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Sample records for cys25-his159 catalytic diad

  1. Predictors of physical inactivity in men and women with type 2 diabetes from the Detection of Ischemia in Asymptomatic Diabetics (DIAD) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Margaret M; Davey, Janice; Wackers, Frans J Th; Chyun, Deborah A

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this secondary analysis was to determine changes in physical inactivity from baseline to 5 years and to identify factors associated with and predictive of physical inactivity among individuals with type 2 diabetes enrolled in the Detection of Ischemia in Asymptomatic Diabetics (DIAD) study. DIAD was a prospective randomized screening trial that assessed the prevalence of silent ischemia in asymptomatic patients with type 2 diabetes. Subjects were recruited from diabetes and primary care practices at 14 centers throughout the United States and Canada. This is a secondary data analysis of the physical activity data (type and hours/week) collected. No intervention was conducted. In all subjects, physical inactivity rose from 24% at baseline to 33% at 5 years (S = 28.93; P physical inactivity as well as in factors predictive of physical inactivity at 5 years. Important factors associated at both time points included lower level of education, current employment, presence of peripheral and autonomic neuropathy, and indicators of overweight/obesity. Baseline physical inactivity was strongly predictive of physical inactivity at 5 years (odds ratio, 3.27; 95% confidence interval, 2.36-4.54; P physical inactivity. © 2014 The Author(s).

  2. Catalytic treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindley, W T.R.

    1931-04-18

    An apparatus is described for the catalytic treatment of liquids, semi-liquids, and gases comprising a vessel into which the liquid, semi-liquid, or gas to be treated is introduced through a common inlet to a chamber within the vessel whence it passes to contact with a catalyst through radially arranged channels or passages to a common outlet chamber.

  3. SHORT COMMUNICATION CATALYTIC KINETIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IV) catalyzes the discoloring reaction of DBS-arsenazo oxidized by potassium bromate, a new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace titanium (IV) was developed. The linear range of the determination of ...

  4. Catalytic distillation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  5. Catalytic distillation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  6. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellin, Michael J; Hryn, John N; Elam, Jeffrey W

    2013-08-27

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features Including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity. Also provided is a method for producing a catalytic membrane having flow-through pores and discreet catalytic clusters adhering to the inside surfaces of the pores.

  7. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  8. Catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vail' eva, N A; Buyanov, R A

    1979-01-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of petroleum fractions (undecane) was performed with the object of clarifying such questions as the mechanism of action of the catalyst, the concepts of activity and selectivity of the catalyst, the role of transport processes, the temperature ranges and limitations of the catalytic process, the effect of the catalyst on secondary processes, and others. Catalysts such as quartz, MgO, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, were used. Analysis of the experimental findings and the fact that the distribution of products is independent of the nature of the surface, demonstrate that the pyrolysis of hydrocarbons in the presence of catalysts is based on the heterogeneous-homogeneous radical-chain mechanism of action, and that the role of the catalysts reduces to increasing the concentration of free radicals. The concept of selectivity cannot be applied to catalysts here, since they do not affect the mechanism of the unfolding of the process of pyrolysis and their role consists solely in initiating the process. In catalytic pyrolysis the concepts of kinetic and diffusive domains of unfolding of the catalytic reaction do not apply, and only the outer surface of the catalyst is engaged, whereas the inner surface merely promotes deletorious secondary processes reducing the selectivity of the process and the activity of the catalyst. 6 references, 2 figures.

  9. Catalytic Conversion of Biofuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Betina

    This thesis describes the catalytic conversion of bioethanol into higher value chemicals. The motivation has been the unavoidable coming depletion of the fossil resources. The thesis is focused on two ways of utilising ethanol; the steam reforming of ethanol to form hydrogen and the partial oxida...

  10. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    acetylchlorophosphonazo(CPApA) by hydrogen peroxide in 0.10 M phosphoric acid. A novel catalytic kinetic-spectrophotometric method is proposed for the determination of copper based on this principle. Copper(II) can be determined spectrophotometrically ...

  11. Catalytic methanol dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcinikov, Y.; Fainberg, V.; Garbar, A.; Gutman, M.; Hetsroni, G.; Shindler, Y.; Tatrtakovsky, L.; Zvirin, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Results of the methanol dissociation study on copper/potassium catalyst with alumina support at various temperatures are presented. The following gaseous and liquid products at. The catalytic methanol dissociation is obtained: hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, and dimethyl ether. Formation rates of these products are discussed. Activation energies of corresponding reactions are calculated

  12. Concentric catalytic combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, Gerald J [Oviedo, FL; Laster, Walter R [Oviedo, FL

    2009-03-24

    A catalytic combustor (28) includes a tubular pressure boundary element (90) having a longitudinal flow axis (e.g., 56) separating a first portion (94) of a first fluid flow (e.g., 24) from a second portion (95) of the first fluid flow. The pressure boundary element includes a wall (96) having a plurality of separate longitudinally oriented flow paths (98) annularly disposed within the wall and conducting respective portions (100, 101) of a second fluid flow (e.g., 26) therethrough. A catalytic material (32) is disposed on a surface (e.g., 102, 103) of the pressure boundary element exposed to at least one of the first and second portions of the first fluid flow.

  13. Catalytic exhaust control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, H

    1973-09-01

    Recent achievements and problems in the development of exhaust control devices in the USA are reviewed. To meet the 1976 emission standards, catalytic systems for the oxidation of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons and for the reduction of nitrogen oxides to nitrogen and water are needed. While oxidizing catalysts using platinum, palladium, copper, vanadium, and chromium appplied on alumina or ceramic materials are more or less effective in emission control, there are no catalytic devices for the reduction of nitrogen oxides with the required useful life of 25,000 to 50,000 miles as yet available. In the case of platinum catalysts on monolithic supports, the operating temperature of 650 to 750/sup 0/C as required for the oxidation process may cause inactivation of the catalysts and fusion of the support material. The oxidation of CO and hydrocarbons is inhibited by high concentrations of CO, nitric oxide, and hydrocarbons. The use of catalytic converters requires the use of lead-free or low-lead gasoline. The nitrogen oxides conversion efficiency is considerably influenced by the oxygen-to-CO ratio of the exhaust gas, which makes limitation of this ratio necessary.

  14. Catalytic biomass pyrolysis process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayton, David C.; Gupta, Raghubir P.; Turk, Brian S.; Kataria, Atish; Shen, Jian-Ping

    2018-04-17

    Described herein are processes for converting a biomass starting material (such as lignocellulosic materials) into a low oxygen containing, stable liquid intermediate that can be refined to make liquid hydrocarbon fuels. More specifically, the process can be a catalytic biomass pyrolysis process wherein an oxygen removing catalyst is employed in the reactor while the biomass is subjected to pyrolysis conditions. The stream exiting the pyrolysis reactor comprises bio-oil having a low oxygen content, and such stream may be subjected to further steps, such as separation and/or condensation to isolate the bio-oil.

  15. Catalytic reforming methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  16. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  17. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Extensive studies have been conducted to establish sound basis for design and engineering of reactors for practising such catalytic reactions and for realizing improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so recent) developments in engineering reactors for catalytic reactions is ...

  18. Catalytic detritiation of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, M.L.; Lamberger, P.H.; Ellis, R.E.; Mills, T.K.

    1977-01-01

    A pilot-scale system has been used at Mound Laboratory to investigate the catalytic detritiation of water. A hydrophobic, precious metal catalyst is used to promote the exchange of tritium between liquid water and gaseous hydrogen at 60 0 C. Two columns are used, each 7.5 m long by 2.5 cm ID and packed with catalyst. Water flow is 5-10 cm 3 /min and countercurrent hydrogen flow is 9,000-12,000 cm 3 /min. The equipment, except for the columns, is housed in an inert atmosphere glovebox and is computer controlled. The hydrogen is obtained by electrolysis of a portion of the water stream. Enriched gaseous tritium is withdrawn for further enrichment. A description of the system is included along with an outline of its operation. Recent experimental data are discussed

  19. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  20. Catalytic production of biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theilgaard Madsen, A.

    2011-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the catalytic production of diesel from biomass, especially emphasising catalytic conversion of waste vegetable oils and fats. In chapter 1 an introduction to biofuels and a review on different catalytic methods for diesel production from biomass is given. Two of these methods have been used industrially for a number of years already, namely the transesterification (and esterification) of oils and fats with methanol to form fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), and the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of fats and oils to form straight-chain alkanes. Other possible routes to diesel include upgrading and deoxygenation of pyrolysis oils or aqueous sludge wastes, condensations and reductions of sugars in aqueous phase (aqueous-phase reforming, APR) for monofunctional hydrocarbons, and gasification of any type of biomass followed by Fischer-Tropsch-synthesis for alkane biofuels. These methods have not yet been industrialised, but may be more promising due to the larger abundance of their potential feedstocks, especially waste feedstocks. Chapter 2 deals with formation of FAME from waste fats and oils. A range of acidic catalysts were tested in a model fat mixture of methanol, lauric acid and trioctanoin. Sulphonic acid-functionalised ionic liquids showed extremely fast convertion of lauric acid to methyl laurate, and trioctanoate was converted to methyl octanoate within 24 h. A catalyst based on a sulphonated carbon-matrix made by pyrolysing (or carbonising) carbohydrates, so-called sulphonated pyrolysed sucrose (SPS), was optimised further. No systematic dependency on pyrolysis and sulphonation conditions could be obtained, however, with respect to esterification activity, but high activity was obtained in the model fat mixture. SPS impregnated on opel-cell Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and microporous SiO{sub 2} (ISPS) was much less active in the esterification than the original SPS powder due to low loading and thereby low number of strongly acidic sites on the

  1. Catalytic cracking of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.; Nowak, S.; Naegler, T.; Zimmermann, J. [Hochschule Merseburg (Germany); Welscher, J.; Schwieger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany); Hahn, T. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    A most important factor for the chemical industry is the availability of cheap raw materials. As the oil price of crude oil is rising alternative feedstocks like coal are coming into focus. This work, the catalytic cracking of lignite is part of the alliance ibi (innovative Braunkohlenintegration) to use lignite as a raw material to produce chemicals. With this new one step process without an input of external hydrogen, mostly propylene, butenes and aromatics and char are formed. The product yield depends on manifold process parameters. The use of acid catalysts (zeolites like MFI) shows the highest amount of the desired products. Hydrogen rich lignites with a molar H/C ratio of > 1 are to be favoured. Due to primary cracking and secondary reactions the ratio between catalyst and lignite, temperature and residence time are the most important parameter to control the product distribution. Experiments at 500 C in a discontinuous rotary kiln reactor show yields up to 32 wt-% of hydrocarbons per lignite (maf - moisture and ash free) and 43 wt-% char, which can be gasified. Particularly, the yields of propylene and butenes as main products can be enhanced four times to about 8 wt-% by the use of catalysts while the tar yield decreases. In order to develop this innovative process catalyst systems fixed on beads were developed for an easy separation and regeneration of the used catalyst from the formed char. (orig.)

  2. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    126, No. 2, March 2014, pp. 341–351. c Indian Academy of Sciences. ... enhancement was realized by catalyst design, appropriate choice of reactor, better injection and .... Gas–liquid and liquid–solid transport processes in catalytic reactors.5.

  3. Catalytic bioreactors and methods of using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, Robert Mark; Liu, Yangmu Chloe

    2017-07-25

    Various embodiments provide a bioreactor for producing a bioproduct comprising one or more catalytically active zones located in a housing and adapted to keep two incompatible gaseous reactants separated when in a gas phase, wherein each of the one or more catalytically active zones may comprise a catalytic component retainer and a catalytic component retained within and/or thereon. Each of the catalytically active zones may additionally or alternatively comprise a liquid medium located on either side of the catalytic component retainer. Catalytic component may include a microbial cell culture located within and/or on the catalytic component retainer, a suspended catalytic component suspended in the liquid medium, or a combination thereof. Methods of using various embodiments of the bioreactor to produce a bioproduct, such as isobutanol, are also provided.

  4. Catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Clausen, Bjerne

    2007-01-01

    Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change with par......Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change...... with particle size. We find that the fraction of low-coordinated Au atoms scales approximately with the catalytic activity, suggesting that atoms on the corners and edges of Au nanoparticles are the active sites. This effect is explained using density functional calculations....

  5. Catalytic properties of niobium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, K.; Iizuka, T.

    1983-04-01

    The catalytic activity and selectivity of niobium compounds including oxides, salts, organometallic compounds and others are outlined. The application of these compounds as catalysts to diversified reactions is reported. The nature and action of niobium catalysts are characteristic and sometimes anomalous, suggesting the necessity of basic research and the potential use as catalysts for important processes in the chemical industry. (Author) [pt

  6. Catalytic Decoupling of Quantum Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majenz, Christian; Berta, Mario; Dupuis, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    The decoupling technique is a fundamental tool in quantum information theory with applications ranging from quantum thermodynamics to quantum many body physics to the study of black hole radiation. In this work we introduce the notion of catalytic decoupling, that is, decoupling in the presence...... and quantum state merging, and leads to a resource theory of decoupling....

  7. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and catalytic oxidation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    were characterized by infrared, electronic, electron paramagnetic resonance ... The catalytic oxidation property of ruthenium(III) complexes were also ... cies at room temperature. ..... aldehyde part of Schiff base ligands, catalytic activ- ity of new ...

  8. Catalytic process for tritium exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansoo Lee; Kang, H.S.; Paek, S.W.; Hongsuk Chung; Yang Geun Chung; Sook Kyung Lee

    2001-01-01

    The catalytic activities for a hydrogen isotope exchange were measured through the reaction of a vapor and gas mixture. The catalytic activity showed to be comparable with the published data. Since the gas velocity is relatively low, the deactivation was not found clearly during the 5-hour experiment. Hydrogen isotope transfer experiments were also conducted through the liquid phase catalytic exchange reaction column that consisted of a catalytic bed and a hydrophilic bed. The efficiencies of both the catalytic and hydrophilic beds were higher than 0.9, implying that the column performance was excellent. (author)

  9. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Dickerson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic pyrolysis is a promising thermochemical conversion route for lignocellulosic biomass that produces chemicals and fuels compatible with current, petrochemical infrastructure. Catalytic modifications to pyrolysis bio-oils are geared towards the elimination and substitution of oxygen and oxygen-containing functionalities in addition to increasing the hydrogen to carbon ratio of the final products. Recent progress has focused on both hydrodeoxygenation and hydrogenation of bio-oil using a variety of metal catalysts and the production of aromatics from bio-oil using cracking zeolites. Research is currently focused on developing multi-functional catalysts used in situ that benefit from the advantages of both hydrodeoxygenation and zeolite cracking. Development of robust, highly selective catalysts will help achieve the goal of producing drop-in fuels and petrochemical commodities from wood and other lignocellulosic biomass streams. The current paper will examine these developments by means of a review of existing literature.

  10. Catalytic processes for cleaner fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catani, R.; Marchionna, M.; Rossini, S.

    1999-01-01

    More stringent limitations on vehicle emissions require different measurement: fuel reformulation is one of the most important and is calling for a noticeable impact on refinery assets. Composition rangers of the future fuels have been defined on a time scale. In this scenario the evolution of catalytic technologies becomes a fundamental tool for allowing refinery to reach the fixed-by-law targets. In this paper, the refinery process options to meet each specific requirements of reformulated fuels are surveyed [it

  11. Kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Boudart, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book is a critical account of the principles of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions in the light of recent developments in surface science and catalysis science. Originally published in 1984. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase acc

  12. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  13. Catalytic cracking of hydrocarbon oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1940-09-12

    A process is described for the vapor phase catalytic cracking of hydrocarbon oils boiling substantially in the gas oil range. The reaction takes place in the presence of a solid catalyst between 700 to 900/sup 0/F under pressure between atmospheric and 400 psi. A gas containing between 20 and 90 mol % of free hydrogen is used. The reaction is allowed to proceed until consumption of the free begins. The reaction is discontinued at that point and the catalyst is regenerated for further use.

  14. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen, is divided into two tasks. Task 1 centers on the activation of dihydrogen by molecular basic reagents such as hydroxide ion to convert it into a reactive adduct (OH{center_dot}H{sub 2}){sup {minus}} that can reduce organic molecules. Such species should be robust withstanding severe conditions and chemical poisons. Task 2 is focused on an entirely different approach that exploits molecular catalysts, derived from organometallic compounds that are capable of reducing monocyclic aromatic compounds under very mild conditions. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  15. Catalytic enantioselective Reformatsky reaction with ketones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez-Ibanez, M. Angeles; Macia, Beatriz; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2008-01-01

    Chiral tertiary alcohols were obtained with good yields and enantioselectivities via a catalytic Reformatsky reaction with ketones, including the challenging diaryl ketones, using chiral BINOL derivatives.

  16. Petrochemical promoters in catalytic cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Maria; Vargas, Clemencia; Lizcano, Javier

    2010-01-01

    This study is based on the current scheme followed by a refinery with available Catalytic Cracking capacity to process new feedstocks such as Straight Run Naphtha and Naphthas from FCC. These feedstocks are of petrochemical interest to produce Ethane, Ethylene, Propylene, i-Butane, Toluene and Xylene. To evaluate the potential of these new streams versus the Cracking-charged Residues, it was performed a detailed chemical analysis on the structural groups in carbons [C1-C12] at the reactor product obtained in pilot plant. A catalyst with and without Propylene Promoter Additive was used. This study analyzes the differences in the chemical composition of the feedstocks, relating them to the yield of each petrochemical product. Straight Run Naphthas with a high content of Naphthenes, and Paraffines n[C5-C12] and i[C7-C12] are selective to the production of i-Butane and Propane, while Naphthas from FCC with a high content of n[C5-C12]Olefins, i-Olefins, and Aromatics are more selective to Propylene, Toluene, and Xylene. Concerning Catalytic Cracking of Naphthas, the Additive has similar selectivity for all the petrochemical products, their yields increase by about one point with 4%wt of Additive, while in cracking of Residues, the Additive increases in three points Propylene yield, corresponding to a selectivity of 50% (?C3= / ?LPG).

  17. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  18. Catalytic converters in the fireplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouki, J.

    1995-01-01

    In addition to selecting the appropriate means of heating and using dry fuel, the amount of harmful emissions contained by flue gases produced by fireplaces can be reduced by technical means. One such option is to use an oxidising catalytic converter. Tests at TTS Institute's Heating Studies Experimental Station have focused on two such converters (dense and coarse) mounted in light-weight iron heating stoves. The ability of the dense catalytic converter to oxidise carbon monoxide gases proved to be good. The concentration of carbon monoxide in the flue gases was reduced by as much as 90 %. Measurements conducted by VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland) showed that the conversion of other gases, e.g. of methane, was good. The exhaust resistance caused by the dense converter was so great as to necessitate the mounting of a fluegas evacuation fan in the chimney for the purpose of creating sufficient draught. When relying on natural draught, the dense converter requires a chimney of at least 7 metres and a by-pass connection while the fire is being lit. In addition, the converter will have to be constructed to be less dense and this will mean that it's capability to oxidise non-combusted gases will be reduced. The coarse converter did not impair the draught but it's oxidising property was insufficient. With the tests over, the converter was not observed to have become blocked up by impurities

  19. Heterogeneous catalytic degradation of polyacrylamide solution | Hu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Modified with trace metal elements, the catalytic activity of Fe2O3/Al2O3 could be changed greatly. Among various trace metal elements, Fe2O3/Al2O3 catalysts modified with Co and Cu showed great increase on catalytic activity. International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology, Vol. 2, No. 7, 2010, pp. 110- ...

  20. Method of fabricating a catalytic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Harry W [Idaho Falls, ID; Petkovic, Lucia M [Idaho Falls, ID; Ginosar, Daniel M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-22

    A precursor to a catalytic structure comprising zinc oxide and copper oxide. The zinc oxide has a sheet-like morphology or a spherical morphology and the copper oxide comprises particles of copper oxide. The copper oxide is reduced to copper, producing the catalytic structure. The catalytic structure is fabricated by a hydrothermal process. A reaction mixture comprising a zinc salt, a copper salt, a hydroxyl ion source, and a structure-directing agent is formed. The reaction mixture is heated under confined volume conditions to produce the precursor. The copper oxide in the precursor is reduced to copper. A method of hydrogenating a carbon oxide using the catalytic structure is also disclosed, as is a system that includes the catalytic structure.

  1. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wayland, B.B.

    1993-12-01

    Focus of this project is on developing new approaches for hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. The strategies to accomplish CO reduction are based on favorable thermodynamics manifested by rhodium macrocycles for producing a series of intermediates implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Metalloformyl complexes from reactions of H 2 and CO, and CO reductive coupling to form metallo α-diketone species provide alternate routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics are promising candidates for future development

  2. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J; Koljonen, T [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  3. Non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.; Kurek, Harry

    2015-12-22

    A non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot flue gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is embedded in the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot flue gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, extended surfaces of metal material such as stainless steel or metal alloy that are high in nickel content are included within at least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path.

  4. Studies of Catalytic Model Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holse, Christian

    The overall topic of this thesis is within the field of catalysis, were model systems of different complexity have been studied utilizing a multipurpose Ultra High Vacuum chamber (UHV). The thesis falls in two different parts. First a simple model system in the form of a ruthenium single crystal...... of the Cu/ZnO nanoparticles is highly relevant to industrial methanol synthesis for which the direct interaction of Cu and ZnO nanocrystals synergistically boost the catalytic activity. The dynamical behavior of the nanoparticles under reducing and oxidizing environments were studied by means of ex situ X......-ray Photoelectron Electron Spectroscopy (XPS) and in situ Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The surface composition of the nanoparticles changes reversibly as the nanoparticles exposed to cycles of high-pressure oxidation and reduction (200 mbar). Furthermore, the presence of metallic Zn is observed by XPS...

  5. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  6. The evolution of catalytic function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurel, Marie-Christine; Ricard, Jacques

    2006-03-01

    It is very likely that the main driving force of enzyme evolution is the requirement to improve catalytic and regulatory efficiency which results from the intrinsic performance as well as from the spatial and functional organization of enzymes in living cells. Kinetic co-operativity may occur in simple monomeric proteins if they display “slow” conformational transitions, at the cost of catalytic efficiency. Oligomeric enzymes on the other hand can be both efficient and co-operative. We speculate that the main reason for the emergence of co-operative oligomeric enzymes is the need for catalysts that are both cooperative and efficient. As it is not useful for an enzyme to respond to a change of substrate concentration in a complex kinetic way, the emergence of symmetry has its probable origin in a requirement for “functional simplicity”. In a living cell, enzyme are associated with other macromolecules and membranes. The fine tuning of their activity may also be reached through mutations of the microenvironment. Our hypothesis is that these mutations are related to the vectorial transport of molecules, to achieve the hysteresis loops of enzyme reactions generated by the coupling of reaction and diffusion, through the co-operativity brought about by electric interactions between a charged substrate and a membrane, and last but not least, through oscillations. As the physical origins of these effects are very simple and do not require complex molecular devices, it is very likely that the functional advantage generated by the spatial and functional organization of enzyme molecules within the cell have appeared in prebiotic catalysis or very early during the primeval stages of biological evolution. We shall began this paper by presenting the nature of the probable earliest catalysts in the RNA world.

  7. Catalytic modification of cellulose and hemicellulose - Sugarefine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repo, T. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland),Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry], email: timo.repo@helsinki.fi

    2012-07-01

    The main goal of the project is to develop catalytic methods for the modification of lignocellulose-based saccharides in the biorefineries. The products of these reactions could be used for example as biofuel components, raw materials for the chemical industry, solvents and precursors for biopolymers. The catalyst development aims at creating efficient, selective and green catalytic methods for profitable use in biorefineries. The project is divided in three work packages: In WP1 (Catalytic dehydration of cellulose) the aim is at developing non-toxic, efficient methods for the catalytic dehydration of cellulose the target molecule being here 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF). 5-HMF is an interesting platform chemical for the production of fuel additives, solvents and polymers. In WP2 (Catalytic reduction), the objective of the catalytic reduction studies is to produce commercially interesting monofunctional chemicals, such as 1-butanol or 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MeTHF). In WP3 (Catalytic oxidation), the research focuses on developing a green and efficient oxidation method for producing acids. Whereas acetic and formic acids are bulk chemicals, diacids such as glucaric and xylaric acids are valuable specialty chemicals for detergent, polymer and food production.

  8. Catalytic Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqi Lao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This review surveys the literature regarding the development of catalytic versions of the Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions. The first section summarizes how arsenic and tellurium-based catalytic Wittig-type reaction systems were developed first due to the relatively easy reduction of the oxides involved. This is followed by a presentation of the current state of the art regarding phosphine-catalyzed Wittig reactions. The second section covers the field of related catalytic aza-Wittig reactions that are catalyzed by both phosphine oxides and phosphines.

  9. Catalytic models developed through social work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    of adolescents placed in out-of-home care and is characterised using three situated cases as empirical data. Afterwards the concept of catalytic processes is briefly presented and then applied in an analysis of pedagogical treatment in the three cases. The result is a different conceptualisation of the social......The article develops the concept of catalytic processes in relation to social work with adolescents in an attempt to both reach a more nuanced understanding of social work and at the same time to develop the concept of catalytic processes in psychology. The social work is pedagogical treatment...

  10. Efficient catalytic combustion in integrated micropellistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bársony, I; Ádám, M; Fürjes, P; Dücső, Cs; Lucklum, R; Hirschfelder, M; Kulinyi, S

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyses two of the key issues of the development of catalytic combustion-type sensors: the selection and production of active catalytic particles on the micropellistor surface as well as the realization of a reliable thermal conduction between heater element and catalytic surface, for the sensing of temperature increase produced by the combustion. The report also demonstrates that chemical sensor product development by a MEMS process is a continuous struggle for elimination of all uncertainties influencing reliability and sensitivity of the final product

  11. Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, David K.

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

  12. Catalytic hydrotreatment of refinery waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The object of the project is to produce liquid hydrocarbons by the catalytic hydroprocessing of solid refinery wastes (hard pitches) in order to improve the profitability of deep conversion processes and reduce the excess production of heavy fuels. The project was mostly carried out on the ASVAHL demonstration platform site, at Solaize, and hard pitches were produced primarily by deasphalting of atmospheric or vacuum distillation residues. The project includes two experimental phases and an economic evaluation study phase. In phase 1, two granular catalysts were used to transform pitch into standard low sulphur fuel oil: a continuously moving bed, with demetallation and conversion catalyst; a fixed bed, with hydrorefining catalyst. In phase 2 of the project, it was proven that a hydrotreatment process using a finely dispersed catalyst in the feedstock, can, under realistic operating conditions, transform with goods yields hard pitch into distillates that can be refined through standard methods. In phase 3 of the project, it was shown that the economics of such processes are tightly linked to the price differential between white and black oil products, which is expected to increase in the future. Furthermore, the evolution of environmental constraints will impel the use of such methods, thus avoiding the coproduction of polluting solid residues.

  13. Chemistry and engineering of catalytic hydrodesulfurization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuit, G.C.A.; Gates, B.C.

    1973-01-01

    A review with 74 refs. on catalytic hydrodesulfurization of pure compds. and petroleum feedstocks, with emphasis on reaction intermediates and structures of Al2O3-supported Ni-W and Co-Mo catalysts. [on SciFinder (R)

  14. Catalytic Aminohalogenation of Alkenes and Alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemler, Sherry R; Bovino, Michael T

    2013-06-07

    Catalytic aminohalogenation methods enable the regio- and stereoselective vicinal difunctionalization of alkynes, allenes and alkenes with amine and halogen moieties. A range of protocols and reaction mechanisms including organometallic, Lewis base, Lewis acid and Brønsted acid catalysis have been disclosed, enabling the regio- and stereoselective synthesis of halogen-functionalized acyclic amines and nitrogen heterocycles. Recent advances including aminofluorination and catalytic enantioselective aminohalogenation reactions are summarized in this review.

  15. Kinetic catalytic studies of scorpion's hemocyanin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queinnec, E.; Vuillaume, M.; Gardes-Albert, M.; Ferradini, C.; Ducancel, F.

    1991-01-01

    Hemocyanins are copper proteins which function as oxygen carriers in the haemolymph of Molluscs and Arthropods. They possess enzymatic properties: peroxidatic and catalatic activities, although they have neither iron nor porphyrin ring at the active site. The kinetics of the catalytic reaction is described. The reaction of superoxide anion with hemocyanin has been studied using pulse radiolysis at pH 9. The catalytic rate constant is 3.5 X 10 7 mol -1 .l.s -1 [fr

  16. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayland, B.B.

    1992-12-01

    This project is focused on developing strategies to accomplish the reduction and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. Our approaches to this issue are based on the recognition that rhodium macrocycles have unusually favorable thermodynamic values for producing a series of intermediate implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Observations of metalloformyl complexes produced by reactions of H{sub 2} and CO, and reductive coupling of CO to form metallo {alpha}-diketone species have suggested a multiplicity of routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in constructing energy profiles for a variety of potential pathways, and these schemes are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Variation of the electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Emerging knowledge of the factors that contribute to M-H, M-C and M-O bond enthalpies is directing the search for ligand arrays that will expand the range of metal species that have favorable thermodynamic parameters to produce the primary intermediates for CO hydrogenation. Studies of rhodium complexes are being extended to non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics. Multifunctional catalyst systems designed to couple the ability of rhodium complexes to produce formyl and diketone intermediates with a second catalyst that hydrogenates these imtermediates are promising approaches to accomplish CO hydrogenation at mild conditions.

  17. Adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles and methods of using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slowing, Igor Ivan; Kandel, Kapil

    2017-01-31

    The present invention provides an adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle including a mesoporous silica nanoparticle having at least one adsorbent functional group bound thereto. The adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle also includes at least one catalytic material. In various embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using and making the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles. In some examples, the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles can be used to selectively remove fatty acids from feedstocks for biodiesel, and to hydrotreat the separated fatty acids.

  18. Contributions to the theory of catalytic titrations-III Neutralization catalytic titrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaál, F F; Abramović, B F

    1985-07-01

    Neutralization catalytic titrations of weak monoprotic adds and bases with both volumetric and coulometric addition of the titrant (strong base/acid) have been simulated by taking into account the equilibrium concentration of the catalyst during the titration. The influence of several factors on the shape of the simulated catalytic titration curve has been investigated and is discussed.

  19. Atomically Precise Metal Nanoclusters for Catalytic Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Rongchao [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-11-18

    The central goal of this project is to explore the catalytic application of atomically precise gold nanoclusters. By solving the total structures of ligand-protected nanoclusters, we aim to correlate the catalytic properties of metal nanoclusters with their atomic/electronic structures. Such correlation unravel some fundamental aspects of nanocatalysis, such as the nature of particle size effect, origin of catalytic selectivity, particle-support interactions, the identification of catalytically active centers, etc. The well-defined nanocluster catalysts mediate the knowledge gap between single crystal model catalysts and real-world conventional nanocatalysts. These nanoclusters also hold great promise in catalyzing certain types of reactions with extraordinarily high selectivity. These aims are in line with the overall goals of the catalytic science and technology of DOE and advance the BES mission “to support fundamental research to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the level of electrons, atoms, and molecules”. Our group has successfully prepared different sized, robust gold nanoclusters protected by thiolates, such as Au25(SR)18, Au28(SR)20, Au38(SR)24, Au99(SR)42, Au144(SR)60, etc. Some of these nanoclusters have been crystallographically characterized through X-ray crystallography. These ultrasmall nanoclusters (< 2 nm diameter) exhibit discrete electronic structures due to quantum size effect, as opposed to quasicontinuous band structure of conventional metal nanoparticles or bulk metals. The available atomic structures (metal core plus surface ligands) of nanoclusters serve as the basis for structure-property correlations. We have investigated the unique catalytic properties of nanoclusters (i.e. not observed in conventional nanogold catalysts) and revealed the structure-selectivity relationships. Highlights of our

  20. Reactivity of organic compounds in catalytic synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minachev, Kh M; Bragin, O V

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive review of 1976 Soviet research on catalysis delivered to the 1977 annual session of the USSR Academy of Science Council on Catalysis (Baku 6/16-20/77) covers hydrocarbon reactions, including hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis, dehydrogenation, olefin dimerization and disproportionation, and cyclization and dehydrocyclization (e.g., piperylene cyclization and ethylene cyclotrimerization); catalytic and physicochemical properties of zeolites, including cracking, dehydrogenation, and hydroisomerization catalytic syntheses and conversion of heterocyclic and functional hydrocarbon derivatives, including partial and total oxidation (e.g., of o-xylene to phthalic anhydride); syntheses of thiophenes from alkanes and hydrogen sulfide over certain dehydrogenation catalysts; catalytic syntheses involving carbon oxides ( e.g., the development of a new heterogeneous catalyst for hydroformylation of olefins), and of Co-MgO zeolitic catalysts for synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons from carbon dioxide and hydrogen, and fabrication of high-viscosity lubricating oils over bifunctional aluminosilicate catalysts.

  1. Catalytic Organic Transformations Mediated by Actinide Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabell S. R. Karmel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This review article presents the development of organoactinides and actinide coordination complexes as catalysts for homogeneous organic transformations. This chapter introduces the basic principles of actinide catalysis and deals with the historic development of actinide complexes in catalytic processes. The application of organoactinides in homogeneous catalysis is exemplified in the hydroelementation reactions, such as the hydroamination, hydrosilylation, hydroalkoxylation and hydrothiolation of alkynes. Additionally, the use of actinide coordination complexes for the catalytic polymerization of α-olefins and the ring opening polymerization of cyclic esters is presented. The last part of this review article highlights novel catalytic transformations mediated by actinide compounds and gives an outlook to the further potential of this field.

  2. Highly Dense Isolated Metal Atom Catalytic Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaxin; Kasama, Takeshi; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    -ray diffraction. A combination of electron microscopy images with X-ray absorption spectra demonstrated that the silver atoms were anchored on five-fold oxygen-terminated cavities on the surface of the support to form highly dense isolated metal active sites, leading to excellent reactivity in catalytic oxidation......Atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites are promising materials with which to maximise metal efficiency and to enhance catalytic performance; however, their fabrication remains challenging because metal atoms are prone to sintering, especially at a high metal...... loading. A dynamic process of formation of isolated metal atom catalytic sites on the surface of the support, which was achieved starting from silver nanoparticles by using a thermal surface-mediated diffusion method, was observed directly by using in situ electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron X...

  3. Modeling and simulation of heterogeneous catalytic processes

    CERN Document Server

    Dixon, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis and mathematical modeling are essential components of the continuing search for better utilization of raw materials and energy, with reduced impact on the environment. Numerical modeling of chemical systems has progressed rapidly due to increases in computer power, and is used extensively for analysis, design and development of catalytic reactors and processes. This book presents reviews of the state-of-the-art in modeling of heterogeneous catalytic reactors and processes. Reviews by leading authorities in the respective areas Up-to-date reviews of latest techniques in modeling of catalytic processes Mix of US and European authors, as well as academic/industrial/research institute perspectives Connections between computation and experimental methods in some of the chapters.

  4. Catalytic Wastewater Treatment Using Pillared Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perathoner, Siglinda; Centi, Gabriele

    After introduction on the use of solid catalysts in wastewater treatment technologies, particularly advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), this review discussed the use of pillared clay (PILC) materials in three applications: (i) wet air catalytic oxidation (WACO), (ii) wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) on Cu-PILC and Fe-PILC, and (iii) behavior of Ti-PILC and Fe-PILC in the photocatalytic or photo-Fenton conversion of pollutants. Literature data are critically analyzed to evidence the main direction to further investigate, in particularly with reference to the possible practical application of these technologies to treat industrial, municipal, or agro-food production wastewater.

  5. Catalytic Kinetic Resolution of Biaryl Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Gaoyuan; Sibi, Mukund P

    2015-08-10

    Biaryl compounds with axial chirality are very common in synthetic chemistry, especially in catalysis. Axially chiral biaryls are important due to their biological activities and extensive applications in asymmetric catalysis. Thus the development of efficient enantioselective methods for their synthesis has attracted considerable attention. This Minireview discusses the progress made in catalytic kinetic resolution of biaryl compounds and chronicles significant advances made recently in catalytic kinetic resolution of biaryl scaffolds. © 2015 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Thermal and catalytic pyrolysis of plastic waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Almeida

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The amount of plastic waste is growing every year and with that comes an environmental concern regarding this problem. Pyrolysis as a tertiary recycling process is presented as a solution. Pyrolysis can be thermal or catalytical and can be performed under different experimental conditions. These conditions affect the type and amount of product obtained. With the pyrolysis process, products can be obtained with high added value, such as fuel oils and feedstock for new products. Zeolites can be used as catalysts in catalytic pyrolysis and influence the final products obtained.

  7. Janus droplet as a catalytic micromotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyaev, Sergey

    2015-06-01

    Self-propulsion of a Janus droplet in a solution of surfactant, which reacts on a half of a drop surface, is studied theoretically. The droplet acts as a catalytic motor creating a concentration gradient, which generates its surface-tension-driven motion; the self-propulsion speed is rather high, 60 μ \\text{m/s} and more. This catalytic motor has several advantages over other micromotors: simple manufacturing, easily attained neutral buoyancy. In contrast to a single-fluid droplet, which demonstrates a self-propulsion as a result of symmetry breaking instability, for the Janus one no stability threshold exists; hence, the droplet radius can be scaled down to micrometers.

  8. Catalytic burners in larger boiler appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silversand, Fredrik; Persson, Mikael (Catator AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-02-15

    This project focuses on the scale up of a Catator's catalytic burner technology to enable retrofit installation in existing boilers and the design of new innovative combinations of catalytic burners and boilers. Different design approaches are discussed and evaluated in the report and suggestions are made concerning scale-up. Preliminary test data, extracted from a large boiler installation are discussed together with an accurate analysis of technical possibilities following an optimization of the boiler design to benefit from the advantages of catalytic combustion. The experimental work was conducted in close collaboration with ICI Caldaie (ICI), located in Verona, Italy. ICI is a leading European boiler manufacturer in the effect segment ranging from about 20 kWt to several MWt. The study shows that it is possibly to scale up the burner technology and to maintain low emissions. The boilers used in the study were designed around conventional combustion and were consequently not optimized for implementation of catalytic burners. From previous experiences it stands clear that the furnace volume can be dramatically decreased when applying catalytic combustion. In flame combustion, this volume is normally dimensioned to avoid flame impingement on cold surfaces and to facilitate completion of the gas-phase reactions. The emissions of nitrogen oxides can be reduced by decreasing the residence time in the furnace. Even with the over-dimensioned furnace used in this study, we easily reached emission values close to 35 mg/kWh. The emissions of carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons were negligible (less than 5 ppmv). It is possible to decrease the emissions of nitrogen oxides further by designing the furnace/boiler around the catalytic burner, as suggested in the report. Simultaneously, the size of the boiler installation can be reduced greatly, which also will result in material savings, i.e. the production cost can be reduced. It is suggested to optimize the

  9. Catalytic gasification of oil-shales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, A.; Avakyan, T. [I.M. Gubkin Russian State Univ. of Oil and Gas, Moscow (Russian Federation); Strizhakova, Yu. [Samara State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    Nowadays, the problem of complex usage of solid fossil fuels as raw materials for obtaining of motor fuels and chemical products is becoming increasingly important. A one of possible solutions of the problem is their gasification with further processing of gaseous and liquid products. In this work we have investigated the process of thermal and catalytic gasification of Baltic and Kashpir oil-shales. We have shown that, as compared with non-catalytic process, using of nickel catalyst in the reaction increases the yield of gas, as well as hydrogen content in it, and decreases the amount of liquid products. (orig.)

  10. Using electron beams to investigate catalytic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bingsen; Su, Dang Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Transmission Electron microscopy (TEM) enables us, not only to reveal the morphology, but also to provide structural, chemical and electronic information about solid catalysts at the atomic level, providing a dramatic driving force for the development of heterogeneous catalysis. Almost all catalytic materials have been studied with TEM in order to obtain information about their structures, which can help us to establish the synthesis-structure-property relationships and to design catalysts with new structures and desired properties. Herein, several examples will be reviewed to illustrate the investigation of catalytic materials by using electron beams. (authors)

  11. Fluid catalytic cracking : Feedstocks and reaction mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dupain, X.

    2006-01-01

    The Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) process is one of the key units in a modern refinery. Traditionally, its design is primarily aimed for the production of gasoline from heavy oil fractions, but as co-products also diesel blends and valuable gasses (e.g. propene and butenes) are formed in

  12. Kinetic equation of heterogeneous catalytic isotope exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trokhimets, A I [AN Belorusskoj SSR, Minsk. Inst. Fiziko-Organicheskoj Khimii

    1979-12-01

    A kinetic equation is derived for the bimolecular isotope exchange reaction between AXsub(n)sup(*) and BXsub(m)sup(o), all atoms of element X in each molecule being equivalent. The equation can be generalized for homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic isotope exchange.

  13. Complementary structure sensitive and insensitive catalytic relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santen, van R.A.

    2009-01-01

    The burgeoning field of nanoscience has stimulated an intense interest in properties that depend on particle size. For transition metal particles, one important property that depends on size is catalytic reactivity, in which bonds are broken or formed on the surface of the particles. Decreased

  14. Toward Facilitative Mentoring and Catalytic Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Melissa K.; Lewis, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    In TESOL teacher mentoring, giving advice can be conceptualized as a continuum, ranging from directive to facilitative feedback. The goal, over time, is to lead toward the facilitative end of the continuum and specifically to catalytic interventions that encourage self-reflection and autonomous learning. This study begins by examining research on…

  15. Electrochemical Promotion of Catalytic Reactions Using

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrushina, Irina; Bjerrum, Niels; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on electrochemical promotion (EP) of catalytic reactions using Pt/C/polybenzimidazole(H3PO4)/Pt/C fuel cell performed by the Energy and Materials Science Group (Technical University of Denmark) during the last 6 years[1-4]. The development of our...... understanding of the nature of the electrochemical promotion is also presented....

  16. Novel Metal Nanomaterials and Their Catalytic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqing Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the rapidly developing areas of nanotechnology, nano-scale materials as heterogeneous catalysts in the synthesis of organic molecules have gotten more and more attention. In this review, we will summarize the synthesis of several new types of noble metal nanostructures (FePt@Cu nanowires, Pt@Fe2O3 nanowires and bimetallic Pt@Ir nanocomplexes; Pt-Au heterostructures, Au-Pt bimetallic nanocomplexes and Pt/Pd bimetallic nanodendrites; Au nanowires, CuO@Ag nanowires and a series of Pd nanocatalysts and their new catalytic applications in our group, to establish heterogeneous catalytic system in “green” environments. Further study shows that these materials have a higher catalytic activity and selectivity than previously reported nanocrystal catalysts in organic reactions, or show a superior electro-catalytic activity for the oxidation of methanol. The whole process might have a great impact to resolve the energy crisis and the environmental crisis that were caused by traditional chemical engineering. Furthermore, we hope that this article will provide a reference point for the noble metal nanomaterials’ development that leads to new opportunities in nanocatalysis.

  17. Toward a catalytic site in DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Ulla; Rohr, Katja; Vogel, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    A number of functionalized polyaza crown ether building blocks have been incorporated into DNA-conjugates as catalytic Cu(2+) binding sites. The effect of the DNA-conjugate catalyst on the stereochemical outcome of a Cu(2+)-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction will be presented....

  18. CATALYTIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION OF Mn(II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    method is based on the catalytic effect of Mn(II) with the oxidation of Celestine blue .... water samples were filtered through a 0.45 μm pore size membrane filter to remove suspended .... slope of the calibration graph as the optimization criterion. ..... In presence of Phen as stability enhancement agent in indicator system. ( ) +.

  19. Catalytic asymmetric synthesis of the alkaloid (+)-myrtine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pizzuti, Maria Gabriefla; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2008-01-01

    A new protocol for the asymmetric synthesis of trans-2,6-disubstituted-4-piperidones has been developed using a catalytic enantioselective conjugate addition reaction in combination with a diastereoselective lithiation-substitution sequence; an efficient synthesis of (+)-myrtine has been achieved

  20. Catalytic oxidation of cyclohexane to cyclohexanone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... a precursor and characterized by chemical analysis using the ICP–AES method, XRD, TEM, FTIR and BET surface area determination. The oxidation reaction was carried out at 70°C under atmospheric pressure. The results showed the catalytic performance of Pt/Al2O3 as being very high in terms of turnover frequency.

  1. Catalytic site interactions in yeast OMP synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Barr, Eric W.; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    2014-01-01

    45 (2006) 5330-5342]. This behavior was investigated in the yeast enzyme by mutations in the conserved catalytic loop and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-diphosphate (PRPP) binding motif. Although the reaction is mechanistically sequential, the wild-type (WT) enzyme shows parallel lines in double reciprocal...

  2. Flame assisted synthesis of catalytic ceramic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Johnny; Mosleh, Majid; Johannessen, Tue

    2004-01-01

    technology it is possible to make supported catalysts, composite metal oxides, catalytically active surfaces, and porous ceramic membranes. Membrane layers can be formed by using a porous substrate tube (or surface) as a nano-particle filter. The aerosol gas from the flame is led through a porous substrate...

  3. Sintering of Catalytic Nanoparticles: Particle Migration or Ostwald Ripening?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; DeLaRiva, Andrew T.; Challa, Sivakumar R.

    2013-01-01

    deactivation, is an important mechanism for the loss of catalyst activity. This is especially true for high temperature catalytic processes, such as steam reforming, automotive exhaust treatment, or catalytic combustion. With dwindling supplies of precious metals and increasing demand, fundamental...

  4. Catalytic characterization of bi-functional catalysts derived from Pd ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    1995; Lyubovsky and Pfefferle 1999; Sales et al 1999;. Hill et al 2000). ... For a catalytic system, whose activity ... catalytic systems containing Pd, supported on various acid- ..... Further studies are needed to optimize a balance between.

  5. Catalytically favorable surface patterns in Pt-Au nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental demonstrations of novel PtAu nanoparticles with highly enhanced catalytic properties, we present a systematic theoretical study that explores principal catalytic indicators as a function of the particle size

  6. Catalytic site identification—a web server to identify catalytic site structural matches throughout PDB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshner, Daniel A.; Nilmeier, Jerome P.; Lightstone, Felice C.

    2013-01-01

    The catalytic site identification web server provides the innovative capability to find structural matches to a user-specified catalytic site among all Protein Data Bank proteins rapidly (in less than a minute). The server also can examine a user-specified protein structure or model to identify structural matches to a library of catalytic sites. Finally, the server provides a database of pre-calculated matches between all Protein Data Bank proteins and the library of catalytic sites. The database has been used to derive a set of hypothesized novel enzymatic function annotations. In all cases, matches and putative binding sites (protein structure and surfaces) can be visualized interactively online. The website can be accessed at http://catsid.llnl.gov. PMID:23680785

  7. On the Structural Context and Identification of Enzyme Catalytic Residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tung Chien

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes play important roles in most of the biological processes. Although only a small fraction of residues are directly involved in catalytic reactions, these catalytic residues are the most crucial parts in enzymes. The study of the fundamental and unique features of catalytic residues benefits the understanding of enzyme functions and catalytic mechanisms. In this work, we analyze the structural context of catalytic residues based on theoretical and experimental structure flexibility. The results show that catalytic residues have distinct structural features and context. Their neighboring residues, whether sequence or structure neighbors within specific range, are usually structurally more rigid than those of noncatalytic residues. The structural context feature is combined with support vector machine to identify catalytic residues from enzyme structure. The prediction results are better or comparable to those of recent structure-based prediction methods.

  8. Effect of inlet cone pipe angle in catalytic converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amira Zainal, Nurul; Farhain Azmi, Ezzatul; Arifin Samad, Mohd

    2018-03-01

    The catalytic converter shows significant consequence to improve the performance of the vehicle start from it launched into production. Nowadays, the geometric design of the catalytic converter has become critical to avoid the behavior of backpressure in the exhaust system. The backpressure essentially reduced the performance of vehicles and increased the fuel consumption gradually. Consequently, this study aims to design various models of catalytic converter and optimize the volume of fluid flow inside the catalytic converter by changing the inlet cone pipe angles. Three different geometry angles of the inlet cone pipe of the catalytic converter were assessed. The model is simulated in Solidworks software to determine the optimum geometric design of the catalytic converter. The result showed that by decreasing the divergence angle of inlet cone pipe will upsurge the performance of the catalytic converter.

  9. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2018-04-10

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  10. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2016-02-09

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  11. Enantioselective catalytic fluorinative aza-semipinacol rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov-Michailidis, Fedor; Pupier, Marion; Besnard, Céline; Bürgi, Thomas; Alexakis, Alexandre

    2014-10-03

    An efficient and highly stereoselective fluorinative aza-semipinacol rearrangement is described. The catalytic reaction requires use of Selectfluor in combination with the chiral, enantiopure phosphate anion derived from acid L3. Under optimized conditions, cyclopropylamines A were transformed into β-fluoro cyclobutylimines B in good yields and high levels of diastereo- and enantiocontrol. Furthermore, the optically active cyclobutylimines were reduced diastereoselectively with L-Selectride in the corresponding fluorinated amines C, compounds of significant interest in the pharmacological industry.

  12. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alochols to hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2017-01-03

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  13. Materials for High-Temperature Catalytic Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersson, Anders

    2003-04-01

    Catalytic combustion is an environmentally friendly technique to combust fuels in e.g. gas turbines. Introducing a catalyst into the combustion chamber of a gas turbine allows combustion outside the normal flammability limits. Hence, the adiabatic flame temperature may be lowered below the threshold temperature for thermal NO{sub X} formation while maintaining a stable combustion. However, several challenges are connected to the application of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The first part of this thesis reviews the use of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The influence of the fuel has been studied and compared over different catalyst materials. The material section is divided into two parts. The first concerns bimetallic palladium catalysts. These catalysts showed a more stable activity compared to their pure palladium counterparts for methane combustion. This was verified both by using an annular reactor at ambient pressure and a pilot-scale reactor at elevated pressures and flows closely resembling the ones found in a gas turbine combustor. The second part concerns high-temperature materials, which may be used either as active or washcoat materials. A novel group of materials for catalysis, i.e. garnets, has been synthesised and tested in combustion of methane, a low-heating value gas and diesel fuel. The garnets showed some interesting abilities especially for combustion of low-heating value, LHV, gas. Two other materials were also studied, i.e. spinels and hexa aluminates, both showed very promising thermal stability and the substituted hexa aluminates also showed a good catalytic activity. Finally, deactivation of the catalyst materials was studied. In this part the sulphur poisoning of palladium, platinum and the above-mentioned complex metal oxides has been studied for combustion of a LHV gas. Platinum and surprisingly the garnet were least deactivated. Palladium was severely affected for methane combustion while the other washcoat materials were

  14. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M.; Zeitoon, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    Molten Metal Technology was awarded a contract to demonstrate the applicability of the Catalytic Extraction Process, a proprietary process that could be applied to US DOE's inventory of low level mixed waste. This paper is a description of that technology, and included within this document are discussions of: (1) Program objectives, (2) Overall technology review, (3) Organic feed conversion to synthetic gas, (4) Metal, halogen, and transuranic recovery, (5) Demonstrations, (6) Design of the prototype facility, and (7) Results

  15. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2017-12-19

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  16. Catalytic hydrogen recombination for nuclear containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koroll, G.W.; Lau, D.W.P.; Dewit, W.A.; Graham, W.R.C.

    1994-01-01

    Catalytic recombiners appear to be a credible option for hydrogen mitigation in nuclear containments. The passive operation, versatility and ease of back fitting are appealing for existing stations and new designs. Recently, a generation of wet-proofed catalyst materials have been developed at AECL which are highly specific to H 2 -O 2 , are active at ambient temperatures and are being evaluated for containment applications. Two types of catalytic recombiners were evaluated for hydrogen removal in containments based on the AECL catalyst. The first is a catalytic combustor for application in existing air streams such as provided by fans or ventilation systems. The second is an autocatalytic recombiner which uses the enthalpy of reaction to produce natural convective flow over the catalyst elements. Intermediate-scale results obtained in 6 m 3 and 10 m 3 spherical and cylindrical vessels are given to demonstrate self-starting limits, operating limits, removal capacity, scaling parameters, flow resistance, mixing behaviour in the vicinity of an operating recombiner and sensitivity to poisoning, fouling and radiation. (author). 13 refs., 10 figs

  17. Electrochemical catalytic treatment of phenol wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Hongzhu; Zhang Xinhai; Ma Qingliang; Wang Bo

    2009-01-01

    The slurry bed catalytic treatment of contaminated water appears to be a promising alternative for the oxidation of aqueous organic pollutants. In this paper, the electrochemical oxidation of phenol in synthetic wastewater catalyzed by ferric sulfate and potassium permanganate adsorbed onto active bentonite in slurry bed electrolytic reactor with graphite electrode has been investigated. In order to determine the optimum operating condition, the orthogonal experiments were devised and the results revealed that the system of ferric sulfate, potassium permanganate and active bentonite showed a high catalytic efficiency on the process of electrochemical oxidation phenol in initial pH 5. When the initial concentration of phenol was 0.52 g/L (the initial COD 1214 mg/L), up to 99% chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was obtained in 40 min. According to the experimental results, a possible mechanism of catalytic degradation of phenol was proposed. Environmental estimation was also done and the results showed that the treated wastewater have little impact on plant growth and could totally be applied to irrigation.

  18. Catalytic applications of bio-inspired nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacardo, Dennis Kien Balaong

    The biomimetic synthesis of Pd nanoparticles was presented using the Pd4 peptide, TSNAVHPTLRHL, isolated from combinatorial phage display library. Using this approach, nearly monodisperse and spherical Pd nanoparticles were generated with an average diameter of 1.9 +/- 0.4 nm. The peptide-based nanocatalyst were employed in the Stille coupling reaction under energy-efficient and environmentally friendly reaction conditions of aqueous solvent, room temperature and very low catalyst loading. To this end, the Pd nanocatalyst generated high turnover frequency (TOF) value and quantitative yields using ≥ 0.005 mol% Pd as well as catalytic activities with different aryl halides containing electron-withdrawing and electron-donating groups. The Pd4-capped Pd nanoparticles followed the atom-leaching mechanism and were found to be selective with respect to substrate identity. On the other hand, the naturally-occurring R5 peptide (SSKKSGSYSGSKGSKRRIL) was employed in the synthesis of biotemplated Pd nanomaterials which showed morphological changes as a function of Pd:peptide ratio. TOF analysis for hydrogenation of olefinic alcohols showed similar catalytic activity regardless of nanomorphology. Determination of catalytic properties of these bio-inspired nanomaterials are important as they serve as model system for alternative green catalyst with applications in industrially important transformations.

  19. Vapor-Driven Propulsion of Catalytic Micromotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Renfeng; Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Ezhilan, Barath; Xu, Tailin; Christianson, Caleb; Gao, Wei; Saintillan, David; Ren, Biye; Wang, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Chemically-powered micromotors offer exciting opportunities in diverse fields, including therapeutic delivery, environmental remediation, and nanoscale manufacturing. However, these nanovehicles require direct addition of high concentration of chemical fuel to the motor solution for their propulsion. We report the efficient vapor-powered propulsion of catalytic micromotors without direct addition of fuel to the micromotor solution. Diffusion of hydrazine vapor from the surrounding atmosphere into the sample solution is instead used to trigger rapid movement of iridium-gold Janus microsphere motors. Such operation creates a new type of remotely-triggered and powered catalytic micro/nanomotors that are responsive to their surrounding environment. This new propulsion mechanism is accompanied by unique phenomena, such as the distinct off-on response to the presence of fuel in the surrounding atmosphere, and spatio-temporal dependence of the motor speed borne out of the concentration gradient evolution within the motor solution. The relationship between the motor speed and the variables affecting the fuel concentration distribution is examined using a theoretical model for hydrazine transport, which is in turn used to explain the observed phenomena. The vapor-powered catalytic micro/nanomotors offer new opportunities in gas sensing, threat detection, and environmental monitoring, and open the door for a new class of environmentally-triggered micromotors.

  20. Catalytic pyrolysis of olive mill wastewater sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellaoui, Hamza

    From 2008 to 2013, an average of 2,821.4 kilotons/year of olive oil were produced around the world. The waste product of the olive mill industry consists of solid residue (pomace) and wastewater (OMW). Annually, around 30 million m3 of OMW are produced in the Mediterranean area, 700,000 m3 year?1 in Tunisia alone. OMW is an aqueous effluent characterized by an offensive smell and high organic matter content, including high molecular weight phenolic compounds and long-chain fatty acids. These compounds are highly toxic to micro-organisms and plants, which makes the OMW a serious threat to the environment if not managed properly. The OMW is disposed of in open air evaporation ponds. After evaporation of most of the water, OMWS is left in the bottom of the ponds. In this thesis, the effort has been made to evaluate the catalytic pyrolysis process as a technology to valorize the OMWS. The first section of this research showed that 41.12 wt. % of the OMWS is mostly lipids, which are a good source of energy. The second section proved that catalytic pyrolysis of the OMWS over red mud and HZSM-5 can produce green diesel, and 450 °C is the optimal reaction temperature to maximize the organic yields. The last section revealed that the HSF was behind the good fuel-like properties of the OMWS catalytic oils, whereas the SR hindered the bio-oil yields and quality.

  1. Antibody proteases: induction of catalytic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabibov, A G; Friboulet, A; Thomas, D; Demin, A V; Ponomarenko, N A; Vorobiev, I I; Pillet, D; Paon, M; Alexandrova, E S; Telegin, G B; Reshetnyak, A V; Grigorieva, O V; Gnuchev, N V; Malishkin, K A; Genkin, D D

    2002-10-01

    Most of the data accumulated throughout the years on investigation of catalytic antibodies indicate that their production increases on the background of autoimmune abnormalities. The different approaches to induction of catalytic response toward recombinant gp120 HIV-1 surface protein in mice with various autoimmune pathologies are described. The peptidylphosphonate conjugate containing structural part of gp120 molecule is used for reactive immunization of NZB/NZW F1, MRL, and SJL mice. The specific modification of heavy and light chains of mouse autoantibodies with Val-Ala-Glu-Glu-Glu-Val-PO(OPh)2 reactive peptide was demonstrated. Increased proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies in SJL mice encouraged us to investigate the production of antigen-specific catalytic antibodies on the background of induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The immunization of autoimmune-prone mice with the engineered fusions containing the fragments of gp120 and encephalitogenic epitope of myelin basic protein (MBP(89-104)) was made. The proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies isolated from the sera of autoimmune mice immunized by the described antigen was shown. Specific immune response of SJL mice to these antigens was characterized. Polyclonal antibodies purified from sera of the immunized animals revealed proteolytic activity. The antiidiotypic approach to raise the specific proteolytic antibody as an "internal image" of protease is described. The "second order" monoclonal antibodies toward subtilisin Carlsberg revealed pronounced proteolytic activity.

  2. Electrochemical catalytic treatment of phenol wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Hongzhu, E-mail: hzmachem@snnu.edu.cn [Institute of Energy Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Zhang Xinhai [Institute of Energy Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Ma Qingliang [Department of Applied Physics, College of Sciences, Taiyuan University of Technology, 030024 Taiyuan (China); Wang Bo [Institute of Energy Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China)

    2009-06-15

    The slurry bed catalytic treatment of contaminated water appears to be a promising alternative for the oxidation of aqueous organic pollutants. In this paper, the electrochemical oxidation of phenol in synthetic wastewater catalyzed by ferric sulfate and potassium permanganate adsorbed onto active bentonite in slurry bed electrolytic reactor with graphite electrode has been investigated. In order to determine the optimum operating condition, the orthogonal experiments were devised and the results revealed that the system of ferric sulfate, potassium permanganate and active bentonite showed a high catalytic efficiency on the process of electrochemical oxidation phenol in initial pH 5. When the initial concentration of phenol was 0.52 g/L (the initial COD 1214 mg/L), up to 99% chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was obtained in 40 min. According to the experimental results, a possible mechanism of catalytic degradation of phenol was proposed. Environmental estimation was also done and the results showed that the treated wastewater have little impact on plant growth and could totally be applied to irrigation.

  3. Turning goals into results: the power of catalytic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J

    1999-01-01

    Most executives have a big, hairy, audacious goal. They write vision statements, formalize procedures, and develop complicated incentive programs--all in pursuit of that goal. In other words, with the best of intentions, they install layers of stultifying bureaucracy. But it doesn't have to be that way. In this article, Jim Collins introduces the catalytic mechanism, a simple yet powerful managerial tool that helps translate lofty aspirations into concrete reality. Catalytic mechanisms are the crucial link between objectives and performance; they are a galvanizing, nonbureaucratic means to turn one into the other. What's the difference between catalytic mechanisms and most traditional managerial controls? Catalytic mechanisms share five characteristics. First, they produce desired results in unpredictable ways. Second, they distribute power for the benefit of the overall system, often to the discomfort of those who traditionally hold power. Third, catalytic mechanisms have teeth. Fourth, they eject "viruses"--those people who don't share the company's core values. Finally, they produce an ongoing effect. Catalytic mechanisms are just as effective for reaching individual goals as they are for corporate ones. To illustrate how catalytic mechanisms work, the author draws on examples of individuals and organizations that have relied on such mechanisms to achieve their goals. The same catalytic mechanism that works in one organization, however, will not necessarily work in another. Catalytic mechanisms must be tailored to specific goals and situations. To help readers get started, the author offers some general principles that support the process of building catalytic mechanisms effectively.

  4. Effect of support on the catalytic activity of manganese oxide catalyts for toluene combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozan, Gulin Selda

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► α-Al 2 O 3 , obtained from Bohmite, as a support for enhancing of the activity. ► The support material for catalytic oxidation. ► The manganese state and oxygen species effect on the catalytic combustion reaction. - Abstract: The aim of this work was to study combustion of toluene (1000 ppm) over MnO 2 modified with different supports. α-Al 2 O 3 and γ-Al 2 O 3 obtained from Boehmite, γ-Al 2 O 3 (commercial), SiO 2 , TiO 2 and ZrO 2 were used as commercial support materials. In view of potential interest of this process, the influence of support material on the catalytic performance was discussed. The deposition of 9.5MnO 2 was performed by impregnation over support. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), temperature programmed reduction and oxidation (TPR/TPO) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The catalytic tests were carried out at atmospheric pressure in a fixed-bed flow reactor. 9.5MnO 2 /α-Al 2 O 3 (B) (synthesized from Boehmite) catalyst exhibits the highest catalytic activity, over which the toluene conversion was up to 90% at a temperature of 289 °C. Considering all the characterization and reaction data reported in this study, it was concluded that the manganese state and oxygen species played an important role in the catalytic activity.

  5. Heterogeneous catalytic materials solid state chemistry, surface chemistry and catalytic behaviour

    CERN Document Server

    Busca, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous Catalytic Materials discusses experimental methods and the latest developments in three areas of research: heterogeneous catalysis; surface chemistry; and the chemistry of catalysts. Catalytic materials are those solids that allow the chemical reaction to occur efficiently and cost-effectively. This book provides you with all necessary information to synthesize, characterize, and relate the properties of a catalyst to its behavior, enabling you to select the appropriate catalyst for the process and reactor system. Oxides (used both as catalysts and as supports for cata

  6. Engineering Metallic Nanoparticles for Enhancing and Probing Catalytic Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Gillian; Holmes, Justin D

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments in tailoring the structural and chemical properties of colloidal metal nanoparticles (NPs) have led to significant enhancements in catalyst performance. Controllable colloidal synthesis has also allowed tailor-made NPs to serve as mechanistic probes for catalytic processes. The innovative use of colloidal NPs to gain fundamental insights into catalytic function will be highlighted across a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic applications. The engineering of future heterogenous catalysts is also moving beyond size, shape and composition considerations. Advancements in understanding structure-property relationships have enabled incorporation of complex features such as tuning surface strain to influence the behavior of catalytic NPs. Exploiting plasmonic properties and altering colloidal surface chemistry through functionalization are also emerging as important areas for rational design of catalytic NPs. This news article will highlight the key developments and challenges to the future design of catalytic NPs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Catalytic cracking models developed for predictive control purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dag Ljungqvist

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with state-space modeling issues in the context of model-predictive control, with application to catalytic cracking. Emphasis is placed on model establishment, verification and online adjustment. Both the Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC and the Residual Catalytic Cracking (RCC units are discussed. Catalytic cracking units involve complex interactive processes which are difficult to operate and control in an economically optimal way. The strong nonlinearities of the FCC process mean that the control calculation should be based on a nonlinear model with the relevant constraints included. However, the model can be simple compared to the complexity of the catalytic cracking plant. Model validity is ensured by a robust online model adjustment strategy. Model-predictive control schemes based on linear convolution models have been successfully applied to the supervisory dynamic control of catalytic cracking units, and the control can be further improved by the SSPC scheme.

  8. Protein structure based prediction of catalytic residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, J Eduardo; Fiser, Andras

    2013-02-22

    Worldwide structural genomics projects continue to release new protein structures at an unprecedented pace, so far nearly 6000, but only about 60% of these proteins have any sort of functional annotation. We explored a range of features that can be used for the prediction of functional residues given a known three-dimensional structure. These features include various centrality measures of nodes in graphs of interacting residues: closeness, betweenness and page-rank centrality. We also analyzed the distance of functional amino acids to the general center of mass (GCM) of the structure, relative solvent accessibility (RSA), and the use of relative entropy as a measure of sequence conservation. From the selected features, neural networks were trained to identify catalytic residues. We found that using distance to the GCM together with amino acid type provide a good discriminant function, when combined independently with sequence conservation. Using an independent test set of 29 annotated protein structures, the method returned 411 of the initial 9262 residues as the most likely to be involved in function. The output 411 residues contain 70 of the annotated 111 catalytic residues. This represents an approximately 14-fold enrichment of catalytic residues on the entire input set (corresponding to a sensitivity of 63% and a precision of 17%), a performance competitive with that of other state-of-the-art methods. We found that several of the graph based measures utilize the same underlying feature of protein structures, which can be simply and more effectively captured with the distance to GCM definition. This also has the added the advantage of simplicity and easy implementation. Meanwhile sequence conservation remains by far the most influential feature in identifying functional residues. We also found that due the rapid changes in size and composition of sequence databases, conservation calculations must be recalibrated for specific reference databases.

  9. Catalytic oxidation of soot over alkaline niobates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecchi, G.; Cabrera, B.; Buljan, A.; Delgado, E.J.; Gordon, A.L.; Jimenez, R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► No previous reported studies about alkaline niobates as catalysts for soot oxidation. ► NaNbO 3 and KNbO 3 perovskite-type oxides show lower activation energy than other lanthanoid perovskite-type oxides. ► The alkaline niobate does not show deactivation by metal loss. - Abstract: The lack of studies in the current literature about the assessment of alkaline niobates as catalysts for soot oxidation has motivated this research. In this study, the synthesis, characterization and assessment of alkaline metal niobates as catalysts for soot combustion are reported. The solids MNbO 3 (M = Li, Na, K, Rb) are synthesized by a citrate method, calcined at 450 °C, 550 °C, 650 °C, 750 °C, and characterized by AAS, N 2 adsorption, XRD, O 2 -TPD, FTIR and SEM. All the alkaline niobates show catalytic activity for soot combustion, and the activity depends basically on the nature of the alkaline metal and the calcination temperature. The highest catalytic activity, expressed as the temperature at which combustion of carbon black occurs at the maximum rate, is shown by KNbO 3 calcined at 650 °C. At this calcination temperature, the catalytic activity follows an order dependent on the atomic number, namely: KNbO 3 > NaNbO 3 > LiNbO 3 . The RbNbO 3 solid do not follow this trend presumably due to the perovskite structure was not reached. The highest catalytic activity shown by of KNbO 3 , despite the lower apparent activation energy of NaNbO 3 , stress the importance of the metal nature and suggests the hypothesis that K + ions are the active sites for soot combustion. It must be pointed out that alkaline niobate subjected to consecutive soot combustion cycles does not show deactivation by metal loss, due to the stabilization of the alkaline metal inside the perovskite structure.

  10. Tritium stripping by a catalytic exchange stripper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heung, L.K.; Gibson, G.W.; Ortman, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    A catalytic exchange process for stripping elemental tritium from gas streams has been demonstrated. The process uses a catalyzed isotopic exchange reaction between tritium in the gas phase and protium or deuterium in the solid phase on alumina. The reaction is catalyzed by platinum deposited on the alumina. The process has been tested with both tritium and deuterium. Decontamination factors (ration of inlet and outlet tritium concentrations) as high as 1000 have been achieved, depending on inlet concentration. The test results and some demonstrated applications are presented

  11. Plasma-catalytic reforming of liquid hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedybaliuk, O.A.; Chernyak, V.Ya; Kolgan, V.V.; Iukhymenko, V.V.; Solomenko, O.V.; Fedirchyk, I.I.; Martysh, E.V.; Demchina, V.P.; Klochok, N.V.; Dragnev, S.V.

    2015-01-01

    The series of experiments studying the plasma-catalytic reforming of liquid hydrocarbons was carried out. The dynamic plasma-liquid system based on a low-power rotating gliding arc with solid electrodes was used for the investigation of liquid hydrocarbons reforming process. Conversion was done via partial oxidation. A part of oxidant flow was activated by the discharge. Synthesis-gas composition was analysed by means of mass-spectrometry and gas-chromatography. A standard boiler, which operates on natural gas and LPG, was used for the burning of synthesis-gas

  12. Methane combustion in catalytic premixed burners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerri, I.; Saracco, G.; Specchia, V.

    1999-01-01

    Catalytic premixed burners for domestic boiler applications were developed with the aim of achieving a power modularity from 10 to 100% and pollutant emissions limited to NO x 2 , where the combustion took place entirely inside the burner heating it to incandescence and allowing a decrease in the flame temperature and NO x emissions. Such results were confirmed through further tests carried out in a commercial industrial-scale boiler equipped with the conical panels. All the results, by varying the excess air and the heat power employed, are presented and discussed [it

  13. Direct catalytic hydrothermal liquefaction of spirulina to biofuels with hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qin; Liao, Hansheng; Zhou, Shiqin; Li, Qiuping; Wang, Lu; Yu, Zhihao; Jing, Li

    2018-01-01

    We report herein on acquiring biofuels from direct catalytic hydrothermal liquefaction of spirulina. The component of bio-oil from direct catalytic hydrothermal liquefaction was similar to that from two independent processes (including liquefaction and upgrading of biocrude). However, one step process has higher carbon recovery, due to the less loss of carbons. It was demonstrated that the yield and HHV of bio-oil from direct catalytic algae with hydrothermal condition is higher than that from two independent processes.

  14. Including lateral interactions into microkinetic models of catalytic reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellman, Anders; Honkala, Johanna Karoliina

    2007-01-01

    In many catalytic reactions lateral interactions between adsorbates are believed to have a strong influence on the reaction rates. We apply a microkinetic model to explore the effect of lateral interactions and how to efficiently take them into account in a simple catalytic reaction. Three differ...... different approximations are investigated: site, mean-field, and quasichemical approximations. The obtained results are compared to accurate Monte Carlo numbers. In the end, we apply the approximations to a real catalytic reaction, namely, ammonia synthesis....

  15. A study on naphtha catalytic reforming reactor simulation and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ke-min; Guo, Hai-yan; Pan, Shi-wei

    2005-06-01

    A naphtha catalytic reforming unit with four reactors in series is analyzed. A physical model is proposed to describe the catalytic reforming radial flow reactor. Kinetics and thermodynamics equations are selected to describe the naphtha catalytic reforming reactions characteristics based on idealizing the complex naphtha mixture by representing the paraffin, naphthene, and aromatic groups by single compounds. The simulation results based above models agree very well with actual operation unit data.

  16. A study on naphtha catalytic reforming reactor simulation and analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Ke-min; Guo, Hai-yan; Pan, Shi-wei

    2005-01-01

    A naphtha catalytic reforming unit with four reactors in series is analyzed. A physical model is proposed to describe the catalytic reforming radial flow reactor. Kinetics and thermodynamics equations are selected to describe the naphtha catalytic reforming reactions characteristics based on idealizing the complex naphtha mixture by representing the paraffin, naphthene, and aromatic groups by single compounds. The simulation results based above models agree very well with actual operation uni...

  17. Effect of support on the catalytic activity of manganese oxide catalyts for toluene combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozan, Gulin Selda

    2012-06-30

    The aim of this work was to study combustion of toluene (1000ppm) over MnO(2) modified with different supports. α-Al(2)O(3) and γ-Al(2)O(3) obtained from Boehmite, γ-Al(2)O(3) (commercial), SiO(2), TiO(2) and ZrO(2) were used as commercial support materials. In view of potential interest of this process, the influence of support material on the catalytic performance was discussed. The deposition of 9.5MnO(2) was performed by impregnation over support. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), temperature programmed reduction and oxidation (TPR/TPO) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The catalytic tests were carried out at atmospheric pressure in a fixed-bed flow reactor. 9.5MnO(2)/α-Al(2)O(3)(B) (synthesized from Boehmite) catalyst exhibits the highest catalytic activity, over which the toluene conversion was up to 90% at a temperature of 289°C. Considering all the characterization and reaction data reported in this study, it was concluded that the manganese state and oxygen species played an important role in the catalytic activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Catalytic membrane in reduction of aqueous nitrates: operational principles and catalytic performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilinitch, O.M.; Cuperus, F.P.; Nosova, L.V.; Gribov, E.N.

    2000-01-01

    The catalytic membrane with palladium-copper active component supported over the macroporous ceramic membrane, and a series of γ-Al 2O 3 supported Pd-Cu catalysts were prepared and investigated. In reduction of nitrate ions by hydrogen in water at ambient temperature, pronounced internal diffusion

  19. Non-thermal plasmas for non-catalytic and catalytic VOC abatement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandenbroucke, Arne M.; Morent, Rino; De Geyter, Nathalie; Leys, Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We review the current status of catalytic and non-catalytic VOC abatement based on a vast number of research papers. → The underlying mechanisms of plasma-catalysis for VOC abatement are discussed. → Critical process parameters that determine the influent are discussed and compared. - Abstract: This paper reviews recent achievements and the current status of non-thermal plasma (NTP) technology for the abatement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Many reactor configurations have been developed to generate a NTP at atmospheric pressure. Therefore in this review article, the principles of generating NTPs are outlined. Further on, this paper is divided in two equally important parts: plasma-alone and plasma-catalytic systems. Combination of NTP with heterogeneous catalysis has attracted increased attention in order to overcome the weaknesses of plasma-alone systems. An overview is given of the present understanding of the mechanisms involved in plasma-catalytic processes. In both parts (plasma-alone systems and plasma-catalysis), literature on the abatement of VOCs is reviewed in close detail. Special attention is given to the influence of critical process parameters on the removal process.

  20. Microwave Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrocarbons in Aqueous Solutions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cha, Chang

    2003-01-01

    .... A sufficient amount of experimental work has been completed evaluating the performance of the microwave catalytic oxidation process and determining the effect of different operating parameters...

  1. Catalytically favorable surface patterns in Pt-Au nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental demonstrations of novel PtAu nanoparticles with highly enhanced catalytic properties, we present a systematic theoretical study that explores principal catalytic indicators as a function of the particle size and composition. We find that Pt electronic states in the vicinity of the Fermi level combined with a modified electron distribution in the nanoparticle due to Pt-to-Au charge transfer are the origin of the outstanding catalytic properties. From our model we deduce the catalytically favorable surface patterns that induce ensemble and ligand effects. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.

  2. Computational and Physical Analysis of Catalytic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Richard; Sohn, Jung Jae; Kyung, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Nanoparticles exhibit unique physical and chemical properties depending on their geometrical properties. For this reason, synthesis of nanoparticles with controlled shape and size is important to use their unique properties. Catalyst supports are usually made of high-surface-area porous oxides or carbon nanomaterials. These support materials stabilize metal catalysts against sintering at high reaction temperatures. Many studies have demonstrated large enhancements of catalytic behavior due to the role of the oxide-metal interface. In this paper, the catalyzing ability of supported nano metal oxides, such as silicon oxide and titanium oxide compounds as catalysts have been analyzed using computational chemistry method. Computational programs such as Gamess and Chemcraft has been used in an effort to compute the efficiencies of catalytic compounds, and bonding energy changes during the optimization convergence. The result illustrates how the metal oxides stabilize and the steps that it takes. The graph of the energy computation step(N) versus energy(kcal/mol) curve shows that the energy of the titania converges faster at the 7th iteration calculation, whereas the silica converges at the 9th iteration calculation.

  3. New separation technique. Catalytically functionated separation membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urgami, Tadashi [Kansai Univ., Osaka (Japan)

    1989-02-01

    This report introduces research examples, showing the fundamental principle of the membrane by separating the catalytically functionated separation membrane into enzyme fixing separation membrane, polymerized metal complex separation membrane and polymer catalyst separation membrane. This membrane can achieve both functions of separation and catalytic reaction simultaneously and has sufficient possibility to combine powerful functions. Enzyme fixing separation membrane is prepared by carrier combination method, bridging method or covering method and the enzyme fixing method with polymerized complex in which enzyme is controlled to prevent the activity lowering as much as possible and enzyme is fixed from an aqueous solution into polymer membrane. This membrane is applied to the continuous manufacturing of invert sugar from cane sugar and adsorption and removing of harmful substances from blood by utilizing both micro-capsuled urease and active carbon. Alginic acid-copper (II) complex membrane is used for the polymerized metal complex membrane and polystyrene sulfonate membrane is used for the polymer catalyst separation membrane. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tabs.

  4. Study of catalytic phenomena in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dran, J.C.

    1965-01-01

    Two phenomena have been studied: the action of γ rays from radio-cobalt on the adsorption and catalytic properties of ZnO and NiO in. relationship with the heterogeneous oxidation of CO, and the homogeneous catalysis by OsO 4 of the oxidation of various aqueous phase solutes by the same radiation. The prior irradiation of ZnO and of NiO does not modify their catalytic activity but generally increases the adsorption energy of -the gases CO and O 2 . The influence of the radiations appears to be connected with the presence of traces of water on ZnO and of an excess of oxygen on NiO. Osmium tetroxide which is not degraded by irradiation in acid solution, accelerates the radiolytic oxidation of certain compounds (Te IV , Pt 11 , As 111 ) in the presence of oxygen, as a result of its sensitizing effect on the oxidation by H 2 O 2 . In the case of phosphites on the other hand, OsO 4 has a protecting action under certain conditions of acidity and may suppress entirely the chain reaction which characterizes the oxidation of this solute byγ rays. A general mechanism is proposed for these phenomena. The rate constant for the OsO 4 + HO 2 reaction is calculated to be 5.7 x 10 5 l.mol -1 . sec -1 . (author) [fr

  5. Catalytic hydroprocessing of heavy oil feedstocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okunev, A G; Parkhomchuk, E V; Lysikov, A I; Parunin, P D; Semeikina, V S; Parmon, V N

    2015-01-01

    A grave problem of modern oil refining industry is continuous deterioration of the produced oil quality, on the one hand, and increase in the demand for motor fuels, on the other hand. This necessitates processing of heavy oil feedstock with high contents of sulfur, nitrogen and metals and the atmospheric residue. This feedstock is converted to light oil products via hydrogenation processes catalyzed by transition metal compounds, first of all, cobalt- or nickel-promoted molybdenum and tungsten compounds. The processing involves desulfurization, denitrogenation and demetallization reactions as well as reactions converting heavy hydrocarbons to lighter fuel components. The review discusses the mechanisms of reactions involved in the heavy feedstock hydroprocessing, the presumed structure and state of the catalytically active components and methods for the formation of supports with the desired texture. Practically used and prospective approaches to catalytic upgrading of heavy oil feedstock as well as examples of industrial processing of bitumen and vacuum residues in the presence of catalysts are briefly discussed. The bibliography includes 140 references

  6. Catalytic hydroprocessing of heavy oil feedstocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okunev, A. G.; Parkhomchuk, E. V.; Lysikov, A. I.; Parunin, P. D.; Semeikina, V. S.; Parmon, V. N.

    2015-09-01

    A grave problem of modern oil refining industry is continuous deterioration of the produced oil quality, on the one hand, and increase in the demand for motor fuels, on the other hand. This necessitates processing of heavy oil feedstock with high contents of sulfur, nitrogen and metals and the atmospheric residue. This feedstock is converted to light oil products via hydrogenation processes catalyzed by transition metal compounds, first of all, cobalt- or nickel-promoted molybdenum and tungsten compounds. The processing involves desulfurization, denitrogenation and demetallization reactions as well as reactions converting heavy hydrocarbons to lighter fuel components. The review discusses the mechanisms of reactions involved in the heavy feedstock hydroprocessing, the presumed structure and state of the catalytically active components and methods for the formation of supports with the desired texture. Practically used and prospective approaches to catalytic upgrading of heavy oil feedstock as well as examples of industrial processing of bitumen and vacuum residues in the presence of catalysts are briefly discussed. The bibliography includes 140 references.

  7. Catalytic reactor for low-Btu fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lance; Etemad, Shahrokh; Karim, Hasan; Pfefferle, William C.

    2009-04-21

    An improved catalytic reactor includes a housing having a plate positioned therein defining a first zone and a second zone, and a plurality of conduits fabricated from a heat conducting material and adapted for conducting a fluid therethrough. The conduits are positioned within the housing such that the conduit exterior surfaces and the housing interior surface within the second zone define a first flow path while the conduit interior surfaces define a second flow path through the second zone and not in fluid communication with the first flow path. The conduit exits define a second flow path exit, the conduit exits and the first flow path exit being proximately located and interspersed. The conduits define at least one expanded section that contacts adjacent conduits thereby spacing the conduits within the second zone and forming first flow path exit flow orifices having an aggregate exit area greater than a defined percent of the housing exit plane area. Lastly, at least a portion of the first flow path defines a catalytically active surface.

  8. Structured materials for catalytic and sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokenek, Selma

    The optical and chemical properties of the materials used in catalytic and sensing applications directly determine the characteristics of the resultant catalyst or sensor. It is well known that a catalyst needs to have high activity, selectivity, and stability to be viable in an industrial setting. The hydrogenation activity of palladium catalysts is known to be excellent, but the industrial applications are limited by the cost of obtaining catalyst in amounts large enough to make their use economical. As a result, alloying palladium with a cheaper, more widely available metal while maintaining the high catalytic activity seen in monometallic catalysts is, therefore, an attractive option. Similarly, the optical properties of nanoscale materials used for sensing must be attuned to their application. By adjusting the shape and composition of nanoparticles used in such applications, very fine changes can be made to the frequency of light that they absorb most efficiently. The design, synthesis, and characterization of (i) size controlled monometallic palladium nanoparticles for catalytic applications, (ii) nickel-palladium bimetallic nanoparticles and (iii) silver-palladium nanoparticles with applications in drug detection and biosensing through surface plasmon resonance, respectively, will be discussed. The composition, size, and shape of the nanoparticles formed were controlled through the use of wet chemistry techniques. After synthesis, the nanoparticles were analyzed using physical and chemical characterization techniques such as X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy- Energy-Dispersive Spectrometry (STEM-EDX). The Pd and Ni-Pd nanoparticles were then supported on silica for catalytic testing using mass spectrometry. The optical properties of the Ag-Pd nanoparticles in suspension were further investigated using ultraviolet-visible spectrometry (UV-Vis). Monometallic palladium particles have

  9. Catalytic combustion in gas stoves - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjelm, Anna-Karin [CATATOR AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2003-06-01

    Several independent studies show that gas stoves to some degree contribute to the indoor emissions of NO{sub x} especially in situations were the ventilation flow is poor. The peak-NO{sub x} concentrations can reach several hundred ppb but the integral concentration seldom exceeds about 20 - 50 ppb, which corresponds to an indoor-outdoor ratio of about 1 - 2.5. Epidemiological studies indicate increasing problems with respiratory symptoms in sensitive people at concentrations as low as 15 ppb of NO{sub 2}. Consequently, the NO{sub x}-concentration in homes where gas stoves are used is high enough to cause health effects. However, in situations where the ventilation flow is high (utilisation of ventilation hoods) the NO{sub x}-emissions are not likely to cause any health problems. This study has been aimed at investigating the possibilities to reduce the NO{sub x} emissions from gas stoves by replacing the conventional flame combustion with catalytic combustion. The investigation is requested by Swedish Gas Center, and is a following-up work of an earlier conducted feasibility study presented in April-2002. The present investigation reports on the possibility to use cheap and simple retro-fit catalytic design suggestions for traditional gas stoves. Experiments have been conducted with both natural and town gas, and parameters such as emissions of NO{sub x}, CO and unburned fuel gas and thermal efficiency, etc, have been examined and are discussed. The results show that it is possible to reduce the NO{sub x} emissions up to 80% by a simple retro-fit installation, without decreasing the thermal efficiency of the cooking plate. The measured source strengths correspond to indoor NO{sub x} concentrations that are below or equal to the average outdoor concentration, implying that no additional detrimental health effects are probable. The drawback of the suggested installations is that the concentration of CO and in some cases also CH{sub 4} are increased in the flue gases

  10. Hydrogen Production From catalytic reforming of greenhouse gases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    a fixed bed stainless steel reactor. The 20wt%. ... catalytic activity for hydrogen production with the highest yield and selectivity of 32.5% and 17.6% respectively. © JASEM ... CO2 reforming of methane is however not fully developed ..... Design and preparation of .... catalytic nickel membrane for gas to liquid (GTL) process.

  11. Catalytic synthesis of ammonia using vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Billing, Gert D.

    1992-01-01

    The dissociation of nitrogen is the rate-limiting step in the catalytic synthesis of ammonia. Theoretical calculations have shown that the dissociative sticking probability of molecular nitrogen on catalytic active metal surfaces is enhanced by orders of magnitude when the molecules...

  12. synthesis, characterization, electrical and catalytic studies of some

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    B. S. Chandravanshi

    catalytic activity of the VO(IV) and Mn(III) complexes have been tested in the epoxidation reaction of styrene ... Vanadyl sulfate pentahydrate, chromium chloride hexahydrate, anhydrous ferric ..... The catalytic oxidation of styrene gives the products styrene oxide, benzaldehyde, benzoic acid, ... bond via a radical mechanism.

  13. Carbon nanofibers: a versatile catalytic support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelize Maria de Almeida Coelho

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is present an overview of the promising results obtained while using carbon nanofibers based composites as catalyst support for different practical applications: hydrazine decomposition, styrene synthesis, direct oxidation of H2S into elementary sulfur and as fuel-cell electrodes. We have also discussed some prospects of the use of these new materials in total combustion of methane and in ammonia decomposition. The macroscopic carbon nanofibers based composites were prepared by the CVD method (Carbon Vapor Deposition employing a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and ethane. The results showed a high catalytic activity and selectivity in comparison to the traditional catalysts employed in these reactions. The fact was attributed, mainly, to the morphology and the high external surface of the catalyst support.

  14. Radiant non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.

    2017-10-31

    A radiant, non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot exhaust gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is positioned adjacent to the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot exhaust gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is positioned outside of flue gas flow path for a relatively large residence time.

  15. Chemical and catalytic effects of ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, G.K.

    1982-01-01

    Energetic particles are used for inducing chemical reactions as well as for modifying the properties of materials with regard to their bulk and surface chemical behavior. The effects are partly caused by radiation damage or phase intermixing, partly by the chemical properties of the individual bombarding particles. In this contribution a survey of relevant applications of these techniques is presented: (1) Chemical reactions of implanted and recoil atoms and their use for syntheses, doping and labeling of compounds. (2) The formation of thin films by decomposing chemical compounds with ion beams. 3) Catalytic effects on substrates treated by sputtering or ion implantation. Recent results with nonmetallic substrates are reviewed. Mainly hydrogenation reactions at a solid/gas interface or redox reactions at an electrified solid/liquid interface are mentioned. The present status and future prospects of these kinds of investigations will be discussed. (author)

  16. Contact structure for use in catalytic distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1984-03-27

    A method is described for conducting catalytic chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants into a distillation column reactor, contracting said reactant in liquid phase with a fixed bed catalyst in the form of a contact catalyst structure consisting of closed porous containers containing the catalyst for the reaction and a clip means to hold and support said containers, which are disposed above, i.e., on the distillation trays in the tower. The trays have weir means to provide a liquid level on the trays to substantially cover the containers. In other words, the trays function in their ordinary manner with the addition thereto of the catalyst. The reaction mixture is concurrently fractionated in the column. 7 figs.

  17. Direct catalytic asymmetric aldol-Tishchenko reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanadesikan, Vijay; Horiuchi, Yoshihiro; Ohshima, Takashi; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2004-06-30

    A direct catalytic asymmetric aldol reaction of propionate equivalent was achieved via the aldol-Tishchenko reaction. Coupling an irreversible Tishchenko reaction to a reversible aldol reaction overcame the retro-aldol reaction problem and thereby afforded the products in high enantio and diastereoselectivity using 10 mol % of the asymmetric catalyst. A variety of ketones and aldehydes, including propyl and butyl ketones, were coupled efficiently, yielding the corresponding aldol-Tishchenko products in up to 96% yield and 95% ee. Diastereoselectivity was generally below the detection limit of 1H NMR (>98:2). Preliminary studies performed to clarify the mechanism revealed that the aldol products were racemic with no diastereoselectivity. On the other hand, the Tishchenko products were obtained in a highly enantiocontrolled manner.

  18. Catalytic hot gas cleaning of gasification gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simell, P. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1997-12-31

    The aim of this work was to study the catalytic cleaning of gasification gas from tars and ammonia. In addition, factors influencing catalytic activity in industrial applications were studied, as well as the effects of different operation conditions and limits. Also the catalytic reactions of tar and ammonia with gasification gas components were studied. The activities of different catalyst materials were measured with laboratory-scale reactors fed by slip streams taken from updraft and fluid bed gasifiers. Carbonate rocks and nickel catalysts proved to be active tar decomposing catalysts. Ammonia decomposition was in turn facilitated by nickel catalysts and iron materials like iron sinter and iron dolomite. Temperatures over 850 deg C were required at 2000{sup -1} space velocity at ambient pressure to achieve almost complete conversions. During catalytic reactions H{sub 2} and CO were formed and H{sub 2}O was consumed in addition to decomposing hydrocarbons and ammonia. Equilibrium gas composition was almost achieved with nickel catalysts at 900 deg C. No deactivation by H{sub 2}S or carbon took place in these conditions. Catalyst blocking by particulates was avoided by using a monolith type of catalyst. The apparent first order kinetic parameters were determined for the most active materials. The activities of dolomite, nickel catalyst and reference materials were measured in different gas atmospheres using laboratory apparatus. This consisted of nitrogen carrier, toluene as tar model compound, ammonia and one of the components H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}+H{sub 2}O or CO+CO{sub 2}. Also synthetic gasification gas was used. With the dolomite and nickel catalyst the highest toluene decomposition rates were measured with CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. In gasification gas, however, the rate was retarded due to inhibition by reaction products (CO, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}). Tar decomposition over dolomite was modelled by benzene reactions with CO{sub 2}, H

  19. Smoke emissions from a catalytic wood stove

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowburn, D.A.; Stephens, N.P.J.

    1994-01-01

    The work reported here was concerned with testing a catalytic wood burning stove (roomheater) following the most applicable UK procedures. The identical stove has also been tested in several other nations to their individual procedures. The results will be submitted to the International Energy Agency (IEA) such that appropriate comparisons can be made. The results comprised: burning rate; an indicative appliance efficiency; heat output; carbon dioxide emissions; carbon monoxide emissions; and smoke emissions. These results were determined with the appliance at three nominal burning rates (high, medium and low). Comparing the results with those obtained in other countries indicates good agreement except when the appliance was operated at low burning rates, under which conditions the UK results indicate significantly worse smoke emissions than those measured by other researchers. (author)

  20. Flowthrough Reductive Catalytic Fractionation of Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Eric M.; Stone, Michael L.; Katahira, Rui; Reed, Michelle; Beckham, Gregg T.; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2017-11-01

    Reductive catalytic fractionation (RCF) has emerged as a leading biomass fractionation and lignin valorization strategy. Here, flowthrough reactors were used to investigate RCF of poplar. Most RCF studies to date have been conducted in batch, but a flow-based process enables the acquisition of intrinsic kinetic and mechanistic data essential to accelerate the design, optimization, and scale-up of RCF processes. Time-resolved product distributions and yields obtained from experiments with different catalyst loadings were used to identify and deconvolute events during solvolysis and hydrogenolysis. Multi-bed RCF experiments provided unique insights into catalyst deactivation, showing that leaching, sintering, and surface poisoning are causes for decreased catalyst performance. The onset of catalyst deactivation resulted in higher concentrations of unsaturated lignin intermediates and increased occurrence of repolymerization reactions, producing high-molecular-weight species. Overall, this study demonstrates the concept of flowthrough RCF, which will be vital for realistic scale-up of this promising approach.

  1. Propulsion Mechanism of Catalytic Microjet Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, Vladimir M; Hippler, Markus; Magdanz, Veronika; Soler, Lluís; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G

    2014-02-01

    We describe the propulsion mechanism of the catalytic microjet engines that are fabricated using rolled-up nanotech. Microjets have recently shown numerous potential applications in nanorobotics but currently there is a lack of an accurate theoretical model that describes the origin of the motion as well as the mechanism of self-propulsion. The geometric asymmetry of a tubular microjet leads to the development of a capillary force, which tends to propel a bubble toward the larger opening of the tube. Because of this motion in an asymmetric tube, there emerges a momentum transfer to the fluid. In order to compensate this momentum transfer, a jet force acting on the tube occurs. This force, which is counterbalanced by the linear drag force, enables tube velocities of the order of 100 μ m/s. This mechanism provides a fundamental explanation for the development of driving forces that are acting on bubbles in tubular microjets.

  2. Catalytic Synthesis of Nitriles in Continuous Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordvang, Emily Catherine

    The objective of this thesis is to report the development of a new, alternative process for the flexible production of nitrile compounds in continuous flow. Nitriles are an important class of compounds that find applications as solvents, chemical intermediates and pharmaceutical compounds......, alternative path to acetonitrile from ethanol via the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylamine. The catalytic activity and product ratios of the batch and continuous flow reactions are compared and the effect of reaction conditions on the reaction is investigated. The effects of ammonia in the reaction...... dehydrogenation of ethylamine and post-reaction purging.Chapter 4 outlines the application of RuO2/Al2O3 catalysts to the oxidative dehydrogenation of benzylamine in air, utilizing a new reaction setup. Again, batch and continuous flow reactions are compared and the effects of reaction conditions, ammonia...

  3. Soluble organic nanotubes for catalytic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Linfeng; Yang, Kunran; Zhang, Hui; Liao, Xiaojuan; Huang, Kun

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, we report a novel method for constructing a soluble organic nanotube supported catalyst system based on single-molecule templating of core-shell bottlebrush copolymers. Various organic or metal catalysts, such as sodium prop-2-yne-1-sulfonate (SPS), 1-(2-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy)ethyl)-1H-imidazole (PEI) and Pd(OAc)2 were anchored onto the tube walls to functionalize the organic nanotubes via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. Depending on the ‘confined effect’ and the accessible cavity microenvironments of tubular structures, the organic nanotube catalysts showed high catalytic efficiency and site-isolation features. We believe that the soluble organic nanotubes will be very useful for the development of high performance catalyst systems due to their high stability of support, facile functionalization and attractive textural properties.

  4. Soluble organic nanotubes for catalytic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Linfeng; Yang, Kunran; Zhang, Hui; Liao, Xiaojuan; Huang, Kun

    2016-03-18

    In this paper, we report a novel method for constructing a soluble organic nanotube supported catalyst system based on single-molecule templating of core–shell bottlebrush copolymers. Various organic or metal catalysts, such as sodium prop-2-yne-1-sulfonate (SPS), 1-(2-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy)ethyl)-1H-imidazole (PEI) and Pd(OAc)2 were anchored onto the tube walls to functionalize the organic nanotubes via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. Depending on the 'confined effect' and the accessible cavity microenvironments of tubular structures, the organic nanotube catalysts showed high catalytic efficiency and site-isolation features. We believe that the soluble organic nanotubes will be very useful for the development of high performance catalyst systems due to their high stability of support, facile functionalization and attractive textural properties.

  5. Catalytic flash pyrolysis of oil-impregnated-wood and jatropha cake using sodium based catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Imran, Ali; Bramer, Eddy A.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Brem, Gerrit

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of wood with impregnated vegetable oil was investigated and compared with catalytic pyrolysis of jatropha cake making use of sodium based catalysts to produce a high quality bio-oil. The catalytic pyrolysis was carried out in two

  6. Catalytic combustion in small wood burning appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oravainen, H. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    There is over a million hand fired small heating appliances in Finland where about 5,4 million cubic meters of wood fuel is used. Combustion in such heating appliances is a batch-type process. In early stages of combustion when volatiles are burned, the formation of carbon monoxide (CO) and other combustible gases are difficult to avoid when using fuels that have high volatile matter content. Harmful emissions are formed mostly after each fuel adding but also during char burnout period. When the CO-content in flue gases is, say over 0.5 %, also other harmful emissions will be formed. Methane (CH{sub 4}) and other hydrocarbons are released and the amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)-compounds can be remarkable. Some PAH-compounds are very carcinogenic. It has been estimated that in Finland even more than 90 % of hydrocarbon and PAH emissions are due to small scale wood combustion. Emissions from transportation is excluded from these figures. That is why wood combustion has a net effect on greenhouse gas phenomena. For example carbon monoxide emissions from small scale wood combustion are two fold compared to that of energy production in power plants. Methane emission is of the same order as emission from transportation and seven fold compared with those of energy production. Emissions from small heating appliances can be reduced by developing the combustion techniques, but also by using other means, for example catalytic converters. In certain stages of the batch combustion, temperature is not high enough, gas mixing is not good enough and residence time is too short for complete combustion. When placed to a suitable place inside a heating appliance, a catalytic converter can oxidize unburned gases in the flue gas into compounds that are not harmful to the environment. (3 refs.)

  7. Catalytic combustion in small wood burning appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oravainen, H [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    There is over a million hand fired small heating appliances in Finland where about 5,4 million cubic meters of wood fuel is used. Combustion in such heating appliances is a batch-type process. In early stages of combustion when volatiles are burned, the formation of carbon monoxide (CO) and other combustible gases are difficult to avoid when using fuels that have high volatile matter content. Harmful emissions are formed mostly after each fuel adding but also during char burnout period. When the CO-content in flue gases is, say over 0.5 %, also other harmful emissions will be formed. Methane (CH{sub 4}) and other hydrocarbons are released and the amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)-compounds can be remarkable. Some PAH-compounds are very carcinogenic. It has been estimated that in Finland even more than 90 % of hydrocarbon and PAH emissions are due to small scale wood combustion. Emissions from transportation is excluded from these figures. That is why wood combustion has a net effect on greenhouse gas phenomena. For example carbon monoxide emissions from small scale wood combustion are two fold compared to that of energy production in power plants. Methane emission is of the same order as emission from transportation and seven fold compared with those of energy production. Emissions from small heating appliances can be reduced by developing the combustion techniques, but also by using other means, for example catalytic converters. In certain stages of the batch combustion, temperature is not high enough, gas mixing is not good enough and residence time is too short for complete combustion. When placed to a suitable place inside a heating appliance, a catalytic converter can oxidize unburned gases in the flue gas into compounds that are not harmful to the environment. (3 refs.)

  8. Orion EFT-1 Catalytic Tile Experiment Overview and Flight Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Giovanni; Amar, Adam; Hyatt, Andrew; Rezin, Marc D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design and results of a surface catalysis flight experiment flown on the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle during Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT1). Similar to previous Space Shuttle catalytic tile experiments, the present test consisted of a highly catalytic coating applied to an instrumented TPS tile. However, the present catalytic tile experiment contained significantly more instrumentation in order to better resolve the heating overshoot caused by the change in surface catalytic efficiency at the interface between two distinct materials. In addition to collecting data with unprecedented spatial resolution of the "overshoot" phenomenon, the experiment was also designed to prove if such a catalytic overshoot would be seen in turbulent flow in high enthalpy regimes. A detailed discussion of the results obtained during EFT1 is presented, as well as the challenges associated with data interpretation of this experiment. Results of material testing carried out in support of this flight experiment are also shown. Finally, an inverse heat conduction technique is employed to reconstruct the flight environments at locations upstream and along the catalytic coating. The data and analysis presented in this work will greatly contribute to our understanding of the catalytic "overshoot" phenomenon, and have a significant impact on the design of future spacecraft.

  9. A Review on Catalytic Membranes Production and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Abdallah

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of the chemical industry regarding reducing the production cost and obtaining a high-quality product with low environmental impact became the essential requirements of the world in these days. The catalytic membrane is considered as one of the new alternative solutions of catalysts problems in the industries, where the reaction and separation can be amalgamated in one unit. The catalytic membrane has numerous advantages such as breaking the thermodynamic equilibrium limitation, increasing conversion rate, reducing the recycle and separation costs. But the limitation or most disadvantages of catalytic membranes related to the high capital costs for fabrication or the fact that manufacturing process is still under development. This review article summarizes the most recent advances and research activities related to preparation, characterization, and applications of catalytic membranes. In this article, various types of catalytic membranes are displayed with different applications and explained the positive impacts of using catalytic membranes in various reactions. Copyright © 2017 BCREC Group. All rights reserved. Received: 1st April 2016; Revised: 14th February 2017; Accepted: 22nd February 2017 How to Cite: Abdallah, H. (2017. A Review on Catalytic Membranes Production and Applications. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (2: 136-156 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.2.462.136-156 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.12.2.462.136-156

  10. Hydrocarbon conversion with an attenuated superactive multimetallic catalytic composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antos, G.J.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are converted by contacting them at hydrocarbon conversion conditions with a novel attenuated superactive multimetallic catalytic composite comprising a combination of a catalytically effective amount of a pyrolyzed rhenium carbonyl component with a porous carrier material containing a uniform dispersion of catalytically effective amounts of a platinum group component, which is maintained in the elemental metallic state during the incorporation and pyrolysis of the rhenium carbonyl component, and of an iron component. In a highly preferred embodiment, this novel catalytic composite also contains a catalytically effective amount of a halogen component. The platinum group component, pyrolyzed rhenium carbonyl component, iron component and optional halogen component are preferably present in the multimetallic catalytic composite in amounts, calculated on an elemental basis, corresponding to about 0.01 to about 2 wt. % platinum group metal, about 0.01 to about 5 wt. % rhenium, about 0.005 to about 4 wt. % iron and about 0.1 to about 5 wt. % halogen. A key feature associated with the preparation of the subject catalytic composite is reaction of a rhenium carbonyl complex with a porous carrier material containing a uniform dispersion of an iron component and of a platinum group component maintained in the elemental state, whereby the interaction of the rhenium moiety with the platinum group moiety is maximized due to the platinophilic (i.e., platinum-seeking) propensities of the carbon monoxide ligands associated with the rhenium reagent. A specific example of the type of hydrocarbon conversion process disclosed herein is a process for the catalytic reforming of a low octane gasoline fraction wherein the gasoline fraction and a hydrogen stream are contacted with the attenuated superactive multimetallic catalytic composite at reforming conditions

  11. Surface composition of carburized tungsten trioxide and its catalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, M.; Okamoto, H.

    1985-01-01

    The surface composition and electronic structure of carburized tungsten trioxide are investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The relationship between the surface composition and the catalytic activity for methanol electro-oxidation is clarified. The tungsten carbide concentration in the surface layer increases with the carburization time. The formation of tungsten carbide enhances the catalytic activity. On the other hand, the presence of free carbon or tungsten trioxide in the surface layer reduces the activity remarkably. It is also shown that, the higher the electronic density of states near the Fermi level, the higher the catalytic activity

  12. Enhanced propylene production in FCC by novel catalytic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelkar, C.P.; Harris, D.; Xu, M.; Fu, J. [BASF Catalyst LLC, Iselin, NJ (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking is expected to increasingly supply the additional incremental requirements for propylene. The most efficient route to increase propylene yield from an FCC unit is through the use of medium pore zeolites such as ZSM-5. ZSM-5 zeolite cracks near linear olefins in the gasoline range to LPG olefins such as propylene and butylenes. This paper will describe catalytic approaches to increase gasoline range olefins and the chemistry of ZSM-5 to crack those olefins. The paper will also describe novel catalytic materials designed to increase propylene. (orig.)

  13. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Christpher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2013-12-17

    A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and show to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hyrdocarbons into hydrocarbons removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  14. Catalytic Reactor For Oxidizing Mercury Vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfritch, Dennis J.

    1998-07-28

    A catalytic reactor (10) for oxidizing elemental mercury contained in flue gas is provided. The catalyst reactor (10) comprises within a flue gas conduit a perforated corona discharge plate (30a, b) having a plurality of through openings (33) and a plurality of projecting corona discharge electrodes (31); a perforated electrode plate (40a, b, c) having a plurality of through openings (43) axially aligned with the through openings (33) of the perforated corona discharge plate (30a, b) displaced from and opposing the tips of the corona discharge electrodes (31); and a catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) overlaying that face of the perforated electrode plate (40a, b, c) opposing the tips of the corona discharge electrodes (31). A uniformly distributed corona discharge plasma (1000) is intermittently generated between the plurality of corona discharge electrode tips (31) and the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) when a stream of flue gas is passed through the conduit. During those periods when corona discharge (1000) is not being generated, the catalyst molecules of the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d) adsorb mercury vapor contained in the passing flue gas. During those periods when corona discharge (1000) is being generated, ions and active radicals contained in the generated corona discharge plasma (1000) desorb the mercury from the catalyst molecules of the catalyst member (60a, b, c, d), oxidizing the mercury in virtually simultaneous manner. The desorption process regenerates and activates the catalyst member molecules.

  15. Catalytic hydrotreatment of refinery waste: Demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The object of this project and report is to produce liquid hydrocarbons by the catalytic hydroprocessing of solid refinery wastes (hard pitches) in order to improve the profitability of deep conversion processes and reduce the excess production of heavy fuels. The project was mostly carried out on the ASVAHL demonstration platform site, at Solaize, and hard pitches were produced primarily by deasphalting of atmospheric or vacuum distillation residues. The project includes two experimental phases and an economic evaluation study phase. In Phase 1, two granular catalysts were used to transform pitch into standard low sulfur fuel oil: a continuously moving bed, with demetallation and conversion catalyst; a fixed bed, with hydrorefining catalyst. In Phase 2 of the project, it was proven that a hydrotreatment process using a finely dispersed catalyst in the feedstock, can, under realistic operating conditions, transform with good yields hard pitch into distillates that can be refined through standard methods. In Phase 3 of the project, it was shown that the economics of such processes are tightly linked to the price differential between white'' and black'' oil products, which is expected to increase in the future. Furthermore, the evolution of environmental constraints will impel the use of such methods, thus avoiding the coproduction of polluting solid residues. 11 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Electrochemical promotion of sulfur dioxide catalytic oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrushina, Irina; Bandur, Viktor; Cappeln, Frederik Vilhelm

    2000-01-01

    investigation was to study a possible non-Faradaic electrochemical promotion of the liquid-phase catalytic reaction. It has been shown that there are two negative potential promotion areas with maximum effects at approximately -0.1 and -0.2 V, and one positive potential promotion area with the maximum effect...... between 0.1 and 0.3 V. There were no Faradaic reactions in the negative polarization region, and there was an anodic current which was less than 16% of the theoretical value for an exclusively Faradaic SO2 oxidation. Therefore the promotion effects at negative polarization are completely non-Faradaic. All...... the promotion effects have been explained as mainly due to charging of the electric double layer at the gold electrode. The effect at -0.2 V also depends on the V2O5 concentration and is more pronounced at higher V2O5 concentrations. This has been ascribed to a destruction of the vanadium polymeric chains...

  17. Additive Manufacturing of Catalytically Active Living Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Abhijit; Johnston, Trevor G; Shafranek, Ryan T; Goodman, Cassandra J; Zalatan, Jesse G; Storti, Duane W; Ganter, Mark A; Nelson, Alshakim

    2018-04-25

    Living materials, which are composites of living cells residing in a polymeric matrix, are designed to utilize the innate functionalities of the cells to address a broad range of applications such as fermentation and biosensing. Herein, we demonstrate the additive manufacturing of catalytically active living materials (AMCALM) for continuous fermentation. A multi-stimuli-responsive yeast-laden hydrogel ink, based on F127-dimethacrylate, was developed and printed using a direct-write 3D printer. The reversible stimuli-responsive behaviors of the polymer hydrogel inks to temperature and pressure are critical, as they enabled the facile incorporation of yeast cells and subsequent fabrication of 3D lattice constructs. Subsequent photo-cross-linking of the printed polymer hydrogel afforded a robust elastic material. These yeast-laden living materials were metabolically active in the fermentation of glucose into ethanol for 2 weeks in a continuous batch process without significant reduction in efficiency (∼90% yield of ethanol). This cell immobilization platform may potentially be applicable toward other genetically modified yeast strains to produce other high-value chemicals in a continuous biofermentation process.

  18. Plasma-catalytic decomposition of TCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenbroucke, A.; Morent, R.; De Geyter, N.; Leys, C. [Ghent Univ., Ghent (Belgium). Dept. of Applied Physics; Tuan, N.D.M.; Giraudon, J.M.; Lamonier, J.F. [Univ. des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, Villeneuve (France). Dept. de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide

    2010-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are gaseous pollutants that pose an environmental hazard due to their high volatility and their possible toxicity. Conventional technologies to reduce the emission of VOCs have their advantages, but they become cost-inefficient when low concentrations have to be treated. In the past 2 decades, non-thermal plasma technology has received growing attention as an alternative and promising remediation method. Non-thermal plasmas are effective because they produce a series of strong oxidizers such as ozone, oxygen radicals and hydroxyl radicals that provide a reactive chemical environment in which VOCs are completely oxidized. This study investigated whether the combination of NTP and catalysis could improve the energy efficiency and the selectivity towards carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Trichloroethylene (TCE) was decomposed by non-thermal plasma generated in a DC-excited atmospheric pressure glow discharge. The production of by-products was qualitatively investigated through FT-IR spectrometry. The results were compared with those from a catalytic reactor. The removal rate of TCE reached a maximum of 78 percent at the highest input energy. The by-products of TCE decomposition were CO{sub 2}, carbon monoxide (CO) hydrochloric acid (HCl) and dichloroacetylchloride. Combining the plasma system with a catalyst located in an oven downstream resulted in a maximum removal of 80 percent, at an energy density of 300 J/L, a catalyst temperature of 373 K and a total air flow rate of 2 slm. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Microchannel Reactor System for Catalytic Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeniyi Lawal; Woo Lee; Ron Besser; Donald Kientzler; Luke Achenie

    2010-12-22

    We successfully demonstrated a novel process intensification concept enabled by the development of microchannel reactors, for energy efficient catalytic hydrogenation reactions at moderate temperature, and pressure, and low solvent levels. We designed, fabricated, evaluated, and optimized a laboratory-scale microchannel reactor system for hydrogenation of onitroanisole and a proprietary BMS molecule. In the second phase of the program, as a prelude to full-scale commercialization, we designed and developed a fully-automated skid-mounted multichannel microreactor pilot plant system for multiphase reactions. The system is capable of processing 1 – 10 kg/h of liquid substrate, and an industrially relevant immiscible liquid-liquid was successfully demonstrated on the system. Our microreactor-based pilot plant is one-of-akind. We anticipate that this process intensification concept, if successfully demonstrated, will provide a paradigm-changing basis for replacing existing energy inefficient, cost ineffective, environmentally detrimental slurry semi-batch reactor-based manufacturing practiced in the pharmaceutical and fine chemicals industries.

  20. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan, Monica; Mihet, Maria; Lazar, Mihaela D.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H 2 . In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al 2 O 3 . The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N 2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H 2 , CH 4 , CO, CO 2 . The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H 2 O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%

  1. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M. [Molten Metal Technology, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy issued a Planned Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) in 1993, with the objective of identifying unique technologies which could be applied to the most hazardous waste streams at DOE sites. The combination of radioactive contamination with additional contamination by hazardous constituents such as those identified by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) pose an especially challenging problem. Traditional remediation technologies are increasingly becoming less acceptable to stakeholders and regulators because of the risks they pose to public health and safety. Desirable recycling technologies were described by the DOE as: (1) easily installed, operated, and maintained; (2) exhibiting superior environmental performance; (3) protective of worker and public health and safety; (4) readily acceptable to a wide spectrum of evaluators; and (5) economically feasible. Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT) was awarded a contract as a result of the PRDA initiative to demonstrate the applicability of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP), MMT`s proprietary elemental recycling technology, to DOE`s inventory of low level mixed waste. This includes DOE`s inventory of radioactively- and RCRA-contaminated scrap metal and other waste forms expected to be generated by the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of DOE sites.

  2. Process for catalytic flue gas denoxing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woldhuis, A.; Goudriaan, F.; Groeneveld, M.; Samson, R.

    1991-01-01

    With the increasing concern for the environment, stringency of legislation and industry's awareness of its own environmental responsibility, the demand for the reduction of emission levels of nitrogen oxides is becoming increasingly urgent. This paper reports that Shell has developed a low temperature catalytic deNOx system for deep removal of nitrogen oxides, which includes a low-pressure-drop reactor. This process is able to achieve over 90% removal of nitrogen oxides and therefore can be expected to meet legislation requirements for the coming years. The development of a low-temperature catalyst makes it possible to operate at temperatures as low as 120 degrees C, compared to 300-400 degrees C for the conventional honeycomb and plate-type catalysts. This allows an add-on construction, which is most often a more economical solution than the retrofits in the hot section required with conventional deNOx catalysts. The Lateral Flow Reactor (LFR), which is used for dust-free flue gas applications, and the Parallel Passage Reactor (PPR) for dust-containing flue gas applications, have been developed to work with pressure drops below 10 mbar

  3. Catalytic partial oxidation of pyrolysis oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennard, David Carl

    2009-12-01

    This thesis explores the catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) of pyrolysis oils to syngas and chemicals. First, an exploration of model compounds and their chemistries under CPO conditions is considered. Then CPO experiments of raw pyrolysis oils are detailed. Finally, plans for future development in this field are discussed. In Chapter 2, organic acids such as propionic acid and lactic acid are oxidized to syngas over Pt catalysts. Equilibrium production of syngas can be achieved over Rh-Ce catalysts; alternatively mechanistic evidence is derived using Pt catalysts in a fuel rich mixture. These experiments show that organic acids, present in pyrolysis oils up to 25%, can undergo CPO to syngas or for the production of chemicals. As the fossil fuels industry also provides organic chemicals such as monomers for plastics, the possibility of deriving such species from pyrolysis oils allows for a greater application of the CPO of biomass. However, chemical production is highly dependent on the originating molecular species. As bio oil comprises up to 400 chemicals, it is essential to understand how difficult it would be to develop a pure product stream. Chapter 3 continues the experimentation from Chapter 2, exploring the CPO of another organic functionality: the ester group. These experiments demonstrate that equilibrium syngas production is possible for esters as well as acids in autothermal operation with contact times as low as tau = 10 ms over Rh-based catalysts. Conversion for these experiments and those with organic acids is >98%, demonstrating the high reactivity of oxygenated compounds on noble metal catalysts. Under CPO conditions, esters decompose in a predictable manner: over Pt and with high fuel to oxygen, non-equilibrium products show a similarity to those from related acids. A mechanism is proposed in which ethyl esters thermally decompose to ethylene and an acid, which decarbonylates homogeneously, driven by heat produced at the catalyst surface. Chapter 4

  4. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy issued a Planned Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) in 1993, with the objective of identifying unique technologies which could be applied to the most hazardous waste streams at DOE sites. The combination of radioactive contamination with additional contamination by hazardous constituents such as those identified by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) pose an especially challenging problem. Traditional remediation technologies are increasingly becoming less acceptable to stakeholders and regulators because of the risks they pose to public health and safety. Desirable recycling technologies were described by the DOE as: (1) easily installed, operated, and maintained; (2) exhibiting superior environmental performance; (3) protective of worker and public health and safety; (4) readily acceptable to a wide spectrum of evaluators; and (5) economically feasible. Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT) was awarded a contract as a result of the PRDA initiative to demonstrate the applicability of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP), MMT's proprietary elemental recycling technology, to DOE's inventory of low level mixed waste. This includes DOE's inventory of radioactively- and RCRA-contaminated scrap metal and other waste forms expected to be generated by the decontamination and decommissioning (D ampersand D) of DOE sites

  5. Substrate-Directed Catalytic Selective Chemical Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawano, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Hisashi

    2018-05-04

    The development of highly efficient reactions at only the desired position is one of the most important subjects in organic chemistry. Most of the reactions in current organic chemistry are reagent- or catalyst-controlled reactions, and the regio- and stereoselectivity of the reactions are determined by the inherent nature of the reagent or catalyst. In sharp contrast, substrate-directed reaction determines the selectivity of the reactions by the functional group on the substrate and can strictly distinguish sterically and electronically similar multiple reaction sites in the substrate. In this Perspective, three topics of substrate-directed reaction are mainly reviewed: (1) directing group-assisted epoxidation of alkenes, (2) ring-opening reactions of epoxides by various nucleophiles, and (3) catalytic peptide synthesis. Our newly developed synthetic methods with new ligands including hydroxamic acid derived ligands realized not only highly efficient reactions but also pinpointed reactions at the expected position, demonstrating the substrate-directed reaction as a powerful method to achieve the desired regio- and stereoselective functionalization of molecules from different viewpoints of reagent- or catalyst-controlled reactions.

  6. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan, Monica, E-mail: monica.dan@itim-cj.ro; Mihet, Maria, E-mail: maria.mihet@itim-cj.ro; Lazar, Mihaela D., E-mail: diana.lazar@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 67-103 Donat Street, 400293 Cluj Napoca (Romania)

    2015-12-23

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H{sub 2}. In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}. The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H{sub 2}O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%.

  7. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    The contract was conceived to establish the commercial capability of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP) to treat contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory. In so doing, Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT), pursued the following objectives: demonstration of the recycling of ferrous and non-ferrous metals--to establish that radioactively contaminated scrap metal can be converted to high-grade, ferrous and non-ferrous alloys which can be reused by DOE or reintroduced into commerce; immobilize radionuclides--that CEP will concentrate the radionuclides in a dense vitreous phase, minimize secondary waste generation and stabilize and reduce waste volume; destroy hazardous organics--that CEP will convert hazardous organics to valuable industrial gases, which can be used as feed gases for chemical synthesis or as an energy source; recovery volatile heavy metals--that CEP's off-gas treatment system will capture volatile heavy metals, such as mercury and lead; and establish that CEP is economical for processing contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory--that CEP is a more cost-effective and, complete treatment and recycling technology than competing technologies for processing contaminated scrap. The process and its performance are described

  8. Radioisotope applications on fluidized catalytic cracking units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlton, J.S.

    1997-01-01

    Radioisotopes are used to trace the flow of all the phases of Fluidized Catalytic Cracking process in oil refineries. The gaseous phases, steam, hydrocarbon vapour and air, are generally traced using a noble-gas isotope, 41 Ar, 79 Kr or 85 Kr. An appropriate tracer for the catalyst is produced by irradiating a catalyst sample in a nuclear reactor. The activation products, 140 La and 24 Na provide appropriate radioactive 'labels' for the catalyst, which is reinjected into the FCC. An advantage of this approach is that it facilitates the study of the behaviour of different particle size fractions. Radioisotopes as sealed sources of gamma radiation are used to measure catalyst density variations and density distributions in critical parts of the unit. An important trend in radioisotope applications is the increasing use of the information they produce as inputs to or as validation of, mathematical process models. In line with the increasing sophistication of the models, the technology is undergoing continuous refinement. Developments include the investigation of more efficient, more convenient tracers, the introduction of systems to facilitate more rapid and comprehensive data acquisition and software refinements for enhanced data analysis

  9. Catalytic cleavage activities of 10–23 DNAzyme analogs functionalized with an amino group in its catalytic core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Functionalization of the catalytic loop of 10–23 DNAzyme with an amino group was performed by incorporation of 7-(3-aminopropyl-8-aza-7-deaza-2′-deoxyadenosine in different single positions. Among the nine modified positions in the catalytic loop, A9 is the unique position with positive contribution by such modification. These results indicated that more efficient deoxyribozymes remain to be explored by introduction of exogenous functional groups in an appropriate position in the catalytic loop of 10–23 DNAzyme, such as the combination of 7-functional group substituted 8-aza-7-deaza-2′-deoxyadenosine analogs and A9 position.

  10. Bimetallic Nanoparticles in Alternative Solvents for Catalytic Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trung Dang-Bao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bimetallic nanoparticles represent attractive catalytic systems thanks to the synergy between both partners at the atomic level, mainly induced by electronic effects which in turn are associated with the corresponding structures (alloy, core-shell, hetero-dimer. This type of engineered material can trigger changes in the kinetics of catalyzed processes by variations on the electrophilicity/nucleophilicity of the metal centers involved and also promote cooperative effects to foster organic transformations, including multi-component and multi-step processes. Solvents become a crucial factor in the conception of catalytic processes, not only due to their environmental impact, but also because they can preserve the bimetallic structure during the catalytic reaction and therefore increase the catalyst life-time. In this frame, the present review focuses on the recent works described in the literature concerning the synthesis of bimetallic nanoparticles in non-conventional solvents, i.e., other than common volatile compounds, for catalytic applications.

  11. Catalytic Transformation of Ethylbenzene over Y-Zeolite-based Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Khattaf, Sulaiman

    2008-01-01

    Catalytic transformation of ethylbenzene (EB) has been investigated over ultrastable Y (USY)-zeolite-based catalysts in a novel riser simulator at different operating conditions. The effect of reaction conditions on EB conversion is reported

  12. Catalytic Oxidation of Cyanogen Chloride over a Monolithic Oxidation Catalyst

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Campbell, Jeffrey

    1997-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation of cyanogen chloride was evaluated over a monolithic oxidation catalyst at temperatures between 200 and 300 deg C in air employing feed concentrations between 100 and 10,000 ppm...

  13. Highly efficient catalytic systems based on Pd-coated microbeads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jin Hyun; Cho, Ahyoung; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Bumkyo; Kang, Dong Woo; Koo, Chong Min; Yu, Taekyung; Park, Bum Jun

    2018-01-01

    The efficiency of two prototype catalysis systems using palladium (Pd)-coated microparticles was investigated with regard to the recovery and recyclability of the catalytic particles. One such system was the interface-adsorption method, in which polymer particles coated with Pd nanoparticles strongly and irreversibly attach to the oil-water interface. Due to the irreversible adsorption of the catalytic particles to the interface, particle loss was completely prevented while mixing the aqueous solution and while collecting the products. The other system was based on the magnetic field-associated particle recovery method. The use of polymeric microparticles containing Pd nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles accelerated the sedimentation of the particles in the aqueous phase by applying a strong magnetic field, consequently suppressing drainage of the particles from the reactor along the product stream. Upon multiple runs of the catalytic reactions, it was found that conversion does not change significantly, demonstrating the excellent recyclability and performance efficiency in the catalytic processes.

  14. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes by catalytic vapor decomposition ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs); catalytic vapor decomposition; soap bubble mass flowmeter. ... [4,13,14], makes them an excellent candidate for use as a dielectric in supercapac- itors [15]. ... the change in liquid level in the scrubber. After the ...

  15. Catalytic conversion of methane: Carbon dioxide reforming and oxidative coupling

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    and the oxidative coupling of methane. These two reactions have tremendous technological significance for practical application in industry. An understanding of the fundamental aspects and reaction mechanisms of the catalytic reactions reviewed in this study would

  16. The Catalytic Enantioselective Total Synthesis of (+)‐Liphagal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, Joshua J.; McFadden, Ryan M.; Virgil, Scott C.

    2011-01-01

    Ring a ding: The first catalytic enantioselective total synthesis of the meroterpenoid natural product (+)-liphagal is disclosed. The approach showcases a variety of technology including enantioselective enolate alkylation, a photochemical alkyne-alkene [2+2] reaction, microwaveassisted metal...

  17. Kinetic Studies of Catalytic Oxidation of Cyclohexene Using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    Kinetic Studies of Catalytic Oxidation of Cyclohexene Using Chromium VI Oxide in. Acetic Acid ... respect to the oxidant using pseudo-order approximation method. .... making the concentration of the cyclohexene in ..... on Titanium Silicate.

  18. Processing and structural characterization of porous reforming catalytic films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Xianghui; Williams, Jey; Choy, Kwang-Leong

    2006-01-01

    Nickel-based catalysts are often used to reform methanol into hydrogen. The preparation and installation of these catalysts are costly and laborious. As an alternative, directly applying catalytic films onto the separator components can improve the manufacturing efficiency. This paper reports the successful deposition of adherent porous NiO-Al 2 O 3 -based catalytic films with well-controlled stoichiometry, using a single-step Aerosol Assisted Chemical Vapour Deposition (AACVD) method. The microstructure, composition and crystalline phase of the as-deposited catalytic films are characterized using a combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Spectrometer. The results have demonstrated the capability of AACVD to produce porous NiO-Al 2 O 3 -based catalytic films

  19. Magnetic, catalytic, EPR and electrochemical studies on binuclear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Magnetic, catalytic, EPR and electrochemical studies on binuclear copper(II) complexes ... to the oxidation of 3,5-di--butylcatechol to the corresponding quinone. ... EPR spectral studies in methanol solvent show welldefined four hyperfine ...

  20. Quantum catalysis : the modelling of catalytic transition states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hall, M.B.; Margl, P.; Naray-Szabo, G.; Schramm, Vern; Truhlar, D.G.; Santen, van R.A.; Warshel, A.; Whitten, J.L.; Truhlar, D.G.; Morokuma, K.

    1999-01-01

    A review with 101 refs.; we present an introduction to the computational modeling of transition states for catalytic reactions. We consider both homogeneous catalysis and heterogeneous catalysis, including organometallic catalysts, enzymes, zeolites and metal oxides, and metal surfaces. We summarize

  1. Effect of radioactive radiation on catalytic properties of solid materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokol' skii, D V; Kuzembaev, K K; Kel' man, I V [AN Kazakhskoj SSR, Alma-Ata. Inst. Organicheskogo Kataliza i Ehlektrokhimii

    1977-05-01

    General survey is made of the problem of radiation modification of the action of solid catalysts with respect to the various types of heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Consideration is given to the key mechanisms responsible for radiation damage in the interaction of high-energy radiation with a solid body. The effect of ionizing radiation on the adsorption capacity and catalytic activity of solid bodies is discussed.

  2. Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddy, M.; Jones, S.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the catalytic conversion of solubilized carbohydrate streams to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent efforts within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC) in collaboration with Virent, Inc. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for the catalytic conversion of sugars pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks have been identified.

  3. Advanced Catalytic Converter in Gasoline Enginer Emission Control: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Leman A.M.; Jajuli Afiqah; Feriyanto Dafit; Rahman Fakhrurrazi; Zakaria Supaat

    2017-01-01

    Exhaust emission from automobile source has become a major contributor to the air pollution and environmental problem. Catalytic converter is found to be one of the most effective tools to reduce the overwhelming exhaust pollutants in our environment. The development of sustainable catalytic converter still remains a critical issue due to the stringent exhaust emission regulations. Another issue such as price and availability of the precious metal were also forced the automotive industry to i...

  4. Catalytical Properties of Free and Immobilized Aspergillus niger Tannase

    OpenAIRE

    Abril Flores-Maltos; Luis V. Rodríguez-Durán; Jacqueline Renovato; Juan C. Contreras; Raúl Rodríguez; Cristóbal N. Aguilar

    2011-01-01

    A fungal tannase was produced, recovered, and immobilized by entrapment in calcium alginate beads. Catalytical properties of the immobilized enzyme were compared with those of the free one. Tannase was produced intracellularly by the xerophilic fungus Aspergillus niger GH1 in a submerged fermentation system. Enzyme was recovered by cell disruption and the crude extract was partially purified. The catalytical properties of free and immobilized tannase were evaluated using tannic acid and methy...

  5. Application of Zeolitic Additives in the Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nemati Kharat

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Current article describes application of zeolites in fluid catalytic cracking (FCC. The use of several zeolitic additives for the production light olefins and reduction of pollutants is described. Application of zeolites as fluid catalytic cracking (FCC catalysts and additives due to the presence of active acid sites in the zeolite framework  increase the formation of desired cracking products (i.e., olefin and branched products  in the FCC unit.

  6. Catalytic Reactor for Inerting of Aircraft Fuel Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-06-01

    Aluminum Panels After Triphase Corrosion Test 79 35 Inerting System Flows in Various Flight Modes 82 36 High Flow Reactor Parametric Data 84 37 System...AD/A-000 939 CATALYTIC REACTOR FOR INERTING OF AIRCRAFT FUEL TANKS George H. McDonald, et al AiResearch Manufacturing Company Prepared for: Air Force...190th Street 2b. GROUP Torrance, California .. REPORT TITLE CATALYTIC REACTOR FOR INERTING OF AIRCRAFT FUEL TANKS . OESCRIP TIVE NOTEs (Thpe of refpoft

  7. Aerobic, catalytic oxidation of alcohols in ionic liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Roberto F. de

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient and simple catalytic system based on RuCl3 dissolved in ionic liquids has been developed for the oxidation of alcohols into aldehydes and ketones under mild conditions. A new fluorinated ionic liquid, 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium pentadecafluorooctanoate, was synthesized and demonstrated better performance that the other ionic liquids employed. Moreover this catalytic system utilizes molecular oxygen as an oxidizing agent, producing water as the only by-product.

  8. Catalytic flash pyrolysis of oil-impregnated-wood and jatropha cake using sodium based catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali Imran, A.; Bramer, Eduard A.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Brem, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of wood with impregnated vegetable oil was investigated and compared with catalytic pyrolysis of jatropha cake making use of sodium based catalysts to produce a high quality bio-oil. The catalytic pyrolysis was carried out in two modes: in-situ catalytic pyrolysis and post

  9. Catalytic gasification in fluidized bed, of orange waste. Comparison with non catalytic gasification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar Trujillo, Leonardo; Marquez Montesinos, Francisco; Ramos Robaina, Boris A.; Guerra Reyes, Yanet; Arauzo Perez, Jesus; Gonzalo Callejo, Alberto; Sanchez Cebrian, Jose L

    2011-01-01

    The industry processing of the orange, generates high volumes of solid waste. This waste has been used as complement in the animal feeding, in biochemical processes; but their energy use has not been valued by means of the gasification process. They were carried out gasification studies with air in catalytic fluidized bed (using dolomite and olivine as catalysts in a secondary reactor, also varying the temperature of the secondary reactor and the catalyst mass), of the solid waste of orange and the results are compared with those obtained in the gasification with non catalytic air. In the processes we use a design of complete factorial experiment of 2k, valuing the influence of the independent variables and their interactions in the answers, using the software Design-Expert version 7 and a grade of significance of 95 %. The results demonstrate the qualities of the solid waste of orange in the energy use by means of the gasification process for the treatment of these residuals, obtaining a gas of low caloric value. The use of catalysts also diminishes the yield of tars obtained in the gasification process, being more active the dolomite that the olivine in this process. (author)

  10. Petroleum Refineries (Catalytic Cracking, Catalytic Reforming and Sulfur Recovery Units): National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    learn more about the NESHAP for catalytic cracking and reforming units, as well as sulfur recovery units in petroleum refineries by reading the rule history, rule summary, background information documents, and compliance information

  11. Modelling of procecces in catalytic recombiners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, J.

    2007-01-01

    In order to achieve a high degree of safety in nuclear power plants and prevent possible accident scenarios, their consequences are calculated and analysed with numeric codes. One of the most important part of nuclear safety research of hazardous incidents are development and validation of these numeric models, which are implemented into accident codes. The severe hydrogen release during a core meltdown is one of the considered scenario of performed accident analyses. One of the most important measure for the elimination of the hydrogen is catalytic recombiners. Converting the hydrogen with the atmospheric oxygen to water vapor in an exothermic reaction will prevent possible detonation of the hydrogen/air atmosphere. Within the dissertation the recombiner simulation REKO-DIREKT was developed and validated by an extensive experimental database. The performance of recombiners with regard to the conversion of the hydrogen and the temperature development is modelled. The REKO-DIREKT program is unique and has made significant revolution in research of hydrogen safety. For the first time it has been possible to show the performance of the recombiner so great in detail by using REKO-DIREKT. In the future engineers of nuclear power plants will have opportunity to have precise forecasts about the process of the possible accidents with hydrogen release. Also with presence of water vapor or with oxygen depletion which are included in the model. The major discussion of the hydrogen ignition at hot catalyst steel plates can be evaluated in the future with REKO-DIREKT more reliably than the existing used models. (orig.)

  12. Reductive Catalytic Fractionation of Corn Stover Lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Eric M.; Katahira, Rui; Reed, Michelle; Resch, Michael G.; Karp, Eric M.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2016-12-05

    Reductive catalytic fractionation (RCF) has emerged as an effective biomass pretreatment strategy to depolymerize lignin into tractable fragments in high yields. We investigate the RCF of corn stover, a highly abundant herbaceous feedstock, using carbon-supported Ru and Ni catalysts at 200 and 250 degrees C in methanol and, in the presence or absence of an acid cocatalyst (H3PO4 or an acidified carbon support). Three key performance variables were studied: (1) the effectiveness of lignin extraction as measured by the yield of lignin oil, (2) the yield of monomers in the lignin oil, and (3) the carbohydrate retention in the residual solids after RCF. The monomers included methyl coumarate/ferulate, propyl guaiacol/syringol, and ethyl guaiacol/syringol. The Ru and Ni catalysts performed similarly in terms of product distribution and monomer yields. The monomer yields increased monotonically as a function of time for both temperatures. At 6 h, monomer yields of 27.2 and 28.3% were obtained at 250 and 200 degrees C, respectively, with Ni/C. The addition of an acid cocatalysts to the Ni/C system increased monomer yields to 32% for acidified carbon and 38% for phosphoric acid at 200 degrees C. The monomer product distribution was dominated by methyl coumarate regardless of the use of the acid cocatalysts. The use of phosphoric acid at 200 degrees C or the high temperature condition without acid resulted in complete lignin extraction and partial sugar solubilization (up to 50%) thereby generating lignin oil yields that exceeded the theoretical limit. In contrast, using either Ni/C or Ni on acidified carbon at 200 degrees C resulted in moderate lignin oil yields of ca. 55%, with sugar retention values >90%. Notably, these sugars were amenable to enzymatic digestion, reaching conversions >90% at 96 h. Characterization studies on the lignin oils using two-dimensional heteronuclear single quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance and gel permeation chromatrography revealed

  13. Catalytic and non-catalytic wet air oxidation of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate: kinetics and biodegradability enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Ojeda, María Eugenia; Kim, Jungkwon; Carrera, Julián; Metcalfe, Ian S; Font, Josep

    2007-06-18

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) were investigated as suitable precursors for the biological treatment of industrial wastewater containing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Two hours WAO semi-batch experiments were conducted at 15 bar of oxygen partial pressure (P(O2)) and at 180, 200 and 220 degrees C. It was found that the highest temperature provides appreciable total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement of about 42 and 47%, correspondingly. Based on the main identified intermediates (acetic acid and sulfobenzoic acid) a reaction pathway for DBS and a kinetic model in WAO were proposed. In the case of CWAO experiments, seventy-two hours tests were done in a fixed bed reactor in continuous trickle flow regime, using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst. The temperature and P(O2) were 140-160 degrees C and 2-9 bar, respectively. The influence of the operating conditions on the DBS oxidation, the occurrence of oxidative coupling reactions over the AC, and the catalytic activity (in terms of substrate removal) were established. The results show that the AC without any supported active metal behaves bi-functional as adsorbent and catalyst, giving TOC conversions up to 52% at 160 degrees C and 2 bar of P(O2), which were comparable to those obtained in WAO experiments. Respirometric tests were completed before and after CWAO and to the main intermediates identified through the WAO and CWAO oxidation route. Then, the readily biodegradable COD (COD(RB)) of the CWAO and WAO effluents were found. Taking into account these results it was possible to compare whether or not the CWAO or WAO effluents were suitable for a conventional activated sludge plant inoculated with non adapted culture.

  14. Catalytic and non-catalytic wet air oxidation of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate: Kinetics and biodegradability enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez-Ojeda, Maria Eugenia [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Escola Tecnica Superior d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Paisos Catalans 26, 43007 Tarragona, Catalonia (Spain); Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Edifici Q-ETSE, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Kim, Jungkwon [Chemical Engineering and Analytical Sciences Department, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Carrera, Julian [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Edifici Q-ETSE, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Metcalfe, Ian S. [Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials Department, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Font, Josep [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Escola Tecnica Superior d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Paisos Catalans 26, 43007 Tarragona, Catalonia (Spain)]. E-mail: jose.font@urv.cat

    2007-06-18

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) were investigated as suitable precursors for the biological treatment of industrial wastewater containing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Two hours WAO semi-batch experiments were conducted at 15bar of oxygen partial pressure (P{sub O{sub 2}}) and at 180, 200 and 220deg. C. It was found that the highest temperature provides appreciable total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement of about 42 and 47%, correspondingly. Based on the main identified intermediates (acetic acid and sulfobenzoic acid) a reaction pathway for DBS and a kinetic model in WAO were proposed. In the case of CWAO experiments, seventy-two hours tests were done in a fixed bed reactor in continuous trickle flow regime, using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst. The temperature and P{sub O{sub 2}} were 140-160deg. C and 2-9bar, respectively. The influence of the operating conditions on the DBS oxidation, the occurrence of oxidative coupling reactions over the AC, and the catalytic activity (in terms of substrate removal) were established. The results show that the AC without any supported active metal behaves bi-functional as adsorbent and catalyst, giving TOC conversions up to 52% at 160deg. C and 2 bar of P{sub O{sub 2}}, which were comparable to those obtained in WAO experiments. Respirometric tests were completed before and after CWAO and to the main intermediates identified through the WAO and CWAO oxidation route. Then, the readily biodegradable COD (COD{sub RB}) of the CWAO and WAO effluents were found. Taking into account these results it was possible to compare whether or not the CWAO or WAO effluents were suitable for a conventional activated sludge plant inoculated with non adapted culture.

  15. Catalytic and non-catalytic wet air oxidation of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate: Kinetics and biodegradability enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez-Ojeda, Maria Eugenia; Kim, Jungkwon; Carrera, Julian; Metcalfe, Ian S.; Font, Josep

    2007-01-01

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) were investigated as suitable precursors for the biological treatment of industrial wastewater containing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Two hours WAO semi-batch experiments were conducted at 15bar of oxygen partial pressure (P O 2 ) and at 180, 200 and 220deg. C. It was found that the highest temperature provides appreciable total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement of about 42 and 47%, correspondingly. Based on the main identified intermediates (acetic acid and sulfobenzoic acid) a reaction pathway for DBS and a kinetic model in WAO were proposed. In the case of CWAO experiments, seventy-two hours tests were done in a fixed bed reactor in continuous trickle flow regime, using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst. The temperature and P O 2 were 140-160deg. C and 2-9bar, respectively. The influence of the operating conditions on the DBS oxidation, the occurrence of oxidative coupling reactions over the AC, and the catalytic activity (in terms of substrate removal) were established. The results show that the AC without any supported active metal behaves bi-functional as adsorbent and catalyst, giving TOC conversions up to 52% at 160deg. C and 2 bar of P O 2 , which were comparable to those obtained in WAO experiments. Respirometric tests were completed before and after CWAO and to the main intermediates identified through the WAO and CWAO oxidation route. Then, the readily biodegradable COD (COD RB ) of the CWAO and WAO effluents were found. Taking into account these results it was possible to compare whether or not the CWAO or WAO effluents were suitable for a conventional activated sludge plant inoculated with non adapted culture

  16. Progress in catalytic naphtha reforming process: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimpour, Mohammad Reza; Jafari, Mitra; Iranshahi, Davood

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic naphtha reforming process is a vital process for refineries due to the production of high-octane components, which is intensely demanded in our modern life. The significance of this industrial process induced researchers to investigate different aspects of catalytic naphtha reforming process intensively. Some of the investigators try to improve this process by representing more effective catalysts, while others try to elucidate its kinetic and deactivation mechanisms and design more efficient reactor setups. The amount of these established papers is so much that may confuse some of the researchers who want to find collective information about catalytic naphtha reforming process. In the present paper, the published studies from 1949 until now are categorized into three main groups including finding suitable catalyst, revealing appropriate kinetic and deactivation model, and suggesting efficient reactor configuration and mode of operation. These studies are reviewed separately, and a suitable reference is provided for those who want to have access to generalized information about catalytic naphtha reforming process. Finally, various suggestions for revamping the catalytic naphtha reforming process have been proposed as a guideline for further investigations

  17. Poisoning of bubble propelled catalytic micromotors: the chemical environment matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guanjia; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G; Pumera, Martin

    2013-04-07

    Self-propelled catalytic microjets have attracted considerable attention in recent years and these devices have exhibited the ability to move in complex media. The mechanism of propulsion is via the Pt catalysed decomposition of H2O2 and it is understood that the Pt surface is highly susceptible to poisoning by sulphur-containing molecules. Here, we show that important extracellular thiols as well as basic organic molecules can significantly hamper the motion of catalytic microjet engines. This is due to two different mechanisms: (i) molecules such as dimethyl sulfoxide can quench the hydroxyl radicals produced at Pt surfaces and reduce the amount of oxygen gas generated and (ii) molecules containing -SH, -SSR, and -SCH3 moieties can poison the catalytically active platinum surface, inhibiting the motion of the jet engines. It is essential that the presence of such molecules in the environment be taken into consideration for future design and operation of catalytic microjet engines. We show this effect on catalytic micromotors prepared by both rolled-up and electrodeposition approaches, demonstrating that such poisoning is universal for Pt catalyzed micromotors. We believe that our findings will contribute significantly to this field to develop alternative systems or catalysts for self-propulsion when practical applications in the real environment are considered.

  18. Catalytic conversion of ethanol on H-Y zeolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Čegar Nedeljko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic activity of the H-form of synthetic zeolite NaY was examined in this study. The catalytic activity was determined according to the rate of ethanol conversion in a gas phase in the static system. In the conversion of ethanol on synthetic NaY zeolite at 585, 595, and 610 K, on which the reaction develops at an optimal rate, ethene and diethyl ether are evolved in approximately the same quantity. After transforming the NaY zeolite into the H-form, its catalytic activity was extremely increases so, the reaction develops at a significantly lower temperature with a very large increase in the reaction rate. The distribution of the products also changes, so that at lower temperatures diethyl ether is elvolved in most cases, and the development of ethene is favored at higher ones, and after a certain period of time there is almost complete conversion of ethanol into ethene. The increase in catalytic activity, as well as the change of selectivity of conversion of ethanol on the H-form of zeolite, is the result of removing Na+ cations in the NaY zeolite, so that more acidic catalyst is obtained which contains a number of acidic catalytically active centers, as well as a more powerful one compared to the original NaY zeolite.

  19. Heterogeneous-catalytic redox reactions in nitrate - formate systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananiev, A.V.; Shilov, V.P.; Tananaev, I.G.; Brossard, Ph.; Broudic, J.Ch.

    2000-01-01

    It was found that an intensive destruction of various organic and mineral substances - usual components of aqueous waste solutions (oxalic acid, complexones, urea, hydrazine, ammonium nitrate, etc.) takes place under the conditions of catalytic denitration. Kinetics and mechanisms of urea and ammonium nitrate decomposition in the system HNO 3 - HCOOH - Pt/SiO 2 are comprehensively investigated. The behaviour of uranium, neptunium and plutonium under the conditions of catalytic denitration is studied. It is shown, that under the certain conditions the formic acid is an effective reducer of the uranium (VI), neptunium (VI, V) and plutonium (VI, IV) ions. Kinetics of heterogeneous-catalytic red-ox reactions of uranium (VI), neptunium (VI, V) and plutonium (VI, IV) with formic acid are investigated. The mechanisms of the appropriate reactions are evaluated. (authors)

  20. Catalytic dehydration of ethanol using transition metal oxide catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, T

    2005-04-15

    The aim of this work is to study catalytic ethanol dehydration using different prepared catalysts, which include Fe(2)O(3), Mn(2)O(3), and calcined physical mixtures of both ferric and manganese oxides with alumina and/or silica gel. The physicochemical properties of these catalysts were investigated via X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), acidity measurement, and nitrogen adsorption-desorption at -196 degrees C. The catalytic activities of such catalysts were tested through conversion of ethanol at 200-500 degrees C using a catalytic flow system operated under atmospheric pressure. The results obtained indicated that the dehydration reaction on the catalyst relies on surface acidity, whereas the ethylene production selectivity depends on the catalyst chemical constituents.

  1. Chemically-modified cellulose paper as a microstructured catalytic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Hirotaka; Kitaoka, Takuya; Isogai, Akira

    2015-01-15

    We discuss the successful use of chemically-modified cellulose paper as a microstructured catalytic reactor for the production of useful chemicals. The chemical modification of cellulose paper was achieved using a silane-coupling technique. Amine-modified paper was directly used as a base catalyst for the Knoevenagel condensation reaction. Methacrylate-modified paper was used for the immobilization of lipase and then in nonaqueous transesterification processes. These catalytic paper materials offer high reaction efficiencies and have excellent practical properties. We suggest that the paper-specific interconnected microstructure with pulp fiber networks provides fast mixing of the reactants and efficient transport of the reactants to the catalytically-active sites. This concept is expected to be a promising route to green and sustainable chemistry.

  2. Hydrogen production via catalytic processing of renewable feedstocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazim Muradov; Franklyn Smith; Ali T-Raissi

    2006-01-01

    Landfill gas (LFG) and biogas can potentially become important feedstocks for renewable hydrogen production. The objectives of this work were: (1) to develop a catalytic process for direct reforming of CH 4 -CO 2 gaseous mixture mimicking LFG, (2) perform thermodynamic analysis of the reforming process using AspenPlus chemical process simulator, (3) determine operational conditions for auto-thermal (or thermo-neutral) reforming of a model CH 4 -CO 2 feedstock, and (4) fabricate and test a bench-scale hydrogen production unit. Experimental data obtained from catalytic reformation of the CH 4 -CO 2 and CH 4 -CO 2 -O 2 gaseous mixtures using Ni-catalyst were in a good agreement with the simulation results. It was demonstrated that catalytic reforming of LFG-mimicking gas produced hydrogen with the purity of 99.9 vol.%. (authors)

  3. Chemically-Modified Cellulose Paper as a Microstructured Catalytic Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Koga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the successful use of chemically-modified cellulose paper as a microstructured catalytic reactor for the production of useful chemicals. The chemical modification of cellulose paper was achieved using a silane-coupling technique. Amine-modified paper was directly used as a base catalyst for the Knoevenagel condensation reaction. Methacrylate-modified paper was used for the immobilization of lipase and then in nonaqueous transesterification processes. These catalytic paper materials offer high reaction efficiencies and have excellent practical properties. We suggest that the paper-specific interconnected microstructure with pulp fiber networks provides fast mixing of the reactants and efficient transport of the reactants to the catalytically-active sites. This concept is expected to be a promising route to green and sustainable chemistry.

  4. Electro-catalytic degradation of sulfisoxazole by using graphene anode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanyan; Liu, Shuan; Li, Ruiping; Huang, Yingping; Chen, Chuncheng

    2016-05-01

    Graphite and graphene electrodes were prepared by using pure graphite as precursor. The electrode materials were characterized by a scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements. The electro-catalytic activity for degradation of sulfisoxazole (SIZ) was investigated by using prepared graphene or graphite anode. The results showed that the degradation of SIZ was much more rapid on the graphene than that on the graphite electrode. Moreover, the graphene electrode exhibited good stability and recyclability. The analysis on the intermediate products and the measurement of active species during the SIZ degradation demonstrated that indirect oxidation is the dominant mechanism, involving the electro-catalytic generation of OH and O2(-) as the main active oxygen species. This study implies that graphene is a promising potential electrode material for long-term application to electro-catalytic degradation of organic pollutants. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. A catalytic distillation process for light gas oil hydrodesulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas-Villamil, F.D.; Marroquin, J.O.; Paz, C. de la; Rodriguez, E. [Prog. de Matematicas Aplicadas y Computacion, Prog. de Tratamiento de Crudo Maya, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico City, DF (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    A light gas oil hydrodesulfurization process via catalytic distillation is developed and compared to a conventional process. By integrating the separation and reaction into a single unit, the catalytic distillation may produce a diesel with low concentration of sulfur compounds at a lower cost than the traditional reaction/separation process. The process proposed in this work is compared to an optimised conventional hydrodesulfurization unit which represents fairly well a plant that belongs to the National System of Refineries. During the optimisation of the conventional process, a compromise is established among the production of diesel and naphtha and the operating costs. The results show that the light gas oil hydrodesulfurization via catalytic distillation is as or more efficient than the conventional process. However, the removal of the sulfur compounds is carried out under less rigorous conditions. This design reduces the fix and operational costs. (author)

  6. Photolytic AND Catalytic Destruction of Organic Waste Water Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torosyan, V. F.; Torosyan, E. S.; Kryuchkova, S. O.; Gromov, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The system: water supply source - potable and industrial water - wastewater - sewage treatment - water supply source is necessary for water supply and efficient utilization of water resources. Up-to-date technologies of waste water biological treatment require for special microorganisms, which are technologically complex and expensive but unable to solve all the problems. Application of photolytic and catalytically-oxidizing destruction is quite promising. However, the most reagents are strong oxidizers in catalytic oxidation of organic substances and can initiate toxic substance generation. Methodic and scientific approaches to assess bread making industry influence on the environment have been developed in this paper in order to support forecasting and taking technological decisions concerning reduction of this influence. Destructive methods have been tested: ultra violet irradiation and catalytic oxidation for extraction of organic compounds from waste water by natural reagents.

  7. Kinetic and catalytic performance of a BI-porous composite material in catalytic cracking and isomerisation reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Khattaf, S.

    2012-01-10

    Catalytic behaviour of pure zeolite ZSM-5 and a bi-porous composite material (BCM) were investigated in transformation of m-xylene, while zeolite HY and the bi-porous composite were used in the cracking of 1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene (TIPB). The micro/mesoporous material was used to understand the effect of the presence of mesopores on these reactions. Various characterisation techniques, that is, XRD, SEM, TGA, FT-IR and nitrogen sorption measurements were applied for complete characterisation of the catalysts. Catalytic tests using CREC riser simulator showed that the micro/mesoporous composite catalyst exhibited higher catalytic activity as compared with the conventional microporous ZSM-5 and HY zeolite for transformation of m-xylene and for the catalytic cracking of TIPB, respectively. The outstanding catalytic reactivity of m-xylene and TIPB molecules were mainly attributed to the easier access of active sites provided by the mesopores. Apparent activation energies for the disappearance of m-xylene and TIPB over all catalysts were found to decrease in the order: EBCM>EZSM-5 and EBCM>EHY, respectively. © 2012 Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering.

  8. OPERATING SPECIFICATIONS OF CATALYTIC CLEANING OF GAS FROM BIOMASS GASIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lisý

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the theoretical description of the cleaning of syngas from biomass and waste gasification using catalytic methods, and on the verification of the theory through experiments. The main obstruction to using syngas from fluid gasification of organic matter is the presence of various high-boiling point hydrocarbons (i.e., tar in the gas. The elimination of tar from the gas is a key factor in subsequent use of the gas in other technologies for cogeneration of electrical energy and heat. The application of a natural or artificial catalyst for catalytic destruction of tar is one of the methods of secondary elimination of tar from syngas. In our experiments, we used a natural catalyst (dolomite or calcium magnesium carbonate from Horní Lánov with great mechanical and catalytic properties, suitable for our purposes. The advantages of natural catalysts in contrast to artificial catalysts include their availability, low purchase prices and higher resilience to the so-called catalyst poison. Natural calcium catalysts may also capture undesired compounds of sulphure and chlorine. Our paper presents a theoretical description and analysis of catalytic destruction of tar into combustible gas components, and of the impact of dolomite calcination on its efficiency. The efficiency of the technology is verified in laboratories. The facility used for verification was a 150 kW pilot gasification unit with a laboratory catalytic filter. The efficiency of tar elimination reached 99.5%, the tar concentration complied with limits for use of the gas in combustion engines, and the tar content reached approximately 35 mg/mn3. The results of the measurements conducted in laboratories helped us design a pilot technology for catalytic gas cleaning.

  9. Fuel Flexible, Low Emission Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuel Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eteman, Shahrokh

    2013-06-30

    Limited fuel resources, increasing energy demand and stringent emission regulations are drivers to evaluate process off-gases or process waste streams as fuels for power generation. Often these process waste streams have low energy content and/or highly reactive components. Operability of low energy content fuels in gas turbines leads to issues such as unstable and incomplete combustion. On the other hand, fuels containing higher-order hydrocarbons lead to flashback and auto-ignition issues. Due to above reasons, these fuels cannot be used directly without modifications or efficiency penalties in gas turbine engines. To enable the use of these wide variety of fuels in gas turbine engines a rich catalytic lean burn (RCL®) combustion system was developed and tested in a subscale high pressure (10 atm.) rig. The RCL® injector provided stability and extended turndown to low Btu fuels due to catalytic pre-reaction. Previous work has shown promise with fuels such as blast furnace gas (BFG) with LHV of 85 Btu/ft3 successfully combusted. This program extends on this work by further modifying the combustor to achieve greater catalytic stability enhancement. Fuels containing low energy content such as weak natural gas with a Lower Heating Value (LHV) of 6.5 MJ/m3 (180 Btu/ft3 to natural gas fuels containing higher hydrocarbon (e.g ethane) with LHV of 37.6 MJ/m3 (1010 Btu/ft3) were demonstrated with improved combustion stability; an extended turndown (defined as the difference between catalytic and non-catalytic lean blow out) of greater than 250oF was achieved with CO and NOx emissions lower than 5 ppm corrected to 15% O2. In addition, for highly reactive fuels the catalytic region preferentially pre-reacted the higher order hydrocarbons with no events of flashback or auto-ignition allowing a stable and safe operation with low NOx and CO emissions.

  10. Upgrading of Intermediate Bio-Oil Produced by Catalytic Pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdullah, Zia [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States); Chadwell, Brad [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States); Taha, Rachid [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States); Hindin, Barry [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States); Ralston, Kevin [Battelle Memorial Inst., Columbus, OH (United States)

    2015-06-30

    The objectives of this project were to (1) develop a process to upgrade catalytic pyrolysis bio-oil, (2) investigate new upgrading catalysts suited for upgrading catalytic pyrolysis bio-oil, (3) demonstrate upgrading system operation for more than 1,000 hours using a single catalyst charge, and (4) produce a final upgraded product that can be blended to 30 percent by weight with petroleum fuels or that is compatible with existing petroleum refining operations. This project has, to the best of our knowledge, for the first time enabled a commercially viable bio-oil hydrotreatment process to produce renewable blend stock for transportation fuels.

  11. Bubble Driven Quasioscillatory Translational Motion of Catalytic Micromotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjare, Manoj; Yang, Bo; Zhao, Y.-P.

    2012-09-01

    A new quasioscillatory translational motion has been observed for big Janus catalytic micromotors with a fast CCD camera. Such motional behavior is found to coincide with both the bubble growth and burst processes resulting from the catalytic reaction, and the competition of the two processes generates a net forward motion. Detailed physical models have been proposed to describe the above processes. It is suggested that the bubble growth process imposes a growth force moving the micromotor forward, while the burst process induces an instantaneous local pressure depression pulling the micromotor backward. The theoretic predictions are consistent with the experimental data.

  12. Low and medium heating value coal gas catalytic combustor characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Catalytic combustion with both low and medium heating value coal gases obtained from an operating gasifier was demonstrated. A practical operating range for efficient operation was determined, and also to identify potential problem areas were identified for consideration during stationary gas turbine engine design. The test rig consists of fuel injectors, a fuel-air premixing section, a catalytic reactor with thermocouple instrumentation and a single point, water cooled sample probe. The test rig included inlet and outlet transition pieces and was designed for installation into an existing test loop.

  13. New process model proves accurate in tests on catalytic reformer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar-Rodriguez, E.; Ancheyta-Juarez, J. (Inst. Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico City (Mexico))

    1994-07-25

    A mathematical model has been devised to represent the process that takes place in a fixed-bed, tubular, adiabatic catalytic reforming reactor. Since its development, the model has been applied to the simulation of a commercial semiregenerative reformer. The development of mass and energy balances for this reformer led to a model that predicts both concentration and temperature profiles along the reactor. A comparison of the model's results with experimental data illustrates its accuracy at predicting product profiles. Simple steps show how the model can be applied to simulate any fixed-bed catalytic reformer.

  14. Catalytic Oxidation of Allylic Alcohols to Methyl Esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallas-Hulin, Agata; Kotni, Rama Krishna; Nielsen, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Aerobic oxidation of allylic alcohols to methyl esters using gold nanoparticles supported on different metal oxide carriers has been performed successfully under mild conditions (room temperature, 0.1 MPa O2) without significant loss of catalytic activity. The effects of different reaction...... parameters are studied to find the suitable reaction conditions. All catalysts are characterised by XRD, XRF and TEM. Among these catalysts, Au/TiO2 showed the most efficient catalytic activity towards the selective oxidation of allylic alcohols to the corresponding esters. Moreover, the same Au/TiO2...... to synthesize methyl esters from allylic alcohols....

  15. In situ and operando transmission electron microscopy of catalytic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crozier, Peter A.; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2015-01-01

    measurements of gas-phase catalytic products. To overcome this deficiency, operando TEM techniques are being developed that combine atomic characterization with the simultaneous measurement of catalytic products. This article provides a short review of the current status and major developments......) is a powerful technique for revealing the atomic structures of materials at elevated temperatures in the presence of reactive gases. This approach can allow the structure-reactivity relations underlying catalyst functionality to be investigated. Thus far, ETEM has been limited by the absence of in situ...... in the application of ETEM to gas-phase catalysis over the past 10 years....

  16. Hydrophilic Pt nanoflowers: synthesis, crystallographic analysis and catalytic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourdikoudis, Stefanos; Altantzis, Thomas; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Bals, Sara; Pastoriza-Santos, Isabel; Pérez-Juste, Jorge

    2016-05-21

    Water-soluble Pt nanoflowers (NFs) were prepared by diethylene glycol-mediated reduction of Pt acetylacetonate (Pt(acac) 2 ) in the presence of polyethylenimine. Advanced electron microscopy analysis showed that the NFs consist of multiple branches with a truncated cubic morphology and different crystallographic orientations. We demonstrate that the nature of the solvent strongly influences the resulting morphology. The catalytic performance of the Pt NFs in 4-nitrophenol reduction was found to be superior to that of other nanoparticle-based catalysts. Additionally, the Pt NFs display good catalytic reusability with no loss of activity after five consecutive cycles.

  17. TET2 Regulates Mast Cell Differentiation and Proliferation through Catalytic and Non-catalytic Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Montagner

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Dioxygenases of the TET family impact genome functions by converting 5-methylcytosine (5mC in DNA to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC. Here, we identified TET2 as a crucial regulator of mast cell differentiation and proliferation. In the absence of TET2, mast cells showed disrupted gene expression and altered genome-wide 5hmC deposition, especially at enhancers and in the proximity of downregulated genes. Impaired differentiation of Tet2-ablated cells could be relieved or further exacerbated by modulating the activity of other TET family members, and mechanistically it could be linked to the dysregulated expression of C/EBP family transcription factors. Conversely, the marked increase in proliferation induced by the loss of TET2 could be rescued exclusively by re-expression of wild-type or catalytically inactive TET2. Our data indicate that, in the absence of TET2, mast cell differentiation is under the control of compensatory mechanisms mediated by other TET family members, while proliferation is strictly dependent on TET2 expression. : The impact of TET enzymes on gene expression and cell function is incompletely understood. Montagner et al. investigate the TET-mediated regulation of mast cell differentiation and function, uncover transcriptional pathways regulated by TET2, and identify both enzymatic activity-dependent and -independent functions of TET2. Keywords: differentiation, DNA hydroxymethylation, epigenetics, mast cells, proliferation, TET

  18. Triangular Diagrams Teach Steady and Dynamic Behaviour of Catalytic Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klusacek, K.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates how triangular diagrams can aid in presenting some of the rather complex transient interactions that occur among gas and surface species during heterogeneous catalytic reactions. The basic equations and numerical examples are described. Classroom use of the triangular diagram is discussed. Several diagrams and graphs are provided. (YP)

  19. Solid Waste Decontamination by Thermal Desorption and Catalytic Oxidation Methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šolcová, Olga; Topka, Pavel; Soukup, Karel; Jirátová, Květa; Váňová, H.; Kaštánek, František

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 9 (2014), s. 1279-1282 ISSN 0366-6352 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/059 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : thermal desorption * catalytic oxidation * soil decontamination Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.468, year: 2014

  20. Use of Electrically Heated Metal Catalytic Converter in Cold Starting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Science, Technology and Arts Research Journal. Journal Home ... To address the serious pollution problems posed by vehicles, growing number of countries worldwide? Catalytic ... http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/star.v2i3.98758 · AJOL African ...

  1. Demonstration of a Catalytic Converter Using a Lawn Mower Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic conversion is an important tool in environmental-remediation strategies and source removal of pollutants. Because a catalyst is regenerated, the chemistry can be extremely effective for conversion of undesirable pollutant species to less harmful products in situations where the pollutants have accumulated or are being continuously…

  2. Review of literature on catalytic recombination of hydrogen--oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homsy, R.V.; Glatron, C.A.

    1968-01-01

    The results are reported of a literature search for information concerning the heterogeneous, gas phase, catalytic hydrogen-oxygen recombination. Laboratory scale experiments to test the performance of specific metal oxide catalysts under conditions simulating the atmosphere within a nuclear reactor containment vessel following a loss-of-coolant blowdown accident are suggested

  3. Synthesis, characterization and study of catalytic activity of Silver ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The XRD results revealed that all the samples show wurtzite hexagonal phase of ZnO. .... (Zn(Ac)2.2H2O) was used as zinc oxide source. ... The catalytic experiments ... were filtered out from the catalyst and then oxidation ..... As shown in table 5, the best results were obtained when acetonitrile was used as the sol- vent.

  4. Catalytic Partial Oxidation of Biomass/Oil Mixture

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Veselý, Václav; Hanika, Jiří; Tukač, V.; Lederer, J.; Kovač, D.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 10 (2013), s. 1940-1945 ISSN 1934-8983 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TE01020080; GA MPO 2A-2TP1/024 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : hydrocarbon oil * biomass * catalytic partial oxidation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering http://www.davidpublishing.com/journals_info.asp?jId=1718#

  5. Catalytic Deoxygenation of Fatty Acids: Elucidation of the Inhibition Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollak, S.A.W.; Jong, de K.P.; Es, van D.S.

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic deoxygenation of unsaturated fatty acids in the absence of H2 is known to suffer from significant catalyst inhibition. Thus far, no conclusive results have been reported on the cause of deactivation. Here we show that CC double bonds present in the feed or the products dramatically reduce

  6. Predicting the catalytic sites of isopenicillin N synthase (IPNS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isopenicillin N synthase (IPNS) related Non-haem iron-dependent oxygenases and oxidases (NHIDOX) demonstrated a striking structural conservativeness, even with low protein sequence homology. It is evident that these enzymes have an architecturally similar catalytic centre with active ligands lining the reactive pocket.

  7. Visualizing the mobility of silver during catalytic soot oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardini, Diego; Christensen, Jakob M.; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic activity and mobility of silver nanoparticles used as catalysts in temperature programmed oxidation of soot:silver (1:5 wt:wt) mixtures have been investigated by means of flow reactor experiments and in situ environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM). The carbon oxidation...

  8. Catalytic abatement of nitrous oxide from nitric and production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, J.

    1998-01-01

    Nitric acid production is identified as a main source of nitrous oxide. Options for emission reduction however are not available. TNO and Hydro Agri studied the technological and economic feasibility of catalytic decomposition of nitrous oxide in nitric acid tail-gases. Although in literature

  9. The tritium labeling of Butibufen by heterogeneous catalytic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamaria, J.; Rebollo, D.

    1986-01-01

    The labeling of a new non-steroidal antiinflammatory agent, Butibufen (2-(4-isobutylphenyl) butyric acid) was studied. The method used was heterogeneous catalytic exchange between Butibufen and tritiated water, obtained in situ. Purification was accomplished through thin layer chromatography. Concentration, purity and specific activity of the labeled drug were determined by ultraviolet and liquid scintillation techniques. (Author) 7 refs

  10. Oxyfuel combustion using a catalytic ceramic membrane reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Xiaoyao; Li, K. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, University of London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Thursfield, A.; Metcalfe, I.S. [School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2008-02-29

    Membrane catalytic combustion (MCC) is an environmentally friendly technique for heat and power generation from methane. This work demonstrates the performances of a MCC perovskite hollow fibre membrane reactor for the catalytic combustion of methane. The ionic-electronic La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{alpha}} (LSCF6428) mixed conductor, in the form of an oxygen-permeable hollow fibre membrane, has been prepared successfully by means of a phase-inversion spinning/sintering technique. For this process polyethersulfone (PESf) was used as a binder, N-methyl-2-pyrrollidone (NMP) as solvent and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP, K16-18) as an additive. With the prepared LSCF6428 hollow fibre membranes packed with catalyst, hollow fibre membrane reactors (HFMRs) have been assembled to perform the catalytic combustion of methane. A simple mathematical model that combines the local oxygen permeation rate with approximate catalytic reaction kinetics has been developed and can be used to predict the performance of the HFMRs for methane combustion. The effects of operating temperature and methane and air feed flow rates on the performance of the HFMR have been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Both the methane conversion and oxygen permeation rate can be improved by means of coating platinum on the air side of the hollow fibre membranes. (author)

  11. Catalytic Methane Decomposition over Fe-Al2O3

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Lu; Enakonda, Linga Reddy; Saih, Youssef; Loptain, Sergei; Gary, Daniel; Del-Gallo, Pascal; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The presence of a Fe-FeAl2O4 structure over an Fe-Al2O3 catalysts is demonstrated to be vital for the catalytic methane decomposition (CMD) activity. After H2 reduction at 750°C, Fe-Al2O3 prepared by means of a fusion method, containing 86.5wt% Fe

  12. Short hydrogen bonds in the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR LESKOVAC

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The survey of crystallographic data from the Protein Data Bank for 37 structures of trypsin and other serine proteases at a resolution of 0.78–1.28 Å revealed the presence of hydrogen bonds in the active site of the enzymes, which are formed between the catalytic histidine and aspartate residues and are on average 2.7 Å long. This is the typical bond length for normal hydrogen bonds. The geometric properties of the hydrogen bonds in the active site indicate that the H atom is not centered between the heteroatoms of the catalytic histidine and aspartate residues in the active site. Taken together, these findings exclude the possibility that short “low-barrier” hydrogen bonds are formed in the ground state structure of the active sites examined in this work. Some time ago, it was suggested by Cleland that the “low-barrier hydrogen bond” hypothesis is operative in the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases, and requires the presence of short hydrogen bonds around 2.4 Å long in the active site, with the H atom centered between the catalytic heteroatoms. The conclusions drawn from this work do not exclude the validity of the “low-barrier hydrogen bond” hypothesis at all, but they merely do not support it in this particular case, with this particular class of enzymes.

  13. Dimension meditated optic and catalytic performance over vanadium pentoxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Dezhi; Zhao, Yongjie; Zhang, Ruibo; Ning, Mingqiang; Zhao, Yuzhen; Zhou, Heping; Li, Jingbo; Jin, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • V_2O_5 with diverse dimensional morphologies were synthesized. • The optic properties of diverse dimensional V_2O_5 were investigated in detail. • The catalytic properties of diverse dimensional V_2O_5 on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate were analyzed. - Abstract: Morphologies and sizes of V_2O_5 had crucial effect on their optic and catalytic performance. Diverse dimensional V_2O_5 were successfully synthesized by the combination of a hydrothermal and post heat treatment method. The as-obtained samples were characterized by X-ray power diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectra. Moreover, the optic properties of diverse dimensional V_2O_5 were examined by Fourier transform imaging spectrometer and UV–vis-spectrophotometer. It showed that the IR transmittance of nanowire (at 1019 cm"−"1 is 85%) and UV absorbance of microflowers (at 480 nm) were high. Furthermore, the catalytic properties of diverse dimensional V_2O_5 on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate were evaluated and compared by Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis and Differential Scanning Calorimetry. Moreover, the best catalytic performance was obtained with the morphology of nanowire. It showed the thermal decomposition temperatures of AP with nanowire, microflowers and microsphere were reduced to 373 °C, 382 °C and 376 °C (decreased by 52 °C, 43 °C and 49 °C).

  14. Catalytic Ketone Hydrodeoxygenation Mediated by Highly Electrophilic Phosphonium Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Meera; Holthausen, Michael H; Mallov, Ian; Pérez, Manuel; Qu, Zheng-Wang; Grimme, Stefan; Stephan, Douglas W

    2015-07-06

    Ketones are efficiently deoxygenated in the presence of silane using highly electrophilic phosphonium cation (EPC) salts as catalysts, thus affording the corresponding alkane and siloxane. The influence of distinct substitution patterns on the catalytic effectiveness of several EPCs was evaluated. The deoxygenation mechanism was probed by DFT methods. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Biodiesel by catalytic reactive distillation powered by metal oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiss, A.A.; Dimian, A.C.; Rothenberg, G.

    2008-01-01

    The properties and use of biodiesel as a renewable fuel as well as the problems associated with its current production processes are outlined. A novel sustainable esterification process based on catalytic reactive distillation is proposed. The pros and cons of manufacturing biodiesel via fatty acid

  16. Enhanced Heterogeneous Catalytic Conversion of Furfuryl Alcohol into Butyl Levulinate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carà, P.D..; Ciriminna, R.; Shiju, N.R.; Rothenberg, G.; Pagliaro, M.

    2014-01-01

    We study the catalytic condensation of furfuryl alcohol with 1-butanol to butyl levulinate. A screening of several commercial and as-synthesized solid acid catalysts shows that propylsulfonic acid-functionalized mesoporous silica outperforms the state-of-the-art phosphotungstate acid catalysts. The

  17. Theoretical study of catalytic hydrogenation of oxirane and its methyl ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    C3H6O) is its methyl derivative. Theoretical studies on catalytic hydrogenation of both compounds, in presence of aluminium chloride (AlCl3) catalyst, are carried out. The products of reactions are ethanol and propan-1-ol from oxirane and ...

  18. Hydrogen assisted catalytic biomass pyrolysis for green fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stummann, Magnus Zingler; Høj, Martin; Gabrielsen, Jostein

    2017-01-01

    due to coking of the catalyst is an inhibitive problem for this technology. The objective of the present work is to produce oxygen free gasoline and diesel from biomass by hydrogen assisted catalytic fast pyrolysis. Fast pyrolysis of beech wood has been performed in high-pressure hydrogen atmosphere...

  19. Enhanced catalytic behavior of Ni alloys in steam methane reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yeongpil; Kim, Hanmi; Lee, Jaichan

    2017-08-01

    The dissociation process of methane on Ni and Ni alloys are investigated by density functional theory (DFT) in terms of catalytic efficiency and carbon deposition. Examining the dissociation to CH3, CH2, CH, C, and H is not sufficient to properly predict the catalytic efficiency and carbon deposition, and further investigation of the CO gas-evolving reaction is required to completely understand methane dissociation in steam. The location of alloying element in Ni alloy needed be addressed from the results of ab-inito molecular dynamics (MD). The reaction pathway of methane dissociation associated with CO gas evolution is traced by performing first-principles calculations of the adsorption and activation energies of each dissociation step. During the dissociation process, two alternative reaction steps producing adsorbed C and H or adsorbed CO are critically important in determining coking inhibition as well as H2 gas evolution (i.e., the catalytic efficiency). The theoretical calculations presented here suggest that alloying Ni with Ru is an effective way to reduce carbon deposition and enhance the catalytic efficiency of H2 fueling in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs).

  20. Staged catalytic gasification/steam reforming of pyrolysis oil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossum, G.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    2009-01-01

    Gasification/steam reforming of pyrolysis oil was studied in a staged reactor concept, which consisted of an inert fluidized bed and a catalytic fixed bed. Methane and C2−C3 free syngas is produced at a single temperature around 800 °C at atmospheric pressure. By lowering the temperature of the

  1. Catalytic destruction of tar in biomass derived producer gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ruiqin; Brown, Robert C.; Suby, Andrew; Cummer, Keith

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate catalytic destruction of tar formed during gasification of biomass, with the goal of improving the quality of the producer gas. This work focuses on nickel based catalysts treated with alkali in an effort to promote steam gasification of the coke that deposits on catalyst surfaces. A tar conversion system consisting of a guard bed and catalytic reactor was designed to treat the producer gas from an air blown, fluidized bed biomass gasifier. The guard bed used dolomite to crack the heavy tars. The catalytic reactor was used to evaluate three commercial steam reforming catalysts. These were the ICI46-1 catalyst from Imperial Chemical Industry and Z409 and RZ409 catalysts from Qilu Petrochemical Corp. in China. A 0.5-3 l/min slipstream from a 5 tpd biomass gasifier was used to test the tar conversion system. Gas and tar were sampled before and after the tar conversion system to evaluate the effectiveness of the system. Changes in gas composition as functions of catalytic bed temperature, space velocity and steam/TOC (total organic carbon) ratio are presented. Structural changes in the catalysts during the tests are also described

  2. Modeling of Unidirectional-Overloaded Transition in Catalytic Tubular Microjets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klingner, Anke; Khalil, Islam S. M.; Magdanz, Veronika; Fomin, Vladimir M.; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Misra, Sarthak

    2017-01-01

    A numerical time-resolved model is presented for predicting the transition between unidirectional and overloaded motion of catalytic tubular microjets (Ti/Fe/Pt rolled-up microtubes) in an aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide. Unidirectional movement is achieved by periodic ejection of gas bubbles

  3. Challenges of the movement of catalytic micromotors in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guanjia; Viehrig, Marlitt; Pumera, Martin

    2013-05-21

    Catalytic microjet bubble-propelled engines have attracted a large amount of interest for their potential applications in biomedicine, environmental sciences and natural resources discovery. One of the current efforts in this field is focused on the search of biocompatible fuels. However, only a minimal amount of effort has been made to assess the challenges facing the movement of such devices in a real world environment, especially with regards to the components of blood and their interactions with the catalytic microjets. Herein, we will show the limitations on the movement of catalytic microengines prepared via the rolled-up, as well as the templated-electrochemical deposition method, in an artificial blood sample, due to the presence of two main components of animal blood: the cellular component (red blood cells in this study) and serum. We will show that the motion of catalytic microjets is only possible in highly diluted dispersions of the red blood cells and serum. This finding has a profound implication on the development of the whole field, where the components found in real environments have to be considered carefully, and issues arising from the presence of such components have to be resolved prior to deploying these devices in real world applications.

  4. Oxidation of phosphine by sulfur or selenium involving a catalytic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    P NMR spec- troscopy. Such interconversion with the participation of breaking of bridging copper-µ3-sulfur bond with the formation of new copper–phosphorous bond led to the development of a catalytic cycle using excess. PPh3 and S or Se as the reacting substrates. The turnover number for the oxidation of PPh3 by S ...

  5. Catalytic Synthesis of Ethyl Ester From Some Common Oils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Catalytic conversion of ethanol to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE) was carried out by homogeneous and heterogeneous transesterification of melon seed, shea butter and neem seed oils using NaOH, KOH and 5wt%CaO/Al2O3 catalyst systems respectively. Oil content of the seeds from n-hexane or hot water extract ranged ...

  6. Advanced Catalytic Converter in Gasoline Enginer Emission Control: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leman A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exhaust emission from automobile source has become a major contributor to the air pollution and environmental problem. Catalytic converter is found to be one of the most effective tools to reduce the overwhelming exhaust pollutants in our environment. The development of sustainable catalytic converter still remains a critical issue due to the stringent exhaust emission regulations. Another issue such as price and availability of the precious metal were also forced the automotive industry to investigate the alternatives for producing a better replacement for the material used in catalytic converter. This paper aims at reviewing the present development and improvement on the catalytic converter used on the reduction of exhaust emission in order to meet the regulations and market demand. The use of new catalyst such as to replace the noble metal material of Platinum (Pt, Palladium (Pd and Rhodium (Rh has been reviewed. Material such as zeolite, nickel oxide and metal oxide has been found to effectively reduce the emission than the commercial converter. The preparation method of the catalyst has also evolved through the years as it is to ensure a good characteristic of a good monolith catalyst. Ultrasonic treatment with combination of electroplating technique, citrate method and Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO has been found as the latest novel preparation method on producing an effective catalyst in reducing the exhaust emission.

  7. Direct catalytic cross-coupling of organolithium compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giannerini, Massimo; Fananas Mastral, Martin; Feringa, Ben L.

    Catalytic carbon-carbon bond formation based on cross-coupling reactions plays a central role in the production of natural products, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and organic materials. Coupling reactions of a variety of organometallic reagents and organic halides have changed the face of modern

  8. The catalytic cracking mechanism of lignite pyrolysis char on tar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Z.; Huibin, H.; Xiangling, S.; Zhenhua, M.; Lei, Z.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of different pyrolysis conditions for tar catalytic cracking will be analyzed according to the lignite pyrolysis char as catalyst on pyrolytic tar in this paper. The pyrolysis char what is the by-product of the cracking of coal has an abundant of pore structure and it has good catalytic activity. On this basis, making the modified catalyst when the pyrolysis char is activation and loads Fe by impregnation method. The cracking mechanism of lignite pyrolytic tar is explored by applying gas chromatograph to analyze splitting products of tar. The experimental results showed that: (1) The effect of tar cracking as the pyrolysis temperature, the heating rate, the volatilization of pyrolysis char and particle size increasing is better and better. The effect of the catalytic and cracking of lignite pyrolysis char in tar is best when the heating rate, the pyrolysis temperature, the volatiles of pyrolysis char, particle size is in specific conditions.(2) The activation of pyrolysis char can improve the catalytic effect of pyrolysis char on the tar cracking. But it reduces the effect of the tar cracking when the pyrolysis char is activation loading Fe. (author)

  9. Catalytic Activity Control via Crossover between Two Different Microstructures

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Yuheng

    2017-09-08

    Metal nanocatalysts hold great promise for a wide range of heterogeneous catalytic reactions, while the optimization strategy of catalytic activity is largely restricted by particle size or shape control. Here, we demonstrate that a reversible microstructural control through the crossover between multiply-twinned nanoparticle (MTP) and single crystal (SC) can be readily achieved by solvent post-treatment on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Polar solvents (e.g. water, methanol) direct the transformation from MTP to SC accompanied by the disappearance of twinning and stacking faults. A reverse transformation from SC to MTP is achieved in non-polar solvent (e.g. toluene) mixed with thiol ligands. The transformation between two different microstructures is directly observed by in-situ TEM and leads to a drastic modulation of catalytic activity towards the gas-phase selective oxidation of alcohols. There is a quasi-linear relationship between TOFs and MTP concentrations. Based on the combined experimental and theoretical investigations of alcohol chemisorption on these nanocatalysts, we propose that the exposure of {211}-like microfacets associated with twin boundaries and stack faults accounts for the strong chemisorption of alcohol molecules on MTP AuNPs and thus the exceptionally high catalytic activity.

  10. Catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapours using Faujasite zeolite catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T.S.; Zabeti, M.; Lefferts, Leonardus; Brem, Gerrit; Seshan, Kulathuiyer

    2012-01-01

    Bio-oil produced via fast pyrolysis of biomass has the potential to be processed in a FCC (fluid catalytic cracking) unit to generate liquid fuel. However, this oil requires a significant upgrade to become an acceptable feedstock for refinery plants due to its high oxygen content. One promising

  11. Catalytic polymerization of olefins in supercritical carbon dioxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemmere, M.F.; Vries, de T.J.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.

    2004-01-01

    A novel process is being developed for the catalytic polymerization of olefins in supercritical carbon dioxide (sc CO2), for which potential applications will mainly be in the production of EPDM and other elastomers. For this purpose, the Brookhart catalyst has been tested for the homopolymerization

  12. Sorting catalytically active polymersome nanoreactors by flow cytometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nallani, M.; Woestenenk, R.; de Hoog, H.P.M.; van Dongen, S.F.M.; Boezeman, J.; Cornelissen, J.J.L.M.; Nolte, R.J.M.; van Hest, J.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    A strategy that involves a versatile one-step preparation procedure of enzyme filled porous and stable polymeric catalytically active nanoreactors (polymersomes) by flow cytometry was reported. A 1:1 mixture of the polymerase dispersions was analyzed in a Coulter Epics Elite Flow Cytometer, while

  13. Photo-catalytic Removal of Methyl Orange Dye by Polyaniline ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Photo-catalytic Removal of Methyl Orange Dye by Polyaniline Modified ZnO using Visible Radiation. ... The as-synthesized nano-ZnO, PANI and PANI/ZnO nanocomposite were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), FT-IR, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The UV–visible spectroscopy studies showed that the absorption peak ...

  14. Trends in the Catalytic CO Oxidation Activity of Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Falsig, Hanne; Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk

    2008-01-01

    Going for gold: Density functional calculations show how gold nanoparticles are more active catalysts for CO oxidation than other metal nanoparticles. The high catalytic activity of nanosized gold clusters at low temperature is found to be related to the ability of low-coordinate metal atoms...

  15. CATALYTIC PROPERTIES AND ACIDITY OF MODIFIED MCM-41 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    obtain H-form catalysts, samples were heated to remove the NH3 gas. Catalytic tests .... Chem. Soc. Ethiop. 2006, 20(1). 102. 0. 50. 100. 150. 200. 250. 300. 350. 400. 450. 0. 0.2 ..... Zhao, X.S.; Lu, G.Q.; Millar, G.J.; Li, X.S. Catal. Lett. 1996, 38 ...

  16. Highly efficient catalytic reductive degradation of various organic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    aDepartment of Applied Sciences (Chemical Science Division), GUIST, Gauhati University, ... Highly improved catalytic reductive degradation of different organic dyes, in the ... was prepared by a facile co-precipitation method using ultra-high dilute aqueous solutions. ...... face chemical-modification for engineering the intrin-.

  17. Methods of using structures including catalytic materials disposed within porous zeolite materials to synthesize hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Harry W [Idaho Falls, ID; Petkovic, Lucia M [Idaho Falls, ID; Ginosar, Daniel M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2011-02-01

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  18. Development of a chronocoulometric method for uranium traces determination with basis on nitrate catalytic reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantagallo, M.I.C.; Gutz, I.G.R.

    1990-01-01

    The application of chronocoulometric technique with catalytic reduction of uranium/nitrate with catalytic reduction of uranium/nitrate system is described to give a detection limits on the sub-nanomolar region of uranium. (author)

  19. Heterogeneous kinetic modeling of the catalytic conversion of cycloparaffins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sabawi, Mustafa N.

    The limited availability of high value light hydrocarbon feedstocks along with the rise in crude prices has resulted in the international recognition of the vast potential of Canada's oil sands. With the recent expansion of Canadian bitumen production come, however, many technical challenges, one of which is the significant presence of aromatics and cycloparaffins in bitumen-derived feedstocks. In addition to their negative environmental impact, aromatics limit fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) feedstock conversion, decrease the yield and quality of valuable products such as gasoline and middle distillates, increase levels of polyaromatic hydrocarbons prone to form coke on the catalyst, and ultimately compromise the FCC unit performance. Although cycloparaffins do not have such negative impacts, they are precursors of aromatics as they frequently undergo hydrogen transfer reactions. However, cycloparaffin cracking chemistry involves other competing reactions that are complex and need much investigation. This dissertation provides insights and understanding of the fundamentals of the catalytic cracking of cycloparaffins using carefully selected model compounds such as methylcyclohexane (MCH) and decalin. Thermal and catalytic cracking of these cycloparaffins on FCC-type catalysts are carried out using the CREC Riser Simulator under operating conditions similar to those of the industrial FCC units in terms of temperature, reaction time, reactant partial pressure and catalyst-to-hydrocarbon ratio. The crystallite size of the supported zeolites is varied between 0.4 and 0.9 microns, with both activity and selectivity being monitored. Catalytic conversions ranged between 4 to 16 wt% for MCH and between 8 to 27 wt% for decalin. Reaction pathways of cycloparaffins are determined, and these include ring-opening, protolytic cracking, isomerization, hydrogen transfer and transalkylation. The yields and selectivities of over 60 and 140 products, formed during MCH and decalin

  20. Component Development to Accelerate Commercial Implementation of Ultra-Low Emissions Catalytic Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarty, Jon; Berry, Brian; Lundberg, Kare; Anson, Orris

    2003-03-31

    This final report describes a 2000-2003 program for the development of components and processes to enhance the commercialization of ultra-low emissions catalytic combustion in industrial gas turbines. The range of project tasks includes: development of more durable, lower-cost catalysts and catalytic combustor components; development and design of a catalytic pre-burner and a catalytic pilot burner for gas turbines, and on-site fuel conversion processing for utilization of liquid fuel.

  1. Mechanisms of catalytic activity in heavily coated hydrocracking catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millan, M.; Adell, C.; Hinojosa, C.; Herod, A.A.; Kandiyoti, R. [University of London Imperial College Science Technology & Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-01-15

    Catalyst deactivation by coke deposition has a direct impact on the economic viability of heavy hydrocarbon upgrading processes, such as coal liquefaction and oil residue hydroprocessing. Coke deposition is responsible for rapid loss of catalytic activity and it mostly takes place in the early stages of hydrocracking. The effect of carbonaceous deposition on the catalytic activity of a chromium pillared montmorillonite has been studied in the present work. Its catalytic activity in hydrocracking a coal extract was evaluated based on the boiling point distributions of feed and products obtained by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and their characterisation by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and UV-Fluorescence spectroscopy (UV-F). A large deposition on the catalyst was observed after two successive 2-hour long runs in which the catalyst recovered from the first run was reused in the second. The pillared clay retained its activity even though it showed high carbon loading, a large drop in surface area and complete apparent pore blockage. Some observations may contribute to explain this persistent catalytic activity. First, there is evidence suggesting the dynamic nature of the carbonaceous deposits, which continuously exchange material with the liquid, allowing catalytic activity to continue. Secondly, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) on the used Cr montmorillonite has shown preferential deposition on some regions of the catalyst, which leaves a fraction of the surface relatively exposed. Finally, evidence from SEM coupled to X-ray microanalysis also suggest that deposits are thinner in areas where the active phase of the catalyst is present in higher concentrations. Hydrogenation on the active sites would make the deposits more soluble in the liquid cleaning of surrounding area from deposits.

  2. Selenium utilization in thioredoxin and catalytic advantage provided by selenocysteine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Moon-Jung; Lee, Byung Cheon; Hwang, Kwang Yeon; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Kim, Hwa-Young

    2015-01-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a major thiol-disulfide reductase that plays a role in many biological processes, including DNA replication and redox signaling. Although selenocysteine (Sec)-containing Trxs have been identified in certain bacteria, their enzymatic properties have not been characterized. In this study, we expressed a selenoprotein Trx from Treponema denticola, an oral spirochete, in Escherichia coli and characterized this selenoenzyme and its natural cysteine (Cys) homologue using E. coli Trx1 as a positive control. 75 Se metabolic labeling and mutation analyses showed that the SECIS (Sec insertion sequence) of T. denticola selenoprotein Trx is functional in the E. coli Sec insertion system with specific selenium incorporation into the Sec residue. The selenoprotein Trx exhibited approximately 10-fold higher catalytic activity than the Sec-to-Cys version and natural Cys homologue and E. coli Trx1, suggesting that Sec confers higher catalytic activity on this thiol-disulfide reductase. Kinetic analysis also showed that the selenoprotein Trx had a 30-fold higher K m than Cys-containing homologues, suggesting that this selenoenzyme is adapted to work efficiently with high concentrations of substrate. Collectively, the results of this study support the hypothesis that selenium utilization in oxidoreductase systems is primarily due to the catalytic advantage provided by the rare amino acid, Sec. - Highlights: • The first characterization of a selenoprotein Trx is presented. • The selenoenzyme Trx exhibits 10-fold higher catalytic activity than Cys homologues. • Se utilization in Trx is primarily due to the catalytic advantage provided by Sec residue

  3. Selenium utilization in thioredoxin and catalytic advantage provided by selenocysteine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moon-Jung [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung Cheon [Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Division of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences & Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Kwang Yeon [Division of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences & Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Gladyshev, Vadim N. [Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kim, Hwa-Young, E-mail: hykim@ynu.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-12

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a major thiol-disulfide reductase that plays a role in many biological processes, including DNA replication and redox signaling. Although selenocysteine (Sec)-containing Trxs have been identified in certain bacteria, their enzymatic properties have not been characterized. In this study, we expressed a selenoprotein Trx from Treponema denticola, an oral spirochete, in Escherichia coli and characterized this selenoenzyme and its natural cysteine (Cys) homologue using E. coli Trx1 as a positive control. {sup 75}Se metabolic labeling and mutation analyses showed that the SECIS (Sec insertion sequence) of T. denticola selenoprotein Trx is functional in the E. coli Sec insertion system with specific selenium incorporation into the Sec residue. The selenoprotein Trx exhibited approximately 10-fold higher catalytic activity than the Sec-to-Cys version and natural Cys homologue and E. coli Trx1, suggesting that Sec confers higher catalytic activity on this thiol-disulfide reductase. Kinetic analysis also showed that the selenoprotein Trx had a 30-fold higher K{sub m} than Cys-containing homologues, suggesting that this selenoenzyme is adapted to work efficiently with high concentrations of substrate. Collectively, the results of this study support the hypothesis that selenium utilization in oxidoreductase systems is primarily due to the catalytic advantage provided by the rare amino acid, Sec. - Highlights: • The first characterization of a selenoprotein Trx is presented. • The selenoenzyme Trx exhibits 10-fold higher catalytic activity than Cys homologues. • Se utilization in Trx is primarily due to the catalytic advantage provided by Sec residue.

  4. Development of a catalytically assisted combustor for a gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Yasushi; Fujii, Tomoharu; Sato, Mikio [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-6-1 Nagasaka, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 240-01 (Japan); Kanazawa, Takaaki; Inoue, Hitoshi [Kansai Electric Power Company, Inc., 3-11-20 Nakoji, Amagasaki, Hyoho 661 (Japan)

    1999-01-01

    A catalytically assisted low NO{sub x} combustor has been developed which has the advantage of catalyst durability. This combustor is composed of a burner section and a premixed combustion section behind the burner section. The burner system consists of six catalytic combustor segments and six premixing nozzles, which are arranged alternately and in parallel. Fuel flow rate for the catalysts and the premixing nozzles are controlled independently. The catalytic combustion temperature is maintained under 1000C, additional premixed gas is injected from the premixing nozzles into the catalytic combustion gas, and lean premixed combustion at 1300C is carried out in the premixed combustion section. This system was designed to avoid catalytic deactivation at high temperature and thermal or mechanical shock fracture of the honeycomb monolith. In order to maintain the catalyst temperature under 1000C, the combustion characteristics of catalysts at high pressure were investigated using a bench scale reactor and an improved catalyst was selected for the combustor test. A combustor for a 20MW class multi-can type gas turbine was designed and tested under high pressure conditions using LNG fuel. Measurements of NO{sub x}, CO and unburned hydrocarbon were made and other measurements were made to evaluate combustor performance under various combustion temperatures and pressures. As a result of the tests, it was proved that NO{sub x} emission was lower than 10ppm converted at 16% O{sub 2}, combustion efficiency was almost 100% at 1300C of combustor outlet temperature and 13.5ata of combustor inlet pressure

  5. Kinetic and catalytic performance of a BI-porous composite material in catalytic cracking and isomerisation reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Khattaf, S.; Odedairo, T.; Balasamy, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic behaviour of pure zeolite ZSM-5 and a bi-porous composite material (BCM) were investigated in transformation of m-xylene, while zeolite HY and the bi-porous composite were used in the cracking of 1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene (TIPB). The micro

  6. Multi-Stage Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx in Lean-Burn Engine Exhaust

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Penetrante, B

    1997-01-01

    .... A plasma can also be used to oxidize NO to NO2. This paper compares the multi-stage catalytic scheme with the plasma-assisted catalytic scheme for reduction of NOx in lean-burn engine exhausts. The advantages of plasma oxidation over catalytic oxidation are presented.

  7. Investigation on CO catalytic oxidation reaction kinetics of faceted perovskite nanostructures loaded with Pt

    KAUST Repository

    Yin, S. M.

    2017-01-18

    Perovskite lead titanate nanostructures with specific {111}, {100} and {001} facets exposed, have been employed as supports to investigate the crystal facet effect on the growth and CO catalytic activity of Pt nanoparticles. The size, distribution and surface chemical states of Pt on the perovskite supports have been significantly modified, leading to a tailored conversion temperature and catalytic kinetics towards CO catalytic oxidation.

  8. Investigation on CO catalytic oxidation reaction kinetics of faceted perovskite nanostructures loaded with Pt

    KAUST Repository

    Yin, S. M.; Duanmu, J. J.; Zhu, Yihan; Yuan, Y. F.; Guo, S. Y.; Yang, J. L.; Ren, Z. H.; Han, G. R.

    2017-01-01

    Perovskite lead titanate nanostructures with specific {111}, {100} and {001} facets exposed, have been employed as supports to investigate the crystal facet effect on the growth and CO catalytic activity of Pt nanoparticles. The size, distribution and surface chemical states of Pt on the perovskite supports have been significantly modified, leading to a tailored conversion temperature and catalytic kinetics towards CO catalytic oxidation.

  9. Kinetic Parameters of Non-Isothermal Thermogravimetric Non-Catalytic and Catalytic Pyrolysis of Empty Fruit Bunch with Alumina by Kissinger and Ozawa Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahayu Mohamed, Alina; Li, Nurfahani; Sohaimi, Khairunissa Syairah Ahmad; Izzati Iberahim, Nur; Munirah Rohaizad, Nor; Hamzah, Rosniza

    2018-03-01

    The non-isothermal thermogravimetric non-catalytic and catalytic empty fruit bunch (EFB) pyrolysis with alumina were performed at different heating rates of 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 40 K/min under nitrogen atmosphere at a flow rate of 100 ml/min under dynamic conditions from 301 K to 1273 K. The activation energy were calculated based on Kissinger and Ozawa methods. Both reactions followed first order reactions. By Kissinger method, the activation energy and Ln A values for non-catalytic and catalytic EFB pyrolysis with alumina were 188.69 kJ mol-1 and 201.67 kJ/mol respectively. By Ozawa method, the activation energy values for non-catalytic and catalytic EFB pyrolysis with alumina were 189.13 kJ/mol and 201.44 kJ/mol respectively. The presence of catalyst increased the activation energy values for EFB pyrolysis as calculated by Kissinger and Ozawa methods.

  10. Advances in solid-catalytic and non-catalytic technologies for biodiesel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, Aminul; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin; Chan, Eng-Seng; Moniruzzaman, M.; Islam, Saiful; Nabi, Md. Nurun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The recent technologies for promoting biodiesel synthesis were elucidated. • The design of catalyst consideration of biodiesel production was proposed. • The recent advances and remaining difficulties in biodiesel synthesis were outlined. • The future research trend in biodiesel synthesis was highlighted. - Abstract: The insecure supply of fossil fuel coerces the scientific society to keep a vision to boost investments in the renewable energy sector. Among the many renewable fuels currently available around the world, biodiesel offers an immediate impact in our energy. In fact, a huge interest in related research indicates a promising future for the biodiesel technology. Heterogeneous catalyzed production of biodiesel has emerged as a preferred route as it is environmentally benign needs no water washing and product separation is much easier. The number of well-defined catalyst complexes that are able to catalyze transesterification reactions efficiently has been significantly expanded in recent years. The activity of catalysts, specifically in application to solid acid/base catalyst in transesterification reaction depends on their structure, strength of basicity/acidity, surface area as well as the stability of catalyst. There are various process intensification technologies based on the use of alternate energy sources such as ultrasound and microwave. The latest advances in research and development related to biodiesel production is represented by non-catalytic supercritical method and focussed exclusively on these processes as forthcoming transesterification processes. The latest developments in this field featuring highly active catalyst complexes are outlined in this review. The knowledge of more extensive research on advances in biofuels will allow a deeper insight into the mechanism of these technologies toward meeting the critical energy challenges in future

  11. Networks of high mutual information define the structural proximity of catalytic sites: implications for catalytic residue identification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Marino Buslje

    Full Text Available Identification of catalytic residues (CR is essential for the characterization of enzyme function. CR are, in general, conserved and located in the functional site of a protein in order to attain their function. However, many non-catalytic residues are highly conserved and not all CR are conserved throughout a given protein family making identification of CR a challenging task. Here, we put forward the hypothesis that CR carry a particular signature defined by networks of close proximity residues with high mutual information (MI, and that this signature can be applied to distinguish functional from other non-functional conserved residues. Using a data set of 434 Pfam families included in the catalytic site atlas (CSA database, we tested this hypothesis and demonstrated that MI can complement amino acid conservation scores to detect CR. The Kullback-Leibler (KL conservation measurement was shown to significantly outperform both the Shannon entropy and maximal frequency measurements. Residues in the proximity of catalytic sites were shown to be rich in shared MI. A structural proximity MI average score (termed pMI was demonstrated to be a strong predictor for CR, thus confirming the proposed hypothesis. A structural proximity conservation average score (termed pC was also calculated and demonstrated to carry distinct information from pMI. A catalytic likeliness score (Cls, combining the KL, pC and pMI measures, was shown to lead to significantly improved prediction accuracy. At a specificity of 0.90, the Cls method was found to have a sensitivity of 0.816. In summary, we demonstrate that networks of residues with high MI provide a distinct signature on CR and propose that such a signature should be present in other classes of functional residues where the requirement to maintain a particular function places limitations on the diversification of the structural environment along the course of evolution.

  12. Networks of high mutual information define the structural proximity of catalytic sites: implications for catalytic residue identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino Buslje, Cristina; Teppa, Elin; Di Doménico, Tomas; Delfino, José María; Nielsen, Morten

    2010-11-04

    Identification of catalytic residues (CR) is essential for the characterization of enzyme function. CR are, in general, conserved and located in the functional site of a protein in order to attain their function. However, many non-catalytic residues are highly conserved and not all CR are conserved throughout a given protein family making identification of CR a challenging task. Here, we put forward the hypothesis that CR carry a particular signature defined by networks of close proximity residues with high mutual information (MI), and that this signature can be applied to distinguish functional from other non-functional conserved residues. Using a data set of 434 Pfam families included in the catalytic site atlas (CSA) database, we tested this hypothesis and demonstrated that MI can complement amino acid conservation scores to detect CR. The Kullback-Leibler (KL) conservation measurement was shown to significantly outperform both the Shannon entropy and maximal frequency measurements. Residues in the proximity of catalytic sites were shown to be rich in shared MI. A structural proximity MI average score (termed pMI) was demonstrated to be a strong predictor for CR, thus confirming the proposed hypothesis. A structural proximity conservation average score (termed pC) was also calculated and demonstrated to carry distinct information from pMI. A catalytic likeliness score (Cls), combining the KL, pC and pMI measures, was shown to lead to significantly improved prediction accuracy. At a specificity of 0.90, the Cls method was found to have a sensitivity of 0.816. In summary, we demonstrate that networks of residues with high MI provide a distinct signature on CR and propose that such a signature should be present in other classes of functional residues where the requirement to maintain a particular function places limitations on the diversification of the structural environment along the course of evolution.

  13. Catalytic combustion of gasified waste - Experimental part. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeraas, Sven; Kusar, Henrik [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Chemical Engineering and Technology

    2003-08-01

    This final report covers the work that has been performed within the project P 10547-2, 'Catalytic combustion of gasified waste - system analysis ORWARE'. This project is part of the research programme 'Energy from Waste' financed by the Swedish National Energy Administration. The project has been carried out at the division of Industrial Ecology and at the division of Chemical Technology at Royal Inst. of Technology. The aim of the project has been to study the potentials for catalytic combustion of gasified waste. The supposed end user of the technique is a smaller community in Sweden with 15,000-20,000 inhabitants. The project contains of two sub projects: an experimental part carried out at Chemical Technology and a system analysis carried out at Industrial Ecology. This report covers the experimental part of the project carried out at Chemical Technology. The aim for the experimental part has been to develop and test catalysts with long life-time and a high performance, to reduce the thermal-NO{sub x} below 5 ppm and to significantly reduce NO{sub x} formed from fuel-bound nitrogen. Different experimental studies have been carried out within the project: a set-up of catalytic materials have been tested over a synthetic mixture of the gasified waste, the influence of sulfur present in the gas stream, NO{sub x} formation from fuel bound nitrogen, kinetic studies of CO and H{sub 2} with and without the presence of water and the effects of adding a co-metal to palladium catalysts Furthermore a novel annular reactor design has been used to carry out experiments for kinetic measurements. Real gasification tests of waste pellets directly coupled to catalytic combustion have successfully been performed. The results obtained from the experiments, both the catalytic combustion and from the gasification, have been possible to use in the system analysis. The aim of the system analysis of catalytic combustion of gasified waste takes into consideration

  14. Significant Improvement of Catalytic Efficiencies in Ionic Liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Choong Eui; Yoon, Mi Young; Choi, Doo Seong

    2005-01-01

    The use of ionic liquids as reaction media can confer many advantages upon catalytic reactions over reactions in organic solvents. In ionic liquids, catalysts having polar or ionic character can easily be immobilized without additional structural modification and thus the ionic solutions containing the catalyst can easily be separated from the reagents and reaction products, and then, be reused. More interestingly, switching from an organic solvent to an ionic liquid often results in a significant improvement in catalytic performance (e.g., rate acceleration, (enantio)selectivity improvement and an increase in catalyst stability). In this review, some recent interesting results which can nicely demonstrate these positive 'ionic liquid effect' on catalysis are discussed

  15. Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This technology pathway case investigates the catalytic conversion of solubilized carbohydrate streams to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent efforts within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC) in collaboration with Virent, Inc.. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for the catalytic conversion of sugars pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range hydrocarbon blendstocks have been identified.

  16. Polymer and Membrane Design for Low Temperature Catalytic Reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Villalobos, Luis Francisco; Xie, Yihui; Nunes, Suzana Pereira; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor

    2016-01-01

    Catalytically active asymmetric membranes have been developed with high loadings of palladium nanoparticles located solely in the membrane's ultrathin skin layer. The manufacturing of these membranes requires polymers with functional groups, which can form insoluble complexes with palladium ions. Three polymers have been synthesized for this purpose and a complexation/nonsolvent induced phase separation followed by a palladium reduction step is carried out to prepare such membranes. Parameters to optimize the skin layer thickness and porosity, the palladium loading in this layer, and the palladium nanoparticles size are determined. The catalytic activity of the membranes is verified with the reduction of a nitro-compound and with a liquid phase Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction. Very low reaction times are observed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Catalytical Properties of Free and Immobilized Aspergillus niger Tannase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abril Flores-Maltos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A fungal tannase was produced, recovered, and immobilized by entrapment in calcium alginate beads. Catalytical properties of the immobilized enzyme were compared with those of the free one. Tannase was produced intracellularly by the xerophilic fungus Aspergillus niger GH1 in a submerged fermentation system. Enzyme was recovered by cell disruption and the crude extract was partially purified. The catalytical properties of free and immobilized tannase were evaluated using tannic acid and methyl gallate as substrates. KM and Vmax values for free enzyme were very similar for both substrates. But, after immobilization, KM and Vmax values increased drastically using tannic acid as substrate. These results indicated that immobilized tannase is a better biocatalyst than free enzyme for applications on liquid systems with high tannin content, such as bioremediation of tannery or olive-mill wastewater.

  18. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-03-08

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  19. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-09-06

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  20. Catalytic production of metal carbonyls from metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; Foran, Michael T.

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to the formation of metal carbonyls from metal oxides and specially the formation of molybdenum carbonyl and iron carbonyl from their respective oxides. Copper is used here in admixed form or used in chemically combined form as copper molybdate. The copper/metal oxide combination or combined copper is utilized with a solvent, such as toluene and subjected to carbon monoxide pressure of 25 atmospheres or greater at about 150.degree.-260.degree. C. The reducing metal copper is employed in catalytic concentrations or combined concentrations as CuMoO.sub.4 and both hydrogen and water present serve as promoters. It has been found that the yields by this process have been salutary and that additionally the catalytic metal may be reused in the process to good effect.

  1. Specific synthesis of Pt nanowires for catalytic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenske, Daniela; Kehres, Jan; Al-Shamery, Katharina [IRAC, University Oldenburg (Germany); Center of Interface Science, CIS (Germany); Borchert, Holger; Kolny-Olesiak, Joanna [EHF, University Oldenburg (Germany); Center of Interface Science, CIS (Germany); Baeumer, Marcus [IAPC, University Bremen (Germany); Center of Interface Science, CIS (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Metallic nanomaterials are of great interest in the last years due to their interesting properties as new materials for optical, electronic, magnetic or catalytic applications. Particularly size and morphology of such nanoparticulate systems offer also high potential for material improvement. A promising issue is the preparation of platinum nanowires by means of colloidal chemistry which allows obtaining particles with well-defined size and shape by use of stabilizing ligands. Recent efforts have been focused on the development of synthesis to obtain these nanowires. Therefore we were able to prepare dodecylamine-capped Pt nanowires with 2 nm in diameter and several multiple in length in varying the synthesis conditions. The influence of temperature, stabilisers and reducing agents on the morphology has been investigated. The catalytic activity of such nanowires immobilized at different oxidic supports could also be demonstrated on the example of CO oxidation and are compared to spherical Pt and bimetallic colloidal nanoparticles.

  2. Heterogeneous Photo catalytic Degradation of Hazardous Waste in Aqueous Suspension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadek, S.A.; Ebraheem, S.; Friesen, K.J.

    1999-01-01

    The photo catalytic degradation of hazardous waste like chlorinated paraffin compound (1,12-Dichlorodoecane Ded) was investigated in different aquatic media using GC-MSD. The direct photolysis of Ded in HPLC water was considered to be negligible (k = 0.0020+-0.0007h - 1 ) . An acceleration of the photodegradation rate was occurred in presence of different TiO 2 catalyst systems. Molecular oxygen was found to play a vital role in the degradation process. Anatase TiO 2 was proved to be the most efficient one (k=0.7670+-0.0876h -1 ), while the rate constant of the rutile TiO 2 was calculated to be 0.2780+-0.0342h -1 . Improvement of photo catalytic efficiency of rutile TiO 2 was achieved by addition of Fe +2 giving a rate constant =0.6710+-0.0786h -1

  3. Directional synthesis of ethylbenzene through catalytic transformation of lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Minghui; Jiang, Peiwen; Bi, Peiyan; Deng, Shumei; Yan, Lifeng; Zhai, Qi; Wang, Tiejun; Li, Quanxin

    2013-09-01

    Transformation of lignin to ethylbenzene can provide an important bulk raw material for the petrochemical industry. This work explored the production of ethylbenzene from lignin through the directional catalytic depolymerization of lignin into the aromatic monomers followed by the selective alkylation of the aromatic monomers. For the first step, the aromatics selectivity of benzene derived from the catalytic depolymerization of lignin reached about 90.2 C-mol% over the composite catalyst of Re-Y/HZSM-5 (25). For the alkylation of the aromatic monomers in the second step, the highest selectivity of ethylbenzene was about 72.3 C-mol% over the HZSM-5 (25) catalyst. The reaction pathway for the transformation of lignin to ethylbenzene was also addressed. Present transformation potentially provides a useful approach for the production of the basic petrochemical material and development of high-end chemicals utilizing lignin as the abundant natural aromatic resource. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Lumping procedure for a kinetic model of catalytic naphtha reforming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Arani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A lumping procedure is developed for obtaining kinetic and thermodynamic parameters of catalytic naphtha reforming. All kinetic and deactivation parameters are estimated from industrial data and thermodynamic parameters are calculated from derived mathematical expressions. The proposed model contains 17 lumps that include the C6 to C8+ hydrocarbon range and 15 reaction pathways. Hougen-Watson Langmuir-Hinshelwood type reaction rate expressions are used for kinetic simulation of catalytic reactions. The kinetic parameters are benchmarked with several sets of plant data and estimated by the SQP optimization method. After calculation of deactivation and kinetic parameters, plant data are compared with model predictions and only minor deviations between experimental and calculated data are generally observed.

  5. Polymer and Membrane Design for Low Temperature Catalytic Reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Villalobos, Luis Francisco

    2016-02-29

    Catalytically active asymmetric membranes have been developed with high loadings of palladium nanoparticles located solely in the membrane\\'s ultrathin skin layer. The manufacturing of these membranes requires polymers with functional groups, which can form insoluble complexes with palladium ions. Three polymers have been synthesized for this purpose and a complexation/nonsolvent induced phase separation followed by a palladium reduction step is carried out to prepare such membranes. Parameters to optimize the skin layer thickness and porosity, the palladium loading in this layer, and the palladium nanoparticles size are determined. The catalytic activity of the membranes is verified with the reduction of a nitro-compound and with a liquid phase Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction. Very low reaction times are observed. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Outstanding catalytic activity of ultra-pure platinum nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Januszewska, Aneta; Dercz, Grzegorz; Piwowar, Justyna; Jurczakowski, Rafal; Lewera, Adam

    2013-12-09

    Small (4 nm) nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution, exceptional surface purity, and increased surface order, which exhibits itself as an increased presence of basal crystallographic planes, can be obtained without the use of any surfactant. These nanoparticles can be used in many applications in an as-received state and are threefold more active towards a model catalytic reaction (oxidation of ethylene glycol). Furthermore, the superior properties of this material are interesting not only due to the increase in their intrinsic catalytic activity, but also due to the exceptional surface purity itself. The nanoparticles can be used directly (i.e., as-received, without any cleaning steps) in biomedical applications (i.e., as more efficient drug carriers due to an increased number of adsorption sites) and in energy-harvesting/data-storage devices. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. PARAMETRIC EVALUATION OF VOC CONVERSION VIA CATALYTIC INCINERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaskantzis Neto G.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - A pilot-scale catalytic incineration system was used to investigate the effectiveness of catalytic incineration as a means of reducing volatile organic compound (VOC air pollutants. The objectives of the study were: 1 to investigate the effects of operating and design variables on the reduction efficiency of VOCs; and 2 to evaluate reduction efficiencies for specific compounds in different chemical classes. The study results verified that the following factors affect the catalyst performance: inlet temperature, space velocity, compound type, and compound inlet concentration. Tests showed that reduction efficiencies exceeding 98% were possible, given sufficiently high inlet gas temperatures for the following classes of compounds: alcohols, acetates, ketones, hydrocarbons, and aromatics

  8. Catalytic properties of ADAM12 and its domain deletion mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jonas; Visse, Robert; Sørensen, Hans Peter

    2008-01-01

    of pro, catalytic, disintegrin, cysteine-rich, and EGF domains. Here we present a novel activity of recombinant ADAM12-S and its domain deletion mutants on S-carboxymethylated transferrin (Cm-Tf). Cleavage of Cm-Tf occurred at multiple sites, and N-terminal sequencing showed that the enzyme exhibits...... restricted specificity but a consensus sequence could not be defined as its subsite requirements are promiscuous. Kinetic analysis revealed that the noncatalytic C-terminal domains are important regulators of Cm-Tf activity and that ADAM12-PC consisting of the pro domain and catalytic domain is the most...... active on this substrate. It was also observed that NaCl inhibits ADAM12. Among the tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMP) examined, the N-terminal domain of TIMP-3 (N-TIMP-3) inhibits ADAM12-S and ADAM12-PC with low nanomolar Ki(app) values while TIMP-2 inhibits them with a slightly lower...

  9. Catalytical Properties of Free and Immobilized Aspergillus niger Tannase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Maltos, Abril; Rodríguez-Durán, Luis V; Renovato, Jacqueline; Contreras, Juan C; Rodríguez, Raúl; Aguilar, Cristóbal N

    2011-01-01

    A fungal tannase was produced, recovered, and immobilized by entrapment in calcium alginate beads. Catalytical properties of the immobilized enzyme were compared with those of the free one. Tannase was produced intracellularly by the xerophilic fungus Aspergillus niger GH1 in a submerged fermentation system. Enzyme was recovered by cell disruption and the crude extract was partially purified. The catalytical properties of free and immobilized tannase were evaluated using tannic acid and methyl gallate as substrates. K(M) and V(max) values for free enzyme were very similar for both substrates. But, after immobilization, K(M) and V(max) values increased drastically using tannic acid as substrate. These results indicated that immobilized tannase is a better biocatalyst than free enzyme for applications on liquid systems with high tannin content, such as bioremediation of tannery or olive-mill wastewater.

  10. Catalytic Cracking of Used Palm Oil using Composite Zeolite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, W.H.; Tye, C.T.

    2013-01-01

    The rapid expansion of human society implies greater energy demand and environmental issues. In face of depletion energy resources, research is being carried out widely in order to convert the plant oil into biofuel. In this research, the production of liquid biofuels via catalytic cracking of used palm oil in the presence of composite zeolite was studied. The performance of composite zeolite of different properties in the reaction has been evaluated. The catalytic cracking reactions were carried out in a batch reactor at reaction temperature of 350 degree Celsius for an hour. In the present study, adjusting the ratio of meso porous coating to microporous zeolite and magnesium loading on composite zeolite catalyst were found to be able to increase the gasoline fraction and overall conversion of the reaction. (author)

  11. Synthesis and characterization of type silicoaluminophosphates catalytic support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, C.E.T.; Carvalho, M.W.N.C.; Pereira, K.R.O.

    2010-01-01

    The refining processes, the catalytic hydrocracking is the future of diesel oil in Brazil and the first units are already scheduled to be inaugurated. Among the catalysts used in this process, silicoaluminophosphates (SAPO's) have considerable potential for use as they have been effective in the isomerization of n-alkanes, the isomerization of olefins and alkylation of aromatics. Because of this, the objective is to develop catalysts that will be used in hydrocracking reactions. The media like SAPO-5 were synthesized with different ratios silicon/aluminum, which is used as a catalytic support and have the function of crack organic molecules, since it has acidic character. The materials were characterized by techniques: X-ray diffraction, chemical analysis and textural by BET. After summarizing the media found that they had agreements with the crystalline phases presented in the literature.(author)

  12. Ultraviolet laser deposition of graphene thin films without catalytic layers

    KAUST Repository

    Sarath Kumar, S. R.

    2013-01-09

    In this letter, the formation of nanostructured graphene by ultraviolet laser ablation of a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite target under optimized conditions is demonstrated, without a catalytic layer, and a model for the growth process is proposed. Previously, graphene film deposition by low-energy laser (2.3 eV) was explained by photo-thermal models, which implied that graphene films cannot be deposited by laser energies higher than the C-C bond energy in highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (3.7 eV). Here, we show that nanostructured graphene films can in fact be deposited using ultraviolet laser (5 eV) directly over different substrates, without a catalytic layer. The formation of graphene is explained by bond-breaking assisted by photoelectronic excitation leading to formation of carbon clusters at the target and annealing out of defects at the substrate.

  13. Study of the catalytic activity of supported technetium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitsyn, V.I.; Mikhailenko, I.E.; Pokorovskaya, O.V.

    1985-01-01

    The radioactive d metal 43 Tc 99 has catalytic properties in the synthesis of ammonia. For the purpose of reducing the quantity of the radioactive metal and of increasing the specific surface, the active component was applied to BaTiO 3 and gamma-Al 2 O 3 supports. This paper uses charcoal as a support and a table presents the catalytic activity of the samples during the synthesis of ammonia. X-ray diffractometric investigation of the catalysts was carried out with the use of Cu K /SUB alpha/ radiation. It is shown that the catalysts. The values of the specific rate constants of technetium in the catalysts. The values of the specific rate constants remain practically constant for all the catalyst samples studied, attesting to the absence of a specific metal-support interaction during the synthesis of ammonia

  14. Ultraviolet laser deposition of graphene thin films without catalytic layers

    KAUST Repository

    Sarath Kumar, S. R.; Alshareef, Husam N.

    2013-01-01

    In this letter, the formation of nanostructured graphene by ultraviolet laser ablation of a highly ordered pyrolytic graphite target under optimized conditions is demonstrated, without a catalytic layer, and a model for the growth process is proposed. Previously, graphene film deposition by low-energy laser (2.3 eV) was explained by photo-thermal models, which implied that graphene films cannot be deposited by laser energies higher than the C-C bond energy in highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (3.7 eV). Here, we show that nanostructured graphene films can in fact be deposited using ultraviolet laser (5 eV) directly over different substrates, without a catalytic layer. The formation of graphene is explained by bond-breaking assisted by photoelectronic excitation leading to formation of carbon clusters at the target and annealing out of defects at the substrate.

  15. Reaction rate oscillations during catalytic CO oxidation: A brief overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, T. T.; Sane, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    It is not the intent here to present a comprehensive review of the dynamic behavior of the catalytic oxidation of CO. This reaction is one of the most widely studied in the field of catalysis. A review paper by Engel and Ertl has examined the basic kinetic and mechanistic aspects, and a comprehensive paper by Razon and Schmitz was recently devoted to its dynamic behavior. Those interested in further study of the subject should consult these reviews and a number of general review papers on catalytic reaction dynamics. The goal is to present a brief overview of certain interesting aspects of the dynamic behavior of this reaction and to discuss a few questions and issues, which are still the subject of study and debate.

  16. Additive for vanadium and sulfur oxide capture in catalytic cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, A.A.; Sapre, A.V.; Sarli, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a fluid catalytic cracking process in which a hydrocarbon feedstock. It comprises: a vanadium contaminant in an amount of a least 2 ppmw is cracked under fluid catalytic cracking conditions with a solid, particulate cracking catalyst to produce cracking products of lower molecular weight while depositing carbonaceous material on the particles of cracking catalyst, separating the particles of cracking catalyst from the cracking products in the disengaging zone and oxidatively regenerating the cracking catalyst by burning off the deposited carbonaceous material in a regeneration zone, the improvement comprising reducing the make-up rate of the cracking catalyst by contacting the cracking feed with a particulate additive composition for passivating the vanadium content of the feed, comprising an alkaline earth metal oxide and an alkaline earth metal spinel

  17. Measurements of H-atom density by a catalytic probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesel, A.; Drenik, A.; Mozetic, M.

    2006-01-01

    One of the important plasma parameters in tokamaks is the density of neutral hydrogen atoms which can be measured by catalytic probes. The method is based on the catalytic recombination of H atoms on the metal surface. In order to prevent a substantial drain of atoms by the probe, it should be made as small as possible. But still this effect can not be neglected. Therefore a study of the influence of a catalytic probe on the H-atom density was performed. The source of neutral H-atoms was inductively coupled RF hydrogen plasma. The gas from the discharge vessel was leaked to an experimental chamber through a narrow tube with the diameter of 5 mm and the length of 6 cm. Charged particles created in the discharge vessel were recombined on the walls of the narrow tube, so that the gas entering the experimental chamber was a mixture of hydrogen atoms and molecules only. The density of H-atoms in the experimental chamber was measured with two nickel catalytic probes. One probe was at fixed position and the other one was made movable. A change in the probe signal of the fixed probe was measured versus the position of the movable probe. The measurements were performed at the pressures between 10 Pa and 200 Pa and at two different RF powers 200 W and 300 W. It was found that the density of neutral hydrogen atoms was reduced for about 20% due to the presence of the probe. This result was independent from the pressure in the experimental chamber. (author)

  18. Dimension meditated optic and catalytic performance over vanadium pentoxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Dezhi [Beijing Key Laboratory of Construction Tailorable Advanced Functional Materials and Green Applications, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhao, Yongjie, E-mail: zhaoyjpeace@gmail.com [Beijing Key Laboratory of Construction Tailorable Advanced Functional Materials and Green Applications, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang, Ruibo; Ning, Mingqiang [Beijing Key Laboratory of Construction Tailorable Advanced Functional Materials and Green Applications, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhao, Yuzhen; Zhou, Heping [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li, Jingbo; Jin, Haibo [Beijing Key Laboratory of Construction Tailorable Advanced Functional Materials and Green Applications, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • V{sub 2}O{sub 5} with diverse dimensional morphologies were synthesized. • The optic properties of diverse dimensional V{sub 2}O{sub 5} were investigated in detail. • The catalytic properties of diverse dimensional V{sub 2}O{sub 5} on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate were analyzed. - Abstract: Morphologies and sizes of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} had crucial effect on their optic and catalytic performance. Diverse dimensional V{sub 2}O{sub 5} were successfully synthesized by the combination of a hydrothermal and post heat treatment method. The as-obtained samples were characterized by X-ray power diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectra. Moreover, the optic properties of diverse dimensional V{sub 2}O{sub 5} were examined by Fourier transform imaging spectrometer and UV–vis-spectrophotometer. It showed that the IR transmittance of nanowire (at 1019 cm{sup −1} is 85%) and UV absorbance of microflowers (at 480 nm) were high. Furthermore, the catalytic properties of diverse dimensional V{sub 2}O{sub 5} on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate were evaluated and compared by Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis and Differential Scanning Calorimetry. Moreover, the best catalytic performance was obtained with the morphology of nanowire. It showed the thermal decomposition temperatures of AP with nanowire, microflowers and microsphere were reduced to 373 °C, 382 °C and 376 °C (decreased by 52 °C, 43 °C and 49 °C).

  19. Trends in catalytic NO decomposition over transition metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falsig, Hanne; Bligaard, Thomas; Rass-Hansen, Jeppe

    2007-01-01

    The formation of NOx from combustion of fossil and renewable fuels continues to be a dominant environmental issue. We take one step towards rationalizing trends in catalytic activity of transition metal catalysts for NO decomposition by combining microkinetic modelling with density functional...... theory calculations. We show specifically why the key problem in using transition metal surfaces to catalyze direct NO decomposition is their significant relative overbinding of atomic oxygen compared to atomic nitrogen....

  20. Process and catalyst for the catalytic conversion of hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1939-10-27

    A process is disclosed for converting hydrocarbon oils of higher than gasoline end boiling point, into large yields of motor fuel of high anti-knock value and substantial yields of normally gaseous readily polymerizable olefins, which comprises subjecting said hydrocarbon oils at a temperature within the approximate range of 425 to 650/sup 0/C. to contact with a catalytic material comprising hydrated silica and hydrated zirconia substantially free from alkali metal compounds.

  1. Lamellar zirconium phosphates to host metals for catalytic purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros-Plata, Daniel; Infantes-Molina, Antonia; Rodríguez-Aguado, Elena; Braos-García, Pilar; Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique

    2018-02-27

    In the present study a porous lamellar zirconium phosphate heterostructure (PPH) formed from zirconium(iv) phosphate expanded with silica galleries (P/Zr molar ratio equal to 2 and (Si + Zr)/P equal to 3) was prepared to host noble metals. Textural and structural characterization of PPH-noble metal materials was carried out in order to elucidate the location and dispersion of the metallic particles and the properties of the resulting material to be used in catalytic processes. In the present paper, their activity in the catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) reaction of dibenzofuran (DBF) was evaluated. X-ray diffraction (XRD), solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) evidenced that the structure of the pillared zirconium phosphate material was not modified by the incorporation of Pt and Pd. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed a different dispersion of the noble metal. The acidity of the resulting PPH-noble metal materials also changed, although in all cases the acidity was of weak nature, and the incorporation of noble metals affected Brønsted acid sites as observed from 31 P NMR spectra. In general, the textural, structural and acidic properties of the resulting materials suggest that PPH can be considered a good candidate to be used as a catalytic support. Thus, the catalytic results of the PPH-noble metal samples indicated that the Pd sample showed a stable behavior probably ascribed to a high dispersion of the active phase. However, the Pt sample suffered from fast deactivation. The selectivity to the reaction products was strongly dependent on the noble metal employed.

  2. Catalytic strategy used by the myosin motor to hydrolyze ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2014-07-22

    Myosin is a molecular motor responsible for biological motions such as muscle contraction and intracellular cargo transport, for which it hydrolyzes adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). Early steps of the mechanism by which myosin catalyzes ATP hydrolysis have been investigated, but still missing are the structure of the final ADP·inorganic phosphate (Pi) product and the complete pathway leading to it. Here, a comprehensive description of the catalytic strategy of myosin is formulated, based on combined quantum-classical molecular mechanics calculations. A full exploration of catalytic pathways was performed and a final product structure was found that is consistent with all experiments. Molecular movies of the relevant pathways show the different reorganizations of the H-bond network that lead to the final product, whose γ-phosphate is not in the previously reported HPγO4(2-) state, but in the H2PγO4(-) state. The simulations reveal that the catalytic strategy of myosin employs a three-pronged tactic: (i) Stabilization of the γ-phosphate of ATP in a dissociated metaphosphate (PγO3(-)) state. (ii) Polarization of the attacking water molecule, to abstract a proton from that water. (iii) Formation of multiple proton wires in the active site, for efficient transfer of the abstracted proton to various product precursors. The specific role played in this strategy by each of the three loops enclosing ATP is identified unambiguously. It explains how the precise timing of the ATPase activation during the force generating cycle is achieved in myosin. The catalytic strategy described here for myosin is likely to be very similar in most nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes.

  3. The tritium labelling of ibuprofen by heterogeneous catalytic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamaria, J.; Rebollo, D.V.; Rivera, P.; Estaban, M.

    1986-01-01

    The tritium labelling of 2-(4-isobutylphenyl) propionic acid (ibuprofen) was performed. The method employed was heterogeneous catalytic exchange between ibuprofen and tritiated water. Prior to labelling, thermic stability of ibuprofen was studied. Purification was accomplished through thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Concentration, purity and specific activity of the labelled compound were determined by ultraviolet, HPLC and liquid scintillation techniques. (author)

  4. Photosonochemical catalytic ring opening of α-epoxyketones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saffar-Teluri Ali

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The combination of ultrasound and photochemical methods has been used for the catalytic ring opening of α-epoxyketones by 1-benzyl-2,4,6-triphenylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate (NBTPT as photocatalyst in methanol. Sonication of these compounds in the presence of NBTPT did not result in the opening of epoxide ring, but the use of ultrasound increased the rate of photoreaction.

  5. Renormalization analysis of catalytic Wright-Fisher diffusions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Swart, Jan M.; Fleischmann, K.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 2006, č. 11 (2006), s. 585-654 ISSN 1083-6489 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/06/1323 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : renormalization * catalytic Wright-Fisher diffusion * embedded particle system * extinction * unbounded growth * interacting diffusions * universality Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.676, year: 2006

  6. Catalytic properties of three catalases from Kohlrabi ( Brassica ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) was extracted from kohlrabi bulbs (Brassica oleracea gongylodes) with 0.05 M phosphate buffer, pH 7.0. On the basis of kinetic studies and activity stain for catalase, only three isoenzymes of catalases were detected in kohlrabi bulbs extract with pH optima at 4.5, 6.5 and 10. Highest catalytic ...

  7. A review of liquid-phase catalytic hydrodechlorination

    OpenAIRE

    Alba Nelly Ardila Arias; Consuelo Montes de Correa

    2007-01-01

    This survey was aimed at introducing the effect of light organochlorinated compound emissions on the envi-ronment, particularly on water, air, soil, biota and human beings. The characteristics and advantages of liquid phase catalytic hydrodechlorination as a technology for degrading these chlorinated compounds is also outlined and the main catalysts used in the hydrodechlorination process are described. Special emphasis is placed on palladium catalysts, their activity, the nature of active sp...

  8. Catalytic synthesis of alcoholic fuels for transportation from syngas

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Jensen, Anker Degn; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Temel, Burcin; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt

    2013-01-01

    This work has investigated the catalytic conversion of syngas into methanol and higher alcohols. Based on input from computational catalyst screening, an experimental investigation of promising catalyst candidates for methanol synthesis from syngas has been carried out. Cu-Ni alloys of different composition have been identified as potential candidates for methanol synthesis. These Cu-Ni alloy catalysts have been synthesized and tested in a fixed-bed continuous-flow reactor for CO hydrogenatio...

  9. Plasma-assisted catalytic ionization using porous nickel plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oohara, W.; Maeda, T.; Higuchi, T.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen atomic pair ions, i.e., H + and H - ions, are produced by plasma-assisted catalytic ionization using a porous nickel plate. Positive ions in a hydrogen plasma generated by dc arc discharge are irradiated to the porous plate, and pair ions are produced from the back of the irradiation plane. It becomes clear that the production quantity of pair ions mainly depends on the irradiation current of positive ions and the irradiation energy affects the production efficiency of H - ions.

  10. Catalytic activity of metal borides in the reaction of decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labodi, I.; Korablev, L.I.; Tavadyan, L.A.; Blyumberg, Eh.A.

    1982-01-01

    Catalytic effect of CoB, MoB 2 , ZrB 2 and NbB 2 , prepared by the method of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis, on decomposition of tertiary butyl hydroperoxide has been studied. A technigue of determination of action mechanism of heterogeneous catalysts in liquid-phase process is suggested. It is established that CoB in contrast to other metal borides catalyzes only hydroperoxide decomposition into radicals

  11. Slow, Wet and Catalytic Pyrolysis of Fowl Manure

    OpenAIRE

    Renzo Carta; Mario Cruccu; Francesco Desogus

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the experimental results obtained at a pilot plant which works with a slow, wet and catalytic pyrolysis process of dry fowl manure. This kind of process mainly consists in the cracking of the organic matrix and in the following reaction of carbon with water, which is either already contained in the organic feed or added, to produce carbon monoxide and hydrogen. Reactions are conducted in a rotating reactor maintained at a temperature of 500°C; the requi...

  12. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Acetone to Isopropanol: An Environmentally Benign Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ateeq Rahman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic hydrogenation of acetone is an important area of catalytic process to produce fine chemicals. Hydrogenation of acetone has important applications for heat pumps, fuel cells or in fulfilling the sizeable demand for the production of 2-propanol. Catalytic vapour phase hydrogenation of acetone has gained attention over the decades with variety of homogeneous catalysts notably Iridium, Rh, Ru complexes and heterogeneous catalysts comprising of Raney Nickel, Raney Sponge, Ni/Al2O3, Ni/SiO2, or Co-Al2O3, Pd, Rh, Ru, Re, or Fe/Al2O3 supported on SiO2 or MgO and even CoMgAl, NiMg Al layered double hydroxide, Cu metal, CuO, Cu2O. Nano catalysts are developed for actone reduction Ni maleate, cobalt oxide prepared in organic solvents. Author present a review on acetone hydrogenation under different conditions with various homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts studied so far in literature and new strategies to develop economic and environmentally benign approach. ©2010 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 16th June 2010, Revised: 18th October 2010; Accepted: 25th October 2010[How to Cite:Ateeq Rahman. (2010. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Acetone to Isopropanol: An Environmentally Benign Approach. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 5(2: 113-126. doi:10.9767/bcrec.5.2.798.113-126][DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.5.2.798.113-126 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/798

  13. Key parameters controlling the performance of catalytic motors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esplandiu, Maria J.; Afshar Farniya, Ali [Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2), CSIC and The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Campus UAB, Bellaterra, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Reguera, David, E-mail: dreguera@ub.edu [Departament de Física Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, C/Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-03-28

    The development of autonomous micro/nanomotors driven by self-generated chemical gradients is a topic of high interest given their potential impact in medicine and environmental remediation. Although impressive functionalities of these devices have been demonstrated, a detailed understanding of the propulsion mechanism is still lacking. In this work, we perform a comprehensive numerical analysis of the key parameters governing the actuation of bimetallic catalytic micropumps. We show that the fluid motion is driven by self-generated electro-osmosis where the electric field originates by a proton current rather than by a lateral charge asymmetry inside the double layer. Hence, the surface potential and the electric field are the key parameters for setting the pumping strength and directionality. The proton flux that generates the electric field stems from the proton gradient induced by the electrochemical reactions taken place at the pump. Surprisingly the electric field and consequently the fluid flow are mainly controlled by the ionic strength and not by the conductivity of the solution, as one could have expected. We have also analyzed the influence of the chemical fuel concentration, electrochemical reaction rates, and size of the metallic structures for an optimized pump performance. Our findings cast light on the complex chemomechanical actuation of catalytic motors and provide important clues for the search, design, and optimization of novel catalytic actuators.

  14. Three-Dimensional Structure and Catalytic Mechanism of Cytosine Deaminase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R Hall; A Fedorov; C Xu; E Fedorov; S Almo; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from E. coli is a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily. The structure of the zinc-activated enzyme was determined in the presence of phosphonocytosine, a mimic of the tetrahedral reaction intermediate. This compound inhibits the deamination of cytosine with a K{sub i} of 52 nM. The zinc- and iron-containing enzymes were characterized to determine the effect of the divalent cations on activation of the hydrolytic water. Fe-CDA loses activity at low pH with a kinetic pKa of 6.0, and Zn-CDA has a kinetic pKa of 7.3. Mutation of Gln-156 decreased the catalytic activity by more than 5 orders of magnitude, supporting its role in substrate binding. Mutation of Glu-217, Asp-313, and His-246 significantly decreased catalytic activity supporting the role of these three residues in activation of the hydrolytic water molecule and facilitation of proton transfer reactions. A library of potential substrates was used to probe the structural determinants responsible for catalytic activity. CDA was able to catalyze the deamination of isocytosine and the hydrolysis of 3-oxauracil. Large inverse solvent isotope effects were obtained on k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, consistent with the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond during the conversion of cytosine to uracil. A chemical mechanism for substrate deamination by CDA was proposed.

  15. Preparation, characterization and catalytic effects of copper oxalate nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Gurdip; Kapoor, Inder Pal Singh; Dubey, Reena; Srivastava, Pratibha

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Prepared copper oxalate nanocrystals were characterized by FE-SEM and bright field TEM micrographs. Its catalytic activity was evaluated on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate using TG and TG-DSC techniques. Highlights: ► Preparation of nanocrystals (∼9.0 nm) of copper oxalate using Cu(NO 3 ) 2 ·2H 2 O, oxalic acid and acetone under thermal conditions. ► Method is simple and novel. ► Characterization using XRD, SEM, TEM, HRTEM and ED pattern. ► Catalytic activity of copper oxalate nanocrystals on AP thermal decomposition using thermal techniques (TG, TG-DSC and ignition delay). ► Kinetics of thermal decomposition of AP + CONs using isoconversional and model fitting kinetic approaches. - Abstract: Recent work has described the preparation and characterization of copper oxalate nanocrystals (CONs). It was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron diffraction pattern (ED). The catalytic activity of CONs on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and composite solid propellants (CSPs) has been done by thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and ignition delay measurements. Burning rate of CSPs was also found to be enhanced in presence of copper oxalate nanocrystals. Kinetics of thermal decomposition of AP with and without CONs has also been investigated. The model free (isoconversional) and model-fitting kinetic approaches have been applied to data for isothermal TG decomposition.

  16. Synthesis of urease hybrid nanoflowers and their enhanced catalytic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somturk, Burcu; Yilmaz, Ismail; Altinkaynak, Cevahir; Karatepe, Aslıhan; Özdemir, Nalan; Ocsoy, Ismail

    2016-05-01

    Increasing numbers of materials have been extensively used as platforms for enzyme immobilization to enhance catalytic activity and stability. Although stability of enzyme was accomplished with immobilization approaches, activity of the most of the enzymes was declined after immobilization. Herein, we synthesize the flower shaped-hybrid nanomaterials called hybrid nanoflower (HNF) consisting of urease enzyme and copper ions (Cu(2+)) and report a mechanistic elucidation of enhancement in both activity and stability of the HNF. We demonstrated how experimental factors influence morphology of the HNF. We proved that the HNF (synthesized from 0.02mgmL(-1) urease in 10mM PBS (pH 7.4) at +4°C) exhibited the highest catalytic activity of ∼2000% and ∼4000% when stored at +4°C and RT, respectively compared to free urease. The highest stability was also achieved by this HNF by maintaining 96.3% and 90.28% of its initial activity within storage of 30 days at +4°C and RT, respectively. This dramatically enhanced activity is attributed to high surface area, nanoscale-entrapped urease and favorable urease conformation of the HNF. The exceptional catalytic activity and stability properties of HNF can be taken advantage of to use it in fields of biomedicine and chemistry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Catalytic Conversion of Cellulose to Levulinic Acid by Metal Chlorides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beixiao Zhang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic performance of various metal chlorides in the conversion of cellulose to levulinic acid in liquid water at high temperatures was investigated. The effects of reaction parameters on the yield of levulinic acid were also explored. The results showed that alkali and alkaline earth metal chlorides were not effective in conversion of cellulose, while transition metal chlorides, especially CrCl3, FeCl3 and CuCl2 and a group IIIA metal chloride (AlCl3, exhibited high catalytic activity. The catalytic performance was correlated with the acidity of the reaction system due to the addition of the metal chlorides, but more dependent on the type of metal chloride. Among those metal chlorides, chromium chloride was found to be exceptionally effective for the conversion of cellulose to levulinic acid, affording an optimum yield of 67 mol % after a reaction time of 180 min, at 200 °C, with a catalyst dosage of 0.02 M and substrate concentration of 50 wt %. Chromium metal, most of which was present in its oxide form in the solid sample and only a small part in solution as Cr3+ ion, can be easily separated from the resulting product mixture and recycled. Finally, a plausible reaction scheme for the chromium chloride catalyzed conversion of cellulose in water was proposed.

  18. High aspect ratio catalytic reactor and catalyst inserts therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiefeng; Kelly, Sean M.

    2018-04-10

    The present invention relates to high efficient tubular catalytic steam reforming reactor configured from about 0.2 inch to about 2 inch inside diameter high temperature metal alloy tube or pipe and loaded with a plurality of rolled catalyst inserts comprising metallic monoliths. The catalyst insert substrate is formed from a single metal foil without a central supporting structure in the form of a spiral monolith. The single metal foil is treated to have 3-dimensional surface features that provide mechanical support and establish open gas channels between each of the rolled layers. This unique geometry accelerates gas mixing and heat transfer and provides a high catalytic active surface area. The small diameter, high aspect ratio tubular catalytic steam reforming reactors loaded with rolled catalyst inserts can be arranged in a multi-pass non-vertical parallel configuration thermally coupled with a heat source to carry out steam reforming of hydrocarbon-containing feeds. The rolled catalyst inserts are self-supported on the reactor wall and enable efficient heat transfer from the reactor wall to the reactor interior, and lower pressure drop than known particulate catalysts. The heat source can be oxygen transport membrane reactors.

  19. Catalytic briquettes from low-rank coal for NO reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Boyano; M.E. Galvez; R. Moliner; M.J. Lazaro [Instituto de Carboquimica, CSIC, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    The briquetting is one of the most ancient and widespread techniques of coal agglomeration which is nowadays becoming useless for combustion home applications. However, the social increasing interest in environmental protection opens new applications to this technique, especially in developed countries. In this work, a series of catalytic briquettes were prepared from low-rank Spanish coal and commercial pitch by means of a pressure agglomeration method. After that, they were cured in air and doped by equilibrium impregnation with vanadium compounds. Preparation conditions (especially those of activation and oxidizing process) were changed to study their effects on catalytic behaviour. Catalytic briquettes showed a relative high NO conversion at low temperatures in all cases, however, a strong relation between the preparation process and the reached NO conversion was observed. Preparation procedure has an effect not only on the NO reduction efficiency but also on the mechanical strength of the briquettes as a consequence of the structural and chemical changes carried out during the activation and oxidation procedures. Generally speaking mechanical resistance is enhanced by an optimal porous volume and the creation of new carboxyl groups on surface. Just on the contrary, NO reduction is promoted by high microporous structures and higher amounts of surface oxygen groups. Both facts force to find an optimum point in the preparation produce which will depend on the application. 24 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Catalytic Ozonation of Phenolic Wastewater: Identification and Toxicity of Intermediates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Farzadkia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new strategy in catalytic ozonation removal method for degradation and detoxification of phenol from industrial wastewater was investigated. Magnetic carbon nanocomposite, as a novel catalyst, was synthesized and then used in the catalytic ozonation process (COP and the effects of operational conditions such as initial pH, reaction time, and initial concentration of phenol on the degradation efficiency and the toxicity assay have been investigated. The results showed that the highest catalytic potential was achieved at optimal neutral pH and the removal efficiency of phenol and COD is 98.5% and 69.8%, respectively. First-order modeling demonstrated that the reactions were dependent on the initial concentration of phenol, with kinetic constants varying from 0.038 min−1  ([phenol]o = 1500 mg/L to 1.273 min−1 ([phenol]o = 50 mg/L. Bioassay analysis showed that phenol was highly toxic to Daphnia magna (LC50 96 h=5.6 mg/L. Comparison of toxicity units (TU of row wastewater (36.01 and the treated effluent showed that TU value, after slightly increasing in the first steps of ozonation for construction of more toxic intermediates, severely reduced at the end of reaction (2.23. Thus, COP was able to effectively remove the toxicity of intermediates which were formed during the chemical oxidation of phenolic wastewaters.

  1. Optical manipulation and catalytic activity enhanced by surface plasmon effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ningmu; Min, Jiang; Jiao, Wenxiang; Wang, Guanghui

    2017-02-01

    For optical manipulation, a nano-optical conveyor belt consisting of an array of gold plasmonic non-concentric nano-rings (PNNRs) is demonstrated for the realization of trapping and unidirectional transportation of nanoparticles by polarization rotation of excitation beam. These hot spots of an asymmetric plasmonic nanostructure are polarization dependent, therefore, one can use the incident polarization state to manipulate the trapped targets. Trapped particles could be transferred between adjacent PNNRs in a given direction just by rotating the polarization of incident beam due to unbalanced potential. The angular dependent distribution of electric field around PNNR has been solved using the three- dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique. For optical enhanced catalytic activity, the spectral properties of dimers of Au nanorod-Au nanorod nanostructures under the excitation of 532nm photons have been investigated. With a super-resolution catalytic mapping technique, we identified the existence of "hot spot" in terms of catalytic reactivity at the gap region within the twined plasmonic nanostructure. Also, FDTD calculation has revealed an intrinsic correlation between hot electron transfer.

  2. Catalytic Ethanol Dehydration over Different Acid-activated Montmorillonite Clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutpijit, Chadaporn; Jongsomjit, Bunjerd

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the catalytic dehydration of ethanol to obtain ethylene over montmorillonite clays (MMT) with mineral acid activation including H2SO4 (SA-MMT), HCl (HA-MMT) and HNO3 (NA-MMT) was investigated at temperature range of 200 to 400°C. It revealed that HA-MMT exhibited the highest catalytic activity. Ethanol conversion and ethylene selectivity were found to increase with increased reaction temperature. At 400°C, the HA-MMT yielded 82% of ethanol conversion having 78% of ethylene yield. At lower temperature (i.e. 200 to 300°C), diethyl ether (DEE) was a major product. The highest activity obtained from HA-MMT can be attributed to an increase of weak acid sites and acid density by the activation of MMT with HCl. It can be also proven by various characterization techniques that in most case, the main structure of MMT did not alter by acid activation (excepted for NA-MMT). Upon the stability test for 72 h during the reaction, the MMT and HA-MMT showed only slight deactivation due to carbon deposition. Hence, the acid activation of MMT by HCl is promising to enhance the catalytic dehydration of ethanol.

  3. Dedicated Beamline Facilities for Catalytic Research. Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jingguang [Columbia Univ., New York, NY; Frenkel, Anatoly [Yeshiva Univ., New York, NY (United States); Rodriguez, Jose [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Adzic, Radoslav [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bare, Simon R. [UOP LLC, Des Plaines, IL (United States); Hulbert, Steve L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Karim, Ayman [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mullins, David R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Overbury, Steve [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-03-04

    Synchrotron spectroscopies offer unique advantages over conventional techniques, including higher detection sensitivity and molecular specificity, faster detection rate, and more in-depth information regarding the structural, electronic and catalytic properties under in-situ reaction conditions. Despite these advantages, synchrotron techniques are often underutilized or unexplored by the catalysis community due to various perceived and real barriers, which will be addressed in the current proposal. Since its establishment in 2005, the Synchrotron Catalysis Consortium (SCC) has coordinated significant efforts to promote the utilization of cutting-edge catalytic research under in-situ conditions. The purpose of the current renewal proposal is aimed to provide assistance, and to develop new sciences/techniques, for the catalysis community through the following concerted efforts: Coordinating the implementation of a suite of beamlines for catalysis studies at the new NSLS-II synchrotron source; Providing assistance and coordination for catalysis users at an SSRL catalysis beamline during the initial period of NSLS to NSLS II transition; Designing in-situ reactors for a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic studies; Assisting experimental set-up and data analysis by a dedicated research scientist; Offering training courses and help sessions by the PIs and co-PIs.

  4. New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yi

    2003-01-01

    The goals of the project are to develop new catalytic DNA biosensors for simultaneous detection and quantification of bioavailable radionuclides and metal ions, and apply the sensors for on-site, real-time assessment of concentration, speciation and stability of the individual contaminants during and after bioremediation. A negative selection strategy was tested and validated. In vitro selection was shown to yield highly active and specific transition metal ion-dependent catalytic DNA/RNA. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) study of in vitro selected DNA demonstrated that the trifluorophore labeled system is a simple and powerful tool in studying complex biomolecules structure and dynamics, and is capable of revealing new sophisticated structural changes. New fluorophore/quenchers in a single fluorosensor yielded improved signal to noise ratio in detection, identification and quantification of metal contaminants. Catalytic DNA fluorescent and colorimetric sensors were shown useful in sensing lead in lake water and in leaded paint. Project results were described in two papers and two patents, and won an international prize

  5. Catalytic hydrolysis of ammonia borane via cobalt palladium nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Daohua; Mazumder, Vismadeb; Metin, Önder; Sun, Shouheng

    2011-08-23

    Monodisperse 8 nm CoPd nanoparticles (NPs) with controlled compositions were synthesized by the reduction of cobalt acetylacetonate and palladium bromide in the presence of oleylamine and trioctylphosphine. These NPs were active catalysts for hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of ammonia borane (AB), and their activities were composition dependent. Among the 8 nm CoPd catalysts tested for the hydrolysis of AB, the Co(35)Pd(65) NPs exhibited the highest catalytic activity and durability. Their hydrolysis completion time and activation energy were 5.5 min and 27.5 kJ mol(-1), respectively, which were comparable to the best Pt-based catalyst reported. The catalytic performance of the CoPd/C could be further enhanced by a preannealing treatment at 300 °C under air for 15 h with the hydrolysis completion time reduced to 3.5 min. This high catalytic performance of Co(35)Pd(65) NP catalyst makes it an exciting alternative in pursuit of practical implementation of AB as a hydrogen storage material for fuel cell applications. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  6. Selective Catalytic Synthesis Using the Combination of Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen: Catalytic Chess at the Interface of Energy and Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klankermayer, Jürgen; Wesselbaum, Sebastian; Beydoun, Kassem; Leitner, Walter

    2016-06-20

    The present Review highlights the challenges and opportunities when using the combination CO2 /H2 as a C1 synthon in catalytic reactions and processes. The transformations are classified according to the reduction level and the bond-forming processes, covering the value chain from high volume basic chemicals to complex molecules, including biologically active substances. Whereas some of these concepts can facilitate the transition of the energy system by harvesting renewable energy into chemical products, others provide options to reduce the environmental impact of chemical production already in today's petrochemical-based industry. Interdisciplinary fundamental research from chemists and chemical engineers can make important contributions to sustainable development at the interface of the energetic and chemical value chain. The present Review invites the reader to enjoy this exciting area of "catalytic chess" and maybe even to start playing some games in her or his laboratory. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. 40 CFR Table 26 to Subpart Uuu of... - Initial Compliance With Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units 26 Table 26 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63.1567(b)(4), you shall meet each...

  8. 40 CFR Table 27 to Subpart Uuu of... - Continuous Compliance With Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units 27 Table 27 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of... Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery... Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units As stated in § 63.1567(c)(1), you shall meet...

  9. Highly Selective Synthesis of Catalytically Active Monodisperse Rhodium Nanocubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Grass, M.E.; Kuhn, J.N.; Tao, F.; Habas, S.E.; Huang, W.; Yang, P.; Somorjai, G.A.

    2009-02-21

    Synthesis of monodisperse and shape-controlled colloidal inorganic nanocrystals (NCs) is of increasing scientific interest and technological significance. Recently, shape control of Pt, Pd, Ag, Au, and Rh NCs has been obtained by tuning growth kinetics in various solution-phase approaches, including modified polyol methods, seeded growth by polyol reduction, thermolysis of organometallics, and micelle techniques. Control of reduction kinetics of the noble metal precursors and regulation of the relative growth rates of low-index planes (i.e. {l_brace}100{r_brace} and {l_brace}111{r_brace}) via selective adsorption of selected chemical species are two keys for achieving shape modification of noble metal NCs. One application for noble metal NCs of well-defined shape is in understanding how NC faceting (determines which crystallographic planes are exposed) affects catalytic performance. Rh NCs are used in many catalytic reactions, including hydrogenation, hydroformylation, hydrocarbonylation, and combustion reactions. Shape manipulation of Rh NCs may be important in understanding how faceting on the nanoscale affects catalytic properties, but such control is challenging and there are fewer reports on the shape control of Rh NCs compared to other noble metals. Xia and coworkers obtained Rh multipods exhibiting interesting surface plasmonic properties by a polyol approach. The Somorjai and Tilley groups synthesized crystalline Rh multipods, cubes, horns and cuboctahedra, via polyol seeded growth. Son and colleagues prepared catalytically active monodisperse oleylamine-capped tetrahedral Rh NCs for the hydrogenation of arenes via an organometallic route. More recently, the Somorjai group synthesized sizetunable monodisperse Rh NCs using a one-step polyol technique. In this Communication, we report the highly selective synthesis of catalytically active, monodisperse Rh nanocubes of < 10 nm by a seedless polyol method. In this approach, Br{sup -} ions from trimethyl

  10. Correction: Towards the rationalization of catalytic activity values by means of local hyper-softness on the catalytic site: a criticism about the use of net electric charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Araya, Jorge Ignacio; Grand, André; Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel

    2016-01-28

    Correction for 'Towards the rationalization of catalytic activity values by means of local hyper-softness on the catalytic site: a criticism about the use of net electric charges' by Jorge Ignacio Martínez-Araya et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, DOI: 10.1039/c5cp03822g.

  11. Simulation on Toxic Gases in Vehicle Exhaust Equipped with Modified Catalytic Converter : A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leman A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution and global warming is a major issue nowadays. One of the main contributors to be the emission of harmful gases produced by vehicle exhausts lines. The harmful gases like NOx, CO, unburned HC and particulate matter increases the global warming, so catalytic converter plays a vital role in reducing harmful gases. Catalytic converters are used on most vehicles on the road today. This research deals with the gas emission flow in the catalytic converter involving the heat transfer, velocity flow, back pressure and others chemical reaction in the modified catalytic converter by using FeCrAl as a substrate that is treated using the ultrasonic bath and electroplating techniques. The objective of this study is to obtain a quantitative description of the gas emission in the catalytic converter system of automobile exhaust gas using ANSYS Software. The description of the gas emission in the catalytic converter system of automobile exhaust gas using ANSYS Software was simulated in this research in order to provide better efficiency and ease the reusability of the catalytic converter by comparing experimental data with software analysing data. The result will be expected to demonstrate a good approximation of gas emission in the modified catalytic converter simulation data compared to experimental data in order to verify the effectiveness of modified catalytic converter. Therefore studies on simulation of flow through the modified catalytic converter are very important to increase the accuracy of the obtained emission result.

  12. Tunable preparation of ruthenium nanoparticles with superior size-dependent catalytic hydrogenation properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuan; Luo, Yaodong; Yang, Xuan; Yang, Yaxin; Song, Qijun, E-mail: qsong@jiangnan.edu.cn

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • A facile and efficient strategy is firstly developed for the synthesis of Ru NPs. • Ru NPs are stable and uniform with the controllable sizes from 2.6 to 51.5 nm. • Ru NPs exhibit size-dependent and superior catalytic hydrogenation activity. - Abstract: Ruthenium (Ru) featured with an unusual catalytic behavior is of great significance in several heterogeneous and electro-catalytic reactions. The preparation of tractable Ru nanocatalysts and the building of highly active catalytic system at ambient temperature remains a grand challenge. Herein, a facile strategy is developed for the controllable preparation of Ru nanoparticles (NPs) with the sizes ranging from 2.6 to 51.5 nm. Ru NPs show superior size-dependent catalytic performance with the best kinetic rate constant as high as −1.52 min{sup −1}, which could far surpass the other traditional noble metals. Ru NPs exert exceedingly efficient low-temperature catalytic activity and good recyclability in the catalytic reduction of nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) and azo dyes. The developed catalytic system provides a distinguishing insight for the artificial preparation of Ru NPs with desired sizes, and allows for the development of rational design rules for exploring catalysts with superior catalytic performances, potentially broadening the applications of metallic NP-enabled catalytic analysis.

  13. Reaction Current Phenomenon in Bifunctional Catalytic Metal-Semiconductor Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemian, Mohammad Amin

    Energy transfer processes accompany every elementary step of catalytic chemical processes on material surface including molecular adsorption and dissociation on atoms, interactions between intermediates, and desorption of reaction products from the catalyst surface. Therefore, detailed understanding of these processes on the molecular level is of great fundamental and practical interest in energy-related applications of nanomaterials. Two main mechanisms of energy transfer from adsorbed particles to a surface are known: (i) adiabatic via excitation of quantized lattice vibrations (phonons) and (ii) non-adiabatic via electronic excitations (electron/hole pairs). Electronic excitations play a key role in nanocatalysis, and it was recently shown that they can be efficiently detected and studied using Schottky-type catalytic nanostructures in the form of measureable electrical currents (chemicurrents) in an external electrical circuit. These nanostructures typically contain an electrically continuous nanocathode layers made of a catalytic metal deposited on a semiconductor substrate. The goal of this research is to study the direct observations of hot electron currents (chemicurrents) in catalytic Schottky structures, using a continuous mesh-like Pt nanofilm grown onto a mesoporous TiO2 substrate. Such devices showed qualitatively different and more diverse signal properties, compared to the earlier devices using smooth substrates, which could only be explained on the basis of bifunctionality. In particular, it was necessary to suggest that different stages of the reaction are occurring on both phases of the catalytic structure. Analysis of the signal behavior also led to discovery of a formerly unknown (very slow) mode of the oxyhydrogen reaction on the Pt/TiO2(por) system occurring at room temperature. This slow mode was producing surprisingly large stationary chemicurrents in the range 10--50 microA/cm2. Results of the chemicurrent measurements for the bifunctional

  14. Catalytic Stereoinversion of L-Alanine to Deuterated D-Alanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moozeh, Kimia; So, Soon Mog; Chin, Jik

    2015-08-03

    A combination of an achiral pyridoxal analogue and a chiral base has been developed for catalytic deuteration of L-alanine with inversion of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine under mild conditions (neutral pD and 25 °C) without the use of any protecting groups. This system can also be used for catalytic deuteration of D-alanine with retention of stereochemistry to give deuterated D-alanine. Thus a racemic mixture of alanine can be catalytically deuterated to give an enantiomeric excess of deuterated D-alanine. While catalytic deracemization of alanine is forbidden by the second law of thermodynamics, this system can be used for catalytic deracemization of alanine with deuteration. Such green and biomimetic approach to catalytic stereocontrol provides insights into efficient amino acid transformations. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Catalytic pleat filter bags for combined particulate separation and nitrogen oxides removal from flue gas streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Young Ok; Choi, Ho Kyung

    2010-01-01

    The development of a high temperature catalytically active pleated filter bag with hybrid filter equipment for the combined removal of particles and nitrogen oxides from flue gas streams is presented. A special catalyst load in stainless steel mesh cartridge with a high temperature pleated filter bag followed by optimized catalytic activation was developed to reach the required nitrogen oxides levels and to maintain the higher collection efficiencies. The catalytic properties of the developed high temperature filter bags with hybrid filter equipment were studied and demonstrated in a pilot scale test rig and a demonstration plant using commercial scale of high temperature catalytic pleated filter bags. The performance of the catalytic pleated filter bags were tested under different operating conditions, such as filtration velocity and operating temperature. Moreover, the cleaning efficiency and residual pressure drop of the catalyst loaded cartridges in pleated filter bags were tested. As result of theses studies, the optimum operating conditions for the catalytic pleated filter bags are determined. (author)

  16. Morphology Control of Platinum Nanoparticles and their Catalytic Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Akane; Balint, Ioan; Nakano, Yoshio

    2003-01-01

    Platinum nanoparticles with different morphology were prepared by reduction of K 2 PtCl 4 solution in the presence of different capping polymers. It was found that the shapes and the sizes of the Pt nanocrystals resulted were related to the kind of capping polymer used. When poly(vinylpyrrolidon) (PVP), poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (NIPA) and sodium poly(acrylate) (SPA) were used as capping agents, the dominant shapes of the Pt nanocrystals observed by transmission electron microscopy were hexagonal (∼62%), square (∼67%) and triangular (∼41%), respectively. The average sizes of Pt nanocrystals were 6.9, 13.6 and 14.6 nm for capping polymers of PVP, NIPA and SPA, respectively. The colloidal Pt nanoparticles with different morphologies were supported on γ-Al 2 O 3 (1 wt.% Pt) and then their catalytic activity for NO reduction by CH 4 was tested in the 350-600 deg. C temperature range. Additionally, the catalytic activities of these alumina-supported Pt nanocrystals were compared with a conventional catalyst having the average size of Pt particles of ∼2.4 nm. Over the alumina-supported Pt nanocrystals as compared with the conventional Pt/Al 2 O 3 , it was observed that the NO/CH 4 reaction yields to NH 3 and CO decreased significantly and on the other hand, the yield to N 2 O increased. The experimental results are suggesting that the catalytic behavior can be tuned in a convenient way through the morphological control of the metal nanoparticles

  17. Morphology Control of Platinum Nanoparticles and their Catalytic Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Akane [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Technology (Japan)], E-mail: akanem@chemenv.titech.ac.jp; Balint, Ioan [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Romanian Academy (Romania); Nakano, Yoshio [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Environmental Chemistry and Engineering, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Technology (Japan)

    2003-04-15

    Platinum nanoparticles with different morphology were prepared by reduction of K{sub 2}PtCl{sub 4} solution in the presence of different capping polymers. It was found that the shapes and the sizes of the Pt nanocrystals resulted were related to the kind of capping polymer used. When poly(vinylpyrrolidon) (PVP), poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (NIPA) and sodium poly(acrylate) (SPA) were used as capping agents, the dominant shapes of the Pt nanocrystals observed by transmission electron microscopy were hexagonal ({approx}62%), square ({approx}67%) and triangular ({approx}41%), respectively. The average sizes of Pt nanocrystals were 6.9, 13.6 and 14.6 nm for capping polymers of PVP, NIPA and SPA, respectively. The colloidal Pt nanoparticles with different morphologies were supported on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (1 wt.% Pt) and then their catalytic activity for NO reduction by CH{sub 4} was tested in the 350-600 deg. C temperature range. Additionally, the catalytic activities of these alumina-supported Pt nanocrystals were compared with a conventional catalyst having the average size of Pt particles of {approx}2.4 nm. Over the alumina-supported Pt nanocrystals as compared with the conventional Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, it was observed that the NO/CH{sub 4} reaction yields to NH{sub 3} and CO decreased significantly and on the other hand, the yield to N{sub 2}O increased. The experimental results are suggesting that the catalytic behavior can be tuned in a convenient way through the morphological control of the metal nanoparticles.

  18. Solar photo catalytic treatment of simulated dyestuff effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kositzi, M.; Antoniadis, A.; Poulios, I.; Kiridies, I.; Malato, S.

    2003-07-01

    The photo catalytic organic content reduction of two selected synthetic wastewater from the textile dyeing industry, by the use heterogeneous and homogeneous photo catalytic methods under solar irradiation, has been studied at a pilot plant scale at the Plataforma Solar de Almeria. the effect of two different TiO{sub 2} modifications with oxidants such as H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8}, on the decolorisation and the organic content reduction (DOC) of the wastewater was examined. the TiO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system seems to be more efficient in comparison to the synergetic action which appears when using persulfate and TiO{sub 2} in these specific wastewaters. By an accumulation energy of 50 KJ L''-1 the synergetic effect of TiO{sub 2} P-25 with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} leads to a 70% and 57% DOC reduction, respectively, in the case of cotton synthetic wastewater, while the decolorisation was almost complete. The photo catalytic decolorisation, as well as the DOC reduction in the case of naylon simulated wastewater is a slower process and by an accumulation energy of 50 KJ L''-1 leads to 54% mineralization in both cases. The Photo-Fenton process in both cases was more efficient for this type of wastewater in comparison to the TiO{sub 2}/oxidant system. An accumulation of energy of 50 KJ L''-1 leads to 90% reduction of the organic content. (Author) 13 refs.

  19. Reactivity and Catalytic Activity of Hydrogen Atom Chemisorbed Silver Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor, Dar; Pal, Sourav

    2015-06-18

    Metal clusters of silver have attracted recent interest of researchers as a result of their potential in different catalytic applications and low cost. However, due to the completely filled d orbital and very high first ionization potential of the silver atom, the silver-based catalysts interact very weakly with the reacting molecules. In the current work, density functional theory calculations were carried out to investigate the effect of hydrogen atom chemisorption on the reactivity and catalytic properties of inert silver clusters. Our results affirm that the hydrogen atom chemisorption leads to enhancement in the binding energy of the adsorbed O2 molecule on the inert silver clusters. The increase in the binding energy is also characterized by the decrease in the Ag-O and increase in the O-O bond lengths in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Pertinent to the increase in the O-O bond length, a significant red shift in the O-O stretching frequency is also noted in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Moreover, the hydrogen atom chemisorbed silver clusters show low reaction barriers and high heat of formation of the final products for the environmentally important CO oxidation reaction as compared to the parent catalytically inactive clusters. The obtained results were compared with those of the corresponding gold and hydrogen atom chemisorbed gold clusters obtained at the same level of theory. It is expected the current computational study will provide key insights for future advances in the design of efficient nanosilver-based catalysts through the adsorption of a small atom or a ligand.

  20. Immediate catalytic upgrading of soybean shell bio-oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertero, Melisa; Sedran, Ulises

    2016-01-01

    The pyrolysis of soybean shell and the immediate catalytic upgrading of the bio-oil over an equilibrium FCC catalyst was studied in order to define its potential as a source for fuels and chemicals. The experiments of pyrolysis and immediate catalytic upgrading were performed at 550 °C during 7 min with different catalysts to oil relationships in an integrated fixed bed pyrolysis-conversion reactor. The results were compared under the same conditions against those from pine sawdust, which is a biomass source commonly used for the production of bio-oil. In the pyrolysis the pine sawdust produced more liquids (61.4%wt.) than the soybean shell (54.7%wt.). When the catalyst was presented, the yield of hydrocarbons increased, particularly in the case of soybean shell, which was four time higher than in the pyrolysis. The bio-oil from soybean shell produced less coke (between 3.1 and 4.3%wt.) in its immediate catalytic upgrading than that from pine sawdust (between 5 and 5.8%wt.), due to its lower content of phenolic and other high molecular weight compounds (three and five times less, respectively). Moreover, soybean shell showed a higher selectivity to hydrocarbons in the gasoline range, with more olefins and less aromatic than pine sawdust. - Highlights: • Soybean shell is a possible source of fuels with benefits as compared to pine sawdust. • Bio-oils upgraded over FCC catalyst in an integrated pyrolysis-conversion reactor. • Pine sawdust bio-oil had more phenols than soybean shell bio-oil. • Soybean shell bio-oil produced more hydrocarbons in gasoline range and less coke.

  1. Tuning CNT Properties for Metal-Free Environmental Catalytic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel P. Rocha

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs as metal-free catalysts is a novel approach for heterogeneous liquid phase catalytic systems. Textural and chemical modifications by liquid/gas phase or mechanical treatments, as well as solid state reactions, were successfully applied to obtain carbon nanotubes with different surface functionalities. Oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur are the most common heteroatoms introduced on the carbon surface. This short-review highlights different routes used to develop metal-free carbon nanotube catalysts with enhanced properties for Advanced Oxidation Processes.

  2. Catalytic activity of zeolite-containing catalysts in cumene cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koval' chuk, L V; Takhtarova, G N; Topchieva, K V [Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR). Kafedra Fizicheskoj Khimii

    1977-01-01

    The catalytic properties are studied of decationized forms (Ca and La) of zeolite-containing catalysts in relation to the nature of the cation and the degree of exchange in the cumene cracking reaction. It has been established that the increase in the activity of Ca-decationized catalysts occurs at a degree of exchange from 22 to 40% and at a ratio of the cation and decationized areas from 0.4 to 1. For La-decationized catalysts the activity increases at a degree of exchange up to 60% and at a ratio between the cation and decationized areas exceeding 1.

  3. Catalytic Methane Decomposition over Fe-Al2O3

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Lu

    2016-05-09

    The presence of a Fe-FeAl2O4 structure over an Fe-Al2O3 catalysts is demonstrated to be vital for the catalytic methane decomposition (CMD) activity. After H2 reduction at 750°C, Fe-Al2O3 prepared by means of a fusion method, containing 86.5wt% FeAl2O4 and 13.5wt% Fe0, showed a stable CMD activity at 750°C for as long as 10h. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. The tritium labelling of organic molecules by heterogeneous catalytic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angoso, M.; Kaiser, F.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of the temperature at 65degC and 120degC on the labelling of three organic molecules with tritium was studied. The compounds were: benzoic acid, diphenyl glioxal and 2,3-tetramethylene-4-phenylthien-7-oxodiacetin. The method employed was the heterogeneous catalytic exchange between tritiaded water and the organic compound. The purification was made by thin-layer chromatography and the concentration, purity and specific activity of the products were determined by counting and ultraviolet techniques. The thermal stability and the radiolitic effects on labelled benzoic acid were also considered. (author) [es

  5. The tritium labelling of organic molecules by heterogeneous catalytic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angoso Marina, M.; Kaiser Ruiz del Olmo, F.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of the temperature at 65 degree centigree and 120 degree centigree on the labelling of three organic molecules with tritium was studied. The compounds were: benzoic acid, de phenyl glyoxal and 2,3-tetramethylene-4-pantothenyl-7-oxo diacetin.The method employed was the heterogeneous catalytic exchange between tritiated water and the organic compound. The purification was made by thin-layer chromatography and the concentration, purity and specific activity of the products were determined by counting and ultraviolet techniques. The thermal stability and the radiolytic effects on labelled benzoic acid were also considered. (Author) 9 refs

  6. Forced thermal cycling of catalytic reactions: experiments and modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren; Olsen, Jakob Lind; Thorsteinsson, Sune

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies of catalytic reactions subjected to fast forced temperature oscillations have revealed a rate enhancement increasing with temperature oscillation frequency. We present detailed studies of the rate enhancement up to frequencies of 2.5 Hz. A maximum in the rate enhancement is observed...... at about 1 Hz. A model for the rate enhancement that includes the surface kinetics and the dynamic partial pressure variations in the reactor is introduced. The model predicts a levelling off of the rate enhancement with frequency at about 1 Hz. The experimentally observed decrease above 1 Hz is explained...

  7. Catalytic control of automotive NO{sub x}: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharyya, Souvik [Canterbury Univ., Mechanical Engineering Dept., Christchurch (New Zealand); Das, Randip K. [Mahindra and Mahindra Ltd., R and D Centre, Nashik (India)

    1999-07-01

    This article summarises several technical studies reported in the literature on catalytic conversion technology to control pollution due to automotive exhausts with specific focus on NO{sub x} reduction. While simple theoretical reactions are stated, the review concisely presents the various techniques available with their specifications and performances. Noble-metal converters, in spite of their proven-technology advantage, are considered expensive while zeolite-based catalysts are preferred today as increasingly more research findings have made this technology more mature. Conclusion and recommendations on specific applications have been presented as well. (Author)

  8. Evaluation of catalytic combustion of actual coal-derived gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, J. C.; Shisler, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The combustion characteristics of a Pt-Pl catalytic reactor burning coal-derived, low-Btu gas were investigated. A large matrix of test conditions was explored involving variations in fuel/air inlet temperature and velocity, reactor pressure, and combustor exit temperature. Other data recorded included fuel gas composition, reactor temperatures, and exhaust emissions. Operating experience with the reactor was satisfactory. Combustion efficiencies were quite high (over 95 percent) over most of the operating range. Emissions of NOx were quite high (up to 500 ppm V and greater), owing to the high ammonia content of the fuel gas.

  9. Research progress on catalytic denitrification technology in chemical industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yezhi

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, due to the rising emission of NOx annually, attention has been aroused widely by people on more and more severe environmental problems. This paper first discusses applying NOx removal and control technologies and relating chemical principles. Of many technologies, selective reduction reaction (SCR) is the most widely used. Catalysts, the concentration of NOx at the entrance of SCR catalytic reactor, reaction temperature, NH3/NOx mole ratio and NH3 slip rate analyzed later contributes to the removal efficiency of NOx. Finally, the processing and configuration of SCR de-NOx system are briefly introduced.

  10. Low temperature catalytic combustion of natural gas - hydrogen - air mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newson, E; Roth, F von; Hottinger, P; Truong, T B [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The low temperature catalytic combustion of natural gas - air mixtures would allow the development of no-NO{sub x} burners for heating and power applications. Using commercially available catalysts, the room temperature ignition of methane-propane-air mixtures has been shown in laboratory reactors with combustion efficiencies over 95% and maximum temperatures less than 700{sup o}C. After a 500 hour stability test, severe deactivation of both methane and propane oxidation functions was observed. In cooperation with industrial partners, scaleup to 3 kW is being investigated together with startup dynamics and catalyst stability. (author) 3 figs., 3 refs.

  11. Geopolymer based catalysts-New group of catalytic materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sazama, Petr; Bortnovsky, O.; Dědeček, Jiří; Tvarůžková, Zdenka; Sobalík, Zdeněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 164, č. 1 (2011), s. 92-99 ISSN 0920-5861. [Joint International Conference /1./ of the Tokyo Conference on Advanced Catalytic Science and Technology /11./ Asia Pacific Congress on Catalysis /5./. Sapporo, 18.07.2010-23.07.2010] R&D Projects: GA MPO FT-TA4/068; GA AV ČR KAN100400702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : geopolymers * redox catalysis * SCR-NOx Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.407, year: 2011

  12. Growth of catalytically active nanostructures in the nonequilibrium epitaxy regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorshkov, V.M.; Kuzmenko, V.V.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of metal atom deposition on a flat metal substrate in the diffusion mode has been studied. Conditions for growing up the periodic structures with a developed surface morphology are found. The applicability of the results obtained to the manufacture of catalysts is analyzed. In particular, when platinum atoms are deposited on a gold substrate, which is expedient by cost reasons, a system of nanopyramids confined by (111) facets can be formed under special conditions. This structure possesses an ultrahigh catalytic activity and is promising for applications in chemical industry

  13. A review of liquid-phase catalytic hydrodechlorination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Nelly Ardila Arias

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This survey was aimed at introducing the effect of light organochlorinated compound emissions on the envi-ronment, particularly on water, air, soil, biota and human beings. The characteristics and advantages of liquid phase catalytic hydrodechlorination as a technology for degrading these chlorinated compounds is also outlined and the main catalysts used in the hydrodechlorination process are described. Special emphasis is placed on palladium catalysts, their activity, the nature of active species and deactivation. The effect of several parameters is introduced, such as HCl, solvent, base addition and type of reducing agent used. The main results of kinetic studies, reactors used and the most important survey conclusions are presented.

  14. Hybrid plasma-catalytic reforming of ethanol aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomenko, O.V.; Nedybaliuk, O.A.; Chernyak, V.Ya.; Iukhymenko, V.V.; Veremii, Iu.P.; Iukhymenko, K.V.; Martysh, E.V.; Fedirchyk, I.I.; Demchina, V.P.; Levko, D.S.; Tsymbalyuk, O.M.; Liptuga, A.I.; Dragnev, S.V.

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid plasma-catalytic reforming of the ethanol aerosol with plasma activation of only the oxidant (air) was studied. Part of the oxidant (∼20%) was activated by means of rotational gliding arc with solid electrodes and injected into the reaction (pyrolytic) chamber as a plasma torch. This part of the oxidant interacted with a mixture of hydrocarbons and the rest of the oxidant (∼80%) in the reaction chamber. Temperature changes in the reaction chamber, the composition of the synthesis-gas and the products of synthesis-gas combustion were analyzed

  15. Catalytic Science and Technology in Sustainable Energy II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yuxin; Xiao, Feng-Shou; Seshan, Kulathu K.

    2017-01-01

    This special issue of Catalysis Today results from four sessions, under the collective theme "Catalysis in Sustainable Energy", of the 2ndInternational Symposium on Catalytic Science and Technology in Sustainable Energy and Environment, held in Tianjin, China during October 12-14, 2016. This bien...... whom the special issue would not have been possible. As the organizer of the EECAT 2016, Y Li expresses his special gratitude to the sponsors, especially Haldor Topsoe and Synfuels China, the participants and the co-organizers for their great contribution to the success of EECAT 2016....

  16. Hydrocarbon composition products of the catalytic recycling plastics waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaksyntay Kairbekov

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper represents the IR spectroscopy results of the hydrocarbon composition of products, which is obtained from catalytic processing of plastic wastes. The optimal conditions for the hydrogenation with to producny liquid of products are identified.  These liquid products are enriched with aromatics, paraffinic- naphthenic and unsaturated hydrocarbons. The main characteristics of the distillates received by hydrogenation of plastics (as density, refractive index, iodine number, pour point, cloud point, filtering, sulfur content,  fractional and composition of the hydrocarbon group.

  17. Catalytic and inhibitory effects of thechnetium on reduction processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grases, F.; Genestar, C.; March, J.G.; March, P.

    1986-01-01

    Interactions between technetium and some anthraquinones and tartrazin in the presence of tin(II) are described. It was found that whereas the reductive process between Sn(II) and 1-amino-4-hydroxyanthraquinone is catalyzed by technetium, the reduction of tartrazin is inhibited by this element. Study of such process seems to indicate that the catalytic effect of technetium on the reduction processes is due to Tc(V) action whereas the inhibitory effect is due to the Tc(IV) species. (author)

  18. Flow in axisymmetric expansion in a catalytic converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gotfredsen, Erik; Meyer, Knud Erik

    The flow in an axisymmetric expansion (circular diffusor) is used in many different engineering applications, such as heat exchangers, catalytic converters and filters. These applications require a relatively uniform flow at the inlet. To minimise the pressure loss, an ideal solution would...... Velocimetry (PIV) is a unique method that resolve the entire cross flow. This type of flow is expected to have a fluctuating ‘jet’-like structure from the smaller inlet pipe into the larger converter. The fluctuations of the jet are difficult, if not impossible, to capture with standard time averaged models...

  19. Low-temperature catalytic conversion of carbonaceous materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabakaev Roman B.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Laws of the rate of carbon conversion in steam atmosphere at a temperature in modes of the catalytic low-temperature treatment of peat, brown coal, semi-coke from peat and brown coal are obtained by experiments. Increasing of the rate of carbon conversion in temperature range up to 500 °C is achieved by using of catalysts. The possibility of using results is associated with the burners, a working zone of which is porous filling from carbonaceous particles.

  20. Catalytic activity of lanthanum oxide for the reduction of cyclohexanone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugunan, S.; Sherly, K.B.

    1994-01-01

    Lanthanum oxides, La 2 O 3 has been found to be an effective catalyst for the liquid phase reduction of cyclohexanone. The catalytic activities of La 2 O 3 activated at 300, 500 and 800 degC and its mixed oxides with alumina for the reduction of cylcohexanone with 2-propanol have been determined and the data parallel that of the electron donating properties of the catalysts. The electron donating properties of the catalysts have been determined from the adsorption of electron acceptors of different electron affinities on the surface of these oxides. (author). 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  1. Fabrication of catalytic electrodes for molten carbonate fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, James L.

    1988-01-01

    A porous layer of catalyst material suitable for use as an electrode in a molten carbonate fuel cell includes elongated pores substantially extending across the layer thickness. The catalyst layer is prepared by depositing particulate catalyst material into polymeric flocking on a substrate surface by a procedure such as tape casting. The loaded substrate is heated in a series of steps with rising temperatures to set the tape, thermally decompose the substrate with flocking and sinter bond the catalyst particles into a porous catalytic layer with elongated pores across its thickness. Employed as an electrode, the elongated pores provide distribution of reactant gas into contact with catalyst particles wetted by molten electrolyte.

  2. Catalytic synthesis of ammonia using vibrationally excited nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Billing, Gert D.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    1992-01-01

    In a previous study we have considered the catalytic synthesis of ammonia in the presence of vibrationally excited nitrogen. The distribution over vibrational states was assumed to be maintained during the reaction, and it was shown that the yield of ammonia increased considerably compared...... to that from conventional synthesis. In the present study the nitrogen molecules are only excited at the inlet of a plug flow reactor, and the importance of vibrational relaxation is investigated. We show that vibrational excitation can give an enhanced yield of ammonia also in the situation where vibrational...

  3. Assessing the reliability of calculated catalytic ammonia synthesis rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medford, Andrew James; Wellendorff, Jess; Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a general method for estimating the uncertainty in calculated materials properties based on density functional theory calculations. We illustrate the approach for a calculation of the catalytic rate of ammonia synthesis over a range of transition-metal catalysts. The correlation...... between errors in density functional theory calculations is shown to play an important role in reducing the predicted error on calculated rates. Uncertainties depend strongly on reaction conditions and catalyst material, and the relative rates between different catalysts are considerably better described...

  4. Kinetic particularities of strained alicyclic compounds formation in catalytic methanol to hydrocarbon transformation process

    OpenAIRE

    Doluda V.; Brovko R.; Giniatullina N.; Sulman M.

    2017-01-01

    The catalytic transformation of methanol into hydrocarbons is a complex chemical process, accompanied by chain parallel chemical transformation reactions. The most valuable products of the methanol to hydrocarbons catalytic transformation reaction are the strained hydrocarbons — cyclopropane derivatives. These compounds can be used as a high-energy fuel, and also as a valuable chemical raw material. However, the yield of strained compounds in methanol to hydrocarbons catalytic transformation ...

  5. Fundamental study of manganese dioxide for catalytic recombustion of exhaust gas of motor car

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimoyamada, T

    1974-01-01

    The catalytic activities of five manganese dioxide preparations were tested in a pulse reactor to assess their carbon monoxide-oxidizing capability in relation to the catalytic afterburning of automobile exhaust gases. Catalysts prepared from manganese sulfate showed diminished catalytic activity as a result of sulfate poisoning. Higher oxidation activity was obtained with a catalyst prepared by precipitating the permanganate salt in acidic solution. Two forms of carbon monoxide adsorption were demonstrated, each with a characteristic activation energy and reaction temperature.

  6. Procedure for the preparation of catalysts for application in catalytic gas phase reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The invention describes the preparation of catalysts to be used in catalytic reactions in the gaseous phase. The catalytic material is disposed at the surface of a ceramic or carbon substrate (av. particle size 0.1 μ - 0.5 cm, surface area smaller than 20 m 2 /g) by bombardment of the catalytic material (Pt, Rh, Pd, Ru, Os, Ir) with energetic ions (Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe) in the vicinity of the substrate in medium vacuum

  7. Degradation of paracetamol by catalytic wet air oxidation and sequential adsorption - Catalytic wet air oxidation on activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quesada-Penate, I. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 4, Allee Emile Monso, F-31432 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31432 Toulouse (France); Julcour-Lebigue, C., E-mail: carine.julcour@ensiacet.fr [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 4, Allee Emile Monso, F-31432 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31432 Toulouse (France); Jauregui-Haza, U. J. [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, Ave. Salvador Allende y Luaces, Habana (Cuba); Wilhelm, A. M.; Delmas, H. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 4, Allee Emile Monso, F-31432 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31432 Toulouse (France)

    2012-06-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three activated carbons (AC) compared as adsorbents and oxidation catalysts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Similar evolution for catalytic and adsorptive properties of AC over reuses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acidic and mesoporous AC to be preferred, despite lower initial efficiency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative degradation of paracetamol improves biodegradability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Convenient hybrid adsorption-regenerative oxidation process for continuous treatment. - Abstract: The concern about the fate of pharmaceutical products has raised owing to the increasing contamination of rivers, lakes and groundwater. The aim of this paper is to evaluate two different processes for paracetamol removal. The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of paracetamol on activated carbon was investigated both as a water treatment technique using an autoclave reactor and as a regenerative treatment of the carbon after adsorption in a sequential fixed bed process. Three activated carbons (ACs) from different source materials were used as catalysts: two microporous basic ACs (S23 and C1) and a meso- and micro-porous acidic one (L27). During the first CWAO experiment the adsorption capacity and catalytic performance of fresh S23 and C1 were higher than those of fresh L27 despite its higher surface area. This situation changed after AC reuse, as finally L27 gave the best results after five CWAO cycles. Respirometry tests with activated sludge revealed that in the studied conditions the use of CWAO enhanced the aerobic biodegradability of the effluent. In the ADOX process L27 also showed better oxidation performances and regeneration efficiency. This different ageing was examined through AC physico-chemical properties.

  8. Degradation of paracetamol by catalytic wet air oxidation and sequential adsorption – Catalytic wet air oxidation on activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quesada-Peñate, I.; Julcour-Lebigue, C.; Jáuregui-Haza, U.J.; Wilhelm, A.M.; Delmas, H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Three activated carbons (AC) compared as adsorbents and oxidation catalysts. ► Similar evolution for catalytic and adsorptive properties of AC over reuses. ► Acidic and mesoporous AC to be preferred, despite lower initial efficiency. ► Oxidative degradation of paracetamol improves biodegradability. ► Convenient hybrid adsorption–regenerative oxidation process for continuous treatment. - Abstract: The concern about the fate of pharmaceutical products has raised owing to the increasing contamination of rivers, lakes and groundwater. The aim of this paper is to evaluate two different processes for paracetamol removal. The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of paracetamol on activated carbon was investigated both as a water treatment technique using an autoclave reactor and as a regenerative treatment of the carbon after adsorption in a sequential fixed bed process. Three activated carbons (ACs) from different source materials were used as catalysts: two microporous basic ACs (S23 and C1) and a meso- and micro-porous acidic one (L27). During the first CWAO experiment the adsorption capacity and catalytic performance of fresh S23 and C1 were higher than those of fresh L27 despite its higher surface area. This situation changed after AC reuse, as finally L27 gave the best results after five CWAO cycles. Respirometry tests with activated sludge revealed that in the studied conditions the use of CWAO enhanced the aerobic biodegradability of the effluent. In the ADOX process L27 also showed better oxidation performances and regeneration efficiency. This different ageing was examined through AC physico-chemical properties.

  9. Networks of High Mutual Information Define the Structural Proximity of Catalytic Sites: Implications for Catalytic Residue Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buslje, Cristina Marino; Teppa, Elin; Di Doménico, Tomas

    2010-01-01

    other non-functional conserved residues. Using a data set of 434 Pfam families included in the catalytic site atlas (CSA) database, we tested this hypothesis and demonstrated that MI can complement amino acid conservation scores to detect CR. The Kullback-Leibler (KL) conservation measurement was shown.......90, the Cls method was found to have a sensitivity of 0.816. In summary, we demonstrate that networks of residues with high MI provide a distinct signature on CR and propose that such a signature should be present in other classes of functional residues where the requirement to maintain a particular function...

  10. Catalytic Reduction of NO and NOx Content in Tobacco Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetkovic N

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the nitric oxide (NO and nitrogen oxides (NO content in mainstream tobacco smoke, a new class of catalyst based on Cu-ZSM-5 zeolite has been synthesized. The effectiveness of the new catalyst (degree of reduction and specific catalytic ability was tested both by adding Cu-ZSM-5 zeolite directly to the tobacco blend and by addition to the filter. We have determined that adding the catalyst to the tobacco blend does not cause any changes in the physical, chemical or organoleptic properties of the cigarette blend. But, the addition reduces the yield of nitrogen oxides while having no influence on nicotine and “tar” content in the tobacco smoke of the modified blend. The catalyst addition increases the static burning rate (SBR. The changes in the quantity of NO and NOmay be explained by changes in burning conditions due to the increase of Oobtained from catalytic degradation of NO and NO, and adsorptive and diffusive properties of the catalyst. The changes in mainstream smoke analytes are also given on a puff-by-puff basis.

  11. Catalytic Cracking of Palm Oil Over Zeolite Catalysts: Statistical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. A. Twaiq and S. Bhatia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic cracking of palm oil was conducted in a fixed bed micro-reactor over HZSM-5, zeolite ? and ultrastable Y (USY zeolite catalysts. The objective of the present investigation was to study the effect of cracking reaction variables such as temperature, weight hourly space velocity, catalyst pore size and type of palm oil feed of different molecular weight on the conversion, yield of hydrocarbons in gasoline boiling range and BTX aromatics in the organic liquid product.  Statistical Design of Experiment (DOE with 24 full factorial design was used in experimentation at the first stage.  The nonlinear model and Response Surface Methodology (RSM were utilized in the second stage of experimentation to obtain the optimum values of the variables for maximum yields of hydrocarbons in gasoline boiling range and aromatics.  The HZSM-5 showed the best performance amongst the three catalysts tested.  At 623 K and WHSV of 1 h-1, the highest experimental yields of gasoline and aromatics were 28.3 wt.% and 27 wt.%, respectively over the HZSM-5 catalyst.  For the same catalyst, the statistical model predicted that the optimum yield of gasoline was 28.1 wt.% at WHSV of 1.75 h-1 and 623 K.  The predicted optimum yield of gasoline was 25.5 wt.% at 623 K and WHSV of 1 h-1.KEY WORDS: Catalytic Cracking, Palm Oil, Zeolite, Design Of Experiment, Response Surface Methodology.

  12. Enhancing charge transfer kinetics by nanoscale catalytic cermet interlayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jihwan; Kim, Young-Beom; Gür, Turgut M; Prinz, Fritz B

    2012-12-01

    Enhancing the density of catalytic sites is crucial for improving the performance of energy conversion devices. This work demonstrates the kinetic role of 2 nm thin YSZ/Pt cermet layers on enhancing the oxygen reduction kinetics for low temperature solid oxide fuel cells. Cermet layers were deposited between the porous Pt cathode and the dense YSZ electrolyte wafer using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Not only the catalytic role of the cermet layer itself but the mixing effect in the cermet was explored. For cells with unmixed and fully mixed cermet interlayers, the maximum power density was enhanced by a factor of 1.5 and 1.8 at 400 °C, and by 2.3 and 2.7 at 450 °C, respectively, when compared to control cells with no cermet interlayer. The observed enhancement in cell performance is believed to be due to the increased triple phase boundary (TPB) density in the cermet interlayer. We also believe that the sustained kinetics for the fully mixed cermet layer sample stems from better thermal stability of Pt islands separated by the ALD YSZ matrix, which helped to maintain the high-density TPBs even at elevated temperature.

  13. The use of Phoenics in the design of catalytic converters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luoma, M. [Kemira Metalkat Oy, Oulu (Finland); Smith, A.G. [S and C Thermofluids Ltd, Bath (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    Manufacturers of automotive catalytic converters are constrained to design a system which is mechanically reliable, puts low back pressure on the engine, has adequate conversion performance, is low cost and of minimum size. In recent years, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been widely examined as a means of predicting the performance of catalytic converters to aid with the design process. Kemira Metalkat and S and C Thermofluids have put together and developed a number of existing CFD techniques in order to create a tool which is integrated within the design process. PHOENICS is used in the heart of the system in order to produce predictions of transient (light-off) and steady state catalyst performance. Grid generation tools have been provided to allow simplified and rapid geometry definition with suitable integration (via FEMGEN) within other parts of the catalyst design process. Simplified input techniques have been provided along with associated translators to create specification of the model for PHOENICS. Post-processing software has been provided through FEMVIEW to allow visualisation of catalyst monolith variables and transient performance animation. The whole system is controlled via a menu. The system have been use to study the effects of the catalyst design parameters on the converter performance. The results obtained using the system have so far been more qualitative than quantitative. However, validation studies have been carried out to check pressure drop prediction. A new model for the pressure drop over a metallic monolith has been developed. (author)

  14. Design parameters for measurements of local catalytic activity on surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Martin; Johannessen, Tue; Jørgensen, Jan Hoffmann

    2006-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics in combination with experiments is used to characterize a gas sampling device for measurements of the local catalytic activity on surfaces. The device basically consists of a quartz capillary mounted concentrically inside an aluminum tube. Reactant gas is blown toward......, the limits of the range in reaction rate, which can be Studied are estimated. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.......Computational fluid dynamics in combination with experiments is used to characterize a gas sampling device for measurements of the local catalytic activity on surfaces. The device basically consists of a quartz capillary mounted concentrically inside an aluminum tube. Reactant gas is blown toward...... limit for the lateral resolution of the measurement, and that a flow rate of the order of 240 (ml/min)(n) is sufficient to achieve this resolution. The sensitivity is reasonable also with high flow rates, due to the presence of a pocket of stagnant gas under the tip of the capillary. Furthermore...

  15. Examination of bacterial inhibition using a catalytic DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Qu

    Full Text Available Determination of accurate dosage of existing antibiotics and discovery of new antimicrobials or probiotics entail simple but effective methods that can conveniently track bacteria growth and inhibition. Here we explore the application of a previously reported fluorogenic E. coli-specific DNAzyme (catalytic DNA, RFD-EC1, as a molecular probe for monitoring bacterial inhibition exerted by antibiotics and for studying bacterial competition as a result of cohabitation. Because the DNAzyme method provides a convenient way to monitor the growth of E. coli, it is capable of determining the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of antibiotics much faster than the conventional optical density (OD method. In addition, since the target for RFD-EC1 is an extracellular protein molecule from E. coli, RFD-EC1 is able to identify pore-forming antibiotics or compounds that can cause membrane leakage. Finally, RFD-EC1 can be used to analyse the competition of cohabitating bacteria, specifically the inhibition of growth of E. coli by Bacillus subtilis. The current work represents the first exploration of a catalytic DNA for microbiological applications and showcases the utility of bacteria-sensing fluorogenic DNAzymes as simple molecular probes to facilitate antibiotic and probiotic research.

  16. Structure and catalytic activity of regenerated spent hydrotreating catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C.S.; Massoth, F.E.; Furimsky, E. (Utah University, Salt Lake City, UT (USA). Dept. of Fuels Engineering)

    1992-11-01

    Two spent catalysts, obtained from different hydrodemetallation operations, were regenerated by two different treatments, viz. 2% (V/V) O[sub 2]/N[sub 2] and air. One spent catalyst (B), contained 3 wt% V and 15 wt% C, while the other (H) contained 10 wt% V, 14 wt% C and 8 wt% Fe. After regeneration in the O[sub 2]/N[sub 2] stream, catalyst B showed essentially complete recovery of its original surface area, whereas catalyst H showed only 70% recovery. Both catalysts showed substantial losses in surface area by the air treatment. Catalytic activity tests on the regenerated catalysts for hydrodesulfurization of thiophene and for hydrogenation of 1-hexene showed low recovery of activities, even for the regenerated catalyst in which the surface area had been completely recovered. X-ray diffraction analyses of the spent-regenerated catalysts revealed substantial changes in catalyst structure. Surface area and catalytic activity results were qualitatively explained by these catalyst structural changes. 17 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  17. Intramolecular Crosstalk between Catalytic Activities of Receptor Kinases

    KAUST Repository

    Kwezi, Lusisizwe

    2018-01-22

    Signal modulation is important for the growth and development of plants and this process is mediated by a number of factors including physiological growth regulators and their associated signal transduction pathways. Protein kinases play a central role in signaling, including those involving pathogen response mechanisms. We previously demonstrated an active guanylate cyclase (GC) catalytic center in the brassinosteroid insensitive receptor (AtBRI1) within an active intracellular kinase domain resulting in dual enzymatic activity. Here we propose a novel type of receptor architecture that is characterized by a functional GC catalytic center nested in the cytosolic kinase domain enabling intramolecular crosstalk. This may be through a cGMP-AtBRI1 complex forming that may induce a negative feedback mechanism leading to desensitisation of the receptor, regulated through the cGMP production pathway. We further argue that the comparatively low but highly localized cGMP generated by the GC in response to a ligand is sufficient to modulate the kinase activity. This type of receptor therefore provides a molecular switch that directly and/or indirectly affects ligand dependent phosphorylation of downstream signaling cascades and suggests that subsequent signal transduction and modulation works in conjunction with the kinase in downstream signaling.

  18. Removal of ammonia solutions used in catalytic wet oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang Mao; Lou, Jie Chung; Lin, Chia Hua

    2003-08-01

    Ammonia (NH(3)) is an important product used in the chemical industry, and is common place in industrial wastewater. Industrial wastewater containing ammonia is generally either toxic or has concentrations or temperatures such that direct biological treatment is unfeasible. This investigation used aqueous solutions containing more of ammonia for catalytic liquid-phase oxidation in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) based on Cu/La/Ce composite catalysts, prepared by co-precipitation of Cu(NO(3))(2), La(NO(3))(2), and Ce(NO(3))(3) at 7:2:1 molar concentrations. The experimental results indicated that the ammonia conversion of the wet oxidation in the presence of the Cu/La/Ce composite catalysts was determined by the Cu/La/Ce catalyst. Minimal ammonia was removed from the solution by the wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, while approximately 91% ammonia removal was achieved by wet oxidation over the Cu/La/Ce catalyst at 230 degrees C with oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. Furthermore, the effluent streams were conducted at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h(-1) in the wet catalytic processes, and a reaction pathway was found linking the oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, nitrogen and water. The solution contained by-products, including nitrates and nitrites. Nitrite selectivity was minimized and ammonia removal maximized when the feed ammonia solution had a pH of around 12.0.

  19. Studies Relevent to Catalytic Activation Co & other small Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ford, Peter C

    2005-02-22

    Detailed annual and triannual reports describing the progress accomplished during the tenure of this grant were filed with the Program Manager for Catalysis at the Office of Basic Energy Sciences. To avoid unnecessary duplication, the present report will provide a brief overview of the research areas that were sponsored by this grant and list the resulting publications and theses based on this DOE supported research. The scientific personnel participating in (and trained by) this grant's research are also listed. Research carried out under this DOE grant was largely concerned with the mechanisms of the homogeneous catalytic and photocatalytic activation of small molecules such as carbon monoxide, dihydrogen and various hydrocarbons. Much of the more recent effort has focused on the dynamics and mechanisms of reactions relevant to substrate carbonylations by homogeneous organometallic catalysts. A wide range of modern investigative techniques were employed, including quantitative fast reaction methodologies such as time-resolved optical (TRO) and time-resolved infrared (TRIR) spectroscopy and stopped flow kinetics. Although somewhat diverse, this research falls within the scope of the long-term objective of applying quantitative techniques to elucidate the dynamics and understand the principles of mechanisms relevant to the selective and efficient catalytic conversions of fundamental feedstocks to higher value materials.

  20. Catalytical degradation of relevant pollutants from waters using magnetic nanocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadejde, C.; Neamtu, M.; Schneider, R. J.; Hodoroaba, V.-D.; Ababei, G.; Panne, U.

    2015-10-01

    The catalytic efficiency of two magnetically responsive nanocatalysts was evaluated for the degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and Reactive Yellow 84 (RY84) azo dyes using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant under very mild conditions (atmospheric pressure, room temperature). In order to obtain the nanocatalysts, the surface of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles, prepared by a co-precipitation method, was further modified with ferrous oxalate, a highly sensitive non-hazardous reducing agent. The sensitized nanomaterials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry, and used in the catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation (CWHPO) of RB5 and RY84, in laboratory-scale experiments. The effect of important variables such as catalyst dosage, H2O2 concentration, and contact time was studied in the dye degradation kinetics. The results showed that it was possible to remove up to 99.7% dye in the presence of 20 mM H2O2 after 240 min of oxidation for a catalyst concentration of 10 g L-1 at 25 °C and initial pH value of 9.0. CWHPO of reactive dyes using sensitized magnetic nanocatalysts can be a suitable pre-treatment method for complete decolorization of effluents from textile dyeing and finishing processes, once the optimum operating conditions are established.

  1. The use of Phoenics in the design of catalytic converters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luoma, M [Kemira Metalkat Oy, Oulu (Finland); Smith, A G [S and C Thermofluids Ltd, Bath (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    Manufacturers of automotive catalytic converters are constrained to design a system which is mechanically reliable, puts low back pressure on the engine, has adequate conversion performance, is low cost and of minimum size. In recent years, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been widely examined as a means of predicting the performance of catalytic converters to aid with the design process. Kemira Metalkat and S and C Thermofluids have put together and developed a number of existing CFD techniques in order to create a tool which is integrated within the design process. PHOENICS is used in the heart of the system in order to produce predictions of transient (light-off) and steady state catalyst performance. Grid generation tools have been provided to allow simplified and rapid geometry definition with suitable integration (via FEMGEN) within other parts of the catalyst design process. Simplified input techniques have been provided along with associated translators to create specification of the model for PHOENICS. Post-processing software has been provided through FEMVIEW to allow visualisation of catalyst monolith variables and transient performance animation. The whole system is controlled via a menu. The system have been use to study the effects of the catalyst design parameters on the converter performance. The results obtained using the system have so far been more qualitative than quantitative. However, validation studies have been carried out to check pressure drop prediction. A new model for the pressure drop over a metallic monolith has been developed. (author)

  2. Catalytic Hydrodeoxygenation of Fatty Acids for Biodiesel Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Аntonina A. Stepacheva

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the production of second generation biodiesel via catalytic hydrodeoxygenation of fatty acids. Pd/C catalysts with different metal loading were used. The palladium catalysts were characterized using low-temperature nitrogen physisorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was revealed that the most active and selective catalyst was 1%-Pd/C which allowed reaching up 97.5% of selectivity (regarding to n-heptadecane at 100% conversion of substrate. Moreover, the chosen catalyst is more preferable according to lower metal content that leads the decrease of the process cost. The analysis of the catalysts showed that 1%-Pd/C had the highest specific surface area compared with 5%-Pd/C. Copyright © 2016 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 31st July 2015; Revised: 9th December 2015; Accepted: 30th December 2015 How to Cite: Stepacheva, A.A., Sapunov, V.N., Sulman, E.M., Nikoshvili, L.Z., Sulman, M.G., Sidorov, A.I., Demidenko, G.N., Matveeva, V.G. (2016. Catalytic Hydrodeoxygenation of Fatty Acids for Biodiesel Production. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (2: 125-132 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.2.538.125-132 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.2.538.125-132

  3. Catalytic steam reforming of ethanol for hydrogen production: Brief status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bineli Aulus R.R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen represents a promising fuel since it is considered as a cleanest energy carrier and also because during its combustion only water is emitted. It can be produced from different kinds of renewable feedstocks, such as ethanol, in this sense hydrogen could be treated as biofuel. Three chemical reactions can be used to achieve this purpose: the steam reforming (SR, the partial oxidation (POX and the autothermal reforming (ATR. In this study, the catalysts implemented in steam reforming of ethanol were reviewed. A wide variety of elements can be used as catalysts for this reaction, such as base metals (Ni, Cu and Co or noble metals (Rh, Pt and Ru usually deposited on a support material that increases surface area and improves catalytic function. The use of Rh, Ni and Pt supported or promoted with CeO2, and/or La2O3 shows excellent performance in ethanol SR catalytic process. The ratio of water to ethanol, reaction temperatures, catalysts loadings, selectivity and activity are also discussed as they are extremely important for high hydrogen yields.

  4. Characterization of gallium-containing zeolites for catalytic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Sanchez, M.

    2003-12-08

    The present study considers the synthesis, characterization, and catalytic evaluation of extra-framework gallium-containing zeolites. We focus on modification of zeolites by chemical vapor deposition of trimethylgallium on HZSM-5 and Mordenite zeolites. Chapter 2 is dedicated to the chemisorption and stability of TMG on HZSM-5 and HMOR zeolites. The effect of silylation is also addressed. Some theoretical calculations are also shown in this study to support part of the experimental results. In Chapter 3, the effect of oxidation and reduction treatments on these catalysts is investigated by FTIR, ICP and multinuclei NMR. In Chapter 4, the oxidation state and Ga coordination obtained during and after thermal treatment with H2 and O2 is analysed by X-ray adsorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS) and IR analysis of CO adsorption. These results allow a better understanding of the catalytic behaviour of Ga-containing zeolites catalyst. Chapter 5 consists of two parts: one discusses the H2 activation over Ga/HZSM5 and Ga/MOR catalysts by H2/D2 isotopic exchange reaction, and the second part deals with the aromatization of n-heptane over the same catalysts.

  5. Towards Prebiotic Catalytic Amyloids Using High Throughput Screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Friedmann

    Full Text Available Enzymes are capable of directing complex stereospecific transformations and of accelerating reaction rates many orders of magnitude. As even the simplest known enzymes comprise thousands of atoms, the question arises as to how such exquisite catalysts evolved. A logical predecessor would be shorter peptides, but they lack the defined structure and size that are apparently necessary for enzyme functions. However, some very short peptides are able to assemble into amyloids, thereby forming a well-defined tertiary structure called the cross-β-sheet, which bestows unique properties upon the peptides. We have hypothesized that amyloids could have been the catalytically active precursor to modern enzymes. To test this hypothesis, we designed an amyloid peptide library that could be screened for catalytic activity. Our approach, amenable to high-throughput methodologies, allowed us to find several peptides and peptide mixtures that form amyloids with esterase activity. These results indicate that amyloids, with their stability in a wide range of conditions and their potential as catalysts with low sequence specificity, would indeed be fitting precursors to modern enzymes. Furthermore, our approach can be efficiently expanded upon in library size, screening conditions, and target activity to yield novel amyloid catalysts with potential applications in aqueous-organic mixtures, at high temperature and in other extreme conditions that could be advantageous for industrial applications.

  6. Cheap carbon sorbents produced from lignite by catalytic pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, B.N.; Schchipko, M.L. [Inst. of Chemistry of Natural Organic Materials, Akademgorodok, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-01

    Some data are presented describing the new technology of carbon sorbent production from powdered lignite in the installation with fluidized bed of catalyst. It was shown the different types of char products with extended pore structure and high sorption ability can be produced from cheap and accessible lignite of Kansk-Achinsk coal pit in pilot installation with fluidized bed of Al-Cu-Cr oxide catalyst or catalytically active slag materials. In comparison with the conventional technologies of pyrolysis the catalytic pyrolysis allows to increase by 3-5 times the process productivity and to decrease significantly the formation of harmful compounds. The latter is accomplished by complete oxidation of gaseous pyrolysis products in the presence of catalysts and by avoiding the formation of pyrolysis tars - the source of cancerogenic compounds. The technology of cheap powdered sorbent production from lignites makes possible to obtain from lignite during the time of pyrolysis only a few seconds char products with porosity up to 0.6 cm{sup 3} /g, and specific surface area more than 400 m{sup 3} /g. Some methods of powdered chars molding into carbon materials with the different shape were proved for producing of firmness sorbents. Cheap carbon sorbents obtained by thermocatalytic pyrolysis can be successfully used in purification of different industrial pollutants as one-time sorbent or as adsorbents of long-term application with periodic regeneration.

  7. Tackling Critical Catalytic Residues in Helicobacter pylori L-Asparaginase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristella Maggi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial asparaginases (amidohydrolases, EC 3.5.1.1 are important enzymes in cancer therapy, especially for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia. They are tetrameric enzymes able to catalyze the deamination of L-ASN and, to a variable extent, of L-GLN, on which leukemia cells are dependent for survival. In contrast to other known L-asparaginases, Helicobacter pylori CCUG 17874 type II enzyme (HpASNase is cooperative and has a low affinity towards L-GLN. In this study, some critical amino acids forming the active site of HpASNase (T16, T95 and E289 have been tackled by rational engineering in the attempt to better define their role in catalysis and to achieve a deeper understanding of the peculiar cooperative behavior of this enzyme. Mutations T16E, T95D and T95H led to a complete loss of enzymatic activity. Mutation E289A dramatically reduced the catalytic activity of the enzyme, but increased its thermostability. Interestingly, E289 belongs to a loop that is very variable in L-asparaginases from the structure, sequence and length point of view, and which could be a main determinant of their different catalytic features.

  8. Recent developments in research on catalytic reaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Serra

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last years, analyses performed on a stochastic model of catalytic reaction networks have provided some indications about the reasons why wet-lab experiments hardly ever comply with the phase transition typically predicted by theoretical models with regard to the emergence of collectively self-replicating sets of molecule (also defined as autocatalytic sets, ACSs, a phenomenon that is often observed in nature and that is supposed to have played a major role in the emergence of the primitive forms of life. The model at issue has allowed to reveal that the emerging ACSs are characterized by a general dynamical fragility, which might explain the difficulty to observe them in lab experiments. In this work, the main results of the various analyses are reviewed, with particular regard to the factors able to affect the generic properties of catalytic reactions network, for what concerns, not only the probability of ACSs to be observed, but also the overall activity of the system, in terms of production of new species, reactions and matter.

  9. Catalytic properties and biomedical applications of cerium oxide nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Walkey, Carl D.; Das, Soumen C.; Seal, Sudipta; Erlichman, Joseph S.; Heckman, Karin L.; Ghibelli, Lina; Traversa, Enrico; McGinnis, James F.; Self, William Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) have shown promise as catalytic antioxidants in the test tube, cell culture models and animal models of disease. However given the reactivity that is well established at the surface of these nanoparticles, the biological utilization of nanoceria as a therapeutic still poses many challenges. Moreover the form that these particles take in a biological environment, such as the changes that can occur due to a protein corona, are not well established. This review aims to summarize the existing literature on biological use of nanoceria, and to raise questions about what further study is needed to apply this interesting catalytic material to biomedical applications. These questions include: 1) How does preparation, exposure dose, route and experimental model influence the reported effects of nanoceria in animal studies? 2) What are the considerations to develop nanoceria as a therapeutic agent in regards to these parameters? 3) What biological targets of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are relevant to this targeting, and how do these properties also influence the safety of these nanomaterials?

  10. Triblock copolymer-mediated synthesis of catalytically active gold nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Douglas C.; de Souza, Viviane C.; Vasconcelos, Diego A.; Andrade, George R. S.; Gimenez, Iara F.; Teixeira, Zaine

    2018-04-01

    The design of nanostructures based on poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) and metal nanoparticles is becoming an important research topic due to their multiple functionalities in different fields, including nanomedicine and catalysis. In this work, water-soluble gold nanoparticles have been prepared through a green aqueous synthesis method using Pluronic F127 as both reducing and stabilizing agents. The size dependence (varying from 2 to 70 nm) and stability of gold nanoparticles were systematically studied by varying some parameters of synthesis, which were the polymer concentration, temperature, and exposure to UV-A light, being monitored by UV-Vis spectroscopy and TEM. Also, an elaborated study regarding to the kinetic of formation (nucleation and growth) was presented. Finally, the as-prepared Pluronic-capped gold nanoparticles have shown excellent catalytic activity towards the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol with sodium borohydride, in which a higher catalytic performance was exhibited when compared with gold nanoparticles prepared by classical reduction method using sodium citrate. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. Intramolecular Crosstalk between Catalytic Activities of Receptor Kinases

    KAUST Repository

    Kwezi, Lusisizwe; Wheeler, Janet I; Marondedze, Claudius; Gehring, Christoph A; Irving, Helen R

    2018-01-01

    Signal modulation is important for the growth and development of plants and this process is mediated by a number of factors including physiological growth regulators and their associated signal transduction pathways. Protein kinases play a central role in signaling, including those involving pathogen response mechanisms. We previously demonstrated an active guanylate cyclase (GC) catalytic center in the brassinosteroid insensitive receptor (AtBRI1) within an active intracellular kinase domain resulting in dual enzymatic activity. Here we propose a novel type of receptor architecture that is characterized by a functional GC catalytic center nested in the cytosolic kinase domain enabling intramolecular crosstalk. This may be through a cGMP-AtBRI1 complex forming that may induce a negative feedback mechanism leading to desensitisation of the receptor, regulated through the cGMP production pathway. We further argue that the comparatively low but highly localized cGMP generated by the GC in response to a ligand is sufficient to modulate the kinase activity. This type of receptor therefore provides a molecular switch that directly and/or indirectly affects ligand dependent phosphorylation of downstream signaling cascades and suggests that subsequent signal transduction and modulation works in conjunction with the kinase in downstream signaling.

  12. Cytochromes P450: History, Classes, Catalytic Mechanism, and Industrial Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, D J; Finnigan, J D; Cook, K; Black, G W; Charnock, S J

    Cytochromes P450, a family of heme-containing monooxygenases that catalyze a diverse range of oxidative reactions, are so-called due to their maximum absorbance at 450nm, ie, "Pigment-450nm," when bound to carbon monoxide. They have appeal both academically and commercially due to their high degree of regio- and stereoselectivity, for example, in the area of active pharmaceutical ingredient synthesis. Despite this potential, they often exhibit poor stability, low turnover numbers and typically require electron transport protein(s) for catalysis. P450 systems exist in a variety of functional domain architectures, organized into 10 classes. P450s are also divided into families, each of which is based solely on amino acid sequence homology. Their catalytic mechanism employs a very complex, multistep catalytic cycle involving a range of transient intermediates. Mutagenesis is a powerful tool for the development of improved biocatalysts and has been used extensively with the archetypal Class VIII P450, BM3, from Bacillus megaterium, but with the increasing scale of genomic sequencing, a huge resource is now available for the discovery of novel P450s. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Modelling of the aerosol deposition in a hydrogen catalytic recombiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vendel, J.; Studer, E.; Zavaleta, P.; Hadida, Ph.

    1997-01-01

    Catalytic recombiners are used to remove the hydrogen released in case of a severe accident in a nuclear power plant, so as to reduce the risk of deflagration or detonation. H 2 PAR experiments are carried out to precise the behaviour of recombiners in term of poisoning by aerosols. Firstly, some calculations have been done with the Trio-EF code to assess the structure of convection loops in the experimental tent. We note that when the recombiner is active, it may have a strong influence on the flow inside the tent and may even interact with an other heat source such as a furnace. In the second part, we study the deposition of aerosols on catalytic plates for a given recombiner, when it is active or passive. We list the different mechanisms and quantify them by introducing the deposition velocity. In fact, thermophoresis appears to be the main mechanism, compared to brownian diffusion or difrusiophoresis, which governs aerosols deposition. It favours deposition on > plates and acts against it for > plates. (author)

  14. Catalytic properties and biomedical applications of cerium oxide nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Walkey, Carl D.

    2014-11-10

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) have shown promise as catalytic antioxidants in the test tube, cell culture models and animal models of disease. However given the reactivity that is well established at the surface of these nanoparticles, the biological utilization of nanoceria as a therapeutic still poses many challenges. Moreover the form that these particles take in a biological environment, such as the changes that can occur due to a protein corona, are not well established. This review aims to summarize the existing literature on biological use of nanoceria, and to raise questions about what further study is needed to apply this interesting catalytic material to biomedical applications. These questions include: 1) How does preparation, exposure dose, route and experimental model influence the reported effects of nanoceria in animal studies? 2) What are the considerations to develop nanoceria as a therapeutic agent in regards to these parameters? 3) What biological targets of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are relevant to this targeting, and how do these properties also influence the safety of these nanomaterials?

  15. Catalytic degradation of brominated flame retardants by copper oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, I.; Yecheskel, Y.; Berkowitz, B.

    2013-12-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have been added to various products like plastic, textile, electronics and synthetic polymers at growing rates. In spite of the clear advantages of reducing fire damages, many of these BFRs may be released to the environment after their beneficial use which may lead to contamination of water resources. In this work we present the catalytic degradation of two brominated flame retardants (BFRs), tribromoneopentyl alcohol (TBNPA) and 2,4 dibromophenol (2,4-DBP) by copper oxide nanoparticles (nCuO) in aqueous solution. The degradation kinetics, the debromination, and the formation of intermediates by nCuO catalysis are compared to Fenton oxidation and to reduction by nano zero-valent iron (nZVI). The two studied BFRs are shown to degrade fully by the nCuO system within hours to days. Shorter reaction times showed differences in reaction pathways and kinetics for the two compounds. The 2,4-DBP showed faster degradation than TBNPA, by nCuO catalysis. Relatively high resistance to degradation was recorded for 2,4-DBP with nZVI, yielding 20% degradation after 24 h, while the TBNPA was degraded by 85% within 12 hours. A catalytic mechanism for radical generation and BFR degradation by nCuO is proposed. It is further suggested that H2O2 plays an essential role in the activation of the catalyst.

  16. Degradation of paracetamol by catalytic wet air oxidation and sequential adsorption - Catalytic wet air oxidation on activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada-Peñate, I; Julcour-Lebigue, C; Jáuregui-Haza, U J; Wilhelm, A M; Delmas, H

    2012-06-30

    The concern about the fate of pharmaceutical products has raised owing to the increasing contamination of rivers, lakes and groundwater. The aim of this paper is to evaluate two different processes for paracetamol removal. The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of paracetamol on activated carbon was investigated both as a water treatment technique using an autoclave reactor and as a regenerative treatment of the carbon after adsorption in a sequential fixed bed process. Three activated carbons (ACs) from different source materials were used as catalysts: two microporous basic ACs (S23 and C1) and a meso- and micro-porous acidic one (L27). During the first CWAO experiment the adsorption capacity and catalytic performance of fresh S23 and C1 were higher than those of fresh L27 despite its higher surface area. This situation changed after AC reuse, as finally L27 gave the best results after five CWAO cycles. Respirometry tests with activated sludge revealed that in the studied conditions the use of CWAO enhanced the aerobic biodegradability of the effluent. In the ADOX process L27 also showed better oxidation performances and regeneration efficiency. This different ageing was examined through AC physico-chemical properties. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Probing the Catalytic Mechanism of S-Ribosylhomocysteinase (LuxS) with Catalytic Intermediates and Substrate Analogues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopishetty, Bhaskar; Zhu, Jinge; Rajan, Rakhi; Sobczak, Adam J.; Wnuk, Stanislaw F.; Bell, Charles E.; Pei, Dehua; (OSU); (FIU)

    2009-05-12

    S-Ribosylhomocysteinase (LuxS) cleaves the thioether bond in S-ribosylhomocysteine (SRH) to produce homocysteine (Hcys) and 4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione (DPD), the precursor of the type II bacterial quorum sensing molecule (AI-2). The catalytic mechanism of LuxS comprises three distinct reaction steps. The first step involves carbonyl migration from the C1 carbon of ribose to C2 and the formation of a 2-ketone intermediate. The second step shifts the C=O group from the C2 to C3 position to produce a 3-ketone intermediate. In the final step, the 3-ketone intermediate undergoes a {beta}-elimination reaction resulting in the cleavage of the thioether bond. In this work, the 3-ketone intermediate was chemically synthesized and shown to be chemically and kinetically competent in the LuxS catalytic pathway. Substrate analogues halogenated at the C3 position of ribose were synthesized and reacted as time-dependent inhibitors of LuxS. The time dependence was caused by enzyme-catalyzed elimination of halide ions. Examination of the kinetics of halide release and decay of the 3-ketone intermediate catalyzed by wild-type and mutant LuxS enzymes revealed that Cys-84 is the general base responsible for proton abstraction in the three reaction steps, whereas Glu-57 likely facilitates substrate binding and proton transfer during catalysis.

  18. The Catalytic Activity of Modified Zeolite Lanthanum on the Catalytic Cracking of Al-Duara Atmospheric Distillation Residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Khalifa Esgair

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric residue fluid catalytic cracking was selected as a probe reaction to test the catalytic performance of modified NaY zeolites and prepared NaY zeolites. Modified NaY zeolites have been synthesized by simple ion exchange methods. Three samples of modified zeolite Y have been obtained by replacing the sodium ions in the original sample with lanthanum and the weight percent added are 0.28, 0.53, and 1.02 respectively. The effects of addition of lanthanum to zeolite Y in different weight percent on the cracking catalysts were investigated using an experimental laboratory plant scale of fluidized bed reactor. The experiments have been performed with weight hourly space velocity (WHSV range of 6 to 24 h-1, and the range of temperature from 450 to 510 oC. The activity of the catalyst with 1.02 wt% lanthanum has been shown to be much greater than that of the sample parent NaY. Also it was observed that the addition of the lanthanum causes an increase in the thermal stability of the zeolite.

  19. A Hybrid Catalytic Route to Fuels from Biomass Syngas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, Laurel [LanzaTech, Inc., Skokie, IL (United States); Hallen, Richard [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lilga, Michael [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Heijstra, Bjorn [LanzaTech, Inc., Skokie, IL (United States); Palou-Rivera, Ignasi [LanzaTech, Inc., Skokie, IL (United States); Handler, Robert [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States)

    2017-12-31

    LanzaTech partnered with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Imperium Aviation Fuels, InEnTec, Orochem Technologies, the University of Delaware, Michigan Technological University, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, and The Boeing Company, to develop a cost-effective hybrid conversion technology for catalytic upgrading of biomass-derived syngas to sustainable alternative jet fuel (SAJF) meeting the price, quality and environmental requirements of the aviation industry. Alternative “synthetic paraffinic kerosene” (SPK) blendstock produced from syngas via “Fischer-Tropsch” (F-T) or from lipids via “hydroprocessing of esters and fatty acids” (HEFA) are currently being used in commercial jet fuel blends containing at least 50% petroleum-based fuel. This project developed an alternative route to SAJF from ethanol, a type of “alcohol to jet” (ATJ) SPK. The project objective was to demonstrate a pathway that combines syngas fermentation to ethanol with catalytic upgrading of ethanol to sustainable alternative jet fuel and shows attractive overall system economics to drive down the price of biomass-derived jet fuel. The hybrid pathway was to be demonstrated on three biomass feedstocks: corn stover, woody biomass, and third biomass feedstock, cellulosic residues. The objective also included the co-production of chemicals, exemplified by 2,3-Butanediol (2,3-BDO), which can be converted to key chemical intermediates. The team successfully demonstrated that biomass syngas fermentation followed by catalytic conversion is a viable alternative to the Fischer-Tropsch process and produces a fuel with properties comparable to F-T and HEFA SPKs. Plasma gasification and gas fermentation were successfully integrated and demonstrated in continuous fermentations on waste wood, corn stover, and cellulosic bagasse. Gas fermentation was demonstrated to produce ethanol suitable for catalytic upgrading, isolating the upgrading from variations in biomass

  20. Oscillatory behaviour of catalytic properties, structure and temperature during the catalytic partial oxidation of methane on Pd/Al2O3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimmerle, B.; Baiker, A.; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk

    2010-01-01

    Pd/Al2O3 catalysts showed an oscillatory behaviour during the catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) of methane, which was investigated simultaneously by IR-thermography, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and online mass-spectrometry to correlate the temperature, state of the catalyst and catalytic...... to self-reduction leading to extinction of the process. The latter was the key driver for the oscillations and thus gave additional insight into the mechanism of partial methane oxidation....

  1. Catalytic properties of extraframework iron-containing species in ZSM-5 for N2O decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, G.; Pidko, E.A.; Filot, I.A.W.; Santen, van R.A.; Li, Can; Hensen, E.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    The reactivity of mononuclear and binuclear iron-containing complexes in ZSM-5 zeolite for catalytic N2O decomposition has been investigated by periodic DFT calculations and microkinetic modeling. On mononuclear sites, the activation of a first N2O molecule is favorable. The rate of catalytic N2O

  2. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart Uuu of... - Metal HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Metal HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units 1 Table 1 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Table 1 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Metal HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units As stated in...

  3. 40 CFR Table 15 to Subpart Uuu of... - Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units 15 Table 15 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., Table 15 Table 15 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units As...

  4. 40 CFR Table 22 to Subpart Uuu of... - Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units 22 Table 22 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., Table 22 Table 22 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Inorganic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Reforming Units...

  5. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart Uuu of... - Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 12 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units 8 Table 8 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL..., Table 8 Table 8 to Subpart UUU of Part 63—Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units As...

  6. Catalytic Ammonia Decomposition Over Ruthenium Nanoparticles Supported on Nano-Titanates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klerke, Asbjørn; Klitgaard, Søren Kegnæs; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    Nanosized Na2Ti3O7, K2Ti6O13 and Cs2Ti6O13 materials were prepared and used as supports of ruthenium nanoparticles for catalytic ammonia decomposition. It is shown that these catalysts exhibit higher catalytic activity than ruthenium supported on TiO2 nanoparticles promoted with cesium. The diffe...

  7. Dependence of crystal size on the catalytic performance of a porous coordination polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyonaga, Tomokazu; Higuchi, Masakazu; Kajiwara, Takashi; Takashima, Yohei; Duan, Jingui; Nagashima, Kazuro; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2015-02-14

    Submicrosized MOF-76(Yb) exhibits a higher catalytic performance for esterification than microsized MOF-76(Yb). Control of the crystal size of porous heterogeneous catalysts, such as PCP/MOFs, offers a promising approach to fabricating high-performance catalysts based on accessibility to the internal catalytic sites.

  8. Determination of the gas-to-membrane mass transfer coefficient in a catalytic membrane reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldsink, J.W.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1995-01-01

    A novel method to determine the external mass transfer coefficient in catalytic membrane reactors (Sloot et al., 1992a, b) was presented in this study. In a catalytically active membrane reactor, in which a very fast reaction occurs, the external transfer coefficient can conveniently be measured by

  9. Catalytic stereoselective synthesis of highly substituted indanones via tandem Nazarov cyclization and electrophilic fluorination trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jing; Zhu, Hong-Wei; Cui, Han-Feng; Hua, Ming-Qing; Ma, Jun-An

    2007-08-02

    A new catalytic stereoselective tandem transformation via Nazarov cyclization/electrophilic fluorination has been accomplished. This sequence is efficiently catalyzed by a Cu(II) complex to afford fluorine-containing 1-indanone derivatives with two new stereocenters with high diastereoselectivity (trans/cis up to 49/1). Three examples of catalytic enantioselective tandem transformation are presented.

  10. MEMS-based fuel cells with integrated catalytic fuel processor and method thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Alan F [Livermore, CA; Morse, Jeffrey D [Martinez, CA; Upadhye, Ravindra S [Pleasanton, CA; Havstad, Mark A [Davis, CA

    2011-08-09

    Described herein is a means to incorporate catalytic materials into the fuel flow field structures of MEMS-based fuel cells, which enable catalytic reforming of a hydrocarbon based fuel, such as methane, methanol, or butane. Methods of fabrication are also disclosed.

  11. Metal organic frameworks for the catalytic detoxification of chemical warfare nerve agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupp, Joseph T.; Farha, Omar K.; Katz, Michael J.; Mondloch, Joseph E.

    2017-04-18

    A method of using a metal organic framework (MOF) comprising a metal ion and an at least bidendate organic ligand to catalytically detoxify chemical warfare nerve agents including exposing the metal-organic-framework (MOF) to the chemical warfare nerve agent and catalytically decomposing the nerve agent with the MOF.

  12. Dynamic control of chiral space in a catalytic asymmetric reaction using a molecular motor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Jiaobing; Feringa, B.L.

    2011-01-01

    Enzymes and synthetic chiral catalysts have found widespread application to produce single enantiomers, but in situ switching of the chiral preference of a catalytic system is very difficult to achieve. Here, we report on a light-driven molecular motor with integrated catalytic functions in which

  13. New insight in the microscopic mechanism of the catalytic synthesis of ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Billing, Gert D.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical quantum calculations and molecular beam experiments of the dissociative chemisorption of N-2 molecules on catalytic active metal surfaces have given new insight in the fundamental process of the ammonia synthesis. This new approach to the study of catalytic process supplements the con...

  14. Ionic Liquids: The Synergistic Catalytic Effect in the Synthesis of Cyclic Carbonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora T.T. Ng

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This review presents the synergistic effect in the catalytic system of ionic liquids (ILs for the synthesis of cyclic carbonate from carbon dioxide and epoxide. The emphasis of this review is on three aspects: the catalytic system of metal-based ionic liquids, the catalytic system of hydrogen bond-promoted ionic liquids and supported ionic liquids. Metal and ionic liquids show a synergistic effect on the cycloaddition reactions of epoxides. The cations and anions of ionic liquids show a synergistic effect on the cycloaddition reactions. The functional groups in cations or supports combined with the anions have a synergistic effect on the cycloaddition reactions. Synergistic catalytic effects of ILs play an important role of promoting the cycloaddition reactions of epoxides. The design of catalytic system of ionic liquids will be possible if the synergistic effect on a molecular level is understood.

  15. Experimental Investigation of Flow Resistance in a Coal Mine Ventilation Air Methane Preheated Catalytic Oxidation Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of experimental investigation of flow resistance in a coal mine ventilation air methane preheated catalytic oxidation reactor. The experimental system was installed at the Energy Research Institute of Shandong University of Technology. The system has been used to investigate the effects of flow rate (200 Nm3/h to 1000 Nm3/h and catalytic oxidation bed average temperature (20°C to 560°C within the preheated catalytic oxidation reactor. The pressure drop and resistance proportion of catalytic oxidation bed, the heat exchanger preheating section, and the heat exchanger flue gas section were measured. In addition, based on a large number of experimental data, the empirical equations of flow resistance are obtained by the least square method. It can also be used in deriving much needed data for preheated catalytic oxidation designs when employed in industry.

  16. Physical chemistry of catalytic reduction of nitroarenes using various nanocatalytic systems: past, present, and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begum, Robina; Rehan, Rida; Farooqi, Zahoor H.; Butt, Zonarah; Ashraf, Sania

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic reduction of nitroarenes under various catalytic systems has been widely reported in the flood of publications during last twenty years. This reaction has become a benchmark for testing catalytic activity of inorganic nanoparticles stabilized in various systems. This tutorial review presents design and classification of inorganic nanocatalysts along with their stabilizing agents used for catalytic reduction of nitroarenes. The techniques used for characterization of catalysts have been highlighted in this review. The mechanism of catalytic reduction has been described in a tutorial way. Factors affecting the rate of reduction of nitroarenes in the presence of metal nanoparticles stabilized in polyelectrolyte brushes, polyionic liquids, micelles, dendrimers, and microgels have been discussed for further development in this area.Graphical abstract

  17. Physical chemistry of catalytic reduction of nitroarenes using various nanocatalytic systems: past, present, and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begum, Robina [University of the Punjab, Centre for Undergraduate Studies (Pakistan); Rehan, Rida; Farooqi, Zahoor H., E-mail: zhfarooqi@gmail.com; Butt, Zonarah; Ashraf, Sania [University of the Punjab, Institute of Chemistry (Pakistan)

    2016-08-15

    The catalytic reduction of nitroarenes under various catalytic systems has been widely reported in the flood of publications during last twenty years. This reaction has become a benchmark for testing catalytic activity of inorganic nanoparticles stabilized in various systems. This tutorial review presents design and classification of inorganic nanocatalysts along with their stabilizing agents used for catalytic reduction of nitroarenes. The techniques used for characterization of catalysts have been highlighted in this review. The mechanism of catalytic reduction has been described in a tutorial way. Factors affecting the rate of reduction of nitroarenes in the presence of metal nanoparticles stabilized in polyelectrolyte brushes, polyionic liquids, micelles, dendrimers, and microgels have been discussed for further development in this area.Graphical abstract.

  18. Mesoporous Zeolite Single Crystals for Catalytic Hydrocarbon Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, I.; Christensen, Claus H.; Kustova, Marina

    2005-01-01

    Recently, mesoporous zeolite single crystals were discovered. They constitute a novel family of materials that features a combined micropore and mesopore architecture within each individual crystal. Here, we briefly summarize recent catalytic results from cracking and isomerization of alkalies......, alkylation of aromatics and present new results on isomerization of aromatics. Specifically, the shape-selective isomerization of meta-xylenc into para-xylene and ortho-xylene is studied. In all these reactions, rnesoporous zeolite single crystals prove to be unique catalysts since they provide easy...... transport to and from active sites and at the same time maintain the shape-selectivity required. Thus, all these results support the idea that the beneficial effect of the mesopores system in the mesoporous zeolite single crystals call be solely attributed to enhanced mass transport....

  19. Spectromicroscopy of catalytic relevant processes with sub-micron resolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, S.; Esch, F.; Gregoratti, L.; Marsi, M.; Kiskinova, M.; Schubert, U. A.; Grotz, P.; Knoezinger, H.; Taglauer, E.; Schuetz, E.; Schaak, A.; Imbihl, R.

    2000-01-01

    The capabilities of the Scanning Photo Electron Microscope (SPEM) at ELETTRA as a unique probing tool in the field of catalysis and surface science are illustrated presenting results of two recent investigations. The lateral resolution and the high surface sensitivity of the SPEM has enabled imaging the initial steps of the spreading processes of MoO 3 crystals on an alumina support surface, a model system of a catalyst used in petrochemistry. In the second study the local adsorbate coverage inside a pulse of a chemical wave occurring in the catalytic NO+H 2 reaction on a Rh(110) single crystal surface has been determined. The microscope was used to monitor the sample surface in situ during the reaction and thus characterizing a temporal and spatial inhomogeneous system. The so-called excitation cycle of the pulse formation has been verified and the adsorbate gradient inside a chemical wave was measured

  20. Catalytic Transformation of Ethylbenzene over Y-Zeolite-based Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Khattaf, Sulaiman

    2008-11-19

    Catalytic transformation of ethylbenzene (EB) has been investigated over ultrastable Y (USY)-zeolite-based catalysts in a novel riser simulator at different operating conditions. The effect of reaction conditions on EB conversion is reported. The USY catalyst (FCC-Y) was modified by steaming to form a significantly lower acidity catalyst (FCC-SY). The current study shows that the FCC-SY catalyst favors EB disproportionation more than cracking. A comparison has been made between the results of EB conversion over the lowly acidic catalyst (FCC-SY) and the highly acidic catalyst (FCC-Y) under identical conditions. It was observed that increase in catalyst acidity favored cracking of EB at the expense of disproportionation. Kinetic parameters for EB disappearance during disproportionation reaction over the FCC-SY catalyst were calculated using the catalyst activity decay function based on time on stream (TOS). © 2008 American Chemical Society.

  1. Catalytic effect of halide additives ball milled with magnesium hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malka, I.E.; Bystrzycki, J. [Department of Advanced Materials and Technologies, Military University of Technology, Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Czujko, T. [Department of Advanced Materials and Technologies, Military University of Technology, Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); CanmetENERGY, Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Transportation Energy, Natural Resources (Canada)

    2010-02-15

    The influence of various halide additives milled with magnesium hydride (MgH{sub 2}) on its decomposition temperature was studied. The optimum amount of halide additive and milling conditions were evaluated. The MgH{sub 2} decomposition temperature and energy of activation reduction were measured by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The difference in catalytic efficiency between chlorides and fluorides of the various metals studied is presented. The effects of oxidation state, valence and position in the periodic table for selected halides on MgH{sub 2} decomposition temperature were also studied. The best catalysts, from the halides studied, for magnesium hydride decomposition were ZrF{sub 4}, TaF{sub 5}, NbF{sub 5}, VCl{sub 3} and TiCl{sub 3}. (author)

  2. Catalytic synthesis of alcoholic fuels for transportation from syngas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiongxiao

    This work has investigated the catalytic conversion of syngas into methanol and higher alcohols. Based on input from computational catalyst screening, an experimental investigation of promising catalyst candidates for methanol synthesis from syngas has been carried out. Cu-Ni alloys of different...... composition have been identified as potential candidates for methanol synthesis. These Cu-Ni alloy catalysts have been synthesized and tested in a fixed-bed continuous-flow reactor for CO hydrogenation. The metal area based activity for a Cu-Ni/SiO2 catalyst is at the same level as a Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 model...... catalyst. The high activity and selectivity of silica supported Cu-Ni alloy catalysts agrees with the fact that the DFT calculations identified Cu-Ni alloys as highly active and selective catalysts for the hydrogenation of CO to form methanol. This work has also provided a systematic study of Cu...

  3. Synthesis of polyaniline nanotubes through UV light catalytic method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanyu Sun

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, nitrocellulose (NC fiber blanket prepared by electrostatic spinning method has been used as a template, and copper nitrate (Cu(NO32 as an oxidant to synthesise polyaniline nanotubes doped with heteropolyacid (H4SiW12O40, SiW12 using UV light catalytic method. Infrared spectroscopy (IR, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM technologies were applied to characterize the prepared samples of polyaniline nanotubes. The results show that the external diameter of the tube is about 200 nm, and the internal diameter about 170 nm. We also give a reasonable speculation and explanation about the formation mechanism of the nanotubes.

  4. Self-Propulsion Of Catalytic Conical Micro-Swimmer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallino, Giacomo; Gallaire, Francois; Lauga, Eric; Michelin, Sebastien

    2017-11-01

    Self-propelled artificial micro-motors have attracted much attention both as fundamental examples of active matter and for their potential biomedical applications (e.g. drug delivery, cell sorting). A popular design exploits the catalytic decomposition of a fuel (e.g. hydrogen peroxide) on the active surface of the motor to produce oxygen bubbles that propel the swimmer, effectively converting chemical energy into swimming motion. We focus here on a conical shape swimmer with chemically-active inner surfaces. Using numerical simulations of the chemical problem and viscous hydrodynamics, we analyze the formation, growth and motion of the bubbles inside the micro-motor and the resulting swimming motion. Our results shed light on the fundamental hydrodynamics of the propulsion of conical swimmers and may help to improve the efficiency of these machines. G.G. aknowledges support from the Swiss National Science Fundation.

  5. Enhanced E-bed bottoms upgrading using latest catalytic technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toshima, H.; Mayo, S.; Sedlacek, Z.; Hughes, T.; De Wind, M. [Albermarle Corp., Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2009-07-01

    The profitability of refineries depends on heavy oil upgrading in terms of price, conversion, yields and quality of the product. The Ebullated-bed process represents a solution for the effective primary upgrading of heavy oils. Since the 1970s, Albemarle has commercialized several E-bed catalysts to upgrade the bottoms in low sediment and high hydrogenation operations. Although an E-bed is used to maximize the conversion of vacuum residuum (VR), it is often limited by fouling caused by sediment in the product. In order to reduce sedimentation in the product, Albemarle developed an improved E-bed catalytic technology by characterizing the asphaltenes and sediments in order to better understand the oil chemistry and compatibility. The most recent development involves the patented catalyst-staging technology and the improved single catalyst application. Both achieve very low sediment or higher hydrodesulphurization (HDS) and Conradson carbon (CCR) removal for improved bottom upgrading. tabs., figs.

  6. Nitrogen removal from wastewater by a catalytic oxidation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, T L; Macinnes, J M; Cliffe, K R

    2001-06-01

    The ammonia-containing waste produced in industries is usually characterized by high concentration and high temperature, and is not treatable by biological methods directly. In this study, a hydrophobic Pt/SDB catalyst was first used in a trickle-bed reactor to remove ammonia from wastewater. In the reactor, both stripping and catalytic oxidation occur simultaneously. It was found that higher temperature and higher oxygen partial pressure enhanced the ammonia removal. A reaction pathway, which involves oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, which then further reacts with ammonia to produce nitrogen and water, was confirmed. Small amounts of by-products, nitrites and nitrates were also detected in the resultant reaction solution. These compounds came from the absorption of nitrogen oxides. Both the minimum NO2- selectivity and maximum ammonia removal were achieved when the resultant pH of treated water was near 7.5 for a feed of unbuffered ammonia solution.

  7. Computational enzyme design: transitioning from catalytic proteins to enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Wai Shun; Siegel, Justin B

    2014-08-01

    The widespread interest in enzymes stem from their ability to catalyze chemical reactions under mild and ecologically friendly conditions with unparalleled catalytic proficiencies. While thousands of naturally occurring enzymes have been identified and characterized, there are still numerous important applications for which there are no biological catalysts capable of performing the desired chemical transformation. In order to engineer enzymes for which there is no natural starting point, efforts using a combination of quantum chemistry and force-field based protein molecular modeling have led to the design of novel proteins capable of catalyzing chemical reactions not catalyzed by naturally occurring enzymes. Here we discuss the current status and potential avenues to pursue as the field of computational enzyme design moves forward. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Hydrogenation of Maltose in Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Maltitol Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makertihartha I.G.B.N.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Maltitol is one of the low-calorie sweeteners which has a major role in food industries. Due to its characteristics of comparable sweetness level to sucrose, maltitol can be a suitable sugar replacement. In this work, catalytic membrane reactor (CMR was examined in maltitol production through hydrogenation of maltose. Commercial ceramic membrane impregnated with Kalcat 8030 Nickel was used as the CMR. The reaction was conducted at a batch mode operation, 95 to 110°C of temperature, and 5 to 8 bar of pressure. In the range of working conditions used in this study, up to 47% conversion was achieved. The reaction conversion was significantly affected by temperature and pressure. Results of this preliminary study indicated that CMR can be used for hydrogenation of maltose with good performance under a relatively low operating pressure.

  9. Methods and apparatus for catalytic hydrothermal gasification of biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Butner, Robert Scott; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Zacher, Alan H.; Hart, Todd R.

    2012-08-14

    Continuous processing of wet biomass feedstock by catalytic hydrothermal gasification must address catalyst fouling and poisoning. One solution can involve heating the wet biomass with a heating unit to a temperature sufficient for organic constituents in the feedstock to decompose, for precipitates of inorganic wastes to form, for preheating the wet feedstock in preparation for subsequent separation of sulfur contaminants, or combinations thereof. Treatment further includes separating the precipitates out of the wet feedstock, removing sulfur contaminants, or both using a solids separation unit and a sulfur separation unit, respectively. Having removed much of the inorganic wastes and the sulfur that can cause poisoning and fouling, the wet biomass feedstock can be exposed to the heterogeneous catalyst for gasification.

  10. Catalytic silica particles via template-directed molecular imprinting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markowitz, M.A.; Kust, P.R.; Deng, G.; Schoen, P.E.; Dordick, J.S.; Clark, D.S.; Gaber, B.P.

    2000-02-22

    The surfaces of silica particle were molecularly imprinted with an {alpha}-chymotrypsin transition-state analogue (TSA) by utilizing the technique of template-directed synthesis of mineralized materials. The resulting catalytic particles hydrolyzed amides in an enantioselective manner. A mixture of a nonionic surfactant and the acylated chymotrysin TSA, with the TSA acting as the headgroup at the surfactant-water interface, was used to form a microemulsion for silica particle formation. Incorporation of amine-, dihydroimidazole-, and carboxylate-terminated trialkoxysilanes into the particles during imprinting resulted in enhancement of the rates of amide hydrolysis. Acylated imprint molecules formed more effective imprints in the presence of the functionalized silanes than nonacylated imprint molecules. Particles surface-imprinted with the chymotrypsin TSA were selective for the trypsin substrate, and particles surface-imprinted with the L-isomer of the enzyme TSA were enantioselective for the D-isomer of the substrate.

  11. Catalytic activity trends of CO oxidation – A DFT study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Tao

    theoretical study of CO oxidation with experimental studies. The latter shows promoted catalytic activity when gold particle size decreases to 5 nm. Oxidizing CO by N2O was found to involve a CO␣O transition state, with atomic O adsorbed on the gold B5 sites and CO on the corners. On the other hand, CO...... and experiment were found to be the same. The experiment findings are in good agreement with our theoretical calculations. The second part of the thesis focuses on improving the convergence property of Quasi-Newton algorithm. The eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix of 54 atoms bulk Cu model are calculated......, and the sizes of eigenvalues follow power-law distribution. It is found that the anharmonicity of the weak modes lead to poor Newton step and poor Hessian update in BFGS type Quasi-Newton algorithm, which slow down the geometry optimization. Line search that fulfills Wolff conditions is then applied to improve...

  12. Catalytic ring opening of decalin. Biofunctional versus hydrogenolytic pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weitkamp, J.; Rabl, S.; Haas, A.; Santi, D. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Chemical Technology; Ferrari, M.; Calemma, V. [Eni R and M Div., San Donato Milanese (Italy)

    2010-12-30

    Ir/silica, Pt/La-X and Rh/H-Beta were prepared and tested in the hydroconversion of cisdecalin at different temperatures. The catalytic tests were carried out under hydrogen in a high-pressure flow-type apparatus at 5.2 MPa. On the three catalysts open-chain decane yields up to 20 % were achieved, which is much higher than the yields reported so far in the literature. Pt/La-X and Rh/H-Beta behave as bifunctional catalysts with a high tendency for skeletal isomerization. On these catalysts the so-called paring reaction via carbenium ions occurs, leading to iso-butane and methylcyclopentane as main hydrocracked products. On Ir/SiO{sub 2}, carbon-carbon bond cleavage occurs through hydrogenolysis on the noble metal without prior isomerization. As a consequence the product spectrum is less complex than on the bifunctional catalysts which makes the system particularly amenable to mechanistic studies. (orig.)

  13. Fluidized bed catalytic cracking regenerator model: grid effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errazu, A.F. (Universidad Nacional del Sur, Conicet, Argentina); De Lasa, H.I.; Sarti, F.

    1979-04-01

    A grid model including thermal effects is proposed. The aim is the simulation of a fluidized catalytic cracking regenerator similar to the industrial unit of Destileria La Palta, YPF, Argentina. It is demonstrated that a simple C.S.T.R. model without bypass of gas feed entering the bed provides a good approach for representing the fluidized bed including the grid region. In addition, by means of the C.S.T.R. model, it is shown that there exist two characteristic operating regions: a zone where (C/sub 0//sup 0/ to C/sub c/) depends on the initial coke concentration and a zone where (C/sub c//sub 0/ to C/sub c/) is controlled by oxygen supply. 40 references, 6 figures, 5 tables.

  14. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Bio-Oil for Chemicals and Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2006-02-14

    The scope of work includes optimizing processing conditions and demonstrating catalyst lifetime for catalyst formulations that are readily scaleable to commercial operations. We use a bench-scale, continuous-flow, packed-bed, catalytic, tubular reactor, which can be operated in the range of 100-400 mL/hr., from 50-400 C and up to 20MPa (see Figure 1). With this unit we produce upgraded bio-oil from whole bio-oil or useful bio-oil fractions, specifically pyrolytic lignin. The product oils are fractionated, for example by distillation, for recovery of chemical product streams. Other products from our tests have been used in further testing in petroleum refining technology at UOP and fractionation for product recovery in our own lab. Further scale-up of the technology is envisioned and we will carry out or support process design efforts with industrial partners, such as UOP.

  15. Catalytic hydrotreating of waste cooking oil for renewable diesel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezergianni, Stella; Dimitriadis, Athanasios [Centre for Research and Technology Hellas (CERTH), Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2013-06-01

    A new technology based on catalytic hydrotreating of Waste Cooking Oil (WCO) for biodiesel production has been developed in the Centre for Research and Technology Hellas (CERTH). The main premise of this process is the conversion of the WCO fatty acids into normal- and iso-paraffins. The technology was evaluated in hydroprocessing pilot plants of CERTH where feedstock origin as well as optimal catalysts and operating parameters where identified. The fractionated diesel product, called ''white'' diesel exhibits excellent fuel properties including higher heating value (over 49 MJ/kg), negligible acidity, higher oxidation stability and higher cetane number ({proportional_to}77) than conventional biodiesel. The overall product yield is {proportional_to}92% v/v. This new suggested technology is extremely appealing as it employs existing refinery infrastructure and expertise, offers feedstock flexibility, leaves no by-product and above all is economically attractive. (orig.)

  16. Transfer Hydrogenation: Employing a Simple, In Situ Prepared Catalytic System

    KAUST Repository

    Ang, Eleanor Pei Ling

    2017-04-01

    Transfer hydrogenation has been recognized to be an important synthetic method in both academic and industrial research to obtain valuable products including alcohols. Transition metal catalysts based on precious metals, such as Ru, Rh and Ir, are typically employed for this process. In recent years, iron-based catalysts have attracted considerable attention as a greener and more sustainable alternative since iron is earth abundant, inexpensive and non-toxic. In this work, a combination of iron disulfide with chelating bipyridine ligand was found to be effective for the transfer hydrogenation of a variety of ketones to the corresponding alcohols in the presence of a simple base. It provided a convenient and economical way to conduct transfer hydrogenation. A plausible role of sulfide next to the metal center in facilitating the catalytic reaction is demonstrated.

  17. Hydrogen production from biomass tar by catalytic steam reforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang Jun; Choi, Young-Chan; Lee, Jae-Goo

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic steam reforming of model biomass tar, toluene being a major component, was performed at various conditions of temperature, steam injection rate, catalyst size, and space time. Two kinds of nickel-based commercial catalyst, the Katalco 46-3Q and the Katalco 46-6Q, were evaluated and compared with dolomite catalyst. Production of hydrogen generally increased with reaction temperature, steam injection rate and space time and decreased with catalyst size. In particular, zirconia-promoted nickel-based catalyst, Katalco 46-6Q, showed a higher tar conversion efficiency and shows 100% conversion even relatively lower temperature conditions of 600 deg. C. Apparent activation energy was estimated to 94 and 57 kJ/mol for dolomite and nickel-based catalyst respectively.

  18. Catalytic conversion of methane: Carbon dioxide reforming and oxidative coupling

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Natural gas conversion remains one of the essential technologies for current energy needs. This review focuses on the mechanistic aspects of the development of efficient and durable catalysts for two reactions, carbon dioxide reforming and the oxidative coupling of methane. These two reactions have tremendous technological significance for practical application in industry. An understanding of the fundamental aspects and reaction mechanisms of the catalytic reactions reviewed in this study would support the design of industrial catalysts. CO 2 reforming of methane utilizes CO 2, which is often stored in large quantities, to convert as a reactant. Strategies to eliminate carbon deposition, which is the major problem associated with this reaction, are discussed. The oxidative coupling of methane directly produces ethylene in one reactor through a slightly exothermic reaction, potentially minimizing the capital cost of the natural gas conversion process. The focus of discussion in this review will be on the attainable yield of C 2 products by rigorous kinetic analyses.

  19. Catalytic transformation of functionalized carboxylic acids using multifunctional rhenium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naruto, Masayuki; Agrawal, Santosh; Toda, Katsuaki; Saito, Susumu

    2017-06-13

    Carboxylic acids (CAs) are one of the most ubiquitous and important chemical feedstocks available from biorenewable resources, CO 2 , and the petrochemical industry. Unfortunately, chemoselective catalytic transformations of CH n CO 2 H (n = 1-3) groups into other functionalities remain a significant challenge. Herein, we report rhenium V complexes as extremely effective precatalysts for this purpose. Compared to previously reported heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysts derived from high- or low-valent metals, the present method involves a α-C-H bond functionalization, a hydrogenation, and a hydrogenolysis, which affords functionalized alcohols with a wide substrate scope and high chemoselectivity under relatively mild reaction conditions. The results represent an important step toward a paradigm shift from 'low-valent' to 'high-valent' metal complexes by exploring a new portfolio of selective functional group transformations of highly oxygenated organic substrates, as well as toward the exploitation of CAs as a valuable biorenewable feedstock.

  20. Studies of coupled chemical and catalytic coal conversion methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    This report concerns our research on base-catalyzed coal solubilization and a new approach for hydrogen addition. The work on base-catalyzed, chemical solubilization is continuing. this report is focused on the hydrogenation research. Specifically it deals with the use of arene chromium carbonyl complexes as reagents for the addition of dideuterium to coal molecules. In one phase of the work, he has established that the aromatic hydrocarbons in a representative coal liquid can be converted in very good yield to arene chromium carbonyl compounds. In a second phase of the work directly related to our objective of improved methods for catalytic hydrogenation, he has established that the aromatic constituents of the same coal liquid add dideuterium in the presence of added napththalene chromium carbonyl.

  1. Catalytic aerobic oxidation of bio-renewable chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbanev, Yury

    , EDS, XRF and other methods. Supported gold and ruthenium hydroxide catalyst systems were explored for the aerobic oxidation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDA), a potential polymer building block for the plastic industry, or its dimethyl ester (FDMC). High product......-free conditions. Moreover, a detailed study on the performance and stability of the ruthenium hydroxide catalysts on magnesium-containing supports under reaction conditions was conducted. The aerobic oxidation of HMF to form another value-added chemical, 2,5-diformylfuran (DFF), was also investigated......Ox deposited on various metal oxides. Furthermore, this thesis presents the results of the catalytic aerobic oxidative degradation of higher alcohols over supported ruthenium hydroxide catalysts. A very efficient oxidative cleavage of vic-diols to form respective acids was also shown under examined conditions...

  2. Catalytic production of sugar alcohols (polyols) and their application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, R; Straetz, A; Vollheim, G

    1980-07-01

    The article surveys the numerous applications of the principal sugar alcohols sorbitol and xylitol and their world production in 1978. Nowadays, the industrial production of sugar alcohols is almost exclusively by catalytic hydrogenation of the corresponding sugars; thus sorbitol is manufactured by hydrogenation of D-glucose, xylitol by hydrogenation of xylose, and mannitol by hydrogenation of invert sugar or fructose. Some 80% of the world production of sugar alcohols are manufactured in batch suspension processes using Raney nickel catalysts. Apart from the Atlas Powder continuous suspension process employing nickel-carrier catalysts, continuous processes have recently been developed which use Raney nickel and prove more economical owing to the lower catalyst costs. Trickling processes with fixed catalyst continue to play a minor role. Available production capacity based on batch suspension processes can be expanded by process optimization and new catalyst developments. A newly developed special Raney nickel catalyst reduces the specific catalyst consumption by about 50%.

  3. The impact of catalytic materials on fuel reformulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossini, Stefano [Snamprogetti, S. Donato Milanese, Milan (Italy)

    2003-01-15

    Fuel reformulation has been seeded by the growing consciousness of the potential damages mankind was causing to the ecosystem and to itself. Fuel reformulation means that fuels are defined on a chemical composition base with additional engine-technology related standards rather than on pure performance bases. These standards, which are getting more and more stringent, can be met by different leverages, mainly catalysts and processes operating conditions.This survey reviews the contribution of catalytic materials to the production of cleaner fuel components through some significant examples selected from scientific and technical literature. Having described the trends in automotive fuels quality, production of gasoline and diesel pool components is discussed relating the required properties to the material active site configuration, i.e. acidity/basicity, structural parameters, physical constraints. While distinctions are made between pathways leading to gasoline and those leading to diesel, sulfur removal is faced on a more generalized approach.

  4. ZVI (Fe0) desalination: catalytic partial desalination of saline aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antia, David D. J.

    2018-05-01

    Globally, salinization affects between 100 and 1000 billion m3 a-1 of irrigation water. The discovery that zero valent iron (ZVI, Fe0) could be used to desalinate water (using intra-particle catalysis in a diffusion environment) raises the possibility that large-scale in situ desalination of aquifers could be undertaken to support agriculture. ZVI desalination removes NaCl by an adsorption-desorption process in a multi-stage cross-coupled catalytic process. This study considers the potential application of two ZVI desalination catalyst types for in situ aquifer desalination. The feasibility of using ZVI catalysts when placed in situ within an aquifer to produce 100 m3 d-1 of partially desalinated water from a saline aquifer is considered.

  5. Catalytic Deoxydehydration of Carbohydrates and Polyols to Chemicals and Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas, Kenneth M. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2016-01-15

    As the world's fossil fuel resources are being depleted and their costs increase, there is an urgent need to discover and develop new processes for the conversion of renewable, biomass resources into fuels and chemical feedstocks. Research and development in this area have been given high priority by both governmental agencies and industry. To increase the energy content and decrease the boiling points of biomass-derived carbohydrates and polyols to the useful liquid range it is necessary to chemically remove water (dehydrate) and, preferably, oxygen (deoxygenate/reduce). The poly-hydroxylic nature of carbohydrates is attractive for their use as functionalized chemical building blocks, but it presents a daunting challenge for their selective conversion to single product chemicals or fuels. The long term, practical objective of this project is to develop catalytic processes for the deoxydehydration (DODH) of biomass-derived carbohydrates and polyols to produce unsaturated alcohols and hydrocarbons of value as chemical feedstocks and fuels; DODH: polyol + reductant --(LMOx catalyst)--> unsaturate + oxidized reductant + H2O. Limited prior studies have established the viability of the DODH process with expensive phosphine reductants and rhenium-catalysts. Initial studies in the PI's laboratory have now demonstrated: 1) the moderately efficient conversion of glycols to olefins by the economical sulfite salts is catalyzed by MeReO3 and Z+ReO4-; 2) effective phosphine-based catalytic DODH of representative glycols to olefins by cheap LMoO2 complexes; and 3) computational studies (with K. Houk, UCLA) have identified several Mo-, W-, and V-oxo complexes that are likely to catalyze glycol DODH. Seeking practically useful DODH reactions of complex polyols and new understanding of the reactivity of polyoxo-metal species with biomass-oxygenates we will employ a two-pronged approach: 1) investigate experimentally the reactivity, both stoichiometric and catalytic, of

  6. Fabrication of fuel cell electrodes and other catalytic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.L.

    1987-02-11

    A porous layer of catalyst material suitable for use as an electrode in a molten carbonate fuel cell includes elongated pores substantially extending across the layer thickness. The catalyst layer is prepared by depositing particulate catalyst material into polymeric flocking on a substrate surface by a procedure such as tape casting. The loaded substrate is heated in a series of steps with rising temperatures to set the tape, thermally decompose the substrate with flocking and sinter bond the catalyst particles into a porous catalytic layer with elongated pores across its thickness. Employed as an electrode, the elongated pores provide distribution of reactant gas into contact with catalyst particles wetted by molten electrolyte. 1 fig.

  7. Synthesis and catalytic applications of combined zeolitic/mesoporous materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarian Vernimmen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, research concerning nanoporous siliceous materials has been focused on mesoporous materials with intrinsic zeolitic features. These materials are thought to be superior, because they are able to combine (i the enhanced diffusion and accessibility for larger molecules and viscous fluids typical of mesoporous materials with (ii the remarkable stability, catalytic activity and selectivity of zeolites. This review gives an overview of the state of the art concerning combined zeolitic/mesoporous materials. Focus is put on the synthesis and the applications of the combined zeolitic/mesoporous materials. The different synthesis approaches and formation mechanisms leading to these materials are comprehensively discussed and compared. Moreover, Ti-containing nanoporous materials as redox catalysts are discussed to illustrate a potential implementation of combined zeolitic/mesoporous materials.

  8. Highly Efficient Catalytic Cyclic Carbonate Formation by Pyridyl Salicylimines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Saravanan; Park, Joonho; Byun, Jeehye; Jung, Yousung; Yavuz, Cafer T

    2018-03-21

    Cyclic carbonates as industrial commodities offer a viable nonredox carbon dioxide fixation, and suitable heterogeneous catalysts are vital for their widespread implementation. Here, we report a highly efficient heterogeneous catalyst for CO 2 addition to epoxides based on a newly identified active catalytic pocket consisting of pyridine, imine, and phenol moieties. The polymeric, metal-free catalyst derived from this active site converts less-reactive styrene oxide under atmospheric pressure in quantitative yield and selectivity to the corresponding carbonate. The catalyst does not need additives, solvents, metals, or co-catalysts, can be reused at least 10 cycles without the loss of activity, and scaled up easily to a kilogram scale. Density functional theory calculations reveal that the nucleophilicity of pyridine base gets stronger due to the conjugated imines and H-bonding from phenol accelerates the reaction forward by stabilizing the intermediate.

  9. Synthesis, structure characterization and catalytic activity of nickel tungstate nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi; Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi; Khalilian-Shalamzari, Morteza; Zahedi, Mir Mahdi; Hajimirsadeghi, Seiedeh Somayyeh; Omrani, Ismail

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: NiWO 4 nanoparticles were prepared via precipitation technique. Experimental parameters of procedure were optimized statistically. Highlights: ► NiWO 4 spherical nanoparticles were synthesized via direct precipitation method. ► Taguchi robust design was used for optimization of synthesis reaction parameters. ► Composition and structural properties of NiWO 4 nanoparticles were characterized. ► EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR, UV–vis and photoluminescence techniques were employed. ► Catalytic activity of the product in a cyclo-addition reaction was investigated. - Abstract: Taguchi robust design was applied to optimize experimental parameters for controllable, simple and fast synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles. NiWO 4 nanoparticles were synthesized by precipitation reaction involving addition of nickel ion solution to the tungstate aqueous reagent and then formation of nickel tungstate nucleolus which are insoluble in aqueous media. Effects of various parameters such as nickel and tungstate concentrations, flow rate of reagent addition and reactor temperature on diameter of synthesized nickel tungstate nanoparticles were investigated experimentally by the aid of orthogonal array design. The results for analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that particle size of nickel tungstate can be effectively tuned by controlling significant variables involving nickel and tungstate concentrations and flow rate; while, temperature of the reactor has a no considerable effect on the size of NiWO 4 particles. The ANOVA results proposed the optimum conditions for synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles via this technique. Also, under optimum condition nanoparticles of NiWO 4 were prepared and their structure and chemical composition were characterized by means of EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, UV–vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence. Finally, catalytic activity of the nanoparticles in a cycloaddition reaction was examined.

  10. Synthesis, structure characterization and catalytic activity of nickel tungstate nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi, E-mail: pourmortazavi@yahoo.com [Faculty of Material and Manufacturing Technologies, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi, E-mail: rahiminasrabadi@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Imam Hossein University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalilian-Shalamzari, Morteza [Department of Chemistry, Imam Hossein University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zahedi, Mir Mahdi; Hajimirsadeghi, Seiedeh Somayyeh [Islamic Azad University, Varamin Pishva Branch, Varamin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Omrani, Ismail [Department of Chemistry, Imam Hossein University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: NiWO{sub 4} nanoparticles were prepared via precipitation technique. Experimental parameters of procedure were optimized statistically. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiWO{sub 4} spherical nanoparticles were synthesized via direct precipitation method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Taguchi robust design was used for optimization of synthesis reaction parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composition and structural properties of NiWO{sub 4} nanoparticles were characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR, UV-vis and photoluminescence techniques were employed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalytic activity of the product in a cyclo-addition reaction was investigated. - Abstract: Taguchi robust design was applied to optimize experimental parameters for controllable, simple and fast synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles. NiWO{sub 4} nanoparticles were synthesized by precipitation reaction involving addition of nickel ion solution to the tungstate aqueous reagent and then formation of nickel tungstate nucleolus which are insoluble in aqueous media. Effects of various parameters such as nickel and tungstate concentrations, flow rate of reagent addition and reactor temperature on diameter of synthesized nickel tungstate nanoparticles were investigated experimentally by the aid of orthogonal array design. The results for analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that particle size of nickel tungstate can be effectively tuned by controlling significant variables involving nickel and tungstate concentrations and flow rate; while, temperature of the reactor has a no considerable effect on the size of NiWO{sub 4} particles. The ANOVA results proposed the optimum conditions for synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles via this technique. Also, under optimum condition nanoparticles of NiWO{sub 4} were prepared and their structure and chemical composition were characterized by means of EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, UV

  11. Down-hole catalytic upgrading of heavy crude oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weissman, J.G.; Kessler, R.V.; Sawicki, R.A.; Belgrave, J.D.M.; Laureshen, C.J.; Mehta, S.A.; Moore, R.G.; Ursenbach, M.G. [University of Calgary, Calgary, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering

    1996-07-01

    Several processing options have been developed to accomplish near-well bore in-situ upgrading of heavy crude oils. These processes are designed to pass oil over a fixed bed of catalyst prior to entering the production well, the catalyst being placed by conventional gravel pack methods. The presence of brine and the need to provide heat and reactant gases in a down-hole environment provide challenges not present in conventional processing. These issues were addressed and the processes demonstrated by use of a modified combustion tube apparatus. Middle-Eastern heavy crude oil and the corresponding brine were used at the appropriate reservoir conditions. In-situ combustion was used to generate reactive gases and to drive fluids over a heated sand or catalysts bed, simulating the catalyst contacting portion of the proposed processes. The heavy crude oil was found to be amenable to in-situ combustion at anticipated reservoir conditions, with a relatively low air requirement. Forcing the oil to flow over a heated zone prior to production results in some upgrading of the oil, as compared to the original oil, due to thermal effects. Passing the oil over a hydroprocessing catalyst located in the heated zone results in a product that is significantly upgraded as compared to either the original oil or thermally processed oil. Catalytic upgrading is due to hydrogenation and the results in about a 50% sulfur removal and an 8{degree} API gravity increase. Additionally, the heated catalyst was found to be efficient at converting CO to additional H{sub 2}. While all of the technologies needed for a successful field trial of in-situ catalytic upgrading exist, a demonstration has yet to be undertaken. 27 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Catalytical degradation of relevant pollutants from waters using magnetic nanocatalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadejde, C., E-mail: claudia.nadejde@uaic.ro [Interdisciplinary Research Department – Field Science, ‘Alexandru Ioan Cuza’ University, Lascar Catargi 54, 700107 Iasi (Romania); Neamtu, M., E-mail: mariana.neamtu@uaic.ro [Interdisciplinary Research Department – Field Science, ‘Alexandru Ioan Cuza’ University, Lascar Catargi 54, 700107 Iasi (Romania); Schneider, R.J.; Hodoroaba, V.-D. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany); Ababei, G. [National Institute of Research and Development for Technical Physics, Dimitrie Mangeron Bd. 47, 700050 Iasi (Romania); Panne, U. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany); Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Department of Chemistry, Brook-Taylor-Str. 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Non-hazardous, facile and inexpensive procedure for efficient wastewater treatment. • Chemical synthesis of ferrous oxalate modified Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. • Structural characterization confirmed the senzitized catalysts' nanometric size. • The highly magnetic catalysts can be easily recovered from solution. • 99.7% of azo dye was removed in 4 h using Fenton-like process in alkaline media. - Abstract: The catalytic efficiency of two magnetically responsive nanocatalysts was evaluated for the degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and Reactive Yellow 84 (RY84) azo dyes using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant under very mild conditions (atmospheric pressure, room temperature). In order to obtain the nanocatalysts, the surface of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles, prepared by a co-precipitation method, was further modified with ferrous oxalate, a highly sensitive non-hazardous reducing agent. The sensitized nanomaterials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry, and used in the catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation (CWHPO) of RB5 and RY84, in laboratory-scale experiments. The effect of important variables such as catalyst dosage, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, and contact time was studied in the dye degradation kinetics. The results showed that it was possible to remove up to 99.7% dye in the presence of 20 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} after 240 min of oxidation for a catalyst concentration of 10 g L{sup −1} at 25 °C and initial pH value of 9.0. CWHPO of reactive dyes using sensitized magnetic nanocatalysts can be a suitable pre-treatment method for complete decolorization of effluents from textile dyeing and finishing processes, once the optimum operating conditions are established.

  13. Direct instrumental identification of catalytically active surface sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfisterer, Jonas H. K.; Liang, Yunchang; Schneider, Oliver; Bandarenka, Aliaksandr S.

    2017-09-01

    The activity of heterogeneous catalysts—which are involved in some 80 per cent of processes in the chemical and energy industries—is determined by the electronic structure of specific surface sites that offer optimal binding of reaction intermediates. Directly identifying and monitoring these sites during a reaction should therefore provide insight that might aid the targeted development of heterogeneous catalysts and electrocatalysts (those that participate in electrochemical reactions) for practical applications. The invention of the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) and the electrochemical STM promised to deliver such imaging capabilities, and both have indeed contributed greatly to our atomistic understanding of heterogeneous catalysis. But although the STM has been used to probe and initiate surface reactions, and has even enabled local measurements of reactivity in some systems, it is not generally thought to be suited to the direct identification of catalytically active surface sites under reaction conditions. Here we demonstrate, however, that common STMs can readily map the catalytic activity of surfaces with high spatial resolution: we show that by monitoring relative changes in the tunnelling current noise, active sites can be distinguished in an almost quantitative fashion according to their ability to catalyse the hydrogen-evolution reaction or the oxygen-reduction reaction. These data allow us to evaluate directly the importance and relative contribution to overall catalyst activity of different defects and sites at the boundaries between two materials. With its ability to deliver such information and its ready applicability to different systems, we anticipate that our method will aid the rational design of heterogeneous catalysts.

  14. Computational Modeling of the Catalytic Cycle of Glutathione Peroxidase Nanomimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirabadi, Ramesh; Izadyar, Mohammad

    2016-12-29

    To elucidate the role of a derivative of ebselen as a mimic of the antioxidant selenoenzyme glutathione peroxidase, density functional theory and solvent-assisted proton exchange (SAPE) were applied to model the reaction mechanism in a catalytic cycle. This mimic plays the role of glutathione peroxidase through a four-step catalytic cycle. The first step is described as the oxidation of 1 in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, while selenoxide is reduced by methanthiol at the second step. In the third step of the reaction, the reduction of selenenylsulfide occurs by methanthiol, and the selenenic acid is dehydrated at the final step. Based on the kinetic parameters, step 4 is the rate-determining step (RDS) of the reaction. The bond strength of the atoms involved in the RDS is discussed with the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM). Low value of electron density, ρ(r), and positive Laplacian values are the evidence for the covalent nature of the hydrogen bonds rupture (O 30 -H 31 , O 33 -H 34 ). A change in the sign of the Laplacian, L(r), from the positive value in the reactant to a negative character at the transition state indicates the depletion of the charge density, confirming the N 5 -H 10 and O 11 -Se 1 bond breaking. The analysis of electron location function (ELF) and localized orbital locator (LOL) of the Se 1 -N 5 and Se 1 -O 11 bonds have been done by multi-WFN program. High values of ELF and LOL at the transition state regions between the Se, N, and O atoms display the bond formation. Finally, the main donor-acceptor interaction energies were analyzed using the natural bond orbital analysis for investigation of their stabilization effects on the critical bonds at the RDS.

  15. Selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by olefins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radtke, F

    1997-12-31

    The removal of nitrogen oxides from the exhaust of lean-burn gasoline fuelled and diesel-fuelled engines, operating under net oxidizing conditions, has recently attracted considerable attention. In this work, three different catalytic systems (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Cu/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Cu/ZSM-5) are investigated for their suitability as catalysts for the selective reduction of nitrogen oxides by hydrocarbons in excess oxygen. Special emphasis is given to the formation of potentially harmful byproducts such as hydrogen cyanide (HCN), cyanic acid (HNCO), ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). The effect of reaction temperature, nitrogen oxide (NO, NO{sub 2}), hydrocarbon (ethene, propene) and water on activity and the formation of byproducts is investigated. In situ FTIR spectroscopy and temperature-programmed surface reactions (TPSR) of absorbed species in different atmospheres were used to investigate the nature and reactivity of adsorbates formed under reaction conditions. The catalytic activity was strongly influenced by the presence of water in the feed. The effects of the other parameters were suppressed and the performance generally decreased, except when propene was used for the reduction of NO{sub x} over Cu/ZSM-5. Over Cu/ZSM-5 clearly higher conversion was obtained, when ethene was used as reducing agent, while there was no significant difference when starting from NO or NO{sub 2}. In contrast, with {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} NO{sub 2} was reduced more efficiently than NO with both reductants. The impregnation of {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with copper led to an extensive loss of this performance. For dry feeds and with increasing CuO loading, the catalysts reached maximum activity at lower temperature and the maximum yield of nitrogen slightly decreased. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  16. Performance simulations of catalytic converters during the Federal Test Procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, H.; Shamim, T.; Sengupta, S.; Son, S.; Adamczyk, A.A.

    1999-07-01

    A numerical study is carried out to predict the tailpipe emissions and emission conversion efficiencies of unburned hydrocarbon, nitrogen oxide and carbon monoxide flowing through a catalytic converter during the Federal Test Procedure (FTP). The model considers the effect of heat transfer in the catalytic converter, coupled with catalyst chemical kinetics, including an oxygen storage mechanism. The resulting governing equations based on the conservation of mass and energy are solved by a tridiagonal matrix algorithm (TDMA) with a successive line under relaxation method. The numerical scheme for this non-linear problem is found to have good convergence efficiency. The simulation for the complete FTP cycle is accomplished in less than fifteen minutes on a desktop personal computer. A 13-step reaction mechanism plus a nine-step O{sub 2} storage mechanism is used to simulate the chemical kinetics. The energy equations include the heat loss due to conduction and convection plus the energy liberated by chemical reactions. The effect of radiation is assumed to be negligible and is not considered. The results of the numerical model for both the instantaneous and accumulated emissions are found to be in good agreement with experimental measurements. The conversion efficiencies of HC, CO and NO as predicted by the model are found to be within 5% of those dynamic measurements, and calculated results of accumulated HC, CO and NO{sub x} are in fair agreement with experimental measurements. The transient measurements are also used to check the robustness of the numerical model. The model is found to be robust and hence can simulate various operating conditions of engine output to the converter.

  17. Catalytic transformation of methyl benzenes over zeolite catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Khattaf, S.

    2011-02-01

    Catalytic transformation of three methyl benzenes (toluene, m-xylene, and 1,2,4-trimethyl benzene) has been investigated over ZSM-5, TNU-9, mordenite and SSZ-33 catalysts in a novel riser simulator at different operating conditions. Catalytic experiments were carried out in the temperature range of 300-400 °C to understand the transformation of these alkyl benzenes over large pore (mordenite and SSZ-33) in contrast to medium-pore (ZSM-5 and TNU-9) zeolite-based catalysts. The effect of reaction conditions on the isomerization to disproportionation product ratio, distribution of trimethylbenzene (TMB) isomers, and p-xylene/o-xylene ratios are reported. The sequence of reactivity of the three alkyl benzenes depends upon the pore structure of zeolites. The zeolite structure controls primarily the diffusion of reactants and products while the acidity of these zeolites is of a secondary importance. In the case of medium pore zeolites, the order of conversion was m-xylene > 1,2,4-TMB > toluene. Over large pore zeolites the order of reactivity was 1,2,4-TMB > m-xylene > toluene for SSZ-33 catalyst, and m-xylene ∼ 1,2,4-TMB > toluene over mordenite. Significant effect of pore size between ZSM-5 and TNU-9 was observed; although TNU-9 is also 3D 10-ring channel system, its slightly larger pores compared with ZSM-5 provide sufficient reaction space to behave like large-pore zeolites in transformation of aromatic hydrocarbons. We have also carried out kinetic studies for these reactions and activation energies for all three reactants over all zeolite catalysts under study have been calculated. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  18. Experimental investigation on emission reduction in neem oil biodiesel using selective catalytic reduction and catalytic converter techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Karthickeyan

    2018-05-01

    In the present study, non-edible seed oil namely raw neem oil was converted into biodiesel using transesterification process. In the experimentation, two biodiesel blends were prepared namely B25 (25% neem oil methyl ester with 75% of diesel) and B50 (50% neem oil methyl ester with 50% diesel). Urea-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technique with catalytic converter (CC) was fixed in the exhaust tail pipe of the engine for the reduction of engine exhaust emissions. Initially, the engine was operated with diesel as a working fluid and followed by refilling of biodiesel blends B25 and B50 to obtain the baseline readings without SCR and CC. Then, the same procedure was repeated with SCR and CC technique for emission reduction measurement in diesel, B25 and B50 sample. The experimental results revealed that the B25 blend showed higher break thermal efficiency (BTE) and exhaust gas temperature (EGT) with lower break-specific fuel consumption (BSFC) than B50 blend at all loads. On comparing with biodiesel blends, diesel experiences increased BTE of 31.9% with reduced BSFC of 0.29 kg/kWh at full load. A notable emission reduction was noticed for all test fuels in SCR and CC setup. At full load, B25 showed lower carbon monoxide (CO) of 0.09% volume, hydrocarbon (HC) of 24 ppm, and smoke of 14 HSU and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) of 735 ppm than diesel and B50 in SCR and CC setup. On the whole, the engine with SCR and CC setup showed better performance and emission characteristics than standard engine operation.

  19. 40 CFR 60.105a - Monitoring of emissions and operations for fluid catalytic cracking units (FCCU) and fluid coking...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units. (iii) The owner or operator shall install, operate... for fluid catalytic cracking units (FCCU) and fluid coking units (FCU). 60.105a Section 60.105a... and operations for fluid catalytic cracking units (FCCU) and fluid coking units (FCU). (a) FCCU and...

  20. Effect of Catalytic Layer Thickness on Diameter of Vertically Aligned Individual Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Kyung Jung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of catalytic thin film thickness on the diameter control of individual carbon nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Individual carbon nanotubes were grown on catalytic nanodot arrays, which were fabricated by e-beam lithography and e-beam evaporation. During e-beam evaporation of the nanodot pattern, more catalytic metal was deposited at the edge of the nanodots than the desired catalyst thickness. Because of this phenomenon, carbon atoms diffused faster near the center of the dots than at the edge of the dots. The carbon atoms, which were gathered at the interface between the catalytic nanodot and the diffusion barrier, accumulated near the center of the dot and lifted the catalyst off. From the experiments, an individual carbon nanotube with the same diameter as that of the catalytic nanodot was obtained from a 5 nm thick catalytic nanodot; however, an individual carbon nanotube with a smaller diameter (~40% reduction was obtained from a 50 nm thick nanodot. We found that the thicker the catalytic layer, the greater the reduction in diameter of the carbon nanotubes. The diameter-controlled carbon nanotubes could have applications in bio- and nanomaterial scanning and as a contrast medium for magnetic resonance imaging.

  1. Green technology for conversion of renewable hydrocarbon based on plasma-catalytic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedirchyk, Igor; Nedybaliuk, Oleg; Chernyak, Valeriy; Demchina, Valentina

    2016-09-01

    The ability to convert renewable biomass into fuels and chemicals is one of the most important steps on our path to green technology and sustainable development. However, the complex composition of biomass poses a major problem for established conversion technologies. The high temperature of thermochemical biomass conversion often leads to the appearance of undesirable byproducts and waste. The catalytic conversion has reduced yield and feedstock range. Plasma-catalytic reforming technology opens a new path for biomass conversion by replacing feedstock-specific catalysts with free radicals generated in the plasma. We studied the plasma-catalytic conversion of several renewable hydrocarbons using the air plasma created by rotating gliding discharge. We found that plasma-catalytic hydrocarbon conversion can be conducted at significantly lower temperatures (500 K) than during the thermochemical ( 1000 K) and catalytic (800 K) conversion. By using gas chromatography, we determined conversion products and found that conversion efficiency of plasma-catalytic conversion reaches over 85%. We used obtained data to determine the energy yield of hydrogen in case of plasma-catalytic reforming of ethanol and compared it with other plasma-based hydrogen-generating systems.

  2. Catalytic conversion of CO2 into valuable products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pham-Huu, C.; Ledoux, M.J.

    2008-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows: Synthesis gas, a mixture of H 2 and CO, is an important feed-stock for several chemical processes operated in the production of methanol and synthetic fuels through a Fischer- Tropsch synthesis. Synthesis gas is produced via an endothermic steam reforming of methane (CH 4 + H 2 O → CO + 3H 2 , ΔH = +225.4 kJ.mol -1 ), catalytic or direct partial oxidation of methane (CH 4 + (1/2)O 2 → CO + 2H 2 , ΔH -38 kJ.mol -1 ) and CO 2 reforming of methane (CH 4 + CO 2 → 2CO + 2H 2 , ΔH= +247 kJ.mol -1 ). The main disadvantage of these processes is the high coke formation, essentially in the nano-filament form, which may cause severe deactivation of the catalyst by pore or active site blocking and sometimes, physical disintegration of the catalyst body causing a high pressure drop along the catalyst bed and even, in some cases, inducing damage to the reactor itself. Previous results obtained in the catalytic partial oxidation of methane have shown that due to the hot spot and carbon nano-filaments formation, especially in the case of the CO 2 reforming, the alumina-based catalyst in an extrudate form was broken into powder which induces a significant pressure drop across the catalytic bed. In the case of endothermic reactions, steam and CO 2 reforming, the temperature drop within the catalyst bed could also modified the activity of the catalyst. Silicon carbide (SiC) exhibits a high thermal conductivity, a high resistance towards oxidation, a high mechanical strength, and chemical inertness, all of which make it a good candidate for use as catalyst support in several endothermic and exothermic reactions such as dehydrogenation, selective partial oxidation, and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The gas-solid reaction allows the preparation of SiC with medium surface area, i.e. 10 to 40 m 2 .g -1 , and controlled macroscopic shape, i.e. grains, extrudates or foam, for it subsequence use as catalyst support. In addition, due to its chemical

  3. Mesoporous templated silicas: stability, pore size engineering and catalytic activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vansant, Etienne

    2003-01-01

    The Laboratory of Adsorption and Catalysis has focused its research activities on the synthesis and activation of new porous materials. In the past few years, we have succeeded in developing easy and reproducible pathways to synthesize a huge variety of mesoporous crystalline materials. Points of interest in the synthesis of Mesoporous Templated Silicas are (i) stabilization of the structure, to withstand hydrothermal, thermal and mechanical pressure, (ii) pore size engineering to systematically control the pore size, pore volume and the ratio micro/mesopores and (iii) ease and reproducibility of the synthesis procedure, applying green principles, such as template recuperation. By carefully adapting the synthesis conditions and composition of the synthesis gel, using surfactants (long chain quaternary ammonium ions) and co-templates (long chain amines, alcohols or alkanes), the pore size of the obtained materials can be controlled from 1.5 to 7.0 nm, retaining the very narrow pore size distribution. Alternatively, materials with combined micro- and mesoporosity can be synthesized, using neutral surfactants (triblock copolymers). Hereby, the optimization of the SBA-15 and SBA-16 synthesis is being done in order to create mesoporous materials with microporous walls. The second research line is the controlled activation of MTS materials, by grafting or incorporation of catalytic active centers. We have developed for this purpose the Molecular Designed Dispersion method, which uses metal diketonate complexes as precursors. It is shown that in all cases the dispersion of the metal oxides on the surface is much better compared to the conventional grafting techniques. We have studied and published activation with V, Ti, Mo, Fe, Al and Cr species on different MTS materials. The structure and location of the active metal ion is the subject of an extensive spectroscopic investigation, using FT-IR, FT-Raman, UV-Vis DR coupled with selective chemisorption experiments and

  4. Catalytic oxidative desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbon fuels using air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararaman, Ramanathan

    Conventional approaches to oxidative desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbons involve use of high-purity, expensive water soluble peroxide for oxidation of sulfur compounds followed by post-treatment for removal of oxidized sulfones by extraction. Both are associated with higher cost due to handling, storage of oxidants and yield loss with extraction and water separation, making the whole process more expensive. This thesis explores an oxidative desulfurization process using air as an oxidant followed by catalytic decomposition of sulfones thereby eliminating the aforementioned issues. Oxidation of sulfur compounds was realized by a two step process in which peroxides were first generated in-situ by catalytic air oxidation, followed by catalytic oxidation of S compounds using the peroxides generated in-situ completing the two step approach. By this technique it was feasible to oxidize over 90% of sulfur compounds present in real jet (520 ppmw S) and diesel (41 ppmw S) fuels. Screening of bulk and supported CuO based catalysts for peroxide generation using model aromatic compound representing diesel fuel showed that bulk CuO catalyst was more effective in producing peroxides with high yield and selectivity. Testing of three real diesel fuels obtained from different sources for air oxidation over bulk CuO catalyst showed different level of effectiveness for generating peroxides in-situ which was consistent with air oxidation of representative model aromatic compounds. Peroxides generated in-situ was then used as an oxidant to oxidize sulfur compounds present in the fuel over MoO3/SiO2 catalyst. 81% selectivity of peroxides for oxidation of sulfur compounds was observed on MoO3/SiO2 catalyst at 40 °C and under similar conditions MoO3/Al2O3 gave only 41% selectivity. This difference in selectivity might be related to the difference in the nature of active sites of MoO3 on SiO2 and Al2O 3 supports as suggested by H2-TPR and XRD analyses. Testing of supported and bulk Mg

  5. Towards the rationalization of catalytic activity values by means of local hyper-softness on the catalytic site: a criticism about the use of net electric charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignacio Martínez-Araya, Jorge; Grand, André; Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel

    2015-11-28

    By means of the Spin-Polarized Conceptual Density Functional Theory (SP-CDFT), three 2,6-bis(imino)pyridine catalysts based on iron(II), used for polymerization of ethylene, were studied. The catalysts differed by the substituent group, bearing either -H, -NO2 or -OCH3. To date, catalytic activity, a purely experimental parameter measuring the mass of polyethylene produced per millimole of iron per time and pressure unit at a fixed temperature, has not been explained in terms of local hyper-softness. The latter is a purely theoretical parameter designed for quantifying electronic effects; it is measured using the metal atom responsible for the coordination process with the monomer (ethylene). Because steric effects are not relevant in these kinds of catalysts and only electronic effects drive the catalytic process, an interesting link is found between catalytic activity and the local hyper-softness condensed on the iron atom by means of four functionals (B3LYP, BP86, B97D, and VSXC). This work demonstrates that the use of local hyper-softness, predicted by the SP-CDFT, is a suitable parameter for explaining order relationships among catalytic activity values, thus quantifying the electronic influence of the substituent group inducing this difference; the use of only net electric charges does not lead to clear conclusions. This finding can aid in estimating catalytic activities leading to a more rational design of new catalysts via computational chemistry.

  6. Optimization of Cholinesterase-Based Catalytic Bioscavengers Against Organophosphorus Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lushchekina, Sofya V; Schopfer, Lawrence M; Grigorenko, Bella L; Nemukhin, Alexander V; Varfolomeev, Sergei D; Lockridge, Oksana; Masson, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    Organophosphorus agents (OPs) are irreversible inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase (AChE). OP poisoning causes major cholinergic syndrome. Current medical counter-measures mitigate the acute effects but have limited action against OP-induced brain damage. Bioscavengers are appealing alternative therapeutic approach because they neutralize OPs in bloodstream before they reach physiological targets. First generation bioscavengers are stoichiometric bioscavengers. However, stoichiometric neutralization requires administration of huge doses of enzyme. Second generation bioscavengers are catalytic bioscavengers capable of detoxifying OPs with a turnover. High bimolecular rate constants ( k cat / K m > 10 6 M -1 min -1 ) are required, so that low enzyme doses can be administered. Cholinesterases (ChE) are attractive candidates because OPs are hemi-substrates. Moderate OP hydrolase (OPase) activity has been observed for certain natural ChEs and for G117H-based human BChE mutants made by site-directed mutagenesis. However, before mutated ChEs can become operational catalytic bioscavengers their dephosphylation rate constant must be increased by several orders of magnitude. New strategies for converting ChEs into fast OPase are based either on combinational approaches or on computer redesign of enzyme. The keystone for rational conversion of ChEs into OPases is to understand the reaction mechanisms with OPs. In the present work we propose that efficient OP hydrolysis can be achieved by re-designing the configuration of enzyme active center residues and by creating specific routes for attack of water molecules and proton transfer. Four directions for nucleophilic attack of water on phosphorus atom were defined. Changes must lead to a novel enzyme, wherein OP hydrolysis wins over competing aging reactions. Kinetic, crystallographic, and computational data have been accumulated that describe mechanisms of reactions involving ChEs. From these studies, it appears that introducing

  7. Optimization of Cholinesterase-Based Catalytic Bioscavengers Against Organophosphorus Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofya V. Lushchekina

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphorus agents (OPs are irreversible inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase (AChE. OP poisoning causes major cholinergic syndrome. Current medical counter-measures mitigate the acute effects but have limited action against OP-induced brain damage. Bioscavengers are appealing alternative therapeutic approach because they neutralize OPs in bloodstream before they reach physiological targets. First generation bioscavengers are stoichiometric bioscavengers. However, stoichiometric neutralization requires administration of huge doses of enzyme. Second generation bioscavengers are catalytic bioscavengers capable of detoxifying OPs with a turnover. High bimolecular rate constants (kcat/Km > 106 M−1min−1 are required, so that low enzyme doses can be administered. Cholinesterases (ChE are attractive candidates because OPs are hemi-substrates. Moderate OP hydrolase (OPase activity has been observed for certain natural ChEs and for G117H-based human BChE mutants made by site-directed mutagenesis. However, before mutated ChEs can become operational catalytic bioscavengers their dephosphylation rate constant must be increased by several orders of magnitude. New strategies for converting ChEs into fast OPase are based either on combinational approaches or on computer redesign of enzyme. The keystone for rational conversion of ChEs into OPases is to understand the reaction mechanisms with OPs. In the present work we propose that efficient OP hydrolysis can be achieved by re-designing the configuration of enzyme active center residues and by creating specific routes for attack of water molecules and proton transfer. Four directions for nucleophilic attack of water on phosphorus atom were defined. Changes must lead to a novel enzyme, wherein OP hydrolysis wins over competing aging reactions. Kinetic, crystallographic, and computational data have been accumulated that describe mechanisms of reactions involving ChEs. From these studies, it appears that

  8. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles for biomedical and catalytical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xiaoxing [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Mesoporous silica materials, discovered in 1992 by the Mobile Oil Corporation, have received considerable attention in the chemical industry due to their superior textual properties such as high surface area, large pore volume, tunable pore diameter, and narrow pore size distribution. Among those materials, MCM-41, referred to Mobile Composition of Matter NO. 41, contains honeycomb liked porous structure that is the most common mesoporous molecular sieve studied. Applications of MCM-41 type mesoporous silica material in biomedical field as well as catalytical field have been developed and discussed in this thesis. The unique features of mesoporous silica nanoparticles were utilized for the design of delivery system for multiple biomolecules as described in chapter 2. We loaded luciferin into the hexagonal channels of MSN and capped the pore ends with gold nanoparticles to prevent premature release. Luciferase was adsorbed onto the outer surface of the MSN. Both the MSN and the gold nanoparticles were protected by poly-ethylene glycol to minimize nonspecific interaction of luciferase and keep it from denaturating. Controlled release of luciferin was triggered within the cells and the enzymatic reaction was detected by a luminometer. Further developments by varying enzyme/substrate pairs may provide opportunities to control cell behavior and manipulate intracellular reactions. MSN was also served as a noble metal catalyst support due to its large surface area and its stability with active metals. We prepared MSN with pore diameter of 10 nm (LP10-MSN) which can facilitate mass transfer. And we successfully synthesized an organo silane, 2,2'-Bipyridine-amide-triethoxylsilane (Bpy-amide-TES). Then we were able to functionalize LP10-MSN with bipyridinyl group by both post-grafting method and co-condensation method. Future research of this material would be platinum complexation. This Pt (II) complex catalyst has been reported for a C-H bond activation reaction as an

  9. Selective catalytic oxidation of hydrocarbons as a challenge to the chemical engineer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emig, G [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Technische Chemie 1

    1977-11-01

    In the conversion of the most important chemical raw materials, natural oil and natural gas, to intermediate or end products, selective catalytic oxidation plays an increasing role. This method makes it possible in many cases to use more economical, single-step processes instead of the older multi-step processes. Using the typical example of propylene oxidation or ammonoxidation, the problems encountered by chemical engineers in the development of a heterogeneous-catalytic method of oxidation are demonstrated. The importance of systematic catalyst development is stressed. General aspects of the development of novel processes or the improvement of existing catalytic processes are discussed.

  10. Catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia over transition metal ion-exchanged Y zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciyama, T; Arakawa, T; Matsuda, T; Yamazoe, N; Takita, Y

    1975-01-01

    The catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with ammonia was studied over transition metal ion-exchanged Y zeolite (Me-Y) catalysts. The reaction products are nitrogen, nitrous oxide, and water in all cases. Selectivities to N/sub 2/ are 60 to 80% on all the cation exchanged zeolite catalysts exhibiting a relatively minor variation with the cationic species exchanged. The copper (II)-Y catalyst exhibits low temperature activity and has an unusual catalytic activity-temperature profile with a maximum at 120/sup 0/C. The catalytic activity is enhanced considerably when a second cation, especially cobalt (II) or iron (III) is coexchanged together with Cu (II) in Y zeolite.

  11. Utilization and mitigation of VAM/CMM emissions by a catalytic combustion gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, K.; Yoshino, Y.; Kashihara, H. [Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd., Hyougo (Japan); Kajita, S.

    2013-07-01

    A system configured with a catalytic combustion gas turbine generator unit is introduced. The system has been developed using technologies produced by Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Ltd., such as small gas turbines, recuperators and catalytic combustors, and catalytic oxidation units which use exhaust heat from gas turbines. The system combusts (oxidizes) ventilation air methane (less than 1% concentration) and low concentration coal mine methane (30% concentration or less) discharged as waste from coal mines. Thus, it cannot only reduce the consumption of high- quality fuel for power generation, but also mitigate greenhouse gas emissions.

  12. Catalytic applications of immobilized ionic liquids for synthesis of cyclic carbonates from carbon dioxide and epoxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Woo; Roshan, Roshith; Tharun, Jose; Cherian, Amal; Park, Dae-Won

    2013-01-01

    The catalytic applicability of ionic liquids immobilized on various support materials such as silica, polystyrene and biopolymers in the cycloaddition of carbon dioxide with epoxides is reviewed in this work. Comparisons of the catalytic efficiency of these various catalysts have been done from the aspect of turnover number and reusability. The studies revealed that ionic liquids or support materials possessing hydrogen bonding capable groups exhibited enhanced catalytic activity towards cyclic carbonate synthesis. Moreover, the increased quest towards environmentally benign materials has renewed the search for biocompatible materials as support for ionic liquids

  13. Experimental Investigation of Flow Resistance in a Coal Mine Ventilation Air Methane Preheated Catalytic Oxidation Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Bin; Liu, Yongqi; Liu, Ruixiang; Meng, Jian; Mao, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the results of experimental investigation of flow resistance in a coal mine ventilation air methane preheated catalytic oxidation reactor. The experimental system was installed at the Energy Research Institute of Shandong University of Technology. The system has been used to investigate the effects of flow rate (200 Nm3/h to 1000 Nm3/h) and catalytic oxidation bed average temperature (20°C to 560°C) within the preheated catalytic oxidation reactor. The pressure drop and res...

  14. Plasma-activated core-shell gold nanoparticle films with enhanced catalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llorca, Jordi, E-mail: jordi.llorca@upc.edu; Casanovas, Albert; Dominguez, Montserrat; Casanova, Ignasi [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Institut de Tecniques Energetiques (Spain); Angurell, Inmaculada; Seco, Miquel; Rossell, Oriol [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Quimica Inorganica (Spain)

    2008-03-15

    Catalytically active gold nanoparticle films have been prepared from core-shell nanoparticles by plasma-activation and characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Methane can be selectively oxidized into formic acid with an O{sub 2}-H{sub 2} mixture in a catalytic wall reactor functionalized with plasma-activated gold nanoparticle films containing well-defined Au particles of about 3.5 nm in diameter. No catalytic activity was recorded over gold nanoparticle films prepared by thermal decomposition of core-shell nanoparticles due to particle agglomeration.

  15. Plasma-activated core-shell gold nanoparticle films with enhanced catalytic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llorca, Jordi; Casanovas, Albert; Dominguez, Montserrat; Casanova, Ignasi; Angurell, Inmaculada; Seco, Miquel; Rossell, Oriol

    2008-01-01

    Catalytically active gold nanoparticle films have been prepared from core-shell nanoparticles by plasma-activation and characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Methane can be selectively oxidized into formic acid with an O 2 -H 2 mixture in a catalytic wall reactor functionalized with plasma-activated gold nanoparticle films containing well-defined Au particles of about 3.5 nm in diameter. No catalytic activity was recorded over gold nanoparticle films prepared by thermal decomposition of core-shell nanoparticles due to particle agglomeration

  16. Determination of organic bases in non-aqueous solvents by catalytic thermometric titration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajgand, V J; Kiss, T A; Gaál, F F; Zsigrai, I J

    1968-07-01

    Catalytic thermometric titrations have been developed for bases (brucine, diethylaniline, potassium acetate and triethylamine) in acetic acid by continuous and discontinuous addition of the standard solution and automatic temperature recording. The determination of weak bases, e.g., antipyrine, unsuccessful in acetic acid by catalytic thermometric titration, has been achieved by using nitromethane or acetic anhydride as solvent. Catalytic thermometric titrations were also performed by coulometric generation of hydrogen ions for the determination of micro amounts of weak bases in a mixture of acetic anhyride and acetic acid.

  17. Catalytic pyrolysis of Laminaria japonica over nanoporous catalysts using Py-GC/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeon Jong-Ki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The catalytic pyrolysis of Laminaria japonica was carried out over a hierarchical meso-MFI zeolite (Meso-MFI and nanoporous Al-MCM-48 using pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS. The effect of the catalyst type on the product distribution and chemical composition of the bio-oil was examined using Py-GC/MS. The Meso-MFI exhibited a higher activity in deoxygenation and aromatization during the catalytic pyrolysis of L. japonica. Meanwhile, the catalytic activity of Al-MCM-48 was lower than that of Meso-MFI due to its weak acidity.

  18. Synthesis and catalytic activity of polysaccharide templated nanocrystalline sulfated zirconia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sherly, K. B.; Rakesh, K. [Mahatma Gandhi University Regional Research Center in Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Mar Athanasius College, Kothamangalam-686666, Kerala (India)

    2014-01-28

    Nanoscaled materials are of great interest due to their unique enhanced optical, electrical and magnetic properties. Sulfate-promoted zirconia has been shown to exhibit super acidic behavior and high activity for acid catalyzed reactions. Nanocrystalline zirconia was prepared in the presence of polysaccharide template by interaction between ZrOCl{sub 2}⋅8H{sub 2}O and chitosan template. The interaction was carried out in aqueous phase, followed by the removal of templates by calcination at optimum temperature and sulfation. The structural and textural features were characterized by powder XRD, TG, SEM and TEM. XRD patterns showed the peaks of the diffractogram were in agreement with the theoretical data of zirconia with the catalytically active tetragonal phase and average crystalline size of the particles was found to be 9 nm, which was confirmed by TEM. TPD using ammonia as probe, FTIR and BET surface area analysis were used for analyzing surface features like acidity and porosity. The BET surface area analysis showed the sample had moderately high surface area. FTIR was used to find the type species attached to the surface of zirconia. UV-DRS found the band gap of the zirconia was found to be 2.8 eV. The benzylation of o-xylene was carried out batchwise in atmospheric pressure and 433K temperature using sulfated zirconia as catalyst.

  19. Catalytic amino acid production from biomass-derived intermediates

    KAUST Repository

    Deng, Weiping

    2018-04-30

    Amino acids are the building blocks for protein biosynthesis and find use in myriad industrial applications including in food for humans, in animal feed, and as precursors for bio-based plastics, among others. However, the development of efficient chemical methods to convert abundant and renewable feedstocks into amino acids has been largely unsuccessful to date. To that end, here we report a heterogeneous catalyst that directly transforms lignocellulosic biomass-derived α-hydroxyl acids into α-amino acids, including alanine, leucine, valine, aspartic acid, and phenylalanine in high yields. The reaction follows a dehydrogenation-reductive amination pathway, with dehydrogenation as the rate-determining step. Ruthenium nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes (Ru/CNT) exhibit exceptional efficiency compared with catalysts based on other metals, due to the unique, reversible enhancement effect of NH3 on Ru in dehydrogenation. Based on the catalytic system, a two-step chemical process was designed to convert glucose into alanine in 43% yield, comparable with the well-established microbial cultivation process, and therefore, the present strategy enables a route for the production of amino acids from renewable feedstocks. Moreover, a conceptual process design employing membrane distillation to facilitate product purification is proposed and validated. Overall, this study offers a rapid and potentially more efficient chemical method to produce amino acids from woody biomass components.

  20. Advanced purification of petroleum refinery wastewater by catalytic vacuum distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Long; Ma, Hongzhu; Wang, Bo; Mao, Wei; Chen, Yashao

    2010-06-15

    In our work, a new process, catalytic vacuum distillation (CVD) was utilized for purification of petroleum refinery wastewater that was characteristic of high chemical oxygen demand (COD) and salinity. Moreover, various common promoters, like FeCl(3), kaolin, H(2)SO(4) and NaOH were investigated to improve the purification efficiency of CVD. Here, the purification efficiency was estimated by COD testing, electrolytic conductivity, UV-vis spectrum, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and pH value. The results showed that NaOH promoted CVD displayed higher efficiency in purification of refinery wastewater than other systems, where the pellucid effluents with low salinity and high COD removal efficiency (99%) were obtained after treatment, and the corresponding pH values of effluents varied from 7 to 9. Furthermore, environment estimation was also tested and the results showed that the effluent had no influence on plant growth. Thus, based on satisfied removal efficiency of COD and salinity achieved simultaneously, NaOH promoted CVD process is an effective approach to purify petroleum refinery wastewater. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Catalytic Properties of Lipase Extracts from Aspergillus niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia M. Romero

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Screening of lipolytic strains using Rhodamine-B/olive oil plate technique allowed the selection of Aspergillus niger MYA 135. Lipase production in submerged culture containing 2 % olive oil was enhanced by more than 50 % compared to basal cultural conditions. Optimal catalytic conditions for olive oil-induced lipase were pH=6.5 and 30–35 °C. These values were shifted to the acid region (4.0–6.5 and 35–37 °C when lipase extract was produced under basal conditions. Slight changes of the residual lipase activity against the pH were found. However, preincubation at either 37 or 40 °C caused an increase in the olive oil-inducible lipolytic activity. On the contrary, lipase residual activity decreases in the 30–55 °C range when it was produced in basal medium. Lipolytic extracts were almost not deactivated in presence of 50 % water-miscible organic solvents. However, water-immiscible aliphatic solvents reduced the lipase activity between 20 and 80 %.

  2. Low-temperature catalytic gasification of wet industrial wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, D C; Neuenschwander, G G; Baker, E G; Sealock, Jr, L J; Butner, R S

    1991-04-01

    Bench-scale reactor tests are in progress at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop a low-temperature, catalytic gasification system. The system, licensed under the trade name Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}), is designed for treating a wide variety of feedstocks ranging from dilute organics in water to waste sludges from food processing. This report describes a test program which used a continuous-feed tubular reactor. This test program is an intermediate stage in the process development. The reactor is a laboratory-scale version of the commercial concept as currently envisioned by the process developers. An energy benefit and economic analysis was also completed on the process. Four conceptual commercial installations of the TEES process were evaluated for three food processing applications and one organic chemical manufacturing application. Net energy production (medium-Btu gas) was achieved in all four cases. The organic chemical application was found to be economically attractive in the present situation. Based on sensitivity studies included in the analysis, the three food processing cases will likely become attractive in the near future as waste disposal regulations tighten and disposal costs increase. 21 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. Flame Synthesis of Composite Oxides for Catalytic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Joakim Reimer

    2002-01-01

    gas (CO/CO2/H2) and an excellent thermal stability. Addition of alumina as a structural promoter is necessary in order to obtain a high activity for methanol formation. The binary systems, i.e., CuO/ZnO, ZnO/Al2O3 and CuO/Al2O3 are investigated as a prelude to the preparation of the ternary catalyst...... the flame temperature, the high temperature residence time and the precursor concentration. The Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 methanol catalyst is used as a model system for the preparation of catalytic materials. The flame synthesized catalyst exhibits a high and reproducible activity for methanol formation from synthesis...... crystallites is oxidized. A number of complications may arise using the N2O-titration. It may be difficult to obtain full oxidation of the copper surface without having some oxidation of the bulk. Secondly, some sintering of the nano-sized copper crystallites may occur due to the exothermic nature...

  4. Catalytic effect of light illumination on bioleaching of chalcopyrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shuang; Gan, Min; Zhu, Jianyu; Li, Qian; Jie, Shiqi; Yang, Baojun; Liu, Xueduan

    2015-04-01

    The influence of visible light exposure on chalcopyrite bioleaching was investigated using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The results indicated, in both shake-flasks and aerated reactors with 8500-lux light, the dissolved Cu was 91.80% and 23.71% higher, respectively, than that in the controls without light. The catalytic effect was found to increase bioleaching to a certain limit, then plateaued as the initial chalcopyrite concentration increased from 2% to 4.5%. Thus a balanced mineral concentration is highly amenable to bioleaching via offering increased available active sites for light adsorption while eschewing mineral aggregation and screening effects. Using semiconducting chalcopyrite, the light facilitated the reduction of Fe(3+) to Fe(2+) as metabolic substrates for A.ferrooxidans, leading to better biomass, lower pH and redox potential, which are conducive to chalcopyrite leaching. The light exposure on iron redox cycling was further confirmed by chemical leaching tests using Fe(3+), which exhibited higher Fe(2+) levels in the light-induced system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Diesel Engine Emission Reduction Using Catalytic Nanoparticles: An Experimental Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajin C. Sajeevan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerium oxide being a rare earth metal with dual valance state existence has exceptional catalytic activity due to its oxygen buffering capability, especially in the nanosized form. Hence when used as an additive in the diesel fuel it leads to simultaneous reduction and oxidation of nitrogen dioxide and hydrocarbon emissions, respectively, from diesel engine. The present work investigates the effect of cerium oxide nanoparticles on performance and emissions of diesel engine. Cerium oxide nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical method and techniques such as TEM, EDS, and XRD have been used for the characterization. Cerium oxide was mixed in diesel by means of standard ultrasonic shaker to obtain stable suspension, in a two-step process. The influence of nanoparticles on various physicochemical properties of diesel fuel has also been investigated through extensive experimentation by means of ASTM standard testing methods. Load test was done in the diesel engine to investigate the effect of nanoparticles on the efficiency and the emissions from the engine. Comparisons of fuel properties with and without additives are also presented.

  6. A diagonal approach for the catalytic transformation of carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Emissions of carbon dioxide are growing with the massive utilization of hydrocarbons for the production of energy and chemicals, resulting in a threatening global warming. The development of a more sustainable economy is urging to reduce the fingerprint of our current way of life. In this perspective, the organic chemistry industry will face important challenges in the next decades to replace hydrocarbons as a feedstock and use carbon-free energy sources. To tackle this challenge, new catalytic processes have been designed to convert CO 2 to high energy and value-added chemicals (formamides, N-heterocycles and methanol), using a novel diagonal approach. The energy efficiency of the new transformations is ensured by the utilization of mild reductants such as hydro-silanes and hydro-boranes. Importantly the reactions are promoted by organic catalysts, which circumvent the problems of cost, abundance and toxicity usually encountered with metal complexes. Based on theoretical and experimental studies, the understanding of the mechanisms involved in these reactions allowed the rational optimization of the catalysts as well as the reaction conditions, in order to match the requirements of sustainable chemistry. (author) [fr

  7. Catalytic decomposition of nitrogen dioxide over various metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimokawabe, M; Ohi, A; Takezawa, N [Dept. of Chemical Process Engineering, Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan)

    1992-06-30

    The catalytic decomposition of nitrogen oxide (NO2) was investigated over 18 metal oxides (Al2O3, SiO2, ZrO2, SnO2, TiO2, V2O5, Cr2O3, MnO2, Fe2O3, Co3O4, NiO, CuO, ZnO, MgO, CaO, La2O3, CeO2, and Nd2O3). The relationship between the specific rates of metal oxides (Me{sub x}O{sub y}) (Me{sub x}O{sub y-1} + 1/2O{sub 2} {yields} Me{sub x}O{sub y}) shows a V-shaped curve with a minimum at -{Delta}H around 700 kJ/mol. This suggests that the mechanism dealt with in this article switches at -{Delta}H = 700 kJ/mol. 1 fig., 1 tab., 20 refs.

  8. Electrochemical, H2O2-Boosted Catalytic Oxidation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akse, James R.; Thompson, John O.; Schussel, Leonard J.

    2004-01-01

    An improved water-sterilizing aqueous-phase catalytic oxidation system (APCOS) is based partly on the electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). This H2O2-boosted system offers significant improvements over prior dissolved-oxygen water-sterilizing systems in the way in which it increases oxidation capabilities, supplies H2O2 when needed, reduces the total organic carbon (TOC) content of treated water to a low level, consumes less energy than prior systems do, reduces the risk of contamination, and costs less to operate. This system was developed as a variant of part of an improved waste-management subsystem of the life-support system of a spacecraft. Going beyond its original intended purpose, it offers the advantage of being able to produce H2O2 on demand for surface sterilization and/or decontamination: this is a major advantage inasmuch as the benign byproducts of this H2O2 system, unlike those of systems that utilize other chemical sterilants, place no additional burden of containment control on other spacecraft air- or water-reclamation systems.

  9. The Prevailing Catalytic Role of Meteorites in Formamide Prebiotic Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladino, Raffaele; Botta, Lorenzo; Di Mauro, Ernesto

    2018-02-22

    Meteorites are consensually considered to be involved in the origin of life on this Planet for several functions and at different levels: (i) as providers of impact energy during their passage through the atmosphere; (ii) as agents of geodynamics, intended both as starters of the Earth's tectonics and as activators of local hydrothermal systems upon their fall; (iii) as sources of organic materials, at varying levels of limited complexity; and (iv) as catalysts. The consensus about the relevance of these functions differs. We focus on the catalytic activities of the various types of meteorites in reactions relevant for prebiotic chemistry. Formamide was selected as the chemical precursor and various sources of energy were analyzed. The results show that all the meteorites and all the different energy sources tested actively afford complex mixtures of biologically-relevant compounds, indicating the robustness of the formamide-based prebiotic chemistry involved. Although in some cases the yields of products are quite small, the diversity of the detected compounds of biochemical significance underlines the prebiotic importance of meteorite-catalyzed condensation of formamide.

  10. Synthesis, structure characterization and catalytic activity of nickel tungstate nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi; Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi; Khalilian-Shalamzari, Morteza; Zahedi, Mir Mahdi; Hajimirsadeghi, Seiedeh Somayyeh; Omrani, Ismail

    2012-12-01

    Taguchi robust design was applied to optimize experimental parameters for controllable, simple and fast synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles. NiWO4 nanoparticles were synthesized by precipitation reaction involving addition of nickel ion solution to the tungstate aqueous reagent and then formation of nickel tungstate nucleolus which are insoluble in aqueous media. Effects of various parameters such as nickel and tungstate concentrations, flow rate of reagent addition and reactor temperature on diameter of synthesized nickel tungstate nanoparticles were investigated experimentally by the aid of orthogonal array design. The results for analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that particle size of nickel tungstate can be effectively tuned by controlling significant variables involving nickel and tungstate concentrations and flow rate; while, temperature of the reactor has a no considerable effect on the size of NiWO4 particles. The ANOVA results proposed the optimum conditions for synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles via this technique. Also, under optimum condition nanoparticles of NiWO4 were prepared and their structure and chemical composition were characterized by means of EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence. Finally, catalytic activity of the nanoparticles in a cycloaddition reaction was examined.

  11. Alkali resistivity of Cu based selective catalytic reduction catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putluru, Siva Sankar Reddy; Jensen, Anker Degn; Riisager, Anders

    2012-01-01

    The deactivation of V2O5–WO3–TiO2, Cu–HZSM5 and Cu–HMOR plate type monolithic catalysts was investigated when exposed to KCl aerosols in a bench-scale reactor. Fresh and exposed catalysts were characterized by selective catalytic reduction (SCR) activity measurements, scanning electron microscope......–energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM–EDX) and NH3-temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD). 95% deactivation was observed for the V2O5–WO3–TiO2 catalyst, while the Cu–HZSM5 and Cu–HMOR catalysts deactivated only 58% and 48%, respectively, after 1200 h KCl exposure. SEM analysis of the KCl aerosol exposed...... catalysts revealed that the potassium salt not only deposited on the catalyst surface, but also penetrated into the catalyst wall. Thus, the K/M ratio (M = V or Cu) was high on V2O5–WO3–TiO2 catalyst and comparatively less on Cu–HZSM5 and Cu–HMOR catalysts. NH3-TPD revealed that the KCl exposed Cu–HZSM5...

  12. Catalytic synthesis of diesel from syngas: Theoretical and practical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalid, N.; Saeed, M.M.

    2013-01-01

    The world energy needs have been increasing tremendously resulting in the depletion of the resources of fossil fuel and increase in the prices of crude oil. To meet the required needs or decrease the dependency at least in parts, the attention of the scientists is being focused on the generation of alternate sources for the diesel fuel and other valued products. The catalytic based Fisher-Tropsch process for the generation of liquid chemicals, specially the diesel fuels from syngas is gaining attention since the products formed are of relatively low cost, high quality and environmental friendly due to low aromaticity and sulphur contents. Two main characteristics of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) are the unavoidable production of a wide range of hydrocarbon products (olefins, paraffins, and oxygenated products) and the liberation of large amount of heat from the highly exothermic synthesis reactions. FT synthesis products are influenced by various factors like temperature and pressure of syngas, nature of the catalyst, and the type of reactors. All these parameters are discussed by focusing special attention to the synthesis of cobalt catalyst for the production of diesel fuel. (author)

  13. Catalytic Oxidation of Toluene on Hydrothermally Prepared Ceria Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Duplančić

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ceria nanocrystals were prepared hydrothermally and tested as potential catalysts for oxidation of volatile organic compounds using toluene as a model compound. Pure ceria with a crystallite size of 4 nm, determined by the Scherrer method from XRD pattern has been obtained. The specific surface area of the prepared nanoparticles determined by BET analysis yielded 201 m2 g–1, while the band gap of 3.2 eV was estimated from DRS spectrum via Tauc’s plot. Catalytic tests were performed on calcined ceria (500 °C with increased crystallite size (9 nm caused by thermal treatment. The tests showed good activities for the toluene oxidation with T50 temperatures, corresponding to 50 % toluene conversion, observed at 250 °C and even lower temperatures depending on the total flow rate of the gas mixture. The one-dimensional pseudo-homogeneous model of the fixed bed reactor was proposed to describe the reactor performance and the appropriate kinetic parameters were estimated. Good agreement between experimental data and the proposed model was observed.

  14. Water detritiation: better catalysts for liquid phase catalytic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braet, J.

    2005-01-01

    Fusion reactors are our hope for a clean nuclear energy. But as they shall handle huge amounts of tritium, 1.5 10 19 Bq GWth -1 a -1 or about 50 000 times more tritium than light water fission reactors, they need detritiation. Most tritium losses can be trapped as or can easily be transformed into tritiated water. Water detritiation is preferably based on the multiplication of the large equilibrium isotope effect during the exchange reaction of tritium between hydrogen gas and liquid water in a counter current trickle bed reactor. Such LPCE (Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange) requires an efficient hydrophobic catalyst. SCK-CEN invented and developed such a catalyst in the past. In combination with an appropriate packing, different batches of this catalyst performed very well during years of extensive testing, allowing to develop the ELEX process for water detritiation at inland reprocessing plants. The main objectives of this study were to reproduce and possibly improve the SCK-CEN catalyst for tritium exchange between hydrogen and liquid water; and to demonstrate the high overall exchange rate and thus high detritiation factors that can be realized with it in a small and simple LPCE column under typical but conservative operating conditions

  15. Bimetallic catalysts for continuous catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuny, A; Bengoa, C; Font, J; Fabregat, A

    1999-01-29

    Catalytic wet oxidation has proved to be effective at eliminating hazardous organic compounds, such as phenol, from waste waters. However, the lack of active long-life oxidation catalysts which can perform in aqueous phase is its main drawback. This study explores the ability of bimetallic supported catalysts to oxidize aqueous phenol solutions using air as oxidant. Combinations of 2% of CoO, Fe2O3, MnO or ZnO with 10% CuO were supported on gamma-alumina by pore filling, calcined and later tested. The oxidation was carried out in a packed bed reactor operating in trickle flow regime at 140 degrees C and 900 kPa of oxygen partial pressure. Lifetime tests were conducted for 8 days. The pH of the feed solution was also varied. The results show that all the catalysts tested undergo severe deactivation during the first 2 days of operation. Later, the catalysts present steady activity until the end of the test. The highest residual phenol conversion was obtained for the ZnO-CuO, which was significantly higher than that obtained with the 10% CuO catalyst used as reference. The catalyst deactivation is related to the dissolution of the metal oxides from the catalyst surface due to the acidic reaction conditions. Generally, the performance of the catalysts was better when the pH of the feed solution was increased.

  16. Experimental studies on catalytic hydrogen recombiners for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drinovac, P.

    2006-01-01

    In the course of core melt accidents in nuclear power plants a large amount of hydrogen can be produced and form an explosive or even detonative gas mixture with aerial oxygen in the reactor building. In the containment atmosphere of pressurized water reactors hydrogen combines a phlogistically with the oxygen present to form water vapor even at room temperature. In the past, experimental work conducted at various facilities has contributed little or nothing to an understanding of the operating principles of catalytic recombiners. Hence, the purpose of the present study was to conduct detailed investigations on a section of a recombiner essentially in order to deepen the understanding of reaction kinetics and heat transport processes. The results of the experiments presented in this dissertation form a large data base of measurements which provides an insight into the processes taking place in recombiners. The reaction-kinetic interpretation of the measured data confirms and deepens the diffusion theory - proposed in an earlier study. Thus it is now possible to validate detailed numeric models representing the processes in recombiners. Consequently the present study serves to broaden and corroborate competence in this significant area of reactor technology. In addition, the empirical knowledge thus gained may be used for a critical reassessment of previous numeric model calculations. (orig.)

  17. Nanorods of manganese oxides: Synthesis, characterization and catalytic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zeheng; Zhang, Yuancheng; Zhang, Weixin; Wang, Xue; Qian, Yitai; Wen, Xiaogang; Yang, Shihe

    2006-03-01

    Single-crystalline nanorods of β-MnO 2, α-Mn 2O 3 and Mn 3O 4 were successfully synthesized via the heat-treatment of γ-MnOOH nanorods, which were prepared through a hydrothermal method in advance. The calcination process of γ-MnOOH nanorods was studied with the help of Thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray powder diffraction. When the calcinations were conducted in air from 250 to 1050 °C, the precursor γ-MnOOH was first changed to β-MnO 2, then to α-Mn 2O 3 and finally to Mn 3O 4. When calcined in N 2 atmosphere, γ-MnOOH was directly converted into Mn 3O 4 at as low as 500 °C. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution TEM were also used to characterize the products. The obtained manganese oxides maintain the one-dimensional morphology similar to the precursor γ-MnOOH nanorods. Further experiments show that the as-prepared manganese oxide nanorods have catalytic effect on the oxidation and decomposition of the methylene blue (MB) dye with H 2O 2.

  18. Catalytic arylation methods from the academic lab to industrial processes

    CERN Document Server

    Burke, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    This "hands-on" approach to the topic of arylation consolidates the body of key research over the last ten years (and up to around 2014) on various catalytic methods which involve an arylation process. Clearly structured, the chapters in this one-stop resource are arranged according to the reaction type, and focus on novel, efficient and sustainable processes, rather than the well-known and established cross-coupling methods. The entire contents are written by two authors with academic and industrial expertise to ensure consistent coverage of the latest developments in the field, as well as industrial applications, such as C-H activation, iron and gold-catalyzed coupling reactions, cycloadditions or novel methodologies using arylboron reagents. A cross-section of relevant tried-and-tested experimental protocols is included at the end of each chapter for putting into immediate practice, along with patent literature. Due to its emphasis on efficient, "green" methods and industrial applications of the products c...

  19. Catalytic destruction of organics and chlorinated organics with TEES II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, E.G.; Elliot, D.C.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Neuenschwander, G.G.

    1991-06-01

    A catalytic process is being developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for destroying hazardous organics and chlorinated organics, including spent solvents, in aqueous waste streams. Experiments have been conducted in a batch reactor, a bench-scale continuous-stirred tank reactor (CSTR), and an continuous-flow tubular reactor. A 5-gal/h developmental unit is under construction and will be operational in 1991. The Thermochemical Environmental Energy System 2 can destroy a wide variety of organics and chlorinated organics by thermocatalytic treatment at 300 degrees C to 350 degrees C and 2000 to 3000 psig. This paper summarizes the batch reactor and CSTR results and presents new results obtained in the tubular reactor. The high levels of destruction achieved in the tubular reactor show that kinetic data obtained in CSTR can be used to design large-scale tubular reactors with little scaleup risk. Corrosion studies were completed, and it appears that less expensive materials of construction can be used in many applications, which will make the process more cost effective. Cost estimates for larger- scale facilities have been prepared by Onsite*Ofsite, Inc., who is working with PNL to transfer the technology to industry. 5 refs., 4 tabs., 1 fig

  20. Development of a catalytic system for gasification of wet biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, D.C.; Sealock, L.J.; Phelps, M.R.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Hart, T.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    A gasification system is under development at Pacific Northwest Laboratory that can be used with high-moisture biomass feedstocks. The system operates at 350{degrees}C and 205 atm using a liquid water phase as the processing medium. Since a pressurized system is used, the wet biomass can be fed as a slurry to the reactor without drying. Through the development of catalysts, a useful processing system has been produced. This paper includes assessment of processing test results of different catalysts. Reactor system results including batch, bench-scale continuous, and engineering-scale processing results are presented to demonstrate the applicability of this catalytic gasification system to biomass. The system has utility both for direct conversion of biomass to fuel gas or as a wastewater cleanup system for treatment of unconverted biomass from bioconversion processes. By the use of this system high conversions of biomass to fuel gas can be achieved. Medium-Btu is the primary product. Potential exists for recovery/recycle of some of the unreacted inorganic components from the biomass in the aqueous byproduct stream.