WorldWideScience

Sample records for cyclic amp receptor

  1. The CytR repressor antagonizes cyclic AMP-cyclic AMP receptor protein activation of the deoCp2 promoter of Escherichia coli K-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard-Andersen, L; Martinussen, J; Møllegaard, N E

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of the Escherichia coli deoCp2 promoter by the CytR repressor and the cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) complexed to cAMP. Promoter regions controlled by these two proteins characteristically contain tandem cAMP-CRP binding sites. Here we show that (i) Cyt...

  2. Down-regulation of Cell Surface Cyclic AMP Receptors and Desensitization of Cyclic AMP-stimulated Adenylate Cyclase by Cyclic AMP in Dictyostelium discoideum. Kinetics and Concentration Dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1987-01-01

    cAMP binds to Dictyostelium discoideum surface receptors and induces a transient activation of adenylate cyclase, which is followed by desensitization. cAMP also induces a loss of detectable surface receptors (down-regulation). Cells were incubated with constant cAMP concentrations, washed free of

  3. Binding of the cyclic AMP receptor protein of Escherichia coli to RNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkney, M; Hoggett, J G

    1988-03-15

    Fluorescence polarization studies were used to study the interaction of a fluorescein-labelled conjugate of the Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein (F-CRP) and RNA polymerase. Under conditions of physiological ionic strength, F-CRP binds to RNA polymerase holoenzyme in a cyclic AMP-dependent manner; the dissociation constant was about 3 microM in the presence of cyclic AMP and about 100 microM in its absence. Binding to core RNA polymerase under the same conditions was weak (Kdiss. approx. 80-100 microM) and independent of cyclic AMP. Competition experiments established that native CRP and F-CRP compete for the same binding site on RNA polymerase holoenzyme and that the native protein binds about 3 times more strongly than does F-CRP. Analytical ultracentrifuge studies showed that CRP binds predominantly to the monomeric rather than the dimeric form of RNA polymerase.

  4. Cyclic AMP-receptor protein activates aerobactin receptor IutA expression in Vibrio vulnificus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Choon-Mee; Kim, Seong-Jung; Shin, Sung-Heui

    2012-04-01

    The ferrophilic bacterium Vibrio vulnificus can utilize the siderophore aerobactin of Escherichia coli for iron acquisition via its specific receptor IutA. This siderophore piracy by V. vulnificus may contribute to its survival and proliferation, especially in mixed bacterial environments. In this study, we examined the effects of glucose, cyclic AMP (cAMP), and cAMP-receptor protein (Crp) on iutA expression in V. vulnificus. Glucose dose-dependently repressed iutA expression. A mutation in cya encoding adenylate cyclase required for cAMP synthesis severely repressed iutA expression, and this change was recovered by in trans complementing cya or the addition of exogenous cAMP. Furthermore, a mutation in crp encoding Crp severely repressed iutA expression, and this change was recovered by complementing crp. Accordingly, glucose deprivation under iron-limited conditions is an environmental signal for iutA expression, and Crp functions as an activator that regulates iutA expression in response to glucose availability.

  5. Effect of drugs on lipid methylation, receptor-adenylate cyclase coupling and cyclic AMP secretion in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Waarde, Aren; Van Haastert, P.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Intercellular communication in Dictyostelium discoldeum takes place by means of cyclic AMP-induced cyclic AMP-synthesis and secretion. Since phospholipid methylation has been suggested to play a role in receptor-adenylate cyclase coupling, we examined the effects of transmethylation inhibitors on

  6. Gαs regulates Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor-mediated cyclic AMP generation at Rab5 endosomal compartment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shravan Babu Girada

    2017-10-01

    Conclusions: The findings provide the mechanism of endosomal cyclic AMP generation following GLP-1R activation. We identified the specific compartment that serves as an organizing center to generate endosomal cyclic AMP by internalized activated receptor complex.

  7. Cyclic AMP-receptor proteins in heart muscle of rats flown on Cosmos 1887

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mednieks, Maija I.; Popova, Irina A.; Grindeland, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    The cellular compartmentalization of the cyclic AMP-receptor proteins in heart ventricular tissue obtained from rats flown on the Cosmos 1887 is determined. Photoaffinity labeling of soluble and particular cell fractions with a (32P)-8-azido analog of cyclic AMP is followed by electrophoretic separation of the proteins and by autoradiographic identification of the labeled isoforms of cAPK R subunits. It is shown that RII in the particulate subcellular fraction was significantly decreased in heart cells from rats in the flight group when compared to controls. Protein banding patterns in both the cytoplasmic fraction and in a fraction enriched in chromatin-bound proteins exhibited some variability in tissues of individual animals, but showed no changes that could be directly attributed to flight conditions. No significant change was apparent in the distribution of RI or RII cyclic AMP binding in the soluble fractions. It is inferred that the cardiac cell integrity or its protein content is not compromised under flight conditions.

  8. Mechanism for iron control of the Vibrio fischeri luminescence system: involvement of cyclic AMP and cyclic AMP receptor protein and modulation of DNA level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunlap, P V

    1992-07-01

    Iron controls luminescence in Vibrio fischeri by an indirect but undefined mechanism. To gain insight into that mechanism, the involvement of cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cAMP receptor protein (CRP) and of modulation of DNA levels in iron control of luminescence were examined in V. fischeri and in Escherichia coli containing the cloned V. fischeri lux genes on plasmids. For V. fischeri and E. coli adenylate cyclase (cya) and CRP (crp) mutants containing intact lux genes (luxR luxICDABEG), presence of the iron chelator ethylenediamine-di(o-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid) (EDDHA) increased expression of the luminescence system like in the parent strains only in the cya mutants in the presence of added cAMP. In the E. coli strains containing a plasmid with a Mu dl(lacZ) fusion in luxR, levels of beta-galactosidase activity (expression from the luxR promoter) and luciferase activity (expression from the lux operon promoter) were both 2-3-fold higher in the presence of EDDHA in the parent strain, and for the mutants this response to EDDHA was observed only in the cya mutant in the presence of added cAMP. Therefore, cAMP and CRP are required for the iron restriction effect on luminescence, and their involvement in iron control apparently is distinct from the known differential control of transcription from the luxR and luxICDABEG promoters by cAMP-CRP. Furthermore, plasmid and chromosomal DNA levels were higher in E. coli and V. fischeri in the presence of EDDHA. The higher DNA levels correlated with an increase in expression of chromosomally encoded beta-galactosidase in E. coli and with a higher level of autoinducer in cultures of V. fischeri. These results implicate cAMP-CRP and modulation of DNA levels in the mechanism of iron control of the V. fischeri luminescence system.

  9. A Novel Indirect Sequence Readout Component in the E. coli Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Operator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; Nielsen, Peter Eigil; Valentin-Hansen, Poul

    2014-01-01

    binding sites in the E. coli genome, but the exact role of the N6 region in CRP interaction has not previously been systematic examined. Here we employ an in vitro selection system based on a randomized N6 spacer region to demonstrate that CRP binding to the lacP1 site may be enhanced up to 14-fold......The cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) from Escherichia coli has been extensively studied for several decades. In particular, a detailed characterization of CRP interaction with DNA has been obtained. The CRP dimer recognizes a consensus sequence AANTGTGANNNNNNTCACANTT through direct amino acid...

  10. Dynamic fluctuations provide the basis of a conformational switch mechanism in apo cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Aykaç Fas

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli cyclic AMP Receptor Protein (CRP undergoes conformational changes with cAMP binding and allosterically promotes CRP to bind specifically to the DNA. In that, the structural and dynamic properties of apo CRP prior to cAMP binding are of interest for the comprehension of the activation mechanism. Here, the dynamics of apo CRP monomer/dimer and holo CRP dimer were studied by Molecular Dynamics (MD simulations and Gaussian Network Model (GNM. The interplay of the inter-domain hinge with the cAMP and DNA binding domains are pre-disposed in the apo state as a conformational switch in the CRP's allosteric communication mechanism. The hinge at L134-D138 displaying intra- and inter-subunit coupled fluctuations with the cAMP and DNA binding domains leads to the emergence of stronger coupled fluctuations between the two domains and describes an on state. The flexible regions at K52-E58, P154/D155 and I175 maintain the dynamic coupling of the two domains. With a shift in the inter-domain hinge position towards the N terminus, nevertheless, the latter correlations between the domains loosen and become disordered; L134-D138 dynamically interacts only with the cAMP and DNA binding domains of its own subunit, and an off state is assumed. We present a mechanistic view on how the structural dynamic units are hierarchically built for the allosteric functional mechanism; from apo CRP monomer to apo-to-holo CRP dimers.

  11. Theoretical Analysis of Allosteric and Operator Binding for Cyclic-AMP Receptor Protein Mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einav, Tal; Duque, Julia; Phillips, Rob

    2018-02-01

    Allosteric transcription factors undergo binding events both at their inducer binding sites as well as at distinct DNA binding domains, and it is often difficult to disentangle the structural and functional consequences of these two classes of interactions. In this work, we compare the ability of two statistical mechanical models - the Monod-Wyman-Changeux (MWC) and the Koshland-N\\'emethy-Filmer (KNF) models of protein conformational change - to characterize the multi-step activation mechanism of the broadly acting cyclic-AMP receptor protein (CRP). We first consider the allosteric transition resulting from cyclic-AMP binding to CRP, then analyze how CRP binds to its operator, and finally investigate the ability of CRP to activate gene expression. In light of these models, we examine data from a beautiful recent experiment that created a single-chain version of the CRP homodimer, thereby enabling each subunit to be mutated separately. Using this construct, six mutants were created using all possible combinations of the wild type subunit, a D53H mutant subunit, and an S62F mutant subunit. We demonstrate that both the MWC and KNF models can explain the behavior of all six mutants using a small, self-consistent set of parameters. In comparing the results, we find that the MWC model slightly outperforms the KNF model in the quality of its fits, but more importantly the parameters inferred by the MWC model are more in line with structural knowledge of CRP. In addition, we discuss how the conceptual framework developed here for CRP enables us to not merely analyze data retrospectively, but has the predictive power to determine how combinations of mutations will interact, how double mutants will behave, and how each construct would regulate gene expression.

  12. Dual effects of muscarinic M2 acetylcholine receptors on the synthesis of cyclic AMP in CHO cells: dependence on time, receptor density and receptor agonists

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Michal, Pavel; Lysíková, Michaela; Tuček, Stanislav

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 132, č. 6 (2001), s. 1217-1228 ISSN 0007-1188 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/99/0214; GA AV ČR IAA7011910 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : cyclic AMP * muscarinic receptors * CHO cells Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.502, year: 2001

  13. Suppression of Virulence of Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae by Anethole through the Cyclic AMP (cAMP-cAMP Receptor Protein Signaling System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Shamim Hasan Zahid

    Full Text Available Use of natural compounds as antivirulence drugs could be an alternative therapeutic approach to modify the outcome of bacterial infections, particularly in view of growing resistance to available antimicrobials. Here, we show that sub-bactericidal concentration of anethole, a component of sweet fennel seed, could suppress virulence potential in O1 El Tor biotype strains of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the ongoing 7th cholera pandemic. The expression of cholera toxin (CT and toxin coregulated pilus (TCP, the major virulence factors of V. cholerae, is controlled through a regulatory cascade involving activation of ToxT with synergistic coupling interaction of ToxR/ToxS with TcpP/TcpH. We present evidence that anethole inhibits in vitro expression of CT and TCP in a toxT-dependent but toxR/toxS-independent manner and through repression of tcpP/tcpH, by using bead-ELISA, western blotting and quantitative real-time RT-PCR assays. The cyclic AMP (cAMP-cAMP receptor protein (CRP is a well-studied global signaling system in bacterial pathogens, and this complex is known to suppress expression of tcpP/tcpH in V. cholerae. We find that anethole influences the virulence regulatory cascade by over-expressing cyaA and crp genes. Moreover, suppression of toxigenic V. cholerae-mediated fluid accumulation in ligated ileum of rabbit by anethole demonstrates its potentiality as an antivirulence drug candidate against the diseases caused by toxigenic V. cholerae. Taken altogether, these results revealing a mechanism of virulence inhibition in V. cholerae by the natural compound anethole, may have relevance in designing antivirulence compounds, particularly against multiple antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens.

  14. Suppression of Virulence of Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae by Anethole through the Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP Receptor Protein Signaling System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, M Shamim Hasan; Awasthi, Sharda Prasad; Asakura, Masahiro; Chatterjee, Shruti; Hinenoya, Atsushi; Faruque, Shah M; Yamasaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Use of natural compounds as antivirulence drugs could be an alternative therapeutic approach to modify the outcome of bacterial infections, particularly in view of growing resistance to available antimicrobials. Here, we show that sub-bactericidal concentration of anethole, a component of sweet fennel seed, could suppress virulence potential in O1 El Tor biotype strains of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of the ongoing 7th cholera pandemic. The expression of cholera toxin (CT) and toxin coregulated pilus (TCP), the major virulence factors of V. cholerae, is controlled through a regulatory cascade involving activation of ToxT with synergistic coupling interaction of ToxR/ToxS with TcpP/TcpH. We present evidence that anethole inhibits in vitro expression of CT and TCP in a toxT-dependent but toxR/toxS-independent manner and through repression of tcpP/tcpH, by using bead-ELISA, western blotting and quantitative real-time RT-PCR assays. The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is a well-studied global signaling system in bacterial pathogens, and this complex is known to suppress expression of tcpP/tcpH in V. cholerae. We find that anethole influences the virulence regulatory cascade by over-expressing cyaA and crp genes. Moreover, suppression of toxigenic V. cholerae-mediated fluid accumulation in ligated ileum of rabbit by anethole demonstrates its potentiality as an antivirulence drug candidate against the diseases caused by toxigenic V. cholerae. Taken altogether, these results revealing a mechanism of virulence inhibition in V. cholerae by the natural compound anethole, may have relevance in designing antivirulence compounds, particularly against multiple antibiotic resistant bacterial pathogens.

  15. Reversal of propranolol blockade of adrenergic receptors and related toxicity with drugs that increase cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehurst, V E; Vick, J A; Alleva, F R; Zhang, J; Joseph, X; Balazs, T

    1999-09-01

    An overdose of propranolol, a widely used nonselective beta-adrenergic receptor blocking agent, can result in hypotension and bradycardia leading to irreversible shock and death. In addition, the blockade of adrenergic receptors can lead to alterations in neurotransmitter receptors resulting in the interruption of the activity of other second messengers and the ultimate cellular responses. In the present experiment, three agents, aminophylline, amrinone, and forskolin were tested in an attempt to reverse the potential lethal effects of a propranolol overdose in dogs. Twenty-two anesthetized beagle dogs were given a 10-min infusion of propranolol at a dose of 1 mg/kg/min. Six of the dogs, treated only with intravenous saline, served as controls. Within 15-30 min all six control dogs exhibited profound hypotension and severe bradycardia that led to cardiogenic shock and death. Seven dogs were treated with intravenous aminophylline 20 mg/kg 5 min after the end of the propranolol infusion. Within 10-15 min heart rate and systemic arterial blood pressure returned to near control levels, and all seven dogs survived. Intravenous amrinone (2-3 mg/kg) given to five dogs, and forskolin (1-2 mg/kg) given to four dogs, also increased heart rate and systemic arterial blood pressure but the recovery of these parameters was appreciably slower than that seen with aminophylline. All of these animals also survived with no apparent adverse effects. Histopathologic evaluation of the hearts of the dogs treated with aminophylline showed less damage (vacuolization, inflammation, hemorrhage) than the hearts from animals given propranolol alone. Results of this study showed that these three drugs, all of which increase cyclic AMP, are capable of reversing the otherwise lethal effects of a propranolol overdose in dogs.

  16. Cooperative DNA binding of heterologous proteins: Evidence for contact between the cyclic AMP receptor protein and RNA polymerase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Y.L.; Garges, S.; Adhya, S.; Krakow, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Four cAMP-independent receptor protein mutants (designated CRP* mutants) isolated previously are able to activate in vivo gene transcription in the absence of cAMP and their activity can be enhanced by cAMP or cGMP. One of the four mutant proteins, CRP*598 (Arg-142 to His, Ala-144 to Thr), has been characterized with regard to its conformational properties and ability to bind to and support abortive initiation from the lac promoter. Binding of wild-type CRP to its site on the lac promoter and activation of abortive initiation by RNA polymerase on this promoter are effected by cAMP but not by cGMP. CRP*598 can activate lacP + -directed abortive initiation in the presence of cAMP and less efficiently in the presence of cGMP or in the absence of cyclic nucleotide. DNase I protection (footprinting) indicates that cAMP-CRP* binds to its site on the lac promoter whereas unliganded CRP* and cGMP-CRP* form a stable complex with the [ 32 P]lacP + fragment only in the presence of RNA polymerase, showing cooperative binding of two heterologous proteins. This cooperative binding provides strong evidence for a contact between CRP and RNA polymerase for activation of transcription. Although cGMP binds to CRP, it cannot replace cAMP in effecting the requisite conformational transition necessary for site-specific promoter binding

  17. Gαs regulates Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Receptor-mediated cyclic AMP generation at Rab5 endosomal compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girada, Shravan Babu; Kuna, Ramya S; Bele, Shilpak; Zhu, Zhimeng; Chakravarthi, N R; DiMarchi, Richard D; Mitra, Prasenjit

    2017-10-01

    Upon activation, G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) associate with heterotrimeric G proteins at the plasma membrane to initiate second messenger signaling. Subsequently, the activated receptor experiences desensitization, internalization, and recycling back to the plasma membrane, or it undergoes lysosomal degradation. Recent reports highlight specific cases of persistent cyclic AMP generation by internalized GPCRs, although the functional significance and mechanistic details remain to be defined. Cyclic AMP generation from internalized Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor (GLP-1R) has previously been reported from our laboratory. This study aimed at deciphering the molecular mechanism by which internalized GLP-R supports sustained cyclic AMP generation upon receptor activation in pancreatic beta cells. We studied the time course of cyclic AMP generation following GLP-1R activation with particular emphasis on defining the location where cyclic AMP is generated. Detection involved a novel GLP-1 conjugate coupled with immunofluorescence using specific endosomal markers. Finally, we employed co-immunoprecipitation as well as immunofluorescence to assess the protein-protein interactions that regulate GLP-1R mediated cyclic AMP generation at endosomes. Our data reveal that prolonged association of G protein α subunit Gαs with activated GLP-1R contributed to sustained cyclic AMP generation at Rab 5 endosomal compartment. The findings provide the mechanism of endosomal cyclic AMP generation following GLP-1R activation. We identified the specific compartment that serves as an organizing center to generate endosomal cyclic AMP by internalized activated receptor complex. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  18. Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Acts as a Transcription Regulator in Response to Stresses in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Yang

    Full Text Available The cyclic AMP receptor protein family of transcription factors regulates various metabolic pathways in bacteria, and also play roles in response to environmental changes. Here, we identify four homologs of the CRP family in Deinococcus radiodurans, one of which tolerates extremely high levels of oxidative stress and DNA-damaging reagents. Transcriptional levels of CRP were increased under hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 treatment during the stationary growth phase, indicating that CRPs function in response to oxidative stress. By constructing all CRP single knockout mutants, we found that the dr0997 mutant showed the lowest tolerance toward H2O2, ultraviolet radiation, ionizing radiation, and mitomycin C, while the phenotypes of the dr2362, dr0834, and dr1646 mutants showed slight or no significant differences from those of the wild-type strain. Taking advantage of the conservation of the CRP-binding site in many bacteria, we found that transcription of 18 genes, including genes encoding chromosome-partitioning protein (dr0998, Lon proteases (dr0349 and dr1974, NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (dr1506, thiosulfate sulfurtransferase (dr2531, the DNA repair protein UvsE (dr1819, PprA (dra0346, and RecN (dr1447, are directly regulated by DR0997. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR analyses showed that certain genes involved in anti-oxidative responses, DNA repair, and various cellular pathways are transcriptionally attenuated in the dr0997 mutant. Interestingly, DR0997 also regulate the transcriptional levels of all CRP genes in this bacterium. These data suggest that DR0997 contributes to the extreme stress resistance of D. radiodurans via its regulatory role in multiple cellular pathways, such as anti-oxidation and DNA repair pathways.

  19. Cyclic AMP in rat pancreatic islets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grill, V.; Borglund, E.; Cerasi, E.; Uppsala Univ.

    1977-01-01

    The incorporation of [ 3 H]adenine into cyclic AMP was studied in rat pancreatic islets under varying conditions of labeling. Prolonging the exposure to [ 3 H]adenine progressively augmented the islet cyclic [ 3 H]AMP level. Islets labeled for different periods of time and subsequently incubated (without adenine) in the presence of D-glucose or cholera toxin showed stimulations of intra-islet cyclic [ 3 H]AMP that were proportionate to the levels of radioactive nucleotide present under non-stimulatory conditions. Labeling the islets in a high glucose concentration (27.7 mM) did not modify the nucleotide responses to glucose or cholera toxin. The specific activity of cyclic [ 3 H]AMP, determined by simultaneous assay of cyclic [ 3 H]AMP and total cyclic AMP, was not influenced by glucose or cholera toxin. Glucose had no effect on the specific activity of labeled ATP

  20. 3' : 5'-Cyclic AMP-dependent 3'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mato, José M.; Krens, Frans A.; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Konijn, Theo M.

    1977-01-01

    Suspensions of 3':5'-cyclic AMP (cAMP)-sensitive cells of Dictyostelium discoideum responded to a cAMP pulse with increased 3':5'-cyclic GMP (cGMP) levels. Under the assay conditions used (2 × 10^8 cells per ml in 10 mM phosphate buffer, pH 6.0) cAMP (5 × 10-8 M final concentration) increased cGMP

  1. Effect of Increased Cyclic AMP Concentration on Muscle Protein Synthesis and Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Expression in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Vaughn, J. R.; Bridge, K. Y.; Smith, C. K.

    1998-01-01

    Analogies of epinephrine are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle when fed to animals. These compounds presumably exert their physiological action through interaction with the P-adrenergic receptor. Since the intracellular signal generated by the Beta-adrenergic receptor is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in cell culture to determine if artificial elevation of cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter muscle protein metabolism and P-adrenergic receptor expression. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were treated with 0.2-30 micrometers forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the treatment period, both the concentration of cAMP and the quantity of myosin heavy chain (MHC) were measured. Concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. In contrast, the quantity of MHC was increased approximately 50% above control cells at 0.2 micrometers forskolin, but exhibited a gradual decline at higher levels of forskolin so that the quantity of MHC in cells treated with 30 micrometers forskolin was not significantly different from controls. Curiously, the intracellular concentration of cAMP which elicited the maximum increase in the quantity of MHC was only 40% higher than cAMP concentration in control cells.

  2. Microgravity changes in heart structure and cyclic-AMP metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, D. E.; Fine, A.; Kato, K.; Egnor, R.; Cheng, L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of microgravity on cardiac ultrastructure and cyclic AMP metabolism in tissues of rats flown on Spacelab 3 are reported. Light and electron microscope studies of cell structure, measurements of low and high Km phosphodiesterase activity, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity, and regulatory subunit compartmentation show significant deviations in flight animals when compared to ground controls. The results indicate that some changes have occurred in cellular responses associated with catecholamine receptor interactions and intracellular signal processing.

  3. Regulation of rat hepatocyte function by P2Y receptors: focus on control of glycogen phosphorylase and cyclic AMP by 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-diphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, C Jane; Hall, John F; Webb, Tania E; Boarder, Michael R

    2004-10-01

    Hepatocyte function is regulated by several P2Y receptor subtypes. Here we report that 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-diphosphate (2-MeSADP), an agonist at P2Y(1), P2Y(12), and P2Y(13) receptors, potently (threshold 30 nM) stimulates glycogen phosphorylase in freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. Antagonism by N(6)-methyl 2'-deoxyadenosine 3',5'-bisphosphate (MRS 2179) confirms that this response is mediated by P2Y(1) receptors. In addition, in these cells, both 2-MeSADP and UTP inhibited glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation. This inhibitory effect of 2-MeSADP was not reversed by the P2Y(1) antagonists, adenosine-3'-phosphate-5'-phosphate (A3P5P) or MRS 2179, both in the range 1 to 300 microM, indicating that it was not mediated by P2Y(1) receptors. This contrasts with the increase in cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) induced by 2-MeSADP, which has shown to be inhibited by A3P5P. Pertussis toxin abolished the inhibitory effect of both UTP and 2-MeSADP. After culture of cells for 48 h, the ability of 2-MeSADP to inhibit cyclic AMP accumulation was greatly diminished. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that during this culture period, there was a decline in the ability to detect transcripts for P2Y(12) and P2Y(13) receptors, both of which are activated by 2-MeSADP and negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase. However, in freshly isolated cells, the P2Y(12) and P2Y(13) receptor antagonist, 2-propylthio-beta,gamma-dichloromethylene-d-ATP (AR-C67085) (10 nM to 300 microM) did not alter the ability of 2-MeSADP to inhibit glucagon-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation. We conclude that 2-MeSADP regulates rat hepatocyte glycogen phosphorylase by acting on P2Y(1) receptors coupled to raised [Ca(2+)](c), and by inhibiting cyclic AMP levels by an unknown G(i)-coupled receptor subtype, distinct from P2Y(1), P2Y(12), or P2Y(13) receptors.

  4. Kinetics of activation of the P4 promoter of pBR322 by the Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoggett, J G; Brierley, I

    1992-11-01

    The activation of transcription initiation from the P4 promoter of pBR322 by the Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) has been investigated using a fluorescence abortive initiation assay. The effect of the cyclic-AMP/CRP complex on the linear P4 promoter was to increase the initial binding (KB) of RNA polymerase to the promoter by about a factor of 10, but the rate of isomerization of closed to open complex (kf) was unaffected. One molecule of CRP per promoter was required for activation, and the concentration of cyclic AMP producing half-maximal stimulation was about 7-8 microM. Supercoiling caused a 2-3-fold increase in the rate of isomerization of the CRP-activated promoter, but weakened the initial binding of polymerase by about one order of magnitude. The unactivated supercoiled promoter was too weak to allow reliable assessment of kinetic parameters against the high background rate originating from the rest of the plasmid.

  5. 21 CFR 862.1230 - Cyclic AMP test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cyclic AMP test system. 862.1230 Section 862.1230....1230 Cyclic AMP test system. (a) Identification. A cyclic AMP test system is a device intended to measure the level of adenosine 3′, 5′-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) in plasma, urine, and other body fluids...

  6. A family of octopamine [corrected] receptors that specifically induce cyclic AMP production or Ca2+ release in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfanz, Sabine; Strünker, Timo; Frings, Stephan; Baumann, Arnd

    2005-04-01

    In invertebrates, the biogenic-amine octopamine is an important physiological regulator. It controls and modulates neuronal development, circadian rhythm, locomotion, 'fight or flight' responses, as well as learning and memory. Octopamine mediates its effects by activation of different GTP-binding protein (G protein)-coupled receptor types, which induce either cAMP production or Ca(2+) release. Here we describe the functional characterization of two genes from Drosophila melanogaster that encode three octopamine receptors. The first gene (Dmoa1) codes for two polypeptides that are generated by alternative splicing. When heterologously expressed, both receptors cause oscillatory increases of the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in response to applying nanomolar concentrations of octopamine. The second gene (Dmoa2) codes for a receptor that specifically activates adenylate cyclase and causes a rise of intracellular cAMP with an EC(50) of approximately 3 x 10(-8) m octopamine. Tyramine, the precursor of octopamine biosynthesis, activates all three receptors at > or = 100-fold higher concentrations, whereas dopamine and serotonin are non-effective. Developmental expression of Dmoa genes was assessed by RT-PCR. Overlapping but not identical expression patterns were observed for the individual transcripts. The genes characterized in this report encode unique receptors that display signature properties of native octopamine receptors.

  7. Evidence for a cyclic AMP-dependent pathway in angiotensin AT1-receptor activation of human omental arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoa Ytterberg

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced responses to vasoconstriction induced by neuropeptide Y and α2-adrenoceptor agonists have been seen following pharmacological activation of the adenylyl cyclase (AC system. Since preliminary studies revealed only minor responses to angiotensin II (Ang II in human omental arteries, we have investigated whether enhanced activity of AC may unravel further functional Ang II receptors. Human omental arteries were obtained in conjunction with elective gut surgery. After dissection of the vessel, the endothelium was removed by 10 sec of Triton X-100 treatment. Ring segments (1—2 mm long were mounted on a myograph and studied. Ang II produced small contractions, 27±5% relative to the response elicited by 60 mM K+. However, enhanced Ang II (105±10%, p<0.001 responses were seen during AC activation by forskolin (0.1—1 µM. This enhanced contractile response to Ang II was not inhibited by the angiotensin II type 2 (AT2-receptor antagonist PD 123319 (0.1 µM, but was blocked in an insurmountable way by the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1-receptor antagonist candesartan (1 nM and in a surmountable manner by losartan (0.1 µM and irbesartan (0.1 µM. Pertussis toxin (a Gi-protein blocker and the protein kinase C inhibitor, RO31—8220 (0.01, 0.1 and 1 µM, markedly reduced this response, while the protein kinase A inhibitor, H89 (1, 10 µM, had no effect. RT-PCR provided evidence for the presence of mRNA for both AT1- and AT2-receptors. The results suggest that both a cAMP-dependent and a cAMP-independent mechanism are involved in the contractile responses to Ang II in human omental arteries and that both responses are mediated via the AT1-receptor.

  8. Interactions between the cyclic AMP receptor protein and the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase at the Escherichia coli galactose operon P1 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attey, A; Belyaeva, T; Savery, N; Hoggett, J; Fujita, N; Ishihama, A; Busby, S

    1994-10-25

    DNAase I footprinting has been used to study open complexes between Escherichia coli RNA polymerase and the galactose operon P1 promoter, both in the absence and the presence of CRP (the cyclic AMP receptor protein, a transcription activator). From the effects of deletion of the C-terminal part of the RNA polymerase alpha subunit, we deduce that alpha binds at the upstream end of both the binary RNA polymerase-galP1 and ternary RNA polymerase-CRP-galP1 complexes. Disruption of the alpha-upstream contact suppresses open complex formation at galP1 at lower temperatures. In ternary RNA polymerase-CRP-galP1 complexes, alpha appears to make direct contact with Activating Region 1 in CRP. DNAase I footprinting has been used to detect and quantify interactions between purified alpha and CRP bound at galP1.

  9. Regulation of the Vibrio vulnificus hupA gene by temperature alteration and cyclic AMP receptor protein and evaluation of its role in virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Man Hwan; Lee, Sung Min; Lee, Dong Hwan; Choi, Sang Ho

    2009-03-01

    Availability of free iron is extremely limited in the mammalian host, and the acquisition of iron in the host is essential for successful infection by pathogenic bacteria. Expression of many genes involved in acquiring iron is regulated in response to the level of iron availability, and iron regulation is mediated by Fur. In this study, cellular levels of Vibrio vulnificus HupA, a heme receptor protein, and the hupA transcript were found to increase in cells grown at 40 degrees C compared to cells grown at 30 degrees C. The results suggested that change in growth temperature, in addition to iron availability, is an environmental cue controlling the expression of the hupA gene. The influence of global regulatory proteins on the expression of hupA was examined, and the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) was found to activate the expression of hupA at the transcriptional level. CRP exerts its effects by directly binding to DNA upstream of the hupA promoter P(hupA), and a CRP binding site, centered at 174 bp upstream of the transcription start site, was identified by a DNase I protection assay. Finally, a hupA mutant showed reduced virulence in mice and in tissue cultures, in which growth of the hupA mutant was impaired, indicating that HupA of V. vulnificus is essential for survival and multiplication during infection.

  10. Regulation of the Vibrio vulnificus hupA Gene by Temperature Alteration and Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein and Evaluation of Its Role in Virulence▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Man Hwan; Lee, Sung Min; Lee, Dong Hwan; Choi, Sang Ho

    2009-01-01

    Availability of free iron is extremely limited in the mammalian host, and the acquisition of iron in the host is essential for successful infection by pathogenic bacteria. Expression of many genes involved in acquiring iron is regulated in response to the level of iron availability, and iron regulation is mediated by Fur. In this study, cellular levels of Vibrio vulnificus HupA, a heme receptor protein, and the hupA transcript were found to increase in cells grown at 40°C compared to cells grown at 30°C. The results suggested that change in growth temperature, in addition to iron availability, is an environmental cue controlling the expression of the hupA gene. The influence of global regulatory proteins on the expression of hupA was examined, and the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) was found to activate the expression of hupA at the transcriptional level. CRP exerts its effects by directly binding to DNA upstream of the hupA promoter PhupA, and a CRP binding site, centered at 174 bp upstream of the transcription start site, was identified by a DNase I protection assay. Finally, a hupA mutant showed reduced virulence in mice and in tissue cultures, in which growth of the hupA mutant was impaired, indicating that HupA of V. vulnificus is essential for survival and multiplication during infection. PMID:19139193

  11. Caffeine, cyclic AMP and postreplication repair of mammalian DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehmann, U.K.

    1976-01-01

    The methylxanthines, caffeine and theophylline, inhibit postreplication repair of DNA in mammalian cells. Because they also inhibit cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase, it was thought that there might be some connection between concentrations of cyclic AMP and postreplication repair. This possibility was tested by performing DNA sedimentation experiments with a cyclic AMP-resistant mouse lymphoma cell mutant and its wild-type counterpart. The results show that there is no connection between cellular cyclic AMP concentrations and the rate of postreplication repair. Therefore, it is more likely that caffeine and theophylline inhibit postreplication repair by some other means, such as by binding to DNA

  12. Binding of the cyclic AMP receptor protein of Escherichia coli and DNA bending at the P4 promoter of pBR322.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brierley, I; Hoggett, J G

    1992-07-01

    The binding of the Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) to its specific site on the P4 promoter of pBR322 has been studied by gel electrophoresis. Binding to the P4 site was about 40-50-fold weaker than to the principal CRP site on the lactose promoter at both low (0.01 M) and high (0.1 M) ionic strengths. CRP-induced bending at the P4 site was investigated from the mobilities of CRP bound to circularly permuted P4 fragments. The estimated bending angle, based on comparison with Zinkel & Crothers [(1990) Biopolymers 29, 29-38] A-tract bending standards, was found to be approximately 96 degrees, similar to that found for binding to the lac site. These observations suggest that there is not a simple relationship between strength of CRP binding and the extent of induced bending for different CRP sites. The apparent centre of bending in P4 is displaced about 6-8 bp away from the conserved TGTGA sequence and the P4 transcription start site.

  13. The cyclic AMP receptor protein, CRP, is required for both virulence and expression of the minimal CRP regulon in Yersinia pestis biovar microtus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Lingjun; Han, Yanping; Yang, Lei; Geng, Jing; Li, Yingli; Gao, He; Guo, Zhaobiao; Fan, Wei; Li, Gang; Zhang, Lianfeng; Qin, Chuan; Zhou, Dongsheng; Yang, Ruifu

    2008-11-01

    The cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) is a bacterial regulator that controls more than 100 promoters, including those involved in catabolite repression. In the present study, a null deletion of the crp gene was constructed for Yersinia pestis bv. microtus strain 201. Microarray expression analysis disclosed that at least 6% of Y. pestis genes were affected by this mutation. Further reverse transcription-PCR and electrophoretic mobility shift assay analyses disclosed a set of 37 genes or putative operons to be the direct targets of CRP, and thus they constitute the minimal CRP regulon in Y. pestis. Subsequent primer extension and DNase I footprinting assays mapped transcriptional start sites, core promoter elements, and CRP binding sites within the DNA regions upstream of pla and pst, revealing positive and direct control of these two laterally acquired plasmid genes by CRP. The crp disruption affected both in vitro and in vivo growth of the mutant and led to a >15,000-fold loss of virulence after subcutaneous infection but a pestis and, particularly, is more important for infection by subcutaneous inoculation. It can further be concluded that the reduced in vivo growth phenotype of the crp mutant should contribute, at least partially, to its attenuation of virulence by both routes of infection. Consistent with a previous study of Y. pestis bv. medievalis, lacZ reporter fusion analysis indicated that the crp deletion resulted in the almost absolute loss of pla promoter activity. The plasminogen activator encoded by pla was previously shown to specifically promote Y. pestis dissemination from peripheral infection routes (subcutaneous infection [flea bite] or inhalation). The above evidence supports the notion that in addition to the reduced in vivo growth phenotype, the defect of pla expression in the crp mutant will greatly contribute to the huge loss of virulence of this mutant strain in subcutaneous infection.

  14. Activation of Cyclic AMP Synthesis by Full and Partial Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Agonists in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.

    2003-01-01

    Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Accordingly, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate CAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of CAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of CAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax concentrations were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of CAMP synthesis. When cimaterol and clenbuterol were added to culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals, there was no detectable effect on stimulation of CAMP synthesis. Finally, these same levels of cimaterol and clenbuterol did not antagonize the stimulation of CAMP by either epinephrine or isoproterenol.

  15. Sweet taste receptor expressed in pancreatic beta-cells activates the calcium and cyclic AMP signaling systems and stimulates insulin secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Nakagawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sweet taste receptor is expressed in the taste buds and enteroendocrine cells acting as a sugar sensor. We investigated the expression and function of the sweet taste receptor in MIN6 cells and mouse islets. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The expression of the sweet taste receptor was determined by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Changes in cytoplasmic Ca(2+ ([Ca(2+](c and cAMP ([cAMP](c were monitored in MIN6 cells using fura-2 and Epac1-camps. Activation of protein kinase C was monitored by measuring translocation of MARCKS-GFP. Insulin was measured by radioimmunoassay. mRNA for T1R2, T1R3, and gustducin was expressed in MIN6 cells. In these cells, artificial sweeteners such as sucralose, succharin, and acesulfame-K increased insulin secretion and augmented secretion induced by glucose. Sucralose increased biphasic increase in [Ca(2+](c. The second sustained phase was blocked by removal of extracellular calcium and addition of nifedipine. An inhibitor of inositol(1, 4, 5-trisphophate receptor, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, blocked both phases of [Ca(2+](c response. The effect of sucralose on [Ca(2+](c was inhibited by gurmarin, an inhibitor of the sweet taste receptor, but not affected by a G(q inhibitor. Sucralose also induced sustained elevation of [cAMP](c, which was only partially inhibited by removal of extracellular calcium and nifedipine. Finally, mouse islets expressed T1R2 and T1R3, and artificial sweeteners stimulated insulin secretion. CONCLUSIONS: Sweet taste receptor is expressed in beta-cells, and activation of this receptor induces insulin secretion by Ca(2+ and cAMP-dependent mechanisms.

  16. Type I interferon induction by Neisseria gonorrhoeae: Dual requirement of cyclic GMP-AMP synthase and Toll-like receptor 4

    OpenAIRE

    Andrade, Warrison A.; Agarwal, Sarika; Mo, Shunyan; Shaffer, Scott A.; Dillard, Joseph P.; Schmidt, Tobias; Hornung, Veit; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A.; Golenbock, Douglas T.

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC). Exposure of cells to GC lipooligosaccharides induces a strong immune response, leading to type I interferon (IFN) production via TLR4/MD-2. In addition to living freely in the extracellular space, GC can invade the cytoplasm to evade detection and elimination. Double-stranded DNA introduced into the cytosol binds and activates the enzyme cyclic-GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), which produces 2′3′-cGAMP and trigg...

  17. [Prognostic significance of the cyclic AMP concentration in acute leukemias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paietta, E; Mittermayer, K; Schwarzmeier, J D

    1979-01-01

    In patients with acute leukemia (myeloblastic, lymphoblastic, undifferentiated) proliferation kinetics and cyclic adenosine-3', 5'-monophosphate (cAMP) concentration of the leukemic cells were studied for their significance in the prediction of responsiveness to cytostatic therapy. Patients with good clinical response had significantly faster turnover and lower cAMP-levels than those who failed to respond to treatment.

  18. Regulation of cyclic AMP by extracellular ATP in cultured brain capillary endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Zubeya; Albert, Jennifer L; Gubby, Sharon E; Boyle, John P; Roberts, Jonathon A; Webb, Tania E; Boarder, Michael R

    1999-01-01

    In primary unpassaged rat brain capillary endothelial cell cultures (RBECs), using reverse-transcriptase PCR with primers specific for P2Y receptor subtypes, we detected mRNA for P2Y2, P2Y4 and P2Y6, but not P2Y1 receptors.None of the various nucleotides tested reduced forskolin elevated cyclic AMP levels in RBECs. ATP and ATPγS, as well as adenosine, enhanced cyclic AMP accumulation in the presence of forskolin.Comparison of the concentration response curves to ATPγS with those for ATP and adenosine, at different incubation times, indicated that the response to purine nucleotides was not wholly dependent on conversion to adenosine. Adenosine deaminase abolished the response to adenosine but only reduced the response to ATP by about 50%. These results suggest the participation of a receptor responsive to nucleotides.Isobutylmethylxanthine and 8-sulphophenyltheophylline prevented the cyclic AMP response, while neither 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine nor SCH58261 were effective antagonists. 2-chloradenosine gave a robust response, but neither 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine nor CGS 21680 were agonists.These results show that adenosine and ATP can elevate the cyclic AMP levels of brain endothelial cells by acting on receptors which have a pharmacology apparently distinct from known P2Y and adenosine receptors. PMID:10510459

  19. Discovery of a cAMP Deaminase That Quenches Cyclic AMP-Dependent Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Alissa M.; Feng, Youjun; Raushel, Frank M.; Cronan, John E.

    2013-01-01

    An enzyme of unknown function within the amidohydrolase superfamily was discovered to catalyze the hydrolysis of the universal second messenger, cyclic-3’, 5’-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). The enzyme, which we have named CadD, is encoded by the human pathogenic bacterium Leptospira interrogans. Although CadD is annotated as an adenosine deaminase, the protein specifically deaminates cAMP to cyclic-3’, 5’-inosine monophosphate (cIMP) with a kcat/Km of 2.7 ± 0.4 × 105 M−1 s−1 and has no activity on adenosine, adenine, or 5’-adenosine monophosphate (AMP). This is the first identification of a deaminase specific for cAMP. Expression of CadD in Escherichia coli mimics the loss of adenylate cyclase in that it blocks growth on carbon sources that require the cAMP-CRP transcriptional activator complex for expression of the cognate genes. The cIMP reaction product cannot replace cAMP as the ligand for CRP binding to DNA in vitro and cIMP is a very poor competitor of cAMP activation of CRP for DNA binding. Transcriptional analyses indicate that CadD expression represses expression of several cAMP-CRP dependent genes. CadD adds a new activity to the cAMP metabolic network and may be a useful tool in intracellular study of cAMP-dependent processes. PMID:24074367

  20. Cyclic AMP system in muscle tissue during prolonged hypokinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipenko, Y. A.; Bubeyev, Y. A.; Korovkin, B. F.; Mikhaleva, N. P.

    1980-01-01

    Components of the cyclic Adenosine-cyclic-35-monophosphate (AMP) system in the muscle tissue of white rats were studied during 70-75 days of hypokinesia, created by placing the animals in small booths which restricted their movements, and during the readaptation period. In the initial period, cyclic AMP levels and the activities of phosphodiesterase and adenylate cyclase in muscle tissue were increased. The values for these indices were roughly equal for controls and experimental animals during the adaptation period, but on the 70th day of the experiment cAMP levels dropped, phosphodiesterase activity increased, and the stimulative effect of epinephrine on the activity of adenylate cyclase decreased. The indices under study normalized during the readaptation period.

  1. Cyclic GMP-AMP Displays Mucosal Adjuvant Activity in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Škrnjug, Ivana; Guzmán, Carlos Alberto; Ruecker, Christine

    2014-01-01

    The recently discovered mammalian enzyme cyclic GMP-AMP synthase produces cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) after being activated by pathogen-derived cytosolic double stranded DNA. The product can stimulate STING-dependent interferon type I signaling. Here, we explore the efficacy of cGAMP as a mucosal adjuvant in mice. We show that cGAMP can enhance the adaptive immune response to the model antigen ovalbumin. It promotes antigen specific IgG and a balanced Th1/Th2 lymphocyte response in immunized mice....

  2. Type I Interferon Induction by Neisseria gonorrhoeae: Dual Requirement of Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase and Toll-like Receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Warrison A; Agarwal, Sarika; Mo, Shunyan; Shaffer, Scott A; Dillard, Joseph P; Schmidt, Tobias; Hornung, Veit; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A; Golenbock, Douglas T

    2016-06-14

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC). Exposure of cells to GC lipooligosaccharides induces a strong immune response, leading to type I interferon (IFN) production via TLR4/MD-2. In addition to living freely in the extracellular space, GC can invade the cytoplasm to evade detection and elimination. Double-stranded DNA introduced into the cytosol binds and activates the enzyme cyclic-GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), which produces 2'3'-cGAMP and triggers STING/TBK-1/IRF3 activation, resulting in type I IFN expression. Here, we reveal a cytosolic response to GC DNA that also contributes to type I IFN induction. We demonstrate that complete IFN-β induction by live GC depends on both cGAS and TLR4. Type I IFN is detrimental to the host, and dysregulation of iron homeostasis genes may explain lower bacteria survival in cGAS(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) cells. Collectively, these observations reveal cooperation between TLRs and cGAS in immunity to GC infection. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Type I Interferon Induction by Neisseria gonorrhoeae: Dual Requirement of Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase and Toll-like Receptor 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warrison A. Andrade

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system is the first line of defense against Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC. Exposure of cells to GC lipooligosaccharides induces a strong immune response, leading to type I interferon (IFN production via TLR4/MD-2. In addition to living freely in the extracellular space, GC can invade the cytoplasm to evade detection and elimination. Double-stranded DNA introduced into the cytosol binds and activates the enzyme cyclic-GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS, which produces 2′3′-cGAMP and triggers STING/TBK-1/IRF3 activation, resulting in type I IFN expression. Here, we reveal a cytosolic response to GC DNA that also contributes to type I IFN induction. We demonstrate that complete IFN-β induction by live GC depends on both cGAS and TLR4. Type I IFN is detrimental to the host, and dysregulation of iron homeostasis genes may explain lower bacteria survival in cGAS−/− and TLR4−/− cells. Collectively, these observations reveal cooperation between TLRs and cGAS in immunity to GC infection.

  4. Opposing actions of dibutyryl cyclic AMP and GMP on temperature in conscious guinea-pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, S. B.; Williaes, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that the intracerebroventricular administration of dibutyryl cyclic AMP (Db-cAMP) induced hyperthermia in guinea pigs which was not mediated through prostaglandins or norepinephrine since a prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor and an alpha-adrenergic receptor blocking agent did not antagonize the hyperthermia. However, the hyperthermic response to Db-cAMP was attenuated by the central administration of a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, which indicates that cAMP may be involved, through beta-adrenergic receptors, in the central regulation of heat production and conservation. The central administration of Db-cGMP produced hypothermia which was not mediated via histamine H1 or H2 receptors and serotonin. The antagonism of hypothermia induced by Db-cGMP and acetylcholine + physostigmine by central administration of a cholinergic muscarine receptor antagonist and not by a cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonist suggests that cholinoceptive neurons and endogenous cGMP may regulate heat loss through cholinergic muscarine receptors. It is concluded that these results indicate a regulatory role in thermoregulation provided by a balance between opposing actions of cAMP and cGMP in guinea pigs.

  5. Role of coronary endothelium in cyclic AMP formation by the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroll, K.; Schrader, J.

    1986-01-01

    In order to quantify the activation of adenylate cyclase of the coronary endothelium in vivo, endothelial adenine nucleotides of isolated guinea pig hearts were selectively pre-labeled by intracoronary infusion of tritiated (H3)-adenosine, and the coronary efflux of H3-cAMP was measured. The adenosine receptor agonist, NECA (12 μM), increased total cAMP release 4 fold, and raised H3-cAMP release 22 fold. Several classes of coronary vasodilators (adenosine, L-PIA, D-PIA, the beta 2-adrenergic agonist procaterol, and PGE1) caused dose-dependent increases in endothelial-derived H3-cAMP release. These increases were accompanied by decreases in vascular resistance, at agonist doses without positive intropic effects. Hypoxic perfusion also raised H3-cAMP release, and this was antagonized by theophylline. It is concluded: (1) cyclic AMP formation by coronary endothelium can dominate total cAMP production by the heart; (2) coronary endothelial adenylate cyclase-coupled receptors for adenosine (A2), catecholamines (beta2) and prostaglandins are activated in parallel with coronary vasodilation; (3) endothelial adenylate cyclase can be activated by endogenous adenosine

  6. Radioprotection of mouse intestine by inhibitors of cyclic amp phosphodiesterase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, S.

    1979-01-01

    The survival of colony-forming units of the jejunal crypt was used to assay the radioprotective capacity of various inhibitors of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase. DL-152, RO-20-1724 and the methyl xanthines, caffeine, theophylline, and methyl isbutyl xanthine (MIX) were all found to have some radioprotective effect. The degree of radioprotecton depended on the route of administration of the drug and on the timing of administration with respect to irradiation. Optimum survival of crypt stem cells was found following intraperitoneal administration of DL-152 (60 min before irradiation) or MIX (30 min before irradiaton), and following intravenous administration of caffeine (60 to 120 min before irradiaton) or theophylline (60 min before irradiation). When these protocols were used, crypt stem cell survival could be enhanced by a factor of from 6 to 7. All the compounds investigated produced some elevation of cyclic AMP content of the whole jejunum; this was found to be simultaneous with or to precede the period of maximum radioprotection. Cyclic AMP was localized with immunofluorescent staining; following injection of DL-152 it was found to be elevated in all parts of the jejunum but to the greatest extent in the lower part of the crypt. Survival curves for crypt stem cells from MIX and DL-152 treated mice were found to have almost the same exponential slope as the saline-injected control, suggesting that the mechanism of protection does not depend on induction of hypoxia

  7. Mechanical control of cyclic AMP signalling and gene transcription through integrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C. J.; Alenghat, F. J.; Rim, P.; Fong, J. H.; Fabry, B.; Ingber, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    This study was carried out to discriminate between two alternative hypotheses as to how cells sense mechanical forces and transduce them into changes in gene transcription. Do cells sense mechanical signals through generalized membrane distortion or through specific transmembrane receptors, such as integrins? Here we show that mechanical stresses applied to the cell surface alter the cyclic AMP signalling cascade and downstream gene transcription by modulating local release of signals generated by activated integrin receptors in a G-protein-dependent manner, whereas distortion of integrins in the absence of receptor occupancy has no effect.

  8. Somite chrondrogenesis: alterations in cyclic AMP levels and proteoglycan synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasan, Nagaswamistri; Lamb, K.M.; Heick, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels have been shown to have a positive influence on chondrogenesis in limb buds and pelvic cartilage. In the present study the level of cAMP was measured during somite chondrogenesis in vitro and found to decrease from 1.38 pmol/μg DNA on day 0 to 0.9 pmol/μg DNA on day 6. Inclusion of notochord with somites caused a marked recution, with levels decreasing from 1.41 pmol/μg DNA on day 0 to 0.36 pmol/μg DNA on day 6. Concurrently, the incorporation of radioactive sulfate into sulfated glycosaminoglycans increased from day 3 to day 6 by 38% in somite and 77% in somite-notochord explants. The aggregation of proteoglycans was analyzed by gel chromatography and found to increase with a corresponding decrease in cAMP levels. The result indicate that a decrease in cAMP levels may be necessary for chondrogenic expression in somites. (author)

  9. Cyclic GMP-AMP displays mucosal adjuvant activity in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Škrnjug

    Full Text Available The recently discovered mammalian enzyme cyclic GMP-AMP synthase produces cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP after being activated by pathogen-derived cytosolic double stranded DNA. The product can stimulate STING-dependent interferon type I signaling. Here, we explore the efficacy of cGAMP as a mucosal adjuvant in mice. We show that cGAMP can enhance the adaptive immune response to the model antigen ovalbumin. It promotes antigen specific IgG and a balanced Th1/Th2 lymphocyte response in immunized mice. A characteristic of the cGAMP-induced immune response is the slightly reduced induction of interleukin-17 as a hallmark of Th17 activity--a distinct feature that is not observed with other cyclic di-nucleotide adjuvants. We further characterize the innate immune stimulation activity in vitro on murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and human dendritic cells. The observed results suggest the consideration of cGAMP as a candidate mucosal adjuvant for human vaccines.

  10. Cyclic GMP-AMP displays mucosal adjuvant activity in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrnjug, Ivana; Guzmán, Carlos Alberto; Rueckert, Christine; Ruecker, Christine

    2014-01-01

    The recently discovered mammalian enzyme cyclic GMP-AMP synthase produces cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) after being activated by pathogen-derived cytosolic double stranded DNA. The product can stimulate STING-dependent interferon type I signaling. Here, we explore the efficacy of cGAMP as a mucosal adjuvant in mice. We show that cGAMP can enhance the adaptive immune response to the model antigen ovalbumin. It promotes antigen specific IgG and a balanced Th1/Th2 lymphocyte response in immunized mice. A characteristic of the cGAMP-induced immune response is the slightly reduced induction of interleukin-17 as a hallmark of Th17 activity--a distinct feature that is not observed with other cyclic di-nucleotide adjuvants. We further characterize the innate immune stimulation activity in vitro on murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and human dendritic cells. The observed results suggest the consideration of cGAMP as a candidate mucosal adjuvant for human vaccines.

  11. Chemotaxis to cyclic AMP and folic acid is mediated by different G proteins in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kesbeke, Fanja; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Wit, René J.W. de; Snaar-Jagalska, B. Ewa

    1990-01-01

    Mutant Frigid A (fgdA) of Dictyostelium discoideum is defective in a functional Gα2 subunit of a G protein and is characterized by a complete blockade of the cyclic AMP-mediated sensory transduction steps, including cyclic AMP relay, chemotaxis and the cyclic GMP response. Folic acid-mediated

  12. Angiotensin II potentiates prostaglandin stimulation of cyclic AMP levels in intact bovine adrenal medulla cells but not adenylate cyclase in permeabilized cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boarder, M R; Plevin, R; Marriott, D B

    1988-10-25

    The level of cyclic AMP in primary cultures of bovine adrenal medulla cells is elevated by prostaglandin E1. Angiotensin II is commonly reported to act on receptors linked to phosphoinositide metabolism or to inhibition of adenylate cyclase. We have investigated the effect of angiotensin II on prostaglandin E1-stimulated cyclic AMP levels in these primary cultures. Rather than reducing cyclic AMP levels, we have found that angiotensin II powerfully potentiates prostaglandin E1-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in intact cells, both in the presence and absence of phosphodiesterase inhibitors. The 50% maximal response was similar to that for stimulation of phosphoinositide breakdown by angiotensin II in these cultures. The potentiation of stimulated cyclic AMP levels was seen, although to a smaller maximum, with the protein kinase C (Ca2+/phospholipid-dependent enzyme) activating phorbol ester tetradecanoyl phorbolacetate and with the synthetic diacylglycerol 1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol; pretreatment (24 h) with active phorbol ester, which would be expected to diminish protein kinase C levels, attenuated the angiotensin II potentiation of cyclic AMP. Using digitonin-permeabilized cells we showed that adenylate cyclase activity was stimulated by prostaglandin E1 with the same dose-response relationship as was cyclic AMP accumulation in intact cells, but the permeabilized cells showed no response to angiotensin II. The results are discussed with respect to the hypothesis that the angiotensin II influence on cyclic AMP levels is mediated, in part, by diacylglycerol stimulation of protein kinase C.

  13. Regulation of the Vibrio vulnificus hupA Gene by Temperature Alteration and Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein and Evaluation of Its Role in Virulence▿

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Man Hwan; Lee, Sung Min; Lee, Dong Hwan; Choi, Sang Ho

    2009-01-01

    Availability of free iron is extremely limited in the mammalian host, and the acquisition of iron in the host is essential for successful infection by pathogenic bacteria. Expression of many genes involved in acquiring iron is regulated in response to the level of iron availability, and iron regulation is mediated by Fur. In this study, cellular levels of Vibrio vulnificus HupA, a heme receptor protein, and the hupA transcript were found to increase in cells grown at 40°C compared to cells gr...

  14. Cyclic GMP-AMP as an Endogenous Second Messenger in Innate Immune Signaling by Cytosolic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kazuki; Omura, Hiroki; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nureki, Osamu

    2017-06-20

    The innate immune system functions as the first line of defense against invading bacteria and viruses. In this context, the cGAS/STING [cyclic guanosine monophosphate (GMP)-adenosine monophosphate (AMP) synthase/STING] signaling axis perceives the nonself DNA associated with bacterial and viral infections, as well as the leakage of self DNA by cellular dysfunction and stresses, to elicit the host's immune responses. In this pathway, the noncanonical cyclic dinucleotide 2',3'-cyclic GMP-AMP (2',3'-cGAMP) functions as a second messenger for signal transduction: 2',3'-cGAMP is produced by the enzyme cGAS upon its recognition of double-stranded DNA, and then the 2',3'-cGAMP is recognized by the receptor STING to induce the phosphorylation of downstream factors, including TBK1 (TANK binding kinase 1) and IRF3 (interferon regulatory factor 3). Numerous crystal structures of the components of this cGAS/STING signaling axis have been reported and these clarify the structural basis for their signal transduction mechanisms. In this review, we summarize recent progress made in the structural dissection of this signaling pathway and indicate possible directions of forthcoming research.

  15. "cAMP sponge": a buffer for cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Lefkimmiatis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While intracellular buffers are widely used to study calcium signaling, no such tool exists for the other major second messenger, cyclic AMP (cAMP. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we describe a genetically encoded buffer for cAMP based on the high-affinity cAMP-binding carboxy-terminus of the regulatory subunit RIbeta of protein kinase A (PKA. Addition of targeting sequences permitted localization of this fragment to the extra-nuclear compartment, while tagging with mCherry allowed quantification of its expression at the single cell level. This construct (named "cAMP sponge" was shown to selectively bind cAMP in vitro. Its expression significantly suppressed agonist-induced cAMP signals and the downstream activation of PKA within the cytosol as measured by FRET-based sensors in single living cells. Point mutations in the cAMP-binding domains of the construct rendered the chimera unable to bind cAMP in vitro or in situ. Cyclic AMP sponge was fruitfully applied to examine feedback regulation of gap junction-mediated transfer of cAMP in epithelial cell couplets. CONCLUSIONS: This newest member of the cAMP toolbox has the potential to reveal unique biological functions of cAMP, including insight into the functional significance of compartmentalized signaling events.

  16. AMP is an adenosine A1 receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittiner, Joseph E; Korboukh, Ilia; Hull-Ryde, Emily A; Jin, Jian; Janzen, William P; Frye, Stephen V; Zylka, Mark J

    2012-02-17

    Numerous receptors for ATP, ADP, and adenosine exist; however, it is currently unknown whether a receptor for the related nucleotide adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) exists. Using a novel cell-based assay to visualize adenosine receptor activation in real time, we found that AMP and a non-hydrolyzable AMP analog (deoxyadenosine 5'-monophosphonate, ACP) directly activated the adenosine A(1) receptor (A(1)R). In contrast, AMP only activated the adenosine A(2B) receptor (A(2B)R) after hydrolysis to adenosine by ecto-5'-nucleotidase (NT5E, CD73) or prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP, ACPP). Adenosine and AMP were equipotent human A(1)R agonists in our real-time assay and in a cAMP accumulation assay. ACP also depressed cAMP levels in mouse cortical neurons through activation of endogenous A(1)R. Non-selective purinergic receptor antagonists (pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid and suramin) did not block adenosine- or AMP-evoked activation. Moreover, mutation of His-251 in the human A(1)R ligand binding pocket reduced AMP potency without affecting adenosine potency. In contrast, mutation of a different binding pocket residue (His-278) eliminated responses to AMP and to adenosine. Taken together, our study indicates that the physiologically relevant nucleotide AMP is a full agonist of A(1)R. In addition, our study suggests that some of the physiological effects of AMP may be direct, and not indirect through ectonucleotidases that hydrolyze this nucleotide to adenosine.

  17. The effects of histamine and prostaglandin D2 on rat mast-cell cyclic AMP and mediator release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wescott, S.; Kaliner, M.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility that histamine may play a functional role in modulating mast-cell secretion, as has been suggested for basophil degranulation, has both physiologic and pharmacologic implications. Therefore the capacity of histamine to influence rat peritoneal mast-cell (RPMC) cyclic AMP levels and reversed anaphylatic degranulation as reflected in the release of 3H-serotonin (5-HT) was examined. To ascertain that RPMC were functionally responsive to exogenous hormonal stimulation, assessment of prostaglandin (PG) D2 effects on cyclic AMP and 5-HT release were determined in parallel. Although PGD2 (100 microM) increased cyclic AMP and inhibited 5-HT release in the presence of 50 microM aminophylline, histamine (up to 1000 microM) was ineffective was ineffective in both. However, 1000 microM histamine in the presence of 500 microM aminophylline was capable of transiently increasing RPMC cyclic AMP (for 15 to 30 sec) and under these conditions of suppressing 5-HT release. The receptor subtype involved in the suppressive actions of histamine appeared to be of the H-1 type as reflected in the capacity of specific H-1 agonists to reproduce the inhibition of 5-HT release, whereas neither H-2 agonists nor H-2 antagonists had any influence. Thus, under conditions in which phosphodiesterase enzymatic action is impaired, histamine in extremely high concentrations is able to modulate mast-cell secretion. However, it seems very unlikely that this action of histamine has any physiologic significance

  18. Insulin alters the target size of the peripheral cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase but not the integral cyclic GMP-stimulated cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase in liver plasma membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, A.V.; Martin, B.R.; Houslay, M.D.

    1990-01-01

    Radiation inactivation of the two high affinity cyclic AMP phosphodiesterases (PDE) found in liver plasma membranes afforded an estimation of their molecular target sizes in situ. The activity of the peripheral plasma membrane PDE decayed as a single exponential with a target size corresponding to a monomer of circa 54 kDa. The integral, cyclic GMP-stimulated PDE decayed as a dimer of circa 125 kDa. Preincubation of plasma membranes with insulin (10nM), prior to irradiation, caused the target size of only the peripheral plasma membrane PDE to increase. We suggest that insulin addition causes the peripheral plasma membrane PDE to alter its coupling to an integral plasma membrane protein with a target size of circa 90 kDa

  19. Radioimmunoassays for cyclic AMP cross-react with phosphodiesterase inhibitors and buffer components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinha, B; Semmler, J; Haen, E; Moeller, J; Endres, S

    We addressed the issue of cross-reactivity of several commonly used phosphodiesterase inhibitors with radioimmunoassays for cyclic AMP, after we had observed a considerably high cross-reactivity with a noncommercial antibody. Theophylline, pentoxifylline, penthydroxifylline (BL 194), albifylline

  20. Aspirin effects on lymphocyte cyclic AMP levels in normal human subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, D E; Parker, C W

    1976-01-01

    In purified lymphocytes from the peripheral blood of healthy human subjects who had ingested therapeutic doses of aspirin, there was a significant decrease in resting cyclic AMP levels as well as a partial inhibition of the rise in cyclic AMP with isoproterenol or prostaglandin E1. These changes were seen as early as 30 min after aspirin ingestion and did not appear to result from aspirin effects on lymphocyte recovery, purity, viability, or relative number of thymus- or bone marrow-derived lymphocytes. In contrast, the direct addition of aspirin to suspensions of purified peripheral lymphocytes did not significantly alter their cyclic AMP levels. However, an effect of aspirin could be obtained in vitro if aspirin was added to unprocessed whole blood during the dextran sedimentation phase of the cell purification. Thus the effect of aspirin on lymphocyte cyclic AMP metabolism, may be indirect, through other cells present in the peripheral blood. PMID:182720

  1. The Cyclic AMP-Vfr Signaling Pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Inhibited by Cyclic Di-GMP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almblad, Henrik; Harrison, Joe J; Rybtke, Morten

    2015-01-01

    infection give rise to rugose small colony variants (RSCVs), which are hyper-biofilm-forming mutants that commonly possess mutations that increase production of the biofilm-promoting secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP). We show that RSCVs display a decreased production of acute virulence factors...... as a direct result of elevated c-di-GMP content. Overproduction of c-di-GMP causes a decrease in the transcription of virulence factor genes that are regulated by the global virulence regulator Vfr. The low level of Vfr-dependent transcription is caused by a low level of its coactivator, cyclic AMP (c......AMP), which is decreased in response to a high level of c-di-GMP. Mutations that cause reversion of the RSCV phenotype concomitantly reactivate Vfr-cAMP signaling. Attempts to uncover the mechanism underlying the observed c-di-GMP-mediated lowering of cAMP content provided evidence that it is not caused...

  2. The interplay between cyclic AMP and insulin during obesity development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkowski, Kamil

    Insulin and cAMP signalling are related to two opposite metabolic responses. Insulin secretion is elicited in response to food availability and trigger catabolic processes like lipogenesis and glycogen synthesis with a purpose of energy storage. On the other hand cAMP signalling is associated...

  3. Optimization of cAMP fluorescence dataset from ACTOne cannabinoid receptor 1 cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaela S. Presley

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The ACTOne cannabinoid receptor 1 functional system is comprised of transfected HEK cells with the parental cyclic nucleotide gated channel (CNG co-transfected with cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1. The ACTOne CB1 cell line was evaluated for cAMP driven fluorescence by optimizing experimental conditions for sensitivity to forskolin and CP 55,940, reading time point, reliability of cell passage number, and pertussis inactivation of Gi/o.

  4. Relation of intracellular cyclic AMP to the shape of mammalian cell survival curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, S.

    1975-01-01

    Results of experiments with V79 cells growing in tissue culture indicate that the reproductive survival of cells following irradiation is influenced by the level of intracellular 3', 5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) at the time of irradiation. Cells containing high levels of cyclic AMP induced by treatments with drugs show a characteristic survival curve in which the extent of the shoulder is increased so that the survival after low doses is enhanced. The exponential slope or D 0 , however, is decreased so that at high doses the survival of cells containing high levels of cyclic AMP may be less than that of controls. Naturally occurring changes in radiosensitivity such as those observed as cells pass through the division cycle, may also be related to parallel changes in cyclic AMP concentration occurring during the cycle. Injection of mice with compounds producing elevated cyclic AMP prior to whole-body irradiation increases survival at seven days post-irradiation. The shape of the survival curve for intestinal stem cells in these mice differs from that of the control in having an increased extrapolation number; no change in D 0 is observed in this in vivo situation. (author)

  5. Control of cell volume in the J774 macrophage by microtubule disassembly and cyclic AMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melmed, RN; Karanian, PJ; Berlin, RD

    1981-01-01

    We have explored the possibilities that cell volume is regulated by the status of microtubule assembly and cyclic AMP metabolism and may be coordinated with shape change. Treatment of J774.2 mouse macrophages with colchicine caused rapid microtubule disassembly and was associated with a striking increase (from 15-20 to more than 90 percent) in the proportion of cells with a large protuberance at one pole. This provided a simple experimental system in which shape changes occurred in virtually an entire cell population in suspension. Parallel changes in cell volume could then be quantified by isotope dilution techniques. We found that the shape change caused by colchicine was accompanied by a decrease in cell volume of approximately 20 percent. Nocodozole, but not lumicolchicine, caused identical changes in both cell shape and cell volume. The volume loss was not due to cell lysis nor to inhibition of pinocytosis. The mechanism of volume loss was also examined. Colchicine induced a small but reproducible increase in activity of the ouabain-sensitive Na(+), K(+)-dependent ATPase. However, inhibition of this enzyme/transport system by ouabain did not change cell volume nor did it block the colchicines-induced decrease in volume. One the other hand, SITS (4’acetamido, 4-isothiocyano 2,2’ disulfonic acid stilbene), an inhibitor of anion transport, inhibited the effects of colchicines, thus suggesting a role for an anion transport system in cell volume regulation. Because colchicine is known to activate adenylate cyclase in several systems and because cell shape changes are often induced by hormones that elevate cyclic AMP, we also examined the effects of cyclic AMP on cell volume. Agents that act to increase syclic AMP (cholera toxin, which activates adenylate cyclase; IBMX, and inhibitor of phosphodiesterase; and dibutyryl cyclic AMP) all caused a volume decrease comparable to that of colchicine. To define the effective metabolic pathway, we studied two mutants of J

  6. Is the level of cyclic AMP in the pyloric caeca of the starfish Asterias rubens related to the reproductive cycle?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, P.A.; Rheenen, J.W.A. van

    1984-01-01

    1. 1. Cyclic AMP levels were significantly higher (P = 0.01) in female than in male animals. The average difference found was 0.50 pmole/mg dry weight. 2. 2. Cyclic AMP levels were negatively correlated to the pyloric caeca-index. In females this correlation was −0.54 (P < 0.05). 3. 3. Cyclic

  7. AMP Is an Adenosine A1 Receptor Agonist*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittiner, Joseph E.; Korboukh, Ilia; Hull-Ryde, Emily A.; Jin, Jian; Janzen, William P.; Frye, Stephen V.; Zylka, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous receptors for ATP, ADP, and adenosine exist; however, it is currently unknown whether a receptor for the related nucleotide adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) exists. Using a novel cell-based assay to visualize adenosine receptor activation in real time, we found that AMP and a non-hydrolyzable AMP analog (deoxyadenosine 5′-monophosphonate, ACP) directly activated the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R). In contrast, AMP only activated the adenosine A2B receptor (A2BR) after hydrolysis to adenosine by ecto-5′-nucleotidase (NT5E, CD73) or prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP, ACPP). Adenosine and AMP were equipotent human A1R agonists in our real-time assay and in a cAMP accumulation assay. ACP also depressed cAMP levels in mouse cortical neurons through activation of endogenous A1R. Non-selective purinergic receptor antagonists (pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulfonic acid and suramin) did not block adenosine- or AMP-evoked activation. Moreover, mutation of His-251 in the human A1R ligand binding pocket reduced AMP potency without affecting adenosine potency. In contrast, mutation of a different binding pocket residue (His-278) eliminated responses to AMP and to adenosine. Taken together, our study indicates that the physiologically relevant nucleotide AMP is a full agonist of A1R. In addition, our study suggests that some of the physiological effects of AMP may be direct, and not indirect through ectonucleotidases that hydrolyze this nucleotide to adenosine. PMID:22215671

  8. Activation of the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway in endothelial cells exposed to cyclic strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, C. R.; Mills, I.; Du, W.; Kamal, K.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the involvement of the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway (AC) in endothelial cells (EC) exposed to different levels of mechanical strain. Bovine aortic EC were seeded to confluence on flexible membrane-bottom wells. The membranes were deformed with either 150 mm Hg (average 10% strain) or 37.5 mm Hg (average 6% strain) vacuum at 60 cycles per minute (0.5 s strain; 0.5 s relaxation) for 0-60 min. The results demonstrate that at 10% average strain (but not 6% average strain) there was a 1.5- to 2.2-fold increase in AC, cAMP, and PKA activity by 15 min when compared to unstretched controls. Further studies revealed an increase in cAMP response element binding protein in EC subjected to the 10% average strain (but not 6% average strain). These data support the hypothesis that cyclic strain activates the AC/cAMP/PKA signal transduction pathway in EC which may occur by exceeding a strain threshold and suggest that cyclic strain may stimulate the expression of genes containing cAMP-responsive promoter elements.

  9. Cyclic AMP Pathway Activation and Extracellular Zinc Induce Rapid Intracellular Zinc Mobilization in Candida albicans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellerup, Lasse; Winther, Anne-Marie L.; Wilson, Duncan; Fuglsang, Anja T.

    2018-01-01

    Zinc is an essential micronutrient, required for a range of zinc-dependent enzymes and transcription factors. In mammalian cells, zinc serves as a second messenger molecule. However, a role for zinc in signaling has not yet been established in the fungal kingdom. Here, we used the intracellular zinc reporter, zinbo-5, which allowed visualization of zinc in the endoplasmic reticulum and other components of the internal membrane system in Candida albicans. We provide evidence for a link between cyclic AMP/PKA- and zinc-signaling in this major human fungal pathogen. Glucose stimulation, which triggers a cyclic AMP spike in this fungus resulted in rapid intracellular zinc mobilization and this “zinc flux” could be stimulated with phosphodiesterase inhibitors and blocked via inhibition of adenylate cyclase or PKA. A similar mobilization of intracellular zinc was generated by stimulation of cells with extracellular zinc and this effect could be reversed with the chelator EDTA. However, zinc-induced zinc flux was found to be cyclic AMP independent. In summary, we show that activation of the cyclic AMP/PKA pathway triggers intracellular zinc mobilization in a fungus. To our knowledge, this is the first described link between cyclic AMP signaling and zinc homeostasis in a human fungal pathogen. PMID:29619016

  10. The Interplay between Cyclic AMP, MAPK, and NF-κB Pathways in Response to Proinflammatory Signals in Microglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousumi Ghosh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP is an important intracellular regulator of microglial cell homeostasis and its negative perturbation through proinflammatory signaling results in microglial cell activation. Though cytokines, TNF-α and IL-1β, decrease intracellular cyclic AMP, the mechanism by which this occurs is poorly understood. The current study examined which signaling pathways are responsible for decreasing cyclic AMP in microglia following TNF-α stimulation and sought to identify the role cyclic AMP plays in regulating these pathways. In EOC2 microglia, TNF-α produced a dramatic reduction in cyclic AMP and increased cyclic AMP-dependent PDE activity that could be antagonized by Rolipram, myristoylated-PKI, PD98059, or JSH-23, implicating a role for PDE4, PKA, MEK, and NF-κB in this regulation. Following TNF-α there were significant increases in iNOS and COX-2 immunoreactivity, phosphorylated ERK1/2 and NF-κB-p65, IκB degradation, and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, which were reduced in the presence of high levels of cyclic AMP, indicating that reductions in cyclic AMP during cytokine stimulation are important for removing its inhibitory action on NF-κB activation and subsequent proinflammatory gene expression. Further elucidation of the signaling crosstalk involved in decreasing cyclic AMP in response to inflammatory signals may provide novel therapeutic targets for modulating microglial cell activation during neurological injury and disease.

  11. Dopamine D1 receptors and phosphorylation of dopamine- and cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein-32 in the medial preoptic area are involved in experience-induced enhancement of male sexual behavior in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHenry, Jenna A; Bell, Genevieve A; Parrish, Bradley P; Hull, Elaine M

    2012-08-01

    The medial preoptic area (MPOA) is an integral site for male sexual behavior. Dopamine is released in the MPOA before and during copulation and facilitates male rat sexual behavior. Repeated sexual experience and noncopulatory exposures to an estrous female facilitate subsequent copulation. However, the neurobiological mechanisms that mediate such enhancement remain unclear. Here, we examined the role of dopamine D₁ receptors in the MPOA in experience-induced enhancement of male sexual behavior in rats. In experiment 1, microinjections of the D₁ antagonist SCH-23390 into the MPOA before each of seven daily 30-min noncopulatory exposures to a receptive female impaired copulation on a drug-free test on Day 8, compared to vehicle-treated female-exposed animals. Copulatory performance in drug-treated animals was similar to that of vehicle-treated males that had not been preexposed to females. This effect was site specific. There were no group differences in locomotor activity in an open field on the copulation test day. In experiment 2, a separate cohort of animals was used to examine phosphorylation of dopamine- and cAMP-regulated phosphoprotein (DARPP-32) in the MPOA of animals with acute and/or chronic sexual experience. DARPP-32 is a downstream marker of D₁ receptor signaling and substrate of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Western immunoblot analysis revealed that p-DARPP-32 expression was greatest in the MPOA of males that received both acute and chronic sexual experience, compared to all other mated conditions and naïve controls. These data suggest that D₁ receptors in the MPOA contribute to experience-induced enhancement of male sexual behavior, perhaps through a PKA regulated mechanism.

  12. Cyclic di-AMP regulation of osmotic homeostasis is essential in Group B Streptococcus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Devaux

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotides are universally used as secondary messengers to control cellular physiology. Among these signalling molecules, cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP is a specific bacterial second messenger recognized by host cells during infections and its synthesis is assumed to be necessary for bacterial growth by controlling a conserved and essential cellular function. In this study, we sought to identify the main c-di-AMP dependent pathway in Streptococcus agalactiae, the etiological agent of neonatal septicaemia and meningitis. By conditionally inactivating dacA, the only diadenyate cyclase gene, we confirm that c-di-AMP synthesis is essential in standard growth conditions. However, c-di-AMP synthesis becomes rapidly dispensable due to the accumulation of compensatory mutations. We identified several mutations restoring the viability of a ΔdacA mutant, in particular a loss-of-function mutation in the osmoprotectant transporter BusAB. Identification of c-di-AMP binding proteins revealed a conserved set of potassium and osmolyte transporters, as well as the BusR transcriptional factor. We showed that BusR negatively regulates busAB transcription by direct binding to the busAB promoter. Loss of BusR repression leads to a toxic busAB expression in absence of c-di-AMP if osmoprotectants, such as glycine betaine, are present in the medium. In contrast, deletion of the gdpP c-di-AMP phosphodiesterase leads to hyperosmotic susceptibility, a phenotype dependent on a functional BusR. Taken together, we demonstrate that c-di-AMP is essential for osmotic homeostasis and that the predominant mechanism is dependent on the c-di-AMP binding transcriptional factor BusR. The regulation of osmotic homeostasis is likely the conserved and essential function of c-di-AMP, but each species has evolved specific c-di-AMP mechanisms of osmoregulation to adapt to its environment.

  13. Transcriptional regulation of the tyrosine hydroxylase gene by glucocorticoid and cyclic AMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, E.J.; Harrington, C.A.; Chikaraishi, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    Glucocorticoid and cyclic AMP increase tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and mRNA levels in pheochromocytoma cultures. The transcriptional activity of the TH gene, as measured by nuclear run-on assay, is also increased when cultures are treated with the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone or agents that increase intracellular cyclic AMP, such as forskolin and 8-BrcAMP. Both inducers effect transcriptional changes within 10 min after treatment and are maximal after 30 min for forskolin and after 60 min for dexamethasone. The 5' flanking sequences of the TH gene were fused to the bacterial gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT), and the hybrid gene was transfected into pheochromocytoma cultures and GH 4 pituitary cells. In both cell lines, a region of the TH gene containing bases -272 to +27 conferred induction of CAT by cyclic AMP, but not by glucocorticoid. The same results were found when a region of the TH gene containing -773 to + 27 was used. Thus, the sequences required for induction of TH by cyclic AMP are contained within 272 bases of 5' flanking sequence, but sequences sufficient for glucocorticoid regulation are not contained with 773 bases

  14. Cyclic GMP-AMP Containing Mixed Phosphodiester Linkages Is An Endogenous High Affinity Ligand for STING

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xu; Shi, Heping; Wu, Jiaxi; Zhang, Xuewu; Sun, Lijun; Chen, Chuo; Chen, Zhijian J.

    2013-01-01

    The presence of microbial or self DNA in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells is a danger signal detected by the DNA sensor cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS), which catalyzes the production of cGAMP that in turn serves as a second messenger to activate innate immune responses. Here we show that endogenous cGAMP in mammalian cells contains two distinct phosphodiester linkages, one between 2′-OH of GMP and 5′-phosphate of AMP, and the other between 3′-OH of AMP and 5′-phosphate of GMP. This mo...

  15. Earl Sutherland (1915-1974) [corrected] and the discovery of cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, Stanley A

    2012-01-01

    In 1945, Earl Sutherland (1915-1974) [corrected] and associates began studies of the mechanism of hormone-induced glycogen breakdown in the liver. In 1956, their efforts culminated in the identification of cyclic AMP, an ancient molecule generated in many cell types in response to hormonal and other extracellular signals. Cyclic AMP, the original "second messenger," transmits such signals through pathways that regulate a diversity of cellular functions and capabilities: metabolic processes such as lipolysis and glycogenolysis; hormone secretion; the permeability of ion channels; gene expression; cell proliferation and survival. Indeed, it can be argued that the discovery of cyclic AMP initiated the study of intracellular signaling pathways, a major focus of contemporary biomedical inquiry. This review presents relevant details of Sutherland's career; summarizes key contributions of his mentors, Carl and Gerti Cori, to the knowledge of glycogen metabolism (contributions that were the foundation for his own research); describes the experiments that led to his identification, isolation, and characterization of cyclic AMP; assesses the significance of his work; and considers some aspects of the impact of cyclic nucleotide research on clinical medicine.

  16. The cyclic AMP cascade is altered in the fragile X nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Kelley

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FX, the most common heritable cause of mental retardation and autism, is a developmental disorder characterized by physical, cognitive, and behavioral deficits. FX results from a trinucleotide expansion mutation in the fmr1 gene that reduces levels of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP. Although research efforts have focused on FMRP's impact on mGluR signaling, how the loss of FMRP leads to the individual symptoms of FX is not known. Previous studies on human FX blood cells revealed alterations in the cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cAMP cascade. We tested the hypothesis that cAMP signaling is altered in the FX nervous system using three different model systems. Induced levels of cAMP in platelets and in brains of fmr1 knockout mice are substantially reduced. Cyclic AMP induction is also significantly reduced in human FX neural cells. Furthermore, cAMP production is decreased in the heads of FX Drosophila and this defect can be rescued by reintroduction of the dfmr gene. Our results indicate that a robust defect in cAMP production in FX is conserved across species and suggest that cAMP metabolism may serve as a useful biomarker in the human disease population. Reduced cAMP induction has implications for the underlying causes of FX and autism spectrum disorders. Pharmacological agents known to modulate the cAMP cascade may be therapeutic in FX patients and can be tested in these models, thus supplementing current efforts centered on mGluR signaling.

  17. The effect of in vitro procedures on cyclic AMP accumulation in human leucocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben; Friis, U G; Rasmussen, A K

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of various methodological procedures or protocols on cyclic AMP formation in human leucocytes. The data showed that: (1) ATP content and lactate production was unaffected by hypotonic lysis during leucocyte isolation; (2) there was a linear rela...

  18. Modification of radiation-induced division delay by caffeine analogues and dibutyryl cyclic AMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimler, B.F.; Leeper, D.B.; Snyder, M.H.; Rowley, R.; SChneiderman, M.H.

    1982-01-01

    The mitotic selection procedure for cell cycle analysis was utilized to investigate the concentration-dependent modification of x-radiation-induced division delay in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by methyl xanthines (caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine) and by dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The methyl xanthines (concentrations from 0.5 to 1000 μg/ml) all reduced radiation-induced division delay with the effect being linear between approximately 100 and 1000 μg/ml. After doses of 100-300 rad, delay was reduced by 75, 94 or 83 per cent at 1000 μg/ml for each drug, respectively. However, the addition of dibutyryl cyclic AMP had an opposite effect: radiation-induced delay was increased by the concentration range of 0.3 to 300 μg/ml. These results indicate that in mammalian cells the control of cell cycle progression and the modification of radiation-induced division delay are not simply related to intracellular levels of cyclic AMP. Rather, there appear to be at least two competing mechanisms which are differentially affected by caffeine analogues or by direct addition of dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The direct effect of caffeine and the methyl xanthines on membrane calcium permeability is considered. (author)

  19. Modification of radiation-induced division delay by caffeine analogues and dibutyryl cyclic AMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimler, B.F.; Leeper, D.B.; Snyder, M.H.; Rowley, R.; Schneiderman, M.H. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA). Hospital)

    1982-01-01

    The mitotic selection procedure for cell cycle analysis was utilized to investigate the concentration-dependent modification of x-radiation-induced division delay in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by methyl xanthines (caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine) and by dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The methyl xanthines (concentrations from 0.5 to 1000 ..mu..g/ml) all reduced radiation-induced division delay with the effect being linear between approximately 100 and 1000 ..mu..g/ml. After doses of 100-300 rad, delay was reduced by 75, 94 or 83 per cent at 1000 ..mu..g/ml for each drug, respectively. However, the addition of dibutyryl cyclic AMP had an opposite effect: radiation-induced delay was increased by the concentration range of 0.3 to 300 ..mu..g/ml. These results indicate that in mammalian cells the control of cell cycle progression and the modification of radiation-induced division delay are not simply related to intracellular levels of cyclic AMP. Rather, there appear to be at least two competing mechanisms which are differentially affected by caffeine analogues or by direct addition of dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The direct effect of caffeine and the methyl xanthines on membrane calcium permeability is considered.

  20. Cellular regulation of basal and FSH-stimulated cyclic AMP production in irradiated rat testes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kangasniemi, M.; Kaipia, A.; Toppari, J.; Mali, P.; Huhtaniemi, I.; Parvinen, M.

    1990-01-01

    Basal and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) productions by seminiferous tubular segments from irradiated adult rats were investigated at defined stages of the epithelial cycle when specific spermatogenic cells were low in number. Seven days post-irradiation, depletion of spermatogonia did not influence the basal cAMP production, but FSH response increased in stages II-VIII. Seventeen days post-irradiation when spermatocytes were low in number, there was a small increase in basal cAMP level in stages VII-VIII and FSH-stimulated cAMP production increased in stages VII-XII and XIII-I. At 38 days when pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids (steps 1-6) were low in number, a decreased basal cAMP production was measured in stages II-VI and IX-XII. FSH-stimulated cAMP output increased in stages VII-XII but decreased in stages II-VI. At 52 days when all spermatids were low in number, basal cAMP levels decreased in all stages of the cycle, whereas FSH response was elevated only in stages VII-XII. All spermatogenic cell types seem to have an effect on cAMP production by the seminiferous tubule in a stage-specific fashion. Germ cells appear to regulate Sertoli cell FSH response in a paracrine way, and a part of cAMP may originate from spermatids stimulated by an unknown FSH-dependent Sertoli cell factor. The FSH-dependent functions may control such phenomena as spermatogonial proliferation, final maturation of spermatids, and onset of meiosis

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF P2-PURINOCEPTOR MEDIATED CYCLIC-AMP FORMATION IN MOUSE C2C12 MYOTUBES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HENNING, RH; DUIN, M; DENHERTOG, A; NELEMANS, A

    1 The formation of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) and inositol(1,4,5)trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P3), induced by ATP and other nucleotides was investigated in mouse C2Cl2 myotubes. 2 ATP (100 muM) and ATPgammaS (100 muM) caused a sustained increase in cyclic AMP content of the cells,

  2. Different cAMP sources are critically involved in G protein-coupled receptor CRHR1 signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, Carolina; Dos Santos Claro, Paula A; Bonfiglio, Juan J; Senin, Sergio A; Maccarrone, Giuseppina; Turck, Christoph W; Silberstein, Susana

    2016-07-18

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) activates G protein-dependent and internalization-dependent signaling mechanisms. Here, we report that the cyclic AMP (cAMP) response of CRHR1 in physiologically relevant scenarios engages separate cAMP sources, involving the atypical soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in addition to transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). cAMP produced by tmACs and sAC is required for the acute phase of extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 activation triggered by CRH-stimulated CRHR1, but only sAC activity is essential for the sustained internalization-dependent phase. Thus, different cAMP sources are involved in different signaling mechanisms. Examination of the cAMP response revealed that CRH-activated CRHR1 generates cAMP after endocytosis. Characterizing CRHR1 signaling uncovered a specific link between CRH-activated CRHR1, sAC, and endosome-based signaling. We provide evidence of sAC being involved in an endocytosis-dependent cAMP response, strengthening the emerging model of GPCR signaling in which the cAMP response does not occur exclusively at the plasma membrane and introducing the notion of sAC as an alternative source of cAMP. © 2016 Inda et al.

  3. Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase is Activated by Double-stranded DNA-Induced Oligomerization

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xin; Shu, Chang; Yi, Guanghui; Chaton, Catherine T.; Shelton, Catherine L.; Diao, Jiasheng; Zuo, Xiaobing; Kao, C Cheng; Herr, Andrew B.; Li, Pingwei

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) is a cytosolic DNA sensor mediating innate antimicrobial immunity. It catalyzes the synthesis of a noncanonical cyclic dinucleotide 2′,5′ cGAMP that binds to STING and mediates the activation of TBK1 and IRF-3. Activated IRF-3 translocates to the nucleus and initiates the transcription of the IFN-β gene. The structure of mouse cGAS bound to an 18 bp dsDNA revealed that cGAS interacts with dsDNA through two binding sites, forming a 2:2 complex. Enzyme assays and ...

  4. Nuclease-resistant c-di-AMP derivatives that differentially recognize RNA and protein receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Robert E.; Torgerson, Chad D.; Gaffney, Barbara L.; Jones, Roger A.; Strobel, Scott A.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of bacteria to sense environmental cues and adapt is essential for their survival. The use of second-messenger signaling molecules to translate these cues into a physiological response is a common mechanism employed by bacteria. The second messenger 3’-5’-cyclic diadenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) has been linked to a diverse set of biological processes involved in maintaining cell viability and homeostasis, as well as pathogenicity. A complex network of both protein and RNA receptors inside the cell activate specific pathways and mediate phenotypic outputs in response to c-di-AMP. Structural analysis of these RNA and protein receptors has revealed the different recognition elements employed by these effectors to bind the same small molecule. Herein, using a series of c-di-AMP analogs, we probed the interactions made with a riboswitch and a phosphodiesterase protein to identify the features important for c-di-AMP binding and recognition. We found that the ydaO riboswitch binds c-di-AMP in two discrete sites with near identical affinity and a Hill coefficient of 1.6. The ydaO riboswitch distinguishes between c-di-AMP and structurally related second messengers by discriminating against an amine at the C2 position, more than a carbonyl at the C6 position. We also identified phosphate-modified analogs that bind both the ydaO RNA and GdpP protein with high affinity, while symmetrically-modified ribose analogs exhibited a substantial decrease in ydaO affinity, but retained high affinity for GdpP. These ligand modifications resulted in increased resistance to enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis by the GdpP enzyme. Together, these data suggest that these c-di-AMP analogs could be useful as chemical tools to specifically target subsections of the second-messenger signaling pathways. PMID:26789423

  5. Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase is an Innate Immune Sensor of HIV and Other Retroviruses

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Daxing; Wu, Jiaxi; Wu, You-Tong; Du, Fenghe; Aroh, Chukwuemika; Yan, Nan; Sun, Lijun; Chen, Zhijian J.

    2013-01-01

    Retroviruses, including HIV, can activate innate immune responses, but the host sensors for retroviruses are largely unknown. Here we show that HIV infection activates cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) to produce cGAMP, which binds to and activates the adaptor protein STING to induce type-I interferons and other cytokines. Inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase, but not integrase, abrogated interferon-β induction by the virus, suggesting that the reverse transcribed HIV DNA triggers the...

  6. Regulatory action of catalpol from radix rehmanniae on β-adrenoceptor-cyclic AMP system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qingfeng; Sun Qixiang; Hu Yaer; Xia Zongqin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: It has been proved in previous works from this laboratory that the Yin tonic effect of water extract of Radix Rehmanniae is closely related to its down-regulation effect on β adrenoceptor-cyclic AMP system. The purpose of this work is to investigate whether catalpol from Radix Rehmanniae is the effective active component of this plant drug. Methods: Catalpol was extracted from fresh Radix Rehmanniae by organic solvents and purified by low pressure silica gel column and recrystallization. Experimental mice were divided into 4 groups. Three groups of hyperthyroid mouse models were prepared with subcutaneous injection of T 3 and two of them were additionally fed oral catalpol at low and high dose respectively. One group receiving neither T 3 nor catalpol served as controls. Plasma cAMP levels in these mice were measured with RIA 10 min after subcutaneous injection of a single dose of isoproterenol. Results: After injection of catalpol, the plasma cAMP content rose markedly to above 700 pmol/ml in control mice while that of the hyperthyroid mice rose to a even higher levels. Simultaneous additional oral administration of catalpol with purity >97% for 6 days significantly lowered the cAMP level in hyperthyroid mice. With catalpol dose of 1.56 mg/mouse/d and 6.0 mg/mouse/d, the plasma cAMP levels were 978 ± 283 pmol/ml and 1070 ± 394 pmol/ml respectively, the values in the group without catalpol being 1408 ± 568 pmol/ml and 1491 ± 486 pmol/ml, both P<0.05. Conclusion: Catalpol can repeat the regulatory effect of water extract of Radix Rehmanniae on β adrenoceptor-cyclic AMP system, that is, down regulate the response of hyperthyroid mice to isoproterenol. This result suggests that catalpol is an effective active component of the Yin tonic effect of Radix Rehmanniae. (authors)

  7. Prostaglandin A1 metabolism and inhibition of cyclic AMP extrusion by avian erythrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heasley, L.E.; Brunton, L.L.

    1985-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PG) inhibit active cyclic AMP export from pigeon red cells, PGA1 and PGA2 most potently. To probe the mechanism of this action of PGA1, the authors have studied the interaction of [ 3 H]PGA1 with suspensions of pigeon red cells. The interaction of PGA1 with pigeon red cells is a multistep process of uptake, metabolism, and secretion. [ 3 H] PGA1 rapidly enters red cells and is promptly metabolized to a compound(s) that remains in the aqueous layer after ethylacetate extraction. The glutathione-depleting agent, diamide, inhibits formation of the PGA1 metabolite. The red cells secrete the polar metabolite of PGA1 by a saturable mechanism that lowered temperatures inhibit. Because uptake and metabolism progress with much greater rates than metabolite secretion, red cells transiently concentrate the polar compound intracellularly. Onset and reversal of inhibition of cyclic AMP export by PGA1 coincide with accumulation and secretion of PGA1 metabolite, suggesting that the polar metabolite acts at an intracellular site to inhibit cyclic AMP efflux

  8. Regulation of the sodium/potassium/chloride cotransporter by calcium and cyclic AMP in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, B.L.; Smith, L.; Smith, J.B.

    1987-01-01

    The activity of the Na/K/Cl cotransporter in smooth muscle cells cultured from rat aorta was assayed by measuring the initial rate of furosemide-inhibitable 86 Rb influx or efflux. Five uM furosemide or 0.2 uM bumetanide inhibited influx by 50%. Furosemide-inhibitable 86 Rb influx depended on the presence of all 3 ions in the external medium. The dependence on Na and K was hyperbolic with apparent Km values of 45 and 5 mM, respectively. The dependence on Cl was sigmoidal. Assuming a stoichiometry of 1:1:2 for Na:K:Cl, a Km for Cl of 60 mM was obtained from a Hofstee plot of the data. Rapidly growing cells had 3 fold higher cotransport activity than quiescent cells. Angiotensin II (ANG) stimulated furosemide-inhibitable 86 Rb efflux by 2 fold. An ANG receptor antagonist prevented ANG from increasing cotransport activity. Two calcium ionophores, A23187 and ionomycin, increased cotransport activity by 2 fold. Phorbol myristate acetate had no effect on cotransport activity. Isoproterenol, dibutyryl cyclic AMP, cholera toxin, or methylisobutylxanthine inhibited furosemide-sensitive 86 Rb influx by 35 to 50%. From these findings they conclude that increasing cytoplasmic free calcium stimulates cotransport activity, whereas increasing cellular cyclic AMP inhibits the cotransporter

  9. Proliferation kinetics and cyclic AMP as prognostic factors in adult acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paietta, E; Mittermayer, K; Schwarzmeier, J

    1980-07-01

    In 41 adult patients with acute leukemia (myeloblastic, lymphoblastic, and undifferentiated), proliferation kinetics (as determined by double-label autoradiography) and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) concentration were studied for their significance in the prediction of responsiveness to cytostatic therapy. Patients with good clinical response had significantly shorter turnover times and higher labeling indices in the bone marrow than did those who failed to respond to treatment. Cases for which cell kinetics did not correlate with clinical response were explained by variance in the distribution of leukemic blasts between the proliferative cell cycle and the resting pool. Good clinical response was also found to be associated with low levels of cAMP in leukemic cells prior to therapy, whereas high cAMP contents predicted failure. Low cAMP concentrations, however, did not necessarily correlate with short turnover times and vice versa. This might be due to fluctuations of the cAMP concentrations during the cell cycle.

  10. CRP-Cyclic AMP Regulates the Expression of Type 3 Fimbriae via Cyclic di-GMP in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Ting Lin

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae is the predominant pathogen isolated from liver abscesses of diabetic patients in Asian countries. However, the effects of elevated blood glucose levels on the virulence of this pathogen remain largely unknown. Type 3 fimbriae, encoded by the mrkABCDF genes, are important virulence factors in K. pneumoniae pathogenesis. In this study, the effects of exogenous glucose and the intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP signaling pathway on type 3 fimbriae expression regulation were investigated. The production of MrkA, the major subunit of type 3 fimbriae, was increased in glucose-rich medium, whereas cAMP supplementation reversed the effect. MrkA production was markedly increased by cyaA or crp deletion, but slightly decreased by cpdA deletion. In addition, the mRNA levels of mrkABCDF genes and the activity of PmrkA were increased in Δcrp strain, as well as the mRNA levels of mrkHIJ genes that encode cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP-related regulatory proteins that influence type 3 fimbriae expression. Moreover, the activities of PmrkHI and PmrkJ were decreased in ΔlacZΔcrp strain. These results indicate that CRP-cAMP down-regulates mrkABCDF and mrkHIJ at the transcriptional level. Further deletion of mrkH or mrkI in Δcrp strain diminished the production of MrkA, indicating that MrkH and MrkI are required for the CRP regulation of type 3 fimbriae expression. Furthermore, the high activity of PmrkHI in the ΔlacZΔcrp strain was diminished in ΔlacZΔcrpΔmrkHI, but increased in the ΔlacZΔcrpΔmrkJ strain. Deletion of crp increased the intracellular c-di-GMP concentration and reduced the phosphodiesterase activity. Moreover, we found that the mRNA levels of multiple genes related to c-di-GMP metabolism were altered in Δcrp strain. These indicate that CRP regulates type 3 fimbriae expression indirectly via the c-di-GMP signaling pathway. In conclusion, we found evidence of a coordinated regulation of type 3 fimbriae expression by the CRP-cAMP

  11. Corticosteroid receptors adopt distinct cyclical transcriptional signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Billan, Florian; Amazit, Larbi; Bleakley, Kevin; Xue, Qiong-Yao; Pussard, Eric; Lhadj, Christophe; Kolkhof, Peter; Viengchareun, Say; Fagart, Jérôme; Lombès, Marc

    2018-05-07

    Mineralocorticoid receptors (MRs) and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) are two closely related hormone-activated transcription factors that regulate major pathophysiologic functions. High homology between these receptors accounts for the crossbinding of their corresponding ligands, MR being activated by both aldosterone and cortisol and GR essentially activated by cortisol. Their coexpression and ability to bind similar DNA motifs highlight the need to investigate their respective contributions to overall corticosteroid signaling. Here, we decipher the transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that underlie selective effects of MRs and GRs on shared genomic targets in a human renal cellular model. Kinetic, serial, and sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation approaches were performed on the period circadian protein 1 ( PER1) target gene, providing evidence that both receptors dynamically and cyclically interact at the same target promoter in a specific and distinct transcriptional signature. During this process, both receptors regulate PER1 gene by binding as homo- or heterodimers to the same promoter region. Our results suggest a novel level of MR-GR target gene regulation, which should be considered for a better and integrated understanding of corticosteroid-related pathophysiology.-Le Billan, F., Amazit, L., Bleakley, K., Xue, Q.-Y., Pussard, E., Lhadj, C., Kolkhof, P., Viengchareun, S., Fagart, J., Lombès, M. Corticosteroid receptors adopt distinct cyclical transcriptional signatures.

  12. Cyclic-AMP mediated regulation of ABCB mRNA expression in mussel haemocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Franzellitti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The multixenobiotic resistance system (MXR allows aquatic organisms to cope with their habitat despite high pollution levels by over-expressing membrane and intracellular transporters, including the P-glycoprotein (Pgp. In mammals transcription of the ABCB1 gene encoding Pgp is under cAMP/PKA-mediated regulation; whether this is true in mollusks is not fully clarified. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: cAMP/PKA regulation and ABCB mRNA expression were assessed in haemocytes from Mediterranean mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed in vivo for 1 week to 0.3 ng/L fluoxetine (FX alone or in combination with 0.3 ng/L propranolol (PROP. FX significantly decreased cAMP levels and PKA activity, and induced ABCB mRNA down-regulation. FX effects were abolished in the presence of PROP. In vitro experiments using haemocytes treated with physiological agonists (noradrenaline and serotonin and pharmacological modulators (PROP, forskolin, dbcAMP, and H89 of the cAMP/PKA system were performed to obtain clear evidence about the involvement of the signaling pathway in the transcriptional regulation of ABCB. Serotonin (5-HT decreased cAMP levels, PKA activity and ABCB mRNA expression but increased the mRNA levels for a putative 5-HT1 receptor. Interestingly, 5-HT1 was also over-expressed after in vivo exposures to FX. 5-HT effects were counteracted by PROP. Forskolin and dbcAMP increased PKA activity as well as ABCB mRNA expression; the latter effect was abolished in the presence of the PKA inhibitor H89. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides the first direct evidence for the cAMP/PKA-mediated regulation of ABCB transcription in mussels.

  13. Lack of effect of the alpha2C-adrenoceptor Del322-325 polymorphism on inhibition of cyclic AMP production in HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, M D; Bylund, D B

    2010-02-01

    The alpha(2C)-adrenoceptor has multiple functions, including inhibiting release of noradrenaline from presynaptic nerve terminals. A human alpha(2C) polymorphism, Del322-325, a potential risk factor for heart failure, has been reported to exhibit reduced signalling in CHO cells. To further understand the role of the Del322-325 polymorphism on receptor signalling, we attempted to replicate and further study the reduced signalling in HEK293 cells. Human alpha(2C) wild-type (WT) and Del322-325 adrenoceptors were stably transfected into HEK293 cells. Radioligand binding was performed to determine affinities for both receptors. In intact cells, inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production by WT and Del322-325 clones with a range of receptor densities (200-2320 fmol.mg(-1) protein) was measured following agonist treatment. Noradrenaline, brimonidine and clonidine exhibited similar binding affinities for WT and Del322-325. Brimonidine and clonidine also had similar efficacies and potencies for both receptors for the inhibition of cyclic AMP production at all receptor densities tested. A linear regression analysis comparing efficacy and potency with receptor expression levels showed no differences in slopes between WT and Del322-325. The alpha(2C) WT and Del322-325 adrenoceptors exhibited similar binding properties. Additionally, inhibition of cyclic AMP production by Del322-325 was similar to that of WT over a range of receptor densities. Therefore, in intact HEK293 cells, the alpha(2C)-Del322-325 polymorphism does not exhibit reduced signalling to adenylyl cyclase and may not represent a clinically important phenotype.

  14. Localized cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity is required for myogenic cell fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukai, Atsushi; Hashimoto, Naohiro

    2008-01-01

    Multinucleated myotubes are formed by fusion of mononucleated myogenic progenitor cells (myoblasts) during terminal skeletal muscle differentiation. In addition, myoblasts fuse with myotubes, but terminally differentiated myotubes have not been shown to fuse with each other. We show here that an adenylate cyclase activator, forskolin, and other reagents that elevate intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels induced cell fusion between small bipolar myotubes in vitro. Then an extra-large myotube, designated a 'myosheet,' was produced by both primary and established mouse myogenic cells. Myotube-to-myotube fusion always occurred between the leading edge of lamellipodia at the polar end of one myotube and the lateral plasma membrane of the other. Forskolin enhanced the formation of lamellipodia where cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) was accumulated. Blocking enzymatic activity or anchoring of PKA suppressed forskolin-enhanced lamellipodium formation and prevented fusion of multinucleated myotubes. Localized PKA activity was also required for fusion of mononucleated myoblasts. The present results suggest that localized PKA plays a pivotal role in the early steps of myogenic cell fusion, such as cell-to-cell contact/recognition through lamellipodium formation. Furthermore, the localized cAMP-PKA pathway might be involved in the specification of the fusion-competent areas of the plasma membrane in lamellipodia of myogenic cells

  15. Cyclic AMP Inhibits the Activity and Promotes the Acetylation of Acetyl-CoA Synthetase through Competitive Binding to the ATP/AMP Pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaobiao; Shen, Liqiang; Wang, Qijun; Cen, Xufeng; Wang, Jin; Wu, Meng; Li, Peng; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Guoping

    2017-01-27

    The high-affinity biosynthetic pathway for converting acetate to acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) is catalyzed by the central metabolic enzyme acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase (Acs), which is finely regulated both at the transcriptional level via cyclic AMP (cAMP)-driven trans-activation and at the post-translational level via acetylation inhibition. In this study, we discovered that cAMP directly binds to Salmonella enterica Acs (SeAcs) and inhibits its activity in a substrate-competitive manner. In addition, cAMP binding increases SeAcs acetylation by simultaneously promoting Pat-dependent acetylation and inhibiting CobB-dependent deacetylation, resulting in enhanced SeAcs inhibition. A crystal structure study and site-directed mutagenesis analyses confirmed that cAMP binds to the ATP/AMP pocket of SeAcs, and restrains SeAcs in an open conformation. The cAMP contact residues are well conserved from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, suggesting a general regulatory mechanism of cAMP on Acs. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Electrophysiological and biochemical studies of slow responses to serotonin and dopamine of snail identified neurons. Mediating role of the cyclic AMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deterre, Philippe

    1983-01-01

    In this research thesis, the electrophysiological study of slow incoming currents induced in some identified neurons of the Helix aspersa snail by serotonin and dopamine shows that they are associated with a decrease of a potassium conductance involved in the modulation of the action potential duration. By means of enzymatic tests performed on a single cell, and of electrophysiological experiments, the author shows that the cyclic AMP is an intracellular mediator involved in the genesis of these slow responses. Moreover, the obtained results show that serotonin and dopamine act by binding to specific receptors, and that these receptors activate the adenylate-cyclase through a GTP binding protein [fr

  17. Region-selective effects of long-term lithium and carbamazepine administration on cyclic AMP levels in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiborg, Ove; Krueger, Tanja; Jakosen, Soeren N.

    1999-01-01

    The effect of lithium and carbamazepine in the treatment of bipolar affective disorder is well established. Althougt a number of biochemical effects have been found, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying their therapeutic actions have not been elucidated nor are the target regions in the brain identified. Taken into account the important role of the cyclic AMP second messenger system in the regulation of neuronal exitability and the indications of its involvement in the pathophysiology of bipolar affective disorder, we have focused on the drug effects on cyclic AMP levels. The objectives of this investigation were to measure the effects on basal cyclic AMP levels, and to locate target regions within the rat brain after long-term administration of lithium and carbamazepine. Drug treatments were carried out for a period of 28 days. After either drug treatment the cyclic AMP level was increased 3-4 times in frontal cortex but unchanged in hippocampus, hypothalamus, thalamus, amygdala and in cerebellum. In neostratum the cyclic AMP level was decreased to about 30% after treatment with lithium. We suggest the common region-selective effect, observed for both drugs in frontal cortex, to be essential for the therapeutic actions of lithium and carbamazepine. (au)

  18. Region-selective effects of long-term lithium and carbamazepine administration on cyclic AMP levels in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiborg, Ove; Krueger, Tanja; Jakosen, Soeren N. [Psychiatric Hospital, Dept. of Biological Psychiatry, Risskov (Denmark)

    1999-02-01

    The effect of lithium and carbamazepine in the treatment of bipolar affective disorder is well established. Althougt a number of biochemical effects have been found, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying their therapeutic actions have not been elucidated nor are the target regions in the brain identified. Taken into account the important role of the cyclic AMP second messenger system in the regulation of neuronal exitability and the indications of its involvement in the pathophysiology of bipolar affective disorder, we have focused on the drug effects on cyclic AMP levels. The objectives of this investigation were to measure the effects on basal cyclic AMP levels, and to locate target regions within the rat brain after long-term administration of lithium and carbamazepine. Drug treatments were carried out for a period of 28 days. After either drug treatment the cyclic AMP level was increased 3-4 times in frontal cortex but unchanged in hippocampus, hypothalamus, thalamus, amygdala and in cerebellum. In neostratum the cyclic AMP level was decreased to about 30% after treatment with lithium. We suggest the common region-selective effect, observed for both drugs in frontal cortex, to be essential for the therapeutic actions of lithium and carbamazepine. (au) 46 refs.

  19. An odor-specific threshold deficit implicates abnormal intracellular cyclic AMP signaling in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turetsky, Bruce I; Moberg, Paul J

    2009-02-01

    Although olfactory deficits are common in schizophrenia, their underlying pathophysiology remains unknown. Recent evidence has suggested that cAMP signaling may be disrupted in schizophrenia. Since cAMP mediates signal transduction in olfactory receptor neurons, this could contribute to the etiology of observed olfactory deficits. This study was designed to test this hypothesis by determining odor detection threshold sensitivities to two odorants that differ in their relative activations of this intracellular cAMP signaling cascade. Thirty schizophrenia patients, 25 healthy comparison subjects, and 19 unaffected first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients were studied. Odor detection threshold sensitivities were measured for the two odorants citralva and lyral. Although both have fruity/floral scents, citralva strongly activates adenylyl cyclase to increase cAMP levels, while lyral is a very weak activator of adenylyl cyclase. There was a significant group-by-odor interaction. Both schizophrenia patients and unaffected first-degree relatives were impaired in their ability to detect lyral versus citralva. Comparison subjects were equally sensitive to both odorants. This selective deficit could not be explained by differences in age, sex, smoking, clinical symptom profile, or medication use. This study establishes the presence of an odor-specific hyposmia that may denote a disruption of cAMP-mediated signal transduction in schizophrenia. The presence of a parallel deficit in the patients' unaffected first-degree relatives suggests that this deficit is genetically mediated. Although additional physiological studies are needed to confirm the underlying mechanism, these results offer strong inferential support for the hypothesis that cAMP signaling is dysregulated in schizophrenia.

  20. A simple electrostatic switch important in the activation of type I protein kinase A by cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Dominico; Lin, Jung-Hsin; Sotriffer, Christoph A; Pennypacker, Juniper K; McCammon, J Andrew; Taylor, Susan S

    2006-01-01

    Cyclic AMP activates protein kinase A by binding to an inhibitory regulatory (R) subunit and releasing inhibition of the catalytic (C) subunit. Even though crystal structures of regulatory and catalytic subunits have been solved, the precise molecular mechanism by which cyclic AMP activates the kinase remains unknown. The dynamic properties of the cAMP binding domain in the absence of cAMP or C-subunit are also unknown. Here we report molecular-dynamics simulations and mutational studies of the RIalpha R-subunit that identify the C-helix as a highly dynamic switch which relays cAMP binding to the helical C-subunit binding regions. Furthermore, we identify an important salt bridge which links cAMP binding directly to the C-helix that is necessary for normal activation. Additional mutations show that a hydrophobic "hinge" region is not as critical for the cross-talk in PKA as it is in the homologous EPAC protein, illustrating how cAMP can control diverse functions using the evolutionarily conserved cAMP-binding domains.

  1. Salivary gland ultrastructure and cyclic AMP-dependent reactions in Spacelab 3 rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mednieks, M.I.; Hand, A.R.

    1987-01-01

    Environmental stimuli influencing catecholamine levels induce changes in cyclic AMP-dependent reactions and cell morphology in the rat parotid. Responses of salivary glands to spaceflight were determined by measurement of cyclic AMP-mediated reactions in fresh-frozen salivary glands and by microscopic evaluation of ultrastructure in fixed parotid glands. Decreased cell-free protein phosphorylation, determined by autoradiography, occurred in parotid glands in three of five flight animals. Protein kinase activity ratios were decreased in the soluble and increased in the particulate fractions of Spacelab 3 (SL-3) rat sublingual glands, compared with ground controls. Biochemical analyses show that effects of space flight on salivary glands are similar to those induced experimentally by physiological manipulation or alteration of catecholamine levels. Morphological evaluation of three SL-3 rat parotid glands showed increased numbers of lysosomes, autophagic vacuoles containing degenerating secretory product, and accumulation of lipid droplets. Since these animals lost weight, consistent with disruption of food and water consumption, morphological changes may in part be due to decreased masticatory stimulation, as occurs with reduced food intake or a liquid diet. The observed changes may reflect physiological responses of the gastrointestinal and autonomic systems to effects of spaceflight

  2. Cyclic GMP-AMP Containing Mixed Phosphodiester Linkages Is An Endogenous High Affinity Ligand for STING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Shi, Heping; Wu, Jiaxi; Zhang, Xuewu; Sun, Lijun; Chen, Chuo; Chen, Zhijian J.

    2013-01-01

    The presence of microbial or self DNA in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells is a danger signal detected by the DNA sensor cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS), which catalyzes the production of cGAMP that in turn serves as a second messenger to activate innate immune responses. Here we show that endogenous cGAMP in mammalian cells contains two distinct phosphodiester linkages, one between 2′-OH of GMP and 5′-phosphate of AMP, and the other between 3′-OH of AMP and 5′-phosphate of GMP. This molecule, termed 2′3′-cGAMP, is unique in that it binds to the adaptor protein STING with a much greater affinity than cGAMP molecules containing other combinations of phosphodiester linkages. The crystal structure of STING bound to 2′3′-cGAMP revealed the structural basis of this high-affinity binding and a ligand-induced conformational change in STING that may underlie its activation. PMID:23747010

  3. The enzymatic preparation of [α-32P]nucleoside triphosphates, cyclic [32P]AMP, and cyclic [32P]GMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walseth, T.F.; Johnson, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    A method has been developed for the enzymatic preparation of α- 32 P-labelled ribo- and deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, cyclic [ 32 P]AMP, and cyclic [ 32 P]GMP of high specific radioactivity and in high yield from 32 Psub(i). The method also enables the preparation of [γ- 32 P]ATP, [γ- 32 P]GTP, [γ- 32 P]ITP, and [γ- 32 P]-dATP of very high specific activity and in high yield. (Auth.)

  4. Cyclic AMP-specific phosphodiesterase-4 as a target for the development of antidepressant drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han-Ting

    2009-01-01

    Phosphodiesterase-4 (PDE4), one of eleven PDE enzyme families, specifically catalyzes hydrolysis of cyclic AMP (cAMP); it has four subtypes (PDE4A-D) with at least 25 splice variants. PDE4 plays a critical role in the control of intracellular cAMP concentrations. PDE4 inhibitors produce antidepressant actions in both animals and humans via enhancement of cAMP signaling in the brain. However, their clinical utility has been hampered by side effects, in particular nausea and emesis. While there is still a long way to go before PDE4 inhibitors with high therapeutic indices are available for treatment of depressive disorders, important advances have been made in the development of PDE4 inhibitors as antidepressants. First, limited, but significant studies point to PDE4D as the major PDE4 subtype responsible for antidepressant-like effects of PDE4 inhibitors, although the role of PDE4A cannot be excluded. Second, PDE4D may contribute to emesis, the major side effect of PDE4 inhibitors. For this reason, identification of roles of PDE4D splice variants in mediating antidepressant activity is particularly important. Recent studies using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have demonstrated the feasibility to identify cellular functions of individual PDE4 variants. Third, mixed inhibitors of PDE4 and PDE7 or PDE4 and serotonin reuptake have been developed and may be potential antidepressants with minimized side effects. Finally, relatively selective inhibitors of one or two PDE4 subtypes have been synthesized using structure- and scaffold-based design. This review also discusses the relationship between PDE4 and antidepressant activity based on structures, brain distributions, and pharmacological properties of PDE4 and its isoforms.

  5. Induction of dopamine biosynthesis by l-DOPA in PC12 cells: implications of L-DOPA influx and cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Chun Mei; Yang, Yoo Jung; Huang, Hai Shan; Lim, Sung Cil; Kai, Masaaki; Lee, Myung Koo

    2008-09-04

    The effects of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) on dopamine biosynthesis and cytotoxicity were investigated in PC12 cells. l-DOPA treatment (20-200 microM) increased the levels of dopamine by 226%-504% after 3-6 h of treatment and enhanced the activities of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC). l-DOPA (20-200 muM) treatment led to a 562%-937% increase in l-DOPA influx at 1 h, which inhibited the activity of TH, but not AADC, during the same period. The extracellular releases of dopamine were also increased by 231%-570% after treatment with 20 and 200 microM l-DOPA for 0.5-3 h. l-DOPA at a concentration of 100-200 microM, but not 20 microM, exerted apoptotic cytotoxicity towards PC12 cells for 24-48 h. l-DOPA (20-200 microM) increased the intracellular cyclic AMP levels by 318%-557% after 0.5-1 h in a concentration-dependent manner. However, the elevated cyclic AMP levels by l-DOPA could not protect against l-DOPA (100-200 microM)-induced cytotoxicity after 24-48 h. In addition, l-DOPA (20-200 microM)-induced increases in cyclic AMP and dopamine were significantly reduced by treatment with SCH23390 (dopamine D(1) receptor antagonist). The increased levels of dopamine by l-DOPA were also reduced by H89 (protein kinase A, PKA, inhibitor) and GF109203X (protein kinase C inhibitor); however, the reduction by GF109203X was not significant. l-DOPA at 20-200 microM stimulated the phosphorylation of PKA and cyclic AMP-response element binding protein and induced the biosynthesis of the TH protein. These results indicate that 20-200 microM l-DOPA induces dopamine biosynthesis by two pathways. One pathway involves l-DOPA directly entering the cells to convert dopamine through AADC activity (l-DOPA decarboxylation). The other pathway involves l-DOPA and/or released dopamine activating TH to enhance dopamine biosynthesis by the dopamine D(1) receptor-cyclic AMP-PKA signaling system (dopamine biosynthesis by TH).

  6. Effects of exogenous cyclic AMP on growth characteristics and radiation response of Reuber H35 hepatoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Rijn, J.; van Den Berg, J.; van Meeteren, A.; van Wijk, R.

    1983-01-01

    Reuber H35 rat hepatoma cells, clone KRC, were used to study the effect of cyclic AMP on radiation-induced cell death. Treatment of logarithmically growing cultures with 0.5 mM cAMP for 17 hr prior to irradiation resulted in a decreased cell survival. Similar results were obtained with cultures irradiated after treatment with Bt 2 cAMP. Treatment of H35 cells with cAMP or Bt 2 cAMP caused inhibition of their proliferation and resulted in an accumulation of cells in early S phase and depletion of G2-phase cells. In synchronized cultures cells were relatively radioresistant during their S phase. In addition to single-dose treatment with X rays, the effect of Bt 2 cAMP on radiation-induced cell death was studied during fractionated irradiation wtih 2.5 Gy per day. This fractionated irradiation resulted in a dose-reduction factor of 1.6 at the 10% survival level and a 10-fold decrease in the surviving cell population due to the cooperative effects of Bt 2 cAMP on growth rate and radiation survival. The effect of cAMP on radiation-induced mitotic delay was also studied. It appeared that where cAMP had on effect on the progression of G2 cells into mitosis, it prevented cells from recovery from the X-ray mitotic delay in G2

  7. Regulation of cyclic AMP metabolism by prostaglandins in rabbit cortical collecting tubule cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonnenburg, W.K.

    1987-01-01

    In the rabbit cortical collecting tubule (RCCT), prostaglandin E 1 (PGE 1 ) and prostaglandin E 2 (PGE 2 ) at 1 nM inhibit arginine-vasopressin (AVP)-induced water reabsorption, while 100 nM PGE 1 and PGE 2 alone stimulate water reabsorption. Reported here are studies designed to investigate the molecular basis for the biphasic physiological action of PGE 1 and PGE 2 in the collecting duct. In freshly isolated RCCT cells, PGE 1 , PGE 2 , and 16,16-dimethyl-PGE 2 (DM-PGE 2 ) stimulated cAMP synthesis at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 10 M. Other prostaglandins including the synthetic PGE 2 analogue, sulprostone, failed to stimulate cAMP synthesis. Moreover, sulprostone did not antagonize PGE 2 -stimulated cAMP formation. In contrast, PGE 2 and sulprostone at concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 nM, inhibited AVP-induced cAMP accumulation in freshly isolated RCCT cells. PGE 2 , PGE 1 , DM-PGE 2 and sulprostone at 100 nM were equally effective in inhibiting AVP-induced cAMP formation. Moreover sulprostone inhibited AVP-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity. These results suggest that PGE derivatives mediate either inhibition or activation of adenylate cyclase by stimulating different PGE receptors. To further test this concept, PGE 2 binding to freshly isolated RCCT cell membranes was characterized. Two different classes of PGE 2 binding were detected. / 3 H/PGE 2 binding to the high affinity class of sites was increased by the GTP-analogue, GTP S, while pertussis toxin pretreatment blocked the stimulatory action. In contrast, / 3 H/ PGE 2 binding to the low affinity class of sites was decreased by GTP S; this inhibitory effect was not blocked by pertussis toxin pretreatment

  8. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Mechanism of DncV, Bacterial Homolog of Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Kazuki; Ishii, Ryohei; Hirano, Seiichi; Ishitani, Ryuichiro; Nureki, Osamu

    2015-05-05

    Cyclic dinucleotides (CDNs) play key roles as second messengers and signaling molecules in bacteria and metazoans. The newly identified dinucleotide cyclase in Vibrio cholerae (DncV) produces three different CDNs containing two 3'-5' phosphodiester bonds, and its predominant product is cyclic GMP-AMP, whereas mammalian cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) produces only cyclic GMP-AMP containing mixed 2'-5' phosphodiester bonds. We report the crystal structures of V. cholerae and Escherichia coli DncV in complex with various nucleotides in the pre-reaction states. The high-resolution structures revealed that DncV preferably recognizes ATP and GTP as acceptor and donor nucleotides, respectively, in the first nucleotidyl transfer reaction. Considering the recently reported intermediate structures, our pre-reaction state structures provide the precise mechanism of 3'-5' linked cyclic AMP-GMP production in bacteria. A comparison with cGAS in the pre-reaction states suggests that the orientation of the acceptor nucleotide primarily determines the distinct linkage specificities between DncV and cGAS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. 2′,3′-cAMP, 3′-AMP, and 2′-AMP inhibit human aortic and coronary vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation via A2B receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jin; Gillespie, Delbert G.

    2011-01-01

    Rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from renal microvessels metabolize 2′,3′-cAMP to 2′-AMP and 3′-AMP, and these AMPs are converted to adenosine that inhibits microvascular VSMC proliferation via A2B receptors. The goal of this study was to test whether this mechanism also exists in VSMCs from conduit arteries and whether it is similarly expressed in human vs. rat VSMCs. Incubation of rat and human aortic VSMCs with 2′,3′-cAMP concentration-dependently increased levels of 2′-AMP and 3′-AMP in the medium, with a similar absolute increase in 2′-AMP vs. 3′-AMP. In contrast, in human coronary VSMCs, 2′,3′-cAMP increased 2′-AMP levels yet had little effect on 3′-AMP levels. In all cell types, 2′,3′-cAMP increased levels of adenosine, but not 5′-AMP, and 2′,3′-AMP inhibited cell proliferation. Antagonism of A2B receptors (MRS-1754), but not A1 (1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine), A2A (SCH-58261), or A3 (VUF-5574) receptors, attenuated the antiproliferative effects of 2′,3′-cAMP. In all cell types, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, and 5′-AMP increased adenosine levels, and inhibition of ecto-5′-nucleotidase blocked this effect of 5′-AMP but not that of 2′-AMP nor 3′-AMP. Also, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, and 5′-AMP, like 2′,3′-cAMP, exerted antiproliferative effects that were abolished by antagonism of A2B receptors with MRS-1754. In conclusion, VSMCs from conduit arteries metabolize 2′,3′-cAMP to AMPs, which are metabolized to adenosine. In rat and human aortic VSMCs, both 2′-AMP and 3′-AMP are involved in this process, whereas, in human coronary VSMCs, 2′,3′-cAMP is mainly converted to 2′-AMP. Because adenosine inhibits VSMC proliferation via A2B receptors, local vascular production of 2′,3′-cAMP may protect conduit arteries from atherosclerosis. PMID:21622827

  10. Early effects of synthetic bovine parathyroid hormone and synthetic salmon calcitonin on urinary excretion of cyclic AMP, phosphate and calcium in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caniggia, A; Gennari, C; Vattimo, A; Nardi, P; Nuti, R; Galli, M

    1976-04-20

    Bovine synthetic parathyroid hormone infused intravenously in man increased both the urinary excretion of cyclic AMP and the urinary excretion of phosphate whereas a Salmon synthetic calcitonin infusion increased the urinary excretion of phosphate without change in urinary excretion of cyclic AMP. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that different renal mechanisms are involved in the response to each hormone.

  11. An AP-2 element acts synergistically with the cyclic AMP- and Phorbol ester-inducible enhancer of the human proenkephalin gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyman, S.E.; Comb, M.; Pearlberg, J.; Goodman, H.M.

    1989-01-01

    An enhancer with two DNA elements, one containing the sequence CGTCA, is required for cyclic AMP-and phorbol ester-inducible transcription of the human proenkephalin gene. The authors report that an AP-2 element located adjacent to the enhancer acts synergistically with it to confer maximal response to cyclic AMP and phorbol esters.

  12. Timing is critical for effective glucocorticoid receptor mediated repression of the cAMP-induced CRH gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siem van der Laan

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid negative feedback of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis is mediated in part by direct repression of gene transcription in glucocorticoid receptor (GR expressing cells. We have investigated the cross talk between the two main signaling pathways involved in activation and repression of corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH mRNA expression: cyclic AMP (cAMP and GR. We report that in the At-T20 cell-line the glucocorticoid-mediated repression of the cAMP-induced human CRH proximal promoter activity depends on the relative timing of activation of both signaling pathways. Activation of the GR prior to or in conjunction with cAMP signaling results in an effective repression of the cAMP-induced transcription of the CRH gene. In contrast, activation of the GR 10 minutes after onset of cAMP treatment, results in a significant loss of GR-mediated repression. In addition, translocation of ligand-activated GR to the nucleus was found as early as 10 minutes after glucocorticoid treatment. Interestingly, while both signaling cascades counteract each other on the CRH proximal promoter, they synergize on a synthetic promoter containing 'positive' response elements. Since the order of activation of both signaling pathways may vary considerably in vivo, we conclude that a critical time-window exists for effective repression of the CRH gene by glucocorticoids.

  13. Dibutyryl cyclic AMP induces differentiation of human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells into a noradrenergic phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kume, Toshiaki; Kawato, Yuka; Osakada, Fumitaka; Izumi, Yasuhiko; Katsuki, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Takayuki; Kaneko, Shuji; Niidome, Tetsuhiro; Takada-Takatori, Yuki; Akaike, Akinori

    2008-10-10

    Dibutyryl cyclic AMP (dbcAMP) and retinoic acid (RA) have been demonstrated to be the inducers of morphological differentiation in SH-SY5Y cells, a human catecholaminergic neuroblastoma cell line. However, it remains unclear whether morphologically differentiated SH-SY5Y cells by these compounds acquire catecholaminergic properties. We focused on the alteration of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression and intracellular content of noradrenaline (NA) as the indicators of functional differentiation. Three days treatment with dbcAMP (1mM) and RA (10microM) induced morphological changes and an increase of TH-positive cells using immunocytochemical analysis in SH-SY5Y cells. The percentage of TH-expressing cells in dbcAMP (1mM) treatment was larger than that in RA (10microM) treatment. In addition, dbcAMP increased intracellular NA content, whereas RA did not. The dbcAMP-induced increase in TH-expressing cells is partially inhibited by KT5720, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. We also investigated the effect of butyrate on SH-SY5Y cells, because dbcAMP is enzymatically degraded by intracellular esterase, thereby resulting in the formation of butyrate. Butyrate induced the increase of NA content at lower concentrations than dbcAMP, although the increase in TH-expressing cells by butyrate was smaller than that by dbcAMP. The dbcAMP (1mM)- and butyrate (0.3mM)-induced increase in NA content was completely suppressed by alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (1mM), an inhibitor of TH. These results suggest that dbcAMP induces differentiation into the noradrenergic phenotype through both PKA activation and butyrate.

  14. Essential role for cyclic-AMP responsive element binding protein 1 (CREB) in the survival of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sligte, Naomi E.; Kampen, Kim R.; ter Elst, Arja; Scherpen, Frank J. G.; Meeuwsen-de Boer, Tiny G. J.; Guryev, Victor; van Leeuwen, Frank N.; Kornblau, Steven M.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) relapse remains a leading cause of cancer related death in children, therefore, new therapeutic options are needed. Recently, we showed that a peptide derived from Cyclic-AMP Responsive Element Binding Protein (CREB) was highly phosphorylated in pediatric

  15. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase is activated by double-stranded DNA-induced oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Shu, Chang; Yi, Guanghui; Chaton, Catherine T; Shelton, Catherine L; Diao, Jiasheng; Zuo, Xiaobing; Kao, C Cheng; Herr, Andrew B; Li, Pingwei

    2013-12-12

    Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) is a cytosolic DNA sensor mediating innate antimicrobial immunity. It catalyzes the synthesis of a noncanonical cyclic dinucleotide, 2',5' cGAMP, that binds to STING and mediates the activation of TBK1 and IRF-3. Activated IRF-3 translocates to the nucleus and initiates the transcription of the IFN-β gene. The structure of mouse cGAS bound to an 18 bp dsDNA revealed that cGAS interacts with dsDNA through two binding sites, forming a 2:2 complex. Enzyme assays and IFN-β reporter assays of cGAS mutants demonstrated that interactions at both DNA binding sites are essential for cGAS activation. Mutagenesis and DNA binding studies showed that the two sites bind dsDNA cooperatively and that site B plays a critical role in DNA binding. The structure of mouse cGAS bound to dsDNA and 2',5' cGAMP provided insight into the catalytic mechanism of cGAS. These results demonstrated that cGAS is activated by dsDNA-induced oligomerization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Competitive cAMP Antagonists for cAMP-Receptor Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Driel, Roel van; Jastorff, Bernd; Baraniak, Janina; Stec, Wojciech J.; Wit, René J.W. de

    1984-01-01

    The two exocyclic oxygen atoms at phosphorus of cAMP have been replaced by a sulfur atom or by a dimethylamino group. These substitutions introduce chirality at the phosphorus atom; therefore, two diastereoisomers are known for each derivative: (SP)-cAMPS, (RP)-cAMPS, (SP)-cAMPN(CH3)2, and

  17. [Effects of cytosolic bacteria on cyclic GMP-AMP synthase expression in human gingival tissues and periodontal ligament cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaojun, Yang; Yongmei, Tan; Zhihui, Tian; Ting, Zhou; Wanghong, Zhao; Jin, Hou

    2017-04-01

    This work aims to determine the effect of cytosolic bacteria on the expression of cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) in human periodontal ligament cells (hPDLCs) and gingival tissues. The ability of Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) to invade hPDLCs was detected using laser scanning confocal microscope assay at a multiplicity of infection of 10. P. gingivalis-infected cells were sorted by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). Then, quantitative real time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and Western blot were used to detect cGAS expression in infected cells. Finally, the location and expression of cGAS in inflammatory and normal gingival tissues were investigated by immunohistochemistry. P. gingivalis actively invaded hPDLCs. Moreover, cGAS expression significantly increased in P. gingivalis-infected cells. Although cGAS was expressed in the epithelial and subepithelial cells of both inflamed and normal gingival tissues, cGAS expression significantly increased in inflamed gingival tissues. Cytosolic bacteria can upregulate cGAS expression in infected cells. These data suggest that cGAS may act as pattern-recognition receptors and participate in recognizing cytosolic nucleic acid pathogen-associated molecular patterns.
.

  18. Activation of PKA and Epac proteins by cyclic AMP depletes intracellular calcium stores and reduces calcium availability for vasoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuíñas, Andrea; García-Morales, Verónica; Viña, Dolores; Gil-Longo, José; Campos-Toimil, Manuel

    2016-06-15

    We investigated the implication of PKA and Epac proteins in the endothelium-independent vasorelaxant effects of cyclic AMP (cAMP). Cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) was measured by fura-2 imaging in rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMC). Contraction-relaxation experiments were performed in rat aortic rings deprived of endothelium. In extracellular Ca(2+)-free solution, cAMP-elevating agents induced an increase in [Ca(2+)]c in RASMC that was reproduced by PKA and Epac activation and reduced after depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) reservoirs. Arginine-vasopressin (AVP)-evoked increase of [Ca(2+)]c and store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) were inhibited by cAMP-elevating agents, PKA or Epac activation in these cells. In aortic rings, the contractions induced by phenylephrine in absence of extracellular Ca(2+) were inhibited by cAMP-elevating agents, PKA or Epac activation. In these conditions, reintroduction of Ca(2+) induced a contraction that was inhibited by cAMP-elevating agents, an effect reduced by PKA inhibition and reproduced by PKA or Epac activators. Our results suggest that increased cAMP depletes intracellular, thapsigargin-sensitive Ca(2+) stores through activation of PKA and Epac in RASMC, thus reducing the amount of Ca(2+) released by IP3-generating agonists during the contraction of rat aorta. cAMP rise also inhibits the contraction induced by depletion of intracellular Ca(2+), an effect mediated by reduction of SOCE after PKA or Epac activation. Both effects participate in the cAMP-induced endothelium-independent vasorelaxation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Expression of Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jie; Durcan, Laura; Karr, Reynold M; Briggs, Tracy A; Rice, Gillian I; Teal, Thomas H; Woodward, Joshua J; Elkon, Keith B

    2017-04-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) is implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and interferonopathies such as Aicardi-Goutières syndrome. A recently discovered DNA-activated type I IFN pathway, cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), has been linked to Aicardi-Goutières syndrome and mouse models of lupus. The aim of this study was to determine whether the cGAS pathway contributes to type I IFN production in patients with SLE. SLE disease activity was measured by the Safety of Estrogens in Lupus Erythematosus National Assessment version of the Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Activity Index. Expression of messenger RNA for cGAS and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) was determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. Cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) levels were examined by multiple reaction monitoring with ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Expression of cGAS in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was significantly higher in SLE patients than in normal controls (n = 51 and n = 20 respectively; P < 0.01). There was a positive correlation between cGAS expression and the IFN score (P < 0.001). The expression of cGAS in PBMCs showed a dose response to type I IFN stimulation in vitro, consistent with it being an ISG. Targeted measurement of cGAMP by tandem mass spectrometry detected cGAMP in 15% of the SLE patients (7 of 48) but none of the normal (0 of 19) or rheumatoid arthritis (0 of 22) controls. Disease activity was higher in SLE patients with cGAMP versus those without cGAMP. Increased cGAS expression and cGAMP in a proportion of SLE patients indicates that the cGAS pathway should be considered as a contributor to type I IFN production. Whereas higher cGAS expression may be a consequence of exposure to type I IFN, detection of cGAMP in patients with increased disease activity indicates potential involvement of this pathway in disease expression. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  20. Cyclic AMP-specific phosphodiesterase, PDE8A1, is activated by protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Kim M.; Lee, Louisa C.Y; Findlay, Jane E.; Day, Jonathan P.; Baillie, George S.

    2012-01-01

    The cyclic AMP-specific phosphodiesterase PDE8 has been shown to play a pivotal role in important processes such as steroidogenesis, T cell adhesion, regulation of heart beat and chemotaxis. However, no information exists on how the activity of this enzyme is regulated. We show that under elevated cAMP conditions, PKA acts to phosphorylate PDE8A on serine 359 and this action serves to enhance the activity of the enzyme. This is the first indication that PDE8 activity can be modulated by a kin...

  1. Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-mediated stimulation of adipocyte differentiation requires the synergistic action of Epac- and cAMP-dependent protein kinase-dependent processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Koefoed; Madsen, Lise; Pedersen, Lone Møller

    2008-01-01

    AMP-dependent stimulation of adipocyte differentiation. Epac, working via Rap, acted synergistically with cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A [PKA]) to promote adipogenesis. The major role of PKA was to down-regulate Rho and Rho-kinase activity, rather than to enhance CREB phosphorylation. Suppression of Rho......-kinase impaired proadipogenic insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling, which was restored by activation of Epac. This interplay between PKA and Epac-mediated processes not only provides novel insight into the initiation and tuning of adipocyte differentiation, but also demonstrates a new mechanism of c......AMP signaling whereby cAMP uses both PKA and Epac to achieve an appropriate cellular response....

  2. Topoisomerase 1 Inhibition Promotes Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase-Dependent Antiviral Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geneviève Pèépin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory responses, while essential for pathogen clearance, can also be deleterious to the host. Chemical inhibition of topoisomerase 1 (Top1 by low-dose camptothecin (CPT can suppress transcriptional induction of antiviral and inflammatory genes and protect animals from excessive and damaging inflammatory responses. We describe the unexpected finding that minor DNA damage from topoisomerase 1 inhibition with low-dose CPT can trigger a strong antiviral immune response through cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS detection of cytoplasmic DNA. This argues against CPT having only anti-inflammatory activity. Furthermore, expression of the simian virus 40 (SV40 large T antigen was paramount to the proinflammatory antiviral activity of CPT, as it potentiated cytoplasmic DNA leakage and subsequent cGAS recruitment in human and mouse cell lines. This work suggests that the capacity of Top1 inhibitors to blunt inflammatory responses can be counteracted by viral oncogenes and that this should be taken into account for their therapeutic development.

  3. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of porcine cyclic GMP-AMP synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiang; Chu, Beibei; Du, Lili; Han, Yingqian; Zhang, Xuemei; Fan, Shuangshuang; Wang, Yueying; Yang, Guoyu

    2015-06-01

    Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), which belongs to the nucleotidyltransferase family, recognizes cytosolic DNA and induces the type I interferon (IFN) pathway through the synthesis of the second messenger cGAMP. In this study, porcine cGAS (p-cGAS) was identified and its tissue distribution, subcellular localization, and functions in innate immunity were characterized. The coding sequence of p-cGAS is 1494 bp long, encodes 497 amino acids, and is most similar (74%) to Bos taurus cGAS. p-cGAS mRNA is abundant in the spleen, duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. The subcellular distribution of p-cGAS is not only in the cytosol, but also on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. The overexpression of wild-type p-cGAS in porcine kidney epithelial cells, but not its catalytically inactive mutants, induced IFN-β expression, which was dependent on STING and IRF3. However, the downregulation of p-cGAS by RNA interference markedly reduced IFN-β expression after pseudorabies virus (PRV) infection or poly(dA:dT) transfection. These results demonstrate that p-cGAS is an important DNA sensor, required for IFN-β activation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Maintenance of cyclic GMP-AMP homeostasis by ENPP1 is involved in pseudorabies virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiang; Lu, Shao-Fang; Wan, Bo; Ming, Sheng-Li; Li, Guo-Li; Su, Bing-Qian; Liu, Jiao-Yang; Wei, Yu-Shuang; Yang, Guo-Yu; Chu, Bei-Bei

    2018-03-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that porcine cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) catalyzes cGAMP production and is an important DNA sensor for the pseudorabies virus (PRV)-induced activation of interferon β (IFN-β). Ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase phosphodiesterase 1 (ENPP1) has recently been identified as the hydrolase of cGAMP in rodents, but its role in porcine cells is not clear. Our recent study demonstrated that porcine ENPP1 is responsible for the homeostasis of cGAMP and is critical for PRV infection. Porcine ENPP1 mRNA is predominantly expressed in muscle. PRV infection was enhanced by ENPP1 overexpression and attenuated by silencing of ENPP1. During PRV infection, the activation of IFN-β and NF-κB was reduced in ENPP1 overexpressed cells and promoted in ENPP1 knockdown cells. Investigation of the molecular mechanisms of ENPP1 during PRV infection showed that ENPP1 hydrolyzed cGAMP in PRV-infected or cGAMP-transfected cells and inhibited IRF3 phosphorylation, reducing IFN-β secretion. These results, combined with those for porcine cGAS, demonstrate that ENPP1 acts coordinately with cGAS to maintain the reservoir of cGAMP and participates in PRV infection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis cAMP Receptor Protein (Rv3676) Differs from the Escherichia coli Paradigm in Its cAMP Binding and DNA Binding Properties and Transcription Activation Properties*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Melanie; Haq, Ihtshamul; Hunt, Debbie M.; Arnvig, Kristine B.; Artymiuk, Peter J.; Buxton, Roger S.; Green, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis produces a burst of cAMP upon infection of macrophages. Bacterial cyclic AMP receptor proteins (CRP) are transcription factors that respond to cAMP by binding at target promoters when cAMP concentrations increase. Rv3676 (CRPMt) is a CRP family protein that regulates expression of genes (rpfA and whiB1) that are potentially involved in M. tuberculosis persistence and/or emergence from the dormant state. Here, the CRPMt homodimer is shown to bind two molecules of cAMP (one per protomer) at noninteracting sites. Furthermore, cAMP binding by CRPMt was relatively weak, entropy driven, and resulted in a relatively small enhancement in DNA binding. Tandem CRPMt-binding sites (CRP1 at −58.5 and CRP2 at −37.5) were identified at the whiB1 promoter (PwhiB1). In vitro transcription reactions showed that CRP1 is an activating site and that CRP2, which was only occupied in the presence of cAMP or at high CRPMt concentrations in the absence of cAMP, is a repressing site. Binding of CRPMt to CRP1 was not essential for open complex formation but was required for transcription activation. Thus, these data suggest that binding of CRPMt to the PwhiB1 CRP1 site activates transcription at a step after open complex formation. In contrast, high cAMP concentrations allowed occupation of both CRP1 and CRP2 sites, resulting in inhibition of open complex formation. Thus, M. tuberculosis CRP has evolved several distinct characteristics, compared with the Escherichia coli CRP paradigm, to allow it to regulate gene expression against a background of high concentrations of cAMP. PMID:20028978

  6. The reduction of radiation-induced mitotic delay by caffeine: a test of the cyclic AMP hypothesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oleinick, N.L.; Brewer, E.N.; Rustad, R.C.

    1978-01-01

    A study has been made of the reduction in γ-radiation-induced mitotic delay by caffeine in the naturally-synchronous plasmodial slime mould. Physarum polycephalum during late G 2 and early prophase, and the results compared with those obtained with other compounds of similar structure and/or physiological function. The reduction of radiation-induced mitotic delay was related to increasing concentrations of caffeine over at least two orders of magnitude. Pre-irradiation treatment with caffeine had no detectable effect. Caffeine had to be present for most, if not all, of the post-irradiation pre-mitotic period. Other chemicals which are reported to inhibit cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase either reduce or increase radiation-induced mitotic delay. The results therefore indicate that the reduction of mitotic delay by caffeine is not a result of altered cyclic AMP levels. (UK)

  7. Control of Saccharomyces cerevisiae catalase T gene (CTT1) expression by nutrient supply via the RAS-cyclic AMP pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissinger, P H; Wieser, R; Hamilton, B; Ruis, H

    1989-03-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, lack of nutrients triggers a pleiotropic response characterized by accumulation of storage carbohydrates, early G1 arrest, and sporulation of a/alpha diploids. This response is thought to be mediated by RAS proteins, adenylate cyclase, and cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinases. This study shows that expression of the S. cerevisiae gene coding for a cytoplasmic catalase T (CTT1) is controlled by this pathway: it is regulated by the availability of nutrients. Lack of a nitrogen, sulfur, or phosphorus source causes a high-level expression of the gene. Studies with strains with mutations in the RAS-cAMP pathway and supplementation of a rca1 mutant with cAMP show that CTT1 expression is under negative control by a cAMP-dependent protein kinase and that nutrient control of CTT1 gene expression is mediated by this pathway. Strains containing a CTT1-Escherichia coli lacZ fusion gene have been used to isolate mutants with mutations in the pathway. Mutants characterized in this investigation fall into five complementation groups. Both cdc25 and ras2 alleles were identified among these mutants.

  8. Topoisomerase 1 Inhibition Promotes Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase-Dependent Antiviral Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pépin, Geneviève; Nejad, Charlotte; Ferrand, Jonathan; Thomas, Belinda J; Stunden, H James; Sanij, Elaine; Foo, Chwan-Hong; Stewart, Cameron R; Cain, Jason E; Bardin, Philip G; Williams, Bryan R G; Gantier, Michael P

    2017-10-03

    Inflammatory responses, while essential for pathogen clearance, can also be deleterious to the host. Chemical inhibition of topoisomerase 1 (Top1) by low-dose camptothecin (CPT) can suppress transcriptional induction of antiviral and inflammatory genes and protect animals from excessive and damaging inflammatory responses. We describe the unexpected finding that minor DNA damage from topoisomerase 1 inhibition with low-dose CPT can trigger a strong antiviral immune response through cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) detection of cytoplasmic DNA. This argues against CPT having only anti-inflammatory activity. Furthermore, expression of the simian virus 40 (SV40) large T antigen was paramount to the proinflammatory antiviral activity of CPT, as it potentiated cytoplasmic DNA leakage and subsequent cGAS recruitment in human and mouse cell lines. This work suggests that the capacity of Top1 inhibitors to blunt inflammatory responses can be counteracted by viral oncogenes and that this should be taken into account for their therapeutic development. IMPORTANCE Recent studies suggest that low-dose DNA-damaging compounds traditionally used in cancer therapy can have opposite effects on antiviral responses, either suppressing (with the example of CPT) or potentiating (with the example of doxorubicin) them. Our work demonstrates that the minor DNA damage promoted by low-dose CPT can also trigger strong antiviral responses, dependent on the presence of viral oncogenes. Taken together, these results call for caution in the therapeutic use of low-dose chemotherapy agents to modulate antiviral responses in humans. Copyright © 2017 Pépin et al.

  9. Activation of cyclic GMP-AMP synthase by self-DNA causes autoimmune diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Daxing; Li, Tuo; Li, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Xiang; Li, Quan-Zhen; Wight-Carter, Mary; Chen, Zhijian J

    2015-10-20

    TREX1 is an exonuclease that digests DNA in the cytoplasm. Loss-of-function mutations of TREX1 are linked to Aicardi-Goutieres Syndrome (AGS) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in humans. Trex1(-/-) mice exhibit autoimmune and inflammatory phenotypes that are associated with elevated expression of interferon (IFN)-induced genes (ISGs). Cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) is a cytosolic DNA sensor that activates the IFN pathway. Upon binding to DNA, cGAS is activated to catalyze the synthesis of cGAMP, which functions as a second messenger that binds and activates the adaptor protein STING to induce IFNs and other cytokines. Here we show that genetic ablation of cGas in Trex1(-/-) mice eliminated all detectable pathological and molecular phenotypes, including ISG induction, autoantibody production, aberrant T-cell activation, and lethality. Even deletion of just one allele of cGas largely rescued the phenotypes of Trex1(-/-) mice. Similarly, deletion of cGas in mice lacking DNaseII, a lysosomal enzyme that digests DNA, rescued the lethal autoimmune phenotypes of the DNaseII(-/-) mice. Through quantitative mass spectrometry, we found that cGAMP accumulated in mouse tissues deficient in Trex1 or DNaseII and that this accumulation was dependent on cGAS. These results demonstrate that cGAS activation causes the autoimmune diseases in Trex1(-/-) and DNaseII(-/-) mice and suggest that inhibition of cGAS may lead to prevention and treatment of some human autoimmune diseases caused by self-DNA.

  10. Selective enhancement of wnt4 expression by cyclic AMP-associated cooperation between rat central astrocytes and microglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Masatoshi, E-mail: ohnishi@fupharm.fukuyama-u.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Graduate School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, 985-1 Sanzo, Higashimura-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, 729-0292 (Japan); Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, 985-1 Sanzo, Higashimura-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, 729-0292 (Japan); Urasaki, Tomoka [Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Graduate School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, 985-1 Sanzo, Higashimura-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, 729-0292 (Japan); Ochiai, Hiroyuki; Matsuoka, Kohei; Takeo, Shin; Harada, Tomoki; Ohsugi, Yoshihito [Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, 985-1 Sanzo, Higashimura-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, 729-0292 (Japan); Inoue, Atsuko [Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Graduate School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, 985-1 Sanzo, Higashimura-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, 729-0292 (Japan); Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, 985-1 Sanzo, Higashimura-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, 729-0292 (Japan)

    2015-11-13

    The wnt protein family has important members involved in cell differentiation, proliferation and plasticity expression; however, little is known about its biosynthesis processes. On the other hand, an increase in the intracerebral cyclic adenosine 3′, 5’-monophosphate (cAMP) level leads to synaptic plasticity via the de novo synthesis of any protein. Here, the effect of dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP), a membrane permeability cAMP analog, on the wnt family was investigated in rat primary-cultured glial cells containing astrocytes and microglia. Among wnt3a, 4, 5a, 7a and 11 mRNA, only wnt4 expression was increased by longer treatment (24 h), compared with short treatment (2 h), with dbcAMP in a concentration-dependent manner, and its effect reached statistical significance at 1 mM. In cultures of isolated astrocytes or microglia, wnt4 expression was not affected by 1 mM dbcAMP for 24 h, and microglial wnt4 protein was undetectable even when cells were treated with the drug. Mixed glial cells treated for 24 h with 1 mM dbcAMP showed significantly increased wnt4 protein, as well as mRNA. Immunofluorescence manifested that cells that expressed wnt4 protein were astrocytes, but not microglia. Intraperitoneal injection of 1.25 mg/kg rolipram, a phosphodiesterase (PDE) IV inhibitor that can pass through the blood brain barrier and inhibits cAMP degradation specifically, showed a tendency to increase wnt4 expression in the adult rat brain after 24 h, and the increases in wnt4 mRNA and protein levels reached statistical significance in the hippocampus and striatum, respectively. This is the first finding to help elucidate the selective biosynthesis of central wnt4 through cAMP-stimulated microglia and astrocytes interaction. - Highlights: • Dibutyryl cAMP increased wnt4, but not wnt3a, 5a, 7a and 11, mRNA in mixed glia. • Wnt4 protein increased in astrocytes co-cultivated with microglia. • It took a long time to robustly increase wnt4 expression. • Rolipram

  11. Selective enhancement of wnt4 expression by cyclic AMP-associated cooperation between rat central astrocytes and microglia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnishi, Masatoshi; Urasaki, Tomoka; Ochiai, Hiroyuki; Matsuoka, Kohei; Takeo, Shin; Harada, Tomoki; Ohsugi, Yoshihito; Inoue, Atsuko

    2015-01-01

    The wnt protein family has important members involved in cell differentiation, proliferation and plasticity expression; however, little is known about its biosynthesis processes. On the other hand, an increase in the intracerebral cyclic adenosine 3′, 5’-monophosphate (cAMP) level leads to synaptic plasticity via the de novo synthesis of any protein. Here, the effect of dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP), a membrane permeability cAMP analog, on the wnt family was investigated in rat primary-cultured glial cells containing astrocytes and microglia. Among wnt3a, 4, 5a, 7a and 11 mRNA, only wnt4 expression was increased by longer treatment (24 h), compared with short treatment (2 h), with dbcAMP in a concentration-dependent manner, and its effect reached statistical significance at 1 mM. In cultures of isolated astrocytes or microglia, wnt4 expression was not affected by 1 mM dbcAMP for 24 h, and microglial wnt4 protein was undetectable even when cells were treated with the drug. Mixed glial cells treated for 24 h with 1 mM dbcAMP showed significantly increased wnt4 protein, as well as mRNA. Immunofluorescence manifested that cells that expressed wnt4 protein were astrocytes, but not microglia. Intraperitoneal injection of 1.25 mg/kg rolipram, a phosphodiesterase (PDE) IV inhibitor that can pass through the blood brain barrier and inhibits cAMP degradation specifically, showed a tendency to increase wnt4 expression in the adult rat brain after 24 h, and the increases in wnt4 mRNA and protein levels reached statistical significance in the hippocampus and striatum, respectively. This is the first finding to help elucidate the selective biosynthesis of central wnt4 through cAMP-stimulated microglia and astrocytes interaction. - Highlights: • Dibutyryl cAMP increased wnt4, but not wnt3a, 5a, 7a and 11, mRNA in mixed glia. • Wnt4 protein increased in astrocytes co-cultivated with microglia. • It took a long time to robustly increase wnt4 expression. • Rolipram

  12. Biochemical studies on the DNA binding function of the cyclic-amp reactor protein of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angulo, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is an allosteric protein in which binding of cAMP effects a conformational change with a consequent increased affinity for DNA. Binding of double-stranded deoxyribopolynucleotides and calf thymus DNA by cAMP-CRP confers protection against attack by trypsin, subtilisin, Staph. aureus V8 protease and clostripain. Of the single-stranded deoxy- and ribopolynucleotides tested, only r(I)/sub n/ and r(A)/sub n/ gave significant protection against attack by these proteases. In the absence of cAMP, CRP is resistant to proteolysis. Incubation of CRP-DNA with trypsin results in the accumulation of two novel fragments. CRP-DNA is partially sensitive to digestion by chymotrypsin but resistant to attack by subtilisin, the Staph. aureus V8 protease and clostripain. Cleavage of CRP-DNA to fragments is accompanied by the loss of 3 H-cAMP binding activity. Modification of the arginines with phenylglyoxal or butanedione results in loss of DNA binding activity. cAMP-CRP incorporates more 14 C-phenylglyoxal than unliganded CRP. Titration of the arginines with 14 C-phenylglyoxal to where over 90% of the DNA binding activity is lost results in incorporation of one mole of reagent per mole of subunit

  13. Transporter function and cyclic AMP turnover in normal colonic mucosa from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleberg Karen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathogenesis of colorectal neoplasia is still unresolved but has been associated with alterations in epithelial clearance of xenobiotics and metabolic waste products. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize the transport of cyclic nucleotides in colonic biopsies from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia. Methods Cyclic nucleotides were used as model substrates shared by some OATP- and ABC-transporters, which in part are responsible for clearance of metabolites and xenobiotics from the colonic epithelium. On colonic biopsies from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia, molecular transport was electrophysiologically registered in Ussing-chamber set-ups, mRNA level of selected transporters was quantified by rt-PCR, and subcellular location of transporters was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results Of four cyclic nucleotides, dibuturyl-cAMP induced the largest short circuit current in both patient groups. The induced short circuit current was significantly lower in neoplasia-patients (p = 0.024. The observed altered transport of dibuturyl-cAMP in neoplasia-patients could not be directly translated to an observed increased mRNA expression of OATP4A1 and OATP2B1 in neoplasia patients. All other examined transporters were expressed to similar extents in both patient groups. Conclusions OATP1C1, OATP4A1, OATP4C1 seem to be involved in the excretory system of human colon. ABCC4 is likely to be involved from an endoplasmic-Golgi complex and basolateral location in goblet cells. ABCC5 might be directly involved in the turnover of intracellular cAMP at the basolateral membrane of columnar epithelial cells, while OATP2B1 is indirectly related to the excretory system. Colorectal neoplasia is associated with lower transport or sensitivity to cyclic nucleotides and increased expression of OATP2B1 and OATP4A1 transporters, known to transport PGE2.

  14. cAMP biosensors applied in molecular pharmacological studies of G protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff; Vedel, Line; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2013-01-01

    end-point assays for quantifying GPCR-mediated changes in intracellular cAMP levels exist. More recently, fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP biosensors that can quantify intracellular cAMP levels in real time have been developed. These FRET-based cAMP biosensors have been used...... primarily in single cell FRET microscopy to monitor and visualize changes in cAMP upon GPCR activation. Here, a similar cAMP biosensor with a more efficient mCerulean/mCitrine FRET pair is described for use in the 384-well plate format. After cloning and expression in HEK293 cells, the biosensor...... is characterized in the 384-well plate format and used for measuring the signaling of the G(s)-coupled ß(2)-adrenergic receptor. The procedures described may be applied for other FRET-based biosensors in terms of characterization and conversion to the 384-well plate format....

  15. Cyclic AMP signaling restricts activation and promotes maturation and antioxidant defenses in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paco, Sonia; Hummel, Manuela; Plá, Virginia; Sumoy, Lauro; Aguado, Fernando

    2016-04-23

    cAMP signaling produces dramatic changes in astrocyte morphology and physiology. However, its involvement in phenotype acquisition and the transcriptionally mediated mechanisms of action are largely unknown. Here we analyzed the global transcriptome of cultured astroglial cells incubated with activators of cAMP pathways. A bulk of astroglial transcripts, 6221 annotated genes, were differentially regulated by cAMP signaling. cAMP analogs strongly upregulated genes involved in typical functions of mature astrocytes, such as homeostatic control, metabolic and structural support to neurons, antioxidant defense and communication, whereas they downregulated a considerable number of proliferating and immaturity-related transcripts. Moreover, numerous genes typically activated in reactive cells, such as scar components and immunological mediators, were repressed by cAMP. GSEA analysis contrasting gene expression profiles with transcriptome signatures of acutely isolated astrocytes and in situ evaluation of protein levels in these cells showed that cAMP signaling conferred mature and in vivo-like transcriptional features to cultured astrocytes. These results indicate that cAMP signaling is a key pathway promoting astrocyte maturation and restricting their developmental and activation features. Therefore, a positive modulation of cAMP signaling may promote the normal state of differentiated astrocytes and favor the protection and function of neuronal networks.

  16. Anticonvulsant effect of AMP by direct activation of adenosine A1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzi, Mirko; Coppi, Elisabetta; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Chiarugi, Alberto

    2013-12-01

    Purinergic neurotransmission mediated by adenosine (Ado) type 1 receptors (A1Rs) plays pivotal roles in negative modulation of epileptic seizures, and Ado is thought to be a key endogenous anticonvulsant. Recent evidence, however, indicates that AMP, the metabolic precursor of Ado, also activate A1Rs. Here, we evaluated the antiepileptic effects of AMP adopting in vitro and in vivo models of epilepsy. We report that AMP reversed the increase in population spike (PS) amplitude and the decrease in PS latency induced by a Mg(2+)-free extracellular solution in CA1 neurons of mouse hippocampal slices. The AMP effects were inhibited by the A1R antagonist DPCPX, but not prevented by inhibiting conversion of AMP into Ado, indicating that AMP inhibited per se sustained hippocampal excitatory neurotransmission by directly activating A1Rs. AMP also reduced seizure severity and mortality in a model of audiogenic convulsion. Of note, the anticonvulsant effects of AMP were potentiated by preventing its conversion into Ado and inhibited by DPCPX. When tested in a model of kainate-induced seizure, AMP prolonged latency of convulsions but had no effects on seizure severity and mortality. Data provide the first evidence that AMP is an endogenous anticonvulsant acting at A1Rs. © 2013.

  17. Leptin interferes with 3',5'-Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate (cAMP signaling to inhibit steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HoYuen Basil

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity has been linked to an increased risk of female infertility. Leptin, an adipocytokine which is elevated during obesity, may influence gonadal function through modulating steroidogenesis in granulosa cells. Methods The effect of leptin on progesterone production in simian virus 40 immortalized granulosa (SVOG cells was examined by Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The effect of leptin on the expression of the steroidogenic enzymes (StAR, P450scc, 3betaHSD in SVOG cells was examined by real-time PCR and Western blotting. The mRNA expression of leptin receptor isoforms in SVOG cells were examined by using PCR. SVOG cells were co-treated with leptin and specific pharmacological inhibitors to identify the signaling pathways involved in leptin-reduced progesterone production. Silencing RNA against leptin receptor was used to determine that the inhibition of leptin on cAMP-induced steroidogenesis acts in a leptin receptor-dependent manner. Results and Conclusion In the present study, we investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying leptin-regulated steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells. We show that leptin inhibits 8-bromo cAMP-stimulated progesterone production in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, we show that leptin inhibits expression of the cAMP-stimulated steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR protein, the rate limiting de novo protein in progesterone synthesis. Leptin induces the activation of ERK1/2, p38 and JNK but only the ERK1/2 (PD98059 and p38 (SB203580 inhibitors attenuate the leptin-induced inhibition of cAMP-stimulated StAR protein expression and progesterone production. These data suggest that the leptin-induced MAPK signal transduction pathway interferes with cAMP/PKA-stimulated steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells. Moreover, siRNA mediated knock-down of the endogenous leptin receptor attenuates the effect of leptin on cAMP-induced StAR protein expression and progesterone

  18. 2',3'-cAMP, 3'-AMP, 2'-AMP and adenosine inhibit TNF-α and CXCL10 production from activated primary murine microglia via A2A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Elizabeth A; Exo, Jennifer L; Verrier, Jonathan D; Jackson, Travis C; Gillespie, Delbert G; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Kochanek, Patrick M; Jackson, Edwin K

    2015-01-12

    Some cells, tissues and organs release 2',3'-cAMP (a positional isomer of 3',5'-cAMP) and convert extracellular 2',3'-cAMP to 2'-AMP plus 3'-AMP and convert these AMPs to adenosine (called the extracellular 2',3'-cAMP-adenosine pathway). Recent studies show that microglia have an extracellular 2',3'-cAMP-adenosine pathway. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether the extracellular 2',3'-cAMP-adenosine pathway could have functional consequences on the production of cytokines/chemokines by activated microglia. Experiments were conducted in cultures of primary murine microglia. In the first experiment, the effect of 2',3'-cAMP, 3'-AMP, 2'-AMP and adenosine on LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production was determined. In the next experiment, the first protocol was replicated but with the addition of 1,3-dipropyl-8-p-sulfophenylxanthine (DPSPX) (0.1 μM; antagonist of adenosine receptors). The last experiment compared the ability of 2-chloro-N(6)-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA) (10 μM; selective A1 agonist), 5'-N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine (NECA) (10 μM; agonist for all adenosine receptor subtypes) and CGS21680 (10 μM; selective A2A agonist) to inhibit LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production. (1) 2',3'-cAMP, 3'-AMP, 2'-AMP and adenosine similarly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production; (2) DPSPX nearly eliminated the inhibitory effects of 2',3'-cAMP, 3'-AMP, 2'-AMP and adenosine on LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production; (3) CCPA did not affect LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10; (4) NECA and CGS21680 similarly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production. 2',3'-cAMP and its metabolites (3'-AMP, 2'-AMP and adenosine) inhibit LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production via A2A-receptor activation. Adenosine and its precursors, via A2A receptors, likely suppress TNF-α and CXCL10 production by activated microglia in brain diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. 2’,3’-cAMP, 3’-AMP, 2’-AMP and Adenosine Inhibit TNF-α and CXCL10 Production From Activated Primary Murine Microglia via A2A Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Elizabeth A.; Exo, Jennifer L.; Verrier, Jonathan D.; Jackson, Travis C.; Gillespie, Delbert G.; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Kochanek, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Some cells, tissues and organs release 2’,3’-cAMP (a positional isomer of 3’,5’-cAMP) and convert extracellular 2’,3’-cAMP to 2’-AMP plus 3’-AMP and convert these AMPs to adenosine (called the extracellular 2’,3’-cAMP-adenosine pathway). Recent studies show that microglia have an extracellular 2’,3’-cAMP-adenosine pathway. The goal of the present study was to investigate whether the extracellular 2’,3’-cAMP-adenosine pathway could have functional consequences on the production of cytokines/chemokines by activated microglia. Methods Experiments were conducted in cultures of primary murine microglia. In the first experiment, the effect of 2’,3’-cAMP, 3’-AMP, 2’-AMP and adenosine on LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production was determined. In the next experiment, the first protocol was replicated but with the addition of 1,3-dipropyl-8-p-sulfophenylxanthine (DPSPX) (0.1 µM; antagonist of adenosine receptors). The last experiment compared the ability of 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CCPA) (10 µM; selective A1 agonist), 5’-N-ethylcarboxamide adenosine (NECA) (10 µM; agonist for all adenosine receptor subtypes) and CGS21680 (10 µM; selective A2A agonist) to inhibit LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production. Results 1) 2’,3’-cAMP, 3’-AMP, 2’-AMP and adenosine similarly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production; 2) DPSPX nearly eliminated the inhibitory effects of 2’,3’-cAMP, 3’-AMP, 2’-AMP and adenosine on LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production; 3) CCPA did not affect LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10; 4) NECA and CGS21680 similarly inhibited LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production. Conclusions 2’,3’-cAMP and its metabolites (3’-AMP, 2’-AMP and adenosine) inhibit LPS-induced TNF-α and CXCL10 production via A2A-receptor activation. Adenosine and its precursors, via A2A receptors, likely suppress TNF-α and CXCL10 production by activated microglia in brain diseases. PMID:25451117

  20. Physiological and Molecular Effects of the Cyclic Nucleotides cAMP and cGMP on Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Herrera, Natalia M.

    2012-12-01

    The cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (CNs), cAMP and cGMP, are second messengers that participate in the regulation of development, metabolism and adaptive responses. In plants, CNs are associated with the control of pathogen responses, pollen tube orientation, abiotic stress response, membrane transport regulation, stomatal movement and light perception. In this study, we hypothesize that cAMP and cGMP promote changes in the transcription level of genes related to photosynthesis, high light and membrane transport in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves and, that these changes at the molecular level can have functional biological consequences. For this reason we tested if CNs modulate the photosynthetic rate, responses to high light and root ion transport. Real time quantitative PCR was used to assess transcription levels of selected genes and infrared gas analyzers coupled to fluorescence sensors were used to measure the photosynthetic parameters. We present evidence that both cAMP and cGMP modulate foliar mRNA levels early after stimulation. The two CNs trigger different responses indicating that the signals have specificity. A comparison of proteomic and transcriptional changes suggest that both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms are modulated by CNs. cGMP up-regulates the mRNA levels of components of the photosynthesis and carbon metabolism. However, neither cAMP nor cGMP trigger differences in the rate of carbon assimilation, maximum efficiency of the photosystem II (PSII), or PSII operating efficiency. It was also demonstrated that CN regulate the expression of its own targets, the cyclic nucleotide gated channels - CNGC. Further studies are needed to identify the components of the signaling transduction pathway that mediate cellular changes and their respective regulatory and/or signaling roles.

  1. Cyclic AMP regulates the biosynthesis of cellobiohydrolase in Cellulomonas flavigena growing in sugar cane bagasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Herrera, Jesús Antonio; Pérez-Avalos, Odilia; Salgado, Luis M; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa

    2009-10-01

    Cellulomonas flavigena produces a battery of cellulase components that act concertedly to degrade cellulose. The addition of cAMP to repressed C. flavigena cultures released catabolic repression, while addition of cAMP to induced C. flavigena cultures led to a cellobiohydrolase hyperproduction. Exogenous cAMP showed positive regulation on cellobiohydrolase production in C. flavigena grown on sugar cane bagasse. A C. flavigena cellobiohydrolase gene was cloned (named celA), which coded for a 71- kDa enzyme. Upstream, a repressor celR1, identified as a 38 kDa protein, was monitored by use of polyclonal antibodies.

  2. The DNA sensor, cyclic GMP-AMP synthase, is essential for induction of IFN-β during Chlamydia trachomatis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yugen; Yeruva, Laxmi; Marinov, Anthony; Prantner, Daniel; Wyrick, Priscilla B; Lupashin, Vladimir; Nagarajan, Uma M

    2014-09-01

    IFN-β has been implicated as an effector of oviduct pathology resulting from genital chlamydial infection in the mouse model. In this study, we investigated the role of cytosolic DNA and engagement of DNA sensors in IFN-β expression during chlamydial infection. We determined that three-prime repair exonuclease-1, a host 3' to 5' exonuclease, reduced IFN-β expression significantly during chlamydial infection using small interfering RNA and gene knockout fibroblasts, implicating cytosolic DNA as a ligand for this response. The DNA sensor cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) has been shown to bind cytosolic DNA to generate cyclic GMP-AMP, which binds to the signaling adaptor stimulator of IFN genes (STING) to induce IFN-β expression. We determined that cGAS is required for IFN-β expression during chlamydial infection in multiple cell types. Interestingly, although infected cells deficient for STING or cGAS alone failed to induce IFN-β, coculture of cells depleted for either STING or cGAS rescued IFN-β expression. These data demonstrate that cyclic GMP-AMP produced in infected cGAS(+)STING(-) cells can migrate into adjacent cells via gap junctions to function in trans in cGAS(-)STING(+) cells. Furthermore, we observed cGAS localized in punctate regions on the cytosolic side of the chlamydial inclusion membrane in association with STING, indicating that chlamydial DNA is most likely recognized outside the inclusion as infection progresses. These novel findings provide evidence that cGAS-mediated DNA sensing directs IFN-β expression during Chlamydia trachomatis infection and suggest that effectors from infected cells can directly upregulate IFN-β expression in adjacent uninfected cells during in vivo infection, contributing to pathogenesis. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase Is Required for Cell Proliferation and Inflammatory Responses in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synoviocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yan; Su, Guo-Hua; Zhang, Fang; Chu, Jing-Xue; Wang, Yun-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by inflammatory cell infiltration, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) invasive proliferation, and joint destruction. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) is a cytosolic DNA sensor that induces immune activation. In this study, we examined whether cGAS plays a role in RA FLS. In this study, cGAS was overexpressed in RA-FLS compared with OA FLS. TNFα stimulation induced cGAS expression in RA FLS. Overexpression of cGAS promoted the proliferation and knockdow...

  4. Hepatitis C virus NS2 protein activates cellular cyclic AMP-dependent pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyoung Mi; Kwon, Shi-Nae; Kang, Ju-Il; Lee, Song Hee; Jang, Sung Key; Ahn, Byung-Yoon; Kim, Yoon Ki

    2007-01-01

    Chronic infection of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) leads to liver cirrhosis and cancer. The mechanism leading to viral persistence and hepatocellular carcinoma, however, has not been fully understood. In this study, we show that the HCV infection activates cellular cAMP-dependent pathways. Expression of a luciferase reporter gene controlled by a basic promoter with the cAMP response element (CRE) was significantly elevated in human hepatoma Huh-7 cells infected with the HCV JFH1. Analysis with viral subgenomic replicons indicated that the HCV NS2 protein is responsible for the effect. Furthermore, the level of cellular transcripts whose stability is known to be regulated by cAMP was specifically reduced in cells harboring NS2-expressing replicons. These results allude to the HCV NS2 protein having a novel function of regulating cellular gene expression and proliferation through the cAMP-dependent pathway

  5. AMP-guided tumour-specific nanoparticle delivery via adenosine A1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Tongcheng; Li, Na; Han, Fajun; Zhang, Hua; Zhang, Yuanxing; Liu, Qin

    2016-03-01

    Active targeting-ligands have been increasingly used to functionalize nanoparticles for tumour-specific clinical applications. Here we utilize nucleotide adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) as a novel ligand to functionalize polymer-based fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) for tumour-targeted imaging. We demonstrate that AMP-conjugated NPs (NPs-AMP) efficiently bind to and are following internalized into colon cancer cell CW-2 and breast cancer cell MDA-MB-468 in vitro. RNA interference and inhibitor assays reveal that the targeting effects mainly rely on the specific binding of AMP to adenosine A1 receptor (A1R), which is greatly up-regulated in cancer cells than in matched normal cells. More importantly, NPs-AMP specifically accumulate in the tumour site of colon and breast tumour xenografts and are further internalized into the tumour cells in vivo via tail vein injection, confirming that the high in vitro specificity of AMP can be successfully translated into the in vivo efficacy. Furthermore, NPs-AMP exhibit an active tumour-targeting behaviour in various colon and breast cancer cells, which is positively related to the up-regulation level of A1R in cancer cells, suggesting that AMP potentially suits for more extensive A1R-overexpressing cancer models. This work establishes AMP to be a novel tumour-targeting ligand and provides a promising strategy for future diagnostic or therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase is a cytosolic DNA sensor that activates the type I interferon pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lijun; Wu, Jiaxi; Du, Fenghe; Chen, Xiang; Chen, Zhijian J

    2013-02-15

    The presence of DNA in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells is a danger signal that triggers host immune responses such as the production of type I interferons. Cytosolic DNA induces interferons through the production of cyclic guanosine monophosphate-adenosine monophosphate (cyclic GMP-AMP, or cGAMP), which binds to and activates the adaptor protein STING. Through biochemical fractionation and quantitative mass spectrometry, we identified a cGAMP synthase (cGAS), which belongs to the nucleotidyltransferase family. Overexpression of cGAS activated the transcription factor IRF3 and induced interferon-β in a STING-dependent manner. Knockdown of cGAS inhibited IRF3 activation and interferon-β induction by DNA transfection or DNA virus infection. cGAS bound to DNA in the cytoplasm and catalyzed cGAMP synthesis. These results indicate that cGAS is a cytosolic DNA sensor that induces interferons by producing the second messenger cGAMP.

  7. Cyclic [G(2',5')pA(3',5')p] is the metazoan second messenger produced by DNA-activated cyclic GMP-AMP synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Pu; Ascano, Manuel; Wu, Yang; Barchet, Winfried; Gaffney, Barbara L; Zillinger, Thomas; Serganov, Artem A; Liu, Yizhou; Jones, Roger A; Hartmann, Gunther; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2013-05-23

    Recent studies identified cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) as a metazoan second messenger triggering an interferon response. cGAMP is generated from GTP and ATP by cytoplasmic dsDNA sensor cGAMP synthase (cGAS). We combined structural, chemical, biochemical, and cellular assays to demonstrate that this second messenger contains G(2',5')pA and A(3',5')pG phosphodiester linkages, designated c[G(2',5')pA(3',5')p]. We show that, upon dsDNA binding, cGAS is activated through conformational transitions, resulting in formation of a catalytically competent and accessible nucleotide-binding pocket for generation of c[G(2',5')pA(3',5')p]. We demonstrate that cyclization occurs in a stepwise manner through initial generation of 5'-pppG(2',5')pA prior to cyclization to c[G(2',5')pA(3',5')p], with the latter positioned precisely in the catalytic pocket. Mutants of cGAS dsDNA-binding or catalytic pocket residues exhibit reduced or abrogated activity. Our studies have identified c[G(2',5')pA(3',5')p] as a founding member of a family of metazoan 2',5'-containing cyclic heterodinucleotide second messengers distinct from bacterial 3',5' cyclic dinucleotides. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ecklonia cava Polyphenol Has a Protective Effect against Ethanol-Induced Liver Injury in a Cyclic AMP-Dependent Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haruka Yamashita

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we showed that Ecklonia cava polyphenol (ECP treatment suppressed ethanol-induced increases in hepatocyte death by scavenging intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS and maintaining intracellular glutathione levels. Here, we examined the effects of ECP on the activities of alcohol-metabolizing enzymes and their regulating mechanisms in ethanol-treated hepatocytes. Isolated hepatocytes were incubated with or without 100 mM ethanol. ECP was dissolved in dimethylsulfoxide. ECP was added to cultured cells that had been incubated with or without ethanol. The cells were incubated for 0–24 h. In cultured hepatocytes, the ECP treatment with ethanol inhibited cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1 expression and activity, which is related to the production of ROS when large quantities of ethanol are oxidized. On the other hand, ECP treatment with ethanol increased the activity of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH and aldehyde dehydrogenase. These changes in activities of CYP2E1 and ADH were suppressed by treatment with H89, an inhibitor of protein kinase A. ECP treatment with ethanol enhanced cyclic AMP concentrations compared with those of control cells. ECP may be a candidate for preventing ethanol-induced liver injury via regulating alcohol metabolic enzymes in a cyclic AMP-dependent manner.

  9. Effects of subacute and chronic lead treatment on glucose homestasis and renal cyclic AMP metabolism in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, A; Merali, Z; Kacew, S; Singhal, R L

    1976-01-01

    The effects of chronic oral ingestion of lead in doses ranging from 20 to 80 ppM were compared with those seen after the subacute exposure of rats to a 10 mg/kg daily dose of the heavy metal for 7 days. Irrespective of the treatment regimen used, lead treatment significantly increased the activities of renal pyruvate carboxylase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, fructose 1,6-diphosphatase and glucose 6-phosphatase. The observed enhancement of kidney gluconeogenic enzymes in chronically treated animals was associated with a stimulation of the adenylate cyclase-cyclic AMP system, a rise in blood glucose and urea as well as a depression in hepatic glycogen and serum immunoreactive insulin (IRI) levels. In contrast, subacute exposure to lead failed to significantly alter cyclic AMP metabolism and the concentrations of liver glycogen, blood glucose, serum urea or IRI. Whereas the insulinogenic index (the ratio of serum IRI to blood glucose concentration) was markedly suppressed in chronically treated rats, this ratio remained within normal limits following subacute exposure to the heavy metal. However, a marked decrease in the insulinogenic index was observed in subacutely treated rats 15 min after the administration of a glucose load. The data provide evidence to show that increased glucose synthesis as well as suppressed pancreatic function may be responsible for lead-induced disturbances in glucose homeostasis.

  10. Cyclic GMP-AMP containing mixed phosphodiester linkages is an endogenous high-affinity ligand for STING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Shi, Heping; Wu, Jiaxi; Zhang, Xuewu; Sun, Lijun; Chen, Chuo; Chen, Zhijian J

    2013-07-25

    The presence of microbial or self DNA in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells is a danger signal detected by the DNA sensor cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS), which catalyzes the production of cGAMP that in turn serves as a second messenger to activate innate immune responses. Here we show that endogenous cGAMP in mammalian cells contains two distinct phosphodiester linkages, one between 2'-OH of GMP and 5'-phosphate of AMP, and the other between 3'-OH of AMP and 5'-phosphate of GMP. This molecule, termed 2'3'-cGAMP, is unique in that it binds to the adaptor protein STING with a much greater affinity than cGAMP molecules containing other combinations of phosphodiester linkages. The crystal structure of STING bound to 2'3'-cGAMP revealed the structural basis of this high-affinity binding and a ligand-induced conformational change in STING that may underlie its activation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Overexpression of the cAMP Receptor 1 in Growing Dictyostelium Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnson, Ronald L.; Vaughan, Roxanne A.; Caterina, Michael J.; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Devreotes, Peter N.

    1991-01-01

    cAR1, the cAMP receptor expressed normally during the early aggregation stage of the Dictyostelium developmental program, has been expressed during the growth stage, when only low amounts of endogenous receptors are present. Transformants expressing cAR1 have 7-40 times over growth stage and

  12. Cyclic AMP is a key regulator of M1 to M2a phenotypic conversion of microglia in the presence of Th2 cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Mousumi; Xu, Yong; Pearse, Damien D

    2016-01-13

    Microglia and macrophages play a central role in neuroinflammation. Pro-inflammatory cytokines trigger their conversion to a classically activated (M1) phenotype, sustaining inflammation and producing a cytotoxic environment. Conversely, anti-inflammatory cytokines polarize the cells towards an alternatively activated (M2), tissue reparative phenotype. Elucidation of the signal transduction pathways involved in M1 to M2 phenotypic conversion may provide insight into how the innate immune response can be harnessed during distinct phases of disease or injury to mediate neuroprotection and neurorepair. Microglial cells (cell line and primary) were subjected to combined cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) and IL-4, or either alone, in the presence of pro-inflammatory mediators, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Their effects on the expression of characteristic markers for M1 and M2 microglia were assessed. Similarly, the M1 and M2 phenotypes of microglia and macrophages within the lesion site were then evaluated following a contusive spinal cord injury (SCI) to the thoracic (T8) spinal cord of rats and mice when the agents were administered systemically. It was demonstrated that cyclic AMP functions synergistically with IL-4 to promote M1 to M2 conversion of microglia in culture. The combination of cyclic AMP and IL-4, but neither alone, induced an Arg-1(+)/iNOS(-)cell phenotype with concomitant expression of other M2-specific markers including TG2 and RELM-α. M2-converted microglia showed ameliorated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IP-10) and reactive oxygen species, with no alteration in phagocytic properties. M2a conversion required protein kinase A (PKA), but not the exchange protein directly activated by cyclic AMP (EPAC). Systemic delivery of cyclic AMP and IL-4 after experimental SCI also promoted a significant M1 to M2a phenotypic change in microglia and macrophage population dynamics in the lesion

  13. Comparison of phosphorylation of ribosomal proteins from HeLa and Krebs II ascites-tumour cells by cyclic AMP-dependent and cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Issinger, O G; Beier, H; Speichermann, N

    1980-01-01

    Phosphorylation of eukaryotic ribosomal proteins in vitro by essentially homogeneous preparations of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit and cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase was compared. Each protein kinase was added at a concentration of 30nM. Ribosomal proteins were...... by the cyclic AMP-dependent enzyme. Between 0.1 and 0.2 mol of phosphate was incorporated/mol of these phosphorylated proteins. With the exception of protein S7, the same proteins were also major substrates for the cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase. Time courses of the phosphorylation of individual proteins...... from the small and large ribosomal subunits in the presence of either protein kinase suggested four types of phosphorylation reactions: (1) proteins S2, S10 and L5 were preferably phosphorylated by the cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase; (2) proteins S3 and L6 were phosphorylated at very similar rates...

  14. Attempt to demonstrate an in vivo effect of mianserin hydrochloride on erythrocyte Na+-K+-ATPase activity and cyclic AMP concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, G. S.; Buckley, D. E.; Boardman, L. J.; Smith, A. H. W.; Moody, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    1 There is evidence that erythrocyte Na+-K+-ATPase activity and erythrocyte cyclic AMP change on recovery from a depressive illness. Mianserin is a recently introduced antidepressant but its mode of action is unknown. The present study was therefore designed to investigate in vivo the effect of mianserin on erythrocyte Na+-K+-ATPase and cyclic AMP. 2 Biochemical estimations were made on blood from depressed patients before beginning either mianserin or matched placebo treatment, after 1 week, and again after 2 weeks' treatment. 3 Neither the erythrocyte Na+-K+-ATPase, nor the erythrocyte cyclic AMP concentration, changed significantly in either the mianserin- or the placebo-treated group. 4 The study sheds no light on the possible mechanism of action of mianserin. PMID:203308

  15. Parathyroid hormone promotes the disassembly of cytoskeletal actin and myosin in cultured osteoblastic cells: Mediation by cyclic AMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egan, J.J.; Gronowicz, G.; Rodan, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone (PTH) alters the shape of osteoblastic cells both in vivo and in vitro. In this study, we examined the effect of PTH on cytoskeletal actin and myosin, estimated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of Triton X-100 (1%) nonextractable proteins. After 2-5 minutes, PTH caused a rapid and transient decrease of 50-60% in polymerized actin and myosin associated with the Triton X-100 nonextractable cytoskeleton. Polymerized actin returned to control levels by 30 min. The PTH effect was dose-dependent with an IC50 of about 1 nM, and was partially inhibited by the (3-34) PTH antagonist. PTH caused a rapid transient rise in cyclic AMP (cAMP) in these cells that peaked at 4 min, while the nadir in cytoskeletal actin and myosin was recorded around 5 min. The intracellular calcium chelator Quin-2/AM (10 microM) also decreased cytoskeletal actin and myosin, to the same extent as did PTH (100 nM). To distinguish between cAMP elevation and Ca++ reduction as mediators of PTH action, we measured the phosphorylation of the 20 kD (PI 4.9) myosin light chain in cells preincubated with [32P]-orthophosphate. The phosphorylation of this protein decreased within 2-3 min after PTH addition and returned to control levels after 5 min. The calcium ionophore A-23187 did not antagonize this PTH effect. Visualization of microfilaments with rhodamine-conjugated phalloidin showed that PTH altered the cytoskeleton by decreasing the number of stress fibers. These changes in the cytoskeleton paralleled changes in the shape of the cells from a spread configuration to a stellate form with retracting processes. The above findings indicate that the alteration in osteoblast shape produced by PTH involve relatively rapid and transient changes in cytoskeletal organization that appear to be mediated by cAMP

  16. Characterisation of endogenous A2A and A2B receptor-mediated cyclic AMP responses in HEK 293 cells using the GloSensor™ biosensor: Evidence for an allosteric mechanism of action for the A2B-selective antagonist PSB 603.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, Joelle; May, Lauren T; Hill, Stephen J

    2018-01-01

    Endogenous adenosine A 2B receptors (A 2B AR) mediate cAMP accumulation in HEK 293 cells. Here we have used a biosensor to investigate the mechanism of action of the A 2B AR antagonist PSB 603 in HEK 293 cells. The A 2A agonist CGS 21680 elicited a small response in these cells (circa 20% of that obtained with NECA), suggesting that they also contain a small population of A 2A receptors. The responses to NECA and adenosine were antagonised by PSB 603, but not by the selective A 2A AR antagonist SCH 58261. In contrast, CGS 21680 responses were not antagonised by high concentrations of PSB 603, but were sensitive to inhibition by SCH 58261. Analysis of the effect of increasing concentrations of PSB 603 on the response to NECA indicated a non-competitive mode of action yielding a marked reduction in the NECA E MAX with no significant effect on EC 50 values. Kinetics analysis of the effect of PSB 603 on the A 2B AR-mediated NECA responses confirmed a saturable effect that was consistent with an allosteric mode of antagonism. The possibility that PSB 603 acts as a negative allosteric modulator of A 2B AR suggests new approaches to the development of therapeutic agents to treat conditions where adenosine levels are high. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Characterization of a crp* mutant of the E. coli cAMP receptor protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Y.L.; Garges, S.; Adhya, S.; Krakow, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    One of the crp* mutants previously isolated to activate lac promoter in vivo has been characterized with regard to its biochemical properties. CRP*592 shows a more open conformation than CRP as indicated by its sensitivity to proteolytic attack. Dithionitrobenzoic acid mediated intersubunit crosslinking of CRP requires cAMP; this reaction occurs with unliganded CRP*592. Binding of CRP to its site on the lac promoter and activation of abortive initiation is effected by cAMP but not by cGMP. CRP*592 can activate abortive initiation in the presence of cAMP or cGMP and also at a high CRP*592 concentration in the absence of cyclic nucleotide. DNase I footprinting shows that cAMP-CRP* binds to its site on lac P + while unliganded CRP* and cGMP-CRP* form a stable complex with the [ 32 P]lac P + only in the presence of RNA polymerase. While cGMP binds to CRP it cannot replace cAMP in effecting the conformation necessary for site specific promoter binding; the weakly active unliganded CRP*592 can be shifted to a functional conformation by cAMP, cGMP and RNA polymerase

  18. Export of cyclic AMP by avian red cells and inhibition by prostaglandin A1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heasley, L.E.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanism by which PGA 1 inhibits cAMP export by avian red cells was studied, to provide details on the molecular mechanism of a prostaglandin action and on the process of cAMP export itself. The interaction of PGA 1 with pigeon red cells is a multi-step process of uptake, metabolism and secretion. [ 3 H]PGA rapidly enters red cells and is promptly metabolized (V/sub max/ ≥ 1 nmol/min/10 7 cells) to a compound (5) that remains in the aqueous layer after ethyl acetate extraction. Chromatographic analyses, amino acid content and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry reveal that the polar metabolite is conjugated with glutathione (PGA 1 -GSH) at C-11 via a thioether bond and is largely (80%) reduced to the C-9 hydroxyl derivative

  19. Dendritic diameter influences the rate and magnitude of hippocampal cAMP and PKA transients during β-adrenergic receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luczak, Vincent; Blackwell, Kim T; Abel, Ted; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Gervasi, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    In the hippocampus, cyclic-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) form a critical signaling cascade required for long-lasting synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. Plasticity and memory are known to occur following pathway-specific changes in synaptic strength that are thought to result from spatially and temporally coordinated intracellular signaling events. To better understand how cAMP and PKA dynamically operate within the structural complexity of hippocampal neurons, we used live two-photon imaging and genetically-encoded fluorescent biosensors to monitor cAMP levels or PKA activity in CA1 neurons of acute hippocampal slices. Stimulation of β-adrenergic receptors (isoproterenol) or combined activation of adenylyl cyclase (forskolin) and inhibition of phosphodiesterase (IBMX) produced cAMP transients with greater amplitude and rapid on-rates in intermediate and distal dendrites compared to somata and proximal dendrites. In contrast, isoproterenol produced greater PKA activity in somata and proximal dendrites compared to intermediate and distal dendrites, and the on-rate of PKA activity did not differ between compartments. Computational models show that our observed compartmental difference in cAMP can be reproduced by a uniform distribution of PDE4 and a variable density of adenylyl cyclase that scales with compartment size to compensate for changes in surface to volume ratios. However, reproducing our observed compartmental difference in PKA activity required enrichment of protein phosphatase in small compartments; neither reduced PKA subunits nor increased PKA substrates were sufficient. Together, our imaging and computational results show that compartment diameter interacts with rate-limiting components like adenylyl cyclase, phosphodiesterase and protein phosphatase to shape the spatial and temporal components of cAMP and PKA signaling in CA1 neurons and suggests that small neuronal compartments are most sensitive to cAMP

  20. Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase is a Cytosolic DNA Sensor that Activates the Type-I Interferon Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lijun; Wu, Jiaxi; Du, Fenghe; Chen, Xiang; Chen, Zhijian J.

    2013-01-01

    The presence of DNA in the cytoplasm of mammalian cells is a danger signal that triggers the host immune responses such as the production of type-I interferons (IFN). Cytosolic DNA induces IFN through the production of cyclic-GMP-AMP (cGAMP), which binds to and activates the adaptor protein STING. Through biochemical fractionation and quantitative mass spectrometry, we identified a cGAMP synthase (cGAS), which belongs to the nucleotidyltransferase family. Overexpression of cGAS activated the transcription factor IRF3 and induced IFNβ in a STING-dependent manner. Knockdown of cGAS inhibited IRF3 activation and IFNβ induction by DNA transfection or DNA virus infection. cGAS bound to DNA in the cytoplasm and catalyzed cGAMP synthesis. These results indicate that cGAS is a cytosolic DNA sensor that induces interferons by producing the second messenger cGAMP. PMID:23258413

  1. The effects of irradiation on the cytosol glucocorticoid receptor and concentrations of corticosterone and cyclic nucleotides in the rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teshima, Teruki; Mori, Masaki; Honke, Yoshifumi

    1983-01-01

    The effects of irradiation on both the cytosol glucocorticoid receptor and concentrations of corticosterone and cyclic nucleotides in the rat liver were investigated. The liver concentrations of corticosterone and cyclic nucleotides were measured by radioimmunoassay before and after the irradiation of 1,000 rad/l fraction. The glucocorticoid receptor in the liver cytosol was determined by the measurement of the cytosol binding to 3 H-dexamethasone. The cytosol and nuclear corticosterone levels reached a peak 1 day after the irradiation of the rat liver and declined to the control levels after 2 days. The increase in corticosterone levels may be due to the direct stimulation of the right adrenal gland and/ or the stress induced by the irradiation. The binding capacity of the glucocorticoid receptor in rat liver cytosol decreased to the minimum 1 day after the irradiation, and the recovery occurred at 4 days. The Kd value of the glucocorticoid receptor remained unchanged from 1 hour until 4 days but was high at 4 and 7 days. The distinctly increased levels of cyclic GMP in the rat liver were found from 1 hour through 7 days after the irradiation, while cyclic AMP did not change. The inversed relationship between the cytosol glucocorticoid receptor and corticosterone levels in cytosol and the nuclei indicates that the receptor-bound corticosterone in cytosol can be transferred to a nucleus and remain there in the presence of appropriate amounts of corticosterone in cytosol, after which the receptor is released from the nucleus into cytosol. The high Kd values observed 4 -- 7 days after the irradiation may be either due to the direct effect of irradiation or to the replenishment of the receptor with a low affinity. (author)

  2. DNA-Mediated Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase-Dependent and -Independent Regulation of Innate Immune Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motani, Kou; Ito, Shinji; Nagata, Shigekazu

    2015-05-15

    Cytoplasmic DNA activates cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) to produce cyclic 2'-5'3'-5'GMP-AMP dinucleotide (2'5 'cGAMP). The binding of 2'5'cGAMP to an adaptor protein, stimulator of IFN genes (STING), activates a transcription factor, IFN regulatory factor 3, leading to the induction of IFN and chemokine gene expression. In this study, we found that the 2'5'cGAMP-dependent STING activation induced highly upregulated CXCL10 gene expression. Formation of a distinct STING dimer, which was detected by native PAGE, was induced by 2'5'cGAMP, but not 3'-5'3'-5'cGAMP. Analysis of DNase II(-/-) mice, which constitutively produce IFN-β and CXCL10, showed the accumulation of 2'5'cGAMP in their fetal livers and spleens, suggesting that the undigested DNA accumulating in DNase II(-/-) cells may have leaked from the lysosomes into the cytoplasm. The DNase II(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts produced 2'5'cGAMP in a cGAS-dependent manner during apoptotic cell engulfment. However, cGAS deficiency did not impair the STING-dependent upregulation of CXCL10 in DNase II(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts that was induced by apoptotic cell engulfment or DNA lipofection. These results suggest the involvement of a cGAS-independent additional DNA sensor(s) that induces the STING-dependent activation of innate immunity. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. Enhanced phosphorylation of cyclic AMP response element binding protein in Brain of mice following repetitive hypoxic exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yanan; Gao Ge; Long Caixia; Han Song; Zu Pengyu; Fang Li; Li Junfa

    2006-01-01

    Cerebral ischemic/hypoxic preconditioning (I/HPC) is a phenomenon of endogenous protection that renders Brain tolerant to sustained ischemia/hypoxia. This profound protection induced by I/HPC makes it an attractive target for developing potential clinical therapeutic approaches. However, the molecular mechanism of I/HPC is unclear. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB), a selective nuclear transcriptional factor, plays a key role in the neuronal functions. Phosphorylation of CREB on Ser-133 may facilitate its transcriptional activity in response to various stresses. In the current study, we observed the changes in CREB phosphorylation (Ser-133) and protein expression in Brain of auto-hypoxia-induced HPC mice by using Western blot analysis. We found that the levels of phosphorylated CREB (Ser-133), but not protein expression of CREB, increased significantly (p < 0.05) in the hippocampus and the frontal cortex of mice after repetitive hypoxic exposure (H2-H4, n = 6 for each group), when compared to that of the normoxic (H0, n = 6) or hypoxic exposure once group (H1, n = 6). In addition, a significant enhancement (p < 0.05) of CREB phosphorylation (Ser-133) could also be found in the nuclear extracts from the whole hippocampus of hypoxic preconditioned mice (H2-H4, n = 6 for each group). These results suggest that the phosphorylation of CREB might be involved in the development of cerebral hypoxic preconditioning

  4. Adrenomedullin stimulates cyclic AMP production in the airway epithelial cells of guinea-pigs and in the human epithelial cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Kawaguchi

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to examine the effects of adrenomedullin (AM on airway epithelial cells. Primary cultures of guinea-pig tracheal epithelial cells and the human bronchiolar epithelial cell line NCI-H441 were used. Intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, and stable end-products of nitric oxide were assayed. Adrenomedullin (10−6 mol/L stimulated cAMP production in guinea-pig epithelial cells. Indomethacin (10−5 mol/L significantly decreased the basal level of intracellular cAMP in guinea-pig epithelial cells, but not in NCI-H441 cells. However, AM did not stimulate production of PGE2, a major product that can increase cAMP formation. In the case of NCI-H441 cells, AM (10−8 – 10−6 mol/L did not significantly affect intracellular cGMP levels or nitrite content in conditioned medium. Adrenomedullin and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP each stimulated cAMP production in NCI-H441 cells, but AM-stimulated cAMP production was antagonized by the CGRP fragment CGRP8–37. These findings suggest that AM stimulates cAMP production and functionally competes with CGRP for binding sites in airway epithelial cells, at least in human epithelial cells, but that it does not stimulate the release of PGE2 and nitric oxide. Though cyclooxygenase products contribute to some extent to cAMP formation in guinea-pigs, AM independently stimulates intracellular cAMP formation in airway epithelial cells.

  5. Distribution and function of 3',5'-Cyclic-AMP phosphodiesterases in the human ovary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, T S; Kristensen, S G; Jeppesen, J V

    2015-01-01

    The concentration of the important second messenger cAMP is regulated by phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and hence an attractive drug target. However, limited human data are available about the PDEs in the ovary. The aim of the present study was to describe and characterise the PDEs in the human ovary....... Results were obtained by analysis of mRNA microarray data from follicles and granulosa cells (GCs), combined RT-PCR and enzymatic activity analysis in GCs, immunohistochemical analysis of ovarian sections and by studying the effect of PDE inhibitors on progesterone production from cultured GCs. We found...

  6. Influence of sulphate on effects of ADP, 3′,5′-cyclic amp and citrate on human platelet phosphofructokinase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Jan Willem N.; Gorter, G.; Sixma, J.J.; Staal, Gerard E.J.

    1974-01-01

    1. 1. Sulphate ions activate partially-purified human platelet phosphofructokinase. This is caused by suppression of the cooperativity of the enzyme with respect to fructose 6-phosphate. 2. 2. Sulphate therefore markedly affects the influences of allosteric modifiers such as ADP, 3′,5′-cyclic AMP

  7. Computational prediction of cAMP receptor protein (CRP binding sites in cyanobacterial genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Zhengchang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP, also known as catabolite gene activator protein (CAP, is an important transcriptional regulator widely distributed in many bacteria. The biological processes under the regulation of CRP are highly diverse among different groups of bacterial species. Elucidation of CRP regulons in cyanobacteria will further our understanding of the physiology and ecology of this important group of microorganisms. Previously, CRP has been experimentally studied in only two cyanobacterial strains: Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Anabaena sp. PCC 7120; therefore, a systematic genome-scale study of the potential CRP target genes and binding sites in cyanobacterial genomes is urgently needed. Results We have predicted and analyzed the CRP binding sites and regulons in 12 sequenced cyanobacterial genomes using a highly effective cis-regulatory binding site scanning algorithm. Our results show that cyanobacterial CRP binding sites are very similar to those in E. coli; however, the regulons are very different from that of E. coli. Furthermore, CRP regulons in different cyanobacterial species/ecotypes are also highly diversified, ranging from photosynthesis, carbon fixation and nitrogen assimilation, to chemotaxis and signal transduction. In addition, our prediction indicates that crp genes in modern cyanobacteria are likely inherited from a common ancestral gene in their last common ancestor, and have adapted various cellular functions in different environments, while some cyanobacteria lost their crp genes as well as CRP binding sites during the course of evolution. Conclusion The CRP regulons in cyanobacteria are highly diversified, probably as a result of divergent evolution to adapt to various ecological niches. Cyanobacterial CRPs may function as lineage-specific regulators participating in various cellular processes, and are important in some lineages. However, they are dispensable in some other lineages. The

  8. Characterization of the regulatory subunit from brain cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, J.C.

    1985-01-01

    Tryptic peptides derived from the regulatory subunits of brain and heart cAMP-dependent protein kinase II were mapped by reverse phase HPLC. At 280 nm, 15 unique peptides were found only in the heart RII digest, while 5 other peptides were obtained only from brain RII. At 210 nm, 13 brain-RII specific and 15 heart-RII specific tryptic peptides were identified and resolved. Two-dimensional mapping analyses revealed that several 37 P-labeled tryptic fragments derived from the autophosphorylation and the photoaffinity labeled cAMP-binding sites of brain RII were separate and distinct from the 32 P-peptides isolated from similarly treated heart RII. The tryptic phosphopeptide containing the autophosphorylation site in brain RII was purified. The sequence and phosphorylation site is: Arg-Ala-Ser(P)-Val-Cys-Ala-Glu-Ala-Tyr-Asn-Pro-Asp-Glu-Glu-Glu-Asp-Asp-Ala-Glu. Astrocytes and neurons exhibit high levels of the brain RII enzyme, while oligodendrocytes contain the heart RII enzyme. Monoclonal antibodies to bovine cerebral cortex RII were made and characterized. The antibodies elucidated a subtle difference between membrane-associated and cytosolic RII from cerebral cortex

  9. Cyclic AMP-dependent signaling system is a primary metabolic target for non-thermal effect of microwaves on heart muscle hydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narinyan, Lilia; Ayrapetyan, Sinerik

    2017-01-01

    Previously, we have suggested that cell hydration is a universal and extra-sensitive sensor for the structural changes of cell aqua medium caused by the impact of weak chemical and physical factors. The aim of present work is to elucidate the nature of the metabolic messenger through which physiological solution (PS) treated by non-thermal (NT) microwaves (MW) could modulate heart muscle hydration of rats. For this purpose, the effects of NT MW-treated PS on heart muscle hydration, [ 3 H]-ouabain binding with cell membrane, 45 Ca 2+ uptake and intracellular cyclic nucleotides contents in vivo and in vitro experiments were studied. It is shown that intraperitoneal injections of both Sham-treated PS and NT MW-treated PS elevate heart muscle hydration. However, the effect of NT MW-treated PS on muscle hydration is more pronounced than the effect of Sham-treated PS. In vitro experiments NT MW-treated PS has dehydration effect on muscle, which is not changed by decreasing Na + gradients on membrane. Intraperitoneal injection of Sham- and NT MW-treated PS containing 45 Ca 2+ have similar dehydration effect on muscle, while NT MW-treated PS has activation effect on Na + /Ca 2+ exchange in reverse mode. The intraperitoneal injection of NT MW-treated PS depresses [ 3 H]-ouabain binding with its high-affinity membrane receptors, elevates intracellular cAMP and decreases cGMP contents. Based on the obtained data, it is suggested that cAMP-dependent signaling system serves as a primary metabolic target for NT MW effect on heart muscle hydration.

  10. Cyclic cholecystokinin analogues with high selectivity for central receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpentier, B.; Pelaprat, D.; Durieux, C.; Dor, A.; Roques, B.P.; Reibaud, M.; Blanchard, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    Taking as a model the N-terminal folding of the cholecystokinin tyrosine-sulfated octapeptide deduced from conformational studies, two cyclic cholecystokinin (CCK) analogues were synthesized by conventional peptide synthesis. The binding characteristics of these peptides were investigated on brain cortex membranes and pancreatic acini of guinea pig. Compounds I and II were competitive inhibitors of [ 3 H]Boc[Ahx 28,31 ]CCK-(27-33) binding to central CCK receptors and showed a high degree of selectivity for these binding sites. This high selectivity was associated with a high affinity for central CCK receptors. Similar affinities and selectivities were found when 125 I Bolton-Hunter-labeled CCK-8 was used as a ligand. Moreover, these compounds were only weakly active in the stimulation of amylase release from guinea pig pancreatic acini and were unable to induce contractions in the guinea pig ileum. The two cyclic CCK analogues, therefore, appear to be synthetic ligands exhibiting both high affinity and high selectivity for central CCK binding sites. These compounds could help clarify the respective role of central and peripheral receptors for various CCK-8-induced pharmacological effects

  11. Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase Is the Cytosolic Sensor of Plasmodium falciparum Genomic DNA and Activates Type I IFN in Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Marin, Carolina; Schrum, Jacob E; Andrade, Warrison A; Shaffer, Scott A; Giraldo, Lina F; Lasso, Alvaro M; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn A; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Golenbock, Douglas T

    2018-01-15

    Innate immune receptors have a key role in the sensing of malaria and initiating immune responses. As a consequence of infection, systemic inflammation emerges and is directly related to signs and symptoms during acute disease. We have previously reported that plasmodial DNA is the primary driver of systemic inflammation in malaria, both within the phagolysosome and in the cytosol of effector cells. In this article, we demonstrate that Plasmodium falciparum genomic DNA delivered to the cytosol of human monocytes binds and activates cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS). Activated cGAS synthesizes 2'3'-cGAMP, which we subsequently can detect using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. 2'3'-cGAMP acts as a second messenger for STING activation and triggers TBK1/IRF3 activation, resulting in type I IFN production in human cells. This induction of type I IFN was independent of IFI16. Access of DNA to the cytosolic compartment is mediated by hemozoin, because incubation of purified malaria pigment with DNase abrogated IFN-β induction. Collectively, these observations implicate cGAS as an important cytosolic sensor of P. falciparum genomic DNA and reveal the role of the cGAS/STING pathway in the induction of type I IFN in response to malaria parasites. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase interferes with GTP γS stimulated IP3 formation in differentiated HL-60 cell membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misaki, Naoyuki; Imaizumi, Taro; Watanabe, Yashuiro

    1989-01-01

    The effects of addition of activated cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) on the function of islet-activating protein (IAP)-sensitive GTP-binding (G) protein were studied in the plasma membranes of 3 H-inositol-labeled differentiated human leukemic (HL-60) cells. Pretreatment of the membranes with activated PKA in the presence of MgATP for 15 min. at 37 degree C decreased GTP γS-stimulated inositol trisphosphate (IP 3 ) formation by about 30%, but had no influence on Ca 2+ -stimulated IP 3 formation. And autoradiography in the phosphorylation experiments of solubilized HL-60 cell membranes by PKA showed some 32 P incorporated bands, and among them one of the major bands showed the migration at 40 kDa supporting that the G protein coupling with PI response was phosphorylated by PKA. These results showed that pretreatment with activated PKA inhibited the mediating function of the G protein between the fMLP receptor and phospholipase C by its phosphorylation

  13. Dopamine receptors modulate cytotoxicity of natural killer cells via cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhao

    Full Text Available Dopamine (DA, a neurotransmitter in the nervous system, has been shown to modulate immune function. We have previously reported that five subtypes of DA receptors, including D1R, D2R, D3R, D4R and D5R, are expressed in T lymphocytes and they are involved in regulation of T cells. However, roles of these DA receptor subtypes and their coupled signal-transduction pathway in modulation of natural killer (NK cells still remain to be clarified. The spleen of mice was harvested and NK cells were isolated and purified by negative selection using magnetic activated cell sorting. After NK cells were incubated with various drugs for 4 h, flow cytometry measured cytotoxicity of NK cells against YAC-1 lymphoma cells. NK cells expressed the five subtypes of DA receptors at mRNA and protein levels. Activation of D1-like receptors (including D1R and D5R with agonist SKF38393 enhanced NK cell cytotoxicity, but activation of D2-like receptors (including D2R, D3R and D4R with agonist quinpirole attenuated NK cells. Simultaneously, SKF38393 elevated D1R and D5R expression, cAMP content, and phosphorylated cAMP-response element-binding (CREB level in NK cells, while quinpirole reduced D3R and D4R expression, cAMP content, and phosphorylated CREB level in NK cells. These effects of SKF38393 were blocked by SCH23390, an antagonist of D1-like receptors, and quinpirole effects were abolished by haloperidol, an antagonist of D2-like receptors. In support these results, H89, an inhibitor of phosphokinase A (PKA, prevented the SKF38393-dependent enhancement of NK cells and forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase (AC, counteracted the quinpirole-dependent suppression of NK cells. These findings show that DA receptor subtypes are involved in modulation of NK cells and suggest that D1-like receptors facilitate NK cells by stimulating D1R/D5R-cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling pathway and D2-like receptors suppress NK cells by inhibiting D3R/D4R-cAMP-PKA-CREB signaling pathway. The

  14. Reflections on: "A general role for adaptations in G-Proteins and the cyclic AMP system in mediating the chronic actions of morphine and cocaine on neuronal function".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestler, Eric J

    2016-08-15

    In 1991 we demonstrated that chronic morphine exposure increased levels of adenylyl cyclase and protein kinase A (PKA) in several regions of the rat central nervous system as inferred from measures of enzyme activity in crude extracts (Terwilliger et al., 1991). These findings led us to hypothesize that a concerted upregulation of the cAMP pathway is a general mechanism of opiate tolerance and dependence. Moreover, in the same study we showed similar induction of adenylyl cyclase and PKA activity in nucleus accumbens (NAc) in response to chronic administration of cocaine, but not of several non-abused psychoactive drugs. Morphine and cocaine also induced equivalent changes in inhibitory G protein subunits in this brain region. We thus extended our hypothesis to suggest that, particularly within brain reward regions such as NAc, cAMP pathway upregulation represents a common mechanism of reward tolerance and dependence shared by several classes of drugs of abuse. Research since that time, by many laboratories, has provided substantial support for these hypotheses. Specifically, opiates in several CNS regions including NAc, and cocaine more selectively in NAc, induce expression of certain adenylyl cyclase isoforms and PKA subunits via the transcription factor, CREB, and these transcriptional adaptations serve a homeostatic function to oppose drug action. In certain brain regions, such as locus coeruleus, these adaptations mediate aspects of physical opiate dependence and withdrawal, whereas in NAc they mediate reward tolerance and dependence that drives increased drug self-administration. This work has had important implications for understanding the molecular basis of addiction. "A general role for adaptations in G-proteins and the cyclic AMP system in mediating the chronic actions of morphine and cocaine on neuronal function". Previous studies have shown that chronic morphine increases levels of the G-protein subunits Giα and Goα, adenylate cyclase, cyclic AMP

  15. Increase of Intracellular Cyclic AMP by PDE4 Inhibitors Affects HepG2 Cell Cycle Progression and Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimi, Mara; Cardarelli, Silvia; Galli, Francesca; Giardi, Maria Federica; Ragusa, Federica; Panera, Nadia; Cinque, Benedetta; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Biagioni, Stefano; Giorgi, Mauro

    2017-06-01

    Type 4 cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDE4) are major members of a superfamily of enzymes (PDE) involved in modulation of intracellular signaling mediated by cAMP. Broadly expressed in most human tissues and present in large amounts in the liver, PDEs have in the last decade been key therapeutic targets for several inflammatory diseases. Recently, a significant body of work has underscored their involvement in different kinds of cancer, but with no attention paid to liver cancer. The present study investigated the effects of two PDE4 inhibitors, rolipram and DC-TA-46, on the growth of human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Treatment with these inhibitors caused a marked increase of intracellular cAMP level and a dose- and time-dependent effect on cell growth. The concentrations of inhibitors that halved cell proliferation to about 50% were used for cell cycle experiments. Rolipram (10 μM) and DC-TA-46 (0.5 μM) produced a decrease of cyclin expression, in particular of cyclin A, as well as an increase in p21, p27 and p53, as evaluated by Western blot analysis. Changes in the intracellular localization of cyclin D1 were also observed after treatments. In addition, both inhibitors caused apoptosis, as demonstrated by an Annexin-V cytofluorimetric assay and analysis of caspase-3/7 activity. Results demonstrated that treatment with PDE4 inhibitors affected HepG2 cell cycle and survival, suggesting that they might be useful as potential adjuvant, chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive agents in hepatocellular carcinoma. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1401-1411, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase is an innate immune sensor of HIV and other retroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Daxing; Wu, Jiaxi; Wu, You-Tong; Du, Fenghe; Aroh, Chukwuemika; Yan, Nan; Sun, Lijun; Chen, Zhijian J

    2013-08-23

    Retroviruses, including HIV, can activate innate immune responses, but the host sensors for retroviruses are largely unknown. Here we show that HIV infection activates cyclic guanosine monophosphate-adenosine monophosphate (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) to produce cGAMP, which binds to and activates the adaptor protein STING to induce type I interferons and other cytokines. Inhibitors of HIV reverse transcriptase, but not integrase, abrogated interferon-β induction by the virus, suggesting that the reverse-transcribed HIV DNA triggers the innate immune response. Knockout or knockdown of cGAS in mouse or human cell lines blocked cytokine induction by HIV, murine leukemia virus, and simian immunodeficiency virus. These results indicate that cGAS is an innate immune sensor of HIV and other retroviruses.

  17. Acute morphine alters GABAergic transmission in the central amygdala during naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal: role of cyclic AMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal eBajo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The central amygdala (CeA plays an important role in opioid addiction. Therefore, we examined the effects of naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal (WD on GABAergic transmission in rat CeA neurons using whole-cell recordings with naloxone in the bath. The basal frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs increased in CeA neurons from WD compared to placebo rats. Acute morphine (10 M had mixed effects (> 20% change from baseline on mIPSCs in placebo and WD rats. In most CeA neurons (64% from placebo rats, morphine significantly decreased mIPSC frequency and amplitude. In 32% of placebo neurons, morphine significantly increased mIPSC amplitudes but had no effect on mIPSC frequency. In WD rats, acute morphine significantly increased mIPSC frequency but had no effect on mIPSC amplitude in 41% of CeA neurons. In 45% of cells, acute morphine significantly decreased mIPSC frequency and amplitude. Pre-treatment with the cyclic AMP inhibitor (R-adenosine, cyclic 3’,5’-(hydrogenphosphorothioate triethylammonium (RP, prevented acute morphine-induced potentiation of mIPSCs. Pre-treatment of slices with the Gi/o G-protein subunit inhibitor pertussis toxin (PTX did not prevent the acute morphine-induced enhancement or inhibition of mIPSCs. PTX and RP decreased basal mIPSC frequencies and amplitudes only in WD rats. The results suggest that inhibition of GABAergic transmission in the CeA by acute morphine is mediated by PTX-insensitive mechanisms, although PTX-sensitive mechanisms cannot be ruled out for non-morphine responsive cells; by contrast, potentiation of GABAergic transmission is mediated by activated cAMP signaling that also mediates the increased basal GABAergic transmission in WD rats. Our data indicate that during the acute phase of WD, the CeA opioid and GABAergic systems undergo neuroadaptative changes conditioned by a previous chronic morphine exposure and dependence.

  18. AMP and adenosine are both ligands for adenosine 2B receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holien, Jessica K; Seibt, Benjamin; Roberts, Veena; Salvaris, Evelyn; Parker, Michael W; Cowan, Peter J; Dwyer, Karen M

    2018-01-15

    Adenosine is considered the canonical ligand for the adenosine 2B receptor (A 2B R). A 2B R is upregulated following kidney ischemia augmenting post ischemic blood flow and limiting tubular injury. In this context the beneficial effect of A 2B R signaling has been attributed to an increase in the pericellular concentration of adenosine. However, following renal ischemia both kidney adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and adenosine levels are substantially increased. Using computational modeling and calcium mobilization assays, we investigated whether AMP could also be a ligand for A 2B R. The computational modeling suggested that AMP interacts with more favorable energy to A 2B R compared with adenosine. Furthermore, AMPαS, a non-hydrolyzable form of AMP, increased calcium uptake by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the human A 2B R, indicating preferential signaling via the G q pathway. Therefore, a putative AMP-A 2B R interaction is supported by the computational modeling data and the biological results suggest this interaction involves preferential G q activation. These data provide further insights into the role of purinergic signaling in the pathophysiology of renal IRI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Embryonic cholesterol esterification is regulated by a cyclic AMP-dependent pathway in yolk sac membrane-derived endodermal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siou-Huei Wang

    Full Text Available During avian embryonic development, endodermal epithelial cells (EECs absorb yolk through the yolk sac membrane. Sterol O-acyltransferase (SOAT is important for esterification and yolk lipid utilization during development. Because the major enzyme for yolk sac membrane cholesteryl ester synthesis is SOAT1, we cloned the avian SOAT1 promoter and elucidated the cellular functions of SOAT1. Treatments with either glucagon, isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX, an adenylate cyclase activator (forskolin, a cAMP analog (dibutyryl-cAMP, or a low glucose concentration all increased SOAT1 mRNA accumulation in EECs from Japanese quail, suggesting that SOAT1 is regulated by nutrients and hormones through a cAMP-dependent pathway. Activity of protein kinase A (PKA was increased by IBMX, whereas co-treatment with the PKA inhibitor, H89 negated the increase in PKA activity. Cyclic AMP-induced EECs had greater cholesterol esterification than untreated EECs. By promoter deletion and point-mutation, the cAMP-response element (-349 to -341 bp was identified as critical in mediating transcription of SOAT1. In conclusion, expression of SOAT1 was regulated by a cAMP-dependent pathway and factors that increase PKA will increase SOAT1 to improve the utilization of lipids in the EECs and potentially modify embryonic growth.

  20. Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase Is an Innate Immune DNA Sensor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Angela C; Cai, Haocheng; Li, Tuo; Franco, Luis H; Li, Xiao-Dong; Nair, Vidhya R; Scharn, Caitlyn R; Stamm, Chelsea E; Levine, Beth; Chen, Zhijian J; Shiloh, Michael U

    2015-06-10

    Activation of the DNA-dependent cytosolic surveillance pathway in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection stimulates ubiquitin-dependent autophagy and inflammatory cytokine production, and plays an important role in host defense against M. tuberculosis. However, the identity of the host sensor for M. tuberculosis DNA is unknown. Here we show that M. tuberculosis activated cyclic guanosine monophosphate-adenosine monophosphate (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS) in macrophages to produce cGAMP, a second messenger that activates the adaptor protein stimulator of interferon genes (STING) to induce type I interferons and other cytokines. cGAS localized with M. tuberculosis in mouse and human cells and in human tuberculosis lesions. Knockdown or knockout of cGAS in human or mouse macrophages blocked cytokine production and induction of autophagy. Mice deficient in cGAS were more susceptible to lethality caused by infection with M. tuberculosis. These results demonstrate that cGAS is a vital innate immune sensor of M. tuberculosis infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The small molecule triclabendazole decreases the intracellular level of cyclic AMP and increases resistance to stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Joo Lee

    Full Text Available The Ras-adenylyl cyclase-protein kinase A nutrient-sensing pathway controls metabolism, proliferation and resistance to stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The genetic disruption of this pathway increases resistance to a variety of stresses. We show here that the pharmacological inhibition of this pathway by the drug triclabendazole increases resistance to oxidants, heat stress and extends the chronological life. Evidence is presented that triclabendazole decreases the intracellular level of cyclic AMP by inhibiting adenylyl cyclase and triggers the parallel rapid translocation of the stress-resistance transcription factor Msn2 from the cytosol into the nucleus, as deduced from experiments employing a strain in which MSN2 is replaced with MSN2-GFP (GFP, green fluorescent protein. Msn2 and Msn4 are responsible for activating the transcription of numerous genes that encode proteins that protect cells from stress. The results are consistent with triclabendazole either inhibiting the association of Ras with adenylyl cyclase or directly inhibiting adenylyl cyclase, which in turn triggers Msn2/4 to enter the nucleus and activate stress-responsible element gene expression.

  2. Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase Is Required for Cell Proliferation and Inflammatory Responses in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synoviocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is characterized by inflammatory cell infiltration, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS invasive proliferation, and joint destruction. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS is a cytosolic DNA sensor that induces immune activation. In this study, we examined whether cGAS plays a role in RA FLS. In this study, cGAS was overexpressed in RA-FLS compared with OA FLS. TNFα stimulation induced cGAS expression in RA FLS. Overexpression of cGAS promoted the proliferation and knockdown of cGAS inhibited the proliferation of RA FLS. cGAS overexpression enhanced the production of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs as well as AKT and ERK phosphorylation in TNFα-stimulated FLS. In contrast, cGAS silencing inhibited production of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs as well as AKT and ERK phosphorylation in TNFα-stimulated FLS. These results suggest that cGAS activates the AKT and ERK pathways to promote the inflammatory response of RA FLS, and the development of strategies targeting cGAS may have therapeutic potential for human RA.

  3. The catalytic mechanism of cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) and implications for innate immunity and inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Justin; Ralph, Erik C; Shanker, Suman; Wang, Hong; Byrnes, Laura J; Horst, Reto; Wong, Jimson; Brault, Amy; Dumlao, Darren; Smith, James F; Dakin, Leslie A; Schmitt, Daniel C; Trujillo, John; Vincent, Fabien; Griffor, Matt; Aulabaugh, Ann E

    2017-12-01

    Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) is activated by ds-DNA binding to produce the secondary messenger 2',3'-cGAMP. cGAS is an important control point in the innate immune response; dysregulation of the cGAS pathway is linked to autoimmune diseases while targeted stimulation may be of benefit in immunoncology. We report here the structure of cGAS with dinucleotides and small molecule inhibitors, and kinetic studies of the cGAS mechanism. Our structural work supports the understanding of how ds-DNA activates cGAS, suggesting a site for small molecule binders that may cause cGAS activation at physiological ATP concentrations, and an apparent hotspot for inhibitor binding. Mechanistic studies of cGAS provide the first kinetic constants for 2',3'-cGAMP formation, and interestingly, describe a catalytic mechanism where 2',3'-cGAMP may be a minor product of cGAS compared with linear nucleotides. © 2017 The Authors Protein Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Protein Society.

  4. Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase Is Required for Cell Proliferation and Inflammatory Responses in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synoviocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Su, Guo-Hua; Zhang, Fang; Chu, Jing-Xue; Wang, Yun-Shan

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by inflammatory cell infiltration, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) invasive proliferation, and joint destruction. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) is a cytosolic DNA sensor that induces immune activation. In this study, we examined whether cGAS plays a role in RA FLS. In this study, cGAS was overexpressed in RA-FLS compared with OA FLS. TNFα stimulation induced cGAS expression in RA FLS. Overexpression of cGAS promoted the proliferation and knockdown of cGAS inhibited the proliferation of RA FLS. cGAS overexpression enhanced the production of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) as well as AKT and ERK phosphorylation in TNFα-stimulated FLS. In contrast, cGAS silencing inhibited production of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) as well as AKT and ERK phosphorylation in TNFα-stimulated FLS. These results suggest that cGAS activates the AKT and ERK pathways to promote the inflammatory response of RA FLS, and the development of strategies targeting cGAS may have therapeutic potential for human RA.

  5. Cutting edge: Antimalarial drugs inhibit IFN-β production through blockade of cyclic GMP-AMP synthase-DNA interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jie; Woodward, Joshua J; Sasaki, Tomikazu; Minie, Mark; Elkon, Keith B

    2015-05-01

    Type I IFN is strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases, such as lupus, and rare monogenic IFNopathies, including Aicardi-Goutières syndrome. Recently, a new DNA-activated pathway involving the enzyme cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) was described and potentially linked to Aicardi-Goutières syndrome. To identify drugs that could potentially inhibit cGAS activity, we performed in silico screening of drug libraries. By computational analysis, we identified several antimalarial drugs (AMDs) that were predicted to interact with the cGAS/dsDNA complex. Our studies validated that several AMDs were effective inhibitors of IFN-β production and that they functioned by inhibiting dsDNA stimulation of cGAS. Because AMDs have been widely used in human diseases and have an excellent safety profile, our findings suggest new therapeutic strategies for the treatment of severe debilitating diseases associated with type I IFNs due to cGAS activation. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  6. Regulation of Cancer Cell Responsiveness to Ionizing Radiation Treatment by Cyclic AMP Response Element Binding Nuclear Transcription Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca D’Auria

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP response element binding (CREB protein is a member of the CREB/activating transcription factor (ATF family of transcription factors that play an important role in the cell response to different environmental stimuli leading to proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and survival. A number of studies highlight the involvement of CREB in the resistance to ionizing radiation (IR therapy, demonstrating a relationship between IR-induced CREB family members’ activation and cell survival. Consistent with these observations, we have recently demonstrated that CREB and ATF-1 are expressed in leukemia cell lines and that low-dose radiation treatment can trigger CREB activation, leading to survival of erythro-leukemia cells (K562. On the other hand, a number of evidences highlight a proapoptotic role of CREB following IR treatment of cancer cells. Since the development of multiple mechanisms of resistance is one key problem of most malignancies, including those of hematological origin, it is highly desirable to identify biological markers of responsiveness/unresponsiveness useful to follow-up the individual response and to adjust anticancer treatments. Taking into account all these considerations, this mini-review will be focused on the involvement of CREB/ATF family members in response to IR therapy, to deepen our knowledge of this topic, and to pave the way to translation into a therapeutic context.

  7. Regulation of Cox-2 by Cyclic AMP Response Element Binding Protein in Prostate Cancer: Potential Role for Nexrutine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Ghosh

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We recently showed that NexrutineR, a Phellodendron amurense bark extract, suppresses proliferation of prostate cancer cell lines and tumor development in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP model. Our data also indicate that the antiproliferative effects of NexrutineR are mediated in part by Akt and Cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB. Cyclooxygenase (Cox-2, a pro-inflammatory mediator, is a CREB target that induces prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and suppresses apoptosis. Treatment of LNCaP cells with NexrutineR reduced tumor necrosis factor α-induced enzymatic as well as promoter activities of Cox-2. NexrutineR also reduced the expression and promoter activity of Cox-2 in PC-3 cells that express high constitutive levels of Cox-2. Deletion analysis coupled with mutational analysis of the Cox-2 promoter identified CRE as being sufficient for mediating NexrutineR response. Immunohistochemical analysis of human prostate tumors show increased expression of CREB and DNA binding activity in high-grade tumors (three-fold higher in human prostate tumors compared to normal prostate; P = .01. We have identified CREB-mediated activation of Cox-2 as a potential signaling pathway in prostate cancer which can be blocked with a nontoxic, cost-effective dietary supplement like NexrutineR, demonstrating a prospective for development of NexrutineR for prostate cancer management.

  8. Regulation of cAMP Responsive Element Binding Protein 3-Like 1 (Creb3l1 Expression by Orphan Nuclear Receptor Nr4a1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P. Greenwood

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP (cAMP inducible transcription factor cAMP responsive element binding protein 3 like 1 (Creb3l1 is strongly activated in the hypothalamus in response to hyperosmotic cues such as dehydration (DH. We have recently shown that Creb3l1 expression is upregulated by cAMP pathways in vitro, however the exact mechanisms are not known. Here we show that increasing Creb3l1 transcription by raising cAMP levels in mouse pituitary AtT20 cells automatically initiates cleavage of Creb3l1, leading to a greater abundance of the transcriptionally active N-terminal portion. Inhibiting protein synthesis indicated that de novo protein synthesis of an intermediary transcription factor was required for Creb3l1 induction. Strategic mining of our microarray data from dehydrated rodent hypothalamus revealed four candidates, reduced to two by analysis of acute hyperosmotic-induced transcriptional activation profiles in the hypothalamus, and one, orphan nuclear receptor Nr4a1, by direct shRNA mediated silencing in AtT20 cells. We show that activation of Creb3l1 transcription by Nr4a1 involves interaction with a single NBRE site in the promoter region. The ability to activate Creb3l1 transcription by this pathway in vitro is dictated by the level of methylation of a CpG island within the proximal promoter/5′UTR of this gene. We thus identify a novel cAMP-Nr4a1-Creb3l1 transcriptional pathway in AtT20 cells and also, our evidence would suggest, in the hypothalamus.

  9. Mechanisms of Altered Control of Proliferation by Cyclic Amp/Protein Kinase A During Mammary Tumor Progression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Imagawa, Walter

    1999-01-01

    We hypothesize that alterations in the regulation of growth by growth factors and cAMP during mammary tumor progression are related to MAP kinase signaling pathways known to be affected by cAMP and pertussis toxin (PT...

  10. Synthesis of interleukin 6 (interferon-β2/B cell stimulatory factor 2) in human fibroblasts is triggered by an increase in intracellular cyclic AMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhange, Y.; Lin, J.X.; Vilcek, J.

    1988-01-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6; also referred to as interferon-β 2 , 26-kDa protein, and B cell stimulatory factor 2) is a cytokine whose actions include a stimulation of immunoglobulin synthesis, enhancement of B cell growth, and modulation of acute phase protein synthesis by hepatocytes. Synthesis of IL-6 is stimulated by interleukin 1 (IL-1), tumor necrosis factor (TNF), or platelet-derived growth factor. The authors examined the role of the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent signal transduction pathway in IL-6 gene expression. Several activators of adenylate cyclase, including prostaglandin E1, forskolin, and cholera toxin, as well as the phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutylmethylxanthine and the cAMP analog dibutyryl cAMP, shared the ability to cause a dramatic and sustained increase in IL-6 mRNA levels in human FS-4 fibroblasts. Actinomycin D treatment abolished this enhancement. Treatments that increased intracellular cAMP also stimulated the secretion of the IL-6 protein in a biologically active form. Increased intracellular cAMP appears to enhance IL-6 gene expression by a protein kinase C-independent mechanism because down-regulation of protein kinase C by a chronic exposure of cells to a high dose of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate did not abolish the enhancement of IL-6 expression by treatments that increase cAMP. IL-1 and TNF too increased IL-6 mRNA levels by a protein kinase C-independent mechanism. The results suggest a role for the cAMP-dependent pathway(s) in IL-6 gene activation by TNF and IL-1

  11. Cyclic AMP Regulates Bacterial Persistence through Repression of the Oxidative Stress Response and SOS-Dependent DNA Repair in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Quiroz, Roberto C; Silva-Valenzuela, Cecilia; Brewster, Jennifer; Castro-Nallar, Eduardo; Levy, Stuart B; Camilli, Andrew

    2018-01-09

    Bacterial persistence is a transient, nonheritable physiological state that provides tolerance to bactericidal antibiotics. The stringent response, toxin-antitoxin modules, and stochastic processes, among other mechanisms, play roles in this phenomenon. How persistence is regulated is relatively ill defined. Here we show that cyclic AMP, a global regulator of carbon catabolism and other core processes, is a negative regulator of bacterial persistence in uropathogenic Escherichia coli , as measured by survival after exposure to a β-lactam antibiotic. This phenotype is regulated by a set of genes leading to an oxidative stress response and SOS-dependent DNA repair. Thus, persister cells tolerant to cell wall-acting antibiotics must cope with oxidative stress and DNA damage and these processes are regulated by cyclic AMP in uropathogenic E. coli IMPORTANCE Bacterial persister cells are important in relapsing infections in patients treated with antibiotics and also in the emergence of antibiotic resistance. Our results show that in uropathogenic E. coli , the second messenger cyclic AMP negatively regulates persister cell formation, since in its absence much more persister cells form that are tolerant to β-lactams antibiotics. We reveal the mechanism to be decreased levels of reactive oxygen species, specifically hydroxyl radicals, and SOS-dependent DNA repair. Our findings suggest that the oxidative stress response and DNA repair are relevant pathways to target in the design of persister-specific antibiotic compounds. Copyright © 2018 Molina-Quiroz et al.

  12. Cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling in the anterior pituitary gland in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2018-03-05

    The cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) was the first among the so-called "second messengers" to be described. It is conserved in most organisms and functions as a signal transducer by mediating the intracellular effects of multiple hormones and neurotransmitters. In this review, we first delineate how different members of the cAMP pathway ensure its correct compartmentalization and activity, mediate the terminal intracellular effects, and allow the crosstalk with other signaling pathways. We then focus on the pituitary gland, where cAMP exerts a crucial function by controlling the responsiveness of the cells to hypothalamic hormones, neurotransmitters and peripheral factors. We discuss the most relevant physiological functions mediated by cAMP in the different pituitary cell types, and summarize the defects affecting this pathway that have been reported in the literature. We finally discuss how a deregulated cAMP pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of pituitary disorders and how it affects the response to therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Phosphorylation of the protein kinase A catalytic subunit is induced by cyclic AMP deficiency and physiological stresses in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McInnis, Brittney; Mitchell, Jessica; Marcus, Stevan

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → cAMP deficiency induces phosphorylation of PKA catalytic subunit (Pka1) in S. pombe. → Pka1 phosphorylation is further induced by physiological stresses. → Pka1 phosphorylation is not induced in cells lacking the PKA regulatory subunit. → Results suggest that cAMP-independent Pka1 phosphorylation is stimulatory in nature. -- Abstract: In the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is not essential for viability under normal culturing conditions, making this organism attractive for investigating mechanisms of PKA regulation. Here we show that S. pombe cells carrying a deletion in the adenylate cyclase gene, cyr1, express markedly higher levels of the PKA catalytic subunit, Pka1, than wild type cells. Significantly, in cyr1Δ cells, but not wild type cells, a substantial proportion of Pka1 protein is hyperphosphorylated. Pka1 hyperphosphorylation is strongly induced in cyr1Δ cells, and to varying degrees in wild type cells, by both glucose starvation and stationary phase stresses, which are associated with reduced cAMP-dependent PKA activity, and by KCl stress, the cellular adaptation to which is dependent on PKA activity. Interestingly, hyperphosphorylation of Pka1 was not detected in either cyr1 + or cyr1Δ S. pombe strains carrying a deletion in the PKA regulatory subunit gene, cgs1, under any of the tested conditions. Our results demonstrate the existence of a cAMP-independent mechanism of PKA catalytic subunit phosphorylation, which we propose could serve as a mechanism for inducing or maintaining specific PKA functions under conditions in which its cAMP-dependent activity is downregulated.

  14. Inhibition of cyclic AMP response element-directed transcription by decoy oligonucleotides enhances tumor-specific radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Serk In, E-mail: serkin@korea.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); The BK21 Plus Program for Biomedical Sciences, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Medicine and Center for Bone Biology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Park, Sung-Jun [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Laboratory of Obesity and Aging Research, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Lee, Junghan; Kim, Hye Eun; Park, Su Jin; Sohn, Jeong-Won [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yun Gyu, E-mail: parkyg@korea.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    The radiation stress induces cytotoxic responses of cell death as well as cytoprotective responses of cell survival. Understanding exact cellular mechanism and signal transduction pathways is important in improving cancer radiotherapy. Increasing evidence suggests that cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB)/activating transcription factor (ATF) family proteins act as a survival factor and a signaling molecule in response to stress. We postulated that CREB inhibition via CRE decoy oligonucleotide increases tumor cell sensitization to γ-irradiation-induced cytotoxic stress. In the present study, we demonstrate that CREB phosphorylation and CREB DNA-protein complex formation increased in time- and radiation dose-dependent manners, while there was no significant change in total protein level of CREB. In addition, CREB was phosphorylated in response to γ-irradiation through p38 MAPK pathway. Further investigation revealed that CREB blockade by decoy oligonucleotides functionally inhibited transactivation of CREB, and significantly increased radiosensitivity of multiple human cancer cell lines including TP53- and/or RB-mutated cells with minimal effects on normal cells. We also demonstrate that tumor cells ectopically expressing dominant negative mutant CREB (KCREB) and the cells treated with p38 MAPK inhibitors were more sensitive to γ-irradiation than wild type parental cells or control-treated cells. Taken together, we conclude that CREB protects tumor cells from γ-irradiation, and combination of CREB inhibition plus ionizing radiation will be a promising radiotherapeutic approach. - Highlights: • γ-Irradiation induced CREB phosphorylation and CRE-directed transcription in tumor. • γ-Irradiation-induced transcriptional activation of CREB was via p38 MAPK pathway. • CRE blockade increased radiosensitivity of tumor cells but not of normal cells. • CRE decoy oligonucleotides or p38 MAPK inhibitors can be used as radiosensitizers.

  15. Inhibition of cyclic AMP response element-directed transcription by decoy oligonucleotides enhances tumor-specific radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Serk In; Park, Sung-Jun; Lee, Junghan; Kim, Hye Eun; Park, Su Jin; Sohn, Jeong-Won; Park, Yun Gyu

    2016-01-01

    The radiation stress induces cytotoxic responses of cell death as well as cytoprotective responses of cell survival. Understanding exact cellular mechanism and signal transduction pathways is important in improving cancer radiotherapy. Increasing evidence suggests that cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB)/activating transcription factor (ATF) family proteins act as a survival factor and a signaling molecule in response to stress. We postulated that CREB inhibition via CRE decoy oligonucleotide increases tumor cell sensitization to γ-irradiation-induced cytotoxic stress. In the present study, we demonstrate that CREB phosphorylation and CREB DNA-protein complex formation increased in time- and radiation dose-dependent manners, while there was no significant change in total protein level of CREB. In addition, CREB was phosphorylated in response to γ-irradiation through p38 MAPK pathway. Further investigation revealed that CREB blockade by decoy oligonucleotides functionally inhibited transactivation of CREB, and significantly increased radiosensitivity of multiple human cancer cell lines including TP53- and/or RB-mutated cells with minimal effects on normal cells. We also demonstrate that tumor cells ectopically expressing dominant negative mutant CREB (KCREB) and the cells treated with p38 MAPK inhibitors were more sensitive to γ-irradiation than wild type parental cells or control-treated cells. Taken together, we conclude that CREB protects tumor cells from γ-irradiation, and combination of CREB inhibition plus ionizing radiation will be a promising radiotherapeutic approach. - Highlights: • γ-Irradiation induced CREB phosphorylation and CRE-directed transcription in tumor. • γ-Irradiation-induced transcriptional activation of CREB was via p38 MAPK pathway. • CRE blockade increased radiosensitivity of tumor cells but not of normal cells. • CRE decoy oligonucleotides or p38 MAPK inhibitors can be used as radiosensitizers.

  16. Presence of cyclic adenosine-3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP) in primary shoots of Zea mays L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edlich, W.; Graeser, H.

    1978-01-01

    The concentration of cAMP was determined in extracts of crude homogenates of maize seedlings, 3800 . g supernatants and isolated chloroplasts by the isotope dilution test. After extractpurification by precipitation with BaSO 4 and by chromatography on aluminium oxide column, a factor by means of which the binding of [8- 3 H]-cAMP with cAMP-dependent protein kinase was inhibited. The inhibitor was found inactive after treatment of the extracts with phosphodiesterase. In conclusion, this factor was identical with cAMP. It is suggested that cAMP-synthesis is localized in chloroplasts. Microbial contaminations which might disturb the detection of cAMP was excluded at least in the preparations of chloroplasts. (author)

  17. Imaging of persistent cAMP signaling by internalized G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calebiro, Davide; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Lohse, Martin J

    2010-07-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest family of plasma membrane receptors. They mediate the effects of several endogenous cues and serve as important pharmacological targets. Although many biochemical events involved in GPCR signaling have been characterized in great detail, little is known about their spatiotemporal dynamics in living cells. The recent advent of optical methods based on fluorescent resonance energy transfer allows, for the first time, to directly monitor GPCR signaling in living cells. Utilizing these methods, it has been recently possible to show that the receptors for two protein/peptide hormones, the TSH and the parathyroid hormone, continue signaling to cAMP after their internalization into endosomes. This type of intracellular signaling is persistent and apparently triggers specific cellular outcomes. Here, we review these recent data and explain the optical methods used for such studies. Based on these findings, we propose a revision of the current model of the GPCR-cAMP signaling pathway to accommodate receptor signaling at endosomes.

  18. Cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is required for osmotic regulation in Staphylococcus aureus but dispensable for viability in anaerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeden, Merve S; Schuster, Christopher F; Bowman, Lisa; Zhong, Qiyun; Williams, Huw D; Gründling, Angelika

    2018-03-02

    Cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is a recently discovered signaling molecule important for the survival of Firmicutes, a large bacterial group that includes notable pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus However, the exact role of this molecule has not been identified. dacA , the S. aureus gene encoding the diadenylate cyclase enzyme required for c-di-AMP production, cannot be deleted when bacterial cells are grown in rich medium, indicating that c-di-AMP is required for growth in this condition. Here, we report that an S. aureus dacA mutant can be generated in chemically defined medium. Consistent with previous findings, this mutant had a severe growth defect when cultured in rich medium. Using this growth defect in rich medium, we selected for suppressor strains with improved growth to identify c-di-AMP-requiring pathways. Mutations bypassing the essentiality of dacA were identified in alsT and opuD, encoding a predicted amino acid and osmolyte transporter, the latter of which we show here to be the main glycine betaine-uptake system in S. aureus. Inactivation of these transporters likely prevents the excessive osmolyte and amino acid accumulation in the cell, providing further evidence for a key role of c-di-AMP in osmotic regulation. Suppressor mutations were also obtained in hepS, hemB, ctaA, and qoxB, coding proteins required for respiration. Furthermore, we show that dacA is dispensable for growth in anaerobic conditions. Together, these findings reveal an essential role for the c-di-AMP signaling network in aerobic, but not anaerobic, respiration in S. aureus . © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Detection of Cyclic Dinucleotides by STING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xiao-Xia; Su, Xiao-Dong

    2017-01-01

    STING (stimulator of interferon genes) is an essential signaling adaptor protein mediating cytosolic DNA-induced innate immunity for both microbial invasion and self-DNA leakage. STING is also a direct receptor for cytosolic cyclic dinucleotides (CDNs), including the microbial secondary messengers c-di-GMP (3',3'-cyclic di-GMP), 3',3'cGAMP (3',3'-cyclic GMP-AMP), and mammalian endogenous 2',3'cGAMP (2',3'-cyclic GMP-AMP) synthesized by cGAS (cyclic GMP-AMP synthase). Upon CDN binding, STING undergoes a conformational change to enable signal transduction by phosphorylation and finally to active IRF3 (Interferon regulatory factor 3) for type I interferon production. Here, we describe some experimental procedures such as Isothermal Titration Calorimetry and luciferase reporter assays to study the CDNs binding and activity by STING proteins.

  20. Basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated levels of cAMP are reduced in lymphocytes from alcoholic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, I.; Wrubel, B.; Estrin, W.; Gordon, A.

    1987-01-01

    Alcoholism causes serious neurologic disease that may be due, in part, to the ability of ethanol to interact with neural cell membranes and change neuronal function. Adenosine receptors are membrane-bound proteins that appear to mediate some of the effects of ethanol in the brain. Human lymphocytes also have adenosine receptors, and their activation causes increases in cAMP levels. To test the hypothesis that basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP levels in lymphocytes might be abnormal in alcoholism, the authors studied lymphocytes from 10 alcoholic subjects, 10 age- and sex-matched normal individuals, and 10 patients with nonalcoholic liver disease. Basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated cAMP levels were reduced 75% in lymphocytes from alcoholic subjects. Also, there was a 76% reduction in ethanol stimulation of cAMP accumulation in lymphocytes from alcoholics. Similar results were demonstrable in isolated T cells. Unlike other laboratory tests examined, these measurements appeared to distinguish alcoholics from normal subjects and from patients with nonalcoholic liver disease. Reduced basal and adenosine receptor-stimulated levels of cAMP in lymphocytes from alcoholics may reflect a change in cell membranes due either to chronic alcohol abuse or to a genetic predisposition unique to alcoholic subjects

  1. Trichoderma G protein-coupled receptors: functional characterisation of a cAMP receptor-like protein from Trichoderma atroviride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Kurt; Omann, Markus; Pucher, Marion E; Delic, Marizela; Lehner, Sylvia M; Domnanich, Patrick; Kratochwill, Klaus; Druzhinina, Irina; Denk, Dagmar; Zeilinger, Susanne

    2008-12-01

    Galpha subunits act to regulate vegetative growth, conidiation, and the mycoparasitic response in Trichoderma atroviride. To extend our knowledge on G protein signalling, we analysed G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). As the genome sequence of T. atroviride is not publicly available yet, we carried out an in silico exploration of the genome database of the close relative T. reesei. Twenty genes encoding putative GPCRs distributed over eight classes and additional 35 proteins similar to the Magnaporthe grisea PTH11 receptor were identified. Subsequently, four T. atroviride GPCR-encoding genes were isolated and affiliated to the cAMP receptor-like family by phylogenetic and topological analyses. All four genes showed lowest expression on glycerol and highest mRNA levels upon carbon starvation. Transcription of gpr3 and gpr4 responded to exogenously added cAMP and the shift from liquid to solid media. gpr3 mRNA levels also responded to the presence of fungal hyphae or cellulose membranes. Further characterisation of mutants bearing a gpr1-silencing construct revealed that Gpr1 is essential for vegetative growth, conidiation and conidial germination. Four genes encoding the first GPCRs described in Trichoderma were isolated and their expression characterized. At least one of these GPCRs is important for several cellular processes, supporting the fundamental role of G protein signalling in this fungus.

  2. Caffeine Modulates Vesicle Release and Recovery at Cerebellar Parallel Fibre Terminals, Independently of Calcium and Cyclic AMP Signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Katharine L.; Jackson, Claire; Balakrishnan, Saju; Bellamy, Tomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cerebellar parallel fibres release glutamate at both the synaptic active zone and at extrasynaptic sites—a process known as ectopic release. These sites exhibit different short-term and long-term plasticity, the basis of which is incompletely understood but depends on the efficiency of vesicle release and recycling. To investigate whether release of calcium from internal stores contributes to these differences in plasticity, we tested the effects of the ryanodine receptor agonist caffeine on both synaptic and ectopic transmission. Methods Whole cell patch clamp recordings from Purkinje neurons and Bergmann glia were carried out in transverse cerebellar slices from juvenile (P16-20) Wistar rats. Key Results Caffeine caused complex changes in transmission at both synaptic and ectopic sites. The amplitude of postsynaptic currents in Purkinje neurons and extrasynaptic currents in Bergmann glia were increased 2-fold and 4-fold respectively, but paired pulse ratio was substantially reduced, reversing the short-term facilitation observed under control conditions. Caffeine treatment also caused synaptic sites to depress during 1 Hz stimulation, consistent with inhibition of the usual mechanisms for replenishing vesicles at the active zone. Unexpectedly, pharmacological intervention at known targets for caffeine—intracellular calcium release, and cAMP signalling—had no impact on these effects. Conclusions We conclude that caffeine increases release probability and inhibits vesicle recovery at parallel fibre synapses, independently of known pharmacological targets. This complex effect would lead to potentiation of transmission at fibres firing at low frequencies, but depression of transmission at high frequency connections. PMID:25933382

  3. Effect of glucagon on cyclic AMP, albumin metabolism and incorporation of 14C-leucine into proteins in isolated parenchymal rat liver cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dich, J; Gluud, C N

    1976-01-01

    wet wt. This is about the rate found in the perfused liver, Glucagon (10(-8-10(-6) M) inhibited albumin secretion and the incorporation of 14C-leucine into albumin, into total proteins in the medium and into total proteins in the cell suspension. The effect of glucagon on albumin secretion...... is compatible with an effect on the rate of synthesis. A positive correlation existed between the maximal level of cyclic AMP after glucagon administration and the inhibition of both albumin secretion and the incorporation of 149leucine....

  4. Regulation of cessation of respiration and killing by cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate and its receptor protein after far-ultraviolet irradiation of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenson, P.A.; Schenley, R.L.; Joshi, J.G.

    1978-01-01

    When Escherichia coli B/r cultures are irradiated with ultraviolet light (UV) (254 nm), those cells that are killed stop respiring by 60 min after irradiation. Post-UV treatment with cyclic adenosine 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) causes more cells to stop respiring and to die. We have studied these effects at a UV fluence of 52 I/m 2 in a a wild-type E. coli K 12 strain and in mutants defective in cAMP metabolism. Strain CA 8,000 has crp + and cya + genes for the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) (required for transcription of operons regulated by cAMP) and for adenylate cyclase, respectively; CA 7901 is crp - ; and CA 8306 is a cya deletion (Δ). The wild-type culture showed a small transient cessation of respiration, and addition of cAMP caused cessation to be nearly complete. The crp - culture showed no evidence of cessation of respiration, and cAMP had no effect. The Δ cya mutant also showed no cessation of respiration, but cAMP (5 mM) caused as complete inhibition as in the wild type. cAMP caused a 10-fold loss in viability of UV-irradiated wild-type and Δ cya liquid cultures but had no effect on the cpr - culture. Respiration and viability changes were also studied in a double mutant, CA8404 Δ cya crp*, which has an altered CRP that is, with respect to the lac operon, independent of cAMP. The respiration response to UV was similar to that of the wild-type culture, and both respiration and viability of cells in liquid culture were sensitive to cAMP. The survival data, obtained by plating immediately after irradiation, show the wild type, Δ cya strains, and Δ cya crp* to be equally sensitive and the crp - strain to be more resistant. We conclude that cessation of respiration and cell killing after UV irradiation are regulated by cAMP and the CRP. (orig.) [de

  5. Subcellular compartmentation, interdependency and dynamics of the cyclic AMP-dependent PKA subunits during pathogenic differentiation in rice blast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, Poonguzhali; Tham, Hong Fai; Ramanujam, Ravikrishna; Naqvi, Naweed I

    2017-08-01

    The cAMP-dependent PKA signalling plays a central role in growth, asexual development and pathogenesis in fungal pathogens. Here, we functionally characterised RPKA, the regulatory subunit of cAMP/PKA and studied the dynamics and organisation of the PKA subunits in the rice blast pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae. The RPKA subunit was essential for proper vegetative growth, asexual sporulation and surface hydrophobicity in M. oryzae. A spontaneous suppressor mutation, SMR19, that restored growth and conidiation in the RPKA deletion mutant was isolated and characterised. SMR19 enhanced conidiation and appressorium formation but failed to suppress the pathogenesis defects in rpkAΔ. The PKA activity was undetectable in the mycelial extracts of SMR19, which showed a single mutation (val242leu) in the highly conserved active site of the catalytic subunit (CPKA) of cAMP/PKA. The two subunits of cAMP/PKA showed different subcellular localisation patterns with RpkA being predominantly nucleocytoplasmic in conidia, while CpkA was largely cytosolic and/or vesicular. The CpkA anchored RpkA in cytoplasmic vesicles, and localisation of PKA in the cytoplasm was governed by CpkA in a cAMP-dependant or independent manner. We show that there exists a tight regulation of PKA subunits at the level of transcription, and the cAMP signalling is differentially compartmentalised in a stage-specific manner in rice blast. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Preclinical evaluation of radiolabeled DOTA-derivatized cyclic minigastrin analogs for targeting cholecystokinin receptor expressing malignancies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guggenberg, E. von; Rangger, C.; Sosabowski, J.; Laverman, P.; Reubi, J.C.; Virgolini, I.J.; Decristoforo, C.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: Targeting of cholecystokinin receptor expressing malignancies such as medullary thyroid carcinoma is currently limited by low in vivo stability of radioligands. To increase the stability, we have developed and preclinically evaluated two cyclic

  7. The μ opioid agonist morphine modulates potentiation of capsaicin-evoked TRPV1 responses through a cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts-Thomson Sarah J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1 is critical in the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. Several receptors including G-protein coupled prostaglandin receptors have been reported to functionally interact with the TRPV1 through a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA pathway to potentiate TRPV1-mediated capsaicin responses. Such regulation may have significance in inflammatory pain. However, few functional receptor interactions that inhibit PKA-mediated potentiation of TRPV1 responses have been described. Results In the present studies we investigated the hypothesis that the μ opioid receptor (MOP agonist morphine can modulate forskolin-potentiated capsaicin responses through a cAMP-dependent PKA pathway. HEK293 cells were stably transfected with TRPV1 and MOP, and calcium (Ca2+ responses to injection of the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin were monitored in Fluo-3-loaded cells. Pre-treatment with morphine did not inhibit unpotentiated capsaicin-induced Ca2+ responses but significantly altered capsaicin responses potentiated by forskolin. TRPV1-mediated Ca2+ responses potentiated by the direct PKA activator 8-Br-cAMP and the PKC activator Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetatewere not modulated by morphine. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed that the TRPV1 and MOP are co-expressed on cultured Dorsal Root Ganglion neurones, pointing towards the existence of a functional relationship between the G-protein coupled MOP and nociceptive TRPV1. Conclusion The results presented here indicate that the opioid receptor agonist morphine acts via inhibition of adenylate cyclase to inhibit PKA-potentiated TRPV1 responses. Targeting of peripheral opioid receptors may therefore have therapeutic potential as an intervention to prevent potentiation of TRPV1 responses through the PKA pathway in inflammation.

  8. Cyclic [G(2′,5′)pA(3′,5′)p] Is the Metazoan Second Messenger Produced by DNA-Activated Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Pu; Ascano, Manuel; Wu, Yang; Barchet, Winfried; Gaffney, Barbara L.; Zillinger, Thomas; Serganov, Artem A.; Liu, Yizhou; Jones, Roger A.; Hartmann, Gunther; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies identified cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) as a metazoan second messenger triggering an interferon response. cGAMP is generated from GTP and ATP by cytoplasmic dsDNA sensor cGAMP synthase (cGAS). We combined structural, chemical, biochemical, and cellular assays to demonstrate that this second messenger contains G(2′,5′)pA and A(3′,5′)pG phosphodiester linkages, designated c[G(2′,5′) pA(3′,5′)p]. We show that, upon dsDNA binding, cGAS is activated through conformational transitions, res...

  9. Dissecting direct and indirect readout of cAMP receptor protein DNA binding using an inosine and 2,6-diaminopurine in vitro selection system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; Nielsen, Peter E.; Møllegaard, Niels Erik

    2008-01-01

    The DNA interaction of the Escherichia coli cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) represents a typical example of a dual recognition mechanism exhibiting both direct and indirect readout. We have dissected the direct and indirect components of DNA recognition by CRP employing in vitro selection...... is functionally intact. The majority of the selected sites contain the natural consensus sequence TGTGAN(6)TCACA (i.e. TITIDN(6)TCDCD). Thus, direct readout of the consensus sequence is independent of minor groove conformation. Consequently, the indirect readout known to occur in the TG/CA base pair step (primary...... kink site) in the consensus sequence is not affected by I-D substitutions. In contrast, the flanking regions are selected as I/C rich sequences (mostly I-tracts) instead of A/T rich sequences which are known to strongly increase CRP binding, thereby demonstrating almost exclusive indirect readout...

  10. Hypothermia in mouse is caused by adenosine A1 and A3 receptor agonists and AMP via three distinct mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Jesse Lea; Jain, Shalini; Gizewski, Elizabeth; Wan, Tina C; Tosh, Dilip K; Xiao, Cuiying; Auchampach, John A; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Gavrilova, Oksana; Reitman, Marc L

    2017-03-01

    Small mammals have the ability to enter torpor, a hypothermic, hypometabolic state, allowing impressive energy conservation. Administration of adenosine or adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) can trigger a hypothermic, torpor-like state. We investigated the mechanisms for hypothermia using telemetric monitoring of body temperature in wild type and receptor knock out (Adora1 -/- , Adora3 -/- ) mice. Confirming prior data, stimulation of the A 3 adenosine receptor (AR) induced hypothermia via peripheral mast cell degranulation, histamine release, and activation of central histamine H 1 receptors. In contrast, A 1 AR agonists and AMP both acted centrally to cause hypothermia. Commonly used, selective A 1 AR agonists, including N 6 -cyclopentyladenosine (CPA), N 6 -cyclohexyladenosine (CHA), and MRS5474, caused hypothermia via both A 1 AR and A 3 AR when given intraperitoneally. Intracerebroventricular dosing, low peripheral doses of Cl-ENBA [(±)-5'-chloro-5'-deoxy-N 6 -endo-norbornyladenosine], or using Adora3 -/- mice allowed selective stimulation of A 1 AR. AMP-stimulated hypothermia can occur independently of A 1 AR, A 3 AR, and mast cells. A 1 AR and A 3 AR agonists and AMP cause regulated hypothermia that was characterized by a drop in total energy expenditure, physical inactivity, and preference for cooler environmental temperatures, indicating a reduced body temperature set point. Neither A 1 AR nor A 3 AR was required for fasting-induced torpor. A 1 AR and A 3 AR agonists and AMP trigger regulated hypothermia via three distinct mechanisms. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Purine 3':5'-cyclic nucleotides with the nucleobase in a syn orientation: cAMP, cGMP and cIMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Řlepokura, Katarzyna Anna

    2016-06-01

    Purine 3':5'-cyclic nucleotides are very well known for their role as the secondary messengers in hormone action and cellular signal transduction. Nonetheless, their solid-state conformational details still require investigation. Five crystals containing purine 3':5'-cyclic nucleotides have been obtained and structurally characterized, namely adenosine 3':5'-cyclic phosphate dihydrate, C10H12N5O6P·2H2O or cAMP·2H2O, (I), adenosine 3':5'-cyclic phosphate 0.3-hydrate, C10H12N5O6P·0.3H2O or cAMP·0.3H2O, (II), guanosine 3':5'-cyclic phosphate pentahydrate, C10H12N5O7P·5H2O or cGMP·5H2O, (III), sodium guanosine 3':5'-cyclic phosphate tetrahydrate, Na(+)·C10H11N5O7P(-)·4H2O or Na(cGMP)·4H2O, (IV), and sodium inosine 3':5'-cyclic phosphate tetrahydrate, Na(+)·C10H10N4O7P(-)·4H2O or Na(cIMP)·4H2O, (V). Most of the cyclic nucleotide zwitterions/anions [two from four cAMP present in total in (I) and (II), cGMP in (III), cGMP(-) in (IV) and cIMP(-) in (V)] are syn conformers about the N-glycosidic bond, and this nucleobase arrangement is accompanied by Crib-H...Npur hydrogen bonds (rib = ribose and pur = purine). The base orientation is tuned by the ribose pucker. An analysis of data obtained from the Cambridge Structural Database made in the context of syn-anti conformational preferences has revealed that among the syn conformers of various purine nucleotides, cyclic nucleotides and dinucleotides predominate significantly. The interactions stabilizing the syn conformation have been indicated. The inter-nucleotide contacts in (I)-(V) have been systematized in terms of the chemical groups involved. All five structures display three-dimensional hydrogen-bonded networks.

  12. Cyclic-AMP mediated drugs: differential or global reduction of eicosanoid synthesis in the isolated rat lung?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J. Post

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the question was addressed whether cAMP mediated drugs induce a differential reduction of branches of the arachidonic acid metabolism rather than a global reduction of eicosanoid synthesis. The isolated lungs of actively sensitized rats were employed to study prostaglandin and leukotriene release in the presence and absence of the cAMP mediated drugs theophylline, milrinone, sulmazole, isobutyl-methylxanthine and salbutamol. The release of eicosanoids as measured by RIA was predominantly basal and continuous, with a mild antigen induced stimulation only for TXB2 and the leukotrienes. All drugs reduced eicosanoid release globally. It is concluded that cAMP mediated drugs interfere with arachidonic acid metabolism at a site proximal to the branching into lipoxygenase and cyclo-oxygenase pathways.

  13. New Insights into the Cyclic Di-adenosine Monophosphate (c-di-AMP) Degradation Pathway and the Requirement of the Cyclic Dinucleotide for Acid Stress Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Lisa; Zeden, Merve S; Schuster, Christopher F; Kaever, Volkhard; Gründling, Angelika

    2016-12-30

    Nucleotide signaling networks are key to facilitate alterations in gene expression, protein function, and enzyme activity in response to diverse stimuli. Cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is an important secondary messenger molecule produced by the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and is involved in regulating a number of physiological processes including potassium transport. S. aureus must ensure tight control over its cellular levels as both high levels of the dinucleotide and its absence result in a number of detrimental phenotypes. Here we show that in addition to the membrane-bound Asp-His-His and Asp-His-His-associated (DHH/DHHA1) domain-containing phosphodiesterase (PDE) GdpP, S. aureus produces a second cytoplasmic DHH/DHHA1 PDE Pde2. Although capable of hydrolyzing c-di-AMP, Pde2 preferentially converts linear 5'-phosphadenylyl-adenosine (pApA) to AMP. Using a pde2 mutant strain, pApA was detected for the first time in S. aureus, leading us to speculate that this dinucleotide may have a regulatory role under certain conditions. Moreover, pApA is involved in a feedback inhibition loop that limits GdpP-dependent c-di-AMP hydrolysis. Another protein linked to the regulation of c-di-AMP levels in bacteria is the predicted regulator protein YbbR. Here, it is shown that a ybbR mutant S. aureus strain has increased acid sensitivity that can be bypassed by the acquisition of mutations in a number of genes, including the gene coding for the diadenylate cyclase DacA. We further show that c-di-AMP levels are slightly elevated in the ybbR suppressor strains tested as compared with the wild-type strain. With this, we not only identified a new role for YbbR in acid stress resistance in S. aureus but also provide further insight into how c-di-AMP levels impact acid tolerance in this organism. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Cyclic AMP induces apoptosis in multiple myeloma cells and inhibits tumor development in a mouse myeloma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Follin-Arbelet, Virginie; Hofgaard, Peter O; Hauglin, Harald; Naderi, Soheil; Sundan, Anders; Blomhoff, Rune; Bogen, Bjarne; Blomhoff, Heidi K

    2011-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is an incurable disease requiring the development of effective therapies which can be used clinically. We have elucidated the potential for manipulating the cAMP signaling pathway as a target for inhibiting the growth of multiple myeloma cells. As a model system, we primarily used the murine multiple myeloma cell line MOPC315 which can be grown both in vivo and in vitro. Human multiple myeloma cell lines U266, INA-6 and the B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line Reh were used only for in vitro studies. Cell death was assessed by flow cytometry and western blot analysis after treatment with cAMP elevating agents (forskolin, prostaglandin E2 and rolipram) and cAMP analogs. We followed tumor growth in vivo after forskolin treatment by imaging DsRed-labelled MOPC315 cells transplanted subcutaneously in BALB/c nude mice. In contrast to the effect on Reh cells, 50 μM forskolin more than tripled the death of MOPC315 cells after 24 h in vitro. Forskolin induced cell death to a similar extent in the human myeloma cell lines U266 and INA-6. cAMP-mediated cell death had all the typical hallmarks of apoptosis, including changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential and cleavage of caspase 3, caspase 9 and PARP. Forskolin also inhibited the growth of multiple myeloma cells in a mouse model in vivo. Elevation of intracellular levels of cAMP kills multiple myeloma cells in vitro and inhibits development of multiple myeloma in vivo. This strongly suggests that compounds activating the cAMP signaling pathway may be useful in the field of multiple myeloma

  15. cAMP control of HCN2 channel Mg2+ block reveals loose coupling between the cyclic nucleotide-gating ring and the pore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex K Lyashchenko

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-regulated HCN channels underlie the Na+-K+ permeable IH pacemaker current. As with other voltage-gated members of the 6-transmembrane KV channel superfamily, opening of HCN channels involves dilation of a helical bundle formed by the intracellular ends of S6 albeit this is promoted by inward, not outward, displacement of S4. Direct agonist binding to a ring of cyclic nucleotide-binding sites, one of which lies immediately distal to each S6 helix, imparts cAMP sensitivity to HCN channel opening. At depolarized potentials, HCN channels are further modulated by intracellular Mg2+ which blocks the open channel pore and blunts the inhibitory effect of outward K+ flux. Here, we show that cAMP binding to the gating ring enhances not only channel opening but also the kinetics of Mg2+ block. A combination of experimental and simulation studies demonstrates that agonist acceleration of block is mediated via acceleration of the blocking reaction itself rather than as a secondary consequence of the cAMP enhancement of channel opening. These results suggest that the activation status of the gating ring and the open state of the pore are not coupled in an obligate manner (as required by the often invoked Monod-Wyman-Changeux allosteric model but couple more loosely (as envisioned in a modular model of protein activation. Importantly, the emergence of second messenger sensitivity of open channel rectification suggests that loose coupling may have an unexpected consequence: it may endow these erstwhile "slow" channels with an ability to exert voltage and ligand-modulated control over cellular excitability on the fastest of physiologically relevant time scales.

  16. Regulation of Mg2+ Reabsorption and Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin Type 6 Activity by cAMP Signaling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanchard, M.G.; Kittikulsuth, W.; Nair, A.V.; Baaij, J.H.F. de; Latta, F.; Genzen, J.R.; Kohan, D.E.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.

    2016-01-01

    The transient receptor potential melastatin type 6 (TRPM6) epithelial Mg(2+) channels participate in transcellular Mg(2+) transport in the kidney and intestine. Previous reports suggested a hormonal cAMP-dependent regulation of Mg(2+) reabsorption in the kidney. The molecular details of this process

  17. Modulation of cyclic amp-dependent protein kinase isozyme expression associated with activation of a macrophage cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Justement, L.B.; Aldrich, W.A.; Wenger, G.D.; O'Dorisio, M.S.; Zwilling, B.S.

    1986-01-01

    The RAW 264.7 macrophage (MO) cell line was used to study cAMPdPK isozymes during activation by lymphokine (LK) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Untreated cells were found to have two isozymes of cAMPdPK in their cytosol. PKI and PKII were differentiated based on the M/sub r/ of their regulatory subunits (RI, 45,500; and RII, 52,000, respectively) as determined by photoactivated incorporation of the cAMP analog 8-N 3 -[ 32 P]cAMP. Loss of the RI subunit of PKI occurred in association with activation of the cell line by suboptimal concentrations of LK and LPS. No modulation of the RII subunit of PKII was observed under these conditions. The addition of a suboptimal concentration of LPS after LK or a high dose of LPS alone was required for acquisition of cytolytic activity and loss of RI. The antitumor activity of the RAW 264.7 cell line was transiently expressed after activation. Cells no longer exhibited tumoricidal activity 48 hr after the removal of activating agents. It was observed that the loss of cytolytic function was accompanied by the reexpression of RI in the cytosol. This study provides evidence that modulation of cAMPdPK isozymes occurs during activation, suggesting a potential mechanism for controlling the effects of cAMP on the MO

  18. β adrenergic receptor/cAMP/PKA signaling contributes to the intracellular Ca2+ release by tentacle extract from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qianqian; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Bo; Wang, Chao; Xiao, Liang; Zhang, Liming

    2017-07-25

    Intracellular Ca 2+ overload induced by extracellular Ca 2+ entry has previously been confirmed to be an important mechanism for the cardiotoxicity as well as the acute heart dysfunction induced by jellyfish venom, while the underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. Under extracellular Ca 2+ -free or Ca 2+ -containing conditions, the Ca 2+ fluorescence in isolated adult mouse cardiomyocytes pre-incubated with tentacle extract (TE) from the jellyfish Cyanea capillata and β blockers was scanned by laser scanning confocal microscope. Then, the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) concentration and protein kinase A (PKA) activity in primary neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes were determined by ELISA assay. Furthermore, the effect of propranolol against the cardiotoxicity of TE was evaluated in Langendorff-perfused rat hearts and intact rats. The increase of intracellular Ca 2+ fluorescence signal by TE was significantly attenuated and delayed when the extracellular Ca 2+ was removed. The β adrenergic blockers, including propranolol, atenolol and esmolol, partially inhibited the increase of intracellular Ca 2+ in the presence of 1.8 mM extracellular Ca 2+ and completely abolished the Ca 2+ increase under an extracellular Ca 2+ -free condition. Both cAMP concentration and PKA activity were stimulated by TE, and were inhibited by the β adrenergic blockers. Cardiomyocyte toxicity of TE was antagonized by β adrenergic blockers and the PKA inhibitor H89. Finally, the acute heart dysfuction by TE was antagonized by propranolol in Langendorff-perfused rat hearts and intact rats. Our findings indicate that β adrenergic receptor/cAMP/PKA signaling contributes to the intracellular Ca 2+ overload through intracellular Ca 2+ release by TE from the jellyfish C. capillata.

  19. Inhibition of insulin release by cyproheptadine: Effects on 3',5'-cyclic-AMP-content and /sup 45/Ca-accumulation of incubated mouse islets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joost, H G; Beckmann, J; Lenzen, S; Hasselblatt, A [Goettingen Univ. (F.R. Germany)

    1976-01-01

    Cyproheptadine (1, 10 and 100 ..mu..m) significantly reduced insulin release from isolated mouse islets in response to glucose. In contrast, 1 mM cyproheptadine induced a large release of insulin into the incubation medium probably due to islet cell damage, since the islets had lost a considerable amount of their protein content. 3',5'-cyclic-AMP-levels of the islets were not significantly affected by 10 ..mu..M cyproheptadine in the presence as well as in the absence of theophylline (10 mM). As the inhibitory effect of cyproheptadine on insulin release was correlated with reduced accumulation of calcium-45, the agent may inhibit insulin release by interfering with the calcium handling of the ..beta..-cell.

  20. Transporter function and cyclic AMP turnover in normal colonic mucosa from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleberg, Karen; Jensen, Gerda Majgaard; Christensen, Dan Ploug

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of colorectal neoplasia is still unresolved but has been associated with alterations in epithelial clearance of xenobiotics and metabolic waste products. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize the transport of cyclic nucleotides in colonic biopsies from patients...

  1. L-4F Inhibits Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein-induced Inflammatory Adipokine Secretion via Cyclic AMP/Protein Kinase A-CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein β Signaling Pathway in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Zhu Xie

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: OxLDL induces C/EBPβ protein synthesis in a time-dependent manner and enhances MCP-1 secretion and expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. L-4F dose-dependently counterbalances the pro-inflammatory effect of oxLDL, and cyclic AMP/PKA-C/EBPβ signaling pathway may participate in it.

  2. LPA is a chemorepellent for B16 melanoma cells: action through the cAMP-elevating LPA5 receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maikel Jongsma

    Full Text Available Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA, a lipid mediator enriched in serum, stimulates cell migration, proliferation and other functions in many cell types. LPA acts on six known G protein-coupled receptors, termed LPA(1-6, showing both overlapping and distinct signaling properties. Here we show that, unexpectedly, LPA and serum almost completely inhibit the transwell migration of B16 melanoma cells, with alkyl-LPA(18:1 being 10-fold more potent than acyl-LPA(18:1. The anti-migratory response to LPA is highly polarized and dependent on protein kinase A (PKA but not Rho kinase activity; it is associated with a rapid increase in intracellular cAMP levels and PIP3 depletion from the plasma membrane. B16 cells express LPA(2, LPA(5 and LPA(6 receptors. We show that LPA-induced chemorepulsion is mediated specifically by the alkyl-LPA-preferring LPA(5 receptor (GPR92, which raises intracellular cAMP via a noncanonical pathway. Our results define LPA(5 as an anti-migratory receptor and they implicate the cAMP-PKA pathway, along with reduced PIP3 signaling, as an effector of chemorepulsion in B16 melanoma cells.

  3. Enhanced efficacy (intrinsic activity) of cyclic opioid peptide analogs at the μ-receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiller, P.W.; Lemieux, C.; Nguyen, T.M.D.; Maziak, L.A.

    1986-01-01

    Side-chain to end group cyclized enkephalin analogs (e.g. H-Tyr-cyclo[-D-Lys-Gly-Phe-Leu-] and cyclic opioid peptide analogs obtained through covalent linkage of two side-chains (e.g. H-Tyr-D-Cys-Gly-Phe-Cys-NH 2 or H-Tyr-D-Lys-Gly-Phe-Glu-NH 3 ) were tested in the μ-receptor-representative guinea pig ileum (GPI) bioassay and in a binding assay based on displacement of the μ-ligand [ 3 H]DAGO from rat brain membranes. The cyclic analogs were 5 to 70 times more potent in the GPI assay than in the binding assay, whereas linear analogs showed equal potency in the two assays. These results suggest that the efficacy (intrinsic activity) of cyclic opioid peptide analogs at the μ-receptor is increased as a consequence of the conformation constraint imposed through ring closure. This effect was most pronounced in analogs containing a long hydrophobic sidechain as part of the ring structure in the 2-position of the peptide sequence. Further experimental evidence ruled out the possibilities that these potency discrepancies may be due to differences in enzymatic degradation, dissimilar exposure of the receptors in their lipid environment or interaction with different receptor types in the two assay systems. It can be hypothesized that the semi-rigid cyclic analogs may induce a more productive conformational change in the receptor protein than the linear peptides

  4. Interplay of the modified nucleotide phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) with global regulatory proteins in Escherichia coli: modulation of cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent gene expression and interaction with the HupA regulatory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Francesca; Motta, Sara; Mauri, Pierluigi; Landini, Paolo; Rossi, Elio

    2016-11-25

    In the bacterium Escherichia coli, some intermediates of the sulfate assimilation and cysteine biosynthesis pathway can act as signal molecules and modulate gene expression. In addition to sensing and utilization of sulphur sources, these signaling mechanisms also impact more global cell processes, such as resistance to antimicrobial agents and biofilm formation. In a recent work, we have shown that inactivation of the cysH gene, encoding phosphoadenosine-phosphosulfate (PAPS) reductase, and the consequent increase in intracellular PAPS concentration, strongly affect production of several cell surface-associated structures, enhancing surface adhesion and cell aggregation. In order to identify the molecular mechanism relaying intracellular PAPS concentration to regulation of cell surface-associated structures, we looked for mutations able to suppress the effects of cysH inactivation. We found that mutations in the adenylate cyclase-encoding cyaA gene abolished the effects of PAPS accumulation; consistent with this result, cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent gene expression appears to be increased in the cysH mutant. Experiments aimed at the direct identification of proteins interacting with either CysC or CysH, i.e. the PAPS-related proteins APS kinase and PAPS reductase, allowed us to identify several regulators, namely, CspC, CspE, HNS and HupA. Protein-protein interaction between HupA and CysH was confirmed by a bacterial two hybrid system, and inactivation of the hupA gene enhanced the effects of the cysH mutation in terms of production of cell surface-associated factors. Our results indicate that PAPS can modulate different regulatory systems, providing evidence that this molecule acts as a global signal molecule in E. coli. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Secretion of [Met]enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7-related peptides and catecholamines from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells: modification by changes in cyclic AMP and by treatment with reserpine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M; Boarder, M R

    1987-07-01

    Investigations into the effects of culturing bovine adrenal chromaffin cells in the presence (72 h) of dibutyryl cyclic AMP, forskolin, and reserpine on the level and release of [Met]enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7 immunoreactivity, noradrenaline, and adrenaline are reported. The assay for [Met]enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7 immunoreactivity recognises both peptide B, the 31-amino acid carboxy-terminal segment of proenkephalin, and its heptapeptide fragment, [Met]enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7. Treatments that elevate cyclic AMP increase the amount of peptide immunoreactivity in these cells; this is predominantly peptide B-like immunoreactivity in both control cells and cyclic AMP-elevated cells. Treatment with reserpine gives no change in total immunoreactivity levels, but does not result in increased accumulation of the heptapeptide [Met]enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7 at the expense of immunoreactivity that elutes with its immediate precursor, peptide B. Cyclic AMP treatment causes either no change or a decrease in levels of accumulated noradrenaline and adrenaline. However, the release of [Met]enkephalin-Arg6-Phe7 immunoreactivity, noradrenaline, and adrenaline is increased by 72-h pretreatment with forskolin or dibutyryl cyclic AMP, whether release is stimulated by nicotine or elevated potassium. In each case the molecular form of [Met]enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7 immunoreactivity that is released approximately reflects the cell content. Pretreatment with reserpine has no effect on the total [Met]enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7 immunoreactivity released, but does result in an increased release of the heptapeptide and a decrease in release of peptide B-like immunoreactivity. The studies suggest that the levels of [Met]enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7 and peptide B available for release are controlled both at the level of proenkephalin synthesis and at the level of double-basic residue proteolysis.

  6. Propofol reduced myocardial contraction of vertebrates partly by mediating the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Xiaotong; Zhang, Xinyu; Bo, Qiyu; Meng, Tao; Lei, Zhen; Li, Jingxin; Hou, Yonghao; Yu, Xiaoqian; Yu, Jingui

    2016-01-01

    Propofol inhibits myocardial contraction in a dose dependent manner. The present study is designed to examine the effect of propofol on PKA mediated myocardial contraction in the absence of adrenoreceptor agonist. The contraction of isolated rat heart was measured in the presence or absence of PKA inhibitor H89 or propofol, using a pressure transducer. The levels of cAMP and PKA kinase activity were detected by ELISA. The mRNA and total protein or phosphorylation level of PKA and downstream proteins were tested in the presence or absence of PKA inhibitor H89 or propofol, using RT-PCR, QPCR and western blotting. The phosphorylation level of PKA was examined thoroughly using immunofluorescence and PKA activity non-radioactive detection kit. Propofol induced a dose-dependent negative contractile response on the rat heart. The inhibitory effect of high concentration propofol (50 μM) with 45% decease of control could be partly reversed by the PKA inhibitor H89 (10 μM) and the depressant effect of propofol decreased from 45% to 10%. PKA kinase activity was inhibited by propofol in a dose-dependent manner. Propofol also induced a decrease in phosphorylation of PKA, which was also inhibited by H89, but did not alter the production of cAMP and the mRNA levels of PKA. The downstream proteins of PKA, PLN and RyR2 were phosphorylated to a lesser extent with propofol or H89 than control. These results demonstrated that propofol induced a negative myocardial contractile response partly by mediating the PKA phosphorylation pathway.

  7. Cyclic [G(2′,5′)pA(3′,5′)p] Is the Metazoan Second Messenger Produced by DNA-Activated Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Pu; Ascano, Manuel; Wu, Yang; Barchet, Winfried; Gaffney, Barbara L.; Zillinger, Thomas; Serganov, Artem A.; Liu, Yizhou; Jones, Roger A.; Hartmann, Gunther; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Recent studies identified cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) as a metazoan second messenger triggering an interferon response. cGAMP is generated from GTP and ATP by cytoplasmic dsDNA sensor cGAMP synthase (cGAS). We combined structural, chemical, biochemical, and cellular assays to demonstrate that this second messenger contains G(2′,5′)pA and A(3′,5′)pG phosphodiester linkages, designated c[G(2′,5′) pA(3′,5′)p]. We show that, upon dsDNA binding, cGAS is activated through conformational transitions, resulting in formation of a catalytically competent and accessible nucleotide-binding pocket for generation of c[G(2′,5′)pA(3′,5′)p]. We demonstrate that cyclization occurs in a stepwise manner through initial generation of 5′-pppG(2′,5′)pA prior to cyclization to c[G(2′,5′)pA(3′,5′)p], with the latter positioned precisely in the catalytic pocket. Mutants of cGAS dsDNA-binding or catalytic pocket residues exhibit reduced or abrogated activity. Our studies have identified c[G(2′,5′)pA(3′,5′)p] as a founding member of a family of metazoan 2′,5′-containing cyclic heterodinucleotide second messengers distinct from bacterial 3′,5′ cyclic dinucleotides. PMID:23647843

  8. Evidence for CB2 receptor involvement in LPS-induced reduction of cAMP intracellular levels in uterine explants from pregnant mice: pathophysiological implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Ana Inés; Carozzo, Alejandro; Correa, Fernando; Davio, Carlos; Franchi, Ana María

    2017-07-01

    What is the role of the endocannabinoid system (eCS) on the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) effects on uterine explants from 7-day pregnant mice in a murine model of endotoxin-induced miscarriage? We found evidence for cannabinoid receptor type2 (CB2) involvement in LPS-induced increased prostaglandin-F2α (PGF2α) synthesis and diminished cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) intracellular content in uterine explants from early pregnant mice. Genital tract infections by Gram-negative bacteria are a common complication of human pregnancy that results in an increased risk of pregnancy loss. LPS, the main component of the Gram-negative bacterial wall, elicits a strong maternal inflammatory response that results in embryotoxicity and embryo resorption in a murine model endotoxin-induced early pregnancy loss. We have previously shown that the eCS mediates the embryotoxic effects of LPS, mainly via CB1 receptor activation. An in vitro study of mice uterine explants was performed to investigate the eCS in mediating the effects of LPS on PGF2α production and cAMP intracellular content. Eight to 12-week-old virgin female BALB/c or CD1 (wild-type [WT] or CB1-knockout [CB1-KO]) mice were paired with 8- to 12-week-old BALB/c or CD1 (WT or CB1-KO) males, respectively. On day 7 of pregnancy, BALB/c, CD1 WT or CD1 CB1-KO mice were euthanized, the uteri were excised, implantation sites were removed and the uterine tissues were separated from decidual and embryo tissues. Uterine explants were cultured and exposed for an appropriate amount of time to different pharmacological treatments. The tissues were then collected for cAMP assay and PGF2α content determination by radioimmunoassay. In vitro treatment of uteri explants from 7-day pregnant BALB/c or CD1 (WT or CB1-KO) mice with LPS induced an increased production of PGF2α (P Investigaciones Científicas y Técnicas (PIP 2012/0061). Dr Carlos Davio was funded by Agencia Nacional para la Promoción Científica y Tecnológica (PICT 2013

  9. Viral DNA Sensors IFI16 and Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase Possess Distinct Functions in Regulating Viral Gene Expression, Immune Defenses, and Apoptotic Responses during Herpesvirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A. Diner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The human interferon-inducible protein IFI16 is an important antiviral factor that binds nuclear viral DNA and promotes antiviral responses. Here, we define IFI16 dynamics in space and time and its distinct functions from the DNA sensor cyclic dinucleotide GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS. Live-cell imaging reveals a multiphasic IFI16 redistribution, first to viral entry sites at the nuclear periphery and then to nucleoplasmic puncta upon herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infections. Optogenetics and live-cell microscopy establish the IFI16 pyrin domain as required for nuclear periphery localization and oligomerization. Furthermore, using proteomics, we define the signature protein interactions of the IFI16 pyrin and HIN200 domains and demonstrate the necessity of pyrin for IFI16 interactions with antiviral proteins PML and cGAS. We probe signaling pathways engaged by IFI16, cGAS, and PML using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockouts in primary fibroblasts. While IFI16 induces cytokines, only cGAS activates STING/TBK-1/IRF3 and apoptotic responses upon HSV-1 and HCMV infections. cGAS-dependent apoptosis upon DNA stimulation requires both the enzymatic production of cyclic dinucleotides and STING. We show that IFI16, not cGAS or PML, represses HSV-1 gene expression, reducing virus titers. This indicates that regulation of viral gene expression may function as a greater barrier to viral replication than the induction of antiviral cytokines. Altogether, our findings establish coordinated and distinct antiviral functions for IFI16 and cGAS against herpesviruses.

  10. Design of Cyclic Peptide Based Glucose Receptors and Their Application in Glucose Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Chen, Xin; Zhang, Fuyuan; He, Xingxing; Fang, Guozhen; Liu, Jifeng; Wang, Shuo

    2017-10-03

    Glucose assay is of great scientific significance in clinical diagnostics and bioprocess monitoring, and to design a new glucose receptor is necessary for the development of more sensitive, selective, and robust glucose detection techniques. Herein, a series of cyclic peptide (CP) glucose receptors were designed to mimic the binding sites of glucose binding protein (GBP), and CPs' sequence contained amino acid sites Asp, Asn, His, Asp, and Arg, which constituted the first layer interactions of GBP. The properties of these CPs used as a glucose receptor or substitute for the GBP were studied by using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) technique. It was found that CPs can form a self-assembled monolayer at the Au quartz electrode surface, and the monolayer's properties were characterized by using cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The CPs' binding affinity to saccharide (i.e., galactose, fructose, lactose, sucrose, and maltose) was investigated, and the CPs' sensitivity and selectivity toward glucose were found to be dependent upon the configuration,i.e., the amino acids sequence of the CPs. The cyclic unit with a cyclo[-CNDNHCRDNDC-] sequence gave the highest selectivity and sensitivity for glucose sensing. This work suggests that a synthetic peptide bearing a particular functional sequence could be applied for developing a new generation of glucose receptors and would find huge application in biological, life science, and clinical diagnostics fields.

  11. Protein kinases mediate increment of the phosphorylation of cyclic AMP -responsive element binding protein in spinal cord of rats following capsaicin injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Junfa

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Strong noxious stimuli cause plastic changes in spinal nociceptive neurons. Intracellular signal transduction pathways from cellular membrane to nucleus, which may further regulate gene expression by critical transcription factors, convey peripheral stimulation. Cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB is a well-characterized stimulus-induced transcription factor whose activation requires phosphorylation of the Serine-133 residue. Phospho-CREB can further induce gene transcription and strengthen synaptic transmission by the activation of the protein kinase cascades. However, little is known about the mechanisms by which CREB phosphorylation is regulated by protein kinases during nociception. This study was designed to use Western blot analysis to investigate the role of mitogen-activated protein (MAP/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK kinase (MEK 1/2, PKA and PKC in regulating the phosphorylation of CREB in the spinal cord of rats following intraplantar capsaicin injection. Results We found that capsaicin injection significantly increased the phosphorylation level of CREB in the ipsilateral side of the spinal cord. Pharmacological manipulation of MEK 1/2, PKA and PKC with their inhibitors (U0126, H89 and NPC 15473, respectively significantly blocked this increment of CREB phosphorylation. However, the expression of CREB itself showed no change in any group. Conclusion These findings suggest that the activation of intracellular MAP kinase, PKA and PKC cascades may contribute to the regulation of phospho-CREB in central nociceptive neurons following peripheral painful stimuli.

  12. Met-enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7 immunoreactivity in a human neuroblastoma cell line: effect of dibutyryl 3':5'-cyclic AMP and reserpine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boarder, M R; Marriott, D; Adams, M

    1986-12-30

    The carboxy terminal part of the proenkephalin A sequence is the 31 amino acid peptide B, which has as its final seven amino acids the sequence of the opioid peptide Met-enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7. Using a radioimmunoassay which recognises both these peptides we have investigated the relative amounts of peptide B and Met-enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7 in a human neuroblastoma cell line. We show that these cells contain peptide B-like immunoreactivity but not its heptapeptide fragment. This may be due to lack of proteolytic activity cleaving Met-enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7 from its precursor, peptide B. On treatment with dibutyryl cyclic AMP the level of immunoreactivity approximately doubles, due to increased amounts of peptide B-like immunoreactivity. Treatment with reserpine, which increases conversion of peptide B to the heptapeptide in bovine chromaffin cells in culture does not stimulate the accumulation of Met-enkephalyl-Arg6-Phe7 in the human neuroblastoma cells. The results are discussed with respect to peptide processing.

  13. The antimicrobial peptide derived from insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 5, AMP-IBP5, regulates keratinocyte functions through Mas-related gene X receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieosilapatham, Panjit; Niyonsaba, François; Kiatsurayanon, Chanisa; Okumura, Ko; Ikeda, Shigaku; Ogawa, Hideoki

    2017-10-01

    In addition to their microbicidal properties, host defense peptides (HDPs) display various immunomodulatory functions, including keratinocyte production of cytokines/chemokines, proliferation, migration and wound healing. Recently, a novel HDP named AMP-IBP5 (antimicrobial peptide derived from insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 5) was shown to exhibit antimicrobial activity against numerous pathogens, even at concentrations comparable to those of human β-defensins and LL-37. However, the immunomodulatory role of AMP-IBP5 in cutaneous tissue remains unknown. To investigate whether AMP-IBP5 triggers keratinocyte activation and to clarify its mechanism. Production of cytokines/chemokines and growth factors was determined by appropriate ELISA kits. Cell migration was assessed by in vitro wound closure assay, whereas cell proliferation was analyzed using BrdU incorporation assay complimented with XTT assay. MAPK and NF-κB activation was determined by Western blotting. Intracellular cAMP levels were assessed using cAMP enzyme immunoassay kit. Among various cytokines/chemokines and growth factors tested, AMP-IBP5 selectively increased the production of IL-8 and VEGF. Moreover, AMP-IBP5 markedly enhanced keratinocyte migration and proliferation. AMP-IBP5-induced keratinocyte activation was mediated by Mrg X1-X4 receptors with MAPK and NF-κB pathways working downstream, as evidenced by the inhibitory effects of MrgX1-X4 siRNAs and ERK-, JNK-, p38- and NF-κB-specific inhibitors. We confirmed that AMP-IBP5 indeed induced MAPK and NF-κB activation. Furthermore, AMP-IBP5-induced VEGF but not IL-8 production correlated with an increase in intracellular cAMP. Our findings suggest that in addition to its antimicrobial function, AMP-IBP5 might contribute to wound healing process through activation of keratinocytes. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The Popeye Domain Containing Genes and cAMP Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Brand

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is a second messenger, which plays an important role in the heart. It is generated in response to activation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. Initially, it was thought that protein kinase A (PKA exclusively mediates cAMP-induced cellular responses such as an increase in cardiac contractility, relaxation, and heart rate. With the identification of the exchange factor directly activated by cAMP (EPAC and hyperpolarizing cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels as cAMP effector proteins it became clear that a protein network is involved in cAMP signaling. The Popeye domain containing (Popdc genes encode yet another family of cAMP-binding proteins, which are prominently expressed in the heart. Loss-of-function mutations in mice are associated with cardiac arrhythmia and impaired skeletal muscle regeneration. Interestingly, the cardiac phenotype, which is present in both, Popdc1 and Popdc2 null mutants, is characterized by a stress-induced sinus bradycardia, suggesting that Popdc proteins participate in cAMP signaling in the sinuatrial node. The identification of the two-pore channel TREK-1 and Caveolin 3 as Popdc-interacting proteins represents a first step into understanding the mechanisms of heart rate modulation triggered by Popdc proteins.

  15. Atrial natriuretic peptide receptor heterogeneity and effects on cyclic GMP accumulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitman, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) on guanylate cyclase activity and cyclic GMP accumulation were examined, since these hormones appear to be intimately associated with blood pressure and intravascular volume homeostasis. ANP was found to increase cyclic GMP accumulation in ten cell culture systems, which were derived from blood vessels, adrenal cortex, kidney, lung, testes and mammary gland. ANP receptors were characterized in intact cultured cells using 125 I-ANP 8-33 . Specific 125 I-ANP binding was saturable and of high affinity. Scratchard analysis of the binding data for all cell types exhibited a straight line, indicating that these cells possessed a single class of binding sites. Despite the presence of linear Scatchard plots, these studies demonstrated that cultured cells possess two functionally and physically distinct ANP-binding sites. Most of the ANP-binding sites in cultured cells have a molecular size of 66,000 daltons under reducing conditions. The identification of cultured cell types in which hormones (ANP and oxytocin) regulate guanylate cyclase activity and increase cyclic GMP synthesis will provide valuable systems to determine the mechanisms of hormone-receptor coupling to guanylate cyclase and the cellular processes regulated by cyclic GMP

  16. Calcium pathways such as cAMP modulate clothianidin action through activation of α-bungarotoxin-sensitive and -insensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calas-List, Delphine; List, Olivier; Quinchard, Sophie; Thany, Steeve H

    2013-07-01

    Clothianidin is a neonicotinoid insecticide developed in the early 2000s. We have recently demonstrated that it was a full agonist of α-bungarotoxin-sensitive and -insensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in the cockroach dorsal unpaired median neurons. Clothianidin was able to act as an agonist of imidacloprid-insensitive nAChR2 receptor and internal regulation of cAMP concentration modulated nAChR2 sensitivity to clothianidin. In the present study, we demonstrated that cAMP modulated the agonist action of clothianidin via α-bungarotoxin-sensitive and insensitive receptors. Clothianidin-induced current-voltage curves were dependent to clothianidin concentrations. At 10 μM clothianidin, increasing cAMP concentration induced a linear current-voltage curve. Clothianidin effects were blocked by 0.5 μM α-bungarotoxin suggesting that cAMP modulation occurred through α-bungarotoxin-sensitive receptors. At 1 mM clothianidin, cAMP effects were associated to α-bungarotoxin-insensitive receptors because clothianidin-induced currents were blocked by 5 μM mecamylamine and 20 μM d-tubocurarine. In addition, we found that application of 1mM clothianidin induced a strong increase of intracellular calcium concentration. These data reinforced the finding that calcium pathways including cAMP modulated clothianidin action on insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. We proposed that intracellular calcium pathways such as cAMP could be a target to modulate the mode of action of neonicotinoid insecticides. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Elevated carbon dioxide blunts mammalian cAMP signaling dependent on inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor-mediated Ca2+ release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Zara C; Gray, Michael A; Cann, Martin J

    2012-07-27

    Elevated CO(2) is generally detrimental to animal cells, suggesting an interaction with core processes in cell biology. We demonstrate that elevated CO(2) blunts G protein-activated cAMP signaling. The effect of CO(2) is independent of changes in intracellular and extracellular pH, independent of the mechanism used to activate the cAMP signaling pathway, and is independent of cell context. A combination of pharmacological and genetic tools demonstrated that the effect of elevated CO(2) on cAMP levels required the activity of the IP(3) receptor. Consistent with these findings, CO(2) caused an increase in steady state cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentrations not observed in the absence of the IP(3) receptor or under nonspecific acidotic conditions. We examined the well characterized cAMP-dependent inhibition of the isoform 3 Na(+)/H(+) antiporter (NHE3) to demonstrate a functional relevance for CO(2)-mediated reductions in cellular cAMP. Consistent with the cellular biochemistry, elevated CO(2) abrogated the inhibitory effect of cAMP on NHE3 function via an IP(3) receptor-dependent mechanism.

  18. Elevated Carbon Dioxide Blunts Mammalian cAMP Signaling Dependent on Inositol 1,4,5-Triphosphate Receptor-mediated Ca2+ Release*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Zara C.; Gray, Michael A.; Cann, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated CO2 is generally detrimental to animal cells, suggesting an interaction with core processes in cell biology. We demonstrate that elevated CO2 blunts G protein-activated cAMP signaling. The effect of CO2 is independent of changes in intracellular and extracellular pH, independent of the mechanism used to activate the cAMP signaling pathway, and is independent of cell context. A combination of pharmacological and genetic tools demonstrated that the effect of elevated CO2 on cAMP levels required the activity of the IP3 receptor. Consistent with these findings, CO2 caused an increase in steady state cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentrations not observed in the absence of the IP3 receptor or under nonspecific acidotic conditions. We examined the well characterized cAMP-dependent inhibition of the isoform 3 Na+/H+ antiporter (NHE3) to demonstrate a functional relevance for CO2-mediated reductions in cellular cAMP. Consistent with the cellular biochemistry, elevated CO2 abrogated the inhibitory effect of cAMP on NHE3 function via an IP3 receptor-dependent mechanism. PMID:22654111

  19. Polarized Th1 and Th2 cells are less responsive to negative feedback by receptors coupled to the AC/cAMP system compared to freshly isolated T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijink, Irene H; Vellenga, Edo; Borger, Peter; Postma, Dirkje S; Monchy, Jan G R de; Kauffman, Henk F

    1 The adenylyl cyclase (AC)/cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) system is known to negatively regulate transcriptional activity of T cells, thereby possibly modulating T-cell-mediated responses at the sites of inflammation. Effects of cAMP have been widely studied in freshly isolated T cells and

  20. Viral DNA Sensors IFI16 and Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase Possess Distinct Functions in Regulating Viral Gene Expression, Immune Defenses, and Apoptotic Responses during Herpesvirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diner, Benjamin A; Lum, Krystal K; Toettcher, Jared E; Cristea, Ileana M

    2016-11-15

    The human interferon-inducible protein IFI16 is an important antiviral factor that binds nuclear viral DNA and promotes antiviral responses. Here, we define IFI16 dynamics in space and time and its distinct functions from the DNA sensor cyclic dinucleotide GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS). Live-cell imaging reveals a multiphasic IFI16 redistribution, first to viral entry sites at the nuclear periphery and then to nucleoplasmic puncta upon herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections. Optogenetics and live-cell microscopy establish the IFI16 pyrin domain as required for nuclear periphery localization and oligomerization. Furthermore, using proteomics, we define the signature protein interactions of the IFI16 pyrin and HIN200 domains and demonstrate the necessity of pyrin for IFI16 interactions with antiviral proteins PML and cGAS. We probe signaling pathways engaged by IFI16, cGAS, and PML using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9-mediated knockouts in primary fibroblasts. While IFI16 induces cytokines, only cGAS activates STING/TBK-1/IRF3 and apoptotic responses upon HSV-1 and HCMV infections. cGAS-dependent apoptosis upon DNA stimulation requires both the enzymatic production of cyclic dinucleotides and STING. We show that IFI16, not cGAS or PML, represses HSV-1 gene expression, reducing virus titers. This indicates that regulation of viral gene expression may function as a greater barrier to viral replication than the induction of antiviral cytokines. Altogether, our findings establish coordinated and distinct antiviral functions for IFI16 and cGAS against herpesviruses. How mammalian cells detect and respond to DNA viruses that replicate in the nucleus is poorly understood. Here, we decipher the distinct functions of two viral DNA sensors, IFI16 and cGAS, during active immune signaling upon infection with two herpesviruses, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). We show that IFI16

  1. Bone Abnormalities in Mice with Protein Kinase A (PKA) Defects Reveal a Role of Cyclic AMP Signaling in Bone Stromal Cell-Dependent Tumor Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S; Shapiro, J M; Saloustros, E; Stratakis, C A

    2016-11-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is an important enzyme for all eukaryotic cells. PKA phosphorylates other proteins, thus, it is essential for the regulation of many diverse cellular functions, including cytoplasmic trafficking and signaling, organelle structure and mitochondrial oxidation, nuclear gene expression, the cell cycle, and cellular division. The PKA holoenzyme is composed of 2 regulatory and 2 catalytic subunits. Four regulatory (R1α, R1β, R2α, and R2β) and 4 catalytic subunits (Cα, Cβ, Cγ, and Prkx) have been identified, giving rise to mainly PKA-I (when the 2 regulatory subunits are either R1α or R1β), or PKA-II (when the 2 regulatory subunits are either R2α or R2β). Mutations in the PKA subunits can lead to altered total PKA activity or abnormal PKA-I to PKA-II ratio, leading to various abnormalities in both humans and mice. These effects can be tissue-specific. We studied the effect of PKA subunit defects on PKA activity and bone morphology of mice that were single or double heterozygous for null alleles of the various PKA subunit genes. Bone lesions including fibrous dysplasia, myxomas, osteo-sarcomas, -chondromas and -chondrosarcomas were found in these mice. Observational and molecular studies showed that these lesions were derived from bone stromal cells (BSCs). We conclude that haploinsufficiency for different PKA subunit genes affected bone lesion formation, new bone generation, organization, and mineralization in variable ways. This work identified a PKA subunit- and activity-dependent pathway of bone lesion formation from BSCs with important implications for understanding how cyclic AMP affects the skeleton and its tumorigenesis. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Presenilins Regulate Neurotrypsin Gene Expression and Neurotrypsin-dependent Agrin Cleavage via Cyclic AMP Response Element-binding Protein (CREB) Modulation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Kim, Sonia N.; Benner, Christopher; Herrera, Cheryl M.; Kang, David E.; Garcia-Bassets, Ivan; Goldstein, Lawrence S. B.

    2013-01-01

    Presenilins, the catalytic components of the γ-secretase complex, are upstream regulators of multiple cellular pathways via regulation of gene transcription. However, the underlying mechanisms and the genes regulated by these pathways are poorly characterized. In this study, we identify Tequila and its mammalian ortholog Prss12 as genes negatively regulated by presenilins in Drosophila larval brains and mouse embryonic fibroblasts, respectively. Prss12 encodes the serine protease neurotrypsin, which cleaves the heparan sulfate proteoglycan agrin. Altered neurotrypsin activity causes serious synaptic and cognitive defects; despite this, the molecular processes regulating neurotrypsin expression and activity are poorly understood. Using γ-secretase drug inhibitors and presenilin mutants in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we found that a mature γ-secretase complex was required to repress neurotrypsin expression and agrin cleavage. We also determined that PSEN1 endoproteolysis or processing of well known γ-secretase substrates was not essential for this process. At the transcriptional level, PSEN1/2 removal induced cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB)/CREB-binding protein binding, accumulation of activating histone marks at the neurotrypsin promoter, and neurotrypsin transcriptional and functional up-regulation that was dependent on GSK3 activity. Upon PSEN1/2 reintroduction, this active epigenetic state was replaced by a methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2)-containing repressive state and reduced neurotrypsin expression. Genome-wide analysis revealed hundreds of other mouse promoters in which CREB binding is similarly modulated by the presence/absence of presenilins. Our study thus identifies Tequila and neurotrypsin as new genes repressed by presenilins and reveals a novel mechanism used by presenilins to modulate CREB signaling based on controlling CREB recruitment. PMID:24145027

  3. Presenilins regulate neurotrypsin gene expression and neurotrypsin-dependent agrin cleavage via cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Kim, Sonia N; Benner, Christopher; Herrera, Cheryl M; Kang, David E; Garcia-Bassets, Ivan; Goldstein, Lawrence S B

    2013-12-06

    Presenilins, the catalytic components of the γ-secretase complex, are upstream regulators of multiple cellular pathways via regulation of gene transcription. However, the underlying mechanisms and the genes regulated by these pathways are poorly characterized. In this study, we identify Tequila and its mammalian ortholog Prss12 as genes negatively regulated by presenilins in Drosophila larval brains and mouse embryonic fibroblasts, respectively. Prss12 encodes the serine protease neurotrypsin, which cleaves the heparan sulfate proteoglycan agrin. Altered neurotrypsin activity causes serious synaptic and cognitive defects; despite this, the molecular processes regulating neurotrypsin expression and activity are poorly understood. Using γ-secretase drug inhibitors and presenilin mutants in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we found that a mature γ-secretase complex was required to repress neurotrypsin expression and agrin cleavage. We also determined that PSEN1 endoproteolysis or processing of well known γ-secretase substrates was not essential for this process. At the transcriptional level, PSEN1/2 removal induced cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB)/CREB-binding protein binding, accumulation of activating histone marks at the neurotrypsin promoter, and neurotrypsin transcriptional and functional up-regulation that was dependent on GSK3 activity. Upon PSEN1/2 reintroduction, this active epigenetic state was replaced by a methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2)-containing repressive state and reduced neurotrypsin expression. Genome-wide analysis revealed hundreds of other mouse promoters in which CREB binding is similarly modulated by the presence/absence of presenilins. Our study thus identifies Tequila and neurotrypsin as new genes repressed by presenilins and reveals a novel mechanism used by presenilins to modulate CREB signaling based on controlling CREB recruitment.

  4. β2-Adrenergic receptor activation mobilizes intracellular calcium via a non-canonical cAMP-independent signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galaz-Montoya, Monica; Wright, Sara J; Rodriguez, Gustavo J; Lichtarge, Olivier; Wensel, Theodore G

    2017-06-16

    Beta adrenergic receptors (βARs) are G-protein-coupled receptors essential for physiological responses to the hormones/neurotransmitters epinephrine and norepinephrine which are found in the nervous system and throughout the body. They are the targets of numerous widely used drugs, especially in the case of the most extensively studied βAR, β 2 AR, whose ligands are used for asthma and cardiovascular disease. βARs signal through Gα s G-proteins and via activation of adenylyl cyclase and cAMP-dependent protein kinase, but some alternative downstream pathways have also been proposed that could be important for understanding normal physiological functioning of βAR signaling and its disruption in disease. Using fluorescence-based Ca 2+ flux assays combined with pharmacology and gene knock-out methods, we discovered a previously unrecognized endogenous pathway in HEK-293 cells whereby β 2 AR activation leads to robust Ca 2+ mobilization from intracellular stores via activation of phospholipase C and opening of inositol trisphosphate (InsP 3 ) receptors. This pathway did not involve cAMP, Gα s , or Gα i or the participation of the other members of the canonical β 2 AR signaling cascade and, therefore, constitutes a novel signaling mechanism for this receptor. This newly uncovered mechanism for Ca 2+ mobilization by β 2 AR has broad implications for adrenergic signaling, cross-talk with other signaling pathways, and the effects of βAR-directed drugs. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) enhances cAMP-responsive element binding (CREB) protein phosphorylation and phospho-CREB interaction with the mouse steroidogenic acute regulatory protein gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clem, Brian F; Hudson, Elizabeth A; Clark, Barbara J

    2005-03-01

    Steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) transcription is regulated through cAMP-protein kinase A-dependent mechanisms that involve multiple transcription factors including the cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) family members. Classically, binding of phosphorylated CREB to cis-acting cAMP-responsive elements (5'-TGACGTCA-3') within target gene promoters leads to recruitment of the coactivator CREB binding protein (CBP). Herein we examined the extent of CREB family member phosphorylation on protein-DNA interactions and CBP recruitment with the StAR promoter. Immunoblot analysis revealed that CREB, cAMP-responsive element modulator (CREM), and activating transcription factor (ATF)-1 are expressed in MA-10 mouse Leydig tumor cells, yet only CREB and ATF-1 are phosphorylated. (Bu)2cAMP treatment of MA-10 cells increased CREB phosphorylation approximately 2.3-fold within 30 min but did not change total nuclear CREB expression levels. Using DNA-affinity chromatography, we now show that CREB and ATF-1, but not CREM, interact with the StAR promoter, and this interaction is dependent on the activator protein-1 (AP-1) cis-acting element within the cAMP-responsive region. In addition, (Bu)2cAMP-treatment increased phosphorylated CREB (P-CREB) association with the StAR promoter but did not influence total CREB interaction. In vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated CREB binding to the StAR proximal promoter is independent of (Bu)2cAMP-treatment, confirming our in vitro analysis. However, (Bu)2cAMP-treatment increased P-CREB and CBP interaction with the StAR promoter, demonstrating for the first time the physical role of P-CREB:DNA interactions in CBP recruitment to the StAR proximal promoter.

  6. Control of βAR- and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA Receptor-Dependent cAMP Dynamics in Hippocampal Neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Chay

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Norepinephrine, a neuromodulator that activates β-adrenergic receptors (βARs, facilitates learning and memory as well as the induction of synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Several forms of long-term potentiation (LTP at the Schaffer collateral CA1 synapse require stimulation of both βARs and N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs. To understand the mechanisms mediating the interactions between βAR and NMDAR signaling pathways, we combined FRET imaging of cAMP in hippocampal neuron cultures with spatial mechanistic modeling of signaling pathways in the CA1 pyramidal neuron. Previous work implied that cAMP is synergistically produced in the presence of the βAR agonist isoproterenol and intracellular calcium. In contrast, we show that when application of isoproterenol precedes application of NMDA by several minutes, as is typical of βAR-facilitated LTP experiments, the average amplitude of the cAMP response to NMDA is attenuated compared with the response to NMDA alone. Models simulations suggest that, although the negative feedback loop formed by cAMP, cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA, and type 4 phosphodiesterase may be involved in attenuating the cAMP response to NMDA, it is insufficient to explain the range of experimental observations. Instead, attenuation of the cAMP response requires mechanisms upstream of adenylyl cyclase. Our model demonstrates that Gs-to-Gi switching due to PKA phosphorylation of βARs as well as Gi inhibition of type 1 adenylyl cyclase may underlie the experimental observations. This suggests that signaling by β-adrenergic receptors depends on temporal pattern of stimulation, and that switching may represent a novel mechanism for recruiting kinases involved in synaptic plasticity and memory.

  7. The Orphan G Protein-coupled Receptor Gpr175 (Tpra40) Enhances Hedgehog Signaling by Modulating cAMP Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jaskirat; Wen, Xiaohui; Scales, Suzie J

    2015-12-04

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays an essential role in vertebrate embryonic tissue patterning of many developing organs. Signaling occurs predominantly in primary cilia and is initiated by the entry of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-like protein Smoothened into cilia and culminates in gene transcription via the Gli family of transcription factors upon their nuclear entry. Here we identify an orphan GPCR, Gpr175 (also known as Tpra1 or Tpra40: transmembrane protein, adipocyte associated 1 or of 40 kDa), which also localizes to primary cilia upon Hh stimulation and positively regulates Hh signaling. Interaction experiments place Gpr175 at the level of PKA and upstream of the Gαi component of heterotrimeric G proteins, which itself localizes to cilia and can modulate Hh signaling. Gpr175 or Gαi1 depletion leads to increases in cellular cAMP levels and in Gli3 processing into its repressor form. Thus we propose that Gpr175 coupled to Gαi1 normally functions to inhibit the production of cAMP by adenylyl cyclase upon Hh stimulation, thus maximizing signaling by turning off PKA activity and hence Gli3 repressor formation. Taken together our data suggest that Gpr175 is a novel positive regulator of the Hh signaling pathway. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. G-CSF receptor-binding cyclic peptides designed with artificial amino-acid linkers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, Kenji; Maruyama-Takahashi, Kumiko; Yamasaki, Motoo; Hirayama, Noriaki

    2006-01-01

    Designing small molecules that mimic the receptor-binding local surface structure of large proteins such as cytokines or growth factors is fascinating and challenging. In this study, we designed cyclic peptides that reproduce the receptor-binding loop structures of G-CSF. We found it is important to select a suitable linker to join two or more discontinuous sequences and both termini of the peptide corresponding to the receptor-binding loop. Structural simulations based on the crystallographic structure of KW-2228, a stable and potent analog of human G-CSF, led us to choose 4-aminobenzoic acid (Abz) as a part of the linker. A combination of 4-Abz with β-alanine or glycine, and disulfide bridges between cysteins or homocysteins, gave a structure suitable for receptor binding. In this structure, the side-chains of several amino acids important for the interactions with the receptor are protruding from one side of the peptide ring. This artificial peptide showed G-CSF antagonistic activity in a cell proliferation assay

  9. Cyclic AMP regulation of the human glycoprotein hormone α-subunit gene is mediated by an 18-base-pair element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, B.J.; Bokar, J.A.; Virgin, J.B.; Vallen, E.A.; Milsted, A.; Nilson, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    cAMP regulates transcription of the gene encoding the α-subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) in the choriocarcinoma cells (BeWo). To define the sequences required for regulation by cAMP, the authors inserted fragments from the 5' flanking region of the α-subunit gene into a test vector containing the simian virus 40 early promoter (devoid of its enhancer) linked to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene. Results from transient expression assays in BeWo cells indicated that a 1500-base-pair (bp) fragment conferred cAMP responsiveness on the CAT gene regardless of position or orientation of the insert relative to the viral promoter. A subfragment extending from position -169 to position -100 had the same effect on cAMP-induced expression. Furthermore, the entire stimulatory effect could be achieved with an 18-bp synthetic oligodeoxynucleotide corresponding to a direct repeat between position -146 and -111. In the absence of cAMP, the α-subunit 5' flanking sequence also enhanced transcription from the simian virus 40 early promoter. They localized this enhancer activity to the same -169/-100 fragment containing the cAMP response element. The 18-bp element alone, however, had no effect on basal expression. Thus, this short DNA sequence serves as a cAMP response element and also functions independently of other promoter-regulatory elements located in the 5' flanking sequence of the α-subunit gene

  10. Dopamine receptors D3 and D5 regulate CD4(+)T-cell activation and differentiation by modulating ERK activation and cAMP production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Dafne; Contreras, Francisco; González, Hugo; Prado, Carolina; Elgueta, Daniela; Figueroa, Claudio; Pacheco, Rodrigo

    2015-07-15

    Dopamine receptors have been described in T-cells, however their signalling pathways coupled remain unknown. Since cAMP and ERKs play key roles regulating T-cell physiology, we aim to determine whether cAMP and ERK1/2-phosphorylation are modulated by dopamine receptor 3 (D3R) and D5R, and how this modulation affects CD4(+) T-cell activation and differentiation. Our pharmacologic and genetic evidence shows that D3R-stimulation reduced cAMP levels and ERK2-phosphorylation, consequently increasing CD4(+) T-cell activation and Th1-differentiation, respectively. Moreover, D5R expression reinforced TCR-triggered ERK1/2-phosphorylation and T-cell activation. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate how D3R and D5R modulate key signalling pathways affecting CD4(+) T-cell activation and Th1-differentiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Insulin elevates leptin secretion and mRNA levels via cyclic AMP in 3T3-L1 adipocytes deprived of glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Tsubai

    2016-11-01

    Conclusion: Insulin alone stimulates leptin secretion and elevates leptin mRNA levels via cAMP under the lack of glucose metabolism, while glucose is a significant and ambivalent effector on the insulin effects of leptin.

  12. Aspirin-triggered resolvin D1 attenuates PDGF-induced vascular smooth muscle cell migration via the cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase A (cAMP/PKA) pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottola, Giorgio; Chatterjee, Anuran; Wu, Bian; Chen, Mian; Conte, Michael S

    2017-01-01

    Resolvin D1 (RvD1) is a specialized pro-resolving lipid mediator that has been previously shown to attenuate vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration, a key process in the development of intimal hyperplasia. We sought to investigate the role of the cAMP/PKA pathway in mediating the effects of the aspirin-triggered epimer 17R-RvD1 (AT-RvD1) on VSMC migration. VSMCs were harvested from human saphenous veins. VSMCs were analyzed for intracellular cAMP levels and PKA activity after exposure to AT-RvD1. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced migration and cytoskeletal changes in VSMCs were observed through scratch, Transwell, and cell shape assays in the presence or absence of a PKA inhibitor (Rp-8-Br-cAMP). Further investigation of the pathways involved in AT-RvD1 signaling was performed by measuring Rac1 activity, vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation and paxillin translocation. Finally, we examined the role of RvD1 receptors (GPR32 and ALX/FPR2) in AT-RvD1 induced effects on VSMC migration and PKA activity. Treatment with AT-RvD1 induced a significant increase in cAMP levels and PKA activity in VSMCs at 5 minutes and 30 minutes, respectively. AT-RvD1 attenuated PDGF-induced VSMC migration and cytoskeletal rearrangements. These effects were attenuated by the PKA inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cAMP, suggesting cAMP/PKA involvement. Treatment of VSMC with AT-RvD1 inhibited PDGF-stimulated Rac1 activity, increased VASP phosphorylation, and attenuated paxillin localization to focal adhesions; these effects were negated by the addition of Rp-8-Br-cAMP. The effects of AT-RvD1 on VSMC migration and PKA activity were attenuated by blocking ALX/FPR2, suggesting an important role of this G-protein coupled receptor. Our results suggest that AT-RvD1 attenuates PDGF-induced VSMC migration via ALX/FPR2 and cAMP/PKA. Interference with Rac1, VASP and paxillin function appear to mediate the downstream effects of AT-RvD1 on VSMC migration.

  13. A cAMP Biosensor-Based High-Throughput Screening Assay for Identification of Gs-Coupled GPCR Ligands and Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Line; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) is an important second messenger, and quantification of intracellular cAMP levels is essential in studies of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The intracellular cAMP levels are regulated by the adenylate cyclase (AC) upon activation of either Gs- or ...... also observed for the other representative Gs-coupled GPCRs tested, GLP-1R and GlucagonR. The FRET-based cAMP biosensor assay is robust, reproducible, and inexpensive with good Z factors and is highly applicable for HTS....

  14. Corticotropin-releasing factor in the basolateral amygdala enhances memory consolidation via an interaction with the beta-adrenoceptor-cAMP pathway: dependence on glucocorticoid receptor activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roozendaal, Benno; Schelling, Gustav; McGaugh, James L

    2008-06-25

    Extensive evidence indicates that stress hormone effects on the consolidation of emotionally influenced memory involve noradrenergic activation of the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA). The present experiments examined whether corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) modulates memory consolidation via an interaction with the beta-adrenoceptor-cAMP system in the BLA. In a first experiment, male Sprague Dawley rats received bilateral infusions of the CRF-binding protein ligand inhibitor CRF(6-33) into the BLA either alone or together with the CRF receptor antagonist alpha-helical CRF(9-41) immediately after inhibitory avoidance training. CRF(6-33) induced dose-dependent enhancement of 48 h retention latencies, which was blocked by coadministration of alpha-helical CRF(9-41), suggesting that CRF(6-33) enhances memory consolidation by displacing CRF from its binding protein, thereby increasing "free" endogenous CRF concentrations. In a second experiment, intra-BLA infusions of atenolol (beta-adrenoceptor antagonist) and Rp-cAMPS (cAMP inhibitor), but not prazosin (alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist), blocked CRF(6-33)-induced retention enhancement. In a third experiment, the CRF receptor antagonist alpha-helical CRF(9-41) administered into the BLA immediately after training attenuated the dose-response effects of concurrent intra-BLA infusions of clenbuterol (beta-adrenoceptor agonist). In contrast, alpha-helical CRF(9-41) did not alter retention enhancement induced by posttraining intra-BLA infusions of either cirazoline (alpha(1)-adrenoceptor agonist) or 8-br-cAMP (cAMP analog). These findings suggest that CRF facilitates the memory-modulatory effects of noradrenergic stimulation in the BLA via an interaction with the beta-adrenoceptor-cAMP cascade, at a locus between the membrane-bound beta-adrenoceptor and the intracellular cAMP formation site. Moreover, consistent with evidence that glucocorticoids enhance memory consolidation via a similar interaction with the

  15. The Combined Inhibitory Effect of the Adenosine A1 and Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors on cAMP Accumulation in the Hippocampus Is Additive and Independent of A1 Receptor Desensitization

    OpenAIRE

    Serpa, Andr?; Correia, Sara; Ribeiro, Joaquim A.; Sebasti?o, Ana M.; Cascalheira, Jos? F.

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine A1 and cannabinoid CB1 receptors are highly expressed in hippocampus where they trigger similar transduction pathways. We investigated how the combined acute activation of A1 and CB1 receptors modulates cAMP accumulation in rat hippocampal slices. The CB1 agonist WIN55212-2 (0.3?30??M) decreased forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation with an EC50 of 6.6 ? 2.7??M and an E max? of 31% ? 2%, whereas for the A1 agonist, N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 10?150?nM), an EC50 of 35 ? 19?nM, an...

  16. Differential regulation of human 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 for steroid hormone biosynthesis by starvation and cyclic AMP stimulation: studies in the human adrenal NCI-H295R cell model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Udhane

    Full Text Available Human steroid biosynthesis depends on a specifically regulated cascade of enzymes including 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSD3Bs. Type 2 HSD3B catalyzes the conversion of pregnenolone, 17α-hydroxypregnenolone and dehydroepiandrosterone to progesterone, 17α-hydroxyprogesterone and androstenedione in the human adrenal cortex and the gonads but the exact regulation of this enzyme is unknown. Therefore, specific downregulation of HSD3B2 at adrenarche around age 6-8 years and characteristic upregulation of HSD3B2 in the ovaries of women suffering from the polycystic ovary syndrome remain unexplained prompting us to study the regulation of HSD3B2 in adrenal NCI-H295R cells. Our studies confirm that the HSD3B2 promoter is regulated by transcription factors GATA, Nur77 and SF1/LRH1 in concert and that the NBRE/Nur77 site is crucial for hormonal stimulation with cAMP. In fact, these three transcription factors together were able to transactivate the HSD3B2 promoter in placental JEG3 cells which normally do not express HSD3B2. By contrast, epigenetic mechanisms such as methylation and acetylation seem not involved in controlling HSD3B2 expression. Cyclic AMP was found to exert differential effects on HSD3B2 when comparing short (acute versus long-term (chronic stimulation. Short cAMP stimulation inhibited HSD3B2 activity directly possibly due to regulation at co-factor or substrate level or posttranslational modification of the protein. Long cAMP stimulation attenuated HSD3B2 inhibition and increased HSD3B2 expression through transcriptional regulation. Although PKA and MAPK pathways are obvious candidates for possibly transmitting the cAMP signal to HSD3B2, our studies using PKA and MEK1/2 inhibitors revealed no such downstream signaling of cAMP. However, both signaling pathways were clearly regulating HSD3B2 expression.

  17. Protein kinase A and Epac activation by cAMP regulates the expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein in glial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugimoto Naotoshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP controls differentiation in several types of cells during brain development. However, the molecular mechanism of cAMP-controlled differentiation is not fully understood. We investigated the role of protein kinase A (PKA and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac on cAMP-induced glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, an astrocyte marker, in cultured glial cells. B92 glial cells were treated with cAMP-elevating drugs, an activator of adenylate cyclase, phosphodiesterase inhibitor and a ß adrenal receptor agonist. These cAMP-elevating agents induced dramatic morphological changes and expression of GFAP. A cAMP analog, 8-Br-cAMP, which activates Epac as well as PKA, induced GFAP expression and morphological changes, while another cAMP analog, 8-CPT-cAMP, which activates Epac with greater efficacy when compared to PKA, induced GFAP expression but very weak morphological changes. Most importantly, the treatment with a PKA inhibitor partially reduced cAMP-induced GFAP expression. Taken together, these results indicate that cAMP-elevating drugs lead to the induction of GFAP via PKA and/or Epac activation in B92 glial cells.

  18. G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30) forms a plasma membrane complex with membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs) and protein kinase A-anchoring protein 5 (AKAP5) that constitutively inhibits cAMP production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broselid, Stefan; Berg, Kelly A; Chavera, Teresa A; Kahn, Robin; Clarke, William P; Olde, Björn; Leeb-Lundberg, L M Fredrik

    2014-08-08

    GPR30, or G protein-coupled estrogen receptor, is a G protein-coupled receptor reported to bind 17β-estradiol (E2), couple to the G proteins Gs and Gi/o, and mediate non-genomic estrogenic responses. However, controversies exist regarding the receptor pharmacological profile, effector coupling, and subcellular localization. We addressed the role of the type I PDZ motif at the receptor C terminus in receptor trafficking and coupling to cAMP production in HEK293 cells and CHO cells ectopically expressing the receptor and in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells expressing the native receptor. GPR30 was localized both intracellularly and in the plasma membrane and subject to limited basal endocytosis. E2 and G-1, reported GPR30 agonists, neither stimulated nor inhibited cAMP production through GPR30, nor did they influence receptor localization. Instead, GPR30 constitutively inhibited cAMP production stimulated by a heterologous agonist independently of Gi/o. Moreover, siRNA knockdown of native GPR30 increased cAMP production. Deletion of the receptor PDZ motif interfered with inhibition of cAMP production and increased basal receptor endocytosis. GPR30 interacted with membrane-associated guanylate kinases, including SAP97 and PSD-95, and protein kinase A-anchoring protein (AKAP) 5 in the plasma membrane in a PDZ-dependent manner. Knockdown of AKAP5 or St-Ht31 treatment, to disrupt AKAP interaction with the PKA RIIβ regulatory subunit, decreased inhibition of cAMP production, and St-Ht31 increased basal receptor endocytosis. Therefore, GPR30 forms a plasma membrane complex with a membrane-associated guanylate kinase and AKAP5, which constitutively attenuates cAMP production in response to heterologous agonists independently of Gi/o and retains receptors in the plasma membrane. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh; Xiang, Wenpei; Wang, Yinna; Zhang, Xiaoying; Billiar, Timothy R.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► cAMP blocks cell death induced by TNF and actinomycin D in cultured hepatocytes. ► cAMP blocks NF-κB activation induced by TNF and actinomycin D. ► cAMP blocks DISC formation following TNF and actinomycin D exposure. ► cAMP blocks TNF signaling at a proximal step. -- Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF + ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found that cAMP exerts its affect at the proximal level of TNF signaling by inhibiting the formation of the DISC

  20. cAMP prevents TNF-induced apoptosis through inhibiting DISC complex formation in rat hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Rajesh [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Xiang, Wenpei [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Family Planning Research Institute, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, People' s Republic of China (China); Wang, Yinna [Vascular Medicine Institute, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, 10051-5A BST 3, 3501 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Zhang, Xiaoying [Department of Medicine/Endocrinology Division, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, 200 Lothrop St., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Billiar, Timothy R., E-mail: billiartr@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2012-06-22

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks cell death induced by TNF and actinomycin D in cultured hepatocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks NF-{kappa}B activation induced by TNF and actinomycin D. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks DISC formation following TNF and actinomycin D exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer cAMP blocks TNF signaling at a proximal step. -- Abstract: Tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine that plays a role in immunity and the control of cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and apoptosis. The pleiotropic nature of TNF is due to the formation of different signaling complexes upon the binding of TNF to its receptor, TNF receptor type 1 (TNFR1). TNF induces apoptosis in various mammalian cells when the cells are co-treated with a transcription inhibitor like actinomycin D (ActD). When TNFR1 is activated, it recruits an adaptor protein, TNF receptor-associated protein with death domain (TRADD), through its cytoplasmic death effector domain (DED). TRADD, in turn, recruits other signaling proteins, including TNF receptor-associated protein 2 (TRAF2) and receptor-associated protein kinase (RIPK) 1, to form a complex. Subsequently, this complex combines with FADD and procaspase-8, converts into a death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) to induce apoptosis. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a second messenger that regulates various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, gene expression, and apoptosis. cAMP analogues are reported to act as anti-apoptotic agents in various cell types, including hepatocytes. We found that a cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cAMP (db-cAMP), inhibits TNF + ActD-induced apoptosis in rat hepatocytes. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT-5720 reverses this inhibitory effect of cAMP on apoptosis. Cytoprotection by cAMP involves down-regulation of various apoptotic signal regulators like TRADD and FADD and inhibition of caspase-8 and caspase-3 cleavage. We also found

  1. Increase in cyclic AMP concentration in a cerebral giant interneuron mimics part of a memory trace for conditioned taste aversion of the pond snail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Emi; Matsunaga, Miho; Okada, Ryuichi; Yamagishi, Miki; Okuta, Akiko; Lukowiak, Ken; Ito, Etsuro

    2013-01-01

    Conditioned taste aversion (CTA) can be classically conditioned in the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis and subsequently be consolidated into long-term memory (LTM). The neural trace that subserves CTA-LTM can be summarized as follows: A polysynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic potential recorded in the neuron 1 medial (N1M) cell in the conditioned snails as a result of activation of the cerebral giant cell (CGC) is larger and lasts longer than that in control snails. The N1M cell is ultimately activated by the CGC via the neuron 3 tonic (N3t) cell. That is, the inhibitory monosynaptic inputs from the N3t cell to the N1M cell are facilitated. The N1M and N3t cells are the members of feeding central pattern generator, whereas the CGC is a multimodal interneuron thought to play a key role in feeding behavior. Here we examined the involvement of a second messenger, cAMP, in the establishment of the memory trace. We injected cAMP into the CGC and monitored the potentials of the B3 motor neuron activated by the CGC. B3 activity is used as an index for the synaptic inputs from the N3t cell to the N1M cell. We found that the B3 potentials were transiently enlarged. Thus, when the cAMP concentration is increased in the CGC by taste aversion training, cAMP-induced changes may play a key role in the establishment of a memory trace in the N3t cell.

  2. Adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent phosphoregulation of mitochondrial complex I is inhibited by nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lund, Kaleb C.; Wallace, Kendall B.

    2008-01-01

    Nucleoside analog reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) are known to directly inhibit mitochondrial complex I activity as well as various mitochondrial kinases. Recent observations that complex I activity and superoxide production are modulated through cAMP-dependent phosphorylation suggests a mechanism through which NRTIs may affect mitochondrial respiration via kinase-dependent protein phosphorylation. In the current study, we examine the potential for NRTIs to inhibit the cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of complex I and the associated NADH:CoQ oxidoreductase activities and rates of superoxide production using HepG2 cells. Phosphoprotein staining of immunocaptured complex I revealed that 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT; 10 and 50 μM), AZT monophosphate (150 μM), and 2',3'-dideoxycytidine (ddC; 1 μM) prevented the phosphorylation of the NDUFB11 subunit of complex I. This was associated with a decrease in complex I activity with AZT and AZT monophosphate only. In the presence of succinate, superoxide production was increased with 2',3'-dideoxyinosine (ddI; 10 μM) and ddC (1 μM). In the presence of succinate + cAMP, AZT showed an inverse dose-dependent effect on superoxide production. None of the NRTIs examined inhibit PKA activity suggesting that the observed effects are due to a direct interaction with complex I. These data demonstrate a direct effect of NRTIs on cAMP-dependent regulation of mitochondrial bioenergetics independent of DNA polymerase-γ activity; in the case of AZT, these observations may provide a mechanism for the observed long-term toxicity with this drug

  3. The freeze-thaw stress response of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is growth phase specific and is controlled by nutritional state via the RAS-cyclic AMP signal transduction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J I; Grant, C M; Attfield, P V; Dawes, I W

    1997-10-01

    The ability of cells to survive freezing and thawing is expected to depend on the physiological conditions experienced prior to freezing. We examined factors affecting yeast cell survival during freeze-thaw stress, including those associated with growth phase, requirement for mitochondrial functions, and prior stress treatment(s), and the role played by relevant signal transduction pathways. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was frozen at -20 degrees C for 2 h (cooling rate, less than 4 degrees C min-1) and thawed on ice for 40 min. Supercooling occurred without reducing cell survival and was followed by freezing. Loss of viability was proportional to the freezing duration, indicating that freezing is the main determinant of freeze-thaw damage. Regardless of the carbon source used, the wild-type strain and an isogenic petite mutant ([rho 0]) showed the same pattern of freeze-thaw tolerance throughout growth, i.e., high resistance during lag phase and low resistance during log phase, indicating that the response to freeze-thaw stress is growth phase specific and not controlled by glucose repression. In addition, respiratory ability and functional mitochondria are necessary to confer full resistance to freeze-thaw stress. Both nitrogen and carbon source starvation led to freeze-thaw tolerance. The use of strains affected in the RAS-cyclic AMP (RAS-cAMP) pathway or supplementation of an rca1 mutant (defective in the cAMP phosphodiesterase gene) with cAMP showed that the freeze-thaw response of yeast is under the control of the RAS-cAMP pathway. Yeast did not adapt to freeze-thaw stress following repeated freeze-thaw treatment with or without a recovery period between freeze-thaw cycles, nor could it adapt following pretreatment by cold shock. However, freeze-thaw tolerance of yeast cells was induced during fermentative and respiratory growth by pretreatment with H2O2, cycloheximide, mild heat shock, or NaCl, indicating that cross protection between freeze-thaw stress

  4. FRET-based binding assay between a fluorescent cAMP analogue and a cyclic nucleotide-binding domain tagged with a CFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Francisco; Santana-Calvo, Carmen; Sánchez-Guevara, Yoloxochitl; Nishigaki, Takuya

    2017-09-01

    The cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD) functions as a regulatory domain of many proteins involved in cyclic nucleotide signalling. We developed a straightforward and reliable binding assay based on intermolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between an adenosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate analogue labelled with fluorescein and a recombinant CNBD of human EPAC1 tagged with a cyan fluorescence protein (CFP). The high FRET efficiency of this method (~ 80%) allowed us to perform several types of binding experiments with nanomolar range of sample using conventional equipment. In addition, the CFP tag on the CNBD enabled us to perform a specific binding experiment using an unpurified protein. Considering these advantages, this technique is useful to study poorly characterized CNBDs. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  5. Effect of cAMP signaling on expression of glucocorticoid receptor, Bim and Bad in glucocorticoid-sensitive and resistant leukemic and multiple myeloma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongli; Carlton, Michael E; Lerner, Adam; Epstein, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of cAMP signaling induces apoptosis in glucocorticoid-sensitive and resistant CEM leukemic and MM.1 multiple myeloma cell lines, and this effect is enhanced by dexamethasone in both glucocorticoid-sensitive cell types and in glucocorticoid-resistant CEM cells. Expression of the mRNA for the glucocorticoid receptor alpha (GR) promoters 1A3, 1B and 1C, expression of mRNA and protein for GR, and the BH3-only proapoptotic proteins, Bim and Bad, and the phosphorylation state of Bad were examined following stimulation of the cAMP and glucocorticoid signaling pathways. Expression levels of GR promoters were increased by cAMP and glucocorticoid signaling, but GR protein expression was little changed in CEM and decreased in MM.1 cells. Stimulation of these two signaling pathways induced Bim in CEM cells, induced Bad in MM.1 cells, and activated Bad, as indicated by its dephosphorylation on ser112, in both cell types. This study shows that leukemic and multiple myeloma cells, including those resistant to glucocorticoids, can be induced to undergo apoptosis by stimulating the cAMP signaling pathway, with enhancement by glucocorticoids, and the mechanism by which this occurs may be related to changes in Bim and Bad expression, and in all cases, to activation of Bad.

  6. Expression of orphan G-protein coupled receptor GPR174 in CHO cells induced morphological changes and proliferation delay via increasing intracellular cAMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugita, Kazuya; Yamamura, Chiaki; Tabata, Ken-ichi [Laboratory of Pharmacoinformatics, Graduate School of Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Fujita, Norihisa, E-mail: nori@ph.ritsumei.ac.jp [Laboratory of Pharmacoinformatics, Graduate School of Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); School of Pharmacy, Ristumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of GPR174 in CHO cells induces morphological changes and proliferation delay. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These are due to increase in intracellular cAMP concentration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lysophosphatidylserine was identified to stimulate GPR174 leading to activate ACase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The potencies of fatty acid moiety on LysoPS were oleoyl Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To stearoyl > palmitoyl. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We propose that GPR174 is a lysophosphatidylserine receptor. -- Abstract: We established cell lines that stably express orphan GPCR GPR174 using CHO cells, and studied physiological and pharmacological features of the receptor. GPR174-expressing cells showed cell-cell adhesion with localization of actin filaments to cell membrane, and revealed significant delay of cell proliferation. Since the morphological changes of GPR174-cells were very similar to mock CHO cells treated with cholera toxin, we measured the concentration of intracellular cAMP. The results showed the concentration was significantly elevated in GPR174-cells. By measuring intracellular cAMP concentration in GPR174-cells, we screened lipids and nucleotides to identify ligands for GPR174. We found that lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS) stimulated increase in intracellular cAMP in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, phosphorylation of Erk was elevated by LysoPS in GPR174 cells. These LysoPS responses were inhibited by NF449, an inhibitor of G{alpha}{sub s} protein. These results suggested that GPR174 was a putative LysoPS receptor conjugating with G{alpha}{sub s}, and its expression induced morphological changes in CHO cells by constitutively activating adenylyl cycles accompanied with cell conjunctions and delay of proliferation.

  7. Cows are not mice: the role of cyclic AMP, phosphodiesterases, and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in the maintenance of meiotic arrest in bovine oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau-Goeseels, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Meiotic maturation in mammalian oocytes is initiated during fetal development, and is then arrested at the dictyate stage - possibly for several years. Oocyte meiosis resumes in preovulatory follicles in response to the lutenizing hormone (LH) surge or spontaneously when competent oocytes are removed from follicles and cultured. The mechanisms involved in meiotic arrest and resumption in bovine oocytes are not fully understood, and several studies point to important differences between oocytes from rodent and livestock species. This paper reviews earlier and contemporary studies on the effects of cAMP-elevating agents and phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzyme inhibitors on the maintenance of meiotic arrest in bovine oocytes in vitro. Contrary to results obtained with mouse oocytes, bovine oocyte meiosis is inhibited by activators of the energy sensor adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK, mammalian gene PRKA), which is activated by AMP, the degradation product of cAMP. It is not clear whether or not the effects were due to AMPK activation, and they may depend on culture conditions. Evidence suggests that other signaling pathways (for example, the cGMP/nitric oxide pathway) are involved in bovine oocyte meiotic arrest, but further studies are needed to understand the interactions between the signaling pathways that lead to maturation promoting factor (MPF) being inactive or active. An improved understanding of the mechanisms involved in the control of bovine oocyte meiosis will facilitate better control of the process in vitro, resulting in increased developmental competence and increased efficiency of in vitro embryo production procedures. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Enhancing E. coli tolerance towards oxidative stress via engineering its global regulator cAMP receptor protein (CRP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souvik Basak

    Full Text Available Oxidative damage to microbial hosts often occurs under stressful conditions during bioprocessing. Classical strain engineering approaches are usually both time-consuming and labor intensive. Here, we aim to improve E. coli performance under oxidative stress via engineering its global regulator cAMP receptor protein (CRP, which can directly or indirectly regulate redox-sensing regulators SoxR and OxyR, and other ~400 genes in E. coli. Error-prone PCR technique was employed to introduce modifications to CRP, and three mutants (OM1~OM3 were identified with improved tolerance via H(2O(2 enrichment selection. The best mutant OM3 could grow in 12 mM H(2O(2 with the growth rate of 0.6 h(-1, whereas the growth of wild type was completely inhibited at this H(2O(2 concentration. OM3 also elicited enhanced thermotolerance at 48°C as well as resistance against cumene hydroperoxide. The investigation about intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS, which determines cell viability, indicated that the accumulation of ROS in OM3 was always lower than in WT with or without H(2O(2 treatment. Genome-wide DNA microarray analysis has shown not only CRP-regulated genes have demonstrated great transcriptional level changes (up to 8.9-fold, but also RpoS- and OxyR-regulated genes (up to 7.7-fold. qRT-PCR data and enzyme activity assay suggested that catalase (katE could be a major antioxidant enzyme in OM3 instead of alkyl hydroperoxide reductase or superoxide dismutase. To our knowledge, this is the first work on improving E. coli oxidative stress resistance by reframing its transcription machinery through its native global regulator. The positive outcome of this approach may suggest that engineering CRP can be successfully implemented as an efficient strain engineering alternative for E. coli.

  9. G-protein-mediated interconversions of cell-surface cAMP receptors and their involvement in excitation and desensitization of guanylate cyclase in Dictyostelium discoideum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Haastert, P.J.; de Wit, R.J.; Janssens, P.M.; Kesbeke, F.; DeGoede, J.

    1986-01-01

    In Dictyostelium discoideum cells, extracellular cAMP induces the rapid (within 2 s) activation of guanylate cyclase, which is followed by complete desensitization after about 10 s. cAMP binding to these cells is heterogeneous, showing a subclass of fast dissociating sites coupled to adenylate cyclase (A-sites) and a subclass of slowly dissociating sites coupled to guanylate cyclase (B-sites). The kinetics of the B-sites were further investigated on a seconds time scale. Statistical analysis of the association of [ 3 H]cAMP to the B-sites and dissociation of the complex revealed that the receptor can exist in three states which interconvert according to the following scheme. cAMP binds to the BF-state (off-rate 2.5 s) which rapidly (t1/2 = 3 s) converts to the BS-state (off-rate 15 s) and subsequently (without a detectable delay) into the BSS-state (off-rate 150 s). In membranes, both the BS- and BSS-states are converted to the BF-state by GTP and GDP, suggesting the involvement of a G-protein. Densensitized cells show a 80% reduction of the formation of the BSS-state, but no reduction of the BF- or BS-state. These data are combined into a model in which the transitions of the B-sites are mediated by a G-protein; activation of the G-protein and guanylate cyclase is associated with the transition of the BS- to the BSS-state of the receptor, whereas desensitization is associated with the inhibition of this transition

  10. cAMP and forskolin decrease γ-aminobutyric acid-gated chloride flux in rat brain synaptoneurosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuschneider, G.; Schwartz, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of the cyclic nucleotide cAMP on γ-aminobutyric acid-gated chloride channel function were investigated. The membrane-permeant cAMP analog N 6 , O 2' -dibutyryladenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate inhibited muscimol-induced 36 Cl - uptake into rat cerebral cortical synaptoneurosomes in a concentration-dependent manner. The inhibition was due to a decrease in the maximal effect of muscimol, with no change in potency. Similar effects were observed with 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutylmethylxanthine. The effect of endogenous cAMP accumulation on the γ-aminobutyric acid-gated Cl - channel was studied with forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase. Under identical conditions, in the intact synaptoneurosomes, forskolin inhibited muscimol-induced 36 Cl - uptake and generated cAMP with similar potencies. Surprisingly, 1,9-dideoxyforskolin, which does not activate adenylate cyclase, also inhibited the muscimol response, suggesting that forskolin and its lipophilic derivatives may interact with the Cl - channel directly. The data suggest that γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA A ) receptor function in brain can be regulated by cAMP-dependent phosphorylation

  11. Genetically-encoded tools for cAMP probing and modulation in living systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriy M Paramonov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is one of the principal second messengers downstream of a manifold of signal transduction pathways, including the ones triggered by G protein-coupled receptors. Not surprisingly, biochemical assays for cAMP have been instrumental for basic research and drug discovery for decades, providing insights into cellular physiology and guiding pharmaceutical industry. However, despite impressive track record, the majority of conventional biochemical tools for cAMP probing share the same fundamental shortcoming - all the measurements require sample disruption for cAMP liberation. This common bottleneck, together with inherently low spatial resolution of measurements (as cAMP is typically analyzed in lysates of thousands of cells, underpin the ensuing limitations of the conventional cAMP assays: 1 genuine kinetic measurements of cAMP levels over time in a single given sample are unfeasible; 2 inability to obtain precise information on cAMP spatial distribution and transfer at subcellular levels, let alone the attempts to pinpoint dynamic interactions of cAMP and its effectors. At the same time, tremendous progress in synthetic biology over the recent years culminated in drastic refinement of our toolbox, allowing us not only to bypass the limitations of conventional assays, but to put intracellular cAMP life-span under tight control – something, that seemed scarcely attainable before. In this review article we discuss the main classes of modern genetically-encoded tools tailored for cAMP probing and modulation in living systems. We examine the capabilities and weaknesses of these different tools in the context of their operational characteristics and applicability to various experimental set-ups involving living cells, providing the guidance for rational selection of the best tools for particular needs.

  12. Cyclic AMP-Elevating Capacity of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin-Hemolysin Is Sufficient for Lung Infection but Not for Full Virulence of Bordetella pertussis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Škopová, Karolína; Tomalová, Barbora; Kanchev, Ivan; Rossmann, Pavel; Švédová, Martina; Adkins, Irena; Bíbová, Ilona; Tomala, Jakub; Mašín, Jiří; Guiso, N.; Osička, Radim; Sedláček, Radislav; Kovář, Marek; Šebo, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 6 (2017), s. 1-22, č. článku e00937-16. ISSN 0019-9567 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NV16-28126A; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-14547S; GA ČR GA13-12885S; GA ČR GA15-09157S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/12/0460; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015064; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015040 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : Bordetella pertussis * adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin * cAMP intoxication Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology; EE - Microbiology, Virology (UMG-J) OBOR OECD: Microbiology; Microbiology (UMG-J) Impact factor: 3.593, year: 2016

  13. Role of cyclic AMP sensor Epac1 in masseter muscle hypertrophy and myosin heavy chain transition induced by β2-adrenoceptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, Yoshiki; Umeki, Daisuke; Mototani, Yasumasa; Jin, Huiling; Cai, Wenqian; Shiozawa, Kouichi; Suita, Kenji; Saeki, Yasutake; Fujita, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Okumura, Satoshi

    2014-12-15

    The predominant isoform of β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) in skeletal muscle is β2-AR and that in the cardiac muscle is β1-AR. We have reported that Epac1 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1), a new protein kinase A-independent cAMP sensor, does not affect cardiac hypertrophy in response to pressure overload or chronic isoproterenol (isoprenaline) infusion. However, the role of Epac1 in skeletal muscle hypertrophy remains poorly understood. We thus examined the effect of disruption of Epac1, the major Epac isoform in skeletal muscle, on masseter muscle hypertrophy induced by chronic β2-AR stimulation with clenbuterol (CB) in Epac1-null mice (Epac1KO). The masseter muscle weight/tibial length ratio was similar in wild-type (WT) and Epac1KO at baseline and was significantly increased in WT after CB infusion, but this increase was suppressed in Epac1KO. CB treatment significantly increased the proportion of myosin heavy chain (MHC) IIb at the expense of that of MHC IId/x in both WT and Epac1KO, indicating that Epac1 did not mediate the CB-induced MHC isoform transition towards the faster isoform. The mechanism of suppression of CB-mediated hypertrophy in Epac1KO is considered to involve decreased activation of Akt signalling. In addition, CB-induced histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) phosphorylation on serine 246 mediated by calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII), which plays a role in skeletal muscle hypertrophy, was suppressed in Epac1KO. Our findings suggest that Epac1 plays a role in β2-AR-mediated masseter muscle hypertrophy, probably through activation of both Akt signalling and CaMKII/HDAC4 signalling. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  14. Cyclic-AMP metabolism in synaptic growth, strength and precision: Neural and behavioral phenotype-specific counterbalancing effects between dnc PDE and rut AC mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Atsushi; Wu, Chun-Fang

    2012-01-01

    Two classic learning mutants in Drosophila, rutabaga (rut) and dunce (dnc), are defective in cAMP synthesis and degradation, respectively, exhibiting a variety of neuronal and behavioral defects. We ask how the opposing effects of these mutations on cAMP levels modify subsets of phenotypes, and whether any specific phenotypes could be ameliorated by biochemical counter balancing effects in dnc rut double mutants. Our study at larval neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) demonstrate that dnc mutations caused severe defects in nerve terminal morphology, characterized by unusually large synaptic boutons and aberrant innervation patterns. Interestingly, a counterbalancing effect led to rescue of the aberrant innervation patterns but the enlarged boutons in dnc rut double mutant remained as extreme as those in dnc. In contrast to dnc, rut mutations strongly affect synaptic transmission. Focal loose-patch recording data accumulated over 4 years suggest that synaptic currents in rut boutons were characterized by unusually large temporal dispersion and a seasonal variation in the amount of transmitter release, with diminished synaptic currents in summer months. Experiments with different rearing temperatures revealed that high temperature (29–30 °C) decreased synaptic transmission in rut, but did not alter dnc and WT. Importantly, the large temporal dispersion and abnormal temperature dependence of synaptic transmission, characteristic of rut, still persisted in dnc rut double mutants. To interpret these results in a proper perspective, we reviewed previously documented differential effects of dnc and rut mutations and their genetic interactions in double mutants on a variety of physiological and behavioral phenotypes. The cases of rescue in double mutants are associated with gradual developmental and maintenance processes whereas many behavioral and physiological manifestations on faster time scales could not be rescued. We discuss factors that could contribute to the

  15. Solid-phase receptor-based assay for the detection of cyclic imines by chemiluminescence, fluorescence, or colorimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Laura P; Vilariño, Natalia; Molgó, Jordi; Aráoz, Rómulo; Antelo, Alvaro; Vieytes, Mercedes R; Botana, Luis M

    2011-08-01

    The spirolides and gymnodimines are marine phycotoxins included in the group of cyclic imines. The toxicity of these compounds to humans is still unknown, although their toxicity by intraperitoneal injection in rodents is very high. A receptor-based method was developed using the competition of the 13-desmethyl spirolide C with biotin-labeled α-bungarotoxin for binding to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and the immobilization of the α-bungarotoxin-receptor complex on streptavidin-coated surfaces. The quantification of the immobilized receptor can be achieved using a specific antibody. Finally, after the addition of a secondary antibody labeled with horseradish peroxidase, three alternative substrates of this enzyme generate a chemiluminescent, fluorescent, or colorimetric signal. The assay performs well in shellfish extracts and the detection range is 5-150 nM of 13-desmethyl spirolide C in shellfish extracts, which is at least 5 times more sensitive than the existing fluorescence polarization assay. This assay can also detect gymnodimine, although with 10 times lower sensitivity than the spirolide. The detection of cyclic imines with microplate assays would be useful for screening purposes in order to reduce the number of samples to be processed by bioassays or analytical methods.

  16. Inhibition of Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate (cAMP-response Element-binding Protein (CREB-binding Protein (CBP/β-Catenin Reduces Liver Fibrosis in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Osawa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Wnt/β-catenin is involved in every aspect of embryonic development and in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, and is also implicated in organ fibrosis. However, the role of β-catenin-mediated signaling on liver fibrosis remains unclear. To explore this issue, the effects of PRI-724, a selective inhibitor of the cAMP-response element-binding protein-binding protein (CBP/β-catenin interaction, on liver fibrosis were examined using carbon tetrachloride (CCl4- or bile duct ligation (BDL-induced mouse liver fibrosis models. Following repetitive CCl4 administrations, the nuclear translocation of β-catenin was observed only in the non-parenchymal cells in the liver. PRI-724 treatment reduced the fibrosis induced by CCl4 or BDL. C-82, an active form of PRI-724, inhibited the activation of isolated primary mouse quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSCs and promoted cell death in culture-activated HSCs. During the fibrosis resolution period, an increase in F4/80+ CD11b+ and Ly6Clow CD11b+ macrophages was induced by CCl4 and was sustained for two weeks thereafter, even after having stopped CCl4 treatment. PRI-724 accelerated the resolution of CCl4-induced liver fibrosis, and this was accompanied by increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9, MMP-2, and MMP-8 expression in intrahepatic leukocytes. In conclusion, targeting the CBP/β-catenin interaction may become a new therapeutic strategy in treating liver fibrosis.

  17. Regulation of Maltodextrin Phosphorylase Synthesis in Escherichia coli by Cyclic Adenosine 3′, 5′-Monophosphate and Glucose1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Julie; Weathersbee, Carolyn J.

    1974-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′-monophosphate (AMP) stimulates maltodextrin phosphorylase synthesis in Escherichia coli cells induced with maltose. A maximal effect occurs at 2 to 3 mM cyclic AMP. The action of cyclic AMP is specific, inasmuch as adenosine triphosphate, 3′-AMP, 5′-AMP, adenosine, and dibutyryl cyclic AMP are inactive. Glucose, α-methyl glucoside, 2-deoxyglucose, and pyridoxal 5′-phosphate repress maltodextrin phosphorylase synthesis. This repression is reversed by cyclic AMP. The action of cyclic AMP appears to be at the transcriptional level, since cyclic AMP fails to stimulate phosphorylase production in induced cells in which messenger ribonucleic acid synthesis has been arrested by rifampin or by inducer removal. The two other enzymes involved in the metabolism of maltose, amylomaltase and maltose permease, are also induced in this strain of E. coli and affected by glucose and cyclic AMP in a manner similar to phosphorylase. PMID:4358043

  18. Changes in calmodulin concentration and cyclic 3',5'-nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity in skeletal muscle of hyper- and hypothyroid rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, T; Iwase, K; Yoshimochi, I; Sawai, Y; Oda, N; Nishida, Y; Mokuno, T; Kotake, M; Nakai, A; Hayakawa, N

    1995-08-01

    Hyper- and hypothyroid states occasionally induce skeletal muscle dysfunction i.e. periodic paralysis and thyroid myopathy. The etiology of these diseases remains unclear, but several findings suggest that the catecholamine-beta-receptor-cAMP system or other messenger systems are disturbed in these diseases. In this context, we evaluated changes in the cyclic 3',5'-nucleotide metabolic enzyme, cyclic 3',5'-nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) and calmodulin concentrations in skeletal muscles of hyper- and hypothyroid rats. Activities of cyclic AMP-PDE were low in skeletal muscle both from hyper- and hypothyroid rats, and calmodulin concentration was high in hyperthyroid and low in hypothyroid rats, as compared with normal rats. DE-52 column chromatographic analysis showed that the cGMP hydrolytic activity in peak I and the cAMP hydrolytic activity in peak II were decreased in hypothyroid rats, whereas cAMP hydrolytic activity in peak III was unchanged. The cAMP hydrolytic activity in peak III was decreased in hyperthyroid rats, but the activities in peaks I and II were unchanged. These findings indicate that cAMP and calmodulin may have some role in skeletal muscle function in the hyperthyroid state, and that cAMP and calmodulin-dependent metabolism may be suppressed in the hypothyroid state.

  19. Nitric oxide increases cyclic GMP levels, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)alpha1-specific activity and glucose transport in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, A S; Long, Y C; de Castro Barbosa, T

    2010-01-01

    -nitrosohydrazino)-1,2-ethylenediamine (spermine NONOate) would increase intracellular cyclic GMP (cGMP) levels and promote glucose transport. METHODS: Skeletal muscle strips were prepared from vastus lateralis muscle biopsies obtained from seven healthy men. Muscle strips were incubated in the absence or presence...... of 5 mmol/l spermine NONOate or 120 nmol/l insulin. The L6 muscle cells were treated with spermine NONOate (20 micromol/l) and incubated in the absence or presence of insulin (120 nmol/l). The direct effect of spermine NONOate and insulin on glucose transport, cGMP levels and signal transduction...... was determined. RESULTS: In human skeletal muscle, spermine NONOate increased glucose transport 2.4-fold (p GMP levels (80-fold, p

  20. D1-like dopamine receptors downregulate Na+-K+-ATPase activity and increase cAMP production in the posterior gills of the blue crab Callinectes sapidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaldo, Francis B; Villar, Van Anthony M; Konkalmatt, Prasad R; Owens, Shaun A; Asico, Laureano D; Jones, John E; Yang, Jian; Lovett, Donald L; Armando, Ines; Jose, Pedro A; Concepcion, Gisela P

    2014-09-15

    Dopamine-mediated regulation of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity in the posterior gills of some crustaceans has been reported to be involved in osmoregulation. The dopamine receptors of invertebrates are classified into three groups based on their structure and pharmacology: D1- and D2-like receptors and a distinct invertebrate receptor subtype (INDR). We tested the hypothesis that a D1-like receptor is expressed in the blue crab Callinectes sapidus and regulates Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity. RT-PCR, using degenerate primers, showed the presence of D1βR mRNA in the posterior gill. The blue crab posterior gills showed positive immunostaining for a dopamine D5 receptor (D5R or D1βR) antibody in the basolateral membrane and cytoplasm. Confocal microscopy showed colocalization of Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase and D1βR in the basolateral membrane. To determine the effect of D1-like receptor stimulation on Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity, intact crabs acclimated to low salinity for 6 days were given an intracardiac infusion of the D1-like receptor agonist fenoldopam, with or without the D1-like receptor antagonist SCH23390. Fenoldopam increased cAMP production twofold and decreased Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity by 50% in the posterior gills. This effect was blocked by coinfusion with SCH23390, which had no effect on Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity by itself. Fenoldopam minimally decreased D1βR protein expression (10%) but did not affect Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase α-subunit protein expression. This study shows the presence of functional D1βR in the posterior gills of euryhaline crabs chronically exposed to low salinity and highlights the evolutionarily conserved function of the dopamine receptors on sodium homeostasis. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Autonomous and nonautonomous regulation of axis formation by antagonistic signaling via 7-span cAMP receptors and GSK3 in Dictyostelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, G T; Kimmel, A R

    1997-08-15

    Early during Dictyostelium development a fundamental cell-fate decision establishes the anteroposterior (prestalk/prespore) axis. Signaling via the 7-transmembrane cAMP receptor CAR4 is essential for creating and maintaining a normal pattern; car4-null alleles have decreased levels of prestalk-specific mRNAs but enhanced expression of prespore genes. car4- cells produce all of the signals required for prestalk differentiation but lack an extracellular factor necessary for prespore differentiation of wild-type cells. This secreted factor decreases the sensitivity of prespore cells to inhibition by the prestalk morphogen DIF-1. At the cell autonomous level, CAR4 is linked to intracellular circuits that activate prestalk but inhibit prespore differentiation. The autonomous action of CAR4 is antagonistic to the positive intracellular signals mediated by another cAMP receptor, CAR1 and/or CAR3. Additional data indicate that these CAR-mediated pathways converge at the serine/threonine protein kinase GSK3, suggesting that the anterior (prestalk)/posterior (prespore) axis of Dictyostelium is regulated by an ancient mechanism that is shared by the Wnt/Fz circuits for dorsoventral patterning during early Xenopus development and establishing Drosophila segment polarity.

  2. In Vivo Cardiovascular Pharmacology of 2′,3′-cAMP, 2′-AMP, and 3′-AMP in the Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Zaichuan

    2013-01-01

    The naturally occurring purine 2′,3′-cAMP is metabolized in vitro to 2′-AMP and 3′-AMP, which are subsequently metabolized to adenosine. Whether in vivo 2′,3′-cAMP, 2′-AMP, or 3′-AMP are rapidly converted to adenosine and exert rapid effects via adenosine receptors is unknown. To address this question, we compared the cardiovascular and renal effects of 2′,3′-cAMP, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, 3′,5′-cAMP, 5′-AMP, and adenosine in vivo in the rat. Purines were infused intravenously while monitoring mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output, and renal and mesenteric blood flows. Total peripheral (TPR), renal vascular (RVR), and mesenteric vascular (MVR) resistances were calculated. Urine was collected for determination of urine excretion rate [urine volume (UV)]. When sufficient urine was available, the sodium excretion rate (Na+ER) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were determined. 2′,3′-cAMP, 2′-AMP, and 3′-AMP dose-dependently and profoundly reduced MABP, HR, TPR, and MVR with efficacy and potency similar to adenosine and 5′-AMP. These effects of 2′,3′-cAMP, 2′-AMP, and 3′-AMP were attenuated by blockade of adenosine receptors with 1,3-dipropyl-8-(p-sulfophenyl)xanthine. 2′,3′-cAMP, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, adenosine, and 5′-AMP variably affected RVR, but profoundly (nearly 100%) decreased UV at higher doses. GFR and Na+ER could be measured at the lower doses and were suppressed by 2′,3′-cAMP, 2′-AMP, and 3′-AMP, but not by adenosine or 5′-AMP. 2′,3′-cAMP increased urinary excretion rates of 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, and adenosine. 3′,5′-cAMP exerted no adverse hemodynamic effects yet increased urinary adenosine as efficiently as 2′,3′-cAMP. Conclusions: In vivo 2′,3′-cAMP is rapidly converted to adenosine. Because both cAMPs increase adenosine in the urinary compartment, these agents may provide unique therapeutic opportunities. PMID:23759508

  3. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta activates insulin-like growth factor-I gene transcription in osteoblasts. Identification of a novel cyclic AMP signaling pathway in bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umayahara, Y.; Ji, C.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.; McCarthy, T. L.

    1997-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a key role in skeletal growth by stimulating bone cell replication and differentiation. We previously showed that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and other cAMP-activating agents enhanced IGF-I gene transcription in cultured primary rat osteoblasts through promoter 1, the major IGF-I promoter, and identified a short segment of the promoter, termed HS3D, that was essential for hormonal regulation of IGF-I gene expression. We now demonstrate that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) delta is a major component of a PGE2-stimulated DNA-protein complex involving HS3D and find that C/EBPdelta transactivates IGF-I promoter 1 through this site. Competition gel shift studies first indicated that a core C/EBP half-site (GCAAT) was required for binding of a labeled HS3D oligomer to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Southwestern blotting and UV-cross-linking studies showed that the HS3D probe recognized a approximately 35-kDa nuclear protein, and antibody supershift assays indicated that C/EBPdelta comprised most of the PGE2-activated gel-shifted complex. C/EBPdelta was detected by Western immunoblotting in osteoblast nuclear extracts after treatment of cells with PGE2. An HS3D oligonucleotide competed effectively with a high affinity C/EBP site from the rat albumin gene for binding to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Co-transfection of osteoblast cell cultures with a C/EBPdelta expression plasmid enhanced basal and PGE2-activated IGF-I promoter 1-luciferase activity but did not stimulate a reporter gene lacking an HS3D site. By contrast, an expression plasmid for the related protein, C/EBPbeta, did not alter basal IGF-I gene activity but did increase the response to PGE2. In osteoblasts and in COS-7 cells, C/EBPdelta, but not C/EBPbeta, transactivated a reporter gene containing four tandem copies of HS3D fused to a minimal promoter; neither transcription factor stimulated a gene with four copies of an HS3D mutant that was unable to bind osteoblast

  4. Pharmacological characterization of the dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase in cockroach brain: evidence for a distinct dopamine receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orr, G.L.; Gole, J.W.D.; Notman, H.J.; Downer, R.G.H.

    1987-01-01

    Dopamine increases cyclic AMP production in crude membrane preparations of cockroach brain with plateaus in cyclic AMP production occurring between 1-10 μM and 10 mM. Maximal production of cyclic AMP is 2.25 fold greater than that of control values. Octopamine also increases cyclic AMP production with a Ka of 1.4 μM and maximal production 3.5 fold greater than that of control. 5-Hydroxytryptamine does not increase cyclic AMP production. The effects of octopamine and dopamine are fully additive. The vertebrate dopamine agonists ADTN and epinine stimulate the dopamine-sensitive adenylate cyclase (AC) with Ka values of 4.5 and 0.6 μM respectively and with maximal effectiveness 1.7 fold greater than that of control. The selective D 2 -dopamine agonist LY-171555 stimulates cyclic AMP production to a similar extent with a Ka of 50 μM. Other dopamine agonists have no stimulatory effects. With the exception of mianserin, 3 H-piflutixol is displaced from brain membranes by dopamine antagonists with an order of potency similar to that observed for the inhibition of dopamine-sensitive AC. The results indicate that the octopamine- and dopamine-sensitive AC in cockroach brain can be distinguished pharmacologically and the dopamine receptors coupled to AC have pharmacological characteristics distinct from vertebrate D 1 - and D 2 -dopamine receptors. 33 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  5. Chronic exercise improves repeated restraint stress-induced anxiety and depression through 5HT1A receptor and cAMP signaling in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mun Hee; Leem, Yea Hyun

    2014-03-01

    Mood disorders such as anxiety and depression are prevalent psychiatric illness, but the role of 5HT1A in the anti-depressive effects of exercise has been rarely known yet. We investigated whether long-term exercise affected a depressive-like behavior and a hippocampal 5HT1A receptor-mediated cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling in depression mice model. To induce depressive behaviors, mice were subjected to 14 consecutive days of restraint stress (2 hours/day). Depression-like behaviors were measured by forced swimming test (TST), and anxiety-like behavior was assessed by elevated plus maze (EPM). Treadmill exercise was performed with 19 m/min for 60 min/day, 5 days/week from weeks 0 to 8. Restraint stress was started at week 6 week and ended at week 8. To elucidate the role of 5HT1A in depression, the immunoreactivities of 5HT1A were detected in hippocampus using immunohistochemical technique. Chronic/repeated restraint stress induced behavioral anxiety and depression, such as reduced time and entries in open arms in EPM and enhanced immobility time in FST. These anxiety and depressive behaviors were ameliorated by chronic exercise. Also, these behavioral changes were concurrent with the deficit of 5HT1A and cAMP/PKA/CREB cascade in hippocampus, which was coped with chronic exercise. These results suggest that chronic exercise may improve the disturbance of hippocampal 5HT1A-regulated cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling in a depressed brain, thereby exerting an antidepressive action.

  6. Identification of the subunit of cAMP receptor protein (CRP) that functionally interacts with CytR in CRP-CytR-mediated transcriptional repression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meibom, K L; Kallipolitis, B H; Ebright, R H

    2000-01-01

    At promoters of the Escherichia coli CytR regulon, the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) interacts with the repressor CytR to form transcriptionally inactive CRP-CytR-promoter or (CRP)(2)-CytR-promoter complexes. Here, using "oriented heterodimer" analysis, we show that only one subunit of the CRP dimer......, the subunit proximal to CytR, functionally interacts with CytR in CRP-CytR-promoter and (CRP)(2)-CytR-promoter complexes. Our results provide information about the architecture of CRP-CytR-promoter and (CRP)(2)-CytR-promoter complexes and rule out the proposal that masking of activating region 2 of CRP...

  7. Cyclic Nucleotide Monophosphates and Their Cyclases in Plant Signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A.

    2017-10-04

    The cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (cNMPs), and notably 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) are now accepted as key signaling molecules in many processes in plants including growth and differentiation, photosynthesis, and biotic and abiotic defense. At the single molecule level, we are now beginning to understand how cNMPs modify specific target molecules such as cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, while at the systems level, a recent study of the Arabidopsis cNMP interactome has identified novel target molecules with specific cNMP-binding domains. A major advance came with the discovery and characterization of a steadily increasing number of guanylate cyclases (GCs) and adenylate cyclases (ACs). Several of the GCs are receptor kinases and include the brassinosteroid receptor, the phytosulfokine receptor, the Pep receptor, the plant natriuretic peptide receptor as well as a nitric oxide sensor. We foresee that in the near future many more molecular mechanisms and biological roles of GCs and ACs and their catalytic products will be discovered and further establish cNMPs as a key component of plant responses to the environment.

  8. Cyclic Nucleotide Monophosphates and Their Cyclases in Plant Signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A; Turek, Ilona S.

    2017-01-01

    The cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (cNMPs), and notably 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) are now accepted as key signaling molecules in many processes in plants including growth and differentiation, photosynthesis, and biotic and abiotic defense. At the single molecule level, we are now beginning to understand how cNMPs modify specific target molecules such as cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, while at the systems level, a recent study of the Arabidopsis cNMP interactome has identified novel target molecules with specific cNMP-binding domains. A major advance came with the discovery and characterization of a steadily increasing number of guanylate cyclases (GCs) and adenylate cyclases (ACs). Several of the GCs are receptor kinases and include the brassinosteroid receptor, the phytosulfokine receptor, the Pep receptor, the plant natriuretic peptide receptor as well as a nitric oxide sensor. We foresee that in the near future many more molecular mechanisms and biological roles of GCs and ACs and their catalytic products will be discovered and further establish cNMPs as a key component of plant responses to the environment.

  9. Proteomic signatures implicate cAMP in light and temperature responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Thomas, Ludivine; Marondedze, Claudius; Ederli, Luisa; Pasqualini, Stefania; Gehring, Christoph A

    2013-01-01

    The second messenger 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenylyl cyclases (ACs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cAMP from ATP, are increasingly recognized as important signaling molecules in a number of physiological responses

  10. A bacterial cyclic dinucleotide activates the cytosolic surveillance pathway and mediates innate resistance to tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Bappaditya; Dey, Ruchi Jain; Cheung, Laurene S; Pokkali, Supriya; Guo, Haidan; Lee, Jong-Hee; Bishai, William R

    2015-04-01

    Detection of cyclic-di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP), a bacterial second messenger, by the host cytoplasmic surveillance pathway (CSP) is known to elicit type I interferon (IFN) responses, which are crucial to antimicrobial defense. However, the mechanisms and role of c-di-AMP signaling in Mycobacterium tuberculosis virulence remain unclear. Here we show that resistance to tuberculosis requires CSP-mediated detection of c-di-AMP produced by M. tuberculosis and that levels of c-di-AMP modulate the fate of infection. We found that a di-adenylate cyclase (disA or dacA)-overexpressing M. tuberculosis strain that secretes excess c-di-AMP activates the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) pathway with enhanced levels of IFN-β, elicits increased macrophage autophagy, and exhibits substantial virulence attenuation in mice. We show that c-di-AMP-mediated IFN-β induction during M. tuberculosis infection requires stimulator of interferon genes (STING)-signaling. We observed that c-di-AMP induction of IFN-β is independent of the cytosolic nucleic acid receptor cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) synthase (cGAS), but cGAS nevertheless contributes substantially to the overall IFN-β response to M. tuberculosis infection. In sum, our results reveal c-di-AMP to be a key mycobacterial pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) driving host type I IFN responses and autophagy. These findings suggest that modulating the levels of this small molecule may lead to novel immunotherapeutic strategies against tuberculosis.

  11. Conformational study on cyclic melanocortin ligands and new insight into their binding mode at the MC4 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieco, Paolo; Brancaccio, Diego; Novellino, Ettore; Hruby, Victor J; Carotenuto, Alfonso

    2011-09-01

    The melanocortin receptors are involved in many physiological functions, including pigmentation, sexual function, feeding behavior, and energy homeostasis, making them potential targets to treat obesity, sexual dysfunction, etc. Understanding the basis of the ligand-receptor interactions is crucial for the design of potent and selective ligands for these receptors. The conformational preferences of the cyclic melanocortin ligands MTII (Ac-Nle(4)-c[Asp(5)-His(6)-DPhe(7)-Arg(8)-Trp(9)-Lys(10)]-NH(2)) and SHU9119 (Ac-Nle(4)-c[Asp(5)-His(6)-DNal(2')(7)-Arg(8)-Trp(9)-Lys(10)]-NH(2)), which show agonist and antagonist activity at the h-MC4R, respectively, were comprehensively investigated by solution NMR spectroscopy in different environments. In particular, water and water/DMSO (8:2) solutions were used as isotropic solutions and an aqueous solution of DPC (dodecylphosphocholine) micelles was used as a membrane mimetic environment. NMR-derived conformations of these two ligands were docked within h-MC4R models. NMR and docking studies revealed intriguing differences which can help explain the different activities of these two ligands. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Up-regulated Ectonucleotidases in Fas-Associated Death Domain Protein- and Receptor-Interacting Protein Kinase 1-Deficient Jurkat Leukemia Cells Counteract Extracellular ATP/AMP Accumulation via Pannexin-1 Channels during Chemotherapeutic Drug-Induced Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd-Tressler, Andrea M; Lane, Graham S; Dubyak, George R

    2017-07-01

    Pannexin-1 (Panx1) channels mediate the efflux of ATP and AMP from cancer cells in response to induction of extrinsic apoptosis by death receptors or intrinsic apoptosis by chemotherapeutic agents. We previously described the accumulation of extracellular ATP /AMP during chemotherapy-induced apoptosis in Jurkat human leukemia cells. In this study, we compared how different signaling pathways determine extracellular nucleotide pools in control Jurkat cells versus Jurkat lines that lack the Fas-associated death domain (FADD) or receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIP1) cell death regulatory proteins. Tumor necrosis factor- α induced extrinsic apoptosis in control Jurkat cells and necroptosis in FADD-deficient cells; treatment of both lines with chemotherapeutic drugs elicited similar intrinsic apoptosis. Robust extracellular ATP/AMP accumulation was observed in the FADD-deficient cells during necroptosis, but not during apoptotic activation of Panx1 channels. Accumulation of extracellular ATP/AMP was similarly absent in RIP1-deficient Jurkat cells during apoptotic responses to chemotherapeutic agents. Apoptotic activation triggered equivalent proteolytic gating of Panx1 channels in all three Jurkat cell lines. The differences in extracellular ATP/AMP accumulation correlated with cell-line-specific expression of ectonucleotidases that metabolized the released ATP/AMP. CD73 mRNA, and α β -methylene-ADP-inhibitable ecto-AMPase activity were elevated in the FADD-deficient cells. In contrast, the RIP1-deficient cells were defined by increased expression of tartrate-sensitive prostatic acid phosphatase as a broadly acting ectonucleotidase. Thus, extracellular nucleotide accumulation during regulated tumor cell death involves interplay between ATP/AMP efflux pathways and different cell-autonomous ectonucleotidases. Differential expression of particular ectonucleotidases in tumor cell variants will determine whether chemotherapy-induced activation of Panx1 channels

  13. The Vasopressin Type-2 Receptor and Prostaglandin Receptors EP2 and EP4 can Increase Aquaporin-2 Plasma Membrane Targeting Through a cAMP Independent Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Emma Tina Bisgaard; Moeller, Hanne Bjerregaard; Assentoft, Mette

    2016-01-01

    Apical membrane targeting of the collecting duct water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2) is essential for body water balance. As this event is regulated by Gs coupled 7-transmembrane receptors such as the vasopressin type 2 receptor (V2R) and the prostanoid receptors EP2 and EP4, it is believed to be c...

  14. Effects of hypokinesia on cyclic nucleotides and hormonal regulation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PTH), calcitonin (CT), cyclic nucleotides (cAMP, cGMP) and calcium in the blood of rats, while in urine - phosphate, calcium and cyclic nucleotides. Design: Laboratory based experiment. Setting: Laboratory in the Department of Biochemistry, ...

  15. Existence of multiple receptors in single neurons: responses of single bullfrog olfactory neurons to many cAMP-dependent and independent odorants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashiwayanagi, M; Shimano, K; Kurihara, K

    1996-11-04

    The responses of single bullfrog olfactory neurons to various odorants were measured with the whole-cell patch clamp which offers direct information on cellular events and with the ciliary recording technique to obtain stable quantitative data from many neurons. A large portion of single olfactory neurons (about 64% and 79% in the whole-cell recording and in the ciliary recording, respectively) responded to many odorants with quite diverse molecular structures, including both odorants previously indicated to be cAMP-dependent (increasing) and independent odorants. One odorant elicited a response in many cells; e.g. hedione and citralva elicited the response in 100% and 92% of total neurons examined with the ciliary recording technique. To confirm that a single neuron carries different receptors or transduction pathways, the cross-adaptation technique was applied to single neurons. Application of hedione to a single neuron after desensitization of the current in response to lyral or citralva induced an inward current with a similar magnitude to that applied alone. It was suggested that most single olfactory neurons carry multiple receptors and at least dual transduction pathways.

  16. An assessment tumor targeting ability of 177Lu labeled cyclic CCK analogue peptide by binding with cholecystokinin receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Ha Cho

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The cholecystokinin (CCK receptor is known as a receptor that is overexpressed in many human tumors. The present study was designed to investigate the targeting ability of cyclic CCK analogue in AR42J pancreatic cells. The CCK analogues, DOTA-K(glucose-Gly-Trp-Nle-Asp-Phe (DOTA-glucose-CCK and DOTA-Nle-cyclo(Glu-Trp-Nle-Asp-Phe-Lys-NH2 (DOTA-[Nle]-cCCK, were synthesized and radiolabeled with 177Lu, and competitive binding was evaluated. The binding appearance of synthesized peptide with AR42J cells was evaluated by confocal microscopy. And bio-distribution was performed in AR42J xenografted mice. Synthesized peptides were prepared by a solid phase synthesis method, and their purity was over 98%. DOTA is the chelating agent for 177Lu-labeling, in which the peptides were radiolabeled with 177Lu by a high radiolabeling yield. A competitive displacement of 125I-CCK8 on the AR42J cells revealed that the 50% inhibitory concentration value (IC50 was 12.3 nM of DOTA-glucose-CCK and 1.7 nM of DOTA-[Nle]-cCCK. Radio-labeled peptides were accumulated in AR42J tumor in vivo, and %ID/g of the tumor was 0.4 and 0.9 at 2 h p.i. It was concluded that 177Lu-DOTA-[Nle]-cCCK has higher binding affinity than 177Lu-DOTA-glucose-CCK and can be a potential candidate as a targeting modality for a CCK receptor over-expressing tumors.

  17. Allosteric analysis of glucocorticoid receptor-DNA interface induced by cyclic Py-Im polyamide: a molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaru Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been extensively developed in recent years that cell-permeable small molecules, such as polyamide, can be programmed to disrupt transcription factor-DNA interfaces and can silence aberrant gene expression. For example, cyclic pyrrole-imidazole polyamide that competes with glucocorticoid receptor (GR for binding to glucocorticoid response elements could be expected to affect the DNA dependent binding by interfering with the protein-DNA interface. However, how such small molecules affect the transcription factor-DNA interfaces and gene regulatory pathways through DNA structure distortion is not fully understood so far. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present work, we have constructed some models, especially the ternary model of polyamides+DNA+GR DNA-binding domain (GRDBD dimer, and carried out molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations for them to address how polyamide molecules disrupt the GRDBD and DNA interface when polyamide and protein bind at the same sites on opposite grooves of DNA. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We found that the cyclic polyamide binding in minor groove of DNA can induce a large structural perturbation of DNA, i.e. a >4 Å widening of the DNA minor groove and a compression of the major groove by more than 4 Å as compared with the DNA molecule in the GRDBD dimer+DNA complex. Further investigations for the ternary system of polyamides+DNA+GRDBD dimer and the binary system of allosteric DNA+GRDBD dimer revealed that the compression of DNA major groove surface causes GRDBD to move away from the DNA major groove with the initial average distance of ∼4 Å to the final average distance of ∼10 Å during 40 ns simulation course. Therefore, this study straightforward explores how small molecule targeting specific sites in the DNA minor groove disrupts the transcription factor-DNA interface in DNA major groove, and consequently modulates gene expression.

  18. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors suppress Lactobacillus casei cell-wall-induced NF-κB and MAPK activations and cell proliferation through protein kinase A--or exchange protein activated by cAMP-dependent signal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takekatsu; Sugimoto, Naotoshi; Ohta, Kunio; Shimizu, Tohru; Ohtani, Kaori; Nakayama, Yuko; Nakamura, Taichi; Hitomi, Yashiaki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Koizumi, Shoichi; Yachie, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    Specific strains of Lactobacillus have been found to be beneficial in treating some types of diarrhea and vaginosis. However, a high mortality rate results from underlying immunosuppressive conditions in patients with Lactobacillus casei bacteremia. Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a small second messenger molecule that mediates signal transduction. The onset and progression of inflammatory responses are sensitive to changes in steady-state cAMP levels. L. casei cell wall extract (LCWE) develops arteritis in mice through Toll-like receptor-2 signaling. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether intracellular cAMP affects LCWE-induced pathological signaling. LCWE was shown to induce phosphorylation of the nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways and cell proliferation in mice fibroblast cells. Theophylline and phosphodiesterase inhibitor increased intracellular cAMP and inhibited LCWE-induced cell proliferation as well as phosphorylation of NF-κB and MAPK. Protein kinase A inhibitor H89 prevented cAMP-induced MAPK inhibition, but not cAMP-induced NF-κB inhibition. An exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac) agonist inhibited NF-κB activation but not MAPK activation. These results indicate that an increase in intracellular cAMP prevents LCWE induction of pathological signaling pathways dependent on PKA and Epac signaling.

  19. Understanding cAMP-dependent allostery by NMR spectroscopy: comparative analysis of the EPAC1 cAMP-binding domain in its apo and cAMP-bound states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazhab-Jafari, Mohammad T; Das, Rahul; Fotheringham, Steven A; SilDas, Soumita; Chowdhury, Somenath; Melacini, Giuseppe

    2007-11-21

    cAMP (adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate) is a ubiquitous second messenger that activates a multitude of essential cellular responses. Two key receptors for cAMP in eukaryotes are protein kinase A (PKA) and the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (EPAC), which is a recently discovered guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for the small GTPases Rap1 and Rap2. Previous attempts to investigate the mechanism of allosteric activation of eukaryotic cAMP-binding domains (CBDs) at atomic or residue resolution have been hampered by the instability of the apo form, which requires the use of mixed apo/holo systems, that have provided only a partial picture of the CBD apo state and of the allosteric networks controlled by cAMP. Here, we show that, unlike other eukaryotic CBDs, both apo and cAMP-bound states of the EPAC1 CBD are stable under our experimental conditions, providing a unique opportunity to define at an unprecedented level of detail the allosteric interactions linking two critical functional sites of this CBD. These are the phosphate binding cassette (PBC), where cAMP binds, and the N-terminal helical bundle (NTHB), which is the site of the inhibitory interactions between the regulatory and catalytic regions of EPAC. Specifically, the combined analysis of the cAMP-dependent changes in chemical shifts, 2 degrees structure probabilities, hydrogen/hydrogen exchange (H/H) and hydrogen/deuterium exchange (H/D) protection factors reveals that the long-range communication between the PBC and the NTHB is implemented by two distinct intramolecular cAMP-signaling pathways, respectively, mediated by the beta2-beta3 loop and the alpha6 helix. Docking of cAMP into the PBC perturbs the NTHB inner core packing and the helical probabilities of selected NTHB residues. The proposed model is consistent with the allosteric role previously hypothesized for L273 and F300 based on site-directed mutagenesis; however, our data show that such a contact is part of a

  20. Cyclic nucleotides and radioresistnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulinskij, V.I.; Mikheeva, G.A.; Zel'manovich, B.M.

    1982-01-01

    The addition of glucose to meat-peptone broth does not change the radiosensitizing effect (RSE) of cAMP at the logarithmic phase (LP) and the radioprotective effect (RPE) at the stationary phase (SP), but sensitization, characteristic of cGMP, disappears in SP and turns into RPE in LP. Introduction of glucose into the broth for 20 min eliminates all the effects of both cyclic nucleotides in the cya + strain while cya - mutant exhibits RSE. RSE of both cyclic nucleotides is only manifested on minimal media. These data brought confirmation of the dependence of the influence of cyclic media. These data brought confirmation of the dependence of the influence of cyclic nucleotides on radioresistance upon the metabolic status of the cell [ru

  1. Rigid nonproteinogenic cyclic amino acids as ligands for glutamate receptors: trans-tris(homoglutamic) acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Udo; Bisel, Philippe; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2005-01-01

    The second-generation asymmetric synthesis of the trans-tris(homoglutamic) acids reported herein proceeds via Strecker reaction of chiral ketimines, obtained from condensation of racemic 2-ethoxycarbonylmethylcyclopentanone and commercially available (S)- and (R)-1-phenylethylamine, respectively......) yielded diastereomeric mixtures of secondary alpha-amino amido-esters, which after separation were hydrogenolyzed and hydrolyzed each to the enantiomeric trans-1-amino-2-carboxymethylcyclopentanecarboxylic acids. Their configuration was completely established by NMR methods, CD spectra, and X-ray analysis...... of the trans-1S,2R-configured secondary alpha-amino amido-ester. In receptor binding assays and functional tests, trans-1S,2R-1-amino-2-carboxymethylcyclopentanecarboxylic acid hydrochloride was found to behave as a selective mGluR(2)-antagonist without relevant binding properties at iGluRs....

  2. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Interacts with the Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Delta to Induce Genes Affecting Fatty Acid Oxidation in Human Macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Kemmerer

    Full Text Available AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK maintains energy homeostasis by suppressing cellular ATP-consuming processes and activating catabolic, ATP-producing pathways such as fatty acid oxidation (FAO. The transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ also affects fatty acid metabolism, stimulating the expression of genes involved in FAO. To question the interplay of AMPK and PPARδ in human macrophages we transduced primary human macrophages with lentiviral particles encoding for the constitutively active AMPKα1 catalytic subunit, followed by microarray expression analysis after treatment with the PPARδ agonist GW501516. Microarray analysis showed that co-activation of AMPK and PPARδ increased expression of FAO genes, which were validated by quantitative PCR. Induction of these FAO-associated genes was also observed upon infecting macrophages with an adenovirus coding for AMPKγ1 regulatory subunit carrying an activating R70Q mutation. The pharmacological AMPK activator A-769662 increased expression of several FAO genes in a PPARδ- and AMPK-dependent manner. Although GW501516 significantly increased FAO and reduced the triglyceride amount in very low density lipoproteins (VLDL-loaded foam cells, AMPK activation failed to potentiate this effect, suggesting that increased expression of fatty acid catabolic genes alone may be not sufficient to prevent macrophage lipid overload.

  3. Adrenomedullin increases the short-circuit current in the rat prostate: Receptors, chloride channels, the effects of cAMP and calcium ions and implications on fluid secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, S B; Cheung, K H; Cheung, M P L; Wong, P F; O, W S; Tang, F

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we have investigated the effects of adrenomedullin on chloride and fluid secretion in the rat prostate. The presence of adrenomedullin (ADM) in rat prostate was confirmed using immunostaining, and the molecular species was determined using gel filtration chromatography coupled with an enzyme-linked assay for ADM. The effects of ADM on fluid secretion were studied by short-circuit current technique in a whole mount preparation of the prostate in an Ussing chamber. The results indicated that the ADM level was higher in the ventral than the dorso-lateral prostate and the major molecular species was the active peptide. ADM increased the short-circuit current through both the cAMP- and calcium-activated chloride channels in the ventral lobe, but only through the calcium-activated channels in the dorso-lateral lobe. These stimulatory effects were blocked by the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, hCGRP8-37. We conclude that ADM may regulate prostatic fluid secretion through the chloride channels, which may affect the composition of the seminal plasma bathing the spermatozoa and hence fertility. © 2014 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  4. Puerarin activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase through estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and calcium-dependent AMP-activated protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Hien, Tran Thi; Jeong, Myung Ho; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2011-01-01

    The cardioprotective properties of puerarin, a natural product, have been attributed to the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated production of nitric oxide (NO) in EA.hy926 endothelial cells. However, the mechanism by which puerarin activates eNOS remains unclear. In this study, we sought to identify the intracellular pathways underlying eNOS activation by puerarin. Puerarin induced the activating phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser1177 and the production of NO in EA.hy926 cells. Puerarin-induced eNOS phosphorylation required estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling and was reversed by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibition. Importantly, puerarin inhibited the adhesion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-stimulated monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNF-α induced expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1. Puerarin also inhibited the TNF-α-induced nuclear factor-κB activation, which was attenuated by pretreatment with N G -nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a NOS inhibitor. These results indicate that puerarin stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production via activation of an estrogen receptor-mediated PI3K/Akt- and CaMKII/AMPK-dependent pathway. Puerarin may be useful for the treatment or prevention of endothelial dysfunction associated with diabetes and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: ► Puerarin induced the phosphorylation of eNOS and the production of NO. ► Puerarin activated eNOS through ER-dependent PI3-kinase and Ca 2+ -dependent AMPK. ► Puerarin-induced NO was involved in the inhibition of NF-kB activation. ► Puerarin may help for prevention of vascular dysfunction and diabetes.

  5. Puerarin activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase through estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and calcium-dependent AMP-activated protein kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Kim, Hyung Gyun [Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hien, Tran Thi [College of Pharmacy, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Myung Ho [Heart Research Center, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Tae Cheon, E-mail: taecheon@ynu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Yeungnam University, Gyungsan (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hye Gwang, E-mail: hgjeong@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    The cardioprotective properties of puerarin, a natural product, have been attributed to the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated production of nitric oxide (NO) in EA.hy926 endothelial cells. However, the mechanism by which puerarin activates eNOS remains unclear. In this study, we sought to identify the intracellular pathways underlying eNOS activation by puerarin. Puerarin induced the activating phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser1177 and the production of NO in EA.hy926 cells. Puerarin-induced eNOS phosphorylation required estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling and was reversed by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibition. Importantly, puerarin inhibited the adhesion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-stimulated monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNF-{alpha} induced expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1. Puerarin also inhibited the TNF-{alpha}-induced nuclear factor-{kappa}B activation, which was attenuated by pretreatment with N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a NOS inhibitor. These results indicate that puerarin stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production via activation of an estrogen receptor-mediated PI3K/Akt- and CaMKII/AMPK-dependent pathway. Puerarin may be useful for the treatment or prevention of endothelial dysfunction associated with diabetes and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin induced the phosphorylation of eNOS and the production of NO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin activated eNOS through ER-dependent PI3-kinase and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin-induced NO was involved in the inhibition of NF-kB activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin may help for prevention of vascular dysfunction and diabetes.

  6. Cyclic ADP ribose-dependent Ca2+ release by group I metabotropic glutamate receptors in acutely dissociated rat hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Woo Sohn

    Full Text Available Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (group I mGluRs; mGluR1 and mGluR5 exert diverse effects on neuronal and synaptic functions, many of which are regulated by intracellular Ca(2+. In this study, we characterized the cellular mechanisms underlying Ca(2+ mobilization induced by (RS-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG; a specific group I mGluR agonist in the somata of acutely dissociated rat hippocampal neurons using microfluorometry. We found that DHPG activates mGluR5 to mobilize intracellular Ca(2+ from ryanodine-sensitive stores via cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose (cADPR, while the PLC/IP(3 signaling pathway was not involved in Ca(2+ mobilization. The application of glutamate, which depolarized the membrane potential by 28.5±4.9 mV (n = 4, led to transient Ca(2+ mobilization by mGluR5 and Ca(2+ influx through L-type Ca(2+ channels. We found no evidence that mGluR5-mediated Ca(2+ release and Ca(2+ influx through L-type Ca(2+ channels interact to generate supralinear Ca(2+ transients. Our study provides novel insights into the mechanisms of intracellular Ca(2+ mobilization by mGluR5 in the somata of hippocampal neurons.

  7. Multivalent cyclic RGD ligands: influence of linker lengths on receptor binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubas, Holger; Schaefer, Martin; Bauder-Wuest, Ulrike; Eder, Matthias; Oltmanns, Doerte [Department of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, Uwe; Mier, Walter [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Eisenhut, Michael, E-mail: m.eisenhut@dkfz.d [Department of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2010-11-15

    Peptides involving the RGD motive (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) recognize members of the integrin receptor family. Since the receptors are located mainly on the surface of endothelial cells, structural modifications including multimers of c(RGDfE) were recently found to improve the binding avidity for {alpha}{sub v{beta}3} integrin significantly. The multivalent RGD peptides exhibited rather loose linkages partly including oligo(ethylene glycol) spacers (EG{sub n}) with different chain lengths. Therefore, the dependence of multivalent RGD systems with and without EG{sub n} linkers were investigated on their binding properties to cultured {alpha}{sub v{beta}3} integrin-expressing U87MG cells. Methods: We synthesized a series of di-, tri- and tetravalent rigid scaffolds (terephthalic acid, trimesic acid and adamantane-1,3,5,7-tetracarboxylic acid) conjugated to c(RGDyK) ligands, which were linked contiguously or separated by the oligo(ethylene glycol) spacers. The inhibition constants of these c(RGDyK) derivatives were determined by competition assays with {sup 125}I-labeled echistatin. Results: While c(RGDyK) function is a relative weak competitor against [{sup 125}I]echistatin (K{sub i}, 329{+-}18 nM) for {alpha}{sub v{beta}3} integrin-expressing U87MG cells, RGD dimers improved the competition potency considerably (K{sub i}, 64{+-}23 nM). This effect was even more pronounced with the RGD trimers (K{sub i}, 40{+-}7 nM) and tetramers (K{sub i}, 26{+-}9 nM). The introduction of EG{sub n} spacers and the increase of linker lengths proved to be detrimental since more competitors were needed to compete with [{sup 125}I]echistatin. The EG{sub 6} group, for example, reduced the inhibition constants by 29% (dimer), 57% (trimer) and 97% (tetramer). Conclusion: The binding experiments performed with the three forms of multivalent RGD ligands indicate the weakening of competitive potency against [{sup 125}I]echistatin with the introduction of EG{sub n} spacers. This effect

  8. Ligand- and cell-dependent determinants of internalization and cAMP modulation by delta opioid receptor (DOR) agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charfi, Iness; Nagi, Karim; Mnie-Filali, Ouissame; Thibault, Dominic; Balboni, Gianfranco; Schiller, Peter W.; Trudeau, Louis-Eric

    2014-01-01

    Signaling bias refers to G protein-coupled receptor ligand ability to preferentially activate one type of signal over another. Bias to evoke signaling as opposed to sequestration has been proposed as a predictor of opioid ligand potential for generating tolerance. Here we measured whether delta opioid receptor agonists preferentially inhibited cyclase activity over internalization in HEK cells. Efficacy (τ) and affinity (KA) values were estimated from functional data and bias was calculated from efficiency coefficients (log τ/KA). This approach better represented the data as compared to alternative methods that estimate bias exclusively from τ values. Log (τ/KA) coefficients indicated that SNC-80 and UFP-512 promoted cyclase inhibition more efficiently than DOR internalization as compared to DPDPE (bias factor for SNC-80: 50 and for UFP-512: 132). Molecular determinants of internalization were different in HEK293 cells and neurons with βarrs contributing to internalization in both cell types, while PKC and GRK2 activities were only involved in neurons. Rank orders of ligand ability to engage different internalization mechanisms in neurons were compared to rank order of Emax values for cyclase assays in HEK cells. Comparison revealed a significant reversal in rank order for cyclase Emax values and βarr-dependent internalization in neurons, indicating that these responses were ligand-specific. Despite this evidence, and because kinases involved in internalization were not the same across cellular backgrounds, it is not possible to assert if the magnitude and nature of bias revealed by rank orders of maximal responses is the same as the one measured in HEK cells. PMID:24022593

  9. Potent μ-Opioid Receptor Agonists from Cyclic Peptides Tyr-c[D-Lys-Xxx-Tyr-Gly]: Synthesis, Biological, and Structural Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yangmei; Cazares, Margret; Wu, Jinhua; Houghten, Richard A; Toll, Laurence; Dooley, Colette

    2016-02-11

    To optimize the structure of a μ-opioid receptor ligand, analogs H-Tyr-c[D-Lys-Xxx-Tyr-Gly] were synthesized and their biological activity was tested. The analog containing a Phe(3) was identified as not only exhibiting binding affinity 14-fold higher than the original hit but also producing agonist activity 3-fold more potent than morphine. NMR study suggested that a trans conformation at D-Lys(2)-Xxx(3) is crucial for these cyclic peptides to maintain high affinity, selectivity, and functional activity toward the μ-opioid receptor.

  10. Adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate in higher plants: Isolation and characterization of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate from Kalanchoe and Agave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, A R; Polya, G M

    1977-01-01

    1.3':5'-Cyclic AMP was extensively purified from Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Agave americana by neutral alumina and anion- and cation-exchange column chromatography. Inclusion of 3':5'-cyclic [8-3H]AMP from the point of tissue extraction permitted calculation of yields. The purification procedure removed contaminating material that was shown to interfere with the 3':5'-cyclic AMP estimation and characterization procedures. 2. The partially purified 3':5'-cyclic AMP was quantified by means of a radiochemical saturation assay using an ox heart 3':5'-cyclic AMP-binding protein and by an assay involving activation of a mammalian protein kinase. 3. The plant 3':5'-cyclic AMP co-migrated with 3':5'-cyclic [8-3H]AMP on cellulose chromatography, poly(ethyleneimine)-cellulose chromatography and silica-gel t.l.c. developed with several solvent systems. 4. The plant 3':5'-cyclic AMP was degraded by ox heart 3':5'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase at the same rates as authentic 3':5'-cyclic AMP. 1-Methyl-3-isobutylxanthine (1 mM), a specific inhibitor of the 3':5'-cyclic nucleotide phosphodieterase, completely inhibited such degradation. 5. The concentrations of 3':5'-cyclic AMP satisfying the above criteria in Kalanchoe and Agave were 2-6 and 1 pmol/g fresh wt. respectively. Possible bacterial contribution to these analyses was estimated to be less than 0.002pmol/g fresh wt. Evidence for the occurrence of 3':5'-cyclic AMP in plants is discussed. PMID:196595

  11. Gly184 of the Escherichia coli cAMP receptor protein provides optimal context for both DNA binding and RNA polymerase interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Matt N; Gunasekara, Sanjiva; Serate, Jose; Park, Jin; Mosharaf, Pegah; Zhou, Yue; Lee, Jin-Won; Youn, Hwan

    2017-10-01

    The Escherichia coli cAMP receptor protein (CRP) utilizes the helix-turn-helix motif for DNA binding. The CRP's recognition helix, termed F-helix, includes a stretch of six amino acids (Arg180, Glu181, Thr182, Val183, Gly184, and Arg185) for direct DNA contacts. Arg180, Glu181 and Arg185 are known as important residues for DNA binding and specificity, but little has been studied for the other residues. Here we show that Gly184 is another F-helix residue critical for the transcriptional activation function of CRP. First, glycine was repeatedly selected at CRP position 184 for its unique ability to provide wild type-level transcriptional activation activity. To dissect the glycine requirement, wild type CRP and mutants G184A, G184F, G184S, and G184Y were purified and their in vitro DNA-binding activity was measured. G184A and G184F displayed reduced DNA binding, which may explain their low transcriptional activation activity. However, G184S and G184Y displayed apparently normal DNA affinity. Therefore, an additional factor is needed to account for the diminished transcriptional activation function in G184S and G184Y, and the best explanation is perturbations in their interaction with RNA polymerase. The fact that glycine is the smallest amino acid could not fully warrant its suitability, as shown in this study. We hypothesize that Gly184 fulfills the dual functions of DNA binding and RNA polymerase interaction by conferring conformational flexibility to the F-helix.

  12. Magnolol Alleviates Inflammatory Responses and Lipid Accumulation by AMP-Activated Protein Kinase-Dependent Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Tian

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Magnolol (MG is a kind of lignin isolated from Magnolia officinalis, which serves several different biological functions, such as antifungal, anticancer, antioxidant, and hepatoprotective functions. This study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of MG against oleic acid (OA-induced hepatic steatosis and inflammatory damage in HepG2 cells and in a tyloxapol (Ty-induced hyperlipidemia mouse model. Our findings indicated that MG can effectively inhibit OA-stimulated tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α secretion, reactive oxygen species generation, and triglyceride (TG accumulation. Further study manifested that MG significantly suppressed OA-activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB signaling pathways and that these inflammatory responses can be negated by pretreatment with inhibitors of extracellular regulated protein kinase and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (U0126 and SP600125, respectively. In addition, MG dramatically upregulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα translocation and reduced sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1c (SREBP-1c protein synthesis and excretion, both of which are dependent upon the phosphorylation of adenosine monophosphate (AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, acetyl-CoA carboxylase, and AKT kinase (AKT. However, MG suspended the activation of PPARα expression and was thus blocked by pretreatment with LY294002 and compound c (specific inhibitors of AKT and AMPK. Furthermore, MG clearly alleviated serum TG and total cholesterol release; upregulated AKT, AMPK, and PPARα expression; suppressed SREBP-1c generation; and alleviated hepatic steatosis and dyslipidemia in Ty-induced hyperlipidemia mice. Taken together, these results suggest that MG exerts protective effects against steatosis, hyperlipidemia, and the underlying mechanism, which may be closely associated with AKT/AMPK/PPARα activation and MAPK/NF-κB/SREBP-1c inhibition.

  13. Evaluation of single amino acid chelate derivatives and regioselective radiolabelling of a cyclic peptide for the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Andrea F.; Lemon, Jennifer A. [McMaster Institute for Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, ON, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Czorny, Shannon K. [McMaster Institute for Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, ON, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, ON, L8V 5C2 (Canada); Singh, Gurmit [Juravinski Cancer Centre, Hamilton, ON, L8V 5C2 (Canada); Valliant, John F. [Department of Chemistry, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, L8S 4M1 (Canada)], E-mail: valliant@mcmaster.ca

    2009-11-15

    Introduction: The aim of this work was to investigate the relative radiolabelling kinetics and affinity of a series of ligands for the [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}]{sup +} core, both in the absence and in the presence of competing donors. This information was used to select a suitable ligand for radiolabelling complex peptide-based targeting vectors in high yield under mild conditions. Methods: A series of {alpha}-N-Fmoc-protected lysine derivatives bearing two heterocyclic donor groups at the {epsilon}-amine (, 2-pyridyl; , quinolyl; , 6-methoxy-2-pyridyl; 1d, 2-thiazolyl; 1e, N-methylimidazolyl; , 3-pyridyl) were synthesized and labelled with {sup 99m}Tc. A resin-capture purification strategy for the separation of residual ligand from the radiolabelled product was also developed. The binding affinities of targeted peptides 4, 5a and 5b for uPAR were determined using flow cytometry. Results: Variable temperature radiolabelling reactions using - and [{sup 99m}Tc(CO){sub 3}]{sup +} revealed optimal kinetics and good selectivity for compounds and 1d; in the case of , 1d, and 1e, the labelling can be conducted at ambient temperature. The utility of this class of ligands was further demonstrated by the radiolabelling of a cyclic peptide that is known to target the serine protease receptor uPAR; essentially quantitative incorporation of {sup 99m}Tc occurred exclusively at the SAAC site, despite the presence of a His residue, and without disruption of the disulfide bond. Conclusion: A series of single amino acid chelate (SAAC) ligands have been evaluated for their ability to incorporate {sup 99m}Tc into peptides. The lead agent to emerge from this work is the thiazole SAAC derivative 1d which has demonstrated the ability to regioselectively label the widest range of peptides.

  14. A multi-angular mass spectrometric view at cyclic nucleotide signaling proteins : Structure/function and protein interactions of cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, A.

    2006-01-01

    The primary focus of this thesis is the two kinases PKA and PKG, cAMP and cGMP dependent protein kinase respectively. PKA and PKG are studied both at structure/function level as well as at the level of interaction with other proteins in tissue. Our primary methods are all based on mass spectrometry.

  15. Identification of G-Protein-Coupled-Receptors (GPCRs) in Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells as Novel Therapeutic Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    muscle cells (PASMCs), G-protein- coupled receptors (GPCRs), cyclic AMP , hypoxia. 3. ACCOMPLISHMENTS What were the major goals of the project? The 3 Aims...potentially important for the regulation of cells and tissues in health and disease. The results have impact on cell biology, biochemistry , physiology

  16. Regulation of phospholipid synthesis in Mycobacterium smegmatis by cyclic adenosine monophosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sareen, Monica; Kaur, Harpinder; Khuller, G.K.

    1993-01-01

    Forskolin, an adenylate cyclase activator and a cyclic AMP analogue, dibutyryl cyclic AMP have been used to examine the relationship between intracellular levels of cyclic AMP and lipid synthesis in Mycobacterium smegmatis. Total phospholipid content was found to be increased in forskolin grown cells as a result of increased cyclic AMP levels caused by activation of adenylate cyclase. Increased phospholipid content was supported by increased [ 14 C]acetate incorporation as well as increased activity of glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase. Pretreatment of cells with dibutyryl cyclic AMP had similar effects on lipid synthesis. Taking all these observations together it is suggested that lipid synthesis is being controlled by cyclic AMP in mycobacteria. (author). 14 refs., 4 tabs

  17. Schwann Cells Metabolize Extracellular 2′,3′-cAMP to 2′-AMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, Jonathan D.; Kochanek, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    The 3′,5′-cAMP–adenosine pathway (3′,5′-cAMP→5′-AMP→adenosine) and the 2′,3′-cAMP–adenosine pathway (2′,3′-cAMP→2′-AMP/3′-AMP→adenosine) are active in the brain. Oligodendrocytes participate in the brain 2′,3′-cAMP–adenosine pathway via their robust expression of 2′,3′-cyclic nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase (CNPase; converts 2′,3′-cAMP to 2′-AMP). Because Schwann cells also express CNPase, it is conceivable that the 2′,3′-cAMP–adenosine pathway exists in the peripheral nervous system. To test this and to compare the 2′,3′-cAMP–adenosine pathway to the 3′,5′-cAMP–adenosine pathway in Schwann cells, we examined the metabolism of 2′,3′-cAMP, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, 3′,5′-cAMP, and 5′-AMP in primary rat Schwann cells in culture. Addition of 2′,3′-cAMP (3, 10, and 30 µM) to Schwann cells increased levels of 2′-AMP in the medium from 0.006 ± 0.002 to 21 ± 2, 70 ± 3, and 187 ± 10 nM/µg protein, respectively; in contrast, Schwann cells had little ability to convert 2′,3′-cAMP to 3′-AMP or 3′,5′-cAMP to either 3′-AMP or 5′-AMP. Although Schwann cells slightly converted 2′,3′-cAMP and 2′-AMP to adenosine, they did so at very modest rates (e.g., 5- and 3-fold, respectively, more slowly compared with our previously reported studies in oligodendrocytes). Using transected myelinated rat sciatic nerves in culture medium, we observed a time-related increase in endogenous intracellular 2′,3′-cAMP and extracellular 2′-AMP. These findings indicate that Schwann cells do not have a robust 3′,5′-cAMP–adenosine pathway but do have a 2′,3′-cAMP–adenosine pathway; however, because the pathway mostly involves 2′-AMP formation rather than 3′-AMP, and because the conversion of 2′-AMP to adenosine is slow, metabolism of 2′,3′-cAMP mostly results in the accumulation of 2′-AMP. Accumulation of 2′-AMP in peripheral nerves postinjury could have

  18. Differential regulation by agonist and phorbol ester of cloned m1 and m2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in mouse Y1 adrenal cells and in Y1 cells deficient in cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, N.M.; Nathanson, N.M.

    1990-01-01

    Cloned muscarinic acetylcholine m1 and m2 receptors were expressed in stably transfected mouse Y1 adrenal cells and in a variant Y1 line, Kin-8, which is deficient in cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity (PKA - ). m1 and m2 receptors were rapidly internalized following exposure of transfected PKA + or PKA - cells to the muscarinic agonist carbachol. Thus, agonist-dependent internalization of m1 and m2 did not require PKA activity. A differential effect of PKA on regulation by agonist of the m2 receptor, but not the m1 receptor, was unmasked in PKA - cells. These data indicate that the basal activity of PKA may modulate the agonist-dependent internalization of the m2 receptor, but not the m1 receptor. The internalization of the m1 and m2 receptors in both PKA + and PKA - cells was accompanied by desensitization of functional responses. Exposure of PKA + cells to 10 -7 M phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), an activator of protein kinase C, resulted in a 30 ± 9% decrease in the number of m1 receptors on the cell surface. The m2 receptor was not internalized following treatment of either PKA + or PKA - cells with PMA. Thus, the m1 and m2 receptors show differential sensitivity to internalization by PMA. Agonist-dependent internalization of the m1 receptor appeared to be independent of activation of PKC because (1) agonist-dependent internalization of m1 was not attenuated in PKA - cells, (2) the rate and extent of internalization of m1 in cells exposed to PMA were less than those in cells exposed to agonist, and (3) treatment of cells with concanavalin A selectivity blocked internalization of m1 in cells exposed to PMA, but not to agonist. The effects of agonist and PMA on receptor internalization were not additive. Exposure of PKA + or PKA - cells to PMA reduced the magnitude of pilocarpine-stimulated PI hydrolysis by about 25%

  19. Direct Light-up of cAMP Derivatives in Living Cells by Click Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available 8-Azidoadenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (8-azido cAMP was directly detected in living cells, by applying Cu-free azide-alkyne cycloaddition to probe cAMP derivatives by fluorescence light-up. Fluorescence emission was generated by two non-fluorescent molecules, 8-azido cAMP as a model target and difluorinated cyclooctyne (DIFO reagent as a probe. The azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction between 8-azido cAMP and DIFO induces fluorescence in 8-azido cAMP. The fluorescence emission serves as a way to probe 8-azido cAMP in cells.

  20. Plasticity of regulation of mannitol phosphotransferase system operon by CRP-cAMP complex in Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yan Yan; Zhang, Hong Zhi; Liang, Wei Li; Zhang, Li Juan; Zhu, Jun; Kan, Biao

    2013-10-01

    The complex of the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) and cAMP is an important transcriptional regulator of numerous genes in prokaryotes. The transport of mannitol through the phosphotransferase systems (PTS) is regulated by the CRP-cAMP complex. The aim of the study is to investigate how the CRP-cAMP complex acting on the mannitol PTS operon mtl of the Vibrio cholerae El Tor biotype. The crp mutant strain was generated by homologous recombination to assess the need of CRP to activate the mannitol PTS operon of V. cholerae El Tor. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and the reporter plasmid pBBRlux were used to confirm the role that the CRP-cAMP complex playing on the mannitol PTS operon mtl. In this study, we confirmed that CRP is strictly needed for the activation of the mtl operon. We further experimentally identified five CRP binding sites within the promoter region upstream of the mannitol PTS operon mtl of the Vibrio cholerae El Tor biotype and found that these sites display different affinities for CRP and provide different contributions to the activation of the operon. The five binding sites collectively confer the strong activation of mannitol transfer by CRP in V. cholerae, indicating an elaborate and subtle CRP activation mechanism. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  1. Learning and memory deficits consequent to reduction of the fragile X mental retardation protein result from metabotropic glutamate receptor-mediated inhibition of cAMP signaling in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanellopoulos, Alexandros K; Semelidou, Ourania; Kotini, Andriana G; Anezaki, Maria; Skoulakis, Efthimios M C

    2012-09-19

    Loss of the RNA-binding fragile X protein [fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP)] results in a spectrum of cognitive deficits, the fragile X syndrome (FXS), while aging individuals with decreased protein levels present with a subset of these symptoms and tremor. The broad range of behavioral deficits likely reflects the ubiquitous distribution and multiple functions of the protein. FMRP loss is expected to affect multiple neuronal proteins and intracellular signaling pathways, whose identity and interactions are essential in understanding and ameliorating FXS symptoms. We used heterozygous mutants and targeted RNA interference-mediated abrogation in Drosophila to uncover molecular pathways affected by FMRP reduction. We present evidence that FMRP loss results in excess metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) activity, attributable at least in part to elevation of the protein in affected neurons. Using high-resolution behavioral, genetic, and biochemical analyses, we present evidence that excess mGluR upon FMRP attenuation is linked to the cAMP decrement reported in patients and models, and underlies olfactory associative learning and memory deficits. Furthermore, our data indicate positive transcriptional regulation of the fly fmr1 gene by cAMP, via protein kinase A, likely through the transcription factor CREB. Because the human Fmr1 gene also contains CREB binding sites, the interaction of mGluR excess and cAMP signaling defects we present suggests novel combinatorial pharmaceutical approaches to symptom amelioration upon FMRP attenuation.

  2. Alpha 2-adrenergic receptor stimulation of phospholipase A2 and of adenylate cyclase in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells is mediated by different mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, S.B.; Halenda, S.P.; Bylund, D.B.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of alpha 2-adrenergic receptor activation on adenylate cyclase activity in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with the alpha 2A-adrenergic receptor gene is biphasic. At lower concentrations of epinephrine forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production is inhibited, but at higher concentrations the inhibition is reversed. Both of these effects are blocked by the alpha 2 antagonist yohimbine but not by the alpha 1 antagonist prazosin. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin attenuates inhibition at lower concentrations of epinephrine and greatly potentiates forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production at higher concentrations of epinephrine. alpha 2-Adrenergic receptor stimulation also causes arachidonic acid mobilization, presumably via phospholipase A2. This effect is blocked by yohimbine, quinacrine, removal of extracellular Ca2+, and pretreatment with pertussis toxin. Quinacrine and removal of extracellular Ca2+, in contrast, have no effect on the enhanced forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production. Thus, it appears that the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor in these cells can simultaneously activate distinct signal transduction systems; inhibition of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of phospholipase A2, both via G1, and potentiation of cyclic AMP production by a different (pertussis toxin-insensitive) mechanism

  3. Alpha 2-adrenergic receptor stimulation of phospholipase A2 and of adenylate cyclase in transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells is mediated by different mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, S.B.; Halenda, S.P.; Bylund, D.B. (Univ. of Missouri-Columbia (USA))

    1991-02-01

    The effect of alpha 2-adrenergic receptor activation on adenylate cyclase activity in Chinese hamster ovary cells stably transfected with the alpha 2A-adrenergic receptor gene is biphasic. At lower concentrations of epinephrine forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production is inhibited, but at higher concentrations the inhibition is reversed. Both of these effects are blocked by the alpha 2 antagonist yohimbine but not by the alpha 1 antagonist prazosin. Pretreatment with pertussis toxin attenuates inhibition at lower concentrations of epinephrine and greatly potentiates forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production at higher concentrations of epinephrine. alpha 2-Adrenergic receptor stimulation also causes arachidonic acid mobilization, presumably via phospholipase A2. This effect is blocked by yohimbine, quinacrine, removal of extracellular Ca2+, and pretreatment with pertussis toxin. Quinacrine and removal of extracellular Ca2+, in contrast, have no effect on the enhanced forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP production. Thus, it appears that the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor in these cells can simultaneously activate distinct signal transduction systems; inhibition of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of phospholipase A2, both via G1, and potentiation of cyclic AMP production by a different (pertussis toxin-insensitive) mechanism.

  4. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARdelta )-mediated regulation of preadipocyte proliferation and gene expression is dependent on cAMP signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jacob B.; Zhang, H; Rasmussen, T H

    2001-01-01

    of a PPARdelta ligand and methylisobutylxanthine (MIX) or other cAMP elevating agents. We further show that ligands and MIX synergistically stimulated PPARdelta-mediated transactivation. In 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, simultaneous administration of a PPARdelta-selective ligand and MIX significantly enhanced the early...

  5. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase rapidly suppresses multiple pro-inflammatory pathways in adipocytes including IL-1 receptor-associated kinase-4 phosphorylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mancini, Sarah J; White, Anna D; Bijland, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation of adipose tissue in obesity is associated with increased IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α secretion and proposed to contribute to insulin resistance. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates nutrient metabolism and is reported to have anti-inflammatory actions in adipose tissue, yet the m...

  6. Insulin: its binding to specific receptors and its stimulation of DNA synthesis and 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide phosphohydrolase in embryonic mouse brain cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanker, G.; Pieringer, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    Previously, the authors demonstrated that ornithine decarboxylase was stimulated by insulin in cultures of embryonic mouse brain cells. In the present work, they have investigated the presence and specificity of insulin receptors in these cultures. A time study showed that maximum binding of 125 [I] labelled insulin was around 75 min. Other studies measured the influence of concentration and age on insulin binding. A displacement study using increasing concentrations of cold insulin, glucagon or growth hormone demonstrated that the specificity of the receptors for insulin was rather high. It was also found that insulin displayed a clear dose-dependent stimulation of thymidine incorporation into the brain cells. Insulin also stimulated the glial enzyme 2':3'-cyclic nucleotide phosphohydrolase (CNP-ase). The results suggest a dual role for insulin; it regulates both cell proliferation as well as differentiation

  7. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor I transcription by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) in fetal rat bone cells through an element within exon 1: protein kinase A-dependent control without a consensus AMP response element

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, T. L.; Thomas, M. J.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.

    1995-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a locally synthesized anabolic growth factor for bone. IGF-I synthesis by primary fetal rat osteoblasts (Ob) is stimulated by agents that increase the intracellular cAMP concentration, including prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Previous studies with Ob cultures demonstrated that PGE2 enhanced IGF-I transcription through selective use of IGF-I promoter 1, with little effect on IGF-I messenger RNA half-life. Transient transfection of Ob cultures with an array of promoter 1-luciferase reporter fusion constructs has now allowed localization of a potential cis-acting promoter element(s) responsible for cAMP-stimulated gene expression to the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of IGF-I exon 1, within a segment lacking a consensus cAMP response element. Our evidence derives from three principal observations: 1) a transfection construct containing only 122 nucleotides (nt) of promoter 1 and 328 nt of the 5'-UTR retained full PGE2-stimulated reporter expression; 2) maximal PGE2-driven reporter expression required the presence of nt 196 to 328 of exon 1 when tested within the context of IGF-I promoter 1; 3) cotransfection of IGF-I promoter-luciferase-reporter constructs with a plasmid encoding the alpha-isoform of the catalytic subunit of murine cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) produced results comparable to those seen with PGE2 treatment, whereas cotransfection with a plasmid encoding a mutant regulatory subunit of PKA that cannot bind cAMP blocked PGE2-induced reporter expression. Deoxyribonuclease I footprinting of the 5'-UTR of exon 1 demonstrated protected sequences at HS3A, HS3B, and HS3D, three of six DNA-protein binding sites previously characterized with rat liver nuclear extracts. Of these three regions, only the HS3D binding site is located within the functionally identified hormonally responsive segment of IGF-I exon 1. These results directly implicate PKA in the control of IGF-I gene transcription by PGE2 and identify a segment of

  8. Synthesis, characterization and inhibitory activities of (4-N3[3,5-3H]Phe10)PKI(6-22)amide and its precursors: photoaffinity labeling peptides for the active site of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, B M; Lundquist, L J; Walsh, D A; Glass, D B

    1989-06-01

    PKI(6-22)amide is a 17 residue peptide corresponding to the active portion of the heat-stable inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The peptide is a potent (Ki = 1.6 nM), competitive inhibitor of the enzyme. The photoreactive peptide analog (4-azidophenylalanine10)PKI(6-22)amide was synthesized in both its non-radiolabeled and tritiated forms by chemical modification of precursor peptides that were prepared by stepwise solid-phase synthesis. (4-Amino[3,5-3H]phenylalanine10)PKI(6-22)amide, the precursor for the radiolabeled arylazide peptide, was obtained by catalytic reduction of the corresponding peptide containing the 3,5-diiodo-4-aminophenylalanine residue at position 10. The purified PKI peptides were analyzed by HPLC, amino acid analysis, and u.v. spectra. In the dark, (4-azidophenylalanine10)PKI(6-22)amide inhibited the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase with a Ki value of 2.8 nM. The photoreactivity of the arylazide peptide was demonstrated by time-dependent u.v. spectral changes on exposure to light. Photolysis of the catalytic subunit (4-azido[3,5-3H]phenylalanine10)PKI(6-22)amide complex resulted in specific covalent labeling of the enzyme. The data indicate that this peptide is a useful photoaffinity labeling reagent for the active site of the protein kinase.

  9. Comparison of thyroid stimulating activities measured by cyclic AMP production, those by radioiodine uptake in FRTL-5 cells and TSH-binding inhibitory activities in patients with hyperthyroid and euthyroid Graves' diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasagi, Kanji; Hatabu, Hiroto; Tokuda, Yasutaka; Arai, Keisuke; Iida, Yasuhiro; Konishi, Junji

    1988-01-01

    By using an assay measuring cAMP production in FRTL-5 thyroid cells, thyroid stimulating antibodies (TSab) were detected in all of 15 patients with euthyroid Graves' disease (EG) and of 26 patients with hyperthyroid Graves' disease (HG). There was no signicant difference between TSab activities in Eg and in HG. In an effort to elucidate why EG patients remain euthyroid in spite of having TSab, we investigated the effect of the patient's crude immunoglobulin fractions 125 I uptake in FRTL-5 thyroid cells, one of the indices of stimulation subsequent to cAMP production. The 125 Iuptake stimulation (IUS) activity was positive in 46,7% (7/15) of EG patients and 88.5% (23/26) of HG patients, being significantly lower in the former than in the latter (P 99m Tc thyroid uptake (r = 0.401, P 99m Tc thyroid uptake in comparison to 19 HG patients with a similar range of IUS activities. There was a good correlation between thyroid weight and 99m Tc thyroid uptake (r = 8.827, P 99m Tc and presumably radioiodine in vivo, might be a factor responsible for keeping EG patients euthyroid despite the presence of TSab. (author)

  10. The crystal structures of apo and cAMP-bound GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum reveal structural and dynamic changes upon cAMP binding in CRP/FNR family transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip D Townsend

    Full Text Available The cyclic AMP-dependent transcriptional regulator GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum is a member of the super-family of CRP/FNR (cyclic AMP receptor protein/fumarate and nitrate reduction regulator transcriptional regulators that play central roles in bacterial metabolic regulatory networks. In C. glutamicum, which is widely used for the industrial production of amino acids and serves as a non-pathogenic model organism for members of the Corynebacteriales including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the GlxR homodimer controls the transcription of a large number of genes involved in carbon metabolism. GlxR therefore represents a key target for understanding the regulation and coordination of C. glutamicum metabolism. Here we investigate cylic AMP and DNA binding of GlxR from C. glutamicum and describe the crystal structures of apo GlxR determined at a resolution of 2.5 Å, and two crystal forms of holo GlxR at resolutions of 2.38 and 1.82 Å, respectively. The detailed structural analysis and comparison of GlxR with CRP reveals that the protein undergoes a distinctive conformational change upon cyclic AMP binding leading to a dimer structure more compatible to DNA-binding. As the two binding sites in the GlxR homodimer are structurally identical dynamic changes upon binding of the first ligand are responsible for the allosteric behavior. The results presented here show how dynamic and structural changes in GlxR lead to optimization of orientation and distance of its two DNA-binding helices for optimal DNA recognition.

  11. Vasotocin has the potential to inhibit basolateral Na(+)/K (+)-pump current across isolated skin of tree frog in vitro, via its V(2)-type receptor/cAMP pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Makoto; Fujimaki, Kayo; Hokari, Shigeru

    2008-11-01

    Adult frog skin transports Na(+) from the apical to the basolateral side across the skin. Antidiuretic hormone (ADH) is involved in the regulation of Na(+) transport in both mammals and amphibians. We investigated the effect of arginine vasotocin (AVT), the ADH of amphibians, on the short-circuit current (SCC) across intact skin and on the basolateral Na(+)/K(+)-pump current across apically nystatin-permeabilized skin of the tree frog, Hyla japonica, in which the V(2)-type ADH receptor is expressed in vitro. In intact skin, 1 pM AVT had no effect on the SCC, but 10 nM AVT was sufficient to stimulate the SCC since 10 nM and 1 microM of AVT increased the SCC 3.2- and 3.4-fold, respectively (P > 0.9). However, in permeabilized skin, AVT (1 microM) decreased the Na(+)/K(+)-pump current to 0.79 times vehicle control. Similarly, 500 microM of 8Br-cAMP increased the SCC 3.2-fold, yet 1 mM of 8Br-cAMP decreased the Na(+)/K(+)-pump current to 0.76 times vehicle control. Arachidonic acid (10(-5) M) tended to decrease the Na(+)/K(+)-pump current. To judge from these in vitro experiments, AVT has the potential to inhibit the basolateral Na(+)/K(+)-pump current via the V(2)-type receptor/cAMP pathway in the skin of the tree frog.

  12. A direct radiolabeling of 99Tcm cyclic RGD peptide, an antagonist of αvβ3 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qianwei; Liu Guangyuan; Liu Kaiyuan; Huang Dingde; Xie Ganfeng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: It has been reported that Cys-Asp-Cys-Arg-Gly-Asp-Cys-Lys-Cys (RGD) peptides, as integrin α v β 3 receptor antagonists, might inhibit angiogenesis of tumor. The aim of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of direct labeling of 99 Tc m to a cyclic nine peptide containing RGD sequence (RGD-4CK), to observe the effects of different conditions on labeling efficiency, and to evaluate the radiochemical property of 99 Tc m -RGD-4CK. Methods: The peptide RGD-4CK contained the sequence of Cys-Asp-Cys-Arg-Gly-Asp-Cys-Lys-Cys. It was labeled directly by 99 Tc m with 'pretinning' method. The Rf value of 99 Tc m -RGD-4CK and 99 Tc m O 4 were determined in 3 MM paper chromatography. The labeling efficiency and specific activity were calculated. The influences of various conditions to the labeling rate were studied. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis and Sep-Pak C18 chromatography were used to assess the property of radiolabeled 99 Tc m -RGD-4CK. The stability in vitro, the cysteine replacement and the serum protein combination were also tested. Results: The Rf values of 99 Tc m -RGD-4CK were 0 and 0.8-0.9 respectively in mobile phase of acetone and V(NH 4 OH): V(ethanol): V(water) = 1: 2: 5. The radiochemical yield was (97.8±0.4)% and the specific activity (11.90±0.05) TBq/mmol in the basic condition of labeling. The labeling efficiency remained over 95% under the condition of 150-300 μg stannous tartrate, pH value 2.0-3.5, temperature 60 degree C and incubation time over 6 h in the process of pretinning reaction, the activity of 99 Tc m O 4 - was 37-185 MBq within volume of 200 μl. With the labeling temperature of 95 degree C in 30 min, the retention of 99 Tc m -RGD-4CK was in accordance with the major peak of time-activity curve from the analytical HPLC. The radiochemical purity of 99 Tc m -RGD-4CK remained above 95% after 6 h at room temperature. The amount of 99 Tc m O 4 - ; increased only by 0.5% as measured with Sep

  13. The A2B Adenosine Receptor Modulates the Epithelial– Mesenchymal Transition through the Balance of cAMP/PKA and MAPK/ERK Pathway Activation in Human Epithelial Lung Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomelli, Chiara; Daniele, Simona; Romei, Chiara; Tavanti, Laura; Neri, Tommaso; Piano, Ilaria; Celi, Alessandro; Martini, Claudia; Trincavelli, Maria L.

    2018-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a complex process in which cell phenotype switches from the epithelial to mesenchymal one. The deregulations of this process have been related with the occurrence of different diseases such as lung cancer and fibrosis. In the last decade, several efforts have been devoted in understanding the mechanisms that trigger and sustain this transition process. Adenosine is a purinergic signaling molecule that has been involved in the onset and progression of chronic lung diseases and cancer through the A2B adenosine receptor subtype activation, too. However, the relationship between A2BAR and EMT has not been investigated, yet. Herein, the A2BAR characterization was carried out in human epithelial lung cells. Moreover, the effects of receptor activation on EMT were investigated in the absence and presence of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1), which has been known to promote the transition. The A2BAR activation alone decreased and increased the expression of epithelial markers (E-cadherin) and the mesenchymal one (Vimentin, N-cadherin), respectively, nevertheless a complete EMT was not observed. Surprisingly, the receptor activation counteracted the EMT induced by TGF-β1. Several intracellular pathways regulate the EMT: high levels of cAMP and ERK1/2 phosphorylation has been demonstrated to counteract and promote the transition, respectively. The A2BAR stimulation was able to modulated these two pathways, cAMP/PKA and MAPK/ERK, shifting the fine balance toward activation or inhibition of EMT. In fact, using a selective PKA inhibitor, which blocks the cAMP pathway, the A2BAR-mediated EMT promotion were exacerbated, and conversely the selective inhibition of MAPK/ERK counteracted the receptor-induced transition. These results highlighted the A2BAR as one of the receptors involved in the modulation of EMT process. Nevertheless, its activation is not enough to trigger a complete transition, its ability to affect different

  14. The A2B Adenosine Receptor Modulates the Epithelial– Mesenchymal Transition through the Balance of cAMP/PKA and MAPK/ERK Pathway Activation in Human Epithelial Lung Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Giacomelli

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT is a complex process in which cell phenotype switches from the epithelial to mesenchymal one. The deregulations of this process have been related with the occurrence of different diseases such as lung cancer and fibrosis. In the last decade, several efforts have been devoted in understanding the mechanisms that trigger and sustain this transition process. Adenosine is a purinergic signaling molecule that has been involved in the onset and progression of chronic lung diseases and cancer through the A2B adenosine receptor subtype activation, too. However, the relationship between A2BAR and EMT has not been investigated, yet. Herein, the A2BAR characterization was carried out in human epithelial lung cells. Moreover, the effects of receptor activation on EMT were investigated in the absence and presence of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1, which has been known to promote the transition. The A2BAR activation alone decreased and increased the expression of epithelial markers (E-cadherin and the mesenchymal one (Vimentin, N-cadherin, respectively, nevertheless a complete EMT was not observed. Surprisingly, the receptor activation counteracted the EMT induced by TGF-β1. Several intracellular pathways regulate the EMT: high levels of cAMP and ERK1/2 phosphorylation has been demonstrated to counteract and promote the transition, respectively. The A2BAR stimulation was able to modulated these two pathways, cAMP/PKA and MAPK/ERK, shifting the fine balance toward activation or inhibition of EMT. In fact, using a selective PKA inhibitor, which blocks the cAMP pathway, the A2BAR-mediated EMT promotion were exacerbated, and conversely the selective inhibition of MAPK/ERK counteracted the receptor-induced transition. These results highlighted the A2BAR as one of the receptors involved in the modulation of EMT process. Nevertheless, its activation is not enough to trigger a complete transition, its ability to

  15. Cyclic Nucleotide Signalling in Kidney Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Schinner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kidney fibrosis is an important factor for the progression of kidney diseases, e.g., diabetes mellitus induced kidney failure, glomerulosclerosis and nephritis resulting in chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP were implicated to suppress several of the above mentioned renal diseases. In this review article, identified effects and mechanisms of cGMP and cAMP regarding renal fibrosis are summarized. These mechanisms include several signalling pathways of nitric oxide/ANP/guanylyl cyclases/cGMP-dependent protein kinase and cAMP/Epac/adenylyl cyclases/cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Furthermore, diverse possible drugs activating these pathways are discussed. From these diverse mechanisms it is expected that new pharmacological treatments will evolve for the therapy or even prevention of kidney failure.

  16. Biphasic action of cyclic adenosine 3',5'- monophosphate in gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analog-stimulated hormone release from GH3 cells stably transfected with GnRH receptor complementary deoxyribonucleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislaus, D; Arora, V; Awara, W M; Conn, P M

    1996-03-01

    GH3 cells are a PRL-secreting adenoma cell line derived from pituitary lactotropes. These cells have been stably transfected with rat GnRH receptor complementary DNA to produce four cell lines: GGH(3)1', GGH(3)2', GGH(3)6', and GGH(3)12'. In response to either GnRH or Buserelin (a metabolically stable GnRH agonist), these cell lines synthesize PRL in a cAMP-dependent manner. Only GGH(3)6' cells desensitize in response to persistent treatment with 10(-7) g/ml Buserelin. GGH(3)1', GGH(3)2', and GGH(3)12' cells, however, can be made refractory to Buserelin stimulation by raising cAMP levels either by the addition of (Bu)2cAMP to the medium or by treatment with cholera toxin. In GGH(3) cells, low levels of cAMP fulfill the requirements for a second messenger, whereas higher levels appear to mediate the development of desensitization. The observation that in GGH(3)6' cells, cAMP production persists after the onset of desensitization is consistent with the view that the mechanism responsible for desensitization is distal to the production of cAMP. Moreover, the absence of any significant difference in the amount of cAMP produced per cell in GGH(3)2', GGH(3)6', or GGH(3)12' cells suggests that elevated cAMP production per cell does not explain the development of desensitization in GGH(3)6' cells. We suggest that Buserelin-stimulated PRL synthesis in GGH(3)6' cells is mediated by a different cAMP-dependent protein kinase pool(s) than that in nondesensitizing GGH(3) cells. Such a protein kinase A pool(s) may be more susceptible to degradation via cAMP-mediated mechanisms than the protein kinase pools mediating the Buserelin response in nondesensitizing GGH(3) cells. A similar mechanism has been reported in other systems.

  17. EP3 receptors inhibit antidiuretic-hormone-dependent sodium transport across frog skin epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rytved, Klaus A.; Nielsen, Robert

    1999-01-01

    Antidiuretic hormone; tight epithelium; prostaglandin receptors; sulprostone; misoprostol; cAMP; cellular Ca2+......Antidiuretic hormone; tight epithelium; prostaglandin receptors; sulprostone; misoprostol; cAMP; cellular Ca2+...

  18. Regulation of melanogenesis: the role of cAMP and MITF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Otręba

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the melanogenesis pathway and the role of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP and microphthalmia transcription factor (MITF in regulation of this process. Products of melanogenesis are eu- and/or pheomelanins synthesized in a multistage process of tyrosine oxidation and polymerization. The conversions require the presence of tyrosinase (TYR, key enzyme, tyrosine hydroxylase isoform I (THI and tyrosinase related proteins (TRP1 and TRP2. Many types of signal molecules and transcription factors participate in regulation of melanin synthesis, but the most important are cAMP and MITF. cAMP is the second messenger in the intracellular signal cascade, which is synthesized from adenosine triphosphate (ATP by adenylyl cyclase, activated among others by the melanocortin receptor and the αS subunit of G protein. The signal molecule cAMP regulates MITF, TYR, THI, GTP-cyclohydroxylase I (GTP-CHI transcription and phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH phosphorylation at Ser16 by protein kinase A (PKA. Mutations of genes encoding proteins belonging to the cAMP signal cascade may lead to McCune-Albright and Carney syndromes. MITF is one of the most important nuclear transcription factors regulating melanogenesis. Currently 10 isoforms of human MITF are known, but in melanocytes only MITF-M, MITF-Mdel, MITF-A and MITF-H occur. MITF transcription factor regulates melanogenesis by activation of tyrosinase, TRP1 and TRP2 transcription. It also affects expression of other factors regulating melanosome maturation, biogenesis and transport. Moreover, it regulates melanocyte proliferation and protection against apoptosis. Mutations of the MITF gene may lead to hereditary diseases: Waardenburg type II and Tietz syndromes.

  19. Association of dopamine D(3) receptors with actin-binding protein 280 (ABP-280).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Li, Chuanyu; Weingarten, Paul; Bunzow, James R; Grandy, David K; Zhou, Qun Yong

    2002-03-01

    Proteins that bind to G protein-coupled receptors have been identified as regulators of receptor localization and signaling. In our previous studies, a cytoskeletal protein, actin-binding protein 280 (ABP-280), was found to associate with the third cytoplasmic loop of dopamine D(2) receptors. In this study, we demonstrate that ABP-280 also interacts with dopamine D(3) receptors, but not with D(4) receptors. Similar to the dopamine D(2) receptor, the D(3)/ABP-280 association is of signaling importance. In human melanoma M2 cells lacking ABP-280, D(3) receptors were unable to inhibit forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP (cAMP) production significantly. D(4) receptors, however, exhibited a similar degree of inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP production in ABP-280-deficient M2 cells and ABP-280-replent M2 subclones (A7 cells). Further experiments revealed that the D(3)/ABP-280 interaction was critically dependent upon a 36 amino acid carboxyl domain of the D(3) receptor third loop, which is conserved in the D(2) receptor but not in the D(4) receptor. Our results demonstrate a subtype-specific regulation of dopamine D(2)-family receptor signaling by the cytoskeletal protein ABP-280.

  20. Modulation of cAMP levels by high-fat diet and curcumin and regulatory effects on CD36/FAT scavenger receptor/fatty acids transporter gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zingg, Jean-Marc; Hasan, Syeda T; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Canepa, Elisa; Ricciarelli, Roberta; Villacorta, Luis; Azzi, Angelo; Meydani, Mohsen

    2017-01-02

    Curcumin, a polyphenol from turmeric (Curcuma longa), reduces inflammation, atherosclerosis, and obesity in several animal studies. In Ldlr -/- mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD), curcumin reduces plasma lipid levels, therefore contributing to a lower accumulation of lipids and to reduced expression of fatty acid transport proteins (CD36/FAT, FABP4/aP2) in peritoneal macrophages. In this study, we analyzed the molecular mechanisms by which curcumin (500, 1000, 1500 mg/kg diet, for 4 months) may influence plasma and tissue lipid levels in Ldlr -/- mice fed an HFD. In liver, HFD significantly suppressed cAMP levels, and curcumin restored almost normal levels. Similar trends were observed in adipose tissues, but not in brain, skeletal muscle, spleen, and kidney. Treatment with curcumin increased phosphorylation of CREB in liver, what may play a role in regulatory effects of curcumin in lipid homeostasis. In cell lines, curcumin increased the level of cAMP, activated the transcription factor CREB and the human CD36 promoter via a sequence containing a consensus CREB response element. Regulatory effects of HFD and Cur on gene expression were observed in liver, less in skeletal muscle and not in brain. Since the cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA)/CREB pathway plays an important role in lipid homeostasis, energy expenditure, and thermogenesis by increasing lipolysis and fatty acid β-oxidation, an increase in cAMP levels induced by curcumin may contribute to its hypolipidemic and anti-atherosclerotic effects. © 2016 BioFactors, 43(1):42-53, 2017. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  1. MEK Inhibitors Reverse cAMP-Mediated Anxiety in Zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Pia R.; Anastasaki, Corina; Grant, Nicola J.

    2015-01-01

    Altered phosphodiesterase (PDE)-cyclic AMP (cAMP) activity is frequently associated with anxiety disorders, but current therapies act by reducing neuronal excitability rather than targeting PDE-cAMP-mediated signaling pathways. Here, we report the novel repositioning of anti-cancer MEK inhibitors...... as anxiolytics in a zebrafish model of anxiety-like behaviors. PDE inhibitors or activators of adenylate cyclase cause behaviors consistent with anxiety in larvae and adult zebrafish. Small-molecule screening identifies MEK inhibitors as potent suppressors of cAMP anxiety behaviors in both larvae and adult...... zebrafish, while causing no anxiolytic behavioral effects on their own. The mechanism underlying cAMP-induced anxiety is via crosstalk to activation of the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. We propose that targeting crosstalk signaling pathways can be an effective strategy for mental health disorders, and advance...

  2. Adrenergic receptors are a fallible index of adrenergic denervation hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, Anders; Liggett, S B; Christensen, N J

    1991-01-01

    In view of evidence that neither interindividual nor induced intra-individual variations of adrenergic receptor status are related to metabolic or haemodynamic sensitivity to adrenaline in vivo, we took an alternative approach to assessment of the relevance of adrenergic receptor measurement...... densities (and binding affinities), measured with 3H-labelled yohimbine, and adrenaline-induced suppression of cyclic AMP contents did not differ among the three groups. Thus, in contrast to idiopathic autonomic failure, there is no generalized increase in adrenergic receptors in autonomic failure due...

  3. Imaging alterations of cardiomyocyte cAMP microdomains in disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eFroese

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available 3’,5’-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is an important second messenger which regulates heart function by acting in distinct subcellular microdomains. Recent years have provided deeper mechanistic insights into compartmentalized cAMP signaling and its link to cardiac disease. In this mini review, we summarize newest developments in this field achieved by cutting-edge biochemical and biophysical techniques. We further compile the data from different studies into a bigger picture of so far uncovered alterations in cardiomyocyte cAMP microdomains which occur in compensated cardiac hypertrophy and chronic heart failure. Finally, future research directions and translational perspectives are briefly discussed.

  4. Optogenetic Manipulation of Cyclic Di-GMP (c-di-GMP) Levels Reveals the Role of c-di-GMP in Regulating Aerotaxis Receptor Activity in Azospirillum brasilense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Lindsey; Ryu, Min-Hyung; Gomelsky, Mark; Alexandre, Gladys

    2017-09-15

    Bacterial chemotaxis receptors provide the sensory inputs that inform the direction of navigation in changing environments. Recently, we described the bacterial second messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP) as a novel regulator of a subclass of chemotaxis receptors. In Azospirillum brasilense , c-di-GMP binds to a chemotaxis receptor, Tlp1, and modulates its signaling function during aerotaxis. Here, we further characterize the role of c-di-GMP in aerotaxis using a novel dichromatic optogenetic system engineered for manipulating intracellular c-di-GMP levels in real time. This system comprises a red/near-infrared-light-regulated diguanylate cyclase and a blue-light-regulated c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase. It allows the generation of transient changes in intracellular c-di-GMP concentrations within seconds of irradiation with appropriate light, which is compatible with the time scale of chemotaxis signaling. We provide experimental evidence that binding of c-di-GMP to the Tlp1 receptor activates its signaling function during aerotaxis, which supports the role of transient changes in c-di-GMP levels as a means of adjusting the response of A. brasilense to oxygen gradients. We also show that intracellular c-di-GMP levels in A. brasilense change with carbon metabolism. Our data support a model whereby c-di-GMP functions to imprint chemotaxis receptors with a record of recent metabolic experience, to adjust their contribution to the signaling output, thus allowing the cells to continually fine-tune chemotaxis sensory perception to their metabolic state. IMPORTANCE Motile bacteria use chemotaxis to change swimming direction in response to changes in environmental conditions. Chemotaxis receptors sense environmental signals and relay sensory information to the chemotaxis machinery, which ultimately controls the swimming pattern of cells. In bacteria studied to date, differential methylation has been known as a mechanism to control the activity of chemotaxis receptors and

  5. Improvements in the automated radioimmunoassay for cAMP or cGMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooker, G.

    1988-01-01

    The work others in developing antibodies and the original radioimmunoassay for cyclic nucleotides provides the basis for these sensitive assays. The acetylation radioimmunoassay for cyclic nucleotides has enabled the measurement of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in very small biological samples. This is because accurate determinations can be made in samples containing less than 1 fmol of cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP. The Gamma-Flo automated radioimmunoassay system has been adapted to these assays such that cyclic nucleotides can be automatically measured at a rate of about 60 samples/hr. The Gamma-Flo instrument provides high-precision assays and eliminates human intervention in all steps of the radioimmunoassay. The automated assay has been in continuous operation in our laboratory over the last 10 years and this chapter summarizes the methodology and delineates improvements which have occurred over that time frame. Details for the preparation of the radioligands apply also to the manual acetylated radioimmunoassay for cyclic nucleotides

  6. cAMP signalling in the vasculature: the role of Epac (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Owain Llŷr; Dart, Caroline

    2014-02-01

    The second messenger cAMP plays a central role in mediating vascular smooth muscle relaxation in response to vasoactive transmitters and in strengthening endothelial cell-cell junctions that regulate the movement of solutes, cells and macromolecules between the blood and the surrounding tissue. The vasculature expresses three cAMP effector proteins: PKA (protein kinase A), CNG (cyclic-nucleotide-gated) ion channels, and the most recently discovered Epacs (exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP). Epacs are a family of GEFs (guanine-nucleotide-exchange factors) for the small Ras-related GTPases Rap1 and Rap2, and are being increasingly implicated as important mediators of cAMP signalling, both in their own right and in parallel with the prototypical cAMP target PKA. In the present paper, we review what is currently known about the role of Epac within blood vessels, particularly with regard to the regulation of vascular tone, endothelial barrier function and inflammation.

  7. The innate immune DNA sensor cGAS produces a noncanonical cyclic dinucleotide that activates human STING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diner, Elie J; Burdette, Dara L; Wilson, Stephen C; Monroe, Kathryn M; Kellenberger, Colleen A; Hyodo, Mamoru; Hayakawa, Yoshihiro; Hammond, Ming C; Vance, Russell E

    2013-05-30

    The presence of foreign DNA in the cytosol of mammalian cells elicits a potent antiviral interferon response. Recently, cytosolic DNA was proposed to induce the synthesis of cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP) upon binding to an enzyme called cGAMP synthase (cGAS). cGAMP activates an interferon response by binding to a downstream receptor called STING. Here, we identify natural variants of human STING (hSTING) that are poorly responsive to cGAMP yet, unexpectedly, are normally responsive to DNA and cGAS signaling. We explain this paradox by demonstrating that the cGAS product is actually a noncanonical cyclic dinucleotide, cyclic [G(2'-5')pA(3'-5')p], which contains a single 2'-5' phosphodiester bond. Cyclic [G(2'-5')pA(3'-5')p] potently activates diverse hSTING receptors and, therefore, may be a useful adjuvant or immunotherapeutic. Our results indicate that hSTING variants have evolved to distinguish conventional (3'-5') cyclic dinucleotides, known to be produced mainly by bacteria, from the noncanonical cyclic dinucleotide produced by mammalian cGAS. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Innate Immune DNA Sensor cGAS Produces a Noncanonical Cyclic Dinucleotide that Activates Human STING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie J. Diner

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The presence of foreign DNA in the cytosol of mammalian cells elicits a potent antiviral interferon response. Recently, cytosolic DNA was proposed to induce the synthesis of cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP upon binding to an enzyme called cGAMP synthase (cGAS. cGAMP activates an interferon response by binding to a downstream receptor called STING. Here, we identify natural variants of human STING (hSTING that are poorly responsive to cGAMP yet, unexpectedly, are normally responsive to DNA and cGAS signaling. We explain this paradox by demonstrating that the cGAS product is actually a noncanonical cyclic dinucleotide, cyclic [G(2′-5′pA(3′-5′p], which contains a single 2′-5′ phosphodiester bond. Cyclic [G(2′-5′pA(3′-5′p] potently activates diverse hSTING receptors and, therefore, may be a useful adjuvant or immunotherapeutic. Our results indicate that hSTING variants have evolved to distinguish conventional (3′-5′ cyclic dinucleotides, known to be produced mainly by bacteria, from the noncanonical cyclic dinucleotide produced by mammalian cGAS.

  9. Adrenomedullin increased the short-circuit current in the pig oviduct through chloride channels via the CGRP receptor: mediation by cAMP and calcium ions but not by nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, S B; Cheung, K H; Cheung, M P L; To, Y T; O, W S; Tang, F

    2013-10-01

    The oviduct serves as a site for the fertilization of the ovum and the transport of the conceptus down to the uterus for implantation. In this study, we investigated the presence of adrenomedullin (ADM) and its receptor component proteins in the pig oviduct. The effect of ADM on oviductal secretion, the specific receptor, and the mechanisms involved were also investigated. The presence of ADM and its receptor component proteins in the pig oviduct were confirmed using immunostaining. Short-circuit current (I(sc)) technique was employed to study chloride ion secretion in the oviductal epithelium. ADM increased I(sc) through cAMP- and calcium-activated chloride channels, and this effect could be inhibited by the CGRP receptor antagonist, hCGRP8-37. In contrast, the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME), could not block the effect of ADM on I(sc). In summary, ADM may increase oviductal fluid secretion via chloride secretion independent of the nitric oxide pathway for the transport of sperm and the conceptus.

  10. Effects of sodium ions on rat thyrocyte (FRTL-5 cells) swelling- and thyrotropin-activated taurine efflux dependent on cAMP and Epac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fugelli, Kjell

    2016-03-01

    Cellular osmolyte release is important in preventing water accumulation and swelling. However, the signaling pathways that detect volume increase and activate solute efflux are still not fully understood. We investigated efflux activation of the osmolyte taurine which is actively accumulated in rat thyrocytes (FRTL-5). Efflux of accumulated [(3)H]taurine was stimulated by cellular swelling and thyrotropin (TSH). These effects were significantly diminished in cells having reduced TSH receptor concentrations. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors (IBMX, Rolipram) enhanced both responses. An analog of forskolin (FSK; 7-deacetyl-7-[O-(N-methylpiperazino)-γ-butyryl] dihydrochloride) and an analog of cAMP, specific for activating exchange protein activated directly by cAMP (Epac; 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2'-O-methyladenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, acetoxymethyl ester), significantly stimulated [(3)H]taurine efflux. A cAMP analog specific for activating protein kinase A (PKA; N6-benzoyladenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, acetoxymethyl ester) had no significant stimulatory effect on [(3)H]taurine efflux rate. The amiloride analog, 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)-amiloride, which inhibits a TSH-stimulated Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, enhanced (100 %) and ouabain inhibited (50 %) the TSH-stimulated [(3)H]taurine efflux rate. The effect of FSK on efflux was strongly potentiated by Na(+)-free iso-osmotic conditions and by osmolality/cell volume that affected also the db-cAMP-stimulated efflux. The TSH receptors and downstream elements of the signaling pathway comprising adenylyl cyclase, cAMP and Epac appeared to mediate the hormone-induced signal for [(3)H]taurine efflux from FRTL-5 cells. With less evidence, the cell volume/osmolality-induced [(3)H]taurine efflux cascade appeared to share some of the hormone signaling elements and to modulate the hormone signaling pathway at two levels through cellular Na(+).

  11. Study on the change of cyclic nucleotide in mice with yang vacuity disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xinhua; Shen Ling; Wang Shuguang

    2002-01-01

    To study the relation between Yang Vacuity disease happening, development and cyclic nucleotide response, and prove curative effects of some assisting Yang drug, the plasma cAMP, cGMP and cAMP/cGMP levels were detected by radioimmunoassay in the Yang Vacuity group and curing group. Results: showed: (1) Yang Vacuity group: the symptoms were clear, death rate was high, the plasma cAMP and cAMP/cGMP increased obviously, it suggests that cyclic nucleotide was imbalance. (2) Curing group: the symptoms of Yang Vacuity disease were improved obviously, death rate dropped, cAMP declined, cGMP increased, while cAMP/cGMP reached the normal level, it showed that cyclic nucleotide of the body had altered greatly. (3) It is a reference target for Yang Vacuity. (4) Assisting yang drug (Sini Decoction) had a close relation with correcting imbalance of cyclic nucleotide

  12. Duodenal activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase induces vagal afferent firing and lowers glucose production in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Brittany A; Breen, Danna M; Luo, Ping; Cheung, Grace W C; Yang, Clair S; Sun, Biying; Kokorovic, Andrea; Rong, Weifang; Lam, Tony K T

    2012-04-01

    The duodenum senses nutrients to maintain energy and glucose homeostasis, but little is known about the signaling and neuronal mechanisms involved. We tested whether duodenal activation of adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) is sufficient and necessary for cholecystokinin (CCK) signaling to trigger vagal afferent firing and regulate glucose production. In rats, we selectively activated duodenal PKA and evaluated changes in glucose kinetics during the pancreatic (basal insulin) pancreatic clamps and vagal afferent firing. The requirement of duodenal PKA signaling in glucose regulation was evaluated by inhibiting duodenal activation of PKA in the presence of infusion of the intraduodenal PKA agonist (Sp-cAMPS) or CCK1 receptor agonist (CCK-8). We also assessed the involvement of a neuronal network and the metabolic impact of duodenal PKA activation in rats placed on high-fat diets. Intraduodenal infusion of Sp-cAMPS activated duodenal PKA and lowered glucose production, in association with increased vagal afferent firing in control rats. The metabolic and neuronal effects of duodenal Sp-cAMPS were negated by coinfusion with either the PKA inhibitor H89 or Rp-CAMPS. The metabolic effect was also negated by coinfusion with tetracaine, molecular and pharmacologic inhibition of NR1-containing N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors within the dorsal vagal complex, or hepatic vagotomy in rats. Inhibition of duodenal PKA blocked the ability of duodenal CCK-8 to reduce glucose production in control rats, whereas duodenal Sp-cAMPS bypassed duodenal CCK resistance and activated duodenal PKA and lowered glucose production in rats on high-fat diets. We identified a neural glucoregulatory function of duodenal PKA signaling. Copyright © 2012 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Caffeine Inhibits the Activation of Hepatic Stellate Cells Induced by Acetaldehyde via Adenosine A2A Receptor Mediated by the cAMP/PKA/SRC/ERK1/2/P38 MAPK Signal Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wanzhi; Wang, Qi; Zhao, Han; Yang, Feng; Lv, Xiongwen; Li, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Hepatic stellate cell (HSC) activation is an essential event during alcoholic liver fibrosis. Evidence suggests that adenosine aggravates liver fibrosis via the adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR). Caffeine, which is being widely consumed during daily life, inhibits the action of adenosine. In this study, we attempted to validate the hypothesis that caffeine influences acetaldehyde-induced HSC activation by acting on A2AR. Acetaldehyde at 50, 100, 200, and 400 μM significantly increased HSC-T6 cells proliferation, and cell proliferation reached a maximum at 48 h after exposure to 200 μM acetaldehyde. Caffeine and the A2AR antagonist ZM241385 decreased the cell viability and inhibited the expression of procollagen type I and type III in acetaldehyde-induced HSC-T6 cells. In addition, the inhibitory effect of caffeine on the expression of procollagen type I was regulated by A2AR-mediated signal pathway involving cAMP, PKA, SRC, and ERK1/2. Interestingly, caffeine’s inhibitory effect on the expression of procollagen type III may depend upon the A2AR-mediated P38 MAPK-dependent pathway. Conclusions: Caffeine significantly inhibited acetaldehyde-induced HSC-T6 cells activation by distinct A2AR mediated signal pathway via inhibition of cAMP-PKA-SRC-ERK1/2 for procollagen type I and via P38 MAPK for procollagen type III. PMID:24682220

  14. Discovery and characterization of a novel cyclic peptide that effectively inhibits ephrin binding to the EphA4 receptor and displays anti-angiogenesis activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Han

    Full Text Available The EphA4 receptor tyrosine kinase regulates a variety of physiological and pathological processes during neural development and the formation of tumor blood vessels; thus, it represents a new and promising therapeutic target. We used a combination of phage peptide display and computer modeling/docking approaches and discovered a novel cyclic nonapeptide, now designated TYY. This peptide selectively inhibits the binding of the ephrinA5 ligand with EphA4 and significantly blocks angiogenesis in a 3D matrigel culture system. Molecular docking reveals that TYY recognizes the same binding pocket on EphA4 that the natural ephrin ligand binds to and that the Tyr3 and Tyr4 side chains of TYY are both critical for the TYY/EphA4 interaction. The discovery of TYY introduces a valuable probe of EphA4 function and a new lead for EphA4-targeted therapeutic development.

  15. CRIS-a novel cAMP-binding protein controlling spermiogenesis and the development of flagellar bending.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Miriam Krähling

    Full Text Available The second messengers cAMP and cGMP activate their target proteins by binding to a conserved cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD. Here, we identify and characterize an entirely novel CNBD-containing protein called CRIS (cyclic nucleotide receptor involved in sperm function that is unrelated to any of the other members of this protein family. CRIS is exclusively expressed in sperm precursor cells. Cris-deficient male mice are either infertile due to a lack of sperm resulting from spermatogenic arrest, or subfertile due to impaired sperm motility. The motility defect is caused by altered Ca(2+ regulation of flagellar beat asymmetry, leading to a beating pattern that is reminiscent of sperm hyperactivation. Our results suggest that CRIS interacts during spermiogenesis with Ca(2+-regulated proteins that--in mature sperm--are involved in flagellar bending.

  16. Cyclic adenosine 3:5-monophosphate binding proteins in Hartmannella culbertsoni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, A.K.; Krishna Murti, C.R.

    1976-01-01

    When 100, 000 g supernatant fractions of homogenates of Hartmannella culbertsoni were incubated with ('- 3 H)-cyclic adenosine 3 : 5 monophosphate and passed through a sephadex G-100 column, radioactivity appeared with protein fractions eluted after the void colume. About 75% radioactivity bound to these fractions was recovered as cyclic adenosine 3 : 5 monophosphate. Unlabelled cAMP diluted the amount of radioactivity bound. Adenosine, deoxyadenosine, 5-AMP, 3-AMP, ADP and ATP did not inhibit binding. (author)

  17. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits A2A adenosine receptor agonist induced β-amyloid production in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells via a cAMP dependent pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan Vijay Nagpure

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is the leading cause of senile dementia in today's society. Its debilitating symptoms are manifested by disturbances in many important brain functions, which are influenced by adenosine. Hence, adenosinergic system is considered as a potential therapeutic target in AD treatment. In the present study, we found that sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, an H2S donor, 100 µM attenuated HENECA (a selective A2A receptor agonist, 10-200 nM induced β-amyloid (1-42 (Aβ42 production in SH-SY5Y cells. NaHS also interfered with HENECA-stimulated production and post-translational modification of amyloid precursor protein (APP by inhibiting its maturation. Measurement of the C-terminal APP fragments generated from its enzymatic cleavage by β-site amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1 showed that NaHS did not have any significant effect on β-secretase activity. However, the direct measurements of HENECA-elevated γ-secretase activity and mRNA expressions of presenilins suggested that the suppression of Aβ42 production in NaHS pretreated cells was mediated by inhibiting γ-secretase. NaHS induced reductions were accompanied by similar decreases in intracellular cAMP levels and phosphorylation of cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB. NaHS significantly reduced the elevated cAMP and Aβ42 production caused by forskolin (an adenylyl cyclase, AC agonist alone or forskolin in combination with IBMX (a phosphodiesterase inhibitor, but had no effect on those caused by IBMX alone. Moreover, pretreatment with NaHS significantly attenuated HENECA-elevated AC activity and mRNA expressions of various AC isoforms. These data suggest that NaHS may preferentially suppress AC activity when it was stimulated. In conclusion, H2S attenuated HENECA induced Aβ42 production in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells through inhibiting γ-secretase via a cAMP dependent pathway.

  18. Interrogating the Spatiotemporal Landscape of Neuromodulatory GPCR Signaling by Real-Time Imaging of cAMP in Intact Neurons and Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian S. Muntean

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Modulation of neuronal circuits is key to information processing in the brain. The majority of neuromodulators exert their effects by activating G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs that control the production of second messengers directly impacting cellular physiology. How numerous GPCRs integrate neuromodulatory inputs while accommodating diversity of incoming signals is poorly understood. In this study, we develop an in vivo tool and analytical suite for analyzing GPCR responses by monitoring the dynamics of a key second messenger, cyclic AMP (cAMP, with excellent quantitative and spatiotemporal resolution in various neurons. Using this imaging approach in combination with CRISPR/Cas9 editing and optogenetics, we interrogate neuromodulatory mechanisms of defined populations of neurons in an intact mesolimbic reward circuit and describe how individual inputs generate discrete second-messenger signatures in a cell- and receptor-specific fashion. This offers a resource for studying native neuronal GPCR signaling in real time. : Muntean et al. develop an in vivo reagent to study processing of neurotransmitter GPCR signals by monitoring real-time dynamics of cAMP responses. They demonstrate application of this approach, in combination with CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing and optogenetics, to interrogate the functional organization of a striatal circuit. Keywords: cAMP, GPCR, neuromodulation, dopamine, striatum, imaging, optogenetics

  19. The phytosulfokine (PSK) receptor is capable of guanylate cyclase activity and enabling cyclic GMP-dependent signaling in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Kwezi, Lusisizwe; Ruzvidzo, Oziniel; Wheeler, Janet I.; Govender, Kershini; Iacuone, Sylvana; Thompson, Philip E.; Gehring, Christoph A; Irving, Helen R.

    2011-01-01

    Phytosulfokines (PSKs) are sulfated pentapeptides that stimulate plant growth and differentiation mediated by the PSK receptor (PSKR1), which is a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase. We identified a putative guanylate cyclase (GC) catalytic center in PSKR1 that is embedded within the kinase domain and hypothesized that the GC works in conjunction with the kinase in downstream PSK signaling. We expressed the recombinant complete kinase (cytoplasmic) domain of AtPSKR1 and show that it has serine/threonine kinase activity using the Ser/Thr peptide 1 as a substrate with an approximate Km of 7.5 μM and Vmax of 1800 nmol min-1 mg-1 of protein. This same recombinant protein also has GC activity in vitro that is dependent on the presence of either Mg2+ or Mn2+. Overexpression of the full-length AtPSKR1 receptor in Arabidopsis leaf protoplasts raised the endogenous basal cGMP levels over 20-fold, indicating that the receptor has GC activity in vivo. In addition, PSK-α itself, but not the non-sulfated backbone, induces rapid increases in cGMP levels in protoplasts. Together these results indicate that the PSKR1 contains dual GC and kinase catalytic activities that operate in vivo and that this receptor constitutes a novel class of enzymes with overlapping catalytic domains. © 2011 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. The phytosulfokine (PSK) receptor is capable of guanylate cyclase activity and enabling cyclic GMP-dependent signaling in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Kwezi, Lusisizwe

    2011-04-19

    Phytosulfokines (PSKs) are sulfated pentapeptides that stimulate plant growth and differentiation mediated by the PSK receptor (PSKR1), which is a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase. We identified a putative guanylate cyclase (GC) catalytic center in PSKR1 that is embedded within the kinase domain and hypothesized that the GC works in conjunction with the kinase in downstream PSK signaling. We expressed the recombinant complete kinase (cytoplasmic) domain of AtPSKR1 and show that it has serine/threonine kinase activity using the Ser/Thr peptide 1 as a substrate with an approximate Km of 7.5 μM and Vmax of 1800 nmol min-1 mg-1 of protein. This same recombinant protein also has GC activity in vitro that is dependent on the presence of either Mg2+ or Mn2+. Overexpression of the full-length AtPSKR1 receptor in Arabidopsis leaf protoplasts raised the endogenous basal cGMP levels over 20-fold, indicating that the receptor has GC activity in vivo. In addition, PSK-α itself, but not the non-sulfated backbone, induces rapid increases in cGMP levels in protoplasts. Together these results indicate that the PSKR1 contains dual GC and kinase catalytic activities that operate in vivo and that this receptor constitutes a novel class of enzymes with overlapping catalytic domains. © 2011 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Conservation and divergence of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-protein kinase A (cAMP–PKA) pathway in two plant-pathogenic fungi: Fusarium graminearum and F. verticillioides

    Science.gov (United States)

    The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-PKA pathway is a central signaling cascade that transmits extracellular stimuli and governs cell responses through the second messenger cAMP. The importance of cAMP signaling in fungal biology has been well documented. Two key conserved components, adenylate cyclase (AC) and ca...

  2. [3H] glycogen hydrolysis in brain slices: responses to meurotransmitters and modulation of noradrenaline receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quach, T.T.; Rose, C.; Schwartz, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    Different agents have been investigated for their effects on [ 3 H] glycogen synthesized in mouse cortical slices. Of these noradrenaline, serotonin and histamine induced clear concentration-dependent glycogenesis. [ 3 H] glycogen hydrolysis induced by noradrenaline appears to be mediated by beta-adrenergic receptors because it is completely prevented by timolol, while phentolamine is ineffective. It seems to involve cyclic AMP because it is potentiated in the presence of isobutylmethylxanthine; in addition dibutyryl cyclic AMP (but not dibutyryl cyclic GMP) promotes glycogenolysis. Lower concentrations of noradrenaline were necessary for [ 3 H] glycogen hydrolysis (ECsub(50) 0.5μM) than for stimulation of cyclic AMP accumulation (ECsub(50) = 8μM). After subchronic reserpine treatment the concentration-response curve to noradrenaline was significantly shifted to the left (ECsub(50) = 0.09 +- 0.02 μM as compared with 0.49 +- 0.08μM in saline-pretreated mice) without modifications of either the basal [ 3 H] glycogen level, maximal glycogenolytic effect, or the dibutyryl cAMP-induced glycogenolytic response. In addition to noradrenaline, clear concentration-dependent [ 3 H] glycogen hydrolysis was observed in the presence of histamine or serotonin. In contrast to the partial [ 3 H] glycogen hydrolysis elicited by these biogenic amines, depolarization of the slices by 50 mM K + provoked a nearly total [ 3 H] glycogen hydrolysis. (author)

  3. A Temporal-Specific and Transient cAMP Increase Characterizes Odorant Classical Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Wen; Smith, Andrew; Darby-King, Andrea; Harley, Carolyn W.; McLean, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Increases in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) are proposed to initiate learning in a wide variety of species. Here, we measure changes in cAMP in the olfactory bulb prior to, during, and following a classically conditioned odor preference trial in rat pups. Measurements were taken up to the point of maximal CREB phosphorylation in olfactory…

  4. The cAMP Signaling and MAP Kinase Pathways in Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehrabi, R.; Zhao, X.; Kim, Y.; Xu, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The key components of the well conserved cyclic AMP signaling and MAP kinase pathways have been functionally characterized in the corn smut Ustilago maydis, rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea, and a few other fungal pathogens. In general, the cAMP signaling and the MAP kinase cascade homologous to

  5. Functional somatostatin receptors on a rat pancreatic acinar cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viguerie, N.; Tahiri-Jouti, N.; Esteve, J.P.; Clerc, P.; Logsdon, C.; Svoboda, M.; Susini, C.; Vaysse, N.; Ribet, A.

    1988-01-01

    Somatostatin receptors from a rat pancreatic acinar cell line, AR4-2J, were characterized biochemically, structurally, and functionally. Binding of 125 I-[Tyr 11 ]Somatostatin to AR4-2J cells was saturable, exhibiting a single class of high-affinity binding sites with a maximal binding capacity of 258 ± 20 fmol/10 6 cells. Somatostatin receptor structure was analyzed by covalently cross-linking 125 I-[Tyr 11 ]somatostatin to its plasma membrane receptors. Gel electrophoresis and autoradiography of cross-linked proteins revealed a peptide containing the somatostatin receptor. Somatostatin inhibited vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-stimulated adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) formation in a dose-dependent manner. The concentration of somatostatin that caused half-maximal inhibition of cAMP formation was close to the receptor affinity for somatostatin. Pertussis toxin pretreatment of AR4-2J cells prevented somatostatin inhibition of VIP-stimulated cAMP formation as well as somatostatin binding. The authors conclude that AR4-2J cells exhibit functional somatostatin receptors that retain both specificity and affinity of the pancreatic acinar cell somatostatin receptors and act via the pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide-binding protein N i to inhibit adenylate cyclase

  6. A novel Ras-interacting protein required for chemotaxis and cyclic adenosine monophosphate signal relay in Dictyostelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S; Parent, C A; Insall, R; Firtel, R A

    1999-09-01

    We have identified a novel Ras-interacting protein from Dictyostelium, RIP3, whose function is required for both chemotaxis and the synthesis and relay of the cyclic AMP (cAMP) chemoattractant signal. rip3 null cells are unable to aggregate and lack receptor activation of adenylyl cyclase but are able, in response to cAMP, to induce aggregation-stage, postaggregative, and cell-type-specific gene expression in suspension culture. In addition, rip3 null cells are unable to properly polarize in a cAMP gradient and chemotaxis is highly impaired. We demonstrate that cAMP stimulation of guanylyl cyclase, which is required for chemotaxis, is reduced approximately 60% in rip3 null cells. This reduced activation of guanylyl cyclase may account, in part, for the defect in chemotaxis. When cells are pulsed with cAMP for 5 h to mimic the endogenous cAMP oscillations that occur in wild-type strains, the cells will form aggregates, most of which, however, arrest at the mound stage. Unlike the response seen in wild-type strains, the rip3 null cell aggregates that form under these experimental conditions are very small, which is probably due to the rip3 null cell chemotaxis defect. Many of the phenotypes of the rip3 null cell, including the inability to activate adenylyl cyclase in response to cAMP and defects in chemotaxis, are very similar to those of strains carrying a disruption of the gene encoding the putative Ras exchange factor AleA. We demonstrate that aleA null cells also exhibit a defect in cAMP-mediated activation of guanylyl cyclase similar to that of rip3 null cells. A double-knockout mutant (rip3/aleA null cells) exhibits a further reduction in receptor activation of guanylyl cyclase, and these cells display almost no cell polarization or movement in cAMP gradients. As RIP3 preferentially interacts with an activated form of the Dictyostelium Ras protein RasG, which itself is important for cell movement, we propose that RIP3 and AleA are components of a Ras

  7. Assisted Medical Procedures (AMP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — DOCUMENTATION, DEVELOPMENT, AND PROGRESS The AMP was initially being developed as part the Advanced Integrated Clinical System (AICS)-Guided Medical Procedure System...

  8. Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Sadredinamin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are extensive group of molecules that produced by variety tissues of invertebrate, plants, and animal species which play an important role in their immunity response. AMPs have different classifications such as; biosynthetic machines, biological sources, biological functions, molecular properties, covalent bonding patterns, three dimensional structures, and molecular targets.These molecules have multidimensional properties including antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, antifungal activity, anti-parasite activity, biofilm control, antitumor activity, mitogens activity and linking innate to adaptive immunity that making them promising agents for therapeutic drugs. In spite of this advantage of AMPs, their clinical developments have some limitation for commercial development. But some of AMPs are under clinical trials for the therapeutic purpose such as diabetic foot ulcers, different bacterial infections and tissue damage. In this review, we emphasized on the source, structure, multidimensional properties, limitation and therapeutic applications of various antimicrobial peptides.

  9. [Physiopathology of cAMP/PKA signaling in neurons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Liliana; Yapo, Cedric; Vincent, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and the cyclic-AMP dependent protein kinase (PKA) regulate a plethora of cellular functions in virtually all eukaryotic cells. In neurons, the cAMP/PKA signaling cascade controls a number of biological properties such as axonal growth, synaptic transmission, regulation of excitability or long term changes in the nucleus. Genetically-encoded optical biosensors for cAMP or PKA considerably improved our understanding of these processes by providing a real-time measurement in living neurons. In this review, we describe the recent progresses made in the creation of biosensors for cAMP or PKA activity. These biosensors revealed profound differences in the amplitude of the cAMP signal evoked by neuromodulators between various neuronal preparations. These responses can be resolved at the level of individual neurons, also revealing differences related to the neuronal type. At the subcellular level, biosensors reported different signal dynamics in domains like dendrites, cell body, nucleus and axon. Combining this imaging approach with pharmacology or genetical models points at phosphodiesterases and phosphatases as critical regulatory proteins. Biosensor imaging will certainly help understand the mechanism of action of current drugs as well as help in devising novel therapeutic strategies for neuropsychiatric diseases. © Société de Biologie, 2017.

  10. Frequency-Dependent Modulation of Dopamine Release by Nicotine and Dopamine D1 Receptor Ligands: An In Vitro Fast Cyclic Voltammetry Study in Rat Striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutier, W; Lowry, J P; McCreary, A C; O'Connor, J J

    2016-05-01

    Nicotine is a highly addictive drug and exerts this effect partially through the modulation of dopamine release and increasing extracellular dopamine in regions such as the brain reward systems. Nicotine acts in these regions on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The effect of nicotine on the frequency dependent modulation of dopamine release is well established and the purpose of this study was to investigate whether dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) ligands have an influence on this. Using fast cyclic voltammetry and rat corticostriatal slices, we show that D1R ligands are able to modulate the effect of nicotine on dopamine release. Nicotine (500 nM) induced a decrease in dopamine efflux at low frequency (single pulse or five pulses at 10 Hz) and an increase at high frequency (100 Hz) electrical field stimulation. The D1R agonist SKF-38393, whilst having no effect on dopamine release on its own or on the effect of nicotine upon multiple pulse evoked dopamine release, did significantly prevent and reverse the effect of nicotine on single pulse dopamine release. Interestingly similar results were obtained with the D1R antagonist SCH-23390. In this study we have demonstrated that the modulation of dopamine release by nicotine can be altered by D1R ligands, but only when evoked by single pulse stimulation, and are likely working via cholinergic interneuron driven dopamine release.

  11. The Role of Cyclic Nucleotide Signaling Pathways in Cancer: Targets for Prevention and Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo, Alexandra M.; Piazza, Gary A. [Drug Discovery Research Center, Mitchell Cancer Institute, University of South Alabama, 1660 Springhill Ave, Suite 3029, Mobile, AL 36604 (United States); Tinsley, Heather N., E-mail: htinsley@montevallo.edu [Department of Biology, Chemistry, and Mathematics, University of Montevallo, Station 6480, Montevallo, AL 35115 (United States)

    2014-02-26

    For more than four decades, the cyclic nucleotides cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP) have been recognized as important signaling molecules within cells. Under normal physiological conditions, cyclic nucleotides regulate a myriad of biological processes such as cell growth and adhesion, energy homeostasis, neuronal signaling, and muscle relaxation. In addition, altered cyclic nucleotide signaling has been observed in a number of pathophysiological conditions, including cancer. While the distinct molecular alterations responsible for these effects vary depending on the specific cancer type, several studies have demonstrated that activation of cyclic nucleotide signaling through one of three mechanisms—induction of cyclic nucleotide synthesis, inhibition of cyclic nucleotide degradation, or activation of cyclic nucleotide receptors—is sufficient to inhibit proliferation and activate apoptosis in many types of cancer cells. These findings suggest that targeting cyclic nucleotide signaling can provide a strategy for the discovery of novel agents for the prevention and/or treatment of selected cancers.

  12. In Vitro Assessment of Guanylyl Cyclase Activity of Plant Receptor Kinases

    KAUST Repository

    Raji, Misjudeen; Gehring, Christoph A

    2017-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotides such as 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) are increasingly recognized as key signaling molecules in plants, and a growing number of plant mononucleotide cyclases, both adenylate cyclases (ACs) and guanylate cyclases (GCs), have been reported. Catalytically active cytosolic GC domains have been shown to be part of many plant receptor kinases and hence directly linked to plant signaling and downstream cellular responses. Here we detail, firstly, methods to identify and express essential functional GC domains of receptor kinases, and secondly, we describe mass spectrometric methods to quantify cGMP generated by recombinant GCs from receptor kinases in vitro.

  13. In Vitro Assessment of Guanylyl Cyclase Activity of Plant Receptor Kinases

    KAUST Repository

    Raji, Misjudeen

    2017-05-31

    Cyclic nucleotides such as 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) are increasingly recognized as key signaling molecules in plants, and a growing number of plant mononucleotide cyclases, both adenylate cyclases (ACs) and guanylate cyclases (GCs), have been reported. Catalytically active cytosolic GC domains have been shown to be part of many plant receptor kinases and hence directly linked to plant signaling and downstream cellular responses. Here we detail, firstly, methods to identify and express essential functional GC domains of receptor kinases, and secondly, we describe mass spectrometric methods to quantify cGMP generated by recombinant GCs from receptor kinases in vitro.

  14. The solvent effect on the enthalpy of hydrolysis of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate : a quantum chemical study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffers - Sap, Miek; Buck, H.M.

    1978-01-01

    The solvent effect on the enthalpy of hydrolysis has been studied by the Extended-Hückel method for the hydrolysis reactions of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic 3',5'-AMP) and related cyclic phosphate diesters. The results show that the difference in enthalpy of hydrolysis between cyclic

  15. Cardiac cAMP: production, hydrolysis, modulation and detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric eBOULARAN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic adenosine 3’,5’-monophosphate (cAMP modulates a broad range of biological processes including the regulation of cardiac myocyte contractile function where it constitutes the main second messenger for β-adrenergic receptors’ signaling to fulfill positive chronotropic, inotropic and lusitropic effects. A growing number of studies pinpoint the role of spatial organization of the cAMP signaling as an essential mechanism to regulate cAMP outcomes in cardiac physiology. Here, we will briefly discuss the complexity of cAMP synthesis and degradation in the cardiac context, describe the way to detect it and review the main pharmacological arsenal to modulate its availability.

  16. Endogenous Parathyroid Hormone Promotes Fracture Healing by Increasing Expression of BMPR2 through cAMP/PKA/CREB Pathway in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Endogenous parathyroid hormone (PTH plays an important role in fracture healing. This study investigated whether endogenous PTH regulates fracture healing by bone morphogenetic protein (BMP and/or the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β signaling pathway. Methods: Eight-week-old wild-type (WT and PTH-knockout (PTH KO male mice were selected, and models of open right-femoral fracture were constructed. Fracture healing and callus characteristics of mice in the two groups were compared by X-ray, micro-computed tomography, histological, and immunohistochemical examinations. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs of 8-week-old WT and PTHKO male mice were obtained and induced into osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Results: We found that expression levels of Runt-related transcription factor (RUNX2, bone morphogenetic protein-receptor-type Ⅱ (BMPR2, phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8, and phosphorylated cyclic adenosine monophosphate-responsive element binding protein (CREB in the callus of PTHKO mice were significantly decreased, whereas no significant difference in expression of SOX9, TGF-βR2,or pSMAD2/3 was observed between PTHKO and WT mice. Additionally, the activity of osteoblast alkaline phosphatase was low at 7 days post-induction, and was upregulated by addition of PTH or dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (dbcAMP to the cell culture. Furthermore, H89 (protein kinase A inhibitoreliminated the simulating effects of PTH and dbcAMP, and a low concentration of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP was observed in PTHKO mouse BMMSCs. Conclusion: These results suggested that endogenous PTH enhanced BMPR2 expression by a cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway in osteoblasts, and increased RUNX2 expression through transduction of the BMP/pSMAD1/5/8 signaling pathway.

  17. The urokinase receptor-derived cyclic peptide [SRSRY] suppresses neovascularization and intravasation of osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingangi, Vincenzo; Bifulco, Katia; Yousif, Ali Munaim; Ragone, Concetta; Motti, Maria Letizia; Rea, Domenica; Minopoli, Michele; Botti, Giovanni; Scognamiglio, Giuseppe; Fazioli, Flavio; Gallo, Michele; De Chiara, Annarosaria; Arra, Claudio; Grieco, Paolo; Carriero, Maria Vincenza

    2016-08-23

    The receptor for the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPAR) is a widely recognized master regulator of cell migration and uPAR88-92 is the minimal sequence required to induce cell motility and angiogenesis by interacting with the formyl peptide receptor type 1 (FPR1). In this study, we present evidence that the cyclization of the uPAR88-92 sequence generates a new potent inhibitor of migration, and extracellular matrix invasion of human osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma cells expressing comparable levels of FPR1 on cell surface. In vitro, the cyclized peptide [SRSRY] prevents formation of capillary-like tubes by endothelial cells co-cultured with chondrosarcoma cells and trans-endothelial migration of osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma cells. When chondrosarcoma cells were subcutaneously injected in nude mice, tumor size, intra-tumoral microvessel density and circulating tumor cells in blood samples collected before the sacrifice, were significantly reduced in animals treated daily with i.p-administration of 6 mg/Kg [SRSRY] as compared to animals treated with vehicle only. Our findings indicate that [SRSRY] prevents three key events occurring during the metastatic process of osteosarcoma and chondrosarcoma cells: the extracellular matrix invasion, the formation of a capillary network and the entry into bloodstream.

  18. Critical Role of Nitric Oxide-cGMP Cascade in the Formation of cAMP-Dependent Long-Term Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aonuma, Hitoshi; Mizunami, Makoto; Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Unoki, Sae

    2006-01-01

    Cyclic AMP pathway plays an essential role in formation of long-term memory (LTM). In some species, the nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic GMP pathway has been found to act in parallel and complementary to the cAMP pathway for LTM formation. Here we describe a new role of the NO-cGMP pathway, namely, stimulation of the cAMP pathway to induce LTM. We have…

  19. Biosynthesis of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and GnRH receptor (GnRHR) in hypothalamic-pituitary unit of anoestrous and cyclic ewes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciechanowska, M O; Łapot, M; Mateusiak, K; Paruszewska, E; Malewski, T; Przekop, F

    2017-02-01

    This study was performed to explain how the molecular processes governing the biosynthesis of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and GnRH receptor (GnRHR) in the hypothalamic-pituitary unit are reflected by luteinizing hormone (LH) secretion in sheep during anoestrous period and during luteal and follicular phases of the oestrous cycle. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), we analyzed the levels of GnRH and GnRHR in preoptic area (POA), anterior (AH) and ventromedial hypothalamus (VM), stalk-median eminence (SME), and GnRHR in the anterior pituitary gland (AP). Radioimmunoassay has also been used to define changes in plasma LH concentrations. The study provides evidence that the levels of GnRH in the whole hypothalamus of anoestrous ewes were lower than that in sheep during the follicular phase of the oestrous cycle (POA: p pituitary unit, as well as LH level, in the blood in anoestrous ewes were significantly lower than those detected in animals of both cyclic groups. Our data suggest that decrease in LH secretion during the long photoperiod in sheep may be due to low translational activity of genes encoding both GnRH and GnRHR.

  20. EFFECT OF dbcAMP ON PROLIFERATION AND APOPTOSIS OF PORCINE GRANULOSA CELLS in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Alexa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotide cAMP and its target protein kinase A (PKA dependent intracellular mechanisms can play an important role in regulation of ovarian cell function and in mediating gonadotropin action on these cells. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (dbcAMP (0; 0.1; 1 and 10 µg/ml or FSH (0; 0,01; 1 IU/ml on proliferation and apoptosis of porcine granulosa cells in vitro. Indices of cell apoptosis (expression of apoptotic peptide bax and proliferation (expression of proliferation-associated peptide PCNA within ovarian granulosa cells were analysed by immunocytochemistry. It was observed that accumulation of PCNA was increased by dbcAMP and FSH at all doses added. The occurrence of bax was also stimulated by dbcAMP after exposition (at 0,1 and 1 µg/ml, but not at dose 10 µg/ml and by FSH (at all doses added. The stimulatory effect of both dbcAMP and FSH on both ovarian cell apoptosis and proliferation suggest, that these substances may promote ovarian follicular cell turnover. The similarity of dbcAMP and FSH effect may indicate that FSH can affect ovarian functions via cAMP-dependent intracellular mechanisms. The present data may provide new tools to regulate human and animal reproductive processes via cAMP-dependent mechanisms.

  1. AMP language reference manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drouffe, J.M.

    1982-06-01

    The use of a program for symbolic calculations named AMP (Algebraic Manipulation Program) is described. Its main features are: high speed heart for usual algebraic calculations; conversational capability; derivation, substitutions, matricial calculus, expansions, non commutative algebrae...; possibility to define new symbols and associated rules; possibility to create and use external libraries; written for IBM/370 like computers

  2. Skeletal muscle expresses the extracellular cyclic AMP–adenosine pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavegatti, T; Costa, V L; Araújo, M S; Godinho, R O

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: cAMP is a key intracellular signalling molecule that regulates multiple processes of the vertebrate skeletal muscle. We have shown that cAMP can be actively pumped out from the skeletal muscle cell. Since in other tissues, cAMP efflux had been associated with extracellular generation of adenosine, in the present study we have assessed the fate of interstitial cAMP and the existence of an extracellular cAMP-adenosine signalling pathway in skeletal muscle. Experimental approach: cAMP efflux and/or its extracellular degradation were analysed by incubating rat cultured skeletal muscle with exogenous cAMP, forskolin or isoprenaline. cAMP and its metabolites were quantified by radioassay or HPLC, respectively. Key results: Incubation of cells with exogenous cAMP was followed by interstitial accumulation of 5′-AMP and adenosine, a phenomenon inhibited by selective inhibitors of ecto-phosphodiesterase (DPSPX) and ecto-nucleotidase (AMPCP). Activation of adenylyl cyclase (AC) in cultured cells with forskolin or isoprenaline increased cAMP efflux and extracellular generation of 5′-AMP and adenosine. Extracellular cAMP-adenosine pathway was also observed after direct and receptor-dependent stimulation of AC in rat extensor muscle ex vivo. These events were attenuated by probenecid, an inhibitor of ATP binding cassette family transporters. Conclusions and implications: Our results show the existence of an extracellular biochemical cascade that converts cAMP into adenosine. The functional relevance of this extracellular signalling system may involve a feedback modulation of cellular response initiated by several G protein-coupled receptor ligands, amplifying cAMP influence to a paracrine mode, through its metabolite, adenosine. PMID:18157164

  3. Characterization of α2-adrenergic receptors in rat cerebral cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasseri, A.

    1987-01-01

    The properties of 3 H-RX 781094 binding sites and the receptors inhibiting norepinephrine (NE) release and cyclic AMP accumulation in rat cerebral cortex were compared. 3 H-RX 781094, a new α 2 -adrenergic receptor antagonist radioligand, labelled a homogeneous population of binding sites at 37 0 C with the pharmacological specificity expected of α 2 -adrenergic receptors. Gpp(NH)p and NaCl decreased the potencies of agonists at 3 H-RX 781094 binding sites 3-22 fold. Antagonists blocked the inhibition of potassium-evoked tritium release from cortical slices preloaded with 3 H-NE by exogenous NE with potencies similar to those observed in competition for specific 3 H-RX 781094 binding sites. EEDQ, an irreversible α 2 -adrenergic receptors and determine whether there was a receptor reserve for the inhibition of tritium release

  4. The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Chp Chemosensory System Regulates Intracellular cAMP Levels by Modulating Adenylate Cyclase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Nanette B.; Holliday, Phillip M.; Klem, Erich; Cann, Martin J.; Wolfgang, Matthew C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Multiple virulence systems in the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa are regulated by the second messenger signaling molecule adenosine 3’, 5’-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP). Production of cAMP by the putative adenylate cyclase enzyme CyaB represents a critical control point for virulence gene regulation. To identify regulators of CyaB, we screened a transposon insertion library for mutants with reduced intracellular cAMP. The majority of insertions resulting in reduced cAMP mapped to the Chp gene cluster encoding a putative chemotaxis-like chemosensory system. Further genetic analysis of the Chp system revealed that it has both positive and negative effects on intracellular cAMP and that it regulates cAMP levels by modulating CyaB activity. The Chp system was previously implicated in the production and function of type IV pili (TFP). Given that cAMP and the cAMP-dependent transcriptional regulator Vfr control TFP biogenesis gene expression, we explored the relationship between cAMP, the Chp system and TFP regulation. We discovered that the Chp system controls TFP production through modulation of cAMP while control of TFP-dependent twitching motility is cAMP-independent. Overall, our data define a novel function for a chemotaxis-like system in controlling cAMP production and establish a regulatory link between the Chp system, TFP and other cAMP-dependent virulence systems. PMID:20345659

  5. Further studies on the effect of adenosine cyclic monophosphate derivatives on cell proliferation in the jejunal crypts of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutton, P J; Barkla, D H

    1982-01-01

    1. Cell proliferation in the jejunal crypt epithelium of rat was measured using a stathmokinetic technique. 2. Sodium butyrate was found to promote jejunal crypt cell proliferation. 3. N6, O2'-Dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), N6-monobutyryl-cAMP and N6-monobutyryl-8-bromo-cAMP were found to inhibit cell proliferation when compared to sodium butyrate treated tissues. 4. 8-Chlorophenylthio-cAMP was found to inhibit cell division when compared to untreated animals. 5. O2'-Monobutyryl cAMP and 8-bromo-cAMP were not found to inhibit cell proliferation.

  6. Cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase II is necessary for macrophage M1 polarization and phagocytosis via toll-like receptor 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Wei-Ting; You, Huey-Ling; Li, Changgui; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Chang, Shun-Jen; Chen, Chung-Jen

    2015-05-01

    Cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase II (cGKII; PRKG2) phosphorylates a variety of biological targets and has been identified as a gout-susceptible gene. However, the regulatory role of cGKII in triggering gout disease has yet to be clarified. Thus, we plan to explore the specific function of cGKII in macrophages related to gout disease. By using cGKII gene knockdown method, we detected macrophage M1/M2 polarization, phagocytosis, and their responses to stimulation by monosodium urate (MSU). cGKII was highly expressed in M1 phenotype, but not in M2, and cGKII knockdown significantly inhibited macrophage M1 polarization by decreasing M1 chemokine markers (CXCL10 and CCL2) and downregulating phagocytosis function. We further identified that cGKII-associated phagocytosis was mediated by upregulating toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) expression, but not by TLR4. Mimicking gout condition by MSU treatments, we found that MSU alone induced cGKII and TLR2 expression with increased M1 polarization markers and phagocytosis activity. It means that cGKII knockdown significantly inhibited this MSU-induced cGKII-TLR2-phagocytosis axis. Our study showed that cGKII plays a key role in M1 polarization, especially in TLR2-mediated phagocytosis under MSU exposure. The findings provide evidence for the possible role of cGKII as an inflammation exciter in gout disease. Gout-susceptible gene cGKII is necessary for macrophage M1 polarization. cGKII regulates M1 phagocytosis function via TLR2. Monosodium urate treatments increase cGKII expression and related function. This study reveals the role of cGKII in enhancing gouty inflammatory responses.

  7. Cyclic AMP response element binding protein and brain-derived ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    learning tasks and memory (Bramham and Messaoudi 2005). Thus, BDNF is involved in structural remodeling, neuronal .... in hippocampal-dependent learning and memory (Tyler et al 2002; Mizuno and Giese 2005) may play a ..... neurons in the olfactory bulb; J. Neurosci. 25 10105–10118. Gould E and Tanapat P 1999 ...

  8. Non-Enzymatic Oligomerization of 3 ', 5 ' Cyclic AMP

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Costanzo, G.; Pino, S.; Timperio, A.M.; Šponer, Judit E.; Sponer, Jiri; Nováková, Olga; Šedo, O.; Zdráhal, Z.; Di Mauro, E.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 11 (2016), č. článku e0165723. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-12010S; GA ČR GBP206/12/G151 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : template-directed synthesis * nucleoside phosphorylation * montmorillonite catalysis * molecular-structure Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016

  9. Review Cyclic AMP response element binding protein and brain ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    Several types of adult-onset stressors, including physical and psychosocial stressors ... stress-induced atrophy with antidepressant therapy in animal models (Watanabe et ..... (Strauss et al 2005) and geriatric depression (Hwang et al. 2005).

  10. Prostaglandin E2 EP2 and EP4 receptor activation mediates cAMP-dependent hyperpolarization and exocytosis of renin in juxtaglomerular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ulla Glenert; Stubbe, Jane; Uhrenholt, Torben Rene

    2005-01-01

    /l), AE1-259-01 (1 nmol/l), EP4-selective agonist AE1-329 (1 nmol/l), and IP agonist iloprost (1 micromol/l) significantly increased C(m) mediated by PKA. The EP4 antagonist AE3-208 (10 nmol/l) blocked the effect of EP4 agonist but did not alter the response to PGE(2). Application of both EP4 antagonist....... The membrane potential hyperpolarized significantly after PGE(2), butaprost, AE1-329 and AE1-259 and outward current was augmented in a PKA-dependent fashion. PGE(2)-stimulated outward current, but not C(m) change, was abolished by the BK(Ca) channel inhibitor iberiotoxin (300 nmol/l). EP2 and EP4 m......RNA was detected in sampled JG cells, and the preglomerular and glomerular vasculature was immunopositive for EP4. Thus IP, EP2, and EP4 receptors are associated with JG cells, and their activation leads to rapid PKA-mediated exocytotic fusion and release of renin granules....

  11. Melatonin modulates rat myotube-acetylcholine receptors by inhibiting calmodulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida-Paula, Lidiana Duarte; Costa-Lotufo, Leticia V; Silva Ferreira, Zulma; Monteiro, Amanda Elisa G; Isoldi, Mauro Cesar; Godinho, Rosely O; Markus, Regina P

    2005-11-21

    Melatonin, the pineal gland hormone, modulates alpha-bungarotoxin sensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in sympathetic nerve terminals, cerebellum and chick retina imposing a diurnal variation in functional responses [Markus, R.P., Zago, W.M., Carneiro, R.C., 1996. Melatonin modulation of presynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the rat vas deferens. J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 279, 18-22; Markus, R.P., Santos, J.M., Zago, W., Reno, L.A., 2003. Melatonin nocturnal surge modulates nicotinic receptors and nicotine-induced [3HI] glutamate release in rat cerebellum slices. J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 305, 525-530; Sampaio, L.F.S., Hamassaki-Britto, D.E., Markus, R.P., 2005. Influence of melatonin on the development of functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in cultured chick retinal cells. Braz. J. Med. Biol. Res. 38, 603-613]. Here we show that in rat myotubes forskolin and melatonin reduced the number of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed in plasma membrane. In addition, these cells expressed melatonin MT1 receptors, which are known to be coupled to G(i)-protein. However, the pharmacological profile of melatonin analogs regarding the reduction in cyclic AMP accumulation and number of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors did not point to a mechanism mediated by activation of G(i)-protein coupled receptors. On the other hand, calmidazolium, a classical inhibitor of calmodulin, reduced in a similar manner both effects. Considering that one isoform of adenylyl cyclase present in rat myotubes is regulated by Ca2+/calmodulin, we propose that melatonin modulates the number of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors via reduction in cyclic AMP accumulation.

  12. Amtyr1: characterization of a gene from honeybee (Apis mellifera) brain encoding a functional tyramine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blenau, W; Balfanz, S; Baumann, A

    2000-03-01

    Biogenic amine receptors are involved in the regulation and modulation of various physiological and behavioral processes in both vertebrates and invertebrates. We have cloned a member of this gene family from the CNS of the honeybee, Apis mellifera. The deduced amino acid sequence is homologous to tyramine receptors cloned from Locusta migratoria and Drosophila melanogaster as well as to an octopamine receptor cloned from Heliothis virescens. Functional properties of the honeybee receptor were studied in stably transfected human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Tyramine reduced forskolin-induced cyclic AMP production in a dose-dependent manner with an EC50 of approximately 130 nM. A similar effect of tyramine was observed in membrane homogenates of honeybee brains. Octopamine also reduced cyclic AMP production in the transfected cell line but was both less potent (EC50 of approximately 3 microM) and less efficacious than tyramine. Receptor-encoding mRNA has a wide-spread distribution in the brain and subesophageal ganglion of the honeybee, suggesting that this tyramine receptor is involved in sensory signal processing as well as in higher-order brain functions.

  13. Adiponectin promotes hyaluronan synthesis along with increases in hyaluronan synthase 2 transcripts through an AMP-activated protein kinase/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α-dependent pathway in human dermal fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Takumi; Kobayashi-Hattori, Kazuo; Oishi, Yuichi

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Adiponectin promotes hyaluronan synthesis along with an increase in HAS2 transcripts. ► Adiponectin also increases the phosphorylation of AMPK. ► A pharmacological activator of AMPK increases mRNA levels of PPARα and HAS2. ► Adiponectin-induced HAS2 mRNA expression is blocked by a PPARα antagonist. ► Adiponectin promotes hyaluronan synthesis via an AMPK/PPARα-dependent pathway. -- Abstract: Although adipocytokines affect the functions of skin, little information is available on the effect of adiponectin on the skin. In this study, we investigated the effect of adiponectin on hyaluronan synthesis and its regulatory mechanisms in human dermal fibroblasts. Adiponectin promoted hyaluronan synthesis along with an increase in the mRNA levels of hyaluronan synthase 2 (HAS2), which plays a primary role in hyaluronan synthesis. Adiponectin also increased the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). A pharmacological activator of AMPK, 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1β-ribofuranoside (AICAR), increased mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α (PPARα), which enhances the expression of HAS2 mRNA. In addition, AICAR increased the mRNA levels of HAS2. Adiponectin-induced HAS2 mRNA expression was blocked by GW6471, a PPARα antagonist, in a concentration-dependent manner. These results show that adiponectin promotes hyaluronan synthesis along with increases in HAS2 transcripts through an AMPK/PPARα-dependent pathway in human dermal fibroblasts. Thus, our study suggests that adiponectin may be beneficial for retaining moisture in the skin, anti-inflammatory activity, and the treatment of a variety of cutaneous diseases.

  14. Cyclic multiverses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marosek, Konrad; Dąbrowski, Mariusz P.; Balcerzak, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Using the idea of regularization of singularities due to the variability of the fundamental constants in cosmology we study the cyclic universe models. We find two models of oscillating and non-singular mass density and pressure (`non-singular' bounce) regularized by varying gravitational constant G despite the scale factor evolution is oscillating and having sharp turning points (`singular' bounce). Both violating (big-bang) and non-violating (phantom) null energy condition models appear. Then, we extend this idea on to the multiverse containing cyclic individual universes with either growing or decreasing entropy though leaving the net entropy constant. In order to get an insight into the key idea, we consider the doubleverse with the same geometrical evolution of the two `parallel' universes with their physical evolution [physical coupling constants c(t) and G(t)] being different. An interesting point is that there is a possibility to exchange the universes at the point of maximum expansion - the fact which was already noticed in quantum cosmology. Similar scenario is also possible within the framework of Brans-Dicke theory where varying G(t) is replaced by the dynamical Brans-Dicke field φ(t) though these theories are slightly different.

  15. AMP-18 Targets p21 to Maintain Epithelial Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peili; Li, Yan Chun; Toback, F Gary

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulated homeostasis of epithelial cells resulting in disruption of mucosal barrier function is an important pathogenic mechanism in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). We have characterized a novel gastric protein, Antrum Mucosal Protein (AMP)-18, that has pleiotropic properties; it is mitogenic, anti-apoptotic and can stimulate formation of tight junctions. A 21-mer synthetic peptide derived from AMP-18 exhibits the same biological functions as the full-length protein and is an effective therapeutic agent in mouse models of IBD. In this study we set out to characterize therapeutic mechanisms and identify molecular targets by which AMP-18 maintains and restores disrupted epithelial homeostasis in cultured intestinal epithelial cells and a mouse model of IBD. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, a pro-inflammatory cytokine known to mediate gastrointestinal (GI) mucosal injury in IBD, was used to induce intestinal epithelial cell injury, and study the effects of AMP-18 on apoptosis and the cell cycle. An apoptosis array used to search for targets of AMP-18 in cells exposed to TNF-α identified the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 WAF1/CIP1. Treatment with AMP-18 blunted increases in p21 expression and apoptosis, while reversing disturbed cell cycle kinetics induced by TNF-α. AMP-18 appears to act through PI3K/AKT pathways to increase p21 phosphorylation, thereby reducing its nuclear accumulation to overcome the antiproliferative effects of TNF-α. In vitamin D receptor-deficient mice with TNBS-induced IBD, the observed increase in p21 expression in colonic epithelial cells was suppressed by treatment with AMP peptide. The results indicate that AMP-18 can maintain and/or restore the homeostatic balance between proliferation and apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells to protect and repair mucosal barrier homeostasis and function, suggesting a therapeutic role in IBD.

  16. AMP-18 Targets p21 to Maintain Epithelial Homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peili Chen

    Full Text Available Dysregulated homeostasis of epithelial cells resulting in disruption of mucosal barrier function is an important pathogenic mechanism in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD. We have characterized a novel gastric protein, Antrum Mucosal Protein (AMP-18, that has pleiotropic properties; it is mitogenic, anti-apoptotic and can stimulate formation of tight junctions. A 21-mer synthetic peptide derived from AMP-18 exhibits the same biological functions as the full-length protein and is an effective therapeutic agent in mouse models of IBD. In this study we set out to characterize therapeutic mechanisms and identify molecular targets by which AMP-18 maintains and restores disrupted epithelial homeostasis in cultured intestinal epithelial cells and a mouse model of IBD. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, a pro-inflammatory cytokine known to mediate gastrointestinal (GI mucosal injury in IBD, was used to induce intestinal epithelial cell injury, and study the effects of AMP-18 on apoptosis and the cell cycle. An apoptosis array used to search for targets of AMP-18 in cells exposed to TNF-α identified the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21 WAF1/CIP1. Treatment with AMP-18 blunted increases in p21 expression and apoptosis, while reversing disturbed cell cycle kinetics induced by TNF-α. AMP-18 appears to act through PI3K/AKT pathways to increase p21 phosphorylation, thereby reducing its nuclear accumulation to overcome the antiproliferative effects of TNF-α. In vitamin D receptor-deficient mice with TNBS-induced IBD, the observed increase in p21 expression in colonic epithelial cells was suppressed by treatment with AMP peptide. The results indicate that AMP-18 can maintain and/or restore the homeostatic balance between proliferation and apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells to protect and repair mucosal barrier homeostasis and function, suggesting a therapeutic role in IBD.

  17. Inhibition of cAMP-Dependent PKA Activates β2-Adrenergic Receptor Stimulation of Cytosolic Phospholipase A2 via Raf-1/MEK/ERK and IP3-Dependent Ca2+ Signaling in Atrial Myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabbidi, M R; Ji, X; Maxwell, J T; Mignery, G A; Samarel, A M; Lipsius, S L

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported in atrial myocytes that inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) by laminin (LMN)-integrin signaling activates β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) stimulation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2). The present study sought to determine the signaling mechanisms by which inhibition of PKA activates β2-AR stimulation of cPLA2. We therefore determined the effects of zinterol (0.1 μM; zint-β2-AR) to stimulate ICa,L in atrial myocytes in the absence (+PKA) and presence (-PKA) of the PKA inhibitor (1 μM) KT5720 and compared these results with atrial myocytes attached to laminin (+LMN). Inhibition of Raf-1 (10 μM GW5074), phospholipase C (PLC; 0.5 μM edelfosine), PKC (4 μM chelerythrine) or IP3 receptor (IP3R) signaling (2 μM 2-APB) significantly inhibited zint-β2-AR stimulation of ICa,L in-PKA but not +PKA myocytes. Western blots showed that zint-β2-AR stimulation increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation in-PKA compared to +PKA myocytes. Adenoviral (Adv) expression of dominant negative (dn) -PKCα, dn-Raf-1 or an IP3 affinity trap, each inhibited zint-β2-AR stimulation of ICa,L in + LMN myocytes compared to control +LMN myocytes infected with Adv-βgal. In +LMN myocytes, zint-β2-AR stimulation of ICa,L was enhanced by adenoviral overexpression of wild-type cPLA2 and inhibited by double dn-cPLA2S505A/S515A mutant compared to control +LMN myocytes infected with Adv-βgal. In-PKA myocytes depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores by 5 μM thapsigargin failed to inhibit zint-β2-AR stimulation of ICa,L via cPLA2. However, disruption of caveolae formation by 10 mM methyl-β-cyclodextrin inhibited zint-β2-AR stimulation of ICa,L in-PKA myocytes significantly more than in +PKA myocytes. We conclude that inhibition of PKA removes inhibition of Raf-1 and thereby allows β2-AR stimulation to act via PKCα/Raf-1/MEK/ERK1/2 and IP3-mediated Ca2+ signaling to stimulate cPLA2 signaling within caveolae. These findings may be relevant to the remodeling of

  18. Adrenergic receptors are a fallible index of adrenergic denervation hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dejgaard, Anders; Liggett, S B; Christensen, N J

    1991-01-01

    In view of evidence that neither interindividual nor induced intra-individual variations of adrenergic receptor status are related to metabolic or haemodynamic sensitivity to adrenaline in vivo, we took an alternative approach to assessment of the relevance of adrenergic receptor measurement...... by measuring these in a group of subjects with well-documented adrenergic denervation hypersensitivity, patients with diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Mononuclear leukocyte beta 2-adrenergic receptor densities (and binding affinities), measured with 125I-labelled pindolol, and isoproterenol-stimulated cyclic AMP...... accumulation, in samples from patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) with diabetic autonomic neuropathy (n = 8), were no different from those in samples from patients with IDDM without neuropathy (n = 8), or from non-diabetic subjects (n = 8). In addition, platelet alpha 2-adrenergic receptor...

  19. Molecular, pharmacological, and signaling properties of octopamine receptors from honeybee (Apis mellifera) brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balfanz, Sabine; Jordan, Nadine; Langenstück, Teresa; Breuer, Johanna; Bergmeier, Vera; Baumann, Arnd

    2014-04-01

    G protein-coupled receptors are important regulators of cellular signaling processes. Within the large family of rhodopsin-like receptors, those binding to biogenic amines form a discrete subgroup. Activation of biogenic amine receptors leads to transient changes of intracellular Ca²⁺-([Ca²⁺](i)) or 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate ([cAMP](i)) concentrations. Both second messengers modulate cellular signaling processes and thereby contribute to long-lasting behavioral effects in an organism. In vivo pharmacology has helped to reveal the functional effects of different biogenic amines in honeybees. The phenolamine octopamine is an important modulator of behavior. Binding of octopamine to its receptors causes elevation of [Ca²⁺](i) or [cAMP](i). To date, only one honeybee octopamine receptor that induces Ca²⁺ signals has been molecularly and pharmacologically characterized. Here, we examined the pharmacological properties of four additional honeybee octopamine receptors. When heterologously expressed, all receptors induced cAMP production after binding to octopamine with EC₅₀(s) in the nanomolar range. Receptor activity was most efficiently blocked by mianserin, a substance with antidepressant activity in vertebrates. The rank order of inhibitory potency for potential receptor antagonists was very similar on all four honeybee receptors with mianserin > cyproheptadine > metoclopramide > chlorpromazine > phentolamine. The subroot of octopamine receptors activating adenylyl cyclases is the largest that has so far been characterized in arthropods, and it should now be possible to unravel the contribution of individual receptors to the physiology and behavior of honeybees. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  20. Design of cAMP-CRP-activated promoters in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin-Hansen, P; Holst, B; Søgaard-Andersen, L

    1991-01-01

    We have studied the deoP2 promoter of Escherichia coli to define features that are required for optimal activation by the complex of adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cAMP) and the cAMP receptor protein (CRP). Systematic mutagenesis of deoP2 shows that the distance between the CRP site and the -10...

  1. Role of AC-cAMP-PKA Cascade in Antidepressant Action of Electroacupuncture Treatment in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-hua Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenylyl cyclase (AC-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP-cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA cascade is considered to be associated with the pathogenesis and treatment of depression. The present study was conducted to explore the role of the cAMP cascade in antidepressant action of electroacupuncture (EA treatment for chronic mild stress (CMS-induced depression model rats. The results showed that EA improved significantly behavior symptoms in depression and dysfunction of AC-cAMP-PKA signal transduction pathway induced by CMS, which was as effective as fluoxetine. Moreover, the antidepressant effects of EA rather than Fluoxetine were completely abolished by H89, a specific PKA inhibitor. Consequently, EA has a significant antidepressant treatment in CMS-induced depression model rats, and AC-cAMP-PKA signal transduction pathway is crucial for it.

  2. The participation of elevated levels of cyclic GMP in the recovery from radiation-induced mitotic delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, J.W.; Oleinick, N.L.

    1984-01-01

    The levels of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP have been measured in Physarum plasmodia before and after treatment with gamma-radiation, 2 mM caffeine, or combinations of the two agents compared to the length of the radiation-induced mitotic delay. Caffeine alone produces a rapid transient elevation of cyclic AMP and a slower delayed elevation of cyclic GMP. Irradiation elicits an immediate transient increase in cyclic AMP and a later cyclic GMP increase which accompanies or precedes the delayed mitosis. A composite pattern is produced by combinations of radiation and caffeine, a distinctive feature of which is an elevated level of cyclic GMP near the time of the radiation-delayed and caffeine-promoted mitosis. With pretreatment by caffeine, the least radiation-induced mitotic delay occurs when plasmodia are irradiated during the caffeine-elicited increase in cyclic GMP. The plasmodium becomes refractory to the reduction of mitotic delay by caffeine at approximately the time it becomes refractory to the further elevation of cyclic GMP by caffeine. The data support a role for cyclic AMP in the onset of and for cyclic GMP in the recovery from mitotic delay induced by ionizing radiation. (author)

  3. AMP affects intracellular Ca2+ signaling, migration, cytokine secretion and T cell priming capacity of dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Panther

    Full Text Available The nucleotide adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP can be released by various cell types and has been shown to elicit different cellular responses. In the extracellular space AMP is dephosphorylated to the nucleoside adenosine which can then bind to adenosine receptors. However, it has been shown that AMP can also activate A(1 and A(2a receptors directly. Here we show that AMP is a potent modulator of mouse and human dendritic cell (DC function. AMP increased intracellular Ca(2+ concentration in a time and dose dependent manner. Furthermore, AMP stimulated actin-polymerization in human DCs and induced migration of immature human and bone marrow derived mouse DCs, both via direct activation of A(1 receptors. AMP strongly inhibited secretion of TNF-α and IL-12p70, while it enhanced production of IL-10 both via activation of A(2a receptors. Consequently, DCs matured in the presence of AMP and co-cultivated with naive CD4(+CD45RA(+ T cells inhibited IFN-γ production whereas secretion of IL-5 and IL-13 was up-regulated. An enhancement of Th2-driven immune response could also be observed when OVA-pulsed murine DCs were pretreated with AMP prior to co-culture with OVA-transgenic naïve OTII T cells. An effect due to the enzymatic degradation of AMP to adenosine could be ruled out, as AMP still elicited migration and changes in cytokine secretion in bone-marrow derived DCs generated from CD73-deficient animals and in human DCs pretreated with the ecto-nucleotidase inhibitor 5'-(alpha,beta-methylene diphosphate (APCP. Finally, the influence of contaminating adenosine could be excluded, as AMP admixed with adenosine desaminase (ADA was still able to influence DC function. In summary our data show that AMP when present during maturation is a potent regulator of dendritic cell function and point out the role for AMP in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders.

  4. AMP (Activity Manipulation Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engle, W.W. Jr.

    1976-03-01

    AMP is a FORTRAN IV program written to handle energy-group structured activity factors such as sources, conversion factors, and response functions, as used by ANISN, DOT III, and other nuclear reactor and shielding codes. Activities may be retrieved from ANISN-type cross-section and activity sets found on cards and tapes, and from tabular-type sets on cards. They may be altered by change of group structure, multiplication by a constant, or multiplication by delta E (the group-energy interval), and then output to ANISN-type cards or tape and tabular-type cards. A full edit of input and output activities is always printed by group and activity number

  5. cAMP/PKA signalling reinforces the LATS–YAP pathway to fully suppress YAP in response to actin cytoskeletal changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minchul; Kim, Miju; Lee, Seunghee; Kuninaka, Shinji; Saya, Hideyuki; Lee, Ho; Lee, Sookyung; Lim, Dae-Sik

    2013-01-01

    Actin cytoskeletal damage induces inactivation of the oncoprotein YAP (Yes-associated protein). It is known that the serine/threonine kinase LATS (large tumour suppressor) inactivates YAP by phosphorylating its Ser127 and Ser381 residues. However, the events downstream of actin cytoskeletal changes that are involved in the regulation of the LATS–YAP pathway and the mechanism by which LATS differentially phosphorylates YAP on Ser127 and Ser381 in vivo have remained elusive. Here, we show that cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) phosphorylates LATS and thereby enhances its activity sufficiently to phosphorylate YAP on Ser381. We also found that PKA activity is involved in all contexts previously reported to trigger the LATS–YAP pathway, including actin cytoskeletal damage, G-protein-coupled receptor activation, and engagement of the Hippo pathway. Inhibition of PKA and overexpression of YAP cooperate to transform normal cells and amplify neural progenitor pools in developing chick embryos. We also implicate neurofibromin 2 as an AKAP (A-kinase-anchoring protein) scaffold protein that facilitates the function of the cAMP/PKA–LATS–YAP pathway. Our study thus incorporates PKA as novel component of the Hippo pathway. PMID:23644383

  6. Functional characteristics of the naked mole rat μ-opioid receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Busch-Dienstfertig

    Full Text Available While humans and most animals respond to µ-opioid receptor (MOR agonists with analgesia and decreased aggression, in the naked mole rat (NMR opioids induce hyperalgesia and severe aggression. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the human mu-opioid receptor gene (OPRM1 can underlie altered behavioral responses to opioids. Therefore, we hypothesized that the primary structure of the NMR MOR may differ from other species. Sequencing of the NMR oprm1 revealed strong homology to other mammals, but exposed three unique amino acids that might affect receptor-ligand interactions. The NMR and rat oprm1 sequences were cloned into mammalian expression vectors and transfected into HEK293 cells. Radioligand binding and 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP enzyme immunoassays were used to compare opioid binding and opioid-mediated cAMP inhibition. At normalized opioid receptor protein levels we detected significantly lower [3H]DAMGO binding to NMR compared to rat MOR, but no significant difference in DAMGO-induced cAMP inhibition. Strong DAMGO-induced MOR internalization was detectable using radioligand binding and confocal imaging in HEK293 cells expressing rat or NMR receptor, while morphine showed weak or no effects. In summary, we found minor functional differences between rat and NMR MOR suggesting that other differences e.g. in anatomical distribution of MOR underlie the NMR's extreme reaction to opioids.

  7. The role of NMDA receptor and nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of dextromethorphan in mice forced swimming test and tail suspension test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhaee, Ehsan; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Yousefi, Farbod; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Akbarian, Reyhaneh; Chamanara, Mohsen; Zolfaghari, Samira; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2017-01-01

    Depression is a devastating disorder which has a high impact on the wellbeing of overall society. As such, need for innovative therapeutic agents are always there. Most of the researchers focused on N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor to explore the antidepressant like activity of new therapeutic agents. Dextromethorphan is a cough suppressant agent with potential antidepressant activity reported in mouse force swimming test. Considering N-methyl-d-aspartate as a forefront in exploring antidepressant agents, here we focused to unpin the antidepressant mechanism of dextromethorphan targeting N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor induced nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling. Dextromethorphan administered at a dose of 10 and 30mg/kg i.p significantly reduced the immobility time. Interestingly, this effect of drug (30mg/kg) was inhibited when the animals were pretreated either with N-methyl-d-aspartate (75mg/kg), or l-arginine (750mg/kg) as a nitric oxide precursor and/or sildenafil (5mg/kg) as a phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor. However, the antidepressant effect of Dextromethorphan subeffective dose (3mg/kg) was augmented when the animals were administered with either L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester (10mg/kg) non-specific nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, 7-Nitroindazole (30mg/kg) specific neural nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, MK-801 (0.05mg/kg) an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist but not aminoguanidine (50mg/kg) which is specific inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor as compared to the drugs when administered alone. No remarkable effect on locomotor activity was observed during open field test when the drugs were administered at the above mentioned doses. Therefore, it is evident that the antidepressant like effect of Dextromethorphan is owed due to its inhibitory effect on N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor and NO- Cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Involvement of cyclic nucleotides in locust flight muscle metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Worm, R.A.A.

    1980-01-01

    1. Flight had no significant effect on the levels of c-AMP of c-GMP in the flight muscles of Locusta migratoria. 2. Injections of 0.01 or 0.1 corpus cardiacum equivalents into the abdominal cavity did not elicit any effect on cyclic nucleotide levels either. 3. Injection of A23187 resulted in

  9. Distinctive G Protein-Dependent Signaling by Protease-Activated Receptor 2 (PAR2 in Smooth Muscle: Feedback Inhibition of RhoA by cAMP-Independent PKA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wimolpak Sriwai

    Full Text Available We examined expression of protease-activated receptors 2 (PAR2 and characterized their signaling pathways in rabbit gastric muscle cells. The PAR2 activating peptide SLIGRL (PAR2-AP stimulated Gq, G13, Gi1, PI hydrolysis, and Rho kinase activity, and inhibited cAMP formation. Stimulation of PI hydrolysis was partly inhibited in cells expressing PAR2 siRNA, Gaq or Gai minigene and in cells treated with pertussis toxin, and augmented by expression of dominant negative regulator of G protein signaling (RGS4(N88S. Stimulation of Rho kinase activity was abolished by PAR-2 or Ga13 siRNA, and by Ga13 minigene. PAR2-AP induced a biphasic contraction; initial contraction was selectively blocked by the inhibitor of PI hydrolysis (U73122 or MLC kinase (ML-9, whereas sustained contraction was selectively blocked by the Rho kinase inhibitor (Y27632. PAR2-AP induced phosphorylation of MLC20, MYPT1 but not CPI-17. PAR2-AP also caused a decrease in the association of NF-kB and PKA catalytic subunit: the effect of PAR2-AP was blocked by PAR2 siRNA or phosphorylation-deficient RhoA (RhoA(S188A. PAR2-AP-induced degradation of IkBa and activation of NF-kB were abolished by the blockade of RhoA activity by Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme suggesting RhoA-dependent activation of NF-kB. PAR2-AP-stimulated Rho kinase activity was significantly augmented by the inhibitors of PKA (myristoylated PKI, IKK2 (IKKIV or NF-kB (MG132, and in cells expressing dominant negative mutants of IKK (IKK(K44A, IkBa (IkBa (S32A/S36A or RhoA(S188A, suggesting feedback inhibition of Rho kinase activity via PKA derived from NF-kB pathway. PAR2-AP induced phosphorylation of RhoA and the phosphorylation was attenuated in cells expressing phosphorylation-deficient RhoA(S188A. Our results identified signaling pathways activated by PAR2 to mediate smooth muscle contraction and a novel pathway for feedback inhibition of PAR2-stimulated RhoA. The pathway involves activation of the NF-kB to

  10. Dehydroeburicoic Acid from Antrodia camphorata Prevents the Diabetic and Dyslipidemic State via Modulation of Glucose Transporter 4, Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor α Expression and AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphorylation in High-Fat-Fed Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueh-Hsiung Kuo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the potential effects of dehydroeburicoic acid (TT, a triterpenoid compound from Antrodia camphorata, in vitro and examined the effects and mechanisms of TT on glucose and lipid homeostasis in high-fat-diet (HFD-fed mice. The in vitro study examined the effects of a MeOH crude extract (CruE of A. camphorata and Antcin K (AnK; the main constituent of fruiting body of this mushroom on membrane glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4 and phospho-Akt in C2C12 myoblasts cells. The in vitro study demonstrated that treatment with CruE, AnK and TT increased the membrane levels of glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4 and phospho-Akt at different concentrations. The animal experiments were performed for 12 weeks. Diabetic mice were randomly divided into six groups after 8 weeks of HFD-induction and treated with daily oral gavage doses of TT (at three dose levels, fenofibrate (Feno (at 0.25 g/kg body weight, metformin (Metf (at 0.3 g/kg body weight or vehicle for another 4 weeks while on an HFD diet. HFD-fed mice exhibited increased blood glucose levels. TT treatment dramatically lowered blood glucose levels by 34.2%~43.4%, which was comparable to the antidiabetic agent-Metf (36.5%. TT-treated mice reduced the HFD-induced hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hyperinsulinemia, hyperleptinemia, and hypercholesterolemia. Membrane levels of GLUT4 were significantly higher in CruE-treated groups in vitro. Skeletal muscle membrane levels of GLUT4 were significantly higher in TT-treated mice. These groups of mice also displayed lower mRNA levels of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6 Pase, an inhibitor of hepatic glucose production. The combination of these agents produced a net hypoglycemic effect in TT-treated mice. TT treatment enhanced the expressions of hepatic and skeletal muscle AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK phosphorylation in mice. TT-treated mice exhibited enhanced expression of hepatic fatty acid oxidation enzymes, including peroxisome proliferator

  11. Targeting brain tumor cAMP: the case for sex-specific therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Warrington

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A relationship between cyclic adenosine 3’, 5’-monophosphate (cAMP levels and brain tumor biology has been evident for nearly as long as cAMP and its synthetase, adenylate cyclase (ADCY have been known. The importance of the pathway in brain tumorigenesis has been demonstrated in vitro and in multiple animal models. Recently, we provided human validation for a cooperating oncogenic role for cAMP in brain tumorigenesis when we found that SNPs in ADCY8 were correlated with glioma (brain tumor risk in individuals with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1. Together, these studies provide a strong rationale for targeting cAMP in brain tumor therapy. However, the cAMP pathway is well known to be sexually dimorphic, and SNPs in ADCY8 affected glioma risk in a sex-specific fashion, elevating the risk for females while protecting males. The cAMP pathway can be targeted at multiple levels in the regulation of its synthesis and degradation. Sex differences in response to drugs that target cAMP regulators indicate that successful targeting of the cAMP pathway for brain tumor patients is likely to require matching specific mechanisms of drug action with patient sex.

  12. Quantitative Proteomics Analysis of the cAMP/Protein Kinase A Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    To define the proteins whose expression is regulated by cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA), we used a quantitative proteomics approach in studies of wild-type (WT) and kin- (PKA-null) S49 murine T lymphoma cells. We also compared the impact of endogenous increases in the level of cAMP [by forskolin (Fsk) and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX)] or by a cAMP analogue (8-CPT-cAMP). We identified 1056 proteins in WT and kin- S49 cells and found that 8-CPT-cAMP and Fsk with IBMX produced differences in protein expression. WT S49 cells had a correlation coefficient of 0.41 between DNA microarray data and the proteomics analysis in cells incubated with 8-CPT-cAMP for 24 h and a correlation coefficient of 0.42 between the DNA microarray data obtained at 6 h and the changes in protein expression after incubation with 8-CPT-cAMP for 24 h. Glutathione reductase (Gsr) had a higher level of basal expression in kin- S49 cells than in WT cells. Consistent with this finding, kin- cells are less sensitive to cell killing and generation of malondialdehyde than are WT cells incubated with H2O2. Cyclic AMP acting via PKA thus has a broad impact on protein expression in mammalian cells, including in the regulation of Gsr and oxidative stress. PMID:23110364

  13. [Accumulation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate in the ovary of the eel (Anguilla anguilla L.) in vitro under the effect of carp gonadotropin or ovine lutropin: kinetics and thermodependence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, C; Marchelidon, J; Fontaine-Bertrand, E; Fontaine, Y A

    1986-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) in pieces of eel ovary was greatly increased in vitro by the gonadotropin (cGTH) of carp, another teleost fish; after one hour at 20 degrees C, maximal stimulation = 31.7 and E.D. 50 = 0.08 micrograms/ml. Ovine lutropin (oLH) had less effect (maximal stimulation: 2.35; E.D. 50: 1.42 micrograms/ml); its action suggested that it involved a subfraction (oLH/cGTH RAc) of the receptor-adenylate cyclase (RAc) systems which mediate the action of cGTH. Another difference was the percentage of total cAMP accumulated under hormonal stimulation and released into the incubation medium; this percentage was much higher with oLH than with cGTH (47 vs 8% after one hour at 20 degrees C). This result might be explained by a localization of oLH/cGTH RAc in cells (theca ?) situated on the outside of the follicles and/or by a relative lack of cAMP binding proteins in the case of cAMP produced by oLH/cGTH RAc. Kinetic and thermodependence studies also disclosed hormone-dependent differences; at 5 degrees C, cAMP concentration was maximal after 40 min with oLH, whereas it was still increasing after 3 h with cGTH. Differences in the properties of phosphodiesterases and/or in the clearance rate of hormone-receptor (HR) complexes could explain these results. The set of RAc systems in eel ovary recognizing fish gonadotropin would then be heterogeneous; some of them would be endowed with original properties concerning receptor specificity and cAMP diffusion as well as associated phosphodiesterase activity and/or HR metabolism. We suggest that at a stage of evolution when a single sensu stricto GTH is present (instead of two in tetrapods), "isoreceptors", differing in specificity and in their fate after hormone binding, could be an important element in the fine regulation of gonadal functions.

  14. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent phosphorylation of mammalian mitochondrial proteins: enzyme and substrate characterization and functional role

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dobrová, Zuzana; Sardanelli, A. M.; Speranza, F.; Scacco, S.; Signorile, A.; Lorusso, V.; Papa, S.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 40, - (2001), s. 13941-13947 ISSN 0006-2960 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : cAMP * cyclic adenosine monophosphate Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.114, year: 2001

  15. Recent Advances in the Development of Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs): Attempts for Sustainable Medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokel, Anne; Torok, Marianna

    2018-01-17

    Since the first isolation of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) they have attracted extensive interest in medicinal chemistry. However, only a few AMP-based drugs are currently available on the market. Despite their effectiveness, biodegradability, and versatile mode of action that is less likely to induce resistance compared to conventional antibiotics, AMPs suffer from major issues that need to be addressed to broaden their use. Notably, AMPs can lack selectivity leading to side effects and cytotoxicity, and also exhibit in vivo instability. Several strategies are being actively considered to overcome the limitations that restrain the success of AMPs. In the current work, recent strategies reported for improving AMPs in the context of drug design and delivery were surveyed, and also their possible impact on patients and the environment was assessed. As a major advantage AMPs possess an easily tunable skeleton offering opportunities to improve their properties. Strategic structural modifications and the beneficial properties of cyclic or branched AMPs in term of stability have been reported. The conjugation of AMPs with nanoparticles has also been explored to increase their in vivo stability. Other techniques such as the coupling of AMPs with specific antibodies aim to increase the selectivity of the potential drug towards the target. These strategies were evaluated for their effect on the environment highlighting green technologies. Although further research is needed taking into account both environmental and human health consequences of novel AMPs several of these compounds are promising drug candidates for use in sustainable medicine. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Sleutelmag en amp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Rossouw

    1985-06-01

    Full Text Available As die Heidelbergse Kategismus (Sondag 31 handel oor die sleutels van die Koninkryk, dan word die betrokkenheid van die ampte slegs per implikasie veronderstel. Meer eksplisiet word die amp en sleutelmag in die Nederlandse Geloofsbelydenis gekoppel; “ons glo dat hierdie ware kerk ooreenkomstig die geestelike bestuurswyse wat ons Here ons in sy Woord geleer het, geregeer moet word... hulle (moet sorg dra dat die ware godsdiens onderhou (word, die ware leer orals versprei, die oortreders op geestelike wyse vermaan en in toom gehou (word... (N.G.B. art. 30 en: “Ons glo verder dat die regeerders van die kerk, al is dit nuttig en goed om onder mekaar ’n bepaalde orde tot instandhouding van die liggaam van die kerk in te stel en te handhaaf, tog noukeurig moet oppas om nie af te wyk van wat Christus, ons enigste Meester, vir ons ingestel het nie... Ons aanvaar derhalwe slegs wat kan dien om eendrag en eenheid te bewaar en te bevorder, en om alles in gehoorsaamheid van God te onderhou. Daarvoor is nodig die ban en alles wat daarmee saamhang, toegepas ooreenkomstig die Woord van God” (N.G.B. art. 32.

  17. Am5-HT7: molecular and pharmacological characterization of the first serotonin receptor of the honeybee (Apis mellifera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlenstedt, Jana; Balfanz, Sabine; Baumann, Arnd; Blenau, Wolfgang

    2006-09-01

    The biogenic amine serotonin (5-HT) plays a key role in the regulation and modulation of many physiological and behavioural processes in both vertebrates and invertebrates. These functions are mediated through the binding of serotonin to its receptors, of which 13 subtypes have been characterized in vertebrates. We have isolated a cDNA from the honeybee Apis mellifera (Am5-ht7) sharing high similarity to members of the 5-HT(7) receptor family. Expression of the Am5-HT(7) receptor in HEK293 cells results in an increase in basal cAMP levels, suggesting that Am5-HT(7) is expressed as a constitutively active receptor. Serotonin application to Am5-ht7-transfected cells elevates cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) levels in a dose-dependent manner (EC(50) = 1.1-1.8 nm). The Am5-HT(7) receptor is also activated by 5-carboxamidotryptamine, whereas methiothepin acts as an inverse agonist. Receptor expression has been investigated by RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, and western blotting experiments. Receptor mRNA is expressed in the perikarya of various brain neuropils, including intrinsic mushroom body neurons, and in peripheral organs. This study marks the first comprehensive characterization of a serotonin receptor in the honeybee and should facilitate further analysis of the role(s) of the receptor in mediating the various central and peripheral effects of 5-HT.

  18. Sulpiride and the role of dopaminergic receptor blockade in the antipsychotic activity of neuroleptics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Memo, M; Battaini, F; Spano, P F; Trabucchi, M [University of Brescia, (Italy). Dept. of Pharmacology

    1981-01-01

    It is now generally recognized that dopamine receptors excist in the CNS as different subtypes: D/sub 1/ receptors, associated with adenylyl cyclase activity, and D/sub 2/ receptor, uncoupled to a cyclic AMP generating system. In order to understand the role of D/sub 1/ and D/sub 2/ receptors in the antipsychotic action of neuroleptics, we have performed subchronic treatment with haloperidol, a drug which acts on D/sub 1/ receptors, and sulpiride, a selective antagonist to D/sub 2/ receptors. Long-term treatment with haloperidol does not induce significant supersensitivity of the D/sub 2/ receptors. In fact under these conditions /sup 3/H-(-)-sulpiride binding, which is a marker of D/sub 2/ receptor function, does not increase in rat striatum, while the long-term administration of sulpiride, itself produces supersensitivity of D/sub 2/ receptors. Moreover, sulpiride does not induce supersensitivity of the D/sub 1/ receptors, characterized by /sup 3/H-spiroperidol binding. These data suggest that both types of dopamine receptors may be involved in the clinical antipsychotic effects of neuroleptics. Unilateral leison of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway produces an increase of striatal dopaminergic receptors, measured either by /sup 3/H-spiroperidol and /sup 3/H-(-)-sulpiride binding. These findings suggest that D/sub 1/ and D/sub 2/ receptors are present in postsynaptic membranes while it is still not known whether they exist in the same cellular elements.

  19. Signaling properties and pharmacological analysis of two sulfakinin receptors from the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Zels

    Full Text Available Sulfakinin is an insect neuropeptide that constitutes an important component of the complex network of hormonal and neural factors that regulate feeding and digestion. The key modulating functions of sulfakinin are mediated by binding and signaling via G-protein coupled receptors. Although a substantial amount of functional data have already been reported on sulfakinins in different insect species, only little information is known regarding the properties of their respective receptors. In this study, we report on the molecular cloning, functional expression and characterization of two sulfakinin receptors in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Both receptor open reading frames show extensive sequence similarity with annotated sulfakinin receptors from other insects. Comparison of the sulfakinin receptor sequences with homologous vertebrate cholecystokinin receptors reveals crucial conserved regions for ligand binding and receptor activation. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR shows that transcripts of both receptors are primarily expressed in the central nervous system of the beetle. Pharmacological characterization using 29 different peptide ligands clarified the essential requirements for efficient activation of these sulfakinin receptors. Analysis of the signaling pathway in multiple cell lines disclosed that the sulfakinin receptors of T. castaneum can stimulate both the Ca²⁺ and cyclic AMP second messenger pathways. This in depth characterization of two insect sulfakinin receptors may provide useful leads for the further development of receptor ligands with a potential applicability in pest control and crop protection.

  20. Signaling properties and pharmacological analysis of two sulfakinin receptors from the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zels, Sven; Verlinden, Heleen; Dillen, Senne; Vleugels, Rut; Nachman, Ronald J; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    Sulfakinin is an insect neuropeptide that constitutes an important component of the complex network of hormonal and neural factors that regulate feeding and digestion. The key modulating functions of sulfakinin are mediated by binding and signaling via G-protein coupled receptors. Although a substantial amount of functional data have already been reported on sulfakinins in different insect species, only little information is known regarding the properties of their respective receptors. In this study, we report on the molecular cloning, functional expression and characterization of two sulfakinin receptors in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum. Both receptor open reading frames show extensive sequence similarity with annotated sulfakinin receptors from other insects. Comparison of the sulfakinin receptor sequences with homologous vertebrate cholecystokinin receptors reveals crucial conserved regions for ligand binding and receptor activation. Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR shows that transcripts of both receptors are primarily expressed in the central nervous system of the beetle. Pharmacological characterization using 29 different peptide ligands clarified the essential requirements for efficient activation of these sulfakinin receptors. Analysis of the signaling pathway in multiple cell lines disclosed that the sulfakinin receptors of T. castaneum can stimulate both the Ca²⁺ and cyclic AMP second messenger pathways. This in depth characterization of two insect sulfakinin receptors may provide useful leads for the further development of receptor ligands with a potential applicability in pest control and crop protection.

  1. Decoding spatial and temporal features of neuronal cAMP/PKA signaling with FRET biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Liliana R V; Guiot, Elvire; Polito, Marina; Paupardin-Tritsch, Daniéle; Vincent, Pierre

    2014-02-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and the cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) regulate a plethora of cellular functions in virtually all eukaryotic cells. In neurons, the cAMP/PKA signaling cascade controls a number of biological properties such as axonal growth, pathfinding, efficacy of synaptic transmission, regulation of excitability, or long term changes. Genetically encoded optical biosensors for cAMP or PKA are considerably improving our understanding of these processes by providing a real-time measurement in living neurons. In this review, we describe the recent progress made in the creation of biosensors for cAMP or PKA activity. These biosensors revealed profound differences in the amplitude of the cAMP signal evoked by neuromodulators between various neuronal preparations. These responses can be resolved at the level of individual neurons, also revealing differences related to the neuronal type. At the sub-cellular level, biosensors reported different signal dynamics in domains like dendrites, cell body, nucleus, and axon. Combining this imaging approach with pharmacology or genetic models points at phosphodiesterases and phosphatases as critical regulatory proteins. Biosensor imaging will certainly emerge as a forefront tool to decipher the subtle mechanics of intracellular signaling. This will certainly help us to understand the mechanism of action of current drugs and foster the development of novel molecules for neuropsychiatric diseases. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Characterising the developmental profile of human embryonic stem cell-derived medium spiny neuron progenitors and assessing mature neuron function using a CRISPR-generated human DARPP-32WT/eGFP-AMP reporter line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, C P J; Pouton, C W; Haynes, J M

    2017-06-01

    In the developing ventral telencephalon, cells of the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE) give rise to all medium spiny neurons (MSNs). This development occurs in response to a highly orchestrated series of morphogenetic stimuli that pattern the resultant neurons as they develop. Striatal MSNs are characterised by expression of dopamine receptors, dopamine-and cyclic AMP-regulated phosphoprotein (DARPP32) and the neurotransmitter GABA. In this study, we demonstrate that fine tuning Wnt and hedgehog (SHH) signaling early in human embryonic stem cell differentiation can induce a subpallial progenitor molecular profile. Stimulation of TGFβ signaling pathway by activin-A further supports patterning of progenitors to striatal precursors which adopt an LGE-specific gene signature. Moreover, we report that these MSNs also express markers associated with mature neuron function (cannabinoid, adenosine and dopamine receptors). To facilitate live-cell identification we generated a human embryonic stem cell line using CRISPR-mediated gene editing at the DARPP32 locus (DARPP32 WT/eGFP-AMP-LacZ ). The addition of dopamine to MSNs either increased, decreased or had no effect on intracellular calcium, indicating the presence of multiple dopamine receptor subtypes. In summary, we demonstrate greater control over early fate decisions using activin-A, Wnt and SHH to direct differentiation into MSNs. We also generate a DARPP32 reporter line that enables deeper pharmacological profiling and interrogation of complex receptor interactions in human MSNs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Allosteric regulation by oleamide of the binding properties of 5-hydroxytryptamine7 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedlund, P B; Carson, M J; Sutcliffe, J G; Thomas, E A

    1999-12-01

    Oleamide belongs to a family of amidated lipids with diverse biological activities, including sleep induction and signaling modulation of several 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor subtypes, including 5-HT1A, 5-HT2A/2C, and 5-HT7. The 5-HT7 receptor, predominantly localized in the hypothalamus, hippocampus, and frontal cortex, stimulates cyclic AMP formation and is thought to be involved in the regulation of sleep-wake cycles. Recently, it was proposed that oleamide acts at an allosteric site on the 5-HT7 receptor to regulate cyclic AMP formation. We have further investigated the interaction between oleamide and 5-HT7 receptors by performing radioligand binding assays with HeLa cells transfected with the 5-HT7 receptor. Methiothepin, clozapine, and 5-HT all displaced specific [3H]5-HT (100 nM) binding, with pK(D) values of 7.55, 7.85, and 8.39, respectively. Oleamide also displaced [3H]5-HT binding, but the maximum inhibition was only 40% of the binding. Taking allosteric (see below) cooperativity into account, a K(D) of 2.69 nM was calculated for oleamide. In saturation binding experiments, oleamide caused a 3-fold decrease in the affinity of [3H]5-HT for the 5-HT7 receptor, without affecting the number of binding sites. A Schild analysis showed that the induced shift in affinity of [3H]5-HT reached a plateau, unlike that of a competitive inhibitor, illustrating the allosteric nature of the interaction between oleamide and the 5-HT7 receptor. Oleic acid, the product of oleamide hydrolysis, had a similar effect on [3H]5-HT binding, whereas structural analogs of oleamide, trans-9,10-octadecenamide, cis-8,9-octadecenamide, and erucamide, did not alter [3H]5-HT binding significantly. The findings support the hypothesis that oleamide acts via an allosteric site on the 5-HT7 receptor regulating receptor affinity.

  4. cAMP/PKA-CREB-BDNF signaling pathway in hippocampus mediates cyclooxygenase 2-induced learning/memory deficits of rats subjected to chronic unpredictable mild stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ying; Kuang, Shengnan; Li, Huan; Ran, Dongzhi; Yang, Junqing

    2017-05-30

    To investigate the mechanism of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) in learning and memory impairments in rats subjected to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), meloxicam was used intragastrically to inhibit the activity of cyclooxygenase 2. Moreover, cyclooxygenase 2 over-expressing or RNA interfere lentivirus was injected intraventricularly to increase or decrease the enzyme's expression, respectively. The body weights and sucrose consumption were used to analyze depressive behaviors, while the Morris water maze and step-down-type passive avoidance tests were carried out to evaluate the learning-memory functions. The levels of inflammatory cytokines were measured to estimate inflammation and the contents of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) were used to measure the levels of the second messenger. Changes in cyclooxygenase 2 mRNA levels were analyzed using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Moreover, the expression of cyclooxygenase 2, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), prostaglandins receptor 3 (EP3), protein kinase A (PKA), cAMP response element binding protein (CREB), and phosphorylated CREB were estimated using immunohistochemical staining or western blotting. The results showed that CUMS led to significant depressive-like behaviors and learning and memory dysfunctions. Also, the cAMP levels decreased significantly, while levels of inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandins E2 increased significantly. The expressions of PKA, BDNF, phosphorylated CREB/CREB declined and cyclooxygenase 2 was increased. Meloxicam and cyclooxygenase 2 RNA interfere lentivirus reversed the changes caused by CUMS while cyclooxygenase 2-overexpressing lentivirus worsened these abnormalities. The findings also showed that CUMS increased cyclooxygenase 2 expression, which can cause learning and memory impairments, mainly through activating the hippocampal neuronal cAMP/PKA-CREB-BDNF signaling pathways.

  5. Expression of estrogen receptors in the hypothalamo-pituitary-ovarian axis in middle-aged rats after re-instatement of estrus cyclicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttner, M; Leonhardt, S; Wuttke, W; Wedel, T; Jarry, H

    2010-02-01

    During reproductive aging female rats enter an anovulatory state of persistent estrus (PE). In an animal model of reinstatement of estrus cyclicity in middle-aged PE rats we injected the animals with progesterone (0.5 mg progesterone/kg body weight) at 12:00 for 4 days whereas control animals received corn oil injections. After the last injection animals were analyzed at 13:00 and 17:00. Young regular cycling rats served as positive controls and were assessed at 13:00 and 17:00 on proestrus. Progesterone treatment of middle-aged PE rats led to occurrence of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), and prolactin surges in a subset of animals that were denoted as responders. Responding middle-aged rats displayed a reduction of ER-beta mRNA in the preoptic area which was similar to the effect in young rats. Within the mediobasal hypothalamus, only young rats showed a decline of ER-alpha mRNA expression. A decrease of ER-alpha mRNA levels in the pituitary was observed in progesterone-responsive rats and in young animals. ER-beta mRNA expression was reduced in young regular cycling rats. ER-beta mRNA levels in the ovary were reduced following progesterone treatment in PE rats and in young rats. Taken together our data show that cyclic administration of progesterone reinstates ovulatory cycles in intact aging females which have already lost their ability to display spontaneous cyclicity. This treatment leads to the occurrence of preovulatory LH, FSH and prolactin surges which are accompanied by differential modulation of ERs in the hypothalamus, the pituitary and the ovary.

  6. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels and the function of skin microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuder, R M; Karasek, M A; Bensch, K G

    1990-02-01

    The maintenance of the normal epithelioid morphology of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (MEC) grown in vitro depends strongly on the presence of factors that increase intracellular levels of cyclic AMP. Complete removal of dibutyryl cAMP and isobutylmethylxanthine (IMX) from the growth medium results in a progressive transition from an epithelioid to a spindle-shaped cell line. This transition cannot be reversed by the readdition of dibutyryl cAMP and IMX to the growth medium or by addition of agonists that increase cAMP levels. Spindle-shaped MEC lose the ability to express Factor VIII rAG and DR antigens and to bind peripheral blood mononuclear leukocyte (PBML). Ultrastructural analyses of transitional cells and spindle-shaped cells show decreased numbers of Weibel-Palade bodies in transitional cells and their complete absence in spindle-shaped cells. Interferon-gamma alters several functional properties of both epithelioid and spindle-shaped cells. In the absence of dibutyryl cAMP it accelerates the transition from epithelial to spindle-shaped cells, whereas in the presence of cyclic AMP interferon-gamma increases the binding of PBMLs to both epithelioid and spindle-shaped MEC and the endocytic activity of the endothelial cells. These results suggest that cyclic AMP is an important second messenger in the maintenance of several key functions of microvascular endothelial cells. Factors that influence the levels of this messenger in vivo can be expected to influence the angiogenic and immunologic functions of the microvasculature.

  7. Desensitization of parathyroid hormone receptors on cultured bone cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pun, K.K.; Ho, P.W.; Nissenson, R.A.; Arnaud, C.D.

    1990-01-01

    Administration of excessive amounts of parathyroid hormone (PTH) in the treatment of osteoporosis can reverse the beneficial effects of a low-dose, intermittent regime. To investigate the direct actions and the possible cellular mechanisms of PTH in inducing desensitization of PTH receptors, we studied the effects of desensitization on rat osteoblastic UMR-106 cells. When the osteoblasts were preincubated with bPTH-(1-34), complete refractoriness to a subsequent challenge with the hormone developed within 1 h and at hormone concentrations as low as 5 nM. When osteoblasts thus desensitized were incubated in hormone-free medium, recovery of the cAMP responses began within 2 h and reached maximum after 16 h. Cycloheximide did not affect the process of desensitization. [Nle8,Nle18,Tyr34]bPTH-(3-34)amide significantly impaired the desensitization process by PTH-(1-34) but did not have stimulatory effect on cAMP responses. No significant heterologous desensitization was obvious after preincubation with isoprenaline (50 microM), prostaglandin E1 (50 microM), or prostaglandin E2 (50 microM) for 2 h. Binding experiments with [125I]PLP-(1-36)amide after desensitization revealed that there was an approximate twofold decrease in receptor affinities as analyzed by Scatchard analysis, showing that the decrease in affinity was prominent in the process of desensitization. When the cells were treated with monensin during desensitization, PTH challenge after desensitization produced significantly lower cyclic AMP responses. Recovery after desensitization occurred over a period of 16 h. Inclusion of monensin, but not cycloheximide, impaired the recovery. The results show that homologous desensitization of rat osteoblasts to PTH is brought about by the occupancy of receptors by PTH-(1-34) but not by cAMP generation itself

  8. Restitution of defective glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in diabetic GK rat by acetylcholine uncovers paradoxical stimulatory effect of beta-cell muscarinic receptor activation on cAMP production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolz, Manuel; Bailbé, Danielle; Giroix, Marie-Hélène; Calderari, Sophie; Gangnerau, Marie-Noelle; Serradas, Patricia; Rickenbach, Katharina; Irminger, Jean-Claude; Portha, Bernard

    2005-11-01

    Because acetylcholine (ACh) is a recognized potentiator of glucose-stimulated insulin release in the normal beta-cell, we have studied ACh's effect on islets of the Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat, a spontaneous model of type 2 diabetes. We first verified that ACh was able to restore the insulin secretory glucose competence of the GK beta-cell. Then, we demonstrated that in GK islets 1) ACh elicited a first-phase insulin release at low glucose, whereas it had no effect in Wistar; 2) total phospholipase C activity, ACh-induced inositol phosphate production, and intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) elevation were normal; 3) ACh triggered insulin release, even in the presence of thapsigargin, which induced a reduction of the ACh-induced [Ca2+]i response (suggesting that ACh produces amplification signals that augment the efficacy of elevated [Ca2+]i on GK exocytosis); 4) inhibition of protein kinase C did not affect [Ca2+]i nor the insulin release responses to ACh; and 5) inhibition of cAMP-dependent protein kinases (PKAs), adenylyl cyclases, or cAMP generation, while not affecting the [Ca2+]i response, significantly lowered the insulinotropic response to ACh (at low and high glucose). In conclusion, ACh acts mainly through activation of the cAMP/PKA pathway to potently enhance Ca2+-stimulated insulin release in the GK beta-cell and, in doing so, normalizes its defective glucose responsiveness.

  9. Effect of cholera toxin on cAMP levels and Na+ influx in isolated intestinal epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, C.S.; Kimmich, G.A.

    1982-01-01

    Freshly isolated chicken intestinal cells contain approximately 20 pmol adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)/mg cellular protein. Incubation with 3 μg/ml cholera toxin (CT) at 37 0 C induces an elevation of cellular cAMP beginning 10-15 min after initial exposure. The response is linear with time for 40-50 min and causes a six- to eightfold increase over control levels at steady state. Dibutyryl cAMP and agents that increase cAMP production inhibit Na + influx into the isolated enterocytes. Chlorpromazine completely abolishes the toxin-induced elevation of cAMP in the isolated cells and also reverses the effect on Na + entry. The data provide evidence for a cAMP-mediated control of intestinal cell Na + uptake, which may represent the mechanistic basis for the antiabsorptive effect of CT on Na + during induction of intestinal secretory activity. Studies on the time-dependent effects of chlorpromazine on both intracellular cAMP concentration and Na + influx suggest that the reactivation of the Na + transport system after cAMP-induced inhibition is slow relative to the disappearance of cAMP

  10. Interactions of ligands with active and inactive conformations of the dopamine D2 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmberg, A; Mohell, N; Backlund Höök, B; Johansson, A M; Hacksell, U; Nordvall, G

    1998-04-10

    The affinities of 19 pharmacologically diverse dopamine D2 receptor ligands were determined for the active and inactive conformations of cloned human dopamine D2 receptors expressed in Ltk cells. The agonist [3H]quinpirole was used to selectively label the guanine nucleotide-binding protein-coupled, active receptor conformation. The antagonist [3H]raclopride, in the presence of the non-hydrolysable GTP-analogue Gpp(NH)p and sodium ions and in the absence of magnesium ions, was used to label the free inactive receptor conformation. The intrinsic activities of the ligands were determined in a forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP assay using the same cells. An excellent correlation was shown between the affinity ratios (KR/KRG) of the ligands for the two receptor conformations and their intrinsic activity (r=0.96). The ligands included eight structurally related and enantiopure 2-aminotetralin derivatives; the enantiomers of 5-hydroxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin, 5-methoxy-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin, 5-fluoro-2-(dipropylamino)tetralin and 2-(dipropylamino)tetralin. The (S)-enantiomers behaved as full agonists in the cyclic AMP assay and displayed a large KR/KRG ratio. The (R)-enantiomers were classified as partial agonists and had lower ratios. The structure-affinity relationships of these compounds at the active and the inactive receptor conformations were analysed separately, and used in conjunction with a homology based receptor model of the dopamine D2 receptor. This led to proposed binding modes for agonists, antagonists and partial agonists in the 2-aminotetralin series. The concepts used in this study should be of value in the design of ligands with predetermined affinity and intrinsic activity.

  11. Pancreatic acini possess endothelin receptors whose internalization is regulated by PLC-activating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, P; Mrozinski, J E; Mantey, S A; Patto, R J; Jensen, R T

    1993-05-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) and ET-3 mRNA have been found in the pancreas. We investigated the ability of ET-1, ET-2, and ET-3 to interact with and alter dispersed rat pancreatic acinar cell function. Radiolabeled ETs bound in a time- and temperature-dependent fashion, which was specific and saturable. Analysis demonstrated two classes of receptors, one class (ETA receptor) had a high affinity for ET-1 but a low affinity for ET-3, and the other class (ETB receptor) had equally high affinities for ET-1 and ET-3. No specific receptor for ET-2 was identified. Pancreatic secretagogues that activate phospholipase C (PLC) inhibited binding of 125I-labeled ET-1 (125I-ET-1) or 125I-ET-3, whereas agents that act through adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) did not. A23187 had no effect on 125I-ET-1 or 125I-ET-3 binding, whereas the phorbol ester 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate reduced binding. The effect of cholecystokinin octapeptide (CCK-8) was mediated through its own receptor. Stripping of surface bound ligand studies demonstrated that both 125I-labeled ET-1 and 125I-labeled ET-3 were rapidly internalized. CCK-8 decreased the internalization but did not change the amount of surface bound ligand. Endothelins neither stimulate nor alter changes in enzyme secretion, intracellular calcium, cAMP, or [3H]inositol trisphosphate (IP3). This study demonstrates the presence of ETA and ETB receptors on rat pancreatic acini; occupation of both receptors resulted in rapid internalization, which is regulated by PLC-activating secretagogues. Occupation of either ET receptor did not alter intracellular calcium, cAMP, IP3, or stimulate amylase release.

  12. Studies on c-AMP contents in sea urchin eggs fertilized with normal and x-irradiated sperm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Hiroshi

    1975-01-01

    Intracellular levels of cyclic 3', 5'-adenosine monophosphate (c-AMP) seemed to remain constant through the first cleavage cycle of sea urchin eggs. X-irradiation to the sperm, which induced the first cleavage delay, did not change this level. Although it was shown in the previous paper that X-ray-induced cleavage delay was reduced by caffeine but not by aminophyline, both caffeine and aminophyline caused an increase in c-AMP levels. These results indicated the possibility that c-AMP does not mediate this caffeine effect on cleavage delay. (auth.)

  13. Inhibition of cAMP-Activated Intestinal Chloride Secretion by Diclofenac: Cellular Mechanism and Potential Application in Cholera

    OpenAIRE

    Pongkorpsakol, Pawin; Pathomthongtaweechai, Nutthapoom; Srimanote, Potjanee; Soodvilai, Sunhapas; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj; Muanprasat, Chatchai

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic AMP-activated intestinal Cl- secretion plays an important role in pathogenesis of cholera. This study aimed to investigate the effect of diclofenac on cAMP-activated Cl- secretion, its underlying mechanisms, and possible application in the treatment of cholera. Diclofenac inhibited cAMP-activated Cl- secretion in human intestinal epithelial (T84) cells with IC50 of ∼ 20 µM. The effect required no cytochrome P450 enzyme-mediated metabolic activation. Interestingly, exposures of T84 cell...

  14. A conjugate of decyltriphenylphosphonium with plastoquinone can carry cyclic adenosine monophosphate, but not cyclic guanosine monophosphate, across artificial and natural membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firsov, Alexander M; Rybalkina, Irina G; Kotova, Elena A; Rokitskaya, Tatyana I; Tashlitsky, Vadim N; Korshunova, Galina A; Rybalkin, Sergei D; Antonenko, Yuri N

    2018-02-01

    The present study demonstrated for the first time the interaction between adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), one of the most important signaling compounds in living organisms, and the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant plastoquinonyl-decyltriphenylphosphonium (SkQ1). The data obtained on model liquid membranes and human platelets revealed the ability of SkQ1 to selectively transport cAMP, but not guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP), across both artificial and natural membranes. In particular, SkQ1 elicited translocation of cAMP from the source to the receiving phase of a Pressman-type cell, while showing low activity with cGMP. Importantly, only conjugate with plastoquinone, but not dodecyl-triphenylphosphonium, was effective in carrying cAMP. In human platelets, SkQ1 also appeared to serve as a carrier of cAMP, but not cGMP, from outside to inside the cell, as measured by phosphorylation of the vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein. The SkQ1-induced transfer of cAMP across the plasma membrane found here can be tentatively suggested to interfere with cAMP signaling pathways in living cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. {beta}-adrenergic receptor density and adenylate cyclase activity in lead-exposed rat brain after cessation of lead exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Huoy-Rou [I-Shou University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Dashu Shiang, Kaohsiung County (Taiwan); Tsao, Der-An [Fooyin University of Technology, Department of Medical Technology (Taiwan); Yu, Hsin-Su [Taiwan University, Department of Dermatology, College of Medicine (Taiwan); Ho, Chi-Kung [Kaohsiung Medical University, Occupational Medicine (Taiwan); Kaohsiung Medical University, Graduate Institute of Medicine, Research Center for Occupational Disease (Taiwan)

    2005-01-01

    To understanding the reversible or irreversible harm to the {beta}-adrenergic system in the brain of lead-exposed rats, this study sets up an animal model to estimate the change in the sympathetic nervous system of brain after lead exposure was withdrawn. We address the following topics in this study: (a) the relationship between withdrawal time of lead exposure and brain {beta}-adrenergic receptor, blood lead level, and brain lead level in lead-exposed rats after lead exposure was stopped; and (b) the relationship between lead level and {beta}-adrenergic receptor and cyclic AMP (c-AMP) in brain. Wistar rats were chronically fed with 2% lead acetate and water for 2 months. Radioligand binding was assayed by a method that fulfilled strict criteria of {beta}-adrenergic receptor using the ligand [{sup 125}I]iodocyanopindolol. The levels of lead were determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. The c-AMP level was determined by radioimmunoassay. The results showed a close relationship between decreasing lead levels and increasing numbers of brain {beta}-adrenergic receptors and brain adenylate cyclase activity after lead exposure was withdrawn. The effect of lead exposure on the {beta}-adrenergic system of the brain is a partly reversible condition. (orig.)

  16. Measurement of cAMP in an undergraduate teaching laboratory, using ALPHAscreen technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartho, Joseph D; Ly, Kien; Hay, Debbie L

    2012-02-14

    Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) is a cellular second messenger with central relevance to pharmacology, cell biology, and biochemistry teaching programs. cAMP is produced from adenosine triphosphate by adenylate cyclase, and its production is reduced or enhanced upon activation of many G protein-coupled receptors. Therefore, the measurement of cAMP serves as an indicator of receptor activity. Although there are many assays available for measuring cAMP, few are suitable for large class teaching, and even fewer seem to have been adapted for this purpose. Here, we describe the use of bead-based ALPHAscreen (Amplified Luminescent Proximity Homogenous Assay) technology for teaching a class of more than 300 students the practical aspects of detecting signal transduction. This technology is applicable to the measurement of many different signaling pathways. This resource is designed to provide a practical guide for instructors and a useful model for developing other classes using similar technologies.

  17. Ru (amp)(bipy)Cl

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    [RuV(amp)(bipy)O]+ intermediate complex which leads to the high affinity for hydrogen atom/hydride abstraction. Acknowledgement. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support from the Department of Science &. Technology, Government of India. We are thankful to Shri Hardyal Singh for his encouragement. Reference.

  18. Global and local missions of cAMP signaling in neural plasticity, learning and memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daewoo eLee

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has been a popular model to study cAMP signaling and resultant behaviors due to its powerful genetic approaches. All molecular components (AC, PDE, PKA, CREB, etc essential for cAMP signaling have been identified in the fly. Among them, adenylyl cyclase (AC gene rutabaga and phosphodiesterase (PDE gene dunce have been intensively studied to understand the role of cAMP signaling. Interestingly, these two mutant genes were originally identified on the basis of associative learning deficits. This commentary summarizes findings on the role of cAMP in Drosophila neuronal excitability, synaptic plasticity and memory. It mainly focuses on two distinct mechanisms (global versus local regulating excitatory and inhibitory synaptic plasticity related to cAMP homeostasis. This dual regulatory role of cAMP is to increase the strength of excitatory neural circuits on one hand, but to act locally on postsynaptic GABA receptors to decrease inhibitory synaptic plasticity on the other. Thus the action of cAMP could result in a global increase in the neural circuit excitability and memory. Implications of this cAMP signaling related to drug discovery for neural diseases are also described.

  19. Atrazine acts as an endocrine disrupter by inhibiting cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucka, Marek; Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Fa, Svetlana; Stojilkovic, Stanko S.; Kovacevic, Radmila

    2012-01-01

    Atrazine, one of the most commonly used herbicides worldwide, acts as an endocrine disruptor, but the mechanism of its action has not been characterized. In this study, we show that atrazine rapidly increases cAMP levels in cultured rat pituitary and testicular Leydig cells in a concentration-dependent manner, but less effectively than 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, a competitive non-specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases (PDEs). In forskolin (an activator of adenylyl cyclase)- and probenecid (an inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide transporters)-treated cells, but not in 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine-treated cells, atrazine further increased cAMP levels, indicating that inhibition of PDEs accounts for accumulation of cAMP. In contrast to cAMP, atrazine did not alter cGMP levels, further indicating that it inhibits cAMP-specific PDEs. Atrazine-induced changes in cAMP levels were sufficient to stimulate prolactin release in pituitary cells and androgen production in Leydig cells, indicating that it acts as an endocrine disrupter both in cells that secrete by exocytosis of prestored hormones and in cells that secrete by de novo hormone synthesis. Rolipram abolished the stimulatory effect of atrazine on cAMP release in both cell types, suggesting that it acts as an inhibitor of PDE4s, isoforms whose mRNA transcripts dominate in pituitary and Leydig cells together with mRNA for PDE8A. In contrast, immortalized lacto-somatotrophs showed low expression of these mRNA transcripts and several fold higher cAMP levels compared to normal pituitary cells, and atrazine was unable to further increase cAMP levels. These results indicate that atrazine acts as a general endocrine disrupter by inhibiting cAMP-specific PDE4s. -- Highlights: ► Atrazine stimulates cAMP accumulation in pituitary and Leydig cells. ► Atrazine also stimulates PRL and androgens secretion. ► Stimulatory effects of atrazine were abolished in cells with IBMX-inhibited PDEs. ► Atrazine specificity toward cAMP

  20. Biophysical Techniques for Detection of cAMP and cGMP in Living Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viacheslav O. Nikolaev

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP are ubiquitous second messengers which regulate myriads of functions in virtually all eukaryotic cells. Their intracellular effects are often mediated via discrete subcellular signaling microdomains. In this review, we will discuss state-of-the-art techniques to measure cAMP and cGMP in biological samples with a particular focus on live cell imaging approaches, which allow their detection with high temporal and spatial resolution in living cells and tissues. Finally, we will describe how these techniques can be applied to the analysis of second messenger dynamics in subcellular signaling microdomains.

  1. Effects of oxytocin and methacholine on cyclic nucleotide levels of rabbit myometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlageter, N; Janis, R A; Gualtieri, R T; Hechter, O

    1980-03-01

    The effects of oxytocin and methacholine on cyclic nucleotide levels in estrogen-primed rabbit myometrium were studied in the presence and absence of 1-methyl-3-isobutyl xanthine (MIX), a phosphodiesterase inhibitor. In the absence of MIX, methacholine increased guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) levels at a time when contraction was decreasing, but had no influence on adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) levels. In contrast, oxytocin did not elevate cGMP, but rapidly decreased cAMP levels. MIX (1 mM) increased both cAMP and cGMP levels. Oxytocin or methacholine further increased cGMP, indicating activation of guanylate cyclase. Oxytocin- but not methacholine-induced stimulation of guanylate cyclase was abolished in Ca2+-free solution. Oxytocin increased cAMP over the levels produced by MIX alone, whereas methacholine decreased cAMP below the MIX control values; these effects were insensitive to indomethacin. Tissue levels of cGMP and cAMP did not directly correlate with isometric tension. The results also indicate that both oxytocin and methacholine stimulate guanylate cyclase but have opposing effects on adenylate cyclase of rabbit myometrium.

  2. The effect of ultraviolet light on the cyclic nucleotide system of human fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fertel, R.H.; Tejwani, G.A.; Albrightson, C.R.; Hart, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    The concentrations of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in in human skin fibroblasts in culture were determined after exposing the cells to varying fluences of UV (254 nm) light. The cyclic nucleotide concentrations of cells irradiated in the log phase of growth were unchanged relative to controls. In contrast, there was a rise in the concentration of cyclic AMP in cells irradiated after they reached confluency. The increase in concentration was observed as early as 30 min after irradiation, reached a maximum of about 200% of control at 4 to 6 h after exposure, and returned to control values by 24 h after irradiation. The effect was proportional to a UV fluence from 5 to 20 J/m 2 , and was blocked by the addition of the UV absorbing agent para-aminobenzoic acid. In contrast, the results indicated that UV light had no effect on the concentration of cyclic GMP in human fibroblast cell cultures. Because of the importance of cyclic nucleotides in the regulation of cellular function, it is reasonable to hypothesize that changes in cyclic AMP induced by UV light may effect the extranuclear functions of irradiated cells. (author)

  3. Role of androgen receptor on cyclic mechanical stretch-regulated proliferation of C2C12 myoblasts and its upstream signals: IGF-1-mediated PI3K/Akt and MAPKs pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yiming; Fu, Shaoting; Lu, Lin; Wang, Xiaohui

    2017-07-15

    To detect the effects of androgen receptor (AR) on cyclic mechanical stretch-modulated proliferation of C2C12 myoblasts and its pathways: roles of IGF-1, PI3K and MAPK. C2C12 were randomly divided into five groups: un-stretched control, six or 8 h of fifteen percent stretch, and six or 8 h of twenty percent stretch. Cyclic mechanical stretch of C2C12 were completed using a computer-controlled FlexCell Strain Unit. Cell proliferation and IGF-1 concentration in medium were detected by CCK8 and ELISA, respectively. Expressions of AR and IGF-1R, and expressions and activities of PI3K, p38 and ERK1/2 in stretched C2C12 cells were determined by Western blot. ①The proliferation of C2C12 cells, IGF-1 concentration in medium, expressions of AR and IGF-1R, and activities of PI3K, p38 and ERK1/2 were increased by 6 h of fifteen percent stretch, while decreased by twenty percent stretch for six or 8 h ②The fifteen percent stretch-increased proliferation of C2C12 cells was reversed by AR inhibitor, Flutamide. ③The increases of AR expression, activities of PI3K, p38 and ERK1/2 resulted from fifteen percent stretch were attenuated by IGF-1 neutralizing antibody, while twenty percent stretch-induced decreases of the above indicators were enhanced by recombinant IGF-1. ④Specific inhibitors of p38, ERK1/2 and PI3K all decreased the expression of AR in fifteen percent and twenty percent of stretched C2C12 cells. Cyclic mechanical stretch modulated the proliferation of C2C12 cells, which may be attributed to the alterations of AR via IGF-1-PI3K/Akt and IGF-1-MAPK (p38, ERK1/2) pathways in C2C12 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Involvement of NMDA receptors and L-arginine/nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in the antidepressant-like effects of topiramate in mice forced swimming test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Chamanara, Mohsen; Jazaeri, Farahnaz; Zolfaghari, Samira; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-04-01

    Topiramate (TPM) is an agent primarily used in the treatment of epilepsy. Using mice model of forced swimming test (FST) the current study was basically aimed to investigate the influence of TPM on depression by inhibiting NMDA receptor and nitric oxide-cGMP production. When TPM was administered in a dose of 20 and 30 mg/kg by i.p. route it reduced the immobility time during FST. However this effect of TPM (30 mg/kg, i.p.) in the FST was abolished when the mice were pretreated either with NMDA (75 mg/kg, i.p.), or l-arginine (750 mg/kg, i.p. NO precursor), or sildenafil (5mg/kg, i.p. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor). The immobility time in the FST was reduced after administration of L-NAME (10mg/kg, i.p, a non-specific NOS inhibitor), 7-nitoinidazol (30 mg/kg, i.p. a nNOS inhibitor) or MK-801 (0.05 mg/kg, i.p, a NMDA receptor antagonist) in combination with a subeffective dose of TPM (10mg/kg, i.p.) as compared with single use of either drug. Co-administrated of lower doses of MK-801 (0.01 mg/kg) or L-NAME (1mg/kg) failed to effect immobility time. However, simultaneous administration of these two agents in the same doses with subeffective dose of TPM (10mg/kg, i.p.), reduced the immobility time during FST. None of these drugs were found to have a profound effect on the locomotor activity per se during the open field test. Taken together, our data demonstrates that TPM exhibit antidepressant-like effect which is accomplished either due to inhibition of NMDA receptors or NO-cGMP production. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Selectivity and specificity of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor ligands: caveats and critical thinking in characterizing receptor-mediated effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomone, Salvatore; Waeber, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Receptors for sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) have been identified only recently. Their medicinal chemistry is therefore still in its infancy, and few selective agonists or antagonists are available. Furthermore, the selectivity of S1P receptor agonists or antagonists is not well established. JTE-013 and BML-241 (also known as CAY10444), used extensively as specific S1P(2) and S1P(3) receptors antagonists respectively, are cases in point. When analyzing S1P-induced vasoconstriction in mouse basilar artery, we observed that JTE-013 inhibited not only the effect of S1P, but also the effect of U46619, endothelin-1 or high KCl; JTE-013 strongly inhibited responses to S1P in S1P(2) receptor knockout mice. Similarly, BML-241 has been shown to inhibit increases in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration via P(2) receptor or α(1A)-adrenoceptor stimulation and α(1A)-adrenoceptor-mediated contraction of rat mesenteric artery, while it did not affect S1P(3)-mediated decrease of forskolin-induced cyclic AMP accumulation. Another putative S1P(1/3) receptor antagonist, VPC23019, does not inhibit S1P(3)-mediated vasoconstriction. With these examples in mind, we discuss caveats about relying on available pharmacological tools to characterize receptor subtypes.

  6. Selectivity and specificity of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor ligands: caveats and critical thinking in characterizing receptor-mediated effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eWaeber

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Receptors for sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P have been identified only recently. Their medicinal chemistry is therefore still in its infancy, and few selective agonists or antagonists are available. Furthermore, the selectivity of S1P receptor agonists or antagonists is not well established. JTE-013 and BML-241 (also known as CAY10444, used extensively as specific S1P2 and S1P3 receptors antagonists respectively, are cases in point. When analyzing S1P-induced vasoconstriction in mouse basilar artery, we observed that JTE-013 inhibited not only the effect of S1P, but also the effect of U46619, endothelin-1 or high KCl; JTE-013 strongly inhibited responses to S1P in S1P2 receptor knockout mice. Similarly, BML-241 has been shown to inhibit increases in intracellular Ca2+ concentration via P2 receptor or α1A-adrenoceptor stimulation and α1A-adrenoceptor-mediated contraction of rat mesenteric artery, while it did not affect S1P3-mediated decrease of forskolin-induced cyclic AMP accumulation. Another putative S1P1/3 receptor antagonist, VPC23019, does not inhibit S1P3-mediated vasoconstriction. With these examples in mind, we discuss caveats about relying on available pharmacological tools to characterize receptor subtypes.

  7. Synthesis and degradation of cyclic nucleotides in brain after a high dose of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, W.A.; Dalton, T.K.

    1981-01-01

    Previous data from our laboratory have indicated that a high dose of ionizing radiation can deplete the cyclic nucleotides guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) and adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) on several areas of the rat brain. cGMP is more sensitive to radiation than cAMP and does not recover for at least 24 h after irradiation. The response of cAMP is transient and recovery occurs within 4 h. The purpose of the present paper is to determine whether alternations in the activity of the synthetic and degradative enzymes that regulate cyclic nucleotide levels could account for the observed effects. Guanylate and adenylate cyclase and cGMP and cAMP phosphodiesterase activities were determined 10 min after irradiation with 10,000 rad of high-energy electrons. No alteration was detected under these experimental conditions. The data suggest that the reduction in cyclic nucleotides is not a direct effect on their metabolic enzymes and is probably secondary to some as yet-undefined action of radiation on the brain

  8. Effect of cAMP on short-circuit current in isolated human ciliary body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ren-yi; Ma, Ning; Hu, Qian-qian

    2013-07-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) could activate chloride channels in bovine ciliary body and trigger an increase in the ionic current (short-circuit current, Isc) across the ciliary processes in pigs. The purpose of this study was to investigate how cAMP modulates Isc in isolated human ciliary processes and the possible involvement of chloride transport across the tissue in cAMP-induced Isc change. In an Ussing-type chamber system, the Isc changes induced by the cAMP analogue 8-bromo-cAMP and an adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin in isolated human ciliary processes were assessed. The involvement of Cl(-) component in the bath solution was investigated. The effect of Cl(-) channel (10 µmol/L niflumic acid and 1 mmol/L 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS)), K(+) channel (10 mmol/L tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA)), or Na(+) channel blockers (1 mmol/L amiloride) on 8-bromo-cAMP-induced Isc change was also studied. Dose-dependently, 8-bromo-cAMP (10 nmol/L-30 µmol/L) or forskolin (10 nmol/L-3 µmol/L) increased Isc across the ciliary processes with an increase in negative potential difference on the non-pigmented epithelium (NPE) side of the tissue. Isc increase induced by 8-bromo-cAMP was more pronounced when the drug was applied on the NPE side than on the pigmented epithelium side. When the tissue was bathed in low Cl(-) solutions, the Isc increase was significantly inhibited. Finally, niflumic acid and DIDS, but not TEA or amiloride, significantly prevented the Isc increase induced by 8-bromo-cAMP. cAMP stimulates stroma-to-aqueous anionic transport in isolated human ciliary processes. Chloride is likely to be among the ions, the transportation of which across the tissue is triggered by cAMP, suggesting the potential role of cAMP in the process of aqueous humor formation in human eyes.

  9. Immunohistochemical distribution of cAMP- and cGMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoenzymes in the human prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uckert, Stefan; Oelke, Matthias; Stief, Christian G.; Andersson, K.-E.; Jonas, Udo; Hedlund, Petter

    2006-01-01

    With the introduction of sildenafil citrate (Viagra), the concept of phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibition has gained tremendous interest in the field of urology. Cyclic nucleotide second messengers cGMP and cAMP have been assumed to be involved in the control of the normal function of the prostate.

  10. cGAS produces a 2'-5'-linked cyclic dinucleotide second messenger that activates STING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ablasser, Andrea; Goldeck, Marion; Cavlar, Taner; Deimling, Tobias; Witte, Gregor; Röhl, Ingo; Hopfner, Karl-Peter; Ludwig, Janos; Hornung, Veit

    2013-06-20

    Detection of cytoplasmic DNA represents one of the most fundamental mechanisms of the innate immune system to sense the presence of microbial pathogens. Moreover, erroneous detection of endogenous DNA by the same sensing mechanisms has an important pathophysiological role in certain sterile inflammatory conditions. The endoplasmic-reticulum-resident protein STING is critically required for the initiation of type I interferon signalling upon detection of cytosolic DNA of both exogenous and endogenous origin. Next to its pivotal role in DNA sensing, STING also serves as a direct receptor for the detection of cyclic dinucleotides, which function as second messenger molecules in bacteria. DNA recognition, however, is triggered in an indirect fashion that depends on a recently characterized cytoplasmic nucleotidyl transferase, termed cGAMP synthase (cGAS), which upon interaction with DNA synthesizes a dinucleotide molecule that in turn binds to and activates STING. We here show in vivo and in vitro that the cGAS-catalysed reaction product is distinct from previously characterized cyclic dinucleotides. Using a combinatorial approach based on mass spectrometry, enzymatic digestion, NMR analysis and chemical synthesis we demonstrate that cGAS produces a cyclic GMP-AMP dinucleotide, which comprises a 2'-5' and a 3'-5' phosphodiester linkage >Gp(2'-5')Ap(3'-5')>. We found that the presence of this 2'-5' linkage was required to exert potent activation of human STING. Moreover, we show that cGAS first catalyses the synthesis of a linear 2'-5'-linked dinucleotide, which is then subject to cGAS-dependent cyclization in a second step through a 3'-5' phosphodiester linkage. This 13-membered ring structure defines a novel class of second messenger molecules, extending the family of 2'-5'-linked antiviral biomolecules.

  11. Multimodal Imaging of Integrin Receptor-Positive Tumors by Bioluminescence, Fluorescence, Gamma Scintigraphy, and Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography Using a Cyclic RGD Peptide Labeled with a Near-Infrared Fluorescent Dye and a Radionuclide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Barry Edwards

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Integrins, particularly the αvβ3 heterodimers, play important roles in tumor-induced angiogenesis and invasiveness. To image the expression pattern of the αvβ3 integrin in tumors through a multimodality imaging paradigm, we prepared a cyclic RGDyK peptide analogue (LS308 bearing a tetraazamacrocycle 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N, N′, N″, N‴-tetraacetic acid (DOTA and a lipophilic near-infrared (NIR fluorescent dye cypate. The αvβ3 integrin binding affinity and the internalization properties of LS308 mediated by the αvβ3 integrin in 4t1luc cells were investigated by receptor binding assay and fluorescence microscopy, respectively. The in vivo distribution of 111In-labeled LS308 in a 4t1luc tumor-bearing mouse model was studied by fluorescence, bioluminescence, planar gamma, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT. The results show that LS308 has high affinity for αvβ3 integrin and internalized preferentially via the αvβ3 integrin-mediated endocytosis in 4t1luc cells. We also found that LS308 selectively accumulated in αvβ3-positve tumors in a receptor-specific manner and was visualized by the four imaging methods. Whereas the endogenous bioluminescence imaging identified the ensemble of the tumor tissue, the fluorescence and SPECT methods with the exogenous contrast agent LS308 reported the local expression of αvβ3 integrin. Thus, the multimodal imaging approach could provide important complementary diagnostic information for monitoring the efficacy of new antiangiogenic drugs.

  12. Plasma levels of cAMP, cGMP and CGRP in sildenafil-induced headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruuse, Christina Rostrup; Frandsen, E; Schifter, S

    2004-01-01

    Sildenafil, a selective inhibitor of the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) degrading phosphodiestrase 5 (PDE5), induced migraine without aura in 10 of 12 migraine patients and in healthy subjects it induced significantly more headache than placebo. The aim of the present study was to determine...... whether the pain-inducing effects of sildenafil would be reflected in plasma levels of important signalling molecules in migraine: cGMP, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Ten healthy subjects (four women, six men) and 12 patients (12 women) suffering from...... migraine without aura were included in two separate double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over studies in which placebo or sildenafil 100 mg was administered orally. Plasma levels of CGRP, cAMP and cGMP were determined in blood from the antecubital vein. Despite the ability of sildenafil to induce...

  13. Molecular and pharmacological characterization of serotonin 5-HT2α and 5-HT7 receptors in the salivary glands of the blowfly Calliphora vicina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röser, Claudia; Jordan, Nadine; Balfanz, Sabine; Baumann, Arnd; Walz, Bernd; Baumann, Otto; Blenau, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Secretion in blowfly (Calliphora vicina) salivary glands is stimulated by the biogenic amine serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), which activates both inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP(3))/Ca(2+) and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) signalling pathways in the secretory cells. In order to characterize the signal-inducing 5-HT receptors, we cloned two cDNAs (Cv5-ht2α, Cv5-ht7) that share high similarity with mammalian 5-HT(2) and 5-HT(7) receptor genes, respectively. RT-PCR demonstrated that both receptors are expressed in the salivary glands and brain. Stimulation of Cv5-ht2α-transfected mammalian cells with 5-HT elevates cytosolic [Ca(2+)] in a dose-dependent manner (EC(50) = 24 nM). In Cv5-ht7-transfected cells, 5-HT produces a dose-dependent increase in [cAMP](i) (EC(50) = 4 nM). We studied the pharmacological profile for both receptors. Substances that appear to act as specific ligands of either Cv5-HT(2α) or Cv5-HT(7) in the heterologous expression system were also tested in intact blowfly salivary gland preparations. We observed that 5-methoxytryptamine (100 nM) activates only the Cv5-HT(2α) receptor, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (300 nM) activates only the Cv5-HT(7) receptor, and clozapine (1 µM) antagonizes the effects of 5-HT via Cv5-HT(7) in blowfly salivary glands, providing means for the selective activation of each of the two 5-HT receptor subtypes. This study represents the first comprehensive molecular and pharmacological characterization of two 5-HT receptors in the blowfly and permits the analysis of the physiological role of these receptors, even when co-expressed in cells, and of the modes of interaction between the Ca(2+)- and cAMP-signalling cascades.

  14. Molecular and pharmacological characterization of serotonin 5-HT2α and 5-HT7 receptors in the salivary glands of the blowfly Calliphora vicina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Röser

    Full Text Available Secretion in blowfly (Calliphora vicina salivary glands is stimulated by the biogenic amine serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT, which activates both inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP(3/Ca(2+ and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP signalling pathways in the secretory cells. In order to characterize the signal-inducing 5-HT receptors, we cloned two cDNAs (Cv5-ht2α, Cv5-ht7 that share high similarity with mammalian 5-HT(2 and 5-HT(7 receptor genes, respectively. RT-PCR demonstrated that both receptors are expressed in the salivary glands and brain. Stimulation of Cv5-ht2α-transfected mammalian cells with 5-HT elevates cytosolic [Ca(2+] in a dose-dependent manner (EC(50 = 24 nM. In Cv5-ht7-transfected cells, 5-HT produces a dose-dependent increase in [cAMP](i (EC(50 = 4 nM. We studied the pharmacological profile for both receptors. Substances that appear to act as specific ligands of either Cv5-HT(2α or Cv5-HT(7 in the heterologous expression system were also tested in intact blowfly salivary gland preparations. We observed that 5-methoxytryptamine (100 nM activates only the Cv5-HT(2α receptor, 5-carboxamidotryptamine (300 nM activates only the Cv5-HT(7 receptor, and clozapine (1 µM antagonizes the effects of 5-HT via Cv5-HT(7 in blowfly salivary glands, providing means for the selective activation of each of the two 5-HT receptor subtypes. This study represents the first comprehensive molecular and pharmacological characterization of two 5-HT receptors in the blowfly and permits the analysis of the physiological role of these receptors, even when co-expressed in cells, and of the modes of interaction between the Ca(2+- and cAMP-signalling cascades.

  15. Glucocorticoid acts on a putative G protein-coupled receptor to rapidly regulate the activity of NMDA receptors in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanmin; Sheng, Hui; Qi, Jinshun; Ma, Bei; Sun, Jihu; Li, Shaofeng; Ni, Xin

    2012-04-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) have been demonstrated to act through both genomic and nongenomic mechanisms. The present study demonstrated that corticosterone rapidly suppressed the activity of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in cultured hippocampal neurons. The effect was maintained with corticosterone conjugated to bovine serum albumin and blocked by inhibition of G protein activity with intracellular GDP-β-S application. Corticosterone increased GTP-bound G(s) protein and cyclic AMP (cAMP) production, activated phospholipase Cβ(3) (PLC-β(3)), and induced inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP(3)) production. Blocking PLC and the downstream cascades with PLC inhibitor, IP(3) receptor antagonist, Ca(2+) chelator, and protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitors prevented the actions of corticosterone. Blocking adenylate cyclase (AC) and protein kinase A (PKA) caused a decrease in NMDA-evoked currents. Application of corticosterone partly reversed the inhibition of NMDA currents caused by blockage of AC and PKA. Intracerebroventricular administration of corticosterone significantly suppressed long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA1 region of the hippocampus within 30 min in vivo, implicating the possibly physiological significance of rapid effects of GC on NMDA receptors. Taken together, our results indicate that GCs act on a putative G protein-coupled receptor to activate multiple signaling pathways in hippocampal neurons, and the rapid suppression of NMDA activity by GCs is dependent on PLC and downstream signaling.

  16. AMP Affects Intracellular Ca2+ Signaling, Migration, Cytokine Secretion and T Cell Priming Capacity of Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panther, Elisabeth; Dürk, Thorsten; Ferrari, Davide; Di Virgilio, Francesco; Grimm, Melanie; Sorichter, Stephan; Cicko, Sanja; Herouy, Yared; Norgauer, Johannes; Idzko, Marco; Müller, Tobias

    2012-01-01

    The nucleotide adenosine-5′-monophosphate (AMP) can be released by various cell types and has been shown to elicit different cellular responses. In the extracellular space AMP is dephosphorylated to the nucleoside adenosine which can then bind to adenosine receptors. However, it has been shown that AMP can also activate A1 and A2a receptors directly. Here we show that AMP is a potent modulator of mouse and human dendritic cell (DC) function. AMP increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration in a time and dose dependent manner. Furthermore, AMP stimulated actin-polymerization in human DCs and induced migration of immature human and bone marrow derived mouse DCs, both via direct activation of A1 receptors. AMP strongly inhibited secretion of TNF-α and IL-12p70, while it enhanced production of IL-10 both via activation of A2a receptors. Consequently, DCs matured in the presence of AMP and co-cultivated with naive CD4+CD45RA+ T cells inhibited IFN-γ production whereas secretion of IL-5 and IL-13 was up-regulated. An enhancement of Th2-driven immune response could also be observed when OVA-pulsed murine DCs were pretreated with AMP prior to co-culture with OVA-transgenic naïve OTII T cells. An effect due to the enzymatic degradation of AMP to adenosine could be ruled out, as AMP still elicited migration and changes in cytokine secretion in bone-marrow derived DCs generated from CD73-deficient animals and in human DCs pretreated with the ecto-nucleotidase inhibitor 5′-(alpha,beta-methylene) diphosphate (APCP). Finally, the influence of contaminating adenosine could be excluded, as AMP admixed with adenosine desaminase (ADA) was still able to influence DC function. In summary our data show that AMP when present during maturation is a potent regulator of dendritic cell function and point out the role for AMP in the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders. PMID:22624049

  17. Influence of cAMP on reporter bioassays for dioxin and dioxin-like compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasai, Ayumi; Yao, Jian; Yamauchi, Kozue; Hiramatsu, Nobuhiko; Hayakawa, Kunihiro; Meng, Yiman; Maeda, Shuichiro; Kitamura, Masanori

    2006-01-01

    In reporter assays for detection of dioxins, the dioxin-responsive element (DRE) is generally used as a sensor sequence. In several systems, the CYP1A1 promoter containing DREs (DRE cyp ) is inserted into a part of the long terminal repeat of mouse mammary tumor virus (LTR MMTV ) to improve sensitivity of assays. We found that DRE cyp -LTR MMTV responds not only to dioxins and dioxin-like compounds but also to forskolin, a cAMP-elevating agent. This effect was dose-dependent and reproduced by other cAMP-elevating agents including 8-bromo-cAMP and 3-isobutyl-methylxanthine. The cAMP response element (CRE) and CRE-like sequences were absent in DRE cyp -LTR MMTV and not involved in this process. In contrast to the effect of dioxin, the activation of DRE cyp -LTR MMTV by cAMP was independent of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-dependent transcription factor for DRE. Furthermore, neither DRE cyp , LTR MMTV nor the consensus sequence of DRE alone was activated in response to cAMP. These data elucidated for the first time that the combination of DRE cyp with LTR MMTV causes a peculiar response to cAMP and suggested that use of AhR antagonists is essential to exclude false-positive responses of DRE cyp -LTR MMTV -based bioassays for detection and quantification of dioxins and dioxin-like compounds

  18. AIM2-Like Receptors Positively and Negatively Regulate the Interferon Response Induced by Cytosolic DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Nakaya

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cytosolic DNAs derived from retrotransposons serve as pathogen-associated molecular patterns for pattern recognition receptors (PRRs that stimulate the induction of interferons (IFNs and other cytokines, leading to autoimmune disease. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase is one PRR that senses retrotransposon DNA, activating type I IFN responses through the stimulator of IFN genes (STING. Absent in melanoma 2 (AIM2-like receptors (ALRs have also been implicated in these pathways. Here we show that the mouse ALR IFI205 senses cytosolic retrotransposon DNA independently of cyclic GMP-AMP production. AIM2 antagonizes IFI205-mediated IFN induction activity by sequestering it from STING. We also found that the complement of genes located in the ALR locus in C57BL/6 and AIM2 knockout mice are different and unique, which has implications for interpretation of the sensing of pathogens in different mouse strains. Our data suggest that members of the ALR family are critical to the host IFN response to endogenous DNA.

  19. Effects of fenspiride on human bronchial cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase isoenzymes: functional and biochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortijo, J; Naline, E; Ortiz, J L; Berto, L; Girard, V; Malbezin, M; Advenier, C; Morcillo, E J

    1998-01-02

    We have investigated the role of human bronchial cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases in the effects of fenspiride, a drug endowed with bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory properties. Functional studies on human isolated bronchi showed that fenspiride (10(-6)-3 x 10(-3) M, 30 min) induced a shift to the left of the concentration-response curves for isoprenaline and sodium nitroprusside with -logEC50 values of 4.1+/-0.1 (n = 7) and 3.5+/-0.2 (n = 8), respectively. Biochemical studies were carried out on three human bronchi in which separation of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase isoenzymes was performed by ion exchange chromatography followed by determination of phosphodiesterase activity with a radioisotopic method. Phosphodiesterase 4 (cyclic AMP-specific) and phosphodiesterase 5 (cyclic GMP-specific) were the major phosphodiesterase isoforms present in the human bronchial tissue. The presence of phosphodiesterase 1 (Ca2+/calmodulin-stimulated), phosphodiesterase 2 (cyclic GMP-stimulated) and, in two cases, phosphodiesterase 3 (cyclic GMP-inhibited) was also identified. Fenspiride inhibited phosphodiesterase 4 and phosphodiesterase 3 activities with -logIC50 values of 4.16+/-0.09 and 3.44+/-0.12, respectively. Phosphodiesterase 5 activity was also inhibited with a -logIC50 value of approximately 3.8. Fenspiride (fenspiride is an effective inhibitor of both cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP hydrolytic activity in human bronchial tissues and this action may contribute to its airway effects.

  20. Effect of cAMP derivates on assembly and maintenance of tight junctions in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beese Michaela

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Endothelial tight and adherens junctions control a variety of physiological processes like adhesion, paracellular transport of solutes or trafficking of activated leukocytes. Formation and maintenance of endothelial junctions largely depend on the microenvironment of the specific vascular bed and on interactions of the endothelium with adjacent cell types. Consequently, primary cultures of endothelial cells often lose their specific junctional pattern and fail to establish tight monolayer in vitro. This is also true for endothelial cells isolated from the vein of human umbilical cords (HUVEC which are widely used as model for endothelial cell-related studies. Results We here compared the effect of cyclic 3'-5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP and its derivates on formation and stabilization of tight junctions and on alterations in paracellular permeability in HUVEC. We demonstrated by light and confocal laser microscopy that for shorter time periods the sodium salt of 8-bromoadenosine-cAMP (8-Br-cAMP/Na and for longer incubation periods 8-(4-chlorophenylthio-cAMP (pCPT-cAMP exerted the greatest effects of all compounds tested here on formation of continuous tight junction strands in HUVEC. We further demonstrated that although all compounds induced protein kinase A-dependent expression of the tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin only pCPT-cAMP slightly enhanced paracellular barrier functions. Moreover, we showed that pCPT-cAMP and 8-Br-cAMP/Na induced expression and membrane translocation of tricellulin. Conclusions pCPT-cAMP and, to a lesser extend, 8-Br-cAMP/Na improved formation of continuous tight junction strands and decreased paracellular permeability in primary HUVEC. We concluded that under these conditions HUVEC represent a feasible in vitro model to study formation and disassembly of endothelial tight junctions and to characterize tight junction-associated proteins