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Sample records for cyclic amp regulation

  1. Transcriptional regulation by cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montminy, M

    1997-01-01

    A number of hormones and growth factors have been shown to stimulate target cells via second messenger pathways that in turn regulate the phosphorylation of specific nuclear factors. The second messenger cyclic AMP, for example, regulates a striking number of physiologic processes, including intermediary metabolism, cellular proliferation, and neuronal signaling, by altering basic patterns of gene expression. Our understanding of cyclic AMP signaling in the nucleus has expanded considerably over the past decade, owing in large part to the characterization of cyclic AMP-responsive promoter elements, transcription factors that bind them, and signal-dependent coactivators that mediate target gene induction. More importantly, these studies have revealed new insights into biological problems as diverse as biological clocks and long-term memory. The purpose of this review is to describe the components of the cyclic AMP response unit and to analyze how these components cooperate to induce target gene expression in response to hormonal stimulation.

  2. Copper Regulates Cyclic AMP-Dependent Lipolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Lakshmi; Cotruvo, Joseph A.; Chan, Jefferson; Kaluarachchi, Harini; Muchenditsi, Abigael; Pendyala, Venkata S.; Jia, Shang; Aron, Allegra T.; Ackerman, Cheri M.; Vander Wal, Mark N.; Guan, Timothy; Smaga, Lukas P.; Farhi, Samouil L.; New, Elizabeth J.; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Chang, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Cell signaling relies extensively on dynamic pools of redox-inactive metal ions such as sodium, potassium, calcium, and zinc, but their redox-active transition metal counterparts such as copper and iron have been studied primarily as static enzyme cofactors. Here we report that copper is an endogenous regulator of lipolysis, the breakdown of fat, which is an essential process in maintaining the body's weight and energy stores. Utilizing a murine model of genetic copper misregulation, in combination with pharmacological alterations in copper status and imaging studies in a 3T3-L1 white adipocyte model, we demonstrate that copper regulates lipolysis at the level of the second messenger, cyclic AMP (cAMP), by altering the activity of the cAMP-degrading phosphodiesterase PDE3B. Biochemical studies of the copper-PDE3B interaction establish copper-dependent inhibition of enzyme activity and identify a key conserved cysteine residue within a PDE3-specific loop that is essential for the observed copper-dependent lipolytic phenotype. PMID:27272565

  3. Down-regulation of Cell Surface Cyclic AMP Receptors and Desensitization of Cyclic AMP-stimulated Adenylate Cyclase by Cyclic AMP in Dictyostelium discoideum. Kinetics and Concentration Dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1987-01-01

    cAMP binds to Dictyostelium discoideum surface receptors and induces a transient activation of adenylate cyclase, which is followed by desensitization. cAMP also induces a loss of detectable surface receptors (down-regulation). Cells were incubated with constant cAMP concentrations, washed free of

  4. CRP-Cyclic AMP Regulates the Expression of Type 3 Fimbriae via Cyclic di-GMP in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

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    Ching-Ting Lin

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae is the predominant pathogen isolated from liver abscesses of diabetic patients in Asian countries. However, the effects of elevated blood glucose levels on the virulence of this pathogen remain largely unknown. Type 3 fimbriae, encoded by the mrkABCDF genes, are important virulence factors in K. pneumoniae pathogenesis. In this study, the effects of exogenous glucose and the intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP signaling pathway on type 3 fimbriae expression regulation were investigated. The production of MrkA, the major subunit of type 3 fimbriae, was increased in glucose-rich medium, whereas cAMP supplementation reversed the effect. MrkA production was markedly increased by cyaA or crp deletion, but slightly decreased by cpdA deletion. In addition, the mRNA levels of mrkABCDF genes and the activity of PmrkA were increased in Δcrp strain, as well as the mRNA levels of mrkHIJ genes that encode cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP-related regulatory proteins that influence type 3 fimbriae expression. Moreover, the activities of PmrkHI and PmrkJ were decreased in ΔlacZΔcrp strain. These results indicate that CRP-cAMP down-regulates mrkABCDF and mrkHIJ at the transcriptional level. Further deletion of mrkH or mrkI in Δcrp strain diminished the production of MrkA, indicating that MrkH and MrkI are required for the CRP regulation of type 3 fimbriae expression. Furthermore, the high activity of PmrkHI in the ΔlacZΔcrp strain was diminished in ΔlacZΔcrpΔmrkHI, but increased in the ΔlacZΔcrpΔmrkJ strain. Deletion of crp increased the intracellular c-di-GMP concentration and reduced the phosphodiesterase activity. Moreover, we found that the mRNA levels of multiple genes related to c-di-GMP metabolism were altered in Δcrp strain. These indicate that CRP regulates type 3 fimbriae expression indirectly via the c-di-GMP signaling pathway. In conclusion, we found evidence of a coordinated regulation of type 3 fimbriae expression by the CRP-cAMP

  5. Regulation of cyclic AMP by extracellular ATP in cultured brain capillary endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Zubeya; Albert, Jennifer L; Gubby, Sharon E; Boyle, John P; Roberts, Jonathon A; Webb, Tania E; Boarder, Michael R

    1999-01-01

    In primary unpassaged rat brain capillary endothelial cell cultures (RBECs), using reverse-transcriptase PCR with primers specific for P2Y receptor subtypes, we detected mRNA for P2Y2, P2Y4 and P2Y6, but not P2Y1 receptors.None of the various nucleotides tested reduced forskolin elevated cyclic AMP levels in RBECs. ATP and ATPγS, as well as adenosine, enhanced cyclic AMP accumulation in the presence of forskolin.Comparison of the concentration response curves to ATPγS with those for ATP and adenosine, at different incubation times, indicated that the response to purine nucleotides was not wholly dependent on conversion to adenosine. Adenosine deaminase abolished the response to adenosine but only reduced the response to ATP by about 50%. These results suggest the participation of a receptor responsive to nucleotides.Isobutylmethylxanthine and 8-sulphophenyltheophylline prevented the cyclic AMP response, while neither 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine nor SCH58261 were effective antagonists. 2-chloradenosine gave a robust response, but neither 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine nor CGS 21680 were agonists.These results show that adenosine and ATP can elevate the cyclic AMP levels of brain endothelial cells by acting on receptors which have a pharmacology apparently distinct from known P2Y and adenosine receptors. PMID:10510459

  6. Cyclic-AMP mediated regulation of ABCB mRNA expression in mussel haemocytes.

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    Silvia Franzellitti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The multixenobiotic resistance system (MXR allows aquatic organisms to cope with their habitat despite high pollution levels by over-expressing membrane and intracellular transporters, including the P-glycoprotein (Pgp. In mammals transcription of the ABCB1 gene encoding Pgp is under cAMP/PKA-mediated regulation; whether this is true in mollusks is not fully clarified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: cAMP/PKA regulation and ABCB mRNA expression were assessed in haemocytes from Mediterranean mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed in vivo for 1 week to 0.3 ng/L fluoxetine (FX alone or in combination with 0.3 ng/L propranolol (PROP. FX significantly decreased cAMP levels and PKA activity, and induced ABCB mRNA down-regulation. FX effects were abolished in the presence of PROP. In vitro experiments using haemocytes treated with physiological agonists (noradrenaline and serotonin and pharmacological modulators (PROP, forskolin, dbcAMP, and H89 of the cAMP/PKA system were performed to obtain clear evidence about the involvement of the signaling pathway in the transcriptional regulation of ABCB. Serotonin (5-HT decreased cAMP levels, PKA activity and ABCB mRNA expression but increased the mRNA levels for a putative 5-HT1 receptor. Interestingly, 5-HT1 was also over-expressed after in vivo exposures to FX. 5-HT effects were counteracted by PROP. Forskolin and dbcAMP increased PKA activity as well as ABCB mRNA expression; the latter effect was abolished in the presence of the PKA inhibitor H89. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides the first direct evidence for the cAMP/PKA-mediated regulation of ABCB transcription in mussels.

  7. Cyclic AMP regulates the biosynthesis of cellobiohydrolase in Cellulomonas flavigena growing in sugar cane bagasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Herrera, Jesús Antonio; Pérez-Avalos, Odilia; Salgado, Luis M; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa

    2009-10-01

    Cellulomonas flavigena produces a battery of cellulase components that act concertedly to degrade cellulose. The addition of cAMP to repressed C. flavigena cultures released catabolic repression, while addition of cAMP to induced C. flavigena cultures led to a cellobiohydrolase hyperproduction. Exogenous cAMP showed positive regulation on cellobiohydrolase production in C. flavigena grown on sugar cane bagasse. A C. flavigena cellobiohydrolase gene was cloned (named celA), which coded for a 71- kDa enzyme. Upstream, a repressor celR1, identified as a 38 kDa protein, was monitored by use of polyclonal antibodies.

  8. Cyclic AMP-dependent regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and immunofluorescence levels in rat retinal precursor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voisin, Pierre; Bernard, Marianne

    2013-05-01

    Stimulation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) gene transcription by cyclic AMP (cAMP) has been clearly established in adrenal medula cells and neural-crest-derived cell lines but information on this mechanism is still lacking in dopaminergic neurons. Because they are easily amenable to in vitro experiments, dopaminergic amacrine cells of the retina might constitute a valuable model system to study this mechanism. We have used real-time reverse transcription with the polymerase chain reaction to quantify TH mRNA levels in the rat retina during post-natal development and in retinal precursor cells obtained from neonatal rats and cultured for 3 days in serum-free medium. Whereas the TH mRNA concentration remains consistantly low in control cultures, treatment with cAMP-increasing agents (forskolin, membrane depolarization, phosphodiesterase inhibitors) is sufficient to raise it to the level observed in adult retina (15-fold increase). Treatment of the cultured cells can be delayed by up to 2 days with identical results at the TH mRNA level, thus ruling out a survival-promoting effect of cAMP. TH immunofluorescence has confirmed cAMP-dependent regulation of TH expression at the protein level and indicates that the frequency of TH-positive cells in the cultures is similar to that observed in the adult retina. Selective phosphodiesterase inhibitors suggest that PDE4 is the major subtype involved in the dopaminergic amacrine cell response. Our data clearly establish the cAMP-dependent regulation of TH mRNA and immunofluorescence levels in retinal precursor cells. The possible role of this regulation mechanism in the developmental activation of TH gene expression is discussed.

  9. Regulation of laminin and entactin mRNA levels by retinoic acid and dibutyryl cyclic AMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durkin, M.E.; Phillips, S.L.; Carlin, B.E.; Merlie, J.P.; Chung, A.E.

    1986-01-01

    Retinoic acid and dibutyryl cAMP induced F9 embryonal carcinoma cells to differentiate to parietal endoderm; the morphological changes were accompanied by the increased synthesis of the basement membrane glycoproteins laminin and entactin. cDNA clones have been isolated for the A (400 kD), B1 (220 kD), and B2 (205 kD) chains of laminin. Northern blot analysis indicated that the A, B1, and B2 chains were encoded by RNA species of 9.8, 6.0, and 8.0 kb, respectively. The kinetics of induction of the laminin mRNAs were studied by dot-blotting dilutions of RNA extracted from F9 cells cultured in retinoic acid and dibutyryl cAMP for increasing amounts of time and hybridizing to 32 P-labeled recombinant plasmids. Very low levels of the A and B chain RNAs were found in uninduced cells, and a large increase occurred between 48 and 72 hr of growth in retinoic acid and dibutyryl cAMP. A cDNA clone was also obtained for entactin, a 150 kD glycoprotein that forms a complex with laminin. Retinoic acid and dibutyryl cAMP treatment also increased the amount of entactin RNA in F9 cells. These results suggested that a common mechanism may exist for the coordinate regulation of the 4 basement membrane protein genes during differentiation

  10. Cyclic AMP in rat pancreatic islets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grill, V.; Borglund, E.; Cerasi, E.; Uppsala Univ.

    1977-01-01

    The incorporation of [ 3 H]adenine into cyclic AMP was studied in rat pancreatic islets under varying conditions of labeling. Prolonging the exposure to [ 3 H]adenine progressively augmented the islet cyclic [ 3 H]AMP level. Islets labeled for different periods of time and subsequently incubated (without adenine) in the presence of D-glucose or cholera toxin showed stimulations of intra-islet cyclic [ 3 H]AMP that were proportionate to the levels of radioactive nucleotide present under non-stimulatory conditions. Labeling the islets in a high glucose concentration (27.7 mM) did not modify the nucleotide responses to glucose or cholera toxin. The specific activity of cyclic [ 3 H]AMP, determined by simultaneous assay of cyclic [ 3 H]AMP and total cyclic AMP, was not influenced by glucose or cholera toxin. Glucose had no effect on the specific activity of labeled ATP

  11. 3' : 5'-Cyclic AMP-dependent 3'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mato, José M.; Krens, Frans A.; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Konijn, Theo M.

    1977-01-01

    Suspensions of 3':5'-cyclic AMP (cAMP)-sensitive cells of Dictyostelium discoideum responded to a cAMP pulse with increased 3':5'-cyclic GMP (cGMP) levels. Under the assay conditions used (2 × 10^8 cells per ml in 10 mM phosphate buffer, pH 6.0) cAMP (5 × 10-8 M final concentration) increased cGMP

  12. RhoE is regulated by cyclic AMP and promotes fusion of human BeWo choriocarcinoma cells.

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    Gavin P Collett

    Full Text Available Fusion of placental villous cytotrophoblasts with the overlying syncytiotrophoblast is essential for the maintenance of successful pregnancy, and disturbances in this process have been implicated in pathological conditions such as pre-eclampsia and intra-uterine growth retardation. In this study we examined the role of the Rho GTPase family member RhoE in trophoblast differentiation and fusion using the BeWo choriocarcinoma cell line, a model of villous cytotrophoblast fusion. Treatment of BeWo cells with the cell permeable cyclic AMP analogue dibutyryl cyclic AMP (dbcAMP resulted in a strong upregulation of RhoE at 24 h, coinciding with the onset of fusion. Using the protein kinase A (PKA-specific cAMP analogue N(6-phenyl-cAMP, and a specific inhibitor of PKA (14-22 amide, PKI, we found that upregulation of RhoE by cAMP was mediated through activation of PKA signalling. Silencing of RhoE expression by RNA interference resulted in a significant decrease in dbcAMP-induced fusion. However, expression of differentiation markers human chorionic gonadotrophin and placental alkaline phosphatase was unaffected by RhoE silencing. Finally, we found that RhoE upregulation by dbcAMP was significantly reduced under hypoxic conditions in which cell fusion is impaired. These results show that induction of RhoE by cAMP is mediated through PKA and promotes BeWo cell fusion but has no effect on functional differentiation, supporting evidence that these two processes may be controlled by separate or diverging pathways.

  13. Regulation of cyclic AMP metabolism by prostaglandins in rabbit cortical collecting tubule cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnenburg, W.K.

    1987-01-01

    In the rabbit cortical collecting tubule (RCCT), prostaglandin E 1 (PGE 1 ) and prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) at 1 nM inhibit arginine-vasopressin (AVP)-induced water reabsorption, while 100 nM PGE 1 and PGE 2 alone stimulate water reabsorption. Reported here are studies designed to investigate the molecular basis for the biphasic physiological action of PGE 1 and PGE 2 in the collecting duct. In freshly isolated RCCT cells, PGE 1 , PGE 2 , and 16,16-dimethyl-PGE 2 (DM-PGE 2 ) stimulated cAMP synthesis at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 10 M. Other prostaglandins including the synthetic PGE 2 analogue, sulprostone, failed to stimulate cAMP synthesis. Moreover, sulprostone did not antagonize PGE 2 -stimulated cAMP formation. In contrast, PGE 2 and sulprostone at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 nM, inhibited AVP-induced cAMP accumulation in freshly isolated RCCT cells. PGE 2 , PGE 1 , DM-PGE 2 and sulprostone at 100 nM were equally effective in inhibiting AVP-induced cAMP formation. Moreover sulprostone inhibited AVP-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. These results suggest that PGE derivatives mediate either inhibition or activation of adenylate cyclase by stimulating different PGE receptors. To further test this concept, PGE 2 binding to freshly isolated RCCT cell membranes was characterized. Two different classes of PGE 2 binding were detected. / 3 H/PGE 2 binding to the high affinity class of sites was increased by the GTP-analogue, GTP S, while pertussis toxin pretreatment blocked the stimulatory action. In contrast, / 3 H/ PGE 2 binding to the low affinity class of sites was decreased by GTP S; this inhibitory effect was not blocked by pertussis toxin pretreatment

  14. The CytR repressor antagonizes cyclic AMP-cyclic AMP receptor protein activation of the deoCp2 promoter of Escherichia coli K-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard-Andersen, L; Martinussen, J; Møllegaard, N E

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of the Escherichia coli deoCp2 promoter by the CytR repressor and the cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) complexed to cAMP. Promoter regions controlled by these two proteins characteristically contain tandem cAMP-CRP binding sites. Here we show that (i) Cyt...

  15. Escherichia coli exports cyclic AMP via TolC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantke, Klaus; Winkler, Karin; Schultz, Joachim E

    2011-03-01

    In Escherichia coli more than 180 genes are regulated by the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) complex. However, more than 90% of cAMP that is made by intracellular adenylyl cyclases is found in the culture medium. How is cAMP exported from E. coli? In a tolC mutant, 0.03 mM IPTG (isopropyl-β-d-thiogalactopyranoside) was sufficient to induce β-galactosidase compared to 0.1 mM IPTG in the parent strain. In a cya mutant unable to produce cAMP about 1 mM extracellular cAMP was required to induce β-galactosidase, whereas in a cya tolC mutant 0.1 mM cAMP was sufficient. When cAMP in E. coli cya was generated intracellularly by a recombinant, weakly active adenylyl cyclase from Corynebacterium glutamicum, the critical level of cAMP necessary for induction of maltose degradation was only achieved in a tolC mutant and not in the parent strain. Deletion of a putative cAMP phosphodiesterase of E. coli, CpdA, resulted in a slightly similar, yet more diffuse phenotype. The data demonstrate that export of cAMP via TolC is a most efficient way of E. coli to lower high concentrations of cAMP in the cell and maintain its sensitivity in changing metabolic environments.

  16. Regulation of cyclic AMP formation in cultures of human foetal astrocytes by beta 2-adrenergic and adenosine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, M D; Freshney, R I; Ball, S G; Vaughan, P F

    1989-09-01

    Two cell cultures, NEP2 and NEM2, isolated from human foetal brain have been maintained through several passages and found to express some properties of astrocytes. Both cell cultures contain adenylate cyclase stimulated by catecholamines with a potency order of isoprenaline greater than adrenaline greater than salbutamol much greater than noradrenaline, which is consistent with the presence of beta 2-adrenergic receptors. This study reports that the beta 2-adrenergic-selective antagonist ICI 118,551 is approximately 1,000 times more potent at inhibiting isoprenaline stimulation of cyclic AMP (cAMP) formation in both NEP2 and NEM2 than the beta 1-adrenergic-selective antagonist practolol. This observation confirms the presence of beta 2-adrenergic receptors in these cell cultures. The formation of cAMP in NEP2 is also stimulated by 5'-(N-ethylcarboxamido)adenosine (NECA) more potently than by either adenosine or N6-(L-phenylisopropyl)adenosine (L-PIA), which suggests that this foetal astrocyte expresses adenosine A2 receptors. Furthermore, L-PIA and NECA inhibit isoprenaline stimulation of cAMP formation, a result suggesting the presence of adenosine A1 receptors on NEP2. The presence of A1 receptors is confirmed by the observation that the A1-selective antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine reverses the inhibition of isoprenaline stimulation of cAMP formation by L-PIA and NECA. Additional evidence that NEP2 expresses adenosine receptors linked to the adenylate cyclase-inhibitory GTP-binding protein is provided by the finding that pretreatment of these cells with pertussis toxin reverses the adenosine inhibition of cAMP formation stimulated by either isoprenaline or forskolin.

  17. Cyclic-AMP regulates postnatal development of neural and behavioral responses to NaCl in rats.

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    Qian, Jie; Mummalaneni, Shobha; Phan, Tam-Hao T; Heck, Gerard L; DeSimone, John A; West, David; Mahavadi, Sunila; Hojati, Deanna; Murthy, Karnam S; Rhyu, Mee-Ra; Spielman, Andrew I; Özdener, Mehmet Hakan; Lyall, Vijay

    2017-01-01

    During postnatal development rats demonstrate an age-dependent increase in NaCl chorda tympani (CT) responses and the number of functional apical amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na+ channels (ENaCs) in salt sensing fungiform (FF) taste receptor cells (TRCs). Currently, the intracellular signals that regulate the postnatal development of salt taste have not been identified. We investigated the effect of cAMP, a downstream signal for arginine vasopressin (AVP) action, on the postnatal development of NaCl responses in 19-23 day old rats. ENaC-dependent NaCl CT responses were monitored after lingual application of 8-chlorophenylthio-cAMP (8-CPT-cAMP) under open-circuit conditions and under ±60 mV lingual voltage clamp. Behavioral responses were tested using 2 bottle/24h NaCl preference tests. The effect of [deamino-Cys1, D-Arg8]-vasopressin (dDAVP, a specific V2R agonist) was investigated on ENaC subunit trafficking in rat FF TRCs and on cAMP generation in cultured adult human FF taste cells (HBO cells). Our results show that in 19-23 day old rats, the ENaC-dependent maximum NaCl CT response was a saturating sigmoidal function of 8-CPT-cAMP concentration. 8-CPT-cAMP increased the voltage-sensitivity of the NaCl CT response and the apical Na+ response conductance. Intravenous injections of dDAVP increased ENaC expression and γ-ENaC trafficking from cytosolic compartment to the apical compartment in rat FF TRCs. In HBO cells dDAVP increased intracellular cAMP and cAMP increased trafficking of γ- and δ-ENaC from cytosolic compartment to the apical compartment 10 min post-cAMP treatment. Control 19-23 day old rats were indifferent to NaCl, but showed clear preference for appetitive NaCl concentrations after 8-CPT-cAMP treatment. Relative to adult rats, 14 day old rats demonstrated significantly less V2R antibody binding in circumvallate TRCs. We conclude that an age-dependent increase in V2R expression produces an AVP-induced incremental increase in cAMP that modulates

  18. Cyclic-AMP regulates postnatal development of neural and behavioral responses to NaCl in rats.

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    Jie Qian

    Full Text Available During postnatal development rats demonstrate an age-dependent increase in NaCl chorda tympani (CT responses and the number of functional apical amiloride-sensitive epithelial Na+ channels (ENaCs in salt sensing fungiform (FF taste receptor cells (TRCs. Currently, the intracellular signals that regulate the postnatal development of salt taste have not been identified. We investigated the effect of cAMP, a downstream signal for arginine vasopressin (AVP action, on the postnatal development of NaCl responses in 19-23 day old rats. ENaC-dependent NaCl CT responses were monitored after lingual application of 8-chlorophenylthio-cAMP (8-CPT-cAMP under open-circuit conditions and under ±60 mV lingual voltage clamp. Behavioral responses were tested using 2 bottle/24h NaCl preference tests. The effect of [deamino-Cys1, D-Arg8]-vasopressin (dDAVP, a specific V2R agonist was investigated on ENaC subunit trafficking in rat FF TRCs and on cAMP generation in cultured adult human FF taste cells (HBO cells. Our results show that in 19-23 day old rats, the ENaC-dependent maximum NaCl CT response was a saturating sigmoidal function of 8-CPT-cAMP concentration. 8-CPT-cAMP increased the voltage-sensitivity of the NaCl CT response and the apical Na+ response conductance. Intravenous injections of dDAVP increased ENaC expression and γ-ENaC trafficking from cytosolic compartment to the apical compartment in rat FF TRCs. In HBO cells dDAVP increased intracellular cAMP and cAMP increased trafficking of γ- and δ-ENaC from cytosolic compartment to the apical compartment 10 min post-cAMP treatment. Control 19-23 day old rats were indifferent to NaCl, but showed clear preference for appetitive NaCl concentrations after 8-CPT-cAMP treatment. Relative to adult rats, 14 day old rats demonstrated significantly less V2R antibody binding in circumvallate TRCs. We conclude that an age-dependent increase in V2R expression produces an AVP-induced incremental increase in cAMP

  19. Characterization of the MKS1 gene, a new negative regulator of the Ras-cyclic AMP pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, A; Anraku, Y

    1993-04-01

    In order to isolate genes that function downstream of the Ras-cAMP pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a YEp13-based genomic library was screened for clones that inhibit growth of cells with diminished A-kinase activity. One such gene, MKS1, was found to encode a hydrophilic 52 kDa protein that shares weak homology with the yeast SPT2/SIN1 gene product. Three lines of evidence suggest that the MKS1 gene product is a negative regulator downstream of the Ras-cAMP pathway: (i) overexpression of MKS1 inhibits growth of cyr1 disruptant cells on YPD medium containing a low concentration of cAMP; (ii) overexpression of MKS1 does not affect TPK1 expression; and (iii) the temperature-sensitive cyr1-230 mutation is partially suppressed by mks1 disruption. The mks1 mutant shows similar phenotypes to gal11/spt13, i.e., it cannot grow on YPGal containing ethidium bromide at 25 degrees C, or on YPGly or SGal at 37 degrees C. The mks1 gal11 double mutant shows more marked phenotypic changes than the single mutants. These results suggest that MKS1 is involved in transcriptional regulation of several genes by cAMP.

  20. Cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is required for osmotic regulation in Staphylococcus aureus but dispensable for viability in anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeden, Merve S; Schuster, Christopher F; Bowman, Lisa; Zhong, Qiyun; Williams, Huw D; Gründling, Angelika

    2018-03-02

    Cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is a recently discovered signaling molecule important for the survival of Firmicutes, a large bacterial group that includes notable pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus However, the exact role of this molecule has not been identified. dacA , the S. aureus gene encoding the diadenylate cyclase enzyme required for c-di-AMP production, cannot be deleted when bacterial cells are grown in rich medium, indicating that c-di-AMP is required for growth in this condition. Here, we report that an S. aureus dacA mutant can be generated in chemically defined medium. Consistent with previous findings, this mutant had a severe growth defect when cultured in rich medium. Using this growth defect in rich medium, we selected for suppressor strains with improved growth to identify c-di-AMP-requiring pathways. Mutations bypassing the essentiality of dacA were identified in alsT and opuD, encoding a predicted amino acid and osmolyte transporter, the latter of which we show here to be the main glycine betaine-uptake system in S. aureus. Inactivation of these transporters likely prevents the excessive osmolyte and amino acid accumulation in the cell, providing further evidence for a key role of c-di-AMP in osmotic regulation. Suppressor mutations were also obtained in hepS, hemB, ctaA, and qoxB, coding proteins required for respiration. Furthermore, we show that dacA is dispensable for growth in anaerobic conditions. Together, these findings reveal an essential role for the c-di-AMP signaling network in aerobic, but not anaerobic, respiration in S. aureus . © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Regulation of rat hepatocyte function by P2Y receptors: focus on control of glycogen phosphorylase and cyclic AMP by 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-diphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, C Jane; Hall, John F; Webb, Tania E; Boarder, Michael R

    2004-10-01

    Hepatocyte function is regulated by several P2Y receptor subtypes. Here we report that 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-diphosphate (2-MeSADP), an agonist at P2Y(1), P2Y(12), and P2Y(13) receptors, potently (threshold 30 nM) stimulates glycogen phosphorylase in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. Antagonism by N(6)-methyl 2'-deoxyadenosine 3',5'-bisphosphate (MRS 2179) confirms that this response is mediated by P2Y(1) receptors. In addition, in these cells, both 2-MeSADP and UTP inhibited glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation. This inhibitory effect of 2-MeSADP was not reversed by the P2Y(1) antagonists, adenosine-3'-phosphate-5'-phosphate (A3P5P) or MRS 2179, both in the range 1 to 300 microM, indicating that it was not mediated by P2Y(1) receptors. This contrasts with the increase in cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) induced by 2-MeSADP, which has shown to be inhibited by A3P5P. Pertussis toxin abolished the inhibitory effect of both UTP and 2-MeSADP. After culture of cells for 48 h, the ability of 2-MeSADP to inhibit cyclic AMP accumulation was greatly diminished. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that during this culture period, there was a decline in the ability to detect transcripts for P2Y(12) and P2Y(13) receptors, both of which are activated by 2-MeSADP and negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase. However, in freshly isolated cells, the P2Y(12) and P2Y(13) receptor antagonist, 2-propylthio-beta,gamma-dichloromethylene-d-ATP (AR-C67085) (10 nM to 300 microM) did not alter the ability of 2-MeSADP to inhibit glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation. We conclude that 2-MeSADP regulates rat hepatocyte glycogen phosphorylase by acting on P2Y(1) receptors coupled to raised [Ca(2+)](c), and by inhibiting cyclic AMP levels by an unknown G(i)-coupled receptor subtype, distinct from P2Y(1), P2Y(12), or P2Y(13) receptors.

  2. The CytR repressor antagonizes cyclic AMP-cyclic AMP receptor protein activation of the deoCp2 promoter of Escherichia coli K-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Martinussen, J; Møllegaard, N E

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of the Escherichia coli deoCp2 promoter by the CytR repressor and the cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) complexed to cAMP. Promoter regions controlled by these two proteins characteristically contain tandem cAMP-CRP binding sites. Here we show that (i) Cyt......R selectively regulated cAMP-CRP-dependent initiations, although transcription started from the same site in deoCp2 in the absence or presence of cAMP-CRP; (ii) deletion of the uppermost cAMP-CRP target (CRP-2) resulted in loss of CytR regulation, but had only a minor effect on positive control by the cAMP...

  3. "cAMP sponge": a buffer for cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate.

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    Konstantinos Lefkimmiatis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While intracellular buffers are widely used to study calcium signaling, no such tool exists for the other major second messenger, cyclic AMP (cAMP. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe a genetically encoded buffer for cAMP based on the high-affinity cAMP-binding carboxy-terminus of the regulatory subunit RIbeta of protein kinase A (PKA. Addition of targeting sequences permitted localization of this fragment to the extra-nuclear compartment, while tagging with mCherry allowed quantification of its expression at the single cell level. This construct (named "cAMP sponge" was shown to selectively bind cAMP in vitro. Its expression significantly suppressed agonist-induced cAMP signals and the downstream activation of PKA within the cytosol as measured by FRET-based sensors in single living cells. Point mutations in the cAMP-binding domains of the construct rendered the chimera unable to bind cAMP in vitro or in situ. Cyclic AMP sponge was fruitfully applied to examine feedback regulation of gap junction-mediated transfer of cAMP in epithelial cell couplets. CONCLUSIONS: This newest member of the cAMP toolbox has the potential to reveal unique biological functions of cAMP, including insight into the functional significance of compartmentalized signaling events.

  4. Transcriptome analysis of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A–regulated genes reveals the production of the novel natural compound fumipyrrole by Aspergillus fumigatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macheleidt, Juliane; Scherlach, Kirstin; Neuwirth, Toni; Schmidt-Heck, Wolfgang; Straßburger, Maria; Spraker, Joseph; Baccile, Joshua A.; Schroeder, Frank C.; Keller, Nancy P.; Hertweck, Christian; Heinekamp, Thorsten; Brakhage, Axel A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic human pathogenic fungus causing life-threatening infections in immunocompromised patients. Adaptation to different habitats and also virulence of the fungus depends on signal perception and transduction by modules such as the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) pathway. Here, by transcriptome analysis, 632 differentially regulated genes of this important signaling cascade were identified, including 23 putative transcriptional regulators. The highest upregulated transcription factor gene was located in a previously unknown secondary metabolite gene cluster, which we named fmp, encoding an incomplete nonribosomal peptide synthetase, FmpE. Overexpression of the regulatory gene fmpR using the TetOn system led to the specific expression of the other six genes of the fmp cluster. Metabolic profiling of wild type and fmpR overexpressing strain by HPLC-DAD and HPLCHRESI-MS and structure elucidation by NMR led to identification of 5-benzyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carboxylic acid, which we named fumipyrrole. Fumipyrrole was not described as natural product yet. Chemical synthesis of fumipyrrole confirmed its structure. Interestingly, deletion of fmpR or fmpE led to reduced growth and sporulation of the mutant strains. Although fmp cluster genes were transcribed in infected mouse lungs, deletion of fmpR resulted in wild-type virulence in a murine infection model. PMID:25582336

  5. Microgravity changes in heart structure and cyclic-AMP metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, D. E.; Fine, A.; Kato, K.; Egnor, R.; Cheng, L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of microgravity on cardiac ultrastructure and cyclic AMP metabolism in tissues of rats flown on Spacelab 3 are reported. Light and electron microscope studies of cell structure, measurements of low and high Km phosphodiesterase activity, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity, and regulatory subunit compartmentation show significant deviations in flight animals when compared to ground controls. The results indicate that some changes have occurred in cellular responses associated with catecholamine receptor interactions and intracellular signal processing.

  6. Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population is Up-Regulated by Increased Cyclic Amp Concentration in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, Kristin Y.; Vaughn, Jeffrey R.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal muscle hypertrophy is promoted in vivo by administration of beta-drenergic receptor (bAR) agonists. Chicken skeletal muscle cells were treated with 1 (mu)M isoproterenol, a strong bAR agonist, between days 7 and 10 in culture. bAR population increased by approximately 40% during this treatment; however, the ability of the cells to synthesize cyclic AMP (cAMP) was diminished by two-fold. The quantity of myosin heavy chain (MHC) was not affected. To understand further the relationship between intracellular cAMP levels, bAR population, and muscle protein accumulation, intracellular cAMP levels were artificially elevated by treatment with 0-10 uM forskolin for up to three days. The basal concentration of CAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 7-fold in a dose dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of forskolin also led to an increase in bAR population, with a maximum increase of approximately 40-60% at 10 uM forskolin. A maximum increase of 40-50% in the quantity of MHC was observed at 0.2 uM forskolin, but higher concentrations of forskolin reduced the quantity of MHC back to control levels. At 0.2 uM forskolin, intracellular levels of cAMP were higher by approximately 35%, and the (beta)AR population was higher by approximately 30%. Neither the number of muscle nuclei fused into myotubes nor the percentage of nuclei in myotubes were affected by forskolin at any of the concentrations studied.

  7. Control of cell volume in the J774 macrophage by microtubule disassembly and cyclic AMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melmed, RN; Karanian, PJ; Berlin, RD

    1981-01-01

    We have explored the possibilities that cell volume is regulated by the status of microtubule assembly and cyclic AMP metabolism and may be coordinated with shape change. Treatment of J774.2 mouse macrophages with colchicine caused rapid microtubule disassembly and was associated with a striking increase (from 15-20 to more than 90 percent) in the proportion of cells with a large protuberance at one pole. This provided a simple experimental system in which shape changes occurred in virtually an entire cell population in suspension. Parallel changes in cell volume could then be quantified by isotope dilution techniques. We found that the shape change caused by colchicine was accompanied by a decrease in cell volume of approximately 20 percent. Nocodozole, but not lumicolchicine, caused identical changes in both cell shape and cell volume. The volume loss was not due to cell lysis nor to inhibition of pinocytosis. The mechanism of volume loss was also examined. Colchicine induced a small but reproducible increase in activity of the ouabain-sensitive Na(+), K(+)-dependent ATPase. However, inhibition of this enzyme/transport system by ouabain did not change cell volume nor did it block the colchicines-induced decrease in volume. One the other hand, SITS (4’acetamido, 4-isothiocyano 2,2’ disulfonic acid stilbene), an inhibitor of anion transport, inhibited the effects of colchicines, thus suggesting a role for an anion transport system in cell volume regulation. Because colchicine is known to activate adenylate cyclase in several systems and because cell shape changes are often induced by hormones that elevate cyclic AMP, we also examined the effects of cyclic AMP on cell volume. Agents that act to increase syclic AMP (cholera toxin, which activates adenylate cyclase; IBMX, and inhibitor of phosphodiesterase; and dibutyryl cyclic AMP) all caused a volume decrease comparable to that of colchicine. To define the effective metabolic pathway, we studied two mutants of J

  8. Cyclic AMP system in muscle tissue during prolonged hypokinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipenko, Y. A.; Bubeyev, Y. A.; Korovkin, B. F.; Mikhaleva, N. P.

    1980-01-01

    Components of the cyclic Adenosine-cyclic-35-monophosphate (AMP) system in the muscle tissue of white rats were studied during 70-75 days of hypokinesia, created by placing the animals in small booths which restricted their movements, and during the readaptation period. In the initial period, cyclic AMP levels and the activities of phosphodiesterase and adenylate cyclase in muscle tissue were increased. The values for these indices were roughly equal for controls and experimental animals during the adaptation period, but on the 70th day of the experiment cAMP levels dropped, phosphodiesterase activity increased, and the stimulative effect of epinephrine on the activity of adenylate cyclase decreased. The indices under study normalized during the readaptation period.

  9. 21 CFR 862.1230 - Cyclic AMP test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cyclic AMP test system. 862.1230 Section 862.1230 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862...

  10. Cyclic AMP response element binding protein and brain-derived ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    the role of CREB and BDNF in depression and as targets/mediators of antidepressant action. [Nair A and Vaidya V A 2006 Cyclic AMP response element binding protein and brain-derived neurotrophic factor: Molecules that modulate our mood?; J. Biosci. 31 423–434]. Keywords. Antidepressant; depression; hippocampus ...

  11. Regulation of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase from Mucor rouxii by phosphorylation and proteolysis. Interrelationship of the activatable and insensitive forms of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerner, N; Moreno, S; Passeron, S

    1984-01-01

    DEAE-cellulose chromatography of mycelial extracts of Mucor rouxii grown to mid-exponential phase resolves two types of low-Km cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase (EC 3.1.4.17; PDE): PDE I, highly activatable (4-6-fold) by phosphorylation or proteolysis, and PDE II, unresponsive to activation. The enzymic profile of PDE activity obtained from germlings shows only PDE I activity, whereas PDE activity from mycelia grown to stationary phase is eluted from the DEAE-cellulose column at the position of PDE II, and like PDE II is unresponsive to activation. Endogenous proteolysis or controlled trypsin treatment transforms PDE I into PDE II. The insensitive forms of PDE exhibit a slightly smaller sedimentation coefficient than the activatable forms, as judged by sucrose-gradient centrifugation. The basal activity of the highly activatable form of PDE is elevated almost to the value in the presence of trypsin on storage at 4 degrees C in the absence of proteinase inhibitors. Benzamidine, leupeptin, antipain or EGTA prevents the activation produced by storage. PDE I remains strongly activatable by phosphorylation and proteolysis after resolution by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. PMID:6326757

  12. Species-specific aggregation factor in sponges. VII. Its effect on cyclic amp and cyclic gmp metabolism in cells of Geodia cydonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, W E; Müller, I; Zahn, R K; Kurelec, B

    1978-01-01

    In dissociated single cells from the sponge Geodia cydonium, DNA synthesis is initiated after incubation with a homologous, soluble aggregation factor. During the DNA-initiation phase the cyclic AMP- and cyclic GMP levels vary drastically; the cyclic AMP content drops from 2.2 pmol/10(6) cells to 0.3 pmol/10(6) cells while the cyclic GMP content increases from 0.6 pmol to 3.7 pmol/10(6) cells. The activity of neither the adenylate cyclase nor of the guanylate cyclase isolated from cells which have been incubated for different periods of time with the aggregation factor, is changed. The soluble as well as the particulate enzyme activities were checked in vitro. The cyclic nucleotide receptors have been isolated from the sponge cells and characterized with respect to their molecular weight, dissociation constant for cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP and intracellular concentration. None of these parameters are altered during aggregation factor-mediated DNA initiation. From these data it is concluded that the regulation of cyclic nucleotide levels is a consequence of a changed activity of nucleotide cyclases or of phosphodiesterases, but this is presumably not caused by a changed rate of synthesis of nucleotide cyclases or of cyclic nucleotide receptors.

  13. Histamine-induced increases in cyclic AMP levels in bovine adrenal medullary cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Marley, P. D.; Thomson, K. A.; Jachno, K.; Johnston, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    1. The effect of histamine on cellular cyclic AMP levels in cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells has been studied. 2. Histamine (0.3-30 microM) increased cyclic AMP levels transiently, with a maximal response after 5 min, a smaller response after 20 min, and no increase seen after 80 or 180 min. The EC50 at 5 min was approximately 2 microM. Histamine had no effect on cyclic AMP release from the cells over 5 min, but increased it after 90 min. 3. The cyclic AMP response to 5 microM histamin...

  14. Phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor cilostazol induces migraine-like attacks via cyclic AMP increase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Song; Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-01-01

    The initiating mechanisms of migraine attacks are very complex but may involve the cyclic AMP signalling pathway. It is unknown whether intracellular cyclic AMP accumulation induces migraine attacks. We investigated whether administration of cilostazol, which causes cyclic AMP accumulation, may...... and that cilostazol-induced attacks responded to their usual migraine treatment. Median time of medication intake was 6 h (range 4-11 h). The present study suggests that intracellular cyclic AMP accumulation plays a crucial role in migraine induction. This knowledge is a further step in our understanding...

  15. TSH-induced cyclic AMP production in an ovine thyroid cell line: OVNIS 5H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayet, G; Aouani, A; Hovsépian, S

    1986-01-06

    The TSH-induced cyclic AMP response was studied using a 3-year-old ovine thyroid cell line TSH-independent for growth: OVNIS 5H. The kinetics of cyclic AMP production was followed both in cell layers and in cell culture media, with or without phosphodiesterase inhibitor. It is noteworthy that following the first wave in cyclic AMP obtained within minutes, we observed later a sustained exponential increase in cyclic AMP during the 5 days following TSH stimulation. A bioassay of TSH was derived allowing measurement of 1 microU/ml TSH from a crude bTSH preparation.

  16. Region-selective effects of long-term lithium and carbamazepine administration on cyclic AMP levels in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiborg, Ove; Krueger, Tanja; Jakosen, Soeren N.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of lithium and carbamazepine in the treatment of bipolar affective disorder is well established. Althougt a number of biochemical effects have been found, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying their therapeutic actions have not been elucidated nor are the target regions in the brain identified. Taken into account the important role of the cyclic AMP second messenger system in the regulation of neuronal exitability and the indications of its involvement in the pathophysiology of bipolar affective disorder, we have focused on the drug effects on cyclic AMP levels. The objectives of this investigation were to measure the effects on basal cyclic AMP levels, and to locate target regions within the rat brain after long-term administration of lithium and carbamazepine. Drug treatments were carried out for a period of 28 days. After either drug treatment the cyclic AMP level was increased 3-4 times in frontal cortex but unchanged in hippocampus, hypothalamus, thalamus, amygdala and in cerebellum. In neostratum the cyclic AMP level was decreased to about 30% after treatment with lithium. We suggest the common region-selective effect, observed for both drugs in frontal cortex, to be essential for the therapeutic actions of lithium and carbamazepine. (au)

  17. Cyclic AMP synergizes with butyrate in promoting β-defensin 9 expression in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Lakshmi T; Zeng, Xiangfang; Curtis, Amanda R; Zhang, Guolong

    2014-02-01

    Host defense peptides (HDP) have both microbicidal and immunomodulatory properties. Specific induction of endogenous HDP synthesis has emerged as a novel approach to antimicrobial therapy. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and butyrate have been implicated in HDP induction in humans. However, the role of cAMP signaling and the possible interactions between cAMP and butyrate in regulating HDP expression in other species remain unknown. Here we report that activation of cAMP signaling induces HDP gene expression in chickens as exemplified by β-defensin 9 (AvBD9). We further showed that, albeit being weak inducers, cAMP agonists synergize strongly with butyrate or butyrate analogs in AvBD9 induction in macrophages and primary jejunal explants. Additionally, oral supplementation of forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase agonist in the form of a Coleus forskohlii extract, was found to induce AvBD9 expression in the crop of chickens. Furthermore, feeding with both forskolin and butyrate showed an obvious synergy in triggering AvBD9 expression in the crop and jejunum of chickens. Surprisingly, inhibition of the MEK-ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway augmented the butyrate-FSK synergy, whereas blocking JNK or p38 MAPK pathway significantly diminished AvBD9 induction in chicken macrophages and jejunal explants in response to butyrate and FSK individually or in combination. Collectively, these results suggest the potential for concomitant use of butyrate and cAMP signaling activators in enhancing HDP expression, innate immunity, and disease resistance in both animals and humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The interplay between cyclic AMP and insulin during obesity development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkowski, Kamil

    Insulin and cAMP signalling are related to two opposite metabolic responses. Insulin secretion is elicited in response to food availability and trigger catabolic processes like lipogenesis and glycogen synthesis with a purpose of energy storage. On the other hand cAMP signalling is associated...... with stress and starvation and stimulates processes like glycogen degradation and lipolysis to distribute the stored energy through the body. Although in energy preserving tissues insulin inhibit cAMP signalling, in fat precursor cells cAMP potentiates insulin action and promote adipogenesis. Activation...... of exchange factor directly activated by cAMP (Epac) has been shown to be crucial for cAMP mediated potentiation of insulin signaling. In the current study I am trying to answer the question as to how cAMP accelerates adipogenesis in vivo as well as what is the role of Epac in cAMP mediated potentiation...

  19. Aspirin effects on lymphocyte cyclic AMP levels in normal human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, D E; Parker, C W

    1976-01-01

    In purified lymphocytes from the peripheral blood of healthy human subjects who had ingested therapeutic doses of aspirin, there was a significant decrease in resting cyclic AMP levels as well as a partial inhibition of the rise in cyclic AMP with isoproterenol or prostaglandin E1. These changes were seen as early as 30 min after aspirin ingestion and did not appear to result from aspirin effects on lymphocyte recovery, purity, viability, or relative number of thymus- or bone marrow-derived lymphocytes. In contrast, the direct addition of aspirin to suspensions of purified peripheral lymphocytes did not significantly alter their cyclic AMP levels. However, an effect of aspirin could be obtained in vitro if aspirin was added to unprocessed whole blood during the dextran sedimentation phase of the cell purification. Thus the effect of aspirin on lymphocyte cyclic AMP metabolism, may be indirect, through other cells present in the peripheral blood. PMID:182720

  20. The interplay between cyclic AMP and insulin during obesity development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkowski, Kamil

    with stress and starvation and stimulates processes like glycogen degradation and lipolysis to distribute the stored energy through the body. Although in energy preserving tissues insulin inhibit cAMP signalling, in fat precursor cells cAMP potentiates insulin action and promote adipogenesis. Activation...... of exchange factor directly activated by cAMP (Epac) has been shown to be crucial for cAMP mediated potentiation of insulin signaling. In the current study I am trying to answer the question as to how cAMP accelerates adipogenesis in vivo as well as what is the role of Epac in cAMP mediated potentiation...... of insulin signalling. Moreover, I am investigating how increased insulin secretion caused by sucrose consumption, affects insulin signaling in peripheral tissues....

  1. The effect of in vitro procedures on cyclic AMP accumulation in human leucocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben; Friis, U G; Rasmussen, A K

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of various methodological procedures or protocols on cyclic AMP formation in human leucocytes. The data showed that: (1) ATP content and lactate production was unaffected by hypotonic lysis during leucocyte isolation; (2) there was a linear...... relation between cell number/sample and the production of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP); (3) the interindividual variation markedly affected cAMP production during long observation periods (years), whereas day-to-day variation within a week was less important; (4) whole blood could be stored...... for up to 4 h (at 4 degrees C or 23 degrees C) without affecting cAMP accumulation; (5) isolated MNL could be stored for up to 2 h (at 4 degrees C) without affecting cAMP accumulation; and finally that (6) choice and concentration of phosphodiesterase inhibitors markedly influenced the basal...

  2. Cyclic AMP Pathway Activation and Extracellular Zinc Induce Rapid Intracellular Zinc Mobilization in Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellerup, Lasse; Winther, Anne-Marie L.; Wilson, Duncan; Fuglsang, Anja T.

    2018-01-01

    Zinc is an essential micronutrient, required for a range of zinc-dependent enzymes and transcription factors. In mammalian cells, zinc serves as a second messenger molecule. However, a role for zinc in signaling has not yet been established in the fungal kingdom. Here, we used the intracellular zinc reporter, zinbo-5, which allowed visualization of zinc in the endoplasmic reticulum and other components of the internal membrane system in Candida albicans. We provide evidence for a link between cyclic AMP/PKA- and zinc-signaling in this major human fungal pathogen. Glucose stimulation, which triggers a cyclic AMP spike in this fungus resulted in rapid intracellular zinc mobilization and this “zinc flux” could be stimulated with phosphodiesterase inhibitors and blocked via inhibition of adenylate cyclase or PKA. A similar mobilization of intracellular zinc was generated by stimulation of cells with extracellular zinc and this effect could be reversed with the chelator EDTA. However, zinc-induced zinc flux was found to be cyclic AMP independent. In summary, we show that activation of the cyclic AMP/PKA pathway triggers intracellular zinc mobilization in a fungus. To our knowledge, this is the first described link between cyclic AMP signaling and zinc homeostasis in a human fungal pathogen. PMID:29619016

  3. Cyclic AMP levels in several macroalgae and their relation to light quantity and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordillo, Francisco J L; Segovia, María; López-Figueroa, Félix

    2004-02-01

    Total cAMP levels were measured in the macroalgae Dictyota dichotoma, Gelidium sesquipedale and Ulva rigida under different light conditions in order to study its regulation either by phytochrome or photosynthesis. Incubation in red or far-red light did not promote a phytochrome-like response; instead, it showed a synergistic effect upon cAMP accumulation. cAMP levels seemed to depend on the amount of energy applied. The correlation between photosynthetic oxygen evolution and cAMP variations at sub-saturating white light irradiance pointed to photosynthetic electron transport as involved in the regulation of cAMP accumulation at least in G. sesquipedale and U. rigida. Inhibitors of thylakoidal and mitochondrial electron transport chains reduced cAMP levels in 70 to 99%. We conclude that cAMP accumulation could be regulated by photosynthetic activity rather than phytochrome in the macroalgae studied.

  4. Inhibition of renal brush border phosphate transport and stimulation of renal gluconeogenesis by cyclic amp and parathyroid hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempson, S A; Kowalski, J C; Puschett, J B

    1983-05-01

    The aims of the study were to determine whether 8-bromo-cyclic AMP (8BcAMP) in vivo mimics the inhibitory action of parathyroid hormone (PTH) on phosphate transport across the brush border membrane (BBM) of the renal proximal tubule, and to examine whether changes in BBM transport are accompanied by changes in the rate of renal gluconeogenesis. Thyroparathyroidectomized dogs were anesthetized and equilibrated, and control urine collections were obtained prior to removing the left kidney. Subsequent intravenous infusion of 8BcAMP at 50 mg/hr for 2 hr increased fractional excretion of phosphate from 4 +/- 1 (controls) to 29 +/- 4% (P less than 0.001) without changing glomerular filtration. In BBM vesicles isolated from the renal cortex, the initial Na+-dependent transport of phosphate was decreased from 747 +/- 135 (controls) to 564 +/- 126 pmoles per mg per 0.25 min after 8BcAMP (P less than 0.025), but Na+-independent phosphate uptake and Na+-dependent L-proline uptake were not changed significantly. Renal gluconeogenesis in the same animals was increased from 2.5 +/- 0.3 (controls) to 5.3 +/- 0.5 mumoles glucose per g tissue per hr after infusion of 8BcAMP (P less than 0.001). Infusion of PTH, like 8BcAMP, inhibited BBM phosphate transport and stimulated renal gluconeogenesis. We conclude that the inhibitory action of cyclic AMP and PTH on BBM phosphate transport is accompanied by stimulation of gluconeogenesis which suggests, indirectly, that changes in gluconeogenesis may be part of the intracellular mechanism for regulating BBM phosphate uptake in response to certain stimuli.

  5. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Chp Chemosensory System Regulates Intracellular cAMP Levels by Modulating Adenylate Cyclase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Nanette B.; Holliday, Phillip M.; Klem, Erich; Cann, Martin J.; Wolfgang, Matthew C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Multiple virulence systems in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa are regulated by the second messenger signaling molecule adenosine 3’, 5’-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP). Production of cAMP by the putative adenylate cyclase enzyme CyaB represents a critical control point for virulence gene regulation. To identify regulators of CyaB, we screened a transposon insertion library for mutants with reduced intracellular cAMP. The majority of insertions resulting in reduced cAMP mapped to the Chp gene cluster encoding a putative chemotaxis-like chemosensory system. Further genetic analysis of the Chp system revealed that it has both positive and negative effects on intracellular cAMP and that it regulates cAMP levels by modulating CyaB activity. The Chp system was previously implicated in the production and function of type IV pili (TFP). Given that cAMP and the cAMP-dependent transcriptional regulator Vfr control TFP biogenesis gene expression, we explored the relationship between cAMP, the Chp system and TFP regulation. We discovered that the Chp system controls TFP production through modulation of cAMP while control of TFP-dependent twitching motility is cAMP-independent. Overall, our data define a novel function for a chemotaxis-like system in controlling cAMP production and establish a regulatory link between the Chp system, TFP and other cAMP-dependent virulence systems. PMID:20345659

  6. The Cyclic AMP-Vfr Signaling Pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Inhibited by Cyclic Di-GMP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almblad, Henrik; Harrison, Joe J; Rybtke, Morten

    2015-01-01

    : Our work suggests that cross talk between c-di-GMP and cAMP signaling pathways results in downregulation of acute virulence factors in P. aeruginosa biofilm infections. Knowledge about this cross-regulation adds to our understanding of virulence traits and immune evasion by P. aeruginosa in chronic......AMP), which is decreased in response to a high level of c-di-GMP. Mutations that cause reversion of the RSCV phenotype concomitantly reactivate Vfr-cAMP signaling. Attempts to uncover the mechanism underlying the observed c-di-GMP-mediated lowering of cAMP content provided evidence that it is not caused...

  7. Cyclic AMP response in cells exposed to electric fields of different frequencies and intensities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knedlitschek, G. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Toxikologie; Noszvai-Nagy, M. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Toxikologie; Meyer-Waarden, H. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Toxikologie; Schimmelpfeng, J. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Toxikologie; Weibezahn, K.F. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Toxikologie; Dertinger, H. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Toxikologie

    1994-04-01

    The action on intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) of therapeutically used 4000-Hz electric fields was investigated and compared with 50-Hz data. Cultured mouse fibroblasts were exposed for 5 minutes to 4000-Hz sine wave internal electric fields between 3 mV/m and 30 V/m applied within culture medium. A statistically significant decrease in cellular cAMP concentration relative to unexposed cells was observed for fields higher than 10 mV/m. The drop in cAMP was ost pronounced at lower field strengths (71% of controls at 30 mV/m) and tended to disappear at higher field strengths. An increase of cAMP content was observed with 50-Hz electric fields, as was also the case when 4000-Hz fields were modulated with certain low frequencies. (orig.)

  8. Identification of the Components Involved in Cyclic Di-AMP Signaling in Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedric Blötz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria often use cyclic dinucleotides as second messengers for signal transduction. While the classical molecule c-di-GMP is involved in lifestyle selection, the functions of the more recently discovered signaling nucleotide cyclic di-AMP are less defined. For many Gram-positive bacteria, c-di-AMP is essential for growth suggesting its involvement in a key cellular function. We have analyzed c-di-AMP signaling in the genome-reduced pathogenic bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Our results demonstrate that these bacteria produce c-di-AMP, and we could identify the diadenylate cyclase CdaM (MPN244. This enzyme is the founding member of a novel family of diadenylate cyclases. Of two potential c-di-AMP degrading phosphodiesterases, only PdeM (MPN549 is active in c-di-AMP degradation, whereas NrnA (MPN140 was reported to degrade short oligoribonucleotides. As observed in other bacteria, both the c-di-AMP synthesizing and the degrading enzymes are essential for M. pneumoniae suggesting control of a major homeostatic process. To obtain more insights into the nature of this process, we have identified a c-di-AMP-binding protein from M. pneumoniae, KtrC. KtrC is the cytoplasmic regulatory subunit of the low affinity potassium transporter KtrCD. It is established that binding of c-di-AMP inhibits the KtrCD activity resulting in a limitation of potassium uptake. Our results suggest that the control of potassium homeostasis is the essential function of c-di-AMP in M. pneumoniae.

  9. Theoretical Analysis of Allosteric and Operator Binding for Cyclic-AMP Receptor Protein Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einav, Tal; Duque, Julia; Phillips, Rob

    2018-02-01

    Allosteric transcription factors undergo binding events both at their inducer binding sites as well as at distinct DNA binding domains, and it is often difficult to disentangle the structural and functional consequences of these two classes of interactions. In this work, we compare the ability of two statistical mechanical models - the Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) and the Koshland-N\\'emethy-Filmer (KNF) models of protein conformational change - to characterize the multi-step activation mechanism of the broadly acting cyclic-AMP receptor protein (CRP). We first consider the allosteric transition resulting from cyclic-AMP binding to CRP, then analyze how CRP binds to its operator, and finally investigate the ability of CRP to activate gene expression. In light of these models, we examine data from a beautiful recent experiment that created a single-chain version of the CRP homodimer, thereby enabling each subunit to be mutated separately. Using this construct, six mutants were created using all possible combinations of the wild type subunit, a D53H mutant subunit, and an S62F mutant subunit. We demonstrate that both the MWC and KNF models can explain the behavior of all six mutants using a small, self-consistent set of parameters. In comparing the results, we find that the MWC model slightly outperforms the KNF model in the quality of its fits, but more importantly the parameters inferred by the MWC model are more in line with structural knowledge of CRP. In addition, we discuss how the conceptual framework developed here for CRP enables us to not merely analyze data retrospectively, but has the predictive power to determine how combinations of mutations will interact, how double mutants will behave, and how each construct would regulate gene expression.

  10. Cyclic di-AMP signaling in Listeria monocytogenes

    OpenAIRE

    Whiteley, Aaron Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The Gram positive facultative intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes is both ubiquitous in the environment and is a facultative intracellular pathogen. A high degree of adaptability to different growth niches is one reason for the success of this organism. In this dissertation, two facets of L. monocytogenes, growth and gene expression have been investigated. The first portion examines the function and necessity of the nucleotide second messenger c-di-AMP, and the second portion of thi...

  11. Effect of drugs on lipid methylation, receptor-adenylate cyclase coupling and cyclic AMP secretion in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Waarde, Aren; Van Haastert, P.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Intercellular communication in Dictyostelium discoldeum takes place by means of cyclic AMP-induced cyclic AMP-synthesis and secretion. Since phospholipid methylation has been suggested to play a role in receptor-adenylate cyclase coupling, we examined the effects of transmethylation inhibitors on

  12. The cyclic AMP cascade is altered in the fragile X nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Kelley

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FX, the most common heritable cause of mental retardation and autism, is a developmental disorder characterized by physical, cognitive, and behavioral deficits. FX results from a trinucleotide expansion mutation in the fmr1 gene that reduces levels of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP. Although research efforts have focused on FMRP's impact on mGluR signaling, how the loss of FMRP leads to the individual symptoms of FX is not known. Previous studies on human FX blood cells revealed alterations in the cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cAMP cascade. We tested the hypothesis that cAMP signaling is altered in the FX nervous system using three different model systems. Induced levels of cAMP in platelets and in brains of fmr1 knockout mice are substantially reduced. Cyclic AMP induction is also significantly reduced in human FX neural cells. Furthermore, cAMP production is decreased in the heads of FX Drosophila and this defect can be rescued by reintroduction of the dfmr gene. Our results indicate that a robust defect in cAMP production in FX is conserved across species and suggest that cAMP metabolism may serve as a useful biomarker in the human disease population. Reduced cAMP induction has implications for the underlying causes of FX and autism spectrum disorders. Pharmacological agents known to modulate the cAMP cascade may be therapeutic in FX patients and can be tested in these models, thus supplementing current efforts centered on mGluR signaling.

  13. Control of Saccharomyces cerevisiae catalase T gene (CTT1) expression by nutrient supply via the RAS-cyclic AMP pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissinger, P H; Wieser, R; Hamilton, B; Ruis, H

    1989-03-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, lack of nutrients triggers a pleiotropic response characterized by accumulation of storage carbohydrates, early G1 arrest, and sporulation of a/alpha diploids. This response is thought to be mediated by RAS proteins, adenylate cyclase, and cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinases. This study shows that expression of the S. cerevisiae gene coding for a cytoplasmic catalase T (CTT1) is controlled by this pathway: it is regulated by the availability of nutrients. Lack of a nitrogen, sulfur, or phosphorus source causes a high-level expression of the gene. Studies with strains with mutations in the RAS-cAMP pathway and supplementation of a rca1 mutant with cAMP show that CTT1 expression is under negative control by a cAMP-dependent protein kinase and that nutrient control of CTT1 gene expression is mediated by this pathway. Strains containing a CTT1-Escherichia coli lacZ fusion gene have been used to isolate mutants with mutations in the pathway. Mutants characterized in this investigation fall into five complementation groups. Both cdc25 and ras2 alleles were identified among these mutants.

  14. Modification of radiation-induced division delay by caffeine analogues and dibutyryl cyclic AMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimler, B.F.; Leeper, D.B.; Snyder, M.H.; Rowley, R.; Schneiderman, M.H. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA). Hospital)

    1982-01-01

    The mitotic selection procedure for cell cycle analysis was utilized to investigate the concentration-dependent modification of x-radiation-induced division delay in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by methyl xanthines (caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine) and by dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The methyl xanthines (concentrations from 0.5 to 1000 ..mu..g/ml) all reduced radiation-induced division delay with the effect being linear between approximately 100 and 1000 ..mu..g/ml. After doses of 100-300 rad, delay was reduced by 75, 94 or 83 per cent at 1000 ..mu..g/ml for each drug, respectively. However, the addition of dibutyryl cyclic AMP had an opposite effect: radiation-induced delay was increased by the concentration range of 0.3 to 300 ..mu..g/ml. These results indicate that in mammalian cells the control of cell cycle progression and the modification of radiation-induced division delay are not simply related to intracellular levels of cyclic AMP. Rather, there appear to be at least two competing mechanisms which are differentially affected by caffeine analogues or by direct addition of dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The direct effect of caffeine and the methyl xanthines on membrane calcium permeability is considered.

  15. Effects of hypokinesia on cyclic nucleotides and hormonal regulation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PTH), calcitonin (CT), cyclic nucleotides (cAMP, cGMP) and calcium in the blood of rats, while in urine - phosphate, calcium and cyclic nucleotides. Design: Laboratory based experiment. Setting: Laboratory in the Department of Biochemistry, ...

  16. Physiological and Molecular Effects of the Cyclic Nucleotides cAMP and cGMP on Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Herrera, Natalia M.

    2012-12-01

    The cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (CNs), cAMP and cGMP, are second messengers that participate in the regulation of development, metabolism and adaptive responses. In plants, CNs are associated with the control of pathogen responses, pollen tube orientation, abiotic stress response, membrane transport regulation, stomatal movement and light perception. In this study, we hypothesize that cAMP and cGMP promote changes in the transcription level of genes related to photosynthesis, high light and membrane transport in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves and, that these changes at the molecular level can have functional biological consequences. For this reason we tested if CNs modulate the photosynthetic rate, responses to high light and root ion transport. Real time quantitative PCR was used to assess transcription levels of selected genes and infrared gas analyzers coupled to fluorescence sensors were used to measure the photosynthetic parameters. We present evidence that both cAMP and cGMP modulate foliar mRNA levels early after stimulation. The two CNs trigger different responses indicating that the signals have specificity. A comparison of proteomic and transcriptional changes suggest that both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms are modulated by CNs. cGMP up-regulates the mRNA levels of components of the photosynthesis and carbon metabolism. However, neither cAMP nor cGMP trigger differences in the rate of carbon assimilation, maximum efficiency of the photosystem II (PSII), or PSII operating efficiency. It was also demonstrated that CN regulate the expression of its own targets, the cyclic nucleotide gated channels - CNGC. Further studies are needed to identify the components of the signaling transduction pathway that mediate cellular changes and their respective regulatory and/or signaling roles.

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF P2-PURINOCEPTOR MEDIATED CYCLIC-AMP FORMATION IN MOUSE C2C12 MYOTUBES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HENNING, RH; DUIN, M; DENHERTOG, A; NELEMANS, A

    1 The formation of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) and inositol(1,4,5)trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P3), induced by ATP and other nucleotides was investigated in mouse C2Cl2 myotubes. 2 ATP (100 muM) and ATPgammaS (100 muM) caused a sustained increase in cyclic AMP content of the cells,

  18. Sustained signalling by PTH modulates IP3 accumulation and IP3 receptors through cyclic AMP junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Abha; Tovey, Stephen C.; Taylor, Colin W.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Parathyroid hormone (PTH) stimulates adenylyl cyclase through type 1 PTH receptors (PTH1R) and potentiates the Ca2+ signals evoked by carbachol, which stimulates formation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). We confirmed that in HEK cells expressing PTH1R, acute stimulation with PTH(1-34) potentiated carbachol-evoked Ca2+ release. This was mediated by locally delivered cyclic AMP (cAMP), but unaffected by inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA), exchange proteins activated by cAMP, cAMP phosphodiesterases (PDEs) or substantial inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. Sustained stimulation with PTH(1-34) causes internalization of PTH1R–adenylyl cyclase signalling complexes, but the consequences for delivery of cAMP to IP3R within cAMP signalling junctions are unknown. Here, we show that sustained stimulation with PTH(1-34) or with PTH analogues that do not evoke receptor internalization reduced the potentiated Ca2+ signals and attenuated carbachol-evoked increases in cytosolic IP3. Similar results were obtained after sustained stimulation with NKH477 to directly activate adenylyl cyclase, or with the membrane-permeant analogue of cAMP, 8-Br-cAMP. These responses were independent of PKA and unaffected by substantial inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. During prolonged stimulation with PTH(1-34), hyperactive cAMP signalling junctions, within which cAMP is delivered directly and at saturating concentrations to its targets, mediate sensitization of IP3R and a more slowly developing inhibition of IP3 accumulation. PMID:25431134

  19. Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-mediated stimulation of adipocyte differentiation requires the synergistic action of Epac- and cAMP-dependent protein kinase-dependent processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Koefoed; Madsen, Lise; Pedersen, Lone Møller

    2008-01-01

    AMP-dependent stimulation of adipocyte differentiation. Epac, working via Rap, acted synergistically with cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A [PKA]) to promote adipogenesis. The major role of PKA was to down-regulate Rho and Rho-kinase activity, rather than to enhance CREB phosphorylation. Suppression of Rho......-kinase impaired proadipogenic insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling, which was restored by activation of Epac. This interplay between PKA and Epac-mediated processes not only provides novel insight into the initiation and tuning of adipocyte differentiation, but also demonstrates a new mechanism of c......AMP signaling whereby cAMP uses both PKA and Epac to achieve an appropriate cellular response....

  20. Positive Effect of Carbon Sources on Natural Transformation in Escherichia coli: Role of Low-Level Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP Receptor Protein in the Derepression of rpoS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Mengyue; Wang, Huanyu; Xie, Nengbin; Xie, Zhixiong

    2015-10-01

    Natural plasmid transformation of Escherichia coli is a complex process that occurs strictly on agar plates and requires the global stress response factor σ(S). Here, we showed that additional carbon sources could significantly enhance the transformability of E. coli. Inactivation of phosphotransferase system genes (ptsH, ptsG, and crr) caused an increase in the transformation frequency, and the addition of cyclic AMP (cAMP) neutralized the promotional effect of carbon sources. This implies a negative role of cAMP in natural transformation. Further study showed that crp and cyaA mutations conferred a higher transformation frequency, suggesting that the cAMP-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) complex has an inhibitory effect on transformation. Moreover, we observed that rpoS is negatively regulated by cAMP-CRP in early log phase and that both crp and cyaA mutants show no transformation superiority when rpoS is knocked out. Therefore, it can be concluded that both the crp and cyaA mutations derepress rpoS expression in early log phase, whereby they aid in the promotion of natural transformation ability. We also showed that the accumulation of RpoS during early log phase can account for the enhanced transformation aroused by additional carbon sources. Our results thus demonstrated that the presence of additional carbon sources promotes competence development and natural transformation by reducing cAMP-CRP and, thus, derepressing rpoS expression during log phase. This finding could contribute to a better understanding of the relationship between nutrition state and competence, as well as the mechanism of natural plasmid transformation in E. coli. Escherichia coli, which is not usually considered to be naturally transformable, was found to spontaneously take up plasmid DNA on agar plates. Researching the mechanism of natural transformation is important for understanding the role of transformation in evolution, as well as in the transfer of pathogenicity and antibiotic

  1. Cyclic AMP activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in PC12 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, M; Peraldi, P; Van Obberghen, E

    1994-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are activated in response to a large variety of extracellular signals, including growth factors, hormones, and neurotransmitters, which activate distinct intracellular signaling pathways. Their activation by the cAMP-dependent pathway, however, has not been...... reported. In rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells, we demonstrate here a stimulation of the MAP kinase isozyme extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) following elevation of intracellular cAMP after exposure of the cells to isobutylmethylxanthine, cholera toxin, forskolin, or cAMP-analogues. cAMP acted...... synergistically with phorbol ester, an activator of protein kinase C, in the stimulation of ERK1. In accordance with this observation, the peptide neurotransmitter pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide 38 (PACAP38), which stimulates cAMP production as well as phosphatidylinositol breakdown in PC12...

  2. Cyclic AMP activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in PC12 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, M; Peraldi, P; Van Obberghen, E

    1994-01-01

    reported. In rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells, we demonstrate here a stimulation of the MAP kinase isozyme extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) following elevation of intracellular cAMP after exposure of the cells to isobutylmethylxanthine, cholera toxin, forskolin, or cAMP-analogues. cAMP acted...... upstream activator of ERK1 in the MAP kinase cascade. Supporting this view, forskolin and a cAMP analogue were found to increase the activity of MAP kinase kinase in PC12 cells, alone as well as in combination with phorbol ester. PACAP38 also stimulated in vivo 32P-labeling of ERK1 and MAP kinase kinase...... activity. Finally, cAMP or PACAP38 increased by 3-fold nerve growth factor-stimulated neurite formation in PC12 cells, which may be correlated with the potentiating effect of these agents on nerve growth factor-stimulated ERK1 activity....

  3. Cyclic AMP agonist inhibition increases at low levels of histamine release from human basophils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tung, R.S.; Lichtenstein, L.M.

    1981-09-01

    The relationship between the intensity of the signal for antigen-induced immunoglobulin E-mediated histamine release from human basophils and the concentration of agonist needed to inhibit release has been determined. The agonists, prostaglandin E1, dimaprit, fenoterol, isobutylmethylxanthine and dibutyryl cyclic AMP, all act by increasing the cyclic AMP level. Each agonist was 10- to 1000-fold more potent (relative ID50) at low levels of histamine release (5-10% of total histamine) than at high levels (50-80%). Thus, the inhibitory potential of a drug is a function of the concentration of antigen used to initiate the response. Our results are now more in accord with the inhibitory profile of these drugs in human lung tissue. It is suggested that in vivo release is likely to be low and that this is the level at which to evaluate drugs in vitro.

  4. Cyclic AMP signaling restricts activation and promotes maturation and antioxidant defenses in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paco, Sonia; Hummel, Manuela; Plá, Virginia; Sumoy, Lauro; Aguado, Fernando

    2016-04-23

    cAMP signaling produces dramatic changes in astrocyte morphology and physiology. However, its involvement in phenotype acquisition and the transcriptionally mediated mechanisms of action are largely unknown. Here we analyzed the global transcriptome of cultured astroglial cells incubated with activators of cAMP pathways. A bulk of astroglial transcripts, 6221 annotated genes, were differentially regulated by cAMP signaling. cAMP analogs strongly upregulated genes involved in typical functions of mature astrocytes, such as homeostatic control, metabolic and structural support to neurons, antioxidant defense and communication, whereas they downregulated a considerable number of proliferating and immaturity-related transcripts. Moreover, numerous genes typically activated in reactive cells, such as scar components and immunological mediators, were repressed by cAMP. GSEA analysis contrasting gene expression profiles with transcriptome signatures of acutely isolated astrocytes and in situ evaluation of protein levels in these cells showed that cAMP signaling conferred mature and in vivo-like transcriptional features to cultured astrocytes. These results indicate that cAMP signaling is a key pathway promoting astrocyte maturation and restricting their developmental and activation features. Therefore, a positive modulation of cAMP signaling may promote the normal state of differentiated astrocytes and favor the protection and function of neuronal networks.

  5. Cyclic AMP-receptor proteins in heart muscle of rats flown on Cosmos 1887

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mednieks, Maija I.; Popova, Irina A.; Grindeland, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    The cellular compartmentalization of the cyclic AMP-receptor proteins in heart ventricular tissue obtained from rats flown on the Cosmos 1887 is determined. Photoaffinity labeling of soluble and particular cell fractions with a (32P)-8-azido analog of cyclic AMP is followed by electrophoretic separation of the proteins and by autoradiographic identification of the labeled isoforms of cAPK R subunits. It is shown that RII in the particulate subcellular fraction was significantly decreased in heart cells from rats in the flight group when compared to controls. Protein banding patterns in both the cytoplasmic fraction and in a fraction enriched in chromatin-bound proteins exhibited some variability in tissues of individual animals, but showed no changes that could be directly attributed to flight conditions. No significant change was apparent in the distribution of RI or RII cyclic AMP binding in the soluble fractions. It is inferred that the cardiac cell integrity or its protein content is not compromised under flight conditions.

  6. Prostaglandin A1 metabolism and inhibition of cyclic AMP extrusion by avian erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heasley, L.E.; Brunton, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PG) inhibit active cyclic AMP export from pigeon red cells, PGA1 and PGA2 most potently. To probe the mechanism of this action of PGA1, the authors have studied the interaction of [ 3 H]PGA1 with suspensions of pigeon red cells. The interaction of PGA1 with pigeon red cells is a multistep process of uptake, metabolism, and secretion. [ 3 H] PGA1 rapidly enters red cells and is promptly metabolized to a compound(s) that remains in the aqueous layer after ethylacetate extraction. The glutathione-depleting agent, diamide, inhibits formation of the PGA1 metabolite. The red cells secrete the polar metabolite of PGA1 by a saturable mechanism that lowered temperatures inhibit. Because uptake and metabolism progress with much greater rates than metabolite secretion, red cells transiently concentrate the polar compound intracellularly. Onset and reversal of inhibition of cyclic AMP export by PGA1 coincide with accumulation and secretion of PGA1 metabolite, suggesting that the polar metabolite acts at an intracellular site to inhibit cyclic AMP efflux

  7. The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein signaling system mediates resistance of Vibrio cholerae O1 strains to multiple environmental bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, M Shamim Hasan; Waise, T M Zaved; Kamruzzaman, M; Ghosh, Amar N; Nair, G Balakrish; Mekalanos, John J; Faruque, Shah M

    2010-07-01

    Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the epidemic diarrheal disease cholera, interacts with diverse environmental bacteriophages. These interactions promote genetic diversity or cause selective enrichment of phage-resistant bacterial clones. To identify bacterial genes involved in mediating the phage-resistant phenotype, we screened a transposon insertion library of V. cholerae O1 El Tor biotype strain C6706 to identify mutants showing altered susceptibility to a panel of phages isolated from surface waters in Bangladesh. Mutants with insertion in cyaA or crp genes encoding adenylate cyclase or cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP), respectively, were susceptible to a phage designated JSF9 to which the parent strain was completely resistant. Application of the cyaA mutant as an indicator strain in environmental phage monitoring enhanced phage detection, and we identified 3 additional phages to which the parent strain was resistant. Incorporation of the cyaA or crp mutations into other V. cholerae O1 strains caused similar alterations in their phage susceptibility patterns, and the susceptibility correlated with the ability of the bacteria to adsorb these phages. Our results suggest that cAMP-CRP-mediated downregulation of phage adsorption may contribute to a mechanism for the V. cholerae O1 strains to survive predation by multiple environmental phages. Furthermore, the cyaA or crp mutant strains may be used as suitable indicators in monitoring cholera phages in the water.

  8. c-di-AMP: An Essential Molecule in the Signaling Pathways that Regulate the Viability and Virulence of Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Tazin; Port, Gary C; Cho, Kyu Hong

    2017-08-07

    Signal transduction pathways enable organisms to monitor their external environment and adjust gene regulation to appropriately modify their cellular processes. Second messenger nucleotides including cyclic adenosine monophosphate (c-AMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (c-GMP), cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), and cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) play key roles in many signal transduction pathways used by prokaryotes and/or eukaryotes. Among the various second messenger nucleotides molecules, c-di-AMP was discovered recently and has since been shown to be involved in cell growth, survival, and regulation of virulence, primarily within Gram-positive bacteria. The cellular level of c-di-AMP is maintained by a family of c-di-AMP synthesizing enzymes, diadenylate cyclases (DACs), and degradation enzymes, phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Genetic manipulation of DACs and PDEs have demonstrated that alteration of c-di-AMP levels impacts both growth and virulence of microorganisms. Unlike other second messenger molecules, c-di-AMP is essential for growth in several bacterial species as many basic cellular functions are regulated by c-di-AMP including cell wall maintenance, potassium ion homeostasis, DNA damage repair, etc. c-di-AMP follows a typical second messenger signaling pathway, beginning with binding to receptor molecules to subsequent regulation of downstream cellular processes. While c-di-AMP binds to specific proteins that regulate pathways in bacterial cells, c-di-AMP also binds to regulatory RNA molecules that control potassium ion channel expression in Bacillus subtilis . c-di-AMP signaling also occurs in eukaryotes, as bacterially produced c-di-AMP stimulates host immune responses during infection through binding of innate immune surveillance proteins. Due to its existence in diverse microorganisms, its involvement in crucial cellular activities, and its stimulating activity in host immune responses, c-di-AMP signaling pathway has become

  9. Induction of phenotypic changes in SCLC cell lines in vitro by hexamethylene bisacetamide, sodium butyrate, and cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M Z; Freshney, R I; McNicol, A M; Murray, A M

    1993-06-01

    Hexamethylene bisacetamide (HMBA), sodium butyrate (NaBt), and cyclic AMP (cAMP) have been shown to induce differentiation, which may regulate tumour growth differently from conventional cytotoxic drugs. It was the intention in the present study to determine whether alterations could be induced in the phenotype of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines with HMBA, NaBt and cAMP, and whether these alterations would correlate with reduced growth in vivo, implying a phenotypic shift from malignancy towards differentiation. The cell lines were NCI-H69, H187 and H128. The activity of dopa decarboxylase (DDC), the BB isozyme of creatine kinase (CK-BB), the synthesis of bombesin-like peptide (BLI), and the presence of neurone specific enolase (NSE) and chromogranin were used as markers of the small cell phenotype. Clonogenicity in suspension in agar, and growth as xenografts in nude mice, were used as malignancy-associated properties. Cell proliferation in vitro was determined by cell counting and growth curve analysis. HMBA, NaBt and cAMP were found to be reversibly cytostatic in liquid culture and pre-exposure reduced the cloning efficiency in agar by 60%-80%. Growth as xenografts was inhibited (three- to five-fold increase in the tumour doubling time), most significantly by NaBt. Effects of phenotypic markers were more complex. The most significant were a two-fold reduction in DDC with NaBt and HMBA, a 50% increase in CK-BB with cAMP, and a 70%-100% increase in secreted BLI with HMBA and cAMP, in NCI-H69 cells. No significant effects were seen on NSE and chromogranin. There was little sign of an interaction with adriamycin and vincristine, although a slight increase was observed in the ID50 of VP-16 following treatment with cAMP. NaBt, HMBA and cAMP were cytostatic and inhibited tumour growth, but there was no coordinated response in marker expression that would confirm phenotypic alteration indicative of differentiation. The problem of defining differentiation in

  10. Mechanisms of Altered Control of Proliferation by Cyclic Amp/Protein Kinase A During Mammary Tumor Progression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Imagawa, Walter

    1999-01-01

    We hypothesize that alterations in the regulation of growth by growth factors and cAMP during mammary tumor progression are related to MAP kinase signaling pathways known to be affected by cAMP and pertussis toxin (PT...

  11. Cyclic AMP counteracts mitogen-induced inositol phosphate generation and increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations in human lymphocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tits, L. J.; Michel, M. C.; Motulsky, H. J.; Maisel, A. S.; Brodde, O. E.

    1991-01-01

    1. The effects of increases in intracellular adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) on mitogen-induced generation of inositol phosphates and increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentration were investigated in human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (MNL). 2. The mitogens concanavalin

  12. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor I transcription by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) in fetal rat bone cells through an element within exon 1: protein kinase A-dependent control without a consensus AMP response element

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, T. L.; Thomas, M. J.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.

    1995-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a locally synthesized anabolic growth factor for bone. IGF-I synthesis by primary fetal rat osteoblasts (Ob) is stimulated by agents that increase the intracellular cAMP concentration, including prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Previous studies with Ob cultures demonstrated that PGE2 enhanced IGF-I transcription through selective use of IGF-I promoter 1, with little effect on IGF-I messenger RNA half-life. Transient transfection of Ob cultures with an array of promoter 1-luciferase reporter fusion constructs has now allowed localization of a potential cis-acting promoter element(s) responsible for cAMP-stimulated gene expression to the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of IGF-I exon 1, within a segment lacking a consensus cAMP response element. Our evidence derives from three principal observations: 1) a transfection construct containing only 122 nucleotides (nt) of promoter 1 and 328 nt of the 5'-UTR retained full PGE2-stimulated reporter expression; 2) maximal PGE2-driven reporter expression required the presence of nt 196 to 328 of exon 1 when tested within the context of IGF-I promoter 1; 3) cotransfection of IGF-I promoter-luciferase-reporter constructs with a plasmid encoding the alpha-isoform of the catalytic subunit of murine cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) produced results comparable to those seen with PGE2 treatment, whereas cotransfection with a plasmid encoding a mutant regulatory subunit of PKA that cannot bind cAMP blocked PGE2-induced reporter expression. Deoxyribonuclease I footprinting of the 5'-UTR of exon 1 demonstrated protected sequences at HS3A, HS3B, and HS3D, three of six DNA-protein binding sites previously characterized with rat liver nuclear extracts. Of these three regions, only the HS3D binding site is located within the functionally identified hormonally responsive segment of IGF-I exon 1. These results directly implicate PKA in the control of IGF-I gene transcription by PGE2 and identify a segment of

  13. Reflections on: "A general role for adaptations in G-Proteins and the cyclic AMP system in mediating the chronic actions of morphine and cocaine on neuronal function".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestler, Eric J

    2016-08-15

    -dependent protein kinase, and certain phosphoproteins in the rat locus coeruleus, but not in several other brain regions studied, and that chronic morphine decreases levels of Giα and increases levels of adenylate cyclase in dorsal root ganglion/spinal cord (DRG-SC) co-cultures. These findings led us to survey the effects of chronic morphine on the G-protein/cyclic AMP system in a large number of brain regions to determine how widespread such regulation might be. We found that while most regions showed no regulation in response to chronic morphine, nucleus accumbens (NAc) and amygdala did show increases in adenylate cyclase and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity, and thalamus showed an increase in cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity only. An increase in cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity was also observed in DRG-SC co-cultures. Morphine regulation of G-proteins was variable, with decreased levels of Giα seen in the NAc, increased levels of Giα and Goα amygdala, and no change in thalamus or the other brain regions studied. Interestingly, chronic treatment of rats with cocaine, but not with several non-abused drugs, produced similar changes compared to morphine in G-proteins, adenylate cyclase, and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase in the NAc, but not in the other brain regions studied. These results indicate that regulation of the G-protein/cyclic AMP system represents a mechanism by which a number of opiate-sensitive neurons adapt to chronic morphine and thereby develop aspects of opiate tolerance and/or dependence. The findings that chronic morphine and cocaine produce similar adaptations in the NAc, a brain region important for the reinforcing actions of many types of abused substances, suggest further that common mechanisms may underlie psychological aspects of drug addiction mediated by this brain region. © 1991. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:50th Anniversary Issue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Localized cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity is required for myogenic cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Naohiro

    2008-01-01

    Multinucleated myotubes are formed by fusion of mononucleated myogenic progenitor cells (myoblasts) during terminal skeletal muscle differentiation. In addition, myoblasts fuse with myotubes, but terminally differentiated myotubes have not been shown to fuse with each other. We show here that an adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, and other reagents that elevate intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels induced cell fusion between small bipolar myotubes in vitro. Then an extra-large myotube, designated a 'myosheet,' was produced by both primary and established mouse myogenic cells. Myotube-to-myotube fusion always occurred between the leading edge of lamellipodia at the polar end of one myotube and the lateral plasma membrane of the other. Forskolin enhanced the formation of lamellipodia where cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) was accumulated. Blocking enzymatic activity or anchoring of PKA suppressed forskolin-enhanced lamellipodium formation and prevented fusion of multinucleated myotubes. Localized PKA activity was also required for fusion of mononucleated myoblasts. The present results suggest that localized PKA plays a pivotal role in the early steps of myogenic cell fusion, such as cell-to-cell contact/recognition through lamellipodium formation. Furthermore, the localized cAMP-PKA pathway might be involved in the specification of the fusion-competent areas of the plasma membrane in lamellipodia of myogenic cells

  15. Modulation of agonist-induced phosphoinositide metabolism, Ca 2+ signalling and contraction of airway smooth muscle by cyclic AMP-dependent mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoiting, B.H; Meurs, Herman; Schuiling, M; Kuipers, R; Elzinga, C.R S; Zaagsma, Hans

    1 The effects of increased cellular cyclic AMP levels induced by isoprenaline, forskolin and 8-bromo-adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cyclic AMP) on phosphoinositide metabolism and changes in intracellular Ca2+ elicited by methacholine and histamine were examined in bovine isolated

  16. Suppression of Virulence of Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae by Anethole through the Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP Receptor Protein Signaling System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, M Shamim Hasan; Awasthi, Sharda Prasad; Asakura, Masahiro; Chatterjee, Shruti; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Faruque, Shah M; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Use of natural compounds as antivirulence drugs could be an alternative therapeutic approach to modify the outcome of bacterial infections, particularly in view of growing resistance to available antimicrobials. Here, we show that sub-bactericidal concentration of anethole, a component of sweet fennel seed, could suppress virulence potential in O1 El Tor biotype strains of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the ongoing 7th cholera pandemic. The expression of cholera toxin (CT) and toxin coregulated pilus (TCP), the major virulence factors of V. cholerae, is controlled through a regulatory cascade involving activation of ToxT with synergistic coupling interaction of ToxR/ToxS with TcpP/TcpH. We present evidence that anethole inhibits in vitro expression of CT and TCP in a toxT-dependent but toxR/toxS-independent manner and through repression of tcpP/tcpH, by using bead-ELISA, western blotting and quantitative real-time RT-PCR assays. The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is a well-studied global signaling system in bacterial pathogens, and this complex is known to suppress expression of tcpP/tcpH in V. cholerae. We find that anethole influences the virulence regulatory cascade by over-expressing cyaA and crp genes. Moreover, suppression of toxigenic V. cholerae-mediated fluid accumulation in ligated ileum of rabbit by anethole demonstrates its potentiality as an antivirulence drug candidate against the diseases caused by toxigenic V. cholerae. Taken altogether, these results revealing a mechanism of virulence inhibition in V. cholerae by the natural compound anethole, may have relevance in designing antivirulence compounds, particularly against multiple antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens.

  17. Suppression of Virulence of Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae by Anethole through the Cyclic AMP (cAMP-cAMP Receptor Protein Signaling System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Shamim Hasan Zahid

    Full Text Available Use of natural compounds as antivirulence drugs could be an alternative therapeutic approach to modify the outcome of bacterial infections, particularly in view of growing resistance to available antimicrobials. Here, we show that sub-bactericidal concentration of anethole, a component of sweet fennel seed, could suppress virulence potential in O1 El Tor biotype strains of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the ongoing 7th cholera pandemic. The expression of cholera toxin (CT and toxin coregulated pilus (TCP, the major virulence factors of V. cholerae, is controlled through a regulatory cascade involving activation of ToxT with synergistic coupling interaction of ToxR/ToxS with TcpP/TcpH. We present evidence that anethole inhibits in vitro expression of CT and TCP in a toxT-dependent but toxR/toxS-independent manner and through repression of tcpP/tcpH, by using bead-ELISA, western blotting and quantitative real-time RT-PCR assays. The cyclic AMP (cAMP-cAMP receptor protein (CRP is a well-studied global signaling system in bacterial pathogens, and this complex is known to suppress expression of tcpP/tcpH in V. cholerae. We find that anethole influences the virulence regulatory cascade by over-expressing cyaA and crp genes. Moreover, suppression of toxigenic V. cholerae-mediated fluid accumulation in ligated ileum of rabbit by anethole demonstrates its potentiality as an antivirulence drug candidate against the diseases caused by toxigenic V. cholerae. Taken altogether, these results revealing a mechanism of virulence inhibition in V. cholerae by the natural compound anethole, may have relevance in designing antivirulence compounds, particularly against multiple antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens.

  18. Positive Effect of Carbon Sources on Natural Transformation in Escherichia coli: Role of Low-Level Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP Receptor Protein in the Derepression of rpoS

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Mengyue; Wang, Huanyu; Xie, Nengbin; Xie, Zhixiong

    2015-01-01

    Natural plasmid transformation of Escherichia coli is a complex process that occurs strictly on agar plates and requires the global stress response factor σS. Here, we showed that additional carbon sources could significantly enhance the transformability of E. coli. Inactivation of phosphotransferase system genes (ptsH, ptsG, and crr) caused an increase in the transformation frequency, and the addition of cyclic AMP (cAMP) neutralized the promotional effect of carbon sources. This implies a n...

  19. Synthesis of interleukin 6 (interferon-. beta. /sub 2//B cell stimulatory factor 2) in human fibroblasts is triggered by an increase in intracellular cyclic AMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhange, Y.; Lin, J.X.; Vilcek, J.

    1988-05-05

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6; also referred to as interferon-..beta../sub 2/, 26-kDa protein, and B cell stimulatory factor 2) is a cytokine whose actions include a stimulation of immunoglobulin synthesis, enhancement of B cell growth, and modulation of acute phase protein synthesis by hepatocytes. Synthesis of IL-6 is stimulated by interleukin 1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), or platelet-derived growth factor. The authors examined the role of the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent signal transduction pathway in IL-6 gene expression. Several activators of adenylate cyclase, including prostaglandin E1, forskolin, and cholera toxin, as well as the phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutylmethylxanthine and the cAMP analog dibutyryl cAMP, shared the ability to cause a dramatic and sustained increase in IL-6 mRNA levels in human FS-4 fibroblasts. Actinomycin D treatment abolished this enhancement. Treatments that increased intracellular cAMP also stimulated the secretion of the IL-6 protein in a biologically active form. Increased intracellular cAMP appears to enhance IL-6 gene expression by a protein kinase C-independent mechanism because down-regulation of protein kinase C by a chronic exposure of cells to a high dose of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate did not abolish the enhancement of IL-6 expression by treatments that increase cAMP. IL-1 and TNF too increased IL-6 mRNA levels by a protein kinase C-independent mechanism. The results suggest a role for the cAMP-dependent pathway(s) in IL-6 gene activation by TNF and IL-1.

  20. Synthesis of interleukin 6 (interferon-β2/B cell stimulatory factor 2) in human fibroblasts is triggered by an increase in intracellular cyclic AMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhange, Y.; Lin, J.X.; Vilcek, J.

    1988-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6; also referred to as interferon-β 2 , 26-kDa protein, and B cell stimulatory factor 2) is a cytokine whose actions include a stimulation of immunoglobulin synthesis, enhancement of B cell growth, and modulation of acute phase protein synthesis by hepatocytes. Synthesis of IL-6 is stimulated by interleukin 1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), or platelet-derived growth factor. The authors examined the role of the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent signal transduction pathway in IL-6 gene expression. Several activators of adenylate cyclase, including prostaglandin E1, forskolin, and cholera toxin, as well as the phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutylmethylxanthine and the cAMP analog dibutyryl cAMP, shared the ability to cause a dramatic and sustained increase in IL-6 mRNA levels in human FS-4 fibroblasts. Actinomycin D treatment abolished this enhancement. Treatments that increased intracellular cAMP also stimulated the secretion of the IL-6 protein in a biologically active form. Increased intracellular cAMP appears to enhance IL-6 gene expression by a protein kinase C-independent mechanism because down-regulation of protein kinase C by a chronic exposure of cells to a high dose of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate did not abolish the enhancement of IL-6 expression by treatments that increase cAMP. IL-1 and TNF too increased IL-6 mRNA levels by a protein kinase C-independent mechanism. The results suggest a role for the cAMP-dependent pathway(s) in IL-6 gene activation by TNF and IL-1

  1. An AP-2 element acts synergistically with the cyclic AMP- and Phorbol ester-inducible enhancer of the human proenkephalin gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyman, S.E.; Comb, M.; Pearlberg, J.; Goodman, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    An enhancer with two DNA elements, one containing the sequence CGTCA, is required for cyclic AMP-and phorbol ester-inducible transcription of the human proenkephalin gene. The authors report that an AP-2 element located adjacent to the enhancer acts synergistically with it to confer maximal response to cyclic AMP and phorbol esters.

  2. Angiotensin II potentiates prostaglandin stimulation of cyclic AMP levels in intact bovine adrenal medulla cells but not adenylate cyclase in permeabilized cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boarder, M R; Plevin, R; Marriott, D B

    1988-10-25

    The level of cyclic AMP in primary cultures of bovine adrenal medulla cells is elevated by prostaglandin E1. Angiotensin II is commonly reported to act on receptors linked to phosphoinositide metabolism or to inhibition of adenylate cyclase. We have investigated the effect of angiotensin II on prostaglandin E1-stimulated cyclic AMP levels in these primary cultures. Rather than reducing cyclic AMP levels, we have found that angiotensin II powerfully potentiates prostaglandin E1-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in intact cells, both in the presence and absence of phosphodiesterase inhibitors. The 50% maximal response was similar to that for stimulation of phosphoinositide breakdown by angiotensin II in these cultures. The potentiation of stimulated cyclic AMP levels was seen, although to a smaller maximum, with the protein kinase C (Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent enzyme) activating phorbol ester tetradecanoyl phorbolacetate and with the synthetic diacylglycerol 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol; pretreatment (24 h) with active phorbol ester, which would be expected to diminish protein kinase C levels, attenuated the angiotensin II potentiation of cyclic AMP. Using digitonin-permeabilized cells we showed that adenylate cyclase activity was stimulated by prostaglandin E1 with the same dose-response relationship as was cyclic AMP accumulation in intact cells, but the permeabilized cells showed no response to angiotensin II. The results are discussed with respect to the hypothesis that the angiotensin II influence on cyclic AMP levels is mediated, in part, by diacylglycerol stimulation of protein kinase C.

  3. Total biosynthesis of the cyclic AMP booster forskolin from Coleus forskohlii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pateraki, Irini; Andersen-Ranberg, Johan; Jensen, Nils Bjerg

    2017-01-01

    Forskolin is a unique structurally complex labdane type diterpenoid used in the treatment of glaucoma and heart failure based on its activity as a cyclic AMP booster. Commercial production of forskolin relies exclusively on extraction from its only known natural source, the plant Coleus forskohlii......, in which forskolin accumulates in the root cork. Here we report the discovery of five cytochrome P450s and two acetyltransferases which catalyze a cascade of reactions converting the forskolin precursor 13R-manoyl oxide into forskolin and a diverse array of additional labdane-type diterpenoids. A minimal...... set of three P450s in combination with a single acetyl transferase was identified that catalyzes the conversion of 13R-manoyl oxide into forskolin as demonstrated by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. The entire pathway for forskolin production from glucose encompassing expression of nine...

  4. A Novel Indirect Sequence Readout Component in the E. coli Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Operator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; Nielsen, Peter Eigil; Valentin-Hansen, Poul

    2014-01-01

    binding sites in the E. coli genome, but the exact role of the N6 region in CRP interaction has not previously been systematic examined. Here we employ an in vitro selection system based on a randomized N6 spacer region to demonstrate that CRP binding to the lacP1 site may be enhanced up to 14-fold......The cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) from Escherichia coli has been extensively studied for several decades. In particular, a detailed characterization of CRP interaction with DNA has been obtained. The CRP dimer recognizes a consensus sequence AANTGTGANNNNNNTCACANTT through direct amino acid...... nucleobase interactions in the major groove of the two operator half-sites. Crystal structure analyses have revealed that the interaction results in two strong kinks at the TG/CA steps closest to the 6-base-pair spacer (N6). This spacer exhibits high sequence variability among the more than 100 natural...

  5. Cyclic AMP-binding capacities and histone kinase activation in subcellular components of neocortical tissue. Differential responses to three neurohumoural agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jitendra; Newman, Michael; McIlwain, Henry

    1981-01-01

    1. Noradrenaline and histamine, when added to superfused guinea-pig cerebral-cortical tissues, increased both cyclic AMP-dependent and -independent histone kinase activities of some, but not of all, subsequently isolated subcellular fractions, and decreased their cyclic [3H]AMP-binding capacity, which was concluded to be due to an increase in endogenously bound cyclic AMP. 2. Adenosine and 2-chloroadenosine also diminished the cyclic [3H]AMP-binding capacities, but did not affect the histone kinase activities. 3. DEAE-cellulose chromatography and stability to KCl additions showed that the greater part of the histone kinase of the present preparations corresponded to the type II enzyme [of Corbin, Keely & Park (1975) J. Biol. Chem. 250, 218–225], with a lesser amount of type I activity. Different sites of cyclic AMP accumulation in relation to these or other kinases are considered in interpreting the differential tissue responses to the neurohumoural agents examined. PMID:6118136

  6. Essential role for cyclic-AMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB) in the survival of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sligte, Naomi E.; Kampen, Kim R.; ter Elst, Arja; Scherpen, Frank J. G.; Meeuwsen-de Boer, Tiny G. J.; Guryev, Victor; van Leeuwen, Frank N.; Kornblau, Steven M.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) relapse remains a leading cause of cancer related death in children, therefore, new therapeutic options are needed. Recently, we showed that a peptide derived from Cyclic-AMP Responsive Element Binding Protein (CREB) was highly phosphorylated in pediatric

  7. FimL regulates cAMP synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki F Inclan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous bacteria found in diverse ecological niches, is an important cause of acute infections in immunocompromised individuals and chronic infections in patients with Cystic Fibrosis. One signaling molecule required for the coordinate regulation of virulence factors associated with acute infections is 3', 5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate, (cAMP, which binds to and activates a catabolite repressor homolog, Vfr. Vfr controls the transcription of many virulence factors, including those associated with Type IV pili (TFP, the Type III secretion system (T3SS, the Type II secretion system, flagellar-mediated motility, and quorum sensing systems. We previously identified FimL, a protein with histidine phosphotransfer-like domains, as a regulator of Vfr-dependent processes, including TFP-dependent motility and T3SS function. In this study, we carried out genetic and physiologic studies to further define the mechanism of action of FimL. Through a genetic screen designed to identify suppressors of FimL, we found a putative cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (CpdA, suggesting that FimL regulates cAMP levels. Inactivation of CpdA increases cAMP levels and restores TFP-dependent motility and T3SS function to fimL mutants, consistent with in vivo phosphodiesterase activity. By constructing combinations of double and triple mutants in the two adenylate cyclase genes (cyaA and cyaB, fimL, and cpdA, we show that ΔfimL mutants resemble ΔcyaB mutants in TM defects, decreased T3SS transcription, and decreased cAMP levels. Similar to some of the virulence factors that they regulate, we demonstrate that CyaB and FimL are polarly localized. These results reveal new complexities in the regulation of diverse virulence pathways associated with acute P. aeruginosa infections.

  8. Phosphorylation of the protein kinase A catalytic subunit is induced by cyclic AMP deficiency and physiological stresses in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McInnis, Brittney; Mitchell, Jessica; Marcus, Stevan

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → cAMP deficiency induces phosphorylation of PKA catalytic subunit (Pka1) in S. pombe. → Pka1 phosphorylation is further induced by physiological stresses. → Pka1 phosphorylation is not induced in cells lacking the PKA regulatory subunit. → Results suggest that cAMP-independent Pka1 phosphorylation is stimulatory in nature. -- Abstract: In the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is not essential for viability under normal culturing conditions, making this organism attractive for investigating mechanisms of PKA regulation. Here we show that S. pombe cells carrying a deletion in the adenylate cyclase gene, cyr1, express markedly higher levels of the PKA catalytic subunit, Pka1, than wild type cells. Significantly, in cyr1Δ cells, but not wild type cells, a substantial proportion of Pka1 protein is hyperphosphorylated. Pka1 hyperphosphorylation is strongly induced in cyr1Δ cells, and to varying degrees in wild type cells, by both glucose starvation and stationary phase stresses, which are associated with reduced cAMP-dependent PKA activity, and by KCl stress, the cellular adaptation to which is dependent on PKA activity. Interestingly, hyperphosphorylation of Pka1 was not detected in either cyr1 + or cyr1Δ S. pombe strains carrying a deletion in the PKA regulatory subunit gene, cgs1, under any of the tested conditions. Our results demonstrate the existence of a cAMP-independent mechanism of PKA catalytic subunit phosphorylation, which we propose could serve as a mechanism for inducing or maintaining specific PKA functions under conditions in which its cAMP-dependent activity is downregulated.

  9. REVIEW: Role of cyclic AMP signaling in the production and function of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiwen; Jin, Tianru

    2008-01-01

    Pancreatic cells express the proglucagon gene (gcg) and thereby produce the peptide hormone glucagon, which stimulates hepatic glucose production and thereby increases blood glucose levels. The same gcg gene is also expressed in the intestinal endocrine L cells and certain neural cells in the brain. In the gut, gcg expression leads to the production of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). This incretin hormone stimulates insulin secretion when blood glucose level is high. In addition, GLP-1 stimulates pancreatic cell proliferation, inhibits cell apoptosis, and has been utilized in the trans-differentiation of insulin producing cells. Today, a long-term effective GLP-1 receptor agonist has been developed as a drug in treating diabetes and potentially other metabolic disorders. Extensive investigations have shown that the expression of gcg and the production of GLP-1 can be activated by the elevation of the second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP). Recent studies suggest that in addition to protein kinase A (PKA), exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac), another effector of cAMP signaling, and the crosstalk between PKA and Wnt signaling pathway, are also involved in cAMP-stimulated gcg expression and GLP-1 production. Furthermore, functions of GLP-1 in pancreatic cells are mainly mediated by cAMP-PKA, cAMP-Epac and Wnt signaling pathways as well.

  10. Activation of PKA and Epac proteins by cyclic AMP depletes intracellular calcium stores and reduces calcium availability for vasoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuíñas, Andrea; García-Morales, Verónica; Viña, Dolores; Gil-Longo, José; Campos-Toimil, Manuel

    2016-06-15

    We investigated the implication of PKA and Epac proteins in the endothelium-independent vasorelaxant effects of cyclic AMP (cAMP). Cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) was measured by fura-2 imaging in rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMC). Contraction-relaxation experiments were performed in rat aortic rings deprived of endothelium. In extracellular Ca(2+)-free solution, cAMP-elevating agents induced an increase in [Ca(2+)]c in RASMC that was reproduced by PKA and Epac activation and reduced after depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) reservoirs. Arginine-vasopressin (AVP)-evoked increase of [Ca(2+)]c and store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) were inhibited by cAMP-elevating agents, PKA or Epac activation in these cells. In aortic rings, the contractions induced by phenylephrine in absence of extracellular Ca(2+) were inhibited by cAMP-elevating agents, PKA or Epac activation. In these conditions, reintroduction of Ca(2+) induced a contraction that was inhibited by cAMP-elevating agents, an effect reduced by PKA inhibition and reproduced by PKA or Epac activators. Our results suggest that increased cAMP depletes intracellular, thapsigargin-sensitive Ca(2+) stores through activation of PKA and Epac in RASMC, thus reducing the amount of Ca(2+) released by IP3-generating agonists during the contraction of rat aorta. cAMP rise also inhibits the contraction induced by depletion of intracellular Ca(2+), an effect mediated by reduction of SOCE after PKA or Epac activation. Both effects participate in the cAMP-induced endothelium-independent vasorelaxation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Regulation of phospholipid synthesis in Mycobacterium smegmatis by cyclic adenosine monophosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sareen, Monica; Kaur, Harpinder; Khuller, G.K.

    1993-01-01

    Forskolin, an adenylate cyclase activator and a cyclic AMP analogue, dibutyryl cyclic AMP have been used to examine the relationship between intracellular levels of cyclic AMP and lipid synthesis in Mycobacterium smegmatis. Total phospholipid content was found to be increased in forskolin grown cells as a result of increased cyclic AMP levels caused by activation of adenylate cyclase. Increased phospholipid content was supported by increased [ 14 C]acetate incorporation as well as increased activity of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase. Pretreatment of cells with dibutyryl cyclic AMP had similar effects on lipid synthesis. Taking all these observations together it is suggested that lipid synthesis is being controlled by cyclic AMP in mycobacteria. (author). 14 refs., 4 tabs

  12. Inhibition of gastric acid secretion by epidermal growth factor. Effects on cyclic AMP and on prostaglandin production in rat isolated parietal cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Hatt, J F; Hanson, P J

    1988-01-01

    Histamine (0.5 mM) stimulated the cyclic AMP content of cell suspensions containing greater than 80% parietal cells. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) inhibited this stimulatory effect of histamine, but had no effect on basal cyclic AMP content. The half-maximally effective concentration of EGF for inhibition of histamine-stimulated cyclic AMP was 3.9 nM. The equivalent measurement for the inhibition of histamine-stimulated aminopyrine accumulation was 3.0 nM. Aminopyrine accumulation was measure...

  13. Cyclic di-AMP Acts as an Extracellular Signal That ImpactsBacillus subtilisBiofilm Formation and Plant Attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsley, Loni; Yannarell, Sarah M; Huynh, Tuanh Ngoc; Woodward, Joshua J; Shank, Elizabeth A

    2018-03-27

    There is a growing appreciation for the impact that bacteria have on higher organisms. Plant roots often harbor beneficial microbes, such as the Gram-positive rhizobacterium Bacillus subtilis , that influence their growth and susceptibility to disease. The ability to form surface-attached microbial communities called biofilms is crucial for the ability of B. subtilis to adhere to and protect plant roots. In this study, strains harboring deletions of the B. subtilis genes known to synthesize and degrade the second messenger cyclic di-adenylate monophosphate (c-di-AMP) were examined for their involvement in biofilm formation and plant attachment. We found that intracellular production of c-di-AMP impacts colony biofilm architecture, biofilm gene expression, and plant attachment in B. subtilis We also show that B. subtilis secretes c-di-AMP and that putative c-di-AMP transporters impact biofilm formation and plant root colonization. Taken together, our data describe a new role for c-di-AMP as a chemical signal that affects important cellular processes in the environmentally and agriculturally important soil bacterium B. subtilis These results suggest that the "intracellular" signaling molecule c-di-AMP may also play a previously unappreciated role in interbacterial cell-cell communication within plant microbiomes. IMPORTANCE Plants harbor bacterial communities on their roots that can significantly impact their growth and pathogen resistance. In most cases, however, the signals that mediate host-microbe and microbe-microbe interactions within these communities are unknown. A detailed understanding of these interaction mechanisms could facilitate the manipulation of these communities for agricultural or environmental purposes. Bacillus subtilis is a plant-growth-promoting bacterium that adheres to roots by forming biofilms. We therefore began by exploring signals that might impact its biofilm formation. We found that B. subtilis secretes c-di-AMP and that the

  14. The reduction of radiation-induced mitotic delay by caffeine: a test of the cyclic AMP hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oleinick, N.L.; Brewer, E.N.; Rustad, R.C.

    1978-01-01

    A study has been made of the reduction in γ-radiation-induced mitotic delay by caffeine in the naturally-synchronous plasmodial slime mould. Physarum polycephalum during late G 2 and early prophase, and the results compared with those obtained with other compounds of similar structure and/or physiological function. The reduction of radiation-induced mitotic delay was related to increasing concentrations of caffeine over at least two orders of magnitude. Pre-irradiation treatment with caffeine had no detectable effect. Caffeine had to be present for most, if not all, of the post-irradiation pre-mitotic period. Other chemicals which are reported to inhibit cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase either reduce or increase radiation-induced mitotic delay. The results therefore indicate that the reduction of mitotic delay by caffeine is not a result of altered cyclic AMP levels. (UK)

  15. Estimation of cyclic AMP turnover in normal and methylprednisolone-treated dogs: effect of catecholamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issekutz, T B

    1975-08-01

    The turnover rate of plasma cAMP was measured in unanesthetized normal and methylprednisolone (MP)-treated dogs with [8-3H]cAMP. Determination of specific activity was based on saturation of the specific binding protein, thus bypassing the need to know the plasma level of cAMP. In normal dogs the infusion of epinephrine increased plasma glucose by 33% and both the plasma level and rate of appearance (Ra) of cAMP 2.5-fold. Treatment with MP decreased the concentration as well as the turnover rate of cAMP by about 50%. It greatly potentiated not only the hyperglycemic effect (4-fold) of epinephrine but also the rise of plasma cAMP (8.5-fold) and that of Ra (6.8-fold). Norepinephrine infusion increased cAMP only by 50%. This effect was not potentiated by MP treatment and not altered by Na nicotinate. There was a linear correlation between plasma cAMP concentration and the rate of disappearance (Rd) of cAMP. It is concluded that: a) the increase of hepatic glycogenolysis is accompanied by a rise of cAMP output, whereas that of lipolysis is not; b) glucocorticoid treatment affects cAMP turnover; and c) the plasma level of cAMP is controlled by Ra, whereas Rd is the result of the mass-action effect of the concentration.

  16. Diazepam increases the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity by a cyclic AMP-dependent mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, M Luisa; Abella, Cristina; Hernandez, Jesus

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies in this laboratory have shown that diazepam behaves as a phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE 4) inhibitor. It has been reported that PDE-4 inhibitors activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis in the rat. In the present study we have examined whether activation of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is involved in the effect of diazepam on basal HPA axis activity. Acute systemic administration of diazepam (10 mg kg−1 i.p.) was found to increase the basal HPA axis activity, increasing the plasma concentrations of corticotrophin (ACTH) and corticosterone 30 min post injection. Diazepam also elevated cyclic AMP content of the hypothalamus. Pretreatment of the animals with dexamethasone (1 mg kg−1 s.c.) for 3 days completely abolished the effect of diazepam on HPA axis activity. The antagonists of central and peripheral benzodiazepine receptors, flumazenil (10 mg kg−1 i.p.) and PK 11195 (5 mg kg−1 i.p.) did not affect the diazepam induced increase of HPA axis activity nor did they have an effect per se. The increase in ACTH and corticosterone levels was significantly reduced by the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitor, H-89, given either subcutaneously (5 mg kg−1 s.c.) or intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.; 28 μg in 10 μl). The results indicate that diazepam can stimulate basal HPA axis activity in the rat by a cyclic AMP-dependent PKA mediated pathway. PMID:11498522

  17. Response of cytosolic calcium, cyclic AMP, and cyclic GMP in dimethylsulfoxide-differentiated HL-60 cells to modulated low frequency electric currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontag, W; Dertinger, H

    1998-01-01

    The action of interferential current (IFC), an amplitude-modulated 4000 kHz current used in therapeutic applications, upon intracellular calcium, adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), and guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) was investigated. Human promyelocytes (HL-60) were differentiated to granulocytes by dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) treatment and exposed for 5 min at 25, 250, and 2500 microA/cm2 current density. No significant changes in cytosolic free calcium were detected as a function of modulation frequency of the IFC. However, intracellular cAMP reacted in a complex way to modulation frequency, resulting in stimulations and depressions within the range of frequencies studied (0-125 Hz). The "windows" of modulation frequency, where statistically significant increases or decreases in cAMP were noted, coincided with those published earlier for mouse fibroblasts. Cellular cGMP content was always lowered by IFC treatment. Furthermore, no significant influence of IFC current density upon the three second messengers was noted. These results, which also include data relating to treatment with sinusoidal 50 Hz current, contribute to a more detailed understanding of the primary biophysical mechanisms of signal transduction by time-varying electric fields.

  18. Properties of the luminal membrane of isolated perfused rat pancreatic ducts. Effect of cyclic AMP and blockers of chloride transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I; Greger, R

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate by what transport mechanism does HCO-3 cross the luminal membrane of pancreatic duct cells, and how do the cells respond to stimulation with dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db-cAMP). For this purpose a newly developed preparation of isolated and perfused intra......) hyperpolarized PDbl by 10.3 +/- 1.7 mV (n = 10); and SITS hyperpolarized PDbl by 7.8 +/- 0.9 mV (n = 4). Stimulation of the ducts with db-cAMP in the presence of bath HCO-3/CO2 resulted in depolarization of PDbl, the ductal lumen became more negative and the fractional resistance of the luminal membrane...... decreased. Together with forskolin (10(-6) M), db-cAMP (10(-4) M) caused a fast depolarization of PDbl by 33.8 +/- 2.5 mV (n = 6). When db-cAMP (5 x 10(-4) M) was given alone in the presence of bath HCO-3/CO2, PDbl depolarized by 25.3 +/- 4.2 mV (n = 10).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)...

  19. Roles of Intracellular Cyclic AMP Signal Transduction in the Capacitation and Subsequent Hyperactivation of Mouse and Boar Spermatozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    HARAYAMA, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    It is not until accomplishment of a variety of molecular changes during the transit through the female reproductive tract that mammalian spermatozoa are capable of exhibiting highly activated motility with asymmetric whiplash beating of the flagella (hyperactivation) and undergoing acrosomal exocytosis in the head (acrosome reaction). These molecular changes of the spermatozoa are collectively termed capacitation and promoted by bicarbonate, calcium and cholesterol acceptors. Such capacitation-promoting factors can stimulate intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) signal transduction in the spermatozoa. Meanwhile, hyperactivation and the acrosome reaction are essential to sperm fertilization with oocytes and are apparently triggered by a sufficient increase of intracellular Ca2+ in the sperm flagellum and head, respectively. Thus, it is necessary to investigate the relationship between cAMP signal transduction and calcium signaling cascades in the spermatozoa for the purpose of understanding the molecular basis of capacitation. In this review, I cover updated insights regarding intracellular cAMP signal transduction, the acrosome reaction and flagellar motility in mammalian spermatozoa and then account for possible roles of intracellular cAMP signal transduction in the capacitation and subsequent hyperactivation of mouse and boar spermatozoa. PMID:24162806

  20. Phorbol esters inhibit chondrogenesis in limb mesenchyme by mechanisms independent of PGE sub 2 or cyclic AMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddulph, D.M.; Dozier, M.M. (Wake Forest Univ., Winston-Salem, NC (United States))

    1989-12-01

    Effects of the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) on chondrogenesis and concentrations of prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) and cyclic AMP (cAMP) were investigated in micromass cultures of chick limb mesenchyme derived from the distal tip of stage 25 limb buds. TPA completely inhibited chondrogenesis during the first 4 days of culture; however, a few small cartilage nodules formed by day 6. Relative to control cultures, both PGE{sub 2} and cAMP concentrations were altered by TPA treatment during the 6-day period of cell culture. Concentrations of both compounds increased in control cells during the first 24 hours of culture and then declined during the remaining 5 days. In TPA-treated cells both PGE{sub 2} and cAMP levels increased progressively during the 6 days of cell culture, each being elevated at day 6 by twofold over control cells. The results suggest the presence of regulatory pathways important in chondrogenesis which occur independent of those initiated by PGE{sub 2} and the cAMP system.

  1. New Insights into the Cyclic Di-adenosine Monophosphate (c-di-AMP) Degradation Pathway and the Requirement of the Cyclic Dinucleotide for Acid Stress Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Lisa; Zeden, Merve S; Schuster, Christopher F; Kaever, Volkhard; Gründling, Angelika

    2016-12-30

    Nucleotide signaling networks are key to facilitate alterations in gene expression, protein function, and enzyme activity in response to diverse stimuli. Cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is an important secondary messenger molecule produced by the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and is involved in regulating a number of physiological processes including potassium transport. S. aureus must ensure tight control over its cellular levels as both high levels of the dinucleotide and its absence result in a number of detrimental phenotypes. Here we show that in addition to the membrane-bound Asp-His-His and Asp-His-His-associated (DHH/DHHA1) domain-containing phosphodiesterase (PDE) GdpP, S. aureus produces a second cytoplasmic DHH/DHHA1 PDE Pde2. Although capable of hydrolyzing c-di-AMP, Pde2 preferentially converts linear 5'-phosphadenylyl-adenosine (pApA) to AMP. Using a pde2 mutant strain, pApA was detected for the first time in S. aureus, leading us to speculate that this dinucleotide may have a regulatory role under certain conditions. Moreover, pApA is involved in a feedback inhibition loop that limits GdpP-dependent c-di-AMP hydrolysis. Another protein linked to the regulation of c-di-AMP levels in bacteria is the predicted regulator protein YbbR. Here, it is shown that a ybbR mutant S. aureus strain has increased acid sensitivity that can be bypassed by the acquisition of mutations in a number of genes, including the gene coding for the diadenylate cyclase DacA. We further show that c-di-AMP levels are slightly elevated in the ybbR suppressor strains tested as compared with the wild-type strain. With this, we not only identified a new role for YbbR in acid stress resistance in S. aureus but also provide further insight into how c-di-AMP levels impact acid tolerance in this organism. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Selective enhancement of wnt4 expression by cyclic AMP-associated cooperation between rat central astrocytes and microglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Masatoshi, E-mail: ohnishi@fupharm.fukuyama-u.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Graduate School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, 985-1 Sanzo, Higashimura-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, 729-0292 (Japan); Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, 985-1 Sanzo, Higashimura-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, 729-0292 (Japan); Urasaki, Tomoka [Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Graduate School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, 985-1 Sanzo, Higashimura-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, 729-0292 (Japan); Ochiai, Hiroyuki; Matsuoka, Kohei; Takeo, Shin; Harada, Tomoki; Ohsugi, Yoshihito [Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, 985-1 Sanzo, Higashimura-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, 729-0292 (Japan); Inoue, Atsuko [Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Graduate School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, 985-1 Sanzo, Higashimura-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, 729-0292 (Japan); Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, 985-1 Sanzo, Higashimura-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, 729-0292 (Japan)

    2015-11-13

    The wnt protein family has important members involved in cell differentiation, proliferation and plasticity expression; however, little is known about its biosynthesis processes. On the other hand, an increase in the intracerebral cyclic adenosine 3′, 5’-monophosphate (cAMP) level leads to synaptic plasticity via the de novo synthesis of any protein. Here, the effect of dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP), a membrane permeability cAMP analog, on the wnt family was investigated in rat primary-cultured glial cells containing astrocytes and microglia. Among wnt3a, 4, 5a, 7a and 11 mRNA, only wnt4 expression was increased by longer treatment (24 h), compared with short treatment (2 h), with dbcAMP in a concentration-dependent manner, and its effect reached statistical significance at 1 mM. In cultures of isolated astrocytes or microglia, wnt4 expression was not affected by 1 mM dbcAMP for 24 h, and microglial wnt4 protein was undetectable even when cells were treated with the drug. Mixed glial cells treated for 24 h with 1 mM dbcAMP showed significantly increased wnt4 protein, as well as mRNA. Immunofluorescence manifested that cells that expressed wnt4 protein were astrocytes, but not microglia. Intraperitoneal injection of 1.25 mg/kg rolipram, a phosphodiesterase (PDE) IV inhibitor that can pass through the blood brain barrier and inhibits cAMP degradation specifically, showed a tendency to increase wnt4 expression in the adult rat brain after 24 h, and the increases in wnt4 mRNA and protein levels reached statistical significance in the hippocampus and striatum, respectively. This is the first finding to help elucidate the selective biosynthesis of central wnt4 through cAMP-stimulated microglia and astrocytes interaction. - Highlights: • Dibutyryl cAMP increased wnt4, but not wnt3a, 5a, 7a and 11, mRNA in mixed glia. • Wnt4 protein increased in astrocytes co-cultivated with microglia. • It took a long time to robustly increase wnt4 expression. • Rolipram

  3. Selective enhancement of wnt4 expression by cyclic AMP-associated cooperation between rat central astrocytes and microglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Masatoshi; Urasaki, Tomoka; Ochiai, Hiroyuki; Matsuoka, Kohei; Takeo, Shin; Harada, Tomoki; Ohsugi, Yoshihito; Inoue, Atsuko

    2015-01-01

    The wnt protein family has important members involved in cell differentiation, proliferation and plasticity expression; however, little is known about its biosynthesis processes. On the other hand, an increase in the intracerebral cyclic adenosine 3′, 5’-monophosphate (cAMP) level leads to synaptic plasticity via the de novo synthesis of any protein. Here, the effect of dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP), a membrane permeability cAMP analog, on the wnt family was investigated in rat primary-cultured glial cells containing astrocytes and microglia. Among wnt3a, 4, 5a, 7a and 11 mRNA, only wnt4 expression was increased by longer treatment (24 h), compared with short treatment (2 h), with dbcAMP in a concentration-dependent manner, and its effect reached statistical significance at 1 mM. In cultures of isolated astrocytes or microglia, wnt4 expression was not affected by 1 mM dbcAMP for 24 h, and microglial wnt4 protein was undetectable even when cells were treated with the drug. Mixed glial cells treated for 24 h with 1 mM dbcAMP showed significantly increased wnt4 protein, as well as mRNA. Immunofluorescence manifested that cells that expressed wnt4 protein were astrocytes, but not microglia. Intraperitoneal injection of 1.25 mg/kg rolipram, a phosphodiesterase (PDE) IV inhibitor that can pass through the blood brain barrier and inhibits cAMP degradation specifically, showed a tendency to increase wnt4 expression in the adult rat brain after 24 h, and the increases in wnt4 mRNA and protein levels reached statistical significance in the hippocampus and striatum, respectively. This is the first finding to help elucidate the selective biosynthesis of central wnt4 through cAMP-stimulated microglia and astrocytes interaction. - Highlights: • Dibutyryl cAMP increased wnt4, but not wnt3a, 5a, 7a and 11, mRNA in mixed glia. • Wnt4 protein increased in astrocytes co-cultivated with microglia. • It took a long time to robustly increase wnt4 expression. • Rolipram

  4. Transporter function and cyclic AMP turnover in normal colonic mucosa from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleberg Karen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathogenesis of colorectal neoplasia is still unresolved but has been associated with alterations in epithelial clearance of xenobiotics and metabolic waste products. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize the transport of cyclic nucleotides in colonic biopsies from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia. Methods Cyclic nucleotides were used as model substrates shared by some OATP- and ABC-transporters, which in part are responsible for clearance of metabolites and xenobiotics from the colonic epithelium. On colonic biopsies from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia, molecular transport was electrophysiologically registered in Ussing-chamber set-ups, mRNA level of selected transporters was quantified by rt-PCR, and subcellular location of transporters was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results Of four cyclic nucleotides, dibuturyl-cAMP induced the largest short circuit current in both patient groups. The induced short circuit current was significantly lower in neoplasia-patients (p = 0.024. The observed altered transport of dibuturyl-cAMP in neoplasia-patients could not be directly translated to an observed increased mRNA expression of OATP4A1 and OATP2B1 in neoplasia patients. All other examined transporters were expressed to similar extents in both patient groups. Conclusions OATP1C1, OATP4A1, OATP4C1 seem to be involved in the excretory system of human colon. ABCC4 is likely to be involved from an endoplasmic-Golgi complex and basolateral location in goblet cells. ABCC5 might be directly involved in the turnover of intracellular cAMP at the basolateral membrane of columnar epithelial cells, while OATP2B1 is indirectly related to the excretory system. Colorectal neoplasia is associated with lower transport or sensitivity to cyclic nucleotides and increased expression of OATP2B1 and OATP4A1 transporters, known to transport PGE2.

  5. Involvement of cyclic AMP-mediated pathway in neural release of noradrenaline in canine isolated mesenteric artery and vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutafova-Yambolieva, Violeta N; Smyth, Lisa; Bobalova, Janette

    2003-01-01

    Our major hypothesis is that cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-mediated modulation of neurotransmitter release plays different roles at low and high activity of the sympathetic nervous system. We further hypothesize that cAMP-mediated neuromodulation might underlie disparate neurovascular control in mesenteric arteries and veins. Electrical field stimulation (EFS)-evoked overflow of noradrenaline (NA) was evaluated in the absence or presence of activators and inhibitors of cAMP-dependent pathway at low (4 Hz) and high (16 Hz) frequencies of stimulation of endothelium-denuded secondary and tertiary branches of the canine isolated inferior mesenteric arteries and veins. The content of NA in samples of the superfusates collected before and during nerve stimulation was assayed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) technique in conjunction with electrochemical detection. Student's t-test and ANOVA analyses were applied for statistical analysis. Activation of cAMP-dependent pathway with either isoproterenol (ISO, 10 microM), forskolin (1 microM), dibutyryl cAMP (100 microM) or combined site-specific activators of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) [i.e. N(6)-phenyl-adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, 8-(6-aminohexyl) aminoadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, and the Sp-isomer of 5,6-dichloro-1-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate, each 100 microM] caused an enhancement of the EFS-evoked overflow of endogenous NA at 16 Hz of stimulation but was without an effect at 4 Hz of stimulation both in artery and vein. The EFS (16 Hz)-evoked overflow of NA in vein was also increased in the presence of inhibitors of phosphodiesterase (PDE) III and PDE IV (i.e. milrinone, 0.4 microM, and roilpram, 30 microM), whereas these inhibitors did not affect the overflow of NA in the artery. The facilitating effect of activators of cAMP-dependent pathway on the EFS-evoked release of NA at 16 Hz appears to be more pronounced in the vein than in

  6. The Cyclic Nucleotide Specificity of Three cAMP Receptors in Dictyostelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Ronald L.; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Kimmel, Alan R.; Saxe III, Charles L.; Jastorff, Bernd; Devreotes, Peter N.

    1992-01-01

    cAMP receptors mediate signal transduction pathways during development in Dictyostelium. A cAMP receptor (cAR1) has been cloned and sequenced (Klein, P., Sun, T. J., Saxe, C. L., Kimmel, A. R., Johnson, R. L., and Devreotes, P. N. (1988) Science 241, 1467-1472) and recently several other cAR genes

  7. Plasticity of regulation of mannitol phosphotransferase system operon by CRP-cAMP complex in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan Yan; Zhang, Hong Zhi; Liang, Wei Li; Zhang, Li Juan; Zhu, Jun; Kan, Biao

    2013-10-01

    The complex of the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) and cAMP is an important transcriptional regulator of numerous genes in prokaryotes. The transport of mannitol through the phosphotransferase systems (PTS) is regulated by the CRP-cAMP complex. The aim of the study is to investigate how the CRP-cAMP complex acting on the mannitol PTS operon mtl of the Vibrio cholerae El Tor biotype. The crp mutant strain was generated by homologous recombination to assess the need of CRP to activate the mannitol PTS operon of V. cholerae El Tor. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and the reporter plasmid pBBRlux were used to confirm the role that the CRP-cAMP complex playing on the mannitol PTS operon mtl. In this study, we confirmed that CRP is strictly needed for the activation of the mtl operon. We further experimentally identified five CRP binding sites within the promoter region upstream of the mannitol PTS operon mtl of the Vibrio cholerae El Tor biotype and found that these sites display different affinities for CRP and provide different contributions to the activation of the operon. The five binding sites collectively confer the strong activation of mannitol transfer by CRP in V. cholerae, indicating an elaborate and subtle CRP activation mechanism. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  8. The Phosphorylation Status of a Cyclic AMP-Responsive Activator Is Modulated via a Chromatin-Dependent Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Laura F.; Asahara, Hiroshi; Shulman, Andrew I.; Kraus, W. Lee; Montminy, Marc

    2000-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) stimulates the expression of numerous genes via the protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of CREB at Ser133. Ser133 phosphorylation, in turn, promotes recruitment of the coactivator CREB binding protein and its paralog p300, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) that have been proposed to mediate target gene activation, in part, by destabilizing promoter bound nucleosomes and thereby allowing assembly of the transcriptional apparatus. Here we show that although histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors potentiate target gene activation via cAMP, they do not stimulate transcription over the early burst phase, during which CREB phosphorylation and CBP/p300 recruitment are maximal. Rather, HDAC inhibitors augment CREB activity during the late attenuation phase by prolonging CREB phosphorylation on chromosomal but, remarkably, not on extrachromosomal templates. In reconstitution studies, assembly of periodic nucleosomal arrays on a cAMP-responsive promoter template potently inhibited CREB phosphorylation by PKA, and acetylation of these template-bound nucleosomes by p300 partially rescued CREB phosphorylation by PKA. Our results suggest a novel regulatory mechanism by which cellular HATs and HDACs modulate the phosphorylation status of nuclear activators in response to cellular signals. PMID:10669737

  9. Comparison of phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins from HeLa and Krebs II ascites-tumour cells by cyclic AMP-dependent and cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issinger, O G; Beier, H; Speichermann, N

    1980-01-01

    Phosphorylation of eukaryotic ribosomal proteins in vitro by essentially homogeneous preparations of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit and cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase was compared. Each protein kinase was added at a concentration of 30nM. Ribosomal proteins were identi...

  10. Subcellular compartmentation, interdependency and dynamics of the cyclic AMP-dependent PKA subunits during pathogenic differentiation in rice blast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Poonguzhali; Tham, Hong Fai; Ramanujam, Ravikrishna; Naqvi, Naweed I

    2017-08-01

    The cAMP-dependent PKA signalling plays a central role in growth, asexual development and pathogenesis in fungal pathogens. Here, we functionally characterised RPKA, the regulatory subunit of cAMP/PKA and studied the dynamics and organisation of the PKA subunits in the rice blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. The RPKA subunit was essential for proper vegetative growth, asexual sporulation and surface hydrophobicity in M. oryzae. A spontaneous suppressor mutation, SMR19, that restored growth and conidiation in the RPKA deletion mutant was isolated and characterised. SMR19 enhanced conidiation and appressorium formation but failed to suppress the pathogenesis defects in rpkAΔ. The PKA activity was undetectable in the mycelial extracts of SMR19, which showed a single mutation (val242leu) in the highly conserved active site of the catalytic subunit (CPKA) of cAMP/PKA. The two subunits of cAMP/PKA showed different subcellular localisation patterns with RpkA being predominantly nucleocytoplasmic in conidia, while CpkA was largely cytosolic and/or vesicular. The CpkA anchored RpkA in cytoplasmic vesicles, and localisation of PKA in the cytoplasm was governed by CpkA in a cAMP-dependant or independent manner. We show that there exists a tight regulation of PKA subunits at the level of transcription, and the cAMP signalling is differentially compartmentalised in a stage-specific manner in rice blast. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. cAMP control of HCN2 channel Mg2+ block reveals loose coupling between the cyclic nucleotide-gating ring and the pore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex K Lyashchenko

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-regulated HCN channels underlie the Na+-K+ permeable IH pacemaker current. As with other voltage-gated members of the 6-transmembrane KV channel superfamily, opening of HCN channels involves dilation of a helical bundle formed by the intracellular ends of S6 albeit this is promoted by inward, not outward, displacement of S4. Direct agonist binding to a ring of cyclic nucleotide-binding sites, one of which lies immediately distal to each S6 helix, imparts cAMP sensitivity to HCN channel opening. At depolarized potentials, HCN channels are further modulated by intracellular Mg2+ which blocks the open channel pore and blunts the inhibitory effect of outward K+ flux. Here, we show that cAMP binding to the gating ring enhances not only channel opening but also the kinetics of Mg2+ block. A combination of experimental and simulation studies demonstrates that agonist acceleration of block is mediated via acceleration of the blocking reaction itself rather than as a secondary consequence of the cAMP enhancement of channel opening. These results suggest that the activation status of the gating ring and the open state of the pore are not coupled in an obligate manner (as required by the often invoked Monod-Wyman-Changeux allosteric model but couple more loosely (as envisioned in a modular model of protein activation. Importantly, the emergence of second messenger sensitivity of open channel rectification suggests that loose coupling may have an unexpected consequence: it may endow these erstwhile "slow" channels with an ability to exert voltage and ligand-modulated control over cellular excitability on the fastest of physiologically relevant time scales.

  12. Actions of neuropeptide Y on basal, cyclic AMP-induced and neurally evoked ion transport in porcine distal jejunum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D R; Boster, S L; Overend, M F; Parsons, A M; Treder, B G

    1990-06-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and its homolog, peptide YY, are present respectively in neurons and endocrine cells within the mammalian small intestine. In this study, we examined the actions of NPY on ion transport in the porcine distal jejunum mucosa-submucosa in vitro. Peptide YY and NPY were equieffective in producing rapid and sustained decreases in basal short-circuit current (Isc), a bioelectrical measure of active ion transport, eliciting half-maximal decreases at respective serosal concentrations of 0.8 and 30 nmol/l. NPY-induced changes in Isc were due to increased mucosa-to-serosa and net Cl fluxes and were not affected by the absence of extracellular HCO3 ions. NPY activity was correlated with the magnitude of the basal Isc and appeared to depend on the spontaneous production of eicosanoids. The peptide also decreased Isc stimulated by forskolin and 8-bromo-cyclic AMP, but the ionic bases for this effect were complex and differed from those determined under basal conditions. NPY attenuated increases in Isc produced by electrical stimulation of enteric neurons with an IC50 = 5 nmol/l. The actions of the peptide on basal and cyclic AMP-induced ion transport were abolished by the neuronal conduction blocker tetrodotoxin, but not by the opiate antagonist naloxone. The alpha-adrenoceptor blocker phentolamine diminished the effects of NPY on basal, but not cyclic AMP-induced Isc. These results indicate that NPY is capable of modulating NaCl transport in the porcine jejunal mucosa under several different conditions. Furthermore, the effects of the peptide are mediated in part through noradrenergic nerves as well as enteric neurons of unknown chemical identity.

  13. Changes in rodent thyroid hormones and cyclic-AMP following treatment with pineal indolic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nir, I; Hirschmann, N; Puder, M; Petrank, J

    1978-05-01

    Treatment of rats with pineal indolic compounds 5-methoxytryptophol, 5-hydroxytryptophol and serotonin brought about a significant increase in serum thyroxine levels, while serotonin and melatonin caused an increase in thyroid cAMP content with corresponding decrease in the gland's hormones. The total quantity of cAMP in the thyroid was also increased by melatonin in the organ culture system. All these findings would indicate that some of the pineal indoleamines elicit a direct action on the thyroid by stimulating the adenyl cyclase activity and intrathyroidal cAMP, bringing about increased release of thyroxine into the blood stream, and that this is usually not accompanied by adequate synthesis in the gland. Our observation that continuous darkness, which stimulates pineal activity, also brought about an increase in cAMP, concours with our finding of a stimulatory effect of the indolic compounds on thyroid hormone release.

  14. Response of cyclic AMP by DMSO differentiated HL-60 cells exposed to electric interferential current after prestimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontag, W

    2004-04-01

    The action of interferential current (IFC) upon intracellular content of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) after prestimulation with the chemotactic peptide N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP) has been investigated. Human promyelocytes (HL-60) differentiated to granulocytes by dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) have been treated with different concentrations of fMLP. This enhances their cAMP content. The half maximal effective concentration (EC50) was about 4 nM. Exposure to IFC with modulation frequencies of 35 and 125 Hz (5 min, 250 microA/cm2) after prestimulation with various concentrations of fMLP had no enhancing effect at low or high concentrations of fMLP. In contrast, at medium concentrations in the range of about 100 pM fMLP, a significant enhancement of cAMP could be observed. This synergistic effect of fMLP and IFC has been examined in detail by varying the modulation frequency, current density, and exposure time. Enhancement of cAMP content could be observed at certain modulation frequencies and exposure times suggesting a window effect, whereas for the current density in the range measured (8.5 microA/cm2-2.5 mA/cm2) a constant enhancement could be observed. The synergistic effect of fMLP and IFC could only be observed in the treatment sequence of fMLP followed by IFC; an inverse sequence had no effect on the cAMP content. . Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Proteomic and Metabolic Analyses of S49 Lymphoma Cells Reveal Novel Regulation of Mitochondria by cAMP and Protein Kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilderman, Andrea; Guo, Yurong; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Perkins, Guy; Zhang, Lingzhi; Murphy, Anne N; Taylor, Susan S; Insel, Paul A

    2015-09-04

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP), acting via protein kinase A (PKA), regulates many cellular responses, but the role of mitochondria in such responses is poorly understood. To define such roles, we used quantitative proteomic analysis of mitochondria-enriched fractions and performed functional and morphologic studies of wild-type (WT) and kin(-) (PKA-null) murine S49 lymphoma cells. Basally, 75 proteins significantly differed in abundance between WT and kin(-) S49 cells. WT, but not kin(-), S49 cells incubated with the cAMP analog 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)adenosine cAMP (CPT-cAMP) for 16 h have (a) increased expression of mitochondria-related genes and proteins, including ones in pathways of branched-chain amino acid and fatty acid metabolism and (b) increased maximal capacity of respiration on branched-chain keto acids and fatty acids. CPT-cAMP also regulates the cellular rate of ATP-utilization, as the rates of both ATP-linked respiration and proton efflux are decreased in WT but not kin(-) cells. CPT-cAMP protected WT S49 cells from glucose or glutamine deprivation, In contrast, CPT-cAMP did not protect kin(-) cells or WT cells treated with the PKA inhibitor H89 from glutamine deprivation. Under basal conditions, the mitochondrial structure of WT and kin(-) S49 cells is similar. Treatment with CPT-cAMP produced apoptotic changes (i.e. decreased mitochondrial density and size and loss of cristae) in WT, but not kin(-) cells. Together, these findings show that cAMP acts via PKA to regulate multiple aspects of mitochondrial function and structure. Mitochondrial perturbation thus likely contributes to cAMP/PKA-mediated cellular responses. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Identification of rat brain muscarinic M4 receptors coupled to cyclic AMP using the selective antagonist muscarinic toxin 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olianas, M C; Adem, A; Karlsson, E; Onali, P

    1998-09-18

    In membranes of olfactory tubercle and striatum, the selective muscarinic M4 receptor antagonist muscarinic toxin 3 completely antagonized the acetylcholine-induced inhibition of forskolin- and dopamine D1 receptor-stimulated cyclic AMP formation with Ki values of 7 and 4 nM, respectively. In olfactory bulb, where acetylcholine stimulated basal adenylyl cyclase activity and inhibited forskolin-stimulated enzyme activity, muscarinic toxin 3 caused a partial antagonism of both acetylcholine effects with high potencies (Ki values = 4-6 nM). In frontal cortex, muscarinic toxin 3 counteracted the acetylcholine-induced potentiation of corticotropin-releasing hormone-stimulated cyclic AMP with a Ki of 58 nM, which is close to the toxin affinity for the muscarinic M1 receptor. In the same brain region, the acetylcholine inhibition of forskolin-stimulated enzyme activity was not affected by muscarinic toxin 3. In microdissected regions of the hippocampus, a significant portion (33-48%) of the acetylcholine inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity was blocked by muscarinic toxin 3 with Ki values (6-8 nM) consistent with the involvement of muscarinic M4 receptors. These data show that muscarinic toxin 3 discriminates between adenylyl cyclase-coupled muscarinic receptors and demonstrate the utility of the toxin in identifying the relative contribution by the muscarinic M4 receptor subtype.

  17. Evidence of cAMP involvement in cellobiohydrolase expression and secretion by Trichoderma reesei in presence of the inducer sophorose

    OpenAIRE

    Nogueira, Karoline Maria Vieira; Costa, Mariana do Nascimento; de Paula, Renato Graciano; Mendonça-Natividade, Flávia Costa; Ricci-Azevedo, Rafael; Silva, Roberto Nascimento

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background The signaling second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates many aspects of cellular function in all organisms. Previous studies have suggested a role for cAMP in the regulation of gene expression of cellulolytic enzymes in Trichoderma reesei (anamorph of Hypocrea jecorina). Methods The effects of cAMP in T. reesei were analyzed through both acti...

  18. Attempt to demonstrate an in vivo effect of mianserin hydrochloride on erythrocyte Na+-K+-ATPase activity and cyclic AMP concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, G. S.; Buckley, D. E.; Boardman, L. J.; Smith, A. H. W.; Moody, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    1 There is evidence that erythrocyte Na+-K+-ATPase activity and erythrocyte cyclic AMP change on recovery from a depressive illness. Mianserin is a recently introduced antidepressant but its mode of action is unknown. The present study was therefore designed to investigate in vivo the effect of mianserin on erythrocyte Na+-K+-ATPase and cyclic AMP. 2 Biochemical estimations were made on blood from depressed patients before beginning either mianserin or matched placebo treatment, after 1 week, and again after 2 weeks' treatment. 3 Neither the erythrocyte Na+-K+-ATPase, nor the erythrocyte cyclic AMP concentration, changed significantly in either the mianserin- or the placebo-treated group. 4 The study sheds no light on the possible mechanism of action of mianserin. PMID:203308

  19. Parathyroid hormone promotes the disassembly of cytoskeletal actin and myosin in cultured osteoblastic cells: Mediation by cyclic AMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egan, J.J.; Gronowicz, G.; Rodan, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) alters the shape of osteoblastic cells both in vivo and in vitro. In this study, we examined the effect of PTH on cytoskeletal actin and myosin, estimated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of Triton X-100 (1%) nonextractable proteins. After 2-5 minutes, PTH caused a rapid and transient decrease of 50-60% in polymerized actin and myosin associated with the Triton X-100 nonextractable cytoskeleton. Polymerized actin returned to control levels by 30 min. The PTH effect was dose-dependent with an IC50 of about 1 nM, and was partially inhibited by the (3-34) PTH antagonist. PTH caused a rapid transient rise in cyclic AMP (cAMP) in these cells that peaked at 4 min, while the nadir in cytoskeletal actin and myosin was recorded around 5 min. The intracellular calcium chelator Quin-2/AM (10 microM) also decreased cytoskeletal actin and myosin, to the same extent as did PTH (100 nM). To distinguish between cAMP elevation and Ca++ reduction as mediators of PTH action, we measured the phosphorylation of the 20 kD (PI 4.9) myosin light chain in cells preincubated with [32P]-orthophosphate. The phosphorylation of this protein decreased within 2-3 min after PTH addition and returned to control levels after 5 min. The calcium ionophore A-23187 did not antagonize this PTH effect. Visualization of microfilaments with rhodamine-conjugated phalloidin showed that PTH altered the cytoskeleton by decreasing the number of stress fibers. These changes in the cytoskeleton paralleled changes in the shape of the cells from a spread configuration to a stellate form with retracting processes. The above findings indicate that the alteration in osteoblast shape produced by PTH involve relatively rapid and transient changes in cytoskeletal organization that appear to be mediated by cAMP

  20. High glucose enhances cAMP level and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in Chinese hamster ovary cell: Usage of Br-cAMP in foreign protein β-galactosidase expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiao-Hsien; Lee, Tsung-Yih; Liu, Ting-Wei; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2017-07-01

    Glucose is a carbon source for Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell growth, while low growth rate is considered to enhance the production of recombinant proteins. The present study reveals that glucose concentrations higher than 1 g/L reduce the growth rate and substantially increase in cAMP (∼300%) at a high glucose concentration (10 g/L). High glucose also enhances the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p27 kip by Western blot analysis. To determine whether the phosphorylation of ERK is involved in the mechanism, a cyclic-AMP dependent protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor (H-8) or MEK (MAPKK) inhibitor (PD98059) was added to block ERK phosphorylation. We show that both the high glucose-induced ERK phosphorylation and growth rate return to baseline levels. These results suggest that the cAMP/PKA and MAP signaling pathways are involved in the abovementioned mechanism. Interestingly, the direct addition of 8-bromo-cAMP (Br-cAMP), a membrane-permeable cAMP analog, can mimic the similar effects produced by high glucose. Subsequently Br-cAMP could induce β-galactosidase (β-Gal) recombinant protein expression by 1.6-fold. Furthermore, Br-cAMP can additionally enhance the β-Gal production (from 2.8- to 4.5-fold) when CHO cells were stimulated with glycerol, thymidine, dimethyl sulfoxide, pentanoic acid, or sodium butyrate. Thus, Br-cAMP may be used as an alternative agent in promoting foreign protein expression for CHO cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Toxoplasma gondii Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Subunit 3 Is Involved in the Switch from Tachyzoite to Bradyzoite Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuki Sugi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular apicomplexan parasite that infects warm-blooded vertebrates, including humans. Asexual reproduction in T. gondii allows it to switch between the rapidly replicating tachyzoite and quiescent bradyzoite life cycle stages. A transient cyclic AMP (cAMP pulse promotes bradyzoite differentiation, whereas a prolonged elevation of cAMP inhibits this process. We investigated the mechanism(s by which differential modulation of cAMP exerts a bidirectional effect on parasite differentiation. There are three protein kinase A (PKA catalytic subunits (TgPKAc1 to -3 expressed in T. gondii. Unlike TgPKAc1 and TgPKAc2, which are conserved in the phylum Apicomplexa, TgPKAc3 appears evolutionarily divergent and specific to coccidian parasites. TgPKAc1 and TgPKAc2 are distributed in the cytomembranes, whereas TgPKAc3 resides in the cytosol. TgPKAc3 was genetically ablated in a type II cyst-forming strain of T. gondii (PruΔku80Δhxgprt and in a type I strain (RHΔku80Δhxgprt, which typically does not form cysts. The Δpkac3 mutant exhibited slower growth than the parental and complemented strains, which correlated with a higher basal rate of tachyzoite-to-bradyzoite differentiation. 3-Isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX treatment, which elevates cAMP levels, maintained wild-type parasites as tachyzoites under bradyzoite induction culture conditions (pH 8.2/low CO2, whereas the Δpkac3 mutant failed to respond to the treatment. This suggests that TgPKAc3 is the factor responsible for the cAMP-dependent tachyzoite maintenance. In addition, the Δpkac3 mutant had a defect in the production of brain cysts in vivo, suggesting that a substrate of TgPKAc3 is probably involved in the persistence of this parasite in the intermediate host animals.

  2. Effects of histamine and activators of the cyclic AMP system on protein synthesis in and release of high molecular weight glycoproteins from isolated gastric non-parietal cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Heim, H. K.; Oestmann, A.; Sewing, K. F.

    1991-01-01

    1. Glycoprotein and protein synthesis in and release from pig isolated, enriched gastric mucous cells were measured by the incorporation of N-acetyl-[14C]-D-glucosamine and [3H]-L-leucine, respectively, into cellular and released acid precipitable material. 2. Histamine and activators of the adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) system maximally stimulated total protein and glycoprotein synthesis in and release from the cells at concentrations of histamine (10 microM), forskolin (...

  3. Protein kinases mediate increment of the phosphorylation of cyclic AMP -responsive element binding protein in spinal cord of rats following capsaicin injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Junfa

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Strong noxious stimuli cause plastic changes in spinal nociceptive neurons. Intracellular signal transduction pathways from cellular membrane to nucleus, which may further regulate gene expression by critical transcription factors, convey peripheral stimulation. Cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB is a well-characterized stimulus-induced transcription factor whose activation requires phosphorylation of the Serine-133 residue. Phospho-CREB can further induce gene transcription and strengthen synaptic transmission by the activation of the protein kinase cascades. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which CREB phosphorylation is regulated by protein kinases during nociception. This study was designed to use Western blot analysis to investigate the role of mitogen-activated protein (MAP/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK kinase (MEK 1/2, PKA and PKC in regulating the phosphorylation of CREB in the spinal cord of rats following intraplantar capsaicin injection. Results We found that capsaicin injection significantly increased the phosphorylation level of CREB in the ipsilateral side of the spinal cord. Pharmacological manipulation of MEK 1/2, PKA and PKC with their inhibitors (U0126, H89 and NPC 15473, respectively significantly blocked this increment of CREB phosphorylation. However, the expression of CREB itself showed no change in any group. Conclusion These findings suggest that the activation of intracellular MAP kinase, PKA and PKC cascades may contribute to the regulation of phospho-CREB in central nociceptive neurons following peripheral painful stimuli.

  4. The cyclic nucleotide monophosphate domain of Xanthomonas campestris global regulator Clp defines a new class of cyclic di-GMP effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Fei; He, Ya-Wen; Wu, Dong-Hui; Swarup, Sanjay; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2010-02-01

    The widely conserved second messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) plays a key role in quorum-sensing (QS)-dependent production of virulence factors in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. The detection of QS diffusible signal factor (DSF) by the sensor RpfC leads to the activation of response regulator RpfG, which activates virulence gene expression by degrading c-di-GMP. Here, we show that a global regulator in the X. campestris pv. campestris QS regulatory pathway, Clp, is a c-di-GMP effector. c-di-GMP specifically binds to Clp with high affinity and induces allosteric conformational changes that abolish the interaction between Clp and its target gene promoter. Clp is similar to the cyclic AMP (cAMP) binding proteins Crp and Vfr and contains a conserved cyclic nucleotide monophosphate (cNMP) binding domain. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we found that the cNMP binding domain of Clp contains a glutamic acid residue (E99) that is essential for c-di-GMP binding. Substituting the residue with serine (E99S) resulted in decreased sensitivity to changes in the intracellular c-di-GMP level and attenuated bacterial virulence. These data establish the direct role of Clp in the response to fluctuating c-di-GMP levels and depict a novel mechanism by which QS links the second messenger with the X. campestris pv. campestris virulence regulon.

  5. Export of cyclic AMP by avian red cells and inhibition by prostaglandin A1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heasley, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism by which PGA 1 inhibits cAMP export by avian red cells was studied, to provide details on the molecular mechanism of a prostaglandin action and on the process of cAMP export itself. The interaction of PGA 1 with pigeon red cells is a multi-step process of uptake, metabolism and secretion. [ 3 H]PGA rapidly enters red cells and is promptly metabolized (V/sub max/ ≥ 1 nmol/min/10 7 cells) to a compound (5) that remains in the aqueous layer after ethyl acetate extraction. Chromatographic analyses, amino acid content and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry reveal that the polar metabolite is conjugated with glutathione (PGA 1 -GSH) at C-11 via a thioether bond and is largely (80%) reduced to the C-9 hydroxyl derivative

  6. Cyclic AMP-dependent phosphorylation of a brain inositol trisphosphate receptor decreases its release of calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supattapone, S.; Danoff, S.K.; Theibert, A.; Joseph, S.K.; Steiner, J.; Snyder, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    The authors report the stoichiometric phosphorylation of an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor-binding protein from rat brain by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase but not by protein kinase C or Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase. This phosphorylation event does not markedly alter [ 3 H]inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-binding characteristics. However, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate is only 10% as potent in releasing 45 Ca 2+ from phosphorylated, as compared with native, cerebellar microsomes. Phosphorylation of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-binding protein by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase may provide a biochemical substrate for second-messenger cross talk

  7. High-throughput screening of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) using the caliper microfluidic platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Leonard J; Birkos, Steve; Hallam, Rhonda; Van De Carr, Gretchen; Arroway, Jamie; Suto, Carla M; Janzen, William P

    2009-01-01

    Inhibitors of kinase activities can be mechanistically diverse, genomically selective, and pathway sensitive. This potential has made these biological targets the focus of a number of drug discovery and development programs in the pharmaceutical industry. To this end, the high-throughput screening of kinase targets against diverse chemical libraries or focused compound collections is at the forefront of the drug discovery process. Thus, the platform technology used to screen such libraries must be flexible and produce reliable and comparable data. The Caliper HTS microfluidic platform provides a direct determination of a peptidic substrate and phosphorylated product through the electrophoretic separation of the two species. The resulting data are reliable and comparable among screens and cover a broad range of biological targets, provided there is a definable peptide substrate that permits separation. Here we present a method for the high-throughput screening of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) as an example of the simplicity of this microfluidic platform.

  8. Leptin interferes with 3',5'-Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate (cAMP signaling to inhibit steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HoYuen Basil

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity has been linked to an increased risk of female infertility. Leptin, an adipocytokine which is elevated during obesity, may influence gonadal function through modulating steroidogenesis in granulosa cells. Methods The effect of leptin on progesterone production in simian virus 40 immortalized granulosa (SVOG cells was examined by Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The effect of leptin on the expression of the steroidogenic enzymes (StAR, P450scc, 3betaHSD in SVOG cells was examined by real-time PCR and Western blotting. The mRNA expression of leptin receptor isoforms in SVOG cells were examined by using PCR. SVOG cells were co-treated with leptin and specific pharmacological inhibitors to identify the signaling pathways involved in leptin-reduced progesterone production. Silencing RNA against leptin receptor was used to determine that the inhibition of leptin on cAMP-induced steroidogenesis acts in a leptin receptor-dependent manner. Results and Conclusion In the present study, we investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying leptin-regulated steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells. We show that leptin inhibits 8-bromo cAMP-stimulated progesterone production in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, we show that leptin inhibits expression of the cAMP-stimulated steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR protein, the rate limiting de novo protein in progesterone synthesis. Leptin induces the activation of ERK1/2, p38 and JNK but only the ERK1/2 (PD98059 and p38 (SB203580 inhibitors attenuate the leptin-induced inhibition of cAMP-stimulated StAR protein expression and progesterone production. These data suggest that the leptin-induced MAPK signal transduction pathway interferes with cAMP/PKA-stimulated steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells. Moreover, siRNA mediated knock-down of the endogenous leptin receptor attenuates the effect of leptin on cAMP-induced StAR protein expression and progesterone

  9. The Global Regulatory Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein (CRP) Controls Multifactorial Fluoroquinolone Susceptibility in Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kary, Stefani C; Yoneda, Joshua R K; Olshefsky, Stephen C; Stewart, Laura A; West, Steven B; Cameron, Andrew D S

    2017-11-01

    Fluoroquinolone antibiotics are prescribed for the treatment of Salmonella enterica infections, but resistance to this family of antibiotics is growing. Here we report that loss of the global regulatory protein cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) or its allosteric effector, cAMP, reduces susceptibility to fluoroquinolones. A Δ crp mutation was synergistic with the primary fluoroquinolone resistance allele gyrA83 , thus able to contribute to clinically relevant resistance. Decreased susceptibility to fluoroquinolones could be partly explained by decreased expression of the outer membrane porin genes ompA and ompF with a concomitant increase in the expression of the ciprofloxacin resistance efflux pump gene acrB in Δ crp cells. Expression of gyrAB , which encode the DNA supercoiling enzyme GyrAB, which is blocked by fluoroquinolones, and expression of topA , which encodes the dominant supercoiling-relaxing enzyme topoisomerase I, were unchanged in Δ crp cells. Yet Δ crp cells maintained a more relaxed state of DNA supercoiling, correlating with an observed increase in topoisomerase IV ( parCE ) expression. Surprisingly, the Δ crp mutation had the unanticipated effect of enhancing fitness in the presence of fluoroquinolone antibiotics, which can be explained by the observation that exposure of Δ crp cells to ciprofloxacin had the counterintuitive effect of restoring wild-type levels of DNA supercoiling. Consistent with this, Δ crp cells did not become elongated or induce the SOS response when challenged with ciprofloxacin. These findings implicate the combined action of multiple drug resistance mechanisms in Δ crp cells: reduced permeability and elevated efflux of fluoroquinolones coupled with a relaxed DNA supercoiling state that buffers cells against GyrAB inhibition by fluoroquinolones. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Enhanced phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element binding protein in Brain of mice following repetitive hypoxic exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yanan; Gao Ge; Long Caixia; Han Song; Zu Pengyu; Fang Li; Li Junfa

    2006-01-01

    Cerebral ischemic/hypoxic preconditioning (I/HPC) is a phenomenon of endogenous protection that renders Brain tolerant to sustained ischemia/hypoxia. This profound protection induced by I/HPC makes it an attractive target for developing potential clinical therapeutic approaches. However, the molecular mechanism of I/HPC is unclear. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB), a selective nuclear transcriptional factor, plays a key role in the neuronal functions. Phosphorylation of CREB on Ser-133 may facilitate its transcriptional activity in response to various stresses. In the current study, we observed the changes in CREB phosphorylation (Ser-133) and protein expression in Brain of auto-hypoxia-induced HPC mice by using Western blot analysis. We found that the levels of phosphorylated CREB (Ser-133), but not protein expression of CREB, increased significantly (p < 0.05) in the hippocampus and the frontal cortex of mice after repetitive hypoxic exposure (H2-H4, n = 6 for each group), when compared to that of the normoxic (H0, n = 6) or hypoxic exposure once group (H1, n = 6). In addition, a significant enhancement (p < 0.05) of CREB phosphorylation (Ser-133) could also be found in the nuclear extracts from the whole hippocampus of hypoxic preconditioned mice (H2-H4, n = 6 for each group). These results suggest that the phosphorylation of CREB might be involved in the development of cerebral hypoxic preconditioning

  11. Identification and Characterization of Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein H Response Element in the Human Apolipoprotein A5 Gene Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Hoon Song

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The cyclic AMP response element-binding protein H (CREBH plays important roles in hepatic lipogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, and lipolysis under metabolic stress. Here, we report CREBH as a novel regulator of human APOA5. Knockdown of endogenous CREBH expression via small interfering RNA resulted in the downregulation of human APOA5 mRNA expression in human hepatoma cells, HepG2. Sequence analysis suggested that putative CREBH response element (CREBHRE is located in the human APOA5 promoter region and is highly conserved in both human and rodent. To clarify whether the human APOA5 promoter is regulated by CREBH, we analyzed the human APOA5 promoter region using a transient transfection assay and determined that transfection of CREBH induced human APOA5 promoter activity. Moreover, it was shown that CREBH directly regulated human APOA5 gene expression by binding to a unique CREBHRE located in the proximal human APOA5 promoter region, using 5′-deletion and mutagenesis of human APOA5 promoter analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Taken together, our results demonstrated that human APOA5 is directly regulated by CREBH via CREBHRE and provided a new insight into the role of this liver-specific bZIP transcription factor in lipoprotein metabolism and triglyceride homeostasis.

  12. Dual effects of muscarinic M2 acetylcholine receptors on the synthesis of cyclic AMP in CHO cells: dependence on time, receptor density and receptor agonists

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michal, Pavel; Lysíková, Michaela; Tuček, Stanislav

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 132, č. 6 (2001), s. 1217-1228 ISSN 0007-1188 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/99/0214; GA AV ČR IAA7011910 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : cyclic AMP * muscarinic receptors * CHO cells Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.502, year: 2001

  13. Effect of Increased Cyclic AMP Concentration on Muscle Protein Synthesis and Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Expression in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Vaughn, J. R.; Bridge, K. Y.; Smith, C. K.

    1998-01-01

    Analogies of epinephrine are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle when fed to animals. These compounds presumably exert their physiological action through interaction with the P-adrenergic receptor. Since the intracellular signal generated by the Beta-adrenergic receptor is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in cell culture to determine if artificial elevation of cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter muscle protein metabolism and P-adrenergic receptor expression. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were treated with 0.2-30 micrometers forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the treatment period, both the concentration of cAMP and the quantity of myosin heavy chain (MHC) were measured. Concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. In contrast, the quantity of MHC was increased approximately 50% above control cells at 0.2 micrometers forskolin, but exhibited a gradual decline at higher levels of forskolin so that the quantity of MHC in cells treated with 30 micrometers forskolin was not significantly different from controls. Curiously, the intracellular concentration of cAMP which elicited the maximum increase in the quantity of MHC was only 40% higher than cAMP concentration in control cells.

  14. Cyclic nucleotide dependent dephosphorylation of regulator of G-protein signaling 18 in human platelets.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gegenbauer, Kristina

    2013-11-01

    Regulator of G-protein signaling 18 (RGS18) is a GTPase-activating protein that turns off Gq signaling in platelets. RGS18 is regulated by binding to the adaptor protein 14-3-3 via phosphorylated serine residues S49 and S218 on RGS18. In this study we confirm that thrombin, thromboxane A2, or ADP stimulate the interaction of RGS18 and 14-3-3 by increasing the phosphorylation of S49. Cyclic AMP- and cyclic GMP-dependent kinases (PKA, PKG) inhibit the interaction of RGS18 and 14-3-3 by phosphorylating S216. To understand the effect of S216 phosphorylation we studied the phosphorylation kinetics of S49, S216, and S218 using Phos-tag gels and phosphorylation site-specific antibodies in transfected cells and in platelets. Cyclic nucleotide-induced detachment of 14-3-3 from RGS18 coincides initially with double phosphorylation of S216 and S218. This is followed by dephosphorylation of S49 and S218. Dephosphorylation of S49 and S218 might be mediated by protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) which is linked to RGS18 by the regulatory subunit PPP1R9B (spinophilin). We conclude that PKA and PKG induced S216 phosphorylation triggers the dephosphorylation of the 14-3-3 binding sites of RGS18 in platelets.

  15. PdeH, a high-affinity cAMP phosphodiesterase, is a key regulator of asexual and pathogenic differentiation in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravikrishna Ramanujam

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP-dependent pathways mediate the communication between external stimuli and the intracellular signaling machinery, thereby influencing important aspects of cellular growth, morphogenesis and differentiation. Crucial to proper function and robustness of these signaling cascades is the strict regulation and maintenance of intracellular levels of cAMP through a fine balance between biosynthesis (by adenylate cyclases and hydrolysis (by cAMP phosphodiesterases. We functionally characterized gene-deletion mutants of a high-affinity (PdeH and a low-affinity (PdeL cAMP phosphodiesterase in order to gain insights into the spatial and temporal regulation of cAMP signaling in the rice-blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. In contrast to the expendable PdeL function, the PdeH activity was found to be a key regulator of asexual and pathogenic development in M. oryzae. Loss of PdeH led to increased accumulation of intracellular cAMP during vegetative and infectious growth. Furthermore, the pdeHDelta showed enhanced conidiation (2-3 fold, precocious appressorial development, loss of surface dependency during pathogenesis, and highly reduced in planta growth and host colonization. A pdeHDelta pdeLDelta mutant showed reduced conidiation, exhibited dramatically increased (approximately 10 fold cAMP levels relative to the wild type, and was completely defective in virulence. Exogenous addition of 8-Br-cAMP to the wild type simulated the pdeHDelta defects in conidiation as well as in planta growth and development. While a fully functional GFP-PdeH was cytosolic but associated dynamically with the plasma membrane and vesicular compartments, the GFP-PdeL localized predominantly to the nucleus. Based on data from cAMP measurements and Real-Time RTPCR, we uncover a PdeH-dependent biphasic regulation of cAMP levels during early and late stages of appressorial development in M. oryzae. We propose that PdeH-mediated sustenance and dynamic regulation of cAMP signaling

  16. Acute morphine alters GABAergic transmission in the central amygdala during naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal: role of cyclic AMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal eBajo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The central amygdala (CeA plays an important role in opioid addiction. Therefore, we examined the effects of naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal (WD on GABAergic transmission in rat CeA neurons using whole-cell recordings with naloxone in the bath. The basal frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs increased in CeA neurons from WD compared to placebo rats. Acute morphine (10 M had mixed effects (> 20% change from baseline on mIPSCs in placebo and WD rats. In most CeA neurons (64% from placebo rats, morphine significantly decreased mIPSC frequency and amplitude. In 32% of placebo neurons, morphine significantly increased mIPSC amplitudes but had no effect on mIPSC frequency. In WD rats, acute morphine significantly increased mIPSC frequency but had no effect on mIPSC amplitude in 41% of CeA neurons. In 45% of cells, acute morphine significantly decreased mIPSC frequency and amplitude. Pre-treatment with the cyclic AMP inhibitor (R-adenosine, cyclic 3’,5’-(hydrogenphosphorothioate triethylammonium (RP, prevented acute morphine-induced potentiation of mIPSCs. Pre-treatment of slices with the Gi/o G-protein subunit inhibitor pertussis toxin (PTX did not prevent the acute morphine-induced enhancement or inhibition of mIPSCs. PTX and RP decreased basal mIPSC frequencies and amplitudes only in WD rats. The results suggest that inhibition of GABAergic transmission in the CeA by acute morphine is mediated by PTX-insensitive mechanisms, although PTX-sensitive mechanisms cannot be ruled out for non-morphine responsive cells; by contrast, potentiation of GABAergic transmission is mediated by activated cAMP signaling that also mediates the increased basal GABAergic transmission in WD rats. Our data indicate that during the acute phase of WD, the CeA opioid and GABAergic systems undergo neuroadaptative changes conditioned by a previous chronic morphine exposure and dependence.

  17. PKA and PDE4D3 anchoring to AKAP9 provides distinct regulation of cAMP signals at the centrosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrin, Anna; Monterisi, Stefania; Stangherlin, Alessandra; Zoccarato, Anna; Koschinski, Andreas; Surdo, Nicoletta C.; Mongillo, Marco; Sawa, Akira; Jordanides, Niove E.; Mountford, Joanne C.

    2012-01-01

    Previous work has shown that the protein kinase A (PKA)–regulated phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4D3 binds to A kinase–anchoring proteins (AKAPs). One such protein, AKAP9, localizes to the centrosome. In this paper, we investigate whether a PKA–PDE4D3–AKAP9 complex can generate spatial compartmentalization of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling at the centrosome. Real-time imaging of fluorescence resonance energy transfer reporters shows that centrosomal PDE4D3 modulated a dynamic microdomain within which cAMP concentration selectively changed over the cell cycle. AKAP9-anchored, centrosomal PKA showed a reduced activation threshold as a consequence of increased autophosphorylation of its regulatory subunit at S114. Finally, disruption of the centrosomal cAMP microdomain by local displacement of PDE4D3 impaired cell cycle progression as a result of accumulation of cells in prophase. Our findings describe a novel mechanism of PKA activity regulation that relies on binding to AKAPs and consequent modulation of the enzyme activation threshold rather than on overall changes in cAMP levels. Further, we provide for the first time direct evidence that control of cell cycle progression relies on unique regulation of centrosomal cAMP/PKA signals. PMID:22908311

  18. cAMP Regulation of the lactose operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2004-05-01

    Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: lactose operon, adenylate cyclase, cAMP, catabolite activator protein (CAP), expression plasmid, lac operator, lac repressor, lactose, glucose, promoter, cis- and trans-acting factors. Copyright © 2004 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. The small molecule triclabendazole decreases the intracellular level of cyclic AMP and increases resistance to stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Joo Lee

    Full Text Available The Ras-adenylyl cyclase-protein kinase A nutrient-sensing pathway controls metabolism, proliferation and resistance to stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The genetic disruption of this pathway increases resistance to a variety of stresses. We show here that the pharmacological inhibition of this pathway by the drug triclabendazole increases resistance to oxidants, heat stress and extends the chronological life. Evidence is presented that triclabendazole decreases the intracellular level of cyclic AMP by inhibiting adenylyl cyclase and triggers the parallel rapid translocation of the stress-resistance transcription factor Msn2 from the cytosol into the nucleus, as deduced from experiments employing a strain in which MSN2 is replaced with MSN2-GFP (GFP, green fluorescent protein. Msn2 and Msn4 are responsible for activating the transcription of numerous genes that encode proteins that protect cells from stress. The results are consistent with triclabendazole either inhibiting the association of Ras with adenylyl cyclase or directly inhibiting adenylyl cyclase, which in turn triggers Msn2/4 to enter the nucleus and activate stress-responsible element gene expression.

  20. Monosodium glutamate neurotoxicity increases beta amyloid in the rat hippocampus: a potential role for cyclic AMP protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dief, Abeer E; Kamha, Eman S; Baraka, Azza M; Elshorbagy, Amany K

    2014-05-01

    Glutamate excitotoxicity and cyclic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) are both recognized as important mediators in neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). To investigate whether oral or subcutaneous monosodium glutamate (MSG) neurotoxicity mimics some features of AD and whether these can be reversed by the AMPK activator Pioglitazone. Male Wistar rats aged 5 weeks were administered oral or subcutaneous MSG for 10 days with or without daily oral Pioglitazone. Two additional groups given only saline orally or subcutaneously acted as controls. At age 10 weeks the rats were subjected to neurobehavioral testing, then sacrificed for measurement of AMPK, β-amyloid and Fas ligand in the hippocampus. Oral and subcutaneous MSG both induced a lowering of hippocampal AMPK by 43% and 31% respectively (P2-fold increase in hippocampal Fas ligand, a mediator of apoptosis (P4-fold and >5-fold in the oral and subcutaneous groups. This was associated with increased latency before crossing to the white half in the black-white alley and before the first rear in the holeboard test, suggesting increased anxiety. Pioglitazone decreased hippocampal β-amyloid accumulation and Fas ligand, but did not ameliorate the neurobehavioural deficits induced by MSG. MSG treatment enhances β-amyloid accumulation in the rat hippocampus. Our results suggest a role for AMPK reduction in mediating the neurotoxic effects of glutamate, including β-amyloid accumulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) enhances cAMP-responsive element binding (CREB) protein phosphorylation and phospho-CREB interaction with the mouse steroidogenic acute regulatory protein gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clem, Brian F; Hudson, Elizabeth A; Clark, Barbara J

    2005-03-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) transcription is regulated through cAMP-protein kinase A-dependent mechanisms that involve multiple transcription factors including the cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) family members. Classically, binding of phosphorylated CREB to cis-acting cAMP-responsive elements (5'-TGACGTCA-3') within target gene promoters leads to recruitment of the coactivator CREB binding protein (CBP). Herein we examined the extent of CREB family member phosphorylation on protein-DNA interactions and CBP recruitment with the StAR promoter. Immunoblot analysis revealed that CREB, cAMP-responsive element modulator (CREM), and activating transcription factor (ATF)-1 are expressed in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells, yet only CREB and ATF-1 are phosphorylated. (Bu)2cAMP treatment of MA-10 cells increased CREB phosphorylation approximately 2.3-fold within 30 min but did not change total nuclear CREB expression levels. Using DNA-affinity chromatography, we now show that CREB and ATF-1, but not CREM, interact with the StAR promoter, and this interaction is dependent on the activator protein-1 (AP-1) cis-acting element within the cAMP-responsive region. In addition, (Bu)2cAMP-treatment increased phosphorylated CREB (P-CREB) association with the StAR promoter but did not influence total CREB interaction. In vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated CREB binding to the StAR proximal promoter is independent of (Bu)2cAMP-treatment, confirming our in vitro analysis. However, (Bu)2cAMP-treatment increased P-CREB and CBP interaction with the StAR promoter, demonstrating for the first time the physical role of P-CREB:DNA interactions in CBP recruitment to the StAR proximal promoter.

  2. Inhibition of cyclic AMP response element-directed transcription by decoy oligonucleotides enhances tumor-specific radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Serk In, E-mail: serkin@korea.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); The BK21 Plus Program for Biomedical Sciences, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Medicine and Center for Bone Biology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Park, Sung-Jun [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Laboratory of Obesity and Aging Research, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Lee, Junghan; Kim, Hye Eun; Park, Su Jin; Sohn, Jeong-Won [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yun Gyu, E-mail: parkyg@korea.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    The radiation stress induces cytotoxic responses of cell death as well as cytoprotective responses of cell survival. Understanding exact cellular mechanism and signal transduction pathways is important in improving cancer radiotherapy. Increasing evidence suggests that cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB)/activating transcription factor (ATF) family proteins act as a survival factor and a signaling molecule in response to stress. We postulated that CREB inhibition via CRE decoy oligonucleotide increases tumor cell sensitization to γ-irradiation-induced cytotoxic stress. In the present study, we demonstrate that CREB phosphorylation and CREB DNA-protein complex formation increased in time- and radiation dose-dependent manners, while there was no significant change in total protein level of CREB. In addition, CREB was phosphorylated in response to γ-irradiation through p38 MAPK pathway. Further investigation revealed that CREB blockade by decoy oligonucleotides functionally inhibited transactivation of CREB, and significantly increased radiosensitivity of multiple human cancer cell lines including TP53- and/or RB-mutated cells with minimal effects on normal cells. We also demonstrate that tumor cells ectopically expressing dominant negative mutant CREB (KCREB) and the cells treated with p38 MAPK inhibitors were more sensitive to γ-irradiation than wild type parental cells or control-treated cells. Taken together, we conclude that CREB protects tumor cells from γ-irradiation, and combination of CREB inhibition plus ionizing radiation will be a promising radiotherapeutic approach. - Highlights: • γ-Irradiation induced CREB phosphorylation and CRE-directed transcription in tumor. • γ-Irradiation-induced transcriptional activation of CREB was via p38 MAPK pathway. • CRE blockade increased radiosensitivity of tumor cells but not of normal cells. • CRE decoy oligonucleotides or p38 MAPK inhibitors can be used as radiosensitizers.

  3. The progestin levonorgestrel induces endothelium-independent relaxation of rabbit jugular vein via inhibition of calcium entry and protein kinase C: role of cyclic AMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herkert, Olaf; Kuhl, Herbert; Busse, Rudi; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2000-01-01

    The progestin and oestrogen component of oral contraceptives have been involved in the development of venous thromboembolic events in women. In the present study we determined the vasoactive effects of sex steroids used in oral contraceptives in isolated preconstricted rabbit jugular veins in the presence of diclofenac and examined the underlying mechanisms.The natural hormone progesterone, the synthetic progestins levonorgestrel, 3-keto-desogestrel, gestodene and chlormadinone acetate, and the synthetic estrogen 17 α-ethinyloestradiol induced concentration-dependent relaxations of endothelium-intact veins constricted with U46619. Levonorgestrel also inhibited constrictions evoked by either a high potassium (K+) solution or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) in the absence and presence of extracellular calcium (Ca2+). In addition, levonorgestrel depressed contractions evoked by Ca2+ and reduced 45Ca2+ influx in depolarized veins.Relaxations to levonorgestrel in U46619-constricted veins were neither affected by the presence of the endothelium nor by the inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase, NS2028, but were significantly improved either by the selective cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram or in the absence of diclofenac, and decreased by the protein kinase A inhibitor, Rp-8-CPT-cAMPS. Rolipram also potentiated relaxations to levonorgestrel in PMA-constricted veins in the presence, but not in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. Levonorgestrel increased levels of cyclic AMP and inhibited PMA-induced activation of protein kinase C in veins.These findings indicate that levonorgestrel caused endothelium-independent relaxations of jugular veins via inhibition of Ca2+ entry and of protein kinase C activation. In addition, the cyclic AMP effector pathway contributes to the levonorgestrel-induced relaxation possibly by depressing Ca2+ entry. PMID:10952682

  4. Pseudomonas aeruginosa AmpR: an acute–chronic switch regulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramanian, Deepak; Kumari, Hansi; Mathee, Kalai

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most intractable human pathogens that pose serious clinical challenge due to extensive prevalence of multidrug-resistant clinical isolates. Armed with abundant virulence and antibiotic resistance mechanisms, it is a major etiologic agent in a number of acute and chronic infections. A complex and intricate network of regulators dictates the expression of pathogenicity factors in P. aeruginosa. Some proteins within the network play key roles and control multiple pathways. This review discusses the role of one such protein, AmpR, which was initially recognized for its role in antibiotic resistance by regulating AmpC β-lactamase. Recent genomic, proteomic and phenotypic analyses demonstrate that AmpR regulates expression of hundreds of genes that are involved in diverse pathways such as β-lactam and non-β-lactam resistance, quorum sensing and associated virulence phenotypes, protein phosphorylation, and physiological processes. Finally, ampR mutations in clinical isolates are reviewed to shed light on important residues required for its function in antibiotic resistance. The prevalence and evolutionary implications of AmpR in pathogenic and nonpathogenic proteobacteria are also discussed. A comprehensive understanding of proteins at nodal positions in the P. aeruginosa regulatory network is crucial in understanding, and ultimately targeting, the pathogenic stratagems of this organism. PMID:25066236

  5. Spatiotemporal regulation of cAMP signaling controls the human trophoblast fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbaud, Pascale; Taskén, Kjetil; Pidoux, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    During human placentation, mononuclear cytotrophoblasts fuse to form multinucleated syncytia ensuring hormonal production and nutrient exchanges between the maternal and fetal circulation. Syncytial formation is essential for the maintenance of pregnancy and for fetal growth. The cAMP signaling pathway is the major route to trigger trophoblast fusion and its activation results in phosphorylation of specific intracellular target proteins, in transcription of fusogenic genes and assembly of macromolecular protein complexes constituting the fusogenic machinery at the plasma membrane. Specificity in cAMP signaling is ensured by generation of localized pools of cAMP controlled by cAMP phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and by discrete spatial and temporal activation of protein kinase A (PKA) in supramolecular signaling clusters inside the cell organized by A-kinase-anchoring proteins (AKAPs) and by organization of signal termination by protein phosphatases (PPs). Here we present original observations on the available components of the cAMP signaling pathway in the human placenta including PKA, PDE, and PP isoforms as well as AKAPs. We continue to discuss the current knowledge of the spatiotemporal regulation of cAMP signaling triggering trophoblast fusion. PMID:26441659

  6. Cyclic di-AMP-mediated interaction between Mycobacterium tuberculosis ΔcnpB and macrophages implicates a novel strategy for improving BCG vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Yang, Jun; Bai, Guangchun

    2018-01-31

    Cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP) has been shown to play an important role in bacterial physiology and pathogen-host interactions. We previously reported that deletion of the sole c-di-AMP phosphodiesterase-encoding gene (cnpB) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) led to significant virulence attenuation. In this study, we found that ΔcnpB of M. bovis BCG (BCG) was unable to secrete c-di-AMP, which differs from Mtb ΔcnpB. We infected bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) with c-di-AMP-associated mutants generated from both Mtb and BCG. Our results showed that upon infection with Mtb ΔcnpB, BMDMs of WT mice secreted a large amount of interferon-β (IFN-β) post-infection similarly as we reported previously. In contrast, the response was less pronounced with BMDMs isolated from cGAS-/- mice and was nearly abolished with BMDMs prepared from STING-/- mice. Deletion of the region of difference 1 (RD1) locus in Mtb ΔcnpB did not alter the c-di-AMP secretion of ΔcnpB but eliminated the IFN-β production in the infected cells. In contrast, neither BCG ΔcnpB nor a recombinant BCG ΔcnpB with a pRD1 cosmid induced a type I interferon response. Interestingly, multiple studies have demonstrated that type I IFN enhances BCG's immunity. Thus, amending BCG based on our findings might improve BCG vaccination. © FEMS 2018. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Mechanism of nuclear calcium signaling by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate produced in the nucleus, nuclear located protein kinase C and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Christian; Malviya, Anant N

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear phospholipase C-gamma 1 can be phosphorylated by nuclear membrane located epidermal growth factor receptor sequel to epidermal growth factor-mediated signaling to the nucleus. The function of mouse liver phospholipase C-gamma 1 is attributed to a 120 kDa protein fragment which has been found to be a proteolytic product of the 150 kDa native nuclear enzyme. The tyrosine-phosphorylated 120 kDa protein band interacts with activated EGFR, binds phosphatidyl-3-OH kinase enhancer, and activates nuclear phosphatidylinositol-3-OH-kinase, and is capable of generating diacylglycerol in response to the epidermal growth factor signal to the nucleus in vivo. Thus a mechanism for nuclear production of inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate is unraveled. Nuclear generated inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate interacts with the inner membrane located inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate receptor and sequesters calcium into the nucleoplasm. Nuclear inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate receptor is phosphorylated by native nuclear protein kinase C which enhances the receptor-ligand interaction. Nuclear calcium-ATPase and inositol-1,3,4,5-tetrakisphophate receptor are located on the outer nuclear membrane, thus facilitating calcium transport into the nuclear envelope lumen either by ATP or inositol-1,3,4,5-tetrakisphophate depending upon the external free calcium concentrations. Nuclear calcium ATPase is phosphorylated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase with enhanced calcium pumping activity. A holistic picture emerges here where tyrosine phosphorylation compliments serine phosphorylation of key moieties regulating nuclear calcium signaling. Evidence are forwarded in favor of proteolysis having a profound implications in nuclear calcium homeostasis in particular and signal transduction in general.

  8. The cyclic AMP receptor protein, CRP, is required for both virulence and expression of the minimal CRP regulon in Yersinia pestis biovar microtus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Lingjun; Han, Yanping; Yang, Lei; Geng, Jing; Li, Yingli; Gao, He; Guo, Zhaobiao; Fan, Wei; Li, Gang; Zhang, Lianfeng; Qin, Chuan; Zhou, Dongsheng; Yang, Ruifu

    2008-11-01

    The cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) is a bacterial regulator that controls more than 100 promoters, including those involved in catabolite repression. In the present study, a null deletion of the crp gene was constructed for Yersinia pestis bv. microtus strain 201. Microarray expression analysis disclosed that at least 6% of Y. pestis genes were affected by this mutation. Further reverse transcription-PCR and electrophoretic mobility shift assay analyses disclosed a set of 37 genes or putative operons to be the direct targets of CRP, and thus they constitute the minimal CRP regulon in Y. pestis. Subsequent primer extension and DNase I footprinting assays mapped transcriptional start sites, core promoter elements, and CRP binding sites within the DNA regions upstream of pla and pst, revealing positive and direct control of these two laterally acquired plasmid genes by CRP. The crp disruption affected both in vitro and in vivo growth of the mutant and led to a >15,000-fold loss of virulence after subcutaneous infection but a pestis and, particularly, is more important for infection by subcutaneous inoculation. It can further be concluded that the reduced in vivo growth phenotype of the crp mutant should contribute, at least partially, to its attenuation of virulence by both routes of infection. Consistent with a previous study of Y. pestis bv. medievalis, lacZ reporter fusion analysis indicated that the crp deletion resulted in the almost absolute loss of pla promoter activity. The plasminogen activator encoded by pla was previously shown to specifically promote Y. pestis dissemination from peripheral infection routes (subcutaneous infection [flea bite] or inhalation). The above evidence supports the notion that in addition to the reduced in vivo growth phenotype, the defect of pla expression in the crp mutant will greatly contribute to the huge loss of virulence of this mutant strain in subcutaneous infection.

  9. Bone Abnormalities in Mice with Protein Kinase A (PKA) Defects Reveal a Role of Cyclic AMP Signaling in Bone Stromal Cell-Dependent Tumor Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S; Shapiro, J M; Saloustros, E; Stratakis, C A

    2016-11-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is an important enzyme for all eukaryotic cells. PKA phosphorylates other proteins, thus, it is essential for the regulation of many diverse cellular functions, including cytoplasmic trafficking and signaling, organelle structure and mitochondrial oxidation, nuclear gene expression, the cell cycle, and cellular division. The PKA holoenzyme is composed of 2 regulatory and 2 catalytic subunits. Four regulatory (R1α, R1β, R2α, and R2β) and 4 catalytic subunits (Cα, Cβ, Cγ, and Prkx) have been identified, giving rise to mainly PKA-I (when the 2 regulatory subunits are either R1α or R1β), or PKA-II (when the 2 regulatory subunits are either R2α or R2β). Mutations in the PKA subunits can lead to altered total PKA activity or abnormal PKA-I to PKA-II ratio, leading to various abnormalities in both humans and mice. These effects can be tissue-specific. We studied the effect of PKA subunit defects on PKA activity and bone morphology of mice that were single or double heterozygous for null alleles of the various PKA subunit genes. Bone lesions including fibrous dysplasia, myxomas, osteo-sarcomas, -chondromas and -chondrosarcomas were found in these mice. Observational and molecular studies showed that these lesions were derived from bone stromal cells (BSCs). We conclude that haploinsufficiency for different PKA subunit genes affected bone lesion formation, new bone generation, organization, and mineralization in variable ways. This work identified a PKA subunit- and activity-dependent pathway of bone lesion formation from BSCs with important implications for understanding how cyclic AMP affects the skeleton and its tumorigenesis. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Convergent Transcriptional Programs Regulate cAMP Levels in C. elegans GABAergic Motor Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bin; Wang, Xiaolin; Wei, Shuai; Fu, Tao; Dzakah, Emmanuel Enoch; Waqas, Ahmed; Walthall, Walter W; Shan, Ge

    2017-10-23

    Both transcriptional regulation and signaling pathways play crucial roles in neuronal differentiation and plasticity. Caenorhabditis elegans possesses 19 GABAergic motor neurons (MNs) called D MNs, which are divided into two subgroups: DD and VD. DD, but not VD, MNs reverse their cellular polarity in a developmental process called respecification. UNC-30 and UNC-55 are two critical transcription factors in D MNs. By using chromatin immunoprecipitation with CRISPR/Cas9 knockin of GFP fusion, we uncovered the global targets of UNC-30 and UNC-55. UNC-30 and UNC-55 are largely converged to regulate over 1,300 noncoding and coding genes, and genes in multiple biological processes, including cAMP metabolism, are co-regulated. Increase in cAMP levels may serve as a timing signal for respecification, whereas UNC-55 regulates genes such as pde-4 to keep the cAMP levels low in VD. Other genes modulating DD respecification such as lin-14, irx-1, and oig-1 are also found to affect cAMP levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of glucagon on cyclic AMP, albumin metabolism and incorporation of 14C-leucine into proteins in isolated parenchymal rat liver cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dich, J; Gluud, C N

    1976-01-01

    wet wt. This is about the rate found in the perfused liver, Glucagon (10(-8-10(-6) M) inhibited albumin secretion and the incorporation of 14C-leucine into albumin, into total proteins in the medium and into total proteins in the cell suspension. The effect of glucagon on albumin secretion...... is compatible with an effect on the rate of synthesis. A positive correlation existed between the maximal level of cyclic AMP after glucagon administration and the inhibition of both albumin secretion and the incorporation of 149leucine....

  12. Electrophysiological and biochemical studies of slow responses to serotonin and dopamine of snail identified neurons. Mediating role of the cyclic AMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deterre, Philippe

    1983-01-01

    In this research thesis, the electrophysiological study of slow incoming currents induced in some identified neurons of the Helix aspersa snail by serotonin and dopamine shows that they are associated with a decrease of a potassium conductance involved in the modulation of the action potential duration. By means of enzymatic tests performed on a single cell, and of electrophysiological experiments, the author shows that the cyclic AMP is an intracellular mediator involved in the genesis of these slow responses. Moreover, the obtained results show that serotonin and dopamine act by binding to specific receptors, and that these receptors activate the adenylate-cyclase through a GTP binding protein [fr

  13. Redox regulation of the AMP-activated protein kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Han

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Redox state is a critical determinant of cell function, and any major imbalances can cause severe damage or death.The aim of this study is to determine if AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, a cellular energy sensor, is activated by oxidants generated by Berberine in endothelial cells (EC.Bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC were exposed to Berberine. AMPK activity and reactive oxygen species were monitored after the incubation.In BAEC, Berberine caused a dose- and time-dependent increase in the phosphorylation of AMPK at Thr172 and acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACC at Ser79, a well characterized downstream target of AMPK. Concomitantly, Berberine increased peroxynitrite, a potent oxidant formed by simultaneous generation of superoxide and nitric oxide. Pre-incubation of BAEC with anti-oxidants markedly attenuated Berberine-enhanced phosphorylation of both AMPK and ACC. Consistently, adenoviral expression of superoxide dismutase and pretreatment of L-N(G-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME; a non-selective NOS inhibitor blunted Berberine-induced phosphorylation of AMPK. Furthermore, mitochondria-targeted tempol (mito-tempol pretreatment or expression of uncoupling protein attenuated AMPK activation caused by Berberine. Depletion of mitochondria abolished the effects of Berberine on AMPK in EC. Finally, Berberine significantly increased the phosphorylation of LKB1 at Ser307 and gene silencing of LKB1 attenuated Berberine-enhanced AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation in BAEC.Our results suggest that mitochondria-derived superoxide anions and peroxynitrite are required for Berberine-induced AMPK activation in endothelial cells.

  14. Reversal of TGF-β1 stimulation of α-smooth muscle actin and extracellular matrix components by cyclic AMP in Dupuytren's - derived fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Sandra

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myofibroblasts, a derived subset of fibroblasts especially important in scar formation and wound contraction, have been found at elevated levels in affected Dupuytren's tissues. Transformation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts is characterized by expression of alpha- smooth muscle actin (α-SMA and increased production of extracellular matrix (ECM components, both events of relevance to connective tissue remodeling. We propose that increasing the activation of the cyclic AMP (cAMP/protein kinase A signaling pathway will inhibit transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1-induced ECM synthesis and myofibroblast formation and may provide a means to blunt fibrosis. Methods Fibroblasts derived from areas of Dupuytren's contracture cord (DC, from adjacent and phenotypically normal palmar fascia (PF, and from palmar fascia from patients undergoing carpal tunnel release (CTR; CT were treated with TGF-β1 (2 ng/ml and/or forskolin (10 μM (a known stimulator of cAMP. Total RNA and protein extracted was subjected to real time RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Results The basal mRNA expression levels of fibronectin- extra domain A (FN1-EDA, type I (COL1A2 and type III collagen (COL3A1, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF were all significantly increased in DC- and in PF-derived cells compared to CT-derived fibroblasts. The TGF-β1 stimulation of α-SMA, CTGF, COL1A2 and COL3A1 was greatly inhibited by concomitant treatment with forskolin, especially in DC-derived cells. In contrast, TGF-β1 stimulation of FN1-EDA showed similar levels of reduction with the addition of forskolin in all three cell types. Conclusion In sum, increasing cAMP levels show potential to inhibit the formation of myofibroblasts and accumulation of ECM components. Molecular agents that increase cAMP may therefore prove useful in mitigating DC progression or recurrence.

  15. cAMP-Signalling Regulates Gametocyte-Infected Erythrocyte Deformability Required for Malaria Parasite Transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghania Ramdani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Blocking Plasmodium falciparum transmission to mosquitoes has been designated a strategic objective in the global agenda of malaria elimination. Transmission is ensured by gametocyte-infected erythrocytes (GIE that sequester in the bone marrow and at maturation are released into peripheral blood from where they are taken up during a mosquito blood meal. Release into the blood circulation is accompanied by an increase in GIE deformability that allows them to pass through the spleen. Here, we used a microsphere matrix to mimic splenic filtration and investigated the role of cAMP-signalling in regulating GIE deformability. We demonstrated that mature GIE deformability is dependent on reduced cAMP-signalling and on increased phosphodiesterase expression in stage V gametocytes, and that parasite cAMP-dependent kinase activity contributes to the stiffness of immature gametocytes. Importantly, pharmacological agents that raise cAMP levels in transmissible stage V gametocytes render them less deformable and hence less likely to circulate through the spleen. Therefore, phosphodiesterase inhibitors that raise cAMP levels in P. falciparum infected erythrocytes, such as sildenafil, represent new candidate drugs to block transmission of malaria parasites.

  16. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate in the regulation of the cell function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Zbrojkiewicz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular concentration of cGMP depends on the activity of guanylate cyclase, responsible for its synthesis, on the activity of cyclic nucleotide degrading enzymes - phosphodiesterases (PDEs. There are two forms of guanylate cyclase: the membrane-bound cyclase and the soluble form. The physiological activators of the membrane guanylate cyclase are natriuretic peptides (NPs, and of the cytosolic guanylate cyclase - nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO. Intracellular cGMP signaling pathways arise from its direct effect on the activity of G protein kinases, phosphodiesterases and cyclic nucleotide dependent cation channels. It has been shown in recent years that cGMP can also affect other signal pathways in cell signaling activity involving Wnt proteins and sex hormones. The increased interest in the research on the role of cGMP, resulted also in the discovery of its role in the regulation of phototransduction in the eye, neurotransmission, calcium homeostasis, platelet aggregation, heartbeat, bone remodeling, lipid metabolism and the activity of the cation channels. Better understanding of the mechanisms of action of cGMP in the regulation of cell function can create new opportunities for the cGMP affecting drugs use in the pharmacotherapy.

  17. Biochemical studies on the DNA binding function of the cyclic-amp reactor protein of Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angulo, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is an allosteric protein in which binding of cAMP effects a conformational change with a consequent increased affinity for DNA. Binding of double-stranded deoxyribopolynucleotides and calf thymus DNA by cAMP-CRP confers protection against attack by trypsin, subtilisin, Staph. aureus V8 protease and clostripain. Of the single-stranded deoxy- and ribopolynucleotides tested, only r(I)/sub n/ and r(A)/sub n/ gave significant protection against attack by these proteases. In the absence of cAMP, CRP is resistant to proteolysis. Incubation of CRP-DNA with trypsin results in the accumulation of two novel fragments. CRP-DNA is partially sensitive to digestion by chymotrypsin but resistant to attack by subtilisin, the Staph. aureus V8 protease and clostripain. Cleavage of CRP-DNA to fragments is accompanied by the loss of /sup 3/H-cAMP binding activity. Modification of the arginines with phenylglyoxal or butanedione results in loss of DNA binding activity. cAMP-CRP incorporates more /sup 14/C-phenylglyoxal than unliganded CRP. Titration of the arginines with /sup 14/C-phenylglyoxal to where over 90% of the DNA binding activity is lost results in incorporation of one mole of reagent per mole of subunit.

  18. Mining frequent patterns for AMP-activated protein kinase regulation on skeletal muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Qingfeng; Chen, Yi-Ping Phoebe

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has emerged as a significant signaling intermediary that regulates metabolisms in response to energy demand and supply. An investigation into the degree of activation and deactivation of AMPK subunits under exercise can provide valuable data for understanding AMPK. In particular, the effect of AMPK on muscle cellular energy status makes this protein a promising pharmacological target for disease treatment. As more AMPK regulation data ar...

  19. The phorbol ester TPA potentiates cholera toxin- and isoproterenol-stimulated cyclic AMP-synthesis in primary astrocyte cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebicke-Haerter, P J; Seregi, A; Schobert, A; Hertting, G

    1994-01-01

    Cellular responses to changes in the extracellular environment are mediated by intracellular signaling systems. One of the most extensively studied systems is adenylate cyclase which generates the second messenger molecule cAMP. Another one is the phosphatidylinositol (PI) second messenger system giving rise to IP3 and diacylglycerol, the latter stimulating protein kinase C. Recently, a third potential signaling system has attracted increased scientific attention: the phospholipase A2 system which generates arachidonic acid. This substance may be used for eicosanoid synthesis or serve as a second messenger molecule. The present report gives more evidence about mechanisms how these signaling pathways interact in cultured astrocytes. Substances commonly used for stimulation of arachidonic acid release and prostaglandin synthesis in these cultures (A23187, TPA) had no influence on intracellular cAMP levels. Pertussis toxin that had previously been shown to inhibit prostaglandin synthesis, had no influence on cAMP levels either. Cholera toxin, however, raised intracellular cAMP significantly, although much less than the beta-adrenoceptor agonist isoproterenol. Cholera toxin also caused a marked change in astroglial morphology even at reduced concentrations (1-10 ng/ml). A23187 used in combination with Ctx had a moderate stimulatory effect on cAMP synthesis. In contrast, in the presence of Ctx, the PKC-activating phorbol ester TPA synergistically stimulated cAMP production, raising cAMP levels as high as isoproterenol-stimulated levels. The TPA effect was concentration-dependent. It was also dependent on an intact PKC since preincubation of cells with the phorbol ester completely abolished the synergistic effect. The synergistic effect of the phorbol ester was also observed at subthreshold concentrations of isoproterenol. The data reveal that the sole activation of most Gs molecules is a necessary but not sufficient prerequisite to achieve maximal adenylate cyclase

  20. Effect of beta-ADrenergic Agonist on Cyclic AMP Synthesis in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Because it seems logical that these agonists exert their action on muscle through stimulation of cAMP synthesis, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate cAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of cAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of cAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax levels were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of cAMP synthesis. In addition, the EC50 values for isoproterenol, cimaterol, clenbuterol, epinephrine, and albuterol were 360 nM, 630 nM, 900 nM, 2,470 nM, and 3,650 nM, respectively. Finally, dose response curves show that the concentrations of cimaterol and clenbuterol in culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals had no detectable effect on stimulation of CAMP accumulation in chicken skeletal muscle cells.

  1. Regulation of dynamic cyclic nucleotide signalling in social amoebas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weening, Karin Esther

    2010-01-01

    Over the past years, much information has been gathered about the importance of the individual key components that control cAMP signalling in eukaryotes and prokaryotes. In mammalians, several different classes of ACs produce cAMP and much is known about their mechanism of stimulation and function.

  2. Cyclic AMP induces apoptosis in multiple myeloma cells and inhibits tumor development in a mouse myeloma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follin-Arbelet, Virginie; Hofgaard, Peter O; Hauglin, Harald; Naderi, Soheil; Sundan, Anders; Blomhoff, Rune; Bogen, Bjarne; Blomhoff, Heidi K

    2011-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable disease requiring the development of effective therapies which can be used clinically. We have elucidated the potential for manipulating the cAMP signaling pathway as a target for inhibiting the growth of multiple myeloma cells. As a model system, we primarily used the murine multiple myeloma cell line MOPC315 which can be grown both in vivo and in vitro. Human multiple myeloma cell lines U266, INA-6 and the B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line Reh were used only for in vitro studies. Cell death was assessed by flow cytometry and western blot analysis after treatment with cAMP elevating agents (forskolin, prostaglandin E2 and rolipram) and cAMP analogs. We followed tumor growth in vivo after forskolin treatment by imaging DsRed-labelled MOPC315 cells transplanted subcutaneously in BALB/c nude mice. In contrast to the effect on Reh cells, 50 μM forskolin more than tripled the death of MOPC315 cells after 24 h in vitro. Forskolin induced cell death to a similar extent in the human myeloma cell lines U266 and INA-6. cAMP-mediated cell death had all the typical hallmarks of apoptosis, including changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential and cleavage of caspase 3, caspase 9 and PARP. Forskolin also inhibited the growth of multiple myeloma cells in a mouse model in vivo. Elevation of intracellular levels of cAMP kills multiple myeloma cells in vitro and inhibits development of multiple myeloma in vivo. This strongly suggests that compounds activating the cAMP signaling pathway may be useful in the field of multiple myeloma

  3. PDE2A2 regulates mitochondria morphology and apoptotic cell death via local modulation of cAMP/PKA signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monterisi, Stefania; Lobo, Miguel J; Livie, Craig; Castle, John C; Weinberger, Michael; Baillie, George; Surdo, Nicoletta C; Musheshe, Nshunge; Stangherlin, Alessandra; Gottlieb, Eyal; Maizels, Rory; Bortolozzi, Mario; Micaroni, Massimo; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2017-05-02

    cAMP/PKA signalling is compartmentalised with tight spatial and temporal control of signal propagation underpinning specificity of response. The cAMP-degrading enzymes, phosphodiesterases (PDEs), localise to specific subcellular domains within which they control local cAMP levels and are key regulators of signal compartmentalisation. Several components of the cAMP/PKA cascade are located to different mitochondrial sub-compartments, suggesting the presence of multiple cAMP/PKA signalling domains within the organelle. The function and regulation of these domains remain largely unknown. Here, we describe a novel cAMP/PKA signalling domain localised at mitochondrial membranes and regulated by PDE2A2. Using pharmacological and genetic approaches combined with real-time FRET imaging and high resolution microscopy, we demonstrate that in rat cardiac myocytes and other cell types mitochondrial PDE2A2 regulates local cAMP levels and PKA-dependent phosphorylation of Drp1. We further demonstrate that inhibition of PDE2A, by enhancing the hormone-dependent cAMP response locally, affects mitochondria dynamics and protects from apoptotic cell death.

  4. Regulation of cessation of respiration and killing by cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate and its receptor protein after far-ultraviolet irradiation of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenson, P.A.; Schenley, R.L.; Joshi, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    When Escherichia coli B/r cultures are irradiated with ultraviolet light (UV) (254 nm), those cells that are killed stop respiring by 60 min after irradiation. Post-UV treatment with cyclic adenosine 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) causes more cells to stop respiring and to die. We have studied these effects at a UV fluence of 52 I/m 2 in a a wild-type E. coli K 12 strain and in mutants defective in cAMP metabolism. Strain CA 8,000 has crp + and cya + genes for the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) (required for transcription of operons regulated by cAMP) and for adenylate cyclase, respectively; CA 7901 is crp - ; and CA 8306 is a cya deletion (Δ). The wild-type culture showed a small transient cessation of respiration, and addition of cAMP caused cessation to be nearly complete. The crp - culture showed no evidence of cessation of respiration, and cAMP had no effect. The Δ cya mutant also showed no cessation of respiration, but cAMP (5 mM) caused as complete inhibition as in the wild type. cAMP caused a 10-fold loss in viability of UV-irradiated wild-type and Δ cya liquid cultures but had no effect on the cpr - culture. Respiration and viability changes were also studied in a double mutant, CA8404 Δ cya crp*, which has an altered CRP that is, with respect to the lac operon, independent of cAMP. The respiration response to UV was similar to that of the wild-type culture, and both respiration and viability of cells in liquid culture were sensitive to cAMP. The survival data, obtained by plating immediately after irradiation, show the wild type, Δ cya strains, and Δ cya crp* to be equally sensitive and the crp - strain to be more resistant. We conclude that cessation of respiration and cell killing after UV irradiation are regulated by cAMP and the CRP. (orig.) [de

  5. Targeted overexpression of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase subunit in Toxoplasma gondii promotes replication and virulence in host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongchao; Wang, Suhua; Zhao, Xianfeng; Yao, Chaoqun; Zhuang, Haohan; Huang, Yechuan; Chen, Xueqiu; Yang, Yi; Du, Aifang

    2017-08-30

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is one of the most common parasite that can infect almost any warm-blooded animals including humans. The cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase (PKA) regulates a spectrum of intracellular signal pathways in many organisms. Protein kinase catalytic subunit (PKAC) is the core of the whole protein, and plays an important role in the life cycle of T.gondii. Here, T.gondii PKAC (TgPKAC) overexpression strain (TgPKAC-OE) was constructed. The growth of the TgPKAC-OE, RH△Ku80, and TgPKAC inhibition strains (TgPKAC-H89) were analysed by SYBR-green real-time PCR, and the ultrastructure was observed by transmission electron microscopy. The survival rate in mice was also recorded to analyse the virulence of the parasites. We also investigated the subcellular localization of TgPKAC in Vero cells by laser scanning microscope. We found that TgPKAC-OE strain exhibited obviously increased growth rate in Vero cells in vitro, and infected mice survived for a shorter time compared to wild type strain. Ultrastructural analysis found more autophagosomes-like structures in TgPKAC-H89 parasite compared to RH△Ku80 strain, and the relative expression level of Toxoplasma gondii autophagy-related protein (ATG8) in TgPKAC-H89 parasite was higher than wild type parasite. Laser confocal results showed that TgPKAC was mainly expressed in the cytoplasm of Vero cells. In conclusion, we hypothesized that inhibition of TgPKAC could cause autophagy of Toxoplasma gondii and then influence the replication of the parasite. TgPKAC plays an important role in parasite virulence in vivo, and the subcellular localization was successfully detected in Vero cells. Our data will provide a basis for further study of TgPKAC function and help screen drug targets of T. gondii. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Cryptochrome mediates circadian regulation of cAMP signaling and hepatic gluconeogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Eric E; Liu, Yi; Dentin, Renaud; Pongsawakul, Pagkapol Y; Liu, Andrew C; Hirota, Tsuyoshi; Nusinow, Dmitri A; Sun, Xiujie; Landais, Severine; Kodama, Yuzo; Brenner, David A; Montminy, Marc; Kay, Steve A

    2010-10-01

    During fasting, mammals maintain normal glucose homeostasis by stimulating hepatic gluconeogenesis. Elevations in circulating glucagon and epinephrine, two hormones that activate hepatic gluconeogenesis, trigger the cAMP-mediated phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (Creb) and dephosphorylation of the Creb-regulated transcription coactivator-2 (Crtc2)--two key transcriptional regulators of this process. Although the underlying mechanism is unclear, hepatic gluconeogenesis is also regulated by the circadian clock, which coordinates glucose metabolism with changes in the external environment. Circadian control of gene expression is achieved by two transcriptional activators, Clock and Bmal1, which stimulate cryptochrome (Cry1 and Cry2) and Period (Per1, Per2 and Per3) repressors that feed back on Clock-Bmal1 activity. Here we show that Creb activity during fasting is modulated by Cry1 and Cry2, which are rhythmically expressed in the liver. Cry1 expression was elevated during the night-day transition, when it reduced fasting gluconeogenic gene expression by blocking glucagon-mediated increases in intracellular cAMP concentrations and in the protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of Creb. In biochemical reconstitution studies, we found that Cry1 inhibited accumulation of cAMP in response to G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activation but not to forskolin, a direct activator of adenyl cyclase. Cry proteins seemed to modulate GPCR activity directly through interaction with G(s)α. As hepatic overexpression of Cry1 lowered blood glucose concentrations and improved insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant db/db mice, our results suggest that compounds that enhance cryptochrome activity may provide therapeutic benefit to individuals with type 2 diabetes.

  7. A cAMP-Regulated Chloride Channel in Lymphocytes that is Affected in Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jennifer H.; Schulman, Howard; Gardner, Phyllis

    1989-02-01

    A defect in regulation of a chloride channel appears to be the molecular basis for cystic fibrosis (CF), a common lethal genetic disease. It is shown here that a chloride channel with kinetic and regulatory properties similar to those described for secretory epithelial cells is present in both T and B lymphocyte cell lines. The regulation of the channels by adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)--dependent protein kinase in transformed B cells from CF patients is defective. Thus, lymphocytes may be an accessible source of CF tissue for study of this defect, for cloning of the chloride channel complex, and for diagnosis of the disease.

  8. Down-regulation of outer membrane proteins by noncoding RNAs: unraveling the cAMP-CRP- and sigmaE-dependent CyaR-ompX regulatory case

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jesper; Eriksen, Maiken; Kallipolitis, Birgitte

    2008-01-01

    The sigma(E) (extracytoplasmic stress response sigma factor in Escherichia coli) signaling system of Gram-negative bacteria plays an essential role in the maintenance of the extracytoplasmic compartment. Upon induction of this system, approximately 100 genes are up-regulated. The majority...... is sufficient to trigger the envelope stress response. Recent work indicates that small Hfq-binding RNAs play a major role in maintaining envelope homeostasis and, so far, two sigma(E)-dependent small noncoding RNAs (sRNAs), MicA and RybB, have been shown to facilitate rapid removal of multiple omp transcripts...... in response to elevated activity of the alternative sigma factor. Here we report the identification of the sRNA (CyaR, cyclic AMP-activated RNA) that promotes decay of the ompX mRNA. The transcription of the cyaR gene is stringently controlled by cAMP-cAMP receptor protein and, unexpectedly, cyaR expression...

  9. Transporter function and cyclic AMP turnover in normal colonic mucosa from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleberg, Karen; Jensen, Gerda Majgaard; Christensen, Dan Ploug

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of colorectal neoplasia is still unresolved but has been associated with alterations in epithelial clearance of xenobiotics and metabolic waste products. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize the transport of cyclic nucleotides in colonic biopsies from patients w...

  10. Anti-cyclic regulation of the Ukrainian economy under current conditions of the international markets volatility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Satsyk

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In the article there are considered the theoretical and methodological basis of anti-cyclic regulation of the countries’ economy under conditions of the world economy globalization. It suggests the analysis of practices of implementing of anti-cyclic policy in highly developed states, its defining features and directions under current global financial and economic crisis. There has been researched a practical toolkit of economic cycles diagnostics and cyclic fluctuations of total business activity in Ukraine based on this study. There are suggested recommendations concerning the formation of the effective mechanism of anti-cyclic regulation of the Ukrainian economy.

  11. Posttranslational processing of SREBP-1 in rat hepatocytes is regulated by insulin and cAMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yellaturu, Chandrahasa R.; Deng Xiong; Cagen, Lauren M.; Wilcox, Henry G.; Park, Edwards A.; Raghow, Rajendra; Elam, Marshall B.

    2005-01-01

    Insulin and cAMP have opposing effects on de novo fatty acid synthesis in liver and in cultured hepatocytes mediated by sterol-regulatory element binding protein (SREBP). To determine whether these agents regulate the cleavage of full-length SREBP to generate the transcriptionally active N-terminal fragment (nSREBP) in primary rat hepatocytes, an adenoviral vector (Ad-SREBP-1a) was constructed to constitutively express full-length SREBP-1a. Insulin increased, and dibutyryl (db)-cAMP inhibited, generation of nSREBP-1a from its full-length precursor. Insulin stimulated processing of SREBP-1a within 1 h, and the effect was sustained for at least 24 h. The initial stimulation of SREBP processing by insulin preceded measurable reduction in Insig-2 mRNA levels. Rat hepatocytes were also infected with an adenovirus expressing the nuclear form of SREBP-1c (Ad-nSREBP-1c). Insulin increased the half-life of constitutively expressed nSREBP-1c, and this effect of insulin was also inhibited by db-cAMP

  12. Secretion of [Met]enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7-related peptides and catecholamines from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells: modification by changes in cyclic AMP and by treatment with reserpine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M; Boarder, M R

    1987-07-01

    Investigations into the effects of culturing bovine adrenal chromaffin cells in the presence (72 h) of dibutyryl cyclic AMP, forskolin, and reserpine on the level and release of [Met]enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7 immunoreactivity, noradrenaline, and adrenaline are reported. The assay for [Met]enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7 immunoreactivity recognises both peptide B, the 31-amino acid carboxy-terminal segment of proenkephalin, and its heptapeptide fragment, [Met]enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7. Treatments that elevate cyclic AMP increase the amount of peptide immunoreactivity in these cells; this is predominantly peptide B-like immunoreactivity in both control cells and cyclic AMP-elevated cells. Treatment with reserpine gives no change in total immunoreactivity levels, but does not result in increased accumulation of the heptapeptide [Met]enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7 at the expense of immunoreactivity that elutes with its immediate precursor, peptide B. Cyclic AMP treatment causes either no change or a decrease in levels of accumulated noradrenaline and adrenaline. However, the release of [Met]enkephalin-Arg6-Phe7 immunoreactivity, noradrenaline, and adrenaline is increased by 72-h pretreatment with forskolin or dibutyryl cyclic AMP, whether release is stimulated by nicotine or elevated potassium. In each case the molecular form of [Met]enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7 immunoreactivity that is released approximately reflects the cell content. Pretreatment with reserpine has no effect on the total [Met]enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7 immunoreactivity released, but does result in an increased release of the heptapeptide and a decrease in release of peptide B-like immunoreactivity. The studies suggest that the levels of [Met]enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7 and peptide B available for release are controlled both at the level of proenkephalin synthesis and at the level of double-basic residue proteolysis.

  13. Spinal Glia Division Contributes to Conditioning Lesion-Induced Axon Regeneration Into the Injured Spinal Cord: Potential Role of Cyclic AMP-Induced Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huaqing; Angert, Mila; Nishihara, Tasuku; Shubayev, Igor; Dolkas, Jennifer; Shubayev, Veronica I

    2015-06-01

    Regeneration of sensory neurons after spinal cord injury depends on the function of dividing neuronal-glial antigen 2 (NG2)-expressing cells. We have shown that increases in the number of dividing NG2-positive cells through short-term pharmacologic inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases contributes to recovery after spinal cord injury. A conditioning sciatic nerve crush (SNC) preceding spinal cord injury stimulates central sensory axon regeneration via the intraganglionic action of cyclic adenosine monophosphate. Here, using bromodeoxyuridine, mitomycin (mitosis inhibitor), and cholera toxin B tracer, we demonstrate that SNC-induced division of spinal glia is related to the spinal induction of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and contributes to central sensory axon growth into the damaged spinal cord. Dividing cells were mainly NG2-positive and Iba1-positive and included myeloid NG2-positive populations. The cells dividing in response to SNC mainly matured into oligodendrocytes and microglia within the injured spinal cord. Some postmitotic cells remained NG2-reactive and were associated with regenerating fibers. Moreover, intraganglionic tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 expression was induced after administration of SNC or cyclic adenosine monophosphate analog (dbcAMP) to dorsal root ganglia in vivo and in primary adult dorsal root ganglia cultures. Collectively, these findings support a novel model whereby a cyclic adenosine monophosphate-activated regeneration program induced in sensory neurons by a conditioning peripheral nerve lesion uses tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 to protect against short-term proteolysis, enabling glial cell division and promoting axon growth into the damaged CNS.

  14. TauCstF-64 Mediates Correct mRNA Polyadenylation and Splicing of Activator and Repressor Isoforms of the Cyclic AMP-Responsive Element Modulator (CREM) in Mouse Testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grozdanov, Petar N; Amatullah, Atia; Graber, Joel H; MacDonald, Clinton C

    2016-02-01

    Spermatogenesis is coordinated by the spatial and temporal expression of many transcriptional and posttranscriptional factors. The cyclic AMP-responsive element modulator (CREM) gene encodes both activator and repressor isoforms that act as transcription factors to regulate spermiogenesis. We found that the testis-expressed paralog of CstF-64, tauCstF-64 (gene symbol Cstf2t), is involved in a polyadenylation site choice switch of Crem mRNA and leads to an overall decrease of the Crem mRNAs that are generated from internal promoters in Cstf2t(-/-) mice. More surprisingly, loss of tauCstF-64 also leads to alternative splicing of Crem exon 4, which contains an important activation domain. Thus, testis-specific CREMtau2 isoform protein levels are reduced in Cstf2t(-/-) mice. Consequently, expression of 15 CREM-regulated genes is decreased in testes of Cstf2t(-/-) mice at 25 days postpartum. These effects might further contribute to the infertility phenotype of these animals. This demonstrates that tauCstF-64 is an important stage-specific regulator of Crem mRNA processing that modulates the spatial and temporal expression of downstream stage-specific genes necessary for the proper development of sperm in mice. © 2016 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  15. The Role of Cyclic Nucleotide Signaling Pathways in Cancer: Targets for Prevention and Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo, Alexandra M.; Piazza, Gary A. [Drug Discovery Research Center, Mitchell Cancer Institute, University of South Alabama, 1660 Springhill Ave, Suite 3029, Mobile, AL 36604 (United States); Tinsley, Heather N., E-mail: htinsley@montevallo.edu [Department of Biology, Chemistry, and Mathematics, University of Montevallo, Station 6480, Montevallo, AL 35115 (United States)

    2014-02-26

    For more than four decades, the cyclic nucleotides cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP) have been recognized as important signaling molecules within cells. Under normal physiological conditions, cyclic nucleotides regulate a myriad of biological processes such as cell growth and adhesion, energy homeostasis, neuronal signaling, and muscle relaxation. In addition, altered cyclic nucleotide signaling has been observed in a number of pathophysiological conditions, including cancer. While the distinct molecular alterations responsible for these effects vary depending on the specific cancer type, several studies have demonstrated that activation of cyclic nucleotide signaling through one of three mechanisms—induction of cyclic nucleotide synthesis, inhibition of cyclic nucleotide degradation, or activation of cyclic nucleotide receptors—is sufficient to inhibit proliferation and activate apoptosis in many types of cancer cells. These findings suggest that targeting cyclic nucleotide signaling can provide a strategy for the discovery of novel agents for the prevention and/or treatment of selected cancers.

  16. Evidence for a cyclic AMP-dependent pathway in angiotensin AT1-receptor activation of human omental arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoa Ytterberg

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced responses to vasoconstriction induced by neuropeptide Y and α2-adrenoceptor agonists have been seen following pharmacological activation of the adenylyl cyclase (AC system. Since preliminary studies revealed only minor responses to angiotensin II (Ang II in human omental arteries, we have investigated whether enhanced activity of AC may unravel further functional Ang II receptors. Human omental arteries were obtained in conjunction with elective gut surgery. After dissection of the vessel, the endothelium was removed by 10 sec of Triton X-100 treatment. Ring segments (1—2 mm long were mounted on a myograph and studied. Ang II produced small contractions, 27±5% relative to the response elicited by 60 mM K+. However, enhanced Ang II (105±10%, p<0.001 responses were seen during AC activation by forskolin (0.1—1 µM. This enhanced contractile response to Ang II was not inhibited by the angiotensin II type 2 (AT2-receptor antagonist PD 123319 (0.1 µM, but was blocked in an insurmountable way by the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1-receptor antagonist candesartan (1 nM and in a surmountable manner by losartan (0.1 µM and irbesartan (0.1 µM. Pertussis toxin (a Gi-protein blocker and the protein kinase C inhibitor, RO31—8220 (0.01, 0.1 and 1 µM, markedly reduced this response, while the protein kinase A inhibitor, H89 (1, 10 µM, had no effect. RT-PCR provided evidence for the presence of mRNA for both AT1- and AT2-receptors. The results suggest that both a cAMP-dependent and a cAMP-independent mechanism are involved in the contractile responses to Ang II in human omental arteries and that both responses are mediated via the AT1-receptor.

  17. Propofol reduced myocardial contraction of vertebrates partly by mediating the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xiaotong; Zhang, Xinyu; Bo, Qiyu; Meng, Tao; Lei, Zhen; Li, Jingxin; Hou, Yonghao; Yu, Xiaoqian; Yu, Jingui

    2016-01-01

    Propofol inhibits myocardial contraction in a dose dependent manner. The present study is designed to examine the effect of propofol on PKA mediated myocardial contraction in the absence of adrenoreceptor agonist. The contraction of isolated rat heart was measured in the presence or absence of PKA inhibitor H89 or propofol, using a pressure transducer. The levels of cAMP and PKA kinase activity were detected by ELISA. The mRNA and total protein or phosphorylation level of PKA and downstream proteins were tested in the presence or absence of PKA inhibitor H89 or propofol, using RT-PCR, QPCR and western blotting. The phosphorylation level of PKA was examined thoroughly using immunofluorescence and PKA activity non-radioactive detection kit. Propofol induced a dose-dependent negative contractile response on the rat heart. The inhibitory effect of high concentration propofol (50 μM) with 45% decease of control could be partly reversed by the PKA inhibitor H89 (10 μM) and the depressant effect of propofol decreased from 45% to 10%. PKA kinase activity was inhibited by propofol in a dose-dependent manner. Propofol also induced a decrease in phosphorylation of PKA, which was also inhibited by H89, but did not alter the production of cAMP and the mRNA levels of PKA. The downstream proteins of PKA, PLN and RyR2 were phosphorylated to a lesser extent with propofol or H89 than control. These results demonstrated that propofol induced a negative myocardial contractile response partly by mediating the PKA phosphorylation pathway.

  18. Effect of Serum from Chickens Treated with Clenbuterol on Myosin Accumulation, Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population, and Cyclic AMP Synthesis in Embryonic Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, Kristin Y.; Wuethrich, Andrew J.; Hancock, Deana L.

    2002-01-01

    Broiler chickens at 35 d of age were fed 1 ppm clenbuterol for 14 d. This level of dietary clenbuterol led to 5-7% increases in the weights of leg and breast muscle tissue. At the end of the 14-d period, serum was prepared from both control and clenbuterol-treated chickens, and was then employed as a component of cell culture media at a final concentration of 20% (v/v). Muscle cell cultures were prepared from both the leg and the breast muscle groups of 12-d chick embryos. Treatment groups included control chicken serum to which 10 nM, 50 nM, and 1 uM clenbuterol had been added, as well as cells grown in media containing 10% horse serum. Cultures were subjected to each treatment for 3 d, beginning on the seventh d in culture. Neither the percent fusion nor the number of nuclei in myotubes was significantly affected by any of the treatments. The quantity of myosin heavy chains (MHCs) was not increased by serum from clenbuterol-treated chickens in either breast or leg muscle cultures; however, the MHC quantity was 50-150% higher in cultures grown in control chicken serum to which 10 and 50 nM clenbuterol had also been added. The B-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) population was 4000-7000 betaARs per cell in cultures grown in chicken serum with leg muscle cultures having approximately 25-30% more receptors than breast muscle Culture. Receptor population was not significantly affected by the presence of clenbuterol or by the presence of serum from clenbuterol-treated chickens. In contrast, the betaAR Population in leg and breast muscle cultures grown in the presence of 10% horse serum was 16,000-18,000 betaARs per cell. Basal concentration of cyclic adenosine 3':5'monophosphate (cAMP) was not significantly affected by the treatments. When cultures grown in chicken serum were stimulated for 10 min with 1 uM isoproterenol, limited increases of 12-20% in cAMP Concentration above the. basal levels were observed. However, when cultures grown in the presence of horse serum were

  19. Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent phosphoregulation of mitochondrial complex I is inhibited by nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, Kaleb C.; Wallace, Kendall B.

    2008-01-01

    Nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) are known to directly inhibit mitochondrial complex I activity as well as various mitochondrial kinases. Recent observations that complex I activity and superoxide production are modulated through cAMP-dependent phosphorylation suggests a mechanism through which NRTIs may affect mitochondrial respiration via kinase-dependent protein phosphorylation. In the current study, we examine the potential for NRTIs to inhibit the cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of complex I and the associated NADH:CoQ oxidoreductase activities and rates of superoxide production using HepG2 cells. Phosphoprotein staining of immunocaptured complex I revealed that 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT; 10 and 50 μM), AZT monophosphate (150 μM), and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC; 1 μM) prevented the phosphorylation of the NDUFB11 subunit of complex I. This was associated with a decrease in complex I activity with AZT and AZT monophosphate only. In the presence of succinate, superoxide production was increased with 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI; 10 μM) and ddC (1 μM). In the presence of succinate + cAMP, AZT showed an inverse dose-dependent effect on superoxide production. None of the NRTIs examined inhibit PKA activity suggesting that the observed effects are due to a direct interaction with complex I. These data demonstrate a direct effect of NRTIs on cAMP-dependent regulation of mitochondrial bioenergetics independent of DNA polymerase-γ activity; in the case of AZT, these observations may provide a mechanism for the observed long-term toxicity with this drug

  20. How do students self-regulate?: review of Zimmerman's cyclical model of self-regulated learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Panadero

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of learning strategies is crucial for students' academic performance and promoting deeper learning approaches. The self-regulated learning models offer comprehensive theoretical backgrounds. These enable more holistic approaches to the use of learning strategies. In this paper, Zimmerman's (2000; 2003; Zimmerman & Moylan, 2009 cyclical model of self-regulated learning is described and analysed as one of the most comprehensive. The model is grounded in social cognitive theory and is comprised of three phases (forethought, performance and self-reflection with a special focus on the influences of motivation on self-regulation. The different processes included in the model are analysed here in detail. Zimmerman's framework is considered in relation to other self-regulated learning models in order to recognize its importance in theory and practice.

  1. Regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by natural and synthetic activators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Grahame Hardie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is a sensor of cellular energy status that is almost universally expressed in eukaryotic cells. While it appears to have evolved in single-celled eukaryotes to regulate energy balance in a cell-autonomous manner, during the evolution of multicellular animals its role has become adapted so that it also regulates energy balance at the whole body level, by responding to hormones that act primarily on the hypothalamus. AMPK monitors energy balance at the cellular level by sensing the ratios of AMP/ATP and ADP/ATP, and recent structural analyses of the AMPK heterotrimer that have provided insight into the complex mechanisms for these effects will be discussed. Given the central importance of energy balance in diseases that are major causes of morbidity or death in humans, such as type 2 diabetes, cancer and inflammatory disorders, there has been a major drive to develop pharmacological activators of AMPK. Many such activators have been described, and the various mechanisms by which these activate AMPK will be discussed. A particularly large class of AMPK activators are natural products of plants derived from traditional herbal medicines. While the mechanism by which most of these activate AMPK has not yet been addressed, I will argue that many of them may be defensive compounds produced by plants to deter infection by pathogens or grazing by insects or herbivores, and that many of them will turn out to be inhibitors of mitochondrial function.

  2. A Universal Stress Protein (USP) in Mycobacteria Binds cAMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Arka; Adolph, Ramona S.; Gopalakrishnapai, Jayashree; Kleinboelting, Silke; Emmerich, Christiane; Steegborn, Clemens; Visweswariah, Sandhya S.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteria are endowed with rich and diverse machinery for the synthesis, utilization, and degradation of cAMP. The actions of cyclic nucleotides are generally mediated by binding of cAMP to conserved and well characterized cyclic nucleotide binding domains or structurally distinct cGMP-specific and -regulated cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, adenylyl cyclase, and E. coli transcription factor FhlA (GAF) domain-containing proteins. Proteins with cyclic nucleotide binding and GAF domains can be identified in the genome of mycobacterial species, and some of them have been characterized. Here, we show that a significant fraction of intracellular cAMP is bound to protein in mycobacterial species, and by using affinity chromatography techniques, we identify specific universal stress proteins (USP) as abundantly expressed cAMP-binding proteins in slow growing as well as fast growing mycobacteria. We have characterized the biochemical and thermodynamic parameters for binding of cAMP, and we show that these USPs bind cAMP with a higher affinity than ATP, an established ligand for other USPs. We determined the structure of the USP MSMEG_3811 bound to cAMP, and we confirmed through structure-guided mutagenesis, the residues important for cAMP binding. This family of USPs is conserved in all mycobacteria, and we suggest that they serve as “sinks” for cAMP, making this second messenger available for downstream effectors as and when ATP levels are altered in the cell. PMID:25802331

  3. Cyclic AMP-dependent signaling system is a primary metabolic target for non-thermal effect of microwaves on heart muscle hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narinyan, Lilia; Ayrapetyan, Sinerik

    2017-01-01

    Previously, we have suggested that cell hydration is a universal and extra-sensitive sensor for the structural changes of cell aqua medium caused by the impact of weak chemical and physical factors. The aim of present work is to elucidate the nature of the metabolic messenger through which physiological solution (PS) treated by non-thermal (NT) microwaves (MW) could modulate heart muscle hydration of rats. For this purpose, the effects of NT MW-treated PS on heart muscle hydration, [ 3 H]-ouabain binding with cell membrane, 45 Ca 2+ uptake and intracellular cyclic nucleotides contents in vivo and in vitro experiments were studied. It is shown that intraperitoneal injections of both Sham-treated PS and NT MW-treated PS elevate heart muscle hydration. However, the effect of NT MW-treated PS on muscle hydration is more pronounced than the effect of Sham-treated PS. In vitro experiments NT MW-treated PS has dehydration effect on muscle, which is not changed by decreasing Na + gradients on membrane. Intraperitoneal injection of Sham- and NT MW-treated PS containing 45 Ca 2+ have similar dehydration effect on muscle, while NT MW-treated PS has activation effect on Na + /Ca 2+ exchange in reverse mode. The intraperitoneal injection of NT MW-treated PS depresses [ 3 H]-ouabain binding with its high-affinity membrane receptors, elevates intracellular cAMP and decreases cGMP contents. Based on the obtained data, it is suggested that cAMP-dependent signaling system serves as a primary metabolic target for NT MW effect on heart muscle hydration.

  4. Caffeine Modulates Vesicle Release and Recovery at Cerebellar Parallel Fibre Terminals, Independently of Calcium and Cyclic AMP Signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Katharine L; Jackson, Claire; Balakrishnan, Saju; Bellamy, Tomas C

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar parallel fibres release glutamate at both the synaptic active zone and at extrasynaptic sites-a process known as ectopic release. These sites exhibit different short-term and long-term plasticity, the basis of which is incompletely understood but depends on the efficiency of vesicle release and recycling. To investigate whether release of calcium from internal stores contributes to these differences in plasticity, we tested the effects of the ryanodine receptor agonist caffeine on both synaptic and ectopic transmission. Whole cell patch clamp recordings from Purkinje neurons and Bergmann glia were carried out in transverse cerebellar slices from juvenile (P16-20) Wistar rats. Caffeine caused complex changes in transmission at both synaptic and ectopic sites. The amplitude of postsynaptic currents in Purkinje neurons and extrasynaptic currents in Bergmann glia were increased 2-fold and 4-fold respectively, but paired pulse ratio was substantially reduced, reversing the short-term facilitation observed under control conditions. Caffeine treatment also caused synaptic sites to depress during 1 Hz stimulation, consistent with inhibition of the usual mechanisms for replenishing vesicles at the active zone. Unexpectedly, pharmacological intervention at known targets for caffeine--intracellular calcium release, and cAMP signalling--had no impact on these effects. We conclude that caffeine increases release probability and inhibits vesicle recovery at parallel fibre synapses, independently of known pharmacological targets. This complex effect would lead to potentiation of transmission at fibres firing at low frequencies, but depression of transmission at high frequency connections.

  5. Biosynthesis and regulation of cyclic lipopeptides in Pseudomonas fluorescens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, de I.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) are surfactant and antibiotic metabolites produced by a variety of bacterial
    genera. For the genus Pseudomonas, many structurally different CLPs have been identified. CLPs play an
    important role in surface motility of Pseudomonas strains, but also in virulence

  6. Caffeine Modulates Vesicle Release and Recovery at Cerebellar Parallel Fibre Terminals, Independently of Calcium and Cyclic AMP Signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Katharine L.; Jackson, Claire; Balakrishnan, Saju; Bellamy, Tomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cerebellar parallel fibres release glutamate at both the synaptic active zone and at extrasynaptic sites—a process known as ectopic release. These sites exhibit different short-term and long-term plasticity, the basis of which is incompletely understood but depends on the efficiency of vesicle release and recycling. To investigate whether release of calcium from internal stores contributes to these differences in plasticity, we tested the effects of the ryanodine receptor agonist caffeine on both synaptic and ectopic transmission. Methods Whole cell patch clamp recordings from Purkinje neurons and Bergmann glia were carried out in transverse cerebellar slices from juvenile (P16-20) Wistar rats. Key Results Caffeine caused complex changes in transmission at both synaptic and ectopic sites. The amplitude of postsynaptic currents in Purkinje neurons and extrasynaptic currents in Bergmann glia were increased 2-fold and 4-fold respectively, but paired pulse ratio was substantially reduced, reversing the short-term facilitation observed under control conditions. Caffeine treatment also caused synaptic sites to depress during 1 Hz stimulation, consistent with inhibition of the usual mechanisms for replenishing vesicles at the active zone. Unexpectedly, pharmacological intervention at known targets for caffeine—intracellular calcium release, and cAMP signalling—had no impact on these effects. Conclusions We conclude that caffeine increases release probability and inhibits vesicle recovery at parallel fibre synapses, independently of known pharmacological targets. This complex effect would lead to potentiation of transmission at fibres firing at low frequencies, but depression of transmission at high frequency connections. PMID:25933382

  7. Caffeine Modulates Vesicle Release and Recovery at Cerebellar Parallel Fibre Terminals, Independently of Calcium and Cyclic AMP Signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine L Dobson

    Full Text Available Cerebellar parallel fibres release glutamate at both the synaptic active zone and at extrasynaptic sites-a process known as ectopic release. These sites exhibit different short-term and long-term plasticity, the basis of which is incompletely understood but depends on the efficiency of vesicle release and recycling. To investigate whether release of calcium from internal stores contributes to these differences in plasticity, we tested the effects of the ryanodine receptor agonist caffeine on both synaptic and ectopic transmission.Whole cell patch clamp recordings from Purkinje neurons and Bergmann glia were carried out in transverse cerebellar slices from juvenile (P16-20 Wistar rats.Caffeine caused complex changes in transmission at both synaptic and ectopic sites. The amplitude of postsynaptic currents in Purkinje neurons and extrasynaptic currents in Bergmann glia were increased 2-fold and 4-fold respectively, but paired pulse ratio was substantially reduced, reversing the short-term facilitation observed under control conditions. Caffeine treatment also caused synaptic sites to depress during 1 Hz stimulation, consistent with inhibition of the usual mechanisms for replenishing vesicles at the active zone. Unexpectedly, pharmacological intervention at known targets for caffeine--intracellular calcium release, and cAMP signalling--had no impact on these effects.We conclude that caffeine increases release probability and inhibits vesicle recovery at parallel fibre synapses, independently of known pharmacological targets. This complex effect would lead to potentiation of transmission at fibres firing at low frequencies, but depression of transmission at high frequency connections.

  8. Cyclic nucleotides and mitogen-activated protein kinases: regulation of simvastatin in platelet activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Ssu-Yu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background 3-Hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins have been widely used to reduce cardiovascular risk. These statins (i.e., simvastatin may exert other effects besides from their cholesterol-lowering actions, including inhibition of platelet activation. Platelet activation is relevant to a variety of coronary heart diseases. Although the inhibitory effect of simvastatin in platelet activation has been studied; the detailed signal transductions by which simvastatin inhibit platelet activation has not yet been completely resolved. Methods The aim of this study was to systematically examine the detailed mechanisms of simvastatin in preventing platelet activation. Platelet aggregation, flow cytometric analysis, immunoblotting, and electron spin resonance studies were used to assess the antiplatelet activity of simvastatin. Results Simvastatin (20-50 μM exhibited more-potent activity of inhibiting platelet aggregation stimulated by collagen than other agonists (i.e., thrombin. Simvastatin inhibited collagen-stimulated platelet activation accompanied by [Ca2+]i mobilization, thromboxane A2 (TxA2 formation, and phospholipase C (PLCγ2, protein kinase C (PKC, and mitogen-activated protein kinases (i.e., p38 MAPK, JNKs phosphorylation in washed platelets. Simvastatin obviously increased both cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP levels. Simvastatin markedly increased NO release, vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP phosphorylation, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS expression. SQ22536, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, markedly reversed the simvastatin-mediated inhibitory effects on platelet aggregation, PLCγ2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, and simvastatin-mediated stimulatory effects on VASP and eNOS phosphorylation. Conclusion The most important findings of this study demonstrate for the first time that inhibitory effect of simvastatin in platelet activation may involve activation of the cyclic AMP-eNOS/NO-cyclic

  9. The cyclic GMP-AMP synthetase-STING signaling pathway is required for both the innate immune response against HBV and the suppression of HBV assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dansako, Hiromichi; Ueda, Youki; Okumura, Nobuaki; Satoh, Shinya; Sugiyama, Masaya; Mizokami, Masashi; Ikeda, Masanori; Kato, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    During viral replication, the innate immune response is induced through the recognition of viral replication intermediates by host factor(s). One of these host factors, cyclic GMP-AMP synthetase (cGAS), was recently reported to be involved in the recognition of viral DNA derived from DNA viruses. However, it is uncertain whether cGAS is involved in the recognition of hepatitis B virus (HBV), which is a hepatotropic DNA virus. In the present study, we demonstrated that HBV genome-derived double-stranded DNA induced the innate immune response through cGAS and its adaptor protein, stimulator of interferon genes (STING), in human hepatoma Li23 cells expressing high levels of cGAS. In addition, we demonstrated that HBV infection induced ISG56 through the cGAS-STING signaling pathway. This signaling pathway also showed an antiviral response towards HBV through the suppression of viral assembly. From these results, we conclude that the cGAS-STING signaling pathway is required for not only the innate immune response against HBV but also the suppression of HBV assembly. The cGAS-STING signaling pathway may thus be a novel target for anti-HBV strategies. © 2015 FEBS.

  10. Met-enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7 immunoreactivity in a human neuroblastoma cell line: effect of dibutyryl 3':5'-cyclic AMP and reserpine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boarder, M R; Marriott, D; Adams, M

    1986-12-30

    The carboxy terminal part of the proenkephalin A sequence is the 31 amino acid peptide B, which has as its final seven amino acids the sequence of the opioid peptide Met-enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7. Using a radioimmunoassay which recognises both these peptides we have investigated the relative amounts of peptide B and Met-enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7 in a human neuroblastoma cell line. We show that these cells contain peptide B-like immunoreactivity but not its heptapeptide fragment. This may be due to lack of proteolytic activity cleaving Met-enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7 from its precursor, peptide B. On treatment with dibutyryl cyclic AMP the level of immunoreactivity approximately doubles, due to increased amounts of peptide B-like immunoreactivity. Treatment with reserpine, which increases conversion of peptide B to the heptapeptide in bovine chromaffin cells in culture does not stimulate the accumulation of Met-enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7 in the human neuroblastoma cells. The results are discussed with respect to peptide processing.

  11. The μ opioid agonist morphine modulates potentiation of capsaicin-evoked TRPV1 responses through a cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts-Thomson Sarah J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1 is critical in the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. Several receptors including G-protein coupled prostaglandin receptors have been reported to functionally interact with the TRPV1 through a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA pathway to potentiate TRPV1-mediated capsaicin responses. Such regulation may have significance in inflammatory pain. However, few functional receptor interactions that inhibit PKA-mediated potentiation of TRPV1 responses have been described. Results In the present studies we investigated the hypothesis that the μ opioid receptor (MOP agonist morphine can modulate forskolin-potentiated capsaicin responses through a cAMP-dependent PKA pathway. HEK293 cells were stably transfected with TRPV1 and MOP, and calcium (Ca2+ responses to injection of the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin were monitored in Fluo-3-loaded cells. Pre-treatment with morphine did not inhibit unpotentiated capsaicin-induced Ca2+ responses but significantly altered capsaicin responses potentiated by forskolin. TRPV1-mediated Ca2+ responses potentiated by the direct PKA activator 8-Br-cAMP and the PKC activator Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetatewere not modulated by morphine. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed that the TRPV1 and MOP are co-expressed on cultured Dorsal Root Ganglion neurones, pointing towards the existence of a functional relationship between the G-protein coupled MOP and nociceptive TRPV1. Conclusion The results presented here indicate that the opioid receptor agonist morphine acts via inhibition of adenylate cyclase to inhibit PKA-potentiated TRPV1 responses. Targeting of peripheral opioid receptors may therefore have therapeutic potential as an intervention to prevent potentiation of TRPV1 responses through the PKA pathway in inflammation.

  12. Biosynthesis and regulation of cyclic lipopeptides in Pseudomonas fluorescens

    OpenAIRE

    Bruijn, de, I.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) are surfactant and antibiotic metabolites produced by a variety of bacterial genera. For the genus Pseudomonas, many structurally different CLPs have been identified. CLPs play an important role in surface motility of Pseudomonas strains, but also in virulence and attachment/detachment to and from surfaces. In this Ph.D. thesis project, two new CLP biosynthesis clusters were identified in Pseudomonas fluorescens and fully sequenced. In P. fluorescens strain SBW2...

  13. Regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase by LKB1 and CaMKK in adipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gormand, Amélie; Henriksson, Emma; Ström, Kristoffer

    2011-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine kinase that regulates cellular and whole body energy homeostasis. In adipose tissue, activation of AMPK has been demonstrated in response to a variety of extracellular stimuli. However, the upstream kinase that activates AMPK in adipocytes...... remains elusive. Previous studies have identified LKB1 as a major AMPK kinase in muscle, liver, and other tissues. In certain cell types, Ca(2+) /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ) has been shown to activate AMPK in response to increases of intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Our aim...... was to investigate if LKB1 and/or CaMKK function as AMPK kinases in adipocytes. We used adipose tissue and isolated adipocytes from mice in which the expression of LKB1 was reduced to 10-20% of that of wild-type (LKB1 hypomorphic mice). We show that adipocytes from LKB1 hypomorphic mice display a 40% decrease...

  14. Imaging alterations of cardiomyocyte cAMP microdomains in disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eFroese

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available 3’,5’-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is an important second messenger which regulates heart function by acting in distinct subcellular microdomains. Recent years have provided deeper mechanistic insights into compartmentalized cAMP signaling and its link to cardiac disease. In this mini review, we summarize newest developments in this field achieved by cutting-edge biochemical and biophysical techniques. We further compile the data from different studies into a bigger picture of so far uncovered alterations in cardiomyocyte cAMP microdomains which occur in compensated cardiac hypertrophy and chronic heart failure. Finally, future research directions and translational perspectives are briefly discussed.

  15. Regulation of proximal tubule vacuolar H+-ATPase by PKA and AMP-activated protein kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-bataineh, Mohammad M.; Gong, Fan; Marciszyn, Allison L.; Myerburg, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    The vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) mediates ATP-driven H+ transport across membranes. This pump is present at the apical membrane of kidney proximal tubule cells and intercalated cells. Defects in the V-ATPase and in proximal tubule function can cause renal tubular acidosis. We examined the role of protein kinase A (PKA) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the regulation of the V-ATPase in the proximal tubule as these two kinases coregulate the V-ATPase in the collecting duct. As the proximal tubule V-ATPases have different subunit compositions from other nephron segments, we postulated that V-ATPase regulation in the proximal tubule could differ from other kidney tubule segments. Immunofluorescence labeling of rat ex vivo kidney slices revealed that the V-ATPase was present in the proximal tubule both at the apical pole, colocalizing with the brush-border marker wheat germ agglutinin, and in the cytosol when slices were incubated in buffer alone. When slices were incubated with a cAMP analog and a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, the V-ATPase accumulated at the apical pole of S3 segment cells. These PKA activators also increased V-ATPase apical membrane expression as well as the rate of V-ATPase-dependent extracellular acidification in S3 cell monolayers relative to untreated cells. However, the AMPK activator AICAR decreased PKA-induced V-ATPase apical accumulation in proximal tubules of kidney slices and decreased V-ATPase activity in S3 cell monolayers. Our results suggest that in proximal tubule the V-ATPase subcellular localization and activity are acutely coregulated via PKA downstream of hormonal signals and via AMPK downstream of metabolic stress. PMID:24553431

  16. The cAMP-PKA Signaling Pathway Regulates Pathogenicity, Hyphal Growth, Appressorial Formation, Conidiation, and Stress Tolerance in Colletotrichum higginsianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenjun; Zhou, Man; Xiong, Zeyang; Peng, Fang; Wei, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Colletotrichum higginsianum is an economically important pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in a wide range of cruciferous crops. Understanding the mechanisms of the cruciferous plant- C. higginsianum interactions will be important in facilitating efficient control of anthracnose diseases. The cAMP-PKA signaling pathway plays important roles in diverse physiological processes of multiple pathogens. C. higginsianum contains two genes, ChPKA1 and ChPKA2 , that encode the catalytic subunits of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). To analyze the role of cAMP signaling pathway in pathogenicity and development in C. higginsianum , we characterized ChPKA1 and ChPKA2 genes, and adenylate cyclase ( ChAC ) gene. The ChPKA1 and ChAC deletion mutants were unable to cause disease and significantly reduced in hyphal growth, tolerance to cell wall inhibitors, conidiation, and appressorial formation with abnormal germ tubes, but they had an increased tolerance to elevated temperatures and exogenous H 2 O 2 . In contrast, the ChPKA2 mutant had no detectable alteration of phenotypes, suggesting that ChPKA1 contributes mainly to PKA activities in C. higginsianum . Moreover, we failed to generate Δ ChPKA1ChPKA2 double mutant, indicating that deletion of both PKA catalytic subunits is lethal in C. higginsianum and the two catalytic subunits possibly have overlapping functions. These results indicated that ChPKA1 is the major PKA catalytic subunit in cAMP-PKA signaling pathway and plays significant roles in hyphal growth, pathogenicity, appressorial formation, conidiation, and stress tolerance in C. higginsianum .

  17. The cAMP-PKA Signaling Pathway Regulates Pathogenicity, Hyphal Growth, Appressorial Formation, Conidiation, and Stress Tolerance in Colletotrichum higginsianum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Zhu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Colletotrichum higginsianum is an economically important pathogen that causes anthracnose disease in a wide range of cruciferous crops. Understanding the mechanisms of the cruciferous plant–C. higginsianum interactions will be important in facilitating efficient control of anthracnose diseases. The cAMP-PKA signaling pathway plays important roles in diverse physiological processes of multiple pathogens. C. higginsianum contains two genes, ChPKA1 and ChPKA2, that encode the catalytic subunits of cyclic AMP (cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA. To analyze the role of cAMP signaling pathway in pathogenicity and development in C. higginsianum, we characterized ChPKA1 and ChPKA2 genes, and adenylate cyclase (ChAC gene. The ChPKA1 and ChAC deletion mutants were unable to cause disease and significantly reduced in hyphal growth, tolerance to cell wall inhibitors, conidiation, and appressorial formation with abnormal germ tubes, but they had an increased tolerance to elevated temperatures and exogenous H2O2. In contrast, the ChPKA2 mutant had no detectable alteration of phenotypes, suggesting that ChPKA1 contributes mainly to PKA activities in C. higginsianum. Moreover, we failed to generate ΔChPKA1ChPKA2 double mutant, indicating that deletion of both PKA catalytic subunits is lethal in C. higginsianum and the two catalytic subunits possibly have overlapping functions. These results indicated that ChPKA1 is the major PKA catalytic subunit in cAMP-PKA signaling pathway and plays significant roles in hyphal growth, pathogenicity, appressorial formation, conidiation, and stress tolerance in C. higginsianum.

  18. Regulation of Mg2+ Reabsorption and Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin Type 6 Activity by cAMP Signaling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanchard, M.G.; Kittikulsuth, W.; Nair, A.V.; Baaij, J.H.F. de; Latta, F.; Genzen, J.R.; Kohan, D.E.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.

    2016-01-01

    The transient receptor potential melastatin type 6 (TRPM6) epithelial Mg(2+) channels participate in transcellular Mg(2+) transport in the kidney and intestine. Previous reports suggested a hormonal cAMP-dependent regulation of Mg(2+) reabsorption in the kidney. The molecular details of this process

  19. The Recruitment of AMP-activated Protein Kinase to Glycogen Is Regulated by Autophosphorylation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oligschlaeger, Yvonne; Miglianico, Marie; Chanda, Dipanjan; Scholz, Roland; Thali, Ramon F.; Tuerk, Roland; Stapleton, David I.; Gooley, Paul R.; Neumann, Dietbert

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an obligatory αβγ heterotrimeric complex carrying a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) in the β-subunit (AMPKβ) capable of attaching AMPK to glycogen. Nonetheless, AMPK localizes at many different cellular compartments, implying the existence of mechanisms that prevent AMPK from glycogen binding. Cell-free carbohydrate binding assays revealed that AMPK autophosphorylation abolished its carbohydrate-binding capacity. X-ray structural data of the CBM displays the central positioning of threonine 148 within the binding pocket. Substitution of Thr-148 for a phospho-mimicking aspartate (T148D) prevents AMPK from binding to carbohydrate. Overexpression of isolated CBM or β1-containing AMPK in cellular models revealed that wild type (WT) localizes to glycogen particles, whereas T148D shows a diffuse pattern. Pharmacological AMPK activation and glycogen degradation by glucose deprivation but not forskolin enhanced cellular Thr-148 phosphorylation. Cellular glycogen content was higher if pharmacological AMPK activation was combined with overexpression of T148D mutant relative to WT AMPK. In summary, these data show that glycogen-binding capacity of AMPKβ is regulated by Thr-148 autophosphorylation with likely implications in the regulation of glycogen turnover. The findings further raise the possibility of regulated carbohydrate-binding function in a wider variety of CBM-containing proteins. PMID:25792737

  20. The recruitment of AMP-activated protein kinase to glycogen is regulated by autophosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oligschlaeger, Yvonne; Miglianico, Marie; Chanda, Dipanjan; Scholz, Roland; Thali, Ramon F; Tuerk, Roland; Stapleton, David I; Gooley, Paul R; Neumann, Dietbert

    2015-05-01

    The mammalian AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an obligatory αβγ heterotrimeric complex carrying a carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) in the β-subunit (AMPKβ) capable of attaching AMPK to glycogen. Nonetheless, AMPK localizes at many different cellular compartments, implying the existence of mechanisms that prevent AMPK from glycogen binding. Cell-free carbohydrate binding assays revealed that AMPK autophosphorylation abolished its carbohydrate-binding capacity. X-ray structural data of the CBM displays the central positioning of threonine 148 within the binding pocket. Substitution of Thr-148 for a phospho-mimicking aspartate (T148D) prevents AMPK from binding to carbohydrate. Overexpression of isolated CBM or β1-containing AMPK in cellular models revealed that wild type (WT) localizes to glycogen particles, whereas T148D shows a diffuse pattern. Pharmacological AMPK activation and glycogen degradation by glucose deprivation but not forskolin enhanced cellular Thr-148 phosphorylation. Cellular glycogen content was higher if pharmacological AMPK activation was combined with overexpression of T148D mutant relative to WT AMPK. In summary, these data show that glycogen-binding capacity of AMPKβ is regulated by Thr-148 autophosphorylation with likely implications in the regulation of glycogen turnover. The findings further raise the possibility of regulated carbohydrate-binding function in a wider variety of CBM-containing proteins. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Phosphorylation of CREB, a cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein, contributes partially to lysophosphatidic acid-induced fibroblast cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, Yong-Jun; Sun, Yuanjie; Kim, Nam-Ho; Huh, Sung-Oh

    2009-01-01

    Lysophospholipids regulate a wide array of biological processes including cell survival and proliferation. In our previous studies, we found that in addition to SRE, CRE is required for maximal c-fos promoter activation triggered by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). c-fos is an early indicator of various cells into the cell cycle after mitogenic stimulation. However, role of CREB activation in LPA-stimulated proliferation has not been elucidated yet. Here, we investigate how LPA induces proliferation in Rat-2 fibroblast cell via CREB activation. We found that total cell number and BrdU-positive cells were increased by LPA. Moreover, levels of c-fos mRNA and cyclin D1 protein were increased via LPA-induced CREB phosphorylation. Furthermore, LPA-induced Rat-2 cell proliferation was decreased markedly by ERK inhibitor (U0126) and partially by MSK inhibitor (H89). Taken together, these results suggest that CREB activation could partially up-regulate accumulation of cyclin D1 protein level and proliferation of LPA-stimulated Rat-2 fibroblast cells.

  2. Cyclic nucleotide regulation of inositol lipid metabolism in rat cerebral cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicchitta, C.V.; Williamson, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have investigated the effects of compounds known to elevate cAMP levels and/or activate the cAMP dependent protein kinase on resting and stimulated inositol lipid metabolism in rat cortical slices and synaptosomes. In [ 3 H]-myo-inositol-labeled brain slices, carbamylcholine-stimulated accumulation of [ 3 H]-myo-inositol 1-phosphate (IP 1 ) was decreased 50% by forskolin (150μM) isobutylmethylxantihine (IBMX) (1mM), 8-bromo cAMP (5mM) or 8-(4-chlorophenylthio) cAMP (5mM). In studies with synaptosomes, the incorporation of [ 32 Pi] into phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP), phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP 2 ) and phosphatidic acid (PA) was also reduced in the presence of forskolin or the cAMP phosphodiesterase inhibitors IBMX and RO20-1724 (+/-)-4-(3-butoxy-4-methoxybenzyl)-2-imidazolidinone. In the presence of maximally effective concentrations of these agents, steady state PIP levels were reduced by 50% and PIP 2 and PA levels by 40%. The effects of these compounds on [ 32 Pi] labeling of the phosphoinositides and PA are consistent with an inhibition of flux through the inositide cycle, presumably through the action of cAMP. Such an inhibition may account for the reduction in carbamylcholine sensitive IP 1 accumulation observed in brain slices. These studies indicate that in rat brain, β-adrenergic stimulation may be involved in modulating the activity of muscarinic cholinergic agonists. This regulation appears to be at the level of inositol lipid metabolism

  3. cAMP-CRP acts as a key regulator for the viable but non-culturable state in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosho, Kazuki; Fukushima, Hiroko; Asai, Takehiro; Nishio, Masahiro; Takamaru, Reiko; Kobayashi-Kirschvink, Koseki Joseph; Ogawa, Tetsuhiro; Hidaka, Makoto; Masaki, Haruhiko

    2018-03-01

    A variety of bacteria, including Escherichia coli, are known to enter the viable but non-culturable (VBNC) state under various stress conditions. During this state, cells lose colony-forming activities on conventional agar plates while retaining signs of viability. Diverse environmental stresses including starvation induce the VBNC state. However, little is known about the genetic mechanism inducing this state. Here, we aimed to reveal the genetic determinants of the VBNC state of E. coli. We hypothesized that the VBNC state is a process wherein specific gene products important for colony formation are depleted during the extended period of stress conditions. If so, higher expression of these genes would maintain colony-forming activities, thereby restraining cells from entering the VBNC state. From an E. coli plasmid-encoded ORF library, we identified genes that were responsible for maintaining high colony-forming activities after exposure to starvation condition. Among these, cpdA encoding cAMP phosphodiesterase exhibited higher performance in the maintenance of colony-forming activities. As cpdA overexpression decreases intracellular cAMP, cAMP or its complex with cAMP-receptor protein (CRP) may negatively regulate colony-forming activities under stress conditions. We confirmed this using deletion mutants lacking adenylate cyclase or CRP. These mutants fully maintained colony-forming activities even after a long period of starvation, while wild-type cells lost most of this activity. Thus, we concluded that the lack of cAMP-CRP effectively retains high colony-forming activities, indicating that cAMP-CRP acts as a positive regulator necessary for the induction of the VBNC state in E. coli.

  4. Spatial regulation of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase during chemotactic cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Alan K; Baldor, Linda C; Hogan, Brian P

    2005-10-04

    Historically, the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) has a paradoxical role in cell motility, having been shown to both facilitate and inhibit actin cytoskeletal dynamics and cell migration. In an effort to understand this dichotomy, we show here that PKA is regulated in subcellular space during cell migration. Immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical enrichment of pseudopodia showed that type II regulatory subunits of PKA and PKA activity are enriched in protrusive cellular structures formed during chemotaxis. This enrichment correlates with increased phosphorylation of key cytoskeletal substrates for PKA, including the vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) and the protein tyrosine phosphatase containing a PEST motif. Importantly, inhibition of PKA activity or its ability to interact with A kinase anchoring proteins inhibited the activity of the Rac GTPase within pseudopodia. This effect correlated with both decreased guanine nucleotide exchange factor activity and increased GTPase activating protein activity. Finally, inhibition of PKA anchoring, like inhibition of total PKA activity, inhibited pseudopod formation and chemotactic cell migration. These data demonstrate that spatial regulation of PKA via anchoring is an important facet of normal chemotactic cell movement.

  5. cAMP-response-element-binding protein positively regulates breast cancer metastasis and subsequent bone destruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Jieun; Lee, Jong-Ho; Kim, Ha-Neui; Ha, Hyunil, E-mail: hyunil74@hotmail.com; Lee, Zang Hee, E-mail: zang1959@snu.ac.kr

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields} CREB is highly expressed in advanced breast cancer cells. {yields} Tumor-related factors such as TGF-{beta} further elevate CREB expression. {yields} CREB upregulation stimulates metastatic potential of breast cancer cells. {yields} CREB signaling is required for breast cancer-induced bone destruction. -- Abstract: cAMP-response-element-binding protein (CREB) signaling has been reported to be associated with cancer development and poor clinical outcome in various types of cancer. However, it remains to be elucidated whether CREB is involved in breast cancer development and osteotropism. Here, we found that metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exhibited higher CREB expression than did non-metastatic MCF-7 cells and that CREB expression was further increased by several soluble factors linked to cancer progression, such as IL-1, IGF-1, and TGF-{beta}. Using wild-type CREB and a dominant-negative form (K-CREB), we found that CREB signaling positively regulated the proliferation, migration, and invasion of MDA-MB-231 cells. In addition, K-CREB prevented MDA-MB-231 cell-induced osteolytic lesions in a mouse model of cancer metastasis. Furthermore, CREB signaling in cancer cells regulated the gene expression of PTHrP, MMPs, and OPG, which are closely involved in cancer metastasis and bone destruction. These results indicate that breast cancer cells acquire CREB overexpression during their development and that this CREB upregulation plays an important role in multiple steps of breast cancer bone metastasis.

  6. Adenosine receptors regulate gap junction coupling of the human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells hCMEC/D3 by Ca2+influx through cyclic nucleotide-gated channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Almke; Bintig, Willem; Begandt, Daniela; Klett, Anne; Siller, Ina G; Gregor, Carola; Schaarschmidt, Frank; Weksler, Babette; Romero, Ignacio; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Hell, Stefan W; Ngezahayo, Anaclet

    2017-04-15

    Gap junction channels are essential for the formation and regulation of physiological units in tissues by allowing the lateral cell-to-cell diffusion of ions, metabolites and second messengers. Stimulation of the adenosine receptor subtype A 2B increases the gap junction coupling in the human blood-brain barrier endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. Although the increased gap junction coupling is cAMP-dependent, neither the protein kinase A nor the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP were involved in this increase. We found that cAMP activates cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels and thereby induces a Ca 2+ influx, which leads to the increase in gap junction coupling. The report identifies CNG channels as a possible physiological link between adenosine receptors and the regulation of gap junction channels in endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. The human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 was used to characterize the physiological link between adenosine receptors and the gap junction coupling in endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. Expressed adenosine receptor subtypes and connexin (Cx) isoforms were identified by RT-PCR. Scrape loading/dye transfer was used to evaluate the impact of the A 2A and A 2B adenosine receptor subtype agonist 2-phenylaminoadenosine (2-PAA) on the gap junction coupling. We found that 2-PAA stimulated cAMP synthesis and enhanced gap junction coupling in a concentration-dependent manner. This enhancement was accompanied by an increase in gap junction plaques formed by Cx43. Inhibition of protein kinase A did not affect the 2-PAA-related enhancement of gap junction coupling. In contrast, the cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel inhibitor l-cis-diltiazem, as well as the chelation of intracellular Ca 2+ with BAPTA, or the absence of external Ca 2+ , suppressed the 2-PAA-related enhancement of gap junction coupling. Moreover, we observed a 2-PAA-dependent activation of CNG channels by a combination of

  7. Differential regulation by AMP and ADP of AMPK complexes containing different γ subunit isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Fiona A; Jensen, Thomas E; Hardie, D Grahame

    2016-01-15

    The γ subunits of heterotrimeric AMPK complexes contain the binding sites for the regulatory adenine nucleotides AMP, ADP and ATP. We addressed whether complexes containing different γ isoforms display different responses to adenine nucleotides by generating cells stably expressing FLAG-tagged versions of the γ1, γ2 or γ3 isoform. When assayed at a physiological ATP concentration (5 mM), γ1- and γ2-containing complexes were allosterically activated almost 10-fold by AMP, with EC50 values one to two orders of magnitude lower than the ATP concentration. By contrast, γ3 complexes were barely activated by AMP under these conditions, although we did observe some activation at lower ATP concentrations. Despite this, all three complexes were activated, due to increased Thr(172) phosphorylation, when cells were incubated with mitochondrial inhibitors that increase cellular AMP. With γ1 complexes, activation and Thr(172) phosphorylation induced by the upstream kinase LKB1 [liver kinase B1; but not calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase (CaMKKβ)] in cell-free assays was markedly promoted by AMP and, to a smaller extent and less potently, by ADP. However, effects of AMP or ADP on activation and phosphorylation of the γ2 and γ3 complexes were small or insignificant. Binding of AMP or ADP protected all three γ subunit complexes against inactivation by Thr(172) dephosphorylation; with γ2 complexes, ADP had similar potency to AMP, but with γ1 and γ3 complexes, ADP was less potent than AMP. Thus, AMPK complexes containing different γ subunit isoforms respond differently to changes in AMP, ADP or ATP. These differences may tune the responses of the isoforms to fit their differing physiological roles. © 2016 Authors.

  8. AMP-Activated Kinase AMPK Is Expressed in Boar Spermatozoa and Regulates Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado de Llera, Ana; Martin-Hidalgo, David; Gil, María C.

    2012-01-01

    The main functions of spermatozoa required for fertilization are dependent on the energy status and metabolism. AMP-activated kinase, AMPK, acts a sensor and regulator of cell metabolism. As AMPK studies have been focused on somatic cells, our aim was to investigate the expression of AMPK protein in spermatozoa and its possible role in regulating motility. Spermatozoa from boar ejaculates were isolated and incubated under different conditions (38,5°C or 17°C, basal medium TBM or medium with Ca2+ and bicarbonate TCM, time from 1–24 hours) in presence or absence of AMPK inhibitor, compound C (CC, 30 µM). Western blotting reveals that AMPK is expressed in boar spermatozoa at relatively higher levels than in somatic cells. AMPK phosphorylation (activation) in spermatozoa is temperature-dependent, as it is undetectable at semen preservation temperature (17°C) and increases at 38,5°C in a time-dependent manner. AMPK phosphorylation is independent of the presence of Ca2+ and/or bicarbonate in the medium. We confirm that CC effectively blocks AMPK phosphorylation in boar spermatozoa. Analysis of spermatozoa motility by CASA shows that CC treatment either in TBM or in TCM causes a significant reduction of any spermatozoa motility parameter in a time-dependent manner. Thus, AMPK inhibition significantly decreases the percentages of motile and rapid spermatozoa, significantly reduces spermatozoa velocities VAP, VCL and affects other motility parameters and coefficients. CC treatment does not cause additional side effects in spermatozoa that might lead to a lower viability even at 24 h incubation. Our results show that AMPK is expressed in spermatozoa at high levels and is phosphorylated under physiological conditions. Moreover, our study suggests that AMPK regulates a relevant function of spermatozoa, motility, which is essential for their ultimate role of fertilization. PMID:22719961

  9. Mining frequent patterns for AMP-activated protein kinase regulation on skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yi-Ping

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK has emerged as a significant signaling intermediary that regulates metabolisms in response to energy demand and supply. An investigation into the degree of activation and deactivation of AMPK subunits under exercise can provide valuable data for understanding AMPK. In particular, the effect of AMPK on muscle cellular energy status makes this protein a promising pharmacological target for disease treatment. As more AMPK regulation data are accumulated, data mining techniques can play an important role in identifying frequent patterns in the data. Association rule mining, which is commonly used in market basket analysis, can be applied to AMPK regulation. Results This paper proposes a framework that can identify the potential correlation, either between the state of isoforms of α, β and γ subunits of AMPK, or between stimulus factors and the state of isoforms. Our approach is to apply item constraints in the closed interpretation to the itemset generation so that a threshold is specified in terms of the amount of results, rather than a fixed threshold value for all itemsets of all sizes. The derived rules from experiments are roughly analyzed. It is found that most of the extracted association rules have biological meaning and some of them were previously unknown. They indicate direction for further research. Conclusion Our findings indicate that AMPK has a great impact on most metabolic actions that are related to energy demand and supply. Those actions are adjusted via its subunit isoforms under specific physical training. Thus, there are strong co-relationships between AMPK subunit isoforms and exercises. Furthermore, the subunit isoforms are correlated with each other in some cases. The methods developed here could be used when predicting these essential relationships and enable an understanding of the functions and metabolic pathways regarding AMPK.

  10. cAMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation of EVL, a Mena/VASP relative, regulates its interaction with actin and SH3 domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrechts, A; Kwiatkowski, A V; Lanier, L M; Bear, J E; Vandekerckhove, J; Ampe, C; Gertler, F B

    2000-11-17

    Proteins of the Ena/VASP family are implicated in processes that require dynamic actin remodeling such as axon guidance and platelet activation. In this work, we explored some of the pathways that likely regulate actin dynamics in part via EVL (Ena/VASP-like protein). Two isoforms, EVL and EVL-I, were highly expressed in hematopoietic cells of thymus and spleen. In CD3-activated T-cells, EVL was found in F-actin-rich patches and at the distal tips of the microspikes that formed on the activated side of the T-cells. Like the other family members, EVL localized to focal adhesions and the leading edge of lamellipodia when expressed in fibroblasts. EVL was a substrate for the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, and this phosphorylation regulated several of the interactions between EVL and its ligands. Unlike VASP, EVL nucleated actin polymerization under physiological conditions, whereas phosphorylation of both EVL and VASP decreased their nucleating activity. EVL bound directly to the Abl, Lyn, and nSrc SH3 domains; the FE65 WW domain; and profilin, likely via its proline-rich core. Binding of Abl and nSrc SH3 domains, but not profilin or other SH3 domains, was abolished by cAMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation of EVL. We show strong cooperative binding of two profilin dimers on the polyproline sequence of EVL. Additionally, profilin competed with the SH3 domains for binding to partially overlapping binding sites. These data suggest that the function of EVL could be modulated in a complex manner by its interactions with multiple ligands and through phosphorylation by cyclic nucleotide dependent kinases.

  11. Cardiac cAMP: production, hydrolysis, modulation and detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric eBOULARAN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic adenosine 3’,5’-monophosphate (cAMP modulates a broad range of biological processes including the regulation of cardiac myocyte contractile function where it constitutes the main second messenger for β-adrenergic receptors’ signaling to fulfill positive chronotropic, inotropic and lusitropic effects. A growing number of studies pinpoint the role of spatial organization of the cAMP signaling as an essential mechanism to regulate cAMP outcomes in cardiac physiology. Here, we will briefly discuss the complexity of cAMP synthesis and degradation in the cardiac context, describe the way to detect it and review the main pharmacological arsenal to modulate its availability.

  12. Neuro-endocrine regulation of LH secretion in cyclic pigs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierx, J.

    1999-01-01

    The present thesis describes the study in the hormonal (endocrine) regulation of the fertility in the female pig. Fertility is optimal when during the reproductive cycle the concentrations of hormones change in a particular sequence. In the present thesis it has been shown that, amongst

  13. Effects of a water-soluble forskolin derivative (NKH477) and a membrane-permeable cyclic AMP analogue on noradrenaline-induced Ca2+ mobilization in smooth muscle of rabbit mesenteric artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, S.; Suzuki, S.; Itoh, T.

    1993-01-01

    1. Effects were studied of 6-(3-dimethylaminopropionyl) forskolin (NKH477), a water-soluble forskolin derivative and of dibutyryl-cyclic AMP, a membrane-permeable cyclic AMP analogue on noradrenaline (NA)-induced Ca2+ mobilization in smooth muscle strips of the rabbit mesenteric artery. The intracellular concentration of Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), isometric force and cellular concentration of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) were measured. 2. NA (10 microM) produced a phasic, followed by a tonic increase in both [Ca2+]i and force in a solution containing 2.6 mM Ca2+. NKH477 (0.01-0.3 microM) attenuated the phasic and the tonic increases in both [Ca2+]i and force induced by 10 microM NA, in a concentration-dependent manner. 3. In Ca(2+)-free solution containing 2 mM EGTA with 5.9 mM K+, NA (10 microM) produced only phasic increases in [Ca2+]i and force. NKH477 (0.01 microM) and dibutyryl-cyclic AMP (0.1 mM) each greatly inhibited these increases. 4. NA (10 microM) led to the production of InsP3 in intact smooth muscle strips and InsP3 (10 microM) increased Ca2+ in Ca(2+)-free solution after a brief application of Ca2+ in beta-escin-skinned smooth muscle strips. NKH477 (0.01 microM) or dibutyryl-cyclic AMP (0.1 mM) modified neither the NA-induced synthesis of InsP3 in intact muscle strips nor the InsP3-induced Ca2+ release in skinned strips. 5. In Ca(2+)-free solution, high K+ (40 and 128 mM) itself failed to increase [Ca2+]i but concentration-dependently enhanced the amplitude of the increase in [Ca2+]i induced by 10 microM NA with a parallel enhancement of the maximum rate of rise.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8298800

  14. cAMP dependent and independent regulation of thyroglobulin synthesis by two clones of the OVNIS 6H thyroid cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouani, A; Hovsépian, S; Fayet, G

    1987-07-01

    The hormonal regulation of thyroglobulin synthesis has been studied using two independent clones of the OVNIS 6H cell line. Insulin, hydrocortisone and TSH were able to stimulate thyroglobulin synthesis, whereas transferrin, somatostatin and glycyl-histidyl-lysine were without effect. Insulin stimulated thyroglobulin synthesis without affecting cAMP production. Hydrocortisone, when combined with insulin was a stimulator too; this stimulation was not accompanied by an increase in cAMP. TSH alone was unable to stimulate either cAMP or thyroglobulin synthesis. The stimulatory effect of TSH on thyroglobulin synthesis took place only when combined with insulin or insulin plus hydrocortisone, and was mediated by cAMP. Consequently, insulin and hydrocortisone stimulated thyroglobulin synthesis by cAMP-independent mechanisms, whereas TSH acted via the cAMP system. Forskolin mimicked TSH effects on cAMP and thyroglobulin synthesis. Calf serum inhibited cAMP and thyroglobulin production. Optimal cAMP and thyroglobulin synthesis as well as TSH responsiveness were obtained in serum-free medium supplemented with 5 micrograms/ml insulin, 100 nM hydrocortisone and 1 mU/ml TSH.

  15. Analysis of a cAMP regulated coactivator family reveals an alternative phosphorylation motif for AMPK family members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonntag, Tim; Moresco, James J; Vaughan, Joan M; Matsumura, Shigenobu; Yates, John R; Montminy, Marc

    2017-01-01

    The second messenger cAMP stimulates cellular gene expression via the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of the transcription factor CREB and through dephosphorylation of the cAMP-responsive transcriptional coactivators (CRTCs). Under basal conditions, CRTCs are phosphorylated by members of the AMPK family of Ser/Thr kinases and sequestered in the cytoplasm via a phosphorylation-dependent association with 14-3-3 proteins. Increases in cAMP promote the dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation of CRTCs, where they bind to CREB and stimulate relevant target genes. Although they share considerable sequence homology, members of the CRTC family exert non-overlapping effects on cellular gene expression through as yet unidentified mechanisms. Here we show that the three CRTCs exhibit distinct patterns of 14-3-3 binding at three conserved sites corresponding to S70, S171, and S275 (in CRTC2). S171 functions as the gatekeeper site for 14-3-3 binding; it acts cooperatively with S275 in stabilizing this interaction following its phosphorylation by the cAMP-responsive SIK and the cAMP-nonresponsive MARK kinases. Although S171 contains a consensus recognition site for phosphorylation by AMPK family members, S70 and S275 carry variant motifs (MNTGGS275LPDL), lacking basic residues that are otherwise critical for SIK/MARK recognition as well as 14-3-3 binding. Correspondingly, the activity of these motifs differs between CRTC family members. As the variant (SLPDL) motif is present and apparently phosphorylated in other mammalian proteins, our studies suggest that the regulation of cellular targets by AMPK family members is more extensive than previously appreciated.

  16. Insulin elevates leptin secretion and mRNA levels via cyclic AMP in 3T3-L1 adipocytes deprived of glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Tsubai

    2016-11-01

    Conclusion: Insulin alone stimulates leptin secretion and elevates leptin mRNA levels via cAMP under the lack of glucose metabolism, while glucose is a significant and ambivalent effector on the insulin effects of leptin.

  17. Cyclic-AMP metabolism in synaptic growth, strength and precision: Neural and behavioral phenotype-specific counterbalancing effects between dnc PDE and rut AC mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Ueda, Atsushi; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2012-01-01

    Two classic learning mutants in Drosophila, rutabaga (rut) and dunce (dnc), are defective in cAMP synthesis and degradation, respectively, exhibiting a variety of neuronal and behavioral defects. We ask how the opposing effects of these mutations on cAMP levels modify subsets of phenotypes, and whether any specific phenotypes could be ameliorated by biochemical counter balancing effects in dnc rut double mutants. Our study at larval neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) demonstrate that dnc mutation...

  18. Differential regulation by AMP and ADP of AMPK complexes containing different γ subunit isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ross, Fiona A; Jensen, Thomas Elbenhardt; Hardie, D Grahame

    2016-01-01

    The g subunits of heterotrimeric AMPK complexes contain the binding sites for the regulatory adenine nucleotides AMP, ADP and ATP. We addressed whether complexes containing different g isoforms display different responses to adenine nucleotides by generating cells stably expressing FLAG-tagged ve......The g subunits of heterotrimeric AMPK complexes contain the binding sites for the regulatory adenine nucleotides AMP, ADP and ATP. We addressed whether complexes containing different g isoforms display different responses to adenine nucleotides by generating cells stably expressing FLAG......-tagged versions of the g1, g2 or g3 isoform. When assayed at a physiological ATP concentration (5 mM), g1- and g2-containing complexes were allosterically activated almost 10-fold by AMP, with EC50 values one to two orders of magnitude lower than the ATP concentration. By contrast, g3 complexes were barely...... activated by AMP under these conditions, although we did observe some activation at lower ATP concentrations. Despite this, all three complexes were activated, due to increased Thr172 phosphorylation, when cells were incubated with mitochondrial inhibitors that increase cellular AMP. With g1 complexes...

  19. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) improves the diabetic cytopathy (DCP) via up-regulation of CGRP and cAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Liucheng; Song, Tao; Yi, Chaoran; Huang, Yi; Yu, Wen; Ling, Lin; Dai, Yutian; Wei, Zhongqing

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanism of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation (TENS) on the diabetic cytopathy (DCP) in the diabetic bladder. A total of 45 rats were randomly divided into diabetes mellitus (DM)/TENS group (n=15), DM group (n=15) and control group (n=15). The rats in the DM/TENS and TENS groups were electronically stimulated (stimulating parameters: intensity-31 V, frequency-31 Hz, and duration of stimulation of 15 min) for three weeks. Bladder histology, urodynamics and contractile responses to field stimulation and carbachol were determined. The expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was analyzed by RT-PCR and Western blotting. The results showed that contractile responses of the DM rats were ameliorated after 3 weeks of TENS. Furthermore, TENS significantly increased bladder wet weight, volume threshold for micturition and reduced PVR, V% and cAMP content of the bladder. The mRNA and protein levels of CGRP in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in the DM/TENS group were higher than those in the DM group. TENS also significantly up-regulated the cAMP content in the bladder body and base compared with diabetic rats. We conclude that TENS can significantly improve the urine contractility and ameliorate the feeling of bladder fullness in DM rats possibly via up-regulation of cAMP and CGRP in DRG.

  20. Dual pathways regulate neurite outgrowth in enteric ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeone, D M; Romanchuk, G; Mulholland, M W

    1994-10-01

    Primary cultures of guinea pig myenteric plexus ganglia were used to examine the ability of agents that activate adenylate cyclase or mimic intracellular adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) to stimulate morphological growth. Dose-dependent increases in neurite length and density were produced in enteric neuronal cultures by forskolin (212% of control), cholera toxin (356% of control), or the permeant cAMP analogues 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate and dibutyryl cAMP. (R)-p-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate, an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent kinases, blocked the growth-promoting effects of cAMP analogues but not of nerve growth factor (NGF). Activation of cAMP-dependent signaling pathways also increased production of mRNA for alpha-tubulin and microtubule-associated protein 2. Dual pathways, regulated by NGF and cAMP-dependent protein kinases, influence growth signaling in enteric ganglia.

  1. Different cAMP sources are critically involved in G protein?coupled receptor CRHR1 signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Inda, Carolina; dos Santos Claro, Paula A.; Bonfiglio, Juan J.; Senin, Sergio A.; Maccarrone, Giuseppina; Turck, Christoph W.; Silberstein, Susana

    2016-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) activates G protein-dependent and internalization-dependent signaling mechanisms. Here, we report that the cyclic AMP (cAMP) response of CRHR1 in physiologically relevant scenarios engages separate cAMP sources, involving the atypical soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in addition to transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). cAMP produced by tmACs and sAC is required for the acute phase of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 activation trigg...

  2. cAMP-dependent signaling regulates the adipogenic effect of n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lise; Pedersen, Lone Møller; Liaset, Bjørn

    2008-01-01

    -adipogenic action of n-6 PUFAs was dependent on a cAMP-dependent protein kinase-mediated induction of cyclooxygenase expression and activity. We show that n-6 PUFAs were pro-adipogenic when combined with a high carbohydrate diet, but non-adipogenic when combined with a high protein diet in mice. The high protein...... diet increased the glucagon/insulin ratio, leading to elevated cAMP-dependent signaling and induction of cyclooxygenase-mediated prostaglandin synthesis. Mice fed the high protein diet had a markedly lower feed efficiency than mice fed the high carbohydrate diet. Yet, oxygen consumption and apparent...... heat production were similar. Mice on a high protein diet had increased hepatic expression of PGC-1alpha (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1alpha) and genes involved in energy-demanding processes like urea synthesis and gluconeogenesis. We conclude that cAMP signaling...

  3. The role of exchange protein directly activated by cyclic AMP 2-mediated calreticulin expression in the decidualization of human endometrial stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusama, Kazuya; Yoshie, Mikihiro; Tamura, Kazuhiro; Nakayama, Takahiro; Nishi, Hirotaka; Isaka, Keiichi; Tachikawa, Eiichi

    2014-01-01

    Decidualization of human endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) accompanied by the production of prolactin (PRL) and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP) 1 and rounded-cell morphology is indispensable for the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. Protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated cAMP signaling is known to be crucial for decidualization. We previously reported that activation of a cAMP mediator, called Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (EPAC) promotes cAMP analog- or ovarian steroid-induced decidualization in cultured human ESCs. In addition, small interfering RNA-mediated knock-down of the EPAC subtypes, EPAC1 or EPAC2, or knock-down of Rap1, a downstream factor of EPAC signaling, blocked functional and morphological decidualization of ESCs. However, factors downstream of EPAC2 other than Rap1 have not been determined. The present study was undertaken to identify additional downstream targets of EPAC2 associated with decidualization. Using proteomic analysis, we identified calreticulin (CRT) as a potential target of EPAC2. Knock-down of CRT expression in cultured ESCs significantly inhibited PKA-selective cAMP analog- or PKA-selective cAMP analog plus EPAC-selective cAMP analog-induced PRL and IGFBP1 expression. Furthermore, CRT knock-down suppressed the ovarian steroid-stimulated PRL and IGFBP1 expression and morphological differentiation, and silencing of EPAC2 or CRT significantly increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity with enhanced p21 expression and decreased p53 expression. These results suggest that EPAC2 and CRT are associated with cellular senescence in ESCs. In conclusion, we demonstrate here that EPAC2-mediated CRT expression is essential for the functional and morphological differentiation of ESCs into decidual cells. Furthermore, both EPAC2 and CRT might prevent ESCs from undergoing abnormal cellular senescence during decidualization.

  4. Levels of cyclic-AMP and cyclic-GMP in porcine oocyte-cumulus complexes and cumulus-free oocytes derived from small and middle follicles during the first 24-hour period of in vitro maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okudaira, Yuichi; Wakai, Takuya; Funahashi, Hiroaki

    2017-04-21

    The objective of this study was to compare the cAMP and cGMP levels in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) derived from the middle follicles (MFs, 3-6 mm in diameter) and small follicles (SFs, 1-3 mm in diameter) of pre-pubertal gilts during the first 24-h period of maturation in vitro (IVM). Both cAMP and cGMP levels in MF- and SF-derived oocytes did not change during this period. Although the cAMP levels increased in the COCs at 10 and 20 h after the start of IVM, the levels of cAMP were significantly higher in MF-derived COCs than in SF-derived COCs at 20 h after the start of IVM. On the other hand, the cGMP levels in COCs decreased to basal levels between 10 and 20 h after the start of the IVM, whereas cGMP levels were lower in SF-derived COCs than in MF-derived COCs during the first 10 h. The number of cumulus cells was larger in the MF-derived COCs than in the SF-derived COCs during the first 20-h period of IVM. The estimated cAMP level per cumulus cell at 10 h after the start of the IVM was higher in SF-derived COCs than in MF-derived COCs, whereas the estimated cGMP level per cumulus cell was no different between MF- and SF-derived COCs. From these results, we conclude that cAMP and cGMP levels in COCs, but not in oocytes, drastically change during the first 20-h period of IVM, and that both cAMP and cGMP levels significantly differ between MF- and SF-derived COCs.

  5. Molecular and functional identification of cyclic AMP-sensitive BKCa potassium channels (ZERO variant) and L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels in single rat juxtaglomerular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ulla G; Jørgensen, Finn; Andreasen, Ditte

    2003-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying the type and functional significance of potassium channels and voltage-dependent calcium channels (Ca(v)) in single rat JG cells using whole-cell patch clamp. Single JG cells displayed outward rectification at positive membrane potentials and limited net currents......, respectively. Double immunofluorescence confirmed the presence of BKCa and renin in the same cell. cAMP increased the outward current by 1.6-fold, and this was inhibited by 74% with iberiotoxin. Expression of the cAMP-sensitive splice variant (ZERO) of BKCa was confirmed in single-sampled JG cells by RT...... no effect. We conclude that JG cells express functional cAMP-sensitive BKCa channels (the ZERO splice variant) and voltage-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels....

  6. Increased expression and secretion of r-Gsp protein, rat counterpart of complement C1s precursor, during cyclic AMP-induced differentiation in rat C6 glioma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Masanori; Nakashima, Shigeru; Banno, Yoshiko; Yamada, Jun; Sawada, Motoshi; Yoshimura, Shin ichi; Kaku, Yasuhiko; Iwama, Toru; Shinoda, Jun; Sakai, Noboru

    2002-10-15

    The gene, termed r-gsp, was originally isolated during identification of differentiation-associated molecules in rat C6 glial cells. Its mRNA expression was markedly increased during cAMP-induced glial cell differentiation. The deduced amino acid sequence of r-gsp was homologous to those of complement C1s precursors of hamsters and humans. In the present study, we raised anti-peptide antibody against r-Gsp protein and analyzed its change during cAMP-induced differentiation. The 90-kDa r-Gsp protein increased time-dependently and reached the maximal level ( approximately 7.6-fold increase) at 24 h in response to dibutyryl cyclic AMP (dbcAMP) and theophylline. Moreover, it was secreted into the medium and then was cleaved to form disulfide-linked fragments, one of which was 30 kDa, similar to C1s, suggesting its processing in the extracellular space. In fact, the partially purified r-Gsp from culture medium was cleaved by active human C1r to form a 30-kDa polypeptide. Moreover, secreted r-Gsp protein cleaved human C4alpha to yield C4alpha' and associated with human serum C1-esterase inhibitor, strongly suggesting that r-Gsp protein is rat C1s. However, in C6 cells overexpressing r-Gsp, their morphology and proliferation rate were similar to those in parent C6 cells. These results suggest that r-Gsp protein could not induce glial differentiation alone, and suggest that r-Gsp protein was secreted as a proenzyme and processed in culture medium. Its possible role in glial cell differentiation will be discussed.

  7. Low doses of cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase inhibitors rapidly evoke opioid receptor-mediated thermal hyperalgesia in naïve mice which is converted to prominent analgesia by cotreatment with ultra-low-dose naltrexone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, Stanley M; Shen, Ke-Fei

    2008-09-22

    Systemic (s.c.) injection in naïve mice of cyclic AMP-phosphodiesterase (cAMP-PDE) inhibitors, e.g. 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine [(IBMX) or caffeine, 10 mg/kg] or the more specific cAMP-PDE inhibitor, rolipram (1 mug/kg), rapidly evokes thermal hyperalgesia (lasting >5 h). These effects appear to be mediated by enhanced excitatory opioid receptor signaling, as occurs during withdrawal in opioid-dependent mice. Cotreatment of these mice with ultra-low-dose naltrexone (NTX, 0.1 ng/kg-1 pg/kg, s.c.) results in prominent opioid analgesia (lasting >4 h) even when the dose of rolipram is reduced to 1 pg/kg. Cotreatment of these cAMP-PDE inhibitors in naïve mice with an ultra-low-dose (0.1 ng/kg) of the kappa-opioid receptor antagonist, nor-binaltorphimine (nor-BNI) or the mu-opioid receptor antagonist, beta-funaltrexamine (beta-FNA) also results in opioid analgesia. These excitatory effects of cAMP-PDE inhibitors in naïve mice may be mediated by enhanced release of small amounts of endogenous bimodally-acting (excitatory/inhibitory) opioid agonists by neurons in nociceptive networks. Ultra-low-dose NTX, nor-BNI or beta-FNA selectively antagonizes high-efficacy excitatory (hyperalgesic) Gs-coupled opioid receptor-mediated signaling in naïve mice and results in rapid conversion to inhibitory (analgesic) Gi/Go-coupled opioid receptor-mediated signaling which normally requires activation by much higher doses of opioid agonists. Cotreatment with a low subanalgesic dose of kelatorphan, an inhibitor of multiple endogenous opioid peptide-degrading enzymes, stabilizes endogenous opioid agonists released by cAMP-PDE inhibitors, resulting in conversion of the hyperalgesia to analgesia without requiring selective blockade of excitatory opioid receptor signaling. The present study provides a novel pharmacologic paradigm that may facilitate development of valuable non-narcotic clinical analgesics utilizing cotreatment with ultra-low-dose rolipram plus ultra-low-dose NTX or related

  8. Role of the cAMP Pathway in Glucose and Lipid Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravnskjaer, Kim; Madiraju, Anila; Montminy, Marc

    2016-01-01

    3'-5'-Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP or cAMP) was first described in 1957 as an intracellular second messenger mediating the effects of glucagon and epinephrine on hepatic glycogenolysis (Berthet et al., J Biol Chem 224(1):463-475, 1957). Since this initial characterization, cAMP has been firmly established as a versatile molecular signal involved in both central and peripheral regulation of energy homeostasis and nutrient partitioning. Many of these effects appear to be mediated at the transcriptional level, in part through the activation of the transcription factor CREB and its coactivators. Here we review current understanding of the mechanisms by which the cAMP signaling pathway triggers metabolic programs in insulin-responsive tissues.

  9. Nitric oxide increases cyclic GMP levels, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)alpha1-specific activity and glucose transport in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, A S; Long, Y C; de Castro Barbosa, T

    2010-01-01

    an insulin-independent signalling mechanism. Consistent with this, spermine NONOate increased AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-alpha1-associated activity (1.7-fold, p .... CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Pharmacological treatment of skeletal muscle with spermine NONOate increases glucose transport via insulin-independent signalling pathways involving increased intracellular cGMP levels and AMPK-alpha1-associated activity....

  10. Vascular effects and cyclic AMP production produced by VIP, PHM, PHV, PACAP-27, PACAP-38, and NPY on rabbit ovarian artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, W; Sheikh, S P; Ottesen, B

    1996-01-01

    The relationship between vessel tone and cAMP production induced by vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), peptide histidine methionine (PHM), peptide histidine valine (PHV), pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP-27 and PACAP-38), and neuropeptide Y (NPY) was investigated in...

  11. The MRP4/ABCC4 gene encodes a novel apical organic anion transporter in human kidney proximal tubules: putative efflux pump for urinary cAMP and cGMP.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aubel, R.A.M.H. van; Smeets, P.H.E.; Peters, J.G.P.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Russel, F.G.M.

    2002-01-01

    The cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP play key roles in cellular signaling and the extracellular regulation of fluid balance. In the kidney, cAMP is excreted across the apical proximal tubular membrane into urine, where it reduces phosphate reabsorption through a dipyridamole-sensitive mechanism that

  12. Polarized Th1 and Th2 cells are less responsive to negative feedback by receptors coupled to the AC/cAMP system compared to freshly isolated T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijink, Irene H; Vellenga, Edo; Borger, Peter; Postma, Dirkje S; Monchy, Jan G R de; Kauffman, Henk F

    1 The adenylyl cyclase (AC)/cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) system is known to negatively regulate transcriptional activity of T cells, thereby possibly modulating T-cell-mediated responses at the sites of inflammation. Effects of cAMP have been widely studied in freshly isolated T cells and

  13. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta activates insulin-like growth factor-I gene transcription in osteoblasts. Identification of a novel cyclic AMP signaling pathway in bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umayahara, Y.; Ji, C.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.; McCarthy, T. L.

    1997-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a key role in skeletal growth by stimulating bone cell replication and differentiation. We previously showed that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and other cAMP-activating agents enhanced IGF-I gene transcription in cultured primary rat osteoblasts through promoter 1, the major IGF-I promoter, and identified a short segment of the promoter, termed HS3D, that was essential for hormonal regulation of IGF-I gene expression. We now demonstrate that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) delta is a major component of a PGE2-stimulated DNA-protein complex involving HS3D and find that C/EBPdelta transactivates IGF-I promoter 1 through this site. Competition gel shift studies first indicated that a core C/EBP half-site (GCAAT) was required for binding of a labeled HS3D oligomer to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Southwestern blotting and UV-cross-linking studies showed that the HS3D probe recognized a approximately 35-kDa nuclear protein, and antibody supershift assays indicated that C/EBPdelta comprised most of the PGE2-activated gel-shifted complex. C/EBPdelta was detected by Western immunoblotting in osteoblast nuclear extracts after treatment of cells with PGE2. An HS3D oligonucleotide competed effectively with a high affinity C/EBP site from the rat albumin gene for binding to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Co-transfection of osteoblast cell cultures with a C/EBPdelta expression plasmid enhanced basal and PGE2-activated IGF-I promoter 1-luciferase activity but did not stimulate a reporter gene lacking an HS3D site. By contrast, an expression plasmid for the related protein, C/EBPbeta, did not alter basal IGF-I gene activity but did increase the response to PGE2. In osteoblasts and in COS-7 cells, C/EBPdelta, but not C/EBPbeta, transactivated a reporter gene containing four tandem copies of HS3D fused to a minimal promoter; neither transcription factor stimulated a gene with four copies of an HS3D mutant that was unable to bind osteoblast

  14. Adenylyl cyclase alpha and cAMP signaling mediate Plasmodium sporozoite apical regulated exocytosis and hepatocyte infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Ono

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Malaria starts with the infection of the liver of the host by Plasmodium sporozoites, the parasite form transmitted by infected mosquitoes. Sporozoites migrate through several hepatocytes by breaching their plasma membranes before finally infecting one with the formation of an internalization vacuole. Migration through host cells induces apical regulated exocytosis in sporozoites. Here we show that apical regulated exocytosis is induced by increases in cAMP in sporozoites of rodent (P. yoelii and P. berghei and human (P. falciparum Plasmodium species. We have generated P. berghei parasites deficient in adenylyl cyclase alpha (ACalpha, a gene containing regions with high homology to adenylyl cyclases. PbACalpha-deficient sporozoites do not exocytose in response to migration through host cells and present more than 50% impaired hepatocyte infectivity in vivo. These effects are specific to ACalpha, as re-introduction of ACalpha in deficient parasites resulted in complete recovery of exocytosis and infection. Our findings indicate that ACalpha and increases in cAMP levels are required for sporozoite apical regulated exocytosis, which is involved in sporozoite infection of hepatocytes.

  15. Sweet taste receptor expressed in pancreatic beta-cells activates the calcium and cyclic AMP signaling systems and stimulates insulin secretion.

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    Yuko Nakagawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sweet taste receptor is expressed in the taste buds and enteroendocrine cells acting as a sugar sensor. We investigated the expression and function of the sweet taste receptor in MIN6 cells and mouse islets. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The expression of the sweet taste receptor was determined by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Changes in cytoplasmic Ca(2+ ([Ca(2+](c and cAMP ([cAMP](c were monitored in MIN6 cells using fura-2 and Epac1-camps. Activation of protein kinase C was monitored by measuring translocation of MARCKS-GFP. Insulin was measured by radioimmunoassay. mRNA for T1R2, T1R3, and gustducin was expressed in MIN6 cells. In these cells, artificial sweeteners such as sucralose, succharin, and acesulfame-K increased insulin secretion and augmented secretion induced by glucose. Sucralose increased biphasic increase in [Ca(2+](c. The second sustained phase was blocked by removal of extracellular calcium and addition of nifedipine. An inhibitor of inositol(1, 4, 5-trisphophate receptor, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, blocked both phases of [Ca(2+](c response. The effect of sucralose on [Ca(2+](c was inhibited by gurmarin, an inhibitor of the sweet taste receptor, but not affected by a G(q inhibitor. Sucralose also induced sustained elevation of [cAMP](c, which was only partially inhibited by removal of extracellular calcium and nifedipine. Finally, mouse islets expressed T1R2 and T1R3, and artificial sweeteners stimulated insulin secretion. CONCLUSIONS: Sweet taste receptor is expressed in beta-cells, and activation of this receptor induces insulin secretion by Ca(2+ and cAMP-dependent mechanisms.

  16. The freeze-thaw stress response of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is growth phase specific and is controlled by nutritional state via the RAS-cyclic AMP signal transduction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J I; Grant, C M; Attfield, P V; Dawes, I W

    1997-10-01

    The ability of cells to survive freezing and thawing is expected to depend on the physiological conditions experienced prior to freezing. We examined factors affecting yeast cell survival during freeze-thaw stress, including those associated with growth phase, requirement for mitochondrial functions, and prior stress treatment(s), and the role played by relevant signal transduction pathways. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was frozen at -20 degrees C for 2 h (cooling rate, less than 4 degrees C min-1) and thawed on ice for 40 min. Supercooling occurred without reducing cell survival and was followed by freezing. Loss of viability was proportional to the freezing duration, indicating that freezing is the main determinant of freeze-thaw damage. Regardless of the carbon source used, the wild-type strain and an isogenic petite mutant ([rho 0]) showed the same pattern of freeze-thaw tolerance throughout growth, i.e., high resistance during lag phase and low resistance during log phase, indicating that the response to freeze-thaw stress is growth phase specific and not controlled by glucose repression. In addition, respiratory ability and functional mitochondria are necessary to confer full resistance to freeze-thaw stress. Both nitrogen and carbon source starvation led to freeze-thaw tolerance. The use of strains affected in the RAS-cyclic AMP (RAS-cAMP) pathway or supplementation of an rca1 mutant (defective in the cAMP phosphodiesterase gene) with cAMP showed that the freeze-thaw response of yeast is under the control of the RAS-cAMP pathway. Yeast did not adapt to freeze-thaw stress following repeated freeze-thaw treatment with or without a recovery period between freeze-thaw cycles, nor could it adapt following pretreatment by cold shock. However, freeze-thaw tolerance of yeast cells was induced during fermentative and respiratory growth by pretreatment with H2O2, cycloheximide, mild heat shock, or NaCl, indicating that cross protection between freeze-thaw stress

  17. Transcription factor CREB3L1 mediates cAMP and glucocorticoid regulation of arginine vasopressin gene transcription in the rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Mingkwan; Greenwood, Michael P; Mecawi, Andre S; Loh, Su Yi; Rodrigues, José Antunes; Paton, Julian F R; Murphy, David

    2015-10-26

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP), a neuropeptide hormone that functions in the regulation of water homeostasis by controlling water re-absorption at kidneys, is synthesised in supraoptic nucleus and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. An increase in plasma osmolality stimulates secretion of AVP to blood circulation and induces AVP synthesis in these nuclei. Although studies on mechanism of AVP transcriptional regulation in hypothalamus proposed that cAMP and glucocorticoids positively and negatively regulate Avp expression, respectively, the molecular mechanisms have remained elusive. Recently, we identified CREB3L1 (cAMP-responsive element binding protein 3 like 1) as a putative transcription factor of Avp transcription in the rat hypothalamus. However the mechanism of how CREB3L1 is regulated in response of hyperosmotic stress in the neurons of hypothalamus has never been reported. This study aims to investigate effect of previously reported regulators (cAMP and glucocorticoid) of Avp transcription on transcription factor CREB3L1 in order to establish a molecular explanation for cAMP and glucocorticoids effect on AVP expression. The effect of cAMP and glucocorticoid treatment on Creb3l1 was investigated in both AtT20 cells and hypothalamic organotypic cultures. The expression of Creb3l1 was increased in both mRNA and protein level by treatment with forskolin, which raises intracellular cAMP levels. Activation of cAMP by forskolin also increased Avp promoter activity in AtT20 cells and this effect was blunted by shRNA mediated silencing of Creb3l1. The forskolin induced increase in Creb3l1 expression was diminished by combined treatment with dexamethasone, and, in vivo, intraperitoneal dexamethasone injection blunted the increase in Creb3l1 and Avp expression induced by hyperosmotic stress. Here we shows that cAMP and glucocorticoid positively and negatively regulate Creb3l1 expression in the rat hypothalamus, respectively, and regulation of cAMP on AVP

  18. A cyclic GMP signalling module that regulates gliding motility in a malaria parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W Moon

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The ookinete is a motile stage in the malaria life cycle which forms in the mosquito blood meal from the zygote. Ookinetes use an acto-myosin motor to glide towards and penetrate the midgut wall to establish infection in the vector. The regulation of gliding motility is poorly understood. Through genetic interaction studies we here describe a signalling module that identifies guanosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP as an important second messenger regulating ookinete differentiation and motility. In ookinetes lacking the cyclic nucleotide degrading phosphodiesterase delta (PDEdelta, unregulated signalling through cGMP results in rounding up of the normally banana-shaped cells. This phenotype is suppressed in a double mutant additionally lacking guanylyl cyclase beta (GCbeta, showing that in ookinetes GCbeta is an important source for cGMP, and that PDEdelta is the relevant cGMP degrading enzyme. Inhibition of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase, PKG, blocks gliding, whereas enhanced signalling through cGMP restores normal gliding speed in a mutant lacking calcium dependent protein kinase 3, suggesting at least a partial overlap between calcium and cGMP dependent pathways. These data demonstrate an important function for signalling through cGMP, and most likely PKG, in dynamically regulating ookinete gliding during the transmission of malaria to the mosquito.

  19. Interaction of 125I-labeled Ca2+-dependent regulator protein with cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase and its inhibitory protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richman, P.G.; Klee, C.B.

    1978-01-01

    The Ca 2+ -dependent regulator protein of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase was labeled with 125 I to the extent of 1 mol of monoiodotyrosine per mol. The iodinated protein showed a small decrease in affinity for phosphodiesterase but gave the same maximal level of activation of the enzyme as did the unmodified regulator protein. Iodinated regulator protein formed complexes with both highly purified cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase and phosphodiesterase inhibitory protein in the presence but not in the absence of Ca 2+ as demonstrated by ultracentrifugation in glycerol gradients. Cross-linking experiments indicate that the Ca 2+ -dependent regulator protein interacts with the large subunit of the inhibitory protein

  20. Thyrotropin regulates IL-6 expression in CD34+ fibrocytes: clear delineation of its cAMP-independent actions.

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    Nupur Raychaudhuri

    Full Text Available IL-6 plays diverse roles in normal and disease-associated immunity such as that associated with Graves' disease (GD. In that syndrome, the orbit undergoes remodeling during a process known as thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO. Recently, CD34(+ fibrocytes were found to infiltrate the orbit in TAO where they transition into CD34(+ orbital fibroblasts. Surprisingly, fibrocytes display high levels of functional thyrotropin receptor (TSHR, the central antigen in GD. We report here that TSH and the pathogenic anti-TSHR antibodies that drive hyperthyroidism in GD induce IL-6 expression in fibrocytes and orbital fibroblasts. Unlike TSHR signaling in thyroid epithelium, that occurring in fibrocytes is completely independent of adenylate cyclase activation and cAMP generation. Instead TSH activates PDK1 and both AKT/PKB and PKC pathways. Expression and use of PKCβII switches to that of PKCµ as fibrocytes transition to TAO orbital fibroblasts. This shift is imposed by CD34(- orbital fibroblasts but reverts when CD34(+ fibroblasts are isolated. The up-regulation of IL-6 by TSH results from coordinately enhanced IL-6 gene promoter activity and increased IL-6 mRNA stability. TSH-dependent IL-6 expression requires activity at both CREB (-213 to -208 nt and NF-κB (-78 to -62 nt binding sites. These results provide novel insights into the molecular action of TSH and signaling downstream for TSHR in non-thyroid cells. Fibrocytes neither express adenylate cyclase nor generate cAMP and thus these findings are free from any influence of cAMP-related signaling. They identify potential therapeutic targets for TAO.

  1. Cl- transport pathways regulated by Ca++, cAMP, and pH in human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, P.; Gruenstein, E.

    1987-01-01

    Under basal conditions Cl - efflux from human fibroblasts occurs with a rate constant of permeability of 0.08 min -1 . 50% of the basal efflux is due to Cl - /anion exchange and is DIDS inhibitable, 25% is due to Na + /K + /Cl - cotransport and is furosemide inhibitable, and 20% is due to an electrically conductive pathway. Increasing intracellular Ca ++ with A23187 stimulates Cl - efflux by 30%. This increase appears to occur entirely via an electrically conducting pathway, but unlike basal Cl - conductance, it is DIDS sensitive. Exposure of the cells to dibutyryl cAMP stimulates Cl - efflux by 15%. They do not yet know whether the cAMP stimulated pathway is electrically conductive, but the stimulation is additive with that caused by elevated Ca ++ suggesting that different pathways are activated. Elevation of intracellular pH by any of several standard methods increases Cl - efflux by as much as 700%. The pH effect appears to be mediated by a Cl - /anion exchange pathway since it is DIDS sensitive and electroneutral. Previous work from this laboratory describing a transient rapid efflux of Cl - followed by a slower efflux phase can now be explained as the result of a transient alkalinization of cells rather than as 2 subcellular Cl - compartments. This alkalinization occurs when cells are transferred from a 5% CO 2 atmosphere during 36 Cl - load to ambient CO 2 for efflux

  2. Regulation of cAMP Responsive Element Binding Protein 3-Like 1 (Creb3l1 Expression by Orphan Nuclear Receptor Nr4a1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Greenwood

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP (cAMP inducible transcription factor cAMP responsive element binding protein 3 like 1 (Creb3l1 is strongly activated in the hypothalamus in response to hyperosmotic cues such as dehydration (DH. We have recently shown that Creb3l1 expression is upregulated by cAMP pathways in vitro, however the exact mechanisms are not known. Here we show that increasing Creb3l1 transcription by raising cAMP levels in mouse pituitary AtT20 cells automatically initiates cleavage of Creb3l1, leading to a greater abundance of the transcriptionally active N-terminal portion. Inhibiting protein synthesis indicated that de novo protein synthesis of an intermediary transcription factor was required for Creb3l1 induction. Strategic mining of our microarray data from dehydrated rodent hypothalamus revealed four candidates, reduced to two by analysis of acute hyperosmotic-induced transcriptional activation profiles in the hypothalamus, and one, orphan nuclear receptor Nr4a1, by direct shRNA mediated silencing in AtT20 cells. We show that activation of Creb3l1 transcription by Nr4a1 involves interaction with a single NBRE site in the promoter region. The ability to activate Creb3l1 transcription by this pathway in vitro is dictated by the level of methylation of a CpG island within the proximal promoter/5′UTR of this gene. We thus identify a novel cAMP-Nr4a1-Creb3l1 transcriptional pathway in AtT20 cells and also, our evidence would suggest, in the hypothalamus.

  3. Cows are not mice: the role of cyclic AMP, phosphodiesterases, and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in the maintenance of meiotic arrest in bovine oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau-Goeseels, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Meiotic maturation in mammalian oocytes is initiated during fetal development, and is then arrested at the dictyate stage - possibly for several years. Oocyte meiosis resumes in preovulatory follicles in response to the lutenizing hormone (LH) surge or spontaneously when competent oocytes are removed from follicles and cultured. The mechanisms involved in meiotic arrest and resumption in bovine oocytes are not fully understood, and several studies point to important differences between oocytes from rodent and livestock species. This paper reviews earlier and contemporary studies on the effects of cAMP-elevating agents and phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzyme inhibitors on the maintenance of meiotic arrest in bovine oocytes in vitro. Contrary to results obtained with mouse oocytes, bovine oocyte meiosis is inhibited by activators of the energy sensor adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK, mammalian gene PRKA), which is activated by AMP, the degradation product of cAMP. It is not clear whether or not the effects were due to AMPK activation, and they may depend on culture conditions. Evidence suggests that other signaling pathways (for example, the cGMP/nitric oxide pathway) are involved in bovine oocyte meiotic arrest, but further studies are needed to understand the interactions between the signaling pathways that lead to maturation promoting factor (MPF) being inactive or active. An improved understanding of the mechanisms involved in the control of bovine oocyte meiosis will facilitate better control of the process in vitro, resulting in increased developmental competence and increased efficiency of in vitro embryo production procedures. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Angiopoietin-like protein 4 is an exercise-induced hepatokine in humans, regulated by glucagon and cAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingerslev, Bodil; Hansen, Jakob S; Hoffmann, Christoph; Clemmesen, Jens O; Secher, Niels H; Scheler, Mika; Hrabĕ de Angelis, Martin; Häring, Hans U; Pedersen, Bente K; Weigert, Cora; Plomgaard, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Angiopoietin-like protein-4 (ANGPTL4) is a circulating protein that is highly expressed in liver and implicated in regulation of plasma triglyceride levels. Systemic ANGPTL4 increases during prolonged fasting and is suggested to be secreted from skeletal muscle following exercise. We investigated the origin of exercise-induced ANGPTL4 in humans by measuring the arterial-to-venous difference over the leg and the hepato-splanchnic bed during an acute bout of exercise. Furthermore, the impact of the glucagon-to-insulin ratio on plasma ANGPTL4 was studied in healthy individuals. The regulation of ANGPTL4 was investigated in both hepatic and muscle cells. The hepato-splanchnic bed, but not the leg, contributed to exercise-induced plasma ANGPTL4. Further studies using hormone infusions revealed that the glucagon-to-insulin ratio is an important regulator of plasma ANGPTL4 as elevated glucagon in the absence of elevated insulin increased plasma ANGPTL4 in resting subjects, whereas infusion of somatostatin during exercise blunted the increase of both glucagon and ANGPTL4. Moreover, activation of the cAMP/PKA signaling cascade let to an increase in ANGPTL4 mRNA levels in hepatic cells, which was prevented by inhibition of PKA. In humans, muscle ANGPTL4 mRNA increased during fasting, with only a marginal further induction by exercise. In human muscle cells, no inhibitory effect of AMPK activation could be demonstrated on ANGPTL4 expression. The data suggest that exercise-induced ANGPTL4 is secreted from the liver and driven by a glucagon-cAMP-PKA pathway in humans. These findings link the liver, insulin/glucagon, and lipid metabolism together, which could implicate a role of ANGPTL4 in metabolic diseases. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  5. Ex vivo and in vivo studies of CME-1, a novel polysaccharide purified from the mycelia of Cordyceps sinensis that inhibits human platelet activation by activating adenylate cyclase/cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wan-Jung; Chang, Nen-Chung; Jayakumar, Thanasekaran; Liao, Jiun-Cheng; Lin, Mei-Jiun; Wang, Shwu-Huey; Chou, Duen-Suey; Thomas, Philip Aloysius; Sheu, Joen-Rong

    2014-12-01

    CME-1, a novel water-soluble polysaccharide, was purified from the mycelia of Cordyceps sinensis, and its chemical structure was characterized to contain mannose and galactose in a ratio of 4:6 (27.6 kDa). CME-1 was originally observed to exert a potent inhibitory effect on tumor migration and a cytoprotective effect against oxidative stress. Activation of platelets caused by arterial thrombosis is relevant to various cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). However, no data are available concerning the effects of CME-1 on platelet activation. Hence, the purpose of this study was to examine the ex vivo and in vivo antithrombotic effects of CME-1 and its possible mechanisms in platelet activation. The aggregometry, immunoblotting, flow cytometric analysis and platelet functional analysis were used in this study. CME-1 (2.3-7.6 μM) exhibited highly potent activity in inhibiting human platelet aggregation when stimulated by collagen, thrombin, and arachidonic acid but not by U46619. CME-1 inhibited platelet activation accompanied by inhibiting Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), thromboxane B2 (TxB2) and hydroxyl radical (OH(●)) formation. However, CME-1 interrupted neither FITC-triflavin nor FITC-collagen binding to platelets. CME-1 markedly increased cyclic AMP levels, but not cyclic GMP levels, and stimulated vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation. SQ22536, an inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, but not ODQ, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase, obviously reversed the CME-1-mediated effects on platelet aggregation and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP), Akt, p38 MAPK phosphorylation, and TxB2 formation. CME-1 substantially prolonged the closure time of whole blood and the occlusion time of platelet plug formation. This study demonstrates for the first time that CME-1 exhibits highly potent antiplatelet activity that may initially activate adenylate cyclase/cyclic AMP and, subsequently, inhibit intracellular signals (such as Akt and

  6. Targeting brain tumor cAMP: the case for sex-specific therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Warrington

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A relationship between cyclic adenosine 3’, 5’-monophosphate (cAMP levels and brain tumor biology has been evident for nearly as long as cAMP and its synthetase, adenylate cyclase (ADCY have been known. The importance of the pathway in brain tumorigenesis has been demonstrated in vitro and in multiple animal models. Recently, we provided human validation for a cooperating oncogenic role for cAMP in brain tumorigenesis when we found that SNPs in ADCY8 were correlated with glioma (brain tumor risk in individuals with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1. Together, these studies provide a strong rationale for targeting cAMP in brain tumor therapy. However, the cAMP pathway is well known to be sexually dimorphic, and SNPs in ADCY8 affected glioma risk in a sex-specific fashion, elevating the risk for females while protecting males. The cAMP pathway can be targeted at multiple levels in the regulation of its synthesis and degradation. Sex differences in response to drugs that target cAMP regulators indicate that successful targeting of the cAMP pathway for brain tumor patients is likely to require matching specific mechanisms of drug action with patient sex.

  7. Convergent regulation of skeletal muscle Ca2+ channels by dystrophin, the actin cytoskeleton, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Barry D.; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A.

    2005-03-01

    The skeletal muscle L-type Ca2+ channel (CaV1.1), which is responsible for initiating muscle contraction, is regulated by phosphorylation by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in a voltage-dependent manner that requires direct physical association between the channel and the kinase mediated through A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). The role of the actin cytoskeleton in channel regulation was investigated in skeletal myocytes cultured from wild-type mice, mdx mice that lack the cytoskeletal linkage protein dystrophin, and a skeletal muscle cell line, 129 CB3. Voltage dependence of channel activation was shifted positively, and potentiation was greatly diminished in mdx myocytes and in 129 CB3 cells treated with the microfilament stabilizer phalloidin. Voltage-dependent potentiation by strong depolarizing prepulses was reduced in mdx myocytes but could be restored by positively shifting the stimulus potentials to compensate for the positive shift in the voltage dependence of gating. Inclusion of PKA in the pipette caused a negative shift in the voltage dependence of activation and restored voltage-dependent potentiation in mdx myocytes. These results show that skeletal muscle Ca2+ channel activity and voltage-dependent potentiation are controlled by PKA and microfilaments in a convergent manner. Regulation of Ca2+ channel activity by hormones and neurotransmitters that use the PKA signal transduction pathway may interact in a critical way with the cytoskeleton and may be impaired by deletion of dystrophin, contributing to abnormal regulation of intracellular calcium concentrations in dystrophic muscle.

  8. Cyclic AMP-Elevating Capacity of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin-Hemolysin Is Sufficient for Lung Infection but Not for Full Virulence of Bordetella pertussis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Škopová, Karolína; Tomalová, Barbora; Kanchev, Ivan; Rossmann, Pavel; Švédová, Martina; Adkins, Irena; Bíbová, Ilona; Tomala, Jakub; Mašín, Jiří; Guiso, N.; Osička, Radim; Sedláček, Radislav; Kovář, Marek; Šebo, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 6 (2017), s. 1-22, č. článku e00937-16. ISSN 0019-9567 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV16-28126A; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-14547S; GA ČR GA13-12885S; GA ČR GA15-09157S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/12/0460; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015064; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015040 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : Bordetella pertussis * adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin * cAMP intoxication Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology; EE - Microbiology, Virology (UMG-J) OBOR OECD: Microbiology; Microbiology (UMG-J) Impact factor: 3.593, year: 2016

  9. Role of cyclic AMP sensor Epac1 in masseter muscle hypertrophy and myosin heavy chain transition induced by β2-adrenoceptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Umeki, Daisuke; Mototani, Yasumasa; Jin, Huiling; Cai, Wenqian; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Suita, Kenji; Saeki, Yasutake; Fujita, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Okumura, Satoshi

    2014-12-15

    The predominant isoform of β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) in skeletal muscle is β2-AR and that in the cardiac muscle is β1-AR. We have reported that Epac1 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1), a new protein kinase A-independent cAMP sensor, does not affect cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload or chronic isoproterenol (isoprenaline) infusion. However, the role of Epac1 in skeletal muscle hypertrophy remains poorly understood. We thus examined the effect of disruption of Epac1, the major Epac isoform in skeletal muscle, on masseter muscle hypertrophy induced by chronic β2-AR stimulation with clenbuterol (CB) in Epac1-null mice (Epac1KO). The masseter muscle weight/tibial length ratio was similar in wild-type (WT) and Epac1KO at baseline and was significantly increased in WT after CB infusion, but this increase was suppressed in Epac1KO. CB treatment significantly increased the proportion of myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIb at the expense of that of MHC IId/x in both WT and Epac1KO, indicating that Epac1 did not mediate the CB-induced MHC isoform transition towards the faster isoform. The mechanism of suppression of CB-mediated hypertrophy in Epac1KO is considered to involve decreased activation of Akt signalling. In addition, CB-induced histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) phosphorylation on serine 246 mediated by calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII), which plays a role in skeletal muscle hypertrophy, was suppressed in Epac1KO. Our findings suggest that Epac1 plays a role in β2-AR-mediated masseter muscle hypertrophy, probably through activation of both Akt signalling and CaMKII/HDAC4 signalling. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  10. Cyclic-AMP metabolism in synaptic growth, strength and precision: Neural and behavioral phenotype-specific counterbalancing effects between dnc PDE and rut AC mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Atsushi; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2012-01-01

    Two classic learning mutants in Drosophila, rutabaga (rut) and dunce (dnc), are defective in cAMP synthesis and degradation, respectively, exhibiting a variety of neuronal and behavioral defects. We ask how the opposing effects of these mutations on cAMP levels modify subsets of phenotypes, and whether any specific phenotypes could be ameliorated by biochemical counter balancing effects in dnc rut double mutants. Our study at larval neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) demonstrate that dnc mutations caused severe defects in nerve terminal morphology, characterized by unusually large synaptic boutons and aberrant innervation patterns. Interestingly, a counterbalancing effect led to rescue of the aberrant innervation patterns but the enlarged boutons in dnc rut double mutant remained as extreme as those in dnc. In contrast to dnc, rut mutations strongly affect synaptic transmission. Focal loose-patch recording data accumulated over 4 years suggest that synaptic currents in rut boutons were characterized by unusually large temporal dispersion and a seasonal variation in the amount of transmitter release, with diminished synaptic currents in summer months. Experiments with different rearing temperatures revealed that high temperature (29–30 °C) decreased synaptic transmission in rut, but did not alter dnc and WT. Importantly, the large temporal dispersion and abnormal temperature dependence of synaptic transmission, characteristic of rut, still persisted in dnc rut double mutants. To interpret these results in a proper perspective, we reviewed previously documented differential effects of dnc and rut mutations and their genetic interactions in double mutants on a variety of physiological and behavioral phenotypes. The cases of rescue in double mutants are associated with gradual developmental and maintenance processes whereas many behavioral and physiological manifestations on faster time scales could not be rescued. We discuss factors that could contribute to the

  11. cAMP/PKA signaling pathway contributes to neuronal apoptosis via regulating IDE expression in a mixed model of type 2 diabetes and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huajie; Yang, Song; Wu, Jian; Ji, Lei; Zhu, Linfeng; Cao, Liping; Huang, Jinzhong; Jiang, Qingqing; Wei, Jiang; Liu, Meng; Mao, Keshi; Wei, Ning; Xie, Wei; Yang, Zhilong

    2018-02-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) may play a relevant role in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD), however, the underlying mechanism was not clear yet. We developed an animal model presenting both AD and T2D, morris water maze (MWM) test and recognition task were performed to trace the cognitive function. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were determined to trace the metabolism evolution. TUNEL assay and apoptosis-related protein levels were analyzed for the detection of neuronal apoptosis. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) agonist bucladesine or protein kinase (PKA) inhibitor H-89 were used to determine the effects of cAMP/PKA signaling pathway on IDE expression and neuronal apoptosis. The results showed that T2D contributes to the AD progress by accelerating and worsening spatial memory and recognition dysfunctions. Metabolic parameters and glucose tolerance were significantly changed in the presence of the AD and T2D. The significantly induced neuronal apoptosis and increased pro-apoptotic proteins in mice with AD and T2D were also observed. We showed the decreased expression level of IDE and the activating of cAMP/PKA signaling pathway in AD and T2D mice. Further studies indicated that cAMP agonist decreased the expression level of IDE and induced the neuronal apoptosis in mice with AD and T2D; whereas PKA inhibitor H-89 treatment showed the completely opposite results. Our study indicated that, in the T2D and AD mice, cAMP/PKA signaling pathway and IDE may participate in the contribute role of T2D in accelerating the pathological process of AD via causing the accumulation of Aβ and neuronal apoptosis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Different cAMP sources are critically involved in G protein-coupled receptor CRHR1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, Carolina; Dos Santos Claro, Paula A; Bonfiglio, Juan J; Senin, Sergio A; Maccarrone, Giuseppina; Turck, Christoph W; Silberstein, Susana

    2016-07-18

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) activates G protein-dependent and internalization-dependent signaling mechanisms. Here, we report that the cyclic AMP (cAMP) response of CRHR1 in physiologically relevant scenarios engages separate cAMP sources, involving the atypical soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in addition to transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). cAMP produced by tmACs and sAC is required for the acute phase of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 activation triggered by CRH-stimulated CRHR1, but only sAC activity is essential for the sustained internalization-dependent phase. Thus, different cAMP sources are involved in different signaling mechanisms. Examination of the cAMP response revealed that CRH-activated CRHR1 generates cAMP after endocytosis. Characterizing CRHR1 signaling uncovered a specific link between CRH-activated CRHR1, sAC, and endosome-based signaling. We provide evidence of sAC being involved in an endocytosis-dependent cAMP response, strengthening the emerging model of GPCR signaling in which the cAMP response does not occur exclusively at the plasma membrane and introducing the notion of sAC as an alternative source of cAMP. © 2016 Inda et al.

  13. Parathyroid hormone contributes to the down-regulation of cytochrome P450 3A through the cAMP/PI3K/PKC/PKA/NF-κB signaling pathway in secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Ryusei; Ikegami, Komei; Enoki, Yuki; Imafuku, Tadashi; Fujimura, Rui; Bi, Jing; Nishida, Kento; Sakaguchi, Yoshiaki; Murata, Michiya; Maeda, Hitoshi; Hirata, Kenshiro; Jingami, Sachiko; Ishima, Yu; Tanaka, Motoko; Matsushita, Kazutaka; Komaba, Hirotaka; Fukagawa, Masafumi; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    2017-12-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), which affects, not only renal clearance, but also non-renal clearance, is accompanied by a decline in renal function. Although it has been suggested that humoral factors, such as uremic toxins that accumulate in the body under CKD conditions, could be involved in the changes associated with non-renal drug clearance, the overall process is not completely understood. In this study, we report on the role of parathyroid hormone (PTH), a middle molecule uremic toxin, on the expression of drug metabolizing or transporting proteins using rats with secondary hyperparathyroidism (SHPT) as models. In SHPT rats, hepatic and intestinal CYP3A expression was suppressed, but the changes were recovered by the administration of the calcimimetic cinacalcet, a PTH suppressor. Under the same experimental conditions, a pharmacokinetic study using orally administered midazolam, a substrate for CYP3A, showed that the AUC was increased by 5 times in SHPT rats, but that was partially recovered by a cinacalcet treatment. This was directly tested in rat primary hepatocytes and intestinal Caco-2 cells where the expression of the CYP3A protein was down-regulated by PTH (1-34). In Caco-2 cells, PTH (1-34) down-regulated the expression of CYP3A mRNA, but an inactive PTH derivative (13-34) had no effect. 8-Bromo-cyclic adenosine monophosphate, a membrane-permeable cAMP analog, reduced mRNA expression of CYP3A whereas the inhibitors of PI3K, NF-κB, PKC and PKA reversed the PTH-induced CYP3A down-regulation. These results suggest that PTH down-regulates CYP3A through multiple signaling pathways, including the PI3K/PKC/PKA/NF-κB pathway after the elevation of intracellular cAMP, and the effect of PTH can be prevented by cinacalcet treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A Fluorometric Activity Assay for Light-Regulated Cyclic-Nucleotide-Monophosphate Actuators.

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    Schumacher, Charlotte Helene; Körschen, Heinz G; Nicol, Christopher; Gasser, Carlos; Seifert, Reinhard; Schwärzel, Martin; Möglich, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    As a transformative approach in neuroscience and cell biology, optogenetics grants control over manifold cellular events with unprecedented spatiotemporal definition, reversibility, and noninvasiveness. Sensory photoreceptors serve as genetically encoded, light-regulated actuators and hence embody the cornerstone of optogenetics. To expand the scope of optogenetics, ever more naturally occurring photoreceptors are being characterized, and synthetic photoreceptors with customized, light-regulated function are being engineered. Perturbational control over intracellular cyclic-nucleotide-monophosphate (cNMP) levels is achieved via sensory photoreceptors that catalyze the making and breaking of these second messengers in response to light. To facilitate discovery, engineering and quantitative characterization of such light-regulated cNMP actuators, we have developed an efficient fluorometric assay. Both the formation and the hydrolysis of cNMPs are accompanied by proton release which can be quantified with the fluorescent pH indicator 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). This assay equally applies to nucleotide cyclases, e.g., blue-light-activated bPAC, and to cNMP phosphodiesterases, e.g., red-light-activated LAPD. Key benefits include potential for parallelization and automation, as well as suitability for both purified enzymes and crude cell lysates. The BCECF assay hence stands to accelerate discovery and characterization of light-regulated actuators of cNMP metabolism.

  15. Continuous versus cyclic progesterone exposure differentially regulates hippocampal gene expression and functional profiles.

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    Liqin Zhao

    Full Text Available This study investigated the impact of chronic exposure to continuous (CoP4 versus cyclic progesterone (CyP4 alone or in combination with 17β-estradiol (E2 on gene expression profiles targeting bioenergetics, metabolism and inflammation in the adult female rat hippocampus. High-throughput qRT-PCR analyses revealed that ovarian hormonal depletion induced by ovariectomy (OVX led to multiple significant gene expression alterations, which were to a great extent reversed by co-administration of E2 and CyP4. In contrast, co-administration of E2 and CoP4 induced a pattern highly resembling OVX. Bioinformatics analyses further revealed clear disparities in functional profiles associated with E2+CoP4 and E2+CyP4. Genes involved in mitochondrial energy (ATP synthase α subunit; Atp5a1, redox homeostasis (peroxiredoxin 5; Prdx5, insulin signaling (insulin-like growth factor I; Igf1, and cholesterol trafficking (liver X receptor α subtype; Nr1h3, differed in direction of regulation by E2+CoP4 (down-regulation relative to OVX and E2+CyP4 (up-regulation relative to OVX. In contrast, genes involved in amyloid metabolism (β-secretase; Bace1 differed only in degree of regulation, as both E2+CoP4 and E2+CyP4 induced down-regulation at different efficacy. E2+CyP4-induced changes could be associated with regulation of progesterone receptor membrane component 1(Pgrmc1. In summary, results from this study provide evidence at the molecular level that differing regimens of hormone therapy (HT can induce disparate gene expression profiles in brain. From a translational perspective, confirmation of these results in a model of natural menopause, would imply that the common regimen of continuous combined HT may have adverse consequences whereas a cyclic combined regimen, which is more physiological, could be an effective strategy to maintain neurological health and function throughout menopausal aging.

  16. Enhancing E. coli tolerance towards oxidative stress via engineering its global regulator cAMP receptor protein (CRP.

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    Souvik Basak

    Full Text Available Oxidative damage to microbial hosts often occurs under stressful conditions during bioprocessing. Classical strain engineering approaches are usually both time-consuming and labor intensive. Here, we aim to improve E. coli performance under oxidative stress via engineering its global regulator cAMP receptor protein (CRP, which can directly or indirectly regulate redox-sensing regulators SoxR and OxyR, and other ~400 genes in E. coli. Error-prone PCR technique was employed to introduce modifications to CRP, and three mutants (OM1~OM3 were identified with improved tolerance via H(2O(2 enrichment selection. The best mutant OM3 could grow in 12 mM H(2O(2 with the growth rate of 0.6 h(-1, whereas the growth of wild type was completely inhibited at this H(2O(2 concentration. OM3 also elicited enhanced thermotolerance at 48°C as well as resistance against cumene hydroperoxide. The investigation about intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS, which determines cell viability, indicated that the accumulation of ROS in OM3 was always lower than in WT with or without H(2O(2 treatment. Genome-wide DNA microarray analysis has shown not only CRP-regulated genes have demonstrated great transcriptional level changes (up to 8.9-fold, but also RpoS- and OxyR-regulated genes (up to 7.7-fold. qRT-PCR data and enzyme activity assay suggested that catalase (katE could be a major antioxidant enzyme in OM3 instead of alkyl hydroperoxide reductase or superoxide dismutase. To our knowledge, this is the first work on improving E. coli oxidative stress resistance by reframing its transcription machinery through its native global regulator. The positive outcome of this approach may suggest that engineering CRP can be successfully implemented as an efficient strain engineering alternative for E. coli.

  17. PGD2 stimulates osteoprotegerin synthesis via AMP-activated protein kinase in osteoblasts: Regulation of ERK and SAPK/JNK.

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    Kainuma, Shingo; Tokuda, Haruhiko; Kuroyanagi, Gen; Yamamoto, Naohiro; Ohguchi, Reou; Fujita, Kazuhiko; Matsushima-Nishiwaki, Rie; Kozawa, Osamu; Otsuka, Takanobu

    2015-10-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key enzyme sensing cellular energy metabolism, is currently known to regulate multiple metabolic pathways. Osteoprotegerin plays a pivotal role in the regulation of bone metabolism by inhibiting osteoclast activation. We have previously reported that prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) stimulates the synthesis of osteoprotegerin through the activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, p44/p42 MAP kinase and stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (SAPK/JNK) in osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cells. On the basis of these findings, we herein investigated the implication of AMPK in PGD2-stimulated osteoprotegerin synthesis in these cells. PGD2 induced the phosphorylation of AMPKα (Thr-172) and AMPKβ (Ser-108), and the phosphorylation of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, a direct AMPK substrate. Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, which suppressed the phosphorylation of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, significantly attenuated both the release and the mRNA levels of osteoprotegerin stimulated by PGD2. The PGD2-induced phosphorylation of p44/p42 MAP kinase and SAPK/JNK but not p38 MAP kinase were markedly inhibited by compound C. These results strongly suggest that AMPK regulates the PGD2-stimulated osteoprotegerin synthesis at a point upstream of p44/p42 MAP kinase and SAPK/JNK in osteoblasts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Intermingled cAMP, cGMP and calcium spatiotemporal dynamics in developing neuronal circuits

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    Stefania eAveraimo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available cAMP critically modulates the development of neuronal connectivity. It is involved in a wide range of cellular processes that require independent regulation. However, our understanding of how this single second messenger achieves specific modulation of the signaling pathways involved remains incomplete. The subcellular compartmentalization and temporal regulation of cAMP signals have recently been identified as important coding strategies leading to specificity. Dynamic interactions of this cyclic nucleotide with other second messenger including calcium and cGMP are critically involved in the regulation of spatiotemporal control of cAMP. Recent technical improvements of fluorescent sensors facilitate cAMP monitoring, whereas optogenetic tools permit spatial and temporal control of cAMP manipulations, all of which enabled the direct investigation of spatiotemporal characteristics of cAMP modulation in developing neurons. Focusing on neuronal polarization, neurotransmitter specification, axon guidance, and refinement of neuronal connectivity, we summarize herein the recent advances in understanding the features of cAMP signals and their dynamic interactions with calcium and cGMP involved in shaping the nervous system.

  19. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK mediates nutrient regulation of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP in pancreatic beta-cells.

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    Maayan Shaked

    Full Text Available Thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP regulates critical biological processes including inflammation, stress and apoptosis. TXNIP is upregulated by glucose and is a critical mediator of hyperglycemia-induced beta-cell apoptosis in diabetes. In contrast, the saturated long-chain fatty acid palmitate, although toxic to the beta-cell, inhibits TXNIP expression. The mechanisms involved in the opposing effects of glucose and fatty acids on TXNIP expression are unknown. We found that both palmitate and oleate inhibited TXNIP in a rat beta-cell line and islets. Palmitate inhibition of TXNIP was independent of fatty acid beta-oxidation or esterification. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK has an important role in cellular energy sensing and control of metabolic homeostasis; therefore we investigated its involvement in nutrient regulation of TXNIP. As expected, glucose inhibited whereas palmitate stimulated AMPK. Pharmacologic activators of AMPK mimicked fatty acids by inhibiting TXNIP. AMPK knockdown increased TXNIP expression in presence of high glucose with and without palmitate, indicating that nutrient (glucose and fatty acids effects on TXNIP are mediated in part via modulation of AMPK activity. TXNIP is transcriptionally regulated by carbohydrate response element-binding protein (ChREBP. Palmitate inhibited glucose-stimulated ChREBP nuclear entry and recruitment to the Txnip promoter, thereby inhibiting Txnip transcription. We conclude that AMPK is an important regulator of Txnip transcription via modulation of ChREBP activity. The divergent effects of glucose and fatty acids on TXNIP expression result in part from their opposing effects on AMPK activity. In light of the important role of TXNIP in beta-cell apoptosis, its inhibition by fatty acids can be regarded as an adaptive/protective response to glucolipotoxicity. The finding that AMPK mediates nutrient regulation of TXNIP may have important implications for the pathophysiology and treatment

  20. RpoS-independent evolution reveals the importance of attenuated cAMP/CRP regulation in high hydrostatic pressure resistance acquisition in E. coli.

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    Gayán, Elisa; Cambré, Alexander; Michiels, Chris W; Aertsen, Abram

    2017-08-17

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) processing is an attractive non-thermal alternative to food pasteurization. Nevertheless, the large inter- and intra-species variations in HHP resistance among foodborne pathogens and the ease by which they can acquire extreme resistance are an issue of increasing concern. Since RpoS activity has been considered as a central determinant in the HHP resistance of E. coli and its pathovars, this study probed for the potential of an E. coli MG1655 ΔrpoS mutant to acquire HHP resistance by directed evolution. Despite the higher initial HHP sensitivity of the ΔrpoS mutant compared to the wild-type strain, evolved lineages of the former readily managed to restore or even succeed wild-type levels of resistance. A number of these ΔrpoS derivatives were affected in cAMP/CRP regulation, and this could be causally related to their HHP resistance. Subsequent inspection revealed that some of previously isolated HHP-resistant mutants derived from the wild-type strain also incurred a causal decrease in cAMP/CRP regulation. cAMP/CRP attenuated HHP-resistant mutants also exhibited higher resistance to fosfomycin, a preferred treatment for STEC infections. As such, this study reveals attenuation of cAMP/CRP regulation as a relevant and RpoS-independent evolutionary route towards HHP resistance in E. coli that coincides with fosfomycin resistance.

  1. Acetic acid activates the AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathway to regulate lipid metabolism in bovine hepatocytes.

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    Xinwei Li

    Full Text Available The effect of acetic acid on hepatic lipid metabolism in ruminants differs significantly from that in monogastric animals. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the regulation mechanism of acetic acid on the hepatic lipid metabolism in dairy cows. The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK signaling pathway plays a key role in regulating hepatic lipid metabolism. In vitro, bovine hepatocytes were cultured and treated with different concentrations of sodium acetate (neutralized acetic acid and BML-275 (an AMPKα inhibitor. Acetic acid consumed a large amount of ATP, resulting in an increase in AMPKα phosphorylation. The increase in AMPKα phosphorylation increased the expression and transcriptional activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α, which upregulated the expression of lipid oxidation genes, thereby increasing lipid oxidation in bovine hepatocytes. Furthermore, elevated AMPKα phosphorylation reduced the expression and transcriptional activity of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c and the carbohydrate responsive element-binding protein, which reduced the expression of lipogenic genes, thereby decreasing lipid biosynthesis in bovine hepatocytes. In addition, activated AMPKα inhibited the activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase. Consequently, the triglyceride content in the acetate-treated hepatocytes was significantly decreased. These results indicate that acetic acid activates the AMPKα signaling pathway to increase lipid oxidation and decrease lipid synthesis in bovine hepatocytes, thereby reducing liver fat accumulation in dairy cows.

  2. Reciprocal regulation of ARPP-16 by PKA and MAST3 kinases provides a cAMP-regulated switch in protein phosphatase 2A inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musante, Veronica; Li, Lu; Kanyo, Jean; Lam, Tukiet T; Colangelo, Christopher M; Cheng, Shuk Kei; Brody, A Harrison; Greengard, Paul; Le Novère, Nicolas; Nairn, Angus C

    2017-01-01

    ARPP-16, ARPP-19, and ENSA are inhibitors of protein phosphatase PP2A. ARPP-19 and ENSA phosphorylated by Greatwall kinase inhibit PP2A during mitosis. ARPP-16 is expressed in striatal neurons where basal phosphorylation by MAST3 kinase inhibits PP2A and regulates key components of striatal signaling. The ARPP-16/19 proteins were discovered as substrates for PKA, but the function of PKA phosphorylation is unknown. We find that phosphorylation by PKA or MAST3 mutually suppresses the ability of the other kinase to act on ARPP-16. Phosphorylation by PKA also acts to prevent inhibition of PP2A by ARPP-16 phosphorylated by MAST3. Moreover, PKA phosphorylates MAST3 at multiple sites resulting in its inhibition. Mathematical modeling highlights the role of these three regulatory interactions to create a switch-like response to cAMP. Together, the results suggest a complex antagonistic interplay between the control of ARPP-16 by MAST3 and PKA that creates a mechanism whereby cAMP mediates PP2A disinhibition. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.24998.001 PMID:28613156

  3. Improving ethanol tolerance of Escherichia coli by rewiring its global regulator cAMP receptor protein (CRP.

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    Huiqing Chong

    Full Text Available A major challenge in bioethanol fermentation is the low tolerance of the microbial host towards the end product bioethanol. Here we report to improve the ethanol tolerance of E. coli from the transcriptional level by engineering its global transcription factor cAMP receptor protein (CRP, which is known to regulate over 400 genes in E. coli. Three ethanol tolerant CRP mutants (E1- E3 were identified from error-prone PCR libraries. The best ethanol-tolerant strain E2 (M59T had the growth rate of 0.08 h(-1 in 62 g/L ethanol, higher than that of the control at 0.06 h(-1. The M59T mutation was then integrated into the genome to create variant iE2. When exposed to 150 g/l ethanol, the survival of iE2 after 15 min was about 12%, while that of BW25113 was <0.01%. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR analysis (RT-PCR on 444 CRP-regulated genes using OpenArray® technology revealed that 203 genes were differentially expressed in iE2 in the absence of ethanol, whereas 92 displayed differential expression when facing ethanol stress. These genes belong to various functional groups, including central intermediary metabolism (aceE, acnA, sdhD, sucA, iron ion transport (entH, entD, fecA, fecB, and general stress response (osmY, rpoS. Six up-regulated and twelve down-regulated common genes were found in both iE2 and E2 under ethanol stress, whereas over one hundred common genes showed differential expression in the absence of ethanol. Based on the RT-PCR results, entA, marA or bhsA was knocked out in iE2 and the resulting strains became more sensitive towards ethanol.

  4. Novel reciprocal regulation of cAMP signaling and apoptosis by orphan G-protein-coupled receptor GPRC5A gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Minoru; Zang, Liqing; Oka, Takehiko; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Shimada, Yasuhito; Nishimura, Yuhei; Tanaka, Toshio

    2006-01-01

    GPRC5A is a member of G-protein-coupled receptors, which was originally identified as an all-trans-retinoic acid-induced gene. Although recent studies reported that this gene was highly expressed in the cancer cell lines and that GPRC5A might positively regulate cell proliferation, its mechanism remains unknown. We investigated the upstream and downstream signaling of GPRC5A and its biological function, and found that cAMP signaling is the novel GPRC5A induction pathway. When GPRC5A gene was overexpressed, intracellular cAMP concentration was decreased, and Gsα gene expression was downregulated. On the other hand, RNA interference of GPRC5A increased mRNA levels of Gsα and intracellular cAMP, reduced cell number, and induced apoptosis. Conversely, cell number was increased by GPRC5A overexpression. We first report the novel negative feedback model of cAMP signaling through GPRC5A gene expression. This evidence explains one of the mechanisms of the GPRC5A-regulated cell growth in some cancer cell lines

  5. Salinomycin activates AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent autophagy in cultured osteoblastoma cells: a negative regulator against cell apoptosis.

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    Lun-qing Zhu

    Full Text Available The malignant osteoblastoma has poor prognosis, thus the search for novel and more efficient chemo-agents against this disease is urgent. Salinomycin induces broad anti-cancer effects both in vivo and in vitro, however, its role in osteoblastoma is still not clear.Salinomycin induced both apoptosis and autophagy in cultured U2OS and MG-63 osteoblastoma cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA, or by RNA interference (RNAi of light chain 3B (LC3B, enhanced salinomycin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Salinomycin induced a profound AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK activation, which was required for autophagy induction. AMPK inhibition by compound C, or by AMPKα RNAi prevented salinomycin-induced autophagy activation, while facilitating cancer cell death and apoptosis. On the other hand, the AMPK agonist AICAR promoted autophagy activation in U2OS cells. Salinomycin-induced AMPK activation was dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS production in osteoblastoma cells. Antioxidant n-acetyl cysteine (NAC significantly inhibited salinomycin-induced AMPK activation and autophagy induction.Salinomycin activates AMPK-dependent autophagy in osteoblastoma cells, which serves as a negative regulator against cell apoptosis. AMPK-autophagy inhibition might be a novel strategy to sensitize salinomycin's effect in cancer cells.

  6. Salinomycin activates AMP-activated protein kinase-dependent autophagy in cultured osteoblastoma cells: a negative regulator against cell apoptosis.

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    Zhu, Lun-qing; Zhen, Yun-fang; Zhang, Ya; Guo, Zhi-xiong; Dai, Jin; Wang, Xiao-dong

    2013-01-01

    The malignant osteoblastoma has poor prognosis, thus the search for novel and more efficient chemo-agents against this disease is urgent. Salinomycin induces broad anti-cancer effects both in vivo and in vitro, however, its role in osteoblastoma is still not clear. Salinomycin induced both apoptosis and autophagy in cultured U2OS and MG-63 osteoblastoma cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), or by RNA interference (RNAi) of light chain 3B (LC3B), enhanced salinomycin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Salinomycin induced a profound AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, which was required for autophagy induction. AMPK inhibition by compound C, or by AMPKα RNAi prevented salinomycin-induced autophagy activation, while facilitating cancer cell death and apoptosis. On the other hand, the AMPK agonist AICAR promoted autophagy activation in U2OS cells. Salinomycin-induced AMPK activation was dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in osteoblastoma cells. Antioxidant n-acetyl cysteine (NAC) significantly inhibited salinomycin-induced AMPK activation and autophagy induction. Salinomycin activates AMPK-dependent autophagy in osteoblastoma cells, which serves as a negative regulator against cell apoptosis. AMPK-autophagy inhibition might be a novel strategy to sensitize salinomycin's effect in cancer cells.

  7. Dibenzoylmethane exerts metabolic activity through regulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK-mediated glucose uptake and adipogenesis pathways.

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    Nami Kim

    Full Text Available Dibenzoylmethane (DBM has been shown to exert a variety of beneficial effects on human health. However, the mechanism of action is poorly understood. In this study, DBM increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and stimulated glucose uptake in a skeletal muscle cell line. Both knockdown of AMPK with siRNA and inhibition with AMPK inhibitor blocked DBM-induced glucose uptake. DBM increased the concentration of intracellular calcium and glucose uptake due to DBM was abolished by STO-609 (a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase inhibitor. DBM stimulated phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK, which was blocked by pretreatment with compound C, an AMPK inhibitor. The expression of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4 was increased by DBM. The translocation of GLUT4 to the plasma membrane was also increased by DBM in AMPK dependently. In addition, DBM suppressed weight gain and prevented fat accumulation in the liver and abdomen in mice fed a high-fat diet. In pre-adipocyte cells, DBM decreased the activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC, the rate-limiting enzyme of fatty acid synthesis. Expression of the adipogenic gene, fatty acid synthase (FAS, was suppressed by DBM in an AMPK-dependent manner. These results showed that the beneficial metabolic effects of DBM might be due to regulation of glucose uptake via AMPK in skeletal muscle and inhibition of adipogenesis in pre-adipocytes.

  8. Salinomycin Activates AMP-Activated Protein Kinase-Dependent Autophagy in Cultured Osteoblastoma Cells: A Negative Regulator against Cell Apoptosis

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    Zhang, Ya; Guo, Zhi-xiong; Dai, Jin; Wang, Xiao-dong

    2013-01-01

    Background The malignant osteoblastoma has poor prognosis, thus the search for novel and more efficient chemo-agents against this disease is urgent. Salinomycin induces broad anti-cancer effects both in vivo and in vitro, however, its role in osteoblastoma is still not clear. Key Findings Salinomycin induced both apoptosis and autophagy in cultured U2OS and MG-63 osteoblastoma cells. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA), or by RNA interference (RNAi) of light chain 3B (LC3B), enhanced salinomycin-induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis. Salinomycin induced a profound AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation, which was required for autophagy induction. AMPK inhibition by compound C, or by AMPKα RNAi prevented salinomycin-induced autophagy activation, while facilitating cancer cell death and apoptosis. On the other hand, the AMPK agonist AICAR promoted autophagy activation in U2OS cells. Salinomycin-induced AMPK activation was dependent on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in osteoblastoma cells. Antioxidant n-acetyl cysteine (NAC) significantly inhibited salinomycin-induced AMPK activation and autophagy induction. Conclusions Salinomycin activates AMPK-dependent autophagy in osteoblastoma cells, which serves as a negative regulator against cell apoptosis. AMPK-autophagy inhibition might be a novel strategy to sensitize salinomycin’s effect in cancer cells. PMID:24358342

  9. Down-Regulation of the Na+-Coupled Phosphate Transporter NaPi-IIa by AMP-Activated Protein Kinase

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    Miribane Dërmaku-Sopjani

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The Na+-coupled phosphate transporter NaPi-IIa is the main carrier accomplishing renal tubular phosphate reabsorption. It is driven by the electrochemical Na+ gradient across the apical cell membrane, which is maintained by Na+ extrusion across the basolateral cell membrane through the Na+/K+ ATPase. The operation of NaPi-IIa thus requires energy in order to avoid cellular Na+ accumulation and K+ loss with eventual decrease of cell membrane potential, Cl- entry and cell swelling. Upon energy depletion, early inhibition of Na+-coupled transport processes may delay cell swelling and thus foster cell survival. Energy depletion is sensed by the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, a serine/threonine kinase stimulating several cellular mechanisms increasing energy production and limiting energy utilization. The present study explored whether AMPK influences the activity of NAPi-IIa. Methods: cRNA encoding NAPi-IIa was injected into Xenopus oocytes with or without additional expression of wild-type AMPK (AMPKα1-HA+AMPKβ1-Flag+AMPKγ1-HA, of inactive AMPKαK45R (AMPKα1K45R+AMPKβ1-Flag+AMPKγ1-HA or of constitutively active AMPKγR70Q (AMPKα1-HA+AMPKβ1-Flag+AMPKγ1R70Q. NaPi-IIa activity was estimated from phosphate-induced current in dual electrode voltage clamp experiments. Results: In NaPi-IIa-expressing, but not in water-injected Xenopus oocytes, the addition of phosphate (1 mM to the extracellular bath solution generated a current (Ip, which was significantly decreased by coexpression of wild-type AMPK and of AMPKγR70Q but not of AMPKαK45R. The phosphate-induced current in NaPi-IIa- and AMPK-expressing Xenopus ooocytes was significantly increased by AMPK inhibitor Compound C (20 µM. Kinetic analysis revealed that AMPK significantly decreased the maximal transport rate. Conclusion: The AMP-activated protein kinase AMPK is a powerful regulator of NaPi-IIa and thus of renal tubular phosphate transport.

  10. CB1 receptors down-regulate a cAMP/Epac2/PLC pathway to silence the nerve terminals of cerebellar granule cells.

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    Alonso, Beatris; Bartolomé-Martín, David; Ferrero, José Javier; Ramírez-Franco, Jorge; Torres, Magdalena; Sánchez-Prieto, José

    2017-08-01

    Cannabinoid receptors mediate short-term retrograde inhibition of neurotransmitter release, as well as long-term depression of synaptic transmission at excitatory synapses. The responses of individual nerve terminals in VGLUT1-pHluorin transfected cerebellar granule cells to cannabinoids have shown that prolonged activation of cannabinoid type 1 receptors (CB1Rs) silences a subpopulation of previously active synaptic boutons. Adopting a combined pharmacological and genetic approach to study the molecular mechanisms of CB1R-induced silencing, we found that adenylyl cyclase inhibition decreases cAMP levels while it increases the number of silent synaptic boutons and occludes the induction of further silencing by the cannabinoid agonist HU-210. Guanine nucleotide exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epac proteins) mediate some of the presynaptic effects of cAMP in the potentiation of synaptic transmission. ESI05, a selective Epac2 inhibitor, and U-73122, the specific inhibitor of phospholipase C (PLC), both augment the number of silent synaptic boutons. Moreover, they abolish the capacity of the Epac activator, 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2'-O-methyladenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate monosodium hydrate, to prevent HU-210-induced silencing consistent with PLC signaling lying downstream of Epac2 proteins. Furthermore, Rab3-interacting molecule (RIM)1α KO cells have many more basally silent synaptic boutons (12.9 ± 3.5%) than wild-type cells (1.1 ± 0.5%). HU-210 induced further silencing in these mutant cells, although 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2'-O-methyladenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate monosodium hydrate only awoke the HU-210-induced silence and not the basally silent synaptic boutons. This behavior can be rescued by expressing RIM1α in RIM1α KO cells, these cells behaving very much like wild-type cells. These findings support the hypothesis that a cAMP/Epac/PLC signaling pathway targeting the release machinery appears to mediate cannabinoid

  11. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes

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    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Xiang, Wenpei [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Family Planning Research Institute, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, People' s Republic of China (China); Wang, Yinna [Vascular Medicine Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 10051-5A BST 3, 3501 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Zhang, Xiaoying [Department of Medicine/Endocrinology Division, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 200 Lothrop St., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Billiar, Timothy R., E-mail: billiartr@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks cell death induced by TNF and actinomycin D in cultured hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks NF-{kappa}B activation induced by TNF and actinomycin D. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks DISC formation following TNF and actinomycin D exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks TNF signaling at a proximal step. -- Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF + ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found

  12. Regulation of autophagy by AMP-activated protein kinase/sirtuin 1 pathway reduces spinal cord neurons damage.

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    Yan, Peng; Bai, Liangjie; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yuzhong; Bi, Yunlong; Lv, Gang

    2017-09-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase/sirtuin 1 (AMPK/SIRT1) signaling pathway has been proved to be involved in the regulation of autophagy in various models. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of AMPK/SIRT1 pathway on autophagy after spinal cord injury (SCI). The SCI model was established in rats in vivo and the primary spinal cord neurons were subjected to mechanical injury (MI) in vitro . The apoptosis in spinal cord tissue and neurons was assessed by TUNEL staining and Hoechst 33342 staining, respectively. The autophagy-related proteins levels were detected by Western blot. The activation of AMPK/SIRT1 pathway was determined by Western blot and immunohistochemical staining. We found that the apoptosis of spinal cord tissue and cell damage of spinal cord neurons was obvious after the trauma. The ratio of LC3II/LC3I and level of p62 were first increased significantly and then decreased after the trauma in vivo and in vitro , indicating the defect in autophagy. The levels of p-AMPK and SIRT1 were increased obviously after the trauma in vivo and in vitro . Further activation of the AMPK/SIRT1 pathway by pretreatment with resveratrol, a confirmed activator of the AMPK/SIRT1 pathway, alleviated the cell damage and promoted the autophagy flux via downregulation of p62 in spinal cord neurons at 24 hr after MI. Our results demonstrate that regulation of autophagy by AMPK/SIRT1 pathway can restrain spinal cord neurons damage, which may be a potential intervention of SCI.

  13. Phosphorylation of Cytochrome c Threonine 28 Regulates Electron Transport Chain Activity in Kidney: IMPLICATIONS FOR AMP KINASE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahapatra, Gargi; Varughese, Ashwathy; Ji, Qinqin; Lee, Icksoo; Liu, Jenney; Vaishnav, Asmita; Sinkler, Christopher; Kapralov, Alexandr A.; Moraes, Carlos T.; Sanderson, Thomas H.; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Grossman, Lawrence I.; Kagan, Valerian E.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Salomon, Arthur R.; Edwards, Brian F. P.; Hüttemann, Maik

    2016-10-07

    Mammalian cytochrome c (Cytc) plays a key role in cellular life and death decisions, functioning as an electron carrier in the electron transport chain and as a trigger of apoptosis when released from the mitochondria. However, its regulation is not well understood. We show that the major fraction of Cytc isolated from kidneys is phosphorylated on Thr28, leading to a partial inhibition of respiration in the reaction with cytochrome c oxidase. To further study the effect of Cytc phosphorylation in vitro, we generated T28E phosphomimetic Cytc, revealing superior behavior regarding protein stability and its ability to degrade reactive oxygen species compared with wild-type unphosphorylated Cytc. Introduction of T28E phosphomimetic Cytc into Cytc knock-out cells shows that intact cell respiration, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), and ROS levels are reduced compared with wild type. As we show by high resolution crystallography of wild-type and T28E Cytc in combination with molecular dynamics simulations, Thr28 is located at a central position near the heme crevice, the most flexible epitope of the protein apart from the N and C termini. Finally, in silico prediction and our experimental data suggest that AMP kinase, which phosphorylates Cytc on Thr28 in vitro and colocalizes with Cytc to the mitochondrial intermembrane space in the kidney, is the most likely candidate to phosphorylate Thr28 in vivo. We conclude that Cytc phosphorylation is mediated in a tissue-specific manner and leads to regulation of electron transport chain flux via “controlled respiration,” preventing ΔΨm hyperpolarization, a known cause of ROS and trigger of apoptosis.

  14. Regulation of autophagy by AMP-activated protein kinase/ sirtuin 1 pathway reduces spinal cord neurons damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Yan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: AMP-activated protein kinase/sirtuin 1 (AMPK/SIRT1 signaling pathway has been proved to be involved in the regulation of autophagy in various models. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of AMPK/SIRT1 pathway on autophagy after spinal cord injury (SCI. Materials and Methods:The SCI model was established in rats in vivo and the primary spinal cord neurons were subjected to mechanical injury (MI in vitro. The apoptosis in spinal cord tissue and neurons was assessed by TUNEL staining and Hoechst 33342 staining, respectively. The autophagy-related proteins levels were detected by Western blot. The activation of AMPK/SIRT1 pathway was determined by Western blot and immunohistochemical staining. Results: We found that the apoptosis of spinal cord tissue and cell damage of spinal cord neurons was obvious after the trauma. The ratio of LC3II/LC3I and level of p62 were first increased significantly and then decreased after the trauma in vivo and in vitro, indicating the defect in autophagy. The levels of p-AMPK and SIRT1 were increased obviously after the trauma in vivo and in vitro. Further activation of the AMPK/SIRT1 pathway by pretreatment with resveratrol, a confirmed activator of the AMPK/SIRT1 pathway, alleviated the cell damage and promoted the autophagy flux via downregulation of p62 in spinal cord neurons at 24 hr after MI. Conclusion: Our results demonstrate that regulation of autophagy by AMPK/SIRT1 pathway can restrain spinal cord neurons damage, which may be a potential intervention of SCI.

  15. AMP-activated kinase in human spermatozoa: identification, intracellular localization, and key function in the regulation of sperm motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle-Guisado, Violeta; de Llera, Ana Hurtado; Martin-Hidalgo, David; Mijares, Jose; Gil, Maria C; Alvarez, Ignacio S; Bragado, Maria J; Garcia-Marin, Luis J

    2017-01-01

    AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), a protein that regulates energy balance and metabolism, has recently been identified in boar spermatozoa where regulates key functional sperm processes essential for fertilization. This work's aims are AMPK identification, intracellular localization, and their role in human spermatozoa function. Semen was obtained from healthy human donors. Sperm AMPK and phospho-Thr172-AMPK were analyzed by Western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence. High- and low-quality sperm populations were separated by a 40%-80% density gradient. Human spermatozoa motility was evaluated by an Integrated Semen Analysis System (ISAS) in the presence or absence of the AMPK inhibitor compound C (CC). AMPK is localized along the human spermatozoa, at the entire acrosome, midpiece and tail with variable intensity, whereas its active form, phospho-Thr172-AMPK, shows a prominent staining at the acrosome and sperm tail with a weaker staining in the midpiece and the postacrosomal region. Interestingly, spermatozoa bearing an excess residual cytoplasm show strong AMPK staining in this subcellular compartment. Both AMPK and phospho-Thr172-AMPK human spermatozoa contents exhibit important individual variations. Moreover, active AMPK is predominant in the high motility sperm population, where shows a stronger intensity compared with the low motility sperm population. Inhibition of AMPK activity in human spermatozoa by CC treatment leads to a significant reduction in any sperm motility parameter analyzed: percent of motile sperm, sperm velocities, progressivity, and other motility coefficients. This work identifies and points out AMPK as a new molecular mechanism involved in human spermatozoa motility. Further AMPK implications in the clinical efficiency of assisted reproduction and in other reproductive areas need to be studied.

  16. AMP-activated kinase in human spermatozoa: identification, intracellular localization, and key function in the regulation of sperm motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle-Guisado, Violeta; de Llera, Ana Hurtado; Martin-Hidalgo, David; Mijares, Jose; Gil, Maria C; Alvarez, Ignacio S; Bragado, Maria J; Garcia-Marin, Luis J

    2017-01-01

    AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), a protein that regulates energy balance and metabolism, has recently been identified in boar spermatozoa where regulates key functional sperm processes essential for fertilization. This work's aims are AMPK identification, intracellular localization, and their role in human spermatozoa function. Semen was obtained from healthy human donors. Sperm AMPK and phospho-Thr172-AMPK were analyzed by Western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence. High- and low-quality sperm populations were separated by a 40%–80% density gradient. Human spermatozoa motility was evaluated by an Integrated Semen Analysis System (ISAS) in the presence or absence of the AMPK inhibitor compound C (CC). AMPK is localized along the human spermatozoa, at the entire acrosome, midpiece and tail with variable intensity, whereas its active form, phospho-Thr172-AMPK, shows a prominent staining at the acrosome and sperm tail with a weaker staining in the midpiece and the postacrosomal region. Interestingly, spermatozoa bearing an excess residual cytoplasm show strong AMPK staining in this subcellular compartment. Both AMPK and phospho-Thr172-AMPK human spermatozoa contents exhibit important individual variations. Moreover, active AMPK is predominant in the high motility sperm population, where shows a stronger intensity compared with the low motility sperm population. Inhibition of AMPK activity in human spermatozoa by CC treatment leads to a significant reduction in any sperm motility parameter analyzed: percent of motile sperm, sperm velocities, progressivity, and other motility coefficients. This work identifies and points out AMPK as a new molecular mechanism involved in human spermatozoa motility. Further AMPK implications in the clinical efficiency of assisted reproduction and in other reproductive areas need to be studied. PMID:27678462

  17. AMP-activated kinase in human spermatozoa: identification, intracellular localization, and key function in the regulation of sperm motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Calle-Guisado

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available AMP-activated kinase (AMPK, a protein that regulates energy balance and metabolism, has recently been identified in boar spermatozoa where regulates key functional sperm processes essential for fertilization. This work′s aims are AMPK identification, intracellular localization, and their role in human spermatozoa function. Semen was obtained from healthy human donors. Sperm AMPK and phospho-Thr172-AMPK were analyzed by Western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence. High- and low-quality sperm populations were separated by a 40%-80% density gradient. Human spermatozoa motility was evaluated by an Integrated Semen Analysis System (ISAS in the presence or absence of the AMPK inhibitor compound C (CC. AMPK is localized along the human spermatozoa, at the entire acrosome, midpiece and tail with variable intensity, whereas its active form, phospho-Thr172-AMPK, shows a prominent staining at the acrosome and sperm tail with a weaker staining in the midpiece and the postacrosomal region. Interestingly, spermatozoa bearing an excess residual cytoplasm show strong AMPK staining in this subcellular compartment. Both AMPK and phospho-Thr172-AMPK human spermatozoa contents exhibit important individual variations. Moreover, active AMPK is predominant in the high motility sperm population, where shows a stronger intensity compared with the low motility sperm population. Inhibition of AMPK activity in human spermatozoa by CC treatment leads to a significant reduction in any sperm motility parameter analyzed: percent of motile sperm, sperm velocities, progressivity, and other motility coefficients. This work identifies and points out AMPK as a new molecular mechanism involved in human spermatozoa motility. Further AMPK implications in the clinical efficiency of assisted reproduction and in other reproductive areas need to be studied.

  18. The cAMP response element modulator (CREM) regulates TH2 mediated inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verjans, Eva; Ohl, Kim; Reiss, Lucy K.; van Wijk, Femke; Toncheva, Antonaneta A.; Wiener, Anastasia; Yu, Yin; Rieg, Annette D.; Gaertner, Vincent D.; Roth, Johannes; Knol, Edward; Kabesch, Michael; Wagner, Norbert; Uhlig, Stefan; Martin, Christian; Tenbrock, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    A characteristic feature of allergic diseases is the appearance of a subset of CD4+ cells known as TH2 cells, which is controlled by transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms. We aimed to analyze the role of CREM, a known transcriptional activator of T cells, with regard to TH2 responses and allergic diseases in men and mice. Here we demonstrate that T cells of asthmatic children and PBMCs of adults with atopy express lower mRNA levels of the transcription factor CREM compared to cells from healthy controls. CREM deficiency in murine T cells results in enhanced TH2 effector cytokines in vitro and in vivo and CREM−/− mice demonstrate stronger airway hyperresponsiveness in an OVA-induced asthma model. Mechanistically, both direct CREM binding to the IL-4 and IL-13 promoter as well as a decreased IL-2 dependent STAT5 activation suppress the TH2 response. Accordingly, mice selectively overexpressing CREMα in T cells display decreased TH2 type cytokines in vivo and in vitro, and are protected in an asthma model. Thus, we provide evidence that CREM is a negative regulator of the TH2 response and determines the outcome of allergic asthma. PMID:26459392

  19. Biophysical Techniques for Detection of cAMP and cGMP in Living Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viacheslav O. Nikolaev

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP are ubiquitous second messengers which regulate myriads of functions in virtually all eukaryotic cells. Their intracellular effects are often mediated via discrete subcellular signaling microdomains. In this review, we will discuss state-of-the-art techniques to measure cAMP and cGMP in biological samples with a particular focus on live cell imaging approaches, which allow their detection with high temporal and spatial resolution in living cells and tissues. Finally, we will describe how these techniques can be applied to the analysis of second messenger dynamics in subcellular signaling microdomains.

  20. Cell surface protein disulfide isomerase regulates natriuretic peptide generation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuchong Pan

    Full Text Available The family of natriuretic peptides (NPs, including atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP, B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP, and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP, exert important and diverse actions for cardiovascular and renal homeostasis. The autocrine and paracrine functions of the NPs are primarily mediated through the cellular membrane bound guanylyl cyclase-linked receptors GC-A (NPR-A and GC-B (NPR-B. As the ligands and receptors each contain disulfide bonds, a regulatory role for the cell surface protein disulfide isomerase (PDI was investigated.We utilized complementary in vitro and in vivo models to determine the potential role of PDI in regulating the ability of the NPs to generate its second messenger, cyclic guanosine monophosphate.Inhibition of PDI attenuated the ability of ANP, BNP and CNP to generate cGMP in human mesangial cells (HMCs, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs, and human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs, each of which were shown to express PDI. In LLC-PK1 cells, where PDI expression was undetectable by immunoblotting, PDI inhibition had a minimal effect on cGMP generation. Addition of PDI to cultured LLC-PK1 cells increased intracellular cGMP generation mediated by ANP. Inhibition of PDI in vivo attenuated NP-mediated generation of cGMP by ANP. Surface Plasmon Resonance demonstrated modest and differential binding of the natriuretic peptides with immobilized PDI in a cell free system. However, PDI was shown to co-localize on the surface of cells with GC-A and GC-B by co-immunoprecpitation and immunohistochemistry.These data demonstrate for the first time that cell surface PDI expression and function regulate the capacity of natriuretic peptides to generate cGMP through interaction with their receptors.

  1. cAMP and EPAC Are Key Players in the Regulation of the Signal Transduction Pathway Involved in the α-Hemolysin Autophagic Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, María Belén; Colombo, María Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a microorganism that causes serious diseases in the human being. This microorganism is able to escape the phagolysosomal pathway, increasing intracellular bacterial survival and killing the eukaryotic host cell to spread the infection. One of the key features of S. aureus infection is the production of a series of virulence factors, including secreted enzymes and toxins. We have shown that the pore-forming toxin α-hemolysin (Hla) is the S. aureus–secreted factor responsible for the activation of the autophagic pathway and that this response occurs through a PI3K/Beclin1-independent form. In the present report we demonstrate that cAMP has a key role in the regulation of this autophagic response. Our results indicate that cAMP is able to inhibit the autophagy induced by Hla and that PKA, the classical cAMP effector, does not participate in this regulation. We present evidence that EPAC and Rap2b, through calpain activation, are the proteins involved in the regulation of Hla-induced autophagy. Similar results were obtained in cells infected with different S. aureus strains. Interestingly, in this report we show, for the first time to our knowledge, that both EPAC and Rap2b are recruited to the S. aureus–containing phagosome. We believe that our findings have important implications in understanding innate immune processes involved in intracellular pathogen invasion of the host cell. PMID:22654658

  2. cAMP and EPAC are key players in the regulation of the signal transduction pathway involved in the α-hemolysin autophagic response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Belén Mestre

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a microorganism that causes serious diseases in the human being. This microorganism is able to escape the phagolysosomal pathway, increasing intracellular bacterial survival and killing the eukaryotic host cell to spread the infection. One of the key features of S. aureus infection is the production of a series of virulence factors, including secreted enzymes and toxins. We have shown that the pore-forming toxin α-hemolysin (Hla is the S. aureus-secreted factor responsible for the activation of the autophagic pathway and that this response occurs through a PI3K/Beclin1-independent form. In the present report we demonstrate that cAMP has a key role in the regulation of this autophagic response. Our results indicate that cAMP is able to inhibit the autophagy induced by Hla and that PKA, the classical cAMP effector, does not participate in this regulation. We present evidence that EPAC and Rap2b, through calpain activation, are the proteins involved in the regulation of Hla-induced autophagy. Similar results were obtained in cells infected with different S. aureus strains. Interestingly, in this report we show, for the first time to our knowledge, that both EPAC and Rap2b are recruited to the S. aureus-containing phagosome. We believe that our findings have important implications in understanding innate immune processes involved in intracellular pathogen invasion of the host cell.

  3. Cyclic AMP-Responsive Element-Binding Protein (CREB is Critical in Autoimmunity by Promoting Th17 but Inhibiting Treg Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohu Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms that govern differential T cell development into pro-inflammatory Th17 vs. regulatory T (Treg cells remain unclear. Here, we show that selective deletion of CREB in T cells or Th17 cells impaired Th17 cell differentiation in vitro and in vivo, and led to resistance to autoimmune diseases. Mechanistically, CREB, activated by CD3-PKC-ϴ signaling, plays a key role in regulating Th17 cell differentiation, at least in part through directly binding to the Il17-Il17f gene locus. Unexpectedly, although dispensable for FOXP3 expression and for the homeostasis and suppressive function of thymus-derived Treg cells, CREB negatively regulates the survival of TGF-β-induced Treg cells, and deletion of CREB resulted in increased FOXP3+ Treg cells in the intestine and protection in a colitis model. Thus, CREB is critical in autoimmune diseases by promoting Th17 cell and inhibiting de novo Treg cell generation.

  4. Perilipin 5 regulates islet lipid metabolism and insulin secretion in a cAMP-dependent manner: implication of its role in the postprandial insulin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Michelle B; Machida, Yui; Hallinger, Daniel R; Garcia, Eden; Christensen, Aaron; Dutta, Sucharita; Peake, David A; Ikeda, Yasuhiro; Imai, Yumi

    2015-04-01

    Elevation of circulating fatty acids (FA) during fasting supports postprandial (PP) insulin secretion that is critical for glucose homeostasis and is impaired in diabetes. We tested our hypothesis that lipid droplet (LD) protein perilipin 5 (PLIN5) in β-cells aids PP insulin secretion by regulating intracellular lipid metabolism. We demonstrated that PLIN5 serves as an LD protein in human islets. In vivo, Plin5 and triglycerides were increased by fasting in mouse islets. MIN6 cells expressing PLIN5 (adenovirus [Ad]-PLIN5) and those expressing perilipin 2 (PLIN2) (Ad-PLIN2) had higher [(3)H]FA incorporation into triglycerides than Ad-GFP control, which support their roles as LD proteins. However, Ad-PLIN5 cells had higher lipolysis than Ad-PLIN2 cells, which increased further by 8-Br-cAMP, indicating that PLIN5 facilitates FA mobilization upon cAMP stimulation as seen postprandially. Ad-PLIN5 in islets enhanced the augmentation of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by FA and 8-Br-cAMP in G-protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40)- and cAMP-activated protein kinase-dependent manners, respectively. When PLIN5 was increased in mouse β-cells in vivo, glucose tolerance after an acute exenatide challenge was improved. Therefore, the elevation of islet PLIN5 during fasting allows partitioning of FA into LD that is released upon refeeding to support PP insulin secretion in cAMP- and GPR40-dependent manners. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  5. SIMULTANEOUS EXPRESSION AND REGULATION OF G-CSF AND IL-6 MESSENGER-RNA IN ADHERENT HUMAN MONOCYTES AND FIBROBLASTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VELLENGA, E; VANDERVINNE, B; DEWOLF, JTM; HALIE, MR

    The regulation of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) mRNA was studied in human adherent monocytes in response to the protein kinase C activator, oleolyl-acetylglycerol (OAG), the calcium-ionophore A23187 and the cyclic AMP elevating agents, dibutyryl c-AMP

  6. Cyclic Mechanical Stretch Up-regulates Hepatoma-Derived Growth Factor Expression in Cultured Rat Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Ying-Hsien; Chen, Po-Han; Sun, Cheuk-Kwan; Chang, Yo-Chen; Lin, Yu-Chun; Tsai, Ming-Shian; Lee, Po-Huang; Cheng, Cheng-I

    2018-02-21

    Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) is a potent mitogen for vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) during embryogenesis and injury repair of vessel walls. Whether mechanical stimuli modulate HDGF expression remains unknown. This study aimed at investigating whether cyclic mechanical stretch plays a regulatory role in HDGF expression and regenerative cytokine production in aortic SMCs. A SMC cell line was grown on a silicone-based elastomer chamber with extracellular matrix coatings (either type I collagen or fibronectin) and received cyclic and uni-axial mechanical stretches with 10% deformation at frequency 1 Hz. Morphological observation showed that fibronectin coating provided better cell adhesion and spreading and that consecutive 6 hours of cyclic mechanical stretch remarkably induced reorientation and realignment of SMCs. Western blotting detection demonstrated that continuous mechanical stimuli elicited up-regulation of HDGF and PCNA, a cell proliferative marker. Signal kinetic profiling study indicated that cyclic mechanical stretch induced signaling activity in RhoA/ROCK and PI3K/Akt cascades. Kinase inhibition study further showed that blockade of PI3K activity suppressed the stretch-induced TNF-a, whereas RhoA/ROCK inhibition significantly blunted the IL-6 production and HDGF over-expression. Moreover, siRNA-mediated HDGF gene silencing significantly suppressed constitutive expression of IL-6, but not TNF-α, in SMCs. These findings support the role of HDGF in maintaining vascular expression of IL-6, which has been regarded a crucial regenerative factor for acute vascular injury. In conclusion, cyclic mechanical stretch may maintain constitutive expression of HDGF in vascular walls and be regarded an important biophysical regulator in vascular regeneration. ©2018 The Author(s).

  7. Importance of the alphaC-helix in the cyclic nucleotide binding domain for the stable channel regulation and function of cyclic nucleotide gated ion channels in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Kimberley; Moeder, Wolfgang; Abdel-Hamid, Huda; Shahinas, Dea; Gupta, Deepali; Yoshioka, Keiko

    2010-05-01

    The involvement of cyclic nucleotide gated ion channels (CNGCs) in the signal transduction of animal light and odorant perception is well documented. Although plant CNGCs have recently been revealed to mediate multiple stress responses and developmental pathways, studies that aim to elucidate their structural and regulatory properties are still very much in their infancy. The structure-function relationship of plant CNGCs was investigated here by using the chimeric Arabidopsis AtCNGC11/12 gene that induces multiple defence responses in the Arabidopsis mutant constitutive expresser of PR genes 22 (cpr22) for the identification of functionally essential residues. A genetic screen for mutants that suppress cpr22-conferred phenotypes identified over 20 novel mutant alleles in AtCNGC11/12. One of these mutants, suppressor S58 possesses a single amino acid substitution, arginine 557 to cysteine, in the alphaC-helix of the cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD). The suppressor S58 lost all cpr22 related phenotypes, such as spontaneous cell death formation under ambient temperature conditions. However, these phenotypes were recovered at 16 degrees C suggesting that the stability of channel function is affected by temperature. In silico modelling and site-directed mutagenesis analyses suggest that arginine 557 in the alphaC-helix of the CNBD is important for channel regulation, but not for basic function. Furthermore, another suppressor mutant, S136 that lacks the entire alphaC-helix due to a premature stop codon, lost channel function completely. Our data presented here indicate that the alphaC-helix is functionally important in plant CNGCs.

  8. Human mesenchymal stem cell proliferation is regulated by PGE2 through differential activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleiveland, Charlotte Ramstad; Kassem, Moustapha; Lea, Tor

    2008-01-01

    of PGE2 on proliferation of hMSC. We here demonstrate that one of the main control molecules in the Wnt pathway, GSK-3 beta, is phosphorylated at the negative regulatory site ser-9 after treating the cells with PGE2. This phosphorylation is mediated by elevation of cAMP and subsequent activation of PKA....... Furthermore, PGE2 treatment leads to enhanced nuclear translocation of beta-catenin, thus influencing cell proliferation. The presence of two PKA isoforms, types I and II, prompted us to investigate their individual contribution in PGE2-mediated regulation of proliferation. Specific activation of PKA type II...... with synthetic cAMP analogues, resulted in enhancement of proliferation. On the other side, we found that treatment of hMSC with high concentrations of PGE2 inhibited cell proliferation by arresting the cells in G0/G1 phase, an effect we found to be mediated by PKA I. Hence, the two different PKA isoforms seem...

  9. Uptake of 3H-cAMP by retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moredock Steve

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bluegill sunfish, the melanin-containing pigment granules of the retinal pigment epithelium undergo cyclic movements in response both to ambient lighting and circadian cues. Pigment granules aggregate into the cell body at night (in the dark, and disperse into apical processes during the day (in the light. Regulation of pigment granule aggregation in a number of fishes depends on modulating the intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate. Results Here we show isolated RPE takes up cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP in a saturable manner, exogenously applied cAMP induces pigment granule aggregation in retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill, and aggregation induced in this manner is inhibited by treatment with probenecid, an organic anion transport inhibitor. Conclusion Our results raise the possibility that cAMP functions as a messenger secreted from the neural retina to signal darkness to the RPE, which takes it up. It further suggests that organic anion transport systems are the route by which cAMP crosses RPE cell membranes since probenecid inhibits extracellular cAMP from causing pigment granule aggregation.

  10. Ferulic acid prevents LPS-induced up-regulation of PDE4B and stimulates the cAMP/CREB signaling pathway in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao; Hong, Qian; Tan, Hong-Ling; Xiao, Cheng-Rong; Gao, Yue

    2016-12-01

    Phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) isozymes are involved in different functions, depending on their patterns of distribution in the brain. The PDE4 subtypes are distributed in different inflammatory cells, and appear to be important regulators of inflammatory processes. In this study we examined the effects of ferulic acid (FA), a plant component with strong anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced up-regulation of phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) in PC12 cells, which in turn regulated cellular cAMP levels and the cAMP/cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) pathway in the cells. PC12 cells were treated with LPS (1 μg/mL) for 8 h, and the changes of F-actin were detected using laser scanning confocal microscopy. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines were measured suing ELISA kits, and PDE4B-specific enzymatic activity was assessed with a PDE4B assay kit. The mRNA levels of PDE4B were analyzed with Q-PCR, and the protein levels of CREB and phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) were determined using immunoblotting. Furthermore, molecular docking was used to identify the interaction between PDE4B2 and FA. Treatment of PC12 cells with LPS induced thick bundles of actin filaments appearing in the F-actin cytoskeleton, which were ameliorated by pretreatment with FA (10-40 μmol/L) or with a PDE4B inhibitor rolipram (30 μmol/L). Pretreatment with FA dose-dependently inhibited the LPS-induced production of TNF-α and IL-1β in PC12 cells. Furthermore, pretreatment with FA dose-dependently attenuated the LPS-induced up-regulation of PDE4 activity in PC12 cells. Moreover, pretreatment with FA decreased LPS-induced up-regulation of the PDE4B mRNA, and reversed LPS-induced down-regulation of CREB and pCREB in PC12 cells. The molecular docking results revealed electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between FA and PDE4B2. The beneficial effects of FA in PC12 cells might be conferred through inhibition of LPS-induced up-regulation of PDE4B and

  11. Effect of ionizing radiation on calcium and cyclic nucleotides metabolism in rats of different age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efimova, N.I.; Libenson, S.V.

    1982-01-01

    Some features of mechanism of calcium homeostasis and cyclic nucleotide exchange breakage in case of acute radiation injury of rats of various age were studied. It is established that calcium level in blood in nonpuberal animals, calcium and cAMP excretion with urine are minimal and reach maximum at puberal age. cGMP excretion with urine and concentrational levels of cAMP and cGMP in blood do not change with age. It is shown that calcium excretion with urine decreases adaptively in conditions of acute radiation injury in rats of all age groups. Maximal shifts in cAMP/cGMP ratio were noted in nonpuberal animals, whereas maximal adaptive-compensatory abilities in the regulation system of calcium homeostasis and cyclic nucleotides are typical to adolescent puberal animals

  12. Angiopoietin-like protein 4 is an exercise-induced hepatokine in humans, regulated by glucagon and cAMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodil Ingerslev

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: The data suggest that exercise-induced ANGPTL4 is secreted from the liver and driven by a glucagon-cAMP-PKA pathway in humans. These findings link the liver, insulin/glucagon, and lipid metabolism together, which could implicate a role of ANGPTL4 in metabolic diseases.

  13. Noninvasive microelectrode ion flux estimation technique (MIFE) for the study of the regulation of root membrane transport by cyclic nucleotides

    KAUST Repository

    Ordoñez, Natalia Maria

    2013-09-03

    Changes in ion permeability and subsequently intracellular ion concentrations play a crucial role in intracellular and intercellular communication and, as such, confer a broad array of developmental and adaptive responses in plants. These changes are mediated by the activity of plasma-membrane based transport proteins many of which are controlled by cyclic nucleotides and/or other signaling molecules. The MIFE technique for noninvasive microelectrode ion flux measuring allows concurrent quantification of net fluxes of several ions with high spatial (μm range) and temporal (ca. 5 s) resolution, making it a powerful tool to study various aspects of downstream signaling events in plant cells. This chapter details basic protocols enabling the application of the MIFE technique to study regulation of root membrane transport in general and cyclic nucleotide mediated transport in particular. © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013.

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis cAMP Receptor Protein (Rv3676) Differs from the Escherichia coli Paradigm in Its cAMP Binding and DNA Binding Properties and Transcription Activation Properties*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Melanie; Haq, Ihtshamul; Hunt, Debbie M.; Arnvig, Kristine B.; Artymiuk, Peter J.; Buxton, Roger S.; Green, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis produces a burst of cAMP upon infection of macrophages. Bacterial cyclic AMP receptor proteins (CRP) are transcription factors that respond to cAMP by binding at target promoters when cAMP concentrations increase. Rv3676 (CRPMt) is a CRP family protein that regulates expression of genes (rpfA and whiB1) that are potentially involved in M. tuberculosis persistence and/or emergence from the dormant state. Here, the CRPMt homodimer is shown to bind two molecules of cAMP (one per protomer) at noninteracting sites. Furthermore, cAMP binding by CRPMt was relatively weak, entropy driven, and resulted in a relatively small enhancement in DNA binding. Tandem CRPMt-binding sites (CRP1 at −58.5 and CRP2 at −37.5) were identified at the whiB1 promoter (PwhiB1). In vitro transcription reactions showed that CRP1 is an activating site and that CRP2, which was only occupied in the presence of cAMP or at high CRPMt concentrations in the absence of cAMP, is a repressing site. Binding of CRPMt to CRP1 was not essential for open complex formation but was required for transcription activation. Thus, these data suggest that binding of CRPMt to the PwhiB1 CRP1 site activates transcription at a step after open complex formation. In contrast, high cAMP concentrations allowed occupation of both CRP1 and CRP2 sites, resulting in inhibition of open complex formation. Thus, M. tuberculosis CRP has evolved several distinct characteristics, compared with the Escherichia coli CRP paradigm, to allow it to regulate gene expression against a background of high concentrations of cAMP. PMID:20028978

  15. Regulation of basal and reserve cardiac pacemaker function by interactions of cAMP mediated PKA-dependent Ca2+ cycling with surface membrane channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradova, Tatiana M.; Lakatta, Edward G.

    2009-01-01

    Decades of intensive research of primary cardiac pacemaker, the sinoatrial node, have established potential roles of specific membrane channels in the generation of the diastolic depolarization, the major mechanism allowing sinoatrial node cells generate spontaneous beating. During the last three decades, multiple studies made either in the isolated sinoatrial node or sinoatrial node cells have demonstrated a pivotal role of Ca2+ and, specifically Ca2+-release from sarcoplasmic reticulum, for spontaneous beating of cardiac pacemaker. Recently, spontaneous, rhythmic local subsarcolemmal Ca2+ releases from ryanodine receptors during late half of the diastolic depolarization have been implicated as a vital factor in the generation of sinoatrial node cells spontaneous firing. Local Ca2+ releases are driven by a unique combination of high basal cAMP production by adenylyl cyclases, high basal cAMP degradation by phosphodiesterases and a high level of cAMP-mediated PKA-dependent phosphorylation. These local Ca2+ releases activate an inward Na+-Ca2+ exchange current which accelerates the terminal diastolic depolarization rate and, thus, controls the spontaneous pacemaker firing. Both the basal primary pacemaker beating rate and its modulation via β-adrenergic receptor stimulation appear to be critically dependent upon intact RyR function and local subsarcolemmal sarcoplasmic reticulum generated Ca2+ releases. This review aspires to integrate the traditional viewpoint that has emphasized the supremacy of the ensemble of surface membrane ion channels in spontaneous firing of the primary cardiac pacemaker, and these novel perspectives of cAMP-mediated PKA-dependent Ca2+ cycling in regulation of the heart pacemaker clock, both in the basal state and during β-adrenergic receptor stimulation. PMID:19573534

  16. Role of Interaction and Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase B in Regulation of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Function by cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee A Borthwick

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis results from mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA and ATP-regulated chloride channel. Here, we demonstrate that nucleoside diphosphate kinase B (NDPK-B, NM23-H2 forms a functional complex with CFTR. In airway epithelia forskolin/IBMX significantly increases NDPK-B co-localisation with CFTR whereas PKA inhibitors attenuate complex formation. Furthermore, an NDPK-B derived peptide (but not its NDPK-A equivalent disrupts the NDPK-B/CFTR complex in vitro (19-mers comprising amino acids 36-54 from NDPK-B or NDPK-A. Overlay (Far-Western and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR analysis both demonstrate that NDPK-B binds CFTR within its first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1, CFTR amino acids 351-727. Analysis of chloride currents reflective of CFTR or outwardly rectifying chloride channels (ORCC, DIDS-sensitive showed that the 19-mer NDPK-B peptide (but not its NDPK-A equivalent reduced both chloride conductances. Additionally, the NDPK-B (but not NDPK-A peptide also attenuated acetylcholine-induced intestinal short circuit currents. In silico analysis of the NBD1/NDPK-B complex reveals an extended interaction surface between the two proteins. This binding zone is also target of the 19-mer NDPK-B peptide, thus confirming its capability to disrupt NDPK-B/CFTR complex. We propose that NDPK-B forms part of the complex that controls chloride currents in epithelia.

  17. Cyclic nucleotides and radioresistnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulinskij, V.I.; Mikheeva, G.A.; Zel'manovich, B.M.

    1982-01-01

    The addition of glucose to meat-peptone broth does not change the radiosensitizing effect (RSE) of cAMP at the logarithmic phase (LP) and the radioprotective effect (RPE) at the stationary phase (SP), but sensitization, characteristic of cGMP, disappears in SP and turns into RPE in LP. Introduction of glucose into the broth for 20 min eliminates all the effects of both cyclic nucleotides in the cya + strain while cya - mutant exhibits RSE. RSE of both cyclic nucleotides is only manifested on minimal media. These data brought confirmation of the dependence of the influence of cyclic media. These data brought confirmation of the dependence of the influence of cyclic nucleotides on radioresistance upon the metabolic status of the cell [ru

  18. Identification of a novel human glucagon receptor promoter: regulation by cAMP and PGC-1alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Ole Hartvig; Dichmann, Darwin Sorento; Abrahamsen, Niels

    2007-01-01

    the promoter regions of the human glucagon receptor gene. Primer extension studies yielded multiple products in both liver and pancreas, corresponding to transcription start sites situated at -166 and -477 relative to the start of translation, indicating two putative promoters. Both transcription start sites...... between 1051 and 1016 base pairs upstream of the transcription start site, which contains several putative cAMP responsive elements. Expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1alpha (PGC-1alpha), known to be upregulated in the liver by fasting, was found to abolish the c......AMP-dependent downregulation of glucagon receptor mRNA expression in vitro, whereas overexpression of PGC-1beta had no effect....

  19. Prolyl isomerase Pin1 negatively regulates AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) by associating with the CBS domain in the γ subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsu, Yusuke; Iwashita, Misaki; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Ono, Hiraku; Nagata, Kengo; Matsunaga, Yasuka; Fukushima, Toshiaki; Fujishiro, Midori; Kushiyama, Akifumi; Kamata, Hideaki; Takahashi, Shin-Ichiro; Katagiri, Hideki; Honda, Hiroaki; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Uchida, Takafumi; Asano, Tomoichiro

    2015-10-02

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) plays a critical role in metabolic regulation. In this study, first, it was revealed that Pin1 associates with any isoform of γ, but not with either the α or the β subunit, of AMPK. The association between Pin1 and the AMPK γ1 subunit is mediated by the WW domain of Pin1 and the Thr(211)-Pro-containing motif located in the CBS domain of the γ1 subunit. Importantly, overexpression of Pin1 suppressed AMPK phosphorylation in response to either 2-deoxyglucose or biguanide stimulation, whereas Pin1 knockdown by siRNAs or treatment with Pin1 inhibitors enhanced it. The experiments using recombinant Pin1, AMPK, LKB1, and PP2C proteins revealed that the protective effect of AMP against PP2C-induced AMPKα subunit dephosphorylation was markedly suppressed by the addition of Pin1. In good agreement with the in vitro data, the level of AMPK phosphorylation as well as the expressions of mitochondria-related genes, such as PGC-1α, which are known to be positively regulated by AMPK, were markedly higher with reduced triglyceride accumulation in the muscles of Pin1 KO mice as compared with controls. These findings suggest that Pin1 plays an important role in the pathogenic mechanisms underlying impaired glucose and lipid metabolism, functioning as a negative regulator of AMPK. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-lactamase induction requires two permeases, AmpG and AmpP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneper Lisa

    2010-12-01

    importance. Both ampP and ampG are required for maximum induction. Similar to ampC, ampP expression is inducible in an ampR-dependent manner. Importantly, ampP expression is autoregulated and ampP also regulates expression of ampG. Both AmpG and AmpP have topologies consistent with functions in transport. Together, these data suggest that the mechanism of β-lactam resistance of P. aeruginosa is distinct from well characterized systems in Enterobacteriaceae and involves a highly complicated interaction between these putative permeases and known Amp proteins.

  1. Cyclic phosphatidic acid and lysophosphatidic acid induce hyaluronic acid synthesis via CREB transcription factor regulation in human skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda-Sano, Katsura; Gotoh, Mari; Morohoshi, Toshiro; Someya, Takao; Murofushi, Hiromu; Murakami-Murofushi, Kimiko

    2014-09-01

    Cyclic phosphatidic acid (cPA) is a naturally occurring phospholipid mediator and an analog of the growth factor-like phospholipid lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). cPA has a unique cyclic phosphate ring at the sn-2 and sn-3 positions of its glycerol backbone. We showed before that a metabolically stabilized cPA derivative, 2-carba-cPA, relieved osteoarthritis pathogenesis in vivo and induced hyaluronic acid synthesis in human osteoarthritis synoviocytes in vitro. This study focused on hyaluronic acid synthesis in human fibroblasts, which retain moisture and maintain health in the dermis. We investigated the effects of cPA and LPA on hyaluronic acid synthesis in human fibroblasts (NB1RGB cells). Using particle exclusion and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, we found that both cPA and LPA dose-dependently induced hyaluronic acid synthesis. We revealed that the expression of hyaluronan synthase 2 messenger RNA and protein is up-regulated by cPA and LPA treatment time dependently. We then characterized the signaling pathways up-regulating hyaluronic acid synthesis mediated by cPA and LPA in NB1RGB cells. Pharmacological inhibition and reporter gene assays revealed that the activation of the LPA receptor LPAR1, Gi/o protein, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K), extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) but not nuclear factor κB induced hyaluronic acid synthesis by the treatment with cPA and LPA in NB1RGB cells. These results demonstrate for the first time that cPA and LPA induce hyaluronic acid synthesis in human skin fibroblasts mainly through the activation of LPAR1-Gi/o followed by the PI3K, ERK, and CREB signaling pathway. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Vibrio cholerae VpsT Regulates Matrix Production and Motility by Directly Sensing Cyclic di-GMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasteva, P.; Fong, J; Shikuma, N; Beyhan, S; Navarro, M; Yildiz, F; Sondermann, H

    2010-01-01

    Microorganisms can switch from a planktonic, free-swimming life-style to a sessile, colonial state, called a biofilm, which confers resistance to environmental stress. Conversion between the motile and biofilm life-styles has been attributed to increased levels of the prokaryotic second messenger cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), yet the signaling mechanisms mediating such a global switch are poorly understood. Here we show that the transcriptional regulator VpsT from Vibrio cholerae directly senses c-di-GMP to inversely control extracellular matrix production and motility, which identifies VpsT as a master regulator for biofilm formation. Rather than being regulated by phosphorylation, VpsT undergoes a change in oligomerization on c-di-GMP binding.

  3. cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) regulates angiogenesis by modulating tip cell behavior in a Notch-independent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedvetsky, Pavel I; Zhao, Xiaocheng; Mathivet, Thomas; Aspalter, Irene M; Stanchi, Fabio; Metzger, Ross J; Mostov, Keith E; Gerhardt, Holger

    2016-10-01

    cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) is a ubiquitously expressed serine/threonine kinase that regulates a variety of cellular functions. Here, we demonstrate that endothelial PKA activity is essential for vascular development, specifically regulating the transition from sprouting to stabilization of nascent vessels. Inhibition of endothelial PKA by endothelial cell-specific expression of dominant-negative PKA in mice led to perturbed vascular development, hemorrhage and embryonic lethality at mid-gestation. During perinatal retinal angiogenesis, inhibition of PKA resulted in hypersprouting as a result of increased numbers of tip cells. In zebrafish, cell autonomous PKA inhibition also increased and sustained endothelial cell motility, driving cells to become tip cells. Although these effects of PKA inhibition were highly reminiscent of Notch inhibition effects, our data demonstrate that PKA and Notch independently regulate tip and stalk cell formation and behavior. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Variation of cyclic strain parameters regulates development of elastic modulus in fibroblast/substrate constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Sagar D; Webb, Ken

    2008-08-01

    Dynamic mechanical culture systems are a widely studied approach for improving the functional mechanical properties of tissue engineering constructs intended for loading-bearing orthopedic applications such as tendon/ligament reconstruction. The design of effective mechanical stimulation regimes requires a fundamental understanding of the effects of cyclic strain parameters on the resulting construct properties. Toward this end, these studies employed a modular cyclic strain bioreactor system and fibroblast-seeded, porous polyurethane substrates to systematically investigate the effect of varying cyclic strain amplitude, rate, frequency, and daily cycle number on construct mechanical properties. Significant differences were observed in response to variation of all four loading parameters tested. In general, the highest values of elastic modulus within each experimental group were observed at low to intermediate values of the experimental variables tested, corresponding to the low to subphysiological range (2.5% strain amplitude, 25%/s strain rate, 0.1-0.5 Hz frequency, and 7,200-28,800 cycles/day). These studies demonstrate that fibroblasts are sensitive and responsive to multiple characteristics of their mechanical environment, and suggest that systematic optimization of dynamic culture conditions may be useful for the acceleration of construct maturation and mechanical function.

  5. Cyclic nucleotide content of tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Helen; Das, Swadipa; Smith, Christopher J; Pereira, Louisa; Geisbrecht, Alan; Devitt, Nicola J; Games, David E; van Geyschem, Jan; Gareth Brenton, A; Newton, Russell P

    2002-11-01

    The cyclic nucleotide content of cultured tobacco bright yellow-2 (BY-2) cells was determined, after freeze-killing, perchlorate extraction and sequential chromatography, by radioimmunoassay. The identities of the putative cyclic nucleotides, adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP), guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) and cytidine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic CMP) were unambiguously confirmed by tandem mass spectrometry. The potential of BY-2 cell cultures as a model system for future investigations of cyclic nucleotide function in higher plants is discussed.

  6. Complex Interplay between FleQ, Cyclic Diguanylate and Multiple σ Factors Coordinately Regulates Flagellar Motility and Biofilm Development in Pseudomonas putida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Jiménez-Fernández

    Full Text Available Most bacteria alternate between a free living planktonic lifestyle and the formation of structured surface-associated communities named biofilms. The transition between these two lifestyles requires a precise and timely regulation of the factors involved in each of the stages that has been likened to a developmental process. Here we characterize the involvement of the transcriptional regulator FleQ and the second messenger cyclic diguanylate in the coordinate regulation of multiple functions related to motility and surface colonization in Pseudomonas putida. Disruption of fleQ caused strong defects in flagellar motility, biofilm formation and surface attachment, and the ability of this mutation to suppress multiple biofilm-related phenotypes associated to cyclic diguanylate overproduction suggests that FleQ mediates cyclic diguanylate signaling critical to biofilm growth. We have constructed a library containing 94 promoters potentially involved in motility and biofilm development fused to gfp and lacZ, screened this library for FleQ and cyclic diguanylate regulation, and assessed the involvement of alternative σ factors σN and FliA in the transcription of FleQ-regulated promoters. Our results suggest a dual mode of action for FleQ. Low cyclic diguanylate levels favor FleQ interaction with σN-dependent promoters to activate the flagellar cascade, encompassing the flagellar cluster and additional genes involved in cyclic diguanylate metabolism, signal transduction and gene regulation. On the other hand, characterization of the FleQ-regulated σN- and FliA-independent PlapA and PbcsD promoters revealed two disparate regulatory mechanisms leading to a similar outcome: the synthesis of biofilm matrix components in response to increased cyclic diguanylate levels.

  7. The Arabidopsis thaliana Cyclic-Nucleotide-Dependent Response – a Quantitative Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Alqurashi, May M.

    2013-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation governs many regulatory pathways and an increasing number of kinases, proteins that transfer phosphate groups, are in turn activated by cyclic nucleotides. One of the cyclic nucleotides, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), has been shown to be a second messenger in abiotic and biotic stress responses. However, little is known about the precise role of cAMP in plants and in the down-stream activation of kinases, and hence cAMP-dependent phosphorylation. To increase our understanding of the role of cAMP, proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of Arabidopsis thaliana suspension culture cells were analyzed before and after treatment of cells with two different concentrations of 8-Bromo-cAMP (1 µM and 100 nM) and over a time-course of one hour. A comparative quantitative analysis was undertaken using two- dimensional gel electrophoresis and the Delta 2D software (DECODON) followed by protein spot identification by tandem mass spectrometry combined with Mascot and Scaffold. Differentially expressed proteins and regulated phosphoproteins were categorized according to their biological function using bioinformatics tools. The results revealed that the treatment with 1 µM and 100 nM 8-Bromo-cAMP was sufficient to induce specific concentration- and time-dependent changes at the proteome and phosphoproteome levels. In particular, different phosphorylation patterns were observed overtime preferentially affecting proteins in a number of functional categories, notably phosphatases, proteins that remove phosphate groups. This suggests that cAMP both transiently activates and deactivates proteins through specific phosphorylation events and provides new insight into biological mechanisms and functions at the systems level.

  8. Human mesenchymal stem cell proliferation is regulated by PGE2 through differential activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase isoforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kleiveland, Charlotte Ramstad; Kassem, Moustapha; Lea, Tor

    2008-01-01

    The conditions used for in vitro differentiation of hMSCs contain substances that affect the activity and expression of cyclooxygenase enzymes (COX1/COX2) and thereby the synthesis of prostanoids. hMSC constitutively produce PGE2 when cultivated in vitro. In this study we have investigated effects of PGE2 on proliferation of hMSC. We here demonstrate that one of the main control molecules in the Wnt pathway, GSK-3β, is phosphorylated at the negative regulatory site ser-9 after treating the cells with PGE2. This phosphorylation is mediated by elevation of cAMP and subsequent activation of PKA. Furthermore, PGE2 treatment leads to enhanced nuclear translocation of β-catenin, thus influencing cell proliferation. The presence of two PKA isoforms, types I and II, prompted us to investigate their individual contribution in PGE2-mediated regulation of proliferation. Specific activation of PKA type II with synthetic cAMP analogues, resulted in enhancement of proliferation. On the other side, we found that treatment of hMSC with high concentrations of PGE2 inhibited cell proliferation by arresting the cells in G 0 /G 1 phase, an effect we found to be mediated by PKA I. Hence, the two different PKA isoforms seem to have opposing functions in the regulation of proliferation and differentiation in these cells

  9. Rac1 controls Schwann cell myelination through cAMP and NF2/merlin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Li; Moon, Chandra; Niehaus, Karen; Zheng, Yi; Ratner, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    During peripheral nervous system development, Schwann cells (SCs) surrounding single large axons differentiate into myelinating SCs. Previous studies implicate RhoGTPases in SC myelination, but the mechanisms involved in RhoGTPase regulation of SC myelination are unknown. Here, we show that SC myelination is arrested in Rac1 conditional knockout (Rac1-CKO) mice. Rac1 knockout abrogated phosphorylation of the effector p21-activated kinase (PAK) and decreased NF2/merlin phosphorylation. Mutation of NF2/merlin rescued the myelin deficit in Rac1-CKO mice in vivo, and the shortened processes in cultured Rac1-CKO SCs in vitro. Mechanistically, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels and E-cadherin expression were decreased in the absence of Rac1, and both were restored by mutation of NF2/merlin. Reduced cAMP is a cause of the myelin deficiency in Rac1-CKO mice, as elevation of cAMP by rolipram in Rac1-CKO mice in vivo allowed myelin formation. Thus NF2/merlin and cAMP function downstream of Rac1 signaling in SC myelination, and cAMP levels control Rac1-regulated SC myelination. PMID:23197717

  10. The ever unfolding story of cAMP signalling in trypanosomatids: vive la difference!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Nii Aryee Tagoe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Kinetoplastids are unicellular, eukaryotic, flagellated protozoans containing the eponymous kinetoplast. Within this order, the family of trypanosomatids are responsible for some of the most serious human diseases, including Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi, sleeping sickness (T. brucei spp. and leishmaniasis (Leishmania spp. Although cAMP is produced during the life cycle stages of these parasites, its signalling pathways are very different from those of mammals. The absence of G-protein-coupled recep¬tors, the presence of structurally different adenylyl cyclases, the paucity of known cAMP effector proteins and the stringent need for regulation of cAMP in the small kinetoplastid cells all suggest a significantly different biochemical pathway and likely cell biology. However, each of the main kinetoplastid parasites express four class 1-type cyclic nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterases (PDEA-D, which have highly similar catalytic domains to that of human PDEs. To date, only TbrPDEB, expressed as two slightly different isoforms TbrPDEB1 and B2, has been found to be essential when ablated. Although the genomes contain reasonably well con¬served genes for catalytic and regulatory domains of pro¬tein kinase A, these have been shown to have varied structural and functional roles in the different species. Recent discovery of a role of cAMP/AMP metabolism in a quorum-sensing signalling pathway in T. brucei, and the identification of downstream cAMP Response Proteins (CARPs whose expression levels correlate with sensitivity to PDE inhibitors, suggests a complex signalling cascade. The interplay between the roles of these novel CARPs and the quorum-sensing signalling pathway on cell division and differentiation makes for intriguing cell biology and a new paradigm in cAMP signal transduction, as well as potential targets for trypanosomatid-specific cAMP pathway-based therapeutics.

  11. Integration of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle with cAMP signaling and Sfl2 pathways in the regulation of CO2 sensing and hyphal development in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Li; Zhang, Yulong; Fan, Shuru; Nobile, Clarissa J; Guan, Guobo; Huang, Guanghua

    2017-08-01

    Morphological transitions and metabolic regulation are critical for the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans to adapt to the changing host environment. In this study, we generated a library of central metabolic pathway mutants in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, and investigated the functional consequences of these gene deletions on C. albicans biology. Inactivation of the TCA cycle impairs the ability of C. albicans to utilize non-fermentable carbon sources and dramatically attenuates cell growth rates under several culture conditions. By integrating the Ras1-cAMP signaling pathway and the heat shock factor-type transcription regulator Sfl2, we found that the TCA cycle plays fundamental roles in the regulation of CO2 sensing and hyphal development. The TCA cycle and cAMP signaling pathways coordinately regulate hyphal growth through the molecular linkers ATP and CO2. Inactivation of the TCA cycle leads to lowered intracellular ATP and cAMP levels and thus affects the activation of the Ras1-regulated cAMP signaling pathway. In turn, the Ras1-cAMP signaling pathway controls the TCA cycle through both Efg1- and Sfl2-mediated transcriptional regulation in response to elevated CO2 levels. The protein kinase A (PKA) catalytic subunit Tpk1, but not Tpk2, may play a major role in this regulation. Sfl2 specifically binds to several TCA cycle and hypha-associated genes under high CO2 conditions. Global transcriptional profiling experiments indicate that Sfl2 is indeed required for the gene expression changes occurring in response to these elevated CO2 levels. Our study reveals the regulatory role of the TCA cycle in CO2 sensing and hyphal development and establishes a novel link between the TCA cycle and Ras1-cAMP signaling pathways.

  12. Integration of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle with cAMP signaling and Sfl2 pathways in the regulation of CO2 sensing and hyphal development in Candida albicans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Tao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Morphological transitions and metabolic regulation are critical for the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans to adapt to the changing host environment. In this study, we generated a library of central metabolic pathway mutants in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, and investigated the functional consequences of these gene deletions on C. albicans biology. Inactivation of the TCA cycle impairs the ability of C. albicans to utilize non-fermentable carbon sources and dramatically attenuates cell growth rates under several culture conditions. By integrating the Ras1-cAMP signaling pathway and the heat shock factor-type transcription regulator Sfl2, we found that the TCA cycle plays fundamental roles in the regulation of CO2 sensing and hyphal development. The TCA cycle and cAMP signaling pathways coordinately regulate hyphal growth through the molecular linkers ATP and CO2. Inactivation of the TCA cycle leads to lowered intracellular ATP and cAMP levels and thus affects the activation of the Ras1-regulated cAMP signaling pathway. In turn, the Ras1-cAMP signaling pathway controls the TCA cycle through both Efg1- and Sfl2-mediated transcriptional regulation in response to elevated CO2 levels. The protein kinase A (PKA catalytic subunit Tpk1, but not Tpk2, may play a major role in this regulation. Sfl2 specifically binds to several TCA cycle and hypha-associated genes under high CO2 conditions. Global transcriptional profiling experiments indicate that Sfl2 is indeed required for the gene expression changes occurring in response to these elevated CO2 levels. Our study reveals the regulatory role of the TCA cycle in CO2 sensing and hyphal development and establishes a novel link between the TCA cycle and Ras1-cAMP signaling pathways.

  13. Reciprocal Roles of Angiotensin II and Angiotensin II Receptors Blockade (ARB in Regulating Cbfa1/RANKL via cAMP Signaling Pathway: Possible Mechanism for Hypertension-Related Osteoporosis and Antagonistic Effect of ARB on Hypertension-Related Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Yao Li

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a risk factor for osteoporosis. Animal and epidemiological studies demonstrate that high blood pressure is associated with increased calcium loss, elevated parathyroid hormone, and increased calcium movement from bone. However, the mechanism responsible for hypertension-related osteoporosis remains elusive. Recent epidemiological studies indicate the benefits of Angiotensin II Receptors Blockade (ARB on decreasing fracture risks. Since receptors for angiotensin II, the targets of ARB, are expressed in both osteoblasts and osteoclasts, we postulated that angiotensin II plays an important role in hypertension-related osteoporosis. Cbfa1 and RANKL, the important factors for maintaining bone homeostasis and key mediators in controlling osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation, are both regulated by cAMP-dependent signaling. Angiotensin II along with factors such as LDL, HDL, NO and homocysteine that are commonly altered both in hypertension and osteoporosis, can down-regulate the expression of Cbfa1 but up-regulate RANKL expression via the cAMP signaling pathway. We thus hypothesized that, by altering the ratio of Cbfa1/RANKL expression via the cAMP-dependent pathway, angiotensin II differently regulates osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation leading to enhanced bone resorption and reduced bone formation. Since ARB can antagonize the adverse effect of angiotensin II on bone by lowering cAMP levels and modifying other downstream targets, including LDL, HDL, NO and Cbfa1/RANKL, we propose the hypothesis that the antagonistic effects of ARB may also be exerted via cAMP signaling pathway.

  14. A Serratia marcescens PigP homolog controls prodigiosin biosynthesis, swarming motility and hemolysis and is regulated by cAMP-CRP and HexS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M Q Shanks

    Full Text Available Swarming motility and hemolysis are virulence-associated determinants for a wide array of pathogenic bacteria. The broad host-range opportunistic pathogen Serratia marcescens produces serratamolide, a small cyclic amino-lipid, that promotes swarming motility and hemolysis. Serratamolide is negatively regulated by the transcription factors HexS and CRP. Positive regulators of serratamolide production are unknown. Similar to serratamolide, the antibiotic pigment, prodigiosin, is regulated by temperature, growth phase, HexS, and CRP. Because of this co-regulation, we tested the hypothesis that a homolog of the PigP transcription factor of the atypical Serratia species ATCC 39006, which positively regulates prodigiosin biosynthesis, is also a positive regulator of serratamolide production in S. marcescens. Mutation of pigP in clinical, environmental, and laboratory strains of S. marcescens conferred pleiotropic phenotypes including the loss of swarming motility, hemolysis, and severely reduced prodigiosin and serratamolide synthesis. Transcriptional analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays place PigP in a regulatory pathway with upstream regulators CRP and HexS. The data from this study identifies a positive regulator of serratamolide production, describes novel roles for the PigP transcription factor, shows for the first time that PigP directly regulates the pigment biosynthetic operon, and identifies upstream regulators of pigP. This study suggests that PigP is important for the ability of S. marcescens to compete in the environment.

  15. Early embryonic renal tubules of wild-type and polycystic kidney disease kidneys respond to cAMP stimulation with cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator/Na(+),K(+),2Cl(-) Co-transporter-dependent cystic dilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magenheimer, Brenda S; St John, Patricia L; Isom, Kathryn S; Abrahamson, Dale R; De Lisle, Robert C; Wallace, Darren P; Maser, Robin L; Grantham, Jared J; Calvet, James P

    2006-12-01

    Metanephric organ culture has been used to determine whether embryonic kidney tubules can be stimulated by cAMP to form cysts. Under basal culture conditions, wild-type kidneys from embryonic day 13.5 to 15.5 mice grow in size and continue ureteric bud branching and tubule formation over a 4- to 5-d period. Treatment of these kidneys with 8-Br-cAMP or the cAMP agonist forskolin induced the formation of dilated tubules within 1 h, which enlarged over several days and resulted in dramatically expanded cyst-like structures of proximal tubule and collecting duct origin. Tubule dilation was reversible upon withdrawal of 8-Br-cAMP and was inhibited by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase inhibitor H89 and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) inhibitor CFTR(inh)172. For further testing of the role of CFTR, metanephric cultures were prepared from mice with a targeted mutation of the Cftr gene. In contrast to kidneys from wild-type mice, those from Cftr -/- mice showed no evidence of tubular dilation in response to 8-Br-cAMP, indicating that CFTR Cl(-) channels are functional in embryonic kidneys and are required for cAMP-driven tubule expansion. A requirement for transepithelial Cl(-) transport was demonstrated by inhibiting the basolateral Na(+),K(+),2Cl(-) co-transporter with bumetanide, which effectively blocked all cAMP-stimulated tubular dilation. For determination of whether cystic dilation occurs to a greater extent in PKD kidneys in response to cAMP, Pkd1(m1Bei) -/- embryonic kidneys were treated with 8-Br-cAMP and were found to form rapidly CFTR- and Na(+),K(+),2Cl(-) co-transporter-dependent cysts that were three- to six-fold larger than those of wild-type kidneys. These results suggest that cAMP can stimulate fluid secretion early in renal tubule development during the time when renal cysts first appear in PKD kidneys and that PKD-deficient renal tubules are predisposed to abnormally increased cyst expansion in response to elevated levels

  16. Adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate in higher plants: Isolation and characterization of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate from Kalanchoe and Agave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, A R; Polya, G M

    1977-07-01

    1.3':5'-Cyclic AMP was extensively purified from Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Agave americana by neutral alumina and anion- and cation-exchange column chromatography. Inclusion of 3':5'-cyclic [8-3H]AMP from the point of tissue extraction permitted calculation of yields. The purification procedure removed contaminating material that was shown to interfere with the 3':5'-cyclic AMP estimation and characterization procedures. 2. The partially purified 3':5'-cyclic AMP was quantified by means of a radiochemical saturation assay using an ox heart 3':5'-cyclic AMP-binding protein and by an assay involving activation of a mammalian protein kinase. 3. The plant 3':5'-cyclic AMP co-migrated with 3':5'-cyclic [8-3H]AMP on cellulose chromatography, poly(ethyleneimine)-cellulose chromatography and silica-gel t.l.c. developed with several solvent systems. 4. The plant 3':5'-cyclic AMP was degraded by ox heart 3':5'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase at the same rates as authentic 3':5'-cyclic AMP. 1-Methyl-3-isobutylxanthine (1 mM), a specific inhibitor of the 3':5'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodieterase, completely inhibited such degradation. 5. The concentrations of 3':5'-cyclic AMP satisfying the above criteria in Kalanchoe and Agave were 2-6 and 1 pmol/g fresh wt. respectively. Possible bacterial contribution to these analyses was estimated to be less than 0.002pmol/g fresh wt. Evidence for the occurrence of 3':5'-cyclic AMP in plants is discussed.

  17. Adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate in higher plants: Isolation and characterization of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate from Kalanchoe and Agave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, A R; Polya, G M

    1977-01-01

    1.3':5'-Cyclic AMP was extensively purified from Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Agave americana by neutral alumina and anion- and cation-exchange column chromatography. Inclusion of 3':5'-cyclic [8-3H]AMP from the point of tissue extraction permitted calculation of yields. The purification procedure removed contaminating material that was shown to interfere with the 3':5'-cyclic AMP estimation and characterization procedures. 2. The partially purified 3':5'-cyclic AMP was quantified by means of a radiochemical saturation assay using an ox heart 3':5'-cyclic AMP-binding protein and by an assay involving activation of a mammalian protein kinase. 3. The plant 3':5'-cyclic AMP co-migrated with 3':5'-cyclic [8-3H]AMP on cellulose chromatography, poly(ethyleneimine)-cellulose chromatography and silica-gel t.l.c. developed with several solvent systems. 4. The plant 3':5'-cyclic AMP was degraded by ox heart 3':5'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase at the same rates as authentic 3':5'-cyclic AMP. 1-Methyl-3-isobutylxanthine (1 mM), a specific inhibitor of the 3':5'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodieterase, completely inhibited such degradation. 5. The concentrations of 3':5'-cyclic AMP satisfying the above criteria in Kalanchoe and Agave were 2-6 and 1 pmol/g fresh wt. respectively. Possible bacterial contribution to these analyses was estimated to be less than 0.002pmol/g fresh wt. Evidence for the occurrence of 3':5'-cyclic AMP in plants is discussed. PMID:196595

  18. Regulation of the MAP kinase cascade in PC12 cells: B-Raf activates MEK-1 (MAP kinase or ERK kinase) and is inhibited by cAMP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peraldi, P; Frödin, M; Barnier, J V

    1995-01-01

    In PC12 cells, cAMP stimulates the MAP kinase pathway by an unknown mechanism. Firstly, we examined the role of calcium ion mobilization and of protein kinase C in cAMP-stimulated MAP kinase activation. We show that cAMP stimulates p44mapk independently of these events. Secondly, we studied the r...

  19. cAMP/PKA regulates osteogenesis, adipogenesis and ratio of RANKL/OPG mRNA expression in mesenchymal stem cells by suppressing leptin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Der-Chih Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are a pluripotent cell type that can differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts and other cells. The reciprocal relationship between adipogenesis and osteogenesis was previously demonstrated; however, the mechanisms remain largely unknown. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We report that activation of PKA by 3-isobutyl-1 methyl xanthine (IBMX and forskolin enhances adipogenesis, the gene expression of PPARgamma2 and LPL, and downregulates the gene expression of Runx2 and osteopontin, markers of osteogenesis. PKA activation also decreases the ratio of Receptor Activator of the NF-kappaB Ligand to Osteoprotegerin (RANKL/OPG gene expression - the key factors of osteoclastogenesis. All these effects are mediated by the cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway by suppressing leptin, and may contribute to PKA stimulators-induced in vivo bone loss in developing zebrafish. CONCLUSIONS: Using MSCs, the center of a newly proposed bone metabolic unit, we identified cAMP/PKA signaling, one of the many signaling pathways that regulate bone homeostasis via controlling cyto-differentiation of MSCs and altering RANKL/OPG gene expression.

  20. Autonomous and nonautonomous regulation of axis formation by antagonistic signaling via 7-span cAMP receptors and GSK3 in Dictyostelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, G T; Kimmel, A R

    1997-08-15

    Early during Dictyostelium development a fundamental cell-fate decision establishes the anteroposterior (prestalk/prespore) axis. Signaling via the 7-transmembrane cAMP receptor CAR4 is essential for creating and maintaining a normal pattern; car4-null alleles have decreased levels of prestalk-specific mRNAs but enhanced expression of prespore genes. car4- cells produce all of the signals required for prestalk differentiation but lack an extracellular factor necessary for prespore differentiation of wild-type cells. This secreted factor decreases the sensitivity of prespore cells to inhibition by the prestalk morphogen DIF-1. At the cell autonomous level, CAR4 is linked to intracellular circuits that activate prestalk but inhibit prespore differentiation. The autonomous action of CAR4 is antagonistic to the positive intracellular signals mediated by another cAMP receptor, CAR1 and/or CAR3. Additional data indicate that these CAR-mediated pathways converge at the serine/threonine protein kinase GSK3, suggesting that the anterior (prestalk)/posterior (prespore) axis of Dictyostelium is regulated by an ancient mechanism that is shared by the Wnt/Fz circuits for dorsoventral patterning during early Xenopus development and establishing Drosophila segment polarity.

  1. Aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 attenuates PDGF-induced vascular smooth muscle cell migration via the cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottola, Giorgio; Chatterjee, Anuran; Wu, Bian; Chen, Mian; Conte, Michael S

    2017-01-01

    Resolvin D1 (RvD1) is a specialized pro-resolving lipid mediator that has been previously shown to attenuate vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration, a key process in the development of intimal hyperplasia. We sought to investigate the role of the cAMP/PKA pathway in mediating the effects of the aspirin-triggered epimer 17R-RvD1 (AT-RvD1) on VSMC migration. VSMCs were harvested from human saphenous veins. VSMCs were analyzed for intracellular cAMP levels and PKA activity after exposure to AT-RvD1. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced migration and cytoskeletal changes in VSMCs were observed through scratch, Transwell, and cell shape assays in the presence or absence of a PKA inhibitor (Rp-8-Br-cAMP). Further investigation of the pathways involved in AT-RvD1 signaling was performed by measuring Rac1 activity, vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation and paxillin translocation. Finally, we examined the role of RvD1 receptors (GPR32 and ALX/FPR2) in AT-RvD1 induced effects on VSMC migration and PKA activity. Treatment with AT-RvD1 induced a significant increase in cAMP levels and PKA activity in VSMCs at 5 minutes and 30 minutes, respectively. AT-RvD1 attenuated PDGF-induced VSMC migration and cytoskeletal rearrangements. These effects were attenuated by the PKA inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cAMP, suggesting cAMP/PKA involvement. Treatment of VSMC with AT-RvD1 inhibited PDGF-stimulated Rac1 activity, increased VASP phosphorylation, and attenuated paxillin localization to focal adhesions; these effects were negated by the addition of Rp-8-Br-cAMP. The effects of AT-RvD1 on VSMC migration and PKA activity were attenuated by blocking ALX/FPR2, suggesting an important role of this G-protein coupled receptor. Our results suggest that AT-RvD1 attenuates PDGF-induced VSMC migration via ALX/FPR2 and cAMP/PKA. Interference with Rac1, VASP and paxillin function appear to mediate the downstream effects of AT-RvD1 on VSMC migration.

  2. Visualization of cyclic nucleotide dynamics in neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill eGorshkov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The second messengers cAMP and cGMP transduce many neuromodulatory signals from hormones and neurotransmitters into specific functional outputs. Their production, degradation and signaling are spatiotemporally regulated to achieve high specificity in signal transduction. The development of genetically encodable fluorescent biosensors has provided researchers with useful tools to study these versatile second messengers and their downstream effectors with unparalleled spatial and temporal resolution in cultured cells and living animals. In this review, we introduce the general design of these fluorescent biosensors and describe several of them in more detail. Then we discuss a few examples of using cyclic nucleotide fluorescent biosensors to study regulation of neuronal function and finish with a discussion of advances in the field. Although there has been significant progress made in understanding how the specific signaling of cyclic nucleotide second messengers is achieved, the mechanistic details in complex cell types like neurons are only just beginning to surface. Current and future fluorescent protein reporters will be essential to elucidate the role of cyclic nucleotide signaling dynamics in the functions of individual neurons and their networks.

  3. Proteomic signatures implicate cAMP in light and temperature responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Thomas, Ludivine

    2013-05-01

    The second messenger 3\\'-5\\'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenylyl cyclases (ACs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cAMP from ATP, are increasingly recognized as important signaling molecules in a number of physiological responses in higher plants. Here we used proteomics to identify cAMP-dependent protein signatures in Arabidopsis thaliana and identify a number of differentially expressed proteins with a role in light- and temperature-dependent responses, notably photosystem II subunit P-1, plasma membrane associated cation-binding protein and chaperonin 60 β. Based on these proteomics results we conclude that, much like in cyanobacteria, algae and fungi, cAMP may have a role in light signaling and the regulation of photosynthesis as well as responses to temperature and we speculate that ACs could act as light and/or temperature sensors in higher plants. Biological significance: This current study is significant since it presents the first proteomic response to cAMP, a novel and key second messenger in plants. It will be relevant to researchers in plant physiology and in particular those with an interest in second messengers and their role in biotic and abiotic stress responses. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  4. cAMP level modulates scleral collagen remodeling, a critical step in the development of myopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijin Tao

    Full Text Available The development of myopia is associated with decreased ocular scleral collagen synthesis in humans and animal models. Collagen synthesis is, in part, under the influence of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP. We investigated the associations between cAMP, myopia development in guinea pigs, and collagen synthesis by human scleral fibroblasts (HSFs. Form-deprived myopia (FDM was induced by unilateral masking of guinea pig eyes. Scleral cAMP levels increased selectively in the FDM eyes and returned to normal levels after unmasking and recovery. Unilateral subconjunctival treatment with the adenylyl cyclase (AC activator forskolin resulted in a myopic shift accompanied by reduced collagen mRNA levels, but it did not affect retinal electroretinograms. The AC inhibitor SQ22536 attenuated the progression of FDM. Moreover, forskolin inhibited collagen mRNA levels and collagen secretion by HSFs. The inhibition was reversed by SQ22536. These results demonstrate a critical role of cAMP in control of myopia development. Selective regulation of cAMP to control scleral collagen synthesis may be a novel therapeutic strategy for preventing and treating myopia.

  5. A security network in PSI photoprotection: regulation of photosynthetic control, NPQ and O2 photoreduction by cyclic electron flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric eChaux

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic Electron Flow (CEF is a regulator of acceptor-side limitations and has multiple functions in the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Here we draw on recent and historic literature and concentrate on its role in Photosystem I (PSI photoprotection, outlining causes and consequences of damage to PSI and CEF’s role as an avoidance mechanism. We outline two functions of CEF in PSI photoprotection that are both linked to trans-thylakoidal gradient formation and luminal acidification: firstly, its action on Photosystem II non-photochemical quenching and photosynthetic control and secondly, its action in stromal poising to overcome acceptor-side limitation by rebalancing NADPH and ATP ratios for carbon fixation.

  6. Regulation of ATP-sensitive K+ channels in insulinoma cells: Activation by somatostatin and protein kinase C and the role of cAMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Weille, J.R.; Schmid-Antomarchi, H.; Fosset, M.; Lazdunski, M.

    1989-01-01

    The actions of somatostatin and of the phorbol ester 4β-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) were studied in rat insulinoma (RINm5F) cells by electrophysiological and 86 Rb + flux techniques. Both PMA and somatostatin hyperpolarize insulinoma cells by activating ATP-sensitive K + channels. The presence of intracellular GTP is required for the somatostatin effects. PMA- and somatostatin-induced hyperpolarization and channel activity are inhibited by the sulfonylurea glibenclamide. Glibenclamide-sensitive 86 Rb + efflux from insulinoma cells is stimulated by somatostatin in a dose-dependent manner (half maximal effect at 0.7 nM) and abolished by pertussis toxin pretreatment. Mutual roles of a GTP-binding protein, of protein kinase C, and of cAMP in the regulation of ATP-sensitive K + channels are discussed

  7. Coordinated induction of GST and MRP2 by cAMP in Caco-2 cells: Role of protein kinase A signaling pathway and toxicological relevance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arana, Maite Rocío; Tocchetti, Guillermo Nicolás; Domizi, Pablo; Arias, Agostina; Rigalli, Juan Pablo; Ruiz, María Laura

    2015-01-01

    The cAMP pathway is a universal signaling pathway regulating many cellular processes including metabolic routes, growth and differentiation. However, its effects on xenobiotic biotransformation and transport systems are poorly characterized. The effect of cAMP on expression and activity of GST and MRP2 was evaluated in Caco-2 cells, a model of intestinal epithelium. Cells incubated with the cAMP permeable analog dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db-cAMP: 1,10,100 μM) for 48 h exhibited a dose–response increase in GST class α and MRP2 protein expression. Incubation with forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, confirmed the association between intracellular cAMP and upregulation of MRP2. Consistent with increased expression of GSTα and MRP2, db-cAMP enhanced their activities, as well as cytoprotection against the common substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. Pretreatment with protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors totally abolished upregulation of MRP2 and GSTα induced by db-cAMP. In silico analysis together with experiments consisting of treatment with db-cAMP of Caco-2 cells transfected with a reporter construct containing CRE and AP-1 sites evidenced participation of these sites in MRP2 upregulation. Further studies involving the transcription factors CREB and AP-1 (c-JUN, c-FOS and ATF2) demonstrated increased levels of total c-JUN and phosphorylation of c-JUN and ATF2 by db-cAMP, which were suppressed by a PKA inhibitor. Co-immunoprecipitation and ChIP assay studies demonstrated that db-cAMP increased c-JUN/ATF2 interaction, with further recruitment to the region of the MRP2 promoter containing CRE and AP-1 sites. We conclude that cAMP induces GSTα and MRP2 expression and activity in Caco-2 cells via the PKA pathway, thus regulating detoxification of specific xenobiotics. - Highlights: • cAMP positively modulates the expression and activity of GST and MRP2 in Caco-2 cells. • Such induction resulted in increased cytoprotection against chemical injury. • PKA

  8. Coordinated induction of GST and MRP2 by cAMP in Caco-2 cells: Role of protein kinase A signaling pathway and toxicological relevance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arana, Maite Rocío, E-mail: arana@ifise-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Tocchetti, Guillermo Nicolás, E-mail: gtocchetti@live.com.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Domizi, Pablo, E-mail: domizi@ibr-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Rosario (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Arias, Agostina, E-mail: agoarias@yahoo.com.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Rigalli, Juan Pablo, E-mail: jprigalli@gmail.com [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Ruiz, María Laura, E-mail: ruiz@ifise-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); and others

    2015-09-01

    The cAMP pathway is a universal signaling pathway regulating many cellular processes including metabolic routes, growth and differentiation. However, its effects on xenobiotic biotransformation and transport systems are poorly characterized. The effect of cAMP on expression and activity of GST and MRP2 was evaluated in Caco-2 cells, a model of intestinal epithelium. Cells incubated with the cAMP permeable analog dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db-cAMP: 1,10,100 μM) for 48 h exhibited a dose–response increase in GST class α and MRP2 protein expression. Incubation with forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, confirmed the association between intracellular cAMP and upregulation of MRP2. Consistent with increased expression of GSTα and MRP2, db-cAMP enhanced their activities, as well as cytoprotection against the common substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. Pretreatment with protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors totally abolished upregulation of MRP2 and GSTα induced by db-cAMP. In silico analysis together with experiments consisting of treatment with db-cAMP of Caco-2 cells transfected with a reporter construct containing CRE and AP-1 sites evidenced participation of these sites in MRP2 upregulation. Further studies involving the transcription factors CREB and AP-1 (c-JUN, c-FOS and ATF2) demonstrated increased levels of total c-JUN and phosphorylation of c-JUN and ATF2 by db-cAMP, which were suppressed by a PKA inhibitor. Co-immunoprecipitation and ChIP assay studies demonstrated that db-cAMP increased c-JUN/ATF2 interaction, with further recruitment to the region of the MRP2 promoter containing CRE and AP-1 sites. We conclude that cAMP induces GSTα and MRP2 expression and activity in Caco-2 cells via the PKA pathway, thus regulating detoxification of specific xenobiotics. - Highlights: • cAMP positively modulates the expression and activity of GST and MRP2 in Caco-2 cells. • Such induction resulted in increased cytoprotection against chemical injury. • PKA

  9. A Nutrient-Regulated Cyclic Diguanylate Phosphodiesterase Controls Clostridium difficile Biofilm and Toxin Production during Stationary Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Erin B; McKee, Robert W; Courson, David S; Garrett, Elizabeth M; McBride, Shonna M; Cheney, Richard E; Tamayo, Rita

    2017-09-01

    The signaling molecule cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) mediates physiological adaptation to extracellular stimuli in a wide range of bacteria. The complex metabolic pathways governing c-di-GMP synthesis and degradation are highly regulated, but the specific cues that impact c-di-GMP signaling are largely unknown. In the intestinal pathogen Clostridium difficile , c-di-GMP inhibits flagellar motility and toxin production and promotes pilus-dependent biofilm formation, but no specific biological functions have been ascribed to any of the individual c-di-GMP synthases or phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Here, we report the functional and biochemical characterization of a c-di-GMP PDE, PdcA, 1 of 37 confirmed or putative c-di-GMP metabolism proteins in C. difficile 630. Our studies reveal that pdcA transcription is controlled by the nutrient-regulated transcriptional regulator CodY and accordingly increases during stationary phase. In addition, PdcA PDE activity is allosterically regulated by GTP, further linking c-di-GMP levels to nutrient availability. Mutation of pdcA increased biofilm formation and reduced toxin biosynthesis without affecting swimming motility or global intracellular c-di-GMP. Analysis of the transcriptional response to pdcA mutation indicates that PdcA-dependent phenotypes manifest during stationary phase, consistent with regulation by CodY. These results demonstrate that inactivation of this single PDE gene is sufficient to impact multiple c-di-GMP-dependent phenotypes, including the production of major virulence factors, and suggest a link between c-di-GMP signaling and nutrient availability. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Schwann Cells Metabolize Extracellular 2′,3′-cAMP to 2′-AMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, Jonathan D.; Kochanek, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    The 3′,5′-cAMP–adenosine pathway (3′,5′-cAMP→5′-AMP→adenosine) and the 2′,3′-cAMP–adenosine pathway (2′,3′-cAMP→2′-AMP/3′-AMP→adenosine) are active in the brain. Oligodendrocytes participate in the brain 2′,3′-cAMP–adenosine pathway via their robust expression of 2′,3′-cyclic nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase (CNPase; converts 2′,3′-cAMP to 2′-AMP). Because Schwann cells also express CNPase, it is conceivable that the 2′,3′-cAMP–adenosine pathway exists in the peripheral nervous system. To test this and to compare the 2′,3′-cAMP–adenosine pathway to the 3′,5′-cAMP–adenosine pathway in Schwann cells, we examined the metabolism of 2′,3′-cAMP, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, 3′,5′-cAMP, and 5′-AMP in primary rat Schwann cells in culture. Addition of 2′,3′-cAMP (3, 10, and 30 µM) to Schwann cells increased levels of 2′-AMP in the medium from 0.006 ± 0.002 to 21 ± 2, 70 ± 3, and 187 ± 10 nM/µg protein, respectively; in contrast, Schwann cells had little ability to convert 2′,3′-cAMP to 3′-AMP or 3′,5′-cAMP to either 3′-AMP or 5′-AMP. Although Schwann cells slightly converted 2′,3′-cAMP and 2′-AMP to adenosine, they did so at very modest rates (e.g., 5- and 3-fold, respectively, more slowly compared with our previously reported studies in oligodendrocytes). Using transected myelinated rat sciatic nerves in culture medium, we observed a time-related increase in endogenous intracellular 2′,3′-cAMP and extracellular 2′-AMP. These findings indicate that Schwann cells do not have a robust 3′,5′-cAMP–adenosine pathway but do have a 2′,3′-cAMP–adenosine pathway; however, because the pathway mostly involves 2′-AMP formation rather than 3′-AMP, and because the conversion of 2′-AMP to adenosine is slow, metabolism of 2′,3′-cAMP mostly results in the accumulation of 2′-AMP. Accumulation of 2′-AMP in peripheral nerves postinjury could have

  11. Up-regulated Ectonucleotidases in Fas-Associated Death Domain Protein- and Receptor-Interacting Protein Kinase 1-Deficient Jurkat Leukemia Cells Counteract Extracellular ATP/AMP Accumulation via Pannexin-1 Channels during Chemotherapeutic Drug-Induced Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd-Tressler, Andrea M; Lane, Graham S; Dubyak, George R

    2017-07-01

    Pannexin-1 (Panx1) channels mediate the efflux of ATP and AMP from cancer cells in response to induction of extrinsic apoptosis by death receptors or intrinsic apoptosis by chemotherapeutic agents. We previously described the accumulation of extracellular ATP /AMP during chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in Jurkat human leukemia cells. In this study, we compared how different signaling pathways determine extracellular nucleotide pools in control Jurkat cells versus Jurkat lines that lack the Fas-associated death domain (FADD) or receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIP1) cell death regulatory proteins. Tumor necrosis factor- α induced extrinsic apoptosis in control Jurkat cells and necroptosis in FADD-deficient cells; treatment of both lines with chemotherapeutic drugs elicited similar intrinsic apoptosis. Robust extracellular ATP/AMP accumulation was observed in the FADD-deficient cells during necroptosis, but not during apoptotic activation of Panx1 channels. Accumulation of extracellular ATP/AMP was similarly absent in RIP1-deficient Jurkat cells during apoptotic responses to chemotherapeutic agents. Apoptotic activation triggered equivalent proteolytic gating of Panx1 channels in all three Jurkat cell lines. The differences in extracellular ATP/AMP accumulation correlated with cell-line-specific expression of ectonucleotidases that metabolized the released ATP/AMP. CD73 mRNA, and α β -methylene-ADP-inhibitable ecto-AMPase activity were elevated in the FADD-deficient cells. In contrast, the RIP1-deficient cells were defined by increased expression of tartrate-sensitive prostatic acid phosphatase as a broadly acting ectonucleotidase. Thus, extracellular nucleotide accumulation during regulated tumor cell death involves interplay between ATP/AMP efflux pathways and different cell-autonomous ectonucleotidases. Differential expression of particular ectonucleotidases in tumor cell variants will determine whether chemotherapy-induced activation of Panx1 channels

  12. The crystal structures of apo and cAMP-bound GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum reveal structural and dynamic changes upon cAMP binding in CRP/FNR family transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip D Townsend

    Full Text Available The cyclic AMP-dependent transcriptional regulator GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum is a member of the super-family of CRP/FNR (cyclic AMP receptor protein/fumarate and nitrate reduction regulator transcriptional regulators that play central roles in bacterial metabolic regulatory networks. In C. glutamicum, which is widely used for the industrial production of amino acids and serves as a non-pathogenic model organism for members of the Corynebacteriales including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the GlxR homodimer controls the transcription of a large number of genes involved in carbon metabolism. GlxR therefore represents a key target for understanding the regulation and coordination of C. glutamicum metabolism. Here we investigate cylic AMP and DNA binding of GlxR from C. glutamicum and describe the crystal structures of apo GlxR determined at a resolution of 2.5 Å, and two crystal forms of holo GlxR at resolutions of 2.38 and 1.82 Å, respectively. The detailed structural analysis and comparison of GlxR with CRP reveals that the protein undergoes a distinctive conformational change upon cyclic AMP binding leading to a dimer structure more compatible to DNA-binding. As the two binding sites in the GlxR homodimer are structurally identical dynamic changes upon binding of the first ligand are responsible for the allosteric behavior. The results presented here show how dynamic and structural changes in GlxR lead to optimization of orientation and distance of its two DNA-binding helices for optimal DNA recognition.

  13. Cyclic glycine-proline regulates IGF-1 homeostasis by altering the binding of IGFBP-3 to IGF-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Jian; Gluckman, Peter; Yang, Panzao; Krissansen, Geoff; Sun, Xueying; Zhou, Yongzhi; Wen, Jingyuan; Phillips, Gemma; Shorten, Paul R.; McMahon, Chris D.; Wake, Graeme C.; Chan, Wendy H. K.; Thomas, Mark F.; Ren, April; Moon, Steve; Liu, Dong-Xu

    2014-03-01

    The homeostasis of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is essential for metabolism, development and survival. Insufficient IGF-1 is associated with poor recovery from wounds whereas excessive IGF-1 contributes to growth of tumours. We have shown that cyclic glycine-proline (cGP), a metabolite of IGF-1, can normalise IGF-1 function by showing its efficacy in improving the recovery from ischemic brain injury in rats and inhibiting the growth of lymphomic tumours in mice. Further investigation in cell culture suggested that cGP promoted the activity of IGF-1 when it was insufficient, but inhibited the activity of IGF-1 when it was excessive. Mathematical modelling revealed that the efficacy of cGP was a modulated IGF-1 effect via changing the binding of IGF-1 to its binding proteins, which dynamically regulates the balance between bioavailable and non-bioavailable IGF-1. Our data reveal a novel mechanism of auto-regulation of IGF-1, which has physiological and pathophysiological consequences and potential pharmacological utility.

  14. Increased cAMP levels modulate transforming growth factor-beta/Smad-induced expression of extracellular matrix components and other key fibroblast effector functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, Meinhard; Dennler, Sylviane; Anderegg, Ulf; Kokot, Agatha; Simon, Jan C; Luger, Thomas A; Mauviel, Alain; Böhm, Markus

    2010-01-01

    cAMP is a key messenger of many hormones and neuropeptides, some of which modulate the composition of extracellular matrix. Treatment of human dermal fibroblasts with dibutyryl cyclic AMP and forskolin antagonized the inductive effects of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) on the expression of collagen, connective tissue growth factor, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1, and plasminogen activator inhibitor type I, four prototypical TGF-beta-responsive genes. Increased intracellular cAMP prevented TGF-beta-induced Smad-specific gene transactivation, although TGF-beta-mediated Smad phosphorylation and nuclear translocation remained unaffected. However, increased cAMP levels abolished TGF-beta-induced interaction of Smad3 with its transcriptional co-activator cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP)/p300. Overexpression of the transcriptional co-activator CBP/p300 rescued Smad-specific gene transcription in the presence of cAMP suggesting that sequestration of limited amounts of CBP/p300 by the activated cAMP/CREB pathway is the molecular basis of this inhibitory effect. These findings were extended by two functional assays. Increased intracellular cAMP levels suppressed the inductive activity of TGF-beta to contract mechanically unloaded collagen lattices and resulted in an attenuation of fibroblast migration of mechanically induced cell layer wounds. Of note, cAMP and TGF-beta synergistically induced hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2) expression and hyaluronan secretion, presumably via putative CREB-binding sites adjacent to Smad-binding sites within the HAS2 promoter. Our findings identify the cAMP pathway as a potent but differential and promoter-specific regulator of TGF-beta-mediated effects involved in extracellular matrix homeostasis.

  15. Angiopoietin-like protein 4 is an exercise-induced hepatokine in humans, regulated by glucagon and cAMP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingerslev, Bodil; Hansen, Jakob S; Hoffmann, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Angiopoietin-like protein-4 (ANGPTL4) is a circulating protein that is highly expressed in liver and implicated in regulation of plasma triglyceride levels. Systemic ANGPTL4 increases during prolonged fasting and is suggested to be secreted from skeletal muscle following exercise. METH...

  16. The Bacterial Second Messenger Cyclic di-GMP Regulates Brucella Pathogenesis and Leads to Altered Host Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mike; Harms, Jerome S; Marim, Fernanda M; Armon, Leah; Hall, Cherisse L; Liu, Yi-Ping; Banai, Menachem; Oliveira, Sergio C; Splitter, Gary A; Smith, Judith A

    2016-12-01

    Brucella species are facultative intracellular bacteria that cause brucellosis, a chronic debilitating disease significantly impacting global health and prosperity. Much remains to be learned about how Brucella spp. succeed in sabotaging immune host cells and how Brucella spp. respond to environmental challenges. Multiple types of bacteria employ the prokaryotic second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) to coordinate responses to shifting environments. To determine the role of c-di-GMP in Brucella physiology and in shaping host-Brucella interactions, we utilized c-di-GMP regulatory enzyme deletion mutants. Our results show that a ΔbpdA phosphodiesterase mutant producing excess c-di-GMP displays marked attenuation in vitro and in vivo during later infections. Although c-di-GMP is known to stimulate the innate sensor STING, surprisingly, the ΔbpdA mutant induced a weaker host immune response than did wild-type Brucella or the low-c-di-GMP guanylate cyclase ΔcgsB mutant. Proteomics analysis revealed that c-di-GMP regulates several processes critical for virulence, including cell wall and biofilm formation, nutrient acquisition, and the type IV secretion system. Finally, ΔbpdA mutants exhibited altered morphology and were hypersensitive to nutrient-limiting conditions. In summary, our results indicate a vital role for c-di-GMP in allowing Brucella to successfully navigate stressful and shifting environments to establish intracellular infection. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Cyclic Compressive Stress Regulates Apoptosis in Rat Osteoblasts: Involvement of PI3K/Akt and JNK MAPK Signaling Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanglong Song

    Full Text Available It is widely accepted that physiological mechanical stimulation suppresses apoptosis and induces synthesis of extracellular matrix by osteoblasts; however, the effect of stress overloading on osteoblasts has not been fully illustrated. In the present study, we investigated the effect of cyclic compressive stress on rat osteoblasts apoptosis, using a novel liquid drop method to generate mechanical stress on osteoblast monolayers. After treatment with different levels of mechanical stress, apoptosis of osteoblasts and activations of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs and PI3-kinase (PI3K/Akt signaling pathways were investigated. Osteoblasts apoptosis was observed after treated with specific inhibitors prior to mechanical stimulation. Protein levels of Bax/Bcl-2/caspase-3 signaling were determined using western blot with or without inhibitors of PI3K/Akt and phosphorylation of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK MAPK. Results showed that mechanical stimulation led to osteoblasts apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner and a remarkable activation of MAPKs and PI3K/Akt signaling pathways. Activation of PI3K/Akt protected against apoptosis, whereas JNK MAPK increased apoptosis via regulation of Bax/Bcl-2/caspase-3 activation. In summary, the PI3K/Akt and JNK MAPK signaling pathways played opposing roles in osteoblasts apoptosis, resulting in inhibition of apoptosis upon small-magnitude stress and increased apoptosis upon large-magnitude stress.

  18. Cyclic nucleotide binding and structural changes in the isolated GAF domain of Anabaena adenylyl cyclase, CyaB2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabir Hassan Biswas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available GAF domains are a large family of regulatory domains, and a subset are found associated with enzymes involved in cyclic nucleotide (cNMP metabolism such as adenylyl cyclases and phosphodiesterases. CyaB2, an adenylyl cyclase from Anabaena, contains two GAF domains in tandem at the N-terminus and an adenylyl cyclase domain at the C-terminus. Cyclic AMP, but not cGMP, binding to the GAF domains of CyaB2 increases the activity of the cyclase domain leading to enhanced synthesis of cAMP. Here we show that the isolated GAFb domain of CyaB2 can bind both cAMP and cGMP, and enhanced specificity for cAMP is observed only when both the GAFa and the GAFb domains are present in tandem (GAFab domain. In silico docking and mutational analysis identified distinct residues important for interaction with either cAMP or cGMP in the GAFb domain. Structural changes associated with ligand binding to the GAF domains could not be detected by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET experiments. However, amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDXMS experiments provided insights into the structural basis for cAMP-induced allosteric regulation of the GAF domains, and differences in the changes induced by cAMP and cGMP binding to the GAF domain. Thus, our findings could allow the development of molecules that modulate the allosteric regulation by GAF domains present in pharmacologically relevant proteins.

  19. Identification of a specific assembly of the G protein Golf as a critical and regulated module of dopamine and adenosine-activated cAMP pathways in the striatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis eHervé

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In the principal neurons of striatum (medium spiny neurons, MSNs, cAMP pathway is primarily activated through the stimulation of dopamine D1 and adenosine A2A receptors, these receptors being mainly expressed in striatonigral and striatopallidal MSNs, respectively. Since cAMP signaling pathway could be altered in various physiological and pathological situations, including drug addiction and Parkinson’s disease, it is of crucial importance to identify the molecular components involved in the activation of this pathway. In MSNs, cAMP pathway activation is not dependent on the classical Gs GTP-binding protein but requires a specific G protein subunit heterotrimer containing Galpha-olf/beta2/gamma7 in particular association with adenylate cyclase type 5. This assembly forms an authentic functional signaling unit since loss of one of its members leads to defects of cAMP pathway activation in response to D1 or A2A receptor stimulation, inducing dramatic impairments of behavioral responses dependent on these receptors. Interestingly, D1 receptor-dependent cAMP signaling is modulated by the neuronal levels of Galpha-olf, indicating that Galpha-olf represents the rate-limiting step in this signaling cascade and could constitute a critical element for regulation of D1 receptor responses. In both Parkinsonian patients and several animal models of Parkinson’s disease, the lesion of dopamine neurons produces a prolonged elevation of Galpha-olf levels. This observation gives an explanation for the cAMP pathway hypersensitivity to D1 stimulation, occurring despite an unaltered D1 receptor density. In conclusion, alterations in the highly specialized assembly of Galpha-olf/beta2/gamma7 subunits can happen in pathological conditions, such as Parkinson’s disease, and it could have important functional consequences in relation to changes in D1 receptor signaling in the striatum.

  20. Comparison of thyroid stimulating activities measured by cyclic AMP production, those by radioiodine uptake in FRTL-5 cells and TSH-binding inhibitory activities in patients with hyperthyroid and euthyroid Graves' diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasagi, Kanji; Hatabu, Hiroto; Tokuda, Yasutaka; Arai, Keisuke; Iida, Yasuhiro; Konishi, Junji

    1988-01-01

    By using an assay measuring cAMP production in FRTL-5 thyroid cells, thyroid stimulating antibodies (TSab) were detected in all of 15 patients with euthyroid Graves' disease (EG) and of 26 patients with hyperthyroid Graves' disease (HG). There was no signicant difference between TSab activities in Eg and in HG. In an effort to elucidate why EG patients remain euthyroid in spite of having TSab, we investigated the effect of the patient's crude immunoglobulin fractions 125 I uptake in FRTL-5 thyroid cells, one of the indices of stimulation subsequent to cAMP production. The 125 Iuptake stimulation (IUS) activity was positive in 46,7% (7/15) of EG patients and 88.5% (23/26) of HG patients, being significantly lower in the former than in the latter (P 99m Tc thyroid uptake (r = 0.401, P 99m Tc thyroid uptake in comparison to 19 HG patients with a similar range of IUS activities. There was a good correlation between thyroid weight and 99m Tc thyroid uptake (r = 8.827, P 99m Tc and presumably radioiodine in vivo, might be a factor responsible for keeping EG patients euthyroid despite the presence of TSab. (author)

  1. Endosomal generation of cAMP in GPCR signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Jean-Alphonse, Frederic G.; Gardella, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    It has been widely assumed that the production of the ubiquitous second messenger cyclic AMP, which is mediated by cell surface G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), and its termination take place exclusively at the plasma membrane. Recent studies reveal that diverse GPCRs do not always follow this conventional paradigm. In the new model, GPCRs mediate G-protein signaling not only from the plasma membrane but also from endosomal membranes. This model proposes that following ligand binding and activation, cell surface GPCRs internalize and redistribute into early endosomes, where trimeric G protein signaling can be maintained for an extended period of time. This Perspective discusses the molecular and cellular mechanistic subtleties as well as the physiological consequences of this unexpected process, which is considerably changing how we think about GPCR signaling and regulation and how we study drugs that target this receptor family. PMID:25271346

  2. The stable prostacyclin-analogue, iloprost, unlike prostanoids and leukotrienes, potently stimulates cyclic adenosine monophosphate synthesis of primary astroglial cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seregi, A; Schobert, A; Hertting, G

    1988-06-01

    The effect of different eicosanoids on adenosine-3', 5'-cyclic-monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation in primary astroglial cell cultures prepared from newborn rat brain was studied. The stable prostacyclin-analogue, iloprost, effectively stimulated cAMP synthesis in a concentration-dependent, saturable manner, the EC50 being about 3 x 10(-8) M. Prostaglandin (PG) E2 was less potent, without reaching plateau even at 10(-5) M. Prostaglandins D2 and F2 alpha, and the stable thromboxane A2-analogue, U 46619, as well as leukotrienes (LT) B4, C4, D4 and E4 were not effective and did not attenuate basal or isoprenaline (10(-8) M)-stimulated astroglial cAMP formation. This is the first indication for the existence of a prostacyclin receptor coupled positively to the adenylate cyclase in astrocytes. Other eicosanoids are unlikely to be involved in receptor-mediated regulation of astroglial cAMP levels.

  3. Regulation of Renin Release via Cyclic ADP-Ribose-Mediated Signaling: Evidence from Mice Lacking CD38 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xiong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Despite extensive studies, the intracellular regulatory mechanism of renin production and release is still poorly understood. The present study was designed to test whether CD38-ADP-ribosylcyclase signaling pathway contributes to the regulation of renin production and release, and to examine whether CD38 gene knockout (CD38-/- can change this important renal endocrinal function. Methods: ADP–ribosylcyclase activity was estimated utilizing HPLC, cADPR levels from western blot, plasma renin activity from RIA kit, urinary sodium and potassium excretion from fame photometry. Results: The expression of CD38 and the activity of ADP-ribosylcyclase to produce cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR were nearly abolished in the kidney from CD38-/- mice, indicating that CD38 gene is a major enzyme responsible for the generation of cADPR in vivo. Mice lacking CD38 gene showed increased plasma renin activity (PRA in either conscious or anesthetized status (P+/+ and CD38-/- mice. In acute experiments, it was demonstrated that plasma renin activity (PRA significantly increased upon isoprenaline infusion in CD38-/- mice compared to CD38+/+ mice. Accompanied with such increase in PRA, glomerular filtration rate (GFR, renal blood flow (RBF, urine volume (UV and sodium excretion (UNaV more significantly decreased in CD38-/- than CD38+/+ mice. Similarly, more increases in PRA but more decreases in GFR, RBF, UV and UNaV were observed in CD38-/- than CD38+/+ mice when they had a low renal perfusion pressure (RPP. Conclusion: CD38-cADPR-mediated signaling may importantly contribute to the maintenance of low PRA and participate in the regulation of renal hemodynamics and excretory function in mice.

  4. Novel Radioligands for Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterase Imaging with Positron Emission Tomography: An Update on Developments Since 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susann Schröder

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs are a class of intracellular enzymes that inactivate the secondary messenger molecules, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP. Thus, PDEs regulate the signaling cascades mediated by these cyclic nucleotides and affect fundamental intracellular processes. Pharmacological inhibition of PDE activity is a promising strategy for treatment of several diseases. However, the role of the different PDEs in related pathologies is not completely clarified yet. PDE-specific radioligands enable non-invasive visualization and quantification of these enzymes by positron emission tomography (PET in vivo and provide an important translational tool for elucidation of the relationship between altered expression of PDEs and pathophysiological effects as well as (pre-clinical evaluation of novel PDE inhibitors developed as therapeutics. Herein we present an overview of novel PDE radioligands for PET published since 2012.

  5. Regulation of P450-mediated permethrin resistance inCulex quinquefasciatusby the GPCR/Gαs/AC/cAMP/PKA signaling cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Liu, Nannan

    2017-12-01

    This study explores the role of G-protein-coupled receptor-intracellular signaling in the development of P450-mediated insecticide resistance in mosquitoes, Culex quinquefasciatus , focusing on the essential function of the GPCRs and their downstream effectors of Gs alpha subunit protein (Gαs) and adenylyl cyclase (ACs) in P450-mediated insecticide resistance of Culex mosquitoes. Our RNAi-mediated functional study showed that knockdown of Gαs caused the decreased expression of the downstream effectors of ACs and PKAs in the GPCR signaling pathway and resistance P450 genes, whereas knockdown of ACs decreased the expression of PKAs and resistance P450 genes. Knockdown of either Gαs or ACs resulted in an increased susceptibility of mosquitoes to permethrin. These results add significantly to our understanding of the molecular basis of resistance P450 gene regulation through GPCR/Gαs/AC/cAMP-PKA signaling pathways in the insecticide resistance of mosquitoes. The temporal and spatial dynamic analyses of GPCRs, Gαs, ACs, PKAs, and P450s in two insecticide resistant mosquito strains revealed that all the GPCR signaling pathway components tested, namely GPCRs, Gαs, ACs and PKAs, were most highly expressed in the brain for both resistant strains, suggesting the role played by these genes in signaling transduction and regulation. The resistance P450 genes were mainly expressed in the brain, midgut and malpighian tubules (MTs), suggesting their critical function in the central nervous system and importance for detoxification. The temporal dynamics analysis for the gene expression showed a diverse expression profile during mosquito development, indicating their initially functional importance in response to exposure to insecticides during their life stages.

  6. Study on the change of cyclic nucleotide in mice with yang vacuity disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xinhua; Shen Ling; Wang Shuguang

    2002-01-01

    To study the relation between Yang Vacuity disease happening, development and cyclic nucleotide response, and prove curative effects of some assisting Yang drug, the plasma cAMP, cGMP and cAMP/cGMP levels were detected by radioimmunoassay in the Yang Vacuity group and curing group. Results: showed: (1) Yang Vacuity group: the symptoms were clear, death rate was high, the plasma cAMP and cAMP/cGMP increased obviously, it suggests that cyclic nucleotide was imbalance. (2) Curing group: the symptoms of Yang Vacuity disease were improved obviously, death rate dropped, cAMP declined, cGMP increased, while cAMP/cGMP reached the normal level, it showed that cyclic nucleotide of the body had altered greatly. (3) It is a reference target for Yang Vacuity. (4) Assisting yang drug (Sini Decoction) had a close relation with correcting imbalance of cyclic nucleotide

  7. A structural basis for the regulation of an H-NOX-associated cyclic-di-GMP synthase/phosphodiesterase enzyme by nitric oxide-bound H-NOX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Tanaya; Luan, Bowu; Raleigh, Daniel P; Boon, Elizabeth M

    2014-04-08

    Biofilms are surface-attached communities of bacteria enclosed in a polysaccharide matrix. Bacteria in a biofilm are extremely resistant to antibiotics. Several recent reports have linked the signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) with biofilm dispersal. We have previously reported that an H-NOX (heme-nitric oxide/oxygen binding) protein in the biofilm-dwelling bacterium Shewanella woodyi mediates NO-induced biofilm dispersal. In S. woodyi, H-NOX (SwH-NOX) is cocistronic with a gene encoding a dual-functioning diguanylate cyclase/phosphodiesterase enzyme, designated here as HaCE (H-NOX-associated cyclic-di-GMP processing enzyme). Enzymes such as these are responsible for regulating the intracellular concentrations of cyclic-di-GMP, a secondary signaling molecule essential to biofilm formation in bacteria. We have demonstrated that NO-bound SwH-NOX regulates both enzymatic activities of SwHaCE, resulting in decreased cellular cyclic-di-GMP levels and disruption of biofilm formation. Thus, H-NOX/HaCE represents a potential drug target for regulating biofilm formation. In this work, the SwH-NOX surface residues critical for the formation of a protein complex with SwHaCE are identified using nuclear magnetic resonance, fluorescence quenching, and cosedimentation. Enzyme assays confirm this protein-protein interface and its importance for H-NOX/HaCE function.

  8. AMP kinase regulates K-ATP currents evoked by NMDA receptor stimulation in rat subthalamic nucleus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, K-Z; Yakhnitsa, V; Munhall, A C; Johnson, S W

    2014-08-22

    Our lab recently showed that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) evokes ATP-sensitive K(+) (K-ATP) currents in subthalamic nucleus (STN) neurons in slices of the rat brain. Both K-ATP channels and 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) are considered cellular energy sensors because their activities are influenced by the phosphorylation state of adenosine nucleotides. Moreover, AMPK has been shown to regulate K-ATP function in a variety of tissues including pancreas, cardiac myocytes, and hypothalamus. We used whole-cell patch clamp recordings to study the effect of AMPK activation on K-ATP channel function in STN neurons in slices of the rat brain. We found that bath or intracellular application of the AMPK activators A769662 and PT1 augmented tolbutamide-sensitive K-ATP currents evoked by NMDA receptor stimulation. The effect of AMPK activators was blocked by the AMPK inhibitor dorsomorphin (compound C), and by STO609, an inhibitor of the upstream AMPK activator CaMKKβ. AMPK augmentation of NMDA-induced K-ATP current was also blocked by intracellular BAPTA and by inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase and guanylyl cyclase. However, A769662 did not augment currents evoked by the K-ATP channel opener diazoxide. In the presence of NMDA, A769662 inhibited depolarizing plateau potentials and burst firing, both of which could be antagonized by tolbutamide or dorsomorphin. These studies show that AMPK augments NMDA-induced K-ATP currents by a Ca(2+)-dependent process that involves nitric oxide and cGMP. By augmenting K-ATP currents, AMPK activation would be expected to dampen the excitatory effect of glutamate-mediated transmission in the STN. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Regulation of Tyrosine Hydroxylase Activity in Cultured Mouse Neuroblastoma Cells: Elevation Induced by Analogs of Adenosine 3′:5′-Cyclic Monophosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waymire, J. C.; Weiner, N.; Prasad, K. N.

    1972-01-01

    Mouse neuroblastoma cells in culture have been used as a model for the study of the mechanism by which activities of tyrosine hydroxylase (EC 1.14.3.a) are regulated in sympathetic tissue. The activity of tyrosine hydroxylase in cultured cells drops to barely detectable activities after 1 week and remains low for months in culture in the uncloned cell line of neuroblastoma. Activity in an adrenergic clone isolated from the uncloned line has about 20% of the activity of the fresh grated tumor cell. N6, O2′-dibutyryl adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate causes a concentration and time-dependent increase in enzyme activity in both the cloned and uncloned cell lines. Enzyme activity is elevated by other stable analogs of adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate, notably the N6-monobutyryl, 8-aminomethyl, and 8-methylthio derivatives of the cyclic nucleotide; by the inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, papaverine; and by sodium butyrate. Changes in cell morphology and tyrosine hydroxylase activity are shown not to be necessarily related. PMID:4403308

  10. MEK Inhibitors Reverse cAMP-Mediated Anxiety in Zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Pia R.; Anastasaki, Corina; Grant, Nicola J.

    2015-01-01

    Altered phosphodiesterase (PDE)-cyclic AMP (cAMP) activity is frequently associated with anxiety disorders, but current therapies act by reducing neuronal excitability rather than targeting PDE-cAMP-mediated signaling pathways. Here, we report the novel repositioning of anti-cancer MEK inhibitors...... as anxiolytics in a zebrafish model of anxiety-like behaviors. PDE inhibitors or activators of adenylate cyclase cause behaviors consistent with anxiety in larvae and adult zebrafish. Small-molecule screening identifies MEK inhibitors as potent suppressors of cAMP anxiety behaviors in both larvae and adult...... zebrafish, while causing no anxiolytic behavioral effects on their own. The mechanism underlying cAMP-induced anxiety is via crosstalk to activation of the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. We propose that targeting crosstalk signaling pathways can be an effective strategy for mental health disorders, and advance...

  11. Selective modulation of protein kinase isozymes by the site-selective analog 8-chloroadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate provides a biological means for control of human colon cancer cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ally, S.; Tortora, G.; Clair, T.

    1988-01-01

    Differential expression of type I and type II cAMP-dependent protein kinase isozymes has been linked to growth regulation and differentiation. The authors examined the expression of protein kinase isozymes in the LS 174T human colon cancer cell line during 8-chloroadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Cl-cAMP)-induced growth inhibition. Two species of R II (the regulatory subunit of protein kinase type II) with apparent M r 52,000 (R II 52 ) and M r 56,000 (R II 56 ) and a single species of R I (the regulatory subunit of protein kinase type I) with M r 48,000 were identified in the cancer cells. R I and both forms of R II were covalently labeled with 8-azidoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic [ 32 P]monophosphate, and two anti-R II antibodies that exclusively recognize either R II 52 or R II 56 resolved two forms of the R II receptors. 8-Cl-cAMP caused transcriptional activation of the R II 52 receptor gene and inactivation of the R I receptor gene. Thus, differential regulation of various forms of cAMP receptor proteins is involved in 8-Cl-cAMP-induced regulation of cancer cell growth, and nuclear translocation of R II 52 receptor protein appears to be an early event in such differential regulation

  12. Piperidine alkaloids from Piperretrofractum Vahl. protect against high-fat diet-induced obesity by regulating lipid metabolism and activating AMP-activated protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung Jin; Lee, Myoung-Su; Jo, Keunae; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Piperidine alkaloids from Piperretrofractum Vahl. (PRPAs), including piperine, pipernonaline, and dehydropipernonaline, are isolated as the anti-obesity constituents. → PRPA administration significantly reduces body weight gain without altering food intake and fat pad mass. → PRPA reduces high-fat diet-induced triglyceride accumulation in liver. → PRPAs attenuate HFD-induced obesity by activating AMPK and PPARδ, and regulate lipid metabolism, suggesting their potential anti-obesity effects. -- Abstract: The fruits of Piperretrofractum Vahl. have been used for their anti-flatulent, expectorant, antitussive, antifungal, and appetizing properties in traditional medicine, and they are reported to possess gastroprotective and cholesterol-lowering properties. However, their anti-obesity activity remains unexplored. The present study was conducted to isolate the anti-obesity constituents from P. retrofractum Vahl. and evaluate their effects in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. Piperidine alkaloids from P. retrofractum Vahl. (PRPAs), including piperine, pipernonaline, and dehydropipernonaline, were isolated as the anti-obesity constituents through a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ) transactivation assay. The molecular mechanism was investigated in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and L6 myocytes. PRPA treatment activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and PPARδ protein and also regulated the expression of lipid metabolism-related proteins. In the animal model, oral PRPA administration (50, 100, or 300 mg/kg/day for 8 weeks) significantly reduced HFD-induced body weight gain without altering the amount of food intake. Fat pad mass was reduced in the PRPA treatment groups, as evidenced by reduced adipocyte size. In addition, elevated serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total lipid, leptin, and lipase were suppressed by PRPA treatment. PRPA also protected against the development of

  13. Piperidine alkaloids from Piperretrofractum Vahl. protect against high-fat diet-induced obesity by regulating lipid metabolism and activating AMP-activated protein kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Jin [Department of Biomaterials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Myoung-Su; Jo, Keunae [Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jae-Kwan, E-mail: jkhwang@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Biomaterials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Translational Research Center for Protein Functional Control, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} Piperidine alkaloids from Piperretrofractum Vahl. (PRPAs), including piperine, pipernonaline, and dehydropipernonaline, are isolated as the anti-obesity constituents. {yields} PRPA administration significantly reduces body weight gain without altering food intake and fat pad mass. {yields} PRPA reduces high-fat diet-induced triglyceride accumulation in liver. {yields} PRPAs attenuate HFD-induced obesity by activating AMPK and PPAR{delta}, and regulate lipid metabolism, suggesting their potential anti-obesity effects. -- Abstract: The fruits of Piperretrofractum Vahl. have been used for their anti-flatulent, expectorant, antitussive, antifungal, and appetizing properties in traditional medicine, and they are reported to possess gastroprotective and cholesterol-lowering properties. However, their anti-obesity activity remains unexplored. The present study was conducted to isolate the anti-obesity constituents from P. retrofractum Vahl. and evaluate their effects in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. Piperidine alkaloids from P. retrofractum Vahl. (PRPAs), including piperine, pipernonaline, and dehydropipernonaline, were isolated as the anti-obesity constituents through a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {delta} (PPAR{delta}) transactivation assay. The molecular mechanism was investigated in 3T3-L1 adipocytes and L6 myocytes. PRPA treatment activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and PPAR{delta} protein and also regulated the expression of lipid metabolism-related proteins. In the animal model, oral PRPA administration (50, 100, or 300 mg/kg/day for 8 weeks) significantly reduced HFD-induced body weight gain without altering the amount of food intake. Fat pad mass was reduced in the PRPA treatment groups, as evidenced by reduced adipocyte size. In addition, elevated serum levels of total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total lipid, leptin, and lipase were suppressed by PRPA treatment. PRPA also

  14. Aspirin-induced AMP-activated protein kinase activation regulates the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells from spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Jin Young [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyoung Chul, E-mail: hcchoi@med.yu.ac.kr [Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} Aspirin-induced AMPK phosphorylation was greater in VSMC from SHR than WKY. {yields} Aspirin-induced AMPK phosphorylation inhibited proliferation of VSMC from SHR. {yields} Low basal AMPK phosphorylation in SHR elicits increased VSMC proliferation. {yields} Inhibition of AMPK restored decreased VSMC proliferation by aspirin in SHR. {yields} Aspirin exerts anti-proliferative effect through AMPK activation in VSMC from SHR. -- Abstract: Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin), used to reduce risk of cardiovascular disease, plays an important role in the regulation of cellular proliferation. However, mechanisms responsible for aspirin-induced growth inhibition are not fully understood. Here, we investigated whether aspirin may exert therapeutic effects via AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from wistar kyoto rats (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Aspirin increased AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphorylation in a time- and dose-dependent manner in VSMCs from WKY and SHR, but with greater efficacy in SHR. In SHR, a low basal phosphorylation status of AMPK resulted in increased VSMC proliferation and aspirin-induced AMPK phosphorylation inhibited proliferation of VSMCs. Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, and AMPK siRNA reduced the aspirin-mediated inhibition of VSMC proliferation, this effect was more pronounced in SHR than in WKY. In VSMCs from SHR, aspirin increased p53 and p21 expression and inhibited the expression of cell cycle associated proteins, such as p-Rb, cyclin D, and cyclin E. These results indicate that in SHR VSMCs aspirin exerts anti-proliferative effects through the induction of AMPK phosphorylation.

  15. Aspirin-induced AMP-activated protein kinase activation regulates the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells from spontaneously hypertensive rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Jin Young; Choi, Hyoung Chul

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Aspirin-induced AMPK phosphorylation was greater in VSMC from SHR than WKY. → Aspirin-induced AMPK phosphorylation inhibited proliferation of VSMC from SHR. → Low basal AMPK phosphorylation in SHR elicits increased VSMC proliferation. → Inhibition of AMPK restored decreased VSMC proliferation by aspirin in SHR. → Aspirin exerts anti-proliferative effect through AMPK activation in VSMC from SHR. -- Abstract: Acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin), used to reduce risk of cardiovascular disease, plays an important role in the regulation of cellular proliferation. However, mechanisms responsible for aspirin-induced growth inhibition are not fully understood. Here, we investigated whether aspirin may exert therapeutic effects via AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activation in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) from wistar kyoto rats (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Aspirin increased AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase phosphorylation in a time- and dose-dependent manner in VSMCs from WKY and SHR, but with greater efficacy in SHR. In SHR, a low basal phosphorylation status of AMPK resulted in increased VSMC proliferation and aspirin-induced AMPK phosphorylation inhibited proliferation of VSMCs. Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, and AMPK siRNA reduced the aspirin-mediated inhibition of VSMC proliferation, this effect was more pronounced in SHR than in WKY. In VSMCs from SHR, aspirin increased p53 and p21 expression and inhibited the expression of cell cycle associated proteins, such as p-Rb, cyclin D, and cyclin E. These results indicate that in SHR VSMCs aspirin exerts anti-proliferative effects through the induction of AMPK phosphorylation.

  16. DAF-16/FoxO directly regulates an atypical AMP-activated protein kinase gamma isoform to mediate the effects of insulin/IGF-1 signaling on aging in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullet, Jennifer M A; Araiz, Caroline; Sanders, Matthew J; Au, Catherine; Benedetto, Alexandre; Papatheodorou, Irene; Clark, Emily; Schmeisser, Kathrin; Jones, Daniel; Schuster, Eugene F; Thornton, Janet M; Gems, David

    2014-02-01

    The DAF-16/FoxO transcription factor controls growth, metabolism and aging in Caenorhabditis elegans. The large number of genes that it regulates has been an obstacle to understanding its function. However, recent analysis of transcript and chromatin profiling implies that DAF-16 regulates relatively few genes directly, and that many of these encode other regulatory proteins. We have investigated the regulation by DAF-16 of genes encoding the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which has α, β and γ subunits. C. elegans has 5 genes encoding putative AMP-binding regulatory γ subunits, aakg-1-5. aakg-4 and aakg-5 are closely related, atypical isoforms, with orthologs throughout the Chromadorea class of nematodes. We report that ∼75% of total γ subunit mRNA encodes these 2 divergent isoforms, which lack consensus AMP-binding residues, suggesting AMP-independent kinase activity. DAF-16 directly activates expression of aakg-4, reduction of which suppresses longevity in daf-2 insulin/IGF-1 receptor mutants. This implies that an increase in the activity of AMPK containing the AAKG-4 γ subunit caused by direct activation by DAF-16 slows aging in daf-2 mutants. Knock down of aakg-4 expression caused a transient decrease in activation of expression in multiple DAF-16 target genes. This, taken together with previous evidence that AMPK promotes DAF-16 activity, implies the action of these two metabolic regulators in a positive feedback loop that accelerates the induction of DAF-16 target gene expression. The AMPK β subunit, aakb-1, also proved to be up-regulated by DAF-16, but had no effect on lifespan. These findings reveal key features of the architecture of the gene-regulatory network centered on DAF-16, and raise the possibility that activation of AMP-independent AMPK in nutritionally replete daf-2 mutant adults slows aging in C. elegans. Evidence of activation of AMPK subunits in mammals suggests that such FoxO-AMPK interactions may be evolutionarily conserved.

  17. Conservation and divergence of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-protein kinase A (cAMP–PKA) pathway in two plant-pathogenic fungi: Fusarium graminearum and F. verticillioides

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-PKA pathway is a central signaling cascade that transmits extracellular stimuli and governs cell responses through the second messenger cAMP. The importance of cAMP signaling in fungal biology has been well documented. Two key conserved components, adenylate cyclase (AC) and ca...

  18. Modulation of phenotype and function of human CD4+CD25+ T regulatory lymphocytes mediated by cAMP elevating agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Riccomi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We have shown that Cholera Toxin (CT and other cyclic AMP (cAMP elevating agents induce up-regulation of the inhibitory molecule CTLA-4 in human resting CD4+ T lymphocytes, which following the treatment acquired suppressive functions. In this study, we evaluated the effect of cAMP elevating agents on human CD4+CD25+ T cells, which include the T regulatory (Treg cells that play a pivotal role in the maintenance of immunological tolerance. We found that cAMP elevating agents induce up-regulation of CTLA-4 in CD4+CD25- and further enhance its expression in CD4+CD25+ T cells. We observed an increase of two isoforms of mRNA coding for the membrane and the soluble CTLA-4 molecules, suggesting that the regulation of CTLA-4 expression by cAMP is at the transcriptional level. In addition, we found that the increase of cAMP in CD4+CD25+ T cells converts the CD4+CD25+Foxp3- T cells in CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells, whereas the increase of cAMP in CD4+CD25- T cells did not up-regulate Foxp3 in the absence of activation stimuli. To investigate the function of these cells, we performed an in vitro suppression assay by culturing CD4+CD25+ T cells untreated or pre-treated with CT with anti-CD3 mAbs-stimulated autologous PBMC. We found that CT enhances the inhibitory function of CD4+CD25+ T cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T cell proliferation and IFNγ production are strongly inhibited by CD4+CD25+ T cells pre-treated with cAMP elevating agents. Furthermore, we found that CD4+CD25+ T lymphocytes pre-treated with cAMP elevating agents induce the up-regulation of CD80 and CD86 co-stimulatory molecules on immature dendritic cells (DCs in the absence of antigenic stimulation, however without leading to full DC maturation. These data show that the increase of intracellular cAMP modulates the phenotype and function of human CD4+CD25+ T cells.

  19. Regulation of the MAP kinase cascade in PC12 cells: B-Raf activates MEK-1 (MAP kinase or ERK kinase) and is inhibited by cAMP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peraldi, P; Frödin, M; Barnier, J V

    1995-01-01

    AMP inhibits B-Raf autokinase activity as well as its ability to phosphorylate and activate MEK-1. This inhibition is likely to be due to a direct effect since we found that PKA phosphorylates B-Raf in vitro. Further, we show that B-Raf binds to p21ras, but more important, this binding to p21ras is virtually...... abolished with B-Raf from PC12 cells treated with CPT-cAMP. Hence, these data indicate that the PKA-mediated phosphorylation of B-Raf hampers its interaction with p21ras, which is responsible for the PKA-mediated decrease in B-Raf activity. Finally, our work suggests that in PC12 cells, cAMP stimulates MAP...

  20. A Temporal-Specific and Transient cAMP Increase Characterizes Odorant Classical Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Wen; Smith, Andrew; Darby-King, Andrea; Harley, Carolyn W.; McLean, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Increases in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) are proposed to initiate learning in a wide variety of species. Here, we measure changes in cAMP in the olfactory bulb prior to, during, and following a classically conditioned odor preference trial in rat pups. Measurements were taken up to the point of maximal CREB phosphorylation in olfactory…

  1. The cAMP Signaling and MAP Kinase Pathways in Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehrabi, R.; Zhao, X.; Kim, Y.; Xu, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The key components of the well conserved cyclic AMP signaling and MAP kinase pathways have been functionally characterized in the corn smut Ustilago maydis, rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea, and a few other fungal pathogens. In general, the cAMP signaling and the MAP kinase cascade homologous to

  2. CRIS-a novel cAMP-binding protein controlling spermiogenesis and the development of flagellar bending.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Miriam Krähling

    Full Text Available The second messengers cAMP and cGMP activate their target proteins by binding to a conserved cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD. Here, we identify and characterize an entirely novel CNBD-containing protein called CRIS (cyclic nucleotide receptor involved in sperm function that is unrelated to any of the other members of this protein family. CRIS is exclusively expressed in sperm precursor cells. Cris-deficient male mice are either infertile due to a lack of sperm resulting from spermatogenic arrest, or subfertile due to impaired sperm motility. The motility defect is caused by altered Ca(2+ regulation of flagellar beat asymmetry, leading to a beating pattern that is reminiscent of sperm hyperactivation. Our results suggest that CRIS interacts during spermiogenesis with Ca(2+-regulated proteins that--in mature sperm--are involved in flagellar bending.

  3. ABCC5 is required for cAMP-mediated hindgut invagination in sea urchin embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipp, Lauren E; Hill, Rose Z; Moy, Gary W; Gökırmak, Tufan; Hamdoun, Amro

    2015-10-15

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are evolutionarily conserved proteins that pump diverse substrates across membranes. Many are known to efflux signaling molecules and are extensively expressed during development. However, the role of transporters in moving extracellular signals that regulate embryogenesis is largely unexplored. Here, we show that a mesodermal ABCC (MRP) transporter is necessary for endodermal gut morphogenesis in sea urchin embryos. This transporter, Sp-ABCC5a (C5a), is expressed in pigment cells and their precursors, which are a subset of the non-skeletogenic mesoderm (NSM) cells. C5a expression depends on Delta/Notch signaling from skeletogenic mesoderm and is downstream of Gcm in the aboral NSM gene regulatory network. Long-term imaging of development reveals that C5a knockdown embryos gastrulate, but ∼90% develop a prolapse of the hindgut by the late prism stage (∼8 h after C5a protein expression normally peaks). Since C5a orthologs efflux cyclic nucleotides, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (Sp-CAPK/PKA) is expressed in pigment cells, we examined whether C5a could be involved in gastrulation through cAMP transport. Consistent with this hypothesis, membrane-permeable pCPT-cAMP rescues the prolapse phenotype in C5a knockdown embryos, and causes archenteron hyper-invagination in control embryos. In addition, the cAMP-producing enzyme soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is expressed in pigment cells, and its inhibition impairs gastrulation. Together, our data support a model in which C5a transports sAC-derived cAMP from pigment cells to control late invagination of the hindgut. Little is known about the ancestral functions of ABCC5/MRP5 transporters, and this study reveals a novel role for these proteins in mesoderm-endoderm signaling during embryogenesis. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARdelta )-mediated regulation of preadipocyte proliferation and gene expression is dependent on cAMP signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jacob B.; Zhang, H; Rasmussen, T H

    2001-01-01

    of a PPARdelta ligand and methylisobutylxanthine (MIX) or other cAMP elevating agents. We further show that ligands and MIX synergistically stimulated PPARdelta-mediated transactivation. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, simultaneous administration of a PPARdelta-selective ligand and MIX significantly enhanced the early...

  5. Assisted Medical Procedures (AMP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DOCUMENTATION, DEVELOPMENT, AND PROGRESS The AMP was initially being developed as part the Advanced Integrated Clinical System (AICS)-Guided Medical Procedure System...

  6. Drug AMP Reporting - Quarterly

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Drugs that have been reported under the Medicaid Drug Rebate Program along with an indication of whether or not the required Average Manufacturer Price (AMP) was...

  7. Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Sadredinamin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are extensive group of molecules that produced by variety tissues of invertebrate, plants, and animal species which play an important role in their immunity response. AMPs have different classifications such as; biosynthetic machines, biological sources, biological functions, molecular properties, covalent bonding patterns, three dimensional structures, and molecular targets.These molecules have multidimensional properties including antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, antifungal activity, anti-parasite activity, biofilm control, antitumor activity, mitogens activity and linking innate to adaptive immunity that making them promising agents for therapeutic drugs. In spite of this advantage of AMPs, their clinical developments have some limitation for commercial development. But some of AMPs are under clinical trials for the therapeutic purpose such as diabetic foot ulcers, different bacterial infections and tissue damage. In this review, we emphasized on the source, structure, multidimensional properties, limitation and therapeutic applications of various antimicrobial peptides.

  8. A Novel T55A Variant of Gsα Associated with Impaired cAMP Production, Bone Fragility, and Osteolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Wentworth

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs mediate a wide spectrum of biological activities. The GNAS complex locus encodes the stimulatory alpha subunit of the guanine nucleotide binding protein (Gsα and regulates production of the second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP. Loss-of-function GNAS mutations classically lead to Albright’s Hereditary Osteodystrophy (AHO and pseudohypoparathyroidism, often with significant effects on bone formation and mineral metabolism. We present the case of a child who exhibits clinical features of osteolysis, multiple childhood fractures, and neonatal SIADH. Exome sequencing revealed a novel de novo heterozygous missense mutation of GNAS (c.163AAMP activity associated with this mutation. We identified a 64% decrease in isoproterenol-induced cAMP production in vitro, compared to wild type, consistent with loss of Gsα activity. Despite a significant decrease in isoproterenol-induced cAMP production in vitro, this mutation did not produce a classical AHO phenotype in our patient; however, it may account for her presentation with childhood fractures and osteolysis.

  9. Axon Regeneration Is Regulated by Ets-C/EBP Transcription Complexes Generated by Activation of the cAMP/Ca2+ Signaling Pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Li

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability of specific neurons to regenerate their axons after injury is governed by cell-intrinsic regeneration pathways. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the JNK and p38 MAPK pathways are important for axon regeneration. Axonal injury induces expression of the svh-2 gene encoding a receptor tyrosine kinase, stimulation of which by the SVH-1 growth factor leads to activation of the JNK pathway. Here, we identify ETS-4 and CEBP-1, related to mammalian Ets and C/EBP, respectively, as transcriptional activators of svh-2 expression following axon injury. ETS-4 and CEBP-1 function downstream of the cAMP and Ca2+-p38 MAPK pathways, respectively. We show that PKA-dependent phosphorylation of ETS-4 promotes its complex formation with CEBP-1. Furthermore, activation of both cAMP and Ca2+ signaling is required for activation of svh-2 expression. Thus, the cAMP/Ca2+ signaling pathways cooperatively activate the JNK pathway, which then promotes axon regeneration.

  10. Biosynthesis of the antimicrobial cyclic lipopeptides nunamycin and nunapeptin by Pseudomonas fluorescens strain In5 is regulated by the LuxR-type transcriptional regulator NunF

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennessy, Rosanna Catherine; Phippen, Christopher; Nielsen, Kristian Fog

    2017-01-01

    Nunamycin and nunapeptin are two antimicrobial cyclic lipopeptides (CLPs) produced by Pseudomonas fluorescens In5 and synthesized by nonribosomal synthetases (NRPS) located on two gene clusters designated the nun-nup regulon. Organization of the regulon is similar to clusters found in other CLP-p...

  11. A derivative of ascorbic acid modulates cAMP production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordignon, B; Mones, S; Rahman, F; Chiron, J; Peiretti, F; Vidal, N; Fontes, M

    2013-09-13

    We reported, in previous experiments, that AA is a global regulator of cAMP pools. In this study, we demonstrate that K873, an analog of AA we synthesized and presenting antiproliferative properties, has also an impact on cAMP production. However, K873 has no antioxidant activity, at the contrary of AA. It definitively demonstrates that action of AA on the cAMP production is not linked to antioxidant activity. These data suggest that AA, and derivatives of this molecule, could be promising drug acting on biological processes that are under the control of cAMP dependent pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Sleep deprivation impairs cAMP signalling in the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecsey, Christopher G; Baillie, George S; Jaganath, Devan; Havekes, Robbert; Daniels, Andrew; Wimmer, Mathieu; Huang, Ted; Brown, Kim M; Li, Xiang-Yao; Descalzi, Giannina; Kim, Susan S; Chen, Tao; Shang, Yu-Ze; Zhuo, Min; Houslay, Miles D; Abel, Ted

    2009-10-22

    Millions of people regularly obtain insufficient sleep. Given the effect of sleep deprivation on our lives, understanding the cellular and molecular pathways affected by sleep deprivation is clearly of social and clinical importance. One of the major effects of sleep deprivation on the brain is to produce memory deficits in learning models that are dependent on the hippocampus. Here we have identified a molecular mechanism by which brief sleep deprivation alters hippocampal function. Sleep deprivation selectively impaired 3', 5'-cyclic AMP (cAMP)- and protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent forms of synaptic plasticity in the mouse hippocampus, reduced cAMP signalling, and increased activity and protein levels of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4), an enzyme that degrades cAMP. Treatment of mice with phosphodiesterase inhibitors rescued the sleep-deprivation-induced deficits in cAMP signalling, synaptic plasticity and hippocampus-dependent memory. These findings demonstrate that brief sleep deprivation disrupts hippocampal function by interfering with cAMP signalling through increased PDE4 activity. Thus, drugs that enhance cAMP signalling may provide a new therapeutic approach to counteract the cognitive effects of sleep deprivation.

  13. Identification of small-molecule agonists of human relaxin family receptor 1 (RXFP1) by using a homogenous cell-based cAMP assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Catherine Z; Southall, Noel; Xiao, Jingbo; Marugan, Juan J; Ferrer, Marc; Hu, Xin; Jones, Raisa E; Feng, Shu; Agoulnik, Irina U; Zheng, Wei; Agoulnik, Alexander I

    2013-07-01

    The relaxin hormone is involved in a variety of biological functions, including female reproduction and parturition, as well as regulation of cardiovascular, renal, pulmonary, and hepatic functions. It regulates extracellular matrix remodeling, cell invasiveness, proliferation, differentiation, and overall tissue homeostasis. The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) relaxin family receptor 1 (RXFP1) is a cognate relaxin receptor that mainly signals through cyclic AMP second messenger. Although agonists of the receptor could have a wide range of pharmacologic utility, until now there have been no reported small-molecule agonists for relaxin receptors. Here, we report the development of a quantitative high-throughput platform for an RXFP1 agonist screen based on homogenous cell-based HTRF cyclic AMP (cAMP) assay technology. Two small molecules of similar structure were independently identified from a screen of more than 365 677 compounds. Neither compound showed activity in a counterscreen with HEK293T cells transfected with an unrelated GPCR vasopressin 1b receptor. These small-molecule agonists also demonstrated selectivity against the RXFP2 receptor, providing a basis for future medicinal chemistry optimization of selective relaxin receptor agonists.

  14. Octopamine regulates antennal sensory neurons via daytime-dependent changes in cAMP and IP3 levels in the hawkmoth Manduca sexta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Schendzielorz

    Full Text Available The biogenic amine octopamine (OA mediates reward signals in olfactory learning and memory as well as circadian rhythms of sleep and activity. In the crepuscular hawkmoth Manduca sexta, OA changed pheromone detection thresholds daytime-dependently, suggesting that OA confers circadian control of olfactory transduction. Thus, with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays we searched hawkmoth antennae for daytime-dependent changes in the concentration of OA and its respective second messengers. Antennal stimulation with OA raised cAMP- and IP3 levels. Furthermore, antennae expressed daytime-dependent changes in the concentration of OA, with maxima at Zeitgebertime (ZT 20 when moths were active and also maximal concentrations of cAMP occurred. Maximal IP3 levels at ZT 18 and 23 correlated with maximal flight activity of male moths, while minimal IP3 levels at dusk correlated with peaks of feeding activity. Half maximal effective concentration (EC50 for activation of the OA-receptor decreased during the moth's activity phase suggesting daytime-dependent changes in OA receptor sensitivity. With an antiserum against tyramine, the precursor of OA, two centrifugal neurons were detected projecting out into the sensory cell layer of the antenna, possibly mediating more rapid stimulus-dependent OA actions. Indeed, in fast kinetic assays OA receptor stimulation increased cAMP concentrations within 50 msec. Thus, we hypothesize that fast, stimulus-dependent centrifugal control of OA-release in the antenna occurs. Additional slow systemic OA actions might be based upon circadian release of OA into the hemolymph mediating circadian rhythms of antennal second messenger levels. The resulting rhythms of odor sensitivity are suggested to underlie circadian rhythms in odor-mediated behavior.

  15. The Autonomic Nervous System Regulates the Heart Rate through cAMP-PKA Dependent and Independent Coupled-Clock Pacemaker Cell Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Joachim; Ganesan, Ambhighainath; Zhang, Jin; Yaniv, Yael

    2016-01-01

    Sinoatrial nodal cells (SANCs) generate spontaneous action potentials (APs) that control the cardiac rate. The brain modulates SANC automaticity, via the autonomic nervous system, by stimulating membrane receptors that activate (adrenergic) or inactivate (cholinergic) adenylyl cyclase (AC). However, these opposing afferents are not simply additive. We showed that activation of adrenergic signaling increases AC-cAMP/PKA signaling, which mediates the increase in the SANC AP firing rate (i.e., positive chronotropic modulation). However, there is a limited understanding of the underlying internal pacemaker mechanisms involved in the crosstalk between cholinergic receptors and the decrease in the SANC AP firing rate (i.e., negative chronotropic modulation). We hypothesize that changes in AC-cAMP/PKA activity are crucial for mediating either decrease or increase in the AP firing rate and that the change in rate is due to both internal and membrane mechanisms. In cultured adult rabbit pacemaker cells infected with an adenovirus expressing the FRET sensor AKAR3, PKA activity and AP firing rate were tightly linked in response to either adrenergic receptor stimulation (by isoproterenol, ISO) or cholinergic stimulation (by carbachol, CCh). To identify the main molecular targets that mediate between PKA signaling and pacemaker function, we developed a mechanistic computational model. The model includes a description of autonomic-nervous receptors, post- translation signaling cascades, membrane molecules, and internal pacemaker mechanisms. Yielding results similar to those of the experiments, the model simulations faithfully reproduce the changes in AP firing rate in response to CCh or ISO or a combination of both (i.e., accentuated antagonism). Eliminating AC-cAMP-PKA signaling abolished the core effect of autonomic receptor stimulation on the AP firing rate. Specifically, disabling the phospholamban modulation of the SERCA activity resulted in a significantly reduced effect

  16. Dysfunctional Hyperpolarization-Activated Cyclic Nucleotide-gated Ion Channels in Cardiac Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqi Zhao

    Full Text Available Abstract Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels are reverse voltage-dependent, and their activation depends on the hyperpolarization of the membrane and may be directly or indirectly regulated by the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP or other signal-transduction cascades. The distribution, quantity and activation states of HCN channels differ in tissues throughout the body. Evidence exhibits that HCN channels play critical roles in the generation and conduction of the electrical impulse and the physiopathological process of some cardiac diseases. They may constitute promising drug targets in the treatment of these cardiac diseases. Pharmacological treatment targeting HCN channels is of benefit to these cardiac conditions.

  17. Endogenous Parathyroid Hormone Promotes Fracture Healing by Increasing Expression of BMPR2 through cAMP/PKA/CREB Pathway in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Endogenous parathyroid hormone (PTH plays an important role in fracture healing. This study investigated whether endogenous PTH regulates fracture healing by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP and/or the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β signaling pathway. Methods: Eight-week-old wild-type (WT and PTH-knockout (PTH KO male mice were selected, and models of open right-femoral fracture were constructed. Fracture healing and callus characteristics of mice in the two groups were compared by X-ray, micro-computed tomography, histological, and immunohistochemical examinations. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs of 8-week-old WT and PTHKO male mice were obtained and induced into osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Results: We found that expression levels of Runt-related transcription factor (RUNX2, bone morphogenetic protein-receptor-type Ⅱ (BMPR2, phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8, and phosphorylated cyclic adenosine monophosphate-responsive element binding protein (CREB in the callus of PTHKO mice were significantly decreased, whereas no significant difference in expression of SOX9, TGF-βR2,or pSMAD2/3 was observed between PTHKO and WT mice. Additionally, the activity of osteoblast alkaline phosphatase was low at 7 days post-induction, and was upregulated by addition of PTH or dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (dbcAMP to the cell culture. Furthermore, H89 (protein kinase A inhibitoreliminated the simulating effects of PTH and dbcAMP, and a low concentration of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP was observed in PTHKO mouse BMMSCs. Conclusion: These results suggested that endogenous PTH enhanced BMPR2 expression by a cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway in osteoblasts, and increased RUNX2 expression through transduction of the BMP/pSMAD1/5/8 signaling pathway.

  18. Linoleic acid enhance the production of moncolin K and red pigments in Monascus ruber by activating mokH and mokA, and by accelerating cAMP-PkA pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Liao, NanQing; Li, HaoMing

    2018-04-01

    Monacolin K, an inhibitor of HMG-CoA reductase, is a secondary metabolite synthesized by polyketide synthases (PKS) from Monascus ruber. The mokH gene encoding Zn(II)2Cys6 binding protein and mokA gene encoding polyketide synthase are presumed to activate monacolin K production. In this study, linoleic acid could be a quorum sensing signaling molecule to increase monacolin K production in the cyclic AMP(cAMP)-protein kinase A(PKA) signaling pathway. Analysis of the PKA activity and the cAMP concentration shows that linoleic acid could increase cAMP concentration and activate PKA. Analysis of the RT-qPCR products demonstrates that 256μM and 512μM linoleic acid can up-regulate mokH and mokA gene transcript levels. Especially with 512μM linoleic acid addition, linoleic acid increase 1.35 folds of monacolin K production, but 64μM linoleic acid increase 1.94 folds of red pigment production in Monascus ruber. These results show the cAMP-PkA pathway activity can up-regulate mokA and mokH gene, which enhance the yield of Monacolin K. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. AMP Deaminase 3 Deficiency Enhanced 5′-AMP Induction of Hypometabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Isadora Susan; O′Brien, William G.; Nath, Vinay; Zhao, Zhaoyang; Lee, Cheng Chi

    2013-01-01

    A hypometabolic state can be induced in mice by 5′-AMP administration. Previously we proposed that an underlying mechanism for this hypometabolism is linked to reduced erythrocyte oxygen transport function due to 5′-AMP uptake altering the cellular adenylate equilibrium. To test this hypothesis, we generated mice deficient in adenosine monophosphate deaminase 3 (AMPD3), the key catabolic enzyme for 5′-AMP in erythrocytes. Mice deficient in AMPD3 maintained AMPD activities in all tissues except erythrocytes. Developmentally and morphologically, the Ampd3−/− mice were indistinguishable from their wild type siblings. The levels of ATP, ADP but not 5′-AMP in erythrocytes of Ampd3−/− mice were significantly elevated. Fasting blood glucose levels of the Ampd3−/− mice were comparable to wild type siblings. In comparison to wild type mice, the Ampd3−/− mice displayed a deeper hypometabolism with a significantly delayed average arousal time in response to 5′-AMP administration. Together, these findings demonstrate a central role of AMPD3 in the regulation of 5′-AMP mediated hypometabolism and further implicate erythrocytes in this behavioral response. PMID:24066180

  20. GSKIP- and GSK3-mediated anchoring strengthens cAMP/PKA/Drp1 axis signaling in the regulation of mitochondrial elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Joon-Khim; Lin, Ching-Chih; Yang, Ming-Chang; Chou, Chia-Hua; Chen, Wan-Shia; Hong, Ming-Chang; Cho, Chung-Lung; Hsu, Ching-Mei; Cheng, Jiin-Tsuey; Chou, An-Kuo; Chang, Chung-Hsing; Tseng, Chao-Neng; Wang, Chi-Huei; Lieu, Ann-Shung; Howng, Shen-Long; Hong, Yi-Ren

    2015-08-01

    GSK3β binding of GSKIP affects neurite outgrowth, but the physiological significance of PKA binding to GSKIP remains to be determined. We hypothesized that GSKIP and GSK3β mediate cAMP/PKA/Drp1 axis signaling and modulate mitochondrial morphology by forming a working complex comprising PKA/GSKIP/GSK3β/Drp1. We demonstrated that GSKIP wild-type overexpression increased phosphorylation of Drp1 S637 by 7-8-fold compared to PKA kinase-inactive mutants (V41/L45) and a GSK3β binding-defective mutant (L130) under H2O2 and forskolin challenge in HEK293 cells, indicating that not only V41/L45, but also L130 may be involved in Drp1-associated protection of GSKIP. Interestingly, silencing either GSKIP or GSK3β but not GSK3α resulted in a dramatic decrease in Drp1 S637 phosphorylation, revealing that both GSKIP and GSK3β are required in this novel PKA/GSKIP/GSK3β/Drp1 complex. Moreover, overexpressed kinase-dead GSK3β-K85R, which retains the capacity to bind GSKIP, but not K85M which shows total loss of GSKIP-binding, has a higher Drp1 S637 phosphorylation similar to the GSKIP wt overexpression group, indicating that GSK3β recruits Drp1 by anchoring rather than in a kinase role. With further overexpression of either V41/L45P or the L130P GSKIP mutant, the elongated mitochondrial phenotype was lost; however, ectopically expressed Drp1 S637D, a phosphomimetic mutant, but not S637A, a non-phosphorylated mutant, restored the elongated mitochondrial morphology, indicating that Drp1 is a downstream effector of direct PKA signaling and possibly has an indirect GSKIP function involved in the cAMP/PKA/Drp1 signaling axis. Collectively, our data revealed that both GSKIP and GSK3β function as anchoring proteins in the cAMP/PKA/Drp1 signaling axis modulating Drp1 phosphorylation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Expression of Tas1 Taste Receptors in Mammalian Spermatozoa: Functional Role of Tas1r1 in Regulating Basal Ca2+ and cAMP Concentrations in Spermatozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Dorke; Voigt, Anja; Widmayer, Patricia; Borth, Heike; Huebner, Sandra; Breit, Andreas; Marschall, Susan; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Boehm, Ulrich; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Gudermann, Thomas; Boekhoff, Ingrid

    2012-01-01

    Background During their transit through the female genital tract, sperm have to recognize and discriminate numerous chemical compounds. However, our current knowledge of the molecular identity of appropriate chemosensory receptor proteins in sperm is still rudimentary. Considering that members of the Tas1r family of taste receptors are able to discriminate between a broad diversity of hydrophilic chemosensory substances, the expression of taste receptors in mammalian spermatozoa was examined. Methodology/Principal Findings The present manuscript documents that Tas1r1 and Tas1r3, which form the functional receptor for monosodium glutamate (umami) in taste buds on the tongue, are expressed in murine and human spermatozoa, where their localization is restricted to distinct segments of the flagellum and the acrosomal cap of the sperm head. Employing a Tas1r1-deficient mCherry reporter mouse strain, we found that Tas1r1 gene deletion resulted in spermatogenic abnormalities. In addition, a significant increase in spontaneous acrosomal reaction was observed in Tas1r1 null mutant sperm whereas acrosomal secretion triggered by isolated zona pellucida or the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 was not different from wild-type spermatozoa. Remarkably, cytosolic Ca2+ levels in freshly isolated Tas1r1-deficient sperm were significantly higher compared to wild-type cells. Moreover, a significantly higher basal cAMP concentration was detected in freshly isolated Tas1r1-deficient epididymal spermatozoa, whereas upon inhibition of phosphodiesterase or sperm capacitation, the amount of cAMP was not different between both genotypes. Conclusions/Significance Since Ca2+ and cAMP control fundamental processes during the sequential process of fertilization, we propose that the identified taste receptors and coupled signaling cascades keep sperm in a chronically quiescent state until they arrive in the vicinity of the egg - either by constitutive receptor activity and/or by tonic receptor activation by

  2. Cyclic Vitalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halse, Sven

    2014-01-01

    an enthusiastic worshipping of life, one that holds youth, health, strength and beauty as its primary attributes, and which was prevalent in all aspects of cultural life around 1900. But even the post war founders of the Vitalist re-conceptualisation of this era, Wolfdietrich Rasch and Gunter Martens, warned...... that also encompasses notions of destruction, decay and death. “All life symbols in literature around 1900 are at the same time symbols of death”. (Rasch, W. 1967:24) Through the analyses of three poems, this article aims to show concrete examples of how cyclic Vitalist thinking is embedded in poetry...

  3. Effect of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate and inhibition of protein kinase a on heat sensitivity in H35 hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijn, Johannes van; Berg, Jaap van den

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the role of the cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (AMP) signal transduction pathway in heat-induced cell death and the development of thermotolerance. Methods and Materials: Reuber H35 rat hepatoma cells were heated after preincubation with various compounds known to modulate the cyclic AMP signal transduction pathway. Cell survival was determined by colony-forming ability. Results: Preincubation of H35 cells with forskolin, a stimulator of adenylate cyclase, in combination with IBMX (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine), an inhibitor of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase, results in thermosensitization. Similar results are obtained with various cyclic AMP analogs. Maximum thermosensitization occurs with 0.5 mM dibutyryl cyclic AMP (DBcAMP) after a preincubation period of 5 h and heating in the presence of the drug. The same relative degree of thermosensitization is found with 8-Cl-cAMP, but at a 10-fold lower concentration. Thermosensitization by DBcAMP is prevented by H89, a specific inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Without additional cyclic AMP-inducing factors, H89 induces thermoprotection. None of the drug treatments are cytotoxic at 37 deg. C. DBcAMP does not affect the development of heat-induced thermotolerance but it reduces its expression to an extent similarly found in the observed thermosensitization in nonthermotolerant cells. Conclusion: The results strongly indicate that the cyclic AMP signal transduction pathway is involved in the process of heat-induced cell death. DBcAMP reduces the expression of thermotolerance, but does not affect its induction

  4. The EGPs: the eclosion hormone and cyclic GMP-regulated phosphoproteins. I. Appearance and partial characterization in the CNS of Manduca sexta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, D B; Truman, J W

    1988-04-01

    The present study describes 2 phosphoproteins, both with an apparent molecular weight of 54 kDa, in the CNS of the tobacco hornworm, Manduca sexta. Their phosphorylation is regulated by a neuropeptide, eclosion hormone (EH), and the second messenger cGMP, which thus have been named the EGPs (eclosion hormone- and cGMP-regulated phosphoproteins). Although cAMP was more effective than cGMP at stimulating the phosphorylation of the EGPs in CNS homogenates, in the intact CNS cGMP was more effective. Since cGMP mediates the action of EH, this strongly suggests that cGMP is the second messenger that stimulates the phosphorylation of the EGPs in vivo. The EGPs can only be phosphorylated in vitro during discrete time periods during the life of Manduca. During the larval and pupal molts, the EGPs can first be phosphorylated just prior to ecdysis. Their ability to be phosphorylated is correlated with the time when the insect is sensitive to EH. This close temporal correlation suggests that the ability to phosphorylate the EGPs determines when the insect can first respond to EH. During adult development, the EGPs first appeared on fluorograms 6 d before sensitivity to EH, suggesting that at this stage other factors may also be involved in the regulation of sensitivity. For the ecdyses of all 3 stages, EH appeared to stimulate the phosphorylation of the EGPs at ecdysis. The EGPs were found in all regions of the prepupal nervous system that were investigated, but only in the abdominal and pterothoracic ganglia of the developing adult. Fractionation of nervous system homogenates by ultracentrifugation revealed that one of the EGPs was present only in the pellet fraction, whereas the other was approximately equally distributed between pellet and supernatant. Furthermore, the EGPs in the pellet fraction could be partially solubilized with detergents and high salt concentrations.

  5. Cyclic AMP response element binding protein and brain-derived ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    learning tasks and memory (Bramham and Messaoudi 2005). Thus, BDNF is involved in structural remodeling, neuronal .... in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory (Tyler et al 2002; Mizuno and Giese 2005) may play a ..... neurons in the olfactory bulb; J. Neurosci. 25 10105–10118. Gould E and Tanapat P 1999 ...

  6. Non-Enzymatic Oligomerization of 3 ', 5 ' Cyclic AMP

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Costanzo, G.; Pino, S.; Timperio, A.M.; Šponer, Judit E.; Sponer, Jiri; Nováková, Olga; Šedo, O.; Zdráhal, Z.; Di Mauro, E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 11 (2016), č. článku e0165723. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12010S; GA ČR GBP206/12/G151 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : template-directed synthesis * nucleoside phosphorylation * montmorillonite catalysis * molecular-structure Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016

  7. AMP activated protein kinase α2 controls substrate metabolism during post-exercise recovery via regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritzen, Andreas Mæchel; Lundsgaard, Annemarie; Jeppesen, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that exercise has a major impact on substrate metabolism for many hours after exercise. However, the regulatory mechanisms increasing lipid oxidation and facilitating glycogen resynthesis in the post-exercise period are unknown. To address this, substrate oxidation was measured...... after prolonged exercise and during the following six hours post exercise in 5´AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK)α2 and α1 knock-out (KO) and wild type (WT) mice with free access to food. Substrate oxidation was similar during exercise at the same relative intensity between genotypes. During post......-exercise recovery, a lower lipid oxidation (P free-carnitine concentrations. A similar increase...

  8. Regulation of Hxt3 and Hxt7 turnover converges on the Vid30 complex and requires inactivation of the Ras/cAMP/PKA pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Snowdon

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells adjust their intracellular protein complement as a mechanism to adapt to changing environmental signals. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the hexose transporters Hxt3 and Hxt7 are expressed and function on the plasma membrane in high and low glucose abundance, respectively. By contrast, Hxt3 is endocytosed and degraded in the vacuole when cells are starved of glucose and Hxt7 in response to rapamycin treatment or when nitrogen is limiting. Yeast uses several signaling pathways, including the TORC1 and Ras/cAMP/Protein Kinase A (PKA pathways, to adapt to nutrient changes in the environment. The multi-protein Vid30 complex (Vid30c, an E3 ubiquitin ligase required for the degradation of FBPase, assists in this adaptation process in a mechanism that is poorly understood. Here we show the endocytosis and the subsequent degradation of both Hxt3 and Hxt7, in response to different nutrient signals, is dependent on components of the Vid30c. Additionally, we define the signaling events required for the turnover of Hxt3 and Hxt7 by showing that Hxt3 turnover requires Ras2 and PKA inactivation, whereas Hxt7 turnover requires TORC1 and Ras2 inactivation. Further investigation led us to identify Rim15, a kinase that is inhibited by both the TORC1 and Ras/cAMP/PKA pathways, as a key downstream effector in signaling both turnover events. Finally, we show that the turnover of both Hxt3 and Hxt7 is dependent on the essential E3 ubiquitin ligase, Rsp5, indicating that the role of the Vid30c might be indirect of Hxt ubiquitylation.

  9. Cyclic multiverses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marosek, Konrad; Dąbrowski, Mariusz P.; Balcerzak, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Using the idea of regularization of singularities due to the variability of the fundamental constants in cosmology we study the cyclic universe models. We find two models of oscillating and non-singular mass density and pressure (`non-singular' bounce) regularized by varying gravitational constant G despite the scale factor evolution is oscillating and having sharp turning points (`singular' bounce). Both violating (big-bang) and non-violating (phantom) null energy condition models appear. Then, we extend this idea on to the multiverse containing cyclic individual universes with either growing or decreasing entropy though leaving the net entropy constant. In order to get an insight into the key idea, we consider the doubleverse with the same geometrical evolution of the two `parallel' universes with their physical evolution [physical coupling constants c(t) and G(t)] being different. An interesting point is that there is a possibility to exchange the universes at the point of maximum expansion - the fact which was already noticed in quantum cosmology. Similar scenario is also possible within the framework of Brans-Dicke theory where varying G(t) is replaced by the dynamical Brans-Dicke field φ(t) though these theories are slightly different.

  10. Expression of the diguanylate cyclase GcbA is regulated by FleQ in response to cyclic di-GMP in Pseudomonas putida KT2440.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yujie; Nie, Hailing; Liu, Huizhong; Chen, Wenli; Huang, Qiaoyun

    2016-12-01

    Cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP), a ubiquitous bacterial second messenger that regulates diverse cellular processes, is synthesized by diguanylate cyclase (DGC) and degraded by phosphodiesterase (PDE). GcbA is a well conserved DGC among Pseudomonas species, and has been reported to influence biofilm formation and flagellar motility in Pseudomonas fluorescens and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Here we confirm the function of GcbA in Pseudomonas putida and reveal that expression of GcbA is regulated by FleQ in response to c-di-GMP. GcbA deletion impaired initial biofilm formation and enhanced swimming motility, but showed no influence on biofilm maturation in Pseudomonas putida. Deletion of the c-di-GMP effector FleQ led to a significant decrease in transcription of gcbA. Moreover, reducing c-di-GMP levels promoted gcbA transcription in a FleQ dependent way, while enhancing c-di-GMP levels abolished the promotion. In in vitro experiments we found that FleQ bound to gcbA promoter DNA and the binding was inhibited by c-di-GMP. Besides, FleN, an anti-activator of FleQ, and the sigma factor RpoN also participated in transcription of gcbA. Our finding expands the complexity of FleQ-dependent regulation and reveals a self-regulation function of c-di-GMP by regulating GcbA expression via FleQ. © 2016 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. FleQ of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is a multimeric cyclic diguanylate binding protein that differentially regulates expression of biofilm matrix components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Henares, María Antonia; Ramos-González, María Isabel; Daddaoua, Abdelali; Fernández-Escamilla, Ana María; Espinosa-Urgel, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    The intracellular signal molecule cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) is an important element in regulation of biofilm formation by bacteria. In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, FleQ functions as a c-di-GMP-dependent transcriptional regulator of expression of flagellar genes and the exopolysaccharide (EPS) Pel, a component of the biofilm extracellular matrix. In the plant-beneficial bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440, a mutation in fleQ reduces biofilm formation and colonization of plant surfaces. Using isothermal titration calorimetry and electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we show in this work that FleQ of P. putida interacts with c-di-GMP and directly binds the promoter regions of flagellar and EPS genes. Data obtained by analytical gel filtration and ultracentrifugation indicate that FleQ is in multiple oligomeric states in solution (dimers, tetramers and hexamers), which do not show altered equilibrium in the presence of c-di-GMP. DNA binding is independent of c-diGMP, although it is favored by the second messenger in the case of the promoter of the operon responsible for synthesis of the species-specific EPS Pea. Analysis of expression using transcriptional fusions showed an influence of FleQ upon two of the four EPS operons under regular growth conditions. Finally, a consensus sequence for promoter recognition by FleQ in P. putida is also proposed. Copyright © 2016 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Assessing Self-Regulation as a Cyclical, Context-Specific Phenomenon: Overview and Analysis of SRL Microanalytic Protocols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy J. Cleary

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary purpose of this paper is to review relevant research related to the use of an assessment technique, called Self-Regulated Learning (SRL Microanalysis. This structured interview is grounded in social-cognitive theory and research and thus seeks to evaluate students' regulatory processes as they engage in well-defined academic or nonacademic tasks and activities. We illustrate the essential features of this contextualized assessment approach and detail a simple five-step process that researchers can use to apply this approach to their work. Example questions and administration procedures for five key self-regulation subprocesses (i.e., including goal-setting, strategic planning, monitoring, self-evaluation, and attributions are highlighted, with particular emphasis placed on causal attributions. The psychometric properties of SRL microanalytic assessment protocols and potential areas of future research are presented.

  13. ¬cAMP promotes the differentiation of neural progenitor cells in vitro via modulation of voltage-gated calcium channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme eLepski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms underlying the differentiation of neural progenitor cells (NPCs remain poorly understood. In this study we investigated the role of Ca2+ and cAMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate in the differentiation of NPCs extracted from the subventricular zone of E14.5 rat embryos. Patch clamp recordings revealed that increasing cAMP-signaling with Forskolin or IBMX (3-isobutyl-1-methylxantine significantly facilitated neuronal functional maturation. A continuous application of IBMX to the differentiation medium substantially increased the functional expression of voltage-gated Na+ and K+ channels, as well as neuronal firing frequency. Furthermore, we observed an increase in the frequency of spontaneous synaptic currents and in the amplitude of evoked glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic currents. The most prominent acute effect of applying IBMX was an increase in L-type Ca2+currents. Conversely, blocking L-type channels strongly inhibited dendritic outgrowth and synapse formation even in the presence of IBMX, indicating that voltage-gated Ca2+ influx plays a major role in neuronal differentiation. Finally, we found that nifedipine completely blocks IBMX-induced CREB phosphorylation (cAMP-response-element-binding protein, indicating that the activity of this important transcription factor equally depends on both enhanced cAMP and voltage-gated Ca2+-signaling. Taken together, these data indicate that the up-regulation of voltage-gated L-type Ca2+-channels and early electrical excitability are critical steps in the cAMP-dependent differentiation of SVZ-derived NPCs into functional neurons. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of the acute effects of cAMP on voltage-gated Ca+2channels in NPC-derived developing neurons.

  14. AMP-activated protein kinase regulates lymphocyte responses to metabolic stress but is largely dispensable for immune cell development and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Alice; Denanglaire, Sébastien; Viollet, Benoit; Leo, Oberdan; Andris, Fabienne

    2008-04-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a phylogenetically conserved serine/threonine protein kinase, represents an energy sensor able to adapt cellular metabolism in response to nutritional environmental variations. TCR stimulation activates AMPK, a regulatory event that is known to stimulate ATP-producing processes, possibly in anticipation of the increased energetic needs associated with cell division and expression of effector function. Taking advantage of the selective expression of the AMPKalpha1 catalytic subunit in lymphoid cells, we have analyzed the in vitro and in vivo capacity of lymphocytes lacking AMPK activity (AMPKalpha1-KO cells) to respond to metabolic stress and to initiate and sustain an immune response. AMPKalpha1-KO cells displayed increasing sensitivity to energetic stress in vitro, and were found unable to maintain adequate ATP levels in response to ATP synthase inhibition. These cells were, however, able to respond to antigen stimulation in vitro, as shown by optimal proliferation and cytokine production. Similarly, AMPKalpha1-KO mice were fully immunocompetent in vivo and displayed normal cell proliferation, humoral, cytotoxic and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses following antigen injection. In conclusion, AMPK represents an important enzyme allowing lymphocytes to resist a mild energy crisis in vitro, but is largely dispensable for activation and expression of effector function in response to antigen stimulation.

  15. A cAMP/PKA/Kinesin-1 Axis Promotes the Axonal Transport of Mitochondria in Aging Drosophila Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagnoni, Alessio; Bullock, Simon L

    2018-04-23

    Mitochondria play fundamental roles within cells, including energy provision, calcium homeostasis, and the regulation of apoptosis. The transport of mitochondria by microtubule-based motors is critical for neuronal structure and function. This process allows local requirements for mitochondrial functions to be met and also facilitates recycling of these organelles [1, 2]. An age-related reduction in mitochondrial transport has been observed in neurons of mammalian and non-mammalian organisms [3-6], and has been proposed to contribute to the broader decline in neuronal function that occurs during aging [3, 5-7]. However, the factors that influence mitochondrial transport in aging neurons are poorly understood. Here we provide evidence using the tractable Drosophila wing nerve system that the cyclic AMP/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) pathway promotes the axonal transport of mitochondria in adult neurons. The level of the catalytic subunit of PKA decreases during aging, and acute activation of the cAMP/PKA pathway in aged flies strongly stimulates mitochondrial motility. Thus, the age-related impairment of transport is reversible. The expression of many genes is increased by PKA activation in aged flies. However, our results indicate that elevated mitochondrial transport is due in part to upregulation of the heavy chain of the kinesin-1 motor, the level of which declines during aging. Our study identifies evolutionarily conserved factors that can strongly influence mitochondrial motility in aging neurons. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Great times for small molecules: c-di-AMP, a second messenger candidate in Bacteria and Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römling, Ute

    2008-08-19

    Successful cell division in pro- and eukaryotes is ensured by checkpoints that regulate cell cycle progression. Structural and biochemical analyses of the DNA integrity scanning protein (DisA) have recently shown that its domain of unknown function, DUF147 [renamed DAC (for diadenylate cyclase)], has diadenylate cyclase activity. This diadenylate cyclase activity is abolished when DisA binds to branched DNA substrates, which arise during DNA double-strand breaks that can spontaneously occur during DNA replication. This finding identifies cyclic di(3'-->5')-adenylic acid (c-di-AMP) as a second messenger candidate that signals DNA integrity in Bacillus subtilis during sporulation, a specialized cell division process that leads to formation of a dormant cell called a spore. The DAC domain is widespread in Bacteria and Archaea; moreover, it is found in proteins containing diverse domains, suggesting that c-di-AMP acts as a second messenger molecule in response to various signals besides branched DNA. To elucidate the biological importance and molecular mechanisms of action for c-di-AMP and the recently recognized second messenger c-di-GMP will require a multidisciplinary approach.

  17. Hormone regulation system and cyclic nucleotids in the Chernobyl accident liquidators with doses absorbed less then 1 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, A.N.

    1997-01-01

    During 6 years after the accident (1987-1992) a functional state of endocrine system that regulate the adaptation, reproduction, metabolism, vessels tonicity and water-electrolyte balance were investigated in 249 liquidators with doses absorbed less then 1 Gy. The changes of these systems activity in state of basal secretion and peculiarities of their reactions under influence of perturbation (adrenaline, insulin) were revealed. Post-irradiation endocrinopathy was characterized and its role in decrease of the organism's adaptation and in mechanism of sanogenesis and pathogenesis was found. (author)

  18. The participation of elevated levels of cyclic GMP in the recovery from radiation-induced mitotic delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, J.W.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1984-01-01

    The levels of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP have been measured in Physarum plasmodia before and after treatment with gamma-radiation, 2 mM caffeine, or combinations of the two agents compared to the length of the radiation-induced mitotic delay. Caffeine alone produces a rapid transient elevation of cyclic AMP and a slower delayed elevation of cyclic GMP. Irradiation elicits an immediate transient increase in cyclic AMP and a later cyclic GMP increase which accompanies or precedes the delayed mitosis. A composite pattern is produced by combinations of radiation and caffeine, a distinctive feature of which is an elevated level of cyclic GMP near the time of the radiation-delayed and caffeine-promoted mitosis. With pretreatment by caffeine, the least radiation-induced mitotic delay occurs when plasmodia are irradiated during the caffeine-elicited increase in cyclic GMP. The plasmodium becomes refractory to the reduction of mitotic delay by caffeine at approximately the time it becomes refractory to the further elevation of cyclic GMP by caffeine. The data support a role for cyclic AMP in the onset of and for cyclic GMP in the recovery from mitotic delay induced by ionizing radiation. (author)

  19. [The Action of CO2 on the Light-dependent Cl(-)-Uptake by Elodea densa: Regulation between Noncyclic and Cyclic photophosphorylation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeschke, W D; Simonis, W

    1969-06-01

    The light curve of Cl(-)-uptake (uptake vs. light intensity) byElodea densa in pure N2 shows that saturation is reached at a very low light intensity. In N2+3% CO2, on the other hand, there is considerably less Cl(-) uptake. Under these conditions, the saturation attained at low light intensity is only temporary, and the Cl(-)-uptake increases steadily with a further rise in light intensity. It is suggested that the reason for the low intensity of light saturation may be the necessity for an intracellular transport of ATP from the site of its formation to the site of Cl(-)-uptake.CO2 exerts a strong inhibitory influence on the Cl(-)-uptake, especially at low light intensities. At higher intensities the inhibition diminishes and it is nearly absent at high intensities of white light.The inhibition by CO2 is also a function of the wavelength of the light; it is greatest in the region below 683 nm, where photosynthesis occurs with high efficiency, but it is still present at wavelengths beyond 700 nm.CO2 also inhibits the Cl(-)-uptake at high light intensities of white light when small concentration of DCMU (5×10(-7) M) is present at the same time.The inhibitory action of CO2 is partly interpreted as a consequence of a competition for ATP between CO2-assimilation (espectially below 683 nm) and the light-dependent Cl(-)-uptake. In addition, however, it is suggested that at low light intensities the presence of CO2 effects a regulation between noncyclic and cyclic electron transports and photophosphorylation which is supposed to be a consequence of a change in the redox potential of ferredoxin or another cofactor acting in noncyclic and cyclic electron transports. Especially the inhibition of the Cl(-)-uptake by CO2 in far-red light (λ>700 nm) and in the presence of DCMU is taken to be an indication of this intracellular regulation.

  20. Helicobacter pylori induces miR-155 in T cells in a cAMP-Foxp3-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Fassi Fehri

    Full Text Available Amongst the most severe clinical outcomes of life-long infections with Helicobacter pylori is the development of peptic ulcers and gastric adenocarcinoma--diseases often associated with an increase of regulatory T cells. Understanding H. pylori-driven regulation of T cells is therefore of crucial clinical importance. Several studies have defined mammalian microRNAs as key regulators of the immune system and of carcinogenic processes. Hence, we aimed here to identify H. pylori-regulated miRNAs, mainly in human T cells. MicroRNA profiling of non-infected and infected human T cells revealed H. pylori infection triggers miR-155 expression in vitro and in vivo. By using single and double H. pylori mutants and the corresponding purified enzymes, the bacterial vacuolating toxin A (VacA and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT plus lipopolysaccharide (LPS tested positive for their ability to regulate miR-155 and Foxp3 expression in human lymphocytes; the latter being considered as the master regulator and marker of regulatory T cells. RNAi-mediated knockdown (KD of the Foxp3 transcription factor in T cells abolished miR-155 expression. Using adenylate cyclase inhibitors, the miR-155 induction cascade was shown to be dependent on the second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP. Furthermore, we found that miR-155 directly targets the protein kinase A inhibitor alpha (PKIalpha mRNA in its 3'UTR, indicative of a positive feedback mechanism on the cAMP pathway. Taken together, our study describes, in the context of an H. pylori infection, a direct link between Foxp3 and miR-155 in human T cells and highlights the significance of cAMP in this miR-155 induction cascade.

  1. Prostaglandin E2-induced up-regulation of c-fos messenger ribonucleic acid is primarily mediated by 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, J.; Dietz, T. J.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    2000-01-01

    The mechanism by which the proto-oncogene, c-fos, is up-regulated in response to PGE2 in the mouse osteoblastic (MC3T3-E1) cell line was investigated using RT-PCR. c-fos messenger RNA up-regulation by dmPGE2 is rapid, starting 10 min post stimulation, and transient. The specific protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H89, inhibited c-fos induction. Moreover, down-regulation of protein kinase C (PKC) activity by chronic TPA treatment had no effect on the induction of c-fos by dmPGE2. We conclude that up-regulation of c-fos by dmPGE2 is primarily dependent on PKA in MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts. In S49 lymphoma wild-type but not S49 cyc- cells, which are deficient in cAMP signaling, dmPGE2 up-regulates c-fos and increases cell growth compared with unstimulated cells. Thus in S49 lymphoma cells, c-fos induction by PGE2 is also dependent on cAMP signaling. The minimal c-fos promoter region required for dmPGE2-induced expression was identified by transfecting c-fos promoter deletion constructs coupled to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter gene into Vero cells. Transfection of a plasmid containing 99 bp c-fos proximal promoter was sufficient to direct c-fos/CAT expression following stimulation with dmPGE2. Because induction of c-fos is mediated by cAMP, these data are consistent with activation of c-fos via the CRE/ATF cis element.

  2. Neuronal activity promotes myelination via a cAMP pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Misti; Gary, Devin; Yang, In Hong; Miglioretti, Anna; Houdayer, Thierry; Thakor, Nitish; McDonald, John

    2013-06-01

    Neuronal activity promotes myelination in vivo and in vitro. However, the molecular events that mediate activity-dependent myelination are not completely understood. Seven, daily 1 h sessions of patterned electrical stimulation (ESTIM) promoted myelin segment formation in mixed cultures of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and oligodendrocytes (OLs); the increase in myelination was frequency-dependent. Myelin segment formation was also enhanced following exposure of DRGs to ESTIM prior to OL addition, suggesting that ESTIM promotes myelination in a manner involving neuron-specific signaling. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels in DRGs were increased three-fold following ESTIM, and artificially increasing cAMP mimicked the ability of ESTIM to promote myelination. Alternatively, inhibiting the cAMP pathway suppressed ESTIM-induced myelination. We used compartmentalized, microfluidic platforms to isolate DRG soma from OLs and assessed cell-type specific effects of ESTIM on myelination. A selective increase or decrease in DRG cAMP levels resulted in enhanced or suppressed myelination, respectively. This work describes a novel role for the cAMP pathway in neurons that results in enhanced myelination. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Role of AC-cAMP-PKA Cascade in Antidepressant Action of Electroacupuncture Treatment in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-hua Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenylyl cyclase (AC-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP-cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA cascade is considered to be associated with the pathogenesis and treatment of depression. The present study was conducted to explore the role of the cAMP cascade in antidepressant action of electroacupuncture (EA treatment for chronic mild stress (CMS-induced depression model rats. The results showed that EA improved significantly behavior symptoms in depression and dysfunction of AC-cAMP-PKA signal transduction pathway induced by CMS, which was as effective as fluoxetine. Moreover, the antidepressant effects of EA rather than Fluoxetine were completely abolished by H89, a specific PKA inhibitor. Consequently, EA has a significant antidepressant treatment in CMS-induced depression model rats, and AC-cAMP-PKA signal transduction pathway is crucial for it.

  4. Histamine modulates contraction and cyclic nucleotides in cultured rat mesangial cells. Differential effects mediated by histamine H1 and H2 receptors.

    OpenAIRE

    Sedor, J R; Abboud, H E

    1985-01-01

    Histamine influences the glomerular microcirculation and modulates immune-inflammatory responses. In the rat kidney, histamine is synthesized by glomeruli and stimulates cyclic nucleotide production specifically in glomeruli. We investigated the in vitro effect of histamine on cyclic nucleotide accumulation in rat cultured glomerular mesangial and epithelial cells. Histamine stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) accumulation in cultured mesangial cells (64.0 +/- 22.1 to 511.4 +/- 86.6 pmol/mg protein,...

  5. Metformin-induced mitochondrial function and ABCD2 up-regulation in X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy involves AMP-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaspreet; Olle, Brittany; Suhail, Hamid; Felicella, Michelle M; Giri, Shailendra

    2016-07-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a progressive neurometabolic disease caused by mutations/deletions in the Abcd1 gene. Similar mutations/deletions in the Abcd1 gene often result in diagonally opposing phenotypes of mild adrenomyeloneuropathy and severe neuroinflammatory cerebral adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), which suggests involvement of downstream modifier genes. We recently documented the first evidence of loss of AMP-activated protein kinase α1 (AMPKα1) in ALD patient-derived cells. Here, we report the novel loss of AMPKα1 in postmortem brain white matter of patients with ALD phenotype. Pharmacological activation of AMPK can rescue the mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibit the pro-inflammatory response. The FDA approved anti-diabetic drug Metformin, a well-known AMPK activator, induces mitochondrial biogenesis and is documented for its anti-inflammatory role. We observed a dose-dependent activation of AMPKα1 in metformin-treated X-ALD patient-derived fibroblasts. Metformin also induced mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and ATP levels in X-ALD patient-derived fibroblasts. Metformin treatment decreased very long chain fatty acid levels and pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expressions in X-ALD patient-derived cells. Abcd2 [adrenoleukodystrophy protein-related protein] levels were increased in metformin-treated X-ALD patient-derived fibroblasts and Abcd1-KO mice primary mixed glial cells. Abcd2 induction was AMPKα1-dependent since metformin failed to induce Abcd2 levels in AMPKα1-KO mice-derived primary mixed glial cells. In vivo metformin (100 mg/Kg) in drinking water for 60 days induced Abcd2 levels and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation protein levels in the brain and spinal cord of Abcd1-KO mice. Taken together, these results provide proof-of-principle for therapeutic potential of metformin as a useful strategy for correcting the metabolic and inflammatory derangements in X-ALD by targeting AMPK. There is no effective therapy for inherited

  6. The EGPs: the eclosion hormone and cyclic GMP-regulated phosphoproteins. II. Regulation of appearance by the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone in Manduca sexta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, D B; Truman, J W

    1988-04-01

    Two proteins (the EGPs) in the CNS of the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta are phosphorylated by the action of the neuropeptide eclosion hormone (EH), which triggers ecdysis behavior (Morton and Truman, 1986, 1988). The onset of sensitivity to EH requires prior exposure to the steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone (20-HE). A series of steroid removal and replacement experiments indicates that the EGPs are also regulated by 20-HE with a time course that is similar to that seen for the 20-HE regulation of behavioral sensitivity to EH. This suggests that the steroid regulation of EH sensitivity is due to the regulation of the EGPs. The appearance of the EGPs requires not only the presence of 20-HE, but also its subsequent removal. The appearance of the EGPs can be blocked in vivo and in vitro by maintaining artificially elevated levels of 20-HE, but only up to a particular time in development. The ending of this steroid-sensitive period occurs 4 hr before the normal appearance of the EGPs, consistent with the hypothesis that the EGPs are synthesized de novo in response to the removal of 20-HE.

  7. Cyclic di-GMP regulation of the bvg-repressed genes and the orphan response regulator RisA in Bordetella pertussis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expression of Bordetella pertussis virulence factors is activated by the BvgAS two-component system. Under modulating growth conditions BvgAS indirectly represses another set of genes through the action of BvgR, a bvg-activated protein. BvgR blocks activation of the response regulator RisA which is ...

  8. Increased Set1 binding at the promoter induces aberrant epigenetic alterations and up-regulates cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate response element modulator alpha in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing; Ding, Shu; Zhang, Huilin; Long, Hai; Wu, Haijing; Zhao, Ming; Chan, Vera; Lau, Chak-Sing; Lu, Qianjin

    2016-01-01

    Up-regulated cyclic adenosine 5'-monophosphate response element modulator α (CREMα) which can inhibit IL-2 and induce IL-17A in T cells plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This research aimed to investigate the mechanisms regulating CREMα expression in SLE. From the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) microarray data, we found a sharply increased H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) amount at the CREMα promoter in SLE CD4+ T cells compared to controls. Then, by ChIP and real-time PCR, we confirmed this result. Moreover, H3K4me3 amount at the promoter was positively correlated with CREMα mRNA level in SLE CD4+ T cells. In addition, a striking increase was observed in SET domain containing 1 (Set1) enrichment, but no marked change in mixed-lineage leukemia 1 (MLL1) enrichment at the CREMα promoter in SLE CD4+ T cells. We also proved Set1 enrichment was positively correlated with both H3K4me3 amount at the CREMα promoter and CREMα mRNA level in SLE CD4+ T cells. Knocking down Set1 with siRNA in SLE CD4+ T cells decreased Set1 and H3K4me3 enrichments, and elevated the levels of DNMT3a and DNA methylation, while the amounts of H3 acetylation (H3ac) and H4 acetylation (H4ac) didn't alter greatly at the CREMα promoter. All these changes inhibited the expression of CREMα, then augmented IL-2 and down-modulated IL-17A productions. Subsequently, we observed that DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 3a enrichment at the CREMα promoter was down-regulated significantly in SLE CD4+ T cells, and H3K4me3 amount was negatively correlated with both DNA methylation level and DNMT3a enrichment at the CREMα promoter in SLE CD4+ T cells. In SLE CD4+ T cells, increased Set1 enrichment up-regulates H3K4me3 amount at the CREMα promoter, which antagonizes DNMT3a and suppresses DNA methylation within this region. All these factors induce CREMα overexpression, consequently result in IL-2 under-expression and IL-17A overproduction, and

  9. Lipopolysaccharide Compromises Human Sperm Function by Reducing Intracellular cAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhongyuan; Zhang, Dahu; He, Yuanqiao; Ding, Zhiyong; Mao, Fei; Luo, Tao; Zhang, Xiaoping

    2016-02-01

    A worldwide decline in the quality of human semen is currently occurring. In mammals, sperm are produced from diploid stem-cell spermatogonia by spermatogenesis in testes and become mature in epididymis. Nevertheless, these biological processes can be affected by Gram-negative bacterial infection mediated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the major endotoxin of Gram-negative bacteria. It is well known that LPS can disturb spermatogenesis and affect sperm maturation and quality in vivo. However, the effect of LPS on the ejaculated mature sperm in vitro remains unclear. Thus, this study aimed to assess the in vitro toxicity of LPS on human sperm function and to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Human sperm were incubated with LPS (0.1-100 μg/ml) for 1-12 h in vitro and, subsequently, sperm viability, motility and capacitation, and the acrosome reaction were examined. LPS dose-dependently inhibited total and progressive motility and the ability to move through a viscous medium of the sperm but did not affect sperm viability, capacitation, and the acrosome reaction. To explore the underlying mechanism of LPS's actions, we examined the effects of LPS on the intracellular concentrations of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and calcium ([Ca(2+)]i) and protein-tyrosine phosphorylation of human sperm, which are key regulators of human sperm function. LPS decreased intracellular cAMP dose-dependently but had no effect on [Ca(2+)]i and protein-tyrosine phosphorylation of human sperm. These findings suggest that LPS inhibits human sperm motility by decreasing intracellular cAMP.

  10. Proliferative effect of histamine on MA-10 Leydig tumor cells mediated through HRH2 activation, transient elevation in cAMP production, and increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagotto, Romina María; Monzón, Casandra; Moreno, Marcos Besio; Pignataro, Omar Pedro; Mondillo, Carolina

    2012-06-01

    Mast cells (MC) occur normally in the testis with a species-specific distribution, yet their precise role remains unclear. Testicular MC express histidine decarboxylase (HDC), the unique enzyme responsible for histamine (HA) generation. Evidence to date supports a role for HA as a local regulator of steroidogenesis via functional H₁ and H₂ receptor subtypes (HRH1 and HRH2, respectively) present in Leydig cells. Given that HA is a well-known modulator of physiological and pathological proliferation in many different cell types, we aimed in the present study to evaluate whether HA might contribute to the regulation of Leydig cell number as well as to the control of androgen production. Herein, we demonstrate, to our knowledge for the first time, that MA-10 Leydig tumor cells, but not normal immature Leydig cells (ILC), exhibit a proliferative response upon stimulation with HA that involves HRH2 activation, transient elevation of cAMP levels, and increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. Our results also reveal that MA-10 cells show significantly heightened HDC expression compared to normal ILC or whole-testicular lysate and that inhibition of HDC activity decreases MA-10 cell proliferation, suggesting a possible correlation between autocrine overproduction of HA and abnormally increased proliferation in Leydig cells. The facts that germ cells are also both source and target of HA and that multiple testicular cells are susceptible to HA action underline the importance of the present study, which we hope will serve as a first step for further research into regulation of non-MC-related HDC expression within the testis and its significance for testicular function.

  11. Effect of cyclic hydrodynamic pressure-induced proliferation of human bladder smooth muscle through Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 and extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Chen, Lin; Wei, Tangqiang; Wang, Yan; Xu, Feng; Wang, Kunjie

    2012-09-01

    To examine the role of Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 and extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 in the cyclic hydrodynamic pressure-induced proliferation of human bladder smooth muscle cells. Human bladder smooth muscle cells were exposed to cyclic hydrodynamic pressures in vitro with defined parameters (static, 100 cmH(2) O, 200 cmH(2) O and 300 cmH(2) O pressure) for 24 h. The proliferation of cells was assessed by flow cytometry. Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 and extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 messenger ribonucleic acid, and protein expression was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Specificity of the Rac1 was determined with real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot technique with small interfering ribonucleic acid transfection and Rac1 inhibitor (NSC23766). The proliferation of human bladder smooth muscle cells was increased. Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2 and extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 were activated by 200 and 300 cmH(2) O cyclic hydrodynamic pressure compared with static and 100 cmH(2) O pressure. The "knockdown" of activation of Rac1 using target small interfering ribonucleic acid transfection and Rac1 inhibitor (NSC23766) decreased proliferation of human bladder smooth muscle cells, and downregulated mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/2, extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2. The Rac1 pathway is activated in mechanotransduction and regulation of human bladder smooth muscle cell proliferation in response to cyclic hydrodynamic pressure. © 2012 The Japanese Urological Association.

  12. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent phosphorylation of mammalian mitochondrial proteins: enzyme and substrate characterization and functional role

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dobrová, Zuzana; Sardanelli, A. M.; Speranza, F.; Scacco, S.; Signorile, A.; Lorusso, V.; Papa, S.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 40, - (2001), s. 13941-13947 ISSN 0006-2960 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : cAMP * cyclic adenosine monophosphate Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.114, year: 2001

  13. Identification of a novel phosphorylation site on TBC1D4 regulated by AMP-activated protein kinase in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treebak, Jonas Thue; Taylor, Eric B.; Witczak, Carol A.

    2010-01-01

    TBC1D4 (also known as AS160) regulates GLUT4 translocation and glucose uptake in adipocytes and skeletal muscle. Its mode of action involves phosphorylation of Serine (S)/Threonine (T) residues by upstream kinases resulting in inactivation of Rab-GAP activity leading to GLUT4 mobilization. The ma...

  14. Optogenetic Manipulation of Cyclic Di-GMP (c-di-GMP) Levels Reveals the Role of c-di-GMP in Regulating Aerotaxis Receptor Activity in Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Lindsey; Ryu, Min-Hyung; Gomelsky, Mark; Alexandre, Gladys

    2017-09-15

    Bacterial chemotaxis receptors provide the sensory inputs that inform the direction of navigation in changing environments. Recently, we described the bacterial second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) as a novel regulator of a subclass of chemotaxis receptors. In Azospirillum brasilense , c-di-GMP binds to a chemotaxis receptor, Tlp1, and modulates its signaling function during aerotaxis. Here, we further characterize the role of c-di-GMP in aerotaxis using a novel dichromatic optogenetic system engineered for manipulating intracellular c-di-GMP levels in real time. This system comprises a red/near-infrared-light-regulated diguanylate cyclase and a blue-light-regulated c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase. It allows the generation of transient changes in intracellular c-di-GMP concentrations within seconds of irradiation with appropriate light, which is compatible with the time scale of chemotaxis signaling. We provide experimental evidence that binding of c-di-GMP to the Tlp1 receptor activates its signaling function during aerotaxis, which supports the role of transient changes in c-di-GMP levels as a means of adjusting the response of A. brasilense to oxygen gradients. We also show that intracellular c-di-GMP levels in A. brasilense change with carbon metabolism. Our data support a model whereby c-di-GMP functions to imprint chemotaxis receptors with a record of recent metabolic experience, to adjust their contribution to the signaling output, thus allowing the cells to continually fine-tune chemotaxis sensory perception to their metabolic state. IMPORTANCE Motile bacteria use chemotaxis to change swimming direction in response to changes in environmental conditions. Chemotaxis receptors sense environmental signals and relay sensory information to the chemotaxis machinery, which ultimately controls the swimming pattern of cells. In bacteria studied to date, differential methylation has been known as a mechanism to control the activity of chemotaxis receptors and

  15. Spontaneous Glutamatergic Synaptic Activity Regulates Constitutive COX-2 Expression in Neurons: OPPOSING ROLES FOR THE TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS CREB (cAMP RESPONSE ELEMENT BINDING) PROTEIN AND Sp1 (STIMULATORY PROTEIN-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewett, Sandra J; Shi, Jingxue; Gong, Yifan; Dhandapani, Krishnan; Pilbeam, Carol; Hewett, James A

    2016-12-30

    Burgeoning evidence supports a role for cyclooxygenase metabolites in regulating membrane excitability in various forms of synaptic plasticity. Two cyclooxygenases, COX-1 and COX-2, catalyze the initial step in the metabolism of arachidonic acid to prostaglandins. COX-2 is generally considered inducible, but in glutamatergic neurons in some brain regions, including the cerebral cortex, it is constitutively expressed. However, the transcriptional mechanisms by which this occurs have not been elucidated. Here, we used quantitative PCR and also analyzed reporter gene expression in a mouse line carrying a construct consisting of a portion of the proximal promoter region of the mouse COX-2 gene upstream of luciferase cDNA to characterize COX-2 basal transcriptional regulation in cortical neurons. Extracts from the whole brain and from the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, and olfactory bulbs exhibited high luciferase activity. Moreover, constitutive COX-2 expression and luciferase activity were detected in cortical neurons, but not in cortical astrocytes, cultured from wild-type and transgenic mice, respectively. Constitutive COX-2 expression depended on spontaneous but not evoked excitatory synaptic activity and was shown to be N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-dependent. Constitutive promoter activity was reduced in neurons transfected with a dominant-negative cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) and was eliminated by mutating the CRE-binding site on the COX-2 promoter. However, mutation of the stimulatory protein-1 (Sp1)-binding site resulted in an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor-dependent enhancement of COX-2 promoter activity. Basal binding of the transcription factors CREB and Sp1 to the native neuronal COX-2 promoter was confirmed. In toto, our data suggest that spontaneous glutamatergic synaptic activity regulates constitutive neuronal COX-2 expression via Sp1 and CREB protein-dependent transcriptional mechanisms. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry

  16. Maturation and processing of the amyloid precursor protein is regulated by the potassium/sodium hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel 2 (HCN2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frykman, Susanne; Inoue, Mitsuhiro; Ikeda, Atsushi; Teranishi, Yasuhiro; Kihara, Takahiro; Lundgren, Jolanta L; Yamamoto, Natsuko G; Bogdanovic, Nenad; Winblad, Bengt; Schedin-Weiss, Sophia; Tjernberg, Lars O

    2017-01-29

    The toxic amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) is a key player in Alzheimer Disease (AD) pathogenesis and selective inhibition of the production of this peptide is sought for. Aβ is produced by the sequential cleavage of the Aβ precursor protein (APP) by β-secretase (to yield APP-C-terminal fragment β (APP-CTFβ) and soluble APPβ (sAPPβ)) and γ-secretase (to yield Aβ). We reasoned that proteins that associate with γ-secretase are likely to regulate Aβ production and to be targets of pharmaceutical interventions and therefore performed a pull-down assay to screen for such proteins in rat brain. Interestingly, one of the purified proteins was potassium/sodium hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel 2 (HCN2), which has been shown to be involved in epilepsy. We found that silencing of HCN2 resulted in decreased secreted Aβ levels. To further investigate the mechanism behind this reduction, we also determined the levels of full-length APP, sAPP and APP-CTF species after silencing of HCN2. A marked reduction in sAPP and APP-CTF, as well as glycosylated APP levels was detected. Decreased Aβ, sAPP and APP-CTF levels were also detected after treatment with the HCN2 inhibitor ZD7288. These results indicate that the effect on Aβ levels after HCN2 silencing or inhibition is due to altered APP maturation or processing by β-secretase rather than a direct effect on γ-secretase. However, HCN2 and γ-secretase were found to be in close proximity, as evident by proximity ligation assay and immunoprecipitation. In summary, our results indicate that silencing or inhibition of HCN2 affects APP processing and thereby could serve as a potential treatment strategy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Exposure to a specific time-varying electromagnetic field inhibits cell proliferation via cAMP and ERK signaling in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Carly A; Buckner, Alison L; Koren, Stan A; Persinger, Michael A; Lafrenie, Robert M

    2018-04-01

    Exposure to specific electromagnetic field (EMF) patterns can affect a variety of biological systems. We have shown that exposure to Thomas-EMF, a low-intensity, frequency-modulated (25-6 Hz) EMF pattern, inhibited growth and altered cell signaling in malignant cells. Exposure to Thomas-EMF for 1 h/day inhibited the growth of malignant cells including B16-BL6 mouse melanoma cells, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, BT-20, and MCF-7 human breast cancer and HeLa cervical cancer cells but did not affect non-malignant cells. The Thomas-EMF-dependent changes in cell proliferation were mediated by adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways. Exposure of malignant cells to Thomas-EMF transiently changed the level of cellular cAMP and promoted ERK phosphorylation. Pharmacologic inhibitors (SQ22536) and activators (forskolin) of cAMP production both blocked the ability of Thomas-EMF to inhibit cell proliferation, and an inhibitor of the MAP kinase pathway (PD98059) was able to partially block Thomas-EMF-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. Genetic modulation of protein kinase A (PKA) in B16-BL6 cells also altered the effect of Thomas-EMF on cell proliferation. Cells transfected with the constitutively active form of PKA (PKA-CA), which interfered with ERK phosphorylation, also interfered with the Thomas-EMF effect on cell proliferation. The non-malignant cells did not show any EMF-dependent changes in cAMP levels, ERK phosphorylation, or cell growth. These data indicate that exposure to the specific Thomas-EMF pattern can inhibit the growth of malignant cells in a manner dependent on contributions from the cAMP and MAP kinase pathways. Bioelectromagnetics. 39;217-230, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. The reciprocal interaction of sympathetic nervous system and cAMP-PKA-NF-kB pathway in immune suppression after experimental stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Lei; Shi, Luhang; Yan, Fuling

    2016-08-03

    Sympathetic nervous system(SNS) is involved in the mechanism of immune suppression after stroke. Furthermore, as the pro-inflammatory effect of nuclear factor kappa B(NF-kB) is inhibited after stroke, which is regulated by cyclic adenosine monophosphate(cAMP) and proteinkinase A(PKA). The cAMP-PKA-NF-kB pathway might play an important role in noradrenergic-mediated immune dysfunction. The purpose of our research is to analyze how SNS interfere with the immune system after acute stroke and the underlying mechanism of cAMP-PKA-NF-kB pathway in regulating the inflammation. 32 healthy male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups equally and randomly (1) Sham operation group; (2) middle cerebral artery occlusion; (MCAO) control group; (3) propranolol MCAO group; (4) isopropylarterenol sham group. 72h later after MCAO or sham operation, tumor necrosis factor-α(TNF-α)and interleukine-10(IL-10) in serum as well as cAMP, PKA and NF-kB in spleen cells were tested. TNF-α decreased while IL-10 increased in serum after acute ischemia stroke (pPKA in spleen both increased in MCAO model while the expression of NF-kB was inhibited (pPKA. Therefore, the level of nuclear factor NF-kB is down-regulated. Since the pro-inflammatory effect of NF-kB slacked, the immune system may be inhibited after stroke. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Bacterial subversion of cAMP signalling inhibits cathelicidin expression, which is required for innate resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shashank; Winglee, Kathryn; Gallo, Richard; Bishai, William R

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides such as cathelicidins are an important component of innate immune defence against inhaled microorganisms and have demonstrated antimicrobial activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis with in vitro models. Despite this, little is known about the regulation and expression of cathelicidin during tuberculosis in vivo. We sought to determine whether the cathelicidin-related antimicrobial peptide (Cramp) gene, the murine functional homologue of the human cathelicidin gene (CAMP or LL-37), is required for regulating protective immunity during M. tuberculosis infection in vivo. We used Cramp−/− mice in a validated model of pulmonary tuberculosis and conducted cell-based assays with macrophages from these mice. We evaluated the in vivo susceptibility of Cramp−/− mice to infection and further dissected various pro-inflammatory immune responses against M. tuberculosis. We observed increased susceptibility of Cramp−/− mice to M. tuberculosis compared to wild type mice. Macrophages from Cramp−/− mice were unable to control M. tuberculosis growth in an in vitro infection model, were deficient in intracellular calcium influx and were defective in stimulating T-cells. Additionally, CD4 and CD8 T-cells from Cramp−/− mice produced less IFNβ upon stimulation. Furthermore, bacterial-derived cyclic-AMP modulated cathelicidin expression in macrophages. Our results demonstrate that cathelicidin is required for innate resistance to M. tuberculosis in a relevant animal model and is a key mediator in regulating the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines by calcium and cyclic nucleotides. PMID:28097645

  20. Recent Advances in the Development of Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs): Attempts for Sustainable Medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokel, Anne; Torok, Marianna

    2018-01-17

    Since the first isolation of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) they have attracted extensive interest in medicinal chemistry. However, only a few AMP-based drugs are currently available on the market. Despite their effectiveness, biodegradability, and versatile mode of action that is less likely to induce resistance compared to conventional antibiotics, AMPs suffer from major issues that need to be addressed to broaden their use. Notably, AMPs can lack selectivity leading to side effects and cytotoxicity, and also exhibit in vivo instability. Several strategies are being actively considered to overcome the limitations that restrain the success of AMPs. In the current work, recent strategies reported for improving AMPs in the context of drug design and delivery were surveyed, and also their possible impact on patients and the environment was assessed. As a major advantage AMPs possess an easily tunable skeleton offering opportunities to improve their properties. Strategic structural modifications and the beneficial properties of cyclic or branched AMPs in term of stability have been reported. The conjugation of AMPs with nanoparticles has also been explored to increase their in vivo stability. Other techniques such as the coupling of AMPs with specific antibodies aim to increase the selectivity of the potential drug towards the target. These strategies were evaluated for their effect on the environment highlighting green technologies. Although further research is needed taking into account both environmental and human health consequences of novel AMPs several of these compounds are promising drug candidates for use in sustainable medicine. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Genetically-encoded tools for cAMP probing and modulation in living systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriy M Paramonov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is one of the principal second messengers downstream of a manifold of signal transduction pathways, including the ones triggered by G protein-coupled receptors. Not surprisingly, biochemical assays for cAMP have been instrumental for basic research and drug discovery for decades, providing insights into cellular physiology and guiding pharmaceutical industry. However, despite impressive track record, the majority of conventional biochemical tools for cAMP probing share the same fundamental shortcoming - all the measurements require sample disruption for cAMP liberation. This common bottleneck, together with inherently low spatial resolution of measurements (as cAMP is typically analyzed in lysates of thousands of cells, underpin the ensuing limitations of the conventional cAMP assays: 1 genuine kinetic measurements of cAMP levels over time in a single given sample are unfeasible; 2 inability to obtain precise information on cAMP spatial distribution and transfer at subcellular levels, let alone the attempts to pinpoint dynamic interactions of cAMP and its effectors. At the same time, tremendous progress in synthetic biology over the recent years culminated in drastic refinement of our toolbox, allowing us not only to bypass the limitations of conventional assays, but to put intracellular cAMP life-span under tight control – something, that seemed scarcely attainable before. In this review article we discuss the main classes of modern genetically-encoded tools tailored for cAMP probing and modulation in living systems. We examine the capabilities and weaknesses of these different tools in the context of their operational characteristics and applicability to various experimental set-ups involving living cells, providing the guidance for rational selection of the best tools for particular needs.

  2. Ascorbic acid is a dose-dependent inhibitor of adipocyte differentiation, probably by reducing cAMP pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Fryad; Al Frouh, Fadi; Bordignon, Benoit; Fraterno, Marc; Landrier, Jean-François; Peiretti, Franck; Fontes, Michel

    2014-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA) is the active component of vitamin C and antioxidant activity was long considered to be the primary molecular mechanism underlying the physiological actions of AA. We recently demonstrated that AA is a competitive inhibitor of adenylate cyclase, acting as a global regulator of intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels. Our study, therefore, aimed to determine new targets of AA that would account for its potential effect on signal transduction, particularly during cell differentiation. We demonstrated that AA is an inhibitor of pre-adipocyte cell line differentiation, with a dose-dependent effect. Additionally, we describe the impact of AA on the expression of genes involved in adipogenesis and/or the adipocyte phenotype. Moreover, our data suggest that treatment with AA partially reverses lipid accumulation in mature adipocytes. These properties likely reflect the function of AA as a global regulator of the cAMP pool, since an analog of AA without any antioxidant properties elicited the same effect. Additionally, we demonstrated that AA inhibits adipogenesis in OP9 mesenchymal cell line and drives the differentiation of this line toward osteogenesis. Finally, our data suggest that the intracellular transporter SVCT2 is involved in these processes and may act as a receptor for AA.

  3. Dynamics of adenylate cyclase regulation via heterotrimeric G-proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milde, Markus; Werthmann, Ruth C; von Hayn, Kathrin; Bünemann, Moritz

    2014-04-01

    A wide variety of G-protein-coupled receptors either activate or inhibit ACs (adenylate cyclases), thereby regulating cellular cAMP levels and consequently inducing proper physiological responses. Stimulatory and inhibitory G-proteins interact directly with ACs, whereas G(q)-coupled receptors exert their effects primarily via Ca2+. Using the FRET-based cAMP sensor Epac1 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1)-cAMPS (adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate), we studied cAMP levels in single living VSMCs (vascular smooth muscle cells) or HUVECs (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) with subsecond temporal resolution. Stimulation of purinergic (VSMCs) or thrombin (HUVECs) receptors rapidly decreased cAMP levels in the presence of the β-adrenergic agonist isoprenaline via a rise in Ca2+ and subsequent inhibition of AC5 and AC6. Specifically in HUVECs, we observed that, in the continuous presence of thrombin, cAMP levels climbed slowly after the initial decline with a delay of a little less than 1 min. The underlying mechanism includes phospholipase A2 activity and cyclo-oxygenase-mediated synthesis of prostaglandins. We studied further the dynamics of the inhibition of ACs via G(i)-proteins utilizing FRET imaging to resolve interactions between fluorescently labelled G(i)-proteins and AC5. FRET between Gα(i1) and AC5 developed at much lower concentration of agonist compared with the overall G(i)-protein activity. We found the dissociation of Gα(i1) subunits and AC5 to occur slower than the G(i)-protein deactivation. This led us to the conclusion that AC5, by binding active Gα(i1), interferes with G-protein deactivation and reassembly and thereby might sensitize its own regulation.

  4. Recognition of the bacterial second messenger cyclic diguanylate by its cognate riboswitch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulshina, Nadia; Baird, Nathan J.; Ferré-D' Amaré, Adrian R.; (UWASH); (FHCRC)

    2009-12-03

    The cyclic diguanylate (bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate, c-di-GMP) riboswitch is the first known example of a gene-regulatory RNA that binds a second messenger. c-di-GMP is widely used by bacteria to regulate processes ranging from biofilm formation to the expression of virulence genes. The cocrystal structure of the c-di-GMP responsive GEMM riboswitch upstream of the tfoX gene of Vibrio cholerae reveals the second messenger binding the RNA at a three-helix junction. The two-fold symmetric second messenger is recognized asymmetrically by the monomeric riboswitch using canonical and noncanonical base-pairing as well as intercalation. These interactions explain how the RNA discriminates against cyclic diadenylate (c-di-AMP), a putative bacterial second messenger. Small-angle X-ray scattering and biochemical analyses indicate that the RNA undergoes compaction and large-scale structural rearrangement in response to ligand binding, consistent with organization of the core three-helix junction of the riboswitch concomitant with binding of c-di-GMP.

  5. Assisted Medical Procedures (AMP) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Documentation and Development: The AMP was initially being developed as part the Advanced Integrated Clinical System (AICS)-Guided Medical Procedure System for the...

  6. Atrial Fibrillation Activates AMP-Dependent Protein Kinase and its Regulation of Cellular Calcium Handling: Potential Role in Metabolic Adaptation and Prevention of Progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Masahide; Tadevosyan, Artavazd; Qi, Xiaoyan; Xiao, Jiening; Liu, Tao; Voigt, Niels; Karck, Matthias; Kamler, Markus; Kodama, Itsuo; Murohara, Toyoaki; Dobrev, Dobromir; Nattel, Stanley

    2015-07-07

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is associated with metabolic stress, which activates adenosine monophosphate-regulated protein kinase (AMPK). This study sought to examine AMPK response to AF and associated metabolic stress, along with consequences for atrial cardiomyocyte Ca(2+) handling. Calcium ion (Ca(2+)) transients (CaTs) and cell shortening (CS) were measured in dog and human atrial cardiomyocytes. AMPK phosphorylation and AMPK association with Ca(2+)-handling proteins were evaluated by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation. CaT amplitude and CS decreased at 4-min glycolysis inhibition (GI) but returned to baseline at 8 min, suggesting cellular adaptation to metabolic stress, potentially due to AMPK activation. GI increased AMPK-activating phosphorylation, and an AMPK inhibitor, compound C (CompC), abolished the adaptation of CaT and CS to GI. The AMPK activator 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) increased CaT amplitude and CS, restoring CompC-induced CaT and CS decreases. CompC decreased L-type calcium channel current (ICa,L), along with ICa,L-triggered CaT amplitude and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+) content under voltage clamp conditions in dog cells and suppressed CaT and ICa,L in human cardiomyocytes. Small interfering ribonucleic acid-based AMPK knockdown decreased CaT amplitude in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. L-type Ca(2+) channel α subunits coimmunoprecipitated with AMPKα. Atrial AMPK-activating phosphorylation was enhanced by 1 week of electrically maintained AF in dogs; fractional AMPK phosphorylation was increased in paroxysmal AF and reduced in longstanding persistent AF patients. AMPK is activated by metabolic stress and AF, and helps maintain the intactness of atrial ICa,L, Ca(2+) handling, and cell contractility. AMPK contributes to the atrial compensatory response to AF-related metabolic stress; AF-related metabolic responses may be an interesting new therapeutic target. Copyright © 2015 American College of Cardiology

  7. Cyclic Railway Timetable Optimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.W.P. Peeters (Leon)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractCyclic Railway Timetable Optimization describes mathematical models and solution methods for constructing high quality cyclic railway timetables. In a cyclic timetable, a train for a certain destination leaves a certain station at the same time every cycle time, say every half an hour,

  8. Cyclic ADP-ribose and heat regulate oxytocin release via CD38 and TRPM2 in the hypothalamus during social or psychological stress in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Hypothalamic oxytocin (OT is released into the brain by cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR with or without depolarizing stimulation. Previously, we showed that the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i that seems to trigger OT release can be elevated by -NAD+, cADPR, and ADP in mouse oxytocinergic neurons. As these -NAD+ metabolites activate warm-sensitive TRPM2 cation channels, when the incubation temperature is increased, the [Ca2+]i in hypothalamic neurons is elevated. However, it has not been determined whether OT release is facilitated by heat in vitro or hyperthermia in vivo in combination with cADPR. Furthermore, it has not been examined whether CD38 and TRPM2 exert their functions on OT release during stress or stress-induced hyperthermia in relation to the anxiolytic roles and social behaviors of OT under stress conditions. Here, we report that OT release from the isolated hypothalami of male mice in culture was enhanced by extracellular application of cADPR or increasing the incubation temperature from 35°C to 38.5°C, and simultaneous stimulation showed a greater effect. This release was inhibited by a cADPR-dependent ryanodine receptor inhibitor and a nonspecific TRPM2 inhibitor. The facilitated release by heat and cADPR was suppressed in the hypothalamus isolated from CD38 knockout mice and CD38- or TRPM2-knockdown mice. In the course of these experiments, we noted that OT release differed markedly between individual mice under stress with group housing. That is, when male mice received cage-switch stress and eliminated due to their social subclass, significantly higher levels of OT release were found in subordinates compared with ordinates. In mice exposed to anxiety stress in an open field, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF OT level increased transiently at 5 minutes after exposure, and the rectal temperature also increased from 36.6°C to 37.8°C. OT levels in the CSF of mice with lipopolysaccharide-induced fever (+0.8

  9. cAMP/PKA signalling reinforces the LATS–YAP pathway to fully suppress YAP in response to actin cytoskeletal changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minchul; Kim, Miju; Lee, Seunghee; Kuninaka, Shinji; Saya, Hideyuki; Lee, Ho; Lee, Sookyung; Lim, Dae-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Actin cytoskeletal damage induces inactivation of the oncoprotein YAP (Yes-associated protein). It is known that the serine/threonine kinase LATS (large tumour suppressor) inactivates YAP by phosphorylating its Ser127 and Ser381 residues. However, the events downstream of actin cytoskeletal changes that are involved in the regulation of the LATS–YAP pathway and the mechanism by which LATS differentially phosphorylates YAP on Ser127 and Ser381 in vivo have remained elusive. Here, we show that cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) phosphorylates LATS and thereby enhances its activity sufficiently to phosphorylate YAP on Ser381. We also found that PKA activity is involved in all contexts previously reported to trigger the LATS–YAP pathway, including actin cytoskeletal damage, G-protein-coupled receptor activation, and engagement of the Hippo pathway. Inhibition of PKA and overexpression of YAP cooperate to transform normal cells and amplify neural progenitor pools in developing chick embryos. We also implicate neurofibromin 2 as an AKAP (A-kinase-anchoring protein) scaffold protein that facilitates the function of the cAMP/PKA–LATS–YAP pathway. Our study thus incorporates PKA as novel component of the Hippo pathway. PMID:23644383

  10. Cyclic nucleotide-stimulable protein kinases in the central nervous sytem of Manduca sexta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, E E; Newburgh, R W

    1975-02-19

    Cyclic nucleotide-stimulable protein kinase (EC 1.7.1.37) has been studied in crude extracts from the central nervous system of the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae). The insect kinase was fulfhydryl-sensitive and required Mg-2+ for optimal activity. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of supernatants demonstrated the presence of multiple kinases in the larval nerve cord. At low concentrations, cyclic AMP was a much more potent activator of soluble and particulate activities than was cyclic GMP. The specific activity of coluble kinase and the magnitude of its activations by cyclic AMP were greater in the adult than in the larval central nervous system. The exogenous protein substrate specificity of the insect enzyme was similar to that of rat brain kinase with the sole exception that protamine was more readily phosphorylated than histone by nerve cord kinase. It was observed that cyclic AMP lowered the Km of Manduca sexta kinase for ATP, a phenomenon which is apparently nervous tissue=specific in mammals. An effective inhibitor of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase was prepared from the larval central nervous system.

  11. Interleukin-10 does not mediate the inhibitory effect of PDE-4 inhibitors and other cAMP-elevating drugs on lipopolysaccharide-induced tumors necrosis factor-alpha generation from human peripheral blood monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seldon, P M; Barnes, P J; Giembycz, M A

    1998-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced liver injury in mice and LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) generation by murine macrophages and hepatocytes are suppressed markedly by agents that elevate intracellular cAMP. Phosphodiesterase (PDE)-4 inhibitors, beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists, and E-series prostaglandins also attenuate the induction of the TNF-alpha gene in human monocytes in response to bacterial LPS. The mechanism of action of cAMP is unclear, but in the mouse, is believed to involve the generation of this anti-inflammatory cytokine, interleukin-10 (IL-10). In this article, we describe the results of studies designed to determine the extent to which IL-10 contributes to the suppression of TNF-alpha generation from LPS-stimulated human monocytes evoked by 8-bromo cyclic AMP (8-Br-cAMP), rolipram, salbutamol, and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). LPS evoked a time- and concentration-dependent generation of TNF-alpha (t1/2 = 4.5 h; EC50 = 273 pg/mL), which was inhibited by exogenous human recombinant (h) IL-10 (IC50 = 124 pg/mL), and by rolipram (EC50 = 420 nM), 8-Br-cAMP (EC50 = 77 (microM), PGE2 (EC50 = 15 nM) and salbutamol (EC50 = 20 nM). In addition, 8-Br-cAMP, PGE2; and salbutamol (but not rolipram) augmented significantly LPS-induced IL-10 production (two-to-fivefold) under identical experimental conditions. Pretreatment of monocytes with an anti-IL-10 monoclonal antibody (MAb) that abolished the inhibitory action of a maximally effective concentration of exogenous hrIL-10, failed to attenuate the inhibitory effect of rolipram, PGE2, salbutamol, and 8-Br-cAMP. Anti-IL-10 was similarly inactive when the number of monocytes seeded was increased from 0.5 to 4 x 10(6)/mL or when measurements were made at 42 h post-LPS, a time when the concentration of IL-10 released was maximal. Collectively, these data suggest that in contrast to murine hepatocytes and macrophages, IL-10 does not mediate the inhibitory effect of cAMP-elevating drugs on TNF

  12. A conjugate of decyltriphenylphosphonium with plastoquinone can carry cyclic adenosine monophosphate, but not cyclic guanosine monophosphate, across artificial and natural membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firsov, Alexander M; Rybalkina, Irina G; Kotova, Elena A; Rokitskaya, Tatyana I; Tashlitsky, Vadim N; Korshunova, Galina A; Rybalkin, Sergei D; Antonenko, Yuri N

    2018-02-01

    The present study demonstrated for the first time the interaction between adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), one of the most important signaling compounds in living organisms, and the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant plastoquinonyl-decyltriphenylphosphonium (SkQ1). The data obtained on model liquid membranes and human platelets revealed the ability of SkQ1 to selectively transport cAMP, but not guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP), across both artificial and natural membranes. In particular, SkQ1 elicited translocation of cAMP from the source to the receiving phase of a Pressman-type cell, while showing low activity with cGMP. Importantly, only conjugate with plastoquinone, but not dodecyl-triphenylphosphonium, was effective in carrying cAMP. In human platelets, SkQ1 also appeared to serve as a carrier of cAMP, but not cGMP, from outside to inside the cell, as measured by phosphorylation of the vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein. The SkQ1-induced transfer of cAMP across the plasma membrane found here can be tentatively suggested to interfere with cAMP signaling pathways in living cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. cAMP-binding proteins in medullary tubules from rat kidney: effect of ADH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gapstur, S.M.; Homma, S.; Dousa, T.P.

    1988-01-01

    Little is known of the regulatory steps in the cellular action of vasopressin (AVP) on the renal epithelium, subsequent to the cAMP generation. We studied cAMP-binding proteins in the medullary collecting tubule (MCT) and the thick ascending limb of Henle's loop (MTAL) microdissected from the rat kidney by use of photoaffinity labeling. Microdissected tubules were homogenized and photoaffinity labeled by incubation with 1 microM 32P-labeled 8-azido-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (N3-8-[32P]-cAMP); the incorporated 32P was analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Both in MCT and MTAL preparations, the analyses showed incorporation of N3-8-[32P]cAMP into two bands (Mr = 49,000 and Mr = 55,000) that comigrated with standards of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulatory subunits RI and RII. In MCT, most of the 32P (80%) was incorporated into RI, whereas in MTAL the 32P incorporated into RI and RII was equivalent. When freshly dissected MCT segments were incubated with 10(-12)-10(-6) M AVP, the subsequent photoaffinity labeling of RI with N3-8-[32P]cAMP was markedly diminished in a dose-dependent manner compared with controls. Our results suggest that cAMP binds in MCT and MTAL to regulatory subunits RI and RII of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. However, in MCT the dominant type of cAMP-dependent protein kinase appears to be type I. The outlined procedure is suitable to indirectly measure the occupancy of RI by endogenous cAMP generated in MCT cells in response to physiological levels (10(-12) M) of AVP

  14. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3α Is the Main Isoform That Regulates the Transcription Factors Nuclear Factor-Kappa B and cAMP Response Element Binding in Bovine Endothelial Cells Infected with Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio Silva-García

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3 is a constitutive enzyme implicated in the regulation of cytokine expression and the inflammatory response during bacterial infections. Mammals have two GSK3 isoforms named GSK3α and GSK3β that plays different but often overlapping functions. Although the role of GSK3β in cytokine regulation during the inflammatory response caused by bacteria is well described, GSK3α has not been found to participate in this process. Therefore, we tested if GSK3α may act as a regulatory isoform in the cytokine expression by bovine endothelial cells infected with Staphylococcus aureus because this bacterium is one of the major pathogens that cause tissue damage associated with inflammatory dysfunction. Interestingly, although both isoforms were phosphorylated–inactivated, we consistently observed a higher phosphorylation of GSK3α at Ser21 than that of GSK3β at Ser9 after bacterial challenge. During a temporal course of infection, we characterized a molecular switch from pro-inflammatory cytokine expression (IL-8, promoted by nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB, at an early stage (2 h to an anti-inflammatory cytokine expression (IL-10, promoted by cAMP response element binding (CREB, at a later stage (6 h. We observed an indirect effect of GSK3α activity on NF-κB activation that resulted in a low phosphorylation of CREB at Ser133, a decreased interaction between CREB and the co-activator CREB-binding protein (CBP, and a lower expression level of IL-10. Gene silencing of GSK3α and GSK3β with siRNA indicated that GSK3α knockout promoted the interaction between CREB and CBP that, in turn, increased the expression of IL-10, reduced the interaction of NF-κB with CBP, and reduced the expression of IL-8. These results indicate that GSK3α functions as the primary isoform that regulates the expression of IL-10 in endothelial cells infected with S. aureus.

  15. Liraglutide, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, inhibits vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by enhancing AMP-activated protein kinase and cell cycle regulation, and delays atherosclerosis in ApoE deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jojima, Teruo; Uchida, Kohsuke; Akimoto, Kazumi; Tomotsune, Takanori; Yanagi, Kazunori; Iijima, Toshie; Suzuki, Kunihiro; Kasai, Kikuo; Aso, Yoshimasa

    2017-06-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that both native glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and GLP-1 receptor agonists suppress the progression of atherosclerosis in animal models. We investigated whether liraglutide, a GLP-1 analogue, could prevent the development of atherosclerosis in apolipoprotein E knockout mice (ApoE -/- ) on a high-fat diet. We also examined the influence of liraglutide on angiotensin II-induced proliferation of rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) via enhancement of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and regulation of cell cycle progression. Treatment of ApoE -/- mice with liraglutide (400 μg/day for 4 weeks) suppressed atherosclerotic lesions and increased AMPK phosphorylation in the aortic wall. Liraglutide also improved the endothelial function of thoracic aortas harvested from ApoE -/- mice in an ex vivo study. Furthermore, liraglutide increased AMPK phosphorylation in rat VSMCs, while liraglutide-induced activation of AMPK was abolished by exendin 9-39, a GLP-1 antagonist. Moreover, angiotensin (Ang) II-induced proliferation of VSMCs was suppressed by liraglutide in a dose-dependent manner, and flow cytometry of Ang II-stimulated VSMCs showed that liraglutide reduced the percentage of cells in G2/M phase (by arrest in G0/G1 phase). These findings suggest that liraglutide may inhibit Ang II-induced VSMC proliferation by activating AMPK signaling and inducing cell cycle arrest, thus delaying the progression of atherosclerosis independently of its glucose-lowering effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Differential regulation by agonist and phorbol ester of cloned m1 and m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in mouse Y1 adrenal cells and in Y1 cells deficient in cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, N.M.; Nathanson, N.M.

    1990-01-01

    Cloned muscarinic acetylcholine m1 and m2 receptors were expressed in stably transfected mouse Y1 adrenal cells and in a variant Y1 line, Kin-8, which is deficient in cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity (PKA - ). m1 and m2 receptors were rapidly internalized following exposure of transfected PKA + or PKA - cells to the muscarinic agonist carbachol. Thus, agonist-dependent internalization of m1 and m2 did not require PKA activity. A differential effect of PKA on regulation by agonist of the m2 receptor, but not the m1 receptor, was unmasked in PKA - cells. These data indicate that the basal activity of PKA may modulate the agonist-dependent internalization of the m2 receptor, but not the m1 receptor. The internalization of the m1 and m2 receptors in both PKA + and PKA - cells was accompanied by desensitization of functional responses. Exposure of PKA + cells to 10 -7 M phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), an activator of protein kinase C, resulted in a 30 ± 9% decrease in the number of m1 receptors on the cell surface. The m2 receptor was not internalized following treatment of either PKA + or PKA - cells with PMA. Thus, the m1 and m2 receptors show differential sensitivity to internalization by PMA. Agonist-dependent internalization of the m1 receptor appeared to be independent of activation of PKC because (1) agonist-dependent internalization of m1 was not attenuated in PKA - cells, (2) the rate and extent of internalization of m1 in cells exposed to PMA were less than those in cells exposed to agonist, and (3) treatment of cells with concanavalin A selectivity blocked internalization of m1 in cells exposed to PMA, but not to agonist. The effects of agonist and PMA on receptor internalization were not additive. Exposure of PKA + or PKA - cells to PMA reduced the magnitude of pilocarpine-stimulated PI hydrolysis by about 25%

  17. AMP-guided tumour-specific nanoparticle delivery via adenosine A1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Tongcheng; Li, Na; Han, Fajun; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Yuanxing; Liu, Qin

    2016-03-01

    Active targeting-ligands have been increasingly used to functionalize nanoparticles for tumour-specific clinical applications. Here we utilize nucleotide adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) as a novel ligand to functionalize polymer-based fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for tumour-targeted imaging. We demonstrate that AMP-conjugated NPs (NPs-AMP) efficiently bind to and are following internalized into colon cancer cell CW-2 and breast cancer cell MDA-MB-468 in vitro. RNA interference and inhibitor assays reveal that the targeting effects mainly rely on the specific binding of AMP to adenosine A1 receptor (A1R), which is greatly up-regulated in cancer cells than in matched normal cells. More importantly, NPs-AMP specifically accumulate in the tumour site of colon and breast tumour xenografts and are further internalized into the tumour cells in vivo via tail vein injection, confirming that the high in vitro specificity of AMP can be successfully translated into the in vivo efficacy. Furthermore, NPs-AMP exhibit an active tumour-targeting behaviour in various colon and breast cancer cells, which is positively related to the up-regulation level of A1R in cancer cells, suggesting that AMP potentially suits for more extensive A1R-overexpressing cancer models. This work establishes AMP to be a novel tumour-targeting ligand and provides a promising strategy for future diagnostic or therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Lipidated cyclic γ-AApeptides display both antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaqiong; Smith, Christina; Wu, Haifan; Padhee, Shruti; Manoj, Namitha; Cardiello, Joseph; Qiao, Qiao; Cao, Chuanhai; Yin, Hang; Cai, Jianfeng

    2013-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are host-defense agents capable of both bacterial membrane disruption and immunomodulation. However, the development of natural AMPs as potential therapeutics is hampered by their moderate activity and susceptibility to protease degradation. Herein we report lipidated cyclic γ-AApeptides that have potent antibacterial activity against clinically relevant Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, many of which are resistant to conventional antibiotics. We show that lipidated cyclic γ-AApeptides mimic the bactericidal mechanism of AMPs by disrupting bacterial membranes. Interestingly, they also harness the immune response and inhibit lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activated Toll-Like Receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling, suggesting that lipidated cyclic γ-AApeptides have dual roles as novel antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:24144063

  19. Effect of cholera toxin on cAMP levels and Na/sup +/ influx in isolated intestinal epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyun, C.S.; Kimmich, G.A.

    1982-09-01

    Freshly isolated chicken intestinal cells contain approximately 20 pmol adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)/mg cellular protein. Incubation with 3 ..mu..g/ml cholera toxin (CT) at 37/sup 0/C induces an elevation of cellular cAMP beginning 10-15 min after initial exposure. The response is linear with time for 40-50 min and causes a six- to eightfold increase over control levels at steady state. Dibutyryl cAMP and agents that increase cAMP production inhibit Na/sup +/ influx into the isolated enterocytes. Chlorpromazine completely abolishes the toxin-induced elevation of cAMP in the isolated cells and also reverses the effect on Na/sup +/ entry. The data provide evidence for a cAMP-mediated control of intestinal cell Na/sup +/ uptake, which may represent the mechanistic basis for the antiabsorptive effect of CT on Na/sup +/ during induction of intestinal secretory activity. Studies on the time-dependent effects of chlorpromazine on both intracellular cAMP concentration and Na/sup +/ influx suggest that the reactivation of the Na/sup +/ transport system after cAMP-induced inhibition is slow relative to the disappearance of cAMP.

  20. Effect of cholera toxin on cAMP levels and Na+ influx in isolated intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, C.S.; Kimmich, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    Freshly isolated chicken intestinal cells contain approximately 20 pmol adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)/mg cellular protein. Incubation with 3 μg/ml cholera toxin (CT) at 37 0 C induces an elevation of cellular cAMP beginning 10-15 min after initial exposure. The response is linear with time for 40-50 min and causes a six- to eightfold increase over control levels at steady state. Dibutyryl cAMP and agents that increase cAMP production inhibit Na + influx into the isolated enterocytes. Chlorpromazine completely abolishes the toxin-induced elevation of cAMP in the isolated cells and also reverses the effect on Na + entry. The data provide evidence for a cAMP-mediated control of intestinal cell Na + uptake, which may represent the mechanistic basis for the antiabsorptive effect of CT on Na + during induction of intestinal secretory activity. Studies on the time-dependent effects of chlorpromazine on both intracellular cAMP concentration and Na + influx suggest that the reactivation of the Na + transport system after cAMP-induced inhibition is slow relative to the disappearance of cAMP

  1. Inhibition of cAMP-Activated Intestinal Chloride Secretion by Diclofenac: Cellular Mechanism and Potential Application in Cholera

    OpenAIRE

    Pongkorpsakol, Pawin; Pathomthongtaweechai, Nutthapoom; Srimanote, Potjanee; Soodvilai, Sunhapas; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj; Muanprasat, Chatchai

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic AMP-activated intestinal Cl- secretion plays an important role in pathogenesis of cholera. This study aimed to investigate the effect of diclofenac on cAMP-activated Cl- secretion, its underlying mechanisms, and possible application in the treatment of cholera. Diclofenac inhibited cAMP-activated Cl- secretion in human intestinal epithelial (T84) cells with IC50 of ∼ 20 µM. The effect required no cytochrome P450 enzyme-mediated metabolic activation. Interestingly, exposures of T84 cell...

  2. Biologic activity of cyclic and caged phosphates: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorke, Dietrich E; Stegmeier-Petroianu, Anka; Petroianu, Georg A

    2017-01-01

    The recognition in the early 1960s by Morifusa Eto that tri-o-cresyl phosphate (TOCP) is hydroxylated by the cytochrome P450 system to an intermediate that spontaneously cyclizes to a neurotoxic phosphate (saligenin phosphate ester) ignited the interest in this group of compounds. Only the ortho isomer can cyclize and clinically cause Organo Phosphate Induced Delayed Neurotoxicity (OPIDN); the meta and para isomers of tri-cresyl phosphate are not neuropathic because they are unable to form stable cyclic saligenin phosphate esters. This review identifies the diverse biological effects associated with various cyclic and caged phosphates and phosphonates and their possible use. Cyclic compounds that inhibit acetylcholine esterase (AChE), such as salithion, can be employed as pesticides. Others are neurotoxic, most probably because of inhibition of neuropathy target esterase (NTE). Cyclic phosphates that inhibit lipases, the cyclipostins, possibly represent promising therapeutic avenues for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus and/or microbial infections; those compounds inhibiting β-lactamase may prevent bacterial resistance against β-lactam antibiotics. Naturally occurring cyclic phosphates, such as cyclic AMP, cyclic phosphatidic acid and the ryanodine receptor modulator cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose, play an important physiological role in signal transduction. Moreover, some cyclic phosphates are GABA-antagonists, while others are an essential component of Molybdenum-containing enzymes. Some cyclic phosphates (cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide) are clinically used in tumor therapy, while the coupling of therapeutic agents with other cyclic phosphates (HepDirect® Technology) allows drugs to be targeted to specific organs. Possible clinical applications of these compounds are considered. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Effects of oxytocin and methacholine on cyclic nucleotide levels of rabbit myometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlageter, N; Janis, R A; Gualtieri, R T; Hechter, O

    1980-03-01

    The effects of oxytocin and methacholine on cyclic nucleotide levels in estrogen-primed rabbit myometrium were studied in the presence and absence of 1-methyl-3-isobutyl xanthine (MIX), a phosphodiesterase inhibitor. In the absence of MIX, methacholine increased guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) levels at a time when contraction was decreasing, but had no influence on adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) levels. In contrast, oxytocin did not elevate cGMP, but rapidly decreased cAMP levels. MIX (1 mM) increased both cAMP and cGMP levels. Oxytocin or methacholine further increased cGMP, indicating activation of guanylate cyclase. Oxytocin- but not methacholine-induced stimulation of guanylate cyclase was abolished in Ca2+-free solution. Oxytocin increased cAMP over the levels produced by MIX alone, whereas methacholine decreased cAMP below the MIX control values; these effects were insensitive to indomethacin. Tissue levels of cGMP and cAMP did not directly correlate with isometric tension. The results also indicate that both oxytocin and methacholine stimulate guanylate cyclase but have opposing effects on adenylate cyclase of rabbit myometrium.

  4. cAMP biosensors applied in molecular pharmacological studies of G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff; Vedel, Line; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a common second messenger that mediates numerous biological responses. Intracellular cAMP levels are increased by activation of G(s)-coupled G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and decreased by activation of G(i)-coupled GPCRs via the adenylyl cyclase. Many...... is characterized in the 384-well plate format and used for measuring the signaling of the G(s)-coupled ß(2)-adrenergic receptor. The procedures described may be applied for other FRET-based biosensors in terms of characterization and conversion to the 384-well plate format....

  5. Atrazine acts as an endocrine disrupter by inhibiting cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucka, Marek [Section on Cellular Signaling, Program in Developmental Neuroscience, NICHD, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States); Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Fa, Svetlana [Laboratory for Ecotoxicology, Department of Biology and Ecology, University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Sciences, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Stojilkovic, Stanko S. [Section on Cellular Signaling, Program in Developmental Neuroscience, NICHD, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kovacevic, Radmila, E-mail: radmila.kovacevic@dbe.uns.ac.rs [Laboratory for Ecotoxicology, Department of Biology and Ecology, University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Sciences, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia)

    2012-11-15

    Atrazine, one of the most commonly used herbicides worldwide, acts as an endocrine disruptor, but the mechanism of its action has not been characterized. In this study, we show that atrazine rapidly increases cAMP levels in cultured rat pituitary and testicular Leydig cells in a concentration-dependent manner, but less effectively than 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, a competitive non-specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases (PDEs). In forskolin (an activator of adenylyl cyclase)- and probenecid (an inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide transporters)-treated cells, but not in 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine-treated cells, atrazine further increased cAMP levels, indicating that inhibition of PDEs accounts for accumulation of cAMP. In contrast to cAMP, atrazine did not alter cGMP levels, further indicating that it inhibits cAMP-specific PDEs. Atrazine-induced changes in cAMP levels were sufficient to stimulate prolactin release in pituitary cells and androgen production in Leydig cells, indicating that it acts as an endocrine disrupter both in cells that secrete by exocytosis of prestored hormones and in cells that secrete by de novo hormone synthesis. Rolipram abolished the stimulatory effect of atrazine on cAMP release in both cell types, suggesting that it acts as an inhibitor of PDE4s, isoforms whose mRNA transcripts dominate in pituitary and Leydig cells together with mRNA for PDE8A. In contrast, immortalized lacto-somatotrophs showed low expression of these mRNA transcripts and several fold higher cAMP levels compared to normal pituitary cells, and atrazine was unable to further increase cAMP levels. These results indicate that atrazine acts as a general endocrine disrupter by inhibiting cAMP-specific PDE4s. -- Highlights: ► Atrazine stimulates cAMP accumulation in pituitary and Leydig cells. ► Atrazine also stimulates PRL and androgens secretion. ► Stimulatory effects of atrazine were abolished in cells with IBMX-inhibited PDEs. ► Atrazine specificity toward cAMP

  6. Impact of AmpC Derepression on Fitness and Virulence: the Mechanism or the Pathway?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Pérez-Gallego

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the interplay between antibiotic resistance and bacterial fitness and virulence is essential to guide individual treatments and improve global antibiotic policies. A paradigmatic example of a resistance mechanism is the intrinsic inducible chromosomal β-lactamase AmpC from multiple Gram-negative bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a major nosocomial pathogen. The regulation of ampC expression is intimately linked to peptidoglycan recycling, and AmpC-mediated β-lactam resistance is frequently mediated by inactivating mutations in ampD, encoding an N-acetyl-anhydromuramyl-l-alanine amidase, affecting the levels of ampC-activating muropeptides. Here we dissect the impact of the multiple pathways causing AmpC hyperproduction on P. aeruginosa fitness and virulence. Through a detailed analysis, we demonstrate that the lack of all three P. aeruginosa AmpD amidases causes a dramatic effect in fitness and pathogenicity, severely compromising growth rates, motility, and cytotoxicity; the latter effect is likely achieved by repressing key virulence factors, such as protease LasA, phospholipase C, or type III secretion system components. We also show that ampC overexpression is required but not sufficient to confer the growth-motility-cytotoxicity impaired phenotype and that alternative pathways leading to similar levels of ampC hyperexpression and resistance, such as those involving PBP4, had no fitness-virulence cost. Further analysis indicated that fitness-virulence impairment is caused by overexpressing ampC in the absence of cell wall recycling, as reproduced by expressing ampC from a plasmid in an AmpG (muropeptide permease-deficient background. Thus, our findings represent a major step in the understanding of β-lactam resistance biology and its interplay with fitness and pathogenesis.

  7. Regulation of ketogenesis during the suckling-weanling transition in the rat. Studies with isolated hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, M; Whitelaw, E; Williamson, D H

    1979-04-15

    The rates of ketogenesis from endogenous substrates, butyrate or oleate, have been measured in isolated hepatocytes from suckling and weanling rats. Ketogenesis from endogenous substrate and from oleate decreased on weaning, whereas the rate from butyrate remained unchanged. It is concluded that the major site of regulation of ketogenesis during this period of development involves the disposal of long-chain fatty acyl-CoA between the esterification and beta-oxidation pathways. Modulators of lipogenesis [dihydroxyacetone and 5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid] did not alter the rate of ketogenesis in hepatocytes from suckling rats, and it is suggested that this is due to the low rate of lipogenesis in these cells. Hepatocytes from fed weanling rats have a high rate of lipogenesis and evidence is presented for a reciprocal relationship between ketogenesis and lipogenesis, and ketogenesis, and esterification in these cells. Dibutyryl cyclic AMP stimulated ketogenesis from oleate in hepatocytes from fed weanling rats, even in the presence of an inhibitor of lipogenesis [5-(tetradecyloxy)-2-furoic acid], but not in cells from suckling rats. It is suggested that cyclic AMP may act via inhibition of esterification and that in hepatocytes from suckling rats ketogenesis is already maximally stimulated by the high basal concentrations of cyclic AMP [Beaudry, Chiasson & Exton (1977) Am. J. Physiol. 233, E175--E180].

  8. Ru (amp)(bipy)Cl

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    [RuV(amp)(bipy)O]+ intermediate complex which leads to the high affinity for hydrogen atom/hydride abstraction. Acknowledgement. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support from the Department of Science &. Technology, Government of India. We are thankful to Shri Hardyal Singh for his encouragement. Reference.

  9. No Arithmetic Cyclic Quadrilaterals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauregard, Raymond A.

    2006-01-01

    A quadrilateral is arithmetic if its area is an integer and its sides are integers in an arithmetic progression, and it is cyclic if it can be inscribed in a circle. The author shows that no quadrilateral is both arithmetic and cyclic.

  10. Mechanism of intracellular cAMP sensor Epac2 activation: cAMP-induced conformational changes identified by amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (DXMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng; Tsalkova, Tamara; White, Mark A; Mei, Fang C; Liu, Tong; Wang, Daphne; Woods, Virgil L; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2011-05-20

    Epac2, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor, regulates a wide variety of intracellular processes in response to second messenger cAMP. In this study, we have used peptide amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to probe the solution structural and conformational dynamics of full-length Epac2 in the presence and absence of cAMP. The results support a mechanism in which cAMP-induced Epac2 activation is mediated by a major hinge motion centered on the C terminus of the second cAMP binding domain. This conformational change realigns the regulatory components of Epac2 away from the catalytic core, making the later available for effector binding. Furthermore, the interface between the first and second cAMP binding domains is highly dynamic, providing an explanation of how cAMP gains access to the ligand binding sites that, in the crystal structure, are seen to be mutually occluded by the other cAMP binding domain. Moreover, cAMP also induces conformational changes at the ionic latch/hairpin structure, which is directly involved in RAP1 binding. These results suggest that in addition to relieving the steric hindrance imposed upon the catalytic lobe by the regulatory lobe, cAMP may also be an allosteric modulator directly affecting the interaction between Epac2 and RAP1. Finally, cAMP binding also induces significant conformational changes in the dishevelled/Egl/pleckstrin (DEP) domain, a conserved structural motif that, although missing from the active Epac2 crystal structure, is important for Epac subcellular targeting and in vivo functions. © 2011 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Immunohistochemical distribution of cAMP- and cGMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoenzymes in the human prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uckert, Stefan; Oelke, Matthias; Stief, Christian G.; Andersson, K.-E.; Jonas, Udo; Hedlund, Petter

    2006-01-01

    With the introduction of sildenafil citrate (Viagra), the concept of phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibition has gained tremendous interest in the field of urology. Cyclic nucleotide second messengers cGMP and cAMP have been assumed to be involved in the control of the normal function of the prostate.

  12. FRET biosensor uncovers cAMP nano-domains at ?-adrenergic targets that dictate precise tuning of cardiac contractility

    OpenAIRE

    Surdo, Nicoletta C.; Berrera, Marco; Koschinski, Andreas; Brescia, Marcella; Machado, Matias R.; Carr, Carolyn; Wright, Peter; Gorelik, Julia; Morotti, Stefano; Grandi, Eleonora; Bers, Donald M.; Pantano, Sergio; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2017-01-01

    Compartmentalized cAMP/PKA signalling is now recognized as important for physiology and pathophysiology, yet a detailed understanding of the properties, regulation and function of local cAMP/PKA signals is lacking. Here we present a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based sensor, CUTie, which detects compartmentalized cAMP with unprecedented accuracy. CUTie, targeted to specific multiprotein complexes at discrete plasmalemmal, sarcoplasmic reticular and myofilament sites, reveals ...

  13. Combinatorial effects of genistein and sex-steroids on the level of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), adenylate cyclase (AC) and cAMP in the cervix of ovariectomised rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, Naguib; Ismail, Nurain; Muniandy, Sekaran; Korla, Praveen Kumar; Giribabu, Nelli

    2015-12-01

    The combinatorial effects of genistein and estrogen (E) or estrogen plus progesterone (E+P) on CFTR, AC and cAMP levels in cervix were investigated. Ovariectomised adult female rats received 50 or 100mg/kg/day genistein with E or E followed by E+P [E+(E+P)] for seven consecutive days. Cervixes were harvested and analyzed for CFTR mRNA levels by Real-time PCR. Distribution of AC and CFTR proteins in endocervix were observed by immunohistochemistry. Levels of cAMP were measured by enzyme-immunoassay. Molecular docking predicted interaction between genistein and AC. Our results indicate that levels of CFTR, AC and cAMP in cervix of rats receiving genistein plus E were higher than E-only treatment (pcervix of E and E+(E+P)-treated rats by genistein could affect the cervical secretory function which could influence the female reproductive processes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Ultraviolet light induction of skin carcinoma in the mouse; influence of cAMP modifying agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zajdela, F.; Latarjet, R.

    1978-01-01

    A short review of pathogenic factors in U.V. light skin carcinogenesis in the mouse is presented. Caffeine and theophylline applied locally during U.V. irradiation caused a 50% reduction of skin tumour induction in Swiss mice. These two chemicals are inhibitors of DNA postreplication repair, but they also raise the intracellular level of cyclic AMP by inhibiting cAMP phosphodiesterase with, as a consequence, a possible slowing down of cellular growth. Control experiments using three different chemicals capable of raising the cAMP level in epidermal cells gave negative results. These experimental data are compatible with our original hypothesis according to which production of skin cancers by U.V. radiation is in same way related to DNA repair which helps the cell to survive but allows or favours the occurence of errors in cellular DNA

  15. Global and local missions of cAMP signaling in neural plasticity, learning, and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Daewoo

    2015-01-01

    The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been a popular model to study cAMP signaling and resultant behaviors due to its powerful genetic approaches. All molecular components (AC, PDE, PKA, CREB, etc) essential for cAMP signaling have been identified in the fly. Among them, adenylyl cyclase (AC) gene rutabaga and phosphodiesterase (PDE) gene dunce have been intensively studied to understand the role of cAMP signaling. Interestingly, these two mutant genes were originally identified on the basis of associative learning deficits. This commentary summarizes findings on the role of cAMP in Drosophila neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity and memory. It mainly focuses on two distinct mechanisms (global versus local) regulating excitatory and inhibitory synaptic plasticity related to cAMP homeostasis. This dual regulatory role of cAMP is to increase the strength of excitatory neural circuits on one hand, but to act locally on postsynaptic GABA receptors to decrease inhibitory synaptic plasticity on the other. Thus the action of cAMP could result in a global increase in the neural circuit excitability and memory. Implications of this cAMP signaling related to drug discovery for neural diseases are also described.

  16. A low-voltage SC cyclic D/A converter using matrix algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    船越, 一徳; 松本, 寛樹

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a low-voltage switched-capacitor(SC) cyclic D/A converter using matrix algorithm is proposed which consists of a switch, capacitor, MOSFET and op-amp In PSpice simulation, resolution of about 8 bits was confirmed.

  17. Real Topological Cyclic Homology

    DEFF