early development and differentiation.

  17. Cytoplasmic vacuolation in cultured rat astrocytes induced by an organophosphorus agent requires extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isobe, Ichiro; Maeno, Yoshitaka; Nagao, Masataka; Iwasa, Mineo; Koyama, Hiroyoshi; Seko-Nakamura, Yoshimi; Monma-Ohtaki, Jun

    2003-01-01

    There are various toxic chemicals that cause cell death. However, in certain cases deleterious agents elicit various cellular responses prior to cell death. To determine the cellular mechanisms by which such cellular responses are induced is important, but sufficient attention has not been paid to this issue to date. In this study, we showed the characteristic effects of an organophosphorus (OP) agent, bis(pinacolyl methyl)phosphonate (BPMP), which we synthesized for the study of OP nerve agents, on cultured rat astrocytes. Morphologically, BPMP induced cytoplasmic vacuolation and stellation in the rat astrocytes. Cytoplasmic vacuolation is a cell pathological change observed, for example, in vacuolar degeneration, and stellation has been reported in astrocytic reactions against various stimuli. By pretreatment with cycloheximide, a protein synthesis inhibitor, stellation was inhibited, although vacuolation was not. Cell staining with a mitochondrion-selective dye indicated that the vacuolation probably occurs in the mitochondria that are swollen and vacuolatred in the center. Interestingly, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade inhibitor inhibited vacuolation and, to some extent, stellation. These results suggest that the ERK signaling cascade is important for the induction of mitochondrial vacuolation. We expect that a detailed study of these astrocytic reactions will provide us new perspectives regarding the variation and pathological significance of cell morphological changes, such as vacuolar degeneration, and also the mechanisms underlying various neurological disorders

  18. Constitutively expressed Protocadherin-α regulates the coalescence and elimination of homotypic olfactory axons through its cytoplasmic region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonoko eHasegawa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory sensory neuron (OSN axons coalesce into specific glomeruli in the olfactory bulb (OB according to their odorant receptor (OR expression. Several guidance molecules enhance the coalescence of homotypic OSN projections, in an OR-specific- and neural-activity-dependent manner. However, the mechanism by which homotypic OSN axons are organized into glomeruli is unsolved. We previously reported that the clustered protocadherin-α (Pcdh-α family of diverse cadherin-related molecules plays roles in the coalescence and elimination of homotypic OSN axons throughout development. Here we showed that the elimination of small ectopic homotypic glomeruli required the constitutive expression of a Pcdh-α isoform and Pcdh-α’s cytoplasmic region, but not OR specificity or neural activity. These results suggest that Pcdh-α proteins provide a cytoplasmic signal to regulate repulsive activity for homotypic OSN axons independently of OR expression and neural activity. The counterbalancing effect of Pcdh-α proteins for the axonal coalescence mechanisms mediated by other olfactory guidance molecules indicate a possible mechanism for the organization of homotypic OSN axons into glomeruli during development.

  19. Activatory and Inhibitory Fcγ Receptors Augment Rituximab-mediated Internalization of CD20 Independent of Signaling via the Cytoplasmic Domain*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Andrew T.; Chan, Claude H. T.; Klein, Christian; Glennie, Martin J.; Beers, Stephen A.; Cragg, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Type I anti-CD20 mAb such as rituximab and ofatumumab engage with the inhibitory FcγR, FcγRIIb on the surface of B cells, resulting in immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) phosphorylation. Internalization of the CD20·mAb·FcγRIIb complex follows, the rate of which correlates with FcγRIIb expression. In contrast, although type II anti-CD20 mAb such as tositumomab and obinutuzumab also interact with and activate FcγRIIb, this interaction fails to augment the rate of CD20·mAb internalization, raising the question of whether ITIM phosphorylation plays any role in this process. We have assessed the molecular requirements for the internalization process and demonstrate that in contrast to internalization of IgG immune complexes, FcγRIIb-augmented internalization of rituximab-ligated CD20 occurs independently of the FcγRIIb ITIM, indicating that signaling downstream of FcγRIIb is not required. In transfected cells, activatory FcγRI, FcγRIIa, and FcγRIIIa augmented internalization of rituximab-ligated CD20 in a similar manner. However, FcγRIIa mediated a slower rate of internalization than cells expressing equivalent levels of the highly homologous FcγRIIb. The difference was maintained in cells expressing FcγRIIa and FcγRIIb lacking cytoplasmic domains and in which the transmembrane domains had been exchanged. This difference may be due to increased degradation of FcγRIIa, which traffics to lysosomes independently of rituximab. We conclude that the cytoplasmic domain of FcγR is not required for promoting internalization of rituximab-ligated CD20. Instead, we propose that FcγR provides a structural role in augmenting endocytosis that differs from that employed during the endocytosis of immune complexes. PMID:25568316

  20. The novel 2Fe–2S outer mitochondrial protein mitoNEET displays conformational flexibility in its N-terminal cytoplasmic tethering domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlan, Andrea R.; Paddock, Mark L.; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Cohen, Aina E.; Abresch, Edward C.; Wiley, Sandra; Roy, Melinda; Nechushtai, Rachel; Jennings, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    The crystal structure of the anti-diabetic drug target mitoNEET obtained from a GFP fusion construct (1.4 Å resolution, R factor = 20.2%) shows that the CDGSH 2Fe–2S binding domains are superimposable with previously determined non-fused constructs. However, there is considerable flexibility in the position of the outer mitochondrial tethering arms resulting in two different conformations in the crystal structure. A primary role for mitochondrial dysfunction is indicated in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. A widely used drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes is pioglitazone, a member of the thiazolidinedione class of molecules. MitoNEET, a 2Fe–2S outer mitochondrial membrane protein, binds pioglitazone [Colca et al. (2004 ▶), Am. J. Physiol. Endocrinol. Metab.286, E252–E260]. The soluble domain of the human mitoNEET protein has been expressed C-terminal to the superfolder green fluorescent protein and the mitoNEET protein has been isolated. Comparison of the crystal structure of mitoNEET isolated from cleavage of the fusion protein (1.4 Å resolution, R factor = 20.2%) with other solved structures shows that the CDGSH domains are superimposable, indicating proper assembly of mitoNEET. Furthermore, there is considerable flexibility in the position of the cytoplasmic tethering arms, resulting in two different conformations in the crystal structure. This flexibility affords multiple orientations on the outer mitochondrial membrane

  1. Identification of Proteins Involved in Carbohydrate Metabolism and Energy Metabolism Pathways and Their Regulation of Cytoplasmic Male Sterility in Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingxia Geng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS where no functional pollen is produced has important roles in wheat breeding. The anther is a unique organ for male gametogenesis and its abnormal development can cause male sterility. However, the mechanisms and regulatory networks related to plant male sterility are poorly understood. In this study, we conducted comparative analyses using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ of the pollen proteins in a CMS line and its wheat maintainer. Differentially abundant proteins (DAPs were analyzed based on Gene Ontology classifications, metabolic pathways and transcriptional regulation networks using Blast2GO. We identified 5570 proteins based on 23,277 peptides, which matched with 73,688 spectra, including proteins in key pathways such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase and 6-phosphofructokinase 1 in the glycolysis pathway, isocitrate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH-dehydrogenase and adenosine-triphosphate (ATP synthases in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway. These proteins may comprise a network that regulates male sterility in wheat. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR analysis, ATP assays and total sugar assays validated the iTRAQ results. These DAPs could be associated with abnormal pollen grain formation and male sterility. Our findings provide insights into the molecular mechanism related to male sterility in wheat.

  2. Identification of Proteins Involved in Carbohydrate Metabolism and Energy Metabolism Pathways and Their Regulation of Cytoplasmic Male Sterility in Wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xingxia; Ye, Jiali; Yang, Xuetong; Li, Sha; Zhang, Lingli; Song, Xiyue

    2018-01-23

    Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) where no functional pollen is produced has important roles in wheat breeding. The anther is a unique organ for male gametogenesis and its abnormal development can cause male sterility. However, the mechanisms and regulatory networks related to plant male sterility are poorly understood. In this study, we conducted comparative analyses using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) of the pollen proteins in a CMS line and its wheat maintainer. Differentially abundant proteins (DAPs) were analyzed based on Gene Ontology classifications, metabolic pathways and transcriptional regulation networks using Blast2GO. We identified 5570 proteins based on 23,277 peptides, which matched with 73,688 spectra, including proteins in key pathways such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase and 6-phosphofructokinase 1 in the glycolysis pathway, isocitrate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH)-dehydrogenase and adenosine-triphosphate (ATP) synthases in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway. These proteins may comprise a network that regulates male sterility in wheat. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis, ATP assays and total sugar assays validated the iTRAQ results. These DAPs could be associated with abnormal pollen grain formation and male sterility. Our findings provide insights into the molecular mechanism related to male sterility in wheat.

  3. Adrenergic regulation of cytoplasmic structures related to secretory processes in pig pinealocytes-an ultrastructural, quantitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybylska-Gornowicz, Barbara; Lewczuk, Bogdan; Ziółkowska, Natalia; Prusik, Magdalena

    2017-10-01

    Two structures, considered as secretory in nature, are present in the pinealocytes in of the domestic pig show the presence of two structures, which are considered as secretory in nature - the dense core vesicles (DCV) and the membrane bounded (dense) bodies (MBB). The latter are extremely numerous in pig pinealocytes (they occupy 6-20% of the cytoplasm), and the number of MBB changes under different physiological and experimental conditions. Norepinephrine is the main neurotransmitter that regulates the secretion of pineal melatonin. The present study was carried out to 1) clarify whether the DCV and their source - the Golgi apparatus (GA) - as well as the MBB are controlled by norepinephrine, 2) determine the effect of adrenergic stimulation on these structures, and 3) identify the receptors involved in the regulation of these structures. The studies were performed using a static organ culture of pig pineal explants. The explants were incubated in a control medium between 08:00 and 20:00 and in a medium with 10μM norepinephrine or alpha- or beta-adrenoceptor agonists between 20:00 and 08:00 on five consecutive days. The tissues were subsequently prepared for ultrastructural analysis. The results distinctly showed that the DCV, GA and MBB in pig pinealocytes are under adrenergic control. The stimulation of the beta-adrenoceptors resulted in an increase in the numerical density of the DCV and a decrease in the relative volume of the GA in the perikarya, while the incubation with agonists of the alpha1-adrenoceptors was ineffective. The relative volume of the MBB in the perikarya significantly decreased after treatment with both beta-agonists and alpha1-agonists, which suggested the involvement of two types of adrenoceptors in the regulation of these structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The brain cytoplasmic RNA BC1 regulates dopamine D2 receptor-mediated transmission in the striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centonze, Diego; Rossi, Silvia; Napoli, Ilaria; Mercaldo, Valentina; Lacoux, Caroline; Ferrari, Francesca; Ciotti, Maria Teresa; De Chiara, Valentina; Prosperetti, Chiara; Maccarrone, Mauro; Fezza, Filomena; Calabresi, Paolo; Bernardi, Giorgio; Bagni, Claudia

    2007-08-15

    Dopamine D(2) receptor (D(2)DR)-mediated transmission in the striatum is remarkably flexible, and changes in its efficacy have been heavily implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological conditions. Although receptor-associated proteins are clearly involved in specific forms of synaptic plasticity, the molecular mechanisms regulating the sensitivity of D(2) receptors in this brain area are essentially obscure. We have studied the physiological responses of the D(2)DR stimulations in mice lacking the brain cytoplasmic RNA BC1, a small noncoding dendritically localized RNA that is supposed to play a role in mRNA translation. We show that the efficiency of D(2)-mediated transmission regulating striatal GABA synapses is under the control of BC1 RNA, through a negative influence on D(2) receptor protein level affecting the functional pool of receptors. Ablation of the BC1 gene did not result in widespread dysregulation of synaptic transmission, because the sensitivity of cannabinoid CB(1) receptors was intact in the striatum of BC1 knock-out (KO) mice despite D(2) and CB(1) receptors mediated similar electrophysiological actions. Interestingly, the fragile X mental retardation protein FMRP, one of the multiple BC1 partners, is not involved in the BC1 effects on the D(2)-mediated transmission. Because D(2)DR mRNA is apparently equally translated in the BC1-KO and wild-type mice, whereas the protein level is higher in BC1-KO mice, we suggest that BC1 RNA controls D(2)DR indirectly, probably regulating translation of molecules involved in D(2)DR turnover and/or stability.

  5. Activatory and inhibitory Fcγ receptors augment rituximab-mediated internalization of CD20 independent of signaling via the cytoplasmic domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Andrew T; Chan, Claude H T; Klein, Christian; Glennie, Martin J; Beers, Stephen A; Cragg, Mark S

    2015-02-27

    Type I anti-CD20 mAb such as rituximab and ofatumumab engage with the inhibitory FcγR, FcγRIIb on the surface of B cells, resulting in immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) phosphorylation. Internalization of the CD20·mAb·FcγRIIb complex follows, the rate of which correlates with FcγRIIb expression. In contrast, although type II anti-CD20 mAb such as tositumomab and obinutuzumab also interact with and activate FcγRIIb, this interaction fails to augment the rate of CD20·mAb internalization, raising the question of whether ITIM phosphorylation plays any role in this process. We have assessed the molecular requirements for the internalization process and demonstrate that in contrast to internalization of IgG immune complexes, FcγRIIb-augmented internalization of rituximab-ligated CD20 occurs independently of the FcγRIIb ITIM, indicating that signaling downstream of FcγRIIb is not required. In transfected cells, activatory FcγRI, FcγRIIa, and FcγRIIIa augmented internalization of rituximab-ligated CD20 in a similar manner. However, FcγRIIa mediated a slower rate of internalization than cells expressing equivalent levels of the highly homologous FcγRIIb. The difference was maintained in cells expressing FcγRIIa and FcγRIIb lacking cytoplasmic domains and in which the transmembrane domains had been exchanged. This difference may be due to increased degradation of FcγRIIa, which traffics to lysosomes independently of rituximab. We conclude that the cytoplasmic domain of FcγR is not required for promoting internalization of rituximab-ligated CD20. Instead, we propose that FcγR provides a structural role in augmenting endocytosis that differs from that employed during the endocytosis of immune complexes. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Cytoplasmic Domain of MscS Interacts with Cell Division Protein FtsZ: A Possible Non-Channel Function of the Mechanosensitive Channel in Escherichia Coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Koprowski

    Full Text Available Bacterial mechano-sensitive (MS channels reside in the inner membrane and are considered to act as emergency valves whose role is to lower cell turgor when bacteria enter hypo-osmotic environments. However, there is emerging evidence that members of the Mechano-sensitive channel Small (MscS family play additional roles in bacterial and plant cell physiology. MscS has a large cytoplasmic C-terminal region that changes its shape upon activation and inactivation of the channel. Our pull-down and co-sedimentation assays show that this domain interacts with FtsZ, a bacterial tubulin-like protein. We identify point mutations in the MscS C-terminal domain that reduce binding to FtsZ and show that bacteria expressing these mutants are compromised in growth on sublethal concentrations of β-lactam antibiotics. Our results suggest that interaction between MscS and FtsZ could occur upon inactivation and/or opening of the channel and could be important for the bacterial cell response against sustained stress upon stationary phase and in the presence of β-lactam antibiotics.

  7. Cytoplasmic Domain of MscS Interacts with Cell Division Protein FtsZ: A Possible Non-Channel Function of the Mechanosensitive Channel in Escherichia Coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprowski, Piotr; Grajkowski, Wojciech; Balcerzak, Marcin; Filipiuk, Iwona; Fabczak, Hanna; Kubalski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial mechano-sensitive (MS) channels reside in the inner membrane and are considered to act as emergency valves whose role is to lower cell turgor when bacteria enter hypo-osmotic environments. However, there is emerging evidence that members of the Mechano-sensitive channel Small (MscS) family play additional roles in bacterial and plant cell physiology. MscS has a large cytoplasmic C-terminal region that changes its shape upon activation and inactivation of the channel. Our pull-down and co-sedimentation assays show that this domain interacts with FtsZ, a bacterial tubulin-like protein. We identify point mutations in the MscS C-terminal domain that reduce binding to FtsZ and show that bacteria expressing these mutants are compromised in growth on sublethal concentrations of β-lactam antibiotics. Our results suggest that interaction between MscS and FtsZ could occur upon inactivation and/or opening of the channel and could be important for the bacterial cell response against sustained stress upon stationary phase and in the presence of β-lactam antibiotics.

  8. Multimerization of the cytoplasmic domain of syndecan-4 is required for its ability to activate protein kinase C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oh, E S; Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1997-01-01

    of syndecan-4 (4L) containing a membrane-proximal basic sequence did not form higher order oligomers and could not regulate the activity of PKCalphabetagamma unless induced to aggregate by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. Oligomerization and PKC regulatory activity of the 4V peptide were both increased...... by addition of N-terminal cysteine and reduced by phosphorylation of the cysteine thiol group. Concentration of syndecan-4 at sites of focal adhesion formation may enhance multimerization and both localize PKC and potentiate its activity to induce stable complex formation....

  9. MapA, an iron-regulated, cytoplasmic membrane protein in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. strain PCC7942.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, R; Troyan, T; Sherman, D; Sherman, L A

    1994-08-01

    Growth of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 in iron-deficient media leads to the accumulation of an approximately 34-kDa protein. The gene encoding this protein, mapA (membrane-associated protein A), has been cloned and sequenced (GenBank accession number, L01621). The mapA transcript is not detectable in normally grown cultures but is stably accumulated by cells grown in iron-deficient media. However, the promoter sequence for this gene does not resemble other bacterial iron-regulated promoters described to date. The carboxyl-terminal region of the derived amino acid sequence of MapA resembles bacterial proteins involved in iron acquisition, whereas the amino-terminal end of MapA has a high degree of amino acid identity with the abundant, chloroplast envelope protein E37. An approach employing improved cellular fractionation techniques as well as electron microscopy and immunocytochemistry was essential in localizing MapA protein to the cytoplasmic membrane of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942. When these cells were grown under iron-deficient conditions, a significant fraction of MapA could also be localized to the thylakoid membranes.

  10. Structural transitions in conserved, ordered Beclin 1 domains essential to regulating autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, Karen; Li, Yue; Mukhopadhyay, Shreya; Leuthner, Zoe; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Colbert, Christopher L.; Sinha, Sangita C. (NDSU); (IIT)

    2017-08-10

    Beclin 1 (BECN1) is a key regulator of autophagy, a critical catabolic homeostasis pathway that involves sequestration of selected cytoplasmic components by multilayered vesicles called autophagosomes, followed by lysosomal fusion and degradation. BECN1 is a core component of class III phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase complexes responsible for autophagosome nucleation. Without heterologous binding partners, BECN1 forms an antiparallel homodimer via its coiled-coil domain (CCD). However, the last 16 CCD residues, composing an “overlap helix” (OH), have been crystallized in two mutually exclusive states: either as part of the CCD or packed against the C-terminal β-α repeated, autophagy-specific domain (BARAD). Here, using CD spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, and small-angle X-ray scattering, we show that in the homodimeric state, the OH transitions between these two different packing states, with the predominant state comprising the OH packed against the BARAD, contrary to expectations based on known BECN1 interactions with heterologous partners. We confirmed this observation by comparing the impact of mutating four residues that mediate packing of the OH against both the CCD and BARAD on structure and stability of the CCD, the OH+BARAD, and the two-domain CCD–BARAD. Last, we used cellular assays to demonstrate that mutation of these OH-interface residues abrogates starvation-induced up-regulation of autophagy but does not affect basal autophagy. In summary, we have identified a BECN1 helical region that transitions between packing as part of either one of two conserved domains (i.e. the CCD or the BARAD). Our findings have important implications for the relative stability of autophagy-inactive and autophagy-active BECN1 complexes.

  11. Chimeric rabies glycoprotein with a transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic tail from Newcastle disease virus fusion protein incorporates into the Newcastle disease virion at reduced levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Gui Mei; Zu, Shu Long; Zhou, Wei Wei; Wang, Xi Jun; Shuai, Lei; Wang, Xue Lian; Ge, Jin Ying; Bu, Zhi Gao

    2017-08-31

    Rabies remains an important worldwide health problem. Newcastle disease virus (NDV) was developed as a vaccine vector in animals by using a reverse genetics approach. Previously, our group generated a recombinant NDV (LaSota strain) expressing the complete rabies virus G protein (RVG), named rL-RVG. In this study, we constructed the variant rL-RVGTM, which expresses a chimeric rabies virus G protein (RVGTM) containing the ectodomain of RVG and the transmembrane domain (TM) and a cytoplasmic tail (CT) from the NDV fusion glycoprotein to study the function of RVG's TM and CT. The RVGTM did not detectably incorporate into NDV virions, though it was abundantly expressed at the surface of infected BHK-21 cells. Both rL-RVG and rL-RVGTM induced similar levels of NDV virus-neutralizing antibody (VNA) after initial and secondary vaccination in mice, whereas rabies VNA induction by rL-RVGTM was markedly lower than that induced by rL-RVG. Though rL-RVG could spread from cell to cell like that in rabies virus, rL-RVGTM lost this ability and spread in a manner similar to the parental NDV. Our data suggest that the TM and CT of RVG are essential for its incorporation into NDV virions and for spreading of the recombinant virus from the initially infected cells to surrounding cells.

  12. A plasma membrane localization signal in the HIV-1 envelope cytoplasmic domain prevents localization at sites of vesicular stomatitis virus budding and incorporation into VSV virions.

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    Johnson, J E; Rodgers, W; Rose, J K

    1998-11-25

    Previous studies showed that the HIV-1 envelope (Env) protein was not incorporated into vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) virions unless its cytoplasmic tail was replaced with that of the VSV glycoprotein (G). To determine whether the G tail provided a positive incorporation signal for Env, or if sequences in the Env tail prevented incorporation, we generated mutants of Env with its 150-amino-acid tail shortened to 29, 10, or 3 amino acids (Envtr mutants). Cells infected with VSV recombinants expressing these proteins or an Env-G tail hybrid showed similar amounts of Env protein at the surface. The Env-G tail hybrid or the Envtr3 mutant were incorporated at the highest levels into budding VSV virions. In contrast, the Envtr29 or Envtr10 mutants were incorporated poorly. These results defined a signal preventing incorporation within the 10 membrane-proximal amino acids of the Env tail. Confocal microscopy revealed that this signal functioned by causing localization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Env to plasma membrane domains distinct from the VSV budding sites, where VSV proteins were concentrated. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  13. A dimer of the Toll-like receptor 4 cytoplasmic domain provides a specific scaffold for the recruitment of signalling adaptor proteins.

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    Ricardo Núñez Miguel

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 is a class I transmembrane receptor expressed on the surface of immune system cells. TLR4 is activated by exposure to lipopolysaccharides derived from the outer membrane of Gram negative bacteria and forms part of the innate immune response in mammals. Like other class 1 receptors, TLR4 is activated by ligand induced dimerization, and recent studies suggest that this causes concerted conformational changes in the receptor leading to self association of the cytoplasmic Toll/Interleukin 1 receptor (TIR signalling domain. This homodimerization event is proposed to provide a new scaffold that is able to bind downstream signalling adaptor proteins. TLR4 uses two different sets of adaptors; TRAM and TRIF, and Mal and MyD88. These adaptor pairs couple two distinct signalling pathways leading to the activation of interferon response factor 3 (IRF-3 and nuclear factor kappaB (NFkappaB respectively. In this paper we have generated a structural model of the TLR4 TIR dimer and used molecular docking to probe for potential sites of interaction between the receptor homodimer and the adaptor molecules. Remarkably, both the Mal and TRAM adaptors are strongly predicted to bind at two symmetry-related sites at the homodimer interface. This model of TLR4 activation is supported by extensive functional studies involving site directed mutagenesis, inhibition by cell permeable peptides and stable protein phosphorylation of receptor and adaptor TIR domains. Our results also suggest a molecular mechanism for two recent findings, the caspase 1 dependence of Mal signalling and the protective effects conferred by the Mal polymorphism Ser180Leu.

  14. The Eag domain regulates the voltage-dependent inactivation of rat Eag1 K+ channels.

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    Ting-Feng Lin

    Full Text Available Eag (Kv10 and Erg (Kv11 belong to two distinct subfamilies of the ether-à-go-go K+ channel family (KCNH. While Erg channels are characterized by an inward-rectifying current-voltage relationship that results from a C-type inactivation, mammalian Eag channels display little or no voltage-dependent inactivation. Although the amino (N-terminal region such as the eag domain is not required for the C-type inactivation of Erg channels, an N-terminal deletion in mouse Eag1 has been shown to produce a voltage-dependent inactivation. To further discern the role of the eag domain in the inactivation of Eag1 channels, we generated N-terminal chimeras between rat Eag (rEag1 and human Erg (hERG1 channels that involved swapping the eag domain alone or the complete cytoplasmic N-terminal region. Functional analyses indicated that introduction of the homologous hERG1 eag domain led to both a fast phase and a slow phase of channel inactivation in the rEag1 chimeras. By contrast, the inactivation features were retained in the reverse hERG1 chimeras. Furthermore, an eag domain-lacking rEag1 deletion mutant also showed the fast phase of inactivation that was notably attenuated upon co-expression with the rEag1 eag domain fragment, but not with the hERG1 eag domain fragment. Additionally, we have identified a point mutation in the S4-S5 linker region of rEag1 that resulted in a similar inactivation phenotype. Biophysical analyses of these mutant constructs suggested that the inactivation gating of rEag1 was distinctly different from that of hERG1. Overall, our findings are consistent with the notion that the eag domain plays a critical role in regulating the inactivation gating of rEag1. We propose that the eag domain may destabilize or mask an inherent voltage-dependent inactivation of rEag1 K+ channels.

  15. The PH Domain of PDK1 Exhibits a Novel, Phospho-Regulated Monomer-Dimer Equilibrium With Important Implications for Kinase Domain Activation: Single Molecule and Ensemble Studies†

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    Ziemba, Brian P.; Pilling, Carissa; Calleja, Véronique; Larijani, Banafshé; Falke, Joseph J.

    2013-01-01

    the viscous bilayer, thereby increasing the diffusional friction. Ensemble measurements of PH domain affinity for PIP3 on plasma membrane-like bilayers reveals that dimeric WT PH domain possesses a one-order of magnitude higher target membrane affinity than the previously characterized monomeric PH domains, consistent with a dimerization-triggered, allosterically-enhanced affinity for one PIP3 molecule (a much larger affinity enhancement would be expected for dimerization-triggered binding to two PIP3 molecules). The monomeric T513E PDK1 PH domain, like other monomeric PH domains, exhibits a PIP3 affinity and bound state lifetime that are each a full order of magnitude lower than dimeric WT PH domain, which is predicted to facilitate release of activated, monomeric PDK1 to cytoplasm. Overall, the study yields the first molecular picture of PH domain regulation via electrostatic control of dimer-monomer conversion. PMID:23745598

  16. Characterization of Elements Regulating the Nuclear-to-Cytoplasmic Translocation of ICP0 in Late Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection.

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    Samrat, Subodh Kumar; Ha, Binh L; Zheng, Yi; Gu, Haidong

    2018-01-15

    Infected cell protein 0 (ICP0) of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is an immediate early protein containing a RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligase. It targets several host factors for proteasomal degradation and subsequently activates viral expression. ICP0 has a nuclear localization sequence and functions in the nucleus early during infection. However, later in infection, ICP0 is found solely in the cytoplasm. The molecular mechanism and biological function of the ICP0 nuclear-to-cytoplasmic translocation are not well understood. In this study, we sought to characterize elements important for this translocation. We found that (i) in human embryonic lung fibroblast (HEL) cells, ICP0 C-terminal residues 741 to 775 were necessary but not sufficient for the nuclear-to-cytoplasmic translocation; (ii) the loss of ICP0 E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, which led to defective viral replication in nonpermissive cells, also caused mutant ICP0 to be retained in the nucleus of HEL cells; (iii) in permissive U2OS cells, however, ICP0 lacking E3 ligase activity was translocated to the cytoplasm at a pace faster than that of wild-type ICP0, suggesting that nuclear retention of ICP0 occurs in an ICP0 E3 ligase-dependent manner; and (iv) the ICP0 C terminus and late viral proteins cooperate in order to overcome nuclear retention and stimulate ICP0 cytoplasmic translocation. Taken together, less ICP0 nuclear retention may contribute to the permissiveness of U2OS cells to HSV-1 in the absence of functional ICP0. IMPORTANCE A distinct characteristic for eukaryotes is the compartmentalization of cell metabolic pathways, which allows greater efficiency and specificity of cellular functions. ICP0 of HSV-1 is a multifunctional viral protein that travels through different compartments as infection progresses. Its main regulatory functions are carried out in the nucleus, but it is translocated to the cytoplasm late during HSV-1 infection. To understand the biological significance of cytoplasmic ICP0 in

  17. Mena/VASP and αII-Spectrin complexes regulate cytoplasmic actin networks in cardiomyocytes and protect from conduction abnormalities and dilated cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Peter M; Merkel, Carla J; Offner, Kristin; Abeßer, Marco; Ullrich, Melanie; Fischer, Tobias; Bayer, Barbara; Wagner, Helga; Gambaryan, Stepan; Ursitti, Jeanine A; Adham, Ibrahim M; Linke, Wolfgang A; Feller, Stephan M; Fleming, Ingrid; Renné, Thomas; Frantz, Stefan; Unger, Andreas; Schuh, Kai

    2013-08-12

    In the heart, cytoplasmic actin networks are thought to have important roles in mechanical support, myofibrillogenesis, and ion channel function. However, subcellular localization of cytoplasmic actin isoforms and proteins involved in the modulation of the cytoplasmic actin networks are elusive. Mena and VASP are important regulators of actin dynamics. Due to the lethal phenotype of mice with combined deficiency in Mena and VASP, however, distinct cardiac roles of the proteins remain speculative. In the present study, we analyzed the physiological functions of Mena and VASP in the heart and also investigated the role of the proteins in the organization of cytoplasmic actin networks. We generated a mouse model, which simultaneously lacks Mena and VASP in the heart. Mena/VASP double-deficiency induced dilated cardiomyopathy and conduction abnormalities. In wild-type mice, Mena and VASP specifically interacted with a distinct αII-Spectrin splice variant (SH3i), which is in cardiomyocytes exclusively localized at Z- and intercalated discs. At Z- and intercalated discs, Mena and β-actin localized to the edges of the sarcomeres, where the thin filaments are anchored. In Mena/VASP double-deficient mice, β-actin networks were disrupted and the integrity of Z- and intercalated discs was markedly impaired. Together, our data suggest that Mena, VASP, and αII-Spectrin assemble cardiac multi-protein complexes, which regulate cytoplasmic actin networks. Conversely, Mena/VASP deficiency results in disrupted β-actin assembly, Z- and intercalated disc malformation, and induces dilated cardiomyopathy and conduction abnormalities.

  18. Defective cancellous bone structure and abnormal response to PTH in cortical bone of mice lacking Cx43 cytoplasmic C-terminus domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Costa, Rafael; Davis, Hannah M.; Sorenson, Chad; Hon, Mary C.; Hassan, Iraj; Reginato, Rejane D.; Allen, Matthew R.; Bellido, Teresita; Plotkin, Lilian I.

    2015-01-01

    Connexin43 (Cx43) forms gap junction channels and hemichannels that allow the communication among osteocytes, osteoblasts, and osteoclasts. Cx43 carboxy-terminal (CT) domain regulates channel opening and intracellular signaling by acting as a scaffold for structural and signaling proteins. To determine the role of Cx43 CT domain in bone, mice in which one allele of full length Cx43 was replaced by a mutant lacking the CT domain (Cx43ΔCT/fl) were studied. Cx43ΔCT/fl mice exhibit lower cancellous bone volume but higher cortical thickness than Cx43fl/fl controls, indicating that the CT domain is involved in normal cancellous bone gain but opposes cortical bone acquisition. Further, Cx43ΔCT is able to exert the functions of full length osteocytic Cx43 on cortical bone geometry and mechanical properties, demonstrating that domains other than the CT are responsible for Cx43 function in cortical bone. In addition, parathyroid hormone (PTH) failed to increase endocortical bone formation or energy to failure, a mechanical property that indicates resistance to fracture, in cortical bone in Cx43ΔCT mice with or without osteocytic full length Cx43. On the other hand, bone mass and bone formation markers were increased by the hormone in all mouse models, regardless of whether full length or Cx43ΔCT were or not expressed. We conclude that Cx43 CT domain is involved in proper bone acquisition; and that Cx43 expression in osteocytes is dispensable for some but not all PTH anabolic actions. PMID:26409319

  19. Human regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1 (RTEL1) is required for the nuclear and cytoplasmic trafficking of pre-U2 RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schertzer, Michael; Jouravleva, Karina; Perderiset, Mylene; Dingli, Florent; Loew, Damarys; Le Guen, Tangui; Bardoni, Barbara; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Revy, Patrick; Londoño-Vallejo, Arturo

    2015-02-18

    Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome (HHS) is a severe form of Dyskeratosis congenita characterized by developmental defects, bone marrow failure and immunodeficiency and has been associated with telomere dysfunction. Recently, mutations in Regulator of Telomere ELongation helicase 1 (RTEL1), a helicase first identified in Mus musculus as being responsible for the maintenance of long telomeres, have been identified in several HHS patients. Here we show that RTEL1 is required for the export and the correct cytoplasmic trafficking of the small nuclear (sn) RNA pre-U2, a component of the major spliceosome complex. RTEL1-HHS cells show abnormal subcellular partitioning of pre-U2, defects in the recycling of ribonucleotide proteins (RNP) in the cytoplasm and splicing defects. While most of these phenotypes can be suppressed by re-expressing the wild-type protein in RTEL1-HHS cells, expression of RTEL1 mutated variants in immortalized cells provokes cytoplasmic mislocalizations of pre-U2 and other RNP components, as well as splicing defects, thus phenocopying RTEL1-HHS cellular defects. Strikingly, expression of a cytoplasmic form of RTEL1 is sufficient to correct RNP mislocalizations both in RTEL1-HHS cells and in cells expressing nuclear mutated forms of RTEL1. This work unravels completely unanticipated roles for RTEL1 in RNP trafficking and strongly suggests that defects in RNP biogenesis pathways contribute to the pathology of HHS. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. The Cytoplasmic Domain of MUC1 Induces Hyperplasia in the Mammary Gland and Correlates with Nuclear Accumulation of β-Catenin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Yi, Haiying; Yao, Yixin; Liao, Xiaodong; Xie, Yiqun; Yang, Jie; Yan, Zheng; Wang, Long; Lu, Shunyuan; Kuang, Ying; Gu, Mingmin; Fei, Jian; Wang, Zhugang; Huang, Lei

    2011-01-01

    MUC1 is an oncoprotein that is overexpressed in up to 90% of breast carcinomas. A previous in vitro study by our group demonstrated that the cytoplasmic domain of MUC1 (MUC1-CD), the minimal functional unit of MUC1, contributes to the malignant phenotype in cells by binding directly to β-catenin and protecting β-catenin from GSK3β-induced degradation. To understand the in vivo role of MUC1-CD in breast development, we generated a MUC1-CD transgenic mouse model under the control of the MMTV promoter in a C57BL/6J background, which is more resistant to breast tumor. We show that the expression of MUC1-CD in luminal epithelial cells of the mammary gland induced a hyperplasia phenotype characterized by the development of hyper-branching and extensive lobuloalveoli in transgenic mice. In addition to this hyperplasia, there was a marked increase in cellular proliferation in the mouse mammary gland. We further show that MUC1-CD induces nuclear localization of β-catenin, which is associated with a significant increase of β-catenin activity, as shown by the elevated expression of cyclin D1 and c-Myc in MMTV-MUC1-CD mice. Consistent with this finding, we observed that overexpression of MUC1-C is associated with β-catenin nuclear localization in tumor tissues and increased expression of Cyclin D1 and c-Myc in breast carcinoma specimens. Collectively, our data indicate a critical role for MUC1-CD in the development of mammary gland preneoplasia and tumorigenesis, suggesting MUC1-CD as a potential target for the diagnosis and chemoprevention of human breast cancer. PMID:21533058

  1. The cytoplasmic domain of MUC1 induces hyperplasia in the mammary gland and correlates with nuclear accumulation of β-catenin.

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    Yuan Li

    Full Text Available MUC1 is an oncoprotein that is overexpressed in up to 90% of breast carcinomas. A previous in vitro study by our group demonstrated that the cytoplasmic domain of MUC1 (MUC1-CD, the minimal functional unit of MUC1, contributes to the malignant phenotype in cells by binding directly to β-catenin and protecting β-catenin from GSK3β-induced degradation. To understand the in vivo role of MUC1-CD in breast development, we generated a MUC1-CD transgenic mouse model under the control of the MMTV promoter in a C57BL/6J background, which is more resistant to breast tumor. We show that the expression of MUC1-CD in luminal epithelial cells of the mammary gland induced a hyperplasia phenotype characterized by the development of hyper-branching and extensive lobuloalveoli in transgenic mice. In addition to this hyperplasia, there was a marked increase in cellular proliferation in the mouse mammary gland. We further show that MUC1-CD induces nuclear localization of β-catenin, which is associated with a significant increase of β-catenin activity, as shown by the elevated expression of cyclin D1 and c-Myc in MMTV-MUC1-CD mice. Consistent with this finding, we observed that overexpression of MUC1-C is associated with β-catenin nuclear localization in tumor tissues and increased expression of Cyclin D1 and c-Myc in breast carcinoma specimens. Collectively, our data indicate a critical role for MUC1-CD in the development of mammary gland preneoplasia and tumorigenesis, suggesting MUC1-CD as a potential target for the diagnosis and chemoprevention of human breast cancer.

  2. TWEAK-independent Fn14 self-association and NF-κB activation is mediated by the C-terminal region of the Fn14 cytoplasmic domain.

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    Sharron A N Brown

    Full Text Available The tumor necrosis factor (TNF superfamily member TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK is a pro-inflammatory and pro-angiogenic cytokine implicated in physiological tissue regeneration and wound repair. TWEAK binds to a 102-amino acid type I transmembrane cell surface receptor named fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14. TWEAK:Fn14 engagement activates several intracellular signaling cascades, including the NF-κB pathway, and sustained Fn14 signaling has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. Although several groups are developing TWEAK- or Fn14-targeted agents for therapeutic use, much more basic science research is required before we fully understand the TWEAK/Fn14 signaling axis. For example, we and others have proposed that TWEAK-independent Fn14 signaling may occur in cells when Fn14 levels are highly elevated, but this idea has never been tested directly. In this report, we first demonstrate TWEAK-independent Fn14 signaling by showing that an Fn14 deletion mutant that is unable to bind TWEAK can activate the NF-κB pathway in transfected cells. We then show that ectopically-expressed, cell surface-localized Fn14 can self-associate into Fn14 dimers, and we show that Fn14 self-association is mediated by an 18-aa region within the Fn14 cytoplasmic domain. Endogenously-expressed Fn14 as well as ectopically-overexpressed Fn14 could also be detected in dimeric form when cell lysates were subjected to SDS-PAGE under non-reducing conditions. Additional experiments revealed that Fn14 dimerization occurs during cell lysis via formation of an intermolecular disulfide bond at cysteine residue 122. These findings provide insight into the Fn14 signaling mechanism and may aid current studies to develop therapeutic agents targeting this small cell surface receptor.

  3. Cytoplasmic localization of Hug1p, a negative regulator of the MEC1 pathway, coincides with the compartmentalization of Rnr2p–Rnr4p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ainsworth, William B. [Cain Department of Chemical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Hughes, Bridget Todd; Au, Wei Chun; Sakelaris, Sally [Genetics Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Kerscher, Oliver [Biology Department, The College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23185 (United States); Benton, Michael G., E-mail: benton@lsu.edu [Cain Department of Chemical Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Basrai, Munira A., E-mail: basraim@mail.nih.gov [Genetics Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Hug1p overexpression sensitizes wild-type cells to DNA damage and hydroxyurea (HU). •Expression of Hug1p in response to HU treatment is delayed relative to Rnr3p. •MEC1 pathway genes are required for cytoplasmic localization of Hug1p. •Hug1p subcellular compartmentalization to the cytoplasm coincides with Rnr2p–Rnr4p. -- Abstract: The evolutionarily conserved MEC1 checkpoint pathway mediates cell cycle arrest and induction of genes including the RNR (Ribonucleotide reductase) genes and HUG1 (Hydroxyurea, ultraviolet, and gamma radiation) in response to DNA damage and replication arrest. Rnr complex activity is in part controlled by cytoplasmic localization of the Rnr2p–Rnr4p subunits and inactivation of negative regulators Sml1p and Dif1p upon DNA damage and hydroxyurea (HU) treatment. We previously showed that a deletion of HUG1 rescues lethality of mec1Δ and suppresses dun1Δ strains. In this study, multiple approaches demonstrate the regulatory response of Hug1p to DNA damage and HU treatment and support its role as a negative effector of the MEC1 pathway. Consistent with our hypothesis, wild-type cells are sensitive to DNA damage and HU when HUG1 is overexpressed. A Hug1 polyclonal antiserum reveals that HUG1 encodes a protein in budding yeast and its MEC1-dependent expression is delayed compared to the rapid induction of Rnr3p in response to HU treatment. Cell biology and subcellular fractionation experiments show localization of Hug1p-GFP to the cytoplasm upon HU treatment. The cytoplasmic localization of Hug1p-GFP is dependent on MEC1 pathway genes and coincides with the cytoplasmic localization of Rnr2p–Rnr4p. Taken together, the genetic interactions, gene expression, and localization studies support a novel role for Hug1p as a negative regulator of the MEC1 checkpoint response through its compartmentalization with Rnr2p–Rnr4p.

  4. Prolyl hydroxylase domain enzymes: important regulators of cancer metabolism

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    Yang M

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ming Yang,1 Huizhong Su,1 Tomoyoshi Soga,2 Kamil R Kranc,3 Patrick J Pollard1 1Cancer Biology and Metabolism Group, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; 2Institute for Advanced Biosciences, Keio University, Mizukami, Tsuruoka, Yamagata, Japan; 3MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK Abstract: The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF prolyl hydroxylase domain enzymes (PHDs regulate the stability of HIF protein by post-translational hydroxylation of two conserved prolyl residues in its α subunit in an oxygen-dependent manner. Trans-4-prolyl hydroxylation of HIFα under normal oxygen (O2 availability enables its association with the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL tumor suppressor pVHL E3 ligase complex, leading to the degradation of HIFα via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Due to the obligatory requirement of molecular O2 as a co-substrate, the activity of PHDs is inhibited under hypoxic conditions, resulting in stabilized HIFα, which dimerizes with HIFβ and, together with transcriptional co-activators CBP/p300, activates the transcription of its target genes. As a key molecular regulator of adaptive response to hypoxia, HIF plays important roles in multiple cellular processes and its overexpression has been detected in various cancers. The HIF1α isoform in particular has a strong impact on cellular metabolism, most notably by promoting anaerobic, whilst inhibiting O2-dependent, metabolism of glucose. The PHD enzymes also seem to have HIF-independent functions and are subject to regulation by factors other than O2, such as by metabolic status, oxidative stress, and abnormal levels of endogenous metabolites (oncometabolites that have been observed in some types of cancers. In this review, we aim to summarize current understandings of the function and regulation of PHDs in cancer with an emphasis on their roles in metabolism. Keywords: prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD

  5. Poliovirus 2A protease triggers a selective nucleo-cytoplasmic redistribution of splicing factors to regulate alternative pre-mRNA splicing.

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    Enrique Álvarez

    Full Text Available Poliovirus protease 2A (2A(pro obstructs host gene expression by reprogramming transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulatory events during infection. Here we demonstrate that expression of 2A(pro induces a selective nucleo-cytoplasm translocation of several important RNA binding proteins and splicing factors. Subcellular fractionation studies, together with immunofluorescence microscopy revealed an asymmetric distribution of HuR and TIA1/TIAR in 2A(pro expressing cells, which modulates splicing of the human Fas exon 6. Consistent with this result, knockdown of HuR or overexpression of TIA1/TIAR, leads to Fas exon 6 inclusion in 2A(pro-expressing cells. Therefore, poliovirus 2A(pro can target alternative pre-mRNA splicing by regulating protein shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm.

  6. Expression of the nuclear gene TaF(A)d is under mitochondrial retrograde regulation in anthers of male sterile wheat plants with timopheevii cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pei; Yang, Yuwen; Zhang, Zhengzhi; Chen, Weihua; Zhang, Caiqin; Zhang, Lixia; Zou, Sixiang; Ma, Zhengqiang

    2008-01-01

    Alterations of mitochondrial-encoded subunits of the F(o)F(1)-ATP synthase are frequently associated with cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) in plants; however, little is known about the relationship of the nuclear encoded subunits of this enzyme with CMS. In the present study, the full cDNA of the gene TaF(A)d that encodes the putative F(A)d subunit of the F(o)F(1)-ATP synthase was isolated from the wheat (Triticum aestivum) fertility restorer '2114' for timopheevii cytoplasm-based CMS. The deduced 238 amino acid polypeptide is highly similar to its counterparts in dicots and other monocots but has low homology to its mammalian equivalents. TaF(A)d is a single copy gene in wheat and maps to the short arm of the group 6 chromosomes. Transient expression of the TaF(A)d-GFP fusion in onion epidermal cells demonstrated TaF(A)d's mitochondrial location. TaF(A)d was expressed abundantly in stem, leaf, anther, and ovary tissues of 2114. Nevertheless, its expression was repressed in anthers of CMS plants with timopheevii cytoplasm. Genic male sterility did not affect its expression in anthers. The expression of the nuclear gene encoding the 20 kDa subunit of F(o) was down-regulated in a manner similar to TaF(A)d in the T-CMS anthers while that of genes encoding the 6 kDa subunit of F(o) and the gamma subunit of F(1) was unaffected. These observations implied that TaF(A)d is under mitochondrial retrograde regulation in the anthers of CMS plants with timopheevii cytoplasm.

  7. The Cish SH2 domain is essential for PLC-γ1 regulation in TCR stimulated CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guittard, Geoffrey; Dios-Esponera, Ana; Palmer, Douglas C; Akpan, Itoro; Barr, Valarie A; Manna, Asit; Restifo, Nicholas P; Samelson, Lawrence E

    2018-03-28

    Cish, participates within a multi-molecular E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, which ubiquitinates target proteins. It has an inhibitory effect on T cell activation mediated by PLC-γ1 regulation, and it functions as a potent checkpoint in CD8 + T cell tumor immunotherapy. To study the structural and functional relationships between Cish and PLC-γ1 during CD8 + T cell activation, we tested mutants of the Cish-SH2 (R107K) and D/BC (L222Q, C226Q) domains. We confirmed that Cish-SH2-specific binding was essential for PLC-γ1 ubiquitination and degradation. This domain was essential for the Cish-mediated inhibition of Ca 2+ release upon TCR stimulation. No effect on inhibition of cytokine release was observed with SH2 or D/BC mutants, although the absence of Cish led to an increased release of IFN-γ and TNF-α. Using imaging we showed that Cish was expressed mostly in the cytoplasm and we did not see any Cish clustering at the plasma membrane upon stimulation. We conclude that the Cish-SH2 domain is essential for PLC-γ1 regulation in TCR-stimulated CD8 + T cells.

  8. Regulation of Exocytotic Fusion Pores by SNARE Protein Transmembrane Domains

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    Zhenyong Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Calcium-triggered exocytotic release of neurotransmitters and hormones from neurons and neuroendocrine cells underlies neuronal communication, motor activity and endocrine functions. The core of the neuronal exocytotic machinery is composed of soluble N-ethyl maleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs. Formation of complexes between vesicle-attached v- and plasma-membrane anchored t-SNAREs in a highly regulated fashion brings the membranes into close apposition. Small, soluble proteins called Complexins (Cpx and calcium-sensing Synaptotagmins cooperate to block fusion at low resting calcium concentrations, but trigger release upon calcium increase. A growing body of evidence suggests that the transmembrane domains (TMDs of SNARE proteins play important roles in regulating the processes of fusion and release, but the mechanisms involved are only starting to be uncovered. Here we review recent evidence that SNARE TMDs exert influence by regulating the dynamics of the fusion pore, the initial aqueous connection between the vesicular lumen and the extracellular space. Even after the fusion pore is established, hormone release by neuroendocrine cells is tightly controlled, and the same may be true of neurotransmitter release by neurons. The dynamics of the fusion pore can regulate the kinetics of cargo release and the net amount released, and can determine the mode of vesicle recycling. Manipulations of SNARE TMDs were found to affect fusion pore properties profoundly, both during exocytosis and in biochemical reconstitutions. To explain these effects, TMD flexibility, and interactions among TMDs or between TMDs and lipids have been invoked. Exocytosis has provided the best setting in which to unravel the underlying mechanisms, being unique among membrane fusion reactions in that single fusion pores can be probed using high-resolution methods. An important role will likely be played by methods that can probe single fusion pores

  9. Nuclear translocation and regulation of intranuclear distribution of cytoplasmic poly(A-binding protein are distinct processes mediated by two Epstein Barr virus proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Park

    Full Text Available Many viruses target cytoplasmic polyA binding protein (PABPC to effect widespread inhibition of host gene expression, a process termed viral host-shutoff (vhs. During lytic replication of Epstein Barr Virus (EBV we observed that PABPC was efficiently translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Translocated PABPC was diffusely distributed but was excluded from viral replication compartments. Vhs during EBV infection is regulated by the viral alkaline nuclease, BGLF5. Transfection of BGLF5 alone into BGLF5-KO cells or uninfected 293 cells promoted translocation of PAPBC that was distributed in clumps in the nucleus. ZEBRA, a viral bZIP protein, performs essential functions in the lytic program of EBV, including activation or repression of downstream viral genes. ZEBRA is also an essential replication protein that binds to viral oriLyt and interacts with other viral replication proteins. We report that ZEBRA also functions as a regulator of vhs. ZEBRA translocated PABPC to the nucleus, controlled the intranuclear distribution of PABPC, and caused global shutoff of host gene expression. Transfection of ZEBRA alone into 293 cells caused nuclear translocation of PABPC in the majority of cells in which ZEBRA was expressed. Co-transfection of ZEBRA with BGLF5 into BGLF5-KO cells or uninfected 293 cells rescued the diffuse intranuclear pattern of PABPC seen during lytic replication. ZEBRA mutants defective for DNA-binding were capable of regulating the intranuclear distribution of PABPC, and caused PABPC to co-localize with ZEBRA. One ZEBRA mutant, Z(S186E, was deficient in translocation yet was capable of altering the intranuclear distribution of PABPC. Therefore ZEBRA-mediated nuclear translocation of PABPC and regulation of intranuclear PABPC distribution are distinct events. Using a click chemistry-based assay for new protein synthesis, we show that ZEBRA and BGLF5 each function as viral host shutoff factors.

  10. Identification of adaptive mutations in the influenza A virus non-structural 1 gene that increase cytoplasmic localization and differentially regulate host gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Forbes

    Full Text Available The NS1 protein of influenza A virus (IAV is a multifunctional virulence factor. We have previously characterized gain-of-function mutations in the NS1 protein arising from the experimental adaptation of the human isolate A/Hong Kong/1/1968(H3N2 (HK to the mouse. The majority of these mouse adapted NS1 mutations were demonstrated to increase virulence, viral fitness, and interferon antagonism, but differ in binding to the post-transcriptional processing factor cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor 30 (CPSF30. Because nuclear trafficking is a major genetic determinant of influenza virus host adaptation, we assessed subcellular localization and host gene expression of NS1 adaptive mutations. Recombinant HK viruses with adaptive mutations in the NS1 gene were assessed for NS1 protein subcellular localization in mouse and human cells using confocal microscopy and cellular fractionation. In human cells the HK wild-type (HK-wt virus NS1 protein partitioned equivalently between the cytoplasm and nucleus but was defective in cytoplasmic localization in mouse cells. Several adaptive mutations increased the proportion of NS1 in the cytoplasm of mouse cells with the greatest effects for mutations M106I and D125G. The host gene expression profile of the adaptive mutants was determined by microarray analysis of infected mouse cells to show either high or low extents of host-gene regulation (HGR or LGR phenotypes. While host genes were predominantly down regulated for the HGR group of mutants (D2N, V23A, F103L, M106I+L98S, L98S, M106V, and M106V+M124I, the LGR phenotype mutants (D125G, M106I, V180A, V226I, and R227K were characterized by a predominant up regulation of host genes. CPSF30 binding affinity of NS1 mutants did not predict effects on host gene expression. To our knowledge this is the first report of roles of adaptive NS1 mutations that impact intracellular localization and regulation of host gene expression.

  11. A fraction of Crm1 locates at centrosomes by its CRIME domain and regulates the centrosomal localization of pericentrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Qinying; Jiang, Qing; Zhang, Chuanmao

    2009-01-01

    Crm1 plays a role in exporting proteins containing nuclear export signals (NESs) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Some proteins that are capable of interacting with Ran/Crm1 were reported to be localized at centrosomes and to function as centrosome checkpoints. But it remains unclear how Crm1 locates at centrosomes. In this study, we found that a fraction of Crm1 is located at centrosomes through its N-terminal CRM1, importin β etc. (CRIME) domain, which is responsible for interacting with RanGTP, suggesting that Crm1 might target to centrosomes through binding centrosomal RanGTP. Moreover, overexpression of the CRIME domain, which is free of NES binding domain, resulted in the dissociation of pericentrin and γ-tubulin complex from centrosomes and the disruption of microtubule nucleation. Deficiency of Crm1 provoked by RNAi also decreased the spindle poles localization of pericentrin and γ-tubulin complex, coupled with mitotic defects. Since pericentrin was sensitive to Crm1 specific inhibitor leptomycin B, we propose that the centrosomal Crm1 might interact with pericentrin and regulate the localization and function of pericentrin at centrosomes.

  12. Androgen receptor regulates nuclear trafficking and nuclear domain residency of corepressor HDAC7 in a ligand-dependent fashion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karvonen, Ulla; Jaenne, Olli A.; Palvimo, Jorma J.

    2006-01-01

    In addition to chromosomal proteins, histone deacetylases (HDACs) target transcription factors in transcriptional repression. Here, we show that the class II HDAC family member HDAC7 is an efficient corepressor of the androgen receptor (AR). HDAC7 resided in the cytoplasm in the absence of AR or a cognate ligand, but hormone-occupancy of AR induced nuclear transfer of HDAC7. Nuclear colocalization pattern of AR and HDAC7 was dependent on the nature of the ligand. In the presence of testosterone, a portion of HDAC7 localized to pearl-like nuclear domains, whereas AR occupied with antagonistic ligands cyproterone acetate- or casodex (bicalutamide) recruited HDAC7 from these domains to colocalize with the receptor in speckles and nucleoplasm in a more complete fashion. Ectopic expression of PML-3 relieved the repressive effect of HDAC7 on AR function by sequestering HDAC7 to PML-3 domains. AR acetylation at Lys630/632/633 was not the target of HDAC7 repression, since repression of AR function was independent of these acetylation sites. Moreover, the deacetylase activity of HDAC7 was in part dispensable in the repression of AR function. In sum, our results identify HDAC7 as a novel AR corepressor whose subcellular and subnuclear compartmentalization can be regulated in an androgen-selective manner

  13. Cytoplasmic protein binding to highly conserved sequences in the 3' untranslated region of mouse protamine 2 mRNA, a translationally regulated transcript of male germ cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Y.K.; Hecht, N.B.

    1991-01-01

    The expression of the protamines, the predominant nuclear proteins of mammalian spermatozoa, is regulated translationally during male germ-cell development. The 3' untranslated region (UTR) of protamine 1 mRNA has been reported to control its time of translation. To understand the mechanisms controlling translation of the protamine mRNAs, we have sought to identify cis elements of the 3' UTR of protamine 2 mRNA that are recognized by cytoplasmic factors. From gel retardation assays, two sequence elements are shown to form specific RNA-protein complexes. Protein binding sites of the two complexes were determined by RNase T1 mapping, by blocking the putative binding sites with antisense oligonucleotides, and by competition assays. The sequences of these elements, located between nucleotides + 537 and + 572 in protamine 2 mRNA, are highly conserved among postmeiotic translationally regulated nuclear proteins of the mammalian testis. Two closely linked protein binding sites were detected. UV-crosslinking studies revealed that a protein of about 18 kDa binds to one of the conserved sequences. These data demonstrate specific protein binding to a highly conserved 3' UTR of translationally regulated testicular mRNA

  14. The brain cytoplasmic RNA BC1 regulates dopamine D-2 receptor-mediated transmission in the striatum

    OpenAIRE

    Centonze, Diego; Rossi, Silvia; Napoli, Ilaria; Mercaldo, Valentina; Lacoux, Caroline; Ferrari, Francesca; Ciotti, Maria Teresa; De Chiara, Valentina; Prosperetti, Chiara; Maccarrone, Mauro; Fezza, Filomena; Calabresi, Paolo; Bernardi, Giorgio; Bagni, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    Dopamine D-2 receptor (D2DR)-mediated transmission in the striatum is remarkably flexible, and changes in its efficacy have been heavily implicated in a variety of physiological and pathological conditions. Although receptor-associated proteins are clearly involved in specific forms of synaptic plasticity, the molecular mechanisms regulating the sensitivity of D-2 receptors in this brain area are essentially obscure. We have studied the physiological responses of the D2DR stimulations in mice...

  15. Comparison of structure, function and regulation of plant cold shock domain proteins to bacterial and animal cold shock domain proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikam, Vijay; Karlson, Dale T

    2010-01-01

    The cold shock domain (CSD) is among the most ancient and well conserved nucleic acid binding domains from bacteria to higher animals and plants. The CSD facilitates binding to RNA, ssDNA and dsDNA and most functions attributed to cold shock domain proteins are mediated by this nucleic acid binding activity. In prokaryotes, cold shock domain proteins only contain a single CSD and are termed cold shock proteins (Csps). In animal model systems, various auxiliary domains are present in addition to the CSD and are commonly named Y-box proteins. Similar to animal CSPs, plant CSPs contain auxiliary C-terminal domains in addition to their N-terminal CSD. Cold shock domain proteins have been shown to play important roles in development and stress adaptation in wide variety of organisms. In this review, the structure, function and regulation of plant CSPs are compared and contrasted to the characteristics of bacterial and animal CSPs. [BMB reports 2010; 43(1): 1-8].

  16. Oxidised LDL internalisation by the LOX-1 scavenger receptor is dependent on a novel cytoplasmic motif and is regulated by dynamin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jane E; Vohra, Ravinder S; Dunn, Sarah; Holloway, Zoe G; Monaco, Anthony P; Homer-Vanniasinkam, Shervanthi; Walker, John H; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2008-07-01

    The LOX-1 scavenger receptor recognises pro-atherogenic oxidised low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) particles and is implicated in atherosclerotic plaque formation, but this mechanism is not well understood. Here we show evidence for a novel clathrin-independent and cytosolic-signal-dependent pathway that regulates LOX-1-mediated OxLDL internalisation. Cell surface labelling in the absence or presence of OxLDL ligand showed that LOX-1 is constitutively internalised from the plasma membrane and its half-life is not altered upon ligand binding and trafficking. We show that LOX-1-mediated OxLDL uptake is disrupted by overexpression of dominant-negative dynamin-2 but unaffected by CHC17 or mu2 (AP2) depletion. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed a conserved and novel cytoplasmic tripeptide motif (DDL) that regulates LOX-1-mediated endocytosis of OxLDL. Taken together, these findings indicate that LOX-1 is internalised by a clathrin-independent and dynamin-2-dependent pathway and is thus likely to mediate OxLDL trafficking in vascular tissues.

  17. α6-Integrin alternative splicing: distinct cytoplasmic variants in stem cell fate specification and niche interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zijing; Qu, Jing; He, Li; Peng, Hong; Chen, Ping; Zhou, Yong

    2018-05-02

    α6-Integrin subunit (also known as CD49f) is a stemness signature that has been found on the plasma membrane of more than 30 stem cell populations. A growing body of studies have focused on the critical role of α6-containing integrins (α6β1 and α6β4) in the regulation of stem cell properties, lineage-specific differentiation, and niche interaction. α6-Integrin subunit can be alternatively spliced at the post-transcriptional level, giving rise to divergent isoforms which differ in the cytoplasmic and/or extracellular domains. The cytoplasmic domain of integrins is an important functional part of integrin-mediated signals. Structural changes in the cytoplasmic domain of α6 provide an efficient means for the regulation of stem cell responses to biochemical stimuli and/or biophysical cues in the stem cell niche, thus impacting stem cell fate determination. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the structural variants of the α6-integrin subunit and spatiotemporal expression of α6 cytoplasmic variants in embryonic and adult stem/progenitor cells. We highlight the roles of α6 cytoplasmic variants in stem cell fate decision and niche interaction, and discuss the potential mechanisms involved. Understanding of the distinct functions of α6 splicing variants in stem cell biology may inform the rational design of novel stem cell-based therapies for a range of human diseases.

  18. Legal Challenges Related to the Regulation of a Domain Name System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Kalinauskas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—to review and analyse the problematic aspects related to domain name allocation and further usage processes, highlighting legal regulation of a domain name system.Design/methodology/approach—based on the comparison analysis of scientific literature, authors discuss problematic issues related to the legal regulation of domain name allocation and usage processes, analyse practical approaches and collision cases in the context of a domain name system. The authors examine the positive and negative aspects of a domain naming system and conflicting regulatory specifics. This paper describes the development of institutional bodies responsible for DNS management, supervision approaches and inner functionality policies.Findings—the authors examine domain naming system models and dispute resolution mechanisms, their evolution in the context of Internet development and the structural changes of the Internet governance institutions. The authors analyse tendencies related to DNS regulation and the possible effect of new regulation models in practice, while reflecting interests of stakeholders in the subject field.Research limitations/implications—agreements on the registration of domain names are based on self-regulation principles. A number of different interests may collide when speaking about domain name registration or usage and this issue becomes a major challenge to scientists and lawyers who are seeking an optimal domain-naming regulatory mechanism. The article does not address trademark conflicts within domain names in this respect. This should be considered as an object for separate study, which requires deeper analysis.Practical implications—the authors review key aspects of the domain name system and describe tendencies for the regulatory models.Value—the article emphasizes potential domain naming conflicts and disputes concerning the usage of common terms and phrases in order to manipulate information for illicit purposes. The

  19. Legal Challenges Related to the Regulation of a Domain Name System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Kalinauskas

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—to review and analyse the problematic aspects related to domain name allocation and further usage processes, highlighting legal regulation of a domain name system. Design/methodology/approach—based on the comparison analysis of scientific literature, authors discuss problematic issues related to the legal regulation of domain name allocation and usage processes, analyse practical approaches and collision cases in the context of a domain name system. The authors examine the positive and negative aspects of a domain naming system and conflicting regulatory specifics. This paper describes the development of institutional bodies responsible for DNS management, supervision approaches and inner functionality policies. Findings—the authors examine domain naming system models and dispute resolution mechanisms, their evolution in the context of Internet development and the structural changes of the Internet governance institutions. The authors analyse tendencies related to DNS regulation and the possible effect of new regulation models in practice, while reflecting interests of stakeholders in the subject field. Research limitations/implications—agreements on the registration of domain names are based on self-regulation principles. A number of different interests may collide when speaking about domain name registration or usage and this issue becomes a major challenge to scientists and lawyers who are seeking an optimal domain-naming regulatory mechanism. The article does not address trademark conflicts within domain names in this respect. This should be considered as an object for separate study, which requires deeper analysis. Practical implications—the authors review key aspects of the domain name system and describe tendencies for the regulatory models. Value—the article emphasizes potential domain naming conflicts and disputes concerning the usage of common terms and phrases in order to manipulate information for illicit purposes

  20. The PH domain of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 exhibits a novel, phospho-regulated monomer-dimer equilibrium with important implications for kinase domain activation: single-molecule and ensemble studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Brian P; Pilling, Carissa; Calleja, Véronique; Larijani, Banafshé; Falke, Joseph J

    2013-07-16

    deeper insertion of the protein into the viscous bilayer, thereby increasing the diffusional friction. Ensemble measurements of PH domain affinity for PIP3 on plasma membrane-like bilayers reveal that the dimeric WT PH domain possesses a one order of magnitude higher target membrane affinity than the previously characterized monomeric PH domains, consistent with a dimerization-triggered, allosterically enhanced affinity for one PIP3 molecule (a much larger affinity enhancement would be expected for dimerization-triggered binding to two PIP3 molecules). The monomeric T513E PDK1 PH domain, like other monomeric PH domains, exhibits a PIP3 affinity and bound state lifetime that are each 1 order of magnitude lower than those of the dimeric WT PH domain, which is predicted to facilitate release of activated, monomeric PDK1 to the cytoplasm. Overall, the study yields the first molecular picture of PH domain regulation via electrostatic control of dimer-monomer conversion.

  1. ATP binding to p97/VCP D1 domain regulates selective recruitment of adaptors to its proximal N-domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sheng Chia

    Full Text Available p97/Valosin-containing protein (VCP is a member of the AAA-ATPase family involved in many cellular processes including cell division, intracellular trafficking and extraction of misfolded proteins in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD. It is a homohexamer with each subunit containing two tandem D1 and D2 ATPase domains and N- and C-terminal regions that function as adaptor protein binding domains. p97/VCP is directed to its many different functional pathways by associating with various adaptor proteins. The regulation of the recruitment of the adaptor proteins remains unclear. Two adaptor proteins, Ufd1/Npl4 and p47, which bind exclusively to the p97/VCP N-domain and direct p97/VCP to either ERAD-related processes or homotypic fusion of Golgi fragments, were studied here. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor-based assays allowed the study of binding kinetics in real time. In competition experiments, it was observed that in the presence of ATP, Ufd1/Npl4 was able to compete more effectively with p47 for binding to p97/VCP. By using non-hydrolysable ATP analogues and the hexameric truncated p97/N-D1 fragment, it was shown that binding rather than hydrolysis of ATP to the proximal D1 domain strengthened the Ufd1/Npl4 association with the N-domain, thus regulating the recruitment of either Ufd1/Npl4 or p47. This novel role of ATP and an assigned function to the D1 AAA-ATPase domain link the multiple functions of p97/VCP to the metabolic status of the cell.

  2. ATP binding to p97/VCP D1 domain regulates selective recruitment of adaptors to its proximal N-domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chia, Wei Sheng; Chia, Diana Xueqi; Rao, Feng; Bar Nun, Shoshana; Geifman Shochat, Susana

    2012-01-01

    p97/Valosin-containing protein (VCP) is a member of the AAA-ATPase family involved in many cellular processes including cell division, intracellular trafficking and extraction of misfolded proteins in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD). It is a homohexamer with each subunit containing two tandem D1 and D2 ATPase domains and N- and C-terminal regions that function as adaptor protein binding domains. p97/VCP is directed to its many different functional pathways by associating with various adaptor proteins. The regulation of the recruitment of the adaptor proteins remains unclear. Two adaptor proteins, Ufd1/Npl4 and p47, which bind exclusively to the p97/VCP N-domain and direct p97/VCP to either ERAD-related processes or homotypic fusion of Golgi fragments, were studied here. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor-based assays allowed the study of binding kinetics in real time. In competition experiments, it was observed that in the presence of ATP, Ufd1/Npl4 was able to compete more effectively with p47 for binding to p97/VCP. By using non-hydrolysable ATP analogues and the hexameric truncated p97/N-D1 fragment, it was shown that binding rather than hydrolysis of ATP to the proximal D1 domain strengthened the Ufd1/Npl4 association with the N-domain, thus regulating the recruitment of either Ufd1/Npl4 or p47. This novel role of ATP and an assigned function to the D1 AAA-ATPase domain link the multiple functions of p97/VCP to the metabolic status of the cell.

  3. BET domain co-regulators in obesity, inflammation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkina, Anna C; Denis, Gerald V

    2012-06-22

    The bromodomain is a highly conserved motif of 110 amino acids that is bundled into four anti-parallel α-helices and found in proteins that interact with chromatin, such as transcription factors, histone acetylases and nucleosome remodelling complexes. Bromodomain proteins are chromatin 'readers'; they recruit chromatin-regulating enzymes, including 'writers' and 'erasers' of histone modification, to target promoters and to regulate gene expression. Conventional wisdom held that complexes involved in chromatin dynamics are not 'druggable' targets. However, small molecules that inhibit bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) proteins have been described. We examine these developments and discuss the implications for small molecule epigenetic targeting of chromatin networks in cancer.

  4. Acidic pH sensing in the bacterial cytoplasm is required for Salmonella virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jeongjoon; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2016-09-01

    pH regulates gene expression, biochemical activities and cellular behaviors. A mildly acidic pH activates the master virulence regulatory system PhoP/PhoQ in the facultative intracellular pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. The sensor PhoQ harbors an extracytoplasmic domain implicated in signal sensing, and a cytoplasmic domain controlling activation of the regulator PhoP. We now report that, surprisingly, a decrease in Salmonella's own cytoplasmic pH induces transcription of PhoP-activated genes even when the extracytoplasmic pH remains neutral. Amino acid substitutions in PhoQ's cytoplasmic domain hindered activation by acidic pH and attenuated virulence in mice, but did not abolish activation by low Mg(2+) or the antimicrobial peptide C18G. Conversely, removal of PhoQ's extracytoplasmic domains prevented the response to the latter PhoQ-activating signals but not to acidic pH. PhoP-dependent genes were minimally induced by acidic pH in the non-pathogenic species Salmonella bongori but were activated by low Mg(2+) and C18G as in pathogenic S. enterica. Our findings indicate that the sensor PhoQ enables S. enterica to respond to both host- and bacterial-derived signals that alter its cytoplasmic pH. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. The Caenorhabditis elegans iodotyrosine deiodinase ortholog SUP-18 functions through a conserved channel SC-box to regulate the muscle two-pore domain potassium channel SUP-9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Perez de la Cruz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans gene sup-18 suppress the defects in muscle contraction conferred by a gain-of-function mutation in SUP-10, a presumptive regulatory subunit of the SUP-9 two-pore domain K(+ channel associated with muscle membranes. We cloned sup-18 and found that it encodes the C. elegans ortholog of mammalian iodotyrosine deiodinase (IYD, an NADH oxidase/flavin reductase that functions in iodine recycling and is important for the biosynthesis of thyroid hormones that regulate metabolism. The FMN-binding site of mammalian IYD is conserved in SUP-18, which appears to require catalytic activity to function. Genetic analyses suggest that SUP-10 can function with SUP-18 to activate SUP-9 through a pathway that is independent of the presumptive SUP-9 regulatory subunit UNC-93. We identified a novel evolutionarily conserved serine-cysteine-rich region in the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of SUP-9 required for its specific activation by SUP-10 and SUP-18 but not by UNC-93. Since two-pore domain K(+ channels regulate the resting membrane potentials of numerous cell types, we suggest that the SUP-18 IYD regulates the activity of the SUP-9 channel using NADH as a coenzyme and thus couples the metabolic state of muscle cells to muscle membrane excitability.

  6. Distinct functional domains within the acidic cluster of tegument protein pp28 required for trafficking and cytoplasmic envelopment of human cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jun-Young; Jeon, Hyejin; Hong, Sookyung; Britt, William J

    2016-10-01

    Human cytomegalovirus UL99-encoded tegument protein pp28 contains a 16 aa acidic cluster that is required for pp28 trafficking to the assembly compartment (AC) and the virus assembly. However, functional signals within the acidic cluster of pp28 remain undefined. Here, we demonstrated that an acidic cluster rather than specific sorting signals was required for trafficking to the AC. Recombinant viruses with chimeric pp28 proteins expressing non-native acidic clusters exhibited delayed viral growth kinetics and decreased production of infectious virus, indicating that the native acidic cluster of pp28 was essential for wild-type virus assembly. These results suggested that the acidic cluster of pp28 has distinct functional domains required for trafficking and for efficient virus assembly. The first half (aa 44-50) of the acidic cluster was sufficient for pp28 trafficking, whereas the native acidic cluster consisting of aa 51-59 was required for the assembly of wild-type levels of infectious virus.

  7. Autoantibodies in Serum of Systemic Scleroderma Patients: Peptide-Based Epitope Mapping Indicates Increased Binding to Cytoplasmic Domains of CXCR3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Recke

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Systemic sclerosis (SSc is a severe chronic autoimmune disease with high morbidity and mortality. Sera of patients with SSc contain a large variety of autoantibody (aab reactivities. Among these are functionally active aab that bind to G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR such as C-X-C motif chemokine receptor 3 (CXCR3 and 4 (CXCR4. Aab binding to the N-terminal portion of these two GPCRs have been shown to be associated with slower disease progression in SSc, especially deterioration of lung function. Aabs binding to GPCRs exhibit functional activities by stimulating or inhibiting GPCR signaling. The specific functional activity of aabs crucially depends on the epitopes they bind to. To identify the location of important epitopes on CXCR3 recognized by aabs from SSc patients, we applied an array of 36 overlapping 18-20mer peptides covering the entire CXCR3 sequence, comparing epitope specificity of SSc patient sera (N = 32, with positive reactivity with CXCR3 to healthy controls (N = 30. Binding of SSc patient and control sera to these peptides was determined by ELISA. Using a Bayesian model approach, we found increased binding of SSc patient sera to peptides corresponding to intracellular epitopes within CXCR3, while the binding signal to extracellular portions of CXCR3 was found to be reduced. Experimentally determined epitopes showed a good correspondence to those predicted by the ABCpred tool. To verify these results and to translate them into a novel diagnostic ELISA, we combined the peptides that represent SSc-associated epitopes into a single ELISA and evaluated its potential to discriminate SSc patients (N = 31 from normal healthy controls (N = 47. This ELISA had a sensitivity of 0.61 and a specificity of 0.85. Our data reveals that SSc sera preferentially bind intracellular epitopes of CXCR3, while an extracellular epitope in the N-terminal domain that appears to be target of aabs in healthy individuals is not bound by SSc

  8. The BEACH Domain Protein SPIRRIG Is Essential for Arabidopsis Salt Stress Tolerance and Functions as a Regulator of Transcript Stabilization and Localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Steffens

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Members of the highly conserved class of BEACH domain containing proteins (BDCPs have been established as broad facilitators of protein-protein interactions and membrane dynamics in the context of human diseases like albinism, bleeding diathesis, impaired cellular immunity, cancer predisposition, and neurological dysfunctions. Also, the Arabidopsis thaliana BDCP SPIRRIG (SPI is important for membrane integrity, as spi mutants exhibit split vacuoles. In this work, we report a novel molecular function of the BDCP SPI in ribonucleoprotein particle formation. We show that SPI interacts with the P-body core component DECAPPING PROTEIN 1 (DCP1, associates to mRNA processing bodies (P-bodies, and regulates their assembly upon salt stress. The finding that spi mutants exhibit salt hypersensitivity suggests that the local function of SPI at P-bodies is of biological relevance. Transcriptome-wide analysis revealed qualitative differences in the salt stress-regulated transcriptional response of Col-0 and spi. We show that SPI regulates the salt stress-dependent post-transcriptional stabilization, cytoplasmic agglomeration, and localization to P-bodies of a subset of salt stress-regulated mRNAs. Finally, we show that the PH-BEACH domains of SPI and its human homolog FAN (Factor Associated with Neutral sphingomyelinase activation interact with DCP1 isoforms from plants, mammals, and yeast, suggesting the evolutionary conservation of an association of BDCPs and P-bodies.

  9. Proteins with GGDEF and EAL domains regulate Pseudomonas putida biofilm formation and dispersal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjermansen, Morten; Ragas, Paula Cornelia; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2006-01-01

    Microbial biofilm formation often causes problems in medical and industrial settings, and knowledge about the factors that are involved in biofilm development and dispersion is useful for creating strategies to control the processes. In this report, we present evidence that proteins with GGDEF...... and EAL domains are involved in the regulation of biofilm formation and biofilm dispersion in Pseudomonas putida. Overexpression in P. putida of the Escherichia coli YedQ protein, which contains a GGDEF domain, resulted in increased biofilm formation. Overexpression in P. putida of the E. coli Yhj......H protein, which contains an EAL domain, strongly inhibited biofilm formation. Induction of YhjH expression in P. putida cells situated in established biofilms led to rapid dispersion of the biofilms. These results support the emerging theme that GGDEF-domain and EAL-domain proteins are involved...

  10. SH2 domains: modulators of nonreceptor tyrosine kinase activity

    OpenAIRE

    Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Müller, Susanne; Knapp, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The Src homology 2 (SH2) domain is a sequence-specific phosphotyrosine-binding module present in many signaling molecules. In cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases, the SH2 domain is located N-terminally to the catalytic kinase domain (SH1) where it mediates cellular localization, substrate recruitment, and regulation of kinase activity. Initially, structural studies established a role of the SH2 domain stabilizing the inactive state of Src family members. However, biochemical characterization showed ...

  11. A generalized allosteric mechanism for cis-regulated cyclic nucleotide binding domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandr P Kornev

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotides (cAMP and cGMP regulate multiple intracellular processes and are thus of a great general interest for molecular and structural biologists. To study the allosteric mechanism of different cyclic nucleotide binding (CNB domains, we compared cAMP-bound and cAMP-free structures (PKA, Epac, and two ionic channels using a new bioinformatics method: local spatial pattern alignment. Our analysis highlights four major conserved structural motifs: 1 the phosphate binding cassette (PBC, which binds the cAMP ribose-phosphate, 2 the "hinge," a flexible helix, which contacts the PBC, 3 the beta(2,3 loop, which provides precise positioning of an invariant arginine from the PBC, and 4 a conserved structural element consisting of an N-terminal helix, an eight residue loop and the A-helix (N3A-motif. The PBC and the hinge were included in the previously reported allosteric model, whereas the definition of the beta(2,3 loop and the N3A-motif as conserved elements is novel. The N3A-motif is found in all cis-regulated CNB domains, and we present a model for an allosteric mechanism in these domains. Catabolite gene activator protein (CAP represents a trans-regulated CNB domain family: it does not contain the N3A-motif, and its long range allosteric interactions are substantially different from the cis-regulated CNB domains.

  12. CARF and WYL domains: ligand-binding regulators of prokaryotic defense systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira eMakarova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity systems of bacteria and archaea insert fragments of virus or plasmid DNA as spacer sequences into CRISPR repeat loci. Processed transcripts encompassing these spacers guide the cleavage of the cognate foreign DNA or RNA. Most CRISPR-Cas loci, in addition to recognized cas genes, also include genes that are not directly implicated in spacer acquisition, CRISPR transcript processing or interference. Here we comprehensively analyze sequences, structures and genomic neighborhoods of one of the most widespread groups of such genes that encode proteins containing a predicted nucleotide-binding domain with a Rossmann-like fold, which we denote CARF (CRISPR-associated Rossmann fold. Several CARF protein structures have been determined but functional characterization of these proteins is lacking. The CARF domain is most frequently combined with a C-terminal winged helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain and effector domains most of which are predicted to possess DNase or RNase activity. Divergent CARF domains are also found in RtcR proteins, sigma-54 dependent regulators of the rtc RNA repair operon. CARF genes frequently co-occur with those coding for proteins containing the WYL domain with the Sm-like SH3 β-barrel fold, which is also predicted to bind ligands. CRISPR-Cas and possibly other defense systems are predicted to be transcriptionally regulated by multiple ligand-binding proteins containing WYL and CARF domains which sense modified nucleotides and nucleotide derivatives generated during virus infection. We hypothesize that CARF domains also transmit the signal from the bound ligand to the fused effector domains which attack either alien or self nucleic acids, resulting, respectively, in immunity complementing the CRISPR-Cas action or in dormancy/programmed cell death.

  13. NeuN/Rbfox3 nuclear and cytoplasmic isoforms differentially regulate alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated decay of Rbfox2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Kate Dredge

    Full Text Available Anti-NeuN (Neuronal Nuclei is a monoclonal antibody used extensively to specifically detect post-mitotic neurons. Anti-NeuN reactivity is predominantly nuclear; by western it detects multiple bands ranging in molecular weight from 45 kDa to >75 kDa. Expression screening putatively identified R3hdm2 as NeuN; however immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry of the two major NeuN species at 45-50 kDa identified both as the RNA binding protein Rbfox3 (a member of the Fox family of alternative splicing factors, confirming and extending the identification of the 45 kDa band as Rbfox3 by Kim et al. Mapping of the anti-NeuN reactive epitopes in both R3hdm2 and Rbfox3 reveals a common proline- and glutamine-rich domain that lies at the N-terminus of the Rbfox3 protein. Our data suggests that alternative splicing of the Rbfox3 pre-mRNA itself leads to the production of four protein isoforms that migrate in the 45-50 kDa range, and that one of these splicing choices regulates Rbfox3/NeuN sub-cellular steady-state distribution, through the addition or removal of a short C-terminal extension containing the second half of a bipartite hydrophobic proline-tyrosine nuclear localization signal. Rbfox3 regulates alternative splicing of the Rbfox2 pre-mRNA, producing a message encoding a dominant negative form of the Rbfox2 protein. We show here that nuclear Rbfox3 isoforms can also enhance the inclusion of cryptic exons in the Rbfox2 mRNA, resulting in nonsense-mediated decay of the message, thereby contributing to the negative regulation of Rbfox2 by Rbfox3 through a novel mechanism.

  14. Concerted action of the PHD, chromo and motor domains regulates the human chromatin remodelling ATPase CHD4

    OpenAIRE

    Morra, Rosa; Lee, Benjamin M; Shaw, Heather; Tuma, Roman; Mancini, Erika J

    2012-01-01

    CHD4, the core subunit of the Nucleosome Remodelling and Deacetylase (NuRD) complex, is a chromatin remodelling ATPase that, in addition to a helicase domain, harbors tandem plant homeo finger and chromo domains. By using a panel of domain constructs we dissect their roles and demonstrate that DNA binding, histone binding and ATPase activities are allosterically regulated. Molecular shape reconstruction from small-angle X-ray scattering reveals extensive domain-domain interactions, which prov...

  15. Neurofilament subunit (NFL) head domain phosphorylation regulates axonal transport of neurofilaments.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yates, Darran M

    2009-04-01

    Neurofilaments are the intermediate filaments of neurons and are synthesised in neuronal cell bodies and then transported through axons. Neurofilament light chain (NFL) is a principal component of neurofilaments, and phosphorylation of NFL head domain is believed to regulate the assembly of neurofilaments. However, the role that NFL phosphorylation has on transport of neurofilaments is poorly understood. To address this issue, we monitored axonal transport of phosphorylation mutants of NFL. We mutated four known phosphorylation sites in NFL head domain to either preclude phosphorylation, or mimic permanent phosphorylation. Mutation to preclude phosphorylation had no effect on transport but mutation of three sites to mimic permanent phosphorylation inhibited transport. Mutation of all four sites together to mimic permanent phosphorylation proved especially potent at inhibiting transport and also disrupted neurofilament assembly. Our results suggest that NFL head domain phosphorylation is a regulator of neurofilament axonal transport.

  16. Herp regulates Hrd1-mediated ubiquitylation in a ubiquitin-like domain-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kny, Melanie; Standera, Sybille; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    in ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) and interacts directly with the ubiquitin ligase Hrd1, which is found in high molecular mass complexes of the ER membrane. Here we present the first evidence that Herp regulates Hrd1-mediated ubiquitylation in a ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain-dependent manner. We...

  17. Regulation of TCF ETS-domain transcription factors by helix-loop-helix motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Julie; Inoue, Toshiaki; Yates, Paula; Clancy, Anne; Norton, John D; Sharrocks, Andrew D

    2003-08-15

    DNA binding by the ternary complex factor (TCF) subfamily of ETS-domain transcription factors is tightly regulated by intramolecular and intermolecular interactions. The helix-loop-helix (HLH)-containing Id proteins are trans-acting negative regulators of DNA binding by the TCFs. In the TCF, SAP-2/Net/ERP, intramolecular inhibition of DNA binding is promoted by the cis-acting NID region that also contains an HLH-like motif. The NID also acts as a transcriptional repression domain. Here, we have studied the role of HLH motifs in regulating DNA binding and transcription by the TCF protein SAP-1 and how Cdk-mediated phosphorylation affects the inhibitory activity of the Id proteins towards the TCFs. We demonstrate that the NID region of SAP-1 is an autoinhibitory motif that acts to inhibit DNA binding and also functions as a transcription repression domain. This region can be functionally replaced by fusion of Id proteins to SAP-1, whereby the Id moiety then acts to repress DNA binding in cis. Phosphorylation of the Ids by cyclin-Cdk complexes results in reduction in protein-protein interactions between the Ids and TCFs and relief of their DNA-binding inhibitory activity. In revealing distinct mechanisms through which HLH motifs modulate the activity of TCFs, our results therefore provide further insight into the role of HLH motifs in regulating TCF function and how the inhibitory properties of the trans-acting Id HLH proteins are themselves regulated by phosphorylation.

  18. The JH2 domain and SH2-JH2 linker regulate JAK2 activity: A detailed kinetic analysis of wild type and V617F mutant kinase domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz Sanz, Arturo; Niranjan, Yashavanthi; Hammarén, Henrik; Ungureanu, Daniela; Ruijtenbeek, Rob; Touw, Ivo P; Silvennoinen, Olli; Hilhorst, Riet

    2014-10-01

    JAK2 tyrosine kinase regulates many cellular functions. Its activity is controlled by the pseudokinase (JH2) domain by still poorly understood mechanisms. The V617F mutation in the pseudokinase domain activates JAK2 and causes myeloproliferative neoplasms. We conducted a detailed kinetic analysis of recombinant JAK2 tyrosine kinase domain (JH1) and wild-type and V617F tandem kinase (JH1JH2) domains using peptide microarrays to define the functions of the kinase domains. The results show that i) JAK2 follows a random Bi-Bi reaction mechanism ii) JH2 domain restrains the activity of the JH1 domain by reducing the affinity for ATP and ATP competitive inhibitors iii) V617F decreases affinity for ATP but increases catalytic activity compared to wild-type and iv) the SH2-JH2 linker region participates in controlling activity by reducing the affinity for ATP. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Microtubule plus end-tracking proteins play critical roles in directional growth of hyphae by regulating the dynamics of cytoplasmic microtubules in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Cui J Tracy; Kim, Hye-Ryun; Vargas Arispuro, Irasema; Kim, Jung-Mi; Huang, An-Chi; Liu, Bo

    2014-11-01

    Cytoplasmic microtubules (MTs) serve as a rate-limiting factor for hyphal tip growth in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. We hypothesized that this function depended on the MT plus end-tracking proteins (+TIPs) including the EB1 family protein EBA that decorated the MT plus ends undergoing polymerization. The ebAΔ mutation reduced colony growth and the mutant hyphae appeared in an undulating pattern instead of exhibiting unidirectional growth in the control. These phenotypes were enhanced by a mutation in another +TIP gene clipA. EBA was required for plus end-tracking of CLIPA, the Kinesin-7 motor KipA, and the XMAP215 homologue AlpA. In addition, cytoplasmic dynein also depended on EBA to track on most polymerizing MT plus ends, but not for its conspicuous appearance at the MT ends near the hyphal apex. The loss of EBA reduced the number of cytoplasmic MTs and prolonged dwelling times for MTs after reaching the hyphal apex. Finally, we found that colonies were formed in the absence of EBA, CLIPA, and NUDA together, suggesting that they were dispensable for fundamental functions of MTs. This study provided a comprehensive delineation of the relationship among different +TIPs and their contributions to MT dynamics and unidirectional hyphal expansion in filamentous fungi. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Mutant p53 protein localized in the cytoplasm inhibits autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morselli, Eugenia; Tasdemir, Ezgi; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Kepp, Oliver; Criollo, Alfredo; Vicencio, José Miguel; Soussi, Thierry; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-10-01

    The knockout, knockdown or chemical inhibition of p53 stimulates autophagy. Moreover, autophagy-inducing stimuli such as nutrient depletion, rapamycin or lithium cause the depletion of cytoplasmic p53, which in turn is required for the induction of autophagy. Here, we show that retransfection of p53(-/-) HCT 116 colon carcinoma cells with wild type p53 decreases autophagy down to baseline levels. Surprisingly, one third among a panel of 22 cancer-associated p53 single amino acid mutants also inhibited autophagy when transfected into p53(-/-) cells. Those variants of p53 that preferentially localize to the cytoplasm effectively repressed autophagy, whereas p53 mutants that display a prominently nuclear distribution failed to inhibit autophagy. The investigation of a series of deletion mutants revealed that removal of the DNA-binding domain from p53 fails to interfere with its role in the regulation of autophagy. Altogether, these results identify the cytoplasmic localization of p53 as the most important feature for p53-mediated autophagy inhibition. Moreover, the structural requirements for the two biological activities of extranuclear p53, namely induction of apoptosis and inhibition of autophagy, are manifestly different.

  1. Regulation of plant plasma membrane H+- and Ca2+-ATPases by terminal domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lone; Fuglsang, Anja Thoe; Palmgren, Michael Gjedde

    2005-01-01

    In the last few years, major progress has been made to elucidate the structure, function, and regulation of P-type plasma membrane H(+)-and Ca(2+)-ATPases. Even though a number of regulatory proteins have been identified, many pieces are still lacking in order to understand the complete regulatory...... mechanisms of these pumps. In plant plasma membrane H(+)- and Ca(2+)-ATPases, autoinhibitory domains are situated in the C- and N-terminal domains, respectively. A model for a common mechanism of autoinhibition is discussed....

  2. Factor H C-Terminal Domains Are Critical for Regulation of Platelet/Granulocyte Aggregate Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Z. Blatt

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Platelet/granulocyte aggregates (PGAs increase thromboinflammation in the vasculature, and PGA formation is tightly controlled by the complement alternative pathway (AP negative regulator, Factor H (FH. Mutations in FH are associated with the prothrombotic disease atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS, yet it is unknown whether increased PGA formation contributes to the thrombosis seen in patients with aHUS. Here, flow cytometry assays were used to evaluate the effects of aHUS-related mutations on FH regulation of PGA formation and characterize the mechanism. Utilizing recombinant fragments of FH spanning the entire length of the protein, we mapped the regions of FH most critical for limiting AP activity on the surface of isolated human platelets and neutrophils, as well as the regions most critical for regulating PGA formation in human whole blood stimulated with thrombin receptor-activating peptide (TRAP. FH domains 19–20 were the most critical for limiting AP activity on platelets, neutrophils, and at the platelet/granulocyte interface. The role of FH in PGA formation was attributed to its ability to regulate AP-mediated C5a generation. AHUS-related mutations in domains 19–20 caused differential effects on control of PGA formation and AP activity on platelets and neutrophils. Our data indicate FH C-terminal domains are key for regulating PGA formation, thus increased FH protection may have a beneficial impact on diseases characterized by increased PGA formation, such as cardiovascular disease. Additionally, aHUS-related mutations in domains 19–20 have varying effects on control of TRAP-mediated PGA formation, suggesting that some, but not all, aHUS-related mutations may cause increased PGA formation that contributes to excessive thrombosis in patients with aHUS.

  3. SH2 domains of the p85 alpha subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase regulate binding to growth factor receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlade, C J; Ellis, C; Reedijk, M; Anderson, D; Mbamalu, G; Reith, A D; Panayotou, G; End, P; Bernstein, A; Kazlauskas, A

    1992-01-01

    The binding of cytoplasmic signaling proteins such as phospholipase C-gamma 1 and Ras GTPase-activating protein to autophosphorylated growth factor receptors is directed by their noncatalytic Src homology region 2 (SH2) domains. The p85 alpha regulatory subunit of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase, which associates with several receptor protein-tyrosine kinases, also contains two SH2 domains. Both p85 alpha SH2 domains, when expressed individually as fusion proteins in bacteria, bound stably to the activated beta receptor for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Complex formation required PDGF stimulation and was dependent on receptor tyrosine kinase activity. The bacterial p85 alpha SH2 domains recognized activated beta PDGF receptor which had been immobilized on a filter, indicating that SH2 domains contact autophosphorylated receptors directly. Several receptor tyrosine kinases within the PDGF receptor subfamily, including the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor and the Steel factor receptor (Kit), also associate with PI 3-kinase in vivo. Bacterially expressed SH2 domains derived from the p85 alpha subunit of PI 3-kinase bound in vitro to the activated colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor and to Kit. We infer that the SH2 domains of p85 alpha bind to high-affinity sites on these receptors, whose creation is dependent on receptor autophosphorylation. The SH2 domains of p85 are therefore primarily responsible for the binding of PI 3-kinase to activated growth factor receptors. Images PMID:1372092

  4. Differential Regulation of Disheveled in a Novel Vegetal Cortical Domain in Sea Urchin Eggs and Embryos: Implications for the Localized Activation of Canonical Wnt Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, ChiehFu Jeff; Wikramanayake, Athula H.

    2013-01-01

    Pattern formation along the animal-vegetal (AV) axis in sea urchin embryos is initiated when canonical Wnt (cWnt) signaling is activated in vegetal blastomeres. The mechanisms that restrict cWnt signaling to vegetal blastomeres are not well understood, but there is increasing evidence that the egg’s vegetal cortex plays a critical role in this process by mediating localized “activation” of Disheveled (Dsh). To investigate how Dsh activity is regulated along the AV axis, sea urchin-specific Dsh antibodies were used to examine expression, subcellular localization, and post-translational modification of Dsh during development. Dsh is broadly expressed during early sea urchin development, but immunolocalization studies revealed that this protein is enriched in a punctate pattern in a novel vegetal cortical domain (VCD) in the egg. Vegetal blastomeres inherit this VCD during embryogenesis, and at the 60-cell stage Dsh puncta are seen in all cells that display nuclear β-catenin. Analysis of Dsh post-translational modification using two-dimensional Western blot analysis revealed that compared to Dsh pools in the bulk cytoplasm, this protein is differentially modified in the VCD and in the 16-cell stage micromeres that partially inherit this domain. Dsh localization to the VCD is not directly affected by disruption of microfilaments and microtubules, but unexpectedly, microfilament disruption led to degradation of all the Dsh pools in unfertilized eggs over a period of incubation suggesting that microfilament integrity is required for maintaining Dsh stability. These results demonstrate that a pool of differentially modified Dsh in the VCD is selectively inherited by the vegetal blastomeres that activate cWnt signaling in early embryos, and suggests that this domain functions as a scaffold for localized Dsh activation. Localized cWnt activation regulates AV axis patterning in many metazoan embryos. Hence, it is possible that the VCD is an evolutionarily conserved

  5. Regulation of the Hsp104 middle domain activity is critical for yeast prion propagation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E Dulle

    Full Text Available Molecular chaperones play a significant role in preventing protein misfolding and aggregation. Indeed, some protein conformational disorders have been linked to changes in the chaperone network. Curiously, in yeast, chaperones also play a role in promoting prion maintenance and propagation. While many amyloidogenic proteins are associated with disease in mammals, yeast prion proteins, and their ability to undergo conformational conversion into a prion state, are proposed to play a functional role in yeast biology. The chaperone Hsp104, a AAA+ ATPase, is essential for yeast prion propagation. Hsp104 fragments large prion aggregates to generate a population of smaller oligomers that can more readily convert soluble monomer and be transmitted to daughter cells. Here, we show that the middle (M domain of Hsp104, and its mobility, plays an integral part in prion propagation. We generated and characterized mutations in the M-domain of Hsp104 that are predicted to stabilize either a repressed or de-repressed conformation of the M-domain (by analogy to ClpB in bacteria. We show that the predicted stabilization of the repressed conformation inhibits general chaperone activity. Mutation to the de-repressed conformation, however, has differential effects on ATP hydrolysis and disaggregation, suggesting that the M-domain is involved in coupling these two activities. Interestingly, we show that changes in the M-domain differentially affect the propagation of different variants of the [PSI+] and [RNQ+] prions, which indicates that some prion variants are more sensitive to changes in the M-domain mobility than others. Thus, we provide evidence that regulation of the M-domain of Hsp104 is critical for efficient prion propagation. This shows the importance of elucidating the function of the M-domain in order to understand the role of Hsp104 in the propagation of different prions and prion variants.

  6. Domain-to-domain coupling in voltage-sensing phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Souhei; Matsuda, Makoto; Kawanabe, Akira; Okamura, Yasushi

    2017-01-01

    Voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP) consists of a transmembrane voltage sensor and a cytoplasmic enzyme region. The enzyme region contains the phosphatase and C2 domains, is structurally similar to the tumor suppressor phosphatase PTEN, and catalyzes the dephosphorylation of phosphoinositides. The transmembrane voltage sensor is connected to the phosphatase through a short linker region, and phosphatase activity is induced upon membrane depolarization. Although the detailed molecular characteristics of the voltage sensor domain and the enzyme region have been revealed, little is known how these two regions are coupled. In addition, it is important to know whether mechanism for coupling between the voltage sensor domain and downstream effector function is shared among other voltage sensor domain-containing proteins. Recent studies in which specific amino acid sites were genetically labeled using a fluorescent unnatural amino acid have enabled detection of the local structural changes in the cytoplasmic region of Ciona intestinalis VSP that occur with a change in membrane potential. The results of those studies provide novel insight into how the enzyme activity of the cytoplasmic region of VSP is regulated by the voltage sensor domain.

  7. Concerted action of the PHD, chromo and motor domains regulates the human chromatin remodelling ATPase CHD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, Rosa; Lee, Benjamin M; Shaw, Heather; Tuma, Roman; Mancini, Erika J

    2012-07-30

    CHD4, the core subunit of the Nucleosome Remodelling and Deacetylase (NuRD) complex, is a chromatin remodelling ATPase that, in addition to a helicase domain, harbors tandem plant homeo finger and chromo domains. By using a panel of domain constructs we dissect their roles and demonstrate that DNA binding, histone binding and ATPase activities are allosterically regulated. Molecular shape reconstruction from small-angle X-ray scattering reveals extensive domain-domain interactions, which provide a structural explanation for the regulation of CHD4 activities by intramolecular domain communication. Our results demonstrate functional interdependency between domains within a chromatin remodeller. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. The epigenetic regulator Smchd1 contains a functional GHKL-type ATPase domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kelan; Dobson, Renwick C J; Lucet, Isabelle S; Young, Samuel N; Pearce, F Grant; Blewitt, Marnie E; Murphy, James M

    2016-06-15

    Structural maintenance of chromosomes flexible hinge domain containing 1 (Smchd1) is an epigenetic regulator that plays critical roles in gene regulation during development. Mutations in SMCHD1 were recently implicated in the pathogenesis of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), although the mechanistic basis remains of outstanding interest. We have previously shown that Smchd1 associates with chromatin via its homodimeric C-terminal hinge domain, yet little is known about the function of the putative GHKL (gyrase, Hsp90, histidine kinase, MutL)-type ATPase domain at its N-terminus. To formally assess the structure and function of Smchd1's ATPase domain, we have generated recombinant proteins encompassing the predicted ATPase domain and the adjacent region. Here, we show that the Smchd1 N-terminal region exists as a monomer and adopts a conformation resembling that of monomeric full-length heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) protein in solution, even though the two proteins share only ∼8% overall sequence identity. Despite being monomeric, the N-terminal region of Smchd1 exhibits ATPase activity, which can be antagonized by the reaction product, ADP, or the Hsp90 inhibitor, radicicol, at a nanomolar concentration. Interestingly, introduction of an analogous mutation to that identified in SMCHD1 of an FSHD patient compromised protein stability, suggesting a possible molecular basis for loss of protein function and pathogenesis. Together, these results reveal important structure-function characteristics of Smchd1 that may underpin its mechanistic action at the chromatin level. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  9. Functional domains of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase: regulation by autoinhibitory and visinin-like domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandiran, S.; Takezawa, D.; Wang, W.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1997-01-01

    A novel calcium-binding calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) with a catalytic domain, calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like domain was cloned and characterized from plants [Patil et al., (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 4797-4801; Takezawa et al. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 8126-8132]. The mechanisms of CCaMK activation by calcium and calcium/calmodulin were investigated using various deletion mutants. The use of deletion mutants of CCaMK lacking either one, two, or all three calcium-binding EF hands indicated that all three calcium-binding sites in the visinin-like domain were crucial for the full calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity. As each calcium-binding EF hand was deleted, there was a gradual reduction in calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity from 100 to 4%. Another mutant (amino acids 1-322) which lacks both the visinin-like domain containing three EF hands and the calmodulin-binding domain was constitutively active, indicating the presence of an autoinhibitory domain around the calmodulin-binding domain. By using various synthetic peptides and the constitutively active mutant, we have shown that CCaMK contains an autoinhibitory domain within the residues 322-340 which overlaps its calmodulin-binding domain. Kinetic studies with both ATP and the GS peptide substrate suggest that the autoinhibitory domain of CCaMK interacts only with the peptide substrate binding motif of the catalytic domain, but not with the ATP-binding motif.

  10. Cytoplasmic Z-RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zarling, D.A.; Calhoun, C.J.; Hardin, C.C.; Zarling, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    Specific immunochemical probes for Z-RNA were generated and characterized to search for possible Z-RNA-like double helices in cells. Z-RNA was detected in the cytoplasm of fixed protozoan cells by immunofluorescence microscopy using these anti-Z-RNA IgCs. In contrast, autoimmune or experimentally elicited anti-DNA antibodies, specifically reactive with B-DNA or Z-DNA, stained the nuclei. Pre-or nonimmune IgGs did not bind to the cells. RNase A or T1 digestion eliminated anti-Z-RNA IgG binding to cytoplasmic determinants; however, DNase I or mung bean nuclease had no effect. Doxorubicin and ethidium bromide prevented anti-Z-RNA antibody binding; however, actinomycin D, which does not bind double-stranded RNA, did not. Anti-Z-RNA immunofluorescence was specifically blocked in competition assays by synthetic Z-RNA but not Z-DNA, A-RNA, or single-stranded RNAs. Thus, some cytoplasmic sequences in fixed cells exist in the left-handed Z-RNA conformation

  11. Conformational switching in the coiled-coil domains of a proteasomal ATPase regulates substrate processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoberger, Aaron; Brettrager, Evan J; Smith, David M

    2018-06-18

    Protein degradation in all domains of life requires ATPases that unfold and inject proteins into compartmentalized proteolytic chambers. Proteasomal ATPases in eukaryotes and archaea contain poorly understood N-terminally conserved coiled-coil domains. In this study, we engineer disulfide crosslinks in the coiled-coils of the archaeal proteasomal ATPase (PAN) and report that its three identical coiled-coil domains can adopt three different conformations: (1) in-register and zipped, (2) in-register and partially unzipped, and (3) out-of-register. This conformational heterogeneity conflicts with PAN's symmetrical OB-coiled-coil crystal structure but resembles the conformational heterogeneity of the 26S proteasomal ATPases' coiled-coils. Furthermore, we find that one coiled-coil can be conformationally constrained even while unfolding substrates, and conformational changes in two of the coiled-coils regulate PAN switching between resting and active states. This switching functionally mimics similar states proposed for the 26S proteasome from cryo-EM. These findings thus build a mechanistic framework to understand regulation of proteasome activity.

  12. Multivalent Chromatin Engagement and Inter-domain Crosstalk Regulate MORC3 ATPase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forest H. Andrews

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available MORC3 is linked to inflammatory myopathies and cancer; however, the precise role of MORC3 in normal cell physiology and disease remains poorly understood. Here, we present detailed genetic, biochemical, and structural analyses of MORC3. We demonstrate that MORC3 is significantly upregulated in Down syndrome and that genetic abnormalities in MORC3 are associated with cancer. The CW domain of MORC3 binds to the methylated histone H3K4 tail, and this interaction is essential for recruitment of MORC3 to chromatin and accumulation in nuclear bodies. We show that MORC3 possesses intrinsic ATPase activity that requires DNA, but it is negatively regulated by the CW domain, which interacts with the ATPase domain. Natively linked CW impedes binding of the ATPase domain to DNA, resulting in a decrease in the DNA-stimulated enzymatic activity. Collectively, our studies provide a molecular framework detailing MORC3 functions and suggest that its modulation may contribute to human disease.

  13. Diacylglycerol Acyltransferase 1 Is Regulated by Its N-Terminal Domain in Response to Allosteric Effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldo, Kristian Mark P; Acedo, Jeella Z; Panigrahi, Rashmi; Vederas, John C; Weselake, Randall J; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2017-10-01

    Diacylglycerol acyltransferase 1 (DGAT1) is an integral membrane enzyme catalyzing the final and committed step in the acyl-coenzyme A (CoA)-dependent biosynthesis of triacylglycerol (TAG). The biochemical regulation of TAG assembly remains one of the least understood areas of primary metabolism to date. Here, we report that the hydrophilic N-terminal domain of Brassica napus DGAT1 (BnaDGAT1 1-113 ) regulates activity based on acyl-CoA/CoA levels. The N-terminal domain is not necessary for acyltransferase activity and is composed of an intrinsically disordered region and a folded segment. We show that the disordered region has an autoinhibitory function and a dimerization interface, which appears to mediate positive cooperativity, whereas the folded segment of the cytosolic region was found to have an allosteric site for acyl-CoA/CoA. Under increasing acyl-CoA levels, the binding of acyl-CoA with this noncatalytic site facilitates homotropic allosteric activation. Enzyme activation, on the other hand, is prevented under limiting acyl-CoA conditions (low acyl-CoA-to-CoA ratio), whereby CoA acts as a noncompetitive feedback inhibitor through interaction with the same folded segment. The three-dimensional NMR solution structure of the allosteric site revealed an α-helix with a loop connecting a coil fragment. The conserved amino acid residues in the loop interacting with CoA were identified, revealing details of this important regulatory element for allosteric regulation. Based on these results, a model is proposed illustrating the role of the N-terminal domain of BnaDGAT1 as a positive and negative modulator of TAG biosynthesis. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Transactivation domain of p53 regulates DNA repair and integrity in human iPS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannappan, Ramaswamy; Mattapally, Saidulu; Wagle, Pooja A; Zhang, Jianyi

    2018-05-18

    The role of p53 transactivation domain (p53-TAD), a multifunctional and dynamic domain, on DNA repair and retaining DNA integrity in human iPS cells has never been studied. p53-TAD was knocked out in iPS cells using CRISPR/Cas9 and was confirmed by DNA sequencing. p53-TAD KO cells were characterized by: accelerated proliferation, decreased population doubling time, and unaltered Bcl2, BBC3, IGF1R, Bax and altered Mdm2, p21, and PIDD transcripts expression. In p53-TAD KO cells p53 regulated DNA repair proteins XPA, DNA polH and DDB2 expression were found to be reduced compared to p53-WT cells. Exposure to low dose of doxorubicin (Doxo) induced similar DNA damage and DNA damage response (DDR) measured by RAD50 and MRE11 expression, Checkpoint kinase 2 activation and γH2A.X recruitment at DNA strand breaks in both the cell groups indicating silencing p53-TAD do not affect DDR mechanism upstream of p53. Following removal of Doxo p53-WT hiPS cells underwent DNA repair, corrected their damaged DNA and restored DNA integrity. Conversely, p53-TAD KO hiPS cells did not undergo complete DNA repair and failed to restore DNA integrity. More importantly continuous culture of p53-TAD KO hiPS cells underwent G2/M cell cycle arrest and expressed cellular senescent marker p16 INK4a . Our data clearly shows that silencing transactivation domain of p53 did not affect DDR but affected the DNA repair process implying the crucial role of p53 transactivation domain in maintaining DNA integrity. Therefore, activating p53-TAD domain using small molecules may promote DNA repair and integrity of cells and prevent senescence.

  15. Protein domain analysis of genomic sequence data reveals regulation of LRR related domains in plant transpiration in Ficus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Tiange; Yin, Kangquan; Liu, Jinyu; Cao, Kunfang; Cannon, Charles H; Du, Fang K

    2014-01-01

    Predicting protein domains is essential for understanding a protein's function at the molecular level. However, up till now, there has been no direct and straightforward method for predicting protein domains in species without a reference genome sequence. In this study, we developed a functionality with a set of programs that can predict protein domains directly from genomic sequence data without a reference genome. Using whole genome sequence data, the programming functionality mainly comprised DNA assembly in combination with next-generation sequencing (NGS) assembly methods and traditional methods, peptide prediction and protein domain prediction. The proposed new functionality avoids problems associated with de novo assembly due to micro reads and small single repeats. Furthermore, we applied our functionality for the prediction of leucine rich repeat (LRR) domains in four species of Ficus with no reference genome, based on NGS genomic data. We found that the LRRNT_2 and LRR_8 domains are related to plant transpiration efficiency, as indicated by the stomata index, in the four species of Ficus. The programming functionality established in this study provides new insights for protein domain prediction, which is particularly timely in the current age of NGS data expansion.

  16. Four and a half domain 2 (FHL2) scaffolding protein is a marker of connective tissues of developing digits and regulates fibrogenic differentiation of limb mesodermal progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorda-Diez, C I; Montero, J A; Sanchez-Fernandez, C; Garcia-Porrero, J A; Chimal-Monroy, J; Hurle, J M

    2018-04-01

    Four and a half LIM domain 2 (FHL2) is a multifunctional scaffolding protein of well-known function regulating cell signalling cascades and gene transcription in cancer tissues. However, its function in embryonic systems is poorly characterized. Here, we show that Fhl2 is involved in the differentiation of connective tissues of developing limb autopod. We show that Fhl2 exhibits spatially restricted and temporally dynamic expression around the tendons of developing digits, interphalangeal joint capsules, and fibrous peridigital tissue. Immunolabelling analysis of the skeletal progenitors identified a predominant, but not exclusive, cytoplasmic distribution of FHL2 being associated with focal adhesions and actin cytoskeleton. In the course of chondrogenic differentiation of cultures of limb skeletal progenitors, the expression of Fhl2 is down-regulated. Furthermore, cultures of skeletal progenitors overexpressing Fhl2 take on a predominant fibrogenic appearance. Both gain-of-function and loss-of-function experiments in the micromass culture assays revealed a positive transcriptional influence of Fhl2 in the expression of fibrogenic markers including Scleraxis, Tenomodulin, Tenascin C, βig-h3, and Tgif1. We further show that the expression of Fhl2 is positively regulated by profibrogenic signals including Tgfβ2, all-trans-retinoic acid, and canonical Wnt signalling molecules and negatively regulated by prochondrogenic factors of the bone morphogenetic protein family. Expression of Fhl2 is also regulated negatively in immobilized limbs, but this influence appears to be mediated by other connective tissue markers, such as Tgfβs and Scleraxis. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Gating of human ClC-2 chloride channels and regulation by carboxy-terminal domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Olivares, Jennie; Alekov, Alexi; Boroumand, Mohammad Reza; Begemann, Birgit; Hidalgo, Patricia; Fahlke, Christoph

    2008-11-15

    Eukaryotic ClC channels are dimeric proteins with each subunit forming an individual protopore. Single protopores are gated by a fast gate, whereas the slow gate is assumed to control both protopores through a cooperative movement of the two carboxy-terminal domains. We here study the role of the carboxy-terminal domain in modulating fast and slow gating of human ClC-2 channels, a ubiquitously expressed ClC-type chloride channel involved in transepithelial solute transport and in neuronal chloride homeostasis. Partial truncation of the carboxy-terminus abolishes function of ClC-2 by locking the channel in a closed position. However, unlike other isoforms, its complete removal preserves function of ClC-2. ClC-2 channels without the carboxy-terminus exhibit fast and slow gates that activate and deactivate significantly faster than in WT channels. In contrast to the prevalent view, a single carboxy-terminus suffices for normal slow gating, whereas both domains regulate fast gating of individual protopores. Our findings demonstrate that the carboxy-terminus is not strictly required for slow gating and that the cooperative gating resides in other regions of the channel protein. ClC-2 is expressed in neurons and believed to open at negative potentials and increased internal chloride concentrations after intense synaptic activity. We propose that the function of the ClC-2 carboxy-terminus is to slow down the time course of channel activation in order to stabilize neuronal excitability.

  18. Independent regulation of reovirus membrane penetration and apoptosis by the mu1 phi domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danthi, Pranav; Coffey, Caroline M; Parker, John S L; Abel, Ty W; Dermody, Terence S

    2008-12-01

    Apoptosis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of reovirus encephalitis. Reovirus outer-capsid protein mu1, which functions to penetrate host cell membranes during viral entry, is the primary regulator of apoptosis following reovirus infection. Ectopic expression of full-length and truncated forms of mu1 indicates that the mu1 phi domain is sufficient to elicit a cell death response. To evaluate the contribution of the mu1 phi domain to the induction of apoptosis following reovirus infection, phi mutant viruses were generated by reverse genetics and analyzed for the capacity to penetrate cell membranes and elicit apoptosis. We found that mutations in phi diminish reovirus membrane penetration efficiency by preventing conformational changes that lead to generation of key reovirus entry intermediates. Independent of effects on membrane penetration, amino acid substitutions in phi affect the apoptotic potential of reovirus, suggesting that phi initiates apoptosis subsequent to cytosolic delivery. In comparison to wild-type virus, apoptosis-defective phi mutant viruses display diminished neurovirulence following intracranial inoculation of newborn mice. These results indicate that the phi domain of mu1 plays an important regulatory role in reovirus-induced apoptosis and disease.

  19. Independent regulation of reovirus membrane penetration and apoptosis by the mu1 phi domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Danthi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of reovirus encephalitis. Reovirus outer-capsid protein mu1, which functions to penetrate host cell membranes during viral entry, is the primary regulator of apoptosis following reovirus infection. Ectopic expression of full-length and truncated forms of mu1 indicates that the mu1 phi domain is sufficient to elicit a cell death response. To evaluate the contribution of the mu1 phi domain to the induction of apoptosis following reovirus infection, phi mutant viruses were generated by reverse genetics and analyzed for the capacity to penetrate cell membranes and elicit apoptosis. We found that mutations in phi diminish reovirus membrane penetration efficiency by preventing conformational changes that lead to generation of key reovirus entry intermediates. Independent of effects on membrane penetration, amino acid substitutions in phi affect the apoptotic potential of reovirus, suggesting that phi initiates apoptosis subsequent to cytosolic delivery. In comparison to wild-type virus, apoptosis-defective phi mutant viruses display diminished neurovirulence following intracranial inoculation of newborn mice. These results indicate that the phi domain of mu1 plays an important regulatory role in reovirus-induced apoptosis and disease.

  20. The molecular mechanism and physiological role of cytoplasmic streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Motoki; Ito, Kohji

    2015-10-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming occurs widely in plants ranging from algae to angiosperms. However, the molecular mechanism and physiological role of cytoplasmic streaming have long remained unelucidated. Recent molecular genetic approaches have identified specific myosin members (XI-2 and XI-K as major and XI-1, XI-B, and XI-I as minor motive forces) for the generation of cytoplasmic streaming among 13 myosin XIs in Arabidopsis thaliana. Simultaneous knockout of these myosin XI members led to a reduced velocity of cytoplasmic streaming and marked defects of plant development. Furthermore, the artificial modifications of myosin XI-2 velocity changed plant and cell sizes along with the velocity of cytoplasmic streaming. Therefore, we assume that cytoplasmic streaming is one of the key regulators in determining plant size. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Regulation of Na+ channel inactivation by the DIII and DIV voltage-sensing domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Eric J; Zhu, Wandi; Schubert, Angela R; Voelker, Taylor; Varga, Zoltan; Silva, Jonathan R

    2017-03-06

    Functional eukaryotic voltage-gated Na + (Na V ) channels comprise four domains (DI-DIV), each containing six membrane-spanning segments (S1-S6). Voltage sensing is accomplished by the first four membrane-spanning segments (S1-S4), which together form a voltage-sensing domain (VSD). A critical Na V channel gating process, inactivation, has previously been linked to activation of the VSDs in DIII and DIV. Here, we probe this interaction by using voltage-clamp fluorometry to observe VSD kinetics in the presence of mutations at locations that have been shown to impair Na V channel inactivation. These locations include the DIII-DIV linker, the DIII S4-S5 linker, and the DIV S4-S5 linker. Our results show that, within the 10-ms timeframe of fast inactivation, the DIV-VSD is the primary regulator of inactivation. However, after longer 100-ms pulses, the DIII-DIV linker slows DIII-VSD deactivation, and the rate of DIII deactivation correlates strongly with the rate of recovery from inactivation. Our results imply that, over the course of an action potential, DIV-VSDs regulate the onset of fast inactivation while DIII-VSDs determine its recovery. © 2017 Hsu et al.

  2. The SH2 domain of Abl kinases regulates kinase autophosphorylation by controlling activation loop accessibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamontanara, Allan Joaquim; Georgeon, Sandrine; Tria, Giancarlo; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Hantschel, Oliver

    2014-11-01

    The activity of protein kinases is regulated by multiple molecular mechanisms, and their disruption is a common driver of oncogenesis. A central and almost universal control element of protein kinase activity is the activation loop that utilizes both conformation and phosphorylation status to determine substrate access. In this study, we use recombinant Abl tyrosine kinases and conformation-specific kinase inhibitors to quantitatively analyse structural changes that occur after Abl activation. Allosteric SH2-kinase domain interactions were previously shown to be essential for the leukemogenesis caused by the Bcr-Abl oncoprotein. We find that these allosteric interactions switch the Abl activation loop from a closed to a fully open conformation. This enables the trans-autophosphorylation of the activation loop and requires prior phosphorylation of the SH2-kinase linker. Disruption of the SH2-kinase interaction abolishes activation loop phosphorylation. Our analysis provides a molecular mechanism for the SH2 domain-dependent activation of Abl that may also regulate other tyrosine kinases.

  3. The structure and dynamics of tandem WW domains in a negative regulator of notch signaling, Suppressor of deltex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedoroff, Oleg Y; Townson, Sharon A; Golovanov, Alexander P; Baron, Martin; Avis, Johanna M

    2004-08-13

    WW domains mediate protein recognition, usually though binding to proline-rich sequences. In many proteins, WW domains occur in tandem arrays. Whether or how individual domains within such arrays cooperate to recognize biological partners is, as yet, poorly characterized. An important question is whether functional diversity of different WW domain proteins is reflected in the structural organization and ligand interaction mechanisms of their multiple domains. We have determined the solution structure and dynamics of a pair of WW domains (WW3-4) from a Drosophila Nedd4 family protein called Suppressor of deltex (Su(dx)), a regulator of Notch receptor signaling. We find that the binding of a type 1 PPPY ligand to WW3 stabilizes the structure with effects propagating to the WW4 domain, a domain that is not active for ligand binding. Both WW domains adopt the characteristic triple-stranded beta-sheet structure, and significantly, this is the first example of a WW domain structure to include a domain (WW4) lacking the second conserved Trp (replaced by Phe). The domains are connected by a flexible linker, which allows a hinge-like motion of domains that may be important for the recognition of functionally relevant targets. Our results contrast markedly with those of the only previously determined three-dimensional structure of tandem WW domains, that of the rigidly oriented WW domain pair from the RNA-splicing factor Prp40. Our data illustrate that arrays of WW domains can exhibit a variety of higher order structures and ligand interaction mechanisms.

  4. Balanced nuclear and cytoplasmic activities of EDS1 are required for a complete plant innate immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana V García

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available An important layer of plant innate immunity to host-adapted pathogens is conferred by intracellular nucleotide-binding/oligomerization domain-leucine rich repeat (NB-LRR receptors recognizing specific microbial effectors. Signaling from activated receptors of the TIR (Toll/Interleukin-1 Receptor-NB-LRR class converges on the nucleo-cytoplasmic immune regulator EDS1 (Enhanced Disease Susceptibility1. In this report we show that a receptor-stimulated increase in accumulation of nuclear EDS1 precedes or coincides with the EDS1-dependent induction and repression of defense-related genes. EDS1 is capable of nuclear transport receptor-mediated shuttling between the cytoplasm and nucleus. By enhancing EDS1 export from inside nuclei (through attachment of an additional nuclear export sequence (NES or conditionally releasing EDS1 to the nucleus (by fusion to a glucocorticoid receptor (GR in transgenic Arabidopsis we establish that the EDS1 nuclear pool is essential for resistance to biotrophic and hemi-biotrophic pathogens and for transcriptional reprogramming. Evidence points to post-transcriptional processes regulating receptor-triggered accumulation of EDS1 in nuclei. Changes in nuclear EDS1 levels become equilibrated with the cytoplasmic EDS1 pool and cytoplasmic EDS1 is needed for complete resistance and restriction of host cell death at infection sites. We propose that coordinated nuclear and cytoplasmic activities of EDS1 enable the plant to mount an appropriately balanced immune response to pathogen attack.

  5. Membrane Localization is Critical for Activation of the PICK1 BAR Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Kenneth L.; Eriksen, Jacob; Milan-Lobo, Laura; Han, Daniel S.; Niv, Masha Y.; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Henriksen, Ulla; Bhatia, Vikram K.; Stamou, Dimitrios; Sitte, Harald H.; McMahon, Harvey T.; Weinstein, Harel; Gether, Ulrik

    2008-01-01

    The PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 homology (PDZ) domain protein, protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1) contains a C-terminal Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain mediating recognition of curved membranes; however, the molecular mechanisms controlling the activity of this domain are poorly understood. In agreement with negative regulation of the BAR domain by the N-terminal PDZ domain, PICK1 distributed evenly in the cytoplasm, whereas truncation of the PDZ domain caused BAR domain-dependent redis...

  6. Structural basis for different phosphoinositide specificities of the PX domains of sorting nexins regulating G-protein signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas, Caroline; Norwood, Suzanne J; Bugarcic, Andrea; Kinna, Genevieve; Leneva, Natalya; Kovtun, Oleksiy; Ghai, Rajesh; Ona Yanez, Lorena E; Davis, Jasmine L; Teasdale, Rohan D; Collins, Brett M

    2014-10-10

    Sorting nexins (SNXs) or phox homology (PX) domain containing proteins are central regulators of cell trafficking and signaling. A subfamily of PX domain proteins possesses two unique PX-associated domains, as well as a regulator of G protein-coupled receptor signaling (RGS) domain that attenuates Gαs-coupled G protein-coupled receptor signaling. Here we delineate the structural organization of these RGS-PX proteins, revealing a protein family with a modular architecture that is conserved in all eukaryotes. The one exception to this is mammalian SNX19, which lacks the typical RGS structure but preserves all other domains. The PX domain is a sensor of membrane phosphoinositide lipids and we find that specific sequence alterations in the PX domains of the mammalian RGS-PX proteins, SNX13, SNX14, SNX19, and SNX25, confer differential phosphoinositide binding preferences. Although SNX13 and SNX19 PX domains bind the early endosomal lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate, SNX14 shows no membrane binding at all. Crystal structures of the SNX19 and SNX14 PX domains reveal key differences, with alterations in SNX14 leading to closure of the binding pocket to prevent phosphoinositide association. Our findings suggest a role for alternative membrane interactions in spatial control of RGS-PX proteins in cell signaling and trafficking. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Regulation of embryonic hematopoiesis by a cytokine-inducible SH2 domain homolog in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Rowena S; Noor, Suzita M; Fraser, Fiona W; Sertori, Robert; Liongue, Clifford; Ward, Alister C

    2014-06-15

    Cytokine-inducible SH2 domain-containing protein (CISH), a member of the suppressor of cytokine signaling family of negative feedback regulators, is induced by cytokines that activate STAT5 and can inhibit STAT5 signaling in vitro. However, demonstration of a definitive in vivo role for CISH during development has remained elusive. This study employed expression analysis and morpholino-mediated knockdown in zebrafish in concert with bioinformatics and biochemical approaches to investigate CISH function. Two zebrafish CISH paralogs were identified, cish.a and cish.b, with high overall conservation (43-46% identity) with their mammalian counterparts. The cish.a gene was maternally derived, with transcripts present throughout embryogenesis, and increasing at 4-5 d after fertilization, whereas cish.b expression commenced at 8 h after fertilization. Expression of cish.a was regulated by the JAK2/STAT5 pathway via conserved tetrameric STAT5 binding sites (TTCN3GAA) in its promoter. Injection of morpholinos targeting cish.a, but not cish.b or control morpholinos, resulted in enhanced embryonic erythropoiesis, myelopoiesis, and lymphopoiesis, including a 2- 3-fold increase in erythrocytic markers. This occurred concomitantly with increased activation of STAT5. This study indicates that CISH functions as a conserved in vivo target and regulator of STAT5 in the control of embryonic hematopoiesis. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. Analysis of the meiotic transcriptome reveals the genes related to the regulation of pollen abortion in cytoplasmic male-sterile pepper (Capsicum annuum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yilan; Liao, Lijuan; Jin, Xiaorui; Mao, Dandan; Liu, Rushi

    2018-01-30

    CMS, which refers to the inability to generate functional pollen grains while still producing a normal gynoecium, has been widely used for pepper hybrid seed production. Pepper line 8214A is an excellent CMS line exhibiting 100% male sterility and superior economic characteristics. A TUNEL assay revealed the nuclear DNA is damaged in 8214A PMCs during meiosis. TEM images indicated that the 8214A PMCs exhibited asynchronous meiosis after prophase I, and some PMCs degraded prematurely with morphological features typical of PCD. Additionally, at the end of meiosis, the 8214A PMCs formed abnormal non-tetrahedral tetrads that degraded in situ. To identify the genes involved in the pollen abortion of line 8214A, the transcriptional profiles of the 8214A and the 8214B anthers (i.e., from the fertile maintainer line) during meiosis were analyzed using an RNA-seq approach. A total of 1355 genes were determined to be differentially expressed, including 424 and 931 up- and down- regulated genes, respectively, in the 8214A anthers during meiosis relative to the expression levels in the 8214B. The expression levels of ubiquitin ligase and cell cycle-related genes were apparently down-regulated, while the expression of methyltransferase genes was up-regulated in the 8214A anthers during meiosis, which likely contributed to the PCD of these PMCs during meiosis. Thus, our results may be useful for revealing the molecular mechanism regulating the pollen abortion of CMS pepper. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Structural analyses of the Ankyrin Repeat Domain of TRPV6 and related TRPV ion channels†‡

    OpenAIRE

    Phelps, Christopher B.; Huang, Robert J.; Lishko, Polina V.; Wang, Ruiqi R.; Gaudet, Rachelle

    2008-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) proteins are cation channels composed of a transmembrane domain flanked by large N- and C-terminal cytoplasmic domains. All members of the vanilloid family of TRP channels (TRPV) possess an N-terminal ankyrin repeat domain (ARD). The ARD of mammalian TRPV6, an important regulator of calcium uptake and homeostasis, is essential for channel assembly and regulation. The 1.7 Å crystal structure of the TRPV6-ARD reveals conserved structural elements unique to the...

  10. Phospho-Caveolin-1 Mediates Integrin-Regulated Membrane Domain Internalisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Pozo, Miguel A.; Alderson, Nazilla B.; Grande-García, Araceli; Balasubramanian, Nagaraj; Schwartz, Martin A.; Kiosses, William B.; Anderson, Richard G.W.

    2005-01-01

    Growth of normal cells is anchorage-dependent because signalling through multiple pathways including Erk, PI 3-kinase and Rac requires integrin-mediated cell adhesion 1. Components of these pathways localize to low density, cholesterol-rich domains in the plasma membrane named “lipid rafts” 2,3 or “cholesterol enriched membrane microdomains” (CEMM) 4. We previously reported that integrin-mediated adhesion regulates CEMM trafficking such that cell detachment from the extracellular matrix (ECM) triggers CEMM internalisation and clearance from the plasma membrane 5. We now report that this internalisation is mediated by dynamin-2 and caveolin-1. Internalisation requires phosphorylation of caveolin-1 on tyrosine 14. A shift in localisation of phospho-caveolin-1 from focal adhesions to caveolae induces CEMM internalisation upon cell detachment, which mediates inhibition of Erk, PI 3-kinase and Rac. These data define a novel molecular mechanism for growth and tumour suppression by caveolin-1. PMID:16113676

  11. Engineering FKBP-Based Destabilizing Domains to Build Sophisticated Protein Regulation Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenlin An

    Full Text Available Targeting protein stability with small molecules has emerged as an effective tool to control protein abundance in a fast, scalable and reversible manner. The technique involves tagging a protein of interest (POI with a destabilizing domain (DD specifically controlled by a small molecule. The successful construction of such fusion proteins may, however, be limited by functional interference of the DD epitope with electrostatic interactions required for full biological function of proteins. Another drawback of this approach is the remaining endogenous protein. Here, we combined the Cre-LoxP system with an advanced DD and generated a protein regulation system in which the loss of an endogenous protein, in our case the tumor suppressor PTEN, can be coupled directly with a conditionally fine-tunable DD-PTEN. This new system will consolidate and extend the use of DD-technology to control protein function precisely in living cells and animal models.

  12. Human regulator of telomere elongation helicase 1 (RTEL1) is required for the nuclear and cytoplasmic trafficking of pre-U2 RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Schertzer , Michael; Jouravleva , Karina; Perderiset , Mylène; Dingli , Florent; Loew , Damarys; Le Guen , Tangui; Bardoni , Barbara; De Villartay , Jean-Pierre; Revy , Patrick; Londono-Vallejo , Arturo

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Hoyeraal-Hreidarsson syndrome (HHS) is a severe form of Dyskeratosis congenita characterized by developmental defects, bone marrow failure and im-munodeficiency and has been associated with telom-ere dysfunction. Recently, mutations in Regulator of Telomere ELongation helicase 1 (RTEL1), a helicase first identified in Mus musculus as being responsible for the maintenance of long telomeres, have been identified in several HHS patients. Here we show that RTEL1 is require...

  13. Focused transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex modulates specific domains of self-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pripfl, Jürgen; Lamm, Claus

    2015-02-01

    Recent neuroscience theories suggest that different kinds of self-regulation may share a common psychobiological mechanism. However, empirical evidence for a domain general self-regulation mechanism is scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate whether focused anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), facilitating the activity of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC), acts on a domain general self-regulation mechanism and thus modulates both affective and appetitive self-regulation. Twenty smokers participated in this within-subject sham controlled study. Effects of anodal left, anodal right and sham tDCS over the dlPFC on affective picture appraisal and nicotine craving-cue appraisal were assessed. Anodal right tDCS over the dlPFC reduced negative affect in emotion appraisal, but neither modulated regulation of positive emotion appraisal nor of craving appraisal. Anodal left stimulation did not induce any significant effects. The results of our study show that domain specific self-regulation networks are at work in the prefrontal cortex. Focused tDCS modulation of this specific self-regulation network could probably be used during the first phase of nicotine abstinence, during which negative affect might easily result in relapse. These findings have implications for neuroscience models of self-regulation and are of relevance for the development of brain stimulation based treatment methods for neuropsychiatric disorders associated with self-regulation deficits. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and the Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Allosteric Regulation in the Ligand Binding Domain of Retinoic Acid Receptorγ.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yassmine Chebaro

    Full Text Available Retinoic acid (RA plays key roles in cell differentiation and growth arrest through nuclear retinoic acid receptors (RARs, which are ligand-dependent transcription factors. While the main trigger of RAR activation is the binding of RA, phosphorylation of the receptors has also emerged as an important regulatory signal. Phosphorylation of the RARγ N-terminal domain (NTD is known to play a functional role in neuronal differentiation. In this work, we investigated the phosphorylation of RARγ ligand binding domain (LBD, and present evidence that the phosphorylation status of the LBD affects the phosphorylation of the NTD region. We solved the X-ray structure of a phospho-mimetic mutant of the LBD (RARγ S371E, which we used in molecular dynamics simulations to characterize the consequences of the S371E mutation on the RARγ structural dynamics. Combined with simulations of the wild-type LBD, we show that the conformational equilibria of LBD salt bridges (notably R387-D340 are affected by the S371E mutation, which likely affects the recruitment of the kinase complex that phosphorylates the NTD. The molecular dynamics simulations also showed that a conservative mutation in this salt bridge (R387K affects the dynamics of the LBD without inducing large conformational changes. Finally, cellular assays showed that the phosphorylation of the NTD of RARγ is differentially regulated by retinoic acid in RARγWT and in the S371N, S371E and R387K mutants. This multidisciplinary work highlights an allosteric coupling between phosphorylations of the LBD and the NTD of RARγ and supports the importance of structural dynamics involving electrostatic interactions in the regulation of RARs activity.

  15. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) regulates proliferation of endochondral cells in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Ikuma; Hisaki, Tomoka; Sugiura, Koji; Naito, Kunihiko; Kano, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase. ► DDR2 regulates cell proliferation, cell adhesion, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling. ► We produced in vitro and in vivo model to better understand the role of DDR2. ► DDR2 might play an inhibitory role in the proliferation of chondrocyte. -- Abstract: Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is activated by fibrillar collagens. DDR2 regulates cell proliferation, cell adhesion, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling. The decrement of endogenous DDR2 represses osteoblastic marker gene expression and osteogenic differentiation in murine preosteoblastic cells, but the functions of DDR2 in chondrogenic cellular proliferation remain unclear. To better understand the role of DDR2 signaling in cellular proliferation in endochondral ossification, we inhibited Ddr2 expression via the inhibitory effect of miRNA on Ddr2 mRNA (miDdr2) and analyzed the cellular proliferation and differentiation in the prechondrocyte ATDC5 cell lines. To investigate DDR2’s molecular role in endochondral cellular proliferation in vivo, we also produced transgenic mice in which the expression of truncated, kinase dead (KD) DDR2 protein is induced, and evaluated the DDR2 function in cellular proliferation in chondrocytes. Although the miDdr2-transfected ATDC5 cell lines retained normal differentiation ability, DDR2 reduction finally promoted cellular proliferation in proportion to the decreasing ratio of Ddr2 expression, and it also promoted earlier differentiation to cartilage cells by insulin induction. The layer of hypertrophic chondrocytes in KD Ddr2 transgenic mice was not significantly thicker than that of normal littermates, but the layer of proliferative chondrocytes in KD-Ddr2 transgenic mice was significantly thicker than that of normal littermates. Taken together, our data demonstrated that DDR2 might play a local and essential role in the

  16. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) regulates proliferation of endochondral cells in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, Ikuma; Hisaki, Tomoka; Sugiura, Koji; Naito, Kunihiko [Laboratory of Applied Genetics, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Kano, Kiyoshi, E-mail: kanokiyo@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Developmental Biology, Joint Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi 753-8515, Japan. (Japan); Biomedical Science Center for Translational Research (BSCTR), The United Graduate School of Veterinary Science, Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi 753-8515 (Japan)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DDR2 regulates cell proliferation, cell adhesion, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We produced in vitro and in vivo model to better understand the role of DDR2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DDR2 might play an inhibitory role in the proliferation of chondrocyte. -- Abstract: Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is activated by fibrillar collagens. DDR2 regulates cell proliferation, cell adhesion, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling. The decrement of endogenous DDR2 represses osteoblastic marker gene expression and osteogenic differentiation in murine preosteoblastic cells, but the functions of DDR2 in chondrogenic cellular proliferation remain unclear. To better understand the role of DDR2 signaling in cellular proliferation in endochondral ossification, we inhibited Ddr2 expression via the inhibitory effect of miRNA on Ddr2 mRNA (miDdr2) and analyzed the cellular proliferation and differentiation in the prechondrocyte ATDC5 cell lines. To investigate DDR2's molecular role in endochondral cellular proliferation in vivo, we also produced transgenic mice in which the expression of truncated, kinase dead (KD) DDR2 protein is induced, and evaluated the DDR2 function in cellular proliferation in chondrocytes. Although the miDdr2-transfected ATDC5 cell lines retained normal differentiation ability, DDR2 reduction finally promoted cellular proliferation in proportion to the decreasing ratio of Ddr2 expression, and it also promoted earlier differentiation to cartilage cells by insulin induction. The layer of hypertrophic chondrocytes in KD Ddr2 transgenic mice was not significantly thicker than that of normal littermates, but the layer of proliferative chondrocytes in KD-Ddr2 transgenic mice was significantly thicker than that of normal littermates

  17. Inhibitory PAS domain protein is a negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Yuichi; Cao, Renhai; Svensson, Kristian; Bertilsson, Göran; Asman, Mikael; Tanaka, Hirotoshi; Cao, Yihai; Berkenstam, Anders; Poellinger, Lorenz

    2001-11-01

    Alteration of gene expression is a crucial component of adaptive responses to hypoxia. These responses are mediated by hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs). Here we describe an inhibitory PAS (Per/Arnt/Sim) domain protein, IPAS, which is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)/PAS protein structurally related to HIFs. IPAS contains no endogenous transactivation function but demonstrates dominant negative regulation of HIF-mediated control of gene expression. Ectopic expression of IPAS in hepatoma cells selectively impairs induction of genes involved in adaptation to a hypoxic environment, notably the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene, and results in retarded tumour growth and tumour vascular density in vivo. In mice, IPAS was predominantly expressed in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum and in corneal epithelium of the eye. Expression of IPAS in the cornea correlates with low levels of expression of the VEGF gene under hypoxic conditions. Application of an IPAS antisense oligonucleotide to the mouse cornea induced angiogenesis under normal oxygen conditions, and demonstrated hypoxia-dependent induction of VEGF gene expression in hypoxic corneal cells. These results indicate a previously unknown mechanism for negative regulation of angiogenesis and maintenance of an avascular phenotype.

  18. Mapping of ESE-1 subdomains required to initiate mammary epithelial cell transformation via a cytoplasmic mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tentler John J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ETS family transcription factor ESE-1 is often overexpressed in human breast cancer. ESE-1 initiates transformation of MCF-12A cells via a non-transcriptional, cytoplasmic process that is mediated by a unique 40-amino acid serine and aspartic acid rich (SAR subdomain, whereas, ESE-1's nuclear transcriptional property is required to maintain the transformed phenotype of MCF7, ZR-75-1 and T47D breast cancer cells. Results To map the minimal functional nuclear localization (NLS and nuclear export (NES signals, we fused in-frame putative NLS and NES motifs between GFP and the SAR domain. Using these GFP constructs as reporters of subcellular localization, we mapped a single NLS to six basic amino acids (242HGKRRR247 in the AT-hook and two CRM1-dependent NES motifs, one to the pointed domain (NES1: 102LCNCALEELRL112 and another to the DNA binding domain (DBD, (NES2: 275LWEFIRDILI284. Moreover, analysis of a putative NLS located in the DBD (316GQKKKNSN323 by a similar GFP-SAR reporter or by internal deletion of the DBD, revealed this sequence to lack NLS activity. To assess the role of NES2 in regulating ESE-1 subcellular localization and subsequent transformation potency, we site-specifically mutagenized NES2, within full-length GFP-ESE-1 and GFP-NES2-SAR reporter constructs. These studies show that site-specific mutation of NES2 completely abrogates ESE-1 transforming activity. Furthermore, we show that exclusive cytoplasmic targeting of the SAR domain is sufficient to initiate transformation, and we report that an intact SAR domain is required, since block mutagenesis reveals that an intact SAR domain is necessary to maintain its full transforming potency. Finally, using a monoclonal antibody targeting the SAR domain, we demonstrate that the SAR domain contains a region accessible for protein - protein interactions. Conclusions These data highlight that ESE-1 contains NLS and NES signals that play a critical role in

  19. The Human Escort Protein Hep Binds to the ATPase Domain of Mitochondrial Hsp70 and Regulates ATP Hydrolysis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Peng; Stanworth, Crystal; Liu, Shirley; Silberg, Jonathan J.

    2008-01-01

    Hsp70 escort proteins (Hep) have been implicated as essential for maintaining the function of yeast mitochondrial hsp70 molecular chaperones (mtHsp70), but the role that escort proteins play in regulating mammalian chaperone folding and function has not been established. We present evidence that human mtHsp70 exhibits limited solubility due to aggregation mediated by its ATPase domain and show that human Hep directly enhances chaperone solubility through interactions with this domain. In the absence of Hep, mtHsp70 was insoluble when expressed in Escherichia coli, as was its isolated ATPase domain and a chimera having this domain fused to the peptide-binding domain of HscA, a soluble monomeric chaperone. In contrast, these proteins all exhibited increased solubility when expressed in the presence of Hep. In vitro studies further revealed that purified Hep regulates the interaction of mtHsp70 with nucleotides. Full-length mtHsp70 exhibited slow intrinsic ATP hydrolysis activity (6.8 ± 0.2 × 10-4 s-1) at 25 °C, which was stimulated up to 49-fold by Hep. Hep also stimulated the activity of the isolated ATPase domain, albeit to a lower maximal extent (11.5-fold). In addition, gel-filtration studies showed that formation of chaperone-escort protein complexes inhibited mtHsp70 self-association, and they revealed that Hep binding to full-length mtHsp70 and its isolated ATPase domain is strongest in the absence of nucleotides. These findings provide evidence that metazoan escort proteins regulate the catalytic activity and solubility of their cognate chaperones, and they indicate that both forms of regulation arise from interactions with the mtHsp70 ATPase domain. PMID:18632665

  20. The human escort protein Hep binds to the ATPase domain of mitochondrial hsp70 and regulates ATP hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Peng; Stanworth, Crystal; Liu, Shirley; Silberg, Jonathan J

    2008-09-19

    Hsp70 escort proteins (Hep) have been implicated as essential for maintaining the function of yeast mitochondrial hsp70 molecular chaperones (mtHsp70), but the role that escort proteins play in regulating mammalian chaperone folding and function has not been established. We present evidence that human mtHsp70 exhibits limited solubility due to aggregation mediated by its ATPase domain and show that human Hep directly enhances chaperone solubility through interactions with this domain. In the absence of Hep, mtHsp70 was insoluble when expressed in Escherichia coli, as was its isolated ATPase domain and a chimera having this domain fused to the peptide-binding domain of HscA, a soluble monomeric chaperone. In contrast, these proteins all exhibited increased solubility when expressed in the presence of Hep. In vitro studies further revealed that purified Hep regulates the interaction of mtHsp70 with nucleotides. Full-length mtHsp70 exhibited slow intrinsic ATP hydrolysis activity (6.8+/-0.2 x 10(-4) s(-1)) at 25 degrees C, which was stimulated up to 49-fold by Hep. Hep also stimulated the activity of the isolated ATPase domain, albeit to a lower maximal extent (11.5-fold). In addition, gel-filtration studies showed that formation of chaperone-escort protein complexes inhibited mtHsp70 self-association, and they revealed that Hep binding to full-length mtHsp70 and its isolated ATPase domain is strongest in the absence of nucleotides. These findings provide evidence that metazoan escort proteins regulate the catalytic activity and solubility of their cognate chaperones, and they indicate that both forms of regulation arise from interactions with the mtHsp70 ATPase domain.

  1. Cytoplasmic influence of nucleolar development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, Sibdas

    1974-01-01

    The role of cytoplasmic factors on the development of nucleolus in nucleus has been investigated in Ehrlich mouse ascites tumour cells using tritiated thymidine/uridine for autoradiography. It is inferred from the observations that the cytoplasmic factors has some but not absolute control over the development of nucleolus. (M.G.B.)

  2. A conserved inter-domain communication mechanism regulates the ATPase activity of the AAA-protein Drg1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prattes, Michael; Loibl, Mathias; Zisser, Gertrude; Luschnig, Daniel; Kappel, Lisa; Rössler, Ingrid; Grassegger, Manuela; Hromic, Altijana; Krieger, Elmar; Gruber, Karl; Pertschy, Brigitte; Bergler, Helmut

    2017-03-17

    AAA-ATPases fulfil essential roles in different cellular pathways and often act in form of hexameric complexes. Interaction with pathway-specific substrate and adaptor proteins recruits them to their targets and modulates their catalytic activity. This substrate dependent regulation of ATP hydrolysis in the AAA-domains is mediated by a non-catalytic N-terminal domain. The exact mechanisms that transmit the signal from the N-domain and coordinate the individual AAA-domains in the hexameric complex are still the topic of intensive research. Here, we present the characterization of a novel mutant variant of the eukaryotic AAA-ATPase Drg1 that shows dysregulation of ATPase activity and altered interaction with Rlp24, its substrate in ribosome biogenesis. This defective regulation is the consequence of amino acid exchanges at the interface between the regulatory N-domain and the adjacent D1 AAA-domain. The effects caused by these mutations strongly resemble those of pathological mutations of the AAA-ATPase p97 which cause the hereditary proteinopathy IBMPFD (inclusion body myopathy associated with Paget's disease of the bone and frontotemporal dementia). Our results therefore suggest well conserved mechanisms of regulation between structurally, but not functionally related members of the AAA-family.

  3. The MARVEL domain protein Nce102 regulates actin organization and invasive growth of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Lois M; Wang, Hong X; Konopka, James B

    2013-11-26

    Invasive growth of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans into tissues promotes disseminated infections in humans. The plasma membrane is essential for pathogenesis because this important barrier mediates morphogenesis and invasive growth, as well as secretion of virulence factors, cell wall synthesis, nutrient import, and other processes. Previous studies showed that the Sur7 tetraspan protein that localizes to MCC (membrane compartment occupied by Can1)/eisosome subdomains of the plasma membrane regulates a broad range of key functions, including cell wall synthesis, morphogenesis, and resistance to copper. Therefore, a distinct tetraspan protein found in MCC/eisosomes, Nce102, was investigated. Nce102 belongs to the MARVEL domain protein family, which is implicated in regulating membrane structure and function. Deletion of NCE102 did not cause the broad defects seen in sur7Δ cells. Instead, the nce102Δ mutant displayed a unique phenotype in that it was defective in forming hyphae and invading low concentrations of agar but could invade well in higher agar concentrations. This phenotype was likely due to a defect in actin organization that was observed by phalloidin staining. In support of this, the invasive growth defect of a bni1Δ mutant that mislocalizes actin due to lack of the Bni1 formin was also reversed at high agar concentrations. This suggests that a denser matrix provides a signal that compensates for the actin defects. The nce102Δ mutant displayed decreased virulence and formed abnormal hyphae in mice. These studies identify novel ways that Nce102 and the physical environment surrounding C. albicans regulate morphogenesis and pathogenesis. The plasma membrane promotes virulence of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans by acting as a protective barrier around the cell and mediating dynamic activities, such as morphogenesis, cell wall synthesis, secretion of virulence factors, and nutrient uptake. To better understand how the plasma membrane

  4. Adaptor protein containing PH domain, PTB domain and leucine zipper (APPL1) regulates the protein level of EGFR by modulating its trafficking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae-Rin; Hahn, Hwa-Sun; Kim, Young-Hoon; Nguyen, Hong-Hoa; Yang, Jun-Mo; Kang, Jong-Sun; Hahn, Myong-Joon

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► APPL1 regulates the protein level of EGFR in response to EGF stimulation. ► Depletion of APPL1 accelerates the movement of EGF/EGFR from the cell surface to the perinuclear region in response to EGF. ► Knockdown of APPL1 enhances the activity of Rab5. -- Abstract: The EGFR-mediated signaling pathway regulates multiple biological processes such as cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Previously APPL1 (adaptor protein containing PH domain, PTB domain and leucine zipper 1) has been reported to function as a downstream effector of EGF-initiated signaling. Here we demonstrate that APPL1 regulates EGFR protein levels in response to EGF stimulation. Overexpression of APPL1 enhances EGFR stabilization while APPL1 depletion by siRNA reduces EGFR protein levels. APPL1 depletion accelerates EGFR internalization and movement of EGF/EGFR from cell surface to the perinuclear region in response to EGF treatment. Conversely, overexpression of APPL1 decelerates EGFR internalization and translocation of EGF/EGFR to the perinuclear region. Furthermore, APPL1 depletion enhances the activity of Rab5 which is involved in internalization and trafficking of EGFR and inhibition of Rab5 in APPL1-depleted cells restored EGFR levels. Consistently, APPL1 depletion reduced activation of Akt, the downstream signaling effector of EGFR and this is restored by inhibition of Rab5. These findings suggest that APPL1 is required for EGFR signaling by regulation of EGFR stabilities through inhibition of Rab5.

  5. The Arabidopsis Cysteine-Rich Receptor-Like Kinase CRK36 Regulates Immunity through Interaction with the Cytoplasmic Kinase BIK1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Sook Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Receptor-like kinases are important signaling components that regulate a variety of cellular processes. In this study, an Arabidopsis cDNA microarray analysis led to the identification of the cysteine-rich receptor-like kinase CRK36 responsive to the necrotrophic fungal pathogen, Alternaria brassicicola. To determine the function of CRK36 in plant immunity, T-DNA-insertion knockdown (crk36 and overexpressing (CRK36OE plants were prepared. CRK36OE plants exhibited increased hypersensitive cell death and ROS burst in response to avirulent pathogens. Treatment with a typical pathogen-associated molecular pattern, flg22, markedly induced pattern-triggered immune responses, notably stomatal defense, in CRK36OE plants. The immune responses were weakened in crk36 plants. Protein-protein interaction assays revealed the in vivo association of CRK36, FLS2, and BIK1. CRK36 enhanced flg22-triggered BIK1 phosphorylation, which showed defects with Cys mutations in the DUF26 motifs of CRK36. Disruption of BIK1 and RbohD/RbohF genes further impaired CRK36-mediated stomatal defense. We propose that CRK36, together with BIK1 and NADPH oxidases, may form a positive activation loop that enhances ROS burst and leads to the promotion of stomatal immunity.

  6. Roles of the SH2 and SH3 domains in the regulation of neuronal Src kinase functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groveman, Bradley R; Xue, Sheng; Marin, Vedrana; Xu, Jindong; Ali, Mohammad K; Bienkiewicz, Ewa A; Yu, Xian-Min

    2011-02-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that intra-domain interactions between Src family kinases (SFKs), stabilized by binding of the phosphorylated C-terminus to the SH2 domain and/or binding of the SH2 kinase linker to the SH3 domain, lock the molecules in a closed conformation, disrupt the kinase active site, and inactivate SFKs. Here we report that the up-regulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) induced by expression of constitutively active neuronal Src (n-Src), in which the C-terminus tyrosine is mutated to phenylalanine (n-Src/Y535F), is significantly reduced by dysfunctions of the SH2 and/or SH3 domains of the protein. Furthermore, we found that dysfunctions of SH2 and/or SH3 domains reduce auto-phosphorylation of the kinase activation loop, depress kinase activity, and decrease NMDAR phosphorylation. The SH2 domain plays a greater regulatory role than the SH3 domain. Our data also show that n-Src binds directly to the C-terminus of the NMDAR NR2A subunit in vitro, with a K(D) of 108.2 ± 13.3 nM. This binding is not Src kinase activity-dependent, and dysfunctions of the SH2 and/or SH3 domains do not significantly affect the binding. These data indicate that the SH2 and SH3 domains may function to promote the catalytic activity of active n-Src, which is important in the regulation of NMDAR functions. © 2010 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 FEBS.

  7. Cellular prion protein expression is not regulated by the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Lewis

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence of molecular and cellular links between Alzheimer's disease (AD and prion diseases. The cellular prion protein, PrP(C, modulates the post-translational processing of the AD amyloid precursor protein (APP, through its inhibition of the β-secretase BACE1, and oligomers of amyloid-β bind to PrP(C which may mediate amyloid-β neurotoxicity. In addition, the APP intracellular domain (AICD, which acts as a transcriptional regulator, has been reported to control the expression of PrP(C. Through the use of transgenic mice, cell culture models and manipulation of APP expression and processing, this study aimed to clarify the role of AICD in regulating PrP(C. Over-expression of the three major isoforms of human APP (APP(695, APP(751 and APP(770 in cultured neuronal and non-neuronal cells had no effect on the level of endogenous PrP(C. Furthermore, analysis of brain tissue from transgenic mice over-expressing either wild type or familial AD associated mutant human APP revealed unaltered PrP(C levels. Knockdown of endogenous APP expression in cells by siRNA or inhibition of γ-secretase activity also had no effect on PrP(C levels. Overall, we did not detect any significant difference in the expression of PrP(C in any of the cell or animal-based paradigms considered, indicating that the control of cellular PrP(C levels by AICD is not as straightforward as previously suggested.

  8. Impact of the [delta]F508 Mutation in First Nucleotide-binding Domain of Human Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator on Domain Folding and Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Hal A.; Zhao, Xun; Wang, Chi; Sauder, J. Michael; Rooney, Isabelle; Noland, Brian W.; Lorimer, Don; Kearins, Margaret C.; Conners, Kris; Condon, Brad; Maloney, Peter C.; Guggino, William B.; Hunt, John F.; Emtage, Spencer (SG); (Columbia); (JHU)

    2010-07-19

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), commonly the deletion of residue Phe-508 (DeltaF508) in the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1), which results in a severe reduction in the population of functional channels at the epithelial cell surface. Previous studies employing incomplete NBD1 domains have attributed this to aberrant folding of DeltaF508 NBD1. We report structural and biophysical studies on complete human NBD1 domains, which fail to demonstrate significant changes of in vitro stability or folding kinetics in the presence or absence of the DeltaF508 mutation. Crystal structures show minimal changes in protein conformation but substantial changes in local surface topography at the site of the mutation, which is located in the region of NBD1 believed to interact with the first membrane spanning domain of CFTR. These results raise the possibility that the primary effect of DeltaF508 is a disruption of proper interdomain interactions at this site in CFTR rather than interference with the folding of NBD1. Interestingly, increases in the stability of NBD1 constructs are observed upon introduction of second-site mutations that suppress the trafficking defect caused by the DeltaF508 mutation, suggesting that these suppressors might function indirectly by improving the folding efficiency of NBD1 in the context of the full-length protein. The human NBD1 structures also solidify the understanding of CFTR regulation by showing that its two protein segments that can be phosphorylated both adopt multiple conformations that modulate access to the ATPase active site and functional interdomain interfaces.

  9. DMPD: Critical role of toll-like receptors and nucleotide oligomerisation domain inthe regulation of health and disease. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available and nucleotide oligomerisation domain inthe regulation of health and disease. Pu...bmedID 17535871 Title Critical role of toll-like receptors and nucleotide oligomerisation domain inthe regulation of health...17535871 Critical role of toll-like receptors and nucleotide oligomerisation domain inthe regulation of heal...th and disease. Mitchell JA, Paul-Clark MJ, Clarke GW, McMaster SK, Cartwright N. J

  10. Regulation of EGF receptor signaling by the MARVEL domain-containing protein CKLFSF8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Caining; Ding, Peiguo; Wang, Ying; Ma, Dalong

    2005-11-21

    It is known that chemokine-like factor superfamily 8 (CKLFSF8), a member of the CKLF superfamily, has four putative transmembrane regions and a MARVEL domain. Its structure is similar to TM4SF11 (plasmolipin) and widely distributed in normal tissue. However, its function is not yet known. We show here that CKLFSF8 is associated with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and that ectopic expression of CKLFSF8 in several cell lines suppresses EGF-induced cell proliferation, whereas knockdown of CKLFSF8 by siRNA promotes cell proliferation. In cells overexpressing CKLFSF8, the initial activation of EGFR was not affected, but subsequent desensitization of EGF-induced signaling occurred rapidly. This attenuation was correlated with an increased rate of receptor endocytosis. In contrast, knockdown of CKLFSF8 by siCKLFSF8 delayed EGFR endocytosis. These results identify CKLFSF8 as a novel regulator of EGF-induced signaling and indicate that the association of EGFR with four transmembrane proteins is critical for EGFR desensitization.

  11. Arabidopsis COLD SHOCK DOMAIN PROTEIN2 is a RNA chaperone that is regulated by cold and developmental signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Kentaro; Kim, Myung-Hee; Imai, Ryozo

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial cold shock proteins (CSPs) are RNA chaperones that unwind RNA secondary structures. Arabidopsis COLD SHOCK DOMAIN PROTEIN2 (AtCSP2) contains a domain that is shared with bacterial CSPs. Here we showed that AtCSP2 binds to RNA and unwinds nucleic acid duplex. Heterologous expression of AtCSP2 complemented cold sensitivity of an Escherichia coli csp quadruple mutant, indicating that AtCSP2 function as a RNA chaperone in E. coli. AtCSP2 mRNA and protein levels increased during cold acclimation, but the protein accumulation was most prominent after 10 days of cold treatment. AtCSP2 promoter::GUS transgenic plants revealed that AtCSP2 is expressed only in root and shoot apical regions during vegetative growth but is expressed in reproductive organs such as pollens, ovules and embryos. These data indicated that AtCSP2 is involved in developmental processes as well as cold adaptation. Localization of AtCSP2::GFP in nucleolus and cytoplasm suggested different nuclear and cytosolic RNA targets

  12. Site-Specific Phosphorylation of PSD-95 PDZ Domains Reveals Fine-Tuned Regulation of Protein-Protein Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Søren W; Albertsen, Louise; Moran, Griffin E

    2017-01-01

    The postsynaptic density protein of 95 kDa (PSD-95) is a key scaffolding protein that controls signaling at synapses in the brain through interactions of its PDZ domains with the C-termini of receptors, ion channels, and enzymes. PSD-95 is highly regulated by phosphorylation. To explore the effec...

  13. Regulation of abiotic stress signalling by Arabidopsis C-terminal domain phosphatase-like 1 requires interaction with a k-homology domain-containing protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Sil Jeong

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis thaliana CARBOXYL-TERMINAL DOMAIN (CTD PHOSPHATASE-LIKE 1 (CPL1 regulates plant transcriptional responses to diverse stress signals. Unlike typical CTD phosphatases, CPL1 contains two double-stranded (ds RNA binding motifs (dsRBMs at its C-terminus. Some dsRBMs can bind to dsRNA and/or other proteins, but the function of the CPL1 dsRBMs has remained obscure. Here, we report identification of REGULATOR OF CBF GENE EXPRESSION 3 (RCF3 as a CPL1-interacting protein. RCF3 co-purified with tandem-affinity-tagged CPL1 from cultured Arabidopsis cells and contains multiple K-homology (KH domains, which were predicted to be important for binding to single-stranded DNA/RNA. Yeast two-hybrid, luciferase complementation imaging, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses established that CPL1 and RCF3 strongly associate in vivo, an interaction mediated by the dsRBM1 of CPL1 and the KH3/KH4 domains of RCF3. Mapping of functional regions of CPL1 indicated that CPL1 in vivo function requires the dsRBM1, catalytic activity, and nuclear targeting of CPL1. Gene expression profiles of rcf3 and cpl1 mutants were similar during iron deficiency, but were distinct during the cold response. These results suggest that tethering CPL1 to RCF3 via dsRBM1 is part of the mechanism that confers specificity to CPL1-mediated transcriptional regulation.

  14. The external PASTA domain of the essential serine/threonine protein kinase PknB regulates mycobacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turapov, Obolbek; Loraine, Jessica; Jenkins, Christopher H; Barthe, Philippe; McFeely, Daniel; Forti, Francesca; Ghisotti, Daniela; Hesek, Dusan; Lee, Mijoon; Bottrill, Andrew R; Vollmer, Waldemar; Mobashery, Shahriar; Cohen-Gonsaud, Martin; Mukamolova, Galina V

    2015-07-01

    PknB is an essential serine/threonine protein kinase required for mycobacterial cell division and cell-wall biosynthesis. Here we demonstrate that overexpression of the external PknB_PASTA domain in mycobacteria results in delayed regrowth, accumulation of elongated bacteria and increased sensitivity to β-lactam antibiotics. These changes are accompanied by altered production of certain enzymes involved in cell-wall biosynthesis as revealed by proteomics studies. The growth inhibition caused by overexpression of the PknB_PASTA domain is completely abolished by enhanced concentration of magnesium ions, but not muropeptides. Finally, we show that the addition of recombinant PASTA domain could prevent regrowth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and therefore offers an alternative opportunity to control replication of this pathogen. These results suggest that the PknB_PASTA domain is involved in regulation of peptidoglycan biosynthesis and maintenance of cell-wall architecture.

  15. PH Domain-Arf G Protein Interactions Localize the Arf-GEF Steppke for Cleavage Furrow Regulation in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghoon M Lee

    Full Text Available The recruitment of GDP/GTP exchange factors (GEFs to specific subcellular sites dictates where they activate small G proteins for the regulation of various cellular processes. Cytohesins are a conserved family of plasma membrane GEFs for Arf small G proteins that regulate endocytosis. Analyses of mammalian cytohesins have identified a number of recruitment mechanisms for these multi-domain proteins, but the conservation and developmental roles for these mechanisms are unclear. Here, we report how the pleckstrin homology (PH domain of the Drosophila cytohesin Steppke affects its localization and activity at cleavage furrows of the early embryo. We found that the PH domain is necessary for Steppke furrow localization, and for it to regulate furrow structure. However, the PH domain was not sufficient for the localization. Next, we examined the role of conserved PH domain amino acid residues that are required for mammalian cytohesins to bind PIP3 or GTP-bound Arf G proteins. We confirmed that the Steppke PH domain preferentially binds PIP3 in vitro through a conserved mechanism. However, disruption of residues for PIP3 binding had no apparent effect on GFP-Steppke localization and effects. Rather, residues for binding to GTP-bound Arf G proteins made major contributions to this Steppke localization and activity. By analyzing GFP-tagged Arf and Arf-like small G proteins, we found that Arf1-GFP, Arf6-GFP and Arl4-GFP, but not Arf4-GFP, localized to furrows. However, analyses of embryos depleted of Arf1, Arf6 or Arl4 revealed either earlier defects than occur in embryos depleted of Steppke, or no detectable furrow defects, possibly because of redundancies, and thus it was difficult to assess how individual Arf small G proteins affect Steppke. Nonetheless, our data show that the Steppke PH domain and its conserved residues for binding to GTP-bound Arf G proteins have substantial effects on Steppke localization and activity in early Drosophila embryos.

  16. Cellular Subcompartments through Cytoplasmic Streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieuchot, Laurent; Lai, Julian; Loh, Rachel Ann; Leong, Fong Yew; Chiam, Keng-Hwee; Stajich, Jason; Jedd, Gregory

    2015-08-24

    Cytoplasmic streaming occurs in diverse cell types, where it generally serves a transport function. Here, we examine streaming in multicellular fungal hyphae and identify an additional function wherein regimented streaming forms distinct cytoplasmic subcompartments. In the hypha, cytoplasm flows directionally from cell to cell through septal pores. Using live-cell imaging and computer simulations, we identify a flow pattern that produces vortices (eddies) on the upstream side of the septum. Nuclei can be immobilized in these microfluidic eddies, where they form multinucleate aggregates and accumulate foci of the HDA-2 histone deacetylase-associated factor, SPA-19. Pores experiencing flow degenerate in the absence of SPA-19, suggesting that eddy-trapped nuclei function to reinforce the septum. Together, our data show that eddies comprise a subcellular niche favoring nuclear differentiation and that subcompartments can be self-organized as a consequence of regimented cytoplasmic streaming. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Unstructured Paramyxovirus Nucleocapsid Protein Tail Domain Modulates Viral Pathogenesis through Regulation of Transcriptase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Vidhi D; Cox, Robert M; Sawatsky, Bevan; da Fontoura Budaszewski, Renata; Sourimant, Julien; Wabbel, Katrin; Makhsous, Negar; Greninger, Alexander L; von Messling, Veronika; Plemper, Richard K

    2018-04-15

    pathogenesis. We show that internal deletions in this Ntail region of up to 55 amino acids in length are compatible with efficient replication of recombinant viruses in cell culture but result in gradual viral attenuation in a lethal canine distemper virus (CDV)/ferret model. Mechanistically, we demonstrate a role of the intact Ntail region in the regulation of viral transcriptase activity. Recombinant viruses with Ntail truncations induce protective immunity against lethal challenge of ferrets with pathogenic CDV. This identification of the unstructured central Ntail domain as a nonessential paramyxovirus pathogenesis factor establishes a foundation for harnessing Ntail truncations for vaccine engineering against emerging and reemerging members of the paramyxovirus family. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. The N domain of somatic angiotensin-converting enzyme negatively regulates ectodomain shedding and catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodman, Zenda L; Schwager, Sylva L U; Redelinghuys, Pierre; Carmona, Adriana K; Ehlers, Mario R W; Sturrock, Edward D

    2005-08-01

    sACE (somatic angiotensin-converting enzyme) consists of two homologous, N and C domains, whereas the testis isoenzyme [tACE (testis ACE)] consists of a single C domain. Both isoenzymes are shed from the cell surface by a sheddase activity, although sACE is shed much less efficiently than tACE. We hypothesize that the N domain of sACE plays a regulatory role, by occluding a recognition motif on the C domain required for ectodomain shedding and by influencing the catalytic efficiency. To test this, we constructed two mutants: CNdom-ACE and CCdom-ACE. CNdom-ACE was shed less efficiently than sACE, whereas CCdom-ACE was shed as efficiently as tACE. Notably, cleavage occurred both within the stalk and the interdomain bridge in both mutants, suggesting that a sheddase recognition motif resides within the C domain and is capable of directly cleaving at both positions. Analysis of the catalytic properties of the mutants and comparison with sACE and tACE revealed that the k(cat) for sACE and CNdom-ACE was less than or equal to the sum of the kcat values for tACE and the N-domain, suggesting negative co-operativity, whereas the kcat value for the CCdom-ACE suggested positive co-operativity between the two domains. Taken together, the results provide support for (i) the existence of a sheddase recognition motif in the C domain and (ii) molecular flexibility of the N and C domains in sACE, resulting in occlusion of the C-domain recognition motif by the N domain as well as close contact of the two domains during hydrolysis of peptide substrates.

  19. Regulation of the interaction between the neuronal BIN1 isoform 1 and Tau proteins - role of the SH3 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malki, Idir; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Sottejeau, Yoann; Lippens, Guy; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Landrieu, Isabelle

    2017-10-01

    Bridging integrator 1 (bin1) gene is a genetic determinant of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and has been reported to modulate Alzheimer's pathogenesis through pathway(s) involving Tau. The functional impact of Tau/BIN1 interaction as well as the molecular details of this interaction are still not fully resolved. As a consequence, how BIN1 through its interaction with Tau affects AD risk is also still not determined. To progress in this understanding, interaction of Tau with two BIN1 isoforms was investigated using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. 1 H, 15 N spectra showed that the C-terminal SH3 domain of BIN1 isoform 1 (BIN1Iso1) is not mobile in solution but locked with the core of the protein. In contrast, the SH3 domain of BIN1 isoform 9 (BIN1Iso9) behaves as an independent mobile domain. This reveals an equilibrium between close and open conformations for the SH3 domain. Interestingly, a 334-376 peptide from the clathrin and AP-2-binding domain (CLAP) domain of BIN1Iso1, which contains a SH3-binding site, is able to compete with BIN1-SH3 intramolecular interaction. For both BIN1 isoforms, the SH3 domain can interact with Tau(210-240) sequence. Tau(210-240) peptide can indeed displace the intramolecular interaction of the BIN1-SH3 of BIN1Iso1 and form a complex with the released domain. The measured K d were in agreement with a stronger affinity of Tau peptide. Both CLAP and Tau peptides occupied the same surface on the BIN1-SH3 domain, showing that their interaction is mutually exclusive. These results emphasize an additional level of complexity in the regulation of the interaction between BIN1 and Tau dependent of the BIN1 isoforms. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  20. The N domain of somatic angiotensin-converting enzyme negatively regulates ectodomain shedding and catalytic activity

    OpenAIRE

    Woodman, Zenda L.; Schwager, Sylva L. U.; Redelinghuys, Pierre; Carmona, Adriana K.; Ehlers, Mario R. W.; Sturrock, Edward D.

    2005-01-01

    sACE (somatic angiotensin-converting enzyme) consists of two homologous, N and C domains, whereas the testis isoenzyme [tACE (testis ACE)] consists of a single C domain. Both isoenzymes are shed from the cell surface by a sheddase activity, although sACE is shed much less efficiently than tACE. We hypothesize that the N domain of sACE plays a regulatory role, by occluding a recognition motif on the C domain required for ectodomain shedding and by influencing the catalytic efficiency. To test ...

  1. The juxtamembrane domain in ETV6/FLT3 is critical for PIM-1 up-regulation and cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, Hoang Anh; Xinh, Phan Thi; Kano, Yasuhiko; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Sato, Yuko

    2009-01-01

    We recently reported that the ETV6/FLT3 fusion protein conferred interleukin-3-independent growth on Ba/F3 cells. The present study has been conducted to assess role of the juxtamembrane domain of FLT3 for signal transduction and cell transformation. The wild-type ETV6/FLT3 fusion protein in transfected cells was a constitutively activated tyrosine kinase that led to up-regulation of PIM-1 and activations of STAT5, AKT, and MAPK. Deletion of the juxtamembrane domain abrogated interleukin-3-independent growth of the transfected cells and PIM-1 up-regulation, whereas it retained compatible levels of phosphorylations of STAT5, AKT, and MAPK. Further deletion of N-terminal region of the tyrosine kinase I domain of FLT3 completely abolished these phosphorylations. Our data indicate that the juxtamembrane domain of FLT3 in ETV6/FLT3 fusion protein is critical for cell proliferation and PIM-1 up-regulation that might be independent of a requirement for signaling through STAT5, MAPK, and AKT pathways.

  2. The metal chaperone Atox1 regulates the activity of the human copper transporter ATP7B by modulating domain dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Corey H; Yang, Nan; Bothe, Jameson; Tonelli, Marco; Nokhrin, Sergiy; Dolgova, Natalia V; Braiterman, Lelita; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Dmitriev, Oleg Y

    2017-11-03

    The human transporter ATP7B delivers copper to the biosynthetic pathways and maintains copper homeostasis in the liver. Mutations in ATP7B cause the potentially fatal hepatoneurological disorder Wilson disease. The activity and intracellular localization of ATP7B are regulated by copper, but the molecular mechanism of this regulation is largely unknown. We show that the copper chaperone Atox1, which delivers copper to ATP7B, and the group of the first three metal-binding domains (MBD1-3) are central to the activity regulation of ATP7B. Atox1-Cu binding to ATP7B changes domain dynamics and interactions within the MBD1-3 group and activates ATP hydrolysis. To understand the mechanism linking Atox1-MBD interactions and enzyme activity, we have determined the MBD1-3 conformational space using small angle X-ray scattering and identified changes in MBD dynamics caused by apo -Atox1 and Atox1-Cu by solution NMR. The results show that copper transfer from Atox1 decreases domain interactions within the MBD1-3 group and increases the mobility of the individual domains. The N-terminal segment of MBD1-3 was found to interact with the nucleotide-binding domain of ATP7B, thus physically coupling the domains involved in copper binding and those involved in ATP hydrolysis. Taken together, the data suggest a regulatory mechanism in which Atox1-mediated copper transfer activates ATP7B by releasing inhibitory constraints through increased freedom of MBD1-3 motions. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Xenopus egg cytoplasm with intact actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Christine M; Nguyen, Phuong A; Ishihara, Keisuke; Groen, Aaron C; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    We report optimized methods for preparing Xenopus egg extracts without cytochalasin D, that we term "actin-intact egg extract." These are undiluted egg cytoplasm that contains abundant organelles, and glycogen which supplies energy, and represents the least perturbed cell-free cytoplasm preparation we know of. We used this system to probe cell cycle regulation of actin and myosin-II dynamics (Field et al., 2011), and to reconstitute the large, interphase asters that organize early Xenopus embryos (Mitchison et al., 2012; Wühr, Tan, Parker, Detrich, & Mitchison, 2010). Actin-intact Xenopus egg extracts are useful for analysis of actin dynamics, and interaction of actin with other cytoplasmic systems, in a cell-free system that closely mimics egg physiology, and more generally for probing the biochemistry and biophysics of the egg, zygote, and early embryo. Detailed protocols are provided along with assays used to check cell cycle state and tips for handling and storing undiluted egg extracts. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. G2E3 is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein with DNA damage responsive localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, William S.; Banerjee, Sami; Crawford, David F.

    2007-01-01

    G2E3 was originally described as a G2/M-specific gene with DNA damage responsive expression. The presence of a conserved HECT domain within the carboxy-terminus of the protein indicated that it likely functions as a ubiquitin ligase or E3. Although HECT domains are known to function in this capacity for many proteins, we demonstrate that a portion of the HECT domain from G2E3 plays an important role in the dynamic subcellular localization of the protein. We have shown that G2E3 is a nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling protein with nuclear export mediated by a novel nuclear export domain that functions independently of CRM1. In full-length G2E3, a separate region of the HECT domain suppresses the function of the NES. Additionally, G2E3 contains a nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) in its amino terminus. Localization of G2E3 to the nucleolus is a dynamic process, and the protein delocalizes from the nucleolus rapidly after DNA damage. Cell cycle phase-specific expression and highly regulated subcellular localization of G2E3 suggest a possible role in cell cycle regulation and the cellular response to DNA damage

  5. Probing the Role of Loops & Domains in Regulating Coagulation Factor VIIa Allostery and Specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anders Bundgård

    2016-01-01

    The front-page illustrates the protease domain of factor VII in complex with tissue factor, the structure was solved during this dissertation (pdb id 5feo).......The front-page illustrates the protease domain of factor VII in complex with tissue factor, the structure was solved during this dissertation (pdb id 5feo)....

  6. Structures of the NLRP14 pyrin domain reveal a conformational switch mechanism regulating its molecular interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eibl, Clarissa; Hessenberger, Manuel; Wenger, Julia; Brandstetter, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Pyrin domains (PYDs) recruit downstream effector molecules in NLR signalling. A specific charge-relay system suggests a the formation of a signalling complex involving a PYD dimer. The cytosolic tripartite NLR receptors serve as important signalling platforms in innate immunity. While the C-terminal domains act as sensor and activation modules, the N-terminal death-like domain, e.g. the CARD or pyrin domain, is thought to recruit downstream effector molecules by homotypic interactions. Such homotypic complexes have been determined for all members of the death-domain superfamily except for pyrin domains. Here, crystal structures of human NLRP14 pyrin-domain variants are reported. The wild-type protein as well as the clinical D86V mutant reveal an unexpected rearrangement of the C-terminal helix α6, resulting in an extended α5/6 stem-helix. This reordering mediates a novel symmetric pyrin-domain dimerization mode. The conformational switching is controlled by a charge-relay system with a drastic impact on protein stability. How the identified charge relay allows classification of NLRP receptors with respect to distinct recruitment mechanisms is discussed

  7. Acetylation within the N- and C-Terminal Domains of Src Regulates Distinct Roles of STAT3-Mediated Tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chao; Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Lihan; Lee, Hank W; Ayrapetov, Marina K; Zhao, Ting C; Hao, Yimei; Gao, Jinsong; Yang, Chunzhang; Mehta, Gautam U; Zhuang, Zhengping; Zhang, Xiaoren; Hu, Guohong; Chin, Y Eugene

    2018-06-01

    Posttranslational modifications of mammalian c-Src N-terminal and C-terminal domains regulate distinct functions. Myristoylation of G 2 controls its cell membrane association and phosphorylation of Y419/Y527 controls its activation or inactivation, respectively. We provide evidence that Src-cell membrane association-dissociation and catalytic activation-inactivation are both regulated by acetylation. In EGF-treated cells, CREB binding protein (CBP) acetylates an N-terminal lysine cluster (K5, K7, and K9) of c-Src to promote dissociation from the cell membrane. CBP also acetylates the C-terminal K401, K423, and K427 of c-Src to activate intrinsic kinase activity for STAT3 recruitment and activation. N-terminal domain phosphorylation (Y14, Y45, and Y68) of STAT3 by c-Src activates transcriptionally active dimers of STAT3. Moreover, acetyl-Src translocates into nuclei, where it forms the Src-STAT3 enhanceosome for gene regulation and cancer cell proliferation. Thus, c-Src acetylation in the N-terminal and C-terminal domains play distinct roles in Src activity and regulation. Significance: CBP-mediated acetylation of lysine clusters in both the N-terminal and C-terminal regions of c-Src provides additional levels of control over STAT3 transcriptional activity. Cancer Res; 78(11); 2825-38. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Interaction of the phosphorylated DNA-binding domain in nuclear receptor CAR with its ligand-binding domain regulates CAR activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizu, Ryota; Min, Jungki; Sobhany, Mack; Pedersen, Lars C; Mutoh, Shingo; Negishi, Masahiko

    2018-01-05

    The nuclear protein constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR or NR1I3) regulates several liver functions such as drug and energy metabolism and cell growth or death, which are often involved in the development of diseases such as diabetes and hepatocellular carcinoma. CAR undergoes a conversion from inactive homodimers to active heterodimers with retinoid X receptor α (RXRα), and phosphorylation of the DNA-binding domain (DBD) at Thr-38 in CAR regulates this conversion. Here, we uncovered the molecular mechanism by which this phosphorylation regulates the intramolecular interaction between CAR's DBD and ligand-binding domain (LBD), enabling the homodimer-heterodimer conversion. Phosphomimetic substitution of Thr-38 with Asp increased co-immunoprecipitation of the CAR DBD with CAR LBD in Huh-7 cells. Isothermal titration calorimetry assays also revealed that recombinant CAR DBD-T38D, but not nonphosphorylated CAR DBD, bound the CAR LBD peptide. This DBD-LBD interaction masked CAR's dimer interface, preventing CAR homodimer formation. Of note, EGF signaling weakened the interaction of CAR DBD T38D with CAR LBD, converting CAR to the homodimer form. The DBD-T38D-LBD interaction also prevented CAR from forming a heterodimer with RXRα. However, this interaction opened up a CAR surface, allowing interaction with protein phosphatase 2A. Thr-38 dephosphorylation then dissociated the DBD-LBD interaction, allowing CAR heterodimer formation with RXRα. We conclude that the intramolecular interaction of phosphorylated DBD with the LBD enables CAR to adapt a transient monomer configuration that can be converted to either the inactive homodimer or the active heterodimer.

  9. The autoantigen Ro52 is an E3 ligase resident in the cytoplasm but enters the nucleus upon cellular exposure to nitric oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Espinosa, Alexander; Oke, Vilija; Elfving, Ase; Nyberg, Filippa; Covacu, Ruxandra; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie

    2008-01-01

    Patients with the systemic autoimmune diseases Sjoegrens's syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus often have autoantibodies against the intracellular protein Ro52. Ro52 is an E3 ligase dependent on the ubiquitin conjugation enzymes UBE2D1 and UBE2E1. While Ro52 and UBE2D1 are cytoplasmic proteins, UBE2E1 is localized to the nucleus. Here, we investigate how domains of human Ro52 regulate its intracellular localization. By expressing fluorescently labeled Ro52 and Ro52 mutants in HeLa cells, an intact coiled-coil domain was found to be necessary for the cytoplasmic localization of Ro52. The amino acids 381-470 of the B30.2 region were essential for translocation into the nucleus. Furthermore, after exposure of HeLa cells to the inflammatory mediator nitric oxide (NO), Ro52 translocated to the nucleus. A nuclear localization of Ro52 in inflamed tissue expressing inducible NO synthetase (iNOS) from cutaneous lupus patients was observed by immunohistochemistry and verified in NO-treated cultures of patient-derived primary keratinocytes. Our results show that the localization of Ro52 is regulated by endogenous sequences, and that nuclear translocation is induced by an inflammatory mediator. This suggests that Ro52 has both cytoplasmic and nuclear substrates, and that Ro52 mediates ubiquitination through UBE2D1 in the cytoplasm and through UBE2E1 in the nucleus

  10. Regulation of adhesion behavior of murine macrophage using supported lipid membranes displaying tunable mannose domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaindl, T; Oelke, J; Kaufmann, S; Tanaka, M; Pasc, A; Konovalov, O V; Funari, S S; Engel, U; Wixforth, A

    2010-01-01

    Highly uniform, strongly correlated domains of synthetically designed lipids can be incorporated into supported lipid membranes. The systematic characterization of membranes displaying a variety of domains revealed that the equilibrium size of domains significantly depends on the length of fluorocarbon chains, which can be quantitatively interpreted within the framework of an equivalent dipole model. A mono-dispersive, narrow size distribution of the domains enables us to treat the inter-domain correlations as two-dimensional colloidal crystallization and calculate the potentials of mean force. The obtained results demonstrated that both size and inter-domain correlation can precisely be controlled by the molecular structures. By coupling α-D-mannose to lipid head groups, we studied the adhesion behavior of the murine macrophage (J774A.1) on supported membranes. Specific adhesion and spreading of macrophages showed a clear dependence on the density of functional lipids. The obtained results suggest that such synthetic lipid domains can be used as a defined platform to study how cells sense the size and distribution of functional molecules during adhesion and spreading.

  11. Novel autophosphorylation sites of Src family kinases regulate kinase activity and SH2 domain-binding capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Marion E; Mann, Jacqueline E; Corwin, Thomas; Fulton, Zachary W; Hao, Jennifer M; Maniscalco, Jeanine F; Kenney, Marie C; Roman Roque, Kristal M; Chapdelaine, Elizabeth F; Stelzl, Ulrich; Deming, Paula B; Ballif, Bryan A; Hinkle, Karen L

    2016-04-01

    Src family tyrosine kinases (SFKs) are critical players in normal and aberrant biological processes. While phosphorylation importantly regulates SFKs at two known tyrosines, large-scale phosphoproteomics have revealed four additional tyrosines commonly phosphorylated in SFKs. We found these novel tyrosines to be autophosphorylation sites. Mimicking phosphorylation at the C-terminal site to the activation loop decreased Fyn activity. Phosphomimetics and direct phosphorylation at the three SH2 domain sites increased Fyn activity while reducing phosphotyrosine-dependent interactions. While 68% of human SH2 domains exhibit conservation of at least one of these tyrosines, few have been found phosphorylated except when found in cis to a kinase domain. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  12. Differential Roles of the Glycogen-Binding Domains of β Subunits in Regulation of the Snf1 Kinase Complex▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangat, Simmanjeet; Chandrashekarappa, Dakshayini; McCartney, Rhonda R.; Elbing, Karin; Schmidt, Martin C.

    2010-01-01

    Members of the AMP-activated protein kinase family, including the Snf1 kinase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are activated under conditions of nutrient stress. AMP-activated protein kinases are heterotrimeric complexes composed of a catalytic α subunit and regulatory β and γ subunits. In this study, the role of the β subunits in the regulation of Snf1 activity was examined. Yeasts express three isoforms of the AMP-activated protein kinase consisting of Snf1 (α), Snf4 (γ), and one of three alternative β subunits, either Sip1, Sip2, or Gal83. The Gal83 isoform of the Snf1 complex is the most abundant and was analyzed in the greatest detail. All three β subunits contain a conserved domain referred to as the glycogen-binding domain. The deletion of this domain from Gal83 results in a deregulation of the Snf1 kinase, as judged by a constitutive activity independent of glucose availability. In contrast, the deletion of this homologous domain from the Sip1 and Sip2 subunits had little effect on Snf1 kinase regulation. Therefore, the different Snf1 kinase isoforms are regulated through distinct mechanisms, which may contribute to their specialized roles in different stress response pathways. In addition, the β subunits are subjected to phosphorylation. The responsible kinases were identified as being Snf1 and casein kinase II. The significance of the phosphorylation is unclear since the deletion of the region containing the phosphorylation sites in Gal83 had little effect on the regulation of Snf1 in response to glucose limitation. PMID:19897735

  13. Differential roles of the glycogen-binding domains of beta subunits in regulation of the Snf1 kinase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangat, Simmanjeet; Chandrashekarappa, Dakshayini; McCartney, Rhonda R; Elbing, Karin; Schmidt, Martin C

    2010-01-01

    Members of the AMP-activated protein kinase family, including the Snf1 kinase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are activated under conditions of nutrient stress. AMP-activated protein kinases are heterotrimeric complexes composed of a catalytic alpha subunit and regulatory beta and gamma subunits. In this study, the role of the beta subunits in the regulation of Snf1 activity was examined. Yeasts express three isoforms of the AMP-activated protein kinase consisting of Snf1 (alpha), Snf4 (gamma), and one of three alternative beta subunits, either Sip1, Sip2, or Gal83. The Gal83 isoform of the Snf1 complex is the most abundant and was analyzed in the greatest detail. All three beta subunits contain a conserved domain referred to as the glycogen-binding domain. The deletion of this domain from Gal83 results in a deregulation of the Snf1 kinase, as judged by a constitutive activity independent of glucose availability. In contrast, the deletion of this homologous domain from the Sip1 and Sip2 subunits had little effect on Snf1 kinase regulation. Therefore, the different Snf1 kinase isoforms are regulated through distinct mechanisms, which may contribute to their specialized roles in different stress response pathways. In addition, the beta subunits are subjected to phosphorylation. The responsible kinases were identified as being Snf1 and casein kinase II. The significance of the phosphorylation is unclear since the deletion of the region containing the phosphorylation sites in Gal83 had little effect on the regulation of Snf1 in response to glucose limitation.

  14. In vitro and in vivo Analysis of the Binding of the C Terminus of the HDL Receptor Scavenger Receptor Class B type I (SR-BI) to the PDZ1 Domain of its Cytoplasmic Adaptor Protein PDZK1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O Kocher; G Birrane; K Tsukamoto; S Fenske; A Yesilaltay; R Pal; K Daniels; J Ladias; M Krieger

    2011-12-31

    The PDZ1 domain of the four PDZ domain-containing protein PDZK1 has been reported to bind the C terminus of the HDL receptor scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI), and to control hepatic SR-BI expression and function. We generated wild-type (WT) and mutant murine PDZ1 domains, the mutants bearing single amino acid substitutions in their carboxylate binding loop (Lys(14)-Xaa(4)-Asn(19)-Tyr-Gly-Phe-Phe-Leu(24)), and measured their binding affinity for a 7-residue peptide corresponding to the C terminus of SR-BI ((503)VLQEAKL(509)). The Y20A and G21Y substitutions abrogated all binding activity. Surprisingly, binding affinities (K(d)) of the K14A and F22A mutants were 3.2 and 4.0 ?M, respectively, similar to 2.6 ?M measured for the WT PDZ1. To understand these findings, we determined the high resolution structure of WT PDZ1 bound to a 5-residue sequence from the C-terminal SR-BI ((505)QEAKL(509)) using x-ray crystallography. In addition, we incorporated the K14A and Y20A substitutions into full-length PDZK1 liver-specific transgenes and expressed them in WT and PDZK1 knock-out mice. In WT mice, the transgenes did not alter endogenous hepatic SR-BI protein expression (intracellular distribution or amount) or lipoprotein metabolism (total plasma cholesterol, lipoprotein size distribution). In PDZK1 knock-out mice, as expected, the K14A mutant behaved like wild-type PDZK1 and completely corrected their hepatic SR-BI and plasma lipoprotein abnormalities. Unexpectedly, the 10-20-fold overexpressed Y20A mutant also substantially, but not completely, corrected these abnormalities. The results suggest that there may be an additional site(s) within PDZK1 that bind(s) SR-BI and mediate(s) productive SR-BI-PDZK1 interaction previously attributed exclusively to the canonical binding of the C-terminal SR-BI to PDZ1.

  15. Drosophila Pumilio protein contains multiple autonomous repression domains that regulate mRNAs independently of Nanos and brain tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidmann, Chase A; Goldstrohm, Aaron C

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster Pumilio is an RNA-binding protein that potently represses specific mRNAs. In developing embryos, Pumilio regulates a key morphogen, Hunchback, in collaboration with the cofactor Nanos. To investigate repression by Pumilio and Nanos, we created cell-based assays and found that Pumilio inhibits translation and enhances mRNA decay independent of Nanos. Nanos robustly stimulates repression through interactions with the Pumilio RNA-binding domain. We programmed Pumilio to recognize a new binding site, which garners repression of new target mRNAs. We show that cofactors Brain Tumor and eIF4E Homologous Protein are not obligatory for Pumilio and Nanos activity. The conserved RNA-binding domain of Pumilio was thought to be sufficient for its function. Instead, we demonstrate that three unique domains in the N terminus of Pumilio possess the major repressive activity and can function autonomously. The N termini of insect and vertebrate Pumilio and Fem-3 binding factors (PUFs) are related, and we show that corresponding regions of human PUM1 and PUM2 have repressive activity. Other PUF proteins lack these repression domains. Our findings suggest that PUF proteins have evolved new regulatory functions through protein sequences appended to their conserved PUF repeat RNA-binding domains.

  16. Specific phosphopeptide binding regulates a conformational change in the PI 3-kinase SH2 domain associated with enzyme activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoelson, S E; Sivaraja, M; Williams, K P; Hu, P; Schlessinger, J; Weiss, M A

    1993-01-01

    SH2 (src-homology 2) domains define a newly recognized binding motif that mediates the physical association of target phosphotyrosyl proteins with downstream effector enzymes. An example of such phosphoprotein-effector coupling is provided by the association of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) with specific phosphorylation sites within the PDGF receptor, the c-Src/polyoma virus middle T antigen complex and the insulin receptor substrate IRS-1. Notably, phosphoprotein association with the SH2 domains of p85 also stimulates an increase in catalytic activity of the PI 3-kinase p110 subunit, which can be mimicked by phosphopeptides corresponding to targeted phosphoprotein phosphorylation sites. To investigate how phosphoprotein binding to the p85 SH2 domain stimulates p110 catalytic activation, we have examined the differential effects of phosphotyrosine and PDGF receptor-, IRS-1- and c-Src-derived phosphopeptides on the conformation of an isolated SH2 domain of PI 3-kinase. Although phosphotyrosine and both activating and non-activating phosphopeptides bind to the SH2 domain, activating phosphopeptides bind with higher affinity and induce a qualitatively distinct conformational change as monitored by CD and NMR spectroscopy. Amide proton exchange and protease protection assays further show that high affinity, specific phosphopeptide binding induces non-local dynamic SH2 domain stabilization. Based on these findings we propose that specific phosphoprotein binding to the p85 subunit induces a change in SH2 domain structure which is transmitted to the p110 subunit and regulates enzymatic activity by an allosteric mechanism. Images PMID:8382612

  17. Membrane Restructuring by Phospholipase A2 Is Regulated by the Presence of Lipid Domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leidy, Chad; Ocampo, Jackson; Duelund, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) catalyzes the hydrolysis of glycerophospholipids. This enzyme is sensitive to membrane structure, and its activity has been shown to increase in the presence of liquid-crystalline/gel (Lα/Lβ) lipid domains. In this work, we explore whether lipid domains can also...... without necessarily destroying the membrane. We confirm by high-performance liquid chromatography the preferential hydrolysis of DMPC within the phase coexistence region of the DMPC/DSPC phase diagram, showing that this preferential hydrolysis is accentuated close to the solidus phase boundary...

  18. Cytoplasmic chromatin triggers inflammation in senescence and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Zhixun; Ghosh, Kanad; Vizioli, Maria Grazia; Zhu, Jiajun; Sen, Payel; Wangensteen, Kirk J; Simithy, Johayra; Lan, Yemin; Lin, Yanping; Zhou, Zhuo; Capell, Brian C; Xu, Caiyue; Xu, Mingang; Kieckhaefer, Julia E; Jiang, Tianying; Shoshkes-Carmel, Michal; Tanim, K M Ahasan Al; Barber, Glen N; Seykora, John T; Millar, Sarah E; Kaestner, Klaus H; Garcia, Benjamin A; Adams, Peter D; Berger, Shelley L

    2017-10-19

    Chromatin is traditionally viewed as a nuclear entity that regulates gene expression and silencing. However, we recently discovered the presence of cytoplasmic chromatin fragments that pinch off from intact nuclei of primary cells during senescence, a form of terminal cell-cycle arrest associated with pro-inflammatory responses. The functional significance of chromatin in the cytoplasm is unclear. Here we show that cytoplasmic chromatin activates the innate immunity cytosolic DNA-sensing cGAS-STING (cyclic GMP-AMP synthase linked to stimulator of interferon genes) pathway, leading both to short-term inflammation to restrain activated oncogenes and to chronic inflammation that associates with tissue destruction and cancer. The cytoplasmic chromatin-cGAS-STING pathway promotes the senescence-associated secretory phenotype in primary human cells and in mice. Mice deficient in STING show impaired immuno-surveillance of oncogenic RAS and reduced tissue inflammation upon ionizing radiation. Furthermore, this pathway is activated in cancer cells, and correlates with pro-inflammatory gene expression in human cancers. Overall, our findings indicate that genomic DNA serves as a reservoir to initiate a pro-inflammatory pathway in the cytoplasm in senescence and cancer. Targeting the cytoplasmic chromatin-mediated pathway may hold promise in treating inflammation-related disorders.

  19. The membrane-cytoplasm interface of integrin alpha subunits is critical for receptor latency.

    OpenAIRE

    Briesewitz, R; Kern, A; Smilenov, L B; David, F S; Marcantonio, E E

    1996-01-01

    Localization of integrin receptors to focal contact sites occurs upon ligand binding. This activity is latent, since unoccupied integrin receptors do not localize to focal contacts. Deletion analysis has revealed that the alpha cytoplasmic domains is required for the maintenance of integrin receptor latency. Our current hypothesis for the mechanism of integrin post-ligand binding events is that there is a change in relationship of alpha and beta cytoplasmic domains, which overcomes receptor l...

  20. Positional effect of phosphorylation sites 266 and 267 in the cytoplasmic domain of the E2 protein of hepatitis C virus 3a genotype: Interferon Resistance analysis via Sequence Alignment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ur Rehman Irshad

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferon is well thought-out as the key defence against all infections including HCV. The only treatment for HCV infection is pegylated interferon alpha (IFN-α but unluckily more than half of the infected individuals do not act in response to the cure and become chronic HCV carriers. The mechanism how HCV induce interferon resistance is still elusive. It is recently reported that HCV envelope protein 2 interacts with PKR which is the interferon-inducible protein kinase and which in turn blocks the activity of its target molecule called eukaryotic initiation factor elF2. Sequence analysis of Envelope protein reveals it contains a domain homologous to phosphorylation sites of PKR andthe translation initiation factor eIF2alpha. Envelope protein competes for phosphorylation with PKR. Inhibition of kinase activity of PKR is postulated as a mechanism of to interferon (IFN resistance. Results Present study involves the insilico investigation of possible role of potential phosphorylation in envelope 2 protein of 3a genotype in interferon resistance. Envelope protein coding genes were isolated from local HCV isolates, cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis was done and tertiary structure of envelope gene was predicted. Visualization of phosphorylation in tertiary structure reveals that residue 266 and 267 of envelope gene 2 are surface exposed and their phosphorylation may compete with the phosphorylation of PKR protein and possibly involved in mediating Interferon Resistance. Conclusion A hybrid in-silico and wet laboratory approach of motif prediction, evolutionary and structural analysis has pointed out serine 266 and 267 of the HCV E2 gene as a hopeful claimant for the serine phosphorylation. Recognition of these nucleotide variations may assist to propose genotype precise therapy to avoid and resolve HCV infections.

  1. Cytoplasmic streaming velocity as a plant size determinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tominaga, Motoki; Kimura, Atsushi; Yokota, Etsuo; Haraguchi, Takeshi; Shimmen, Teruo; Yamamoto, Keiichi; Nakano, Akihiko; Ito, Kohji

    2013-11-11

    Cytoplasmic streaming is active transport widely occurring in plant cells ranging from algae to angiosperms. Although it has been revealed that cytoplasmic streaming is generated by organelle-associated myosin XI moving along actin bundles, the fundamental function in plants remains unclear. We generated high- and low-speed chimeric myosin XI by replacing the motor domains of Arabidopsis thaliana myosin XI-2 with those of Chara corallina myosin XI and Homo sapiens myosin Vb, respectively. Surprisingly, the plant sizes of the transgenic Arabidopsis expressing high- and low-speed chimeric myosin XI-2 were larger and smaller, respectively, than that of the wild-type plant. This size change correlated with acceleration and deceleration, respectively, of cytoplasmic streaming. Our results strongly suggest that cytoplasmic streaming is a key determinant of plant size. Furthermore, because cytoplasmic streaming is a common system for intracellular transport in plants, our system could have applications in artificial size control in plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. PICK1 regulates the trafficking of ASIC1a and acidotoxicity in a BAR domain lipid binding-dependent manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wenying

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acid-sensing ion channel 1a (ASIC1a is the major ASIC subunit determining acid-activated currents in brain neurons. Recent studies show that ASIC1a play critical roles in acid-induced cell toxicity. While these studies raise the importance of ASIC1a in diseases, mechanisms for ASIC1a trafficking are not well understood. Interestingly, ASIC1a interacts with PICK1 (protein interacting with C-kinase 1, an intracellular protein that regulates trafficking of several membrane proteins. However, whether PICK1 regulates ASIC1a surface expression remains unknown. Results Here, we show that PICK1 overexpression increases ASIC1a surface level. A BAR domain mutant of PICK1, which impairs its lipid binding capability, blocks this increase. Lipid binding of PICK1 is also required for PICK1-induced clustering of ASIC1a. Consistent with the effect on ASIC1a surface levels, PICK1 increases ASIC1a-mediated acidotoxicity and this effect requires both the PDZ and BAR domains of PICK1. Conclusions Taken together, our results indicate that PICK1 regulates trafficking and function of ASIC1a in a lipid binding-dependent manner.

  3. Structural insights into the regulation and the recognition of histone marks by the SET domain of NSD1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morishita, Masayo; Di Luccio, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → NSD1, NSD2/MMSET/WHSC1, and NSD3/WHSC1L1 are histone methyltransferases linked to numerous cancers. → Little is known about the NSD pathways and HMTase inhibitors are sorely needed in the epigenetic therapy of cancers. → We investigate the regulation and the recognition of histone marks by the SET domain of NSD1. → A unique and key mechanism is driven by a loop at the interface of the SET and postSET region. → Implications for developing specific and selective HMTase inhibitors are presented. -- Abstract: The development of epigenetic therapies fuels cancer hope. DNA-methylation inhibitors, histone-deacetylase and histone-methyltransferase (HMTase) inhibitors are being developed as the utilization of epigenetic targets is emerging as an effective and valuable approach to chemotherapy as well as chemoprevention of cancer. The nuclear receptor binding SET domain (NSD) protein is a family of three HMTases, NSD1, NSD2/MMSET/WHSC1, and NSD3/WHSC1L1 that are critical in maintaining the chromatin integrity. A growing number of studies have reported alterations or amplifications of NSD1, NSD2, or NSD3 in numerous carcinogenic events. Reducing NSDs activity through specific lysine-HMTase inhibitors appears promising to help suppressing cancer growth. However, little is known about the NSD pathways and our understanding of the histone lysine-HMTase mechanism is partial. To shed some light on both the recognition and the regulation of epigenetic marks by the SET domain of the NSD family, we investigate the structural mechanisms of the docking of the histone-H4 tail on the SET domain of NSD1. Our finding exposes a key regulatory and recognition mechanism driven by the flexibility of a loop at the interface of the SET and postSET region. Finally, we prospect the special value of this regulatory region for developing specific and selective NSD inhibitors for the epigenetic therapy of cancers.

  4. A novel calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase (ACA2) from Arabidopsis with an N-terminal autoinhibitory domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, J. F.; Hong, B.; Hwang, I.; Guo, H. Q.; Stoddard, R.; Huang, J. F.; Palmgren, M. G.; Sze, H.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    To study transporters involved in regulating intracellular Ca2+, we isolated a full-length cDNA encoding a Ca2+-ATPase from a model plant, Arabidopsis, and named it ACA2 (Arabidopsis Ca2+-ATPase, isoform 2). ACA2p is most similar to a "plasma membrane-type" Ca2+-ATPase, but is smaller (110 kDa), contains a unique N-terminal domain, and is missing a long C-terminal calmodulin-binding regulatory domain. In addition, ACA2p is localized to an endomembrane system and not the plasma membrane, as shown by aqueous-two phase fractionation of microsomal membranes. ACA2p was expressed in yeast as both a full-length protein (ACA2-1p) and an N-terminal truncation mutant (ACA2-2p; Delta residues 2-80). Only the truncation mutant restored the growth on Ca2+-depleted medium of a yeast mutant defective in both endogenous Ca2+ pumps, PMR1 and PMC1. Although basal Ca2+-ATPase activity of the full-length protein was low, it was stimulated 5-fold by calmodulin (50% activation around 30 nM). In contrast, the truncated pump was fully active and insensitive to calmodulin. A calmodulin-binding sequence was identified within the first 36 residues of the N-terminal domain, as shown by calmodulin gel overlays on fusion proteins. Thus, ACA2 encodes a novel calmodulin-regulated Ca2+-ATPase distinguished by a unique N-terminal regulatory domain and a non-plasma membrane localization.

  5. Exclusion of NFAT5 from mitotic chromatin resets its nucleo-cytoplasmic distribution in interphase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anaïs Estrada-Gelonch

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The transcription factor NFAT5 is a major inducer of osmoprotective genes and is required to maintain the proliferative capacity of cells exposed to hypertonic stress. In response to hypertonicity, NFAT5 translocates to the nucleus, binds to regulatory regions of osmoprotective genes and activates their transcription. Besides stimulus-specific regulatory mechanisms, the activity of transcription factors in cycling cells is also regulated by the passage through mitosis, when most transcriptional processes are downregulated. It was not known whether mitosis could be a point of control for NFAT5. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using confocal microscopy we observed that NFAT5 was excluded from chromatin during mitosis in both isotonic and hypertonic conditions. Analysis of NFAT5 deletions showed that exclusion was mediated by the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD. NFAT5 mutants lacking this domain showed constitutive binding to mitotic chromatin independent of tonicity, which caused them to localize in the nucleus and remain bound to chromatin in the subsequent interphase without hypertonic stimulation. We analyzed the contribution of the CTD, DNA binding, and nuclear import and export signals to the subcellular localization of this factor. Our results indicated that cytoplasmic localization of NFAT5 in isotonic conditions required both the exclusion from mitotic DNA and active nuclear export in interphase. Finally, we identified several regions within the CTD of NFAT5, some of them overlapping with transactivation domains, which were separately capable of causing its exclusion from mitotic chromatin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results reveal a multipart mechanism regulating the subcellular localization of NFAT5. The transactivating module of NFAT5 switches its function from an stimulus-specific activator of transcription in interphase to an stimulus-independent repressor of binding to DNA in mitosis. This mechanism, together with export

  6. Structural properties of the linkers connecting the N- and C- terminal domains in the MocR bacterial transcriptional regulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Milano

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Peptide inter-domain linkers are peptide segments covalently linking two adjacent domains within a protein. Linkers play a variety of structural and functional roles in naturally occurring proteins. In this work we analyze the sequence properties of the predicted linker regions of the bacterial transcriptional regulators belonging to the recently discovered MocR subfamily of the GntR regulators. Analyses were carried out on the MocR sequences taken from the phyla Actinobacteria, Firmicutes, Alpha-, Beta- and Gammaproteobacteria. The results suggest that MocR linkers display phylum-specific characteristics and unique features different from those already described for other classes of inter-domain linkers. They show an average length significantly higher: 31.8 ± 14.3 residues reaching a maximum of about 150 residues. Compositional propensities displayed general and phylum-specific trends. Pro is dominating in all linkers. Dyad propensity analysis indicate Pro–Pro as the most frequent amino acid pair in all linkers. Physicochemical properties of the linker regions were assessed using amino acid indices relative to different features: in general, MocR linkers are flexible, hydrophilic and display propensity for β-turn or coil conformations. Linker sequences are hypervariable: only similarities between MocR linkers from organisms related at the level of species or genus could be found with sequence searches. The results shed light on the properties of the linker regions of the new MocR subfamily of bacterial regulators and may provide knowledge-based rules for designing artificial linkers with desired properties.

  7. MicroRNA-128 targets myostatin at coding domain sequence to regulate myoblasts in skeletal muscle development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lei; Zhou, Bo; Li, Pinghua; Schinckel, Allan P; Liang, Tingting; Wang, Han; Li, Huizhi; Fu, Lingling; Chu, Qingpo; Huang, Ruihua

    2015-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) play a critical role in skeletal muscle development. In a previous study we observed that miR-128 was highly expressed in skeletal muscle. However, its function in regulating skeletal muscle development is not clear. Our hypothesis was that miR-128 is involved in the regulation of the proliferation and differentiation of skeletal myoblasts. In this study, through bioinformatics analyses, we demonstrate that miR-128 specifically targeted mRNA of myostatin (MSTN), a critical inhibitor of skeletal myogenesis, at coding domain sequence (CDS) region, resulting in down-regulating of myostatin post-transcription. Overexpression of miR-128 inhibited proliferation of mouse C2C12 myoblast cells but promoted myotube formation; whereas knockdown of miR-128 had completely opposite effects. In addition, ectopic miR-128 regulated the expression of myogenic factor 5 (Myf5), myogenin (MyoG), paired box (Pax) 3 and 7. Furthermore, an inverse relationship was found between the expression of miR-128 and MSTN protein expression in vivo and in vitro. Taken together, these results reveal that there is a novel pathway in skeletal muscle development in which miR-128 regulates myostatin at CDS region to inhibit proliferation but promote differentiation of myoblast cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Formation and biochemical characterization of tube/pelle death domain complexes: critical regulators of postreceptor signaling by the Drosophila toll receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffmann, D A; White, J H; Cooper, A; Nutley, M A; Harding, S E; Jumel, K; Solari, R; Ray, K P; Gay, N J

    1999-09-07

    In Drosophila, the Toll receptor signaling pathway is required for embryonic dorso-ventral patterning and at later developmental stages for innate immune responses. It is thought that dimerization of the receptor by binding of the ligand spätzle causes the formation of a postreceptor activation complex at the cytoplasmic surface of the membrane. Two components of this complex are the adaptor tube and protein kinase pelle. These proteins both have "death domains", protein interaction motifs found in a number of signaling pathways, particularly those involved in apoptotic cell death. It is thought that pelle is bound by tube during formation of the activation complexes, and that this interaction is mediated by the death domains. In this paper, we show using the yeast two-hybrid system that the wild-type tube and pelle death domains bind together. Mutant tube proteins which do not support signaling in the embryo are also unable to bind pelle in the 2-hybrid assay. We have purified proteins corresponding to the death domains of tube and pelle and show that these form corresponding heterodimeric complexes in vitro. Partial proteolysis reveals a smaller core consisting of the minimal death domain sequences. We have studied the tube/pelle interaction with the techniques of surface plasmon resonance, analytical ultracentrifugation and isothermal titration calorimetry. These measurements produce a value of K(d) for the complex of about 0.5 microM.

  9. Interaction of GlnK with the GAF domain of Herbaspirillum seropedicae NifA mediates NH₄⁺-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marco A S; Aquino, Bruno; Bonatto, Ana Claudia; Huergo, Luciano F; Chubatsu, Leda S; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Souza, Emanuel M; Dixon, Ray; Monteiro, Rose A

    2012-04-01

    Nitrogen fixation in Herbaspirillum seropedicae is transcriptionally regulated by NifA, a σ(54) transcriptional activator with three structural domains: an N-terminal GAF domain, a catalytic AAA+ domain and a C-terminal DNA-binding domain. NifA is only active in H. seropedicae when cultures are grown in the absence of fixed nitrogen and at low oxygen tensions. There is evidence that the inactivation of NifA in response to fixed nitrogen is mediated by the regulatory GAF domain. However, the mechanism of NifA repression by the GAF domain, as well as the transduction of nitrogen status to NifA, is not understood. In order to study the regulation of NifA activity by fixed nitrogen independently of oxygen regulation, we constructed a chimeric protein containing the GAF domain of H. seropedicae NifA fused to the AAA+ and C-terminal domains of Azotobacter vinelandii NifA. This chimeric protein (NifAQ1) lacks the cysteine motif found in oxygen sensitive NifA proteins and is not oxygen responsive in vivo. Our results demonstrate that NifAQ1 responds to fixed nitrogen and requires GlnK protein for activity, a behavior similar to H. seropedicae NifA. In addition, protein footprinting analysis indicates that this response probably involves a protein-protein contact between the GAF domain and the GlnK protein. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Focal adhesion kinase-dependent focal adhesion recruitment of SH2 domains directs SRC into focal adhesions to regulate cell adhesion and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jui-Chung; Chen, Yu-Chen; Kuo, Chih-Ting; Wenshin Yu, Helen; Chen, Yin-Quan; Chiou, Arthur; Kuo, Jean-Cheng

    2015-12-18

    Directed cell migration requires dynamical control of the protein complex within focal adhesions (FAs) and this control is regulated by signaling events involving tyrosine phosphorylation. We screened the SH2 domains present in tyrosine-specific kinases and phosphatases found within FAs, including SRC, SHP1 and SHP2, and examined whether these enzymes transiently target FAs via their SH2 domains. We found that the SRC_SH2 domain and the SHP2_N-SH2 domain are associated with FAs, but only the SRC_SH2 domain is able to be regulated by focal adhesion kinase (FAK). The FAK-dependent association of the SRC_SH2 domain is necessary and sufficient for SRC FA targeting. When the targeting of SRC into FAs is inhibited, there is significant suppression of SRC-mediated phosphorylation of paxillin and FAK; this results in an inhibition of FA formation and maturation and a reduction in cell migration. This study reveals an association between FAs and the SRC_SH2 domain as well as between FAs and the SHP2_N-SH2 domains. This supports the hypothesis that the FAK-regulated SRC_SH2 domain plays an important role in directing SRC into FAs and that this SRC-mediated FA signaling drives cell migration.

  11. Amyloid cores in prion domains: Key regulators for prion conformational conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, María Rosario; Batlle, Cristina; Gil-García, Marcos; Ventura, Salvador

    2017-01-02

    Despite the significant efforts devoted to decipher the particular protein features that encode for a prion or prion-like behavior, they are still poorly understood. The well-characterized yeast prions constitute an ideal model system to address this question, because, in these proteins, the prion activity can be univocally assigned to a specific region of their sequence, known as the prion forming domain (PFD). These PFDs are intrinsically disordered, relatively long and, in many cases, of low complexity, being enriched in glutamine/asparagine residues. Computational analyses have identified a significant number of proteins having similar domains in the human proteome. The compositional bias of these regions plays an important role in the transition of the prions to the amyloid state. However, it is difficult to explain how composition alone can account for the formation of specific contacts that position correctly PFDs and provide the enthalpic force to compensate for the large entropic cost of immobilizing these domains in the initial assemblies. We have hypothesized that short, sequence-specific, amyloid cores embedded in PFDs can perform these functions and, accordingly, act as preferential nucleation centers in both spontaneous and seeded aggregation. We have shown that the implementation of this concept in a prediction algorithm allows to score the prion propensities of putative PFDs with high accuracy. Recently, we have provided experimental evidence for the existence of such amyloid cores in the PFDs of Sup35, Ure2, Swi1, and Mot3 yeast prions. The fibrils formed by these short stretches may recognize and promote the aggregation of the complete proteins inside cells, being thus a promising tool for targeted protein inactivation.

  12. HD-GYP domain proteins regulate biofilm formation and virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryan, Robert P.; Lucey, Jean; O'Donovan, Karen

    2009-01-01

    residues (YN-GYP). Here we have investigated the role of these proteins in biofilm formation, virulence factor synthesis and virulence of P. aeruginosa. Mutation of PA4108 and PA4781 led to an increase in the level of cyclic-di-GMP in P. aeruginosa, consistent with the predicted activity of the encoded......2572 had a negative influence on swarming that was cryptic and was revealed only after removal of an uncharacterized C-terminal domain. Mutation of PA4108, PA4781 and PA2572 had distinct effects on biofilm formation and architecture of P. aeruginosa. All three proteins contributed to virulence of P...

  13. Generic concept to program the time domain of self-assemblies with a self-regulation mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuser, Thomas; Steppert, Ann-Kathrin; Lopez, Catalina Molano; Zhu, Baolei; Walther, Andreas

    2015-04-08

    Nature regulates complex structures in space and time via feedback loops, kinetically controlled transformations, and under energy dissipation to allow non-equilibrium processes. Although man-made static self-assemblies realize excellent control over hierarchical structures via molecular programming, managing their temporal destiny by self-regulation is a largely unsolved challenge. Herein, we introduce a generic concept to control the time domain by programming the lifetimes of switchable self-assemblies in closed systems. We conceive dormant deactivators that, in combination with fast promoters, enable a unique kinetic balance to establish an autonomously self-regulating, transient pH-state, whose duration can be programmed over orders of magnitude-from minutes to days. Coupling this non-equilibrium state to pH-switchable self-assemblies allows predicting their assembly/disassembly fate in time, similar to a precise self-destruction mechanism. We demonstrate a platform approach by programming self-assembly lifetimes of block copolymers, nanoparticles, and peptides, enabling dynamic materials with a self-regulation functionality.

  14. Computational Studies of the Active and Inactive Regulatory Domains of Response Regulator PhoP Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Xiao-Yu; Steenackers, Hans; Venken, Tom; De Maeyer, Marc; Voet, Arnout

    2017-11-01

    The response regulator PhoP is part of the PhoP/PhoQ two-component system, which is responsible for regulating the expression of multiple genes involved in controlling virulence, biofilm formation, and resistance to antimicrobial peptides. Therefore, modulating the transcriptional function of the PhoP protein is a promising strategy for developing new antimicrobial agents. There is evidence suggesting that phosphorylation-mediated dimerization in the regulatory domain of PhoP is essential for its transcriptional function. Disruption or stabilization of protein-protein interactions at the dimerization interface may inhibit or enhance the expression of PhoP-dependent genes. In this study, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on the active and inactive dimers and monomers of the PhoP regulatory domains, followed by pocket-detecting screenings and a quantitative hot-spot analysis in order to assess the druggability of the protein. Consistent with prior hypothesis, the calculation of the binding free energy shows that phosphorylation enhances dimerization of PhoP. Furthermore, we have identified two different putative binding sites at the dimerization active site (the α4-β5-α5 face) with energetic "hot-spot" areas, which could be used to search for modulators of protein-protein interactions. This study delivers insight into the dynamics and druggability of the dimerization interface of the PhoP regulatory domain, and may serve as a basis for the rational identification of new antimicrobial drugs. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. The SH2 Domain Regulates c-Abl Kinase Activation by a Cyclin-Like Mechanism and Remodulation of the Hinge Motion

    OpenAIRE

    Dölker, N.; Górna, M. W.; Sutto, L.; Torralba, A. S.; Superti-Furga, G.; Gervasio, F. L.

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of the c-Abl (ABL1) tyrosine kinase is important because of its role in cellular signaling, and its relevance in the leukemiogenic counterpart (BCR-ABL). Both auto-inhibition and full activation of c-Abl are regulated by the interaction of the catalytic domain with the Src Homology 2 (SH2) domain. The mechanism by which this interaction enhances catalysis is not known. We combined computational simulations with mutagenesis and functional analysis to find that the SH2 domain conveys...

  16. Regulation of β2-adrenergic receptor function by conformationally selective single-domain intrabodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staus, Dean P; Wingler, Laura M; Strachan, Ryan T

    2014-01-01

    . However, a monomeric single-domain antibody (nanobody) from the Camelid family was recently found to allosterically bind and stabilize an active conformation of the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR). Here, we set out to study the functional interaction of 18 related nanobodies with the β2AR to investigate...... their roles as novel tools for studying GPCR biology. Our studies revealed several sequence-related nanobody families with preferences for active (agonist-occupied) or inactive (antagonist-occupied) receptors. Flow cytometry analysis indicates that all nanobodies bind to epitopes displayed...... on the intracellular receptor surface; therefore, we transiently expressed them intracellularly as "intrabodies" to test their effects on β2AR-dependent signaling. Conformational specificity was preserved after intrabody conversion as demonstrated by the ability for the intracellularly expressed nanobodies...

  17. Negative regulation of retrovirus expression in embryonal carcinoma cells mediated by an intragenic domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, T P; Sievert, L L; Scott, R W

    1988-11-01

    An intragenic region spanning the tRNA primer binding site of a Moloney murine leukemia virus recombinant retrovirus was found to restrict expression specifically in embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells. When the inhibitory domain was present, the levels of steady-state RNA synthesized from integrated recombinant templates in stable cotransformation assays were reduced 20-fold in EC cells but not in C2 myoblast cells. Transient-cotransfection assays showed that repression of a template containing the EC-specific inhibitory component was relieved by an excess of specific competitor DNA. In addition, repression mediated by the inhibitory component was orientation independent. This evidence demonstrates the presence of a saturable, trans-acting negative regulatory factor(s) in EC cells and suggests that the interaction of the factor(s) with the intragenic inhibitory component occurs at the DNA level.

  18. A20 Functional Domains Regulate Subcellular Localization and NF-Kappa B Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    endothelial cells or if the effects of A20 are limited strictly to the process of apoptosis. The Ferran group began by taking bovine aortic endothelial...protein (64, 67, 81, 118, 122). Interestingly, A20 is also involved in the regulation of intracellular parasite infection (109, 123). Given the...was supplemented with a combination of heat inactivated 10% fetal bovine serum and 1% penicillin G/streptomycin sulfate/gentamycin sulfate

  19. Mechanisms for cytoplasmic organization: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliaro, L

    2000-01-01

    One of the basic characteristics of life is the intrinsic organization of cytoplasm, yet we know surprisingly little about the manner in which cytoplasmic macromolecules are arranged. It is clear that cytoplasm is not the homogeneous "soup" it was once envisioned to be, but a comprehensive model for cytoplasmic organization is not available in modern cell biology. The premise of this volume is that phase separation in cytoplasm may play a role in organization at the subcellular level. Other mechanisms for non-membrane-bounded intracellular organization have previously been proposed. Some of these will be reviewed in this chapter. Multiple mechanisms, involving phase separation, specific intracellular targeting, formation of macromolecular complexes, and channeling, all could well contribute to cytoplasmic organization. Temporal and spatial organization, as well as composition, are likely to be important in defining the characteristics of cytoplasm.

  20. SH2 domains: modulators of nonreceptor tyrosine kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Müller, Susanne; Knapp, Stefan

    2009-12-01

    The Src homology 2 (SH2) domain is a sequence-specific phosphotyrosine-binding module present in many signaling molecules. In cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases, the SH2 domain is located N-terminally to the catalytic kinase domain (SH1) where it mediates cellular localization, substrate recruitment, and regulation of kinase activity. Initially, structural studies established a role of the SH2 domain stabilizing the inactive state of Src family members. However, biochemical characterization showed that the presence of the SH2 domain is frequently required for catalytic activity, suggesting a crucial function stabilizing the active state of many nonreceptor tyrosine kinases. Recently, the structure of the SH2-kinase domain of Fes revealed that the SH2 domain stabilizes the active kinase conformation by direct interactions with the regulatory helix alphaC. Stabilizing interactions between the SH2 and the kinase domains have also been observed in the structures of active Csk and Abl. Interestingly, mutations in the SH2 domain found in human disease can be explained by SH2 domain destabilization or incorrect positioning of the SH2. Here we summarize our understanding of mechanisms that lead to tyrosine kinase activation by direct interactions mediated by the SH2 domain and discuss how mutations in the SH2 domain trigger kinase inactivation.

  1. Solution structure of the dimeric cytoplasmic domain of syndecan-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, J; Lee, W; Lee, D

    2001-01-01

    The syndecans, transmembrane proteoglycans which are involved in the organization of cytoskeleton and/or actin microfilaments, have important roles as cell surface receptors during cell-cell and/or cell-matrix interactions. Since previous studies indicate that the function of the syndecan-4...... between peptides at physiological pH. Commensurately, the NMR structures demonstrate that syndecan-4L is a compact intertwined dimer with a symmetric clamp shape in the central variable V region with a root-mean-square deviation between backbone atom coordinates of 0.95 A for residues Leu(186)-Ala(195...... in the center of the dimeric twist similar to our previously reported 4V structure. The overall topology of the central variable region within the 4L structure is very similar to that of 4V complexed with the phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate; however, the intersubunit interaction mode is affected...

  2. Interactome maps of mouse gene regulatory domains reveal basic principles of transcriptional regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kieffer-Kwon, Kyong-Rim; Tang, Zhonghui; Mathe, Ewy

    2013-01-01

    IA-PET technologies to map the promoter-enhancer interactomes of pluripotent ES cells and differentiated B lymphocytes. We confirm that enhancer usage varies widely across tissues. Unexpectedly, we find that this feature extends to broadly transcribed genes, including Myc and Pim1 cell-cycle regulators, which...... associate with an entirely different set of enhancers in ES and B cells. By means of high-resolution CpG methylomes, genome editing, and digital footprinting, we show that these enhancers recruit lineage-determining factors. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the turning on and off of enhancers during...

  3. Cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP): New approach for the delivery of biomolecules into cytoplasm in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Daeyou; Jeon, Choonju; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Mi-Seon; Yoon, Cheol-Hee; Choi, In-Soo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Bae, Yong-Soo

    2006-01-01

    The protein transduction domain (PTD) of HIV-1 TAT has been extensively documented with regard to its membrane transduction potential, as well as its efficient delivery of biomolecules in vivo. However, the majority of PTD and PTD-conjugated molecules translocate to the nucleus rather than to the cytoplasm after transduction, due to the functional nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Here, we report a cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP), which was deliberately designed to ensure the efficient cytoplasmic delivery of the CTP-fused biomolecules. In comparison with PTD, CTP and its fusion partners exhibited a clear preference for cytoplasmic localization, and also markedly enhanced membrane transduction potential. Unlike the mechanism underlying PTD-mediated transduction, CTP-mediated transduction occurs independently of the lipid raft-dependent macropinocytosis pathway. The CTP-conjugated Smac/DIABLO peptide (Smac-CTP) was also shown to be much more efficient than Smac-PTD in the blockage of the antiapoptotic properties of XIAP, suggesting that cytoplasmic functional molecules can be more efficiently targeted by CTP-mediated delivery. In in vivo trafficking studies, CTP-fused β-gal exhibited unique organ tropisms to the liver and lymph nodes when systemically injected into mice, whereas PTD-β-gal exhibited no such tropisms. Taken together, our findings implicate CTP as a novel delivery peptide appropriate for (i) molecular targeting to cytoplasmic compartments in vitro, (ii) the development of class I-associated CTL vaccines, and (iii) special drug delivery in vivo, without causing any untoward effects on nuclear genetic material

  4. Domain- and nucleotide-specific Rev response element regulation of feline immunodeficiency virus production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hong; Huisman, Willem; Ellestad, Kristofor K.; Phillips, Tom R.; Power, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Computational analysis of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) RNA sequences indicated that common FIV strains contain a rev response element (RRE) defined by a long unbranched hairpin with 6 stem-loop sub-domains, termed stem-loop A (SLA). To examine the role of the RNA secondary structure of the RRE, mutational analyses were performed in both an infectious FIV molecular clone and a FIV CAT-RRE reporter system. These studies disclosed that the stems within SLA (SA1, 2, 3, 4, and 5) of the RRE were critical but SA6 was not essential for FIV replication and CAT expression. These studies also revealed that the secondary structure rather than an antisense protein (ASP) mediates virus expression and replication in vitro. In addition, a single synonymous mutation within the FIV-RRE, SA3/45, reduced viral reverse transcriptase activity and p24 expression after transfection but in addition also showed a marked reduction in viral expression and production following infection. PMID:20570310

  5. A Phosphosite within the SH2 Domain of Lck Regulates Its Activation by CD45.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, Adam H; Amacher, Jeanine F; Kadlecek, Theresa A; Mollenauer, Marianne N; Au-Yeung, Byron B; Kuriyan, John; Weiss, Arthur

    2017-08-03

    The Src Family kinase Lck sets a critical threshold for T cell activation because it phosphorylates the TCR complex and the Zap70 kinase. How a T cell controls the abundance of active Lck molecules remains poorly understood. We have identified an unappreciated role for a phosphosite, Y192, within the Lck SH2 domain that profoundly affects the amount of active Lck in cells. Notably, mutation of Y192 blocks critical TCR-proximal signaling events and impairs thymocyte development in retrogenic mice. We determined that these defects are caused by hyperphosphorylation of the inhibitory C-terminal tail of Lck. Our findings reveal that modification of Y192 inhibits the ability of CD45 to associate with Lck in cells and dephosphorylate the C-terminal tail of Lck, which prevents its adoption of an active open conformation. These results suggest a negative feedback loop that responds to signaling events that tune active Lck amounts and TCR sensitivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. SAM pointed domain ETS factor (SPDEF) regulates terminal differentiation and maturation of intestinal goblet cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noah, Taeko K.; Kazanjian, Avedis [Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Whitsett, Jeffrey [Developmental Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Neonatology and Pulmonary Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Shroyer, Noah F., E-mail: noah.shroyer@cchmc.org [Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Developmental Biology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center and University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2010-02-01

    Background and Aims: SPDEF (also termed PDEF or PSE) is an ETS family transcription factor that regulates gene expression in the prostate and goblet cell hyperplasia in the lung. Spdef has been reported to be expressed in the intestine. In this paper, we identify an important role for Spdef in regulating intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis and differentiation. Methods: SPDEF expression was inhibited in colon cancer cells to determine its ability to control goblet cell gene activation. The effects of transgenic expression of Spdef on intestinal differentiation and homeostasis were determined. Results: In LS174T colon cancer cells treated with Notch/{gamma}-secretase inhibitor to activate goblet cell gene expression, shRNAs that inhibited SPDEF also repressed expression of goblet cell genes AGR2, MUC2, RETLNB, and SPINK4. Transgenic expression of Spdef caused the expansion of intestinal goblet cells and corresponding reduction in Paneth, enteroendocrine, and absorptive enterocytes. Spdef inhibited proliferation of intestinal crypt cells without induction of apoptosis. Prolonged expression of the Spdef transgene caused a progressive reduction in the number of crypts that expressed Spdef, consistent with its inhibitory effects on cell proliferation. Conclusions: Spdef was sufficient to inhibit proliferation of intestinal progenitors and induce differentiation into goblet cells; SPDEF was required for activation of goblet cell associated genes in vitro. These data support a model in which Spdef promotes terminal differentiation into goblet cells of a common goblet/Paneth progenitor.

  7. Cytoplasmic Histidine Kinase (HP0244)-Regulated Assembly of Urease with UreI, a Channel for Urea and Its Metabolites, CO2, NH3, and NH4+, Is Necessary for Acid Survival of Helicobacter pylori▿

    OpenAIRE

    Scott, David R.; Marcus, Elizabeth A.; Wen, Yi; Singh, Siddarth; Feng, Jing; Sachs, George

    2009-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori colonizes the normal human stomach by maintaining both periplasmic and cytoplasmic pH close to neutral in the presence of gastric acidity. Urease activity, urea flux through the pH-gated urea channel, UreI, and periplasmic α-carbonic anhydrase are essential for colonization. Exposure to pH 4.5 for up to 180 min activates total bacterial urease threefold. Within 30 min at pH 4.5, the urease structural subunits, UreA and UreB, and the Ni2+ insertion protein, UreE, are recrui...

  8. Different domains of P21Cip1/waf1 regulate DNA replication and DNA repair-associated processes after UV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soria, Gaston; Speroni, Juliana; Podhajcer, Osvaldo L.; Gottifredi, Vanesa; Prives, Carol

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Many genotoxic insults result in p21 up-regulation and p21-dependent cell cycle arrest but UV irradiation triggers p21 proteolysis. The significance of the increased p21 turnover is unclear and might be associated to DNA repair. While the role of p21 in Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) remains controversial, two recent reports explore its effect on Translesion DNA Synthesis (TLS), a process that avoids replication blockage during S phase. The first report shows that p21 degradation is required for efficient PCNA ubiquitination, a post transcriptional modification that is relevant for TLS. The second report demonstrates that p21 (-/-) cells have increased TLS-associated mutagenic rates. Herein we analyze the effect of p21 on different PCNA-driven processes including DNA replication, NER and TLS. Whereas only the CDK binding domain of p21 is required for cell cycle arrest in unstressed cells; neither the CDK- nor the PCNA-binding domains of p21 are able to block early and late steps of NER. Intriguingly, through its PCNA binding domain, p21 inhibited recruitment of the TLS-polymerase, polη to PCNA foci after UV. Moreover, this obstruction correlates with accumulation of γH2AX and increased apoptosis. Taking together, our data emphasizes the link between p21 turnover and efficient TLS. This might also suggest a potential effect of p21 on other activities of polζ, a DNA polymerase with central roles in other biological scenarios such as genetic conversion, homologous recombination and modulation of the cellular response to genotoxic agents [es

  9. The pseudokinase domain of JAK2 is a dual-specificity protein kinase that negatively regulates cytokine signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ungureanu, Daniela; Wu, Jinhua; Pekkala, Tuija

    2011-01-01

    Human JAK2 tyrosine kinase mediates signaling through numerous cytokine receptors. The JAK2 JH2 domain functions as a negative regulator and is presumed to be a catalytically inactive pseudokinase, but the mechanism(s) for its inhibition of JAK2 remains unknown. Mutations in JH2 lead to increased...... JAK2 activity, contributing to myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). Here we show that JH2 is a dual-specificity protein kinase that phosphorylates two negative regulatory sites in JAK2: Ser523 and Tyr570. Inactivation of JH2 catalytic activity increased JAK2 basal activity and downstream signaling....... Notably, different MPN mutations abrogated JH2 activity in cells, and in MPN (V617F) patient cells phosphorylation of Tyr570 was reduced, suggesting that loss of JH2 activity contributes to the pathogenesis of MPNs. These results identify the catalytic activity of JH2 as a previously unrecognized...

  10. Human cytoplasmic copper chaperones Atox1 and CCS exchange copper ions in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzoldt, Svenja; Kahra, Dana; Kovermann, Michael; Dingeldein, Artur P G; Niemiec, Moritz S; Ådén, Jörgen; Wittung-Stafshede, Pernilla

    2015-06-01

    After Ctr1-mediated copper ion (Cu) entry into the human cytoplasm, chaperones Atox1 and CCS deliver Cu to P1B-type ATPases and to superoxide dismutase, respectively, via direct protein-protein interactions. Although the two Cu chaperones are presumed to work along independent pathways, we here assessed cross-reactivity between Atox1 and the first domain of CCS (CCS1) using biochemical and biophysical methods in vitro. By NMR we show that CCS1 is monomeric although it elutes differently from Atox1 in size exclusion chromatography (SEC). This property allows separation of Atox1 and CCS1 by SEC and, combined with the 254/280 nm ratio as an indicator of Cu loading, we demonstrate that Cu can be transferred from one protein to the other. Cu exchange also occurs with full-length CCS and, as expected, the interaction involves the metal binding sites since mutation of Cu-binding cysteine in Atox1 eliminates Cu transfer from CCS1. Cross-reactivity between CCS and Atox1 may aid in regulation of Cu distribution in the cytoplasm.

  11. FlnA binding to PACSIN2 F-BAR domain regulates membrane tubulation in megakaryocytes and platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begonja, Antonija Jurak; Pluthero, Fred G; Suphamungmee, Worawit; Giannini, Silvia; Christensen, Hilary; Leung, Richard; Lo, Richard W; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Lehman, William; Plomann, Markus; Hoffmeister, Karin M; Kahr, Walter H A; Hartwig, John H; Falet, Hervé

    2015-07-02

    Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) and Fes-CIP4 homology BAR (F-BAR) proteins generate tubular membrane invaginations reminiscent of the megakaryocyte (MK) demarcation membrane system (DMS), which provides membranes necessary for future platelets. The F-BAR protein PACSIN2 is one of the most abundant BAR/F-BAR proteins in platelets and the only one reported to interact with the cytoskeletal and scaffold protein filamin A (FlnA), an essential regulator of platelet formation and function. The FlnA-PACSIN2 interaction was therefore investigated in MKs and platelets. PACSIN2 associated with FlnA in human platelets. The interaction required FlnA immunoglobulin-like repeat 20 and the tip of PACSIN2 F-BAR domain and enhanced PACSIN2 F-BAR domain membrane tubulation in vitro. Most human and wild-type mouse platelets had 1 to 2 distinct PACSIN2 foci associated with cell membrane GPIbα, whereas Flna-null platelets had 0 to 4 or more foci. Endogenous PACSIN2 and transfected enhanced green fluorescent protein-PACSIN2 were concentrated in midstage wild-type mouse MKs in a well-defined invagination of the plasma membrane reminiscent of the initiating DMS and dispersed in the absence of FlnA binding. The DMS appeared less well defined, and platelet territories were not readily visualized in Flna-null MKs. We conclude that the FlnA-PACSIN2 interaction regulates membrane tubulation in MKs and platelets and likely contributes to DMS formation. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  12. Abscisic Acid Regulates Inflammation via Ligand-binding Domain-independent Activation of Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor γ*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Guri, Amir J.; Lu, Pinyi; Climent, Montse; Carbo, Adria; Sobral, Bruno W.; Horne, William T.; Lewis, Stephanie N.; Bevan, David R.; Hontecillas, Raquel

    2011-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) has shown efficacy in the treatment of diabetes and inflammation; however, its molecular targets and the mechanisms of action underlying its immunomodulatory effects remain unclear. This study investigates the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR γ) and lanthionine synthetase C-like 2 (LANCL2) as molecular targets for ABA. We demonstrate that ABA increases PPAR γ reporter activity in RAW 264.7 macrophages and increases ppar γ expression in vivo, although it does not bind to the ligand-binding domain of PPAR γ. LANCL2 knockdown studies provide evidence that ABA-mediated activation of macrophage PPAR γ is dependent on lancl2 expression. Consistent with the association of LANCL2 with G proteins, we provide evidence that ABA increases cAMP accumulation in immune cells. ABA suppresses LPS-induced prostaglandin E2 and MCP-1 production via a PPAR γ-dependent mechanism possibly involving activation of PPAR γ and suppression of NF-κB and nuclear factor of activated T cells. LPS challenge studies in PPAR γ-expressing and immune cell-specific PPAR γ null mice demonstrate that ABA down-regulates toll-like receptor 4 expression in macrophages and T cells in vivo through a PPAR γ-dependent mechanism. Global transcriptomic profiling and confirmatory quantitative RT-PCR suggest novel candidate targets and demonstrate that ABA treatment mitigates the effect of LPS on the expression of genes involved in inflammation, metabolism, and cell signaling, in part, through PPAR γ. In conclusion, ABA decreases LPS-mediated inflammation and regulates innate immune responses through a bifurcating pathway involving LANCL2 and an alternative, ligand-binding domain-independent mechanism of PPAR γ activation. PMID:21088297

  13. Abscisic acid regulates inflammation via ligand-binding domain-independent activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Guri, Amir J; Lu, Pinyi; Climent, Montse; Carbo, Adria; Sobral, Bruno W; Horne, William T; Lewis, Stephanie N; Bevan, David R; Hontecillas, Raquel

    2011-01-28

    Abscisic acid (ABA) has shown efficacy in the treatment of diabetes and inflammation; however, its molecular targets and the mechanisms of action underlying its immunomodulatory effects remain unclear. This study investigates the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR γ) and lanthionine synthetase C-like 2 (LANCL2) as molecular targets for ABA. We demonstrate that ABA increases PPAR γ reporter activity in RAW 264.7 macrophages and increases ppar γ expression in vivo, although it does not bind to the ligand-binding domain of PPAR γ. LANCL2 knockdown studies provide evidence that ABA-mediated activation of macrophage PPAR γ is dependent on lancl2 expression. Consistent with the association of LANCL2 with G proteins, we provide evidence that ABA increases cAMP accumulation in immune cells. ABA suppresses LPS-induced prostaglandin E(2) and MCP-1 production via a PPAR γ-dependent mechanism possibly involving activation of PPAR γ and suppression of NF-κB and nuclear factor of activated T cells. LPS challenge studies in PPAR γ-expressing and immune cell-specific PPAR γ null mice demonstrate that ABA down-regulates toll-like receptor 4 expression in macrophages and T cells in vivo through a PPAR γ-dependent mechanism. Global transcriptomic profiling and confirmatory quantitative RT-PCR suggest novel candidate targets and demonstrate that ABA treatment mitigates the effect of LPS on the expression of genes involved in inflammation, metabolism, and cell signaling, in part, through PPAR γ. In conclusion, ABA decreases LPS-mediated inflammation and regulates innate immune responses through a bifurcating pathway involving LANCL2 and an alternative, ligand-binding domain-independent mechanism of PPAR γ activation.

  14. The F-Actin Binding Protein Cortactin Regulates the Dynamics of the Exocytotic Fusion Pore through its SH3 Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Jamett, Arlek M.; Guerra, María J.; Olivares, María J.; Haro-Acuña, Valentina; Baéz-Matus, Ximena; Vásquez-Navarrete, Jacqueline; Momboisse, Fanny; Martinez-Quiles, Narcisa; Cárdenas, Ana M.

    2017-01-01

    Upon cell stimulation, the network of cortical actin filaments is rearranged to facilitate the neurosecretory process. This actin rearrangement includes both disruption of the preexisting actin network and de novo actin polymerization. However, the mechanism by which a Ca2+ signal elicits the formation of new actin filaments remains uncertain. Cortactin, an actin-binding protein that promotes actin polymerization in synergy with the nucleation promoting factor N-WASP, could play a key role in this mechanism. We addressed this hypothesis by analyzing de novo actin polymerization and exocytosis in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells expressing different cortactin or N-WASP domains, or cortactin mutants that fail to interact with proline-rich domain (PRD)-containing proteins, including N-WASP, or to be phosphorylated by Ca2+-dependent kinases, such as ERK1/2 and Src. Our results show that the activation of nicotinic receptors in chromaffin cells promotes cortactin translocation to the cell cortex, where it colocalizes with actin filaments. We further found that, in association with PRD-containing proteins, cortactin contributes to the Ca2+-dependent formation of F-actin, and regulates fusion pore dynamics and the number of exocytotic events induced by activation of nicotinic receptors. However, whereas the actions of cortactin on the fusion pore dynamics seems to depend on the availability of monomeric actin and its phosphorylation by ERK1/2 and Src kinases, cortactin regulates the extent of exocytosis by a mechanism independent of actin polymerization. Together our findings point out a role for cortactin as a critical modulator of actin filament formation and exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells. PMID:28522963

  15. Signaling domain of Sonic Hedgehog as cannibalistic calcium-regulated zinc-peptidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Rebollido-Rios

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sonic Hedgehog (Shh is a representative of the evolutionary closely related class of Hedgehog proteins that have essential signaling functions in animal development. The N-terminal domain (ShhN is also assigned to the group of LAS proteins (LAS = Lysostaphin type enzymes, D-Ala-D-Ala metalloproteases, Sonic Hedgehog, of which all members harbor a structurally well-defined Zn2+ center; however, it is remarkable that ShhN so far is the only LAS member without proven peptidase activity. Another unique feature of ShhN in the LAS group is a double-Ca2+ center close to the zinc. We have studied the effect of these calcium ions on ShhN structure, dynamics, and interactions. We find that the presence of calcium has a marked impact on ShhN properties, with the two calcium ions having different effects. The more strongly bound calcium ion significantly stabilizes the overall structure. Surprisingly, the binding of the second calcium ion switches the putative catalytic center from a state similar to LAS enzymes to a state that probably is catalytically inactive. We describe in detail the mechanics of the switch, including the effect on substrate co-ordinating residues and on the putative catalytic water molecule. The properties of the putative substrate binding site suggest that ShhN could degrade other ShhN molecules, e.g. by cleavage at highly conserved glycines in ShhN. To test experimentally the stability of ShhN against autodegradation, we compare two ShhN mutants in vitro: (1 a ShhN mutant unable to bind calcium but with putative catalytic center intact, and thus, according to our hypothesis, a constitutively active peptidase, and (2 a mutant carrying additionally mutation E177A, i.e., with the putative catalytically active residue knocked out. The in vitro results are consistent with ShhN being a cannibalistic zinc-peptidase. These experiments also reveal that the peptidase activity depends on pH.

  16. Comparison of SH3 and SH2 domain dynamics when expressed alone or in an SH(3+2) construct: the role of protein dynamics in functional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engen, J R; Smithgall, T E; Gmeiner, W H; Smith, D L

    1999-04-02

    Protein dynamics play an important role in protein function and regulation of enzymatic activity. To determine how additional interactions with surrounding structure affects local protein dynamics, we have used hydrogen exchange and mass spectrometry to investigate the SH2 and SH3 domains of the protein tyrosine kinase Hck. Exchange rates of isolated Hck SH3 and SH2 domains were compared with rates for the same domains when part of a larger SH(3+2) construct. Increased deuterium incorporation was observed for the SH3 domain in the joint construct, particularly near the SH2 interface and the short sequence that connects SH3 to SH2, implying greater flexibility of SH3 when it is part of SH(3+2). Slow cooperative unfolding of the SH3 domain occurred at the same rate in isolated SH3 as in the SH(3+2) construct, suggesting a functional significance for this unfolding. The SH2 domain displayed relatively smaller changes in flexibility when part of the SH(3+2) construct. These results suggest that the domains influence each other. Further, our results imply a link between functional regulation and structural dynamics of SH3 and SH2 domains. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  17. Accessory factors of cytoplasmic viral RNA sensors required for antiviral innate immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki eOshiumi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferon (IFN induces many antiviral factors in host cells. RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs are cytoplasmic viral RNA sensors that trigger the signal to induce the innate immune response that includes type I IFN production. RIG-I and MDA5 are RLRs that form nucleoprotein filaments along viral double-stranded RNA, resulting in the activation of MAVS adaptor molecule. The MAVS protein forms a prion-like aggregation structure, leading to type I IFN production. RIG-I and MDA5 undergo post-translational modification. TRIM25 and Riplet ubiquitin ligases deliver a K63-linked polyubiquitin moiety to the RIG-I N-terminal caspase activation and recruitment domains (CARDs and C-terminal region; the polyubiquitin chain then stabilizes the two-CARD tetramer structure required for MAVS assembly. MDA5 activation is regulated by phosphorylation. RIOK3 is a protein kinase that phosphorylates the MDA5 protein in a steady state, and PP1α/γ dephosphorylate this protein, resulting in its activation. RIG-I and MDA5 require cytoplasmic RNA helicases for their efficient activation. LGP2, another RLR, is an RNA helicase involved in RLR signaling. This protein does not possess N-terminal CARDs and thus cannot trigger downstream signaling by itself. Recent studies have revealed that this protein modulates MDA5 filament formation, resulting in enhanced type I IFN production. Several other cytoplasmic RNA helicases are involved in RLR signaling. DDX3, DHX29, DHX36, and DDX60 RNA helicases have been reported to be involved in RLR-mediated type I IFN production after viral infection. However, the underlying mechanism is largely unknown. Future studies are required to reveal the role of RNA helicases in the RLR signaling pathway.

  18. TRIM5α association with cytoplasmic bodies is not required for antiretroviral activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Byeongwoon; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Park, Do Hyun; Rogers, Thomas; Stremlau, Matthew; Sodroski, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    The tripartite motif (TRIM) protein, TRIM5α, restricts infection by particular retroviruses. Many TRIM proteins form cytoplasmic bodies of unknown function. We investigated the relationship between cytoplasmic body formation and the structure and antiretroviral activity of TRIM5α. In addition to diffuse cytoplasmic staining, the TRIM5α proteins from several primate species were located in cytoplasmic bodies of different sizes; by contrast, TRIM5α from spider monkeys did not form cytoplasmic bodies. Despite these differences, all of the TRIM5α proteins exhibited the ability to restrict infection by particular retroviruses. Treatment of cells with geldanamycin, an Hsp90 inhibitor, resulted in disappearance or reduction of the TRIM5α-associated cytoplasmic bodies, yet exerted little effect on the restriction of retroviral infection. Studies of green fluorescent protein-TRIM5α fusion proteins indicated that no TRIM5α domain is specifically required for association with cytoplasmic bodies. Apparently, the formation of cytoplasmic bodies is not required for the antiretroviral activity of TRIM5α

  19. The SH2 Domain Regulates c-Abl Kinase Activation by a Cyclin-Like Mechanism and Remodulation of the Hinge Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dölker, Nicole; Górna, Maria W.; Sutto, Ludovico; Torralba, Antonio S.; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Gervasio, Francesco L.

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of the c-Abl (ABL1) tyrosine kinase is important because of its role in cellular signaling, and its relevance in the leukemiogenic counterpart (BCR-ABL). Both auto-inhibition and full activation of c-Abl are regulated by the interaction of the catalytic domain with the Src Homology 2 (SH2) domain. The mechanism by which this interaction enhances catalysis is not known. We combined computational simulations with mutagenesis and functional analysis to find that the SH2 domain conveys both local and global effects on the dynamics of the catalytic domain. Locally, it regulates the flexibility of the αC helix in a fashion reminiscent of cyclins in cyclin-dependent kinases, reorienting catalytically important motifs. At a more global level, SH2 binding redirects the hinge motion of the N and C lobes and changes the conformational equilibrium of the activation loop. The complex network of subtle structural shifts that link the SH2 domain with the activation loop and the active site may be partially conserved with other SH2-domain containing kinases and therefore offer additional parameters for the design of conformation-specific inhibitors. PMID:25299346

  20. The SH2 domain regulates c-Abl kinase activation by a cyclin-like mechanism and remodulation of the hinge motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dölker, Nicole; Górna, Maria W; Sutto, Ludovico; Torralba, Antonio S; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Gervasio, Francesco L

    2014-10-01

    Regulation of the c-Abl (ABL1) tyrosine kinase is important because of its role in cellular signaling, and its relevance in the leukemiogenic counterpart (BCR-ABL). Both auto-inhibition and full activation of c-Abl are regulated by the interaction of the catalytic domain with the Src Homology 2 (SH2) domain. The mechanism by which this interaction enhances catalysis is not known. We combined computational simulations with mutagenesis and functional analysis to find that the SH2 domain conveys both local and global effects on the dynamics of the catalytic domain. Locally, it regulates the flexibility of the αC helix in a fashion reminiscent of cyclins in cyclin-dependent kinases, reorienting catalytically important motifs. At a more global level, SH2 binding redirects the hinge motion of the N and C lobes and changes the conformational equilibrium of the activation loop. The complex network of subtle structural shifts that link the SH2 domain with the activation loop and the active site may be partially conserved with other SH2-domain containing kinases and therefore offer additional parameters for the design of conformation-specific inhibitors.

  1. The SH2 domain regulates c-Abl kinase activation by a cyclin-like mechanism and remodulation of the hinge motion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Dölker

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of the c-Abl (ABL1 tyrosine kinase is important because of its role in cellular signaling, and its relevance in the leukemiogenic counterpart (BCR-ABL. Both auto-inhibition and full activation of c-Abl are regulated by the interaction of the catalytic domain with the Src Homology 2 (SH2 domain. The mechanism by which this interaction enhances catalysis is not known. We combined computational simulations with mutagenesis and functional analysis to find that the SH2 domain conveys both local and global effects on the dynamics of the catalytic domain. Locally, it regulates the flexibility of the αC helix in a fashion reminiscent of cyclins in cyclin-dependent kinases, reorienting catalytically important motifs. At a more global level, SH2 binding redirects the hinge motion of the N and C lobes and changes the conformational equilibrium of the activation loop. The complex network of subtle structural shifts that link the SH2 domain with the activation loop and the active site may be partially conserved with other SH2-domain containing kinases and therefore offer additional parameters for the design of conformation-specific inhibitors.

  2. Direct Binding between Pre-S1 and TRP-like Domains in TRPP Channels Mediates Gating and Functional Regulation by PIP2

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Zheng; Ruiqi Cai; Laura Hofmann; Vasyl Nesin; Qiaolin Hu; Wentong Long; Mohammad Fatehi; Xiong Liu; Shaimaa Hussein; Tim Kong; Jingru Li; Peter E. Light; Jingfeng Tang; Veit Flockerzi; Leonidas Tsiokas

    2018-01-01

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are regulated by diverse stimuli comprising thermal, chemical, and mechanical modalities. They are also commonly regulated by phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), with underlying mechanisms largely unknown. We here revealed an intramolecular interaction of the TRPP3 N and C termini (N-C) that is functionally essential. The interaction was mediated by aromatic Trp81 in pre-S1 domain and cationic Lys568 in TRP-like domain. Structure-function ...

  3. Structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1, a fission yeast MAPK target RNA binding protein, and implication for its RNA recognition and regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Ayaho; Kanaba, Teppei [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Satoh, Ryosuke [Institute of Microbial Chemistry, 3-14-23 Kamiosaki, Shinagawa-ku 141-0021, Tokyo (Japan); Fujiwara, Toshinobu [Institute of Microbial Chemistry, 3-14-23 Kamiosaki, Shinagawa-ku 141-0021, Tokyo (Japan); Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 3-1 Tanabe-dori, Mizuho-ku,Nagoya 467-8603 (Japan); Ito, Yutaka [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Sugiura, Reiko [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Mishima, Masaki, E-mail: mishima-masaki@tmu.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan)

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •Solution structure of the second RRM of Nrd1 was determined. •RNA binding site of the second RRM was estimated. •Regulatory mechanism of RNA binding by phosphorylation is discussed. -- Abstract: Negative regulator of differentiation 1 (Nrd1) is known as a negative regulator of sexual differentiation in fission yeast. Recently, it has been revealed that Nrd1 also regulates cytokinesis, in which physical separation of the cell is achieved by a contractile ring comprising many proteins including actin and myosin. Cdc4, a myosin II light chain, is known to be required for cytokinesis. Nrd1 binds and stabilizes Cdc4 mRNA, and thereby suppressing the cytokinesis defects of the cdc4 mutants. Interestingly, Pmk1 MAPK phosphorylates Nrd1, resulting in markedly reduced RNA binding activity. Furthermore, Nrd1 localizes to stress granules in response to various stresses, and Pmk1 phosphorylation enhances the localization. Nrd1 consists of four RRM domains, although the mechanism by which Pmk1 regulates the RNA binding activity of Nrd1 is unknown. In an effort to delineate the relationship between Nrd1 structure and function, we prepared each RNA binding domain of Nrd1 and examined RNA binding to chemically synthesized oligo RNA using NMR. The structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1 was determined and the RNA binding site on the second RRM domain was mapped by NMR. A plausible mechanism pertaining to the regulation of RNA binding activity by phosphorylation is also discussed.

  4. Structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1, a fission yeast MAPK target RNA binding protein, and implication for its RNA recognition and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Ayaho; Kanaba, Teppei; Satoh, Ryosuke; Fujiwara, Toshinobu; Ito, Yutaka; Sugiura, Reiko; Mishima, Masaki

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Solution structure of the second RRM of Nrd1 was determined. •RNA binding site of the second RRM was estimated. •Regulatory mechanism of RNA binding by phosphorylation is discussed. -- Abstract: Negative regulator of differentiation 1 (Nrd1) is known as a negative regulator of sexual differentiation in fission yeast. Recently, it has been revealed that Nrd1 also regulates cytokinesis, in which physical separation of the cell is achieved by a contractile ring comprising many proteins including actin and myosin. Cdc4, a myosin II light chain, is known to be required for cytokinesis. Nrd1 binds and stabilizes Cdc4 mRNA, and thereby suppressing the cytokinesis defects of the cdc4 mutants. Interestingly, Pmk1 MAPK phosphorylates Nrd1, resulting in markedly reduced RNA binding activity. Furthermore, Nrd1 localizes to stress granules in response to various stresses, and Pmk1 phosphorylation enhances the localization. Nrd1 consists of four RRM domains, although the mechanism by which Pmk1 regulates the RNA binding activity of Nrd1 is unknown. In an effort to delineate the relationship between Nrd1 structure and function, we prepared each RNA binding domain of Nrd1 and examined RNA binding to chemically synthesized oligo RNA using NMR. The structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1 was determined and the RNA binding site on the second RRM domain was mapped by NMR. A plausible mechanism pertaining to the regulation of RNA binding activity by phosphorylation is also discussed

  5. Cytoplasmic Streaming - Skylab Student Experiment ED-63

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    This chart describes the Skylab student experiment (ED-63), Cytoplasmic Streaming, proposed by Cheryl A. Peitz of Arapahoe High School, Littleton, Colorado. Experiment ED-63 was to observe the effect of zero-gravity on cytoplasmic streaming in the aquatic plant named Elodea, commonly called water weed or water thyme. The phenomenon of cytoplasmic streaming is not well understood, but it is recognized as the circulation mechanism of the internal materials or cytoplasm of a cell. Cytoplasm is a gelatinous substance that has the ability to change its viscosity and flow, carrying various cell materials with it. The activity can be stimulated by sunlight or heat. In March 1972, NASA and the National Science Teachers Association selected 25 experiment proposals for flight on Skylab. Science advisors from the Marshall Space Flight Center aided and assisted the students in developing the proposals for flight on Skylab.

  6. The Structure of the ZMYND8/Drebrin Complex Suggests a Cytoplasmic Sequestering Mechanism of ZMYND8 by Drebrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Ningning; Li, Jianchao; Liu, Haiyang; Wan, Jun; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Mingjie

    2017-11-07

    Malfunctions of the actin binding protein Drebrin have been implicated in various human diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, cognitive impairments, cancer, and digestive disorders, though with poorly understood mechanisms. The ADF-H domain of Drebrin does not contain actin binding and depolymerizing activity. Instead, it binds to a histone marker reader, ZMYND8. Here we present the high-resolution crystal structure of Drebrin ADF-H in complex with the ZMYND8 PHD-BROMO-PWWP tandem, elucidating the mechanistic basis governing the highly specific interaction of the two proteins. The structure reveals that the ZMYND8 PHD-BROMO-PWWP tandem forms a structural supramodule that is necessary for binding to Drebrin ADF-H. Drebrin ADF-H competes with modified histone for binding to ZMYND8. Binding of Drebrin can shuttle ZMYND8 from nucleus to cytoplasm in living cells. Taken together, our study uncovers a non-actin target binding mode for ADF-H domains, and suggests that Drebrin may regulate activities of epigenetic reader ZMYND8 via its cytoplasmic sequestration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Training self-assessment and task-selection skills to foster self-regulated learning: Do trained skills transfer across domains?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaijmakers, Steven F; Baars, Martine; Paas, Fred; van Merriënboer, Jeroen J G; van Gog, Tamara

    2018-01-01

    Students' ability to accurately self-assess their performance and select a suitable subsequent learning task in response is imperative for effective self-regulated learning. Video modeling examples have proven effective for training self-assessment and task-selection skills, and-importantly-such training fostered self-regulated learning outcomes. It is unclear, however, whether trained skills would transfer across domains. We investigated whether skills acquired from training with either a specific, algorithmic task-selection rule or a more general heuristic task-selection rule in biology would transfer to self-regulated learning in math. A manipulation check performed after the training confirmed that both algorithmic and heuristic training improved task-selection skills on the biology problems compared with the control condition. However, we found no evidence that students subsequently applied the acquired skills during self-regulated learning in math. Future research should investigate how to support transfer of task-selection skills across domains.

  8. TaUBA, a UBA domain-containing protein in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), is a negative regulator of salt and drought stress response in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Zhang, Shuang-shuang; Ma, Jun-xia; Guo, Guang-yan; Zhang, Xue-yong; Liu, Xu; Bi, Cai-li

    2015-05-01

    TaUBA functions as a negative regulator of salt and drought stress response in transgenic Arabidopsis, either the UBA domain or the zinc finger domain is crucial for TaUBA's function. TaUBA (DQ211935), which is a UBA domain-containing protein in wheat, was cloned and functionally characterized. Southern blot suggested that TaUBA is a low copy gene in common wheat. qRT-PCR assay showed that the expression of TaUBA was strongly induced by salt and drought stress. When suffering from drought and salt stresses, lower proline content and much higher MDA content in the TaUBA overexpressors were observed than those of the wild-type control, suggesting TaUBA may function as a negative regulator of salt and drought stress response in plants. To study whether the UBA domain or the zinc finger domain affects the function of TaUBA, TaUBAΔUBA (deletion of UBA domain) and TaUBA-M (Cys464Gly and Cys467Gly) overexpression vectors were constructed and transformed into Arabidopsis. Upon drought and salt stresses, the TaUBAΔUBA-and TaUBA-M-overexpressed plants accumulated much more proline and lower MDA than the wild-type control, the TaUBA-overexpressors lost water more quickly than TaUBAΔUBA-and TaUBA-M-overexpressed plants as well as the wild-type control, suggesting that overexpression of TaUBAΔUBA or TaUBA-M improved the drought and salt tolerance of transgenic Arabidopsis plants and the possibility of ubiquitination role in the regulation of osmolyte synthesis and oxidative stress responses in mediating stress tolerance. qRT-PCR assay of stress-related genes in transgenic plants upon drought and salt stresses suggested that TaUBA may function through down-regulating some stress related-transcription factors and by regulating P5CSs to cope with osmotic stress.

  9. Characterization of cytoplasmic male sterility of rice with Lead Rice cytoplasm in comparison with that with Chinsurah Boro II cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itabashi, Etsuko; Kazama, Tomohiko; Toriyama, Kinya

    2009-02-01

    Rice with LD-type cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) possesses the cytoplasm of 'Lead Rice' and its fertility is recovered by a nuclear fertility restorer gene Rf1. Rf1 promotes processing of a CMS-associated mitochondrial RNA of atp6-orf79, which consists of atp6 and orf79, in BT-CMS with the cytoplasm of 'Chinsurah Boro II'. In this study, we found that LD-cytoplasm contained a sequence variant of orf79 downstream of atp6. Northern blot analysis showed that atp6-orf79 RNA of LD-cytoplasm was co-transcribed and was processed in the presence of Rf1 in the same manner as in BT-cytoplasm. Western blot analysis showed that the ORF79 peptide did not accumulate in an LD-CMS line, while ORF79 accumulated in a BT-CMS line and was diminished by Rf1. These results suggest that accumulation of ORF79 is not the cause of CMS in LD-cytoplasm and the mechanism of male-sterility induction/fertility restoration in LD-CMS is different from that in BT-CMS.

  10. Localization and function of KLF4 in cytoplasm of vascular smooth muscle cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yan; Zheng, Bin; Zhang, Xin-hua; Nie, Chan-juan; Li, Yong-hui; Wen, Jin-kun

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •PDGF-BB prompts the translocation of KLF4 to the cytoplasm. •PDGF-BB promotes interaction between KLF4 and actin in the cytoplasm. •Phosphorylation and SUMOylation of KLF4 participates in regulation of cytoskeletal organization. •KLF4 regulates cytoskeleton by promoting the expression of contraction-associated genes. -- Abstract: The Krüppel-like factor 4 is a DNA-binding transcriptional regulator that regulates a diverse array of cellular processes, including development, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. The previous studies about KLF4 functions mainly focused on its role as a transcription factor, its functions in the cytoplasm are still unknown. In this study, we found that PDGF-BB could prompt the translocation of KLF4 to the cytoplasm through CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and increased the interaction of KLF4 with actin in the cytoplasm. Further study showed that both KLF4 phosphorylation and SUMOylation induced by PDGF-BB participates in regulation of cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing the actin cytoskeleton in VSMCs. In conclusion, these results identify that KLF4 participates in the cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing cytoskeleton in the cytoplasm of VSMCs

  11. Localization and function of KLF4 in cytoplasm of vascular smooth muscle cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Key Laboratory of Neurobiology and Vascular Biology (China); The Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, Shijazhuang (China); Zheng, Bin; Zhang, Xin-hua; Nie, Chan-juan; Li, Yong-hui [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Key Laboratory of Neurobiology and Vascular Biology (China); Wen, Jin-kun, E-mail: wjk@hebmu.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The Key Laboratory of Neurobiology and Vascular Biology (China)

    2013-06-28

    Highlights: •PDGF-BB prompts the translocation of KLF4 to the cytoplasm. •PDGF-BB promotes interaction between KLF4 and actin in the cytoplasm. •Phosphorylation and SUMOylation of KLF4 participates in regulation of cytoskeletal organization. •KLF4 regulates cytoskeleton by promoting the expression of contraction-associated genes. -- Abstract: The Krüppel-like factor 4 is a DNA-binding transcriptional regulator that regulates a diverse array of cellular processes, including development, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. The previous studies about KLF4 functions mainly focused on its role as a transcription factor, its functions in the cytoplasm are still unknown. In this study, we found that PDGF-BB could prompt the translocation of KLF4 to the cytoplasm through CRM1-mediated nuclear export pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and increased the interaction of KLF4 with actin in the cytoplasm. Further study showed that both KLF4 phosphorylation and SUMOylation induced by PDGF-BB participates in regulation of cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing the actin cytoskeleton in VSMCs. In conclusion, these results identify that KLF4 participates in the cytoskeletal organization by stabilizing cytoskeleton in the cytoplasm of VSMCs.

  12. Jasmonate ZIM-domain (JAZ protein regulates host and nonhost pathogen-induced cell death in tomato and Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuhiro Ishiga

    Full Text Available The nonhost-specific phytotoxin coronatine (COR produced by several pathovars of Pseudomonas syringae functions as a jasmonic acid-isoleucine (JA-Ile mimic and contributes to disease development by suppressing plant defense responses and inducing reactive oxygen species in chloroplast. It has been shown that the F-box protein CORONATINE INSENSITIVE 1 (COI1 is the receptor for COR and JA-Ile. JASMONATE ZIM DOMAIN (JAZ proteins act as negative regulators for JA signaling in Arabidopsis. However, the physiological significance of JAZ proteins in P. syringae disease development and nonhost pathogen-induced hypersensitive response (HR cell death is not completely understood. In this study, we identified JAZ genes from tomato, a host plant for P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst DC3000, and examined their expression profiles in response to COR and pathogens. Most JAZ genes were induced by COR treatment or inoculation with COR-producing Pst DC3000, but not by the COR-defective mutant DB29. Tomato SlJAZ2, SlJAZ6 and SlJAZ7 interacted with SlCOI1 in a COR-dependent manner. Using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS, we demonstrated that SlJAZ2, SlJAZ6 and SlJAZ7 have no effect on COR-induced chlorosis in tomato and Nicotiana benthamiana. However, SlJAZ2-, SlJAZ6- and SlJAZ7-silenced tomato plants showed enhanced disease-associated cell death to Pst DC3000. Furthermore, we found delayed HR cell death in response to the nonhost pathogen Pst T1 or a pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP, INF1, in SlJAZ2- and SlJAZ6-silenced N. benthamiana. These results suggest that tomato JAZ proteins regulate the progression of cell death during host and nonhost interactions.

  13. Identification of the C-terminal domain of Daxx acts as a potential regulator of intracellular cholesterol synthesis in HepG2 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Shaowei; Wen, Juan; Qiu, Fei; Yin, Yufang; Xu, Guina; Li, Tianping; Nie, Juan; Xiong, Guozuo; Zhang, Caiping; Liao, Duangfang; Chen, Jianxiong; Tuo, Qinhui

    2016-01-01

    Daxx is a highly conserved nuclear transcriptional factor, which has been implicated in many nuclear processes including transcription and cell cycle regulation. Our previous study demonstrated Daxx also plays a role in regulation of intracellular cholesterol content. Daxx contains several domains that are essential for interaction with a growing number of proteins. To delineate the underlying mechanism of hypocholesterolemic activity of Daxx, we constructed a set of plasmids which can be used to overexpress different fragments of Daxx and transfected to HepG2 cells. We found that the C- terminal region Daxx626–740 clearly reduced intracellular cholesterol levels and inhibited the expression of SREBPs and SCAP. In GST pull-down experiments and Double immunofluorescence assays, Daxx626–740 was demonstrated to bind directly to androgen receptor (AR). Our findings suggest that the interaction of Daxx626-740 and AR abolishes the AR-mediated activation of SCAP/SREBPs pathway, which suppresses the de novo cholesterol synthesis. Thus, C-terminal domain of Daxx acts as a potential regulator of intracellular cholesterol content in HepG2 cells. - Highlights: • Daxx C-terminal domain reduces cholesterol levels. • Daxx C-terminal domain binds directly to AR. • The interaction of Daxx C-terminal domain and AR suppresses cholesterol synthesis.

  14. The structure of the first representative of Pfam family PF09836 reveals a two-domain organization and suggests involvement in transcriptional regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Debanu; Grishin, Nick V.; Kumar, Abhinav; Carlton, Dennis; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Miller, Mitchell D.; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Axelrod, Herbert L.; Burra, Prasad; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Chiu, Michelle; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Ernst, Dustin; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grzechnik, Anna; Grzechnik, Slawomir K.; Grant, Joanna C.; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Johnson, Hope A.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Oommachen, Silvya; Paulsen, Jessica; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Rife, Christopher L.; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; Bedem, Henry van den; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2009-01-01

    The crystal structure of the NGO1945 gene product from N. gonorrhoeae (UniProt Q5F5IO) reveals that the N-terminal domain assigned as a domain of unknown function (DUF2063) is likely to bind DNA and that the protein may be involved in transcriptional regulation. Proteins with the DUF2063 domain constitute a new Pfam family, PF09836. The crystal structure of a member of this family, NGO1945 from Neisseria gonorrhoeae, has been determined and reveals that the N-terminal DUF2063 domain is likely to be a DNA-binding domain. In conjunction with the rest of the protein, NGO1945 is likely to be involved in transcriptional regulation, which is consistent with genomic neighborhood analysis. Of the 216 currently known proteins that contain a DUF2063 domain, the most significant sequence homologs of NGO1945 (∼40–99% sequence identity) are from various Neisseria and Haemophilus species. As these are important human pathogens, NGO1945 represents an interesting candidate for further exploration via biochemical studies and possible therapeutic intervention

  15. Hydrodynamic property of the cytoplasm is sufficient to mediate cytoplasmic streaming in the Caenorhabiditis elegans embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwayama, Ritsuya; Shinohara, Kyosuke; Kimura, Akatsuki

    2011-01-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming is a type of intracellular transport widely seen in nature. Cytoplasmic streaming in Caenorhabditis elegans at the one-cell stage is bidirectional; the flow near the cortex (“cortical flow”) is oriented toward the anterior, whereas the flow in the central region (“cytoplasmic flow”) is oriented toward the posterior. Both cortical flow and cytoplasmic flow depend on non-muscle-myosin II (NMY-2), which primarily localizes in the cortex. The manner in which NMY-2 proteins drive cytoplasmic flow in the opposite direction from remote locations has not been fully understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the hydrodynamic properties of the cytoplasm are sufficient to mediate the forces generated by the cortical myosin to drive bidirectional streaming throughout the cytoplasm. We quantified the flow velocities of cytoplasmic streaming using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and conducted a three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulation using the moving particle semiimplicit method. Our simulation quantitatively reconstructed the quantified flow velocity distribution resolved through PIV analysis. Furthermore, our PIV analyses detected microtubule-dependent flows during the pronuclear migration stage. These flows were reproduced via hydrodynamic interactions between moving pronuclei and the cytoplasm. The agreement of flow dynamics in vivo and in simulation indicates that the hydrodynamic properties of the cytoplasm are sufficient to mediate cytoplasmic streaming in C. elegans embryos. PMID:21730185

  16. Ribosomal L1 domain and lysine-rich region are essential for CSIG/ RSL1D1 to regulate proliferation and senescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Liwei; Zhao, Wenting; Zheng, Quanhui; Chen, Tianda; Qi, Ji; Li, Guodong; Tong, Tanjun

    2016-01-01

    The expression change of cellular senescence-associated genes is underlying the genetic foundation of cellular senescence. Using a suppressive subtractive hybridization system, we identified CSIG (cellular senescence-inhibited gene protein; RSL1D1) as a novel senescence-associated gene. CSIG is implicated in various process including cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and tumor metastasis. We previously showed that CSIG plays an important role in regulating cell proliferation and cellular senescence progression through inhibiting PTEN, however, which domain or region of CSIG contributes to this function? To clarify this question, we investigated the functional importance of ribosomal L1 domain and lysine (Lys) -rich region of CSIG. The data showed that expression of CSIG potently reduced PTEN expression, increased cell proliferation rates, and reduced the senescent phenotype (lower SA-β-gal activity). By contrast, neither the expression of CSIG N- terminal (NT) fragment containing the ribosomal L1 domain nor C-terminal (CT) fragment containing Lys-rich region could significantly altered the levels of PTEN; instead of promoting cell proliferation and delaying cellular senescence, expression of CSIG-NT or CSIG-CT inhibited cell proliferation and accelerated cell senescence (increased SA-β-gal activity) compared to either CSIG over-expressing or control (empty vector transfected) cells. The further immunofluorescence analysis showed that CSIG-CT and CSIG-NT truncated proteins exhibited different subcellular distribution with that of wild-type CSIG. Conclusively, both ribosomal L1 domain and Lys-rich region of CSIG are critical for CSIG to act as a regulator of cell proliferation and cellular senescence. - Highlights: • The ribosomal L1 domain and lysine-rich region of CSIG were expressed. • They are critical for CSIG to regulate proliferation and senescence. • CSIG and its domains exhibit different subcellular distribution.

  17. Ribosomal L1 domain and lysine-rich region are essential for CSIG/ RSL1D1 to regulate proliferation and senescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Liwei; Zhao, Wenting; Zheng, Quanhui; Chen, Tianda; Qi, Ji; Li, Guodong; Tong, Tanjun, E-mail: tztong@bjmu.edu.cn

    2016-01-15

    The expression change of cellular senescence-associated genes is underlying the genetic foundation of cellular senescence. Using a suppressive subtractive hybridization system, we identified CSIG (cellular senescence-inhibited gene protein; RSL1D1) as a novel senescence-associated gene. CSIG is implicated in various process including cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and tumor metastasis. We previously showed that CSIG plays an important role in regulating cell proliferation and cellular senescence progression through inhibiting PTEN, however, which domain or region of CSIG contributes to this function? To clarify this question, we investigated the functional importance of ribosomal L1 domain and lysine (Lys) -rich region of CSIG. The data showed that expression of CSIG potently reduced PTEN expression, increased cell proliferation rates, and reduced the senescent phenotype (lower SA-β-gal activity). By contrast, neither the expression of CSIG N- terminal (NT) fragment containing the ribosomal L1 domain nor C-terminal (CT) fragment containing Lys-rich region could significantly altered the levels of PTEN; instead of promoting cell proliferation and delaying cellular senescence, expression of CSIG-NT or CSIG-CT inhibited cell proliferation and accelerated cell senescence (increased SA-β-gal activity) compared to either CSIG over-expressing or control (empty vector transfected) cells. The further immunofluorescence analysis showed that CSIG-CT and CSIG-NT truncated proteins exhibited different subcellular distribution with that of wild-type CSIG. Conclusively, both ribosomal L1 domain and Lys-rich region of CSIG are critical for CSIG to act as a regulator of cell proliferation and cellular senescence. - Highlights: • The ribosomal L1 domain and lysine-rich region of CSIG were expressed. • They are critical for CSIG to regulate proliferation and senescence. • CSIG and its domains exhibit different subcellular distribution.

  18. A role for the juxtamembrane cytoplasm in the molecular dynamics of focal adhesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haguy Wolfenson

    Full Text Available Focal adhesions (FAs are specialized membrane-associated multi-protein complexes that link the cell to the extracellular matrix and play crucial roles in cell-matrix sensing. Considerable information is available on the complex molecular composition of these sites, yet the regulation of FA dynamics is largely unknown. Based on a combination of FRAP studies in live cells, with in silico simulations and mathematical modeling, we show that the FA plaque proteins paxillin and vinculin exist in four dynamic states: an immobile FA-bound fraction, an FA-associated fraction undergoing exchange, a juxtamembrane fraction experiencing attenuated diffusion, and a fast-diffusing cytoplasmic pool. The juxtamembrane region surrounding FAs displays a gradient of FA plaque proteins with respect to both concentration and dynamics. Based on these findings, we propose a new model for the regulation of FA dynamics in which this juxtamembrane domain acts as an intermediary layer, enabling an efficient regulation of FA formation and reorganization.

  19. The human CD8β M-4 isoform dominant in effector memory T cells has distinct cytoplasmic motifs that confer unique properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepshi Thakral

    Full Text Available The CD8 co-receptor influences T cell recognition and responses in both anti-tumor and anti-viral immunity. During evolution in the ancestor of humans and chimpanzees, the CD8B gene acquired two additional exons. As a result, in humans, there are four CD8β splice variants (M1 to M4 that differ in their cytoplasmic tails. The M-1 isoform which is the equivalent of murine CD8β, is predominantly expressed in naïve T cells, whereas, the M-4 isoform is predominantly expressed in effector memory T cells. The characteristics of the M-4 isoform conferred by its unique 36 amino acid cytoplasmic tail are not known. In this study, we identified a dihydrophobic leucine-based receptor internalization motif in the cytoplasmic tail of M-4 that regulated its cell surface expression and downregulation after activation. Further the M-4 cytoplasmic tail was able to associate with ubiquitinated targets in 293T cells and mutations in the amino acids NPW, a potential EH domain binding site, either enhanced or inhibited the interaction. In addition, the M-4 tail was itself mono-ubiquitinated on a lysine residue in both 293T cells and a human T cell line. When peripheral blood human T cells expressed CD8αβ M-4, the frequency of MIP-1β secreting cells responding to antigen presenting cells was two-fold higher as compared to CD8αβ M-1 expressing T cells. Thus, the cytoplasmic tail of the CD8β M-4 isoform has unique characteristics, which likely contributed to its selective expression and function in human effector memory T cells.

  20. Nucleoporin Nup98 mediates galectin-3 nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funasaka, Tatsuyoshi, E-mail: funasaka@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Department of Biology, Faculty of Natural Systems, Institute of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Ishikawa (Japan); Balan, Vitaly; Raz, Avraham [Department of Oncology and Pathology, Karmanos Cancer Institute, Wayne State University, School of Medicine, Detroit, MI (United States); Wong, Richard W., E-mail: rwong@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Department of Biology, Faculty of Natural Systems, Institute of Science and Engineering, Kanazawa University, Ishikawa (Japan); Bio-AFM Frontier Research Center, Kanazawa Kanazawa University, Ishikawa (Japan)

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •Nuclear pore protein Nup98 is a novel binding partner of galectin-3. •Nup98 transports galectin-3 into cytoplasm. •Nup98 depletion leads to galectin-3 nuclear transport and induces growth retardation. •Nup98 may involve in ß-catenin pathway through interaction with galectin-3. -- Abstract: Nucleoporin Nup98 is a component of the nuclear pore complex, and is important in transport across the nuclear pore. Many studies implicate nucleoporin in cancer progression, but no direct mechanistic studies of its effect in cancer have been reported. We show here that Nup98 specifically regulates nucleus–cytoplasm transport of galectin-3, which is a ß-galactoside-binding protein that affects adhesion, migration, and cancer progression, and controls cell growth through the ß-catenin signaling pathway in cancer cells. Nup98 interacted with galectin-3 on the nuclear membrane, and promoted galectin-3 cytoplasmic translocation whereas other nucleoporins did not show these functions. Inversely, silencing of Nup98 expression by siRNA technique localized galectin-3 to the nucleus and retarded cell growth, which was rescued by Nup98 transfection. In addition, Nup98 RNA interference significantly suppressed downstream mRNA expression in the ß-catenin pathway, such as cyclin D1 and FRA-1, while nuclear galectin-3 binds to ß-catenin to inhibit transcriptional activity. Reduced expression of ß-catenin target genes is consistent with the Nup98 reduction and the galectin-3–nucleus translocation rate. Overall, the results show Nup98’s involvement in nuclear–cytoplasm translocation of galectin-3 and ß-catenin signaling pathway in regulating cell proliferation, and the results depicted here suggest a novel therapeutic target/modality for cancers.

  1. Curious Sex Ratios and Cytoplasmic Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    instances of curious sex ratios exemplify an important principle: the fitness ..... markable transition - the whole means of sex determination has changed. No longer ... to the cytoplasmic symbiont is self-evident; the symbionts simply increase the.

  2. Differential splicing of the apoptosis-associated speck like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC regulates inflammasomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojanasakul Yon

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The apoptotic speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC is the essential adaptor protein for caspase 1 mediated interleukin (IL-1β and IL-18 processing in inflammasomes. It bridges activated Nod like receptors (NLRs, which are a family of cytosolic pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system, with caspase 1, resulting in caspase 1 activation and subsequent processing of caspase 1 substrates. Hence, macrophages from ASC deficient mice are impaired in their ability to produce bioactive IL-1β. Furthermore, we recently showed that ASC translocates from the nucleus to the cytosol in response to inflammatory stimulation in order to promote an inflammasome response, which triggers IL-1β processing and secretion. However, the precise regulation of inflammasomes at the level of ASC is still not completely understood. In this study we identified and characterized three novel ASC isoforms for their ability to function as an inflammasome adaptor. Methods To establish the ability of ASC and ASC isoforms as functional inflammasome adaptors, IL-1β processing and secretion was investigated by ELISA in inflammasome reconstitution assays, stable expression in THP-1 and J774A1 cells, and by restoring the lack of endogenous ASC in mouse RAW264.7 macrophages. In addition, the localization of ASC and ASC isoforms was determined by immunofluorescence staining. Results The three novel ASC isoforms, ASC-b, ASC-c and ASC-d display unique and distinct capabilities to each other and to full length ASC in respect to their function as an inflammasome adaptor, with one of the isoforms even showing an inhibitory effect. Consistently, only the activating isoforms of ASC, ASC and ASC-b, co-localized with NLRP3 and caspase 1, while the inhibitory isoform ASC-c, co-localized only with caspase 1, but not with NLRP3. ASC-d did not co-localize with NLRP3 or with caspase 1 and consistently lacked the ability to function as an

  3. Human I-mfa domain proteins specifically interact with KSHV LANA and affect its regulation of Wnt signaling-dependent transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusano, Shuichi, E-mail: skusano@m2.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Division of Persistent and Oncogenic Viruses, Center for Chronic Viral Diseases, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Eizuru, Yoshito [Division of Persistent and Oncogenic Viruses, Center for Chronic Viral Diseases, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)

    2010-06-04

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV)-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) protein has been reported to interact with glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) and to negatively regulate its activity, leading to stimulation of GSK-3{beta}-dependent {beta}-catenin degradation. We show here that the I-mfa domain proteins, HIC (human I-mfa domain-containing protein) and I-mfa (inhibitor of MyoD family a), interacted in vivo with LANA through their C-terminal I-mfa domains. This interaction affected the intracellular localization of HIC, inhibited the LANA-dependent transactivation of a {beta}-catenin-regulated reporter construct, and decreased the level of the LANA.GSK-3{beta} complex. These data reveal for the first time that I-mfa domain proteins interact with LANA and negatively regulate LANA-mediated activation of Wnt signaling-dependent transcription by inhibiting the formation of the LANA.GSK-3{beta} complex.

  4. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of Methyl CpG Binding Domain Protein 2 Regulates Chromatin Structure*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Annette; Zhang, Peng; Allmann, Lena; Meilinger, Daniela; Bertulat, Bianca; Eck, Daniel; Hofstaetter, Maria; Bartolomei, Giody; Hottiger, Michael O.; Schreiber, Valérie; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic information encoded in the genomic DNA methylation pattern is translated by methylcytosine binding proteins like MeCP2 into chromatin topology and structure and gene activity states. We have shown previously that the MeCP2 level increases during differentiation and that it causes large-scale chromatin reorganization, which is disturbed by MeCP2 Rett syndrome mutations. Phosphorylation and other posttranslational modifications of MeCP2 have been described recently to modulate its function. Here we show poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of endogenous MeCP2 in mouse brain tissue. Consequently, we found that MeCP2 induced aggregation of pericentric heterochromatin and that its chromatin accumulation was enhanced in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1−/− compared with wild-type cells. We mapped the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation domains and engineered MeCP2 mutation constructs to further analyze potential effects on DNA binding affinity and large-scale chromatin remodeling. Single or double deletion of the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated regions and PARP inhibition increased the heterochromatin clustering ability of MeCP2. Increased chromatin clustering may reflect increased binding affinity. In agreement with this hypothesis, we found that PARP-1 deficiency significantly increased the chromatin binding affinity of MeCP2 in vivo. These data provide novel mechanistic insights into the regulation of MeCP2-mediated, higher-order chromatin architecture and suggest therapeutic opportunities to manipulate MeCP2 function. PMID:26772194

  5. RIPK3/Fas-Associated Death Domain Axis Regulates Pulmonary Immunopathology to Cryptococcal Infection Independent of Necroptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzong Fa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fas-associated death domain (FADD and receptor interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3 are multifunctional regulators of cell death and immune response. Using a mouse model of cryptococcal infection, the roles of FADD and RIPK3 in anti-cryptococcal defense were investigated. Deletion of RIPK3 alone led to increased inflammatory cytokine production in the Cryptococcus neoformans-infected lungs, but in combination with FADD deletion, it led to a robust Th1-biased response with M1-biased macrophage activation. Rather than being protective, these responses led to paradoxical C. neoformans expansion and rapid clinical deterioration in Ripk3−/− and Ripk3−/−Fadd−/− mice. The increased mortality of Ripk3−/− and even more accelerated mortality in Ripk3−/−Fadd−/− mice was attributed to profound pulmonary damage due to neutrophil-dominant infiltration with prominent upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines. This phenomenon was partially associated with selective alterations in the apoptotic frequency of some leukocyte subsets, such as eosinophils and neutrophils, in infected Ripk3−/−Fadd−/− mice. In conclusion, our study shows that RIPK3 in concert with FADD serve as physiological “brakes,” preventing the development of excessive inflammation and Th1 bias, which in turn contributes to pulmonary damage and defective fungal clearance. This novel link between the protective effect of FADD and RIPK3 in antifungal defense and sustenance of immune homeostasis may be important for the development of novel immunomodulatory therapies against invasive fungal infections.

  6. SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 and focal adhesion kinase protein interactions regulate pulmonary endothelium barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chichger, Havovi; Braza, Julie; Duong, Huetran; Harrington, Elizabeth O

    2015-06-01

    Enhanced protein tyrosine phosphorylation is associated with changes in vascular permeability through formation and dissolution of adherens junctions and regulation of stress fiber formation. Inhibition of the protein tyrosine phosphorylase SH2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2 (SHP2) increases tyrosine phosphorylation of vascular endothelial cadherin and β-catenin, resulting in disruption of the endothelial monolayer and edema formation in the pulmonary endothelium. Vascular permeability is a hallmark of acute lung injury (ALI); thus, enhanced SHP2 activity offers potential therapeutic value for the pulmonary vasculature in diseases such as ALI, but this has not been characterized. To assess whether SHP2 activity mediates protection against edema in the endothelium, we assessed the effect of molecular activation of SHP2 on lung endothelial barrier function in response to the edemagenic agents LPS and thrombin. Both LPS and thrombin reduced SHP2 activity, correlated with decreased focal adhesion kinase (FAK) phosphorylation (Y(397) and Y(925)) and diminished SHP2 protein-protein associations with FAK. Overexpression of constitutively active SHP2 (SHP2(D61A)) enhanced baseline endothelial monolayer resistance and completely blocked LPS- and thrombin-induced permeability in vitro and significantly blunted pulmonary edema formation induced by either endotoxin (LPS) or Pseudomonas aeruginosa exposure in vivo. Chemical inhibition of FAK decreased SHP2 protein-protein interactions with FAK concomitant with increased permeability; however, overexpression of SHP2(D61A) rescued the endothelium and maintained FAK activity and FAK-SHP2 protein interactions. Our data suggest that SHP2 activation offers the pulmonary endothelium protection against barrier permeability mediators downstream of the FAK signaling pathway. We postulate that further studies into the promotion of SHP2 activation in the pulmonary endothelium may offer a therapeutic approach for patients

  7. Structure of Thermotoga maritima TM0439: implications for the mechanism of bacterial GntR transcription regulators with Zn2+-binding FCD domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Meiying; Cooper, David R.; Grossoehme, Nickolas E.; Yu, Minmin; Hung, Li-Wei; Cieslik, Marcin; Derewenda, Urszula; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.; Giedroc, David P.; Derewenda, Zygmunt S.

    2009-01-01

    Here, the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain found in the Thermotoga maritima genome, is described. The GntR superfamily of dimeric transcription factors, with more than 6200 members encoded in bacterial genomes, are characterized by N-terminal winged-helix DNA-binding domains and diverse C-terminal regulatory domains which provide a basis for the classification of the constituent families. The largest of these families, FadR, contains nearly 3000 proteins with all-α-helical regulatory domains classified into two related Pfam families: FadR-C and FCD. Only two crystal structures of FadR-family members, those of Escherichia coli FadR protein and LldR from Corynebacterium glutamicum, have been described to date in the literature. Here, the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain found in the Thermotoga maritima genome, is described. The FCD domain is similar to that of the LldR regulator and contains a buried metal-binding site. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy and Trp fluorescence, it is shown that the recombinant protein contains bound Ni 2+ ions but that it is able to bind Zn 2+ with K d < 70 nM. It is concluded that Zn 2+ is the likely physiological metal and that it may perform either structural or regulatory roles or both. Finally, the TM0439 structure is compared with two other FadR-family structures recently deposited by structural genomics consortia. The results call for a revision in the classification of the FadR family of transcription factors

  8. A Novel Plasma Membrane-Anchored Protein Regulates Xylem Cell-Wall Deposition through Microtubule-Dependent Lateral Inhibition of Rho GTPase Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Yuki; Wakazaki, Mayumi; Toyooka, Kiminori; Fukuda, Hiroo; Oda, Yoshihisa

    2017-08-21

    Spatial control of cell-wall deposition is essential for determining plant cell shape [1]. Rho-type GTPases, together with the cortical cytoskeleton, play central roles in regulating cell-wall patterning [2]. In metaxylem vessel cells, which are the major components of xylem tissues, active ROP11 Rho GTPases form oval plasma membrane domains that locally disrupt cortical microtubules, thereby directing the formation of oval pits in secondary cell walls [3-5]. However, the regulatory mechanism that determines the planar shape of active Rho of Plants (ROP) domains is still unknown. Here we show that IQD13 associates with cortical microtubules and the plasma membrane to laterally restrict the localization of ROP GTPase domains, thereby directing the formation of oval secondary cell-wall pits. Loss and overexpression of IQD13 led to the formation of abnormally round and narrow secondary cell-wall pits, respectively. Ectopically expressed IQD13 increased the presence of parallel cortical microtubules by promoting microtubule rescue. A reconstructive approach revealed that IQD13 confines the area of active ROP domains within the lattice of the cortical microtubules, causing narrow ROP domains to form. This activity required the interaction of IQD13 with the plasma membrane. These findings suggest that IQD13 positively regulates microtubule dynamics as well as their linkage to the plasma membrane, which synergistically confines the area of active ROP domains, leading to the formation of oval secondary cell-wall pits. This finding sheds light on the role of microtubule-plasma membrane linkage as a lateral fence that determines the planar shape of Rho GTPase domains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Forkhead-associated (FHA) Domain Containing ABC Transporter Rv1747 Is Positively Regulated by Ser/Thr Phosphorylation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, Vicky L.; Molle, Virginie; Whalan, Rachael H.; Rodgers, Angela; Leiba, Jade; Stach, Lasse; Walker, K. Barry; Smerdon, Stephen J.; Buxton, Roger S.

    2011-01-01

    One major signaling method employed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is through reversible phosphorylation of proteins mediated by protein kinases and phosphatases. This study concerns one of these enzymes, the serine/threonine protein kinase PknF, that is encoded in an operon with Rv1747, an ABC transporter that is necessary for growth of M. tuberculosis in vivo and contains two forkhead-associated (FHA) domains. FHA domains are phosphopeptide recognition motifs that specifically recognize phosphothreonine-containing epitopes. Experiments to determine how PknF regulates the function of Rv1747 demonstrated that phosphorylation occurs on two specific threonine residues, Thr-150 and Thr-208. To determine the in vivo consequences of phosphorylation, infection experiments were performed in bone marrow-derived macrophages and in mice using threonine-to-alanine mutants of Rv1747 that prevent specific phosphorylation and revealed that phosphorylation positively modulates Rv1747 function in vivo. The role of the FHA domains in this regulation was further demonstrated by isothermal titration calorimetry, using peptides containing both phosphothreonine residues. FHA-1 domain mutation resulted in attenuation in macrophages highlighting the critical role of this domain in Rv1747 function. A mutant deleted for pknF did not, however, have a growth phenotype in an infection, suggesting that other kinases can fulfill its role when it is absent. This study provides the first information on the molecular mechanism(s) regulating Rv1747 through PknF-dependent phosphorylation but also indicates that phosphorylation activates Rv1747, which may have important consequences in regulating growth of M. tuberculosis. PMID:21622570

  10. Cytoplasmic p21 is a potential predictor for cisplatin sensitivity in ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia, Xi; Weng, Yanjie; Liao, Shujie; Han, Zhiqiang; Liu, Ronghua; Zhu, Tao; Wang, Shixuan; Xu, Gang; Meng, Li; Zhou, Jianfeng; Ma, Ding; Ma, Quanfu; Li, Xiao; Ji, Teng; Chen, Pingbo; Xu, Hongbin; Li, Kezhen; Fang, Yong; Weng, Danhui

    2011-01-01

    P21 (WAF1/Cip1) binds to cyclin-dependent kinase complexes and inhibits their activities. It was originally described as an inhibitor of cancer cell proliferation. However, many recent studies have shown that p21 promotes tumor progression when accumulated in the cell cytoplasm. So far, little is known about the correlation between cytoplasmic p21 and drug resistance. This study was aimed to investigate the role of p21 in the cisplatin resistance of ovarian cancer. RT-PCR, western blot and immunofluorescence were used to detect p21 expression and location in cisplatin-resistant ovarian cancer cell line C13* and its parental line OV2008. Regulation of cytoplasmic p21 was performed through transfection of p21 siRNA, Akt2 shRNA and Akt2 constitutively active vector in the two cell lines; their effects on cisplatin-induced apoptosis were evaluated by flow cytometry. Tumor tissue sections of clinical samples were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. p21 predominantly localizes to the cytoplasm in C13* compared to OV2008. Persistent exposure to low dose cisplatin in OV2008 leads to p21 translocation from nuclear to cytoplasm, while it had not impact on p21 localization in C13*. Knockdown of cytoplasmic p21 by p21 siRNA transfection in C13* notably increased cisplatin-induced apoptosis through activation of caspase 3. Inhibition of p21 translocation into the cytoplasm by transfection of Akt2 shRNA into C13* cells significantly increased cisplatin-induced apoptosis, while induction of p21 translocation into the cytoplasm by transfection of constitutively active Akt2 in OV2008 enhanced the resistance to cisplatin. Immunohistochemical analysis of clinical ovarian tumor tissues demonstrated that cytoplasmic p21 was negatively correlated with the response to cisplatin based treatment. Cytoplasmic p21 is a novel biomarker of cisplatin resistance and it may represent a potential therapeutic target for ovarian tumors that are refractory to conventional treatment

  11. Critical Role of the Src Homology 2 (SH2) Domain of Neuronal SH2B1 in the Regulation of Body Weight and Glucose Homeostasis in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, David L.; Cho, Kae Won; Rui, Liangyou

    2010-01-01

    SH2B1 is an SH2 domain-containing adaptor protein that plays a key role in the regulation of energy and glucose metabolism in both rodents and humans. Genetic deletion of SH2B1 in mice results in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the SH2B1 loci and chromosomal deletions of the SH2B1 loci associate with obesity and insulin resistance in humans. In cultured cells, SH2B1 promotes leptin and insulin signaling by binding via its SH2 domain to phosphorylated tyrosines ...

  12. Control of cytoplasmic and nuclear protein kinase A by phosphodiesterases and phosphatases in cardiac myocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj Slimane, Zeineb; Bedioune, Ibrahim; Lechêne, Patrick; Varin, Audrey; Lefebvre, Florence; Mateo, Philippe; Domergue-Dupont, Valérie; Dewenter, Matthias; Richter, Wito; Conti, Marco; El-Armouche, Ali; Zhang, Jin; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Vandecasteele, Grégoire

    2014-01-01

    Aims The cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) mediates β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) regulation of cardiac contraction and gene expression. Whereas PKA activity is well characterized in various subcellular compartments of adult cardiomyocytes, its regulation in the nucleus remains largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to compare the modalities of PKA regulation in the cytoplasm and nucleus of cardiomyocytes. Methods and results Cytoplasmic and nuclear cAMP and PKA activity were measured with targeted fluorescence resonance energy transfer probes in adult rat ventricular myocytes. β-AR stimulation with isoprenaline (Iso) led to fast cAMP elevation in both compartments, whereas PKA activity was fast in the cytoplasm but markedly slower in the nucleus. Iso was also more potent and efficient in activating cytoplasmic than nuclear PKA. Similar slow kinetics of nuclear PKA activation was observed upon adenylyl cyclase activation with L-858051 or phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibition with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxantine. Consistently, pulse stimulation with Iso (15 s) maximally induced PKA and myosin-binding protein C phosphorylation in the cytoplasm, but marginally activated PKA and cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation in the nucleus. Inhibition of PDE4 or ablation of the Pde4d gene in mice prolonged cytoplasmic PKA activation and enhanced nuclear PKA responses. In the cytoplasm, phosphatase 1 (PP1) and 2A (PP2A) contributed to the termination of PKA responses, whereas only PP1 played a role in the nucleus. Conclusion Our study reveals a differential integration of cytoplasmic and nuclear PKA responses to β-AR stimulation in cardiac myocytes. This may have important implications in the physiological and pathological hypertrophic response to β-AR stimulation. PMID:24550350

  13. Autophagy-Related Direct Membrane Import from ER/Cytoplasm into the Vacuole or Apoplast: A Hidden Gateway also for Secondary Metabolites and Phytohormones?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Kulich

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Transportation of low molecular weight cargoes into the plant vacuole represents an essential plant cell function. Several lines of evidence indicate that autophagy-related direct endoplasmic reticulum (ER to vacuole (and also, apoplast transport plays here a more general role than expected. This route is regulated by autophagy proteins, including recently discovered involvement of the exocyst subcomplex. Traffic from ER into the vacuole bypassing Golgi apparatus (GA acts not only in stress-related cytoplasm recycling or detoxification, but also in developmentally-regulated biopolymer and secondary metabolite import into the vacuole (or apoplast, exemplified by storage proteins and anthocyanins. We propose that this pathway is relevant also for some phytohormones’ (e.g., auxin, abscisic acid (ABA and salicylic acid (SA degradation. We hypothesize that SA is not only an autophagy inducer, but also a cargo for autophagy-related ER to vacuole membrane container delivery and catabolism. ER membrane localized enzymes will potentially enhance the area of biosynthetic reactive surfaces, and also, abundant ER localized membrane importers (e.g., ABC transporters will internalize specific molecular species into the autophagosome biogenesis domain of ER. Such active ER domains may create tubular invaginations of tonoplast into the vacuoles as import intermediates. Packaging of cargos into the ER-derived autophagosome-like containers might be an important mechanism of vacuole and exosome biogenesis and cytoplasm protection against toxic metabolites. A new perspective on metabolic transformations intimately linked to membrane trafficking in plants is emerging.

  14. Cytoplasmic Skp2 expression is associated with p-Akt1 and predicts poor prognosis in human breast carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: S-phase kinase protein 2 (Skp2, an oncogenic protein, is a key regulator in different cellular and molecular processes, through ubiquitin-proteasome degradation pathway. Increased levels of Skp2 are observed in various types of cancer and associated with poor prognosis. However, in human breast carcinomas, the underlying mechanism and prognostic significance of cytoplasmic Skp2 is still undefined. METHODS: To investigate the role of cytoplasmic Skp2 expression in human breast carcinomas, we immnohistochemically assessed cytoplasmic Skp2, p-Akt1, and p27 expression in 251 patients with invasive ductal carcinomas of the breast. Association of cytoplasmic Skp2 expression with p-Akt1 and p27 was analyzed as well as correspondence with other clinicopathological parameters. Disease-free survival and overall survival were determined based on the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression models. RESULTS: Cytoplasmic of Skp2 was detected in 165 out of 251 (65.7% patients. Cytoplasmic Skp2 expression was associated with larger tumor size, more advanced histological grade, and positive HER2 expression. Increased cytoplasmic Skp2 expression correlated with p-Akt1 expression, with 54.2% (51/94 of low p-Akt1-expressing breast carcinomas, but 72.6% (114/157 of high p-Akt1-expressing breast carcinomas exhibiting cytoplasmic Skp2 expression. Elevated cytoplasmic Skp2 expression with low p-Akt1 expression was associated with poor disease-free and overall survival (DFS and OS, and Cox regression models demonstrated that cytoplasmic Skp2 expression was an independent prognostic marker for invasive breast carcinomas. CONCLUSION: Cytoplasmic Skp2 expression is associated with aggressive prognostic factors, such as larger tumor size, and advanced histological grade of the breast cancers. Results demonstrate that combined cytoplasmic Skp2 and p-Akt1 expression may be prognostic for patients with invasive breast carcinomas, and cytoplasmic Skp2 may serve as a

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the receiver domain of a putative response regulator, BPSL0128, from Burkholderia pseudomallei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Aziz, Abd Ghani; Sedelnikova, Svetlana E.; Ruzheinikov, Sergey N.; Thorpe, Simon; Mohamed, Rahmah; Nathan, Sheila; Rafferty, John B.; Baker, Patrick J.; Rice, David W.

    2012-01-01

    The receiver domain of a putative response regulator from B. pseudomallei, BPSL0128, has been crystallized in a form suitable for X-ray analysis. bpsl0128, a gene encoding a putative response regulator from Burkholderia pseudomallei strain D286, has been cloned into a pETBLUE-1 vector system, overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. The full-length protein is degraded during purification to leave a fragment corresponding to the putative receiver domain, and crystals of this protein that diffracted to beyond 1.75 Å resolution have been grown by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique using PEG 6000 as the precipitant. The crystals belonged to one of the enantiomorphic pair of space groups P3 1 21 and P3 2 21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 65.69, c = 105.01 Å and either one or two molecules in the asymmetric unit

  16. The SRC homology 2 domain of Rin1 mediates its binding to the epidermal growth factor receptor and regulates receptor endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, M Alejandro; Kong, Chen; Chen, Pin-I; Horazdovsky, Bruce F; Stahl, Philip D

    2003-08-22

    Activated epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs) recruit intracellular proteins that mediate receptor signaling and endocytic trafficking. Rin1, a multifunctional protein, has been shown to regulate EGFR internalization (1). Here we show that EGF stimulation induces a specific, rapid, and transient membrane recruitment of Rin1 and that recruitment is dependent on the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain of Rin1. Immunoprecipitation of EGFR is accompanied by co-immunoprecipitation of Rin1 in a time- and ligand-dependent manner. Association of Rin1 and specifically the SH2 domain of Rin1 with the EGFR was dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation of the intracellular domain of the EGFR. The recruitment of Rin1, observed by light microscopy, indicated that although initially cytosolic, Rin1 was recruited to both plasma membrane and endosomes following EGF addition. Moreover, the expression of the SH2 domain of Rin1 substantially impaired the internalization of EGF without affecting internalization of transferrin. Finally, we found that Rin1 co-immunoprecipitated with a number of tyrosine kinase receptors but not with cargo endocytic receptors. These results indicate that Rin1 provides a link via its SH2 domain between activated tyrosine kinase receptors and the endocytic pathway through the recruitment and activation of Rab5a.

  17. Cytoplasmic Streaming in the Drosophila Oocyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Margot E

    2016-10-06

    Objects are commonly moved within the cell by either passive diffusion or active directed transport. A third possibility is advection, in which objects within the cytoplasm are moved with the flow of the cytoplasm. Bulk movement of the cytoplasm, or streaming, as required for advection, is more common in large cells than in small cells. For example, streaming is observed in elongated plant cells and the oocytes of several species. In the Drosophila oocyte, two stages of streaming are observed: relatively slow streaming during mid-oogenesis and streaming that is approximately ten times faster during late oogenesis. These flows are implicated in two processes: polarity establishment and mixing. In this review, I discuss the underlying mechanism of streaming, how slow and fast streaming are differentiated, and what we know about the physiological roles of the two types of streaming.

  18. Cytoplasmic Estrogen Receptor in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Allison W.; Lannin, Donald R.; Young, Gregory S.; Sherman, Mark E.; Figueroa, Jonine D.; Henry, N. Lynn; Ryden, Lisa; Kim, Chungyeul; Love, Richard R.; Schiff, Rachel; Rimm, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose In addition to genomic signaling, it is accepted that ERα has non-nuclear signaling functions, which correlate with tamoxifen resistance in preclinical models. However, evidence for cytoplasmic ER localization in human breast tumors is less established. We sought to determine the presence and implications of non-nuclear ER in clinical specimens. Experimental Design A panel of ERα-specific antibodies (SP1, MC20, F10, 60c, 1D5) were validated by western blot and quantitative immunofluorescent (QIF) analysis of cell lines and patient controls. Then eight retrospective cohorts collected on tissue microarrays were assessed for cytoplasmic ER. Four cohorts were from Yale (YTMA 49, 107, 130, 128) and four others (NCI YTMA 99, South Swedish Breast Cancer Group SBII, NSABP B14, and a Vietnamese Cohort) from other sites around the world. Results Four of the antibodies specifically recognized ER by western and QIF, showed linear increases in amounts of ER in cell line series with progressively increasing ER, and the antibodies were reproducible on YTMA 49 with pearson’s correlations (r2 values)ranging from 0.87-0.94. One antibody with striking cytoplasmic staining (MC20) failed validation. We found evidence for specific cytoplasmic staining with the other 4 antibodies across eight cohorts. The average incidence was 1.5%, ranging from 0 to 3.2%. Conclusions Our data shows ERα present in the cytoplasm in a number of cases using multiple antibodies, while reinforcing the importance of antibody validation. In nearly 3,200 cases, cytoplasmic ER is present at very low incidence, suggesting its measurement is unlikely to be of routine clinical value. PMID:21980134

  19. Self-perceived successful weight regulators are less affected by self-regulatory depletion in the domain of eating behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friese, Malte; Engeler, Michèle; Florack, Arnd

    2015-01-01

    Weight loss and maintenance goals are highly prevalent in many affluent societies, but many weight regulators are not successful in the long term. Research started to reveal psychological mechanisms that help successful weight regulators in being successful. In the present study, we tested the assumption that these mechanisms facilitate successful self-regulation particularly under conditions of self-regulatory depletion. Participants exerted or did not exert self-control in a first task before engaging in a taste test of a tempting but unhealthy food. Participants who had initially exerted self-control ate more than participants in the control condition. This effect was reduced in self-perceived successful weight regulators as compared to perceived unsuccessful self-regulators. A reduced susceptibility to self-regulatory depletion may be an important contributor to long-term weight regulation success in successful weight regulators. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Consequences of cytoplasmic irradiation. Studies from microbeam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Hongning; Hong, Mei; Chai, Yunfei; Hei, Tom K.

    2009-01-01

    The prevailing dogma for radiation biology is that genotoxic effects of ionizing radiation such as mutations and carcinogenesis are attributed mainly to direct damage to the nucleus. However, with the development of microbeam that can target precise positions inside the cells, accumulating evidences have shown that energy deposit by radiation in nuclear DNA is not required to trigger the damage, extra-nuclear or extra-cellular radiation could induce the similar biological effects as well. This review will summarize the biological responses after cytoplasm irradiated by microbeam, and the possible mechanisms involved in cytoplasmic irradiation. (author)

  1. Identification of phenylalanine 346 in the rat growth hormone receptor as being critical for ligand-mediated internalization and down-regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allevato, G; Billestrup, N; Goujon, L

    1995-01-01

    The functional significance of growth hormone (GH) receptor (GHR) internalization is unknown; therefore, we have analyzed domains and individual amino acids in the cytoplasmic region of the rat GHR required for ligand-mediated receptor internalization, receptor down-regulation, and transcriptiona...

  2. Crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima TM0439: implications for the mechanism of bacterial GntR transcription regulators with Zn2+-binding FCD domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Meiying; Cooper, David; Grossoehmerb, Nickolas; Yu, Minmin; Hung, Li-Wei; Cieslik, Murcin; Derewendaro, Urszula; Lesley, Scott; Wilson, Ian; Giedrocb, David; Derewenda, Zygmunt

    2009-06-06

    The GntR superfamily of dimeric transcription factors, with more than 6200 members encoded in bacterial genomes, are characterized by N-terminal winged helix (WH) DNA-binding domains and diverse C-terminal, regulatory domains, which provide a basis for the classification of the constituent families. The largest of these families, FadR, contains nearly 3000 proteins with all a-helical regulatory domains classified into two related Pfam families: FadR{_}C and FCD. Only two crystal structures of the FadR family members, i.e. the E. coli FadR protein and the LldR from C. glutamicum, have been described to date in literature. Here we describe the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain, found in the Thermotoga maritima genome. The FCD domain is similar to that of the LldR regulator, and contains a buried metal binding site. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy and Trp fluorescence, we show that the recombinant protein contains bound Ni{sup 2+} ions, but it is able to bind Zn{sup 2+} with K{sub D} < 70 nM . We conclude that Zn{sup 2+} is the likely physiological metal, where it may perform either or both structural and regulatory roles. Finally, we compare the TM0439 structure to two other FadR family structures recently deposited by Structural Genomics consortia. The results call for a revision in the classification of the FadR family of transcription factors.

  3. Direct Binding between Pre-S1 and TRP-like Domains in TRPP Channels Mediates Gating and Functional Regulation by PIP2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wang; Cai, Ruiqi; Hofmann, Laura; Nesin, Vasyl; Hu, Qiaolin; Long, Wentong; Fatehi, Mohammad; Liu, Xiong; Hussein, Shaimaa; Kong, Tim; Li, Jingru; Light, Peter E; Tang, Jingfeng; Flockerzi, Veit; Tsiokas, Leonidas; Chen, Xing-Zhen

    2018-02-06

    Transient receptor potential (TRP) channels are regulated by diverse stimuli comprising thermal, chemical, and mechanical modalities. They are also commonly regulated by phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), with underlying mechanisms largely unknown. We here revealed an intramolecular interaction of the TRPP3 N and C termini (N-C) that is functionally essential. The interaction was mediated by aromatic Trp81 in pre-S1 domain and cationic Lys568 in TRP-like domain. Structure-function analyses revealed similar N-C interaction in TRPP2 as well as TRPM8/-V1/-C4 via highly conserved tryptophan and lysine/arginine residues. PIP2 bound to cationic residues in TRPP3, including K568, thereby disrupting the N-C interaction and negatively regulating TRPP3. PIP2 had similar negative effects on TRPP2. Interestingly, we found that PIP2 facilitates the N-C interaction in TRPM8/-V1, resulting in channel potentiation. The intramolecular N-C interaction might represent a shared mechanism underlying the gating and PIP2 regulation of TRP channels. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Direct Binding between Pre-S1 and TRP-like Domains in TRPP Channels Mediates Gating and Functional Regulation by PIP2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Zheng

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential (TRP channels are regulated by diverse stimuli comprising thermal, chemical, and mechanical modalities. They are also commonly regulated by phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2, with underlying mechanisms largely unknown. We here revealed an intramolecular interaction of the TRPP3 N and C termini (N-C that is functionally essential. The interaction was mediated by aromatic Trp81 in pre-S1 domain and cationic Lys568 in TRP-like domain. Structure-function analyses revealed similar N-C interaction in TRPP2 as well as TRPM8/-V1/-C4 via highly conserved tryptophan and lysine/arginine residues. PIP2 bound to cationic residues in TRPP3, including K568, thereby disrupting the N-C interaction and negatively regulating TRPP3. PIP2 had similar negative effects on TRPP2. Interestingly, we found that PIP2 facilitates the N-C interaction in TRPM8/-V1, resulting in channel potentiation. The intramolecular N-C interaction might represent a shared mechanism underlying the gating and PIP2 regulation of TRP channels.

  5. Cytoplasmic TRADD Confers a Worse Prognosis in Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmistha Chakraborty

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1-associated death domain protein (TRADD is an important adaptor in TNFR1 signaling and has an essential role in nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB activation and survival signaling. Increased expression of TRADD is sufficient to activate NF-κB. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of NF-κB activation as a key pathogenic mechanism in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults.We examined the expression of TRADD by immunohistochemistry (IHC and find that TRADD is commonly expressed at high levels in GBM and is detected in both cytoplasmic and nuclear distribution. Cytoplasmic IHC TRADD scoring is significantly associated with worse progression-free survival (PFS both in univariate and multivariate analysis but is not associated with overall survival (n = 43 GBMs. PFS is a marker for responsiveness to treatment. We propose that TRADD-mediated NF-κB activation confers chemoresistance and thus a worse PFS in GBM. Consistent with the effect on PFS, silencing TRADD in glioma cells results in decreased NF-κB activity, decreased proliferation of cells, and increased sensitivity to temozolomide. TRADD expression is common in glioma-initiating cells. Importantly, silencing TRADD in GBM-initiating stem cell cultures results in decreased viability of stem cells, suggesting that TRADD may be required for maintenance of GBM stem cell populations. Thus, our study suggests that increased expression of cytoplasmic TRADD is both an important biomarker and a key driver of NF-κB activation in GBM and supports an oncogenic role for TRADD in GBM.

  6. Transcytosis of Aminopeptidase N in caco-2 cells is mediated by a Non-cytoplasmic Signal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, L K; Norén, Ove; Sjöström, H

    1995-01-01

    In Caco-2 cells, aminopeptidase N is transported to the apical membrane from the trans Golgi network by both the direct and the indirect pathway (Matter, K., Brauchbar, M., Bucher, K., and Hauri, H.-P. (1990) Cell 60, 429-437). The aim of this study was to determine the importance...... of the transmembrane or cytoplasmic domain of aminopeptidase N for transport of aminopeptidase N by the indirect pathway by analysis of mutated forms of aminopeptidase N recombinantly expressed in Caco-2 cells. A tail-less and two secretory forms of aminopeptidase N, all deprived of the cytoplasmic tail, were...

  7. Critical role of the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain of neuronal SH2B1 in the regulation of body weight and glucose homeostasis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, David L; Cho, Kae Won; Rui, Liangyou

    2010-08-01

    SH2B1 is an SH2 domain-containing adaptor protein that plays a key role in the regulation of energy and glucose metabolism in both rodents and humans. Genetic deletion of SH2B1 in mice results in obesity and type 2 diabetes. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the SH2B1 loci and chromosomal deletions of the SH2B1 loci associate with obesity and insulin resistance in humans. In cultured cells, SH2B1 promotes leptin and insulin signaling by binding via its SH2 domain to phosphorylated tyrosines in Janus kinase 2 and the insulin receptor, respectively. Here we generated three lines of mice to analyze the role of the SH2 domain of SH2B1 in the central nervous system. Transgenic mice expressing wild-type, SH2 domain-defective (R555E), or SH2 domain-alone (DeltaN503) forms of SH2B1 specifically in neurons were crossed with SH2B1 knockout mice to generate KO/SH2B1, KO/R555E, or KO/DeltaN503 compound mutant mice. R555E had a replacement of Arg(555) with Glu within the SH2 domain. DeltaN503 contained an intact SH2 domain but lacked amino acids 1-503. Neuron-specific expression of recombinant SH2B1, but not R555E or DeltaN503, corrected hyperphagia, obesity, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance in SH2B1 null mice. Neuron-specific expression of R555E in wild-type mice promoted obesity and insulin resistance. These results indicate that in addition to the SH2 domain, N-terminal regions of neuronal SH2B1 are also required for the maintenance of normal body weight and glucose metabolism. Additionally, mutations in the SH2 domain of SH2B1 may increase the susceptibility to obesity and type 2 diabetes in a dominant-negative manner.

  8. HIV-1 tat protein recruits CIS to the cytoplasmic tail of CD127 to induce receptor ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugden, Scott, E-mail: scott.sugden@ircm.qc.ca [The Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8L6 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8M5 (Canada); Ghazawi, Feras [The Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8L6 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8M5 (Canada); MacPherson, Paul, E-mail: pmacpherson@toh.on.ca [The Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8L6 (Canada); Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8M5 (Canada); Division of Infectious Diseases, The Ottawa Hospital General Campus, 501 Smyth Road, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1H 8L6 (Canada)

    2016-11-15

    HIV-1 Tat protein down regulates expression of the IL-7 receptor alpha-chain (CD127) from the surface of CD8 T cells resulting in impaired T cell proliferation and cytolytic capacity. We have previously shown that soluble Tat protein is taken up by CD8 T cells and interacts with the cytoplasmic tail of CD127 to induce receptor degradation. The N-terminal domain of Tat interacts with CD127 while the basic domain directs CD127 to the proteasome. We have also shown that upon IL-7 binding to its receptor, CD127 is phosphorylated resulting in CIS-mediated proteasomal degradation. Here, we show that Tat mimics this process by recruiting CIS to CD127 in the absence of IL-7 and receptor phosphorylation, leading to CD127 ubiquitination and degradation. Tat therefore acts as an adapter to induce cellular responses under conditions where they may not otherwise occur. Thusly, Tat reduces IL-7 signaling and impairs CD8 T cell survival and function. -- Highlights: •Soluble HIV-1 Tat decreases CD127 expression on CD8 T cells, causing dysfunction. •Tat induces CD127 ubiquitination without activating IL-7 signaling. •Tat binds CD127 and recruits the E3 ubiquitin ligase CIS via its basic domain. •Tat hijacks a normal cellular mechanism to degrade CD127 without IL-7 signaling.

  9. HIV-1 tat protein recruits CIS to the cytoplasmic tail of CD127 to induce receptor ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugden, Scott; Ghazawi, Feras; MacPherson, Paul

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Tat protein down regulates expression of the IL-7 receptor alpha-chain (CD127) from the surface of CD8 T cells resulting in impaired T cell proliferation and cytolytic capacity. We have previously shown that soluble Tat protein is taken up by CD8 T cells and interacts with the cytoplasmic tail of CD127 to induce receptor degradation. The N-terminal domain of Tat interacts with CD127 while the basic domain directs CD127 to the proteasome. We have also shown that upon IL-7 binding to its receptor, CD127 is phosphorylated resulting in CIS-mediated proteasomal degradation. Here, we show that Tat mimics this process by recruiting CIS to CD127 in the absence of IL-7 and receptor phosphorylation, leading to CD127 ubiquitination and degradation. Tat therefore acts as an adapter to induce cellular responses under conditions where they may not otherwise occur. Thusly, Tat reduces IL-7 signaling and impairs CD8 T cell survival and function. -- Highlights: •Soluble HIV-1 Tat decreases CD127 expression on CD8 T cells, causing dysfunction. •Tat induces CD127 ubiquitination without activating IL-7 signaling. •Tat binds CD127 and recruits the E3 ubiquitin ligase CIS via its basic domain. •Tat hijacks a normal cellular mechanism to degrade CD127 without IL-7 signaling.

  10. The Chloroplastic Protein THF1 Interacts with the Coiled-Coil Domain of the Disease Resistance Protein N′ and Regulates Light-Dependent Cell Death1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Ken-Taro; Wallon, Thérèse; Sugiwaka, Yuji; Kobayashi, Kappei

    2016-01-01

    One branch of plant immunity is mediated through nucleotide-binding/Leu-rich repeat (NB-LRR) family proteins that recognize specific effectors encoded by pathogens. Members of the I2-like family constitute a well-conserved subgroup of NB-LRRs from Solanaceae possessing a coiled-coil (CC) domain at their N termini. We show here that the CC domains of several I2-like proteins are able to induce a hypersensitive response (HR), a form of programmed cell death associated with disease resistance. Using yeast two-hybrid screens, we identified the chloroplastic protein Thylakoid Formation1 (THF1) as an interacting partner for several I2-like CC domains. Co-immunoprecipitations and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays confirmed that THF1 and I2-like CC domains interact in planta and that these interactions take place in the cytosol. Several HR-inducing I2-like CC domains have a negative effect on the accumulation of THF1, suggesting that the latter is destabilized by active CC domains. To confirm this model, we investigated N′, which recognizes the coat protein of most Tobamoviruses, as a prototypical member of the I2-like family. Transient expression and gene silencing data indicated that THF1 functions as a negative regulator of cell death and that activation of full-length N′ results in the destabilization of THF1. Consistent with the known function of THF1 in maintaining chloroplast homeostasis, we show that the HR induced by N′ is light-dependent. Together, our results define, to our knowledge, novel molecular mechanisms linking light and chloroplasts to the induction of cell death by a subgroup of NB-LRR proteins. PMID:26951433

  11. The Chloroplastic Protein THF1 Interacts with the Coiled-Coil Domain of the Disease Resistance Protein N' and Regulates Light-Dependent Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Louis-Philippe; Sekine, Ken-Taro; Wallon, Thérèse; Sugiwaka, Yuji; Kobayashi, Kappei; Moffett, Peter

    2016-05-01

    One branch of plant immunity is mediated through nucleotide-binding/Leu-rich repeat (NB-LRR) family proteins that recognize specific effectors encoded by pathogens. Members of the I2-like family constitute a well-conserved subgroup of NB-LRRs from Solanaceae possessing a coiled-coil (CC) domain at their N termini. We show here that the CC domains of several I2-like proteins are able to induce a hypersensitive response (HR), a form of programmed cell death associated with disease resistance. Using yeast two-hybrid screens, we identified the chloroplastic protein Thylakoid Formation1 (THF1) as an interacting partner for several I2-like CC domains. Co-immunoprecipitations and bimolecular fluorescence complementation assays confirmed that THF1 and I2-like CC domains interact in planta and that these interactions take place in the cytosol. Several HR-inducing I2-like CC domains have a negative effect on the accumulation of THF1, suggesting that the latter is destabilized by active CC domains. To confirm this model, we investigated N', which recognizes the coat protein of most Tobamoviruses, as a prototypical member of the I2-like family. Transient expression and gene silencing data indicated that THF1 functions as a negative regulator of cell death and that activation of full-length N' results in the destabilization of THF1. Consistent with the known function of THF1 in maintaining chloroplast homeostasis, we show that the HR induced by N' is light-dependent. Together, our results define, to our knowledge, novel molecular mechanisms linking light and chloroplasts to the induction of cell death by a subgroup of NB-LRR proteins. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Detection of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCAs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damoiseaux, Jan; Csernok, Elena; Rasmussen, Niels

    2017-01-01

    of diagnosis) from 251 patients with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV), including granulomatosis with polyangiitis and microscopic polyangiitis, and from 924 disease controls were tested for the presence of cytoplasmic pattern/perinuclear pattern and atypical ANCA (A-ANCA) by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF...

  13. How crowded is the prokaryotic cytoplasm?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spitzer, Jan; Poolman, Bert; Ferguson, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    We consider biomacromolecular crowding within the cytoplasm of prokaryotic cells as a two-phase system of 'supercrowded' cytogel and 'dilute' cytosol; we simplify and quantify this model for a coccoid cell over a wide range of biomacromolecular crowding. The key result shows that the supercrowded

  14. Curious Sex Ratios and Cytoplasmic Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 6. Curious Sex Ratios and Cytoplasmic Genes Microbes Can Distort the Sex Ratio of Populations. Stephen J Freeland Laurence D Hurst. General Article Volume 2 Issue 6 June 1997 pp 68-78 ...

  15. Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 2 (ERK2) Phosphorylation Sites and Docking Domain on the Nuclear Pore Complex Protein Tpr Cooperatively Regulate ERK2-Tpr Interaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vomastek, Tomáš; Iwanicky, M. P.; Burack, W. R.; Tiwari, D.; Kumar, D.; Parsons, J. T.; Weber, M. J.; Nandicoori, V. K.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 22 (2008), s. 6954-6966 ISSN 0270-7306 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA500200716 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : erk * docking domain * cell growth Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 5.942, year: 2008

  16. Endogenous Mouse Dicer Is an Exclusively Cytoplasmic Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Much

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Dicer is a large multi-domain protein responsible for the ultimate step of microRNA and short-interfering RNA biogenesis. In human and mouse cell lines, Dicer has been shown to be important in the nuclear clearance of dsRNA as well as the establishment of chromatin modifications. Here we set out to unambiguously define the cellular localization of Dicer in mice to understand if this is a conserved feature of mammalian Dicer in vivo. To this end, we utilized an endogenously epitope tagged Dicer knock-in mouse allele. From primary mouse cell lines and adult tissues, we determined with certainty by biochemical fractionation and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy that endogenous Dicer is exclusively cytoplasmic. We ruled out the possibility that a fraction of Dicer shuttles to and from the nucleus as well as that FGF or DNA damage signaling induce Dicer nuclear translocation. We also explored Dicer localization during the dynamic and developmental context of embryogenesis, where Dicer is ubiquitously expressed and strictly cytoplasmic in all three germ layers as well as extraembryonic tissues. Our data exclude a direct role for Dicer in the nuclear RNA processing in the mouse.

  17. Endogenous Mouse Dicer Is an Exclusively Cytoplasmic Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Much, Christian; Auchynnikava, Tania; Pavlinic, Dinko; Buness, Andreas; Rappsilber, Juri; Benes, Vladimir; Allshire, Robin; O'Carroll, Dónal

    2016-06-01

    Dicer is a large multi-domain protein responsible for the ultimate step of microRNA and short-interfering RNA biogenesis. In human and mouse cell lines, Dicer has been shown to be important in the nuclear clearance of dsRNA as well as the establishment of chromatin modifications. Here we set out to unambiguously define the cellular localization of Dicer in mice to understand if this is a conserved feature of mammalian Dicer in vivo. To this end, we utilized an endogenously epitope tagged Dicer knock-in mouse allele. From primary mouse cell lines and adult tissues, we determined with certainty by biochemical fractionation and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy that endogenous Dicer is exclusively cytoplasmic. We ruled out the possibility that a fraction of Dicer shuttles to and from the nucleus as well as that FGF or DNA damage signaling induce Dicer nuclear translocation. We also explored Dicer localization during the dynamic and developmental context of embryogenesis, where Dicer is ubiquitously expressed and strictly cytoplasmic in all three germ layers as well as extraembryonic tissues. Our data exclude a direct role for Dicer in the nuclear RNA processing in the mouse.

  18. Cleavage of the SUN-domain protein Mps3 at its N-terminus regulates centrosome disjunction in budding yeast meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Centrosomes organize microtubules and are essential for spindle formation and chromosome segregation during cell division. Duplicated centrosomes are physically linked, but how this linkage is dissolved remains unclear. Yeast centrosomes are tethered by a nuclear-envelope-attached structure called the half-bridge, whose components have mammalian homologues. We report here that cleavage of the half-bridge protein Mps3 promotes accurate centrosome disjunction in budding yeast. Mps3 is a single-pass SUN-domain protein anchored at the inner nuclear membrane and concentrated at the nuclear side of the half-bridge. Using the unique feature in yeast meiosis that centrosomes are linked for hours before their separation, we have revealed that Mps3 is cleaved at its nucleus-localized N-terminal domain, the process of which is regulated by its phosphorylation at serine 70. Cleavage of Mps3 takes place at the yeast centrosome and requires proteasome activity. We show that noncleavable Mps3 (Mps3-nc inhibits centrosome separation during yeast meiosis. In addition, overexpression of mps3-nc in vegetative yeast cells also inhibits centrosome separation and is lethal. Our findings provide a genetic mechanism for the regulation of SUN-domain protein-mediated activities, including centrosome separation, by irreversible protein cleavage at the nuclear periphery.

  19. Cleavage of the SUN-domain protein Mps3 at its N-terminus regulates centrosome disjunction in budding yeast meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Bailey A.; Han, Xuemei

    2017-01-01

    Centrosomes organize microtubules and are essential for spindle formation and chromosome segregation during cell division. Duplicated centrosomes are physically linked, but how this linkage is dissolved remains unclear. Yeast centrosomes are tethered by a nuclear-envelope-attached structure called the half-bridge, whose components have mammalian homologues. We report here that cleavage of the half-bridge protein Mps3 promotes accurate centrosome disjunction in budding yeast. Mps3 is a single-pass SUN-domain protein anchored at the inner nuclear membrane and concentrated at the nuclear side of the half-bridge. Using the unique feature in yeast meiosis that centrosomes are linked for hours before their separation, we have revealed that Mps3 is cleaved at its nucleus-localized N-terminal domain, the process of which is regulated by its phosphorylation at serine 70. Cleavage of Mps3 takes place at the yeast centrosome and requires proteasome activity. We show that noncleavable Mps3 (Mps3-nc) inhibits centrosome separation during yeast meiosis. In addition, overexpression of mps3-nc in vegetative yeast cells also inhibits centrosome separation and is lethal. Our findings provide a genetic mechanism for the regulation of SUN-domain protein-mediated activities, including centrosome separation, by irreversible protein cleavage at the nuclear periphery. PMID:28609436

  20. The PR/SET Domain Zinc Finger Protein Prdm4 Regulates Gene Expression in Embryonic Stem Cells but Plays a Nonessential Role in the Developing Mouse Embryo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, Debora; Morgan, Marc A. J.; Nelson, Andrew C.; Costello, Ita; McGouran, Joanna F.; Kessler, Benedikt M.

    2013-01-01

    Prdm4 is a highly conserved member of the Prdm family of PR/SET domain zinc finger proteins. Many well-studied Prdm family members play critical roles in development and display striking loss-of-function phenotypes. Prdm4 functional contributions have yet to be characterized. Here, we describe its widespread expression in the early embryo and adult tissues. We demonstrate that DNA binding is exclusively mediated by the Prdm4 zinc finger domain, and we characterize its tripartite consensus sequence via SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) and ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing) experiments. In embryonic stem cells (ESCs), Prdm4 regulates key pluripotency and differentiation pathways. Two independent strategies, namely, targeted deletion of the zinc finger domain and generation of a EUCOMM LacZ reporter allele, resulted in functional null alleles. However, homozygous mutant embryos develop normally and adults are healthy and fertile. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that Prdm4 functions redundantly with other transcriptional partners to cooperatively regulate gene expression in the embryo and adult animal. PMID:23918801

  1. Stabilization of a nucleotide-binding domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator yields insight into disease-causing mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Robert M; Chong, P Andrew; Lin, Hong; Yang, Zhengrong; Zhou, Qingxian; Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Dawson, Jennifer E; Riordan, John R; Brouillette, Christie G; Thibodeau, Patrick H; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2017-08-25

    Characterization of the second nucleotide-binding domain (NBD2) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) has lagged behind research into the NBD1 domain, in part because NBD1 contains the F508del mutation, which is the dominant cause of cystic fibrosis. Research on NBD2 has also been hampered by the overall instability of the domain and the difficulty of producing reagents. Nonetheless, multiple disease-causing mutations reside in NBD2, and the domain is critical for CFTR function, because channel gating involves NBD1/NBD2 dimerization, and NBD2 contains the catalytically active ATPase site in CFTR. Recognizing the paucity of structural and biophysical data on NBD2, here we have defined a bioinformatics-based method for manually identifying stabilizing substitutions in NBD2, and we used an iterative process of screening single substitutions against thermal melting points to both produce minimally mutated stable constructs and individually characterize mutations. We present a range of stable constructs with minimal mutations to help inform further research on NBD2. We have used this stabilized background to study the effects of NBD2 mutations identified in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, demonstrating that mutants such as N1303K and G1349D are characterized by lower stability, as shown previously for some NBD1 mutations, suggesting a potential role for NBD2 instability in the pathology of CF. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Two memory associated genes regulated by amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain ovel insights into the pathogenesis of learning and memory impairment in Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuandong Zheng; Xi Gu; Zhimei Zhong; Rui Zhu; Tianming Gao; Fang Wang

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we employed chromatin immunoprecipitation, a useful method for studying the locations of transcription factors bound to specific DNA regions in specific cells, to investigate amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain binding sites in chromatin DNA from hippocampal neurons of rats, and to screen out five putative genes associated with the learning and memory functions. The promoter regions of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha and glutamate receptor-2 genes were amplified by PCR from DNA products immunoprecipitated by amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay and western blot analysis suggested that the promoter regions of these two genes associated with learning and memory were bound by amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain (in complex form). Our experimental findings indicate that the amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain is involved in the transcriptional regulation of learning- and memory-associated genes in hippocampal neurons. These data may provide new insights into the molecular mechanism underlying the symptoms of progressive memory loss in Alzheimer's disease.

  3. Cytoplasmic Kaiso is associated with poor prognosis in non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Shun-Dong; Wang, Yan; Miao, Yuan; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Yong; Jiang, Gui-Yang; Zhang, Peng-Xin; Yang, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, En-Hua

    2009-01-01

    Kaiso has been identified as a new member of the POZ-zinc finger family of transcription factors that are implicated in development and cancer. Although controversy still exists, Kaiso is supposed to be involved in human cancer. However, there is limited information regarding the clinical significance of cytoplasmic/nuclear Kaiso in human lung cancer. In this study, immunohistochemical studies were performed on 20 cases of normal lung tissues and 294 cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including 50 cases of paired lymph node metastases and 88 cases with complete follow-up records. Three lung cancer cell lines showing primarily nuclear localization of Kaiso were selected to examine whether roles of Kaiso in cytoplasm and in nucleus are identical. Nuclear Kaiso was down-regulated by shRNA technology or addition a specific Kaiso antibody in these cell lines. The proliferative and invasive abilities were evaluated by MTT and Matrigel invasive assay, transcription of Kaiso's target gene matrilysin was detected by RT-PCR. Kaiso was primarily expressed in the cytoplasm of lung cancer tissues. Overall positive cytoplasmic expression rate was 63.61% (187/294). The positive cytoplasmic expression of Kaiso was higher in advanced TNM stages (III+IV) of NSCLC, compared to lower stages (I+II) (p = 0.019). A correlation between cytoplasmic Kaiso expression and lymph node metastasis was found (p = 0.003). In 50 paired cases, cytoplasmic expression of Kaiso was 78.0% (41/50) in primary sites and 90.0% (45/50) in lymph node metastases (p = 0.001). The lung cancer-related 5-year survival rate was significantly lower in patients who were cytoplasmic Kaiso-positive (22.22%), compared to those with cytoplasmic Kaiso-negative tumors (64.00%) (p = 0.005). Nuclear Kaiso staining was seen in occasional cases with only a 5.10% (15/294) positive rate and was not associated with any clinicopathological features of NSCLC. Furthermore, after the down-regulation of the nuclear

  4. Domains and domain loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haberland, Hartmut

    2005-01-01

    politicians and in the media, especially in the discussion whether some languages undergo ‘domain loss’ vis-à-vis powerful international languages like English. An objection that has been raised here is that domains, as originally conceived, are parameters of language choice and not properties of languages...

  5. Arrest of cytoplasmic streaming induces algal proliferation in green paramecia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Takahashi

    Full Text Available A green ciliate Paramecium bursaria, bearing several hundreds of endosymbiotic algae, demonstrates rotational microtubule-based cytoplasmic streaming, in which cytoplasmic granules and endosymbiotic algae flow in a constant direction. However, its physiological significance is still unknown. We investigated physiological roles of cytoplasmic streaming in P. bursaria through host cell cycle using video-microscopy. Here, we found that cytoplasmic streaming was arrested in dividing green paramecia and the endosymbiotic algae proliferated only during the arrest of cytoplasmic streaming. Interestingly, arrest of cytoplasmic streaming with pressure or a microtubule drug also induced proliferation of endosymbiotic algae independently of host cell cycle. Thus, cytoplasmic streaming may control the algal proliferation in P. bursaria. Furthermore, confocal microscopic observation revealed that a division septum was formed in the constricted area of a dividing paramecium, producing arrest of cytoplasmic streaming. This is a first report to suggest that cytoplasmic streaming controls proliferation of eukaryotic cells.

  6. Production of ABA responses requires both the nuclear and cytoplasmic functional involvement of PYR1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, EunJoo; Kim, Tae-Houn

    2017-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) enhances stress tolerant responses in plants against unfavorable environmental conditions. In Arabidopsis, ABA promotes interactions between PYR/PYL/RCARs and PP2C, thereby allowing SnRK2s to phosphorylate downstream components required for the regulation of gene expression or for gating ion channels. Because PYR1 is known to localize to nucleus and cytoplasm it is a question whether nuclear or cytoplasmic PYR1 confer different functions to the ABA signaling pathway, as has been previously shown for regulatory proteins. In order to answer this question, transgenic lines expressing nuclear PYR1 were generated in an ABA insensitive mutant background. Enforced nuclear expression of PYR1 was examined by confocal microscopy and western blot analysis. Physiological analyses of the transgenic lines demonstrated that nuclear PYR1 is sufficient to generate ABA responses, such as, the inhibition of seed germination, root growth inhibition, the induction of gene expression, and stomatal closing movement. However, for the full recovery of ABA responses in the mutant background cytoplasmic PYR1 was required. The study suggests both nuclear and cytoplasmic PYR1 participate in the control of ABA signal transduction. - Highlights: • Nuclear and cytoplasmic functions of PYR1 were studied in the mutant which lacked majority of ABA responses. • Nuclear PYR1 reconstituted partially the ABA responses during seed germination, root growth, and guard cell movement. • Both the nuclear and cytoplasmic functions of PYR1 were required for the full generation of ABA responses.

  7. Ubiquitination of MBNL1 Is Required for Its Cytoplasmic Localization and Function in Promoting Neurite Outgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ying Wang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The Muscleblind-like protein family (MBNL plays an important role in regulating the transition between differentiation and pluripotency and in the pathogenesis of myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1, a CTG expansion disorder. How different MBNL isoforms contribute to the differentiation and are affected in DM1 has not been investigated. Here, we show that the MBNL1 cytoplasmic, but not nuclear, isoform promotes neurite morphogenesis and reverses the morphological defects caused by expanded CUG RNA. Cytoplasmic MBNL1 is polyubiquitinated by lysine 63 (K63. Reduced cytoplasmic MBNL1 in the DM1 mouse brain is consistent with the reduced extent of K63 ubiquitination. Expanded CUG RNA induced the deubiqutination of cytoplasmic MBNL1, which resulted in nuclear translocation and morphological impairment that could be ameliorated by inhibiting K63-linked polyubiquitin chain degradation. Our results suggest that K63-linked ubiquitination of MBNL1 is required for its cytoplasmic localization and that deubiquitination of cytoplasmic MBNL1 is pathogenic in the DM1 brain.

  8. SIRT6 Acts as a Negative Regulator in Dengue Virus-Induced Inflammatory Response by Targeting the DNA Binding Domain of NF-κB p65

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengcheng Li

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is a mosquito-borne single-stranded RNA virus causing human disease with variable severity. The production of massive inflammatory cytokines in dengue patients has been associated with dengue disease severity. However, the regulation of these inflammatory responses remains unclear. In this study, we report that SIRT6 is a negative regulator of innate immune responses during DENV infection. Silencing of Sirt6 enhances DENV-induced proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production. Overexpression of SIRT6 inhibits RIG-I-like receptor (RLR and Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3 mediated NF-κB activation. The sirtuin core domain of SIRT6 is required for the inhibition of NF-κB p65 function. SIRT6 interacts with the DNA binding domain of p65 and competes with p65 to occupy the Il6 promoter during DENV infection. Collectively, our study demonstrates that SIRT6 negatively regulates DENV-induced inflammatory response via RLR and TLR3 signaling pathways.

  9. Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS 5 utilises distinct domains for regulation of JAK1 and interaction with the adaptor protein Shc-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmond M Linossi

    Full Text Available Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS5 is thought to act as a tumour suppressor through negative regulation of JAK/STAT and epidermal growth factor (EGF signaling. However, the mechanism/s by which SOCS5 acts on these two distinct pathways is unclear. We show for the first time that SOCS5 can interact directly with JAK via a unique, conserved region in its N-terminus, which we have termed the JAK interaction region (JIR. Co-expression of SOCS5 was able to specifically reduce JAK1 and JAK2 (but not JAK3 or TYK2 autophosphorylation and this function required both the conserved JIR and additional sequences within the long SOCS5 N-terminal region. We further demonstrate that SOCS5 can directly inhibit JAK1 kinase activity, although its mechanism of action appears distinct from that of SOCS1 and SOCS3. In addition, we identify phosphoTyr317 in Shc-1 as a high-affinity substrate for the SOCS5-SH2 domain and suggest that SOCS5 may negatively regulate EGF and growth factor-driven Shc-1 signaling by binding to this site. These findings suggest that different domains in SOCS5 contribute to two distinct mechanisms for regulation of cytokine and growth factor signaling.

  10. Invasive Streptococcus mutans induces inflammatory cytokine production in human aortic endothelial cells via regulation of intracellular toll-like receptor 2 and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, E; Oho, T

    2017-04-01

    Streptococcus mutans, the primary etiologic agent of dental caries, can gain access to the bloodstream and has been associated with cardiovascular disease. However, the roles of S. mutans in inflammation in cardiovascular disease remain unclear. The aim of this study was to examine cytokine production induced by S. mutans in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) and to evaluate the participation of toll-like receptors (TLRs) and cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD) -like receptors in HAECs. Cytokine production by HAECs was determined using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, and the expression of TLRs and NOD-like receptors was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction, flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry. The involvement of TLR2 and NOD2 in cytokine production by invaded HAECs was examined using RNA interference. The invasion efficiencies of S. mutans strains were evaluated by means of antibiotic protection assays. Five of six strains of S. mutans of various serotypes induced interleukin-6, interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production by HAECs. All S. mutans strains upregulated TLR2 and NOD2 mRNA levels in HAECs. Streptococcus mutans Xc upregulated the intracellular TLR2 and NOD2 protein levels in HAECs. Silencing of the TLR2 and NOD2 genes in HAECs invaded by S. mutans Xc led to a reduction in interleukin-6, interleukin-8 and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 production. Cytokine production induced by invasive S. mutans via intracellular TLR2 and NOD2 in HAECs may be associated with inflammation in cardiovascular disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The F-BAR domains from srGAP1, srGAP2 and srGAP3 regulate membrane deformation differently

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho-Budd, Jaeda; Ghukasyan, Vladimir; Zylka, Mark J.; Polleux, Franck

    2012-01-01

    Summary Coordination of membrane deformation and cytoskeletal dynamics lies at the heart of many biological processes critical for cell polarity, motility and morphogenesis. We have recently shown that Slit-Robo GTPase-activating protein 2 (srGAP2) regulates neuronal morphogenesis through the ability of its F-BAR domain to regulate membrane deformation and induce filopodia formation. Here, we demonstrate that the F-BAR domains of two closely related family members, srGAP1 and srGAP3 [designated F-BAR(1) and F-BAR(3), respectively] display significantly different membrane deformation properties in non-neuronal COS7 cells and in cortical neurons. F-BAR(3) induces filopodia in both cell types, though less potently than F-BAR(2), whereas F-BAR(1) prevents filopodia formation in cortical neurons and reduces plasma membrane dynamics. These three F-BAR domains can heterodimerize, and they act synergistically towards filopodia induction in COS7 cells. As measured by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching, F-BAR(2) displays faster molecular dynamics than F-BAR(3) and F-BAR(1) at the plasma membrane, which correlates well with its increased potency to induce filopodia. We also show that the molecular dynamic properties of F-BAR(2) at the membrane are partially dependent on F-Actin. Interestingly, acute phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PtdIns(4,5)P2] depletion in cells does not interfere with plasma membrane localization of F-BAR(2), which is compatible with our result showing that F-BAR(2) binds to a broad range of negatively-charged phospholipids present at the plasma membrane, including phosphatidylserine (PtdSer). Overall, our results provide novel insights into the functional diversity of the membrane deformation properties of this subclass of F-BAR-domains required for cell morphogenesis. PMID:22467852

  12. Intracellular APP Domain Regulates Serine-Palmitoyl-CoA Transferase Expression and Is Affected in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Marcus O. W.; Grösgen, Sven; Rothhaar, Tatjana L.; Burg, Verena K.; Hundsdörfer, Benjamin; Haupenthal, Viola J.; Friess, Petra; Müller, Ulrike; Fassbender, Klaus; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Grimm, Heike S.; Hartmann, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Lipids play an important role as risk or protective factors in Alzheimer's disease (AD), a disease biochemically characterized by the accumulation of amyloid beta peptides (Aβ), released by proteolytic processing of the amyloid precursor protein (APP). Changes in sphingolipid metabolism have been associated to the development of AD. The key enzyme in sphingolipid de novo synthesis is serine-palmitoyl-CoA transferase (SPT). In the present study we identified a new physiological function of APP in sphingolipid synthesis. The APP intracellular domain (AICD) was found to decrease the expression of the SPT subunit SPTLC2, the catalytic subunit of the SPT heterodimer, resulting in that decreased SPT activity. AICD function was dependent on Fe65 and SPTLC2 levels are increased in APP knock-in mice missing a functional AICD domain. SPTLC2 levels are also increased in familial and sporadic AD postmortem brains, suggesting that SPT is involved in AD pathology. PMID:21660213

  13. Regulation of the heavy metal pump AtHMA4 by a metal-binding autoinhibitory domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lone; Roed, Maria Dalgaard; Zhang, Yang

    Heavy metal pumps, or P1B ATPases, are important for heavy metal homeostasis in most cells. In general, these pumps contain extended N- and/or C-termini with one or more metal-binding domains (MBDs), but the role of the extended termini is still not clear. The Arabidopsis thaliana Zn2+-ATPase At......HMA4 contains a very long C-terminus with 13 cysteine pairs and an 11 amino acid residue long histidine stretch at the end. To ascertain the role of the potentially metal-binding domains in the C-terminus of AtHMA4, the C-terminal region alone was expressed in yeast. This resulted in increased Zn...

  14. Cell density-dependent nuclear/cytoplasmic localization of NORPEG (RAI14) protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutty, R. Krishnan; Chen, Shanyi; Samuel, William; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Duncan, Todd; Tsai, Jen-Yue; Fariss, Robert N.; Carper, Deborah; Jaworski, Cynthia; Wiggert, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    NORPEG (RAI14), a developmentally regulated gene induced by retinoic acid, encodes a 980 amino acid (aa) residue protein containing six ankyrin repeats and a long coiled-coil domain [Kutty et al., J. Biol. Chem. 276 (2001), pp. 2831-2840]. We have expressed aa residues 1-287 of NORPEG and used the recombinant protein to produce an anti-NORPEG polyclonal antibody. Confocal immunofluorescence analysis showed that the subcellular localization of NORPEG in retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells varies with cell density, with predominantly nuclear localization in nonconfluent cells, but a cytoplasmic localization, reminiscent of cytoskeleton, in confluent cultures. Interestingly, an evolutionarily conserved putative monopartite nuclear localization signal (P 27 KKRKAP 276 ) was identified by analyzing the sequences of NORPEG and its orthologs. GFP-NORPEG (2-287 aa), a fusion protein containing this signal, was indeed localized to nuclei when expressed in ARPE-19 or COS-7 cells. Deletion and mutation analysis indicated that the identified nuclear localization sequence is indispensable for nuclear targeting

  15. Modulation of brassinosteroid-regulated gene expression by jumonji domain-containing proteins ELF6 and REF6 in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Xiaofei; Li, Li; Li, Lei; Guo, Michelle; Chory, Joanne; Yin, Yanhai

    2008-01-01

    Plant steroid hormones, brassinosteroids (BRs), are of great importance for plant growth and development. BRs signal through a cell surface receptor kinase, BRI1, and a GSK3-like kinase, BIN2, to regulate the BES1/BZR1 family of transcription factors, which directly bind to target gene promoters to activate or repress gene expression and mediate BR responses. To understand how BES1 regulates target gene expression, we identified two BES1-interacting proteins, ELF6 (early flowering 6) and its ...

  16. Oxidative Unfolding of the Rubredoxin Domain and the Natively Disordered N-terminal Region Regulate the Catalytic Activity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Protein Kinase G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittwer, Matthias; Luo, Qi; Kaila, Ville R I; Dames, Sonja A

    2016-12-30

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis escapes killing in human macrophages by secreting protein kinase G (PknG). PknG intercepts host signaling to prevent fusion of the phagosome engulfing the mycobacteria with the lysosome and, thus, their degradation. The N-terminal NORS (no regulatory secondary structure) region of PknG (approximately residues 1-75) has been shown to play a role in PknG regulation by (auto)phosphorylation, whereas the following rubredoxin-like metal-binding motif (RD, residues ∼74-147) has been shown to interact tightly with the subsequent catalytic domain (approximately residues 148-420) to mediate its redox regulation. Deletions or mutations in NORS or the redox-sensitive RD significantly decrease PknG survival function. Based on combined NMR spectroscopy, in vitro kinase assay, and molecular dynamics simulation data, we provide novel insights into the regulatory roles of the N-terminal regions. The NORS region is indeed natively disordered and rather dynamic. Consistent with most earlier data, autophosphorylation occurs in our assays only when the NORS region is present and, thus, in the NORS region. Phosphorylation of it results only in local conformational changes and does not induce interactions with the subsequent RD. Although the reduced, metal-bound RD makes tight interactions with the following catalytic domain in the published crystal structures, it can also fold in its absence. Our data further suggest that oxidation-induced unfolding of the RD regulates substrate access to the catalytic domain and, thereby, PknG function under different redox conditions, e.g. when exposed to increased levels of reactive oxidative species in host macrophages. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. The four and a half LIM domains 2 (FHL2) regulates ovarian granulosa cell tumor progression via controlling AKT1 transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, G; He, C; Lv, X; Fan, L; Wang, C; Remmenga, S W; Rodabaugh, K J; Yang, L; Lele, S M; Yang, P; Karpf, A R; Davis, J S; Wang, C

    2016-01-01

    The four and a half LIM domains 2 (FHL2) has been shown to play important roles in the regulation of cell proliferation, survival, adhesion, motility and signal transduction in a cell type and tissue-dependent manner. However, the function of FHL2 in ovarian physiology and pathology is unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the role and functional mechanism of FHL2 in the progression of ovarian granulosa cell tumors (GCTs). Immunohistochemical analysis indicated that FHL2 was overexp...

  18. Light-induced conformational changes of LOV1 (light oxygen voltage-sensing domain 1) and LOV2 relative to the kinase domain and regulation of kinase activity in Chlamydomonas phototropin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okajima, Koji; Aihara, Yusuke; Takayama, Yuki; Nakajima, Mihoko; Kashojiya, Sachiko; Hikima, Takaaki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Kobayashi, Amane; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Suzuki, Tomomi; Nagatani, Akira; Nakasako, Masayoshi; Tokutomi, Satoru

    2014-01-03

    Phototropin (phot), a blue light (BL) receptor in plants, has two photoreceptive domains named LOV1 and LOV2 as well as a Ser/Thr kinase domain (KD) and acts as a BL-regulated protein kinase. A LOV domain harbors a flavin mononucleotide that undergoes a cyclic photoreaction upon BL excitation via a signaling state in which the inhibition of the kinase activity by LOV2 is negated. To understand the molecular mechanism underlying the BL-dependent activation of the kinase, the photochemistry, kinase activity, and molecular structure were studied with the phot of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Full-length and LOV2-KD samples of C. reinhardtii phot showed cyclic photoreaction characteristics with the activation of LOV- and BL-dependent kinase. Truncation of LOV1 decreased the photosensitivity of the kinase activation, which was well explained by the fact that the signaling state lasted for a shorter period of time compared with that of the phot. Small angle x-ray scattering revealed monomeric forms of the proteins in solution and detected BL-dependent conformational changes, suggesting an extension of the global molecular shapes of both samples. Constructed molecular model of full-length phot based on the small angle x-ray scattering data proved the arrangement of LOV1, LOV2, and KD for the first time that showed a tandem arrangement both in the dark and under BL irradiation. The models suggest that LOV1 alters its position relative to LOV2-KD under BL irradiation. This finding demonstrates that LOV1 may interact with LOV2 and modify the photosensitivity of the kinase activation through alteration of the duration of the signaling state in LOV2.

  19. Cytoplasmic lipid bodies of human neutrophilic leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weller, P.F.; Ackerman, S.J.; Nicholson-Weller, A.; Dvorak, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    The morphology and function of cytoplasmic lipid bodies in human neutrophils were evaluated. By transmission electron microscopy, neutrophil lipid bodies were cytoplasmic inclusions, usually several microns in diameter, that occasionally coalesced to attain a diameter up to 7 microM. Neutrophil lipid bodies were not enveloped by membrane but were often surrounded by a more electron-dense shell at their periphery. Normal peripheral blood neutrophils contained an average of approximately one lipid body per cell. Lipid bodies appeared in greater numbers in neutrophils from inflammatory lesions. Perturbation of neutrophils during conventional methods of cell isolation and purification modestly increased lipid body numbers in neutrophils, whereas incubation of neutrophils with 1 microM oleic acid rapidly induced lipid body formation over 30 to 60 minutes. After granulocytes were incubated for 2 hours with 3H-fatty acids, including arachidonic, oleic, and palmitic acids, electron microscopic autoradiography demonstrated that lipid bodies represented the predominant intracellular sites of localization of each of the three 3H-fatty acids. There was lesser labeling noted in the perinuclear cisterna, but not in cell membranes. Virtually all of each of the three 3H-fatty acids incorporated by the neutrophils were esterified into chromatographically resolved classes of neutral lipids or phospholipids. These findings indicate that cytoplasmic lipid bodies are more prominent in neutrophils in vivo engaged in inflammatory responses and that these organelles in human neutrophils function as sites of deposition of esterified, incorporated fatty acids

  20. Porcine bocavirus NP1 negatively regulates interferon signaling pathway by targeting the DNA-binding domain of IRF9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ruoxi; Fang, Liurong; Wang, Dang; Cai, Kaimei; Zhang, Huan; Xie, Lilan; Li, Yi; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2015-01-01

    To subvert host antiviral immune responses, many viruses have evolved countermeasures to inhibit IFN signaling pathway. Porcine bocavirus (PBoV), a newly identified porcine parvovirus, has received attention because it shows clinically high co-infection prevalence with other pathogens in post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PWMS) and diarrheic piglets. In this study, we screened the structural and non-structural proteins encoded by PBoV and found that the non-structural protein NP1 significantly suppressed IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) activity and subsequent IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression. However, NP1 affected neither the activation and translocation of STAT1/STAT2, nor the formation of the heterotrimeric transcription factor complex ISGF3 (STAT1/STAT2/IRF9). Detailed analysis demonstrated that PBoV NP1 blocked the ISGF3 DNA-binding activity by combining with the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of IRF9. In summary, these results indicate that PBoV NP1 interferes with type I IFN signaling pathway by blocking DNA binding of ISGF3 to attenuate innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Porcine bocavirus (PBoV) NP1 interferes with the IFN α/β signaling pathway. • PBoV NP1 does not prevent STAT1/STAT2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. • PBoV NP1 inhibits the DNA-binding activity of ISGF3. • PBoV NP1 interacts with the DNA-binding domain of IRF9.

  1. Porcine bocavirus NP1 negatively regulates interferon signaling pathway by targeting the DNA-binding domain of IRF9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ruoxi [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); The Cooperative Innovation Center for Sustainable Pig Production, Wuhan 430070 (China); Fang, Liurong, E-mail: fanglr@mail.hzau.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); The Cooperative Innovation Center for Sustainable Pig Production, Wuhan 430070 (China); Wang, Dang; Cai, Kaimei; Zhang, Huan [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); The Cooperative Innovation Center for Sustainable Pig Production, Wuhan 430070 (China); Xie, Lilan; Li, Yi [College of Life Science and Technology, Wuhan Institute of Bioengineering, Wuhan 430415 (China); Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); The Cooperative Innovation Center for Sustainable Pig Production, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2015-11-15

    To subvert host antiviral immune responses, many viruses have evolved countermeasures to inhibit IFN signaling pathway. Porcine bocavirus (PBoV), a newly identified porcine parvovirus, has received attention because it shows clinically high co-infection prevalence with other pathogens in post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PWMS) and diarrheic piglets. In this study, we screened the structural and non-structural proteins encoded by PBoV and found that the non-structural protein NP1 significantly suppressed IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) activity and subsequent IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression. However, NP1 affected neither the activation and translocation of STAT1/STAT2, nor the formation of the heterotrimeric transcription factor complex ISGF3 (STAT1/STAT2/IRF9). Detailed analysis demonstrated that PBoV NP1 blocked the ISGF3 DNA-binding activity by combining with the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of IRF9. In summary, these results indicate that PBoV NP1 interferes with type I IFN signaling pathway by blocking DNA binding of ISGF3 to attenuate innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Porcine bocavirus (PBoV) NP1 interferes with the IFN α/β signaling pathway. • PBoV NP1 does not prevent STAT1/STAT2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. • PBoV NP1 inhibits the DNA-binding activity of ISGF3. • PBoV NP1 interacts with the DNA-binding domain of IRF9.

  2. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated small-vessel vasculitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kallenberg, Cees G. M.

    Purpose of reviews This review focuses on recent advance in the diagnosis pathogenesis and treatment of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibody-associated small-vessel vasculitis. Recent findings Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies are closely associated with Wegener's granulomatosis and

  3. A conserved inter-domain communication mechanism regulates the ATPase activity of the AAA-protein Drg1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prattes, M.; Loibl, M.; Zisser, G.; Luschnig, D.; Kappel, L.; Rossler, I.; Grassegger, M.; Hromic, A.; Krieger, E.; Gruber, K.; Pertschy, B.; Bergler, H.

    2017-01-01

    AAA-ATPases fulfil essential roles in different cellular pathways and often act in form of hexameric complexes. Interaction with pathway-specific substrate and adaptor proteins recruits them to their targets and modulates their catalytic activity. This substrate dependent regulation of ATP

  4. Effect of the amino acid substitution in the DNA-binding domain of the Fur regulator on production of pyoverdine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valešová, Renata; Palyzová, Andrea; Marešová, Helena; Štěpánek, Václav; Babiak, Petr; Kyslík, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 4 (2013), s. 311-317 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB500200703 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : FERRIC UPTAKE REGULATOR * STARVATION SIGMA-FACTOR * MEDIATED IRON TRANSPORT Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics Impact factor: 1.145, year: 2013

  5. Regulation of DU145 prostate cancer cell growth by Scm-like with four mbt domains 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwanghyun; Na, Wonho; Maeng, Je-Heon; Wu, Hongjin; Ju, Bong-Gun

    2013-03-01

    Mammalian SFMBTs have been considered to be polycomb group repressors. However, molecular mechanisms underlying mammalian SFMBTs-mediated gene regulation and their biological function have not been characterized. In the present study, we identified YY1 and methylated histones as interacting proteins of human SFMBT2. We also found that human SFMBT2 binds preferentially to methylated histone H3 and H4 that are associated with transcriptional repression. Using DU145 prostate cancer cells as a model, we showed that SFMBT2 has a transcriptional repression activity on HOXB13 gene expression. In addition, occupancy of SFMBT2 coincided with enrichment of diand tri-methylated H3K9 and H4K20 as well as tri-methylated H3K27 at the HOXB13 gene promoter. When SFMBT2 was depleted by siRNA in DU145 prostate cancer cells, significant up-regulation of HOXB13 gene expression and decreased cell growth were observed. Collectively, our findings indicate that human SFMBT2 may regulate cell growth via epigenetic regulation of HOXB13 gene expression in DU145 prostate cancer cells.

  6. The F-BAR domain protein PACSIN2 associates with Rac1 and regulates cell spreading and migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kreuk, Bart-Jan; Nethe, Micha; Fernandez-Borja, Mar; Anthony, Eloise C.; Hensbergen, Paul J.; Deelder, Andre M.; Plomann, Markus; Hordijk, Peter L.

    2011-01-01

    The Rac1 GTPase controls cytoskeletal dynamics and is a key regulator of cell spreading and migration mediated by signaling through effector proteins, such as the PAK kinases and the Scar and WAVE proteins. We previously identified a series of regulatory proteins that associate with Rac1 through its

  7. A conserved serine residue regulates the stability of Drosophila Salvador and human WW domain-containing adaptor 45 through proteasomal degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Di, E-mail: DiWu@mail.nankai.edu.cn; Wu, Shian

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Ser-17 is key for the stability of Drosophila Sav. •Ala mutation of Ser-17 promotes the proteasomal degradation of Sav. •Ser-17 residue is not the main target of Hpo-induced Sav stabilization. •Hpo-dependent and -independent mechanisms regulate Sav stability. •This mechanism is conserved in the homologue of Sav, human WW45. -- Abstract: The Hippo (Hpo) pathway is a conserved tumor suppressor pathway that controls organ size through the coordinated regulation of apoptosis and proliferation. Drosophila Salvador (Sav), which limits organ size, is a core component of the Hpo pathway. In this study, Ser-17 was shown to be important for the stability of Sav. Alanine mutation of Ser-17 promoted the proteasomal degradation of Sav. Destabilization and stabilization of the Sav protein mediated by alanine mutation of Ser-17 and by Hpo, respectively, were independent of each other. This implies that the stability of Sav is controlled by two mechanisms, one that is Ser-17-dependent and Hpo-independent, and another that is Ser-17-independent and Hpo-dependent. These dual mechanisms also regulated the human counterpart of Drosophila Sav, WW domain-containing adaptor 45 (WW45). The conservation of this regulation adds to its significance in normal physiology and tumorigenesis.

  8. The p2 domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag regulates sequential proteolytic processing and is required to produce fully infectious virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, S C; Moody, M D; Wehbie, R S; Kaplan, A H; Nantermet, P V; Klein, C A; Swanstrom, R

    1994-12-01

    The proteolytic processing sites of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag precursor are cleaved in a sequential manner by the viral protease. We investigated the factors that regulate sequential processing. When full-length Gag protein was digested with recombinant HIV-1 protease in vitro, four of the five major processing sites in Gag were cleaved at rates that differ by as much as 400-fold. Three of these four processing sites were cleaved independently of the others. The CA/p2 site, however, was cleaved approximately 20-fold faster when the adjacent downstream p2/NC site was blocked from cleavage or when the p2 domain of Gag was deleted. These results suggest that the presence of a C-terminal p2 tail on processing intermediates slows cleavage at the upstream CA/p2 site. We also found that lower pH selectively accelerated cleavage of the CA/p2 processing site in the full-length precursor and as a peptide primarily by a sequence-based mechanism rather than by a change in protein conformation. Deletion of the p2 domain of Gag results in released virions that are less infectious despite the presence of the processed final products of Gag. These findings suggest that the p2 domain of HIV-1 Gag regulates the rate of cleavage at the CA/p2 processing site during sequential processing in vitro and in infected cells and that p2 may function in the proper assembly of virions.

  9. A phospho-sugar binding domain homologous to NagB enzymes regulates the activity of the central glycolytic genes repressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, Thierry; Martin, Laetitia; Zorrilla, Silvia; Chaix, Denis; Aymerich, Stéphane; Labesse, Gilles; Declerck, Nathalie

    2008-06-01

    CggR belongs to the SorC family of bacterial transcriptional regulators which control the expression of genes and operons involved in carbohydrate catabolism. CggR was first identified in Bacillus subtilis where it represses the gapA operon encoding the five enzymes that catalyze the central part of glycolysis. Here we present a structure/function study demonstrating that the C-terminal region of CggR regulates the DNA binding activity of this repressor in response to binding of a phosphorylated sugar. Molecular modeling of CggR revealed a winged-helix DNA-binding motif followed by a C-terminal domain presenting weak but significant homology with glucosamine-6-phosphate deaminases from the NagB family. In silico ligand screening suggested that the CggR C-terminal domain would bind preferentially bi-phosphorylated compounds, in agreement with previous studies that proposed fructuose-1,6-biphosphate (FBP) as the inducer metabolite. In vitro, FBP was the only sugar compound capable of interfering with CggR cooperative binding to DNA. FBP was also found to protect CggR against trypsin degradation at two arginine residues predicted to reside in a mobile loop forming the active site lid of the NagB enzymes. Replacement of residues predicted to interact with FBP led to mutant CggR with altered repressor activity in vivo but retaining their structural integrity and DNA binding activity in vitro. Interestingly, some of the mutant repressors responded with different specificity towards mono- and di-phospho-fructosides. Based on these results, we propose that the activity of the CggR-like repressors is controlled by a phospho-sugar binding (PSB) domain presenting structural and functional homology with NagB enzymes. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. An N-terminal nuclear localization sequence but not the calmodulin-binding domain mediates nuclear localization of nucleomorphin, a protein that regulates nuclear number in Dictyostelium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myre, Michael A.; O'Day, Danton H.

    2005-01-01

    Nucleomorphin is a novel nuclear calmodulin (CaM)-binding protein (CaMBP) containing an extensive DEED (glu/asp repeat) domain that regulates nuclear number. GFP-constructs of the 38 kDa NumA1 isoform localize as intranuclear patches adjacent to the inner nuclear membrane. The translocation of CaMBPs into nuclei has previously been shown by others to be mediated by both classic nuclear localization sequences (NLSs) and CaM-binding domains (CaMBDs). Here we show that NumA1 possesses a CaMBD ( 171 EDVSRFIKGKLLQKQQKIYKDLERF 195 ) containing both calcium-dependent-binding motifs and an IQ-like motif for calcium-independent binding. GFP-constructs containing only NumA1 residues 1-129, lacking the DEED and CaMBDs, still localized as patches at the internal periphery of nuclei thus ruling out a direct role for the CaMBD in nuclear import. These constructs contained the amino acid residues 48 KKSYQDPEIIAHSRPRK 64 that include both a putative bipartite and classical NLS. GFP-bipartite NLS constructs localized uniformly within nuclei but not as patches. As with previous work, removal of the DEED domain resulted in highly multinucleate cells. However as shown here, multinuclearity only occurred when the NLS was present allowing the protein to enter nuclei. Site-directed mutation analysis in which the NLS was changed to 48 EF 49 abolished the stability of the GFP fusion at the protein but not RNA level preventing subcellular analyses. Cells transfected with the 48 EF 49 construct exhibited slowed growth when compared to parental AX3 cells and other GFP-NumA1 deletion mutants. In addition to identifying an NLS that is sufficient for nuclear translocation of nucleomorphin and ruling out CaM-binding in this event, this work shows that the nuclear localization of NumA1 is crucial to its ability to regulate nuclear number in Dictyostelium

  11. Associations among workplace environment, self-regulation, and domain-specific physical activities among white-collar workers: a multilevel longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Kawakami, Norito; Otsuka, Yasumasa; Inoue, Shigeru

    2018-05-31

    Psychological and environmental determinants have been discussed for promoting physical activity among workers. However, few studies have investigated effects of both workplace environment and psychological determinants on physical activity. It is also unknown which domains of physical activities are promoted by these determinants. This study aimed to investigate main and interaction effects of workplace environment and individual self-regulation for physical activity on domain-specific physical activities among white-collar workers. A multi-site longitudinal study was conducted at baseline and about 5-month follow-up. A total of 49 worksites and employees within the worksites were recruited. Inclusion criteria for the worksites (a) were located in the Kanto area, Japan and (b) employed two or more employees. Employee inclusion criteria were (a) employed by the worksites, (b) aged 18 years or older, and (c) white-collar workers. For outcomes, three domain-specific physical activities (occupational, transport-related, and leisure-time) at baseline and follow-up were measured. For independent variables, self-regulation for physical activity, workplace environments (parking/bike, signs/bulletin boards/advertisements, stairs/elevators, physical activity/fitness facilities, work rules, written policies, and health promotion programs), and covariates at baseline were measured. Hierarchical Linear Modeling was conducted to investigate multilevel associations. Of the recruited worksites, 23 worksites and 562 employees, and 22 worksites and 459 employees completed the baseline and the follow-up surveys. As results of Hierarchical Linear Modeling, stairs/elevator (γ=3.80 [SE=1.80], ppsychological approaches to increase effect sizes to promote overall physical activity.

  12. Blue light-excited LOV1 and LOV2 domains cooperatively regulate the kinase activity of full-length phototropin2 from Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oide, Mao; Okajima, Koji; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Kato, Takayuki; Sekiguchi, Yuki; Oroguchi, Tomotaka; Hikima, Takaaki; Yamamoto, Masaki; Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2018-01-19

    Phototropin2 (phot2) is a blue-light (BL) receptor that regulates BL-dependent activities for efficient photosynthesis in plants. phot2 comprises two BL-receiving light-oxygen-voltage-sensing domains (LOV1 and LOV2) and a kinase domain. BL-excited LOV2 is thought to be primarily responsible for the BL-dependent activation of the kinase. However, the molecular mechanisms by which small BL-induced conformational changes in the LOV2 domain are transmitted to the kinase remain unclear. Here, we used full-length wild-type and mutant phot2 proteins from Arabidopsis to study their molecular properties in the dark and under BL irradiation. Phosphorylation assays and absorption measurements indicated that the LOV1 domain assists the thermal relaxation of BL-excited LOV2 and vice versa. Using small-angle X-ray scattering and electron microscopy, we observed that phot2 forms a dimer and has a rod shape with a maximum length of 188 Å and a radius of gyration of 44 Å. Under BL, phot2 displayed large conformational changes that bent the rod shape. By superimposing the crystal structures of the LOV1 dimer, LOV2, and a homology model of the kinase to the observed changes, we inferred that the BL-dependent change consisted of positional shifts of both LOV2 and the kinase relative to LOV1. Furthermore, phot2 mutants lacking the photocycle in LOV1 or LOV2 still exhibited conformational changes under BL, suggesting that LOV1 and LOV2 cooperatively contribute to the conformational changes that activate the kinase. These results suggest that BL-activated LOV1 contributes to the kinase activity of phot2. We discuss the possible intramolecular interactions and signaling mechanisms in phot2. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. F42. CHONDROTIN-6 SULFATE CLUSTERS: ASSOCIATION OF SYNAPTIC DOMAINS AND REGULATION OF SYNAPTIC PLASTICITY DURING FEAR LEARNING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelini, Gabriele; Berciu, Cristina; Pilobello, Kanoelani; Peter, Durning; Rachel, Jenkins; Kahn, Moazzzam; Ramikie, Teniel; Subramanian, Siva; Ressler, Kerry; Pantazopoulos, Charalampos; Berretta, Sabina

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Background Emerging evidence from our group and others has brought the brain extracellular matrix (ECM) to the forefront of investigations on brain disorders. Our group has shown that organized perisynaptic ECM aggregates, i.e. perineuronal nets (PNNs) are decreased in several brain regions in people with schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD). PNNs were detected by their expression of specific chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), main components of the ECM, thought to play a key role in synaptic regulation during development and adulthood. Our studies have also shown that glial cells expressing CSPGs are altered in these disorders, suggesting a link between glial cell and PNN abnormalities. Finally, we have recently shown that novel CSPG structures, bearing a distinct CS-6 sulfation pattern and named CS-6 glial clusters, are decreased in the amygdala of people with SZ and BD. The morphology and function of CS-6 glial clusters is not currently known, but evidence from rodents and on the role of CSPGs in regulating synaptic functions strongly suggest that they may affect synaptic plasticity. We tested this hypothesis using a combination of human postmortem and rodent brain studies. Methods High Resolution electron microscopy was used to investigate the ultrastructural organization of CS-6 glia clusters. A transgenic mouse model expressing green fluorescent protein in a subset of excitatory pyramidal neurons was used to investigate dendritic spines association with CS-6 glia clusters. Mice were exposed to a single session of auditory fear conditioning for a total of 15 minutes. Animals were euthanized 4 hours after behavioral test. Multiplex immunocytochemistry was used to visualize CS-6 clusters. Results In human tissue, we show that CS-6 glia clusters are widespread in several brain regions, including the amygdala, entorhinal cortex, thalamus and hippocampus. Ultrastructural results show that CS-6 glia clusters are formed by CS-6 accumulations

  14. Bacillus subtilis Two-Component System Sensory Kinase DegS Is Regulated by Serine Phosphorylation in Its Input Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jers, Carsten; Kobir, Ahasanul; Søndergaard, Elsebeth Oline

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis two-component system DegS/U is well known for the complexity of its regulation. The cytosolic sensory kinase DegS does not receive a single predominant input signal like most two-component kinases, instead it integrates a wide array of metabolic inputs that modulate its activity......S phosphorylation can be carried out by at least two B. subtilis Hanks-type kinases in vitro, and this stimulates the phosphate transfer towards DegU. The consequences of this process were studied in vivo, using phosphomimetic (Ser76Asp) and non-phosphorylatable (Ser76Ala) mutants of DegS. In a number...

  15. The Yin and Yang of SagS: Distinct Residues in the HmsP Domain of SagS Independently Regulate Biofilm Formation and Biofilm Drug Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingemans, Jozef; Poudyal, Bandita

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The formation of inherently drug-tolerant biofilms by the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa requires the sensor-regulator hybrid SagS, with ΔsagS biofilms being unstructured and exhibiting increased antimicrobial susceptibility. Recent findings indicated SagS to function as a switch to control biofilm formation and drug tolerance independently. Moreover, findings suggested the periplasmic sensory HmsP domain of SagS is likely to be the control point in the regulation of biofilm formation and biofilm cells transitioning to a drug-tolerant state. We thus asked whether specific amino acid residues present in the HmsP domain contribute to the switch function of SagS. HmsP domain residues were therefore subjected to alanine replacement mutagenesis to identify substitutions that block the sensory function(s) of SagS, which is apparent by attached cells being unable to develop mature biofilms and/or prevent transition to an antimicrobial-resistant state. Mutant analyses revealed 32 residues that only contribute to blocking one sensory function. Moreover, amino acid residues affecting attachment and subsequent biofilm formation but not biofilm tolerance also impaired histidine kinase signaling via BfiS. In contrast, residues affecting biofilm drug tolerance but not attachment and subsequent biofilm formation negatively impacted BrlR transcription factor levels. Structure prediction suggested the two sets of residues affecting sensory functions are located in distinct areas that were previously described as being involved in ligand binding interactions. Taken together, these studies identify the molecular basis for the dual regulatory function of SagS. IMPORTANCE The membrane-bound sensory protein SagS plays a pivotal role in P. aeruginosa biofilm formation and biofilm cells gaining their heightened resistance to antimicrobial agents, with SagS being the control point at which both pathways diverge. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that the two

  16. Human NACHT, LRR, and PYD domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activity is regulated by and potentially targetable through Bruton tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Pichulik, Tica; Wolz, Olaf-Oliver; Dang, Truong-Minh; Stutz, Andrea; Dillen, Carly; Delmiro Garcia, Magno; Kraus, Helene; Dickhöfer, Sabine; Daiber, Ellen; Münzenmayer, Lisa; Wahl, Silke; Rieber, Nikolaus; Kümmerle-Deschner, Jasmin; Yazdi, Amir; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Macek, Boris; Radsak, Markus; Vogel, Sebastian; Schulte, Berit; Walz, Juliane Sarah; Hartl, Dominik; Latz, Eicke; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Grimbacher, Bodo; Miller, Lloyd; Brunner, Cornelia; Wolz, Christiane; Weber, Alexander N R

    2017-10-01

    The Nod-like receptor NACHT, LRR, and PYD domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) and Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) are protagonists in innate and adaptive immunity, respectively. NLRP3 senses exogenous and endogenous insults, leading to inflammasome activation, which occurs spontaneously in patients with Muckle-Wells syndrome; BTK mutations cause the genetic immunodeficiency X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). However, to date, few proteins that regulate NLRP3 inflammasome activity in human primary immune cells have been identified, and clinically promising pharmacologic targeting strategies remain elusive. We sought to identify novel regulators of the NLRP3 inflammasome in human cells with a view to exploring interference with inflammasome activity at the level of such regulators. After proteome-wide phosphoproteomics, the identified novel regulator BTK was studied in human and murine cells by using pharmacologic and genetic BTK ablation. Here we show that BTK is a critical regulator of NLRP3 inflammasome activation: pharmacologic (using the US Food and Drug Administration-approved inhibitor ibrutinib) and genetic (in patients with XLA and Btk knockout mice) BTK ablation in primary immune cells led to reduced IL-1β processing and secretion in response to nigericin and the Staphylococcus aureus toxin leukocidin AB (LukAB). BTK affected apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC) speck formation and caspase-1 cleavage and interacted with NLRP3 and ASC. S aureus infection control in vivo and IL-1β release from cells of patients with Muckle-Wells syndrome were impaired by ibrutinib. Notably, IL-1β processing and release from immune cells isolated from patients with cancer receiving ibrutinib therapy were reduced. Our data suggest that XLA might result in part from genetic inflammasome deficiency and that NLRP3 inflammasome-linked inflammation could potentially be targeted pharmacologically through BTK. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy

  17. Tumor-extrinsic discoidin domain receptor 1 promotes mammary tumor growth by regulating adipose stromal interleukin 6 production in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiujie; Gupta, Kshama; Wu, Bogang; Zhang, Deyi; Yuan, Bin; Zhang, Xiaowen; Chiang, Huai-Chin; Zhang, Chi; Curiel, Tyler J; Bendeck, Michelle P; Hursting, Stephen; Hu, Yanfen; Li, Rong

    2018-02-23

    Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) is a collagen receptor that mediates cell communication with the extracellular matrix (ECM). Aberrant expression and activity of DDR1 in tumor cells are known to promote tumor growth. Although elevated DDR1 levels in the stroma of breast tumors are associated with poor patient outcome, a causal role for tumor-extrinsic DDR1 in cancer promotion remains unclear. Here we report that murine mammary tumor cells transplanted to syngeneic recipient mice in which Ddr1 has been knocked out (KO) grow less robustly than in WT mice. We also found that the tumor-associated stroma in Ddr1- KO mice exhibits reduced collagen deposition compared with the WT controls, supporting a role for stromal DDR1 in ECM remodeling of the tumor microenvironment. Furthermore, the stromal-vascular fraction (SVF) of Ddr1 knockout adipose tissue, which contains committed adipose stem/progenitor cells and preadipocytes, was impaired in its ability to stimulate tumor cell migration and invasion. Cytokine array-based screening identified interleukin 6 (IL-6) as a cytokine secreted by the SVF in a DDR1-dependent manner. SVF-produced IL-6 is important for SVF-stimulated tumor cell invasion in vitro , and, using antibody-based neutralization, we show that tumor promotion by IL-6 in vivo requires DDR1. In conclusion, our work demonstrates a previously unrecognized function of DDR1 in promoting tumor growth. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Structural basis for substrate activation and regulation by cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) domains in cystathionine [beta]-synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koutmos, Markos; Kabil, Omer; Smith, Janet L.; Banerjee, Ruma (Michigan-Med)

    2011-08-17

    The catalytic potential for H{sub 2}S biogenesis and homocysteine clearance converge at the active site of cystathionine {beta}-synthase (CBS), a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzyme. CBS catalyzes {beta}-replacement reactions of either serine or cysteine by homocysteine to give cystathionine and water or H{sub 2}S, respectively. In this study, high-resolution structures of the full-length enzyme from Drosophila in which a carbanion (1.70 {angstrom}) and an aminoacrylate intermediate (1.55 {angstrom}) have been captured are reported. Electrostatic stabilization of the zwitterionic carbanion intermediate is afforded by the close positioning of an active site lysine residue that is initially used for Schiff base formation in the internal aldimine and later as a general base. Additional stabilizing interactions between active site residues and the catalytic intermediates are observed. Furthermore, the structure of the regulatory 'energy-sensing' CBS domains, named after this protein, suggests a mechanism for allosteric activation by S-adenosylmethionine.

  19. Cofactor Editing by the G-protein Metallochaperone Domain Regulates the Radical B12 Enzyme IcmF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhu; Kitanishi, Kenichi; Twahir, Umar T; Cracan, Valentin; Chapman, Derrell; Warncke, Kurt; Banerjee, Ruma

    2017-03-10

    IcmF is a 5'-deoxyadenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl)-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the carbon skeleton rearrangement of isobutyryl-CoA to butyryl-CoA. It is a bifunctional protein resulting from the fusion of a G-protein chaperone with GTPase activity and the cofactor- and substrate-binding mutase domains with isomerase activity. IcmF is prone to inactivation during catalytic turnover, thus setting up its dependence on a cofactor repair system. Herein, we demonstrate that the GTPase activity of IcmF powers the ejection of the inactive cob(II)alamin cofactor and requires the presence of an acceptor protein, adenosyltransferase, for receiving it. Adenosyltransferase in turn converts cob(II)alamin to AdoCbl in the presence of ATP and a reductant. The repaired cofactor is then reloaded onto IcmF in a GTPase-gated step. The mechanistic details of cofactor loading and offloading from the AdoCbl-dependent IcmF are distinct from those of the better characterized and homologous methylmalonyl-CoA mutase/G-protein chaperone system. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. The B7-1 cytoplasmic tail enhances intracellular transport and mammalian cell surface display of chimeric proteins in the absence of a linear ER export motif.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chieh Lin

    Full Text Available Membrane-tethered proteins (mammalian surface display are increasingly being used for novel therapeutic and biotechnology applications. Maximizing surface expression of chimeric proteins on mammalian cells is important for these applications. We show that the cytoplasmic domain from the B7-1 antigen, a commonly used element for mammalian surface display, can enhance the intracellular transport and surface display of chimeric proteins in a Sar1 and Rab1 dependent fashion. However, mutational, alanine scanning and deletion analysis demonstrate the absence of linear ER export motifs in the B7 cytoplasmic domain. Rather, efficient intracellular transport correlated with the presence of predicted secondary structure in the cytoplasmic tail. Examination of the cytoplasmic domains of 984 human and 782 mouse type I transmembrane proteins revealed that many previously identified ER export motifs are rarely found in the cytoplasmic tail of type I transmembrane proteins. Our results suggest that efficient intracellular transport of B7 chimeric proteins is associated with the structure rather than to the presence of a linear ER export motif in the cytoplasmic tail, and indicate that short (less than ~ 10-20 amino acids and unstructured cytoplasmic tails should be avoided to express high levels of chimeric proteins on mammalian cells.

  1. SFMBT2 (Scm-like with four mbt domains 2) negatively regulates cell migration and invasion in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Jungsug; Shin, Jee Yoon; Lee, Kwanghyun; Hong, Soon Ki; Oh, Sangtaek; Goh, Sung-Ho; Kim, Won Sun; Ju, Bong Gun

    2016-07-26

    Metastatic prostate cancer is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in men. In this study, we found that expression level of SFMBT2 is altered during prostate cancer progression and has been associated with the migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells. The expression level of SFMBT2 is high in poorly metastatic prostate cancer cells compared to highly metastatic prostate cancer cells. We also found that SFMBT2 knockdown elevates MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, and MMP-26 expression, leading to increased cell migration and invasion in LNCaP and VCaP cells. SFMBT2 interacts with YY1, RNF2, N-CoR and HDAC1/3, as well as repressive histone marks such as H3K9me2, H4K20me2, and H2AK119Ub which are associated with transcriptional repression. In addition, SFMBT2 knockdown decreased KAI1 gene expression through up-regulation of N-CoR gene expression. Expression of SFMBT2 in prostate cancer was strongly associated with clinicopathological features. Patients having higher Gleason score (≥ 8) had substantially lower SFMBT2 expression than patients with lower Gleason score. Moreover, tail vein or intraprostatic injection of SFMBT2 knockdown LNCaP cells induced metastasis. Taken together, our findings suggest that regulation of SFMBT2 may provide a new therapeutic strategy to control prostate cancer metastasis as well as being a potential biomarker of metastatic prostate cancer.

  2. Neural cell adhesion molecule-180-mediated homophilic binding induces epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) down-regulation and uncouples the inhibitory function of EGFR in neurite outgrowth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Povlsen, Gro Klitgaard; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) plays important roles in neuronal development, regeneration, and synaptic plasticity. NCAM homophilic binding mediates cell adhesion and induces intracellular signals, in which the fibroblast growth factor receptor plays a prominent role. Recent studies...... this NCAM-180-induced EGFR down-regulation involves increased EGFR ubiquitination and lysosomal EGFR degradation. Furthermore, NCAM-180-mediated EGFR down-regulation requires NCAM homophilic binding and interactions of the cytoplasmic domain of NCAM-180 with intracellular interaction partners, but does...

  3. V-set and Ig domain-containing 4 (VSIG4)-expressing hepatic F4/80+ cells regulate oral antigen-specific responses in mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Wonhwa; Jeon, Youkyoung; Choi, Inhak; Kim, Yeon-Jeong

    2018-04-01

    Oral tolerance can prevent unnecessary immune responses against dietary antigens. Members of the B7 protein family play critical roles in the positive and/or negative regulation of T cell responses to interactions between APCs and T cells. V-set and Ig domain-containing 4 (VSIG4), a B7-related co-signaling molecule, has been known to act as a co-inhibitory ligand and may be critical in establishing immune tolerance. Therefore, we investigated the regulation of VSIG4 signaling in a food allergy and experimental oral tolerance murine models. We analyzed the contributions of the two main sites involved in oral tolerance, the mesenteric lymph node (MLN) and the liver, in VSIG4-mediated oral tolerance induction. Through the comparative analysis of major APCs, dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages, we found that Kupffer cells play a critical role in inducing regulatory T cells (Tregs) and establishing immune tolerance against oral antigens via VSIG4 signaling. Taken together, these results suggest the possibility of VSIG4 signaling-based regulation of orally administered antigens. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Expression of Anion Exchanger 1 Sequestrates p16 in the Cytoplasm in Gastric, Colonic Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Wei Shen

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available p16INK4A (p16 binds to cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6, negatively regulates cell growth. Recent studies have led to an understanding of additional biologic functions for p16; however, the detailed mechanisms involved are still elusive. In this article, we show an unexpected expression of anion exchanger 1 (AEi in the cytoplasm in poorly, moderately differentiated gastric, colonic adenocarcinoma cells, in its interaction with p16, thereby sequestrating the protein in the cytoplasm. Genetic alterations of p16, AEi were not detectable. Forced expression of AEi in these cells sequestrated more p16 in the cytoplasm, whereas small interfering RNA-mediated silencing of AEi in the cells induced the release of p16 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, leading to cell death, growth inhibition of tumor cells. By analyzing tissue samples obtained from patients with gastric, colonic cancers, we found that 83.33% of gastric cancers, 56.52% of colonic cancers coexpressed AEi, p16 in the cytoplasm. We conclude that AEi plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of gastric, colonic adenocarcinoma, that p16 dysfunction is a novel pathway of carcinogenesis.

  5. Myosin-Powered Membrane Compartment Drives Cytoplasmic Streaming, Cell Expansion and Plant Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peremyslov, Valera V; Cole, Rex A; Fowler, John E; Dolja, Valerian V

    2015-01-01

    Using genetic approaches, particle image velocimetry and an inert tracer of cytoplasmic streaming, we have made a mechanistic connection between the motor proteins (myosins XI), cargo transported by these motors (distinct endomembrane compartment defined by membrane-anchored MyoB receptors) and the process of cytoplasmic streaming in plant cells. It is shown that the MyoB compartment in Nicotiana benthamiana is highly dynamic moving with the mean velocity of ~3 μm/sec. In contrast, Golgi, mitochondria, peroxisomes, carrier vesicles and a cytosol flow tracer share distinct velocity profile with mean velocities of 0.6-1.5 μm/sec. Dominant negative inhibition of the myosins XI or MyoB receptors using overexpression of the N. benthamiana myosin cargo-binding domain or MyoB myosin-binding domain, respectively, resulted in velocity reduction for not only the MyoB compartment, but also each of the tested organelles, vesicles and cytoplasmic streaming. Furthermore, the extents of this reduction were similar for each of these compartments suggesting that MyoB compartment plays primary role in cytosol dynamics. Using gene knockout analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana, it is demonstrated that inactivation of MyoB1-4 results in reduced velocity of mitochondria implying slower cytoplasmic streaming. It is also shown that myosins XI and MyoB receptors genetically interact to contribute to cell expansion, plant growth, morphogenesis and proper onset of flowering. These results support a model according to which myosin-dependent, MyoB receptor-mediated transport of a specialized membrane compartment that is conserved in all land plants drives cytoplasmic streaming that carries organelles and vesicles and facilitates cell growth and plant development.

  6. Conformational regulation of charge recombination reactions in a photosynthetic bacterial reaction center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katona, Gergely; Snijder, Arjan; Gourdon, Pontus Emanuel

    2005-01-01

    In bright light the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides stabilizes the P(+)(870).Q(-)(A) charge-separated state and thereby minimizes the potentially harmful effects of light saturation. Using X-ray diffraction we report a conformational change that occurs within the cy...... the cytoplasmic domain of this RC in response to prolonged illumination with bright light. Our observations suggest a novel structural mechanism for the regulation of electron transfer reactions in photosynthesis....

  7. Dominant gain-of-function mutations in transmembrane domain III of ERS1 and ETR1 suggest a novel role for this domain in regulating the magnitude of ethylene response in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslauriers, Stephen D; Alvarez, Ashley A; Lacey, Randy F; Binder, Brad M; Larsen, Paul B

    2015-10-01

    Prior work resulted in identification of an Arabidopsis mutant, eer5-1, with extreme ethylene response in conjunction with failure to induce a subset of ethylene-responsive genes, including AtEBP. EER5, which is a TREX-2 homolog that is part of a nucleoporin complex, functions as part of a cryptic aspect of the ethylene signaling pathway that is required for regulating the magnitude of ethylene response. A suppressor mutagenesis screen was carried out to identify second site mutations that could restore the growth of ethylene-treated eer5-1 to wild-type levels. A dominant gain-of-function mutation in the ethylene receptor ETHYLENE RESPONSE SENSOR 1 (ERS1) was identified, with the ers1-4 mutation being located in transmembrane domain III at a point nearly equivalent to the previously described etr1-2 mutation in the other Arabidopsis subfamily I ethylene receptor, ETHYLENE RESPONSE 1 (ETR1). Although both ers1-4 and etr1-2 partially suppress the ethylene hypersensitivity of eer5-1 and are at least in part REVERSION TO ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY 1 (RTE1)-dependent, ers1-4 was additionally found to restore the expression of AtEBP in ers1-4;eer5-1 etiolated seedlings after ethylene treatment in an EIN3-dependent manner. Our work indicates that ERS1-regulated expression of a subset of ethylene-responsive genes is related to controlling the magnitude of ethylene response, with hyperinduction of these genes correlated with reduced ethylene-dependent growth inhibition. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. A protein kinase binds the C-terminal domain of the readthrough protein of Turnip yellows virus and regulates virus accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Medina, Caren; Boissinot, Sylvaine [UMR 1131 SVQV INRA-UDS, 28 rue de Herrlisheim, 68021 Colmar (France); Chapuis, Sophie [Institut de Biologie Moléculaire des Plantes, Laboratoire propre du CNRS conventionné avec l’Université de Strasbourg, 12 rue du Général Zimmer, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Gereige, Dalya; Rastegar, Maryam; Erdinger, Monique [UMR 1131 SVQV INRA-UDS, 28 rue de Herrlisheim, 68021 Colmar (France); Revers, Frédéric [INRA, Université de Bordeaux, UMR 1332 de Biologie du Fruit et Pathologie, 33882 Villenave d’Ornon (France); Ziegler-Graff, Véronique [Institut de Biologie Moléculaire des Plantes, Laboratoire propre du CNRS conventionné avec l’Université de Strasbourg, 12 rue du Général Zimmer, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Brault, Véronique, E-mail: veronique.brault@colmar.inra.fr [UMR 1131 SVQV INRA-UDS, 28 rue de Herrlisheim, 68021 Colmar (France)

    2015-12-15

    Turnip yellows virus (TuYV), a phloem-limited virus, encodes a 74 kDa protein known as the readthrough protein (RT) involved in virus movement. We show here that a TuYV mutant deleted of the C-terminal part of the RT protein (TuYV-∆RT{sub Cter}) was affected in long-distance trafficking in a host-specific manner. By using the C-terminal domain of the RT protein as a bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a phloem cDNA library from Arabidopsis thaliana we identified the calcineurin B-like protein-interacting protein kinase-7 (AtCIPK7). Transient expression of a GFP:CIPK7 fusion protein in virus-inoculated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves led to local increase of wild-type TuYV accumulation, but not that of TuYV-∆RT{sub Cter}. Surprisingly, elevated virus titer in inoculated leaves did not result in higher TuYV accumulation in systemic leaves, which indicates that virus long-distance movement was not affected. Since GFP:CIPK7 was localized in or near plasmodesmata, CIPK7 could negatively regulate TuYV export from infected cells. - Highlights: • The C-terminal domain of TuYV-RT is required for long-distance movement. • CIPK7 from Arabidopsis interacts with RT{sub Cter} in yeast and in plants. • CIPK7 overexpression increases virus titer locally but not virus systemic movement. • CIPK7 localizes to plasmodesmata. • CIPK7 could be a defense protein regulating virus export.

  9. Transcript Profiling Identifies NAC-Domain Genes Involved in Regulating Wall Ingrowth Deposition in Phloem Parenchyma Transfer Cells of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzhou Wu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Transfer cells (TCs play important roles in facilitating enhanced rates of nutrient transport at key apoplasmic/symplasmic junctions along the nutrient acquisition and transport pathways in plants. TCs achieve this capacity by developing elaborate wall ingrowth networks which serve to increase plasma membrane surface area thus increasing the cell's surface area-to-volume ratio to achieve increased flux of nutrients across the plasma membrane. Phloem parenchyma (PP cells of Arabidopsis leaf veins trans-differentiate to become PP TCs which likely function in a two-step phloem loading mechanism by facilitating unloading of photoassimilates into the apoplasm for subsequent energy-dependent uptake into the sieve element/companion cell (SE/CC complex. We are using PP TCs in Arabidopsis as a genetic model to identify transcription factors involved in coordinating deposition of the wall ingrowth network. Confocal imaging of pseudo-Schiff propidium iodide-stained tissue revealed different profiles of temporal development of wall ingrowth deposition across maturing cotyledons and juvenile leaves, and a basipetal gradient of deposition across mature adult leaves. RNA-Seq analysis was undertaken to identify differentially expressed genes common to these three different profiles of wall ingrowth deposition. This analysis identified 68 transcription factors up-regulated two-fold or more in at least two of the three experimental comparisons, with six of these transcription factors belonging to Clade III of the NAC-domain family. Phenotypic analysis of these NAC genes using insertional mutants revealed significant reductions in levels of wall ingrowth deposition, particularly in a double mutant of NAC056 and NAC018, as well as compromised sucrose-dependent root growth, indicating impaired capacity for phloem loading. Collectively, these results support the proposition that Clade III members of the NAC-domain family in Arabidopsis play important roles in

  10. A protein kinase binds the C-terminal domain of the readthrough protein of Turnip yellows virus and regulates virus accumulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Medina, Caren; Boissinot, Sylvaine; Chapuis, Sophie; Gereige, Dalya; Rastegar, Maryam; Erdinger, Monique; Revers, Frédéric; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique; Brault, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Turnip yellows virus (TuYV), a phloem-limited virus, encodes a 74 kDa protein known as the readthrough protein (RT) involved in virus movement. We show here that a TuYV mutant deleted of the C-terminal part of the RT protein (TuYV-∆RT_C_t_e_r) was affected in long-distance trafficking in a host-specific manner. By using the C-terminal domain of the RT protein as a bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a phloem cDNA library from Arabidopsis thaliana we identified the calcineurin B-like protein-interacting protein kinase-7 (AtCIPK7). Transient expression of a GFP:CIPK7 fusion protein in virus-inoculated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves led to local increase of wild-type TuYV accumulation, but not that of TuYV-∆RT_C_t_e_r. Surprisingly, elevated virus titer in inoculated leaves did not result in higher TuYV accumulation in systemic leaves, which indicates that virus long-distance movement was not affected. Since GFP:CIPK7 was localized in or near plasmodesmata, CIPK7 could negatively regulate TuYV export from infected cells. - Highlights: • The C-terminal domain of TuYV-RT is required for long-distance movement. • CIPK7 from Arabidopsis interacts with RT_C_t_e_r in yeast and in plants. • CIPK7 overexpression increases virus titer locally but not virus systemic movement. • CIPK7 localizes to plasmodesmata. • CIPK7 could be a defense protein regulating virus export.

  11. A jasmonate ZIM-domain protein NaJAZd regulates floral jasmonic acid levels and counteracts flower abscission in Nicotiana attenuata plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjoo Oh

    Full Text Available Jasmonic acid is an important regulator of plant growth, development and defense. The jasmonate-ZIM domain (JAZ proteins are key regulators in jasmonate signaling ubiquitously present in flowering plants but their functional annotation remains largely incomplete. Recently, we identified 12 putative JAZ proteins in native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata, and initiated systematic functional characterization of these proteins by reverse genetic approaches. In this report, Nicotiana attenuata plants silenced in the expression of NaJAZd (irJAZd by RNA interference were used to characterize NaJAZd function. Although NaJAZd transcripts were strongly and transiently up-regulated in the rosette leaves by simulated herbivory treatment, we did not observe strong defense-related phenotypes, such as altered herbivore performance or the constitutive accumulation of defense-related secondary metabolites in irJAZd plants compared to wild type plants, both in the glasshouse and the native habitat of Nicotiana attenuata in the Great Basin Desert, Utah, USA. Interestingly, irJAZd plants produced fewer seed capsules than did wild type plants as a result of increased flower abscission in later stages of flower development. The early- and mid-developmental stages of irJAZd flowers had reduced levels of jasmonic acid and jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine, while fully open flowers had normal levels, but these were impaired in NaMYB305 transcript accumulations. Previously, NaMYB305-silenced plants were shown to have strong flower abscission phenotypes and contained lower NECTARIN 1 transcript levels, phenotypes which are copied in irJAZd plants. We propose that the NaJAZd protein is required to counteract flower abscission, possibly by regulating jasmonic acid and jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine levels and/or expression of NaMYB305 gene in Nicotiana attenuata flowers. This novel insight into the function of JAZ proteins in flower and seed development highlights the diversity of functions

  12. Yes-associated protein/TEA domain family member and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-alpha (HNF4α) repress reciprocally to regulate hepatocarcinogenesis in rats and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wang-Yu; Lin, Ling-Yun; Hao, Han; Zhang, Sai-Man; Ma, Fei; Hong, Xin-Xin; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Qing-Feng; Ye, Guo-Dong; Sun, Guang-Bin; Liu, Yun-Jia; Li, Sheng-Nan; Xie, Yuan-Yuan; Cai, Jian-Chun; Li, Bo-An

    2017-04-01

    Great progress has been achieved in the study of Hippo signaling in regulating tumorigenesis; however, the downstream molecular events that mediate this process have not been completely defined. Moreover, regulation of Hippo signaling during tumorigenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains largely unknown. In the present study, we systematically investigated the relationship between Yes-associated protein/TEA domain family member (YAP-TEAD) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-alpha (HNF4α) in the hepatocarcinogenesis of HCC cells. Our results indicated that HNF4α expression was negatively regulated by YAP1 in HCC cells by a ubiquitin proteasome pathway. By contrast, HNF4α was found to directly associate with TEAD4 to compete with YAP1 for binding to TEAD4, thus inhibiting the transcriptional activity of YAP-TEAD and expression of their target genes. Moreover, overexpression of HNF4α was found to significantly compromise YAP-TEAD-induced HCC cell proliferation and stem cell expansion. Finally, we documented the regulatory mechanism between YAP-TEAD and HNF4α in rat and mouse tumor models, which confirmed our in vitro results. There is a double-negative feedback mechanism that controls TEAD-YAP and HNF4α expression in vitro and in vivo, thereby regulating cellular proliferation and differentiation. Given that YAP acts as a dominant oncogene in HCC and plays a crucial role in stem cell homeostasis and tissue regeneration, manipulating the interaction between YAP, TEADs, and HNF4α may provide a new approach for HCC treatment and regenerative medicine. (Hepatology 2017;65:1206-1221). © 2016 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  13. Membrane Localization is Critical for Activation of the PICK1 BAR Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Kenneth L.; Eriksen, Jacob; Milan-Lobo, Laura; Han, Daniel S.; Niv, Masha Y.; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Henriksen, Ulla; Bhatia, Vikram K.; Stamou, Dimitrios; Sitte, Harald H.; McMahon, Harvey T.; Weinstein, Harel; Gether, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    The PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1 homology (PDZ) domain protein, protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1) contains a C-terminal Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain mediating recognition of curved membranes; however, the molecular mechanisms controlling the activity of this domain are poorly understood. In agreement with negative regulation of the BAR domain by the N-terminal PDZ domain, PICK1 distributed evenly in the cytoplasm, whereas truncation of the PDZ domain caused BAR domain-dependent redistribution to clusters colocalizing with markers of recycling endosomal compartments. A similar clustering was observed both upon truncation of a short putative α-helical segment in the linker between the PDZ and the BAR domains and upon coexpression of PICK1 with a transmembrane PDZ ligand, including the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor GluR2 subunit, the GluR2 C-terminus transferred to the single transmembrane protein Tac or the dopamine transporter C-terminus transferred to Tac. In contrast, transfer of the GluR2 C-terminus to cyan fluorescent protein, a cytosolic protein, did not elicit BAR domain-dependent clustering. Instead, localizing PICK1 to the membrane by introducing an N-terminal myristoylation site produced BAR domain-dependent, but ligand-independent, PICK1 clustering. The data support that in the absence of PDZ ligand, the PICK1 BAR domain is inhibited through a PDZ domain-dependent and linker-dependent mechanism. Moreover, they suggest that unmasking of the BAR domain’s membrane-binding capacity is not a consequence of ligand binding to the PDZ domain per se but results from, and coincides with, recruitment of PICK1 to a membrane compartment. PMID:18466293

  14. KCNK10, a Tandem Pore Domain Potassium Channel, Is a Regulator of Mitotic Clonal Expansion during the Early Stage of Adipocyte Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Nishizuka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available KCNK10, a member of tandem pore domain potassium channel family, gives rise to leak K+ currents. It plays important roles in stabilizing the negative resting membrane potential and in counterbalancing depolarization. We previously demonstrated that kcnk10 expression is quickly elevated during the early stage of adipogenesis of 3T3-L1 cells and that reduction of kcnk10 expression inhibits adipocyte differentiation. However, the molecular mechanism of KCNK10 in adipocyte differentiation remains unclear. Here we revealed that kcnk10 is induced by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, a cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase inhibitor and a potent inducer of adipogenesis, during the early stage of adipocyte differentiation. We also demonstrated that KCNK10 functions as a positive regulator of mitotic clonal expansion (MCE, a necessary process for terminal differentiation. The reduction of kcnk10 expression repressed the expression levels of CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein β (C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ as well as the phosphorylation level of Akt during the early phase of adipogenesis. In addition, knockdown of kcnk10 expression suppressed insulin-induced Akt phosphorylation. These results indicate that KCNK10 contributes to the regulation of MCE through the control of C/EBPβ and C/EBPδ expression and insulin signaling.

  15. Structure of the Francisella response regulator QseB receiver domain, and characterization of QseB inhibition by antibiofilm 2-aminoimidazole-based compounds: Inhibition of response regulator QseB by antibiofilm compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton, Morgan E.; Allen, C. Leigh; Feldmann, Erik A.; Bobay, Benjamin G.; Jung, David K.; Stephens, Matthew D.; Melander, Roberta J.; Theisen, Kelly E.; Zeng, Daina; Thompson, Richele J.; Melander, Christian; Cavanagh, John (NCSU)

    2017-08-16

    With antibiotic resistance increasing at alarming rates, targets for new antimicrobial therapies must be identified. A particularly promising target is the bacterial two-component system. Two-component systems allow bacteria to detect, evaluate and protect themselves against changes in the environment, such as exposure to antibiotics and also to trigger production of virulence factors. Drugs that target the response regulator portion of two-component systems represent a potent new approach so far unexploited. Here, we focus efforts on the highly virulent bacterium Francisella tularensis tularensis. Francisella contains only three response regulators, making it an ideal system to study. In this study, we initially present the structure of the N-terminal domain of QseB, the response regulator responsible for biofilm formation. Subsequently, using binding assays, computational docking and cellular studies, we show that QseB interacts with2-aminoimidazole based compounds that impede its function. This information will assist in tailoring compounds to act as adjuvants that will enhance the effect of antibiotics.

  16. Domain swapping reveals that the N-terminal domain of the sensor kinase KdpD in Escherichia coli is important for signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lippert Marie-Luise

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The KdpD/KdpE two-component system of Escherichia coli regulates expression of the kdpFABC operon encoding the high affinity K+ transport system KdpFABC. The input domain of KdpD comprises a domain that belongs to the family of universal stress proteins (Usp. It has been previously demonstrated that UspC binds to this domain, resulting in KdpD/KdpE scaffolding under salt stress. However the mechanistic significance of this domain for signaling remains unclear. Here, we employed a "domain swapping" approach to replace the KdpD-Usp domain with four homologous domains or with the six soluble Usp proteins of E. coli. Results Full response to salt stress was only achieved with a chimera that contains UspC, probably due to unaffected scaffolding of the KdpD/KdpE signaling cascade by soluble UspC. Unexpectedly, chimeras containing either UspF or UspG not only prevented kdpFABC expression under salt stress but also under K+ limiting conditions, although these hybrid proteins exhibited kinase and phosphotransferase activities in vitro. These are the first KdpD derivatives that do not respond to K+ limitation due to alterations in the N-terminal domain. Analysis of the KdpD-Usp tertiary structure revealed that this domain has a net positively charged surface, while UspF and UspG are characterized by net negative surface charges. Conclusion The Usp domain within KdpD not only functions as a binding surface for the scaffold UspC, but it is also important for KdpD signaling. We propose that KdpD sensing/signaling involves alterations of electrostatic interactions between the large N- and C-terminal cytoplasmic domains.

  17. Domain analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2017-01-01

    The domain-analytic approach to knowledge organization (KO) (and to the broader field of library and information science, LIS) is outlined. The article reviews the discussions and proposals on the definition of domains, and provides an example of a domain-analytic study in the field of art studies....... Varieties of domain analysis as well as criticism and controversies are presented and discussed....

  18. The crystal structure of the regulatory domain of the human sodium-driven chloride/bicarbonate exchanger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvadia, Carolina M; Sommer, Theis; Bjerregaard-Andersen, Kaare; Damkier, Helle Hasager; Montrasio, Michele; Aalkjaer, Christian; Morth, J Preben

    2017-09-21

    The sodium-driven chloride/bicarbonate exchanger (NDCBE) is essential for maintaining homeostatic pH in neurons. The crystal structure at 2.8 Å resolution of the regulatory N-terminal domain of human NDCBE represents the first crystal structure of an electroneutral sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter. The crystal structure forms an equivalent dimeric interface as observed for the cytoplasmic domain of Band 3, and thus establishes that the consensus motif VTVLP is the key minimal dimerization motif. The VTVLP motif is highly conserved and likely to be the physiologically relevant interface for all other members of the SLC4 family. A novel conserved Zn 2+ -binding motif present in the N-terminal domain of NDCBE is identified and characterized in vitro. Cellular studies confirm the Zn 2+ dependent transport of two electroneutral bicarbonate transporters, NCBE and NBCn1. The Zn 2+ site is mapped to a cluster of histidines close to the conserved ETARWLKFEE motif and likely plays a role in the regulation of this important motif. The combined structural and bioinformatics analysis provides a model that predicts with additional confidence the physiologically relevant interface between the cytoplasmic domain and the transmembrane domain.

  19. Nuclear Trafficking of the Rabies Virus Interferon Antagonist P-Protein Is Regulated by an Importin-Binding Nuclear Localization Sequence in the C-Terminal Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin L Rowe

    Full Text Available Rabies virus P-protein is expressed as five isoforms (P1-P5 which undergo nucleocytoplasmic trafficking important to roles in immune evasion. Although nuclear import of P3 is known to be mediated by an importin (IMP-recognised nuclear localization sequence in the N-terminal region (N-NLS, the mechanisms underlying nuclear import of other P isoforms in which the N-NLS is inactive or has been deleted have remained unresolved. Based on the previous observation that mutation of basic residues K214/R260 of the P-protein C-terminal domain (P-CTD can result in nuclear exclusion of P3, we used live cell imaging, protein interaction analysis and in vitro nuclear transport assays to examine in detail the nuclear trafficking properties of this domain. We find that the effect of mutation of K214/R260 on P3 is largely dependent on nuclear export, suggesting that nuclear exclusion of mutated P3 involves the P-CTD-localized nuclear export sequence (C-NES. However, assays using cells in which nuclear export is pharmacologically inhibited indicate that these mutations significantly inhibit P3 nuclear accumulation and, importantly, prevent nuclear accumulation of P1, suggestive of effects on NLS-mediated import activity in these isoforms. Consistent with this, molecular binding and transport assays indicate that the P-CTD mediates IMPα2/IMPβ1-dependent nuclear import by conferring direct binding to the IMPα2/IMPβ1 heterodimer, as well as to a truncated form of IMPα2 lacking the IMPβ-binding autoinhibitory domain (ΔIBB-IMPα2, and IMPβ1 alone. These properties are all dependent on K214 and R260. This provides the first evidence that P-CTD contains a genuine IMP-binding NLS, and establishes the mechanism by which P-protein isoforms other than P3 can be imported to the nucleus. These data underpin a refined model for P-protein trafficking that involves the concerted action of multiple NESs and IMP-binding NLSs, and highlight the intricate regulation of P

  20. Perturbation of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport affects size of nucleus and nucleolus in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Abira; Bhattacharjee, Chumki; Bhave, Madhura; Kailaje, Vaishali; Jain, Bhawik K; Sengupta, Isha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu

    2016-03-01

    Size regulation of human cell nucleus and nucleolus are poorly understood subjects. 3D reconstruction of live image shows that the karyoplasmic ratio (KR) increases by 30-80% in transformed cell lines compared to their immortalized counterpart. The attenuation of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport causes the KR value to increase by 30-50% in immortalized cell lines. Nucleolus volumes are significantly increased in transformed cell lines and the attenuation of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport causes a significant increase in the nucleolus volume of immortalized cell lines. A cytosol and nuclear fraction swapping experiment emphasizes the potential role of unknown cytosolic factors in nuclear and nucleolar size regulation. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  1. p53 down-regulates SARS coronavirus replication and is targeted by the SARS-unique domain and PLpro via E3 ubiquitin ligase RCHY1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma-Lauer, Yue; Carbajo-Lozoya, Javier; Müller, Marcel A.; Deng, Wen; Lei, Jian; Meyer, Benjamin; Kusov, Yuri; von Brunn, Brigitte; Bairad, Dev Raj; Hünten, Sabine; Drosten, Christian; Hermeking, Heiko; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Mann, Matthias; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; von Brunn, Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has developed strategies to inhibit host immune recognition. We identify cellular E3 ubiquitin ligase ring-finger and CHY zinc-finger domain-containing 1 (RCHY1) as an interacting partner of the viral SARS-unique domain (SUD) and papain-like protease (PLpro), and, as a consequence, the involvement of cellular p53 as antagonist of coronaviral replication. Residues 95–144 of RCHY1 and 389–652 of SUD (SUD-NM) subdomains are crucial for interaction. Association with SUD increases the stability of RCHY1 and augments RCHY1-mediated ubiquitination as well as degradation of p53. The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II delta (CAMK2D), which normally influences RCHY1 stability by phosphorylation, also binds to SUD. In vivo phosphorylation shows that SUD does not regulate phosphorylation of RCHY1 via CAMK2D. Similarly to SUD, the PLpros from SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and HCoV-NL63 physically interact with and stabilize RCHY1, and thus trigger degradation of endogenous p53. The SARS-CoV papain-like protease is encoded next to SUD within nonstructural protein 3. A SUD–PLpro fusion interacts with RCHY1 more intensively and causes stronger p53 degradation than SARS-CoV PLpro alone. We show that p53 inhibits replication of infectious SARS-CoV as well as of replicons and human coronavirus NL63. Hence, human coronaviruses antagonize the viral inhibitor p53 via stabilizing RCHY1 and promoting RCHY1-mediated p53 degradation. SUD functions as an enhancer to strengthen interaction between RCHY1 and nonstructural protein 3, leading to a further increase in in p53 degradation. The significance of these findings is that down-regulation of p53 as a major player in antiviral innate immunity provides a long-sought explanation for delayed activities of respective genes. PMID:27519799

  2. Homologous Transcription Factors DUX4 and DUX4c Associate with Cytoplasmic Proteins during Muscle Differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugénie Ansseau

    Full Text Available Hundreds of double homeobox (DUX genes map within 3.3-kb repeated elements dispersed in the human genome and encode DNA-binding proteins. Among these, we identified DUX4, a potent transcription factor that causes facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD. In the present study, we performed yeast two-hybrid screens and protein co-purifications with HaloTag-DUX fusions or GST-DUX4 pull-down to identify protein partners of DUX4, DUX4c (which is identical to DUX4 except for the end of the carboxyl terminal domain and DUX1 (which is limited to the double homeodomain. Unexpectedly, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, GST pull-down, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay the interaction of DUX4, DUX4c and DUX1 with type III intermediate filament protein desmin in the cytoplasm and at the nuclear periphery. Desmin filaments link adjacent sarcomere at the Z-discs, connect them to sarcolemma proteins and interact with mitochondria. These intermediate filament also contact the nuclear lamina and contribute to positioning of the nuclei. Another Z-disc protein, LMCD1 that contains a LIM domain was also validated as a DUX4 partner. The functionality of DUX4 or DUX4c interactions with cytoplasmic proteins is underscored by the cytoplasmic detection of DUX4/DUX4c upon myoblast fusion. In addition, we identified and validated (by co-immunoprecipitation, co-immunofluorescence and in situ Proximal Ligation Assay as DUX4/4c partners several RNA-binding proteins such as C1QBP, SRSF9, RBM3, FUS/TLS and SFPQ that are involved in mRNA splicing and translation. FUS and SFPQ are nuclear proteins, however their cytoplasmic translocation was reported in neuronal cells where they associated with ribonucleoparticles (RNPs. Several other validated or identified DUX4/DUX4c partners are also contained in mRNP granules, and the co-localizations with cytoplasmic DAPI-positive spots is in keeping with such an association. Large muscle RNPs

  3. Cytoplasmic Dynein Promotes HIV-1 Uncoating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Pawlica

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Retroviral capsid (CA cores undergo uncoating during their retrograde transport (toward the nucleus, and/or after reaching the nuclear membrane. However, whether HIV-1 CA core uncoating is dependent upon its transport is not understood. There is some evidence that HIV-1 cores retrograde transport involves cytoplasmic dynein complexes translocating on microtubules. Here we investigate the role of dynein-dependent transport in HIV-1 uncoating. To interfere with dynein function, we depleted dynein heavy chain (DHC using RNA interference, and we over-expressed p50/dynamitin. In immunofluorescence microscopy experiments, DHC depletion caused an accumulation of CA foci in HIV-1 infected cells. Using a biochemical assay to monitor HIV-1 CA core disassembly in infected cells, we observed an increase in amounts of intact (pelletable CA cores upon DHC depletion or p50 over-expression. Results from these two complementary assays suggest that inhibiting dynein-mediated transport interferes with HIV-1 uncoating in infected cells, indicating the existence of a functional link between HIV-1 transport and uncoating.

  4. A physical perspective on cytoplasmic streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Raymond E; van de Meent, Jan-Willem

    2015-08-06

    Organisms show a remarkable range of sizes, yet the dimensions of a single cell rarely exceed 100 µm. While the physical and biological origins of this constraint remain poorly understood, exceptions to this rule give valuable insights. A well-known counterexample is the aquatic plant Chara, whose cells can exceed 10 cm in length and 1 mm in diameter. Two spiralling bands of molecular motors at the cell periphery drive the cellular fluid up and down at speeds up to 100 µm s(-1), motion that has been hypothesized to mitigate the slowness of metabolite transport on these scales and to aid in homeostasis. This is the most organized instance of a broad class of continuous motions known as 'cytoplasmic streaming', found in a wide range of eukaryotic organisms-algae, plants, amoebae, nematodes and flies-often in unusually large cells. In this overview of the physics of this phenomenon, we examine the interplay between streaming, transport and cell size and discuss the possible role of self-organization phenomena in establishing the observed patterns of streaming.

  5. Antineutrophil cytoplasm antibody: positivity and clinical correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Téllez, Goitybell; Torres Rives, Bárbara; Rangel Velázquez, Suchiquil; Sánchez Rodríguez, Vicky; Ramos Ríos, María Antonia; Fuentes Smith, Lisset Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    To determine positivity and clinical correlation of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA), taking into account the interference of antinuclear antibodies (ANA). A prospective study was conducted in the Laboratory of Immunology of the National Cuban Center of Medical Genetic during one year. Two hounded sixty-seven patients with indication for ANCA determination were included. ANCA and ANA determinations with different cut off points and assays were determined by indirect immunofluorescense. Anti proteinase 3 and antimyeloperoxidase antibodies were determined by ELISA. Most positivity for ANCA was seen in patients with ANCA associated, primary small-vessel vasculitides, rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Presence of ANCA without positivity for proteinase 3 and myeloperoxidase was higher in patients with ANA and little relation was observed between the perinuclear pattern confirmed in formalin and specificity by myeloperoxidase. Highest sensibility and specificity values for vasculitides diagnostic were achieved by ANCA determination using indirect immunofluorescense with a cut off 1/80 and confirming antigenic specificities with ELISA. ANCA can be present in a great number of chronic inflammatory or autoimmune disorders in the population studied. This determination using indirect immunofluorescence and following by ELISA had a great value for vasculitis diagnosis. Anti mieloperoxidasa assay has a higher utility than the formalin assay when ANA is present. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Phosphatase Rtr1 Regulates Global Levels of Serine 5 RNA Polymerase II C-Terminal Domain Phosphorylation and Cotranscriptional Histone Methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gerald O; Fox, Melanie J; Smith-Kinnaman, Whitney R; Gogol, Madelaine; Fleharty, Brian; Mosley, Amber L

    2016-09-01

    In eukaryotes, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of Rpb1 contains a heptapeptide repeat sequence of (Y1S2P3T4S5P6S7)n that undergoes reversible phosphorylation through the opposing action of kinases and phosphatases. Rtr1 is a conserved protein that colocalizes with RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) and has been shown to be important for the transition from elongation to termination during transcription by removing RNAPII CTD serine 5 phosphorylation (Ser5-P) at a selection of target genes. In this study, we show that Rtr1 is a global regulator of the CTD code with deletion of RTR1 causing genome-wide changes in Ser5-P CTD phosphorylation and cotranscriptional histone H3 lysine 36 trimethylation (H3K36me3). Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-resolution microarrays, we show that RTR1 deletion results in global changes in RNAPII Ser5-P levels on genes with different lengths and transcription rates consistent with its role as a CTD phosphatase. Although Ser5-P levels increase, the overall occupancy of RNAPII either decreases or stays the same in the absence of RTR1 Additionally, the loss of Rtr1 in vivo leads to increases in H3K36me3 levels genome-wide, while total histone H3 levels remain relatively constant within coding regions. Overall, these findings suggest that Rtr1 regulates H3K36me3 levels through changes in the number of binding sites for the histone methyltransferase Set2, thereby influencing both the CTD and histone codes. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. CMTM3 (CKLF-Like Marvel Transmembrane Domain 3) Mediates Angiogenesis by Regulating Cell Surface Availability of VE-Cadherin in Endothelial Adherens Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrifi, Ihsan; Louzao-Martinez, Laura; Brandt, Maarten; van Dijk, Christian G M; Burgisser, Petra; Zhu, Changbin; Kros, Johan M; Duncker, Dirk J; Cheng, Caroline

    2017-06-01

    Decrease in VE-cadherin adherens junctions reduces vascular stability, whereas disruption of adherens junctions is a requirement for neovessel sprouting during angiogenesis. Endocytosis plays a key role in regulating junctional strength by altering bioavailability of cell surface proteins, including VE-cadherin. Identification of new mediators of endothelial endocytosis could enhance our understanding of angiogenesis. Here, we assessed the function of CMTM3 (CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain 3), which we have previously identified as highly expressed in Flk1 + endothelial progenitor cells during embryonic development. Using a 3-dimensional coculture of human umbilical vein endothelial cells-GFP (green fluorescent protein) and pericytes-RFP (red fluorescent protein), we demonstrated that siRNA-mediated CMTM3 silencing in human umbilical vein endothelial cells impairs angiogenesis. In vivo CMTM3 inhibition by morpholino injection in developing zebrafish larvae confirmed that CMTM3 expression is required for vascular sprouting. CMTM3 knockdown in human umbilical vein endothelial cells does not affect proliferation or migration. Intracellular staining demonstrated that CMTM3 colocalizes with early endosome markers EEA1 (early endosome marker 1) and Clathrin + vesicles and with cytosolic VE-cadherin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Adenovirus-mediated CMTM3 overexpression enhances endothelial endocytosis, shown by an increase in Clathrin + , EEA1 + , Rab11 + , Rab5 + , and Rab7 + vesicles. CMTM3 overexpression enhances, whereas CMTM3 knockdown decreases internalization of cell surface VE-cadherin in vitro. CMTM3 promotes loss of endothelial barrier function in thrombin-induced responses, shown by transendothelial electric resistance measurements in vitro. In this study, we have identified a new regulatory function for CMTM3 in angiogenesis. CMTM3 is involved in VE-cadherin turnover and is a regulator of the cell surface pool of VE-cadherin. Therefore, CMTM

  8. Coordinated regulation by two VPS9 domain-containing guanine nucleotide exchange factors in small GTPase Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukamoto, Yuta; Kagiwada, Satoshi; Shimazu, Sayuri; Takegawa, Kaoru; Noguchi, Tetsuko; Miyamoto, Masaaki

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase Rab5 is reported to regulate various cellular functions, such as vesicular transport and endocytosis. VPS9 domain-containing proteins are thought to activate Rab5(s) by their guanine-nucleotide exchange activities. Numerous VPS9 proteins have been identified and are structurally conserved from yeast to mammalian cells. However, the functional relationships among VPS9 proteins in cells remain unclear. Only one Rab5 and two VPS9 proteins were identified in the Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome. Here, we examined the cellular function of two VPS9 proteins and the relationship between these proteins in cellular functions. Vps901-GFP and Vps902-GFP exhibited dotted signals in vegetative and differentiated cells. vps901 deletion mutant (Δvps901) cells exhibited a phenotype deficient in the mating process and responses to high concentrations of ions, such as calcium and metals, and Δvps901Δvps902 double mutant cells exhibited round cell shapes similar to ypt5-909 (Rab5 mutant allele) cells. Deletion of both vps901 and vps902 genes completely abolished the mating process and responses to various stresses. A lack of vacuole formation and aberrant inner cell membrane structures were also observed in Δvps901Δvps902 cells by electron microscopy. These data strongly suggest that Vps901 and Vps902 are cooperatively involved in the regulation of cellular functions, such as cell morphology, sexual development, response to ion stresses, and vacuole formation, via Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast cells. - Highlights: • Roles of Rab5 activator VPS9 proteins in cellular functions. • Cooperation between VPS9 proteins in Rab5 signaling pathway. • Roles of each VPS9 protein in Rab5 signaling pathway are discussed

  9. Coordinated regulation by two VPS9 domain-containing guanine nucleotide exchange factors in small GTPase Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukamoto, Yuta [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Kagiwada, Satoshi [Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Nara Women' s University, Kitauoyanishi-machi, Nara 630-8506 (Japan); Shimazu, Sayuri [Center for Supports to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Takegawa, Kaoru [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Bioresource and Bioenvironmental Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Noguchi, Tetsuko [Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Nara Women' s University, Kitauoyanishi-machi, Nara 630-8506 (Japan); Miyamoto, Masaaki, E-mail: miya@kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Center for Supports to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2015-03-20

    The small GTPase Rab5 is reported to regulate various cellular functions, such as vesicular transport and endocytosis. VPS9 domain-containing proteins are thought to activate Rab5(s) by their guanine-nucleotide exchange activities. Numerous VPS9 proteins have been identified and are structurally conserved from yeast to mammalian cells. However, the functional relationships among VPS9 proteins in cells remain unclear. Only one Rab5 and two VPS9 proteins were identified in the Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome. Here, we examined the cellular function of two VPS9 proteins and the relationship between these proteins in cellular functions. Vps901-GFP and Vps902-GFP exhibited dotted signals in vegetative and differentiated cells. vps901 deletion mutant (Δvps901) cells exhibited a phenotype deficient in the mating process and responses to high concentrations of ions, such as calcium and metals, and Δvps901Δvps902 double mutant cells exhibited round cell shapes similar to ypt5-909 (Rab5 mutant allele) cells. Deletion of both vps901 and vps902 genes completely abolished the mating process and responses to various stresses. A lack of vacuole formation and aberrant inner cell membrane structures were also observed in Δvps901Δvps902 cells by electron microscopy. These data strongly suggest that Vps901 and Vps902 are cooperatively involved in the regulation of cellular functions, such as cell morphology, sexual development, response to ion stresses, and vacuole formation, via Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast cells. - Highlights: • Roles of Rab5 activator VPS9 proteins in cellular functions. • Cooperation between VPS9 proteins in Rab5 signaling pathway. • Roles of each VPS9 protein in Rab5 signaling pathway are discussed.

  10. Probing the biology of cell boundary conditions through confinement of Xenopus cell-free cytoplasmic extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Jessica G; Chen, Hui; Einstein, Lily C; Good, Matthew C

    2017-01-01

    Cell-free cytoplasmic extracts prepared from Xenopus eggs and embryos have for decades provided a biochemical system with which to interrogate complex cell biological processes in vitro. Recently, the application of microfabrication and microfluidic strategies in biology has narrowed the gap between in vitro and in vivo studies by enabling formation of cell-size compartments containing functional cytoplasm. These approaches provide numerous advantages over traditional biochemical experiments performed in a test tube. Most notably, the cell-free cytoplasm is confined using a two- or three-dimensional boundary, which mimics the natural configuration of a cell. This strategy enables characterization of the spatial organization of a cell, and the role that boundaries play in regulating intracellular assembly and function. In this review, we describe the marriage of Xenopus cell-free cytoplasm and confinement technologies to generate synthetic cell-like systems, the recent biological insights they have enabled, and the promise they hold for future scientific discovery. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. The Arf-GDP-regulated recruitment of GBF1 to Golgi membranes requires domains HDS1 and HDS2 and a Golgi-localized protein receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quilty, Douglas; Chan, Calvin J; Yurkiw, Katherine; Bain, Alexandra; Babolmorad, Ghazal; Melançon, Paul

    2018-04-19

    We previously proposed a novel mechanism by which the enzyme Golgi-specific Brefeldin A resistance factor 1 (GBF1) is recruited to the membranes of the cis -Golgi, based on in vivo experiments. Here, we extended our in vivo analysis on the production of regulatory Arf-GDP and observed that ArfGAP2 and ArfGAP3 do not play a role in GBF1 recruitment. We confirm that Arf-GDP localization is critical, as a TGN-localized Arf-GDP mutant protein fails to promote GBF1 recruitment. We also reported the establishment of an in vitro GBF1 recruitment assay that supports the regulation of GBF1 recruitment by Arf-GDP. This in vitro assay yielded further evidence for the requirement of a Golgi-localized protein because heat denaturation or protease treatment of Golgi membranes abrogated GBF1 recruitment. Finally, combined in vivo and in vitro measurements indicated that the recruitment to Golgi membranes via a putative receptor requires only the HDS1 and HDS2 domains in the C-terminal half of GBF1. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  12. A genetic association study of the FXYD domain containing ion transport regulator 6 (FXYD6) gene, encoding phosphohippolin, in susceptibility to schizophrenia in a Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Yoshihito; Nakamura, Yukako; Takahashi, Nagahide; Saito, Shinichi; Aleksic, Branko; Iwata, Nakao; Inada, Toshiya; Ozaki, Norio

    2008-06-13

    The FXYD domain containing ion transport regulator 6 (FXYD6) gene is located within a region of chromosome 11 (11q23.3) that has been shown by a number of genome scans to be one of the most well-established linkages to schizophrenia. FXYD6 encodes the protein phosphohippolin, which is primarily expressed in the brain. Phosphohippolin modulates the kinetic activity of Na,K-ATPase and has long-term physiological importance in maintaining cation homeostasis. A recent study reported that FXYD6 was associated with schizophrenia in the United Kingdom samples. Applying the gene-based association concept, we carried out an association study regarding FXYD6 and schizophrenia in a Japanese population, with a sample consisting of 2026 subjects (906 schizophrenics and 1120 controls). After linkage disequilibrium analysis, 23 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped using 5'-exonuclease allelic discrimination assay. We found a significant association of two SNPs (rs11216573; genotypic P value: 0.022 and rs555577; genotypic P value: 0.026, allelic P value: 0.011, uncorrected). Nominal P values did not survive correction for multiple testing (rs11216573; genotypic P value: 0.47 and rs555577; genotypic P value: 0.55, allelic P value: 0.24, after SNPSpD correction). No association was observed between schizophrenia patients and controls in allelic, genotypic and haplotypic analyses. Our findings suggest that FXYD6 is unlikely to be related to the development of schizophrenia in a Japanese population.

  13. A protein kinase binds the C-terminal domain of the readthrough protein of Turnip yellows virus and regulates virus accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Medina, Caren; Boissinot, Sylvaine; Chapuis, Sophie; Gereige, Dalya; Rastegar, Maryam; Erdinger, Monique; Revers, Frédéric; Ziegler-Graff, Véronique; Brault, Véronique

    2015-12-01

    Turnip yellows virus (TuYV), a phloem-limited virus, encodes a 74kDa protein known as the readthrough protein (RT) involved in virus movement. We show here that a TuYV mutant deleted of the C-terminal part of the RT protein (TuYV-∆RTCter) was affected in long-distance trafficking in a host-specific manner. By using the C-terminal domain of the RT protein as a bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a phloem cDNA library from Arabidopsis thaliana we identified the calcineurin B-like protein-interacting protein kinase-7 (AtCIPK7). Transient expression of a GFP:CIPK7 fusion protein in virus-inoculated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves led to local increase of wild-type TuYV accumulation, but not that of TuYV-∆RTCter. Surprisingly, elevated virus titer in inoculated leaves did not result in higher TuYV accumulation in systemic leaves, which indicates that virus long-distance movement was not affected. Since GFP:CIPK7 was localized in or near plasmodesmata, CIPK7 could negatively regulate TuYV export from infected cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of external pH on the cytoplasmic and vacuolar pHs in Mung bean root-tip cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torimitsu, Keiichi; Yazaki, Yoshiaki; Nagasuka, Kinuyo; Ohta, Eiji; Sakata, Makoto

    1984-01-01

    The effect of the external pH on the intracellular pH in mung bean (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper) root-tip cells was investigated with the 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) method. The 31 P NMR spectra showed three peaks caused by cytoplasmic G-6-P, cytoplasmic Psub(i) and vacuolar Psub(i). The cytoplasmic and vacuolar pHs could be determined by comparing the Psub(i) chemical shifts with the titration curve. When the external pH was changed over a range from pH 3 to 10, the cytoplasmic pH showed smaller changes than the vacuolar pH, suggesting that the former is regulated more strictly than the latter. The H + -ATPase inhibitor, DCCD, caused the breakdown of the mechanism that regulates the intracellular pH. H + -ATPase appears to have an important part in the regulation of the intracellular pH. (author)

  15. PspF-binding domain PspA1-144 and the PspA·F complex: New insights into the coiled-coil-dependent regulation of AAA+ proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadnik, Hendrik; Schöpfel, Michael; Heidrich, Eyleen; Mehner, Denise; Lilie, Hauke; Parthier, Christoph; Risselada, H Jelger; Grubmüller, Helmut; Stubbs, Milton T; Brüser, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Phage shock protein A (PspA) belongs to the highy conserved PspA/IM30 family and is a key component of the stress inducible Psp system in Escherichia coli. One of its central roles is the regulatory interaction with the transcriptional activator of this system, the σ(54) enhancer-binding protein PspF, a member of the AAA+ protein family. The PspA/F regulatory system has been intensively studied and serves as a paradigm for AAA+ enzyme regulation by trans-acting factors. However, the molecular mechanism of how exactly PspA controls the activity of PspF and hence σ(54) -dependent expression of the psp genes is still unclear. To approach this question, we identified the minimal PspF-interacting domain of PspA, solved its structure, determined its affinity to PspF and the dissociation kinetics, identified residues that are potentially important for PspF regulation and analyzed effects of their mutation on PspF in vivo and in vitro. Our data indicate that several characteristics of AAA+ regulation in the PspA·F complex resemble those of the AAA+ unfoldase ClpB, with both proteins being regulated by a structurally highly conserved coiled-coil domain. The convergent evolution of both regulatory domains points to a general mechanism to control AAA+ activity for divergent physiologic tasks via coiled-coil domains. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Concrete domains

    OpenAIRE

    Kahn, G.; Plotkin, G.D.

    1993-01-01

    This paper introduces the theory of a particular kind of computation domains called concrete domains. The purpose of this theory is to find a satisfactory framework for the notions of coroutine computation and sequentiality of evaluation.

  17. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies, Autoimmune Neutropenia, and Vasculitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Peter C.; Sloan, J. Mark; Niles, John L.; Monach, Paul A.; Merkel, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Reports of an association between antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) and autoimmune neutropenia have rarely included cases of proven vasculitis. A case of ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) with recurrent neutropenia is described and relevant literature on the association between ANCA, neutropenia, and vasculitis is reviewed. Methods Longitudinal clinical assessments and laboratory findings are described in a patient with AAV and recurrent episodes of profound neutropenia from December 2008 – October 2010. A PubMed database search of the medical literature was performed for papers published from 1960 through October 2010 to identify all reported cases of ANCA and neutropenia. Results A 49 year-old man developed recurrent neutropenia, periodic fevers, arthritis, biopsy-proven cutaneous vasculitis, sensorineural hearing loss, epididymitis, and positive tests for ANCA with specificity for antibodies to both proteinase 3 and myeloperoxidase. Antineutrophil membrane antibodies were detected during an acute neutropenic phase and were not detectable in a post-recovery sample, whereas ANCA titers did not seem to correlate with neutropenia. An association between ANCA and neutropenia has been reported in 74 cases from 24 studies in the context of drug/toxin exposure, underlying autoimmune disease, or chronic neutropenia without underlying autoimmune disease. In these cases, the presence of atypical ANCA patterns and other antibodies were common; however, vasculitis was uncommon and when it occurred was usually limited to the skin and in cases of underlying toxin exposure. Conclusions ANCA is associated with autoimmune neutropenia, but systemic vasculitis rarely occurs in association with ANCA and neutropenia. The interaction between neutrophils and ANCA may provide insight into understanding both autoimmune neutropenia and AAV. PMID:21507463

  18. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies Associated With Infective Endocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Vincent; Lesourd, Anais; Girszyn, Nicolas; Ménard, Jean-Francois; Levesque, Hervé; Caron, Francois; Marie, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To determine the prevalence of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in patients with infective endocarditis (IE) in internal medicine; and to compare clinical and biochemical features and outcome between patients exhibiting IE with and without ANCA. Fifty consecutive patients with IE underwent ANCA testing. The medical records of these patients were reviewed. Of the 50 patients with IE, 12 exhibited ANCA (24%). ANCA-positive patients with IE exhibited: longer duration between the onset of first symptoms and IE diagnosis (P = 0.02); and more frequently: weight loss (P = 0.017) and renal impairment (P = 0.08), lower levels of C-reactive protein (P = 0.0009) and serum albumin (P = 0.0032), involvement of both aortic and mitral valves (P = 0.009), and longer hospital stay (P = 0.016). Under multivariate analysis, significant factors for ANCA-associated IE were: longer hospital stay (P = 0.004), lower level of serum albumin (P = 0.02), and multiple valve involvement (P = 0.04). Mortality rate was 25% in ANCA patients; death was because of IE complications in all these patients. Our study identifies a high prevalence of ANCA in unselected patients with IE in internal medicine (24%). Our findings further underscore that ANCA may be associated with a subacute form of IE leading to multiple valve involvement and more frequent renal impairment. Because death was due to IE complications in all patients, our data suggest that aggressive therapy may be required to improve such patients’ outcome. PMID:26817911

  19. Domain Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjørner, Dines

    Before software can be designed we must know its requirements. Before requirements can be expressed we must understand the domain. So it follows, from our dogma, that we must first establish precise descriptions of domains; then, from such descriptions, “derive” at least domain and interface requirements; and from those and machine requirements design the software, or, more generally, the computing systems.

  20. Subtype-selective regulation of IP(3) receptors by thimerosal via cysteine residues within the IP(3)-binding core and suppressor domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Samir A; Rossi, Ana M; Riley, Andrew M; Potter, Barry V L; Taylor, Colin W

    2013-04-15

    IP(3)R (IP(3) [inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate] receptors) and ryanodine receptors are the most widely expressed intracellular Ca(2+) channels and both are regulated by thiol reagents. In DT40 cells stably expressing single subtypes of mammalian IP(3)R, low concentrations of thimerosal (also known as thiomersal), which oxidizes thiols to form a thiomercurylethyl complex, increased the sensitivity of IP(3)-evoked Ca(2+) release via IP(3)R1 and IP(3)R2, but inhibited IP(3)R3. Activation of IP(3)R is initiated by IP(3) binding to the IBC (IP(3)-binding core; residues 224-604) and proceeds via re-arrangement of an interface between the IBC and SD (suppressor domain; residues 1-223). Thimerosal (100 μM) stimulated IP(3) binding to the isolated NT (N-terminal; residues 1-604) of IP(3)R1 and IP(3)R2, but not to that of IP(3)R3. Binding of a competitive antagonist (heparin) or partial agonist (dimeric-IP(3)) to NT1 was unaffected by thiomersal, suggesting that the effect of thimerosal is specifically related to IP(3)R activation. IP(3) binding to NT1 in which all cysteine residues were replaced by alanine was insensitive to thimerosal, so too were NT1 in which cysteine residues were replaced in either the SD or IBC. This demonstrates that thimerosal interacts directly with cysteine in both the SD and IBC. Chimaeric proteins in which the SD of the IP(3)R was replaced by the structurally related A domain of a ryanodine receptor were functional, but thimerosal inhibited both IP(3) binding to the chimaeric NT and IP(3)-evoked Ca(2+) release from the chimaeric IP(3)R. This is the first systematic analysis of the effects of a thiol reagent on each IP(3)R subtype. We conclude that thimerosal selectively sensitizes IP(3)R1 and IP(3)R2 to IP(3) by modifying cysteine residues within both the SD and IBC and thereby stabilizing an active conformation of the receptor.

  1. Subtype-selective regulation of IP3 receptors by thimerosal via cysteine residues within the IP3-binding core and suppressor domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Samir A.; Rossi, Ana M.; Riley, Andrew M.; Potter, Barry V. L.; Taylor, Colin W.

    2013-01-01

    IP3R (IP3 [inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate] receptors) and ryanodine receptors are the most widely expressed intracellular Ca2+ channels and both are regulated by thiol reagents. In DT40 cells stably expressing single subtypes of mammalian IP3R, low concentrations of thimerosal (also known as thiomersal), which oxidizes thiols to form a thiomercurylethyl complex, increased the sensitivity of IP3-evoked Ca2+ release via IP3R1 and IP3R2, but inhibited IP3R3. Activation of IP3R is initiated by IP3 binding to the IBC (IP3-binding core; residues 224–604) and proceeds via re-arrangement of an interface between the IBC and SD (suppressor domain; residues 1–223). Thimerosal (100 μM) stimulated IP3 binding to the isolated NT (N-terminal; residues 1–604) of IP3R1 and IP3R2, but not to that of IP3R3. Binding of a competitive antagonist (heparin) or partial agonist (dimeric-IP3) to NT1 was unaffected by thiomersal, suggesting that the effect of thimerosal is specifically related to IP3R activation. IP3 binding to NT1 in which all cysteine residues were replaced by alanine was insensitive to thimerosal, so too were NT1 in which cysteine residues were replaced in either the SD or IBC. This demonstrates that thimerosal interacts directly with cysteine in both the SD and IBC. Chimaeric proteins in which the SD of the IP3R was replaced by the structurally related A domain of a ryanodine receptor were functional, but thimerosal inhibited both IP3 binding to the chimaeric NT and IP3-evoked Ca2+ release from the chimaeric IP3R. This is the first systematic analysis of the effects of a thiol reagent on each IP3R subtype. We conclude that thimerosal selectively sensitizes IP3R1 and IP3R2 to IP3 by modifying cysteine residues within both the SD and IBC and thereby stabilizing an active conformation of the receptor. PMID:23282150

  2. Cytoplasmic RAP1 mediates cisplatin resistance of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lu; Lan, Xiaoying; Shi, Xianping; Zhao, Kai; Wang, Dongrui; Wang, Xuejun; Li, Faqian; Huang, Hongbiao; Liu, Jinbao

    2017-05-18

    Cytotoxic chemotherapy agents (e.g., cisplatin) are the first-line drugs to treat non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) but NSCLC develops resistance to the agent, limiting therapeutic efficacy. Despite many approaches to identifying the underlying mechanism for cisplatin resistance, there remains a lack of effective targets in the population that resist cisplatin treatment. In this study, we sought to investigate the role of cytoplasmic RAP1, a previously identified positive regulator of NF-κB signaling, in the development of cisplatin resistance in NSCLC cells. We found that the expression of cytoplasmic RAP1 was significantly higher in high-grade NSCLC tissues than in low-grade NSCLC; compared with a normal pulmonary epithelial cell line, the A549 NSCLC cells exhibited more cytoplasmic RAP1 expression as well as increased NF-κB activity; cisplatin treatment resulted in a further increase of cytoplasmic RAP1 in A549 cells; overexpression of RAP1 desensitized the A549 cells to cisplatin, and conversely, RAP1 depletion in the NSCLC cells reduced their proliferation and increased their sensitivity to cisplatin, indicating that RAP1 is required for cell growth and has a key mediating role in the development of cisplatin resistance in NSCLC cells. The RAP1-mediated cisplatin resistance was associated with the activation of NF-κB signaling and the upregulation of the antiapoptosis factor BCL-2. Intriguingly, in the small portion of RAP1-depleted cells that survived cisplatin treatment, no induction of NF-κB activity and BCL-2 expression was observed. Furthermore, in established cisplatin-resistant A549 cells, RAP1 depletion caused BCL2 depletion, caspase activation and dramatic lethality to the cells. Hence, our results demonstrate that the cytoplasmic RAP1-NF-κB-BCL2 axis represents a key pathway to cisplatin resistance in NSCLC cells, identifying RAP1 as a marker and a potential therapeutic target for cisplatin resistance of NSCLC.

  3. CTP synthase forms cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gou, Ke-Mian; Chang, Chia-Chun; Shen, Qing-Ji; Sung, Li-Ying; Liu, Ji-Long

    2014-01-01

    CTP synthase is an essential metabolic enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of CTP. Multiple studies have recently showed that CTP synthase protein molecules form filamentous structures termed cytoophidia or CTP synthase filaments in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, as well as in bacteria. Here we report that CTP synthase can form cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Both glutamine deprivation and glutamine analog treatment promote formation of cytoplasmic cytoophidia (C-cytoophidia) and nuclear cytoophidia (N-cytoophidia). N-cytoophidia are generally shorter and thinner than their cytoplasmic counterparts. In mammalian cells, both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 can form cytoophidia. Using live imaging, we have observed that both C-cytoophidia and N-cytoophidia undergo multiple rounds of fusion upon glutamine analog treatment. Our study reveals the coexistence of cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus, therefore providing a good opportunity to investigate the intracellular compartmentation of CTP synthase. - Highlights: • CTP synthase forms cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm but also in the nucleus. • Glutamine deprivation and Glutamine analogs promotes cytoophidium formation. • N-cytoophidia exhibit distinct morphology when compared to C-cytoophidia. • Both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 form cytoophidia in mammalian cells. • Fusions of cytoophidia occur in the cytoplasm and nucleus

  4. Uniparental Inheritance Promotes Adaptive Evolution in Cytoplasmic Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Joshua R; Beekman, Madeleine

    2017-03-01

    Eukaryotes carry numerous asexual cytoplasmic genomes (mitochondria and plastids). Lacking recombination, asexual genomes should theoretically suffer from impaired adaptive evolution. Yet, empirical evidence indicates that cytoplasmic genomes experience higher levels of adaptive evolution than predicted by theory. In this study, we use a computational model to show that the unique biology of cytoplasmic genomes-specifically their organization into host cells and their uniparental (maternal) inheritance-enable them to undergo effective adaptive evolution. Uniparental inheritance of cytoplasmic genomes decreases competition between different beneficial substitutions (clonal interference), promoting the accumulation of beneficial substitutions. Uniparental inheritance also facilitates selection against deleterious cytoplasmic substitutions, slowing Muller's ratchet. In addition, uniparental inheritance generally reduces genetic hitchhiking of deleterious substitutions during selective sweeps. Overall, uniparental inheritance promotes adaptive evolution by increasing the level of beneficial substitutions relative to deleterious substitutions. When we assume that cytoplasmic genome inheritance is biparental, decreasing the number of genomes transmitted during gametogenesis (bottleneck) aids adaptive evolution. Nevertheless, adaptive evolution is always more efficient when inheritance is uniparental. Our findings explain empirical observations that cytoplasmic genomes-despite their asexual mode of reproduction-can readily undergo adaptive evolution. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  5. Uniparental Inheritance Promotes Adaptive Evolution in Cytoplasmic Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Joshua R.; Beekman, Madeleine

    2017-01-01

    Eukaryotes carry numerous asexual cytoplasmic genomes (mitochondria and plastids). Lacking recombination, asexual genomes should theoretically suffer from impaired adaptive evolution. Yet, empirical evidence indicates that cytoplasmic genomes experience higher levels of adaptive evolution than predicted by theory. In this study, we use a computational model to show that the unique biology of cytoplasmic genomes—specifically their organization into host cells and their uniparental (maternal) inheritance—enable them to undergo effective adaptive evolution. Uniparental inheritance of cytoplasmic genomes decreases competition between different beneficial substitutions (clonal interference), promoting the accumulation of beneficial substitutions. Uniparental inheritance also facilitates selection against deleterious cytoplasmic substitutions, slowing Muller’s ratchet. In addition, uniparental inheritance generally reduces genetic hitchhiking of deleterious substitutions during selective sweeps. Overall, uniparental inheritance promotes adaptive evolution by increasing the level of beneficial substitutions relative to deleterious substitutions. When we assume that cytoplasmic genome inheritance is biparental, decreasing the number of genomes transmitted during gametogenesis (bottleneck) aids adaptive evolution. Nevertheless, adaptive evolution is always more efficient when inheritance is uniparental. Our findings explain empirical observations that cytoplasmic genomes—despite their asexual mode of reproduction—can readily undergo adaptive evolution. PMID:28025277

  6. CTP synthase forms cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gou, Ke-Mian [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom); State Key Laboratory for Agrobiotechnology, College of Biological Sciences, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193 (China); Chang, Chia-Chun [Institute of Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Shen, Qing-Ji [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom); Sung, Li-Ying, E-mail: liyingsung@ntu.edu.tw [Institute of Biotechnology, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, Ji-Long, E-mail: jilong.liu@dpag.ox.ac.uk [MRC Functional Genomics Unit, Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PT (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-15

    CTP synthase is an essential metabolic enzyme responsible for the de novo synthesis of CTP. Multiple studies have recently showed that CTP synthase protein molecules form filamentous structures termed cytoophidia or CTP synthase filaments in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells, as well as in bacteria. Here we report that CTP synthase can form cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm, but also in the nucleus of eukaryotic cells. Both glutamine deprivation and glutamine analog treatment promote formation of cytoplasmic cytoophidia (C-cytoophidia) and nuclear cytoophidia (N-cytoophidia). N-cytoophidia are generally shorter and thinner than their cytoplasmic counterparts. In mammalian cells, both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 can form cytoophidia. Using live imaging, we have observed that both C-cytoophidia and N-cytoophidia undergo multiple rounds of fusion upon glutamine analog treatment. Our study reveals the coexistence of cytoophidia in the cytoplasm and nucleus, therefore providing a good opportunity to investigate the intracellular compartmentation of CTP synthase. - Highlights: • CTP synthase forms cytoophidia not only in the cytoplasm but also in the nucleus. • Glutamine deprivation and Glutamine analogs promotes cytoophidium formation. • N-cytoophidia exhibit distinct morphology when compared to C-cytoophidia. • Both CTP synthase 1 and CTP synthase 2 form cytoophidia in mammalian cells. • Fusions of cytoophidia occur in the cytoplasm and nucleus.

  7. Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease with Cytoplasmic Staining of Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar I. Saadah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is unusual for the antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody with cytoplasmic pattern (cANCA to present in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD without vasculitis. The purpose of this study was to describe the occurrence and characteristics of pediatrics IBD with cANCA. Methods. A retrospective review of pediatric IBD associated with cANCA serology in patients from King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Saudi Arabia, between September 2002 and February 2012. Results. Out of 131 patients with IBD screened for cANCAs, cANCA was positive in 7 (5.3% patients of whom 4 had ulcerative colitis and 3 had Crohn's disease. The median age was 8.8 years (2–14.8 years. Six (86% were males. Of the 7 patients, 5 (71% were Saudi Arabians and 2 were of Indian ethnicity. The most common symptoms were diarrhea, abdominal pain, weight loss, and rectal bleeding. None had family history or clinical features suggestive of vasculitis involving renal and respiratory systems. No difference in the disease location or severity was observed between cANCA positive and cANCA negative patients apart from male preponderance in cANCA positive patients. Conclusion. The occurrence of cANCA in pediatric IBD is rare. Apart from male preponderance, there were no peculiar characteristics for the cANCA positive patients.

  8. Crystal Structure of the FERM Domain of Focal Adhesion Kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceccarelli, D.; Song, H.; Poy, F.; Schaller, M.; Eck, M.

    2006-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is a non-receptor tyrosine kinase that localizes to focal adhesions in adherent cells. Through phosphorylation of proteins assembled at the cytoplasmic tails of integrins, FAK promotes signaling events that modulate cellular growth, survival, and migration. The amino-terminal region of FAK contains a region of sequence homology with band 4.1 and ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) proteins termed a FERM domain. FERM domains are found in a variety of signaling and cytoskeletal proteins and are thought to mediate intermolecular interactions with partner proteins and phospholipids at the plasma membrane and intramolecular regulatory interactions. Here we report two crystal structures of an NH2-terminal fragment of avian FAK containing the FERM domain and a portion of the regulatory linker that connects the FERM and kinase domains. The tertiary folds of the three subdomains (F1, F2, and F3) are similar to those of known FERM structures despite low sequence conservation. Differences in the sequence and relative orientation of the F3 subdomain alters the nature of the interdomain interface, and the phosphoinositide binding site found in ERM family FERM domains is not present in FAK. A putative protein interaction site on the F3 lobe is masked by the proximal region of the linker. Additionally, in one structure the adjacent Src SH3 and SH2 binding sites in the linker associate with the surfaces of the F3 and F1 lobes, respectively. These structural features suggest the possibility that protein interactions of the FAK FERM domain can be regulated by binding of Src kinases to the linker segment

  9. The DEAD box helicase RDE-12 promotes amplification of RNAi in cytoplasmic foci in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huan; Vallandingham, Jim; Shiu, Philip; Li, Hua; Hunter, Craig P; Mak, Ho Yi

    2014-04-14

    RNAi is a potent mechanism for downregulating gene expression. Conserved RNAi pathway components are found in animals, plants, fungi, and other eukaryotes. In C. elegans, the RNAi response is greatly amplified by the synthesis of abundant secondary small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Exogenous double-stranded RNA is processed by Dicer and RDE-1/Argonaute into primary siRNA that guides target mRNA recognition. The RDE-10/RDE-11 complex and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase RRF-1 then engage the target mRNA for secondary siRNA synthesis. However, the molecular link between primary siRNA production and secondary siRNA synthesis remains largely unknown. Furthermore, it is unclear whether the subcellular sites for target mRNA recognition and degradation coincide with sites where siRNA synthesis and amplification occur. In the C. elegans germline, cytoplasmic P granules at the nuclear pores and perinuclear Mutator foci contribute to target mRNA surveillance and siRNA amplification, respectively. We report that RDE-12, a conserved phenylalanine-glycine (FG) domain-containing DEAD box helicase, localizes in P granules and cytoplasmic foci that are enriched in RSD-6 but are excluded from the Mutator foci. Our results suggest that RDE-12 promotes secondary siRNA synthesis by orchestrating the recruitment of RDE-10 and RRF-1 to primary siRNA-targeted mRNA in distinct cytoplasmic compartments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. WW domains of the yes-kinase-associated-protein (YAP transcriptional regulator behave as independent units with different binding preferences for PPxY motif-containing ligands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Iglesias-Bexiga

    Full Text Available YAP is a WW domain-containing effector of the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, and the object of heightened interest as a potent oncogene and stemness factor. YAP has two major isoforms that differ in the number of WW domains they harbor. Elucidating the degree of co-operation between these WW domains is important for a full understanding of the molecular function of YAP. We present here a detailed biophysical study of the structural stability and binding properties of the two YAP WW domains aimed at investigating the relationship between both domains in terms of structural stability and partner recognition. We have carried out a calorimetric study of the structural stability of the two YAP WW domains, both isolated and in a tandem configuration, and their interaction with a set of functionally relevant ligands derived from PTCH1 and LATS kinases. We find that the two YAP WW domains behave as independent units with different binding preferences, suggesting that the presence of the second WW domain might contribute to modulate target recognition between the two YAP isoforms. Analysis of structural models and phage-display studies indicate that electrostatic interactions play a critical role in binding specificity. Together, these results are relevant to understand of YAP function and open the door to the design of highly specific ligands of interest to delineate the functional role of each WW domain in YAP signaling.

  11. Involvement of hGLD-2 in cytoplasmic polyadenylation of human p53 mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glahder, Jacob-Andreas Harald; Norrild, Bodil

    2011-01-01

    Cytoplasmic polyadenylation is a post-transcriptional mechanism regulating mRNA stability and translation. The human p53 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) contains two regions similar to cytoplasmic polyadenylation elements (CPEs) just upstream of the poly(A) hexanucleotide. Evaluation of the p53 CPE......-like elements was performed by luciferase reporter assays, qPCR, and poly(A) assays. Herein, we report the down regulation of a luciferase reporter fused to the p53 3'-UTR, when human CPE-binding protein 1 (hCPEB1) is overexpressed. This inhibition is partially rescued when hCPEB1fused to hGLD-2 [a human...... cytoplasmic poly(A) polymerase] is overexpressed instead. The stability of a luciferase mRNA containing the p53 3'-UTR downstream, is decreased when hCPEB1 is overexpressed as seen by qPCR. Expression of hGLD-2 restores the mRNA stability. This is due to elongation of the poly(A) tail as seen by a PCR...

  12. Changes in pH and NADPH regulate the DNA binding activity of neuronal PAS domain protein 2, a mammalian circadian transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, Katsuhiro; Tajima, Fumihisa; Ishijima, Sumio; Sagami, Ikuko

    2015-01-20

    Neuronal PAS domain protein 2 (NPAS2) is a core clock transcription factor that forms a heterodimer with BMAL1 to bind the E-box in the promoter of clock genes and is regulated by various environmental stimuli such as heme, carbon monoxide, and NAD(P)H. In this study, we investigated the effects of pH and NADPH on the DNA binding activity of NPAS2. In an electrophoretic mobility shift (EMS) assay, the pH of the reaction mixture affected the DNA binding activity of the NPAS2/BMAL1 heterodimer but not that of the BMAL1/BMAL1 homodimer. A change in pH from 7.0 to 7.5 resulted in a 1.7-fold increase in activity in the absence of NADPH, and NADPH additively enhanced the activity up to 2.7-fold at pH 7.5. The experiments using truncated mutants revealed that N-terminal amino acids 1-61 of NPAS2 were sufficient to sense the change in both pH and NADPH. We further analyzed the kinetics of formation and DNA binding of the NPAS2/BMAL1 heterodimer at various pH values. In the absence of NADPH, a change in pH from 6.5 to 8.0 decreased the KD(app) value of the E-box from 125 to 22 nM, with an 8-fold increase in the maximal level of DNA binding for the NPAS2/BMAL1 heterodimer. The addition of NADPH resulted in a further decrease in KD(app) to 9 nM at pH 8.0. Furthermore, NPAS2-dependent transcriptional activity in a luciferase assay using NIH3T3 cells also increased with the pH of the culture medium. These results suggest that NPAS2 has a role as a pH and metabolite sensor in regulating circadian rhythms.

  13. Conserved allosteric hot spots in the transmembrane domains of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Chauvet, Sylvain; Guo, Jingyu; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2014-07-18

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are an ancient family of transmembrane proteins that utilize ATPase activity to move substrates across cell membranes. The ABCC subfamily of the ABC transporters includes active drug exporters (the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs)) and a unique ATP-gated ion channel (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)). The CFTR channel shares gating principles with conventional ligand-gated ion channels, but the allosteric network that couples ATP binding at its nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) with conformational changes in its transmembrane helices (TMs) is poorly defined. It is also unclear whether the mechanisms that govern CFTR gating are conserved with the thermodynamically distinct MRPs. Here we report a new class of gain of function (GOF) mutation of a conserved proline at the base of the pore-lining TM6. Multiple substitutions of this proline promoted ATP-free CFTR activity and activation by the weak agonist, 5'-adenylyl-β,γ-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). TM6 proline mutations exhibited additive GOF effects when combined with a previously reported GOF mutation located in an outer collar of TMs that surrounds the pore-lining TMs. Each TM substitution allosterically rescued the ATP sensitivity of CFTR gating when introduced into an NBD mutant with defective ATP binding. Both classes of GOF mutations also rescued defective drug export by a yeast MRP (Yor1p) with ATP binding defects in its NBDs. We conclude that the conserved TM6 proline helps set the energy barrier to both CFTR channel opening and MRP-mediated drug efflux and that CFTR channels and MRP pumps utilize similar allosteric mechanisms for coupling conformational changes in their translocation pathways to ATP binding at their NBDs. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. A mutation within the SH2 domain of slp-76 regulates the tissue distribution and cytokine production of iNKT cells in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danzer, Claudia; Koller, Anna; Baier, Julia; Arnold, Harald; Giessler, Claudia; Opoka, Robert; Schmidt, Stephanie; Willers, Maike; Mihai, Sidonia; Parsch, Hans; Wirtz, Stefan; Daniel, Christoph; Reinhold, Annegret; Engelmann, Swen; Kliche, Stefanie; Bogdan, Christian; Hoebe, Kasper; Mattner, Jochen

    2016-09-01

    TCR ligation is critical for the selection, activation, and integrin expression of T lymphocytes. Here, we explored the role of the TCR adaptor protein slp-76 on iNKT-cell biology. Compared to B6 controls, slp-76(ace/ace) mice carrying a missense mutation (Thr428Ile) within the SH2-domain of slp-76 showed an increase in iNKT cells in the thymus and lymph nodes, but a decrease in iNKT cells in spleens and livers, along with reduced ADAP expression and cytokine response. A comparable reduction in iNKT cells was observed in the livers and spleens of ADAP-deficient mice. Like ADAP(-/-) iNKT cells, slp-76(ace/ace) iNKT cells were characterized by enhanced CD11b expression, correlating with an impaired induction of the TCR immediate-early gene Nur77 and a decreased adhesion to ICAM-1. Furthermore, CD11b-intrinsic effects inhibited cytokine release, concanavalin A-mediated inflammation, and iNKT-cell accumulation in the liver. Unlike B6 and ADAP(-/-) mice, the expression of the transcription factors Id3 and PLZF was reduced, whereas NP-1-expression was enhanced in slp-76(ace/ace) mice. Blockade of NP-1 decreased the recovery of iNKT cells from peripheral lymph nodes, identifying NP-1 as an iNKT-cell-specific adhesion factor. Thus, slp-76 contributes to the regulation of the tissue distribution, PLZF, and cytokine expression of iNKT cells via ADAP-dependent and -independent mechanisms. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. A cupin domain-containing protein with a quercetinase activity (VdQase regulates Verticillium dahliae’s pathogenicity and contributes to counteracting host defenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel eElHadrami

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We previously identified rutin as part of potato root responses to its pathogen Verticillium dahliae. Rutin was directly toxic to the pathogen at doses greater than 160 μM, a threshold below which many V. dahliae pathogenicity-related genes were up-regulated. We identified and characterized a cupin domain-containing protein (VdQase with a dioxygenase activity and a potential role in V. dahliae-potato interactions. The pathogenicity of VdQase knock-out mutants generated through Agrobacterium tumefasciens-mediated transformation was significantly reduced on susceptible potato cultivar Kennebec compared to wild type isolates. Fluorescence microscopy revealed a higher accumulation of flavonols in the stems of infected potatoes and a higher concentration of rutin in the leaves in response to the VdQase mutants as compared to wild type isolates. This, along with the HPLC characterization of high residual and non-utilized quercetin in presence of the knockout mutants, indicates the involvement of VdQase in the catabolism of quercetin and possibly other flavonols in planta. Quantification of Salicylic and Jasmonic Acids (SA, JA in response to the mutants versus wild type isolates revealed involvement of VdQase in the interference with signaling, suggesting a role in pathogenicity. It is hypothesized that the by-product of dioxygenation 2-protocatechuoylphloroglucinolcarboxylic acid, after dissociating into phloroglucinol and protocatechuoyl moieties, becomes a starting point for benzoic acid and SA, thereby interfering with the JA pathway and affecting the interaction outcome. These events may be key factors for V. dahliae in countering potato defenses and becoming notorious in the rhizosphere.

  16. The -271 G>A polymorphism of kinase insert domain-containing receptor gene regulates its transcription level in patients with non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, She-Juan; Chen, Zhi-Hong; Lin, Qiu-Xiong; Su, Jian; Chen, Hua-Jun; Lin, Jia-Ying; Wu, Yi-Long

    2009-01-01

    Kinase insert domain-containing receptor (KDR) plays a critical role in the metastasis of cancer and is used as a molecular target in cancer therapy. We investigated the characteristics of the -271 G>A polymorphism of the KDR gene to gain information that may benefit the development of individualized therapies for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The -271 G>A polymorphism of the KDR gene in 106 lung cancer patients and 203 healthy control individuals was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing methods. Real-time quantitative PCR and immunohistochemical methods were used to evaluate KDR mRNA and protein expression levels, respectively, in frozen tumor specimens. The -271 G>A polymorphism was associated with the mRNA expression level of the KDR gene in tumor tissues (t = 2.178, P = 0.032, independent samples t-test). Compared with the AG/GG genotype, the AA genotype was associated with higher KDR mRNA expression in tumor tissues. We found no relationship between the genotype and the KDR protein expression level and no significant difference in the distribution of the KDR gene polymorphism genotypes between lung cancer patients and the control group (χ 2 = 1.269, P = 0.264, Fisher's exact test). This study is the first to show that the -271 G>A polymorphism of the KDR gene may be a functional polymorphism related to the regulation of gene transcription. These findings may have important implications for therapies targeting KDR in patients with NSCLC

  17. Nuclear localization of lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) and its role in regulating LIM domain only 2 (Lmo2) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkitachalam, Srividya; Chueh, Fu-Yu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, H. M. Bligh Cancer Research Laboratories, Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL 60064 (United States); Yu, Chao-Lan, E-mail: chaolan.yu@rosalindfranklin.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, H. M. Bligh Cancer Research Laboratories, Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL 60064 (United States)

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lmo2 expression is elevated in Lck-transformed cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both endogenous and exogenous Lck localize in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear Lck is active in Lck-transformed cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lck binds to the promoter region of Lmo2 gene in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In contrast to JAK2, Lck does not increase histone H3 phosphorylation on Tyr 41. -- Abstract: LIM domain only protein 2 (Lmo2) is a transcription factor that plays a critical role in the development of T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). A previous report established a link between Lmo2 expression and the nuclear presence of oncogenic Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase. The oncogenic JAK2 kinase phosphorylates histone H3 on Tyr 41 that leads to the relief of Lmo2 promoter repression and subsequent gene expression. Similar to JAK2, constitutive activation of lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) has been implicated in lymphoid malignancies. However, it is not known whether oncogenic Lck regulates Lmo2 expression through a similar mechanism. We show here that Lmo2 expression is significantly elevated in T cell leukemia LSTRA overexpressing active Lck kinase and in HEK 293 cells expressing oncogenic Y505FLck kinase. Nuclear localization of active Lck kinase was confirmed in both Lck-transformed cells by subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence microscopy. More importantly, in contrast to oncogenic JAK2, oncogenic Lck kinase does not result in significant increase in histone H3 phosphorylation on Tyr 41. Instead, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiment shows that oncogenic Y505FLck kinase binds to the Lmo2 promoter in vivo. This result raises the possibility that oncogenic Lck may activate Lmo2 promoter through direct interaction.

  18. Suppression of LIM and SH3 Domain Protein 1 (LASP1) Negatively Regulated by Androgen Receptor Delays Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejima, Takashi; Imada, Kenjiro; Takeuchi, Ario; Shiota, Masaki; Leong, Jeffrey; Tombe, Tabitha; Tam, Kevin; Fazli, Ladan; Naito, Seiji; Gleave, Martin E; Ong, Christopher J

    2017-02-01

    LIM and SH3 domain protein 1 (LASP1) has been implicated in several human malignancies and has been shown to predict PSA recurrence in prostate cancer. However, the anti-tumor effect of LASP1 knockdown and the association between LASP1 and the androgen receptor (AR) remains unclear. The aim of this study is to clarify the significance of LASP1 as a target for prostate cancer, and to test the effect of silencing LASP1 in vivo using antisense oligonucleotides (ASO). A tissue microarray (TMA) was performed to characterize the differences in LASP1 expression in prostate cancer treated after hormone deprivation therapy. Flow cytometry was used to analyze cell cycle. We designed LASP1 ASO for knockdown of LASP1 in vivo studies. The expression of LASP1 in TMA was increased after androgen ablation and persisted in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Also in TMA, compared with LNCaP cell, LASP1 expression is elevated in CRPC cell lines (C4-2 and VehA cells). Interestingly, suppression of AR elevated LASP1 expression conversely, AR activation decreased LASP1 expression. Silencing of LASP1 reduced cell growth through G1 arrest which was accompanied by a decrease of cyclin D1. Forced overexpression of LASP1 promoted cell cycle and induced cell growth which was accompanied by an increase of cyclin D1. Systemic administration of LASP1 ASO with athymic mice significantly inhibited tumor growth in CRPC xenografts. These results indicate that LASP1 is negatively regulated by AR at the transcriptional level and promotes tumor growth through induction of cell cycle, ultimately suggesting that LASP1 may be a potential target in prostate cancer treatment. Prostate 77:309-320, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of a dipeptide ABC transporter reveals a novel iron-sulfur cluster-binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolu; Zhuo, Wei; Yu, Jie; Ge, Jingpeng; Gu, Jinke; Feng, Yue; Yang, Maojun; Wang, Linfang; Wang, Na

    2013-02-01

    Dipeptide permease (Dpp), which belongs to an ABC transport system, imports peptides consisting of two or three L-amino acids from the matrix to the cytoplasm in microbes. Previous studies have indicated that haem competes with dipeptides to bind DppA in vitro and in vivo and that the Dpp system can also translocate haem. Here, the crystal structure of DppD, the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of the ABC-type dipeptide/oligopeptide/nickel-transport system from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis, bound with ATP, Mg(2+) and a [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur cluster is reported. The N-terminal domain of DppD shares a similar structural fold with the NBDs of other ABC transporters. Interestingly, the C-terminal domain of DppD contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster. The UV-visible absorbance spectrum of DppD was consistent with the presence of a [4Fe-4S] cluster. A search with DALI revealed that the [4Fe-4S] cluster-binding domain is a novel structural fold. Structural analysis and comparisons with other ABC transporters revealed that this iron-sulfur cluster may act as a mediator in substrate (dipeptide or haem) binding by electron transfer and may regulate the transport process in Dpp ABC transport systems. The crystal structure provides a basis for understanding the properties of ABC transporters and will be helpful in investigating the functions of NBDs in the regulation of ABC transporter activity.

  20. Polarized trafficking: the palmitoylation cycle distributes cytoplasmic proteins to distinct neuronal compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortosa, Elena; Hoogenraad, Casper C

    2018-02-01

    In neurons, polarized cargo distribution occurs mainly between the soma and axonal and dendritic compartments, and requires coordinated regulation of cytoskeletal remodeling and membrane trafficking. The Golgi complex plays a critical role during neuronal polarization and secretory trafficking has been shown to differentially transport proteins to both axons and dendrites. Besides the Golgi protein sorting, recent data revealed that palmitoylation cycles are an efficient mechanism to localize cytoplasmic, non-transmembrane proteins to particular neuronal compartments, such as the newly formed axon. Palmitoylation allows substrate proteins to bind to and ride with Golgi-derived secretory vesicles to all neuronal compartments. By allowing cytoplasmic proteins to 'hitchhike' on transport carriers in a non-polarized fashion, compartmentalized depalmitoylation may act as a selective retention mechanism. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Fanconi Anemia DNA Repair Pathway Is Regulated by an Interaction between Ubiquitin and the E2-like Fold Domain of FANCL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Jennifer A; Frost, Mark G; Carroll, Eilis; Rowe, Michelle L; Howard, Mark J; Sidhu, Ateesh; Chaugule, Viduth K; Alpi, Arno F; Walden, Helen

    2015-08-21

    The Fanconi Anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway is essential for the recognition and repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICL). Inefficient repair of these ICL can lead to leukemia and bone marrow failure. A critical step in the pathway is the monoubiquitination of FANCD2 by the RING E3 ligase FANCL. FANCL comprises 3 domains, a RING domain that interacts with E2 conjugating enzymes, a central domain required for substrate interaction, and an N-terminal E2-like fold (ELF) domain. The ELF domain is found in all FANCL homologues, yet the function of the domain remains unknown. We report here that the ELF domain of FANCL is required to mediate a non-covalent interaction between FANCL and ubiquitin. The interaction involves the canonical Ile44 patch on ubiquitin, and a functionally conserved patch on FANCL. We show that the interaction is not necessary for the recognition of the core complex, it does not enhance the interaction between FANCL and Ube2T, and is not required for FANCD2 monoubiquitination in vitro. However, we demonstrate that the ELF domain is required to promote efficient DNA damage-induced FANCD2 monoubiquitination in vertebrate cells, suggesting an important function of ubiquitin binding by FANCL in vivo. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Plant cytoplasmic GAPDH: redox post-translational modifications and moonlighting properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko eZaffagnini

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH is a ubiquitous enzyme involved in glycolysis and shown, particularly in animal cells, to play additional roles in several unrelated non-metabolic processes such as control of gene expression and apoptosis. This functional versatility is regulated, in part at least, by redox post-translational modifications that alter GAPDH catalytic activity and influence the subcellular localization of the enzyme. In spite of the well established moonlighting (multifunctional properties of animal GAPDH, little is known about non-metabolic roles of GAPDH in plants. Plant cells contain several GAPDH isoforms with different catalytic and regulatory properties, located both in the cytoplasm and in plastids, and participating in glycolysis and the Calvin-Benson cycle. A general feature of all GAPDH proteins is the presence of an acidic catalytic cysteine in the active site that is overly sensitive to oxidative modifications, including glutathionylation and S-nitrosylation. In Arabidopsis, oxidatively-modified cytoplasmic GAPDH has been successfully used as a tool to investigate the role of reduced glutathione, thioredoxins and glutaredoxins in the control of different types of redox post-translational modifications. Oxidative modifications inhibit GAPDH activity, but might enable additional functions in plant cells. Mounting evidence support the concept that plant cytoplasmic GAPDH may fulfill alternative, non-metabolic functions that are triggered by redox post-translational modifications of the protein under stress conditions. The aim of this review is to detail the molecular mechanisms underlying the redox regulation of plant cytoplasmic GAPDH in the light of its crystal structure, and to provide a brief inventory of the well known redox-dependent multi-facetted properties of animal GAPDH, together with the emerging roles of oxidatively-modified GAPDH in stress signaling pathways in plants.

  3. Refractory disease in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies associated vasculitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, Abraham; Kallenberg, Cornelis

    Purpose of review Induction treatment of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) associated vasculitis (AAV) is not always successful and nonresponding patients are considered refractory. Recent findings Refractory disease should be subdefined to the treatment that was received.

  4. Cytoplasmic ATR Activation Promotes Vaccinia Virus Genome Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Postigo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to most DNA viruses, poxviruses replicate their genomes in the cytoplasm without host involvement. We find that vaccinia virus induces cytoplasmic activation of ATR early during infection, before genome uncoating, which is unexpected because ATR plays a fundamental nuclear role in maintaining host genome integrity. ATR, RPA, INTS7, and Chk1 are recruited to cytoplasmic DNA viral factories, suggesting canonical ATR pathway activation. Consistent with this, pharmacological and RNAi-mediated inhibition of canonical ATR signaling suppresses genome replication. RPA and the sliding clamp PCNA interact with the viral polymerase E9 and are required for DNA replication. Moreover, the ATR activator TOPBP1 promotes genome replication and associates with the viral replisome component H5. Our study suggests that, in contrast to long-held beliefs, vaccinia recruits conserved components of the eukaryote DNA replication and repair machinery to amplify its genome in the host cytoplasm.

  5. Evaluation of cytoplasmic genetic effects for production and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    uvp

    2014-12-03

    Dec 3, 2014 ... Cytoplasmic genetic effects are transmitted directly only from mother to offspring through mitochondrial DNA. Normal genetic .... inheritance in three synthetic lines of beef cattle differing in mature size. J. Anim. Sci. 69, 745.

  6. Vasculitis and antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies associated with propylthiouracil therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dolman, K. M.; Gans, R. O.; Vervaat, T. J.; Zevenbergen, G.; Maingay, D.; Nikkels, R. E.; Donker, A. J.; von dem Borne, A. E.; Goldschmeding, R.

    1993-01-01

    Vasculitis is a rare complication of propylthiouracil therapy. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) have been described in association with several vasculitic disorders. We report detection of ANCA against human neutrophil elastase, proteinase 3, and myeloperoxidase in serum from six

  7. Computational Investigations of Post-Transcriptional Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon Horskjær

    and miRNA regulation was studied by cross-linking immunoprecipitation (CLIP) and RBP double knockdown experiments. A comprehensive analysis of 107 CLIP datasets of 49 RBPs demonstrated that RBPs modulate miRNA regulation. Results suggest it is mediated by RBP-binding hotspots that likely...... investigated using high-throughput data. Analysis of IMP RIP-seq, iCLIP and RNA-seq datasets identified transcripts associated with cytoplasmic IMP ribonucleoproteins. Many of these transcripts were functionally involved in actin cytoskeletal remodeling. Further analyses of this data permitted estimation...... of a bipartite motif, composed of an AU-rich and a CA-rich domain. In addition, a regulatory motif discovery method was developed and applied to identify motifs using differential expression data and CLIP-data in the above investigations. This thesis increased the understanding of the role of RBPs in mi...

  8. Structure and function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Morales

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a lethal autosomal recessive genetic disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. Mutations in the CFTR gene may result in a defective processing of its protein and alter the function and regulation of this channel. Mutations are associated with different symptoms, including pancreatic insufficiency, bile duct obstruction, infertility in males, high sweat Cl-, intestinal obstruction, nasal polyp formation, chronic sinusitis, mucus dehydration, and chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus lung infection, responsible for 90% of the mortality of CF patients. The gene responsible for the cellular defect in CF was cloned in 1989 and its protein product CFTR is activated by an increase of intracellular cAMP. The CFTR contains two membrane domains, each with six transmembrane domain segments, two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs, and a cytoplasmic domain. In this review we discuss the studies that have correlated the role of each CFTR domain in the protein function as a chloride channel and as a regulator of the outwardly rectifying Cl- channels (ORCCs.

  9. Generation and characterization of a monoclonal antibody to the cytoplasmic tail of MUC16

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gipson, Ilene K; Mandel, Ulla; Menon, Balaraj

    2017-01-01

    of the biological relevance of the C-terminal domain of MUC16 has been limited by lack of availability of monoclonal antibodies that recognize the native CT. Here, we report the development of a novel monoclonal antibody to the CT region of the molecule that recognizes native MUC16 and its enzymatically released CT...... for the disease and it is considered a promising target for immunotherapeutic intervention. Immunodetection of the mucin has to date been through antibodies that recognize its exceptionally large ectodomain. Similar to other membrane anchored mucins, MUC16 has a short cytoplasmic tail (CT), but studies...... region. The antibody is useful for immunoprecipitation of the released CT domain as demonstrated with the OVCAR3 ovarian cancer cell line and can be used for detailed cytolocalization in cells as well as in frozen sections of ocular surface and uterine epithelium....

  10. Increased Eps15 homology domain 1 and RAB11FIP3 expression regulate breast cancer progression via promoting epithelial growth factor receptor recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Dandan; Liang, Ya-Nan; Stepanova, A A; Liu, Yu; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Letian; Zhang, Fengmin; Vasilyeva, N V

    2017-02-01

    Recent research indicates that the C-terminal Eps15 homology domain 1 is associated with epithelial growth factor receptor-mediated endocytosis recycling in non-small-cell lung cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical significance of Eps15 homology domain 1 gene expression in relation to phosphorylation of epithelial growth factor receptor expression in patients with breast cancer. Primary breast cancer samples from 306 patients were analyzed for Eps15 homology domain 1, RAB11FIP3, and phosphorylation of epithelial growth factor receptor expression via immunohistochemistry. The clinical significance was assessed via a multivariate Cox regression analysis, Kaplan-Meier curves, and the log-rank test. Eps15 homology domain 1 and phosphorylation of epithelial growth factor receptor were upregulated in 60.46% (185/306) and 53.92% (165/306) of tumor tissues, respectively, as assessed by immunohistochemistry. The statistical correlation analysis indicated that Eps15 homology domain 1 overexpression was positively correlated with the increases in phosphorylation of epithelial growth factor receptor ( r = 0.242, p breast cancer for the overall survival in the total, chemotherapy, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (-) groups. However, the use of combined expression of Eps15 homology domain 1 and phosphorylation of epithelial growth factor receptor markers is more effective for the disease-free survival in the overall population, chemotherapy, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (-) groups. Moreover, the combined markers are also significant prognostic markers of breast cancer in the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (+), estrogen receptor (+), and estrogen receptor (-) groups. Eps15 homology domain 1 has a tumor suppressor function, and the combined marker of Eps15 homology domain 1/phosphorylation of epithelial growth factor receptor expression was identified as a better prognostic marker in breast cancer diagnosis

  11. HuR represses Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity by promoting cytoplasmic localization of β-catenin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Inae; Hur, Jung; Jeong, Sunjoo, E-mail: sjsj@dankook.ac.kr

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • Wnt signaling as well as β-catenin overexpression enhance HuR cytoplasmic export. • HuR overexpression promotes cytoplasmic localization of β-catenin from the perinuclear fraction. • Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity is repressesed by HuR. - Abstract: β-Catenin is the key transcriptional activator of canonical Wnt signaling in the nucleus; thus, nuclear accumulation of β-catenin is a critical step for expressing target genes. β-Catenin accumulates in the nucleus of cancer cells where it activates oncogenic target genes. Hu antigen R (HuR) is a RNA binding protein that regulates multiple post-transcriptional processes including RNA stability. Thus, cytoplasmic HuR protein may be involved in tumorigenesis by stabilizing oncogenic transcripts, but the molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here, we observed that Wnt/β-catenin signaling induced export of the HuR protein, whereas HuR overexpression promoted accumulation of the β-catenin protein in the cytoplasm. Thus, Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity in the nucleus was reduced by overexpressing HuR. These results suggest novel and uncharacterized cytoplasmic β-catenin functions related to HuR-mediated RNA metabolism in cancer cells.

  12. An ABC transporter B family protein, ABCB19, is required for cytoplasmic streaming and gravitropism of the inflorescence stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Keishi; Ueda, Haruko; Shimada, Tomoo; Tamura, Kentaro; Koumoto, Yasuko; Tasaka, Masao; Morita, Miyo Terao; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2016-01-01

    A significant feature of plant cells is the extensive motility of organelles and the cytosol, which was originally defined as cytoplasmic streaming. We suggested previously that a three-way interaction between plant-specific motor proteins myosin XIs, actin filaments, and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) was responsible for cytoplasmic streaming. (1) Currently, however, there are no reports of molecular components for cytoplasmic streaming other than the actin-myosin-cytoskeleton and ER-related proteins. In the present study, we found that elongated cells of inflorescence stems of Arabidopsis thaliana exhibit vigorous cytoplasmic streaming. Statistical analysis showed that the maximal velocity of plastid movements is 7.26 µm/s, which is much faster than the previously reported velocities of organelles. Surprisingly, the maximal velocity of streaming in the inflorescence stem cells was significantly reduced to 1.11 µm/s in an Arabidopsis mutant, abcb19-101, which lacks ATP BINDING CASSETTE SUBFAMILY B19 (ABCB19) that mediates the polar transport of the phytohormone auxin together with PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins. Polar auxin transport establishes the auxin concentration gradient essential for plant development and tropisms. Deficiency of ABCB19 activity eventually caused enhanced gravitropic responses of the inflorescence stems and abnormally flexed inflorescence stems. These results suggest that ABCB19-mediated auxin transport plays a role not only in tropism regulation, but also in cytoplasmic streaming.

  13. HuR represses Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity by promoting cytoplasmic localization of β-catenin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Inae; Hur, Jung; Jeong, Sunjoo

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Wnt signaling as well as β-catenin overexpression enhance HuR cytoplasmic export. • HuR overexpression promotes cytoplasmic localization of β-catenin from the perinuclear fraction. • Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity is repressesed by HuR. - Abstract: β-Catenin is the key transcriptional activator of canonical Wnt signaling in the nucleus; thus, nuclear accumulation of β-catenin is a critical step for expressing target genes. β-Catenin accumulates in the nucleus of cancer cells where it activates oncogenic target genes. Hu antigen R (HuR) is a RNA binding protein that regulates multiple post-transcriptional processes including RNA stability. Thus, cytoplasmic HuR protein may be involved in tumorigenesis by stabilizing oncogenic transcripts, but the molecular mechanism remains unclear. Here, we observed that Wnt/β-catenin signaling induced export of the HuR protein, whereas HuR overexpression promoted accumulation of the β-catenin protein in the cytoplasm. Thus, Wnt/β-catenin-mediated transcriptional activity in the nucleus was reduced by overexpressing HuR. These results suggest novel and uncharacterized cytoplasmic β-catenin functions related to HuR-mediated RNA metabolism in cancer cells

  14. Molecular and structural characterisation of the human sodium/iodide symporter (h N.I.S.) C-terminus and the implication of this domain in the transporter regulation; Caracterisation moleculaire et structurale de l'extremite C-Terminale du co-transporteur sodium/iode humain (h N.I.S.): Implication de ce domaine dans la regulation du transporteur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huc, S

    2007-12-15

    The human natrium iodide symporter (h N.I.S.) is an intrinsic membrane protein expressed in thyroid cells where it allows iodide uptake and accumulation. It is composed of thirteen transmembrane helices and its ninety- three amino acids long cytosolic C-terminus presents many potential post-translational regulatory sites. A first part of the PhD work has been dedicated to the expression in a bacterial system and to the purification of the cytosolic C-terminal fragment. Biochemical and structural characterisation have revealed that this C-terminus is very flexible but prone to dimerization. The fragment has also been used as a bait to test the interactions with PDZ domain proteins spotted on a membrane. Several proteins interacting with the (natrium/iodide symporter) N.I.S. C-terminus have thus been identified and the study of their implication in the protein regulation has been initiated. A second part of the work has underlined the existence of a N.I.S. fragment co-purified with the entire protein. This fragment has been found in cells in culture stably expressing N.I.S. and also in human thyroid extracts and in rodent thyroid cells. We observed that this fragment is spontaneously associated with the entire protein. It is composed of the last 131 amino acid of the protein and so comprises the last transmembrane domain and the C-terminal extremity. The expression of a truncated form of h N.I.S., lacking the last 131 amino acids, shows that this protein is not correctly addressed to the cell membrane and cells expressing this mutated symporter cannot accumulate iodide. However, our results show that the co-expression of the two N.I.S. parts, the truncated form lacking the last 131 amino acid, and the complementary C-terminal fragment, leads to cells presenting 10 % of the activity of cells expressing the whole N.I.S.. (author)

  15. IAPs contain an evolutionarily conserved ubiquitin-binding domain that regulates NF-kappaB as well as cell survival and oncogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Darding, Maurice; Miasari, Maria

    2008-01-01

    found that the UBA domain is essential for the oncogenic potential of cIAP1, to maintain endothelial cell survival and to protect cells from TNF-alpha-induced apoptosis. Moreover, the UBA domain is required for XIAP and cIAP2-MALT1 to activate NF-kappaB. Our data suggest that the UBA domain of cIAP2......-MALT1 stimulates NF-kappaB signalling by binding to polyubiquitylated NEMO. Significantly, 98% of all cIAP2-MALT1 fusion proteins retain the UBA domain, suggesting that ubiquitin-binding contributes to the oncogenic potential of cIAP2-MALT1 in MALT lymphoma. Our data identify IAPs as ubiquitin...

  16. Regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballereau, P.

    1999-01-01

    The different regulations relative to nuclear energy since the first of January 1999 are given here. Two points deserve to be noticed: the decree of the third august 1999 authorizing the national Agency for the radioactive waste management to install and exploit on the commune of Bures (Meuse) an underground laboratory destined to study the deep geological formations where could be stored the radioactive waste. The second point is about the uranium residues and the waste notion. The judgment of the administrative tribunal of Limoges ( 9. july 1998) forbidding the exploitation of a storage installation of depleted uranium considered as final waste and qualifying it as an industrial waste storage facility has been annulled bu the Court of Appeal. It stipulated that, according to the law number 75663 of the 15. july 1965, no criteria below can be applied to depleted uranium: production residue (possibility of an ulterior enrichment), abandonment of a personal property or simple intention to do it ( future use aimed in the authorization request made in the Prefecture). This judgment has devoted the primacy of the waste notion on this one of final waste. (N.C.)

  17. Assembly and misassembly of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator: folding defects caused by deletion of F508 occur before and after the calnexin-dependent association of membrane spanning domain (MSD) 1 and MSD2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Meredith F N; Grove, Diane E; Chen, Liling; Cyr, Douglas M

    2008-11-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a polytopic membrane protein that functions as a Cl(-) channel and consists of two membrane spanning domains (MSDs), two cytosolic nucleotide binding domains (NBDs), and a cytosolic regulatory domain. Cytosolic 70-kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70), and endoplasmic reticulum-localized calnexin are chaperones that facilitate CFTR biogenesis. Hsp70 functions in both the cotranslational folding and posttranslational degradation of CFTR. Yet, the mechanism for calnexin action in folding and quality control of CFTR is not clear. Investigation of this question revealed that calnexin is not essential for CFTR or CFTRDeltaF508 degradation. We identified a dependence on calnexin for proper assembly of CFTR's membrane spanning domains. Interestingly, efficient folding of NBD2 was also found to be dependent upon calnexin binding to CFTR. Furthermore, we identified folding defects caused by deletion of F508 that occurred before and after the calnexin-dependent association of MSD1 and MSD2. Early folding defects are evident upon translation of the NBD1 and R-domain and are sensed by the RMA-1 ubiquitin ligase complex.

  18. Cytoplasmic sequestration of cyclin D1 associated with cell cycle withdrawal of neuroblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumrejkanchanakij, Piyamas; Eto, Kazuhiro; Ikeda, Masa-Aki

    2006-01-01

    The regulation of D-type cyclin-dependent kinase activity is critical for neuronal differentiation and apoptosis. We recently showed that cyclin D1 is sequestered in the cytoplasm and that its nuclear localization induces apoptosis in postmitotic primary neurons. Here, we further investigated the role of the subcellular localization of cyclin D1 in cell cycle withdrawal during the differentiation of N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells. We show that cyclin D1 became predominantly cytoplasmic after differentiation. Targeting cyclin D1 expression to the nucleus induced phosphorylation of Rb and cdk2 kinase activity. Furthermore, cyclin D1 nuclear localization promoted differentiated N1E-115 cells to reenter the cell cycle, a process that was inhibited by p16 INK4a , a specific inhibitor of D-type cyclin activity. These results indicate that cytoplasmic sequestration of cyclin D1 plays a role in neuronal cell cycle withdrawal, and suggests that the abrogation of machinery involved in monitoring aberrant nuclear cyclin D1 activity contributes to neuronal tumorigenesis

  19. ROS-activated ATM-dependent phosphorylation of cytoplasmic substrates identified by large scale phosphoproteomics screen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Waardenberg, Ashley J; Engholm-Keller, Kasper

    2016-01-01

    ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated) protein plays a central role in phosphorylating a network of proteins in response to DNA damage. These proteins function in signalling pathways designed to maintain the stability of the genome and minimize the risk of disease by controlling cell cycle checkpoi......ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated) protein plays a central role in phosphorylating a network of proteins in response to DNA damage. These proteins function in signalling pathways designed to maintain the stability of the genome and minimize the risk of disease by controlling cell cycle...... checkpoints, initiating DNA repair and regulating gene expression. ATM kinase can be activated by a variety of stimuli, including oxidative stress. Here we confirmed activation of cytoplasmic ATM by autophosphorylation at multiple sites. Then we employed a global quantitative phosphoproteomics approach...... to identify cytoplasmic proteins altered in their phosphorylation state in control and A-T (ataxia-telangiectasia) cells in response to oxidative damage. We demonstrated that ATM was activated by oxidative damage in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus and identified a total of 9,833 phosphorylation sites...

  20. HA117 endows HL60 cells with a stem-like signature by inhibiting the degradation of DNMT1 via its ability to down-regulate expression of the GGL domain of RGS6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuangshuang Li

    Full Text Available All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA induces complete remission in almost all patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL via its ability to induce the in vivo differentiation of APL blasts. However, prolonged ATRA treatment can result in drug resistance. In previous studies, we generated a multi-drug-resistant HL60/ATRA cell line and found it to contain a new drug resistance-related gene segment, HA117. In this study, we demonstrate that ATRA induces multi-drug-resistant subpopulations of HL60 cells with a putative stem-like signature by up-regulating the expression of the new gene segment HA117. Western blot analysis and quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that HA117 causes alternative splicing of regulator of G-protein signaling 6 (RGS6 and down-regulation of the expression of the GGL domain of RGS6, which plays an important role in DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1 degradation. Moreover, DNMT1 expression was increased in multi-drug resistance HL60/ATRA cells. Knockdown of HA117 restored expression of the GGL domain and blocked DNMT1 expression. Moreover, resistant cells displayed a putative stem-like signature with increased expression of cancer steam cell markers CD133 and CD123. The stem cell marker, Nanog, was significantly up-regulated. In conclusion, our study shows that HA117 potentially promotes the stem-like signature of the HL60/ATRA cell line by inhibiting by the ubiquitination and degradation of DNMT1 and by down-regulating the expression of the GGL domain of RGS6. These results throw light on the cellular events associated with the ATRA-induced multi-drug resistance phenotype in acute leukemia.

  1. Control of nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling of Ankrd54 by PKCδ

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amy L Samuels; Alison Louw; Reza Zareie; Evan Ingley

    2017-01-01

    AIM To identify and characterize the effect of phosphorylation on the subcellular localization of Ankrd54.METHODS HEK293 T cells were treated with calyculin A, staurosporin or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate(PMA). Cells were transfected with eG FP-tagged Ankrd54 with or without Lyn tyrosine kinase(wild-type, Y397 F mutant, or Y508 F mutant). The subcellular localization was assessed by immunofluorescence imaging of cells, immunoblotting of subcellular fractionations. The phosphorylation of Ankrd54 was monitored using Phos-tagT M gel retardation. Phosphorylated peptides were analysed by multiplereaction-monitoring(MRM) proteomic analysis.RESULTS Activation of PKC kinases using PMA promoted nuclear export of Ankrd54 and correlated with increased Ankrd54 phosphorylation, assayed using Phos-tag TM gel retardation. Co-expression of an active form of the PKCδisoform specifically promoted both phosphorylation and cytoplasmic localization of Ankrd54, while PKCδ, Akt and PKA did not. Alanine mutation of several serine residues in the amino-terminal region of Ankrd54(Ser14, Ser17, Ser18, Ser19) reduced both PMA induced cytoplasmic localization and phosphorylation of Ankrd54. Using MRM proteomic analysis, phosphorylation of the Ser18 residue of Ankrd54 was readily detectable in response to PMA stimulation. PMA stimulation of cells co-expressing Ankrd54 and Lyn tyrosine kinase displayed increased coimmunoprecipitation and enhanced co-localization in the cytoplasm.CONCLUSION We identify phosphorylation by PKCδ as a major regulator of nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling of Ankrd54, and its interaction with the tyrosine kinase Lyn.

  2. Cytoplasmic BRMS1 expression in malignant melanoma is associated with increased disease-free survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slipicevic Ana

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/aims Breast cancer metastasis suppressor 1 (BRMS1 blocks metastasis in melanoma xenografts; however, its usefulness as a biomarker in human melanomas has not been widely studied. The goal was to measure BRMS1 expression in benign nevi, primary and metastatic melanomas and evaluate its impact on disease progression and prognosis. Methods Paraffin-embedded tissue from 155 primary melanomas, 69 metastases and 15 nevi was examined for BRMS1 expression using immunohistochemistry. siRNA mediated BRMS1 down-regulation was used to study impact on invasion and migration in melanoma cell lines. Results A significantly higher percentage of nevi (87%, compared to primary melanomas (20% and metastases (48%, expressed BRMS1 in the nucelus (p Waf1/Cip1 (p = 0.009. Cytoplasmic score index was inversely associated with nuclear p-Akt (p = 0.013 and positively associated with cytoplasmic p-ERK1/2 expression (p = 0.033. Nuclear BRMS1 expression in ≥ 10% of primary melanoma cells was associated with thicker tumors (p = 0.016 and decreased relapse-free period (p = 0.043. Nuclear BRMS1 was associated with expression of fatty acid binding protein 7 (FABP7; p = 0.011, a marker of invasion in melanomas. In line with this, repression of BRMS1 expression reduced the ability of melanoma cells to migrate and invade in vitro. Conclusion Our data suggest that BRMS1 is localized in cytoplasm and nucleus of melanocytic cells and that cellular localization determines its in vivo effect. We hypothesize that cytoplasmic BRMS1 restricts melanoma progression while nuclear BRMS1 possibly promotes melanoma cell invasion. Please see related article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/10/19

  3. Sorting by the cytoplasmic domain of the amyloid precursor protein binding receptor SorLA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten S; Gustafsen, Camilla; Madsen, Peder

    2007-01-01

    -formation with the amyloid precursor protein it downregulates generation of Alzheimer's disease-associated Abeta-peptide. The receptor is mainly located in vesicles, suggesting a function in protein sorting and transport. Here we examined SorLA's trafficking using full-length and chimeric receptors and find that its...

  4. Activation-induced proteolysis of cytoplasmic domain of zeta in T cell receptors and Fc receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupin, J L; Anderson, P

    1994-12-01

    The CD3-T cell receptor (TCR) complex on T cells and the Fc gamma receptor type III (Fc gamma RIII)-zeta-gamma complex on natural killer cells are functionally analogous activation receptors that associate with a family of disulfide-linked dimers composed of the related subunits zeta and gamma. Immunochemical analysis of receptor complexes separated on two-dimensional diagonal gels allowed the identification of a previously uncharacterized zeta-p14 heterodimer. zeta-p14 is a component of both CD3-TCR and Fc gamma RIII-zeta-gamma. Peptide mapping analysis shows that p14 is structurally related to zeta, suggesting that it is either: (i) derived from zeta proteolytically or (ii) the product of an alternatively spliced mRNA. The observation that COS cells transformed with a cDNA encoding zeta express zeta-p14 supports the former possibility. The expression of CD3-TCR complexes including zeta-p14 increases following activation with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or concanavalin A, suggesting that proteolysis of zeta may contribute to receptor modulation or desensitization.

  5. Intrinsically disordered cytoplasmic domains of two cytokine receptors mediate conserved interactions with membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haxholm, Gitte Wolfsberg; Nikolajsen, Louise Fletcher; Olsen, Johan Gotthardt

    2015-01-01

    . This study presents the first comprehensive structural characterization of any cytokine receptor ICD and demonstrates that the human prolactin and growth hormone receptor ICDs are intrinsically disordered throughout their entire lengths. We show that they interact specifically with hallmark lipids...

  6. Identification of Cytoplasmic Proteins Interacting with the Mammary Cell Transforming Domain of Ese-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    measure auto - fluorescence , cells were incubated overnight at 4°C with blocking buffer alone. shRNA tranfected cells under- went the same procedure at 48...to a 50-GGA(A/T)-30 DNA coremotif [2]. All ETS proteins, with the exception of GA-binding protein (GABP)a, bind to DNA as a monomer and are auto ...skin, retina and other epithelia [7-10]. During mouse embryo develop- ment, Elf3 mRNA expression levels increase progressively, from embryonic day 7 to

  7. Localization of catalytic active sites in the large cytoplasmic domain of Na+/K+-ATPase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krumscheid, R.; Sušánková, Klára; Ettrich, R.; Teisinger, Jan; Amler, Evžen; Schoner, W.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 986, - (2003), s. 242-244 ISSN 0077-8923 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/02/1479; GA ČR GA204/01/0254; GA ČR GA204/01/1001 Grant - others:CZ-DE(CZ) TSR-088-97; CZ-DE(CZ) CZE 00/033 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : H4H5 loop * TNP-ATP phosphotase activity Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.892, year: 2003

  8. The Capsicum annuum class IV chitinase ChitIV interacts with receptor-like cytoplasmic protein kinase PIK1 to accelerate PIK1-triggered cell death and defence responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Sung; Kim, Nak Hyun; Hwang, Byung Kook

    2015-01-01

    The pepper receptor-like cytoplasmic protein kinase, CaPIK1, which mediates signalling of plant cell death and defence responses was previously identified. Here, the identification of a class IV chitinase, CaChitIV, from pepper plants (Capsicum annuum), which interacts with CaPIK1 and promotes CaPIK1-triggered cell death and defence responses, is reported. CaChitIV contains a signal peptide, chitin-binding domain, and glycol hydrolase domain. CaChitIV expression was up-regulated by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria (Xcv) infection. Notably, avirulent Xcv infection rapidly induced CaChitIV expression in pepper leaves. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and co-immunoprecipitation revealed that CaPIK1 interacts with CaChitIV in planta, and that the CaPIK1–CaChitIV complex is localized mainly in the cytoplasm and plasma membrane. CaChitIV is also localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Transient co-expression of CaChitIV with CaPIK1 enhanced CaPIK1-triggered cell death response and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) bursts. Co-silencing of both CaChitIV and CaPIK1 in pepper plants conferred enhanced susceptibility to Xcv infection, which was accompanied by a reduced induction of cell death response, ROS and NO bursts, and defence response genes. Ectopic expression of CaPIK1 in Arabidopsis enhanced basal resistance to Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis infection. Together, the results suggest that CaChitIV positively regulates CaPIK1-triggered cell death and defence responses through its interaction with CaPIK1. PMID:25694549

  9. Olfactory receptor signaling is regulated by the post-synaptic density 95, Drosophila discs large, zona-occludens 1 (PDZ) scaffold multi-PDZ domain protein 1.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dooley, Ruth

    2009-12-01

    The unique ability of mammals to detect and discriminate between thousands of different odorant molecules is governed by the diverse array of olfactory receptors expressed by olfactory sensory neurons in the nasal epithelium. Olfactory receptors consist of seven transmembrane domain G protein-coupled receptors and comprise the largest gene superfamily in the mammalian genome. We found that approximately 30% of olfactory receptors possess a classical post-synaptic density 95, Drosophila discs large, zona-occludens 1 (PDZ) domain binding motif in their C-termini. PDZ domains have been established as sites for protein-protein interaction and play a central role in organizing diverse cell signaling assemblies. In the present study, we show that multi-PDZ domain protein 1 (MUPP1) is expressed in the apical compartment of olfactory sensory neurons. Furthermore, on heterologous co-expression with olfactory sensory neurons, MUPP1 was shown to translocate to the plasma membrane. We found direct interaction of PDZ domains 1 + 2 of MUPP1 with the C-terminus of olfactory receptors in vitro. Moreover, the odorant-elicited calcium response of OR2AG1 showed a prolonged decay in MUPP1 small interfering RNA-treated cells. We have therefore elucidated the first building blocks of the putative \\'olfactosome\\

  10. A novel RNA binding surface of the TAM domain of TIP5/BAZ2A mediates epigenetic regulation of rRNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anosova, Irina; Melnik, Svitlana; Tripsianes, Konstantinos; Kateb, Fatiha; Grummt, Ingrid; Sattler, Michael

    2015-05-26

    The chromatin remodeling complex NoRC, comprising the subunits SNF2h and TIP5/BAZ2A, mediates heterochromatin formation at major clusters of repetitive elements, including rRNA genes, centromeres and telomeres. Association with chromatin requires the interaction of the TAM (TIP5/ARBP/MBD) domain of TIP5 with noncoding RNA, which targets NoRC to specific genomic loci. Here, we show that the NMR structure of the TAM domain of TIP5 resembles the fold of the MBD domain, found in methyl-CpG binding proteins. However, the TAM domain exhibits an extended MBD fold with unique C-terminal extensions that constitute a novel surface for RNA binding. Mutation of critical amino acids within this surface abolishes RNA binding in vitro and in vivo. Our results explain the distinct binding specificities of TAM and MBD domains to RNA and methylated DNA, respectively, and reveal structural features for the interaction of NoRC with non-coding RNA. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. The RanGTP pathway: from nucleo-cytoplasmic transport to spindle assembly and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso eCavazza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The small GTPase Ran regulates the interaction of transport receptors with a number of cellular cargo proteins. The high affinity binding of the GTP-bound form of Ran to import receptors promotes cargo release, whereas its binding to export receptors stabilizes their interaction with the cargo. This basic mechanism linked to the asymmetric distribution of the two nucleotide-bound forms of Ran between the nucleus and the cytoplasm generates a switch like mechanism controlling nucleo-cytoplasmic transport. Since 1999, we have known that after nuclear envelope breakdown (NEBD Ran and the above transport receptors also provide a local control over the activity of factors driving spindle assembly and regulating other aspects of cell division. The identification and functional characterization of RanGTP mitotic targets is providing novel insights into mechanisms essential for cell division. Here we review our current knowledge on the RanGTP system and its regulation and we focus on the recent advances made through the characterization of its mitotic targets. We then briefly review the novel functions of the pathway that were recently described. Altogether, the RanGTP system has moonlighting functions exerting a spatial control over protein interactions that drive specific functions depending on the cellular context.

  12. Uptake and degradation of cytoplasmic RNA by lysosomes in the perfused rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heydrick, S.J.; Lardeux, B.; Mortimore, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    The release of [ 14 C]cytidine has been shown previously to be a valid marker for RNA degradation in rat hepatocytes. The breakdown of RNA measured with this marker in perfused livers prelabeled in vivo with [6- 14 C]orotic acid was found to be regulated acutely by perfusate amino acids over a wide range, from 0.29 to 3.48%/h. This regulation paralleled that of lysosomal proteolysis. Chloroquine inhibited RNA degradation 60-70%. In subsequent cell fractionation studies labelled cytidine was released; the distribution of this release paralleled that of a lysosomal marker enzyme. The release plateaued after two hours, defining a distinct lysosomal pool of RNA. The lysosomal location of the RNA pool was confirmed in experiments where a 22% increase in the apparent pool size was obtained by lowering the homogenate pH from 7.0 to 5.5. The pool size correlated linearly with the rate of RNA degradation measured during perfusion, giving a turnover constant in reasonable agreement with values reported for autophagy. These results indicate that cytoplasmic RNA degradation occurs primarily in the lysosome and is regulated under these conditions by the amino acid control of lysosomal sequestration of cytoplasm

  13. KEJAHATAN NAMA DOMAIN BERKAITAN DENGAN MEREK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Nizar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia already has an ITE Law governing domain names in general terms and on certain provisions in chapter VI, but the regulation of domain name crimes is not regulated in the ITE Law as mandated in the academic draft of the ITE Bill. The absence of regulation of domain name norm in the ITE Law creates problems with registrant of domain name (registrant which deliberately register the domain name is bad faith. The characteristic of a crime in a domain name relating to the mark is that the registered domain name has an equation in essence with another party’s well-known brand, the act of doing so by exploiting a reputation for well-known or previously commercially valuable names as domain names for addresses for sites (websites it manages. The Prosecutor may include articles of the KUHP in filing his indictment before the Court during the absence of special regulatory provisions concerning domain name crime.

  14. Serine 77 in the PDZ domain of PICK1 is a protein kinase Cα phosphorylation site regulated by lipid membrane binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Thorsen, Thor Seneca; Gether, Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1) contains an N-terminal protein binding PDZ domain and a C-terminal lipid binding BAR domain. PICK1 plays a key role in several physiological processes, including synaptic plasticity. However, little is known about the cellular mechanisms governing the a...... lipid binding and/or polymerization capacity. We propose that PICK1 is phosphorylated at Ser77 by PKCα preferentially when bound to membrane vesicles and that this phosphorylation in turn modulates its cellular distribution....

  15. Cytoplasmic Flow Enhances Organelle Dispersion in Eukaryotic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koslover, Elena; Mogre, Saurabh; Chan, Caleb; Theriot, Julie

    The cytoplasm of a living cell is an active environment through which intracellular components move and mix. We explore, using theoretical modeling coupled with microrheological measurements, the efficiency of particle dispersion via different modes of transport within this active environment. In particular, we focus on the role of cytoplasmic flow over different scales in contributing to organelle transport within two different cell types. In motile neutrophil cells, we show that bulk fluid flow associated with rapid cell deformation enhances particle transport to and from the cell periphery. In narrow fungal hyphae, localized flows due to hydrodynamic entrainment are shown to contribute to optimally efficient organelle dispersion. Our results highlight the importance of non-traditional modes of transport associated with flow of the cytoplasmic fluid in the distribution of organelles throughout eukaryotic cells.