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Sample records for cystoscopy

  1. Virtual Cystoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mejia Restrepo, Jorge; Aldana S, Natalia; Munoz Sierra, Juan; Lopez Amaya, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: virtual cystoscopy is a minimally invasive procedure that facilitates the evaluation of the urinary tract, allowing intraluminal navigation through the urinary tract structures on the basis of CT imaging reconstructions. it allows detection of various pathologies of the system, through high-sensitivity, three-dimensional lesion visualization with some advantages over conventional cystoscopy. Objective: to describe the technique used for virtual cystoscopy at our institution,and present some representative cases. Materials and methods: We describe the main indications, advantages and limitations of the method, followed by a description of the technique used in our institution, and finally, we present five representative cases of bladder and urethral pathology. Conclusion: virtual cystoscopy is a sensitive technique for the diagnosis of bladder tumors, even those smaller than 5mm. it is the preferred method in patients who have contraindications for conventional cystoscopy, such as prostate hyperplasia, urethral stenoses and active haematuria.it is less invasive and has a lower complication rate when compared with conventional cystoscopy. It has limited use in the assessment of the mucosa and of small, flat lesions.

  2. Virtual cystoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Aza; Simpson, Adam; Zamora, Ignacio; Gilliland, Leslie

    2008-07-01

    Bladder cancer is a common problem facing urologists worldwide. The gold standard for its diagnosis and follow-up is the direct visualization of the tumor using conventional cystoscopy. Despite having high sensitivity and specificity for detecting bladder cancer, conventional cystoscopy is regarded as an invasive procedure which is associated with several complications. In addition, regular follow-up of patients with bladder cancer is a financial burden on the health system. With the progressive development in diagnostic imaging and medical computer software technologies, it was possible to generate virtual reality images to aid the clinician to inspect the interior of the bladder in real time. This technology is considered as a safe test for bladder cancer diagnosis and follow-up, and it is associated with cancer detection rates comparable with conventional cystoscopy. However, it is associated with some drawbacks that limit its use in routine clinical practice at the current time. In this paper, we review the development and clinical applications of this technology.

  3. Office flexible cystoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavoussi, L R; Clayman, R V

    1988-11-01

    Since the development of the first purpose-built flexible cystoscope in 1984, flexible cystoscopy has become an accepted diagnostic and therapeutic modality. Indeed, it is estimated that more than 10 per cent of practicing urologists are already familiar with this technology. The flexible cystoscope has markedly extended the urologist's ability to examine the bladder, and it has become a valuable adjunct to the rigid cystoscope. Although the operation of this instrument is vastly different from that of its rigid counterpart, with practice, the technique can be learned. After experience is obtained with diagnostic flexible cystoscopy, the urologist will likely prefer this new instrument for bladder inspection, as it provides for a more thorough yet less morbid and less expensive examination. In the future, the development of improved and smaller instrumentation will further extend the therapeutic indications for flexible cystoscopy. Indeed, advances in laser technology are already providing the urologist with 300- to 600-micron (0.9 to 1.8F) flexible probes capable of incision (KTP laser), fulguration (Nd:YAG laser), and stone disintegration (tunable dye laser). Lastly, the skills obtained in using the flexible cystoscope are all readily applicable to the development of dexterity with the already available flexible nephroscope and the more recently developed flexible ureteroscope.

  4. Virtual computed tomography cystoscopy in bladder pathologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arslan, Halil; Ceylan, Kadir; Harman, Mustafa; Yilmaz, Yuksel; Temizoz, Osman; Can, Saban

    2006-01-01

    Objective: assessed the usefulness of virtual cystoscopy performed with multidetector computed tomography (CT) in patients with different urinary bladder pathologies compared to the conventional cystoscopy.Materials and methods: eighteen patients with different bladder pathologies, which consisted of 11 tumors, 3 diverticula, 2 trabecular changes and 2 stones, were assessed with conventional cystoscopy and virtual CT cystoscopy. The results of virtual CT cystoscopy were compared with the findings of conventional cystoscopy. We determined the detection rate and positive predictive value of CT imaging based virtual cystoscopy in the diagnosis of urinary bladder lesions. Results: CT scanning was well tolerated by all patients, and no complications occurred. Images in 16 (88%) of the 18 virtual cystoscopic examinations were either of excellent or good quality. All tumors except one, 2 trabecular changes and 2 stones were characterized with similar findings in the both of methods. The masses ranged from 0.4 to 7.0 cm in diameter. While conventional cystoscopy could not evaluate interior part of the diverticulum, virtual CT cystoscopy could demonstrate clearly within it. There were no false-positive findings in our series. Conclusion: virtual CT cystoscopy is a promising technique to be used in the detection of bladder lesions. It should be considered especially at the evaluation of bladder diverticula. In the future, it may be possible or even advantageous to incorporate into the imaging algorithm for evaluation of bladder lesion. (author)

  5. Flexible and rigid cystoscopy in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, Jason R; Waterman, Bradley J; Jarrard, David F; Hedican, Sean P; Bruskewitz, Reginald C; Nakada, Stephen Y

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have evaluated the tolerability of rigid versus flexible cystoscopy in men. Similar studies, however, have not been performed in women. We sought to determine whether office-based flexible cystoscopy was better tolerated than rigid cystoscopy in women. Following full IRB approval, women were prospectively randomized in a single-blind manner. Patients were randomized to flexible or rigid cystoscopy and draped in the lithotomy position to maintain blinding of the study. Questionnaires evaluated discomfort before, during, and after cystoscopy. Thirty-six women were randomized to flexible (18) or rigid (18) cystoscopy. Indications were surveillance (16), hematuria (15), recurrent UTIs (2), voiding dysfunction (1), and other (2). All questionnaires were returned by 31/36 women. Using a 10-point visual analog scale (VAS), median discomfort during the procedure for flexible and rigid cystoscopy were 1.4 and 1.8, respectively, in patients perceiving pain. Median recalled pain 1 week later was similar at 0.8 and 1.15, respectively. None of these differences were statistically significant. Flexible and rigid cystoscopy are well tolerated in women. Discomfort during and after the procedure is minimal in both groups. Urologists should perform either procedure in women based on their preference and skill level.

  6. Predicting results of daily-practice cystoscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Velandria, F; Sánchez-García, J F; Rodríguez-Toves, L A; Alvarez-Buitrago, L; Conde-Redondo, C; Rodríguez-Tesedo, V; Amón-Sesmero, J H; Cepeda-Delgado, M; Cobos-Carbó, A; Alonso-Fernández, D; Martínez-Sagarra, J M

    2014-10-01

    Our objective was to elaborate a predictive model of bladder cancer, in an unselected clinical population submitted to cystoscopy. We recruited consecutive patients that underwent cystoscopy due to suspicion of bladder cancer or surveillance of a previously diagnosed bladder cancer. Urine cytology and a BTA-stat® (BTA) test were carried out for all patients. To avoid an assessment bias, the BTA-tests, cytologies and cystoscopies were conducted in a blinded fashion. We used logistic regression to predict cystoscopy results from cytology, BTA-test and clinical variables. From August 2011 to July 2012, we recruited 244 patients and 237 were valid for analysis. Newly diagnosed and surveillance cases were 13% and 87% respectively. Cytology and BTA-test sensitivities were 57.9% (CI 95: 42.2-72.1) and 63.2% (CI 95: 47.3-76.6) with specificities of 84.4% (CI 95: 78.7-88.8) and 82.9% (CI 95: 77.1-87.5). The predictive model included the BTA-test, cytology, time since previous tumour, and treatment with mitomicin or BGC during the last three months. The model predictive accuracy (AUC) was .85 (.78-.92), and dropped to 0.79 when excluding the BTA-test (P=.026). For the surveillance of bladder cancer, a 10% threshold on the model predicted probabilities resulted in an overall negative predictive value of 95.7%, and 95.0% in low grade tumours. In a cost containment environment, our prediction model could be used to space out cystoscopies in patients with previous, low grade tumours, resulting in a more efficient use of resources in the healthcare system. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Virtual cystoscopy of urinary bladder. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gualdi, G.F.; Casciani, E.; Rojas, M.; Polettini, E.

    1999-01-01

    Cystoscopy plays a key role in the diagnosis of the urinary bladder carcinoma. However cystoscopy is invasive, as a limited field of view and lacks an objective scale; moreover it is not indicated in patients with severe urethral stricture or active vesical bleeding. In this study, virtual cystoscopy depicted all the masses > 1 cm, and lesions in a diverticulum with a small opening. Virtual cystoscopy was also very useful in a patient with urethral stricture (ho could not be submitted to conventional cystoscopy) where it showed the lesions before transurethral resection after urethrotomy. The virtual technique could also be complementary to conventional cystoscopy in evaluation of bladder base and anterior bladder neck, as well as post chemotherapy follow-up. Unfortunately virtual cystoscopy does not allow biopsy of suspicious lesions [it

  8. Clinical relevance of narrow-band imaging in flexible cystoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drejer, Ditte; Béji, Sami; Munk Nielsen, Anna

    2017-01-01

    urological departments. Patients had either hematuria (n = 483) or known recurrent non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) (n = 472). High-definition (HD) cystoscopy was performed in white light (WL) and a preliminary clinical decision was made. Then, a second cystoscopy was performed in NBI...... in NBI compared to WL (NBI: 100.0% vs WL: 83.2%, p decision making as a supplement to WL because it yields a significantly higher...... and a conclusive clinical decision was made. A difference between the two decisions that had a clinical impact on the patient was considered clinically relevant. RESULTS: Pathology was found in 216 WL cystoscopies, and additional pathology in 15 NBI cystoscopies (6.9%). Based on NBI, pathology was suspected in 23...

  9. Role of hexaminolevulinate-guided fluorescence cystoscopy in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmström, Per-Uno; Grabe, Magnus; Haug, Erik Skaaheim

    2012-01-01

    Hexaminolevulinate (HAL) is an optical imaging agent used with fluorescence cystoscopy (FC) for the detection of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Guidelines from the European Association of Urology (EAU) and a recent, more detailed European expert consensus statement agree that HAL...

  10. Virtual cystoscopy, computed tomography urography and optical cystoscopy for the detection and follow-up for bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez Muñoz, D; Quintana Martínez, I; Fernández Militino, A; Sánchez Zalabardo, D; Sarria Octavio de Toledo, L; Cozcolluela Cabrejas, R

    To evaluate the utility of virtual cystoscopy (VC) performed with CT urography in patients being studied under gross hematuria or patients being followed-up after a previous bladder cancer and compare the results with those obtained with gold standard technique (optical cystoscopy). Retrospective study of 117 patients who were referred for VC by the Urology Department between May 2014 and May 2015. Those patients presented with gross hematuria or they were previously treated patients from bladder cancer being followed up. These patients were evaluated with MDCT and virtual cystoscopy after distending the bladder with air. The results were compared with those obtained with optical cystoscopy which was performed no more than a week after. The global sensitivity and specificity of VC were 81,8 and 92,1%. Aditional findings detected in CT urography were an aortic dissection, urinary lithiasis and colonic metastasis. VC seems an useful technique in the diagnosis and follow-up for bladder cancer with a good correlation with OC. The main limitations are the impossibility of biopsy during the procedure and the detection of erythematous lesions. Collateral findings can be detected performed with CT urography although the high radiation exposure does not recommend their combined use. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Prospective evaluation of the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis before cystoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Cam

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to prospectively compare single-dose intravenous antibiotic prophylaxis vs. no prophylaxis before minor cystoscopic procedures, including punch biopsy and transurethral resection (TUR of small bladder tumors. Materials and Methods: A total of 200 patients with a mean age of 47.3 years old (range: 19-84 years old with initial negative urine cultures were recruited. All patients underwent a diagnostic cystoscopy. Patients were then randomized into 2 groups: o0 ne group that did not receive antibiotics (100 patients and the other group that received antibiotic treatment (100 patients with a single intravenous dose of cefoperazone. All patients had urine analysis and urine cultures on the second day after the operation. Additionally, clinical parameters including fever and dysuria were recorded. In 15% of the patients, incidental additional interventions such as punch biopsy or TUR of a small bladder tumor that were similarly distributed in both groups were performed. Results: In 1 patient from the antibiotic group and 2 patients from the no prophylaxis group, the urine cultures after cystoscopy were positive. No statistically significant difference was observed between these groups based on the microbiological and clinical parameters. Conclusion: The current study provides evidence that no antibiotic prophylaxis is required before diagnostic cystoscopy in patients without bacteriuria. But, the absolute risk of infection was small, suggesting that a much larger study is required.

  12. Findings of universal cystoscopy at incontinence surgery and their sequelae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczynski, Halina M.; Sirls, Larry T.; Greer, W. Jerod; Rahn, David D.; Casiano, Elizabeth; Norton, Peggy; Kim, Hae-Young; Brubaker, Linda

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to report the frequency of abnormal cystoscopy at incontinence surgery and to identify risk factors and sequelae of injury. STUDY DESIGN Findings of cystoscopy were collected prospectively in 3 multicenter surgical trials. Clinical, demographic, and procedure characteristics and surgeon experience were analyzed for association with iatrogenic injury and noninjury abnormalities. Impact of abnormalities on continence outcomes and adverse events during 12 months after the procedure were assessed. RESULTS Abnormal findings in the bladder or urethra were identified in 95 of 1830 women (5.2%). Most injuries (75.8%) were iatrogenic. Lower urinary tract (LUT) injury was most common at retropubic urethropexy and retropubic midurethral sling procedures (MUS; 6.4% each), followed by autologous pubovaginal sling procedures (1.7%) and transobturator MUS (0.4%). Increasing age (56.9 vs 51.9 years; P = .04), vaginal deliveries (3.2 vs 2.6; P = .04), and blood loss (393 vs 218 mL; P=.01) were associated with LUT injury during retropubic urethropexy; however, only age (62.9 vs 51.4 years; P = .02) and smoking history (P = .04) were associated for pubovaginal sling procedures. No factors correlated with increased risk of injury at retropubic and transobturator MUS. Notably, previous incontinence surgery, concomitant procedures, anesthesia type, and trainee participation did not increase LUT injury frequency. Although discharge with an indwelling catheter was more common after trocar perforation compared with the noninjury group (55.6% vs 18.5%; P urinary tract infections, or urge urinary incontinence. CONCLUSION Universal cystoscopy at incontinence surgery detects abnormalities in 1 in 20 women. Urinary trocar perforations that are addressed intraoperatively have no long-term adverse sequelae. PMID:24380742

  13. 3D reconstruction of cystoscopy videos for comprehensive bladder records.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Kristen L; Angst, Roland; Zlatev, Dimitar V; Liao, Joseph C; Ellerbee Bowden, Audrey K

    2017-04-01

    White light endoscopy is widely used for diagnostic imaging of the interior of organs and body cavities, but the inability to correlate individual 2D images with 3D organ morphology limits its utility for quantitative or longitudinal studies of disease physiology or cancer surveillance. As a result, most endoscopy videos, which carry enormous data potential, are used only for real-time guidance and are discarded after collection. We present a computational method to reconstruct and visualize a 3D model of organs from an endoscopic video that captures the shape and surface appearance of the organ. A key aspect of our strategy is the use of advanced computer vision techniques and unmodified, clinical-grade endoscopy hardware with few constraints on the image acquisition protocol, which presents a low barrier to clinical translation. We validate the accuracy and robustness of our reconstruction and co-registration method using cystoscopy videos from tissue-mimicking bladder phantoms and show clinical utility during cystoscopy in the operating room for bladder cancer evaluation. As our method can powerfully augment the visual medical record of the appearance of internal organs, it is broadly applicable to endoscopy and represents a significant advance in cancer surveillance opportunities for big-data cancer research.

  14. Improved detection of urothelial carcinoma in situ with hexaminolevulinate fluorescence cystoscopy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidbauer, J.; Witjes, J.A.; Schmeller, N.; Donat, R.; Susani, M.; Marberger, M.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE: In this European multicenter study we compared hexaminolevulinate (HAL) fluorescence cystoscopy and standard white light cystoscopy for the detection of carcinoma in situ (CIS) in patients suspected of having high risk bladder cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study was a prospective

  15. Fluorescence and white light cystoscopy for detection of carcinoma in situ of the urinary bladder.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lerner, S.P.; Liu, H.; Wu, M.F.; Thomas, Y.K.; Witjes, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To understand the additional benefits of HAL compared with conventional cystoscopy at the patient level and to explore relationships of urine cytology and CIS. METHODS: We reanalyzed pooled data from 3 phase III studies comparing hexaminolevulinate (HAL, Hexvix) fluorescence cystoscopy

  16. Treatment efficacy of virtual reality distraction in the reduction of pain and anxiety during cystoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Marc R; Kallingal, George J S; Musser, John E; Folen, Raymond; Stetz, Melba C; Clark, Joseph Y

    2014-08-01

    Assessment of virtual reality (VR) distraction for alleviating pain and anxiety during flexible cystoscopy. Cystoscopy is a common ambulatory procedure performed in Urology and can be associated with moderate pain and anxiety. Sophisticated distraction techniques are not used with cystoscopy and VR has not been studied for this procedure. We designed a prospective, randomized, controlled trial assessing the efficacy of VR for alleviating pain and anxiety during flexible cystoscopy. Adult men referred for cystoscopy were randomized into a control or VR group. Subjects were given preprocedure and postprocedure questionnaires addressing anxiety, pain, and time spent thinking about pain. Vitals signs and galvanic skin monitors were used as objective measures. The control group underwent routine cystoscopy and the VR group underwent cystoscopy with VR. Physicians answered a postprocedure questionnaire assessing the difficulty of the exam. All questionnaires used a visual analog score for assessment. 23 patients enrolled in the control group and 22 in the VR group. Mean scores and Student's t-test were employed to analyze the data. No data endpoints showed a statistically significant difference between the 2 groups. We concluded no benefit to VR distraction mitigating pain in male patients during cystoscopy. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  17. Prospective, multi-institutional pain assessment of 150 women undergoing diagnostic cystoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seklehner, Stephan; Saratlija-Novakovic, Zana; Skopek, Matthias; Fajkovic, Harun; Remzi, Mesut; Duvnjak, Mario; Resch, Irene; Hruby, Stephan; lmHÜBNER, Wilhelm; Librenjak, Davor; Breinl, Eckart; Riedl, Claus; Engelhardt, Paul F

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively assess women's pain during rigid and flexible diagnostic cystoscopy and afterwards during a one-week follow-up. Prospective, multi-institutional trial analyzing numeric rating scales (NRS) of women undergoing diagnostic cystoscopy. Pain categories: no (0 points), mild (1-3), moderate (4-6) and severe pain (7-10). Assessing of pain before, during cystoscopy, and at day 1, 4 and 7 of follow-up. A total of 150 women undergoing rigid (N.=85) or flexible (N.=65) diagnostic cystoscopy were analyzed. Women undergoing flexible cystoscopy were more frequently pain-free (64.6% vs. 40%, P=0.003) and experienced mild pain less frequently (27.7% vs. 52.9% vs. P=0.002). No significant differences were noted among moderate (6.2% vs. 5.9%, P=0.95) and severe pain (1.5% vs. 1.2%, P=0.85). Patients undergoing their first (P=0.14) and repeat cystoscopy (P=0.08) had similar pain perception. In multivariate logistic regression analyses, women undergoing flexible cystoscopy had a 2.6 increased chance of being pain-free (OR=2.6, CI: 1.28-5.11, P=0.08) and their odds of experiencing mild pain were significantly lower (OR=0.34, CI: 0.17-0.71, P=0.004). The likelihood of experiencing moderate (OR=1.1, CI: 0.28- 4.4, P=0.83) or severe pain (OR=2.42, CI: 0.11-51.79, P=0.57) differed insignificantly. Rigid and flexible cystoscopies were well-tolerated by most women. However, flexible cystoscopy was associated with a higher likelihood of being pain-free and lower chances of experiencing mild pain. Patients' previous experience with cystoscopy did not influence pain perception.

  18. Blue light cystoscopy with hexylaminolevulinate: Our 7 years experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Lacetera

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The objective of the present study is to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of hexylaminolevulinate (HAL blue light cystoscopy compared with standard white light cystoscopy (WLC in daily practice. Materials and methods: An observational, comparative, controlled (within patient study was carried out at our Center. 61 consecutive patients with suspected or confirmed bladder cancer were recruited for the study from January 2008 until January 2015. Patients with suspected bladder cancer (positive cytology with negative WLC or history of previous high-grade NMIBC or CIS were included in the study. Biopsies/resection of each positive lesion/suspicious areas were always taken after the bladder was inspected under WLC and BLC. Diagnoses of bladder tumor or CIS were considered as positive results, and the presence of normal urothelium in the biopsy specimen as negative result. Results: 61 BLC were performed. 15/61 (24.5% with suspected initial diagnosis of NMIBC and 46/61 (75.5% with a history of high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC. We performed a total of 173 biopsies/TURBT of suspicious areas: 129 positive only to the BLC and 44 both positive to WLC and BLC. 84/173 biopsies/TURBT were positive for cancer. All 84 NMIBC were positive to the BLC, while 35/84 were positive to the WLC with a sensitivity of BLC and WLC respectively of 100% and 41.7%. Sensitivity of WLC for highgrade NMIBC and CIS was 34.1% and 39% respectively while sensitivity of BLC for high-grade NMIBC and CIS was 100%. The specificity of the WLC was 79.9% compared to 48.5% of the BLC. The positive predictive value of BLC and WLC were respectively 48% (95% CI: 0.447-0.523 and 79% (95% CI: 0.856-0.734. Conclusions: Our data confirm those reported in the literature: BLC increases the detection rate of NMIBC particularly in high risk patients (history of CIS or high grade. BLC is a powerful diagnostic tool in the diagnosis of bladder cancer if malignancy is suspected

  19. Laser ablation of posterior urethral valves by fetal cystoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, José María; Masoller, Narcis; Devlieger, Roland; Passchyn, Esther; Gómez, Olga; Rodo, Joan; Deprest, Jan A; Gratacós, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    To report the results of fetal cystoscopic laser ablation of posterior urethral valves (PUV) in a consecutive series in two referral centers. Twenty pregnant women with a presumptive isolated PUV were treated with fetal cystoscopy under local anesthesia. Identification and fulguration of the PUV by one or several firing-contacts with diode laser were attempted. Perinatal and long-term outcomes were prospectively recorded. The median gestational age at procedure was 18.1 weeks (range 15.0-25.6), and median operation time was 24 min (range 15-40). Access to the urethra was achieved in 19/20 (95%) cases, and postoperative, normalization of bladder size and amniotic fluid was observed in 16/20 (80%). Overall, there were 9 (45%) terminations of pregnancy and 11 women (55%) delivered a liveborn baby at a mean gestational age of 37.3 (29.1-40.2) weeks. No infants developed pulmonary hypoplasia and all were alive at 15-110 months. Eight (40% of all fetuses, 72.7% of newborns) had normal renal function and 3 (27.3%) had renal failure awaiting renal transplantation. Fetoscopic laser ablation for PUV can achieve bladder decompression and amniotic fluid normalization with a single procedure in selected cases with anyhydramnios. There is still a significant risk of progression to renal failure pre or postnatally. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Use of 50% Dextrose as the Distension Medium During Cystoscopy for Visualization of Ureteric Jets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhulu, Deepa M; Prabakar, Cheruba; Tang, Nancy; Bral, Pedram

    2016-01-01

    Indigotindisulfonate sodium has been used to color the urine and thereby improve the visualization of ureteric jets during intraoperative cystoscopy. After indigotindisulfonate sodium became unavailable, there has been an ongoing search for an alternate agent to improve visualization of the jets. We used 50% dextrose, which is more viscous than urine, as the distension medium during cystoscopy so that the ureteric efflux is seen as a jet of contrasting viscosity. We instilled 100 mL of 50% dextrose into the bladder through an indwelling catheter, which is then removed and cystoscopy is performed as usual. We observed jets of contrasting viscosity in every patient in whom 50% dextrose was used as compared with coloring agents in which the jet is not always colored at the time of cystoscopy. Visualization of the other structures in the bladder and the bladder wall itself is not altered by 50% dextrose, although the volume of 50% dextrose that we typically use may not provide adequate distension for a complete assessment of the bladder. If additional distension is necessary, normal saline may be used in addition to the 50% dextrose once the ureteric jets have been assessed. Fifty percent dextrose is an effective alternative to indigotindisulfonate sodium for visualization of ureteric jets during cystoscopy.

  1. Anaesthesia of the posterior urethra and pain reduction during cystoscopy - a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletajew, Sławomir; Bender, Sylwia; Pudełko, Paweł; Łykowski, Marcin; Piecha, Tomasz; Sutkowski, Bartosz; Radziszewski, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Standard intra-urethral instillation of anaesthetic gel may not sufficiently exclude pain perception during cystoscopy. To evaluate the impact of the anaesthesia within the posterior urethra on pain intensity related to cystoscopy in men. One hundred and twenty-seven men undergoing cystoscopy were prospectively enrolled in the study. Patients were randomly assigned to the experimental or control group (66 vs. 61 patients). Intra-urethral instillation of 2% lidocaine gel was done in both groups. In the experimental group, the posterior urethra was additionally anaesthetized with distribution of the lidocaine gel by catheterisation. The study endpoints were pain intensity at successive time points of the procedure assessed on a numeric rating scale, overall pain intensity assessed on a Likert scale, the need for analgesics during 6 h after the procedure, and the frequency of urinary tract infections (UTIs) during 14 days after the procedure. Pain perception during cystoscopy did not differ significantly between the two groups (p > 0.05). However, after 6 h patients in the experimental group were more likely to declare that the cystoscopy was painless (81.8% vs. 70.2%, relative risk = 1.17). The need for analgesics and the incidence of UTI were similar in both groups (p > 0.05). Statistically significant differences regarding pain perception were observed depending on patients' age and the number of transurethral procedures performed in the past, with no relation to type of anaesthesia (p < 0.05). Anaesthesia of the posterior urethra is not more efficacious in reducing pain related to cystoscopy than standard instillation of anaesthetic gel. However, it improves the general perception of the procedure, and hence may positively influence patients' compliance.

  2. Emerging optical techniques in advanced cystoscopy for bladder cancer diagnosis: A review of the current literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cauberg Evelyne, C. C.; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.; de Reijke, Theo M.

    2011-01-01

    The current standard for the diagnosis and followup of bladder cancer remains white light cystoscopy, despite its well-known limitations. The aim of this paper is to review the current literature on three optical diagnostics that have been developed to improve the performance of white light

  3. Listening to music during cystoscopy decreases anxiety, pain, and dissatisfaction in patients: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Jeong Kyun; Cho, Dae Yeon; Oh, Mi Mi; Park, Seok San; Park, Min Gu

    2013-04-01

    To determine whether listening to music during cystoscopy decreases anxiety, pain, and dissatisfaction among patients and results in a more comfortable and better-tolerated procedure. Seventy male patients who underwent rigid cystoscopy between May 2011 and December 2011 were randomized into the following: no music (Group I, n=35) or classical music during procedure (Group II, n=35). Before cystoscopy, lidocaine gel was instilled in the urethra, and both groups viewed their procedures on a video monitor. Anxiety levels were quantified according to the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. A visual analog scale (0-10) was used for a self-assessment of satisfaction, discomfort, and willingness among patients to repeat the cystoscopy. Demographic characteristics, mean age, procedure duration, and procedure indications were statistically similar between the two groups. The mean anxiety level and mean pain score of Group II were significantly lower than those of Group I (pmusic during rigid cystoscopy significantly reduces feelings of pain, discomfort, and dissatisfaction. Music can serve as a simple, inexpensive, and effective adjunct to sedation during cystoscopy. We recommend the application of music during rigid cystoscopy for clinical use.

  4. Efficacy and safety of hexaminolevulinate fluorescence cystoscopy in the diagnosis of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Seung; Lee, Seo Yeon; Kim, Woo Jung; Seo, Seong Il; Jeon, Seong Soo; Lee, Hyun Moo; Choi, Han Yong; Jeong, Byong Chang

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of hexaminolevulinate fluorescence cystoscopy in the diagnosis of bladder cancer. In a prospective design, we included patients who had a bladder lesion suggesting bladder cancer. Patients with massive hematuria, urethral Foley catheter insertion, chronic retention state, or urinary tract infection were excluded. After the bladder was emptied, hexaminolevulinate was gently administered into the bladder. One hour later, cystoscopy under white light and blue light was performed. After marking the lesions confirmed with white light or blue light, transurethral resection of the bladder lesion and pathologic confirmation were done. Transurethral resection of the lesions that were negative in both white and blue light was also performed. From April 2010 to September 2010, 30 patients were enrolled. From the total of 30 patients (25 men and 5 women; mean age, 60.4±9.22 years), 134 specimens were extracted. Among these, 101 specimens showed positive results by blue light cystoscopy (BLC). The sensitivity of BLC and white light cystoscopy (WLC) was 92.3% and 80.8%, respectively (p=0.021). The specificity of BLC and WLC was 48% and 49.1%, respectively (p>0.05). The positive and negative predictive values of BLC were 71.2% and 81.8%, respectively, whereas those of WLC were 72.0% and 68.6%, respectively. With WLC, 48 specimens showed negative findings, but of that group, 15 specimens (31.2%) were revealed to be malignant with BLC. There were no significant side effects in the 24 hours after the instillation of hexaminolevulinate. Photodynamic diagnosis with hexaminolevulinate helps to find tumors that could be missed by use of WLC only. Photodynamic diagnosis might be valuable in complete resection as well as for more accurate diagnosis of bladder tumor.

  5. 50% dextrose versus normal saline as distension media during cystoscopy for assessment of ureteric patency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhulu, Deepa Maheswari; Prabakar, Cheruba; Tang, Nancy; Bral, Pedram

    2016-04-01

    To compare the visualization of ureteric jets when using 50% dextrose (D50) as opposed to normal saline (NS) as distension media during cystoscopy. Cross sectional study. Two patients each had two cystoscopy videos recorded at the time of a ureteric jet; one using NS and the other using D50 resulting in two sets of paired videos (four videos). A fifth cystoscopy video was recorded, as a control, at a time when there was no ureteric-jet. Fifty participants including attending physicians, residents and medical students were recruited at an academic-affiliated community hospital. Participants were blinded to the medium used and viewed each of the five videos. Participants assessed each video for presence of a ureteric-jet, ease of interpretation, and compared the paired D50 and NS videos for clarity of ureteric-jets. Participant's assessment of clarity of the ureteric jets when D50 was used as compared to when NS was used in the paired videos. All 100 observations of the two D50 videos with jets identified the presence of a jet; for the NS videos, 96/100 observations identified a jet, 2/100 did not identify a jet and 2/100 were unsure. 48/50 observations of the video with no jet were correct, while 2/50 were unsure. Participants rated the ureteric-jets to be clearer in videos with D50 (86% vs 14%, Pdextrose was used as the distension medium during cystoscopy as compared to normal saline. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Sixteen-slice multidetector computed tomographic virtual cystoscopy in the evaluation of a patient with suspected bladder tumor and history of bladder carcinoma operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Muzaffer; Ozkurt, Huseyin; Tanriverdi, Orhan; Cay, Esra; Aydin, Mustafa; Miroglu, Cengiz

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the use of virtual cystoscopy performed with multidetector computed tomography (CT) in patients with suspected bladder tumors and histories of bladder carcinoma operation. Thirty-six patients (29 men and 7 women) with a mean age of 66 years (range, 24-88 years) with suspected bladder tumors and histories of bladder carcinoma operation were included in this prospective study. Virtual cystoscopy was performed by 16-slice multidetector CT scanner. The bladder was filled with diluted contrast material solution through a Foley catheter. Then, all patients underwent conventional cystoscopy examination. Two reviewers found 18 lesions detected by virtual cystoscopy by consensus, whereas 19 lesions were depicted by conventional cystoscopy. At virtual and conventional cystoscopies, the conditions of 3 patients, 2 with chronic inflammations and 1 with foreign body reaction, were wrongly diagnosed as tumors. At conventional cystoscopy, one patient's result was wrongly interpreted as normal. In pathologic evaluation, all tumors were diagnosed as transitional cell carcinoma. Bladder tumor can be noninvasively diagnosed using virtual cystoscopy. Use of virtual cystoscopy should be considered inpatients who present with hematuria or have histories of bladder carcinoma operation and are for follow-up because of its lesser complication risk and its being a less invasive, easily applied procedure without need of anesthesia. In the future, owing to the development of the CT technology and image processing technique, virtual cystoscopy may have a part in the detection of bladder cancer.

  7. Internal urethrotomy combined with antegrade flexible cystoscopy for management of obliterative urethral stricture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Seyed Jali; Kaviani, Ali; Vazirnia, Ali Reza

    2008-01-01

    We studied the safety and efficacy of flexible cystoscopy-guided internal urethrotomy in the management of obliterative urethral strictures. Forty-three flexible cystoscopy-guided internal urethrotomies were performed between 1999 and 2005. The indication for the procedure was nearly blinded bulbar or membranous urethral strictures not longer than 1 cm that would not allow passage of guide wire. Candidates were those who refused or were unable to undergo urtheroplasty. By monitoring any impression of the urethrotome on the monitor through the flexible cystoscope, we were able to do under-vision urethrotomy. All of the patients were started clean intermittent catheterization afterwards which was tapered over the following 6 months. Follow-up continued for 24 months after the last internal urethrotomy. Seventeen patients were younger than 65 years with a history of failed posterior urethroplasty, and 26 were older than 65 with poor cardiopulmonary conditions who had bulbar urethral stricture following straddle or iatrogenic injuries. Urethral stricture stabilized in 16 patients (37.2%) with a single session of urethrotomy and in 17 (39.5%) with 2 urethrotomies. Overall, urethral stricture stabilized in 76.7% of patients with 1 or 2 internal urethrotomies within 24 months of follow-up. No severe complication was reported. Flexible cystoscopy-guided internal urethrotomy is a simple, safe, and under-vision procedure in obliterative urethral strictures shorter than 1 cm. It can be an ideal option for patients who do not accept posterior urethroplasty or are in a poor cardiopulmonary condition that precludes general anesthesia.

  8. Comparison of virtual cystoscopy and ultrasonography for bladder cancer detection: A meta-analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Xinhua; Huang Xiaolu; Wu Lianming; Huang Gang; Ping Xiong; Yan Weili

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: Bladder cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in patients presenting with haematuria. Early detection is crucial for improving patient prognosis. We therefore performed a meta-analysis to evaluate and compare the detection validity (sensitivity and specificity) of virtual cystoscopy (VC) and ultrasonography (US). Methods: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed and the Cochrane Library for studies evaluating diagnosis validity of VC and US between January 1966 and December 2009. Meta-analysis methods were used to pool sensitivity and specificity and to construct a summary receiver-operating characteristic (SROC) curve. Results: A total of 26 studies that included 3084 patients who fulfilled all of the inclusion criteria were considered for inclusion in the analysis. The pooled sensitivity for bladder cancer detection using CT virtual cystoscopy (CTVC), MR virtual cystoscopy (MRVC) and US was 0.939 (95% CI, 0.919-0.956), 0.908 (95% CI, 0.827-0.959) and 0.779 (95% CI, 0.744-0.812), respectively. The pooled specificity for bladder cancer detection using CTVC, MRVC and US was 0.981 (95% CI, 0.973-0.988), 0.948 (95% CI, 0.884-0.983) and 0.962 (95% CI, 0.953-0.969), respectively. The pooled diagnostic odd ratio (DOR) estimate for CTVC (604.22) were significantly higher than for MRVC (144.35, P < 0.001) and US (72.472, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Our results showed that both CTVC and MRVC are better imaging methods for diagnosing bladder cancer than US. CTVC has higher diagnostic value (sensitivity, specificity and DOR) for the detection of bladder cancer than either MRCT or US.

  9. Comparison of virtual cystoscopy and ultrasonography for bladder cancer detection: A meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qu Xinhua; Huang Xiaolu [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China); Department of Ultrasonic, Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200011 (China); Wu Lianming [Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China); Huang Gang [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China); Ping Xiong, E-mail: pxiong6@126.com [Department of Ultrasonic, Ninth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200011 (China); Yan Weili, E-mail: wl_yan67@126.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200127 (China)

    2011-11-15

    Background and purpose: Bladder cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in patients presenting with haematuria. Early detection is crucial for improving patient prognosis. We therefore performed a meta-analysis to evaluate and compare the detection validity (sensitivity and specificity) of virtual cystoscopy (VC) and ultrasonography (US). Methods: We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed and the Cochrane Library for studies evaluating diagnosis validity of VC and US between January 1966 and December 2009. Meta-analysis methods were used to pool sensitivity and specificity and to construct a summary receiver-operating characteristic (SROC) curve. Results: A total of 26 studies that included 3084 patients who fulfilled all of the inclusion criteria were considered for inclusion in the analysis. The pooled sensitivity for bladder cancer detection using CT virtual cystoscopy (CTVC), MR virtual cystoscopy (MRVC) and US was 0.939 (95% CI, 0.919-0.956), 0.908 (95% CI, 0.827-0.959) and 0.779 (95% CI, 0.744-0.812), respectively. The pooled specificity for bladder cancer detection using CTVC, MRVC and US was 0.981 (95% CI, 0.973-0.988), 0.948 (95% CI, 0.884-0.983) and 0.962 (95% CI, 0.953-0.969), respectively. The pooled diagnostic odd ratio (DOR) estimate for CTVC (604.22) were significantly higher than for MRVC (144.35, P < 0.001) and US (72.472, P < 0.001). Conclusion: Our results showed that both CTVC and MRVC are better imaging methods for diagnosing bladder cancer than US. CTVC has higher diagnostic value (sensitivity, specificity and DOR) for the detection of bladder cancer than either MRCT or US.

  10. Virtual 3D bladder reconstruction for augmented medical records from white light cystoscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurie, Kristen L.; Zlatev, Dimitar V.; Angst, Roland; Liao, Joseph C.; Ellerbee, Audrey K.

    2016-02-01

    Bladder cancer has a high recurrence rate that necessitates lifelong surveillance to detect mucosal lesions. Examination with white light cystoscopy (WLC), the standard of care, is inherently subjective and data storage limited to clinical notes, diagrams, and still images. A visual history of the bladder wall can enhance clinical and surgical management. To address this clinical need, we developed a tool to transform in vivo WLC videos into virtual 3-dimensional (3D) bladder models using advanced computer vision techniques. WLC videos from rigid cystoscopies (1280 x 720 pixels) were recorded at 30 Hz followed by immediate camera calibration to control for image distortions. Video data were fed into an automated structure-from-motion algorithm that generated a 3D point cloud followed by a 3D mesh to approximate the bladder surface. The highest quality cystoscopic images were projected onto the approximated bladder surface to generate a virtual 3D bladder reconstruction. In intraoperative WLC videos from 36 patients undergoing transurethral resection of suspected bladder tumors, optimal reconstruction was achieved from frames depicting well-focused vasculature, when the bladder was maintained at constant volume with minimal debris, and when regions of the bladder wall were imaged multiple times. A significant innovation of this work is the ability to perform the reconstruction using video from a clinical procedure collected with standard equipment, thereby facilitating rapid clinical translation, application to other forms of endoscopy and new opportunities for longitudinal studies of cancer recurrence.

  11. Hexaminolevulinate blue-light cystoscopy in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer: review of the clinical evidence and consensus statement on appropriate use in the USA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daneshmand, S.; Schuckman, A.K.; Bochner, B.H.; Cookson, M.S.; Downs, T.M.; Gomella, L.G.; Grossman, H.B.; Kamat, A.M.; Konety, B.R.; Lee, C.T.; Pohar, K.S.; Pruthi, R.S.; Resnick, M.J.; Smith, N.D.; Witjes, J.A.; Schoenberg, M.P.; Steinberg, G.D.

    2014-01-01

    Hexaminolevulinate (HAL) is a tumour photosensitizer that is used in combination with blue-light cystoscopy (BLC) as an adjunct to white-light cystoscopy (WLC) in the diagnosis and management of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Since being licensed in Europe in 2005, HAL has been used in

  12. Outpatient photodynamic-guided diagnosis of carcinoma in situ with flexible cystoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Karin; Glenthøj, Anders; Toft, Birgitte Grønkær

    2017-01-01

    ), without compromising the diagnosis of carcinoma in situ (CIS). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-one patients were included. After BCG instillation for CIS, bladder biopsies were obtained using photodynamic-guided flexible cystoscopy. Two weeks later, patients underwent the conventional inpatient procedure....... An external pathologist reviewed the biopsy samples. Pain and quality of life (QoL) symptom score were recorded. RESULTS: Post-BCG biopsies showed only CIS in 10 patients; high-grade Ta or T1 tumour in three patients, who were referred for cystectomy; and normal or low-grade tumour tissue in 18 patients...... patients. Quality of biopsies did not differ between the two procedures. Pain scores for outpatients were low, and median QoL symptom score was significantly lower than for inpatients (24 vs 33, p = 0.02). Hospital length of stay was significantly longer for inpatients. CONCLUSIONS: Outpatient photodynamic...

  13. Fluorescence cystoscopy in patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Rusakov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The main challenge of treating non-muscle invasive bladder cancer is multifocal tumors. Current methods of diagnosis are failed to detect all superficial flat tumor lesions in bladder mucosa. The use of fluorescence imaging with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA allows to improve the sensibility of routine cystoscopy, but low specificity decreases its diagnostic accuracy. The method of fluorescence imaging combined with local fluorescence spectroscopy developed in P.A. Herzen MCRI has been shown to increase the specificity from 71% to 84%. Thus, local fluorescence spectroscopy in visible fluorescence of 5-ALA-induced protoporphyrin allows to perform guided biopsy and decrease the rate of diagnostic mistakes. 

  14. Automatic T1 bladder tumor detection by using wavelet analysis in cystoscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Nuno R.; Vieira, Pedro M.; Lima, Estevão; Lima, Carlos S.

    2018-02-01

    Correct classification of cystoscopy images depends on the interpreter’s experience. Bladder cancer is a common lesion that can only be confirmed by biopsying the tissue, therefore, the automatic identification of tumors plays a significant role in early stage diagnosis and its accuracy. To our best knowledge, the use of white light cystoscopy images for bladder tumor diagnosis has not been reported so far. In this paper, a texture analysis based approach is proposed for bladder tumor diagnosis presuming that tumors change in tissue texture. As is well accepted by the scientific community, texture information is more present in the medium to high frequency range which can be selected by using a discrete wavelet transform (DWT). Tumor enhancement can be improved by using automatic segmentation, since a mixing with normal tissue is avoided under ideal conditions. The segmentation module proposed in this paper takes advantage of the wavelet decomposition tree to discard poor texture information in such a way that both steps of the proposed algorithm segmentation and classification share the same focus on texture. Multilayer perceptron and a support vector machine with a stratified ten-fold cross-validation procedure were used for classification purposes by using the hue-saturation-value (HSV), red-green-blue, and CIELab color spaces. Performances of 91% in sensitivity and 92.9% in specificity were obtained regarding HSV color by using both preprocessing and classification steps based on the DWT. The proposed method can achieve good performance on identifying bladder tumor frames. These promising results open the path towards a deeper study regarding the applicability of this algorithm in computer aided diagnosis.

  15. Surgical treatment of an acquired posterior urethral diverticulum with cystoscopy assisted robotic technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guneri, Cagri; Kirac, Mustafa; Biri, Hasan

    2017-03-01

    A 42-year-old man with a history of recurrent urethral stenosis, recurrent urinary tract infection and macroscopic hematuria has referred to our clinic. He underwent several internal urethrotomies and currently using clean intermittent self-catheterization. During the internal urethrotomy, we noted a large posterior urethral diverticulum (UD) between verumontanum and bladder neck. His obstructive symptoms were resolved after the catheter removal. But perineal discomfort, urgency and dysuria were prolonged about 3-4 weeks. Urinalysis and urine culture confirmed recurrent urinary tract infections. Due to this conditions and symptoms, we planned a surgical approach which was planned as transperitoneal robotic-assisted laparoscopic approach. This technique is still applied for the diverticulectomy of the bladder. In addition to this we utilized the cystoscopy equipments for assistance. During this process, cystoscope was placed in the UD to help the identification of UD from adjacent tissues like seminal vesicles by its movement and translumination. Operating time was 185 min. On the post-operative third day he was discharged. Foley catheter was removed after 2 weeks. Urination was quite satisfactory. His perineal discomfort was resolved. The pathology report confirmed epidermoid (tailgut) cyst of the prostate. Urethrogram showed no radiologic signs of UD after 4 weeks. Irritative and obstructive symptoms were completely resolved after 3 months. No urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction or retrograde ejaculation was noted. While posterior UD is an extremely rare situation, surgical treatment of posterior UD remains uncertain. To our knowledge, no above-mentioned cystoscopy assisted robotic technique for the treatment was described in the literature.

  16. The Impact of Blue Light Cystoscopy with Hexaminolevulinate (HAL) on Progression of Bladder Cancer - A New Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Ashish M; Cookson, Michael; Witjes, J Alfred; Stenzl, Arnulf; Grossman, H Barton

    2016-04-27

    Background: The International Bladder Cancer Group (IBCG) recently proposed a new definition of disease progression in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), including change in T-stage, change to T2 or higher or change from low to high grade. Objective: To establish whether blue light cystoscopy with hexaminolevulinate (HAL) impacts the rate of progression and time to progression using the revised definition. Methods: An earlier long-term follow-up of a controlled Phase III study reported outcomes following blue light cystoscopy with HAL (255 patients) or white light (WL) cystoscopy (261 patients) in NMIBC patients. The data was re-analysed according to the new definition. Results: In the original analysis, after 4.5 years (median), eight HAL and 16 WL patients were deemed to have progressed (transition from NMIBC to muscle invasive bladder cancer, (T2-4)). According to the new definition, additional patients in both groups were found to have progressed: 31 (12.2%) HAL vs 46 (17.6%) WL ( p  = 0.085) with four (1.6%) HAL and 11 (4.2%) WL patients progressing from Ta to CIS. Time to progression was longer in the HAL group ( p  = 0.05). Conclusions: Applying the new IBCG definition there was a trend towards a lower rate of progression in HAL patients, particularly in those progressing from Ta to CIS. Time to progression was significantly prolonged. This suggests that patients should receive blue light cystoscopy with HAL rather than WL at resection. Adoption of the new definition could allow more patients at risk of progression to be treated appropriately earlier.

  17. Seed loss through the urinary tract after prostate brachytherapy: examining the role of cystoscopy and urine straining post implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stutz, Michael; Petrikas, James; Raslowsky, Michael; Lee, Plato; Gurel, Michelle; Moran, Brian

    2003-01-01

    This study describes one institution's experience with seed retrieval through the urinary tract and makes recommendations for cystoscopy and urine straining post prostate brachytherapy (PB). 1794 patients from two separate cohorts covering different time periods (early versus late) were analyzed. All patients were preplanned with a modified peripheral loading technique and implanted with preloaded needles ( 125 I or 103 Pd) under ultrasound guidance. A catheter was used to delineate the urethra during the volume study but was not used during the implant. All patients underwent post implant cystoscopy. All patients were instructed to strain their urine for seven days post implant and return any seeds to our center. In our experience, seed loss through the urinary tract is a common event after PB, occurring in 29.7% of patients and was more common in patients from the early cohort, those implanted with 125 I seeds or those patients with prior transurethral resection of the prostate. Average seed loss per case, however, represents only 0.58% of total activity. We continue to recommend routine post implant cystoscopy for seed retrieval and periprocedural management. We no longer recommend that patients strain their urine at home after documenting a low rate of seed loss after discharge

  18. An optical method for reducing green fluorescence from urine during fluorescence-guided cystoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindvold, Lars R.; Hermann, Gregers G.

    2016-12-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) of bladder tumour tissue significantly improves endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer in rigid cystoscopes in the operating theatre and thus reduces tumour recurrence. PDD comprises the use of blue light, which unfortunately excites green fluorescence from urine. As this green fluorescence confounds the desired red fluorescence of the PDD, methods for avoiding this situation particularly in cystoscopy using flexible cystoscopes are desirable. In this paper we demonstrate how a tailor made high power LED light source at 525 nm can be used for fluorescence assisted tumour detection using both a flexible and rigid cystoscope used in the outpatient department (OPD) and operating room (OR) respectively. It is demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo how this light source can significantly reduce the green fluorescence problem with urine. At the same time this light source also is useful for exciting autofluorescence in healthy bladder mucosa. This autofluorescence then provides a contrast to the sensitized fluorescence (PDD) of tumours in the bladder.

  19. Comparison of Nuclear Matrix Protein (NMP22 test with cystoscopy and urine cytology in follow-up of patients with superficial bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ozudogru

    2012-06-01

    Conclusion: NMP22 was found more sensitive than urinary cytology. NMP22 were not influenced by intracavitary immunotherapy. As long as tumor grade increased, NMP22 values increased. But no significant relation with tumor stage was detected. The NMP22 test remains incapable for the supplanting of control cystoscopy. Until a better tumor marker was acquired, NMP22 test can be used. In patients with negative NMP22 test, control cystoscopy intervals may prolonged. [J Contemp Med 2012; 2(2.000: 64-68

  20. Use of Flexible Cystoscopy to Insert a Foley Catheter over a Guide Wire in Spinal Cord Injury Patients: Special Precautions to be Observed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Soni, Bakul; Singh, Gurpreet; Hughes, Peter; Oo, Tun

    2011-01-01

    When urethral catheterisation is difficult or impossible in spinal cord injury patients, flexible cystoscopy and urethral catheterisation over a guide wire can be performed on the bedside, thus obviating the need for emergency suprapubic cystostomy. Spinal cord injury patients, who undergo flexible cystoscopy and urethral catheterisation over a guide wire, may develop potentially serious complications. (1) Persons with lesion above T-6 are susceptible to develop autonomic dysreflexia during cystoscopy and urethral catheterisation over a guide wire; nifedipine 5-10 milligrams may be administered sublingually just prior to the procedure to prevent autonomic dysreflexia. (2) Spinal cord injury patients are at increased risk for getting urine infections as compared to able-bodied individuals. Therefore, antibiotics should be given to patients who get haematuria or urethral bleeding following urethral catheterisation over a guide wire. (3) Some spinal cord injury patients may have a small capacity bladder; in these patients, the guide wire, which is introduced into the urinary bladder, may fold upon itself with the tip of guide wire entering the urethra. If this complication is not recognised and a catheter is inserted over the guide wire, the Foley catheter will then be misplaced in urethra despite using cystoscopy and guide wire.

  1. Safety of hexaminolevulinate for blue light cystoscopy in bladder cancer. A combined analysis of the trials used for registration and postmarketing data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witjes, J.A.; Gomella, L.G.; Stenzl, A.; Chang, S.S.; Zaak, D.; Grossman, H.B.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To detail and put into perspective, safety of hexaminolevulinate blue light cystoscopy (HAL-BLC), including repeated use, based on combined data of controlled trials used for registration of HAL and postmarketing experience. METHODS: Safety data of 2 randomized comparative studies (group

  2. Comparison of urine and bladder or urethral mucosal biopsy culture obtained by transurethral cystoscopy in dogs with chronic lower urinary tract disease: 41 cases (2002 to 2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sycamore, K F; Poorbaugh, V R; Pullin, S S; Ward, C R

    2014-07-01

    To compare aerobic bacterial culture of urine to cystoscopically obtained mucosal biopsies of the lower urinary tract in dogs. Retrospective review of case records from dogs that had transurethral cystoscopy at a veterinary teaching hospital between 2002 and 2011. Dogs that had culture results from cystocentesis obtained urine and transurethral cystoscopically obtained mucosal samples were included in the study. Pathogens identified were compared between sampling methods. Forty dogs underwent transurethral cystoscopy for lower urinary tract disease on 41 occasions. There was significant (P = 0 · 0003) agreement between urine and mucosal biopsy cultures. Both cultures were negative in 66% and positive in 17% of dogs. There was a 17% disagreement between the sampling methods. Although not statistically significant, more mucosal samples than urine cultures were positive for Escherichia coli. There was a good agreement between pathogen identification from urine and lower urinary tract mucosal cultures. These results do not support the utilisation of transurethral cystoscopy to obtain biopsy samples for culture in dogs with urinary tract infection and positive urine culture. Individual cases with possible chronic urinary tract infection and negative urine culture may benefit from transurethral cystoscopy to obtain biopsies for culture. © 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  3. Use of Flexible Cystoscopy to Insert a Foley Catheter over a Guide Wire in Spinal Cord Injury Patients: Special Precautions to be Observed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Vaidyanathan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available When urethral catheterisation is difficult or impossible in spinal cord injury patients, flexible cystoscopy and urethral catheterisation over a guide wire can be performed on the bedside, thus obviating the need for emergency suprapubic cystostomy. Spinal cord injury patients, who undergo flexible cystoscopy and urethral catheterisation over a guide wire, may develop potentially serious complications. (1 Persons with lesion above T-6 are susceptible to develop autonomic dysreflexia during cystoscopy and urethral catheterisation over a guide wire; nifedipine 5–10 milligrams may be administered sublingually just prior to the procedure to prevent autonomic dysreflexia. (2 Spinal cord injury patients are at increased risk for getting urine infections as compared to able-bodied individuals. Therefore, antibiotics should be given to patients who get haematuria or urethral bleeding following urethral catheterisation over a guide wire. (3 Some spinal cord injury patients may have a small capacity bladder; in these patients, the guide wire, which is introduced into the urinary bladder, may fold upon itself with the tip of guide wire entering the urethra. If this complication is not recognised and a catheter is inserted over the guide wire, the Foley catheter will then be misplaced in urethra despite using cystoscopy and guide wire.

  4. Patients with a negative cystoscopy and negative Nmp22® Bladderchek® test are at low risk of missed transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder: a prospective evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Terrell

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Urine based tumor markers have uncertain utility in diagnosis or surveillance of patients with bladder cancer while cytology is commonly used. We evaluated whether cytology provides additional diagnostic information in patients with a negative NMP22® BladderChek® test (BladderChek and negative cystoscopy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed subset analyses of 2 large prospective multi-center databases evaluating BladderChek for UCB detection and surveillance. These cohorts were analyzed for presence of cancer and result of urine cytology in setting of a negative cystoscopy and negative BladderChek. Subsequently, we prospectively performed cystoscopy, cytology and BladderChek on 434 patients at our institution being evaluated for UCB. RESULTS: In the detection database (n = 1331, 1065 patients had a negative cystoscopy and BladderChek. There were 3 cancers (stages Ta, Tis and T1 and cytology was atypical in one and reactive in two. In the surveillance cohort (n = 668 patients, 437 patients had negative cystoscopy and BladderChek. Cancer was found in 2 patients (stages Tis and Ta. The patient with Tis has dysplastic cytology and Ta tumor had reactive cytology. In our cohort of 434 patients, 288 pts had negative cystoscopy and BladderChek. One cancer was missed, a Ta ureteral urothelial carcinoma with a reactive cytology. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with negative cystoscopy and BladderChek, very few cancers are missed and cytology was not effective in detection. Use of a point-of-care test in conjunction with cystoscopy in lieu of cytology could decrease cost, provide immediate results, improve negative predictive value and reduce the uncertainty that results from inconclusive cytologic results.

  5. An Investigation of the Basic Physics of Irrigation in Urology and the Role of Automated Pump Irrigation in Cystoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwayne Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate the effects of height, external pressure, and bladder fullness on the flow rate in continuous, non-continuous cystoscopy and the automated irrigation fluid pumping system (AIFPS. Materials. Each experiment had two 2-litre 0.9% saline bags connected to a continuous, non-continuous cystoscope or AIFPS via irrigation tubing. Other equipment included height-adjustable drip poles, uroflowmetry devices, and model bladders. Methods. In Experiment 1, saline bags were elevated to measure the increment in flow rate. In Experiment 2, saline bags were placed under external pressures to evaluate the effect on flow rate. In Experiment 3, flow rate changes in response to variable bladder fullness were measured. Results. Elevating saline bags caused an increase in flow rates, however the increment slowed down beyond a height of 80 cm. Increase in external pressure on saline bags elevated flow rates, but inconsistently. A fuller bladder led to a decrease in flow rates. In all experiments, the AIFPS posted consistent flow rates. Conclusions. Traditional irrigation systems were susceptible to changes in height of irrigation solution, external pressure application, and bladder fullness thus creating inconsistent flow rates. The AIFPS produced consistent flow rates and was not affected by any of the factors investigated in the study.

  6. Detection and recurrence rate of transurethral resection of bladder tumors by narrow-band imaging: Prospective, randomized comparison with white light cystoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Bin Kim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of narrow-band imaging (NBI as a diagnostic tool for detecting bladder tumors during cystoscopy compared with white light cystoscopy (WLC. Materials and Methods: From December 2013 to June 2017, a randomized prospective study was conducted on 198 patients underwent transurethral resection of bladder tumor by a single surgeon. The patients were divided into two groups according to diagnostic method. In Group I, WLC only was performed. In Group II, NBI was additionally performed after WLC. We analyzed the rate of detection of bladder tumors as a primary endpoint. In addition, we evaluated rates of recurrence in each group. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups in characteristics except hypertension. In the analysis of rates of detection, the probability of diagnosing cancer was 80.9% (114/141 in the WLC group, and the probability of diagnosing cancer using WLC in the NBI group was 85.5% (159/186. After switching from WLC to NBI for second-look cystoscopy in the NBI group, NBI was shown to detect additional tumors with a detection rate of 35.1% (13/37 from the perspective of the patients and 42.2% (27/64 from the perspective of the tumors. The 1-year recurrence-free rate was 72.2% in the WLC group and 85.2% in the NBI group (p=0.3. Conclusions: NBI had benefits for detecting tumors overlooked by WLC. Although the difference in the 1-year recurrence-free rate was not statistically significant, our results showed a trend for higher recurrence in the NBI group.

  7. Treatment changes and long-term recurrence rates after hexaminolevulinate (HAL) fluorescence cystoscopy: does it really make a difference in patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geavlete, Bogdan; Multescu, Razvan; Georgescu, Dragos; Jecu, Marian; Stanescu, Florin; Geavlete, Petrisor

    2012-02-01

    •  To evaluate in a prospective, randomized study the impact of hexaminolevulinate blue-light cystoscopy (HAL-BLC) on the diagnostic accuracy and treatment changes in cases of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) compared with standard white-light cystoscopy (WLC). •  To compare the long-term recurrence rates in the two study arms. •  In all, 362 patients suspected of NMIBC were included in the trial based on positive urinary cytology and/or ultrasonographic suspicion of bladder tumours and underwent transurethral resection of bladder tumours. •  A single postoperative mytomicin-C instillation was performed in all cases, intravesical chemotherapy for intermediate-risk patients and BCG instillations for high-risk cases. •  The follow-up protocol consisted of urinary cytology and WLC every 3 months for 2 years. •  Only first-time recurrences after the initial diagnosis were considered. •  In the 142 patients with NMIBC in the HAL-BLC series, tumour detection rates significantly improved for carcinoma in situ, pTa andoverall cases. •  In 35.2% of the cases, additional malignant lesions were found by HAL-BLC and consequently, the recurrence- and progression-risk categories of patients and subsequent treatment improved in 19% of the cases due to fluorescence cystoscopy. •  In all, 125 patients in the HAL-BLC group and 114 of the WLC group completed the follow-up. •  The recurrence rate at 3 months was lower in the HAL-BLC series (7.2% vs 15.8%) due to fewer 'other site' recurrences when compared with the WLC series (0.8% vs 6.1%). •  The 1 and 2 years recurrence rates were significantly decreased in the HAL-BLC group compared with the WLC group (21.6% vs 32.5% and 31.2% vs 45.6%, respectively). •  HAL-BLC was better than WLC for detecting NMIBC cases and improved tumour detection rates. •  HAL-BLC significantly modified the postoperative treatment of cases. •  The 3 months, 1 and 2 years recurrence rates were

  8. Direct Observation vs. Video-Based Assessment in Flexible Cystoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dagnaes-Hansen, Julia; Mahmood, Oria; Bube, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    .86. Interrater reliability was 0.74 for single measure and 0.85 for average measures. A hawk-dove effect was seen between the 2 raters. Direct observer bias was detected when comparing direct observer scores to the assessment by an independent video-rater (p

  9. Comparison of findings using ultrasonography and cystoscopy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    urine remains the gold-standard test for the diagnosis of urogenital schistosomiasis ... late manifestations of schistosomiasis, including urothelial cancer of the bladder. However, this .... of breast, gynaecological and urological pathology, and ...

  10. Bladder cancer diagnosis during cystoscopy using Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimbergen, M. C. M.; van Swol, C. F. P.; Draga, R. O. P.; van Diest, P.; Verdaasdonk, R. M.; Stone, N.; Bosch, J. H. L. R.

    2009-02-01

    Raman spectroscopy is an optical technique that can be used to obtain specific molecular information of biological tissues. It has been used successfully to differentiate normal and pre-malignant tissue in many organs. The goal of this study is to determine the possibility to distinguish normal tissue from bladder cancer using this system. The endoscopic Raman system consists of a 6 Fr endoscopic probe connected to a 785nm diode laser and a spectral recording system. A total of 107 tissue samples were obtained from 54 patients with known bladder cancer during transurethral tumor resection. Immediately after surgical removal the samples were placed under the Raman probe and spectra were collected and stored for further analysis. The collected spectra were analyzed using multivariate statistical methods. In total 2949 Raman spectra were recorded ex vivo from cold cup biopsy samples with 2 seconds integration time. A multivariate algorithm allowed differentiation of normal and malignant tissue with a sensitivity and specificity of 78,5% and 78,9% respectively. The results show the possibility of discerning normal from malignant bladder tissue by means of Raman spectroscopy using a small fiber based system. Despite the low number of samples the results indicate that it might be possible to use this technique to grade identified bladder wall lesions during endoscopy.

  11. Comparison of findings using ultrasonography and cystoscopy in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cystoscopic examination (CE) has been accepted as the gold-standard test for detecting the late manifestations of schistosomiasis, including urothelial cancer of ... find it useful for more accurate diagnosis of haematuria and to identify bladder wall alterations in both adults and children in schistosomiasis-endemic regions.

  12. The light bulb, cystoscopy, and Thomas Alva Edison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Michael E

    2010-09-01

    Thomas Alva Edison was an icon of American achievement who literally invented the 20th century. Although best known as the inventor of the electric light bulb, the phonograph, and motion pictures, he also left a lasting legacy via peripheral developmental applications, such as endoscopes. A review of published urologic writings about incandescent cystoscopes was cross-referenced to writings about or from Edison. Important events that allowed transference of technology from the Edison laboratory to clinical practice were emphasized. Edison was born in 1847 while Lincoln was serving in Congress; he died in 1931 when Hoover struggled with the Great Depression. Edison's life spanned the formative period of America that Henry Adams called the "coming of age." Edison received a Sprengel vacuum device in late 1879, and as usual, he was able to tweak the machine to better performance. For 5 days in October, 16 to 21, he improved the vacuum from 1/100,000 to 1/1,000,000 atm, and his first incandescent bulb burned softly. On December 21, 1879, he leaked the story to N.Y. Herald journalist Marshall Fox, and the world was notified of the light bulb. Special Christmas light visits started in Menlo Park just 4 days later. Edison patented the screw cap for easy changes, and the first bulbs sold for 40 cents (cost $1.40). 100,000 bulbs sold in 1882, 4 million by 1892, and 45 million in 1903. Immediately, competitors and specialty manufacturers entered the market. Dr. Henry Koch and Charles Preston in Rochester, N.Y., developed a smaller, low amperage bulb that could be fitted to medical devices. No discussion of electricity and modern applications would be complete without some discussion of Thomas Alva Edison and his sentinel contributions. The first church, post office, and ship were illuminated in 1892. The first hotel, theater, and electric sign were in 1893. The rapidity of dispersal and secondary applications of Edison's inventions is typified by the rise of cystoscopes. Nitze used a modified Edison bulb in his second and third generation scopes by 1887-1888 within 8 years of discovery.

  13. 3D reconstruction of cystoscopy videos for comprehensive bladder records

    OpenAIRE

    Lurie, Kristen L.; Angst, Roland; Zlatev, Dimitar V.; Liao, Joseph C.; Ellerbee Bowden, Audrey K.

    2017-01-01

    White light endoscopy is widely used for diagnostic imaging of the interior of organs and body cavities, but the inability to correlate individual 2D images with 3D organ morphology limits its utility for quantitative or longitudinal studies of disease physiology or cancer surveillance. As a result, most endoscopy videos, which carry enormous data potential, are used only for real-time guidance and are discarded after collection. We present a computational method to reconstruct and visualize ...

  14. An optical method for reducing green fluorescence from urine during fluorescence-guided cystoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvold, Lars René; Hermann, Gregers G

    2016-01-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) of bladder tumour tissue significantly improves endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer in rigid cystoscopes in the operating theatre and thus reduces tumour recurrence. PDD comprises the use of blue light, which unfortunately excites green fluorescence...... this light source also is useful for exciting autofluorescence in healthy bladder mucosa. This autofluorescence then provides a contrast to the sensitized fluorescence (PDD) of tumours in the bladder....

  15. Optimizing the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer using fluorescence cystoscopy and Raman spectroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draga, R.O.P.

    2013-01-01

    The gold standard for the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer is transurethral resection of bladder tumors (TURBT). A relative high recurrence rate and the need for repeated treatments make bladder cancer one the most expensive cancers from diagnosis till death of the patient. The TURBT

  16. Acquisition of flexible cystoscopy skills on a virtual reality simulator by experts and novices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schout, Barbara M. A.; Muijtjens, Arno M. M.; Hendrikx, Ad J. M.; Ananias, Hildo J. K.; Dolmans, Valerie E. M. G.; Scherpbier, Albert J. J. A.; Bemelmans, Bart L. H.

    OBJECTIVE To assess the construct validity of the URO MentorTM (Simbionix Corp., Cleveland, OH, USA) virtual reality training model for several variables of skills training in cysto-urethroscopy, addressing two research questions: (i) Does training on the URO Mentor significantly improve novices'

  17. The Impact of Blue Light Cystoscopy with Hexaminolevulinate (HAL) on Progression of Bladder Cancer - A New Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamat, A.M.; Cookson, M.; Witjes, J.A.; Stenzl, A.; Grossman, H.B.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The International Bladder Cancer Group (IBCG) recently proposed a new definition of disease progression in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), including change in T-stage, change to T2 or higher or change from low to high grade. Objective: To establish whether blue light

  18. Efficacy of voided urinary cytology and ultrasonography compared to cystoscopy in the detection of urinary bladder cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kumar

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: Voided urinary cytology can be omitted as a screening test. Ultrasonography can be recommended as the initial imaging investigation for detection of bladder carcinoma in patients presenting with hematuria and for follow up of bladder carcinoma patients.

  19. An Evidence-Based Protocol for Antibiotic Use Prior to Cystoscopy Decreases Antibiotic Use without Impacting Post-Procedural Symptomatic Urinary Tract Infection Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Justin R; Bhalla, Rohan G; Cook, J Paul; Kang, Caroline; Dmochowski, Roger; Talbot, Thomas R; Barocas, Daniel A

    2018-04-01

    Symptomatic urinary tract infection is a complication of office based cystourethroscopy. Studies are mixed regarding the efficacy of antibiotic prophylaxis to prevent urinary tract infections. Our aim was to develop and evaluate an evidence-based protocol that reduces unnecessary antibiotic use while avoiding an increase in urinary tract infections. We created a clinic antibiogram based on all urology office visits performed during a 2-year period. Bacterial resistance rates, institutional risk related data and clinical guidelines were applied to create a protocol for antibiotic administration before cystourethroscopy. We then analyzed 1,245 consecutive patients without a renal transplant who underwent outpatient cystourethroscopy, including 610 after protocol initiation. Urinary tract infection rates and antibiotic use were analyzed for an association with the protocol change using the Fisher exact test. Cultures had an overall 20% rate of resistance to fluoroquinolones, representing 40% of the cultures that grew Escherichia coli. Before the protocol change 602 of 635 patients (94.8%) received a preprocedural antibiotic compared to 426 of 610 (69.9%) after protocol initiation (p urinary tract infection prior to the protocol change while 16 (2.6%) had a urinary tract infection after the change (p = 0.69). Regarding resistance, fluoroquinolone resistant organisms grew in the cultures of 12 of 19 patients (63.2%) with a urinary tract infection before the protocol change compared to 5 of 16 (31.3%) with a urinary tract infection after the change. Recent antibiotic administration, hospitalization and chronic catheterization were associated with urinary tract infection in the entire cohort (all p ≤0.01). A local antibiogram with infection related risk data effectively risk stratifies patients before cystourethroscopy, decreasing the use of antibiotics without increasing the rate of symptomatic urinary tract infection. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A microbiological evaluation of level of disinfection for flexible cystoscopes protected by disposable endosheaths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Peter Hjorth; Slotsbjerg, Torsten; Westh, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Flexible cystoscopy is used in urological outpatient departments for diagnostic cystoscopy of bladder cancer and requires a high-level disinfection between each patient. The purpose of this study was to make a microbiological post disinfection efficacy assessment of flexible cystoscopes (FC) using...

  1. CT cystography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsili, A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Cancer of the urinary bladder is one of the commonest urothelial neoplasms. Conventional cystoscopy remains the mainstay in the diagnosis of urinary bladder carcinomas. But it is an invasive and uncomfortable procedure, associated with complications. Computed tomographic (CT) virtual cystoscopy has been proposed as an alternative imaging modality with potential advantages in the detection of urinary bladder neoplasms and good patient acceptance. It is a minimally invasive technique, allowing imaging of the urinary bladder in multiple planes and a 360 0 view. CT cystoscopy provides information about the location, size and morphologic features of urinary bladder lesions, indicating appropriate areas for biopsy. It can be performed in cases in which conventional cystoscopy is not feasible, such as in the presence of urethral strictures, marked prostatic hypertrophy or active bleeding, and in cases in which cystoscopic findings are inconclusive. The technique can be used to evaluate areas of the urinary bladder difficult to evaluate with cystoscopy, such as the anterior bladder neck and narrowmouthed diverticula. Finally, virtual cystoscopy provides both intraluminal and extraluminal pathologic changes, so intravesical disease and exrtavesical extension can be evaluated in the same study. One of the limitations of this technique is the difficulty to demonstrate small-sized lesions. The introduction of multi-detector row CT (MDCT) scanners was a major technological advancement because among other things it substantially improves z-axis resolution by reducing section collimation and allowing the detection of very small lesions. The near isotropic or isotropic pixels achieved with a multidetector CT scanner, enable the creation of multiplanar reformatted images with a resolution very close to that of the axial images and three-dimensional (3D) renderings of outstanding quality. Transverse, multiplanar reformations and virtual endoscopic images are complementary

  2. Stress incontinence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genital exam in men Pelvic exam in women Rectal exam Tests may include: Cystoscopy to look inside ... Copyright 1997-2018, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing ...

  3. ISSN 2073 East Cent. Afr. j. surg.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DELL

    2009-02-27

    Feb 27, 2009 ... Bladder Tumours at Tikur Anbessa Hospital in Ethiopia. ... The most common presenting symptoms were hematuria in 89(91.8%). cystoscopy ..... West DA, Cummings JM, Longo WE, et al; Role of chronic catheterization in the.

  4. A rare complication of acute appendicitis: complete bilateral distal ureteral obstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aronson, D. C.; Moorman-Voestermans, C. G.; Tiel-van Buul, M. M.; Vos, A.

    1994-01-01

    Three children treated for appendicitis developed anuria and acute renal insufficiency several days after appendicectomy. Associated hydronephrosis or hydroureters were present in two. At cystoscopy, marked swelling of the trigonum and ureteric orifices was seen. One patient developed unilateral

  5. Utility of urine cytology in evaluating hematuria with sonographically suspected bladder lesion in patients older than 50 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussam Eldin Helmy Mady

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Hematuria in patients older than 50 years with sonographically suspected bladder lesion mandates cystoscopy and biopsy. UC does not add more significant information in this group of patients.

  6. Emerging Endoscopic and Photodynamic Techniques for Bladder Cancer Detection and Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This review provides an overview of emerging techniques, namely, photodynamic diagnosis (PDD, narrow band imaging (NBI, Raman spectroscopy, optical coherence tomography, virtual cystoscopy, and endoscopic microscopy for its use in the diagnosis and surveillance of bladder cancer. The technology, clinical evidence and future applications of these approaches are discussed with particular emphasis on PDD and NBI. These approaches show promise to optimise cystoscopy and transurethral resection of bladder tumours.

  7. Iatrogenic urological triggers of autonomic dysreflexia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, N; Zhou, M; Biering-Sørensen, F

    2015-01-01

    pressure (BP) assessments during urological procedures were excluded. RESULTS: Forty studies were included for analysis and categorized into four groups: (1) urodynamics and cystometry; (2) cystoscopy and transurethral litholapaxy; (3) extracorporeal shock-wave lithotripsy (ESWL); and (4) other procedures...... dyssynergia. Without anesthesia, the majority of individuals develop AD during cystoscopy, transurethral litholapaxy and ESWL. The effectiveness of different anesthesia methods relies on blocking the nociceptive signals from the lower urinary tract (LUT) below the level of the neurological lesion. Other...

  8. Diagnosis of bladder tumours in patients with macroscopic haematuria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gandrup, Karen L; Løgager, Vibeke B; Bretlau, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    patients underwent CTU, MRU and flexible cystoscopy. Two uroradiologists individually reviewed the images without any clinical information, using a questionnaire. Patient records and pathology reports were also reviewed. RESULTS: At flexible cystoscopy, MRU and CTU, 32, 19 and 15 bladder lesions were...... identified, respectively. Histopathology showed that 13 of the 29 biopsied lesions were transitional cell carcinomas. Compared with the histopathology, the sensitivity and specificity for detection of tumours by CTU and MRU were 61.5% and 94.9%, and 79.9% and 93.4%, respectively. False-positive detection...... of bladder tumours, compared with histopathology, was reported in seven CTUs and nine MRUs, whereas the number of false-negative findings was five for CTUs and three for MRUs. CONCLUSIONS: Split-bolus CTU or MRU cannot replace cystoscopy in cases of macroscopic haematuria. MRU has a higher sensitivity than...

  9. Evaluation of hematuria in anticoagulated patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuttino, J.T.; Clark, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of investigating hematuria in anticoagulated patients the authors examined records of 25 consecutive patients with hematuria who were on an anticoagulation regimen with sodium warfarin (Coumadin) for various thromboembolic disorders. All had undergone intravenous urography (IVU) and 12 had undergone cystoscopy. Potential bleeding sources were discovered in 14 patients by IVU and in seven patients by cystoscopy. Disorders found were renal stones (4), transitional carcinoma (1), lymphoma (1), retroperitoneal hematoma (1), bladder tumors (2), calcified renal mass (1), hemorrhagic cystitis (2), and enlarged prostate (7). In 18 (72%) patients, the findings on IVU and/or cystoscopy were abnormal. Hematuria is a serious symptom that warrants investigation in anticoagulated as well as nonanticoagulated patients

  10. Are urological procedures in tetraplegic patients safely performed without anesthesia? a report of three cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidyanathan Subramanian

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some tetraplegic patients may wish to undergo urological procedures without anaesthesia, but these patients can develop autonomic dysreflexia if cystoscopy and vesical lithotripsy are performed without anaesthesia. Case presentation We describe three tetraplegic patients, who developed autonomic dysreflexia when cystoscopy and laser lithotripsy were carried out without anesthesia. In two patients, who declined anaesthesia, blood pressure increased to more than 200/110 mmHg during cystoscopy. One of these patients developed severe bleeding from bladder mucosa and lithotripsy was abandoned. Laser lithotripsy was carried out under subarachnoid block a week later in this patient, and this patient did not develop autonomic dysreflexia. The third patient with C-3 tetraplegia had undergone correction of kyphoscoliotic deformity of spine with spinal rods and pedicular screws from the level of T-2 to S-2. Pulmonary function test revealed moderate to severe restricted curve. This patient developed vesical calculus and did not wish to have general anaesthesia because of possible need for respiratory support post-operatively. Subarachnoid block was not considered in view of previous spinal fixation. When cystoscopy and laser lithotripsy were carried out under sedation, blood pressure increased from 110/50 mmHg to 160/80 mmHg. Conclusion These cases show that tetraplegic patients are likely to develop autonomic dysreflexia during cystoscopy and vesical lithotripsy, performed without anaesthesia. Health professionals should educate spinal cord injury patients regarding risks of autonomic dysreflexia, when urological procedures are carried out without anaesthesia. If spinal cord injury patients are made aware of potentially life-threatening complications of autonomic dysreflexia, they are less likely to decline anaesthesia for urological procedures. Subrachnoid block or epidural meperidine blocks nociceptive impulses from urinary bladder

  11. Urethral Triplication Without Bladder Duplication: Endourologic Diagnosis and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Ruben; Burgos, Laura; Angulo, Jose Maria

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Urethral triplication is a rare congenital anomaly of the lower urinary system, with urethra ending in glans. At the beginning of toilet training, urine output was observed along the rectum. Rigid cystoscopy shows a perineal urethra starting in the posterior urethra. Subsequently, flexible cystoscopy showed entry of epispadic urethra in the bladder immediately superior to the bladder neck. It was running parallel to primary urethra. Then, we observed two most frequent types of urethral duplication in the sagittal plane in a single patient. PMID:29675475

  12. BEHAVIOR OF LIPIODOL MARKERS DURING IMAGE GUIDED RADIOTHERAPY OF BLADDER CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chai, Xiangfei; van Herk, Marcel; van de Kamer, Jeroen B.; Remeijer, Peter; Bex, Axel; Betgen, Anja; de Reijke, Theo M.; Hulshof, Maarten C. C. M.; Pos, Floris J.; Bel, Arjan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the stability of a novel type of markers used in partial bladder tumor irradiation and tumor deformation as indicated by the markers. Materials and Methods: In 15 patients with solitary bladder cancer, lipiodol was injected in the bladder wall during flexible cystoscopy to

  13. Primært adenokarcinom i det mandlige urinrør

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldskou, Eva; Thind, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of a 43-year-old man treated for urethral stricture. Cystoscopy showed unusual tissue in the posterior urethra. Biopsies showed adenocarcinoma which was positive for cytokeratins 7 and 20 and negative for prostate specific antigen. Immunohistochemistry in this case was important...... for the diagnosis, primary urethral adenocarcinoma....

  14. Self-insertion of needle as urethral foreign body after sexual gratification: An unusual case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin Tahaoglu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Self-inserted foreign bodies in the urethra are rare among children. We describe here a 13-year-old boy who had self-inserted a needle into his urethra. Selfinsertion of the needle wrapped with cotton into the urethra for cleaning after masturbation by patient was applied. A foreign body in the urethra was removed by cystoscopy.

  15. Post-TURP obliterative urethral stricture: Unusual treatment and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    shanker

    considered as the gold standard surgery for the treatment of benign hyperplasia of the prostate ... through a 22Fr cystoscopy sheath after placing a stent pusher. A central hole was created in ... Meatal stenosis may occur when instruments are ...

  16. NMP22 BladderChek Test: point-of-care technology with life- and money-saving potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomera, Kevin M

    2004-11-01

    A new, relatively obscure tumor marker assay, the NMP22 BladderChek Test (Matritech, Inc.), represents a paradigm shift in the diagnosis and management of urinary bladder cancer (transitional cell carcinoma). Specifically, BladderChek should be employed every time a cystoscopy is performed, with corresponding changes in the diagnostic protocol and the guidelines of the American Urological Association for the diagnosis and management of bladder cancer. Currently, cystoscopy is the reference standard and NMP22 BladderChek Test in combination with cystoscopy improves the performance of cystoscopy. At every stage of disease, BladderChek provides a higher sensitivity for the detection of bladder cancer than cytology, which now represents the adjunctive standard of care. Moreover, BladderChek is four-times more sensitive than cytology and is available at half the cost. Early detection of bladder cancer improves prognosis, quality of life and survival. BladderChek may be analogous to the prostate-specific antigen test and eventually expand beyond the urologic setting into the primary care setting for the testing of high-risk patients characterized by smoking history, occupational exposures or age.

  17. Bladder stones

    Science.gov (United States)

    The health care provider will perform a physical exam. This will also include a rectal exam. The exam may reveal an enlarged prostate or other problems. The following tests may be done: Bladder or pelvic x-ray Cystoscopy Urinalysis Urine culture (clean catch)

  18. A case of ectopic ureteral orifice with hypoplastic kidney diagnosed by enhanced computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Mikio; Yoshimoto, Jun; Matsumura, Yosuke; Ohmori, Hiroyuki

    1983-01-01

    A case of ectopic ureteral orifice, 6 year old girl with urinary incontinece, is herein reported. Cystoscopy and excretory urogram showed absense of right half of trigone and non visualizing kidney. By enhanced computed tomography, right hypoplastic kidney was found and right nephrectomy was performed. We emphasize that enhanced computed tomography is very usefull for diagnosis of localization of hypoplastic kidney. (author)

  19. 1 The effectiveness of ultrasound in the diagnosis of bladder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    evaluating patients presenting with haematuria or suspected to have bladder tumours. It is cheap, ... world, transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the commonest, while in developing countries squamous cell ..... Fenlon, H., Bell, T., Ahari, H. & Hussain, S. (1997) Virtual cystoscopy: early clinical experience. Radiology 250 ...

  20. The Effects of Instrumentation on Urine Cytology and CK-20 Analysis for the Detection of Bladder Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegelin, Olivier; Bartels, Diny W M; Tromp, Ellen; Kuypers, Karel C.; Van Melick, Harm H E

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of cystoscopy on urine cytology and additional cytokeratin-20 (CK-20) staining in patients presenting with gross hematuria. Patients and Methods For 83 patients presenting with gross hematuria, spontaneous and instrumented paired urine samples were analyzed. Three

  1. Value of urine cytology in screening patients with prostatitis syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de la Rosette, J. J.; Hubregtse, M. R.; Wiersma, A. M.; Debruyne, F. M.

    1993-01-01

    We reviewed the results of urine cytology examination of 206 patients with a diagnosis of prostatitis syndromes in the period 1985-1991. The urine samples showed an incidence of 20.4% for slight to moderate atypia and 6.3% for severe atypia. In these patients, cystoscopy, bladder biopsies and

  2. Primært adenokarcinom i det mandlige urinrør

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldskou, Eva; Thind, Peter

    2012-01-01

    We present a case of a 43-year-old man treated for urethral stricture. Cystoscopy showed unusual tissue in the posterior urethra. Biopsies showed adenocarcinoma which was positive for cytokeratins 7 and 20 and negative for prostate specific antigen. Immunohistochemistry in this case was important...

  3. Brunn nests masquerading as bladder tumor: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin Hee; Byun, Kyung Hwan; Jeon, Ji Min

    2005-01-01

    Brunn nests are the most common proliferative lesions of the bladder uroepithelium, but exuberant proliferation can mimic bladder tumor on radiologic imaging and cystoscopy. We describe a case of pathologically proven Brunn nests in a 34-year-old man, misdiagnosed as bladder tumor on preoperative imaging studies

  4. Detection of human telomerase reverse transcriptase messenger ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction and Objectives: Bladder cancer is an important national health problem as it is the leading cancer in men in Egypt. Cystoscopy and biopsy, currently remains the gold standard procedure for diagnosis, yet, it is invasive and costly. Urinary cytopathology remains to be the only non-invasive alternative method for ...

  5. Reducing recurrence in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer using photodynamic diagnosis and immediate post-transurethral resection of the bladder chemoprophylaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Malene Bøg; Nielsen, Tommy Kjærgaard; Zieger, Karsten Egbert Arnold

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of fluorescence cystoscopy and immediate post-transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB) chemoprophylaxis on the risk of recurrence of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) under routine clinical conditions. Materials...

  6. Bladder carcinoma. Apport MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, C.; Spittler, G.; Jacqmin, D.; Morel, M.

    1991-01-01

    Bladder carcinoma is the second most commun cause of urogenital tumor. It is suspected by abdominal ultrasound and prouved by cystoscopy with biopsy. At present, MR Imaging is the most accurate diagnostic modality for loco-regional staging. Urography is still useful to appreciate urinary tract [fr

  7. Delay in diagnosis of cancer as a patient safety issue - a root cause analysis based on a representative case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Paul

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is well known in the literature that imaging has almost no value for diagnosis of superficial bladder cancer. However, wide gap exists between knowledge on diagnosis of bladder cancer and actual clinical practice. Case presentation Delay in diagnosis of bladder cancer in a male person with tetraplegia occurred because of reliance on negative flexible cystoscopy and single biopsy, negative ultrasound examination of urinary bladder, and computerised tomography of pelvis. Difficulties in scheduling cystoscopy also contributed to a delay of nearly ten months between the onset of haematuria and establishing a histological diagnosis of vesical malignancy in this patient. The time interval between transurethral resection and cystectomy was 42 days. This delay was mainly due to scheduling of surgery. Conclusion We learn from this case that doctors should be aware of the limitations of negative flexible cystoscopy and single biopsy, cytology of urine, ultrasound examination of urinary bladder, and computed tomography of pelvis for diagnosis of bladder cancer in spinal cord injury patients. Random bladder biopsies must be considered under general anaesthesia when there is high suspicion of bladder cancer. Spinal cord injury patients with lesions above T-6 may develop autonomic dysreflexia; therefore, one should be extremely well prepared to prevent or manage autonomic dysreflexia when performing cystoscopy and bladder biopsy. Spinal cord injury patients, who pass blood in urine, should be accorded top priority in scheduling of investigations and surgical procedures.

  8. On the influence of the instillation time on the results of HAL (Hexvix) fluorescence detection of superficial bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jichlinski, Patrice; Aymon, Daniela; Wagnieres, Georges A.; Marti, Alexandre; Lange, Norbert; Guillou, Louis; Leisinger, Hans-Juerg; van den Bergh, Hubert

    2003-10-01

    Hexyl aminolevulinate (HAL) fluorescence cystoscopy is being investigated as a new diagnostic tool for the detection of flat urothelial malignancies in bladder cancers. However, the influence of the bladder instillation time on the performance of this detection modality has not been addressed up to now. We report our initial experience comparing different instillation schedules of HAL cystoscopy in the diagnosis of superficial bladder cancer. A total of 718 fluorescent positive (433) and fluorescence negative (285) biopsies have been taken in the bladder of 143 patients using the Storz D-light fluorescence imaging system (Karl Storz, Tuttlingen, Germany) which allows both white and blue light (380-450 nm) bladder wall inspection. Following hospitalisation, 50 ml of HAL (8mM) phosphate buffer solution was instilled into the bladder of patients during one hour (1 hour protocol involving 57 patients), or during two hours followed by a two hours resting time after removal of the solution (2+2 hours protocol involving 86 patients). Both instillation subgroups were homogeneous in terms of proportion of high risk disease, previous BCG treatment and/or recurrent disease. This study indicates that the instillation duration does not influence the results of HAL (Hexvix) fluorescence cystoscopy in our conditions. Compared to the standard use of ALA, HAL (Hexvix) fluorescence cystoscopy allows a significant reduction of the instillation time (to less than one hour) without prejudicing the efficacy of the method, what represents a real advantage in daily clinical practice.

  9. Future strategies in the diagnosis, staging and treatment of bladder cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, A.G. van der; Witjes, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: In this review new modalities in the diagnosis, staging and treatment of superficial and invasive bladder cancer are reviewed. RECENT FINDINGS: Urinary markers still cannot replace cystoscopy in diagnosing bladder cancer. However, DNA micro-array has shown promise for diagnosis.

  10. Evaluation of tissue and urinary survivin expression in non-muscle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, they suffer from drawbacks where cystoscopy is an invasive procedure and urine cytology shows limited ability to detect low grade bladder tumors. Therefore, new non-invasive tests with high sensitivity and specificity that are easy to perform are needed not only for initial diagnosis but also in surveillance for ...

  11. FLUORESCENCE DIAGNOSIS FOR RECURRENT BLADDER CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. V. Ulyanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical case of successful use of local fluorescence spectroscopy combined with fluorescence imaging during cystoscopy for diagnosis of recurrent bladder cancer is represented in the article. Histological study of fluorescent foci confirmed tumor growth (urothelial carcinoma in all areas with high levels of diagnostic parameter. In the fluorescent focus with low diagnostic parameter inflammation was detected.

  12. Efficacy of voided urinary cytology and ultrasonography compared to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    N. Kumar

    2017-07-29

    Jul 29, 2017 ... ninth most common cancer in women [1]. The commonest ... (4) renal or bladder calculi, (5) foreign body (stent or nephrostomy tube), (6) other ... low power and then the high power objective. Malignant transi- ... Mean BMI (min–max) .... tion and patient satisfaction after flexible cystoscopy and urodynamic.

  13. Polyarteritis nodosa presenting as a bladder outlet obstruction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acute-on-chronic renal impairment. All virological and serological tests including hepatitis B and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody were negative. A computed tomography scan of the brain revealed small-vessel disease. A bladder neck mass was visualised on cystoscopy. Histological examination of this demonstrated a ...

  14. Urethral Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the bladder and the urethra ( cystoscopy ). Treatment Bladder drainage tube Sometimes surgery (to repair urethral tears) For urethral bruises that do not result in any leakage of urine, a doctor can place a catheter ... days to drain the urine while the urethra heals. For urethral ...

  15. Ureteral stent retrieval using the crochet hook technique in females.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kawahara

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: We developed a method for ureteral stent removal in female patients that requires no cystoscopy or fluoroscopic guidance using a crochet hook. In addition, we also investigated the success rate, complications and pain associated with this procedure. METHODS: A total of 40 female patients (56 stents underwent the removal of ureteral stents. All procedures were carried out with the patients either under anesthesia, conscious sedation, or analgesic suppositories as deemed appropriate for each procedure including Shock Wave Lithotripsy (SWL, Ureteroscopy (URS, Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy (PCNL, and ureteral stent removal. At the time of these procedures, fluoroscopy and/or cystoscopy were prepared, but they were not used unless we failed to successfully remove the ureteral stent using the crochet hook. In addition, matched controls (comprising 50 stents which were removed by standard ureteral stent removal using cystoscopy were used for comparison purposes. RESULTS: A total of 47 of the 56 stents (83.9% were successfully removed. In addition, 47 of 52 (90.4% were successfully removed except for two migrated stents and two heavily encrusted stents which could not be removed using cystoscopy. Ureteral stent removal using the crochet hook technique was unsuccessful in nine patients, including two encrustations and two migrations. Concerning pain, ureteral stent removal using the crochet hook technique showed a lower visual analogue pain scale (VAPS score than for the standard technique using cystoscopy. CONCLUSIONS: Ureteral stent removal using a crochet hook is considered to be easy, safe, and cost effective. This technique is also easy to learn and is therefore considered to be suitable for use on an outpatient basis.

  16. Evaluation of multidetector computed tomography urography and ultrasonography for diagnosing bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knox, M.K. [Nuffield Department of Surgery, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Cowan, N.C. [Nuffield Department of Surgery, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Churchill Hospital, Oxford OX3 7LJ (United Kingdom)], E-mail: nigel.cowan@nds.ox.ac.uk; Rivers-Bowerman, M.D.; Turney, B.W. [Nuffield Department of Surgery, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    Aim: To evaluate and compare the diagnostic accuracy of multidetector computed tomography urography (CTU) and ultrasonography (US) for diagnosing bladder cancer. Materials and methods: A consecutive series of 143 patients over 40-years of age, presenting with macroscopic haematuria and without urinary tract infection underwent same-day CTU, US, and flexible cystoscopy. CTU and US were independently rated on a five-point scale for the presence of bladder cancer without knowledge of the reference standard of flexible or rigid cystoscopy and/or biopsy results. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and likelihood ratios. Results: For CTU, a rating of 5 (definitely tumour) was highly specific for bladder cancer (96.5%, 95%CI: 91.3-99%), effectively confirming diagnosis (positive likelihood ratio 25.6, 95%CI: 9.7-67.4). For US, specificity was also high (94.7%, 95%CI: 88.9-98%) with a positive likelihood ratio of 13.1 (95%CI: 5.8-29.6). Sensitivity at this rating was substantially higher for CTU (89.7%, 95%CI: 72.7-97.8%) than US (69%, 95%CI: 49.2-84.7%). Standardized partial area (A{sub z}) under the ROC curve between 95-100% specificity, representing the average sensitivity in this range, was significantly greater (0.88 versus 0.61, p < 0.05) for CTU than US. Conclusion: The specificities of CTU and US for the diagnosis of bladder cancer were similar, but CTU was more sensitive. Although the sensitivity of CTU was not high enough to replace flexible cystoscopy in the diagnostic pathway, the high specificity enables direct referral to rigid cystoscopy, bypassing flexible cystoscopy and expediting diagnosis and treatment in those patients testing positive.

  17. Evaluation of multidetector computed tomography urography and ultrasonography for diagnosing bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, M.K.; Cowan, N.C.; Rivers-Bowerman, M.D.; Turney, B.W.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate and compare the diagnostic accuracy of multidetector computed tomography urography (CTU) and ultrasonography (US) for diagnosing bladder cancer. Materials and methods: A consecutive series of 143 patients over 40-years of age, presenting with macroscopic haematuria and without urinary tract infection underwent same-day CTU, US, and flexible cystoscopy. CTU and US were independently rated on a five-point scale for the presence of bladder cancer without knowledge of the reference standard of flexible or rigid cystoscopy and/or biopsy results. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis and likelihood ratios. Results: For CTU, a rating of 5 (definitely tumour) was highly specific for bladder cancer (96.5%, 95%CI: 91.3-99%), effectively confirming diagnosis (positive likelihood ratio 25.6, 95%CI: 9.7-67.4). For US, specificity was also high (94.7%, 95%CI: 88.9-98%) with a positive likelihood ratio of 13.1 (95%CI: 5.8-29.6). Sensitivity at this rating was substantially higher for CTU (89.7%, 95%CI: 72.7-97.8%) than US (69%, 95%CI: 49.2-84.7%). Standardized partial area (A z ) under the ROC curve between 95-100% specificity, representing the average sensitivity in this range, was significantly greater (0.88 versus 0.61, p < 0.05) for CTU than US. Conclusion: The specificities of CTU and US for the diagnosis of bladder cancer were similar, but CTU was more sensitive. Although the sensitivity of CTU was not high enough to replace flexible cystoscopy in the diagnostic pathway, the high specificity enables direct referral to rigid cystoscopy, bypassing flexible cystoscopy and expediting diagnosis and treatment in those patients testing positive

  18. Emphysematous cystitis occurred in the case treated with steroid for autoimmune hepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Tateki; Ohara, Shinya; Moriyama, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    Emphysematous cystitis is a rare clinically entity, more commonly seen in diabetic, immunocompromised patients, which was characterized by air within the bladder wall and lumen. A 83-year-old woman was introduced to our department with fever elevation and abnormal findings of computed tomography (CT). She took orally prednisolone for autoimmune hepatitis. Pelvic CT revealed diffuse air throughout the bladder wall. Urinalysis showed combined hematuria and pyuria. Escherichia coli was detected in blood culture. Abnormal findings of complete blood count and laboratory examination included an elevated WBC count (12,200/μL), C-reactive protein (11.7 mg/dL), and creatinine (1.07 mg/dL). Cystoscopy confirmed diffuse submucosal emphysema throughout. On the basis of diagnosis with emphysematous cystitis, she was treated with antibiotics based on the results of blood culture and indwelling Foley catheter. After treatment, the improvement of inflammatory findings and submucosal emphysema on cystoscopy and CT were achieved.

  19. [Virtual CT-pneumocystoscopy: indications, advantages and limitations. Our experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regine, Giovanni; Atzori, Maurizio; Buffa, Vitaliano; Miele, Vittorio; Ialongo, Pasquale; Adami, Loredana

    2003-09-01

    The use of CT volume-rendering techniques allows the evaluation of visceral organs without the need for endoscopy. Conventional endoscopic evaluation of the bladder is limited by the invasiveness of the technique and the difficulty exploring the entire bladder. Virtual evaluation of the bladder by three-dimensional CT reconstruction offers potential advantages and can be used in place of endoscopy. This study investigates the sensitivity of virtual CT in assessing lesion of the bladder wall to compare it with that of conventional endoscopy, and outlines the indications, advantages and disadvantages of virtual CT-pneumocystography. Between September 2001 and May 2002, 21 patients with haematuria and positive cystoscopic findings were studied. After an initial assessment by ultrasound, the patients underwent pelvic CT as a single volumetric scan after preliminary air distension of the bladder by means of 12 F Foley catheter. The images were processed on an independent workstation (Advantage 3.0 GE) running dedicated software for endoluminal navigation. The lesions detected by endoscopy were classified as sessile or pedunculated, and according to size (more or less than 5 mm). Finally, the results obtained at virtual cystoscopy were evaluated by two radiologists blinded to the conventional cystoscopy results. Thirty lesions (24 pedunculated, 6 sessile) were detected at conventional cystoscopy in 16 patients (multiple polyposis in 3 cases). Virtual cystoscopy identified 23 lesions (19 pedunculated and 4 sessile). The undetected lesions were pedunculated <5 mm (5 cases) and sessile (2 cases). One correctly identified pedunculated lesion was associated with a bladder stone. Good quality virtual images were obtained in all of the patients. In only one patient with multiple polyposis the quality of the virtual endoscopic evaluation was limited by the patient's intolerance to bladder distension, although identification of the lesions was not compromised. The overall

  20. Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma of Urinary Bladder Occurring as a Second Primary Malignancy: A Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manint Usawachintachit

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of bladder alveolar soft part sarcoma in an 18-year-old Thai male patient who had been treated with testicular radiation and systemic chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia with testicular relapse. He presented with recurrent dysuria and gross hematuria. Cystoscopy revealed a 2-centimeter irregular sessile mass at the bladder base adjacent to left ureteral orifice. Transurethral resection of the tumor was performed. The histopathological diagnosis was alveolar soft part sarcoma. Chest and abdominal computed tomography showed no evidence of metastasis. He was treated with partial cystectomy and left ureteral reimplantation with negative surgical margin. No evidence of recurrence was found during a 28-month follow-up period with surveillance cystoscopy and computed tomography of the chest and abdomen.

  1. A Unique Presentation of an Undiagnosed Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Kravvas

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a 58-year-old lady who presented initially to her general practitioner with a palpable warty urethral nodule. She was subsequently referred to the urology department for further investigations. She underwent flexible cystoscopy and imaging, followed by rigid cystoscopy and excision of the nodule. Histological analysis was consistent with renal cell carcinoma (RCC. CT imaging confirmed the presence of an invading metastatic left renal cell carcinoma with bilateral metastatic deposits to the lungs and adrenal glands. The patient was enlisted on the Panther Trial and received a course of Pazopanib before undergoing radical nephrectomy. Two years later she is still alive with metastases remaining reduced in size and numbers. During this study we have performed a literature review of similar cases with this unusual presentation of RCC.

  2. Pathogenic and Diagnostic Potential of BLCA-1 and BLCA-4 Nuclear Proteins in Urothelial Cell Carcinoma of Human Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Santoni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the bladder is one of the most common malignancies of genitourinary tract. Patients with bladder cancer need a life-long surveillance, directly due to the relatively high recurrence rate of this tumor. The use of cystoscopy represents the gold standard for the followup of previously treated patients. Nevertheless, several factors, including cost and invasiveness, render cystoscopy not ideal for routine controls. Advances in the identification of specific alterations in the nuclear structure of bladder cancer cells have opened novel diagnostic landscapes. The members of nuclear matrix protein family BLCA-1 and BLCA-4, are currently under evaluation as bladder cancer urinary markers. They are involved in tumour cell proliferation, survival, and angiogenesis. In this paper, we illustrate the role of BLCA-1 and BLCA-4 in bladder carcinogenesis and their potential exploitation as biomarkers in this cancer.

  3. The effects of visual fluorescence marking induced by 5-aminolevulinic acid for endoscopic diagnosis of urinary bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniltchenko, Dmitri I.; Koenig, Frank; Schnorr, Dietmar; Valdman, Alexander; Al-Shukri, Salman; Loening, Stefan A.

    2003-10-01

    During cystoscopy procedure, fluorescence diagnostics induced by 5-ALA improves visual detection of the bladder cancer. Macroscopic ALA-fluorescence allows visualizing of small flat tumors, carcinoma in situ, true neoplasm margins and dysplasias of the bladder. Following ALA instillation, cystoscopy has been performed under both standard and blue light illumination. Totally, 153 biopsies have been carried out at 53 patients with suspicion of bladder cancer. The results were compared to ALA-fluorescence data. In 13% of the patients, bladder cancer and dysplasia were found out in addition, due to red fluorescence. The sensitivity and specificity of ALA-fluorescence technique aggregated 96% and 52% respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of 5-ALA-fluorescent detection exceeded standard endoscopy under white light on 20%. The new method does not exclude a false positive and a false negative fluorescent luminescence. The ALA-based fluorescence detection system enhances the diagnosis of malignant/dysplastic bladder lesions significantly.

  4. Primary Bladder Neurofibroma: A Rare Case with Clinical Implications and Diagnostic Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umakanthan, Srikanth; Naik, Ramadas; Bukelo, Maryann Margaret; Rai, Sharada; Prabhu, Laxman

    2015-09-01

    Neurofibroma of the genito-urinary tract is rare. Urinary bladder is the commonest organ involved in cases of urinary tract involvement. Patients present early in life and there is male preponderance. We discuss here a case of primary neurofibroma of the urinary bladder in a 52-year-male presenting with haematuria, irritative bladder symptoms and pelvic mass. Cystoscopy showed a swelling in the left lateral wall. A transurethral biopsy revealed neurofibroma of the urinary bladder. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed the diagnosis.

  5. The Burden of Cystoscopic Bladder Cancer Surveillance: Anxiety, Discomfort, and Patient Preferences for Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Kevin; Zubkoff, Lisa; Sirovich, Brenda E; Goodney, Philip P; Robertson, Douglas J; Seigne, John D; Schroeck, Florian R

    2017-10-01

    To examine discomfort, anxiety, and preferences for decision making in patients undergoing surveillance cystoscopy for non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Veterans with a prior diagnosis of NMIBC completed validated survey instruments assessing procedural discomfort, worry, and satisfaction, and were invited to participate in semistructured focus groups about their experience and desire to be involved in surveillance decision making. Focus group transcripts were analyzed qualitatively, using (1) systematic iterative coding, (2) triangulation involving multiple perspectives from urologists and an implementation scientist, and (3) searching and accounting for disconfirming evidence. Twelve patients participated in 3 focus groups. Median number of lifetime cystoscopy procedures was 6.5 (interquartile range 4-10). Based on survey responses, two-thirds of participants (64%) experienced some degree of procedural discomfort or worry, and all participants reported improvement in at least 2 dimensions of overall well-being following cystoscopy. Qualitative analysis of the focus groups indicated that participants experience preprocedural anxiety and worry about their disease. Although many participants did not perceive themselves as having a defined role in decision making surrounding their surveillance care, their preferences to be involved in decision making varied widely, ranging from acceptance of the physician's recommendation, to uncertainty, to dissatisfaction with not being involved more in determining the intensity of surveillance care. Many patients with NMIBC experience discomfort, anxiety, and worry related to disease progression and not only cystoscopy. Although some patients are content to defer surveillance decisions to their physicians, others prefer to be more involved. Future work should focus on defining patient-centered approaches to surveillance decision making. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Uroflowmetry in neurologically normal children with voiding disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K M; Nielsen, K.K.; Kristensen, E S

    1985-01-01

    of neurological deficits underwent a complete diagnostic program including intravenous urography, voiding cystography and cystoscopy as well as spontaneous uroflowmetry, cystometry-emg and pressure-flow-emg study. The incidence of dyssynergia was 22%. However, neither the flow curve pattern nor single flow...... variables were able to identify children with dyssynergia. Consequently uroflowmetry seems inefficient in the screening for dyssynergia in neurological normal children with voiding disorders in the absence of anatomical bladder outlet obstruction....

  7. An Unusual Case Of Urinary Bladder Arteriovenous Malformation

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gnanappiragasam, D

    2016-07-01

    A 45-year-old male presented with haematuria and urinary frequency. Computed Tomography (CT) urogram revealed gross thickening of the left bladder wall. Histology showed large vessels cuffed by eosinophonilic material suggestive of urinary bladder arteriovenous malformation (AVM). No further intervention was carried out as symptoms resolve after the resection. Follow up rigid cystoscopy and CT at 3 months showed resolution of all visible pathology and no evidence of recurrence.

  8. A microbiological evaluation of level of disinfection for flexible cystoscopes protected by disposable endosheaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Peter Hjorth; Slotsbjerg, Torsten; Westh, Henrik; Buitenhuis, Vicki; Hermann, Gregers Gautier

    2013-10-07

    Flexible cystoscopy is used in urological outpatient departments for diagnostic cystoscopy of bladder cancer and requires a high-level disinfection between each patient. The purpose of this study was to make a microbiological post disinfection efficacy assessment of flexible cystoscopes (FC) using disposable sterile endosheaths. One hundred endosheaths underwent a leak-test for barrier integrity after cystoscopy. Microbiological samples from these cystoscopies were obtained; after removal of the endosheath, and after cleaning the scope with a detergent cloth, rinsing with tap water followed by 70% ethanol disinfection and subsequent drying. The number of colony forming units (cfu) from the samples was counted after 72 hours and then divided in three categories, Clean FC (50 cfu/sample). The result was compared with data of 10 years continuous control sampling recorded in the Copenhagen Clean-Endoscope Quality Control Database (CCQCD) and analyzed with a Chi-square test for homogeneity. All 100 endosheaths passed the leak-test. All samples showed a Clean FC and low means of cfu. A query to the CCQCD, showed that 99.8% (1264/1267) of all FC with a built-in work-channel reprocessed in a WD were clean before use. The reprocessing of FC using endosheaths, as preformed in this study, provides a patient-ready procedure. The results display a reprocessing procedure with low risk of pathogen transmission, high patient safety and a valid alternative to the recommended high-level disinfection procedure of FC. However, the general impression was that sheaths slightly reduced vision and resulted in some patient discomfort.

  9. Hemangioma of the prostate--an unusual cause of lower urinary tract symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serizawa, Reza R; Nørgaard, Nis; Horn, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hemangioma of the prostate gland is extremely rare and only a few cases have been reported. There have been several cases of hemangioma of posterior urethra, urinary bladder and periprostatic plexus in the literature, all presenting with hematuria or hematospermia. Diagnosis of prostatic hemangioma...... is difficult due to its rarity and unspecific symptoms such as hematuria, hematospermia or lower urinary tract symptoms. It cannot be detected by conventional examinations such as cystoscopy or standard rectal ultrasonography....

  10. [Treatment of interstitial cystitis by intravesical instillation of hyaluronic acid: A prospective study on 31 patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Agt, S; Gobet, F; Sibert, L; Leroi, A-M; Grise, P

    2011-03-01

    We evaluate the efficacy of hyaluronate acid instillation for treatment of interstitial cystitis (IC). From March 2008 to May 2009, a prospective study included 31 patients. We used the new definition of IC established by the ICS in 2002. Patients have a urinalysis, a cystoscopy, a hydrodistension test and bladder biopsies. The urodynamic evaluation was not systematic. Patients received weekly six instillations of 40mg (50ml) intravesical hyaluronate acid. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of treatment with two specific questionnaires of interstitial cystitis filled before and after 6 weeks of treatment: the O'Leary-Sant and Pelvic pain and Urgency/Frequency (PUF). Four groups were defined: good response, partial response, poor response and no response. They were composed by 14 patients (45%), two (7%), seven (22%) and eight patients (26%). We obtained 52% positive response (good response and partial response) after 6 weeks of treatment. Patients with cystoscopy and histology abnormal had a response rate of 60%. No serious side effects were observed. Hyaluronate acid has a place in the treatment of interstitial cystitis with an efficiency comparable to other treatments and good tolerance. The response rate to treatment can be improved by better selection of patients, particularly those having a cystoscopy and histology abnormal. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Primary Signet-Ring Cell Adenocarcinoma of the Urinary Bladder Treated with Partial Cystectomy: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Jayarajah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary signet-ring cell carcinoma is a variant of adenocarcinoma which is extremely rare, associated with poor prognosis and generally found to be resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We report a case of primary signet-ring cell carcinoma of the bladder which was successfully treated with partial cystectomy. A 71-year-old female with a history of type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and ischaemic heart disease presented with painless haematuria for 2 months’ duration. The abdominal ultrasonography showed a localised polypoidal vesical growth arising from the bladder dome. Cystoscopy revealed an exophytic solid tumour in the anterior fundal wall. A deep transurethral resection of bladder tumour was done and histology revealed an adenocarcinoma composed of mucinous and signet-ring cell components. Later, considering the patient’s age and the poor general condition, a partial cystectomy was done. Follow-up cystoscopy and ultrasonography were done at 12 months and there was no evidence of tumour recurrence and the patient is currently symptom-free. Partial cystectomy may be considered in patients with localised tumour without evidence of metastasis and poor general condition. Regular cystoscopies and ultrasound imaging are necessary for follow-up and early identification of recurrences.

  12. A Systematic Review of the Diagnostic and Prognostic Value of Urinary Protein Biomarkers in Urothelial Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    D’Costa, Jamie J.; Goldsmith, James C.; Wilson, Jayne S.; Bryan, Richard T.; Ward, Douglas G.

    2016-01-01

    For over 80 years, cystoscopy has remained the gold-standard for detecting tumours of the urinary bladder. Since bladder tumours have a tendency to recur and progress, many patients are subjected to repeated cystoscopies during long-term surveillance, with the procedure being both unpleasant for the patient and expensive for healthcare providers. The identification and validation of bladder tumour specific molecular markers in urine could enable tumour detection and reduce reliance on cystoscopy, and numerous classes of biomarkers have been studied. Proteins represent the most intensively studied class of biomolecule in this setting. As an aid to researchers searching for better urinary biomarkers, we report a comprehensive systematic review of the literature and a searchable database of proteins that have been investigated to date. Our objective was to classify these proteins as: 1) those with robustly characterised sensitivity and specificity for bladder cancer detection; 2) those that show potential but further investigation is required; 3) those unlikely to warrant further investigation; and 4) those investigated as prognostic markers. This work should help to prioritise certain biomarkers for rigorous validation, whilst preventing wasted effort on proteins that have shown no association whatsoever with the disease, or only modest biomarker performance despite large-scale efforts at validation. PMID:27500198

  13. Urine cytology in the evaluation of urological malignancy revisited: is it still necessary?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Falebita, Opeyemi Adegboyega

    2012-01-31

    OBJECTIVE: We aim to determine if urine cytology was still necessary as a routine part of the evaluation for the presence of urological malignancy and to evaluate its cost effectiveness. METHODS: Urine cytology reports over a 6-year period (2000-2005) were retrieved from our institution\\'s pathology department database. Patients with urine cytology positive for malignant cells were identified. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of these patients for age, sex, flexible cystoscopy and radiological imaging results. The cost of urine cytology was retrieved from the pathology department. RESULTS: There were a total of 2,568 urine cytological examinations. Of these, 25 were positive for malignant cells. There were 19 male (76%) and 6 female (24%) patients with a mean age of 72 years (range: 49-97). In 21 patients with positive cytology, a bladder tumor was identified at flexible cystoscopy and\\/or imaging studies. For a positive cytology yield of 1%, EUR 210,000 was spent. CONCLUSIONS: Routine urine cytology was not cost effective and did not add to the diagnostic yield beyond cystoscopy and diagnostic imaging. It may be omitted in the initial evaluation of urological malignancy.

  14. Routine short-term ureteral stent in living donor renal transplantation: introduction of a simple stent removal technique without using anesthesia and cystoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, J; Lu, J; Zu, Q; Yang, S; Sun, S; Cai, W; Zhang, L; Zhang, X

    2011-12-01

    We evaluated routine short-time insertion of ureteral stent in living donor renal transplant at a single center. It was easy to remove the stent without cystoscopy and anesthesia. Between October 2007 and July 2010, a single surgeon performed 76 living donor renal transplantations at one institute. All recipients underwent extravesical ureteroneocystostomy with a 2-0 silk suture passed through the venting side hole of the double-J stent into the bladder; a quadruple knot prevented the suture's slippage or distraction from the stent. After removal of the indwelling catheter at 5 days posttransplantation, the 2-0 silk passed with the urinary stream within 72 hours. The double-J stent was removed at 7 to 10 (mean 8.4) days after kidney transplantation by pulling the 2-0 silk out of the urethral orifice without anesthesia or cystoscopy. There was only one case of stenosis, which was resolved by surgery. No patient developed urinary leakage. There were three episodes of urinary tract infection in 70 patients during first 6 months' follow-up. Routine short-term stenting is a safe and effective technique in living donor renal transplantation. Removal of the stent is feasible without cystoscopy or anesthesia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Ambulatory surgery center market share and rates of outpatient surgery in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbeck, Brent K; Hollingsworth, John M; Dunn, Rodney L; Zaojun Ye; Birkmeyer, John D

    2010-12-01

    Relative to outpatient surgery in hospital settings, ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) are more efficient and associated with a lower cost per case. However, these facilities may also spur higher overall procedure utilization and thus lead to greater overall health care costs. The authors used the State Ambulatory Surgery Database from the State of Florida to identify Medicare-aged patients undergoing 4 common ambulatory procedures in 2006, including knee arthroscopy, cystoscopy, cataract removal, and colonoscopy. Hospital service areas (HSAs) were characterized according to ASC market share, that is, the proportion of residents undergoing outpatient surgery in these facilities. The authors then examined relationships between ASC market share and rates of each procedure. Age-adjusted rates of ambulatory surgery ranged from 190.5 cases per 1000 to 320.8 cases per 1000 in HSAs with low and high ASC market shares, respectively (P market share. The greatest difference, both in relative and absolute terms, was observed for patients undergoing cystoscopy. In areas of high ASC market share, the age-adjusted rate of cystoscopy was nearly 3-fold higher than in areas with low ASC market share (34.5 vs 11.9 per 1000 population; P elderly. Whether ASCs are meeting unmet clinical demand or spurring overutilization is not clear.

  16. Voided urine versus bladder washing cytology for detection of urothelial carcinoma: which is better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Anna Krarup; Jensen, Jørgen Bjerggaard

    2017-08-01

    Cytology is recommended as part of the follow-up of high-grade non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). However, currently there are no solid guideline recommendations regarding the use of voided urine versus bladder washing for cytology as part of the diagnosis or follow-up of NMIBC. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the cytological outcome was equal regarding the two techniques. The authors reviewed all outpatient flexible cystoscopies carried out in their department in 2013. Patient records in the registry of pathology were examined and those with simultaneous urine and bladder washing cytology were included. Previous urothelial disease and positive histology within 3 months after the cystoscopy were registered. A total of 1458 patients had both voided urine and bladder washing cytology and were included in the study, of whom 643 (44%) had a history of urothelial disease. An equal outcome of urine and bladder washing cytology was found in 1447 patients (99.2%). For the remaining 11 patients, only four patients underwent further examinations based on cytology findings in addition to what had already been planned after cystoscopy. Of the included patients, 100 (6.9%) had a positive histological outcome within 3 months. In most patients, no relevant difference between voided urine and bladder washing cytology was observed. Therefore, if cytology is indicated, it is recommended to use the test that is most readily available locally. The additional gain in using both urine and bladder wash is minimal, and can therefore be discarded.

  17. Use of a percutaneously controlled hydraulic occluder for treatment of refractory urinary incontinence in three female cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kendall E; Berent, Allyson C; Weisse, Chick W

    2016-03-01

    CASE DESCRIPTION 3 cats were referred for evaluation of chronic urinary incontinence. CLINICAL FINDINGS A presumptive diagnosis of urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence (USMI) was made in all 3 cats. Preoperatively, incontinence was mild in 1 cat (incontinence during sleep) and moderate to severe (incontinence while awake and at rest) in 2. Structural abnormalities noted during cystoscopy included urethrovestibular junction stenosis (n = 1), vaginal stenosis (1), short urethra (1), and intrapelvic bladder (1). TREATMENT AND OUTCOME All 3 cats were treated by means of implantation of an inflatable silicone hydraulic occluder (HO) via a ventral midline celiotomy. Immediately prior to HO implantation, patients underwent cystoscopy to detect any anatomic abnormalities and confirm the absence of ureteral ectopia. Following surgery, all 3 patients attained complete continence, needing 0 or 1 inflation of the device. Complications included cystoscopy-associated urethral tear (n = 1), constipation (1), stranguria (1), hematuria (2), and urinary tract infection (2). Device explantation was performed 14 weeks after surgery in 1 cat because of postoperative constipation. Constipation persisted and urinary incontinence recurred but was markedly improved following device removal in this cat (leakage of urine only when sleeping at follow-up 29 months after surgery [26 months after device explantation]). At the time of last follow-up, 2 of the 3 cats remained fully continent approximately 3 and 6 years after device implantation. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Findings suggested that implantation of an HO may be a safe and effective long-term treatment for some cats with USMI. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the potential for treatment-related complications and the long-term outcome.

  18. Subpubic Cartilaginous Pseudocyst: Orthopedic Feature with Urological Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fawzy Farag

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Masses arising from structures adjacent to the female urethra can cause obstructive urinary symptoms. Subpubic cartilaginous pseudocyst is a rare degenerative lesion of pubic symphysis that may cause these symptoms. Materials and Methods. A 61-year- and 57-year-old women presented with symptoms of difficult micturition and dyspareunia. Physical examination revealed a painless smooth, rounded, firm, and cystic mass, at the anterior vaginal wall of about 4 cm width. The mass caused inward deviation of the external urethral meatus. Cystoscopy and MRI were done. Results. Cystoscopy of case 1 (61 y demonstrated anterior external urethral compression with normal urethral mucosa. Cystoscopy was not possible in case 2 (57 y because the urethra could not be entered under local anesthesia. MRI showed almost the same findings in both cases: midline, rounded, and cystic mass ~3×3×4 cm, anterosuperior to the urethra, and posteroinferior to the pubic symphysis, with normal features of the urinary bladder. Open surgical excision of theses lesions was performed in both patients. Histopathologic assessment of the specimen obtained from both patients showed degenerated hyaline with areas of fibrinous and mucoid degeneration, a picture suggestive of cartilaginous subpubic pseudocyst. After 11-month and 4-month followup of patients numbers 1 and 2, respectively, there is no evidence of local recurrence of the lesion, either clinically or radiologically and both patients void empty. Conclusions. Subpubic cartilaginous pseudocysts are rare benign lesions with only 13 cases were reported in the literature. Patients present with a spectrum of gynecological and/or urological manifestations. Sizable lesions severely compressing the urethra need surgical excision to restore the voiding function.

  19. Significance of prostatic weight in prostatism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K M; Bruskewitz, R C; Iversen, P

    1983-01-01

    In addition to routine evaluation, 68 patients with prostatism underwent blinded urodynamic testing prior to transurethral prostatectomy and were reexamined symptomatologically and urodynamically at 3 and 12 months after surgery to determine if prostatic weight could predict postoperative outcome....... Resected prostatic weight correlated with estimated weight at cystoscopy and with obstructive symptoms, but not with urodynamic variables of infravesical obstruction. Patients with small prostates improved symptomatologically to the same degree as patients with larger glands, although they did not improve...... to the same degree urodynamically. Prostatic weight, therefore, could not be used to predict the outcome of transurethral surgery....

  20. [Leiomyoma of the bladder causing the destruction of a kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehila, Mehdi; Mekni, Karima; Abouda, Hassine Saber; Chtourou, Maher; Zeghal, Dorra; Chanoufi, Mohamed Badis

    2016-01-01

    Leiomyoma of the bladder is a rare benign tumor deemed to have a good prognosis after surgical treatment. This is unfortunately not always true. We report the case of a 33 year-old patient who consulted for lumbar pain on right side. Exploration of patient revealed bladder floor solid tumor with non-functioning right kidney and left urinary tract dilation. Cystoscopy objectified solid tumor of the right perimeatal bladder. Tumor biopsies were performed together with the insertion of a left double J stent. Anatomo-pathologic study showed leiomyoma of the bladder. The patient underwent laparoscopic myomectomy. The postoperative course was uneventful. Pathological effect and sequelae was complete distruction of kidney.

  1. Surgical management of bladder transitional cell carcinoma in a vesicular diverticulum: case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Raheem, Omer A

    2011-08-01

    We report a case of primary transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of a bladder diverticum along with a literature review. A 55-year-old male presented with painless gross hematuria. A histological diagnosis of TCC within a bladder diverticulum was made following cystoscopical examination. Initially transurethral resection of bladder tumour with subsequent intravesical chemotherapy followed. As a result of recurrence and in view of bladder-sparing therapy, a distal partial cystectomy was performed. This report demonstrates that conservative bladder-sparing treatment can be achieved and subsequently followed by vigilant cystoscopy.

  2. Surgical management of bladder transitional cell carcinoma in a vesicular diverticulum: case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Raheem, Omer A

    2012-02-01

    We report a case of primary transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of a bladder diverticum along with a literature review. A 55-year-old male presented with painless gross hematuria. A histological diagnosis of TCC within a bladder diverticulum was made following cystoscopical examination. Initially transurethral resection of bladder tumour with subsequent intravesical chemotherapy followed. As a result of recurrence and in view of bladder-sparing therapy, a distal partial cystectomy was performed. This report demonstrates that conservative bladder-sparing treatment can be achieved and subsequently followed by vigilant cystoscopy.

  3. Anastomotic Urethroplasty for an Obstructing Calculus Within a Bulbar Urethral Diverticulum and Urethral Stricture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooya Banapour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 61-year-old male with prior history of endoscopic urethral calculus removal presented to the emergency room with urinary retention and a palpable perineal mass. A CT showed a large calcification within the bulbar urethra. After multiple unsuccessful attempts at foley catheter insertion, the urology service was consulted. The patient was taken to the operating room where an obstructing urethral calculus with associated urethral stricture was visualized on cystoscopy. We present an exceedingly rare case of recurrent urethrolithiasis with associated urethral stricture managed with initial suprapubic tube and delayed primary end-to-end urethroplasty, excision of urethral stricture and urethral diverticulectomy.

  4. A bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm following traumatic urethral catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettez, Mathieu; Aubé, Melanie; Sherbiny, Mohamed El; Cabrera, Tatiana; Jednak, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic urethral catheterization may result in a number of serious complications. A rare occurrence is the development of a urethral pseudoaneurysm. We report the case of a 13-year-old male who required placement of a Foley catheter for an orthopedic surgical procedure. The Foley was misplaced in the bulbourethra, resulting in the development of a bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm. Profuse bleeding via the urethra was noted after removal of the catheter, and the patient experienced severe intermittent hematuria during the postoperative period. Cystoscopy revealed a pulsatile mass within the bulbourethra. Angiography confirmed a bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm, which was successfully embolized with resolution of bleeding.

  5. Method for improving photodynamic diagnosis and surgery of bladder tumours using cystoscopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindvold, Lars René; Hermann, Gregers G.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new concept on how to remove unwanted green fluorescence from urine during Photodynamic Diagnostics of tumours in the bladder using cystoscopy. A high power LED based light source (525 nm) has been made in our laboratory. This light source is tailored to match most commercially...... available rigid cystoscopes. A suitable spectral filter and adapter, for the eyepiece of the cystoscope, has been selected which allows the urologist to observe both red fluorescence from tumours and autofluorescence from healthy tissue at the same time....

  6. Three-dimensional stereology as a tool for evaluating bladder outlet obstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wijk, J. Van der; Wijk, J. Van der; Horn, T.

    2008-01-01

    -cup biopsy, taken during cystoscopy, was stereologically evaluated to determine the smooth muscle cell volume and the fractions of collagen and smooth muscle using light and electron microscopy. Results. The collagen fraction was higher in patients than in controls (probably because the patients were older...... tract symptoms (LUTS) suggestive of BOO and five controls (mean age 48.6 years; range 43-53 years) without LUTS were studied. All participants underwent a full examination, including determination of the International Prostate Symptom Score, laboratory analysis and a urodynamic evaluation. A cold...

  7. Urethral Stone Disease Leading to Retention After Hair-bearing Neophalloplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Viviano

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old male patient with a past history of traumatic penile amputation and subsequent penile reconstruction with a radial artery free flap phalloplasty presented to the urology clinic for urinary retention and complaint of a firm penile mass. The patient had been lost to follow-up for 2 years before this presentation. Patient had a suprapubic tube in place from initial surgery, with imaging showing 2 large uroliths encrusted around the end. Urethral stricture was suspected in the patient. On cystoscopy, an additional obstructing urolith was found in penile urethra, appearing to have formed in situ.

  8. Orthotopic ureterocele masquerading as a bladder tumor in a woman with pelvic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David D. Thiel

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Single system orthotopic ureteroceles often present in adulthood are associated with characteristic radiographic findings. We present the case of a 54 year old woman with 8 months of urgency/frequency and pelvic pain that has the cystoscopic appearance of a bladder tumor. Cystoscopic images, radiographs and intraoperative photos demonstrate the work-up, evaluation, and treatment of this unique single system orthotopic ureterocele containing a calculus. This patient demonstrates the need for cystoscopy accompanied by upper tract imaging in patients with new onset pelvic pain, urgency/frequency, and frequent urinary tract infections.

  9. Transvaginal closure of urethra and correction of uterovaginal prolapse in neurologically impaired patient with chronic indwelling catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubal, U; Arunkalaivanan, A S; Baptiste, M

    2009-08-01

    We report the case of a 38-year-old neurologically impaired woman with continuous urinary incontinence as a result of a chronic indwelling catheter for neurogenic bladder. Long-term catheter resulted in dilatation of urethra and pressure necrosis of urethra, with subsequent incontinence despite the catheter. She also had a stage 3 uterovaginal prolapse. She underwent cystoscopy, closure of urethra and bladder neck by transvaginal route (Feneley procedure), insertion of a suprapubic catheter, sacrospinous fixation and posterior colporrhaphy with prolene mesh (Apogee). Vaginal hysterectomy was declined by the patient and her family. She remained dry at follow-up visit and is happy with the outcome.

  10. Vesicovaginal fistula after sexual intercourse. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Toshikazu; Nishiyama, Toru; Ohara, Rei; Hasegawa, Shintaro

    2007-01-01

    A 53-year old female visited our hospital with a complaint of continuous urinary incontinence after sexual intercourse. She had been diagnosed with carcinoma of uterine cervix stage I b2 and had undergone radical hysterectomy and radiation therapy (45 Gy). Cystoscopy revealed vesicovaginal fistula in the trigone which measured almost 3 cm. We repaired it by transabdominal and vaginal routes 5 days after the injury. She was discharged with a Foley catheter. Three months after the operation, cystography revealed improvement of vesicovaginal fistula. (author)

  11. Castleman's Disease: An Interesting Cause of Hematuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolofari, Sotonye Karl; Chow, Wai-Man; Hussain, Basharat

    2015-03-01

    Castleman's disease is a rare benign lymphoproliferative disorder, characterized by benign growths of the lymph node tissue. It is associated with a number of malignancies, including Kaposi sarcoma, non-Hodgkin's and Hodgkins lymphoma, and POEMS syndrome. This report describes the case of a 38 year old gentleman, presenting with painless hematuria. Initial investigations, including flexible cystoscopy were unremarkable. However, subsequent imaging including CT Urogram and MR pelvis revealed multiple prevesical lesions. Histology obtained from excision biopsy revealed histological features consistent with Castleman's disease. In this report we discuss the nature, presentation and treatment modalities of this rare condition.

  12. Reduction of recurrence in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer using photodynamic diagnosis and immediate post-TUR-B chemoprophylaxis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risager, Malene Bøg

    2013-01-01

    (TUR-B), and one single instillation of 40 mg Mitomycin C (MMC) within 24 hours post-TUR-B were introduced at our institution by March 2008. For the study, patients were identified retrospectively using procedure codes for TUR-B and cystoscopy with biopsy and fulguration. Patients with muscle......-invasive bladder cancer were excluded. 190 consecutive patients, treated between 03-01-2008 and 28-02-2010, were included into the intervention group, while 216 patients, treated between 03-01-2006 and 29-02-2008, served as controls. Procedures and pathology results were registered. The groups were comparable...

  13. [Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia presenting with hematuria and severe anemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, A; Goren, E; Segal, M

    1995-07-01

    A patient with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia was admitted with hematuria and severe anemia after mild recurrent episodes of epistaxis. Telangiectasias were found in the skin and buccal and nasal mucosa. No defect in the coagulation mechanism was found; thrombocyte count and function were normal. On cystoscopy, tortuous engorged vessels, some actively bleeding, were seen in the trigonal mucosa. Biopsy showed enlarged vessels in the lamina propria. Electrocoagulation of the bleeding vessels stopped hematuria, but 6 months later it recurred. This time Nd-YAG laser was used to stop the bleeding after electrocoagulation was ineffective.

  14. Eosinophilic cystitis in a 3-year-old boy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breysem, L.; Smet, M.H.; Gordts, H.; Marchal, G.

    1991-01-01

    Eosinophilic cystitis is a rare in children; it also affects adults. Clinical manifestations are variable. The diagnosis can be confirmed by cystoscopy and biopsy, both rather invasive procedures, especially in younger patients. We report a 3-year-old boy with eosinophilic cystitis. The most important radiological finding was marked thickening of the bladder wall, documented on ultrasound, cystography and CT. The CT findings of eosinophilic cystitis have, to the best of our knowledge, not been reported before. In addition to ultrasound and cystography, CT clearly demonstrates extension of the inflammatory process into the perivesical tissues. (orig.)

  15. NBI - plasma vaporization hybrid approach in bladder cancer endoscopic management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stănescu, F; Geavlete, B; Georgescu, D; Jecu, M; Moldoveanu, C; Adou, L; Bulai, C; Ene, C; Geavlete, P

    2014-06-15

    A prospective study was performed aiming to evaluate the surgical efficacy, perioperative safety profile, diagnostic accuracy and medium term results of a multi-modal approach consisting in narrow band imaging (NBI) cystoscopy and bipolar plasma vaporization (BPV) when compared to the standard protocol represented by white light cystoscopy (WLC) and transurethral resection of bladder tumors (TURBT). A total of 260 patients with apparently at least one bladder tumor over 3 cm were included in the trial. In the first group, 130 patients underwent conventional and NBI cystoscopy followed by BPV, while in a similar number of cases of the second arm, classical WLC and TURBT were applied. In all non-muscle invasive bladder tumors' (NMIBT) pathologically confirmed cases, standard monopolar Re-TUR was performed at 4-6 weeks after the initial intervention, followed by one year' BCG immunotherapy. The follow-up protocol included abdominal ultrasound, urinary cytology and WLC, performed every 3 months for a period of 2 years. The obturator nerve stimulation, bladder wall perforation, mean hemoglobin level drop, postoperative bleeding, catheterization period and hospital stay were significantly reduced for the plasma vaporization technique by comparison to conventional resection. Concerning tumoral detection, the present data confirmed the NBI superiority when compared to standard WLC regardless of tumor stage (95.3% vs. 65.1% for CIS, 93.3% vs. 82.2% for pTa, 97.4% vs. 94% for pT1, 95% vs. 84.2% overall). During standard Re-TUR the overall (6.3% versus 17.4%) and primary site (3.6% versus 12.8%) residual tumors' rates were significantly lower for the NBI-BPV group. The 1 (7.2% versus 18.3%) and 2 (11.5% versus 25.8%) years' recurrence rates were substantially lower for the combined approach. NBI cystoscopy significantly improved diagnostic accuracy, while bipolar technology showed a higher surgical efficiency, lower morbidity and faster postoperative recovery. The combined

  16. A bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm following traumatic urethral catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettez, Mathieu; Aubé, Melanie; Sherbiny, Mohamed El; Cabrera, Tatiana; Jednak, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic urethral catheterization may result in a number of serious complications. A rare occurrence is the development of a urethral pseudoaneurysm. We report the case of a 13-year-old male who required placement of a Foley catheter for an orthopedic surgical procedure. The Foley was misplaced in the bulbourethra, resulting in the development of a bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm. Profuse bleeding via the urethra was noted after removal of the catheter, and the patient experienced severe intermittent hematuria during the postoperative period. Cystoscopy revealed a pulsatile mass within the bulbourethra. Angiography confirmed a bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm, which was successfully embolized with resolution of bleeding. PMID:28163815

  17. Simultaneous uterine and urinary bladder rupture in an otherwise successful vaginal birth after cesarean delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Szu-Ying; Chang, Shuenn-Dhy; Liang, Ching-Chung

    2010-12-01

    Uterine rupture is the primary concern when a patient chooses a trial of labor after a cesarean section. Bladder rupture accompanied by uterine rupture should be taken into consideration if gross hematuria occurs. We report the case of a patient with uterine rupture during a trial of labor after cesarean delivery. She had a normal course of labor and no classic signs of uterine rupture. However, gross hematuria was noted after repair of the episiotomy. The patient began to complain of progressive abdominal pain, gross hematuria and oliguria. Cystoscopy revealed a direct communication between the bladder and the uterus. When opening the bladder peritoneum, rupture sites over the anterior uterus and posterior wall of the bladder were noted. Following primary repair of both wounds, a Foley catheter was left in place for 12 days. The patient had achieved a full recovery by the 2-year follow-up examination. Bladder injury and uterine rupture can occur at any time during labor. Gross hematuria immediately after delivery is the most common presentation. Cystoscopy is a good tool to identify the severity of bladder injury. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Simultaneous Uterine and Urinary Bladder Rupture in an Otherwise Successful Vaginal Birth After Cesarean Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Ying Ho

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Uterine rupture is the primary concern when a patient chooses a trial of labor after a cesarean section. Bladder rupture accompanied by uterine rupture should be taken into consideration if gross hematuria occurs. We report the case of a patient with uterine rupture during a trial of labor after cesarean delivery. She had a normal course of labor and no classic signs of uterine rupture. However, gross hematuria was noted after repair of the episiotomy. The patient began to complain of progressive abdominal pain, gross hematuria and oliguria. Cystoscopy revealed a direct communication between the bladder and the uterus. When opening the bladder peritoneum, rupture sites over the anterior uterus and posterior wall of the bladder were noted. Following primary repair of both wounds, a Foley catheter was left in place for 12 days. The patient had achieved a full recovery by the 2-year follow-up examination. Bladder injury and uterine rupture can occur at any time during labor. Gross hematuria immediately after delivery is the most common presentation. Cystoscopy is a good tool to identify the severity of bladder injury.

  19. [Clinical, ureteroscopic and photodynamic diagnosis of urothelial carcinomas of the upper tract: state-of-the art review for the yearly scientific report of the French National Association of Urology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nison, L; Bozzini, G; Rouprêt, M; Traxer, O; Colin, P

    2014-11-01

    To propose a state-of-the art of current knowledge about clinical, ureteroscopic and photodynamic for the diagnosis of the upper urinary tract cancer (UTUC). A systematic review of the literature search was performed from the database Medline (NLM, Pubmed), focused on the following keywords: urothelial carcinomas; upper urinary tract; ureter; renal pelvis; diagnosis; fluorescence; ureteroscopy; photodynamic technique; biopsy; cytology. Gross hematuria and flank pain are the two main clinical symptoms revealing a UTUC in daily clinical practice. Urinary cystoscopy and cystoscopy are mandatory to rule out a concomittant synchronous bladder tumour. Flexible ureteroscopy has revolutionized the management of UTUC by allowing a full exploration of upper urinary tract, an endoscopi vizualization of the tumour and assessment of grade with biopsies. A flexible ureteroscopy is mandatory in diagnostic evaluation of UTUC as soon as a conservative management is being considered. New investigation technologies such as fluorescence, narrow band imaging and optical coherence tomography (± combined with ultra sound), are promising for a near future. It has to be understood that the diagnostic work-up of a UTUC has to be exhaustive and particularly the search of another urothelial carcinoma within the urinary tract. Flexible ureterosocopy has revolutionized the diagnosis and management of UTUC and belongs fully to its initial evaluation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Intraoperative translabial ultrasound for urethral diverticula: A road map for surgeons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Zein, C.; Khoury, N.; El-Zein, Y.; Bulbul, M.; Birjawi, G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To highlight the importance of intraoperative translabial ultrasound, for identification of diverticular neck allowing complete resection of periurethral diverticula and decrease in the recurrence rate. Material and methods: This study included 4 women of age range between 38 and 68 years presenting for recurrent urinary tract infections and urethral pain. All had translabial urethral ultrasound and cystoscopy with and without U/C guidance. Results: Prior cystoscopy in all these patients failed to demonstrate the diverticulum. Translabial ultrasound showed the diverticula some of which were infected. Ultrasound was used intraoperatively to guide the surgeon. With this approach the abnormality was confirmed and the neck of the diverticulum was identified through percutaneous needle insertion. This allowed complete resection of the diverticula. Conclusion: Translabial ultrasound is a non-invasive technique that plays a major role in examining the urethra and identifying the periuthral diverticula. In our experience, it was very useful as an adjunct to guide the surgeon intraoperatively allowing complete excision of the diverticulum.

  1. Intraoperative translabial ultrasound for urethral diverticula: A road map for surgeons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Zein, C.; Khoury, N.; El-Zein, Y. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Bliss Street, P.O. Box 11-0236, Riad El Solh 1107 2020, Beirut (Lebanon); Bulbul, M. [Department of Urology, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Bliss Street, P.O. Box 11-0236, Riad El Solh 1107 2020, Beirut (Lebanon); Birjawi, G. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, American University of Beirut Medical Center, Bliss Street, P.O. Box 11-0236, Riad El Solh 1107 2020, Beirut (Lebanon)], E-mail: gb02@aub.edu.lb

    2009-04-15

    Purpose: To highlight the importance of intraoperative translabial ultrasound, for identification of diverticular neck allowing complete resection of periurethral diverticula and decrease in the recurrence rate. Material and methods: This study included 4 women of age range between 38 and 68 years presenting for recurrent urinary tract infections and urethral pain. All had translabial urethral ultrasound and cystoscopy with and without U/C guidance. Results: Prior cystoscopy in all these patients failed to demonstrate the diverticulum. Translabial ultrasound showed the diverticula some of which were infected. Ultrasound was used intraoperatively to guide the surgeon. With this approach the abnormality was confirmed and the neck of the diverticulum was identified through percutaneous needle insertion. This allowed complete resection of the diverticula. Conclusion: Translabial ultrasound is a non-invasive technique that plays a major role in examining the urethra and identifying the periuthral diverticula. In our experience, it was very useful as an adjunct to guide the surgeon intraoperatively allowing complete excision of the diverticulum.

  2. The length of the male urethra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias. S. Kohler

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Catheter-based medical devices are an important component of the urologic armamentarium. To our knowledge, there is no population-based data regarding normal male urethral length. We evaluated the length of the urethra in men with normal genitourinary anatomy undergoing either Foley catheter removal or standard cystoscopy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Male urethral length was obtained in 109 men. After study permission was obtained, the subject's penis was placed on a gentle stretch and the catheter was marked at the tip of the penis. The catheter was then removed and the distance from the mark to the beginning of the re-inflated balloon was measured. Alternatively, urethral length was measured at the time of cystoscopy, on removal of the cystoscope. Data on age, weight, and height was obtained in patients when possible. RESULTS: The mean urethral length was 22.3 cm with a standard deviation of 2.4 cm. Urethral length varied between 15 cm and 29 cm. No statistically significant correlation was found between urethral length and height, weight, body mass index (BMI, or age. CONCLUSIONS: Literature documenting the length of the normal male adult urethra is scarce. Our data adds to basic anatomic information of the male urethra and may be used to optimize genitourinary device design.

  3. Vaginal-sparing ventral buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty for female urethral stricture: A novel modification of surgical technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoag, Nathan; Gani, Johan; Chee, Justin

    2016-07-01

    To present a novel modification of surgical technique to treat female urethral stricture (FUS) by a vaginal-sparing ventral buccal mucosal urethroplasty. Recurrent FUS represents an uncommon, though difficult clinical scenario to manage definitively. A variety of surgical techniques have been described to date, yet a lack of consensus on the optimal procedure persists. We present a 51-year-old female with urethral stricture involving the entire urethra. Suspected etiology was iatrogenic from cystoscopy 17 years prior. Since then, the patient had undergone at least 25 formal urethral dilations and periods of self-dilation. In lithotomy position, the urethra was dilated to accommodate forceps, and ventral urethrotomy carried out sharply, exposing a bed of periurethral tissue. Buccal mucosa was harvested, and a ventral inlay technique facilitated by a nasal speculum, was used to place the graft from the proximal urethra/bladder neck to urethral meatus without a vaginal incision. Graft was sutured into place, and urethral Foley catheter inserted. The vaginal-sparing ventral buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty was deemed successful as of last follow-up. Flexible cystoscopy demonstrated patency of the repair at 6 months. At 10 months of follow-up, the patient was voiding well, with no urinary incontinence. No further interventions have been required. This case describes a novel modification of surgical technique for performing buccal mucosal urethroplasty for FUS. By avoiding incision of the vaginal mucosa, benefits may include reduced: morbidity, urinary incontinence, and wound complications including urethro-vaginal fistula.

  4. Radiotherapy of bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Yoshiyuki

    1978-01-01

    Methods of treating bladder cancer include surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, as well as various combinations of these. The author investigated clinically and histopathologically the therapeutic results of preoperative irradiation in cases of bladder cancer. 1. The survival rates (crude survival rates) in forty cases of bladder cancer were 90% after one year, 62.5% after three years and 46% after five years from the treatment. 2. As the result of irradiation, urogram improved in 25%, which was comparatively remarkable in high stage cases. There were no cases of deterioration of urogram findings caused by irradiation. Cystoscopy revealed disappearance or remarkable shrinkage of the tumors in 35% of the total cases and effects of the irradiation was observed not correlated to the stage and grade. 3. With respect to the histopathological changes, the changes became greater as the dosage increased and the higher the stage and grade were the more remarkable tendency was observed. 4. From our clinical observations such as urogram, cystoscopy and histopathologically, we estimated the optimum dosage of preoperative irradiation for bladder cancer is 3000 - 4000 rad. Thus, we concluded that the radiotherapy is effective in reducing both surgical invasion and postoperative recurrence. (author)

  5. [Calculus formation in the prostatic cavity after transurethral resection of the prostate: causes, treatment and prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhi-Feng; Xu, Xiao-Feng; Cheng, Wen; Zhou, Wen-Quan; Ge, Jing-Ping; Zhang, Zheng-Yu; Gao, Jian-Ping

    2012-05-01

    To study the causes, clinical manifestations, treatment and prevention of calculus that develops in the prostatic cavity after transurethral resection of the prostate. We reported 11 cases of calculus that developed in the prostatic cavity after transurethral resection or transurethral plasmakinetic resection of prostate. The patients complained of repeated symptoms of frequent micturition, urgent micturition and urodynia after operation, accompanied with urinary tract infection and some with urinary obstruction, which failed to respond to anti-infective therapies. Cystoscopy revealed calculi in the prostatic cavity, with eschar, sphacelus, uneven wound surface and small diverticula in some cases. After diagnosis, 1 case was treated by holmium laser lithotripsy and a second transurethral resection of the prostate, while the other 10 had the calculi removed under the cystoscope, followed by 1 -2 weeks of anti-infective therapy. After treatment, all the 11 cases showed normal results of routine urinalysis, and no more symptoms of frequent micturition, urgent micturition and urodynia. Three- to six-month follow-up found no bladder irritation symptoms and urinary tract infection. Repeated symptoms of frequent micturition, urgent micturition, urodynia and urinary tract infection after transurethral resection of the prostate should be considered as the indicators of calculus in the prostatic cavity, which can be confirmed by cystoscopy. It can be treated by lithotripsy or removal of the calculus under the cystoscope, or even a second transurethral resection of the prostate. For its prevention, excessive electric coagulation and uneven wound surface should be avoided and anti-infection treatment is needed.

  6. Bladder wall thickness mapping for magnetic resonance cystography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Yang; Liang Zhengrong; Zhu Hongbin; Han Hao; Yan Zengmin; Duan Chaijie; Lu Hongbing; Gu Xianfeng

    2013-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown evidence that the bladder wall thickness is an effective biomarker for bladder abnormalities. Clinical optical cystoscopy, the current gold standard, cannot show the wall thickness. The use of ultrasound by experts may generate some local thickness information, but the information is limited in field-of-view and is user dependent. Recent advances in magnetic resonance (MR) imaging technologies lead MR-based virtual cystoscopy or MR cystography toward a potential alternative to map the wall thickness for the entire bladder. From a high-resolution structural MR volumetric image of the abdomen, a reasonable segmentation of the inner and outer borders of the bladder wall can be achievable. Starting from here, this paper reviews the limitation of a previous distance field-based approach of measuring the thickness between the two borders and then provides a solution to overcome the limitation by an electric field-based strategy. In addition, this paper further investigates a surface-fitting strategy to minimize the discretization errors on the voxel-like borders and facilitate the thickness mapping on the three-dimensional patient-specific bladder model. The presented thickness calculation and mapping were tested on both phantom and human subject datasets. The results are preliminary but very promising with a noticeable improvement over the previous distance field-based approach. (paper)

  7. MRI of acquired posterior urethral diverticulum following surgery for anorectal malformations

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    Podberesky, Daniel J.; Anton, Christopher G. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Weaver, Nicholas C. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Lawal, Taiwo [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States); University College Hospital, Department of Surgery, Ibadan (Nigeria); Hamrick, Miller C.; Pena, Alberto; Levitt, Marc A. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Alam, Shumyle [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Urology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Posterior urethral diverticulum (PUD) is one of the most common postoperative complications associated with anorectal malformation (ARM) correction. To describe our MRI protocol for evaluating acquired PUD following ARM surgery, and associated imaging findings. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed 61 pelvic MRI examinations performed for postoperative ARM for PUD identification and characteristics. Associated clinical, operative and cystoscopy reports were also reviewed and compared to MRI. An abnormal retrourethral focus suspicious for PUD was identified at MRI in 13 patients. Ten of these patients underwent subsequent surgery or cystoscopy, and PUD was confirmed in five. All of the confirmed PUD cases appeared as cystic lesions that were at least 1 cm in diameter in two imaging planes. Four of the false-positive cases were punctate retrourethral foci that were visible only on a single MRI plane. One patient had a seminal vesical cyst mimicking a PUD. Pelvic MRI can be a useful tool in the postoperative assessment of suspected PUD associated with ARM. Radiologists should have a high clinical suspicion for a postoperative PUD when a cystic lesion posterior to the bladder/posterior urethra is encountered on two imaging planes in these patients. (orig.)

  8. MRI of acquired posterior urethral diverticulum following surgery for anorectal malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podberesky, Daniel J.; Anton, Christopher G.; Weaver, Nicholas C.; Lawal, Taiwo; Hamrick, Miller C.; Pena, Alberto; Levitt, Marc A.; Alam, Shumyle

    2011-01-01

    Posterior urethral diverticulum (PUD) is one of the most common postoperative complications associated with anorectal malformation (ARM) correction. To describe our MRI protocol for evaluating acquired PUD following ARM surgery, and associated imaging findings. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed 61 pelvic MRI examinations performed for postoperative ARM for PUD identification and characteristics. Associated clinical, operative and cystoscopy reports were also reviewed and compared to MRI. An abnormal retrourethral focus suspicious for PUD was identified at MRI in 13 patients. Ten of these patients underwent subsequent surgery or cystoscopy, and PUD was confirmed in five. All of the confirmed PUD cases appeared as cystic lesions that were at least 1 cm in diameter in two imaging planes. Four of the false-positive cases were punctate retrourethral foci that were visible only on a single MRI plane. One patient had a seminal vesical cyst mimicking a PUD. Pelvic MRI can be a useful tool in the postoperative assessment of suspected PUD associated with ARM. Radiologists should have a high clinical suspicion for a postoperative PUD when a cystic lesion posterior to the bladder/posterior urethra is encountered on two imaging planes in these patients. (orig.)

  9. A comparative study of ascending urethrogram and sono-urethrogram in the evaluation of stricture urethra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikumar B.R.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available To compare the efficacy of sono-urethrogram and ascending urethrogram in the evaluation of stricture urethra. Materials and Methods In this prospective study 40 patients with obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms and suspected to be having stricture urethra were subjected to ascending urethrogram and sonourethrogram. The radiologist was blinded to the findings of ascending urethrogram. All the sonourethrograms were done by the same radiologist. The findings of sonourethrogram & ascending urethrogram were compared with the findings of cystoscopy and intra-operative findings. The specificity, sensitivity,positive predictive value and negative predictive value of each modality in the diagnosis of various urethral anomalies were estimated. Results The sonourethrogram identified stricture disease in all the patients who had abnormal ascending urethrogram. In addition, other abnormalities like spongiofibrosis, diverticula and stones which were not picked up in ascending urethrogram were diagnosed by sonourethrogram. The cystoscopic and intra-operative findings with respect to stricture length, diameter and spongiofibrosis correlated well with sono-urethrogram findings. 5 patients who had stricture in the ascending urethrogram were found to be having the normal urethra in sonourethrogram and confirmed by cystoscopy. Conclusion sonourethrogram is an effective alternative to ascending urethrogram in the evaluation of stricture urethra. It is more sensitive in the diagnosis of anterior urethral strictures than posterior urethral strictures. It is superior to ascending urethrogram in the identification of spongiofibrosis, diameter and length of the stricture. The complications were lower in sonourethrogram group compared to ascending urethrogram.

  10. A comparative study of ascending urethrogram and sono-urethrogram in the evaluation of stricture urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravikumar, B R; Tejus, Chiranjeevi; Madappa, K M; Prashant, Dharakh; Dhayanand, G S

    2015-01-01

    To compare the efficacy of sono-urethrogram and ascending urethrogram in the evaluation of stricture urethra. In this prospective study 40 patients with obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms and suspected to be having stricture urethra were subjected to ascending urethrogram and sonourethrogram. The radiologist was blinded to the findings of ascending urethrogram. All the sonourethrograms were done by the same radiologist. The findings of sonourethrogram & ascending urethrogram were compared with the findings of cystoscopy and intra-operative findings. The specificity, sensitivity,positive predictive value and negative predictive value of each modality in the diagnosis of various urethral anomalies were estimated. The sonourethrogram identified stricture disease in all the patients who had abnormal ascending urethrogram. In addition, other abnormalities like spongiofibrosis, diverticula and stones which were not picked up in ascending urethrogram were diagnosed by sonourethrogram. The cystoscopic and intra-operative findings with respect to stricture length, diameter and spongiofibrosis correlated well with sono-urethrogram findings. 5 patients who had stricture in the ascending urethrogram were found to be having the normal urethra in sonourethrogram and confirmed by cystoscopy. sonourethrogram is an effective alternative to ascending urethrogram in the evaluation of stricture urethra. It is more sensitive in the diagnosis of anterior urethral strictures than posterior urethral strictures. It is superior to ascending urethrogram in the identification of spongiofibrosis, diameter and length of the stricture. The complications were lower in sonourethrogram group compared to ascending urethrogram.

  11. Assessment of DNA damage and telomerase activity in exfoliated urinary cells as sensitive and noninvasive biomarkers for early diagnosis of bladder cancer in ex-workers of a rubber tyres industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Delia; Casadio, Valentina; Bravaccini, Sara; Iavicoli, Sergio; Pira, Enrico; Romano, Canzio; Fresegna, Anna Maria; Maiello, Raffaele; Ciervo, Aureliano; Buresti, Giuliana; Zoli, Wainer; Calistri, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify sensitive and noninvasive biomarkers of early carcinogenic effect at target organ to use in biomonitoring studies of workers at risk for previous occupational exposure to potential carcinogens. Standard urine cytology (Papanicolaou staining test), comet assay, and quantitative telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay were performed in 159 ex-rubber workers employed in tyres production and 97 unexposed subjects. In TRAP positive cases, a second level analysis using FISH (Urovysion) was done. Cystoscopy results were available for 11 individuals whose 6 FISH/TRAP/comet positive showed in 3 cases a dysplastic condition confirmed by biopsy, 1 comet positive resulted in infiltrating UBC to the biopsy and with hyperplasia and slight dysplasia to the urinary cytology, 1 comet positive resulted in papillary superficial UBC to the biopsy, 1 FISH/TRAP positive showed a normal condition, and 2 TRAP positive showed in one case a phlogosis condition. The results evidenced good concordance of TRAP, comet, and FISH assays as early biomarkers of procarcinogenic effect confirmed by the dysplastic condition and UBC found by cystoscopy-biopsy analysis. The analysis of these markers in urine cells could be potentially more accurate than conventional cytology in monitoring workers exposed to mixture of bladder potential carcinogens.

  12. Assessment of DNA Damage and Telomerase Activity in Exfoliated Urinary Cells as Sensitive and Noninvasive Biomarkers for Early Diagnosis of Bladder Cancer in Ex-Workers of a Rubber Tyres Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia Cavallo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to identify sensitive and noninvasive biomarkers of early carcinogenic effect at target organ to use in biomonitoring studies of workers at risk for previous occupational exposure to potential carcinogens. Standard urine cytology (Papanicolaou staining test, comet assay, and quantitative telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP assay were performed in 159 ex-rubber workers employed in tyres production and 97 unexposed subjects. In TRAP positive cases, a second level analysis using FISH (Urovysion was done. Cystoscopy results were available for 11 individuals whose 6 FISH/TRAP/comet positive showed in 3 cases a dysplastic condition confirmed by biopsy, 1 comet positive resulted in infiltrating UBC to the biopsy and with hyperplasia and slight dysplasia to the urinary cytology, 1 comet positive resulted in papillary superficial UBC to the biopsy, 1 FISH/TRAP positive showed a normal condition, and 2 TRAP positive showed in one case a phlogosis condition. The results evidenced good concordance of TRAP, comet, and FISH assays as early biomarkers of procarcinogenic effect confirmed by the dysplastic condition and UBC found by cystoscopy-biopsy analysis. The analysis of these markers in urine cells could be potentially more accurate than conventional cytology in monitoring workers exposed to mixture of bladder potential carcinogens.

  13. Anterior Urethral Valves

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    Vidyadhar P. Mali

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available We studied the clinical presentation and management of four patients with anterior urethral valves; a rare cause of urethral obstruction in male children. One patient presented antenatally with oligohydramnios, bilateral hydronephrosis and bladder thickening suggestive of an infravesical obstruction. Two other patients presented postnatally at 1 and 2 years of age, respectively, with poor stream of urine since birth. The fourth patient presented at 9 years with frequency and dysuria. Diagnosis was established on either micturating cystourethrogram (MCU (in 2 or on cystoscopy (in 2. All patients had cystoscopic ablation of the valves. One patient developed a postablation stricture that was resected with an end-to-end urethroplasty. He had an associated bilateral vesicoureteric junction (VUJ obstruction for which a bilateral ureteric reimplantation was done at the same time. On long-term follow-up, all patients demonstrated a good stream of urine. The renal function is normal. Patients are continent and free of urinary infections. Anterior urethral valves are rare obstructive lesions in male children. The degree of obstruction is variable, and so they may present with mild micturition difficulty or severe obstruction with hydroureteronephrosis and renal impairment. Hence, it is important to evaluate the anterior urethra in any male child with suspected infravesical obstruction. The diagnosis is established by MCU or cystoscopy and the treatment is always surgical, either a transurethral ablation or an open resection. The long-term prognosis is good.

  14. Closure and augmentation of bladder exstrophy using rectus abdominis musculo-peritoneal flap

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    P Agarwal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of the rectus abdominis myo-peritoneal flap (RAMP technique for the closure and augmentation of small, non-elastic, non-compliant bladder exstrophies. Materials and Methods: The RAMP technique was used in three boys with bladder exstrophy who presented late with small, non-elastic, non-compliant bladder. The clinical outcome, imaging, cystoscopy, biochemical and microbiological studies were assessed during a follow-up of 36 months. Results: Bladder closure and augmentation was achieved in all patients without any complications. There were no urinary tract infections, metabolic problems or electrolyte disturbances and the kidney function remained normal in all patients. Radiography confirmed intact function and anatomy of the urinary tract and cystoscopy showed complete coverage of the inner peritoneal layer of RAMP with uroepithelium. No stone formation or mucous production was detected. Conclusions: The RAMP technique is a good alternative for closing bladder exstrophies and achieves an increase in bladder capacity and compliance. The technique is indicated in the closure of large bladder defects, bladder exstrophies with small, inelastic, non-compliant bladder remnants and failed primary closures.

  15. Mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma) of the urinary bladder: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsang, T.; Masters, J.; Chan, K.; Jose, C.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma) of the urinary bladder is a rare condition. The best treatment approach for this disease is controversial. A case report on a patient with MALT lymphoma of the urinary bladder. The relevant current literature was reviewed. A 79 year old lady presented with haematuria in 2002. Ultrasound of the pelvis showed a large tumour in the bladder. Cystoscopy revealed a mass arising from the bladder. Transurethral resection of the tumour was performed. Histology showed Non Hodgkin's lymphoma of MALT type. CT showed a 8.9 X 7.6 cm solid tumour involving almost whole of the bladder. The patient could not tolerate anti helicobacter treatment and was then treated with radiotherapy. The pelvis was treated with 18 MV photons with a 3 field technique in 2 phases, with CT planning. In phase 1, the pelvis was treated to 24 Gy in 12 fractions, over 2.5 weeks. Phase 2 was treated to a reduced pelvic field, to a dose of 16 Gy in 8 fractions over 1.5 weeks. Five months after radiotherapy, repeat cystoscopy and biopsy of bladder base showed no evidence of malignancy. MALT lymphoma of the urinary bladder responds well to radiotherapy and permits bladder preservation. The current literature in management of MALT lymphoma of urinary bladder is reviewed

  16. Optical coherence tomography in diagnostics of precancer and cancer of human bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagaynova, Elena V.; Streltsova, Olga S.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Shakhova, Natalia M.; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Kamensky, Vladislav A.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Snopova, Ludmila B.; Donchenko, Ekaterina V.

    2004-07-01

    Our goal was statistical assessment of the in vivo cystoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) ability to detect neoplasia in human urinary bladder. We analyzed major reasons of false positive and false negative image recognition results. Optical coherence tomography was performed to image the bladder during cystoscopy. The study enrolled 63 patients with suspicion for bladder cancer and scheduled for cystoscopy. The diagnosis was established by histopathology examination of a biopsy. Each biopsy site was examined by OCT. Benign conditions were diagnosed for 31 patients, and dysplasia or carcinoma were diagnosed for 32 patients. Six physicians blinded to all clinical data participated in the dichotomy recognition (malignant or benign) of the OCT images. 98% sensitivity and 72% specificity for the OCT recognition of dysplastic/malignant versus benign/reactive conditions of the bladder are demonstrated. Total error rate was 14.8%. The interobserver agreement multi-rater kappa coefficient is 0.80. The superficial and invasive bladder cancer and high-grade dysplasia were recognized with minimum error rate ranging from 0 to 3.3%. High sensitivity and good specificity of the OCT method in the diagnostics of bladder neoplasia makes OCT a promising complementary cystoscopic technique for non-invasive evaluation of zones suspicious for high-grade dysplasia and cancer.

  17. Accuracy of preoperative urinary symptoms, urinalysis, computed tomography and cystoscopic findings for the diagnosis of urinary bladder invasion in patients with colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woranisarakul, Varat; Ramart, Patkawat; Phinthusophon, Kittipong; Chotikawanich, Ekkarin; Prapasrivorakul, Siriluck; Lohsiriwat, Varut

    2014-01-01

    To determine the accuracy of preoperative urinary symptoms, urinalysis, computed tomography (CT) and cystoscopic findings for the diagnosis of urinary bladder invasion in patients with colorectal cancer. Records of patients with colorectal cancer and a suspicion of bladder invasion, who underwent tumor resection with partial or total cystectomy between 2002 and 2013 at the Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, were reviewed. Correlations between preoperative urinary symptoms, urinalysis, cystoscopic finding, CT imaging and final pathological reports were analyzed. This study included 90 eligible cases (71% male). The most common site of primary colorectal cancer was the sigmoid colon (44%), followed by the rectum (33%). Final pathological reports showed definite bladder invasion in 53 cases (59%). Significant features for predicting definite tumor invasion were gross hematuria (OR 13.6, sensitivity 39%, specificity 73%), and visible tumor during cystoscopy (OR 5.33, sensitivity 50%, specificity 84%). Predictive signs in CT imaging were gross tumor invasion (OR 7.07, sensitivity 89%, specificity 46%), abnormal enhancing mass at bladder wall (OR 4.09, sensitivity 68%, specificity 66%), irregular bladder mucosa (OR 3.53, sensitivity 70%, specificity 60% ), and loss of perivesical fat plane (OR 3.17, sensitivity 81%, specificity 43%). However, urinary analysis and other urinary tract symptoms were poor predictors of bladder involvement. The present study demonstrated that the most relevant preoperative predictors of definite bladder invasion in patients with colorectal cancer are gross hematuria, a visible tumor during cystoscopy, and abnormal CT findings.

  18. Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the urinary bladder in a patient with bladder cancer previously treated with intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numakura, Satoe; Morikawa, Teppei; Ushiku, Tetsuo; Toyoshima, Toyoaki; Fukayama, Masashi

    2014-02-01

    We report an extremely rare case of Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) of the urinary bladder. A 68-year-old man presented with gross hematuria. Cystoscopy showed multiple papillary tumors in the urinary bladder, and transurethral resection was performed. Pathological diagnosis was high-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma with lamina propria invasion. The patient received six treatments with intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) therapy. Seven months after surgery, follow-up cystoscopy showed three elevated lesions in the urinary bladder, two of which were identified histologically as recurrent urothelial carcinoma. Microscopic examination of the lesion at the anterior wall revealed diffuse infiltration of medium to large histiocytoid cells in the lamina propria, many of which had distorted nuclei and nuclear grooves. Dense eosinophilic infiltration was also observed. Immunohistochemically, the histiocytoid cells were diffusely positive for S-100 and CD1a, but negative for cytokeratin AE1/AE3 and melanosome-associated antigen recognized by HMB-45. Based on the histological and immunohistochemical features, we diagnosed the lesion as LCH of the urinary bladder. There was no evidence of recurrence of either bladder cancer or LCH after an 18-month follow-up. To avoid misdiagnosis, urologists and pathologists should be aware that LCH may develop in the urinary bladder after intravesical BCG therapy for bladder cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. Robust bladder image registration by redefining data-term in total variational approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sharib; Daul, Christian; Galbrun, Ernest; Amouroux, Marine; Guillemin, François; Blondel, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Cystoscopy is the standard procedure for clinical diagnosis of bladder cancer diagnosis. Bladder carcinoma in situ are often multifocal and spread over large areas. In vivo, localization and follow-up of these tumors and their nearby sites is necessary. But, due to the small field of view (FOV) of the cystoscopic video images, urologists cannot easily interpret the scene. Bladder mosaicing using image registration facilitates this interpretation through the visualization of entire lesions with respect to anatomical landmarks. The reference white light (WL) modality is affected by a strong variability in terms of texture, illumination conditions and motion blur. Moreover, in the complementary fluorescence light (FL) modality, the texture is visually different from that of the WL. Existing algorithms were developed for a particular modality and scene conditions. This paper proposes a more general on fly image registration approach for dealing with these variability issues in cystoscopy. To do so, we present a novel, robust and accurate image registration scheme by redefining the data-term of the classical total variational (TV) approach. Quantitative results on realistic bladder phantom images are used for verifying accuracy and robustness of the proposed model. This method is also qualitatively assessed with patient data mosaicing for both WL and FL modalities.

  20. Pathological diagnosis of bladder cancer by image analysis of hypericin induced fluorescence cystoscopic images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kah, James C. Y.; Olivo, Malini C.; Lau, Weber K. O.; Sheppard, Colin J. R.

    2005-08-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis of bladder carcinoma based on hypericin fluorescence cystoscopy has shown to have a higher degree of sensitivity for the detection of flat bladder carcinoma compared to white light cystoscopy. The potential of the photosensitizer hypericin-induced fluorescence in performing non-invasive optical biopsy to grade bladder cancer in vivo using fluorescence cystoscopic image analysis without surgical resection for tissue biopsy is investigated in this study. The correlation between tissue fluorescence and histopathology of diseased tissue was explored and a diagnostic algorithm based on fluorescence image analysis was developed to classify the bladder cancer without surgical resection for tissue biopsy. Preliminary results suggest a correlation between tissue fluorescence and bladder cancer grade. By combining both the red-to-blue and red-to-green intensity ratios into a 2D scatter plot yields an average sensitivity and specificity of around 70% and 85% respectively for pathological cancer grading of the three different grades of bladder cancer. Therefore, the diagnostic algorithm based on colorimetric intensity ratio analysis of hypericin fluorescence cystoscopic images developed in this preliminary study shows promising potential to optically diagnose and grade bladder cancer in vivo.

  1. Urine Telomerase for Diagnosis and Surveillance of Bladder Cancer

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    Angela Lamarca

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bladder cancer has increased incidence during last decades. For those patients with nonmuscle involved tumors, noninvasive diagnosis test and surveillance methods must be designed to avoid current cystoscopies that nowadays are done regularly in a lot of patients. Novel urine biomarkers have been developed during last years. Telomerase is important in cancer biology, improving the division capacity of cancer cells. Even urinary telomerase could be a potentially useful urinary tumor marker; its use for diagnosis of asymptomatic and symptomatic patients or its impact during surveillance is still unknown. Moreover, there will need to be uniformity and standardization in the assays before it can become useful in clinical practice. It does not seem to exist a real difference between the most classical assays for the detection of urine telomerase (TRAP and hTERT. However, the new detection methods with modified TeloTAGGG telomerase or with gold nanoparticles must also be taken into consideration for the correct development of this diagnosis method. Maybe the target population would be the high-risk groups within screening programs. To date there is no enough evidence to use it alone and to eliminate cystoscopies from the diagnosis and surveillance of these patients. The combination with cytology or FISH is still preferred.

  2. Urothelial carcinoma arising within bladder diverticulum—Report of a case and review of the literature

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    Hung-En Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bladder diverticulum is an outpouching of bladder mucosa through the musculature of the bladder wall. The incidence of bladder diverticulum in Taiwan is about 1.7% in children and 23.4% in adults. Intradiverticular carcinoma of urinary bladder is uncommon. It ranges from 0.8% to 14.3%. Here we report a case of urothelial carcinoma within a bladder diverticulum. A 60-year-old male patient had history of BPH under medical treatment and right ureteral stone treated with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL. He presented with painless gross hematuria about 3 months after ESWL. Intravenous pyelography showed a filling defect within the bladder diverticulum. Histopathological diagnosis of low grade urothelial carcinoma arising from the bladder diverticulum was made following cystoscopic biopsy. Laparoscopic partial cystectomy was performed with subsequent intravesical chemotherapy. Tumor recurrence was found not from the previous diverticulum but from another area during regular cystoscopy at the 6-month postoperative follow up. He underwent transurethral resection of bladder tumor. Pathology revealed a noninvasive, high grade urothelial carcinoma. There was no further bladder tumor recurrence during the 1-year follow-up period. Bladder-sparing surgery with close cystoscopy follow up for intradiverticular urothelial carcinoma can be applied as an alternative treatment modality.

  3. The use of portable video media vs standard verbal communication in the urological consent process: a multicentre, randomised controlled, crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Matthew; Kam, Jonathan; Nalavenkata, Sunny; Hardy, Ellen; Handmer, Marcus; Ainsworth, Hannah; Lee, Wai Gin; Louie-Johnsun, Mark

    2016-11-01

    To determine if portable video media (PVM) improves patient's knowledge and satisfaction acquired during the consent process for cystoscopy and insertion of a ureteric stent compared to standard verbal communication (SVC), as informed consent is a crucial component of patient care and PVM is an emerging technology that may help improve the consent process. In this multi-centre randomised controlled crossover trial, patients requiring cystoscopy and stent insertion were recruited from two major teaching hospitals in Australia over a 15-month period (July 2014-December 2015). Patient information delivery was via PVM and SVC. The PVM consisted of an audio-visual presentation with cartoon animation presented on an iPad. Patient satisfaction was assessed using the validated Client Satisfaction Questionnaire 8 (CSQ-8; maximum score 32) and knowledge was tested using a true/false questionnaire (maximum score 28). Questionnaires were completed after first intervention and after crossover. Scores were analysed using the independent samples t-test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test for the crossover analysis. In all, 88 patients were recruited. A significant 3.1 point (15.5%) increase in understanding was demonstrable favouring the use of PVM (P < 0.001). There was no difference in patient satisfaction between the groups as judged by the CSQ-8. A significant 3.6 point (17.8%) increase in knowledge score was seen when the SVC group were crossed over to the PVM arm. A total of 80.7% of patients preferred PVM and 19.3% preferred SVC. Limitations include the lack of a validated questionnaire to test knowledge acquired from the interventions. This study demonstrates patients' preference towards PVM in the urological consent process of cystoscopy and ureteric stent insertion. PVM improves patient's understanding compared with SVC and is a more effective means of content delivery to patients in terms of overall preference and knowledge gained during the consent process. © 2016 The

  4. Posterior urethra: Anterior urethra ratio in the evaluation of success following PUV ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, R; Hariharasudhan, S; Ramesh, C

    2016-12-01

    There are conflicting reports on the criteria with which to determine success following posterior urethral valve (PUV) ablation. The aims of this study were to assess the value of the posterior urethra: anterior urethra ratio (PAR) in predicting successful PUV ablation. All neonates and infants with confirmed PUV on voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) were included. Initial PAR was computed by dividing maximum posterior urethral diameter by anterior urethral diameter. Distances were measured by an on-screen distance measurement tool in the Radiology department, to avoid error. Only oblique images with good voiding phases were used for assessment. All patients underwent cystoscopy and PUV ablation using cold knife. Postoperative VCUG and cystoscopy were performed at 3 months follow-up. Success was defined as cystoscopic resolution of obstruction, in addition to biochemical and radiological improvement, and this was compared with PAR findings. An equal number of age-matched control patients who had a normal VCUG (as a part of evaluation of antenatal hydronephrosis) were also analyzed. A total of 56 patients (median age 15 days, range 3-250 days) were analyzed between 2013 and 2016. The mean PAR was 1.5 (0.42) in controls and 3.42 (0.75) in those with PUV at diagnosis (P = 0.001). In those with successful PUV ablation (n = 51) the mean PAR was 1.8 (0.21), and in those with residual PUV/stricture (n = 5) the mean PAR was 3.16 (0.54). The difference between these two groups was statistically significant (P = 0.0001). Applying the value of mean + 2 SD of successful PUV ablation, an upper limit of PAR >2.2 was proposed to predict failure. Using this cut-off, 4/7 with PAR >2.2 had confirmed failure, while 48/49 with PAR posterior urethra is more than 2.2 times the diameter of the anterior urethra (PAR >2.2) on repeat VCUG following a PUV ablation, a cystoscopy check is essential to rule out residual PUV/stricture. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Pediatric Urology

  5. Isolated urachal malakoplakia mimicking malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saisriharsha Pakalapati

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Malakoplakia is an unusual inflammatory disease with uncertain pathogenesis affecting any organ in the body, but predominantly genitourinary tract, with specific predilection to the bladder. We report a rare case of isolated malakoplakia of the urachus in a 29-year-old male patient who presented with lower urinary tract symptoms without any hematuria. Investigations revealed sterile pyuria with no bacterial growth in urine. Radiological investigations revealed a mass in the urachal region. The patient underwent cystoscopy with biopsy followed by pelvic lymph node dissection and partial cystectomy with excision of the urachal mass. Histopathological examination of the mass revealed malakoplakia. Postoperative course was uneventful. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first ever case report of isolated urachal malakoplakia without any concomitant malignancy or bladder involvement reported in our country and one of the very few reported worldwide.

  6. Two Neonates with Congenital Hydrocolpos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vydehi Murthy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Neonatal hydrocolpos is a rare condition. Hydrocolpos is cystic dilatation of the vagina with fluid accumulation due to a combination of stimulation of secretary glands of the reproductive tract and vaginal obstruction. The differential for a neonatal presentation of lower abdominal mass includes urogenital anomalies, Hirschsprung’s, disease or sacrococcygeal teratoma. Prenatal diagnosis and early newborn imaging studies leads to early detection and treatment of these cases. Case. We report here two cases of neonatal hydrocolpos with prenatal diagnosis of lower abdominal mass. Postnatally, ultrasound, MRI imaging, and cystoscopy confirmed large cystic mass as hydrocolpos with distal vaginal obstruction. Both patients had enlarged renal system secondary to mass effect. Conclusion. High index of suspicion for hydrocolpos in a newborn presenting with fetal diagnosis of infraumbilical abdominal mass will facilitate timely intervention and prevention of complications.

  7. Mucinous Bladder Adenocarcinoma: Case Report and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Mello R. Santos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary mucinous adenocarcinoma is an extremely rare type of bladder cancer, with aggressive behavior and poor response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The symptoms are similar to those of other bladder tumors. Surgery is the main treatment and remains the only curative option. There may be a progression from mucinous metaplasia to mucinous adenoma and then mucinous adenocarcinoma. We present the case of a 40-year-old woman with recurrent lower urinary tract infections, submitted to imaging tests, which showed a bladder tumor. After transurethral resection, pathology showed intestinal mucinous carcinoma. Metastatic work-up was negative. New surgical procedure showed metaplasia but no recurrence of the carcinoma. The patient is now using antibiotic prophylaxis and will undergo a cystoscopy every 3 months and computed tomography in one year.

  8. Clear cell carcinoma of female urethral diverticulum—A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ching Weng

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Primary malignancies of female urethral diverticulum are rare. A well-documented female patient with primary clear cell carcinoma of the urethral diverticulum is presented here. A 65-year-old woman presented with frequency and voiding difficulty for 2 months. Physical examination showed a 4-cm mass protruding from anterior vaginal wall. Intravenous urography, magnetic resonance imaging, and cystoscopy showed a polypoid mass in urethral diverticulum. She then underwent anterior exenteration with ileal conduit diversion and urethrectomy. Pathology confirmed the diagnosis of clear cell adenocarcinoma with bladder neck invasion. She had no disease recurrence at 2-year follow-up. Careful clinical examination and image studies are helpful in making the preoperative diagnosis for the rare disease. Early radical surgery can achieve better survival.

  9. Sonographic diagnosis of vesicouterine fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, O-R; Kim, T-S; Kim, H-J

    2003-07-01

    Vesicouterine fistula is one of the least common types of urogenital fistula, accounting for only 1-4% of all cases. We report a case of vesicouterine fistula after vacuum delivery in a woman with a history of a previous Cesarean section. The 29-year-old woman was hospitalized due to continuous serosanguinous vaginal leakage and hematuria. Transvaginal sonography demonstrated the presence of a fistulous tract between the uterus and the bladder. Cystoscopy demonstrated a small opening in the posterior bladder wall and a cystogram revealed a fistulous tract between the posterior portion of the bladder and the uterine cavity. Since the patient could not tolerate her symptoms, we decided to close the fistulous tract surgically. The fistulous tract was excised and the bladder and uterus were closed primarily. The bladder was drained with a Foley catheter for 12 days and subsequent follow-up of the patient has demonstrated urinary continence. Copyright 2003 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Bladder rupture caused by postpartum urinary retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueñas-García, Omar Felipe; Rico, Hugo; Gorbea-Sanchez, Viridiana; Herrerias-Canedo, Tomas

    2008-08-01

    Postpartum bladder rupture is an uncommon surgical emergency and a diagnostic challenge. A primigravida delivered a healthy newborn without complications at 39.4 weeks of gestation. The patient was admitted 80 hours postpartum with abdominal pain, oliguria, hematuria, and pain that worsened during the previous 4 hours. An inserted Foley catheter drained only a small amount of urine, and serum creatinine was elevated (3.5 mg/dL). A laparotomy was performed and revealed a 10-cm hole in the urinary bladder. The bladder was repaired and the patient was discharged 15 days after surgery. The follow-up cystoscopy revealed adequate healing of the bladder. Urinary retention can lead to serious complications, including bladder rupture. Postpartum bladder rupture due to urinary retention should be ruled out if there is a history of abdominal pain, oliguria, and elevated of serum creatinine.

  11. Spontaneous intrapartum vesicouterine fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaaki, Bilal; Gyves, Michael; Goldman, Howard

    2006-02-01

    Vesicouterine fistulae as an obstetrical complication have been reported only in women with a history of cesarean. We present a patient with no such history who developed a vesicouterine fistula after vaginal delivery. A 43-year-old gravida 5 at term with no history of cesarean presented in the latent phase of labor. Gross hematuria was noted intrapartum, and a foley catheter was placed. A cystogram showed an extraperitoneal bladder perforation. The patient had urinary incontinence despite Foley catheter drainage. The diagnosis of vesicouterine fistula was made by cystoscopy and fistulogram. The patient had a successful repair at 3 months. This is a rare case of a vesicouterine fistula developing during a pregnancy with no previous cesarean. Accurate diagnosis is essential because surgical repair has an excellent outcome.

  12. Factors related to recurrence of bladder transitional cell carcinoma after transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TUR-BT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Ki Dong; Koo, Bong Sik; Yoon, Seong Kuk; Park, Byung Ho; Nam, Kyung Jin; Choi, Jong Cheol; Lee, Ki Nam; Lee, Young Il; Chung, Duck Hwan

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate factors related to the recurrence of TCC (transitional cell carcinoma) in the urinary bladder after transurethal resection of bladder tumor (TUR-BT). We retrospectively reviewed 54 patients in whom TCC (transitional cell carcinoma) after TUR-BT had been confirmed. Recurrence was evaluated by US, CT, cystoscopy and urine smear during the follow-up period of 6 months. The multiplicity, shape, size, and calcification of TCC, as revealed by radiologic studies, were evaluated retrospectively before TUR-BT. After TUR-BT, the histologic grade and pathologic stage of TCC were evaluated. Radiologically, multiple and/or sessile type TCC had a higher recurrence rate than the single and/or pedunculated type. Pathologically, when the grade and stage of bladder tumor were higher, recurrent rates were higher. (author). 17 refs., 3 tabs., 3 figs

  13. Urofacial syndrome: A subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes?

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    K N Stamatiou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The urofacial syndrome is probably a subset of neurogenic bladder dysfunction syndromes characterized by detrusor-sphincter discoordination along with a characteristic inversion of facial expression with laughing. This characteristic facial expression can facilitate early detection of this disorder, which leads to poor bladder emptying with high residual urine, hydro-nephrosis with vesico-ureteral reflux and potentially renal failure if left untreated. The etiology of the urofacial syndrome is unknown. In our case, a 12-year-old boy of Middle-Eastern origin presented to the Outpatient Department of our hospital with left pyelonephritis, hydronephrosis and bladder dilatation. Voiding cystourethrography performed 15 days later revealed left vesicoureteral reflux. Cystoscopy revealed bladder trabeculation however an anatomic urethral obstruction was not noticed. Both, neurological examination and radiography of the lumbosacral spine were normal. Urodynamic evaluation revealed the typical findings of detrusor-sphincter discoordination.

  14. A panel of prognostic protein markers for progression in non-muscle invasive bladder cancer - a multicenter tissue microarray validation study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fristrup, Niels; Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin; Ulhøi, Benedicte Parm

    2012-01-01

    cohort of 283 patients with long-term follow-up. For validation of the results we used three independent patient cohorts with long-term follow-up from Sweden, Spain, and Taiwan. In total 649 primary NMIBC tissue-microarray specimens from patients with long-term follow-up were used. Protein expression......Bladder cancer is the fifth most common cancer in the Western world. The histopathological parameters used in the clinic cannot precisely predict the individual disease course. Bladder cancer patients are therefore monitored thoroughly for disease recurrence and progression by urine and cystoscopy...... Ta and T1 urothelial carcinomas. Transcripts from the five genes encoding these proteins were previously included in gene expression signatures for outcome prediction for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). As a training-set, we used primary NMIBC tissue-microarray specimens from a Danish...

  15. Rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure following prolonged surgery in the lithotomy position

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    Adnane Guella

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Operative positions commonly used in urogenital surgeries when perineal exposure is required include the lithotomy and the exaggerated lithotomy positions (LPs, which expose patients to the risk of rhabdomyolysis. We report a patient with bladder outflow obstruction, benign prostatic hypertrophy and a very large bladder stone, which was removed with cystoscopy and cystolitholapaxy in the LP. The procedure was complicated by posterior bladder perforation and abdominal distention leading to prolonged surgery duration (5.5 h. The patient developed rhabdomyolysis and acute renal failure (ARF without compartmental syndrome. On the other hand, there was a potential role of glycine solution, used for bladder irrigation, in the appearance of ARF. Overall, our case shows that rhabdomyolysis and ARF can develop in operative positions, and duration of surgery is the most important risk factor for such complications.

  16. Lymphangioma involving the urogenital system in childhood

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    Michael Yap

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lymphangioma of the urogenital system is extremely rare and we present two cases treated at our institution over a one year period. The first case is a 3 year-old boy who presented with scrotal swelling and was initially thought to have a complex hydrocele. On surgical exploration, an extratesticular multiloculated cystic mass was discovered and testis-sparing excision of the mass was performed. Pathology revealed lymphangioma. The second case is a 5 year-old male who initially presented with gross hematuria. Ultrasound was unremarkable but cystoscopy revealed varicosities extending from the bladder wall. On transurethral resection, histology showed non-specific benign vascular malformation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI was obtained because of persistent hematuria and showed multiple bladder lesions suggestive of lymphatic malformation. Partial cystectomy was ultimately performed and histology confirmed lymphangioma. To the author's knowledge, this represents the fifth reported case of lymphangioma of bladder.

  17. Metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma penis: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Santiago Caicedo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Describe a case report of a patient with prostatic adenocarcinoma metastatic to penis due to shortage reports of similar cases to perform a literature review. Methods: We identified a case of a patient with prostatic adenocarcinoma, who during de the course of a cystoscopy at Hospital Universitario San Jose (Third-level Public Hospital in Popayan, Colombia a suspicious nodule of malignancy was observed in the penis. We described the clinical case in order to proceed to a literature search for the discussion. Results: 72-year-old patient diagnosed with prostatic adenocarcinoma Gleason Score 4+5=9, treated with bilateral orchiectomy and a suspicious nodule of malignancy incidentally observed in the penis, currently undergoing palliative care with Karnofsky score of 30 points. Conclusion: cutaneous metastases are rare; indicate longstanding disease and poor prognosis.

  18. Robotic-assisted vesicovaginal fistula repair using an extravesical approach without interposition grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Erin; Wu, Maria Y; MacMillan, J Barry

    2018-03-01

    Post-hysterectomy vesicovaginal fistula (VVF) is rare. In addition to conventional abdominal and vaginal approaches, robotic-assisted VVF repairs have recently been described. We present a case of an extravesical, robotic-assisted VVF repair, without placement of an interposition graft performed in a Canadian teaching center. A 51-year-old woman presented with urinary incontinence 5 days after laparoscopic hysterectomy. Computed tomography cystogram, cystoscopy, and methylene blue dye test, confirmed a VVF above the bladder trigone. The patient underwent a robotic-assisted VVF repair 3 months after presentation, without complication. An abdominal, extravesical approach was used. Operative time was 116 min and repeat CT cystogram showed no evidence of persistent. We have demonstrated that a VVF repair, using a robotic-assisted, extravesical approach without interposition graft placement, can be safe, less invasive and have a successful outcome at 1 year of follow-up.

  19. [Cytology in uropathological diagnostics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaisa, N T; Lindemann-Docter, K

    2015-11-01

    Cytology in uropathological diagnostics is mainly performed for oncological purposes. The assessment of malignancy by urothelial cell morphology is therefore decisive; however, cytology is only sensitive enough to detect high-grade tumor cells and the different low-grade tumors cannot be reliably diagnosed. Thus, the four-tier classification system of cytological findings (i.e. negative, atypical cells but significance uncertain, suspicious and positive) refers to high-grade tumor cells only. Furthermore, for valid cytological diagnostics not only the cytological specimen but also clinical information on cystoscopy findings and, if applicable, a biopsy should be evaluated together. In difficult differential diagnostic settings, e.g. differentiation between reactive versus neoplastic atypia or difficult to access lesions in the upper urinary tract, additional fluorescence in situ hybridization of cytological preparations might be helpful. At the moment there are no indications for further immunocytology or additional biomarker tests.

  20. Successful Pregnancy Following Repair of Vesicouterine Fistula Following Repeat Caesarean Section: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilruba Akter

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A lady, para 2, both delivered by caesarean section for prolonged labour, presented with the complaints of menouria and infertility for 3 years following her last caesarean section. She had history of haematuria during menstruation and her menstrual flow is scanty. Her first baby was female and alive, but her second baby was stillborn following prolonged and obstructed labour. This has been continuously blamed by family and others for happening that events. Her fistula was confirmed by ultrasound scan, histerography and cystoscopy. The vesicouterine fistula was treated by local repair with omental patch through transperitoneal approach. Pregnancy following one year of successful repair has turned her from miserable to happiness in life.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3329/bsmmuj.v5i1.11030 BSMMU J 2012; 5(1:76-78 

  1. Severe hematuria after transurethral electrocoagulation in a patient with an arteriovesical fistula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiangyi; Lin, Yiwei; Chen, Bin; Zhou, Xianyong; Zhou, Xiaofeng; Shen, Yuehong; Xie, Liping

    2013-12-01

    Arteriovesical fistulas are extremely rare. Only eleven cases were previously reported in the literature. They can occur iatrogenically, traumatically or spontaneously. We report an unusual case of a 62-year-old woman with arteriovesical fistula that developed fatal hematuria after transurethral electrocoagulation. Computed tomography (CT) and selective angiography revealed a pseudoaneurysm of the right superior vesical artery with arteriovesical fistula formation, which was managed by transarterial embolization. Contrast enhanced CT or CT angiography should be performed when a pulsatile hemorrhage is revealed during cystoscopy. Therapeutic vesical arterial embolization should be considered as a safe and effective procedure for arteriovesical fistulas. Transurethral electrocoagulation may cause severe hematuria for pulsatile bladder bleeding in patients with pelvic vascular malformation.

  2. A trifid pelvis in a patient with a solitary kidney with LUTS: An unusual presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guntaka Ajay Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Trifid pelvis is one of the rarest congenital malformations of the upper urinary tract. Trifid pelvis in a solitary kidney is a very rare presentation. A young male adult presented to us with dysuria and white discharge per urethra since 1 year on and off. Urine examination showed few pus cells and white blood cells. Initial imaging by ultrasonography revealed a solitary right kidney. A computed tomography urogram showed a normal right kidney with a trifid pelvis and left ectopic hypoplastic kidney with focal thickening at the right posterolateral aspect of the vesicoureteric junction. Cystoscopy revealed normal anterior and posterior urethra, verumontanum extending until bladder neck, no ejaculatory duct openings noted, and right ureteric orifice placed slightly laterally, with the left ureteric orifice not visualized. Right RGP confirmed a trifid pelvis. A high index of suspicion is needed for the identification of this rare condition.

  3. Forced diuresis 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/contrast enhanced in detection of carcinoma of urinary bladder diverticulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soundararajan, Ramya; Singh, Harmandeep; Arora, Saurabh; Nayak, Brusabhanu; Shamim, Shamim Ahmed; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Kumar, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Urinary bladder diverticular carcinomas are uncommon with a lesser incidence of 0.8–10% and its diagnosis still remains a challenge. Cystoscopy is the most reliable method, but evaluating diverticulum with narrow orifices is difficult. Before the initiation of appropriate treatment, proper detection of bladder diverticular carcinoma and its locoregional and distant sites of involvement is necessary. Here, we present a case of 48-year-old male with urinary bladder diverticular carcinoma detected by forced diuretic 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computerized tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET/CT). This case also highlights the significance of forced diuretic 18 F-FDG PET/CT in the detection, staging, and response evaluation of bladder diverticular carcinoma

  4. Lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma of the urinary bladder: A case report and review of systemic treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas M Pantelides

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma (LELC of the urinary bladder is a rare variant, which can occur in a pure form or in conjunction with transitional cell carcinoma. Owing to the scarcity of reported cases, the optimum treatment is yet to be defined, although the benefits of chemotherapy are increasingly recognised. We present a case of a 64-year-old man with pure LELC, treated with trans-urethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBT and primary gemcitabine and platinum-based chemotherapy. He remained free of disease at six-month follow-up cystoscopy. The case adds to the growing evidence for the efficacy of chemotherapy, coupled with TUR, as part of a bladder-preserving treatment option for LELC.

  5. Diagnostic criteria, classification, and nomenclature for painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis: An ESSIC proposal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merwe, J.P.V. de; Nordling, J.; Bouchelouche, P.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Because the term ''interstitial cystitis'' (IC) has different meanings in different centers and different parts of the world, the European Society for the Study of Interstitial Cystitis (ESSIC) has worked to create a consensus on definitions, diagnosis, and classification in an attempt...... to overcome the lack of international agreement on various aspects of IC. Methods: ESSIC has discussed definitions, diagnostic criteria, and disease classification in four meetings and extended e-mail correspondence. Results: It was agreed to name the disease bladder pain syndrome (BPS) BPS would be diagnosed...... might be performed according to findings at cystoscopy with hydrodistention and morphologic findings in bladder biopsies. The presence of other organ symptoms as well as cognitive, behavioral, emotional, and sexual symptoms, should be addressed. Conclusions: The name IC has become misleading...

  6. A Case of Distal Vaginal Agenesis Presenting with Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection and Pyuria in a Prepubertal Girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dural, Ozlem; Ugurlucan, Funda Gungor; Yasa, Cenk; Bastu, Ercan; Eren, Hulya; Yuksel, Bahar; Celik, Serdal; Akhan, Suleyman Engin

    2017-02-01

    Isolated distal vaginal agenesis is a rare anomaly and mostly becomes symptomatic after menarche. We describe an unusual presentation of this anomaly in a prepubertal girl. An 11-year-old prepubertal girl presented with recurrent urinary tract infection, pyuria, and right-sided renal agenesis. The findings of perineal inspection, ultrasonography, and magnetic resonance imaging were consistent with a distal vaginal agenesis with pyometrocolpos. Discharging pyometrocolpos with dissection of the atretic portion and a pull-through vaginoplasty were performed. A cystoscopy showed no sign of a vesicovaginal or uterine fistula. This rare presentation of distal vaginal agenesis reminds us that congenital malformations of the female genital tract should be considered in patients with congenital anomalies of the urinary system and/or recurrent urinary tract infection, even during the prepubertal period. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hormonal Treatment for Severe Hydronephrosis Caused by Bladder Endometriosis

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    Erkan Efe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of endometriosis cases involving the urinary system has recently increased, and the bladder is a specific zone where endometriosis is most commonly seen in the urinary system. In the case presented here, a patient presented to the emergency department with the complaint of side pain and was examined and diagnosed with severe hydronephrosis and bladder endometriosis was determined in the etiology. After the patient was pathologically diagnosed, Levonorgestrel-Releasing Intrauterine System (LNG-IUS was administered to the uterine cavity. At the 12-month follow-up, endometriosis was not observed in the cystoscopy and symptoms had completely regressed. Hydronephrosis may be observed after exposure of the ureter, and silent renal function loss may develop in patients suffering from endometriosis with bladder involvement. For patients with moderate or severe hydronephrosis associated with bladder endometriosis, LNG-IUS application may be separately and successfully used after conservative surgery.

  8. Forgotten long-term indwelling double "J" stent

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    Bhushan Wani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A poor, uneducated patient from a rural background presented to us with burning micturition and colicky pain in the loin. He had undergone surgery for pelvi-ureteric junction (PUJ obstruction on the right side four years earlier. Following surgery, the patient was irregular in his follow-up and, as such, he did not get the double "J" (DJ stent, which was placed during surgery, removed. Ultrasonography performed during the present admission revealed mild hydronephrosis of the right kidney with a tiny calculus in the urinary bladder. Intravenous urography revealed mild hydronephrosis with the DJ stent in situ in the right kidney. After an unsuccessful attempt with cystoscopy, the stent was removed successfully by suprapubic cystostomy. The post-operative course was uneventful and the patient was discharged in seven days.

  9. Missing IUD Despite Threads at the Cervix

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    Andrew L. Atkinson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, the intrauterine device (IUD is by far the most popular form of long term reversible contraception in the world. Side effects from the IUD are minimal and complications are rare. Uterine perforation and migration of the IUD outside the uterine cavity are the most serious complications. Physician visualization and/or the patient feeling retrieval threads at the cervical os are confirmation that the IUD has not been expelled or migrated. We present a case of a perforated, intraperitoneal IUD with threads noted at the cervical os. Office removal was not possible using gentle traction on the threads. Multiple imaging and endoscopic modalities were used to try and locate the IUD including pelvic ultrasound, diagnostic hysteroscopy, cystoscopy, and pelvic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The studies gave conflicting results on location of the IUD. Ultimately, the missing IUD was removed via laparoscopy.

  10. Hemangioma of the prostate--an unusual cause of lower urinary tract symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serizawa, Reza R; Nørgaard, Nis; Horn, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Hemangioma of the prostate gland is extremely rare and only a few cases have been reported. There have been several cases of hemangioma of posterior urethra, urinary bladder and periprostatic plexus in the literature, all presenting with hematuria or hematospermia. Diagnosis of prostatic hemangio...... is difficult due to its rarity and unspecific symptoms such as hematuria, hematospermia or lower urinary tract symptoms. It cannot be detected by conventional examinations such as cystoscopy or standard rectal ultrasonography.......Hemangioma of the prostate gland is extremely rare and only a few cases have been reported. There have been several cases of hemangioma of posterior urethra, urinary bladder and periprostatic plexus in the literature, all presenting with hematuria or hematospermia. Diagnosis of prostatic hemangioma...

  11. Acquired factor VIII inhibitor syndrome: A rare cause of hematuria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthuvel Seral Kannan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 50-year-old woman presented with gross hematuria for 1 month. Clinical examinations, laboratory investigations, ultrasound and contrast computed tomography were normal, except anemia. Cystoscopy revealed bloody efflux from the right side. Retrograde pyelogram showed filling defect in the renal pelvis and biopsy was inconclusive. Renal angiogram was normal. She developed ecchymosis on the right thigh and arm with elevated activated partial thromboplastin time. The partial thromboplastin time correction study and Bethesda study confirmed the presence of acquired factor VIII inhibitor (acquired hemophilia. With flexible ureterorenoscopy, the mass in the renal pelvis was removed and its histopathology revealed clotted blood. The patient was subsequently managed with steroids and Factor eight inhibitor bypass activity.

  12. Bilateral Double Ureters with Bladder Neck Diverticulum in a Nigerian Woman Masquerading as an Obstetric Fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran O. Morhason-Bello

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 43-year-old woman presented with 20-year history of leakage of urine per vaginam. She had one failed repair attempt. Pelvic examination with dye test showed leakage of clear urine suggestive of ureterovaginal fistula. The preoperative intravenous urogram revealed duplex ureter and cystoscopy showed normally cited ureteric orifices with two other ectopic ureteric openings and bladder diverticula. The definitive surgery performed was ureteric reimplantation (ureteroneocystostomy of the two distal ureteric to 2 cm superiolateral to the two normal orifices and diverticuloplasty. There was resolution of urinary incontinence after surgery. Three months after surgery, she had urodynamic testing done (cystometry, which showed 220 mLs with no signs of instability or leakage during filling phase but leaked on coughing at maximal bladder capacity. This is to showcase some diagnostic dilemma that could arise with obstetric fistula, which is generally diagnosed by clinical assessment.

  13. Cystoscopic optical coherence tomography for urinary bladder imaging in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z. G.; Adler, H.; Chan, D.; Jain, A.; Xie, H. K.; Wu, Z. L.; Pan, Y. T.

    2006-02-01

    This paper summarizes the development of new 2D MEMS mirrors and the pertinent modification to improve OCT endoscopic catheter packaging suitable for in vivo imaging diagnosis of bladder cancers. Comparative study of the newly developed endocopic OCT versus the bench-top OCT is presented. Results of in vivo OCT cystoscopy based on a porcine acute inflammation model are presented to compare time-domain OCT and spectral-domain OCT for in vivo imaging. In addition, results of spectral-domain Doppler OCT are presented to image blood flow in the lamina propria of the bladder. The results of our in vivo animal study using the presented OCT endoscope are discussed for potential problems in the future clinical applications.

  14. A 3-plex methylation assay combined with the FGFR3 mutation assay sensitively detects recurrent bladder cancer in voided urine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandimalla, Raju; Masius, Roy; Beukers, Willemien

    2013-01-01

    is to determine the sensitivity and specificity of a urine assay for the diagnosis of recurrences in patients with a previous primary NMIBC G1/G2 by using cystoscopy as the reference standard. Experimental Design: We selected eight CpG islands (CGI) methylated in bladder cancer from our earlier genome-wide study......Purpose: DNA methylation is associated with bladder cancer and these modifications could serve as useful biomarkers. FGFR3 mutations are present in 60% to 70% of non–muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC). Low-grade bladder cancer recurs in more than 50% of patients. The aim of this study......, and nonmalignant urines (n = 130). Results: The 3-plex assay identified recurrent bladder cancer in voided urine with a sensitivity of 74% in the validation set. In combination with the FGFR3 mutation assay, a sensitivity of 79% was reached (specificity of 77%). Sensitivity of FGFR3 and cytology was 52% and 57...

  15. Unrecognized paraganglioma of the urinary bladder as a cause for basilar-type migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, Renate; Heidegger, Isabel; Klinglmair, Gerald; Kroiss, Alexander; Uprimny, Christian; Gasser, Rudolf Wolfgang; Schäfer, Georg; Steiner, Hannes

    2014-01-01

    Extra-adrenal paraganglioma with isolated localization in the urinary bladder is a rare neuroendocrine tumor. Although the typical symptoms like headache, nausea, weight loss, flushing, heart palpitation or paroxysmal hypertension during micturition are well established, we present an unusual case of bladder paraganglioma, 'misdiagnosed' with basilar-type migraine due to headache for the past 8 years. As urologists linked the presence of a tumor (by CT) and symptoms connected with micturition, no cystoscopy and no transurethral resection of the bladder was performed prior to detailed diagnostic workup. After diagnosis of an extra-adrenal paraganglioma, the patient was scheduled for open partial cystectomy. In consideration of the fact that bladder paraganglioma is an infrequent genitourinary cancer, this case report clearly points out the importance of an exact anamnesis and clinical examination to minimize the probability of misdiagnosis with possible fatal consequences in any case with clinical suspicion of bladder paraganglioma. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Delayed vaginal and urethral mesh exposure: 10 years after TVT surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanuengkitkong, Siwatchaya; Lo, Tsia-Shu; Dass, Anil Krishna

    2013-03-01

    Delayed mesh exposure after tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) procedure is rare. We report a case of mesh exposure into the vagina and urethra that developed 10 years after TVT surgery. A 58-year-old postmenopausal woman presented with mixed urinary incontinence. She was investigated, and her stress urinary incontinence was cured with a TVT procedure 10 years ago. She was then scheduled follow-up annually. Two years postsurgery, a granulation tissue was observed and excised at the vaginal incision site. Vaginal examination 10 years postsurgery showed vaginal mesh erosion 0.5 cm from urethral meatus. Cystoscopy revealed concomitant urethral erosion at the posterior urethral wall. Mesh excision was performed, and urethra and vagina were repaired in layers. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. This finding shows that, although rare, complications can occur even after 10 years of TVT surgery.

  17. Surgical removal of a large vaginal calculus formed after a tension-free vaginal tape procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberlicht, Ariel; Feiner, Benjamin; Haya, Nir; Auslender, Ron; Abramov, Yoram

    2016-11-01

    Vaginal calculus is a rare disorder which has been reported in association with urethral diverticulum, urogenital sinus anomaly, bladder exstrophy and the tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) procedure. We report a 42-year-old woman who presented with persistent, intractable urinary tract infection (UTI) following a TVT procedure. Cystoscopy demonstrated an eroded tape with the formation of a bladder calculus, and the patient underwent laser cystolithotripsy and cystoscopic resection of the tape. Following this procedure, her UTI completely resolved and she remained asymptomatic for several years. Seven years later she presented with a solid vaginal mass. Pelvic examination followed by transvaginal ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a large vaginal calculus located at the lower third of the anterior vaginal wall adjacent to the bladder neck. This video presents the transvaginal excision and removal of the vaginal calculus.

  18. Haematuria in association with Lynch syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwan Ma'ayeh

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A 40-year-old Caucasian male presented to the Emergency Department complaining of intermittent painless frank haematuria. Past medical history was significant for Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colon Cancer (HNPCC and a prophylactic total colectomy. Computed tomography urogram showed thickening in the posterior wall of the bladder. Cystoscopy showed a small bladder mass. Histology showed a papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential. HNPCC, also known as Lynch Syndrome, is an autosomal dominant disorder responsible for 3-5% of colorectal cancers. There are certain cancers known to be associated with HNPCC; colorectal cancer, endometrial, ovarian, stomach, pancreas, biliary tract, small bowel, brain, renal pelvic and ureteric tumours, sebaceous gland adenomas and keratocanthomas. An association with bladder tumours is not well established.

  19. Bladder Involvement in Stage I Endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Paula C; Missmer, Stacey A; Laufer, Marc R

    2017-08-01

    Endometriosis-the ectopic implantation of endometrial-like tissue-affects 10% of adolescent females and adults. Bladder involvement, causing dysuria and hematuria, occurs in a very small number of endometriosis patients. The patient presented at age 12 years with dysuria and pelvic pain. Laparoscopy revealed stage I endometriosis. Postoperatively, she reported persistent dysuria and passage of tissue in her urine. Cystoscopy showed diffuse erythema; urine cytology revealed glandular and spindle cells suggestive of endometriosis. She was transitioned from oral contraceptives to an intranasal gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, with symptom resolution. Intravesicular endometriosis coinciding with stage I disease supports a mechanism of endometriosis dissemination other than direct bladder infiltration. Patients with endometriosis who complain of urinary symptoms warrant assessment, because intravesicular bladder involvement cannot be excluded using pelviscopy. Copyright © 2017 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the urinary bladder in an Arab woman with history of squamous cell carcinoma: a case report.

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    Al Meshaan, Mohd Khaled; Nayef, Marwan; Kwaider, Talal; Otto, Wolfgang; Katchy, Ken C

    2009-04-29

    Peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors of the urinary bladder are rare and tend to occur in an older age group than do their counterparts in bones and soft tissue. We report a case of peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor of the urinary bladder in a 67-year-old woman of Arab origin. She had undergone transurethral resection followed by chemotherapy because of pulmonary metastasized muscle-invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder in 2005. One year later, she first presented with a history of repeated hematuria in our institution. Performing cystoscopy any tumor could be detected. Control cystoscopy two months later showed a tumor mass of 3 cm in diameter at another location than described for the first tumor. After perforating by transurethral resection partial bladder resection had to be done. Tissue specimen after pathological analysis revealed a peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor with tumor cells reactive to cluster of differentiation 99, neuron-specific enolase and S100 protein and stained negative for other markers such as cytokeratins, epithelial membrane antigen, desmin, smooth muscle actin, chromogranin and leucocyte common antigen. Staging computerized tomography was especially free from any hint on organ metastasis, but the patient died due to a cardiac problem only a few months later. To the best of our knowledge, we report the eighth case of bladder peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumors in literature and the first concerning an Arab patient. It is also the first presentation of a peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumor patient with a history of squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder. As in other cases, expression of single-chain-type 1 glycoprotein and neural markers was positive and the disease was at an advanced stage at the time of diagnosis.

  1. What is the fate of artificial urinary sphincters among men undergoing repetitive bladder cancer treatment?

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    S. Mitchell Heiner

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Functional characteristics and durability of the artificial urinary sphincter (AUS among patients who develop bladder cancer has been poorly characterized. We sought to evaluate AUS outcomes among patients subsequently diagnosed with bladder cancer, in order to describe device survivability when subject to diagnostic and therapeutic procedures such as cystoscopy, transurethral resection, and cystectomy. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 1,803 male patients treated with AUS surgery at a single institution between 1983–2014. We describe AUS device outcomes among patients undergoing surveillance and treatment for bladder cancer. Results: Following AUS placement, 14 (0.8% patients were subsequently diagnosed with and treated for bladder cancer and 4 patients with bladder cancer undergoing treatment and screening, subsequently received AUS placement. The median follow-up from device placement was 7.2 years (interquartile range [IQR], 2.8–11.5, and the median time from AUS placement to bladder cancer diagnosis was 6 (IQR, 0–9. There were a total of 8 primary and 1 secondary devices failures. Despite a median of 2 diagnostic cystoscopies (IQR, 1–6 and 0 bladder tumor resections (IQR, 0–0 per patient following device implantation, only 1 (5.6% patient experienced an iatrogenic erosion related to urethral manipulation. Among those undergoing cystectomy (n=4, 1 device was left in situ without complication. Conclusions: Bladder cancer surveillance and treatment with an AUS device in place appears to confer minimal additional risk to AUS survival. Careful attention should be given to device deactivation and use of the smallest caliber instruments available to minimize the risk of iatrogenic urethral erosion.

  2. Photodynamic therapy of bladder cancer - a phase I study using hexaminolevulinate (HAL).

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    Bader, M J; Stepp, Herbert; Beyer, Wolfgang; Pongratz, Thomas; Sroka, Ronald; Kriegmair, Martin; Zaak, Dirk; Welschof, Mona; Tilki, Derya; Stief, Christian G; Waidelich, Raphaela

    2013-10-01

    To assess the safety and feasibility of hexaminolevulinate (HAL) based photodynamic therapy (PDT) as adjuvant treatment after transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB) in patients with intermediate or high-risk urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) of the bladder. Seventeen patients received 50 ml of either a 16 mM (4 patients) or 8 mM HAL (13 patients) solution instilled intravesically. Bladder wall irradiation was performed using an incoherent white light source coupled via a quartz fiber assembled into a flexible transurethral irrigation catheter. Each patient received 3 treatments with HAL-PDT 6 weeks apart. After PDT, patients were followed by regular cystoscopy for up to 21 months to assess time to recurrence. Reported adverse events (AEs) were coded according the World Health Organization Adverse Reaction Terminology (WHO-ART). Efficacy was assessed by cystoscopy, cytology, and histology, and was defined as the number of patients who were tumor-free at 6 or 21 months after initial PDT treatment. Transient bladder irritability was reported by 15 of the 17 patients and resolved completely in all patients. No evidence of a cumulative effect of treatment on the incidence of AEs could be detected. PDT treatment was performed without any technical complications. Furthermore preliminary assessment of efficacy showed that of the 17 patients included, 9 (52.9%; 95% CI: 27.8-77.0) were tumor-free at 6 months, 4 (23.5%; 95% CI: 6.8-49.9) were tumor-free at 9 months, and 2 (11.8%, 95% CI: 1.5-36.4) were tumor-free after 21 months. PDT using hexaminolevulinate and an incoherent white light system with the special flexible irradiation catheter system is technically feasible and safe and may offer an alternative in the treatment of non-muscle-invasive intermediate and high-risk bladder cancer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Hematuria screening test for urinary bladder mucosal infiltration in cervical cancer.

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    Chuttiangtum, Ayuth; Udomthavornsuk, Banchong; Chumworathayi, Bandit

    2012-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic performance of hematuria as a screening test for urinary bladder infiltration in cervical cancer patients with a prospective study design. Newly diagnosed cervical cancer patients at Srinagarind hospital from 14 June 2011 to 30 April 2012 were enrolled in this study. We collected midstream urine samples for urinalysis from every patient before routine cystoscopic exam for clinical staging. The presence of 3 or more red blood cells (RBCs) per high power field was defined as positive for hematuria. A two-by-two table was used to determine the diagnostic performance of hematuria to detect urinary bladder mucosal infiltration using cystoscopy and biopsy as the gold standard. A total of 130 were patients included, 54 of which (41.5%) had hematuria. Of these, four patients (3.08%) had pathological report from cystoscopic biopsy confirmed metastatic squamous cell carcinoma. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of hematuria as a screening test to detect urinary bladder mucosal infiltration of cervical cancer were 100%, 60.3%, 7.4%, 100%, and 61.5%, respectively. There was no single case of urinary bladder mucosal infiltration in patients initially staged less than stage III. Hematuria can be used as a screening test to detect urinary bladder mucosal infiltration of cervical cancer. This can reduce the number of cervical cancer patients who really need to undergo cystoscopy as a staging procedure to less than half and to less than 20% if stage III or more were included without missing a single case of urinary bladder mucosal infiltration.

  4. Detection Of Aneuploidy In Chromosomes 3,7,9 And 17 In Bladder Cancer Patients Using Urovysion Assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd-Elsattar, N.A.; Yossef, M.F.; Saleh, S.A.R.; Shahin, R.S.; Ali, H.H.; Kotb, Y.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cystoscopy is considered up till now the gold standard as well as urine cytology for diagnosis and follow up of urinary bladder cancer patients. Cystoscopy is an invasive inconclusive technique while cytology have low sensitivity. Therefore search for a more sensitive, non-invasive highly reliable method is important. Aim of the study: To assess the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of Urovysion to be used as a non-invasive tool for early detection of bladder cancer patients. Furthermore, to assess its relationship with histopathological stages and grades of the disease. Subjects and methods: This study was conducted on 30 patients with urinary bladder cancer( Group I) which were subdivided according to cancer stages and grades into subgroups and 15 diseased control patients (Group II). One urine sample was taken from each patient for Urovysion assay and another sample taken for urine cytology. Results: Urovysion showed higher positive results in (Group I) than urine cytology. In (Group II) the latter did not miss any negative case while urovysion showed only one false positive case. Moreover, Urovysion results revealed significant association with both bladder cancer histopathological stages and grades while urine cytology showed significant association with tumor grades only. Conclusion: Urovysion; both by itself and in combination with urine cytology; offers a sensitive, reliable and non invasive approach to bladder cancer diagnosis. Urovysion is associated with invasiveness of bladder cancer from stage Tis, T1 to T4 and from grades G1 to G3. Thus, urovysion assay can be used as an important diagnostic and prognostic indicator of this disease

  5. Laser lithotripsy for removal of uroliths in dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Larry G.; Lulich, Jody P.

    2006-02-01

    Introduction: This study evaluated the ability to fragment and remove naturally occurring uroliths in dogs using a holmium: YAG laser. Methods: Twenty four dogs with naturally occurring uroliths including 10 spayed females and 14 neutered males. The dogs were 8.7 +/- 2.8 years old and weighed 13.7 +/- 8.0 kg. All dogs had bladder stones and 5 male dogs also had urethral stones. In female dogs, cystoscopy was performed using a rigid cystoscope with sheath diameter of 14 to 19 french. Cystoscopy was performed in males dogs using a 7.5 french diameter pediatric ureteroscope. Uroliths were fragmented using a 20 watt Holmium: YAG laser and the fragments were removed by basket extraction and voiding urohydropropulsion. Results: Average laser parameters for urolith fragmentation were 0.7 Joules at 8 Hertz (range: 0.5 to 1.3 Joules at 5 to 13 Hertz). All urolith fragments were successfully removed in all 10 female dogs and 11 of 14 male dogs. In one male dog, the urethra was too small to allow passage of the ureteroscope. In one of the male dogs, the urethral stones were successfully removed by laser lithotripsy, but removal of the bladder stones was performed by cystotomy. There was one complication of urethral perforation during attempts to pass an access sheath transurethrally in a dog with extensive proliferative urethritis. Conclusions: Laser lithotripsy is a safe and effective method of removing bladder and urethral stones in dogs provided the dog is large enough to permit transurethral passage of a cystoscope or ureteroscope.

  6. Vesicovaginal fistula repair through vaginal approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, S.; Rahim, J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the outcome of trans-vaginal repair of vesico-vaginal fistula through vaginal approach. Study Design: Prospective study. Material and Methods: This study was carried out in Department of Urology, Shaikh Zayed Postgraduate Medical Institute and National institute of Kidney Diseases, Lahore for the period extending from April 2009 to April 2014. Total 17 patients were included in the study. History, physical examination and findings on investigations were reviewed. In all patients cystoscopy and vaginal examination was performed to see fistula site and ureteral orfices. Then trans-vaginal repair was done in all cases. Results: VVF repair was performed on 17 patients aging 25 to 45 years (mean 35.83 ± 7.37 years). The symptoms preceded for a period of 3 months to 8 years. The cause was gynecological hysterectomy 8 (47.05%), obstetric C-section 7 (41.17%) and obstructed labor 2(11.76%). In three of our patients VVF was previously repaired trans-abdominally. On cystoscopy no patients had more than one fistula. In two (11.76%) patients fistula was supratrigonal. The average size of fistula was 2.05 em, detail of fistula site and size is given in table. One patient had leakage on second postop day that was managed with change of Foleys catheter. Successful repair was achieved in all patients and no patient required second attempt. No ureteric injury and other complications were observed. Conclusion: Trans-vaginal repair of VVF avoid laparotomy and bladder bisection. It has reduced hospital stay and morbidity. (author)

  7. Vaginal-sparing ventral buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty for female urethral stricture: A novel modification of surgical technique

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    Nathan Hoag

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To present a novel modification of surgical technique to treat female urethral stricture (FUS by a vaginal-sparing ventral buccal mucosal urethroplasty. Recurrent FUS represents an uncommon, though difficult clinical scenario to manage definitively. A variety of surgical techniques have been described to date, yet a lack of consensus on the optimal procedure persists. Materials and Methods: We present a 51-year-old female with urethral stricture involving the entire urethra. Suspected etiology was iatrogenic from cystoscopy 17 years prior. Since then, the patient had undergone at least 25 formal urethral dilations and periods of self-dilation. In lithotomy position, the urethra was dilated to accommodate forceps, and ventral urethrotomy carried out sharply, exposing a bed of periurethral tissue. Buccal mucosa was harvested, and a ventral inlay technique facilitated by a nasal speculum, was used to place the graft from the proximal urethra/bladder neck to urethral meatus without a vaginal incision. Graft was sutured into place, and urethral Foley catheter inserted. Results: The vaginal-sparing ventral buccal mucosal graft urethroplasty was deemed successful as of last follow-up. Flexible cystoscopy demonstrated patency of the repair at 6 months. At 10 months of follow-up, the patient was voiding well, with no urinary incontinence. No further interventions have been required. Conclusions: This case describes a novel modification of surgical technique for performing buccal mucosal urethroplasty for FUS. By avoiding incision of the vaginal mucosa, benefits may include reduced: morbidity, urinary incontinence, and wound complications including urethro-vaginal fistula.

  8. Incidence and Management of Uncomplicated Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections in a National Sample of Women in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suskind, Anne M; Saigal, Christopher S; Hanley, Janet M; Lai, Julie; Setodji, Claude M; Clemens, J Quentin

    2016-04-01

    To determine the incidence and characteristics of women with uncomplicated recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) and to explore whether the use of culture-driven treatment affects rates of UTI-related complications and resource utilization. Using MarketScan claims from 2003 to 2011, we identified UTI-naive women ages 18-64 with incident-uncomplicated recurrent UTIs. Recurrent UTIs were defined as 3 UTI visits associated with antibiotics during a 12-month period. Cases were excluded if they had a UTI in the preceding year, or if they had any complicating factors (eg, abnormality of the urinary tract, neurologic condition, pregnancy, diabetes, or currently taking immunosuppression). We next assessed use of urine cultures, imaging, and cystoscopy, and performed propensity score matching with logistic regression to determine whether having a urine culture associated with >50% of UTIs affected rates of complications and downstream resource utilization. We identified 48,283 women with incident-uncomplicated recurrent UTIs, accounting for an overall incidence of 102 per 100,000 women, highest among women ages 18-34 and 55-64. Sixty-one percent of these women had at least 1 urine culture, 6.9% had imaging, and 2.8% had cystoscopy. Having a urine culture >50% of the time was associated with fewer UTI-related hospitalizations and lower rates of intravenous antibiotic use, whereas demonstrating higher rates of UTI-related office visits and pyelonephritis. The incidence of uncomplicated recurrent UTIs increases with age. Urine culture-directed care is beneficial in reducing high-cost services including UTI-related hospitalizations and intravenous antibiotic use, making urine cultures a valuable component to management of these patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Reduced recurrence of late hemorrhagic radiation cystitis by WF10 therapy in cervical cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veerasarn, Vutisiri; Khorprasert, Chonlakiet; Lorvidhaya, Vicharn; Sangruchi, Supatra; Tantivatana, Thanatip; Narkwong, Ladawan; Kongthanarat, Yongyut; Chitapanarux, Imjai; Tesavibul, Chanawat; Panichevaluk, Apichart; Puribhat, Sirisak; Sangkittipaiboon, Somphob; Sookpreedee, Lak; Lertsanguansinchai, Prasert; Phromratanapongse, Pramook; Rungpoka, Poonkiat; Trithratipvikul, Supamitr; Lojanapiwat, Bannakij; Ruangdilokrat, Sathit; Ngampanprasert, Pichai

    2004-01-01

    Background and purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and the safety of WF10 as adjunct to standard treatment in the management of late hemorrhagic radiation cystitis compared to standard treatment alone. Patients and methods: Cervical cancer patients with Grade 2 or 3 late hemorrhagic radiation cystitis, were randomized and treated with WF10 0.5 ml/kg body weight, diluted in physiological saline or 5% dextrose water 250 ml, intravenous infusions over 2 h on 5 consecutive days, every 3 weeks for 2 cycles plus standard treatment (WF10 group) or standard treatment alone (control group). Fifty patients in each group were evaluated by questioning; urinalysis and cystoscopy during a 1 year follow up. Results: At week 7, 37 patients (74%) in the WF10 group and 32 patients (64%) in the control group showed complete resolution in objective hematuria (P=0.28). Significantly lower use of antibiotics (P=0.002) and antispasmodics (P<0.001) was found in the WF10 group. Among the responders, 24 patients (77%) in the control group experienced recurrent objective hematuria, whereas in the WF10 group only 17 patients (47%) experienced a recurrence (P=0.01). Recurrence of objective hematuria occurred significantly faster in the control group as evidenced by Kaplan-Meier and log-rank statistics (P=0.004), suggesting a long-term effect of WF10. Cystoscopy, at the end of the treatment period and after the one year follow up showed overall improvement without significant difference between two groups. No severe toxicity was monitored. Conclusions: WF10 therapy is a safe, non-invasive and convenient method in the management of late hemorrhagic radiation cystitis. WF10 therapy, as adjunct to standard treatment, has significantly reduced recurrence of objective hematuria, compared to standard treatment alone, during a one year follow up

  10. Contrast-enhanced multislice pneumo-CT-cystography in the evaluation of urinary bladder neoplasms

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    Scardapane, Arnaldo [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital ' Policlinico' , Bari (Italy)], E-mail: scardapane@aruba.it; Pagliarulo, Vincenzo [Institute of Urology, University Hospital ' Policlinico' , Bari (Italy); Ianora, Amato A. Stabile [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital ' Policlinico' , Bari (Italy); Pagliarulo, Arcangelo [Institute of Urology, University Hospital ' Policlinico' , Bari (Italy); Angelelli, Giuseppe [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital ' Policlinico' , Bari (Italy)

    2008-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of contrast-enhanced multislice CT (MSCT) in the study of urothelial tumors after distension of the bladder with air. Materials and methods: We evaluated 43 consecutive patients with endoscopically proven bladder lesions. After air distension of the bladder, unenhanced pelvic and enhanced abdomino-pelvic scans were obtained with the following protocol: thickness 2.5 mm x 4 mm, increment 1 mm, scan delay 40'' and 7-10 min. For each patient we considered the number, size, aspect (papillary or sessile) and contrast enhancement of lesions. Ureteral involvement and the presence of synchronous lesions in the excretory scan were also evaluated. MPR and virtual endoscopy images were reviewed in all cases. Results: Bladder lesions were visualized in 39/43 cases. Compared to conventional cystoscopy, MSCT recognized single lesions in 31/33 patients, two lesions in 4/6, three in 2/2 and more than five foci in 2/2 patients. A papillary aspect was described in 44 cases while 11 lesions were sessile. Conventional Cystoscopy recognized six more lesions as compared with MSCT (four flat and two small papillary lesions). The detection rate for protruding lesions was 100% (52/52) for lesions > 5 mm and 60% (3/5%) for lesions < 5 mm. In four patients hydronephrosis was present, while in one case a synchronous lesion was evident in the renal pelvis. Conclusion: Contrast-enhanced MSCT with air distension of the urinary bladder is a safe and complete investigation to evaluate the local stage of bladder cancer and to evaluate the ureteral extension of the tumor, as well as the presence of synchronous lesions.

  11. Multimodal, 3D pathology-mimicking bladder phantom for evaluation of cystoscopic technologies (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gennifer T.; Lurie, Kristen L.; Zlatev, Dimitar V.; Liao, Joseph C.; Ellerbee, Audrey K.

    2016-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and blue light cystoscopy (BLC) have shown significant potential as complementary technologies to traditional white light cystoscopy (WLC) for early bladder cancer detection. Three-dimensional (3D) organ-mimicking phantoms provide realistic imaging environments for testing new technology designs, the diagnostic potential of systems, and novel image processing algorithms prior to validation in real tissue. Importantly, the phantom should mimic features of healthy and diseased tissue as they appear under WLC, BLC, and OCT, which are sensitive to tissue color and structure, fluorescent contrast, and optical scattering of subsurface layers, respectively. We present a phantom posing the hollow shape of the bladder and fabricated using a combination of 3D-printing and spray-coating with Dragon Skin (DS) (Smooth-On Inc.), a highly elastic polymer to mimic the layered structure of the bladder. Optical scattering of DS was tuned by addition of titanium dioxide, resulting in scattering coefficients sufficient to cover the human bladder range (0.49 to 2.0 mm^-1). Mucosal vasculature and tissue coloration were mimicked with elastic cord and red dye, respectively. Urethral access was provided through a small hole excised from the base of the phantom. Inserted features of bladder pathology included altered tissue color (WLC), fluorescence emission (BLC), and variations in layered structure (OCT). The phantom surface and underlying material were assessed on the basis of elasticity, optical scattering, layer thicknesses, and qualitative image appearance. WLC, BLC, and OCT images of normal and cancerous features in the phantom qualitatively matched corresponding images from human bladders.

  12. Effect of Music on Outpatient Urological Procedures: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis from the European Association of Urology Section of Uro-Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakides, Rena; Jones, Patrick; Geraghty, Robert; Skolarikos, Andreas; Liatsikos, Evangellos; Traxer, Olivier; Pietropaolo, Amelia; Somani, Bhaskar K

    2018-05-01

    Music is a practical, inexpensive and harmless analgesic and anxiolytic. An increasing number of original studies have been performed to investigate its potential application in urology. Our aim was to identify the effect of music on outpatient based urological procedures. We systematically reviewed the effect of using music during all reported outpatient urology procedures, including transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy, shock wave lithotripsy, urodynamic studies, percutaneous nephrostomy tube placement and cystoscopy. Data were included on all randomized trials from 1980 to 2017 and no language restrictions were applied. Included in analysis were 16 randomized studies in which 972 of 1,950 patients (49.8%) were exposed to music during an outpatient procedure. The procedures included transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy in 4 studies in a total of 286 patients, shock wave lithotripsy in 6 studies in a total of 1,023, cystoscopy in 3 studies in a total of 331, urodynamics in 2 studies in a total of 210 and percutaneous nephrostomy in 1 study in a total of 100. All studies incorporated a visual analog score to measure pain. Anxiety was measured by STAI (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory) in 13 studies and by a visual analog scale in 2. While 14 of the 16 studies showed a reduction in self-reported pain, a reduction in anxiety was seen in 14. When using music, overall procedural satisfaction was better in 9 studies and patient willingness to repeat the procedure was also higher in 7. Our meta-analysis revealed a significant reduction in visual analog scale and STAI findings across all studies (p <0.001). Our systematic review demonstrated a beneficial effect of music on urological outpatient procedures. Music seemed to decrease anxiety and pain. It might serve as a useful adjunct to increase procedural satisfaction and patient willingness to undergo the procedure again. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc

  13. Efficiency of Staging Work-Ups in the Evaluation of Carcinoma of the Uterine Cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jae Sung; Ha, Sung Whan

    1991-01-01

    A series of 510 patients with carcinoma of the uterine cervix given the curative radiation therapy from March 1979 through December 1986 was evaluated to determine the value of intravenous pyelography(IVP), cystoscopy, sigmoidoscopy, and abdomino-pelvic CT as staging work-up prior to treatment. On IVP and cystoscopy, 10.7%(49/456) and 5/3%(24/452) showed abnormality, respectively, but only 0.7% (3/413) did on signoidoscopy. As a result of these work-ups prerequisite to FIGO staging, twenty six (5.1%) out of 510 patients were upstaged from the stage determined by the findings of physical examination alone. The proportions of upstaging in each stage were as follows none in stage IB(35), IIA (89) and IIIA(8), 7.9%(20/252) in stage IIB(14 patients to FIGO Stage IIIB, 6 patients to FIGO stage IVA), and 4.8% (6/126) in stage IIIB (all to FIGO stage IVA). Positive findings of staging work-ups were found only in patients with advanced stages of stage IIB or over determined by physical examination alone but not in those with earlier stages. CT was performed in 337 patients. CT detected pelvic lymph node (LN) enlargement in 25.2% (85/337) and paraaortic LN enlargement in 7.4% (25/337). Pelvic LN positivity was well correlated with increasing stage but paraaortic LN positivity was not. In the evaluation of parametrial involvement, CT findings were in accordance with those of physical examination only in 65.6%(442/674). When compared with endoscopic studies, CT had much lower positive predictive value than negative predictive value in the evaluation of adjacent organ invasion. The staging work-ups should be individualized by the disease extent of each patient, and then the efficiency of work-ups may be increased without compromising the appropriate FIGO staging and treatment

  14. SENSITIVITY AND SPECIFICITY OF URINARY BLADDER CANCER ANTIGEN FOR DIAGNOSIS OF BLADDER TUMOR;A COMPARATIVE STUDY WITH URINARY CYTOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Radkhah

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Cystoscopy and urinary cytology are currently the basis for diagnosis and ‎follow-up of bladder tumors. Research to find a sensitive and specific tumor ‎marker for diagnosis of bladder tumor is actively underway, however, due to low sensitivity ‎and high cost of cytology. This cross-sectional study was performed in 65 patients to evaluate whether urinary bladder ‎cancer (UBC antigen level can predict the presence of active bladder tumor. In patients with ‎inactive tumor, UBC antigen level was determined in addition to standard cystoscopy ‎and cytology for follow-up. Patients with active tumor were ‎subjected to standard treatment and UBC antigen level determination. UBC antigen ‎ levels were measured by ELISA, using monoclonal antibodies ‎specific for UBC antigen. As a control group, UBC antigen level ‎was also determined in 65 persons who had been referred for urinalysis for other reasons. ‎UBC antigen level more than 1 μg/L which was regarded as ‎positive was found in 49.4% of the patients. In control group, 96.9% had UBC antigen < 1μg/L‎. Mean UBC antigen level in patients was ‎3.77 μg/L while it was 0.508 μg/L in controls (P < 0.0001. Sensitivity of ‎UBC antigen was 53.3% and its specificity was 40%. Sensitivity and specificity of urinary cytology was 17.3% and 88.2%, respectively. This difference was statistically ‎significant (P < 0.001. UBC antigen is more sensitive than urinary cytology, although cytology still ‎retains its priority in specificity. It is not yet recommended to replace UBC antigen for ‎cytology due to its low specificity and not favorable sensitivity.

  15. Photodynamic management of bladder cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, A.; Stepp, H.; Beyer, W.; Pongratz, T.; Sroka, R.; Bader, M.; Kriegmair, M.; Zaak, D.; Waidelich, R.; Karl, A.; Hofstetter, A.; Stief, C.; Baumgartner, R.

    2009-06-01

    Bladder cancer (BC) is among the most expensive oncological diseases. Any improvement in diagnosis or therapy carries a high potential for reducing costs. Fluorescence cystoscopy relies on a selective formation of Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) or more general photoactive porphyrins (PAP) in malignant urothelium upon instillation of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) or its hexyl-derivative h-ALA. Fluorescence cystoscopy equipment has been developed with the aim to compensate for the undesired distortion caused by the tissue optical properties by displaying the red fluorescence simultaneously with the backscattered blue light. Many clinical studies proved a high sensitivity in detecting flat carcinoma in situ and small papillary malignant tumours. As a result, recurrence rates were significantly decreased in most studies. The limitation lies in a low specificity, caused by false positive findings at inflamed bladder wall. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is currently being investigated as a promising tool to overcome this limitation. H-ALA-PDT (8 or 16 mM h-ALA in 50 ml instillation for 1-2 h, white light source, catheter applicator) has recently been investigated in a phase I study. 17 patients were applied 100 J/cm2 (3 patients received incrementing doses of 25 - 50 - 100 J/cm2) during approx. 1 hour irradiation time in 3 sessions, 6 weeks apart. PDT was performed without any technical complications. Complete photobleaching of the PpIX-fluorescence, as intended, could be achieved in 43 of 45 PDT-sessions receiving 100 J/cm2. The most prominent side effects were postoperative urgency and bladder pain, all symptoms being more severe after 16 mM h-ALA. Preliminary evaluation shows complete response assessed at 3 months after the third PDT-session (i.e. 6 months after first treatment) in 9 of 12 patients. 2 of these patients were free of recurrence until final follow-up at 84 weeks.

  16. Promising results with image guided intensity modulated radiotherapy for muscle invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whalley, D.; Caine, H.; McCloud, P.; Guo, L.; Kneebone, A.; Eade, T.

    2015-01-01

    To describe the feasibility of image guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) using daily soft tissue matching in the treatment of bladder cancer. Twenty-eight patients with muscle-invasive carcinoma of the bladder were recruited to a protocol of definitive radiation using IMRT with accelerated hypofractionation with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB). Isotropic margins of .5 and 1 cm were used to generate the high risk and intermediate risk planning target volumes respectively. Cone beam CT (CBCT) was acquired daily and a soft tissue match was performed. Cystoscopy was scheduled 6 weeks post treatment. The median age was 83 years (range 58-92). Twenty patients had stage II or III disease, and eight were stage IV. Gross disease received 66 Gy in 30 fractions in 11 patients (ten with concurrent chemotherapy) or 55 Gy in 20 fractions for those of poorer performance status or with palliative intent. All patients completed radiation treatment as planned. Three patients ceased chemotherapy early due to toxicity. Six patients (21 %) had acute Grade ≥ 2 genitourinary (GU) toxicity and six (21 %) had acute Grade ≥ 2 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity. Five patients (18 %) developed Grade ≥2 late GU toxicity and no ≥2 late GI toxicity was observed. Nineteen patients underwent cystoscopy following radiation, with complete response (CR) in 16 cases (86 %), including all patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. Eight patients relapsed, four of which were local relapses. Of the patients with local recurrence, one underwent salvage cystectomy. For patients treated with definitive intent, freedom from locoregional recurrence (FFLR) and overall survival (OS) was 90 %/100 % for chemoradiotherapy versus 86 %/69 % for radiotherapy alone. IG- IMRT using daily soft tissue matching is a feasible in the treatment of bladder cancer, enabling the delivery of accelerated synchronous integrated boost with good early local control outcomes and low toxicity

  17. Comparison of efficacy of prophylactic ketamine and dexmedetomidine on postoperative bladder catheter-related discomfort

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    Başak Akça

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To compare the effects of prophylactic ketamine and dexmedetomidine on postoperative bladder catheter-related discomfort/pain in patients undergoing cystoscopy. Methods: This prospective study was conducted on 75 American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA I-II patients between 18-75 years of age and undergoing cystoscopy between November 2011 and June 2012 at Hacettepe University Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. Patients were randomly assigned to one of the 3 groups to receive 1 μ/kg dexmedetomidine, 250 μ/kg intravenous ketamine, or normal saline. All patients were questioned regarding probe-related discomfort, patient satisfaction, and pain at the end of the operation 0 (t0 and 15 (t1, 60 (t2, 120 (t3, and 360 (t4 minutes postoperatively. Evaluations were performed in person at the post-anesthesia care unit, or in ambulatory surgery rooms, or by phone calls. Results: Pain incidence in the dexmedetomidine and ketamine groups (p=0.042 was significantly lower than that in the control group (p=0.044.The sedation scores recorded at t0 in the dexmedetomidine and ketamine groups (p=0.004 were significantly higher than that of the control group (p=0.017. Patient groups were similar regarding the rate of hallucinations experienced at t1, no patients experienced hallucinations at t2, t3, or t4. Significantly more patients experienced hallucinations at t0 in the ketamine group than in the dexmedetomidine group (p=0.034 and the control group (p=0.005. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine and ketamine had similar analgesic effects in preventing catheter-related pain; however, dexmedetomidine had a more acceptable side effect profile. To identify the optimal doses of dexmedetomidine and ketamine, more large-scale interventional studies are needed.

  18. Histological aspects of the bladder in systemic lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Roger Wroclawski

    2009-12-01

    statistically significant differences between the two groups regarding chronic unspecific cystitis and bladder vasculitis (Z = 2.078 > Z5% = 1.645 and Z = 1.777 > Z5% = 1.645 and also mean number of mast cells (Z = 2.387 > Z5% = 1.673. There were statistically significant differences between the proportion of mast cell infiltrate and presence of suprapubic pain as well as use of antimalarial drugs. The other analysis did not show statistically significant differences. There was no statistical evidence of dependence among the events: cystoscopy with interstitial pattern and chronic unspecific cystitis (p > 0.237; cystoscopy with interstitial pattern and bladder vasculitis(p > 0.325; cystoscopy with interstitial pattern and mast cell infiltrate (p > 0.277. Cconclusions: the bladder in systemic lupus erythematosus may be involved even in the absence of clinical manifestations. The involvement of the bladder in systemic lupus erythematosus was characterized mainly by the finding of chronic unspecific cystitis, bladder vasculitis and mast cell infiltrate. The presence of chronic unspecific cystitis was significantly greater in patients with the disease than in the Control Group, and the same occurred with bladder vasculitis. The number of mast cells/mm2 was higher than normal in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. This finding was associated to suprapubic pain upon bladder repletion and to use of antimalarial drugs.

  19. Application of 2-Micron Laser to Outpatients with Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer%2 μm激光治疗非肌层浸润性膀胱肿瘤30例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈文政; 李宏召; 杨勇

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the security and feasibility of 2-micron laser to treat outpatients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer under local anesthesia. Methods Altogether 30 cases of single and thin-pedicle bladder tumors with a diameter less than 3 cm were directly resected with 2-micron laser during the cystoscopy. NRS pain scores were taken separately during the cystoscopy and resection. Bladder epirubicin irrigation was given in 2 hours after the operation. Follow-up visits were conducted regularly. Results The pathological results showed 25 cases of GradeⅠ urothelial carcinoma, 3 cases of GradeⅠ -Ⅱ urothelial carcinoma and 2 cases of inverted papilloma. As to the NRS pain score related to the cystoscopy, 12 cases got a score of 2, and 18 cases a score of 3. For the resection, the NRS pain scores were 4 in 5 cases, 5 in 13 cases and 6 in 12 cases. No obturator nerve reflex or bladder perforation was found. The postoperative follow-up lasted for 6-24 months, and none of the patients was observed with tumor recurrence in si- Conclusions It is safe and feasible to treat non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer of outpatients with 2-micron laser, which alleviated greatly the patients'pain and economic burden.%目的 探讨局部麻醉下门诊膀胱镜检查中2 μm激光气化切除单发非肌层浸润性膀胱肿瘤的安全性和可行性.方法 在尿道局部麻醉下,经膀胱镜检查发现的单发、带蒂、直径小于3 cm的膀胱肿瘤患者30例,直接采用2μm激光气化切除.并在膀胱镜检查及激光气化切除过程中对患者进行NRS疼痛评分.术后2h给予表阿霉素膀胱灌注,定期灌注随访.结果 组织病理学检查结果显示,尿路上皮癌Ⅰ级25例,尿路上皮癌Ⅰ~Ⅱ级3例,内翻性乳头状瘤2例.膀胱镜检查时NRS疼痛评分:2分12例,3分18例;激光切除时疼痛评分:4分5例,5分13例,6分12例.术中无闭孔神经反射及膀胱穿孔等手术并发症.术后6~24个月随访,所有

  20. Transurethral Resection of Bladder Tumors: Next-generation Virtual Reality Training for Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Eva; Mayer, Julian; Russo, Giorgio Ivan; Amend, Bastian; Rausch, Steffen; Deininger, Susanne; Harland, Niklas; da Costa, Inês Anselmo; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Stenzl, Arnulf; Kruck, Stephan; Bedke, Jens

    2018-05-22

    The number of virtual reality (VR) simulators is increasing. The aim of this prospective trial was to determine the benefit of VR cystoscopy (UC) and transurethral bladder tumor resection (TURBT) training in students. Medical students without endoscopic experience (n=51, median age=25 yr, median 4th academic year) were prospectively randomized into groups A and B. After an initial VR-UC and VR-TURBT task, group A (n=25) underwent a video-based tutorial by a skilled expert. Group B (n=26) was trained using a VR training program (Uro-Trainer). Following the training, every participant performed a final VR-UC and VR-TURBT task. Performance indicators were recorded via the simulator. Data was analyzed by Mann-Whitney U test. VR cystoscopy and TURBT. No baseline and post-training differences were found for VR-UC between groups. During baseline, VR-TURBT group A showed higher inspected bladder surface than group B (56% vs 73%, p=0.03). Subgroup analysis detected differences related to sex before training (male: 31.2% decreased procedure time; 38.1% decreased resectoscope movement; p=0.02). After training, significant differences in procedure time (3.9min vs 2.7min, p=0.007), resectoscope movement (857mm vs 529mm, p=0.005), and accidental bladder injury (n=3.0 vs n=0.88, p=0.003) were found. Male participants showed reduced blood loss (males: 3.92ml vs females: 10.12ml; p=0.03) after training. Measuring endoscopic skills within a virtual environment can be done easily. Short training improved efficacy and safety of VR-TURBT. Nevertheless, transfer of improved VR performance into real world surgery needs further clarification. We investigated how students without endoscopic experience profit from simulation-based training. The safe environment and repeated simulations can improve the surgical training. It may be possible to enhance patient's safety and the training of surgeons in long term. Copyright © 2018 European Association of Urology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  1. Signal-to-noise contribution of principal component loads in reconstructed near-infrared Raman tissue spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimbergen, M C M; van Swol, C F P; Kendall, C; Verdaasdonk, R M; Stone, N; Bosch, J L H R

    2010-01-01

    The overall quality of Raman spectra in the near-infrared region, where biological samples are often studied, has benefited from various improvements to optical instrumentation over the past decade. However, obtaining ample spectral quality for analysis is still challenging due to device requirements and short integration times required for (in vivo) clinical applications of Raman spectroscopy. Multivariate analytical methods, such as principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), are routinely applied to Raman spectral datasets to develop classification models. Data compression is necessary prior to discriminant analysis to prevent or decrease the degree of over-fitting. The logical threshold for the selection of principal components (PCs) to be used in discriminant analysis is likely to be at a point before the PCs begin to introduce equivalent signal and noise and, hence, include no additional value. Assessment of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) at a certain peak or over a specific spectral region will depend on the sample measured. Therefore, the mean SNR over the whole spectral region (SNR(msr)) is determined in the original spectrum as well as for spectra reconstructed from an increasing number of principal components. This paper introduces a method of assessing the influence of signal and noise from individual PC loads and indicates a method of selection of PCs for LDA. To evaluate this method, two data sets with different SNRs were used. The sets were obtained with the same Raman system and the same measurement parameters on bladder tissue collected during white light cystoscopy (set A) and fluorescence-guided cystoscopy (set B). This method shows that the mean SNR over the spectral range in the original Raman spectra of these two data sets is related to the signal and noise contribution of principal component loads. The difference in mean SNR over the spectral range can also be appreciated since fewer principal components can

  2. Surgical tips and tricks during urethroplasty for bulbar urethral strictures focusing on accurate localisation of the stricture: results from a tertiary centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tricia L C; Venugopal, Suresh; Inman, Richard D; Chapple, Christopher R

    2015-04-01

    There are several techniques for characterising and localising an anterior urethral stricture, such as preoperative retrograde urethrography, ultrasonography, and endoscopy. However, these techniques have some limitations. The final determinant is intraoperative assessment, as this yields the most information and defines what surgical procedure is undertaken. We present our intraoperative approach for localising and operating on a urethral stricture, with assessment of outcomes. A retrospective review of urethral strictures operated was carried out. All patients had a bulbar or bulbomembranous urethroplasty. All patients were referred to a tertiary centre and operated on by two urethral reconstructive surgeons. Intraoperative identification of the stricture was performed by cystoscopy. The location of the stricture is demonstrated externally on the urethra by external transillumination of the urethra and comparison with the endoscopic picture. This is combined with accurate placement of a suture through the urethra, at the distal extremity of the stricture, verified precisely by endoscopy. Clinical data were collected in a dedicated database. Intraoperative details and postoperative follow-up data for each patient were recorded and analysed. A descriptive data analysis was performed. A representative group of 35 male patients who had surgery for bulbar stricture was randomly selected from January 2010 to December 2013. Mean follow-up was 13.8 mo (range 2-43 mo). Mean age was 46.5 yr (range 17-70 yr). Three patients had undergone previous urethroplasty and 26 patients had previous urethrotomy or dilatation. All patients had preoperative retrograde urethrography and most (85.7%) had endoscopic assessment. The majority of patients (48.6%) had a stricture length of >2-7 cm and 45.7% of patients required a buccal mucosa graft. There were no intraoperative complications. Postoperatively, two patients had a urinary tract infection. All patients were assessed

  3. One stage correction of anorectal malformations in newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makedonsky I.O.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The retrospective analysis of case histories of 35 infants (19 boys, 16 girls, treated in the department of reconstructive surgery of Dnipropetrovsk center of mother and child health in the period 2008-2013 was done. All the patients underwent one-stage treatment of anorectal malformations in neonatal period. Surgery was performed in the first 48 hours of life. Body weight of infants ranged from 2,8 to 4,4 kg (average weight 3,2 kg. Among related conditions there were observed vesico-ureteral reflux (VUR – in 11 (31,4%, VATER association - in 6 (17.1%, malformations of the spine – in 18 (51,4%, of the heart – in 2 (5,7% . During cystoscopy fistula in the urinary system was revealed in 16 boys. Surgical treatment was carried out by the posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (PSARP by A.Pena. 2 patients additionally underwent laparotomy. Among 16 patients with fistula in the urinary system, prostatic urethra fistula was revealed in 14, bladder neck fistula – in 2. Children were discharged from the hospital 2 weeks after surgery. All the children re­ceived anti­biotics due to the presence of VUR. After 1 month after surgery VCUG was performed. Long-term results were studied for a period of 10 to 24 months. All patients had VUR without evidence of hydronephrosis. In the period of 3-6 months after surgery 2 patients presented anal stenosis due to violation of dilatation. The evaluation results in the late period (10-24 months after surgery noted the presence of normal stool 2-3 times a day, 3 children had periodic con­stipations treated by diet. Available merits of the described method: only one operation and general anesthesia is per­for­med, no risk of prolonged contamination by pathogenic flora of the urinary system through the fistula, potential risk of complications of laparotomy and colostomy decreases, fistula visualization in cystoscopy allows to avoid the X-ray.

  4. Acute Bacterial Prostatitis: Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Timothy J; Dierfeldt, Daniel M

    2016-01-15

    Acute bacterial prostatitis is an acute infection of the prostate gland that causes pelvic pain and urinary tract symptoms, such as dysuria, urinary frequency, and urinary retention, and may lead to systemic symptoms, such as fevers, chills, nausea, emesis, and malaise. Although the true incidence is unknown, acute bacterial prostatitis is estimated to comprise approximately 10% of all cases of prostatitis. Most acute bacterial prostatitis infections are community acquired, but some occur after transurethral manipulation procedures, such as urethral catheterization and cystoscopy, or after transrectal prostate biopsy. The physical examination should include abdominal, genital, and digital rectal examination to assess for a tender, enlarged, or boggy prostate. Diagnosis is predominantly made based on history and physical examination, but may be aided by urinalysis. Urine cultures should be obtained in all patients who are suspected of having acute bacterial prostatitis to determine the responsible bacteria and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern. Additional laboratory studies can be obtained based on risk factors and severity of illness. Radiography is typically unnecessary. Most patients can be treated as outpatients with oral antibiotics and supportive measures. Hospitalization and broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics should be considered in patients who are systemically ill, unable to voluntarily urinate, unable to tolerate oral intake, or have risk factors for antibiotic resistance. Typical antibiotic regimens include ceftriaxone and doxycycline, ciprofloxacin, and piperacillin/tazobactam. The risk of nosocomial bacterial prostatitis can be reduced by using antibiotics, such as ciprofloxacin, before transrectal prostate biopsy.

  5. Posterior Nutcracker Syndrome with Left Renal Vein Duplication: A Rare Cause of Haematuria in a 12-Year-Old Boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Preza Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The nutcracker syndrome (NCS is a rare cause of haematuria. It embraces an extended nonpathognomonic spectrum of symptoms that imply a difficult diagnosis. Ultimately it may be associated with substantial morbidity and even life-threatening events. We report a rare cause if a 12-year-old boy who presented with a history of frequent intermittent episodes of painless constant haematuria. The cystoscopy showed a bloody urine ejaculate from the left ureter meatus. The Doppler ultrasonography showed turbulent pattern of venous blood flow of the posterior renal vein branch behind the aorta. The abdominopelvic computer tomography (apCT revealed left renal vein (LRV duplication with a dilated retroaortic branch, entrapped between the aorta and the vertebral column, promoting the renal nutcracker syndrome. The patient was initially hospitalized and managed with oral iron supplements and continuous saline bladder irrigation, not requiring additional treatment. The child is currently asymptomatic, with haemoglobin value returning to normal and therefore proposed to conservative management with close followup. The authors present a case report of episodic haematuria caused by a rare entity—posterior nutcracker syndrome with renal vein duplication.

  6. The Youngest Korean Case of Urachal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Ryeol Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Urachal anomalies are relatively uncommon and result from incomplete obliteration of the urachus perinatally. In children, most urachal diseases including urachal cysts and sinuses are benign, and these can sometimes become secondarily infected. Malignant involvement of the urachus is rarely reported, one in 5 million people, accounting for 0.35% to 0.7% of all bladder cancers. There are only five cases of urachal cancer diagnosed at the age of twenties in English written literature. Age at the diagnosis of urachal carcinoma is important to understand pathogenetic transition from benign to malignancy. A 26-year-old man visited our clinic with gross hematuria starting a few months before. CT scan showed a 4.0 × 6.8 cm sized lobulated cystic mass over the bladder dome. Cystoscopy showed a ball-shaped extrinsic mass from the bladder dome with intact bladder mucosa. With an impression of urachal cancer, laparoscopic partial cystectomy with wide excision of urachus was performed. Final diagnosis was well differentiated mucinous urachal adenocarcinoma invading bladder muscle, staged as pT3a based on Sheldon’s staging system. To our best knowledge, this case is the youngest Korean case of urachal carcinoma (the fourth youngest ever in English written literature.

  7. Metastatic carcinoma of the urinary bladder in a 67-year-old female with underlying triple primary cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Yen Hung

    2016-06-01

    A 67-year-old Taiwanese female presented to our institution in November 1997 with gastric signet ring cell carcinoma, pT2N0M0, status post subtotal gastrectomy. In February 2003 she was diagnosed with left breast invasive lobular carcinoma status post modified radical mastectomy, pT2N2M0. Further examination in January 2005 revealed proximal transverse colon cancer, Dukes' C2, with status post right hemicolectomy. She achieved disease-free status from all three malignancies after surgical resection and adjuvant chemotherapy for breast and colon cancers sequentially. In November 2011, she complained about sudden onset of gross hematuria for several days. Diagnostic cystoscopy showed a mass lesion over her urinary bladder. Cystoscope-assisted biopsy showed metastatic poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma with signet ring appearance. Herein we have discussed the pathologic role in the diagnosis of metastatic tumor involving a patient with multiple primary cancers. We also explored the epidemiologic risk and potential causal mechanism of patients with multiple primary cancers.

  8. Bladder metastases of appendiceal mucinous adenocarcinoma: a case presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giusti Guido

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Appendiceal adenocarcinoma is rare with a frequency of 0.08% of all surgically removed appendices. Few cases of appendiceal carcinoma infiltrating the bladder wall for spatial contiguity have been documented. Case Presentation A case is reported of a 45-years old woman with mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the appendix with bladder metastasis. Although ultrasonography and voided urinary cytology were negative, abdomen computed tomography (CT scan and cystoscopy and subsequent pathological examination revealed a mass exclusively located in the anterior wall of the bladder. Histopathology of the transurethral bladder resection revealed a bladder adenocarcinoma [6 cm (at the maximum diameter × 2,5 cm; approximate weight: 10 gr] with focal mucinous aspects penetrating the muscle and perivisceral fat. Laparotomy evidenced the presence of a solid mass of the appendix (2,5 cm × 3 cm × 2 cm extending to the loco-regional lymph nodes. Appendectomy and right hemicolectomy, linfoadenectomy and partial cystectomy were performed. The subsequent pathological examination revealed a mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the appendix with metastatic cells colonising the anterior bladder wall and several colic lymph nodes. Conclusions The rarity of the appendiceal carcinoma invading the urinary bladder and its usual involvement of nearest organs and the posterior bladder wall, led us to describe this case which demonstrates the ability of the appendiceal cancer to metastasize different regions of urinary bladder.

  9. Unusual presentation of high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma of the Urinary bladder with small-cell and large-cell features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitor Fiorin de Vasconcellos

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available High-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma of the urinary bladder comprehends small-cell and large-cell variants. It is a rare and aggressive neoplasm, mostly diagnosed in advanced stages. It is more frequently encountered among Caucasian men in the sixth decade of life. Urinary symptoms are the most common clinical presentation. Diagnosis is generally not troublesome once the lesions are easily detectable by imaging exams and cystoscopy. This neoplasia is associated with tobacco smoking, and is frequently associated with other carcinomatous components such as urothelial carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and sarcomatoid carcinoma. The authors report a case of an apparently healthy female patient who presented cervical lymph node enlargement not accompanied by systemic symptoms. The supraclavicular lymph node biopsy revealed metastatic small cell carcinoma. The computed tomography scan showed a bladder wall nodular thickening, enlarged lymph nodes along the iliac, periaortic, mediastinal, cervical and supraclavicular chains, as well as an insufflating lytic bone lesion in the right iliac wing. The positron emission tomography-fluorodeoxyglucose (PET-FDG added to these findings, the presence of a paraesophageal lymph node, lymphadenomegaly in the gluteal region and a vertebral lytic lesion in T10. Resected specimen of the bladder tumor revealed a high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma with small-cell and large-cell features.

  10. Use of a laparoscopic specimen retrieval pouch to facilitate removal of intact or fragmented cystic calculi from standing sedated horses: 8 cases (2012-2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzman, Scott A; Vaughan, Betsy; Nieto, Jorge E; Galuppo, Larry D

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the use of a laparoscopic specimen retrieval pouch for removal of intact or fragmented cystic calculi from standing horses. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 8 horses (5 geldings and 3 mares) with cystic calculi. PROCEDURES Physical examination and cystoscopic, ultrasonographic, and hematologic evaluations of urinary tract function were performed for each horse. A diagnosis of cystic calculus was made on the basis of results of cystoscopy and ultrasonography. Concurrent urolithiasis or other urinary tract abnormalities identified during preoperative evaluation were recorded. Horses were sedated and placed in standing stocks, and the perineum was aseptically prepared. Direct access to the urinary bladder was gained in geldings via perineal urethrotomy or in mares by a transurethral approach. Calculi were visualized endoscopically, manipulated into the retrieval pouch, and removed intact or fragmented (for larger calculi). RESULTS For 4 geldings and 1 mare, fragmentation was necessary to facilitate calculus removal. Mean duration of surgery was 125 minutes, and trauma to the urinary bladder and urethra was limited to areas of hyperemia and submucosal petechiation. No postoperative complications were encountered for any horse. When lithotripsy was required, the retrieval pouch provided an effective means of stabilizing calculi and containing the fragments for removal. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Use of the laparoscopic specimen retrieval pouch was an effective, minimally traumatic method for retrieving cystic calculi from standing horses. The pouch protected the urinary bladder and urethra from trauma during calculus removal and allowed for stabilization, containment, and fragmentation of calculi when necessary.

  11. Spontaneous puerperal extraperitoneal bladder wall rupture in young woman with diagnostic dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabat, Debabrat Kumar; Panigrahi, Pradeep Kumar; Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar; Acharya, Mousumi; Sahu, Mahesh Ch

    2015-01-01

    A young female presented with an acute abdominal pain and oliguria for 1 week following normal vaginal delivery. No history of hematuria was present. Patient was having lochia rubra. Sealed uterine rupture was suspected clinically. Initial ultrasound of the patient showed distended urinary bladder containing Foley catheter ballon with clamping of Foley catheter and particulate ascites. Abdominal paracentesis revealed hemorrhagic fluid. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography of abdomen revealed ascites, distended urinary bladder and no extraluminal contrast extravasation in delayed scan. As patient condition deteriorated, repeat ultrasound guided abdominal paracentesis was done which revealed transudative peritoneal collection with distended bladder. Cystoscopy revealed urinary bladder ruptures with exudate sealing the rupture site. Exploratory laparotomy was done and a diagnosis of extraperitoneal bladder rupture was confirmed. The rent was repaired in layers. She was put on continuous bladder drainage for 3 weeks followed by bladder training. It presented in a unique way as there was hemorrhagic peritoneal tap, no macroscopic hematuria and urinary bladder was distended in spite of urinary bladder wall rupture which delayed the diagnosis and treatment. Complete emptying of urinary bladder before second stage of labor and during postpartum period with perineal repair is mandatory to prevent urinary bladder rupture.

  12. Case series: Bladder clot evacuation using a prostate morcellation device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doersch, Karen M; Navetta, Andrew F; Bird, Erin T; El Tayeb, Marawan M

    2017-07-01

    We sought to provide a technical update on the use of a prostate morcellator device (PMD) to manage organized blood clots of the bladder following laser prostatectomy. Herein, we describe our experience in using the Wolf Piranha morcellator in managing organized bladder blood clots supplemented with a retrospective chart review of the patients in whom this procedure was performed. Six patients, all male with a mean age of 75 ± 8.9 years, had organized bladder clots following either holmium laser enucleation or photoselective vaporization of the prostate managed with a PMD. Clots were recognized based on hematuria or urinary retention a median of 3.5 days following the aforementioned procedures. Initial management was attempted with more conservative measures, including a three-way Foley catheter, followed by cystoscopy with an Ellik evacuator, or a glass Tommey syringe. Morcellation times were a mean of 10.2 ± 6.15 minutes (range 2-18). This technique was able to manage clots that were an average of 173.3 ± 115.9 cc in size. The procedure was well-tolerated. No patients experienced intraoperative or morcellator-related complications. Benign prostatic hypertrophy frequently requires surgical endoscopic management and can be complicated by hematuria and bladder blood clot formation. When these clots become organized, this can lead to urinary retention and the required management, evacuation, may be difficult. The use of a Wolf Piranha PMD is a safe, well-tolerated, and effective in evacuating organized blood clots of the bladder.

  13. A designated centre for people with disabilities operated by The Cheshire Foundation in Ireland, Cork

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Connell, L

    2018-02-01

    Ureteric stents are frequently inserted post endourological procedures. However, subsequent endoscopic stent removal requires a second procedure for the patient and the availability of necessary resources. Longer duration of indwelling stents can lead to increased risk of symptoms and complications. The use of magnetic stents removed with a magnetic retrieval device (BlackStar©), offers an alternative which obviates the need for cystoscopy. We assessed the outcomes for this novel method of stent removal in our institution. A retrospective analysis was performed of all patients undergoing magnetic stent insertion and subsequent removal in a nurse-led clinic over a nine-month period. Patients were followed up with a prospective validated Ureteral Stent Symptoms Questionnaire (USSQ)3. A cost analysis was also performed. In total, 59 patients were treated using magnetic stents. The complication rate was low (6.7%). The median duration of indwelling stent was 5.8 days (range 1-11 days). Patients reported haematuria and lower urinary tract symptoms but >90% experienced no functional impairment with minimal days of employment lost (mean 0.75 days). All patients reported satisfaction with nurse-led stent removal and 97% were happy to have stents removed via this method in the future. The total financial savings were estimated at €47,790 over this period. Nurse-led removal of magnetic stents is safe and well tolerated by patients and enables expedient stent removal. It also provides a significant cost benefit and frees up valuable endoscopic resources.

  14. The Expanding Role of Advanced Practice Providers in Urologic Procedural Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langston, Joshua P; Duszak, Richard; Orcutt, Venetia L; Schultz, Heather; Hornberger, Brad; Jenkins, Lawrence C; Hemingway, Jennifer; Hughes, Danny R; Pruthi, Raj S; Nielsen, Matthew E

    2017-08-01

    To understand the role of Advanced Practice Providers (APPs) in urologic procedural care and its change over time. As the population ages and the urologic workforce struggles to meet patient access demands, the role of APPs in the provision of all aspects of urologic care is increasing. However, little is currently known about their role in procedural care. Commonly performed urologic procedures were linked to Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes from 1994 to 2012. National Medicare Part B beneficiary claims frequency was identified using Physician Supplier Procedure Summary Master Files. Trends were studied for APPs, urologists, and all other providers nationally across numerous procedures spanning complexity, acuity, and technical skill set requirements. Between 1994 and 2012, annual Medicare claims for urologic procedures by APPs increased dramatically. Cystoscopy increased from 24 to 1820 (+7483%), transrectal prostate biopsy from 17 to 834 (+4806%), complex Foley catheter placement from 471 to 2929 (+522%), urodynamics testing from 41 to 9358 (+22,727%), and renal ultrasound from 18 to 4500 (+24,900%) CONCLUSION: We found dramatic growth in the provision of urologic procedural care by APPs over the past 2 decades. These data reinforce the known expansion of the APP role in urology and support the timeliness of ongoing collaborative multidisciplinary educational efforts to address unmet needs in education, training, and guideline formation to maximize access to urologic procedural services. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of an interstitial cystitis risk score for bladder permeability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E Lamb

    Full Text Available Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC is a multifactorial syndrome of severe pelvic and genitalia pain and compromised urinary function; a subset of IC patients present with Hunner's lesions or ulcers on their bladder walls (UIC. UIC is diagnosed by cystoscopy, which may be quite painful. The objective of this study was to determine if a calculated Bladder Permeability Defect Risk Score (BP-RS based on non-invasive urinary cytokines could discriminate UIC patients from controls and IC patients without Hunner's ulcers.A national crowdsourcing effort targeted IC patients and age-matched controls to provide urine samples. Urinary cytokine levels for GRO, IL-6, and IL-8 were determined using a Luminex assay.We collected 448 urine samples from 46 states consisting of 153 IC patients (147 female, 6 male, of which 54 UIC patients (50 females, 4 male, 159 female controls, and 136 male controls. A defined BP-RS was calculated to classify UIC, or a bladder permeability defect etiology, with 89% validity.The BP-RS Score quantifies UIC risk, indicative of a bladder permeability defect etiology in a subset of IC patients. The Bladder Permeability Defect Risk Score is the first validated urine biomarker assay for interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

  16. Constructing spherical panoramas of a bladder phantom from endoscopic video using bundle adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soper, Timothy D.; Chandler, John E.; Porter, Michael P.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2011-03-01

    The high recurrence rate of bladder cancer requires patients to undergo frequent surveillance screenings over their lifetime following initial diagnosis and resection. Our laboratory is developing panoramic stitching software that would compile several minutes of cystoscopic video into a single panoramic image, covering the entire bladder, for review by an urolgist at a later time or remote location. Global alignment of video frames is achieved by using a bundle adjuster that simultaneously recovers both the 3D structure of the bladder as well as the scope motion using only the video frames as input. The result of the algorithm is a complete 360° spherical panorama of the outer surface. The details of the software algorithms are presented here along with results from both a virtual cystoscopy as well from real endoscopic imaging of a bladder phantom. The software successfully stitched several hundred video frames into a single panoramic with subpixel accuracy and with no knowledge of the intrinsic camera properties, such as focal length and radial distortion. In the discussion, we outline future work in development of the software as well as identifying factors pertinent to clinical translation of this technology.

  17. Medical malpractice in endourology: analysis of closed cases from the State of New York.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duty, Brian; Okhunov, Zhamshid; Okeke, Zeph; Smith, Arthur

    2012-02-01

    Medical malpractice indemnity payments continue to rise, resulting in increased insurance premiums. We reviewed closed malpractice claims pertaining to endourological procedures with the goal of helping urologists mitigate their risk of lawsuit. All closed malpractice claims from 2005 to 2010 pertaining to endourological procedures filed against urologists insured by the Medical Liability Mutual Insurance Company of New York were examined. Claims were reviewed for plaintiff demographics, medical history, operative details, alleged complication, clinical outcome and lawsuit disposition. A total of 25 closed claims involved endourological operations and of these cases 10 were closed with an indemnity payment. The average payout was $346,722 (range $25,000 to $995,000). Of the plaintiffs 16 were women and mean plaintiff age was 51.4 years. Cystoscopy with ureteral stent placement/exchange resulted in 13 lawsuits, ureteroscopic lithotripsy 8, percutaneous stone extraction 2 and shock wave lithotripsy 2. There were 17 malpractice suits brought for alleged operative complications. Failure to arrange adequate followup was implicated in 4 cases. Error in diagnosis and delay in treatment was alleged in 3 claims. Urologists are not immune to the current medical malpractice crisis. Endourology and urological oncology generate the greatest number of lawsuits against urologists. Most malpractice claims involving endourological procedures result from urolithiasis and alleged technical errors. Therefore, careful attention to surgical technique is essential during stone procedures to reduce the risk of malpractice litigation. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Renal Allograft Donor with Isolated Microhematuria

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    Karkar Ayman

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been extensive debate about extending the criteria for accepting living donors to include the presence of mild renal abnormalities such as isolated microhematuria. Hematuria defined as the detection of greater than five red blood cells per high power field can be associated with abnormalities throughout the urinary tract. Detection of casts or dysmorphic red blood cells in the urine sediment with or without proteinuria could indicate underlying intrinsic renal disease. Anatomic causes, such as stones and tumors, should be excluded; cystoscopy may be indicated to exclude bladder pathology. Obviously, urinary tract infection, uncontrolled hypertension and latent diabetes mellitus must be excluded. Microscopic hematuria could be associated with mesangial IgA deposits; as 10% of first-degree relatives of patients with IgA glomerulonephritis suffer from microhematuria and/or proteinuria that may require consideration of renal biopsy. Microhematuria could also be associated with other known hereditary renal diseases such as C3 deposits disease, IgM nephropathy, autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, Alport′s syndrome or thin basement membrane disease. In conclusion, careful assessment of isolated microhematuria, in the context of living kidney donation, is mandatory as results may reveal occult renal disease that may contraindicate kidney donation.

  19. Step-by-Step robotic heminephrectomy for duplicated renal collecting system

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    Homayoun Zargar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction A duplicated renal collecting system is a relatively common congenital anomaly rarely presenting in adults. Aim In this video we demonstrate our step-by-step technique of Robotic heminephrectomy in a patient with non-functioning upper pole moiety. Materials and Methods Following cystoscopy and ureteral catheter insertion the patient was placed in 600 modified flank position with the ipsilateral arm positioned at the side of the patient. A straight-line, three arm robotic port configuration was employed. The robot was docked at a 90-degree angle, perpendicular to the patient. Following mobilization the colon and identifying both ureters of the duplicated system, the ureters were followed cephalically toward, hilar vessels where the hilar anatomy was identified. The nonfunctioning pole vasculature was ligated using hem-o-lok clips. The ureter was sharply divided and the proximal ureteral stump was passed posterior the renal hilum. Ureteral stump was used as for retraction and heminephrectomy is completed along the line demarcating the upper and lower pole moieties. Renorrhaphy was performed using 0-Vicryl suture with a CT-1 needle. The nonfunctioning pole ureter was then dissected caudally toward the bladder hiatus, ligated using clips, and transected. Results The operating time was 240 minutes and blood loss was 100 cc. There was no complication post-operatively. Conclusions Wrist articulation and degree of freedom offered by robotic platform facilitates successful performance of minimally invasive heminephrectomy in the setting of an atrophic and symptomatic renal segment.

  20. The use of JJ stent in the management of deep endometriosis lesion, affecting or potentially affecting the ureter: a review of our practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingertner, A S; Rodriguez, B; Ziane, A; Gibon, E; Thoma, V; Osario, F; Haddad, C; Wattiez, A

    2008-08-01

    With the increasing number of operative laparoscopies performed for the treatment of deep pelvic endometriosis, technical difficulties and risk of complications inevitably increase. We report our experience using JJ stents, in women treated for deep pelvic endometriosis, with regard to prevention and management of ureteral lesions. Descriptive retrospective analysis between March 2004 and March 2007. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital, Strasbourg, France. Cases of women who underwent laparoscopic surgery for severe endometriosis and who needed a JJ stent in their management were recorded. Laparoscopic surgery was performed at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at CMCO-SIHCUS and Hautepierre Hospitals, Strasbourg, which are referral centres in the treatment of deep endometriosis. To evaluate the contribution of JJ stent in the prevention and management of ureteral lesions from endometriotic origin and/or iatrogenic origin in women treated for deep pelvic endometriosis. A total of 145 women had surgery for deep pelvic endometriosis. Seventeen (11.7%) women had a JJ ureteral stent inserted. In 82.4% of women, the stent was inserted pre- or peroperatively. We noted three ureteral complications, of which only one needed management by laparotomy. Except in extreme cases, management of ureteral endometriosis should be performed laparoscopically. Ureteral lesions whether iatrogenic, or secondary to endometriotic disease, can be treated by cystoscopy, JJ stent and laparoscopy. The combination of these three elements is the optimal management and is unlikely to cause subsequent complications. Laparotomy and its associated morbidity should be avoided.

  1. Cystinuria in children in Bahrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hermi, B.; Al-Kameli, A.; Aal, Abbas A.

    2002-01-01

    Cystinuria is a rare autosomal recessive trait with a defect in transportof cystine and other dibasic amino acids in the kidney and intestine. Renalstone formation is the only clinical presentation of Cystinuria. We presentherewith three cases with Cystinuria. We present herewith three cases withcystinuria. Case 1 is a 13-year-old boy known to have Bernard Souliersyndrome who presented at the age of six years with staghorn stone of theleft kidney. He was treated with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL)with little benefit, followed by percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL). Hestill gets recurrent renal stones and is being treated with high fluidintake, low sodium diet, captopril, K-citrate and D-pencillamine. Case 2 is a10-year-old boy, brother of the first patient, who was diagnosed ascystinuria on family screening. He presented with bilateral tiny renalstones. Case 3 is a four-year-old girl who was presented at the age of 1.5years with urinary tract infection (UTI). Renal ultrasound showed lefthydronephrosis and intravenous pyelography (IVP) showed bilateral ureteralstones. She underwent cystoscopy and lithiotripsy twice; currently she is oncaptopril, K-citrate, high fluid intake and low sodium diet. We believe thisis the first report of cystinuria in children from Bahrain. (author)

  2. Treatment options for high-risk T1 bladder cancer. Status quo and future perspectives of radiochemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiss, C.; Roedel, C.; Ott, O.J.; Wittlinger, M.; Fietkau, R.; Sauer, R.; Krause, S.F.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: to review the standards and new developments in diagnosis and management of high-risk T1 bladder cancer with emphasis on the role of radiotherapy (RT) and radiochemotherapy (RCT). Material and methods: a systematic review of the literature on developments in diagnosis and management of high-risk T1 bladder cancer was performed. Results: first transurethral resection (TUR), as radical as safely possible, supported by fluorescence cystoscopy, shows higher detection and decreased recurrence rates. An immediate single postoperative instillation with a chemotherapeutic drug reduces the relative risk of recurrence by 40%. A second TUR is recommended to assess residual tumor. For adjuvant intravesical therapy, bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) demonstrated the highest efficacy. Early cystectomy should be reserved for selected patients. A recent phase III trial comparing RT versus conservative treatment in T1 G3 tumors could not show any advantage for RT. Data from Erlangen, Germany, using combined RCT in 80% of the patients, compare favorably with most of the contemporary BCG series. Conclusion: results of intravesical therapy are still unsatisfying and early cystectomy is associated with morbidity and mortality. RT alone proved not superior to other conservative treatment strategies. However, data on RCT are promising and demonstrate an alternative to intravesical therapy and radical cystectomy. (orig.)

  3. Tubularized Penile-Flap Urethroplasty Using a Fasciocutaneous Random Pedicled Flap for Recurrent Anterior Urethral Stricture

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    Yong Jig Lee

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the use of a tubularized random flap for the curative treatment of recurrent anterior urethral stricture. Under the condition of pendulous lithotomy and suprapubic cystostomy, the urethral stricture was removed via a midline ventral penile incision followed by elevation of the flap and insertion of an 18-Fr catheter. Subcutaneous buried interrupted sutures were used to reapproximate the waterproof tubularized neourethra and to coapt with the neourethra and each stump of the urethra, first proximally and then distally. The defect of the penile shaft was covered by advancement of the surrounding scrotal flap. The indwelling catheter was maintained for 21 days. A 9 month postoperative cystoscopy showed no flap necrosis, no mechanical stricture, and no hair growth on the lumen of the neourethra. The patient showed no voiding discomfort 6 months after the operation. The advantages of this procedure are the lack of need for microsurgery, shortening of admission, the use of only spinal anesthesia (no general anesthesia, and a relatively short operative time. The tubularized unilateral penile fasciocutaneous flap should be considered an option for initial flap urethroplasty as a curative technique.

  4. Immediate endoscopic management of complete iatrogenic anterior urethral injuries: A case series with long-term results

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    Maheshwari Pankaj N

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urethral injury produces partial or complete disruption of the urethral integrity. Advances in endourology have made endoscopic management of most of these injuries feasible without greatly compromising the final result. We report our institutional experience of immediate endoscopic realignment of complete iatrogenic anterior urethral injury. Methods From May 1997 to May 2003, seven patients with complete anterior urethral disruption were managed by immediate endoscopy guided splinting of urethra. Retrograde urethroscopy, combined with fluoroscopic guidance and in some cases antegrade cystoscopy through a suprapubic stab cystostomy was performed. A guide wire was negotiated across the disruption. Later, a 16 F Foley catheter was placed for 1–3 weeks. Patients were followed up at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months and then yearly to assess the long-term outcome of endoscopic management. Results Immediate endoscopic realignment was achieved in all patients. Three patients developed recurrence at six months; that was treated by optical urethrotomy. Only one patient developed multiple recurrences over an average follow-up of 49.2 months (range 7 to 74 months. He was offered open end-to-end urethroplasty at twenty months after third recurrence. Thus immediate endoscopic realignment avoided any further intervention in four patients (57.14%; while after an additional optical urethrotomy, urethroplasty could be avoided in six patients (87.2%. Conclusion Immediate endoscopic realignment of traumatic urethral disruption is a feasible, safe and effective treatment modality for management of patients with iatrogenic complete anterior urethral injuries.

  5. Single stage circumferential lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty in near obliterative bulbar urethra stricture: A novel technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Umesh; Yadav, Sher Singh; Tomar, Vinay; Garg, Amit

    2016-01-01

    This is a prospective study of the use and efficacy of a novel technique of circumferential tubularised lingual mucosal graft (LMG) in obliterative and near obliterative bulbar urethral stricture of >2 cm where excisional and augmented anastomotic urethroplasty are not feasible. The stenotic urethral segment was opened dorsally in midline and fibrosed urethra was excised taking care to preserve the healthy spongiosum tissue. LMG (av. Length 3 cm) was placed from one end of corporal body towards spongy tissue in a circumferential manner. Another LMG was placed in similar manner to deal with longer stricture. The urethra was tubularised over 14 Fr silicone catheter. A total of 12 men, of mean age 47 years underwent this procedure. The mean follow up period was 11 months starting from July 2014 till manuscript submission. Follow up included voiding cystourethrogram at 3 weeks, cystoscopy at 3 months (one patient didn't turned up) and subsequent follow up. Mean stricture length was 4.66 cm (range, 3-8.5 cm) and mean operative time was 195 min. (range, 160 to 200 min.). The technique was successful (normal voiding with no need for any post-operative procedure) in 11(91.6%) patients. One patient developed early recurrence at 4 month of surgery and had anastomotic stricture which was successfully managed by direct visual internal urethrotomy. Single stage circumferential tubularised graft urethroplasty is an excellent technique for strictures that include segments of obliterative and near obliterative diseased urethra. It provide a wider neourethra than patch graft urethroplasty.

  6. Computed tomography in staging of bladder carcinoma (Prospective study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Soo; Choi, Byung Ihn; Han, Man Chung

    1985-01-01

    Staging of carcinoma of the urinary bladder is important for the choice of therapy and also has prognostic implications. Hitherto the staging has been based upon cystoscopy with biopsy, transurethral resection, and palpation with complementary radiographic examinations such as cystography, urography, lymphangiography, ultrasound and angiography. However, with all these methods, the staging of bladder carcinomas still uncertain and inferior to CT. Authors analyzed CT staging of bladder cancers and compared with pathologic staging of laparotomy results. The results are as following: 1. Overall accuracy of CT staging in bladder carcinoma was 72 percent. 2. Overstaging was 20 percent (5/25) and understaging was 8 percent (2/25). 3. All of CT stage B cancers were proven to be stage B, pathologically. 4. In 6 cases of CT static cancers, only one was correct, 3 were overstaged and 2 were understaged. 5. In 7 cases of CT stage D cancers, 5 were correct and 2 were overstaged. 6. CT detected only 2 cases of pelvic lymph node involvement in 4 of pathologically proven lymphadenopathy

  7. The results of a series of 963 patients with transitional cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder primarily treated by radical megavoltage X-ray therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, W.; Quilty, P.M.

    1986-01-01

    The results are reported of a large series of patients with transitional cell cancer of the bladder, treated in Edinburgh between 1971 and 1982. Analysis of pre-treatment characteristics for patients with transitional cell bladder cancer showed that tumour category was significantly associated with grade and tumour size. Complete local tumour regression at follow-up cystoscopy was achieved in 45.9% of patients who completed radical megavoltage X-ray therapy. Patients with grade 2 or 3 cancer, a solid cancer or a tumour of less than 8 cm in size had significantly improved complete regression rates. Lasting local tumour control after initial complete regression was better in patients with grade 3 cancer. Complete regression was associated with improved survival for all but patients with T1 cancer. The poorest survival rates were seen in patients over 79 years of age, those with T4 cancer, an ulcerated cancer, a grade 3 cancer or a tumour of more than 7 cm in size. Metastases were more often seen in patients with grade 3 or T3/T4 cancer. Severe late radiation-related complications were seen in 14.8% of patients. (Auth.)

  8. Vesical schistosomiasis with terminal hematuria in sub-Saharan patients.

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    Pereira, J; Calleja, E; Marne, C; Borque, A

    2014-03-01

    To know the characteristics of vesical schistosomiasis caused by schistosoma hematobium in immigrant patients. The retrospective study of 41 cases microbiologically diagnosed in our hospital over the last 16 years is presented. Data was collected on origin, age, presentation form, diagnostic tests and treatment. All were African patients whose ages ranged from 4 to 32 years and who had terminal macroscopic hematuria. Most of the patients (85%) were men. In all of the cases, diagnosis was by a urinary microbiological study and in one case, cystoscopy with a biopsy of a typical vesical lesion. Terminal hematuria is the most representative clinical sign. They were treated with praziquantel. The epidemiology and intermittent terminal hematuria in African patients should lead to the suspicion of vesical schistosomiasis as the first diagnostic option. Urinary microbiological study is a rapid, non-invasive, test with high diagnostic yield that would avoid performing invasive studies. Its simple treatment assures high level of compliance and consequent efficacy. Copyright © 2013 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Penile-preserving surgery for primary urothelial carcinoma of male urethra

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    Haoping Tai

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Primary urethral carcinoma is a rare cancer, comprising <1% of all malignancies. The location of this lesion presents a certain dilemma of treatment between efficacy and quality of life. We report an 84-year-old male patient, with a history of chronic hepatitis C, hypertension, and transient ischemic accident, who presented with dysuria and acute urinary retention. The intravenous urography showed mild prostatic enlargement, but no stone or filling defect was noted in the upper urinary tract. On urethrocystoscopy, multiple papillary tumors were found at the pendulous urethra, and the pathology of biopsy confirmed urothelial carcinoma. The patient was admitted, and electroresection with fulguration of urethral tumors was performed owing to the patient's old age and poor performance status. Intraurethral and intravesical chemotherapy with mitomycin C was regularly given at the outpatient clinic. Recurrent urothelial carcinomas were noted twice in the first 2 years of follow up, and repeated transurethral resections were done. Unfortunately, liver cirrhosis with hepatocellular carcinoma was diagnosed last June, for which he received transcatheter arterial chemoembolization. No recurrence of urethral cancer has been found on semiannual cystoscopy in the past 3 years. Penile-preserving surgery is a reasonable surgical option for elderly primary urethral carcinoma patients with acceptable oncological outcome and good quality of life.

  10. Urethral metastasis from non-seminomatous germ cell tumor: a case report

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    Joffe Johnathan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We present a case of nonseminomatous germ cell tumor of the testes with acute urinary retention secondary to urethral metastasis. This presentation, and similar cases of urethral metastasis from this tumor, have not been reported previously. Case presentation A 35-year-old Caucasian man presented to hospital with a history of acute urinary retention. On examination he was found to have right testicular enlargement with raised β-human chorionic gonadotrophin, serum α-fetoprotein and lactate dehydrogenase levels. He underwent radical left inguinal orchidectomy and histology confirmed a nonseminomatous germ cell tumor of the testes. Cystoscopy carried out due to urinary retention showed penile metastasis and the biopsy confirmed metastatic malignant undifferentiated teratoma. Staging computed tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis showed pulmonary, pelvic nodal, ischial and penile metastasis. The diagnosis of the International Germ Cell Cancer Collaborative Group of poor prognosis metastatic nonseminomatous germ cell tumor was made, following which he received four cycles of bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy with curative intent. He had a complete marker and an excellent radiological response. He is currently under follow up. Conclusion The unusual presentation of lymphovascular spread in this case of nonseminomatous germ cell tumor highlights the need to include routine pelvic imaging in the assessment and follow up of testicular cancer.

  11. Histiocytic sarcoma with bladder involvement: Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Aceñero, Mª Jesús; Pérez Alonso, Pablo; Díaz Del Arco, Cristina

    We report an unusual case of histiocytic sarcoma with bladder involvement. An 80 year-old man with a previous history of diffuse large B-cell malignant lymphoma presented with hematuria and back pain. Serial urine cytologies revealed no urothelial malignant cells, but cystoscopy showed a large intravesical mass. The patient underwent transurethral resection (TUR) of the tumor. The bladder TUR specimen showed a widely infiltrating epithelioid neoplasm, with intense immunohistochemical positivity for CD45 and histiocytic markers (CD68, lysozime and fascin). Histopathological diagnosis was histiocytic sarcoma. As the patient's condition was progressively deteriorating, only palliative care was indicated and he died one month after TUR. Although histiocytic sarcoma can often be widespread at the time of diagnosis, to our knowledge, this is the first report of a case presenting with urinary symptoms. Histiocytic sarcoma can mimic many other malignant lesions, and only immunohistochemistry can define the tumor cells, allowing correct therapy. We discuss the differential diagnosis and possible associations. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anatomía Patológica. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Ureteric stricture secondary to unusual extension of prostatic adenocarcinoma.

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    Chalasani, Venu; Macek, Petr; O'Neill, Gordon F; Barret, Wade

    2010-02-01

    This article describes an unusual finding in a patient who presented with an adenocarcinoma of the prostate and right hydronephrosis. A 68-year-old male presented with right hydronephrosis and a PSA of 96. DRE was consistent with cT3 carcinoma. Cystoscopy showed an exophytic superficial transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder and a transrectal biopsy of the prostate confirmed adenocarcinoma Gleason score 4+3. Staging investigations (CT pelvis and bone scan) were negative; androgen deprivation therapy was therefore initiated for the prostatic adenocarcinoma. Upper tract imaging showed multiple filling defects in the proximal ureter. Ureteroscopy showed a stricture at the level of the iliac vessels. With a working diagnosis of upper tract TCC, right open nephroureterectomy was performed. Final histology showed prostatic adenocarcinoma infiltrating the adventitia of the entire ureter up to the level of the renal pelvis. A rare cause of ureteric stricture, contiguous spread of prostatic adenocarcinoma, should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with upper tract obstruction and a known history of prostatic adenocarcinoma. Androgen deprivation therapy for several months did not seem to cause resolution of the tumor in the periureteric, ureteric and perihilar tissues.

  13. Retrieval of proximally migrated double J ureteric stents in children using goose neck snare

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    Sivasankar Jayakumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Proximal migration of the ureteric double J stent is a rare but known complication. We describe three cases where a minimally invasive technique for retrieval of displaced double J stents using Amplatz™ goose-neck snare was successful. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of patients with displaced double J stent was carried out, in whom cystoscopy guided retrieval of double J stent was attempted with the help of Amplatz goose-neck snare under radiological control. Results: All three patients were under the age of 3 years. Two patients had migrated double J stent following pyeloplasty and in one patient the double J stent was displaced during a retrograde insertion of double J stent. In all cases, retrieval of displaced double J stent was successfully achieved using Amplatz goose-neck snare. There were no postoperative complications. Conclusion: Our method of retrieval of stent from renal pelvis is simple, safe and minimally invasive. This technique is a useful and safe alternative option for retrieval of proximally migrated double J stents in children.

  14. Steroid instillation for idiopathic urethritis in children: an 8-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Sivasankar; Ninan, George Kaithayil; Pringle, Kirsty

    2015-04-01

    Idiopathic urethritis (IU) in children is of unknown etiology and treatment options are limited. We aim to report our experience with steroid instillation in IU in children. Retrospective data collection of all male children diagnosed with IU over a period of 8 years. Patients with balanitis xerotica obliterans (BXO) and positive urine culture at presentation were excluded from the study. Data were collected on patient demographics, laboratory and radiological investigations, cystoscopy findings, management, and outcomes. A total of 16 male children were diagnosed with IU. The mean age was 11.6 (7-16) years. Presenting symptoms included dysuria in 10; frank hematuria in 7; loin pain in 5; and scrotal pain in 2 patients. Serum C-reactive protein and full blood count was tested in 13 patients and was within normal limits in all of them. Endoscopy findings included posterior urethritis in 12, anterior urethritis in 2, and urethral stricture with inflammation in 2 patients. Ten patients required more than one episode of steroid instillation. Mean follow-up was 19.4 (1-74) months. Complete resolution of symptoms and signs occurred in 15 (93.6%) patients and improvement of symptoms and signs noted with ongoing treatment in 1 (6.4%) patient. IU in children can be successfully managed with steroid instillation. In our series, 93.6% of children had complete resolution of symptoms. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Modified totally tubeless percutaneous nephrolithotomy: Is it an effective and safe treatment option for renal and upper ureteral stones?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ho Seok; Jung, Seung Il; Yu, Ho Song; Hwang, Eu Chang; Oh, Kyung Jin; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Park, Kwangsung

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that modified totally tubeless percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) without indwelling ureteral stent would minimize postoperative discomfort without complications. To evaluate the safety, efficacy, and morbidity of standard, tubeless, and modified totally tubeless PNL as well as the usefulness of modified totally tubeless PNL. From November 2011 to February 2015, 211 patients who underwent PNL consecutively were enrolled in this study and divided into 3 groups (group 1: standard, group 2: tubeless, group 3: modified totally tubeless PNL). Patient and stone characteristics, operation time, hemoglobin change, length of hospitalization, stone-free rate, analgesic requirement, and perioperative complications were analyzed and compared among the 3 groups. There were no significant differences in preoperative patient characteristics among the three groups. In the postoperative analysis, the three groups had similar operation time, stone-free rate, perioperative fever and transfusion rate, but group 2 showed superior results in terms of length of hospitalization (p = 0.001). Group 2 and group 3 had a lower analgesic requirement (p = 0.010). Immediate postoperative hemoglobin change (p = 0.001) and tube site complications (p = 0.001) were more common in group 1. Modified totally tubeless PNL was not inferior in terms of postoperative outcomes and safety compared with the standard and tubeless PNL, and avoided the postoperative stent-related symptoms and cystoscopy for double-J stent removal. Modified totally tubeless PNL could be an alternative treatment of choice for management of renal or upper ureteral stones in selected patients.

  16. [Giant prostatic calculus with neurogenic bladder disease and prostate diverticulum: a case report and review of the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Shi; Quan, Chang-Yi; Li, Gang; Cai, Qi-Liang; Hu, Bin; Wang, Jiu-Wei; Niu, Yuan-Jie

    2013-02-01

    To study the etiology, clinical manifestation, diagnosis and treatment of giant prostatic calculus with neurogenic bladder disease and prostate diverticulum. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of a case of giant prostatic calculus with neurogenic bladder disease and prostate diverticulum and reviewed the relevant literature. The patient was a 37-year-old man, with urinary incontinence for 22 years and intermittent dysuria with frequent micturition for 9 years, aggravated in the past 3 months. He had received surgery for spina bifida and giant vesico-prostatic calculus. The results of preoperative routine urinary examination were as follows: WBC 17 -20/HPF, RBC 12 - 15/HPF. KUB, IVU and pelvic CT revealed spina bifida occulta, neurogenic bladder and giant prostatic calculus. The patient underwent TURP and transurethral lithotripsy with holmium-YAG laser. The prostatic calculus was carbonate apatite in composition. Urinary dynamic images at 2 weeks after surgery exhibited significant improvement in the highest urine flow rate and residual urine volume. Seventeen months of postoperative follow-up showed dramatically improved urinary incontinence and thicker urine stream. Prostate diverticulum with prostatic giant calculus is very rare, and neurogenic bladder may play a role in its etiology. Cystoscopy is an accurate screening method for its diagnosis. For the young patients and those who wish to retain sexual function, TURP combined with holmium laser lithotripsy can be employed, and intraoperative rectal examination should be taken to ensure complete removal of calculi.

  17. Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offiah, I; McMahon, S B; O'Reilly, B A

    2013-08-01

    The bladder pain syndrome (BPS) is a spectrum of urological symptoms characterised by bladder pain with typical cystoscopic features. Diagnosis and management of this syndrome may be difficult. There is no evidence-based management approach for the diagnosis or treatment of BPS. The objective of this study was to critically review and summarise the evidence relating to the diagnosis and treatment of the bladder pain syndrome. A review of published data on the diagnosis and treatment of the BPS was performed. Our search was limited to English-language articles, on the "diagnosis", and "management" or "treatment" of "interstitial cystitis" and the "bladder pain syndrome" in "humans." Frequency, urgency and pain on bladder filling are the most common symptoms of BPS. All urodynamic volumes are reduced in patients with BPS. Associated conditions include psychological distress, depression, history of sexual assault, irritable bowel syndrome and fibromyalgia. Cystoscopy remains the test for definitive diagnosis, with visualisation of haemorrhage on cystoreduction. A multidisciplinary treatment approach is essential in the management of this condition. Orally administered amitriptyline is an efficacious medical treatment for BPS. Intravesical hyaluronic acid and local anaesthetic, with/without hydrodistension are among new treatment strategies. Sacral or pudendal neuromodulation is effective, minimally invasive and safe. Surgery is reserved for refractory cases. There remains a paucity of evidence for the diagnosis and treatment of BPS. We encountered significant heterogeneity in the assessment of symptoms, duration of treatment and follow up of patients in our literature review.

  18. Recurrent spontaneous bladder rupture cured by conservative therapy. A case report

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    Hagiwara, Noriyasu; Nishida, Yasuyuki; Fujimoto, Yoshinori; Isogai, Kazutoshi; Fujihiro, Shigeru; Deguchi, Takashi

    2002-01-01

    The patient was a 44-year-old woman, who had undergone radical hysterectomy and postoperative radiation therapy for cervical cancer at the age of 34 years old. In 1998, she was admitted to our hospital with chief complaints of acute abdominal pain and high fever. We made a diagnosis of spontaneous bladder rupture associated with neurogenic bladder dysfunction and radiation cystitis, based on findings of cystoscopy and cystography. She was cured by conservative therapy, including catheter drainage and antibacterial chemotherapy. Thereafter, she was managed with intermittent self-catheterization. In 2000, spontaneous bladder rupture recurred, but conservative therapy was effective again. A review of 12 cases of recurrent spontaneous bladder rupture in Japan, including the present case, suggests that proper management of urination for neurogenic bladder dysfunction may be necessary for prevention of recurrent rupture, when the impaired bladder is left after either successful conservative or surgical treatment of bladder rupture. Urinary diversion and augmentation cystoplasty should be considered for repeated rupture of the bladder. (author)

  19. Urinothorax: Case report and systematic review of the literature

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    Alexander Casallas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinothorax, the presence of urine in the pleural space, is a rare cause of pleural effusion, usually associated with obstructive uropathy, or urinary trauma. We present the case of a 3 year-old boy and a systematic review of the literature of the 44 cases encountered. After resection of a Wilm's tumour in the right kidney our patient presented acute respiratory distress associated with radiographically confirmed pleural effusion. With the initial diagnosis of pneumonia or malignant pleural effusion, a closed thoracotomy was performed. The liquid obtained suggested urine, which was confirmed by the laboratory. Cystoscopy with retrograde pyelography detected a fistula on the posterior wall of the right kidney. The report of cases worldwide is low, probably due to its low incidence but also to underdiagnosis. Respiratory symptoms are not always present and urological symptoms usually predominate. Diagnosis requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and is confirmed by the main biochemical marker: The ratio >1 .0 pleural fluid creatinine and creatinine serum.

  20. Overactive pelvic floor muscles (OPFM): improving diagnostic accuracy with clinical examination and functional studies.

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    Aw, Hau Choong; Ranasinghe, Weranja; Tan, Philip Huang Min; O'Connell, Helen E

    2017-07-01

    To identify the functional correlation of overactive pelvic floor muscles (OPFM) with cystoscopic and fluoroscopic urodynamic studies (FUDS), including urethral pressure measurements. Patients refractory to conservative therapy including bladder retraining, medications and pelvic muscle exercises for a variety of gamut of storage and voiding disorders were evaluated. Prospective data for 201 patients across both genders who underwent flexible cystoscopy and urodynamics for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) refractory to conservative management between 01 Jan 2014 and 01 Jan 2016 was collected. Factors studied included history of LUTS, voiding patterns, physical examination, cystoscopic findings and functional studies, with maximum urethral closing pressure (MUCP). A total of 201 were patients recruited. The 85 were diagnosed with OPFM based on clinical presentation and presence of pelvic floor tenderness on examination. Significant differences were noted on functional studies with FUDS and urethral pressure measurement. Subjects with pelvic floor tenderness were found to have a higher (MUCP) at 93.1 cm H2O compared to 80.6 cm H2O (P=0.015). There are distinct characteristics of OPFM on clinical examination and functional studies, in particular MUCP. In patients refractory to conservative treatments, specific urodynamics tests are useful in sub-categorising patients. When OPFM is diagnosed, the impact on patient management is significant, and targeted intervention with pelvic floor physiotherapy is central in the multimodal approach of this complex condition.

  1. The management of non-invasive bladder tumours with Doxorubicin intravesical instillation after transurethral resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Gallab, Musa I; Naddaf, Louai A; Kanan, Mohamad R

    2009-04-01

    Evaluation of the intravesical instillation of doxorubicin for its effect on disease recurrence for patients with non-invasive bladder tumour. The study was performed at Al Assad University Hospital in Lattakia, Syria and included patients with non-invasive bladder tumours who were managed with transurethral resection and induction and maintenance therapy with intravesical doxorubicin. They were followed up by cystoscopy every 3 months for 2 years and every 6 months thereafter with special emphasis on recurrence rates. The study included 85 patients with non-invasive bladder tumours: 23 with non-invasive papillary carcinoma (Stage Ta), 62 with tumour invading subepithelial connective tissue (Stage T1). Twelve patients had well differentiated tumours (Grade 1), 48 had moderately differentiated (Grade 2), 25 had poorly differentiated (Grade 3) tumours. The total recurrence rate was 23%. The rates of recurrence were 56% in Grade 3 and 0% in Grade 1. The recurrence rate was 41% in patients with large tumours versus 17% in those with small tumours; 44% in those with multiple tumours compared to 18% in those with solitary tumours; 30% of Stage Ta tumours recurred and 21% of Stage T1 tumours. In short term follow-up, our rate of recurrence was 23%. Adjuvant intravesical doxorubicin was shown to reduce the recurrence of superficial bladder cancer. Tumour grade, size and number were shown to be prognostic factors for recurrence.

  2. What are the currently available and in development molecular markers for bladder cancer? Will they prove to be useful in the future?

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    Abdulmajed, Mohamed Ismat; Sancak, Eyüp Burak; Reşorlu, Berkan; Al-Chalaby, Gydhia Zuhair

    2014-12-01

    Urothelial carcinoma is the 9(th) most common cancer worldwide. Most urothelial tumors are non-muscle invasive on presentation. However, two-thirds of non-invasive bladder cancers will eventually recur with a 25% risk of progression to muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Tumor stage, histological grade and pathological invasion of blood vessels and lymphatic tissue are the main indicators for urothelial cancer prognosis. The gold standard for diagnosing bladder cancer is conventional white-light cystoscopy and biopsy. Urine cytology is a highly specific, sensitive test for high-grade tumors or carcinoma in situ (CIS). Urinary NMP22 has an overall sensitivity and specificity for detecting bladder cancer of 49% and 87%, respectively. However, there are false-positive results in the presence of urinary tract infection or hematuria. The detection of specific gene mutations related to urothelial cancers has been studied and employed to reproduce markers helpful for diagnosis. According to current studies, molecular markers can be used to predict tumor recurrence. From a prognostic point of view, new molecular markers have yet to be established as reliable indicators of tumor aggressiveness. We aimed to review the molecular markers with possible prognostic significance that have been discussed in the literature. This review examined the literature for various molecular markers under development for bladder cancer in an attempt to optimize patient care and reduce the costs of treating these patients.

  3. Molecular markers in disease detection and follow-up of patients with non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, Moritz; Walz, Simon; Stühler, Viktoria; Aufderklamm, Stefan; Rausch, Steffen; Bedke, Jens; Stenzl, Arnulf; Todenhöfer, Tilman

    2018-05-01

    Diagnosis and surveillance of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is mainly based on endoscopic bladder evaluation and urine cytology. Several assays for determining additional molecular markers (urine-, tissue- or blood-based) have been developed in recent years but have not been included in clinical guidelines so far. Areas covered: This review gives an update on different molecular markers in the urine and evaluates their role in patients with NMIBC in disease detection and surveillance. Moreover, the potential of recent approaches such as DNA methylation assays, multi-panel RNA gene expression assays and cell-free DNA analysis is assessed. Expert commentary: Most studies on various molecular urine markers have mainly focused on a potential replacement of cystoscopy. New developments in high throughput technologies and urine markers may offer further advantages as they may represent a non-invasive approach for molecular characterization of the disease. This opens new options for individualized surveillance strategies and may help to choose the best therapeutic option. The implementation of these technologies in well-designed clinical trials is essential to further promote the use of urine diagnostics in the management of patients with NMIBC.

  4. Formation of a vesicovaginal fistula in a pig model

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    Lindberg J

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Jennifer Lindberg,1 Emilie Rickardsson,1 Margrethe Andersen,2 Lars Lund1,2 1Clinical Institute, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, 2Department of Urology, Odense University Hospital, Odense C, Denmark Objective: To establish an animal model of a vesicovaginal fistula that can later be used in the development of new treatment modalities.Materials and methods: Six female pigs of Landrace/Yorkshire breed were used. Vesicotomy was performed through open surgery. An standardized incision between the bladder and the vagina was made, and the mucosa between them was sutured together with absorbable sutures. A durometer ureteral stent was introduced into the fistula, secured with sutures to the bladder wall, allowing for the formation of a persistent fistula tract. Six weeks postoperatively cysto-scopy was performed to examine the fistula in vivo. Thereafter, the pigs were euthanized with intravenous pentobarbital.Results: Two out of four (50% pigs developed persistent fistulas. No per- or postoperative complications occurred.Conclusion: This study indicates that this pig model of vesicovaginal fistula can be an effective and cheap way to create a fistula between the bladder and vagina. Keywords: vesicovaginal fistula, urinary fistula, animal model

  5. Laparoscopic transureteroureterostomy: a novel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piaggio, Lisandro A; González, Ricardo

    2007-06-01

    We describe the feasibility and short-term results of laparoscopic transureteroureterostomy in children. We performed transperitoneal laparoscopic transureteroureterostomy with a 4-trocar technique in 3 children with a mean age of 63 months (range 18 to 105). Diagnoses were unilateral ureteral obstruction after cross-trigonal reimplantation for vesicoureteral reflux (1 patient), unilateral refluxing megaureter (1) and ureteral injury after bladder diverticulectomy (1). Cystoscopy, retrograde pyelogram and stent placement in the recipient ureter were performed at the beginning of each case. The anastomoses were carried out with running 6-zero reabsorbable sutures at the level of the pelvic bream. An abdominal drain and Foley catheter were left indwelling for 1 to 3 days. All cases were performed successfully. Postoperative course was uneventful except for a transient urinary leak, and patients were discharged home on postoperative day 2 to 4. At a mean followup of 6 months all patients were clinically well, with normal kidney function and blood pressure, and no significant hydronephrosis. Based on our initial experience, laparoscopic transureteroureterostomy is safe and effective, and is associated with little blood loss, minimal analgesia requirements, fast recovery and excellent cosmetic results. We believe that in selected cases in which transureteroureterostomy is the chosen technique a laparoscopic approach is advantageous.

  6. Primary Intramural Vesical Endometriosis Mimicking Urothelial Carcinoma in a Middle Aged Female

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    Shirazi N

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Endometriosis is the presence of ectopic endometrial tissue outside the uterus. Presence of endometrial glands and/or stroma may interfere with the normal physiological process by their infiltrative nature or by forming adhesions. Endometriosis occurs in 15-20% of women of child bearing age and commonly involves the ovaries, utero-sacral ligaments, fallopian tubes, rectum, scar sites and cervico-vaginal regions. Incidence of urinary tract involvement is estimated to be 1%. We report a case of a 38 year female presenting with low back pain, single episode of haematuria and burning during micturition. Urine culture was negative. There was no past history of pelvic surgery. On cystoscopy, a growth was visualised in the posterior urinary bladder wall suspicious of neoplastic origin. Tansurethral resection of bladder nodule was done and sent for histopathology, on which it was diagnosed as endometriosis. The case merits interest due to its atypical clinical presentation and the rarity of the lesion at this site.

  7. Clinical results of a concomitant boost radiotherapy technique for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

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    Piet, A H.M.; Hulshof, M C.C.M.; Pieters, B R; Koning, C C.E. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pos, F J [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Inst., Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Reijke, T.M. de [Dept. of Urology, Academic Medical Center, Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2008-06-15

    Purpose: to update the results of external radiotherapy with a focal concomitant boost technique on local control and bladder function in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Patients and methods: the authors retrospectively evaluated 92 elderly or disabled patients with localized T2-4 N0-1 M0 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder and a median age of 79 years, not suitable for radical surgery and treated between 1994 and 2005. Treatment consisted of a dose of 40 Gy/2 Gy to the small pelvis with a daily concomitant boost of 0.75 Gy to the tumor. Total dose was 55 Gy in 4 weeks. Results: complete remission rate after evaluation by means of cystoscopy at 3 months was 78%. 3-year local control rate amounted to 56%, and 3-year overall survival to 36%. The posttreatment bladder capacity was comparable with the pretreatment capacity and was {>=} 200 ml in 81% of the cases. Mean bladder capacity did not deteriorate at longer follow-up. Conclusion: the local control rate after external beam radiotherapy in elderly patients with a focal concomitant boost for localized muscle-invasive bladder cancer was 56% at 3 years. Functional bladder outcome was good. (orig.)

  8. Clinical results of a concomitant boost radiotherapy technique for muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piet, A.H.M.; Hulshof, M.C.C.M.; Pieters, B.R.; Koning, C.C.E.; Pos, F.J.; Reijke, T.M. de

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: to update the results of external radiotherapy with a focal concomitant boost technique on local control and bladder function in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Patients and methods: the authors retrospectively evaluated 92 elderly or disabled patients with localized T2-4 N0-1 M0 transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder and a median age of 79 years, not suitable for radical surgery and treated between 1994 and 2005. Treatment consisted of a dose of 40 Gy/2 Gy to the small pelvis with a daily concomitant boost of 0.75 Gy to the tumor. Total dose was 55 Gy in 4 weeks. Results: complete remission rate after evaluation by means of cystoscopy at 3 months was 78%. 3-year local control rate amounted to 56%, and 3-year overall survival to 36%. The posttreatment bladder capacity was comparable with the pretreatment capacity and was ≥ 200 ml in 81% of the cases. Mean bladder capacity did not deteriorate at longer follow-up. Conclusion: the local control rate after external beam radiotherapy in elderly patients with a focal concomitant boost for localized muscle-invasive bladder cancer was 56% at 3 years. Functional bladder outcome was good. (orig.)

  9. Hemangioma of the prostate - an unusual cause of lower urinary tract symptoms: Case report

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    Horn Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemangioma of the prostate gland is extremely rare and only a few cases have been reported. There have been several cases of hemangioma of posterior urethra, urinary bladder and periprostatic plexus in the literature, all presenting with hematuria or hematospermia. Diagnosis of prostatic hemangioma is difficult due to its rarity and unspecific symptoms such as hematuria, hematospermia or lower urinary tract symptoms. It cannot be detected by conventional examinations such as cystoscopy or standard rectal ultrasonography. Case presentation We present a case of prostatic hemangioma in an 84-year old male presenting with lower urinary tract symptoms. Bleeding has not been a feature in our case and diagnosis was not made until after operation. The patient was treated as a case of bladder neck outflow obstruction with transurethral resection of prostate gland and simultaneous bladder neck incisions. A period of self-catheterization was instituted due to postoperative urinary retention as the result of detrusor insufficiency. Conclusion Hemangioma of prostate gland is extremely rare and symptomatic prostatic hemangioma should be treated either by transurethral resection of prostate or laser evaporation.

  10. Surgical repair of the iatrogenic falsepassage in the treatment of trauma-induced posterior urethral injuries

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    Faruk Dogan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pelvic fracture associated urethral injury (PFAUI is a rare and challenging sequel of blunt pelvic trauma. Treatment of iatrogenic false urethral passage (FUP remains as a challenge for urologists. In this case report we reviewed the iatrogenic FUP caused by wrong procedures performed in the treatment of a patient with PFAUI and the treatment of posterior urethral stricture with transperineal bulbo-prostatic anatomic urethroplasty in the management of FUP. A 37-year-old male patient with PFAUI had undergone a laparotomy procedure for pelvic bone fracture, complete urethral rupture, and bladder perforation 8 years ago. After stricture formation, patient had undergone procedures that caused FUP. Following operations, he had a low urinary flow rate, and incontinence and urgency even with small amounts of urine. FUP was diagnosed by voiding cystourethrography and retrograde urethrography. FUP was fixed with open urethroplasty with the guidance of flexible antegrade urethtoscopy. False passage should always be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of patients with persistent symptoms that underwent PFAUI therapy. In addition, we believe that in the evaluation of patients with PFAUI suspected for having a false passage, bladder neck and urethra should be assessed by combining routine voiding cystourethrography and retrograde urethrography with preoperative flexible cystoscopy via suprapubic route.

  11. Adult posterior urethral valve: a case report

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    Kilciler, Mete; Basal, Seref; Irkilata, Hasan Cem; Zor, Murat; Istanbulluoglu, Mustafa Okan; Dayanc, Murat

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Posterior urethral valve (PUV) is a congenital obstructive defect of the male urethra with an incidence of 1/8,000 to 1/25,000 live births. PUV is the most common cause of lower urinary tract obstruction in neonates. The diagnosis of PUV is usually made early, and PUV cases have rarely been detected in adults. Case presentation: Here we report the case of a 35 years old man presented with obstructive urinary symptoms. In spite of bladder neck rejection uroflowmetry pointed out infravesical obstruction with max. flow rate 9 ml/s and average flow rate 6 ml/s in uroflowmetry. During cystoscopy mild bladder trabeculation and resected bladder neck were seen. While the cystoscope was taken off, PUV were obtained. Conclusion: Since PUV is a rare condition in adults and the diagnosis of PUVs is also difficult in these groups we must consider this situation during evaluation of adult patients with obstructive symptoms especially during cystourethroscopy. PMID:20379394

  12. Management of the devastated posterior urethra and bladder neck: refractory incontinence and stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kirk M; Higuchi, Ty T; Flynn, Brian J

    2015-02-01

    Stricture of the proximal urethra following treatment for prostate cancer occurs in an estimated 1-8% of patients. Following prostatectomy, urethral reconstruction is feasible in many patients. However, in those patients with prior radiation therapy (RT), failed reconstruction, refractory incontinence or multiple comorbidities, reconstruction may not be feasible. The purpose of this article is to review the evaluation and management options for patients who are not candidates for reconstruction of the posterior urethra and require urinary diversion. Patient evaluation should result in the decision whether reconstruction is feasible. In our experience, risk factors for failed reconstruction include prior radiation and multiple failed endoscopic treatments. Pre-operative cystoscopy is an essential part of the evaluations to identify tissue necrosis, dystrophic calcification, or tumor in the urethra, prostate and/or bladder. If urethral reconstruction is not feasible it is imperative to discuss options for urine diversion with the patient. Treatment options include simple catheter diversion, urethral ligation, and both bladder preserving and non-preserving diversion. Surgical management should address both the bladder and the bladder outlet. This can be accomplished from a perineal, abdominal or abdomino-perineal approach. The devastated bladder outlet is a challenging problem to treat. Typically, patients undergo multiple procedures in an attempt to restore urethral continuity and continence. For the small subset who fails reconstruction, urinary diversion provides a definitive, "end-stage" treatment resulting in improved quality of life.

  13. Adult posterior urethral valve: a case report

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    Dayanc, Murat

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Posterior urethral valve (PUV is a congenital obstructive defect of the male urethra with an incidence of 1/8,000 to 1/25,000 live births. PUV is the most common cause of lower urinary tract obstruction in neonates. The diagnosis of PUV is usually made early, and PUV cases have rarely been detected in adults. Case presentation: Here we report the case of a 35 years old man presented with obstructive urinary symptoms. In spite of bladder neck rejection uroflowmetry pointed out infravesical obstruction with max. flow rate 9 ml/s and average flow rate 6 ml/s in uroflowmetry. During cystoscopy mild bladder trabeculation and resected bladder neck were seen. While the cystoscope was taken off, PUV were obtained. Conclusion: Since PUV is a rare condition in adults and the diagnosis of PUVs is also difficult in these groups we must consider this situation during evaluation of adult patients with obstructive symptoms especially during cystourethroscopy.

  14. Guideline of guidelines: asymptomatic microscopic haematuria.

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    Linder, Brian J; Bass, Edward J; Mostafid, Hugh; Boorjian, Stephen A

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to review major organizational guidelines on the evaluation and management of asymptomatic microscopic haematuria (AMH). We reviewed the haematuria guidelines from: the American Urological Association; the consensus statement by the Canadian Urological Association, Canadian Urologic Oncology Group and Bladder Cancer Canada; the American College of Physicians; the Joint Consensus Statement of the Renal Association and British Association of Urological Surgeons; and the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. All guidelines reviewed recommend evaluation for AMH in the absence of potential benign aetiologies, with the evaluation including cystoscopy and upper urinary tract imaging. Existing guidelines vary in their definition of AMH (role of urine dipstick vs urine microscopy), the age threshold for recommending evaluation, and the optimal imaging method (computed tomography vs ultrasonography). Of the reviewed guidelines, none recommended the use of urine cytology or urine markers during the initial AMH evaluation. Patients should have ongoing follow-up after a negative initial AMH evaluation. Significant variation exists among current guidelines for AMH with respect to who should be evaluated and in what manner. Given the patient and health system implications of balancing appropriately focused and effective diagnostic evaluation, AMH represents a valuable future research opportunity. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Continent Idiopathic Vesicovaginal Fistula Coexisting with Moyamoya Disease

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    İbrahim Güven Kartal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Vesicovaginal fistula (VVF is the abnormal anatomic communication between the female bladder and vagina. Usually presents itself as continuous urinary incontinence. There are many etiologic risk factors such as obstetric trauma, pelvic surgery, infections, congenital abnormalities, foreign materials, malignancy and pelvic radiation (1. Due to high education and sociocultural levels, the incidence seems to be low in the developed countries. On the other hand, in the developing countries, there is an obviously high incidence and prevalence. Considering the low level of medical informative feed-back mechanisms and poor obstetrics health care services, it seems very hard to keep VVF patient data that can be used for epidemiological research studies. In those areas, due to high maternal mortality and obstetric complications, the incidence of VVF is significantly increased (2. In this paper, we report a female patient with known moyamoya disease and a stable right ovarian cyst who was regularly followed up by the departments of neurology, gynecology and presented with radiological and cystoscopy findings of incidentally diagnosed asymptomatic continent VVF.

  16. Patterns of pretreatment diagnostic assessment and staging for patients with cervical cancer (1999-2001). Patterns of care study in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toita, Takafumi; Kodaira, Takeshi; Uno, Takashi; Shinoda, Atsunori; Akino, Yuichi; Teshima, Teruki; Mitsumori, Michihide

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the patterns of pretreatment diagnostic assessment in uterine cervical cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy in Japan. The Japanese Patterns of Care Study working group conducted a second extramural audit survey of 68 institutions and collected specific information on 631 patients with cervical cancer. All patients were treated with radiotherapy in 1999-2001. Of these, 324 patients treated without surgery were the subjects of this study. International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics-prescribed diagnostic procedures were performed at moderate rates in our study cohort. The performance rates of chest X-ray, intravenous urography, cystoscopy, and proctoscopy were 74, 54, 53, and 33%, respectively. Cross sectional imaging studies were frequently performed. Pelvic CT, abdominal CT, and pelvic MRI were performed in 88, 80, and 76%, respectively. Lymphangiography (1%) and surgical evaluation (1%) were rarely done. Only one patient underwent positron emission tomography (PET) scans in this survey period. This study demonstrated the patterns of pretreatment diagnostic assessment in cervical cancer patients treated with definitive radiotherapy in Japan. (author)

  17. Prostatic Artery Embolization (PAE) for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) with Haematuria in the Absence of an Upper Urinary Tract Pathology.

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    Tapping, Charles R; Macdonald, Andrew; Hadi, Mo; Mortensen, Chloe; Crew, Jeremy; Protheroe, Andrew; Little, Mark W; Boardman, Phil

    2018-03-26

    To assess the effectiveness of prostate artery embolization (PAE) in the control of haematuria and in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and normal upper urinary tracts. Twelve consecutive patients with haematuria were included in the prospective study. All patients had prior imaging and cystoscopy to exclude other causes of haematuria. Patients prostate arteries were embolized with particles (200-500 μm), and they were followed up at 3, 12 and 18 months following the procedure. QOL questionnaires, IPSS, IIEF and clinical review were all employed to assess the success of the treatment. To allow useful comparison, patients were age- and prostate volume-matched and compared to patients treated with PAE for BPH without haematuria. All 12/12 cases were technically successful with bilateral PAE being performed. All cases of haematuria resolved by the 3-month follow-up (100%). There was one case of recurrence during the 12-month follow-up (overall clinical success at 18 months 92%). This was due to over anticoagulation and ceased once corrected. There was a reduction in lower urinary tract symptoms noted by improvements in QOL indices, IPSS and IIEF. There was continued success even if the patient was subsequently anticoagulated. There was no associated sexual dysfunction. There was more prostatic arterial branching and volume of embolic required to achieve stasis in BPH and haematuria than in BPH alone (p BPH allows a significant improvement in QOL.

  18. Evaluation of Urinary Inverted Papillomas: A Report of 13 Cases and Literature Review

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    Mete Kilciler

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Inverted papilloma (IP of the urothelium accounts for 2.2% of urothelial neoplasms. The aim of this study was to report the results of 13 patients with urinary IP, pointing out the clinical features, presentations, treatment options and outcomes. The mean age and mean follow-up periods of the patients were 60.23+3.25 (range, 44-81 years and 30 (range, 6-42 months, respectively. There was no coexistence of urothelial carcinoma with IP at presentation. Cystoscopy showed a solitary papillary tumor in the bladders of 11 patients and solid pedunculated tumors in the remaining two patients. The site of development was the bladder in 12 cases (92% and ureter in one (8% case. Transurethral bladder tumor resection was performed in 12 cases. For the case with IP in the ureter, nephroureterectomy was performed. Pathologic examination demonstrated that seven of the 13 cases were of the trabecular type and six were of the glandular type. Of the 13 cases, two (7% had recurrence, at 1 year and 1 month and 1 year and 5 months from initial resection. The male to female ratio was 5.5:1. Initial symptoms included macroscopic hematuria in five cases, microscopic hematuria in four, and dysuria and microscopic hematuria in three; one case was asymptomatic. IPs of the urinary bladder are benign tumors that can be treated successfully by transurethral resection and fulguration of the tumor bed. In addition, these lesions must be followed up closely for recurrence and malignant transformation.

  19. Can immediate second resection be an alternative to standardized second transurethral resection of bladder tumors?

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    Engin Doğantekin

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the impact of an immediate second transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT protocol on residual tumor status at the initial TURBT session and the recurrence rate in the primary resection area. We prospectively evaluated and randomized 47 consecutive patients who underwent TURBT sessions for bladder cancer. In accordance with the inclusion criteria, of the 47 consecutive patients, 19 (Group I underwent immediate second resection of the tumor bed after complete TUR and 28 (Group II did not. After standard TURBT, Group I underwent a second cystoscopy and resection of the bed of the tumor or an ignored tumor, which was performed by a different urologist. After 4–6 weeks, delayed second TURB was performed, and all pathological results were evaluated. Tumors were detected in two patients during the immediate second resection. Of these, one was a misdiagnosed tumor, whereas the other was diagnosed at the bed of the tumor by pathological examination. Tumors were detected in nine patients at the delayed second TURB, of which only one was part of Group I, while the others were part of Group II (p = 0.04. The results of this study demonstrated that residual tumors may remain after initial TURB, either in the tumor bed or in a different location within the bladder. Although this was a pilot study enrolling only a small number of patients, our initial results supported the assertion that immediate second resection can be an alternative to standard second TURBT.

  20. INITIAL EXPERIENCE WITH ADJUVANT INTRAVESICAL THERMOCHEMOTHERAPY FOR NON-MUSCLE INVASIVE BLADDER CANCER

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    K. A. Pavlenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to reveal the benefits of adjuvant intravesical thermochemotherapy (TCT and to evaluate its efficiency in the treatment of moderateand high-risk non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (BC.Subjects and methods. In the period 2009 to 2010, the Urology Clinic, Federal Medical Biophysical Center, treated 21 patients with nonmuscle invasive BC, by using a Thermotron RF-8 clinical hyperthermal system. Intravesical TCT with mitomycin C 40 mg for 60–80 min was performed at 42 ± 2 °С as one session weekly for 6 weeks. Control cystoscopy was carried out every 3 months.Results. Of the 21 patients, 19 were found to tolerate the procedure well. No complications were recorded in these patients during the sessions and throughout the course of intravesical TCT. A recurrence was histologically verified in 2 patients at 6-month follow-up. There was no evidence suggesting a recurrence in 12 (57.14 % patients at one-year follow-up. The follow-up of the other patients is now less than 12 months.Conclusion. The proposed method of hyperthermia may be used as an alternative to the existing one of intracavitary hyperthermia to treat high- and moderate-risk BC and in case of inefficiency of other adjuvant therapy options for non-muscle invasive BC.

  1. Pitfalls and Limitations of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Diagnosis of Urinary Bladder Cancer

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    Wei-Ching Lin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Adequately selecting a therapeutic approach for bladder cancer depends on accurate grading and staging. Substantial inaccuracy of clinical staging with bimanual examination, cystoscopy, and transurethral resection of bladder tumor has facilitated the increasing utility of magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate bladder cancer. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI is a noninvasive functional magnetic resonance imaging technique. The high tissue contrast between cancers and surrounding tissues on DWI is derived from the difference of water molecules motion. DWI is potentially a useful tool for the detection, characterization, and staging of bladder cancers; it can also monitor posttreatment response and provide information on predicting tumor biophysical behaviors. Despite advancements in DWI techniques and the use of quantitative analysis to evaluate the apparent diffusion coefficient values, there are some inherent limitations in DWI interpretation related to relatively poor spatial resolution, lack of cancer specificity, and lack of standardized image acquisition protocols and data analysis procedures that restrict the application of DWI and reproducibility of apparent diffusion coefficient values. In addition, inadequate bladder distension, artifacts, thinness of bladder wall, cancerous mimickers of normal bladder wall and benign lesions, and variations in the manifestation of bladder cancer may interfere with diagnosis and monitoring of treatment. Recognition of these pitfalls and limitations can minimize their impact on image interpretation, and carefully applying the analyzed results and combining with pathologic grading and staging to clinical practice can contribute to the selection of an adequate treatment method to improve patient care.

  2. Bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) in female: etiology and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaikh, N.A.; Ahuja, K.; Shaikh, G.S.; Soomro, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the etiology and management outcome of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) in female. Methodology: From 2009 to 2012, 37 females with a mean age of 40 (range 20-65) were investigated for etiology and management outcome of BOO. Typical complaints were slow urinary flow, difficulty in emptying bladder, frequency of micturition and urgency. Mean duration of symptoms was 6 month. Results: 15 women were confirmed as atrophic urethritis, 5 had functional bladder, 3 had urethral caruncle, 5 had cystocele, 7 had complete procedentia of uterus, and 2 had impacted urethral stone. Cystoscopy was performed in all patients to exclude other pathology like vesical stone and bladder growth. 12 patients were referred to Gynecology due to complete procedentia of uterus and cystocele. Three cases of urethral caruncle were treated by excision and biopsy, 2 patients with urethral stone were treated by endoscopic push back and litholapaxy while 5 required conservative treatment and 15 cases of atrophic urethritis were kept on Hormone Replacement Therapy (HRT). Conclusion: BOO is uncommon in female and management depends upon the etiology. (author)

  3. Gross hematuria as the presentation of an inguinoscrotal hernia: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansari Kayvan

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Several complications have been reported with inguinal hernias. Although hematuria and flank pain, either as the presentation or as a complication of inguinal hernia, are infrequent, this condition may lead to the development of obstructive uropathy, which can have diverse manifestations. Case presentation A 71-year-old Iranian man with Persian ethnicity presented with new onset episodes of gross hematuria and left-sided flank pain. A physical examination revealed a large and non-tender inguinal hernia on his left side. An initial workup included an abdominal ultrasound, an intravenous pyelogram and cystoscopy, which showed left hydronephrosis and a bulging on the left-side of his bladder wall. On further evaluation, computed tomography confirmed that his sigmoid colon was the source of the pressure effect on his bladder, resulting in hydroureteronephrosis and hematuria. No tumoral lesion was evident. Herniorrhaphy led to the resolution of his signs and symptoms. Conclusion Our case illustrates a rare presentation of inguinal hernia responsible for gross hematuria and unilateral hydronephrosis. Urologic signs and symptoms can be caused by the content of inguinal hernias. They can also present as complications of inguinal hernias.

  4. Can Prostate-Specific Antigen Kinetics before Prostate Biopsy Predict the Malignant Potential of Prostate Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Jin; Jeong, Tae Yoong; Yoo, Dae Seon; Park, Jinsung; Cho, Seok; Kang, Seok Ho; Lee, Sang Hyub; Jeon, Seung Hyun; Lee, Tchun Yong; Park, Sung Yul

    2015-11-01

    To predict the malignant potential of prostate cancer (PCa) according to prostate-specific antigen velocity (PSAV), PSA density (PSAD), free/total PSA ratio (%fPSA), and digital rectal examination (DRE). From January 2009 to December 2012, 548 adult male patients were diagnosed with PCa by prostate biopsy at four hospitals in Korea. We retrospectively analyzed 155 adult male patients with an initial PSA level≤10 ng/mL and whose PSA levels had been checked more than two times at least 6 months before they had been diagnosed with PCa, with test intervals of more than 3 months. Patients with a urinary tract infection, and patients who had previously undergone cystoscopy or surgery of the prostate were excluded. We separated patients into two groups according to Gleason sum [Gleason sum≤7 (n=134) or Gleason sum≥8 (n=21)] and the presence of extracapsular invasion [organ confined (n=129) or extracapsular invasion (n=26)]. Differences between the groups were compared. The group with a Gleason sum≥8 or extracapsular invasion of PCa showed high PSAV and significantly lower %fPSA. There were no significant differences in PSAD and the presence of an abnormality on DRE between two groups. In PCa patients treated with other therapies besides prostatectomy, a high PSA velocity and a low %fPSA may predict high grade PCa with a Gleason sum≥8 or the presence of extracapsular invasion.

  5. Flexible Vesiculovasoscopy Using a Microoptical System in a Human Cadaver Model: An Experimental Approach for Atraumatic Endoscopy of the Seminal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlager, Daniel; Maas, Moritz; Hein, Simon; Adams, Fabian; Schoenthaler, Martin; Wetterauer, Ulrich; Diemer, Thorsten; Weidner, Wolfgang; Miernik, Arkadiusz

    2016-08-01

    The most common pathologies of the seminal tract are persistent hematospermia, seminal vesicle stones, and seminal duct obstruction. Endoscopic diagnostic work-up of the seminal tract is impeded by complex anatomy and lack of technical equipment. To date, there is no standardized endoscopic approach. The purpose of this study was to investigate the applicability and feasibility of a flexible microoptical device for atraumatic endoscopy of the seminal tract in a male human cadaver. The transurethral endoscopic examination was performed on a male cadaver. No premortal interventions or diseases of the genitourinary tract had been reported. The seminal orifice was identified via cystoscopy and accessed by the Seldinger technique using a hydrophilic guidewire and ureteral catheter. Retrograde endoscopic inspection of the distal seminal tract was performed using a miniaturized flexible endoscope. An antegrade endoscopic inspection of the seminal tract was carried out via high scrotal access to the vas deferens. Structures of the seminal tract, such as the ejaculatory duct, seminal vesicles, and distal portion of the ductus deferentes, were visualized using the miniaturized endoscope. Image quality allowed identification of anatomical structures and characterization of tissue properties. The technical limitations we observed involved the system's maneuverability. Initial results of this novel endoscopic approach to the seminal tract using a flexible microoptical system are encouraging. However, considerable anatomical limitations of the targeted organs necessitate further refinements of the technical equipment. This approach might improve diagnostics and treatment of genitourinary diseases. Future surgical techniques may include intraseminal laser therapy or endoocclusion to monitor fertility in men.

  6. The diagnostic efficiency of ultrasound guided imaging algorithm in evaluation of patients with hematuria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unsal, Alparslan, E-mail: alparslanunsal@yahoo.com [Adnan Menderes University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 09100 Aydin (Turkey); Caliskan, Eda Kazak [Adnan Menderes University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 09100 Aydin (Turkey); Erol, Haluk [Adnan Menderes University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Urology, 09100 Aydin (Turkey); Karaman, Can Zafer [Adnan Menderes University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 09100 Aydin (Turkey)

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the efficiency of the following imaging algorithm, including intravenous urography (IVU) or computed tomography urography (CTU) based on ultrasonographic (US) selection, in the radiological management of hematuria. Materials and methods: One hundred and forty-one patients with hematuria were prospectively evaluated. Group 1 included 106 cases with normal or nearly normal US result and then they were examined with IVU. Group 2 was composed of the remaining 35 cases which had any urinary tract abnormality, and they were directed to CTU. Radiological results were compared with clinical diagnosis. Results: Ultrasonography and IVU results of 97 cases were congruent in group 1. Eight simple cysts were detected with US and 1 non-obstructing ureter stone was detected with IVU in remaining 9 patients. The only discordant case in clinical comparison was found to have urinary bladder cancer on conventional cystoscopy. Ultrasonography and CTU results were congruent in 30 cases. Additional lesions were detected with CTU (3 ureter stones, 1 ureter TCC, 1 advanced RCC) in remaining 5 patients. Ultrasonography + CTU combination results were all concordant with clinical diagnosis. Except 1 case, radio-clinical agreement was achieved. Conclusion: Cross-sectional imaging modalities are preferred in evaluation of hematuria. CTU is the method of choice; however the limitations preclude using CTU as first line or screening test. Ultrasonography is now being accepted as a first line imaging modality with the increased sensitivity in mass detection compared to IVU. The US guided imaging algorithm can be used effectively in radiological approach to hematuria.

  7. Congenital urethrovaginal fistula associated with imperforate hymen causing fetal urinary ascites and abdominal cystic lesions: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Ohno

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A primipara presented to our hospital due to fetal ascites, bilateral hydronephrosis and hydrometrocolpos. The female baby had two giant abdominal cysts, a single atrium and foot polydactyly. Absence of the vaginal orifice was noticed, and the hymen was broken through; the left cyst collapsed after fluid drainage. The right cyst was punctured and drained, which improved the hydronephrosis. Contrast imaging showed medium pouring into the abdominal cavity via the uterine tube; the right cyst was a 6 × 5 cm closed cavity. Vaginal uroplania persisted even after hospital discharge. At the age of 4 years, cystoscopy showed a fistulous opening on the urethra 5 mm distal from the internal urethral orifice. A catheter inserted via the opening was found in the vagina. In our case, urine poured into the abdominal cavity through the fistula and uterine tube; following obstruction of the uterine tube, giant hydrometrocolpos and hydrosalpinx appeared. Three cases of congenital urethrovaginal fistula (CUVF with imperforate hymen have been reported. A remnant of communication between the uterovaginal primordium and urogenital sinus may be responsible for CUVF.

  8. "A tree must be bent while it is young": teaching urological surgical techniques to schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntrock, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Playing video games in childhood may help achieve advanced laparoscopic skills later in life. The virtual operating room will soon become a reality, as "doctor games 2.0" will doubtlessly begin to incorporate virtual laparoscopic techniques. To teach surgical skills to schoolchildren in order to attract them to urology as a professional choice later in life. As part of EAU Urology Week 2010, 108 school children aged 15-19 attended a seminar with lectures and simulators (laparoscopy, TUR, cystoscopy, and suture sets) at the 62nd Congress of the German Society of Urology in Düsseldorf. A Pub-Med and Google Scholar search was also performed in order to review the beneficial effects of early virtual surgical training. MeSh terms used were "video games," "children," and "surgical skills." Searches were performed without restriction for a certain period of time. In terms of publicity for urology, EAU Urology Week, and the German Society of Urology, the event was immensely successful. Regarding the literature search, four relevant publications were found involving children. An additional three articles evaluated the usefulness of video gaming in medical students and residents. Making use of virtual reality to attract and educate a new generation of urologists is an important step in designing the future of urology.

  9. “A Tree Must Be Bent While It Is Young”: Teaching Urological Surgical Techniques to Schoolchildren

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntrock, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Background Playing video games in childhood may help achieve advanced laparoscopic skills later in life. The virtual operating room will soon become a reality, as “doctor games 2.0” will doubtlessly begin to incorporate virtual laparoscopic techniques. Objectives To teach surgical skills to schoolchildren in order to attract them to urology as a professional choice later in life. Materials and Methods As part of EAU Urology Week 2010, 108 school children aged 15–19 attended a seminar with lectures and simulators (laparoscopy, TUR, cystoscopy, and suture sets) at the 62nd Congress of the German Society of Urology in Düsseldorf. A Pub-Med and Google Scholar search was also performed in order to review the beneficial effects of early virtual surgical training. MeSh terms used were “video games,” “children,” and “surgical skills.” Searches were performed without restriction for a certain period of time. Results In terms of publicity for urology, EAU Urology Week, and the German Society of Urology, the event was immensely successful. Regarding the literature search, four relevant publications were found involving children. An additional three articles evaluated the usefulness of video gaming in medical students and residents. Conclusions Making use of virtual reality to attract and educate a new generation of urologists is an important step in designing the future of urology. PMID:23573467

  10. Epigenetics application in the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harb-de la Rosa, Alfredo; Acker, Matthew; Kumar, Raj A; Manoharan, Murugesan

    2015-10-01

    Bladder cancer is the sixth most common cancer in the Western world. Patients with bladder cancer require close monitoring, which may include frequent cystoscopy and urine cytology. Such monitoring results in significant health care cost. The application of epigenetics may allow for a risk adapted approach and more cost-effective method of monitoring. A number of epigenetic changes have been described for many cancer sites, including the urinary bladder. In this review, we discuss the use of epigenetics in bladder cancer and the potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. A comprehensive search of the English medical literature was conducted in PubMed using the terms microRNA regulation, DNA methylation, histone modification and bladder cancer. The most important epigenetic changes include DNA methylation, histone modification and microRNA regulation. Both DNA hypomethylation and hypermethylation have been associated with higher rate of cancer. The association of epigenetic changes with bladder cancer has led to the research of its diagnostic and prognostic implications as well as to the development of novel drugs to target these changes with the aim of achieving a survival benefit. Recently, epigenetics has been shown to play a much greater role than previously anticipated in the initiation and propagation of many tumors. The use of epigenetics for the diagnosis and treatment of bladder cancer is an evolving and promising field. The possibility of reversing epigenetic changes may facilitate additional cancer treatment options in the future.

  11. A girl of Klippel-Trenaunay Weber syndrome coexistence of recurrent bloody vaginal discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkmen, Mehmet; Kavukçu, Salih; Çakmakci, Handan; Soylu, Alper; Aktan, Sebnem; Çağan, Yeliz

    2010-09-01

    Klippel-Trenaunay Weber syndrome (KTWS) is the coexistence of capillary vascular malformations, varicose veins, dilated arteries and arteriovenous fistulas, soft tissue and/or bone hypertrophy. We present a girl of KTWS associated with hypertrophied left kidney, enlargement in venous structures of the left kidney, recurrent bloody vaginal discharge and angiokeratomas. A 6-year-old girl was admitted to our department with complaints of recurrent bloody vaginal discharge and swelling in the left inguinal region. Physical examination revealed hypertrophy of the left lower extremity. Vaginoscopy and cystoscopy revealed normal findings. Abdominal ultrasound revealed an enlarged left kidney. Enlargement in the venous structures of the hypertrophied left kidney was detected by abdominal magnetic resonance imaging, and arteriovenous fistulas were revealed by conventional angiography. The patient was diagnosed KTWS. Ophthalmic examination was normal. Galactosidase A (GLA) level was found to be at the lower limit of the normal range, and mutation was not detected in the GLA gene. In conclusion, we have emphasized that the girls with recurrent vaginal discharge might be KTWS. Angiokeratoma may be considered as a dermatological finding of KTWS. KTWS may also have enlarged kidney and enlargement in venous structures of the kidney in hypertrophied side.

  12. Clinical utility of urinary soluble Fas in screening for bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Anupam Kumar; Singh, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Dhramveer; Dalela, Divakar; Rath, Srikanta Kumar; Bhatt, Madan Lal Brahma

    2016-06-01

    Early diagnosis of carcinoma of urinary bladder remains a challenge. Urine cytology, as an adjunct to cystoscopy, is less sensitive for low-grade tumors. Soluble Fas (sFas), a cell-surface receptor and member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily, is frequently expressed in urinary bladder carcinoma. The objective of this study was to investigate the urinary sFas for diagnosis of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of urinary bladder. We examined urinary sFas concentration in 74 controls and 117 cases of TCC, both primary and recurrent disease, by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and compared it with urinary cytology. Urinary sFas concentration was found to be significantly higher in the patient as compared to control group (P bladder cancer in comparison with cytology. Out of 15 node positive bladder cancer cases, 13 had high urinary sFas levels, whereas 12 were urinary cytology positive for malignancy. Urinary sFas can be used as a non-invasive diagnostic biomarker for TCC of urinary bladder, both for primary and recurrent disease. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  13. Inconsistency in the definition of urinary tract infection after intravesical botulinum toxin A injection: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, Andrew W; Adelstein, Sarah A; Chen, Andrew; Lucioni, Alvaro; Kobashi, Kathleen C; Lee, Una J

    2018-04-10

    In order to more accurately examine the rate of urinary tract infection following onabotulinumtoxinA injection of the bladder, we systematically reviewed the literature for definitions of urinary tract infection utilized in series that reported on onabotulinumtoxinA injections and assessed them for consistency with guideline statements defining urinary tract infections. A systematic review of the literature was performed via query using MEDLINE and EMBASE. We included original studies that reported on adult idiopathic overactive bladder and/or neurogenic detrusor overactivity patients who underwent cystoscopy with injection of onabotulinumtoxinA and had urinary tract infection as a reported outcome. 299 publications were identified, of which 50 met the inclusion criteria. 27 studies (54%) defined their urinary tract infection diagnostic criteria, and 10 different definitions were noted amongst these studies. None of the OAB studies used a definition which met the European Association of Urology criteria for urinary tract infection. Only 2 of the 10 studies on neurogenic bladder patients used a urinary tract infection definition consistent with National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research standards. Definitions for urinary tract infections are heterogeneous and frequently absent in the literature reporting on onabotulinumtoxinA for the treatment of overactive bladder and/or neurogenic bladder. Given the potential for post procedure urinary symptoms in this setting, explicit criteria are imperative to establish the true urinary tract infection rate following treatment with onabotulinumtoxinA. Copyright © 2018 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Recurrent uncomplicated urinary tract infections in women: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosseir, Sandy B; Lind, Lawrence R; Winkler, Harvey A

    2012-03-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections most often present with symptoms of irritative voiding. In most cases, they are caused by reinfection with a previously isolated organism. Patients with one or more symptoms of uncomplicated recurrent urinary tract infection should undergo thorough examination and screening for underlying comorbidities that increase susceptibility. When frequent reinfections, empiric treatment relapse, persistent infections, or risk factors for complicated infections are encountered, patients may benefit from urodynamics, cystoscopy, renal ultrasound, intravenous urogram, or voiding cystourethrogram to evaluate for anatomic, functional, or metabolic abnormalities affecting the urinary tract (e.g., stones, stricture, obstruction, vesicoureteral reflux, lesions, detrusor underactivity). These patients may benefit from culture-guided empiric treatment and further evaluation by urology, nephrology, or infectious disease specialists. In patients with a history of uncomplicated urinary tract infections, empiric treatment guided by local antimicrobial resistance may efficiently treat a suspected recurrence. After successful treatment of the acute infection, postcoital prophylaxis, continuous prophylaxis, or self-start empiric treatment may be selected based on frequency of recurrent infections, temporal relation to intercourse, and patient characteristics. Ancillary measures such as probiotics, cranberry products, or local estrogen replacement may also be considered. This article will review the current definition, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, work-up, treatment, treatment side effects, and prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections in women. A suggested algorithm for evaluation and treatment based on current literature is provided.

  15. Pitfalls and Limitations of Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in the Diagnosis of Urinary Bladder Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei-Ching; Chen, Jeon-Hor

    2015-01-01

    Adequately selecting a therapeutic approach for bladder cancer depends on accurate grading and staging. Substantial inaccuracy of clinical staging with bimanual examination, cystoscopy, and transurethral resection of bladder tumor has facilitated the increasing utility of magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate bladder cancer. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is a noninvasive functional magnetic resonance imaging technique. The high tissue contrast between cancers and surrounding tissues on DWI is derived from the difference of water molecules motion. DWI is potentially a useful tool for the detection, characterization, and staging of bladder cancers; it can also monitor posttreatment response and provide information on predicting tumor biophysical behaviors. Despite advancements in DWI techniques and the use of quantitative analysis to evaluate the apparent diffusion coefficient values, there are some inherent limitations in DWI interpretation related to relatively poor spatial resolution, lack of cancer specificity, and lack of standardized image acquisition protocols and data analysis procedures that restrict the application of DWI and reproducibility of apparent diffusion coefficient values. In addition, inadequate bladder distension, artifacts, thinness of bladder wall, cancerous mimickers of normal bladder wall and benign lesions, and variations in the manifestation of bladder cancer may interfere with diagnosis and monitoring of treatment. Recognition of these pitfalls and limitations can minimize their impact on image interpretation, and carefully applying the analyzed results and combining with pathologic grading and staging to clinical practice can contribute to the selection of an adequate treatment method to improve patient care. PMID:26055180

  16. Urinary bladder carcinoma with divergent differentiation featuring small cell carcinoma, sarcomatoid carcinoma, and liposarcomatous component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Mariko; Morikawa, Teppei; Nakagawa, Tohru; Miyakawa, Jimpei; Maeda, Daichi; Homma, Yukio; Fukayama, Masashi

    2016-09-01

    Both small cell carcinoma and sarcomatoid carcinoma of the urinary bladder are highly aggressive tumors, and a concurrence of these tumors is extremely rare. We report a case of urinary bladder cancer with small cell carcinoma as a predominant component, accompanied by sarcomatoid carcinoma and conventional urothelial carcinoma (UC). Although the small cell carcinoma component had resolved on receiving chemoradiotherapy, rapid growth of the residual tumor led to a fatal outcome. A 47-year-old man presented with occasional bladder irritation and had a 2-year history of asymptomatic hematuria. Cystoscopy revealed a huge mass in the urinary bladder, and transurethral resection was performed. Microscopically, small cell carcinoma was detected as the major tumor component. Spindle-shaped sarcomatoid cells were also observed that were intermingled with small cell carcinoma and conventional UC. In addition, a sheet-like growth of the lipoblast-like neoplastic cells was observed focally. Initially, by providing chemoradiotherapy, we achieved a marked tumor regression; however, the tumor rapidly regrew after the completion of chemoradiotherapy, and the patient underwent radical cystectomy. Only conventional UC and sarcomatoid carcinoma were identified in the cystectomy specimen. The patient died of the disease 4 months after cystectomy. Urinary bladder cancer may include a combination of multiple aggressive histologies as in the present case. Because the variation in the tumor components may affect the efficacy of therapy, a correct diagnosis of every tumor component is necessary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Feasibility and effectiveness of image-guided percutaneous biopsy of the urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butros, Selim Reha; McCarthy, Colin James; Karaosmanoğlu, Ali Devrim; Shenoy-Bhangle, Anuradha S; Arellano, Ronald S

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the indications, technique, results, and complications of image-guided percutaneous biopsy of the urinary bladder. This retrospective study included 15 patients (10 male, 5 female) who underwent image-guided percutaneous biopsy of the urinary bladder between January 1999 and December 2013. The medical records, imaging studies, procedural details, and long-term follow-up of each patient were reviewed in detail to assess the feasibility of percutaneous bladder biopsy. Ten patients had focal bladder masses and 5 patients had asymmetric or diffuse bladder wall thickening. Eleven patients had either negative or unsatisfactory cystoscopies prior to the biopsy. Percutaneous biopsies were performed under computed tomography guidance in 12 patients and ultrasound in 3 patients. All procedures were technically successful and there were no procedural complications. Malignancy was confirmed in 8 patients, among whom 6 had transitional cell carcinoma, 1 cervical cancer, and 1 prostate cancer metastasis. Seven patients had a benign diagnosis, including 3 that were later confirmed by pathology following surgery and 2 patients with a false-negative result. The overall sensitivity was 80% and accuracy was 87%. Image-guided percutaneous biopsy of the urinary bladder is a safe and technically feasible procedure with a high sensitivity and accuracy rate. Although image-guided bladder biopsy is an uncommon procedure, it should be considered in selected cases when more traditional methods of tissue sampling are either not possible or fail to identify abnormalities detected by cross-sectional imaging.

  18. Cellular autofluorescence imaging for early diagnosis of cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenkeste, Karine; Deniset, Ariane; Lecart, Sandrine; Leveque-Fort, Sandrine; Fontaine-Aupart, Marie-Pierre; Ferlicot, Sophie; Eschwege, Pascal

    2005-08-01

    Urinary cytology is employed in diagnostic guidelines of bladder cancer in anatomo-pathological laboratories mostly for its ability to diagnose non detectable cancers using cystoscopy, but also because it is a non-invasive and non-constraining technique for a regular follow-up of the more exposed populations. The impossibility to detect such cancers is mainly due to their localization either in the bladder or in the upper urinary tract and the prostate. However, urinary cytology lacks sensitivity, especially for the detection of low grade low stage tumors due to inherent limitation of morphological criteria to distinguish low grade tumor cells from normal urothelial cells. For this purpose, we developed, in addition to urinary cytology, an original screening of these cytological slides by using spectrally-resolved and time-resolved fluorescence as a contrast factor, without changing any parameters in the cytological slide preparation. This method takes advantage of a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser, continuously tunable in the spectral range 700-950 nm allowing the observation of most endogenous cellular chromophores by biphotonic excitation. A commercial confocal microscope was also used in the measurements allowing an excitation of the samples between 458 nm and 633 nm. We observed that the fluorescence emission is differentially distributed in normal and pathological urothelial cells. Spectral- and time-resolved measurements attested this difference over about one hundred cases which have been tested to confirm the high accuracy of this non-invasive technique.

  19. [A Case of Primary Schwannoma of the Urinary Bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Yoshitaka; Waku, Natsui; Kawai, Koji; Ikeda, Atsushi; Kimura, Tomokazu; Ishitsuka, Ryutaro; Kojima, Takahiro; Suetomi, Takahiro; Joraku, Akira; Miyazaki, Jun; Sakashita, Mai; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki

    2017-08-01

    A 68-year-old woman presented with a bladder tumor. She was asymptomatic, and the tumor was incidentally detected with radiological imaging performed during treatment of cervical cancer. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography revealed a solitary submucosal tumor located in the anterior wall of the urinary bladder, with homogeneous contrast enhancement. Cystoscopy showed a submucosal tumor covered by normal mucosa. A paraganglioma was considered in the differential diagnosis, but symptoms suggesting hypercatecholaminemia were not apparent. Moreover, she did not have a family history or symptoms associated with neurofibromatosis-1 (NF-1). She underwent partial cystectomy with a preliminary diagnosis of submucosal bladder tumor. Histopathological diagnosis confirmed a schwannoma arising from the bladder wall. She was followed up without intravesical recurrence or metastases for 6 months. In the literature, only 12 cases of bladder schwannoma have been reported. There was no reported family history or symptoms associated with NF-1 in any of the cases. Although the number of cases is limited, literature review showed a favorable prognosis for bladder schwannoma with local tumor resection in patients without NF-1.

  20. Study of false positives in 5-ALA induced photodynamic diagnosis of bladder carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draga, Ronald O. P.; Grimbergen, Matthijs C. M.; Kok, Esther T.; Jonges, Trudy G. N.; Bosch, J. L. H. R.

    2009-02-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) is a technique that enhances the detection of tumors during cystoscopy using a photosensitizer which accumulates primarily in cancerous cells and will fluoresce when illuminated by violetblue light. A disadvantage of PDD is the relatively low specificity. In this retrospective study we aimed to identify predictors for false positive findings in PDD. Factors such as gender, age, recent transurethral resection of bladder tumors (TURBT), previous intravesical therapy (IVT) and urinary tract infections (UTIs) were examined for association with the false positive rates in a multivariate analysis. Data of 366 procedures and 200 patients were collected. Patients were instilled with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) intravesically and 1253 biopsies were taken from tumors and suspicious lesions. Female gender and TURBT are independent predictors of false positives in PDD. However, previous intravesical therapy with Bacille Calmette-Guérin is also an important predictor of false positives. The false positive rate decreases during the first 9-12 weeks after the latest TURBT and the latest intravesical chemotherapy. Although shortly after IVT and TURBT false positives increase, PDD improves the diagnostic sensitivity and results in more adequate treatment strategies in a significant number of patients.

  1. Appraisal of diagnostic ability of UCA1 as a biomarker of carcinoma of the urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, A K; Singh, P K; Rath, S K; Dalela, D; Goel, M M; Bhatt, M L B

    2014-11-01

    Initial diagnosis of carcinoma of the urinary bladder remains to be a challenge. Urine cytology, as an adjunct to cystoscopy, is less sensitive for low-grade tumors. Urothelial cancer associated 1 (UCA1) is a novel non-coding RNA gene, which plays a pivotal role in bladder cancer progression. Our aim is to investigate the significance of urinary UCA1 for the non-invasive diagnosis of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the urinary bladder. We examined UCA1 expression in a bladder cancer cell line (T24) and in urine of 28 healthy individuals, 46 patients of non-malignant disorders, and 117 cases (69 primary and 48 recurrent cases) of histologically proven TCC prior to transurethral resection by using real-time PCR and compared it with voided urinary cytology. UCA1 expression was found in T24 cell line and also found to be significantly higher in the cancer group as compared to the controls (p0.05). UCA1 can be used as a non-invasive diagnostic biomarker for TCC bladder as an adjunct to cytology in the early diagnosis of primary urinary bladder cancer.

  2. A Study of Lipid- and Protein- Bound Sialic Acids for the Diagnosis of Bladder Cancer and Their Relationships with the Severity of Malignancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Habibi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The gold standard for detection of bladder cancer is cystoscopy, which is an invasive and complicated procedure. Our study was conducted to find a tumor marker with high specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy for the diagnosis of bladder cancer. Methods: Serum samples were collected from 58 bladder cancer patients and 60 healthy control subjects. Levels of lipid-bound sialic acid (LBSA, and protein-bound sialic acid (PBSA were measured spectrophotometrically by Aminoff’s method. Results: Mean levels of both markers were found to be significantly higher in the patients than the healthy controls. Positive correlations were observed between serum levels of lipid- (r=0.283, p<0.05 and protein- bound (r=0.56, p<0.05 sialic acids and the grade of malignancy. To differentiate patients with bladder tumors from healthy controls, cut-offpoints were determined for each of the two parameters based on Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve analysis (LBSA=21.25 mg/dL, PBSA=6.15 mg/dL. The data showed good sensitivities (LBSA=89%, PBSA=79%, specificities (LBSA=70%, PBSA=70% and accuracies (LBSA=83%, PBSA=81% for both markers. Conclusion: Measuring serum LBSA and PBSA by this simple, reproducible, noninvasive, and inexpensive method can accurately discriminate cancer patients from healthy individuals.

  3. Urinary bladder cancer: role of MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sadhna; Rajesh, Arumugam; Prasad, Srinivasa R; Gaitonde, Krishnanath; Lall, Chandana G; Mouraviev, Vladimir; Aeron, Gunjan; Bracken, Robert B; Sandrasegaran, Kumaresan

    2012-01-01

    Urinary bladder cancer is a heterogeneous disease with a variety of pathologic features, cytogenetic characteristics, and natural histories. It is the fourth most common cancer in males and the tenth most common cancer in females. Urinary bladder cancer has a high recurrence rate, necessitating long-term surveillance after initial therapy. Early detection is important, since up to 47% of bladder cancer-related deaths may have been avoided. Conventional computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging are only moderately accurate in the diagnosis and local staging of bladder cancer, with cystoscopy and pathologic staging remaining the standards of reference. However, the role of newer MR imaging sequences (eg, diffusion-weighted imaging) in the diagnosis and local staging of bladder cancer is still evolving. Substantial advances in MR imaging technology have made multiparametric MR imaging a feasible and reasonably accurate technique for the local staging of bladder cancer to optimize treatment. In addition, whole-body CT is the primary imaging technique for the detection of metastases in bladder cancer patients, especially those with disease that invades muscle. © RSNA, 2012.

  4. Magnetic Stent Removal in a Nurse-Led Clinic; a Nine-Month Experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Connell, L

    2018-02-01

    Ureteric stents are frequently inserted post endourological procedures. However, subsequent endoscopic stent removal requires a second procedure for the patient and the availability of necessary resources. Longer duration of indwelling stents can lead to increased risk of symptoms and complications. The use of magnetic stents removed with a magnetic retrieval device (BlackStar©), offers an alternative which obviates the need for cystoscopy. We assessed the outcomes for this novel method of stent removal in our institution. A retrospective analysis was performed of all patients undergoing magnetic stent insertion and subsequent removal in a nurse-led clinic over a nine-month period. Patients were followed up with a prospective validated Ureteral Stent Symptoms Questionnaire (USSQ)3. A cost analysis was also performed. In total, 59 patients were treated using magnetic stents. The complication rate was low (6.7%). The median duration of indwelling stent was 5.8 days (range 1-11 days). Patients reported haematuria and lower urinary tract symptoms but >90% experienced no functional impairment with minimal days of employment lost (mean 0.75 days). All patients reported satisfaction with nurse-led stent removal and 97% were happy to have stents removed via this method in the future. The total financial savings were estimated at €47,790 over this period. Nurse-led removal of magnetic stents is safe and well tolerated by patients and enables expedient stent removal. It also provides a significant cost benefit and frees up valuable endoscopic resources.

  5. Ureteroarterial Fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Kim

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ureteral-iliac artery fistula (UIAF is a rare life threatening cause of hematuria. The increasing frequency is attributed to increasing use of ureteral stents. A 68-year-old female presented with gross hematuria. She had prior low anterior resection for rectal cancer and a retained ureteral stent. CT abdomen and pelvis showed a large recurrent pelvic mass and a retained stent. The patient underwent cystoscopy which showed a normal bladder. Upon removal of the stent, brisk bleeding was noted coming from the ureteral orifice. Antegrade pyelogram was done which revealed a UIAF. Angiography was done and a covered stent was placed. Multiple treatment options are available. All must consider management of the arterial and ureteral side. The arterial side may be addressed by primary open repair, embolization with extra-anatomic vascular reconstruction, or endovascular stenting. The ureter can be managed with nephroureterectomy, ureteral reconstruction, placement of a nephrostomy tube, or ureteral stenting. Being minimally invasive, we believe that endovascular stenting should be the preferred therapeutic option as it also corrects the source of bleeding while preserving distal blood flow.

  6. Comparison of TOT and TVT in Treatment of Female Stress Urinary Incontinence

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    Taylan Mit

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the continence results and complications of the tension-free vaginal tape (TVT and transobturator tape (TOT procedures. Material and Method: Sixty two urinary incontinence patients; (37 were stress urinary incontinence and 25 were mixed incontinence underwent TVT or TOT. The clinic-pathologic parameters of the patients, perioperative and postoperative complications and outcome in terms of continence and quality of life were compared. Results: TOT and TVT were performed on % 50 of the patients respectively. An objective cure rate in patients who underwent TOT was observed in 74% of cases, an objective improvement in 26% of cases. 11 of the patients had dysuria, 10 of them had suprapubic pain. An objective cure rate in patients who underwent TVT was observed in 90% of cases, an objective improvement in 8% of cases. A de novo urge incontinence presented in 2 patients. The quality of life improved in 93,5% of cases. In terms of continence results and quality of life, there was no significant difference between the procedures. The complication rate was higher with the TVT procedure when compared to that of the TOT procedure. Discussion: TOT procedure in short terms, performs similar operational success with the TVT procedure. Operational time; in consideration of the cystoscopy time, can be an advantage compared to the TVT procedure. If the operation includes anterior colporrhaphy, the success of both procedures reduces.

  7. A comparison between transabdominal ultrasonographic and cystourethroscopy findings in adult Sudanese patients presenting with haematuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Feras O; Hamdan, Hamdan Z; Abdelgalil, Hani B; Sharfi, Abdulrauf A

    2015-02-01

    Gross and microscopic haematuria both are a common cause of referral to urology clinics. It has a wide spectrum of differential. In many occasions, it is a presentation of underlining serious urological problems. Evaluation of gross and significant microscopic haematuria is of paramount importance. This study was conducted to assess and compare the findings and diagnostic competency of transabdominal ultrasonography (US) versus cystourethroscopy in patients with haematuria of lower urinary tract origin. Prospective hospital-based study done at Ibn Sina Specialized and Omdurman Military Hospitals from June 2012 to March 2013. The study included 109 patients. Structured questionnaires were used to gather data from patients. All patients were evaluated by transabdominal US before cystourethroscopy examination. One hundred and nine patients were studied. Patients' mean (SD) age was 57.9 (18.8) years. Fifty-four patients (49.5 %) presented with macroscopic haematuria, while 55 patients presented with microscopic haematuria. The sensitivity and specificity of the US in detecting prostate enlargement, vesical stones, bladder wall tumour, cystitis and schistosomiasis were [(84, 80 %); (82.6, 97.7 %); (64.7, 92.1 %); (15.3, 96.8 %); and (15.3, 98.9 %)], respectively, as compared to cystoscopic finding as the gold standard. Ultrasonography is accepted only as a first-line imaging tool for evaluation of haematuria in poor settings, but cannot replace or became as good as cystoscopy, which remains the gold standard.

  8. Midurethral bulbocavernous muscle sling for genuine stress incontinence - an alternative to synthetic slings?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Rajamaheswari

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the efficacy of midurethral bulbo-cavernous muscle sling (BCMS in the treatment of genu-ine stress incontinence in women. Methods: A prospective study comprising 25 women was carried out at the Govt. Kasturba Gandhi Hospital, Chennai. The women whose age was in the range of 30-65 years had GSI as proved by urodynamic evaluation. The bulbocavernous muscle sling implies the approximation of both the bulbocavernous muscles around the midurethra with prolene sutures. The procedure is done under regional anaesthesia. Results: These patients were followed up for 2 years. Eighteen (72% women reported complete cure, 4 (16% were significantly improved and in 3 the surgery failed. Conclusions: The bulbocavernous muscle sling is a promising new procedure for genuine stress incontinence. There is no need for intraoperative cystoscopy and the chances of bladder injury are nonexistent. Larger sample with long term follow up and randomized controlled trials comparing it with the other surgical techniques may prove its true efficacy.

  9. The current role of simulation in urological training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Simulation is becoming an increasingly popular educational tool in numerous surgical specialities, including urology. This article reviews the current role of urological simulators; discussing their need, availability, incorporation and current limitations. A literature review of the electronic databases Medline, Embase and Google Scholar was performed. For increasingly limited urological training programs, simulation can act as a valuable adjunct to clinical training. Evidence suggests that simulation enables the trainee to bypass the early, error-prone part of the surgical learning curve. It should be incorporated into proficiency-based curricula, with junior trainees initially beginning with low fidelity simulators to grasp basic surgical skills before moving onto full-procedural simulation as they progress through their training. A wide variety of simulators of differing fidelity are currently available, teaching both technical (eg. cystoscopy) and non-technical (eg. communication) urological surgical skills. Whist numerous studies have assessed the face, content and construct validity of various urological simulators, further work needs to be undertaken to determine whether the skills learnt actually improve trainee performance in the operating room. Then, educators will be able to make informed decisions about whether these resource demanding (financially and in terms of demands on faculty) simulators are a worthwhile educational tool. Although further investigation is required, urological simulators appear to have a considerable role for developing both technical and non-technical urological skills in an increasingly restricted educational environment in modern urogynecology.

  10. Diagnostic value of combined static-excretory MR Urography in children with hydroneph

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    Sally Emad-Eldin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility, accuracy and diagnostic potential of combined static-excretory MR Urography in children with sonographically detected hydronephrosis. We prospectively evaluated 28 children (11 girls and 17 boys, mean age 8.3 years (range 2 months–16 years. Static-excretory MR Urography was performed in all cases. The results of MR Urography were compared with the results of other imaging modalities, cystoscopy and surgery. In 28 children, 61 renal units were evaluated by MR Urography (the renal unit is the kidney and its draining ureter. The final diagnoses included: normal renal units (n = 23; uretropelvic junction obstruction (n = 14; megaureter (n = 8; midureteric stricture (n = 1, complicated duplicated systems (n = 5, post ESWL non-obstructive dilation (n = 2, extrarenal pelvis (n = 4, dysplastic kidney (n = 4. Complex pathology and more than one disease entity in were found in 7 children. The MRI diagnosis correlated with the final diagnosis in 57 units, with diagnostic accuracy 93.4%. In conclusions static and excretory MRU give both morphological and functional information in a single examination without exposure to ionizing radiation and iodinated contrast agent. It is a valuable imaging technique for children with upper urinary tract dilatation; especially in cases of complex congenital pathologies and severely hydronephrotic kidney.

  11. Bladder metastases of appendiceal mucinous adenocarcinoma: a case presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taverna, Gianluigi; Graziotti, Pierpaolo; Corinti, Matteo; Colombo, Piergiuseppe; Grizzi, Fabio; Severo, Mauro; Piccinelli, Alessando; Giusti, Guido; Benetti, Alessio; Zucali, Paolo A

    2010-01-01

    Appendiceal adenocarcinoma is rare with a frequency of 0.08% of all surgically removed appendices. Few cases of appendiceal carcinoma infiltrating the bladder wall for spatial contiguity have been documented. A case is reported of a 45-years old woman with mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the appendix with bladder metastasis. Although ultrasonography and voided urinary cytology were negative, abdomen computed tomography (CT) scan and cystoscopy and subsequent pathological examination revealed a mass exclusively located in the anterior wall of the bladder. Histopathology of the transurethral bladder resection revealed a bladder adenocarcinoma [6 cm (at the maximum diameter) × 2,5 cm; approximate weight: 10 gr] with focal mucinous aspects penetrating the muscle and perivisceral fat. Laparotomy evidenced the presence of a solid mass of the appendix (2,5 cm × 3 cm × 2 cm) extending to the loco-regional lymph nodes. Appendectomy and right hemicolectomy, linfoadenectomy and partial cystectomy were performed. The subsequent pathological examination revealed a mucinous cystadenocarcinoma of the appendix with metastatic cells colonising the anterior bladder wall and several colic lymph nodes. The rarity of the appendiceal carcinoma invading the urinary bladder and its usual involvement of nearest organs and the posterior bladder wall, led us to describe this case which demonstrates the ability of the appendiceal cancer to metastasize different regions of urinary bladder

  12. Pure Lymphoepithelioma-Like Carcinoma Originating from the Urinary Bladder

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    Takashi Nagai

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma of the urinary bladder (LELCB is a rare variant of infiltrating urothelial carcinoma. We report a case of LELCB in a 43-year-old man. Ultrasonography and cystoscopy revealed two bladder tumors, one on the left side of the trigone and the other on the right side of the trigone. Transurethral resection of the bladder tumors was performed and pathological analysis revealed undifferentiated carcinoma. We therefore performed radical cystectomy and urinary diversion. Immunohistochemically the tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin, but negative for Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA in situ hybridization as found for previous cases of LELCB. The final pathological diagnosis was a lymphoepithelioma-like variant of urothelial carcinoma with perivesical soft tissue invasion. For adjuvant systemic chemotherapy, three courses of cisplatin were administered. The patient subsequently became free of cancer 72 months postoperatively. Based on the literature, pure or predominant LELCB types show favorable prognoses due to their sensitivity to chemotherapy or radiotherapy. An analysis of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC values of bladder tumors examined in our institution revealed that the ADC value measured for this LELCB was relatively low compared to conventional urothelial carcinomas. This suggests that measuring the ADC value of a lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma prior to operation may be helpful in predicting LELCB.

  13. Adenocarcinoma of the appendix presenting as bilateral ureteric obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Tawil Sherif

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adenocarcinoma of the vermiform appendix is a rare neoplasm of the gastrointestinal tract. Presentation mimics acute appendicitis, but right iliac fossa mass and intestinal obstruction have also been reported. These presentations reflect various stages of a locally expanding tumour causing luminal obstruction of appendix. The investigation and subsequent management with a review of the literature is presented. Case presentation We report a case of appendicular adenocarcinoma found unexpectedly in a 43 year old male who presented with urinary symptoms. Cystoscopy and uretero-renoscopy showed normal bladder but external compression of the ureters and therefore bilateral stents were inserted. CT scan showed a caecal mass. After colonoscopy, that showed external compression, and diagnostic laparoscopy the patient underwent right hemicolectomy. Histopathology revealed well differentiated adenocarcinoma with signet ring morphology with multiple lymph node involvement. The patient was referred for chemotherapy where he received infusional 5 fluorouracil but died 7 months after surgery. Conclusion Patients with atypical manifestations related to right lower abdominal quadrant should be thoroughly investigated with an open mind. Every attempt should be made to make a precise diagnosis through all the available means to direct the treatment along correct lines.

  14. Primary congenital bladder diverticula: Where does the ureter drain?

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    Antonio Macedo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Primary congenital bladder diverticulum (PCBD is related to a deficient detrusor layer allowing out-pouching of the bladder mucosa through the inadequate muscularis wall. We aimed to review our experience with symptomatic PCBD in order to correlate clinical findings with anatomical aspects and to present late outcome. Materials and Methods: We reviewed all patients operated in our institution since 2004. We evaluated the charts for complaints, radiological exams, method of treatment, complications and length of follow-up. Results: We treated 10 cases (11 renal units - [RU], predominantly males (9/10, mean age at surgery of 5.3 years. All patients had significant urological complaints presenting either with antenatal hydronephrosis (4 or febrile urinary tract infection (5 and urinary retention in one. The ureter was found implanted inside the diverticulum in 8/11 RU. An extravesical psoas-hitch ureteroneocystostomy and diverticulum resection was performed in 10/11 cases, whereas 1 case was treated intravesically based on surgeon′s preference without performing cystoscopy. Mean follow-up was 34.1 months (1-120 without complications. Conclusions: PCBD is an uncommon diagnosis and has a high probability of drainage inside the diverticulum (72.7%. We recommend the extravesical approach associated with diverticulectomy and ureteroneocystostomy as the preferred technique to treat this abnormality.

  15. Urinary bladder tumors among atomic bomb survivors Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1961-1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanefuji, Hayato; Ishimaru, Toranosuke.

    1980-03-01

    A study was made of the relationship of radiation dose to the incidence of urinary bladder tumors among atomic bomb survivors and controls in the RERF Life Span Study extended sample. A total of 112 cases of urinary bladder tumors was identified among approximately 99,000 subjects in this fixed cohort during 1961-72. Morphologic diagnoses were available for 86 cases (76.8%), cystoscopy alone for 21 cases (18.7%), and only the cause of death recorded on death certificates for 5 cases (4.5%). Urothelial carcinoma (transitional cell carcinoma) is the most common type of urinary bladder tumor for which morphologic diagnoses are available. The 1961-72 incidence rate was calculated using 106 cases identified as urinary bladder tumors. Although the crude annual incidence rate in the high dose group (100 rad or more) is elevated in both cities and both sexes, all nine cases with this dose were aged 40 years or more at the time of the bomb (ATB). The standardized relative risk adjusted for city and sex for those of age 40 or more ATB in the high dose group is 1.8 in comparison with the control group and this is a suggestive statistical difference. A statistically significant elevation of risk occurs in the high dose group for urothelial carcinoma and adenocarcinoma of the urinary bladder among those aged 40 or more ATB. (author)

  16. A pilot study combining a GC-sensor device with a statistical model for the identification of bladder cancer from urine headspace.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanzeela Khalid

    Full Text Available There is a need to reduce the number of cystoscopies on patients with haematuria. Presently there are no reliable biomarkers to screen for bladder cancer. In this paper, we evaluate a new simple in-house fabricated, GC-sensor device in the diagnosis of bladder cancer based on volatiles. Sensor outputs from 98 urine samples were used to build and test diagnostic models. Samples were taken from 24 patients with transitional (urothelial cell carcinoma (age 27-91 years, median 71 years and 74 controls presenting with urological symptoms, but without a urological malignancy (age 29-86 years, median 64 years; results were analysed using two statistical approaches to assess the robustness of the methodology. A two-group linear discriminant analysis method using a total of 9 time points (which equates to 9 biomarkers correctly assigned 24/24 (100% of cancer cases and 70/74 (94.6% controls. Under leave-one-out cross-validation 23/24 (95.8% of cancer cases were correctly predicted with 69/74 (93.2% of controls. For partial least squares discriminant analysis, the correct leave-one-out cross-validation prediction values were 95.8% (cancer cases and 94.6% (controls. These data are an improvement on those reported by other groups studying headspace gases and also superior to current clinical techniques. This new device shows potential for the diagnosis of bladder cancer, but the data must be reproduced in a larger study.

  17. [Scrotal fistulas revealing mucinous adenocarcinoma of the scrotum: about a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Alaoui, Abdelilah; El Boté, Hicham; Ziouani, Oussama; Dembele, Oussman; El Sayegh, Hachem; Iken, Ali; Benslimane, Lounis; Nouini, Yassine

    2017-01-01

    Scrotales fistulas are rare and often represent secondary lesions of tuberculosis. Mucinous adenocarcinomas are tumors containing at least 50% of extracellular mucus. They occur most commonly in the rectosigmoid; scrotal location is rare. We report the case of a 54-year old patient, with no particular past medical history, with secondary mucinous adenocarcinoma of the scrotum revealed by scrotal fistulas. The patient had suffered from recurrent scrotal fistulas for two years, with no other associated signs. Clinical examination showed multiple scrotal fistulas with discharge of thick pus. Rectal examination was normal. Urological examinations (IVU, UCRM, cystoscopy, …) were normal, the assessment of infectious diseases as well as the detection of BK virus in urine and sputum were negative. Biopsy of sample of scrotal tissue was in favor of moderately differentiated mucinous adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemical examination was in favor of primary colorectal cancer. Patient's evolution was marked by the occurrence of complex anal fistulas, which appeared on MRI as active, supplying several pelvic peritoneal collections resulting in fleshy buds. There is no consensus on the therapeutic approach due to the rarity of this cancer. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice for this disease. Preoperative chemotherapy and radiation therapy are recommended for this type of cancer, but their role is not well established. The patient underwent primary neoadjuvant chemotherapy and radiation therapy, before abdominoperineal excision.

  18. Length of Stay in Ambulatory Surgical Oncology Patients at High Risk for Sleep Apnea as Predicted by STOP-BANG Questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diwakar D. Balachandran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The STOP-BANG questionnaire has been used to identify surgical patients at risk for undiagnosed obstructive sleep apnea (OSA by classifying patients as low risk (LR if STOP-BANG score < 3 or high risk (HR if STOP-BANG score ≥ 3. Few studies have examined whether postoperative complications are increased in HR patients and none have been described in oncologic patients. Objective. This retrospective study examined if HR patients experience increased complications evidenced by an increased length of stay (LOS in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU. Methods. We retrospectively measured LOS and the frequency of oxygen desaturation (<93% in cancer patients who were given the STOP-BANG questionnaire prior to cystoscopy for urologic disease in an ambulatory surgery center. Results. The majority of patients in our study were men (77.7%, over the age of 50 (90.1%, and had BMI < 30 kg/m2 (88.4%. STOP-BANG results were obtained on 404 patients. Cumulative incidence of the time to discharge between HR and the LR groups was plotted. By 8 hours, LR patients showed a higher cumulative probability of being discharged early (80% versus 74%, P=0.008. Conclusions. Urologic oncology patients at HR for OSA based on the STOP-BANG questionnaire were less likely to be discharged early from the PACU compared to LR patients.

  19. Profilaxis perioperatoria en cirugía urológica en hospitales cubanos Perioperative prophylaxis in urological surgery at Cuban hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humberto Guanche Garcell

    2011-12-01

    descriptive study was conducted over May-December, 2009 by application of self-administered questionnaire which assessed the existence of a politic (written document of prophylactic use and of recommendations for prophylaxis en selected procedures, the moment to administer the initial dose and the potential length of prophylactic regime as well as the antimicrobials used. Results: there was information from 24 hospitals (36.6 % of the Cuban urology services including institutions from the eleven provinces (84.6 %. In 17 services there are written politics (70.8 %. Most of them have indications of prophylaxis for assessed procedures and in 100 % of services to prostate transurethral resection, open or laparoscopic surgery including intestine, therapeutical cystoscopy and endoscopic internal urethrotomy. The 29.2 % of services recommended that the onset of prophylaxis be the night before, the 41.7 % 60 minutes before procedure and the 29.2 % during the anesthetic induction. Authors recommended 24 hours-higher outlines in most of procedures, except for the diagnostic or therapeutical cystoscopy. Different antimicrobials or combinations of it are used with predominance of ciprofloxacin and cefazolin. Conclusion: there is variability in practices of antimicrobials prescription in perioperative prophylaxis in Cuban urology services being necessary a national consensus contributing to improve the quality of fulfilment of this preventive practice.

  20. Squamous metaplasia as a manifestation of urogenital schistosomiasis and its complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Kolmakov

    2016-01-01

    .1 %. Cystoscopically SM detected at 76 (53.5 % patients. The SM confirmed by complex of CEUS, cystoscopy and ultrasound in cases of gross granulomatous mucosal changes of the bladder wall with a significant (> 8 mm thickening of the body wall. SM verified in 25 (64.1 % cases with sBC (median age 29.25 years. The incidence of metaplasia was directly correlated with the stage of cancer. All patients with US and sBC were treated with praziquantel 40 mg / kg and, additionally, with fluoroquinolones in non-specific bacteriuria cases (28.9 % and with antiprotozoa’s in cases of trichomoniasis (14.8 %. Control cystoscopy performed 10 days after the end of treatment. After the course of conservative therapy all symptoms of SM disappeared, without need to specialized surgical treatment.Conclusion. Identifying SM in patients with sBC does not have independent clinical significance: it was founded in conjunction with other specific mucosal changes, may accompany the uncomplicated forms of US and was not detected in patients with sBC in early stages. Therefore we are not being able to use that change as specific marker of the cancer transformation. The complete regression of dysplastic urothelium changes verified at the end of conservative treatment. Further study of the structure and changes of the bladder epithelium in patients with US is very important for understand the pathogenesis of tumor growth and for keeping a highquality of life for young patients with firstly revealed bladder cancer of parasitic nature.

  1. Optical coherence tomography for bladder cancer - ready as a surrogate for optical biopsy? - results of a prospective mono-centre study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction New modalities like Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT allow non-invasive examination of the internal structure of biological tissue in vivo. The potential benefits and limitations of this new technology for the detection and evaluation of bladder cancer were examined in this study. Materials and methods Between January 2007 and January 2008, 52 patients who underwent transurethral bladder biopsy or TUR-BT for surveillance or due to initial suspicion of urothelial carcinoma of the bladder were enrolled in this study. In total, 166 lesions were suspicious for malignancy according to standard white light cystoscopy. All suspicious lesions were scanned and interpreted during perioperative cystoscopy using OCT. Cold cup biopsies and/or TUR-B was performed for all these lesions. For this study we used an OCT-device (Niris®, Imalux®, Cleveland, US, that utilizes near-infrared light guided through a flexible fibre-based applicator, which is placed into the bladder via the working channel of the cystoscope. The technology provides high spatial resolution on the order of about 10-20 μm, and a visualization of tissue to a depth of about 2 mm across a lateral span of about 2 mm in width. The device used received market clearance from the FDA and CE approval in Germany. The diagnostic and surgical procedure was videotaped and analyzed afterwards for definitive matching of scanned and biopsied lesion. The primary aim of this study was to determine the level of correlation between OCT interpretation and final histological result. Results Of 166 scanned OCT images, 102 lesions (61.4% matched to the same site where the biopsy/TUR-BT was taken according to videoanalysis. Only these video-verified lesions were used for further analysis. Of all analyzed lesions 88 were benign (inflammation, edema, hyperplasia etc. and 14 were malignant (CIS, Ta, T1, T2 as shown by final histo pathology. All 14 malignant lesions were detected correctly by

  2. Ketamine-associated lower urinary tract destruction: a new radiological challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, K., E-mail: k.mason@doctors.org.u [Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom); Cottrell, A.M. [North Bristol NHS Trust, Bristol (United Kingdom); Corrigan, A.G. [Bristol Royal Infirmary, Bristol (United Kingdom); Gillatt, D.A.; Mitchelmore, A.E. [North Bristol NHS Trust, Bristol (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    Aim: Ketamine is a short-acting dissociative anaesthetic whose hallucinogenic side effects have led to an increase in its illicit use amongst club and party goers. There is a general misconception amongst users that it is a safe drug with few long term side effects, however ketamine abuse is associated with severe urinary tract dysfunction. Presenting symptoms include urinary frequency, nocturia, dysuria, haematuria and incontinence. Materials and methods: We describe the radiological findings found in a series of 23 patients, all with a history of ketamine abuse, who presented with severe lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Imaging techniques used included ultrasonography (US), intravenous urography (IVU), and computed tomography (CT). These examinations were reviewed to identify common imaging findings. All patients with positive imaging findings had also undergone cystoscopy and bladder wall biopsies, which confirmed the diagnosis. The patients in this series have consented to the use of their data in the ongoing research into ketamine-induced bladder pathology. Results: Ultrasound demonstrated small bladder volume and wall thickening. CT revealed marked, generalized bladder wall thickening, mucosal enhancement, and perivesical inflammation. Ureteric wall thickening and enhancement were also observed. In advanced cases ureteric narrowing and strictures were identified using both CT and IVU. Correlation of clinical history, radiological and pathological findings was performed to confirm the diagnosis. Conclusion: This case series illustrates the harmful effects of ketamine on the urinary tract and the associated radiological findings. Delayed diagnosis can result in irreversible renal tract damage requiring surgical intervention. It is important that radiologists are aware of this emerging clinical entity as early diagnosis and treatment are essential for successful management.

  3. Is there any association between National Institute of Health category IV prostatitis and prostate-specific antigen levels in patients with low-risk localized prostate cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doluoglu, Omer Gokhan; Ceylan, Cavit; Kilinc, Fatih; Gazel, Eymen; Resorlu, Berkan; Odabas, Oner

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the association between National Institute of Health category IV prostatitis and prostate-specific antigen levels in patients with low-risk localized prostate cancer. The data of 440 patients who had undergone prostate biopsies due to high PSA levels and suspicious digital rectal examination findings were reviewed retrospectively. The patients were divided into two groups based on the presence of accompanying NIH IV prostatitis. The exclusion criteria were as follows: Gleason score>6, PSA level>20ng/mL, >2 positive cores, >50% cancerous tissue per biopsy, urinary tract infection, urological interventions at least 1 week previously (cystoscopy, urethral catheterization, or similar procedure), history of prostate biopsy, and history of androgen or 5-alpha reductase use. All patient's age, total PSA and free PSA levels, ratio of free to total PSA, PSA density and prostate volume were recorded. In total, 101 patients were included in the study. Histopathological examination revealed only PCa in 78 (77.2%) patients and PCa+NIH IV prostatitis in 23 (22.7%) patients. The median total PSA level was 7.4 (3.5-20.0) ng/mL in the PCa+NIH IV prostatitis group and 6.5 (0.6-20.0) ng/mL in the PCa group (p=0.67). The PSA level was≤10ng/mL in 60 (76.9%) patients in the PCa group and in 16 (69.6%) patients in the PCa+NIH IV prostatitis group (p=0.32). Our study showed no statistically significant difference in PSA levels between patients with and without NIH IV prostatitis accompanying PCa.

  4. Identifying content for simulation-based curricula in urology: a national needs assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayahangan, Leizl Joy; Bølling Hansen, Rikke; Gilboe Lindorff-Larsen, Karen; Paltved, Charlotte; Nielsen, Bjørn Ulrik; Konge, Lars

    2017-12-01

    Simulation-based training is well recognized in the transforming field of urological surgery; however, integration into the curriculum is often unstructured. Development of simulation-based curricula should follow a stepwise approach starting with a needs assessment. This study aimed to identify technical procedures in urology that should be included in a simulation-based curriculum for residency training. A national needs assessment was performed using the Delphi method involving 56 experts with significant roles in the education of urologists. Round 1 identified technical procedures that newly qualified urologists should perform. Round 2 included a survey using an established needs assessment formula to explore: the frequency of procedures; the number of physicians who should be able to perform the procedure; the risk and/or discomfort to patients when a procedure is performed by an inexperienced physician; and the feasibility of simulation training. Round 3 involved elimination and reranking of procedures according to priority. The response rates for the three Delphi rounds were 70%, 55% and 67%, respectively. The 34 procedures identified in Round 1 were reduced to a final prioritized list of 18 technical procedures for simulation-based training. The five procedures that reached the highest prioritization were cystoscopy, transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy of the prostate, placement of ureteral stent, insertion of urethral and suprapubic catheter, and transurethral resection of the bladder. The prioritized list of technical procedures in urology that were identified as highly suitable for simulation can be used as an aid in the planning and development of simulation-based training programs.

  5. Prostatic carcinoma: limited field irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rounsaville, M.C.; Green, J.P.; Vaeth, J.M.; Purdon, R.P.; Heltzel, M.M.

    1987-01-01

    This is a retrospective study of 251 patients with histologically proven adenocarcinoma treated primarily with limited field radiotherapy techniques, under the principle direction of authors JMV and JPG, between 1968 and 1981 in San Francisco, California. All patients are followed for a minimum of 3 years; mean follow-up is 7.3 years. Routine clinical staging procedures included: HandP, digital prostate exam, cystoscopy, biopsy, blood studies including serum acid phosphatase, and imaging studies including chest X ray, IVP, bone survey or radionucleotide bone scan, and in recent years, pelvic CT scans. Twelve patients are Stage A1, 37-Stage A2, 50-Stage B, 140-Stage C1 and 12-Stage C2. Ninety percent of all cases and 85% of Stage C patients were treated with limited fields to the prostate and periprostatic volume only. Total doses were prescribed at midplane or isocenter and were generally 6500-7000 cGy, daily doses of 180-200 cGy, 5 days per week. Actuarial 5- and 10-year survival rates are: entire population-69% and 47%; Stage A1-74% and 50%; Stage A2-81% and 67%; Stage B-84% and 53%; Stage C1-63% and 42%; Stage C2-32% and 11%. The 5- and 10-year disease-free actuarial survivals are: entire population-71% and 50%; Stage A1-89% and 74%; Stage A2-82% and 69%; Stage B-71% and 52%; Stage C1-67% and 44%; Stage C2-0%. Sites of recurrence, alone or as a component of the failure pattern are: 37 (15%) local, 11 (4%) symptomatic regional recurrence (lower extremity edema, pelvic pain/sciatica, hydroureteronephrosis), and 87 (35%) distant metastasis. Seven (3%) had unknown sites of failure. Local-regional failure occurred in 42% of Stage C2 patients

  6. Prostate Artery Embolization (PAE) in the Management of Refractory Hematuria of Prostatic Origin Secondary to Iatrogenic Urological Trauma: A Safe and Effective Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kably, Isaam; Pereira, Keith; Chong, William; Bhatia, Shivank

    2016-02-01

    Incidence of refractory hematuria of prostatic origin (RHPO) is extremely rare, with an iatrogenic etiology even rarer. When conservative methods fail to control bleeding, more invasive surgical methods are needed. In this article we describe our experience with prostatic artery embolization (PAE) as a minimally invasive alternative treatment option in patients with RHPO secondary to iatrogenic urologic trauma. Three patients presented with RHPO. The etiologies were transurethral resection of prostate surgery, Foley catheter removal with a supratherapeutic international normalized ratio and self-traumatic Foley catheter removal respectively. Stepwise management with conservative and medical methods failed to control bleeding. Under local anesthesia and moderate sedation, bilateral PAE was performed via a right common femoral artery access and using cone beam computed tomography. An embolic mixture containing 300-500 um Embosphere® Microspheres (Biosphere Medical, Rockland, MA) was injected under fluoroscopic guidance until stasis was achieved. PAE using the described technique was a technical and clinical success in all three patients. Hematuria resolved within a period of 24 hours. There were no intra- or periprocedural complications. PAE offers a reasonable option in treatment of RHPO, regardless of the cause and may be attempted prior to surgical techniques or sometimes in conjunction. Being minimally invasive and performed under local anesthesia, PAE is especially useful when excessive bleeding prevents adequate visualization of a bleeding source during cystoscopy and in the elderly age group with several comorbidities. An added advantage is the prostatic parenchymal ischemia leading to significant prostate volume reduction and alleviation of the obstructive symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Robotic repair of vesicovaginal fistulae with the transperitoneal-transvaginal approach: A case series

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    Luciano A. Nunez Bragayrac

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To describe a novel technique of repairing the VVF using the transperitoneal-transvaginal approach. Materials and Methods From June 2011 to October 2013, four patients with symptoms of urine leakage in the vagina underwent robotic repair of VVF with the transperitoneal-transvaginal approach. Cystoscopy revealed the fistula opening on the bladder. A ureteral stent was placed through the fistulous tract. After trocar placement, the omental flap was prepared and mobilized robotically. The vagina was identified and incised. The fistulous tract was excised. Cystorrhaphy was performed in two layers in an interrupted fashion. The vaginal opening was closed with running stitches. The omentum was interposed and anchored between the bladder and vagina. Finally, the ureteral catheters were removed in case they have been placed, and an 18 Fr urethral catheter was removed on the 14th postoperative day. Results The mean age was 46 years (range: 41 to 52 years. The mean fistula diameter was 1.5 cm (range 0.3 to 2 cm. The mean operative time was 117.5 min (range: 100 to 150 min. The estimated blood loss was 100 mL (range: 50 to 150 mL. The mean hospital stay was 1.75 days (range: 1 to 3 days. The mean Foley catheter duration was 15.75 days (range: 10 to 25 days. There was no evidence of recurrence in any of the cases. Conclusions The robot-assisted laparoscopic transperitoneal transvaginal approach for VVF is a feasible procedure when the fistula tract is identified by first intentionally opening the vagina, thereby minimizing the bladder incision and with low morbidity.

  8. Photoselective Vaporisation of the Bladder for the Management of Radiation Cystitis - Technique and Initial Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascoe, Claire; Christidis, Daniel; Manning, Todd; Lamb, Benjamin W; Murphy, Declan G; Lawrentschuk, Nathan

    2018-05-16

    Objective To describe our technique utilising photoselective vaporisation of the bladder (PVB) for the management of haemorrhagic cystitis and initial results of 12 patients. Materials and Method An audit of theatre records of a single surgeon was performed to identify patients who had undergone PVB for management of radiation-cystitis. Rigid cystoscopy was performed. Ureteric catheters were placed and active bleeding sites targeted to optimise vision. Ablation was commenced using the vaporize function. When lasering around delicate structures the coagulation function was used. Ureteric catheters remained in situ for 24h. An 18Fr Foley catheter was placed. When urine output was clear continuous bladder irrigation was ceased. Both uretetric catheters and Foley catheter were removed prior to the 24hour mark. Results 12 patients were identified. 8 had previously required blood transfusion secondary to bladder haemorrhage. 9 were successfully treated and 2 saw improvement in haematuria but required a repeat procedure at 3 weeks post operatively. 4 went on to receive hyperbaric oxygenation as consolidative therapy. 1 patient was unsuccessfully treated and went on to cystectomy. There were no mortalities. No patients sustained bladder perforation or damage to surrounding structures. Conclusion Radiation cystitis can be life threatening and remains a challenge for the urologist with traditional intra-vescical treatments such as aluminium or formalin having variable results. We present an alternate technique using PVB to ablate the bladder mucosa, with good results. Consolidation with hyperbaric oxygen therapy may be considered. Our study is limited by small sample size and the presence of bilateral ureteric catheters leaving the bladder free from urine may impact immediate post operative outcomes. These initial results are promising however further prospective evaluation with a larger cohort and pre and post operative cystograms would enable better evaluation of this

  9. Unusual Complication of Suprapubic Cystostomy in a Male Patient with Tetraplegia: Traction on Foley Catheter Leading to Extrusion of Foley Balloon from Urinary Bladder and Suprapubic Urinary Fistula – Importance of Securely Anchoring Suprapubic Catheter with Adhesive Tape or BioDerm Tube Holder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Vaidyanathan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Suprapubic cystostomy is recommended to patients with neuropathic bladder to prevent complications of long-term urethral catheter drainage. We present a 50-year-old male patient with tetraplegia who had long-term urethral catheter drainage. Following flexible cystoscopy, he developed a urine leak from the right side of the scrotum. Suprapubic cystostomy was performed. After suprapubic cystostomy, the urinary fistula healed completely. A follow-up cystourethrogram confirmed an intact urethra with no leak of contrast. Six weeks later, this patient presented with a hole below the suprapubic cystostomy through which a small amount of urine was leaking. A keyhole dressing had been applied around the suprapubic catheter and the catheter was hanging loosely, thus permitting traction on the catheter, especially when the urine bag was full. Computerised tomography of the pelvis showed extrusion of the Foley balloon from the urinary bladder, but the tip of the catheter was still located within the bladder. The extruded catheter was removed and a Foley catheter was inserted, ensuring that the balloon was inflated within the urinary bladder. The suprapubic catheter was secured firmly to the anterior abdominal wall with a BioDerm Tube Holder, thus preventing any traction on the catheter or Foley balloon. The urine leak through the hole below the suprapubic cystostomy stopped and the sinus healed. This case illustrates the need to anchor the suprapubic catheter securely to the anterior abdominal wall with adhesive tape or BioDerm Tube Holder to prevent traction and consequent displacement of the catheter or Foley balloon.

  10. OPIUM USE IN TRANSITIONAL CELL CARCINOMA OF THE URINARY BLADDER

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    A. Nourbakhsh

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Opium use is one of the most common forms of substance abuse in Iran and there are some evidence indicating it is a risk factor of transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the urinary bladder. The majority of opium users are also cigarette smokers, so consideration of the high prevalence of smoking which is the most important risk factor of TCC of the urinary bladder among opium users is essential to assess the role of opium use as a possible risk factor of TCC. This study was done to evaluate the role of opium as a risk factor of TCC. A case-control study was performed on 255 individuals diagnosed with TCC of the urinary bladder by pathologic light microscopic examination of the tumor biopsies. Control population was chosen from individuals who had no history or presenting signs or symptoms of urinary problems. Case and control groups were matched by sex and age and also by cigarette smoking habits. Forty-one (18.1% of the cases and 12 (5% of controls were recognized to be opium users. Mantel-Haenszel analysis showed an odds ratio of 3.88, with 95% confidence interval of 1.99-7.57 and P value of < 0.001. Results indicate that opium use is a risk factor for TCC. The majority of opium users are also cigarette smokers, which is another important risk factor for TCC. Routine urine cytology and early evaluation in the patients presenting with any of the symptoms of urinary bladder malignancy by means of cystoscopy and urine cytology are highly recommended.

  11. [Acute urinary retention secondary to giant prolapsed ureterocele in a young adult woman. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villagómez-Camargo, Roberto; Chopin-Gazga, Marco; Saucedo-Bravo, Jonathan; García-Cano, Eugenio; Montiel-Jarquín, Álvaro

    2016-01-01

    Ureterocele is a cystic dilation of the distal ureteral segment. The incidence in women ranges from 1/5,000 to 1/12,000. In adults, they are poorly diagnosed and are asymptomatic. Prolapse through the urethra is uncommon, and involves acute urine retention and a reducible vulvar tumour. Woman of 24 years old, two previous caesarean and two abortions. She had incomplete bladder emptying, intermittent voiding, bladder straining and tenesmus, three months before admission. After the voiding effort she presented with acute urine retention with sudden onset of tumour in the vulva. The tumour was manually reduced under regional anaesthesia. A cystoscopy was performed, finding an ischaemic de-roofing of the anterior wall of the ureterocele, causing vesicoureteral reflux grade IV. Surgical correction was performed with Cohen re-implantation and insertion of a double-J catheter. The catheter was removed 30 days later, with a successful post-operative course. Its aetiology is unclear, and most are diagnosed by ultrasound in the prenatal period. The clinical presentation is variable, from urinary tract infection to prolapse. Despite its size, it may cause complications such as ischaemic de-roofing, which if diagnosed soon may be resolved successfully, as with this patient. The results and treatment may be favourable when no renal impact or concomitant anatomical changes are present, as is the case of this patient. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  12. Occupational hazard: radiation exposure for the urologist: developing a reference standard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, Seth A.; Rangarajan, Sriram S.; Chen, Tony; Palazzi, Kerrin L.; Langford, J. Scott; Sur, Roger L., E-mail: rlsur@ucsd.edu [Department of Surgery and Division of Urology, U C San Diego Health Science System, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Introduction: to date, there is a paucity of literature offering practicing urologists a reference for the amount of radiation exposure received while surgically managing urolithiasis. This study examines the cumulative radiation exposure of an urologist over 9 months. Materials and methods: We present a case series of fluoroscopic exposures of an experienced stone surgeon operating at an academic comprehensive stone center between April and December 2011. Radiation exposure measurements were determined by a thermoluminescent dosimeter worn on the outside of the surgeon's thyroid shield. Estimations of radiation exposure (mrem) per month were charted with fluoroscopy times, using scatter plots to estimate Spearman's rank correlation coefficients. Results: the total 9-month radiation exposure was 87 mrems for deep dose equivalent (DDE), 293 mrem for lens dose equivalent (LDE), and 282 mrem for shallow dose equivalent (SDE). Total fluoroscopy time was 252.44 minutes for 64 ureteroscopies (URSs), 29 percutaneous nephrolithtomies (PNLs), 20 cystoscopies with ureteral stent placements, 9 shock wave ithotripsies (SWLs), 9 retrograde pyelograms (RPGs), 2 endoureterotomies, and 1 ureteral balloon dilation. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients examining the association between fluoroscopy time and radiation exposure were not significant for DDE (p = 0.6, Spearman's rho = 0.2), LDE (p = 0.6, Spearman's rho = 0.2), or SDE (p = 0.6, Spearman's rho = 0.2). Conclusions: Over a 9-month period, total radiation exposures were well below annual accepted limits (DDE 5000 mrem, LDE 15,000 mrem and SDE 50,000 mrem). Although fluoroscopy time did not correlate with radiation exposure, future prospective studies can account for co-variates such as patient obesity and urologist distance from radiation source. (author)

  13. Filtration Device for On-Site Collection, Storage and Shipment of Cells from Urine and Its Application to DNA-Based Detection of Bladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Elin; Dahmcke, Christina M; Steven, Kenneth; Larsen, Louise K; Guldberg, Per

    2015-01-01

    Molecular analysis of cells from urine provides a convenient approach to non-invasive detection of bladder cancer. The practical use of urinary cell-based tests is often hampered by difficulties in handling and analyzing large sample volumes, the need for rapid sample processing to avoid degradation of cellular content, and low sensitivity due to a high background of normal cells. We present a filtration device, designed for home or point-of-care use, which enables collection, storage and shipment of urinary cells. A special feature of this device is a removable cartridge housing a membrane filter, which after filtration of urine can be transferred to a storage unit containing an appropriate preserving solution. In spiking experiments, the use of this device provided efficient recovery of bladder cancer cells with elimination of >99% of excess smaller-sized cells. The performance of the device was further evaluated by DNA-based analysis of urinary cells collected from 57 patients subjected to transurethral resection following flexible cystoscopy indicating the presence of a tumor. All samples were tested for FGFR3 mutations and seven DNA methylation markers (BCL2, CCNA1, EOMES, HOXA9, POU4F2, SALL3 and VIM). In the group of patients where a transitional cell tumor was confirmed at histopathological evaluation, urine DNA was positive for one or more markers in 29 out of 31 cases (94%), including 19 with FGFR3 mutation (61%). In the group of patients with benign histopathology, urine DNA was positive for methylation markers in 13 out of 26 cases (50%). Only one patient in this group was positive for a FGFR3 mutation. This patient had a stage Ta tumor resected 6 months later. The ability to easily collect, store and ship diagnostic cells from urine using the presented device may facilitate non-invasive testing for bladder cancer.

  14. Filtration Device for On-Site Collection, Storage and Shipment of Cells from Urine and Its Application to DNA-Based Detection of Bladder Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elin Andersson

    Full Text Available Molecular analysis of cells from urine provides a convenient approach to non-invasive detection of bladder cancer. The practical use of urinary cell-based tests is often hampered by difficulties in handling and analyzing large sample volumes, the need for rapid sample processing to avoid degradation of cellular content, and low sensitivity due to a high background of normal cells. We present a filtration device, designed for home or point-of-care use, which enables collection, storage and shipment of urinary cells. A special feature of this device is a removable cartridge housing a membrane filter, which after filtration of urine can be transferred to a storage unit containing an appropriate preserving solution. In spiking experiments, the use of this device provided efficient recovery of bladder cancer cells with elimination of >99% of excess smaller-sized cells. The performance of the device was further evaluated by DNA-based analysis of urinary cells collected from 57 patients subjected to transurethral resection following flexible cystoscopy indicating the presence of a tumor. All samples were tested for FGFR3 mutations and seven DNA methylation markers (BCL2, CCNA1, EOMES, HOXA9, POU4F2, SALL3 and VIM. In the group of patients where a transitional cell tumor was confirmed at histopathological evaluation, urine DNA was positive for one or more markers in 29 out of 31 cases (94%, including 19 with FGFR3 mutation (61%. In the group of patients with benign histopathology, urine DNA was positive for methylation markers in 13 out of 26 cases (50%. Only one patient in this group was positive for a FGFR3 mutation. This patient had a stage Ta tumor resected 6 months later. The ability to easily collect, store and ship diagnostic cells from urine using the presented device may facilitate non-invasive testing for bladder cancer.

  15. Acute Urinary Obstruction in a Tetraplegic Patient from Misplacement of Catheter in Urethra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Singh, Gurpreet; Hughes, Peter L; Soni, Bakul M

    2016-01-01

    A male tetraplegic patient attended accident and emergency with a blocked catheter; on removing the catheter, he passed bloody urine. After three unsuccessful attempts were made to insert a catheter by nursing staff, a junior doctor inserted a three-way Foley catheter with a 30-mL balloon but inflated the balloon with 10 mL of water to commence the bladder irrigation. The creatinine level was mostly 19 µmol/L (range: 0-135 µmol/L) but increased to 46 µmol/L on day 7. Computerized tomography urogram revealed that the bilateral hydronephrosis with hydroureter was extended down to urinary bladder, the bladder was distended, prostatic urethra was dilated and filled with urine, and although the balloon of Foley catheter was not seen in the bladder, the tip of the catheter was seen lying in the urethra. Following the re-catheterization, the creatinine level decreased to 21 µmol/L. A follow-up ultrasound scan revealed no evidence of hydronephrosis in both kidneys. Flexible cystoscopy revealed inflamed bladder mucosa, catheter reaction, and tiny stones. There was no bladder tumor. This case report concludes that the cause of bilateral hydronephrosis, hydroureter, and distended bladder was inadequate drainage of urinary bladder as the Foley balloon that was under-filled slipped into the urethra resulting in an obstruction to urine flow. Urethral catheterization in tetraplegic patients should be performed by senior, experienced staff in order to avoid trauma and incorrect positioning. Tetraplegic subjects with decreased muscle mass have low creatinine level. Increase in creatinine level (>1.5 times the basal level) indicates acute kidney injury, although peak creatinine level may still be within laboratory reference range. While scanning the urinary tract of spinal cord injury patients with indwelling urinary catheter, if Foley balloon is not seen within the bladder, urethra should be scanned to locate the Foley balloon.

  16. Evaluation of oxidative stress status and antioxidant capacity in patients with painful bladder syndrome/interstitial cystitis: preliminary results of a randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ener, Kemal; Keske, Murat; Aldemir, Mustafa; Özcan, Muhammet Fuat; Okulu, Emrah; Özayar, Asım; Ergin, Merve; Doluoğlu, Ömer Gökhan; Çakmak, Serdar; Erel, Özcan

    2015-08-01

    This study aimed to investigate oxidative stress in etiopathogenesis by analyzing serum total antioxidant capacity (TAC), total oxidant status (TOS), binding capacity of exogenous cobalt to human albumin (IMA), serum advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), paraoxonase (PON), arylesterase, IgE, and C-reactive protein (CRP) in bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC). The study included 16 female patients diagnosed with BPS/IC and 25 healthy female subjects forming the control group. A bladder biopsy was performed on all patients in the BPS/IC group by carrying out cystoscopy with hydrodistention under general anesthesia. The results of serum TAC, TOS, IMA, AOPP, PON, arylesterase, IgE, and CRP of the subjects in both groups were compared. The mean age of the 16 female patients in the BPS/IC group was 43.6 ± 14.5 years, and the mean age of the 25 healthy subjects in the control group was 42.0 ± 10.3 years. According to the criteria of International Society for the Study of Interstitial Cystitis (ESSIC), eight patients were classified as Type 2A, three patients as Type 2B, four patients as Type 2C, and one patient as Type 3C. In the BPS/IC group, while TAC was found significantly lower than in the control group, IMA, IgE, and CRP were found significantly higher (P < 0.05). When binary logistic regression analysis was performed, the created model was determined to have 81.3 % sensitivity and 80 % specifity. In the etiology of BPS/IC, mechanism of oxidative damage comes into prominence. In the diagnosis of BPS/IC, IgE, CRP, and TAC are not specific markers when used separately; however, a higher specifity and sensitivity could be reached when used jointly in the suspected patients.

  17. Expression of circadian clock genes and proteins in urothelial cancer is related to cancer-associated genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litlekalsoy, Jorunn; Rostad, Kari; Kalland, Karl-Henning; Hostmark, Jens G.; Laerum, Ole Didrik

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate invasive and metastatic potential of urothelial cancer by investigating differential expression of various clock genes/proteins participating in the 24 h circadian rhythms and to compare these gene expressions with transcription of other cancer-associated genes. Twenty seven paired samples of tumour and benign tissue collected from patients who underwent cystectomy were analysed and compared to 15 samples of normal bladder tissue taken from patients who underwent cystoscopy for benign prostate hyperplasia (unrelated donors). Immunohistochemical analyses were made for clock and clock-related proteins. In addition, the gene-expression levels of 22 genes (clock genes, casein kinases, oncogenes, tumour suppressor genes and cytokeratins) were analysed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). Considerable up- or down-regulation and altered cellular distribution of different clock proteins, a reduction of casein kinase1A1 (CSNK1A1) and increase of casein kinase alpha 1 E (CSNK1E) were found. The pattern was significantly correlated with simultaneous up-regulation of stimulatory tumour markers, and a down-regulation of several suppressor genes. The pattern was mainly seen in aneuploid high-grade cancers. Considerable alterations were also found in the neighbouring bladder mucosa. The close correlation between altered expression of various clock genes and common tumour markers in urothelial cancer indicates that disturbed function in the cellular clock work may be an important additional mechanism contributing to cancer progression and malignant behaviour. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-016-2580-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  18. Induction Cisplatin and Fluorouracil-Based Chemotherapy Followed by Concurrent Chemoradiation for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.-C.; Hsu, C.-H.; Cheng, Jason C.; Huang, C.-Y.; Tsai, Y.-C.; Hsu, F.-M.; Huang, K.-H.; Cheng, A.-L.; Pu, Y.-S.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate a multimodality bladder-preserving therapy in patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with stages T2-4aN0M0 bladder cancer suitable for cystectomy underwent radical transurethral resection and induction chemotherapy, followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT). Patients with a Karnofsky performance status (KPS) <80 or age ≥70 years underwent Protocol A: induction chemotherapy with three cycles of the cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (CF) regimen, and CCRT with six doses of weekly cisplatin and 64.8 Gy radiotherapy given with the shrinking-field technique. Patients with KPS ≥80 and age <70 years underwent Protocol B: induction chemotherapy with three cycles of weekly paclitaxel plus the CF regimen, and CCRT with six doses of weekly paclitaxel and cisplatin plus 64.8 Gy radiotherapy. Interval cystoscopy was employed after induction chemotherapy and when radiotherapy reached 43.2 Gy. Patients without a complete response (CR) were referred for salvage cystectomy. Results: Among 30 patients (median, 66 years) enrolled, 17 and 13 patients underwent Protocol A and B, respectively. After induction chemotherapy, 23 patients achieved CR. Five (17%) of 7 patients without CR underwent salvage cystectomy. Overall, 28 patients (93%) completed the protocol treatment. Of 22 patients who completed CCRT, 1 had recurrence with carcinoma in situ and 3 had distant metastases. After a median follow-up of 47 months, overall and progression-free survival rate for all patients were 77% and 54% at 3 years, respectively. Of 19 surviving patients, 15 (79%) retained functioning bladders. Conclusions: Our protocols may be alternatives to cystectomy for selected patients who wish to preserve the bladder.

  19. VIRAL ETIOLOGY OF RECURRENT URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS

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    H. S. Ibishev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Recurrent urinary tract infection is an actual problem of modern urology.Objective. Complex investigation of urinary tract infections including viral etiology for chronic recurrent cystitis in womenMaterials and methods. The study included 31 women with recurrent infection of urinary tract. Inclusion criteria were the presence of lower urinary tract symptoms caused by infection, severe recurrent course, the lack of anatomical and functional disorders of the urinary tract, the absence of bacterial pathogens during the study, taking into account the culture of aerobic and anaerobic culturing techniques.Results. The analysis of the clinical manifestations, the dominant in the study group were pain and urgency to urinate at 100% and 90% of women surveyed, respectively, and less frequent urination were recorded in 16.1% of patients. In general clinical examination of urine in all cases identified leukocyturia and 90% of the hematuria. By using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR in midstream urine of all examined was verified 10 types of human papilloma virus (HPV with the predominance of 16 and 18 types . Considering the presence of recurrent infectious and inflammatory processes of the urinary tract, cystoscopy with bladder biopsy was performed for all patients. When histomorphological biopsies of all patients surveyed noted the presence of the specific characteristics of HPV: papillary hyperplasia with squamous koilocytosis, pale cytoplasm and shrunken kernels. When analyzing the results of PCR biopsy data corresponded with the results of PCR in midstream urine in all biopsies was detected HPV.Conclusions. Human papillomavirus infection may be involved in the development of viral cystitis. In the etiological structure of viral cystitis, both highly oncogenic and low oncogenic HPV types can act.

  20. Transurethral ventral buccal mucosa graft inlay urethroplasty for reconstruction of fossa navicularis and distal urethral strictures: surgical technique and preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolavsky, Dmitriy; Abouelleil, Mourad; Daneshvar, Michael

    2016-11-01

    To introduce a novel surgical technique for the reconstruction of distal urethral strictures using buccal mucosal graft (BMG) through a transurethral approach. A retrospective institution chart review was conducted of all the patients who underwent a transurethral ventral BMG inlay urethroplasty from March 2014 to March 2016. Patients with greater than one-year follow-up were included. Steps of the procedure: transurethral ventral wedge resection of the stenosed segment and transurethral delivery and spread fixation of appropriate BMG inlay into the resultant urethrotomy. The patients were followed for post-operative complications and stricture recurrence with uroflow, PVR, cystoscopy and outcome questionnaires. Three patients with a minimum of 12-month follow-up are included in this case series. The mean age of the patients was 42 years (35-53); mean stricture length was 2.1 cm (1-4). All patients had at least 2 previous failed procedures. Mean follow-up was 18 months (12-24). There were no stricture recurrences or fistula. Mean pre- and post-operative uroflow values were 4.3 (0-8) and 19 (16-26), respectively. Neither penile chordee nor changes in sexual function were noted in patients on follow-up. Transurethral ventral BMG inlay urethroplasty is a feasible option for treatment of fossa navicularis strictures. This single-stage technique allows for avoiding skin incision or urethral mobilization. It helps to prevent glans dehiscence, fistula formation and avoids the use of genital skin flaps in all patients, especially those affected with LS. This novel surgical technique is an effective treatment alternative for men with distal urethral strictures.

  1. Single stage circumferential lingual mucosal graft urethroplasty in near obliterative bulbar urethra stricture: A novel technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh Sharma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: This is a prospective study of the use and efficacy of a novel technique of circumferential tubularised lingual mucosal graft (LMG in obliterative and near obliterative bulbar urethral stricture of >2 cm where excisional and augmented anastomotic urethroplasty are not feasible. Materials and Methods: The stenotic urethral segment was opened dorsally in midline and fibrosed urethra was excised taking care to preserve the healthy spongiosum tissue. LMG (av. Length 3 cm was placed from one end of corporal body towards spongy tissue in a circumferential manner. Another LMG was placed in similar manner to deal with longer stricture. The urethra was tubularised over 14 Fr silicone catheter. Results: A total of 12 men, of mean age 47 years underwent this procedure. The mean follow up period was 11 months starting from July 2014 till manuscript submission. Follow up included voiding cystourethrogram at 3 weeks, cystoscopy at 3 months (one patient didn't turned up and subsequent follow up. Mean stricture length was 4.66 cm (range, 3–8.5 cm and mean operative time was 195 min. (range, 160 to 200 min.. The technique was successful (normal voiding with no need for any post-operative procedure in 11(91.6% patients. One patient developed early recurrence at 4 month of surgery and had anastomotic stricture which was successfully managed by direct visual internal urethrotomy. Conclusion: Single stage circumferential tubularised graft urethroplasty is an excellent technique for strictures that include segments of obliterative and near obliterative diseased urethra. It provide a wider neourethra than patch graft urethroplasty.

  2. Internal urethrotomy in patients with recurrent urethral stricture after buccal mucosa graft urethroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Clemens M; Schmid, Marianne; Ludwig, Tim A; Kluth, Luis A; Reiss, Philip; Dahlem, Roland; Engel, Oliver; Chun, Felix K-H; Riechardt, Silke; Fisch, Margit; Ahyai, Sascha A

    2015-09-01

    To determine the success rate of direct vision internal urethrotomy (DVIU) in the treatment of short stricture recurrence after buccal mucosa graft urethroplasty (BMGU). Patients who underwent DVIU for the treatment of short, "veil-like" recurrent urethral strictures (urethroplasty database. Stricture recurrence was defined as maximum flow rate (Q max) <15 ml/s and a consecutively verified stricture in a combined retro- and antegrade voiding cystography or cystoscopy at a follow-up visit. The success rate of DVIU was assessed by Kaplan-Meier analysis. Univariable Cox regression analyses evaluated risk factors for stricture recurrence following DVIU. Forty-three patients underwent DVIU for short stricture recurrence after BMGU for bulbar (81.3 %), penile (14.0 %) and membranous (4.7 %) strictures. Relapse had occurred proximally to the buccal mucosa graft in 28 (65.1 %) and distally in 12 (27.9 %) patients, respectively. At a mean follow-up of 11.7 (±9.7) months, stricture recurrence was observed in 48.8 % of our patients. Stricture recurrence was significantly associated with weak urinary stream (9.3 ml/s vs. no recurrence 19.5 ml/s) and patient dissatisfaction (66.7 % vs. no recurrence 18.1 %; both p < 0.001). The overall success rate was 60.5 % 15 months after DVIU. The main limitations of this study are its retrospective design, the small sample size and the short follow-up. DVIU after BMGU showed a moderate success rate and therefore might be a viable treatment option in selected patients with very short strictures after BMGU. However, longer follow-up is warranted to prove long-term effectiveness.

  3. Redo buccal mucosa graft urethroplasty: success rate, oral morbidity and functional outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Clemens M; Schmid, Marianne; Ludwig, Tim A; Kluth, Luis A; Dahlem, Roland; Fisch, Margit; Ahyai, Sascha

    2016-11-01

    To determine the success rate, oral morbidity and functional outcomes of redo buccal mucosa graft urethroplasty (BMGU) for treatment of stricture recurrence after previous BMGU. We included 50 patients who underwent redo BMGU between February 2009 and September 2014. Patients' charts and non-validated questionnaires were reviewed. The primary endpoint was success rate, defined as stricture-free survival. Stricture recurrence was defined as any postoperative claims of catheterization, dilatation, urethrotomy or repeat urethroplasty, or a maximum urinary flow rate <15 mL/s, and a stricture was consecutively verified in a combined cysto-urethrogram or cystoscopy at annual follow-up visit. The secondary endpoint was oral morbidity. Additional endpoints were erectile function, urinary continence and patients' satisfaction. Redo BMGU was performed for bulbar (71.4%) or penile (28.6%) recurrent strictures. The mean (median; range) follow-up was 25.6 (15.5; 3-70) months. Stricture recurrence occurred in 18.0% of patients within a mean (median; range) of 13.8 (9.0; 3-36) months. Stricture-free survival at 12, 24 and 36 months was 91.2, 86.2 and 80.8%, respectively. The majority of the patients (97.0%) reported no or only mildly changed salivation or problems in opening of the mouth. Severe or very severe oral numbness occurred in 13.5% of patients. Oral problems in daily life were a moderate or severe burden to 13.6 and 2.7% of the patients, respectively, while 75.0% of the patients reported improved quality of life compared with preoperative status. The success rate and oral morbidity of redo BMGU are almost the same as outcomes of primary BMGU. Oral numbness was the most frequently reported oral disorder. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Initial Results of Retrospective Study: Preoperative Transurethral Excision Plus Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy and Trial of Bladder Preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gammal El-Deen, H.S.

    2007-01-01

    For patients with invasive bladder cancer the usual recommended treatment is radical cystectomy, although transurethral resection of the tumor, systemic chemotherapy, and radiotherapy are each effective in some patients. This retrospective study evaluated the experience of the Clinical Oncology Department, Tanta University Hospital with combined modality treatment and selective bladder preservation in patients with muscle-invading bladder cancer with assessment of its safety, tolerance, and efficacy to determine whether these treatments in combination might be as effective as radical cystectomy and thus might allow the bladder to be preserved and the cancer cured and to identify factors that may predict treatment response, risk of relapse and survival. Patients and Methods: Between January 2000 and January 2006, 55 consecutive patients with muscle invading bladder cancer (stages T2 through T4, NX M0) were treated with as complete transurethral surgery as possible, followed by induction combination chemotherapy, and irradiation with 4500 cGy with concurrent cisplatin administration. Urologic evaluation by cystoscopy, cytology, and re biopsy 2-3 weeks later of the tumor response directed further therapy: either radical cystectomy in the patients who had incomplete responses, or additional chemotherapy with the same drugs and doses and radiotherapy up to 6480 cGy in the patients who had complete responses. The median follow-up was 48 months. Results: In 37 patients (67.3%) the bladder was free of invasive tumor and functioning well, even though in 13(23.6%) a superficial tumor recurred and required further transurethral surgery and intravesical drug therapy. Of the 18 (32.7%) patients who still had detectable tumor after initial treatment, all of them underwent radical cystectomy. None of the patients had required a cystectomy for radiation toxicity. Of the 37 (67.3%) patients who had complete responses with no tumor detectable on urine cytology or re biopsy after

  5. Focal cryotherapy: step by step technique description

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    Cristina Redondo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction and objective: Focal cryotherapy emerged as an efficient option to treat favorable and localized prostate cancer (PCa. The purpose of this video is to describe the procedure step by step. Materials and methods: We present the case of a 68 year-old man with localized PCa in the anterior aspect of the prostate. Results: The procedure is performed under general anesthesia, with the patient in lithotomy position. Briefly, the equipment utilized includes the cryotherapy console coupled with an ultrasound system, argon and helium gas bottles, cryoprobes, temperature probes and an urethral warming catheter. The procedure starts with a real-time trans-rectal prostate ultrasound, which is used to outline the prostate, the urethra and the rectal wall. The cryoprobes are pretested and placed in to the prostate through the perineum, following a grid template, along with the temperature sensors under ultrasound guidance. A cystoscopy confirms the right positioning of the needles and the urethral warming catheter is installed. Thereafter, the freeze sequence with argon gas is started, achieving extremely low temperatures (-40°C to induce tumor cell lysis. Sequentially, the thawing cycle is performed using helium gas. This process is repeated one time. Results among several series showed a biochemical disease-free survival between 71-93% at 9-70 month- follow-up, incontinence rates between 0-3.6% and erectile dysfunction between 0-42% (1–5. Conclusions: Focal cryotherapy is a feasible procedure to treat anterior PCa that may offer minimal morbidity, allowing good cancer control and better functional outcomes when compared to whole-gland treatment.

  6. Role of computed tomography (CT scan in staging of cervical carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T V Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Staging of cervical carcinoma is done clinically using International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology (FIGO guidelines. It is based on physical examination findings and also includes results of biopsy, endoscopy and conventional radiological tests like chest radiograph, intravenous urography and barium enema. These conventional radiological investigations have largely been replaced by computed tomography (CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI at present. FIGO staging system does not consider CT and MRI mandatory; however, use of these modalities are encouraged. This prospective study was conducted to determine the role of CT in staging work up in women diagnosed with cervical carcinoma. Methods: Fifty three women diagnosed with cervical carcinoma were evaluated with contrast enhanced CT scan of abdomen and pelvis. CT scan images were especially evaluated to determine tumour size, invasion of parmetrium, pelvic walls, rectum, urinary bladder and ureters, pelvic or retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy and distant metastases. CT findings were associated with clinical findings and staging, including findings from cystoscopy and sigmoidoscopy. Results: There was a poor agreement between clinical and CT staging of cervical carcinoma. Primary tumour was demonstrated on CT in 36 (70% of 53 patients. CT underestimated the parametrial, vaginal and pelvic wall invasion when compared with physical examination. CT overestimated the urinary bladder and rectal invasion when compared with cysto-sigmoidoscopy, however, CT had 100 per cent negative predictive value (NPV to exclude bladder and rectal involvement. CT detection of lymph node enlargement and lung metastases influenced the management. Interpretation & conclusions: Our findings show that CT scan does not reliably correlate with clinical FIGO staging of cervical cancer. However, it can detect urinary obstruction as well as nodal or distant metastases and thus improves the

  7. A study of image-guided radiotherapy of bladder cancer based on lipiodol injection in the bladder wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soendergaard, Jimmi; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Elstroem, Ulrik Vindelev; Grau, Cai; Hoeyer, Morten; Oerding Olsen, Kasper

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. We have tested a procedure of focal injection of the contrast medium Lipiodol as a fiducial marker for image-guided boost of the tumor in bladder cancer radiotherapy (RT). In this study, we have evaluated the feasibility and the safety of the method as well as the inter- and intra-fraction shift of the bladder tumor. Materials and methods. Five patients with muscle invasive urinary bladder cancer were included in the study. Lipiodol was injected during flexible cystoscopy into the submucosa of the bladder wall at the periphery of the tumor or the post resection tumor-bed. Cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans were acquired daily throughout the course of RT. Results. Lipiodol demarcation of the bladder tumor was feasible and safe with only a minimum of side effects related to the procedure. The Lipiodol spots were visible on CT and CBCT scans for the duration of the RT course. More than half of all the treatment fractions required a geometric shift of 5 mm or more to match on the Lipiodol spots. The mean intra-fraction shift (3D) of the tumor was 3 mm, largest in the anterior-posterior and cranial-caudal directions. Conclusion. This study demonstrates that Lipiodol can be injected into the bladder mucosa and subsequently visualized on CT and CBCT as a fiducial marker. The relatively large inter-fraction shifts in the positions of Lipiodol spots compared to the intra-fraction movement indicates that image-guided RT based on radio-opaque markers is important for RT of the bladder cancer tumor.

  8. Methylcap-seq reveals novel DNA methylation markers for the diagnosis and recurrence prediction of bladder cancer in a Chinese population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangxing Zhao

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: There is a need to supplement or supplant the conventional diagnostic tools, namely, cystoscopy and B-type ultrasound, for bladder cancer (BC. We aimed to identify novel DNA methylation markers for BC through genome-wide profiling of BC cell lines and subsequent methylation-specific PCR (MSP screening of clinical urine samples. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The methyl-DNA binding domain (MBD capture technique, methylCap/seq, was performed to screen for specific hypermethylated CpG islands in two BC cell lines (5637 and T24. The top one hundred hypermethylated targets were sequentially screened by MSP in urine samples to gradually narrow the target number and optimize the composition of the diagnostic panel. The diagnostic performance of the obtained panel was evaluated in different clinical scenarios. RESULTS: A total of 1,627 hypermethylated promoter targets in the BC cell lines was identified by Illumina sequencing. The top 104 hypermethylated targets were reduced to eight genes (VAX1, KCNV1, ECEL1, TMEM26, TAL1, PROX1, SLC6A20, and LMX1A after the urine DNA screening in a small sample size of 8 normal control and 18 BC subjects. Validation in an independent sample of 212 BC patients enabled the optimization of five methylation targets, including VAX1, KCNV1, TAL1, PPOX1, and CFTR, which was obtained in our previous study, for BC diagnosis with a sensitivity and specificity of 88.68% and 87.25%, respectively. In addition, the methylation of VAX1 and LMX1A was found to be associated with BC recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: We identified a promising diagnostic marker panel for early non-invasive detection and subsequent BC surveillance.

  9. The Expression of Inflammatory Mediators in Bladder Pain Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offiah, Ifeoma; Didangelos, Athanasios; Dawes, John; Cartwright, Rufus; Khullar, Vik; Bradbury, Elizabeth J; O'Sullivan, Suzanne; Williams, Dic; Chessell, Iain P; Pallas, Kenny; Graham, Gerry; O'Reilly, Barry A; McMahon, Stephen B

    2016-08-01

    Bladder pain syndrome (BPS) pathology is poorly understood. Treatment strategies are empirical, with limited efficacy, and affected patients have diminished quality of life. We examined the hypothesis that inflammatory mediators within the bladder contribute to BPS pathology. Fifteen women with BPS and 15 women with stress urinary incontinence without bladder pain were recruited from Cork University Maternity Hospital from October 2011 to October 2012. During cystoscopy, 5-mm bladder biopsies were taken and processed for gene expression analysis. The effect of the identified genes was tested in laboratory animals. We studied the expression of 96 inflammation-related genes in diseased and healthy bladders. We measured the correlation between genes and patient clinical profiles using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Analysis revealed 15 differentially expressed genes, confirmed in a replication study. FGF7 and CCL21 correlated significantly with clinical outcomes. Intravesical CCL21 instillation in rats caused increased bladder excitability and increased c-fos activity in spinal cord neurons. CCL21 atypical receptor knockout mice showed significantly more c-fos upon bladder stimulation with CCL21 than wild-type littermates. There was no change in FGF7-treated animals. The variability in patient samples presented as the main limitation. We used principal component analysis to identify similarities within the patient group. Our study identified two biologically relevant inflammatory mediators in BPS and demonstrated an increase in nociceptive signalling with CCL21. Manipulation of this ligand is a potential new therapeutic strategy for BPS. We compared gene expression in bladder biopsies of patients with bladder pain syndrome (BPS) and controls without pain and identified two genes that were increased in BPS patients and correlated with clinical profiles. We tested the effect of these genes in laboratory animals, confirming their role in bladder pain. Manipulating

  10. [Future perspectives for diagnostic imaging in urology: from anatomic and functional to molecular imaging].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macis, Giuseppe; Di Giovanni, Silvia; Di Franco, Davide; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    The future approach of diagnostic imaging in urology follows the technological progress, which made the visualization of in vivo molecular processes possible. From anatomo-morphological diagnostic imaging and through functional imaging molecular radiology is reached. Based on molecular probes, imaging is aimed at assessing the in vivo molecular processes, their physiology and function at cellular level. The future imaging will investigate the complex tumor functioning as metabolism, aerobic glycolysis in particular, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, metastatic potential, hypoxia, apoptosis and receptors expressed by neoplastic cells. Methods for performing molecular radiology are CT, MRI, PET-CT, PET-MRI, SPECT and optical imaging. Molecular ultrasound combines technological advancement with targeted contrast media based on microbubbles, this allowing the selective registration of microbubble signal while that of stationary tissues is suppressed. An experimental study was carried out where the ultrasound molecular probe BR55 strictly bound to prostate tumor results in strong enhancement in the early phase after contrast, this contrast being maintained in the late phase. This late enhancement is markedly significant for the detection of prostatic cancer foci and to guide the biopsy sampling. The 124I-cG250 molecular antibody which is strictly linked to cellular carbonic anhydrase IX of clear cell renal carcinoma, allows the acquisition of diagnostic PET images of clear cell renal carcinoma without biopsy. This WG-250 (RENCAREX) antibody was used as a therapy in metastatic clear cell renal carcinoma. Future advancements and applications will result in early cancer diagnosis, personalized therapy that will be specific according to the molecular features of cancer and leading to the development of catheter-based multichannel molecular imaging devices for cystoscopy-based molecular imaging diagnosis and intervention.

  11. Percutaneous nephrolithotomy in very elderly patients (Age 75 and Over

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    Hüseyin Çelik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL is a minimally invasive method used safely in surgical treatment of kidney stones in the world. The first PNL surgery performed in our clinic in March 1998 and first PNL surgery was performed in June 2000 over the age of seventy which was bilaterally side. In our study, PNL operations performed for 75 years and older patients were examined. Methods: PNL operations were performed under the general anesthesia. After cystoscopy in the supine position, ureteral catheter was inserted accompanied by C-arm fluoroscopy. Afterwards, patients were taken prone position then we entered into the kidney with a metal needle with fluoroscopic on. We dilated the entrance with Amplatzer renal dilatators set until the 30 F. After the procedure, the nephrostomy catheter was placed in the renal sheath. 4 mm residual fragments after the PNL operation were accepted as clinically insignificant stone residues (CIRF. Results: 3003 PNL procedures were performed between dates March 1998 - December 2014 in total 16 years. 28 patients of total were 75 years and over. 29 PNL surgeries performed to these patients, including one bilateral PNL procedure. Mean age was 79.36 years (75-88. Twenty (74% of the patients were concluded stone free. 2 patients had tubeless PNL surgery. There was no another complication. Conclusion: PNL is a minimally invasive method has became advantageous according to open surgery because of higher safety, lower complication rates, shorter hospitalization stay, more patient comfort and higher stone free rates. PNL is a safe and effective method in the surgical treatment of urinary tract stone diseases.

  12. What a signature adds to the consent process.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Neary, Peter

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: "Consent is a process by which a patient is informed and becomes a participant in decisions regarding their medical management." It is argued, however, that providing a signature to a form adds little to the quality of this process. METHODS: Views regarding the consent ritual of nonselected patients undergoing endoscopy (cystoscopy or sigmoidoscopy) were prospectively studied together with those of the attending staff. Patient volunteers were randomly assigned to one of two groups and given verbal explanation before the procedure, either alone (group A) or with a request to sign a form in addition (group B). A standardized questionnaire regarding preferences then was applied. RESULTS: A total of 37 patients (22 men) were studied along with seven staff members. Most surveyed felt that signing a consent form helped to empower the patient (group A, 84%; group B, 83%; staff, 100%). Although the patients mainly believed that it functioned primarily to protect the hospital and doctor (group A, 89%; group B, 67%), only one patient (3% of total) felt that such a formality undermined the patient-doctor relationship. Most staff members favored signing a form (86%). The majority of patients either favored it (group A, 47%; group B, 78%) or expressed no strong preference (group A, 32%; group B, 11%). Interestingly, more women than men preferred signing (73 vs. 55%; p = 0.25), perhaps because more women believed that it functioned to preserve autonomy (93 vs. 77% of men). Age was no particular determinant of perspective. CONCLUSION: Although it may be viewed as primarily serving to protect the doctor and hospital, the formal process of signing written consent forms appeals to patients and staff.

  13. Therapeutic efficacy of narrow band imaging-assisted transurethral electrocoagulation for ulcer-type interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajiwara, Mitsuru; Inoue, Shougo; Kobayashi, Kanao; Ohara, Shinya; Teishima, Jun; Matsubara, Akio

    2014-04-01

    Narrow band imaging cystoscopy can increase the visualization and detection of Hunner's lesions. A single-center, prospective clinical trial was carried out aiming to show the effectiveness of narrow band imaging-assisted transurethral electrocoagulation for ulcer-type interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. A total of 23 patients (19 women and 4 men) diagnosed as having ulcer-type interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome were included. All typical Hunner's lesions and suspected areas identified by narrow band imaging were electrocoagulated endoscopically after the biopsy of those lesions. Therapeutic efficacy was assessed prospectively by using visual analog scale score of pain, O'Leary-Sant's symptom index, O'Leary-Sant's problem index and overactive bladder symptom score. The mean follow-up period was 22 months. All patients (100%) experienced a substantial improvement in pain. The average visual analog scale pain scores significantly decreased from 7.3 preoperatively to 1.2 1 month postoperatively. A total of 21 patients (91.3%) who reported improvement had at least a 50% reduction in bladder pain, and five reported complete resolution. Daytime frequency was significantly decreased postoperatively. O'Leary-Sant's symptom index, O'Leary-Sant's problem index and overactive bladder symptom score were significantly decreased postoperatively. However, during the follow-up period, a total of six patients had recurrence, and repeat narrow band imaging-assisted transurethral electrocoagulation of the recurrent lesions was carried out for five of the six patients, with good response in relieving bladder pain. Our results showed that narrow band imaging-assisted transurethral electrocoagulation could be a valuable therapeutic alternative in patients with ulcer-type interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome, with good efficacy and reduction of recurrence rate. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  14. Modified totally tubeless percutaneous nephrolithotomy: Is it an effective and safe treatment option for renal and upper ureteral stones?

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    Ho Seok Chung

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We hypothesized that modified totally tubeless percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL without indwelling ureteral stent would minimize postoperative discomfort without complications. Aim : To evaluate the safety, efficacy, and morbidity of standard, tubeless, and modified totally tubeless PNL as well as the usefulness of modified totally tubeless PNL. Material and methods: From November 2011 to February 2015, 211 patients who underwent PNL consecutively were enrolled in this study and divided into 3 groups (group 1: standard, group 2: tubeless, group 3: modified totally tubeless PNL. Patient and stone characteristics, operation time, hemoglobin change, length of hospitalization, stone-free rate, analgesic requirement, and perioperative complications were analyzed and compared among the 3 groups. Results: There were no significant differences in preoperative patient characteristics among the three groups. In the postoperative analysis, the three groups had similar operation time, stone-free rate, perioperative fever and transfusion rate, but group 2 showed superior results in terms of length of hospitalization (p = 0.001. Group 2 and group 3 had a lower analgesic requirement (p = 0.010. Immediate postoperative hemoglobin change (p = 0.001 and tube site complications (p = 0.001 were more common in group 1. Conclusions : Modified totally tubeless PNL was not inferior in terms of postoperative outcomes and safety compared with the standard and tubeless PNL, and avoided the postoperative stent-related symptoms and cystoscopy for double-J stent removal. Modified totally tubeless PNL could be an alternative treatment of choice for management of renal or upper ureteral stones in selected patients.

  15. Lipiodol as a Fiducial Marker for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freilich, Jessica M.; Spiess, Philippe E.; Biagioli, Matthew C.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Shi, Ellen J.; Hunt, Dylan C.; Gupta, Shilpa; Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: richard.wilder@moffitt.org [Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate Lipiodol as a liquid, radio-opaque fiducial marker for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for bladder cancer; Materials and Methods: Between 2011 and 2012, 5 clinical T2a-T3b N0 M0 stage II-III bladder cancer patients were treated with maximal transurethral resection of a bladder tumor (TURBT) and image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) to 64.8 Gy in 36 fractions ± concurrent weekly cisplatin-based or gemcitabine chemotherapy. Ten to 15mL Lipiodol, using 0.5mL per injection, was injected into bladder submucosa circumferentially around the entire periphery of the tumor bed immediately following maximal TURBT. The authors looked at inter-observer variability regarding the size and location of the tumor bed (CTVboost) on computed tomography scans with versus without Lipiodol. Results: Median follow-up was 18 months. Lipiodol was visible on every orthogonal two-dimensional kV portal image throughout the entire, 7-week course of IGRT. There was a trend towards improved inter-observer agreement on the CTVboost with Lipiodol (p = 0.06). In 2 of 5 patients, the tumor bed based upon Lipiodol extended outside a planning target volume that would have been treated with a radiation boost based upon a cystoscopy report and an enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan for staging. There was no toxicity attributable to Lipiodol: Conclusions: Lipiodol constitutes a safe and effective fiducial marker that an urologist can use to demarcate a tumor bed immediately following maximal TURBT. Lipiodol decreases inter-observer variability in the definition of the extent and location of a tumor bed on a treatment planning CT scan for a radiation boost. (author)

  16. Behavior of Lipiodol Markers During Image Guided Radiotherapy of Bladder Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai Xiangfei; Herk, Marcel van; Kamer, Jeroen B. van de; Remeijer, Peter; Bex, Axel; Betgen, Anja; De Reijke, Theo M.; Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M.; Pos, Floris J.; Bel, Arjan

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the stability of a novel type of markers used in partial bladder tumor irradiation and tumor deformation as indicated by the markers. Materials and Methods: In 15 patients with solitary bladder cancer, lipiodol was injected in the bladder wall during flexible cystoscopy to identify the tumor. A planning CT scan was made, followed by daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans during treatment. To study the accuracy of using these markers for image guidance, uncertainties U1 and U2 were calculated, which were defined as the difference between submask registration (covering single marker) and the average of all submask registrations and the difference between the submask registration and the general mask registration (including all markers), respectively. Finally, to study tumor deformation, the relative movement of each marker pair was correlated with the relative bladder volume (RBV). Results: The analyzed patients had 2.3 marker injections on average. The lipiodol spot size was 0.72 ± 1.1 cm 3 . The intensity of spots in both CT and CBCT was significantly higher than the surrounding bladder tissue. The uncertainties U1 and U2 were comparable, and the uncertainties in left-right direction (0.14-0.19 cm) were smaller than those in cranial-caudal and anterior-posterior directions (0.19-0.32 cm). The relative marker movement of within-zone marker pairs was much smaller (and has less dependence on the RBV) than across-zones marker pairs. Conclusions: Lipiodol markers are a feasible method to track bladder tumor by using online CBCT. Tumor deformation is observed, especially for tumors that cross the defined bladder zones.

  17. Behavior of Lipiodol Markers During Image Guided Radiotherapy of Bladder Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai Xiangfei, E-mail: x.chai@amc.uva.n [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Herk, Marcel van [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kamer, Jeroen B. van de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Remeijer, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bex, Axel [Department of Urology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Betgen, Anja [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); De Reijke, Theo M [Department of Urology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulshof, Maarten C.C.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Pos, Floris J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bel, Arjan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2010-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the stability of a novel type of markers used in partial bladder tumor irradiation and tumor deformation as indicated by the markers. Materials and Methods: In 15 patients with solitary bladder cancer, lipiodol was injected in the bladder wall during flexible cystoscopy to identify the tumor. A planning CT scan was made, followed by daily cone-beam CT (CBCT) scans during treatment. To study the accuracy of using these markers for image guidance, uncertainties U1 and U2 were calculated, which were defined as the difference between submask registration (covering single marker) and the average of all submask registrations and the difference between the submask registration and the general mask registration (including all markers), respectively. Finally, to study tumor deformation, the relative movement of each marker pair was correlated with the relative bladder volume (RBV). Results: The analyzed patients had 2.3 marker injections on average. The lipiodol spot size was 0.72 +- 1.1 cm{sup 3}. The intensity of spots in both CT and CBCT was significantly higher than the surrounding bladder tissue. The uncertainties U1 and U2 were comparable, and the uncertainties in left-right direction (0.14-0.19 cm) were smaller than those in cranial-caudal and anterior-posterior directions (0.19-0.32 cm). The relative marker movement of within-zone marker pairs was much smaller (and has less dependence on the RBV) than across-zones marker pairs. Conclusions: Lipiodol markers are a feasible method to track bladder tumor by using online CBCT. Tumor deformation is observed, especially for tumors that cross the defined bladder zones.

  18. New technologies in diagnosis of preinvasive cervical lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Aminodova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of efficiency assessment of different diagnosis for preinvasive cervical lesions are represented in the article. During investigation the retrospective analysis of 353 patient histories of women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (primary and recurrent, who have been observed in Ivanovskiy regional oncological dispensary from 2002 to 2011, was performed. The accuracy rates of diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia for one or several methods including cytological study, colposcopy and fluorescence cystoscopy were compared. Fluorescence diagnosis was performed with drug fotoditazin (LLC «VETA-GRAND», marketing authorisation №LS 001246 at dose of 1,0 mg/kg body weight. The final diagnosis was determined by results of histological study. The accuracy of cytological study accounted for 67,5–80,7%. Using colposcopy the exact diagnosis was determined in 67,9–74,4% of cases. Combination of cytological study with colposcopy improved the accuracy of diagnosis up to 82.1–88.9%. The superior results were for concurrent use of cytological study with colposcopy and fluorescence diagnosis – in such case the diagnosis was correct in 92,0–96,7% of patients. The analysis of results showed that using all methods of diagnosis the accuracy of diagnosis for recurrent cervical intraepithelial neoplasia was lower than for primary lesions. The decrease of diagnosis accuracy is probably related to previous diagnosis and therapeutic manipulations on cervix. Thus, multimodal diagnosis investigation with methods of fluorescence spectroscopy allows to improve accuracy of diagnosis for preinvasive cervical lesions. 

  19. Endoscopic Urinary Diversion As Initial Management of Symptomatic Obstructive Ectopic Ureter in Infants

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    Ruben Ortiz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available AimDefinitive surgery of ectopic ureter in infants is challenging. We propose an endoscopic urinary diversion (EUD as a novel surgical technique in the initial management of symptomatic obstructive ectopic ureter.Patients and methodsSixteen obstructive ectopic ureters (14 patients were initially treated by EUD between 2006 and 2015. All patients had urinary tract dilatation worsening at preoperative US scans and at least two febrile urinary tract infection (UTI or urinary sepsis despite antibiotic prophylaxis. Ectopic ureter was confirmed by cystoscopy. When ectopic meatus was not found, EUD consisted in the creation of a transurethral neo-orifice (TUNO performed by needle puncturing of the ureterovesical wall, under fluoroscopic and ultrasound control. If ectopic meatus was identified in the posterior urethra, “intravesicalization procedure” was done opening the urethral–ureteral wall to create a new ureteral outlet into the bladder.ResultsEUD was done at a median age of 3.5 months (0.5–7 with median follow-up of 48 months (24–136. TUNO was performed in six patients and “intravesicalization” in eight patients. Significant differences were observed in ureteral diameter and anteroposterior pelvis diameter before and after endoscopic treatment (p < 0.005. Initial renal function was preserved in all cases. Postoperative complications were UTI in four patients and TUNO stenosis in one patient, treated by endoscopic balloon dilation. Definitive treatment was further individualized in each patient after 1 year of life.ConclusionEUD is a feasible and safe less-invasive technique in the initial management of symptomatic obstructive ectopic ureter. It allows an adequate ureteral drainage preserving renal function until definitive repair if necessary and does not invalidate other surgical options in case of failure or future definitive treatments.

  20. Lipiodol as a Fiducial Marker for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica M. Freilich

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To evaluate Lipiodol as a liquid, radio-opaque fiducial marker for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT for bladder cancer.Materials and Methods Between 2011 and 2012, 5 clinical T2a-T3b N0 M0 stage II-III bladder cancer patients were treated with maximal transurethral resection of a bladder tumor (TURBT and image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT to 64.8 Gy in 36 fractions ± concurrent weekly cisplatin-based or gemcitabine chemotherapy. Ten to 15mL Lipiodol, using 0.5mL per injection, was injected into bladder submucosa circumferentially around the entire periphery of the tumor bed immediately following maximal TURBT. The authors looked at inter-observer variability regarding the size and location of the tumor bed (CTVboost on computed tomography scans with versus without Lipiodol.Results Median follow-up was 18 months. Lipiodol was visible on every orthogonal two-dimensional kV portal image throughout the entire, 7-week course of IGRT. There was a trend towards improved inter-observer agreement on the CTVboost with Lipiodol (p = 0.06. In 2 of 5 patients, the tumor bed based upon Lipiodol extended outside a planning target volume that would have been treated with a radiation boost based upon a cystoscopy report and an enhanced computed tomography (CT scan for staging. There was no toxicity attributable to Lipiodol.Conclusions Lipiodol constitutes a safe and effective fiducial marker that an urologist can use to demarcate a tumor bed immediately following maximal TURBT. Lipiodol decreases inter-observer variability in the definition of the extent and location of a tumor bed on a treatment planning CT scan for a radiation boost.

  1. Results of Radiotherapy for the Uterine Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chul Yong; Choi, Myung Sun; Suh, Won Hyuck

    1988-01-01

    One hundred fifty-four patients with the carcinoma of the uterine cervix were studied retrospectively to assess the result and impact of treatment at Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea University, Hae-Wha Hospital from Feb 1981 through Dec. 1986. Prior to radiotherapy, the patients were evaluated and staged by recommendation of FIGO including physical examination, pelvic examination, cystoscopy, rectosigmoidoscopy, chest X-ray, IVP, Ba enema. Also, an additional pelvic CT scan was obtained for some of the patients. The patients were treated by radiotherapy alone or adjuvant postoperative irradiation; In case of radiation therapy only, whole pelvic irradiation was given with C0-69 teletherapy unit via AP and PA parallel opposing fields or 4-oblique fields, 180 cGy per day, 5 days per week and intracavitary insertion was performed. Three dimensional quantitative demonstration of tumor volume is also important in planning radiation therapy. Another advantage of CT scan was detection of recurrent tumor after radiation or surgery. Local control rate of tumor according to the size was 91.3% for less than 5 cm in size and 44.6% in tumor over 5 cm (p<0.0068). Thirty out of 50 recurrent sites has locoregional failures and 17 cases has distant metastases. And the papa-aortic lymph nodes were the most common site for distant metastases. The most common complication was temporal rectal bleeding which was controlled most by conservative management. However, 4 patients required for endoscopic cauterization. The 5-year survival rates showed; stage la and lb 95%, stage lla 81% stage llb 67%, stage llla 37.7%, stage lllb 23%, and 3-year survival rate of stage lVa showed 11.6%, retrospectively

  2. Y-type urethral duplication with rectal implantation of the urethra: Which is the best approach?

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    Macedo, Antonio; Ottoni, Sérgio Leite; Leal da Cruz, Marcela; Pompermaier, Jorge Antonio; Silva, Maria Isabel S; Liguori, Riberto; Garrone, Gilmar

    2018-02-01

    Y-type urethral duplication describes the condition in which a functional urethra is implanted in the rectum, and there is also a dysplastic topic urethra which produces mostly urinary dribbling. These patients are at risk of urinary tract complications and UTI. We aimed to present the surgical steps of a case treated by ASTRA approach in which we separated the urethra from the rectum and created a perineal urethrostomy. We treated a 5-month-old boy with Y-type (IIA-2) urethral duplication, in whom the orthotopic urethra was patent just in the penile segment. The patient had urinary flow per anus and minimal dribbling through the orthotopic urethra. We performed a combined cystoscopy with retrograde urethrogram and managed to catheterize the dysplastic urethra with a guide-wire that showed ectopic implantation in the prostatic urethra, below the bladder neck. We performed an ASTRA procedure to separate the urethra from the rectum. The urethral stump was further mobilized to the perineum and anastomosed to a perineal skin flap to create a stoma and minimize the risk of stricture. The patient was followed at 2 month-intervals, and at 6 months follow-up had an excellent outcome. The ASTRA approach proved to be an excellent alternative for Y-type urethral duplication with functional urethra implanted in the rectum. We believe that further efforts to reconstruct the urethra should be avoided, with a better and simpler option being to create a definitive perineal urethrostomy. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Deep Sequencing of Urinary RNAs for Bladder Cancer Molecular Diagnostics.

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    Sin, Mandy L Y; Mach, Kathleen E; Sinha, Rahul; Wu, Fan; Trivedi, Dharati R; Altobelli, Emanuela; Jensen, Kristin C; Sahoo, Debashis; Lu, Ying; Liao, Joseph C

    2017-07-15

    Purpose: The majority of bladder cancer patients present with localized disease and are managed by transurethral resection. However, the high rate of recurrence necessitates lifetime cystoscopic surveillance. Developing a sensitive and specific urine-based test would significantly improve bladder cancer screening, detection, and surveillance. Experimental Design: RNA-seq was used for biomarker discovery to directly assess the gene expression profile of exfoliated urothelial cells in urine derived from bladder cancer patients ( n = 13) and controls ( n = 10). Eight bladder cancer specific and 3 reference genes identified by RNA-seq were quantitated by qPCR in a training cohort of 102 urine samples. A diagnostic model based on the training cohort was constructed using multiple logistic regression. The model was further validated in an independent cohort of 101 urines. Results: A total of 418 genes were found to be differentially expressed between bladder cancer and controls. Validation of a subset of these genes was used to construct an equation for computing a probability of bladder cancer score (P BC ) based on expression of three markers ( ROBO1, WNT5A , and CDC42BPB ). Setting P BC = 0.45 as the cutoff for a positive test, urine testing using the three-marker panel had overall 88% sensitivity and 92% specificity in the training cohort. The accuracy of the three-marker panel in the independent validation cohort yielded an AUC of 0.87 and overall 83% sensitivity and 89% specificity. Conclusions: Urine-based molecular diagnostics using this three-marker signature could provide a valuable adjunct to cystoscopy and may lead to a reduction of unnecessary procedures for bladder cancer diagnosis. Clin Cancer Res; 23(14); 3700-10. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Acute extrarenal kidney damage in the course of infection with fungal strain of Candida glabrata in a patient with type 2 diabetes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szarejko-Paradowska, A.; Bartnicki, P.; Pietrzak, B.; Wilk, R.; Serwa-Stepien, E.; Rysz, J.; Jablonowski, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acute renal injury is becoming a significant epidemiological problem among patients requiring hospital treatment. Extrarenal aetiology of the kidney injury is recognized in 5 % to 10 % of hospitalized patients; however, the identification of the mycelium of the Candida glabrata as the direct factor causing the acute urinary obstruction is extremely rare. Case Report: A 64-year-old woman was admitted to the clinic because of progressing weakness, nausea and vomiting, poor appetite and reduced urination. On admission, laboratory findings revealed pyuria, inflammatory changes, acute renal failure (eGFR-MDRD 6 ml/min), and hyperglycemia. The patient underwent USG of the abdominal cavity, which showed bilateral hydronephrosis, with lithiasis on the right site. Cystoscopy done the next day revealed that the mucous membrane of the bladder was reddened and had a white coating. During the next several days, a renal fistula was created on the left and right sides. Candida glabrata was isolated from urine, and was sensitive only to voriconazole. V-fend (voriconazole) treatment resulted in increase of diuresis and decrease in creatinine and urea levels. Conclusions: Urinary tract infection caused by Candida glabrata causes significant therapeutic problems. In most cases, these yeasts are resistant to triazole anti-fungal drugs such as fluconazole, which translates into significantly increased mortality of patients. To date, a similar case was described only by one group of doctors, however, due to the intensity of the currently used immunosuppression and multiantibiotic therapy, increased incidence of diabetes and the aging of the population, it is expected that the prevalence of this clinical problem will increase. (authors)

  5. Management of a case of colovesical fistula with fecaluria as first sign

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    Gingu C

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Fecaluria and pneumaturia are the patognomonic signs of an abnormal communication between the bladder and the intestinal tract. Therefore, when a history of digestive signs, symptoms or digestive diseases is missing, this borderline pathology leads the patients in the care of urologists. From diagnosis to treatment the management of these cases can be difficult and challenging. Materials and Methods. A 48 year old patient, without any significant medical history, presented to the emergency room for fecaluria, pneumaturia and an episode of haematuria. He had no prior digestive symptoms. The contrast enhanced abdominal and pelvic CT scan revealed a pelvic mass involving the sigmoid colon and the dome and the posterior wall of the bladder. The cystoscopy objectifies a tumor mass involving the right postero-lateral bladder wall, with extravasation of faeces. A biopsy was taken and the frozen section found mainly uncertain inflammatory type tissue. A colonoscopy couldn’t be done because of an impassable obstacle at 15 cm from the anus. Together with general surgeons we decided for en bloc resection of the tumor with partial cystectomy, right ureterocystoneostomy and rectosigmoid resection with mechanic end to end anastomosis. Results. The postoperative period was uneventful. The histopathological examination revealed an abscessed sigmoid diverticulum with vesico-sigmoid fistula and perilesional inflammatory tissue. Two years after the surgery the patient is asymptomatic with a normal function of the right kidney and restored bladder capacity. Conclusions. Being a borderline pathology, patients with fecaluria and pneumaturia and lack of digestive symptoms are referred and managed by the urologists. Despite extensive investigations, even when preoperative biopsies reveal inflammatory tissue the patients should be treated as oncologic cases. A close cooperation with general surgeons for en bloc multiorgan resection within oncologic

  6. Laparoscopic ipsilateral ureteroureterostomy for the management of children with duplication anomalies

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    VVS Chandrasekharam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Ipsilateral ureteroureterostomy is an established method for the treatment of duplication anomalies in children. With the advent of pediatric laparoscopy, many urologic procedures in children are being performed using minimal access techniques. We present our experience with laparoscopic ipsilateral ureteroureterostomy (LIUU for duplex anomalies. Patients and Methods: The data of children who underwent LIUU was reviewed for demographic parameters, clinical and operative details, follow-up and results. Results: Over 3 years period, LIUU was performed in eight children (age 6-60 months. Five children had complete ipsilateral duplication with ectopic upper moiety ureter, one child each had ipsilateral incomplete duplication and bilateral duplex systems (with ipsilateral ectopic upper moiety ureter. One child had ipsilateral complete duplex with Grade V vesicoureteric reflux into the lower moiety ureter. Four children had antenatal diagnosis of hydronephrosis; three children had a urinary infection and two children presented with urinary incontinence. The surgical procedure consisted of cystoscopy, retrograde studies and cannulation of the recipient ureter. Then, LIUU was performed using three ports. The ectopic (donor ureter was divided at the pelvic brim; the recipient ureter was opened and end-to-side LIUU was performed with 5/0 vicryl stitches over a double J (DJ stent placed in the recipient ureter. Bladder catheter was removed after 2 days, and DJ stent was removed after 4 weeks. At a mean follow-up of 19 months (3-36, all children are asymptomatic and continent, with a significant reduction in hydroureteronephrosis on ultrasound. The cosmetic results were excellent. Conclusion: LIUU is a safe and effective technique in the management of duplication anomalies in children. It could be performed with minimal blood loss, minimal postoperative pain, excellent cosmesis and good success.

  7. Results of the conservative treatment associating radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy in the bladder filtering cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, N.; Bladou, F.; Gravis, G.; Karsenty, G.; Tallet, A.; Lopez, L.; Alzieu, C.; Serment, G.

    2004-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: purpose: to describe outcome of patients with muscle-invasive bladder carcinoma treated with multimodality therapy in our institution from 1993 to 2002. Patients and methods: the charts of sixty patients with T2-4, N0-1, M0 treated with TURBT followed by a chemo-radiotherapy combination were retrospectively reviewed: 22 received neo-adjuvant chemotherapy (CMV/MVAC) followed by concomitant chemo-radiotherapy (weakly cisplatin/carbo-platin or a cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil association) and the other 38 concomitant chemo-radiotherapy alone. Radiotherapy delivered a median dose of 45 Gy to the pelvis and 65 Gy to the bladder in a mono-fractionated or twice a day fractionation scheme. Follow-up evaluations included cystoscopy with biopsies at regular intervals. Salvage cystectomy was recommended in case of local persistent tumor or bladder relapse. Results: median follow-up was 48.5 months (10-126 months). 82% (18/22) of the patients receiving neo-adjuvant chemotherapy had 2 or more cycles and 85% (51/60) got the concomitant chemotherapy as planned. Radiotherapy was completed in 56 patients. Twenty-eight patients relapsed either locally (14 did not achieve local complete response after chemo-radiation and 6 had true local relapse during follow-up) or at distant sites. Actuarial 5-year disease-specific survival and freedom from local and distant relapse rate are respectively 54% and 42%. Actuarial local control rate with intact bladder was 56% at 5-year. When separated according to stage and grade, patients with T2/3 grade 2 tumors had significantly better chance of remaining relapse-free than the others (p = 0.045). Salvage cystectomy (n = 11) for isolated local failure in this population achieved limited results. Conclusion: our experience shows that a significant number of patients will achieve long survival with their bladder intact after multimodality therapy. (authors)

  8. Laparoscopic repair of vesicovaginal fistulae with a transperitoneal approach at Universitas Gadjah Mada Urological Institute: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeroharjo, Indrawarman; Khalilullah, Said Alfin; Danarto, Raden; Yuri, Prahara

    2018-02-25

    A vesicovaginal fistula is an abnormal fistulous tract extending between the bladder and the vagina that allows the continuous involuntary discharge of urine into the vaginal vault. In addition, the sequelae from these fistulae have a profound effect on the patients in view of their physical, psychological, and social dimensions. The treatment of vesicovaginal fistula is surgical in most cases and the choice of the repair technique is controversial. We evaluated the benefits of a laparoscopic approach in a patient with vesicovaginal fistulae. Here, we present our first experience using a simplified laparoscopic approach technique to repair vesicovaginal fistulae in our country. A 46-year-old Javanese woman presented with urinary incontinence following an abdominal hysterectomy 3 months earlier and received laparoscopic repair. A cystoscopy was performed to confirm the fistula orifice and a stent was inserted into the fistula tract from her bladder to her vagina. A tamponade was inserted into her vagina up to the vaginal apex, to be able to identify the vagina. She had adhesions; therefore, adhesiolysis was performed using a combination of sharp and blunt dissection to expose the vaginal stump and the superior aspect of her bladder. A simple cystotomy was performed and extended to include the fistulae site, and then the defect was repaired by using a running stitch. A second layer of closure was performed in an imbricating fashion with the same suture. The vagina defect was not closed separately but covered with an omental flap. This procedure takes approximately 2.5 hours; estimated blood loss was minimal and there were no intraoperative complications. She had no recurrent symptoms 6 months after surgery. Our case report concludes that the simplified laparoscopic approach to vesicovaginal fistulae is a viable option for successful repair and that it reduces the size of bladder opening, causes minimal bleeding, and gives successful relief.

  9. The Ileal W-Shaped Neo bladder Following Radical Cystectomy for Carcinoma of the Urinary Bladder: Experience and Results of 50 Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassiouny, M.; Helmy, A.; Amin, A.; Aboul Kassem, H.

    2003-01-01

    The optimal urinary bladder substitute for patients undergoing radical cystectomy is still controversial. The ideal reservoir should provide a large storage capacity at low pressure achieving effective continence with less frequency and minimal renal reflux. In this study we present our experience with W-shaped ileal neo bladder following radical cystectomy. Material and Methods: Between April 1995 and September 1999, a total of 50 male patients underwent lower urinary tract reconstruction following radical cysto prostatectomy by means of ileal W-shaped neo bladder. All patients had invasive bladder cancer proved by preoperative cystoscopy. Their mean age was 45.5 years. The median neo bladder pouch capacity was 420 ml; daytime continence rate was 89.4%, while nighttime continence was noticed in 53.3% of cases. The uretero intestinal anastomoses were performed employing Le Duc technique in all patients. Renal units remained normal in 25 out of 30 evaluated patients. Dilatation of the pelvicalyceal system and the ureter, either unilateral or bilateral occurred in 5/30 of patients (16.6%). These were due to stricture at the urethro or uretero-pouch anastomosis that needed transurethral urethrotomy or revision of the anastomosis; however, renal functions were maintained in all patients. There were three postoperative mortalities (6%) and the early postoperative complications included urinary leakage (6%), prolonged ileus (10%) and deep venous thrombosis (4%). Late complications related to the neo bladder were acceptable including metabolic acidosis (2%). The ileal W-shaped neo bladder is a good choice for male patients after radical cystectomy, provided that there is no evidence of prostatic or urethral tumor invasion

  10. Evaluation of an Epigenetic Profile for the Detection of Bladder Cancer in Patients with Hematuria.

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    van Kessel, Kim E M; Van Neste, Leander; Lurkin, Irene; Zwarthoff, Ellen C; Van Criekinge, Wim

    2016-03-01

    Many patients enter the care cycle with gross or microscopic hematuria and undergo cystoscopy to rule out bladder cancer. Sensitivity of this invasive examination is limited, leaving many patients at risk for undetected cancer. To improve current clinical practice more sensitive and noninvasive screening methods should be applied. A total of 154 urine samples were collected from patients with hematuria, including 80 without and 74 with bladder cancer. DNA from cells in the urine was epigenetically profiled using 2 independent assays. Methylation specific polymerase chain reaction was performed on TWIST1. SNaPshot™ methylation analysis was done for different loci of OTX1 and ONECUT2. Additionally all samples were analyzed for mutation status of TERT (telomerase reverse transcriptase), PIK3CA, FGFR3 (fibroblast growth factor receptor 3), HRAS, KRAS and NRAS. The combination of TWIST1, ONECUT2 (2 loci) and OTX1 resulted in the best overall performing panel. Logistic regression analysis on these methylation markers, mutation status of FGFR3, TERT and HRAS, and patient age resulted in an accurate model with 97% sensitivity, 83% specificity and an AUC of 0.93 (95% CI 0.88-0.98). Internal validation led to an optimism corrected AUC of 0.92. With an estimated bladder cancer prevalence of 5% to 10% in a hematuria cohort the assay resulted in a 99.6% to 99.9% negative predictive value. Epigenetic profiling using TWIST1, ONECUT2 and OTX1 results in a high sensitivity and specificity. Accurate risk prediction might result in less extensive and invasive examination of patients at low risk, thereby reducing unnecessary patient burden and health care costs. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR AND SURVIVIN EXPRESSION IN BLADDER CANCER TISSUE AND URINE CYTOLOGY OF PATIENTS WITH TRANSITIONAL CELL CARCINOMA OF THE URINARY BLADDER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehinde, E O; Al-Maghrebi, M; Anim, J T; Kapila, K; George, S S; Al-Juwaiser, A; Memon, A

    2013-01-01

    To assess whether epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and survivin immunostaining of tumour cells in urinary cytology and tissue of patients with bladder cancer has a prognostic significance. Prospective study Department of Surgery (Division of Urology), Mubarak Al-Kabeer Teaching Hospital and Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, Kuwait Urine cytology smears obtainedpriorto cystoscopy in patients with transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder were immunostained for EGFR and survivin. Bladder cancer tissue resected at surgery was also immunostained for EGFR and survivin expression. Tissue expression of EGFR and survivin in TCC of the bladder was compared to their expression in urine cytology and relationship to tumour grade and stage. 178 patients were studied (43 newly diagnosed bladder cancer, 58 with recurrent TCC and 77 in disease remission). Twenty five patients with normal urothelium served as controls. The mean sensitivity of urine cytology, tissue survivin immunohistochemistry (IHC) and tissue EGFR IHC was 30.5%, 62% and 59% respectively. The corresponding mean specificity was 95%, 79% and 38% respectively. For grades 1, 2 and 3 bladder tumors, tissue expression positivity for EGFR was 47.8%, 92.9%, 100% and for tissue survivin it was 27.8%, 18.2% and 33.3% respectively. For grades 1, 2 and 3 bladder tumors, urine expression positivity for EGFR was 35.7%, 40% and 67.7% and for urine survivin it was 8.3%, 42.9% and 33.3% respectively. Positive EGFR immunostaining of urine cytology specimen or tumour tissue increases with histological grade of TCC of the bladder. Survivin expression is less consistent in both urine cytology specimen and tissue samples. EGFR immunostaining may provide a useful tool in the grading of bladder TCC and aid in the selection of patients that may benefit from administration of EGFR inhibitors.

  12. [Atypical urothelial cells (AUC): A Bethesda-derived wording applicable to urinary cytopathology].

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    Piaton, Eric; Advenier, Anne-Sophie; Benaïm, Gilles; Petrucci, Myriam Decaussin; Lechevallier, Florence Mege; Ruffion, Alain

    2011-02-01

    To investigate (1) whether sparse nuclear atypias involving deep urothelial cells have a diagnostic or prognostic value in urinary cytology, and (2) whether the terms atypical urothelial cells "of undetermined significance" (AUC-US) or "cannot exclude high grade" (AUC-H) might be used to standardize urinary cytology reports. Atypical urothelial cells (AUC) were defined as deep cells with nuclear abnormalities (increased N/C ratio, eccentric nucleus, hyperchromatism and/or irregular shape) in small number not allowing their categorization as malignant, high grade. We studied 435 urinary samples from 126 patients with AUC at any step of their clinical history, followed up over a 10-year period (1999-2009). Every case was compared with histopathology within 6 months and to long term follow-up including cystoscopy and histopathology combined. A total of 183 AUC was recorded. AUC were associated with negative, benign or low grade histological results in 36 of 106 cases (33.9 %) within 6 months, but a high grade was simultaneously documented in 70 cases (66 %). AUC preceded high-grade lesions in 66 cases (36.1 % of all AUC) in a mean interval of 10.5±12.0 months. Overall, AUC were associated with or predictive of high-grade lesions in 135 cases (73.8 %). AUC have a diagnostic and prognostic value. Applying the terms AUC-US and AUC-H to urinary cytopathology reports would allow, as for the Bethesda system for cervical or vaginal cytologic diagnoses, better appreciation of the risk of progression to high grade tumours in cases with atypias. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. A network meta-analysis of therapeutic outcomes after new image technology-assisted transurethral resection for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer: 5-aminolaevulinic acid fluorescence vs hexylaminolevulinate fluorescence vs narrow band imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Joo Yong; Cho, Kang Su; Kang, Dong Hyuk; Jung, Hae Do; Kwon, Jong Kyou; Oh, Cheol Kyu; Ham, Won Sik; Choi, Young Deuk

    2015-01-01

    This study included a network meta-analysis of evidence from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to assess the therapeutic outcome of transurethral resection (TUR) in patients with non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer assisted by photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) employing 5-aminolaevulinic acid (5-ALA) or hexylaminolevulinate (HAL) or by narrow band imaging (NBI). Relevant RCTs were identified from electronic databases. The proceedings of relevant congresses were also searched. Fifteen articles based on RCTs were included in the analysis, and the comparisons were made by qualitative and quantitative syntheses using pairwise and network meta-analyses. Seven of 15 RCTs were at moderate risk of bias for all quality criteria and two studies were classified as having a high risk of bias. The recurrence rate of cancers resected with 5-ALA-based PDD was lower than of those resected using HAL-based PDD (odds ratio (OR) = 0.48, 95 % confidence interval (CI) [0.26–0.95]) but was not significantly different than those resected with NBI (OR = 0.53, 95 % CI [0.26–1.09]). The recurrence rate of cancers resected using HAL-based PDD versus NBI did not significantly differ (OR = 1.11, 95 % CI [0.55–2.1]). All cancers resected using 5-ALA-based PDD, HAL-based PDD, or NBI recurred at a lower rate than those resected using white light cystoscopy (WLC). No difference in progression rate was observed between cancers resected by all methods investigated. The recurrence rate of some bladder cancers can be decreased by the implementation of either PDD- and NBI-assisted TUR; in real settings, clinicians should consider replacing WLC as the standard imaging technology to guide TUR

  14. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Humberto R.

    2016-01-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥103 CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5–14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required. PMID:26904414

  15. Extraction Strings for Ureteric Stents: Is There an Increased Risk for Urinary Tract Infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, Maryna; Fehr, Jan; Sulser, Tullio; Eberli, Daniel; Mortezavi, Ashkan

    To evaluate urinary tract infections associated with placement of ureteric stents, we performed a retrospective study and compared rates between patients with and patients without an extraction string attached to the ureteric stent. Indwelling ureteric stents are routinely removed by cystoscopy. If an extraction string has been connected to the stent at the time of placement, however, the removal can be performed without an invasive procedure. Concerns exist regarding the risk for an unintentional dislocation, increased stent-related discomfort, or an increase of the post-operative urinary tract infection rate. All elective transurethral ureteric stent placements performed between November 2011 and December 2012 in our department were included for this investigation. Urinary tract infection was defined according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)/National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) surveillance definition of health-care-associated infections. Patients with an existing urinary tract infection at the time of admission were excluded from the analysis. A total of 342 patients receiving ureteric stents were evaluated regarding post-operative urinary tract infections. Of these patients, 127 (37.1%) had an extraction string and 215 (62.9%) a stent without a string. The total urinary tract infection rate was 6.4% with no significant difference between the two groups (7.9% vs. 5.6%, p = 0.49). In the present study, we did not observe an increased rate of post-operative urinary tract infections in patients with an extraction string attached to the ureteral stent. Extraction string is a good option for patients to avoid cystoscopic stent removal.

  16. Urinary tract injuries in laparoscopic hysterectomy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, Marisa R; Bardsley, Tyler R; Sharp, Howard T

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this review was to estimate the incidence of urinary tract injuries associated with laparoscopic hysterectomy and describe the long-term sequelae of these injuries and the impact of early recognition. Studies were identified by searching the PubMed database, spanning the last 10 years. The key words "ureter" or "ureteral" or "urethra" or "urethral" or "bladder" or "urinary tract" and "injury" and "laparoscopy" or "robotic" and "gynecology" were used. Additionally, a separate search was done for "routine cystoscopy" and "gynecology." The inclusion criteria were published articles of original research referring to urologic injuries occurring during either laparoscopic or robotic surgery for gynecologic indications. Only English language articles from the past 10 years were included. Studies with less than 100 patients and no injuries reported were excluded. No robotic series met these criteria. A primary search of the database yielded 104 articles, and secondary cross-reference yielded 6 articles. After reviewing the abstracts, 40 articles met inclusion criteria and were reviewed in their entirety. Of those 40 articles, 3 were excluded because of an inability to extract urinary tract injuries from total injuries. Statistical analysis was performed using a generalized linear mixed effects model. The overall urinary tract injury rate for laparoscopic hysterectomy was 0.73%. The bladder injury rate ranged from 0.05% to 0.66% across procedure types, and the ureteral injury rate ranged from 0.02% to 0.4% across procedure type. In contrast to earlier publications, which cited unacceptably high urinary tract injury rates, laparoscopic hysterectomy appears to be safe regarding the bladder and ureter. Copyright © 2014 AAGL. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Optical Coherencetomography for Bladder Cancer-Ready as a Surrogate for Optical Biopsy? Results of a Prospective Mono-Centre Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl, H. Stepp

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, there is no perfect noninvasive diagnostic technique for bladder cancer. Cystoscopy and transurethral resection (TUR are stil gold standard for the diagnosis of muscle invasive bladder cancer. On the other hand, Optical CoherenceTomography (OCT can be alternative in the future. OCT was the first applied for opthalmology. OCT provides layer by layer images from target tissues with high-resolution, optical cross-sectional tomographic imaging. OCT’s concept is similar to ultrasound, differently it use light for detection. OCT’s resolution may vary from 20 microns (μm up to 1 μm that depends on optical system and lightsource. The image penetration depth of OCT can reach to 2-3 mm. Recently, there are many research about OCT for the diagnosis of urogenital tumors in the literature. In this study, A.Karl reported sensitivity and specificty of OCT for detecting the presence of malignant lession as 100% and %65. But, this small study includes only 52 patients who have 166 suspicious lesions. Specifity of OCT was inadequate due to false positive images, in this report. Contrary, there were no false negative lesions and its sensitivity was 100% depend on all invasive tumors detected and staged correctly beyond the lamina propria. False positive results were associated with edema, inflammation and scar. The overall OCT sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, negative and positive predictive values are reported as 75-100%, 65-98%, 92%, 75% and 100% in the literature. We need more large-scale studies about this topic. It will be promissing technique for diagnostics of urogenital malignant lesions. OCT (optical biopsy will progress with tecnical development and it will be alternative method for staging of bladder cancer.

  18. Bladder cancer in patients after previous irradiation for treatment of tumors of the organs of the lesser pelvis

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    O. S. Strel’tsova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. This article presents clinical cases of bladder cancer (BC developed after previous irradiation and diagnosed in flat suspicious area by cross-polarization optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT based on analysis of characteristics of scattered light, and with histological material confirmed by nonlinear microscopy.Objective: to present clinical cases and features of BC diagnosis in presence of radiation-induced changes.Materials and methods. Intra-vitam examination of the bladder mucosa was performed using the OKT 1300-U system (Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhniy Novgorod. Areas that appeared malignant per CP-OCT data were biopsied. Apart from traditional examination of histological samples with hematoxylin and eosin staining, tissue samples were analyzed using nonlinear microscopy in the mode of second harmonic generation (collagen state analysis and emission of two-photon fluorescence excitation (elastin state analysis.Results are presented through 2 cases of BC in patients with side effects of radiation therapy of varying severity. CP-OCT allowed in-life differentiation of areas of post-radiation inflammatory changes and malignant tumors developed as a result. Nonlinear microscopy provided information on the state of connective tissue matrix of the bladder in the context of radiation changes and transition to tumor.Conclusion. Radiation changes of the bladder mucosa, especially severe ones, can conceal development of malignant tumors. Use of optical methods helps in differential diagnosis of cancer and post-radiation changes of the bladder. CP-OCT is an optimal noninvasive method of examination of the bladder mucosa during cystoscopy. Demonstration of clinical material is aimed at practicing urologists to increase their vigilance in relation to possible BC in patients who underwent radiation therapy of the organs of the lesser pelvis.

  19. Three-dimensional CT virtual endoscopy in the detection of simulated tumors in a novel phantom bladder and ureter model.

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    Russell, Shane T; Kawashima, Akira; Vrtiska, Terri J; LeRoy, Andrew J; Bruesewitz, Michael R; Hartman, Robert P; Slezak, Jeffrey M; McCollough, Cynthia H; Chow, George K; King, Bernard F

    2005-03-01

    Cystoscopy and ureteroscopy have limitations in the evaluation for urothelial tumors, and both are invasive. We studied the utility of three-dimensional (3D) CT virtual endoscopy in phantom models. A phantom pelvis was constructed of Plexiglas, porcine pelvic bones, and processed animal fat and scanned at various table speeds in a four detector-row CT machine for ability to detect "tumors" of Solidwater plastic polymer. Images were reconstructed at slice thicknesses of 2.5 to 5.0 mm and reconstructed in 3D for evaluation by two radiologists with no knowledge of the scanning parameters or tumor location. Similar studies were performed with a ureter model. With 5-mm slices, the sensitivity for bladder tumors ranged from 67% for 2-mm tumors to 100% for 4-mm tumors, with 12 false-positive findings. The overall sensitivity was 86% with 3.75-mm slices with one false positive, and with 2.5-mm slices, the sensitivity was 93%, again with one false positive. For the ureteral tumors, the overall sensitivities and numbers of false positives were 88.9% and eight with 5.0-mm collimation, 88.9% and four with 3.75-mm collimation, and 100% and three with 2.5-mm collimation. The effective radiation dose for all studies was equivalent to that of a standard abdomen/pelvis scan. Although virtual endoscopy traditionally has had difficulty detecting tumors <5 mm, the multidetector-row CT protocols used in this study could detect most lesions smaller than this. The scan also depicts the other tissues of the pelvis, which is valuable for staging. The 3D images were produced using data from the CT urogram parameters standard at our institution.

  20. Interhospital transfer delays emergency abdominal surgery and prolongs stay.

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    Limmer, Alexandra M; Edye, Michael B

    2017-11-01

    Interhospital transfer of patients requiring emergency surgery is common practice. It has the potential to delay surgical intervention, increase rate of complications and thus length of hospital stay. A retrospective cohort study was conducted of adult patients who underwent emergency surgery for abdominal pain at a large metropolitan hospital in New South Wales (Hospital A) in 2013. The impact of interhospital transfer on time to surgical intervention, post-operative length of stay and overall length of stay was assessed. Of the 910 adult patients who underwent emergency surgery for abdominal pain at Hospital A in 2013, 31.9% (n = 290) were transferred by road ambulance from a local district hospital (Hospital B). The leading surgical procedures performed were appendicectomy (n = 299, 32.9%), cholecystectomy (n = 174, 19.1%), gastrointestinal endoscopy (n = 95, 10.4%), cystoscopy (n = 86, 9.5%), hernia repair (n = 45, 4.9%), salpingectomy (n = 19, 2.1%) and oversewing of perforated peptic ulcer (n = 13, 1.4%). Overall, interhospital transfer (n = 290, 31.9%) was associated with increases in mean time to surgical intervention (14.2 h, P < 0.001), post-operative length of stay (1.1 days, P = 0.001) and overall length of stay (1.6 days, P < 0.001). Delayed surgical intervention was observed across all procedure types except surgery for perforated peptic ulcer, where transferred patients underwent surgery within a comparable timeframe to direct admissions. Interhospital transfer delays surgical intervention and increases length of hospital stay. This mandates attention due to the implications for patient outcomes and added burden to the healthcare system. The system did, however, show capability to appropriately expedite surgery for acutely life-threatening cases. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  1. Cistitis intersticial o vejiga dolorosa: Un desafío para el clínico Interstitial cystitis: A challenge for the clinician

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    Pablo Young

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available La cistitis intersticial se define como un síndrome clínico caracterizado por un incremento de la frecuencia urinaria, urgencia miccional y/o dolor abdominal o perineal en ausencia de infección urinaria o enfermedad conocida del aparato urinario. Se divide de acuerdo a los hallazgos citoscópicos en ulcerativa o no. La base del diagnóstico es clínica apoyada en scores de probabilidad y pruebas invasivas. Con la comprensión de la fisiopatología se ha desarrollado un abanico de posibilidades terapéuticas. Comunicamos el caso de una paciente sintomática por cuatro años con diagnóstico de cistitis intersticial con úlcera de Hunner por cistoscopia y excelente respuesta a la amitriptilina. Es una enfermedad que produce considerable alteración de la calidad de vida, por lo que es importante que los médicos estén familiarizados con este cuadro.Interstitial cystitis is characterized by over 6 months of chronic pain, pressure and discomfort felt in the lower pelvis or bladder. It is often relieved with voiding, along with daytime frequency and nocturia in the absence of an urinary tract infection. The disorder can be divided clinically into two groups -ulcerative and non-ulcerative- based on cystoscopic findings and response to treatment. Management follows an approach of applying the least invasive therapy that affords sufficient relief of symptoms. We report a case of a patient with interstitial cystitis. The diagnosis was performed by symptoms and lesion in the cystoscopy and excellent response to amitriptyline.

  2. External Beam Radiotherapy for Focal Lymphoepithelioma-Like Carcinoma in the Urinary Bladder: A Case Report and Literature Review

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    Nobuhiro Kushida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoepithelioma is a malignant epithelial tumor in the nasopharynx characterized by prominent lymphoid infiltration. Carcinomas that resemble lymphoepitheliomas have been called lymphoepithelioma-like carcinomas and have been reported in other organs. A tumor in the bladder is categorized by the percentage of the total area occupied by the lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma pattern, with the prognosis dependent on the percentage. We present an 81-year-old man with stage 3 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and a history of aortic aneurysm repair. The computed tomography scans indicated thickening and irregularity of the bladder wall, with left external iliac lymph node metastasis. His diagnosis was bladder cancer, and the clinical stage was evaluated as T3N1M0. Transurethral resection of the bladder tumor was performed, and the pathological specimen showed that the tumor was composed of undifferentiated malignant cells with sheets and nests arranged in a syncytial pattern, as well as an urothelial carcinoma lesion. A prominent lymphoid reaction accompanied the tumor. The pathological diagnosis was focal-type lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma containing a component of urothelial carcinoma G3>G2. His general condition was such that he could not tolerate radical cystectomy or systemic chemotherapy. External beam radiotherapy (total 60 Gy was given to the bladder, including the lymph node metastatic lesion. No cancer recurrence was detected by regular follow-up computed tomography and cystoscopy. He eventually died of other causes 48 months later. Although treatment for focal lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma generally requires multifocal therapies, in the present case, the bladder became tumor free. We also summarize previously reported lymphoepithelioma-like carcinoma cases treated with radiotherapy.

  3. Feasibility of Raman spectroscopy in vitro after 5-ALA-based fluorescence diagnosis in the bladder

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    Grimbergen, M. C. M.; van Swol, C. F. P.; van Moorselaar, R. J. A.; Mahadevan-Jansen, A.,; Stone, N.

    2006-02-01

    Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) has become popular in bladder cancer detection. Several studies have however shown an increased false positive biopsies rate under PDD guidance compared to conventional cystoscopy. Raman spectroscopy is an optical technique that utilizes molecular specific, inelastic scattering of light photons to interrogate biological tissues, which can successfully differentiate epithelial neoplasia from normal tissue and inflammations in vitro. This investigation was performed to show the feasibility of NIR Raman spectroscopy in vitro on biopsies obtained under guidance of 5-ALA induced PPIX fluorescence imaging. Raman spectra of a PPIX solution was measured to obtain a characteristic signature for the photosensitzer without contributions from tissue constituents. Biopsies were obtained from patients with known bladder cancer instilled with 50ml, 5mg 5-ALA two hours prior to trans-urethral resection of tumor (TURT). Additional biopsies were obtained at a fluorescent and non-fluorescent area, snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen and stored at -80 °C. Each biopsy was thawed before measurements (10sec integration time) with a confocal Raman system (Renishaw Gloucestershire, UK). The 830 nm excitation (300mW) source is focused on the tissue by a 20X ultra-long-working-distance objective. Differences in fluorescence background between the two groups were removed by means of a special developed fluorescence subtraction algorithm. Raman spectra from ALA biopsies showed different fluorescence background which can be effectively removed by a fluorescence subtraction algorithm. This investigation shows that the interaction of the ALA induced PPIX with Raman spectroscopy in bladder samples. Combination of these techniques in-vivo may lead to a viable method of optical biopsies in bladder cancer detection.

  4. In vivo fluorescence imaging of an orthotopic rat bladder tumor model indicates differential uptake of intravesically instilled near-infrared labeled 2-deoxyglucose analog by neoplastic urinary bladder tissues

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    Piao, Daqing; Davis, Carole A.; Hurst, Robert E.; Slaton, Joel W.

    2017-02-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most expensive cancers to manage due to frequent recurrences requiring life-long surveillance and treatment. A near-infrared labeled 2-deoxy-d-glucose probe IRDye800CW-DG targeting glucose metabolism pathway has shown to enhance the sensitivity of diagnosing several types of cancers as tested on tumor models not including bladder tumor. This pilot study has explored differential uptake of intravesically administered IRDye800CW-DG in an orthotopic rat bladder tumor model. Twenty-five female Fischer rats were randomly grouped to four conditions: no-tumor-control (n=3), no-tumor-control intravesically instilled with IRDye800CWDG (n=6), rats bearing GFP-labeled AY-27 rat bladder urothelial cell carcinoma cells and washed with saline (n=5), and rats bearing AY-27 tumors and intravesically instilled with IRDye800CW-DG (n=11). Near-infrared fluorescence was measured from the opened bladder wall of anesthetized rat at an excitation wavelength of 750nm and an emission wavelength of 776nm, by using an in-house fluorescence imaging system. There is no statistically significant difference of the peak fluorescence intensity among the no-tumor-control bladders (n=3), the no-tumorcontrol bladders instilled with IRDye800CW-DG (n=6), and the GFP-labeled AY-27 treated bladders washed by saline (n=5). When compared to that of the no-tumor-control bladders instilled with IRDye800CW-DG (n=6), the fluorescence intensity of GFP-labeled AY-27 treated bladders instilled with IRDye800CW-DG and with histology confirmed neoplastic bladder tissue (n=11) was remarkably more intense (3.34 fold of over the former) and was also statistically significant (pbladder tissues suggests the potential for cystoscopy-adaptation to enhance diagnosis and guiding surgical management of flat urinary bladder cancer.

  5. Human bladder cancer diagnosis using multiphoton microscopy

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    Mukherjee, Sushmita; Wysock, James S.; Ng, Casey K.; Akhtar, Mohammed; Perner, Sven; Lee, Ming-Ming; Rubin, Mark A.; Maxfield, Frederick R.; Webb, Watt W.; Scherr, Douglas S.

    2009-02-01

    At the time of diagnosis, approximately 75% of bladder cancers are non-muscle invasive. Appropriate diagnosis and surgical resection at this stage improves prognosis dramatically. However, these lesions, being small and/or flat, are often missed by conventional white-light cystoscopes. Furthermore, it is difficult to assess the surgical margin for negativity using conventional cystoscopes. Resultantly, the recurrence rates in patients with early bladder cancer are very high. This is currently addressed by repeat cystoscopies and biopsies, which can last throughout the life of a patient, increasing cost and patient morbidity. Multiphoton endoscopes offer a potential solution, allowing real time, noninvasive biopsies of the human bladder, as well as an up-close assessment of the resection margin. While miniaturization of the Multiphoton microscope into an endoscopic format is currently in progress, we present results here indicating that Multiphoton imaging (using a bench-top Multiphoton microscope) can indeed identify cancers in fresh, unfixed human bladder biopsies. Multiphoton images are acquired in two channels: (1) broadband autofluorescence from cells, and (2) second harmonic generation (SHG), mostly by tissue collagen. These images are then compared with gold standard hematoxylin/eosin (H&E) stained histopathology slides from the same specimen. Based on a "training set" and a very small "blinded set" of samples, we have found excellent correlation between the Multiphoton and histopathological diagnoses. A larger blinded analysis by two independent uropathologists is currently in progress. We expect that the conclusion of this phase will provide us with diagnostic accuracy estimates, as well as the degree of inter-observer heterogeneity.

  6. Extended Lymphadenectomy to the Lower Paraortic Nodes During Radical Cystectomy

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    El-Shazli, S.; Anwar, H.; Ramzy, S.; Al-Didi, M.

    2004-01-01

    Evaluation of the diagnostic, prognostic and possible therapeutic role of extended lymphadenectomy to lower para-aortic area in operable bladder cancer patients. Patients and Methods: One hundred and nine patients were subjected to the procedure in the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, and in Minea Oncology Center, Ministry of Health by the same group of surgeons, during the period from September 2000 to March 2003. The lymph nodes dissected were labeled to the following groups: perivesical, lymph node of Cloquet, external iliac, internal iliac and obturator, common iliac and paraortic groups both right and left. These nodes were subjected with the primary tumor to serial sectioning for histopathologic examination. Preoperatively, all patients were subjected to routine laboratory investigations. [n addition to cystoscopy, biopsy and histopathologic examination, bone scan, chest X-Ray and computerized tomography with l. V. contrast examination for the abdomen and pelvis were done for clinical staging of the disease. 34.4% of the node positive patients have been found to harbor the disease in the para-aortic lymph nodes above the common iliac bifurcation. Obturator, external iliac, internal iliac, para-aortic, common iliac, perivesical and lymph node of Cloquet are the higher incidence groups of positive lymph nodes sequentially. The clinical and c.T. staging are inaccurate methods of diagnosis due to high overall error in up to 70.6% of patients. There is no higher incidence of morbidity, mortality, operative time or intraoperative blood loss related to the addition of lower para-aortic dissection to the routine radical cystectomy. Extension of lymphadenectomy to include the lower para-aortic area in addition to the standard pelvic lymphadenectomy during radical cystectomy for bladder cancer is a more accurate technique for diagnosis and staging of bladder cancer patients and it may help in determining the benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy ± radiotherapy

  7. Automatic segmentation of lesions for the computer-assisted detection in fluorescence urology

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    Kage, Andreas; Legal, Wolfgang; Kelm, Peter; Simon, Jörg; Bergen, Tobias; Münzenmayer, Christian; Benz, Michaela

    2012-03-01

    Bladder cancer is one of the most common cancers in the western world. The diagnosis in Germany is based on the visual inspection of the bladder. This inspection performed with a cystoscope is a challenging task as some kinds of abnormal tissues do not differ much in their appearance from their surrounding healthy tissue. Fluorescence Cystoscopy has the potential to increase the detection rate. A liquid marker introduced into the bladder in advance of the inspection is concentrated in areas with high metabolism. Thus these areas appear as bright "glowing". Unfortunately, the fluorescence image contains besides the glowing of the suspicious lesions no more further visual information like for example the appearance of the blood vessels. A visual judgment of the lesion as well as a precise treatment has to be done using white light illumination. Thereby, the spatial information of the lesion provided by the fluorescence image has to be guessed by the clinical expert. This leads to a time consuming procedure due to many switches between the modalities and increases the risk of mistreatment. We introduce an automatic approach, which detects and segments any suspicious lesion in the fluorescence image automatically once the image was classified as a fluorescence image. The area of the contour of the detected lesion is transferred to the corresponding white light image and provide the clinical expert the spatial information of the lesion. The advantage of this approach is, that the clinical expert gets the spatial and the visual information of the lesion together in one image. This can save time and decrease the risk of an incomplete removal of a malign lesion.

  8. Transurethral resection of fibrotic scar tissue combined with temporary urethral stent placement for patients with in anterior urethral stricture

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    Cheol Yong Yoon

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Fibrotic scar formation is a main cause of recurrent urethral stricture after initial management with direct vision internal urethrotomy (DVIU. In the present study, we devised a new technique of combined the transurethral resection of fibrotic scar tissue and temporary urethral stenting, using a thermo-expandable urethral stent (MemokathTM 044TW in patients with anterior urethral stricture. Materials and Methods As a first step, multiple incisions were made around stricture site with cold-cutting knife and Collins knife electrode to release a stricture band. Fibrotic tissue was then resected with a 13Fr pediatric resectoscope before deployment of a MemokathTM 044TW stent (40 – 60mm on a pre-mounted sheath using 0° cystoscopy. Stents were removed within 12 months after initial placement. Results We performed this technique on 11 consecutive patients with initial (n = 4 and recurrent (n = 7 anterior urethral stricture (April 2009 – February 2013. At 18.9 months of mean follow-up (12-34 months, mean Qmax (7.8±3.9ml/sec vs 16.8 ± 4.8ml/sec, p < 0.001, IPSS (20.7 vs 12.5, p = 0.001 , and QoL score (4.7 vs 2.2, p < 0.001 were significantly improved. There were no significant procedure-related complications except two cases of tissue ingrowth at the edge of stent, which were amenable by transurethral resection. In 7 patients, an average 1.4 times (1-5 times of palliative urethral dilatation was carried out and no patients underwent open surgical urethroplasty during the follow-up period. Conclusion Combined transurethral resection and temporary urethral stenting is a effective therapeutic option for anterior urethral stricture. Further investigations to determine the long-term effects, and safety profile of this new technique are warranted.

  9. Prophylactic Antibiotics for Endoscopy-Associated Peritonitis in Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsin-Hsu; Li, I-Jung; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Lee, Cheng-Chia; Chen, Yung-Chang; Chang, Ming-Yang; Fang, Ji-Tseng; Hung, Cheng-Chieh; Yang, Chih-Wei; Tian, Ya-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD) peritonitis may develop after endoscopic procedures, and the benefit of prophylactic antibiotics is unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether prophylactic antibiotics reduce the incidence of peritonitis in these patients. Patients and methods We retrospectively reviewed all endoscopic procedures, including esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy, cystoscopy, hysteroscopy, and hysteroscopy-assisted intrauterine device (IUD) implantation/removal, performed in CAPD patients at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan, between February 2001 and February 2012. Results Four hundred and thirty-three patients were enrolled, and 125 endoscopies were performed in 45 patients. Eight (6.4%) peritonitis episodes developed after the examination. Antibiotics were used in 26 procedures, and none of the patients had peritonitis (0% vs. 8.1% without antibiotic use; p = 0.20). The peritonitis rate was significantly higher in the non-EGD group than in the EGD group (15.9% [7/44] vs. 1.2% [1/81]; pperitonitis rate compared to that without antibiotic use (0% [0/16] vs. 25% [7/28]; pPeritonitis only occurred if invasive procedures were performed, such as biopsy, polypectomy, or IUD implantation, (noninvasive procedures, 0% [0/20] vs. invasive procedures, 30.4% [7/23]; pperitonitis was noted if antibiotics were used prior to examination with invasive procedures (0% [0/10] vs. 53.8% [7/13] without antibiotic use; pperitonitis (antibiotics, 0% [0/4] vs. no antibiotics, 55.6% [5/9]; p = 0.10). Conclusion Antibiotic prophylaxis significantly reduced endoscopy-associated PD peritonitis in the non-EGD group. Endoscopically assisted invasive procedures, such as biopsy, polypectomy, IUD implantation/removal, and dilatation and curettage (D&C), pose a high risk for peritonitis. Prophylactic antibiotics for peritonitis prevention may be required in colonoscopic procedures and gynecologic procedures

  10. Effectivity of intravescical thermo-chemotherapy prophylaxis for patients with high recurrence and progression risk for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gözen, Ali Serdar; Umari, Paolo; Scheitlin, Walter; Su, Fuat Ernis; Akin, Yigit; Rassweiler, Jens

    2017-06-30

    Background&Aim: High grade non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is common in urological practice. Most of these cancers are or become refractory to intravesical immunotherapy and chemotherapy. Here we evaluated the efficacy of combined local bladder hyperthermia and intravesical mitomycin-C (MMC) instillation in patients with high-risk recurrent NMIBC. Between February 2014 and December 2015, 18 patients with high risk NMIBC were enrolled. Patients were treated in an outpatient basis with 6 weekly induction sessions followed by monthly maintenance sessions with intravesical MMC in local hyperthermia with bladder wall thermo-chemotherapy (BWT) system (PelvixTT system, Elmedical Ltd., Hod Hasharon, Israel). The follow-up regimen included cystoscopy after the induction cycle and thereafter with regular intervals. Time to disease recurrence was defined as time from the first intravesical treatment to endoscopic or histological documentation of a new bladder tumour. Adverse events were recorded according to CTC 4.0 (Common Toxicity Criteria) score system. Mean age was 72 (32-87) years. 10 patients had multifocal disease, 9 had CIS, 6 had recurrent disease and 2 had highly recurrent disease (> 3 recurrences in a 24 months period). 6 patients underwent previous intravesical chemotherapy with MMC. The average number of maintenance sessions per patient was 7.6. After a mean follow-up of 433 days, 15 patients (83.3%) were recurrence-free. 3 patients had tumour recurrence after a mean period of 248 days without progression. Side effects were limited to grade 1 in 2 patients and grade 2 in 1 patient. BWT seems to be feasible and safe in high grade NMIBC. More studies are needed to identify the subgroup of patients who may benefit more from this treatment.

  11. Effectivity of intravescical thermo-chemotherapy prophylaxis for patients with high recurrence and progression risk for non-muscle invasive bladder cancer

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    Ali Serdar Gözen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background&Aim: High grade non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC is common in urological practice. Most of these cancers are or become refractory to intravesical immunotherapy and chemotherapy. Here we evaluated the efficacy of combined local bladder hyperthermia and intravesical mitomycin-C (MMC instillation in patients with high-risk recurrent NMIBC. Materials and methods: Between February 2014 and December 2015, 18 patients with high risk NMIBC were enrolled. Patients were treated in an outpatient basis with 6 weekly induction sessions followed by monthly maintenance sessions with intravesical MMC in local hyperthermia with bladder wall thermo-chemotherapy (BWT system (PelvixTT system, Elmedical Ltd., Hod Hasharon, Israel. The follow-up regimen included cystoscopy after the induction cycle and thereafter with regular intervals. Time to disease recurrence was defined as time from the first intravesical treatment to endoscopic or histological documentation of a new bladder tumour. Adverse events were recorded according to CTC 4.0 (Common Toxicity Criteria score system. Results: Mean age was 72 (32-87 years. 10 patients had multifocal disease, 9 had CIS, 6 had recurrent disease and 2 had highly recurrent disease (> 3 recurrences in a 24 months period. 6 patients underwent previous intravesical chemotherapy with MMC. The average number of maintenance sessions per patient was 7.6. After a mean follow-up of 433 days, 15 patients (83.3% were recurrence-free. 3 patients had tumour recurrence after a mean period of 248 days without progression. Side effects were limited to grade 1 in 2 patients and grade 2 in 1 patient. Conclusions: BWT seems to be feasible and safe in high grade NMIBC. More studies are needed to identify the subgroup of patients who may benefit more from this treatment.

  12. Invasive bladder cancer: treatment strategies using transurethral surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy with selection for bladder conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipley, William U.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Kaufman, Donald S.; Althausen, Alex F.; Heney, Niall M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Combined modality therapy has become the standard oncologic approach to achieve organ preservation in many malignancies. Methods and Materials: Although radical cystectomy has been considered as standard treatment for invasive bladder carcinoma in the United States, good results have been recently reported from several centers using multimodality treatment, particularly in patients with clinical T2 and T3a disease who do not have a ureter obstructed by tumor. Results: The components of the combined treatment are usually transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBT) followed by concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Following an induction course of therapy a histologic response is evaluated by cystoscopy and rebiopsy. Clinical 'complete responders' (tumor site rebiopsy negative and urine cytology with no tumor cells present) continue with a consolidation course of concurrent chemotherapy and radiation. Those patients not achieving a clinical complete response are recommended to have an immediate cystectomy. Individually the local monotherapies of radiation, TURBT, or multidrug chemotherapy each achieve a local control rate of the primary tumor of from 20 to 40%. When these are combined, clinical complete response rates of from 65 to 80% can be achieved. Seventy-five to 85% of the clinical complete responders will remain with bladders free of recurrence of an invasive tumor. Conclusions: Bladder conservation trials using combined modality treatment approaches with selection for organ conservation by response of the tumor to initial treatment report overall 5-year survival rates of approximately 50%, and a 40-45% 5-year survival rate with the bladder intact. These modern multimodality bladder conservation approaches offer survival rates similar to radical cystectomy for patients of similar clinical stage and age. Bladder-conserving therapy should be offered to patients with invasive bladder carcinoma as a realistic alternative to radical

  13. Abnormal Sensory Protein Expression and Urothelial Dysfunction in Ketamine-Related Cystitis in Humans

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    Yao Chou Tsai

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose The aim of this study was to analyze patterns of sensory protein expression and urothelial dysfunction in ketamine-related cystitis (KC in humans. Methods Biopsies of bladder mucosa were performed in 29 KC patients during cystoscopy. Then specimens were analyzed for tryptase, zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1, E-cadherin, and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL with immunofluorescence staining and quantification. In addition, 10 healthy control bladder specimens were analyzed and compared with the KC specimens. Another 16 whole bladder specimens obtained from partial cystectomy were also analyzed for the muscarinic receptors M2 and M3, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, β-3 adrenergic receptors (β3-ARs, and the P2X3 receptor by western blotting. In addition, 3 normal control bladder specimens were analyzed and compared with the KC specimens. Results The KC bladder mucosa revealed significantly less expression of ZO-1 and E-cadherin, and greater expression of TUNEL and tryptase activity than the control samples. The expression of M3 and β3-AR in the KC specimens was significantly greater than in the controls. The expression of iNOS, eNOS, M2, and P2X3 was not significantly different between the KC and control specimens. Conclusions The bladder tissue of KC patients revealed significant urothelial dysfunction, which was associated with mast-cell mediated inflammation, increased urothelial cell apoptosis, and increased expression of the M3 and β3-AR.

  14. Complications Following the Insertion of Two Synthetic Mid-urethral Slings and Subsequent Removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dominic; Bacsu, Chasta; Dillon, Benjamin; Zimmern, Philippe E

    2017-06-28

    To determine outcomes after removal of two synthetic mid-urethral slings (MUS) at a tertiary care center. Following IRB approval, a retrospective chart review of non-neurogenic, symptomatic women requiring re-operation after ≥2 MUS was performed. Data reviewed by a third party included: demographics, prior anti-incontinence surgery, complications, pelvic/urinary symptoms, subsequent investigations, surgical repair and outcomes (including UDI-6/IIQ-7 questionnaires) at a minimum 6 months follow-up. Cure was defined as being continent, no dyspareunia, and no additional surgical therapy. Between 2007 and 2014, 21 women met the inclusion criteria. Mean age was 57 years (range: 40-82) and mean follow-up was 30.2 months (range: 6-78). The majority of patients presented with one or more symptoms of voiding dysfunction (95%), urinary incontinence (86%), irritative voiding symptoms (62%), dyspareunia (57%), recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) (29%), vaginal extrusion (20%) and erosion involving the urinary tract (5%). Patients had a mean of 2 prior anti-incontinence procedures (range 2-3). Over two-thirds had a combination of retropubic and transobturator MUS. Mean number of pre-operative investigations was 3.5 (1-6) including voiding cystourethrogram, cystoscopy and urodynamics. Two patients had complete remission, 14 partial remission, and five failed. Mean postoperative total UDI-6 and IIQ-7 scores at last clinic visit were 10 (range: 0-16/SD 4.1) and 11 (range: 0-28/SD 10.3), respectively. The management of women with suboptimal outcomes following two synthetic MUS from transvaginal excision results in modest symptomatic improvement but low permanent complete remission and frequent need for additional therapies. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  15. Clinico-pathological pattern, classification and staging of urinary bladder carcinomas - a five years experience at a tertiary care hospital in central punjab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naeem, A.

    2015-01-01

    In Pakistan, urinary bladder carcinoma is the 8th commonest malignancy while being the fourth commonest cancer in men. The relative occurrence of a particular histological type of bladder carcinoma depends on the clinical setting. Both grade and stage of these cancers are highly correlated with recurrence, progression and patient survival rates. Methods: This cross-sectional study comprised of 122 patients with newly diagnosed operable primary bladder carcinomas who underwent cystoscopy associated transurethral resection of bladder tumour at the Urology Department of Punjab Employees Social Security Hospital, Lahore. All participants completed a detailed questionnaire and underwent an in-depth interview to obtain data. The surgical specimens were referred to the Pathology department. Gross observations of the tumour recorded. Result: A total of 114 cases, classified according to WHO/ISUP criteria, low-grade papillary lesions, comprising Papillary Urothelial Neoplasm of Low Malignant Potential (PUNLMP) and Papillary Low Grade carcinomas, accounted for 43% of tumours. Male to female ratio being 5.3:1 (74%). Lateral walls were involved in 44%, posterior wall in 25.3%, trigone in 10.7%, bladder neck in 7.2%, dome in 5.8%, ureteric orifice in 4.13%, anterior wall in 2% and left ureter in 0.87% cases. Tumour staging revealed an overall 11.5% of tumours with stage Ta and 31.5% with stage T3-4. About 29% tumours were non invasive. About n=13 of low-grade carcinomas and n=68 of high-grade carcinomas were invasive. For tumours classified by WHO/ISUP criteria, the percentage of women was larger for PUNLMP than for the other categories of urothelial tumours (p-value 0.006); no statistically significant difference was found by age or gender with respect to tumour stage (p-value 0.138 and 0.452). Conclusion: Transitional Cell Carcinoma (TCC) is the commonest among middle aged men. (author)

  16. Systematic review of laparoscopic surgery in low- and middle-income countries: benefits, challenges, and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Tiffany E; Mandigo, Morgan; Opoku-Anane, Jessica; Maine, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopy may prove feasible to address surgical needs in limited-resource settings. However, no aggregate data exist regarding the role of laparoscopy in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). This study was designed to describe the issues facing laparoscopy in LMICs and to aggregate reported solutions. A search was conducted using Medline, African Index Medicus, the Directory of Open Access Journals, and the LILACS/BIREME/SCIELO database. Included studies were in English, published after 1992, and reported safety, cost, or outcomes of laparoscopy in LMICs. Studies pertaining to arthroscopy, ENT, flexible endoscopy, hysteroscopy, cystoscopy, computer-assisted surgery, pediatrics, transplantation, and bariatrics were excluded. Qualitative synthesis was performed by extracting results that fell into three categories: advantages of, challenges to, and adaptations made to implement laparoscopy in LMICs. PRISMA guidelines for systematic reviews were followed. A total of 1101 abstracts were reviewed, and 58 articles were included describing laparoscopy in 25 LMICs. Laparoscopy is particularly advantageous in LMICs, where there is often poor sanitation, limited diagnostic imaging, fewer hospital beds, higher rates of hemorrhage, rising rates of trauma, and single income households. Lack of trained personnel and equipment were frequently cited challenges. Adaptive strategies included mechanical insufflation with room air, syringe suction, homemade endoloops, hand-assisted techniques, extracorporeal knot tying, innovative use of cheaper instruments, and reuse of disposable instruments. Inexpensive laboratory-based trainers and telemedicine are effective for training. LMICs face many surgical challenges that require innovation. Laparoscopic surgery may be safe, effective, feasible, and cost-effective in LMICs, although it often remains limited in its accessibility, acceptability, and quality. This study may not capture articles written in languages other than

  17. Holmium:YAG Laser Ablation for the Management of Lower Urinary Tract Foreign Bodies Following Incontinence Surgery: A Case Series and Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Garson; Mamut, Adiel; Martin, Paul; Welk, Blayne

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the outcomes associated with the endoscopic removal of foreign bodies (such as mesh or permanent suture) in the lower urinary tract after female stress incontinence surgery with the Holmium:YAG (Ho:YAG) laser, and to systematically review the literature on this topic. A retrospective chart review of 18 consecutive women found to have mesh or suture exposure was performed. All patients underwent Ho:YAG laser ablation. A systematic review was performed to identify literature addressing the endoscopic management of mesh/suture exposure after stress incontinence surgery. Between November 2011 and February 2016, 18 women underwent Ho:YAG laser ablation of exposed mesh or suture. Presenting symptoms included lower urinary tract symptoms, pelvic pain, incontinence, or recurrent urinary tract infections. Thirteen women had a previous synthetic midurethral sling and five had a prior retropubic suspension. The median age was 58 years (interquartile range [IQR] 50-60) and median follow-up was 2 years (IQR 1-2). Four patients (22%) had residual mesh after the first procedure, requiring a repeat endoscopic procedure. Only one patient had a small amount of asymptomatic residual mesh on cystoscopy after the final procedure. Only minor postoperative complications were observed. Eight patients had stress incontinence and four underwent operative treatment for this. In our systematic review, we identified 16 case series, which described a total of 158 patients. Women most commonly presented with voiding symptoms or incontinence. Based on the synthesis of these data, repeat procedures were necessary in 16% and vesicovaginal fistula occurred in 2%. Recurrent/persistent stress incontinence was present in 20%, and of these patients, 3/4 underwent a new stress incontinence procedure. Both our case series and the systematic review of the literature demonstrated that endoscopic treatment of lower urinary tract foreign bodies after stress

  18. Cloacal reconstruction after a complex treatment of perineal haemangioma in a variant of PELVIS syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalimas, Algirdas; Posiunas, Gintas; Strupas, Sigitas; Raugalas, Ramunas; Raistenskis, Juozas; Verkauskas, Gilvydas

    2015-10-08

    PELVIS is an acronym defining the association of perineal hemangioma, malformations of external genitalia, lipomyelomeningocele, vesicorenal abnormalities, imperforate anus and skin tag. Eleven cases have been reported according to the Orphanet data. Acronyms of LUMBAR and SACRAL syndrome have been used and most probably represent a spectrum of the same entity. Very little is known about the success and timing of cloacal reconstruction after the treatment of hemangioma. We present a variant of PELVIS syndrome and discuss the possibilities and optimal timing of surgical reconstruction. Female infant was born with persistent cloaca and multiple hemangiomas of genitals, perineal area and left thigh. Colostomy was performed after birth. In order to treat hemangioma and to make the reconstruction of cloaca possible, corticosteroid treatment orally and multiple laser treatments were performed alternating Nd:YAG laser and pulsed dye laser therapy. Cystoscopy confirmed hemangiomatosis in the mucosa of the common channel, bladder neck and septate vagina. Oral propranolol treatment was started at the age of 18 months and continued for 1 year. It induced rapid improvement of hemangiomas. Two more pulsed dye laser treatments were performed to remove residuals of hemangiomas from the perineum and genital area. Posterior sagital reconstruction by separation of the rectum, mobilization of urogenital sinus and vaginal reconstruction was performed with no major bleeding at the age of 4 years. Postoperatively, after a period of progressive rectal dilatation colostomy was closed. Girl is now 6 years old, dry day and night without residual urine and normal upper tracts. Rectal calibration is normal, fecal continence is still to be evaluated but constipation is easily manageable. CT of the spine and the perineum showed sacral dysplasia and spina bifida with lumbo-sacral lipoma and tethering of terminal filum without neurological deterioration at the moment but requiring close

  19. Isiris: A Novel Method of Removing Foreign Bodies from the Lower Urinary Tract to Avoid Unnecessary Hospitalization and Anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter Mark; Harbias, Aman; Robinson, Richard; Palmer, Anne; Grey, Benjamin Robin

    2016-01-01

    Polyembolokoilamania refers to the practice of inserting foreign bodies (FBs) into natural orifices. A FB within the urethra is a relatively rare phenomenon with 646 cases recorded last year in the United Kingdom. Management of these patients presents technical challenges and complexities because of underlying psychiatric disorders that are often associated. This case illustrates a novel way of removing FBs from the genitourinary tract, requiring less resources, preventing hospital admission, and attempts to break the cycle of behavior, leading to recurrent attendance with polyembolokoilamania. A 38-year-old Caucasian male prisoner, with psychiatric history presented to the emergency department (ED) with a history of inserting FBs into his urethra on 12 different occasions over a 6-week period. Of these 12 attendances, 3 resulted in admission and 2 required emergency intervention in theater under general anesthesia. After the third attendance in 5 days, it was decided to use Isiris™, a single-use flexible cystoscopy device with a built-in ureteral stent grasper, to remove the FBs and check the integrity of the urethra. The procedure was performed within the ED, without the need for admission to a ward bed or general anesthesia. Furthermore, only two members of staff were required to remove all of the urethral FBs. Isiris, although marketed as a stent removal device, enabled us to remove all the patient's FBs in one procedure. Isiris is an easy to use device, similar to a flexible cystoscope, that a specialist nurse or resident would be familiar using. It allows efficient and safe removal of lower urinary tract FBs, even out of hours. It requires minimal staffing support and can be done in the ED. It has the potential to reduce associated sequela of urethral polyembolokoilamania, saving resources while preserving the availability of the emergency theater.

  20. Managing Patients with Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer: Old Disease, New Ideas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per-Uno Malmström

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Prof Per-Uno Malmström opened this symposium on non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC by describing the medical and economic burden caused by the increasing incidence of bladder cancer and the lack of new therapeutic options available to address the challenges of the management of NMIBC. Prof Marko Babjuk followed with a presentation that demonstrated that risk stratification using European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC and Spanish Urological Club for Oncological Treatment (CUETO risk scores remains a useful tool for determining the best individual treatment options for patients. The next presentation, given by Dr Carsten Ohlmann, described the use of mitomycin C (MMC for low and intermediate-risk patients as per the European Association of Urology (EAU guidelines. However, despite a favourable safety profile, single case reports of severe adverse events following treatment with MMC should not be dismissed. MMC should therefore be given with care, with an emphasis on performing high quality transurethral resection of the bladder (TURB. Prof Bernard Malavaud then presented details of newer diagnostic methods, such as photodynamic diagnosis (PDD and narrow band imaging (NBI, which offer better optical tumour recognition for the surgeon than the old standard of white light cystoscopy. The uptake of PDD and NBI in the future will facilitate an increase in the quality of TURB. Finally, Prof Ashish Kamat explained that recurrence of bladder cancer after bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG treatment (‘BCG failure’ needs to be more clearly defined and stratified. He stated that optimal recognition of timing with relation to BCG immunotherapy is critical to determine the next steps. For example, in the past, patients with late recurrence who may have benefitted from challenge with BCG may have been overlooked.

  1. POLYPOID CYSTITIS: A FINDING AND DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS

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    D. Yu. Pushkar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Polypoid cystitis may simulate urothelial neoplasias cystoscopically and histologically. The frequency of polypoid cystitis is 0.38%; that among patients undergoing bladder catheterization is 6 %.Subjects and methods. The authors estimated the frequency of polypoid cystitis among chronic cystitis patients admitted to City Clinical Hospital Fifty, a base of the Clinic of Urology, Moscow State University of Medicine and Dentistry, in the period from February 2008 to February 2010. Out of 819 patients followed up, 3 who had diagnosed as having polypoid cystitis complained of pollakiuria, imperative micturate urges, and macrohematuria. They underwent ultrasonography, computed tomography, and cystoscopy; bladder masses measured 1.0, 7.0, and 11.5 cm, respectively; extensive growth was verified in 2 cases. Endoscopic studies identified procumbent rough-villous masses without well-defined outlines with the signs of bullous edema, decay, hemorrhages, and urinary salt encrustations. By taking into account the clinical picture and laboratory and instrumental findings, the authors suspected stage T3bNхMх bladder tumor in 2 patients and T1NхMх stage in 1. According to the European Association of Urology guidelines for management of bladder cancer, the patients underwent transurethral bladder resection. The patients were diagnosed as having polypoid cystitis on the basis of postmortem evidence.Results. In this study the frequency of polypoid cystitis was 37 %. Polypoid cystitis, a benign mass without a risk for malignancy, had signs of invasive transitional cell carcinoma.Conclusion. Such cases that rarely occur in practice are of clinical value and interest to urologists, pathologists, and oncologists.

  2. Diagnostic tests and algorithms used in the investigation of haematuria: systematic reviews and economic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, M; Nixon, J; Hempel, S; Aho, T; Kelly, J; Neal, D; Duffy, S; Ritchie, G; Kleijnen, J; Westwood, M

    2006-06-01

    evaluated nuclear matrix protein 22 or bladder tumour antigen. The sensitivity and specificity ranges suggested that neither of these would be useful either for diagnosing bladder cancer or for ruling out patients for further investigation (cystoscopy). However, the evidence remains sparse and the diagnostic accuracy estimates varied widely between studies. Fifteen studies evaluating urine cytology as a test for urinary tract malignancies were heterogeneous and poorly reported. The calculated specificity values were generally high, suggesting some possible utility in confirming malignancy. However, the evidence suggests that urine cytology has no application in ruling out malignancy or excluding patients from further investigation. Fifteen studies evaluated imaging techniques [computed tomography (CT), intravenous urography (IVU) or ultrasound scanning (US)] to detect the underlying cause of haematuria. The target condition and the reference standard varied greatly between these studies. The diagnostic accuracy data for several individual studies appeared promising but meaningful comparison of the available imaging technologies was impossible. Eight studies met the inclusion criteria but addressed different parts of the diagnostic chain (e.g. screening programmes, laboratory investigations, full urological work-up). No single study addressed the complete diagnostic process. The review also highlighted a number of methodological limitations of these studies, including their lack of generalisability to the UK context. Separate decision analytic models were therefore developed to progress estimation of the optimal strategy for the diagnostic management of haematuria. The economic model for the detection of microhaematuria found that immediate microscopy following a positive dipstick test would improve diagnostic efficiency as it eliminates the high number of false positives produced by dipstick testing. Strategies that use routine microscopy may be associated with high numbers

  3. Clinical Outcomes of Image Guided Adaptive Hypofractionated Weekly Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer in Patients Unsuitable for Radical Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafeez, Shaista, E-mail: shaista.hafeez@icr.ac.uk [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); McDonald, Fiona; Lalondrelle, Susan [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); McNair, Helen; Warren-Oseni, Karole; Jones, Kelly [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Harris, Victoria [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Taylor, Helen; Khoo, Vincent [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Thomas, Karen [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Hansen, Vibeke; Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose and Objectives: We report on the clinical outcomes of a phase 2 study assessing image guided hypofractionated weekly radiation therapy in bladder cancer patients unsuitable for radical treatment. Methods and Materials: Fifty-five patients with T2-T4aNx-2M0-1 bladder cancer not suitable for cystectomy or daily radiation therapy treatment were recruited. A “plan of the day” radiation therapy approach was used, treating the whole (empty) bladder to 36 Gy in 6 weekly fractions. Acute toxicity was assessed weekly during radiation therapy, at 6 and 12 weeks using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Late toxicity was assessed at 6 months and 12 months using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grading. Cystoscopy was used to assess local control at 3 months. Cumulative incidence function was used to determine local progression at 1 at 2 years. Death without local progression was treated as a competing risk. Overall survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median age was 86 years (range, 68-97 years). Eighty-seven percent of patients completed their prescribed course of radiation therapy. Genitourinary and gastrointestinal grade 3 acute toxicity was seen in 18% (10/55) and 4% (2/55) of patients, respectively. No grade 4 genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicity was seen. Grade ≥3 late toxicity (any) at 6 and 12 months was seen in 6.5% (2/31) and 4.3% (1/23) of patients, respectively. Local control after radiation therapy was 92% of assessed patients (60% total population). Cumulative incidence of local progression at 1 year and 2 years for all patients was 7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2%-17%) and 17% (95% CI 8%-29%), respectively. Overall survival at 1 year was 63% (95% CI 48%-74%). Conclusion: Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivered weekly with a plan of the day approach offers good local control with acceptable toxicity in a patient population not suitable for radical bladder treatment.

  4. Clinical Outcomes of Image Guided Adaptive Hypofractionated Weekly Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer in Patients Unsuitable for Radical Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafeez, Shaista; McDonald, Fiona; Lalondrelle, Susan; McNair, Helen; Warren-Oseni, Karole; Jones, Kelly; Harris, Victoria; Taylor, Helen; Khoo, Vincent; Thomas, Karen; Hansen, Vibeke; Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Purpose and Objectives: We report on the clinical outcomes of a phase 2 study assessing image guided hypofractionated weekly radiation therapy in bladder cancer patients unsuitable for radical treatment. Methods and Materials: Fifty-five patients with T2-T4aNx-2M0-1 bladder cancer not suitable for cystectomy or daily radiation therapy treatment were recruited. A “plan of the day” radiation therapy approach was used, treating the whole (empty) bladder to 36 Gy in 6 weekly fractions. Acute toxicity was assessed weekly during radiation therapy, at 6 and 12 weeks using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Late toxicity was assessed at 6 months and 12 months using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grading. Cystoscopy was used to assess local control at 3 months. Cumulative incidence function was used to determine local progression at 1 at 2 years. Death without local progression was treated as a competing risk. Overall survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median age was 86 years (range, 68-97 years). Eighty-seven percent of patients completed their prescribed course of radiation therapy. Genitourinary and gastrointestinal grade 3 acute toxicity was seen in 18% (10/55) and 4% (2/55) of patients, respectively. No grade 4 genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicity was seen. Grade ≥3 late toxicity (any) at 6 and 12 months was seen in 6.5% (2/31) and 4.3% (1/23) of patients, respectively. Local control after radiation therapy was 92% of assessed patients (60% total population). Cumulative incidence of local progression at 1 year and 2 years for all patients was 7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2%-17%) and 17% (95% CI 8%-29%), respectively. Overall survival at 1 year was 63% (95% CI 48%-74%). Conclusion: Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivered weekly with a plan of the day approach offers good local control with acceptable toxicity in a patient population not suitable for radical bladder treatment.

  5. EFFECTIVENESS OF TRANSPU B IC URETHROPLASTY FOR RECURRENT URETHRAL STR U CTURE IN PELVIC FRACTURE URETHRAL DISTRACTION DEFECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudegowdar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM OF THE STUDY: Effectiveness of Transpubic urethroplasty in recurrent (failed urethral strictures due to pelvic fracture urethral distraction defects. INTRODUCTION: Urethral distraction injuries occur upto 10% of pelvic fracture cases. The principle indication of Transpubic urethroplasty is length >3 c ms, recur rent (failed repairs of posterior urethral stricture. Though other procedures like primary anastomotic urethroplasty, rerouting of the urethra under the corporal body, urethral substitution with tubularised flaps, two stage urethroplasty are described, Tr anspubic urethroplasty is said to produce the best results especially when repeat procedures are required. MATERIALS & METHODS: This is a prospective study from 2004 to 2014 consisting of 17 patients having recurrent stricture urethra secondary to pelvic f racture urethral distraction defects (PFUDD. All the patients were males and their age ranged from 15year to 45 years. Pre - op evaluation included X - ray KUB, Ultrasound abdomen & pelvis, retrograde urethrogram (RGU, micturating cystourethrogram (MCU, up and down Cystoscopy, urine culture and renal biochemical parameters. Urethra was approched through progressive perineal and abdominal approach with total pubectomy, followed by excising fibrosed stricture and tension free end to end anastomosis. Post opera tively pericatheteral RGU was carried out after 4 weeks and Catheter removed if there was no leak. RGU, MCU uroflowmetry and PVR were done one month after removal of catheter. Subsequently UFR, PVR and obstructive symptoms were assessed periodically. RESUL TS: All 17 Cases were followed up for a period of 3 - 11 years. Out of 17patients, 14(80% patients maintained good uroflow (UFR and insignificant PVR and procedure was considered successful. In 3 patients procedure failed, of which 2 patients had pericathe ter leak and reduced urinary flow with significant PVR and were followed up with CIC and 1 patient remained on permanent

  6. The awareness of patients with non - muscle invasive bladder cancer regarding the importance of smoking cessation and their access to smoking cessation programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emrah Yuruk

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives Smoking is the most important risk factor for bladder cancer and smoking cessation is associated with reduced risk of tumor recurrence and progression. The aim of this study is to assess the awareness of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC patients regarding the importance of smoking cessation, determine their access to smoking cessation programs and the effects of smoking cessation on recurrence rates of NMIBC. Materials and Methods NMIBC patients who were followed with cystoscopy were included in the study. Their demographic properties were recorded, along with their smoking habits, awareness regarding the effects of smoking on bladder cancer and previous attempts for smoking cessation. Moreover, the patients were asked whether they applied for a smoking cessation program. Recurrence of bladder cancer during the follow-up period was also noted. Results A total of 187 patients were included in the study. The mean age was 64.68±12.05 (range: 15-90 and the male to female ratio was 167/20. At the time of diagnosis, 114 patients (61.0% were active smokers, 35 patients (18.7% were ex-smokers and 38 patients (20.3% had never smoked before. After the diagnosis, 83.3% of the actively smoking patients were advised to quit smoking and 57.9% of them quit smoking. At the time of the study, 46.52% of the NMIBC patients were aware of the link between smoking and bladder cancer, whereas only 4.1% of the smoking patients were referred to smoking cessation programs. After a mean follow-up of 32.28±11.42 months, 84 patients (44.91% had recurrence; however, current smoking status or awareness of the causative role of smoking on NMIBC did not affect the recurrence. Conclusion In our study group, the majority of the NMIBC patients were not aware of the association between smoking and bladder cancer. Although most of the physicians advised patients to quit smoking, a significant amount of the patients were still active smokers during

  7. Pseudocarcinomatous epithelial hyperplasia in the bladder unassociated with prior irradiation or chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Zhaoli; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2008-01-01

    Pseudocarcinomatous epithelial hyperplasia in the bladder is a little known phenomenon, recognized to be associated with prior irradiation and/or chemotherapy. Whether this process can occur outside of this setting has not been studied. We identified 8 of these cases mimicking invasive urothelial carcinoma from our consultation files from 07/04 to 07/06 with no prior history of radiation or chemotherapy. The mean age at diagnosis was 65 years (range, 42 to 81 y), with 5 of the 8 males. Seven patients had a potential etiology for these changes that could either have resulted in localized ischemia or injury to the urothelium. These included case 1: atrial fibrillation, hypertension, congestive heart failure, gastrointestinal bleeding, and coronary artery vascular disease; case 2: coronary angioplasty, atrial fibrillation, hyperlipidemia, and amputation of arm for ischemia; case 3: hypertension, uncontrolled diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and atrial fibrillation; case 4: underlying arteriovenous malformation of the bladder; cases 5 to 6: history of indwelling Foley catheter; and case 7: history of radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer but no radiation. One patient had no potential contributing factors. All 8 patients presented with gross hematuria. At cystoscopy, 7 patients had polypoid lesions with 1 appearing nonpolypoid. Histologically, all cases showed epithelial proliferation of urothelium with cells having prominent eosinophilic cytoplasm. This process that mimicked invasive cancer within the lamina propria was marked in 3 cases (38%). Moderate nuclear pleomorphism was seen in 6 cases (75%). Only 1 case revealed mitotic figures. Ulceration was seen in 1 case. All cases showed some degree of hemorrhage with hemosiderin deposition identified in 3 cases (38%). Fibrin deposition was present in 1 case within the stroma, 3 cases in the vessels, and 4 cases in both. Five cases show stromal fibrosis. Edema and vascular congestion were common features (90% and 100

  8. Missed signs of autonomic dysreflexia in a tetraplegic patient after incorrect placement of urethral Foley catheter: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Soni, Bakul M; Oo, Tun; Hughes, Peter L; Singh, Gurpreet

    2014-01-01

    Autonomic dysreflexia is poorly recognised outside of spinal cord injury centres, and may result in adverse outcomes including mortality from delayed diagnosis and treatment. We present a spinal cord injury patient, who developed autonomic dysreflexia following incorrect placement of urethral Foley catheter. Health professionals failed to recognise signs and symptoms of autonomic dysreflexia as well as its significance in this tetraplegic patient. A tetraplegic patient started sweating profusely following insertion of a Foley catheter per urethra. The catheter was draining urine; there was no bypassing, no bleeding per urethra, and no haematuria. Patient's wife, who had been looking after her tetraplegic husband for more than forty years, told the health professionals that the catheter might have been placed incorrectly but her concerns were ignored. Ultrasound scan of urinary tract revealed no urinary calculi, no hydronephrosis. The balloon of Foley catheter was not seen in urinary bladder but this finding was not recognised by radiologist and spinal cord physician. Patient continued to sweat profusely; therefore, CT of pelvis was performed, but there was a delay of ten days. CT revealed the balloon of Foley catheter in the over-stretched prostate-membranous urethra; the tip of catheter was not located within the urinary bladder but was lying distal to bladder neck. Flexible cystoscopy was performed and Foley catheter was inserted into the bladder over a guide wire. The intensity of sweating decreased; noxious stimuli arising from traumatised urethra might take a long while to settle. Inserting a catheter in a tetraplegic patient should be carried out by a senior health professional, who is familiar with spasm of bladder neck which occurs frequently in tetraplegic patients. Facilities for urgent CT scan should be available to check the position of Foley catheter in spinal cord injury patients when a patient manifests signs and symptoms of autonomic dysreflexia

  9. Intravenous chemotherapy combined with intravesical chemotherapy to treat T1G3 bladder urothelial carcinoma after transurethral resection of bladder tumor: results of a retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Y

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Yu Zhang,1,* Linguo Xie,1,* Tao Chen,1,* Wanqin Xie,2 Zhouliang Wu,1 Hao Xu,1 Chen Xing,1 Nan Sha,1 Zhonghua Shen,1 Yunkai Qie,1 Xiaoteng Liu,1 Hailong Hu,1 Changli Wu1 1Department of Urology, The Second Hospital of Tianjin Medical University, Tianjin Institute of Urology, Tianjin, 2Key Laboratory of Genetics and Birth Health of Hunan Province, The Family Planning Research Institute of Hunan Province, Changsha, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: The management of stage 1 and grade 3 (T1G3 bladder cancer continues to be controversial. Although the transurethral resection of bladder tumor (TURBT followed by intravesical chemotherapy is a conservative strategy for treatment of T1G3 bladder cancer, a relatively high risk of tumor recurrence and progression remains regarding the therapy. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of intravenous chemotherapy combined with intravesical chemotherapy versus intravesical chemotherapy alone for T1G3 bladder cancer after TURBT surgery. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the cases of 457 patients who were newly diagnosed with T1G3 bladder urothelial carcinoma between January 2009 and March 2014. After TURBT, 281 patients received intravesical chemotherapy alone, whereas 176 patients underwent intravesical chemotherapy in combination with intravenous chemotherapy. Tumor recurrence and progression were monitored periodically by urine cytology and cystoscopy in follow-up. Recurrence-free survival and progression-free survival of the two chemotherapy strategies following TURBT were analyzed. Univariable and multivariable Cox hazards analyses were performed to predict the prognostic factors for tumor recurrence and progression. Results: The tumor recurrence rate was 36.7% for patients who received intravesical chemotherapy alone after TURBT, compared with 19.9% for patients who received intravenous chemotherapy combined with intravesical chemotherapy after

  10. Anastomic urethroplasty in bulbar urethral stricture. 13 years experience in a department of urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Barranquero, F; Herrera-Imbroda, B; Yáñez-Gálvez, A; Sánchez-Soler, N; Castillo-Gallardo, E; Cantero-Mellado, J A; Julve-Villalta, E; Machuca-Santa Cruz, F J

    2016-01-01

    Urethral stenosis is a common disease in the clinical practice of urology, with a major impact on the quality of life of patients. The anastomotic urethroplasty is a technique with very precise indications usually membranous or bulbar urethra stenosis with a length of 3 cm or up to 7 cm when it is secondary to urethral disruptions (no stenosis) after pelvic trauma. We review anastomotic urethroplasty performed in our department between 2002 and 2015. A retrospective, descriptive and inferential analysis on 107 patients out of 482 treated with Anastomotic urethroplasty by urethral strictures at the Urology Department of the Hospital "Virgen de la Victoria" (Malaga) from January 2002 to September 2015, establishing effectiveness and safety of the technique, as well as factors that might influence the results. The main diagnostic method was retrograde urethrography and voiding cystourethrography in 100% of patients undergoing surgery, using voiding uroflowmetry for subsequent monitoring. The definition of success was a postoperative flowmetry with Qmax>15 ml/s, and in case of lower flow, we perform a cystoscopy to verify recurrence of stenosis or exclude other pathology. The median age was 42 years, with a mean follow up of 59 months. The length of stenosis valued by retrograde urethrography and voiding cystourethrography was in 91.6% of cases of >1 cm and urethroplasty was the initial treatment, followed in frequency by direct vision internal urethrotomy 9.3%. In the case of comorbidities associated with treatment with anastomotic urethroplasty it was observed that only Diabetes Mellitus had a tendency to statistical significance, with p=0.092, not demonstrating such significance in the case of hypertension or when the subject presented Diabetes Mellitus together with hypertension. Finally, the intervention was successful in 102 cases (95.3%), with only 5 cases (4.7%) where it failed, 4 of them treated with a new Anastomotic urethroplasty, with resolution of the

  11. Bladder preservation using chemoradiation therapy for locally invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, Toyofumi; Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Sato, Mototaka; Mori, Naoki; Sekii, Ken-Ichiro; Itatani, Hiroaki

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the long-term results and molecular markers of outcome with selective organ preservation in invasive bladder cancer using chemoradiation therapy. We examined locally invasive bladder cancer in 32 patients (30 men, 2 women; mean age at treatment 68.1 years) who underwent bladder-sparing protocols in the Department of Urology at Sumitomo Hospital between 2000 and 2005. The clinical stage was T2, T3, and T4 in 13, 16, and 3 patients, respectively. Our protocol includes aggressive transurethral resection of the bladder tumor (TURBT) and 46 Gy radiotherapy (2 Gy/fraction, 5 fractions/week) to the pelvis with concurrent cisplatin chemotherapy (20 mg/body/day, 5 days/week, the first and fourth week, intravenously). The initial evaluation included magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), urine cytology, and cystoscopy with a biopsy. During follow-up, if the patients developed superficial recurrence, they was treated with TURBT and intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG), while patients with invasive recurrence were advised to undergo a salvage cystectomy. We examined the association between the expression of the Bcl-2 family in pretreatment TUR specimens and patient outcome. The mean follow-up was 54.6 months. The first assessment after the induction chemoradiotherapy showed that bladder preservation was achieved in 27 patients (84.4%). The actuarial local control rate with an intact bladder was 56.3% (18 patients) at 3 years. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year cancer-specific survival rate was 90.6, 84.0, and 66.9%, respectively. The 5-year cancer-specific survival rate was 75.0, 67.2, and 33.3% in T2, T3, and T4, respectively. Bcl-x positivity was significantly associated with a poor cancer-specific survival rate (log-rank test, p=0.038). Chemoradiation therapy for invasive bladder cancer can achieve survival rates similar to those in patients treated with radical cystectomy, with successful bladder preservation. Our results suggest that the expression of Bcl-x is a

  12. Pain in interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome: do characteristics differ in ulcerative and non-ulcerative subtypes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killinger, Kim A; Boura, Judith A; Peters, Kenneth M

    2013-08-01

    Key differences between interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) subtypes (with and without Hunner's ulcer) have been noted. We hypothesized that pain characteristics in women grouped by IC/BPS subtype would differ. A survey was mailed to 749 women to assess IC/BPS pain and other characteristics. Cystoscopy/hydrodistention reports were reviewed for presence/absence of Hunner's ulcer. The McGill Pain Questionnaire Short Form© (MPQ-SF), Brief Pain Inventory (BPI), and Interstitial Cystitis Symptom and Problem Indices (ICSI-PI) assessed symptoms. Data were analyzed with Pearson's chi-square, Fisher's exact, t tests, and Wilcoxon rank tests. Of the 214 women that returned a survey (36 ulcerative and 178 non-ulcerative IC/BPS), similar proportions in each group reported that certain foods, exercise, and/or stress triggered symptoms. Fewer ulcerative patients reported pain with vaginal penetration than non-ulcerative (5/33, 15.2 % vs 76/160, 47.5 %; p = 0.0006). On the BPI, the ulcerative and non-ulcerative groups reported similar numbers of painful areas (mean 4.1 ± 6.1 and 4.1 ± 3.8; p = 0.33), and lower abdominal/pelvic pain was reported most (13/35, 37 % vs 79/172, 46 %; p = 0.34) followed by lower back pain (12/35, 34 % vs 69/172, 40 %; p = 0.52). Even though ICSI-PI, MPQ-SF, and BPI scores/responses did not differ, on the MPQ-SF the three words most frequently used by ulcerative patients to describe their pain were sharp, stabbing, and hot burning, and in non-ulcerative were aching, cramping, and tender. These measures did not reveal any significant differences in pain between subtypes. More research is needed in larger samples to determine whether differences exist.

  13. [Diagnostic and therapeutic concepts for vesicovaginal and ureterovaginal fistulas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Isabelle Joy; Fisch, Margit; Kluth, Luis Alex

    2018-02-01

     Vesico- and ureterovaginal fistulas are defined as abnormal connections between the urinary tract, on the one side, and the female genital system, on the other. Despite being highly prevalent as an acquired pathology of the urogenital system, there has as yet been no standardized protocol in place for diagnosing and treating these fistulas. This review analyses the current literature concerning vesico- and ureterovaginal fistulas in order to profile common diagnostic and therapeutic concepts.  Literature research was carried out using the data bases of Medline and PubMed. A general internet research was added as well as the subsequent analysis of textbooks. Subsequently 40 scientific publications, four textbooks and one internet source were consulted.  In the diagnostic process of not only vesicovaginal, but also ureterovaginal fistulas a timely vaginal examination followed by a cystoscopy and further imaging by retrograde vaginal methylene blue instillation should be carried out. In order to further the differential diagnosis of ureterovaginal fistulas in particular, additional imaging techniques may be required. However, the therapies of both fistulas manifest essential differences. Ureterovaginal fistulas are closed in a two-stage procedure. At first, a percutaneous nephrostomy is placed to decompress the renal collecting system and further drain the urine, followed by a second intervention, which closes the fistula. The management of vesicovaginal fistulas includes both conservative and surgical concepts, the latter of which may in turn be divided into a transabdominal and/or a transvaginal approach. Essentially, transabdominal fistula surgery should, at first, include the identification of the orifices of both ureters to subsequently splint them as indicated. This should be followed by the excision of the fistula. In the case of large fistulas a flap reconstruction of the area may be considered after the mobilisation of the surrounding tissue. Despite

  14. Endockscope: using mobile technology to create global point of service endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, William; Shreim, Samir; Yoon, Renai; Huynh, Victor B; Dash, Atreya; Clayman, Ralph; Lee, Hak J

    2013-09-01

    Recent advances and the widespread availability of smartphones have ushered in a new wave of innovations in healthcare. We present our initial experience with Endockscope, a new docking system that optimizes the coupling of the iPhone 4S with modern endoscopes. Using the United States Air Force resolution target, we compared the image resolution (line pairs/mm) of a flexible cystoscope coupled to the Endockscope+iPhone to the Storz high definition (HD) camera (H3-Z Versatile). We then used the Munsell ColorChecker chart to compare the color resolution with a 0° laparoscope. Furthermore, 12 expert endoscopists blindly compared and evaluated images from a porcine model using a cystoscope and ureteroscope for both systems. Finally, we also compared the cost (average of two company listed prices) and weight (lb) of the two systems. Overall, the image resolution allowed by the Endockscope was identical to the traditional HD camera (4.49 vs 4.49 lp/mm). Red (ΔE=9.26 vs 9.69) demonstrated better color resolution for iPhone, but green (ΔE=7.76 vs 10.95), and blue (ΔE=12.35 vs 14.66) revealed better color resolution with the Storz HD camera. Expert reviews of cystoscopic images acquired with the HD camera were superior in image, color, and overall quality (P=0.002, 0.042, and 0.003). In contrast, the ureteroscopic reviews yielded no statistical difference in image, color, and overall (P=1, 0.203, and 0.120) quality. The overall cost of the Endockscope+iPhone was $154 compared with $46,623 for a standard HD system. The weight of the mobile-coupled system was 0.47 lb and 1.01 lb for the Storz HD camera. Endockscope demonstrated feasibility of coupling endoscopes to a smartphone. The lighter and inexpensive Endockscope acquired images of the same resolution and acceptable color resolution. When evaluated by expert endoscopists, the quality of the images overall were equivalent for flexible ureteroscopy and somewhat inferior, but still acceptable for flexible cystoscopy.

  15. The value of bladder mapping and prostatic urethra biopsies for detection of carcinoma in situ (CIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudjónsson, Sigurdur; Bläckberg, Mats; Chebil, Gunilla; Jahnson, Staffan; Olsson, Hans; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Månsson, Wiking; Liedberg, Fredrik

    2012-07-01

    It is well known that CIS is a major risk factor for muscle-invasive bladder cancer and that this entity can be difficult to diagnose. Taking cold-cup mapping biopsies from different areas of the bladder (BMAP) is commonly used in patients at risk of harbouring CIS. The diagnostic accuracy of this approach has not been assessed until now. By using the CIS found in the cystoprostatectomy specimen as an indicator of the true occurrence of CIS and comparing that with the findings of BMAP, it is clear that the sensitivity of BMAP to detect CIS when present is low and that negative findings should be considered unreliable. To assess the value of bladder mapping and prostatic urethra biopsies for detection of urothelial carcinoma in situ (CIS). CIS of the urinary bladder is a flat high-grade lesion of the mucosa associated with a significant risk of progression to muscle-invasive disease. CIS is difficult to identify on cystoscopy, and definite diagnosis requires histopathology. Traditionally, if CIS is suspected, multiple cold-cup biopsies are taken from the bladder mucosa, and resection biopsies are obtained from the prostatic urethra in males. This approach is often called bladder mapping (BMAP). The accuracy of BMAP as a diagnostic tool is not known. Male patients with bladder cancer scheduled for cystectomy underwent cold-cup bladder biopsies (sidewalls, posterior wall, dome, trigone), and resection biopsies were taken from the prostatic urethra. After cystectomy, the surgical specimen was investigated in a standardised manner and subsequently compared with the BMAP biopsies for the presence of CIS. The histopathology reports of 162 patients were analysed. CIS was detected in 46% of the cystoprostatectomy specimens, and multiple (≥2) CIS lesions were found in 30%. BMAP (cold-cup bladder biopsies + resection biopsies from the prostatic urethra) provided sensitivity of 51% for any CIS, and 55% for multiple CIS lesions. The cold-cup biopsies for CIS in the bladder

  16. Hematuria following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for clinically localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurka, Marie K; Chen, Leonard N; Bhagat, Aditi; Moures, Rudy; Kim, Joy S; Yung, Thomas; Lei, Siyuan; Collins, Brian T; Krishnan, Pranay; Suy, Simeng; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Lynch, John H; Collins, Sean P

    2015-01-01

    Hematuria following prostate radiotherapy is a known toxicity that may adversely affect a patient’s quality of life. Given the higher dose of radiation per fraction using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) there is concern that post-SBRT hematuria would be more common than with alternative radiation therapy approaches. Herein, we describe the incidence and severity of hematuria following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for prostate cancer at our institution. Two hundred and eight consecutive patients with prostate cancer treated with SBRT monotherapy with at least three years of follow-up were included in this retrospective analysis. Treatment was delivered using the CyberKnife® (Accuray) to doses of 35–36.25 Gy in 5 fractions. Toxicities were scored using the CTCAE v.4. Hematuria was counted at the highest grade it occurred in the acute and late setting for each patient. Cystoscopy findings were retrospectively reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Hematuria-associated bother was assessed via the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC)-26. The median age was 69 years with a median prostate volume of 39 cc. With a median follow-up of 48 months, 38 patients (18.3%) experienced at least one episode of hematuria. Median time to hematuria was 13.5 months. In the late period, there were three grade 3 events and five grade 2 events. There were no grade 4 or 5 events. The 3-year actuarial incidence of late hematuria ≥ grade 2 was 2.4%. On univariate analysis, prostate volume (p = 0.022) and history of prior procedure(s) for benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) (p = 0.002) were significantly associated with hematuria. On multivariate analysis, history of prior procedure(s) for BPH (p < 0.0001) and α 1A antagonist use (p = 0.008) were significantly associated with the development of hematuria. SBRT for prostate cancer was well tolerated with hematuria rates comparable to other radiation modalities. Patients factors

  17. No influence of smoking status on the performance of urine markers for the detection of bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deininger, Susanne; Hennenlotter, J; Rausch, S; Docktor, K; Neumann, E; da Costa, I A; Bedke, J; Stenzl, A; Todenhöfer, T

    2018-04-19

    The performance of urinary markers for detecting bladder cancer (BC) is influenced by various factors. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of smoking habits on the performance of four commonly used urine markers. Urine samples of 723 patients with suspected BC were analysed using urine cytology, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), immunocytology (uCyt+ test), and quantitative nuclear matrix protein 22 (NMP22) immunoassay. The smoking habits of all patients were recorded and a cystoscopy performed within 2 weeks after urinary marker testing. Rates of false negative and false positive results were compared between non-smokers, former smokers, and current smokers by contingency analyses. We included 723 patients in this study, 431 (59.6%) of which were non-smokers, 215 former smokers (29.7%), and 77 (10.7%) current smokers. 148 patients (20.5%) had a tumour at the time of urinary marker testing. Respective rates of false positive test results among non-smokers, former smokers, and current smokers were: 16.3, 19.1, and 11.5% (p = 0.81) for urine cytology; 36.8, 42.0, and 32.7% for the uCyt+ test (p = 0.88); 18.0, 19.1, and 13.5% for FISH (p = 0.66); and 69.5, 71.6, and 71.2% for NMP22 (p = 0.67). Respective rates of false negatives among non-smokers, former smokers, and current smokers were: 31.4, 15.1, and 28.0% for cytology (p = 0.34); 21.4, 22.6, and 16.0% for uCyt+ test (p = 0.67); 24.3, 13.2, and 28.0% for FISH (p = 0.88); and 10.0, 18.9, and 8.0% for NMP22 (p = 0.80). Our results strongly suggest that smoking habits do not affect performance characteristics of urinary markers in the diagnostics of BC.

  18. Complications in the management of bladder trauma in a third level hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echeverría-García, Fernando Enrique; García-Perdomo, Herney Andrés; Barney, Erika

    2014-05-01

    To determine the frecuency of complications during the management of bladder trauma and its associated factors in a third level reference Hospital. A cross-sectional study of adult patients admitted in a reference Hospital from January 2006 to June 2011 with the diagnosis of bladder trauma. We identified demographic variables, type of trauma (blunt, penetrating), diagnostic method, associated traumatisms, management of bladder traumatism, frequency of complications and mortality. Univariate analysis was performed with frequency tables, measures of central tendency and dispersion. Similarly, bivariate analysis was performed to explore the association between variables. We used chi-square test for categorical variables and Student's t test to compare quantitative variables. We reviewed 40 medical records, which met the eligibility criteria. The median age was 27 years (range 16-;67) and 85% (34 patients) were male. Twenty-nine patients (72.5%) had penetrating injuries, being mainly firearm projectile (96.55%) and 11 patients (27.5%) blunt injuries. Most patients had intraoperative diagnosis (67.5%), while 25%, 5% and 2% were diagnosed by CT-cystography, cystoscopy and voiding cystography respectively. 70% (28 patients) had intraperitoneal bladder injuries. Of the forty patients enrolled, thirty six (90%) underwent surgery, while only four (10%) received conservative management. A total of ten patients (25%) had some type of complication. The most frequent was persistent hematuria (40%) followed by surgical site infection (30%), orchitis (20%), urinary tract infection (10%), urine leakage through the operative site, or to the peritoneal cavity (10%). No mortality was detected. On the bivariate logistic regression model type of trauma, number of injuries, performance of cystostomy, use of perivesical drainage tube, chest trauma and small bowel trauma, no association was found with the presence of complications. The frequency of complications was 25%. The presence of

  19. Ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate: immunohistochemical findings and clinical significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sha JJ

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Jianjun Sha,1,2 Juanjie Bo,1 Jiahua Pan,1 Lianhua Zhang,1 Hanqing Xuan,1 Wei Chen,1 Dong Li,1 Zhaoliang Wang,1 Dongming Liu,1 Yiran Huang1,2 1Department of Urology, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, 2School of Biomedical Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China Introduction: To investigate the clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Methods: The clinicopathological and immunohistochemical data of seven patients with ductal adenocarcinoma of the prostate were retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent physical examination, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, bone scan, cystoscopy, and computed tomography (CT scan. The level of prostate-specific antigen (PSA before and after surgery was assessed. Different prostate cancer markers were used for immunohistochemical staining. Results: The mean age of the seven patients diagnosed with prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma in this study was 76.2 years (range 57–88. Five patients presented with intermittent and painless gross hematuria, one patient with progressive dysuria, and one patient with elevated serum PSA on routine health examination. The level of PSA before surgery ranged from 1.3 to 45.0 ng/mL. Immunohistochemical staining results of the prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma confirmed positivity for PSA, prostatic acid phosphatase, androgen receptor, and alpha-methyacyl co-enzyme A (CoA-reductase markers. Two of the patients underwent bilateral orchiectomy combined with anti-androgen therapy, three underwent transurethral resection of prostate, one received radical prostatectomy, and one received medical castration therapy. The clinical outcomes of all patients were satisfactory, based on follow-up data. The symptoms of hematuria and dysuria were ameliorated well, and the postoperative PSA level decreased below 4.0 ng/mL. Recurrence or metastasis of disease was

  20. Hemorrhagic cystitis in a patient receiving conventional doses of dacarbazine for metastatic malignant melanoma: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadianpanah, Mohammad; Shirazi, Mehdi; Mosalaei, Ahmad; Omidvari, Shapour; Ahmadloo, Niloofar

    2007-06-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis is a potentially life-threatening complication in patients receiving cancer therapy. This urologic emergency is commonly associated with the chemotherapeutic use of oxazaphosphorine alkylating agents. This report describes a case of hemorrhagic cystitis associated with dacarbazine treatment. A 63-year-old man with asymptomatic metastatic malignant melanoma received 3 cycles of dacarbazine (600-850 mg/m2) monochemotherapy, each 3 weeks apart. Two weeks after the third cycle, he presented with gross hematuria and mild dysuria. Physical examination revealed no significant finding. Hematuria was confirmed by urinalysis, and urinary infection was excluded by repeated urine cultures. Ultrasonography revealed diffuse bladder wall thickening with no discrete mass or ulceration. Cystoscopy findings revealed generalized inflammation and edema of the mucosa of the bladder, confirming the diagnosis of hemorrhagic cystitis. The patient's gross hematuria continued for 2 weeks and then completely resolved with supportive care. Two weeks after complete resolution, the patient experienced 2 transient episodes of gross hematuria that lasted a few hours and subsided spontaneously. Dacarbazine is currently considered the standard first-line treatment in patients with advanced malignant melanoma. At standard prescribed doses (a single dose of 850-1000 mg/m2 or 250 mg/m2 for 5 days per cycle), dacarbazine is a reasonably well tolerated chemotherapeutic drug; nausea, vomiting, and myelosuppression are the most common adverse effects. Association of dacarbazine with hemorrhagic cystitis has not been reported previously (in a PubMed literature search from 1950-2006), and only 1 case report associates temozolomide (an analog of dacarbazine) with hemorrhagic cystitis. Based on the Naranjo adverse drug reactions probability scale, an objective assessment revealed dacarbazine to be a probable cause of hemorrhagic cystitis in this case. This case report suggests that

  1. High precision bladder cancer irradiation by integrating a library planning procedure of 6 prospectively generated SIB IMRT plans with image guidance using lipiodol markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meijer, Gert Johan; Toorn, Peter-Paul van der; Bal, Matthieu; Schuring, Danny; Weterings, Jan; Wildt, Michel de

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To increase local control and decrease side effects for urinary bladder cancer patients by integrating a library planning procedure with image guidance using lipiodol markers. Methods and materials: Twenty patients with T2-T4N0M0 grade 2–3 invasive bladder carcinoma were treated according to an online adaptive protocol. Initially, the gross tumour volume (GTV) was demarcated during cystoscopy by injecting several drops of lipiodol in the submucosa around the tumour. Subsequently two CT scans were acquired with a full bladder and a voided bladder. On both scans, the boost volume (GTV) and the low-risk bladder volume were delineated. Using an interpolation tool, six concomitant boost IMRT plans with increasing bladder volumes were generated. For each fraction the procedure at the treatment unit was as follows: Firstly, a ConeBeam-CT was acquired and based on the amount of bladder filling the best fitting bladder contours and corresponding GTV and IMRT plans were selected. Secondly, the lipiodol markers were registered using the corresponding GTV contours and it was verified that the corresponding 95%-isodose surface covered the entire bladder. Finally, an online setup correction was applied based on this registration and the corresponding treatment plan was irradiated. Results: The lipiodol markers were very useful in outlining the GTV at the planning CT and for daily setup correction. While the patients strived for a full bladder filling at time of the treatment, this was seldom accomplished. Due to our protocol an appropriate plan with adequate coverage of the PTV and without excessive dose to healthy tissue was delivered every day. The treatment was very well tolerated by all patients. At the end of the treatment no grade 3 urinary or gastro-intestinal toxicity was observed. After a median follow-up of 28 months two local relapses occurred. Conclusion: Using the library planning approach combined with online image guidance using lipiodol markers, we

  2. High precision bladder cancer irradiation by integrating a library planning procedure of 6 prospectively generated SIB IMRT plans with image guidance using lipiodol markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Gert Johan; van der Toorn, Peter-Paul; Bal, Matthieu; Schuring, Danny; Weterings, Jan; de Wildt, Michel

    2012-11-01

    To increase local control and decrease side effects for urinary bladder cancer patients by integrating a library planning procedure with image guidance using lipiodol markers. Twenty patients with T2-T4N0M0 grade 2-3 invasive bladder carcinoma were treated according to an online adaptive protocol. Initially, the gross tumour volume (GTV) was demarcated during cystoscopy by injecting several drops of lipiodol in the submucosa around the tumour. Subsequently two CT scans were acquired with a full bladder and a voided bladder. On both scans, the boost volume (GTV) and the low-risk bladder volume were delineated. Using an interpolation tool, six concomitant boost IMRT plans with increasing bladder volumes were generated. For each fraction the procedure at the treatment unit was as follows: Firstly, a ConeBeam-CT was acquired and based on the amount of bladder filling the best fitting bladder contours and corresponding GTV and IMRT plans were selected. Secondly, the lipiodol markers were registered using the corresponding GTV contours and it was verified that the corresponding 95%-isodose surface covered the entire bladder. Finally, an online setup correction was applied based on this registration and the corresponding treatment plan was irradiated. The lipiodol markers were very useful in outlining the GTV at the planning CT and for daily setup correction. While the patients strived for a full bladder filling at time of the treatment, this was seldom accomplished. Due to our protocol an appropriate plan with adequate coverage of the PTV and without excessive dose to healthy tissue was delivered every day. The treatment was very well tolerated by all patients. At the end of the treatment no grade 3 urinary or gastro-intestinal toxicity was observed. After a median follow-up of 28 months two local relapses occurred. Using the library planning approach combined with online image guidance using lipiodol markers, we were able to deliver a highly conformal dose distribution

  3. Cystoscopic-assisted partial cystectomy: description of technique and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gofrit ON

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Ofer N Gofrit,1 Amos Shapiro,1 Ran Katz,1 Mordechai Duvdevani,1 Vladimir Yutkin,1 Ezekiel H Landau,1 Kevin C Zorn,2 Guy Hidas,1 Dov Pode1 1Department of Urology, Hadassah Hebrew University Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel; 2Department of Surgery, Section of Urology, Montreal, Canada Background: Partial cystectomy provides oncological results comparable with those of radical cystectomy in selected patients with invasive bladder cancer without the morbidity associated with radical cystectomy and urinary diversion. We describe a novel technique of partial cystectomy that allows accurate identification of tumor margins while minimizing damage to the rest of the bladder. Methods: During the study period, 30 patients underwent partial cystectomy for invasive high-grade cancer. In 19 patients, the traditional method of tumor identification was used, ie, identifying the tumor by palpation and cystotomy. In eleven patients, after mobilization of the bladder, flexible cystoscopy was done and the light of the cystoscope was pointed toward one edge of the planned resected ellipse around the tumor, thus avoiding cystotomy. Results: Patients who underwent partial cystectomy using the novel method were similar in all characteristics to patients operated on using the traditional technique except for tumor diameter which was significantly larger in patients operated on using the novel method (4.3±1.5 cm versus 3.11±1.18 cm, P=0.032. Complications were rare in both types of surgery. The 5-year local recurrence-free survival was marginally superior using the novel method (0.8 versus 0.426, P=0.088. Overall, disease-specific and disease-free survival rates were similar. Conclusion: The use of a flexible cystoscope during partial cystectomy is a simple, low-cost maneuver that assists in planning the bladder incision and minimizes injury to the remaining bladder by avoiding the midline cystotomy. Initial oncological results show a trend toward a lower rate of local

  4. p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 dual labelling as a marker for the presence of high-grade cancer cells or disease progression in urinary cytopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piaton, E; Advenier, A S; Carré, C; Decaussin-Petrucci, M; Mege-Lechevallier, F; Ruffion, A

    2013-10-01

    Overexpression of p16(INK4a) independent of the presence of E6-E7 oncoproteins of high-risk papillomaviruses has been identified in bladder carcinoma in situ lesions with or without concurrent papillary or invasive high-grade (HG) urothelial carcinoma. As p16(INK4a) and Ki-67 co-expression clearly indicates deregulation of the cell cycle, the aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 dual labelling in urinary cytology samples. Immunolabelling was performed in demounted, destained Papanicolaou slides after ThinPrep(®) processing. A total of 84 urinary cytology samples (18 negative, 10 low grade, 19 atypical urothelial cells and 37 high grade) were analysed for p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 co-expression. We assessed underlying urothelial malignancy with cystoscopy, histopathology and follow-up data in every case. Compared with raw histopathological results, p16 (INK4a) /Ki-67 dual labelling was observed in 48 out of 55 (87.3%) HG lesions and in 11 out of 29 (37.9%) negative, papillary urothelial neoplasia of low malignant potential or low-grade carcinomas (P = 0.05). All cases with high-grade/malignant cytology were dual labelled. Sixteen out of 17 (94.1%) carcinoma in situ cases and eight out of 14 (57.1%) cases with atypical urothelial cells matching with HG lesions were dual labelled. Extended follow-up allowed three cases of progression to be diagnosed in dual-labelled cases with negative/low-grade cytology results after a 9- to 11-months delay. The data show that p16(INK4a) /Ki-67 co-expression allows most HG cancer cells to be detected initially and in the follow-up period. Additional studies are needed in order to determine whether dual labelling can be used as a triage tool for atypical urothelial cells in the urine. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Promoter hypermethylation of HS3ST2, SEPTIN9 and SLIT2 combined with FGFR3 mutations as a sensitive/specific urinary assay for diagnosis and surveillance in patients with low or high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Roperch, Jean-Pierre

    2016-09-02

    on urine can be a useful strategy in diagnosis, surveillance and for risk stratification of patients with NMIBC. These results provide the basis for a highly accurate noninvasive test for population screening and allowing to decrease the frequency of cystoscopy, an important feature for both patient quality of life improvement and care cost reduction. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. Supplementary Material for: Promoter hypermethylation of HS3ST2, SEPTIN9 and SLIT2 combined with FGFR3 mutations as a sensitive/specific urinary assay for diagnosis and surveillance in patients with low or high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Roperch, Jean-Pierre; Grandchamp, Bernard; Desgrandchamps, Franç ois; Mongiat-Artus, Pierre; Ravery, Vincent; Ouzaid, Idir; Roupret, Morgan; Phe, Vé ronique; Ciofu, Calin; Tubach, Florence; Cussenot, Olivier; Incitti, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    methylation markers on urine can be a useful strategy in diagnosis, surveillance and for risk stratification of patients with NMIBC. These results provide the basis for a highly accurate noninvasive test for population screening and allowing to decrease the frequency of cystoscopy, an important feature for both patient quality of life improvement and care cost reduction.

  7. Muscle invasive bladder cancer treated by transurethral resection, followed by external beam radiation and interstitial iridium-192

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wijnmaalen, Arendjan; Helle, Peter A.; Koper, Peter C.M.; Jansen, Peter P.; Hanssen, Patrick E.; Kruger, Cornelis G.G. Boeken; Putten, Wim L.J. van

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the results of transurethral resection (TUR), external beam radiotherapy (EBRT), and interstitial radiation (IRT) with iridium-192, using the afterloading technique in patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: From May 1989 until September 1995, 66 patients with primary, solitary muscle invasive bladder cancer were treated with TUR, EBRT, and IRT, aiming at bladder preservation. According to the protocol, in three patients low-dose EBRT was applied, whereas 63 patients received high-dose EBRT. Immediately prior to IRT, 42 patients underwent a lymphnode dissection, and in 16 cases a partial cystectomy was performed. For IRT, two to five catheters were used and IRT was started within 24 h after surgery. The majority of patients received 30 Gy of IRT, with a mean dose rate of .58 Gy/h. In three patients, additional EBRT was applied following IRT. Follow-up consisted of regular cystoscopies, mostly done during joint clinics of urologist and radiation oncologist, with urine cytology routinely performed. The median follow-up period was 26 months. The Kaplan-Meier method was used for the determination of survival rates. Results: In seven patients, a bladder relapse developed. The probability of remaining bladder relapse free at 5 years was 88%. The bladder was preserved in 98% of the surviving patients. Metastases developed in 16 patients, and the probability of remaining metastasis free at 5 years was 66%. The cumulative 5-year overall and bladder and distant relapse free survival were 48% and 69%, respectively. Acute toxicity was not serious in the majority of cases; surgical correction of a persisting vesicocutaneous fistula was necessary in two patients, whereas a wound toilet had to be performed in another patient. Serious late toxicity (bladder, RTOG Grade 3) was experienced by only one patient. Conclusions: Interstitial radiation preceded by TUR and EBRT, in a selected group of patients with muscle invasive bladder

  8. Urological management (medical and surgical of BK-virus associated haemorrhagic cystitis in children following haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Vasdev

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Haemorrhagic cystitis (HC is uncommon and in its severe form potentially life threatening complication of Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT in children. We present our single centre experience in the urological management of this clinically challenging condition. Patients and Methods: Fourteen patients were diagnosed with BK-Virus HC in our centre. The mean age at diagnosis was 8.8 years (range, 3.2-18.4 years. The mean number of days post-BMT until onset of HC was 20.8 (range, 1 – 51. While all patients tested urine positive for BKV at the clinical onset of HC, only four patients had viral quantification, with viral loads ranging from 97,000 to >1 billion/ml. 8 patients had clinical HC. Ten patients experienced acute GVHD (grade I: 6 patients, grade II: 3 patients, grade 4: 1 patient.Results: Four patients received medical management for their HC. Treatments included hyperhydration, MESNA, blood and platelet transfusion, premarin and oxybutynin (Table 6.  Two patients received both medical and surgical management which included cystoscopy with clot evacuation, bladder irrigation and supra-pubic catheter insertion. One patient received exclusive surgical management. Seven patients were treated conservatively. Conclusion: There is limited available evidence for other potential therapeutic strategies highlighting the need for more research into the pathophysiology of HSCT-associated HC. Commonly used interventions with possible clinical benefit (e.g. cidofovir, ciprofloxacin still require to be evaluated in multi-centre, high-quality studies. Potential future preventative and therapeutic options, such as modulation of conditioning, immunosuppression and engraftment, new antiviral and anti-inflammatory and less nephrotoxic agents need to be assessed.---------------------------Cite this article as:Vasdev N, Davidson A, Harkensee C, Slatter M, Gennery A, Willetts I, Thorpe A.Urological management (medical and surgical of BK

  9. Prophylactic antibiotics for endoscopy-associated peritonitis in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hsu Wu

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD peritonitis may develop after endoscopic procedures, and the benefit of prophylactic antibiotics is unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether prophylactic antibiotics reduce the incidence of peritonitis in these patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all endoscopic procedures, including esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD, colonoscopy, sigmoidoscopy, cystoscopy, hysteroscopy, and hysteroscopy-assisted intrauterine device (IUD implantation/removal, performed in CAPD patients at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan, between February 2001 and February 2012. RESULTS: Four hundred and thirty-three patients were enrolled, and 125 endoscopies were performed in 45 patients. Eight (6.4% peritonitis episodes developed after the examination. Antibiotics were used in 26 procedures, and none of the patients had peritonitis (0% vs. 8.1% without antibiotic use; p=0.20. The peritonitis rate was significantly higher in the non-EGD group than in the EGD group (15.9% [7/44] vs. 1.2% [1/81]; p<0.005. Antibiotic use prior to non-EGD examinations significantly reduced the endoscopy-associated peritonitis rate compared to that without antibiotic use (0% [0/16] vs. 25% [7/28]; p<0.05. Peritonitis only occurred if invasive procedures were performed, such as biopsy, polypectomy, or IUD implantation, (noninvasive procedures, 0% [0/20] vs. invasive procedures, 30.4% [7/23]; p<0.05. No peritonitis was noted if antibiotics were used prior to examination with invasive procedures (0% [0/10] vs. 53.8% [7/13] without antibiotic use; p<0.05. Although not statistically significant, antibiotics may play a role in preventing gynecologic procedure-related peritonitis (antibiotics, 0% [0/4] vs. no antibiotics, 55.6% [5/9]; p=0.10. CONCLUSION: Antibiotic prophylaxis significantly reduced endoscopy-associated PD peritonitis in the non-EGD group. Endoscopically assisted invasive procedures, such

  10. TOT versus TVT – mesh surgical treatment in stress urinary incontinence

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    Ovidiu Bratu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Stress urinary incontinence is a highly debilitating condition, with an important impact over the quality of life. When the conservative treatment fails, the surgical treatment is a viable solution. Minimally invasive sling procedures have become the gold standard of surgical management for stress urinary incontinence (SUI in women. Material and methods: The study was conducted on 68 patients with stress urinary incontinence, 52 have undergone the retropubic tension-free vaginal tape and 16 patients were operated using the transobturator tape procedure. All the patients were evaluated before the operation and the indication of the surgical treatment was established on the basis of physical examination (all the patients had positive cough test, abdominal ultrasound (to determine postvoid residual urine volume, urinalysis and urine culture (the majority of the patients have had before the operation recurrent urinary tract infections. Results: The satisfaction was similar in both groups of patients, with an average satisfaction rate of 91% for TVT and 86% for the patients who have undergone TOT procedure. The patients were in a proportion of 78,9% at menopause, with an average number of natural births of 1.9 and a mean BMI of 28.2. Regarding the surgical duration, this has varied between 20 and 40 minutes, being higher in the TVT cases (up to 5-7 minutes longer than TOT, because cystoscopy was performed during the operation to verify if the bladder was perforated or not. The urethral catheter was removed immediately after the operation in the case of the TOT procedure and in the day after the operation for the patients who have undergone TVT procedures (all of these patients associated genital prolapse. The hospitalization time was 3 days. We haven’t encountered significant intraoperative and postoperative complications. Conclusions: The TOT and TVT procedures have proven to be highly effective and safe methods in the treatment of

  11. Microsatellite instability as prognostic marker in bladder tumors: a clinical significance

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    Mittal RD

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carcinoma of urinary bladder is one of the leading causes of death in India. Successful treatment of bladder cancer depends on the early detection & specific diagnostic approaches. In the present study, microsatellite instability (MSI has been evaluated as a prognostic marker in patients with superficial urinary bladder cancer in lower urinary tract for determining risk of recurrence. Methods A total of 44 patients with bladder tumors diagnosed with Transitional Cell Carcinomas [TCC] from lower urinary tract were selected for the study. Tumors were staged and graded according to AJCC-UICC (1997 classification and patients were followed with cystoscopy as per the protocol. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR was done to amplify microsatellite sequences at mononucleotide BAT – 26, BAT – 40, TGFβ RII, IGFIIR, hMSH3, BAX and dinucleotide D2S123, D9S283, D9S1851 and D18S58 loci in blood (control and tumor DNA. PCR products were separated on 8% denaturing polyacrylamide gel and visualized by autoradiography. Results MSI was observed in 72.7% of tumors at BAT – 26, BAT – 40, D2S123, D9S283, D9S1851 and D18S58 loci. Good association of MSI was seen with tumor stage and grade. MSI – High (instability at > 30% of loci was frequently observed in high stage (40.6% and high grade (59.4% tumors. Of 24 tumors of Ta-T1 stage with different grades, 11 (9/18 high grade and 2/6 low grade tumors recurred in the mean duration of 36 months. MSI positivity was significantly high in patients who had one or more recurrences (p = 0.02 for high grade and 0.04 for low grade tumors. Conclusions MSI may be an independent prognostic marker for assessing risk of recurrence in superficial tumors irrespective of the grade. Further studies on progression would help in stratifying the patients of T1G3 for early cystectomy vs bladder preservation protocol.

  12. Promoter hypermethylation of HS3ST2, SEPTIN9 and SLIT2 combined with FGFR3 mutations as a sensitive/specific urinary assay for diagnosis and surveillance in patients with low or high-risk non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    KAUST Repository

    Roperch, Jean-Pierre; Grandchamp, Bernard; Desgrandchamps, Franç ois; Mongiat-Artus, Pierre; Ravery, Vincent; Ouzaid, Idir; Roupret, Morgan; Phe, Vé ronique; Ciofu, Calin; Tubach, Florence; Cussenot, Olivier; Incitti, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    urine can be a useful strategy in diagnosis, surveillance and for risk stratification of patients with NMIBC. These results provide the basis for a highly accurate noninvasive test for population screening and allowing to decrease the frequency of cystoscopy, an important feature for both patient quality of life improvement and care cost reduction. © 2016 The Author(s).

  13. Fistules scrotales révélant un adénocarcinome mucineux du scrotum: à propos d’un cas

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Alaoui, Abdelilah; El Boté, Hicham; Ziouani, Oussama; Dembele, Oussman; El Sayegh, Hachem; Iken, Ali; Benslimane, Lounis; Nouini, Yassine

    2017-01-01

    Les fistules scrotales sont rares, et souvent secondaires à des lésions de tuberculose. Les adénocarcinomes mucineux sont des tumeurs qui renferment au moins 50% de mucus extracellulaire, et siègent préférentiellement sur le recto sigmoïde, la localisation scrotale est inhabituelle. Nous rapportons un cas d’adénocarcinome mucineux secondaire du scrotum révélé par des fistules scrotales, chez un patient âgé de 54 ans, sans antécédents pathologiques notables, qui présente depuis deux ans des fistules scrotales à répétition, sans autres signes associés. L’examen trouve de multiples fistules scrotales avec issue de pus épais, le toucher rectal est normal. Les explorations urologiques (UIV, UCRM, Cystoscopie, …) sont normales, le bilan infectieux ainsi que la recherche de BK dans les urines et le crachat sont négatives. La biopsie de la peau scrotale est revenue en faveur d’un adénocarcinome mucineux moyennement différencié, dont l’étude immun histochimique est en faveur d’une origine primitive colorectale. L’évolution a été marqué par l’apparition de fistules anales complexes, ayant a l’IRM une caractéristique active, alimentant plusieurs collections pelvi périnéales comportant des bourgeons charnus. Sur le plan thérapeutique et vu la rareté de ce cancer, il n’y a pas de consensus. La résection chirurgicale reste le traitement de choix pour cette affection. La radio chimiothérapie pré opératoire est préconisée pour ce type de cancer mais son rôle n’est pas bien établi. Chez notre patient on a opté pour une radio chimiothérapie néo adjuvante première, avant la réalisation d’une amputation abdomino- périnéale. PMID:28674583

  14. Can re-cTURBT be useful in pT1HG disease as a risk indicator of recurrence and progression? A single centre experience

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    Roberto Giulianelli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Understaging after initial transurethral resection is common in patients with high-risk non muscle infiltrating bladder cancer (NMIBC and can delay accurate diagnosis and definitive treatment. The rate of upstaging from T1 to T2 disease after repeated transurethral resection ranges from 0 to 28%, although the rate of upstaging may be even higher up to 49% when muscularis propria is absent in the first specimen. A restaging classic transurethral resection of bladder tumour (re-cTURBT is the better predictor of early stage progression. According to some reports, the rate of positivity for tumor in re-cTURBT performed within eight weeks after initial cTURBT was as high as 18-77%, and in about 40% of the patients a change in tumor stage was reported. We aimed to investigate, in high risk group, the presence of residual tumor following white light classical transurethral resection of bladder tumor (WLre-cTURBT and the different recurrence and progression rate between patients with persistent or negative (pT0 oncological disease after WLre-cTURBT. Materials and methods: A cohort of 285 patients presenting with primitive bladder cancer underwent to WLcTURBT from January 2011 to December 2015; out of them 92 (32.28% were T1HG. In according to EAU guidelines 2011, after 4-6 weeks all HG bladder cancer patients underwent a WL recTURBT . All patients were submitted to a subsequent followup including cystoscopy every 3 months with multiple biopsies, randomly and in the previous zone of resection; urinary citology on 3 specimens and kidney/bladder ultrasound every 6 months. The average follow-up was 48 months. Results: Following WLre-cTURBT we observed a persistent disease in 18 (15.2% patients: 14 (77.7% with a HG-NMIBC and 4 (22.2% with a high grade (HG muscle invasive bladder cancer (pT2HG. After follow up of all 92 patients according to the guidelines EAU, we observed recurrence in 36/92 (39.1% and progression in 14/92 (15.2%. Of 14 NMIBC

  15. Delayed Cystectomy for T1G3 Transitional Cell Carcinoma (TCC) of the Urinary Bladder, NCI Retrospective Case Series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FAKHR, I.; EL-HOSSIENY, H.; SALAMA, A.

    2008-01-01

    , for this conservative approach, the overall survival (OS) was (84.4%) and the recurrence-free survival (RFS) was (41.3%), at 18 months; which are comparable to those reported in the literature for the delayed cystectomy approach. Conclusion: Adjuvant intravesical therapy with BCG with repeated cystoscopies, and delayed radical cystectomy until progression to the invasive disease carries a significant risk of mortality from invasive disease. This treatment policy may be acceptable for T1G3 bladder TCC, without concomitant carcinoma in situ (CIS), who don’t recur after intravesical BCG, however, patients who progress to invasive disease may skip stage II disease and present with stage III or IV, with consequent poor survival. There- fore, due to the aggressive biologic behavior of T1G3 cancer, a determination of a cutoff number for recurrence(s) or better evaluation parameters are needed, to proceed with cystectomy without awaiting muscle invasion

  16. Laparoscopic repair for vesicouterine fistulae

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    Rafael A. Maioli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The purpose of this video is to present the laparoscopic repair of a VUF in a 42-year-old woman, with gross hematuria, in the immediate postoperative phase following a cesarean delivery. The obstetric team implemented conservative management, including Foley catheter insertion, for 2 weeks. She subsequently developed intermittent hematuria and cystitis. The urology team was consulted 15 days after cesarean delivery. Cystoscopy indicated an ulcerated lesion in the bladder dome of approximately 1.0cm in size. Hysterosalpingography and a pelvic computed tomography scan indicated a fistula. Materials and Methods: Laparoscopic repair was performed 30 days after the cesarean delivery. The patient was placed in the lithotomy position while also in an extreme Trendelenburg position. Pneumoperitoneum was established using a Veress needle in the midline infra-umbilical region, and a primary 11-mm port was inserted. Another 11-mm port was inserted exactly between the left superior iliac spine and the umbilicus. Two other 5-mm ports were established under laparoscopic guidance in the iliac fossa on both sides. The omental adhesions in the pelvis were carefully released and the peritoneum between the bladder and uterus was incised via cautery. Limited cystotomy was performed, and the specific sites of the fistula and the ureteral meatus were identified; thereafter, the posterior bladder wall was adequately mobilized away from the uterus. The uterine rent was then closed using single 3/0Vicryl sutures and two-layer watertight closure of the urinary bladder was achieved by using 3/0Vicryl sutures. An omental flap was mobilized and inserted between the uterus and the urinary bladder, and was fixed using two 3/0Vicryl sutures, followed by tube drain insertion. Results: The operative time was 140 min, whereas the blood loss was 100ml. The patient was discharged 3 days after surgery, and the catheter was removed 12 days after surgery

  17. Forced diuresis and dual-phase 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT scan for restaging of urinary bladder cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harkirat S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The results of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET imaging carried out with the current standard techniques for assessment of urinary tract cancers have been reported to be less than satisfactory because of the urinary excretion of the tracer. Aims: To investigate the role of dual-phase FDG-PET/CT in the restaging of invasive cancers of the urinary bladder, with delayed imaging after forced diuresis and oral hydration as the scanning protocol. Settings and Design: FDG-PET has been considered to be of limited value for the detection of urinary tract cancers because of interference by the FDG excreted in urine. We investigated the efficacy of delayed FDG-PET/CT in the restaging of invasive bladder cancer, with imaging performed after intravenous (IV administration of a potent diuretic and oral hydration. Materials and Methods: Twenty-nine patients with invasive cancer of the urinary bladder were included in this study. Patients were divided into two groups: Group I (22 patients included cases with invasive bladder cancer who had not undergone cystectomy and group II (seven patients included cases with invasive bladder cancer who had undergone cystectomy and urinary diversion procedure. All patients underwent FDG-PET/CT scan from the skull base to the mid-thighs 60 min after IV injection of 370 mega-Becquerel (MBq of FDG. Additional delayed images were acquired 60-90 min after IV furosemide and oral hydration. PET/CT data were analyzed as PET and CT images studied separately as well as fused PET/CT images and the findings were recorded. The imaging findings were confirmed by cystoscopy, biopsy or follow-up PET/CT. Results: The technique was successful in achieving adequate washout of urinary FDG and overcame the problems posed by the excess FDG in the urinary tract. Hypermetabolic lesions could be easily detected by PET and precisely localized to the bladder wall, perivesical region and pelvic lymph nodes. PET/CT delayed images were able to

  18. Robotic repair of vesicovaginal fistula - initial experience

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    Ankush Jairath

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective The most common acquired fistula of the urinary tract is Vesicovaginal fistulae (VVF (1 posing social stigmata for the patient as well as a surgical challenge for the urologist. Here we present our initial experience with Robotic assisted laparoscopic repair of VVF, its safety and efficacy. Materials and Methods Seven out of eight fistulas were post hysterectomy; five had undergone abdominal while two had laparoscopic hysterectomy while one was due to prolonged labour. Two had associated ureteric injury. All underwent robotic assisted laparoscopic trans abdominal extravesical approach. Three 8 mm ports for robotic arms, one 12 mm port for camera and another 12 mm for assistant were used in a fan shaped manner. All had preoperative ureteric catheter placed. Bladder was closed in two layers and vagina in one layer. Omental flap placed in all cases except two where it was not possible. Drain and per urethral catheter placed in all cases. Double J stents were placed in two cases requiring ureteric implantation additionally. Results The mean age of presentation was 39.25 years (26-47 range with mean BMI being 26.25 kg/m2 (21-32 range. Mean duration between insult and repair was 9.37 months (3-24 months. Only in single case there was history of previous repair attempt. On cystoscopy four had supratrigonal VVF and four were trigonal with mean size of 13.37 mm (7-20 mm. Mean operative time was 117.5 minutes (90-150. There were no intraoperative/postoperative complications or need for open conversion. Mean haemoglobin drop was 1.4 gm/dL (0.3-2 gm. Drain was removed once 24-48 hours output is negligible. One patient had post-operative urinary leak at 2 weeks which ceased with continuation of catheterisation for another 2 weeks. Catheter was removed after voiding cystourethrogram showed no leak at 2-3 weeks postoperatively. Mean duration of drain was 3.75 days (3-5 and per urethral catheterisation (which was removed after voiding

  19. Forced diuresis and dual-phase 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET/CT scan for restaging of urinary bladder cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harkirat, S; Anand, SS; Jacob, MJ

    2010-01-01

    The results of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET imaging carried out with the current standard techniques for assessment of urinary tract cancers have been reported to be less than satisfactory because of the urinary excretion of the tracer. To investigate the role of dual-phase FDG-PET/CT in the restaging of invasive cancers of the urinary bladder, with delayed imaging after forced diuresis and oral hydration as the scanning protocol. FDG-PET has been considered to be of limited value for the detection of urinary tract cancers because of interference by the FDG excreted in urine. We investigated the efficacy of delayed FDG-PET/CT in the restaging of invasive bladder cancer, with imaging performed after intravenous (IV) administration of a potent diuretic and oral hydration. Twenty-nine patients with invasive cancer of the urinary bladder were included in this study. Patients were divided into two groups: Group I (22 patients) included cases with invasive bladder cancer who had not undergone cystectomy and group II (seven patients) included cases with invasive bladder cancer who had undergone cystectomy and urinary diversion procedure. All patients underwent FDG-PET/CT scan from the skull base to the mid-thighs 60 min after IV injection of 370 mega-Becquerel (MBq) of FDG. Additional delayed images were acquired 60-90 min after IV furosemide and oral hydration. PET/CT data were analyzed as PET and CT images studied separately as well as fused PET/CT images and the findings were recorded. The imaging findings were confirmed by cystoscopy, biopsy or follow-up PET/CT. The technique was successful in achieving adequate washout of urinary FDG and overcame the problems posed by the excess FDG in the urinary tract. Hypermetabolic lesions could be easily detected by PET and precisely localized to the bladder wall, perivesical region and pelvic lymph nodes. PET/CT delayed images were able to demonstrate 16 intravesical lesions (in 13 patients), with excellent clarity. Lymph

  20. Single-port laparoscopy in gynecologic oncology: seven years of experience at a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, Laura; Jernigan, Amelia M; Carr, Caitlin; Freeman, Lindsey; Escobar, Pedro F; Michener, Chad M

    2017-11-01

    Single-port laparoscopy has gained popularity within minimally invasive gynecologic surgery for its feasibility, cosmetic outcomes, and safety. However, within gynecologic oncology, there are limited data regarding short-term adverse outcomes and long-term hernia risk in patients undergoing single-port laparoscopic surgery. The objective of the study was to describe short-term outcomes and hernia rates in patients after single-port laparoscopy in a gynecologic oncology practice. A retrospective, single-institution study was performed for patients who underwent single-port laparoscopy from 2009 to 2015. A univariate analysis was performed with χ 2 tests and Student t tests; Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards determined time to hernia development. A total of 898 patients underwent 908 surgeries with a median follow-up of 37.2 months. The mean age and body mass index were 55.7 years and 29.6 kg/m 2 , respectively. The majority were white (87.9%) and American Society of Anesthesiologists class II/III (95.5%). The majority of patients underwent surgery for adnexal masses (36.9%) and endometrial hyperplasia/cancer (37.3%). Most women underwent hysterectomy (62.7%) and removal of 1 or both fallopian tubes and/or ovaries (86%). Rate of adverse outcomes within 30 days, including reoperation (0.1%), intraoperative injury (1.4%), intensive care unit admission (0.4%), venous thromboembolism (0.3%), and blood transfusion, were low (0.8%). The rate of urinary tract infection was 2.8%; higher body mass index (P = .02), longer operative time (P = .02), smoking (P = .01), hysterectomy (P = .01), and cystoscopy (P = .02) increased the risk. The rate of incisional cellulitis was 3.5%. Increased estimated blood loss (P = .03) and endometrial cancer (P = .02) were independent predictors of incisional cellulitis. The rate for surgical readmissions was 3.4%; higher estimated blood loss (P = .03), longer operative time (P = .02), chemotherapy alone (P = .03), and

  1. Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy for the Diagnosis of Urothelial Carcinoma in the Bladder and the Upper Urinary Tract: Protocols for Two Prospective Explorative Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, Esmee Iml; Freund, Jan Erik; Baard, Joyce; de Bruin, D Martijn; Laguna Pes, M Pilar; Savci-Heijink, C Dilara; van Leeuwen, Ton G; de Reijke, Theo M; de la Rosette, Jean Jmch

    2018-02-07

    Visual confirmation of a suspicious lesion in the urinary tract is a major corner stone in diagnosing urothelial carcinoma. However, during cystoscopy (for bladder tumors) and ureterorenoscopy (for tumors of the upper urinary tract) no real-time histopathologic information can be obtained. Confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE) is an optical imaging technique that allows for in vivo high-resolution imaging and may allow real-time tumor grading of urothelial lesions. The primary objective of both studies is to develop descriptive criteria for in vivo CLE images of urothelial carcinoma (low-grade, high-grade, carcinoma in situ) and normal urothelium by comparing CLE images with corresponding histopathology. In these two prospective clinical trials, CLE imaging will be performed of suspicious lesions and normal tissue in the urinary tract during surgery, prior to resection or biopsy. In the bladder study, CLE will be performed in 60 patients using the Cystoflex UHD-R probe. In the upper urinary tract study, CLE will be performed in 25 patients during ureterorenoscopy, who will undergo radical treatment (nephroureterectomy or segmental ureter resection) thereafter. All CLE images will be analyzed frame by frame by three independent, blinded observers. Histopathology and CLE-based diagnosis of the lesions will be evaluated. Both studies comply with the IDEAL stage 2b recommendations. Presently, recruitment of patients is ongoing in both studies. Results and outcomes are expected in 2018. For development of CLE-based diagnosis of urothelial carcinoma in the bladder and the upper urinary tract, a structured conduct of research is required. This study will provide more insight in tissue-specific CLE criteria for real-time tumor grading of urothelial carcinoma. Confocal Laser Endomicroscopy: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03013894; https://clinicaltrials.gov /ct2/show/NCT03013894?term=NCT03013894&rank=1 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6wiPZ378I); and Dutch Central

  2. Three kinds of double-J ureteral stents: a comparison of biocompatibility%三种类型双J输尿管支架的生物相容性比较

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    玉银华

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Ureteral stents used in clinical treatment are mostly made of silicone or polyurethane polymer materials, but these materials cannot be degraded and absorbed in the human body. Therefore, to develop a new type of double-J biodegradable ureteral stent has become a research focus. OBJECTIVE:To summarize the clinical application and development of different kinds of double-J ureteral stents. METHODS: Related literatures were retrieved from Wanfang, CNKI and PubMed databases using the keywords of "double-J ureteral, stent, clinical" in Chinese and English, respectively. The retrieval time ranged from 2010 to 2015. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION:Traditional double-J Ureteral stents can be divided into polymer stents and metal stents, both of which have poor biocompatibility and easily cause various complications. With the in-depth studies of ureteral stents, biodegradable ureteral stents have been developed, which have good mechanical properties, biological inertness and in vivo degradation that can ensure drainage of urine after implantation in the human body without affecting the dynamics of the upper urinary tract; have good histocompatibility, little reactions between tissues, and can disappear after absorption; can avoid the impact on the anti-reflux function at the junction between the ureter and urinary bladder; and can be degraded and excretedvia the urine after completion of drainage and support to avoid the secondary use of cystoscopy, and also to avoid urinary tract infections, renal dysfunction and other complications.%背景:在临床治疗过程中使用的输尿管多为硅胶或聚氨酯高分子材料制造,由于此类材料在人体内不能够自行降解并被人体吸收,所以研制新型可生物降解双J输尿管支架管成为目前研究的重点.目的:总结不同类型双J输尿管支架管的临床应用和研制方向.方法:应用计算机检索万方数据库、中国知网和PubMed文献数据库2010至2015年的文献,检索关

  3. Fluids and diuretics for acute ureteric colic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worster, Andrew S; Bhanich Supapol, Wendy

    2012-02-15

    cystoscopy (1 study, 60 participants: RR 0.67, 95% CI 0.21 to 2.13) when no fluids over six hours was compared to three litres IV fluids administered over a six hour period. There was no difference in stone clearance (1 study 43 participants: RR 1.38, 95% CI 0.50 to 3.84), hourly pain score or patients' narcotic requirements (P > 0.05 for all comparisons) when forced IV hydration of two litres over four hours was compared with minimal IV hydration at 20 mL/hour.One study did not provide any details which would have allowed us to assess any of the risk of bias items (selection, detection, performance, attrition or reporting bias). The second study did not report the method of randomisation or allocation (selection bias - unclear), they reported that the patients were blinded to therapy (low risk of bias), analgesics were administered according to predetermined pain score criteria (low risk), and assessment of stone passage was unlikely to have been biased by knowledge of group assignment (low risk). However the second study also reported a high percentage of participants excluded post randomisation (26%; high risk of bias). We were unable to assess or ascertain any of the other risk of bias items. We found no reliable evidence in the literature to support the use of diuretics and high volume fluid therapy for people with acute ureteric colic. However, given the potential positive therapeutic impact of fluids and diuretics to facilitate stone passage, the capacity of these interventions warrants further investigation to determine safety and efficacy profiles.

  4. Selective bladder preservation by combined modality therapy for invasive bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachnic, L. A.; Kaufman, D. S.; Zietman, A. L.; Dallow, K. C.; Griffin, P. P.; Heney, N. M.; Althausen, A. F.; Shipley, W. U.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To assess the success of selective organ preservation or radical cystectomy in a large group of patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer treated with induction by combined transurethral resection (TURBT), systemic chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Materials and Methods: 106 patients (median age 68 years) were treated with induction by maximal TURBT and 2 cycles of chemotherapy (methotrexate, cisplatin, vinblastine - MCV) followed by 39.6 Gy irradiation in 1.8 Gy fractions with concomitant cisplatin. Tumor response was then evaluated by cystoscopy, rebiopsy, and urine cytology. Complete responders were consolidated with radiation to 64.8 Gy and further cisplatin. Any subsequent isolated invasive local relapse was managed by cystectomy. Patients with any less than a complete response (CR) were recommended cystectomy. Median follow-up was 4.4 years. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess outcome. Results: 74 CR patients (70%) and 7 non-cystectomy candidates with less than a CR (7%) received consolidation chemotherapy and radiation. 13 incomplete responders (12%) underwent immediate cystectomy. 6 patients underwent cystectomy because they could not tolerate induction chemo-radiation. 1 complete response patient underwent radical cystectomy. 83 patients completed their planned therapy but 5 died of treatment related toxicity during induction chemotherapy. Five year actuarial overall survival and disease-specific survival were 52% and 60% respectively. For T2 patients, actuarial overall survival was 63%, and for T3-4, 45%. Five year survival with an intact functioning bladder was 43%. Five year freedom from distant metastases was 66%. Of those who had a CR after TURBT and MCV, the risk of a subsequent invasive bladder relapse was 18% at 5 years. Of those who had a CR after the completion of induction chemotherapy and 39.6 Gy, this risk was 21%. 18 patients (17%) have experienced a non-invasive bladder relapse requiring further TUR and

  5. Selective bladder preservation by combined modality therapy for invasive bladder cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kachnic, L A; Kaufman, D S; Zietman, A L; Dallow, K C; Griffin, P P; Heney, N M; Althausen, A F; Shipley, W U

    1995-07-01

    Purpose/Objective: To assess the success of selective organ preservation or radical cystectomy in a large group of patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer treated with induction by combined transurethral resection (TURBT), systemic chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Materials and Methods: 106 patients (median age 68 years) were treated with induction by maximal TURBT and 2 cycles of chemotherapy (methotrexate, cisplatin, vinblastine - MCV) followed by 39.6 Gy irradiation in 1.8 Gy fractions with concomitant cisplatin. Tumor response was then evaluated by cystoscopy, rebiopsy, and urine cytology. Complete responders were consolidated with radiation to 64.8 Gy and further cisplatin. Any subsequent isolated invasive local relapse was managed by cystectomy. Patients with any less than a complete response (CR) were recommended cystectomy. Median follow-up was 4.4 years. Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess outcome. Results: 74 CR patients (70%) and 7 non-cystectomy candidates with less than a CR (7%) received consolidation chemotherapy and radiation. 13 incomplete responders (12%) underwent immediate cystectomy. 6 patients underwent cystectomy because they could not tolerate induction chemo-radiation. 1 complete response patient underwent radical cystectomy. 83 patients completed their planned therapy but 5 died of treatment related toxicity during induction chemotherapy. Five year actuarial overall survival and disease-specific survival were 52% and 60% respectively. For T2 patients, actuarial overall survival was 63%, and for T3-4, 45%. Five year survival with an intact functioning bladder was 43%. Five year freedom from distant metastases was 66%. Of those who had a CR after TURBT and MCV, the risk of a subsequent invasive bladder relapse was 18% at 5 years. Of those who had a CR after the completion of induction chemotherapy and 39.6 Gy, this risk was 21%. 18 patients (17%) have experienced a non-invasive bladder relapse requiring further TUR and

  6. Urogenital fistulae: A prospective study of 50 cases at a tertiary care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathur Rajkumar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The misfortunate incident of formation of a urogenital fistula remains a major challenge for surgical urologists worldwide. Such fistulae may not be a life-threatening problem, but surely the women face demoralization, social boycott and even divorce and separation. The fistula may be vaginal, recto-vaginal or a combination of the two. The World Health Organization (WHO has estimated that in the developing nations, nearly 5 million women annually suffer severe morbidity with obstetric fistulae being the foremost on the list. The objective of our study was to enunciate the patient demography, patient profile, incidence, type of surgery, as well as the long-term outcomes encountered in the management of all types of genital fistulae at a tertiary care centre. Materials and Methods: 50 consecutive patients, attending the outpatient department with urogenital fistulae, were studied during the period of 5 years from July 2005 to July 2009. All female patients with complaints of urinary incontinence and fecal incontinence and dribbling, patients having a history of obstructed labor, radiotherapy, instrumental delivery, foreign body or trauma and with a history of hysterectomy (abdominal/ vaginal and lower segment caesarean section (LSCS were included. A thorough urological examination included a dye study using methylene blue, Renal function tests, X-ray KUB and intravenous urography (IVU. Cystoscopy along with examination under anaesthesia (EUA were done to assess the actual extent of injury. All patients were subjected to appropriate surgical interventions via the same combination of surgeons . Post operatively, prophylactic antibiotics were administered to all patients and patients were managed till discharge and followed thereafter via regular outpatient visits for a period of 3 years. Results: Age of patients ranged from 21 to 40 years. 64% patients hailed from rural areas, 76% were from the lower socio-economic strata, 40

  7. Imaging of transitional cell carcinomas of the urinary tracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozmen, M.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) is the most common urothelial neoplasm to involve the upper urinary tract and bladder. Prognosis significantly worsens with deeper invasion. The role of imaging is to detect the tiniest urothelial neoplasms while still potentially resectable and curable. In case of advance disease, imaging should identify the extent of disease. Intravenous or retrograde urography, ultrasonography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging have been used for diagnosis of TCC. The diagnostic performances of these imaging modalities differ from each other. A recent review regarding imaging of TCC by Razavi et al states that the retrieved sensitivity/specificity for the detection of TCC of upper urinary tract for CT urography (CTU), MR urography, excretory urography, and retrograde urography were 96%/99%, 69%/97%, 80%/81%, and 96%/96%, respectively. For detecting bladder cancer, the retrieved sensitivity/specificity for CT cystography, MR cystography, and ultrasonography were 94%/98%, 91%/95%, and 78%/96%, respectively. They conclude that CT urography is the best imaging technique for confirming or excluding malignancy in the upper urinary tract, whereas CT cystography has the best diagnostic performance for diagnosing bladder cancer. While cystoscopy is still considered by most to be the gold-standard for evaluation of the urinary bladder, CTU is playing an increasing role in the detection of urinary bladder urothelial neoplasms. As with the upper urinary tract, bladder urothelial neoplasms typically present as a filling defect, a focal mass, or an area of abnormal focal wall thickening. Magnetic resonance imaging is superior for evaluation of the depth of tumour invasion into the bladder wall, but this knowledge may not ultimately affect treatment as feasibility for radical cystectomy depends on staging by a combination of clinical, histopathological and imaging findings. Radical cystectomy may include resection of adjacent organs

  8. Usefulness of Bladder Tumour Antigen (BTA) and Urinary Bladder Cancer test (UBC) in Transitional Cell Bladder Cancer (TCC) diagnosis and follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuvoli, S.; Spanu, A.; Masia, A.; Mulas, A.; Falchi, A.; Solinas, M.E.; Marrosu, A.; Madeddu, G.; Mocci, A.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: We evaluated BTA and UBC clinical utility in TCC diagnosis and follow-up. Materials and Methods: We enrolled consecutively 96 untreated TCC, 73 other genitourinary carcinomas (OC), 106 benign genitourinary diseases (BD) and 75 normal controls (C). After trans-urethral resection (TUR), TCC were classified by clinical staging (9 Ta, 27 T1, 32 T2, 20 T3 and 8 T4) and pathological grading (14 G1, 28 G2, 41 G3 and 13 G4). Urine BTA and UBC were assayed by monoclonal antibody methods, IEMA and IRMA, respectively (cut-off:14 U/ml and 8 μg/l, respectively). Results: Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy were 83.6%, 75.1%, 64.6%, 89.% and 72.4%, respectively for BTA and 53.1%, 89.4%, 72.8%, 78% and 75.6%, respectively for UBC. BTA and UBC specificities were determined combining OC and BD data, although UBC reached the highest value in OC (93.15%). Sensitivity and specificity differences between the two markers were significant (p<0.00001). BTA and UBC sensitivity and mean values significantly increased with progressive staging and grading. Moreover, marker levels were significantly higher in TCC compared to OC, BD and C. Seventy-one high stage and/or grade TCC underwent radical cystectomy, while 25 were monitored after TUR (14 cases: group A) or segmental cystectomy (11 cases: group B) for 8-32 months by periodical clinical examination, cystoscopy and urinary BTA and UBC assays. During follow-up, 9 group A cases developed recurrences and 5 were NED. BTA was elevated in 8/9 cases (88.8%) with recurrence, while borderline in the remaining one. UBC was above cut-off in 6/9 cases (66.6%) all with high BTA, while low in the remaining 3, confirming first observation data. Both marker increases preceded by several months the cystoscopic evidence of recurrence. In NED patients, BTA was low in all cases (100%), while UBC was under cut-off in 4/5 cases (80%) and slightly high in the remaining asymptomatic patient. Ten group B patients developed local recurrences

  9. Targeting bladder tumor cells in voided urine of Chinese patients with FITC-CSNRDARRC peptide ligand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia XY

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Xing-You Jia1, Qi Yu2, Zhe-Hui Zhang3, Xiao-Feng Yang11School of the First Clinical Hospital, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, China; 2Department of Information Management, Shanxi Medical University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, China; 3Research Center for Philosophy of Science and Technology, Shanxi University, Taiyuan, Shanxi, ChinaObjective: To study the practicality of the FITC-CSNRDARRC peptide ligand (containing the Cys–Ser–Asn–Arg–Asp–Ala–Arg–Arg–Cys nonapeptide in diagnosing and monitoring bladder tumors.Materials and methods: Between March 2011 and September 2011, 80 consecutive patients with radiographic abnormalities, localizing hematuria, other symptoms, or signs were studied using the FITC-CSNRDARRC ligand, urinary cytology (UC, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH. The sensitivity and specificity of these three technologies were determined and compared. Cystoscopy and tissue biopsy were taken as the “gold standards” for bladder tumor diagnosis in this study.Results: Twenty-nine out of 80 patients were diagnosed with a bladder tumor via histopathological examination. The FITC-CSNRDARRC ligand was positive in 23 out of 29 bladder tumor patients and produced false negatives in six (20.69% patients. The UC was positive in six out of 29 bladder tumor patients and produced false negatives in 23 (79.31% patients. The FISH was positive in 21 out of 29 bladder tumor patients and produced false negatives in eight (27.59% patients. The overall sensitivity as verified by the FITC-CSNRDARRC ligand was much higher than in UC (79.31% versus 20.69%, P < 0.001 and was slightly higher than in FISH (79.31% versus 72.41%, P = 0.625. The sensitivity of FISH was significantly higher than that of UC (72.41% versus 20.69%, P < 0.001. Sensitivities of the FITC-CSNRDARRC ligand and UC by grade were 58.33% versus 8.3% for low-grade (LG tumors (P = 0.031 and 94.12% versus 29.41% for high-grade (HG tumors (P = 0.003, respectively

  10. Perioperative complications and early follow-up with 100 TVT-SECUR procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, Menahem

    2008-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the complications and early follow-up of the tension-free vaginal tape (TVT)-SECUR, a new minimally invasive anti-incontinence operative procedure. A prospective, observational, and consecutive patient series was conducted. Perioperative and 12-month postoperative data were prospectively collected for the first 50 patients against the next consecutive 50 patients, among which TVT-SECUR specific surgical measurements were adopted (Canadian Task Force classification 2). In private hospital operative theatres, the TVT-SECUR operation was performed. Patients with urodynamically proved stress urinary incontinence were enrolled in this study after detailed informed consent was given. The TVT-SECUR, in the hammock shape to mimic the TVT-obturator placement, yet with no skin incisions, required neither bladder catheterization nor intraoperative diagnostic cystoscopy. The clinical and surgical data of 100 consecutive patients with TVT-SECUR were collected prospectively. Two patients had urinary obstructions and needed surgical tape-tension relief. One patient had a 50 mL paravesical self-remitting hematoma. At the first-month postoperative follow-up appointment, the objective therapeutic failure rate for the TVT-SECUR procedure among the 50 patients was 20.0% (10 patients). But when the tape was placed close to the urethra with no space allowed in between, the failure rate in the second patient group went down to 8.0% (4 patients); yet no further postoperative bladder outlet obstruction was diagnosed. Four (8.0%) patients in the first group had vaginal wall penetration with the inserters, requiring withdrawal, reinsertion, and vaginal wall repair. This was avoided with the second patient group by facilitating the inserters' introduction by widening the submucosal tunnel to 12 mm. Six (12.0%) other patients in the first group needed postoperative trimming of a vaginally extruded tape segment, performed in the office with satisfactory results

  11. Clinical outcome of primary small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder

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    Hou CP

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Chen-Pang Hou,1,2 Yu-Hsiang Lin,1,2 Chien-Lun Chen,1,2 Phei-Lang Chang,1,2 Ke-Hung Tsui1,2 1Department of Urology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-Linko, Taiwan, Republic of China; 2College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taiwan, Republic of China Purpose: Primary small cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is a rare malignant disease. It accounts for less than 1% of all urinary bladder carcinomas. The purpose of this study is to review the clinical features, the treatment modalities, and the overall survival of these patients. We also compare the clinical outcomes between patients of bladder small cell carcinoma (SCC and bladder urothelial carcinoma (UC. Materials and methods: We reviewed the charts of patients with bladder tumors from January 1995 to December 2012 in the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. A total of 2421 malignant bladder tumor patients were reviewed and there were 18 patients who were diagnosed with primary bladder SCC. The patients' characteristics, including age, gender, smoking history, presented symptoms, tumor size, locations, clinical stages, treatment modalities, pathology appearance, recurrence conditions, and survival conditions were all recorded. We also compared the clinical outcomes and the overall survival rates between patients with bladder SCC and those with UC. Results: Bladder SCC accounted for about 0.74% of all bladder malignancies in our institution. The mean age at diagnosis was 70.67 years, and the male-to-female ratio was 2.6:1. Thirteen patients had a history of cigarette smoking. All patients presented with symptoms of gross hematuria, and three of them had bladder tamponade requiring blood clot evacuation by cystoscopy. Only one patient had T1 disease, ten patients had stage III disease, and seven patients had lymph node or distant metastasis (stage IV disease. The mean tumor size was 4.29 cm in diameter. For the majority (61.11% of patients, SCC coexisted with UC components. The average survival time

  12. Urogenital fistulae: A prospective study of 50 cases at a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathur, Rajkumar; Joshi, Nitin; Aggarwal, Gaurav; Raikwar, Ramsharan; Shrivastava, Vaibhav; Mathur, Poonam; Raikwar, Poonam; Joshi, Rupali

    2010-05-01

    The misfortunate incident of formation of a urogenital fistula remains a major challenge for surgical urologists worldwide. Such fistulae may not be a life-threatening problem, but surely the women face demoralization, social boycott and even divorce and separation. The fistula may be vaginal, recto-vaginal or a combination of the two. The World Health Organization (WHO) has estimated that in the developing nations, nearly 5 million women annually suffer severe morbidity with obstetric fistulae being the foremost on the list. The objective of our study was to enunciate the patient demography, patient profile, incidence, type of surgery, as well as the long-term outcomes encountered in the management of all types of genital fistulae at a tertiary care centre. 50 consecutive patients, attending the outpatient department with urogenital fistulae, were studied during the period of 5 years from July 2005 to July 2009. All female patients with complaints of urinary incontinence and fecal incontinence and dribbling, patients having a history of obstructed labor, radiotherapy, instrumental delivery, foreign body or trauma and with a history of hysterectomy (abdominal/ vaginal) and lower segment caesarean section (LSCS) were included. A thorough urological examination included a dye study using methylene blue, Renal function tests, X-ray KUB and intravenous urography (IVU). Cystoscopy along with examination under anaesthesia (EUA) were done to assess the actual extent of injury. All patients were subjected to appropriate surgical interventions via the same combination of surgeons . Post operatively, prophylactic antibiotics were administered to all patients and patients were managed till discharge and followed thereafter via regular outpatient visits for a period of 3 years. Age of patients ranged from 21 to 40 years. 64% patients hailed from rural areas, 76% were from the lower socio-economic strata, 40% illiterate and 69% were short Statured. Vesico vaginal fistulae (VVF

  13. 'Targeted top down' approach for the investigation of UTI: A 10-year follow-up study in a cohort of 1000 children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadis, E; Kronfli, R; Flett, M E; Cascio, S; O'Toole, S J

    2016-02-01

    Investigations following urinary tract infection (UTI) aim to identify children who are prone to renal scarring, which may be preventable. In 2002, in an attempt to reduce unnecessary intervention, the present institution standardised the investigation of children with a confirmed UTI. This study aimed to identify the significance of urological abnormalities on investigations following a UTI in children, prior to the introduction of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guidelines. Clinical information on the first 1000 patients was retrieved from a prospective UTI hospital database. The follow-up period was 10 years. There were 180 males and 820 females (M:F = 1:4.5). The median age of presentation was 5 years (range 11 days-16 years). A renal ultrasound (US) was performed on all patients, and was normal in 93% of cases (n = 889) (see Figure). Of the 7% who had an abnormal US (n = 71), 54 were female and 17 male (M:F = 1:3). A total of 372 DMSA scans were requested and 350 attended their appointment. Of these, 278 cases (79%) were reported as normal, while 72 had an abnormality documented. Of these 72 patients with abnormalities on DMSA scan, 49 had a repeat DMSA scan: 30 demonstrated permanent scarring, while the DMSA scan became normal in 19. Sixteen of the 278 patients whose DMSA scan was initially normal had a repeat DMSA scan due to symptoms, and all scans were normal. Twelve (1.2%) patients required surgical intervention: three underwent circumcision for recurrent UTIs; three underwent endoscopic treatment of VUR; one had a PUV resection; one underwent a cystoscopy; three had a pyeloplasty for pelvi-ureteric junction obstruction; and one had a ureteric reimplantation for vesico-ureteric junction obstruction. After initial investigations and management, 936 patients were discharged from the UTI clinic: 47 of them re-presented - 40 with recurrent UTIs and seven with dysuria. Thirty-five of the 47 children who re-presented with urological

  14. Urinary morbidity following ultrasound-guided transperineal prostate seed implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelblum, Daphna Y.; Potters, Louis; Ashley, Richard; Waldbaum, Robert; Wang Xiaohong; Leibel, Steven

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the urinary morbidity experienced by patients undergoing ultrasound-guided, permanent transperineal seed implantation for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: Between September 1992 and September 1997, 693 consecutive patients presented with a diagnosis of clinically localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate, and were treated with ultrasound-guided transperineal interstitial permanent brachytherapy (TPIPB). Ninety-three patients are excluded from this review, having received neoadjuvant antiandrogen therapy. TPIPB was performed with 125 I in 165 patients and with 103 Pd in 435 patients. Patients treated with implant alone received 160 Gy with 125 I (pre TG43) or 120 Gy with 103 Pd. One hundred two patients received preimplant, pelvic external beam radiation (XRT) to a dose of either 41.4 or 45 Gy because of high-risk features including PSA ≥ 10 and/or Gleason score ≥ 7. Combined modality patients received 120 Gy and 90 Gy, respectively for 125 I or 103 Pd. All patients underwent postimplant cystoscopy and placement of an indwelling Foley catheter for 24-48 h. Follow-up was at 5 weeks after implant, every 3 months for the first 2 years, and then every 6 months for subsequent years. Patients completed AUA urinary symptom scoring questionnaires at initial consultation and at each follow-up visit. Urinary toxicity was classified by the RTOG toxicity scale with the following adaptations; grade 1 urinary toxicity was symptomatic nocturia or frequency requiring none or minimal medical intervention such as phenazopyridine; grade 2 urinary toxicity was early obstructive symptomatology requiring alpha-blocker therapy; and grade 3 toxicity was considered that requiring indwelling catheters or posttreatment transurethral resection of the prostate for symptom relief. Log-rank analysis and Chi-square testing was performed to assess AUA score, prostate size, isotope selection, and the addition of XRT as possible prognosticators of