WorldWideScience

Sample records for cyclic nucleotide signal

  1. Cyclic Nucleotide Signalling in Kidney Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Schinner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kidney fibrosis is an important factor for the progression of kidney diseases, e.g., diabetes mellitus induced kidney failure, glomerulosclerosis and nephritis resulting in chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP were implicated to suppress several of the above mentioned renal diseases. In this review article, identified effects and mechanisms of cGMP and cAMP regarding renal fibrosis are summarized. These mechanisms include several signalling pathways of nitric oxide/ANP/guanylyl cyclases/cGMP-dependent protein kinase and cAMP/Epac/adenylyl cyclases/cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Furthermore, diverse possible drugs activating these pathways are discussed. From these diverse mechanisms it is expected that new pharmacological treatments will evolve for the therapy or even prevention of kidney failure.

  2. Cyclic Nucleotide Monophosphates and Their Cyclases in Plant Signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A.

    2017-10-04

    The cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (cNMPs), and notably 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) are now accepted as key signaling molecules in many processes in plants including growth and differentiation, photosynthesis, and biotic and abiotic defense. At the single molecule level, we are now beginning to understand how cNMPs modify specific target molecules such as cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, while at the systems level, a recent study of the Arabidopsis cNMP interactome has identified novel target molecules with specific cNMP-binding domains. A major advance came with the discovery and characterization of a steadily increasing number of guanylate cyclases (GCs) and adenylate cyclases (ACs). Several of the GCs are receptor kinases and include the brassinosteroid receptor, the phytosulfokine receptor, the Pep receptor, the plant natriuretic peptide receptor as well as a nitric oxide sensor. We foresee that in the near future many more molecular mechanisms and biological roles of GCs and ACs and their catalytic products will be discovered and further establish cNMPs as a key component of plant responses to the environment.

  3. Cyclic Nucleotide Monophosphates in Plants and Plant Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marondedze, Claudius; Wong, Aloysius; Thomas, Ludivine; Irving, Helen; Gehring, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (cNMPs) and the enzymes that can generate them are of increasing interest in the plant sciences. Arguably, the major recent advance came with the release of the complete Arabidopsis thaliana genome that has enabled the systematic search for adenylate (ACs) or guanylate cyclases (GCs) and did eventually lead to the discovery of a number of GCs in higher plants. Many of these proteins have complex domain architectures with AC or GC centers moonlighting within cytosolic kinase domains. Recent reports indicated the presence of not just the canonical cNMPs (i.e., cAMP and cGMP), but also the noncanonical cCMP, cUMP, cIMP, and cdTMP in plant tissues, and this raises several questions. Firstly, what are the functions of these cNMPs, and, secondly, which enzymes can convert the substrate triphosphates into the respective noncanonical cNMPs? The first question is addressed here by comparing the reactive oxygen species (ROS) response of cAMP and cGMP to that elicited by the noncanonical cCMP or cIMP. The results show that particularly cIMP can induce significant ROS production. To answer, at least in part, the second question, we have evaluated homology models of experimentally confirmed plant GCs probing the substrate specificity by molecular docking simulations to determine if they can conceivably catalytically convert substrates other than ATP or GTP. In summary, molecular modeling and substrate docking simulations can contribute to the evaluation of cyclases for noncanonical cyclic mononucleotides and thereby further our understanding of the molecular mechanism that underlie cNMP-dependent signaling in planta.

  4. The arabidopsis cyclic nucleotide interactome

    KAUST Repository

    Donaldson, Lara Elizabeth

    2016-05-11

    Background Cyclic nucleotides have been shown to play important signaling roles in many physiological processes in plants including photosynthesis and defence. Despite this, little is known about cyclic nucleotide-dependent signaling mechanisms in plants since the downstream target proteins remain unknown. This is largely due to the fact that bioinformatics searches fail to identify plant homologs of protein kinases and phosphodiesterases that are the main targets of cyclic nucleotides in animals. Methods An affinity purification technique was used to identify cyclic nucleotide binding proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. The identified proteins were subjected to a computational analysis that included a sequence, transcriptional co-expression and functional annotation analysis in order to assess their potential role in plant cyclic nucleotide signaling. Results A total of twelve cyclic nucleotide binding proteins were identified experimentally including key enzymes in the Calvin cycle and photorespiration pathway. Importantly, eight of the twelve proteins were shown to contain putative cyclic nucleotide binding domains. Moreover, the identified proteins are post-translationally modified by nitric oxide, transcriptionally co-expressed and annotated to function in hydrogen peroxide signaling and the defence response. The activity of one of these proteins, GLYGOLATE OXIDASE 1, a photorespiratory enzyme that produces hydrogen peroxide in response to Pseudomonas, was shown to be repressed by a combination of cGMP and nitric oxide treatment. Conclusions We propose that the identified proteins function together as points of cross-talk between cyclic nucleotide, nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species signaling during the defence response.

  5. Molecular Mechanisms of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Signaling: Integrating Cyclic Nucleotides into the Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig Alexander McArdle

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH is the primary regulator of mammalian reproductive function in both males and females. It acts via G-protein coupled receptors on gonadotropes to stimulate synthesis and secretion of the gonadotropin hormones luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone. These receptors couple primarily via G-proteins of the Gq/11 family, driving activation of phospholipase C and mediating GnRH effects on gonadotropin synthesis and secretion. There is also good evidence that GnRH causes activation of other heterotrimeric G-proteins (Gs and Gi with consequent effects on cyclic AMP production, as well as for effects on the soluble and particulate guanylyl cyclases that generate cGMP. Here we provide an overview of these pathways. We emphasise mechanisms underpinning pulsatile hormone signaling and the possible interplay of GnRH and autocrine or paracrine regulatory mechanisms in control of cyclic nucleotide signaling.

  6. Cyclic nucleotide dependent dephosphorylation of regulator of G-protein signaling 18 in human platelets.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gegenbauer, Kristina

    2013-11-01

    Regulator of G-protein signaling 18 (RGS18) is a GTPase-activating protein that turns off Gq signaling in platelets. RGS18 is regulated by binding to the adaptor protein 14-3-3 via phosphorylated serine residues S49 and S218 on RGS18. In this study we confirm that thrombin, thromboxane A2, or ADP stimulate the interaction of RGS18 and 14-3-3 by increasing the phosphorylation of S49. Cyclic AMP- and cyclic GMP-dependent kinases (PKA, PKG) inhibit the interaction of RGS18 and 14-3-3 by phosphorylating S216. To understand the effect of S216 phosphorylation we studied the phosphorylation kinetics of S49, S216, and S218 using Phos-tag gels and phosphorylation site-specific antibodies in transfected cells and in platelets. Cyclic nucleotide-induced detachment of 14-3-3 from RGS18 coincides initially with double phosphorylation of S216 and S218. This is followed by dephosphorylation of S49 and S218. Dephosphorylation of S49 and S218 might be mediated by protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) which is linked to RGS18 by the regulatory subunit PPP1R9B (spinophilin). We conclude that PKA and PKG induced S216 phosphorylation triggers the dephosphorylation of the 14-3-3 binding sites of RGS18 in platelets.

  7. Visualization of cyclic nucleotide dynamics in neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill eGorshkov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The second messengers cAMP and cGMP transduce many neuromodulatory signals from hormones and neurotransmitters into specific functional outputs. Their production, degradation and signaling are spatiotemporally regulated to achieve high specificity in signal transduction. The development of genetically encodable fluorescent biosensors has provided researchers with useful tools to study these versatile second messengers and their downstream effectors with unparalleled spatial and temporal resolution in cultured cells and living animals. In this review, we introduce the general design of these fluorescent biosensors and describe several of them in more detail. Then we discuss a few examples of using cyclic nucleotide fluorescent biosensors to study regulation of neuronal function and finish with a discussion of advances in the field. Although there has been significant progress made in understanding how the specific signaling of cyclic nucleotide second messengers is achieved, the mechanistic details in complex cell types like neurons are only just beginning to surface. Current and future fluorescent protein reporters will be essential to elucidate the role of cyclic nucleotide signaling dynamics in the functions of individual neurons and their networks.

  8. Supplementary Material for: The arabidopsis cyclic nucleotide interactome

    KAUST Repository

    Donaldson, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Cyclic nucleotides have been shown to play important signaling roles in many physiological processes in plants including photosynthesis and defence. Despite this, little is known about cyclic nucleotide-dependent signaling mechanisms in plants since the downstream target proteins remain unknown. This is largely due to the fact that bioinformatics searches fail to identify plant homologs of protein kinases and phosphodiesterases that are the main targets of cyclic nucleotides in animals. Methods An affinity purification technique was used to identify cyclic nucleotide binding proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. The identified proteins were subjected to a computational analysis that included a sequence, transcriptional co-expression and functional annotation analysis in order to assess their potential role in plant cyclic nucleotide signaling. Results A total of twelve cyclic nucleotide binding proteins were identified experimentally including key enzymes in the Calvin cycle and photorespiration pathway. Importantly, eight of the twelve proteins were shown to contain putative cyclic nucleotide binding domains. Moreover, the identified proteins are post-translationally modified by nitric oxide, transcriptionally co-expressed and annotated to function in hydrogen peroxide signaling and the defence response. The activity of one of these proteins, GLYGOLATE OXIDASE 1, a photorespiratory enzyme that produces hydrogen peroxide in response to Pseudomonas, was shown to be repressed by a combination of cGMP and nitric oxide treatment. Conclusions We propose that the identified proteins function together as points of cross-talk between cyclic nucleotide, nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species signaling during the defence response.

  9. Cyclic nucleotide specific phosphodiesterases of Leishmania major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linder Markus

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leishmania represent a complex of important human pathogens that belong to the systematic order of the kinetoplastida. They are transmitted between their human and mammalian hosts by different bloodsucking sandfly vectors. In their hosts, the Leishmania undergo several differentiation steps, and their coordination and optimization crucially depend on numerous interactions between the parasites and the physiological environment presented by the fly and human hosts. Little is still known about the signalling networks involved in these functions. In an attempt to better understand the role of cyclic nucleotide signalling in Leishmania differentiation and host-parasite interaction, we here present an initial study on the cyclic nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterases of Leishmania major. Results This paper presents the identification of three class I cyclic-nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterases (PDEs from L. major, PDEs whose catalytic domains exhibit considerable sequence conservation with, among other, all eleven human PDE families. In contrast to other protozoa such as Dictyostelium, or fungi such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida ssp or Neurospora, no genes for class II PDEs were found in the Leishmania genomes. LmjPDEA contains a class I catalytic domain at the C-terminus of the polypeptide, with no other discernible functional domains elsewhere. LmjPDEB1 and LmjPDEB2 are coded for by closely related, tandemly linked genes on chromosome 15. Both PDEs contain two GAF domains in their N-terminal region, and their almost identical catalytic domains are located at the C-terminus of the polypeptide. LmjPDEA, LmjPDEB1 and LmjPDEB2 were further characterized by functional complementation in a PDE-deficient S. cerevisiae strain. All three enzymes conferred complementation, demonstrating that all three can hydrolyze cAMP. Recombinant LmjPDEB1 and LmjPDEB2 were shown to be cAMP-specific, with Km values in the low micromolar range

  10. [Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases: role in the heart and therapeutic perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedioune, Ibrahim; Bobin, Pierre; Karam, Sarah; Lindner, Marta; Mika, Delphine; Lechêne, Patrick; Leroy, Jérôme; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Vandecasteele, Grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) degrade the second messengers cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), thereby regulating multiple aspects of cardiac function. This highly diverse class of enzymes encoded by 21 genes encompasses 11 families that are not only responsible for the termination of cyclic nucleotide signalling, but are also involved in the generation of dynamic microdomains of cAMP and cGMP, controlling specific cell functions in response to various neurohormonal stimuli. In the myocardium, the PDE3 and PDE4 families predominate, degrading cAMP and thereby regulating cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. PDE3 inhibitors are positive inotropes and vasodilators in humans, but their use is limited to acute heart failure and intermittent claudication. PDE5 inhibitors, which are used with success to treat erectile dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension, do not seem efficient in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. There is experimental evidence however that these PDE, as well as other PDE families including PDE1, PDE2 and PDE9, may play important roles in cardiac diseases, such as hypertrophy and heart failure (HF). After a brief presentation of the cyclic nucleotide pathways in cardiac myocytes and the major characteristics of the PDE superfamily, this review will focus on the potential use of PDE inhibitors in HF, and the recent research developments that could lead to a better exploitation of the therapeutic potential of these enzymes in the future. © Société de Biologie, 2016.

  11. A Sensitive Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterase Assay for Transient Enzyme Kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lookeren Campagne, Michiel M. van; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1983-01-01

    A new assay for cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase has been developed by using reverse-phase column chromatography for the separation of product and substrate of the enzymatic reaction. The polar 5'-nucleotides are not retarded by the column, while the more lipophilic cyclic nucleotides bind to the

  12. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases in heart and vessels: A therapeutic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobin, Pierre; Belacel-Ouari, Milia; Bedioune, Ibrahim; Zhang, Liang; Leroy, Jérôme; Leblais, Véronique; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Vandecasteele, Grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) degrade the second messengers cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), thereby regulating multiple aspects of cardiac and vascular muscle functions. This highly diverse class of enzymes encoded by 21 genes encompasses 11 families that are not only responsible for the termination of cyclic nucleotide signalling, but are also involved in the generation of dynamic microdomains of cAMP and cGMP, controlling specific cell functions in response to various neurohormonal stimuli. In the myocardium and vascular smooth muscle, the PDE3 and PDE4 families predominate, degrading cAMP and thereby regulating cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and smooth muscle contractile tone. PDE3 inhibitors are positive inotropes and vasodilators in humans, but their use is limited to acute heart failure and intermittent claudication. PDE5 is particularly important for the degradation of cGMP in vascular smooth muscle, and PDE5 inhibitors are used to treat erectile dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension. There is experimental evidence that these PDEs, as well as other PDE families, including PDE1, PDE2 and PDE9, may play important roles in cardiac diseases, such as hypertrophy and heart failure, as well as several vascular diseases. After a brief presentation of the cyclic nucleotide pathways in cardiac and vascular cells, and the major characteristics of the PDE superfamily, this review will focus on the current use of PDE inhibitors in cardiovascular diseases, and the recent research developments that could lead to better exploitation of the therapeutic potential of these enzymes in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Investigating cyclic nucleotide and cyclic dinucleotide binding to HCN channels by surface plasmon resonance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien Hayoz

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated (HCN channels control cardiac and neuronal rhythmicity. HCN channels contain cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD in their C-terminal region linked to the pore-forming transmembrane segment with a C-linker. The C-linker couples the conformational changes caused by the direct binding of cyclic nucleotides to the HCN pore opening. Recently, cyclic dinucleotides were shown to antagonize the effect of cyclic nucleotides in HCN4 but not in HCN2 channels. Based on the structural analysis and mutational studies it has been proposed that cyclic dinucleotides affect HCN4 channels by binding to the C-linker pocket (CLP. Here, we first show that surface plasmon resonance (SPR can be used to accurately measure cyclic nucleotide binding affinity to the C-linker/CNBD of HCN2 and HCN4 channels. We then used SPR to investigate cyclic dinucleotide binding in HCN channels. To our surprise, we detected no binding of cyclic dinucleotides to the isolated monomeric C-linker/CNBDs of HCN4 channels with SPR. The binding of cyclic dinucleotides was further examined with isothermal calorimetry (ITC, which indicated no binding of cyclic dinucleotides to both monomeric and tetrameric C-linker/CNBDs of HCN4 channels. Taken together, our results suggest that interaction of the C-linker/CNBD with other parts of the channel is necessary for cyclic-dinucleotide binding in HCN4 channels.

  14. Plasma Membrane Cyclic Nucleotide Gated Calcium Channels Control Land Plant Thermal Sensing and Acquired Thermotolerance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andrija Finka; America Farinia Henriquez Cuendet; Frans J.M. Maathuis; Younousse Saidi; Pierre Goloubinoff

    2012-01-01

    .... Here, we found that the cyclic nucleotide gated calcium channel (CNGC) CNGCb gene from Physcomitrella patens and its Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog CNGC2, encode a component of cyclic nucleotide gated Ca²...

  15. Identification of cyclic nucleotide gated channels using regular expressions

    KAUST Repository

    Zelman, Alice K.

    2013-09-03

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGCs) are nonselective cation channels found in plants, animals, and some bacteria. They have a six-transmembrane/one- pore structure, a cytosolic cyclic nucleotide-binding domain, and a cytosolic calmodulin-binding domain. Despite their functional similarities, the plant CNGC family members appear to have different conserved amino acid motifs within corresponding functional domains than animal and bacterial CNGCs do. Here we describe the development and application of methods employing plant CNGC-specific sequence motifs as diagnostic tools to identify novel candidate channels in different plants. These methods are used to evaluate the validity of annotations of putative orthologs of CNGCs from plant genomes. The methods detail how to employ regular expressions of conserved amino acids in functional domains of annotated CNGCs and together with Web tools such as PHI-BLAST and ScanProsite to identify novel candidate CNGCs in species including Physcomitrella patens. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  16. Cyclic nucleotides and production of prostanoids in human varicose veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemcova, S; Gloviczki, P; Rud, K S; Miller, V M

    1999-11-01

    Experiments were designed to determine the production of prostacyclin and thromboxane and the activation of cyclic nucleotides in human varicose and nonvaricose veins and to determine whether these second messenger pathways were differentially activated by the venotropic extract of Ruscus aculeatus. The experiments were designed to characterize the activity of cyclic nucleotides and the production of prostaglandins in human varicose and nonvaricose veins. Segments of the greater saphenous veins and the adjacent tributaries were obtained from patients who underwent vein stripping and excision of primary varicose veins. The saphenous veins from the patients who underwent peripheral arterial bypass grafting were used as controls. The segments of veins were incubated in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate solution in the presence of venotropic extract of Ruscus aculeatus (10(-3) g/mL) or in water-miscible organic solvent (dimethyl sulfoxide, 10(-3) g/mL), for 1, 5, and 10 minutes at 37 degrees C. The nonspecific phosphodiesterase inhibitor (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, 10(-4) g/mL) was used to block cyclic nucleotide degradation in some samples. Tissue and media samples were collected. Tissue concentrations of both cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cAMP and cGMP, respectively) and media concentrations of 6-ketoprostaglandin-F(1)(alpha) (the stable metabolite of prostacyclin) and thromboxane B(2) (the stable metabolite of thromboxane A(2)) were measured by means of radioimmunoassay. Cyclooxygenase 2 was measured with Western blot analysis. The varicose veins showed greater levels of cAMP but not of cGMP at all time points as compared with the control veins. Prostanoid production was not significantly altered in the varicose veins. Stimulation with Ruscus aculeatus increased the cAMP concentration in the varicose veins but did not affect the cGMP levels. The ratio between 6-ketoprostaglandin-F(1)(alpha) and thromboxane B(2) was two-fold greater in

  17. Novel Radioligands for Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterase Imaging with Positron Emission Tomography: An Update on Developments Since 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susann Schröder

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs are a class of intracellular enzymes that inactivate the secondary messenger molecules, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP. Thus, PDEs regulate the signaling cascades mediated by these cyclic nucleotides and affect fundamental intracellular processes. Pharmacological inhibition of PDE activity is a promising strategy for treatment of several diseases. However, the role of the different PDEs in related pathologies is not completely clarified yet. PDE-specific radioligands enable non-invasive visualization and quantification of these enzymes by positron emission tomography (PET in vivo and provide an important translational tool for elucidation of the relationship between altered expression of PDEs and pathophysiological effects as well as (pre-clinical evaluation of novel PDE inhibitors developed as therapeutics. Herein we present an overview of novel PDE radioligands for PET published since 2012.

  18. Combating chronic bacterial infections by manipulating cyclic nucleotide-regulated biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Shi-Qi; Ryan, Robert P

    2016-06-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria can form biofilms in clinical settings with major consequences for the progression of infections. Bacterial biofilm communities are typically much more resistant to both antibiotic treatment and clearance by the immune system in comparison to free-living cells. Therefore, drugs that specifically target the formation or maintenance of biofilms would be very valuable additions to current clinical options. Cyclic nucleotide second messengers, in particular cyclic-diguanosine-GMP (c-di-GMP), are now known to play a major role in biofilm formation, and maintenance, in many bacterial species. In this special report, we will review recent progress toward the development of drugs that interfere with c-di-GMP signaling as a route to control biofilm infections. We will focus on the chronic infections associated with the notorious opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa, although the principles outlined here are also relevant to most bacterial pathogens.

  19. Dysfunctional Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide-gated Ion Channels in Cardiac Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqi Zhao

    Full Text Available Abstract Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels are reverse voltage-dependent, and their activation depends on the hyperpolarization of the membrane and may be directly or indirectly regulated by the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP or other signal-transduction cascades. The distribution, quantity and activation states of HCN channels differ in tissues throughout the body. Evidence exhibits that HCN channels play critical roles in the generation and conduction of the electrical impulse and the physiopathological process of some cardiac diseases. They may constitute promising drug targets in the treatment of these cardiac diseases. Pharmacological treatment targeting HCN channels is of benefit to these cardiac conditions.

  20. Extracellular nucleotide signaling in plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, Gary [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2016-09-08

    Over the life of this funded project, our research group identified and characterized two key receptor proteins in plants; one mediating the innate immunity response to chitin and the other elucidating the key receptor for extracellular ATP. In the case of chitin recognition, we recently described the quaternary structure of this receptor, shedding light on how the receptor functions. Perhaps more importantly, we demonstrated that all plants have the ability to recognize both chitin oligomers and lipochitooligosacchardes, fundamentally changing how the community views the evolution of these systems and strategies that might be used, for example, to extend symbiotic nitrogen fixation to non-legumes. Our discovery of DORN1 opens a new chapter in plant physiology documenting conclusively that eATP is an important extracellular signal in plants, as it is in animals. At this point, we cannot predict just how far reaching this discovery may prove to be but we are convinced that eATP signaling is fundamental to plant growth and development and, hence, we believe that the future will be very exciting for the study of DORN1 and its overall function in plants.

  1. Evolutionary and structural perspectives of plant cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channels

    KAUST Repository

    Zelman, Alice K.

    2012-05-29

    Ligand-gated cation channels are a frequent component of signaling cascades in eukaryotes. Eukaryotes contain numerous diverse gene families encoding ion channels, some of which are shared and some of which are unique to particular kingdoms. Among the many different types are cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGCs). CNGCs are cation channels with varying degrees of ion conduction selectivity. They are implicated in numerous signaling pathways and permit diffusion of divalent and monovalent cations, including Ca2+ and K+. CNGCs are present in both plant and animal cells, typically in the plasma membrane; recent studies have also documented their presence in prokaryotes. All eukaryote CNGC polypeptides have a cyclic nucleotide-binding domain and a calmodulin binding domain as well as a six transmembrane/one pore tertiary structure. This review summarizes existing knowledge about the functional domains present in these cation-conducting channels, and considers the evidence indicating that plant and animal CNGCs evolved separately. Additionally, an amino acid motif that is only found in the phosphate binding cassette and hinge regions of plant CNGCs, and is present in all experimentally confirmed CNGCs but no other channels was identified. This CNGC-specific amino acid motif provides an additional diagnostic tool to identify plant CNGCs, and can increase confidence in the annotation of open reading frames in newly sequenced genomes as putative CNGCs. Conversely, the absence of the motif in some plant sequences currently identified as probable CNGCs may suggest that they are misannotated or protein fragments. 2012 Zelman, Dawe, Gehring and Berkowitz.

  2. An affinity pull-down approach to identify the plant cyclic nucleotide interactome

    KAUST Repository

    Donaldson, Lara Elizabeth

    2013-09-03

    Cyclic nucleotides (CNs) are intracellular second messengers that play an important role in mediating physiological responses to environmental and developmental signals, in species ranging from bacteria to humans. In response to these signals, CNs are synthesized by nucleotidyl cyclases and then act by binding to and altering the activity of downstream target proteins known as cyclic nucleotide-binding proteins (CNBPs). A number of CNBPs have been identified across kingdoms including transcription factors, protein kinases, phosphodiesterases, and channels, all of which harbor conserved CN-binding domains. In plants however, few CNBPs have been identified as homology searches fail to return plant sequences with significant matches to known CNBPs. Recently, affinity pull-down techniques have been successfully used to identify CNBPs in animals and have provided new insights into CN signaling. The application of these techniques to plants has not yet been extensively explored and offers an alternative approach toward the unbiased discovery of novel CNBP candidates in plants. Here, an affinity pull-down technique for the identification of the plant CN interactome is presented. In summary, the method involves an extraction of plant proteins which is incubated with a CN-bait, followed by a series of increasingly stringent elutions that eliminates proteins in a sequential manner according to their affinity to the bait. The eluted and bait-bound proteins are separated by one-dimensional gel electrophoresis, excised, and digested with trypsin after which the resultant peptides are identified by mass spectrometry - techniques that are commonplace in proteomics experiments. The discovery of plant CNBPs promises to provide valuable insight into the mechanism of CN signal transduction in plants. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  3. Noninvasive microelectrode ion flux estimation technique (MIFE) for the study of the regulation of root membrane transport by cyclic nucleotides

    KAUST Repository

    Ordoñez, Natalia Maria

    2013-09-03

    Changes in ion permeability and subsequently intracellular ion concentrations play a crucial role in intracellular and intercellular communication and, as such, confer a broad array of developmental and adaptive responses in plants. These changes are mediated by the activity of plasma-membrane based transport proteins many of which are controlled by cyclic nucleotides and/or other signaling molecules. The MIFE technique for noninvasive microelectrode ion flux measuring allows concurrent quantification of net fluxes of several ions with high spatial (μm range) and temporal (ca. 5 s) resolution, making it a powerful tool to study various aspects of downstream signaling events in plant cells. This chapter details basic protocols enabling the application of the MIFE technique to study regulation of root membrane transport in general and cyclic nucleotide mediated transport in particular. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  4. Nuclear-localized cyclic nucleotide-gated channels mediate symbiotic calcium oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charpentier, Myriam; Sun, Jongho; Vaz Martins, Teresa; Radhakrishnan, Guru V; Findlay, Kim; Soumpourou, Eleni; Thouin, Julien; Véry, Anne-Aliénor; Sanders, Dale; Morris, Richard J; Oldroyd, Giles E D

    2016-05-27

    Nuclear-associated Ca(2+) oscillations mediate plant responses to beneficial microbial partners--namely, nitrogen-fixing rhizobial bacteria that colonize roots of legumes and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi that colonize roots of the majority of plant species. A potassium-permeable channel is known to be required for symbiotic Ca(2+) oscillations, but the calcium channels themselves have been unknown until now. We show that three cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in Medicago truncatula are required for nuclear Ca(2+) oscillations and subsequent symbiotic responses. These cyclic nucleotide-gated channels are located at the nuclear envelope and are permeable to Ca(2+) We demonstrate that the cyclic nucleotide-gated channels form a complex with the postassium-permeable channel, which modulates nuclear Ca(2+) release. These channels, like their counterparts in animal cells, might regulate multiple nuclear Ca(2+) responses to developmental and environmental conditions. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase PDE1C1 in human cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeput, Fabrice; Wolda, Sharon L; Krall, Judith; Hambleton, Ryan; Uher, Lothar; McCaw, Kim N; Radwanski, Przemyslaw B; Florio, Vincent; Movsesian, Matthew A

    2007-11-09

    Isoforms in the PDE1 family of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases were recently found to comprise a significant portion of the cGMP-inhibited cAMP hydrolytic activity in human hearts. We examined the expression of PDE1 isoforms in human myocardium, characterized their catalytic activity, and quantified their contribution to cAMP hydrolytic and cGMP hydrolytic activity in subcellular fractions of this tissue. Western blotting with isoform-selective anti-PDE1 monoclonal antibodies showed PDE1C1 to be the principal isoform expressed in human myocardium. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that PDE1C1 is distributed along the Z-lines and M-lines of cardiac myocytes in a striated pattern that differs from that of the other major dual-specificity cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase in human myocardium, PDE3A. Most of the PDE1C1 activity was recovered in soluble fractions of human myocardium. It binds both cAMP and cGMP with K(m) values of approximately 1 microm and hydrolyzes both substrates with similar catalytic rates. PDE1C1 activity in subcellular fractions was quantified using a new PDE1-selective inhibitor, IC295. At substrate concentrations of 0.1 microm, PDE1C1 constitutes the great majority of cAMP hydrolytic and cGMP hydrolytic activity in soluble fractions and the majority of cGMP hydrolytic activity in microsomal fractions, whereas PDE3 constitutes the majority of cAMP hydrolytic activity in microsomal fractions. These results indicate that PDE1C1 is expressed at high levels in human cardiac myocytes with an intracellular distribution distinct from that of PDE3A and that it may have a role in the integration of cGMP-, cAMP- and Ca(2+)-mediated signaling in these cells.

  6. Extracellular modulation of the silkmoth sex pheromone receptor activity by cyclic nucleotides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuro Nakagawa

    Full Text Available Odorants and pheromones are essential to insects as chemical cues for finding food or an appropriate mating partner. These volatile compounds bind to olfactory receptors (Ors expressed by olfactory sensory neurons. Each insect Or functions as a ligand-gated ion channel and is a heteromeric complex that comprises one type of canonical Or and a highly conserved Orco subunit. Because there are many Or types, insect Ors can recognize with high specificity a myriad of chemical cues. Cyclic nucleotides can modulate the activity of insect Or-Orco complexes; however, the mechanism of action of these nucleotides is under debate. Here, we show that cyclic nucleotides, including cAMP and cGMP, interact with the silkmoth sex pheromone receptor complex, BmOr-1-BmOrco, from the outside of the cell and that these nucleotides act as antagonists at low concentrations and weak agonists at high concentrations. These cyclic nucleotides do not compete with the sex pheromone, bombykol, for binding to the BmOr-1 subunit. ATP and GTP also weakly inhibited BmOr-1-BmOrco activity, but D-ribose had no effect; these findings indicated that the purine moiety was crucial for the inhibition. Only the bombykol receptors have been so far shown to be subject to modulation by nucleotide-related compounds, indicating that this responsiveness to these compounds is not common for all insect Or-Orco complexes.

  7. Phosphodiesterase 3 and 5 and cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel expression in rat trigeminovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Lars S; Sandholdt, Nicolai T H; Gammeltoft, Steen

    2006-01-01

    may be associated with mutations in ion channels. The aim of the present study was to describe the expression of phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3) and 5 (PDE5) and cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels (CNG) in cerebral arteries, meninges, and the trigeminal ganglion. mRNA for PDE and CNG was determined...

  8. Proton transfer unlocks inactivation in cyclic nucleotide-gated A1 channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchesi, Arin; Arcangeletti, Manuel; Mazzolini, Monica; Torre, Vincent

    2015-02-15

    Desensitization and inactivation provide a form of short-term memory controlling the firing patterns of excitable cells and adaptation in sensory systems. Unlike many of their cousin K(+) channels, cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are thought not to desensitize or inactivate. Here we report that CNG channels do inactivate and that inactivation is controlled by extracellular protons. Titration of a glutamate residue within the selectivity filter destabilizes the pore architecture, which collapses towards a non-conductive, inactivated state in a process reminiscent of the usual C-type inactivation observed in many K(+) channels. These results indicate that inactivation in CNG channels represents a regulatory mechanism that has been neglected thus far, with possible implications in several physiological processes ranging from signal transduction to growth cone navigation. Ion channels control ionic fluxes across biological membranes by residing in any of three functionally distinct states: deactivated (closed), activated (open) or inactivated (closed). Unlike many of their cousin K(+) channels, cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels do not desensitize or inactivate. Using patch recording techniques, we show that when extracellular pH (pHo ) is decreased from 7.4 to 6 or lower, wild-type CNGA1 channels inactivate in a voltage-dependent manner. pHo titration experiments show that at pHo  < 7 the I-V relationships are outwardly rectifying and that inactivation is coupled to current rectification. Single-channel recordings indicate that a fast mechanism of proton blockage underlines current rectification while inactivation arises from conformational changes downstream from protonation. Furthermore, mutagenesis and ionic substitution experiments highlight the role of the selectivity filter in current decline, suggesting analogies with the C-type inactivation observed in K(+) channels. Analysis with Markovian models indicates that the non-independent binding of two

  9. 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterases inhibit hepatitis B virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Ma

    Full Text Available 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP is a member of the interferon-stimulated genes, which includes isoforms CNP1 and CNP2. CNP1 is locally expressed in the myelin sheath but CNP2 is additionally expressed at low levels outside the nervous system. CNPs regulate multiple cellular functions and suppress protein production by association with polyadenylation of mRNA. Polyadenylation of Hepatitis B virus (HBV RNAs is crucial for HBV replication. Whether CNPs interact with polyadenylation signal of HBV RNAs and interfere HBV replication is unknown. In this study, we evaluated expressions of CNP isoforms in hepatoma cell lines and their effects on HBV replication. We found that CNP2 is moderately expressed and gently responded to interferon treatment in HepG2, but not in Huh7 cells. The CNP1 and CNP2 potently inhibited HBV production by blocking viral proteins synthesis and reducing viral RNAs, respectively. In chronic hepatitis B patients, CNP was expressed in most of HBV-infected hepatocytes of liver specimens. Knockdown of CNP expression moderately improved viral production in the HepG2.2.15 cells treated with IFN-α. In conclusion, CNP might be a mediator of interferon-induced response against HBV.

  10. Sickling Cells, Cyclic Nucleotides, and Protein Kinases: The Pathophysiology of Urogenital Disorders in Sickle Cell Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Angelo Claudino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell anemia is one of the best studied inherited diseases, and despite being caused by a single point mutation in the HBB gene, multiple pleiotropic effects of the abnormal hemoglobin S production range from vaso-occlusive crisis, stroke, and pulmonary hypertension to osteonecrosis and leg ulcers. Urogenital function is not spared, and although priapism is most frequently remembered, other related clinical manifestations have been described, such as nocturia, enuresis, increased frequence of lower urinary tract infections, urinary incontinence, hypogonadism, and testicular infarction. Studies on sickle cell vaso-occlusion and priapism using both in vitro and in vivo models have shed light on the pathogenesis of some of these events. The authors review what is known about the deleterious effects of sickling on the genitourinary tract and how the role of cyclic nucleotides signaling and protein kinases may help understand the pathophysiology underlying these manifestations and develop novel therapies in the setting of urogenital disorders in sickle cell disease.

  11. The cyclic nucleotide monophosphate domain of Xanthomonas campestris global regulator Clp defines a new class of cyclic di-GMP effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Fei; He, Ya-Wen; Wu, Dong-Hui; Swarup, Sanjay; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2010-02-01

    The widely conserved second messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) plays a key role in quorum-sensing (QS)-dependent production of virulence factors in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. The detection of QS diffusible signal factor (DSF) by the sensor RpfC leads to the activation of response regulator RpfG, which activates virulence gene expression by degrading c-di-GMP. Here, we show that a global regulator in the X. campestris pv. campestris QS regulatory pathway, Clp, is a c-di-GMP effector. c-di-GMP specifically binds to Clp with high affinity and induces allosteric conformational changes that abolish the interaction between Clp and its target gene promoter. Clp is similar to the cyclic AMP (cAMP) binding proteins Crp and Vfr and contains a conserved cyclic nucleotide monophosphate (cNMP) binding domain. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we found that the cNMP binding domain of Clp contains a glutamic acid residue (E99) that is essential for c-di-GMP binding. Substituting the residue with serine (E99S) resulted in decreased sensitivity to changes in the intracellular c-di-GMP level and attenuated bacterial virulence. These data establish the direct role of Clp in the response to fluctuating c-di-GMP levels and depict a novel mechanism by which QS links the second messenger with the X. campestris pv. campestris virulence regulon.

  12. FRET-based binding assay between a fluorescent cAMP analogue and a cyclic nucleotide-binding domain tagged with a CFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Francisco; Santana-Calvo, Carmen; Sánchez-Guevara, Yoloxochitl; Nishigaki, Takuya

    2017-09-01

    The cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD) functions as a regulatory domain of many proteins involved in cyclic nucleotide signalling. We developed a straightforward and reliable binding assay based on intermolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between an adenosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate analogue labelled with fluorescein and a recombinant CNBD of human EPAC1 tagged with a cyan fluorescence protein (CFP). The high FRET efficiency of this method (~ 80%) allowed us to perform several types of binding experiments with nanomolar range of sample using conventional equipment. In addition, the CFP tag on the CNBD enabled us to perform a specific binding experiment using an unpurified protein. Considering these advantages, this technique is useful to study poorly characterized CNBDs. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  13. Myelin 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase: active-site ligand binding and molecular conformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Myllykoski

    Full Text Available The 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase is a highly abundant membrane-associated enzyme in the myelin sheath of the vertebrate nervous system. CNPase is a member of the 2H phosphoesterase family and catalyzes the formation of 2'-nucleotide products from 2',3'-cyclic substrates; however, its physiological substrate and function remain unknown. It is likely that CNPase participates in RNA metabolism in the myelinating cell. We solved crystal structures of the phosphodiesterase domain of mouse CNPase, showing the binding mode of nucleotide ligands in the active site. The binding mode of the product 2'-AMP provides a detailed view of the reaction mechanism. Comparisons of CNPase crystal structures highlight flexible loops, which could play roles in substrate recognition; large differences in the active-site vicinity are observed when comparing more distant members of the 2H family. We also studied the full-length CNPase, showing its N-terminal domain is involved in RNA binding and dimerization. Our results provide a detailed picture of the CNPase active site during its catalytic cycle, and suggest a specific function for the previously uncharacterized N-terminal domain.

  14. A nucleotide-independent cyclic nitroxide label for monitoring segmental motions in nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phuong H; Popova, Anna M; Hideg, Kálmán; Qin, Peter Z

    2015-01-01

    Spin labels, which are chemically stable radicals attached at specific sites of a bio-molecule, enable investigations on structure and dynamics of proteins and nucleic acids using techniques such as site-directed spin labeling and paramagnetic NMR. Among spin labels developed, the class of rigid labels have limited or no independent motions between the radical bearing moiety and the target, and afford a number of advantages in measuring distances and monitoring local dynamics within the parent bio-molecule. However, a general method for attaching a rigid label to nucleic acids in a nucleotide-independent manner has not been reported. We developed an approach for installing a nearly rigid nitroxide spin label, designated as R5c, at a specific site of the nucleic acid backbone in a nucleotide-independent manner. The method uses a post-synthesis approach to covalently attach the nitroxide moiety in a cyclic fashion to phosphorothioate groups introduced at two consecutive nucleotides of the target strand. R5c-labeled nucleic acids are capable of pairing with their respective complementary strands, and the cyclic nature of R5c attachment significantly reduced independence motions of the label with respect to the parent duplex, although it may cause distortion of the local environment at the site of labeling. R5c yields enhanced sensitivity to the collective motions of the duplex, as demonstrated by its capability to reveal changes in collective motions of the substrate recognition duplex of the 120-kDa Tetrahymena group I ribozyme, which elude detection by a flexible label. The cyclic R5c nitroxide can be efficiently attached to a target nucleic acid site using a post-synthetic coupling approach conducted under mild biochemical conditions, and serves as a viable label for experimental investigation of segmental motions in nucleic acids, including large folded RNAs.

  15. Physiological and Molecular Effects of the Cyclic Nucleotides cAMP and cGMP on Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Herrera, Natalia M.

    2012-12-01

    The cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (CNs), cAMP and cGMP, are second messengers that participate in the regulation of development, metabolism and adaptive responses. In plants, CNs are associated with the control of pathogen responses, pollen tube orientation, abiotic stress response, membrane transport regulation, stomatal movement and light perception. In this study, we hypothesize that cAMP and cGMP promote changes in the transcription level of genes related to photosynthesis, high light and membrane transport in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves and, that these changes at the molecular level can have functional biological consequences. For this reason we tested if CNs modulate the photosynthetic rate, responses to high light and root ion transport. Real time quantitative PCR was used to assess transcription levels of selected genes and infrared gas analyzers coupled to fluorescence sensors were used to measure the photosynthetic parameters. We present evidence that both cAMP and cGMP modulate foliar mRNA levels early after stimulation. The two CNs trigger different responses indicating that the signals have specificity. A comparison of proteomic and transcriptional changes suggest that both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms are modulated by CNs. cGMP up-regulates the mRNA levels of components of the photosynthesis and carbon metabolism. However, neither cAMP nor cGMP trigger differences in the rate of carbon assimilation, maximum efficiency of the photosystem II (PSII), or PSII operating efficiency. It was also demonstrated that CN regulate the expression of its own targets, the cyclic nucleotide gated channels - CNGC. Further studies are needed to identify the components of the signaling transduction pathway that mediate cellular changes and their respective regulatory and/or signaling roles.

  16. Recovery of Compressively Sampled Sparse Signals using Cyclic Matching Pursuit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturm, Bob L.; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll; Gribonval, Rémi

    We empirically show how applying a pure greedy algorithm cyclically can recover compressively sampled sparse signals as well as other more computationally complex approaches, such as orthogonal greedy algorithms, iterative thresholding, and $\\ell_1$-minimization.......We empirically show how applying a pure greedy algorithm cyclically can recover compressively sampled sparse signals as well as other more computationally complex approaches, such as orthogonal greedy algorithms, iterative thresholding, and $\\ell_1$-minimization....

  17. Evolution of Nucleotide Punctuation Marks: From Structural to Linear Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Houmami, Nawal; Seligmann, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    We present an evolutionary hypothesis assuming that signals marking nucleotide synthesis (DNA replication and RNA transcription) evolved from multi- to unidimensional structures, and were carried over from transcription to translation. This evolutionary scenario presumes that signals combining secondary and primary nucleotide structures are evolutionary transitions. Mitochondrial replication initiation fits this scenario. Some observations reported in the literature corroborate that several signals for nucleotide synthesis function in translation, and vice versa. (a) Polymerase-induced frameshift mutations occur preferentially at translational termination signals (nucleotide deletion is interpreted as termination of nucleotide polymerization, paralleling the role of stop codons in translation). (b) Stem-loop hairpin presence/absence modulates codon-amino acid assignments, showing that translational signals sometimes combine primary and secondary nucleotide structures (here codon and stem-loop). (c) Homopolymer nucleotide triplets (AAA, CCC, GGG, TTT) cause transcriptional and ribosomal frameshifts. Here we find in recently described human mitochondrial RNAs that systematically lack mono-, dinucleotides after each trinucleotide (delRNAs) that delRNA triplets include 2x more homopolymers than mitogenome regions not covered by delRNA. Further analyses of delRNAs show that the natural circular code X (a little-known group of 20 translational signals enabling ribosomal frame retrieval consisting of 20 codons {AAC, AAT, ACC, ATC, ATT, CAG, CTC, CTG, GAA, GAC, GAG, GAT, GCC, GGC, GGT, GTA, GTC, GTT, TAC, TTC} universally overrepresented in coding versus other frames of gene sequences), regulates frameshift in transcription and translation. This dual transcription and translation role confirms for X the hypothesis that translational signals were carried over from transcriptional signals. PMID:28396681

  18. The Arabidopsis thaliana Cyclic-Nucleotide-Dependent Response – a Quantitative Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Alqurashi, May M.

    2013-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation governs many regulatory pathways and an increasing number of kinases, proteins that transfer phosphate groups, are in turn activated by cyclic nucleotides. One of the cyclic nucleotides, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), has been shown to be a second messenger in abiotic and biotic stress responses. However, little is known about the precise role of cAMP in plants and in the down-stream activation of kinases, and hence cAMP-dependent phosphorylation. To increase our understanding of the role of cAMP, proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of Arabidopsis thaliana suspension culture cells were analyzed before and after treatment of cells with two different concentrations of 8-Bromo-cAMP (1 µM and 100 nM) and over a time-course of one hour. A comparative quantitative analysis was undertaken using two- dimensional gel electrophoresis and the Delta 2D software (DECODON) followed by protein spot identification by tandem mass spectrometry combined with Mascot and Scaffold. Differentially expressed proteins and regulated phosphoproteins were categorized according to their biological function using bioinformatics tools. The results revealed that the treatment with 1 µM and 100 nM 8-Bromo-cAMP was sufficient to induce specific concentration- and time-dependent changes at the proteome and phosphoproteome levels. In particular, different phosphorylation patterns were observed overtime preferentially affecting proteins in a number of functional categories, notably phosphatases, proteins that remove phosphate groups. This suggests that cAMP both transiently activates and deactivates proteins through specific phosphorylation events and provides new insight into biological mechanisms and functions at the systems level.

  19. Nucleotide polymorphism and within-gene recombination in Daphnia magna and D. pulex, two cyclical parthenogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Christoph R; McTaggart, Seanna J; Didier, Anaïs; Little, Tom J; Charlesworth, Deborah

    2009-05-01

    Theory predicts that partially asexual organisms may make the "best of both worlds": for the most part, they avoid the costs of sexual reproduction, while still benefiting from an enhanced efficiency of selection compared to obligately asexual organisms. There is, however, little empirical data on partially asexual organisms to test this prediction. Here we examine patterns of nucleotide diversity at eight nuclear loci in continentwide samples of two species of cyclically parthenogenetic Daphnia to assess the effect of partial asexual reproduction on effective population size and amount of recombination. Both species have high nucleotide diversities and show abundant evidence for recombination, yielding large estimates of effective population sizes (300,000-600,000). This suggests that selection will act efficiently even on mutations with small selection coefficients. Divergence between the two species is less than one-tenth of previous estimates, which were derived using a mitochondrial molecular clock. As the two species investigated are among the most distantly related species of the genus, this suggests that the genus Daphnia may be considerably younger than previously thought. Daphnia has recently received increased attention because it is being developed as a model organism for ecological and evolutionary genomics. Our results confirm the attractiveness of Daphnia as a model organism, because the high nucleotide diversity and low linkage disequilibrium suggest that fine-scale mapping of genes affecting phenotypes through association studies should be feasible.

  20. Aflatoxin B1 is an inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsi, P; Augusti-Tocco, G; Palmery, M; Giorgi, M

    1999-05-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) action on cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity has been tested on tissue extracts of various organs. In the presence of 100 microM AFB1 a significant inhibition of cAMP and cGMP hydrolytic activity is observed in all tested tissue extracts. However, cGMP hydrolytic activity appears more sensitive to AFB1 inhibition than cAMP hydrolytic activity and a considerably higher inhibition is observed in lung and spleen, than in liver, brain, kidney, and heart. When cGMP is used as substrate, the inhibitory response reaches 72% in lung and spleen extracts. We have also tested AFB1 effects on lung and liver PDE activity peaks separated by DEAE-cellulose chromatography. These data confirm the poor sensitivity to the toxin of all PDE activities present in liver, while the lung peak (where PDE V in present) shows a higher sensitivity to AFB1. In order to establish whether PDE V is in fact more sensitive to AFB1, we have used mouse neuroblastoma cells, in which cGMP hydrolytic activity has been shown to be due to PDE V only. In this case, the calculated IC50 is 24 microM and Dixon plot analysis shows a competitive inhibitory effect with a Ki of 16.7 microM. We have also used aflatoxin B2 and M2, and they proved to be much less effective than AFB1: AFB2 inhibits PDE V with an IC50 of 117 microM, while AFM2 does not show any effect. These results provide the first evidence of a competitive inhibition of AFB1 on an enzymatic activity and suggest that an alteration of cellular cyclic nucleotide levels may play a role in the mechanism of aflatoxin action.

  1. Induction of an Extracellular Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterase as an Accessory Ribonucleolytic Activity during Phosphate Starvation of Cultured Tomato Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Steffen; Nürnberger, Thorsten; Ahnert, Volker; Krauss, Gerd-Joachim; Glund, Konrad

    2000-01-01

    During growth under conditions of phosphate limitation, suspension-cultured cells of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) secrete phosphodiesterase activity in a similar fashion to phosphate starvation-inducible ribonuclease (RNase LE), a cyclizing endoribonuclease that generates 2′:3′-cyclic nucleoside monophosphates (NMP) as its major monomeric products (T. Nürnberger, S. Abel, W. Jost, K. Glund [1990] Plant Physiol 92: 970–976). Tomato extracellular phosphodiesterase was purified to homogeneity from the spent culture medium of phosphate-starved cells and was characterized as a cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. The purified enzyme has a molecular mass of 70 kD, a pH optimum of 6.2, and an isoelectric point of 8.1. The phosphodiesterase preparation is free of any detectable deoxyribonuclease, ribonuclease, and nucleotidase activity. Tomato extracellular phosphodiesterase is insensitive to EDTA and hydrolyzes with no apparent base specificity 2′:3′-cyclic NMP to 3′-NMP and the 3′:5′-cyclic isomers to a mixture of 3′-NMP and 5′-NMP. Specific activities of the enzyme are 2-fold higher for 2′:3′-cyclic NMP than for 3′:5′-cyclic isomers. Analysis of monomeric products of sequential RNA hydrolysis with purified RNase LE, purified extracellular phosphodiesterase, and cleared −Pi culture medium as a source of 3′-nucleotidase activity indicates that cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase functions as an accessory ribonucleolytic activity that effectively hydrolyzes primary products of RNase LE to substrates for phosphate-starvation-inducible phosphomonoesterases. Biosynthetical labeling of cyclic nucleotide phopshodiesterase upon phosphate starvation suggests de novo synthesis and secretion of a set of nucleolytic enzymes for scavenging phosphate from extracellular RNA substrates. PMID:10677447

  2. Cyclic Pure Greedy Algorithms for Recovering Compressively Sampled Sparse Signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturm, Bob L.; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll; Gribonval, Remi

    2011-01-01

    The pure greedy algorithms matching pursuit (MP) and complementary MP (CompMP) are extremely computationally simple, but can perform poorly in solving the linear inverse problems posed by the recovery of compressively sampled sparse signals. We show that by applying a cyclic minimization principle...

  3. Cyclic nucleotides and mitogen-activated protein kinases: regulation of simvastatin in platelet activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Ssu-Yu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 3-Hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins have been widely used to reduce cardiovascular risk. These statins (i.e., simvastatin may exert other effects besides from their cholesterol-lowering actions, including inhibition of platelet activation. Platelet activation is relevant to a variety of coronary heart diseases. Although the inhibitory effect of simvastatin in platelet activation has been studied; the detailed signal transductions by which simvastatin inhibit platelet activation has not yet been completely resolved. Methods The aim of this study was to systematically examine the detailed mechanisms of simvastatin in preventing platelet activation. Platelet aggregation, flow cytometric analysis, immunoblotting, and electron spin resonance studies were used to assess the antiplatelet activity of simvastatin. Results Simvastatin (20-50 μM exhibited more-potent activity of inhibiting platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen than other agonists (i.e., thrombin. Simvastatin inhibited collagen-stimulated platelet activation accompanied by [Ca2+]i mobilization, thromboxane A2 (TxA2 formation, and phospholipase C (PLCγ2, protein kinase C (PKC, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (i.e., p38 MAPK, JNKs phosphorylation in washed platelets. Simvastatin obviously increased both cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP levels. Simvastatin markedly increased NO release, vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP phosphorylation, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS expression. SQ22536, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, markedly reversed the simvastatin-mediated inhibitory effects on platelet aggregation, PLCγ2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, and simvastatin-mediated stimulatory effects on VASP and eNOS phosphorylation. Conclusion The most important findings of this study demonstrate for the first time that inhibitory effect of simvastatin in platelet activation may involve activation of the cyclic AMP-eNOS/NO-cyclic

  4. Bacterial Signaling Nucleotides Inhibit Yeast Cell Growth by Impacting Mitochondrial and Other Specifically Eukaryotic Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Hesketh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We have engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae to inducibly synthesize the prokaryotic signaling nucleotides cyclic di-GMP (cdiGMP, cdiAMP, and ppGpp in order to characterize the range of effects these nucleotides exert on eukaryotic cell function during bacterial pathogenesis. Synthetic genetic array (SGA and transcriptome analyses indicated that, while these compounds elicit some common reactions in yeast, there are also complex and distinctive responses to each of the three nucleotides. All three are capable of inhibiting eukaryotic cell growth, with the guanine nucleotides exhibiting stronger effects than cdiAMP. Mutations compromising mitochondrial function and chromatin remodeling show negative epistatic interactions with all three nucleotides. In contrast, certain mutations that cause defects in chromatin modification and ribosomal protein function show positive epistasis, alleviating growth inhibition by at least two of the three nucleotides. Uniquely, cdiGMP is lethal both to cells growing by respiration on acetate and to obligately fermentative petite mutants. cdiGMP is also synthetically lethal with the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR inhibitor hydroxyurea. Heterologous expression of the human ppGpp hydrolase Mesh1p prevented the accumulation of ppGpp in the engineered yeast and restored cell growth. Extensive in vivo interactions between bacterial signaling molecules and eukaryotic gene function occur, resulting in outcomes ranging from growth inhibition to death. cdiGMP functions through a mechanism that must be compensated by unhindered RNR activity or by functionally competent mitochondria. Mesh1p may be required for abrogating the damaging effects of ppGpp in human cells subjected to bacterial infection.

  5. Melanocyte response to gravitational stress: an overview with a focus on the role of cyclic nucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Krassimira; Tsiockas, Wasiliki; Eiermann, Peter; Hauslage, Jens; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Block, Ingrid; Gerzer, Rupert

    Human melanocytes are responsible for skin pigmentation by synthesizing the pigment melanin. A well known modulator of melanogenesis is the second messenger adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophos-phate (cAMP). It has also been reported that the nitric oxide (NO)/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) pathway is involved in UVB-induced melanogenesis. Melanin acts as a scavenger for free radicals during oxidative stress, but it may additionally act as a photosensitizer that generates active oxygen species upon UV radiation, which may initiate hypopigmentary disorders (e.g., vitiligo) as well as UV-induced oncogene cell transformation. Melanoma, a deadly skin cancer which arises from transformed melanocytes, is characterized by a resistance to chemotherapy. In our studies we were able to show that hu-man melanocytic cells differentially respond to gravitational stress. Hypergravity (up to 5 g for 24 h) stimulated cGMP efflux in cultured human melanocytes and non-metastatic melanoma cells, but not in metastatic phenotypes under the conditions of limited degradation [e.g., in the presence of phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors] or stimulated synthesis of cGMP [e.g., by NO donors, but not natriuretic peptides], whereas cellular proliferation and morphology were not altered. Interestingly, long-term exposure to hypergravity stimulated an increase in both intra-cellular as well as extracellular cAMP levels as well as melanogenesis in pigmented melanocytes and non-metastatic melanoma cells. As some cAMP-PDEs are regulated by cGMP, it seems that the hypergravity-induced alteration of melanocyte pigmentation could be a result of a cross-talk between these two cyclic nucleotides. Hypergravity induced further an increase in the mRNA and protein levels of the selective cGMP and cAMP exporters, the multidrug resistance proteins (MRP) 4 and 5 -but not 8 -, whereas simulated microgravity (up to 1.21x10-2 g for 24 h) -provided by a fast-rotating clinostat

  6. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels may contribute to regional anesthetic effects of lidocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Cheng; Ke, Bowen; Zhao, Yi; Liang, Peng; Liao, Daqing; Li, Tao; Liu, Jin; Chen, Xiangdong

    2015-03-01

    Local anesthetics (e.g., lidocaine) have been found to inhibit hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels besides sodium channels. However, the exact role of HCN channels in regional anesthesia in vivo is still elusive. Sciatic nerve block and intrathecal anesthesia were performed using lidocaine in wild-type and HCN1 channel knockout (HCN1) mice. EC50 of lidocaine and durations of 1% lidocaine were determined. In electrophysiologic recordings, effects of lidocaine on HCN channel currents, voltage-gated sodium channel currents, and neural membrane properties were recorded on dorsal root ganglia neurons. In both sciatic nerve block and intrathecal anesthesia, EC50 of lidocaine for tactile sensory blockade (2 g von Frey fiber) was significantly increased in HCN1 mice, whereas EC50 of lidocaine for pinprick blockade was unaffected. Durations of 1% lidocaine were significantly shorter in HCN1 mice for both sciatic nerve block and intrathecal anesthesia (n = 10). ZD7288 (HCN blocker) could significantly prolong durations of 1% lidocaine including pinprick blockade in sciatic nerve block (n = 10). Forskolin (raising cyclic adenosine monophosphate to enhance HCN2) could significantly shorten duration of pinprick blockade of 1% lidocaine in sciatic nerve block (n = 10). In electrophysiologic recordings, lidocaine could nonselectively inhibit HCN channel and sodium channel currents both in large and in small dorsal root ganglia neurons (n = 5 to 6). Meanwhile, lidocaine caused neural membrane hyperpolarization and increased input resistance of dorsal root ganglia neurons but not in large dorsal root ganglia neurons from HCN1 mice (n = 5-7). These data indicate that HCN channels may contribute to regional anesthetic effects of lidocaine. By inhibiting HCN channels, lidocaine could alter membrane properties of neurons.

  7. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated channels potentially modulate axonal excitability at different thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerasinghe, Dinushi; Menon, Parvathi; Vucic, Steve

    2017-12-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels mediate differences in sensory and motor axonal excitability at different thresholds in animal models. Importantly, HCN channels are responsible for voltage-gated inward rectifying (Ih) currents activated during hyperpolarization. The Ih currents exert a crucial role in determining the resting membrane potential and have been implicated in a variety of neurological disorders, including neuropathic pain. In humans, differences in biophysical properties of motor and sensory axons at different thresholds remain to be elucidated and could provide crucial pathophysiological insights in peripheral neurological diseases. Consequently, the aim of this study was to characterize sensory and motor axonal function at different threshold. Median nerve motor and sensory axonal excitability studies were undertaken in 15 healthy subjects (45 studies in total). Tracking targets were set to 20, 40, and 60% of maximum for sensory and motor axons. Hyperpolarizing threshold electrotonus (TEh) at 90-100 ms was significantly increased in lower threshold sensory axons times (F = 11.195, P sensory axons. In conclusion, variation in the kinetics of HCN isoforms could account for the findings in motor and sensory axons. Importantly, assessing the function of HCN channels in sensory and motor axons of different thresholds may provide insights into the pathophysiological processes underlying peripheral neurological diseases in humans, particularly focusing on the role of HCN channels with the potential of identifying novel treatment targets.NEW & NOTEWORTHY Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, which underlie inward rectifying currents (Ih), appear to mediate differences in sensory and motor axonal properties. Inward rectifying currents are increased in lower threshold motor and sensory axons, although different HCN channel isoforms appear to underlie these changes. While faster activating HCN

  8. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases in human spermatozoa and seminal fluid: Presence of an active PDE10A in human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maréchal, Loïze; Guillemette, Christine; Goupil, Serge; Blondin, Patrick; Leclerc, Pierre; Richard, François J

    2017-02-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) plays a crucial role as a signaling molecule for sperm functions such as capacitation, motility and acrosome reaction. It is well known that cAMP degradation by phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzyme has a major impact on sperm functions. The present study was undertaken to characterize cAMP-PDE activity in human semen. cAMP-PDE activity was measured in human sperm and seminal plasma using family specific PDE inhibitors. Three sperm fractionation methods were applied to assess cAMP-PDE activity in spermatozoa. Western blots were used to validate the presence of specific family in sperm and seminal plasma. Using three sperm fractionation methods, we demonstrated that in human sperm, the major cAMP-PDE activity is papaverine-sensitive and thus ascribed to PDE10. In seminal plasma, total cAMP-PDE activity was 1.14±0.39fmol of cAMP hydrolyzed per minute per μg of protein. Using specific inhibitors, we showed that the major cAMP-PDE activity found in human seminal plasma is ascribed to PDE4 and PDE11. Western blot analysis, immunoprecipitation with a specific monoclonal antibody, and mass spectrometry confirmed the presence of PDE10 in human spermatozoa. This study provides the first demonstration of the presence of functional PDE10 in human spermatozoa and functional PDE4 and PDE11 in human seminal plasma. Since the contribution of cyclic nucleotides in several sperm functions is well known, the finding that PDE10 is an active enzyme in human spermatozoa is novel and may lead to new insight into fertility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Multiple mechanisms underlying rectification in retinal cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNGA1) channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcangeletti, Manuel; Marchesi, Arin; Mazzolini, Monica; Torre, Vincent

    2013-11-01

    In cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNGA1) channels, in the presence of symmetrical ionic conditions, current-voltage (I-V) relationship depends, in a complex way, on the radius of permeating ion. It has been suggested that both the pore and S4 helix contribute to the observed rectification. In the present manuscript, using tail and gating current measurements from homotetrameric CNGA1 channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes, we clarify and quantify the role of the pore and of the S4 helix. We show that in symmetrical Rb(+) and Cs(+) single-channel current rectification dominates macroscopic currents while voltage-dependent gating becomes larger in symmetrical ethylammonium and dimethylammonium, where the open probability strongly depends on voltage. Isochronal tail currents analysis in dimethylammonium shows that at least two voltage-dependent transitions underlie the observed rectification. Only the first voltage-dependent transition is sensible to mutation of charge residues in the S4 helix. Moreover, analysis of tail and gating currents indicates that the number of elementary charges per channel moving across the membrane is less than 2, when they are about 12 in K(+) channels. These results indicate the existence of distinct mechanisms underlying rectification in CNG channels. A restricted motion of the S4 helix together with an inefficient coupling to the channel gate render CNGA1 channels poorly sensitive to voltage in the presence of physiological Na(+) and K(+).

  10. Multiple mechanisms underlying rectification in retinal cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNGA1) channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcangeletti, Manuel; Marchesi, Arin; Mazzolini, Monica; Torre, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    In cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNGA1) channels, in the presence of symmetrical ionic conditions, current–voltage (I-V) relationship depends, in a complex way, on the radius of permeating ion. It has been suggested that both the pore and S4 helix contribute to the observed rectification. In the present manuscript, using tail and gating current measurements from homotetrameric CNGA1 channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes, we clarify and quantify the role of the pore and of the S4 helix. We show that in symmetrical Rb+ and Cs+ single-channel current rectification dominates macroscopic currents while voltage-dependent gating becomes larger in symmetrical ethylammonium and dimethylammonium, where the open probability strongly depends on voltage. Isochronal tail currents analysis in dimethylammonium shows that at least two voltage-dependent transitions underlie the observed rectification. Only the first voltage-dependent transition is sensible to mutation of charge residues in the S4 helix. Moreover, analysis of tail and gating currents indicates that the number of elementary charges per channel moving across the membrane is less than 2, when they are about 12 in K+ channels. These results indicate the existence of distinct mechanisms underlying rectification in CNG channels. A restricted motion of the S4 helix together with an inefficient coupling to the channel gate render CNGA1 channels poorly sensitive to voltage in the presence of physiological Na+ and K+. PMID:24400150

  11. Simulation of queue with cyclic service in signalized intersection system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Dermawan Mulyodiputro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The simulation was implemented by modeling the queue with cyclic service in the signalized intersection system. The service policies used in this study were exhaustive and gated, the model was the M/M/1 queue, the arrival rate used was Poisson distribution and the services rate used was Exponential distribution. In the gated service policy, the server served only vehicles that came before the green signal appears at an intersection. Considered that there were 2 types of exhaustive policy in the signalized intersection system, namely normal exhaustive (vehicles only served during the green signal was still active, and exhaustive (there was the green signal duration addition at the intersection, when the green signal duration at an intersection finished. The results of this queueing simulation program were to obtain characteristics and performance of the system, i.e. average number of vehicles and waiting time of vehicles in the intersection and in the system, as well as system utilities. Then from these values, it would be known which of the cyclic service policies (normal exhaustive, exhaustive and gated was the most suitable when applied to a signalized intersection system

  12. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in peripheral diaphragmatic lymphatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrini, Daniela; Marcozzi, Cristiana; Solari, Eleonora; Bossi, Elena; Cinquetti, Raffaella; Reguzzoni, Marcella; Moriondo, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    Diaphragmatic lymphatic function is mainly sustained by pressure changes in the tissue and serosal cavities during cardiorespiratory cycles. The most peripheral diaphragmatic lymphatics are equipped with muscle cells (LMCs), which exhibit spontaneous contraction, whose molecular machinery is still undetermined. Hypothesizing that spontaneous contraction might involve hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels in lymphatic LMCs, diaphragmatic specimens, including spontaneously contracting lymphatics, were excised from 33 anesthetized rats, moved to a perfusion chamber containing HEPES-Tyrode's solution, and treated with HCN channels inhibitors cesium chloride (CsCl), ivabradine, and ZD-7288. Compared with control, exposure to 10 mM CsCl reduced (-65%, n = 13, P < 0.01) the contraction frequency (FL) and increased end-diastolic diameter (DL-d, +7.3%, P < 0.01) without changes in end-systolic diameter (DL-s). Ivabradine (300 μM) abolished contraction and increased DL-d (-14%, n = 10, P < 0.01) or caused an incomplete inhibition of FL (n = 3, P < 0.01), leaving DL-d and DL-s unaltered. ZD-7288 (200 μM) completely (n = 12, P < 0.01) abolished FL, while DL-d decreased to 90.9 ± 2.7% of control. HCN gene expression and immunostaining confirmed the presence of HCN1-4 channel isoforms, likely arranged in different configurations, in LMCs. Hence, all together, data suggest that HCN channels might play an important role in affecting contraction frequency of LMCs. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  13. The cyclic nucleotide-gated channel, AtCNGC10, influences salt tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kun-Mei; Babourina, Olga; Christopher, David A; Borsics, Tamas; Rengel, Zed

    2008-11-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated channels (CNGCs) in the plasma membrane transport K+ and other cations; however, their roles in the response and adaptation of plants to environmental salinity are unclear. Growth, cation contents, salt tolerance and K+ fluxes were assessed in wild-type and two AtCNGC10 antisense lines (A2 and A3) of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. Compared with the wild-type, mature plants of both antisense lines had altered K+ and Na+ concentrations in shoots and were more sensitive to salt stress, as assessed by biomass and Chl fluorescence. The shoots of A2 and A3 plants contained higher Na+ concentrations and significantly higher Na+/K+ ratios compared with wild-type, whereas roots contained higher K+ concentrations and lower Na+/K+ ratios. Four-day-old seedlings of both antisense lines exposed to salt stress had smaller Na+/K+ ratios and longer roots than the wild-type. Under sudden salt treatment, the Na+ efflux was higher and the K+ efflux was smaller in the antisense lines, indicating that AtCNGC10 might function as a channel providing Na+ influx and K+ efflux at the root/soil interface. We conclude that the AtCNGC10 channel is involved in Na+ and K+ transport during cation uptake in roots and in long-distance transport, such as phloem loading and/or xylem retrieval. Mature A2 and A3 plants became more salt sensitive than wild-type plants because of impaired photosynthesis induced by a higher Na+ concentration in the leaves.

  14. Cyclic nucleotides of canine antral smooth muscle. Effects of acetylcholine, catecholamines and gastrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, S; Grant, B; Wooton, J

    1981-01-07

    1. The effects of acetylcholine, catecholamines and gastrin on the intracellular content of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in antral circular muscle have been determined. 2. Acetylcholine results in a significant but transient increase in intracellular cyclic GMP. 3. Isoproterenol and norepinephrine increase intracellular cyclic AMP. Based on half-maximal effective doses, isoproterenol is 2.7-times more effective than norepinephrine. The increase in intracellular cyclic AMP by both agents is inhibited by propranolol but not phentolamine, indicating that both agents act on the muscle cell by a beta-receptor-coupled mechanism. 4. Gastrin has no demonstrable effect on either cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP. This suggests that while gastrin and acetylcholine can produce a like myoelectric response in the muscle cell, the action of gastrin is mediated by a separate receptor, presumably on the muscle cell, and not by a release of acetylcholine.

  15. A cyclic GMP signalling module that regulates gliding motility in a malaria parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Moon

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The ookinete is a motile stage in the malaria life cycle which forms in the mosquito blood meal from the zygote. Ookinetes use an acto-myosin motor to glide towards and penetrate the midgut wall to establish infection in the vector. The regulation of gliding motility is poorly understood. Through genetic interaction studies we here describe a signalling module that identifies guanosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP as an important second messenger regulating ookinete differentiation and motility. In ookinetes lacking the cyclic nucleotide degrading phosphodiesterase delta (PDEdelta, unregulated signalling through cGMP results in rounding up of the normally banana-shaped cells. This phenotype is suppressed in a double mutant additionally lacking guanylyl cyclase beta (GCbeta, showing that in ookinetes GCbeta is an important source for cGMP, and that PDEdelta is the relevant cGMP degrading enzyme. Inhibition of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase, PKG, blocks gliding, whereas enhanced signalling through cGMP restores normal gliding speed in a mutant lacking calcium dependent protein kinase 3, suggesting at least a partial overlap between calcium and cGMP dependent pathways. These data demonstrate an important function for signalling through cGMP, and most likely PKG, in dynamically regulating ookinete gliding during the transmission of malaria to the mosquito.

  16. Changes in cyclic nucleotides, locomotory behavior, and body length produced by novel endogenous neuropeptides in the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinitz, Catharine A; Pleva, Anthony E; Stretton, Antony O W

    2011-11-01

    Recent technical advances have rapidly advanced the discovery of novel peptides, as well as the transcripts that encode them, in the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum. Here we report that many of these novel peptides produce profound and varied effects on locomotory behavior and levels of cyclic nucleotides in A. suum. We investigated the effects of 31 endogenous neuropeptides encoded by transcripts afp-1, afp-2, afp-4, afp-6, afp-7, and afp-9-14 (afp: Ascaris FMRFamide-like Precursor protein) on cyclic nucleotide levels, body length and locomotory behavior. Worms were induced to generate anteriorly propagating waveforms, peptides were injected into the pseudocoelomic cavity, and changes in the specific activity (nmol/mg protein) of second messengers cAMP (3'5' cyclic adenosine monophosphate) and cGMP (3'5' cyclic guanosine monophosphate) were determined. Many of these neuropeptides changed the levels of cAMP (both increases and decreases were found), whereas few neuropeptides changed the level of cGMP. A subset of the peptides that lowered cAMP was investigated for effects on the locomotory waveform and on body length. Injection of AF19, or AF34 (afp-13), AF9 (afp-14), AF26 or AF41 (afp-11) caused immediate paralysis and cessation of propagating body waveforms. These neuropeptides also significantly increased body length. In contrast, injection of AF15 (afp-9) reduced the body length, and decreased the amplitude of waves in the body waveform. AF30 (afp-10) produced worms with tight ventral coils. Although injection of neuropeptides encoded by afp-1 (AF3, AF4, AF10 or AF13) produced an increased number of exaggerated body waves, there were no effects on either cAMP or cGMP. By injecting peptides into behaving A. suum, we have provided an initial screen of the effects of novel peptides on several behavioral and biochemical parameters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of Hyperpolarization-activated, Cyclic Nucleotide-gated Cation Channel Type 2 for the Xenon-mediated Anesthetic Effect: Evidence from In Vitro and In Vivo Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattusch, Corinna; Kratzer, Stephan; Buerge, Martina; Kreuzer, Matthias; Engel, Tatiana; Kopp, Claudia; Biel, Martin; Hammelmann, Verena; Ying, Shui-Wang; Goldstein, Peter A; Kochs, Eberhard; Haseneder, Rainer; Rammes, Gerhard

    2015-05-01

    The thalamus is thought to be crucially involved in the anesthetic state. Here, we investigated the effect of the inhaled anesthetic xenon on stimulus-evoked thalamocortical network activity and on excitability of thalamocortical neurons. Because hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated cation (HCN) channels are key regulators of neuronal excitability in the thalamus, the effect of xenon on HCN channels was examined. The effects of xenon on thalamocortical network activity were investigated in acutely prepared brain slices from adult wild-type and HCN2 knockout mice by means of voltage-sensitive dye imaging. The influence of xenon on single-cell excitability in brain slices was investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Effects of xenon on HCN channels were verified in human embryonic kidney cells expressing HCN2 channels. Xenon concentration-dependently diminished thalamocortical signal propagation. In neurons, xenon reduced HCN channel-mediated Ih current amplitude by 33.4 ± 12.2% (at -133 mV; n = 7; P = 0.041) and caused a left-shift in the voltage of half-maximum activation (V1/2) from -98.8 ± 1.6 to -108.0 ± 4.2 mV (n = 8; P = 0.035). Similar effects were seen in human embryonic kidney cells. The impairment of HCN channel function was negligible when intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate level was increased. Using HCN2 mice, we could demonstrate that xenon did neither attenuate in vitro thalamocortical signal propagation nor did it show sedating effects in vivo. Here, we clearly showed that xenon impairs HCN2 channel function, and this impairment is dependent on intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels. We provide evidence that this effect reduces thalamocortical signal propagation and probably contributes to the hypnotic properties of xenon.

  18. Second Messenger Signaling in Bacillus subtilis: Accumulation of Cyclic di-AMP Inhibits Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundlach, Jan; Rath, Hermann; Herzberg, Christina; Mäder, Ulrike; Stülke, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis produces the essential second messenger signaling nucleotide cyclic di-AMP. In B. subtilis and other bacteria, c-di-AMP has been implicated in diverse functions such as control of metabolism, cell division and cell wall synthesis, and potassium transport. To enhance our understanding of the multiple functions of this second messenger, we have studied the consequences of c-di-AMP accumulation at a global level by a transcriptome analysis. C-di-AMP accumulation affected the expression of about 700 genes, among them the two major operons required for biofilm formation. The expression of both operons was severely reduced both in the laboratory and a non-domesticated strain upon accumulation of c-di-AMP. In excellent agreement, the corresponding strain was unable to form complex colonies. In B. subtilis, the transcription factor SinR controls the expression of biofilm genes by binding to their promoter regions resulting in transcription repression. Inactivation of the sinR gene restored biofilm formation even at high intracellular c-di-AMP concentrations suggesting that the second messenger acts upstream of SinR in the signal transduction pathway. As c-di-AMP accumulation did not affect the intracellular levels of SinR, we conclude that the nucleotide affects the activity of SinR.

  19. Type I IFN and not TNF, is Essential for Cyclic Di-nucleotide-elicited CTL by a Cytosolic Cross-presentation Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darío Lirussi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic di-nucleotides (CDN are potent stimulators of innate and adaptive immune responses. Cyclic di-AMP (CDA is a promising adjuvant that generates humoral and cellular immunity. The strong STING-dependent stimulation of type I IFN represents a key feature of CDA. However, recent studies suggested that this is dispensable for adjuvanticity. Here we demonstrate that stimulation of IFN-γ-secreting CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL is significantly decreased after vaccination in the absence of type I IFN signaling. The biological significance of this CTL response was confirmed by the stimulation of MHC class I-restricted protection against influenza virus challenge. We show here that type I IFN (and not TNF-α is essential for CDA-mediated cross-presentation by a cathepsin independent, TAP and proteosome dependent cytosolic antigen processing pathway, which promotes effective cross-priming and further CTL induction. Our data clearly demonstrate that type I IFN signaling is critical for CDN-mediated cross-presentation.

  20. The Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide-Gated Channels: from Biophysics to Pharmacology of a Unique Family of Ion Channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartiani, Laura; Mannaioni, Guido; Masi, Alessio; Novella Romanelli, Maria; Cerbai, Elisabetta

    2017-10-01

    Hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels are important members of the voltage-gated pore loop channels family. They show unique features: they open at hyperpolarizing potential, carry a mixed Na/K current, and are regulated by cyclic nucleotides. Four different isoforms have been cloned (HCN1-4) that can assemble to form homo- or heterotetramers, characterized by different biophysical properties. These proteins are widely distributed throughout the body and involved in different physiologic processes, the most important being the generation of spontaneous electrical activity in the heart and the regulation of synaptic transmission in the brain. Their role in heart rate, neuronal pacemaking, dendritic integration, learning and memory, and visual and pain perceptions has been extensively studied; these channels have been found also in some peripheral tissues, where their functions still need to be fully elucidated. Genetic defects and altered expression of HCN channels are linked to several pathologies, which makes these proteins attractive targets for translational research; at the moment only one drug (ivabradine), which specifically blocks the hyperpolarization-activated current, is clinically available. This review discusses current knowledge about HCN channels, starting from their biophysical properties, origin, and developmental features, to (patho)physiologic role in different tissues and pharmacological modulation, ending with their present and future relevance as drug targets. Copyright © 2017 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  1. Identification of the Components Involved in Cyclic Di-AMP Signaling in Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric Blötz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria often use cyclic dinucleotides as second messengers for signal transduction. While the classical molecule c-di-GMP is involved in lifestyle selection, the functions of the more recently discovered signaling nucleotide cyclic di-AMP are less defined. For many Gram-positive bacteria, c-di-AMP is essential for growth suggesting its involvement in a key cellular function. We have analyzed c-di-AMP signaling in the genome-reduced pathogenic bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Our results demonstrate that these bacteria produce c-di-AMP, and we could identify the diadenylate cyclase CdaM (MPN244. This enzyme is the founding member of a novel family of diadenylate cyclases. Of two potential c-di-AMP degrading phosphodiesterases, only PdeM (MPN549 is active in c-di-AMP degradation, whereas NrnA (MPN140 was reported to degrade short oligoribonucleotides. As observed in other bacteria, both the c-di-AMP synthesizing and the degrading enzymes are essential for M. pneumoniae suggesting control of a major homeostatic process. To obtain more insights into the nature of this process, we have identified a c-di-AMP-binding protein from M. pneumoniae, KtrC. KtrC is the cytoplasmic regulatory subunit of the low affinity potassium transporter KtrCD. It is established that binding of c-di-AMP inhibits the KtrCD activity resulting in a limitation of potassium uptake. Our results suggest that the control of potassium homeostasis is the essential function of c-di-AMP in M. pneumoniae.

  2. Structure of the SthK carboxy-terminal region reveals a gating mechanism for cyclic nucleotide-modulated ion channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Kesters

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotide-sensitive ion channels are molecular pores that open in response to cAMP or cGMP, which are universal second messengers. Binding of a cyclic nucleotide to the carboxyterminal cyclic nucleotide binding domain (CNBD of these channels is thought to cause a conformational change that promotes channel opening. The C-linker domain, which connects the channel pore to this CNBD, plays an important role in coupling ligand binding to channel opening. Current structural insight into this mechanism mainly derives from X-ray crystal structures of the C-linker/CNBD from hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated (HCN channels. However, these structures reveal little to no conformational changes upon comparison of the ligand-bound and unbound form. In this study, we take advantage of a recently identified prokaryote ion channel, SthK, which has functional properties that strongly resemble cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG channels and is activated by cAMP, but not by cGMP. We determined X-ray crystal structures of the C-linker/CNBD of SthK in the presence of cAMP or cGMP. We observe that the structure in complex with cGMP, which is an antagonist, is similar to previously determined HCN channel structures. In contrast, the structure in complex with cAMP, which is an agonist, is in a more open conformation. We observe that the CNBD makes an outward swinging movement, which is accompanied by an opening of the C-linker. This conformation mirrors the open gate structures of the Kv1.2 channel or MthK channel, which suggests that the cAMP-bound C-linker/CNBD from SthK represents an activated conformation. These results provide a structural framework for better understanding cyclic nucleotide modulation of ion channels, including HCN and CNG channels.

  3. C-terminal β9-strand of the cyclic nucleotide-binding homology domain stabilizes activated states of Kv11.1 channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chai Ann Ng

    Full Text Available Kv11.1 potassium channels are important for regulation of the normal rhythm of the heartbeat. Reduced activity of Kv11.1 channels causes long QT syndrome type 2, a disorder that increases the risk of cardiac arrhythmias and sudden cardiac arrest. Kv11.1 channels are members of the KCNH subfamily of voltage-gated K(+ channels. However, they also share many similarities with the cyclic nucleotide gated ion channel family, including having a cyclic nucleotide-binding homology (cNBH domain. Kv11.1 channels, however, are not directly regulated by cyclic nucleotides. Recently, crystal structures of the cNBH domain from mEAG and zELK channels, both members of the KCNH family of voltage-gated potassium channels, revealed that a C-terminal β9-strand in the cNBH domain occupied the putative cyclic nucleotide-binding site thereby precluding binding of cyclic nucleotides. Here we show that mutations to residues in the β9-strand affect the stability of the open state relative to the closed state of Kv11.1 channels. We also show that disrupting the structure of the β9-strand reduces the stability of the inactivated state relative to the open state. Clinical mutations located in this β9-strand result in reduced trafficking efficiency, which suggests that binding of the C-terminal β9-strand to the putative cyclic nucleotide-binding pocket is also important for assembly and trafficking of Kv11.1 channels.

  4. Role of endothelin-1 and cyclic nucleotides in ischemia/reperfusion-mediated microvascular leak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, René; Chong, Terry; Curran, Brian; Victorino, Gregory P

    2006-03-01

    A consequence of ischemia/reperfusion (IR) is endothelial barrier dysfunction and intravascular volume loss. The purposes of our study are to explore the impact of: 1) cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) synthesis inhibition, 2) cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) synthesis inhibition, 3) treatment with endothelin-1, and 4) endothelin-1 (ET-1)-mediated cAMP changes on IR-induced fluid leak. We hypothesize that IR-mediated microvascular fluid leak results from increased cGMP activity and ET-1 decreases IR-induced fluid leak via cAMP. A micro-cannulation technique was used to determine fluid leak or hydraulic permeability (Lp) in rat mesenteric venules. Lp was measured during IR and after treatment with 1) cGMP synthesis inhibitor (LY83583,10 micromol/L) 2) cAMP synthesis inhibitor (2',5'dideoxyadenosine,10 micromol/L), 3) ET-1 (80 pM), and 4) cAMP synthesis inhibitor plus ET-1 (n=6 in each group; Lp represented as mean+/-standard error of the mean; units 10-cm/sec/cmH2O). IR resulted in an increase in Lp (Lp=7.07+/-0.20) sevenfold above baseline (1.05+/-0.31) (pcentral role as a mediator of IR-induced postcapillary venular leak. ET-1 mildly decreased leak. Furthermore, ET-1 may not exert its effects on microvascular fluid leak during IR via cAMP.

  5. Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channels in olfactory sensory neurons regulate axon extension and glomerular formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobley, Arie S; Miller, Alexandra M; Araneda, Ricardo C; Maurer, Lydia R; Müller, Frank; Greer, Charles A

    2010-12-08

    Mechanisms influencing the development of olfactory bulb glomeruli are poorly understood. While odor receptors (ORs) play an important role in olfactory sensory neuron (OSN) axon targeting/coalescence (Mombaerts et al., 1996; Wang et al., 1998; Feinstein and Mombaerts, 2004), recent work showed that G protein activation alone is sufficient to induce OSN axon coalescence (Imai et al., 2006; Chesler et al., 2007), suggesting an activity-dependent mechanism in glomerular development. Consistent with these data, OSN axon projections and convergence are perturbed in mice deficient for adenylyl cyclase III, which is downstream from the OR and catalyzes the conversion of ATP to cAMP. However, in cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel knock-out mice OSN axons are only transiently perturbed (Lin et al., 2000), suggesting that the CNG channel may not be the sole target of cAMP. This prompted us to investigate an alternative channel, the hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel (HCN), as a potential developmental target of cAMP in OSNs. Here, we demonstrate that HCN channels are developmentally precocious in OSNs and therefore are plausible candidates for affecting OSN axon development. Inhibition of HCN channels in dissociated OSNs significantly reduced neurite outgrowth. Moreover, in HCN1 knock-out mice the formation of glomeruli was delayed in parallel with perturbations of axon organization in the olfactory nerve. These data support the hypothesis that the outgrowth and coalescence of OSN axons is, at least in part, subject to activity-dependent mechanisms mediated via HCN channels.

  6. Intercellular signaling via cyclic GMP diffusion through gap junctions restarts meiosis in mouse ovarian follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuhaibar, Leia C; Egbert, Jeremy R; Norris, Rachael P; Lampe, Paul D; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Thunemann, Martin; Wen, Lai; Feil, Robert; Jaffe, Laurinda A

    2015-04-28

    Meiosis in mammalian oocytes is paused until luteinizing hormone (LH) activates receptors in the mural granulosa cells of the ovarian follicle. Prior work has established the central role of cyclic GMP (cGMP) from the granulosa cells in maintaining meiotic arrest, but it is not clear how binding of LH to receptors that are located up to 10 cell layers away from the oocyte lowers oocyte cGMP and restarts meiosis. Here, by visualizing intercellular trafficking of cGMP in real-time in live follicles from mice expressing a FRET sensor, we show that diffusion of cGMP through gap junctions is responsible not only for maintaining meiotic arrest, but also for rapid transmission of the signal that reinitiates meiosis from the follicle surface to the oocyte. Before LH exposure, the cGMP concentration throughout the follicle is at a uniformly high level of ∼2-4 μM. Then, within 1 min of LH application, cGMP begins to decrease in the peripheral granulosa cells. As a consequence, cGMP from the oocyte diffuses into the sink provided by the large granulosa cell volume, such that by 20 min the cGMP concentration in the follicle is uniformly low, ∼100 nM. The decrease in cGMP in the oocyte relieves the inhibition of the meiotic cell cycle. This direct demonstration that a physiological signal initiated by a stimulus in one region of an intact tissue can travel across many layers of cells via cyclic nucleotide diffusion through gap junctions could provide a general mechanism for diverse cellular processes.

  7. Cyclic AMP Signaling: A Molecular Determinant of Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Eric P.; Assi, Mazen; Pearse, Damien D.

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of axonal integrity during injury to the peripheral nerve system (PNS) sets into motion a cascade of responses that includes inflammation, Schwann cell mobilization, and the degeneration of the nerve fibers distal to the injury site. Yet, the injured PNS differentiates itself from the injured central nervous system (CNS) in its remarkable capacity for self-recovery, which, depending upon the length and type of nerve injury, involves a series of molecular events in both the injured neuron and associated Schwann cells that leads to axon regeneration, remyelination repair, and functional restitution. Herein we discuss the essential function of the second messenger, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP), in the PNS repair process, highlighting the important role the conditioning lesion paradigm has played in understanding the mechanism(s) by which cyclic AMP exerts its proregenerative action. Furthermore, we review the studies that have therapeutically targeted cyclic AMP to enhance endogenous nerve repair. PMID:25177696

  8. THE PRESENCE OF 5 CYCLIC-NUCLEOTIDE PHOSPHODIESTERASE ISOENZYME ACTIVITIES IN BOVINE TRACHEAL SMOOTH-MUSCLE AND THE FUNCTIONAL-EFFECTS OF SELECTIVE INHIBITORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANAMSTERDAM, RGM; DEBOER, J; TENBERGE, RE; NICHOLSON, CD; ZAAGSMA, J

    1991-01-01

    1 The profile of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoenzymes and the relaxant effects of isoenzyme selective inhibitors were examined in bovine tracheal smooth muscle. The compounds examined were the non-selective inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), zaprinast (PDE V selective),

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+-channel activity contributes to ER stress and cone death in cyclic nucleotide-gated channel deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Michael R; Ma, Hongwei; Yang, Fan; Belcher, Joshua; Le, Yun-Zheng; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko; Biel, Martin; Michalakis, Stylianos; Iuso, Anthony; Križaj, David; Ding, Xi-Qin

    2017-07-07

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and mislocalization of improperly folded proteins have been shown to contribute to photoreceptor death in models of inherited retinal degenerative diseases. In particular, mice with cone cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel deficiency, a model for achromatopsia, display both early-onset ER stress and opsin mistrafficking. By 2 weeks of age, these mice show elevated signaling from all three arms of the ER-stress pathway, and by 1 month, cone opsin is improperly distributed away from its normal outer segment location to other retinal layers. This work investigated the role of Ca2+-release channels in ER stress, protein mislocalization, and cone death in a mouse model of CNG-channel deficiency. We examined whether preservation of luminal Ca2+ stores through pharmacological and genetic suppression of ER Ca2+ efflux protects cones by attenuating ER stress. We demonstrated that the inhibition of ER Ca2+-efflux channels reduced all three arms of ER-stress signaling while improving opsin trafficking to cone outer segments and decreasing cone death by 20-35%. Cone-specific gene deletion of the inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type I (IP3R1) also significantly increased cone density in the CNG-channel-deficient mice, suggesting that IP3R1 signaling contributes to Ca2+ homeostasis and cone survival. Consistent with the important contribution of organellar Ca2+ signaling in this achromatopsia mouse model, significant differences in dynamic intraorganellar Ca2+ levels were detected in CNG-channel-deficient cones. These results thus identify a novel molecular link between Ca2+ homeostasis and cone degeneration, thereby revealing novel therapeutic targets to preserve cones in inherited retinal degenerative diseases. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Disruption of a Plasmodium falciparum cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase gene causes aberrant gametogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Cathy J; McRobert, Louisa; Baker, David A

    2008-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase (PDE) and guanylyl cyclase (GC) enzymes are key components of the cGMP signalling pathway and are encoded in the genome of Plasmodium falciparum. Here we investigate the role of specific GC and PDE isoforms in gamete formation – a process that is essential for malaria transmission and occurs in the Anopheles mosquito midgut following feeding on an infected individual. Details of the intracellular signalling events controlling development of the male and female gametes from their precursors (gametocytes) remain sparse in P. falciparum. Previous work involving the addition of pharmacological agents to gametocytes implicated cGMP in exflagellation – the emergence of highly motile, flagellated male gametes from the host red blood cell. In this study we show that decreased GC activity in parasites having undergone disruption of the PfGCβ gene had no significant effect on gametogenesis. By contrast, decreased cGMP-PDE activity during gametocyte development owing to disruption of the PfPDEδ gene, led to a severely reduced ability to undergo gametogenesis. This suggests that the concentration of cGMP must be maintained below a threshold in the developing gametocyte to allow subsequent differentiation to proceed normally. The data indicate that PfPDEδ plays a crucial role in regulating cGMP levels during sexual development. PMID:18452584

  11. Expression of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated channel isoforms in a canine model of atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Zhang, Jian; Gan, Tianyi; Xu, Guojun; Tang, Baopeng

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the mRNA and protein expression levels of atrial hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel isoforms in the left atrial muscle of dogs with multiple organ failure. A total of 14 beagle dogs with multiple organ failure, including seven cases with sinus rhythm and seven cases with atrial fibrillation (AF), underwent surgery to remove a sample of left atrial appendage tissue. The expression levels of a number of HCN channel subtypes were subsequently measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis. The mRNA and protein expression levels of HCN2 and HCN4 increased significantly in the AF group when compared with the sinus rhythm group. However, expression of the HCN1 isoform was not detected. Therefore, increased expression levels of HCN2 and HCN4 may be important molecular mechanisms in the pathogenesis of AF, which were associated with differences in patients with valvular heart disease.

  12. Adenosine receptors regulate gap junction coupling of the human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells hCMEC/D3 by Ca2+influx through cyclic nucleotide-gated channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Almke; Bintig, Willem; Begandt, Daniela; Klett, Anne; Siller, Ina G; Gregor, Carola; Schaarschmidt, Frank; Weksler, Babette; Romero, Ignacio; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Hell, Stefan W; Ngezahayo, Anaclet

    2017-04-15

    Gap junction channels are essential for the formation and regulation of physiological units in tissues by allowing the lateral cell-to-cell diffusion of ions, metabolites and second messengers. Stimulation of the adenosine receptor subtype A 2B increases the gap junction coupling in the human blood-brain barrier endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. Although the increased gap junction coupling is cAMP-dependent, neither the protein kinase A nor the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP were involved in this increase. We found that cAMP activates cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels and thereby induces a Ca 2+ influx, which leads to the increase in gap junction coupling. The report identifies CNG channels as a possible physiological link between adenosine receptors and the regulation of gap junction channels in endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. The human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 was used to characterize the physiological link between adenosine receptors and the gap junction coupling in endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. Expressed adenosine receptor subtypes and connexin (Cx) isoforms were identified by RT-PCR. Scrape loading/dye transfer was used to evaluate the impact of the A 2A and A 2B adenosine receptor subtype agonist 2-phenylaminoadenosine (2-PAA) on the gap junction coupling. We found that 2-PAA stimulated cAMP synthesis and enhanced gap junction coupling in a concentration-dependent manner. This enhancement was accompanied by an increase in gap junction plaques formed by Cx43. Inhibition of protein kinase A did not affect the 2-PAA-related enhancement of gap junction coupling. In contrast, the cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel inhibitor l-cis-diltiazem, as well as the chelation of intracellular Ca 2+ with BAPTA, or the absence of external Ca 2+ , suppressed the 2-PAA-related enhancement of gap junction coupling. Moreover, we observed a 2-PAA-dependent activation of CNG channels by a combination of

  13. The Cyclic AMP-Vfr Signaling Pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Inhibited by Cyclic Di-GMP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almblad, Henrik; Harrison, Joe J; Rybtke, Morten

    2015-01-01

    as a direct result of elevated c-di-GMP content. Overproduction of c-di-GMP causes a decrease in the transcription of virulence factor genes that are regulated by the global virulence regulator Vfr. The low level of Vfr-dependent transcription is caused by a low level of its coactivator, cyclic AMP (cAMP...... infection give rise to rugose small colony variants (RSCVs), which are hyper-biofilm-forming mutants that commonly possess mutations that increase production of the biofilm-promoting secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP). We show that RSCVs display a decreased production of acute virulence factors......), which is decreased in response to a high level of c-di-GMP. Mutations that cause reversion of the RSCV phenotype concomitantly reactivate Vfr-cAMP signaling. Attempts to uncover the mechanism underlying the observed c-di-GMP-mediated lowering of cAMP content provided evidence that it is not caused...

  14. The single cyclic nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterase of the intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia represents a potential drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunz, Stefan; Balmer, Vreni; Sterk, Geert Jan; Pollastri, Michael P; Leurs, Rob; Müller, Norbert; Hemphill, Andrew; Spycher, Cornelia

    2017-09-01

    Giardiasis is an intestinal infection correlated with poverty and poor drinking water quality, and treatment options are limited. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Giardia infections afflict nearly 33% of people in developing countries, and 2% of the adult population in the developed world. This study describes the single cyclic nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) of G. lamblia and assesses PDE inhibitors as a new generation of anti-giardial drugs. An extensive search of the Giardia genome database identified a single gene coding for a class I PDE, GlPDE. The predicted protein sequence was analyzed in-silico to characterize its domain structure and catalytic domain. Enzymatic activity of GlPDE was established by complementation of a PDE-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, and enzyme kinetics were characterized in soluble yeast lysates. The potency of known PDE inhibitors was tested against the activity of recombinant GlPDE expressed in yeast and against proliferating Giardia trophozoites. Finally, the localization of epitope-tagged and ectopically expressed GlPDE in Giardia cells was investigated. Giardia encodes a class I PDE. Catalytically important residues are fully conserved between GlPDE and human PDEs, but sequence differences between their catalytic domains suggest that designing Giardia-specific inhibitors is feasible. Recombinant GlPDE hydrolyzes cAMP with a Km of 408 μM, and cGMP is not accepted as a substrate. A number of drugs exhibit a high degree of correlation between their potency against the recombinant enzyme and their inhibition of trophozoite proliferation in culture. Epitope-tagged GlPDE localizes as dots in a pattern reminiscent of mitosomes and to the perinuclear region in Giardia. Our data strongly suggest that inhibition of G. lamblia PDE activity leads to a profound inhibition of parasite proliferation and that GlPDE is a promising target for developing novel anti-giardial drugs.

  15. Role of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase in the renal 2',3'-cAMP-adenosine pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Edwin K; Gillespie, Delbert G; Mi, Zaichuan; Cheng, Dongmei; Bansal, Rashmi; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2014-07-01

    Energy depletion increases the renal production of 2',3'-cAMP (a positional isomer of 3',5'-cAMP that opens mitochondrial permeability transition pores) and 2',3'-cAMP is converted to 2'-AMP and 3'-AMP, which in turn are metabolized to adenosine. Because the enzymes involved in this "2',3'-cAMP-adenosine pathway" are unknown, we examined whether 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) participates in the renal metabolism of 2',3'-cAMP. Western blotting and real-time PCR demonstrated expression of CNPase in rat glomerular mesangial, preglomerular vascular smooth muscle and endothelial, proximal tubular, thick ascending limb and collecting duct cells. Real-time PCR established the expression of CNPase in human glomerular mesangial, proximal tubular and vascular smooth muscle cells; and the level of expression of CNPase was greater than that for phosphodiesterase 4 (major enzyme for the metabolism of 3',5'-cAMP). Overexpression of CNPase in rat preglomerular vascular smooth muscle cells increased the metabolism of exogenous 2',3'-cAMP to 2'-AMP. Infusions of 2',3'-cAMP into isolated CNPase wild-type (+/+) kidneys increased renal venous 2'-AMP, and this response was diminished by 63% in CNPase knockout (-/-) kidneys, whereas the conversion of 3',5'-cAMP to 5'-AMP was similar in CNPase +/+ vs. -/- kidneys. In CNPase +/+ kidneys, energy depletion (metabolic poisons) increased kidney tissue levels of adenosine and its metabolites (inosine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, and uric acid) without accumulation of 2',3'-cAMP. In contrast, in CNPase -/- kidneys, energy depletion increased kidney tissue levels of 2',3'-cAMP and abolished the increase in adenosine and its metabolites. In conclusion, kidneys express CNPase, and renal CNPase mediates in part the renal 2',3'-cAMP-adenosine pathway. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  16. The single cyclic nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterase of the intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia represents a potential drug target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmer, Vreni; Sterk, Geert Jan; Pollastri, Michael P.; Leurs, Rob; Müller, Norbert; Hemphill, Andrew; Spycher, Cornelia

    2017-01-01

    Background Giardiasis is an intestinal infection correlated with poverty and poor drinking water quality, and treatment options are limited. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Giardia infections afflict nearly 33% of people in developing countries, and 2% of the adult population in the developed world. This study describes the single cyclic nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) of G. lamblia and assesses PDE inhibitors as a new generation of anti-giardial drugs. Methods An extensive search of the Giardia genome database identified a single gene coding for a class I PDE, GlPDE. The predicted protein sequence was analyzed in-silico to characterize its domain structure and catalytic domain. Enzymatic activity of GlPDE was established by complementation of a PDE-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, and enzyme kinetics were characterized in soluble yeast lysates. The potency of known PDE inhibitors was tested against the activity of recombinant GlPDE expressed in yeast and against proliferating Giardia trophozoites. Finally, the localization of epitope-tagged and ectopically expressed GlPDE in Giardia cells was investigated. Results Giardia encodes a class I PDE. Catalytically important residues are fully conserved between GlPDE and human PDEs, but sequence differences between their catalytic domains suggest that designing Giardia-specific inhibitors is feasible. Recombinant GlPDE hydrolyzes cAMP with a Km of 408 μM, and cGMP is not accepted as a substrate. A number of drugs exhibit a high degree of correlation between their potency against the recombinant enzyme and their inhibition of trophozoite proliferation in culture. Epitope-tagged GlPDE localizes as dots in a pattern reminiscent of mitosomes and to the perinuclear region in Giardia. Conclusions Our data strongly suggest that inhibition of G. lamblia PDE activity leads to a profound inhibition of parasite proliferation and that GlPDE is a promising target for developing novel

  17. Active 3'-5' cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases are present in detergent-resistant membranes of mural granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Annick; Guillemette, Christine; Sirard, Marc-André; Richard, François J

    2016-01-04

    Lipids rafts are specialised membrane microdomains involved in cell signalling that can be isolated as detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs). The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) has a central role in cell signalling in the ovary and its degradation is carried out by the phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzyme family. We hypothesised that PDEs could be functionally present in the lipid rafts of porcine mural granulosa cell membranes. PDE6C, PDE8A and PDE11A were detected by dot blot in the DRMs and the Triton-soluble fraction of the mural granulosa cells membrane and the cytosol. As shown by immunocytochemistry, PDEs showed clear immunostaining in mural granulosa cell membranes and the cytosol. Interestingly, cAMP-PDE activity was 18 times higher in the DRMs than in the Triton-soluble fraction of cell membranes and was 7.7 times higher in the cytosol than in the DRMs. cAMP-PDE activity in mural granulosa cells was mainly contributed by the PDE8 and PDE11 families. This study shows that PDEs from the PDE8 and PDE11 families are present in mural granulosa cells and that the cAMP-PDE activity is mainly contributed by the cytosol. In the cell membrane, the cAMP-PDE activity is mainly contributed by the DRMs. In addition, receptors for prostaglandin E2 and LH, two G-protein-coupled receptors, are present in lipid rafts and absent from the non-raft fraction of the granulosa cell membrane. These results suggest that in these cells, the lipid rafts exist as a cell-signalling platform and PDEs are one of the key enzyme families present in the raft.

  18. OFDM Signal Detector Based on Cyclic Autocorrelation Function and its Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Fedra

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to research of the general and particular properties of the OFDM signal detector based on the cyclic autocorrelation function. The cyclic autocorrelation function is estimated using DFT. The parameters of the testing signal have been chosen according to 802.11g WLAN. Some properties are described analytically; all events are examined via computer simulations. It is shown that the detector is able to detect an OFDM signal in the case of multipath propagation, inexact frequency synchronization and without time synchronization. The sensitivity of the detector could be decreased in the above cases. An important condition for proper value of the detector sampling interval was derived. Three types of the channels were studied and compared. Detection threshold SNR=-9 dB was found for the signal under consideration and for two-way propagation.

  19. Genetic association of marbling score with intragenic nucleotide variants at selection signals of the bovine genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, J; Lee, C

    2016-04-01

    Selection signals of Korean cattle might be attributed largely to artificial selection for meat quality. Rapidly increased intragenic markers of newly annotated genes in the bovine genome would help overcome limited findings of genetic markers associated with meat quality at the selection signals in a previous study. The present study examined genetic associations of marbling score (MS) with intragenic nucleotide variants at selection signals of Korean cattle. A total of 39 092 nucleotide variants of 407 Korean cattle were utilized in the association analysis. A total of 129 variants were selected within newly annotated genes in the bovine genome. Their genetic associations were analyzed using the mixed model with random polygenic effects based on identical-by-state genetic relationships among animals in order to control for spurious associations produced by population structure. Genetic associations of MS were found (Pgenome. Further studies of fine mapping would be useful to incorporate favorable alleles in marker-assisted selection for MS of Korean cattle.

  20. Genetic variation in Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels and its relationship with neuroticism, cognition and risk of depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Mark Mcintosh

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels are encoded by four genes (HCN1-4 and, through activation by cyclic AMP (cAMP, represent a point of convergence for several psychosis risk genes. On the basis of positive preliminary data, we sought to test whether genetic variation in HCN1-4 conferred risk of depression or cognitive impairment in the Generation Scotland: Scottish Family Health Study. HCN1, HCN2, HCN3 and HCN4 were genotyped for 43 haplotype-tagging SNPs and tested for association with DSM-IV depression, neuroticism and a battery of cognitive tests assessing cognitive ability, memory, verbal fluency and psychomotor performance. No association was found between any HCN channel gene SNP and risk of depression, neuroticism or on any cognitive measure. The current study does not support a genetic role for HCN channels in conferring risk of depression or cognitive impairment in human subjects within the Scottish population.

  1. Regulation of the synthesis of cyclic glucan in Xanthomonas campestris by a diffusible signal molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojnov, A A; Slater, H; Newman, M A; Daniels, M J; Dow, J M

    2001-12-01

    The rpf gene cluster of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris is involved in the co-ordinate positive regulation of the production of extracellular enzymes and the extracellular polysaccharide xanthan. Several of the rpf genes are involved in a regulatory system involving the small diffusible molecule DSF (for diffusible signal factor). Synthesis of DSF requires RpfF, and a two-component sensory transduction system involving RpfC has been implicated in the perception of the signal and signal transduction. Here we show that mutations in both rpfF and rpfC lead to reductions in the levels of cyclic glucan. The levels of cyclic glucan synthetase in membrane preparations from rpfF and rpfC mutants were, however, unaltered from the wild-type. Similar alterations in the level of cyclic glucan without changes in cyclic glucan synthetase activity were seen when wild-type bacteria were exposed to osmotic stress. These results extend the range of cellular functions subject to regulation by the rpf genes and DSF system.

  2. Mechanical control of cyclic AMP signalling and gene transcription through integrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C. J.; Alenghat, F. J.; Rim, P.; Fong, J. H.; Fabry, B.; Ingber, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    This study was carried out to discriminate between two alternative hypotheses as to how cells sense mechanical forces and transduce them into changes in gene transcription. Do cells sense mechanical signals through generalized membrane distortion or through specific transmembrane receptors, such as integrins? Here we show that mechanical stresses applied to the cell surface alter the cyclic AMP signalling cascade and downstream gene transcription by modulating local release of signals generated by activated integrin receptors in a G-protein-dependent manner, whereas distortion of integrins in the absence of receptor occupancy has no effect.

  3. The Interplay between Cyclic AMP, MAPK, and NF-κB Pathways in Response to Proinflammatory Signals in Microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousumi Ghosh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP is an important intracellular regulator of microglial cell homeostasis and its negative perturbation through proinflammatory signaling results in microglial cell activation. Though cytokines, TNF-α and IL-1β, decrease intracellular cyclic AMP, the mechanism by which this occurs is poorly understood. The current study examined which signaling pathways are responsible for decreasing cyclic AMP in microglia following TNF-α stimulation and sought to identify the role cyclic AMP plays in regulating these pathways. In EOC2 microglia, TNF-α produced a dramatic reduction in cyclic AMP and increased cyclic AMP-dependent PDE activity that could be antagonized by Rolipram, myristoylated-PKI, PD98059, or JSH-23, implicating a role for PDE4, PKA, MEK, and NF-κB in this regulation. Following TNF-α there were significant increases in iNOS and COX-2 immunoreactivity, phosphorylated ERK1/2 and NF-κB-p65, IκB degradation, and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, which were reduced in the presence of high levels of cyclic AMP, indicating that reductions in cyclic AMP during cytokine stimulation are important for removing its inhibitory action on NF-κB activation and subsequent proinflammatory gene expression. Further elucidation of the signaling crosstalk involved in decreasing cyclic AMP in response to inflammatory signals may provide novel therapeutic targets for modulating microglial cell activation during neurological injury and disease.

  4. Effects of rolipram, pimobendan and zaprinast on ischaemia-induced dysrhythmias and on ventricular cyclic nucleotide content in the anaesthetized rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carceles, M D; Aleixandre, F; Fuente, T; López-Vidal, J; Laorden, M L

    2003-03-01

    This study was designed to compare the haemodynamic, electrophysiological and pharmacodynamic effects of three selective inhibitors of the different isoenzyme forms of phosphodiesterase (PDE) on ischaemia-induced dysrhythmias in the anaesthetized rat. The drugs used were pimobendan, a selective PDE III inhibitor, rolipram, a selective PDE IV inhibitor, and zaprinast, a selective PDE V inhibitor. The coronary artery was occluded 15 min after commencing drug administration, and myocardial ischaemia was maintained for 30 min during which the heart rate and mean arterial pressure were recorded. cAMP and cGMP were determined by radioimmunoassay. Pretreatment with rolipram decreased the duration of ventricular tachycardia without any change in the incidences of dysrhythmias or the mortality rate. This drug did not modify ventricular content of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) or guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP). Pimobendan (1 mg kg(-1) + 0.1 mg kg(-1) min) decreased the duration of ventricular tachycardia. This dose of pimobendan and zaprinast (1 mg kg(-1) + 0.1 mg kg(-1) min(-1)) increased the incidence rate of ventricular fibrillation following coronary artery ligation and the mortality rate. Moreover, both drugs increased cGMP in the ventricle. The results demonstrated that pimobendan and zaprinast increased the incidence of dysrhythmias and the mortality rate, which was accompanied by an increase in the ventricular content of cGMP. Rolipram decreased the duration of ventricular tachycardia without a change in the cyclic nucleotide content or in the mortality rate.

  5. Regulation of hERG and hEAG channels by Src and by SHP-1 tyrosine phosphatase via an ITIM region in the cyclic nucleotide binding domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyanne C Schlichter

    Full Text Available Members of the EAG K(+ channel superfamily (EAG/Kv10.x, ERG/Kv11.x, ELK/Kv12.x subfamilies are expressed in many cells and tissues. In particular, two prototypes, EAG1/Kv10.1/KCNH1 and ERG1/Kv11.1/KCNH2 contribute to both normal and pathological functions. Proliferation of numerous cancer cells depends on hEAG1, and in some cases, hERG. hERG is best known for contributing to the cardiac action potential, and for numerous channel mutations that underlie 'long-QT syndrome'. Many cells, particularly cancer cells, express Src-family tyrosine kinases and SHP tyrosine phosphatases; and an imbalance in tyrosine phosphorylation can lead to malignancies, autoimmune diseases, and inflammatory disorders. Ion channel contributions to cell functions are governed, to a large degree, by post-translational modulation, especially phosphorylation. However, almost nothing is known about roles of specific tyrosine kinases and phosphatases in regulating K(+ channels in the EAG superfamily. First, we show that tyrosine kinase inhibitor, PP1, and the selective Src inhibitory peptide, Src40-58, reduce the hERG current amplitude, without altering its voltage dependence or kinetics. PP1 similarly reduces the hEAG1 current. Surprisingly, an 'immuno-receptor tyrosine inhibitory motif' (ITIM is present within the cyclic nucleotide binding domain of all EAG-superfamily members, and is conserved in the human, rat and mouse sequences. When tyrosine phosphorylated, this ITIM directly bound to and activated SHP-1 tyrosine phosphatase (PTP-1C/PTPN6/HCP; the first report that a portion of an ion channel is a binding site and activator of a tyrosine phosphatase. Both hERG and hEAG1 currents were decreased by applying active recombinant SHP-1, and increased by the inhibitory substrate-trapping SHP-1 mutant. Thus, hERG and hEAG1 currents are regulated by activated SHP-1, in a manner opposite to their regulation by Src. Given the widespread distribution of these channels, Src and SHP

  6. Multifunctionality of a Picornavirus Polymerase Domain: Nuclear Localization Signal and Nucleotide Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer-Orta, Cristina; de la Higuera, Ignacio; Caridi, Flavia; Sánchez-Aparicio, María Teresa; Moreno, Elena; Perales, Celia; Singh, Kamalendra; Sarafianos, Stefan G.; Sobrino, Francisco; Domingo, Esteban

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The N-terminal region of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 3D polymerase contains the sequence MRKTKLAPT (residues 16 to 24) that acts as a nuclear localization signal. A previous study showed that substitutions K18E and K20E diminished the transport to the nucleus of 3D and 3CD and severely impaired virus infectivity. These residues have also been implicated in template binding, as seen in the crystal structures of different 3D-RNA elongation complexes. Here, we report the biochemical and structural characterization of different mutant polymerases harboring substitutions at residues 18 and 20, in particular, K18E, K18A, K20E, K20A, and the double mutant K18A K20A (KAKA). All mutant enzymes exhibit low RNA binding activity, low processivity, and alterations in nucleotide recognition, including increased incorporation of ribavirin monophosphate (RMP) relative to the incorporation of cognate nucleotides compared with the wild-type enzyme. The structural analysis shows an unprecedented flexibility of the 3D mutant polymerases, including both global rearrangements of the closed-hand architecture and local conformational changes at loop β9-α11 (within the polymerase motif B) and at the template-binding channel. Specifically, in 3D bound to RNA, both K18E and K20E induced the opening of new pockets in the template channel where the downstream templating nucleotide at position +2 binds. The comparisons of free and RNA-bound enzymes suggest that the structural rearrangements may occur in a concerted mode to regulate RNA replication, processivity, and fidelity. Thus, the N-terminal region of FMDV 3D that acts as a nuclear localization signal (NLS) and in template binding is also involved in nucleotide recognition and can affect the incorporation of nucleotide analogues. IMPORTANCE The study documents multifunctionality of a nuclear localization signal (NLS) located at the N-terminal region of the foot-and-mouth disease viral polymerase (3D). Amino acid

  7. Penile Erection Induced by Scoparone from Artemisia capillaris through the Nitric Oxide-Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bo Ram; Kim, Hye Kyung; Park, Jong Kwan

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the relaxant effect of scoparone from Artemisia capillaris on rabbit penile corpus cavernosum smooth muscle (PCCSM) and to elucidate the mechanism of action of scoparone for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED). PCCSM that had been precontracted with phenylephrine was treated with 3 Artemisia herbs (A. princeps, A. capillaris, and A. iwayomogi) and 3 fractions (n-hexane, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol) with different concentrations (0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/mL). Four components (esculetin, scopoletin, capillarisin, and scoparone) isolated from A. capillaris were also evaluated. The PCCSM was preincubated with Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME) and 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ). Cyclic nucleotides in the perfusate were measured by a radioimmunoassay. The interactions of scoparone with udenafil and rolipram were also evaluated. A. capillaris extract relaxed PCCSM in a concentration-dependent manner. Scoparone had the highest relaxant effect on PCCSM among the 4 components (esculetin, scopoletin, capillarisin, and scoparone) isolated from the ethyl acetate fraction. The application of scoparone on PCCSM pretreated with L-NAME and ODQ led to significantly less relaxation. Scoparone also increased the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels in the perfusate in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, scoparone enhanced udenafil- and rolipram-induced relaxation of the PCCSM. Scoparone relaxed the PCCSM mainly by activating the nitric oxide-cGMP signaling pathway, and it may be a new promising treatment for ED patients who do not completely respond to udenafil.

  8. Investigation of using wavelet analysis for classifying pattern of cyclic voltammetry signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jityen, Arthit; Juagwon, Teerasak; Jaisuthi, Rawat; Osotchan, Tanakorn

    2017-09-01

    Wavelet analysis is an excellent technique for data processing analysis based on linear vector algebra since it has an ability to perform local analysis and is able to analyze an unspecific localized area of a large signal. In this work, the wavelet analysis of cyclic waveform was investigated in order to find the distinguishable feature from the cyclic data. The analyzed wavelet coefficients were proposed to be used as selected cyclic feature parameters. The cyclic voltammogram (CV) of different electrodes consisting of carbon nanotube (CNT) and several types of metal phthalocyanine (MPc) including CoPc, FePc, ZnPc and MnPc powders was used as several sets of cyclic data for various types of coffee. The mixture powder was embedded in a hollow Teflon rod and used as working electrodes. Electrochemical response of the fabricated electrodes in Robusta, blend coffee I, blend coffee II, chocolate malt and cocoa at the same concentrations was measured with scanning rate of 0.05V/s from -1.5 to 1.5V respectively to Ag/AgCl electrode for five scanning loops. The CV of blended CNT electrode with some MPc electrodes indicated the ionic interaction which can be the effect of catalytic oxidation of saccharides and/or polyphenol on the sensor surface. The major information of CV response can be extracted by using several mother wavelet families viz. daubechies (dB1 to dB3), coiflets (coiflet1), biorthogonal (Bior1.1) and symlets (sym2) and then the discrimination of these wavelet coefficients of each data group can be separated by principal component analysis (PCA). The PCA results indicated the clearly separate groups with total contribution more than 62.37% representing from PC1 and PC2.

  9. Ric-8A, a Gα protein guanine nucleotide exchange factor potentiates taste receptor signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire J Fenech

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Taste receptors for sweet, bitter and umami tastants are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs. While much effort has been devoted to understanding G-protein-receptor interactions and identifying the components of the signalling cascade downstream of these receptors, at the level of the G-protein the modulation of receptor signal transduction remains relatively unexplored. In this regard a taste-specific regulator of G-protein signaling (RGS, RGS21, has recently been identified. To study whether guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs are involved in the transduction of the signal downstream of the taste GPCRs we investigated the expression of Ric-8A and Ric-8B in mouse taste cells and their interaction with G-protein subunits found in taste buds. Mammalian Ric-8 proteins were initially identified as potent GEFs for a range of Gα subunits and Ric-8B has recently been shown to amplify olfactory signal transduction. We find that both Ric-8A and Ric-8B are expressed in a large portion of taste bud cells and that most of these cells contain IP3R-3 a marker for sweet, umami and bitter taste receptor cells. Ric-8A interacts with Gα-gustducin and Gαi2 through which it amplifies the signal transduction of hTas2R16, a receptor for bitter compounds. Overall, these findings are consistent with a role for Ric-8 in mammalian taste signal transduction.

  10. cAMP control of HCN2 channel Mg2+ block reveals loose coupling between the cyclic nucleotide-gating ring and the pore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex K Lyashchenko

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-regulated HCN channels underlie the Na+-K+ permeable IH pacemaker current. As with other voltage-gated members of the 6-transmembrane KV channel superfamily, opening of HCN channels involves dilation of a helical bundle formed by the intracellular ends of S6 albeit this is promoted by inward, not outward, displacement of S4. Direct agonist binding to a ring of cyclic nucleotide-binding sites, one of which lies immediately distal to each S6 helix, imparts cAMP sensitivity to HCN channel opening. At depolarized potentials, HCN channels are further modulated by intracellular Mg2+ which blocks the open channel pore and blunts the inhibitory effect of outward K+ flux. Here, we show that cAMP binding to the gating ring enhances not only channel opening but also the kinetics of Mg2+ block. A combination of experimental and simulation studies demonstrates that agonist acceleration of block is mediated via acceleration of the blocking reaction itself rather than as a secondary consequence of the cAMP enhancement of channel opening. These results suggest that the activation status of the gating ring and the open state of the pore are not coupled in an obligate manner (as required by the often invoked Monod-Wyman-Changeux allosteric model but couple more loosely (as envisioned in a modular model of protein activation. Importantly, the emergence of second messenger sensitivity of open channel rectification suggests that loose coupling may have an unexpected consequence: it may endow these erstwhile "slow" channels with an ability to exert voltage and ligand-modulated control over cellular excitability on the fastest of physiologically relevant time scales.

  11. Generation of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate and cyclic ADP-ribose by glucagon-like peptide-1 evokes Ca2+ signal that is essential for insulin secretion in mouse pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Ju; Park, Kwang-Hyun; Yim, Chang-Yeol; Takasawa, Shin; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Im, Mie-Jae; Kim, Uh-Hyun

    2008-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) increases intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)), resulting in insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells. The molecular mechanism(s) of the GLP-1-mediated regulation of [Ca(2+)](i) was investigated. GLP-1-induced changes in [Ca(2+)](i) were measured in beta-cells isolated from Cd38(+/+) and Cd38(-/-) mice. Calcium-mobilizing second messengers were identified by measuring levels of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) and cyclic ADP-ribose (ADPR), using a cyclic enzymatic assay. To locate NAADP- and cyclic ADPR-producing enzyme(s), cellular organelles were separated using the sucrose gradient method. A GLP-1-induced [Ca(2+)](i) increase showed a cooperative Ca(2+) signal, i.e., an initial [Ca(2+)](i) rise mediated by the action of NAADP that was produced in acidic organelles and a subsequent long-lasting increase of [Ca(2+)](i) by the action of cyclic ADPR that was produced in plasma membranes and secretory granules. GLP-1 sequentially stimulated production of NAADP and cyclic ADPR in the organelles through protein kinase A and cAMP-regulated guanine nucleotide exchange factor II. Furthermore, the results showed that NAADP production from acidic organelles governed overall Ca(2+) signals, including insulin secretion by GLP-1, and that in addition to CD38, enzymes capable of synthesizing NAADP and/or cyclic ADPR were present in beta-cells. These observations were supported by the study with Cd38(-/-) beta-cells, demonstrating production of NAADP, cyclic ADPR, and Ca(2+) signal with normal insulin secretion stimulated by GLP-1. Our findings demonstrate that the GLP-1-mediated Ca(2+) signal for insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells is a cooperative action of NAADP and cyclic ADPR spatiotemporally formed by multiple enzymes.

  12. No relationship between 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase and schizophrenia in the Chinese Han population: an expression study and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhao

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 2',3'-Cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNP, one of the promising candidate genes for schizophrenia, plays a key part in the oligodendrocyte function and in myelination. The present study aims to investigate the relationship between CNP and schizophrenia in the Chinese population and the effect of different factors on the expression level of CNP in schizophrenia. Methods Five CNP single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were investigated in a Chinese Han schizophrenia case-control sample set (n = 180 using direct sequencing. The results were included in the following meta-analysis. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR was conducted to examine CNP expression levels in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Results Factors including gender, genotype, sub-diagnosis and antipsychotics-treatment were found not to contribute to the expression regulation of the CNP gene in schizophrenia. Our meta-analysis produced similar negative results. Conclusion The results suggest that the CNP gene may not be involved in the etiology and pathology of schizophrenia in the Chinese population.

  13. Altered CD38/Cyclic ADP-Ribose Signaling Contributes to the Asthmatic Phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph A. Jude

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available CD38 is a transmembrane glycoprotein expressed in airway smooth muscle cells. The enzymatic activity of CD38 generates cyclic ADP-ribose from β-NAD. Cyclic ADP-ribose mobilizes intracellular calcium during activation of airway smooth muscle cells by G-protein-coupled receptors through activation of ryanodine receptor channels in the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Inflammatory cytokines that are implicated in asthma upregulate CD38 expression and increase the calcium responses to contractile agonists in airway smooth muscle cells. The augmented intracellular calcium responses following cytokine exposure of airway smooth muscle cells are inhibited by an antagonist of cyclic ADP-ribose. Airway smooth muscle cells from CD38 knockout mice exhibit attenuated intracellular calcium responses to agonists, and these mice have reduced airway response to inhaled methacholine. CD38 also contributes to airway hyperresponsiveness as shown in mouse models of allergen or cytokine-induced inflammatory airway disease. In airway smooth muscle cells obtained from asthmatics, the cytokine-induced CD38 expression is significantly enhanced compared to expression in cells from nonasthmatics. This differential induction of CD38 expression in asthmatic airway smooth muscle cells stems from increased activation of MAP kinases and transcription through NF-κB, and altered post-transcriptional regulation through microRNAs. We propose that increased capacity for CD38 signaling in airway smooth muscle in asthma contributes to airway hyperresponsiveness.

  14. Protein cysteine S-guanylation and electrophilic signal transduction by endogenous nitro-nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Khandaker Ahtesham; Sawa, Tomohiro; Akaike, Takaaki

    2011-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a gaseous free radical that is synthesized in organisms by nitric oxide synthases, participates in a critical fashion in the regulation of diverse physiological functions such as vascular and neuronal signal transduction, host defense, and cell death regulation. Two major pathways of NO signaling involve production of the second messenger guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) and posttranslational modification (PTM) of redox-sensitive cysteine thiols of proteins. We recently clarified the physiological formation of 8-nitroguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-nitro-cGMP) as the first demonstration, since the discovery of cGMP more than 40 years ago, of a new second messenger derived from cGMP in mammals. 8-Nitro-cGMP is electrophilic and reacts efficiently with sulfhydryls of proteins to produce a novel PTM via cGMP adduction, a process that we named protein S-guanylation. 8-Nitro-cGMP may regulate electrophilic signaling on the basis of its electrophilicity through induction of S-guanylation of redox sensor proteins. Examples include S-guanylation of the redox sensor protein Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), which leads to activation of NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-dependent expression of antioxidant and cytoprotective genes. This S-guanylation-mediated activation of an antioxidant adaptive response may play an important role in cytoprotection during bacterial infections and oxidative stress. Identification of new redox-sensitive proteins as targets for S-guanylation may help development of novel therapeutics for oxidative stress- and inflammation-related disorders and vascular diseases as well as understanding of cellular protection against oxidative stress.

  15. Plasma concentrations of the cyclic nucleotides, adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and guanosine 3'.5'-monophosphate, in healthy adults treated with theophylline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, M; Eriksen, P B; Andersen, O

    1982-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate were measured in 10 health adults before, during and after periods of theophylline administration. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate concentrations did not change significantly, but cyclic guanosine monophosph......Plasma concentrations of cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate were measured in 10 health adults before, during and after periods of theophylline administration. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate concentrations did not change significantly, but cyclic guanosine...... monophosphate concentrations decreased by 29% on average when theophylline was administered. The change in cyclic guanosine monophosphate was not correlated to the plasma concentration of theophylline in the range studied....

  16. P2Y2 Nucleotide Receptor Prompts Human Cardiac Progenitor Cell Activation by Modulating Hippo Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalafalla, Farid G; Greene, Steven; Khan, Hashim; Ilves, Kelli; Monsanto, Megan M; Alvarez, Roberto; Chavarria, Monica; Nguyen, Jonathan; Norman, Benjamin; Dembitsky, Walter P; Sussman, Mark A

    2017-11-10

    Autologous stem cell therapy using human c-Kit+ cardiac progenitor cells (hCPCs) is a promising therapeutic approach for treatment of heart failure (HF). However, hCPCs derived from aged patients with HF with genetic predispositions and comorbidities of chronic diseases exhibit poor proliferative and migratory capabilities, which impair overall reparative potential for injured myocardium. Therefore, empowering functionally compromised hCPCs with proregenerative molecules ex vivo is crucial for improving the therapeutic outcome in patients with HF. To improve hCPC proliferation and migration responses that are critical for regeneration by targeting proregenerative P2Y2 nucleotide receptor (P2Y2R) activated by extracellular ATP and UTP molecules released following injury/stress. c-Kit+ hCPCs were isolated from cardiac tissue of patients with HF undergoing left ventricular assist device implantation surgery. Correlations between P2 nucleotide receptor expression and hCPC growth kinetics revealed downregulation of select P2 receptors, including P2Y2R, in slow-growing hCPCs compared with fast growers. hCPC proliferation and migration significantly improved by overexpressing or stimulating P2Y2R. Mechanistically, P2Y2R-induced proliferation and migration were dependent on activation of YAP (yes-associated protein)-the downstream effector of Hippo signaling pathway. Proliferation and migration of functionally impaired hCPCs are enhanced by P2Y2R-mediated YAP activation, revealing a novel link between extracellular nucleotides released during injury/stress and Hippo signaling-a central regulator of cardiac regeneration. Functional correlations exist between hCPC phenotypic properties and P2 purinergic receptor expression. Lack of P2Y2R and other crucial purinergic stress detectors could compromise hCPC responsiveness to presence of extracellular stress signals. These findings set the stage for subsequent studies to assess purinergic signaling modulation as a potential

  17. Stability of 2 ',3 ' and 3 ',5 ' cyclic nucleotides in formamide and in water: a theoretical insight into the factors controlling the accumulation of nucleic acid building blocks in a prebiotic pool

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cassone, Giuseppe; Šponer, Jiří; Saija, F.; Di Mauro, E.; Saitta, A. M.; Šponer, Judit E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 3 (2017), s. 1817-1825 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12010S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : density-functional theory * liquid formamide * 2,3-cyclic nucleotides * molecular-dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016

  18. Mechanisms of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases in modulating T cell responses in murine graft-versus-host disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Weber

    Full Text Available Graft-versus-host disease (GvHD is a key contributor to the morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoetic stem cell transplantation (HSCT. Regulatory Foxp3(+ CD4(+ T cells (Treg suppress conventional T cell activation and can control GvHD. In our previous work, we demonstrate that a basic mechanism of Treg mediated suppression occurs by the transfer of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP to responder cells. Whether this mechanism is relevant for Treg mediated suppression of GvHD is currently unknown. To address this question, bone marrow and T cells from C57BL/6 mice were transferred into lethally irradiated BALB/c recipients, and the course of GvHD and survival were monitored. Transplanted recipients developed severe GvHD that was strongly ameliorated by the transfer of donor Treg cells. Towards the underlying mechanisms, in vitro studies revealed that Treg communicated with DCs via gap junctions, resulting in functional inactivation of DC by a metabolic pathway involving cAMP that is modulated by the phosphodiesterase (PDE 4 inhibitor rolipram. PDE2 or PDE3 inhibitors as well as rolipram suppressed allogeneic T cell activation, indirectly by enhancing Treg mediated suppression of DC activation and directly by inhibiting responder T cell proliferation. In line with this, we observed a cooperative suppression of GvHD upon Treg transfer and additional rolipram treatment. In conclusion, we propose that an important pathway of Treg mediated control of GvHD is based on a cAMP dependent mechanism. These data provide the basis for future concepts to manipulate allogeneic T cell responses to prevent GvHD.

  19. Plasma concentrations of the cyclic nucleotides, adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and guanosine 3'.5'-monophosphate, in healthy adults treated with theophylline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, M; Eriksen, P B; Nielsen, M K

    1982-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate were measured in 10 health adults before, during and after periods of theophylline administration. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate concentrations did not change significantly, but cyclic guanosine...... monophosphate concentrations decreased by 29% on average when theophylline was administered. The change in cyclic guanosine monophosphate was not correlated to the plasma concentration of theophylline in the range studied....

  20. Effects of Cyclic Thermal Load on the Signal Characteristics of FBG Sensors Packaged with Epoxy Adhesives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Heonyoung; Kang, Donghoon [Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Fiber optics sensors that have been mainly applied to aerospace areas are now finding applicability in other areas, such as transportation, including railways. Among the sensors, the fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors have led to a steep increase due to their properties of absolute measurement and multiplexing capability. Generally, the FBG sensors adhere to structures and sensing modules using adhesives such as an epoxy. However, the measurement errors that occurred when the FBG sensors were used in a long-term application, where they were exposed to environmental thermal load, required calibration. For this reason, the thermal curing of adhesives needs to be investigated to enhance the reliability of the FBG sensor system. This can be done at room temperature through cyclic thermal load tests using four types of specimens. From the test results, it is confirmed that residual compressive strain occurs to the FBG sensors due to an initial cyclic thermal load. In conclusion, signals of the FBG sensors need to be stabilized for applying them to a long-term SHM.

  1. 2',3'-Cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase as a messenger of protection of the mitochondrial function during melatonin treatment in aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baburina, Yulia; Odinokova, Irina; Azarashvili, Tamara; Akatov, Vladimir; Lemasters, John J; Krestinina, Olga

    2017-01-01

    The process of aging is considered to be tightly related to mitochondrial dysfunction. One of the causes of aging is an increased sensitivity to the induction of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening in the inner membrane of mitochondria. Melatonin, a natural antioxidant, is a hormone produced by the pineal gland. The role of melatonin whose level decreases with aging is well understood. In the present study, we demonstrated that long-term treatment of aged rats with melatonin improved the functional state of mitochondria; thus, the Ca(2+) capacity was enhanced and mitochondrial swelling was deaccelerated in mitochondria. Melatonin prevented mPTP and impaired the release of cytochrome c and 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) from mitochondria of both young and aged rats. Our data suggest that melatonin retains СNPase inside mitochondria, thereby providing the protection of the protein against deleterious effects of 2',3'-cAMP in aging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Expression, purification, and initial characterization of different domains of recombinant mouse 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase, an enigmatic enzyme from the myelin sheath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kursula Petri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase is an enigmatic enzyme specifically expressed at high levels in the vertebrate myelin sheath, whose function and physiological substrates are unknown. The protein consists of two domains: an uncharacterized N-terminal domain with little homology to other proteins, and a C-terminal phosphodiesterase domain. Findings In order to be able to fully characterize CNPase structurally and functionally, we have set up expression systems for different domains of CNPase, using a total of 18 different expression constructs. CNPase was expressed in E. coli with a TEV-cleavable His-tag. Enzymatic activity assays indicated that the purified proteins were active and correctly folded. The folding of both the full-length protein, as well as the N- and C-terminal domains, was also studied by synchrotron CD spectroscopy. A thermal shift assay was used to optimize buffer compositions to be used during purification and storage. The assay also indicated that CNPase was most stable at a pH of 5.5, and could be significantly stabilized by high salt concentrations. Conclusions We have been able to express and purify recombinantly several different domains of CNPase, including the isolated N-terminal domain, which is folded mainly into a β-sheet structure. The expression system can be used as an efficient tool to elucidate the role of CNPase in the myelin sheath.

  3. [Effects of total coumarins, essential oil and water extracts of Cnidium monnieri on plasma prostaglandin and cyclic nucleotide in the rats of kidney-yang insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, L P; Wu, H; Zhou, Q H

    1993-02-01

    Effects of total coumarins, essential oil and water extracts of Cnidium monnieri on plasma prostaglandin (PGE2 and PGF2 alpha) and cyclic nucleotide levels in rats of Kidney-Yang insufficiency were studied. 55 rats were divided randomly into 5 groups, Group I was administered orally with saline (normal group), group II was injected with intraperitonally hydrocortison acetate to induce Kidney-Yang insufficiency (control group), group III, group IV and group V (experimental groups) were injected with hydrocortison acetate, the same as group II, and administered orally with the total coumarins, essential oil and water extracts of Fructus Cnidii respectively. The levels of plasma PGE2, PG2 alpha and plasma cAMP, cGMP were measured. In group II, in comparing with those of group I, the levels of plasma PGE2, and PGF2 alpha decreased significantly (P Cnidium monnieri are probably the effective ingredients to invigorate Kidney and strengthen Yang, while the efficacy of essential oil remained unconfirmed.

  4. Influence of metabolism modifiers of cyclic nucleotides on contractility of right ventricle of rat heart with intact and removed endocardial endothelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Slađana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Endocardial endothelium, a natural biological barrier between circulating blood in heart ventricle and cells, creates a complex yet finely tuned balance of interactions with the immediate environment. Objective. We investigated the roles of theophylline, nonspecific phosphodiesterase inhibitor, and imidazole, an activator of phosphodiesterase on contractility of the right ventricle of rat heart, with intact and removed endocardial endothelium. Methods. Adult rats, of both sexes, type Wistar albino, were used in this experiment. All experiments were conducted on the preparations of the right ventricle using two experimental models. In the first experimental model, an endocardial endothelium (EE was preserved, and in the second model, an endocardial endothelium (-EE was removed using 1% solution Triton X-100. Results. Theophylline (1x10-2 mol/l expressed the positive inotropic effect on the heart, regardless of the presence of the endocardial endothelium. Inotropic response as multiple process can be induced by inhibition of phosphodiesterase, accumulation of cyclic nucleotides and activation of Ca2+ channels. Imidazole (2x10-3 mol/l increased the contractility of the right ventricle of the heart with EE. The modulator effect of endocardial endothelium on contractility of imidazole proved to be significant. As imidazole influenced the contractility of the right ventricle only in the presence of the endocardial endothelium, it is assumed that its effect is mediated via deliverance of endothelial mediators with positive inotropic effect. Conclusion. An intact endocardial endothelium is necessary for completion of contractile performance of the heart.

  5. From drought sensing to developmental control: evolution of cyclic AMP signaling in social amoebas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Allyson V; van Es, Saskia; Fouquet, Celine; Schaap, Pauline

    2008-10-01

    Amoebas and other protists commonly encyst when faced with environmental stress. Although little is known of the signaling pathways that mediate encystation, the analogous process of spore formation in dictyostelid social amoebas is better understood. In Dictyostelium discoideum, secreted cyclic AMP (cAMP) mediates the aggregation of starving amoebas and induces the differentiation of prespore cells. Intracellular cAMP acting on cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) triggers the maturation of spores and prevents their germination under the prevalent conditions of high osmolality in the spore head. The osmolyte-activated adenylate cyclase, ACG, produces cAMP for prespore differentiation and inhibition of spore germination. To retrace the origin of ACG function, we investigated ACG gene conservation and function in species that span the dictyostelid phylogeny. ACG genes, osmolyte-activated ACG activity, and osmoregulation of spore germination were detected in species that represent the 4 major groups of Dictyostelia. Unlike the derived species D. discoideum, many basal Dictyostelia have retained the ancestral mechanism of encystation from solitary amoebas. In these species and in solitary amoebas, encystation is independently triggered by starvation or by high osmolality. Osmolyte-induced encystation was accompanied by an increase in cAMP and prevented by inhibition of PKA, indicating that ACG and PKA activation mediate this response. We propose that high osmolality signals drought in soil amoebas and that developmental cAMP signaling in the Dictyostelia has evolved from this stress response.

  6. Non-cyclic geometric phase of nuclear quadrupole resonance signals of powdered samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glotova, O; Ponamareva, N; Sinyavsky, N; Nogaj, B

    2011-01-01

    The non-cyclic geometric phase of ¹⁴N and ³⁵Cl NQR signals induced by the character of trajectory of nuclear magnetization motion upon pulse r.f. excitation of powdered samples is studied. Analytical expressions for the geometric phases of NQR signals of the nuclei of spins I=1 and 3/2 upon nuclear magnetization rotation induced by means of r.f. pulses with frequency detuned from the resonance and for any impulse duration for a separate crystallite are obtained. It is shown that the geometric phase recorded for the signal from a powdered sample at Δω=0 can be different from zero and can oscillate upon changes in duration of the r.f. excitation pulse. An alternative variant of the nutation experiment aimed at obtaining the asymmetry parameter η from locations of frequency singularities in the nutation phase spectrum for nuclei of spin I=3/2 in powder substances is proposed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The cyclic-di-GMP signaling pathway in the Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Novak

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In nature, the Lyme disease spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi cycles between the unrelated environments of the Ixodes tick vector and mammalian host. In order to survive transmission between hosts, B. burgdorferi must be able to not only detect changes in its environment, but also rapidly and appropriately respond to these changes. One manner in which this obligate parasite regulates and adapts to its changing environment is through cyclic-di-GMP (c-di-GMP signaling. c-di-GMP has been shown to be instrumental in orchestrating the adaptation of B. burgdorferi to the tick environment. B. burgdorferi possesses only one set of c-di-GMP-metabolizing genes (one diguanylate cyclase and two distinct phosphodiesterases and one c-di-GMP-binding PilZ-domain protein designated as PlzA. While studies in the realm of c-di-GMP signaling in B. burgdorferi have exploded in the last few years, there are still many more questions than answers. Elucidation of the importance of c-di-GMP signaling to B. burgdorferi may lead to the identification of mechanisms that are critical for the survival of B. burgdorferi in the tick phase of the enzootic cycle as well as potentially delineate a role (if any c-di-GMP may play in the transmission and virulence of B. burgdorferi during the enzootic cycle, thereby enabling the development of effective drugs for the prevention and/or treatment of Lyme disease.

  8. Cyclic mechanical strain maintains Nanog expression through PI3K/Akt signaling in mouse embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiuchi, Rie [Division of Regenerative Medical Engineering, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Akimoto, Takayuki, E-mail: akimoto@m.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Division of Regenerative Medical Engineering, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 513 Waseda-tsurumaki, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-0041 (Japan); Hong, Zhang [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Consolidated Research Institute for Advanced Science and Medical Care, Waseda University, 513 Waseda-tsurumaki, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-0041 (Japan); Ushida, Takashi [Division of Regenerative Medical Engineering, Center for Disease Biology and Integrative Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    Mechanical strain has been reported to affect the proliferation/differentiation of many cell types; however, the effects of mechanotransduction on self-renewal as well as pluripotency of embryonic stem (ES) cells remains unknown. To investigate the effects of mechanical strain on mouse ES cell fate, we examined the expression of Nanog, which is an essential regulator of self-renewal and pluripotency as well as Nanog-associated intracellular signaling during uniaxial cyclic mechanical strain. The mouse ES cell line, CCE was plated onto elastic membranes, and we applied 10% strain at 0.17 Hz. The expression of Nanog was reduced during ES cell differentiation in response to the withdrawal of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF); however, two days of cyclic mechanical strain attenuated this reduction of Nanog expression. On the other hand, the cyclic mechanical strain promoted PI3K-Akt signaling, which is reported as an upstream of Nanog transcription. The cyclic mechanical strain-induced Akt phosphorylation was blunted by the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. Furthermore, cytochalasin D, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, also inhibited the mechanical strain-induced increase in phospho-Akt. These findings imply that mechanical force plays a role in regulating Nanog expression in ES cells through the actin cytoskeleton-PI3K-Akt signaling. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The expression of Nanog, which is an essential regulator of 'stemness' was reduced during embryonic stem (ES) cell differentiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyclic mechanical strain attenuated the reduction of Nanog expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyclic mechanical strain promoted PI3K-Akt signaling and mechanical strain-induced Akt phosphorylation was blunted by the PI3K inhibitor and an inhibitor of actin polymerization.

  9. Cyclic GMP is involved in auxin signalling during Arabidopsis root growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Wenbin; Wang, Xiaomin; Yang, Lei; Hu, Yanfeng; Wei, Yuantao; Liang, Xiaolei; Mao, Lina; Bi, Yurong

    2014-04-01

    The second messenger cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) plays an important role in plant development and responses to stress. Recent studies indicated that cGMP is a secondary signal generated in response to auxin stimulation. cGMP also mediates auxin-induced adventitious root formation in mung bean and gravitropic bending in soybean. Nonetheless, the mechanism of the participation of cGMP in auxin signalling to affect these growth and developmental processes is largely unknown. In this report we provide evidence that indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) induces cGMP accumulation in Arabidopsis roots through modulation of the guanylate cyclase activity. Application of 8-bromo-cGMP (a cell-permeable cGMP derivative) increases auxin-dependent lateral root formation, root hair development, primary root growth, and gene expression. In contrast, inhibitors of endogenous cGMP synthesis block these processes induced by auxin. Data also showed that 8-bromo-cGMP enhances auxin-induced degradation of Aux/IAA protein modulated by the SCF(TIR1) ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Furthermore, it was found that 8-bromo-cGMP is unable to directly influence the auxin-dependent TIR1-Aux/IAA interaction as evidenced by pull-down and yeast two-hybrid assays. In addition, we provide evidence for cGMP-mediated modulation of auxin signalling through cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG). Our results suggest that cGMP acts as a mediator to participate in auxin signalling and may govern this process by PKG activity via its influence on auxin-regulated gene expression and auxin/IAA degradation.

  10. Identification, characterization, and structure analysis of the cyclic di-AMP-binding PII-like signal transduction protein DarA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundlach, Jan; Dickmanns, Achim; Schröder-Tittmann, Kathrin; Neumann, Piotr; Kaesler, Jan; Kampf, Jan; Herzberg, Christina; Hammer, Elke; Schwede, Frank; Kaever, Volkhard; Tittmann, Kai; Stülke, Jörg; Ficner, Ralf

    2015-01-30

    The cyclic dimeric AMP nucleotide c-di-AMP is an essential second messenger in Bacillus subtilis. We have identified the protein DarA as one of the prominent c-di-AMP receptors in B. subtilis. Crystal structure analysis shows that DarA is highly homologous to PII signal transducer proteins. In contrast to PII proteins, the functionally important B- and T-loops are swapped with respect to their size. DarA is a homotrimer that binds three molecules of c-di-AMP, each in a pocket located between two subunits. We demonstrate that DarA is capable to bind c-di-AMP and with lower affinity cyclic GMP-AMP (3'3'-cGAMP) but not c-di-GMP or 2'3'-cGAMP. Consistently the crystal structure shows that within the ligand-binding pocket only one adenine is highly specifically recognized, whereas the pocket for the other adenine appears to be promiscuous. Comparison with a homologous ligand-free DarA structure reveals that c-di-AMP binding is accompanied by conformational changes of both the fold and the position of the B-loop in DarA. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Identification, Characterization, and Structure Analysis of the Cyclic di-AMP-binding PII-like Signal Transduction Protein DarA*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundlach, Jan; Dickmanns, Achim; Schröder-Tittmann, Kathrin; Neumann, Piotr; Kaesler, Jan; Kampf, Jan; Herzberg, Christina; Hammer, Elke; Schwede, Frank; Kaever, Volkhard; Tittmann, Kai; Stülke, Jörg; Ficner, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The cyclic dimeric AMP nucleotide c-di-AMP is an essential second messenger in Bacillus subtilis. We have identified the protein DarA as one of the prominent c-di-AMP receptors in B. subtilis. Crystal structure analysis shows that DarA is highly homologous to PII signal transducer proteins. In contrast to PII proteins, the functionally important B- and T-loops are swapped with respect to their size. DarA is a homotrimer that binds three molecules of c-di-AMP, each in a pocket located between two subunits. We demonstrate that DarA is capable to bind c-di-AMP and with lower affinity cyclic GMP-AMP (3′3′-cGAMP) but not c-di-GMP or 2′3′-cGAMP. Consistently the crystal structure shows that within the ligand-binding pocket only one adenine is highly specifically recognized, whereas the pocket for the other adenine appears to be promiscuous. Comparison with a homologous ligand-free DarA structure reveals that c-di-AMP binding is accompanied by conformational changes of both the fold and the position of the B-loop in DarA. PMID:25433025

  12. Azithromycin Modulates 3',5'-cyclic Diguanylic Acid Signaling in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Soichiro; Mori, Nobuaki; Kai, Toshihiro; Ishii, Yoshikazu; Yamaguchi, Keizo; Tateda, Kazuhiro

    2017-08-01

    Macrolides have been reported to exert a variety of effects on both host immunomodulation and repression of bacterial pathogenicity. In this study, we report that the 3',5'-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP) signaling system, which regulates virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is affected by the macrolide azithromycin. Using DNA microarray analysis, we selected a gene encoding PA2567 related to c-di-GMP metabolism that was significantly affected by azithromycin treatment. Expression of the PA2567 gene was significantly repressed by azithromycin in a time- and dose-dependent manner, whereas no difference in PA2567 gene expression was observed in the absence of azithromycin. In-frame deletion of the PA2567 gene affected both virulence factors and the quorum-sensing system, and significantly decreased total bacteria in a mouse pneumonia model compared to the wild-type strain (P < 0.05). These results suggest that macrolides possess the ability to modulate c-di-GMP intracellular signaling in P. aeruginosa. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Selected Melanocortin 1 Receptor Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms Differentially Alter Multiple Signaling Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, J. R.; Fortin, J. P.; Beinborn, M.

    2012-01-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) is a highly polymorphic G protein-coupled receptor, which is known to modulate pigmentation and inflammation. In the current study, we investigated the pharmacological effects of select single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (V60L, R163Q, and F196L). After transient expression of MC1Rs in human embryonic kidney 293 cells, basal and ligand-induced cAMP signaling and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation were assessed by using luciferase reporter gene assays and Western blot analysis, respectively. All receptor variants showed decreased basal cAMP activity. With the V60L and F196L variants, the decrease in constitutive activity was attributable, at least in part, to a reduction in surface expression. The F196L variant also displayed a significant reduction in potency for both the peptide agonist α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) and the small-molecule agonist 1-[1-(3-methyl-l-histidyl-O-methyl-d-tyrosyl)-4-phenyl-4-piperidinyl]-1-butanone (BMS-470539). In MAPK signaling assays, the F196L variant showed decreased phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase levels after stimulation with either α-MSH or BMS-470539. In contrast, the R163Q variant displayed a selective loss of α-MSH-induced MAPK activation; whereas responsiveness to the small-molecule agonist BMS-470539 was preserved. Further assessment of MC1R variants in A549 cells, an in vitro model of inflammation, revealed an enhanced inflammatory response resulting from expression of the F196L variant (versus the wild-type MC1R). This alteration in function was restored by treatment with BMS-470539. Overall, these studies illustrate novel signaling profiles linked to distinct MC1R SNPs. Furthermore, our investigations highlight the potential for small-molecule drugs to rescue the function of MC1R variants that show reduced basal and/or α-MSH stimulated activity. PMID:22547573

  14. Single nucleotide polymorphisms within interferon signaling pathway genes are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility and survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Lu

    Full Text Available Interferon (IFN signaling has been suggested to play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Our study aimed to examine potentially functional genetic variants in interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3, IRF5, IRF7, type I and type II IFN and their receptor genes with respect to colorectal cancer (CRC risk and clinical outcome. Altogether 74 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were covered by the 34 SNPs genotyped in a hospital-based case-control study of 1327 CRC cases and 758 healthy controls from the Czech Republic. We also analyzed these SNPs in relation to overall survival and event-free survival in a subgroup of 483 patients. Seven SNPs in IFNA1, IFNA13, IFNA21, IFNK, IFNAR1 and IFNGR1 were associated with CRC risk. After multiple testing correction, the associations with the SNPs rs2856968 (IFNAR1 and rs2234711 (IFNGR1 remained formally significant (P = 0.0015 and P<0.0001, respectively. Multivariable survival analyses showed that the SNP rs6475526 (IFNA7/IFNA14 was associated with overall survival of the patients (P = 0.041 and event-free survival among patients without distant metastasis at the time of diagnosis, P = 0.034. The hazard ratios (HRs for rs6475526 remained statistically significant even after adjustment for age, gender, grade and stage (P = 0.029 and P = 0.036, respectively, suggesting that rs6475526 is an independent prognostic marker for CRC. Our data suggest that genetic variation in the IFN signaling pathway genes may play a role in the etiology and survival of CRC and further studies are warranted.

  15. Single nucleotide polymorphisms within interferon signaling pathway genes are associated with colorectal cancer susceptibility and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shun; Pardini, Barbara; Cheng, Bowang; Naccarati, Alessio; Huhn, Stefanie; Vymetalkova, Veronika; Vodickova, Ludmila; Buchler, Thomas; Hemminki, Kari; Vodicka, Pavel; Försti, Asta

    2014-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) signaling has been suggested to play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. Our study aimed to examine potentially functional genetic variants in interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), IRF5, IRF7, type I and type II IFN and their receptor genes with respect to colorectal cancer (CRC) risk and clinical outcome. Altogether 74 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were covered by the 34 SNPs genotyped in a hospital-based case-control study of 1327 CRC cases and 758 healthy controls from the Czech Republic. We also analyzed these SNPs in relation to overall survival and event-free survival in a subgroup of 483 patients. Seven SNPs in IFNA1, IFNA13, IFNA21, IFNK, IFNAR1 and IFNGR1 were associated with CRC risk. After multiple testing correction, the associations with the SNPs rs2856968 (IFNAR1) and rs2234711 (IFNGR1) remained formally significant (P = 0.0015 and P<0.0001, respectively). Multivariable survival analyses showed that the SNP rs6475526 (IFNA7/IFNA14) was associated with overall survival of the patients (P = 0.041 and event-free survival among patients without distant metastasis at the time of diagnosis, P = 0.034). The hazard ratios (HRs) for rs6475526 remained statistically significant even after adjustment for age, gender, grade and stage (P = 0.029 and P = 0.036, respectively), suggesting that rs6475526 is an independent prognostic marker for CRC. Our data suggest that genetic variation in the IFN signaling pathway genes may play a role in the etiology and survival of CRC and further studies are warranted.

  16. Joint Channel Estimation and Signal Detection for the OFDM System Without Cyclic Prefix Over Doubly-Selective Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Lijun; Lei, Xia; Jin, Maozhu; Lv, Zhihan

    2015-12-01

    In the high-speed railway wireless communication, a joint channel estimation and signal detection algorithm is proposed for the orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) system without cyclic prefix in the doubly-selective fading channels. Our proposed method first combines the basis expansion model (BEM) and the inter symbol interference (ISI) cancellation to overcome the situation that exists with the fast time-varying channel and the normalized maximum multipath channel exceeding the length of the cyclic prefix (CP). At first, the channel estimation and signal detection can be approximated without considering the ISI. Then, the channel parameters and signal detection are updated through ISI cancellation and circular convolution reconstruction from the frequency domain. The simulations show the algorithm can improve the performance of channel estimation and signal detection.

  17. Maturation and processing of the amyloid precursor protein is regulated by the potassium/sodium hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel 2 (HCN2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frykman, Susanne; Inoue, Mitsuhiro; Ikeda, Atsushi; Teranishi, Yasuhiro; Kihara, Takahiro; Lundgren, Jolanta L; Yamamoto, Natsuko G; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Winblad, Bengt; Schedin-Weiss, Sophia; Tjernberg, Lars O

    2017-01-29

    The toxic amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) is a key player in Alzheimer Disease (AD) pathogenesis and selective inhibition of the production of this peptide is sought for. Aβ is produced by the sequential cleavage of the Aβ precursor protein (APP) by β-secretase (to yield APP-C-terminal fragment β (APP-CTFβ) and soluble APPβ (sAPPβ)) and γ-secretase (to yield Aβ). We reasoned that proteins that associate with γ-secretase are likely to regulate Aβ production and to be targets of pharmaceutical interventions and therefore performed a pull-down assay to screen for such proteins in rat brain. Interestingly, one of the purified proteins was potassium/sodium hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel 2 (HCN2), which has been shown to be involved in epilepsy. We found that silencing of HCN2 resulted in decreased secreted Aβ levels. To further investigate the mechanism behind this reduction, we also determined the levels of full-length APP, sAPP and APP-CTF species after silencing of HCN2. A marked reduction in sAPP and APP-CTF, as well as glycosylated APP levels was detected. Decreased Aβ, sAPP and APP-CTF levels were also detected after treatment with the HCN2 inhibitor ZD7288. These results indicate that the effect on Aβ levels after HCN2 silencing or inhibition is due to altered APP maturation or processing by β-secretase rather than a direct effect on γ-secretase. However, HCN2 and γ-secretase were found to be in close proximity, as evident by proximity ligation assay and immunoprecipitation. In summary, our results indicate that silencing or inhibition of HCN2 affects APP processing and thereby could serve as a potential treatment strategy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Contribution of large-sized primary sensory neuronal sensitization to mechanical allodynia by upregulation of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated channels via cyclooxygenase 1 cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei; Yang, Fei; Wang, Yan; Fu, Han; Yang, Yan; Li, Chun-Li; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Lin, Qing; Chen, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Under physiological state, small- and medium-sized dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons are believed to mediate nociceptive behavioral responses to painful stimuli. However, recently it has been found that a number of large-sized neurons are also involved in nociceptive transmission under neuropathic conditions. Nonetheless, the underlying mechanisms that large-sized DRG neurons mediate nociception are poorly understood. In the present study, the role of large-sized neurons in bee venom (BV)-induced mechanical allodynia and the underlying mechanisms were investigated. Behaviorally, it was found that mechanical allodynia was still evoked by BV injection in rats in which the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1-positive DRG neurons were chemically deleted. Electrophysiologically, in vitro patch clamp recordings of large-sized neurons showed hyperexcitability in these neurons. Interestingly, the firing pattern of these neurons was changed from phasic to tonic under BV-inflamed state. It has been suggested that hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide gated channels (HCN) expressed in large-sized DRG neurons contribute importantly to repeatedly firing. So we examined the roles of HCNs in BV-induced mechanical allodynia. Consistent with the overexpression of HCN1/2 detected by immunofluorescence, HCNs-mediated hyperpolarization activated cation current (Ih) was significantly increased in the BV treated samples. Pharmacological experiments demonstrated that the hyperexcitability and upregulation of Ih in large-sized neurons were mediated by cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1)-prostaglandin E2 pathway. This is evident by the fact that the COX-1 inhibitor significantly attenuated the BV-induced mechanical allodynia. These results suggest that BV can excite the large-sized DRG neurons at least in part by increasing Ih through activation of COX-1. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of ZD7288, a hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channel blocker, on term-pregnant rat uterine contractility in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Mohammed; Kahlat, Karima; Nedjadi, Taoufik; Djouhri, Laiche

    2017-03-01

    The uterus is a myogenic organ that is able to produce discrete spontaneous action potentials and contractions without any stimuli. Myometrial excitability is governed by ion channels including Ca+2 and K+ channels, but whether or not other channels such as hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, which play an important role in regulating cellular excitability, are also involved has not been reported in uterine smooth muscles. The aim of the present study was to examine whether blocking HCN channels with a specific blocker ZD7288 would modulate the uterine contractility in a rat model. Using longitudinal uterine strips from term-pregnant rats, the effects of varying concentrations of ZD7288 (50 μM, 100 μM, and 200 μM) were examined on uterine contractions generated spontaneously or by oxytocin (5 nmol/L) and on uterine strips depolarized by high-KCl (60 mM/L), or activated by L-type Ca2+ channels agonist (Bay K8644; 1 μM). Application of ZD7288 at concentrations of 200 μM and 100 μM, but not 50 μM, significantly decreased the amplitude of spontaneous uterine contractions. In addition, 200 μM of ZD7288 significantly reduced the force of contractions induced by oxytocin with a pronounced reduction while the tissues were depolarized by high-KCl solution, or activated by Bay K8644. The present study provides pharmacological evidence suggesting that pregnant uterine contractility is modulated by HCN channels and that these channels might represent a therapeutic target for controlling premature activation of uterine activity associated with preterm labor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The cyclic nucleotide gated cation channel AtCNGC10 traffics from the ER via Golgi vesicles to the plasma membrane of Arabidopsis root and leaf cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andres Marilou A

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels (CNGCs maintain cation homeostasis essential for a wide range of physiological processes in plant cells. However, the precise subcellular locations and trafficking of these membrane proteins are poorly understood. This is further complicated by a general deficiency of information about targeting pathways of membrane proteins in plants. To investigate CNGC trafficking and localization, we have measured Atcngc5 and Atcngc10 expression in roots and leaves, analyzed AtCNGC10-GFP fusions transiently expressed in protoplasts, and conducted immunofluorescence labeling of protoplasts and immunoelectron microscopic analysis of high pressure frozen leaves and roots. Results AtCNGC10 mRNA and protein levels were 2.5-fold higher in roots than leaves, while AtCNGC5 mRNA and protein levels were nearly equal in these tissues. The AtCNGC10-EGFP fusion was targeted to the plasma membrane in leaf protoplasts, and lightly labeled several intracellular structures. Immunofluorescence microscopy with affinity purified CNGC-specific antisera indicated that AtCNGC5 and AtCNGC10 are present in the plasma membrane of protoplasts. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that AtCNGC10 was associated with the plasma membrane of mesophyll, palisade parenchyma and epidermal cells of leaves, and the meristem, columella and cap cells of roots. AtCNCG10 was also observed in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi cisternae and vesicles of 50–150 nm in size. Patch clamp assays of an AtCNGC10-GFP fusion expressed in HEK293 cells measured significant cation currents. Conclusion AtCNGC5 and AtCNGC10 are plasma membrane proteins. We postulate that AtCNGC10 traffics from the endoplasmic reticulum via the Golgi apparatus and associated vesicles to the plasma membrane. The presence of the cation channel, AtCNGC10, in root cap meristem cells, cell plate, and gravity-sensing columella cells, combined with the previously reported

  1. Role of 2′,3′-cyclic nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase in the renal 2′,3′-cAMP-adenosine pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Delbert G.; Mi, Zaichuan; Cheng, Dongmei; Bansal, Rashmi; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Kochanek, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Energy depletion increases the renal production of 2′,3′-cAMP (a positional isomer of 3′,5′-cAMP that opens mitochondrial permeability transition pores) and 2′,3′-cAMP is converted to 2′-AMP and 3′-AMP, which in turn are metabolized to adenosine. Because the enzymes involved in this “2′,3′-cAMP-adenosine pathway” are unknown, we examined whether 2′,3′-cyclic nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) participates in the renal metabolism of 2′,3′-cAMP. Western blotting and real-time PCR demonstrated expression of CNPase in rat glomerular mesangial, preglomerular vascular smooth muscle and endothelial, proximal tubular, thick ascending limb and collecting duct cells. Real-time PCR established the expression of CNPase in human glomerular mesangial, proximal tubular and vascular smooth muscle cells; and the level of expression of CNPase was greater than that for phosphodiesterase 4 (major enzyme for the metabolism of 3′,5′-cAMP). Overexpression of CNPase in rat preglomerular vascular smooth muscle cells increased the metabolism of exogenous 2′,3′-cAMP to 2′-AMP. Infusions of 2′,3′-cAMP into isolated CNPase wild-type (+/+) kidneys increased renal venous 2′-AMP, and this response was diminished by 63% in CNPase knockout (−/−) kidneys, whereas the conversion of 3′,5′-cAMP to 5′-AMP was similar in CNPase +/+ vs. −/− kidneys. In CNPase +/+ kidneys, energy depletion (metabolic poisons) increased kidney tissue levels of adenosine and its metabolites (inosine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, and uric acid) without accumulation of 2′,3′-cAMP. In contrast, in CNPase −/− kidneys, energy depletion increased kidney tissue levels of 2′,3′-cAMP and abolished the increase in adenosine and its metabolites. In conclusion, kidneys express CNPase, and renal CNPase mediates in part the renal 2′,3′-cAMP-adenosine pathway. PMID:24808540

  2. Nucleotide variants of genes encoding components of the Wnt signalling pathway and the risk of non-syndromic tooth agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostowska, A; Biedziak, B; Zadurska, M; Dunin-Wilczynska, I; Lianeri, M; Jagodzinski, P P

    2013-11-01

    Tooth agenesis is one of the most common dental anomalies, with a complex and not yet fully elucidated aetiology. Given the crucial role of the Wnt signalling pathway during tooth development, the purpose of this study was to determine whether nucleotide variants of genes encoding components of this signalling pathway might be associated with hypodontia and oligodontia in the Polish population. A set of 34 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) in 13 WNT and WNT-related genes were analyzed in a group of 157 patients with tooth agenesis and a properly matched control group (n = 430). In addition, direct sequencing was performed to detect mutations in the MSX1, PAX9 and WNT10A genes. Both single-marker and haplotype analyses showed highly significant association between SNPs in the WNT10A gene and the risk for tooth agenesis. Moreover, nine pathogenic mutations within the coding region of the WNT10A gene were identified in 26 out of 42 (62%) tested patients. One novel heterozygous mutation was identified in the PAX9 gene. Borderline association with the risk of non-syndromic tooth agenesis was also observed for the APC, CTNNB1, DVL2 and WNT11 polymorphisms. In conclusion, nucleotide variants of genes encoding important components of the Wnt signalling pathway might influence the risk of tooth agenesis. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 activation in endothelial cells exposed to cyclic strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, M.; Takei, T.; Mills, I.; Kito, H.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/ERK2) are activated and might play a role in enhanced proliferation and morphological change induced by strain. Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) were subjected to an average of 6 or 10% strain at a rate of 60 cycles/min for up to 4 h. Cyclic strain caused strain- and time-dependent phosphorylation and activation of ERK1/ERK2. Peak phosphorylation and activation of ERK1/ERK2 induced by 10% strain were at 10 min. A specific ERK1/ERK2 kinase inhibitor, PD-98059, inhibited phosphorylation and activation of ERK1/ERK2 but did not inhibit the increased cell proliferation and cell alignment induced by strain. Treatment of BAEC with 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1, 4-benzohydroquinone, to deplete inositol trisphosphate-sensitive calcium storage, and gadolinium chloride, a Ca2+ channel blocker, did not inhibit the activation of ERK1/ERK2. Strain-induced ERK1/ERK2 activation was partly inhibited by the protein kinase C inhibitor calphostin C and completely inhibited by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein. These data suggest that 1) ERK1/ERK2 are not critically involved in the strain-induced cell proliferation and orientation, 2) strain-dependent activation of ERK1/ERK2 is independent of intracellular and extracellular calcium mobilization, and 3) protein kinase C activation and tyrosine kinase regulate strain-induced activation of ERK1/ERK2.

  4. Blau syndrome polymorphisms in NOD2 identify nucleotide hydrolysis and helical domain 1 as signalling regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhouse, Rhiannon; Boyle, Joseph P; Monie, Tom P

    2014-09-17

    Understanding how single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) lead to disease at a molecular level provides a starting point for improved therapeutic intervention. SNPs in the innate immune receptor nucleotide oligomerisation domain 2 (NOD2) can cause the inflammatory disorders Blau Syndrome (BS) and early onset sarcoidosis (EOS) through receptor hyperactivation. Here, we show that these polymorphisms cluster into two primary locations: the ATP/Mg(2+)-binding site and helical domain 1. Polymorphisms in these two locations may consequently dysregulate ATP hydrolysis and NOD2 autoinhibition, respectively. Complementary mutations in NOD1 did not mirror the NOD2 phenotype, which indicates that NOD1 and NOD2 are activated and regulated by distinct methods. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT): appearance of an actress on the stage of purinergic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Yoshinori; Hiasa, Miki; Sakamoto, Shohei; Omote, Hiroshi; Nomura, Masatoshi

    2017-06-14

    Vesicular storage of ATP is one of the processes initiating purinergic chemical transmission. Although an active transport mechanism was postulated to be involved in the processes, a transporter(s) responsible for the vesicular storage of ATP remained unidentified for some time. In 2008, SLC17A9, the last identified member of the solute carrier 17 type I inorganic phosphate transporter family, was found to encode the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) that is responsible for the vesicular storage of ATP. VNUT transports various nucleotides in a membrane potential-dependent fashion and is expressed in the various ATP-secreting cells. Mice with knockout of the VNUT gene lose vesicular storage and release of ATP from neurons and neuroendocrine cells, resulting in blockage of the initiation of purinergic chemical transmission. Thus, VNUT plays an essential role in the vesicular storage and release of ATP. The VNUT knockout mice exhibit resistance for neuropathic pain and a therapeutic effect against diabetes by way of increased insulin sensitivity. Thus, VNUT inhibitors and suppression of VNUT gene expression may be used for therapeutic purposes through suppression of purinergic chemical transmission. This review summarizes the studies to date on VNUT and discusses what we have learned about the relevance of vesicular ATP release as a potential drug target.

  6. Objective models of EMG signals for cyclic processes such as a human gait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babska, Luiza; Selegrat, Monika; Dusza, Jacek J.

    2016-09-01

    EMG signals are small potentials appearing at the surface of human skin during muscle work. They arise due to changes in the physiological state of cell membranes in the muscle fibers. They are characterized by a relatively low frequency range (500 Hz) and a low amplitude signal (of the order of μV), making it difficult to record. Raw EMG signal is inherently random shape. However we can distinguish certain features related to the activation of the muscles of a deterministic or quasi-deterministic associated with the movement and its parametric description. Objective models of EMG signals were created on the base of actual data obtained from the VICON system installed at the University of Physical Education in Warsaw. The object of research (healthy woman) moved repeatedly after a fixed track. On her body 35 reflective markers to record the gait kinematics and 8 electrodes to record EMG signals were placed. We obtained research data included more than 1,000 EMG signals synchronized with the phases of gait. Test result of the work is an algorithm for obtaining the average EMG signal received from the multiple registration gait cycles carried out in the same reproducible conditions. The method described in the article is essentially a pre-finding measurement data from the two quasi-synchronous signals at different sampling frequencies for further processing. This signal is characterized by a significant reduction of high frequency noise and emphasis on the specific characteristics of individual records found in muscle activity.

  7. Association of single nucleotide polymorphisms in Wnt signaling pathway genes with breast cancer in Saudi patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saud Alanazi

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a complex heterogeneous disease involving genetic and epigenetic alterations in genes encoding proteins that are components of various signaling pathways. Candidate gene approach have identified association of genetic variants in the Wnt signaling pathway genes and increased susceptibility to several diseases including breast cancer. Due to the rarity of somatic mutations in key genes of Wnt pathway, we investigated the association of genetic variants in these genes with predisposition to breast cancers. We performed a case-control study to identify risk variants by examining 15 SNPs located in 8 genes associated with Wnt signaling. Genotypic analysis of individual locus showed statistically significant association of five SNPs located in β-catenin, AXIN2, DKK3, SFRP3 and TCF7L2 with breast cancers. Increased risk was observed only with the SNP in β-catenin while the other four SNPs conferred protection against breast cancers. Majority of these associations persisted after stratification of the cases based on estrogen receptor status and age of on-set of breast cancer. The rs7775 SNP in exon 6 of SFRP3 gene that codes for either arginine or glycine exhibited very strong association with breast cancer, even after Bonferroni's correction. Apart from these five variants, rs3923086 in AXIN2 and rs3763511 in DKK4 that did not show any association in the overall population were significantly associated with early on-set and estrogen receptor negative breast cancers, respectively. This is the first study to utilize pathway based approach to identify association of risk variants in the Wnt signaling pathway genes with breast cancers. Confirmation of our findings in larger populations of different ethnicities would provide evidence for the role of Wnt pathway as well as screening markers for early detection of breast carcinomas.

  8. Structures of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin, two snake-venom cysteine-rich secretory proteins that target cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels: implications for movement of the C-terminal cysteine-rich domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Nobuhiro [Department of Applied Biochemistry, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); Yamazaki, Yasuo [Department of Biochemistry, Meiji Pharmaceutical University, Kiyose, Tokyo 204-8588 (Japan); Brown, R. Lane [Neurological Science Institute, Oregon Health and Science University, Beaverton, Oregon 97006 (United States); Fujimoto, Zui [Department of Biochemistry, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); Morita, Takashi, E-mail: tmorita@my-pharm.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, Meiji Pharmaceutical University, Kiyose, Tokyo 204-8588 (Japan); Mizuno, Hiroshi, E-mail: tmorita@my-pharm.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); VALWAY Technology Center, NEC Soft Ltd, Koto-ku, Tokyo 136-8627 (Japan); Institute for Biological Resources and Functions, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Central 6, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8566 (Japan); Department of Applied Biochemistry, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan)

    2008-10-01

    The structures of pseudechetoxin and pseudecin suggest that both proteins bind to cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels in a manner in which the concave surface occludes the pore entrance. Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) ion channels play pivotal roles in sensory transduction by retinal photoreceptors and olfactory neurons. The elapid snake toxins pseudechetoxin (PsTx) and pseudecin (Pdc) are the only known protein blockers of CNG channels. These toxins belong to a cysteine-rich secretory protein (CRISP) family containing an N-terminal pathogenesis-related proteins of group 1 (PR-1) domain and a C-terminal cysteine-rich domain (CRD). PsTx and Pdc are highly homologous proteins, but their blocking affinities on CNG channels are different: PsTx blocks both the olfactory and retinal channels with ∼15–30-fold higher affinity than Pdc. To gain further insights into their structure and function, the crystal structures of PsTx, Pdc and Zn{sup 2+}-bound Pdc were determined. The structures revealed that most of the amino-acid-residue differences between PsTx and Pdc are located around the concave surface formed between the PR-1 domain and the CRD, suggesting that the concave surface is functionally important for CNG-channel binding and inhibition. A structural comparison in the presence and absence of Zn{sup 2+} ion demonstrated that the concave surface can open and close owing to movement of the CRD upon Zn{sup 2+} binding. The data suggest that PsTx and Pdc occlude the pore entrance and that the dynamic motion of the concave surface facilitates interaction with the CNG channels.

  9. Cyclic Di-GMP Signaling Contributes to Pseudomonas aeruginosa-Mediated Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Stephanie J; Lee, Vincent T

    2015-07-20

    Bis-(3'-5') cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) controls the lifestyle transition between the sessile and motile states in many Gram-negative bacteria, including the opportunistic human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Under laboratory conditions, high concentrations of c-di-GMP decrease motility and promote biofilm formation, while low concentrations of c-di-GMP promote motility and decease biofilm formation. Here we sought to determine the contribution of c-di-GMP signaling to biofilm formation during P. aeruginosa-mediated catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI). Using a murine CAUTI model, a decrease in CFU was detected in the bladders and kidneys of mice infected with strains overexpressing the phosphodiesterases (PDEs) encoded by PA3947 and PA2133 compared to those infected with wild-type P. aeruginosa. Conversely, overexpression of the diguanylate cyclases (DGCs) encoded by PA3702 and PA1107 increased the number of bacteria in bladder and significantly increased dissemination of bacteria to the kidneys compared to wild-type infection. To determine which of the DGCs and PDEs contribute to c-di-GMP signaling during infection, a panel of PA14 in-frame deletion mutants lacking DGCs and PDEs were tested in the CAUTI model. Results from these infections revealed five mutants, three containing GGDEF domains (ΔPA14_26970, ΔPA14_72420, and ΔsiaD) and two containing dual GGDEF-EAL domains (ΔmorA and ΔPA14_07500), with decreased colonization of the bladder and dissemination to the kidneys. These results indicate that c-di-GMP signaling influences P. aeruginosa-mediated biofilms during CAUTI. Biofilm-based infections are an important cause of nosocomial infections, since they resist the immune response and traditional antibiotic treatment. Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is a second messenger that promotes biofilm formation in many Gram-negative pathogens, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here we determined the contribution of c-di-GMP signaling to catheter

  10. Neuropeptidergic Signaling in the American Lobster Homarus americanus: New Insights from High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Andrew E; Chi, Megan; Lameyer, Tess J; Pascual, Micah G; Shea, Devlin N; Stanhope, Meredith E; Schulz, David J; Dickinson, Patsy S

    2015-01-01

    Peptides are the largest and most diverse class of molecules used for neurochemical communication, playing key roles in the control of essentially all aspects of physiology and behavior. The American lobster, Homarus americanus, is a crustacean of commercial and biomedical importance; lobster growth and reproduction are under neuropeptidergic control, and portions of the lobster nervous system serve as models for understanding the general principles underlying rhythmic motor behavior (including peptidergic neuromodulation). While a number of neuropeptides have been identified from H. americanus, and the effects of some have been investigated at the cellular/systems levels, little is currently known about the molecular components of neuropeptidergic signaling in the lobster. Here, a H. americanus neural transcriptome was generated and mined for sequences encoding putative peptide precursors and receptors; 35 precursor- and 41 receptor-encoding transcripts were identified. We predicted 194 distinct neuropeptides from the deduced precursor proteins, including members of the adipokinetic hormone-corazonin-like peptide, allatostatin A, allatostatin C, bursicon, CCHamide, corazonin, crustacean cardioactive peptide, crustacean hyperglycemic hormone (CHH), CHH precursor-related peptide, diuretic hormone 31, diuretic hormone 44, eclosion hormone, FLRFamide, GSEFLamide, insulin-like peptide, intocin, leucokinin, myosuppressin, neuroparsin, neuropeptide F, orcokinin, pigment dispersing hormone, proctolin, pyrokinin, SIFamide, sulfakinin and tachykinin-related peptide families. While some of the predicted peptides are known H. americanus isoforms, most are novel identifications, more than doubling the extant lobster neuropeptidome. The deduced receptor proteins are the first descriptions of H. americanus neuropeptide receptors, and include ones for most of the peptide groups mentioned earlier, as well as those for ecdysis-triggering hormone, red pigment concentrating hormone

  11. The Structural Basis of Cyclic Diguanylate Signal Transduction by PilZ Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benach,J.; Swaminathan, S.; Tamayo, R.; Handelman, S.; Folta-Stogniew, E.; Ramos, J.; Forouhar, F.; Neely, H.; Seetharaman, J.; et al

    2007-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) controls the transition between motile and sessile growth in eubacteria, but little is known about the proteins that sense its concentration. Bioinformatics analyses suggested that PilZ domains bind c-di-GMP and allosterically modulate effector pathways. We have determined a 1.9 Angstroms crystal structure of c-di-GMP bound to VCA0042/PlzD, a PilZ domain-containing protein from Vibrio cholerae. Either this protein or another specific PilZ domain-containing protein is required for V. cholerae to efficiently infect mice. VCA0042/PlzD comprises a C-terminal PilZ domain plus an N-terminal domain with a similar beta-barrel fold. C-di-GMP contacts seven of the nine strongly conserved residues in the PilZ domain, including three in a seven-residue long N-terminal loop that undergoes a conformational switch as it wraps around c-di-GMP. This switch brings the PilZ domain into close apposition with the N-terminal domain, forming a new allosteric interaction surface that spans these domains and the c-di-GMP at their interface. The very small size of the N-terminal conformational switch is likely to explain the facile evolutionary diversification of the PilZ domain.

  12. Cyclic lipopeptide iturin A structure-dependently induces defense response in Arabidopsis plants by activating SA and JA signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawagoe, Yumi; Shiraishi, Soma; Kondo, Hiroko; Yamamoto, Shoko; Aoki, Yoshinao; Suzuki, Shunji

    2015-05-15

    Iturin A is the most well studied antifungal cyclic lipopeptide produced by Bacillus species that are frequently utilized as biological control agents. Iturin A not only shows strong antifungal activity against phytopathogens but also induces defense response in plants, thereby reducing plant disease severity. Here we report the defense signaling pathways triggered by iturin A in Arabidopsis salicylic acid (SA) or jasmonic acid (JA)-insensitive mutants. Iturin A activated the transcription of defense genes PR1 and PDF1.2 through the SA and JA signaling pathways, respectively. The role of iturin A as an elicitor was dependent on the cyclization of the seven amino acids and/or the β-hydroxy fatty acid chain. The iturin A derivative peptide, NH2-(L-Asn)-(D-Tyr)-(D-Asn)-(L-Gln)-(L-Pro)-(D-Asn)-(L-Ser)-COOH, completely suppressed PR1 and PDF1.2 gene expression in wild Arabidopsis plants. The identification of target molecules binding to iturin A and its derivative peptide is expected to shed new light on defense response in plants through the SA and JA signaling pathways. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Gene-based analysis of regulatory variants identifies 4 putative novel asthma risk genes related to nucleotide synthesis and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Manuel A R; Jansen, Rick; Willemsen, Gonneke; Penninx, Brenda; Bain, Lisa M; Vicente, Cristina T; Revez, Joana A; Matheson, Melanie C; Hui, Jennie; Tung, Joyce Y; Baltic, Svetlana; Le Souëf, Peter; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Robertson, Colin F; James, Alan; Thompson, Philip J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Hopper, John L; Hinds, David A; Werder, Rhiannon B; Phipps, Simon

    2017-04-01

    asthma and eQTLs for 4 genes related to nucleotide synthesis/signaling and demonstrated the power of gene-based analyses of GWASs. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cyclic programmed cell death stimulates hormone signaling and root development in Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xuan, Wei; Band, Leah R.; Kumpf, Robert P.; Rybel, De Bert

    2016-01-01

    The plant root cap, surrounding the very tip of the growing root, perceives and transmits environmental signals to the inner root tissues. In Arabidopsis thaliana, auxin released by the root cap contributes to the regular spacing of lateral organs along the primary root axis. Here, we show that

  15. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of the cyclic AMP-dependent signaling pathway during morphogenic transitions of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahn, Yong-Sun; Molenda, Matthew; Staab, Janet F; Lyman, Courtney A; Gordon, Laura J; Sundstrom, Paula

    2007-12-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen that causes systemic candidiasis as well as superficial mucosal candidiasis. In response to the host environment, C. albicans transitions between yeast and hyphal forms. In particular, hyphal growth is important in facilitating adhesion and invasion of host tissues, concomitant with the expression of various hypha-specific virulence factors. In previous work, we showed that the cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathway plays a crucial role in morphogenic transitions and virulence of C. albicans by studying genes encoding adenylate cyclase-associated protein (CAP1) and high-affinity phosphodiesterase (PDE2) (Y. S. Bahn, J. Staab, and P. Sundstrom, Mol. Microbiol. 50:391-409, 2003; and Y. S. Bahn and P. Sundstrom, J. Bacteriol. 183:3211-3223, 2001). However, little is known about the downstream targets of the cAMP signaling pathway that are responsible for morphological transitions and the expression of virulence factors. Here, microarrays were probed with RNA from strains with hypoactive (cap1/cap1 null mutant), hyperactive (pde2/pde2 null mutant), and wild-type cAMP signaling pathways to provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of virulence that are regulated by cAMP and that are related to the morphogenesis of C. albicans. Genes controlling metabolic specialization, cell wall structure, ergosterol/lipid biosynthesis, and stress responses were modulated by cAMP during hypha formation. Phenotypic traits predicted to be regulated by cAMP from the profiling results correlated with the relative strengths of the mutants when tested for resistance to azoles and subjected to heat shock stress and oxidative/nitrosative stress. The results from this study provide important insights into the role of the cAMP signaling pathway not only in morphogenic transitions of C. albicans but also for adaptation to stress and for survival during host infections.

  16. Convergence of major physiological stimuli for renin release on the Gs-alpha/cyclic adenosine monophosphate signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Mi; Briggs, Josephine P.

    2012-01-01

    Control of the renin system by physiological mechanisms such as the baroreceptor or the macula densa (MD) is characterized by asymmetry in that the capacity for renin secretion and expression to increase is much larger than the magnitude of the inhibitory response. The large stimulatory reserve of the renin–angiotensin system may be one of the causes for the remarkable salt-conserving power of the mammalian kidney. Physiological stimulation of renin secretion and expression relies on the activation of regulatory pathways that converge on the cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase A (cAMP/ PKA) pathway. Mice with selective Gs-alpha (Gsα) deficiency in juxtaglomerular granular cells show a marked reduction of basal renin secretion, and an almost complete unresponsiveness of renin release to furosemide, hydralazine, or isoproterenol. Cyclooxygenase-2 generating prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and prostacyclin (PGI2) in MD and thick ascending limb cells is one of the main effector systems utilizing Gsα-coupled receptors to stimulate the renin–angiotensin system. In addition, β-adrenergic receptors are critical for the expression of high basal levels of renin and for its release response to lowering blood pressure or MD sodium chloride concentration. Nitric oxide generated by nitric oxide synthases in the MD and in endothelial cells enhances cAMP-dependent signaling by stabilizing cAMP through cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent inhibition of phosphodiesterase 3. The stimulation of renin secretion by drugs that inhibit angiotensin II formation or action results from the convergent activation of cAMP probably through indirect augmentation of the activity of PGE2 and PGI2 receptors, β-adrenergic receptors, and nitric oxide. PMID:22124804

  17. Guanine Nucleotides in the Meiotic Maturation of Starfish Oocytes: Regulation of the Actin Cytoskeleton and of Ca2+ Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyozuka, Keiichiro; Chun, Jong T.; Puppo, Agostina; Gragnaniello, Gianni; Garante, Ezio; Santella, Luigia

    2009-01-01

    Background Starfish oocytes are arrested at the first prophase of meiosis until they are stimulated by 1-methyladenine (1-MA). The two most immediate responses to the maturation-inducing hormone are the quick release of intracellular Ca2+ and the accelerated changes of the actin cytoskeleton in the cortex. Compared with the later events of oocyte maturation such as germinal vesicle breakdown, the molecular mechanisms underlying the early events involving Ca2+ signaling and actin changes are poorly understood. Herein, we have studied the roles of G-proteins in the early stage of meiotic maturation. Methodology/Principal Findings By microinjecting starfish oocytes with nonhydrolyzable nucleotides that stabilize either active (GTPγS) or inactive (GDPβS) forms of G-proteins, we have demonstrated that: i) GTPγS induces Ca2+ release that mimics the effect of 1-MA; ii) GDPβS completely blocks 1-MA-induced Ca2+; iii) GDPβS has little effect on the amplitude of the Ca2+ peak, but significantly expedites the initial Ca2+ waves induced by InsP3 photoactivation, iv) GDPβS induces unexpectedly striking modification of the cortical actin networks, suggesting a link between the cytoskeletal change and the modulation of the Ca2+ release kinetics; v) alteration of cortical actin networks with jasplakinolide, GDPβS, or actinase E, all led to significant changes of 1-MA-induced Ca2+ signaling. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these results indicate that G-proteins are implicated in the early events of meiotic maturation and support our previous proposal that the dynamic change of the actin cytoskeleton may play a regulatory role in modulating intracellular Ca2+ release. PMID:19617909

  18. Guanine nucleotides in the meiotic maturation of starfish oocytes: regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and of Ca(2+ signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichiro Kyozuka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Starfish oocytes are arrested at the first prophase of meiosis until they are stimulated by 1-methyladenine (1-MA. The two most immediate responses to the maturation-inducing hormone are the quick release of intracellular Ca(2+ and the accelerated changes of the actin cytoskeleton in the cortex. Compared with the later events of oocyte maturation such as germinal vesicle breakdown, the molecular mechanisms underlying the early events involving Ca(2+ signaling and actin changes are poorly understood. Herein, we have studied the roles of G-proteins in the early stage of meiotic maturation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By microinjecting starfish oocytes with nonhydrolyzable nucleotides that stabilize either active (GTPgammaS or inactive (GDPbetaS forms of G-proteins, we have demonstrated that: i GTPgammaS induces Ca(2+ release that mimics the effect of 1-MA; ii GDPbetaS completely blocks 1-MA-induced Ca(2+; iii GDPbetaS has little effect on the amplitude of the Ca(2+ peak, but significantly expedites the initial Ca(2+ waves induced by InsP(3 photoactivation, iv GDPbetaS induces unexpectedly striking modification of the cortical actin networks, suggesting a link between the cytoskeletal change and the modulation of the Ca(2+ release kinetics; v alteration of cortical actin networks with jasplakinolide, GDPbetaS, or actinase E, all led to significant changes of 1-MA-induced Ca(2+ signaling. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, these results indicate that G-proteins are implicated in the early events of meiotic maturation and support our previous proposal that the dynamic change of the actin cytoskeleton may play a regulatory role in modulating intracellular Ca(2+ release.

  19. Constitutive activity of the A2A adenosine receptor and compartmentalised cyclic AMP signalling fine-tune noradrenaline release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrisimovic, Edin; Drobny, Helmut; Yang, Qiong; Höfer, Thomas; Boehm, Stefan; Nanoff, Christian; Schicker, Klaus

    2012-12-01

    Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y (SH) cells endogenously express A(2A) adenosine receptors and can be differentiated into a sympathetic neuronal phenotype, capable of depolarisation-dependent noradrenaline release. Using differentiated SH culture, we here explored the link between A(2A)-receptor signalling and neurotransmitter release. In response to the receptor agonist CGS21680, the cells produced cyclic AMP (cAMP), and when depolarised, they released increased amounts of noradrenaline. An A(2A)-receptor antagonist, XAC, as well as an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), H89, depressed agonist-dependent release. In the presence of XAC or H89, noradrenaline release was found to be below basal values. This suggested that release facilitation also owes to constitutive receptor activity. We demonstrate that even in the absence of an agonist, the native A(2A)-receptor stimulated cAMP production, leading to the activation of PKA and enhanced noradrenaline release. Ancillary, non-cAMP-dependent effects of the receptor (i.e. phosphorylation of CREB, of Rabphilin3A) were refractory to constitutive activation. PKA-dependent facilitation of noradrenaline release was recapitulated with membrane-permeable 8-Br-cAMP; in addition to facilitation, 8-Br-cAMP caused marked inhibition of release, an effect not observed upon receptor activation. Inhibition by receptor-independent cAMP was likely due to suppression of voltage-dependent calcium current (VDCC) and increased activity of Src-family kinases. Receptor-mediated release facilitation was reproduced in the presence of tetrodotoxin (blocking action potentials); hence, the signalling occurred at the active zone comprising release sites. Our findings thus support (1) presynaptic localisation of the A(2A)-receptor and (2) suggest that compartmentalised pathways transmit cAMP signalling in order to facilitate depolarisation-dependent neurotransmitter release.

  20. Regulation of Renin Release via Cyclic ADP-Ribose-Mediated Signaling: Evidence from Mice Lacking CD38 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Despite extensive studies, the intracellular regulatory mechanism of renin production and release is still poorly understood. The present study was designed to test whether CD38-ADP-ribosylcyclase signaling pathway contributes to the regulation of renin production and release, and to examine whether CD38 gene knockout (CD38-/- can change this important renal endocrinal function. Methods: ADP–ribosylcyclase activity was estimated utilizing HPLC, cADPR levels from western blot, plasma renin activity from RIA kit, urinary sodium and potassium excretion from fame photometry. Results: The expression of CD38 and the activity of ADP-ribosylcyclase to produce cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR were nearly abolished in the kidney from CD38-/- mice, indicating that CD38 gene is a major enzyme responsible for the generation of cADPR in vivo. Mice lacking CD38 gene showed increased plasma renin activity (PRA in either conscious or anesthetized status (P+/+ and CD38-/- mice. In acute experiments, it was demonstrated that plasma renin activity (PRA significantly increased upon isoprenaline infusion in CD38-/- mice compared to CD38+/+ mice. Accompanied with such increase in PRA, glomerular filtration rate (GFR, renal blood flow (RBF, urine volume (UV and sodium excretion (UNaV more significantly decreased in CD38-/- than CD38+/+ mice. Similarly, more increases in PRA but more decreases in GFR, RBF, UV and UNaV were observed in CD38-/- than CD38+/+ mice when they had a low renal perfusion pressure (RPP. Conclusion: CD38-cADPR-mediated signaling may importantly contribute to the maintenance of low PRA and participate in the regulation of renal hemodynamics and excretory function in mice.

  1. Main: Nucleotide Analysis [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available -acting regulatory DNA elements Database kome_place_search_result.zip kome_place_search_result ... ...Nucleotide Analysis PLACE search result Result of signal search against PLACE : cis

  2. A cyclic nucleotide-gated channel mutation associated with canine daylight blindness provides insight into a role for the S2 segment tri-Asp motif in channel biogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoto Tanaka

    Full Text Available Cone cyclic nucleotide-gated channels are tetramers formed by CNGA3 and CNGB3 subunits; CNGA3 subunits function as homotetrameric channels but CNGB3 exhibits channel function only when co-expressed with CNGA3. An aspartatic acid (Asp to asparagine (Asn missense mutation at position 262 in the canine CNGB3 (D262N subunit results in loss of cone function (daylight blindness, suggesting an important role for this aspartic acid residue in channel biogenesis and/or function. Asp 262 is located in a conserved region of the second transmembrane segment containing three Asp residues designated the Tri-Asp motif. This motif is conserved in all CNG channels. Here we examine mutations in canine CNGA3 homomeric channels using a combination of experimental and computational approaches. Mutations of these conserved Asp residues result in the absence of nucleotide-activated currents in heterologous expression. A fluorescent tag on CNGA3 shows mislocalization of mutant channels. Co-expressing CNGB3 Tri-Asp mutants with wild type CNGA3 results in some functional channels, however, their electrophysiological characterization matches the properties of homomeric CNGA3 channels. This failure to record heteromeric currents suggests that Asp/Asn mutations affect heteromeric subunit assembly. A homology model of S1-S6 of the CNGA3 channel was generated and relaxed in a membrane using molecular dynamics simulations. The model predicts that the Tri-Asp motif is involved in non-specific salt bridge pairings with positive residues of S3/S4. We propose that the D262N mutation in dogs with CNGB3-day blindness results in the loss of these inter-helical interactions altering the electrostatic equilibrium within in the S1-S4 bundle. Because residues analogous to Tri-Asp in the voltage-gated Shaker potassium channel family were implicated in monomer folding, we hypothesize that destabilizing these electrostatic interactions impairs the monomer folding state in D262N mutant CNG

  3. The gene product of a Trypanosoma equiperdum ortholog of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulatory subunit is a monomeric protein that is not capable of binding cyclic nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubis, José; Martínez, Juan Carlos; Calabokis, Maritza; Ferreira, Joilyneth; Sanz-Rodríguez, Carlos E; Navas, Victoria; Escalona, José Leonardo; Guo, Yurong; Taylor, Susan S

    2018-03-01

    The full gene sequence encoding for the Trypanosoma equiperdum ortholog of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) regulatory (R) subunits was cloned. A poly-His tagged construct was generated [TeqR-like(His) 8 ], and the protein was expressed in bacteria and purified to homogeneity. The size of the purified TeqR-like(His) 8 was determined to be ∼57,000 Da by molecular exclusion chromatography indicating that the parasite protein is a monomer. Limited proteolysis with various proteases showed that the T. equiperdum R-like protein possesses a hinge region very susceptible to proteolysis. The recombinant TeqR-like(His) 8 did not bind either [ 3 H] cAMP or [ 3 H] cGMP up to concentrations of 0.40 and 0.65 μM, respectively, and neither the parasite protein nor its proteolytically generated carboxy-terminal large fragments were capable of binding to a cAMP-Sepharose affinity column. Bioinformatics analyses predicted that the carboxy-terminal region of the trypanosomal R-like protein appears to fold similarly to the analogous region of all known PKA R subunits. However, the protein amino-terminal portion seems to be unrelated and shows homology with proteins that contained Leu-rich repeats, a folding motif that is particularly appropriate for protein-protein interactions. In addition, the three-dimensional structure of the T. equiperdum protein was modeled using the crystal structure of the bovine PKA R I α subunit as template. Molecular docking experiments predicted critical changes in the environment of the two putative nucleotide binding clefts of the parasite protein, and the resulting binding energy differences support the lack of cyclic nucleotide binding in the trypanosomal R-like protein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  4. Control of the Diadenylate Cyclase CdaS in Bacillus subtilis AN AUTOINHIBITORY DOMAIN LIMITS CYCLIC DI-AMP PRODUCTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehne, Felix M. P.; Schroeder-Tittmann, Kathrin; Eijlander, Robyn T.; Herzberg, Christina; Hewitt, Lorraine; Kaever, Volkhard; Lewis, Richard J.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Tittmann, Kai; Stuelke, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis encodes three diadenylate cyclases that synthesize the essential signaling nucleotide cyclic di-AMP. The activities of the vegetative enzymes DisA and CdaA are controlled by protein-protein interactions with their conserved partner proteins. Here, we

  5. Nucleotide Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Willemoës, M.; Kilstrup, Mogens

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic pathways are connected through their utilization of nucleotides as supplier of energy, allosteric effectors, and their role in activation of intermediates. Therefore, any attempt to exploit a given living organism in a biotechnological process will have an impact on nucleotide metabolism....... The aim of this article is to provide knowledge of nucleotide metabolism and its regulation to facilitate interpretation of data arising from genetics, proteomics, and transcriptomics in connection with biotechnological processes and beyond....

  6. Brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide exchange protein 3 is localized in lysosomes and regulates GABA signaling in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Li, Hongyu; Hong, Wanjin; Han, Weiping

    2016-12-01

    ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) family of guanine-nucleotide-binding (G) proteins regulates organelle biogenesis, structure and trafficking. The functions of ARF proteins are tightly controlled by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) containing a conserved SEC7 domain. Based on sequence similarity to brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide exchange protein (BIG)/GBF of the Arf-GEF family, we recently identified BIG3 as a novel ARF GEF protein with a non-functional catalytic motif in the SEC7 domain. BIG3 is mainly expressed in pancreatic islets and brain. In the islets, depletion of BIG3 increases insulin and glucagon secretion because of enhanced biogenesis of insulin and glucagon granules in the absence of BIG3. Here, we investigate BIG3 functions in the brain, in particular its regulation of neurotransmitter release in hippocampal neurons from wild-type and BIG3 knockout mice. In hippocampal neurons, BIG3 is mainly localized in lysosomes, and its depletion selectively impairs inhibitory synaptic transmission. Our finding provides novel insights for a cell-specific function of BIG3 in regulating neurotransmission. © 2016 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  7. Generalized Wideband Cyclic MUSIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang-Meng Liu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of Spectral Correlation-Signal Subspace Fitting (SC-SSF fails to separate wideband cyclostationary signals with coherent second-order cyclic statistics (SOCS. Averaged Cyclic MUSIC (ACM method made up for the drawback to some degree via temporally averaging the cyclic cross-correlation of the array output. This paper interprets ACM from another perspective and proposes a new DOA estimation method by generalizing ACM for wideband cyclostationary signals. The proposed method successfully makes up for the aforementioned drawback of SC-SSF and obtains a more satisfying performance than ACM. It is also demonstrated that ACM is a simplified form of the proposed method when only a single spectral frequency is exploited, and the integration of the frequencies within the signal bandwidth helps the new method to outperform ACM.

  8. Muscle A-Kinase Anchoring Protein-α is an Injury-Specific Signaling Scaffold Required for Neurotrophic- and Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate-Mediated Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophic factor and cAMP-dependent signaling promote the survival and neurite outgrowth of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs after injury. However, the mechanisms conferring neuroprotection and neuroregeneration downstream to these signals are unclear. We now reveal that the scaffold protein muscle A-kinase anchoring protein-α (mAKAPα is required for the survival and axon growth of cultured primary RGCs. Although genetic deletion of mAKAPα early in prenatal RGC development did not affect RGC survival into adulthood, nor promoted the death of RGCs in the uninjured adult retina, loss of mAKAPα in the adult increased RGC death after optic nerve crush. Importantly, mAKAPα was required for the neuroprotective effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and cyclic adenosine-monophosphate (cAMP after injury. These results identify mAKAPα as a scaffold for signaling in the stressed neuron that is required for RGC neuroprotection after optic nerve injury.

  9. High-level activation of cyclic AMP signaling attenuates bone morphogenetic protein 2-induced sympathoadrenal lineage development and promotes melanogenesis in neural crest cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ming; Andrisani, Ourania M

    2005-06-01

    The intensity of cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling is a differential instructive signal in neural crest (NC) cell specification. By an unknown mechanism, sympathoadrenal lineage specification is suppressed by high-level activation of cAMP signaling. In NC cultures, high-level activation of cAMP signaling mediates protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent Rap1-B-Raf-ERK1/2 activation, leading to cytoplasmic accumulation of phospho-Smad1, thus terminating bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2)-induced sympathoadrenal cell development. Concurrently, cAMP signaling induces transcription of the melanocyte-determining transcription factor Mitf and melanogenesis. dnACREB and E1A inhibit Mitf expression and melanogenesis, supporting the notion that CREB activation is necessary for melanogenesis. However, constitutively active CREB(DIEDML) without PKA activation is insufficient for Mitf expression and melanogenesis, indicating PKA regulates additional aspects of Mitf transcription. Thus, high-level activation of cAMP signaling plays a dual role in NC cell differentiation: attenuation of BMP2-induced sympathoadrenal cell development and induction of melanogenesis. We conclude the intensity of activation of signal transduction cascades determines cell lineage segregation mechanisms.

  10. Phenotype overlap in Xylella fastidiosa is controlled by the cyclic di-GMP phosphodiesterase Eal in response to antibiotic exposure and diffusible signal factor-mediated cell-cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Alessandra A; Ionescu, Michael; Baccari, Clelia; da Silva, Aline M; Lindow, Steven E

    2013-06-01

    Eal is an EAL domain protein in Xylella fastidiosa homologous to one involved in resistance to tobramycin in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. EAL and HD-GYP domain proteins are implicated in the hydrolysis of the secondary messenger bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric GMP (cyclic di-GMP). Cell density-dependent communication mediated by a Diffusible Signal Factor (DSF) also modulates cyclic di-GMP levels in X. fastidiosa, thereby controlling the expression of virulence genes and genes involved in insect transmission. The possible linkage of Eal to both extrinsic factors such as antibiotics and intrinsic factors such as quorum sensing, and whether both affect virulence, was thus addressed. Expression of eal was induced by subinhibitory concentrations of tobramycin, and an eal deletion mutant was more susceptible to this antibiotic than the wild-type strain and exhibited phenotypes similar to those of an rpfF deletion mutant blocked in DSF production, such as hypermotility, reduced biofilm formation, and hypervirulence to grape. Consistent with that, the rpfF mutant was more susceptible than the wild-type strain to tobramycin. Therefore, we propose that cell-cell communication and antibiotic stress can apparently lead to similar modulations of cyclic di-GMP in X. fastidiosa, resulting in similar phenotypes. However, the effect of cell density is dominant compared to that of antibiotic stress, since eal is suppressed by RpfF, which may prevent inappropriate behavioral changes in response to antibiotic stress when DSF accumulates.

  11. Analysis of Free Energy Signals Arising from Nucleotide Hybridization Between rRNA and mRNA Sequences during Translation in Eubacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mladen A. Vouk

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available A decoding algorithm is tested that mechanistically models the progressive alignments that arise as the mRNA moves past the rRNA tail during translation elongation. Each of these alignments provides an opportunity for hybridization between the single-stranded, 3′-terminal nucleotides of the 16S rRNA and the spatially accessible window of mRNA sequence, from which a free energy value can be calculated. Using this algorithm we show that a periodic, energetic pattern of frequency 1/3 is revealed. This periodic signal exists in the majority of coding regions of eubacterial genes, but not in the non-coding regions encoding the 16S and 23S rRNAs. Signal analysis reveals that the population of coding regions of each bacterial species has a mean phase that is correlated in a statistically significant way with species (G + C content. These results suggest that the periodic signal could function as a synchronization signal for the maintenance of reading frame and that codon usage provides a mechanism for manipulation of signal phase.

  12. Analysis of Free Energy Signals Arising from Nucleotide Hybridization Between rRNA and mRNA Sequences during Translation in Eubacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stomp Anne-Marie

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A decoding algorithm is tested that mechanistically models the progressive alignments that arise as the mRNA moves past the rRNA tail during translation elongation. Each of these alignments provides an opportunity for hybridization between the single-stranded, -terminal nucleotides of the 16S rRNA and the spatially accessible window of mRNA sequence, from which a free energy value can be calculated. Using this algorithm we show that a periodic, energetic pattern of frequency 1/3 is revealed. This periodic signal exists in the majority of coding regions of eubacterial genes, but not in the non-coding regions encoding the 16S and 23S rRNAs. Signal analysis reveals that the population of coding regions of each bacterial species has a mean phase that is correlated in a statistically significant way with species ( content. These results suggest that the periodic signal could function as a synchronization signal for the maintenance of reading frame and that codon usage provides a mechanism for manipulation of signal phase.

  13. ToNER: A tool for identifying nucleotide enrichment signals in feature-enriched RNA-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Promworn, Yuttachon; Kaewprommal, Pavita; Shaw, Philip J; Intarapanich, Apichart; Tongsima, Sissades; Piriyapongsa, Jittima

    2017-01-01

    Biochemical methods are available for enriching 5' ends of RNAs in prokaryotes, which are employed in the differential RNA-seq (dRNA-seq) and the more recent Cappable-seq protocols. Computational methods are needed to locate RNA 5' ends from these data by statistical analysis of the enrichment. Although statistical-based analysis methods have been developed for dRNA-seq, they may not be suitable for Cappable-seq data. The more efficient enrichment method employed in Cappable-seq compared with dRNA-seq could affect data distribution and thus algorithm performance. We present Transformation of Nucleotide Enrichment Ratios (ToNER), a tool for statistical modeling of enrichment from RNA-seq data obtained from enriched and unenriched libraries. The tool calculates nucleotide enrichment scores and determines the global transformation for fitting to the normal distribution using the Box-Cox procedure. From the transformed distribution, sites of significant enrichment are identified. To increase power of detection, meta-analysis across experimental replicates is offered. We tested the tool on Cappable-seq and dRNA-seq data for identifying Escherichia coli transcript 5' ends and compared the results with those from the TSSAR tool, which is designed for analyzing dRNA-seq data. When combining results across Cappable-seq replicates, ToNER detects more known transcript 5' ends than TSSAR. In general, the transcript 5' ends detected by ToNER but not TSSAR occur in regions which cannot be locally modeled by TSSAR. ToNER uses a simple yet robust statistical modeling approach, which can be used for detecting RNA 5'ends from Cappable-seq data, in particular when combining information from experimental replicates. The ToNER tool could potentially be applied for analyzing other RNA-seq datasets in which enrichment for other structural features of RNA is employed. The program is freely available for download at ToNER webpage (http://www4a.biotec.or.th/GI/tools/toner) and Git

  14. ToNER: A tool for identifying nucleotide enrichment signals in feature-enriched RNA-seq data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuttachon Promworn

    Full Text Available Biochemical methods are available for enriching 5' ends of RNAs in prokaryotes, which are employed in the differential RNA-seq (dRNA-seq and the more recent Cappable-seq protocols. Computational methods are needed to locate RNA 5' ends from these data by statistical analysis of the enrichment. Although statistical-based analysis methods have been developed for dRNA-seq, they may not be suitable for Cappable-seq data. The more efficient enrichment method employed in Cappable-seq compared with dRNA-seq could affect data distribution and thus algorithm performance.We present Transformation of Nucleotide Enrichment Ratios (ToNER, a tool for statistical modeling of enrichment from RNA-seq data obtained from enriched and unenriched libraries. The tool calculates nucleotide enrichment scores and determines the global transformation for fitting to the normal distribution using the Box-Cox procedure. From the transformed distribution, sites of significant enrichment are identified. To increase power of detection, meta-analysis across experimental replicates is offered. We tested the tool on Cappable-seq and dRNA-seq data for identifying Escherichia coli transcript 5' ends and compared the results with those from the TSSAR tool, which is designed for analyzing dRNA-seq data. When combining results across Cappable-seq replicates, ToNER detects more known transcript 5' ends than TSSAR. In general, the transcript 5' ends detected by ToNER but not TSSAR occur in regions which cannot be locally modeled by TSSAR.ToNER uses a simple yet robust statistical modeling approach, which can be used for detecting RNA 5'ends from Cappable-seq data, in particular when combining information from experimental replicates. The ToNER tool could potentially be applied for analyzing other RNA-seq datasets in which enrichment for other structural features of RNA is employed. The program is freely available for download at ToNER webpage (http://www4a

  15. The thermodynamic and transport properties of GdCl3 in molten eutectic LiCl-KCl derived from the analysis of cyclic voltammetry signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samin, Adib; Wu, Evan; Zhang, Jinsuo

    2017-02-01

    Pyroprocessing technology is a promising tool for recycling nuclear fuel and producing high purity gadolinium for industrial applications. An efficient implementation of pyroprocessing entails a careful characterization of the electrochemical and transport properties of lanthanides in high temperature molten salts. In this work, the cyclic voltammetry signals of Gd in molten LiCl-KCl salt were recorded for a combination of three temperatures (723 K, 773 K, and 823 K) and three concentration levels (3 wt. %, 6 wt. %, and 9 wt. %) including concentration levels higher than previously reported and relevant for a realistic application of pyroprocessing for molten salt recycle, and the concentration effects were investigated. Four scan rates (200 mV/s to 500 mV/s) were used for each condition, and the signals were examined using conventional Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) analysis equations and by utilizing a two-plate Brunauer, Emmett, and Teller (BET) model accounting for mass diffusion, kinetics, adsorption, and the evolution of electrode morphology via a nonlinear least squares procedure for fitting the model to the experimental signals. It was determined that the redox process is quasi-reversible for the scan rates being used. Furthermore, the applicability of the conventional equations for CV analysis was shown to be problematic for the conditions used, and this is thought to be due to the fact that these equations were derived under the assumption of reversible conditions. The model-derived values for diffusivity are consistent with the literature and are shown to decrease with increasing concentration. This may be due to increased interactions at higher concentration levels. It was also shown that the formal redox potential increased with a concentration and was slightly more positive on the covered electrode.

  16. Decoding ChIP-seq with a double-binding signal refines binding peaks to single-nucleotides and predicts cooperative interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Antonio L C; Abeel, Thomas; Peterson, Matthew; Azizi, Elham; Lyubetskaya, Anna; Carvalho, Luís; Galagan, James

    2014-10-01

    The comprehension of protein and DNA binding in vivo is essential to understand gene regulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) provides a global map of the regulatory binding network. Most ChIP-seq analysis tools focus on identifying binding regions from coverage enrichment. However, less work has been performed to infer the physical and regulatory details inside the enriched regions. This research extends a previous blind-deconvolution approach to develop a post-peak-calling algorithm that improves binding site resolution and predicts cooperative interactions. At the core of our new method is a physically motivated model that characterizes the binding signal as an extreme value distribution. This model suggests a mathematical framework to study physical properties of DNA shearing from the ChIP-seq coverage. The model explains the ChIP-seq coverage with two signals: The first considers DNA fragments with only a single binding event, whereas the second considers fragments with two binding events (a double-binding signal). The model incorporates motif discovery and is able to detect multiple sites in an enriched region with single-nucleotide resolution, high sensitivity, and high specificity. Our method improves peak caller sensitivity, from less than 45% up to 94%, at a false positive rate ChIP-seq analysis: the identification of cooperative interaction. Predictions of known cooperative binding sites show a 0.85 area under an ROC curve. © 2014 Gomes et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  17. Decoding ChIP-seq with a double-binding signal refines binding peaks to single-nucleotides and predicts cooperative interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Antonio L.C.; Abeel, Thomas; Peterson, Matthew; Azizi, Elham; Lyubetskaya, Anna; Carvalho, Luís

    2014-01-01

    The comprehension of protein and DNA binding in vivo is essential to understand gene regulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) provides a global map of the regulatory binding network. Most ChIP-seq analysis tools focus on identifying binding regions from coverage enrichment. However, less work has been performed to infer the physical and regulatory details inside the enriched regions. This research extends a previous blind-deconvolution approach to develop a post-peak–calling algorithm that improves binding site resolution and predicts cooperative interactions. At the core of our new method is a physically motivated model that characterizes the binding signal as an extreme value distribution. This model suggests a mathematical framework to study physical properties of DNA shearing from the ChIP-seq coverage. The model explains the ChIP-seq coverage with two signals: The first considers DNA fragments with only a single binding event, whereas the second considers fragments with two binding events (a double-binding signal). The model incorporates motif discovery and is able to detect multiple sites in an enriched region with single-nucleotide resolution, high sensitivity, and high specificity. Our method improves peak caller sensitivity, from less than 45% up to 94%, at a false positive rate ChIP-seq analysis: the identification of cooperative interaction. Predictions of known cooperative binding sites show a 0.85 area under an ROC curve. PMID:25024162

  18. Cyclic AMP directs inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate-evoked Ca2+ signalling to different intracellular Ca2+ stores

    OpenAIRE

    Tovey, Stephen C.; Taylor, Colin W.

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol depletion reversibly abolishes carbachol-evoked Ca2+ release from inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive stores, without affecting the distribution of IP3 receptors (IP3R) or endoplasmic reticulum, IP3 formation or responses to photolysis of caged IP3. Receptors that stimulate cAMP formation do not alone evoke Ca2+ signals, but they potentiate those evoked by carbachol. We show that these potentiated signals are entirely unaffected by cholesterol depletion and that, within...

  19. The putative guanine nucleotide exchange factor RicA mediates upstream signaling for growth and development in Aspergillus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Nak-Jung; Park, Hee-Soo; Jung, Seunho; Kim, Sun Chang; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2012-11-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins (G proteins) govern growth, development, and secondary metabolism in various fungi. Here, we characterized ricA, which encodes a putative GDP/GTP exchange factor for G proteins in the model fungus Aspergillus nidulans and the opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. In both species, ricA mRNA accumulates during vegetative growth and early developmental phases, but it is not present in spores. The deletion of ricA results in severely impaired colony growth and the total (for A. nidulans) or near (for A. fumigatus) absence of asexual sporulation (conidiation). The overexpression (OE) of the A. fumigatus ricA gene (AfricA) restores growth and conidiation in the ΔAnricA mutant to some extent, indicating partial conservation of RicA function in Aspergillus. A series of double mutant analyses revealed that the removal of RgsA (an RGS protein of the GanB Gα subunit), but not sfgA, flbA, rgsB, or rgsC, restored vegetative growth and conidiation in ΔAnricA. Furthermore, we found that RicA can physically interact with GanB in yeast and in vitro. Moreover, the presence of two copies or OE of pkaA suppresses the profound defects caused by ΔAnricA, indicating that RicA-mediated growth and developmental signaling is primarily through GanB and PkaA in A. nidulans. Despite the lack of conidiation, brlA and vosA mRNAs accumulated to normal levels in the ΔricA mutant. In addition, mutants overexpressing fluG or brlA (OEfluG or OEbrlA) failed to restore development in the ΔAnricA mutant. These findings suggest that the commencement of asexual development requires unknown RicA-mediated signaling input in A. nidulans.

  20. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD) signaling defects and cell death susceptibility cannot be uncoupled in X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP)-driven inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirieleison, Steven M; Marsh, Rebecca A; Kumar, Prathna; Rathkey, Joseph K; Dubyak, George R; Abbott, Derek W

    2017-06-09

    The X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis (XIAP) protein has been identified as a key genetic driver of two distinct inflammatory disorders, X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome 2 (XLP-2) and very-early-onset inflammatory bowel disease (VEO-IBD). Molecularly, the role of XIAP mutations in the pathogenesis of these disorders is unclear. Recent work has consistently shown XIAP to be critical for signaling downstream of the Crohn's disease susceptibility protein nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing 2 (NOD2); however, the reported effects of XLP-2 and VEO-IBD XIAP mutations on cell death have been inconsistent. In this manuscript, we describe a CRISPR-mediated genetic system for cells of the myeloid lineage in which XIAP alleles can be replaced with disease-associated XIAP variants expressed at endogenous levels to simultaneously study inflammation-related cell death and NOD2 signaling. We show that, consistent with previous studies, NOD2 signaling is critically dependent on the BIR2 domain of XIAP. We further used this system to reconcile the aforementioned inconsistent XIAP cell death data to show that XLP-2 and VEO-IBD XIAP mutations that exhibit a loss-of-function NOD2 phenotype also lower the threshold for inflammatory cell death. Last, we identified and studied three novel patient XIAP mutations and used this system to characterize NOD2 and cell death phenotypes driven by XIAP. The results of this work support the role of XIAP in mediating NOD2 signaling while reconciling the role of XLP-2 and VEO-IBD XIAP mutations in inflammatory cell death and provide a set of tools and framework to rapidly test newly discovered XIAP variants. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Coordinated regulation by two VPS9 domain-containing guanine nucleotide exchange factors in small GTPase Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukamoto, Yuta [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Kagiwada, Satoshi [Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Nara Women' s University, Kitauoyanishi-machi, Nara 630-8506 (Japan); Shimazu, Sayuri [Center for Supports to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Takegawa, Kaoru [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Bioresource and Bioenvironmental Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Noguchi, Tetsuko [Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Nara Women' s University, Kitauoyanishi-machi, Nara 630-8506 (Japan); Miyamoto, Masaaki, E-mail: miya@kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Center for Supports to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2015-03-20

    The small GTPase Rab5 is reported to regulate various cellular functions, such as vesicular transport and endocytosis. VPS9 domain-containing proteins are thought to activate Rab5(s) by their guanine-nucleotide exchange activities. Numerous VPS9 proteins have been identified and are structurally conserved from yeast to mammalian cells. However, the functional relationships among VPS9 proteins in cells remain unclear. Only one Rab5 and two VPS9 proteins were identified in the Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome. Here, we examined the cellular function of two VPS9 proteins and the relationship between these proteins in cellular functions. Vps901-GFP and Vps902-GFP exhibited dotted signals in vegetative and differentiated cells. vps901 deletion mutant (Δvps901) cells exhibited a phenotype deficient in the mating process and responses to high concentrations of ions, such as calcium and metals, and Δvps901Δvps902 double mutant cells exhibited round cell shapes similar to ypt5-909 (Rab5 mutant allele) cells. Deletion of both vps901 and vps902 genes completely abolished the mating process and responses to various stresses. A lack of vacuole formation and aberrant inner cell membrane structures were also observed in Δvps901Δvps902 cells by electron microscopy. These data strongly suggest that Vps901 and Vps902 are cooperatively involved in the regulation of cellular functions, such as cell morphology, sexual development, response to ion stresses, and vacuole formation, via Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast cells. - Highlights: • Roles of Rab5 activator VPS9 proteins in cellular functions. • Cooperation between VPS9 proteins in Rab5 signaling pathway. • Roles of each VPS9 protein in Rab5 signaling pathway are discussed.

  2. Spectral entropy analysis of the respiratory signal and its relationship with the cyclic alternating pattern during sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Sanchez, E.; Alba, A.; Méndez, M. O.; Milioli, G.; Parrino, L.

    2016-07-01

    A-phases consist of transient cortical events that normally occur during NREM sleep and can be observed directly in the EEG signals. One particular kind of A-phases, namely, A3-phases are related to arousals from sleep during which increased activity in other systems (such as the cardiovascular and respiratory systems) can also be observed. This study aims to characterize disruptions in the oscillations of the airflow signal during A3-phases of sleep. Spectral entropy was used to quantify the bandwidth of the airflow signal, which under baseline conditions (prior to an A3-phase) resembles a sinusoidal wave with a frequency of about 0.25 Hz and has low spectral entropy values. It was found that during most A3-phases the spectral entropy increases significantly in 70% of the test subjects. These changes occur with higher probability during A3-phases that are longer than 10s, suggesting a delay between the onset of an A3-phase and the effect it has on the respiratory system.

  3. Mechanism of nuclear calcium signaling by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate produced in the nucleus, nuclear located protein kinase C and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Christian; Malviya, Anant N

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear phospholipase C-gamma 1 can be phosphorylated by nuclear membrane located epidermal growth factor receptor sequel to epidermal growth factor-mediated signaling to the nucleus. The function of mouse liver phospholipase C-gamma 1 is attributed to a 120 kDa protein fragment which has been found to be a proteolytic product of the 150 kDa native nuclear enzyme. The tyrosine-phosphorylated 120 kDa protein band interacts with activated EGFR, binds phosphatidyl-3-OH kinase enhancer, and activates nuclear phosphatidylinositol-3-OH-kinase, and is capable of generating diacylglycerol in response to the epidermal growth factor signal to the nucleus in vivo. Thus a mechanism for nuclear production of inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate is unraveled. Nuclear generated inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate interacts with the inner membrane located inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate receptor and sequesters calcium into the nucleoplasm. Nuclear inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate receptor is phosphorylated by native nuclear protein kinase C which enhances the receptor-ligand interaction. Nuclear calcium-ATPase and inositol-1,3,4,5-tetrakisphophate receptor are located on the outer nuclear membrane, thus facilitating calcium transport into the nuclear envelope lumen either by ATP or inositol-1,3,4,5-tetrakisphophate depending upon the external free calcium concentrations. Nuclear calcium ATPase is phosphorylated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase with enhanced calcium pumping activity. A holistic picture emerges here where tyrosine phosphorylation compliments serine phosphorylation of key moieties regulating nuclear calcium signaling. Evidence are forwarded in favor of proteolysis having a profound implications in nuclear calcium homeostasis in particular and signal transduction in general.

  4. Cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling in the anterior pituitary gland in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2017-08-16

    The cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) was the first among the so-called "second messengers" to be described. It is conserved in most organisms and functions as a signal transducer by mediating the intracellular effects of multiple hormones and neurotransmitters. In this review, we first delineate how different members of the cAMP pathway ensure its correct compartmentalization and activity, mediate the terminal intracellular effects, and allow the crosstalk with other signaling pathways. We then focus on the pituitary gland, where cAMP exerts a crucial function by controlling the responsiveness of the cells to hypothalamic hormones, neurotransmitters and peripheral factors. We discuss the most relevant physiological functions mediated by cAMP in the different pituitary cell types, and summarize the defects affecting this pathway that have been reported in the literature. We finally discuss how a deregulated cAMP pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of pituitary disorders and how it affects the response to therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. L-4F Inhibits Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein-induced Inflammatory Adipokine Secretion via Cyclic AMP/Protein Kinase A-CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein β Signaling Pathway in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Zhu Xie

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: OxLDL induces C/EBPβ protein synthesis in a time-dependent manner and enhances MCP-1 secretion and expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. L-4F dose-dependently counterbalances the pro-inflammatory effect of oxLDL, and cyclic AMP/PKA-C/EBPβ signaling pathway may participate in it.

  6. [Beta-adrenoceptor-mediated cyclic AMP signal in different types of cultured nerve cells in normoxic and hypoxic conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóźwiak-Bębenista, M; Wiktorowska-Owczarek, A; Kowalczyk, E

    2016-01-01

    β-adrenergic neurotransmission is an important factor regulating brain activity such as neuronal and glial survival, plasticity, membrane transport or cellular metabolism. Intracellular β-adrenergic signaling, via a stimulatory G protein (Gs), activates two major down-stream effectors, i.e., adenylyl cyclase (AC) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). The aim of this work was to study the ability of endogenous (adrenaline and noradrenaline) and exogenous (isoprenaline) β-adrenergic receptor agonists to increase cAMP in different types of nerve cells. Moreover, we wanted to precisely identify the receptor isoform involved in the observed phenomenon using selective β1-, β2- β3-adrenoceptor blockers. In an additional study, the negative influence of hypoxia on the AC/cAMP intracellular signaling system was tested. The study was conducted in parallel on rat primary glial (astrocytes) cultures, primary neuronal cultures, C6 glioma cells and human T98G glioma cells. The formation of [^(3)H] cAMP by agonists and antagonists was measured in [^(3)H] adenine prelabeled cells under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The obtained results revealed that adrenaline, noradrenaline and isoprenaline strongly stimulated cAMP production in all tested cell types (with highest potency in C6 glioma cells). In glial and neuronal cells the adrenaline-evoked cAMP effect was mediated mainly by the β1-adrenoceptor, whereas in tumor cells the effect was probably mediated by all three β-subtype specific drugs. The AC/cAMP intracellular signaling system is affected by hypoxic conditions. Considering both physiological and therapeutic importance of β-family receptors the present work characterized the β-adrenoceptor-mediated cAMP signal transduction pathway in different nerve cells in normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The proposed in vitro model of hypoxic conditions may serve as a good model system to study the biological effects of endogenous catecholamines as well as potential

  7. Constitutive cyclic GMP accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana compromises systemic acquired resistance induced by an avirulent pathogen by modulating local signals

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, J.; Chen, J.; Locato, V.; Sabetta, W.; Behera, S.; Cimini, S.; Griggio, F.; Martínez-Jaime, S.; Graf, A.; Bouneb, M.; Pachaiappan, R.; Fincato, P.; Blanco, E.; Costa, A.; De Gara, L.

    2016-01-01

    The infection of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with avirulent pathogens causes the accumulation of cGMP with a biphasic profile downstream of nitric oxide signalling. However, plant enzymes that modulate cGMP levels have yet to be identified, so we generated transgenic A. thaliana plants expressing the rat soluble guanylate cyclase (GC) to increase genetically the level of cGMP and to study the function of cGMP in plant defence responses. Once confirmed that cGMP levels were higher in the GC tr...

  8. Rac1 Activation Caused by Membrane Translocation of a Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor in Akt2-Mediated Insulin Signaling in Mouse Skeletal Muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Takenaka

    Full Text Available Insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in skeletal muscle is mediated by the glucose transporter GLUT4, which is translocated to the plasma membrane following insulin stimulation. Several lines of evidence suggested that the protein kinase Akt2 plays a key role in this insulin action. The small GTPase Rac1 has also been implicated as a regulator of insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation, acting downstream of Akt2. However, the mechanisms whereby Akt2 regulates Rac1 activity remain obscure. The guanine nucleotide exchange factor FLJ00068 has been identified as a direct regulator of Rac1 in Akt2-mediated signaling, but its characterization was performed mostly in cultured myoblasts. Here, we provide in vivo evidence that FLJ00068 indeed acts downstream of Akt2 as a Rac1 regulator by using mouse skeletal muscle. Small interfering RNA knockdown of FLJ00068 markedly diminished GLUT4 translocation to the sarcolemma following insulin administration or ectopic expression of a constitutively activated mutant of either phosphoinositide 3-kinase or Akt2. Additionally, insulin and these constitutively activated mutants caused the activation of Rac1 as shown by immunofluorescent microscopy using a polypeptide probe specific to activated Rac1 in isolated gastrocnemius muscle fibers and frozen sections of gastrocnemius muscle. This Rac1 activation was also abrogated by FLJ00068 knockdown. Furthermore, we observed translocation of FLJ00068 to the cell periphery following insulin stimulation in cultured myoblasts. Localization of FLJ00068 in the plasma membrane in insulin-stimulated, but not unstimulated, myoblasts and mouse gastrocnemius muscle was further affirmed by subcellular fractionation and subsequent immunoblotting. Collectively, these results strongly support a critical role of FLJ00068 in Akt2-mediated Rac1 activation in mouse skeletal muscle insulin signaling.

  9. Involvement of a cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent signal in the diet-induced canalicular trafficking of adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette transporter g5/g8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Yasui, Kenta; Hashizume, Takahiro; Suto, Arisa; Mori, Ayaka; Murata, Yuzuki; Yamaguchi, Masahiko; Ikari, Akira; Sugatani, Junko

    2015-10-01

    The adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) half-transporters Abcg5 and Abcg8 promote the secretion of neutral sterol into bile. Studies have demonstrated the diet-induced gene expression of these transporters, but the regulation of their trafficking when the nutritional status changes in the liver remains to be elucidated. Here, we generated a novel in vivo kinetic analysis that can monitor the intracellular trafficking of Abcg5/Abcg8 in living mouse liver by in vivo transfection of the genes of fluorescent protein-tagged transporters and investigated how hypernutrition affects the canalicular trafficking of these transporters. The kinetic analysis showed that lithogenic diet consumption accelerated the translocation of newly synthesized fluorescent-tagged transporters to intracellular pools in an endosomal compartment and enhanced the recruitment of these pooled gene products into the bile canalicular membrane in mouse liver. Because some ABC transporters are reported to be recruited from intracellular pools to the bile canaliculi by cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling, we next evaluated the involvement of this machinery in a diet-induced event. Administration of a protein kinase A inhibitor, N-(2-{[3-(4-bromophenyl)-2-propenyl]amino}ethyl)-5-isoquinolinesulfonamide, decreased the canalicular expression of native Abcg5/Abcg8 in lithogenic diet-fed mice, and injection of a cAMP analog, dibutyryl cAMP, transiently increased their levels in standard diet-fed mice, indicating the involvement of cAMP signaling. Indeed, canalicular trafficking of the fluorescent-tagged Abcg5/Abcg8 was enhanced by dibutyryl cAMP administration. These observations suggest that diet-induced lipid loading into liver accelerates the trafficking of Abcg5/Abcg8 to the bile canalicular membrane through cAMP signaling machinery. © 2015 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  10. Leptin interferes with 3',5'-Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate (cAMP signaling to inhibit steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HoYuen Basil

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity has been linked to an increased risk of female infertility. Leptin, an adipocytokine which is elevated during obesity, may influence gonadal function through modulating steroidogenesis in granulosa cells. Methods The effect of leptin on progesterone production in simian virus 40 immortalized granulosa (SVOG cells was examined by Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The effect of leptin on the expression of the steroidogenic enzymes (StAR, P450scc, 3betaHSD in SVOG cells was examined by real-time PCR and Western blotting. The mRNA expression of leptin receptor isoforms in SVOG cells were examined by using PCR. SVOG cells were co-treated with leptin and specific pharmacological inhibitors to identify the signaling pathways involved in leptin-reduced progesterone production. Silencing RNA against leptin receptor was used to determine that the inhibition of leptin on cAMP-induced steroidogenesis acts in a leptin receptor-dependent manner. Results and Conclusion In the present study, we investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying leptin-regulated steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells. We show that leptin inhibits 8-bromo cAMP-stimulated progesterone production in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, we show that leptin inhibits expression of the cAMP-stimulated steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR protein, the rate limiting de novo protein in progesterone synthesis. Leptin induces the activation of ERK1/2, p38 and JNK but only the ERK1/2 (PD98059 and p38 (SB203580 inhibitors attenuate the leptin-induced inhibition of cAMP-stimulated StAR protein expression and progesterone production. These data suggest that the leptin-induced MAPK signal transduction pathway interferes with cAMP/PKA-stimulated steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells. Moreover, siRNA mediated knock-down of the endogenous leptin receptor attenuates the effect of leptin on cAMP-induced StAR protein expression and progesterone

  11. Carbon Monoxide Inhibits Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Replication by the Cyclic GMP/Protein Kinase G and NF-κB Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Angke; Zhao, Lijuan; Li, Na; Duan, Hong; Liu, Hongliang; Pu, Fengxing; Zhang, Gaiping; Zhou, En-Min; Xiao, Shuqi

    2017-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) causes significant economic losses to the pork industry worldwide each year. Our previous research demonstrated that heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) can suppress PRRSV replication via an unknown molecular mechanism. In this study, inhibition of PRRSV replication was demonstrated to be mediated by carbon monoxide (CO), a downstream metabolite of HO-1. Using several approaches, we demonstrate that CO significantly inhibited PRRSV replication in both a PRRSV permissive cell line, MARC-145, and the predominant cell type targeted during in vivo PRRSV infection, porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs). Our results showed that CO inhibited intercellular spread of PRRSV; however, it did not affect PRRSV entry into host cells. Furthermore, CO was found to suppress PRRSV replication via the activation of the cyclic GMP/protein kinase G (cGMP/PKG) signaling pathway. CO significantly inhibits PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation, a required step for PRRSV replication. Moreover, CO significantly reduced PRRSV-induced proinflammatory cytokine mRNA levels. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that CO exerts its anti-PRRSV effect by activating the cellular cGMP/PKG signaling pathway and by negatively regulating cellular NF-κB signaling. These findings not only provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of HO-1 inhibition of PRRSV replication but also suggest potential new control measures for future PRRSV outbreaks. PRRSV causes great economic losses each year to the swine industry worldwide. Carbon monoxide (CO), a metabolite of HO-1, has been shown to have antimicrobial and antiviral activities in infected cells. Our previous research demonstrated that HO-1 can suppress PRRSV replication. Here we show that endogenous CO produced through HO-1 catalysis mediates the antiviral effect of HO-1. CO inhibits PRRSV replication by activating the cellular cGMP/PKG signaling pathway and by negatively regulating cellular NF

  12. Caffeine Modulates Vesicle Release and Recovery at Cerebellar Parallel Fibre Terminals, Independently of Calcium and Cyclic AMP Signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Katharine L; Jackson, Claire; Balakrishnan, Saju; Bellamy, Tomas C

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar parallel fibres release glutamate at both the synaptic active zone and at extrasynaptic sites-a process known as ectopic release. These sites exhibit different short-term and long-term plasticity, the basis of which is incompletely understood but depends on the efficiency of vesicle release and recycling. To investigate whether release of calcium from internal stores contributes to these differences in plasticity, we tested the effects of the ryanodine receptor agonist caffeine on both synaptic and ectopic transmission. Whole cell patch clamp recordings from Purkinje neurons and Bergmann glia were carried out in transverse cerebellar slices from juvenile (P16-20) Wistar rats. Caffeine caused complex changes in transmission at both synaptic and ectopic sites. The amplitude of postsynaptic currents in Purkinje neurons and extrasynaptic currents in Bergmann glia were increased 2-fold and 4-fold respectively, but paired pulse ratio was substantially reduced, reversing the short-term facilitation observed under control conditions. Caffeine treatment also caused synaptic sites to depress during 1 Hz stimulation, consistent with inhibition of the usual mechanisms for replenishing vesicles at the active zone. Unexpectedly, pharmacological intervention at known targets for caffeine--intracellular calcium release, and cAMP signalling--had no impact on these effects. We conclude that caffeine increases release probability and inhibits vesicle recovery at parallel fibre synapses, independently of known pharmacological targets. This complex effect would lead to potentiation of transmission at fibres firing at low frequencies, but depression of transmission at high frequency connections.

  13. Constitutive cyclic GMP accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana compromises systemic acquired resistance induced by an avirulent pathogen by modulating local signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Jamshaid; Chen, Jian; Locato, Vittoria; Sabetta, Wilma; Behera, Smrutisanjita; Cimini, Sara; Griggio, Francesca; Martínez-Jaime, Silvia; Graf, Alexander; Bouneb, Mabrouk; Pachaiappan, Raman; Fincato, Paola; Blanco, Emanuela; Costa, Alex; De Gara, Laura; Bellin, Diana; de Pinto, Maria Concetta; Vandelle, Elodie

    2016-11-04

    The infection of Arabidopsis thaliana plants with avirulent pathogens causes the accumulation of cGMP with a biphasic profile downstream of nitric oxide signalling. However, plant enzymes that modulate cGMP levels have yet to be identified, so we generated transgenic A. thaliana plants expressing the rat soluble guanylate cyclase (GC) to increase genetically the level of cGMP and to study the function of cGMP in plant defence responses. Once confirmed that cGMP levels were higher in the GC transgenic lines than in wild-type controls, the GC transgenic plants were then challenged with bacterial pathogens and their defence responses were characterized. Although local resistance was similar in the GC transgenic and wild-type lines, differences in the redox state suggested potential cross-talk between cGMP and the glutathione redox system. Furthermore, large-scale transcriptomic and proteomic analysis highlighted the significant modulation of both gene expression and protein abundance at the infection site, inhibiting the establishment of systemic acquired resistance. Our data indicate that cGMP plays a key role in local responses controlling the induction of systemic acquired resistance in plants challenged with avirulent pathogens.

  14. Evolutionary conservation of the signaling proteins upstream of cyclic AMP-dependent kinase and protein kinase C in gastropod mollusks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sossin, Wayne S; Abrams, Thomas W

    2009-01-01

    The protein kinase C (PKC) and the cAMP-dependent kinase (protein kinase A; PKA) pathways are known to play important roles in behavioral plasticity and learning in the nervous systems of a wide variety of species across phyla. We briefly review the members of the PKC and PKA family and focus on the evolution of the immediate upstream activators of PKC and PKA i.e., phospholipase C (PLC) and adenylyl cyclase (AC), and their conservation in gastropod mollusks, taking advantage of the recent assembly of the Aplysiacalifornica and Lottia gigantea genomes. The diversity of PLC and AC family members present in mollusks suggests a multitude of possible mechanisms to activate PKA and PKC; we briefly discuss the relevance of these pathways to the known physiological activation of these kinases in Aplysia neurons during plasticity and learning. These multiple mechanisms of activation provide the gastropod nervous system with tremendous flexibility for implementing neuromodulatory responses to both neuronal activity and extracellular signals. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. The phytosulfokine (PSK) receptor is capable of guanylate cyclase activity and enabling cyclic GMP-dependent signaling in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Kwezi, Lusisizwe

    2011-04-19

    Phytosulfokines (PSKs) are sulfated pentapeptides that stimulate plant growth and differentiation mediated by the PSK receptor (PSKR1), which is a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase. We identified a putative guanylate cyclase (GC) catalytic center in PSKR1 that is embedded within the kinase domain and hypothesized that the GC works in conjunction with the kinase in downstream PSK signaling. We expressed the recombinant complete kinase (cytoplasmic) domain of AtPSKR1 and show that it has serine/threonine kinase activity using the Ser/Thr peptide 1 as a substrate with an approximate Km of 7.5 μM and Vmax of 1800 nmol min-1 mg-1 of protein. This same recombinant protein also has GC activity in vitro that is dependent on the presence of either Mg2+ or Mn2+. Overexpression of the full-length AtPSKR1 receptor in Arabidopsis leaf protoplasts raised the endogenous basal cGMP levels over 20-fold, indicating that the receptor has GC activity in vivo. In addition, PSK-α itself, but not the non-sulfated backbone, induces rapid increases in cGMP levels in protoplasts. Together these results indicate that the PSKR1 contains dual GC and kinase catalytic activities that operate in vivo and that this receptor constitutes a novel class of enzymes with overlapping catalytic domains. © 2011 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Caffeine Modulates Vesicle Release and Recovery at Cerebellar Parallel Fibre Terminals, Independently of Calcium and Cyclic AMP Signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine L Dobson

    Full Text Available Cerebellar parallel fibres release glutamate at both the synaptic active zone and at extrasynaptic sites-a process known as ectopic release. These sites exhibit different short-term and long-term plasticity, the basis of which is incompletely understood but depends on the efficiency of vesicle release and recycling. To investigate whether release of calcium from internal stores contributes to these differences in plasticity, we tested the effects of the ryanodine receptor agonist caffeine on both synaptic and ectopic transmission.Whole cell patch clamp recordings from Purkinje neurons and Bergmann glia were carried out in transverse cerebellar slices from juvenile (P16-20 Wistar rats.Caffeine caused complex changes in transmission at both synaptic and ectopic sites. The amplitude of postsynaptic currents in Purkinje neurons and extrasynaptic currents in Bergmann glia were increased 2-fold and 4-fold respectively, but paired pulse ratio was substantially reduced, reversing the short-term facilitation observed under control conditions. Caffeine treatment also caused synaptic sites to depress during 1 Hz stimulation, consistent with inhibition of the usual mechanisms for replenishing vesicles at the active zone. Unexpectedly, pharmacological intervention at known targets for caffeine--intracellular calcium release, and cAMP signalling--had no impact on these effects.We conclude that caffeine increases release probability and inhibits vesicle recovery at parallel fibre synapses, independently of known pharmacological targets. This complex effect would lead to potentiation of transmission at fibres firing at low frequencies, but depression of transmission at high frequency connections.

  17. Targeting of type I protein kinase A to lipid rafts is required for platelet inhibition by the 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate-signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raslan, Z; Magwenzi, S; Aburima, A; Taskén, K; Naseem, K M

    2015-09-01

    Platelet adhesion to von Willebrand factor (VWF) is modulated by 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling through protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of glycoprotein (GP)Ibβ. A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are proposed to control the localization and substrate specificity of individual PKA isoforms. However, the role of PKA isoforms in regulating the phosphorylation of GPIbβ and platelet response to VWF is unknown. We wished to determine the role of PKA isoforms in the phosphorylation of GPIbβ and platelet activation by VWF as a model for exploring the selective partitioning of cAMP signaling in platelets. The two isoforms of PKA in platelets, type I (PKA-I) and type II (PKA-II), were differentially localized, with a small pool of PKA-I found in lipid rafts. Using a combination of Far Western blotting, immunoprecipitation, proximity ligation assay and cAMP pull-down we identified moesin as an AKAP that potentially localizes PKA-I to rafts. Introduction of cell-permeable anchoring disruptor peptide, RI anchoring disruptor (RIAD-Arg11 ), to block PKA-I/AKAP interactions, uncoupled PKA-RI from moesin, displaced PKA-RI from rafts and reduced kinase activity in rafts. Examination of GPIbβ demonstrated that it was phosphorylated in response to low concentrations of PGI2 in a PKA-dependent manner and occurred primarily in lipid raft fractions. RIAD-Arg11 caused a significant reduction in raft-localized phosphoGPIbβ and diminished the ability of PGI2 to regulate VWF-mediated aggregation and thrombus formation in vitro. We propose that PKA-I-specific AKAPs in platelets, including moesin, organize a selective localization of PKA-I required for phosphorylation of GPIbβ and contribute to inhibition of platelet VWF interactions. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  18. Characterization of Rabbit Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain 1 (NOD1 and the Role of NOD1 Signaling Pathway during Bacterial Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengjiao Guo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 1 (NOD1 is the most prominent of all NOD-like receptors, which in the mammalian innate immune system, serve as intracellular receptors for pathogens and endogenous molecules during tissue injury. From rabbit kidney cells, we cloned rabbit NOD1 (rNOD1 and identified an N-terminal caspase activation and recruitment domain, a central NACHT domain, and C-terminal leucine-rich repeat domains. rNOD1 was expressed in all tested tissues; infection with Escherichia coli induced significantly higher expression in the spleen, liver, and kidney compared to other tissues. The overexpression of rNOD1 induced the expression of proinflammatory cytokines Il1b, Il6, Il8, Ifn-γ, and Tnf and defensins, including Defb124, Defb125, Defb128, Defb135, and Np5 via activation of the nuclear factor (NF-κB pathway. Overexpression of rNOD1 inhibited the growth of E. coli, whereas knockdown of rNOD1 or inhibition of the NF-κB pathway promoted the growth of E. coli. rNOD1 colocalized with LC3, upregulated autophagy pathway protein LC3-II, and increased autolysosome formation in RK-13 cells infected with E. coli. In summary, our results explain the primary signaling pathway and antibacterial ability of rNOD1, as well as the induction of autophagy that it mediates. Such findings suggest that NOD1 could contribute to therapeutic strategies such as targets of new vaccine adjuvants or drugs.

  19. Cyclic Vitalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halse, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, Scandinavian and German scholars have been active in the redefinition of the terms ‘Vitalism‘ and ‘Vitalist’ as descriptive categories for analytical purposes in the fields of literary and cultural history. In this context, ‘Vitalism‘ has primarily been used to describe...... that also encompasses notions of destruction, decay and death. “All life symbols in literature around 1900 are at the same time symbols of death”. (Rasch, W. 1967:24) Through the analyses of three poems, this article aims to show concrete examples of how cyclic Vitalist thinking is embedded in poetry...

  20. Cyclic statistics in rolling bearing diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Qu, Liangsheng

    2003-10-01

    Mechanical signals with amplitude modulated are characterized by periodic time-varying ensemble statistics and can be considered as cyclostationary. In this paper, the second order cyclic statistics, i.e. cyclic autocorrelation and cyclic spectrum, are introduced. A method of demodulation based on cyclic autocorrelation is derived from a signal model. The modulators and carrier are exhibited, respectively, in low- and high-frequency band of cyclic frequency domain. The three-dimensional spectral correlation figure, which represents cyclic frequency, frequency and spectral correlation strength simultaneously, is developed to express the demodulation results clearly. The method is tested by simulation signal and applied to diagnose rolling bearing faults. It obtained more information than other conventional methods, such as the frequency domain and the envelop detection. Furthermore, its effect is demonstrated by comparing with the wavelet envelope demodulation.

  1. Schizosaccharomyces pombe Git7p, a member of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sgtlp family, is required for glucose and cyclic AMP signaling, cell wall integrity, and septation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadick, Kevin; Fourcade, H Matthew; Boumenot, Peter; Seitz, Jeffrey J; Morrell, Jennifer L; Chang, Louise; Gould, Kathleen L; Partridge, Janet F; Allshire, Robin C; Kitagawa, Katsumi; Hieter, Phil; Hoffman, Charles S

    2002-08-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe fbp1 gene, encoding fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, is transcriptionally repressed by glucose. Mutations that confer constitutive fbp1 transcription identify git (glucose-insensitive transcription) genes that encode components of a cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathway required for adenylate cyclase activation. Four of these genes encode the three subunits of a heterotrimeric G protein (gpa2, git5, and git11) and a G protein-coupled receptor (git3). Three additional genes, git1, git7, and git10, act in parallel to or downstream from the G protein genes. Here, we describe the cloning and characterization of the git7 gene. The Git7p protein is a member of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sgtlp protein family. In budding yeast, Sgtlp associates with Skplp and plays an essential role in kinetochore assembly, while in Arabidopsis, a pair of SGT1 proteins have been found to be involved in plant disease resistance through an interaction with RAR1. Like S. cerevisiae Sgtlp, Git7p is essential, but this requirement appears to be due to roles in septation and cell wall integrity, which are unrelated to cAMP signaling, as S. pombe cells lacking either adenylate cyclase or protein kinase A are viable. In addition, git7 mutants are sensitive to the microtubule-destabilizing drug benomyl, although they do not display a chromosome stability defect. Two alleles of git7 that are functional for cell growth and septation but defective for glucose-triggered cAMP signaling encode proteins that are altered in the highly conserved carboxy terminus. The S. cerevisiae and human SGT1 genes both suppress git7-93 but not git7-235 for glucose repression of fbp1 transcription and benomyl sensitivity. This allele-specific suppression indicates that the Git7p/Sgtlp proteins may act as multimers, such that Git7-93p but not Git7-235p can deliver the orthologous proteins to species-specific targets. Our studies suggest that members of the Git7p/Sgt1p protein family may play a

  2. Cyclic multiverses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marosek, Konrad; Dąbrowski, Mariusz P.; Balcerzak, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Using the idea of regularization of singularities due to the variability of the fundamental constants in cosmology we study the cyclic universe models. We find two models of oscillating and non-singular mass density and pressure (`non-singular' bounce) regularized by varying gravitational constant G despite the scale factor evolution is oscillating and having sharp turning points (`singular' bounce). Both violating (big-bang) and non-violating (phantom) null energy condition models appear. Then, we extend this idea on to the multiverse containing cyclic individual universes with either growing or decreasing entropy though leaving the net entropy constant. In order to get an insight into the key idea, we consider the doubleverse with the same geometrical evolution of the two `parallel' universes with their physical evolution [physical coupling constants c(t) and G(t)] being different. An interesting point is that there is a possibility to exchange the universes at the point of maximum expansion - the fact which was already noticed in quantum cosmology. Similar scenario is also possible within the framework of Brans-Dicke theory where varying G(t) is replaced by the dynamical Brans-Dicke field φ(t) though these theories are slightly different.

  3. Cyclic biamperometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Mehdi; Mikkelsen, Susan R

    2010-03-01

    Cyclic biamperometry has been investigated as a method for the quantitation of one form of a reversibly electroactive redox couple in the presence of the other form, using the ferri-ferrocyanide couple in aqueous KCl. A triangular voltage waveform applied across two equal-area, planar gold electrodes yields peak currents that depend on the square root of the applied voltage scan rate, when one form of the redox couple is present in excess. Independent measurement of electrode-to-solution potential during biamperometric scans allowed estimation of the fractional impedance at each electrode-solution interface, and these values allow calculation of the effective potential scan rates at each electrode. Results show that when one form is present in a 5-fold excess or greater, the potential scan rate for the limiting reaction is nearly identical to the applied voltage scan rate. Similar values were obtained from impedance calculations, but discrepancies between the predicted and experimental values are evident when the two forms are present at near equivalent concentrations. When one form of the redox couple is present in excess, cyclic biamperometric peak currents depend linearly on the concentration of the limiting form, and these currents can be amplified by using cells with one electrode much larger than the other. Because this method does not require a reference electrode, it can, in principle, be readily incorporated into new electrochemical array or lab-on-a-chip devices.

  4. On Improvements of Cyclic MUSIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Howard Fan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Many man-made signals encountered in communications exhibit cyclostationarity. By exploiting cyclostationarity, cyclic MUSIC has been shown to be able to separate signals with different cycle frequencies, thus, to be able to perform signal selective direction of-arrival (DOA estimation. However, as will be shown in this paper, the DOA estimation of cyclic MUSIC is actually biased. We show in this paper that by properly choosing the frequency for evaluating the steering vector, the bias of DOA estimation can be substantially reduced and the performance can be improved. Furthermore, we propose another algorithm exploiting cyclic conjugate correlation to further improve the performance of DOA estimation. Simulation results show the effectiveness of both of our methods.

  5. cyclic monophosphate

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2006-10-02

    Oct 2, 2006 ... Finally, potential applications of cGMP in plant biotechnology will be discussed. Key words: .... different ion channels and pumps, cause cytosolic Ca2+ transients by stimulating release from intracellular stores and affect the ..... through a subset of abscisic acid-evoked signaling pathways. Natl. Acad. Sci.

  6. NUCLEOTIDES IN INFANT FEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.G. Mamonova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the application of nucleotides-metabolites, playing a key role in many biological processes, for the infant feeding. The researcher provides the date on the nucleotides in the women's milk according to the lactation stages. She also analyzes the foreign experience in feeding newborns with nucleotides-containing milk formulas. The article gives a comparison of nucleotides in the adapted formulas represented in the domestic market of the given products.Key words: children, feeding, nucleotides.

  7. Random mutagenesis of the nucleotide-binding domain of NRC1 (NB-LRR Required for Hypersensitive Response-Associated Cell Death-1), a downstream signalling nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) protein, identifies gain-of-function mutations in the nucleotide-binding pocket

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sueldo, D.J.; Shimels, M.Z.; Spiridon, L.N.; Caldararu, O.; Petrescu, A.J.; Joosten, M.H.A.J.; Tameling, W.I.L.

    2015-01-01

    •Plant nucleotide-binding, leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) proteins confer immunity to pathogens possessing the corresponding avirulence proteins. Activation of NB-LRR proteins is often associated with induction of the hypersensitive response (HR), a form of programmed cell death. •NRC1 (NB-LRR

  8. Species-specific aggregation factor in sponges. VII. Its effect on cyclic amp and cyclic gmp metabolism in cells of Geodia cydonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, W E; Müller, I; Zahn, R K; Kurelec, B

    1978-01-01

    In dissociated single cells from the sponge Geodia cydonium, DNA synthesis is initiated after incubation with a homologous, soluble aggregation factor. During the DNA-initiation phase the cyclic AMP- and cyclic GMP levels vary drastically; the cyclic AMP content drops from 2.2 pmol/10(6) cells to 0.3 pmol/10(6) cells while the cyclic GMP content increases from 0.6 pmol to 3.7 pmol/10(6) cells. The activity of neither the adenylate cyclase nor of the guanylate cyclase isolated from cells which have been incubated for different periods of time with the aggregation factor, is changed. The soluble as well as the particulate enzyme activities were checked in vitro. The cyclic nucleotide receptors have been isolated from the sponge cells and characterized with respect to their molecular weight, dissociation constant for cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP and intracellular concentration. None of these parameters are altered during aggregation factor-mediated DNA initiation. From these data it is concluded that the regulation of cyclic nucleotide levels is a consequence of a changed activity of nucleotide cyclases or of phosphodiesterases, but this is presumably not caused by a changed rate of synthesis of nucleotide cyclases or of cyclic nucleotide receptors.

  9. Time-resolved in silico modeling of fine-tuned cAMP signaling in platelets: feedback loops, titrated phosphorylations and pharmacological modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandekar Thomas

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemostasis is a critical and active function of the blood mediated by platelets. Therefore, the prevention of pathological platelet aggregation is of great importance as well as of pharmaceutical and medical interest. Endogenous platelet inhibition is predominantly based on cyclic nucleotides (cAMP, cGMP elevation and subsequent cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase (PKA, PKG activation. In turn, platelet phosphodiesterases (PDEs and protein phosphatases counterbalance their activity. This main inhibitory pathway in human platelets is crucial for countervailing unwanted platelet activation. Consequently, the regulators of cyclic nucleotide signaling are of particular interest to pharmacology and therapeutics of atherothrombosis. Modeling of pharmacodynamics allows understanding this intricate signaling and supports the precise description of these pivotal targets for pharmacological modulation. Results We modeled dynamically concentration-dependent responses of pathway effectors (inhibitors, activators, drug combinations to cyclic nucleotide signaling as well as to downstream signaling events and verified resulting model predictions by experimental data. Experiments with various cAMP affecting compounds including anti-platelet drugs and their combinations revealed a high fidelity, fine-tuned cAMP signaling in platelets without cross-talk to the cGMP pathway. The model and the data provide evidence for two independent feedback loops: PKA, which is activated by elevated cAMP levels in the platelet, subsequently inhibits adenylyl cyclase (AC but as well activates PDE3. By multi-experiment fitting, we established a comprehensive dynamic model with one predictive, optimized and validated set of parameters. Different pharmacological conditions (inhibition, activation, drug combinations, permanent and transient perturbations are successfully tested and simulated, including statistical validation and sensitivity analysis

  10. Cyclic GMP from the surrounding somatic cells regulates cyclic AMP and meiosis in the mouse oocyte

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rachael P. Norris; William J. Ratzan; Marina Freudzon; Lisa M. Mehlmann; Judith Krall; Matthew A. Movsesian; Huanchen Wang; Hengming Ke; Viacheslav O. Nikolaev; Laurinda A. Jaffe

    2009-01-01

    .... Using FRET-based cyclic nucleotide sensors in follicle-enclosed mouse oocytes, we find that cGMP passes through gap junctions into the oocyte, where it inhibits the hydrolysis of cAMP by the phosphodiesterase PDE3A...

  11. The Insulin-like Growth Factor-I–mTOR Signaling Pathway Induces the Mitochondrial Pyrimidine Nucleotide Carrier to Promote Cell Growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Floyd, Suzanne; Favre, Cedric; Lasorsa, Francesco M.; Leahy, Madeline; Trigiante, Giuseppe; Stroebel, Philipp; Marx, Alexander; Loughran, Gary; O’Callaghan, Katie; Marobbio, Carlo M.T.; Slotboom, Dirk J.; Kunji, Edmund R.S.; Palmieri, Ferdinando; O’Connor, Rosemary

    2007-01-01

    The insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway to mTOR is essential for the survival and growth of normal cells and also contributes to the genesis and progression of cancer. This signaling pathway is linked with regulation of mitochondrial function, but how is incompletely

  12. Effects of hypokinesia on cyclic nucleotides and hormonal regulation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results show that daily excretion of calcium and phosphate is age dependent in rats during the pathogenesis of hypokinesia: the values are higher in control groups. Changes in calcium in the blood and phosphaturia in the experimental animals of all ages were attributed to changes in the intensive re-absorption ...

  13. Possible involvement of integrin-mediated signalling in oocyte activation: evidence that a cyclic RGD-containing peptide can stimulate protein kinase C and cortical granule exocytosis in mouse oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatone, Carla; Carbone, Maria Cristina

    2006-09-25

    Mammalian sperm-oocyte interaction at fertilization involves several combined interactions between integrins on the oocyte and integrin ligands (disintegrins) on the sperm. Recent research has indicated the ability of peptides containing the RGD sequence that characterized several sperm disintegrins, to induce intracellular Ca2+ transients and to initiate parthenogenetic development in amphibian and bovine oocytes. In the present study, we investigate the hypothesis that an integrin-associated signalling may participate in oocyte activation signalling by determining the ability of a cyclic RGD-containing peptide to stimulate the activation of protein kinase C (PKC) and the exocytosis of cortical granules in mouse oocytes. An In-Vitro-Fertilization assay (IVF) was carried in order to test the condition under which a peptide containing the RGD sequence, cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Val), was able to inhibit sperm fusion with zona-free mouse oocytes at metaphase II stage. PKC activity was determined by means of an assay based on the ability of cell lysates to phosphorylate MARKS peptide, a specific PKC substrate. Loss of cortical granules was evaluated by measuring density in the oocyte cortex of cortical granules stained with LCA-biotin/Texas red-streptavidin. In all the experiments, effects of a control peptide containing a non RGD sequence, cyclo(Arg-Ala-Asp-D-Phe-Val), were evaluated. The IVF assay revealed that the fusion rate declined significantly when insemination was carried out in the presence of cyclic RGD peptide at concentrations > or = 250 microM (P exocytosis of cortical granules. These data support the view that RGD-binding receptors may function as signalling receptors giving rise integrated signalling not sufficient for a full oocyte activation response. This study may contribute to the understanding of possible negative effects of skipping gamete interaction in IVF techniques.

  14. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... anxiety to a stress management specialist for relaxation therapy or other treatments. A health care provider may prescribe medications to prevent migraines for people with cyclic vomiting syndrome. Eating, Diet, and Nutrition During the prodrome and vomiting phases of cyclic ...

  15. Possible involvement of integrin-mediated signalling in oocyte activation: evidence that a cyclic RGD-containing peptide can stimulate protein kinase C and cortical granule exocytosis in mouse oocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carbone Maria

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mammalian sperm-oocyte interaction at fertilization involves several combined interactions between integrins on the oocyte and integrin ligands (disintegrins on the sperm. Recent research has indicated the ability of peptides containing the RGD sequence that characterized several sperm disintegrins, to induce intracellular Ca2+ transients and to initiate parthenogenetic development in amphibian and bovine oocytes. In the present study, we investigate the hypothesis that an integrin-associated signalling may participate in oocyte activation signalling by determining the ability of a cyclic RGD-containing peptide to stimulate the activation of protein kinase C (PKC and the exocytosis of cortical granules in mouse oocytes. Methods An In-Vitro-Fertilization assay (IVF was carried in order to test the condition under which a peptide containing the RGD sequence, cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-D-Phe-Val, was able to inhibit sperm fusion with zona-free mouse oocytes at metaphase II stage. PKC activity was determined by means of an assay based on the ability of cell lysates to phosphorylate MARKS peptide, a specific PKC substrate. Loss of cortical granules was evaluated by measuring density in the oocyte cortex of cortical granules stained with LCA-biotin/Texas red-streptavidin. In all the experiments, effects of a control peptide containing a non RGD sequence, cyclo(Arg-Ala-Asp-D-Phe-Val, were evaluated. Results The IVF assay revealed that the fusion rate declined significantly when insemination was carried out in the presence of cyclic RGD peptide at concentrations > or = 250 microM (P Conclusion The presents results provide evidence that a cyclic RGD peptide highly effective in inhibiting sperm-oocyte interaction stimulates in mouse oocytes the activation of PKC and the exocytosis of cortical granules. These data support the view that RGD-binding receptors may function as signalling receptors giving rise integrated signalling not sufficient for

  16. Flow-induced [Ca2+]i increase depends on nucleotide release and subsequent purinergic signaling in the intact nephron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Jensen, Mikkel E.; Odgaard, Elvin V. P.; Christensen, Mette Høgh

    2007-01-01

    that the flow-induced [Ca2+]i response in the renal tubule involves mechanically stimulated nucleotide release. This study investigated (1) the expression of P2 receptors in mouse medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) using P2Y2 receptor knockout (KO) mice, (2) whether flow increases induce [Ca2+]i elevations...... in mTAL, and (3) whether this flow response is affected in mice that are deplete of the main purinergic receptor. [Ca2+]i was imaged in perfused mTAL with fura-2 or fluo-4. It is shown that luminal and basolateral P2Y2 receptors are the main purinergic receptor in this segment. Moreover, the data...... suggest presence of basolateral P2X receptors. Increases of tubular flow were imposed by promptly rising the inflow pressure, which triggered a marked increase of [Ca2+]i. This [Ca2+]i response was significantly reduced in P2Y2 receptor KO tubules (fura-2 ratio increase WT 0.44 +/- 0.09 [n = 28] versus KO...

  17. Species-specific engagement of human nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (NOD)2 and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling upon intracellular bacterial infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salem, M; Seidelin, J B; Eickhardt-Dalbøge, Steffen Robert

    2015-01-01

    Recognition of bacterial peptidoglycan-derived muramyl-dipeptide (MDP) by nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) induces crucial innate immune responses. Most bacteria carry the N-acetylated form of MDP (A-MDP) in their cell membranes, whereas N-glycolyl MDP (G-MDP) is typical for mycobacteria...... of MDP and further to determine the role of NOD2 gene variants for the bacterial recognition in CD. The response pattern to A-MDP, G-MDP, Mycobacterium segmatis (expressing mainly G-MDP) and M. segmatisΔnamH (expressing A-MDP), Listeria monocytogenes (LM) (an A-MDP-containing bacteria) and M. avium...... paratuberculosis (MAP) (a G-MDP-containing bacteria associated with CD) was investigated in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). A-MDP and M. segmatisΔnamH induced significantly higher tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α protein levels in healthy wild-type NOD2 PBMCs compared with G-MDP and M. segmatis...

  18. Sildenafil Prevents Apoptosis of Human First-Trimester Trophoblast Cells Exposed to Oxidative Stress: Possible Role for Nitric Oxide Activation of 3',5'-cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolnick, Jay M; Kilburn, Brian A; Bolnick, Alan D; Diamond, Michael P; Singh, Manvinder; Hertz, Michael; Dai, Jing; Armant, D Randall

    2015-06-01

    Human first-trimester trophoblast cells proliferate at low O2, but survival is compromised by oxidative stress, leading to uteroplacental insufficiency. The vasoactive drug, sildenafil citrate (Viagra, Sigma, St Louis, Missouri), has proven useful in reducing adverse pregnancy outcomes. An important biological function of this pharmaceutical is its action as an inhibitor of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) phosphodiesterase type 5 activity, which suggests that it could have beneficial effects on trophoblast survival. To investigate whether sildenafil can prevent trophoblast cell death, human first-trimester villous explants and the HTR-8/SVneo cytotrophoblast cell line were exposed to hypoxia and reoxygenation (H/R) to generate oxidative stress, which induces apoptosis. Apoptosis was optimally inhibited during H/R by 350 ng/mL sildenafil. Sildenafil-mediated survival was reversed by l-N(G)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride or cGMP antagonist, indicating a dependence on both nitric oxide (NO) and cGMP. Indeed, either a cGMP agonist or an NO generator was cytoprotective independent of sildenafil. These findings suggest a novel intervention route for patients with recurrent pregnancy loss or obstetrical placental disorders. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Nucleotide Salvage Deficiencies, DNA Damage and Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Fasullo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide balance is critically important not only in replicating cells but also in quiescent cells. This is especially true in the nervous system, where there is a high demand for adenosine triphosphate (ATP produced from mitochondria. Mitochondria are particularly prone to oxidative stress-associated DNA damage because nucleotide imbalance can lead to mitochondrial depletion due to low replication fidelity. Failure to maintain nucleotide balance due to genetic defects can result in infantile death; however there is great variability in clinical presentation for particular diseases. This review compares genetic diseases that result from defects in specific nucleotide salvage enzymes and a signaling kinase that activates nucleotide salvage after DNA damage exposure. These diseases include Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, mitochondrial depletion syndromes, and ataxia telangiectasia. Although treatment options are available to palliate symptoms of these diseases, there is no cure. The conclusions drawn from this review include the critical role of guanine nucleotides in preventing neurodegeneration, the limitations of animals as disease models, and the need to further understand nucleotide imbalances in treatment regimens. Such knowledge will hopefully guide future studies into clinical therapies for genetic diseases.

  20. Main: Nucleotide Analysis [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Nucleotide Analysis Japonica genome blast search result Result of blastn search against japon...ica genome sequence kome_japonica_genome_blast_search_result.zip kome_japonica_genome_blast_search_result ...

  1. Mobilisation of trehalose in mutants of the cyclic AMP signalling pathway, cr-1 (CRISP-1) and mcb (microcycle conidiation), of Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pinho, C A; de Lourdes, M; Polizeli, T M; Jorge, J A; Terenzi, H F

    2001-05-15

    The influence of the cAMP-signalling pathway on the metabolism of trehalose in Neurospora crassa was investigated. The changes in intracellular trehalose concentration were measured in two mutants affected in components of the cAMP-signalling pathway: cr-1 (crisp-1), deficient in adenylyl cyclase activity, and mcb (microcyclic conidiation), deficient in the regulatory subunit of PKA. Rapid mobilisation of intracellular trehalose in the wild-type occurred, either at the onset of germination, or after a heat shock, and by carbon starvation. Mutant cr-1 failed to mobilise trehalose at germination, but behaved almost normally after a heat shock, or during carbon starvation. On the other hand, the levels of trehalose in mcb fell to values much lower than in the wild-type at germination, but accumulated trehalose normally during a heat shock. These results are consistent with the involvement of cAMP in the activation of the neutral trehalase at the onset of germination. However, the control of the enzyme under the other physiological conditions which also promote mobilisation of intracellular trehalose was apparently independent of cAMP-signalling.

  2. Nitric oxide-soluble guanylyl cyclase-cyclic GMP signaling in the striatum: New targets for the treatment of Parkinson's disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony R West

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Striatal nitric oxide (NO-producing interneurons play an important role in the regulation of corticostriatal synaptic transmission and motor behavior. Striatal NO synthesis is driven by concurrent activation of NMDA and dopamine (DA D1 receptors. NO diffuses into the dendrites of medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs which contain high levels of NO receptors called soluble guanylyl cyclases (sGC. NO-mediated activation of sGC leads to the synthesis of the second messenger cGMP. In the intact striatum, transient elevations in intracellular cGMP primarily act to increase neuronal excitability and to facilitate glutamatergic corticostriatal transmission. NO-cGMP signaling also functionally opposes the inhibitory effects of DA D2 receptor activation on corticostriatal transmission. Not surprisingly, abnormal striatal NO-sGC-cGMP signaling becomes apparent following striatal DA depletion, an alteration thought to contribute to pathophysiological changes observed in basal ganglia circuits in Parkinson’s disease (PD. Here, we discuss recent developments in the field which have shed light on the role of NO-sGC-cGMP signaling pathways in basal ganglia dysfunction and motor symptoms associated with PD and L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias.

  3. Evolving nucleotide binding surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieber-Emmons, T.; Rein, R.

    1981-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the stability and nature of binding of a nucleotide to several known dehydrogenases. The employed approach includes calculation of hydrophobic stabilization of the binding motif and its intermolecular interaction with the ligand. The evolutionary changes of the binding motif are studied by calculating the Euclidean deviation of the respective dehydrogenases. Attention is given to the possible structural elements involved in the origin of nucleotide recognition by non-coded primordial polypeptides.

  4. A multi-angular mass spectrometric view at cyclic nucleotide signaling proteins : Structure/function and protein interactions of cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, A.

    2006-01-01

    The primary focus of this thesis is the two kinases PKA and PKG, cAMP and cGMP dependent protein kinase respectively. PKA and PKG are studied both at structure/function level as well as at the level of interaction with other proteins in tissue. Our primary methods are all based on mass spectrometry.

  5. Involvement of VILIP-1 (visinin-like protein) and opposite roles of cyclic AMP and GMP signaling in in vitro cell migration of murine skin squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönrath, Katharina; Pan, Wensheng; Klein-Szanto, Andres J; Braunewell, Karl-Heinz

    2011-05-01

    VILIP-1 (visinin-like protein 1) is downregulated in various human squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). In a mouse skin SCC model VILIP-1 expression is reduced in aggressive tumor cells, accompanied by reduced cAMP levels. Overexpression of VILIP-1 in aggressive SCC cells led to enhanced cAMP production, in turn causing a reduction in invasive properties. Moreover, in primary neurons and neuronal tumor lines VILIP-1 enhanced cGMP signaling. Here, we set out to determine whether and how cAMP and cGMP signaling contribute to the VILIP-1 effect on enhanced SCC model cell migration, and thus most likely invasiveness in vivo. We found stronger increase in cGMP levels in aggressive, VILIP-1-negative SCC cells following stimulation of guanylyl cyclases NPR-A and -B with the natriuretic peptides ANP and CNP, respectively. Incubation with ANP or 8Br-cGMP to increase cGMP levels further enhanced the migration capacity of aggressive cells, whereas cell adhesion was unaffected. Increased cGMP was caused by elevated expression levels of NPR-A and -B. However, the expression level of VILIP-1 did not affect cGMP signaling and guanylyl cyclase expression in SCC. In contrast, VILIP-1 led to reduced migration of aggressive SCC cells depending on cAMP levels as shown by use of adenylyl cyclase (AC) inhibitor 2',3'-dideoxyadenosine. Involvement of cAMP-effectors PKA and EPAC play a role downstream of AC activation. VILIP-1-positive and -negative cells did not differ in mRNA expression of ACs, but an effect on enhanced protein expression and membrane localization of ACs was shown to underlie enhancement of cAMP production and, thus, reduction in cell migration by VILIP-1. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: cyclic neutropenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Cyclic neutropenia Cyclic neutropenia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Cyclic neutropenia is a disorder that causes frequent infections and ...

  7. Glucose Evokes Rapid Ca2+ and Cyclic AMP Signals by Activating the Cell-Surface Glucose-Sensing Receptor in Pancreatic β-Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yuko; Nagasawa, Masahiro; Medina, Johan; Kojima, Itaru

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is a primary stimulator of insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. High concentration of glucose has been thought to exert its action solely through its metabolism. In this regard, we have recently reported that glucose also activates a cell-surface glucose-sensing receptor and facilitates its own metabolism. In the present study, we investigated whether glucose activates the glucose-sensing receptor and elicits receptor-mediated rapid actions. In MIN6 cells and isolated mouse β-cells, glucose induced triphasic changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c); glucose evoked an immediate elevation of [Ca2+]c, which was followed by a decrease in [Ca2+]c, and after a certain lag period it induced large oscillatory elevations of [Ca2+]c. Initial rapid peak and subsequent reduction of [Ca2+]c were independent of glucose metabolism and reproduced by a nonmetabolizable glucose analogue. These signals were also blocked by an inhibitor of T1R3, a subunit of the glucose-sensing receptor, and by deletion of the T1R3 gene. Besides Ca2+, glucose also induced an immediate and sustained elevation of intracellular cAMP ([cAMP]c). The elevation of [cAMP]c was blocked by transduction of the dominant-negative Gs, and deletion of the T1R3 gene. These results indicate that glucose induces rapid changes in [Ca2+]c and [cAMP]c by activating the cell-surface glucose-sensing receptor. Hence, glucose generates rapid intracellular signals by activating the cell-surface receptor. PMID:26630567

  8. Real Topological Cyclic Homology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgenhaven, Amalie

    , where O(2) is the semi-direct product of T, the multiplicative group of complex number of modulus 1, by the group G=Gal(C/R). We refer to this O(2)-spectrum as the real topological Hochschild homology. This generalization leads to a G-equivariant version of topological cyclic homology, which we call...... real topological cyclic homology. The first part of the thesis computes the G-equivariant homotopy type of the real topological cyclic homology of spherical group rings at a prime p with anti-involution induced by taking inverses in the group. The second part of the thesis investigates the derived G...

  9. Biomolecular Simulation of Base Excision Repair and Protein Signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straatsma, TP; McCammon, J A; Miller, John H; Smith, Paul E; Vorpagel, Erich R; Wong, Chung F; Zacharias, Martin W

    2006-03-03

    The goal of the Biomolecular Simulation of Base Excision Repair and Protein Signaling project is to enhance our understanding of the mechanism of human polymerase-β, one of the key enzymes in base excision repair (BER) and the cell-signaling enzymes cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase. This work used molecular modeling and simulation studies to specifically focus on the • dynamics of DNA and damaged DNA • dynamics and energetics of base flipping in DNA • mechanism and fidelity of nucleotide insertion by BER enzyme human polymerase-β • mechanism and inhibitor design for cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase. Molecular dynamics simulations and electronic structure calculations have been performed using the computer resources at the Molecular Science Computing Facility at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory.

  10. Molecular methods for the study of signal transduction in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Irving, Helen R.

    2013-09-03

    Novel and improved analytical methods have led to a rapid increase in our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying plant signal transduction. Progress has been made both at the level of single-component analysis and in vivo imaging as well as at the systems level where transcriptomics and particularly phosphoproteomics afford a window into complex biological responses. Here we review the role of the cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP in plant signal transduction as well as the discovery and biochemical and biological characterization of an increasing number of complex multi-domain nucleotide cyclases that catalyze the synthesis of cAMP and cGMP from ATP and GTP, respectively. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  11. Molecular methods for the study of signal transduction in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irving, Helen R; Gehring, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Novel and improved analytical methods have led to a rapid increase in our understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying plant signal transduction. Progress has been made both at the level of single-component analysis and in vivo imaging as well as at the systems level where transcriptomics and particularly phosphoproteomics afford a window into complex biological responses. Here we review the role of the cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP in plant signal transduction as well as the discovery and biochemical and biological characterization of an increasing number of complex multi-domain nucleotide cyclases that catalyze the synthesis of cAMP and cGMP from ATP and GTP, respectively.

  12. Differences in responsiveness of intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid: mechanism of arterial relaxation involves cyclic guanosine 3':5'-monophosphate and cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignarro, L.J.; Harbison, R.G.; Wood, K.S.; Wolin, M.S.; McNamara, D.B.; Hyman, A.L.; Kadowitz, P.J.

    1985-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between responses of bovine intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid and cyclic nucleotide levels in order to better understand the mechanism of relaxation elicited by arachidonic acid and acetylcholine. Arachidonic acid relaxed phenylephrine-precontracted arterial rings and elevated both cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP levels in arteries with intact endothelium. In contrast, endothelium-damaged arterial rings contracted to arachidonic acid without demonstrating significant changes in cyclic nucleotide levels. Indomethacin partially inhibited endothelium-dependent relaxation and abolished cyclic AMP accumulation whereas methylene blue, a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, partially inhibited relaxation and abolished cyclic GMP accumulation in response to arachidonic acid. All vessel responses were blocked by a combination of the two inhibitors. Prostaglandin (PG) I2 relaxed arterial rings and elevated cyclic AMP levels whereas PGE2 and PGF2 alpha caused contraction, suggesting that the indomethacin-sensitive component of arachidonic acid-elicited relaxation is due to PGI2 formation and cyclic AMP accumulation. The methylene blue-sensitive component is attributed to an endothelium-dependent but cyclooxygenase-independent generation of a substance causing cyclic GMP accumulation. Intrapulmonary veins contracted to arachidonic acid with no changes in cyclic nucleotide levels and PGI2 was without effect. Homogenates of intrapulmonary artery and vein formed 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, PGF2 alpha and PGE2 from (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid, which was inhibited by indomethacin. Thus, bovine intrapulmonary vein may not possess receptors for PGI2.

  13. Nucleotide Sequence of the Protective Antigen Gene of Bacillus Anthracis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-02-02

    interactions with eucaryotic cells , p. 189-198. In P. Greengard and G. A. Robinson (ed.), Advances in cyclic nucleotide and protein phosphorylation...biological activity of * PA produced by the recombinants were tested by a Western blot * procedure and the CFO cell elongation assay, respectively (14... cell elongation assay (20; data not shown). To determine the location ard direction of transcription of the PA gene, the 4.2-kb ins’nrt was excised

  14. OCCURRENCE OF NUCLEOTIDES IN CULTURE FLUIDS OF MICROORGANISMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabayashi, Tadashi; Yoshimoto, Akihiro; Ide, Misao

    1963-01-01

    Okabayashi, Tadashi (Shionogi & Co., Ltd., Fukushima-ku, Osaka, Japan), Akihiro Yoshimoto, and Misao Ide. Occurrence of nucleotides in culture fluids of microorganisms. V. Excretion of adenosine cyclic 3′,5′-phosphate by Brevibacterium liquefaciens sp. n. J. Bacteriol. 86:930–936. 1963.—Brevibacterium liquefaciens sp. n., when grown in a medium containing amino acids as the nitrogen source, excreted a considerable amount of an adenine ribonucleotide, which had not previously been noticed. The nucleotide was identified as adenosine cyclic 3′,5′-phosphate by analysis, ultraviolet-absorption spectra, infrared-absorption spectra, paper chromatography, paper electrophoresis, and by comparison of behavior in hydrolysis by HCl, NaOH, and Ba(OH)2; also, behavior in digestion with a crude enzyme preparation of adenosine cyclic 3′,5′-phosphate phosphodiesterase was compared with that of an authentic sample. Preliminary examination of culture conditions revealed that, at least superficially, the substitution of dl-alanine for Casamino Acids (as nitrogen source) is one of the causes of the excretion of adenosine cyclic 3′,5′-phosphate. PMID:14080803

  15. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børsting, Claus; Pereira, Vania; Andersen, Jeppe Dyrberg

    2014-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the most frequent DNA sequence variations in the genome. They have been studied extensively in the last decade with various purposes in mind. In this chapter, we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of using SNPs for human identification...... technologies (also called next generation sequencing or NGS) have the potential to completely transform forensic genetic investigations as we know them today. Here, we will make a short introduction to NGS and explain how NGS may combine analysis of the traditional forensic genetic markers with analysis...

  16. CHARACTERIZATION OF P2-PURINOCEPTOR MEDIATED CYCLIC-AMP FORMATION IN MOUSE C2C12 MYOTUBES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HENNING, RH; DUIN, M; DENHERTOG, A; NELEMANS, A

    1 The formation of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) and inositol(1,4,5)trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P3), induced by ATP and other nucleotides was investigated in mouse C2Cl2 myotubes. 2 ATP (100 muM) and ATPgammaS (100 muM) caused a sustained increase in cyclic AMP content of the cells,

  17. Cyclic AMP receptor protein-aequorin molecular switch for cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Daniel; Hamorsky, Krystal Teasley; Ensor, C Mark; Anderson, Kimberly W; Daunert, Sylvia

    2011-03-16

    Molecular switches are designer molecules that combine the functionality of two individual proteins into one, capable of manifesting an "on/off" signal in response to a stimulus. These switches have unique properties and functionalities and thus, can be employed as nanosensors in a variety of applications. To that end, we have developed a bioluminescent molecular switch for cyclic AMP. Bioluminescence offers many advantages over fluorescence and other detection methods including the fact that there is essentially zero background signal in physiological fluids, allowing for more sensitive detection and monitoring. The switch was created by combining the properties of the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP), a transcriptional regulatory protein from E. Coli that binds selectively to cAMP with those of aequorin, a bioluminescent photoprotein native of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria . Genetic manipulation to split the genetic coding sequence of aequorin in two and genetically attach the fragments to the N and C termini of CRP resulted in a hybrid protein molecular switch. The conformational change experienced by CRP upon the binding of cyclic AMP is suspected to result in the observed loss of the bioluminescent signal from aequorin. The "on/off" bioluminescence can be modulated by cyclic AMP over a range of several orders of magnitude in a linear fashion in addition to the capacity to detect changes in cellular cyclic AMP of intact cells exposed to different external stimuli without the need to lyse the cells. We envision that the molecular switch could find applications in vitro as well as In Vivo cyclic AMP detection and/or imaging.

  18. Dynamics of cyclic machines

    CERN Document Server

    Vulfson, Iosif

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on modern methods of oscillation analysis in machines, including cyclic action mechanisms (linkages, cams, steppers, etc.). It presents schematization techniques and mathematical descriptions of oscillating systems, taking into account the variability of the parameters and nonlinearities, engineering evaluations of dynamic errors, and oscillation suppression methods. The majority of the book is devoted to the development of new methods of dynamic analysis and synthesis for cyclic machines that form regular oscillatory systems with multiple duplicate modules.  There are also sections examining aspects of general engineering interest (nonlinear dissipative forces, systems with non-stationary constraints, impacts and pseudo-impacts in clearances, etc.)  The examples in the book are based on the widely used results of theoretical and experimental studies as well as engineering calculations carried out in relation to machines used in the textile, light, polygraphic and other industries. Particu...

  19. Cyclic quantum teleportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Xuan; Du, Jing; Liu, Si-Yuan; Wang, Xiao-Hui

    2017-08-01

    We propose a scheme of cyclic quantum teleportation for three unknown qubits using six-qubit maximally entangled state as the quantum channel. Suppose there are three observers Alice, Bob and Charlie, each of them has been given a quantum system such as a photon or spin-1/2 particle, prepared in state unknown to them. We show how to implement the cyclic quantum teleportation where Alice can transfer her single-qubit state of qubit a to Bob, Bob can transfer his single-qubit state of qubit b to Charlie and Charlie can also transfer his single-qubit state of qubit c to Alice. We can also implement the cyclic quantum teleportation with N≥slant 3 observers by constructing a 2 N-qubit maximally entangled state as the quantum channel. By changing the quantum channel, we can change the direction of teleportation. Therefore, our scheme can realize teleportation in quantum information networks with N observers in different directions, and the security of our scheme is also investigated at the end of the paper.

  20. Cyclic GMP recognition using ratiometric QD-fluorophore conjugate nanosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cywinski, Piotr J; Moro, Artur J; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd

    2014-02-15

    Novel luminescent ratiometric nanosensors (QD-NAPTHs) were prepared based on cadmium telluride (CdTe655) quantum dots as luminescent nanoscaffolds with naphthyridine dyes as fluorescent receptors. This biosensing bifluorophoric nanosystem has been designed to achieve detection of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) in buffered media. Cyclic GMP is a secondary messenger that is an important factor for detecting cancer, diabetes and, cardiovascular diseases. Due to low concentration levels, even in pathological conditions, sensitive cGMP detection remains a challenge for modern biomedical diagnostics. Here, QD-NAPTH nanosensors were tested in the presence of a target nucleotide and with various structural cGMP analogues. Steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy was used to monitor a change in the nucleotide concentration. A 5-fold increase in naphthyridine fluorescence with a simultaneous decrease in QD luminescence was observed after adding 50 μM of cGMP. Using this novel nanosystem with ratiometric detection, it was possible to recognize cGMP with limit of detection (3σ) equal to 70 ng/ml. Moreover, the enhancement in fluorescence upon interaction with the target nucleotide constitutes a favourable approach towards the detection of cGMP in buffered media. These bifluorophoric nanosensors have a potential for application in fluorescence microscopy imaging and in-vitro assays. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. PAP and NT5E inhibit nociceptive neurotransmission by rapidly hydrolyzing nucleotides to adenosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) and ecto-5'-nucleotidase (NT5E, CD73) produce extracellular adenosine from the nucleotide AMP in spinal nociceptive (pain-sensing) circuits; however, it is currently unknown if these are the main ectonucleotidases that generate adenosine or how rapidly they generate adenosine. Results We found that AMP hydrolysis, when measured histochemically, was nearly abolished in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) neurons and lamina II of spinal cord from Pap/Nt5e double knockout (dKO) mice. Likewise, the antinociceptive effects of AMP, when combined with nucleoside transport inhibitors (dipyridamole or 5-iodotubericidin), were reduced by 80-100% in dKO mice. In addition, we used fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) to measure adenosine production at subsecond resolution within lamina II. Adenosine was maximally produced within seconds from AMP in wild-type (WT) mice but production was reduced >50% in dKO mice, indicating PAP and NT5E rapidly generate adenosine in lamina II. Unexpectedly, we also detected spontaneous low frequency adenosine transients in lamina II with FSCV. Adenosine transients were of short duration (60%) in frequency in Pap-/-, Nt5e-/- and dKO mice, suggesting these ectonucleotidases rapidly hydrolyze endogenously released nucleotides to adenosine. Field potential recordings in lamina II and behavioral studies indicate that adenosine made by these enzymes acts through the adenosine A1 receptor to inhibit excitatory neurotransmission and nociception. Conclusions Collectively, our experiments indicate that PAP and NT5E are the main ectonucleotidases that generate adenosine in nociceptive circuits and indicate these enzymes transform pulsatile or sustained nucleotide release into an inhibitory adenosinergic signal. PMID:22011440

  2. Microgravity changes in heart structure and cyclic-AMP metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, D. E.; Fine, A.; Kato, K.; Egnor, R.; Cheng, L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of microgravity on cardiac ultrastructure and cyclic AMP metabolism in tissues of rats flown on Spacelab 3 are reported. Light and electron microscope studies of cell structure, measurements of low and high Km phosphodiesterase activity, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity, and regulatory subunit compartmentation show significant deviations in flight animals when compared to ground controls. The results indicate that some changes have occurred in cellular responses associated with catecholamine receptor interactions and intracellular signal processing.

  3. [Asthma and cyclic neutropenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar Cabrera, A N; Berrón Pérez, R; Ortega Martell, J A; Onuma Takane, E

    1996-01-01

    We report a male with history of recurrent infections (recurrent oral aphtous disease [ROAD], middle ear infections and pharyngo amigdalitis) every 3 weeks since he was 7 months old. At the age of 3 years cyclic neutropenia was diagnosed with cyclic fall in the total neutrophil count in blood smear every 21 days and prophylactic antimicrobial therapy was indicated. Episodic events every 3 weeks of acute asthma and allergic rhinitis were detected at the age of 6 years old and specific immunotherapy to Bermuda grass was given during 3 years with markedly improvement in his allergic condition but not in the ROAD. He came back until the age of 16 with episodic acute asthma and ROAD. The total neutrophil count failed to 0 every 21 days and surprisingly the total eosinophil count increased up to 2,000 at the same time, with elevation of serum IgE (412 Ul/mL). Specific immunotherapy to D.pt. and Aller.a. and therapy with timomodulin was indicated. After 3 months we observed clinical improvement in the asthmatic condition and the ROAD disappeared, but the total neutrophil count did not improve. We present this case as a rare association between 2 diseases with probably no etiological relationship but may be physiopatological that could help to understand more the pathogenesis of asthma.

  4. Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-mediated stimulation of adipocyte differentiation requires the synergistic action of Epac- and cAMP-dependent protein kinase-dependent processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Koefoed; Madsen, Lise; Pedersen, Lone Møller

    2008-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent processes are pivotal during the early stages of adipocyte differentiation. We show that exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), which functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Ras-like GTPases Rap1 and Rap2, was required for cAMP-dependent ......Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent processes are pivotal during the early stages of adipocyte differentiation. We show that exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), which functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Ras-like GTPases Rap1 and Rap2, was required for c......AMP-dependent stimulation of adipocyte differentiation. Epac, working via Rap, acted synergistically with cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A [PKA]) to promote adipogenesis. The major role of PKA was to down-regulate Rho and Rho-kinase activity, rather than to enhance CREB phosphorylation. Suppression of Rho......-kinase impaired proadipogenic insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling, which was restored by activation of Epac. This interplay between PKA and Epac-mediated processes not only provides novel insight into the initiation and tuning of adipocyte differentiation, but also demonstrates a new mechanism of c...

  5. Cyclic transfers in school timetabling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Gerhard F.; Ahmadi, Samad; Geertsema, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose a neighbourhood structure based on sequential/cyclic moves and a cyclic transfer algorithm for the high school timetabling problem. This method enables execution of complex moves for improving an existing solution, while dealing with the challenge of exploring the

  6. Cyclic transfers in school timetabling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Gerhard F.; Ahmadi, Samad; Geertsema, Frederik

    In this paper we propose a neighbourhood structure based on sequential/cyclic moves and a Cyclic Transfer algorithm for the high school timetabling problem. This method enables execution of complex moves for improving an existing solution, while dealing with the challenge of exploring the

  7. Cyclic Matching Pursuits with Multiscale Time-frequency Dictionaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sturm, Bob L.; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll

    2010-01-01

    We generalize cyclic matching pursuit (CMP), propose an orthogonal variant, and examine their performance using multiscale time-frequency dictionaries in the sparse approximation of signals. Overall, we find that the cyclic approach of CMP produces signal models that have a much lower approximation...... error than existing greedy iterative descent methods such as matching pursuit (MP), and are competitive with models found using orthogonal MP (OMP), and orthogonal least squares (OLS). This implies that CMP is a strong alternative to the more computationally complex approaches of OMP and OLS...

  8. Calcium Signals from the Vacuole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Schönknecht

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The vacuole is by far the largest intracellular Ca2+ store in most plant cells. Here, the current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms of vacuolar Ca2+ release and Ca2+ uptake is summarized, and how different vacuolar Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ pumps may contribute to Ca2+ signaling in plant cells is discussed. To provide a phylogenetic perspective, the distribution of potential vacuolar Ca2+ transporters is compared for different clades of photosynthetic eukaryotes. There are several candidates for vacuolar Ca2+ channels that could elicit cytosolic [Ca2+] transients. Typical second messengers, such as InsP3 and cADPR, seem to trigger vacuolar Ca2+ release, but the molecular mechanism of this Ca2+ release still awaits elucidation. Some vacuolar Ca2+ channels have been identified on a molecular level, the voltage-dependent SV/TPC1 channel, and recently two cyclic-nucleotide-gated cation channels. However, their function in Ca2+ signaling still has to be demonstrated. Ca2+ pumps in addition to establishing long-term Ca2+ homeostasis can shape cytosolic [Ca2+] transients by limiting their amplitude and duration, and may thus affect Ca2+ signaling.

  9. Cyclic biamperometry at micro-interdigitated electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Mehdi; Mikkelsen, Susan R

    2011-10-01

    Cyclic biamperometry was studied as an analytical method for use with commercially available, comb-type, coplanar microinterdigitated electrodes (μIDEs), using the ferri-/ferrocyanide redox couple as a model analyte. The μIDEs studied in this work were made of gold that had been deposited onto a Ti/W adhesion layer on borosilicate glass chips and had 5 and 10 μm bands with equal gap sizes. Close proximity of the two working electrodes, and their interdigitation, resulted in signal amplification by redox cycling. Results were compared with those obtained by cyclic voltammetry, where one of the two IDE electrodes was used as the working electrode and external reference and auxiliary electrodes were used. Amplification factors of almost 20 were achieved due to redox cycling. Attempts to apply cyclic voltammetry to the μIDEs, with one of the combs as the working and the other as the auxiliary electrode, were unsuccessful due to corrosion of the auxiliary electrode comb. Results of this study, and the electrochemically unique feature of biamperometry to probe but not change the net contents of the medium under examination, suggest the applicability of scanning biamperometry at μIDEs to the very small volumes and electrochemical cell dimensions that are now of great interest.

  10. Characterization and role of a 2',3'-cyclic phosphodiesterase from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wanchun; Zhou, Congli; Cheng, Jiahui; Pan, Mingzhe; Hua, Yuejin; Zhao, Ye

    2017-08-01

    A 2',3'-cyclic phosphodiesterase gene (drCPDase) has been characterized from Deinococcus radiodurans and is involved in the robust resistance of this organism. Cells lacking 2',3'-cyclic phosphodiesterase gene (drCPDase) showed modest growth defects and displayed increased sensitivities to high doses of various DNA-damaging agents including ionizing radiation, mitomycin C, UV and H2O2. The transcriptional level of drCPDase increased after H2O2 treatment. Additional nucleotide monophosphate partially recovered the phenotype of drCPDase knockout cells. Complementation of E. coli with drCPDase resulted in enhanced H2O2 resistance. The 2',3'-cyclic phosphodiesterase (drCPDase) contributes to the extreme resistance of D. radiodurans and is presumably involved in damaged nucleotide detoxification.

  11. Binding of regulatory subunits of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase to cyclic CMP agarose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerschmidt, Andreas; Chatterji, Bijon; Zeiser, Johannes; Schröder, Anke; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Pich, Andreas; Kaever, Volkhard; Schwede, Frank; Wolter, Sabine; Seifert, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial adenylyl cyclase toxins CyaA from Bordetella pertussis and edema factor from Bacillus anthracis as well as soluble guanylyl cyclase α(1)β(1) synthesize the cyclic pyrimidine nucleotide cCMP. These data raise the question to which effector proteins cCMP binds. Recently, we reported that cCMP activates the regulatory subunits RIα and RIIα of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. In this study, we used two cCMP agarose matrices as novel tools in combination with immunoblotting and mass spectrometry to identify cCMP-binding proteins. In agreement with our functional data, RIα and RIIα were identified as cCMP-binding proteins. These data corroborate the notion that cAMP-dependent protein kinase may serve as a cCMP target.

  12. The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanz, Carola; Aldebert, Philippe; Althorpe, Nicola; Baker, Wendy; Baldwin, Alastair; Bates, Kirsty; Browne, Paul; van den Broek, Alexandra; Castro, Matias; Cochrane, Guy; Duggan, Karyn; Eberhardt, Ruth; Faruque, Nadeem; Gamble, John; Diez, Federico Garcia; Harte, Nicola; Kulikova, Tamara; Lin, Quan; Lombard, Vincent; Lopez, Rodrigo; Mancuso, Renato; McHale, Michelle; Nardone, Francesco; Silventoinen, Ville; Sobhany, Siamak; Stoehr, Peter; Tuli, Mary Ann; Tzouvara, Katerina; Vaughan, Robert; Wu, Dan; Zhu, Weimin; Apweiler, Rolf

    2005-01-01

    The EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/embl), maintained at the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) near Cambridge, UK, is a comprehensive collection of nucleotide sequences and annotation from available public sources. The database is part of an international collaboration with DDBJ (Japan) and GenBank (USA). Data are exchanged daily between the collaborating institutes to achieve swift synchrony. Webin is the preferred tool for individual submissions of nucleotide sequences, including Third Party Annotation (TPA) and alignments. Automated procedures are provided for submissions from large-scale sequencing projects and data from the European Patent Office. New and updated data records are distributed daily and the whole EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database is released four times a year. Access to the sequence data is provided via ftp and several WWW interfaces. With the web-based Sequence Retrieval System (SRS) it is also possible to link nucleotide data to other specialist molecular biology databases maintained at the EBI. Other tools are available for sequence similarity searching (e.g. FASTA and BLAST). Changes over the past year include the removal of the sequence length limit, the launch of the EMBLCDSs dataset, extension of the Sequence Version Archive functionality and the revision of quality rules for TPA data.

  13. Prognosis of Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, evaluated the clinical features, prognosis, and prophylaxis of cyclic vomiting syndrome and the relationship between the syndrome and levels of adrenocorticotropic/antidiuretic hormones (ACTH/ADH.

  14. Functionalized linear and cyclic polyolefins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuba, Robert; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2018-02-13

    This invention relates to methods and compositions for preparing linear and cyclic polyolefins. More particularly, the invention relates to methods and compositions for preparing functionalized linear and cyclic polyolefins via olefin metathesis reactions. Polymer products produced via the olefin metathesis reactions of the invention may be utilized for a wide range of materials applications. The invention has utility in the fields of polymer and materials chemistry and manufacture.

  15. Cyclic Processing for Context Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun

    2007-01-01

    Many machine-learning techniques use feedback information. However, current context fusion systems do not support this because they constrain processing to be structured as acyclic processing. This paper proposes a generalization which enables the use of cyclic processing in context fusion systems....... A solution is proposed to the inherent problem of how to avoid uncontrollable looping during cyclic processing. The solution is based on finding cycles using graph-coloring and breaking cycles using time constraints....

  16. c-di-AMP: An Essential Molecule in the Signaling Pathways that Regulate the Viability and Virulence of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Tazin; Port, Gary C.

    2017-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways enable organisms to monitor their external environment and adjust gene regulation to appropriately modify their cellular processes. Second messenger nucleotides including cyclic adenosine monophosphate (c-AMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (c-GMP), cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), and cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) play key roles in many signal transduction pathways used by prokaryotes and/or eukaryotes. Among the various second messenger nucleotides molecules, c-di-AMP was discovered recently and has since been shown to be involved in cell growth, survival, and regulation of virulence, primarily within Gram-positive bacteria. The cellular level of c-di-AMP is maintained by a family of c-di-AMP synthesizing enzymes, diadenylate cyclases (DACs), and degradation enzymes, phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Genetic manipulation of DACs and PDEs have demonstrated that alteration of c-di-AMP levels impacts both growth and virulence of microorganisms. Unlike other second messenger molecules, c-di-AMP is essential for growth in several bacterial species as many basic cellular functions are regulated by c-di-AMP including cell wall maintenance, potassium ion homeostasis, DNA damage repair, etc. c-di-AMP follows a typical second messenger signaling pathway, beginning with binding to receptor molecules to subsequent regulation of downstream cellular processes. While c-di-AMP binds to specific proteins that regulate pathways in bacterial cells, c-di-AMP also binds to regulatory RNA molecules that control potassium ion channel expression in Bacillus subtilis. c-di-AMP signaling also occurs in eukaryotes, as bacterially produced c-di-AMP stimulates host immune responses during infection through binding of innate immune surveillance proteins. Due to its existence in diverse microorganisms, its involvement in crucial cellular activities, and its stimulating activity in host immune responses, c-di-AMP signaling pathway has become an

  17. Phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor cilostazol induces migraine-like attacks via cyclic AMP increase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Song; Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-01-01

    The initiating mechanisms of migraine attacks are very complex but may involve the cyclic AMP signalling pathway. It is unknown whether intracellular cyclic AMP accumulation induces migraine attacks. We investigated whether administration of cilostazol, which causes cyclic AMP accumulation, may...... and that cilostazol-induced attacks responded to their usual migraine treatment. Median time of medication intake was 6 h (range 4-11 h). The present study suggests that intracellular cyclic AMP accumulation plays a crucial role in migraine induction. This knowledge is a further step in our understanding...

  18. Cyclic spectra for wavelength-routed optical networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Bill; Geng, Zihan; Rozental, Valery; Lowery, Arthur J

    2017-03-15

    We propose occupying the guard bands in closely spaced WDM systems with redundant signal spectral components to increase tolerance to frequency misalignment and channel shaping from multiplexing elements. By cyclically repeating the spectrum of a modulated signal, we show improved tolerance to impairments due to add/drop multiplexing with a commercial wavelength selective switch in systems using 5%-20% guard bands on a 50 GHz DWDM grid.

  19. SNEP: Simultaneous detection of nucleotide and expression polymorphisms using Affymetrix GeneChip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takada Toyoyuki

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-density short oligonucleotide microarrays are useful tools for studying biodiversity, because they can be used to investigate both nucleotide and expression polymorphisms. However, when different strains (or species produce different signal intensities after mRNA hybridization, it is not easy to determine whether the signal intensities were affected by nucleotide or expression polymorphisms. To overcome this difficulty, nucleotide and expression polymorphisms are currently examined separately. Results We have developed SNEP, a new method that allows simultaneous detection of both nucleotide and expression polymorphisms. SNEP involves a robust statistical procedure based on the idea that a nucleotide polymorphism observed at the probe level can be regarded as an outlier, because the nucleotide polymorphism can reduce the hybridization signal intensity. To investigate the performance of SNEP, we used three species: barley, rice and mice. In addition to the publicly available barley data, we obtained new rice and mouse data from the strains with available genome sequences. The sensitivity and false positive rate of nucleotide polymorphism detection were estimated based on the sequence information. The robustness of expression polymorphism detection against nucleotide polymorphisms was also investigated. Conclusion SNEP performed well regardless of the genome size and showed a better performance for nucleotide polymorphism detection, when compared with other previously proposed methods. The R-software 'SNEP' is available at http://www.ism.ac.jp/~fujisawa/SNEP/.

  20. Cyclic strain increases protease-activated receptor-1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, K. T.; Frye, S. R.; Eskin, S. G.; Patterson, C.; Runge, M. S.; McIntire, L. V.

    2001-01-01

    Cyclic strain regulates many vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) functions through changing gene expression. This study investigated the effects of cyclic strain on protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) expression in VSMCs and the possible signaling pathways involved, on the basis of the hypothesis that cyclic strain would enhance PAR-1 expression, reflecting increased thrombin activity. Uniaxial cyclic strain (1 Hz, 20%) of cells cultured on elastic membranes induced a 2-fold increase in both PAR-1 mRNA and protein levels. Functional activity of PAR-1, as assessed by cell proliferation in response to thrombin, was also increased by cyclic strain. In addition, treatment of cells with antioxidants or an NADPH oxidase inhibitor blocked strain-induced PAR-1 expression. Preincubation of cells with protein kinase inhibitors (staurosporine or Ro 31-8220) enhanced strain-increased PAR-1 expression, whereas inhibitors of NO synthase, tyrosine kinase, and mitogen-activated protein kinases had no effect. Cyclic strain in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor induced PAR-1 mRNA levels beyond the effect of cyclic strain alone, whereas no additive effect was observed between cyclic strain and platelet-derived growth factor-AB. Our findings that cyclic strain upregulates PAR-1 mRNA expression but that shear stress downregulates this gene in VSMCs provide an opportunity to elucidate signaling differences by which VSMCs respond to different mechanical forces.

  1. Nucleotide excision repair in yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijk, Patrick van

    2012-01-01

    Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER) is a conserved DNA repair pathway capable of removing a broad spectrum of DNA damage. In human cells a defect in NER leads to the disorder Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model organism to study the mechanism of NER. The

  2. Small Turing universal signal machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Durand-Lose

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at providing signal machines as small as possible able to perform any computation (in the classical understanding. After presenting signal machines, it is shown how to get universal ones from Turing machines, cellular-automata and cyclic tag systems. Finally a halting universal signal machine with 13 meta-signals and 21 collision rules is presented.

  3. Anticipatory nausea in cyclical vomiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleisher David R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclical Vomiting Syndrome (CVS is characterised by discrete, unexplained episodes of intense nausea and vomiting, and mainly affects children and adolescents. Comprehending Cyclical Vomiting Syndrome requires awareness of the severity of nausea experienced by patients. As a subjective symptom, nausea is easily overlooked, yet is the most distressing symptom for patients and causes many behavioural changes during attacks. Case presentation This first-hand account of one patient's experience of Cyclical Vomiting Syndrome shows how severe nausea contributed to the development of anticipatory nausea and vomiting (ANV, a conditioned response frequently observed in chemotherapy patients. This conditioning apparently worsened the course of the patient's disease. Anticipatory nausea and vomiting has not previously been recognised in Cyclical Vomiting Syndrome, however predictors of its occurrence in oncology patients indicate that it could complicate many cases. Conclusion We suggest a model whereby untreated severe and prolonged nausea provokes anxiety about further cyclical vomiting attacks. This anxiety facilitates conditioning, thus increasing the range of triggers in a self-perpetuating manner. Effective management of the nausea-anxiety feedback loop can reduce the likelihood of anticipatory nausea and vomiting developing in other patients.

  4. Signalling in ciliates: long- and short-range signals and molecular determinants for cellular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, Helmut

    2017-02-01

    In ciliates, unicellular representatives of the bikont branch of evolution, inter- and intracellular signalling pathways have been analysed mainly in Paramecium tetraurelia, Paramecium multimicronucleatum and Tetrahymena thermophila and in part also in Euplotes raikovi. Electrophysiology of ciliary activity in Paramecium spp. is a most successful example. Established signalling mechanisms include plasmalemmal ion channels, recently established intracellular Ca(2+) -release channels, as well as signalling by cyclic nucleotides and Ca(2+) . Ca(2+) -binding proteins (calmodulin, centrin) and Ca(2+) -activated enzymes (kinases, phosphatases) are involved. Many organelles are endowed with specific molecules cooperating in signalling for intracellular transport and targeted delivery. Among them are recently specified soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs), monomeric GTPases, H(+) -ATPase/pump, actin, etc. Little specification is available for some key signal transducers including mechanosensitive Ca(2+) -channels, exocyst complexes and Ca(2+) -sensor proteins for vesicle-vesicle/membrane interactions. The existence of heterotrimeric G-proteins and of G-protein-coupled receptors is still under considerable debate. Serine/threonine kinases dominate by far over tyrosine kinases (some predicted by phosphoproteomic analyses). Besides short-range signalling, long-range signalling also exists, e.g. as firmly installed microtubular transport rails within epigenetically determined patterns, thus facilitating targeted vesicle delivery. By envisaging widely different phenomena of signalling and subcellular dynamics, it will be shown (i) that important pathways of signalling and cellular dynamics are established already in ciliates, (ii) that some mechanisms diverge from higher eukaryotes and (iii) that considerable uncertainties still exist about some essential aspects of signalling. © 2015 Cambridge Philosophical Society.

  5. Signaling interactions in the adrenal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    András eSpät

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The major physiological stimuli of aldosterone secretion are angiotensin II (AII and extracellular K+ whereas cortisol production is primarily regulated by corticotrophin (ACTH in fasciculata cells. AII triggers Ca2+ release from internal stores that is followed by store-operated and voltage-dependent Ca2+ entry whereas K+-evoked depolarisation activates voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. ACTH acts primarily through the formation of cAMP and subsequent protein phosphorylation by protein kinase A. Both Ca2+ and cAMP facilitate the transfer of cholesterol to mitochondrial inner membrane. The cytosolic Ca2+ signal is transferred into the mitochondrial matrix and enhances pyridine nucleotide reduction. Increased formation of NADH results in increased ATP production whereas that of NADPH supports steroid production. In reality, the control of adrenocortical function is a lot more sophisticated with second messengers crosstalking and mutually modifying each other’s pathways. Cytosolic Ca2+ and cGMP are both capable of modifying cAMP metabolism whilst cAMP may enhance Ca2+ release and voltage-activated Ca2+ channel activity. Besides, mitochondrial Ca2+ signal brings about cAMP formation within the organelle and this further enhances aldosterone production. Maintained aldosterone and cortisol secretion are optimized by the concurrent actions of Ca2+ and cAMP, as exemplified by the apparent synergism of Ca2+ influx (inducing cAMP formation and Ca2+ release during response to AII. Thus, cross-actions of parallel signal transducing pathways are not mere intracellular curiosities but rather substantial phenomena which fine-tune the biological response. Our review focuses on these functionally relevant interactions between the Ca2+ and the cyclic nucleotide signal transducing pathways hitherto described in the adrenal cortex.

  6. Nature of solar cyclicity. I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanchuk, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    The report contains a critical survey of work devoted to the study of the nature of solar cyclicity. The inconsistency of the representation of cyclic curves using a frequency spectrum is indicated. The useful contribution of the ideas of Wolf, Newcomb, and Waldmeier to the solution of the problem is noted. Data are cited in favor of the theory of the tidal nature of solar cyclicity developed by the author, which also takes into account the ideas of the above-mentioned authors: the continuous paired and single tidal actions of the planets and the resonance character of this action, thanks to which the approximately 10-year period of action of Jupiter and Saturn is transformed into the 11-year activity cycle.

  7. Cyclic AMP regulates the migration and invasion potential of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Noah P; Roy, Ishan; Hauser, Andrew D; Wilson, Jessica M; Williams, Carol L; Dwinell, Michael B

    2015-03-01

    Aggressive dissemination and metastasis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) results in poor prognosis and marked lethality. Rho monomeric G protein levels are increased in pancreatic cancer tissue. As the mechanisms underlying PDAC malignancy are little understood, we investigated the role for cAMP in regulating monomeric G protein regulated invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer cells. Treatment of PDAC cells with cAMP elevating agents that activate adenylyl cyclases, forskolin, protein kinase A (PKA), 6-Bnz-cAMP, or the cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase inhibitor cilostamide significantly decreased migration and Matrigel invasion of PDAC cell lines. Inhibition was dose-dependent and not significantly different between forskolin or cilostamide treatment. cAMP elevating drugs not only blocked basal migration, but similarly abrogated transforming-growth factor-β-directed PDAC cell migration and invasion. The inhibitory effects of cAMP were prevented by the pharmacological blockade of PKA. Drugs that increase cellular cAMP levels decreased levels of active RhoA or RhoC, with a concomitant increase in phosphorylated RhoA. Diminished Rho signaling was correlated with the appearance of thickened cortical actin bands along the perimeter of non-motile forskolin or cilostamide-treated cells. Decreased migration did not reflect alterations in cell growth or programmed cell death. Collectively these data support the notion that increased levels of cAMP specifically hinder PDAC cell motility through F-actin remodeling. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Nonsurgical treatment of cyclic esotropia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voide, Nathalie; Presset, Claudine; Klainguti, Georges; Kaeser, Pierre-François

    2015-04-01

    Cyclic esotropia is characterized by a 24-hour period of straight eye position followed by 24 hours of large-angle esotropia. Possible mechanisms include notably progressive loss of compensation of a latent strabismus. The classic treatment is surgical correction of the angle measured on the days with manifest deviation. We report the first case of cyclic esotropia successfully treated by prismatic correction of the latent strabismus present on "straight" days. Copyright © 2015 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Necessary relations for nucleotide frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Robert

    2015-06-07

    Genome composition analysis of di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide frequencies is known to be evolutionarily informative, and useful in metagenomic studies, where binning of raw sequence data is often an important first step. Patterns appearing in genome composition analysis may be due to evolutionary processes or purely mathematical relations. For example, the total number of dinucleotides in a sequence is equal to the sum of the individual totals of the sixteen types of dinucleotide, and this is entirely independent of any assumptions made regarding mutation or selection, or indeed any physical or chemical process. Before any statistical analysis can be attempted, a knowledge of all necessary mathematical relations is required. I show that 25% of di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide frequencies can be written as simple sums and differences of the remainder. The vast majority of organisms have circular genomes, for which these relations are exact and necessary. In the case of linear molecules, the absolute error is very nearly zero, and does not grow with contiguous sequence length. As a result of the new, necessary relations presented here, the foundations of the statistical analysis of di-, tri- and tetra-nucleotide frequencies, and k-mer analysis in general, need to be revisited. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Synthesis of cyclic tryptathionine peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotti, G; Beijer, B; Wieland, T

    1987-09-01

    The helicity of the tryptathionine moiety of the phallotoxins has been recognized by comparison with cyclic tryptathionine tripeptides. In order to investigate the influence of the configuration of the component amino acids on the conformation of the cyclic peptides, six analogue thioether tripeptides containing L- and D-alanine and L- and D-cysteine, respectively, have been synthesized. The CD spectra of the peptides are very similar to each other, showing mirror images of the CD of phalloidin and, therefore, negative helicity. The spectra of the D-cysteine containing compounds differ from the L-cysteine containing compounds by their weakly positive ellipticity values around 270 nm. The cyclization reaction of Boc-Hpi-D-Ala-D-Cys(STrt)OCH3, along with the cyclic tripeptide, afforded a cyclic hexapeptide by dimerization. The CD spectrum of the dimer is very similar to that of phalloidin, thus pointing to a positive helicity of its two tryptathionine moieties. The dimeric thioether peptide forms a rather strong complex with Cu2+ ions.

  11. A Porism Concerning Cyclic Quadrilaterals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Kocik

    2013-01-01

    infinite number of cyclic quadrilaterals through four fixed collinear points once one exists. Also, a technique of proving such properties with the use of pseudounitary traceless matrices is presented. A similar property holds for general quadrics as well as for the circle.

  12. Cyclic Voltammograms from First Principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlberg, Gustav; Jaramillo, Thomas; Skulason, Egill

    2007-01-01

    for the simple case of electroadsorption and desorption of H. In the following we derive the cyclic voltammogram for H adsorption and desorption on Pt(111) and Pt(100) based solely on density functional theory calculations and standard molecular tables. The method will also be extended to include the potential...

  13. Transporter function and cyclic AMP turnover in normal colonic mucosa from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleberg, Karen; Jensen, Gerda Majgaard; Christensen, Dan Ploug

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of colorectal neoplasia is still unresolved but has been associated with alterations in epithelial clearance of xenobiotics and metabolic waste products. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize the transport of cyclic nucleotides in colonic biopsies from patients w...

  14. Phosphodiesterase 3 and 5 and cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel expression in rat trigeminovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Lars S; Sandholdt, Nicolai T H; Gammeltoft, Steen

    2006-01-01

    3A mRNA in dura mater and the trigeminal ganglion. PDE5A and PDE3A protein expression was present in both cerebral and peripheral arteries, whereas PDE3B protein was present only in the cerebral arteries. The CNGA4 and B1 subunit mRNAs were detected in cerebral arteries and CNGA2 also...

  15. Cyclic AMP relay and cyclic AMP-induced cyclic GMP accumulation during development of Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kesbeke, Fanja; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Schaap, Pauline

    1986-01-01

    Cyclic AMP-induced cAMP and cGMP responses during development of Dictyostelium discoideum were investigated. The cAMP-induced cGMP response is maximal when aggregation is in full progress, and then decreases to about 10% of the maximal level during further multicellular development. The cAMP

  16. Computational identification of candidate nucleotide cyclases in higher plants

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2013-09-03

    In higher plants guanylyl cyclases (GCs) and adenylyl cyclases (ACs) cannot be identified using BLAST homology searches based on annotated cyclic nucleotide cyclases (CNCs) of prokaryotes, lower eukaryotes, or animals. The reason is that CNCs are often part of complex multifunctional proteins with different domain organizations and biological functions that are not conserved in higher plants. For this reason, we have developed CNC search strategies based on functionally conserved amino acids in the catalytic center of annotated and/or experimentally confirmed CNCs. Here we detail this method which has led to the identification of >25 novel candidate CNCs in Arabidopsis thaliana, several of which have been experimentally confirmed in vitro and in vivo. We foresee that the application of this method can be used to identify many more members of the growing family of CNCs in higher plants. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  17. The Popeye Domain Containing Genes and cAMP Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Brand

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is a second messenger, which plays an important role in the heart. It is generated in response to activation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. Initially, it was thought that protein kinase A (PKA exclusively mediates cAMP-induced cellular responses such as an increase in cardiac contractility, relaxation, and heart rate. With the identification of the exchange factor directly activated by cAMP (EPAC and hyperpolarizing cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels as cAMP effector proteins it became clear that a protein network is involved in cAMP signaling. The Popeye domain containing (Popdc genes encode yet another family of cAMP-binding proteins, which are prominently expressed in the heart. Loss-of-function mutations in mice are associated with cardiac arrhythmia and impaired skeletal muscle regeneration. Interestingly, the cardiac phenotype, which is present in both, Popdc1 and Popdc2 null mutants, is characterized by a stress-induced sinus bradycardia, suggesting that Popdc proteins participate in cAMP signaling in the sinuatrial node. The identification of the two-pore channel TREK-1 and Caveolin 3 as Popdc-interacting proteins represents a first step into understanding the mechanisms of heart rate modulation triggered by Popdc proteins.

  18. The cyclic universe through the origins

    OpenAIRE

    Islam Atef Aly

    2017-01-01

    I report the result of the cyclic universe theory and connect it to the origin of science and God showing some discussions about the cyclic model and the string theory, the cyclic model and the cosmological constant. And discussing the equation of Albert Einstein of the relation between mass and energy.

  19. 40 CFR 721.2120 - Cyclic amide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cyclic amide. 721.2120 Section 721... Cyclic amide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as a cyclic amide (PMN P-92-131) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  20. Identification and quantitation of signal molecule-dependent protein phosphorylation

    KAUST Repository

    Groen, Arnoud J.

    2013-09-03

    Phosphoproteomics is a fast-growing field that aims at characterizing phosphorylated proteins in a cell or a tissue at a given time. Phosphorylation of proteins is an important regulatory mechanism in many cellular processes. Gel-free phosphoproteome technique involving enrichment of phosphopeptide coupled with mass spectrometry has proven to be invaluable to detect and characterize phosphorylated proteins. In this chapter, a gel-free quantitative approach involving 15N metabolic labelling in combination with phosphopeptide enrichment by titanium dioxide (TiO2) and their identification by MS is described. This workflow can be used to gain insights into the role of signalling molecules such as cyclic nucleotides on regulatory networks through the identification and quantification of responsive phospho(proteins). © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  1. Expression of Vesicular Nucleotide Transporter in Rat Odontoblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Ikeda, Erina; Goto, Tetsuya; Gunjigake, Kaori; Kuroishi, Kayoko; Ueda, Masae; Kataoka, Shinji; Toyono, Takashi; Nakatomi, Mitsushiro; Seta, Yuji; Kitamura, Chiaki; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Kawamoto, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Several theories have been proposed regarding pain transmission mechanisms in tooth. However, the exact signaling mechanism from odontoblasts to pulp nerves remains to be clarified. Recently, ATP-associated pain transmission has been reported, but it is unclear whether ATP is involved in tooth pain transmission. In the present study, we focused on the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT), a transporter of ATP into vesicles, and examined whether VNUT was involved in ATP release from odontob...

  2. Nucleotide sequence of the yeast SUC2 gene for invertase.

    OpenAIRE

    Taussig, R; Carlson, M.

    1983-01-01

    The yeast SUC2 gene is a structural gene for both the secreted and intracellular forms of invertase. We have determined the nucleotide sequence of the coding region and the 5' and 3' flanking regions. The coding regions for the signal peptide-containing precursor to secreted invertase and for the intracellular invertase begin at different initiation codons within the SUC2 gene but share the same reading frame. The amino acid sequences predicted for the two forms of invertase from the nucleoti...

  3. Cyclic AMP in cervical mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Póvoa, H; Figueira, D R; Campos da Paz, A; Spichler, E R; Lopes, E R

    1981-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate normally stimulates motility of spermatozoa. Its concentration in cervical mucus was studied by an isotopic competitive method in 15 normal women aged between 20 and 50 years. Values were very high, particularly in the periovulatory period, with a mean (+/-SD) value of 167.90 +/- 154.96 nmol/l. These are very high when compared with values in other biological fluids (blood serum and urine).

  4. Cyclic hydrodynamic pressure induced proliferation of bladder smooth muscle cells via integrin alpha5 and FAK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, T-Q; Luo, D-Y; Chen, L; Wu, T; Wang, K-J

    2014-01-01

    According to previous studies, integrins play an important role in the mechanotransduction. The aim of this study was to examine the role of integrin subunits and its down-stream signaling molecules in the cyclic hydrodynamic pressure-induced proliferation of human bladder smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs) cultured in scaffolds. The HBSMCs cultured in scaffolds were subjected to four different levels of cyclic hydrodynamic pressure for 24 hours, which were controlled by a BOSE BioDynamic bioreactor. Flow cytometry was used to examine cell cycle distribution. Real-time RT-PCR and western blotting were used to examine the expression levels of integrin subunits and their downstream signaling molecules. Integrin alpha5 siRNA was applied to validate the role of integrin alpha5 in cell proliferation. Here, we showed that cyclic hydrodynamic pressure promoted proliferation of HBSMCs. The cyclic hydrodynamic pressure also increased expression of integrin alpha5 and phosphorylation of FAK, the key mediator of integrin alpha5 signaling, but not that of integrin alpha1, alpha3, alpha4, alphav, beta1 and beta3. Moreover, inhibition of integrin alpha5 decreased the level of p-FAK and abolished proliferation of HBSMCs stimulated by cyclic hydrodynamic pressure. Taken together, we demonstrate for the ?rst time that the integrin alpha5-FAK signaling pathway controls the proliferation of HBSMCs in response to cyclic hydrodynamic pressure.

  5. Structure of Gαi1 bound to a GDP-selective peptide provides insight into guanine nucleotide exchange

    OpenAIRE

    Johnston, Christopher A.; Willard, Francis S.; Jezyk, Mark R.; Fredericks, Zoey; Bodor, Erik T.; Jones, Miller B.; Blaesius, Rainer; Watts, Val J.; Harden, T. Kendall; Sondek, John; Ramer, J. Kevin; Siderovski, David P.

    2005-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins are molecular switches that regulate numerous signaling pathways involved in cellular physiology. This characteristic is achieved by the adoption of two principal states: an inactive, GDP-bound and an active, GTP-bound state. Under basal conditions G-proteins exist in the inactive GDP-bound state, thus nucleotide exchange is crucial to the onset of signaling. Despite our understanding of G-protein signaling pathways, the mechanism of nucleotide exchange remains elusi...

  6. Progress in Understanding the Molecular Basis Underlying Functional Diversification of Cyclic Dinucleotide Turnover Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römling, Ute; Liang, Zhao-Xun; Dow, J Maxwell

    2017-03-01

    Cyclic di-GMP was the first cyclic dinucleotide second messenger described, presaging the discovery of additional cyclic dinucleotide messengers in bacteria and eukaryotes. The GGDEF diguanylate cyclase (DGC) and EAL and HD-GYP phosphodiesterase (PDE) domains conduct the turnover of cyclic di-GMP. These three unrelated domains belong to superfamilies that exhibit significant variations in function, and they include both enzymatically active and inactive members, with a subset involved in synthesis and degradation of other cyclic dinucleotides. Here, we summarize current knowledge of sequence and structural variations that underpin the functional diversification of cyclic di-GMP turnover proteins. Moreover, we highlight that superfamily diversification is not restricted to cyclic di-GMP signaling domains, as particular DHH/DHHA1 domain and HD domain proteins have been shown to act as cyclic di-AMP phosphodiesterases. We conclude with a consideration of the current limitations that such diversity of action places on bioinformatic prediction of the roles of GGDEF, EAL, and HD-GYP domain proteins. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  7. Concomitant activation of the PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 signalling is involved in cyclic compressive force-induced IL-6 secretion in MLO-Y4 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jian; Hao, Zhichao; Ma, Yuanyuan; Liao, Shuang; Li, Xianxian; Fu, Jing; Wu, Yeke; Shen, Jiefei; Zhang, Ping; Li, Xiaoyu; Wang, Hang

    2014-05-01

    IL-6 has a dual role in bone remodelling. The ERK1/2 pathway partially upregulated IL-6 secretion in osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells exposed to CCF. We have now investigated the possible role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signalling pathway in the CCF-induced IL-6 expression. MLO-Y4 cells were treated with CCF 2,000 µstrain, 2 Hz, or 10, 30 min, 1, 3 and 6 h. IL-6 expression, Akt and ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt phosphorylation were determined by RT-PCR, ELISA and Western blotting. Inhibition of PI3K/Akt with LY294002 or ERK1/2 with PD98059 significantly attenuated IL-6 upregulation, and IL-6 expression was abolished by inhibiting both pathways. Inhibition of one pathway downregulated the other's phosphorylation level. In conclusion, concomitant activation of PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 pathways mediated IL-6 expression in MLO-Y4 cells under CCF. © 2013 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  8. Ethanol induces apoptotic death of developing beta-endorphin neurons via suppression of cyclic adenosine monophosphate production and activation of transforming growth factor-beta1-linked apoptotic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cui Ping; Kuhn, Peter; Chaturvedi, Kirti; Boyadjieva, Nadka; Sarkar, Dipak K

    2006-03-01

    The mechanism by which ethanol induces beta-endorphin (beta-EP) neuronal death during the developmental period was determined using fetal rat hypothalamic cells in primary cultures. The addition of ethanol to hypothalamic cell cultures stimulated apoptotic cell death of beta-EP neurons by increasing caspase-3 activity. Ethanol lowered the levels of adenylyl cyclase (AC)7 mRNA, AC8 mRNA, and/or cAMP in hypothalamic cells, whereas a cAMP analog blocked the apoptotic action of ethanol on beta-EP neurons. The AC inhibitor dideoxyadenosine (DDA) increased cell apoptosis and reduced the number of beta-EP neurons, and it potentiated the apoptotic action of ethanol on these neurons. beta-EP neurons in hypothalamic cultures showed immunoreactivity to transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) protein. Ethanol and DDA increased TGF-beta1 production and/or release from hypothalamic cells. A cAMP analog blocked the activation by ethanol of TGF-beta1 in these cells. TGF-beta1 increased apoptosis of beta-EP neurons, but it did not potentiate the action of ethanol or DDA actions on these neurons. TGF-beta1 neutralizing antibody blocked the apoptotic action of ethanol on beta-EP neurons. Determination of TGF-beta1-controlled cell apoptosis regulatory gene levels in hypothalamic cell cultures and in isolated beta-EP neurons indicated that ethanol, TGF-beta1, and DDA similarly alter the expression of these genes in these cells. These data suggest that ethanol increases beta-EP neuronal death during the developmental period by cellular mechanisms involving, at least partly, the suppression of cAMP production and activation of TGF-beta1-linked apoptotic signaling.

  9. Identification of a novel Gnao-mediated alternate olfactory signaling pathway in murine OSNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eScholz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available It is generally agreed that in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs, the binding of odorant molecules to their specific olfactory receptor (OR triggers a cAMP-dependent signaling cascade, activating cyclic-nucleotide gated (CNG channels. However, considerable controversy dating back more than 20 years has surrounded the question of whether alternate signaling plays a role in mammalian olfactory transduction. In this study, we demonstrate a specific alternate signaling pathway in Olfr73-expressing OSNs. Methylisoeugenol (MIEG and at least one other known weak Olfr73 agonist (Raspberry Ketone trigger a signaling cascade independent from the canonical pathway, leading to the depolarization of the cell. Interestingly, this pathway is mediated by Gnao activation, leading to Cl- efflux; however, the activation of adenylyl cyclase III (ACIII, the recruitment of Ca2+ from extra-or intracellular stores, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent signaling (PI signaling are not involved. Furthermore, we demonstrated that our newly identified pathway coexists with the canonical olfactory cAMP pathway in the same OSN and can be triggered by the same OR in a ligand-selective manner. We suggest that this pathway might reflect a mechanism for odor recognition predominantly used in early developmental stages before olfactory cAMP signaling is fully developed. Taken together, our findings support the existence of at least one odor-induced alternate signal transduction pathway in native OSNs mediated by Olfr73 in a ligand-selective manner.

  10. Identification of a Novel Gnao-Mediated Alternate Olfactory Signaling Pathway in Murine OSNs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Paul; Mohrhardt, Julia; Jansen, Fabian; Kalbe, Benjamin; Haering, Claudia; Klasen, Katharina; Hatt, Hanns; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    It is generally agreed that in olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), the binding of odorant molecules to their specific olfactory receptor (OR) triggers a cAMP-dependent signaling cascade, activating cyclic-nucleotide gated (CNG) channels. However, considerable controversy dating back more than 20 years has surrounded the question of whether alternate signaling plays a role in mammalian olfactory transduction. In this study, we demonstrate a specific alternate signaling pathway in Olfr73-expressing OSNs. Methylisoeugenol (MIEG) and at least one other known weak Olfr73 agonist (Raspberry Ketone) trigger a signaling cascade independent from the canonical pathway, leading to the depolarization of the cell. Interestingly, this pathway is mediated by Gnao activation, leading to Cl(-) efflux; however, the activation of adenylyl cyclase III (ACIII), the recruitment of Ca(2+) from extra-or intracellular stores, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent signaling (PI signaling) are not involved. Furthermore, we demonstrated that our newly identified pathway coexists with the canonical olfactory cAMP pathway in the same OSN and can be triggered by the same OR in a ligand-selective manner. We suggest that this pathway might reflect a mechanism for odor recognition predominantly used in early developmental stages before olfactory cAMP signaling is fully developed. Taken together, our findings support the existence of at least one odor-induced alternate signal transduction pathway in native OSNs mediated by Olfr73 in a ligand-selective manner.

  11. The cyclical component factor model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Christian Møller; Hansen, Henrik; Smidt, John

    Forecasting using factor models based on large data sets have received ample attention due to the models' ability to increase forecast accuracy with respect to a range of key macroeconomic variables in the US and the UK. However, forecasts based on such factor models do not uniformly outperform...... the simple autoregressive model when using data from other countries. In this paper we propose to estimate the factors based on the pure cyclical components of the series entering the large data set. Monte Carlo evidence and an empirical illustration using Danish data shows that this procedure can indeed...

  12. Nucleotide Selectivity in Abiotic RNA Polymerization Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coari, Kristin M.; Martin, Rebecca C.; Jain, Kopal; McGown, Linda B.

    2017-09-01

    In order to establish an RNA world on early Earth, the nucleotides must form polymers through chemical rather than biochemical reactions. The polymerization products must be long enough to perform catalytic functions, including self-replication, and to preserve genetic information. These functions depend not only on the length of the polymers, but also on their sequences. To date, studies of abiotic RNA polymerization generally have focused on routes to polymerization of a single nucleotide and lengths of the homopolymer products. Less work has been done the selectivity of the reaction toward incorporation of some nucleotides over others in nucleotide mixtures. Such information is an essential step toward understanding the chemical evolution of RNA. To address this question, in the present work RNA polymerization reactions were performed in the presence of montmorillonite clay catalyst. The nucleotides included the monophosphates of adenosine, cytosine, guanosine, uridine and inosine. Experiments included reactions of mixtures of an imidazole-activated nucleotide (ImpX) with one or more unactivated nucleotides (XMP), of two or more ImpX, and of XMP that were activated in situ in the polymerization reaction itself. The reaction products were analyzed using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) to identify the lengths and nucleotide compositions of the polymerization products. The results show that the extent of polymerization, the degree of heteropolymerization vs. homopolymerization, and the composition of the polymeric products all vary among the different nucleotides and depend upon which nucleotides and how many different nucleotides are present in the mixture.

  13. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Sorokman

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS — is a fairly common disease of unknown etiology that affects children of all age groups and sometimes adult population and refers to the functional disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. Objective: to evaluate the effectiveness of the usage of Rehydron Optim for oral rehydration therapy in children. Materials and methods. The treatment of 40 children aged 3 to 11 years with CVS (15 persons and primary acetonemic syndrome (25 persons in the period of acetonemic crisis, including 15 boys and 25 girls, was analyzed. All children were observed in the outpatient department of the Regional children’s hospital of Chernivtsi. Diagnosis was established based on anamnesis, clinical and laboratory data. Patients underwent required clinico-biological tests and instrumental examinations. The dynamics of the following syndromes was investigated: pain, vomiting, dehydration and intoxication. Rehydration therapy in all cases was oral with the usage of Rehydron Optim. Results of the study and their discussion. A cyclical vomiting was observed in children with primary acetonemic syndrome with satisfactory condition in attack-free period. Migraine-like headaches prevailed in 36 patients (80 %, and the age of these patients was older than 7 years. Same children had episodes of paroxysmal autonomic failure. Almost all surveyed children had in their family history the risk factors for CVS development. All children had positive dynamics of the main basic clinical manifestations on the background of oral rehydration therapy using Rehydron Optim. Within the 1st day of oral rehydration therapy with Rehydron Optim in children, we have noted a significant decrease in the incidence of lethargy, vomiting, spastic abdominal pain, smell of acetone in the exhaled air (p < 0.05. In children with the I degree of dehydration, clinical signs of dehydration were not seen before the treatment, and children with the II degree had an

  14. Inhibition of HIV Replication by Cyclic and Hairpin PNAs Targeting the HIV-1 TAR RNA Loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Upert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1 replication and gene expression entails specific interaction of the viral protein Tat with its transactivation responsive element (TAR, to form a highly stable stem-bulge-loop structure. Previously, we described triphenylphosphonium (TPP cation-based vectors that efficiently deliver nucleotide analogs (PNAs into the cytoplasm of cells. In particular, we showed that the TPP conjugate of a linear 16-mer PNA targeting the apical stem-loop region of TAR impedes Tat-mediated transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR in vitro and also in cell culture systems. In this communication, we conjugated TPP to cyclic and hairpin PNAs targeting the loop region of HIV-1 TAR and evaluated their antiviral efficacy in a cell culture system. We found that TPP-cyclic PNAs containing only 8 residues, showed higher antiviral potency compared to hairpin PNAs of 12 or 16 residues. We further noted that the TPP-conjugates of the 8-mer cyclic PNA as well as the 16-mer linear PNA displayed similar antiviral efficacy. However, cyclic PNAs were shown to be highly specific to their target sequences. This communication emphasizes on the importance of small constrained cyclic PNAs over both linear and hairpin structures for targeting biologically relevant RNA hairpins.

  15. Behaviour of Cohesionless Soils During Cyclic Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shajarati, Amir; Sørensen, Kris Wessel; Nielsen, Søren Kjær

    Offshore wind turbine foundations are typically subjected to cyclic loading from both wind and waves, which can lead to unacceptable deformations in the soil. However, no generally accepted standardised method is currently available, when accounting for cyclic loading during the design of offshore...... wind turbine foundations. Therefore a literature study is performed in order to investigate existing research treating the behaviour of cohesionless soils, when subjected to cyclic loading. The behaviour of a soil subjected to cyclic loading is found to be dependent on; the relative density, mean...

  16. Pulmonary preservation studies: effects on endothelial function and pulmonary adenine nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paik, Hyo Chae; Hoffmann, Steven C; Egan, Thomas M

    2003-02-27

    Lung transplantation is an effective therapy plagued by a high incidence of early graft dysfunction, in part because of reperfusion injury. The optimal preservation solution for lung transplantation is unknown. We performed experiments using an isolated perfused rat lung model to test the effect of lung preservation with three solutions commonly used in clinical practice. Lungs were retrieved from Sprague-Dawley rats and flushed with one of three solutions: modified Euro-Collins (MEC), University of Wisconsin (UW), or low potassium dextran and glucose (LPDG), then stored cold for varying periods before reperfusion with Earle's balanced salt solution using the isolated perfused rat lung model. Outcome measures were capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc), wet-to-dry weight ratio, and lung tissue levels of adenine nucleotides and cyclic AMP. All lungs functioned well after 4 hr of storage. By 6 hr, UW-flushed lungs had a lower Kfc than LPDG-flushed lungs. After 8 hr of storage, only UW-flushed lungs had a measurable Kfc. Adenine nucleotide levels were higher in UW-flushed lungs after prolonged storage. Cyclic AMP levels correlated with Kfc in all groups. Early changes in endothelial permeability seemed to be better attenuated in lungs flushed with UW compared with LPDG or MEC; this was associated with higher amounts of adenine nucleotides. MEC-flushed lungs failed earlier than LPDG-flushed or UW-flushed lungs. The content of the solution may be more important for lung preservation than whether the ionic composition is intracellular or extracellular.

  17. Mining the Sinorhizobium meliloti transportome to develop FRET biosensors for sugars, dicarboxylates and cyclic polyols.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Bourdès

    Full Text Available Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET biosensors are powerful tools to detect biologically important ligands in real time. Currently FRET bisosensors are available for twenty-two compounds distributed in eight classes of chemicals (two pentoses, two hexoses, two disaccharides, four amino acids, one nucleobase, two nucleotides, six ions and three phytoestrogens. To expand the number of available FRET biosensors we used the induction profile of the Sinorhizobium meliloti transportome to systematically screen for new FRET biosensors.Two new vectors were developed for cloning genes for solute-binding proteins (SBPs between those encoding FRET partner fluorescent proteins. In addition to a vector with the widely used cyan and yellow fluorescent protein FRET partners, we developed a vector using orange (mOrange2 and red fluorescent protein (mKate2 FRET partners. From the sixty-nine SBPs tested, seven gave a detectable FRET signal change on binding substrate, resulting in biosensors for D-quinic acid, myo-inositol, L-rhamnose, L-fucose, β-diglucosides (cellobiose and gentiobiose, D-galactose and C4-dicarboxylates (malate, succinate, oxaloacetate and fumarate. To our knowledge, we describe the first two FRET biosensor constructs based on SBPs from Tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP transport systems.FRET based on orange (mOrange2 and red fluorescent protein (mKate2 partners allows the use of longer wavelength light, enabling deeper penetration of samples at lower energy and increased resolution with reduced back-ground auto-fluorescence. The FRET biosensors described in this paper for four new classes of compounds; (i cyclic polyols, (ii L-deoxy sugars, (iii β-linked disaccharides and (iv C4-dicarboxylates could be developed to study metabolism in vivo.

  18. Fractional behaviour at cyclic stretch-bending

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmens, W.C.; van den Boogaard, Antonius H.; Kazantzis, A.V.; de Hosson, J.Th.M.; Kolleck, R

    2010-01-01

    The fractional behaviour at cyclic stretch-bending has been studied by performing tensile tests at long specimens that are cyclically bent at the same time, on mild steel, dual-phase steel, stainless steel, aluminium and brass. Several types of fracture are observed, these are discussed, as are the

  19. Labor Productivity: Structural Change and Cyclical Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baily, M.N.; Bartelsman, E.J.; Haltiwanger, J.

    2001-01-01

    A longstanding issue in empirical economics is the behavior of average labor productivity over the business cycle. This paper provides new insights into the cyclicality of aggregate labor productivity by examining the cyclical behavior of productivity at the plant level as well as the role of

  20. On doubly-cyclic convolutional codes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gluesing-Luerssen, H; Schmale, W

    Cyclicity of a convolutional code ( CC) is relying on a nontrivial automorphism of the algebra F[x]/(x(n) - 1), where F is a finite field. A particular choice of the data leads to the class of doubly-cyclic CC's. Within this large class Reed-Solomon and BCH convolutional codes can be defined. After

  1. Synthesis of cyclic alpha-MSH peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaaper, W.M.M.; Adan, R.A.H.; Posthuma, T.A.; Oosterom, J.; Gispen, W.H.; Meloen, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    Cyclic lactam analogs of α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) have been shown to be potent agonists in the frog skin bioassay [Al-Obeidi, F. et al., J. Med. Chem., 32 (1989) 2555], demonstrating melanocortin-1 (MC1) receptor activity. We synthesized cyclic α-MSH(1-13) and α-MSH(4-10) lactam

  2. Synthesis of cyclic α-MSH peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gispen, W.H.; Schaaper, W.M.M..; Adan, R.A.H.; Posthuma, T.A.; Oosterom, J.; Meloen, R.H.

    1998-01-01

    Cyclic lactam analogs of -melanocyte stimulating hormone (-MSH) have been shown to be potent agonists in the frog skin bioassay [Al-Obeidi, F. et al., J. Med. Chem., 32 (1989) 2555], demonstrating melanocortin-1 (MC1) receptor activity. We synthesized cyclic -MSH(1-13) and -MSH(4-10) lactam analogs.

  3. Signal Classification in Fading Channels Using Cyclic Spectral Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    exist to exploit spacial diversity through the use of multiple receiver antennas. By assuming that the channel fades independently on each antenna, the...International Conference on Cognitive Radio Oriented Wireless Networks and Communications (CROWNCOM 󈧊), 2006. 24. D. Pauluzzi and N. Beaulieu, “A comparison

  4. Cyclic vomiting: the pattern and syndrome paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, B U

    1995-01-01

    Although it remains a mysterious disorder since its description over a century ago, cyclic vomiting syndrome appears to be more prevalent than previously thought. With the goal of improving detection of affected children, two quantitative historical criteria-peak intensity > or = 4 emeses/h) and a episode frequency migraine, chronic sinusitis, intracranial neoplasm, anomalies of and mucosal injury to the gastrointestinal tract, urologic abnormalities, and metabolic and endocrine disorders. Because many organic disorders can mimic cyclic vomiting syndrome, a systematic diagnostic evaluation of potential underlying disorders is recommended. The following terminology is proposed: a cyclic pattern is differentiated from a chronic pattern of vomiting on the basis of a higher peak intensity of emesis and lower frequency of episodes; and of those with a cyclic vomiting pattern, an idiopathic subgroup who is not found to have an underlying disorder on diagnostic testing can be labeled as having cyclic vomiting syndrome.

  5. Nucleotide-time alignment for molecular recorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaddeus R Cybulski

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Using a DNA polymerase to record intracellular calcium levels has been proposed as a novel neural recording technique, promising massive-scale, single-cell resolution monitoring of large portions of the brain. This technique relies on local storage of neural activity in strands of DNA, followed by offline analysis of that DNA. In simple implementations of this scheme, the time when each nucleotide was written cannot be determined directly by post-hoc DNA sequencing; the timing data must be estimated instead. Here, we use a Dynamic Time Warping-based algorithm to perform this estimation, exploiting correlations between neural activity and observed experimental variables to translate DNA-based signals to an estimate of neural activity over time. This algorithm improves the parallelizability of traditional Dynamic Time Warping, allowing several-fold increases in computation speed. The algorithm also provides a solution to several critical problems with the molecular recording paradigm: determining recording start times and coping with DNA polymerase pausing. The algorithm can generally locate DNA-based records to within <10% of a recording window, allowing for the estimation of unobserved incorporation times and latent neural tunings. We apply our technique to an in silico motor control neuroscience experiment, using the algorithm to estimate both timings of DNA-based data and the directional tuning of motor cortical cells during a center-out reaching task. We also use this algorithm to explore the impact of polymerase characteristics on system performance, determining the precision of a molecular recorder as a function of its kinetic and error-generating properties. We find useful ranges of properties for DNA polymerase-based recorders, providing guidance for future protein engineering attempts. This work demonstrates a useful general extension to dynamic alignment algorithms, as well as direct applications of that extension toward the development

  6. Cyclic sciatica caused by infiltrative endometriosis: MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yekeler, Ensar; Kumbasar, Basak; Tunaci, Atadan; Barman, Ahmet; Tunaci, Mehtap [Department of Radiology, Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, 34390, Capa, Istanbul (Turkey); Bengisu, Ergin [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, Istanbul (Turkey); Yavuz, Ekrem [Department of Pathology, Istanbul Faculty of Medicine, Istanbul University, 34390, Capa, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2004-03-01

    Endometriosis, an important gynecological disorder of reproductive women, affects most commonly the ovaries and less frequently the gastrointestinal tract, chest, urinary tract, and soft tissues. Endometriosis classically appears on MRI as a mass with a large cystic component and variable signal intensities on T1- and T2-weighted images due to the presence of variable degradation of hemorrhagic products. Endometriosis in an atypical location, an infiltrative appearance and without cystic-hemorrhagic components has rarely been described. We report on a 33-year-old woman with cyclic sciatica due to histologically documented infiltrative endometriosis involving the area of the left sciatic notch. (orig.)

  7. Effects of nucleotides and nucleosides on coagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bune, Laurids; Thaning, Pia; Johansson, Pär I

    2010-01-01

    Nucleotides, including ADP, ATP and uridine triphosphate (UTP), are discharged profusely in the circulation during many pathological conditions including sepsis. Sepsis can cause hypotension and systemic activation of the coagulation and fibrinolytic systems in humans, which may cause disseminated...... intravascular coagulation. We investigated whether nucleotide-induced cardiovascular collapse as provoked by systemic infusion of adenosine, ADP, ATP, UTP and nitric oxide affected the haemostatic system as assessed by whole blood thromboelastography (TEG) analysis. Ten pigs received a randomized infusion...

  8. Protein and signaling networks in vertebrate photoreceptor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl-Wilhelm eKoch

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate photoreceptor cells are exquisite light detectors operating under very dim and bright illumination. The photoexcitation and adaptation machinery in photoreceptor cells consists of protein complexes that can form highly ordered supramolecular structures and control the homeostasis and mutual dependence of the secondary messengers cGMP and Ca2+. The visual pigment in rod photoreceptors, the G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin is organized in tracks of dimers thereby providing a signaling platform for the dynamic scaffolding of the G protein transducin. Illuminated rhodopsin is turned off by phosphorylation catalyzed by rhodopsin kinase GRK1 under control of Ca2+-recoverin. The GRK1 protein complex partly assembles in lipid raft structures, where shutting off rhodopsin seems to be more effective. Re-synthesis of cGMP is another crucial step in the recovery of the photoresponse after illumination. It is catalyzed by membrane bound sensory guanylate cyclases and is regulated by specific neuronal Ca2+-sensor proteins called GCAPs. At least one guanylate cyclase (ROS-GC1 was shown to be part of a multiprotein complex having strong interactions with the cytoskeleton and being controlled in a multimodal Ca2+-dependent fashion. The final target of the cGMP signaling cascade is a cyclic nucleotide-gated channel that is a hetero-oligomeric protein located in the plasma membrane and interacting with accessory proteins in highly organized microdomains. We summarize results and interpretations of findings related to the inhomogeneous organization of signaling units in photoreceptor outer segments.

  9. Activation of the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway in endothelial cells exposed to cyclic strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, C. R.; Mills, I.; Du, W.; Kamal, K.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the involvement of the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway (AC) in endothelial cells (EC) exposed to different levels of mechanical strain. Bovine aortic EC were seeded to confluence on flexible membrane-bottom wells. The membranes were deformed with either 150 mm Hg (average 10% strain) or 37.5 mm Hg (average 6% strain) vacuum at 60 cycles per minute (0.5 s strain; 0.5 s relaxation) for 0-60 min. The results demonstrate that at 10% average strain (but not 6% average strain) there was a 1.5- to 2.2-fold increase in AC, cAMP, and PKA activity by 15 min when compared to unstretched controls. Further studies revealed an increase in cAMP response element binding protein in EC subjected to the 10% average strain (but not 6% average strain). These data support the hypothesis that cyclic strain activates the AC/cAMP/PKA signal transduction pathway in EC which may occur by exceeding a strain threshold and suggest that cyclic strain may stimulate the expression of genes containing cAMP-responsive promoter elements.

  10. Blind Separation of Cyclostationary Sources Sharing Common Cyclic Frequencies Using Joint Diagonalization Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amine Brahmi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new method for blind source separation of cyclostationary sources, whose cyclic frequencies are unknown and may share one or more common cyclic frequencies. The suggested method exploits the cyclic correlation function of observation signals to compose a set of matrices which has a particular algebraic structure. The aforesaid matrices are automatically selected by proposing two new criteria. Then, they are jointly diagonalized so as to estimate the mixing matrix and retrieve the source signals as a consequence. The nonunitary joint diagonalization (NU-JD is ensured by Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (BFGS method which is the most commonly used update strategy for implementing a quasi-Newton technique. The efficiency of the method is illustrated by numerical simulations in digital communications context, which show good performances comparing to other state-of-the-art methods.

  11. Nonparametric Interference Suppression Using Cyclic Wiener Filtering: Pulse Shape Design and Performance Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anass Benjebbour

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In the future, there will be a growing need for more flexible but efficient utilization of radio resources. Increased flexibility in radio transmission, however, yields a higher likelihood of interference owing to limited coordination among users. In this paper, we address the problem of flexible spectrum sharing where a wideband single carrier modulated signal is spectrally overlapped by unknown narrowband interference (NBI and where a cyclic Wiener filter is utilized for nonparametric NBI suppression at the receiver. The pulse shape design for the wideband signal is investigated to improve the NBI suppression capability of cyclic Wiener filtering. Specifically, two pulse shaping schemes, which outperform existing raised cosine pulse shaping schemes even for the same amount of excess bandwidth, are proposed. Based on computer simulation, the interference suppression capability of cyclic Wiener filtering is evaluated for both the proposed and existing pulse shaping schemes under several interference conditions and over both AWGN and Rayleigh fading channels.

  12. Cyclic Control Optimization for a Smart Rotor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergami, Leonardo; Henriksen, Lars Christian

    2012-01-01

    bending moment within a rotor revolution. The method is applied to a rotor equipped with trailing edge flaps, and capable of individual blade pitching. Results show that the optimized cyclic control significantly alleviates the load variations from periodic disturbances; the combination of both cyclic......The paper presents a method to determine cyclic control trajectories for a smart rotor undergoing periodic-deterministic load variations. The control trajectories result from a constrained optimization problem, where the cost function to minimize is given by the variation of the blade root flapwise...... flap and pitch allows to reduce the action (and hence the wear) on the pitch actuators, and still to achieve considerable load alleviation....

  13. Driving Force Based Design of Cyclic Distillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Fjordbak; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Abildskov, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Driving force based design is adopted from conventional continuous distillation to cyclic distillation. This leads to a definition of the operating line representation for the cyclic distillation process. A possible realization of the driving force design is presented, which implies operation...... with mixed phase feeds. A range of binary test cases, benzene toluene, methanol water, and ethanol water, are evaluated. The advantage of the design approach in cyclic distillation is shown to be analogous to the advantages obtained in conventional continuous distillation, including a minimal utility...

  14. Stimulation of Release of Adrenal Catecholamine by Adenosine 3′:5′-Cyclic Monophosphate and Theophylline in the Absence of Extracellular Ca2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, Michael J.

    1972-01-01

    Stimulation of catecholamine release was studied in the isolated adrenal of the cat during retrograde perfusion. Theophylline, adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP), and dibutyryl-cyclic AMP stimulated catecholamine release in adrenal chromaffin tissue; adenosine, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, and 5′-AMP were ineffective. Addition of theophylline for 5-15 min had no effect on catecholamine release induced by KCl or nicotine, but it significantly increased the responses to cyclic AMP and its dibutyryl derivative. Glands perfused with Ca2+-free Locke's solution for 30-180 min rapidly lost their responsiveness to KCl or nicotine. In contrast, exposure to Ca2+-free medium for 180 min had no effect on secretory responses to either the cyclic nucleotides, themselves, or to methylxanthine-induced potentiation of cyclic AMP responses. Thus, dibutyryl-cyclic AMP, cyclic AMP, and theophylline do not require extracellular Ca2+ to release adrenal catecholamines. They may act by translocating intracellular bound Ca2+ or by a mechanism independent of calcium. PMID:4337240

  15. CD47 signaling pathways controlling cellular differentiation and responses to stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Pantoja, David R; Kaur, Sukhbir; Roberts, David D

    2015-01-01

    CD47 is a widely expressed integral membrane protein that serves as the counter-receptor for the inhibitory phagocyte receptor signal-regulatory protein-α (SIRPα) and as a signaling receptor for the secreted matricellular protein thrombospondin-1. Recent studies employing mice and somatic cells lacking CD47 have revealed important pathophysiological functions of CD47 in cardiovascular homeostasis, immune regulation, resistance of cells and tissues to stress and chronic diseases of aging including cancer. With the emergence of experimental therapeutics targeting CD47, a more thorough understanding of CD47 signal transduction is essential. CD47 lacks a substantial cytoplasmic signaling domain, but several cytoplasmic binding partners have been identified, and lateral interactions of CD47 with other membrane receptors play important roles in mediating signaling resulting from the binding of thrombospondin-1. This review addresses recent advances in identifying the lateral binding partners, signal transduction pathways and downstream transcription networks regulated through CD47 in specific cell lineages. Major pathways regulated by CD47 signaling include calcium homeostasis, cyclic nucleotide signaling, nitric oxide and hydrogen sulfide biosynthesis and signaling and stem cell transcription factors. These pathways and other undefined proximal mediators of CD47 signaling regulate cell death and protective autophagy responses, mitochondrial biogenesis, cell adhesion and motility and stem cell self-renewal. Although thrombospondin-1 is the best characterized agonist of CD47, the potential roles of other members of the thrombospondin family, SIRPα and SIRPγ binding and homotypic CD47 interactions as agonists or antagonists of signaling through CD47 should also be considered.

  16. Effects of purine nucleotide administration on purine nucleotide metabolism in brains of heroin-dependent rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Li

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Heroin is known to enhance catabolism and inhibit anabolism of purine nucleotides, leading to purine nucleotide deficiencies in rat brains. Here, we determined the effect of exogenous purine nucleotide administration on purine nucleotide metabolism in the brains of heroin-dependent rats. Heroin was administrated in increasing doses for 9 consecutive days to induce addiction, and the biochemical changes associated with heroin and purine nucleotide administration were compared among the treated groups. HPLC was performed to detect the absolute concentrations of purine nucleotides in the rat brain cortices. The enzymatic activities of adenosine deaminase (ADA and xanthine oxidase (XO in the treated rat cortices were analyzed, and qRT-PCR was performed to determine the relative expression of ADA, XO, adenine phosphoribosyl transferase (APRT, hypoxanthine-guaninephosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT, and adenosine kinase (AK. Heroin increased the enzymatic activity of ADA and XO, and up-regulated the transcription of ADA and XO. Alternatively, heroin decreased the transcription of AK, APRT, and HGPRT in the rat cortices. Furthermore, purine nucleotide administration alleviated the effect of heroin on purine nucleotide content, activity of essential purine nucleotide metabolic enzymes, and transcript levels of these genes. Our findings therefore represent a novel, putative approach to the treatment of heroin addiction.

  17. SVOP is a nucleotide binding protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Yao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2 (SV2 and SV2-related protein (SVOP are transporter-like proteins that localize to neurotransmitter-containing vesicles. Both proteins share structural similarity with the major facilitator (MF family of small molecule transporters. We recently reported that SV2 binds nucleotides, a feature that has also been reported for another MF family member, the human glucose transporter 1 (Glut1. In the case of Glut1, nucleotide binding affects transport activity. In this study, we determined if SVOP also binds nucleotides and assessed its nucleotide binding properties. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed in vitro photoaffinity labeling experiments with the photoreactive ATP analogue, 8-azido-ATP[gamma] biotin and purified recombinant SVOP-FLAG fusion protein. We found that SVOP is a nucleotide-binding protein, although both its substrate specificity and binding site differ from that of SV2. Within the nucleotides tested, ATP, GTP and NAD show same level of inhibition on SVOP-FLAG labeling. Dose dependent studies indicated that SVOP demonstrates the highest affinity for NAD, in contrast to SV2, which binds both NAD and ATP with equal affinity. Mapping of the binding site revealed a single region spanning transmembrane domains 9-12, which contrasts to the two binding sites in the large cytoplasmic domains in SV2A. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SVOP is the third MF family member to be found to bind nucleotides. Given that the binding sites are unique in SVOP, SV2 and Glut1, this feature appears to have arisen separately.

  18. CYCLIC VOLTAMMETRY AND REDUCTION MECHANISTIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    anions [7] and homogeneous photocatalysts for the degradation of organic pollutants, such as phenolic compounds [8, 9] and pesticides [10]. All these cited properties and the physico- chemical characteristics of pyrylium salts are dependant to the substituents on the pyrylium ring. Electrochemical signal measurement is an ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: cyclic vomiting syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... without the disorder to experience depression, anxiety, and panic disorder. It is unclear whether these health conditions are directly related to nausea and vomiting. Cyclic vomiting syndrome is often considered to be a variant of ...

  20. Determination of persistent cyclic organochlorine residues in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MMLLE) and gas chromatography with an electron capture detector (GC-ECD) and gas chromatograph coupled to a mass spectrometer, was developed for the analysis of cyclic organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls ...

  1. Cyclic universe due to phantom and quintessence

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Changjun; Lu, Youjun; Shen, You-Gen

    2014-01-01

    We explore a cyclic universe due to phantom and quintessence fields. We find that, in every cycle of the evolution of the universe, the phantom dominates the cosmic early history and quintessence dominates the cosmic far future. In this model of universe, there are infinite cycles of expansion and contraction. Different from the inflationary universe, the corresponding cosmic space-time is geodesically complete and quantum stable. But similar to the Cyclic Model, the flatness problem, the hor...

  2. Cyclic Period in the CBE Model

    CERN Document Server

    Frampton, Paul H

    2016-01-01

    In a cyclic entropy model in which the extroverse is jettisoned at turnaround with a Come Back Empty (CBE) assumption, we address matching of the contaction scale factor $\\hat{a}(t)=f(t_T){a}(t)$ to the expansion scale factor $a(t)$, where $f(t_T)$ is the ratio at turnaround of the introverse to extroverse radii. Such matching is necessary for infinite cyclicity and fixes the CBE period at $\\sim 2.6Ty$.

  3. Twisted Cyclic Cohomology and Modular Fredholm Modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Rennie

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Connes and Cuntz showed in [Comm. Math. Phys. 114 (1988, 515-526] that suitable cyclic cocycles can be represented as Chern characters of finitely summable semifinite Fredholm modules. We show an analogous result in twisted cyclic cohomology using Chern characters of modular Fredholm modules. We present examples of modular Fredholm modules arising from Podleś spheres and from SU_q(2.

  4. Modeling Cyclic Variation of Intracranial Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    demonstrates a cyclic low-frequency variation in the baseline corresponding to the ventilation . As a result, the ICP recording is not similar to the...dilation must be determined. The cyclic variation of intrathoracic pressure during positive pressure ventilation is considered a major causal... mechanism (s) that controls the dynamic characteristics of the ICP recording over the ventilation cycle are up-stream from the pial veins at vascular

  5. Severe congenital cyclic neutropenia: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Patil, Vidyavathi H.; Hugar, Shivayogi M; Balikai, Girish; Patil, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cyclic neutropenia syndrome is a constitutional genetic disorder which is characterized by very low number of neutrophils (neutropenia). Patients suffering from this disorder clinically present with neutropenia at early age, history of recurrent fever, ulcerations in the oral cavity, gingivitis, and other recurrent infections. This paper describes a case report of a child with recurrent mouth ulcers, fever, and later diagnosed with severe congenital cyclic neutropenia. This also em...

  6. Quantum Quasi-Cyclic LDPC Codes

    OpenAIRE

    Hagiwara, Manabu; Imai, Hideki

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a construction of a pair of "regular" quasi-cyclic LDPC codes as ingredient codes for a quantum error-correcting code is proposed. That is, we find quantum regular LDPC codes with various weight distributions. Furthermore our proposed codes have lots of variations for length, code rate. These codes are obtained by a descrete mathematical characterization for model matrices of quasi-cyclic LDPC codes. Our proposed codes achieve a bounded distance decoding (BDD) bound, or known a...

  7. Radiolabeled cyclic RGD peptides as radiotracers for tumor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiyun; Wang, Fan; Liu, Shuang

    2016-01-01

    The integrin family comprises 24 transmembrane receptors, each a heterodimeric combination of one of 18α and one of 8β subunits. Their main function is to integrate the cell adhesion and interaction with the extracellular microenvironment with the intracellular signaling and cytoskeletal rearrangement through transmitting signals across the cell membrane upon ligand binding. Integrin αvβ3 is a receptor for the extracellular matrix proteins containing arginine-glycine-aspartic (RGD) tripeptide sequence. The αvβ3 is generally expressed in low levels on the epithelial cells and mature endothelial cells, but it is highly expressed in many solid tumors. The αvβ3 levels correlate well with the potential for tumor metastasis and aggressiveness, which make it an important biological target for development of antiangiogenic drugs, and molecular imaging probes for early tumor diagnosis. Over the last decade, many radiolabeled cyclic RGD peptides have been evaluated as radiotracers for imaging tumors by SPECT or PET. Even though they are called "αvβ3-targeted" radiotracers, the radiolabeled cyclic RGD peptides are also able to bind αvβ5, α5β1, α6β4, α4β1, and αvβ6 integrins, which may help enhance their tumor uptake due to the "increased receptor population." This article will use the multimeric cyclic RGD peptides as examples to illustrate basic principles for development of integrin-targeted radiotracers and focus on different approaches to maximize their tumor uptake and T/B ratios. It will also discuss important assays for pre-clinical evaluations of the integrin-targeted radiotracers, and their potential applications as molecular imaging tools for noninvasive monitoring of tumor metastasis and early detection of the tumor response to antiangiogenic therapy.

  8. Cyclicity in the middle Eocene central Arctic Ocean sediment record: orbital forcing and environmental response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sangiorgi, F.; Soelen, E.E. van; Spofforth, D.J.A.; Pälike, H.; Stickley, C.E.; St. John, K.; Koç, N.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Brinkhuis, H.

    2008-01-01

    Continuous X-ray fluorescence scanning of middle Eocene (~46 Ma) core M0002A-55X (~236–241 m composite depth), recovered during Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 302, revealed a strong cyclical signal in some major and trace geochemical elements. We performed a multiproxy study of the

  9. Crystal structure of the RNA 2',3'-cyclic phosphodiesterase from Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wanchun; Cheng, Jiahui; Zhou, Congli; Hua, Yuejin; Zhao, Ye

    2017-05-01

    2',3'-Cyclic phosphodiesterase (CPDase) homologues have been found in all domains of life and are involved in diverse RNA and nucleotide metabolisms. The CPDase from Deinococcus radiodurans was crystallized and the crystals diffracted to 1.6 Å resolution, which is the highest resolution currently known for a CPDase structure. Structural comparisons revealed that the enzyme is in an open conformation in the absence of substrate. Nevertheless, the active site is well formed, and the representative motifs interact with sulfate ion, which suggests a conserved catalytic mechanism.

  10. Consecutive exotropia following surgically corrected cyclic esotropia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Joel; Eidsness, Ryan B; Romanchuk, Kenneth G

    2007-01-01

    Cyclic esotropia is a rare form of strabismus consisting of regular intervals of esotropia alternating with periods of orthophoria in a rhythmic/cyclic manner. In the vast majority of cases, surgery appears to permanently correct the esotropia, with no sequelae after years of follow-up. We report a case of consecutive exotropia in a patient five years after bilateral medial rectus recessions for cyclic esotropia. A case report involving review of a clinical chart. A two-year-old male presented with right esotropia and mild amblyopia. He was treated with patching and following resolution of the amblyopia he developed a cyclic esotropia. Surgical correction was performed for the full amount measured on a "manifest" day. Following the surgery, he was orthophoric and demonstrated binocular vision. He remained stable for five years, and then returned with occasional diplopia and an intermittent exotropia. Cyclic esotropia is a rare disorder of ocular motility that spontaneously appears and disappears at regular intervals. After surgical correction, the deviation disappears and recurrence of esotropia is very infrequent. We present the first reported case of consecutive exotropia following surgical correction of a cyclic esotropia.

  11. The evolution of Momordica cyclic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahatmanto, Tunjung; Mylne, Joshua S; Poth, Aaron G; Swedberg, Joakim E; Kaas, Quentin; Schaefer, Hanno; Craik, David J

    2015-02-01

    Cyclic proteins have evolved for millions of years across all kingdoms of life to confer structural stability over their acyclic counterparts while maintaining intrinsic functional properties. Here, we show that cyclic miniproteins (or peptides) from Momordica (Cucurbitaceae) seeds evolved in species that diverged from an African ancestor around 19 Ma. The ability to achieve head-to-tail cyclization of Momordica cyclic peptides appears to have been acquired through a series of mutations in their acyclic precursor coding sequences following recent and independent gene expansion event(s). Evolutionary analysis of Momordica cyclic peptides reveals sites that are under selection, highlighting residues that are presumably constrained for maintaining their function as potent trypsin inhibitors. Molecular dynamics of Momordica cyclic peptides in complex with trypsin reveals site-specific residues involved in target binding. In a broader context, this study provides a basis for selecting Momordica species to further investigate the biosynthesis of the cyclic peptides and for constructing libraries that may be screened against evolutionarily related serine proteases implicated in human diseases. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. A Relation Between Quasi-Cyclic Codes and 2-D Cyclic Codes

    OpenAIRE

    Güneri, Cem; Özbudak, Ferruh

    2011-01-01

    International audience; We consider a q-ary quasi-cyclic code C of length m' and index ', where both m and ' are relatively prime to q. If the constituents of C are cyclic codes, we show that C can also be viewed as a 2-D cyclic code of size m *l ' over Fq. If we further assume that m and ' are also coprime to each other, then we easily observe that the code C must be equivalent to a cyclic code. The last fact was proved earlier by Lim using a diff erent approach.

  13. Inhibition of cyclic diadenylate cyclase, DisA, by polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opoku-Temeng, Clement; Sintim, Herman O

    2016-05-06

    Cyclic di-AMP has emerged as an important signaling molecule that controls a myriad of functions, including cell wall homeostasis in different bacteria. Polyphenols display various biological activities and tea polyphenols in particular have been shown to possess among other properties antioxidant and antibacterial activities. Certain tea polyphenols, such as catechin and epigallocatechin gallate, have been used to augment the action of traditional antibiotics that target the cell wall. Considering the expanding role played by cyclic dinucleotides in bacteria, we investigated whether the action of polyphenols on bacteria could be due in part to modulation of c-di-AMP signaling. Out of 14 tested polyphenols, tannic acid (TA), theaflavin-3'-gallate (TF2B) and theaflavin-3,3'-digallate (TF3) exhibited inhibitory effects on B. subtilis c-di-AMP synthase, DisA. TF2B and TF3 specifically inhibited DisA but not YybT (a PDE) whilst TA was more promiscuous and inhibited both DisA and YybT.

  14. Purinergic signalling and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burnstock, Geoffrey; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    signalling, we will focus on the role of purinergic signalling and its changes associated with diabetes in the pancreas and selected tissues/organ systems affected by hyperglycaemia and other stress molecules of diabetes. Since this is the first review of this kind, a comprehensive historical angle is taken......The pancreas is an organ with a central role in nutrient breakdown, nutrient sensing and release of hormones regulating whole body nutrient homeostasis. In diabetes mellitus, the balance is broken-cells can be starving in the midst of plenty. There are indications that the incidence of diabetes...... type 1 and 2, and possibly pancreatogenic diabetes, is rising globally. Events leading to insulin secretion and action are complex, but there is emerging evidence that intracellular nucleotides and nucleotides are not only important as intracellular energy molecules but also as extracellular signalling...

  15. Design and synthesis of ATP-based nucleotide analogues and profiling of nucleotide-binding proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, Justina. C.; Roelfes, Gerard; Poolman, Bert

    Two nucleotide-based probes were designed and synthesized in order to enrich samples for specific classes of proteins by affinity-based protein profiling. We focused on the profiling of adenine nucleotide-binding proteins. Two properties were considered in the design of the probes: the bait needs to

  16. Nonenzymatic Oligomerization of 3',5'-Cyclic CMP Induced by Proton and UV Irradiation Hints at a Nonfastidious Origin of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costanzo, Giovanna; Giorgi, Alessandra; Scipioni, Anita; Timperio, Anna Maria; Mancone, Carmine; Tripodi, Marco; Kapralov, Michail; Krasavin, Eugene; Kruse, Holger; Šponer, Jiří; Šponer, Judit E; Ranc, Václav; Otyepka, Michal; Pino, Samanta; Di Mauro, Ernesto

    2017-08-04

    We report that 3',5'-cyclic CMP undergoes nonenzymatic di- and trimerization at 20 °C under dry conditions upon proton or UV irradiation. The reaction involves stacking of the cyclic monomers and subsequent polymerization through serial transphosphorylations between the stacked monomers. Proton- and UV-induced oligomerization of 3',5'-cyclic CMP demonstrates that pyrimidines-similar to purines-might also have taken part in the spontaneous generation of RNA under plausible prebiotic conditions as well as in an extraterrestrial context. The observed polymerization of naturally occurring 3',5'-cyclic nucleotides supports the possibility that the extant genetic nucleic acids might have originated by way of a straight Occamian path, starting from simple reactions between plausibly preactivated monomers. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Structure-Activity Relationship Studies of the Cyclic Depsipeptide Natural Product YM-254890, Targeting the Gq Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Hang; Xiong, Xiao-feng; Boesgaard, Michael W

    2017-01-01

    Extracellular signals perceived by G protein-coupled receptors are transmitted via G proteins, and subsequent intracellular signaling cascades result in a plethora of physiological responses. The natural product cyclic depsipeptides YM-254890 and FR900359 are the only known compounds that specifi...

  18. Do pyrimidine nucleotides regulate translatability of globin mRNA as purine nucleotides do?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, H N; Almendarez, E; Halim, M N

    1988-01-01

    1. When rabbit globin mRNA was incubated with rabbit reticulocyte lysate in the presence of various concentrations of nucleotides, globin synthesis was inhibited or stimulated dependent on dose. 2. Pyrimidine nucleotides inhibited protein synthesis at 0.3 mM, whereas 2 mM of purine nucleotides were required to cause similar inhibition. 3. Adenosine mono- and diphosphate inhibited globin synthesis at a concentration of only 1 mM; however, the sequence is AMP greater than ADP greater than ATP. 4. Translation arrest by these nucleotides was instantaneous. 5. These results suggest that these nucleotides may provide a structural component for maintaining the integrity, the conformation of mRNA or of the messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP).

  19. Extracellular nucleotide derivatives protect cardiomyctes against hypoxic stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golan, O; Issan, Y; Isak, A

    2011-01-01

    RATIONALE: Extracellular nucleotides have widespread effects and various cell responses. Whereas the effect of a purine nucleotide (ATP) and a pyrimidine nucleotide (UTP) on myocardial infarction has been examined, the role of different purine and pyrimidine nucleotides and nucleosides in cardiop...

  20. Multifaceted Roles of the Ras Guanine-Nucleotide Exchange Factor ChRgf in Development, Pathogenesis, and Stress Responses of Colletotrichum higginsianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qiongnan; Chen, Meijuan; Huang, Junbin; Wei, Yangdou; Hsiang, Tom; Zheng, Lu

    2017-04-01

    The infection process of Colletotrichum higginsianum, which causes a disease of crucifers, involves several key steps: conidial germination, appressorial formation, appressorial penetration, and invasive growth in host tissues. In this study, the ChRgf gene encoding a Ras guanine-nucleotide exchange factor protein was identified by screening T-DNA insertion mutants generated from Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation that were unable to cause disease on the host Arabidopsis thaliana. Targeted gene deletion of ChRgf resulted in a null mutant (ΔChrgf-42) with defects in vegetative growth, hyphal morphology, and conidiation, and poor surface attachment and low germination on hydrophobic surfaces; however, there were no apparent differences in appressorial turgor pressure between the wild type and the mutant. The conidia of the mutant were unable to geminate on attached Arabidopsis leaves and did not cause any disease symptoms. Intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels in the ΔChrgf mutant were lower than that of the wild type. Our results suggest that ChRgf is a key regulator in response to salt and osmotic stresses in C. higginsianum, and indicate that it is involved in fungal pathogenicity. This gene seems to act as an important modulator upstream of several distinct signaling pathways that are involved in regulating vegetative growth, conidiation, infection-related structure development, and stress responses of C. higginsianum.

  1. Aortic Valve Cyclic Stretch Causes Increased Remodeling Activity and Enhanced Serotonin Receptor Responsiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Kartik; Bakay, Marina A.; Connolly, Jeanne M.; Zhang, Xuemei; Yoganathan, Ajit P.; Levy, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Increased serotonin(5HT) receptor(5HTR) signaling has been associated with cardiac valvulopathy. Prior cell culture studies of 5HTR signaling in heart valve interstitial cells have provided mechanistic insights concerning only static conditions. We investigated the hypothesis that aortic valve biomechanics participate in the regulation of both 5HTR expression and inter-related extracellular matrix remodeling events. Methods The effects of cyclic-stretch on aortic valve 5HTR, expression, signaling and extracellular matrix remodeling were investigated using a tensile stretch bioreactor in studies which also compared the effects of adding 5HT and/or the 5HT-transporter inhibitor, Fluoxetine. Results Cyclic-stretch alone increased both proliferation and collagen in porcine aortic valve cusp samples. However, with cyclic-stretch, unlike static conditions, 5HT plus Fluoxetine caused the greatest increase in proliferation (p4.5 fold) for cyclic-stretch versus static (p<0.001), while expression of the 5HT transporter was not changed significantly. Extracellular matrix genes (eg. Collagen Types I,II,III, and proteoglycans) were also upregulated by cyclic-stretch. Conclusions Porcine aortic valve cusp samples subjected to cyclic stretch upregulate 5HTR2A and 2B, and also initiate remodeling activity characterized by increased proliferation and collagen production. Importantly, enhanced 5HTR responsiveness, due to increased 5HTR2A and 2B expression, results in a significantly greater response in remodeling endpoints (proliferation, collagen and GAG production) to 5HT in the presence of 5HT transporter blockade. PMID:21718840

  2. Mechanical behavior of cyclically loaded PZT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, G.S.; Hill, M.D.; Freiman, S.W. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Hwang, C.S. [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-31

    Uses of intelligent materials which involve the application of force or the generation of displacements will require the incorporation of some form of actuator material into the overall structure. Typically, these types of applications will result in the generation of cyclic loads on the actuator; depending upon the specific application, the frequency of the loading could be low, e.g., for positioning components, or relatively high, e.g., for damping out vibrations in machining tools. Nevertheless, the cyclic nature of the loading raises the specter of damage and, ultimately, failure arising from cyclic loading processes which would not be predicted by traditional mechanical properties test methods. It has been found that PZT loaded cyclically sometimes fails at loads below its nominal strength, as measured by traditional, monotonically increasing load tests. Damage mechanisms which come into play as a result of the cyclic loading conditions have been postulated as the reasons for this behavior. Recent work investigating the cyclic loading of a PZT-8 material at resonance frequency determined that microcracks were generated in the high stress region of the material. Recent results demonstrate that macrocrack extension appears to be accompanied by domain reorientation whereas microcracks can propagate around PZT grains without affecting the domains, (2) morphology and distribution of microcracks generated under different loading conditions can change dramatically that the qualitative mechanical response of PZT-8 to cyclic loading appears to be insensitive to grain morphology. The results presented imply that stresses generated at the tips of macrocracks are much larger than those at microcracks, that temperature strongly affects the rate of microcrack generation, and that wide distributions in grain size and the presence of large voids do not necessarily result in increased microcrack generation over that seen in 2 {micro}m grain size, small pore material.

  3. Nitric oxide increases the spontaneous firing rate of rat medial vestibular nucleus neurons in vitro via a cyclic GMP-mediated PKG-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podda, Maria Vittoria; Marcocci, Maria Elena; Oggiano, Leonardo; D'Ascenzo, Marcello; Tolu, Eusebio; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Azzena, Gian Battista; Grassi, Claudio

    2004-10-01

    The effects of nitric oxide (NO) on the discharge rate of medial vestibular nucleus neurons (MVNn) were investigated in rat brainstem slices. The NO-donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP, 200 microM) caused a marked enhancement (+36.7%) of MVNn spontaneous firing rate, which was prevented by the NO-scavenger, carboxy-PTIO (300 microM). The SNP effects were not modified (+37.4%) by synaptic uncoupling, suggesting that NO influences intrinsic membrane properties of MVNn rather than the synaptic input they receive. The excitatory action of SNP was virtually abolished by slice pretreatment with the soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, ODQ (10 microM), and it was mimicked (+33.1%) by the cGMP analogue 8-Br-cGMP (400 microM). Protein kinase G (PKG) and cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) were both excluded as downstream effectors of the NO/cGMP-induced excitation. However, the cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel blockers, L-cis-diltiazem (LCD, 100 microM) and Sp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS (100 microM), significantly reduced the firing rate increase produced by 8-Br-cGMP. Moreover, LCD alone decreased spontaneous MVNn firing (-19.7%), suggesting that putative CNG channels may contribute to the tonic control of resting MVNn discharge. 8-Br-cAMP (1 mM) also elicited excitatory effects in MVNn (+40.8%), which occluded those induced by 8-Br-cGMP, indicating that the two nucleotides share a common target. Finally, nested-polymerase chain reaction assay revealed the expression of CNG channel alpha subunit transcript in MVNn. Our data provide the first demonstration that NO/cGMP signalling modulates MVNn spontaneous firing through a mechanism that is independent of PKG or PKA and probably involves activation of CNG channels.

  4. On the equivalence of cyclic and quasi-cyclic codes over finite fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenza Guenda

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the equivalence problem for cyclic codes of length $p^r$ and quasi-cyclic codes of length $p^rl$. In particular, we generalize the results of Huffman, Job, and Pless (J. Combin. Theory. A, 62, 183--215, 1993, who considered the special case $p^2$. This is achieved by explicitly giving the permutations by which two cyclic codes of prime power length are equivalent. This allows us to obtain an algorithm which solves the problem of equivalency for cyclic codes of length $p^r$ in polynomial time. Further, we characterize the set by which two quasi-cyclic codes of length $p^rl$ can be equivalent, and prove that the affine group is one of its subsets.

  5. Retrieval and Representation of Nucleotide Sequence of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Umar et al.: Retrieval and Representation of Nucleotide Sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cystathionine ............. 28. GenBank, information describing each sequence entry is given, including literature references, information about the function of the sequence, location of mRNA and coding regions, and position of ...

  6. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in peroxisome proliferator ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We also investigated the correlation of these two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with plasma resistin levels. The C1431T SNP was associated with higher levels of plasma resistin ( = 0.017). Furthermore, C1431T was associated with resistin in different tertiles. Prevalence of the 'Pro-C' haplotype decreased with ...

  7. Nucleotide excision repair and human syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Boer (Jan); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractDNA damage is implicated in cancer and aging, and several DNA repair mechanisms exist that safeguard the genome from these deleterious consequences. Nucleotide excision repair (NER) removes a wide diversity of lesions, the main of which include UV-induced lesions, bulky chemical adducts

  8. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) and single nucleotide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) are providing in depth knowledge in plant biology, breeding and biotechnology. The emergence of many novel molecular marker techniques are changing and accelerating the process of producing mutations in plant molecular biology ...

  9. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in peroxisome proliferator ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    the metabolic syndrome (MS) and type 2 diabetes. We also investigated the correlation of these two single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with plasma resistin levels. The C1431T SNP was associated with higher levels of plasma resistin (P = 0.017). Furthermore, C1431T was associated with resistin in different tertiles.

  10. Cyclic cellular automata in 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiter, Clifford A., E-mail: reiterc@lafayette.edu [Department of Mathematics, Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042 (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: > We explore the self-organization of cyclic cellular automata in 3D. > Von Neumann, Moore and two types of intermediate neighborhoods are investigated. > Random neighborhoods self organize through phases into complex nested structures. > Demons are seen to have many alternatives in 3D. - Abstract: Cyclic cellular automata in two dimensions have long been intriguing because they self organize into spirals and that behavior can be analyzed. The form for the patterns that develop is highly dependent upon the form of the neighborhood. We extend this work to three dimensional cyclic cellular automata and observe self organization dependent upon the neighborhood type. This includes neighborhood types intermediate between Von Neumann and Moore neighborhoods. We also observe that the patterns include nested shells with the appropriate forms but that the nesting is far more complex than the spirals that occur in two dimensions.

  11. The nature of solar cyclicity. I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanchuk, P. R.

    1981-02-01

    The report contains a critical survey of work devoted to the study of the nature of solar cyclicity. The inconsistency of the representation of cyclic curves using a frequency spectrum is indicated. The useful contribution of the ideas of Wolf, Newcomb, and Waldmeier to the solution of the problem is noted. Data are cited in favor of the theory of the tidal nature of solar cyclicity developed by the author, which also takes into account the ideas of the above-mentioned authors: the continuous paired and single tidal actions of the planets and the resonance character of this action, thanks to which the approximately 10-year period of action of Jupiter and Saturn is transformed into the 11-year activity cycle.

  12. Cyclic distillation technology - A mini-review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bîldea, Costin Sorin; Pătruţ, Cătălin; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    2016-01-01

    Process intensification in distillation systems has received much attention during the pastdecades, with the aim of increasing both energy and separation efficiency. Varioustechniques, such as internal heat-integrated distillation, membrane distillation, rotating packedbed, dividing-wall columns...... and reactive distillation were studied and reported in literature. All these techniques employ the conventional continuous counter-current contact of vapor andliquid phases. Cyclic distillation technology is based on an alternative operating mode usingseparate phase movement which leads to key practical...... advantages in both chemical andbiochemical processes. This article provides a mini-review of cyclic distillation technology.The topics covered include the working principle, design and control methods, main benefitsand limitations as well as current industrial applications. Cyclic distillation can...

  13. Comparison of cyclic correlation algorithm implemented in matlab and python

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Richard; Whitney, James

    Simulation is a necessary step for all engineering projects. Simulation gives the engineers an approximation of how their devices will perform under different circumstances, without hav-ing to build, or before building a physical prototype. This is especially true for space bound devices, i.e., space communication systems, where the impact of system malfunction or failure is several orders of magnitude over that of terrestrial applications. Therefore having a reliable simulation tool is key in developing these devices and systems. Math Works Matrix Laboratory (MATLAB) is a matrix based software used by scientists and engineers to solve problems and perform complex simulations. MATLAB has a number of applications in a wide variety of fields which include communications, signal processing, image processing, mathematics, eco-nomics and physics. Because of its many uses MATLAB has become the preferred software for many engineers; it is also very expensive, especially for students and startups. One alternative to MATLAB is Python. The Python is a powerful, easy to use, open source programming environment that can be used to perform many of the same functions as MATLAB. Python programming environment has been steadily gaining popularity in niche programming circles. While there are not as many function included in the software as MATLAB, there are many open source functions that have been developed that are available to be downloaded for free. This paper illustrates how Python can implement the cyclic correlation algorithm and com-pares the results to the cyclic correlation algorithm implemented in the MATLAB environment. Some of the characteristics to be compared are the accuracy and precision of the results, and the length of the programs. The paper will demonstrate that Python is capable of performing simulations of complex algorithms such cyclic correlation.

  14. Smart Annotation of Cyclic Data Using Hierarchical Hidden Markov Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, Christine F; Hoenig, Florian; Strohrmann, Christina; Eskofier, Bjoern M

    2017-10-13

    Cyclic signals are an intrinsic part of daily life, such as human motion and heart activity. The detailed analysis of them is important for clinical applications such as pathological gait analysis and for sports applications such as performance analysis. Labeled training data for algorithms that analyze these cyclic data come at a high annotation cost due to only limited annotations available under laboratory conditions or requiring manual segmentation of the data under less restricted conditions. This paper presents a smart annotation method that reduces this cost of labeling for sensor-based data, which is applicable to data collected outside of strict laboratory conditions. The method uses semi-supervised learning of sections of cyclic data with a known cycle number. A hierarchical hidden Markov model (hHMM) is used, achieving a mean absolute error of 0.041 ± 0.020 s relative to a manually-annotated reference. The resulting model was also used to simultaneously segment and classify continuous, 'in the wild' data, demonstrating the applicability of using hHMM, trained on limited data sections, to label a complete dataset. This technique achieved comparable results to its fully-supervised equivalent. Our semi-supervised method has the significant advantage of reduced annotation cost. Furthermore, it reduces the opportunity for human error in the labeling process normally required for training of segmentation algorithms. It also lowers the annotation cost of training a model capable of continuous monitoring of cycle characteristics such as those employed to analyze the progress of movement disorders or analysis of running technique.

  15. Smart Annotation of Cyclic Data Using Hierarchical Hidden Markov Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine F. Martindale

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic signals are an intrinsic part of daily life, such as human motion and heart activity. The detailed analysis of them is important for clinical applications such as pathological gait analysis and for sports applications such as performance analysis. Labeled training data for algorithms that analyze these cyclic data come at a high annotation cost due to only limited annotations available under laboratory conditions or requiring manual segmentation of the data under less restricted conditions. This paper presents a smart annotation method that reduces this cost of labeling for sensor-based data, which is applicable to data collected outside of strict laboratory conditions. The method uses semi-supervised learning of sections of cyclic data with a known cycle number. A hierarchical hidden Markov model (hHMM is used, achieving a mean absolute error of 0.041 ± 0.020 s relative to a manually-annotated reference. The resulting model was also used to simultaneously segment and classify continuous, ‘in the wild’ data, demonstrating the applicability of using hHMM, trained on limited data sections, to label a complete dataset. This technique achieved comparable results to its fully-supervised equivalent. Our semi-supervised method has the significant advantage of reduced annotation cost. Furthermore, it reduces the opportunity for human error in the labeling process normally required for training of segmentation algorithms. It also lowers the annotation cost of training a model capable of continuous monitoring of cycle characteristics such as those employed to analyze the progress of movement disorders or analysis of running technique.

  16. Transcriptomic analysis of cyclic AMP response in bovine cumulus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, D R; Guillemette, C; Sirard, M A; Richard, F J

    2015-09-01

    Acquisition of oocyte developmental competence needs to be understood to improve clinical outcomes of assisted reproduction. The stimulation of cumulus cell concentration of cyclic adenosine 3'5'-monophosphate (cAMP) by pharmacological agents during in vitro maturation (IVM) participates in improvement of oocyte quality. However, precise coordination and downstream targets of cAMP signaling in cumulus cells are largely unknown. We have previously demonstrated better embryo development after cAMP stimulation for first 6 h during IVM. Using this model, we investigated cAMP signaling in cumulus cells through in vitro culture of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) in the presence of cAMP raising agents: forskolin, IBMX, and dipyridamole (here called FID treatment). Transcriptomic analysis of cumulus cells indicated that FID-induced differentially expressed transcripts were implicated in cumulus expansion, steroidogenesis, cell metabolism, and oocyte competence. Functional genomic analysis revealed that protein kinase-A (PKA), extracellular signal regulated kinases (ERK1/2), and calcium (Ca(2+)) pathways as key regulators of FID signaling. Inhibition of PKA (H89) in FID-supplemented COCs or substitution of FID with calcium ionophore (A23187) demonstrated that FID activated primarily the PKA pathway which inhibited ERK1/2 phosphorylation and was upstream of calcium signaling. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by FID supported a regulation by dual specific phosphatase (DUSP1) via PKA. Our findings imply that cAMP (FID) regulates cell metabolism, steroidogenesis, intracellular signaling and cumulus expansion through PKA which modulates these functions through optimization of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and coordination of calcium signaling. These findings have implications for development of new strategies for improving oocyte in vitro maturation leading to better developmental competence. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  17. In Vivo Biochemistry: Single-Cell Dynamics of Cyclic Di-GMP in Escherichia coli in Response to Zinc Overload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Jongchan; Dippel, Andrew B; Wang, Xin C; Hammond, Ming C

    2018-01-09

    Intracellular signaling enzymes drive critical changes in cellular physiology and gene expression, but their endogenous activities in vivo remain highly challenging to study in real time and for individual cells. Here we show that flow cytometry can be performed in complex media to monitor single-cell population distributions and dynamics of cyclic di-GMP signaling, which controls the bacterial colonization program. These in vivo biochemistry experiments are enabled by our second-generation RNA-based fluorescent (RBF) biosensors, which exhibit high fluorescence turn-on in response to cyclic di-GMP. Specifically, we demonstrate that intracellular levels of cyclic di-GMP in Escherichia coli are repressed with excess zinc, but not with other divalent metals. Furthermore, in both flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy setups, we monitor the dynamic increase in cellular cyclic di-GMP levels upon zinc depletion and show that this response is due to de-repression of the endogenous diguanylate cyclase DgcZ. In the presence of zinc, cells exhibit enhanced cell motility and increased sensitivity to antibiotics due to inhibited biofilm formation. Taken together, these results showcase the application of RBF biosensors in visualizing single-cell dynamic changes in cyclic di-GMP signaling in direct response to environmental cues such as zinc and highlight our ability to assess whether observed phenotypes are related to specific signaling enzymes and pathways.

  18. Cyclic microplasticity factors of some metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puskar, A. (University of Transport and Telecommunications, Zilina (Czechoslovakia))

    1983-11-01

    The measurement of the internal friction and the elasticity modulus defect together with a new approximation for evaluating the plastic deformation amplitude from the total deformation amplitude enable the cyclic deformation curves, the changes in hysteresis loop area on increasing the deformation amplitude and many other important characteristics of cyclic microplasticity to be determined during a push-pull type of loading at a frequency of 23kHz on dumb-bell shaped specimens of titanium, molybdenum, niobium and low carbon unalloyed steel.

  19. Towards Optimization of Cyclic Production Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Chauvet, Fabrice; Herrmann, Jeffrey W.; Proth, Jean-Marie

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, the expression "production systems" refers to flow-shops, job-shops, assembly systems, Kanban systems and, in general, to any Discrete Event System (DES) which transforms raw material and/or components into products and/or components. Such a system is said to be cyclic if it provides indefinitely the same sequence of products. A schedule of a cyclic production system is defined as soon as the starting time of each operation on the related resource is known. It has been showed t...

  20. SICLOPPS cyclic peptide libraries in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavassoli, Ali

    2017-06-01

    Cyclic peptide libraries have demonstrated significant potential when employed against challenging targets such as protein-protein interactions. While a variety of methods for library generation exist, genetically encoded libraries hold several advantages over their chemically synthesized counterparts; they are more readily accessible and allow straightforward hit deconvolution. One method for the intracellular generation of such libraries is split-intein circular ligation of peptides and proteins (SICLOPPS). Here we detail and discuss the deployment of SICLOPPS libraries for the identification of cyclic peptide inhibitors of a variety of targets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Severe congenital cyclic neutropenia: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Vidyavathi H; Hugar, Shivayogi M; Balikai, Girish; Patil, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Congenital cyclic neutropenia syndrome is a constitutional genetic disorder which is characterized by very low number of neutrophils (neutropenia). Patients suffering from this disorder clinically present with neutropenia at early age, history of recurrent fever, ulcerations in the oral cavity, gingivitis, and other recurrent infections. This paper describes a case report of a child with recurrent mouth ulcers, fever, and later diagnosed with severe congenital cyclic neutropenia. This also emphasizes the importance of identification of rare causes of immunosuppressive conditions in children presenting with recurrent oral ulcers and poor dental hygiene, to prevent long-term complications of oral cavity and also morbidity and mortality secondary to neutropenic sepsis.

  2. Undrained Cyclic Behaviour of Dense Frederikshavn Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Kjær; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Sørensen, Kris Wessel

    2013-01-01

    A modified contour diagram is created for the Frederikshavn Sand in the undrained case for a relative density of ID = 80 %. It can be used to estimate the number of cycles to failure for a given combination of pore pressure, average and cyclic load ratio. The diagram is based on a series of undra......A modified contour diagram is created for the Frederikshavn Sand in the undrained case for a relative density of ID = 80 %. It can be used to estimate the number of cycles to failure for a given combination of pore pressure, average and cyclic load ratio. The diagram is based on a series...

  3. PDE9A, PDE10A, and PDE11A expression in rat trigeminovascular pain signalling system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Lars S; Møller, Morten; Tibaek, Maiken

    2009-01-01

    headache and migraine. In order to investigate the possible role of PDE in the pain pathway of migraine, expression of the most recently discovered PDE subtypes (9A, 10A and 11A) in cerebral arteries, dura mater, and trigeminal ganglion and nucleus was examined. The presence of mRNA and protein......, the expression of PDE9A, PDE10A, and PDE11A in the trigeminovascular system. The functional implications are yet unknown, but their localisation indicates that they may have a role in the pain pathway of migraine as well as trigeminal neuralgia and trigeminal autonomic cephalalgias.......Activation of the trigeminovascular pain signalling system, including cerebral arteries, meninges, trigeminal ganglion, and brain stem, is involved in migraine. Furthermore, stimulation of cyclic nucleotide (cAMP and cGMP) production as well as inhibition of phosphodiesterases (PDEs) induces...

  4. Patterns of nucleotides that flank substitutions in human orthologous genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Zhuoran

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence context is an important aspect of base mutagenesis, and three-base periodicity is an intrinsic property of coding sequences. However, how three-base periodicity is influenced in the vicinity of substitutions is still unclear. The effect of context on mutagenesis should be revealed in the usage of nucleotides that flank substitutions. Relative entropy (also known as Kullback-Leibler divergence is useful for finding unusual patterns in biological sequences. Results Using relative entropy, we visualized the periodic patterns in the context of substitutions in human orthologous genes. Neighbouring patterns differed both among substitution categories and within a category that occurred at three codon positions. Transition tended to occur in periodic sequences relative to transversion. Periodic signals were stronger in a set of flanking sequences of substitutions that occurred at the third-codon positions than in those that occurred at the first- or second-codon positions. To determine how the three-base periodicity was affected near the substitution sites, we fitted a sine model to the values of the relative entropy. A sine of period equal to 3 is a good approximation for the three-base periodicity at sites not in close vicinity to some substitutions. These periods were interrupted near the substitution site and then reappeared away from substitutions. A comparative analysis between the native and codon-shuffled datasets suggested that the codon usage frequency was not the sole origin of the three-base periodicity, implying that the native order of codons also played an important role in this periodicity. Synonymous codon shuffling revealed that synonymous codon usage bias was one of the factors responsible for the observed three-base periodicity. Conclusions Our results offer an efficient way to illustrate unusual periodic patterns in the context of substitutions and provide further insight into the origin of three

  5. Increase of Intracellular Cyclic AMP by PDE4 Inhibitors Affects HepG2 Cell Cycle Progression and Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimi, Mara; Cardarelli, Silvia; Galli, Francesca; Giardi, Maria Federica; Ragusa, Federica; Panera, Nadia; Cinque, Benedetta; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Biagioni, Stefano; Giorgi, Mauro

    2017-06-01

    Type 4 cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDE4) are major members of a superfamily of enzymes (PDE) involved in modulation of intracellular signaling mediated by cAMP. Broadly expressed in most human tissues and present in large amounts in the liver, PDEs have in the last decade been key therapeutic targets for several inflammatory diseases. Recently, a significant body of work has underscored their involvement in different kinds of cancer, but with no attention paid to liver cancer. The present study investigated the effects of two PDE4 inhibitors, rolipram and DC-TA-46, on the growth of human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Treatment with these inhibitors caused a marked increase of intracellular cAMP level and a dose- and time-dependent effect on cell growth. The concentrations of inhibitors that halved cell proliferation to about 50% were used for cell cycle experiments. Rolipram (10 μM) and DC-TA-46 (0.5 μM) produced a decrease of cyclin expression, in particular of cyclin A, as well as an increase in p21, p27 and p53, as evaluated by Western blot analysis. Changes in the intracellular localization of cyclin D1 were also observed after treatments. In addition, both inhibitors caused apoptosis, as demonstrated by an Annexin-V cytofluorimetric assay and analysis of caspase-3/7 activity. Results demonstrated that treatment with PDE4 inhibitors affected HepG2 cell cycle and survival, suggesting that they might be useful as potential adjuvant, chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive agents in hepatocellular carcinoma. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1401-1411, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Mect1-Maml2 fusion oncogene linked to the aberrant activation of cyclic AMP/CREB regulated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coxon, Amy; Rozenblum, Ester; Park, Yoon-Soo; Joshi, Nina; Tsurutani, Junji; Dennis, Phillip A; Kirsch, Ilan R; Kaye, Frederic J

    2005-08-15

    Malignant salivary gland tumors can arise from a t(11;19) translocation that fuses 42 residues from Mect1/Torc1, a cyclic AMP (cAMP)/cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB)-dependent transcriptional coactivator, with 982 residues from Maml2, a NOTCH receptor coactivator. To determine if the Mect1-Maml2 fusion oncogene mediates tumorigenicity by disrupting cAMP/CREB signaling, we have generated in-frame deletions within the CREB-binding domain of Mect1/Torc1 for testing transformation activity and have also developed a doxycycline-regulated Mect1-Maml2 mammalian expression vector for global gene expression profiling. We observed that small deletions within the CREB-binding domain completely abolished transforming activity in RK3E epithelial cells. Further, we have shown that the ectopic induction of Mect1-Maml2 in HeLa cells strongly activated the expression of a group of known cAMP/CREB-regulated genes. In addition, we detected candidate cAMP-responsive element sites within 100 nucleotides of the transcriptional start sites of other genes activated by Mect1-Maml2 expression. In contrast, we did not observe alterations of known Notch-regulated target genes in these expression array profile experiments. We validated the results by reverse transcription-PCR in transfected HeLa, RK3E, and H2009 lung tumor cells and in mucoepidermoid cancer cells that endogenously express the fusion oncopeptide. Whereas overexpression of components of the cAMP pathway has been associated with a subset of human carcinomas, these data provide a direct genetic link between deregulation of cAMP/CREB pathways and epithelial tumorigenesis and suggest future therapeutic strategies for this group of salivary gland tumors.

  7. Targeted overexpression of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase subunit in Toxoplasma gondii promotes replication and virulence in host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongchao; Wang, Suhua; Zhao, Xianfeng; Yao, Chaoqun; Zhuang, Haohan; Huang, Yechuan; Chen, Xueqiu; Yang, Yi; Du, Aifang

    2017-08-30

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is one of the most common parasite that can infect almost any warm-blooded animals including humans. The cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase (PKA) regulates a spectrum of intracellular signal pathways in many organisms. Protein kinase catalytic subunit (PKAC) is the core of the whole protein, and plays an important role in the life cycle of T.gondii. Here, T.gondii PKAC (TgPKAC) overexpression strain (TgPKAC-OE) was constructed. The growth of the TgPKAC-OE, RH△Ku80, and TgPKAC inhibition strains (TgPKAC-H89) were analysed by SYBR-green real-time PCR, and the ultrastructure was observed by transmission electron microscopy. The survival rate in mice was also recorded to analyse the virulence of the parasites. We also investigated the subcellular localization of TgPKAC in Vero cells by laser scanning microscope. We found that TgPKAC-OE strain exhibited obviously increased growth rate in Vero cells in vitro, and infected mice survived for a shorter time compared to wild type strain. Ultrastructural analysis found more autophagosomes-like structures in TgPKAC-H89 parasite compared to RH△Ku80 strain, and the relative expression level of Toxoplasma gondii autophagy-related protein (ATG8) in TgPKAC-H89 parasite was higher than wild type parasite. Laser confocal results showed that TgPKAC was mainly expressed in the cytoplasm of Vero cells. In conclusion, we hypothesized that inhibition of TgPKAC could cause autophagy of Toxoplasma gondii and then influence the replication of the parasite. TgPKAC plays an important role in parasite virulence in vivo, and the subcellular localization was successfully detected in Vero cells. Our data will provide a basis for further study of TgPKAC function and help screen drug targets of T. gondii. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Pinched flow fractionation devices for detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, A.V.; Poulsen, L.; Birgens, H.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate a new and flexible micro fluidic based method for genotyping single nucleotide polymorphisms ( SNPs). The method relies on size separation of selectively hybridized polystyrene microspheres in a micro fluidic pinched flow fractionation (PFF) device. The micro fluidic PFF devices...... and 5.6 mu m were functionalized with biotin-labeled oligonucleotides for the detection of a mutant (Mt) or wild-type (Wt) DNA sequence in the HBB gene, respectively. Hybridization to functionalized beads was performed with fluorescent targets comprising synthetic DNA oligonucleotides or amplified RNA......, synthesized using human DNA samples from individuals with point mutations in the HBB gene. Following a stringent wash, the beads were separated in a PFF device and the fluorescent signal from the beads was analyzed. Patients being wildtypes, heterozygotes or mutated respectively for the investigated mutation...

  9. Cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activity in human gingival carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoto, Giuseppe; Fioroni, Massimiliano; Rubini, Corrado; Di Nicola, Maurizio; Di Pietrantonio, Francesco; Di Matteo, Elisabetta; Piattelli, Adriano

    2004-05-01

    The phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are responsible for the hydrolysis of the second messengers, cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP), to their corresponding monophosphates with a fundamental role in the transduction of the intracellular signals. At least 11 different enzymatic isoforms have been identified, which are listed according to their specificity or affinity for the substratum, identity of the amino acid sequence, cofactor, and inhibitor sensitivity. Variations in PDE activity have been found in different pathologies, and they have also been correlated to different pathological e/o physiological mechanisms, such as cellular differentiation, apoptosis, and tumor invasivity. In this study, we have evaluated cAMP PDE activity in patients with carcinoma of the gingiva, with the purpose of correlating differences in its development and progression. The same enzymatic activity has been used to evaluate differences between patients with lymph node involvement (group N(+)), and patients without lymph node involvement (N(-)). The analysis of PDE activity and the cAMP assay was performed by reverse-phase HPLC on samples of fresh or frozen gingival tissues. Analysis of cAMP was confirmed with the enzyme-linked immunoabsorption assay (EIA). The differences between control and N(-) groups (P = 0.0433), and between control and N(+) groups (P = 0.0156) were statistically significant. PDE3A was also evaluated immunohistochemically in lymph-node negative and lymph-node positive cases. The differences between the two groups were statistically significant (P = 0.0397).

  10. Chlamydial entry involves TARP binding of guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Josh Lane

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia trachomatis attachment to cells induces the secretion of the elementary body-associated protein TARP (Translocated Actin Recruiting Protein. TARP crosses the plasma membrane where it is immediately phosphorylated at tyrosine residues by unknown host kinases. The Rac GTPase is also activated, resulting in WAVE2 and Arp2/3-dependent recruitment of actin to the sites of chlamydia attachment. We show that TARP participates directly in chlamydial invasion activating the Rac-dependent signaling cascade to recruit actin. TARP functions by binding two distinct Rac guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs, Sos1 and Vav2, in a phosphotyrosine-dependent manner. The tyrosine phosphorylation profile of the sequence YEPISTENIYESI within TARP, as well as the transient activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K, appears to determine which GEF is utilized to activate Rac. The first and second tyrosine residues, when phosphorylated, are utilized by the Sos1/Abi1/Eps8 and Vav2, respectively, with the latter requiring the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate. Depletion of these critical signaling molecules by siRNA resulted in inhibition of chlamydial invasion to varying degrees, owing to a possible functional redundancy of the two pathways. Collectively, these data implicate TARP in signaling to the actin cytoskeleton remodeling machinery, demonstrating a mechanism by which C.trachomatis invades non-phagocytic cells.

  11. Base Sequence Context Effects on Nucleotide Excision Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yuqin; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Broyde, Suse; Geacintov, Nicholas E.

    2010-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) plays a critical role in maintaining the integrity of the genome when damaged by bulky DNA lesions, since inefficient repair can cause mutations and human diseases notably cancer. The structural properties of DNA lesions that determine their relative susceptibilities to NER are therefore of great interest. As a model system, we have investigated the major mutagenic lesion derived from the environmental carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), 10S (+)-trans-anti-B[a]P-N2-dG in six different sequence contexts that differ in how the lesion is positioned in relation to nearby guanine amino groups. We have obtained molecular structural data by NMR and MD simulations, bending properties from gel electrophoresis studies, and NER data obtained from human HeLa cell extracts for our six investigated sequence contexts. This model system suggests that disturbed Watson-Crick base pairing is a better recognition signal than a flexible bend, and that these can act in concert to provide an enhanced signal. Steric hinderance between the minor groove-aligned lesion and nearby guanine amino groups determines the exact nature of the disturbances. Both nearest neighbor and more distant neighbor sequence contexts have an impact. Regardless of the exact distortions, we hypothesize that they provide a local thermodynamic destabilization signal for repair. PMID:20871811

  12. Nucleotide Manipulatives to Illustrate the Central Dogma†

    OpenAIRE

    Yung, Sonja B.; Primm, Todd P.

    2015-01-01

    The central dogma is a core concept that is critical for introductory biology and microbiology students to master. However, students often struggle to conceptualize the processes involved, and fail to move beyond simply memorizing the basic facts. To encourage critical thinking, we have designed a set of magnetic nucleotide manipulatives that allow students to model DNA structure, along with the processes of replication, transcription, and translation.

  13. Nucleotide Manipulatives to Illustrate the Central Dogma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja B. Yung

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The central dogma is a core concept that is critical for introductory biology and microbiology students to master. However, students often struggle to conceptualize the processes involved, and fail to move beyond simply memorizing the basic facts. To encourage critical thinking, we have designed a set of magnetic nucleotide manipulatives that allow students to model DNA structure, along with the processes of replication, transcription, and translation.

  14. Aggregation of rat neutrophils by nucleotide triphosphates.

    OpenAIRE

    Ford-Hutchinson, A. W.

    1982-01-01

    1 Adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP) at concentrations of 3 x 10(-7)M and greater cause a rapid partially reversible aggregation of rat polymorphonuclear leucocytes. 2 Other nucleotide phosphates are much less active at producing aggregation responses; the agonist potencies being UTP greater than ATP greater than guanosine 5'-triphosphate, cytidine 5'-triphosphate, thymidine 5'-triphosphate; ATP greater than adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) greater than adenosine ...

  15. Optimization of cyclic operation by recycles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roffel, B.; Betlem, Bernardus H.L.; Barbosa-Póvoa, A.; Matos, H

    2005-01-01

    The production rate of a batch, fed-batch or cyclic process can be increased, meanwhile providing a high product quality along with an excellent feed exhaustion, by partitioning of the process into two phases: a production and an exhaustion phase. The useful part of the exhaustion phase product is

  16. Cosmology and Cosmogony in a Cyclic Universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... In this paper we discuss the properties of the quasi-steady state cosmological model (QSSC) developed in 1993 in its role as a cyclic model of the universe driven by a negative energy scalar field. We discuss the origin of such a scalar field in the primary creation process first described by F. Hoyle & J. V. ...

  17. Cyclic Plastic Deformation and Welding Simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Horn, C.H.L.J.

    2003-01-01

    One of the concerns of a fitness for purpose analysis is the quantification of the relevant material properties. It is known from experiments that the mechanical properties of a material can change due to a monotonic plastic deformation or a cyclic plastic deformation. For a fitness for purpose

  18. Cyclic electron flow: facts and hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finazzi, Giovanni; Johnson, Giles N

    2016-09-01

    Over the last 15 years, research into the process of cyclic electron flow in photosynthesis has seen a huge resurgence. Having been considered by some in the early 1990s as a physiologically unimportant artefact, it is now recognised as essential to normal plant growth. Here, we provide an overview of the major developments covered in this special issue of photosynthesis research.

  19. Monopod Bucket Foundations Under Cyclic Lateral Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foglia, Aligi; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2016-01-01

    The monopod bucket foundation has the potential to become a cost-reducing substructure for offshore wind turbines. To avoid problems during the energy converter operation, the long-term effect of cyclic loading must be considered in the design of the foundation. In this paper, a 1-g testing rig...

  20. Monopod bucket foundations under cyclic lateral loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foglia, Aligi; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    The monopod bucket foundation can be a cost-reducing sub-structure for offshore wind turbines. To avoid problems during the turbine operation, the long-term effect of cyclic loading must be considered in the design of the foundation. In this paper a 1g testing rig is adopted to extend the knowledge...

  1. Cyclic Cushing's syndrome : a clinical challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinardi, J. R.; Wolffenbuttel, B. H. R.; Dullaart, R. P. F.

    Cyclic Cushing's syndrome (CS) is a rare disorder, characterized by repeated episodes of cortisol excess interspersed by periods of normal cortisol secretion. The so-called cycles of hypercortisolism can occur regularly or irregularly with intercyclic phases ranging from days to years. To formally

  2. Cyclic viscoelastoplasticity of polypropylene/nanoclay composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drozdov, A.; Christiansen, Jesper de Claville

    2012-01-01

    Observations are reported on isotactic polypropylene/organically modified nanoclay hybrids with concentrations of filler ranging from 0 to 5 wt.% in cyclic tensile tests with a stress–controlled program (oscillations between various maximum stresses and the zero minimum stress). A pronounced effe...

  3. Pseudocontinuation and cyclicity for random power series

    OpenAIRE

    Abakumov, Evgeny; Poltoratski, Alexei

    2007-01-01

    We prove that a random function in the Hardy space $H^2$ is a non-cyclic vector for the backward shift operator almost surely. The question of existence of a local pseudocontinuation for a random analytic function is also studied.

  4. Steady state oxygen reduction and cyclic voltammetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Karlberg, Gustav; Jaramillo, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The catalytic activity of Pt and Pt3Ni for the oxygen reduction reaction is investigated by applying a Sabatier model based on density functional calculations. We investigate the role of adsorbed OH on the activity, by comparing cyclic voltammetry obtained from theory with previously published ex...

  5. Experimental demonstration of cyclic prefix insertion for all-optical fractional OFDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, T.; Cincotti, G.; Murakawa, T.; Shimizu, S.; Hasegawa, M.; Hattori, K.; Okuno, M.; Mino, S.; Himeno, A.; Wada, N.; Uenohara, H.; Konishi, T.

    2017-08-01

    We verified the insertion effect of a cyclic prefix (CP) in an all-optical fractional orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (FrOFDM) system. CP is an essential technique for reducing inter-channel interference in conventional OFDM. Because a FrOFDM signal is generated by a fractional Fourier transform, which is a generalization of the Fourier transform, a CP is also effective for a FrOFDM signal. The measured bit error rate of a 4×10 Gbit/s DBPSK all-optical FrOFDM system showed that the CP improves the signal quality even if the performance of the time gate is insufficient.

  6. Impact of Cyclic Prefix length on OFDM system Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rom, Christian; Sørensen, Troels Bundgaard; Mogensen, Preben Elgaard

    2005-01-01

    This paper is a study on the impact of the Cyclic Prefix (CP) length on the downlink Capacity in a base-band synchronized SISO-OFDM context. To measure this impact, the capacity, measured in bits per second per hertz, is chosen as quality parameter. The study shows how the lengthening of the CP......) the useful OFDM symbol duration, 2) the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) at the receiver and 3) the channel Power Delay Profile (PDP). Depending on the values of these parameters different optimum CP lengths are obtained. For a system using only one value of CP length we suggest an optimum value to be 4us...... for an OFDM symbol length of 40us and 6us for an OFDM symbol length of 80us....

  7. Augmentation Quotients for Real Representation Rings of Cyclic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    29

    Augmentation Quotients for Real Representation Rings of Cyclic Groups. Article Type: Reseach Article. Keywords: cyclic group; real representation; augmentation ideal; augmentation quotient. Corresponding Author: Hang Liu, Ph.D. Shaanxi Normal University. Xi'an, Shaanxi CHINA. Corresponding Author Secondary.

  8. New Correlations Between Monotonic and Cyclic Properties of Metallic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonfrillo, Giovanni

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge of the cyclic properties of metallic materials is often critical to correctly design structural components. However, cyclic data are not easily available in the literature, while tensile test data are easier to find in specialized sites or vendor catalogs. In this study, the cyclic strength coefficient and the cyclic strain hardening exponent of the Ramberg-Osgood law were evaluated using exclusively data obtained through monotonic tensile tests. The analyses were carried out on a large set of materials. The database used is composed of 338 alloys, mainly iron alloys, but also titanium and aluminum alloys. New subdivisions of the materials were introduced. Several original relations were suggested to correlate static and cyclic strength parameters. The evaluated values of both cyclic strength coefficient and cyclic strain hardening exponent were compared with experimental values coming from cyclic test, obtaining a satisfactory agreement and a higher accuracy if compared with similar relations found in the literature.

  9. Ras conformational switching: simulating nucleotide-dependent conformational transitions with accelerated molecular dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry J Grant

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Ras mediates signaling pathways controlling cell proliferation and development by cycling between GTP- and GDP-bound active and inactive conformational states. Understanding the complete reaction path of this conformational change and its intermediary structures is critical to understanding Ras signaling. We characterize nucleotide-dependent conformational transition using multiple-barrier-crossing accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD simulations. These transitions, achieved for the first time for wild-type Ras, are impossible to observe with classical molecular dynamics (cMD simulations due to the large energetic barrier between end states. Mapping the reaction path onto a conformer plot describing the distribution of the crystallographic structures enabled identification of highly populated intermediate structures. These structures have unique switch orientations (residues 25-40 and 57-75 intermediate between GTP and GDP states, or distinct loop3 (46-49, loop7 (105-110, and alpha5 C-terminus (159-166 conformations distal from the nucleotide-binding site. In addition, these barrier-crossing trajectories predict novel nucleotide-dependent correlated motions, including correlations of alpha2 (residues 66-74 with alpha3-loop7 (93-110, loop2 (26-37 with loop10 (145-151, and loop3 (46-49 with alpha5 (152-167. The interconversion between newly identified Ras conformations revealed by this study advances our mechanistic understanding of Ras function. In addition, the pattern of correlated motions provides new evidence for a dynamic linkage between the nucleotide-binding site and the membrane interacting C-terminus critical for the signaling function of Ras. Furthermore, normal mode analysis indicates that the dominant collective motion that occurs during nucleotide-dependent conformational exchange, and captured in aMD (but absent in cMD simulations, is a low-frequency motion intrinsic to the structure.

  10. Cyclic diguanylate regulation of Bacillus cereus group biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerlund, Annette; Smith, Veronika; Røhr, Åsmund K; Lindbäck, Toril; Parmer, Marthe P; Andersson, K Kristoffer; Reubsaet, Leon; Økstad, Ole Andreas

    2016-08-01

    Biofilm formation can be considered a bacterial virulence mechanism. In a range of Gram-negatives, increased levels of the second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) promotes biofilm formation and reduces motility. Other bacterial processes known to be regulated by c-di-GMP include cell division, differentiation and virulence. Among Gram-positive bacteria, where the function of c-di-GMP signalling is less well characterized, c-di-GMP was reported to regulate swarming motility in Bacillus subtilis while having very limited or no effect on biofilm formation. In contrast, we show that in the Bacillus cereus group c-di-GMP signalling is linked to biofilm formation, and to several other phenotypes important to the lifestyle of these bacteria. The Bacillus thuringiensis 407 genome encodes eleven predicted proteins containing domains (GGDEF/EAL) related to c-di-GMP synthesis or breakdown, ten of which are conserved through the majority of clades of the B. cereus group, including Bacillus anthracis. Several of the genes were shown to affect biofilm formation, motility, enterotoxin synthesis and/or sporulation. Among these, cdgF appeared to encode a master diguanylate cyclase essential for biofilm formation in an oxygenated environment. Only two cdg genes (cdgA, cdgJ) had orthologs in B. subtilis, highlighting differences in c-di-GMP signalling between B. subtilis and B. cereus group bacteria. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Cyclic nucleotides differentially regulate the synthesis of tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-1 beta by human mononuclear cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Endres, S; Fülle, H J; Sinha, B; Stoll, D; Dinarello, C A; Gerzer, R; Weber, P.C.

    Recent reports have shown that phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors suppress production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in mouse macrophages. In the present study we show that theophylline, pentoxifylline and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine markedly suppress the lipopolysaccharide

  12. Biochemical investigations on rat small intestinal epithelium : mitochondrial protein synthesis and antibiotics cyclic nucleotide regulation and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.R. de Jonge (Hugo)

    1975-01-01

    textabstractGastrointestinal disorders form an important category of diseases with an often obscure etiology or biochemical basis. Extension of the fundamental knowledge about structure and function of the enterocyte is essential for a better understanding of the intestinal pathophysiology and may

  13. INVESTIGATION OF SEIZURE ACTIVITY AFTER CYCLIC NUCLEOTIDE PHOSPHODIESTERASE INHIBITION WITH SECOND MESSENGER AND CALCIUM ION CHANNEL INHIBITION IN MICE

    OpenAIRE

    J Nandhakumar; M Selvamurugan; Manoj G Tyagi

    2012-01-01

    The role of PDE-4 inhibitor etazolate, was evaluated in the presence of PDE-7 inhibitor, BRL-50481, in animal models of epilepsy. Seizures were induced in the animals by subjecting them to injection of chemical convulsants, Pilocarpine, Kainic acid (KA) and maximal electroshock (MES). The combination of etazolate and BRL50481 treated mice showed a significant (P

  14. Characterization of heterologously expressed transporter genes by patch- and voltage-clamp methods: Application to cyclic nucleotide-dependent responses

    KAUST Repository

    Lemtiri-Chlieh, Fouad

    2013-09-03

    The application of patch- and voltage-clamp methods to study ion transport can be limited by many hurdles: the size of the cells to be patched and/or stabbed, the subcellular localization of the molecule of interest, and its density of expression that could be too low even in their own native environment. Functional expression of genes using recombinant DNA technology not only overcomes those hurdles but also affords additional and elegant investigations such as single-point mutation studies and subunit associations/regulations. In this chapter, we give a step-by-step description of two electrophysiological methods, patch clamp and two-electrode voltage clamp (TEVC), that are routinely used in combination with heterologous gene expression to assist researchers interested in the identification and characterization of ion transporters. We describe how to (1) obtain and maintain the cells suitable for the use with each of the above-mentioned methods (i.e., HEK-293 cells and yeast spheroplasts to use with the patch-clamp methodology and Xenopus laevis oocytes with TEVC), (2) transfect/inject them with the gene of interest, and (3) record ion transport activities. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  15. Calmodulin-activated cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase from brain. Relationship of subunit structure to activity assessed by radiation inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kincaid, R L; Kempner, E; Manganiello, V C; Osborne, J C; Vaughan, M

    1981-11-10

    The apparent target sizes of the basal and calmodulin-dependent activities of calmodulin-activated phosphodiesterase from bovine brain were estimated using target theory analysis of data from radiation inactivation experiments. Whether crude or highly purified samples were irradiated, the following results were obtained. Low doses of radiation caused a 10 to 15% increase in basal activity, which, with further irradiation, decayed with an apparent target size of approximately 60,000 daltons. Calmodulin-dependent activity decayed with an apparent target size of approximately 105,000 daltons. The percentage stimulation of enzyme activity by calmodulin decreased markedly as a function of radiation dosage. These observations are consistent with results predicted by computer-assisted modeling based on the assumptions that: 1) the calmodulin-activated phosphodiesterase exists as a mixture of monomers which are fully active in the absence of calmodulin and dimers which are inactive in the absence of calmodulin; 2) in the presence of calmodulin, a dimer exhibits activity equal to that of two monomers; 3) on radiations destruction of a dimer, an active monomer is generated. This monomer-dimer hypothesis provides a plausible explanation for and definition of basal and calmodulin-dependent phosphodiesterase activity.

  16. Bioactivatable, membrane-permeant analogs of cyclic nucleotides as biological tools for growth control of C6 glioma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartsch, M; Zorn-Kruppa, M; Kuhl, N; Genieser, HG; Schwede, F; Jastorff, B

    In the present study, the cAMP analogs 8-bromocAMP (8-BrcAMP), N6-2OdibutyrylcAMP (DBcAMP) and 8-parachlorophenylthiocAMP (8-CPTcAMP), as well as the corresponding cAMPacetoxymethyl (AM)esterprodrugs were tested in a HPLC study for their membrane permeability, intracellular accumulation and

  17. Nucleotide composition bias and codon usage trends of gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The GC and AT skews estimate nucleotide composition bias at different positions of nucleotide triplets and the protein consideration caused by the nucleotide composition bias at codon positions 1 and 2 largely take part in synonymous codon usage patterns of the two mycoplasmas. The correlation between the codon ...

  18. Cyclic Soft Groups and Their Applications on Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hacı Aktaş

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In crisp environment the notions of order of group and cyclic group are well known due to many applications. In this paper, we introduce order of the soft groups, power of the soft sets, power of the soft groups, and cyclic soft group on a group. We also investigate the relationship between cyclic soft groups and classical groups.

  19. Cyclic and constant hyperoxia cause inflammation, apoptosis and cell death in human umbilical vein endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J; Hafner, C; Schramel, J P; Kaun, C; Krychtiuk, K A; Wojta, J; Boehme, S; Ullrich, R; Tretter, E V; Markstaller, K; Klein, K U

    2016-04-01

    Perioperative high-dose oxygen (O2 ) exposure can cause hyperoxia. While the effect of constant hyperoxia on the vascular endothelium has been investigated to some extent, the impact of cyclic hyperoxia largely remains unknown. We hypothesized that cyclic hyperoxia would induce more injury than constant hyperoxia to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECs were exposed to cyclic hyperoxia (5-95% O2 ) or constant hyperoxia (95% O2 ), normoxia (21% O2 ), and hypoxia (5% O2 ). Cell growth, viability (Annexin V/propidium iodide and 3-(4,5-dimethythiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide, MTT) lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), release, cytokine (interleukin, IL and macrophage migration inhibitory factor, MIF) release, total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and superoxide dismutase activity (SOD) of cell lysate were assessed at baseline and 8, 24, and 72 h. A signal transduction pathway finder array for gene expression analysis was performed after 8 h. Constant and cyclic hyperoxia-induced gradually detrimental effects on HUVECs. After 72 h, constant or cyclic hyperoxia exposure induced change in cytotoxic (LDH +12%, P = 0.026; apoptosis +121/61%, P < 0.01; alive cells -15%, P < 0.01; MTT -16/15%, P < 0.01), inflammatory (IL-6 +142/190%, P < 0.01; IL-8 +72/43%, P < 0.01; MIF +147/93%, P < 0.01), or redox-sensitive (SOD +278%, TAC-25% P < 0.01) markers. Gene expression analysis revealed that constant and cyclic hyperoxia exposure differently activates oxidative stress, nuclear factor kappa B, Notch, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor pathways. Extreme hyperoxia exposure induces inflammation, apoptosis and cell death in HUVECs. Although our findings cannot be transferred to clinical settings, results suggest that hyperoxia exposure may cause vascular injury that could play a role in determining perioperative outcome. © 2015 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Geometric phases and cyclic isotropic cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper we study the evolution of the modes of a scalar field in a cyclic cosmology. In order to keep the discussion clear, we study the features of a scalar field in a toy model, a Friedman-Robertson-Walker universe with a periodic scale factor, in which the universe expands, contracts and bounces infinite times, in the approximation in which the dynamic features of this universe are driven by some external factor, without the backreaction of the scalar field under study. In particular, we show that particle production exhibits features of the cyclic cosmology in the WKB approximation. Also, by studying the Berry phase of the scalar field, we show that contrarily to what is commonly believed, the scalar field carries information from one bounce to another in the form of a global phase which occurs to be generically non-zero.

  1. Generalized Toeplitz operators and cyclic vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gassier, G; Zerouali, E H

    2003-01-01

    We give in this paper some asymptotic Von Neumann inequalities for power bounded operators in the class C subrho intersection C sub 1. and some spacial von Neumann inequalities associated with non zero elements of the point spectrum, when it is non void, of generalized Toeplitz operators. Introducing perturbed kernel, we consider classes C sub R which extend the classical classes C subrho. We give results about absolute continuity with respect to the Haar measure for operators in class C sub R intersection C sub 1. This allows us to give new results on cyclic vectors for such operators and provides invariant subspaces for their powers. Relationships between cyclic vectors for T and T* involving generalized Toeplitz operators are given and the commutativity of left brace T right brace', the commutant of T is discussed.

  2. Differential diagnosis of cyclic vomiting syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, D

    1995-01-01

    Vomiting is a nonspecific symptom and cyclic vomiting is a symptom complex that may result from a disorder of any major organ system. Children with cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS) need careful review and investigation at their earliest presentations to exclude potentially lethal abnormalities such as intestinal volvulus, metabolic disorders, and neurologic space-occupying lesions. The range of abnormalities that may present with features consistent with CVS includes gastrointestinal obstructive, inflammatory and motility abnormalities, pancreatic disease, metabolic disease (particularly the amino acid-opathies, organic acidurias, fatty acid oxidation defects, and acute intermittent porphyria), renal disease, epilepsy, migraine, and psychiatric disorders. Careful history taking will usually provide clues to these uncommon problems, but all children should undergo baseline assessment of gastrointestinal morphology and screening tests for renal and metabolic disease.

  3. Standard practice for conducting cyclic humidity exposures

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers procedures for conducting cyclic humidity tests with a corrosive dip. It sets forth the conditions required in cyclic humidity testing. 1.2 This practice does not prescribe the type of test specimen or exposure periods nor the interpretation to be given to the results. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to consult and establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  4. Belief Logic Programming with Cyclic Dependencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hui

    Our previous work [26] introduced Belief Logic Programming (BLP), a novel form of quantitative logic programming with correlation of evidence. Unlike other quantitative approaches to logic programming, this new theory is able to provide accurate conclusions in the presence of uncertainty when the sources of information are not independent. However, the semantics defined in [26] is not sufficiently general—it does not allow cyclic dependencies among beliefs, which is a serious limitation of expressive power. This paper extends the semantics of BLP to allow cyclic dependencies. We show that the new semantics is backward compatible with the semantics for acyclic BLP and has the expected properties. The results are illustrated with examples of inference in a simple diagnostic expert system.

  5. Cyclicality of Wages and Union Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morin, Annaïg

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines how trade unions shape the volatility of wages over the business cycle. I present a dynamic stochastic model of the labor market that integrates two main features: search frictions and trade unions. Because of search frictions, each job match yields an economic surplus...... that is shared between the worker and the firm. Therefore, I can decompose the volatility of wages into two components: the volatility of the match surplus and the volatility of the worker share of the surplus. Starting from the unions' objective function, I show that under collective wage bargaining, the worker......: the union wage premium fluctuates counter-cyclically, and employment is more cyclical but less persistent when wages are collectively bargained....

  6. Expression of Vesicular Nucleotide Transporter in Rat Odontoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Erina; Goto, Tetsuya; Gunjigake, Kaori; Kuroishi, Kayoko; Ueda, Masae; Kataoka, Shinji; Toyono, Takashi; Nakatomi, Mitsushiro; Seta, Yuji; Kitamura, Chiaki; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Kawamoto, Tatsuo

    2016-02-27

    Several theories have been proposed regarding pain transmission mechanisms in tooth. However, the exact signaling mechanism from odontoblasts to pulp nerves remains to be clarified. Recently, ATP-associated pain transmission has been reported, but it is unclear whether ATP is involved in tooth pain transmission. In the present study, we focused on the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT), a transporter of ATP into vesicles, and examined whether VNUT was involved in ATP release from odontoblasts. We examined the expression of VNUT in rat pulp by RT-PCR and immunostaining. ATP release from cultured odontoblast-like cells with heat stimulation was evaluated using ATP luciferase methods. VNUT was expressed in pulp tissue, and the distribution of VNUT-immunopositive vesicles was confirmed in odontoblasts. In odontoblasts, some VNUT-immunopositive vesicles were colocalized with membrane fusion proteins. Additionally P2X3, an ATP receptor, immunopositive axons were distributed between odontoblasts. The ATP release by thermal stimulation from odontoblast-like cells was inhibited by the addition of siRNA for VNUT. These findings suggest that cytosolic ATP is transported by VNUT and that the ATP in the vesicles is then released from odontoblasts to ATP receptors on axons. ATP vesicle transport in odontoblasts seems to be a key mechanism for signal transduction from odontoblasts to axons in the pulp.

  7. Regulation of nucleotide excision repair by nuclear lamin b1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Butin-Israeli

    Full Text Available The nuclear lamins play important roles in the structural organization and function of the metazoan cell nucleus. Recent studies on B-type lamins identified a requirement for lamin B1 (LB1 in the regulation of cell proliferation in normal diploid cells. In order to further investigate the function of LB1 in proliferation, we disrupted its normal expression in U-2 OS human osteosarcoma and other tumor cell lines. Silencing LB1 expression induced G1 cell cycle arrest without significant apoptosis. The arrested cells are unable to mount a timely and effective response to DNA damage induced by UV irradiation. Several proteins involved in the detection and repair of UV damage by the nucleotide excision repair (NER pathway are down-regulated in LB1 silenced cells including DDB1, CSB and PCNA. We propose that LB1 regulates the DNA damage response to UV irradiation by modulating the expression of specific genes and activating persistent DNA damage signaling. Our findings are relevant to understanding the relationship between the loss of LB1 expression, DNA damage signaling, and replicative senescence.

  8. Cyclic Triaxial Loading of Cohesionless Silty Sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabaliauskas, Tomas; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2015-01-01

    To engineer efficient structures offshore, we need to extend our knowledge of soil response. Cyclic loading and high water pressure encountered offshore greatly influence cohesionless soil performance. Silty sand from Frederikshavn wind turbine farm was tested using single diameter height samples...... with lubricated, smooth boundary piston heads in a Danish triaxial apparatus. Samples were successfully subjected to loading histories of high complexity. Loading include high strains and stresses, post liquefaction response, transitioning through multiple densities and restoring initial soil properties after...

  9. Optimum Cyclic Redundancy Codes for Noisy Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, E. C.; Merkey, P.

    1986-01-01

    Capabilities and limitations of cyclic redundancy codes (CRC's) for detecting transmission errors in data sent over relatively noisy channels (e.g., voice-grade telephone lines or very-high-density storage media) discussed in 16-page report. Due to prevalent use of bytes in multiples of 8 bits data transmission, report primarily concerned with cases in which both block length and number of redundant bits (check bits for use in error detection) included in each block are multiples of 8 bits.

  10. Sequential Annulation Domino Reaction of Sulfur Ylides and α,β-Unsaturated Cyclic Ketimines: Synthesis of Cyclic 2-Alkenyl Aziridines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Penghao; Huang, You

    2016-05-20

    A sequential annulation domino reaction of sulfur ylides and α,β-unsaturated cyclic ketimines for the construction of cyclic 2-alkenyl aziridines has been developed. Readily accessible starting materials, a one-pot procedure, excellent functional group compatibility, and mild conditions make this transformation a powerful tool for the synthesis of cyclic 2-alkenyl aziridines.

  11. Cyclic AMP-dependent secretion of Ca 19-9 by LS174T human colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchia, Vincenzo; Gargiulo, Maria; Terracciano, Daniela; Di Carlo, Angelina; Mariano, Angela

    2002-01-01

    Prolonged increase of cyclic adenosine-monophosphate (cAMP) level in culture medium of a human colon cancer cell (LS174T) inhibits cellular growth and stimulates Ca 19-9 expression. The raise in cAMP level was produced by dibutyryl cyclic AMP (DBcAMP) or by forskolin an agent acting at the level of cAMP generation. Both these agents in a range of concentration between 10(-3)-10(-5) M have an inhibitory effect on the growth which is dose and time dependent. The inhibition was reversible as demonstrated by complete restoration of cell growth soon after the withdrawal of the substances from the culture medium. When cAMP levels in culture medium was raised, an increase in Ca 19-9 expression was observed and it appears that cyclic nucleotides have at least two effects: the first to cause rapid release of already synthesized Ca 19-9 and second to stimulate new antigen synthesis. The findings of the present study demonstrated that LS174T cells are unable to proliferate upon sustained accumulation of intracellular cyclic AMP suggesting the use of strategies able to increase cAMP levels for therapy of colon cancer. Furthermore, the finding that cAMP may also be a regulator of Ca 19-9 synthesis and release indicates the utility of cell line LS174T as a model for studies on the mechanism of synthesis and secretion of specific tumoral markers in colon cancer.

  12. Scale factor duality for conformal cyclic cosmologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, University Camara da; Lima, A.L. Alves; Sotkov, G.M. [Departamento de Física - CCE,Universidade Federal de Espirito Santo, 29075-900, Vitoria ES (Brazil)

    2016-11-16

    The scale factor duality is a symmetry of dilaton gravity which is known to lead to pre-big-bang cosmologies. A conformal time version of the scale factor duality (SFD) was recently implemented as a UV/IR symmetry between decelerated and accelerated phases of the post-big-bang evolution within Einstein gravity coupled to a scalar field. The problem investigated in the present paper concerns the employment of the conformal time SFD methods to the construction of pre-big-bang and cyclic extensions of these models. We demonstrate that each big-bang model gives rise to two qualitatively different pre-big-bang evolutions: a contraction/expansion SFD model and Penrose’s Conformal Cyclic Cosmology (CCC). A few examples of SFD symmetric cyclic universes involving certain gauged Kähler sigma models minimally coupled to Einstein gravity are studied. We also describe the specific SFD features of the thermodynamics and the conditions for validity of the generalized second law in the case of Gauss-Bonnet (GB) extension of these selected CCC models.

  13. Scale factor duality for conformal cyclic cosmologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara da Silva, U.; Alves Lima, A. L.; Sotkov, G. M.

    2016-11-01

    The scale factor duality is a symmetry of dilaton gravity which is known to lead to pre-big-bang cosmologies. A conformal time version of the scale factor duality (SFD) was recently implemented as a UV/IR symmetry between decelerated and accelerated phases of the post-big-bang evolution within Einstein gravity coupled to a scalar field. The problem investigated in the present paper concerns the employment of the conformal time SFD methods to the construction of pre-big-bang and cyclic extensions of these models. We demonstrate that each big-bang model gives rise to two qualitatively different pre-big-bang evolutions: a contraction/expansion SFD model and Penrose's Conformal Cyclic Cosmology (CCC). A few examples of SFD symmetric cyclic universes involving certain gauged Kähler sigma models minimally coupled to Einstein gravity are studied. We also describe the specific SFD features of the thermodynamics and the conditions for validity of the generalized second law in the case of Gauss-Bonnet (GB) extension of these selected CCC models.

  14. Loss of Nucleotide Excision Repair as a Source of Genomic Instability in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    sequence-specific mechanism of nucleotide excision repair. Genes Dev., 13, 768-785. DNA binding by short single strands of DNA requires the p53 C... Arabidopsis thaliana . The advantage signal (27). CPD-3 cells were further subcloned by single cell dilution, of using XP-A cells completely deficient...developed and optimized a novel technique for the detection of localized DNA damage and damage binding proteins in individual cells, using targeted

  15. A Robust Spectrum Sensing Method Based on Maximum Cyclic Autocorrelation Selection for Dynamic Spectrum Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraoka, Kazushi; Ariyoshi, Masayuki; Fujii, Takeo

    Spectrum sensing is an important function for dynamic spectrum access (DSA) type cognitive radio systems to detect opportunities for sharing the spectrum with a primary system. The key requirements for spectrum sensing are stability in controlling the probability of false alarm as well as detection performance of the primary signals. However, false alarms can be triggered by noise uncertainty at the secondary devices or unknown interference signals from other secondary systems in realistic radio environments. This paper proposes a robust spectrum sensing method against such uncertainties; it is a kind of cyclostationary feature detection (CFD) approaches. Our proposed method, referred to as maximum cyclic autocorrelation selection (MCAS), compares the peak and non-peak values of the cyclic autocorrelation function (CAF) to detect primary signals, where the non-peak value is the CAF value calculated at cyclic frequencies between the peaks. In MCAS, the desired probability of false alarm can be obtained by setting the number of the non-peak values. In addition, the multiple peak values are combined in MCAS to obtain noise reduction effect and coherent combining gain. Through computer simulations, we show that MCAS can control the probability of false alarm under the condition of noise uncertainty and interference. Furthermore, our method achieves better performance with much less computational complexity in comparison to conventional CFD methods.

  16. [Identification of single nucleotide polymorphisms in centenarians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambini, Juan; Gimeno-Mallench, Lucía; Inglés, Marta; Olaso, Gloria; Abdelaziz, Kheira Mohamed; Avellana, Juan Antonio; Belenguer, Ángel; Cruz, Raquel; Mas-Bargues, Cristina; Borras, Consuelo; Viña, José

    2016-01-01

    Longevity is determined by genetic and external factors, such as nutritional, environmental, social, etc. Nevertheless, when living conditions are optimal, longevity is determined by genetic variations between individuals. In a same population, with relative genotypic homogeneity, subtle changes in the DNA sequence affecting a single nucleotide can be observed. These changes, called single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) are present in 1-5% of the population. A total of 92 subjects were recruited, including 28 centenarians and 64 controls, in order to find SNP that maybe implicated in the extreme longevity, as in the centenarians. Blood samples were collected to isolate and amplify the DNA in order to perform the analysis of SPN by Axiom™ Genotyping of Affymetrix technology. Statistical analyses were performed using the Plink program and libraries SNPassoc and skatMeta. Our results show 12 mutations with a p<.001, where 5 of these (DACH1, LOC91948, BTB16, NFIL3 y HDAC4) have regulatory functions of the expressions of others genes. Therefore, these results suggest that the genetic variation between centenarians and controls occurs in five genes that are involved in the regulation of gene expression to adapt to environmental changes better than controls. Copyright © 2015 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  17. Classifying Coding DNA with Nucleotide Statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Carels

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this report, we compared the success rate of classification of coding sequences (CDS vs. introns by Codon Structure Factor (CSF and by a method that we called Universal Feature Method (UFM. UFM is based on the scoring of purine bias (Rrr and stop codon frequency. We show that the success rate of CDS/intron classification by UFM is higher than by CSF. UFM classifies ORFs as coding or non-coding through a score based on (i the stop codon distribution, (ii the product of purine probabilities in the three positions of nucleotide triplets, (iii the product of Cytosine (C, Guanine (G, and Adenine (A probabilities in the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd positions of triplets, respectively, (iv the probabilities of G in 1st and 2nd position of triplets and (v the distance of their GC3 vs. GC2 levels to the regression line of the universal correlation. More than 80% of CDSs (true positives of Homo sapiens (>250 bp, Drosophila melanogaster (>250 bp and Arabidopsis thaliana (>200 bp are successfully classified with a false positive rate lower or equal to 5%. The method releases coding sequences in their coding strand and coding frame, which allows their automatic translation into protein sequences with 95% confidence. The method is a natural consequence of the compositional bias of nucleotides in coding sequences.

  18. Comparative gel-based phosphoproteomics in response to signaling molecules

    KAUST Repository

    Marondedze, Claudius

    2013-09-03

    The gel-based proteomics approach is a valuable technique for studying the characteristics of proteins. This technique has diverse applications ranging from analysis of a single protein to the study of the total cellular proteins. Further, protein quality and to some extent distribution can be first assessed by means of one-dimensional gel electrophoresis and then more informatively, for comparative analysis, using the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis technique. Here, we describe how to take advantage of the availability of fluorescent dyes to stain for a selective class of proteins on the same gel for the detection of both phospho- and total proteomes. This enables the co-detection of phosphoproteins as well as total proteins from the same gel and is accomplished by utilizing two different fluorescent stains, the ProQ-Diamond, which stains only phosphorylated proteins, and Sypro Ruby, which stains the entire subset of proteins. This workflow can be applied to gain insights into the regulatory mechanisms induced by signaling molecules such as cyclic nucleotides through the quantification and subsequent identification of responsive phospho- and total proteins. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  19. Guanine nucleotide regulation of. cap alpha. /sub 1/-adrenergic receptors of muscle and kidney eptihelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terman, B.I.; Hughes, R.J.; Slivka, S.R.; Insel, P.A.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have examined the effect of guanine nucleotides on the interaction of adrenergic agents with ..cap alpha../sup 1/-adrenergic receptors of two cell lines, the Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) and BC3H-1 muscle cells. While gaunylylimidodiphosphoate (Gpp(NH)p) had no effect on the affinity or the total number of (/sup -3/H)prazosin binding sites in membranes prepared from these cells, the nucleotide decreased the apparent affinity of the agonist epinephrine in competing for (/sup 3/H)prazosin binding sites in both cell types. The EC/sub 50/ of Gpp(NH)p was approx.100 ..mu..M, and a maximal effect was seen at 500 ..mu..M. In contrast, 100 ..mu..M Gpp(NH)p yielding maximal shifts in binding of epinephrine to ..beta..-adrenergic receptors in BC3H-1 cell membranes. Guanine nucleotides were significantly more effective than adenine nucleotides in shifting agonist affinity for the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-receptor and Mg/sup + +/ was required to observe a maximal effect. ..cap alpha../sub 1/-receptor agonists activated phosphatidylinositol (PI) hydrolysis in both cell types, but have no direct effect on membrane adenylate cyclase activity. In intact BC3H-1 cells, ..cap alpha../sub 1/-agonists inhibited ..beta..-adrenergic cAMP production, an effect which appears in preliminary studies not to result from enhanced phosphodieterase activity. These results show that agonist binding to ..cap alpha../sup 1/-adrenergic receptors in mammalian kidney and muscle cells is regulated by guanine nucleotides. This regulation and inturn transmembrane signalling (PI hydrolysis) by these receptors appear to involve a guanine nucleotide binding (G) protein, which may be different than G/sub s/ and G/sub i/.

  20. Statistical damage constitutive model for rocks subjected to cyclic stress and cyclic temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shu-Wei; Xia, Cai-Chu; Zhao, Hai-Bin; Mei, Song-Hua; Zhou, Yu

    2017-10-01

    A constitutive model of rocks subjected to cyclic stress-temperature was proposed. Based on statistical damage theory, the damage constitutive model with Weibull distribution was extended. Influence of model parameters on the stress-strain curve for rock reloading after stress-temperature cycling was then discussed. The proposed model was initially validated by rock tests for cyclic stress-temperature and only cyclic stress. Finally, the total damage evolution induced by stress-temperature cycling and reloading after cycling was explored and discussed. The proposed constitutive model is reasonable and applicable, describing well the stress-strain relationship during stress-temperature cycles and providing a good fit to the test results. Elastic modulus in the reference state and the damage induced by cycling affect the shape of reloading stress-strain curve. Total damage induced by cycling and reloading after cycling exhibits three stages: initial slow increase, mid-term accelerated increase, and final slow increase.

  1. A Continuum Damage Mechanics Model for the Static and Cyclic Fatigue of Cellular Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Otto

    2017-01-01

    The fatigue behavior of a cellular composite with an epoxy matrix and glass foam granules is analyzed and modeled by means of continuum damage mechanics. The investigated cellular composite is a particular type of composite foam, and is very similar to syntactic foams. In contrast to conventional syntactic foams constituted by hollow spherical particles (balloons), cellular glass, mineral, or metal place holders are combined with the matrix material (metal or polymer) in the case of cellular composites. A microstructural investigation of the damage behavior is performed using scanning electron microscopy. For the modeling of the fatigue behavior, the damage is separated into pure static and pure cyclic damage and described in terms of the stiffness loss of the material using damage models for cyclic and creep damage. Both models incorporate nonlinear accumulation and interaction of damage. A cycle jumping procedure is developed, which allows for a fast and accurate calculation of the damage evolution for constant load frequencies. The damage model is applied to examine the mean stress effect for cyclic fatigue and to investigate the frequency effect and the influence of the signal form in the case of static and cyclic damage interaction. The calculated lifetimes are in very good agreement with experimental results. PMID:28809806

  2. Classification of organisms using nucleotides frequencies

    OpenAIRE

    Kremličková, Lenka

    2014-01-01

    Tato bakalářská práce se zabývá klasifikací organismů na základě nukleotidové četnosti. Cílem práce je seznámit se s problematikou vyhodnocení příbuznosti organismů na základě podobnosti DNA sekvencí, navrhnout a realizovat v programovém prostředí Matlab algoritmus pro klasifikaci organismů na základě klasické fylogenetické metody, základních i pokročilých numerických metod a tyto metody mezi sebou porovnat. This thesis deals with the classification of organisms based on the nucleotide fre...

  3. CRP-Cyclic AMP Regulates the Expression of Type 3 Fimbriae via Cyclic di-GMP in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Ting Lin

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae is the predominant pathogen isolated from liver abscesses of diabetic patients in Asian countries. However, the effects of elevated blood glucose levels on the virulence of this pathogen remain largely unknown. Type 3 fimbriae, encoded by the mrkABCDF genes, are important virulence factors in K. pneumoniae pathogenesis. In this study, the effects of exogenous glucose and the intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP signaling pathway on type 3 fimbriae expression regulation were investigated. The production of MrkA, the major subunit of type 3 fimbriae, was increased in glucose-rich medium, whereas cAMP supplementation reversed the effect. MrkA production was markedly increased by cyaA or crp deletion, but slightly decreased by cpdA deletion. In addition, the mRNA levels of mrkABCDF genes and the activity of PmrkA were increased in Δcrp strain, as well as the mRNA levels of mrkHIJ genes that encode cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP-related regulatory proteins that influence type 3 fimbriae expression. Moreover, the activities of PmrkHI and PmrkJ were decreased in ΔlacZΔcrp strain. These results indicate that CRP-cAMP down-regulates mrkABCDF and mrkHIJ at the transcriptional level. Further deletion of mrkH or mrkI in Δcrp strain diminished the production of MrkA, indicating that MrkH and MrkI are required for the CRP regulation of type 3 fimbriae expression. Furthermore, the high activity of PmrkHI in the ΔlacZΔcrp strain was diminished in ΔlacZΔcrpΔmrkHI, but increased in the ΔlacZΔcrpΔmrkJ strain. Deletion of crp increased the intracellular c-di-GMP concentration and reduced the phosphodiesterase activity. Moreover, we found that the mRNA levels of multiple genes related to c-di-GMP metabolism were altered in Δcrp strain. These indicate that CRP regulates type 3 fimbriae expression indirectly via the c-di-GMP signaling pathway. In conclusion, we found evidence of a coordinated regulation of type 3 fimbriae expression by the CRP

  4. [Association of cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein gene and major depressive disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-hua; Xu, Yi-feng; Cui, Dong-hong; Jiang, San-duo; Qian, Yi-ping; Yu, Shun-ying; Jiang, Kai-da

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein(CREB1) gene and major depressive disorder (MDD). We recruited 105 parent-offspring trios of Chinese descent, extracted whole blood genomic DNA, and genotyped the SNPs in rs10932201 and rs6740584 loci. Single-marker transmission disequilibrium test (TDT), pairwise SNP linkage disequilibrium(LD) and haplotype-based TDT were performed. No significant association with MDD was observed for SNPs rs10932201 and rs6740584 (P=0.1004 and P=0.4986). However, there was strong positive association between the rs10932201-rs6740584 haplotype and MDD (P=0.00003241), and both haplotypes of A-C and A-T were significantly associated with MDD (P=0.020 and P=0.00022). The rs10932201-rs6740584 haplotype of the CREB1 gene may play an important role in the pathogenesis of MDD.

  5. Numerical Simulation of Cyclic Thermodynamic Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Stig Kildegård

    2006-01-01

    This thesis is on numerical simulation of cyclic thermodynamic processes. A modelling approach and a method for finding periodic steady state solutions are described. Examples of applications are given in the form of four research papers. Stirling machines and pulse tube coolers are introduced......, compressible flow in one space dimension is presented. The implementation produces models where all the equations, which are on a form that should be understandable to someone with a background in engineering thermodynamics, can be accessed and modified individually. The implementation was designed to make...

  6. Cyclic Glucans Enhance Solubility of Bioavailable Flavonoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyeon Park

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Diverse flavonoids are abundant in dietary food constituents and possess useful biological activities. However, some flavonoids have limited bioavailability due to their low solubility in water. As an important approach to enhance aqueous solubility, inclusion of hydrophobic guest molecules in hydrophilic hosts such as cyclic glucans has been used. This review summarizes applications of β-cyclodextrin, synthetic β-cyclodextrin derivatives, and newly synthesized derivatives of cyclosophoraoses as complexing agents to enhance the bioavailability of flavonoids such as baicalein, kaempferol, and naphthoflavones.

  7. Aberrant 3H in Ehrlich mouse ascites tumor cell nucleotides after in vivo labeling with myo-[2-3H]- and L -myo-[1-3H]inositol: implications for measuring inositol phosphate signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren C.; Jensen, Annelie Kolbjørn; Simonsen, L.O.

    2003-01-01

    -[2-3H] inositol with delivery of 3H-labeled metabolites to extrarenal tissues. As expected, the aberrant labeling of ATP is markedly reduced with the use of 3H-myo-inositol labeled at L-C1 rather than at C2, reflecting that the 3H at L-C1 disappears in the first step of the myo-inositol catabolism......: the oxidative conversion to -glucuronate. In contrast, with the 3H at C2 of myo-inositol, the 3H-C2 passes into the pentose phosphate conversions with resulting labeling of nucleotides. The extent of catabolism to 3H-labeled water, the cellular accumulation of 3H-myo-inositol, the incorporation into cellular...... inositol phospholipids, and the labeling pattern of cellular phosphoinositides were all found to be similar for the two labeled myo-inositol moieties. With the use of -myo-[1-3H]inositol an aberrant 3H-labeling at about 25% remained, for which a presumptive mechanism is proposed. -myo-[1-3H...

  8. Palindromic nucleotide analysis in human T cell receptor rearrangements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh K Srivastava

    Full Text Available Diversity of T cell receptor (TCR genes is primarily generated by nucleotide insertions upon rearrangement from their germ line-encoded V, D and J segments. Nucleotide insertions at V-D and D-J junctions are random, but some small subsets of these insertions are exceptional, in that one to three base pairs inversely repeat the sequence of the germline DNA. These short complementary palindromic sequences are called P nucleotides. We apply the ImmunoSeq deep-sequencing assay to the third complementarity determining region (CDR3 of the β chain of T cell receptors, and use the resulting data to study P nucleotides in the repertoire of naïve and memory CD8(+ and CD4(+ T cells. We estimate P nucleotide distributions in a cross section of healthy adults and different T cell subtypes. We show that P nucleotide frequency in all T cell subtypes ranges from 1% to 2%, and that the distribution is highly biased with respect to the coding end of the gene segment. Classification of observed palindromic sequences into P nucleotides using a maximum conditional probability model shows that single base P nucleotides are very rare in VDJ recombination; P nucleotides are primarily two bases long. To explore the role of P nucleotides in thymic selection, we compare P nucleotides in productive and non-productive sequences of CD8(+ naïve T cells. The naïve CD8(+ T cell clones with P nucleotides are more highly expanded.

  9. Investigation of Cyclic Deformation and Fatigue of Polycrystalline Cu under Pure Compression Cyclic Loading Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Tzu-Yin Jean

    It is commonly accepted that fatigue crack is initiated under tensile fatigue stresses. However, practical examples demonstrate that cracks may also initiate under pure compressive fluctuating loads such as the failures observed in aircraft landing gear frames. However, the mechanism of such failures is rarely investigated. Furthermore, knowledge on cyclic deformation response under pure compressive fatigue condition is also very limited or non-existent. Our recent work already verified that fatigue cracks may nucleate from stress concentration sites under pure compression fatigue, but whether or not a form of stress concentration is always needed to initiate a crack under pure compression fatigue remains uncertain. In this study, compression fatigue tests under different peak stresses were carried out on smooth bars of fully annealed OFHC Copper. The purpose of these tests is to investigate not only the cyclic deformation response but also the possibility of crack nucleation without the stress concentrator. Results showed that overall the cyclic stress-strain response and microstructural evolution of OFHC Copper under pure compression fatigue exhibits rather dissimilar behaviour compared to those under symmetrical fatigue. The specimens hardened rapidly within 10 cycles under pure compression fatigue unlike the gradual cyclic hardening behaviour in symmetrical fatigue with the same peak stress amplitude. Compressive cyclic creep behaviour was also observed under the same testing conditions. Moreover, unlike conventional tension-compression fatigue, only moderate slip activity was detectable on the surface instead of typical PSB features detected from TEM observations. The surface observations has revealed that surface slip bands did not increase in number nor did they become more pronounced in height with increasing number of cycles. In addition, surface roughening by grain boundary extrusion was detected to become more severe as the cycling progressed. Therefore

  10. Rf cavity primer for cyclic proton accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, J.E.

    1988-04-01

    The purpose of this note is to describe the electrical and mechanical properites of particle accelerator rf cavities in a manner which will be useful to physics and engineering graduates entering the accelerator field. The discussion will be limited to proton (or antiproton) synchrotron accelerators or storage rings operating roughly in the range of 20 to 200 MHz. The very high gradient, fixed frequency UHF or microwave devices appropriate for electron machines and the somewhat lower frequency and broader bandwidth devices required for heavy ion accelerators are discussed extensively in other papers in this series. While it is common pratice to employ field calculation programs such as SUPERFISH, URMEL, or MAFIA as design aids in the development of rf cavities, we attempt here to elucidate various of the design parameters commonly dealt with in proton machines through the use of simple standing wave coaxial resonator expressions. In so doing, we treat only standing wave structures. Although low-impedance, moderately broad pass-band travelling wave accelerating systems are used in the CERN SPS, such systems are more commonly found in linacs, and they have not been used widely in large cyclic accelerators. Two appendices providing useful supporting material regarding relativistic particle dynamics and synchrotron motion in cyclic accelerators are added to supplement the text.

  11. Effect of registration on cyclical kinematic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Elizabeth A; Cassidy, Ruth B; Rothman, Edward D; Gerstner, Geoffrey E

    2010-08-26

    Given growing interest in functional data analysis (FDA) as a useful method for analyzing human movement data, it is critical to understand the effects of standard FDA procedures, including registration, on biomechanical analyses. Registration is used to reduce phase variability between curves while preserving the individual curve's shape and amplitude. The application of three methods available to assess registration could benefit those in the biomechanics community using FDA techniques: comparison of mean curves, comparison of average RMS values, and assessment of time-warping functions. Therefore, the present study has two purposes. First, the necessity of registration applied to cyclical data after time normalization is assessed. Second, we illustrate the three methods for evaluating registration effects. Masticatory jaw movements of 22 healthy adults (2 males, 21 females) were tracked while subjects chewed a gum-based pellet for 20s. Motion data were captured at 60 Hz with two gen-locked video cameras. Individual chewing cycles were time normalized and then transformed into functional observations. Registration did not affect mean curves and warping functions were linear. Although registration decreased the RMS, indicating a decrease in inter-subject variability, the difference was not statistically significant. Together these results indicate that registration may not always be necessary for cyclical chewing data. An important contribution of this paper is the illustration of three methods for evaluating registration that are easy to apply and useful for judging whether the extra data manipulation is necessary. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A cyclically actuated electrolytic drug delivery device

    KAUST Repository

    Yi, Ying

    2015-01-01

    This work, focusing on an implantable drug delivery system, presents the first prototype electrolytic pump that combines a catalytic reformer and a cyclically actuated mode. These features improve the release performance and extend the lifetime of the device. Using our platinum (Pt)-coated carbon fiber mesh that acts as a catalytic reforming element, the cyclical mode is improved because the faster recombination rate allows for a shorter cycling time for drug delivery. Another feature of our device is that it uses a solid-drug-in-reservoir (SDR) approach, which allows small amounts of a solid drug to be dissolved in human fluid, forming a reproducible drug solution for long-term therapies. We have conducted proof-of-principle drug delivery studies using such an electrolytic pump and solvent blue 38 as the drug substitute. These tests demonstrate power-controlled and pulsatile release profiles of the chemical substance, as well as the feasibility of this device. A drug delivery rate of 11.44 ± 0.56 μg min-1 was achieved by using an input power of 4 mW for multiple pulses, which indicates the stability of our system. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2015.

  13. Trichomonas vaginalis NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase hydrolyze guanine nucleotides and increase extracellular guanosine levels under serum restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Camila Braz; Durgante, Juliano; de Oliveira, Rafael Rodrigues; Dos Santos, Victor Hugo Jacks Mendes; Rodrigues, Luiz Frederico; Garcia, Solange Cristina; Dos Santos, Odelta; Tasca, Tiana

    2016-05-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the aethiologic agent of trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease in the world. The purinergic signaling pathway is mediated by extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides that are involved in many biological effects as neurotransmission, immunomodulation and inflammation. Extracellular nucleotides can be hydrolyzed by a family of enzymes known as ectonucleotidases including the ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (E-NTPDases) family which hydrolyses nucleosides triphosphate and diphosphate as preferential substrates and ecto-5'-nucleotidase which catalyzes the conversion of monophosphates into nucleosides. In T. vaginalis the E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities upon adenine nucleotides have already been characterized in intact trophozoites but little is known concerning guanine nucleotides and nucleoside. These enzymes may exert a crucial role on nucleoside generation, providing the purine sources for the synthesis de novo of these essential nutrients, sustaining parasite growth and survival. In this study, we investigated the hydrolysis profile of guanine-related nucleotides and nucleoside in intact trophozoites from long-term-grown and fresh clinical isolates of T. vaginalis. Knowing that guanine nucleotides are also substrates for T. vaginalis ectoenzymes, we evaluated the profile of nucleotides consumption and guanosine uptake in trophozoites submitted to a serum limitation condition. Results show that guanine nucleotides (GTP, GDP, GMP) were substrates for T. vaginalis ectonucleotidases, with expected kinetic parameters for this enzyme family. Different T. vaginalis isolates (two from the ATCC and nine fresh clinical isolates) presented a heterogeneous hydrolysis profile. The serum culture condition increased E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities with high consumption of extracellular GTP generating enhanced GDP, GMP and guanosine levels as demonstrated by HPLC, with final

  14. On cyclic codes of composite length and the minimal distance

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Maosheng

    2017-01-01

    In an interesting paper Professor Cunsheng Ding provided three constructions of cyclic codes of length being a product of two primes. Numerical data shows that many codes from these constructions are best cyclic codes of the same length and dimension over the same finite field. However, not much is known about these codes. In this paper we explain some of the mysteries of the numerical data by developing a general method on cyclic codes of composite length and on estimating the minimal distan...

  15. The Mucosal Adjuvant Cyclic di-AMP Exerts Immune Stimulatory Effects on Dendritic Cells and Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libanova, Rimma; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Weiss, Siegfried; Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    The cyclic di-nucleotide bis-(3′,5′)-cyclic dimeric adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is a candidate mucosal adjuvant with proven efficacy in preclinical models. It was shown to promote specific humoral and cellular immune responses following mucosal administration. To date, there is only fragmentary knowledge on the cellular and molecular mode of action of c-di-AMP. Here, we report on the identification of dendritic cells and macrophages as target cells of c-di-AMP. We show that c-di-AMP induces the cell surface up-regulation of T cell co-stimulatory molecules as well as the production of interferon-β. Those responses were characterized by in vitro experiments with murine and human immune cells and in vivo studies in mice. Analyses of dendritic cell subsets revealed conventional dendritic cells as principal responders to stimulation by c-di-AMP. We discuss the impact of the reported antigen presenting cell activation on the previously observed adjuvant effects of c-di-AMP in mouse immunization studies. PMID:24755640

  16. Dibutyryl adenosine cyclic 3':5'-monophosphate effects on goldfish behavior and brain RNA metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashoua, V E

    1971-11-01

    Intraventricular administration of dibutyryl adenosine cyclic 3':5'-monophosphate into goldfish brains produced hyperactive animals. A study of the effects of the drug (25-50 mg/kg) on the incorporation of [5-(3)H] orotic acid, as a precursor of labeled uridine and cytidine, into newly synthesized RNA showed the formation of an RNA with a uridine to cytidine ratio 20-50% higher than that of the control. In double-labeling experiments with uridine as the labeled precursor, the synthesis of a nuclear RNA fraction (not produced in the absence of drug) was demonstrated. Some of this RNA was found to migrate into the cytoplasmic fraction and to become associated with polysomes. The results suggest that cyclic AMP might function as a "metabolic demand signal" for eliciting new RNA synthesis in goldfish brain.

  17. Detection of cyclic-fold bifurcation in electrostatic MEMS transducers by motion-induced current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sangtak; Khater, Mahmoud; Effa, David; Abdel-Rahman, Eihab; Yavuz, Mustafa

    2017-08-01

    This paper presents a new detection method of cyclic-fold bifurcations in electrostatic MEMS transducers based on a variant of the harmonic detection of resonance method. The electrostatic transducer is driven by an unbiased harmonic signal at half its natural frequency, ω a   =  1/2 ω o . The response of the transducer consists of static displacement and a series of harmonics at 2 ω a , 4 ω a , and so on. Its motion-induced current is shifted by the excitation frequency, ω a , to appear at 3 ω a , 5 ω a , and higher odd harmonics, providing higher sensitivity to the measurement of harmonic motions. With this method, we successfully detected the variation in the location of the cyclic-fold bifurcation of an encapsulated electrostatic MEMS transducer. We also detected a regime of tapping mode motions subsequent to the bifurcation.

  18. Defects in rhizobial cyclic glucan and lipopolysaccharide synthesis alter legume gene expression during nodule development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Antuono, Alejandra L; Ott, Thomas; Krusell, Lene

    2008-01-01

    cDNA array technology was used to compare transcriptome profiles of Lotus japonicus roots inoculated with a Mesorhizobium loti wild-type and two mutant strains affected in cyclic beta(1-2) glucan synthesis (cgs) and in lipopolysaccharide synthesis (lpsbeta2). Expression of genes associated...... inoculated with the cgs mutant strain. Some of the genes exhibited a transient increase in transcript levels during intermediate steps of normal nodule development while others displayed induced expression during the final steps of nodule development. Ineffective nodules induced by the glucan mutant showed...... higher expression of phenylalanine ammonia lyase than wild-type nodules. Differences in expression pattern of genes involved in early recognition and signaling were observed in plants inoculated with the M. loti mutant strain affected in the synthesis of cyclic glucan. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Jan...

  19. Adenyl cyclases and cAMP in plant signaling - Past and present

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A.

    2010-06-25

    In lower eukaryotes and animals 3\\'-5\\'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenyl cyclases (ACs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cAMP from ATP, have long been established as key components and second messengers in many signaling pathways. In contrast, in plants, both the presence and biological role of cAMP have been a matter of ongoing debate and some controversy. Here we shall focus firstly on the discovery of cellular cAMP in plants and evidence for a role of this second messenger in plant signal transduction. Secondly, we shall review current evidence of plant ACs, analyse aspects of their domain organisations and the biological roles of candidate molecules. In addition, we shall assess different approaches based on search motifs consisting of functionally assigned amino acids in the catalytic centre of annotated and/or experimentally tested nucleotide cyclases that can contribute to the identification of novel candidate molecules with AC activity such as F-box and TIR proteins. 2010 Gehring; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  20. Netrin-1 - DCC Signaling Systems and Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Paul SanGiovanni

    Full Text Available We conducted a nested candidate gene study and pathway-based enrichment analysis on data from a multi-national 77,000-person project on the molecular genetics of age-related macular degeneration (AMD to identify AMD-associated DNA-sequence variants in genes encoding constituents of a netrin-1 (NTN1-based signaling pathway that converges on DNA-binding transcription complexes through a 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate-calcineurin (cAMP-CN-dependent axis. AMD-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs existed in 9 linkage disequilibrium-independent genomic regions; these included loci overlapping NTN1 (rs9899630, P ≤ 9.48 x 10(-5, DCC (Deleted in Colorectal Cancer--the gene encoding a primary NTN1 receptor (rs8097127, P ≤ 3.03 x 10(-5, and 6 other netrin-related genes. Analysis of the NTN1-DCC pathway with exact methods demonstrated robust enrichment with AMD-associated SNPs (corrected P-value = 0.038, supporting the idea that processes driven by NTN1-DCC signaling systems operate in advanced AMD. The NTN1-DCC pathway contains targets of FDA-approved drugs and may offer promise for guiding applied clinical research on preventive and therapeutic interventions for AMD.

  1. Apyrase (nucleoside triphosphate-diphosphohydrolase) and extracellular nucleotides regulate cotton fiber elongation in cultured ovules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Greg; Torres, Jonathan; Finlayson, Scott; Guan, Xueying; Handley, Craig; Lee, Jinsuk; Kays, Julia E; Chen, Z Jeffery; Roux, Stanley J

    2010-02-01

    Ectoapyrase enzymes remove the terminal phosphate from extracellular nucleoside tri- and diphosphates. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), two ectoapyrases, AtAPY1 and AtAPY2, have been implicated as key modulators of growth. In fibers of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), transcript levels for GhAPY1 and GhAPY2, two closely related ectoapyrases that have high sequence similarity to AtAPY1 and AtAPY2, are up-regulated when fibers enter their rapid growth phase. In an ovule culture system, fibers release ATP as they grow, and when their ectoapyrase activity is blocked by the addition of polyclonal anti-apyrase antibodies or by two different small molecule inhibitors, the medium ATP level rises and fiber growth is suppressed. High concentrations of the poorly hydrolyzable nucleotides ATPgammaS and ADPbetaS applied to the medium inhibit fiber growth, and low concentrations of them stimulate growth, but treatment with adenosine 5'-O-thiomonophosphate causes no change in the growth rate. Both the inhibition and stimulation of growth by applied nucleotides can be blocked by an antagonist that blocks purinoceptors in animal cells, and by adenosine. Treatment of cotton ovule cultures with ATPgammaS induces increased levels of ethylene, and two ethylene antagonists, aminovinylglycine and silver nitrate, block both the growth stimulatory and growth inhibitory effects of applied nucleotides. In addition, the ethylene precursor, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid, lowers the concentration of nucleotide needed to promote fiber growth. These data indicate that ectoapyrases and extracellular nucleotides play a significant role in regulating cotton fiber growth and that ethylene is a likely downstream component of the signaling pathway.

  2. Ligase chain reaction amplification for sensitive electrochemiluminescent detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying; Yang, Mengli; Xiang, Yun, E-mail: yunatswu@swu.edu.cn; Yuan, Ruo, E-mail: yuanruo@swu.edu.cn; Chai, Yaqin

    2013-09-24

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Ligase chain reaction amplification (LCR) is employed to sensitively detect single nucleotide polymorphisms. •During LCR, the mutant target gene is recycled and duplicated exponentially to achieve dramatic signal amplification. •The method shows a selectivity factor of 10{sup 3} toward the mutant target gene against the interfering wild target gene. -- Abstract: Single nucleotide polymorphisms are the most common type of genetic variations among human beings and can serve as biomarkers for various types of diseases. In this work, based on ligase chain reaction amplification for the production of massive hemin/G-quadruplex DNAzymes to quench the electrochemiluminescent (ECL) emission of quantum dots (QDs), a universal and sensitive single nucleotide polymorphism detection method is described. During the ligase chain reaction process, the mutant K-ras target gene is recycled and exponentially duplicated, leading to the attachment of numerous G-rich sequences on the QD-embedded sensing surface. Upon the addition of the assistant sequences and hemin, numerous hemin/G-quadruplex DNAzymes are formed, which consume the dissolved oxygen in the detection buffer and result in significant quenching of QD ECL emission for sensitive single nucleotide polymorphism determination. The developed method shows a linear range of 50 fM to 50 pM and an estimated detection limit of 45 fM for the mutant K-ras gene. The proposed strategy also exhibits high selectivity towards the mutant K-ras gene against the co-existence of 10{sup 3}-fold excess of the wild-type K-ras gene, which makes our method a useful addition to the alternatives for single nucleotide polymorphism monitoring.

  3. Angular analysis of the cyclic impacting oscillations in a robotic grinding process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafieian, Farzad; Girardin, François; Liu, Zhaoheng; Thomas, Marc; Hazel, Bruce

    2014-02-01

    In a robotic machining process, a light-weight cutter or grinder is usually held by an articulated robot arm. Material removal is achieved by the rotating cutting tool while the robot end effector ensures that the tool follows a programmed trajectory in order to work on complex curved surfaces or to access hard-to-reach areas. One typical application of such process is maintenance and repair work on hydropower equipment. This paper presents an experimental study of the dynamic characteristics of material removal in robotic grinding, which is unlike conventional grinding due to the lower structural stiffness of the tool-holder robot. The objective of the study is to explore the cyclic nature of this mechanical operation to provide the basis for future development of better process control strategies. Grinding tasks that minimize the number of iterations to converge to the target surface can be better planned based on a good understanding and modeling of the cyclic material removal mechanism. A single degree of freedom dynamic analysis of the process suggests that material removal is performed through high-frequency impacts that mainly last for only a small fraction of the grinding disk rotation period. To detect these discrete cutting events in practice, a grinder is equipped with a rotary encoder. The encoder's signal is acquired through the angular sampling technique. A running cyclic synchronous average is applied to the speed signal to remove its non-cyclic events. The measured instantaneous rotational frequency clearly indicates the impacting nature of the process and captures the transient response excited by these cyclic impacts. The technique also locates the angular positions of cutting impacts in revolution cycles. It is thus possible to draw conclusions about the cyclic nature of dynamic changes in impact-cutting behavior when grinding with a flexible robot. The dynamics of the impacting regime and transient responses to impact-cutting excitations

  4. The ever unfolding story of cAMP signalling in trypanosomatids: vive la difference!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Nii Aryee Tagoe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Kinetoplastids are unicellular, eukaryotic, flagellated protozoans containing the eponymous kinetoplast. Within this order, the family of trypanosomatids are responsible for some of the most serious human diseases, including Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi, sleeping sickness (T. brucei spp. and leishmaniasis (Leishmania spp. Although cAMP is produced during the life cycle stages of these parasites, its signalling pathways are very different from those of mammals. The absence of G-protein-coupled recep¬tors, the presence of structurally different adenylyl cyclases, the paucity of known cAMP effector proteins and the stringent need for regulation of cAMP in the small kinetoplastid cells all suggest a significantly different biochemical pathway and likely cell biology. However, each of the main kinetoplastid parasites express four class 1-type cyclic nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterases (PDEA-D, which have highly similar catalytic domains to that of human PDEs. To date, only TbrPDEB, expressed as two slightly different isoforms TbrPDEB1 and B2, has been found to be essential when ablated. Although the genomes contain reasonably well con¬served genes for catalytic and regulatory domains of pro¬tein kinase A, these have been shown to have varied structural and functional roles in the different species. Recent discovery of a role of cAMP/AMP metabolism in a quorum-sensing signalling pathway in T. brucei, and the identification of downstream cAMP Response Proteins (CARPs whose expression levels correlate with sensitivity to PDE inhibitors, suggests a complex signalling cascade. The interplay between the roles of these novel CARPs and the quorum-sensing signalling pathway on cell division and differentiation makes for intriguing cell biology and a new paradigm in cAMP signal transduction, as well as potential targets for trypanosomatid-specific cAMP pathway-based therapeutics.

  5. Nucleotide Excision Repair in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes Lans

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nucleotide excision repair (NER plays an essential role in many organisms across life domains to preserve and faithfully transmit DNA to the next generation. In humans, NER is essential to prevent DNA damage-induced mutation accumulation and cell death leading to cancer and aging. NER is a versatile DNA repair pathway that repairs many types of DNA damage which distort the DNA helix, such as those induced by solar UV light. A detailed molecular model of the NER pathway has emerged from in vitro and live cell experiments, particularly using model systems such as bacteria, yeast, and mammalian cell cultures. In recent years, the versatility of the nematode C. elegans to study DNA damage response (DDR mechanisms including NER has become increasingly clear. In particular, C. elegans seems to be a convenient tool to study NER during the UV response in vivo, to analyze this process in the context of a developing and multicellular organism, and to perform genetic screening. Here, we will discuss current knowledge gained from the use of C. elegans to study NER and the response to UV-induced DNA damage.

  6. A Lateral Flow Biosensor for the Detection of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lingwen; Xiao, Zhuo

    2017-01-01

    A lateral flow biosensor (LFB) is introduced for the detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The assay is composed of two steps: circular strand displacement reaction and lateral flow biosensor detection. In step 1, the nucleotide at SNP site is recognized by T4 DNA ligase and the signal is amplified by strand displacement DNA polymerase, which can be accomplished at a constant temperature. In step 2, the reaction product of step 1 is detected by a lateral flow biosensor, which is a rapid and cost effective tool for nuclei acid detection. Comparing with conventional methods, it requires no complicated machines. It is suitable for the use of point of care diagnostics. Therefore, this simple, cost effective, robust, and promising LFB detection method of SNP has great potential for the detection of genetic diseases, personalized medicine, cancer related mutations, and drug-resistant mutations of infectious agents.

  7. Purinergic signaling in kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzies, Robert I; Tam, Frederick W; Unwin, Robert J; Bailey, Matthew A

    2017-02-01

    Nucleotides are key subunits for nucleic acids and provide energy for intracellular metabolism. They can also be released from cells to act physiologically as extracellular messengers or pathologically as danger signals. Extracellular nucleotides stimulate membrane receptors in the P2 and P1 family. P2X are ATP-activated cation channels; P2Y and P1 are G-protein coupled receptors activated by ATP, ADP, UTP, and UDP in the case of P2 or adenosine for P1. Renal P2 receptors influence both vascular contractility and tubular function. Renal cells also express ectonucleotidases that rapidly hydrolyze extracellular nucleotides. These enzymes integrate this multireceptor purinergic-signaling complex by determining the nucleotide milieu to titrate receptor activation. Purinergic signaling also regulates immune cell function by modulating the synthesis and release of various cytokines such as IL1-β and IL-18 as part of inflammasome activation. Abnormal or excessive stimulation of this intricate paracrine system can be pro- or anti-inflammatory, and is also linked to necrosis and apoptosis. Kidney tissue injury causes a localized increase in ATP concentration, and sustained activation of P2 receptors can lead to renal glomerular, tubular, and vascular cell damage. Purinergic receptors also regulate the activity and proliferation of fibroblasts, promoting both inflammation and fibrosis in chronic disease. In this short review we summarize some of the recent findings related to purinergic signaling in the kidney. We focus predominantly on the P2X7 receptor, discussing why antagonists have so far disappointed in clinical trials and how advances in our understanding of purinergic signaling might help to reposition these compounds as potential treatments for renal disease. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Light-activated hydrolysis of GTP and cyclic GMP in the rod outer segments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignetti, E; Cavaggioni, A; Sorbi, R T

    1978-06-01

    1. The hydrolysis of guanosine triphosphate (GTP) and the consequent formation of guanosine diphosphate (GDP) and phosphate (P1) are activated by light in a suspension of broken retinal rods: the hydrolysis rate with GTP in the micrometer concentration range is 2.5-3.5 n-mole/min per mg of rhodopsin in the preparation. 2. The ionic composition of the medium suspending the rods is not critical: the hydrolysis is present in NaCl saline solution with MG2+ as well as in Tris-HC1 buffer solution, and with the chelating agent EDTA. 3. The ionic strength is critical: the effect is reduced when the broken rods are suspended in a low salt mannitol solution, and is altogether abolished when they are separated from the mannitol solution; it reappears when the mannitol solution is added again in the presence of salts. An element essential for the effect is thus reversibly released in the mannitol solution. No hydrolytic activity on GTP, however, is found in the mannitol soluble fraction. 4. The cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase is eluted from the rods in the mannitol solution, and is reaggregated to the rods in the presence of salts; once recombined with the rods, it can be activated by light. 5. The activation of the phosphodiesterase by light is present in the absence of added nucleotide triphosphates.

  9. Smoothing localized directional cyclic autocorrelation and application in oil-film instability analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Bo, Lin; Luo, Honglin

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, smoothing localized directional cyclic autocorrelation (SLDCA) is proposed as a novel time-frequency distribution to analyze the vibration signal of rotor-bearing system in oil-film instability. Based on the cyclostationarity of real-valued signal, directional cyclic autocorrelation (DCA) is defined for the complex-valued signal. In order to suppress the cross-term interferences, the DCA is localized and filtered with two-dimensional time-frequency window which allows the smoothing kernel function to adapt to the signal time-frequency-varying characteristics. And then the localized DCA is smoothed by the localized optimal radially Gaussian kernel and cascaded to produce the SLDCA with high time-frequency resolution and less susceptibility to cross-term interferences. The application of SLDCA in the oil-film instability analysis verifies that the SLDCA can not only precisely detect the instantaneous frequency information in the time-frequency distribution with high resolution and robustness to the noises and cross-terms, but also provide the phase coupling information of rotor instantaneous planar motion by which the directivity and shape of the planar motion can be determined.

  10. Estrous Cyclicity in Mice During Simulated Weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, E. L.; Talyansky, Y.; Scott, R. T.; Tash, J. S.; Christenson, L. K.; Alwood, J. S.; Ronca, A. E.

    2017-01-01

    Hindlimb unloading (HU) is a rodent model system used to simulate weightlessness experienced in space. However, some effects of this approach on rodent physiology are under-studied, specifically the effects on ovarian estrogen production which drives the estrous cycle. To resolve this deficiency, we conducted a ground-based validation study using the HU model, while monitoring estrous cycles in 16-weeks-old female C57BL6 mice. Animals were exposed to HU for 12 days following a 3 day HU cage acclimation period, and estrous cycling was analyzed in HU animals (n=22), normally loaded HU Cage Pair-Fed controls (CPF; n=22), and Vivarium controls fed ad libitum (VIV; n=10). Pair feeding was used to control for potential nutritional deficits on ovarian function. Vaginal cells were sampled daily in all mice via saline lavage. Cells were dried and stained with crystal violet, and the smears evaluated using established vaginal cytology techniques by two individuals blinded to the animal treatment group. Estrous cyclicity was disrupted in nearly all HU and CPF mice, while those maintained in VIV had an average normal cycle length of 4.8+/- 0.5 days, with all stages in the cycle visibly observed. CPF and HU animals arrested in the diestrous phase, which precedes the pre-ovulatory estrogen surge. Additionally, infection-like symptoms characterized by vaginal discharge and swelling arose in several HU animals, which we suspect was due to an inability of these mice to properly groom themselves, and/or due to the change in the gravity vector relative to the vaginal opening, which prevented drainage of the lavage solution. Pair-feeding resulted in similar weight gains of HU and CPF (1.5% vs 3.0%, respectively). The current results indicate that pair-feeding controlled weight gain and that the HU cage alone influenced estrous cyclicity. Thus, longer acclimation needs to be tested to determine if and when normal estrous cycling resumes in non-loaded mice in HU cages prior to HU

  11. Estrous Cyclicity of Mice During Simulated Weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Eric; Talyansky, Yuli; Scott, Ryan; Tash, Joseph; Christenson, Lane; Alwood, Joshua; Ronca, April

    2017-01-01

    Hindlimb unloading (HU) is a rodent model system used to simulate weightlessness experienced in space. However, some effects of this approach on rodent physiology are under-studied, specifically the effects on ovarian estrogen production which drives the estrous cycle. To resolve this deficiency, we conducted a ground-based validation study using the HU model, while monitoring estrous cycles in 16-weeks-old female C57BL6 mice. Animals were exposed to HU for 12 days following a 3 day HU cage acclimation period, and estrous cycling was analyzed in HU animals (n22), normally loaded HU Cage Pair-Fed controls (CPF; n22), and Vivarium controls fed ad libitum (VIV; n10). Pair feeding was used to control for potential nutritional deficits on ovarian function. Vaginal cells were sampled daily in all mice via saline lavage. Cells were dried and stained with crystal violet, and the smears evaluated using established vaginal cytology techniques by two individuals blinded to the animal treatment group. Estrous cyclicity was disrupted in nearly all HU and CPF mice, while those maintained in VIV had an average normal cycle length of 4.8 0.5 days, with all stages in the cycle visibly observed. CPF and HU animals arrested in the diestrous phase, which precedes the pre-ovulatory estrogen surge. Additionally, infection-like symptoms characterized by vaginal discharge and swelling arose in several HU animals, which we suspect was due to an inability of these mice to properly groom themselves, andor due to the change in the gravity vector relative to the vaginal opening, which prevented drainage of the lavage solution. Pair-feeding resulted in similar weight gains of HU and CPF (1.5 vs 3.0, respectively). The current results indicate that pair-feeding controlled weight gain and that the HU cage alone influenced estrous cyclicity. Thus, longer acclimation needs to be tested to determine if and when normal estrous cycling resumes in non-loaded mice in HU cages prior to HU testing. Future

  12. Prebiotic nucleotide synthesis demonstration of a geologically plausible pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwartz, A.W.; Veen, van der M.; Bisseling, T.; Chittenden, G.J.

    1975-01-01

    Mineral phosphate (apatite) is activated for the synthesis of nucleotides when dilute solutions containing nucleoside and ammonium oxalate are evaporated in its presence. A natural, igneous fluorapatite was found to be even more effective in nucleotide synthesis than the more soluble

  13. Structure and function of nucleotide sugar transporters: Current progress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadley, B.; Maggioni, A.; Ashikov, A.M.; Day, C.J.; Haselhorst, T.; Tiralongo, J.

    2014-01-01

    The proteomes of eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea are highly diverse due, in part, to the complex post-translational modification of protein glycosylation. The diversity of glycosylation in eukaryotes is reliant on nucleotide sugar transporters to translocate specific nucleotide sugars that are

  14. In-silico single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) mining of Sorghum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may be considered the ultimate genetic markers as they represent the finest resolution of a DNA sequence (a single nucleotide), and are generally abundant in populations with a low mutation rate. SNPs are important tools in studying complex genetic traits and genome evolution.

  15. Condensing the information in DNA with double-headed nucleotides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornum, Mick; Sharma, Pawan K; Reslow-Jacobsen, Charlotte

    2017-01-01

    A normal duplex holds as many Watson-Crick base pairs as the number of nucleotides in its constituent strands. Here we establish that single nucleotides can be designed to functionally imitate dinucleotides without compromising binding affinity. This effectively allows sequence information...

  16. Mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals a low nucleotide diversity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals a low nucleotide diversity of Caligula japonica in China. ... Mitochondrial DNA analysis reveals a low nucleotide diversity of Caligula japonica in China. Y Li, B Yang, H Wang, R Xia, L Wang, Z Zhang, L Qin, Y Liu ...

  17. Single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping and its application on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-03-20

    Mar 20, 2009 ... wide trait analysis. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) are the most common sequence variation and a significant amount of effort has been invested in re-sequencing alleles to discover .... logical markers and are usually visually characterized .... regard two-nucleotide changes and small indels up to a.

  18. New Insights into the Cyclic Di-adenosine Monophosphate (c-di-AMP) Degradation Pathway and the Requirement of the Cyclic Dinucleotide for Acid Stress Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Lisa; Zeden, Merve S.; Kaever, Volkhard

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide signaling networks are key to facilitate alterations in gene expression, protein function, and enzyme activity in response to diverse stimuli. Cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is an important secondary messenger molecule produced by the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and is involved in regulating a number of physiological processes including potassium transport. S. aureus must ensure tight control over its cellular levels as both high levels of the dinucleotide and its absence result in a number of detrimental phenotypes. Here we show that in addition to the membrane-bound Asp-His-His and Asp-His-His-associated (DHH/DHHA1) domain-containing phosphodiesterase (PDE) GdpP, S. aureus produces a second cytoplasmic DHH/DHHA1 PDE Pde2. Although capable of hydrolyzing c-di-AMP, Pde2 preferentially converts linear 5′-phosphadenylyl-adenosine (pApA) to AMP. Using a pde2 mutant strain, pApA was detected for the first time in S. aureus, leading us to speculate that this dinucleotide may have a regulatory role under certain conditions. Moreover, pApA is involved in a feedback inhibition loop that limits GdpP-dependent c-di-AMP hydrolysis. Another protein linked to the regulation of c-di-AMP levels in bacteria is the predicted regulator protein YbbR. Here, it is shown that a ybbR mutant S. aureus strain has increased acid sensitivity that can be bypassed by the acquisition of mutations in a number of genes, including the gene coding for the diadenylate cyclase DacA. We further show that c-di-AMP levels are slightly elevated in the ybbR suppressor strains tested as compared with the wild-type strain. With this, we not only identified a new role for YbbR in acid stress resistance in S. aureus but also provide further insight into how c-di-AMP levels impact acid tolerance in this organism. PMID:27834680

  19. New Insights into the Cyclic Di-adenosine Monophosphate (c-di-AMP) Degradation Pathway and the Requirement of the Cyclic Dinucleotide for Acid Stress Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Lisa; Zeden, Merve S; Schuster, Christopher F; Kaever, Volkhard; Gründling, Angelika

    2016-12-30

    Nucleotide signaling networks are key to facilitate alterations in gene expression, protein function, and enzyme activity in response to diverse stimuli. Cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is an important secondary messenger molecule produced by the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and is involved in regulating a number of physiological processes including potassium transport. S. aureus must ensure tight control over its cellular levels as both high levels of the dinucleotide and its absence result in a number of detrimental phenotypes. Here we show that in addition to the membrane-bound Asp-His-His and Asp-His-His-associated (DHH/DHHA1) domain-containing phosphodiesterase (PDE) GdpP, S. aureus produces a second cytoplasmic DHH/DHHA1 PDE Pde2. Although capable of hydrolyzing c-di-AMP, Pde2 preferentially converts linear 5'-phosphadenylyl-adenosine (pApA) to AMP. Using a pde2 mutant strain, pApA was detected for the first time in S. aureus, leading us to speculate that this dinucleotide may have a regulatory role under certain conditions. Moreover, pApA is involved in a feedback inhibition loop that limits GdpP-dependent c-di-AMP hydrolysis. Another protein linked to the regulation of c-di-AMP levels in bacteria is the predicted regulator protein YbbR. Here, it is shown that a ybbR mutant S. aureus strain has increased acid sensitivity that can be bypassed by the acquisition of mutations in a number of genes, including the gene coding for the diadenylate cyclase DacA. We further show that c-di-AMP levels are slightly elevated in the ybbR suppressor strains tested as compared with the wild-type strain. With this, we not only identified a new role for YbbR in acid stress resistance in S. aureus but also provide further insight into how c-di-AMP levels impact acid tolerance in this organism. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Microplastic deformation of polycrystals during cyclic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudarev, E. F.; Pochivalova, G. P.; Nikitina, N. V.

    1990-03-01

    A model of microplastic deformation of polycrystals during zero-start cyclic loading with tensions lower than the yield strength is proposed according to which during cycling, thermally activated movement of dislocations occurs under conditions of stress relaxation. Based on this model and the statistical theory of polycrystalline microdeformation, the accumulation of microplastic deformation is theoretically described as a function of the number of loading cycles and the stress amplitudes. It is theoretically proved that in the cycling process the microplastic deformation that accumulates over one cycle decreases as the number of cycles increases; up to the macroscopic elastic limit it is independent of the stress amplitude, and then sharply increases. Agreement of the theory with experimental data for spring alloys is observed in the density of mobile dislocations, which decreases during cycling.

  1. Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification of Infectious Prions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moda, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, or prion diseases, are a group of incurable disorders caused by the accumulation of an abnormally folded prion protein (PrP Sc ) in the brain. According to the "protein-only" hypothesis, PrP Sc is the infectious agent able to propagate the disease by acting as a template for the conversion of the correctly folded prion protein (PrP C ) into the pathological isoform. Recently, the mechanism of PrP C conversion has been mimicked in vitro using an innovative technique named protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA). This technology represents a great tool for studying diverse aspects of prion biology in the field of basic research and diagnosis. Moreover, PMCA can be expanded for the study of the misfolding process associated to other neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A Cyclical Nurse Schedule Using Goal Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruzzakiah Jenal

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Scheduling is a very tedious task in organizations where duty is around the clock. Constructing timetable for nurses in hospital is one of the challenging jobs for the head nurse or nurse manager. It requires a lot of time to spend for generating a good and fair timetable. Thus, in this study, we propose a cyclical nurse scheduling model using a 0-1 goal programming that would help the head nurse or nurse manager to have less effort on building new schedules periodically. The proposed model satisfies the stated hospital’s policies and the nurses’ preferences. The result obtained from this model gives an optimal solution where all goals are achieved. The model also provides an unbiased way of scheduling the nurses and thus leads to an overall higher satisfaction and fairness to the nurses and the hospital management.

  3. Pyroelectric Harvesters for Generating Cyclic Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ching Hsiao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Pyroelectric energy conversion is a novel energy process which directly transforms waste heat energy from cyclic heating into electricity via the pyroelectric effect. Application of a periodic temperature profile to pyroelectric cells is necessary to achieve temperature variation rates for generating an electrical output. The critical consideration in the periodic temperature profile is the frequency or work cycle which is related to the properties and dimensions of the air layer; radiation power and material properties, as well as the dimensions and structure of the pyroelectric cells. This article aims to optimize pyroelectric harvesters by matching all these requirements. The optimal induced charge per period increases about 157% and the efficient period band decreases about 77%, when the thickness of the PZT cell decreases from 200 μm to 50 μm, about a 75% reduction. Moreover, when using the thinner PZT cell for harvesting the pyroelectric energy it is not easy to focus on a narrow band with the efficient period. However, the optimal output voltage and stored energy per period decrease about 50% and 74%, respectively, because the electrical capacitance of the 50 μm thick pyroelectric cell is about four times greater than that of the 200 μm thick pyroelectric cell. In addition, an experiment is used to verify that the work cycle to be able to critically affect the efficiency of PZT pyroelectric harvesters. Periods in the range between 3.6 s and 12.2 s are useful for harvesting thermal cyclic energy by pyroelectricity. The optimal frequency or work cycle can be applied in the design of a rotating shutter in order to control the heated and unheated periods of the pyroelectric cells to further enhance the amount of stored energy.

  4. The error performance analysis over cyclic redundancy check codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hee B.

    1991-06-01

    The burst error is generated in digital communication networks by various unpredictable conditions, which occur at high error rates, for short durations, and can impact services. To completely describe a burst error one has to know the bit pattern. This is impossible in practice on working systems. Therefore, under the memoryless binary symmetric channel (MBSC) assumptions, the performance evaluation or estimation schemes for digital signal 1 (DS1) transmission systems carrying live traffic is an interesting and important problem. This study will present some analytical methods, leading to efficient detecting algorithms of burst error using cyclic redundancy check (CRC) code. The definition of burst error is introduced using three different models. Among the three burst error models, the mathematical model is used in this study. The probability density function, function(b) of burst error of length b is proposed. The performance of CRC-n codes is evaluated and analyzed using function(b) through the use of a computer simulation model within CRC block burst error. The simulation result shows that the mean block burst error tends to approach the pattern of the burst error which random bit errors generate.

  5. Effects of cyclic adenosine-monophosphate on growth and PSA secretion of human prostate cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchia, V; Di Carlo, A; De Luca, C; Mariano, A

    2001-05-01

    Prolonged increase of cyclic adenosine-monophosphate (cAMP) level in the culture medium of a well differentiated human prostatic cancer cell (LNCaP) inhibits cellular growth and stimulates PSA secretion. The differentiation of the cells tested was documented by their responsiveness to androgens and the ability to synthesize cellular markers of differentiation (PSA). The raise in cAMP level was produced by dibutyryl cyclic AMP (DBcAMP) or by agents acting at distinct levels in the pathway of cAMP generation (forskolin) or degradation (IBMX). Each of these three agents in a range of concentrations between 10-4-10-6 M had an inhibitory effect on the growth which is dose and time-dependent. The inhibition was reversible as demonstrated by complete restoration of cell growth soon after the withdrawal of the substances from the culture medium. When cAMP levels in culture medium was raised, an increase in PSA content was observed. However, the effects of cAMP on PSA content was not due to increase in PSA synthesis, since simultaneous measurement of secreted and cellular PSA indicated that the principal effect of the cyclic nucleotide was to enhance the secretion of stored PSA. Furthermore the inhibition of cellular growth by cAMP suggests new approaches in prostatic carcinoma therapy.

  6. Structure and stability of spiro-cyclic water clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. The structure and stability of spiro-cyclic water clusters containing up to 32 water molecules have been investigated at different levels of theory. Although there exist minima lower in energy than these spiro-cyclic clusters, calculations at the Hartree–Fock level, density functional theory using B3LYP parametrization ...

  7. Improvements of cyclic somatic embryogenesis of cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raemakers, C.J.J.M.; Schavemaker, C.M.; Jacobsen, E.; Visser, R.G.F.

    1993-01-01

    In cassava a cyclic system of somatic embryogenesis was developed. Primary (torpedo shaped or germinated) embryos, originating from leaf lobes, could only be obtained after culture on solid medium. Cyclic embryos, originating from embryos, could be obtained in both liquid and on solid medium. The

  8. Classifying spaces with virtually cyclic stabilizers for linear groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degrijse, Dieter Dries; Köhl, Ralf; Petrosyan, Nansen

    2015-01-01

    We show that every discrete subgroup of GL(n, ℝ) admits a finite-dimensional classifying space with virtually cyclic stabilizers. Applying our methods to SL(3, ℤ), we obtain a four-dimensional classifying space with virtually cyclic stabilizers and a decomposition of the algebraic K-theory of its...

  9. Evaluating cyclic fatigue of sealants during outdoor testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Sam Williams; Steven Lacher; Corey Halpin; Christopher White

    2009-01-01

    A computer-controlled test apparatus (CCTA) and other instrumentation for subjecting sealant specimens to cyclic fatigue during outdoor exposure was developed. The CCTA enables us to use weather-induced conditions to cyclic fatigue specimens and to conduct controlled tests in-situ during the outdoor exposure. Thermally induced dimensional changes of an aluminum bar...

  10. The antimycin A-sensitive pathway of cyclic electron flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labs, Mathias; Rühle, Thilo; Leister, Dario Michael

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic electron flow has puzzled and divided the field of photosynthesis researchers for decades. This mainly concerns the proportion of its overall contribution to photosynthesis, as well as its components and molecular mechanism. Yet, it is irrefutable that the absence of cyclic electron flow has...

  11. Cyclic imines evaluation in European commercial shellfish samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rambla, Maria; Fernandez-Tejedor, Margarita; Miles, Christopher O.

    Cyclic imines constitute a quite recently discovered group of marine biotoxins that act on neural receptors and that bioaccumulate in seafood. They are grouped together due to the imino group functioning as their common pharmacore, responsible for acute neurotoxicity in mice. Cyclic imines have n...

  12. Role of cyclic AMP in the eye with glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Myoung Sup; Kim, Keun-Young; Ju, Won-Kyu

    2017-02-01

    Glaucoma is characterized by a slow and progressive degeneration of the optic nerve, including retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons in the optic nerve head (ONH), leading to visual impairment. Despite its high prevalence, the biological basis of glaucoma pathogenesis still is not yet fully understood, and the factors contributing to its progression are currently not well characterized. Intraocular pressure (IOP) is the only modifiable risk factor, and reduction of IOP is the standard treatment for glaucoma. However, lowering IOP itself is not always effective for preserving visual function in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma. The second messenger cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) regulates numerous biological processes in the central nervous system including the retina and the optic nerve. Although recent studies revealed that cAMP generated by adenylyl cyclases (ACs) is important in regulating aqueous humor dynamics in ocular tissues, such as the ciliary body and trabecular meshwork, as well as cell death and growth in the retina and optic nerve, the functional role and significance of cAMP in glaucoma remain to be elucidated. In this review, we will discuss the functional role of cAMP in aqueous humor dynamics and IOP regulation, and review the current medications, which are related to the cAMP signaling pathway, for glaucoma treatment. Also, we will further focus on cAMP signaling in RGC growth and regeneration by soluble AC as well as ONH astrocytes by transmembrane ACs to understand its potential role in the pathogenesis of glaucoma neurodegeneration. [BMB Reports 2017; 50(2): 60-70].

  13. Phenomenon of low-alloy steel parametrization transformation at cyclic loading in low-cyclic area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipachev, A. M.; Nazarova, M. N.

    2017-10-01

    Following the results of measurements of hardness, magnetizing force and the rate of ultrasonic longitudinal waves of 09G2S steel samples at various cyclic operating time values, there is a phenomenon of transformation from the normal law of speed distribution of these parameters in power-mode distribution. It shows the submission of the behavior of metal as a complex system to the theory of the self-organized criticality.

  14. Cyclic response and early damage evolution in multiaxial cyclic loading of 316L austenitic steel

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mazánová, Veronika; Škorík, Viktor; Kruml, Tomáš; Polák, Jaroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 100, JUL (2017), s. 466-476 ISSN 0142-1123 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LM2015069; GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-23652S; GA ČR GA15-08826S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : 316L steel * Crack initiation * Cyclic plasticity * Damage mechanism * Multiaxial straining Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.899, year: 2016

  15. A conjugate of decyltriphenylphosphonium with plastoquinone can carry cyclic adenosine monophosphate, but not cyclic guanosine monophosphate, across artificial and natural membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firsov, Alexander M; Rybalkina, Irina G; Kotova, Elena A; Rokitskaya, Tatyana I; Tashlitsky, Vadim N; Korshunova, Galina A; Rybalkin, Sergei D; Antonenko, Yuri N

    2017-10-13

    The present study demonstrated for the first time the interaction between adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), one of the most important signaling compounds in living organisms, and the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant plastoquinonyl-decyltriphenylphosphonium (SkQ1). The data obtained on model liquid membranes and human platelets revealed the ability of SkQ1 to selectively transport cAMP, but not guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP), across both artificial and natural membranes. In particular, SkQ1 elicited translocation of cAMP from the source to the receiving phase of a Pressman-type cell, while showing low activity with cGMP. Importantly, only conjugate with plastoquinone, but not dodecyl-triphenylphosphonium, was effective in carrying cAMP. In human platelets, SkQ1 also appeared to serve as a carrier of cAMP, but not cGMP, from outside to inside the cell, as measured by phosphorylation of the vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein. The SkQ1-induced transfer of cAMP across the plasma membrane found here can be tentatively suggested to interfere with cAMP signaling pathways in living cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. A GTPase chimera illustrates an uncoupled nucleotide affinity and release rate, Providing insight into the activation mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guilfoyle, Amy P.; Deshpande, Chandrika N.; Font Sadurni, Josep

    2014-01-01

    The release of GDP from GTPases signals the initiation of a GTPase cycle, where the association of GTP triggers conformational changes promoting binding of downstream effector molecules. Studies have implicated the nucleotide-binding G5 loop to be involved in the GDP release mechanism. For example...... for GDP release, or, alternatively, the movement is a consequence of release. To gain additional insight into the sequence of events leading to GDP release, we have created a chimeric protein comprised of Escherichia coli NFeoB and the G5 loop from the human Giα1 protein. The protein chimera retains...... GTPase activity at a similar level to wild-type NFeoB, and structural analyses of the nucleotide-free and GDP-bound proteins show that the G5 loop adopts conformations analogous to that of the human nucleotide-bound Giα1 protein in both states. Interestingly, isothermal titration calorimetry and stopped...

  17. Spatial Non-Cyclic Geometric Phase in Neutron Interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipp, Stefan; Hasegawa, Yuji; Loidl, Rudolf; Rauch, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    We present a split-beam neutron interferometric experiment to test the non-cyclic geometric phase tied to the spatial evolution of the system: the subjacent two-dimensional Hilbert space is spanned by the two possible paths in the interferometer and the evolution of the state is controlled by phase shifters and absorbers. A related experiment was reported previously by some of the authors to verify the cyclic spatial geometric phase. The interpretation of this experiment, namely to ascribe a geometric phase to this particular state evolution, has met severe criticism. The extension to non-cyclic evolution manifests the correctness of the interpretation of the previous experiment by means of an explicit calculation of the non-cyclic geometric phase in terms of paths on the Bloch-sphere. The theoretical treatment comprises the cyclic geometric phase as a special case, which is confirmed by experiment.

  18. The elimination of hierarchy in a completely cyclic competition system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongming; Dong, Linrong; Yang, Guangcan

    2012-01-01

    Interactions among competing units are crucial to maintaining biodiversity, and non-hierarchical interactions can promote biodiversity in cyclic competing systems. In the present study, we explore the role of hierarchical interactions, existing ubiquitously in reality, in the co-evolution of a cyclic competing system. In systems composed of cyclic competing species with hierarchy interactions in which one predator species has more than one prey, we find that hierarchy disappears in a rather short evolving time. In the process of co-evolution, a hierarchical competing system tends to transit to a cyclic non-hierarchical competing system described by the rock-paper-scissors game. In other words, the cyclic competing interactions appear to eradicate hierarchy. This conclusion is analyzed by a mean-field approach and is tested by stochastic simulations.

  19. History-independent cyclic response of nanotwinned metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qingsong; Zhou, Haofei; Lu, Qiuhong; Gao, Huajian; Lu, Lei

    2017-11-01

    Nearly 90 per cent of service failures of metallic components and structures are caused by fatigue at cyclic stress amplitudes much lower than the tensile strength of the materials involved. Metals typically suffer from large amounts of cumulative, irreversible damage to microstructure during cyclic deformation, leading to cyclic responses that are unstable (hardening or softening) and history-dependent. Existing rules for fatigue life prediction, such as the linear cumulative damage rule, cannot account for the effect of loading history, and engineering components are often loaded by complex cyclic stresses with variable amplitudes, mean values and frequencies, such as aircraft wings in turbulent air. It is therefore usually extremely challenging to predict cyclic behaviour and fatigue life under a realistic load spectrum. Here, through both atomistic simulations and variable-strain-amplitude cyclic loading experiments at stress amplitudes lower than the tensile strength of the metal, we report a history-independent and stable cyclic response in bulk copper samples that contain highly oriented nanoscale twins. We demonstrate that this unusual cyclic behaviour is governed by a type of correlated ‘necklace’ dislocation consisting of multiple short component dislocations in adjacent twins, connected like the links of a necklace. Such dislocations are formed in the highly oriented nanotwinned structure under cyclic loading and help to maintain the stability of twin boundaries and the reversible damage, provided that the nanotwins are tilted within about 15 degrees of the loading axis. This cyclic deformation mechanism is distinct from the conventional strain localizing mechanisms associated with irreversible microstructural damage in single-crystal, coarse-grained, ultrafine-grained and nanograined metals.

  20. History-independent cyclic response of nanotwinned metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Qingsong; Zhou, Haofei; Lu, Qiuhong; Gao, Huajian; Lu, Lei

    2017-11-09

    Nearly 90 per cent of service failures of metallic components and structures are caused by fatigue at cyclic stress amplitudes much lower than the tensile strength of the materials involved. Metals typically suffer from large amounts of cumulative, irreversible damage to microstructure during cyclic deformation, leading to cyclic responses that are unstable (hardening or softening) and history-dependent. Existing rules for fatigue life prediction, such as the linear cumulative damage rule, cannot account for the effect of loading history, and engineering components are often loaded by complex cyclic stresses with variable amplitudes, mean values and frequencies, such as aircraft wings in turbulent air. It is therefore usually extremely challenging to predict cyclic behaviour and fatigue life under a realistic load spectrum. Here, through both atomistic simulations and variable-strain-amplitude cyclic loading experiments at stress amplitudes lower than the tensile strength of the metal, we report a history-independent and stable cyclic response in bulk copper samples that contain highly oriented nanoscale twins. We demonstrate that this unusual cyclic behaviour is governed by a type of correlated 'necklace' dislocation consisting of multiple short component dislocations in adjacent twins, connected like the links of a necklace. Such dislocations are formed in the highly oriented nanotwinned structure under cyclic loading and help to maintain the stability of twin boundaries and the reversible damage, provided that the nanotwins are tilted within about 15 degrees of the loading axis. This cyclic deformation mechanism is distinct from the conventional strain localizing mechanisms associated with irreversible microstructural damage in single-crystal, coarse-grained, ultrafine-grained and nanograined metals.

  1. Synthetic Nucleotides as Probes of DNA Polymerase Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason M. Walsh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The genetic code is continuously expanding with new nucleobases designed to suit specific research needs. These synthetic nucleotides are used to study DNA polymerase dynamics and specificity and may even inhibit DNA polymerase activity. The availability of an increasing chemical diversity of nucleotides allows questions of utilization by different DNA polymerases to be addressed. Much of the work in this area deals with the A family DNA polymerases, for example, Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I, which are DNA polymerases involved in replication and whose fidelity is relatively high, but more recent work includes other families of polymerases, including the Y family, whose members are known to be error prone. This paper focuses on the ability of DNA polymerases to utilize nonnatural nucleotides in DNA templates or as the incoming nucleoside triphosphates. Beyond the utility of nonnatural nucleotides as probes of DNA polymerase specificity, such entities can also provide insight into the functions of DNA polymerases when encountering DNA that is damaged by natural agents. Thus, synthetic nucleotides provide insight into how polymerases deal with nonnatural nucleotides as well as into the mutagenic potential of nonnatural nucleotides.

  2. Nucleotide Excision Repair in Cellular Chromatin: Studies with Yeast from Nucleotide to Gene to Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Reed

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Here we review our development of, and results with, high resolution studies on global genome nucleotide excision repair (GGNER in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We have focused on how GGNER relates to histone acetylation for its functioning and we have identified the histone acetyl tranferase Gcn5 and acetylation at lysines 9/14 of histone H3 as a major factor in enabling efficient repair. We consider results employing primarily MFA2 as a model gene, but also those with URA3 located at subtelomeric sequences. In the latter case we also see a role for acetylation at histone H4. We then go on to outline the development of a high resolution genome-wide approach that enables one to examine correlations between histone modifications and the nucleotide excision repair (NER of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers throughout entire genomes. This is an approach that will enable rapid advances in understanding the complexities of how compacted chromatin in chromosomes is processed to access DNA damage and then returned to its pre-damaged status to maintain epigenetic codes.

  3. Bacterial Biofilm Control by Perturbation of Bacterial Signaling Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Givskov, Michael

    2017-01-01

    infections. A potential method for biofilm dismantling is chemical interception of regulatory processes that are specifically involved in the biofilm mode of life. In particular, bacterial cell to cell signaling called “Quorum Sensing” together with intracellular signaling by bis-(3′-5′)-cyclic...

  4. Cyclic restricted feeding enhances lipid storage in 3 T3-L1 adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Takeshi; Endo, Yuriko

    2013-05-24

    People who skip breakfast have more visceral fat than those who eat breakfast; however, the mechanism underlying this difference is unclear. In this study, we examined 3 T3-L1 adipocytes and assessed 1) whether restricted feeding (i.e., "breakfast skipping") alters the cyclic expression of brain and muscle aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)-like protein 1 (BMAL1) and lipogenic proteins and 2) whether repeated exposure to growth media at the time-points with enhanced lipogenic regulatory signals increases de novo lipogenesis and lipid storage. Differentiated adipocytes were divided into two groups: a control group and a restricted feeding group, for which incubation with growth medium from ZT 9 to ZT 12 was withheld. A bout of restricted feeding disrupted the cyclic expression of BMAL1 protein and increased the expression of lipogenic proteins, such as fatty acid synthase and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma in adipocytes. Furthermore, the repeated exposure to growth media at the time-points with enhanced lipogenic regulatory signals increased de novo lipogenesis and lipid storage. These findings suggest that direct disruption of intracellular molecular clock systems by breakfast skipping and the concurrent changes in the daily cycle of lipogenic proteins in adipocytes, as a consequence of repeated nutrition at the time-points with enhanced lipogenic regulatory signals, would result in increased lipogenesis and lipid storage. These alterations are important molecular mechanisms underlying augmented adiposity induced by breakfast skipping.

  5. Neuro-controller for reducing cyclic variation in lean combustion spark ignition engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pingan He; Jagannathan, S. [Missouri Univ., Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Rolla, MO (United States)

    2005-07-15

    Literature shows that by controlling engines at extreme lean operating conditions (equivalence ratio <0.75) can reduce emissions by as much as 30% (Inoue, Matsushita, Nakanishi, and Okano (1993). Toyota lean combustion system - the third generation SAE, 930,873) and also it improves fuel efficiency by as much as 5-10%. However, the engine exhibits strong cyclic variation in heat release which may lead to instability and poor performance. A novel neural network (NN) controller is developed to control spark ignition (SI) engines at extreme lean conditions. The purpose of neuro-controller is to reduce the cyclic variation in heat release at lean engine operation even when the engine dynamics are unknown. The stability analysis of the closed-loop control system is given and the boundedness of all the signals is ensured. The adaptive NN does not require an offline learning phase and the weights can be initialized at zero or random. Results demonstrate that the cyclic variation is reduced significantly using the proposed controller developed using an experimentally validated engine model. The proposed approach can also be applied to a class of nonlinear systems that have a similar structure as that of the engine dynamics. (Author)

  6. A Novel Cyclic Time to Digital Converter Based on Triple-Slope Interpolation and Time Amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rezvanyvardom

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates a novel cyclic time-to-digital converter (TDC which employs triple-slope analog interpolation and time amplification techniques for digitizing the time interval between the rising edges of two input signals(Start and Stop. The proposed converter will be a 9-bit cyclic time-to-digital converter that does not use delay lines in its structure. Therefore, it has a low sensitivity to temperature, power supply and process (PVT variations. The other advantages of the proposed converter are low circuit complexity, and high accuracy compared with the time-to-digital converters that have previously been proposed. Also, this converter improves the time resolution and the dynamic range. In the same resolution, linear range and dynamic range, the proposed cyclic TDC reduces the number of circuit elements compared with the converters that have a similar circuit structure. Thus, the converter reduces the chip area, the power consumption and the figure of merit (FoM. In this converter, the integral nonlinearity (INL and differential nonlinearity (DNL errors are reduced. In order to evaluate the idea, the proposed time-to-digital converter is designed in TSMC 45 nm CMOS technology and simulated. Comparison of the theoretical and simulation results confirms the benefits of the proposed TDC.

  7. A novel nucleotide oligomerisation domain 2 mutation in a family with Blau syndrome: Phenotype and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Lawrence Tc; Nachbur, Ueli; Rowczenio, Dorota; Ziegler, John B; Fischer, Eddy; Lin, Ming Wei

    2017-10-01

    Mutations in the nucleotide binding domain of the PRR, NOD2, are associated with the autoinflammatory diseases Blau syndrome and early-onset sarcoidosis. Current theories suggest that constitutive activation of the NOD2 pathway may be responsible for pathogenesis of these diseases. Here, we report the phenotype of a kindred with Blau syndrome caused by a novel NOD2 mutation (p.E383D). Signaling protein and cytokine expression were examined, and the results of these experiments challenge current theories of constitutive NOD2 activation in the pathophysiology of Blau syndrome.

  8. Insights into the biological functions of Dock family guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurin, Mélanie; Côté, Jean-François

    2014-03-15

    Rho GTPases play key regulatory roles in many aspects of embryonic development, regulating processes such as differentiation, proliferation, morphogenesis, and migration. Two families of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) found in metazoans, Dbl and Dock, are responsible for the spatiotemporal activation of Rac and Cdc42 proteins and their downstream signaling pathways. This review focuses on the emerging roles of the mammalian DOCK family in development and disease. We also discuss, when possible, how recent discoveries concerning the biological functions of these GEFs might be exploited for the development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  9. Nucleotides Regulate Secretion of the Inflammatory Chemokine CCL2 from Human Macrophages and Monocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. Higgins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available CCL2 is an important inflammatory chemokine involved in monocyte recruitment to inflamed tissues. The extracellular nucleotide signalling molecules UTP and ATP acting via the P2Y2 receptor are known to induce CCL2 secretion in macrophages. We confirmed this in the human THP-1 monocytic cell line showing that UTP is as efficient as LPS at inducing CCL2 at early time points (2–6 hours. Expression and calcium mobilisation experiments confirmed the presence of functional P2Y2 receptors on THP-1 cells. UTP stimulation of human peripheral CD14+ monocytes showed low responses to LPS (4-hour stimulation but a significant increase above background following 6 hours of treatment. The response to UTP in human monocytes was variable and required stimulation >6 hours. With such variability in response we looked for single nucleotide polymorphisms in P2RY2 that could affect the functional response. Sequencing of P2RY2 from THP-1 cells revealed the presence of a single nucleotide polymorphism altering amino acid 312 from arginine to serine (rs3741156. This polymorphism is relatively common at a frequency of 0.276 (n=404 subjects. Finally, we investigated CCL2 secretion in response to LPS or UTP in human macrophages expressing 312Arg-P2Y2 or 312Ser-P2Y2 where only the latter exhibited significant UTP-induced CCL2 secretion (n=5 donors per group.

  10. Using molecular beacons to detect single-nucleotide polymorphisms with real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhlanga, M M; Malmberg, L

    2001-12-01

    Detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in high-throughput studies promises to be an expanding field of molecular medicine in the near future. Highly specific, simple, and accessible methods are needed to meet the rigorous requirements of single-nucleotide detection needed in pharmacogenomic studies, linkage analysis, and the detection of pathogens. Molecular beacons present such a solution for the high-throughput screening of SNPs in homogeneous assays using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Molecular beacons are probes that fluoresce on hybridization to their perfectly complementary targets. In recent years they have emerged as a leading genetic analysis tool in a wide range of contexts from quantification of RNA transcripts, to probes on microarrays, to single-nucleotide polymorphism detection. The majority of these methods use PCR to obtain sufficient amounts of sample to analyze. The use of molecular beacons with other amplification schemes has been reliably demonstrated, though PCR remains the method of choice. Here we discuss and present how to design and use molecular beacons to achieve reliable SNP genotyping and allele discrimination in real-time PCR. In addition, we provide a new means of analyzing data outputs from such real-time PCR assays that compensates for differences between sample condition, assay conditions, variations in fluorescent signal, and amplification efficiency. The mechanisms by which molecular beacons are able to have extraordinary specificity are also presented. Copyright 2001 Elsevier Science (USA).

  11. Nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotype diversity of RTCS gene in China elite maize inbred lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enying Zhang

    Full Text Available The maize RTCS gene, encoding a LOB domain transcription factor, plays important roles in the initiation of embryonic seminal and postembryonic shoot-borne root. In this study, the genomic sequences of this gene in 73 China elite inbred lines, including 63 lines from 5 temperate heteroric groups and 10 tropic germplasms, were obtained, and the nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotype diversity were detected. A total of 63 sequence variants, including 44 SNPs and 19 indels, were identified at this locus, and most of them were found to be located in the regions of UTR and intron. The coding region of this gene in all tested inbred lines carried 14 haplotypes, which encoding 7 deferring RTCS proteins. Analysis of the polymorphism sites revealed that at least 6 recombination events have occurred. Among all 6 groups tested, only the P heterotic group had a much lower nucleotide diversity than the whole set, and selection analysis also revealed that only this group was under strong negative selection. However, the set of Huangzaosi and its derived lines possessed a higher nucleotide diversity than the whole set, and no selection signal were identified.

  12. Classification of pseudo pairs between nucleotide bases and amino acids by analysis of nucleotide-protein complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Jiro; Westhof, Eric

    2011-10-01

    Nucleotide bases are recognized by amino acid residues in a variety of DNA/RNA binding and nucleotide binding proteins. In this study, a total of 446 crystal structures of nucleotide-protein complexes are analyzed manually and pseudo pairs together with single and bifurcated hydrogen bonds observed between bases and amino acids are classified and annotated. Only 5 of the 20 usual amino acid residues, Asn, Gln, Asp, Glu and Arg, are able to orient in a coplanar fashion in order to form pseudo pairs with nucleotide bases through two hydrogen bonds. The peptide backbone can also form pseudo pairs with nucleotide bases and presents a strong bias for binding to the adenine base. The Watson-Crick side of the nucleotide bases is the major interaction edge participating in such pseudo pairs. Pseudo pairs between the Watson-Crick edge of guanine and Asp are frequently observed. The Hoogsteen edge of the purine bases is a good discriminatory element in recognition of nucleotide bases by protein side chains through the pseudo pairing: the Hoogsteen edge of adenine is recognized by various amino acids while the Hoogsteen edge of guanine is only recognized by Arg. The sugar edge is rarely recognized by either the side-chain or peptide backbone of amino acid residues.

  13. Quantitative extraction of nucleotides from frozen muscle samples of Atlantic salmon ( Salmo salar ) and rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss ) : Effects of time taken to sample and extraction method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, P.M.; Bremner, Allan; Pankhurst, N.W.

    2000-01-01

    Muscle excised from the dorsal flank of Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout at death and up to 120 min postmortem (P.M.) was frozen in liquid N-2 and stored at -80C. Following acid extraction, on ice (method I), or dry ice (method 2) samples were analyzed for cyclic nucleotides to determine...... the effect of time to sample, and extraction method. There was no pattern of change in nucleotide profile in either species up to 10 min P.M. At 120 min P.M., Atlantic salmon muscle extracted by method 2 had a higher IMP concentration than at any other time but there was no difference in adenylates. Ignoring.......8 to -5C) prior to enzyme inactivation....

  14. Bucket foundations under lateral cyclic loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foglia, Aligi

    To enable a prosperous development of offshore wind energy, economically feasible technologies must be developed. The monopod bucket foundation is likely to become a cost-effective sub-structure for offshore wind turbines and has the potential to make offshore wind more cost-competitive in the en......To enable a prosperous development of offshore wind energy, economically feasible technologies must be developed. The monopod bucket foundation is likely to become a cost-effective sub-structure for offshore wind turbines and has the potential to make offshore wind more cost......-competitive in the energy market. This thesis addresses issues concerning monopod bucket foundations in the hope of providing tools and ideas that could be used to optimize the design of this sub-structure. The work is focussed on the behaviour of bucket foundations under lateral cyclic loading. Other related...... and propaedeutic topics, such as bucket foundations under transient lateral loading and under monotonic lateral loading, are also investigated. All the scientific work is fundamentally based on small-scale experimental tests of bucket foundations in dense water-saturated sand. The most important scientific...

  15. Interuniversal entanglement in a cyclic multiverse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Pérez, Salvador; Balcerzak, Adam; Dąbrowski, Mariusz P.; Krämer, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    We study scenarios of parallel cyclic multiverses which allow for a different evolution of the physical constants, while having the same geometry. These universes are classically disconnected, but quantum-mechanically entangled. Applying the thermodynamics of entanglement, we calculate the temperature and the entropy of entanglement. It emerges that the entropy of entanglement is large at big bang and big crunch singularities of the parallel universes as well as at the maxima of the expansion of these universes. The latter seems to confirm earlier studies that quantum effects are strong at turning points of the evolution of the universe performed in the context of the timeless nature of the Wheeler-DeWitt equation and decoherence. On the other hand, the entropy of entanglement at big rip singularities is going to zero despite its presumably quantum nature. This may be an effect of total dissociation of the universe structures into infinitely separated patches violating the null energy condition. However, the temperature of entanglement is large/infinite at every classically singular point and at maximum expansion and seems to be a better measure of quantumness.

  16. ANP-induced signaling cascade and its implications in renal pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theilig, Franziska; Wu, Qingyu

    2015-05-15

    The balance between vasoconstrictor/sodium-retaining and vasodilator/natriuretic systems is essential for maintaining body fluid and electrolyte homeostasis. Natriuretic peptides, such as atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), belong to the vasodilator/natriuretic system. ANP is produced by the conversion of pro-ANP into ANP, which is achieved by a proteolytical cleavage executed by corin. In the kidney, ANP binds to the natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) and enhances its guanylyl cyclase activity, thereby increasing intracellular cyclic guanosine monophosphate production to promote natriuretic and renoprotective responses. In the glomerulus, ANP increases glomerular permeability and filtration rate and antagonizes the deleterious effects of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activation. Along the nephron, natriuretic and diuretic actions of ANP are mediated by inhibiting the basolaterally expressed Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, reducing apical sodium, potassium, and protein organic cation transporter in the proximal tubule, and decreasing Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter activity and renal concentration efficiency in the thick ascending limb. In the medullary collecting duct, ANP reduces sodium reabsorption by inhibiting the cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channels, the epithelial sodium channel, and the heteromeric channel transient receptor potential-vanilloid 4 and -polycystin 2 and diminishes vasopressin-induced water reabsorption. Long-term ANP treatment may lead to NPR-A desensitization and ANP resistance, resulting in augmented sodium and water reabsorption. In mice, corin deficiency impairs sodium excretion and causes salt-sensitive hypertension. Characteristics of ANP resistance and corin deficiency are also encountered in patients with edema-associated diseases, highlighting the importance of ANP signaling in salt-water balance and renal pathophysiology. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Genomic Signals of Reoriented ORFs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Dan Cristea

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex representation of nucleotides is used to convert DNA sequences into complex digital genomic signals. The analysis of the cumulated phase and unwrapped phase of DNA genomic signals reveals large-scale features of eukaryote and prokaryote chromosomes that result from statistical regularities of base and base-pair distributions along DNA strands. By reorienting the chromosome coding regions, a “hidden” linear variation of the cumulated phase has been revealed, along with the conspicuous almost linear variation of the unwrapped phase. A model of chromosome longitudinal structure is inferred on these bases.

  18. Cyclic strain-mediated regulation of vascular endothelial cell migration and tube formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Offenberg Sweeney, Nicholas; Cummins, Philip M; Cotter, Eoin J; Fitzpatrick, Paul A; Birney, Yvonne A; Redmond, Eileen M; Cahill, Paul A

    2005-04-08

    Hemodynamic forces exerted by blood flow (cyclic strain, shear stress) affect the initiation and progression of angiogenesis; however, the precise signaling mechanism(s) involved are unknown. In this study, we examine the role of cyclic strain in regulating bovine aortic endothelial cell (BAEC) migration and tube formation, indices of angiogenesis. Considering their well-documented mechanosensitivity, functional inter-dependence, and involvement in angiogenesis, we hypothesized roles for matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2/9), RGD-dependent integrins, and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) in this process. BAECs were exposed to equibiaxial cyclic strain (5% strain, 1Hz for 24h) before their migration and tube formation was assessed by transwell migration and collagen gel tube formation assays, respectively. In response to strain, both migration and tube formation were increased by 1.83+/-0.1- and 1.84+/-0.1-fold, respectively. Pertussis toxin, a Gi-protein inhibitor, decreased strain-induced migration by 45.7+/-32% and tube formation by 69.8+/-13%, whilst protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibition with genistein had no effect. siRNA-directed attenuation of endothelial MMP-9 (but not MMP-2) expression/activity decreased strain-induced migration and tube formation by 98.6+/-41% and 40.7+/-31%, respectively. Finally, integrin blockade with cRGD peptide and siRNA-directed attenuation of uPA expression reduced strain-induced tube formation by 85.7+/-15% and 84.7+/-31%, respectively, whilst having no effect on migration. Cyclic strain promotes BAEC migration and tube formation in a Gi-protein-dependent PTK-independent manner. Moreover, we demonstrate for the first time a putative role for MMP-9 in both strain-induced events, whilst RGD-dependent integrins and uPA appear only to be involved in strain-induced tube formation.

  19. Cyclic coding for Brillouin optical time-domain analyzers using probe dithering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iribas, Haritz; Loayssa, Alayn; Sauser, Florian; Llera, Miguel; Le Floch, Sébastien

    2017-04-17

    We study the performance limits of mono-color cyclic coding applied to Brillouin optical time-domain analysis (BOTDA) sensors that use probe wave dithering. BOTDA analyzers with dithering of the probe use a dual-probe-sideband setup in which an optical frequency modulation of the probe waves along the fiber is introduced. This avoids non-local effects while keeping the Brillouin threshold at its highest level, thus preventing the spontaneous Brillouin scattering from generating noise in the deployed sensing fiber. In these conditions, it is possible to introduce an unprecedented high probe power into the sensing fiber, which leads to an enhancement of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and consequently to a performance improvement of the analyzer. The addition of cyclic coding in these set-ups can further increase the SNR and accordingly enhance the performance. However, this unprecedented probe power levels that can be employed result in the appearance of detrimental effects in the measurement that had not previously been observed in other BOTDA set-ups. In this work, we analyze the distortion in the decoding process and the errors in the measurement that this distortion causes, due to three factors: the power difference of the successive pulses of a code sequence, the appearance of first-order non-local effects and the non-linear amplification of the probe wave that results when using mono-color cyclic coding of the pump pulses. We apply the results of this study to demonstrate the performance enhancement that can be achieved in a long-range dithered dual-probe BOTDA. A 164-km fiber-loop is measured with 1-m spatial resolution, obtaining 3-MHz Brillouin frequency shift measurement precision at the worst contrast location. To the best of our knowledge, this is the longest sensing distance achieved with a BOTDA sensor using mono-color cyclic coding.

  20. Nucleotide Metabolism and its Control in Lactic Acid Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilstrup, Mogens; Hammer, Karin; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2005-01-01

    Most metabolic reactions are connected through either their utilization of nucleotides or their utilization of nucleotides or their regulation by these metabolites. In this review the biosynthetic pathways for pyrimidine and purine metabolism in lactic acid bacteria are described including...... the interconversion pathways, the formation of deoxyribonucleotides and the salvage pathways for use of exogenous precursors. The data for the enzymatic and the genetic regulation of these pathways are reviewed, as well as the gene organizations in different lactic acid bacteria. Mutant phenotypes and methods...... for manipulation of nucleotide pools are also discussed. Our aim is to provide an overview of the physiology and genetics of nucleotide metabolism and its regulation that will facilitate the interpretation of data arising from genetics, metabolomics, proteomics, and transcriptomics in lactic acid bacteria....

  1. Free amino acids and 5'-nucleotides in Finnish forest mushrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, Hanna; Rotola-Pukkila, Minna; Aisala, Heikki; Hopia, Anu; Laaksonen, Timo

    2018-05-01

    Edible mushrooms are valued because of their umami taste and good nutritional values. Free amino acids, 5'-nucleotides and nucleosides were analyzed from four Nordic forest mushroom species (Lactarius camphoratus, Boletus edulis, Cantharellus cibarius, Craterellus tubaeformis) using high precision liquid chromatography analysis. To our knowledge, these taste components were studied for the first time from Craterellus tubaeformis and Lactarius camphoratus. The focus was on the umami amino acids and 5'-nucleotides. The free amino acid and 5'-nucleotide/nucleoside contents of studied species differed from each other. In all studied samples, umami amino acids were among five major free amino acids. The highest concentration of umami amino acids was on L. camphoratus whereas B. edulis had the highest content of sweet amino acids and C. cibarius had the highest content of bitter amino acids. The content of umami enhancing 5'-nucleotides were low in all studied species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Association study of nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrera, Noa; Arrojo, Manuel; Sanjuán, Julio

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies using several hundred thousand anonymous markers present limited statistical power. Alternatively, association studies restricted to common nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (nsSNPs) have the advantage of strongly reducing the multiple testing problem, ...

  3. Enzymatic Incorporation of Modified Purine Nucleotides in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu El Asrar, Rania; Margamuljana, Lia; Abramov, Mikhail; Bande, Omprakash; Agnello, Stefano; Jang, Miyeon; Herdewijn, Piet

    2017-12-14

    A series of nucleotide analogues, with a hypoxanthine base moiety (8-aminohypoxanthine, 1-methyl-8-aminohypoxanthine, and 8-oxohypoxanthine), together with 5-methylisocytosine were tested as potential pairing partners of N 8 -glycosylated nucleotides with an 8-azaguanine or 8-aza-9-deazaguanine base moiety by using DNA polymerases (incorporation studies). The best results were obtained with the 5-methylisocytosine nucleotide followed by the 1-methyl-8-aminohypoxanthine nucleotide. The experiments demonstrated that small differences in the structure (8-azaguanine versus 8-aza-9-deazaguanine) might lead to significant differences in recognition efficiency and selectivity, base pairing by Hoogsteen recognition at the polymerase level is possible, 8-aza-9-deazaguanine represents a self-complementary base pair, and a correlation exists between in vitro incorporation studies and in vivo recognition by natural bases in Escherichia coli, but this recognition is not absolute (exceptions were observed). © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Signal Words

    Science.gov (United States)

    SIGNAL WORDS TOPIC FACT SHEET NPIC fact sheets are designed to answer questions that are commonly asked by the ... making decisions about pesticide use. What are Signal Words? Signal words are found on pesticide product labels, ...

  5. The mycotoxin definition reconsidered towards fungal cyclic depsipeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taevernier, Lien; Wynendaele, Evelien; De Vreese, Leen; Burvenich, Christian; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2016-04-02

    Currently, next to the major classes, cyclic depsipeptides beauvericin and enniatins are also positioned as mycotoxins. However, as there are hundreds more fungal cyclic depsipeptides already identified, should these not be considered as mycotoxins as well? The current status of the mycotoxin definition revealed a lack of consistency, leading to confusion about what compounds should be called mycotoxins. Because this is of pivotal importance in risk assessment prioritization, a clear and quantitatively expressed mycotoxin definition is proposed, based on data of widely accepted mycotoxins. Finally, this definition is applied to a set of fungal cyclic depsipeptides, revealing that some of these should indeed be considered as mycotoxins.

  6. Cyclic Peptide?Selenium Nanoparticles as Drug Transporters

    OpenAIRE

    Nasrolahi Shirazi, Amir; Tiwari, Rakesh K.; Oh, Donghoon; Sullivan, Brian; Kumar, Anil; Beni, Yousef A.; Parang, Keykavous

    2014-01-01

    A cyclic peptide composed of five tryptophan, four arginine, and one cysteine [W5R4C] was synthesized. The peptide was evaluated for generating cyclic peptide-capped selenium nanoparticles (CP?SeNPs) in situ. A physical mixing of the cyclic peptide with SeO3 ?2 solution in water generated [W5R4C]?SeNPs via the combination of reducing and capping properties of amino acids in the peptide structure. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that [W5R4C]?SeNPs were in the size range of...

  7. The impact of low-frequency, low-force cyclic stretching of human bronchi on airway responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Guen, Morgan; Grassin-Delyle, Stanislas; Naline, Emmanuel; Buenestado, Amparo; Brollo, Marion; Longchampt, Elisabeth; Kleinmann, Philippe; Devillier, Philippe; Faisy, Christophe

    2016-11-14

    In vivo, the airways are constantly subjected to oscillatory strain (due to tidal breathing during spontaneous respiration) and (in the event of mechanical ventilation) positive pressure. This exposure is especially problematic for the cartilage-free bronchial tree. The effects of cyclic stretching (other than high-force stretching) have not been extensively characterized. Hence, the objective of the present study was to investigate the functional and transcriptional response of human bronchi to repetitive mechanical stress caused by low-frequency, low-force cyclic stretching. After preparation and equilibration in an organ bath, human bronchial rings from 66 thoracic surgery patients were stretched in 1-min cycles of elongation and relaxation over a 60-min period. For each segment, the maximal tension corresponded to 80% of the reference contraction (the response to 3 mM acetylcholine). The impact of cyclic stretching (relative to non-stretched controls) was examined by performing functional assessments (epithelium removal and incubation with sodium channel agonists/antagonists or inhibitors of intracellular pathways), biochemical assays of the organ bath fluid (for detecting the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines), and RT-PCR assays of RNA isolated from tissue samples. The application of low-force cyclic stretching to human bronchial rings for 60 min resulted in an immediate, significant increase in bronchial basal tone, relative to non-cyclic stretching (4.24 ± 0.16 g vs. 3.28 ± 0.12 g, respectively; p stretching up-regulated the early mRNA expression of MMP9 only, and was not associated with changes in organ bath levels of pro-inflammatory mediators. Low-frequency, low-force cyclic stretching of whole human bronchi induced a myogenic response rather than activation of the pro-inflammatory signaling pathways mediated by mechanotransduction.

  8. Microsporidia: Why Make Nucleotides if You Can Steal Them?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Dean

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Microsporidia are strict obligate intracellular parasites that infect a wide range of eukaryotes including humans and economically important fish and insects. Surviving and flourishing inside another eukaryotic cell is a very specialised lifestyle that requires evolutionary innovation. Genome sequence analyses show that microsporidia have lost most of the genes needed for making primary metabolites, such as amino acids and nucleotides, and also that they have only a limited capacity for making adenosine triphosphate (ATP. Since microsporidia cannot grow and replicate without the enormous amounts of energy and nucleotide building blocks needed for protein, DNA, and RNA biosynthesis, they must have evolved ways of stealing these substrates from the infected host cell. Providing they can do this, genome analyses suggest that microsporidia have the enzyme repertoire needed to use and regenerate the imported nucleotides efficiently. Recent functional studies suggest that a critical innovation for adapting to intracellular life was the acquisition by lateral gene transfer of nucleotide transport (NTT proteins that are now present in multiple copies in all microsporidian genomes. These proteins are expressed on the parasite surface and allow microsporidia to steal ATP and other purine nucleotides for energy and biosynthesis from their host. However, it remains unclear how other essential metabolites, such as pyrimidine nucleotides, are acquired. Transcriptomic and experimental studies suggest that microsporidia might manipulate host cell metabolism and cell biological processes to promote nucleotide synthesis and to maximise the potential for ATP and nucleotide import. In this review, we summarise recent genomic and functional data relating to how microsporidia exploit their hosts for energy and building blocks needed for growth and nucleic acid metabolism and we identify some remaining outstanding questions.

  9. Influence of cyclic torsional preloading on cyclic fatigue resistance of nickel - titanium instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedullà, E; Lo Savio, F; Boninelli, S; Plotino, G; Grande, N M; Rapisarda, E; La Rosa, G

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of different torsional preloads on cyclic fatigue resistance of endodontic rotary instruments constructed from conventional nickel-titanium (NiTi), M-Wire or CM-Wire. Eighty new size 25, 0.06 taper Mtwo instruments (Sweden & Martina), size 25, 0.06 taper HyFlex CM (Coltene/Whaledent, Inc) and X2 ProTaper Next (Dentsply Maillefer) were used. The Torque and distortion angles at failure of new instruments (n = 10) were measured, and 0% (n = 10), 25%, 50% and 75% (n = 20) of the mean ultimate torsional strength as preloading condition were applied according to ISO 3630-1 for each brand. The twenty files tested for every extent of preload were subjected to 20 or 40 torsional cycles (n = 10). After torsional preloading, the number of cycles to failure was evaluated in a simulated canal with 60° angle of curvature and 5 mm of radius of curvature. Data were analysed using two-way analysis of variance. The fracture surface of each fragment was examined with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Data were analysed by two-way analyses of variance. Preload repetitions did not influence the cyclic fatigue of the three brands; however, the 25%, 50% and 75% torsional preloading significantly reduced the fatigue resistance of all instruments tested (P HyFlex CM preloaded with 25% of the maximum torsional strength (P > 0.05). Torsional preloads reduced the cyclic fatigue resistance of conventional and treated (M-wire and CM-wire) NiTi rotary instruments except for size 25, 0.06 taper HyFlex CM instruments with a 25% of torsional preloading. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. A biological inspired fuzzy adaptive window median filter (FAWMF) for enhancing DNA signal processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Muneer; Jung, Low Tan; Bhuiyan, Al-Amin

    2017-10-01

    Digital signal processing techniques commonly employ fixed length window filters to process the signal contents. DNA signals differ in characteristics from common digital signals since they carry nucleotides as contents. The nucleotides own genetic code context and fuzzy behaviors due to their special structure and order in DNA strand. Employing conventional fixed length window filters for DNA signal processing produce spectral leakage and hence results in signal noise. A biological context aware adaptive window filter is required to process the DNA signals. This paper introduces a biological inspired fuzzy adaptive window median filter (FAWMF) which computes the fuzzy membership strength of nucleotides in each slide of window and filters nucleotides based on median filtering with a combination of s-shaped and z-shaped filters. Since coding regions cause 3-base periodicity by an unbalanced nucleotides' distribution producing a relatively high bias for nucleotides' usage, such fundamental characteristic of nucleotides has been exploited in FAWMF to suppress the signal noise. Along with adaptive response of FAWMF, a strong correlation between median nucleotides and the Π shaped filter was observed which produced enhanced discrimination between coding and non-coding regions contrary to fixed length conventional window filters. The proposed FAWMF attains a significant enhancement in coding regions identification i.e. 40% to 125% as compared to other conventional window filters tested over more than 250 benchmarked and randomly taken DNA datasets of different organisms. This study proves that conventional fixed length window filters applied to DNA signals do not achieve significant results since the nucleotides carry genetic code context. The proposed FAWMF algorithm is adaptive and outperforms significantly to process DNA signal contents. The algorithm applied to variety of DNA datasets produced noteworthy discrimination between coding and non-coding regions contrary

  11. Nucleotide-sugar transporters: structure, function and roles in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handford M.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The glycosylation of glycoconjugates and the biosynthesis of polysaccharides depend on nucleotide-sugars which are the substrates for glycosyltransferases. A large proportion of these enzymes are located within the lumen of the Golgi apparatus as well as the endoplasmic reticulum, while many of the nucleotide-sugars are synthesized in the cytosol. Thus, nucleotide-sugars are translocated from the cytosol to the lumen of the Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum by multiple spanning domain proteins known as nucleotide-sugar transporters (NSTs. These proteins were first identified biochemically and some of them were cloned by complementation of mutants. Genome and expressed sequence tag sequencing allowed the identification of a number of sequences that may encode for NSTs in different organisms. The functional characterization of some of these genes has shown that some of them can be highly specific in their substrate specificity while others can utilize up to three different nucleotide-sugars containing the same nucleotide. Mutations in genes encoding for NSTs can lead to changes in development in Drosophila melanogaster or Caenorhabditis elegans, as well as alterations in the infectivity of Leishmania donovani. In humans, the mutation of a GDP-fucose transporter is responsible for an impaired immune response as well as retarded growth. These results suggest that, even though there appear to be a fair number of genes encoding for NSTs, they are not functionally redundant and seem to play specific roles in glycosylation.

  12. Occurrence of Cyclic di-GMP-Modulating Output Domains in Cyanobacteria: an Illuminating Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostoni, Marco; Koestler, Benjamin J.; Waters, Christopher M.; Williams, Barry L.; Montgomery, Beronda L.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microorganisms use a variety of metabolites to respond to external stimuli, including second messengers that amplify primary signals and elicit biochemical changes in a cell. Levels of the second messenger cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) are regulated by a variety of environmental stimuli and play a critical role in regulating cellular processes such as biofilm formation and cellular motility. Cyclic di-GMP signaling systems have been largely characterized in pathogenic bacteria; however, proteins that can impact the synthesis or degradation of c-di-GMP are prominent in cyanobacterial species and yet remain largely underexplored. In cyanobacteria, many putative c-di-GMP synthesis or degradation domains are found in genes that also harbor light-responsive signal input domains, suggesting that light is an important signal for altering c-di-GMP homeostasis. Indeed, c-di-GMP-associated domains are often the second most common output domain in photoreceptors—outnumbered only by a histidine kinase output domain. Cyanobacteria differ from other bacteria regarding the number and types of photoreceptor domains associated with c-di-GMP domains. Due to the widespread distribution of c-di-GMP domains in cyanobacteria, we investigated the evolutionary origin of a subset of genes. Phylogenetic analyses showed that c-di-GMP signaling systems were present early in cyanobacteria and c-di-GMP genes were both vertically and horizontally inherited during their evolution. Finally, we compared intracellular levels of c-di-GMP in two cyanobacterial species under different light qualities, confirming that light is an important factor for regulating this second messenger in vivo. PMID:23943760

  13. Cyclic Mechanical Stretch Up-regulates Hepatoma-Derived Growth Factor Expression in Cultured Rat Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Ying-Hsien; Chen, Po-Han; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Chang, Yo-Chen; Lin, Yu-Chun; Tsai, Ming-Shian; Lee, Po-Huang; Cheng, Cheng-I

    2018-02-21

    Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) is a potent mitogen for vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) during embryogenesis and injury repair of vessel walls. Whether mechanical stimuli modulate HDGF expression remains unknown. This study aimed at investigating whether cyclic mechanical stretch plays a regulatory role in HDGF expression and regenerative cytokine production in aortic SMCs. A SMC cell line was grown on a silicone-based elastomer chamber with extracellular matrix coatings (either type I collagen or fibronectin) and received cyclic and uni-axial mechanical stretches with 10% deformation at frequency 1 Hz. Morphological observation showed that fibronectin coating provided better cell adhesion and spreading and that consecutive 6 hours of cyclic mechanical stretch remarkably induced reorientation and realignment of SMCs. Western blotting detection demonstrated that continuous mechanical stimuli elicited up-regulation of HDGF and PCNA, a cell proliferative marker. Signal kinetic profiling study indicated that cyclic mechanical stretch induced signaling activity in RhoA/ROCK and PI3K/Akt cascades. Kinase inhibition study further showed that blockade of PI3K activity suppressed the stretch-induced TNF-a, whereas RhoA/ROCK inhibition significantly blunted the IL-6 production and HDGF over-expression. Moreover, siRNA-mediated HDGF gene silencing significantly suppressed constitutive expression of IL-6, but not TNF-α, in SMCs. These findings support the role of HDGF in maintaining vascular expression of IL-6, which has been regarded a crucial regenerative factor for acute vascular injury. In conclusion, cyclic mechanical stretch may maintain constitutive expression of HDGF in vascular walls and be regarded an important biophysical regulator in vascular regeneration. ©2018 The Author(s).

  14. Angiotensin II increases phosphodiesterase 5A expression in vascular smooth muscle cells: A mechanism by which angiotensin II antagonizes cGMP signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongsoo; Aizawa, Toru; Wei, Heng; Pi, Xinchun; Rybalkin, Sergei D.; Berk, Bradford C.; Yan, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) and nitric oxide (NO)/natriuretic peptide (NP) signaling pathways mutually regulate each other. Imbalance of Ang II and NO/NP has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many vascular diseases. cGMP functions as a key mediator in the interaction between Ang II and NO/NP. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 5A (PDE5A) is important in modulating cGMP signaling by hydrolyzing cGMP in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Therefore, we examined whether Ang II negatively modulates intracellular cGMP signaling in VSMC by regulating PDE5A. Ang II rapidly and transiently increased PDE5A mRNA levels in rat aortic VSMC. Upregulation of PDE5A mRNA was associated with a time-dependent increase of both PDE5 protein expression and activity. Increased PDE5A mRNA level was transcription-dependent and mediated by the Ang II type 1 receptor. Ang II-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) was essential for Ang II-induced PDE5A upregulation. Pretreatment of VSMC with Ang II inhibited C-type NP (CNP) stimulated cGMP signaling, such as cGMP dependent protein kinase (PKG)-mediated phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated-phosphoprotein (VASP). Ang II-mediated inhibition of PKG was blocked when PDE5 activity was decreased by selective PDE5 inhibitors, suggesting that upregulation of PDE5A expression is an important mechanism for Ang II to attenuate cGMP signaling. PDE5A may also play a critical role in the growth promoting effects of Ang II because inhibition of PDE5A activity significantly decreased Ang II-stimulated VSMC growth. These observations establish a new mechanism by which Ang II antagonizes cGMP signaling and stimulates VSMC growth. PMID:15623434

  15. Cyclic RGD peptides target human trabecular meshwork cells while ameliorating connective tissue growth factor-induced fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Robert; Kuespert, Sabrina; Haunberger, Alexandra; Goepferich, Achim; Fuchshofer, Rudolf

    2016-12-01

    The major risk factor for primary open-angle glaucoma is increased intraocular pressure stemming from elevated outflow resistance in the trabecular meshwork (TM) region. Integrins play a pivotal role in the TM by influencing its biological properties and growth factor signaling. Pathologic changes in the TM are partially mediated by growth factors like connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). Specific targeting of TM cells could play a critical clinical role by increasing the therapeutic efficacy of nanoparticles, e.g. for nonviral gene delivery. Quantum dots with cyclo(RGDfC) covalently immobilized to their surface effectively targeted cultured TM cells and were rapidly and efficiently endocytosed by binding to αvβ3 and αvβ5 integrins. Compared to the integrin-overexpressing U87-MG cell line, the association of RGD-modified nanoparticles with the TM cells was significantly higher. Binding and uptake into TM cells was receptor-mediated and suppressible with free peptide. Soluble cyclic RGD peptides effectively attenuated CTGF-mediated effects and inhibited CTGF signaling. Due to their antagonism for αvβ3 and αvβ5 integrins, these cyclic RGD pentapeptides effectively ameliorated the CTGF-induced effects and strongly promoted specific nanoparticle association. Thus, cyclic RGD peptides are powerful multifunctional ligands for both addressing nanomaterials to the TM and interfering with pathologic CTGF signaling upon arrival.

  16. Inositol cyclic triphosphate [inositol 1,2-(cyclic)-4,5-triphosphate] is formed upon thrombin stimulation of human platelets.

    OpenAIRE

    Ishii, H; Connolly, T M; Bross, T E; Majerus, P W

    1986-01-01

    Cleavage of polyphosphoinositides in vitro by phospholipase C results in formation of both cyclic and noncyclic inositol phosphates. We have now isolated the cyclic product of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate cleavage, inositol 1,2(cyclic)-4,5-triphosphate [cIns(1:2,4,5)P3], from thrombin-treated platelets. We found 0.2-0.4 nmol of cIns-(1:2,4,5)P3 per 10(9) platelets at 10 sec after thrombin; none was found in unstimulated platelets or in platelets 10 min after thrombin addition. We con...

  17. Filtering of cyclical surface forcings in a layered vadose zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, J.; Ferre, T. P. A.

    2016-12-01

    Infiltration and downward percolation of water in the vadose zone are important processes that may limit availability of water resources in many areas around the world. However, estimates of these fluxes are often uncertain. Climate projections can include changes in both the timing and magnitude of rainfall, which increases the importance of understanding how the vadose zone filters these infiltration signals to better predict the impacts of climate change on groundwater resources. In this presentation, we present a simplified analytical approach that provides insight into how cyclical infiltration forcings at land surface are filtered in a layered vadose zone in terms of changes in the timing and magnitude of hydrologic responses. Our approach provides an alternative to simulating vadose zone flow using computationally-expensive numerical models that solve the Richards equation in investigations of the possible impact of climatic forcings. We use superposition of one-dimensional analytical solutions for sinusoidal infiltration where each solution represents a single soil in a layered profile. The analytical solution uses a linearization of the Richards equation and assumes that the effects of transitioning soil-water properties between layers on flow interfaces are negligible. We evaluate the limit of these approximations by comparing of results from the unsaturated flow numerical model HYDRUS-1D which uses the full Richards equation. We compare (1) the depth at which flux variations become steady, and (2) the travel time of wetting fronts to reach a depth of 10 m. We tested our solution with periods from 30 days to 365 days and fluxes common in arid and semiarid environments (0 mm/d to 2 mm/d) and found that the solution is reasonably accurate (error less than a factor of 2). Using the analytical solution, we investigate the filtering properties of the vadose zone in Central Valley, California and identify areas where surface forcings are essentially damped and

  18. [Wnt signaling molecules related to osteoporosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Takuo; Ozono, Keiichi

    2013-06-01

    Wnt signaling pathway components have been shown to be involved in bone biology since mutations in the LRP5 gene proved to cause osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome and high bone mass trait. Genome wide association studies have indicated that single nucleotide polymorphisms of various components in Wnt signaling pathways are associated with bone mineral density and risk for low-trauma fracture. Mouse genetic studies have demonstrated that multiple components in Wnt signaling pathways play significant roles in skeletal development and bone mass maintenance. Here we review several components in Wnt signaling pathways with their association with bone mineral density in humans.

  19. Cyclic Benzimidazole Derivatives and Their Antitumor Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karminski-Zamola, G.

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Over the past years benzimidazole derivatives are one of the most extensively studied classes of heterocyclic compounds, and have received much attention from synthetic organic as well as medicinal chemists, because of their well known biological activities and their applications in several areas as materials in electronics, in electrochemistry as anticorrosive agents, as polymers or optical materials and fluorescent tags in DNA sequencing. The structure of vitamin B12, as an example, contains a benzimidazole group. Compounds containing benzimidazole nuclei show anticancer, antineoplastic, antiinfective, antibacterial, antifungal and many others activities. Due to the structural similarity of benzimidazole nuclei with some naturally occurring compounds such as purine, they can easily interact with biomolecules of the living systems. The introduction of an additional substituent on the benzimidazole nuclei has been increasing attention in the expectation that such changes could potentially affect the interaction of the molecules with biological targets. Fused cyclic benzimidazole derivatives, as benzimidazo[1,2-a]quinolines,benzimidazo[1,2-c]quinazolines, benzimidazo[2,1-b]isoquinolines and many others, have also interesting biological activities and most of them are very good anticancer agents.DNA is the molecular target of many anticancer drugs in clinical use and development. Compounds which can bind to DNA with intercalative or non-intercalative mechanism play a major role in biological processes such as gene transcription or DNA replication. Benzoannulated benzimidazole analogues contain a planar chromophore and have the ability to become inserted between adjacent base pairs of DNA double helix. Intercalators are recognized as one of the most important classes of anticancer agents. So an understanding of the drug-DNA interactions is a promising approach to developing novel reagents and plays a key role in pharmacology today.

  20. Pregnancy complicated by cyclic vomiting syndrome successfully treated with amitriptyline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, Hanako; Kinugasa, Masato

    2015-06-01

    Some reports suggest that pregnancy leads to exacerbation of cyclic vomiting syndrome. We report a case of pregnancy complicated by cyclic vomiting syndrome that was successfully resolved with amitriptyline, with the subsequent birth of a healthy term neonate. A 27-year-old pregnant woman with cyclic vomiting syndrome was referred to our hospital at 12 weeks of gestation. After excluding other diagnoses, we administered amitriptyline, which had been discontinued temporarily at the time of pregnancy diagnosis. Once a therapeutic dose was achieved, her vomiting attacks ceased and the remainder of her prenatal course was uneventful. At 40 weeks of gestation, she delivered a female neonate. Prevention of vomiting attacks using appropriate agents is essential for the management of pregnancies complicated by cyclic vomiting syndrome.