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Sample records for cyproheptadine

  1. Interactions of diabetogenic compounds: cyproheptadine and alloxan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatterjee, A.K.; Varayotha, V.; Fischer, L.J.

    1991-01-01

    Pretreatment with an oral dose (45 mg/kg) of cyproheptadine (CPH), a drug that inhibits secretion and synthesis of insulin. 3 hr before alloxan (100 mg/kg, iv) protects mice from the permanent diabetes produced by alloxan. Pretreated animals at the time of alloxan administration were hyperglycemic. Therefore, the possibility that CPH-induced hyperglycemia protected mice from alloxan was investigated. This was accomplished by giving mannoheptulose (a glucose antagonist) or insulin (to lower blood glucose) after CPH and before alloxan. These interventions eliminated CPH-induced protection from alloxan, indicating a role for CPH-induced hyperglycemia in the protective effect. To confirm that CPH does not protect mice from alloxan-induced diabetes by a direct action, in vitro experiments using isolated pancreatic islets were conducted. Mouse islets were pretreated with CPH, its metabolite desmethylcyproheptadine (DMCPH), or an equal mixture of the two and/or various concentrations of glucose prior to an acute exposure to a toxic concentration of alloxan. Glucose-stimulated insulin release was used as a measure of pancreatic beta-cell function after alloxan exposure. CPH or DMCPH (alone or in combination) pretreatment did not provide protection against alloxan-induced inhibition of insulin release nor did pretreatments potentiate the protective action of glucose against in vitro alloxan toxicity. The results indicate that the protective action of CPH when given to mice before alloxan is due to drug-induced hyperglycemia and not to a direct effect of CPH or its metabolite

  2. Cyproheptadine versus propranolol in the prevention of migraine headaches in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asadi, B.; Khorvash, F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: There are conflicting results on the efficacy of propranolol and cyproheptadine in the prevention of migraine headaches in children. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the efficacy of propranolol versus cyproheptadine in the prevention of migraine headaches. Methodology: This was a randomized, double-blind trial. Sixty children aged 8-15 yrs with migraine headaches were randomized to be treated with either propranolol (40-80 mg per day) or cyproheptadine (8-12 mg per day) for 4 weeks. The patients were requested to record the Severity and duration of their headaches during a 2-week period before starting the intervention. The patients were followed at 2-week intervals for a period of 1 month after starting treatment. The headache diary was analyzed for each patient and was compared with baseline using SPSS software and statistical tests including the student's t-test. Results: Out of 60 patients at baseline, nine patients in the cyproheptadine group and six patients in the propranolol group did not appear at the appropriate time for follow-up visits and therefore were excluded from the study. The mean age in the cyproheptadine group was 11.9+-2.23 years and in the propranolol group was 0.7 +- 2.33 years. Based on the diaries, the results Showed that propranolol and cyproheptadine decreased headaches by 54.61% and 70.53% (p < 0.05), respectively, at the end of four weeks of treatment. Conclusion: Overall, the results of our study suggest that cyproheptadine is a good choice for prevention of migraine headache in pediatric group although more prolonged study with higher number of the patient is recommended. (author)

  3. Extraction and Determination of Cyproheptadine in Human Urine by DLLME-HPLC Method

    OpenAIRE

    Maham, Mehdi; Kiarostami, Vahid; Waqif-Husain, Syed; Abroomand-Azar, Parviz; Tehrani, Mohammad Saber; Khoeini Sharifabadi, Malihe; Afrouzi, Hossein; Shapouri, MahmoudReza; Karami-Osboo, Rouhollah

    2013-01-01

    Novel dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), coupled with high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection (HPLC-DAD) has been applied for the extraction and determination of cyproheptadine (CPH), an antihistamine, in human urine samples. In this method, 0.6 mL of acetonitrile (disperser solvent) containing 30 ?L of carbon tetrachloride (extraction solvent) was rapidly injected by a syringe into 5 mL urine sample. After centrifugation, the sedimented phase con...

  4. Cyproheptadine in the treatment of autistic disorder: a double-blind placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhondzadeh, S; Erfani, S; Mohammadi, M R; Tehrani-Doost, M; Amini, H; Gudarzi, S S; Yasamy, M T

    2004-04-01

    Autism is a childhood-onset disorder of unknown, possibly of multiple aetiologies. The core symptoms of autism are abnormalities in social interaction, communication and behaviour. The involvement of neurotransmitters such as 5-HT has been suggested in neuropsychiatric disorders and particularly in autistic disorder. Increased platelet 5-HT levels were found in 40% of the autistic population, suggesting that hyperserotonaemia may be a pathologic factor in infantile autism. Therefore, it is of interest to assess the efficacy of cyproheptadine, a 5-HT2 antagonist in the treatment of autistic disorder. In this 8-week double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we assessed the effects of cyproheptadine plus haloperidol in the treatment of autistic disorder. Children between the ages 3 and 11 years (inclusive) with a DSM IV clinical diagnosis of autism and who were outpatients from a specialty clinic for children at Roozbeh Psychiatric Teaching Hospital were recruited. The children presented with a chief complaint of severely disruptive symptoms related to autistic disorder. Patients were randomly allocated to cyproheptadine + haloperidol (Group A) or haloperidol + placebo (Group B) for an 8-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. The dose of haloperidol and cyproheptadine was titrated up to 0.05 and 0.2 mg/kg/day respectively. Patients were assessed by a third-year resident of psychiatry at baseline and after 2, 4, 6 and 8 weeks of starting medication. The primary measure of the outcome was the Aberrant Behaviour Checklist-Community (ABC-C) and the secondary measure of the outcome was the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (relating to people and verbal communication). Side effects and extrapyramidal symptoms were systematically recorded throughout the study and were assessed using a checklist and the Extrapyramidal Symptoms Rating Scale, administered by a resident of psychiatry during weeks 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8. The ABC-C and the Childhood Autism Rating Scale scores improved

  5. The Antidepressant 5-HT2A Receptor Antagonists Pizotifen and Cyproheptadine Inhibit Serotonin-Enhanced Platelet Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Olivia A.; Karim, Zubair A.; Vemana, Hari Priya; Espinosa, Enma V. P.; Khasawneh, Fadi T.

    2014-01-01

    There is considerable interest in defining new agents or targets for antithrombotic purposes. The 5-HT2A receptor is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) expressed on many cell types, and a known therapeutic target for many disease states. This serotonin receptor is also known to regulate platelet function. Thus, in our FDA-approved drug repurposing efforts, we investigated the antiplatelet activity of cyproheptadine and pizotifen, two antidepressant 5-HT2A Receptor antagonists. Our results revealed that cyproheptadine and pizotifen reversed serotonin-enhanced ADP-induced platelet aggregation in vitro and ex vivo. And the inhibitory effects of these two agents were found to be similar to that of EMD 281014, a 5-HT2A Receptor antagonist under development. In separate experiments, our studies revealed that these 5-HT2A receptor antagonists have the capacity to reduce serotonin-enhanced ADP-induced elevation in intracellular calcium levels and tyrosine phosphorylation. Using flow cytometry, we also observed that cyproheptadine, pizotifen, and EMD 281014 inhibited serotonin-enhanced ADP-induced phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, P-selectin expression, and glycoprotein IIb-IIIa activation. Furthermore, using a carotid artery thrombosis model, these agents prolonged the time for thrombotic occlusion in mice in vivo. Finally, the tail-bleeding time was investigated to assess the effect of cyproheptadine and pizotifen on hemostasis. Our findings indicated prolonged bleeding time in both cyproheptadine- and pizotifen-treated mice. Notably, the increases in occlusion and bleeding times associated with these two agents were comparable to that of EMD 281014, and to clopidogrel, a commonly used antiplatelet drug, again, in a fashion comparable to clopidogrel and EMD 281014. Collectively, our data indicate that the antidepressant 5-HT2A antagonists, cyproheptadine and pizotifen do exert antiplatelet and thromboprotective effects, but similar to clopidogrel and EMD 281014, their

  6. Inhibition of insulin release by cyproheptadine: Effects on 3',5'-cyclic-AMP-content and /sup 45/Ca-accumulation of incubated mouse islets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joost, H G; Beckmann, J; Lenzen, S; Hasselblatt, A [Goettingen Univ. (F.R. Germany)

    1976-01-01

    Cyproheptadine (1, 10 and 100 ..mu..m) significantly reduced insulin release from isolated mouse islets in response to glucose. In contrast, 1 mM cyproheptadine induced a large release of insulin into the incubation medium probably due to islet cell damage, since the islets had lost a considerable amount of their protein content. 3',5'-cyclic-AMP-levels of the islets were not significantly affected by 10 ..mu..M cyproheptadine in the presence as well as in the absence of theophylline (10 mM). As the inhibitory effect of cyproheptadine on insulin release was correlated with reduced accumulation of calcium-45, the agent may inhibit insulin release by interfering with the calcium handling of the ..beta..-cell.

  7. Extraction and Determination of Cyproheptadine in Human Urine by DLLME-HPLC Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maham, Mehdi; Kiarostami, Vahid; Waqif-Husain, Syed; Abroomand-Azar, Parviz; Tehrani, Mohammad Saber; Khoeini Sharifabadi, Malihe; Afrouzi, Hossein; Shapouri, Mahmoudreza; Karami-Osboo, Rouhollah

    2013-01-01

    Novel dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), coupled with high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection (HPLC-DAD) has been applied for the extraction and determination of cyproheptadine (CPH), an antihistamine, in human urine samples. In this method, 0.6 mL of acetonitrile (disperser solvent) containing 30 μL of carbon tetrachloride (extraction solvent) was rapidly injected by a syringe into 5 mL urine sample. After centrifugation, the sedimented phase containing enriched analyte was dissolved in acetonitrile and an aliquot of this solution injected into the HPLC system for analysis. Development of DLLME procedure includes optimization of some important parameters such as kind and volume of extraction and disperser solvent, pH and salt addition. The proposed method has good linearity in the range of 0.02-4.5 μg mL(-1) and low detection limit (13.1 ng mL(-1)). The repeatability of the method, expressed as relative standard deviation was 4.9% (n = 3). This method has also been applied to the analysis of real urine samples with satisfactory relative recoveries in the range of 91.6-101.0%.

  8. Formulation and Evaluation of Bioadhesive Cyproheptadine Tablets

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    consist of a connective tissue upper layer. (epithelial layer), the ... Two smooth, polished glass slides were selected, one of .... Table 2: Application of Central composite design (CCD) to optimize polymer combination for ... end was fixed to a glass mortar on a hot plate ... variables (maximum and minimum) boundary of each ...

  9. Formulation and Evaluation of Bioadhesive Cyproheptadine Tablets ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The shear stress of 3 % solution of HPMC was greater than that of an equivalent concentration of Carbopol 934P. The values of K, n, R2 and detachment force for the optimized formulation (F0) were 0.269, 0.696, 0.964 and 0.066 Newton (N), respectively, and showed good correlation with the predicted values, thus ...

  10. Daily Migraine Prevention and Its Influence on Resource Utilization in the Military Health System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    Connection Between Prevention and Resource Use .....................17 Synthesis of Literature Review...Utilization ..................................26 Treatment Evaluation with Observational Designs .........................31 Synthesis of Conceptual...amitriptyline atenolol cyproheptadine methysergide carbamazepine divalproex fluoxetine bupropion clomipramine propranolol gabapentin diltiazem

  11. Evaluation of the cytotoxicity of dihydroxytryptamines and 5-hydroxytryptamine antagonists as cytotoxic agents in dimethylhydrazine-induced adenocarcinomata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutton, P J; Barkla, D H

    1978-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of 5,6-dihydroxytryptamine (5,6-DHT), 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT), bromolysergic acid diethylamide (BOL), methysergide, and cyproheptadine, and also of 5,6-DHT together with either BOL, methysergide, or cyproheptadine in dimethylhydrazine-induced (DMH) carcinomata of rat colon was evaluated by estimating the percentage of necrotic cells in histological sections of tissues taken 15 h after injection of each of the drugs. In addition, the influence of methysergide and cyproheptadine on the tumour cell mitotic rate was estimated by means of a stathmokinetic technique. Both 5,6-DHT and 5,7-DHT were cytotoxic at each dose tested and for each of these agents the percentage of necrotic cells was directly correlated with the dose of drug used. BOL was not found to be cytotoxic to the colonic carcinomata, whereas both methysergide and cyproheptadine did cause detectable tumour cell necrosis. Methysergide was also found to accelerate tumour cell proliferation, whereas cyproheptadine did not. BOL competitively inhibited the cytotoxicity of 5,6-DHT and neither methysergide nor cyproheptadine potentiated the effect of 5,6 DHT.

  12. A comparative study of various therapeutic regimens in urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhopadhyay Amiyakumar

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available 127 patients of urticaria were treated with chlorpheniramine maleate alone and in combination with cyproheptadine hydrochloride, ranitidine and doxepin and levamisole. Chlorpheniramine and doxepin combination showed a satisfactory result in 88.46% of patients. Overall study showed that a combination regimen is better than the antihistaminics alone. Drowsiness was the commonest side effect. Levamisole and chlorpheniramine maleate combination was found to be more effective than the antihimstamine alone.

  13. The Combination of Marketed Antagonists of α1b-Adrenergic and 5-HT2A Receptors Inhibits Behavioral Sensitization and Preference to Alcohol in Mice: A Promising Approach for the Treatment of Alcohol Dependence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice Trovero

    Full Text Available Alcohol-dependence is a chronic disease with a dramatic and expensive social impact. Previous studies have indicated that the blockade of two monoaminergic receptors, α1b-adrenergic and 5-HT2A, could inhibit the development of behavioral sensitization to drugs of abuse, a hallmark of drug-seeking and drug-taking behaviors in rodents. Here, in order to develop a potential therapeutic treatment of alcohol dependence in humans, we have blocked these two monoaminergic receptors by a combination of antagonists already approved by Health Agencies. We show that the association of ifenprodil (1 mg/kg and cyproheptadine (1 mg/kg (α1-adrenergic and 5-HT2 receptor antagonists marketed as Vadilex ® and Periactine ® in France, respectively blocks behavioral sensitization to amphetamine in C57Bl6 mice and to alcohol in DBA2 mice. Moreover, this combination of antagonists inhibits alcohol intake in mice habituated to alcohol (10% v/v and reverses their alcohol preference. Finally, in order to verify that the effect of ifenprodil was not due to its anti-NMDA receptors property, we have shown that a combination of prazosin (0.5 mg/kg, an α1b-adrenergic antagonist, Mini-Press ® in France and cyproheptadine (1 mg/kg could also reverse alcohol preference. Altogether these findings strongly suggest that combined prazosin and cyproheptadine could be efficient as a therapy to treat alcoholism in humans. Finally, because α1b-adrenergic and 5-HT2A receptors blockade also inhibits behavioral sensitization to psychostimulants, opioids and tobacco, it cannot be excluded that this combination will exhibit some efficacy in the treatment of addiction to other abused drugs.

  14. Anticonvulsant properties of methanol leaf extract of Laggera Aurita Linn. F. (Asteraceae) in laboratory animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malami, S; Kyari, H; Danjuma, N M; Ya'u, J; Hussaini, I M

    2016-09-15

    Preparation of Laggera aurita Linn. (Asteraceae) is widely used in traditional medicine to treat various kinds of diseases such as epilepsy, malaria, fever, pain and asthma. Its efficacy is widely acclaimed among communities in Northern Nigeria. The present study is aimed at establishing the possible anticonvulsant effects of the methanol leaf extract of Laggera aurita using acute and chronic anticonvulsant models. Median lethal dose (LD50) was determined in mice and rats via oral and intraperitoneal routes. Anticonvulsant screening of the extract was performed using maximal electroshock-induced seizure test in day-old chicks; pentylenetetrazole-, strychnine- and picrotoxin- induced seizure models in mice. Similarly; its effects on pentylenetetrazole-induce kindling in rats as well as when co-administered with fluphenamic and cyproheptadine in mice, were evaluated. Median lethal dose (LD50) values were found to be >5000mg/kg, p.o. and 2154mg/kg, i.p., each for both rats and mice. The extract showed dose dependent protection against tonic hind limb extension (THLE) and significantly (p<0.05) decreased the mean recovery from seizure in the maximal electroshock-induced seizure. In the pentylenetetrazole-induced seizure model, the extract offered 50% protection at 600mg/kg and also increased the mean onset of seizure at all doses with significant (p<0.05) increase at the highest dose (600mg/kg). Similarly the extract produced significant (p<0.05) increase in the onset of seizures in both strychnine- and picrotoxin- induced seizure models, at all the doses except at 150mg/kg for the picrotoxin model. Co-administration of fluphenamic acid (FFA) (5mg/kg) and the extract (600mg/kg) showed an enhanced effect with percentage protection of 70% while co-administration of FFA (5mg/kg) and phenytoin (5mg/kg) as well phenytoin (5mg/kg) and the extract (600mg/kg) produced an additive effect. Administration of the extract (600mg/kg), phenytoin (20mg/kg) and cyproheptadine (4mg

  15. Over-the-counter self-medication leading to intracranial hypertension in a young lady.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramana Reddy, A M; Prashanth, L K; Sharat Kumar, G G; Chandana, G; Jadav, Rakesh

    2014-10-01

    Intracranial hypertension (idiopathic-IIH and secondary) is a potentially treatable condition. Although various factors such as female gender and obesity, certain drugs have been implicated as risk factors for IIH, there remains a lack of clarity in the exact causal-effect relationship. In India, self-medication by obtaining drugs over the counter due to lack of adequate drug regulation and ignorance of the public is a very common practice with a potential for severe adverse effects. We present a case of a young lady who has developed intracranial hypertension possibly due to self-medication with steroids and cyproheptadine, obtained over the counter.

  16. A nematode that can manipulate the behaviour of slugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Alex; Green, Michael; Martin, Hayley; Crossland, Katie; Swaney, William T; Williamson, Sally M; Rae, Robbie

    2018-06-01

    The ability of parasites to manipulate the behaviour of their hosts has evolved multiple times, and has a clear fitness benefit to the parasite in terms of facilitating growth, reproduction and transfer to suitable hosts. The mechanisms by which these behavioural changes are induced are poorly understood, but in many cases parasite manipulation of serotonergic signalling in the host brain is implicated. Here we report that Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita, a parasite of terrestrial gastropod molluscs, can alter the behaviour of slugs. Uninfected slugs (Deroceras panormitanum, Arion subfuscus and Arion hortensis) avoid areas where P. hermaphrodita is present, but slugs infected with P. hermaphrodita are more likely to be found where the nematodes are present. This ability is specific to P. hermaphrodita and other nematodes (Steinernema carpocapsae and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora) do not induce this behavioural change. To investigate how P. hermaphrodita changes slug behaviour we exposed slugs to fluoxetine (a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) and cyproheptadine (a serotonin receptor antagonist). Uninfected slugs fed fluoxetine no longer avoided areas where P. hermaphrodita was present; and conversely, infected slugs fed cyproheptadine showed no increased attraction to areas with nematodes. These findings suggest that a possible mechanism by which P. hermaphrodita is able to manipulate parasite avoidance behaviour in host slugs is by manipulating serotonergic signalling in the brain, and that increased serotonin levels are potentially associated with a reduction in parasite avoidance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A comparison of mucosal inflammatory responses to Giardia muris in resistant B10 and susceptible BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, P; Finch, R G; Wakelin, D

    1997-03-01

    In the first three weeks of primary Giardia muris infections B10 mice clear infection more rapidly than BALB/c mice. There is evidence that interferon-gamma contributes to the relative resistance of B10 mice. The nature of the functional contribution of interferon-gamma is unclear and does not relate to the secretory or serum antibody response. Mucosal inflammatory events in these strains have been studied. Apart from a small rise in both strains of goblet cell and mucosal mast cell numbers, associated with release of mast cell protease-1 in serum, no inflammatory infiltrate was observed at the time trophozoites were cleared from the intestinal lumen. Inhibition of mast cell products (5-hydroxytryptamine and histamine) by cyproheptadine enhanced the intensity of infection in both strains. The relative resistance of B10 mice could not be explained in terms of the mucosal inflammatory response.

  18. Neuropeptide AF induces anxiety-like and antidepressant-like behavior in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palotai, Miklós; Telegdy, Gyula; Tanaka, Masaru; Bagosi, Zsolt; Jászberényi, Miklós

    2014-11-01

    Little is known about the action of neuropeptide AF (NPAF) on anxiety and depression. Only our previous study provides evidence that NPAF induces anxiety-like behavior in rats. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the action of NPAF on depression-like behavior and the underlying neurotransmissions in mice. In order to determine whether there are species differences between rats and mice, we have investigated the action of NPAF on anxiety-like behavior in mice as well. A modified forced swimming test (mFST) and an elevated plus maze test (EPMT) were used to investigate the depression and anxiety-related behaviors, respectively. Mice were treated with NPAF 30min prior to the tests. In the mFST, the animals were pretreated with a non-selective muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist, atropine, a non-selective 5-HT2 serotonergic receptor antagonist, cyproheptadine, a mixed 5-HT1/5-HT2 serotonergic receptor antagonist, methysergide, a D2/D3/D4 dopamine receptor antagonist, haloperidol, a α1/α2β-adrenergic receptor antagonist, prazosin or a non-selective β-adrenergic receptor antagonist, propranolol 30min before the NPAF administration. In the mFST, NPAF decreased the immobility time and increased the climbing and swimming times. This action was reversed completely by methysergide and partially by atropine, whereas cyproheptadine, haloperidol, prazosin and propranolol were ineffective. In the EPMT, NPAF decreased the time spent in the arms (open/open+closed). Our results demonstrate that NPAF induces anti-depressant-like behavior in mice, which is mediated, at least in part, through 5HT2-serotonergic and muscarinic cholinergic neurotransmissions. In addition, the NPAF-induced anxiety is species-independent, since it develops also in mice. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Specific in vitro uptake of serotonin by cells in the anterior pituitary of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johns, M.A.; Azmitia, E.C.; Krieger, D.T.

    1982-01-01

    In vivo studies have suggested that serotonin (5HT) influences anterior pituitary function at the hypothalamic level. The present in vitro study investigated the possibility that 5HT may act directly on the anterior pituitary. The high affinity uptake of [3H]5HT into adult rat anterior pituitary tissue was examined in two types of experiments. 1) To test the specificity and saturability of uptake of 5HT in the anterior pituitary, pituitary tissue was incubated (37 C) with [3H]5HT (10(-8)-10(-6) M) in the presence and absence of excess (10(-5) M) unlabeled 5HT, norepinephrine, fluoxetine (FLUOX), metergoline, or cyproheptadine. A Hofstee analysis of the specific uptake of [3H]5HT gave an apparent Km value of 4.23 x 10(-7) M and a Vmax of 1576 pmol/g/10 min [3H]5HT. The total uptake of [3H]5HT was not altered by norepinephrine or metergoline, but was significantly reduced (P less than 0.01-0.001) by FLUOX and cyproheptadine. Uptake was shown to be temperature and sodium dependent and not directly dependent on energy derived from glycolysis or aerobic metabolism. 2) To study the site of uptake of 5 HT in the anterior pituitary, in concomitant radioautographic experiments, tissue was incubated with [3H]5HT with and without excess 5HT or FLUOX. Three patterns of silver grain distribution were observed: 1) nonrandom concentrations over select anterior pituitary cells near blood vessels, 2) heavy aggregates of silver grains usually associated with blood vessels, and 3) a seemingly random dispersal of grains over pituitary tissue. Tissue incubated with [3H]5HT alone contained 10% heavily labeled cells, 32% moderately labeled cells, and 58% weakly labeled cells. In contrast, no heavily labeled cells were seen when tissue was incubated with either excess 5HT or FLUOX in addition to [3H]5HT. Our findings of saturable and specific high affinity uptake of [3H]5HT into a subgroup of anterior pituitary cells suggest a direct pituitary action of 5HT

  20. Calotropis procera Latex-Induced Inflammatory Hyperalgesia—Effect of Antiinflammatory Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman Sehgal

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The milky white latex of plant Calotropis procera produces inflammation of the skin and mucous membranes on accidental exposure. It produces edema on local administration due to the release of histamine and prostaglandins and is associated with hyperalgesia. In the present study we have evaluated the antiedematous and analgesic activity of antiinflammatory drugs against inflammatory response induced by dried latex (DL of C procera in rat paw edema model. An aqueous extract of DL of C procera was injected into the subplantar surface of the rat paw and the paw volume was measured by a plethysmometer at 0, 1, 2, 6, 12, and 24 hours. Concomitantly the hyperalgesic response was also evaluated by motility test, stair climbing ability test, dorsal flexion pain test, compression test, and observing the grooming behavior. The inhibitory effect of diclofenac and rofecoxib on edema formation and hyperalgesic response was compared with cyproheptadine (CPH. DL-induced edema formation was maximum at 2 hours that was associated with decreased pain threshold, functional impairment, and grooming. Treatment with antiinflammatory drugs and CPH significantly attenuated the edematous response and grooming, increased the pain threshold, and improved functional parameters. Both antiinflammatory and antiserotonergic drugs significantly inhibited the hyperalgesia associated with DL-induced paw edema. Rofecoxib was found to be superior than diclofenac and was as effective as CPH in ameliorating the hyperalgesia. However, it was found to be less effective than CPH in attenuating edema formation.

  1. Combined DNA, toxicological and heavy metal analyses provides an auditing toolkit to improve pharmacovigilance of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coghlan, Megan L.; Maker, Garth; Crighton, Elly; Haile, James; Murray, Dáithí C.; White, Nicole E.; Byard, Roger W.; Bellgard, Matthew I.; Mullaney, Ian; Trengove, Robert; Allcock, Richard J. N.; Nash, Christine; Hoban, Claire; Jarrett, Kevin; Edwards, Ross; Musgrave, Ian F.; Bunce, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Globally, there has been an increase in the use of herbal remedies including traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). There is a perception that products are natural, safe and effectively regulated, however, regulatory agencies are hampered by a lack of a toolkit to audit ingredient lists, adulterants and constituent active compounds. Here, for the first time, a multidisciplinary approach to assessing the molecular content of 26 TCMs is described. Next generation DNA sequencing is combined with toxicological and heavy metal screening by separation techniques and mass spectrometry (MS) to provide a comprehensive audit. Genetic analysis revealed that 50% of samples contained DNA of undeclared plant or animal taxa, including an endangered species of Panthera (snow leopard). In 50% of the TCMs, an undeclared pharmaceutical agent was detected including warfarin, dexamethasone, diclofenac, cyproheptadine and paracetamol. Mass spectrometry revealed heavy metals including arsenic, lead and cadmium, one with a level of arsenic >10 times the acceptable limit. The study showed 92% of the TCMs examined were found to have some form of contamination and/or substitution. This study demonstrates that a combination of molecular methodologies can provide an effective means by which to audit complementary and alternative medicines.

  2. Potentiation of phorbol ester-induced coronary vasoconstriction in dogs following endothelium disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, R.B.; Ku, D.D.

    1986-01-01

    In the present study, the effect of phorbol ester, 12-0-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (TPA), activation of protein kinase C on coronary vascular reactivity was studied in isolated dog coronary arteries. Addition of TPA (10-100 nM) produced a slow, time- and dose-dependent contraction reaching a maximum at approx 2-3 hrs and was essentially irreversible upon washing. Disruption of the endothelium(EC) greatly accelerated the development as well as increase the magnitude of TPA contraction (50-100%). Prior treatment of vessels with phentolamine (1μM), cyproheptadine (1μH) and ibuprofen (1μg/ml) did not alter the TPA contraction. Furthermore, in contrast to previously reported calcium-dependence of TPA contraction in other vessels, complete removal of extracellular calcium (Ca 0 ) or addition of 1μM nimodipine after TPA(30nM) resulted in only 32 +/- 4% and 25 +/- 3% reversal of TPA contraction, respectively. Addition of amiloride (10μM to 1mM), however, resulted in a dose-dependent reversal of TPA contraction. The results of the present study indicate that a similar activation of protein kinase C by TPA leads to potent coronary vasoconstriction, which is not completely dependent on Ca 0 . More importantly, these results further support their hypothesis that EC also functions as an inhibitory barrier to prevent circulating vasoconstrictors from exerting their deleterious constrictory effects

  3. Off-target effects of psychoactive drugs revealed by genome-wide assays in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elke Ericson

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available To better understand off-target effects of widely prescribed psychoactive drugs, we performed a comprehensive series of chemogenomic screens using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system. Because the known human targets of these drugs do not exist in yeast, we could employ the yeast gene deletion collections and parallel fitness profiling to explore potential off-target effects in a genome-wide manner. Among 214 tested, documented psychoactive drugs, we identified 81 compounds that inhibited wild-type yeast growth and were thus selected for genome-wide fitness profiling. Many of these drugs had a propensity to affect multiple cellular functions. The sensitivity profiles of half of the analyzed drugs were enriched for core cellular processes such as secretion, protein folding, RNA processing, and chromatin structure. Interestingly, fluoxetine (Prozac interfered with establishment of cell polarity, cyproheptadine (Periactin targeted essential genes with chromatin-remodeling roles, while paroxetine (Paxil interfered with essential RNA metabolism genes, suggesting potential secondary drug targets. We also found that the more recently developed atypical antipsychotic clozapine (Clozaril had no fewer off-target effects in yeast than the typical antipsychotics haloperidol (Haldol and pimozide (Orap. Our results suggest that model organism pharmacogenetic studies provide a rational foundation for understanding the off-target effects of clinically important psychoactive agents and suggest a rational means both for devising compound derivatives with fewer side effects and for tailoring drug treatment to individual patient genotypes.

  4. Neuroprotective Effects of Psychotropic Drugs in Huntington’s Disease

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    Edward C. Lauterbach

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Psychotropics (antipsychotics, mood stabilizers, antidepressants, anxiolytics, etc. are commonly prescribed to treat Huntington’s disease (HD. In HD preclinical models, while no psychotropic has convincingly affected huntingtin gene, HD modifying gene, or huntingtin protein expression, psychotropic neuroprotective effects include upregulated huntingtin autophagy (lithium, histone acetylation (lithium, valproate, lamotrigine, miR-222 (lithium-plus-valproate, mitochondrial protection (haloperidol, trifluoperazine, imipramine, desipramine, nortriptyline, maprotiline, trazodone, sertraline, venlafaxine, melatonin, neurogenesis (lithium, valproate, fluoxetine, sertraline, and BDNF (lithium, valproate, sertraline and downregulated AP-1 DNA binding (lithium, p53 (lithium, huntingtin aggregation (antipsychotics, lithium, and apoptosis (trifluoperazine, loxapine, lithium, desipramine, nortriptyline, maprotiline, cyproheptadine, melatonin. In HD live mouse models, delayed disease onset (nortriptyline, melatonin, striatal preservation (haloperidol, tetrabenazine, lithium, sertraline, memory preservation (imipramine, trazodone, fluoxetine, sertraline, venlafaxine, motor improvement (tetrabenazine, lithium, valproate, imipramine, nortriptyline, trazodone, sertraline, venlafaxine, and extended survival (lithium, valproate, sertraline, melatonin have been documented. Upregulated CREB binding protein (CBP; valproate, dextromethorphan and downregulated histone deacetylase (HDAC; valproate await demonstration in HD models. Most preclinical findings await replication and their limitations are reviewed. The most promising findings involve replicated striatal neuroprotection and phenotypic disease modification in transgenic mice for tetrabenazine and for sertraline. Clinical data consist of an uncontrolled lithium case series (n = 3 suggesting non-progression and a primarily negative double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of lamotrigine.

  5. Serotonin syndrome following sibutramine poisoning in a child, with sequential quantification of sibutramine and its primary and secondary amine metabolites in plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucaretchi, Fábio; de Capitani, Eduardo Mello; Mello, Sueli Moreira; Lanaro, Rafael; Barros, Roberta F; Fernandes, Luciane C R; da Costa, José Luiz; Hyslop, Stephen

    2009-07-01

    To report a case of serotonin syndrome (SS) after sibutramine overdose in a child. A 4-year-old girl was admitted 25 h after accidentally ingesting approximately 27 pills of sibutramine (15 mg, approximately 23 mg/kg). The child developed clinical features suggestive of SS, including diaphoresis, tachycardia, hypertension, agitation, insomnia, incoordination, hypertonia (lower limbs > upper limbs), and hallucinations. Serum creatine phosphokinase levels reached a peak on day 3 (2,577 U/L, reference value sibutramine and the active metabolites, M1 (mono-desmethyl sibutramine) and M2 (di-desmethyl sibutramine), by liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry in six sequential samples collected from 25 to 147 h post-ingestion revealed a nonlinear decrease in the log-scale plasma concentrations. Treatment was only supportive and involved prolonged sedation to control the agitation, sleeplessness, and hypertension; no cyproheptadine was used. The patient was discharged on day 6 and follow-up revealed no sequelae. To our knowledge, this is the first report of SS after sibutramine overdose in a child, with sequential monitoring of the plasma levels of the drug and its two active metabolites. The growing consumption of weight reducing pills may increase the risk of unintentional acute toxic exposures in children.

  6. Serotonin Syndrome after Sertraline Overdose in a Child: A Case Report

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    Joana Grenha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin syndrome is a potentially life-threatening drug effect. It may be misdiagnosed because it has mostly been reported in adults. Case Report. An 8-year-old girl with behavioral problems and medicated with risperidone and sertraline was admitted in the emergency department after she had taken voluntarily 1500 mg of sertraline (50 mg/kg. At admission, she had marked agitation, visual hallucinations, diaphoresis, flushing, and tremor. She had fever and periods of hypertension. She also showed generalized rigidity and involuntary movements. She was treated with fluids and iv diazepam, midazolam, clemastine, and biperiden. As the patient presented a severe insomnia and a progressive rhabdomyolysis, she was transferred to pediatric intensive care unit (ICU, where she was under treatment with cyproheptadine, mechanical ventilation, and muscular paralysis for 11 days. She was discharged from hospital a few days later with no neurological sequelae. Conclusions. Serotonin syndrome is still not well recognized by physicians. In our patient, the diagnosis was made early due to the history of overdose with serotonin reuptake inhibitors and the triad of mental, neurological, and autonomic signs. Parents must be educated to prevent children from having free access to drugs, avoiding self-medication or overdose.

  7. Effect of fluoxetine on disease progression in a mouse model of ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschnitzky, J. E.; Quinlan, K. A.; Lukas, T. J.; Kajtaz, E.; Kocevar, E. J.; Mayers, W. F.; Siddique, T.

    2014-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and other antidepressants are often prescribed to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients; however, the impact of these prescriptions on ALS disease progression has not been systematically tested. To determine whether SSRIs impact disease progression, fluoxetine (Prozac, 5 or 10 mg/kg) was administered to mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mice during one of three age ranges: neonatal [postnatal day (P)5–11], adult presymptomatic (P30 to end stage), and adult symptomatic (P70 to end stage). Long-term adult fluoxetine treatment (started at either P30 or P70 and continuing until end stage) had no significant effect on disease progression. In contrast, neonatal fluoxetine treatment (P5-11) had two effects. First, all animals (mutant SOD1G93A and control: nontransgenic and SOD1WT) receiving the highest dose (10 mg/kg) had a sustained decrease in weight from P30 onward. Second, the high-dose SOD1G93A mice reached end stage ∼8 days (∼6% decrease in life span) sooner than vehicle and low-dose animals because of an increased rate of motor impairment. Fluoxetine increases synaptic serotonin (5-HT) levels, which is known to increase spinal motoneuron excitability. We confirmed that 5-HT increases spinal motoneuron excitability during this neonatal time period and therefore hypothesized that antagonizing 5-HT receptors during the same time period would improve disease outcome. However, cyproheptadine (1 or 5 mg/kg), a 5-HT receptor antagonist, had no effect on disease progression. These results show that a brief period of antidepressant treatment during a critical time window (the transition from neonatal to juvenile states) can be detrimental in ALS mouse models. PMID:24598527

  8. A Mixed Presentation of Serotonin Syndrome vs Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome in a 12-Year-Old Boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Christie; Sweet, Hannah; Minns, Alicia B; Shapiro, Desiree; Jenkins, Willough

    2018-04-24

    Neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS) and serotonin syndrome (SS) are serious medical conditions associated with commonly prescribed psychiatric medications. Although the mechanisms differ, they can be clinically difficult to distinguish. We report a case of a pediatric patient with complicated psychiatric history that developed features of both syndromes in the setting of polypharmacy. A 12-year-old boy with a history of developmental delay, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder presented to the emergency department with behavior changes consisting of delayed reactions, gait instability, drooling, and slowed movements. Ten days before presentation, his outpatient psychiatrist had made multiple medication changes including discontinuation of cyproheptadine (an appetite stimulant) and initiation of aripiprazole. On arrival, the patient was noted to be tachycardia and hypertensive for age. He was disoriented, intermittently agitated, and tremulous with increased tonicity, clonus in the lower extremities, and mydriasis. He was supportively treated with lorazepam and intravenous fluids while discontinuing potential offending agents. His course was complicated by hypertension and agitation managed with dexmedetomidine infusion and benzodiazepines. His mental status, tremors, and laboratory values began to improve over the next 2 days, and eventually transitioned to the inpatient psychiatric unit on hospital day 7. Diagnosis of NMS or SS can be difficult when there is overlap between syndromes, particularly in the setting of multiple potential offending agents or underlying developmental delay. In addition, pediatric patients may present atypically as compared with adult patients with the same condition. The use of antipsychotic medications for young children with behavioral problems has risen dramatically in the last decade, increasing their risk for developing SS or NMS.

  9. Attenuation of Morphine Withdrawal Syndrome by Various Dosages of Curcumin in Comparison with Clonidine in Mouse: Possible Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Motaghinejad

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Herbal medical compounds and their major constituent have been used in the management and treatment of opioid withdrawal syndrome and pain. This study was carried out to clarify the effect of curcumin, the major compound of turmeric, on morphine withdrawal syndrome in mouse model and its possible mechanisms of pain relieving activity by assessing in writhing test as a model of visceral pain. Methods: Due to two separate protocols (withdrawal syndrome and pain, 144 male albino mice were divided in two major groups. In withdrawal syndrome group, test effect of various dosages of curcumin (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg was assessed on withdrawal signs and compared with positive and negative control and standard treatment (clonidine 0.4 mg/kg groups. In pain groups, to determine the mechanism of pain relieving activity of curcumin, various dosages of curcumin (10, 20, and 40 mg/kg in three separated groups, were used against acetic acid induced writhing (which is a constriction test. The most effective dose (40 mg/kg was used in writhing test and compared with groups pretreated with antagonist of major neurotransmitters involved in pain; and compared with group pretreated with vehicle (DMSO, 0.05% as control. Results: Curcumin attenuates withdrawal syndrome in a dose dependent manner in comparison with the dependent positive control group (P<0.05. It also indicated that pretreatment with naloxone and cyproheptadine significantly attenuate antinociception effect of curcumin (P<0.05. Conclusion: This study advocate that antinociception of curcumin was mediated by opioidergic and adrenergic system.

  10. Behavioral studies with anxiolytic drugs. IV. Serotonergic involvement in the effects of buspirone on punished behavior of pigeons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witkin, J.M.; Mansbach, R.S.; Barrett, J.E.; Bolger, G.T.; Skolnick, P.; Weissman, B.

    1987-01-01

    Interactions of the nonbenzodiazepine anxiolytic, buspirone, with serotonin (5-HT) were studied using behavioral and neurochemical procedures. Punished responding was studied in pigeons as this behavior is a generally acknowledged preclinical predictor of anxiolytic activity and because buspirone increases punished responding of pigeons with greater potency and efficacy than in other species. Keypeck responses were maintained under either fixed-interval or fixed-ratio schedules of food presentation; every 30th response produced a brief electric shock and suppressed responding (punishment). Buspirone (0.1-5.6 mg/kg i.m.) produced dose-related increases in punished responding which reached a maximum at 1 mg/kg. A serotonin agonist, MK-212 (0.01 mg/kg), antagonized whereas the 5-HT antagonist, cyproheptadine (0.01 mg/kg), potentiated the effects of buspirone without having behavioral effects of their own. The characteristics of [ 3 H]-5-HT binding in pigeon brain membranes were similar to results reported in mammalian brain. Neither buspirone, MJ-13805 (gepirone, a related analog), nor MJ-13653 (a buspirone metabolite), significantly affected [ 3 H]-5-HT binding and none of the compounds appreciably inhibited uptake of [ 3 H]-5-HT into pigeon cerebral synaptosomes. Hill coefficients significantly less than unity for all drugs except 5-HT suggested multiple serotonergic binding sites for buspirone and analogs. Buspirone and MJ-13805 (1 nM) inhibited [ 3 H]ketanserin binding (a measure of 5-HT2 binding sites) in pigeon cerebrum with Ki values above 10(-6) M. The number of [ 3 H]ketanserin binding sites was estimated to be 109 fmol/mg of protein in pigeon cerebrum compared to 400 fmol/mg of protein in rat cerebrum

  11. Do serotonin(1-7) receptors modulate short and long-term memory?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, A

    2007-05-01

    Evidence from invertebrates to human studies indicates that serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT) system modulates short- (STM) and long-term memory (LTM). This work is primarily focused on analyzing the contribution of 5-HT, cholinergic and glutamatergic receptors as well as protein synthesis to STM and LTM of an autoshaping learning task. It was observed that the inhibition of hippocampal protein synthesis or new mRNA did not produce a significant effect on autoshaping STM performance but it did impair LTM. Both non-contingent protein inhibition and 5-HT depletion showed no effects. It was basically the non-selective 5-HT receptor antagonist cyproheptadine, which facilitated STM. However, the blockade of glutamatergic and cholinergic transmission impaired STM. In contrast, the selective 5-HT(1B) receptor antagonist SB-224289 facilitated both STM and LTM. Selective receptor antagonists for the 5-HT(1A) (WAY100635), 5-HT(1D) (GR127935), 5-HT(2A) (MDL100907), 5-HT(2C/2B) (SB-200646), 5-HT(3) (ondansetron) or 5-HT(4) (GR125487), 5-HT(6) (Ro 04-6790, SB-399885 and SB-35713) or 5-HT(7) (SB-269970) did not impact STM. Nevertheless, WAY100635, MDL100907, SB-200646, GR125487, Ro 04-6790, SB-399885 or SB-357134 facilitated LTM. Notably, some of these changes shown to be independent of food-intake. Concomitantly, these data indicate that '5-HT tone via 5-HT(1B) receptors' might function in a serial manner from STM to LTM, whereas working in parallel using 5-HT(1A), 5-HT(2A), 5-HT(2B/2C), 5-HT(4), or 5-HT(6) receptors.

  12. Hydroethanolic extract of Carthamus tinctorius induces antidepressant-like effects: modulation by dopaminergic and serotonergic systems in tail suspension test in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi-Maleki, Saeid; Mousavi, Zahra

    2017-09-01

    Studies indicate that major deficiency in the levels of monoaminergic transmitters is a reason for severe depression. On the other hand, it is shown that Carthamus tinctorius L. (CT) may improve neuropsychological injuries by regulation of the monoamine transporter action. Hence, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the involvement of monoaminergic systems in antidepressant-like effect of CT extract in the tail suspension test (TST) in mice. The mice were intraperitoneally (IP) treated with CT extract (100-400 mg/kg) 1 hr before the TST. To investigate the involvement of monoaminergic systems in antidepressant-like effect, the mice were treated with receptor antagonists 15 min before CT extract treatment (400 mg/kg, IP) and 1 hr before the TST. Findings showed that CT extract (100-400 mg/kg, IP), dose-dependently induced antidepressant-like effect ( P open-field test. Pretreatment of mice with SCH23390, sulpiride, haloperidol, WAY100135, cyproheptadine, ketanserin and p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA) inhibited the antidepressant-like effect of CT extract (400 mg/kg, IP), but not with prazosin and yohimbine. Co-administration of CT extract (100 mg/kg, IP) with sub-effective doses of fluoxetine (5 mg/kg, IP) or imipramine (5 mg/kg, IP) increased their antidepressant-like response. Our findings firstly showed that components (especially N-Hexadecanoic acid) of CT extract induce antidepressant-like effects by interaction with dopaminergic (D1 and D2) and serotonergic (5HT1A, 5-HT2A receptors) systems. These findings validate the folk use of CT extract for the management of depression.

  13. Novel and emerging treatments for autism spectrum disorders: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossignol, Daniel A

    2009-01-01

    Currently, only one medication (risperidone) is FDA-approved for the treatment of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Perhaps for this reason, the use of novel, unconventional, and off-label treatments for ASD is common, with up to 74% of children with ASD using these treatments; however, treating physicians are often unaware of this usage. A systematic literature search of electronic scientific databases was performed to identify studies of novel and emerging treatments for ASD, including nutritional supplements, diets, medications, and nonbiological treatments. A grade of recommendation ("Grade") was then assigned to each treatment using a validated evidence-based guideline as outlined in this review: A: Supported by at least 2 prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or 1 systematic review. B: Supported by at least 1 prospective RCT or 2 nonrandomized controlled trials. C: Supported by at least 1 nonrandomized controlled trial or 2 case series. D: Troublingly inconsistent or inconclusive studies or studies reporting no improvements. Potential adverse effects for each treatment were also reviewed. Grade A treatments for ASD include melatonin, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, naltrexone, and music therapy. Grade B treatments include carnitine, tetrahydrobiopterin, vitamin C, alpha-2 adrenergic agonists, hyperbaric oxygen treatment, immunomodulation and anti-inflammatory treatments, oxytocin, and vision therapy. Grade C treatments for ASD include carnosine, multivitamin/mineral complex, piracetam, polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamin B6/magnesium, elimination diets, chelation, cyproheptadine, famotidine, glutamate antagonists, acupuncture, auditory integration training, massage, and neurofeedback. The reviewed treatments for ASD are commonly used, and some are supported by prospective RCTs. Promising treatments include melatonin, antioxidants, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, naltrexone, and music therapy. All of the reviewed treatments are currently considered

  14. Effects of endorphins on different parts of the gastrointestinal tract of rat and guinea-pig in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijkamp, F P; Van Ree, J M

    1980-04-01

    1 The spasmogenic and spasmolytic effects of beta-lipotropin (LPH) fragments and one analogue were investigated on different parts of the gastro-intestinal tract of guinea-pig and rat in vitro.2 Changes in muscle tone were observed in colon and rectum and to a lesser extent in jejunum and ileum of both species. Rat colon and rectum contracted to the peptides. Guinea-pig colon and rectum relaxed after an initial short-lasting contraction.3 On the rat rectum (D-ala(2))met-enkephalin, leu-enkephalin, gamma-endorphin, alpha-endorphin and beta-LPH 80-91 caused dose-dependent contractions, their ED(50) values being 0.96 x 10(-12) mol, 1.05 x 10(-11) mol, 1.22 x 10(-11) mol, 1.08 x 10(-10) mol, 2.65 x 10(-10) mol and 6.5 x 10(-9) mol, respectively.4 Naloxone dose-dependently shifted the dose-response curve of met-enkephalin to the right. Atropine, hexamethonium, burimamide, mepyramine, propranolol and indomethacin did not influence the response to met-enkephalin.5 In the presence of tetrodotoxin, the ED(50) for met-enkephalin and the maximal contractor response induced by met-enkephalin, appeared to be increased.6 The 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) antagonists, methysergide and cyproheptadine, reduced the contractor response in a non-competitive manner. The alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine, in contrast, caused an increase of the maximal response to met-enkephalin of up to 200%. Noradrenergic and tryptaminergic systems, therefore, might be involved in the changes in muscle tone induced by met-enkephalin.7 These results demonstrate that rectum and colon of guinea-pig and rat are very sensitive to opioid-like peptides.

  15. Molecular, pharmacological, and signaling properties of octopamine receptors from honeybee (Apis mellifera) brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfanz, Sabine; Jordan, Nadine; Langenstück, Teresa; Breuer, Johanna; Bergmeier, Vera; Baumann, Arnd

    2014-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are important regulators of cellular signaling processes. Within the large family of rhodopsin-like receptors, those binding to biogenic amines form a discrete subgroup. Activation of biogenic amine receptors leads to transient changes of intracellular Ca²⁺-([Ca²⁺](i)) or 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate ([cAMP](i)) concentrations. Both second messengers modulate cellular signaling processes and thereby contribute to long-lasting behavioral effects in an organism. In vivo pharmacology has helped to reveal the functional effects of different biogenic amines in honeybees. The phenolamine octopamine is an important modulator of behavior. Binding of octopamine to its receptors causes elevation of [Ca²⁺](i) or [cAMP](i). To date, only one honeybee octopamine receptor that induces Ca²⁺ signals has been molecularly and pharmacologically characterized. Here, we examined the pharmacological properties of four additional honeybee octopamine receptors. When heterologously expressed, all receptors induced cAMP production after binding to octopamine with EC₅₀(s) in the nanomolar range. Receptor activity was most efficiently blocked by mianserin, a substance with antidepressant activity in vertebrates. The rank order of inhibitory potency for potential receptor antagonists was very similar on all four honeybee receptors with mianserin > cyproheptadine > metoclopramide > chlorpromazine > phentolamine. The subroot of octopamine receptors activating adenylyl cyclases is the largest that has so far been characterized in arthropods, and it should now be possible to unravel the contribution of individual receptors to the physiology and behavior of honeybees. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  16. Protective and/or recovering effects of various kinds of chemicals and drugs to the hemopoietic injuries caused by the irradiation of /sup 60/Co. gamma. -rays in the mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kagimoto, Akio

    1987-01-01

    We have injected eleven kinds of chemical substances and drugs intraperitoneally in the male ddN mice, and studied the relative protective and/or recovering effects of them to the hemopoietic injuries caused by the whole body irradiation of 600R of /sup 60/Co ..gamma..-rays. Good radioprotective activity on bone marrow cells in the irradiated mice was found, when we administered AET (S, 2-aminoethylisothiuronium Br. HBr) before irradiation, 5-HTP (5-hydroxytryptophane) in low dosage before irradiation, Glutathione before irradiation, or Serotonin (5-HT; 5-hydroxytryptamine) in high dosage before irradiation. Good radioprotective or recovering activity was observed on the weight of the spleen, by Serotonin in high and low dosage before irradiation, or DBCC (5,6-dimethyl benzimidazolyl cobamide coenzyme; Vitamin B/sub 12/) after irradiation. Positive responses of reticulocytes, erythrocytes, hemoglobin, and hematocrit were obtained in the irradiated mice, when we administered Serotonin in high dosage before irradiation, MET (S-Methyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide) before irradiation, a cocktail of Periactin (Cyproheptadine hydrochloride) and Serotonin before irradiation, MET before and after irradiation or Nucleo (a mixture of products made by degrading yeast-RNA) after irradiation respectively. A good response in leukocyte count was observed when Serotonin in high dosage before irradiation was administered, and in granulocyte count by Serotonin in high dosage before or 5-HTP in low dosage before irradiation. Lymphocyte count was protected or recovered by Serotonin in high dosage before or Nucleo after irradiation. Thrombocyte count was protected by Serotonin in high and low dosage before, Glutathione before, or AET before irradiation.(author).

  17. Effects of drug treatment on inflammation and hyperreactivity of airways and on immune variables in cats with experimentally induced asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinero, Carol R; Decile, Kendra C; Byerly, Jenni R; Berghaus, Roy D; Walby, William E; Berghaus, Londa J; Hyde, Dallas M; Schelegle, Edward S; Gershwin, Laurel J

    2005-07-01

    To compare the effects of an orally administered corticosteroid (prednisone), an inhaled corticosteroid (flunisolide), a leukotriene-receptor antagonist (zafirlukast), an antiserotonergic drug (cyproheptadine), and a control substance on the asthmatic phenotype in cats with experimentally induced asthma. 6 cats with asthma experimentally induced by the use of Bermuda grass allergen (BGA). A randomized, crossover design was used to assess changes in the percentage of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF); airway hyperresponsiveness; blood lymphocyte phenotype determined by use of flow cytometry; and serum and BALF content of BGA-specific IgE, IgG, and IgA determined by use of ELISAs. Mean +/- SE eosinophil percentages in BALF when cats were administered prednisone (5.0 +/- 2.3%) and flunisolide (2.5 +/- 1.7%) were significantly lower than for the control treatment (33.7 +/- 11.1%). We did not detect significant differences in airway hyperresponsiveness or lymphocyte surface markers among treatments. Content of BGA-specific IgE in serum was significantly lower when cats were treated with prednisone (25.5 +/- 5.4%), compared with values for the control treatment (63.6 +/- 12.9%); no other significant differences were observed in content of BGA-specific immunoglobulins among treatments. Orally administered and inhaled corticosteroids decreased eosinophilic inflammation in airways of cats with experimentally induced asthma. Only oral administration of prednisone decreased the content of BGA-specific IgE in serum; no other significant local or systemic immunologic effects were detected among treatments. Inhaled corticosteroids can be considered as an alternate method for decreasing airway inflammation in cats with asthma.

  18. Antidepressant and anxiolytic properties of the methanolic extract of Momordica charantia Linn (Cucurbitaceae) and its mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishola, I O; Akinyede, A A; Sholarin, A M

    2014-07-01

    The whole plant of Momordica charantia Linn (Cucurbitaceae) is used in traditional African medicine in the management of depressive illness. Momordica charantia (MC) (50-400 mg/kg, p.o.) was administered 1 h before behavioural studies using the forced swimming test (FST) and tail suspension test (TST) to investigate antidepressant-like effect while the anxiolytic-like effect was evaluated with elevated plus maze test (EPM), hole-board test (HBT), and light-dark test (LDT). Acute treatment with MC (50-400 mg/kg) significantly increased swimming time (86.51%) and reduced the duration of immobility (52.35%) in FST and TST with peak effects observed at 200 mg/kg, respectively, in comparison to control. The pretreatment of mice with either sulpiride (dopamine D2 receptor antagonist), or metergoline (5-HT2 receptor antagonist), or cyproheptadine (5-HT2 receptor antagonist), or prazosin (α1-adrenoceptor antagonist), or yohimbine (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist), and atropine (muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonist) 15 min before oral administration of MC (200 mg/kg) significantly blocked its anti-immobility effect. Similarly, MC (200 mg/kg) significantly reduced anxiety by increasing the open arm exploration (64.27%) in EPM, number of head-dips in HBT (34.38%), and time spent in light compartment (29.38%) in the LDT. However, pretreatment with flumazenil (GABAA receptor antagonist) 15 min before MC (200 mg/kg) significantly blocked (54.76%) its anxiolytic effect. The findings in this study showed that MC possesses antidepressant-like effect that is dependent on the serotonergic (5-HT2 receptor), noradrenergic (α1- and α2-adrenoceptors), dopaminergic (D2 receptor), and muscarinic cholinergic systems and an anxiolytic-like effect that might involve an action on benzodiazepine-type receptor. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Treatment of cachexia in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E M Tazi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cachexia is a complex metabolic syndrome associated with many chronic or end-stage diseases, especially cancer, and is characterized by loss of muscle with or without loss of fat mass. The management of cachexia is a complex challenge that should address the different causes underlying this clinical event with an integrated or multimodal treatment approach targeting the different factors involved in its pathophysiology. Aims and Objectives : The purpose of this article was to review the current medical treatment of cancer-related cachexia, in particular focusing on combination therapy and ongoing research. Results : Among the treatments proposed in the literature for cancer-related cachexia, some proved to be ineffective, namely, cyproheptadine, hydrazine, metoclopramide, and pentoxifylline. Among effective treatments, progestagens are currently considered the best available treatment option for cancer-related cachexia, and they are the only drugs approved in Europe. Drugs with a strong rationale that have failed or have not shown univocal results in clinical trials so far include eicosapentaenoic acid, cannabinoids, bortezomib, and anti-TNF-alpha MoAb. Several emerging drugs have shown promising results but are still under clinical investigation (thalidomide, selective cox-2 inhibitors, ghrelin mimetics, insulin, oxandrolone, and olanzapine. Conclusions : To date, despite several years of coordinated efforts in basic and clinical research, practice guidelines for the prevention and treatment of cancer-related muscle wasting are lacking, mainly because of the multifactorial pathogenesis of the syndrome. From all the data presented, one can speculate that one single therapy may not be completely successful in the treatment of cachexia. From this point of view, treatments involving different combinations are more likely to be successful.

  20. Protective and/or recovering effects of various kinds of chemicals and drugs to the hemopoietic injuries caused by the irradiation of 60Co γ-rays in the mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagimoto, Akio

    1987-01-01

    We have injected eleven kinds of chemical substances and drugs intraperitoneally in the male ddN mice, and studied the relative protective and/or recovering effects of them to the hemopoietic injuries caused by the whole body irradiation of 600R of 60 Co γ-rays. Good radioprotective activity on bone marrow cells in the irradiated mice was found, when we administered AET (S, 2-aminoethylisothiuronium Br. HBr) before irradiation, 5-HTP (5-hydroxytryptophane) in low dosage before irradiation, Glutathione before irradiation, or Serotonin (5-HT; 5-hydroxytryptamine) in high dosage before irradiation. Good radioprotective or recovering activity was observed on the weight of the spleen, by Serotonin in high and low dosage before irradiation, or DBCC (5,6-dimethyl benzimidazolyl cobamide coenzyme; Vitamin B 12 ) after irradiation. Positive responses of reticulocytes, erythrocytes, hemoglobin, and hematocrit were obtained in the irradiated mice, when we administered Serotonin in high dosage before irradiation, MET (S-Methyl-l-cysteine sulfoxide) before irradiation, a cocktail of Periactin (Cyproheptadine hydrochloride) and Serotonin before irradiation, MET before and after irradiation or Nucleo (a mixture of products made by degrading yeast-RNA) after irradiation respectively. A good response in leukocyte count was observed when Serotonin in high dosage before irradiation was administered, and in granulocyte count by Serotonin in high dosage before or 5-HTP in low dosage before irradiation. Lymphocyte count was protected or recovered by Serotonin in high dosage before or Nucleo after irradiation. Thrombocyte count was protected by Serotonin in high and low dosage before, Glutathione before, or AET before irradiation.(author)

  1. Interactions between lysergic acid diethylamide and dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase systems in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungen, K V; Roberts, S; Hill, D F

    1975-08-22

    Investigations were carried out on the interactions of the hallucinogenic drug, D-lysergic acid diethylamide (D-LSD), and other serotonin antagonists with catecholamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase systems in cell-free preparations from different regions of rat brain. In equimolar concentration, D-LSD, 2-brono-D-lysergic acid diethylamide (BOL), or methysergide (UML) strongly blocked maximal stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by either norepinephrine or dopamine in particulate preparations from cerebral cortices of young adult rats. D-LSD also eliminated the stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity of equimolar concentrations of norepinephrine or dopamine in particulate preparations from rat hippocampus. The effects of this hallucinogenic agent on adenylate cyclase activity were most striking in particulate preparations from corpus striatum. Thus, in 10 muM concentration, D-LSD not only completely eradicated the response to 10 muM dopamine in these preparations but also consistently stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. L-LSD (80 muM) was without effect. Significant activation of striatal adenylate cyclase was produced by 0.1 muM D-LSD. Activation of striatal adenylate cyclase of either D-LSD or dopamine was strongly blocked by the dopamine-blocking agents trifluoperazine, thioridazine, chlorpromazine, and haloperidol. The stimulatory effects of D-LSD and dopamine were also inhibited by the serotonin-blocking agents, BOL, 1-methyl-D-lysergic acid diethylamide (MLD), and cyproheptadine, but not by the beta-adrenergic-blocking agent, propranolol. However, these serotonin antagonists by themselves were incapable of stimulating adenylate cyclase activity in the striatal preparations. Several other hallucinogens, which were structurally related to serotonin, were also inactive in this regard, e.g., mescaline, N,N-dimethyltryptamine, psilocin and bufotenine. Serotonin itself produced a small stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity in striatal preparations and

  2. ABC gene-ranking for prediction of drug-induced cholestasis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yauheniya Cherkas

    drugs that behaved very differently, and were distinct from both non-cholestatic and cholestatic drugs (ketoconazole, dipyridamole, cyproheptadine and aniline, and many postulated human cholestatic drugs that in rat showed no evidence of cholestasis (chlorpromazine, erythromycin, niacin, captopril, dapsone, rifampicin, glibenclamide, simvastatin, furosemide, tamoxifen, and sulfamethoxazole. Most of these latter drugs were noted previously by other groups as showing cholestasis only in humans. The results of this work suggest that the ABC procedure and similar statistical approaches can be instrumental in combining data to compare toxicants across toxicogenomics databases, extract similarities among responses and reduce unexplained data varation. Keywords: Cluster analysis, Cholestasis, Gene signature, Microarray, Prediction, Toxicogenomics

  3. Appetite stimulants for people with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinuck, Ruth; Dewar, Jane; Baldwin, David R; Hendron, Elizabeth

    2014-07-27

    Chronic loss of appetite in cystic fibrosis concerns both individuals and families. Appetite stimulants have been used to help cystic fibrosis patients with chronic anorexia attain optimal body mass index and nutritional status. However, these may have adverse effects on clinical status. The aim of this review is to systematically search for and evaluate evidence on the beneficial effects of appetite stimulants in the management of CF-related anorexia and synthesize reports of any side-effects. Trials were identified by searching the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, handsearching reference lists and contacting local and international experts.Last search of online databases: 01 April 2014.Last search of the Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: 08 April 2014. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of appetite stimulants, compared to placebo or no treatment for at least one month in adults and children with cystic fibrosis. Authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias within eligible trials. Meta-analyses were performed. Three trials (total of 47 recruited patients) comparing appetite stimulants (cyproheptadine hydrochloride and megesterol acetate) to placebo were included; the numbers of adults or children within each trial were not always reported. The risk of bias of the included trials was graded as moderate.A meta-analysis of all three trials showed appetite stimulants produced a larger increase in weight z score at three months compared to placebo, mean difference 0.61 (95% confidence interval 0.29 to 0.93) (P children, appetite stimulants improved only two of the outcomes in this review - weight (or weight z score) and appetite; and side effects were insufficiently reported to determine the full extent of their impact. Whilst the data may suggest the potential use of appetite stimulants in treating anorexia in adults and children with cystic fibrosis

  4. Anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of azadirachtin in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Darly G; Godin, Adriana M; Menezes, Raquel R; Nogueira, Rafaela D; Brito, Ana Mercy S; Melo, Ivo S F; Coura, Giovanna Maria E; Souza, Danielle G; Amaral, Flávio A; Paulino, Tony P; Coelho, Márcio M; Machado, Renes R

    2014-06-01

    Azadirachta indica (Meliaceae) extracts have been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive properties. However, the activities of azadirachtin, a limonoid and the major bioactive compound found in the extracts, have been poorly investigated in animal models. In the present study, we investigated the effects induced by azadirachtin in experimental models of pain and inflammation in mice. Carrageenan-induced paw edema and fibrovascular tissue growth induced by subcutaneous cotton pellet implantation were used to investigate the anti-inflammatory activity of azadirachtin in mice. Zymosan-induced writhing and hot plate tests were employed to evaluate the antinociceptive activity. To explore putative mechanisms of action, the level of tumor necrosis factor-α in inflammatory tissue was measured and the effect induced by opioidergic and serotonergic antagonists was evaluated. Previous per os (p. o.) administration of azadirachtin (120 mg/kg) significantly reduced the acute paw edema induced by carrageenan. However, the concomitant increase of the paw concentration of tumor necrosis factor-α induced by this inflammatory stimulus was not reduced by azadirachtin. In addition to inhibiting the acute paw edema induced by carrageenan, azadirachtin (6, 60, and 120 mg/kg) inhibited the proliferative phase of the inflammatory response, as demonstrated by the reduced formation of fibrovascular tissue growth. Azadirachtin (120 mg/kg) also inhibited the nociceptive response in models of nociceptive (hot plate) and inflammatory (writhing induced by zymosan) pain. The activity of azadirachtin (120 mg/kg) in the model of nociceptive pain was attenuated by a nonselective opioid antagonist, naltrexone (10 mg/kg, i. p.), but not by a nonselective serotonergic antagonist, cyproheptadine. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the activity of azadirachtin in experimental models of nociceptive and inflammatory pain, and also in models of acute and chronic inflammation

  5. Mechanisms of tramadol-related neurotoxicity in the rat: Does diazepam/tramadol combination play a worsening role in overdose?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagard, Camille, E-mail: camille.lagard@gmail.com [Inserm, U1144, Paris (France); UMR-S 1144, Paris-Descartes University, Paris (France); UMR-S 1144, Paris-Diderot University, Paris (France); Chevillard, Lucie, E-mail: luciechevillard@gmail.com [Inserm, U1144, Paris (France); UMR-S 1144, Paris-Descartes University, Paris (France); UMR-S 1144, Paris-Diderot University, Paris (France); Malissin, Isabelle, E-mail: isabellemalissin@gmail.com [Assistance Publique – Hôpitaux de Paris, Lariboisière Hospital, Department of Medical and Toxicological Critical Care, Paris (France); Risède, Patricia, E-mail: patricia.risede@inserm.fr [Inserm, U1144, Paris (France); UMR-S 1144, Paris-Descartes University, Paris (France); UMR-S 1144, Paris-Diderot University, Paris (France); Callebert, Jacques, E-mail: jacques.callebert@aphp.fr [Inserm, U1144, Paris (France); UMR-S 1144, Paris-Descartes University, Paris (France); UMR-S 1144, Paris-Diderot University, Paris (France); Assistance Publique – Hôpitaux de Paris, Lariboisière Hospital, Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Paris (France); Labat, Laurence, E-mail: laurence.labat@aphp.fr [Inserm, U1144, Paris (France); UMR-S 1144, Paris-Descartes University, Paris (France); UMR-S 1144, Paris-Diderot University, Paris (France); Assistance Publique – Hôpitaux de Paris, Cochin Hospital, Laboratory of Toxicology, Paris (France); Launay, Jean-Marie, E-mail: jean-marie.launay@aphp.fr [Assistance Publique – Hôpitaux de Paris, Lariboisière Hospital, Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Paris (France); Inserm, U942, Paris (France); and others

    2016-11-01

    Poisoning with opioid analgesics including tramadol represents a challenge. Tramadol may induce respiratory depression, seizures and serotonin syndrome, possibly worsened when in combination to benzodiazepines. Our objectives were to investigate tramadol-related neurotoxicity, consequences of diazepam/tramadol combination, and mechanisms of drug-drug interactions in rats. Median lethal-doses were determined using Dixon–Bruce's up-and-down method. Sedation, seizures, electroencephalography and plethysmography parameters were studied. Concentrations of tramadol and its metabolites were measured using liquid-chromatography-high-resolution-mass-spectrometry. Plasma, platelet and brain monoamines were measured using liquid-chromatography coupled to fluorimetry. Median lethal-doses of tramadol and diazepam/tramadol combination did not significantly differ, although time-to-death was longer with combination (P = 0.04). Tramadol induced dose-dependent sedation (P < 0.05), early-onset seizures (P < 0.001) and increase in inspiratory (P < 0.01) and expiratory times (P < 0.05). The diazepam/tramadol combination abolished seizures but significantly enhanced sedation (P < 0.01) and respiratory depression (P < 0.05) by reducing tidal volume (P < 0.05) in addition to tramadol-related increase in respiratory times, suggesting a pharmacodynamic mechanism of interaction. Plasma M1 and M5 metabolites were mildly increased, contributing additionally to tramadol-related respiratory depression. Tramadol-induced early-onset increase in brain concentrations of serotonin and norepinephrine was not significantly altered by the diazepam/tramadol combination. Interestingly neither pretreatment with cyproheptadine (a serotonin-receptor antagonist) nor a benserazide/5-hydroxytryptophane combination (enhancing brain serotonin) reduced tramadol-induced seizures. Our study shows that diazepam/tramadol combination does not worsen tramadol-induced fatality risk but alters its toxicity pattern

  6. [Childhood periodic syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuvellier, J-C; Lépine, A

    2010-01-01

    is entertained after exhaustive evaluations have proved unrevealing. The recommended diagnostic approach uses a strategy of targeted testing, which may include gastrointestinal and metabolic evaluations. Therapeutic recommendations include reassurance, both of the child and parents, lifestyle changes, prophylactic therapy (e.g., cyproheptadine in children 5 years or younger and amitriptyline for those older than 5 years), and acute therapy (e.g., triptans, as abortive therapy, and 10% glucose and ondansetron for those requiring intravenous hydration).

  7. Mechanisms of tramadol-related neurotoxicity in the rat: Does diazepam/tramadol combination play a worsening role in overdose?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagard, Camille; Chevillard, Lucie; Malissin, Isabelle; Risède, Patricia; Callebert, Jacques; Labat, Laurence; Launay, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Poisoning with opioid analgesics including tramadol represents a challenge. Tramadol may induce respiratory depression, seizures and serotonin syndrome, possibly worsened when in combination to benzodiazepines. Our objectives were to investigate tramadol-related neurotoxicity, consequences of diazepam/tramadol combination, and mechanisms of drug-drug interactions in rats. Median lethal-doses were determined using Dixon–Bruce's up-and-down method. Sedation, seizures, electroencephalography and plethysmography parameters were studied. Concentrations of tramadol and its metabolites were measured using liquid-chromatography-high-resolution-mass-spectrometry. Plasma, platelet and brain monoamines were measured using liquid-chromatography coupled to fluorimetry. Median lethal-doses of tramadol and diazepam/tramadol combination did not significantly differ, although time-to-death was longer with combination (P = 0.04). Tramadol induced dose-dependent sedation (P < 0.05), early-onset seizures (P < 0.001) and increase in inspiratory (P < 0.01) and expiratory times (P < 0.05). The diazepam/tramadol combination abolished seizures but significantly enhanced sedation (P < 0.01) and respiratory depression (P < 0.05) by reducing tidal volume (P < 0.05) in addition to tramadol-related increase in respiratory times, suggesting a pharmacodynamic mechanism of interaction. Plasma M1 and M5 metabolites were mildly increased, contributing additionally to tramadol-related respiratory depression. Tramadol-induced early-onset increase in brain concentrations of serotonin and norepinephrine was not significantly altered by the diazepam/tramadol combination. Interestingly neither pretreatment with cyproheptadine (a serotonin-receptor antagonist) nor a benserazide/5-hydroxytryptophane combination (enhancing brain serotonin) reduced tramadol-induced seizures. Our study shows that diazepam/tramadol combination does not worsen tramadol-induced fatality risk but alters its toxicity pattern

  8. Rating the elderly with terminal cancer disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riveros Rios, M.

    2012-01-01

    with bone metastasis of lung cancer progression and no response to chemotherapeutic treatment • Less than half of older women terminalidad presented some criteria to be among the most frequent relapse breast cancer and breast cancer with widespread metastatic bone and liver and no response to treatment, cancer Systemic relapse colon • The completion of the comprehensive geriatric Ranking in older adults of both sexes in terminal stage was verified that the Rating physical took place in more than half, almost a quarter functional assessment was performed in less than one quarter the mental assessment was performed, psychological and social • In older adults with criteria or terminally ill hospice bring accurate indication bypass had the same in less than half • Symptoms reported in the medical history who presented the elderly with end-stage disease were by frequencies: pain almost half of patients, constipation, anorexia and nausea / vomiting in nearly a quarter of patients, dyspne a, fatigue, and dysphagia in one fifth of patients and insomnia represents just three patients. • The pharmacological management mentioned in the medical history of the symptoms presented was: For pain alone or in combination: use of opioids (morphine, codeine, tramadol)almost a little over a quarter, NSAIDs on a quarter of patients and others (paracetamole, gabapentin)less than a fifth For nausea and / or vomiting: metaclopramide less than a fifth, ondansetron and haloperidol was not used in only two patients For dyspne a or as adjuvant pain: steroids in one quarter of patients For constipation: laxatives in one quarter of patients For anxiety: short-acting benzodiazepine only in 3 patients To stimulate appetite: steroids / medroxyprogesterone or cyproheptadine only two patients • The associated co morbidities, we found a frequency of: Hypertension nearly half of the patients, type 2 Diabetes Mellitus fifth pulmonary emphysema, kidney failure and heart disease in less than one