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Sample records for cyclic amp concentration

  1. Down-regulation of Cell Surface Cyclic AMP Receptors and Desensitization of Cyclic AMP-stimulated Adenylate Cyclase by Cyclic AMP in Dictyostelium discoideum. Kinetics and Concentration Dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1987-01-01

    cAMP binds to Dictyostelium discoideum surface receptors and induces a transient activation of adenylate cyclase, which is followed by desensitization. cAMP also induces a loss of detectable surface receptors (down-regulation). Cells were incubated with constant cAMP concentrations, washed free of

  2. Cyclic AMP relay and cyclic AMP-induced cyclic GMP accumulation during development of Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kesbeke, Fanja; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Schaap, Pauline

    1986-01-01

    Cyclic AMP-induced cAMP and cGMP responses during development of Dictyostelium discoideum were investigated. The cAMP-induced cGMP response is maximal when aggregation is in full progress, and then decreases to about 10% of the maximal level during further multicellular development. The cAMP

  3. Changes in Tissue Cyclic AMP Concentrations following an Intravenous Lethal Dose of Cholera Enterotoxin in Rabbits,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-13

    correlations with acute tubular necrosis and hypokalemic nephropathy . Ann Intern Med 52:960-975, 1960. 3. Serebro, H. A., McGonagle, T., Iber, F. L., Royall...Benyajati, C., Phillips, R. A. The role of bicarbonate pathophysiology and therapy in Asiatic cholera. Am. J. Med. 35:58-66, 1963. 18. Carpenter, C. C. J...17:581-585, 1979. 20. Tucci, J. R., Lin, T., Kopp, L. Urinary cyclic 3’,5’-adenosine monophosphate levels in diabetes mellitus before and after

  4. Effect of Increased Cyclic AMP Concentration on Muscle Protein Synthesis and Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Expression in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Vaughn, J. R.; Bridge, K. Y.; Smith, C. K.

    1998-01-01

    Analogies of epinephrine are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle when fed to animals. These compounds presumably exert their physiological action through interaction with the P-adrenergic receptor. Since the intracellular signal generated by the Beta-adrenergic receptor is cyclic AMP (cAMP), experiments were initiated in cell culture to determine if artificial elevation of cAMP by treatment with forskolin would alter muscle protein metabolism and P-adrenergic receptor expression. Chicken skeletal muscle cells after 7 days in culture were treated with 0.2-30 micrometers forskolin for a total of three days. At the end of the treatment period, both the concentration of cAMP and the quantity of myosin heavy chain (MHC) were measured. Concentration of cAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 10-fold in a dose dependent manner. In contrast, the quantity of MHC was increased approximately 50% above control cells at 0.2 micrometers forskolin, but exhibited a gradual decline at higher levels of forskolin so that the quantity of MHC in cells treated with 30 micrometers forskolin was not significantly different from controls. Curiously, the intracellular concentration of cAMP which elicited the maximum increase in the quantity of MHC was only 40% higher than cAMP concentration in control cells.

  5. Effects of AMP derivatives on cyclic AMP levels in NG108-15 cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, Satoko; Nakanishi, Hironori; Kimura, Junko; Matsuoka, Isao

    2000-01-01

    In NG108-15 neuroblastoma×glioma hybrid cells, ATP stimulates intracellular cyclic AMP formation, which is inhibited by both adenosine (P1) and P2 receptor antagonists. In the present study, we examined the effects of several AMP derivatives in NG108-15 cells and mouse neuroblastoma N18TG-2 cells. Adenosine 2′-monophosphate (A2P), adenosine 3′-monophosphate (A3P) and adenosine 5′-phosphosulphate (A5PS) increased cyclic AMP levels with similar concentration-dependencies in NG108-15 cells. Increases in cyclic AMP by AMP derivatives were inhibited by the P2 receptor antagonist PPADS, but not by suramin. Effects of AMP derivatives were also inhibited by P1 receptor antagonists ZM241385, XAC, DPCPX and partially by alloxazine. The ecto-nucleotidase inhibitor α,β-methyleneADP was without effect. In contrast, AMP derivatives did not change cyclic AMP levels in N18TG-2 cells. Accumulation of cyclic AMP in N18TG-2 cells was stimulated by adenosine A2 receptor agonists CGS21680 and NECA, but not by ATP or β,γ-methyleneATP, agonists for cyclic AMP production in NG108-15 cells. Reverse transcription-coupled polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) analyses revealed that N18TG-2 cells express both A2A and A2B receptors, while NG108-15 cells express mainly A2A receptors. AMP derivatives did not affect the P2X and P2Y receptors expressed in NG108-15 cells. These results suggest that A2P, A3P and A5PS act as agonists for cyclic AMP production and that these compounds are valuable tools for determinating the mechanism of ATP-stimulated cyclic AMP response in NG108-15 cells. PMID:10725274

  6. Cyclic AMP in cervical mucus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Póvoa, H; Figueira, D R; Campos da Paz, A; Spichler, E R; Lopes, E R

    1981-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate normally stimulates motility of spermatozoa. Its concentration in cervical mucus was studied by an isotopic competitive method in 15 normal women aged between 20 and 50 years. Values were very high, particularly in the periovulatory period, with a mean (+/-SD) value of 167.90 +/- 154.96 nmol/l. These are very high when compared with values in other biological fluids (blood serum and urine).

  7. Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population is Up-Regulated by Increased Cyclic Amp Concentration in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, Kristin Y.; Vaughn, Jeffrey R.

    1999-01-01

    Skeletal muscle hypertrophy is promoted in vivo by administration of beta-drenergic receptor (bAR) agonists. Chicken skeletal muscle cells were treated with 1 (mu)M isoproterenol, a strong bAR agonist, between days 7 and 10 in culture. bAR population increased by approximately 40% during this treatment; however, the ability of the cells to synthesize cyclic AMP (cAMP) was diminished by two-fold. The quantity of myosin heavy chain (MHC) was not affected. To understand further the relationship between intracellular cAMP levels, bAR population, and muscle protein accumulation, intracellular cAMP levels were artificially elevated by treatment with 0-10 uM forskolin for up to three days. The basal concentration of CAMP in forskolin-treated cells increased up to 7-fold in a dose dependent manner. Increasing concentrations of forskolin also led to an increase in bAR population, with a maximum increase of approximately 40-60% at 10 uM forskolin. A maximum increase of 40-50% in the quantity of MHC was observed at 0.2 uM forskolin, but higher concentrations of forskolin reduced the quantity of MHC back to control levels. At 0.2 uM forskolin, intracellular levels of cAMP were higher by approximately 35%, and the (beta)AR population was higher by approximately 30%. Neither the number of muscle nuclei fused into myotubes nor the percentage of nuclei in myotubes were affected by forskolin at any of the concentrations studied.

  8. Cyclic AMP receptor protein-aequorin molecular switch for cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Daniel; Hamorsky, Krystal Teasley; Ensor, C Mark; Anderson, Kimberly W; Daunert, Sylvia

    2011-03-16

    Molecular switches are designer molecules that combine the functionality of two individual proteins into one, capable of manifesting an "on/off" signal in response to a stimulus. These switches have unique properties and functionalities and thus, can be employed as nanosensors in a variety of applications. To that end, we have developed a bioluminescent molecular switch for cyclic AMP. Bioluminescence offers many advantages over fluorescence and other detection methods including the fact that there is essentially zero background signal in physiological fluids, allowing for more sensitive detection and monitoring. The switch was created by combining the properties of the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP), a transcriptional regulatory protein from E. Coli that binds selectively to cAMP with those of aequorin, a bioluminescent photoprotein native of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria . Genetic manipulation to split the genetic coding sequence of aequorin in two and genetically attach the fragments to the N and C termini of CRP resulted in a hybrid protein molecular switch. The conformational change experienced by CRP upon the binding of cyclic AMP is suspected to result in the observed loss of the bioluminescent signal from aequorin. The "on/off" bioluminescence can be modulated by cyclic AMP over a range of several orders of magnitude in a linear fashion in addition to the capacity to detect changes in cellular cyclic AMP of intact cells exposed to different external stimuli without the need to lyse the cells. We envision that the molecular switch could find applications in vitro as well as In Vivo cyclic AMP detection and/or imaging.

  9. The CytR repressor antagonizes cyclic AMP-cyclic AMP receptor protein activation of the deoCp2 promoter of Escherichia coli K-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Martinussen, J; Møllegaard, N E

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the regulation of the Escherichia coli deoCp2 promoter by the CytR repressor and the cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) complexed to cAMP. Promoter regions controlled by these two proteins characteristically contain tandem cAMP-CRP binding sites. Here we show that (i) Cyt......AMP-CRP complex; (iii) introduction of point mutations in either CRP target resulted in loss of CytR regulation; and (iv) regulation by CytR of deletion mutants lacking CRP-2 could be specifically reestablished by increasing the intracellular concentration of CytR. These findings indicate that both CRP targets...

  10. Transcriptomic analysis of cyclic AMP response in bovine cumulus cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, D R; Guillemette, C; Sirard, M A; Richard, F J

    2015-09-01

    Acquisition of oocyte developmental competence needs to be understood to improve clinical outcomes of assisted reproduction. The stimulation of cumulus cell concentration of cyclic adenosine 3'5'-monophosphate (cAMP) by pharmacological agents during in vitro maturation (IVM) participates in improvement of oocyte quality. However, precise coordination and downstream targets of cAMP signaling in cumulus cells are largely unknown. We have previously demonstrated better embryo development after cAMP stimulation for first 6 h during IVM. Using this model, we investigated cAMP signaling in cumulus cells through in vitro culture of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) in the presence of cAMP raising agents: forskolin, IBMX, and dipyridamole (here called FID treatment). Transcriptomic analysis of cumulus cells indicated that FID-induced differentially expressed transcripts were implicated in cumulus expansion, steroidogenesis, cell metabolism, and oocyte competence. Functional genomic analysis revealed that protein kinase-A (PKA), extracellular signal regulated kinases (ERK1/2), and calcium (Ca(2+)) pathways as key regulators of FID signaling. Inhibition of PKA (H89) in FID-supplemented COCs or substitution of FID with calcium ionophore (A23187) demonstrated that FID activated primarily the PKA pathway which inhibited ERK1/2 phosphorylation and was upstream of calcium signaling. Furthermore, inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation by FID supported a regulation by dual specific phosphatase (DUSP1) via PKA. Our findings imply that cAMP (FID) regulates cell metabolism, steroidogenesis, intracellular signaling and cumulus expansion through PKA which modulates these functions through optimization of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and coordination of calcium signaling. These findings have implications for development of new strategies for improving oocyte in vitro maturation leading to better developmental competence. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Microgravity changes in heart structure and cyclic-AMP metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpott, D. E.; Fine, A.; Kato, K.; Egnor, R.; Cheng, L.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of microgravity on cardiac ultrastructure and cyclic AMP metabolism in tissues of rats flown on Spacelab 3 are reported. Light and electron microscope studies of cell structure, measurements of low and high Km phosphodiesterase activity, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity, and regulatory subunit compartmentation show significant deviations in flight animals when compared to ground controls. The results indicate that some changes have occurred in cellular responses associated with catecholamine receptor interactions and intracellular signal processing.

  12. Cyclic AMP Signaling: A Molecular Determinant of Peripheral Nerve Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Eric P.; Assi, Mazen; Pearse, Damien D.

    2014-01-01

    Disruption of axonal integrity during injury to the peripheral nerve system (PNS) sets into motion a cascade of responses that includes inflammation, Schwann cell mobilization, and the degeneration of the nerve fibers distal to the injury site. Yet, the injured PNS differentiates itself from the injured central nervous system (CNS) in its remarkable capacity for self-recovery, which, depending upon the length and type of nerve injury, involves a series of molecular events in both the injured neuron and associated Schwann cells that leads to axon regeneration, remyelination repair, and functional restitution. Herein we discuss the essential function of the second messenger, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP), in the PNS repair process, highlighting the important role the conditioning lesion paradigm has played in understanding the mechanism(s) by which cyclic AMP exerts its proregenerative action. Furthermore, we review the studies that have therapeutically targeted cyclic AMP to enhance endogenous nerve repair. PMID:25177696

  13. Discovery of a cAMP deaminase that quenches cyclic AMP-dependent regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Alissa M; Feng, Youjun; Raushel, Frank M; Cronan, John E

    2013-12-20

    An enzyme of unknown function within the amidohydrolase superfamily was discovered to catalyze the hydrolysis of the universal second messenger, cyclic-3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). The enzyme, which we have named CadD, is encoded by the human pathogenic bacterium Leptospira interrogans. Although CadD is annotated as an adenosine deaminase, the protein specifically deaminates cAMP to cyclic-3',5'-inosine monophosphate (cIMP) with a kcat/Km of 2.7 ± 0.4 × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1) and has no activity on adenosine, adenine, or 5'-adenosine monophosphate (AMP). This is the first identification of a deaminase specific for cAMP. Expression of CadD in Escherichia coli mimics the loss of adenylate cyclase in that it blocks growth on carbon sources that require the cAMP-CRP transcriptional activator complex for expression of the cognate genes. The cIMP reaction product cannot replace cAMP as the ligand for CRP binding to DNA in vitro and cIMP is a very poor competitor of cAMP activation of CRP for DNA binding. Transcriptional analyses indicate that CadD expression represses expression of several cAMP-CRP dependent genes. CadD adds a new activity to the cAMP metabolic network and may be a useful tool in intracellular study of cAMP-dependent processes.

  14. Cyclic AMP system in muscle tissue during prolonged hypokinesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipenko, Y. A.; Bubeyev, Y. A.; Korovkin, B. F.; Mikhaleva, N. P.

    1980-01-01

    Components of the cyclic Adenosine-cyclic-35-monophosphate (AMP) system in the muscle tissue of white rats were studied during 70-75 days of hypokinesia, created by placing the animals in small booths which restricted their movements, and during the readaptation period. In the initial period, cyclic AMP levels and the activities of phosphodiesterase and adenylate cyclase in muscle tissue were increased. The values for these indices were roughly equal for controls and experimental animals during the adaptation period, but on the 70th day of the experiment cAMP levels dropped, phosphodiesterase activity increased, and the stimulative effect of epinephrine on the activity of adenylate cyclase decreased. The indices under study normalized during the readaptation period.

  15. Cyclic AMP response element binding protein and brain-derived ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhu

    The transcription factor cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB) and the neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are targets of diverse classes of antidepressants and are known to be regulated in animal models and in patients suffering from depression. Given their role in neuronal plasticity, ...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1230 - Cyclic AMP test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862... measure the level of adenosine 3′, 5′-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) in plasma, urine, and other body fluids... hypercalcemia (elevated levels of serum calcium.) (b) Classification. Class II. ...

  17. Molecular basis of the synergistic inhibition of platelet function by nitrovasodilators and activators of adenylate cyclase: inhibition of cyclic AMP breakdown by cyclic GMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, D H; Haslam, R J

    1990-05-01

    We investigated the roles of cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP in the inhibition of rabbit platelet aggregation and degranulation by two nitrovasodilators, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1; the active metabolite of molsidomine), with particular reference to the synergistic interaction of these drugs with prostaglandin E1 (PGE1). Changes in platelet cyclic [3H]GMP and cyclic [3H]AMP were measured by rapid and sensitive prelabeling techniques, the validity of which were confirmed by radioimmunoassays. Incubation of the platelets with 0.1 to 10 microM SNP alone for 0.5 min caused progressively greater inhibitions of platelet function associated with large dose-dependent increases in cyclic [3H]GMP and 1.4- to 3.0-fold increases in cyclic [3H]AMP. However, addition of SNP with the adenylate cyclase activator, PGE1, at a concentration of the latter that had little effect alone, caused much larger increases in cyclic [3H]AMP and greatly enhanced the inhibition of platelet aggregation. SIN-1 had effects similar to those of SNP, although it was less active. The adenylate cyclase inhibitor 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine (DDA) diminished the increases in cyclic [3H]AMP caused by SNP or SIN-1 in both the presence and absence of PGE1 but reduced the inhibition of platelet function caused by the nitrovasodilators only in the presence of PGE1. These results suggest that, although cyclic GMP may mediate the inhibition of rabbit platelet function by high concentrations of nitrovasodilators added alone, the synergistic interaction of lower concentrations with PGE1 depends on an enhanced accumulation of cyclic AMP. Synergistic effects on cyclic [3H]AMP accumulation were also observed on incubation of platelets with SNP and adenosine, another activator of adenylate cyclase. Hemoglobin, which binds nitric oxide, blocked or reversed the increases in both cyclic [3H]GMP and cyclic [3H]AMP in platelets caused by the nitrovasodilators added either alone or with PGE1

  18. Adenosine A2B-receptor-mediated cyclic AMP accumulation in primary rat astrocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Peakman, M C; Hill, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    1. The effects of adenosine receptor agonists and antagonists on the accumulation of cyclic AMP have been investigated in primary cultures of rat astrocytes. 2. Adenosine A2-receptor stimulation caused a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of [3H]-cyclic AMP in cells prelabelled with [3H]-adenine. The rank order of agonist potencies was 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA; EC50 = 1 microM) > adenosine (EC50 = 5 microM) > 2-chloroadenosine (EC50 = 20 microM) >> CGS 21680 (EC5...

  19. Cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activity in human gingival carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoto, Giuseppe; Fioroni, Massimiliano; Rubini, Corrado; Di Nicola, Maurizio; Di Pietrantonio, Francesco; Di Matteo, Elisabetta; Piattelli, Adriano

    2004-05-01

    The phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are responsible for the hydrolysis of the second messengers, cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP), to their corresponding monophosphates with a fundamental role in the transduction of the intracellular signals. At least 11 different enzymatic isoforms have been identified, which are listed according to their specificity or affinity for the substratum, identity of the amino acid sequence, cofactor, and inhibitor sensitivity. Variations in PDE activity have been found in different pathologies, and they have also been correlated to different pathological e/o physiological mechanisms, such as cellular differentiation, apoptosis, and tumor invasivity. In this study, we have evaluated cAMP PDE activity in patients with carcinoma of the gingiva, with the purpose of correlating differences in its development and progression. The same enzymatic activity has been used to evaluate differences between patients with lymph node involvement (group N(+)), and patients without lymph node involvement (N(-)). The analysis of PDE activity and the cAMP assay was performed by reverse-phase HPLC on samples of fresh or frozen gingival tissues. Analysis of cAMP was confirmed with the enzyme-linked immunoabsorption assay (EIA). The differences between control and N(-) groups (P = 0.0433), and between control and N(+) groups (P = 0.0156) were statistically significant. PDE3A was also evaluated immunohistochemically in lymph-node negative and lymph-node positive cases. The differences between the two groups were statistically significant (P = 0.0397).

  20. Modification of radiation-induced division delay by caffeine analogues and dibutyryl cyclic AMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimler, B.F.; Leeper, D.B.; Snyder, M.H.; Rowley, R.; Schneiderman, M.H. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA). Hospital)

    1982-01-01

    The mitotic selection procedure for cell cycle analysis was utilized to investigate the concentration-dependent modification of x-radiation-induced division delay in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells by methyl xanthines (caffeine, theophylline, and theobromine) and by dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The methyl xanthines (concentrations from 0.5 to 1000 ..mu..g/ml) all reduced radiation-induced division delay with the effect being linear between approximately 100 and 1000 ..mu..g/ml. After doses of 100-300 rad, delay was reduced by 75, 94 or 83 per cent at 1000 ..mu..g/ml for each drug, respectively. However, the addition of dibutyryl cyclic AMP had an opposite effect: radiation-induced delay was increased by the concentration range of 0.3 to 300 ..mu..g/ml. These results indicate that in mammalian cells the control of cell cycle progression and the modification of radiation-induced division delay are not simply related to intracellular levels of cyclic AMP. Rather, there appear to be at least two competing mechanisms which are differentially affected by caffeine analogues or by direct addition of dibutyryl cyclic AMP. The direct effect of caffeine and the methyl xanthines on membrane calcium permeability is considered.

  1. [Early cellular alterations induced by myocardial hypoxia: possible role of cyclic AMP (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Leiris, J; Bégué, J M; Gauduel, Y; Feuvray, D

    1980-01-01

    The ability of endogenous myocardial catecholamines to participate in the development of myocardial cellular alterations during a short period of severe hypoxia (30 min) was studied in isolated, Langendorff-perfused rat heart preparation, arrested by a high potassium concentration (16 mM) and perfused in the absence of exogenous substrate (Table I). Tyramine, which accelerated catecholamine depletion, also increased myocardial cell damage as assessed by a higher lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and a more marked reduction in cellular levels of high energy phosphates and glycogen (Table II). On the other hand, under conditions of beta-blockade (atenolol), hypoxia-induced tissular damage was reduced (Table II). These changes could be related to modifications in the cellular content of cyclic AMP (cAMP) since cAMP was consistently higher during the first 30 min of hypoxic perfusion than in control normoxic hearts (Table III) whereas cyclic GMP content remained unchanged. Moreover, interventions increasing cellular content of cAMP (theophylline, dibutyryl-cAMP) also increased hypoxic damage (Table IV), whereas N-methyl imidazole which reduced cellular content of cAMP lessened hypoxia-induced cellular alterations (Table IV). It is concluded that cellular lesions developing during the first 30 min of hypoxia in isolated arrested rat heart preparation perfused without exogenous substrate could be related to intracellular accumulation of cAMP occurring under the effect of endogenous catecholamine release.

  2. Activation of insect cell adenylate cyclase by Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxins and melittin. Toxicity is independent of cyclic AMP.

    OpenAIRE

    Knowles, B H; Farndale, R W

    1988-01-01

    Insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) delta-endotoxins are cytolytic to a range of insect cell lines in vitro. Addition of Bt var. aizawai or var. israelensis toxins to Mamestra brassicae (cabbage moth) cells in vitro increased intracellular cyclic AMP, which was paralleled by activation of adenylate cyclase in isolated membranes. Var. kurstaki toxin, which does not lyse M. brassicae cells, had no effect on cyclic AMP concentrations in intact cells, but was able to stimulate adenylate cycl...

  3. Cytokinin activity of N6,O2'-dibutyryl cyclic AMP and N6-butyryladenine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekhuijzen, H.M.; Overeem, J.C.

    Adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and N6,O2′-dibutyryl adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (DBcAMP) were tested for relative growth promoting activity in the soybean callus bio-assay. In contrast to cAMP, DBcAMP showed cytokinin activity. N6-butyryladenine and DBcAMP were found to be

  4. Cyclic AMP-dependent secretion of Ca 19-9 by LS174T human colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchia, Vincenzo; Gargiulo, Maria; Terracciano, Daniela; Di Carlo, Angelina; Mariano, Angela

    2002-01-01

    Prolonged increase of cyclic adenosine-monophosphate (cAMP) level in culture medium of a human colon cancer cell (LS174T) inhibits cellular growth and stimulates Ca 19-9 expression. The raise in cAMP level was produced by dibutyryl cyclic AMP (DBcAMP) or by forskolin an agent acting at the level of cAMP generation. Both these agents in a range of concentration between 10(-3)-10(-5) M have an inhibitory effect on the growth which is dose and time dependent. The inhibition was reversible as demonstrated by complete restoration of cell growth soon after the withdrawal of the substances from the culture medium. When cAMP levels in culture medium was raised, an increase in Ca 19-9 expression was observed and it appears that cyclic nucleotides have at least two effects: the first to cause rapid release of already synthesized Ca 19-9 and second to stimulate new antigen synthesis. The findings of the present study demonstrated that LS174T cells are unable to proliferate upon sustained accumulation of intracellular cyclic AMP suggesting the use of strategies able to increase cAMP levels for therapy of colon cancer. Furthermore, the finding that cAMP may also be a regulator of Ca 19-9 synthesis and release indicates the utility of cell line LS174T as a model for studies on the mechanism of synthesis and secretion of specific tumoral markers in colon cancer.

  5. Cyclic GMP from the surrounding somatic cells regulates cyclic AMP and meiosis in the mouse oocyte

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rachael P. Norris; William J. Ratzan; Marina Freudzon; Lisa M. Mehlmann; Judith Krall; Matthew A. Movsesian; Huanchen Wang; Hengming Ke; Viacheslav O. Nikolaev; Laurinda A. Jaffe

    2009-01-01

    .... Using FRET-based cyclic nucleotide sensors in follicle-enclosed mouse oocytes, we find that cGMP passes through gap junctions into the oocyte, where it inhibits the hydrolysis of cAMP by the phosphodiesterase PDE3A...

  6. Role of cyclic AMP in the eye with glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Myoung Sup; Kim, Keun-Young; Ju, Won-Kyu

    2017-02-01

    Glaucoma is characterized by a slow and progressive degeneration of the optic nerve, including retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons in the optic nerve head (ONH), leading to visual impairment. Despite its high prevalence, the biological basis of glaucoma pathogenesis still is not yet fully understood, and the factors contributing to its progression are currently not well characterized. Intraocular pressure (IOP) is the only modifiable risk factor, and reduction of IOP is the standard treatment for glaucoma. However, lowering IOP itself is not always effective for preserving visual function in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma. The second messenger cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) regulates numerous biological processes in the central nervous system including the retina and the optic nerve. Although recent studies revealed that cAMP generated by adenylyl cyclases (ACs) is important in regulating aqueous humor dynamics in ocular tissues, such as the ciliary body and trabecular meshwork, as well as cell death and growth in the retina and optic nerve, the functional role and significance of cAMP in glaucoma remain to be elucidated. In this review, we will discuss the functional role of cAMP in aqueous humor dynamics and IOP regulation, and review the current medications, which are related to the cAMP signaling pathway, for glaucoma treatment. Also, we will further focus on cAMP signaling in RGC growth and regeneration by soluble AC as well as ONH astrocytes by transmembrane ACs to understand its potential role in the pathogenesis of glaucoma neurodegeneration. [BMB Reports 2017; 50(2): 60-70].

  7. Chemotaxis to cyclic AMP and folic acid is mediated by different G proteins in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kesbeke, Fanja; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Wit, René J.W. de; Snaar-Jagalska, B. Ewa

    1990-01-01

    Mutant Frigid A (fgdA) of Dictyostelium discoideum is defective in a functional Gα2 subunit of a G protein and is characterized by a complete blockade of the cyclic AMP-mediated sensory transduction steps, including cyclic AMP relay, chemotaxis and the cyclic GMP response. Folic acid-mediated

  8. Second Messenger Signaling in Bacillus subtilis: Accumulation of Cyclic di-AMP Inhibits Biofilm Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundlach, Jan; Rath, Hermann; Herzberg, Christina; Mäder, Ulrike; Stülke, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    The Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis produces the essential second messenger signaling nucleotide cyclic di-AMP. In B. subtilis and other bacteria, c-di-AMP has been implicated in diverse functions such as control of metabolism, cell division and cell wall synthesis, and potassium transport. To enhance our understanding of the multiple functions of this second messenger, we have studied the consequences of c-di-AMP accumulation at a global level by a transcriptome analysis. C-di-AMP accumulation affected the expression of about 700 genes, among them the two major operons required for biofilm formation. The expression of both operons was severely reduced both in the laboratory and a non-domesticated strain upon accumulation of c-di-AMP. In excellent agreement, the corresponding strain was unable to form complex colonies. In B. subtilis, the transcription factor SinR controls the expression of biofilm genes by binding to their promoter regions resulting in transcription repression. Inactivation of the sinR gene restored biofilm formation even at high intracellular c-di-AMP concentrations suggesting that the second messenger acts upstream of SinR in the signal transduction pathway. As c-di-AMP accumulation did not affect the intracellular levels of SinR, we conclude that the nucleotide affects the activity of SinR.

  9. Phosphodiesterase 3 inhibitor cilostazol induces migraine-like attacks via cyclic AMP increase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Song; Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-01-01

    The initiating mechanisms of migraine attacks are very complex but may involve the cyclic AMP signalling pathway. It is unknown whether intracellular cyclic AMP accumulation induces migraine attacks. We investigated whether administration of cilostazol, which causes cyclic AMP accumulation, may...... and that cilostazol-induced attacks responded to their usual migraine treatment. Median time of medication intake was 6 h (range 4-11 h). The present study suggests that intracellular cyclic AMP accumulation plays a crucial role in migraine induction. This knowledge is a further step in our understanding...

  10. Species-specific aggregation factor in sponges. VII. Its effect on cyclic amp and cyclic gmp metabolism in cells of Geodia cydonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, W E; Müller, I; Zahn, R K; Kurelec, B

    1978-01-01

    In dissociated single cells from the sponge Geodia cydonium, DNA synthesis is initiated after incubation with a homologous, soluble aggregation factor. During the DNA-initiation phase the cyclic AMP- and cyclic GMP levels vary drastically; the cyclic AMP content drops from 2.2 pmol/10(6) cells to 0.3 pmol/10(6) cells while the cyclic GMP content increases from 0.6 pmol to 3.7 pmol/10(6) cells. The activity of neither the adenylate cyclase nor of the guanylate cyclase isolated from cells which have been incubated for different periods of time with the aggregation factor, is changed. The soluble as well as the particulate enzyme activities were checked in vitro. The cyclic nucleotide receptors have been isolated from the sponge cells and characterized with respect to their molecular weight, dissociation constant for cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP and intracellular concentration. None of these parameters are altered during aggregation factor-mediated DNA initiation. From these data it is concluded that the regulation of cyclic nucleotide levels is a consequence of a changed activity of nucleotide cyclases or of phosphodiesterases, but this is presumably not caused by a changed rate of synthesis of nucleotide cyclases or of cyclic nucleotide receptors.

  11. Activation of insect cell adenylate cyclase by Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxins and melittin. Toxicity is independent of cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, B H; Farndale, R W

    1988-01-01

    Insecticidal Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) delta-endotoxins are cytolytic to a range of insect cell lines in vitro. Addition of Bt var. aizawai or var. israelensis toxins to Mamestra brassicae (cabbage moth) cells in vitro increased intracellular cyclic AMP, which was paralleled by activation of adenylate cyclase in isolated membranes. Var. kurstaki toxin, which does not lyse M. brassicae cells, had no effect on cyclic AMP concentrations in intact cells, but was able to stimulate adenylate cyclase in membrane preparations. In contrast, the bee-venom toxin melittin, which is also cytolytic, increased intracellular cyclic AMP in whole cells, but inhibited adenylate cyclase in isolated membranes. Octopamine and forskolin also increased cyclic AMP in cells, but were not cytolytic. When added to cells at concentrations exceeding their LC90 (concentration causing 90% cell death), melittin and var. israelensis toxins caused cell lysis without a concomitant increase in intracellular cyclic AMP. Taken together, these results suggest that activation of adenylate cyclase by cytolytic toxins is a secondary effect (related perhaps to interactions of these toxins with membrane lipids) and is neither necessary nor sufficient for cytolysis. Images Fig. 6. PMID:2844167

  12. Regulatory Action of Calcium Ion on Cyclic AMP-Enhanced Expression of Implantation-Related Factors in Human Endometrial Cells.

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    Kazuya Kusama

    Full Text Available Decidualization of human endometrial stroma and gland development is mediated through cyclic AMP (cAMP, but the role of intracellular calcium ion (Ca2+ on cAMP mediated-signaling in human endometrial stroma and glandular epithelia has not been well-characterized. The present study was designed to investigate the role of intracellular Ca2+ on cAMP mediated-decidualization and gland maturation events, which can be identified by the up-regulation of prolactin and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP1 in human endometrial stromal cells (ESCs, and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2 and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and glandular epithelial EM-1 cells. Increases in decidual prolactin and IGFBP-1 transcript levels, induced by cAMP-elevating agents forskolin or dibutyryl cyclic AMP, were inhibited by Ca2+ influx into ESCs with Ca2+ ionophores (alamethicin, ionomycin in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, inhibitors of Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel (VDCC, nifedipine and verapamil, enhanced the decidual gene expression. Furthermore, dantrolene, an inhibitor of Ca2+ release from the intracellular Ca2+ store, up-regulated prolactin and IGFBP-1 expression. Ca2+ ionophores decreased intracellular cAMP concentrations, whereas nifedipine, verapamil or dantrolene increased cAMP concentrations in ESCs. In glandular epithelial cells, similar responses in COX2 expression and PGE2 production were found when intracellular cAMP levels were up-regulated by decreases in Ca2+ concentrations. Thus, a marked decrease in cytosolic Ca2+ levels caused the elevation of cAMP concentrations, resulting in enhanced expression of implantation-related factors including decidual markers. These findings suggest that fluctuation in cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations alters intracellular cAMP levels, which then regulate differentiation of endometrial stromal and glandular epithelial cells.

  13. Bromocriptine and lisuride stimulate the accumulation of cyclic AMP in intact slices but not in homogenates of rat neostriatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saiani, L; Trabucchi, M; Tonon, G C; Spano, P F

    1979-09-01

    The effects of bromocriptine and lisuride on cyclic AMP concentrations in homogenates and in intact slices of rat neostriatum were investigated. Significant increases in cyclic AMP concentration were found after a 10-min exposure to bromocriptine and lisuride in striatal intact slices. On the contrary, as previously found, the two dopaminergic ergot derivatives did not stimulate dopamine-senstiive adenylate cyclase present in striatal homogenates. The stimulatory effects observed only in intact tissues were blocked by the specific dopamine receptor blocking agent fluphenazine. It is tempting to conclude that dopaminergic ergot derivatives have a site of action different from that stimulated by classic dopamine agonists in tissue homogenates.

  14. 8-pCPT-conjugated cyclic AMP analogs exert thromboxane receptor antagonistic properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sand, Carsten; Grandoch, Maria; Boergermann, Christof; Weernink, Paschal A. Oude; Mahlke, Yvonne; Schwindenhammer, Benjamin; Weber, Artur-Aron; Fischer, Jens W.; Jakobs, Karl H.; Schmidt, Martina

    Membrane-permeable 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-2'-O-methyl cyclic AMP (8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP) has been shown to specifically activate cAMP- regulated Epac proteins, without direct effects on protein kinase A and protein kinase G. During isometric tension measurements in thoracic aortic rings from Wistar

  15. Effect of Glucagon on Net Splanchnic Cyclic AMP Production in Normal and Diabetic Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liljenquist, John E.; Bomboy, James D.; Lewis, Stephen B.; Sinclair-Smith, Bruce C.; Felts, Philip W.; Lacy, William W.; Crofford, Oscar B.; Liddle, Grant W.

    1974-01-01

    Glucagon activates hepatic adenylate cyclase, thereby increasing acutely the liver content of cyclic AMP (cAMP) as well as the release of cAMP into the hepatic vein. Insulin, on the other hand, antagonizes this glucagon-mediated cAMP production, thus providing a hypothetical mechanism through which insulin might correct some of the metabolic abnormalities of diabetes. To study this hormonal interaction in man, net splanchnic cAMP production (NScAMPP) was investigated in normal and insulin-dependent diabetic men under basal conditions and in response to intravenous glucagon, 50 ng/kg/min for 2 h. In normals (n=19), basal hepatic vein cAMP concentration was 23.6±1.1 nM and NScAMPP was 1.7±0.6 nmol/min. Glucagon stimulated NScAMPP in four normal subjects to a peak of 99.6±43 nmol/min at 25 min with a subsequent fall to 12.4±5.1 nmol/min by 90 min despite continuing glucagon infusion. Endogenous insulin secretion was stimulated as indicated by rising levels of immunoreactive insulin and C-peptide (connecting peptide) immunoreactivity, raising the possibility that endogenous insulin might be responsible for the fall in NScAMPP that followed the initial spike. In the diabetics (n=8), basal hepatic vein cAMP concentration was 24.7±1.2 nM and NScAMPP was undetectable. Glucagon stimulated NScAMPP in five diabetics to a peak of 169.9±42.6 with a subsequent fall to 17.4±3.9 nmol/min by 90 min even though endogenous insulin secretion was not stimulated (no rise in C-peptide immunoreactivity). Although the mean increase in NScAMPP was greater in the diabetics, the two groups did not differ significantly. Conclusions. In normal resting man the liver is a significant source of circulating cAMP. Diabetics do not release abnormally large amounts of hepatic cAMP under basal conditions. Glucagon markedly enhances hepatic cAMP release with a spike-decline pattern in both normal and diabetic men. The decline in hepatic cAMP release despite continuing glucagon stimulation is due

  16. Contemporary concepts in studies on cyclic AMP and its role in the inflammatory reaction

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    Krzysztof Pociecha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Although cyclic AMP (cAMP was discovered more than 50 years ago, new reports of unknown functions of this nucleotide still appear in the literature. It is synthesized from adenosine triphosphate in a reaction catalysed by adenylyl cyclase. In mammalian cells nine membrane-associated and one soluble adenylyl cyclase isoforms occur. Most of them interact with Gs- or Gi-protein coupled receptors. The only way of cAMP degradation is the reaction of hydrolysis catalyzed by phosphodiesterase. In humans there are 11 families of these enzymes, which differ in substrate affinity, structure, place of occurrence and mechanism of regulation. Modulation of activity of these enzymes is an important direction in the search for new drugs. The effectors of cAMP are: protein kinase A (PKA, Epac proteins, and cAMP-dependent ion channels. In the course of the inflammatory response, the increase in cAMP level may lead to an increase in IL-10 expression, inhibition of TNF-α, IL-12, and MIP-1β release, as well as to a reduction inthe permeability of blood vessels. In addition, cAMP regulates the process of phagocytosis. In the majority of cases, acting via PKA it induces cell apoptosis, and by activating Epac proteins it inhibits cell death. It has been shown that the levels of cAMP vary in different intracellular spaces due to the discretely positioned proteins responsible for its synthesis and breakdown. Moreover, the enzymatic pathway responsible for the extracellular degradation of cAMP has been discovered. Two transporters, ABCC4 and ABCC5, are involved in the transport of cAMP outside the cells. Administration of drugs modulating the level of this nucleotide to rodents leads to changes in its concentrations in blood and/or animal tissues. Progress in research on cAMP has become possible to a large extent due to the emergence of new analytical methods for the determination of its concentrations in biological material.

  17. Binding of regulatory subunits of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase to cyclic CMP agarose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerschmidt, Andreas; Chatterji, Bijon; Zeiser, Johannes; Schröder, Anke; Genieser, Hans-Gottfried; Pich, Andreas; Kaever, Volkhard; Schwede, Frank; Wolter, Sabine; Seifert, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial adenylyl cyclase toxins CyaA from Bordetella pertussis and edema factor from Bacillus anthracis as well as soluble guanylyl cyclase α(1)β(1) synthesize the cyclic pyrimidine nucleotide cCMP. These data raise the question to which effector proteins cCMP binds. Recently, we reported that cCMP activates the regulatory subunits RIα and RIIα of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. In this study, we used two cCMP agarose matrices as novel tools in combination with immunoblotting and mass spectrometry to identify cCMP-binding proteins. In agreement with our functional data, RIα and RIIα were identified as cCMP-binding proteins. These data corroborate the notion that cAMP-dependent protein kinase may serve as a cCMP target.

  18. Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-mediated stimulation of adipocyte differentiation requires the synergistic action of Epac- and cAMP-dependent protein kinase-dependent processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Koefoed; Madsen, Lise; Pedersen, Lone Møller

    2008-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent processes are pivotal during the early stages of adipocyte differentiation. We show that exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), which functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Ras-like GTPases Rap1 and Rap2, was required for cAMP-dependent ......Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent processes are pivotal during the early stages of adipocyte differentiation. We show that exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), which functions as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Ras-like GTPases Rap1 and Rap2, was required for c......AMP-dependent stimulation of adipocyte differentiation. Epac, working via Rap, acted synergistically with cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A [PKA]) to promote adipogenesis. The major role of PKA was to down-regulate Rho and Rho-kinase activity, rather than to enhance CREB phosphorylation. Suppression of Rho......-kinase impaired proadipogenic insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling, which was restored by activation of Epac. This interplay between PKA and Epac-mediated processes not only provides novel insight into the initiation and tuning of adipocyte differentiation, but also demonstrates a new mechanism of c...

  19. CRP-Cyclic AMP Regulates the Expression of Type 3 Fimbriae via Cyclic di-GMP in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

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    Ching-Ting Lin

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae is the predominant pathogen isolated from liver abscesses of diabetic patients in Asian countries. However, the effects of elevated blood glucose levels on the virulence of this pathogen remain largely unknown. Type 3 fimbriae, encoded by the mrkABCDF genes, are important virulence factors in K. pneumoniae pathogenesis. In this study, the effects of exogenous glucose and the intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP signaling pathway on type 3 fimbriae expression regulation were investigated. The production of MrkA, the major subunit of type 3 fimbriae, was increased in glucose-rich medium, whereas cAMP supplementation reversed the effect. MrkA production was markedly increased by cyaA or crp deletion, but slightly decreased by cpdA deletion. In addition, the mRNA levels of mrkABCDF genes and the activity of PmrkA were increased in Δcrp strain, as well as the mRNA levels of mrkHIJ genes that encode cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP-related regulatory proteins that influence type 3 fimbriae expression. Moreover, the activities of PmrkHI and PmrkJ were decreased in ΔlacZΔcrp strain. These results indicate that CRP-cAMP down-regulates mrkABCDF and mrkHIJ at the transcriptional level. Further deletion of mrkH or mrkI in Δcrp strain diminished the production of MrkA, indicating that MrkH and MrkI are required for the CRP regulation of type 3 fimbriae expression. Furthermore, the high activity of PmrkHI in the ΔlacZΔcrp strain was diminished in ΔlacZΔcrpΔmrkHI, but increased in the ΔlacZΔcrpΔmrkJ strain. Deletion of crp increased the intracellular c-di-GMP concentration and reduced the phosphodiesterase activity. Moreover, we found that the mRNA levels of multiple genes related to c-di-GMP metabolism were altered in Δcrp strain. These indicate that CRP regulates type 3 fimbriae expression indirectly via the c-di-GMP signaling pathway. In conclusion, we found evidence of a coordinated regulation of type 3 fimbriae expression by the CRP-cAMP

  20. Radioimmunoassays for cyclic AMP cross-react with phosphodiesterase inhibitors and buffer components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinha, B; Semmler, J; Haen, E; Moeller, J; Endres, S

    We addressed the issue of cross-reactivity of several commonly used phosphodiesterase inhibitors with radioimmunoassays for cyclic AMP, after we had observed a considerably high cross-reactivity with a noncommercial antibody. Theophylline, pentoxifylline, penthydroxifylline (BL 194), albifylline

  1. The Cyclic AMP-Vfr Signaling Pathway in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Inhibited by Cyclic Di-GMP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almblad, Henrik; Harrison, Joe J; Rybtke, Morten

    2015-01-01

    as a direct result of elevated c-di-GMP content. Overproduction of c-di-GMP causes a decrease in the transcription of virulence factor genes that are regulated by the global virulence regulator Vfr. The low level of Vfr-dependent transcription is caused by a low level of its coactivator, cyclic AMP (cAMP...... infection give rise to rugose small colony variants (RSCVs), which are hyper-biofilm-forming mutants that commonly possess mutations that increase production of the biofilm-promoting secondary messenger cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP). We show that RSCVs display a decreased production of acute virulence factors......), which is decreased in response to a high level of c-di-GMP. Mutations that cause reversion of the RSCV phenotype concomitantly reactivate Vfr-cAMP signaling. Attempts to uncover the mechanism underlying the observed c-di-GMP-mediated lowering of cAMP content provided evidence that it is not caused...

  2. Cyclic Amp phosphodiesterase activity in normal and inflamed human dental pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoto, G; Menna, V; Serra, E; Santoleri, F; Perfetti, G; Ciavarelli, L; Trentini, P

    2004-01-01

    Cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase (cAMP PDE) seems to be important in pulp tissues. High levels of cAMP PDE have been demonstrated to be in dental pulp cells. In the present study cAMP PDE activity was analyzed in normal healthy human dental pulps, in reversible pulpitis and in irreversible pulpitis. Enzymatic cAMP PDE control values for normal healthy pulps were 12.14 +/- 3.74 nmols/mg of proteins. In reversible pulpitis the cAMP PDE activity increased almost 2.5 times. In irreversible pulpitis specimens the values increased 4.5 times compared with normal healthy pulps activity. The differences between the groups (control vs. reversible pulpitis and vs. irreversible pulpitis) were statistically significant. These results could point to a role of cAMP PDE in the initial pulp response after injury.

  3. The interplay between cyclic AMP and insulin during obesity development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkowski, Kamil

    Insulin and cAMP signalling are related to two opposite metabolic responses. Insulin secretion is elicited in response to food availability and trigger catabolic processes like lipogenesis and glycogen synthesis with a purpose of energy storage. On the other hand cAMP signalling is associated...

  4. Cyclic AMP Recruits a Discrete Intracellular Ca2+ Store by Unmasking Hypersensitive IP3 Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Konieczny

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3 stimulates Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, and the response is potentiated by 3′,5′-cyclic AMP (cAMP. We investigated this interaction in HEK293 cells using carbachol and parathyroid hormone (PTH to stimulate formation of IP3 and cAMP, respectively. PTH alone had no effect on the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, but it potentiated the Ca2+ signals evoked by carbachol. Surprisingly, however, the intracellular Ca2+ stores that respond to carbachol alone could be both emptied and refilled without affecting the subsequent response to PTH. We provide evidence that PTH unmasks high-affinity IP3 receptors within a discrete Ca2+ store. We conclude that Ca2+ stores within the ER that dynamically exchange Ca2+ with the cytosol maintain a functional independence that allows one store to be released by carbachol and another to be released by carbachol with PTH. Compartmentalization of ER Ca2+ stores adds versatility to IP3-evoked Ca2+ signals.

  5. Is the level of cyclic AMP in the pyloric caeca of the starfish Asterias rubens related to the reproductive cycle?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voogt, P.A.; Rheenen, J.W.A. van

    1984-01-01

    1. 1. Cyclic AMP levels were significantly higher (P = 0.01) in female than in male animals. The average difference found was 0.50 pmole/mg dry weight. 2. 2. Cyclic AMP levels were negatively correlated to the pyloric caeca-index. In females this correlation was −0.54 (P < 0.05). 3. 3. Cyclic

  6. Activation of the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway in endothelial cells exposed to cyclic strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, C. R.; Mills, I.; Du, W.; Kamal, K.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the involvement of the adenylyl cyclase/cyclic AMP/protein kinase A pathway (AC) in endothelial cells (EC) exposed to different levels of mechanical strain. Bovine aortic EC were seeded to confluence on flexible membrane-bottom wells. The membranes were deformed with either 150 mm Hg (average 10% strain) or 37.5 mm Hg (average 6% strain) vacuum at 60 cycles per minute (0.5 s strain; 0.5 s relaxation) for 0-60 min. The results demonstrate that at 10% average strain (but not 6% average strain) there was a 1.5- to 2.2-fold increase in AC, cAMP, and PKA activity by 15 min when compared to unstretched controls. Further studies revealed an increase in cAMP response element binding protein in EC subjected to the 10% average strain (but not 6% average strain). These data support the hypothesis that cyclic strain activates the AC/cAMP/PKA signal transduction pathway in EC which may occur by exceeding a strain threshold and suggest that cyclic strain may stimulate the expression of genes containing cAMP-responsive promoter elements.

  7. Control of potassium homeostasis is an essential function of the second messenger cyclic di-AMP in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundlach, Jan; Herzberg, Christina; Kaever, Volkhard; Gunka, Katrin; Hoffmann, Tamara; Weiß, Martin; Gibhardt, Johannes; Thürmer, Andrea; Hertel, Dietrich; Daniel, Rolf; Bremer, Erhard; Commichau, Fabian M; Stülke, Jörg

    2017-04-18

    The second messenger cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is essential in the Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis and in related pathogenic bacteria. It controls the activity of the conserved ydaO riboswitch and of several proteins involved in potassium (K(+)) uptake. We found that the YdaO protein was conserved among several different bacteria and provide evidence that YdaO functions as a K(+) transporter. Thus, we renamed the gene and protein KimA (K(+) importer A). Reporter activity assays indicated that expression beyond the c-di-AMP-responsive riboswitch of the kimA upstream regulatory region occurred only in bacteria grown in medium containing low K(+) concentrations. Furthermore, mass spectrometry analysis indicated that c-di-AMP accumulated in bacteria grown in the presence of high K(+) concentrations but not in low concentrations. A bacterial strain lacking all genes encoding c-di-AMP-synthesizing enzymes was viable when grown in medium containing low K(+) concentrations, but not at higher K(+) concentrations unless it acquired suppressor mutations in the gene encoding the cation exporter NhaK. Thus, our results indicated that the control of potassium homeostasis is an essential function of c-di-AMP. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  8. Montelukast inhibits neutrophil pro-inflammatory activity by a cyclic AMP-dependent mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ronald; Theron, Annette J; Gravett, Cornelia M; Steel, Helen C; Tintinger, Gregory R; Feldman, Charles

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose The objective of this study was to characterize the effects of the cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonist, montelukast (0.1–2 µmol·L−1), on Ca2+-dependent pro-inflammatory activities, cytosolic Ca2+ fluxes and intracellular cAMP in isolated human neutrophils activated with the chemoattractants, N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (1 µmol·L−1) and platelet-activating factor (200 nmol·L−1). Experimental approach Generation of reactive oxygen species was measured by lucigenin- and luminol-enhanced chemiluminescence, elastase release by a colourimetric assay, leukotriene B4 and cAMP by competitive binding ELISA procedures, and Ca2+ fluxes by fura-2/AM-based spectrofluorimetric and radiometric (45Ca2+) procedures. Key results Pre-incubation of neutrophils with montelukast resulted in dose-related inhibition of the generation of reactive oxygen species and leukotriene B4 by chemoattractant-activated neutrophils, as well as release of elastase, all of which were maximal at 2 µmol·L−1 (mean percentages of the control values of 30 ± 1, 12 ± 3 and 21 ± 3 respectively; P montelukast resulted in significant reductions in both post-peak cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations and store-operated Ca2+ influx. These montelukast-mediated alterations in Ca2+ handling by the cells were associated with a significant elevation in basal cAMP levels, which resulted from inhibition of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases. Conclusions and implications Montelukast, primarily a cysteinyl leukotriene (CysLT1) receptor antagonist, exhibited previously undocumented, secondary, neutrophil-directed anti-inflammatory properties, which appeared to be cAMP-dependent. PMID:19068077

  9. The Interplay between Cyclic AMP, MAPK, and NF-κB Pathways in Response to Proinflammatory Signals in Microglia

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    Mousumi Ghosh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP is an important intracellular regulator of microglial cell homeostasis and its negative perturbation through proinflammatory signaling results in microglial cell activation. Though cytokines, TNF-α and IL-1β, decrease intracellular cyclic AMP, the mechanism by which this occurs is poorly understood. The current study examined which signaling pathways are responsible for decreasing cyclic AMP in microglia following TNF-α stimulation and sought to identify the role cyclic AMP plays in regulating these pathways. In EOC2 microglia, TNF-α produced a dramatic reduction in cyclic AMP and increased cyclic AMP-dependent PDE activity that could be antagonized by Rolipram, myristoylated-PKI, PD98059, or JSH-23, implicating a role for PDE4, PKA, MEK, and NF-κB in this regulation. Following TNF-α there were significant increases in iNOS and COX-2 immunoreactivity, phosphorylated ERK1/2 and NF-κB-p65, IκB degradation, and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, which were reduced in the presence of high levels of cyclic AMP, indicating that reductions in cyclic AMP during cytokine stimulation are important for removing its inhibitory action on NF-κB activation and subsequent proinflammatory gene expression. Further elucidation of the signaling crosstalk involved in decreasing cyclic AMP in response to inflammatory signals may provide novel therapeutic targets for modulating microglial cell activation during neurological injury and disease.

  10. Organization of cyclic AMP-dependent connexin 43 in Swiss 3T3 cells attached to a cellulose substratum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faucheux, N; Dufresne, M; Nagel, M D

    2002-01-01

    We have previously shown that the adenylyl cyclase, which produces cyclic AMP (cAMP) in Swiss 3T3 cells, is activated by their attachment to a cellulose substratum (Cuprophan, CU). This substratum adsorbs vitronectin poorly, prevents cell spreading and causes them to aggregate. By contrast, cells spread out on polystyrene and contain low concentrations of cAMP. We have found that Connexin 43 (Cx 43) gap junction plaques are involved in this cell aggregation. MDL 12330 A, a specific inhibitor of adenylyl cyclase, prevented cell aggregation on CU and abolished Cx 43 channel clustering. But forskolin, a direct activator of adenylyl cyclase, and SBr cAMP, a cell-permeable analogue of cAMP, caused Cx 43 channel clustering in cells attached to polystyrene. Hence, Cx 43 channel clustering is regulated by cAMP in Swiss 3T3 cells. In addition, neither brefeldin A nor monensin (inhibitors of transit through the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus), abolished Cx 43 channel clustering in cells aggregated on CU. Thus, the Cx 43 that form clusters in cells attached to CU are not dependent upon the trafficking of Cx 43 from intracellular storage sites, but are probably reorganised from the plasma membrane.

  11. Identification of the Components Involved in Cyclic Di-AMP Signaling in Mycoplasma pneumoniae

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    Cedric Blötz

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria often use cyclic dinucleotides as second messengers for signal transduction. While the classical molecule c-di-GMP is involved in lifestyle selection, the functions of the more recently discovered signaling nucleotide cyclic di-AMP are less defined. For many Gram-positive bacteria, c-di-AMP is essential for growth suggesting its involvement in a key cellular function. We have analyzed c-di-AMP signaling in the genome-reduced pathogenic bacterium Mycoplasma pneumoniae. Our results demonstrate that these bacteria produce c-di-AMP, and we could identify the diadenylate cyclase CdaM (MPN244. This enzyme is the founding member of a novel family of diadenylate cyclases. Of two potential c-di-AMP degrading phosphodiesterases, only PdeM (MPN549 is active in c-di-AMP degradation, whereas NrnA (MPN140 was reported to degrade short oligoribonucleotides. As observed in other bacteria, both the c-di-AMP synthesizing and the degrading enzymes are essential for M. pneumoniae suggesting control of a major homeostatic process. To obtain more insights into the nature of this process, we have identified a c-di-AMP-binding protein from M. pneumoniae, KtrC. KtrC is the cytoplasmic regulatory subunit of the low affinity potassium transporter KtrCD. It is established that binding of c-di-AMP inhibits the KtrCD activity resulting in a limitation of potassium uptake. Our results suggest that the control of potassium homeostasis is the essential function of c-di-AMP in M. pneumoniae.

  12. Sustained cyclic AMP production by parathyroid hormone receptor endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrandon, Sébastien; Feinstein, Timothy N; Castro, Marian; Wang, Bin; Bouley, Richard; Potts, John T; Gardella, Thomas J; Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre

    2009-10-01

    Cell signaling mediated by the G protein-coupled parathyroid hormone receptor type 1 (PTHR) is fundamental to bone and kidney physiology. It has been unclear how the two ligand systems--PTH, endocrine and homeostatic, and PTH-related peptide (PTHrP), paracrine--can effectively operate with only one receptor and trigger different durations of the cAMP responses. Here we analyze the ligand response by measuring the kinetics of activation and deactivation for each individual reaction step along the PTHR signaling cascade. We found that during the time frame of G protein coupling and cAMP production, PTHrP(1-36) action was restricted to the cell surface, whereas PTH(1-34) had moved to internalized compartments where it remained associated with the PTHR and Galpha(s), potentially as a persistent and active ternary complex. Such marked differences suggest a mechanism by which PTH and PTHrP induce differential responses, and these results indicate that the central tenet that cAMP production originates exclusively at the cell membrane must be revised.

  13. Effect of drugs on lipid methylation, receptor-adenylate cyclase coupling and cyclic AMP secretion in Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Waarde, Aren; Van Haastert, P.J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Intercellular communication in Dictyostelium discoldeum takes place by means of cyclic AMP-induced cyclic AMP-synthesis and secretion. Since phospholipid methylation has been suggested to play a role in receptor-adenylate cyclase coupling, we examined the effects of transmethylation inhibitors on

  14. Diazepam increases the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis activity by a cyclic AMP-dependent mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, M Luisa; Abella, Cristina; Hernandez, Jesus

    2001-01-01

    Previous studies in this laboratory have shown that diazepam behaves as a phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE 4) inhibitor. It has been reported that PDE-4 inhibitors activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis in the rat. In the present study we have examined whether activation of the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is involved in the effect of diazepam on basal HPA axis activity. Acute systemic administration of diazepam (10 mg kg−1 i.p.) was found to increase the basal HPA axis activity, increasing the plasma concentrations of corticotrophin (ACTH) and corticosterone 30 min post injection. Diazepam also elevated cyclic AMP content of the hypothalamus. Pretreatment of the animals with dexamethasone (1 mg kg−1 s.c.) for 3 days completely abolished the effect of diazepam on HPA axis activity. The antagonists of central and peripheral benzodiazepine receptors, flumazenil (10 mg kg−1 i.p.) and PK 11195 (5 mg kg−1 i.p.) did not affect the diazepam induced increase of HPA axis activity nor did they have an effect per se. The increase in ACTH and corticosterone levels was significantly reduced by the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) inhibitor, H-89, given either subcutaneously (5 mg kg−1 s.c.) or intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.; 28 μg in 10 μl). The results indicate that diazepam can stimulate basal HPA axis activity in the rat by a cyclic AMP-dependent PKA mediated pathway. PMID:11498522

  15. The cyclic AMP cascade is altered in the fragile X nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Kelley

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FX, the most common heritable cause of mental retardation and autism, is a developmental disorder characterized by physical, cognitive, and behavioral deficits. FX results from a trinucleotide expansion mutation in the fmr1 gene that reduces levels of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP. Although research efforts have focused on FMRP's impact on mGluR signaling, how the loss of FMRP leads to the individual symptoms of FX is not known. Previous studies on human FX blood cells revealed alterations in the cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cAMP cascade. We tested the hypothesis that cAMP signaling is altered in the FX nervous system using three different model systems. Induced levels of cAMP in platelets and in brains of fmr1 knockout mice are substantially reduced. Cyclic AMP induction is also significantly reduced in human FX neural cells. Furthermore, cAMP production is decreased in the heads of FX Drosophila and this defect can be rescued by reintroduction of the dfmr gene. Our results indicate that a robust defect in cAMP production in FX is conserved across species and suggest that cAMP metabolism may serve as a useful biomarker in the human disease population. Reduced cAMP induction has implications for the underlying causes of FX and autism spectrum disorders. Pharmacological agents known to modulate the cAMP cascade may be therapeutic in FX patients and can be tested in these models, thus supplementing current efforts centered on mGluR signaling.

  16. Cyclic AMP inhibition of proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma cells is mediated by Akt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lunhua; Xie, Yili; Lou, Liguang

    2005-11-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP), one of the most important intracellular second messengers, has been reported to inhibit proliferation of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells via negatively regulating p42/44 mitogen-activated protein kinase. Here, we reported that cAMP inhibited the proliferation of HCC BEL-7402 cells via a novel mechanism. Forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase, inhibited fetal bovine serum (FBS)-stimulated BEL-7402 cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner, along with the inhibition of FBS-stimulated serine/threoine protein kinase Akt (also known as PKB) phosphorylation which is required for Akt activation and this effect was mimicked by 8-Br cAMP. Forskolin also inhibited Akt phosphorylation stimulated by other growth factors such as IGF-1, epidermal growth factor, and insulin. These inhibitions were found not only in BEL-7402 cells, but also in another HCC cell line SMMC-7721 cells. Myr-Akt (myristolated-Akt), a constitutively active Akt which was relatively resistant to cAMP inhibition, conferred BEL-7402 cells resistance to cAMP treatment. However, overexpression of Myr-Akt alone was not sufficient to stimulate BEL-7402 cell proliferation. cAMP inhibited FBS-stimulated Akt phosphorylation in a cAMP-dependent protein kinase-dependent manner. Further studies demonstrated that cAMP inhibited FBS-induced membrane localization of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK-1) which is a required process for PDK-1 to phosphorylate Akt, but had no significant effect on phosphoinositide 3-kinase activity. These results indicate that cAMP inhibition of proliferation of HCC cells is mediated by Akt and cAMP inhibits Akt activation via blocking membrane localization of PDK-1.

  17. The effect of in vitro procedures on cyclic AMP accumulation in human leucocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Torben; Friis, U G; Rasmussen, A K

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of various methodological procedures or protocols on cyclic AMP formation in human leucocytes. The data showed that: (1) ATP content and lactate production was unaffected by hypotonic lysis during leucocyte isolation; (2) there was a linear...

  18. Total biosynthesis of the cyclic AMP booster forskolin from Coleus forskohlii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pateraki, Irini; Andersen-Ranberg, Johan; Jensen, Nils Bjerg

    2017-01-01

    Forskolin is a unique structurally complex labdane type diterpenoid used in the treatment of glaucoma and heart failure based on its activity as a cyclic AMP booster. Commercial production of forskolin relies exclusively on extraction from its only known natural source, the plant Coleus forskohlii...

  19. The Mucosal Adjuvant Cyclic di-AMP Exerts Immune Stimulatory Effects on Dendritic Cells and Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libanova, Rimma; Lienenklaus, Stefan; Weiss, Siegfried; Guzmán, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    The cyclic di-nucleotide bis-(3′,5′)-cyclic dimeric adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is a candidate mucosal adjuvant with proven efficacy in preclinical models. It was shown to promote specific humoral and cellular immune responses following mucosal administration. To date, there is only fragmentary knowledge on the cellular and molecular mode of action of c-di-AMP. Here, we report on the identification of dendritic cells and macrophages as target cells of c-di-AMP. We show that c-di-AMP induces the cell surface up-regulation of T cell co-stimulatory molecules as well as the production of interferon-β. Those responses were characterized by in vitro experiments with murine and human immune cells and in vivo studies in mice. Analyses of dendritic cell subsets revealed conventional dendritic cells as principal responders to stimulation by c-di-AMP. We discuss the impact of the reported antigen presenting cell activation on the previously observed adjuvant effects of c-di-AMP in mouse immunization studies. PMID:24755640

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF P2-PURINOCEPTOR MEDIATED CYCLIC-AMP FORMATION IN MOUSE C2C12 MYOTUBES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HENNING, RH; DUIN, M; DENHERTOG, A; NELEMANS, A

    1 The formation of adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) and inositol(1,4,5)trisphosphate (Ins(1,4,5)P3), induced by ATP and other nucleotides was investigated in mouse C2Cl2 myotubes. 2 ATP (100 muM) and ATPgammaS (100 muM) caused a sustained increase in cyclic AMP content of the cells,

  1. From drought sensing to developmental control: evolution of cyclic AMP signaling in social amoebas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Allyson V; van Es, Saskia; Fouquet, Celine; Schaap, Pauline

    2008-10-01

    Amoebas and other protists commonly encyst when faced with environmental stress. Although little is known of the signaling pathways that mediate encystation, the analogous process of spore formation in dictyostelid social amoebas is better understood. In Dictyostelium discoideum, secreted cyclic AMP (cAMP) mediates the aggregation of starving amoebas and induces the differentiation of prespore cells. Intracellular cAMP acting on cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) triggers the maturation of spores and prevents their germination under the prevalent conditions of high osmolality in the spore head. The osmolyte-activated adenylate cyclase, ACG, produces cAMP for prespore differentiation and inhibition of spore germination. To retrace the origin of ACG function, we investigated ACG gene conservation and function in species that span the dictyostelid phylogeny. ACG genes, osmolyte-activated ACG activity, and osmoregulation of spore germination were detected in species that represent the 4 major groups of Dictyostelia. Unlike the derived species D. discoideum, many basal Dictyostelia have retained the ancestral mechanism of encystation from solitary amoebas. In these species and in solitary amoebas, encystation is independently triggered by starvation or by high osmolality. Osmolyte-induced encystation was accompanied by an increase in cAMP and prevented by inhibition of PKA, indicating that ACG and PKA activation mediate this response. We propose that high osmolality signals drought in soil amoebas and that developmental cAMP signaling in the Dictyostelia has evolved from this stress response.

  2. Cyclic AMP regulates the migration and invasion potential of human pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Noah P; Roy, Ishan; Hauser, Andrew D; Wilson, Jessica M; Williams, Carol L; Dwinell, Michael B

    2015-03-01

    Aggressive dissemination and metastasis of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) results in poor prognosis and marked lethality. Rho monomeric G protein levels are increased in pancreatic cancer tissue. As the mechanisms underlying PDAC malignancy are little understood, we investigated the role for cAMP in regulating monomeric G protein regulated invasion and migration of pancreatic cancer cells. Treatment of PDAC cells with cAMP elevating agents that activate adenylyl cyclases, forskolin, protein kinase A (PKA), 6-Bnz-cAMP, or the cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase inhibitor cilostamide significantly decreased migration and Matrigel invasion of PDAC cell lines. Inhibition was dose-dependent and not significantly different between forskolin or cilostamide treatment. cAMP elevating drugs not only blocked basal migration, but similarly abrogated transforming-growth factor-β-directed PDAC cell migration and invasion. The inhibitory effects of cAMP were prevented by the pharmacological blockade of PKA. Drugs that increase cellular cAMP levels decreased levels of active RhoA or RhoC, with a concomitant increase in phosphorylated RhoA. Diminished Rho signaling was correlated with the appearance of thickened cortical actin bands along the perimeter of non-motile forskolin or cilostamide-treated cells. Decreased migration did not reflect alterations in cell growth or programmed cell death. Collectively these data support the notion that increased levels of cAMP specifically hinder PDAC cell motility through F-actin remodeling. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Looking downstream: the role of cyclic AMP-regulated genes in axonal regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa M Siddiq

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP levels has proven to be one of the most effective means of overcoming inhibition of axonal regeneration by myelin-associated inhibitors such as myelin-associated glycoprotein, Nogo, and oligodendrocyte myelin glycoprotein. Pharmacological manipulation of cAMP through the administration of dibutyryl cAMP or rolipram leads to enhanced axonal growth both in vivo and in vitro, and importantly, upregulation of cAMP within dorsal root ganglion neurons is responsible for the conditioning lesion effect, which indicates that cAMP plays a significant role in the endogenous mechanisms that promote axonal regeneration. The effects of cAMP are transcription-dependent and are mediated through the activation of protein kinase A and the transcription factor CREB. This leads to the induction of a variety of genes, several of which have been shown to overcome myelin-mediated inhibition in their own right. In this review, we will highlight the pro-regenerative effects of arginase I, interleukin-6, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor, and metallothionein-I/II, and discuss their potential for therapeutic use in spinal cord injury.

  4. Selective enhancement of wnt4 expression by cyclic AMP-associated cooperation between rat central astrocytes and microglia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohnishi, Masatoshi, E-mail: ohnishi@fupharm.fukuyama-u.ac.jp [Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Graduate School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, 985-1 Sanzo, Higashimura-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, 729-0292 (Japan); Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, 985-1 Sanzo, Higashimura-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, 729-0292 (Japan); Urasaki, Tomoka [Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Graduate School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, 985-1 Sanzo, Higashimura-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, 729-0292 (Japan); Ochiai, Hiroyuki; Matsuoka, Kohei; Takeo, Shin; Harada, Tomoki; Ohsugi, Yoshihito [Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, 985-1 Sanzo, Higashimura-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, 729-0292 (Japan); Inoue, Atsuko [Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Graduate School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, 985-1 Sanzo, Higashimura-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, 729-0292 (Japan); Department of Pharmacotherapeutics, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Fukuyama University, 985-1 Sanzo, Higashimura-cho, Fukuyama, Hiroshima, 729-0292 (Japan)

    2015-11-13

    The wnt protein family has important members involved in cell differentiation, proliferation and plasticity expression; however, little is known about its biosynthesis processes. On the other hand, an increase in the intracerebral cyclic adenosine 3′, 5’-monophosphate (cAMP) level leads to synaptic plasticity via the de novo synthesis of any protein. Here, the effect of dibutyryl cAMP (dbcAMP), a membrane permeability cAMP analog, on the wnt family was investigated in rat primary-cultured glial cells containing astrocytes and microglia. Among wnt3a, 4, 5a, 7a and 11 mRNA, only wnt4 expression was increased by longer treatment (24 h), compared with short treatment (2 h), with dbcAMP in a concentration-dependent manner, and its effect reached statistical significance at 1 mM. In cultures of isolated astrocytes or microglia, wnt4 expression was not affected by 1 mM dbcAMP for 24 h, and microglial wnt4 protein was undetectable even when cells were treated with the drug. Mixed glial cells treated for 24 h with 1 mM dbcAMP showed significantly increased wnt4 protein, as well as mRNA. Immunofluorescence manifested that cells that expressed wnt4 protein were astrocytes, but not microglia. Intraperitoneal injection of 1.25 mg/kg rolipram, a phosphodiesterase (PDE) IV inhibitor that can pass through the blood brain barrier and inhibits cAMP degradation specifically, showed a tendency to increase wnt4 expression in the adult rat brain after 24 h, and the increases in wnt4 mRNA and protein levels reached statistical significance in the hippocampus and striatum, respectively. This is the first finding to help elucidate the selective biosynthesis of central wnt4 through cAMP-stimulated microglia and astrocytes interaction. - Highlights: • Dibutyryl cAMP increased wnt4, but not wnt3a, 5a, 7a and 11, mRNA in mixed glia. • Wnt4 protein increased in astrocytes co-cultivated with microglia. • It took a long time to robustly increase wnt4 expression. • Rolipram

  5. An Essential Poison: Synthesis and Degradation of Cyclic Di-AMP in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundlach, Jan; Mehne, Felix M P; Herzberg, Christina; Kampf, Jan; Valerius, Oliver; Kaever, Volkhard; Stülke, Jörg

    2015-10-01

    Gram-positive bacteria synthesize the second messenger cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP) to control cell wall and potassium homeostasis and to secure the integrity of their DNA. In the firmicutes, c-di-AMP is essential for growth. The model organism Bacillus subtilis encodes three diadenylate cyclases and two potential phosphodiesterases to produce and degrade c-di-AMP, respectively. Among the three cyclases, CdaA is conserved in nearly all firmicutes, and this enzyme seems to be responsible for the c-di-AMP that is required for cell wall homeostasis. Here, we demonstrate that CdaA localizes to the membrane and forms a complex with the regulatory protein CdaR and the glucosamine-6-phosphate mutase GlmM. Interestingly, cdaA, cdaR, and glmM form a gene cluster that is conserved throughout the firmicutes. This conserved arrangement and the observed interaction between the three proteins suggest a functional relationship. Our data suggest that GlmM and GlmS are involved in the control of c-di-AMP synthesis. These enzymes convert glutamine and fructose-6-phosphate to glutamate and glucosamine-1-phosphate. c-di-AMP synthesis is enhanced if the cells are grown in the presence of glutamate compared to that in glutamine-grown cells. Thus, the quality of the nitrogen source is an important signal for c-di-AMP production. In the analysis of c-di-AMP-degrading phosphodiesterases, we observed that both phosphodiesterases, GdpP and PgpH (previously known as YqfF), contribute to the degradation of the second messenger. Accumulation of c-di-AMP in a gdpP pgpH double mutant is toxic for the cells, and the cells respond to this accumulation by inactivation of the diadenylate cyclase CdaA. Bacteria use second messengers for signal transduction. Cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP) is the only second messenger known so far that is essential for a large group of bacteria. We have studied the regulation of c-di-AMP synthesis and the role of the phosphodiesterases that degrade this second messenger. c-di-AMP

  6. The CytR repressor antagonizes cyclic AMP-cyclic AMP receptor protein activation of the deoCp2 promoter of Escherichia coli K-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard-Andersen, L; Martinussen, J; Møllegaard, N E

    1990-01-01

    AMP-CRP complex; (iii) introduction of point mutations in either CRP target resulted in loss of CytR regulation; and (iv) regulation by CytR of deletion mutants lacking CRP-2 could be specifically reestablished by increasing the intracellular concentration of CytR. These findings indicate that both CRP targets...

  7. Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Acts as a Transcription Regulator in Response to Stresses in Deinococcus radiodurans

    OpenAIRE

    Su Yang; Hong Xu; Jiali Wang; Chengzhi Liu; Huizhi Lu; Mengjia Liu; Ye Zhao; Bing Tian; Liangyan Wang; Yuejin Hua

    2016-01-01

    The cyclic AMP receptor protein family of transcription factors regulates various metabolic pathways in bacteria, and also play roles in response to environmental changes. Here, we identify four homologs of the CRP family in Deinococcus radiodurans, one of which tolerates extremely high levels of oxidative stress and DNA-damaging reagents. Transcriptional levels of CRP were increased under hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment during the stationary growth phase, indicating that CRPs function in ...

  8. Cyclic AMP-receptor proteins in heart muscle of rats flown on Cosmos 1887

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mednieks, Maija I.; Popova, Irina A.; Grindeland, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    The cellular compartmentalization of the cyclic AMP-receptor proteins in heart ventricular tissue obtained from rats flown on the Cosmos 1887 is determined. Photoaffinity labeling of soluble and particular cell fractions with a (32P)-8-azido analog of cyclic AMP is followed by electrophoretic separation of the proteins and by autoradiographic identification of the labeled isoforms of cAPK R subunits. It is shown that RII in the particulate subcellular fraction was significantly decreased in heart cells from rats in the flight group when compared to controls. Protein banding patterns in both the cytoplasmic fraction and in a fraction enriched in chromatin-bound proteins exhibited some variability in tissues of individual animals, but showed no changes that could be directly attributed to flight conditions. No significant change was apparent in the distribution of RI or RII cyclic AMP binding in the soluble fractions. It is inferred that the cardiac cell integrity or its protein content is not compromised under flight conditions.

  9. Opposing actions of dibutyryl cyclic AMP and GMP on temperature in conscious guinea-pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, S. B.; Williaes, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that the intracerebroventricular administration of dibutyryl cyclic AMP (Db-cAMP) induced hyperthermia in guinea pigs which was not mediated through prostaglandins or norepinephrine since a prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor and an alpha-adrenergic receptor blocking agent did not antagonize the hyperthermia. However, the hyperthermic response to Db-cAMP was attenuated by the central administration of a beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, which indicates that cAMP may be involved, through beta-adrenergic receptors, in the central regulation of heat production and conservation. The central administration of Db-cGMP produced hypothermia which was not mediated via histamine H1 or H2 receptors and serotonin. The antagonism of hypothermia induced by Db-cGMP and acetylcholine + physostigmine by central administration of a cholinergic muscarine receptor antagonist and not by a cholinergic nicotinic receptor antagonist suggests that cholinoceptive neurons and endogenous cGMP may regulate heat loss through cholinergic muscarine receptors. It is concluded that these results indicate a regulatory role in thermoregulation provided by a balance between opposing actions of cAMP and cGMP in guinea pigs.

  10. The cyclic AMP-protein kinase A pathway restrains islet phospholipase A(2) activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsson, E; Karlsson, S; Ahrén, B

    2000-03-05

    Although phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) is of importance for insulin secretion, it is not established how it relates to other signalling mechanisms. This study examined the crosstalk between PLA(2) and the cyclic AMP (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) pathway in isolated rat islets. Forskolin, IBMX, and dbcAMP reduced [(3)H]arachidonic acid ([(3)H]AA) efflux from prelabelled islets during PLA(2) activation by mellitin or cholecystokinin (CCK-8), while efflux induced by carbachol was unaffected. The PKA inhibitor myrPKI(14-22) prevented this reduction of CCK-8-induced efflux. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) diminished CCK-8-induced efflux. Also in the absence of Ca(2+), forskolin/IBMX and dbcAMP reduced CCK-8-induced efflux. In parallel with effects on [(3)H]AA, the expected additive insulin secretion induced by mellitin or CCK-8 in combination with forskolin or GLP-1, respectively, was reduced. In conclusion, the cAMP-PKA pathway restrains both Ca(2+)-dependent and Ca(2+)-independent PLA(2) activation, indicating a regulating crosstalk between these two pathways. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  11. Effect of diazepam on adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) plasma levels in anesthetized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carceles, Maria D; Ribó, Antonio R; Dávalos, Ramón; Martinez, Teresa; Hernández, Jesús

    2004-05-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that diazepam inhibits the cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase type 4 isozyme (PDE4). PDE enzymes mediate the hydrolysis of the nucleotide adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP). The aim of this study was to determine whether IV administration of diazepam affects cAMP plasma levels in anesthetized patients. In this prospective study, patients scheduled to undergo elective myocardial revascularization surgery with anesthetization with etomidate (0.3 mg/kg), fentanyl (total dose 20-25 microg/kg), and cisatracurium (150 microg/kg), supplemented with sevoflurane (2% in an oxygen/air mixture), were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups to receive diazepam (0.28 mg/kg IV), diazepam vehicle (alcohol and propylene glycol IV), or saline. Before the start of the surgical procedure, at 5 and 10 minutes after administration of diazepam, vehicle, or saline, blood samples were obtained for determination of the diazepam, cAMP, and catecholamine levels. Ten patients received diazepam, 10 received vehicle, and 5 received saline. The mean (SEM) arterial serum concentrations of diazepam were 2.1 (0.2) microg/mL and 1.1 (0.4) microg/mL, respectively, at 5 and 10 minutes after administration. cAMP plasma levels increased from mean (SEM) baseline values of 30.0 (1.7) nmol/L to 35.5 (1.5) nmol/L (P < 0.05) and 43.1 (1.7) nmol/L (P < 0.05) at 5 and 10 minutes, respectively, after diazepam administration. No significant changes in cAMP plasma levels were observed compared with the mean (SEM) baseline value of 32.0 (1.7) nmol/L at 5 minutes (31.8 [1.3] nmol/L) and 10 minutes (30.9 [1.4] nmol/L) after vehicle administration. Epinephrine plasma concentration increased from a mean (SEM) baseline value of 0.13 (0.02) ng/mL to 0.22 (0.02) ng/mL (P < 0.05) at 10 minutes after administration of vehicle and 0.21 (0.02) ng/mL (P < 0.05) at 10 minutes after administration of diazepam. In this preliminary study, diazepam increased cAMP plasma levels in

  12. CA2+-DEPENDENT AND CA2+-INDEPENDENT MECHANISM OF CYCLIC-AMP REDUCTION - MEDIATION BY BRADYKININ B-2 RECEPTORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SIPMA, H; DENHERTOG, A; NELEMANS, A

    1 Bradykinin caused a transient reduction of about 25% in the cyclic AMP level in forskolin prestimulated DDT1 MF-2 smooth muscle cells (IC50: 36.4 +/- 4.9 nM) and a pronounced, sustained inhibition (40%) of the isoprenaline-stimulated cyclic AMP level (IC50: 37.5 +/- 1.1 nM). 2 The Ca2+ ionophore,

  13. Serum uncouples elevation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate concentration from cyclic adenosine monophosphate dependent morphological changes exhibited by cultured pituicytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsell, K D; Cobbett, P

    1997-04-18

    Cultured pituicytes (neurohypophysial astrocytes) are normally flat amorphous cells when incubated (90 min) in a HEPES balanced salt solution (HBSS) but become stellate when incubated in HBSS supplemented with forskolin. This stellation process is attenuated by serum (0.5% vol/vol). The experiments described here were designed to determine whether serum attenuates stellation by modulation of the intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) concentration or some other mechanism. It was observed that the effect of serum on forskolin-induced stellation was not affected by pertussis toxin (100 ng/ml) and that serum also inhibited stellation induced by the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX; 100 microM). Further, serum inhibited stellation induced by the membrane permeable cAMP analog 8-bromo cAMP (150 microM). These results indicate that although an increase of intracellular cAMP concentration is necessary for pituicyte stellation, an increase of intracellular cAMP concentration may be decoupled from stellation.

  14. Capsaicinoids regulate airway anion transporters through Rho kinase- and cyclic AMP-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibino, Yoshitaka; Morise, Masahiro; Ito, Yasushi; Mizutani, Takefumi; Matsuno, Tadakatsu; Ito, Satoru; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Sato, Mitsuo; Kondo, Masashi; Imaizumi, Kazuyoshi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2011-10-01

    To investigate the effects of capsaicinoids on airway anion transporters, we recorded and analyzed transepithelial currents in human airway epithelial Calu-3 cells. Application of capsaicin (100 μM) attenuated vectorial anion transport, estimated as short-circuit currents (I(SC)), before and after stimulation by forskolin (10 μM) with concomitant reduction of cytosolic cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels. The capsaicin-induced inhibition of I(SC) was also observed in the response to 8-bromo-cAMP (1 mM, a cell-permeable cAMP analog) and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (1 mM, an inhibitor of phosphodiesterases). The capsaicin-induced inhibition of I(SC) was attributed to suppression of bumetanide (an inhibitor of the basolateral Na(+)-K(+)-2 Cl(-) cotransporter 1)- and 4,4'-dinitrostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (an inhibitor of basolateral HCO(3)(-)-dependent anion transporters)-sensitive components, which reflect anion uptake via basolateral cAMP-dependent anion transporters. In contrast, capsaicin potentiated apical Cl(-) conductance, which reflects conductivity through the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, a cAMP-regulated Cl(-) channel. All these paradoxical effects of capsaicin were mimicked by capsazepine. Forskolin application also increased phosphorylated myosin phosphatase target subunit 1, and the phosphorylation was prevented by capsaicin and capsazepine, suggesting that these capsaicinoids assume aspects of Rho kinase inhibitors. We also found that the increments in apical Cl(-) conductance were caused by conventional Rho kinase inhibitors, Y-27632 (20 μM) and HA-1077 (20 μM), with selective inhibition of basolateral Na(+)-K(+)-2 Cl(-) cotransporter 1. Collectively, capsaicinoids inhibit cAMP-mediated anion transport through down-regulation of basolateral anion uptake, paradoxically accompanied by up-regulation of apical cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-mediated anion conductance. The latter is mediated by inhibition of Rho

  15. Cyclic AMP promotes axon regeneration, lesion repair and neuronal survival in lampreys after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Billy Y B; Fogerson, Stephanie M; Walsh, Rylie B; Morgan, Jennifer R

    2013-12-01

    Axon regeneration after spinal cord injury in mammals is inadequate to restore function, illustrating the need to design better strategies for improving outcomes. Increasing the levels of the second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) after spinal cord injury enhances axon regeneration across a wide variety of species, making it an excellent candidate molecule that has therapeutic potential. However, several important aspects of the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which cAMP enhances axon regeneration are still unclear, such as how cAMP affects axon growth patterns, the molecular components within growing axon tips, the lesion scar, and neuronal survival. To address these points, we took advantage of the large, identified reticulospinal (RS) neurons in lamprey, a vertebrate that exhibits robust axon regeneration after a complete spinal cord transection. Application of a cAMP analog, db-cAMP, at the time of spinal cord transection increased the number of axons that regenerated across the lesion site. Db-cAMP also promoted axons to regenerate in straighter paths, prevented abnormal axonal growth patterns, increased the levels of synaptotagmin within axon tips, and increased the number of axotomized neurons that survived after spinal cord injury, thereby increasing the pool of neurons available for regeneration. There was also a transient increase in the number of microglia/macrophages and improved repair of the lesion site. Taken together, these data reveal several new features of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying cAMP-mediated enhancement of axon regeneration, further emphasizing the positive roles for this conserved pathway. © 2013.

  16. Role of 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase in the renal 2',3'-cAMP-adenosine pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Edwin K; Gillespie, Delbert G; Mi, Zaichuan; Cheng, Dongmei; Bansal, Rashmi; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Kochanek, Patrick M

    2014-07-01

    Energy depletion increases the renal production of 2',3'-cAMP (a positional isomer of 3',5'-cAMP that opens mitochondrial permeability transition pores) and 2',3'-cAMP is converted to 2'-AMP and 3'-AMP, which in turn are metabolized to adenosine. Because the enzymes involved in this "2',3'-cAMP-adenosine pathway" are unknown, we examined whether 2',3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) participates in the renal metabolism of 2',3'-cAMP. Western blotting and real-time PCR demonstrated expression of CNPase in rat glomerular mesangial, preglomerular vascular smooth muscle and endothelial, proximal tubular, thick ascending limb and collecting duct cells. Real-time PCR established the expression of CNPase in human glomerular mesangial, proximal tubular and vascular smooth muscle cells; and the level of expression of CNPase was greater than that for phosphodiesterase 4 (major enzyme for the metabolism of 3',5'-cAMP). Overexpression of CNPase in rat preglomerular vascular smooth muscle cells increased the metabolism of exogenous 2',3'-cAMP to 2'-AMP. Infusions of 2',3'-cAMP into isolated CNPase wild-type (+/+) kidneys increased renal venous 2'-AMP, and this response was diminished by 63% in CNPase knockout (-/-) kidneys, whereas the conversion of 3',5'-cAMP to 5'-AMP was similar in CNPase +/+ vs. -/- kidneys. In CNPase +/+ kidneys, energy depletion (metabolic poisons) increased kidney tissue levels of adenosine and its metabolites (inosine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, and uric acid) without accumulation of 2',3'-cAMP. In contrast, in CNPase -/- kidneys, energy depletion increased kidney tissue levels of 2',3'-cAMP and abolished the increase in adenosine and its metabolites. In conclusion, kidneys express CNPase, and renal CNPase mediates in part the renal 2',3'-cAMP-adenosine pathway. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Cyclic AMP synergizes with butyrate in promoting β-defensin 9 expression in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkara, Lakshmi T; Zeng, Xiangfang; Curtis, Amanda R; Zhang, Guolong

    2014-02-01

    Host defense peptides (HDP) have both microbicidal and immunomodulatory properties. Specific induction of endogenous HDP synthesis has emerged as a novel approach to antimicrobial therapy. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and butyrate have been implicated in HDP induction in humans. However, the role of cAMP signaling and the possible interactions between cAMP and butyrate in regulating HDP expression in other species remain unknown. Here we report that activation of cAMP signaling induces HDP gene expression in chickens as exemplified by β-defensin 9 (AvBD9). We further showed that, albeit being weak inducers, cAMP agonists synergize strongly with butyrate or butyrate analogs in AvBD9 induction in macrophages and primary jejunal explants. Additionally, oral supplementation of forskolin, an adenylyl cyclase agonist in the form of a Coleus forskohlii extract, was found to induce AvBD9 expression in the crop of chickens. Furthermore, feeding with both forskolin and butyrate showed an obvious synergy in triggering AvBD9 expression in the crop and jejunum of chickens. Surprisingly, inhibition of the MEK-ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway augmented the butyrate-FSK synergy, whereas blocking JNK or p38 MAPK pathway significantly diminished AvBD9 induction in chicken macrophages and jejunal explants in response to butyrate and FSK individually or in combination. Collectively, these results suggest the potential for concomitant use of butyrate and cAMP signaling activators in enhancing HDP expression, innate immunity, and disease resistance in both animals and humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dynamic fluctuations provide the basis of a conformational switch mechanism in apo cyclic AMP receptor protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Aykaç Fas

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli cyclic AMP Receptor Protein (CRP undergoes conformational changes with cAMP binding and allosterically promotes CRP to bind specifically to the DNA. In that, the structural and dynamic properties of apo CRP prior to cAMP binding are of interest for the comprehension of the activation mechanism. Here, the dynamics of apo CRP monomer/dimer and holo CRP dimer were studied by Molecular Dynamics (MD simulations and Gaussian Network Model (GNM. The interplay of the inter-domain hinge with the cAMP and DNA binding domains are pre-disposed in the apo state as a conformational switch in the CRP's allosteric communication mechanism. The hinge at L134-D138 displaying intra- and inter-subunit coupled fluctuations with the cAMP and DNA binding domains leads to the emergence of stronger coupled fluctuations between the two domains and describes an on state. The flexible regions at K52-E58, P154/D155 and I175 maintain the dynamic coupling of the two domains. With a shift in the inter-domain hinge position towards the N terminus, nevertheless, the latter correlations between the domains loosen and become disordered; L134-D138 dynamically interacts only with the cAMP and DNA binding domains of its own subunit, and an off state is assumed. We present a mechanistic view on how the structural dynamic units are hierarchically built for the allosteric functional mechanism; from apo CRP monomer to apo-to-holo CRP dimers.

  19. Dynamic Fluctuations Provide the Basis of a Conformational Switch Mechanism in Apo Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykaç Fas, Burcu; Tutar, Yusuf; Haliloğlu, Türkan

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli cyclic AMP Receptor Protein (CRP) undergoes conformational changes with cAMP binding and allosterically promotes CRP to bind specifically to the DNA. In that, the structural and dynamic properties of apo CRP prior to cAMP binding are of interest for the comprehension of the activation mechanism. Here, the dynamics of apo CRP monomer/dimer and holo CRP dimer were studied by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations and Gaussian Network Model (GNM). The interplay of the inter-domain hinge with the cAMP and DNA binding domains are pre-disposed in the apo state as a conformational switch in the CRP's allosteric communication mechanism. The hinge at L134-D138 displaying intra- and inter-subunit coupled fluctuations with the cAMP and DNA binding domains leads to the emergence of stronger coupled fluctuations between the two domains and describes an on state. The flexible regions at K52-E58, P154/D155 and I175 maintain the dynamic coupling of the two domains. With a shift in the inter-domain hinge position towards the N terminus, nevertheless, the latter correlations between the domains loosen and become disordered; L134-D138 dynamically interacts only with the cAMP and DNA binding domains of its own subunit, and an off state is assumed. We present a mechanistic view on how the structural dynamic units are hierarchically built for the allosteric functional mechanism; from apo CRP monomer to apo-to-holo CRP dimers. PMID:23874183

  20. Aging of the rat adrenocortical cell: response to ACTH and cyclic AMP in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamed, S; Carsia, R V

    1983-03-01

    To study intrinsic age-related changes in adrenocortical steroid production, cells isolated from rats of different ages (3 to 24 months) were used. Acute (2 hour) corticosterone production in response to stimulation by adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) was measured by radioimmunoassay. With age, adrenocortical cells lose much of their ability to produce corticosterone in the absence or presence of ACTH or cAMP. The loss is progressive from 6 to 24 months of age. Analysis of the data suggests that from 6 to 12 months, an intracellular steroidogenic lesion develops; in addition there may be a loss in ACTH receptors on the plasma membrane. After 12 months these defects increase and are accompanied by a decrease in receptor sensitivity to ACTH.

  1. A1 adenosine receptor inhibition of cyclic AMP formation and radioligand binding in the guinea-pig cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, S P; Curtis, A R; Kendall, D A; Hill, S J

    1994-12-01

    1. A1 adenosine receptors were investigated by radioligand binding and functional studies in slices and particulate preparations from guinea-pig cerebral cortex. 2. Binding of the adenosine receptor antagonist radioligand, 8-cyclopentyl-[3H]-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX) to guinea-pig cerebral cortical membranes exhibited high density (1410 +/- 241 fmol mg-1 protein) and high affinity (Kd 3.8 +/- 0.3 nM). 3. [3H]-DPCPX binding to guinea-pig cerebral cortical membranes was displaced in a monophasic manner by adenosine receptor antagonists with the rank order of affinity (Ki values, nM): DPCPX (6) < xanthine amine congener (XAC, 153) < PD 115,199 (308). 4. Agonist displacement of [3H]-DPCPX binding was biphasic and exhibited the following rank order at the low affinity site (Ki values): 2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyl-adenosine (CCPA, 513 nM) = N6-R-phenylisopropyladenosine (R-PIA, 526 nM) = N6-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA, 532 nM) < 2-chloroadenosine (2CA, 3.2 microM) = 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA, 4.6 microM) < N6-S-phenylisopropyladenosine (S-PIA, 19.9 microM). 5. In cerebral cortical slices, [3H]-DPCPX binding was displaced by antagonists and agonists in an apparently monophasic manner with the rank order of affinity (Ki values, nM): DPCPX (14) < XAC (45) < R-PIA (266) < PD 115,199 (666) < S-PIA (21000). 6. Cyclic AMP accumulation stimulated by 30 microM forskolin in guinea-pig cerebral cortical slices was inhibited by R-PIA, CCPA and CPA up to 1 microM in a concentration-dependent fashion with IC50 values of 14, 18, and 22 nM, respectively. All three analogues inhibited the forskolin response to a similar extent (82-93% inhibition). NECA, S-PTA and 2CA failed to inhibit the forskolin response, but rather enhanced the accumulation of cyclic AMP at concentrations of 100 nM or greater, presumably through activation of A2b adenosine receptors coupled to stimulation of cyclic AMP accumulation in guinea-pig cerebral cortical slices.7. The inhibition of forskolin

  2. Cyclic AMP Inhibits the Activity and Promotes the Acetylation of Acetyl-CoA Synthetase through Competitive Binding to the ATP/AMP Pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaobiao; Shen, Liqiang; Wang, Qijun; Cen, Xufeng; Wang, Jin; Wu, Meng; Li, Peng; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Yu; Zhao, Guoping

    2017-01-27

    The high-affinity biosynthetic pathway for converting acetate to acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) is catalyzed by the central metabolic enzyme acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase (Acs), which is finely regulated both at the transcriptional level via cyclic AMP (cAMP)-driven trans-activation and at the post-translational level via acetylation inhibition. In this study, we discovered that cAMP directly binds to Salmonella enterica Acs (SeAcs) and inhibits its activity in a substrate-competitive manner. In addition, cAMP binding increases SeAcs acetylation by simultaneously promoting Pat-dependent acetylation and inhibiting CobB-dependent deacetylation, resulting in enhanced SeAcs inhibition. A crystal structure study and site-directed mutagenesis analyses confirmed that cAMP binds to the ATP/AMP pocket of SeAcs, and restrains SeAcs in an open conformation. The cAMP contact residues are well conserved from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, suggesting a general regulatory mechanism of cAMP on Acs. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Mechanical control of cyclic AMP signalling and gene transcription through integrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C. J.; Alenghat, F. J.; Rim, P.; Fong, J. H.; Fabry, B.; Ingber, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    This study was carried out to discriminate between two alternative hypotheses as to how cells sense mechanical forces and transduce them into changes in gene transcription. Do cells sense mechanical signals through generalized membrane distortion or through specific transmembrane receptors, such as integrins? Here we show that mechanical stresses applied to the cell surface alter the cyclic AMP signalling cascade and downstream gene transcription by modulating local release of signals generated by activated integrin receptors in a G-protein-dependent manner, whereas distortion of integrins in the absence of receptor occupancy has no effect.

  4. A Novel Indirect Sequence Readout Component in the E. coli Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Operator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; Nielsen, Peter Eigil; Valentin-Hansen, Poul

    2014-01-01

    binding sites in the E. coli genome, but the exact role of the N6 region in CRP interaction has not previously been systematic examined. Here we employ an in vitro selection system based on a randomized N6 spacer region to demonstrate that CRP binding to the lacP1 site may be enhanced up to 14-fold......The cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) from Escherichia coli has been extensively studied for several decades. In particular, a detailed characterization of CRP interaction with DNA has been obtained. The CRP dimer recognizes a consensus sequence AANTGTGANNNNNNTCACANTT through direct amino acid...

  5. Region-selective effects of long-term lithium and carbamazepine administration on cyclic AMP levels in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiborg, Ove; Krueger, Tanja; Jakosen, Soeren N. [Psychiatric Hospital, Dept. of Biological Psychiatry, Risskov (Denmark)

    1999-02-01

    The effect of lithium and carbamazepine in the treatment of bipolar affective disorder is well established. Althougt a number of biochemical effects have been found, the exact molecular mechanisms underlying their therapeutic actions have not been elucidated nor are the target regions in the brain identified. Taken into account the important role of the cyclic AMP second messenger system in the regulation of neuronal exitability and the indications of its involvement in the pathophysiology of bipolar affective disorder, we have focused on the drug effects on cyclic AMP levels. The objectives of this investigation were to measure the effects on basal cyclic AMP levels, and to locate target regions within the rat brain after long-term administration of lithium and carbamazepine. Drug treatments were carried out for a period of 28 days. After either drug treatment the cyclic AMP level was increased 3-4 times in frontal cortex but unchanged in hippocampus, hypothalamus, thalamus, amygdala and in cerebellum. In neostratum the cyclic AMP level was decreased to about 30% after treatment with lithium. We suggest the common region-selective effect, observed for both drugs in frontal cortex, to be essential for the therapeutic actions of lithium and carbamazepine. (au) 46 refs.

  6. Cyclic AMP receptor protein regulates pheromone-mediated bioluminescence at multiple levels in Vibrio fischeri ES114.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyell, Noreen L; Colton, Deanna M; Bose, Jeffrey L; Tumen-Velasquez, Melissa P; Kimbrough, John H; Stabb, Eric V

    2013-11-01

    Bioluminescence in Vibrio fischeri ES114 is activated by autoinducer pheromones, and this regulation serves as a model for bacterial cell-cell signaling. As in other bacteria, pheromone concentration increases with cell density; however, pheromone synthesis and perception are also modulated in response to environmental stimuli. Previous studies suggested that expression of the pheromone-dependent bioluminescence activator LuxR is regulated in response to glucose by cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) (P. V. Dunlap and E. P. Greenberg, J. Bacteriol. 164:45-50, 1985; P. V. Dunlap and E. P. Greenberg, J. Bacteriol. 170:4040-4046, 1988; P. V. Dunlap, J. Bacteriol. 171:1199-1202, 1989; and W. F. Friedrich and E. P. Greenberg, Arch. Microbiol. 134:87-91, 1983). Consistent with this model, we found that bioluminescence in V. fischeri ES114 is modulated by glucose and stimulated by cAMP. In addition, a Δcrp mutant was ∼100-fold dimmer than ES114 and did not increase luminescence in response to added cAMP, even though cells lacking crp were still metabolically capable of producing luminescence. We further discovered that CRP regulates not only luxR but also the alternative pheromone synthase gene ainS. We found that His-tagged V. fischeri CRP could bind sequences upstream of both luxR and ainS, supporting bioinformatic predictions of direct regulation at both promoters. Luminescence increased in response to cAMP if either the ainS or luxR system was under native regulation, suggesting cAMP-CRP significantly increases luminescence through both systems. Finally, using transcriptional reporters in transgenic Escherichia coli, we elucidated two additional regulatory connections. First, LuxR-independent basal transcription of the luxI promoter was enhanced by CRP. Second, the effect of CRP on the ainS promoter depended on whether the V. fischeri regulatory gene litR was also introduced. These results suggest an integral role for CRP in pheromone signaling that goes

  7. Transcriptional network of multiple capsule and melanin genes governed by the Cryptococcus neoformans cyclic AMP cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukkila-Worley, Read; Gerrald, Quincy D; Kraus, Peter R; Boily, Marie-Josée; Davis, Matthew J; Giles, Steven S; Cox, Gary M; Heitman, Joseph; Alspaugh, J Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen that elaborates several virulence attributes, including a polysaccharide capsule and melanin pigments. A conserved Galpha protein/cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway controls melanin and capsule production. To identify targets of this pathway, we used an expression profiling approach to define genes that are transcriptionally regulated by the Galpha protein Gpa1. This approach revealed that Gpa1 transcriptionally regulates multiple genes involved in capsule assembly and identified two additional genes with a marked dependence on Gpa1 for transcription. The first is the LAC1 gene, encoding the laccase enzyme that catalyzes a rate-limiting step in diphenol oxidation and melanin production. The second gene identified (LAC2) is adjacent to the LAC1 gene and encodes a second laccase that shares 75% nucleotide identity with LAC1. Similar to the LAC1 gene, LAC2 is induced in response to glucose deprivation. However, LAC2 basal transcript levels are much lower than those for LAC1. Accordingly, a lac2 mutation results in only a modest delay in melanin formation. LAC2 overexpression suppresses the melanin defects of gpa1 and lac1 mutants and partially restores virulence of these strains. These studies provide mechanistic insights into the regulation of capsule and melanin production by the C. neoformans cAMP pathway and demonstrate that multiple laccases contribute to C. neoformans melanin production and pathogenesis.

  8. Repeated predictable or unpredictable stress: effects on cocaine-induced locomotion and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araujo, Ana Paula N; DeLucia, Roberto; Scavone, Cristoforo; Planeta, Cleopatra S

    2003-02-17

    Stressful experiences appear to have a strong influence on susceptibility to drug taking behavior. Cross-sensitization between stress and drug-induced locomotor response has been found. Locomotor response to novelty or cocaine (10 mg/kg, i.p.), cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity in the nucleus accumbens and basal corticosterone levels were evaluated in male adult rats exposed to acute and chronic predictable or unpredictable stress. Rats exposed to a 14-day predictable stress showed increased locomotor response to novelty and to cocaine, whereas rats exposed to chronic unpredictable stress demonstrated increased cyclic AMP-dependent PKA activity in the nucleus accumbens. Both predictable and unpredictable stress increased basal corticosterone plasma levels. These experiments demonstrated that stress-induced early cocaine sensitization depends on the stress regime and is apparently dissociated from stress-induced changes in cyclic AMP-dependent PKA activity and corticosterone levels.

  9. Involvement of Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein in Regulation of the rmf Gene Encoding the Ribosome Modulation Factor in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Shimada, Tomohiro; Yoshida, Hideji; Ishihama, Akira

    2013-01-01

    The decrease in overall translation in stationary-phase Escherichia coli is accompanied with the formation of functionally inactive 100S ribosomes mediated by the ribosome modulation factor (RMF). At present, however, little is known regarding the regulation of stationary-phase-coupled RMF expression. In the course of a systematic screening of regulation targets of DNA-binding transcription factors from E. coli, we realized that CRP (cyclic AMP [cAMP] receptor protein), the global regulator f...

  10. Electrical Stimulation Decreases Coupling Efficiency Between Beta-Adrenergic Receptors and Cyclic AMP Production in Cultured Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.

    1999-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of skeletal muscle cells in culture is an effective way to simulate the effects of muscle contraction and its effects on gene expression in muscle cells. Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor and its coupling to cyclic AMP synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this project was to determine if electrical stimulation altered the beta-adrenergic response in muscle cells. Chicken skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for seven days in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional two days at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. At the end of this two-day stimulation period, beta-adrenergic receptor population was measured by the binding of tritium-labeled CGP-12177 to muscle cells, and coupling to cAMP synthesis was measured by Radioimmunoassay (RIA) after treating the cells for 10 min with the potent (beta)AR agonist, isoproterenol. The number of beta adrenergic receptors and the basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP were not affected by electrical stimulation. However, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately 50%. Thus, an enhanced level of contraction reduces the coupling efficiency of beta-adrenergic receptors for cyclic AMP production.

  11. Effect of glucagon on cyclic AMP, albumin metabolism and incorporation of 14C-leucine into proteins in isolated parenchymal rat liver cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dich, J; Gluud, C N

    1976-01-01

    Parenchymal rat liver cells were isolated by the collagenase method and incubated in Krebs-Henseleit buffer containing 0.5% gelatin. The basal level of cyclic AMP in isolated cells was 0.52 nmol per g liver wet wt. Glucagon (10(-10)-10(-6) M) caused a significant increase in the level of cyclic AMP...

  12. Total biosynthesis of the cyclic AMP booster forskolin from Coleus forskohlii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pateraki, Irini; Andersen-Ranberg, Johan; Jensen, Niels Bjerg; Wubshet, Sileshi Gizachew; Heskes, Allison Maree; Forman, Victor; Hallström, Björn; Hamberger, Britta; Motawia, Mohammed Saddik; Olsen, Carl Erik; Staerk, Dan; Hansen, Jørgen; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Hamberger, Björn

    2017-03-14

    Forskolin is a unique structurally complex labdane-type diterpenoid used in the treatment of glaucoma and heart failure based on its activity as a cyclic AMP booster. Commercial production of forskolin relies exclusively on extraction from its only known natural source, the plant Coleus forskohlii, in which forskolin accumulates in the root cork. Here, we report the discovery of five cytochrome P450s and two acetyltransferases which catalyze a cascade of reactions converting the forskolin precursor 13R-manoyl oxide into forskolin and a diverse array of additional labdane-type diterpenoids. A minimal set of three P450s in combination with a single acetyl transferase was identified that catalyzes the conversion of 13R-manoyl oxide into forskolin as demonstrated by transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. The entire pathway for forskolin production from glucose encompassing expression of nine genes was stably integrated into Saccharomyces cerevisiae and afforded forskolin titers of 40 mg/L.

  13. Distribution and function of 3',5'-Cyclic-AMP phosphodiesterases in the human ovary

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, T S; Kristensen, S G; Jeppesen, J V

    2015-01-01

    The concentration of the important second messenger cAMP is regulated by phosphodiesterases (PDEs) and hence an attractive drug target. However, limited human data are available about the PDEs in the ovary. The aim of the present study was to describe and characterise the PDEs in the human ovary...... secretion. In conclusion, we identified PDE3, PDE4, PDE7 and PDE8 as the major PDEs in the human ovary....

  14. Control of the Diadenylate Cyclase CdaS in Bacillus subtilis AN AUTOINHIBITORY DOMAIN LIMITS CYCLIC DI-AMP PRODUCTION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehne, Felix M. P.; Schroeder-Tittmann, Kathrin; Eijlander, Robyn T.; Herzberg, Christina; Hewitt, Lorraine; Kaever, Volkhard; Lewis, Richard J.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Tittmann, Kai; Stuelke, Joerg

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis encodes three diadenylate cyclases that synthesize the essential signaling nucleotide cyclic di-AMP. The activities of the vegetative enzymes DisA and CdaA are controlled by protein-protein interactions with their conserved partner proteins. Here, we

  15. The progestin levonorgestrel induces endothelium-independent relaxation of rabbit jugular vein via inhibition of calcium entry and protein kinase C: role of cyclic AMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herkert, Olaf; Kuhl, Herbert; Busse, Rudi; Schini-Kerth, Valérie B

    2000-01-01

    The progestin and oestrogen component of oral contraceptives have been involved in the development of venous thromboembolic events in women. In the present study we determined the vasoactive effects of sex steroids used in oral contraceptives in isolated preconstricted rabbit jugular veins in the presence of diclofenac and examined the underlying mechanisms.The natural hormone progesterone, the synthetic progestins levonorgestrel, 3-keto-desogestrel, gestodene and chlormadinone acetate, and the synthetic estrogen 17 α-ethinyloestradiol induced concentration-dependent relaxations of endothelium-intact veins constricted with U46619. Levonorgestrel also inhibited constrictions evoked by either a high potassium (K+) solution or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) in the absence and presence of extracellular calcium (Ca2+). In addition, levonorgestrel depressed contractions evoked by Ca2+ and reduced 45Ca2+ influx in depolarized veins.Relaxations to levonorgestrel in U46619-constricted veins were neither affected by the presence of the endothelium nor by the inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase, NS2028, but were significantly improved either by the selective cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor rolipram or in the absence of diclofenac, and decreased by the protein kinase A inhibitor, Rp-8-CPT-cAMPS. Rolipram also potentiated relaxations to levonorgestrel in PMA-constricted veins in the presence, but not in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. Levonorgestrel increased levels of cyclic AMP and inhibited PMA-induced activation of protein kinase C in veins.These findings indicate that levonorgestrel caused endothelium-independent relaxations of jugular veins via inhibition of Ca2+ entry and of protein kinase C activation. In addition, the cyclic AMP effector pathway contributes to the levonorgestrel-induced relaxation possibly by depressing Ca2+ entry. PMID:10952682

  16. Constitutive activity of the A2A adenosine receptor and compartmentalised cyclic AMP signalling fine-tune noradrenaline release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrisimovic, Edin; Drobny, Helmut; Yang, Qiong; Höfer, Thomas; Boehm, Stefan; Nanoff, Christian; Schicker, Klaus

    2012-12-01

    Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y (SH) cells endogenously express A(2A) adenosine receptors and can be differentiated into a sympathetic neuronal phenotype, capable of depolarisation-dependent noradrenaline release. Using differentiated SH culture, we here explored the link between A(2A)-receptor signalling and neurotransmitter release. In response to the receptor agonist CGS21680, the cells produced cyclic AMP (cAMP), and when depolarised, they released increased amounts of noradrenaline. An A(2A)-receptor antagonist, XAC, as well as an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA), H89, depressed agonist-dependent release. In the presence of XAC or H89, noradrenaline release was found to be below basal values. This suggested that release facilitation also owes to constitutive receptor activity. We demonstrate that even in the absence of an agonist, the native A(2A)-receptor stimulated cAMP production, leading to the activation of PKA and enhanced noradrenaline release. Ancillary, non-cAMP-dependent effects of the receptor (i.e. phosphorylation of CREB, of Rabphilin3A) were refractory to constitutive activation. PKA-dependent facilitation of noradrenaline release was recapitulated with membrane-permeable 8-Br-cAMP; in addition to facilitation, 8-Br-cAMP caused marked inhibition of release, an effect not observed upon receptor activation. Inhibition by receptor-independent cAMP was likely due to suppression of voltage-dependent calcium current (VDCC) and increased activity of Src-family kinases. Receptor-mediated release facilitation was reproduced in the presence of tetrodotoxin (blocking action potentials); hence, the signalling occurred at the active zone comprising release sites. Our findings thus support (1) presynaptic localisation of the A(2A)-receptor and (2) suggest that compartmentalised pathways transmit cAMP signalling in order to facilitate depolarisation-dependent neurotransmitter release.

  17. Increase of Intracellular Cyclic AMP by PDE4 Inhibitors Affects HepG2 Cell Cycle Progression and Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimi, Mara; Cardarelli, Silvia; Galli, Francesca; Giardi, Maria Federica; Ragusa, Federica; Panera, Nadia; Cinque, Benedetta; Cifone, Maria Grazia; Biagioni, Stefano; Giorgi, Mauro

    2017-06-01

    Type 4 cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDE4) are major members of a superfamily of enzymes (PDE) involved in modulation of intracellular signaling mediated by cAMP. Broadly expressed in most human tissues and present in large amounts in the liver, PDEs have in the last decade been key therapeutic targets for several inflammatory diseases. Recently, a significant body of work has underscored their involvement in different kinds of cancer, but with no attention paid to liver cancer. The present study investigated the effects of two PDE4 inhibitors, rolipram and DC-TA-46, on the growth of human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Treatment with these inhibitors caused a marked increase of intracellular cAMP level and a dose- and time-dependent effect on cell growth. The concentrations of inhibitors that halved cell proliferation to about 50% were used for cell cycle experiments. Rolipram (10 μM) and DC-TA-46 (0.5 μM) produced a decrease of cyclin expression, in particular of cyclin A, as well as an increase in p21, p27 and p53, as evaluated by Western blot analysis. Changes in the intracellular localization of cyclin D1 were also observed after treatments. In addition, both inhibitors caused apoptosis, as demonstrated by an Annexin-V cytofluorimetric assay and analysis of caspase-3/7 activity. Results demonstrated that treatment with PDE4 inhibitors affected HepG2 cell cycle and survival, suggesting that they might be useful as potential adjuvant, chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive agents in hepatocellular carcinoma. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 1401-1411, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Mect1-Maml2 fusion oncogene linked to the aberrant activation of cyclic AMP/CREB regulated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coxon, Amy; Rozenblum, Ester; Park, Yoon-Soo; Joshi, Nina; Tsurutani, Junji; Dennis, Phillip A; Kirsch, Ilan R; Kaye, Frederic J

    2005-08-15

    Malignant salivary gland tumors can arise from a t(11;19) translocation that fuses 42 residues from Mect1/Torc1, a cyclic AMP (cAMP)/cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB)-dependent transcriptional coactivator, with 982 residues from Maml2, a NOTCH receptor coactivator. To determine if the Mect1-Maml2 fusion oncogene mediates tumorigenicity by disrupting cAMP/CREB signaling, we have generated in-frame deletions within the CREB-binding domain of Mect1/Torc1 for testing transformation activity and have also developed a doxycycline-regulated Mect1-Maml2 mammalian expression vector for global gene expression profiling. We observed that small deletions within the CREB-binding domain completely abolished transforming activity in RK3E epithelial cells. Further, we have shown that the ectopic induction of Mect1-Maml2 in HeLa cells strongly activated the expression of a group of known cAMP/CREB-regulated genes. In addition, we detected candidate cAMP-responsive element sites within 100 nucleotides of the transcriptional start sites of other genes activated by Mect1-Maml2 expression. In contrast, we did not observe alterations of known Notch-regulated target genes in these expression array profile experiments. We validated the results by reverse transcription-PCR in transfected HeLa, RK3E, and H2009 lung tumor cells and in mucoepidermoid cancer cells that endogenously express the fusion oncopeptide. Whereas overexpression of components of the cAMP pathway has been associated with a subset of human carcinomas, these data provide a direct genetic link between deregulation of cAMP/CREB pathways and epithelial tumorigenesis and suggest future therapeutic strategies for this group of salivary gland tumors.

  19. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of the cyclic AMP-dependent signaling pathway during morphogenic transitions of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahn, Yong-Sun; Molenda, Matthew; Staab, Janet F; Lyman, Courtney A; Gordon, Laura J; Sundstrom, Paula

    2007-12-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic human fungal pathogen that causes systemic candidiasis as well as superficial mucosal candidiasis. In response to the host environment, C. albicans transitions between yeast and hyphal forms. In particular, hyphal growth is important in facilitating adhesion and invasion of host tissues, concomitant with the expression of various hypha-specific virulence factors. In previous work, we showed that the cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathway plays a crucial role in morphogenic transitions and virulence of C. albicans by studying genes encoding adenylate cyclase-associated protein (CAP1) and high-affinity phosphodiesterase (PDE2) (Y. S. Bahn, J. Staab, and P. Sundstrom, Mol. Microbiol. 50:391-409, 2003; and Y. S. Bahn and P. Sundstrom, J. Bacteriol. 183:3211-3223, 2001). However, little is known about the downstream targets of the cAMP signaling pathway that are responsible for morphological transitions and the expression of virulence factors. Here, microarrays were probed with RNA from strains with hypoactive (cap1/cap1 null mutant), hyperactive (pde2/pde2 null mutant), and wild-type cAMP signaling pathways to provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of virulence that are regulated by cAMP and that are related to the morphogenesis of C. albicans. Genes controlling metabolic specialization, cell wall structure, ergosterol/lipid biosynthesis, and stress responses were modulated by cAMP during hypha formation. Phenotypic traits predicted to be regulated by cAMP from the profiling results correlated with the relative strengths of the mutants when tested for resistance to azoles and subjected to heat shock stress and oxidative/nitrosative stress. The results from this study provide important insights into the role of the cAMP signaling pathway not only in morphogenic transitions of C. albicans but also for adaptation to stress and for survival during host infections.

  20. Two phosphodiesterase genes, PDEL and PDEH, regulate development and pathogenicity by modulating intracellular cyclic AMP levels in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Zhang

    Full Text Available Cyclic AMP (cAMP signaling plays an important role in regulating multiple cellular responses, such as growth, morphogenesis, and/or pathogenicity of eukaryotic organisms such as fungi. As a second messenger, cAMP is important in the activation of downstream effector molecules. The balance of intracellular cAMP levels depends on biosynthesis by adenylyl cyclases (ACs and hydrolysis by cAMP phosphodiesterases (PDEases. The rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae contains a high-affinity (PdeH/Pde2 and a low-affinity (PdeL/Pde1 PDEases, and a previous study showed that PdeH has a major role in asexual differentiation and pathogenicity. Here, we show that PdeL is required for asexual development and conidial morphology, and it also plays a minor role in regulating cAMP signaling. This is in contrast to PdeH whose mutation resulted in major defects in conidial morphology, cell wall integrity, and surface hydrophobicity, as well as a significant reduction in pathogenicity. Consistent with both PdeH and PdeL functioning in cAMP signaling, disruption of PDEH only partially rescued the mutant phenotype of ΔmagB and Δpka1. Further studies suggest that PdeH might function through a feedback mechanism to regulate the expression of pathogenicity factor Mpg1 during surface hydrophobicity and pathogenic development. Moreover, microarray data revealed new insights into the underlying cAMP regulatory mechanisms that may help to identify potential pathogenicity factors for the development of new disease management strategies.

  1. Endogenous expression of histamine H1 receptors functionally coupled to phosphoinositide hydrolysis in C6 glioma cells: regulation by cyclic AMP.

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    Peakman, M C; Hill, S J

    1994-12-01

    1. The effects of histamine receptor agonists and antagonists on phospholipid hydrolysis in rat-derived C6 glioma cells have been investigated. 2. Histamine H1 receptor-stimulation caused a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of total [3H]-inositol phosphates in cells prelabelled with [3H]-myo-inositol. The rank order of agonist potencies was histamine (EC50 = 24 microM) > N alpha-methylhistamine (EC50 = 31 microM) > 2-thiazolylethylamine (EC50 = 91 microM). 3. The response to 0.1 mM histamine was antagonized in a concentration-dependent manner by the H1-antagonists, mepyramine (apparent Kd = 1 nM) and (+)-chlorpheniramine (apparent Kd = 4 nM). In addition, (-)-chlorpheniramine was more than two orders of magnitude less potent than its (+)-stereoisomer. 4. Elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP accumulation with forskolin (10 microM, EC50 = 0.3 microM), isoprenaline (1 microM, EC50 = 4 nM) or rolipram (0.5 mM), significantly reduced the histamine-mediated (0.1 mM) inositol phosphate response by 37%, 43% and 26% respectively. In contrast, 1,9-dideoxyforskolin did not increase cyclic AMP accumulation and had no effect on the phosphoinositide response to histamine. 5. These data indicate the presence of functionally coupled, endogenous histamine H1 receptors in C6 glioma cells. Furthermore, the results also indicate that H1 receptor-mediated phospholipid hydrolysis is inhibited by the elevation of cyclic AMP levels in these cells.

  2. CSF concentrations of cAMP and cGMP are lower in patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease but not Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

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    Patrick Oeckl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cyclic nucleotides cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP and cyclic guanosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP are important second messengers and are potential biomarkers for Parkinson's disease (PD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we investigated by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF concentrations of cAMP and cGMP of 82 patients and evaluated their diagnostic potency as biomarkers. For comparison with a well-accepted biomarker, we measured tau concentrations in CSF of CJD and control patients. CJD patients (n = 15 had lower cAMP (-70% and cGMP (-55% concentrations in CSF compared with controls (n = 11. There was no difference in PD, PD dementia (PDD and ALS cases. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analyses confirmed cAMP and cGMP as valuable diagnostic markers for CJD indicated by the area under the curve (AUC of 0.86 (cAMP and 0.85 (cGMP. We calculated a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 64% for cAMP and a sensitivity of 67% and specificity of 100% for cGMP. The combination of both nucleotides increased the sensitivity to 80% and specificity to 91% for the term cAMPxcGMP (AUC 0.92 and to 93% and 100% for the ratio tau/cAMP (AUC 0.99. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that the CSF determination of cAMP and cGMP may easily be included in the diagnosis of CJD and could be helpful in monitoring disease progression as well as in therapy control.

  3. Cyclic AMP levels in several macroalgae and their relation to light quantity and quality.

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    Gordillo, Francisco J L; Segovia, María; López-Figueroa, Félix

    2004-02-01

    Total cAMP levels were measured in the macroalgae Dictyota dichotoma, Gelidium sesquipedale and Ulva rigida under different light conditions in order to study its regulation either by phytochrome or photosynthesis. Incubation in red or far-red light did not promote a phytochrome-like response; instead, it showed a synergistic effect upon cAMP accumulation. cAMP levels seemed to depend on the amount of energy applied. The correlation between photosynthetic oxygen evolution and cAMP variations at sub-saturating white light irradiance pointed to photosynthetic electron transport as involved in the regulation of cAMP accumulation at least in G. sesquipedale and U. rigida. Inhibitors of thylakoidal and mitochondrial electron transport chains reduced cAMP levels in 70 to 99%. We conclude that cAMP accumulation could be regulated by photosynthetic activity rather than phytochrome in the macroalgae studied.

  4. Modulation by atrial natriuretic factor of receptor-mediated cyclic AMP-dependent responses in canine pulmonary artery during heart failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, R.; Omar, H.A.; Fayngersh, R.; Shen, W; Wang, J; Gewitz, M. H.; Hintze, T. H.; Wolin, M S

    1996-01-01

    1. Pacing-induced congestive heart failure (CHF) in dogs is associated with increased plasma levels of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) and inhibition of receptor-mediated cyclic AMP-dependent relaxation in isolated pulmonary arteries (PA). Since ANF is known to be negatively coupled to adenylate cyclase, we studied cyclic AMP-mediated relaxation to isoprenaline (Iso) and arachidonic acid (AA) in PA from control dogs (C), dogs with pacing-induced CHF (CHF) and dogs with bilateral atrial append...

  5. Several isoforms of locustatachykinins may be involved in cyclic AMP-mediated release of adipokinetic hormones from the locust Corpora cardiaca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nässel, D R; Vullings, H G; Passier, P C; Lundquist, C T; Schoofs, L; Diederen, J H; Van der Horst, D J

    1999-03-01

    Four locustatachykinins (LomTK I-IV) were identified in about equal amounts in extracts of corpora cardiaca of locusts, using reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography and radioimmunoassay with synthetic LomTK I-IV as standards. Brain extracts also contained the four isoforms in roughly equimolar concentrations. Retrograde tracing of the nervi corporis cardiaci II (NCC II) in vitro with Lucifer yellow in combination with LomTK immunocytochemistry revealed that about half of the secretomotor neurons in the lateral part of the protocerebrum projecting into the glandular lobe of the corpora cardiaca (CCG) contain LomTK-immunoreactive material. Since the four LomTKs are present in the CCG, these four or five neurons in each hemisphere are likely to contain colocalized LomTK I-IV. The role of two of the LomTKs in the regulation of the release of adipokinetic hormones (AKHs) from the adipokinetic cells in the CCG in the locust was investigated. Experiments performed in vitro showed that LomTK I and II induced release of AKH in a dose-dependent manner. These peptides also rapidly and transiently elevated the cyclic AMP-content of the CCG. The peak level of cyclic AMP occurred about 45 seconds after stimulation with LomTK. These results support the proposal that LomTKs are involved in controlling the release of the adipokinetic hormones and suggest that all LomTK isoforms may participate in this cyclic AMP-mediated event. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  6. Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Acts as a Transcription Regulator in Response to Stresses in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Su; Xu, Hong; Wang, Jiali; Liu, Chengzhi; Lu, Huizhi; Liu, Mengjia; Zhao, Ye; Tian, Bing; Wang, Liangyan; Hua, Yuejin

    2016-01-01

    The cyclic AMP receptor protein family of transcription factors regulates various metabolic pathways in bacteria, and also play roles in response to environmental changes. Here, we identify four homologs of the CRP family in Deinococcus radiodurans, one of which tolerates extremely high levels of oxidative stress and DNA-damaging reagents. Transcriptional levels of CRP were increased under hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment during the stationary growth phase, indicating that CRPs function in response to oxidative stress. By constructing all CRP single knockout mutants, we found that the dr0997 mutant showed the lowest tolerance toward H2O2, ultraviolet radiation, ionizing radiation, and mitomycin C, while the phenotypes of the dr2362, dr0834, and dr1646 mutants showed slight or no significant differences from those of the wild-type strain. Taking advantage of the conservation of the CRP-binding site in many bacteria, we found that transcription of 18 genes, including genes encoding chromosome-partitioning protein (dr0998), Lon proteases (dr0349 and dr1974), NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (dr1506), thiosulfate sulfurtransferase (dr2531), the DNA repair protein UvsE (dr1819), PprA (dra0346), and RecN (dr1447), are directly regulated by DR0997. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analyses showed that certain genes involved in anti-oxidative responses, DNA repair, and various cellular pathways are transcriptionally attenuated in the dr0997 mutant. Interestingly, DR0997 also regulate the transcriptional levels of all CRP genes in this bacterium. These data suggest that DR0997 contributes to the extreme stress resistance of D. radiodurans via its regulatory role in multiple cellular pathways, such as anti-oxidation and DNA repair pathways.

  7. Cyclic AMP Receptor Protein Acts as a Transcription Regulator in Response to Stresses in Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Yang

    Full Text Available The cyclic AMP receptor protein family of transcription factors regulates various metabolic pathways in bacteria, and also play roles in response to environmental changes. Here, we identify four homologs of the CRP family in Deinococcus radiodurans, one of which tolerates extremely high levels of oxidative stress and DNA-damaging reagents. Transcriptional levels of CRP were increased under hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 treatment during the stationary growth phase, indicating that CRPs function in response to oxidative stress. By constructing all CRP single knockout mutants, we found that the dr0997 mutant showed the lowest tolerance toward H2O2, ultraviolet radiation, ionizing radiation, and mitomycin C, while the phenotypes of the dr2362, dr0834, and dr1646 mutants showed slight or no significant differences from those of the wild-type strain. Taking advantage of the conservation of the CRP-binding site in many bacteria, we found that transcription of 18 genes, including genes encoding chromosome-partitioning protein (dr0998, Lon proteases (dr0349 and dr1974, NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (dr1506, thiosulfate sulfurtransferase (dr2531, the DNA repair protein UvsE (dr1819, PprA (dra0346, and RecN (dr1447, are directly regulated by DR0997. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR analyses showed that certain genes involved in anti-oxidative responses, DNA repair, and various cellular pathways are transcriptionally attenuated in the dr0997 mutant. Interestingly, DR0997 also regulate the transcriptional levels of all CRP genes in this bacterium. These data suggest that DR0997 contributes to the extreme stress resistance of D. radiodurans via its regulatory role in multiple cellular pathways, such as anti-oxidation and DNA repair pathways.

  8. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A regulates the alternative splicing of CaMKIIδ.

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    Qingqing Gu

    Full Text Available Ca(2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK IIδ is predominantly expressed in the heart. There are three isoforms of CaMKIIδ resulting from the alternative splicing of exons 14, 15, and 16 of its pre-mRNA, which is regulated by the splicing factor SF2/ASF. Inclusion of exons 15 and 16 or of exon 14 generates δA or δB isoform. The exclusion of all three exons gives rise to δC isoform, which is selectively increased in pressure-overload-induced hypertrophy. Overexpression of either δB or δC induces hypertrophy and heart failure, suggesting their specific role in the pathogenesis of hypertrophy and heart failure. It is well known that the β-adrenergic-cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA pathway is implicated in heart failure. To determine the role of PKA in the alternative splicing of CaMKIIδ, we constructed mini-CaMKIIδ genes and used these genes to investigate the regulation of the alternative splicing of CaMKIIδ by PKA in cultured cells. We found that PKA promoted the exclusion of exons 14, 15, and 16 of CaMKIIδ, resulting in an increase in δC isoform. PKA interacted with and phosphorylated SF2/ASF, and enhanced SF2/ASF's activity to promote the exclusion of exons 14, 15, and 16 of CaMKIIδ, leading to a further increase in the expression of δC isoform. These findings suggest that abnormality in β-adrenergic-PKA signaling may contribute to cardiomyopathy and heart failure through dysregulation in the alternative splicing of CaMKIIδ exons 14, 15, and 16 and up-regulation of CaMKIIδC.

  9. The cyclic AMP receptor protein is the main activator of pectinolysis genes in Erwinia chrysanthemi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reverchon, S; Expert, D; Robert-Baudouy, J; Nasser, W

    1997-06-01

    The main virulence factors of the phytopathogenic bacterium Erwinia chrysanthemi are pectinases that cleave pectin, a major constituent of the plant cell wall. Although physiological studies suggested that pectinase production in Erwinia species is subjected to catabolite repression, the direct implication of the cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP) in this regulation has never been demonstrated. To investigate the role of CRP in pectin catabolism, we cloned the E. chrysanthemi crp gene by complementation of an Escherichia coli crp mutation and then constructed E. chrysanthemi crp mutants by reverse genetics. The carbohydrate fermentation phenotype of the E. chrysanthemi crp mutants is similar to that of an E. coli crp mutant. Furthermore, these mutants are unable to grow on pectin or polygalacturonate as the sole carbon source. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence of the E. chrysanthemi crp gene revealed the presence of a 630-bp open reading frame (ORF) that codes for a protein highly similar to the CRP of E. coli. Using a crp::uidA transcriptional fusion, we demonstrated that the E. chrysanthemi CRP represses its own expression, probably via a mechanism similar to that described for the E. coli crp gene. Moreover, in the E. chrysanthemi crp mutants, expression of pectinase genes (pemA, pelB, pelC, pelD, and pelE) and of genes of the intracellular part of the pectin degradation pathway (ogl, kduI, and kdgT), which are important for inducer formation and transport, is dramatically reduced in induced conditions. In contrast, expression of pelA, which encodes a pectate lyase important for E. chrysanthemi pathogenicity, seems to be negatively regulated by CRP. The E. chrysanthemi crp mutants have greatly decreased maceration capacity in potato tubers, chicory leaves, and celery petioles as well as highly diminished virulence on saintpaulia plants. These findings demonstrate that CRP plays a crucial role in expression of the pectinolysis genes and in the pathogenicity of E

  10. The Catabolite Repressor Protein-Cyclic AMP Complex Regulates csgD and Biofilm Formation in Uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

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    Hufnagel, David A; Evans, Margery L; Greene, Sarah E; Pinkner, Jerome S; Hultgren, Scott J; Chapman, Matthew R

    2016-12-15

    The extracellular matrix protects Escherichia coli from immune cells, oxidative stress, predation, and other environmental stresses. Production of the E. coli extracellular matrix is regulated by transcription factors that are tuned to environmental conditions. The biofilm master regulator protein CsgD upregulates curli and cellulose, the two major polymers in the extracellular matrix of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) biofilms. We found that cyclic AMP (cAMP) regulates curli, cellulose, and UPEC biofilms through csgD The alarmone cAMP is produced by adenylate cyclase (CyaA), and deletion of cyaA resulted in reduced extracellular matrix production and biofilm formation. The catabolite repressor protein (CRP) positively regulated csgD transcription, leading to curli and cellulose production in the UPEC isolate, UTI89. Glucose, a known inhibitor of CyaA activity, blocked extracellular matrix formation when added to the growth medium. The mutant strains ΔcyaA and Δcrp did not produce rugose biofilms, pellicles, curli, cellulose, or CsgD. Three putative CRP binding sites were identified within the csgD-csgB intergenic region, and purified CRP could gel shift the csgD-csgB intergenic region. Additionally, we found that CRP binded upstream of kpsMT, which encodes machinery for K1 capsule production. Together our work shows that cAMP and CRP influence E. coli biofilms through transcriptional regulation of csgD IMPORTANCE The catabolite repressor protein (CRP)-cyclic AMP (cAMP) complex influences the transcription of ∼7% of genes on the Escherichia coli chromosome (D. Zheng, C. Constantinidou, J. L. Hobman, and S. D. Minchin, Nucleic Acids Res 32:5874-5893, 2004, https://dx.doi.org/10.1093/nar/gkh908). Glucose inhibits E. coli biofilm formation, and ΔcyaA and Δcrp mutants show impaired biofilm formation (D. W. Jackson, J.W. Simecka, and T. Romeo, J Bacteriol 184:3406-3410, 2002, https://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JB.184.12.3406-3410.2002). We determined that the cAMP

  11. Growth inhibition by 8-chloro cyclic AMP of human HT29 colorectal and ZR-75-1 breast carcinoma xenografts is associated with selective modulation of protein kinase A isoenzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramage, A D; Langdon, S P; Ritchie, A A; Burns, D J; Miller, W R

    1995-06-01

    Significant dose-related inhibition of growth of HT29 human colorectal cancer xenografts and ZR-75-1 breast cancer xenografts in immune-suppressed mice was induced by the cyclic AMP analogue, 8-chloroadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Cl-cyclic AMP) when given by alzet mini-pumps over a 7-day period at doses of either 50 or 100 mg/kg/day. Levels and types of cyclic AMP binding proteins were measured by ligand binding and photoaffinity labelling, respectively, in tumours harvested at the end of the treatment period. Compared with levels in tumours from control animals, values of tumour cyclic AMP binding proteins from treated animals were significantly reduced. These effects were associated with an apparent modulation of the types of cyclic AMP binding proteins, 8-Cl-cyclic AMP-treated xenografts displaying a reduced ratio of RI/RII isoforms compared with untreated control tumours.

  12. Characterization of the effect of SR48692 on inositol monophosphate, cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP responses linked to neurotensin receptor activation in neuronal and non-neuronal cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Oury-Donat, F.; Thurneyssen, O.; Gonalons, N.; Forgez, P.; Gully, D; Le Fur, G; Soubrie, P

    1995-01-01

    1. Neurotensin stimulated inositol monophosphate (IP1) formation in both human colonic carcinoma HT29 cells and in mouse neuroblastoma N1E115 cells with EC50 values of 3.5 +/- 0.5 nM (n = 4) and 0.46 +/- 0.02 nM (n = 3), respectively. Neurotensin also stimulated cyclic GMP production with an EC50 of 0.47 +/- 1.2 nM and inhibited cyclic AMP accumulation induced by forskolin (0.5 microM) with an IC50 of 1.33 +/- 1.5 nM (n = 3) on the N1E115 cell line. 2. The competitive antagonism by the non-pe...

  13. Positive Effect of Carbon Sources on Natural Transformation in Escherichia coli: Role of Low-Level Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-cAMP Receptor Protein in the Derepression of rpoS.

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    Guo, Mengyue; Wang, Huanyu; Xie, Nengbin; Xie, Zhixiong

    2015-10-01

    Natural plasmid transformation of Escherichia coli is a complex process that occurs strictly on agar plates and requires the global stress response factor σ(S). Here, we showed that additional carbon sources could significantly enhance the transformability of E. coli. Inactivation of phosphotransferase system genes (ptsH, ptsG, and crr) caused an increase in the transformation frequency, and the addition of cyclic AMP (cAMP) neutralized the promotional effect of carbon sources. This implies a negative role of cAMP in natural transformation. Further study showed that crp and cyaA mutations conferred a higher transformation frequency, suggesting that the cAMP-cAMP receptor protein (CRP) complex has an inhibitory effect on transformation. Moreover, we observed that rpoS is negatively regulated by cAMP-CRP in early log phase and that both crp and cyaA mutants show no transformation superiority when rpoS is knocked out. Therefore, it can be concluded that both the crp and cyaA mutations derepress rpoS expression in early log phase, whereby they aid in the promotion of natural transformation ability. We also showed that the accumulation of RpoS during early log phase can account for the enhanced transformation aroused by additional carbon sources. Our results thus demonstrated that the presence of additional carbon sources promotes competence development and natural transformation by reducing cAMP-CRP and, thus, derepressing rpoS expression during log phase. This finding could contribute to a better understanding of the relationship between nutrition state and competence, as well as the mechanism of natural plasmid transformation in E. coli. Escherichia coli, which is not usually considered to be naturally transformable, was found to spontaneously take up plasmid DNA on agar plates. Researching the mechanism of natural transformation is important for understanding the role of transformation in evolution, as well as in the transfer of pathogenicity and antibiotic

  14. Involvement of cyclic AMP receptor protein in regulation of the rmf gene encoding the ribosome modulation factor in Escherichia coli.

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    Shimada, Tomohiro; Yoshida, Hideji; Ishihama, Akira

    2013-05-01

    The decrease in overall translation in stationary-phase Escherichia coli is accompanied with the formation of functionally inactive 100S ribosomes mediated by the ribosome modulation factor (RMF). At present, however, little is known regarding the regulation of stationary-phase-coupled RMF expression. In the course of a systematic screening of regulation targets of DNA-binding transcription factors from E. coli, we realized that CRP (cyclic AMP [cAMP] receptor protein), the global regulator for carbon source utilization, participates in regulation of some ribosomal protein genes, including the rmf gene. In this study, we carried out detailed analysis of the regulation of the RMF gene by cAMP-CRP. The cAMP-dependent binding of CRP to the rmf gene promoter was confirmed by gel shift and DNase I footprinting assays. By using a reporter assay system, the expression level of RMF was found to decrease in the crp knockout mutant, indicating the involvement of CRP as an activator of the rmf promoter. In good agreement with the reduction of rmf promoter activity, we observed decreases in RMF production and 100S ribosome dimerization in the absence of CRP. Taken together, we propose that CRP regulates transcription activation of the rmf gene for formation of 100S ribosome dimers. Physiological roles of CRP involvement in RMF production are discussed.

  15. Changes in sodium, potassium-ATPase induced by repeated fencamfamine: the roles of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase and the nitric oxide-cyclic GMP pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munhoz, Carolina Demarchi; Glezer, Isaias; Kawamoto, Elisa Mitiko; Araújo, Ana Paula Natalini; Lepscha, Lucília B; Planeta, Cleopatra S; DeLucia, Roberto; Scavone, Cristoforo

    2003-12-01

    Fencamfamine (FCF) is an indirect dopamine agent with effects similar to amphetamine and cocaine. In the present study, we investigate changes in Na,K-ATPase, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and cyclic GMP levels in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and striatum (ST) of animals acutely or repeatedly treated with FCF (3.5 mg/kg). Na,K-ATPase had a similar activity in control and repeatedly treated animals, but was reduced in the NAc of the acute group. This enzyme was reduced in the ST in acute and repeatedly treated animals, compared to the control group. Expression of the alpha(1,2,3)-Na,K-ATPase isoforms in the NAc and the ST was not altered in all groups studied. Acute FCF induced a significant increase in PKA activity in both the ST and the NAc. Repeatedly treated animals showed a higher increase in PKA activity in the NAc, but not in the ST, when compared to the acute group. There was also an increase in both NOS activity and cyclic GMP levels only in the NAc of FCF repeatedly treated animals compared to the acute and control groups. We suggest that chronic FCF treatment is linked to a modification in Na,K-ATPase activity through the PKA and NO-cyclic GMP pathway.

  16. Effect of beta-ADrenergic Agonist on Cyclic AMP Synthesis in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Because it seems logical that these agonists exert their action on muscle through stimulation of cAMP synthesis, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate cAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of cAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of cAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax levels were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of cAMP synthesis. In addition, the EC50 values for isoproterenol, cimaterol, clenbuterol, epinephrine, and albuterol were 360 nM, 630 nM, 900 nM, 2,470 nM, and 3,650 nM, respectively. Finally, dose response curves show that the concentrations of cimaterol and clenbuterol in culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals had no detectable effect on stimulation of CAMP accumulation in chicken skeletal muscle cells.

  17. Evolution of motif variants and positional bias of the cyclic-AMP response element

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    Famili A Fazel

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors regulate gene expression by interacting with their specific DNA binding sites. Some transcription factors, particularly those involved in transcription initiation, always bind close to transcription start sites (TSS. Others have no such preference and are functional on sites even tens of thousands of base pairs (bp away from the TSS. The Cyclic-AMP response element (CRE binding protein (CREB binds preferentially to a palindromic sequence (TGACGTCA, known as the canonical CRE, and also to other CRE variants. CREB can activate transcription at CREs thousands of bp away from the TSS, but in mammals CREs are found far more frequently within 1 to 150 bp upstream of the TSS than in any other region. This property is termed positional bias. The strength of CREB binding to DNA is dependent on the sequence of the CRE motif. The central CpG dinucleotide in the canonical CRE (TGACGTCA is critical for strong binding of CREB dimers. Methylation of the cytosine in the CpG can inhibit binding of CREB. Deamination of the methylated cytosines causes a C to T transition, resulting in a functional, but lower affinity CRE variant, TGATGTCA. Results We performed genome-wide surveys of CREs in a number of species (from worm to human and showed that only vertebrates exhibited a CRE positional bias. We performed pair-wise comparisons of human CREs with orthologous sequences in mouse, rat and dog genomes and found that canonical and TGATGTCA variant CREs are highly conserved in mammals. However, when orthologous sequences differ, canonical CREs in human are most frequently TGATGTCA in the other species and vice-versa. We have identified 207 human CREs showing such differences. Conclusion Our data suggest that the positional bias of CREs likely evolved after the separation of urochordata and vertebrata. Although many canonical CREs are conserved among mammals, there are a number of orthologous genes that have canonical CREs in

  18. Physiological and Molecular Effects of the Cyclic Nucleotides cAMP and cGMP on Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Herrera, Natalia M.

    2012-12-01

    The cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (CNs), cAMP and cGMP, are second messengers that participate in the regulation of development, metabolism and adaptive responses. In plants, CNs are associated with the control of pathogen responses, pollen tube orientation, abiotic stress response, membrane transport regulation, stomatal movement and light perception. In this study, we hypothesize that cAMP and cGMP promote changes in the transcription level of genes related to photosynthesis, high light and membrane transport in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves and, that these changes at the molecular level can have functional biological consequences. For this reason we tested if CNs modulate the photosynthetic rate, responses to high light and root ion transport. Real time quantitative PCR was used to assess transcription levels of selected genes and infrared gas analyzers coupled to fluorescence sensors were used to measure the photosynthetic parameters. We present evidence that both cAMP and cGMP modulate foliar mRNA levels early after stimulation. The two CNs trigger different responses indicating that the signals have specificity. A comparison of proteomic and transcriptional changes suggest that both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms are modulated by CNs. cGMP up-regulates the mRNA levels of components of the photosynthesis and carbon metabolism. However, neither cAMP nor cGMP trigger differences in the rate of carbon assimilation, maximum efficiency of the photosystem II (PSII), or PSII operating efficiency. It was also demonstrated that CN regulate the expression of its own targets, the cyclic nucleotide gated channels - CNGC. Further studies are needed to identify the components of the signaling transduction pathway that mediate cellular changes and their respective regulatory and/or signaling roles.

  19. Cyclic AMP regulates the biosynthesis of cellobiohydrolase in Cellulomonas flavigena growing in sugar cane bagasse.

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    Herrera-Herrera, Jesús Antonio; Pérez-Avalos, Odilia; Salgado, Luis M; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa

    2009-10-01

    Cellulomonas flavigena produces a battery of cellulase components that act concertedly to degrade cellulose. The addition of cAMP to repressed C. flavigena cultures released catabolic repression, while addition of cAMP to induced C. flavigena cultures led to a cellobiohydrolase hyperproduction. Exogenous cAMP showed positive regulation on cellobiohydrolase production in C. flavigena grown on sugar cane bagasse. A C. flavigena cellobiohydrolase gene was cloned (named celA), which coded for a 71- kDa enzyme. Upstream, a repressor celR1, identified as a 38 kDa protein, was monitored by use of polyclonal antibodies.

  20. Hepatitis C virus NS2 protein activates cellular cyclic AMP-dependent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Mi; Kwon, Shi-Nae; Kang, Ju-Il; Lee, Song Hee; Jang, Sung Key; Ahn, Byung-Yoon; Kim, Yoon Ki

    2007-05-18

    Chronic infection of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) leads to liver cirrhosis and cancer. The mechanism leading to viral persistence and hepatocellular carcinoma, however, has not been fully understood. In this study, we show that the HCV infection activates cellular cAMP-dependent pathways. Expression of a luciferase reporter gene controlled by a basic promoter with the cAMP response element (CRE) was significantly elevated in human hepatoma Huh-7 cells infected with the HCV JFH1. Analysis with viral subgenomic replicons indicated that the HCV NS2 protein is responsible for the effect. Furthermore, the level of cellular transcripts whose stability is known to be regulated by cAMP was specifically reduced in cells harboring NS2-expressing replicons. These results allude to the HCV NS2 protein having a novel function of regulating cellular gene expression and proliferation through the cAMP-dependent pathway.

  1. The resolution of acute inflammation induced by cyclic AMP is dependent on annexin A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Kátia M; Vago, Juliana P; Caux, Thaís R; Negreiros-Lima, Graziele Letícia; Sugimoto, Michelle A; Tavares, Luciana P; Arribada, Raquel G; Carmo, Aline Alves F; Galvão, Izabela; Costa, Bruno Rocha C; Soriani, Frederico M; Pinho, Vanessa; Solito, Egle; Perretti, Mauro; Teixeira, Mauro M; Sousa, Lirlândia P

    2017-08-18

    Annexin A1 (AnxA1) is a glucocorticoid-regulated protein known for its anti-inflammatory and pro-resolving effects. We have shown previously that the cAMP-enhancing compounds rolipram (ROL; a PDE4 inhibitor) and Bt2cAMP (a cAMP mimetic) drive caspase-dependent resolution of neutrophilic inflammation. In this follow-up study, we investigated whether AnxA1 could be involved in the pro-resolving properties of these compounds using a model of LPS-induced inflammation in BALB/c mice. The treatment with ROL or Bt2cAMP at the peak of inflammation shortened resolution intervals, improved resolution indices, and increased AnxA1 expression. In vitro studies showed that ROL and Bt2cAMP induced AnxA1 expression and phosphorylation, and this effect was prevented by PKA inhibitors, suggesting the involvement of PKA in ROL-induced AnxA1 expression. Akin to these in vitro findings, H89 prevented ROL- and Bt2cAMP-induced resolution of inflammation, and it was associated with decreased levels of intact AnxA1. Moreover, two different strategies to block the AnxA1 pathway (by using N-t-Boc-Met-Leu-Phe, a nonselective AnxA1 receptor antagonist, or by using an anti-AnxA1 neutralizing antiserum) prevented ROL- and Bt2cAMP-induced resolution and neutrophil apoptosis. Likewise, the ability of ROL or Bt2cAMP to induce neutrophil apoptosis was impaired in AnxA-knock-out mice. Finally, in in vitro settings, ROL and Bt2cAMP overrode the survival-inducing effect of LPS in human neutrophils in an AnxA1-dependent manner. Our results show that AnxA1 is at least one of the endogenous determinants mediating the pro-resolving properties of cAMP-elevating agents and cAMP-mimetic drugs. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Terminal neuroendocrine differentiation of human prostate carcinoma cells in response to increased intracellular cyclic AMP.

    OpenAIRE

    Bang, Y J; Pirnia, F; Fang, W G; Kang, W K; Sartor, O; Whitesell, L; Ha, M J; Tsokos, M.; Sheahan, M D; Nguyen, P.

    1994-01-01

    Recent clinicopathologic studies have shown that many prostatic adenocarcinomas express focal neuroendocrine differentiation and that neuroendocrine differentiation is most apparent in advanced anaplastic tumors. While studying growth-regulatory signal transduction events in human prostate carcinoma cell lines, we found that in two of four cell lines, the androgen-sensitive line LNCaP and the highly metastatic androgen-independent line PC-3-M, elevation of cAMP through addition of cAMP analog...

  3. Cyclic AMP-dependent phosphorylation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase mediates penile erection

    OpenAIRE

    Hurt, K. Joseph; Sezen, Sena F.; Lagoda, Gwen F.; Musicki, Biljana; Rameau, Gerald A.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) generated by neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) initiates penile erection, but has not been thought to participate in the sustained erection required for normal sexual performance. We now show that cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of nNOS mediates erectile physiology, including sustained erection. nNOS is phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) at serine(S)1412. Electrical stimulation of the penile innervation increases S1412 phosphorylation that is blocked by PKA inhib...

  4. Vascular effects and cyclic AMP production produced by VIP, PHM, PHV, PACAP-27, PACAP-38, and NPY on rabbit ovarian artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, W; Sheikh, S P; Ottesen, B

    1996-01-01

    -38 all increased cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation. The cAMP accumulation induced by PACAP-27 and PACAP-38 was five times higher than the cAMP content induced by the other three peptides. The peptide-induced smooth muscle relaxation did not correlate to the cAMP accumulation. NPY (10......The relationship between vessel tone and cAMP production induced by vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), peptide histidine methionine (PHM), peptide histidine valine (PHV), pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP-27 and PACAP-38), and neuropeptide Y (NPY) was investigated......(-7) M) markedly reversed the relaxations induced by VIP, PHM, PHV, PACAP-27, and PACAP-38, but did not influence the cAMP production induced by these peptides. In conclusion, the relaxation induced by VIP, PHM, PHV, PACAP-27, and PACAP-38 and the contraction induced by NPY are not solely related...

  5. Cyclic AMP-dependent phosphorylation of neuronal nitric oxide synthase mediates penile erection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, K. Joseph; Sezen, Sena F.; Lagoda, Gwen F.; Musicki, Biljana; Rameau, Gerald A.; Snyder, Solomon H.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) generated by neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) initiates penile erection, but has not been thought to participate in the sustained erection required for normal sexual performance. We now show that cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of nNOS mediates erectile physiology, including sustained erection. nNOS is phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) at serine(S)1412. Electrical stimulation of the penile innervation increases S1412 phosphorylation that is blocked by PKA inhibitors but not by PI3-kinase/Akt inhibitors. Stimulation of cAMP formation by forskolin also activates nNOS phosphorylation. Sustained penile erection elicited by either intracavernous forskolin injection, or augmented by forskolin during cavernous nerve electrical stimulation, is prevented by the NOS inhibitor l-NAME or in nNOS-deleted mice. Thus, nNOS mediates both initiation and maintenance of penile erection, implying unique approaches for treating erectile dysfunction. PMID:23012472

  6. Cyclic AMP activates the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in PC12 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frödin, M; Peraldi, P; Van Obberghen, E

    1994-01-01

    upstream activator of ERK1 in the MAP kinase cascade. Supporting this view, forskolin and a cAMP analogue were found to increase the activity of MAP kinase kinase in PC12 cells, alone as well as in combination with phorbol ester. PACAP38 also stimulated in vivo 32P-labeling of ERK1 and MAP kinase kinase...... activity. Finally, cAMP or PACAP38 increased by 3-fold nerve growth factor-stimulated neurite formation in PC12 cells, which may be correlated with the potentiating effect of these agents on nerve growth factor-stimulated ERK1 activity....

  7. Cyclic AMP-specific and cyclic GMP-specific phosphodiesterase isoenzymes in human cavernous arteries--immunohistochemical distribution and functional significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldkirch, Eginhard; Uckert, Stefan; Yildirim, Hüseyin; Sohn, Michael; Jonas, Udo; Stief, Christian G; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Hedlund, Petter

    2005-12-01

    It has been well established that male erectile dysfunction is frequently associated with vascular diseases. The normal function of cavernous arteries is considered a prerequisite to maintain sufficient blood flow to the trabecular spaces in order to enable penile erection. Contractility of cavernous arteries is regulated by the peripheral autonomic nervous system and endogenous factors released from the endothelial cell layer. A significant increase of blood flow in the central cavernous arteries is the initial event leading to penile tumescence and rigidity. Besides the significance of the nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-mediated mechanisms, the cyclic AMP (cAMP) signalling pathway is also involved in the regulation of tone of the erectile tissue, and interactions between cGMP- and cAMP-mediated mechanisms have been demonstrated. The aim of the present study was to investigate by means of immunohistochemistry the presence of the phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoenzymes 3, 4 (cAMP-specific PDEs) and 5 (cGMP-specific PDE) in thin sections of human central cavernous arteries (HCA) and their functional significance in the mechanism of vessel tone regulation. Functional experiments were performed using circular segments of HCA and strip preparations of the human corpus cavernosum (HCC). Relaxant effects induced by the cumulative addition of the PDE inhibitors milrinone (PDE3 inhibitor), rolipram (PDE4 inhibitor) and sildenafil (PDE5 inhibitor; 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 M) were studied in preparations of HCA and HCC challenged by 1 M norepinephrine (NE). Moreover, immunohistochemistry was carried out in order to evaluate the expression of PDE3, PDE4 and PDE5 in thin sections of HCA. Milrinone, rolipram and sildenafil dose-dependently reversed the NE-induced tension of the isolated vascular segments and HCC strips with sildenafil being the most effective drug. Neither rolipram nor milrinone reached an EC50 value. Abundant immunoreactivities specific for PDE3, PDE

  8. Toxoplasma gondii Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Subunit 3 Is Involved in the Switch from Tachyzoite to Bradyzoite Development

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    Tatsuki Sugi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular apicomplexan parasite that infects warm-blooded vertebrates, including humans. Asexual reproduction in T. gondii allows it to switch between the rapidly replicating tachyzoite and quiescent bradyzoite life cycle stages. A transient cyclic AMP (cAMP pulse promotes bradyzoite differentiation, whereas a prolonged elevation of cAMP inhibits this process. We investigated the mechanism(s by which differential modulation of cAMP exerts a bidirectional effect on parasite differentiation. There are three protein kinase A (PKA catalytic subunits (TgPKAc1 to -3 expressed in T. gondii. Unlike TgPKAc1 and TgPKAc2, which are conserved in the phylum Apicomplexa, TgPKAc3 appears evolutionarily divergent and specific to coccidian parasites. TgPKAc1 and TgPKAc2 are distributed in the cytomembranes, whereas TgPKAc3 resides in the cytosol. TgPKAc3 was genetically ablated in a type II cyst-forming strain of T. gondii (PruΔku80Δhxgprt and in a type I strain (RHΔku80Δhxgprt, which typically does not form cysts. The Δpkac3 mutant exhibited slower growth than the parental and complemented strains, which correlated with a higher basal rate of tachyzoite-to-bradyzoite differentiation. 3-Isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX treatment, which elevates cAMP levels, maintained wild-type parasites as tachyzoites under bradyzoite induction culture conditions (pH 8.2/low CO2, whereas the Δpkac3 mutant failed to respond to the treatment. This suggests that TgPKAc3 is the factor responsible for the cAMP-dependent tachyzoite maintenance. In addition, the Δpkac3 mutant had a defect in the production of brain cysts in vivo, suggesting that a substrate of TgPKAc3 is probably involved in the persistence of this parasite in the intermediate host animals.

  9. Cyclic AMP imaging sheds light on PDF signaling in circadian clock neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomchik, Seth M; Davis, Ronald L

    2008-04-24

    In Drosophila, the neuropeptide PDF is required for circadian rhythmicity, but it is unclear where PDF acts. In this issue of Neuron, Shafer et al. use a novel bioimaging methodology to demonstrate that PDF elevates cAMP in nearly all clock neurons. Thus, PDF apparently exerts more widespread effects on the circadian clock network than suggested by previous studies of PDF receptor expression.

  10. Cyclic AMP induces IPC leukemia cell apoptosis via CRE-and CDK-dependent Bim transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huseby, S; Gausdal, G; Keen, T J; Kjærland, E; Krakstad, C; Myhren, L; Brønstad, K; Kunick, C; Schwede, F; Genieser, H-G; Kleppe, R; Døskeland, S O

    2011-12-08

    The IPC-81 cell line is derived from the transplantable BNML model of acute myelogenic leukemia (AML), known to be a reliable predictor of the clinical efficiency of antileukemic agents, like the first-line AML anthracycline drug daunorubicin (DNR). We show here that cAMP acted synergistically with DNR to induce IPC cell death. The DNR-induced death differed from that induced by cAMP by (1) not involving Bim induction, (2) being abrogated by GSK3β inhibitors, (3) by being promoted by the HSP90/p23 antagonist geldanamycin and truncated p23 and (4) by being insensitive to the CRE binding protein (CREB) antagonist ICER and to cyclin-dependent protein kinase (CDK) inhibitors. In contrast, the apoptosis induced by cAMP correlated tightly with Bim protein expression. It was abrogated by Bim (BCL2L11) downregulation, whether achieved by the CREB antagonist ICER, by CDK inhibitors, by Bim-directed RNAi, or by protein synthesis inhibitor. The forced expression of BimL killed IPC-81(WT) cells rapidly, Bcl2-overexpressing cells being partially resistant. The pivotal role of CREB and CDK activity for Bim transcription is unprecedented. It is also noteworthy that newly developed cAMP analogs specifically activating PKA isozyme I (PKA-I) were able to induce IPC cell apoptosis. Our findings support the notion that AML cells may possess targetable death pathways not exploited by common anti-cancer agents.

  11. Effect of electrical stimulation on beta-adrenergic receptor population and cyclic amp production in chicken and rat skeletal muscle cell cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.; Strietzel, C. J.

    2000-01-01

    Expression of the beta-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) and its coupling to cyclic AMP (cAMP) synthesis are important components of the signaling system that controls muscle atrophy and hypertrophy, and the goal of this study was to determine if electrical stimulation in a pattern simulating slow muscle contraction would alter the betaAR response in primary cultures of avian and mammalian skeletal muscle cells. Specifically, chicken skeletal muscle cells and rat skeletal muscle cells that had been grown for 7 d in culture were subjected to electrical stimulation for an additional 2 d at a pulse frequency of 0.5 pulses/sec and a pulse duration of 200 msec. In chicken skeletal muscle cells, the betaAR population was not significantly affected by electrical stimulation; however, the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was reduced by approximately one-half. In contrast, the betaAR population in rat muscle cells was increased slightly but not significantly by electrical stimulation, and the ability of these cells to synthesize cyclic AMP was increased by almost twofold. The basal levels of intracellular cyclic AMP in neither rat muscle cells nor chicken muscle cells were affected by electrical stimulation.

  12. Identification, characterization, and structure analysis of the cyclic di-AMP-binding PII-like signal transduction protein DarA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundlach, Jan; Dickmanns, Achim; Schröder-Tittmann, Kathrin; Neumann, Piotr; Kaesler, Jan; Kampf, Jan; Herzberg, Christina; Hammer, Elke; Schwede, Frank; Kaever, Volkhard; Tittmann, Kai; Stülke, Jörg; Ficner, Ralf

    2015-01-30

    The cyclic dimeric AMP nucleotide c-di-AMP is an essential second messenger in Bacillus subtilis. We have identified the protein DarA as one of the prominent c-di-AMP receptors in B. subtilis. Crystal structure analysis shows that DarA is highly homologous to PII signal transducer proteins. In contrast to PII proteins, the functionally important B- and T-loops are swapped with respect to their size. DarA is a homotrimer that binds three molecules of c-di-AMP, each in a pocket located between two subunits. We demonstrate that DarA is capable to bind c-di-AMP and with lower affinity cyclic GMP-AMP (3'3'-cGAMP) but not c-di-GMP or 2'3'-cGAMP. Consistently the crystal structure shows that within the ligand-binding pocket only one adenine is highly specifically recognized, whereas the pocket for the other adenine appears to be promiscuous. Comparison with a homologous ligand-free DarA structure reveals that c-di-AMP binding is accompanied by conformational changes of both the fold and the position of the B-loop in DarA. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Identification, Characterization, and Structure Analysis of the Cyclic di-AMP-binding PII-like Signal Transduction Protein DarA*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundlach, Jan; Dickmanns, Achim; Schröder-Tittmann, Kathrin; Neumann, Piotr; Kaesler, Jan; Kampf, Jan; Herzberg, Christina; Hammer, Elke; Schwede, Frank; Kaever, Volkhard; Tittmann, Kai; Stülke, Jörg; Ficner, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The cyclic dimeric AMP nucleotide c-di-AMP is an essential second messenger in Bacillus subtilis. We have identified the protein DarA as one of the prominent c-di-AMP receptors in B. subtilis. Crystal structure analysis shows that DarA is highly homologous to PII signal transducer proteins. In contrast to PII proteins, the functionally important B- and T-loops are swapped with respect to their size. DarA is a homotrimer that binds three molecules of c-di-AMP, each in a pocket located between two subunits. We demonstrate that DarA is capable to bind c-di-AMP and with lower affinity cyclic GMP-AMP (3′3′-cGAMP) but not c-di-GMP or 2′3′-cGAMP. Consistently the crystal structure shows that within the ligand-binding pocket only one adenine is highly specifically recognized, whereas the pocket for the other adenine appears to be promiscuous. Comparison with a homologous ligand-free DarA structure reveals that c-di-AMP binding is accompanied by conformational changes of both the fold and the position of the B-loop in DarA. PMID:25433025

  14. The localization and concentration of the PDE2-encoded high-affinity cAMP phosphodiesterase is regulated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yun; Liu, Enkai; Bai, Xiaojia; Zhang, Aili

    2010-03-01

    The genome of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes two cyclic AMP (cAMP) phosphodiesterases, a low-affinity one, Pde1, and a high-affinity one, Pde2. Pde1 has been ascribed a function for downregulating agonist-induced cAMP accumulation in a protein kinase A (PKA)-governed negative feedback loop, whereas Pde2 controls the basal cAMP level in the cell. Here we show that PKA regulates the localization and protein concentration of Pde2. Pde2 is accumulated in the nucleus in wild-type cells growing on glucose, or in strains with hyperactive PKA. In contrast, in derepressed wild-type cells or cells with attenuated PKA activity, Pde2 is distributed over the nucleus and cytoplasm. We also show evidence indicating that the Pde2 protein level is positively correlated with PKA activity. The increase in the Pde2 protein level in high-PKA strains and in cells growing on glucose was due to its increased half-life. These results suggest that, like its low-affinity counterpart, the high-affinity phosphodiesterase may also play an important role in the PKA-controlled feedback inhibition of intracellular cAMP.

  15. Role of 2′,3′-cyclic nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase in the renal 2′,3′-cAMP-adenosine pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Delbert G.; Mi, Zaichuan; Cheng, Dongmei; Bansal, Rashmi; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Kochanek, Patrick M.

    2014-01-01

    Energy depletion increases the renal production of 2′,3′-cAMP (a positional isomer of 3′,5′-cAMP that opens mitochondrial permeability transition pores) and 2′,3′-cAMP is converted to 2′-AMP and 3′-AMP, which in turn are metabolized to adenosine. Because the enzymes involved in this “2′,3′-cAMP-adenosine pathway” are unknown, we examined whether 2′,3′-cyclic nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) participates in the renal metabolism of 2′,3′-cAMP. Western blotting and real-time PCR demonstrated expression of CNPase in rat glomerular mesangial, preglomerular vascular smooth muscle and endothelial, proximal tubular, thick ascending limb and collecting duct cells. Real-time PCR established the expression of CNPase in human glomerular mesangial, proximal tubular and vascular smooth muscle cells; and the level of expression of CNPase was greater than that for phosphodiesterase 4 (major enzyme for the metabolism of 3′,5′-cAMP). Overexpression of CNPase in rat preglomerular vascular smooth muscle cells increased the metabolism of exogenous 2′,3′-cAMP to 2′-AMP. Infusions of 2′,3′-cAMP into isolated CNPase wild-type (+/+) kidneys increased renal venous 2′-AMP, and this response was diminished by 63% in CNPase knockout (−/−) kidneys, whereas the conversion of 3′,5′-cAMP to 5′-AMP was similar in CNPase +/+ vs. −/− kidneys. In CNPase +/+ kidneys, energy depletion (metabolic poisons) increased kidney tissue levels of adenosine and its metabolites (inosine, hypoxanthine, xanthine, and uric acid) without accumulation of 2′,3′-cAMP. In contrast, in CNPase −/− kidneys, energy depletion increased kidney tissue levels of 2′,3′-cAMP and abolished the increase in adenosine and its metabolites. In conclusion, kidneys express CNPase, and renal CNPase mediates in part the renal 2′,3′-cAMP-adenosine pathway. PMID:24808540

  16. Characterization of the MKS1 gene, a new negative regulator of the Ras-cyclic AMP pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, A; Anraku, Y

    1993-04-01

    In order to isolate genes that function downstream of the Ras-cAMP pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a YEp13-based genomic library was screened for clones that inhibit growth of cells with diminished A-kinase activity. One such gene, MKS1, was found to encode a hydrophilic 52 kDa protein that shares weak homology with the yeast SPT2/SIN1 gene product. Three lines of evidence suggest that the MKS1 gene product is a negative regulator downstream of the Ras-cAMP pathway: (i) overexpression of MKS1 inhibits growth of cyr1 disruptant cells on YPD medium containing a low concentration of cAMP; (ii) overexpression of MKS1 does not affect TPK1 expression; and (iii) the temperature-sensitive cyr1-230 mutation is partially suppressed by mks1 disruption. The mks1 mutant shows similar phenotypes to gal11/spt13, i.e., it cannot grow on YPGal containing ethidium bromide at 25 degrees C, or on YPGly or SGal at 37 degrees C. The mks1 gal11 double mutant shows more marked phenotypic changes than the single mutants. These results suggest that MKS1 is involved in transcriptional regulation of several genes by cAMP.

  17. Effect of Serum from Chickens Treated with Clenbuterol on Myosin Accumulation, Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Population, and Cyclic AMP Synthesis in Embryonic Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cell Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Ronald B.; Bridge, Kristin Y.; Wuethrich, Andrew J.; Hancock, Deana L.

    2002-01-01

    Broiler chickens at 35 d of age were fed 1 ppm clenbuterol for 14 d. This level of dietary clenbuterol led to 5-7% increases in the weights of leg and breast muscle tissue. At the end of the 14-d period, serum was prepared from both control and clenbuterol-treated chickens, and was then employed as a component of cell culture media at a final concentration of 20% (v/v). Muscle cell cultures were prepared from both the leg and the breast muscle groups of 12-d chick embryos. Treatment groups included control chicken serum to which 10 nM, 50 nM, and 1 uM clenbuterol had been added, as well as cells grown in media containing 10% horse serum. Cultures were subjected to each treatment for 3 d, beginning on the seventh d in culture. Neither the percent fusion nor the number of nuclei in myotubes was significantly affected by any of the treatments. The quantity of myosin heavy chains (MHCs) was not increased by serum from clenbuterol-treated chickens in either breast or leg muscle cultures; however, the MHC quantity was 50-150% higher in cultures grown in control chicken serum to which 10 and 50 nM clenbuterol had also been added. The B-adrenergic receptor (betaAR) population was 4000-7000 betaARs per cell in cultures grown in chicken serum with leg muscle cultures having approximately 25-30% more receptors than breast muscle Culture. Receptor population was not significantly affected by the presence of clenbuterol or by the presence of serum from clenbuterol-treated chickens. In contrast, the betaAR Population in leg and breast muscle cultures grown in the presence of 10% horse serum was 16,000-18,000 betaARs per cell. Basal concentration of cyclic adenosine 3':5'monophosphate (cAMP) was not significantly affected by the treatments. When cultures grown in chicken serum were stimulated for 10 min with 1 uM isoproterenol, limited increases of 12-20% in cAMP Concentration above the. basal levels were observed. However, when cultures grown in the presence of horse serum were

  18. Low expression of cyclic AMP response element modulator-1 can increase the migration and invasion of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuchan; Zhou, Shuhui; Yang, Xiaojing; Shi, Hui; Li, Mei; Xue, Qun; Huang, Xianting; Wang, Xinxiu; Wang, Huijie; Zhang, Jianguo

    2013-12-01

    Cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) family can regulate biological functions of various types of cells and has relation with esophageal cancer cell migration and invasion. Cyclic AMP response element modulator-1 (CREM-1) is one member of the family with limited acquaintance. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of CREM-1 on migration and invasion in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). The expression of CREM-1 protein in ESCC tissues with or without lymph nodes metastasis was determined by western blot. Immunohistochemical analysis of CREM-1 expression were carried out in paraffin-embedded sections of ESCC and correlated with clinical features. The roles of CREM-1 in migration and invasion were studied in TE1 cells through knocking CREM-1 down with siRNA or overexpression of CREM-1 in ECA109 cells. The regulations of CREM-1 on invasion and migration were determined by transwell and wounding healing assay. The effect of CREM-1 on chemotherapy drug was analyzed by Cell counting kit-8 assay. We found that the expression of CREM-1 was significantly downregulated in ESCC tissues with lymph nodes metastasis compared with the tissues without lymph nodes metastasis and was correlated with the clinical features of pathological grade, tumor stage and lymph node metastasis. Moreover, knocking CREM-1 down with siRNA increased cell migration and invasion in human ESCC cell lines TE1 while upregulation of CREM-1 inhibited the motility. Our data suggested that CREM-1 might play an important role in the regulation of tumor metastasis and invasion and serve as a tumor suppressor in human ESCC. We proposed that CREM-1 might be used as a potential therapeutic agent for human ESCC.

  19. Leptin interferes with 3',5'-Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate (cAMP signaling to inhibit steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells

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    HoYuen Basil

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity has been linked to an increased risk of female infertility. Leptin, an adipocytokine which is elevated during obesity, may influence gonadal function through modulating steroidogenesis in granulosa cells. Methods The effect of leptin on progesterone production in simian virus 40 immortalized granulosa (SVOG cells was examined by Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The effect of leptin on the expression of the steroidogenic enzymes (StAR, P450scc, 3betaHSD in SVOG cells was examined by real-time PCR and Western blotting. The mRNA expression of leptin receptor isoforms in SVOG cells were examined by using PCR. SVOG cells were co-treated with leptin and specific pharmacological inhibitors to identify the signaling pathways involved in leptin-reduced progesterone production. Silencing RNA against leptin receptor was used to determine that the inhibition of leptin on cAMP-induced steroidogenesis acts in a leptin receptor-dependent manner. Results and Conclusion In the present study, we investigated the cellular mechanisms underlying leptin-regulated steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells. We show that leptin inhibits 8-bromo cAMP-stimulated progesterone production in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, we show that leptin inhibits expression of the cAMP-stimulated steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR protein, the rate limiting de novo protein in progesterone synthesis. Leptin induces the activation of ERK1/2, p38 and JNK but only the ERK1/2 (PD98059 and p38 (SB203580 inhibitors attenuate the leptin-induced inhibition of cAMP-stimulated StAR protein expression and progesterone production. These data suggest that the leptin-induced MAPK signal transduction pathway interferes with cAMP/PKA-stimulated steroidogenesis in human granulosa cells. Moreover, siRNA mediated knock-down of the endogenous leptin receptor attenuates the effect of leptin on cAMP-induced StAR protein expression and progesterone

  20. MyD88 and TRIF mediate the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP induced corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH expression in JEG3 choriocarcinoma cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocak Hande

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Classically protein kinase A (PKA and transcription factor activator protein 1 (AP-1 mediate the cyclic AMP (cAMP induced-corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH expression in the placenta. However enteric Gram (- bacterial cell wall component lipopolysaccharide (LPS may also induce-CRH expression via Toll like receptor (TLR4 and its adaptor molecule Myd88. Here we investigated the role of MyD88, TRIF and IRAK2 on cAMP-induced CRH promoter activation in JEG3 cells in the absence of LPS/TLR4 stimulation. Methods JEG3 cells were transfected with CRH-luciferase and Beta-galactosidase expression vectors and either empty or dominant-negative (DN-MyD88, DN-TRIF or DN-IRAK2 vectors using Fugene6 (Roche. cAMP-induced CRH promoter activation was examined by using a luminometer and luciferase assay. Calorimetric Beta-galactosidase assays were performed to correct for transfection efficiency. Luciferase expression vectors of cAMP-downstream molecules, CRE and AP-1, were used to further examine the signaling cascades. Results cAMP stimulation induced AP-1 and CRE promoter expression and led to dose-dependent CRH promoter activation in JEG3 cells. Inhibition of MyD88 signaling blocked cAMP-induced CRE and CRH promoter activation. Inhibition of TRIF signaling blocked cAMP-induced CRH but not CRE expression, while inhibition of IRAK2 did not have an effect on cAMP-induced CRH expression. Conclusion MyD88 and TRIF exert direct regulatory effect on cAMP-induced CRH promoter activation in JEG3 cells in the absence of infection. MyD88 most likely interacts with molecules upstream of IRAK2 to regulate cAMP-induced CRH expression.

  1. Cyclic-di-AMP synthesis by the diadenylate cyclase CdaA is modulated by the peptidoglycan biosynthesis enzyme GlmM in Lactococcus lactis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yan; Pham, Thi Huong; Nhiep, Thi Hanh Nguyen; Vu, Ngoc Minh Thu; Marcellin, Esteban; Chakrabortti, Alolika; Wang, Yuanliang; Waanders, Jennifer; Lo, Raquel; Huston, Wilhelmina M; Bansal, Nidhi; Nielsen, Lars K; Liang, Zhao-Xun; Turner, Mark S

    2016-03-01

    The second messenger cyclic-di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) plays important roles in growth, virulence, cell wall homeostasis, potassium transport and affects resistance to antibiotics, heat and osmotic stress. Most Firmicutes contain only one c-di-AMP synthesizing diadenylate cyclase (CdaA); however, little is known about signals and effectors controlling CdaA activity and c-di-AMP levels. In this study, a genetic screen was employed to identify components which affect the c-di-AMP level in Lactococcus. We characterized suppressor mutations that restored osmoresistance to spontaneous c-di-AMP phosphodiesterase gdpP mutants, which contain high c-di-AMP levels. Loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutations were identified in the cdaA and gdpP genes, respectively, which led to lower c-di-AMP levels. A mutation was also identified in the phosphoglucosamine mutase gene glmM, which is commonly located within the cdaA operon in bacteria. The glmM I154F mutation resulted in a lowering of the c-di-AMP level and a reduction in the key peptidoglycan precursor UDP-N-acetylglucosamine in L. lactis. C-di-AMP synthesis by CdaA was shown to be inhibited by GlmM(I154F) more than GlmM and GlmM(I154F) was found to bind more strongly to CdaA than GlmM. These findings identify GlmM as a c-di-AMP level modulating protein and provide a direct connection between c-di-AMP synthesis and peptidoglycan biosynthesis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Influence of sulphate on effects of ADP, 3′,5′-cyclic amp and citrate on human platelet phosphofructokinase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Jan Willem N.; Gorter, G.; Sixma, J.J.; Staal, Gerard E.J.

    1974-01-01

    1. 1. Sulphate ions activate partially-purified human platelet phosphofructokinase. This is caused by suppression of the cooperativity of the enzyme with respect to fructose 6-phosphate. 2. 2. Sulphate therefore markedly affects the influences of allosteric modifiers such as ADP, 3′,5′-cyclic AMP

  3. The Role of Angiotensin II and Cyclic AMP in Alveolar Active Sodium Transport.

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    Reem Ismael-Badarneh

    Full Text Available Active alveolar fluid clearance is important in keeping airspaces free of edema. Angiotensin II plays a role in the pathogenesis of hypertension, heart failure and others. However, little is known about its contribution to alveolar fluid clearance. Angiotensin II effects are mediated by two specific receptors; AT1 and AT2. The localization of these two receptors in the lung, specifically in alveolar epithelial cells type II, was recently reported. We hypothesize that Angiotensin II may have a role in the regulation of alveolar fluid clearance. We investigated the effect of Angiotensin II on alveolar fluid clearance in rats using the isolated perfused lung model and isolated rat alveolar epithelial cells. The rate of alveolar fluid clearance in control rats was 8.6% ± 0.1 clearance of the initial volume and decreased by 22.5%, 28.6%, 41.6%, 48.7% and 39% in rats treated with 10-10 M, 10-9 M, 10-8 M, 10-7 M or 10-6 M of Ang II respectively (P < 0.003. The inhibitory effect of Angiotensin II was restored in losartan, an AT1 specific antagonist, pretreated rats, indicating an AT1 mediated effect of Ang II on alveolar fluid clearance. The expression of Na,K-ATPase proteins and cAMP levels in alveolar epithelial cells were down-regulated following the administration of Angiotensin II; suggesting that cAMP may be involved in AngII-induced reduced Na,K-ATPase expression, though the contribution of additional factors could not be excluded. We herein suggest a novel mechanism of clinical relevance by which angiotensin adversely impairs the ability of the lungs to clear edema.

  4. Aspergillus fumigatus allergen expression is coordinately regulated in response to hydrogen peroxide and cyclic AMP

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    Bowyer Paul

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A. fumigatus has been associated with a wide spectrum of allergic disorders such as ABPA or SAFS. It is poorly understood what allergens in particular are being expressed during fungal invasion and which are responsible for stimulation of immune responses. Study of the dynamics of allergen production by fungi may lead to insights into how allergens are presented to the immune system. Methods Expression of 17 A. fumigatus allergen genes was examined in response to various culture conditions and stimuli as well as in the presence of macrophages in order to mimic conditions encountered in the lung. Results Expression of 14/17 allergen genes was strongly induced by oxidative stress caused by hydrogen peroxide (Asp f 1, -2, -4, -5, -6, -7, -8, -10, -13, -17 and -18, all >10-fold and Asp f 11, -12, and -22, 5-10-fold and 16/17 allergen genes were repressed in the presence of cAMP. The 4 protease allergen genes (Asp f -5, -10, -13 and -18 were expressed at very low levels compared to the comparator (β-tubulin under all other conditions examined. Mild heat shock, anoxia, lipid and presence of macrophages did not result in coordinated changes in allergen gene expression. Growth on lipid as sole carbon source contributed to the moderate induction of most of the allergen genes. Heat shock (37°C > 42°C caused moderate repression in 11/17 genes (Asp f 1, -2, -4, -5, -6, -9, -10, -13, -17, -18 and -23 (2- to 9-fold, which was mostly evident for Asp f 1 and -9 (~9-fold. Anaerobic stress led to moderate induction of 13/17 genes (1.1 to 4-fold with one, Asp f 8 induced over 10-fold when grown under mineral oil. Complex changes were seen in gene expression during co-culture of A. fumigatus with macrophages. Conclusions Remarkable coordination of allergen gene expression in response to a specific condition (oxidative stress or the presence of cAMP has been observed, implying that a single biological stimulus may play a role in allergen gene

  5. Effects of dibutyryl cyclic-AMP on survival and neuronal differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells transplanted into spinal cord injured rats.

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    Howard Kim

    Full Text Available Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs have great potential as a cell replacement therapy for spinal cord injury. However, poor control over transplant cell differentiation and survival remain major obstacles. In this study, we asked whether dibutyryl cyclic-AMP (dbcAMP, which was shown to induce up to 85% in vitro differentiation of NSPCs into neurons would enhance survival of transplanted NSPCs through prolonged exposure either in vitro or in vivo through the controlled release of dbcAMP encapsulated within poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA microspheres and embedded within chitosan guidance channels. NSPCs, seeded in fibrin scaffolds within the channels, differentiated in vitro to betaIII-tubulin positive neurons by immunostaining and mRNA expression, in response to dbcAMP released from PLGA microspheres. After transplantation in spinal cord injured rats, the survival and differentiation of NSPCs was evaluated. Untreated NSPCs, NSPCs transplanted with dbcAMP-releasing microspheres, and NSPCs pre-differentiated with dbcAMP for 4 days in vitro were transplanted after rat spinal cord transection and assessed 2 and 6 weeks later. Interestingly, NSPC survival was highest in the dbcAMP pre-treated group, having approximately 80% survival at both time points, which is remarkable given that stem cell transplantation often results in less than 1% survival at similar times. Importantly, dbcAMP pre-treatment also resulted in the greatest number of in vivo NSPCs differentiated into neurons (37±4%, followed by dbcAMP-microsphere treated NSPCs (27±14% and untreated NSPCs (15±7%. The reverse trend was observed for NSPC-derived oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, with these populations being highest in untreated NSPCs. This combination strategy of stem cell-loaded chitosan channels implanted in a fully transected spinal cord resulted in extensive axonal regeneration into the injury site, with improved functional recovery after 6 weeks in animals implanted with

  6. Acute morphine alters GABAergic transmission in the central amygdala during naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal: role of cyclic AMP

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    Michal eBajo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The central amygdala (CeA plays an important role in opioid addiction. Therefore, we examined the effects of naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal (WD on GABAergic transmission in rat CeA neurons using whole-cell recordings with naloxone in the bath. The basal frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs increased in CeA neurons from WD compared to placebo rats. Acute morphine (10 M had mixed effects (> 20% change from baseline on mIPSCs in placebo and WD rats. In most CeA neurons (64% from placebo rats, morphine significantly decreased mIPSC frequency and amplitude. In 32% of placebo neurons, morphine significantly increased mIPSC amplitudes but had no effect on mIPSC frequency. In WD rats, acute morphine significantly increased mIPSC frequency but had no effect on mIPSC amplitude in 41% of CeA neurons. In 45% of cells, acute morphine significantly decreased mIPSC frequency and amplitude. Pre-treatment with the cyclic AMP inhibitor (R-adenosine, cyclic 3’,5’-(hydrogenphosphorothioate triethylammonium (RP, prevented acute morphine-induced potentiation of mIPSCs. Pre-treatment of slices with the Gi/o G-protein subunit inhibitor pertussis toxin (PTX did not prevent the acute morphine-induced enhancement or inhibition of mIPSCs. PTX and RP decreased basal mIPSC frequencies and amplitudes only in WD rats. The results suggest that inhibition of GABAergic transmission in the CeA by acute morphine is mediated by PTX-insensitive mechanisms, although PTX-sensitive mechanisms cannot be ruled out for non-morphine responsive cells; by contrast, potentiation of GABAergic transmission is mediated by activated cAMP signaling that also mediates the increased basal GABAergic transmission in WD rats. Our data indicate that during the acute phase of WD, the CeA opioid and GABAergic systems undergo neuroadaptative changes conditioned by a previous chronic morphine exposure and dependence.

  7. High-level activation of cyclic AMP signaling attenuates bone morphogenetic protein 2-induced sympathoadrenal lineage development and promotes melanogenesis in neural crest cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ming; Andrisani, Ourania M

    2005-06-01

    The intensity of cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling is a differential instructive signal in neural crest (NC) cell specification. By an unknown mechanism, sympathoadrenal lineage specification is suppressed by high-level activation of cAMP signaling. In NC cultures, high-level activation of cAMP signaling mediates protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent Rap1-B-Raf-ERK1/2 activation, leading to cytoplasmic accumulation of phospho-Smad1, thus terminating bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2)-induced sympathoadrenal cell development. Concurrently, cAMP signaling induces transcription of the melanocyte-determining transcription factor Mitf and melanogenesis. dnACREB and E1A inhibit Mitf expression and melanogenesis, supporting the notion that CREB activation is necessary for melanogenesis. However, constitutively active CREB(DIEDML) without PKA activation is insufficient for Mitf expression and melanogenesis, indicating PKA regulates additional aspects of Mitf transcription. Thus, high-level activation of cAMP signaling plays a dual role in NC cell differentiation: attenuation of BMP2-induced sympathoadrenal cell development and induction of melanogenesis. We conclude the intensity of activation of signal transduction cascades determines cell lineage segregation mechanisms.

  8. Regulation of Cox-2 by Cyclic AMP Response Element Binding Protein in Prostate Cancer: Potential Role for Nexrutine

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    Rita Ghosh

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We recently showed that NexrutineR, a Phellodendron amurense bark extract, suppresses proliferation of prostate cancer cell lines and tumor development in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of mouse prostate (TRAMP model. Our data also indicate that the antiproliferative effects of NexrutineR are mediated in part by Akt and Cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB. Cyclooxygenase (Cox-2, a pro-inflammatory mediator, is a CREB target that induces prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 and suppresses apoptosis. Treatment of LNCaP cells with NexrutineR reduced tumor necrosis factor α-induced enzymatic as well as promoter activities of Cox-2. NexrutineR also reduced the expression and promoter activity of Cox-2 in PC-3 cells that express high constitutive levels of Cox-2. Deletion analysis coupled with mutational analysis of the Cox-2 promoter identified CRE as being sufficient for mediating NexrutineR response. Immunohistochemical analysis of human prostate tumors show increased expression of CREB and DNA binding activity in high-grade tumors (three-fold higher in human prostate tumors compared to normal prostate; P = .01. We have identified CREB-mediated activation of Cox-2 as a potential signaling pathway in prostate cancer which can be blocked with a nontoxic, cost-effective dietary supplement like NexrutineR, demonstrating a prospective for development of NexrutineR for prostate cancer management.

  9. Monosodium glutamate neurotoxicity increases beta amyloid in the rat hippocampus: a potential role for cyclic AMP protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dief, Abeer E; Kamha, Eman S; Baraka, Azza M; Elshorbagy, Amany K

    2014-05-01

    Glutamate excitotoxicity and cyclic AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) are both recognized as important mediators in neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD). To investigate whether oral or subcutaneous monosodium glutamate (MSG) neurotoxicity mimics some features of AD and whether these can be reversed by the AMPK activator Pioglitazone. Male Wistar rats aged 5 weeks were administered oral or subcutaneous MSG for 10 days with or without daily oral Pioglitazone. Two additional groups given only saline orally or subcutaneously acted as controls. At age 10 weeks the rats were subjected to neurobehavioral testing, then sacrificed for measurement of AMPK, β-amyloid and Fas ligand in the hippocampus. Oral and subcutaneous MSG both induced a lowering of hippocampal AMPK by 43% and 31% respectively (P2-fold increase in hippocampal Fas ligand, a mediator of apoptosis (P4-fold and >5-fold in the oral and subcutaneous groups. This was associated with increased latency before crossing to the white half in the black-white alley and before the first rear in the holeboard test, suggesting increased anxiety. Pioglitazone decreased hippocampal β-amyloid accumulation and Fas ligand, but did not ameliorate the neurobehavioural deficits induced by MSG. MSG treatment enhances β-amyloid accumulation in the rat hippocampus. Our results suggest a role for AMPK reduction in mediating the neurotoxic effects of glutamate, including β-amyloid accumulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase Is Required for Cell Proliferation and Inflammatory Responses in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synoviocytes

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    Yan Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is characterized by inflammatory cell infiltration, fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS invasive proliferation, and joint destruction. Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS is a cytosolic DNA sensor that induces immune activation. In this study, we examined whether cGAS plays a role in RA FLS. In this study, cGAS was overexpressed in RA-FLS compared with OA FLS. TNFα stimulation induced cGAS expression in RA FLS. Overexpression of cGAS promoted the proliferation and knockdown of cGAS inhibited the proliferation of RA FLS. cGAS overexpression enhanced the production of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs as well as AKT and ERK phosphorylation in TNFα-stimulated FLS. In contrast, cGAS silencing inhibited production of proinflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs as well as AKT and ERK phosphorylation in TNFα-stimulated FLS. These results suggest that cGAS activates the AKT and ERK pathways to promote the inflammatory response of RA FLS, and the development of strategies targeting cGAS may have therapeutic potential for human RA.

  11. Multiple effects of differentiation-inducing factor on prespore differentiation and cyclic-AMP signal transduction in Dictyostelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Mei; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Schaap, Pauline

    1986-01-01

    The effects of the differentiation inducing factor (DIF) on several cAMP-induced responses in Dictyostelium were investigated. It was found that DIF reduces the apparent affinity of cell-surface cAMP receptors. DIF does not affect the cAMP-induced cGMP response, but it is a potent inhibitor of the

  12. Activation of Exchange Protein Activated by Cyclic-AMP Enhances Long-Lasting Synaptic Potentiation in the Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelinas, Jennifer N.; Banko, Jessica L.; Peters, Melinda M.; Klann, Eric; Weeber, Edwin J.; Nguyen, Peter V.

    2008-01-01

    cAMP is a critical second messenger implicated in synaptic plasticity and memory in the mammalian brain. Substantial evidence links increases in intracellular cAMP to activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) and subsequent phosphorylation of downstream effectors (transcription factors, receptors, protein kinases) necessary for long-term…

  13. Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase activity in the somatic cells of the seminiferous tubules. II. Effect of retinol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdieri, M; Pezzotti, R; Nisticò, L

    1991-01-01

    The effect of retinol on cyclic AMP dependent protein kinase activity of Sertoli cells and peritubular cells isolated from prepubertal rats has been investigated. Treatments longer than six hours induced a significant inhibition of type I protein kinase activity of Sertoli cells without appreciable variation of type II protein kinase. Short time treatments with the vitamin did not affect the Sertoli cell protein kinase activity. The vitamin A addition did not induce any appreciable variation of peritubular cell protein kinase activity.

  14. Cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling in the anterior pituitary gland in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ramírez, Laura C; Trivellin, Giampaolo; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2017-08-16

    The cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) was the first among the so-called "second messengers" to be described. It is conserved in most organisms and functions as a signal transducer by mediating the intracellular effects of multiple hormones and neurotransmitters. In this review, we first delineate how different members of the cAMP pathway ensure its correct compartmentalization and activity, mediate the terminal intracellular effects, and allow the crosstalk with other signaling pathways. We then focus on the pituitary gland, where cAMP exerts a crucial function by controlling the responsiveness of the cells to hypothalamic hormones, neurotransmitters and peripheral factors. We discuss the most relevant physiological functions mediated by cAMP in the different pituitary cell types, and summarize the defects affecting this pathway that have been reported in the literature. We finally discuss how a deregulated cAMP pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of pituitary disorders and how it affects the response to therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Phosphorylation of the protein kinase A catalytic subunit is induced by cyclic AMP deficiency and physiological stresses in the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McInnis, Brittney; Mitchell, Jessica [Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Marcus, Stevan, E-mail: smarcus@bama.ua.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

    2010-09-03

    Research highlights: {yields} cAMP deficiency induces phosphorylation of PKA catalytic subunit (Pka1) in S. pombe. {yields} Pka1 phosphorylation is further induced by physiological stresses. {yields} Pka1 phosphorylation is not induced in cells lacking the PKA regulatory subunit. {yields} Results suggest that cAMP-independent Pka1 phosphorylation is stimulatory in nature. -- Abstract: In the fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is not essential for viability under normal culturing conditions, making this organism attractive for investigating mechanisms of PKA regulation. Here we show that S. pombe cells carrying a deletion in the adenylate cyclase gene, cyr1, express markedly higher levels of the PKA catalytic subunit, Pka1, than wild type cells. Significantly, in cyr1{Delta} cells, but not wild type cells, a substantial proportion of Pka1 protein is hyperphosphorylated. Pka1 hyperphosphorylation is strongly induced in cyr1{Delta} cells, and to varying degrees in wild type cells, by both glucose starvation and stationary phase stresses, which are associated with reduced cAMP-dependent PKA activity, and by KCl stress, the cellular adaptation to which is dependent on PKA activity. Interestingly, hyperphosphorylation of Pka1 was not detected in either cyr1{sup +} or cyr1{Delta} S. pombe strains carrying a deletion in the PKA regulatory subunit gene, cgs1, under any of the tested conditions. Our results demonstrate the existence of a cAMP-independent mechanism of PKA catalytic subunit phosphorylation, which we propose could serve as a mechanism for inducing or maintaining specific PKA functions under conditions in which its cAMP-dependent activity is downregulated.

  16. Time-dependent activation of Phox2a by the cyclic AMP pathway modulates onset and duration of p27Kip1 transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Min Hwa; Mavila, Nirmala; Wang, Wen-Horng; Vega Alvarez, Sasha; Hall, Mark C; Andrisani, Ourania M

    2009-09-01

    In noradrenergic progenitors, Phox2a mediates cell cycle exit and neuronal differentiation by inducing p27(Kip1) transcription in response to activation of the cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway. The mechanism of cAMP-mediated activation of Phox2a is unknown. We identified a cluster of phosphoserine-proline sites in Phox2a by mass spectrometry. Ser206 appeared to be the most prominent phosphorylation site. A phospho-Ser206 Phox2a antibody detected dephosphorylation of Phox2a that was dependent on activation of the cAMP pathway, which occurred prior to neuronal differentiation of noradrenergic CAD cells. Employing serine-to-alanine and serine-to-aspartic acid Phox2a substitution mutants expressed in inducible CAD cell lines, we demonstrated that the transcriptional activity of Phox2a is regulated by two sequential cAMP-dependent events: first, cAMP signaling promotes dephosphorylation of Phox2a in at least one site, Ser206, thereby allowing Phox2a to bind DNA and initiate p27(Kip1) transcription; second, following dephosphorylation of the phosphoserine cluster (Ser202 and Ser208), Phox2a becomes phosphorylated by protein kinase A (PKA) on Ser153, which prevents association of Phox2a with DNA and terminates p27(Kip1) transcription. This represents a novel mechanism by which the same stimulus, cAMP signaling, first activates Phox2a by dephosphorylation of Ser206 and then, after a built-in delay, inactivates Phox2a via PKA-dependent phosphorylation of Ser153, thereby modulating onset and duration of p27(Kip1) transcription.

  17. Time-Dependent Activation of Phox2a by the Cyclic AMP Pathway Modulates Onset and Duration of p27Kip1 Transcription▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Min Hwa; Mavila, Nirmala; Wang, Wen-Horng; Vega Alvarez, Sasha; Hall, Mark C.; Andrisani, Ourania M.

    2009-01-01

    In noradrenergic progenitors, Phox2a mediates cell cycle exit and neuronal differentiation by inducing p27Kip1 transcription in response to activation of the cyclic AMP (cAMP) pathway. The mechanism of cAMP-mediated activation of Phox2a is unknown. We identified a cluster of phosphoserine-proline sites in Phox2a by mass spectrometry. Ser206 appeared to be the most prominent phosphorylation site. A phospho-Ser206 Phox2a antibody detected dephosphorylation of Phox2a that was dependent on activation of the cAMP pathway, which occurred prior to neuronal differentiation of noradrenergic CAD cells. Employing serine-to-alanine and serine-to-aspartic acid Phox2a substitution mutants expressed in inducible CAD cell lines, we demonstrated that the transcriptional activity of Phox2a is regulated by two sequential cAMP-dependent events: first, cAMP signaling promotes dephosphorylation of Phox2a in at least one site, Ser206, thereby allowing Phox2a to bind DNA and initiate p27Kip1 transcription; second, following dephosphorylation of the phosphoserine cluster (Ser202 and Ser208), Phox2a becomes phosphorylated by protein kinase A (PKA) on Ser153, which prevents association of Phox2a with DNA and terminates p27Kip1 transcription. This represents a novel mechanism by which the same stimulus, cAMP signaling, first activates Phox2a by dephosphorylation of Ser206 and then, after a built-in delay, inactivates Phox2a via PKA-dependent phosphorylation of Ser153, thereby modulating onset and duration of p27Kip1 transcription. PMID:19564421

  18. Different cis-Acting Elements Are Involved in the Regulation of TRP1 and TRP2 Promoter Activities by Cyclic AMP: Pivotal Role of M Boxes (GTCATGTGCT) and of Microphthalmia

    OpenAIRE

    Bertolotto, Corine; Buscà, Roser; Abbe, Patricia; Bille, Karine; Aberdam, Edith; Ortonne, Jean-Paul; Ballotti, Robert

    1998-01-01

    In melanocytes and in melanoma cells, cyclic AMP (cAMP)-elevating agents stimulate melanogenesis and increase the transcription of tyrosinase, the rate-limiting enzyme in melanin synthesis. However, two other enzymes, tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP1) and TRP2, are required for a normal melanization process leading to eumelanin synthesis. In B16 melanoma cells, we demonstrated that stimulation of melanogenesis by cAMP-elevating agents results in an increase in tyrosinase, TRP1, and TRP2 exp...

  19. Inhibition of cyclic AMP response element-directed transcription by decoy oligonucleotides enhances tumor-specific radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Serk In, E-mail: serkin@korea.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); The BK21 Plus Program for Biomedical Sciences, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Medicine and Center for Bone Biology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States); Park, Sung-Jun [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Laboratory of Obesity and Aging Research, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Lee, Junghan; Kim, Hye Eun; Park, Su Jin; Sohn, Jeong-Won [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yun Gyu, E-mail: parkyg@korea.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    The radiation stress induces cytotoxic responses of cell death as well as cytoprotective responses of cell survival. Understanding exact cellular mechanism and signal transduction pathways is important in improving cancer radiotherapy. Increasing evidence suggests that cyclic AMP response element binding protein (CREB)/activating transcription factor (ATF) family proteins act as a survival factor and a signaling molecule in response to stress. We postulated that CREB inhibition via CRE decoy oligonucleotide increases tumor cell sensitization to γ-irradiation-induced cytotoxic stress. In the present study, we demonstrate that CREB phosphorylation and CREB DNA-protein complex formation increased in time- and radiation dose-dependent manners, while there was no significant change in total protein level of CREB. In addition, CREB was phosphorylated in response to γ-irradiation through p38 MAPK pathway. Further investigation revealed that CREB blockade by decoy oligonucleotides functionally inhibited transactivation of CREB, and significantly increased radiosensitivity of multiple human cancer cell lines including TP53- and/or RB-mutated cells with minimal effects on normal cells. We also demonstrate that tumor cells ectopically expressing dominant negative mutant CREB (KCREB) and the cells treated with p38 MAPK inhibitors were more sensitive to γ-irradiation than wild type parental cells or control-treated cells. Taken together, we conclude that CREB protects tumor cells from γ-irradiation, and combination of CREB inhibition plus ionizing radiation will be a promising radiotherapeutic approach. - Highlights: • γ-Irradiation induced CREB phosphorylation and CRE-directed transcription in tumor. • γ-Irradiation-induced transcriptional activation of CREB was via p38 MAPK pathway. • CRE blockade increased radiosensitivity of tumor cells but not of normal cells. • CRE decoy oligonucleotides or p38 MAPK inhibitors can be used as radiosensitizers.

  20. Cyclic AMP-response element modulator inhibits the promoter activity of the sodium iodide symporter gene in thyroid cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passon, Nadia; Puppin, Cinzia; Lavarone, Elisa; Bregant, Elisa; Franzoni, Alessandra; Hershman, Jerome M; Fenton, Mike S; D'Agostino, Maria; Durante, Cosimo; Russo, Diego; Filetti, Sebastiano; Damante, Giuseppe

    2012-05-01

    Comprehension of the regulatory mechanism involved in the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) expression is of great relevance for thyroid cancer. In fact, restoration of NIS expression would be a strategy to treat undifferentiated thyroid cancer. Previous in vitro findings suggest that the cyclic AMP-response element (CRE) modulator (CREM) is involved in control of NIS expression. In this work, we examined the expression of CREM in a series of thyroid cancer tissues and its action on NIS promoter in human thyroid cancer cells. Expression of mRNA levels for CREM, PAX8 and NIS was measured by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in 6 normal thyroid tissues, 22 papillary, 12 follicular and 4 anaplastic thyroid cancers. The effect of CREM on transcriptional activity of the NIS promoter was investigated by transient transfection of human thyroid cell lines. Compared to normal tissues, NIS and PAX8 mRNA levels were significantly reduced in all types of thyroid cancer. As expected, the maximal decrease was detected in anaplastic thyroid cancer. Conversely, CREM mRNA levels were increased in all types of thyroid cancer, reaching statistical significance for follicular and anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (p=0.0157 and 0.0045, respectively). Transfection experiments showed an inhibitory effect of CREM on NIS promoter activity in various thyroid cancer cell lines. These data demonstrate that CREM expression is increased in thyroid cancer tissue and may play a role in the downregulation of NIS expression in thyroid cancer acting at the transcriptional level.

  1. Chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum : Effect of Concanavalin A on Chemoattractant Mediated Cyclic GMP Accumulation and Light Scattering Decrease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mato, José M.; Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Krens, Frans A.; Konijn, Theo M.

    1978-01-01

    In cells of the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum concanavalin A (Con A), at a concentration of 100 µg per ml, inhibits folic acid and cyclic AMP induced decrease in light scattering. Con A has no effect on folic acid mediated cyclic GMP accumulation and increases cyclic AMP mediated

  2. Cyclic di-AMP-mediated interaction between Mycobacterium tuberculosis ΔcnpB and macrophages implicates a novel strategy for improving BCG vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Yang, Jun; Bai, Guangchun

    2018-01-31

    Cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP) has been shown to play an important role in bacterial physiology and pathogen-host interactions. We previously reported that deletion of the sole c-di-AMP phosphodiesterase-encoding gene (cnpB) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) led to significant virulence attenuation. In this study, we found that ΔcnpB of M. bovis BCG (BCG) was unable to secrete c-di-AMP, which differs from Mtb ΔcnpB. We infected bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) with c-di-AMP-associated mutants generated from both Mtb and BCG. Our results showed that upon infection with Mtb ΔcnpB, BMDMs of WT mice secreted a large amount of interferon-β (IFN-β) post-infection similarly as we reported previously. In contrast, the response was less pronounced with BMDMs isolated from cGAS-/- mice and was nearly abolished with BMDMs prepared from STING-/- mice. Deletion of the region of difference 1 (RD1) locus in Mtb ΔcnpB did not alter the c-di-AMP secretion of ΔcnpB but eliminated the IFN-β production in the infected cells. In contrast, neither BCG ΔcnpB nor a recombinant BCG ΔcnpB with a pRD1 cosmid induced a type I interferon response. Interestingly, multiple studies have demonstrated that type I IFN enhances BCG's immunity. Thus, amending BCG based on our findings might improve BCG vaccination. © FEMS 2018. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Homeodomain transcription factor Phox2a, via cyclic AMP-mediated activation, induces p27Kip1 transcription, coordinating neural progenitor cell cycle exit and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Maryline; Wang, Wen-Horng; Shin, Min-Hwa; Franklin, David S; Andrisani, Ourania M

    2006-12-01

    Mechanisms coordinating neural progenitor cell cycle exit and differentiation are incompletely understood. The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27(Kip1) is transcriptionally induced, switching specific neural progenitors from proliferation to differentiation. However, neuronal differentiation-specific transcription factors mediating p27(Kip1) transcription have not been identified. We demonstrate the homeodomain transcription factor Phox2a, required for central nervous system (CNS)- and neural crest (NC)-derived noradrenergic neuron differentiation, coordinates cell cycle exit and differentiation by inducing p27(Kip1) transcription. Phox2a transcription and activation in the CNS-derived CAD cell line and primary NC cells is mediated by combined cyclic AMP (cAMP) and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) signaling. In the CAD cellular model, cAMP and BMP2 signaling initially induces proliferation of the undifferentiated precursors, followed by p27(Kip1) transcription, G(1) arrest, and neuronal differentiation. Small interfering RNA silencing of either Phox2a or p27(Kip1) suppresses p27(Kip1) transcription and neuronal differentiation, suggesting a causal link between p27(Kip1) expression and differentiation. Conversely, ectopic Phox2a expression via the Tet-off expression system promotes accelerated CAD cell neuronal differentiation and p27(Kip1) transcription only in the presence of cAMP signaling. Importantly, endogenous or ectopically expressed Phox2a activated by cAMP signaling binds homeodomain cis-acting elements of the p27(Kip1) promoter in vivo and mediates p27(Kip1)-luciferase expression in CAD and NC cells. We conclude that developmental cues of cAMP signaling causally link Phox2a activation with p27(Kip1) transcription, thereby coordinating neural progenitor cell cycle exit and differentiation.

  4. Renal vein plasma adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate in renovascular hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchel, O.; Messerli, F. H.; Tolis, G.; Hamet, P.; Fraysse, J.; Cartier, P.; Roy, P.; Boucher, R.; Genest, J.

    1977-01-01

    The concentration of plasma adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP) and plasma renin activity (PRA) were measured concomitantly in blood from both renal veins and in arterial blood in 22 hypertensive patients. In the nine patients with true renovascular hypertension the concentration of plasma cyclic AMP was greater in the venous effluent of the kidney affected by the renal artery stenosis than in that of the unaffected or less affected kidney. The arteriovenous difference in cyclic AMP concentration was less on the affected side in all but one patient. The arteriovenous differences in PRA identified the affected kidney as the source of hyper-reninemia and showed that renin release from the other kidney was suppressed. In the 13 patients with hypertension associated with but unrelated to renal artery stenosis there were no consistent patterns of cyclic AMP concentration or PRA in the venous effluent of the kidneys or of their arteriovenous differences. In renovascular hypertension the venous effluent of the kidney affected by renal artery stenosis contains not only more renin but also more cyclic AMP, owing to either increased cyclic AMP production or decreased excretion or extraction of cyclic AMP by the affected kidney. This unilateral increase in cyclic AMP concentration may become a complementary diagnostic feature of true renovascular hypertension. PMID:192429

  5. Somatostatin dramatically stimulates growth hormone release from primate somatotrophs acting at low doses via somatostatin receptor 5 and cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdoba-Chacón, J; Gahete, M D; Culler, M D; Castaño, J P; Kineman, R D; Luque, R M

    2012-03-01

    Somatostatin and cortistatin have been shown to act directly on pituitary somatotrophs to inhibit growth hormone (GH) release. However, previous results from nonprimate species indicate that these peptides can also directly stimulate GH secretion, at low concentrations. The relevance of this phenomenon in a nonhuman primate model was investigated in the present study by testing the impact of somatostatin/cortistatin on GH release in primary pituitary cell cultures from baboons. High doses (> 10(-10) m) of somatostatin/cortistatin did not alter basal GH secretion but blocked GH-releasing hormone (GHRH)- and ghrelin-induced GH release. However, at low concentrations (10(-17)-10(-13) m), somatostatin/cortistatin dramatically stimulated GH release to levels comparable to those evoked by GHRH or ghrelin. Use of somatostatin receptor (sst) specific agonists/antagonists, and signal transduction blockers indicated that sst2 and sst1 activation via intact adenylate cylcase and mitogen-activated protein kinase systems mediated the inhibitory actions of high-concentration somatostatin. By contrast, the stimulatory actions of low-dose somatostatin on GH release were mediated by sst5 signalling through adenylate cylcase/cAMP/protein kinase A and intracellular Ca(2+) pathways, and were additive with ghrelin (not GHRH). Notably, low-concentrations of somatostatin, similar to sst5-agonists, inhibited prolactin release. These results clearly demonstrate that the ultimate impact of somatostatin/cortistatin on hormone release is dose-dependent, cell type-selective and receptor-specific, where the stimulatory effects of low-concentration somatostatin/cortistatin on GH release extend to primates, thereby supporting the notion that this action is relevant in regulating GH secretion in humans. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neuroendocrinology © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Phosphorylation of yeast phosphatidylserine synthase in vivo and in vitro by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    OpenAIRE

    Kinney, A J; Carman, G M

    1988-01-01

    Evidence is presented that demonstrates that phosphatidylserine synthase (CDPdiacylglycerol:L-serine O-phosphatidyltransferase, EC 2.7.8.8) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is phosphorylated in vivo and in vitro by cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Phosphatidylserine synthase activity in cell extracts was reduced in the bcy1 mutant (which has high cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity) and elevated in the cyr1 mutant (which has low cAMP-dependent protein kinase activity) when compared with wild-ty...

  7. Mechanism of nuclear calcium signaling by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate produced in the nucleus, nuclear located protein kinase C and cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Christian; Malviya, Anant N

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear phospholipase C-gamma 1 can be phosphorylated by nuclear membrane located epidermal growth factor receptor sequel to epidermal growth factor-mediated signaling to the nucleus. The function of mouse liver phospholipase C-gamma 1 is attributed to a 120 kDa protein fragment which has been found to be a proteolytic product of the 150 kDa native nuclear enzyme. The tyrosine-phosphorylated 120 kDa protein band interacts with activated EGFR, binds phosphatidyl-3-OH kinase enhancer, and activates nuclear phosphatidylinositol-3-OH-kinase, and is capable of generating diacylglycerol in response to the epidermal growth factor signal to the nucleus in vivo. Thus a mechanism for nuclear production of inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate is unraveled. Nuclear generated inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate interacts with the inner membrane located inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate receptor and sequesters calcium into the nucleoplasm. Nuclear inositol-1,4,5-trisphophate receptor is phosphorylated by native nuclear protein kinase C which enhances the receptor-ligand interaction. Nuclear calcium-ATPase and inositol-1,3,4,5-tetrakisphophate receptor are located on the outer nuclear membrane, thus facilitating calcium transport into the nuclear envelope lumen either by ATP or inositol-1,3,4,5-tetrakisphophate depending upon the external free calcium concentrations. Nuclear calcium ATPase is phosphorylated by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase with enhanced calcium pumping activity. A holistic picture emerges here where tyrosine phosphorylation compliments serine phosphorylation of key moieties regulating nuclear calcium signaling. Evidence are forwarded in favor of proteolysis having a profound implications in nuclear calcium homeostasis in particular and signal transduction in general.

  8. Cyclic AMP-Elevating Capacity of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin-Hemolysin Is Sufficient for Lung Infection but Not for Full Virulence of Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skopova, Karolina; Tomalova, Barbora; Kanchev, Ivan; Rossmann, Pavel; Svedova, Martina; Adkins, Irena; Bibova, Ilona; Tomala, Jakub; Masin, Jiri; Guiso, Nicole; Osicka, Radim; Sedlacek, Radislav; Kovar, Marek; Sebo, Peter

    2017-06-01

    The adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin (CyaA, ACT, or AC-Hly) of Bordetella pertussis targets phagocytic cells expressing the complement receptor 3 (CR3, Mac-1, αMβ2 integrin, or CD11b/CD18). CyaA delivers into cells an N-terminal adenylyl cyclase (AC) enzyme domain that is activated by cytosolic calmodulin and catalyzes unregulated conversion of cellular ATP into cyclic AMP (cAMP), a key second messenger subverting bactericidal activities of phagocytes. In parallel, the hemolysin (Hly) moiety of CyaA forms cation-selective hemolytic pores that permeabilize target cell membranes. We constructed the first B. pertussis mutant secreting a CyaA toxin having an intact capacity to deliver the AC enzyme into CD11b-expressing (CD11b+) host phagocytes but impaired in formation of cell-permeabilizing pores and defective in cAMP elevation in CD11b- cells. The nonhemolytic AC+ Hly- bacteria inhibited the antigen-presenting capacities of coincubated mouse dendritic cells in vitro and skewed their Toll-like receptor (TLR)-triggered maturation toward a tolerogenic phenotype. The AC+ Hly- mutant also infected mouse lungs as efficiently as the parental AC+ Hly+ strain. Hence, elevation of cAMP in CD11b- cells and/or the pore-forming capacity of CyaA were not required for infection of mouse airways. The latter activities were, however, involved in bacterial penetration across the epithelial layer, enhanced neutrophil influx into lung parenchyma during sublethal infections, and the exacerbated lung pathology and lethality of B. pertussis infections at higher inoculation doses (>107 CFU/mouse). The pore-forming activity of CyaA further synergized with the cAMP-elevating activity in downregulation of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) molecules on infiltrating myeloid cells, likely contributing to immune subversion of host defenses by the whooping cough agent. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  9. Biochemical studies on the DNA binding function of the cyclic-amp reactor protein of Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angulo, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The cAMP receptor protein (CRP) is an allosteric protein in which binding of cAMP effects a conformational change with a consequent increased affinity for DNA. Binding of double-stranded deoxyribopolynucleotides and calf thymus DNA by cAMP-CRP confers protection against attack by trypsin, subtilisin, Staph. aureus V8 protease and clostripain. Of the single-stranded deoxy- and ribopolynucleotides tested, only r(I)/sub n/ and r(A)/sub n/ gave significant protection against attack by these proteases. In the absence of cAMP, CRP is resistant to proteolysis. Incubation of CRP-DNA with trypsin results in the accumulation of two novel fragments. CRP-DNA is partially sensitive to digestion by chymotrypsin but resistant to attack by subtilisin, the Staph. aureus V8 protease and clostripain. Cleavage of CRP-DNA to fragments is accompanied by the loss of /sup 3/H-cAMP binding activity. Modification of the arginines with phenylglyoxal or butanedione results in loss of DNA binding activity. cAMP-CRP incorporates more /sup 14/C-phenylglyoxal than unliganded CRP. Titration of the arginines with /sup 14/C-phenylglyoxal to where over 90% of the DNA binding activity is lost results in incorporation of one mole of reagent per mole of subunit.

  10. Repression of protein kinase C and stimulation of cyclic AMP response elements by fumonisin, a fungal encoded toxin which is a carcinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C; Dickman, M; Henderson, G; Jones, C

    1995-04-15

    Fusarium moniliforme (FM) is a major fungal pathogen of corn and is involved with stalk rot disease. FM is widely spread throughout the world, including the United States. Most strains of FM produce several mycotoxins, the most prominent of which is called fumonisin. Recent epidemiological studies indicated that ingestion of fumonisin correlates with a higher incidence of esophageal cancer in Southern and Northern Africa and China. Furthermore, fumonisin causes a neurodegenerative disease in horses, induces hepatic cancer in rats, and induces pulmonary edema in swine. Considering that high levels of fumonisin have been detected in healthy and diseased corn grown in the United States, fumonisin may pose a health threat to humans and livestock animals. Structurally, fumonisin resembles sphingolipids which are present in the membranes of animal and plant cells. At the present time, very little is known concerning the mechanism by which fumonisin elicits its carcinogenic effect. Our studies indicate that fumonisin represses expression of protein kinase C and AP-1-dependent transcription. In contrast, fumonisin stimulated a simple promoter containing a single cyclic AMP response element. Since fumonisin did not alter protein kinase A activity, it appears that cyclic AMP response element activation was independent of protein kinase A. It is hypothesized that the ability of fumonisin to alter signal transduction pathways plays a role in carcinogenesis.

  11. New Insights into the Cyclic Di-adenosine Monophosphate (c-di-AMP) Degradation Pathway and the Requirement of the Cyclic Dinucleotide for Acid Stress Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Lisa; Zeden, Merve S.; Kaever, Volkhard

    2016-01-01

    Nucleotide signaling networks are key to facilitate alterations in gene expression, protein function, and enzyme activity in response to diverse stimuli. Cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is an important secondary messenger molecule produced by the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and is involved in regulating a number of physiological processes including potassium transport. S. aureus must ensure tight control over its cellular levels as both high levels of the dinucleotide and its absence result in a number of detrimental phenotypes. Here we show that in addition to the membrane-bound Asp-His-His and Asp-His-His-associated (DHH/DHHA1) domain-containing phosphodiesterase (PDE) GdpP, S. aureus produces a second cytoplasmic DHH/DHHA1 PDE Pde2. Although capable of hydrolyzing c-di-AMP, Pde2 preferentially converts linear 5′-phosphadenylyl-adenosine (pApA) to AMP. Using a pde2 mutant strain, pApA was detected for the first time in S. aureus, leading us to speculate that this dinucleotide may have a regulatory role under certain conditions. Moreover, pApA is involved in a feedback inhibition loop that limits GdpP-dependent c-di-AMP hydrolysis. Another protein linked to the regulation of c-di-AMP levels in bacteria is the predicted regulator protein YbbR. Here, it is shown that a ybbR mutant S. aureus strain has increased acid sensitivity that can be bypassed by the acquisition of mutations in a number of genes, including the gene coding for the diadenylate cyclase DacA. We further show that c-di-AMP levels are slightly elevated in the ybbR suppressor strains tested as compared with the wild-type strain. With this, we not only identified a new role for YbbR in acid stress resistance in S. aureus but also provide further insight into how c-di-AMP levels impact acid tolerance in this organism. PMID:27834680

  12. New Insights into the Cyclic Di-adenosine Monophosphate (c-di-AMP) Degradation Pathway and the Requirement of the Cyclic Dinucleotide for Acid Stress Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Lisa; Zeden, Merve S; Schuster, Christopher F; Kaever, Volkhard; Gründling, Angelika

    2016-12-30

    Nucleotide signaling networks are key to facilitate alterations in gene expression, protein function, and enzyme activity in response to diverse stimuli. Cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is an important secondary messenger molecule produced by the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus and is involved in regulating a number of physiological processes including potassium transport. S. aureus must ensure tight control over its cellular levels as both high levels of the dinucleotide and its absence result in a number of detrimental phenotypes. Here we show that in addition to the membrane-bound Asp-His-His and Asp-His-His-associated (DHH/DHHA1) domain-containing phosphodiesterase (PDE) GdpP, S. aureus produces a second cytoplasmic DHH/DHHA1 PDE Pde2. Although capable of hydrolyzing c-di-AMP, Pde2 preferentially converts linear 5'-phosphadenylyl-adenosine (pApA) to AMP. Using a pde2 mutant strain, pApA was detected for the first time in S. aureus, leading us to speculate that this dinucleotide may have a regulatory role under certain conditions. Moreover, pApA is involved in a feedback inhibition loop that limits GdpP-dependent c-di-AMP hydrolysis. Another protein linked to the regulation of c-di-AMP levels in bacteria is the predicted regulator protein YbbR. Here, it is shown that a ybbR mutant S. aureus strain has increased acid sensitivity that can be bypassed by the acquisition of mutations in a number of genes, including the gene coding for the diadenylate cyclase DacA. We further show that c-di-AMP levels are slightly elevated in the ybbR suppressor strains tested as compared with the wild-type strain. With this, we not only identified a new role for YbbR in acid stress resistance in S. aureus but also provide further insight into how c-di-AMP levels impact acid tolerance in this organism. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. cAMP control of HCN2 channel Mg2+ block reveals loose coupling between the cyclic nucleotide-gating ring and the pore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex K Lyashchenko

    Full Text Available Hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-regulated HCN channels underlie the Na+-K+ permeable IH pacemaker current. As with other voltage-gated members of the 6-transmembrane KV channel superfamily, opening of HCN channels involves dilation of a helical bundle formed by the intracellular ends of S6 albeit this is promoted by inward, not outward, displacement of S4. Direct agonist binding to a ring of cyclic nucleotide-binding sites, one of which lies immediately distal to each S6 helix, imparts cAMP sensitivity to HCN channel opening. At depolarized potentials, HCN channels are further modulated by intracellular Mg2+ which blocks the open channel pore and blunts the inhibitory effect of outward K+ flux. Here, we show that cAMP binding to the gating ring enhances not only channel opening but also the kinetics of Mg2+ block. A combination of experimental and simulation studies demonstrates that agonist acceleration of block is mediated via acceleration of the blocking reaction itself rather than as a secondary consequence of the cAMP enhancement of channel opening. These results suggest that the activation status of the gating ring and the open state of the pore are not coupled in an obligate manner (as required by the often invoked Monod-Wyman-Changeux allosteric model but couple more loosely (as envisioned in a modular model of protein activation. Importantly, the emergence of second messenger sensitivity of open channel rectification suggests that loose coupling may have an unexpected consequence: it may endow these erstwhile "slow" channels with an ability to exert voltage and ligand-modulated control over cellular excitability on the fastest of physiologically relevant time scales.

  14. Cyclic-AMP mediated drugs: differential or global reduction of eicosanoid synthesis in the isolated rat lung?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J. Post

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the question was addressed whether cAMP mediated drugs induce a differential reduction of branches of the arachidonic acid metabolism rather than a global reduction of eicosanoid synthesis. The isolated lungs of actively sensitized rats were employed to study prostaglandin and leukotriene release in the presence and absence of the cAMP mediated drugs theophylline, milrinone, sulmazole, isobutyl-methylxanthine and salbutamol. The release of eicosanoids as measured by RIA was predominantly basal and continuous, with a mild antigen induced stimulation only for TXB2 and the leukotrienes. All drugs reduced eicosanoid release globally. It is concluded that cAMP mediated drugs interfere with arachidonic acid metabolism at a site proximal to the branching into lipoxygenase and cyclo-oxygenase pathways.

  15. [Beta-adrenoceptor-mediated cyclic AMP signal in different types of cultured nerve cells in normoxic and hypoxic conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jóźwiak-Bębenista, M; Wiktorowska-Owczarek, A; Kowalczyk, E

    2016-01-01

    β-adrenergic neurotransmission is an important factor regulating brain activity such as neuronal and glial survival, plasticity, membrane transport or cellular metabolism. Intracellular β-adrenergic signaling, via a stimulatory G protein (Gs), activates two major down-stream effectors, i.e., adenylyl cyclase (AC) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). The aim of this work was to study the ability of endogenous (adrenaline and noradrenaline) and exogenous (isoprenaline) β-adrenergic receptor agonists to increase cAMP in different types of nerve cells. Moreover, we wanted to precisely identify the receptor isoform involved in the observed phenomenon using selective β1-, β2- β3-adrenoceptor blockers. In an additional study, the negative influence of hypoxia on the AC/cAMP intracellular signaling system was tested. The study was conducted in parallel on rat primary glial (astrocytes) cultures, primary neuronal cultures, C6 glioma cells and human T98G glioma cells. The formation of [^(3)H] cAMP by agonists and antagonists was measured in [^(3)H] adenine prelabeled cells under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The obtained results revealed that adrenaline, noradrenaline and isoprenaline strongly stimulated cAMP production in all tested cell types (with highest potency in C6 glioma cells). In glial and neuronal cells the adrenaline-evoked cAMP effect was mediated mainly by the β1-adrenoceptor, whereas in tumor cells the effect was probably mediated by all three β-subtype specific drugs. The AC/cAMP intracellular signaling system is affected by hypoxic conditions. Considering both physiological and therapeutic importance of β-family receptors the present work characterized the β-adrenoceptor-mediated cAMP signal transduction pathway in different nerve cells in normoxic and hypoxic conditions. The proposed in vitro model of hypoxic conditions may serve as a good model system to study the biological effects of endogenous catecholamines as well as potential

  16. CB1 cannabinoid receptor-mediated increases in cyclic AMP accumulation are correlated with reduced Gi/o function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldeeb, Khalil; Leone-Kabler, Sandra; Howlett, Allyn C

    2016-05-01

    CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1Rs) stimulate Gi/o-dependent signaling pathways. CB1R-mediated cAMP increases were proposed to result from Gs activation, but CB1R-stimulated GTPγS binding to Gs has not heretofore been investigated. Three models of CB1R-stimulated cAMP production were tested: pertussis toxin disruption of Gi/o in N18TG2 cells; L341A/A342L-CB1R expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells; and CB1 and D2 dopamine receptors endogenously co-expressed in MN9D cells. cAMP was assayed by [3H]cAMP binding competition. G protein activation was assayed by the antibody-targeted scintillation proximity assay. In L341A/A342L-CB1-CHO cells, cannabinoid agonists significantly stimulated cAMP accumulation over vehicle; (-)-3-[2-hydroxyl-4-(1,1-dimethylheptyl)phenyl]-4-[3-hydroxyl propyl] cyclohexan-1-ol (CP55940)-stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding to Gi1/2/3 was reversed, whereas binding to Gs was not different from CB1R. In MN9D cells, CB1 agonist HU210 or D2 agonist quinpirole alone inhibited forskolin-activated cAMP accumulation, whereas HU210 plus quinpirole increased cAMP accumulation above basal. HU210 alone stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding to Gi1/2/3, whereas co-stimulation with quinpirole reversed HU210-stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding to Gi1/2/3. CB1R couples to Gs but with low efficacy compared to Gi/o. The L341A/A342L mutation in CB1R reversed CP55940 activation of Gi to an inhibition, but had no effect on Gs. Combined CB1 plus D2 agonists in MN9D cells converted the CB1 agonist-mediated activation of Gi to inhibition of Gi. In these models, the CB1 agonist response was converted to an inverse agonist response at Gi activation. Cannabinoid agonist-stimulated cAMP accumulation can be best explained as reduced activation of Gi, thereby attenuating the tonic inhibitory influence of Gi on the major isoforms of adenylyl cyclase.

  17. Exchange Protein Activated by Cyclic AMP 2 (Epac2) Plays a Specific and Time-Limited Role in Memory Retrieval

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ostroveanu, Anghelus; van der Zee, Eddy A.; Eisel, Ulrich L. M.; Schmidt, Martina; Nijholt, Ingrid M.

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge on the molecular mechanisms involved in memory retrieval is limited due to the lack of tools to study this stage of the memory process. Here we report that exchange proteins activated by cAMP (Epac) play a surprisingly specific role in memory retrieval. Intrahippocampal injection of the

  18. Cyclic AMP-mediated control of lipogenic enzyme synthesis during adipose differentiation of 3T3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelman, B M; Green, H

    1981-05-01

    During the adipose differentiation of 3T3-F442A cells, there is an increase in the synthesis of numerous proteins, including the lipogenic enzymes glycerophosphate dehydrogenase, fatty acid synthetase and malic enzyme. Agents that increase cAMP content (Dibutyryl cAMP, theophylline, and isoproterenol) are known to induce lipolysis in fat cells; but the same agents are shown here to reduce the synthesis of the lipogenic enzymes during adipose differentiation. The extent of reduction depends on the agent used and differs for the three enzymes; fatty acid synthetase is most sensitive and its synthesis can be suppressed completely. In contrast to their effects on lipogenic enzyme synthesis, these agents do not affect morphological changes or the synthesis of several other proteins, of which some increase and others (such as actin) decrease during the differentiation. The effects of the agents on the synthesis of lipogenic enzymes are not dependent on lipolysis, since they take place to the same degree in cells not permitted to accumulate triglyceride. Translation in vitro of mRNA isolated from cells treated with the agents promoting cAMP accumulation indicates that the levels of functional mRNA for lipogenic enzymes are reduced. We conclude that, in addition to its activation of lipolysis, cAMP reduces specifically mRNA accumulation for lipogenic enzymes. These results also demonstrate the independent control of morphological change and enzyme synthesis during adipose differentiation.

  19. A biphasic and brain-region selective down-regulation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate concentrations supports object recognition in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maïte Hotte

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We aimed to further understand the relationship between cAMP concentration and mnesic performance. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Rats were injected with milrinone (PDE3 inhibitor, 0.3 mg/kg, i.p., rolipram (PDE4 inhibitor, 0.3 mg/kg, i.p. and/or the selective 5-HT4R agonist RS 67333 (1 mg/kg, i.p. before testing in the object recognition paradigm. Cyclic AMP concentrations were measured in brain structures linked to episodic-like memory (i.e. hippocampus, prefrontal and perirhinal cortices before or after either the sample or the testing phase. Except in the hippocampus of rolipram treated-rats, all treatment increased cAMP levels in each brain sub-region studied before the sample phase. After the sample phase, cAMP levels were significantly increased in hippocampus (1.8 fold, prefrontal (1.3 fold and perirhinal (1.3 fold cortices from controls rat while decreased in prefrontal cortex (∼0.83 to 0.62 fold from drug-treated rats (except for milrinone+RS 67333 treatment. After the testing phase, cAMP concentrations were still increased in both the hippocampus (2.76 fold and the perirhinal cortex (2.1 fold from controls animals. Minor increase were reported in hippocampus and perirhinal cortex from both rolipram (respectively, 1.44 fold and 1.70 fold and milrinone (respectively 1.46 fold and 1.56 fold-treated rat. Following the paradigm, cAMP levels were significantly lower in the hippocampus, prefrontal and perirhinal cortices from drug-treated rat when compared to controls animals, however, only drug-treated rats spent longer time exploring the novel object during the testing phase (inter-phase interval of 4 h. CONCLUSIONS: Our results strongly suggest that a "pre-sample" early increase in cAMP levels followed by a specific lowering of cAMP concentrations in each brain sub-region linked to the object recognition paradigm support learning efficacy after a middle-term delay.

  20. The Role of Cyclic AMP and Its Relationship to Parathyroid Hormone Response in an In Vitro Model of Chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    1986; Lewinson and Silbermann 1986; Pines and Hurwitz 1988; Livne 1989), cytodifferentiation ( Hiraki et al. 1985; Takano et al. 1985), enhancement of...exposed to chondrocytes in vitro (Sullivan et al. 1984; Hiraki et al. 1985). For example, cartilage grown in medium containing N6-monobutyryl cAMP... Hiraki Y., Y. Yutani, M. Fukuya, M. Takigawa, F. Suzuki. 1985. Differentiation and de-differentiation of cultured chondroctyes: increase in monomeric

  1. Cyclic AMP directs inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate-evoked Ca2+ signalling to different intracellular Ca2+ stores

    OpenAIRE

    Tovey, Stephen C.; Taylor, Colin W.

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol depletion reversibly abolishes carbachol-evoked Ca2+ release from inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate (IP3)-sensitive stores, without affecting the distribution of IP3 receptors (IP3R) or endoplasmic reticulum, IP3 formation or responses to photolysis of caged IP3. Receptors that stimulate cAMP formation do not alone evoke Ca2+ signals, but they potentiate those evoked by carbachol. We show that these potentiated signals are entirely unaffected by cholesterol depletion and that, within...

  2. Aldo-keto reductase 1b7, a novel marker for renin cells, is regulated by cyclic AMP signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Eugene E; Pentz, Ellen S; Sequeira-Lopez, Maria Luisa S; Gomez, R Ariel

    2015-09-01

    We previously identified aldo-keto reductase 1b7 (AKR1B7) as a marker for juxtaglomerular renin cells in the adult mouse kidney. However, the distribution of renin cells varies dynamically, and it was unknown whether AKR1B7 maintains coexpression with renin in response to different developmental, physiological, and pathological situations, and furthermore, whether similar factor(s) simultaneously regulate both proteins. We show here that throughout kidney development, AKR1B7 expression-together with renin-is progressively restricted in the kidney arteries toward the glomerulus. Subsequently, when formerly renin-expressing cells reacquire renin expression, AKR1B7 is reexpressed as well. This pattern of coexpression persists in extreme pathological situations, such as deletion of the genes for aldosterone synthase or Dicer. However, the two proteins do not colocalize within the same organelles: renin is found in the secretory granules, whereas AKR1B7 localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum. Interestingly, upon deletion of the renin gene, AKR1B7 expression is maintained in a pattern mimicking the embryonic expression of renin, while ablation of renin cells resulted in complete abolition of AKR1B7 expression. Finally, we demonstrate that AKR1B7 transcription is controlled by cAMP. Cultured cells of the renin lineage reacquire the ability to express both renin and AKR1B7 upon elevation of intracellular cAMP. In vivo, deleting elements of the cAMP-response pathway (CBP/P300) results in a stark decrease in AKR1B7- and renin-positive cells. In summary, AKR1B7 is expressed within the renin cell throughout development and perturbations to homeostasis, and AKR1B7 is regulated by cAMP levels within the renin cell. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Mobilisation of trehalose in mutants of the cyclic AMP signalling pathway, cr-1 (CRISP-1) and mcb (microcycle conidiation), of Neurospora crassa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Pinho, C A; de Lourdes, M; Polizeli, T M; Jorge, J A; Terenzi, H F

    2001-05-15

    The influence of the cAMP-signalling pathway on the metabolism of trehalose in Neurospora crassa was investigated. The changes in intracellular trehalose concentration were measured in two mutants affected in components of the cAMP-signalling pathway: cr-1 (crisp-1), deficient in adenylyl cyclase activity, and mcb (microcyclic conidiation), deficient in the regulatory subunit of PKA. Rapid mobilisation of intracellular trehalose in the wild-type occurred, either at the onset of germination, or after a heat shock, and by carbon starvation. Mutant cr-1 failed to mobilise trehalose at germination, but behaved almost normally after a heat shock, or during carbon starvation. On the other hand, the levels of trehalose in mcb fell to values much lower than in the wild-type at germination, but accumulated trehalose normally during a heat shock. These results are consistent with the involvement of cAMP in the activation of the neutral trehalase at the onset of germination. However, the control of the enzyme under the other physiological conditions which also promote mobilisation of intracellular trehalose was apparently independent of cAMP-signalling.

  4. Plasma concentrations of the cyclic nucleotides, adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and guanosine 3'.5'-monophosphate, in healthy adults treated with theophylline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, M; Eriksen, P B; Andersen, O

    1982-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate were measured in 10 health adults before, during and after periods of theophylline administration. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate concentrations did not change significantly, but cyclic guanosine monophosph......Plasma concentrations of cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate were measured in 10 health adults before, during and after periods of theophylline administration. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate concentrations did not change significantly, but cyclic guanosine...... monophosphate concentrations decreased by 29% on average when theophylline was administered. The change in cyclic guanosine monophosphate was not correlated to the plasma concentration of theophylline in the range studied....

  5. Long-term treatment with the beta-3 adrenoceptor agonist, mirabegron ameliorates detrusor overactivity and restores cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels in obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmasini, Fabiano B; de Oliveira, Mariana G; Alexandre, Eduardo C; da Silva, Fábio H; da Silva, Carmem P V; Candido, Tuany Z; Antunes, Edson; Mónica, Fabíola Z

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of the beta-3 adrenoceptor agonist, mirabegron in a mouse model of detrusor overactivity induced by obesity. C57BL/6 male mice were fed with standard chow or high-fat diet for 12 weeks. Lean and obese mice were treated orally with mirabegron (10 mg/kg/day) from the last 2 weeks of diet. Cystometric evaluations, functional assays, protein expression for phosphodiesterase type 4 (PDE4), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) measurement were carried out. In obese mice the body weight, epididymal fat mass, fasting glucose, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels were higher (P < 0.001) than in the lean mice. A reduction of 34% and 54% and an increase of 35% in the epididimal fat, LDL, and HDL levels (P < 0.05), respectively, were observed in the obese group treated with mirabegron, whereas no changes were seen in the lipid profile from lean mice. Obese group showed irregular micturition pattern, characterized by significant increases in frequency and non-void contractions. Carbachol, potassium chloride, and electrical-field stimulation induced detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) contractions, which were greater in bladders from obese mice than from lean mice. Two-week treatment with mirabegron restored all the contractile response alterations in the DSM. Basal intracellular levels of cAMP were reduced (68%), whereas PDE4 protein expression was increased (54%) in bladder from obese mice. Mirabegron restored the cAMP levels in obese bladder, without changing the PDE4 expression. Mirabegron was able to completely restore the urinary alterations seen in the bladder from obese mice. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Transporter function and cyclic AMP turnover in normal colonic mucosa from patients with and without colorectal neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleberg, Karen; Jensen, Gerda Majgaard; Christensen, Dan Ploug

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of colorectal neoplasia is still unresolved but has been associated with alterations in epithelial clearance of xenobiotics and metabolic waste products. The aim of this study was to functionally characterize the transport of cyclic nucleotides in colonic biopsies from patients w...

  7. L-4F Inhibits Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein-induced Inflammatory Adipokine Secretion via Cyclic AMP/Protein Kinase A-CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein β Signaling Pathway in 3T3-L1 Adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang-Zhu Xie

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: OxLDL induces C/EBPβ protein synthesis in a time-dependent manner and enhances MCP-1 secretion and expression in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. L-4F dose-dependently counterbalances the pro-inflammatory effect of oxLDL, and cyclic AMP/PKA-C/EBPβ signaling pathway may participate in it.

  8. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A negatively regulates conidia formation by the tangerine pathotype of Alternaria alternata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsieh-Chin; Yang, Siwy Ling; Chung, Kuang-Ren

    2013-02-01

    The necrotrophic fungal pathogen Alternaria alternata causes brown spot diseases in many citrus cultivars. The FUS3 and SLT2 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK)-mediated signaling pathways have been shown to be required for conidiation. Exogenous application of cAMP to this fungal pathogen decreased conidia formation considerably. This study determined whether a cAMP-activated protein kinase A (PKA) is required for conidiation. Using loss-of-function mutations in PKA catalytic and regulatory subunit-coding genes, we demonstrated that PKA negatively regulates conidiation. Fungal mutants lacking PKA catalytic subunit gene (PKA ( cat )) reduced growth, lacked detectable PKA activity, and produced higher amounts of conidia compared to wild-type. Introduction of a functional copy of PKA ( cat ) into a null mutant partially restored PKA activity and produced wild-type level of conidia. In contrast, fungi lacking PKA regulatory subunit gene (PKA ( reg )) produced detectable PKA activity, exhibited severe growth reduction, formed swelling hyphal segments, and produced no mature conidia. Introduction of the PKA ( reg ) gene to a regulatory subunit mutant restored all phenotypes to wild type. PKA ( reg )-null mutants induced fewer necrotic lesions on citrus compared to wild-type, whereas PKA ( cat ) mutant displayed wild-type virulence. Overall, our studies indicate that PKA and FUS3-mediated signaling pathways apparently have very different roles in the regulation of conidia production and A. alternata pathogenesis in citrus.

  9. Schizosaccharomyces pombe Git7p, a member of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sgtlp family, is required for glucose and cyclic AMP signaling, cell wall integrity, and septation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadick, Kevin; Fourcade, H Matthew; Boumenot, Peter; Seitz, Jeffrey J; Morrell, Jennifer L; Chang, Louise; Gould, Kathleen L; Partridge, Janet F; Allshire, Robin C; Kitagawa, Katsumi; Hieter, Phil; Hoffman, Charles S

    2002-08-01

    The Schizosaccharomyces pombe fbp1 gene, encoding fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, is transcriptionally repressed by glucose. Mutations that confer constitutive fbp1 transcription identify git (glucose-insensitive transcription) genes that encode components of a cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathway required for adenylate cyclase activation. Four of these genes encode the three subunits of a heterotrimeric G protein (gpa2, git5, and git11) and a G protein-coupled receptor (git3). Three additional genes, git1, git7, and git10, act in parallel to or downstream from the G protein genes. Here, we describe the cloning and characterization of the git7 gene. The Git7p protein is a member of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sgtlp protein family. In budding yeast, Sgtlp associates with Skplp and plays an essential role in kinetochore assembly, while in Arabidopsis, a pair of SGT1 proteins have been found to be involved in plant disease resistance through an interaction with RAR1. Like S. cerevisiae Sgtlp, Git7p is essential, but this requirement appears to be due to roles in septation and cell wall integrity, which are unrelated to cAMP signaling, as S. pombe cells lacking either adenylate cyclase or protein kinase A are viable. In addition, git7 mutants are sensitive to the microtubule-destabilizing drug benomyl, although they do not display a chromosome stability defect. Two alleles of git7 that are functional for cell growth and septation but defective for glucose-triggered cAMP signaling encode proteins that are altered in the highly conserved carboxy terminus. The S. cerevisiae and human SGT1 genes both suppress git7-93 but not git7-235 for glucose repression of fbp1 transcription and benomyl sensitivity. This allele-specific suppression indicates that the Git7p/Sgtlp proteins may act as multimers, such that Git7-93p but not Git7-235p can deliver the orthologous proteins to species-specific targets. Our studies suggest that members of the Git7p/Sgt1p protein family may play a

  10. Glucose Evokes Rapid Ca2+ and Cyclic AMP Signals by Activating the Cell-Surface Glucose-Sensing Receptor in Pancreatic β-Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yuko; Nagasawa, Masahiro; Medina, Johan; Kojima, Itaru

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is a primary stimulator of insulin secretion in pancreatic β-cells. High concentration of glucose has been thought to exert its action solely through its metabolism. In this regard, we have recently reported that glucose also activates a cell-surface glucose-sensing receptor and facilitates its own metabolism. In the present study, we investigated whether glucose activates the glucose-sensing receptor and elicits receptor-mediated rapid actions. In MIN6 cells and isolated mouse β-cells, glucose induced triphasic changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c); glucose evoked an immediate elevation of [Ca2+]c, which was followed by a decrease in [Ca2+]c, and after a certain lag period it induced large oscillatory elevations of [Ca2+]c. Initial rapid peak and subsequent reduction of [Ca2+]c were independent of glucose metabolism and reproduced by a nonmetabolizable glucose analogue. These signals were also blocked by an inhibitor of T1R3, a subunit of the glucose-sensing receptor, and by deletion of the T1R3 gene. Besides Ca2+, glucose also induced an immediate and sustained elevation of intracellular cAMP ([cAMP]c). The elevation of [cAMP]c was blocked by transduction of the dominant-negative Gs, and deletion of the T1R3 gene. These results indicate that glucose induces rapid changes in [Ca2+]c and [cAMP]c by activating the cell-surface glucose-sensing receptor. Hence, glucose generates rapid intracellular signals by activating the cell-surface receptor. PMID:26630567

  11. Spinal Glia Division Contributes to Conditioning Lesion-Induced Axon Regeneration Into the Injured Spinal Cord: Potential Role of Cyclic AMP-Induced Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huaqing; Angert, Mila; Nishihara, Tasuku; Shubayev, Igor; Dolkas, Jennifer; Shubayev, Veronica I

    2015-06-01

    Regeneration of sensory neurons after spinal cord injury depends on the function of dividing neuronal-glial antigen 2 (NG2)-expressing cells. We have shown that increases in the number of dividing NG2-positive cells through short-term pharmacologic inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases contributes to recovery after spinal cord injury. A conditioning sciatic nerve crush (SNC) preceding spinal cord injury stimulates central sensory axon regeneration via the intraganglionic action of cyclic adenosine monophosphate. Here, using bromodeoxyuridine, mitomycin (mitosis inhibitor), and cholera toxin B tracer, we demonstrate that SNC-induced division of spinal glia is related to the spinal induction of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 and contributes to central sensory axon growth into the damaged spinal cord. Dividing cells were mainly NG2-positive and Iba1-positive and included myeloid NG2-positive populations. The cells dividing in response to SNC mainly matured into oligodendrocytes and microglia within the injured spinal cord. Some postmitotic cells remained NG2-reactive and were associated with regenerating fibers. Moreover, intraganglionic tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 expression was induced after administration of SNC or cyclic adenosine monophosphate analog (dbcAMP) to dorsal root ganglia in vivo and in primary adult dorsal root ganglia cultures. Collectively, these findings support a novel model whereby a cyclic adenosine monophosphate-activated regeneration program induced in sensory neurons by a conditioning peripheral nerve lesion uses tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 to protect against short-term proteolysis, enabling glial cell division and promoting axon growth into the damaged CNS.

  12. Different cis-acting elements are involved in the regulation of TRP1 and TRP2 promoter activities by cyclic AMP: pivotal role of M boxes (GTCATGTGCT) and of microphthalmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolotto, C; Buscà, R; Abbe, P; Bille, K; Aberdam, E; Ortonne, J P; Ballotti, R

    1998-02-01

    In melanocytes and in melanoma cells, cyclic AMP (cAMP)-elevating agents stimulate melanogenesis and increase the transcription of tyrosinase, the rate-limiting enzyme in melanin synthesis. However, two other enzymes, tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP1) and TRP2, are required for a normal melanization process leading to eumelanin synthesis. In B16 melanoma cells, we demonstrated that stimulation of melanogenesis by cAMP-elevating agents results in an increase in tyrosinase, TRP1, and TRP2 expression. cAMP, through a cAMP-dependent protein kinase pathway, stimulates TRP1 and TRP2 promoter activities in both B16 mouse melanoma cells and normal human melanocytes. Regulation of the TRP1 and TRP2 promoters by cAMP involves a M box and an E box. Further, a classical cAMP response element-like motif participates in the cAMP responsiveness of the TRP2 promoter, demonstrating that the TRP2 gene is subjected to different regulatory processes, which could account for its different expression patterns during embryonic development or under specific physiological and pathological conditions. We also found that microphthalmia, a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, strongly stimulates the transcriptional activities of the TRP1 and TRP2 promoters, mainly through binding to the M boxes. Additionally, we demonstrated that cAMP increases microphthalmia expression and thereby its binding to TRP1 and TRP2 M boxes. These convergent and compelling results disclose at least a part of the molecular mechanism involved in the regulation of melanogenic gene expression by cAMP and emphasize the pivotal role of microphthalmia in this process.

  13. Wound-healing effect of ginsenoside Rd from leaves of Panax ginseng via cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wang-Kyun; Song, Seung-Yong; Oh, Won Keun; Kaewsuwan, Sireewan; Tran, Tien Lam; Kim, Won-Serk; Sung, Jong-Hyuk

    2013-02-28

    Panax ginseng is considered as one of the most valuable medicinal herbs in traditional medicine, and ginsenoside Rd is one of the main active ingredients in P. ginseng leaf. Although there is significant number of evidences implicated on the beneficial effects of the ginsenosides with diverse associated mechanisms, reports on the skin regeneration by the ginsenoside Rd are not sufficient. Therefore, we examined the mitogenic and protective effects of the ginsenoside Rd in the keratinocyte progenitor cells (KPCs) and human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). Furthermore, the signaling pathways involved in the activation of KPCs and HDFs were investigated, and wound-healing effect is evaluated in vivo through animal wound models. We found that the ginsenoside Rd significantly increased the proliferation and migration level of KPCs and HDFs in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, the cell survival was significantly increased in H2O2 treated KPCs. Moreover, the ginsenoside Rd effectively induced collagen type 1 and down-regulated matrix metalloprotinase-1 (MMP-1) in a dose-dependent manner. All of these beneficial effects are associated with an induction of intracellular cAMP levels and phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein expression in nucleus, which both attenuated by adenine 9-β-d-arabinofuranoside, an adenylate cyclase inhibitor. Application of the ginsenoside Rd to an excision wound in mice showed an effective healing process. As skin regeneration is mainly associated with the activation of HDFs and KPCs, P. ginseng leaf, an alternative source of the ginsenoside Rd, can be used as a natural source for skin regeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Evidence for a cyclic AMP-dependent pathway in angiotensin AT1-receptor activation of human omental arteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoa Ytterberg

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced responses to vasoconstriction induced by neuropeptide Y and α2-adrenoceptor agonists have been seen following pharmacological activation of the adenylyl cyclase (AC system. Since preliminary studies revealed only minor responses to angiotensin II (Ang II in human omental arteries, we have investigated whether enhanced activity of AC may unravel further functional Ang II receptors. Human omental arteries were obtained in conjunction with elective gut surgery. After dissection of the vessel, the endothelium was removed by 10 sec of Triton X-100 treatment. Ring segments (1—2 mm long were mounted on a myograph and studied. Ang II produced small contractions, 27±5% relative to the response elicited by 60 mM K+. However, enhanced Ang II (105±10%, p<0.001 responses were seen during AC activation by forskolin (0.1—1 µM. This enhanced contractile response to Ang II was not inhibited by the angiotensin II type 2 (AT2-receptor antagonist PD 123319 (0.1 µM, but was blocked in an insurmountable way by the angiotensin II type 1 (AT1-receptor antagonist candesartan (1 nM and in a surmountable manner by losartan (0.1 µM and irbesartan (0.1 µM. Pertussis toxin (a Gi-protein blocker and the protein kinase C inhibitor, RO31—8220 (0.01, 0.1 and 1 µM, markedly reduced this response, while the protein kinase A inhibitor, H89 (1, 10 µM, had no effect. RT-PCR provided evidence for the presence of mRNA for both AT1- and AT2-receptors. The results suggest that both a cAMP-dependent and a cAMP-independent mechanism are involved in the contractile responses to Ang II in human omental arteries and that both responses are mediated via the AT1-receptor.

  15. Caffeine Modulates Vesicle Release and Recovery at Cerebellar Parallel Fibre Terminals, Independently of Calcium and Cyclic AMP Signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Katharine L; Jackson, Claire; Balakrishnan, Saju; Bellamy, Tomas C

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar parallel fibres release glutamate at both the synaptic active zone and at extrasynaptic sites-a process known as ectopic release. These sites exhibit different short-term and long-term plasticity, the basis of which is incompletely understood but depends on the efficiency of vesicle release and recycling. To investigate whether release of calcium from internal stores contributes to these differences in plasticity, we tested the effects of the ryanodine receptor agonist caffeine on both synaptic and ectopic transmission. Whole cell patch clamp recordings from Purkinje neurons and Bergmann glia were carried out in transverse cerebellar slices from juvenile (P16-20) Wistar rats. Caffeine caused complex changes in transmission at both synaptic and ectopic sites. The amplitude of postsynaptic currents in Purkinje neurons and extrasynaptic currents in Bergmann glia were increased 2-fold and 4-fold respectively, but paired pulse ratio was substantially reduced, reversing the short-term facilitation observed under control conditions. Caffeine treatment also caused synaptic sites to depress during 1 Hz stimulation, consistent with inhibition of the usual mechanisms for replenishing vesicles at the active zone. Unexpectedly, pharmacological intervention at known targets for caffeine--intracellular calcium release, and cAMP signalling--had no impact on these effects. We conclude that caffeine increases release probability and inhibits vesicle recovery at parallel fibre synapses, independently of known pharmacological targets. This complex effect would lead to potentiation of transmission at fibres firing at low frequencies, but depression of transmission at high frequency connections.

  16. Evolutionary conservation of the signaling proteins upstream of cyclic AMP-dependent kinase and protein kinase C in gastropod mollusks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sossin, Wayne S; Abrams, Thomas W

    2009-01-01

    The protein kinase C (PKC) and the cAMP-dependent kinase (protein kinase A; PKA) pathways are known to play important roles in behavioral plasticity and learning in the nervous systems of a wide variety of species across phyla. We briefly review the members of the PKC and PKA family and focus on the evolution of the immediate upstream activators of PKC and PKA i.e., phospholipase C (PLC) and adenylyl cyclase (AC), and their conservation in gastropod mollusks, taking advantage of the recent assembly of the Aplysiacalifornica and Lottia gigantea genomes. The diversity of PLC and AC family members present in mollusks suggests a multitude of possible mechanisms to activate PKA and PKC; we briefly discuss the relevance of these pathways to the known physiological activation of these kinases in Aplysia neurons during plasticity and learning. These multiple mechanisms of activation provide the gastropod nervous system with tremendous flexibility for implementing neuromodulatory responses to both neuronal activity and extracellular signals. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Low salt concentrations activate AMP-activated protein kinase in mouse macula densa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Natasha; Fraser, Scott A; Katerelos, Marina; Katsis, Frosa; Gleich, Kurt; Mount, Peter F; Steinberg, Gregory R; Levidiotis, Vicki; Kemp, Bruce E; Power, David A

    2009-04-01

    The energy-sensing kinase AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is associated with the sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter NKCC2 in the kidney and phosphorylates it on a regulatory site in vitro. To identify a potential role for AMPK in salt sensing at the macula densa, we have used the murine macula densa cell line MMDD1. In this cell line, AMPK was rapidly activated by isosmolar low-salt conditions. In contrast to the known salt-sensing pathway in the macula densa, AMPK activation occurred in the presence of either low sodium or low chloride and was unaffected by inhibition of NKCC2 with bumetanide. Assays using recombinant AMPK demonstrated activation of an upstream kinase by isosmolar low salt. The specific calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase inhibitor STO-609 failed to suppress AMPK activation, suggesting that it was not part of the signal pathway. AMPK activation was associated with increased phosphorylation of the specific substrate acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) at Ser(79), as well as increased NKCC2 phosphorylation at Ser(126). AMPK activation due to low salt concentrations was inhibited by an adenovirus construct encoding a kinase dead mutant of AMPK, leading to reduced ACC Ser(79) and NKCC2 Ser(126) phosphorylation. This work demonstrates that AMPK activation in macula densa-like cells occurs via isosmolar changes in sodium or chloride concentration, leading to phosphorylation of ACC and NKCC2. Phosphorylation of these substrates in vivo is predicted to increase intracellular chloride and so reduce the effect of salt restriction on tubuloglomerular feedback and renin secretion.

  18. Caffeine Modulates Vesicle Release and Recovery at Cerebellar Parallel Fibre Terminals, Independently of Calcium and Cyclic AMP Signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Katharine L.; Jackson, Claire; Balakrishnan, Saju; Bellamy, Tomas C.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cerebellar parallel fibres release glutamate at both the synaptic active zone and at extrasynaptic sites—a process known as ectopic release. These sites exhibit different short-term and long-term plasticity, the basis of which is incompletely understood but depends on the efficiency of vesicle release and recycling. To investigate whether release of calcium from internal stores contributes to these differences in plasticity, we tested the effects of the ryanodine receptor agonist caffeine on both synaptic and ectopic transmission. Methods Whole cell patch clamp recordings from Purkinje neurons and Bergmann glia were carried out in transverse cerebellar slices from juvenile (P16-20) Wistar rats. Key Results Caffeine caused complex changes in transmission at both synaptic and ectopic sites. The amplitude of postsynaptic currents in Purkinje neurons and extrasynaptic currents in Bergmann glia were increased 2-fold and 4-fold respectively, but paired pulse ratio was substantially reduced, reversing the short-term facilitation observed under control conditions. Caffeine treatment also caused synaptic sites to depress during 1 Hz stimulation, consistent with inhibition of the usual mechanisms for replenishing vesicles at the active zone. Unexpectedly, pharmacological intervention at known targets for caffeine—intracellular calcium release, and cAMP signalling—had no impact on these effects. Conclusions We conclude that caffeine increases release probability and inhibits vesicle recovery at parallel fibre synapses, independently of known pharmacological targets. This complex effect would lead to potentiation of transmission at fibres firing at low frequencies, but depression of transmission at high frequency connections. PMID:25933382

  19. Caffeine Modulates Vesicle Release and Recovery at Cerebellar Parallel Fibre Terminals, Independently of Calcium and Cyclic AMP Signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine L Dobson

    Full Text Available Cerebellar parallel fibres release glutamate at both the synaptic active zone and at extrasynaptic sites-a process known as ectopic release. These sites exhibit different short-term and long-term plasticity, the basis of which is incompletely understood but depends on the efficiency of vesicle release and recycling. To investigate whether release of calcium from internal stores contributes to these differences in plasticity, we tested the effects of the ryanodine receptor agonist caffeine on both synaptic and ectopic transmission.Whole cell patch clamp recordings from Purkinje neurons and Bergmann glia were carried out in transverse cerebellar slices from juvenile (P16-20 Wistar rats.Caffeine caused complex changes in transmission at both synaptic and ectopic sites. The amplitude of postsynaptic currents in Purkinje neurons and extrasynaptic currents in Bergmann glia were increased 2-fold and 4-fold respectively, but paired pulse ratio was substantially reduced, reversing the short-term facilitation observed under control conditions. Caffeine treatment also caused synaptic sites to depress during 1 Hz stimulation, consistent with inhibition of the usual mechanisms for replenishing vesicles at the active zone. Unexpectedly, pharmacological intervention at known targets for caffeine--intracellular calcium release, and cAMP signalling--had no impact on these effects.We conclude that caffeine increases release probability and inhibits vesicle recovery at parallel fibre synapses, independently of known pharmacological targets. This complex effect would lead to potentiation of transmission at fibres firing at low frequencies, but depression of transmission at high frequency connections.

  20. Radiation-sensitive Gene A (RadA) Targets DisA, DNA Integrity Scanning Protein A, to Negatively Affect Cyclic Di-AMP Synthesis Activity in Mycobacterium smegmatis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; He, Zheng-Guo

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic di-AMP has been recognized as a ubiquitous second messenger involved in the regulation of bacterial signal transduction. However, little is known about the control of its synthesis and its physiological role in bacteria. In this study, we report a novel mechanism of control of c-di-AMP synthesis and its effects on bacterial growth in Mycobacterium smegmatis. We identified a DisA homolog in M. smegmatis, MsDisA, as an enzyme involved in c-di-AMP synthesis. Furthermore, MsRadA, a RadA homolog in M. smegmatis was found to act as an antagonist of the MsDisA protein. MsRadA can physically interact with MsDisA and inhibit the c-di-AMP synthesis activity of MsDisA. Overexpression of MsdisA in M. smegmatis led to cell expansion and bacterial aggregation as well as loss of motility. However, co-expression of MsradA and MsdisA rescued these abnormal phenotypes. Furthermore, we show that the interaction between RadA and DisA and its role in inhibiting c-di-AMP synthesis may be conserved in bacteria. Our findings enhance our understanding of the control of c-di-AMP synthesis and its physiological roles in bacteria. PMID:23760274

  1. Radiation-sensitive gene A (RadA) targets DisA, DNA integrity scanning protein A, to negatively affect cyclic Di-AMP synthesis activity in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; He, Zheng-Guo

    2013-08-02

    Cyclic di-AMP has been recognized as a ubiquitous second messenger involved in the regulation of bacterial signal transduction. However, little is known about the control of its synthesis and its physiological role in bacteria. In this study, we report a novel mechanism of control of c-di-AMP synthesis and its effects on bacterial growth in Mycobacterium smegmatis. We identified a DisA homolog in M. smegmatis, MsDisA, as an enzyme involved in c-di-AMP synthesis. Furthermore, MsRadA, a RadA homolog in M. smegmatis was found to act as an antagonist of the MsDisA protein. MsRadA can physically interact with MsDisA and inhibit the c-di-AMP synthesis activity of MsDisA. Overexpression of MsdisA in M. smegmatis led to cell expansion and bacterial aggregation as well as loss of motility. However, co-expression of MsradA and MsdisA rescued these abnormal phenotypes. Furthermore, we show that the interaction between RadA and DisA and its role in inhibiting c-di-AMP synthesis may be conserved in bacteria. Our findings enhance our understanding of the control of c-di-AMP synthesis and its physiological roles in bacteria.

  2. Upregulation of skeletal muscle PGC-1α through the elevation of cyclic AMP levels by Cyanidin-3-glucoside enhances exercise performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukawa, Toshiya; Motojima, Hideko; Sato, Yuki; Takahashi, Shinya; Villareal, Myra O; Isoda, Hiroko

    2017-03-20

    Regular exercise and physical training enhance physiological capacity and improve metabolic diseases. Skeletal muscles require peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) in the process of their adaptation to exercise owing to PGC-1α's ability to regulate mitochondrial biogenesis, angiogenesis, and oxidative metabolism. Cyanidin-3-glucoside (Cy3G) is a natural polyphenol and a nutraceutical factor, which has several beneficial effects on human health. Here, the effect of Cy3G on exercise performance and the underlying mechanisms involved were investigated. ICR mice were given Cy3G (1 mg/kg, orally) everyday and made to perform weight-loaded swimming exercise for 15 days. The endurance of mice orally administered with Cy3G was improved, enabling them to swim longer (time) and while the levels of exercise-induced lactate and fatigue markers (urea nitrogen, creatinine and total ketone bodies) were reduced. Additionally, the expression of lactate metabolism-related genes (lactate dehydrogenase B and monocarboxylate transporter 1) in gastrocnemius and biceps femoris muscles was increased in response to Cy3G-induced PGC-1α upregulation. In vitro, using C2C12 myotubes, Cy3G-induced elevation of intracellular cyclic AMP levels increased PGC-1α expression via the Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase pathway. This study demonstrates that Cy3G enhances exercise performance by activating lactate metabolism through skeletal muscle PGC-1α upregulation.

  3. Identification and Characterization of Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein H Response Element in the Human Apolipoprotein A5 Gene Promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Hoon Song

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The cyclic AMP response element-binding protein H (CREBH plays important roles in hepatic lipogenesis, fatty acid oxidation, and lipolysis under metabolic stress. Here, we report CREBH as a novel regulator of human APOA5. Knockdown of endogenous CREBH expression via small interfering RNA resulted in the downregulation of human APOA5 mRNA expression in human hepatoma cells, HepG2. Sequence analysis suggested that putative CREBH response element (CREBHRE is located in the human APOA5 promoter region and is highly conserved in both human and rodent. To clarify whether the human APOA5 promoter is regulated by CREBH, we analyzed the human APOA5 promoter region using a transient transfection assay and determined that transfection of CREBH induced human APOA5 promoter activity. Moreover, it was shown that CREBH directly regulated human APOA5 gene expression by binding to a unique CREBHRE located in the proximal human APOA5 promoter region, using 5′-deletion and mutagenesis of human APOA5 promoter analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Taken together, our results demonstrated that human APOA5 is directly regulated by CREBH via CREBHRE and provided a new insight into the role of this liver-specific bZIP transcription factor in lipoprotein metabolism and triglyceride homeostasis.

  4. Cyclic AMP responsive element-binding protein promotes renal cell carcinoma proliferation probably via the expression of spindle and kinetochore-associated protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Haihui; Meng, Xiangyu; Li, Yanyuan; Wang, Xue; Huang, Shuaishuai; Liu, Kaitai; Hehir, Michael; Fang, Rong; Jiang, Lei; Zhou, Jeff X; Wang, Ping; Ren, Yu

    2016-03-29

    Emerging evidence shows that the aberrantly expressed cyclic AMP responsive element-binding protein (CREB) is associated with tumor development and progression in several cancers. Spindle and kinetochore-associated protein 2 (SKA2) is essential for regulating the progress of mitosis. In this study, we evaluate in vitro and in vivo the functional relationship between CREB and SKA2 in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Suppressing and replenishing CREB levels were used to manipulate SKA2 expression, observing the effects on RCC cell lines. Computational prediction and ChIP assay identified that CREB targeted ska2 by binding its CRE sequence in the human genome. Overexpression of CREB reversed the inhibited cell growth following siSKA2 treatment, and reduced the number of cells holding in mitosis. Decreased expression of CREB suppressed RCC cell growth and xenograft tumor formation, accompanied by reduced expression of SKA2. In RCC tumor samples from patients, mRNA for SKA2 were plotted near those of CREB in each sample, with significantly increased immunohistochemical staining of higher SKA2 and CREB in the higher TNM stages. The study adds evidence that CREB, a tumor oncogene, promotes RCC proliferation. It probably achieves this by increasing SKA2 expression.

  5. Regulated expression of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A reveals an influence on cell size and the secretion of virulence factors in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jaehyuk; Vogl, A Wayne; Kronstad, James W

    2012-08-01

    Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) regulates elaboration of the virulence factors melanin and polysaccharide capsule in Cryptococcus neoformans. A mutation in PKA1 encoding the catalytic subunit is known to reduce virulence in mice while a defect in PKR1 encoding the regulatory subunit enhances disease. Here, we constructed strains with galactose-inducible and glucose-repressible versions of PKA1 and PKR1 by inserting the GAL7 promoter upstream of the genes. As expected, no capsule was found in dextrose-containing media for the P(GAL7):PKA1 strain, whereas a large capsule was formed on cells grown in galactose. Along with capsule thickness, high PKA activity also influenced cell size, ploidy and vacuole enlargement, as observed in previous reports of giant/titan cell formation. We employed the regulated strains to test the hypothesis that PKA influences secretion and found that elevated PKA expression positively regulates extracellular protease activity and negatively regulates urease secretion. Furthermore, proper PKA regulation and activity were required for wild-type levels of melanization and laccase activity, as well as correct localization of the enzyme. The latter phenotype is consistent with the discovery that PKA regulates the organization of intracellular membrane compartments. Overall, these results indicate that PKA influences secretion pathways directly related to virulence factor elaboration. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Targeted overexpression of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase subunit in Toxoplasma gondii promotes replication and virulence in host cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongchao; Wang, Suhua; Zhao, Xianfeng; Yao, Chaoqun; Zhuang, Haohan; Huang, Yechuan; Chen, Xueqiu; Yang, Yi; Du, Aifang

    2017-08-30

    Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is one of the most common parasite that can infect almost any warm-blooded animals including humans. The cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase (PKA) regulates a spectrum of intracellular signal pathways in many organisms. Protein kinase catalytic subunit (PKAC) is the core of the whole protein, and plays an important role in the life cycle of T.gondii. Here, T.gondii PKAC (TgPKAC) overexpression strain (TgPKAC-OE) was constructed. The growth of the TgPKAC-OE, RH△Ku80, and TgPKAC inhibition strains (TgPKAC-H89) were analysed by SYBR-green real-time PCR, and the ultrastructure was observed by transmission electron microscopy. The survival rate in mice was also recorded to analyse the virulence of the parasites. We also investigated the subcellular localization of TgPKAC in Vero cells by laser scanning microscope. We found that TgPKAC-OE strain exhibited obviously increased growth rate in Vero cells in vitro, and infected mice survived for a shorter time compared to wild type strain. Ultrastructural analysis found more autophagosomes-like structures in TgPKAC-H89 parasite compared to RH△Ku80 strain, and the relative expression level of Toxoplasma gondii autophagy-related protein (ATG8) in TgPKAC-H89 parasite was higher than wild type parasite. Laser confocal results showed that TgPKAC was mainly expressed in the cytoplasm of Vero cells. In conclusion, we hypothesized that inhibition of TgPKAC could cause autophagy of Toxoplasma gondii and then influence the replication of the parasite. TgPKAC plays an important role in parasite virulence in vivo, and the subcellular localization was successfully detected in Vero cells. Our data will provide a basis for further study of TgPKAC function and help screen drug targets of T. gondii. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Plasma concentrations of the cyclic nucleotides, adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and guanosine 3'.5'-monophosphate, in healthy adults treated with theophylline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, M; Eriksen, P B; Nielsen, M K

    1982-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate were measured in 10 health adults before, during and after periods of theophylline administration. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate concentrations did not change significantly, but cyclic guanosine...... monophosphate concentrations decreased by 29% on average when theophylline was administered. The change in cyclic guanosine monophosphate was not correlated to the plasma concentration of theophylline in the range studied....

  8. The gene product of a Trypanosoma equiperdum ortholog of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase regulatory subunit is a monomeric protein that is not capable of binding cyclic nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubis, José; Martínez, Juan Carlos; Calabokis, Maritza; Ferreira, Joilyneth; Sanz-Rodríguez, Carlos E; Navas, Victoria; Escalona, José Leonardo; Guo, Yurong; Taylor, Susan S

    2018-03-01

    The full gene sequence encoding for the Trypanosoma equiperdum ortholog of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) regulatory (R) subunits was cloned. A poly-His tagged construct was generated [TeqR-like(His) 8 ], and the protein was expressed in bacteria and purified to homogeneity. The size of the purified TeqR-like(His) 8 was determined to be ∼57,000 Da by molecular exclusion chromatography indicating that the parasite protein is a monomer. Limited proteolysis with various proteases showed that the T. equiperdum R-like protein possesses a hinge region very susceptible to proteolysis. The recombinant TeqR-like(His) 8 did not bind either [ 3 H] cAMP or [ 3 H] cGMP up to concentrations of 0.40 and 0.65 μM, respectively, and neither the parasite protein nor its proteolytically generated carboxy-terminal large fragments were capable of binding to a cAMP-Sepharose affinity column. Bioinformatics analyses predicted that the carboxy-terminal region of the trypanosomal R-like protein appears to fold similarly to the analogous region of all known PKA R subunits. However, the protein amino-terminal portion seems to be unrelated and shows homology with proteins that contained Leu-rich repeats, a folding motif that is particularly appropriate for protein-protein interactions. In addition, the three-dimensional structure of the T. equiperdum protein was modeled using the crystal structure of the bovine PKA R I α subunit as template. Molecular docking experiments predicted critical changes in the environment of the two putative nucleotide binding clefts of the parasite protein, and the resulting binding energy differences support the lack of cyclic nucleotide binding in the trypanosomal R-like protein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  9. Activation of Cyclic AMP Synthesis by Full and Partial Beta-Adrenergic Receptor Agonists in Chicken Skeletal Muscle Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, R. B.; Bridge, K. Y.

    2003-01-01

    Several beta-adrenergic receptor (bAR) agonists are known to cause hypertrophy of skeletal muscle tissue. Accordingly, five bAR agonists encompassing a range in activity from strong to weak were evaluated for their ability to stimulate CAMP accumulation in embryonic chicken skeletal muscle cells in culture. Two strong agonists (epinephrine and isoproterenol), one moderate agonist (albuterol), and two weak agonists known to cause hypertrophy in animals (clenbuterol and cimaterol) were studied. Dose response curves were determined over six orders of magnitude in concentration for each agonist, and values were determined for their maximum stimulation of CAMP synthesis rate (Bmax) and the agonist concentration at which 50% stimulation of CAMP synthesis (EC50) occurred. Bmax values decreased in the following order: isoproterenol, epinephrine, albuterol, cimaterol, clenbuterol. Cimaterol and clenbuterol at their Bmax concentrations were approximately 15-fold weaker than isoproterenol in stimulating the rate of CAMP synthesis. When cimaterol and clenbuterol were added to culture media at concentrations known to cause significant muscle hypertrophy in animals, there was no detectable effect on stimulation of CAMP synthesis. Finally, these same levels of cimaterol and clenbuterol did not antagonize the stimulation of CAMP by either epinephrine or isoproterenol.

  10. Cyclic AMP response element-binding protein in post-mortem brain of teenage suicide victims: specific decrease in the prefrontal cortex but not the hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ghanshyam N; Dwivedi, Yogesh; Ren, Xinguo; Rizavi, Hooriyah S; Roberts, Rosalinda C; Conley, Robert R

    2007-10-01

    Abnormalities in both adenylyl cyclase (AC) and phosphoinositide (PI) signalling systems have been observed in the post-mortem brain of suicide victims. Cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) is a transcription factor that is activated by phosphorylating enzymes such as protein kinase A (PKA) and protein kinase C (PKC), which suggests that both AC and PI signalling systems converge at the level of CREB. CREB is involved in the transcription of many neuronally expressed genes that have been implicated in the pathophysiology of depression and suicide. Since we observed abnormalities of both PKA and PKC in the post-mortem brain of teenage suicide victims, we examined if these abnormalities are also associated with abnormalities of CREB, which is activated by these phosphorylating enzymes. We determined CRE-DNA binding using the gel shift assay, as well as protein expression of CREB using the Western blot technique, and the mRNA expression of CREB using a quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), and hippocampus obtained from 17 teenage suicide victims and 17 matched normal control subjects. We observed that the CRE-DNA binding and the protein expression of CREB were significantly decreased in the PFC of teenage suicide victims compared with controls. There was also a significant decrease in mRNA expression of CREB in the PFC of teenage suicide victims compared with control subjects. However, there were no significant differences in CRE-DNA binding or the protein and mRNA expression of CREB in the hippocampus of teenage suicide victims compared with control subjects. These results suggest that the abnormalities of PKA, and of PKC, observed in teenage suicide victims are also associated with abnormalities of the transcription factor CREB, and that this may also cause alterations of important neuronally expressed genes, and provide further support of the signal transduction of abnormalities

  11. Presenilins regulate neurotrypsin gene expression and neurotrypsin-dependent agrin cleavage via cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Kim, Sonia N; Benner, Christopher; Herrera, Cheryl M; Kang, David E; Garcia-Bassets, Ivan; Goldstein, Lawrence S B

    2013-12-06

    Presenilins, the catalytic components of the γ-secretase complex, are upstream regulators of multiple cellular pathways via regulation of gene transcription. However, the underlying mechanisms and the genes regulated by these pathways are poorly characterized. In this study, we identify Tequila and its mammalian ortholog Prss12 as genes negatively regulated by presenilins in Drosophila larval brains and mouse embryonic fibroblasts, respectively. Prss12 encodes the serine protease neurotrypsin, which cleaves the heparan sulfate proteoglycan agrin. Altered neurotrypsin activity causes serious synaptic and cognitive defects; despite this, the molecular processes regulating neurotrypsin expression and activity are poorly understood. Using γ-secretase drug inhibitors and presenilin mutants in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we found that a mature γ-secretase complex was required to repress neurotrypsin expression and agrin cleavage. We also determined that PSEN1 endoproteolysis or processing of well known γ-secretase substrates was not essential for this process. At the transcriptional level, PSEN1/2 removal induced cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB)/CREB-binding protein binding, accumulation of activating histone marks at the neurotrypsin promoter, and neurotrypsin transcriptional and functional up-regulation that was dependent on GSK3 activity. Upon PSEN1/2 reintroduction, this active epigenetic state was replaced by a methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2)-containing repressive state and reduced neurotrypsin expression. Genome-wide analysis revealed hundreds of other mouse promoters in which CREB binding is similarly modulated by the presence/absence of presenilins. Our study thus identifies Tequila and neurotrypsin as new genes repressed by presenilins and reveals a novel mechanism used by presenilins to modulate CREB signaling based on controlling CREB recruitment.

  12. Presenilins Regulate Neurotrypsin Gene Expression and Neurotrypsin-dependent Agrin Cleavage via Cyclic AMP Response Element-binding Protein (CREB) Modulation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Kim, Sonia N.; Benner, Christopher; Herrera, Cheryl M.; Kang, David E.; Garcia-Bassets, Ivan; Goldstein, Lawrence S. B.

    2013-01-01

    Presenilins, the catalytic components of the γ-secretase complex, are upstream regulators of multiple cellular pathways via regulation of gene transcription. However, the underlying mechanisms and the genes regulated by these pathways are poorly characterized. In this study, we identify Tequila and its mammalian ortholog Prss12 as genes negatively regulated by presenilins in Drosophila larval brains and mouse embryonic fibroblasts, respectively. Prss12 encodes the serine protease neurotrypsin, which cleaves the heparan sulfate proteoglycan agrin. Altered neurotrypsin activity causes serious synaptic and cognitive defects; despite this, the molecular processes regulating neurotrypsin expression and activity are poorly understood. Using γ-secretase drug inhibitors and presenilin mutants in mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we found that a mature γ-secretase complex was required to repress neurotrypsin expression and agrin cleavage. We also determined that PSEN1 endoproteolysis or processing of well known γ-secretase substrates was not essential for this process. At the transcriptional level, PSEN1/2 removal induced cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB)/CREB-binding protein binding, accumulation of activating histone marks at the neurotrypsin promoter, and neurotrypsin transcriptional and functional up-regulation that was dependent on GSK3 activity. Upon PSEN1/2 reintroduction, this active epigenetic state was replaced by a methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2)-containing repressive state and reduced neurotrypsin expression. Genome-wide analysis revealed hundreds of other mouse promoters in which CREB binding is similarly modulated by the presence/absence of presenilins. Our study thus identifies Tequila and neurotrypsin as new genes repressed by presenilins and reveals a novel mechanism used by presenilins to modulate CREB signaling based on controlling CREB recruitment. PMID:24145027

  13. Erythropoietin activates the phosporylated cAMP [adenosine 3'5' cyclic monophosphate] response element-binding protein pathway and attenuates delayed paraplegia after ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mares, Joshua M; Foley, Lisa S; Bell, Marshall T; Bennett, Daine T; Freeman, Kirsten A; Meng, Xianzhong; Weyant, Michael J; Cleveland, Joseph C; Fullerton, David A; Puskas, Ferenc; Reece, Thomas Brett

    2015-03-01

    Paraplegia remains a devastating complication of complex aortic surgery. Erythropoietin (EPO) has been shown to prevent paraplegia after ischemia reperfusion, but the protective mechanism remains poorly described in the spinal cord. We hypothesized that EPO induces the CREB (cAMP [adenosine 3'5' cyclic monophosphate] response element-binding protein) pathway and neurotrophin production in the murine spinal cord, attenuating functional and cellular injury. Adult male mice were subjected to 4 minutes of spinal cord ischemia via an aortic and left subclavian cross-clamp. Experimental groups included EPO treatment 4 hours before incision (n = 7), ischemic control (n = 7), and shams (n = 4). Hind-limb function was assessed using the Basso motor score for 48 hours after reperfusion. Spinal cords were harvested and analyzed for neuronal viability using histology and staining with a fluorescein derivative. Expression of phosphorylated (p)AKT (a serine/threonine-specific kinase), pCREB, B-cell lymphoma 2, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor were determined using immunoblotting. By 36 hours of reperfusion, EPO significantly preserved hind-limb function after ischemia-reperfusion injury (P < .01). Histology demonstrated preserved cytoarchitecture in the EPO treatment group. Cords treated with EPO expressed significant increases in pAKT (P = .021) and pCREB (P = .038). Treatment with EPO induced expression of both of the neurotrophins, B-cell lymphoma 2, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, beginning at 12 hours. Erythropoietin-mediated induction of the CREB pathway and production of neurotrophins is associated with improved neurologic function and increased neuronal viability following spinal cord ischemia reperfusion. Further elucidation of EPO-derived neuroprotection will allow for expansion of adjunct mechanisms for spinal cord protection in high-risk thoracoabdominal aortic intervention. Copyright © 2015 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by

  14. Functional cyclic AMP response element in the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2) promoter modulates epidermal growth factor receptor pathway- or androgen withdrawal-mediated BCRP/ABCG2 transcription in human cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yi; Nakanishi, Takeo; Natarajan, Karthika; Safren, Lowell; Hamburger, Anne W; Hussain, Arif; Ross, Douglas D

    2015-03-01

    Phosphorylated cyclic-AMP (cAMP) response element binding protein (p-CREB) is a downstream effector of a variety of important signaling pathways. We investigated whether the human BCRP promoter contains a functional cAMP response element (CRE). 8Br-cAMP, a cAMP analogue, increased the activity of a BCRP promoter reporter construct and BCRP mRNA in human carcinoma cells. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway activation also led to an increase in p-CREB and in BCRP promoter reporter activity via two major downstream EGFR signaling pathways: the phosphotidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway and the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. EGF treatment increased the phosphorylation of EGFR, AKT, ERK and CREB, while simultaneously enhancing BCRP mRNA and functional protein expression. EGF-stimulated CREB phosphorylation and BCRP induction were diminished by inhibition of EGFR, PI3K/AKT or RAS/MAPK signaling. CREB silencing using RNA interference reduced basal levels of BCRP mRNA and diminished the induction of BCRP by EGF. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed that a putative CRE site on the BCRP promoter bound p-CREB by a point mutation of the CRE site abolished EGF-induced stimulation of BCRP promoter reporter activity. Furthermore, the CREB co-activator, cAMP-regulated transcriptional co-activator (CRTC2), is involved in CREB-mediated BCRP transcription: androgen depletion of LNCaP human prostate cancer cells increased both CREB phosphorylation and CRTC2 nuclear translocation, and enhanced BCRP expression. Silencing CREB or CRTC2 reduced basal BCRP expression and BCRP induction under androgen-depletion conditions. This novel CRE site plays a central role in mediating BCRP gene expression in several human cancer cell lines following activation of multiple cancer-relevant signaling pathways. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Mechanism of cAMP Partial Agonism in Protein Kinase G (PKG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanSchouwen, Bryan; Selvaratnam, Rajeevan; Giri, Rajanish; Lorenz, Robin; Herberg, Friedrich W; Kim, Choel; Melacini, Giuseppe

    2015-11-27

    Protein kinase G (PKG) is a major receptor of cGMP and controls signaling pathways often distinct from those regulated by cAMP. Hence, the selective activation of PKG by cGMP versus cAMP is critical. However, the mechanism of cGMP-versus-cAMP selectivity is only limitedly understood. Although the C-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain B of PKG binds cGMP with higher affinity than cAMP, the intracellular concentrations of cAMP are typically higher than those of cGMP, suggesting that the cGMP-versus-cAMP selectivity of PKG is not controlled uniquely through affinities. Here, we show that cAMP is a partial agonist for PKG, and we elucidate the mechanism for cAMP partial agonism through the comparative NMR analysis of the apo, cGMP-, and cAMP-bound forms of the PKG cyclic nucleotide-binding domain B. We show that although cGMP activation is adequately explained by a two-state conformational selection model, the partial agonism of cAMP arises from the sampling of a third, partially autoinhibited state. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Mechanism of cAMP Partial Agonism in Protein Kinase G (PKG)*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanSchouwen, Bryan; Selvaratnam, Rajeevan; Giri, Rajanish; Lorenz, Robin; Herberg, Friedrich W.; Kim, Choel; Melacini, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase G (PKG) is a major receptor of cGMP and controls signaling pathways often distinct from those regulated by cAMP. Hence, the selective activation of PKG by cGMP versus cAMP is critical. However, the mechanism of cGMP-versus-cAMP selectivity is only limitedly understood. Although the C-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain B of PKG binds cGMP with higher affinity than cAMP, the intracellular concentrations of cAMP are typically higher than those of cGMP, suggesting that the cGMP-versus-cAMP selectivity of PKG is not controlled uniquely through affinities. Here, we show that cAMP is a partial agonist for PKG, and we elucidate the mechanism for cAMP partial agonism through the comparative NMR analysis of the apo, cGMP-, and cAMP-bound forms of the PKG cyclic nucleotide-binding domain B. We show that although cGMP activation is adequately explained by a two-state conformational selection model, the partial agonism of cAMP arises from the sampling of a third, partially autoinhibited state. PMID:26370085

  17. Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase activity in the somatic cells of the seminiferous tubules. I. Isoform analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nistico, L; Pezzotti, R; Galdieri, M

    1991-01-01

    In this work firstly are reported the chromatographic analysis of cAMP dependent protein kinases present in the cytosols obtained from rat Sertoli cells and peritubular cells. In both cell types two different isoenzymes have been detected, one eluting at 40-80 mM KC1 (type I) and a second one eluting at 150-200 mM KC1 (type II). Only the type I was strongly stimulated by cAMP whereas the type II was slightly cAMP dependent both in the Sertoli cells and in the peritubular cells.

  18. Insulin elevates leptin secretion and mRNA levels via cyclic AMP in 3T3-L1 adipocytes deprived of glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Tsubai

    2016-11-01

    Conclusion: Insulin alone stimulates leptin secretion and elevates leptin mRNA levels via cAMP under the lack of glucose metabolism, while glucose is a significant and ambivalent effector on the insulin effects of leptin.

  19. Rp-cAMPS Prodrugs Reveal the cAMP Dependence of First-Phase Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwede, Frank; Chepurny, Oleg G; Kaufholz, Melanie; Bertinetti, Daniela; Leech, Colin A; Cabrera, Over; Zhu, Yingmin; Mei, Fang; Cheng, Xiaodong; Manning Fox, Jocelyn E; MacDonald, Patrick E; Genieser, Hans-G; Herberg, Friedrich W; Holz, George G

    2015-07-01

    cAMP-elevating agents such as the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 potentiate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) from pancreatic β-cells. However, a debate has existed since the 1970s concerning whether or not cAMP signaling is essential for glucose alone to stimulate insulin secretion. Here, we report that the first-phase kinetic component of GSIS is cAMP-dependent, as revealed through the use of a novel highly membrane permeable para-acetoxybenzyl (pAB) ester prodrug that is a bioactivatable derivative of the cAMP antagonist adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate, Rp-isomer (Rp-cAMPS). In dynamic perifusion assays of human or rat islets, a step-wise increase of glucose concentration leads to biphasic insulin secretion, and under these conditions, 8-bromoadenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate, Rp-isomer, 4-acetoxybenzyl ester (Rp-8-Br-cAMPS-pAB) inhibits first-phase GSIS by up to 80%. Surprisingly, second-phase GSIS is inhibited to a much smaller extent (≤20%). Using luciferase, fluorescence resonance energy transfer, and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays performed in living cells, we validate that Rp-8-Br-cAMPS-pAB does in fact block cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation. Novel effects of Rp-8-Br-cAMPS-pAB to block the activation of cAMP-regulated guanine nucleotide exchange factors (Epac1, Epac2) are also validated using genetically encoded Epac biosensors, and are independently confirmed in an in vitro Rap1 activation assay using Rp-cAMPS and Rp-8-Br-cAMPS. Thus, in addition to revealing the cAMP dependence of first-phase GSIS from human and rat islets, these findings establish a pAB-based chemistry for the synthesis of highly membrane permeable prodrug derivatives of Rp-cAMPS that act with micromolar or even nanomolar potency to inhibit cAMP signaling in living cells.

  20. [Cyclic concentration of estradiol and progesterone in hysterectomized women (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynoso Ron, L; Aznar Ramos, R; Bedolla Tovar, N; Cortés-Gallegos, V

    1975-01-01

    The cyclic concentration of estradiol and progesterone was studied in 6 women, 30 years of age or less, who underwent hysterectomy, 7 to 14 months earlier, because of obstetrical complications. The basal body temperature curve, as well as the daily concentrations of plasma estradiol and progesterone during one cycle, showed a pattern similar to that of the control group, except for 2 women with a luteal phase of 16 days, who had progesterone levels of 5 ng/ml or more. Although these values are indicative of ovulation, they fell in the lower limit of the range considered as ovulatory in the laboratory that conducted the test. It is concluded that hysterectomy, with the interruption of the circulation of the ovaric branch of the uterine artery, does not affect the normal esteroidogenic function of the ovary.

  1. Describing the annual cyclic behaviour of 7Be concentrations in surface air in Oceania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, Che; Akber, Riaz

    2008-10-01

    Surface air concentrations of 7Be at a number of stations in Oceania show a distinct annual cycle. We apply a sinusoidal model to describe this cycle. The results show that peak 7Be concentrations in surface air occur during early spring at tropical latitudes and during mid-to-late summer at middle latitudes. Comparison with available 90Sr surface air data for the southern hemisphere indicates that stratosphere-to-troposphere exchange is an active atmospheric process controlling the 7Be annual cycle throughout the Oceania region. Vertical transport of air within the troposphere also seems to influence the observed annual cycle. Seasonality in rainfall is not thought to control the annual cyclic behaviour of 7Be in surface air.

  2. The role of exchange protein directly activated by cyclic AMP 2-mediated calreticulin expression in the decidualization of human endometrial stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusama, Kazuya; Yoshie, Mikihiro; Tamura, Kazuhiro; Nakayama, Takahiro; Nishi, Hirotaka; Isaka, Keiichi; Tachikawa, Eiichi

    2014-01-01

    Decidualization of human endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) accompanied by the production of prolactin (PRL) and IGF-binding protein (IGFBP) 1 and rounded-cell morphology is indispensable for the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. Protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated cAMP signaling is known to be crucial for decidualization. We previously reported that activation of a cAMP mediator, called Exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (EPAC) promotes cAMP analog- or ovarian steroid-induced decidualization in cultured human ESCs. In addition, small interfering RNA-mediated knock-down of the EPAC subtypes, EPAC1 or EPAC2, or knock-down of Rap1, a downstream factor of EPAC signaling, blocked functional and morphological decidualization of ESCs. However, factors downstream of EPAC2 other than Rap1 have not been determined. The present study was undertaken to identify additional downstream targets of EPAC2 associated with decidualization. Using proteomic analysis, we identified calreticulin (CRT) as a potential target of EPAC2. Knock-down of CRT expression in cultured ESCs significantly inhibited PKA-selective cAMP analog- or PKA-selective cAMP analog plus EPAC-selective cAMP analog-induced PRL and IGFBP1 expression. Furthermore, CRT knock-down suppressed the ovarian steroid-stimulated PRL and IGFBP1 expression and morphological differentiation, and silencing of EPAC2 or CRT significantly increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity with enhanced p21 expression and decreased p53 expression. These results suggest that EPAC2 and CRT are associated with cellular senescence in ESCs. In conclusion, we demonstrate here that EPAC2-mediated CRT expression is essential for the functional and morphological differentiation of ESCs into decidual cells. Furthermore, both EPAC2 and CRT might prevent ESCs from undergoing abnormal cellular senescence during decidualization.

  3. Levels of cyclic-AMP and cyclic-GMP in porcine oocyte-cumulus complexes and cumulus-free oocytes derived from small and middle follicles during the first 24-hour period of in vitro maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okudaira, Yuichi; Wakai, Takuya; Funahashi, Hiroaki

    2017-04-21

    The objective of this study was to compare the cAMP and cGMP levels in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) derived from the middle follicles (MFs, 3-6 mm in diameter) and small follicles (SFs, 1-3 mm in diameter) of pre-pubertal gilts during the first 24-h period of maturation in vitro (IVM). Both cAMP and cGMP levels in MF- and SF-derived oocytes did not change during this period. Although the cAMP levels increased in the COCs at 10 and 20 h after the start of IVM, the levels of cAMP were significantly higher in MF-derived COCs than in SF-derived COCs at 20 h after the start of IVM. On the other hand, the cGMP levels in COCs decreased to basal levels between 10 and 20 h after the start of the IVM, whereas cGMP levels were lower in SF-derived COCs than in MF-derived COCs during the first 10 h. The number of cumulus cells was larger in the MF-derived COCs than in the SF-derived COCs during the first 20-h period of IVM. The estimated cAMP level per cumulus cell at 10 h after the start of the IVM was higher in SF-derived COCs than in MF-derived COCs, whereas the estimated cGMP level per cumulus cell was no different between MF- and SF-derived COCs. From these results, we conclude that cAMP and cGMP levels in COCs, but not in oocytes, drastically change during the first 20-h period of IVM, and that both cAMP and cGMP levels significantly differ between MF- and SF-derived COCs.

  4. A cyclic AMP response element mediates repression of tyrosine aminotransferase gene transcription by the tissue-specific extinguisher locus Tse-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boshart, M; Weih, F; Schmidt, A; Fournier, R E; Schütz, G

    1990-06-01

    Tyrosine aminotransferase (TAT) gene expression is liver specific and inducible by glucocorticoids and via the cAMP signaling pathway. In fibroblasts and other nonliver cells the gene is subject to negative control by the trans-dominant tissue-specific extinguisher locus Tse-1. We identified a hepatocyte-specific enhancer that is repressed by Tse-1. Two distinct sequence motifs are absolutely essential for function of this enhancer: a cAMP response element (CRE), which is the target for repression by Tse-1, and a hepatocyte-specific element. The specificity of the enhancer is generated by the combination of these two essential elements, which are fully interdependent. In vivo footprinting indicates that Tse-1 acts by affecting protein binding at the CRE. A direct antagonism between Tse-1 and the cAMP signaling pathway suggests that Tse-1 plays a role in control of developmental activation of the TAT gene.

  5. Involvement of VILIP-1 (visinin-like protein) and opposite roles of cyclic AMP and GMP signaling in in vitro cell migration of murine skin squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönrath, Katharina; Pan, Wensheng; Klein-Szanto, Andres J; Braunewell, Karl-Heinz

    2011-05-01

    VILIP-1 (visinin-like protein 1) is downregulated in various human squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). In a mouse skin SCC model VILIP-1 expression is reduced in aggressive tumor cells, accompanied by reduced cAMP levels. Overexpression of VILIP-1 in aggressive SCC cells led to enhanced cAMP production, in turn causing a reduction in invasive properties. Moreover, in primary neurons and neuronal tumor lines VILIP-1 enhanced cGMP signaling. Here, we set out to determine whether and how cAMP and cGMP signaling contribute to the VILIP-1 effect on enhanced SCC model cell migration, and thus most likely invasiveness in vivo. We found stronger increase in cGMP levels in aggressive, VILIP-1-negative SCC cells following stimulation of guanylyl cyclases NPR-A and -B with the natriuretic peptides ANP and CNP, respectively. Incubation with ANP or 8Br-cGMP to increase cGMP levels further enhanced the migration capacity of aggressive cells, whereas cell adhesion was unaffected. Increased cGMP was caused by elevated expression levels of NPR-A and -B. However, the expression level of VILIP-1 did not affect cGMP signaling and guanylyl cyclase expression in SCC. In contrast, VILIP-1 led to reduced migration of aggressive SCC cells depending on cAMP levels as shown by use of adenylyl cyclase (AC) inhibitor 2',3'-dideoxyadenosine. Involvement of cAMP-effectors PKA and EPAC play a role downstream of AC activation. VILIP-1-positive and -negative cells did not differ in mRNA expression of ACs, but an effect on enhanced protein expression and membrane localization of ACs was shown to underlie enhancement of cAMP production and, thus, reduction in cell migration by VILIP-1. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Widespread receptivity to neuropeptide PDF throughout the neuronal circadian clock network of Drosophila revealed by real-time cyclic AMP imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafer, Orie T; Kim, Dong Jo; Dunbar-Yaffe, Richard; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Lohse, Martin J; Taghert, Paul H

    2008-04-24

    The neuropeptide PDF is released by sixteen clock neurons in Drosophila and helps maintain circadian activity rhythms by coordinating a network of approximately 150 neuronal clocks. Whether PDF acts directly on elements of this neural network remains unknown. We address this question by adapting Epac1-camps, a genetically encoded cAMP FRET sensor, for use in the living brain. We find that a subset of the PDF-expressing neurons respond to PDF with long-lasting cAMP increases and confirm that such responses require the PDF receptor. In contrast, an unrelated Drosophila neuropeptide, DH31, stimulates large cAMP increases in all PDF-expressing clock neurons. Thus, the network of approximately 150 clock neurons displays widespread, though not uniform, PDF receptivity. This work introduces a sensitive means of measuring cAMP changes in a living brain with subcellular resolution. Specifically, it experimentally confirms the longstanding hypothesis that PDF is a direct modulator of most neurons in the Drosophila clock network.

  7. Molecular and functional identification of cyclic AMP-sensitive BKCa potassium channels (ZERO variant) and L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels in single rat juxtaglomerular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ulla G; Jørgensen, Finn; Andreasen, Ditte

    2003-01-01

    , respectively. Double immunofluorescence confirmed the presence of BKCa and renin in the same cell. cAMP increased the outward current by 1.6-fold, and this was inhibited by 74% with iberiotoxin. Expression of the cAMP-sensitive splice variant (ZERO) of BKCa was confirmed in single-sampled JG cells by RT......-PCR. The resting membrane potential of JG cells was -32 mV and activation of BKCa with cAMP hyperpolarized cells on average 16 mV, and inhibition with TEA depolarized cells by 17 mV. The cells displayed typical high-voltage activated calcium currents sensitive to the L-type Ca(v) blocker calciseptine. RT......-PCR analysis and double-immunofluorescence labeling showed coexpression of renin and L-type Ca(v) 1.2. The cAMP-mediated increase in exocytosis (measured as membrane capacitance) was inhibited by depolarization to +10 mV, and this inhibitory effect was blocked with calciseptine, whereas K+-blockers had...

  8. Spatial Memory in the Morris Water Maze and Activation of Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding (CREB) Protein within the Mouse Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porte, Yves; Buhot, Marie Christine; Mons, Nicole E.

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the spatio-temporal dynamics of learning-induced cAMP response element-binding protein activation/phosphorylation (pCREB) in mice trained in a spatial reference memory task in the water maze. Using immunohistochemistry, we examined pCREB immunoreactivity (pCREB-ir) in hippocampal CA1 and CA3 and related brain structures. During the…

  9. CYCLIC AMP-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE INDUCTION BY POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS (PCBS) STIMULATES CREB PHOSPHORYLATION VIA A CALCIUM-DEPENDENT, PKC-INDEPENDENT PATHWAY IN CORTICAL NEURONS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have previously demonstrated that the PCB mixture, Aroclor 1254 (A1254), increases the phosphorylated form of CREB (pCREB), the cAMP-responsive element binding protein. This transcription factor is important in nervous system development and plasticity. Phosphorylationof C...

  10. Sweet Taste Receptor Expressed in Pancreatic β-Cells Activates the Calcium and Cyclic AMP Signaling Systems and Stimulates Insulin Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Yuko; Nagasawa, Masahiro; Yamada, Satoko; Hara, Akemi; Mogami, Hideo; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O.; Lohse, Martin J.; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Kojima, Itaru

    2009-01-01

    Background Sweet taste receptor is expressed in the taste buds and enteroendocrine cells acting as a sugar sensor. We investigated the expression and function of the sweet taste receptor in MIN6 cells and mouse islets. Methodology/Principal Findings The expression of the sweet taste receptor was determined by RT–PCR and immunohistochemistry. Changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]c) and cAMP ([cAMP]c) were monitored in MIN6 cells using fura-2 and Epac1-camps. Activation of protein kinase C was monitored by measuring translocation of MARCKS-GFP. Insulin was measured by radioimmunoassay. mRNA for T1R2, T1R3, and gustducin was expressed in MIN6 cells. In these cells, artificial sweeteners such as sucralose, succharin, and acesulfame-K increased insulin secretion and augmented secretion induced by glucose. Sucralose increased biphasic increase in [Ca2+]c. The second sustained phase was blocked by removal of extracellular calcium and addition of nifedipine. An inhibitor of inositol(1, 4, 5)-trisphophate receptor, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, blocked both phases of [Ca2+]c response. The effect of sucralose on [Ca2+]c was inhibited by gurmarin, an inhibitor of the sweet taste receptor, but not affected by a Gq inhibitor. Sucralose also induced sustained elevation of [cAMP]c, which was only partially inhibited by removal of extracellular calcium and nifedipine. Finally, mouse islets expressed T1R2 and T1R3, and artificial sweeteners stimulated insulin secretion. Conclusions Sweet taste receptor is expressed in β-cells, and activation of this receptor induces insulin secretion by Ca2+ and cAMP-dependent mechanisms. PMID:19352508

  11. Sweet taste receptor expressed in pancreatic beta-cells activates the calcium and cyclic AMP signaling systems and stimulates insulin secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuko Nakagawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sweet taste receptor is expressed in the taste buds and enteroendocrine cells acting as a sugar sensor. We investigated the expression and function of the sweet taste receptor in MIN6 cells and mouse islets. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The expression of the sweet taste receptor was determined by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Changes in cytoplasmic Ca(2+ ([Ca(2+](c and cAMP ([cAMP](c were monitored in MIN6 cells using fura-2 and Epac1-camps. Activation of protein kinase C was monitored by measuring translocation of MARCKS-GFP. Insulin was measured by radioimmunoassay. mRNA for T1R2, T1R3, and gustducin was expressed in MIN6 cells. In these cells, artificial sweeteners such as sucralose, succharin, and acesulfame-K increased insulin secretion and augmented secretion induced by glucose. Sucralose increased biphasic increase in [Ca(2+](c. The second sustained phase was blocked by removal of extracellular calcium and addition of nifedipine. An inhibitor of inositol(1, 4, 5-trisphophate receptor, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, blocked both phases of [Ca(2+](c response. The effect of sucralose on [Ca(2+](c was inhibited by gurmarin, an inhibitor of the sweet taste receptor, but not affected by a G(q inhibitor. Sucralose also induced sustained elevation of [cAMP](c, which was only partially inhibited by removal of extracellular calcium and nifedipine. Finally, mouse islets expressed T1R2 and T1R3, and artificial sweeteners stimulated insulin secretion. CONCLUSIONS: Sweet taste receptor is expressed in beta-cells, and activation of this receptor induces insulin secretion by Ca(2+ and cAMP-dependent mechanisms.

  12. FRET-based binding assay between a fluorescent cAMP analogue and a cyclic nucleotide-binding domain tagged with a CFP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Francisco; Santana-Calvo, Carmen; Sánchez-Guevara, Yoloxochitl; Nishigaki, Takuya

    2017-09-01

    The cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD) functions as a regulatory domain of many proteins involved in cyclic nucleotide signalling. We developed a straightforward and reliable binding assay based on intermolecular fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between an adenosine-3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate analogue labelled with fluorescein and a recombinant CNBD of human EPAC1 tagged with a cyan fluorescence protein (CFP). The high FRET efficiency of this method (~ 80%) allowed us to perform several types of binding experiments with nanomolar range of sample using conventional equipment. In addition, the CFP tag on the CNBD enabled us to perform a specific binding experiment using an unpurified protein. Considering these advantages, this technique is useful to study poorly characterized CNBDs. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  13. The μ opioid agonist morphine modulates potentiation of capsaicin-evoked TRPV1 responses through a cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts-Thomson Sarah J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1 is critical in the development of inflammatory hyperalgesia. Several receptors including G-protein coupled prostaglandin receptors have been reported to functionally interact with the TRPV1 through a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA pathway to potentiate TRPV1-mediated capsaicin responses. Such regulation may have significance in inflammatory pain. However, few functional receptor interactions that inhibit PKA-mediated potentiation of TRPV1 responses have been described. Results In the present studies we investigated the hypothesis that the μ opioid receptor (MOP agonist morphine can modulate forskolin-potentiated capsaicin responses through a cAMP-dependent PKA pathway. HEK293 cells were stably transfected with TRPV1 and MOP, and calcium (Ca2+ responses to injection of the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin were monitored in Fluo-3-loaded cells. Pre-treatment with morphine did not inhibit unpotentiated capsaicin-induced Ca2+ responses but significantly altered capsaicin responses potentiated by forskolin. TRPV1-mediated Ca2+ responses potentiated by the direct PKA activator 8-Br-cAMP and the PKC activator Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetatewere not modulated by morphine. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed that the TRPV1 and MOP are co-expressed on cultured Dorsal Root Ganglion neurones, pointing towards the existence of a functional relationship between the G-protein coupled MOP and nociceptive TRPV1. Conclusion The results presented here indicate that the opioid receptor agonist morphine acts via inhibition of adenylate cyclase to inhibit PKA-potentiated TRPV1 responses. Targeting of peripheral opioid receptors may therefore have therapeutic potential as an intervention to prevent potentiation of TRPV1 responses through the PKA pathway in inflammation.

  14. Cows are not mice: the role of cyclic AMP, phosphodiesterases, and adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in the maintenance of meiotic arrest in bovine oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilodeau-Goeseels, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    Meiotic maturation in mammalian oocytes is initiated during fetal development, and is then arrested at the dictyate stage - possibly for several years. Oocyte meiosis resumes in preovulatory follicles in response to the lutenizing hormone (LH) surge or spontaneously when competent oocytes are removed from follicles and cultured. The mechanisms involved in meiotic arrest and resumption in bovine oocytes are not fully understood, and several studies point to important differences between oocytes from rodent and livestock species. This paper reviews earlier and contemporary studies on the effects of cAMP-elevating agents and phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzyme inhibitors on the maintenance of meiotic arrest in bovine oocytes in vitro. Contrary to results obtained with mouse oocytes, bovine oocyte meiosis is inhibited by activators of the energy sensor adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK, mammalian gene PRKA), which is activated by AMP, the degradation product of cAMP. It is not clear whether or not the effects were due to AMPK activation, and they may depend on culture conditions. Evidence suggests that other signaling pathways (for example, the cGMP/nitric oxide pathway) are involved in bovine oocyte meiotic arrest, but further studies are needed to understand the interactions between the signaling pathways that lead to maturation promoting factor (MPF) being inactive or active. An improved understanding of the mechanisms involved in the control of bovine oocyte meiosis will facilitate better control of the process in vitro, resulting in increased developmental competence and increased efficiency of in vitro embryo production procedures. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Involvement of fatty acid-CoA ligase 4 in hepatocellular carcinoma growth: roles of cyclic AMP and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu-Chih; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Chu, Jan-Show; Wang, Chung-Kwe; Hung, Ling-Fang; Wang, Ying-Jan; Ho, Yuan-Soon; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Lin, Shyr-Yi

    2005-05-07

    Fatty acid-CoA ligase 4 (FACL4) is an arachidonate-preferring enzyme which has been shown to be up-regulated in human colon cancer tissues and implicated in the colon tumorigenesis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of FACL4 in the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) tumorigenesis and the specific signal pathways involved in this process. We investigated the expression and regulation of FACL4 in HCC, adjacent non-tumorous liver tissues, and cell lines. In HCC patients, we demonstrated that FACL4 gene expression was markedly elevated in the cancerous tissues than in the adjacent non-cancerous liver tissues. In addition, several human hepatoma cell lines, including Hep3B and HepG2, expressed high levels of FACL4. Stable overexpression of FACL4 knockdown plasmids (small interfering RNA, siRNA) to Hep3B cells significantly decreased FACL4 expression and subsequently limited the cell proliferation. Treatment of Hep3B cells with 8-bromo-cAMP and SB203508 (p38 MAPK inhibitor) significantly suppressed the FACL4 expression. FACL4 is involved in the HCC tumorigenesis and both cAMP and p38 MAPK pathways are associated with the regulation of FACL4 in HCC.

  16. Nitric oxide increases cyclic GMP levels, AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)alpha1-specific activity and glucose transport in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deshmukh, A S; Long, Y C; de Castro Barbosa, T

    2010-01-01

    of 5 mmol/l spermine NONOate or 120 nmol/l insulin. The L6 muscle cells were treated with spermine NONOate (20 micromol/l) and incubated in the absence or presence of insulin (120 nmol/l). The direct effect of spermine NONOate and insulin on glucose transport, cGMP levels and signal transduction...... an insulin-independent signalling mechanism. Consistent with this, spermine NONOate increased AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-alpha1-associated activity (1.7-fold, p .... CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: Pharmacological treatment of skeletal muscle with spermine NONOate increases glucose transport via insulin-independent signalling pathways involving increased intracellular cGMP levels and AMPK-alpha1-associated activity....

  17. Regulation of Maltodextrin Phosphorylase Synthesis in Escherichia coli by Cyclic Adenosine 3′, 5′-Monophosphate and Glucose1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Julie; Weathersbee, Carolyn J.

    1974-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3′, 5′-monophosphate (AMP) stimulates maltodextrin phosphorylase synthesis in Escherichia coli cells induced with maltose. A maximal effect occurs at 2 to 3 mM cyclic AMP. The action of cyclic AMP is specific, inasmuch as adenosine triphosphate, 3′-AMP, 5′-AMP, adenosine, and dibutyryl cyclic AMP are inactive. Glucose, α-methyl glucoside, 2-deoxyglucose, and pyridoxal 5′-phosphate repress maltodextrin phosphorylase synthesis. This repression is reversed by cyclic AMP. The action of cyclic AMP appears to be at the transcriptional level, since cyclic AMP fails to stimulate phosphorylase production in induced cells in which messenger ribonucleic acid synthesis has been arrested by rifampin or by inducer removal. The two other enzymes involved in the metabolism of maltose, amylomaltase and maltose permease, are also induced in this strain of E. coli and affected by glucose and cyclic AMP in a manner similar to phosphorylase. PMID:4358043

  18. Effects of cyclic adenosine-monophosphate on growth and PSA secretion of human prostate cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macchia, V; Di Carlo, A; De Luca, C; Mariano, A

    2001-05-01

    Prolonged increase of cyclic adenosine-monophosphate (cAMP) level in the culture medium of a well differentiated human prostatic cancer cell (LNCaP) inhibits cellular growth and stimulates PSA secretion. The differentiation of the cells tested was documented by their responsiveness to androgens and the ability to synthesize cellular markers of differentiation (PSA). The raise in cAMP level was produced by dibutyryl cyclic AMP (DBcAMP) or by agents acting at distinct levels in the pathway of cAMP generation (forskolin) or degradation (IBMX). Each of these three agents in a range of concentrations between 10-4-10-6 M had an inhibitory effect on the growth which is dose and time-dependent. The inhibition was reversible as demonstrated by complete restoration of cell growth soon after the withdrawal of the substances from the culture medium. When cAMP levels in culture medium was raised, an increase in PSA content was observed. However, the effects of cAMP on PSA content was not due to increase in PSA synthesis, since simultaneous measurement of secreted and cellular PSA indicated that the principal effect of the cyclic nucleotide was to enhance the secretion of stored PSA. Furthermore the inhibition of cellular growth by cAMP suggests new approaches in prostatic carcinoma therapy.

  19. Estimating Neural Control from Concentric vs. Eccentric Surface Electromyographic Representations during Fatiguing, Cyclic Submaximal Back Extension Exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerold R. Ebenbichler

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the differences in neural control of back muscles activated during the eccentric vs. the concentric portions of a cyclic, submaximal, fatiguing trunk extension exercise via the analysis of amplitude and time-frequency parameters derived from surface electromyographic (SEMG data.Methods: Using back dynamometers, 87 healthy volunteers performed three maximum voluntary isometric trunk extensions (MVC's, an isometric trunk extension at 80% MVC, and 25 cyclic, dynamic trunk extensions at 50% MVC. Dynamic testing was performed with the trunk angular displacement ranging from 0° to 40° and the trunk angular velocity set at 20°/s. SEMG data was recorded bilaterally from the iliocostalis lumborum at L1, the longissimus dorsi at L2, and the multifidus muscles at L5. The initial value and slope of the root mean square (RMS-SEMG and the instantaneous median frequency (IMDF-SEMG estimates derived from the SEMG recorded during each exercise cycle were used to investigate the differences in MU control marking the eccentric vs. the concentric portions of the exercise.Results: During the concentric portions of the exercise, the initial RMS-SEMG values were almost twice those observed during the eccentric portions of the exercise. The RMS-SEMG values generally increased during the concentric portions of the exercise while they mostly remained unchanged during the eccentric portions of the exercise with significant differences between contraction types. Neither the initial IMDF-SEMG values nor the time-course of the IMDF-SEMG values significantly differed between the eccentric and the concentric portions of the exercise.Conclusions: The comparison of the investigated SEMG parameters revealed distinct neural control strategies during the eccentric vs. the concentric portions of the cyclic exercise. We explain these differences by relying upon the principles of orderly recruitment and common drive governing motor unit behavior.

  20. Bidirectional Regulation of the Cyclic-AMP Response Element Binding Protein Encodes Spatial Map Alignment in Prism-Adapting Barn Owls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Grant S; DeBello, William M

    2012-01-01

    The barn owl midbrain contains mutually aligned maps of auditory and visual space. Throughout life, map alignment is maintained through the actions of an instructive signal that encodes the magnitude of auditory-visual mismatch. The intracellular signaling pathways activated by this signal are unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that CREB (cAMP response element binding protein) provides a cell-specific readout of instructive information. Owls were fitted with prismatic or control spectacles and provided rich auditory-visual experience - hunting live mice. CREB activation was analyzed within 30 minutes of hunting using phosphorylation state-specific (pCREB) and CREB antibodies, confocal imaging and immunofluorescence measurements at individual cell nuclei. In control owls or prism-adapted owls, which experience small instructive signals, the frequency distributions of pCREB/CREB values obtained for cell nuclei within the external nucleus of the inferior colliculus (ICX) were unimodal. In contrast, in owls adapting to prisms or re-adapting to normal conditions, the distributions were bimodal: certain cells had received a signal that positively regulated CREB, and by extension, transcription of CREB-dependent genes, while others a signal that negatively regulated it. These changes were restricted to the sub-region of the inferior colliculus that received optically displaced input, the rostral ICX, and not evident in the caudal ICX or central nucleus. Finally, the topographic pattern of CREB regulation was patchy, not continuous, as expected from the actions of a topographically precise signal encoding discrete events. These results support a model in which the magnitude of CREB activation within individual cells provides a readout of the instructive signal that guides plasticity and learning. PMID:18829948

  1. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta activates insulin-like growth factor-I gene transcription in osteoblasts. Identification of a novel cyclic AMP signaling pathway in bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umayahara, Y.; Ji, C.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.; McCarthy, T. L.

    1997-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a key role in skeletal growth by stimulating bone cell replication and differentiation. We previously showed that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and other cAMP-activating agents enhanced IGF-I gene transcription in cultured primary rat osteoblasts through promoter 1, the major IGF-I promoter, and identified a short segment of the promoter, termed HS3D, that was essential for hormonal regulation of IGF-I gene expression. We now demonstrate that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) delta is a major component of a PGE2-stimulated DNA-protein complex involving HS3D and find that C/EBPdelta transactivates IGF-I promoter 1 through this site. Competition gel shift studies first indicated that a core C/EBP half-site (GCAAT) was required for binding of a labeled HS3D oligomer to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Southwestern blotting and UV-cross-linking studies showed that the HS3D probe recognized a approximately 35-kDa nuclear protein, and antibody supershift assays indicated that C/EBPdelta comprised most of the PGE2-activated gel-shifted complex. C/EBPdelta was detected by Western immunoblotting in osteoblast nuclear extracts after treatment of cells with PGE2. An HS3D oligonucleotide competed effectively with a high affinity C/EBP site from the rat albumin gene for binding to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Co-transfection of osteoblast cell cultures with a C/EBPdelta expression plasmid enhanced basal and PGE2-activated IGF-I promoter 1-luciferase activity but did not stimulate a reporter gene lacking an HS3D site. By contrast, an expression plasmid for the related protein, C/EBPbeta, did not alter basal IGF-I gene activity but did increase the response to PGE2. In osteoblasts and in COS-7 cells, C/EBPdelta, but not C/EBPbeta, transactivated a reporter gene containing four tandem copies of HS3D fused to a minimal promoter; neither transcription factor stimulated a gene with four copies of an HS3D mutant that was unable to bind osteoblast

  2. Regulation of insulin-like growth factor I transcription by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) in fetal rat bone cells through an element within exon 1: protein kinase A-dependent control without a consensus AMP response element

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, T. L.; Thomas, M. J.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.

    1995-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) is a locally synthesized anabolic growth factor for bone. IGF-I synthesis by primary fetal rat osteoblasts (Ob) is stimulated by agents that increase the intracellular cAMP concentration, including prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Previous studies with Ob cultures demonstrated that PGE2 enhanced IGF-I transcription through selective use of IGF-I promoter 1, with little effect on IGF-I messenger RNA half-life. Transient transfection of Ob cultures with an array of promoter 1-luciferase reporter fusion constructs has now allowed localization of a potential cis-acting promoter element(s) responsible for cAMP-stimulated gene expression to the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of IGF-I exon 1, within a segment lacking a consensus cAMP response element. Our evidence derives from three principal observations: 1) a transfection construct containing only 122 nucleotides (nt) of promoter 1 and 328 nt of the 5'-UTR retained full PGE2-stimulated reporter expression; 2) maximal PGE2-driven reporter expression required the presence of nt 196 to 328 of exon 1 when tested within the context of IGF-I promoter 1; 3) cotransfection of IGF-I promoter-luciferase-reporter constructs with a plasmid encoding the alpha-isoform of the catalytic subunit of murine cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) produced results comparable to those seen with PGE2 treatment, whereas cotransfection with a plasmid encoding a mutant regulatory subunit of PKA that cannot bind cAMP blocked PGE2-induced reporter expression. Deoxyribonuclease I footprinting of the 5'-UTR of exon 1 demonstrated protected sequences at HS3A, HS3B, and HS3D, three of six DNA-protein binding sites previously characterized with rat liver nuclear extracts. Of these three regions, only the HS3D binding site is located within the functionally identified hormonally responsive segment of IGF-I exon 1. These results directly implicate PKA in the control of IGF-I gene transcription by PGE2 and identify a segment of

  3. A new traveling wave phenomenon of Dictyostelium in the presence of cAMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ševčíková, Hana; Čejková, Jitka; Krausová, Lenka; Přibyl, Michal; Štěpánek, František; Marek, Miloš

    2010-06-01

    The emergence of wave patterns in chemical and biological systems is of interest for the understanding of development, differentiation, signaling, and other phenomena. In this work we report a new type of wave pattern - called the “global wave” - which was observed in populations of Dictyostelium discoideum cells exposed to an excess of cyclic adenosine- 3‧, 5‧- monophosphate (cAMP) added to the supporting agar. It has been found that the addition of different amounts of cAMP to the agar leads to important deviations from the standard course of aggregation: (i) the formation and propagation of a global wave that has not been observed before; (ii) the delayed onset or absence of cAMP waves patterning; (iii) an atypical mechanism of cells clustering; and (iv) a faster or incomplete developmental cycle. We suggest that the global wave is a chemotactic response of the Dictyostelium cells to a wave of the cAMP concentration.

  4. A State Space Model Exhibiting a Cyclic Structure with an Application to Progesterone Concentration in Cow Milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen Vinsløv; Jensen, Jens Ledet; Højsgaard, Søren

    Progesterone is a hormone linked to the reproductive status of dairy cows. Hence, with the increasing availability of on-line records of the concentration of progesterone in cow milk, there is a need for new tools to analyse such data. The aim is to find techniques for better determination...... of the time when cows are in oestrus to increase the rate of succesful inseminations. In this paper we propose a state space model for data with a continuous and cyclic trend in the mean. Furthermore a matching Kalman filter is developed. The model is tested on progesterone data from 112 cow...

  5. Induction of cell cycle arrest at G1 and S phases and cAMP-dependent differentiation in C6 glioma by low concentration of cycloheximide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Samuel S

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Differentiation therapy has been shown effective in treatment of several types of cancer cells and may prove to be effective in treatment of glioblastoma multiforme, the most common and most aggressive primary brain tumor. Although extensively used as a reagent to inhibit protein synthesis in mammalian cells, whether cycloheximide treatment leads to glioma cell differentiation has not been reported. Methods C6 glioma cell was treated with or without cycloheximide at low concentrations (0.5-1 μg/ml for 1, 2 and 3 days. Cell proliferation rate was assessed by direct cell counting and colony formation assays. Apoptosis was assessed by Hoechst 33258 staining and FACS analysis. Changes in several cell cycle regulators such as Cyclins D1 and E, PCNA and Ki67, and several apoptosis-related regulators such as p53, p-JNK, p-AKT, and PARP were determined by Western blot analysis. C6 glioma differentiation was determined by morphological characterization, immunostaining and Western blot analysis on upregulation of GFAP and o p-STAT3 expression, and upregulation of intracellular cAMP. Results Treatment of C6 cell with low concentration of cycloheximide inhibited cell proliferation and depleted cells at both G2 and M phases, suggesting blockade at G1 and S phases. While no cell death was observed, cells underwent profound morphological transformation that indicated cell differentiation. Western blotting and immunostaining analyses further indicated that changes in expression of several cell cycle regulators and the differentiation marker GFAP were accompanied with cycloheximide-induced cell cycle arrest and cell differentiation. Increase in intracellular cAMP, a known promoter for C6 cell differentiation, was found to be elevated and required for cycloheximide-promoted C6 cell differentiation. Conclusion Our results suggest that partial inhibition of protein synthesis in C6 glioma by low concentration of cycloheximide induces cell cycle

  6. Effect of Global Regulators RpoS and Cyclic-AMP/CRP on the Catabolome and Transcriptome of Escherichia coli K12 during Carbon- and Energy-Limited Growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro G Franchini

    Full Text Available For heterotrophic microbes, limited availability of carbon and energy sources is one of the major nutritional factors restricting the rate of growth in most ecosystems. Physiological adaptation to this hunger state requires metabolic versatility which usually involves expression of a wide range of different catabolic pathways and of high-affinity carbon transporters; together, this allows for simultaneous utilization of mixtures of carbonaceous compounds at low concentrations. In Escherichia coli the stationary phase sigma factor RpoS and the signal molecule cAMP are the major players in the regulation of transcription under such conditions; however, their interaction is still not fully understood. Therefore, during growth of E. coli in carbon-limited chemostat culture at different dilution rates, the transcriptomes, expression of periplasmic proteins and catabolomes of strains lacking one of these global regulators, either rpoS or adenylate cyclase (cya, were compared to those of the wild-type strain. The inability to synthesize cAMP exerted a strong negative influence on the expression of alternative carbon source uptake and degradation systems. In contrast, absence of RpoS increased the transcription of genes belonging to high-affinity uptake systems and central metabolism, presumably due to reduced competition of σ(D with σ(S. Phenotypical analysis confirmed this observation: The ability to respire alternative carbon substrates and to express periplasmic high-affinity binding proteins was eliminated in cya and crp mutants, while these properties were not affected in the rpoS mutant. As expected, transcription of numerous stress defence genes was negatively affected by the rpoS knock-out mutation. Interestingly, several genes of the RpoS stress response regulon were also down-regulated in the cAMP-negative strain indicating a coordinated global regulation. The results demonstrate that cAMP is crucial for catabolic flexibility during slow

  7. REGULATION OF PERIPHERAL GLUCAGON CONCENTRATIONS IN CYCLIC, PREGNANT, AND LACTATING RATS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KOITER, TR; FAAS, MM; VISSCHER, A; KIEVIT, C; STEFFENS, AB; SCHUILING, GA

    In the rat, peripheral glucagon concentrations were studied throughout pregnancy and lactation. Basal glucose concentrations were decreased during late pregnancy and during lactation. but basal glucagon concentrations were not affected. Infusion of glucose (7.4 mg/min) caused an elevation of the

  8. Endogenous expression of histamine H1 receptors functionally coupled to phosphoinositide hydrolysis in C6 glioma cells: regulation by cyclic AMP.

    OpenAIRE

    Peakman, M C; Hill, S. J.

    1994-01-01

    1. The effects of histamine receptor agonists and antagonists on phospholipid hydrolysis in rat-derived C6 glioma cells have been investigated. 2. Histamine H1 receptor-stimulation caused a concentration-dependent increase in the accumulation of total [3H]-inositol phosphates in cells prelabelled with [3H]-myo-inositol. The rank order of agonist potencies was histamine (EC50 = 24 microM) > N alpha-methylhistamine (EC50 = 31 microM) > 2-thiazolylethylamine (EC50 = 91 microM). 3. The response t...

  9. Cyclic AMP responsive element-binding protein induces metastatic renal cell carcinoma by mediating the expression of matrix metallopeptidase-2/9 and proteins associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue; Cui, Hui; Lou, Zhongguan; Huang, Shuaishuai; Ren, Yu; Wang, Ping; Weng, Guobin

    2017-06-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most frequently occurring malignancy of the kidney worldwide. Anti-angiogenic targeted therapies inhibit the progression of RCC, however, limited effects on the invasion or metastasis of tumor cells have been observed. Cyclic AMP responsive element‑binding protein (CREB) is a serine/threonine kinase that has been implicated in the regulation of cell proliferation, apoptosis, cycle progression and metastasis, amongst others. Our previous research demonstrated that phosphorylated CREB (pCREB) was upregulated in human renal cancer cell lines and tissues, and decreased pCREB at the Ser133 site inhibited the growth and metastatic activity of OS‑RC‑2 cells. However, the role of CREB in RCC metastasis requires further investigation. Thus, the present study further investigated the role of CREB in RCC metastasis. The present study demonstrated that knockdown of CREB using small interfering RNA (siRNA) that targeted CREB (siCREB) significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of 786‑O and OS‑RC‑2 cells, however, the opposite effect was observed in ACHN cells. In addition, knockdown of CREB suppressed the expression of matrix metallopeptidase (MMP)‑2/9 and proteins associated with epithelial‑mesenchymal transition (EMT) in 786‑O and OS‑RC‑2 cells, and promoted expression in ACHN cells. Furthermore, the chromatin immunoprecipitation assay indicated that pCREB (Ser133) had a direct interaction with the fibronectin promoter, however, pCREB (Ser133) did not target the vimentin promoter in RCC. Therefore, the results of the present study indicate that CREB regulated metastatic RCC by mediating the expression of MMP‑2/9 and EMT‑associated proteins, however, CREB‑mediated MMP‑2/9 and EMT‑associated protein expression may be induced by different pathways in different RCC cells.

  10. Beta2-microglobulin promotes the growth of human renal cell carcinoma through the activation of the protein kinase A, cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein, and vascular endothelial growth factor axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Takeo; Huang, Wen-Chin; Zhau, Haiyen E; Wu, Daqing; Xie, Zhihui; Mimata, Hiromitsu; Zayzafoon, Majd; Young, Andrew N; Marshall, Fray F; Weitzmann, M Neale; Chung, Leland W K

    2006-12-15

    Beta(2)-microglobulin (beta2M), a soluble protein secreted by cancer and host inflammatory cells, has various biological functions, including antigen presentation. Because aberrant expression of beta2M has been reported in human renal cell carcinoma, we investigated the effects of beta2M overexpression on cancer cell growth and analyzed its molecular signaling pathway. We established clonal cell lines that overexpressed beta2M in human renal cell carcinoma (SN12C) cells and then examined cell growth in vitro and in vivo and studied the beta2M-mediated downstream cell signaling pathway. Our results showed that beta2M expression positively correlates with (a) in vitro growth on plastic dishes and as Matrigel colonies, (b) cell invasion and migration in Boyden chambers, and (c) vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and secretion by cells. We found, in addition, that beta2M mediates its action through increased phosphorylation of cyclic AMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB) via the protein kinase A-CREB axis, resulting in increased VEGF expression and secretion. In convergence with this signal axis, beta2M overexpression also activated both phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Beta2M overexpression induced accelerated growth of SN12C in mouse subcutis and bone. Interrupting the beta2M signaling pathway using small interfering RNA led to apoptosis with increased activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Our results showed for the first time that the beta2M-protein kinase A-CREB-VEGF signaling axis plays a crucial role in support of renal cell carcinoma growth and progression and reveals a novel therapeutic target.

  11. Design maps for failure of all-ceramic layer structures in concentrated cyclic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Sanjit; Meléndez-Martínez, Juan José; Zhang, Yu; Lawn, Brian R.

    2009-01-01

    A study is made of the competition between failure modes in ceramic-based bilayer structures joined to polymer-based substrates, in simulation of dental crown-like structures with a functional but weak “veneer” layer bonded onto a strong “core” layer. Cyclic contact fatigue tests are conducted in water on model flat systems consisting of glass plates joined to glass, sapphire, alumina or zirconia support layers glued onto polycarbonate bases. Critical numbers of cycles to take each crack mode to failure are plotted as a function of peak contact load on failure maps showing regions in which each fracture mode dominates. In low-cycle conditions, radial and outer cone cracks are competitive in specimens with alumina cores, and outer cone cracks prevail in specimens with zirconia cores; in high-cycle conditions, inner cone cracks prevail in all cases. The roles of other factors, e.g. substrate modulus, layer thickness, indenter radius and residual stresses from specimen preparation, are briefly considered. PMID:19562095

  12. Role of Pseudomonas aeruginosa AmpR on β-lactam and non-β-lactam transient cross-resistance upon pre-exposure to subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Hansi; Balasubramanian, Deepak; Zincke, Diansy; Mathee, Kalai

    2014-04-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most dreaded opportunistic pathogens accounting for 10 % of hospital-acquired infections, with a 50 % mortality rate in chronically ill patients. The increased prevalence of drug-resistant isolates is a major cause of concern. Resistance in P. aeruginosa is mediated by various mechanisms, some of which are shared among different classes of antibiotics and which raise the possibility of cross-resistance. The goal of this study was to explore the effect of subinhibitory concentrations (SICs) of clinically relevant antibiotics and the role of a global antibiotic resistance and virulence regulator, AmpR, in developing cross-resistance. We investigated the induction of transient cross-resistance in P. aeruginosa PAO1 upon exposure to SICs of antibiotics. Pre-exposure to carbapenems, specifically imipenem, even at 3 ng ml(-1), adversely affected the efficacy of clinically used penicillins and cephalosporins. The high β-lactam resistance was due to elevated expression of both ampC and ampR, encoding a chromosomal β-lactamase and its regulator, respectively. Differences in the susceptibility of ampR and ampC mutants suggested non-AmpC-mediated regulation of β-lactam resistance by AmpR. The increased susceptibility of P. aeruginosa in the absence of ampR to various antibiotics upon SIC exposure suggests that AmpR plays a major role in the cross-resistance. AmpR was shown previously to be involved in resistance to quinolones by regulating MexEF-OprN efflux pump. The data here further indicate the role of AmpR in cross-resistance between quinolones and aminoglycosides. This was confirmed using quantitative PCR, where expression of the mexEF efflux pump was further induced by ciprofloxacin and tobramycin, its substrate and a non-substrate, respectively, in the absence of ampR. The data presented here highlight the intricate cross-regulation of antibiotic resistance pathways at SICs of antibiotics and the need for careful assessment

  13. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs): Ancient compounds that represent novel weapons in the fight against bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageitos, J M; Sánchez-Pérez, A; Calo-Mata, P; Villa, T G

    2017-06-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are short peptidic molecules produced by most living creatures. They help unicellular organisms to successfully compete for nutrients with other organisms sharing their biological niche, while AMPs form part of the immune system of multicellular creatures. Thus, these molecules represent biological weapons that have evolved over millions of years as a result of an escalating arms race for survival among living organisms. All AMPs share common features, such as a small size, with cationic and hydrophobic sequences within a linear or cyclic structure. AMPs can inhibit or kill bacteria at micromolar concentrations, often by non-specific mechanisms; hence the appearance of resistance to these antimicrobials is rare. Moreover, AMPs can kill antibiotic-resistant bacteria, including insidious microbes such as Acinetobacter baumannii and the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. This review gives a detailed insight into a selection of the most prominent and interesting AMPs with antibacterial activity. In the near future AMPs, due to their properties and despite their ancient origin, should represent a novel alternative to antibiotics in the struggle to control pathogenic microorganisms and maintain the current human life expectancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Determination of stress concentration coefficients upon cyclic loading by photometric analysis of structure images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minina, N. A.; Emishkin, V. A.; Ovchinnikov, I. N.

    2017-01-01

    The development of an experimental method for the determination of stress concentration coefficient by the photometric analysis of surface reflectivity of material near stress concentrator and at a distance from it is considered in the paper. The experiments were performed with the AD-19 aluminum alloy samples under fatigue test conditions realized at a vibrating table with cantilevered sample. Notches 5 mm long and 0.4 mm wide spaced at constant intervals were applied by electrical discharge along one edge of the samples. The reflections of light from the fragments in the vicinity of the stress concentrator and from the opposite edge of the sample were compared with the help of photometric image analyzer. It is shown that such analysis can be used to determine the stress concentration coefficients.

  15. Regulated expression of HCN channels and cAMP levels shape the properties of the h current in developing rat hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surges, Rainer; Brewster, Amy L.; Bender, Roland A.; Beck, Heinz; Feuerstein, Thomas J.; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2010-01-01

    The hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih) contributes to intrinsic properties and network responses of neurons. Its biophysical properties depend on the expression profiles of the underlying hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels and the presence of cyclic AMP (cAMP) that potently and differentially modulates Ih conducted by HCN1, HCN2 and/or HCN4. Here, we studied the properties of Ih in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells, the developmental evolution of the HCN-subunit isoforms that contribute to this current, and their interplay with age-dependent free cAMP concentrations, using electrophysiological, molecular and biochemical methods. Ih amplitude increased progressively during the first four postnatal weeks, consistent with the observed overall increased expression of HCN channels. Activation kinetics of the current accelerated during this period, consonant with the quantitative reduction of mRNA and protein expression of the slow-kinetics HCN4 isoform and increased levels of HCN1. The sensitivity of Ih to cAMP, and the contribution of the slow component to the overall Ih, decreased with age. These are likely a result of the developmentally regulated transition of the complement of HCN channel isoforms from cAMP sensitive to relatively cAMP insensitive. Thus, although hippocampal cAMP concentrations increased over twofold during the developmental period studied, the coordinated changes in expression of three HCN channel isoforms resulted in reduced effects of this signalling molecule on neuronal h currents. PMID:16882011

  16. Specificity of Adenosine Inhibition of cAMP-Induced Responses in Dictyostelium Resembles That of the P Site of Higher Organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lookeren Campagne, Michiel M. van; Schaap, Pauline; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1986-01-01

    Adenosine acts as a cyclic AMP antagonist in Dictyostelium discoideum. It inhibits the binding of cyclic AMP to cell surface receptors and the induction of postaggregative differentiation by cyclic AMP. We investigated the nucleoside specificity and dose dependency of both inhibitory effects of

  17. Pseudomonas aeruginosa β-lactamase induction requires two permeases, AmpG and AmpP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneper Lisa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Enterobacteriaceae, β-lactam antibiotic resistance involves murein recycling intermediates. Murein recycling is a complex process with discrete steps taking place in the periplasm and the cytoplasm. The AmpG permease is critical to this process as it transports N-acetylglucosamine anhydrous N-acetylmuramyl peptides across the inner membrane. In Pseudomonadaceae, this intrinsic mechanism remains to be elucidated. Since the mechanism involves two cellular compartments, the characterization of transporters is crucial to establish the link. Results Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 has two ampG paralogs, PA4218 (ampP and PA4393 (ampG. Topology analysis using β-galactosidase and alkaline phosphatase fusions indicates ampP and ampG encode proteins which possess 10 and 14 transmembrane helices, respectively, that could potentially transport substrates. Both ampP and ampG are required for maximum expression of β-lactamase, but complementation and kinetic experiments suggest they act independently to play different roles. Mutation of ampG affects resistance to a subset of β-lactam antibiotics. Low-levels of β-lactamase induction occur independently of either ampP or ampG. Both ampG and ampP are the second members of two independent two-gene operons. Analysis of the ampG and ampP operon expression using β-galactosidase transcriptional fusions showed that in PAO1, ampG operon expression is β-lactam and ampR-independent, while ampP operon expression is β-lactam and ampR-dependent. β-lactam-dependent expression of the ampP operon and independent expression of the ampG operon is also dependent upon ampP. Conclusions In P. aeruginosa, β-lactamase induction occurs in at least three ways, induction at low β-lactam concentrations by an as yet uncharacterized pathway, at intermediate concentrations by an ampP and ampG dependent pathway, and at high concentrations where although both ampP and ampG play a role, ampG may be of greater

  18. Cyclic GMP mediates neurogenic relaxation in the bovine retractor penis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, A.; Drummond, A. H.

    1984-01-01

    Field stimulation of the non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic inhibitory nerves to the bovine isolated retractor penis muscle evoked a relaxation that was preceded by a rise in the tissue content of cyclic GMP. There was no change in the content of cyclic AMP. The selective cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 2-o- propoxyphenyl -8- azapurin -6-one (M&B 22948), elevated the tissue's cyclic GMP content, and potentiated both the relaxation and the rise in cyclic GMP produced by inhibitory nerve stimulation. Sodium nitroprusside and an inhibitory factor extracted from the bovine retractor penis muscle mimicked the effects of inhibitory nerve stimulation in that they each produced relaxation associated with a selective rise in cyclic GMP concentration. Haemoglobin (in the form of erythrocyte haemolysate) and N- methylhydroxylamine , which are known to block guanylate cyclase, blocked the relaxation and the rise in cyclic GMP content produced by inhibitory nerve stimulation, inhibitory factor and sodium nitroprusside. Haemoglobin itself caused a rise in muscle tone and at the same time reduced the cyclic GMP content of the tissue. 8-Bromocyclic GMP, a permeant derivative of cyclic GMP, produced a relaxation of the muscle that, as expected, was not blocked by haemoglobin. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, prostaglandin E1 and forskolin each produced relaxation associated with a selective rise in cyclic AMP content. Their effects were not blocked by haemoglobin or N- methylhydroxylamine . It is concluded that inhibitory nerve stimulation in the bovine retractor penis muscle produces a relaxation that is mediated by cyclic GMP, although some substances relax the muscle without affecting cyclic GMP levels. The results are also compatible with the view that the extracts of muscle contain the inhibitory neurotransmitter. PMID:6326922

  19. Lipoic Acid Stimulates cAMP Production in Healthy Control and Secondary Progressive MS Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedler, Sarah E; Yadav, Vijayshree; Kerns, Amelia R; Tsang, Catherine; Markwardt, Sheila; Kim, Edward; Spain, Rebecca; Bourdette, Dennis; Salinthone, Sonemany

    2017-11-15

    Lipoic acid (LA) exhibits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties; supplementation reduces disease severity and T lymphocyte migration into the central nervous system in a murine model of multiple sclerosis (MS), and administration in secondary progressive MS (SPMS) subjects reduces brain atrophy compared to placebo. The mechanism of action (MOA) of LA's efficacy in suppression of MS pathology is incompletely understood. LA stimulates production of the immunomodulator cyclic AMP (cAMP) in vitro. To determine whether cAMP could be involved in the MOA of LA in vivo, we performed a clinical trial to examine whether LA stimulates cAMP production in healthy control and MS subjects, and whether there are differences in the bioavailability of LA between groups. We administered 1200 mg of oral LA to healthy control, relapsing remitting MS (RRMS) and SPMS subjects, and measured plasma LA and cAMP levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). There were no significant differences between the groups in pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters. Healthy and SPMS subjects had increased cAMP at 2 and 4 h post-LA treatment compared to baseline, while RRMS subjects showed decreases in cAMP. Additionally, plasma concentrations of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, a known cAMP stimulator) were significantly lower in female RRMS subjects compared to female HC and SPMS subjects 4 h after LA ingestion. These data indicate that cAMP could be part of the MOA of LA in SPMS, and that there is a divergent response to LA in RRMS subjects that may have implications in the efficacy of immunomodulatory drugs. This clinical trial, "Defining the Anti-inflammatory Role of Lipoic Acid in Multiple Sclerosis," NCT00997438, is registered at https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/record/NCT00997438 .

  20. The Arabidopsis thaliana Cyclic-Nucleotide-Dependent Response – a Quantitative Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Alqurashi, May M.

    2013-11-01

    Protein phosphorylation governs many regulatory pathways and an increasing number of kinases, proteins that transfer phosphate groups, are in turn activated by cyclic nucleotides. One of the cyclic nucleotides, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), has been shown to be a second messenger in abiotic and biotic stress responses. However, little is known about the precise role of cAMP in plants and in the down-stream activation of kinases, and hence cAMP-dependent phosphorylation. To increase our understanding of the role of cAMP, proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of Arabidopsis thaliana suspension culture cells were analyzed before and after treatment of cells with two different concentrations of 8-Bromo-cAMP (1 µM and 100 nM) and over a time-course of one hour. A comparative quantitative analysis was undertaken using two- dimensional gel electrophoresis and the Delta 2D software (DECODON) followed by protein spot identification by tandem mass spectrometry combined with Mascot and Scaffold. Differentially expressed proteins and regulated phosphoproteins were categorized according to their biological function using bioinformatics tools. The results revealed that the treatment with 1 µM and 100 nM 8-Bromo-cAMP was sufficient to induce specific concentration- and time-dependent changes at the proteome and phosphoproteome levels. In particular, different phosphorylation patterns were observed overtime preferentially affecting proteins in a number of functional categories, notably phosphatases, proteins that remove phosphate groups. This suggests that cAMP both transiently activates and deactivates proteins through specific phosphorylation events and provides new insight into biological mechanisms and functions at the systems level.

  1. Impulse radio ultra wideband wireless transmission of dopamine concentration levels recorded by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrazeh, Ali; Bozorgzadeh, Bardia; Mohseni, Pedram

    2015-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the feasibility of utilizing impulse radio ultra wideband (IR-UWB) signaling technique for reliable, wireless transmission of dopamine concentration levels recorded by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) to address the problem of elevated data rates in high-channel-count neurochemical monitoring. Utilizing an FSCV-sensing chip fabricated in AMS 0.35μm 2P/4M CMOS, a 3-5-GHz, IR-UWB transceiver (TRX) chip fabricated in TSMC 90nm 1P/9M RF CMOS, and two off-chip, miniature, UWB antennae, wireless transfer of pseudo-random binary sequence (PRBS) data at 50Mbps over a distance of transmission of dopamine concentration levels prerecorded with FSCV at a CFM during flow injection analysis (FIA) is also demonstrated with transmitter (TX) power dissipation of only ~4.4μW from 1.2V, representing two orders of magnitude reduction in TX power consumption compared to that of a conventional frequency-shift-keyed (FSK) link operating at ~433MHz.

  2. Atrazine acts as an endocrine disrupter by inhibiting cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucka, Marek [Section on Cellular Signaling, Program in Developmental Neuroscience, NICHD, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States); Pogrmic-Majkic, Kristina; Fa, Svetlana [Laboratory for Ecotoxicology, Department of Biology and Ecology, University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Sciences, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia); Stojilkovic, Stanko S. [Section on Cellular Signaling, Program in Developmental Neuroscience, NICHD, NIH, Bethesda, MD (United States); Kovacevic, Radmila, E-mail: radmila.kovacevic@dbe.uns.ac.rs [Laboratory for Ecotoxicology, Department of Biology and Ecology, University of Novi Sad, Faculty of Sciences, 21000 Novi Sad (Serbia)

    2012-11-15

    Atrazine, one of the most commonly used herbicides worldwide, acts as an endocrine disruptor, but the mechanism of its action has not been characterized. In this study, we show that atrazine rapidly increases cAMP levels in cultured rat pituitary and testicular Leydig cells in a concentration-dependent manner, but less effectively than 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, a competitive non-specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterases (PDEs). In forskolin (an activator of adenylyl cyclase)- and probenecid (an inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide transporters)-treated cells, but not in 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine-treated cells, atrazine further increased cAMP levels, indicating that inhibition of PDEs accounts for accumulation of cAMP. In contrast to cAMP, atrazine did not alter cGMP levels, further indicating that it inhibits cAMP-specific PDEs. Atrazine-induced changes in cAMP levels were sufficient to stimulate prolactin release in pituitary cells and androgen production in Leydig cells, indicating that it acts as an endocrine disrupter both in cells that secrete by exocytosis of prestored hormones and in cells that secrete by de novo hormone synthesis. Rolipram abolished the stimulatory effect of atrazine on cAMP release in both cell types, suggesting that it acts as an inhibitor of PDE4s, isoforms whose mRNA transcripts dominate in pituitary and Leydig cells together with mRNA for PDE8A. In contrast, immortalized lacto-somatotrophs showed low expression of these mRNA transcripts and several fold higher cAMP levels compared to normal pituitary cells, and atrazine was unable to further increase cAMP levels. These results indicate that atrazine acts as a general endocrine disrupter by inhibiting cAMP-specific PDE4s. -- Highlights: ► Atrazine stimulates cAMP accumulation in pituitary and Leydig cells. ► Atrazine also stimulates PRL and androgens secretion. ► Stimulatory effects of atrazine were abolished in cells with IBMX-inhibited PDEs. ► Atrazine specificity toward cAMP

  3. Concentrations of cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes in European cosmetics and personal care products: prerequisite for human and environmental exposure assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudzina, Tatsiana; von Goetz, Natalie; Bogdal, Christian; Biesterbos, Jacqueline W H; Hungerbühler, Konrad

    2014-01-01

    Low molecular weight cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes (cVMSs) are widely employed as emollients and carrier solvents in personal care formulations in order to acquire desired performance benefits owing to their distinctive physicochemical properties. Under current European legislation cosmetic ingredients such as cVMSs are required to be labeled on the product package only qualitatively, while for the assessment of environmental and consumer exposure quantitative information is needed. The aim of this study was therefore to measure concentrations of three cVMSs, namely octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4), decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) in 51 cosmetics and personal care products (C&PCPs) that are currently available on the European market. The list of selected articles comprised a variety of hair and sun care products, skin creams and lotions, deodorants including antiperspirants, liquid foundations and a toothpaste. The target compounds were extracted from the products with different organic solvents dependent on the product matrix, followed by gas chromatography analysis with flame ionization detection (GC-FID). D5 was the predominant cVMS with the highest mean and median concentrations in all the C&PCP categories. The median concentrations of D5, D6 and D4 were 142, 2.3 and 0.053 mg/g in deodorants/antiperspirants (n = 11); 44.6, 30.0mg/g and below the limit of quantification (cosmetics (n = 5); 8.4, 0.32 mg/g and products, respectively. The calculated median aggregate daily dermal exposure to D4 and D5 from multiple C&PCPs was approximately 100 times lower than the current NOAEL derived from chronic inhalation rat studies. © 2013.

  4. Concentrations of cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes in European cosmetics and personal care products: Prerequisite for human and environmental exposure assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dudzina, T.; Goetz, N. von; Bogdal, C.; Biesterbos, J.W.H.; Hungerbuhler, K.

    2014-01-01

    Low molecular weight cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes (cVMSs) are widely employed as emollients and carrier solvents in personal care formulations in order to acquire desired performance benefits owing to their distinctive physicochemical properties. Under current European legislation cosmetic

  5. High glucose enhances cAMP level and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation in Chinese hamster ovary cell: Usage of Br-cAMP in foreign protein β-galactosidase expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiao-Hsien; Lee, Tsung-Yih; Liu, Ting-Wei; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2017-07-01

    Glucose is a carbon source for Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell growth, while low growth rate is considered to enhance the production of recombinant proteins. The present study reveals that glucose concentrations higher than 1 g/L reduce the growth rate and substantially increase in cAMP (∼300%) at a high glucose concentration (10 g/L). High glucose also enhances the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and p27 kip by Western blot analysis. To determine whether the phosphorylation of ERK is involved in the mechanism, a cyclic-AMP dependent protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor (H-8) or MEK (MAPKK) inhibitor (PD98059) was added to block ERK phosphorylation. We show that both the high glucose-induced ERK phosphorylation and growth rate return to baseline levels. These results suggest that the cAMP/PKA and MAP signaling pathways are involved in the abovementioned mechanism. Interestingly, the direct addition of 8-bromo-cAMP (Br-cAMP), a membrane-permeable cAMP analog, can mimic the similar effects produced by high glucose. Subsequently Br-cAMP could induce β-galactosidase (β-Gal) recombinant protein expression by 1.6-fold. Furthermore, Br-cAMP can additionally enhance the β-Gal production (from 2.8- to 4.5-fold) when CHO cells were stimulated with glycerol, thymidine, dimethyl sulfoxide, pentanoic acid, or sodium butyrate. Thus, Br-cAMP may be used as an alternative agent in promoting foreign protein expression for CHO cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Control of cell cycle by metabolites of prostaglandin D2 through a non-cAMP mediated mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Fukushima, M.

    1993-01-01

    The dehydration products of PGD2, 9-deoxy-9 prostaglandin D2(PGJ2), 9-deoxy-delta 9, delta 12, delta 13 dehydroprostaglandin D2 (delta 12 PGJ2), and PGA2 all contain an unsaturated cyclopentenone structure which is characteristic of prostaglandins which effectively inhibit cell growth. It has been suggested that the action of the inhibitory prostaglandins may be through a cAMP mechanism. In this study, we use S49 wild type (WT) and adenylate cyclase variant (cyc-) cells to show that PGD2 and PGJ2 are not acting via a cyclic AMP mechanism. First, the increase in cyclic AMP in wild type S-49 cells is not proportional to its effects on DNA synthesis. More importantly, when S-49 cyc- cells were exposed to PGJ2, the adenylate cyclase (cyc-) mutant had decreased DNA synthesis with no change in its nominal cAMP content. Short-term (2 hours or less) exposure of the cyc- cells to prostaglandin J2 caused an inhibition of DNA synthesis. PGJ2 caused cytolysis at high concentrations. Long-term exposure (>14 hrs) of the cells to PGJ2, delta 12PGJ2 or delta 12, delta 14PGJ2 caused a cell cycle arrest in G1 demonstrating a cell cycle specific mechanism of action for growth inhibition by naturally occurring biological products independent of cAMP.

  7. Synthesis of monodisperse core shell PVA@P(AMPS-co-NIPAm) nanogels structured for pre-concentration of Fe(III) ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoueir, Kamel R; Atta, Ayman M; Sarhan, Ali A; Akl, Magda A

    2017-04-01

    Core shell-structured poly(vinyl alcohol) @ poly(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propane-sulfonic acid-co-N-isopropylacrylamide) PVA@P(AMPS-co-NIPAm) spheres are synthesized. The well-defined PVA@P(AMPS-co-NIPAm) core shell nanogels with diameter nearly 30 nm enriches Fe(III), and the nanogels are characterized by FT-IR, TEM, SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The many factors affecting adsorption were successfully investigated. The maximum capacity of Fe(III) ions was 320 (mg/g) for PVA@P(90AMPS-co-10NIPAm) (wt.: wt%). The equilibrium data matching well with the Langmuir model and the pseudo-second-order form described the adsorption process better than the pseudo-first-order model. Findings of the present study highlight using a simple synthesis of PVA@P(AMPS-co-NIPAm) nanogels as superior and recyclable nanoadsorbents.

  8. A multi-angular mass spectrometric view at cyclic nucleotide signaling proteins : Structure/function and protein interactions of cAMP- and cGMP-dependent protein kinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scholten, A.

    2006-01-01

    The primary focus of this thesis is the two kinases PKA and PKG, cAMP and cGMP dependent protein kinase respectively. PKA and PKG are studied both at structure/function level as well as at the level of interaction with other proteins in tissue. Our primary methods are all based on mass spectrometry.

  9. Antagonists of chemoattractants reveal separate receptors for cAMP, folic acid and pterin in Dictyostelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van; Wit, René J.W. de; Konijn, Theo M.

    1982-01-01

    Adenosine 3’,5’-monophosphate (cAMP), folic acid and pterin are chemoattractants in the cellular slime molds. The cAMP analog, 3’-amino-cAMP, inhibits a chemotactic reaction to cAMP at a concentration at which the analog is chemotactically inactive. The antagonistic effect of 3’-amino-cAMP on the

  10. The cAMP effectors PKA and Epac activate endothelial NO synthase through PI3K/Akt pathway in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Morales, Verónica; Luaces-Regueira, María; Campos-Toimil, Manuel

    2017-12-01

    3',5'-Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) exerts an endothelium-dependent vasorelaxant action by stimulating endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activity, and the subsequent NO release, through cAMP protein kinase (PKA) and exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac) activation in endothelial cells. Here, we have investigated the mechanism by which the cAMP-Epac/PKA pathway activates eNOS. cAMP-elevating agents (forskolin and dibutyryl-cAMP) and the joint activation of PKA (6-Bnz-cAMP) and Epac (8-pCPT-2'-O-Me-cAMP) increased cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c) in ≤30% of fura-2-loaded isolated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). However, these drugs did not modify [Ca2+]c in fluo-4-loaded HUVEC monolayers. In DAF-2-loaded HUVEC monolayers, forskolin, PKA and Epac activators significantly increased NO release, and the forskolin effect was reduced by inhibition of PKA (Rp-cAMPs), Epac (ESI-09), eNOS (L-NAME) or phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K; LY-294,002). On the other hand, inhibition of CaMKII (KN-93), AMPK (Compound C), or total absence of Ca2+, was without effect. In Western blot experiments, Serine 1177 phosphorylated-eNOS was significantly increased in HUVEC by cAMP-elevating agents and PKA or Epac activators. In isolated rat aortic rings LY-294,002, but not KN-93 or Compound C, significantly reduced the vasorelaxant effects of forskolin in the presence of endothelium. Our results suggest that Epac and PKA activate eNOS via Ser 1177 phosphorylation by activating the PI3K/Akt pathway, and independently of AMPK or CaMKII activation or [Ca2+]c increase. This action explains, in part, the endothelium-dependent vasorelaxant effect of cAMP. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cyclic nucleotides and production of prostanoids in human varicose veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemcova, S; Gloviczki, P; Rud, K S; Miller, V M

    1999-11-01

    Experiments were designed to determine the production of prostacyclin and thromboxane and the activation of cyclic nucleotides in human varicose and nonvaricose veins and to determine whether these second messenger pathways were differentially activated by the venotropic extract of Ruscus aculeatus. The experiments were designed to characterize the activity of cyclic nucleotides and the production of prostaglandins in human varicose and nonvaricose veins. Segments of the greater saphenous veins and the adjacent tributaries were obtained from patients who underwent vein stripping and excision of primary varicose veins. The saphenous veins from the patients who underwent peripheral arterial bypass grafting were used as controls. The segments of veins were incubated in Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate solution in the presence of venotropic extract of Ruscus aculeatus (10(-3) g/mL) or in water-miscible organic solvent (dimethyl sulfoxide, 10(-3) g/mL), for 1, 5, and 10 minutes at 37 degrees C. The nonspecific phosphodiesterase inhibitor (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine, 10(-4) g/mL) was used to block cyclic nucleotide degradation in some samples. Tissue and media samples were collected. Tissue concentrations of both cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cAMP and cGMP, respectively) and media concentrations of 6-ketoprostaglandin-F(1)(alpha) (the stable metabolite of prostacyclin) and thromboxane B(2) (the stable metabolite of thromboxane A(2)) were measured by means of radioimmunoassay. Cyclooxygenase 2 was measured with Western blot analysis. The varicose veins showed greater levels of cAMP but not of cGMP at all time points as compared with the control veins. Prostanoid production was not significantly altered in the varicose veins. Stimulation with Ruscus aculeatus increased the cAMP concentration in the varicose veins but did not affect the cGMP levels. The ratio between 6-ketoprostaglandin-F(1)(alpha) and thromboxane B(2) was two-fold greater in

  12. Cyclic biamperometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Mehdi; Mikkelsen, Susan R

    2010-03-01

    Cyclic biamperometry has been investigated as a method for the quantitation of one form of a reversibly electroactive redox couple in the presence of the other form, using the ferri-ferrocyanide couple in aqueous KCl. A triangular voltage waveform applied across two equal-area, planar gold electrodes yields peak currents that depend on the square root of the applied voltage scan rate, when one form of the redox couple is present in excess. Independent measurement of electrode-to-solution potential during biamperometric scans allowed estimation of the fractional impedance at each electrode-solution interface, and these values allow calculation of the effective potential scan rates at each electrode. Results show that when one form is present in a 5-fold excess or greater, the potential scan rate for the limiting reaction is nearly identical to the applied voltage scan rate. Similar values were obtained from impedance calculations, but discrepancies between the predicted and experimental values are evident when the two forms are present at near equivalent concentrations. When one form of the redox couple is present in excess, cyclic biamperometric peak currents depend linearly on the concentration of the limiting form, and these currents can be amplified by using cells with one electrode much larger than the other. Because this method does not require a reference electrode, it can, in principle, be readily incorporated into new electrochemical array or lab-on-a-chip devices.

  13. Dibutyryl cyclic AMP stimulates expression of ependymin mRNA and the synthesis and release of the protein into the culture medium by neuroblastoma cells (NB2a/d1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashoua, V E; Nolan, P M; Shea, T B; Milinazzo, B

    1992-06-01

    Northern blot, immunoprecipitation, and gel electrophoretic data demonstrate that the mouse neuroblastoma NB2a/d1 cells express ependymin mRNA and synthesize and release into the culture medium a protein with immunoreactivity and electrophoretic mobility properties identical to ependymin. This is a brain extracellular glycoprotein that has been implicated in the consolidation process of memory formation and neuronal regeneration. In labeling experiments with 35S-methionine, dibutyrylcyclic3',5'-adenosine-monophosphate (dbcAMP) was found to stimulate the expression of ependymin mRNA and the enhanced synthesis and release of ependymin into the culture medium at the same time that dbcAMP stimulation of neurite outgrowth takes place. These results are consistent with the proposed role of the protein in the mechanism of neuronal regeneration and synaptogenesis. The data indicate that the NB2a/d1 cell line is a good model system for studies of the functional properties of ependymin.

  14. Schwann Cells Metabolize Extracellular 2′,3′-cAMP to 2′-AMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, Jonathan D.; Kochanek, Patrick M.

    2015-01-01

    The 3′,5′-cAMP–adenosine pathway (3′,5′-cAMP→5′-AMP→adenosine) and the 2′,3′-cAMP–adenosine pathway (2′,3′-cAMP→2′-AMP/3′-AMP→adenosine) are active in the brain. Oligodendrocytes participate in the brain 2′,3′-cAMP–adenosine pathway via their robust expression of 2′,3′-cyclic nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase (CNPase; converts 2′,3′-cAMP to 2′-AMP). Because Schwann cells also express CNPase, it is conceivable that the 2′,3′-cAMP–adenosine pathway exists in the peripheral nervous system. To test this and to compare the 2′,3′-cAMP–adenosine pathway to the 3′,5′-cAMP–adenosine pathway in Schwann cells, we examined the metabolism of 2′,3′-cAMP, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, 3′,5′-cAMP, and 5′-AMP in primary rat Schwann cells in culture. Addition of 2′,3′-cAMP (3, 10, and 30 µM) to Schwann cells increased levels of 2′-AMP in the medium from 0.006 ± 0.002 to 21 ± 2, 70 ± 3, and 187 ± 10 nM/µg protein, respectively; in contrast, Schwann cells had little ability to convert 2′,3′-cAMP to 3′-AMP or 3′,5′-cAMP to either 3′-AMP or 5′-AMP. Although Schwann cells slightly converted 2′,3′-cAMP and 2′-AMP to adenosine, they did so at very modest rates (e.g., 5- and 3-fold, respectively, more slowly compared with our previously reported studies in oligodendrocytes). Using transected myelinated rat sciatic nerves in culture medium, we observed a time-related increase in endogenous intracellular 2′,3′-cAMP and extracellular 2′-AMP. These findings indicate that Schwann cells do not have a robust 3′,5′-cAMP–adenosine pathway but do have a 2′,3′-cAMP–adenosine pathway; however, because the pathway mostly involves 2′-AMP formation rather than 3′-AMP, and because the conversion of 2′-AMP to adenosine is slow, metabolism of 2′,3′-cAMP mostly results in the accumulation of 2′-AMP. Accumulation of 2′-AMP in peripheral nerves postinjury could have

  15. Environmental effect on plasma thyroxine (T4), 3,5,3'-triido-L-thyronine (T3), prolactin and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) content in the mudskippers Periophthalmus chrysospilos and Boleophthalmus boddaerti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C G; Ip, Y K

    1987-01-01

    1. In both Periophthalmus chrysospilos and Boleophthalmus boddaerti, T4 was involved in enabling the fish to cope with terrestrial stress and not in osmoregulation in waters of different salinities. In B. boddaerti, however, 3,5,3'-triiodo-L-thyronine (T3) played a more significant role in osmoregulation under the various aquatic conditions. 2. The control of osmoregulation mechanisms in P. chrysospilos kept in waters of different salinities was taken over by prolactin instead, whereas prolactin was only involved in osmoregulation in B. boddaerti under extreme osmotic stress (100% SW). Prolactin is also involved in the terrestrial adaptations of P. chrysospilos. 3. Plasma cAMP levels in P. chrysospilos increased with increasing salinity of the external environment (Tables 4 and 5) implicating its role in the stimulation of chloride secretion and in intracellular isosmotic regulation. 4. Significant increase in the plasma cAMP level of B. boddaerti submerged in 100% SW was also observed. However, the plasma cAMP levels of B. boddaerti fully submerged in 30% and 50% SW were not significantly different from the control as these conditions simulated those of their natural habitats.

  16. Direct Light-up of cAMP Derivatives in Living Cells by Click Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Xu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available 8-Azidoadenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (8-azido cAMP was directly detected in living cells, by applying Cu-free azide-alkyne cycloaddition to probe cAMP derivatives by fluorescence light-up. Fluorescence emission was generated by two non-fluorescent molecules, 8-azido cAMP as a model target and difluorinated cyclooctyne (DIFO reagent as a probe. The azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction between 8-azido cAMP and DIFO induces fluorescence in 8-azido cAMP. The fluorescence emission serves as a way to probe 8-azido cAMP in cells.

  17. Time-resolved in silico modeling of fine-tuned cAMP signaling in platelets: feedback loops, titrated phosphorylations and pharmacological modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dandekar Thomas

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemostasis is a critical and active function of the blood mediated by platelets. Therefore, the prevention of pathological platelet aggregation is of great importance as well as of pharmaceutical and medical interest. Endogenous platelet inhibition is predominantly based on cyclic nucleotides (cAMP, cGMP elevation and subsequent cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinase (PKA, PKG activation. In turn, platelet phosphodiesterases (PDEs and protein phosphatases counterbalance their activity. This main inhibitory pathway in human platelets is crucial for countervailing unwanted platelet activation. Consequently, the regulators of cyclic nucleotide signaling are of particular interest to pharmacology and therapeutics of atherothrombosis. Modeling of pharmacodynamics allows understanding this intricate signaling and supports the precise description of these pivotal targets for pharmacological modulation. Results We modeled dynamically concentration-dependent responses of pathway effectors (inhibitors, activators, drug combinations to cyclic nucleotide signaling as well as to downstream signaling events and verified resulting model predictions by experimental data. Experiments with various cAMP affecting compounds including anti-platelet drugs and their combinations revealed a high fidelity, fine-tuned cAMP signaling in platelets without cross-talk to the cGMP pathway. The model and the data provide evidence for two independent feedback loops: PKA, which is activated by elevated cAMP levels in the platelet, subsequently inhibits adenylyl cyclase (AC but as well activates PDE3. By multi-experiment fitting, we established a comprehensive dynamic model with one predictive, optimized and validated set of parameters. Different pharmacological conditions (inhibition, activation, drug combinations, permanent and transient perturbations are successfully tested and simulated, including statistical validation and sensitivity analysis

  18. Potent constitutive cyclic AMP-generating activity of XLαs implicates this imprinted GNAS product in the pathogenesis of McCune-Albright Syndrome and fibrous dysplasia of bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariot, Virginie; Wu, Joy Y.; Aydin, Cumhur; Mantovani, Giovanna; Mahon, Matthew J.; Linglart, Agnès; Bastepe, Murat

    2010-01-01

    Patients with McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS), characterized primarily by hyperpigmented skin lesions, precocious puberty, and fibrous dyslasia of bone, carry postzygotic heterozygous mutations of GNAS causing constitutive cAMP signaling. GNAS encodes the α-subunit of the stimulatory G protein (Gsα), as well as a large variant (XLαs) derived from the paternal allele. The mutations causing MAS affect both GNAS products, but whether XLαs, like Gsα, can be involved in the pathogenesis remains unknown. Here, we investigated biopsy samples from four previously reported and eight new patients with MAS. Activating mutations of GNAS (Arg201 with respect to the amino acid sequence of Gsα) were present in all the previously reported and five of the new cases. The mutation was detected within the paternally expressed XLαs transcript in five and the maternally expressed NESP55 transcript in four cases. Tissues carrying paternal mutations appeared to have higher XLαs mRNA levels than maternal mutations. The human XLαs mutant analogous to Gsα-R201H (XLαs-R543H) showed markedly higher basal cAMP accumulation than wild-type XLαs in transfected cells. Wild-type XLαs demonstrated higher basal and isoproterenol-induced cAMP signaling than Gsα and co-purified with Gβ1γ2 in transduced cells. XLαs mRNA was measurable in mouse calvarial cells, with its level being significantly higher in undifferentiated cells than those expressing preosteoblastic markers osterix and alkaline phosphatase. XLαs mRNA was also expressed in murine bone marrow stromal cells and preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells. Our findings are consistent with the possibility that constitutive XLαs activity adds to the molecular pathogenesis of MAS and fibrous dysplasia of bone. PMID:20887824

  19. 2′,3′-cAMP, 3′-AMP, and 2′-AMP inhibit human aortic and coronary vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation via A2B receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jin; Gillespie, Delbert G.

    2011-01-01

    Rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from renal microvessels metabolize 2′,3′-cAMP to 2′-AMP and 3′-AMP, and these AMPs are converted to adenosine that inhibits microvascular VSMC proliferation via A2B receptors. The goal of this study was to test whether this mechanism also exists in VSMCs from conduit arteries and whether it is similarly expressed in human vs. rat VSMCs. Incubation of rat and human aortic VSMCs with 2′,3′-cAMP concentration-dependently increased levels of 2′-AMP and 3′-AMP in the medium, with a similar absolute increase in 2′-AMP vs. 3′-AMP. In contrast, in human coronary VSMCs, 2′,3′-cAMP increased 2′-AMP levels yet had little effect on 3′-AMP levels. In all cell types, 2′,3′-cAMP increased levels of adenosine, but not 5′-AMP, and 2′,3′-AMP inhibited cell proliferation. Antagonism of A2B receptors (MRS-1754), but not A1 (1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine), A2A (SCH-58261), or A3 (VUF-5574) receptors, attenuated the antiproliferative effects of 2′,3′-cAMP. In all cell types, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, and 5′-AMP increased adenosine levels, and inhibition of ecto-5′-nucleotidase blocked this effect of 5′-AMP but not that of 2′-AMP nor 3′-AMP. Also, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, and 5′-AMP, like 2′,3′-cAMP, exerted antiproliferative effects that were abolished by antagonism of A2B receptors with MRS-1754. In conclusion, VSMCs from conduit arteries metabolize 2′,3′-cAMP to AMPs, which are metabolized to adenosine. In rat and human aortic VSMCs, both 2′-AMP and 3′-AMP are involved in this process, whereas, in human coronary VSMCs, 2′,3′-cAMP is mainly converted to 2′-AMP. Because adenosine inhibits VSMC proliferation via A2B receptors, local vascular production of 2′,3′-cAMP may protect conduit arteries from atherosclerosis. PMID:21622827

  20. Cyclic Nucleotide Signalling in Kidney Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Schinner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Kidney fibrosis is an important factor for the progression of kidney diseases, e.g., diabetes mellitus induced kidney failure, glomerulosclerosis and nephritis resulting in chronic kidney disease or end-stage renal disease. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP were implicated to suppress several of the above mentioned renal diseases. In this review article, identified effects and mechanisms of cGMP and cAMP regarding renal fibrosis are summarized. These mechanisms include several signalling pathways of nitric oxide/ANP/guanylyl cyclases/cGMP-dependent protein kinase and cAMP/Epac/adenylyl cyclases/cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Furthermore, diverse possible drugs activating these pathways are discussed. From these diverse mechanisms it is expected that new pharmacological treatments will evolve for the therapy or even prevention of kidney failure.

  1. Synthesis, characterization and inhibitory activities of (4-N3[3,5-3H]Phe10)PKI(6-22)amide and its precursors: photoaffinity labeling peptides for the active site of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, B M; Lundquist, L J; Walsh, D A; Glass, D B

    1989-06-01

    PKI(6-22)amide is a 17 residue peptide corresponding to the active portion of the heat-stable inhibitor of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The peptide is a potent (Ki = 1.6 nM), competitive inhibitor of the enzyme. The photoreactive peptide analog (4-azidophenylalanine10)PKI(6-22)amide was synthesized in both its non-radiolabeled and tritiated forms by chemical modification of precursor peptides that were prepared by stepwise solid-phase synthesis. (4-Amino[3,5-3H]phenylalanine10)PKI(6-22)amide, the precursor for the radiolabeled arylazide peptide, was obtained by catalytic reduction of the corresponding peptide containing the 3,5-diiodo-4-aminophenylalanine residue at position 10. The purified PKI peptides were analyzed by HPLC, amino acid analysis, and u.v. spectra. In the dark, (4-azidophenylalanine10)PKI(6-22)amide inhibited the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase with a Ki value of 2.8 nM. The photoreactivity of the arylazide peptide was demonstrated by time-dependent u.v. spectral changes on exposure to light. Photolysis of the catalytic subunit (4-azido[3,5-3H]phenylalanine10)PKI(6-22)amide complex resulted in specific covalent labeling of the enzyme. The data indicate that this peptide is a useful photoaffinity labeling reagent for the active site of the protein kinase.

  2. Cyclic nucleotides of canine antral smooth muscle. Effects of acetylcholine, catecholamines and gastrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, S; Grant, B; Wooton, J

    1981-01-07

    1. The effects of acetylcholine, catecholamines and gastrin on the intracellular content of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in antral circular muscle have been determined. 2. Acetylcholine results in a significant but transient increase in intracellular cyclic GMP. 3. Isoproterenol and norepinephrine increase intracellular cyclic AMP. Based on half-maximal effective doses, isoproterenol is 2.7-times more effective than norepinephrine. The increase in intracellular cyclic AMP by both agents is inhibited by propranolol but not phentolamine, indicating that both agents act on the muscle cell by a beta-receptor-coupled mechanism. 4. Gastrin has no demonstrable effect on either cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP. This suggests that while gastrin and acetylcholine can produce a like myoelectric response in the muscle cell, the action of gastrin is mediated by a separate receptor, presumably on the muscle cell, and not by a release of acetylcholine.

  3. Quantitative effect and regulatory function of cyclic adenosine 5 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cyclic adenosine 5′-phosphate (cAMP) is a global regulator of gene expression in Escherichia coli. Despite decades of intensive study, the quantitative effect and regulatory function of cAMP remain the subjects of considerable debate. Here, we analyse the data in the literature to show that: In carbon-limited cultures ...

  4. A Universal Stress Protein (USP) in Mycobacteria Binds cAMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Arka; Adolph, Ramona S.; Gopalakrishnapai, Jayashree; Kleinboelting, Silke; Emmerich, Christiane; Steegborn, Clemens; Visweswariah, Sandhya S.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteria are endowed with rich and diverse machinery for the synthesis, utilization, and degradation of cAMP. The actions of cyclic nucleotides are generally mediated by binding of cAMP to conserved and well characterized cyclic nucleotide binding domains or structurally distinct cGMP-specific and -regulated cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase, adenylyl cyclase, and E. coli transcription factor FhlA (GAF) domain-containing proteins. Proteins with cyclic nucleotide binding and GAF domains can be identified in the genome of mycobacterial species, and some of them have been characterized. Here, we show that a significant fraction of intracellular cAMP is bound to protein in mycobacterial species, and by using affinity chromatography techniques, we identify specific universal stress proteins (USP) as abundantly expressed cAMP-binding proteins in slow growing as well as fast growing mycobacteria. We have characterized the biochemical and thermodynamic parameters for binding of cAMP, and we show that these USPs bind cAMP with a higher affinity than ATP, an established ligand for other USPs. We determined the structure of the USP MSMEG_3811 bound to cAMP, and we confirmed through structure-guided mutagenesis, the residues important for cAMP binding. This family of USPs is conserved in all mycobacteria, and we suggest that they serve as “sinks” for cAMP, making this second messenger available for downstream effectors as and when ATP levels are altered in the cell. PMID:25802331

  5. Growth on glucose decreases cAMP-CRP activity while paradoxically increasing intracellular cAMP in the light-organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colton, Deanna M; Stoudenmire, Julie L; Stabb, Eric V

    2015-09-01

    Proteobacteria often co-ordinate responses to carbon sources using CRP and the second messenger cyclic 3', 5'-AMP (cAMP), which combine to control transcription of genes during growth on non-glucose substrates as part of the catabolite-repression response. Here we show that cAMP-CRP is active and important in Vibrio fischeri during colonization of its host squid Euprymna scolopes. Moreover, consistent with a classical role in catabolite repression, a cAMP-CRP-dependent reporter showed lower activity in cells grown in media amended with glucose rather than glycerol. Surprisingly though, intracellular cAMP levels were higher in glucose-grown cells. Mutant analyses were consistent with predictions that CyaA was responsible for cAMP generation, that the EIIA(Glc) component of glucose transport could enhance cAMP production and that the phophodiesterases CpdA and CpdP consumed intracellular and extracellular cAMP respectively. However, the observation of lower cAMP levels in glycerol-grown cells seemed best explained by changes in cAMP export, via an unknown mechanism. Our data also indicated that cAMP-CRP activity decreased during growth on glucose independently of crp's native transcriptional regulation or cAMP levels. We speculate that some unknown mechanism, perhaps carbon-source-dependent post-translational modulation of CRP, may help control cAMP-CRP activity in V.fischeri. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase PDE1C1 in human cardiac myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeput, Fabrice; Wolda, Sharon L; Krall, Judith; Hambleton, Ryan; Uher, Lothar; McCaw, Kim N; Radwanski, Przemyslaw B; Florio, Vincent; Movsesian, Matthew A

    2007-11-09

    Isoforms in the PDE1 family of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases were recently found to comprise a significant portion of the cGMP-inhibited cAMP hydrolytic activity in human hearts. We examined the expression of PDE1 isoforms in human myocardium, characterized their catalytic activity, and quantified their contribution to cAMP hydrolytic and cGMP hydrolytic activity in subcellular fractions of this tissue. Western blotting with isoform-selective anti-PDE1 monoclonal antibodies showed PDE1C1 to be the principal isoform expressed in human myocardium. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that PDE1C1 is distributed along the Z-lines and M-lines of cardiac myocytes in a striated pattern that differs from that of the other major dual-specificity cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase in human myocardium, PDE3A. Most of the PDE1C1 activity was recovered in soluble fractions of human myocardium. It binds both cAMP and cGMP with K(m) values of approximately 1 microm and hydrolyzes both substrates with similar catalytic rates. PDE1C1 activity in subcellular fractions was quantified using a new PDE1-selective inhibitor, IC295. At substrate concentrations of 0.1 microm, PDE1C1 constitutes the great majority of cAMP hydrolytic and cGMP hydrolytic activity in soluble fractions and the majority of cGMP hydrolytic activity in microsomal fractions, whereas PDE3 constitutes the majority of cAMP hydrolytic activity in microsomal fractions. These results indicate that PDE1C1 is expressed at high levels in human cardiac myocytes with an intracellular distribution distinct from that of PDE3A and that it may have a role in the integration of cGMP-, cAMP- and Ca(2+)-mediated signaling in these cells.

  7. Marginal AMP chain graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Pena, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new family of models that is based on graphs that may have undirected, directed and bidirected edges. We name these new models marginal AMP (MAMP) chain graphs because each of them is Markov equivalent to some AMP chain graph under marginalization of some of its nodes. However, MAMP chain graphs do not only subsume AMP chain graphs but also multivariate regression chain graphs. We describe global and pairwise Markov properties for MAMP chain graphs and prove their equivalence for...

  8. The Brain In Vivo Expresses the 2′,3′-cAMP-Adenosine Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, Jonathan D.; Jackson, Travis C.; Bansal, Rashmi; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Puccio, Ava M.; Okonkwo, David O.; Jackson, Edwin K.

    2012-01-01

    Although multiple biochemical pathways produce adenosine, studies suggest that the 2′,3′-cAMP-adenosine pathway (2′,3′-cAMP → 2′-AMP/3′-AMP → adenosine) contributes to adenosine production in some cells/tissues/organs. To determine whether the 2′,3′-cAMP-adenosine pathway exists in vivo in the brain, we delivered to the brain (gray matter and white matter separately) via the inflow perfusate of a microdialysis probe either 2′,3′-cAMP, 3′,5′-cAMP, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, or 5′-AMP and measured the recovered metabolites in the microdialysis outflow perfusate with mass spectrometry. In both gray and white matter, 2′,3′-cAMP increased 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP and adenosine, and 3′,5′-cAMP increased 5′-AMP and adenosine. In both brain regions, 2′-AMP, 3-AMP and 5′-AMP were converted to adenosine. Microdialysis experiments in 2′,3′-cyclic nucleotide-3′-phosphodiesterase (CNPase) wild-type mice demonstrated that traumatic brain injury (TBI; controlled cortical impact model) activated the brain 2,3′-cAMP-adenosine pathway; similar experiments in CNPase knockout mice indicated that CNPase was involved in the metabolism of endogenous 2′,3′-cAMP to 2′-AMP and to adenosine. In CSF from TBI patients, 2′,3′-cAMP was significantly increased in the initial 12 hours after injury and strongly correlated with CSF levels of 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, adenosine and inosine. We conclude that in vivo, 2′,3′-cAMP is converted to 2′-AMP/3′-AMP, and these AMPs are metabolized to adenosine. This pathway exists endogenously in both mice and humans. PMID:22360621

  9. Imaging alterations of cardiomyocyte cAMP microdomains in disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander eFroese

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available 3’,5’-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is an important second messenger which regulates heart function by acting in distinct subcellular microdomains. Recent years have provided deeper mechanistic insights into compartmentalized cAMP signaling and its link to cardiac disease. In this mini review, we summarize newest developments in this field achieved by cutting-edge biochemical and biophysical techniques. We further compile the data from different studies into a bigger picture of so far uncovered alterations in cardiomyocyte cAMP microdomains which occur in compensated cardiac hypertrophy and chronic heart failure. Finally, future research directions and translational perspectives are briefly discussed.

  10. MEK Inhibitors Reverse cAMP-Mediated Anxiety in Zebrafish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundegaard, Pia R.; Anastasaki, Corina; Grant, Nicola J.

    2015-01-01

    Altered phosphodiesterase (PDE)-cyclic AMP (cAMP) activity is frequently associated with anxiety disorders, but current therapies act by reducing neuronal excitability rather than targeting PDE-cAMP-mediated signaling pathways. Here, we report the novel repositioning of anti-cancer MEK inhibitors...... as anxiolytics in a zebrafish model of anxiety-like behaviors. PDE inhibitors or activators of adenylate cyclase cause behaviors consistent with anxiety in larvae and adult zebrafish. Small-molecule screening identifies MEK inhibitors as potent suppressors of cAMP anxiety behaviors in both larvae and adult...... zebrafish, while causing no anxiolytic behavioral effects on their own. The mechanism underlying cAMP-induced anxiety is via crosstalk to activation of the RAS-MAPK signaling pathway. We propose that targeting crosstalk signaling pathways can be an effective strategy for mental health disorders, and advance...

  11. The Popeye Domain Containing Genes and cAMP Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Brand

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is a second messenger, which plays an important role in the heart. It is generated in response to activation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. Initially, it was thought that protein kinase A (PKA exclusively mediates cAMP-induced cellular responses such as an increase in cardiac contractility, relaxation, and heart rate. With the identification of the exchange factor directly activated by cAMP (EPAC and hyperpolarizing cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels as cAMP effector proteins it became clear that a protein network is involved in cAMP signaling. The Popeye domain containing (Popdc genes encode yet another family of cAMP-binding proteins, which are prominently expressed in the heart. Loss-of-function mutations in mice are associated with cardiac arrhythmia and impaired skeletal muscle regeneration. Interestingly, the cardiac phenotype, which is present in both, Popdc1 and Popdc2 null mutants, is characterized by a stress-induced sinus bradycardia, suggesting that Popdc proteins participate in cAMP signaling in the sinuatrial node. The identification of the two-pore channel TREK-1 and Caveolin 3 as Popdc-interacting proteins represents a first step into understanding the mechanisms of heart rate modulation triggered by Popdc proteins.

  12. The clinical correlation of regulatory T cells and cyclic adenosine monophosphate in enterovirus 71 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Min Wang

    Full Text Available Brainstem encephalitis (BE and pulmonary edema (PE are notable complications of enterovirus 71 (EV71 infection.This study investigated the immunoregulatory characterizations of EV71 neurological complications by disease severity and milrinone treatment.Patients <18 years with virologically confirmed EV71 infections were enrolled and divided into 2 groups: the hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD or BE group, and the autonomic nervous system (ANS dysregulation or PE group. Cytokine and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP levels, and the regulatory T cell (Tregs profiles of the patients were determined.Patients with ANS dysregulation or PE exhibited significantly low frequency of CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3+ and CD4(+Foxp3(+ T cells compared with patients with HFMD or BE. The expression frequency of CD4-CD8- was also significantly decreased in patients with ANS dysregulation or PE. Among patients with ANS dysregulation or PE, the expression frequency of CD4+Foxp3+ increased markedly after milrinone treatment, and was associated with reduction of plasma levels IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10. Plasma concentrations of cAMP were significantly decreased in patients with ANS dysregulation or PE compared with patients with HFMD or BE; however, cAMP levels increased after milrinone treatment.These findings suggested decreased different regulatory T populations and cAMP expression correlate with increased EV71 disease severity. Improved outcome after milrinone treatment may associate with increased regulatory T populations, cAMP expression and modulation of cytokines levels.

  13. Cross-talk between signaling pathways can generate robust oscillations in calcium and cAMP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Siso-Nadal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To control and manipulate cellular signaling, we need to understand cellular strategies for information transfer, integration, and decision-making. A key feature of signal transduction is the generation of only a few intracellular messengers by many extracellular stimuli. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we model molecular cross-talk between two classic second messengers, cyclic AMP (cAMP and calcium, and show that the dynamical complexity of the response of both messengers increases substantially through their interaction. In our model of a non-excitable cell, both cAMP and calcium concentrations can oscillate. If mutually inhibitory, cross-talk between the two second messengers can increase the range of agonist concentrations for which oscillations occur. If mutually activating, cross-talk decreases the oscillation range, but can generate 'bursting' oscillations of calcium and may enable better filtering of noise. CONCLUSION: We postulate that this increased dynamical complexity allows the cell to encode more information, particularly if both second messengers encode signals. In their native environments, it is unlikely that cells are exposed to one stimulus at a time, and cross-talk may help generate sufficiently complex responses to allow the cell to discriminate between different combinations and concentrations of extracellular agonists.

  14. Role of CNPase in the Oligodendrocytic Extracellular 2′,3′-cAMP-Adenosine Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrier, Jonathan D.; Jackson, Travis C.; Gillespie, Delbert G.; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Bansal, Rashmi; Goebbels, Sandra; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Jackson, Edwin K.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (3′,5′-cAMP) is an endogenous source of localized adenosine production in many organs. Recent studies suggest that extracellular 2′,3′-cAMP (positional isomer of 3′,5′-cAMP) is also a source of adenosine, particularly in the brain in vivo post-injury. Moreover, in vitro studies show that both microglia and astrocytes can convert extracellular 2′,3′-cAMP to adenosine. Here we examined the ability of primary mouse oligodendrocytes and neurons to metabolize extracellular 2′,3′-cAMP and their respective adenosine monophosphates (2′-AMP and 3′-AMP). Cells were also isolated from mice deficient in 2′,3′-cyclic nucleotide-3′-phosphodiesterase (CNPase). Oligodendrocytes metabolized 2′,3′-cAMP to 2′-AMP with 10-fold greater efficiency than did neurons (and also more than previously examined microglia and astrocytes); whereas, the production of 3′-AMP was minimal in both oligodendrocytes and neurons. The production of 2′-AMP from 2′,3′-cAMP was reduced by 65% in CNPase -/- versus CNPase +/+ oligodendrocytes. Oligodendrocytes also converted 2′-AMP to adenosine, and this was also attenuated in CNPase -/- oligodendrocytes. Inhibition of classic 3′,5′-cAMP-3′-phosphodiesterases with 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine did not block metabolism of 2′,3′-cAMP to 2′-AMP and inhibition of classic ecto-5′-nucleotidase (CD73) with α,β-methylene-adenosine-5′-diphosphate did not attenuate the conversion of 2′-AMP to adenosine. These studies demonstrate that oligodendrocytes express the extracellular 2′,3′-cAMP-adenosine pathway (2′,3′-cAMP → 2′-AMP → adenosine). This pathway is more robustly expressed in oligodendrocytes than in all other CNS cell types because CNPase is the predominant enzyme that metabolizes 2′,3′-cAMP to 2-AMP in CNS cells. By reducing levels of 2′,3′-cAMP (a mitochondrial toxin) and increasing levels of adenosine (a neuroprotectant

  15. Identification of c-di-AMP-Binding Proteins Using Magnetic Beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, Jan; Gundlach, Jan; Herzberg, Christina; Treffon, Katrin; Stülke, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    To identify cytosolic proteins that bind to cyclic di-AMP, a biotinylated analog of the nucleotide is used for protein pull-down experiments. In this approach, biotinylated c-di-AMP is coupled to Streptactin-covered beads. After protein separation using standard SDS-PAGE, the protein(s) of interest are identified by mass spectrometric analyses.

  16. A Temporal-Specific and Transient cAMP Increase Characterizes Odorant Classical Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Wen; Smith, Andrew; Darby-King, Andrea; Harley, Carolyn W.; McLean, John H.

    2007-01-01

    Increases in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) are proposed to initiate learning in a wide variety of species. Here, we measure changes in cAMP in the olfactory bulb prior to, during, and following a classically conditioned odor preference trial in rat pups. Measurements were taken up to the point of maximal CREB phosphorylation in olfactory…

  17. The cAMP Signaling and MAP Kinase Pathways in Plant Pathogenic Fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehrabi, R.; Zhao, X.; Kim, Y.; Xu, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The key components of the well conserved cyclic AMP signaling and MAP kinase pathways have been functionally characterized in the corn smut Ustilago maydis, rice blast fungus Magnaporthe grisea, and a few other fungal pathogens. In general, the cAMP signaling and the MAP kinase cascade homologous to

  18. Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Sadredinamin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are extensive group of molecules that produced by variety tissues of invertebrate, plants, and animal species which play an important role in their immunity response. AMPs have different classifications such as; biosynthetic machines, biological sources, biological functions, molecular properties, covalent bonding patterns, three dimensional structures, and molecular targets.These molecules have multidimensional properties including antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, antifungal activity, anti-parasite activity, biofilm control, antitumor activity, mitogens activity and linking innate to adaptive immunity that making them promising agents for therapeutic drugs. In spite of this advantage of AMPs, their clinical developments have some limitation for commercial development. But some of AMPs are under clinical trials for the therapeutic purpose such as diabetic foot ulcers, different bacterial infections and tissue damage. In this review, we emphasized on the source, structure, multidimensional properties, limitation and therapeutic applications of various antimicrobial peptides.

  19. Plasma concentrations of cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes (cVMS) in pregnant and postmenopausal Norwegian women and self-reported use of personal care products (PCPs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanssen, Linda; Warner, Nicholas A; Braathen, Tonje; Odland, Jon Ø; Lund, Eiliv; Nieboer, Evert; Sandanger, Torkjel M

    2013-01-01

    Dermal application of personal care products (PCPs) is considered an important human exposure route for siloxanes. Their presence as minor or major constituents in many personal care products (PCPs) and cosmetics is of concern for human exposure. The aim of this study was to quantify cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes (cVMS) in blood plasma of pregnant and postmenopausal women, and to investigate possible links to self-reported use of PCPs for the latter group. Participants were recruited from two studies, namely the Norwegian Women and Cancer Study (NOWAC) and the North Norwegian Mother-and-child Study (MISA). For the NOWAC cohort, 94 plasma samples from postmenopausal women were analyzed (blood drawn in 2005) and information about PCP use and breast implants was derived from a self-administered questionnaire. In the MISA study, the collection of the plasma samples (blood drawn in 2009) constituted a re-sampling because the original serum vacutainers used were contaminated with cVMS. D4 (octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane) was the dominant compound in plasma for both cohorts. For the NOWAC samples, more than 85% of the women had D4 concentrations above the LOQ (2.74 ng/mL), while the detection frequency was only 18% for the MISA participants. The highest cVMS plasma concentrations were observed for D4: 12.7 ng/mL (NOWAC) and 2.69 ng/mL (MISA). For the other cVMS, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) and dodecamethylcyclohexasiloxane (D6) concentrations were below the detection limit in most samples. There was no significant correlation between the concentrations of D4 and the reported total body cream use. Sampling time (2005 versus 2009) and age of the donors could explain the differences between the two cohorts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Cardiac cAMP: production, hydrolysis, modulation and detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric eBOULARAN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic adenosine 3’,5’-monophosphate (cAMP modulates a broad range of biological processes including the regulation of cardiac myocyte contractile function where it constitutes the main second messenger for β-adrenergic receptors’ signaling to fulfill positive chronotropic, inotropic and lusitropic effects. A growing number of studies pinpoint the role of spatial organization of the cAMP signaling as an essential mechanism to regulate cAMP outcomes in cardiac physiology. Here, we will briefly discuss the complexity of cAMP synthesis and degradation in the cardiac context, describe the way to detect it and review the main pharmacological arsenal to modulate its availability.

  1. Critical Role of Nitric Oxide-cGMP Cascade in the Formation of cAMP-Dependent Long-Term Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aonuma, Hitoshi; Mizunami, Makoto; Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Unoki, Sae

    2006-01-01

    Cyclic AMP pathway plays an essential role in formation of long-term memory (LTM). In some species, the nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic GMP pathway has been found to act in parallel and complementary to the cAMP pathway for LTM formation. Here we describe a new role of the NO-cGMP pathway, namely, stimulation of the cAMP pathway to induce LTM. We have…

  2. cAMP-Inhibits Cytoplasmic Phospholipase A2 and Protects Neurons against Amyloid-β-Induced Synapse Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clive Bate

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A key event in Alzheimer’s disease (AD is the production of amyloid-β (Aβ peptides and the loss of synapses. In cultured neurons Aβ triggered synapse damage as measured by the loss of synaptic proteins. α-synuclein (αSN, aggregates of which accumulate in Parkinson’s disease, also caused synapse damage. Synapse damage was associated with activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2, an enzyme that regulates synapse function and structure, and the production of prostaglandin (PG E2. In synaptosomes PGE2 increased concentrations of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP which suppressed the activation of cPLA2 demonstrating an inhibitory feedback system. Thus, Aβ/αSN-induced activated cPLA2 produces PGE2 which increases cAMP which in turn suppresses cPLA2 and, hence, its own production. Neurons pre-treated with pentoxifylline and caffeine (broad spectrum phosphodiesterase (PDE inhibitors or the PDE4 specific inhibitor rolipram significantly increased the Aβ/αSN-induced increase in cAMP and consequently protected neurons against synapse damage. The addition of cAMP analogues also inhibited cPLA2 and protected neurons against synapse damage. These results suggest that drugs that inhibit Aβ-induced activation of cPLA2 and cross the blood–brain barrier may reduce synapse damage in AD.

  3. Directed breeding of an Arthrobacter mutant for high-yield production of cyclic adenosine monophosphate by N + ion implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, He; Chen, Xiaochun; Cao, Jiaming; Fang, Ting; Bai, Jianxin; Xiong, Jian; Ying, Hanjie

    2010-08-01

    To obtain a cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) high-yield production strain, Arthrobacter NG-1 was mutated by N + ion implantation with an energy level of 10 keV and dose of 7×10 15 ions/cm 2. Combined with directed screening methods, a xanthine-defective and 8-azaguanine (8-AG)-resistant mutant Arthrobacter A302 was selected. The concentration of cAMP produced by this mutant was 41.7% higher than that of the original strain and reached 9.78 g/L. Through ten-generation investigation, the capability of cAMP production of A302 was found to be stable. Compared with the original strain, the special activities of key enzymes in A302, which influenced the cAMP biosynthesis, was analyzed. IMP dehydrogenase activity was defective, whereas PRPP amidotransferase, sAMP synthetase and adenylate cyclase activities were increased by 61.5%, 147% and 21.7%, respecitively, which might explain the mutagenesis mechanism by N + ions implantation under the enzymatic level.

  4. Expression of Tas1 taste receptors in mammalian spermatozoa: functional role of Tas1r1 in regulating basal Ca²⁺ and cAMP concentrations in spermatozoa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorke Meyer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During their transit through the female genital tract, sperm have to recognize and discriminate numerous chemical compounds. However, our current knowledge of the molecular identity of appropriate chemosensory receptor proteins in sperm is still rudimentary. Considering that members of the Tas1r family of taste receptors are able to discriminate between a broad diversity of hydrophilic chemosensory substances, the expression of taste receptors in mammalian spermatozoa was examined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The present manuscript documents that Tas1r1 and Tas1r3, which form the functional receptor for monosodium glutamate (umami in taste buds on the tongue, are expressed in murine and human spermatozoa, where their localization is restricted to distinct segments of the flagellum and the acrosomal cap of the sperm head. Employing a Tas1r1-deficient mCherry reporter mouse strain, we found that Tas1r1 gene deletion resulted in spermatogenic abnormalities. In addition, a significant increase in spontaneous acrosomal reaction was observed in Tas1r1 null mutant sperm whereas acrosomal secretion triggered by isolated zona pellucida or the Ca²⁺ ionophore A23187 was not different from wild-type spermatozoa. Remarkably, cytosolic Ca²⁺ levels in freshly isolated Tas1r1-deficient sperm were significantly higher compared to wild-type cells. Moreover, a significantly higher basal cAMP concentration was detected in freshly isolated Tas1r1-deficient epididymal spermatozoa, whereas upon inhibition of phosphodiesterase or sperm capacitation, the amount of cAMP was not different between both genotypes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Since Ca²⁺ and cAMP control fundamental processes during the sequential process of fertilization, we propose that the identified taste receptors and coupled signaling cascades keep sperm in a chronically quiescent state until they arrive in the vicinity of the egg - either by constitutive receptor activity and

  5. Stimulation of Release of Adrenal Catecholamine by Adenosine 3′:5′-Cyclic Monophosphate and Theophylline in the Absence of Extracellular Ca2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, Michael J.

    1972-01-01

    Stimulation of catecholamine release was studied in the isolated adrenal of the cat during retrograde perfusion. Theophylline, adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP), and dibutyryl-cyclic AMP stimulated catecholamine release in adrenal chromaffin tissue; adenosine, 2′-AMP, 3′-AMP, and 5′-AMP were ineffective. Addition of theophylline for 5-15 min had no effect on catecholamine release induced by KCl or nicotine, but it significantly increased the responses to cyclic AMP and its dibutyryl derivative. Glands perfused with Ca2+-free Locke's solution for 30-180 min rapidly lost their responsiveness to KCl or nicotine. In contrast, exposure to Ca2+-free medium for 180 min had no effect on secretory responses to either the cyclic nucleotides, themselves, or to methylxanthine-induced potentiation of cyclic AMP responses. Thus, dibutyryl-cyclic AMP, cyclic AMP, and theophylline do not require extracellular Ca2+ to release adrenal catecholamines. They may act by translocating intracellular bound Ca2+ or by a mechanism independent of calcium. PMID:4337240

  6. EFFECT OF dbcAMP ON PROLIFERATION AND APOPTOSIS OF PORCINE GRANULOSA CELLS in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Alexa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotide cAMP and its target protein kinase A (PKA dependent intracellular mechanisms can play an important role in regulation of ovarian cell function and in mediating gonadotropin action on these cells. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of cAMP analogue, dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (dbcAMP (0; 0.1; 1 and 10 µg/ml or FSH (0; 0,01; 1 IU/ml on proliferation and apoptosis of porcine granulosa cells in vitro. Indices of cell apoptosis (expression of apoptotic peptide bax and proliferation (expression of proliferation-associated peptide PCNA within ovarian granulosa cells were analysed by immunocytochemistry. It was observed that accumulation of PCNA was increased by dbcAMP and FSH at all doses added. The occurrence of bax was also stimulated by dbcAMP after exposition (at 0,1 and 1 µg/ml, but not at dose 10 µg/ml and by FSH (at all doses added. The stimulatory effect of both dbcAMP and FSH on both ovarian cell apoptosis and proliferation suggest, that these substances may promote ovarian follicular cell turnover. The similarity of dbcAMP and FSH effect may indicate that FSH can affect ovarian functions via cAMP-dependent intracellular mechanisms. The present data may provide new tools to regulate human and animal reproductive processes via cAMP-dependent mechanisms.

  7. Difference in protective effects of GIP and GLP-1 on endothelial cells according to cyclic adenosine monophosphate response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dong-Mee; Park, Keun-Young; Hwang, Won-Min; Kim, Ju-Young; Kim, Byung-Joon

    2017-05-01

    Receptors for glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) are present in vascular endothelial cells. Previous studies investigating euglycemic status have demonstrated that GIP is directly involved in the physiology of blood vessels by controlling the blood flow rate of portal veins and that GLP-1 has a protective effect on blood vessels by acting on endothelial cells. However, to the best of our knowledge, the effects of GIP and GLP-1 on endothelial cells in patients with hyperglycemia remain unknown. Therefore, the present study investigated whether the effect of the incretin hormones GLP-1 and GIP differed with regards to the reversal of endothelial cell dysfunction caused by hyperglycemia. The production of nitric oxide (NO) was measured using the Griess reagent system kit and the expression of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in the cell was measured at a wavelength of 405 nm with the ELISA reader using the cyclic AMP EIA kit. Exposure of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) to a high glucose concentration decreased NO and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) levels but increased inducible NOS (iNOS) levels. However, when HUVECs were pretreated with GLP-1, a reduction of iNOS expression was observed and the expression of eNOS and NO were increased, as opposed to pretreatment with GIP. The results differed according to the response of cAMP, the second messenger of incretin hormones: The GIP pretreatment group did not exhibit an increase in cAMP levels while the GLP-1 pretreatment group did. The results of the present study provide evidence that GLP-1, but not GIP, has a protective effect on endothelial function associated with cardiovascular disease, as it is associated with increased eNOS expression and the levels of NO. This effect may be due to an increase in the cAMP concentration during hyperglycemic events.

  8. Antifungal activity of synthetic peptides derived from Impatiens balsamina antimicrobial peptides Ib-AMP1 and Ib-AMP4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thevissen, Karin; François, Isabelle E J A; Sijtsma, Lolke; van Amerongen, Aart; Schaaper, Wim M M; Meloen, Rob; Posthuma-Trumpie, Truus; Broekaert, Willem F; Cammue, Bruno P A

    2005-07-01

    Seeds of Impatiens balsamina contain a set of related antimicrobial peptides (Ib-AMPs). We have produced a synthetic variant of Ib-AMP1, oxidized to the bicyclic native conformation, which was fully active on yeast and fungal strains; and four linear 20-mer Ib-AMP variants, including two all-D forms. We show that the all-D variants are as active on yeast and fungal strains as native peptides. In addition, fungal growth inhibition nor salt-dependency of Ib-AMP4 could be improved by more than two-fold via replacement of amino acid residues by arginine or tryptophan. Native Ib-AMPs showed no hemolytic nor toxic activity up to a concentration of 100 microM. All these data demonstrate the potential of the native Ib-AMPs to combat fungal infections.

  9. Antidepressant-like effects of curcumin on serotonergic receptor-coupled AC-cAMP pathway in chronic unpredictable mild stress of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Cheng; Wang, Fu-Meng; Pan, Ying; Qiang, Li-Qin; Cheng, Guang; Zhang, Wei-Yun; Kong, Ling-Dong

    2009-04-30

    Serotonergic receptors take their physiologic effects by affecting adenylyl cyclase (AC) catalytic activity and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) concentration. AC-cAMP second messenger pathway has been recently suggested to play an important role in depression. Therefore, the compound that regulates the signal pathway may have potential as antidepressant. Curcumin is the main component of Curcuma longa L, a well-known indigenous herb with comprehensive bioactivities. In the present study, we investigated the effects of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) and curcumin on behaviours and serotonergic receptor-coupled AC-cAMP signal pathway in rats. Curcumin produced beneficial effects on the stressed rats by effectively improving CUMS-induced low sucrose consumption and reducing serum corticosterone levels in rats. Moreover, curcumin enhanced AC activity and cAMP levels in platelet and various brain regions, and up-regulated mRNA expressions of AC subtypes AC 2, AC 8 and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in the hippocampus, cortex and hypothalamus of the CUMS rats. Curcumin also attenuated CUMS-induced reductions of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels and high expressions of central 5-HT(1A/1B/7) receptors in rats. These results suggested that the potent antidepressant property of curcumin might be attributed to its improvement of AC-cAMP pathway as well as CREB via suppressing central 5-HT(1A/1B/7) receptors in the CUMS rats. Our findings provided a basis for examining the interaction of serotonergic receptors and AC-cAMP pathway in depression and curcumin treatment.

  10. Increases in cAMP, MAPK Activity and CREB Phosphorylation during REM Sleep: Implications for REM Sleep and Memory Consolidation

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Jie; Phan, Trongha X.; Yang, Yimei; Garelick, Michael G.; Storm, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) transcriptional pathway is required for consolidation of hippocampus-dependent memory. In mice, this pathway undergoes a circadian oscillation required for memory persistence that reaches a peak during the daytime. Since mice exhibit polyphasic sleep patterns during the day, this suggested the interesting possibility that cAMP, MAPK activity and CREB phosphorylat...

  11. Cyclic Vitalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halse, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, Scandinavian and German scholars have been active in the redefinition of the terms ‘Vitalism‘ and ‘Vitalist’ as descriptive categories for analytical purposes in the fields of literary and cultural history. In this context, ‘Vitalism‘ has primarily been used to describe...... that also encompasses notions of destruction, decay and death. “All life symbols in literature around 1900 are at the same time symbols of death”. (Rasch, W. 1967:24) Through the analyses of three poems, this article aims to show concrete examples of how cyclic Vitalist thinking is embedded in poetry...

  12. Cyclic AMP response element binding protein and brain-derived ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are targets of diverse classes of antidepressants and are known to be regulated in animal models and in patients suffering from depression. Given their role in neuronal plasticity, CREB and BDNF have emerged as molecules that may play an important role in modulating mood.

  13. Cyclic multiverses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marosek, Konrad; Dąbrowski, Mariusz P.; Balcerzak, Adam

    2016-09-01

    Using the idea of regularization of singularities due to the variability of the fundamental constants in cosmology we study the cyclic universe models. We find two models of oscillating and non-singular mass density and pressure (`non-singular' bounce) regularized by varying gravitational constant G despite the scale factor evolution is oscillating and having sharp turning points (`singular' bounce). Both violating (big-bang) and non-violating (phantom) null energy condition models appear. Then, we extend this idea on to the multiverse containing cyclic individual universes with either growing or decreasing entropy though leaving the net entropy constant. In order to get an insight into the key idea, we consider the doubleverse with the same geometrical evolution of the two `parallel' universes with their physical evolution [physical coupling constants c(t) and G(t)] being different. An interesting point is that there is a possibility to exchange the universes at the point of maximum expansion - the fact which was already noticed in quantum cosmology. Similar scenario is also possible within the framework of Brans-Dicke theory where varying G(t) is replaced by the dynamical Brans-Dicke field φ(t) though these theories are slightly different.

  14. 5D imaging approaches reveal the formation of distinct intracellular cAMP spatial gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Thomas C.; Annamdevula, Naga; Trinh, Kenny; Britain, Andrea L.; Mayes, Samuel A.; Griswold, John R.; Deal, Joshua; Hoffman, Chase; West, Savannah; Leavesley, Silas J.

    2017-02-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) is a ubiquitous second messenger known to differentially regulate many cellular functions. Several lines of evidence suggest that the distribution of cAMP within cells is not uniform. However, to date, no studies have measured the kinetics of 3D cAMP distributions within cells. This is largely due to the low signal-tonoise ratio of FRET-based probes. We previously reported that hyperspectral imaging improves the signal-to-noise ratio of FRET measurements. Here we utilized hyperspectral imaging approaches to measure FRET signals in five dimensions (5D) - three spatial (x, y, z), wavelength (λ), and time (t) - allowing us to visualize cAMP gradients in pulmonary endothelial cells. cAMP levels were measured using a FRET-based sensor (H188) comprised of a cAMP binding domain sandwiched between FRET donor and acceptor - Turquoise and Venus fluorescent proteins. We observed cAMP gradients in response to 0.1 or 1 μM isoproterenol, 0.1 or 1 μM PGE1, or 50 μM forskolin. Forskolin- and isoproterenol-induced cAMP gradients formed from the apical (high cAMP) to basolateral (low cAMP) face of cells. In contrast, PGE1-induced cAMP gradients originated from both the basolateral and apical faces of cells. Data suggest that 2D (x,y) studies of cAMP compartmentalization may lead to erroneous conclusions about the existence of cAMP gradients, and that 3D (x,y,z) studies are required to assess mechanisms of signaling specificity. Results demonstrate that 5D imaging technologies are powerful tools for measuring biochemical processes in discrete subcellular domains.

  15. Characterization of cAMP-phosphodiesterase activity in bovine seminal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, A; Aragon, J P; Guillemette, C; Hébert, A; Sullivan, R; Blondin, P; Richard, F J

    2016-11-01

    The second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) has a central role in sperm physiology. Extracellular cAMP can be sequentially degraded into 5'AMP and adenosine by ecto-phosphodiesterases (ecto-PDE) and ecto-nucleotidases, a phenomenon called extracellular cAMP-adenosine pathway. As cAMP-adenosine pathway is involved in sperm capacitation, we hypothesize that extracellular PDEs are functionally present in seminal plasma. Exclusively measuring cAMP-PDE activity, total activity in bovine seminal plasma was 10.1 ± 1.5 fmoles/min/μg. Using different family-specific PDE inhibitors, we showed that in seminal plasma, the major cAMP-PDE activity was papaverine sensitive (47.5%). These data support the presence of PDE10 in bovine seminal plasma and was further confirmed by western blot. In epididymal fluid, total cAMP-PDE activity was 48.2 ± 14.8 fmoles/min/μg and we showed that the major cAMP-PDE activity was 3-isobutyl-methylxanthine insensitive and thus ascribed to PDE8 family. PDE10A mRNAs were found in the testis, epididymis, and seminal vesicles. cAMP-PDE activity is present in bovine seminal plasma and epididymal fluid. The results suggest a role for ecto-PDEs present in those fluids in the signaling pathways involved in sperm functions. © 2016 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  16. Plasma endothelin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha concentrations in pregnant and cyclic rats after low-dose endotoxin infusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faas, MM; Bakker, WW; Valkhof, N; Baller, JFW; Schuiling, GA

    Plasma endothelin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were determined in pregnant and cyclic rats after infusion of either endotoxin (1.0 mu g/kg of body weight) or saline solution. After endotoxin, but not after saline solution, administration there was a transient endothelin-1 response in pregnant

  17. c-di-AMP: An Essential Molecule in the Signaling Pathways that Regulate the Viability and Virulence of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmi, Tazin; Port, Gary C.

    2017-01-01

    Signal transduction pathways enable organisms to monitor their external environment and adjust gene regulation to appropriately modify their cellular processes. Second messenger nucleotides including cyclic adenosine monophosphate (c-AMP), cyclic guanosine monophosphate (c-GMP), cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), and cyclic di-adenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) play key roles in many signal transduction pathways used by prokaryotes and/or eukaryotes. Among the various second messenger nucleotides molecules, c-di-AMP was discovered recently and has since been shown to be involved in cell growth, survival, and regulation of virulence, primarily within Gram-positive bacteria. The cellular level of c-di-AMP is maintained by a family of c-di-AMP synthesizing enzymes, diadenylate cyclases (DACs), and degradation enzymes, phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Genetic manipulation of DACs and PDEs have demonstrated that alteration of c-di-AMP levels impacts both growth and virulence of microorganisms. Unlike other second messenger molecules, c-di-AMP is essential for growth in several bacterial species as many basic cellular functions are regulated by c-di-AMP including cell wall maintenance, potassium ion homeostasis, DNA damage repair, etc. c-di-AMP follows a typical second messenger signaling pathway, beginning with binding to receptor molecules to subsequent regulation of downstream cellular processes. While c-di-AMP binds to specific proteins that regulate pathways in bacterial cells, c-di-AMP also binds to regulatory RNA molecules that control potassium ion channel expression in Bacillus subtilis. c-di-AMP signaling also occurs in eukaryotes, as bacterially produced c-di-AMP stimulates host immune responses during infection through binding of innate immune surveillance proteins. Due to its existence in diverse microorganisms, its involvement in crucial cellular activities, and its stimulating activity in host immune responses, c-di-AMP signaling pathway has become an

  18. Selective adsorption properties of Cs for mordenite enclosing Amp microcapsules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mimura, Hitoshi; Kanome, Shun; Kato, Mariko; Niibori, Yuichi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Selective separation and recovery of heat-generating nuclide ({sup 137}Cs) from high-level liquid waste (HLLW) containing highly concentrated HNO{sub 3} and NaNO{sub 3} are vital issues in relation to the partitioning of radionuclides and volume reduction of radioactive wastes. This paper deals with the novel preparation method of Cs-selective adsorbents. Amp-M, kind of inorganic and organic composites, was prepared by successive impregnation of Pma (H{sub 3}Mo{sub 12}O{sub 40}P) and kneaded sol (NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} and sodium alginate (NALGO) into the macro pores of mordenite. Amp-M composites obtained by 1 to 3 cycles were abbreviated as Amp-M1, Amp-M2 and Amp-M3, respectively.

  19. The adiponectin paralog C1q/TNF-related protein 3 (CTRP3) stimulates testosterone production through the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Masataka; Kogo, Mikihiko; Furukawa, Souhei; Wakisaka, Satoshi; Maeda, Takashi

    2012-05-01

    CTRP3, a paralog of adiponectin, is a member of the C1q and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related protein (CTRP) superfamily. It is expressed at high levels in adipose tissue and has recently emerged as a novel adipokine. In the present study, we provide the first evidence for a physiological role of the new adipokine, CTRP3, in the reproductive system. CTRP3 was specifically expressed in interstitial Leydig cells, where testosterone is produced, in the adult mouse testis. CTRP3 increased testosterone production by TM3 mouse Leydig cells in a dose-dependent manner. The increased testosterone production was linked to upregulation of steroidogenic proteins expression, such as steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein and cholesterol side-chain cleavage cytochrome P450 (P450scc). Moreover, increases in intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) concentrations and the phosphorylation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) in CTRP3-stimulated TM3 Leydig cells were observed. Inhibition of this signaling pathway by a specific protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, H89, blocked testosterone production in CTRP3-stimulated Leydig cells, suggesting that the stimulatory effect of CTRP3 on testosterone production is associated with activation of the cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. Thus, our results demonstrate a physiological role for CTRP3 in testicular steroidogenesis and provide novel insights in the intracellular mechanisms activated by this protein. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Corticotropin-Releasing Factor in the Basolateral Amygdala Enhances Memory Consolidation via an Interaction with the β-Adrenoceptor-cAMP Pathway: Dependence on Glucocorticoid Receptor Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roozendaal, Benno; Schelling, Gustav; McGaugh, James L.

    2008-01-01

    Extensive evidence indicates that stress hormone effects on the consolidation of emotionally influenced memory involve noradrenergic activation of the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA). The present experiments examined whether corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) modulates memory consolidation via an interaction with the β-adrenoceptor-adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) system in the BLA. In a first experiment, male Sprague-Dawley rats received bilateral infusions of the CRF-binding protein ligand inhibitor CRF6-33 into the BLA either alone or together with the CRF receptor antagonist α-helical CRF9-41 immediately after inhibitory avoidance training. CRF6-33 induced dose-dependent enhancement of 48-h retention latencies, which was blocked by co-administration of α-helical CRF9-41, suggesting that CRF6-33 enhances memory consolidation by displacing CRF from its binding protein, thereby increasing ‘free’ endogenous CRF concentrations. In a second experiment, intra-BLA infusions of atenolol (β-adrenoceptor antagonist) and Rp-cAMPS (cAMP inhibitor), but not prazosin (α1-adrenoceptor antagonist), blocked CRF6-33-induced retention enhancement. In a third experiment, the CRF receptor antagonist α-helical CRF9-41 administered into the BLA immediately after training attenuated the dose-response effects of concurrent intra-BLA infusions of clenbuterol (β-adrenoceptor agonist). In contrast, α-helical CRF9-41 did not alter retention enhancement induced by posttraining intra-BLA infusions of either cirazoline (α1-adrenoceptor agonist) or 8-br-cAMP (cAMP analog). These findings suggest that CRF facilitates the memory-modulatory effects of noradrenergic stimulation in the BLA via an interaction with the β-adrenoceptor-cAMP cascade, at a locus between the membrane-bound β-adrenoceptor and the intracellular cAMP formation site. Moreover, consistent with evidence that glucocorticoids enhance memory consolidation via a similar interaction with the

  1. Role of AC-cAMP-PKA Cascade in Antidepressant Action of Electroacupuncture Treatment in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-hua Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenylyl cyclase (AC-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP-cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA cascade is considered to be associated with the pathogenesis and treatment of depression. The present study was conducted to explore the role of the cAMP cascade in antidepressant action of electroacupuncture (EA treatment for chronic mild stress (CMS-induced depression model rats. The results showed that EA improved significantly behavior symptoms in depression and dysfunction of AC-cAMP-PKA signal transduction pathway induced by CMS, which was as effective as fluoxetine. Moreover, the antidepressant effects of EA rather than Fluoxetine were completely abolished by H89, a specific PKA inhibitor. Consequently, EA has a significant antidepressant treatment in CMS-induced depression model rats, and AC-cAMP-PKA signal transduction pathway is crucial for it.

  2. Imaging of PDE2- and PDE3-Mediated cGMP-to-cAMP Cross-Talk in Cardiomyocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Nikoleta Pavlaki; Viacheslav O. Nikolaev

    2018-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotides 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) are important second messengers that regulate cardiovascular function and disease by acting in discrete subcellular microdomains. Signaling compartmentation at these locations is often regulated by phosphodiesterases (PDEs). Some PDEs are also involved in the cross-talk between the two second messengers. The purpose of this review is to summarize and highlight recent findings about t...

  3. Differences in responsiveness of intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid: mechanism of arterial relaxation involves cyclic guanosine 3':5'-monophosphate and cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignarro, L.J.; Harbison, R.G.; Wood, K.S.; Wolin, M.S.; McNamara, D.B.; Hyman, A.L.; Kadowitz, P.J.

    1985-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between responses of bovine intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid and cyclic nucleotide levels in order to better understand the mechanism of relaxation elicited by arachidonic acid and acetylcholine. Arachidonic acid relaxed phenylephrine-precontracted arterial rings and elevated both cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP levels in arteries with intact endothelium. In contrast, endothelium-damaged arterial rings contracted to arachidonic acid without demonstrating significant changes in cyclic nucleotide levels. Indomethacin partially inhibited endothelium-dependent relaxation and abolished cyclic AMP accumulation whereas methylene blue, a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, partially inhibited relaxation and abolished cyclic GMP accumulation in response to arachidonic acid. All vessel responses were blocked by a combination of the two inhibitors. Prostaglandin (PG) I2 relaxed arterial rings and elevated cyclic AMP levels whereas PGE2 and PGF2 alpha caused contraction, suggesting that the indomethacin-sensitive component of arachidonic acid-elicited relaxation is due to PGI2 formation and cyclic AMP accumulation. The methylene blue-sensitive component is attributed to an endothelium-dependent but cyclooxygenase-independent generation of a substance causing cyclic GMP accumulation. Intrapulmonary veins contracted to arachidonic acid with no changes in cyclic nucleotide levels and PGI2 was without effect. Homogenates of intrapulmonary artery and vein formed 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, PGF2 alpha and PGE2 from (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid, which was inhibited by indomethacin. Thus, bovine intrapulmonary vein may not possess receptors for PGI2.

  4. The effect of mitragynine on cAMP formation and mRNA expression of mu-opioid receptors mediated by chronic morphine treatment in SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Mohd Fadzly Amar; Subki, Mohd Ferdaues Mohd; Lan, Tan Mei; Majid, Mohamed Isa Abdul; Adenan, Mohd Ilham

    2013-06-21

    [corrected] Mitragynine is an indole alkaloid compound of Mitragyna speciosa (M. speciosa) Korth. (Rubiaceae). This plant is native to the southern regions of Thailand and northern regions of Malaysia and is frequently used to manage the withdrawal symptoms in both countries. To investigate the effect of mitragynine after chronic morphine treatment on cyclic AMP (cAMP) level and mRNA expression of mu-opioid receptor (MOR) in human neuroblastoma SK-N-SH cell. Mitragynine was isolated from the Mitragyna speciosa plant using the acid-base extraction method. The cAMP level upon forskolin stimulation in the cells was determined using the Calbiochem(®) Direct Immunoassay Kit. The mRNA expression of the MOR was carried out using quantitative RT-PCR. Cotreatment and pretreatment of morphine and mitragynine significantly reduced the production of cAMP level at a lower concentration of mitragynine while the higher concentration of this compound could lead to the development of tolerance and dependence as shown by the increase of the cAMP level production in foskolin stimulation. In MOR mRNA expression study, cotreatment of morphine with mitragynine significantly reduced the down-regulation of MOR mRNA expression as compared to morphine treatment only. These finding suggest that mitragynine could possibly avoid the tolerance and dependence on chronic morphine treatment by reducing the up-regulation of cAMP level as well as reducing the down-regulation of MOR at a lower concentration of mitragynine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cyclic GMP mediates neurogenic relaxation in the bovine retractor penis muscle.

    OpenAIRE

    Bowman, A.; Drummond, A H

    1984-01-01

    Field stimulation of the non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic inhibitory nerves to the bovine isolated retractor penis muscle evoked a relaxation that was preceded by a rise in the tissue content of cyclic GMP. There was no change in the content of cyclic AMP. The selective cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 2-o- propoxyphenyl -8- azapurin -6-one (M&B 22948), elevated the tissue's cyclic GMP content, and potentiated both the relaxation and the rise in cyclic GMP produced by inhibitory nerve s...

  6. [Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases: role in the heart and therapeutic perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedioune, Ibrahim; Bobin, Pierre; Karam, Sarah; Lindner, Marta; Mika, Delphine; Lechêne, Patrick; Leroy, Jérôme; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Vandecasteele, Grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) degrade the second messengers cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), thereby regulating multiple aspects of cardiac function. This highly diverse class of enzymes encoded by 21 genes encompasses 11 families that are not only responsible for the termination of cyclic nucleotide signalling, but are also involved in the generation of dynamic microdomains of cAMP and cGMP, controlling specific cell functions in response to various neurohormonal stimuli. In the myocardium, the PDE3 and PDE4 families predominate, degrading cAMP and thereby regulating cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. PDE3 inhibitors are positive inotropes and vasodilators in humans, but their use is limited to acute heart failure and intermittent claudication. PDE5 inhibitors, which are used with success to treat erectile dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension, do not seem efficient in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction. There is experimental evidence however that these PDE, as well as other PDE families including PDE1, PDE2 and PDE9, may play important roles in cardiac diseases, such as hypertrophy and heart failure (HF). After a brief presentation of the cyclic nucleotide pathways in cardiac myocytes and the major characteristics of the PDE superfamily, this review will focus on the potential use of PDE inhibitors in HF, and the recent research developments that could lead to a better exploitation of the therapeutic potential of these enzymes in the future. © Société de Biologie, 2016.

  7. Extracellular modulation of the silkmoth sex pheromone receptor activity by cyclic nucleotides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuro Nakagawa

    Full Text Available Odorants and pheromones are essential to insects as chemical cues for finding food or an appropriate mating partner. These volatile compounds bind to olfactory receptors (Ors expressed by olfactory sensory neurons. Each insect Or functions as a ligand-gated ion channel and is a heteromeric complex that comprises one type of canonical Or and a highly conserved Orco subunit. Because there are many Or types, insect Ors can recognize with high specificity a myriad of chemical cues. Cyclic nucleotides can modulate the activity of insect Or-Orco complexes; however, the mechanism of action of these nucleotides is under debate. Here, we show that cyclic nucleotides, including cAMP and cGMP, interact with the silkmoth sex pheromone receptor complex, BmOr-1-BmOrco, from the outside of the cell and that these nucleotides act as antagonists at low concentrations and weak agonists at high concentrations. These cyclic nucleotides do not compete with the sex pheromone, bombykol, for binding to the BmOr-1 subunit. ATP and GTP also weakly inhibited BmOr-1-BmOrco activity, but D-ribose had no effect; these findings indicated that the purine moiety was crucial for the inhibition. Only the bombykol receptors have been so far shown to be subject to modulation by nucleotide-related compounds, indicating that this responsiveness to these compounds is not common for all insect Or-Orco complexes.

  8. Convergence of major physiological stimuli for renin release on the Gs-alpha/cyclic adenosine monophosphate signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Mi; Briggs, Josephine P.

    2012-01-01

    Control of the renin system by physiological mechanisms such as the baroreceptor or the macula densa (MD) is characterized by asymmetry in that the capacity for renin secretion and expression to increase is much larger than the magnitude of the inhibitory response. The large stimulatory reserve of the renin–angiotensin system may be one of the causes for the remarkable salt-conserving power of the mammalian kidney. Physiological stimulation of renin secretion and expression relies on the activation of regulatory pathways that converge on the cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase A (cAMP/ PKA) pathway. Mice with selective Gs-alpha (Gsα) deficiency in juxtaglomerular granular cells show a marked reduction of basal renin secretion, and an almost complete unresponsiveness of renin release to furosemide, hydralazine, or isoproterenol. Cyclooxygenase-2 generating prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and prostacyclin (PGI2) in MD and thick ascending limb cells is one of the main effector systems utilizing Gsα-coupled receptors to stimulate the renin–angiotensin system. In addition, β-adrenergic receptors are critical for the expression of high basal levels of renin and for its release response to lowering blood pressure or MD sodium chloride concentration. Nitric oxide generated by nitric oxide synthases in the MD and in endothelial cells enhances cAMP-dependent signaling by stabilizing cAMP through cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent inhibition of phosphodiesterase 3. The stimulation of renin secretion by drugs that inhibit angiotensin II formation or action results from the convergent activation of cAMP probably through indirect augmentation of the activity of PGE2 and PGI2 receptors, β-adrenergic receptors, and nitric oxide. PMID:22124804

  9. A mTurquoise-based cAMP sensor for both FLIM and ratiometric read-out has improved dynamic range

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klarenbeek, J.B.; Goedhart, J.; Hink, M.A.; Gadella, T.W.J.; Jalink, K.

    2011-01-01

    FRET-based sensors for cyclic Adenosine Mono Phosphate (cAMP) have revolutionized the way in which this important intracellular messenger is studied. The currently prevailing sensors consist of the cAMP-binding protein Epac1, sandwiched between suitable donor- and acceptor fluorescent proteins

  10. In vivo footprinting of the carbamoylphosphate synthetase I cAMP-response unit indicates important roles for FoxA and PKA in formation of the enhanceosome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenkamp, M.; Stallen, J. M. P.; Lamers, W. H.; Gaemers, I. C.

    2006-01-01

    The expression of carbamoylphosphate synthetase-I (CPS), the first and rate-determining enzyme of the urea cycle, is regulated at the transcriptional level by glucocorticoids and glucagon, the latter acting via cyclic AMP (cAMP). The hormonal response is mediated by a distal enhancer located 6.3 kb

  11. The Diffusion Coefficients Of Cu And Zn In amp913- And amp919- Solid Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhurim Hoxha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this work the multiphase diffusion in the infinite couple Cu-Zn was studied experimentally. The diffusion couples were prepared by platting technique. The samples were annealed in three different temperatures which were taken below the melting temperature of Zn. For each temperature there were used six different annealing times ranging from 1h up to 32h. In the micrographs provided by light microscopy it can be seen the formation of only two of the three intermetalic phases present in the Cu-Zn phase diagram namely amp949- and amp947-phase. WDX EPMA analysis was used to obtain the concentration profiles of the diffusion layers.he diffusion coefficients of Cu and Zn in amp945- and amp951-solid solutions are calculated using the solutions of second Ficks law for independent concentration case. Since the diffusion coefficients depends only on the temperature of annealing and not on the time of it they must be the same for a given temperature. Therefore the diffusion coefficients were averaged for each temperature. Knowing the diffusion coefficients for each temperature enables the calculation of the activation energies and the frequency factors as well.

  12. Covalent immobilization of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) onto biomaterial surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Fabíola; Carvalho, Isabel F; Montelaro, Ronald C; Gomes, P; Martins, M Cristina L

    2011-04-01

    Bacterial adhesion to biomaterials remains a major problem in the medical devices field. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are well-known components of the innate immune system that can be applied to overcome biofilm-associated infections. Their relevance has been increasing as a practical alternative to conventional antibiotics, which are declining in effectiveness. The recent interest focused on these peptides can be explained by a group of special features, including a wide spectrum of activity, high efficacy at very low concentrations, target specificity, anti-endotoxin activity, synergistic action with classical antibiotics, and low propensity for developing resistance. Therefore, the development of an antimicrobial coating with such properties would be worthwhile. The immobilization of AMPs onto a biomaterial surface has further advantages as it also helps to circumvent AMPs' potential limitations, such as short half-life and cytotoxicity associated with higher concentrations of soluble peptides. The studies discussed in the current review report on the impact of covalent immobilization of AMPs onto surfaces through different chemical coupling strategies, length of spacers, and peptide orientation and concentration. The overall results suggest that immobilized AMPs may be effective in the prevention of biofilm formation by reduction of microorganism survival post-contact with the coated biomaterial. Minimal cytotoxicity and long-term stability profiles were obtained by optimizing immobilization parameters, indicating a promising potential for the use of immobilized AMPs in clinical applications. On the other hand, the effects of tethering on mechanisms of action of AMPs have not yet been fully elucidated. Therefore, further studies are recommended to explore the real potential of immobilized AMPs in health applications as antimicrobial coatings of medical devices. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Calcium and cAMP signaling induced by gamma-hydroxybutyrate receptor(s) stimulation in NCB-20 neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coune, P; Taleb, O; Mensah-Nyagan, A G; Maitre, M; Kemmel, V

    2010-04-28

    The NCB-20 neurohybridoma cells differentiated with dibutyryl-cyclic-AMP represent an interesting model to study several components of the gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) system in brain. In particular, an active Na(+)-dependent uptake and a depolarization-evoked release of GHB is expressed by these cells, together with high affinity specific binding sites for this substance. However, only little is known about cellular mechanisms following GHB receptor(s) stimulation in these neurons. Electrophysiological data indicate that GHB can differently affect Ca(2+) currents. L-type calcium channels were typically inhibited by GHB when NCB-20 cells were depolarized. In contrast, when NCB-20 cells were at resting potential, GHB induced a specific Ca(2+) entry through T-type calcium channels. In this study, we investigated the effect induced on cytosolic free Ca(2+) level and cAMP production by GHB receptor(s) stimulated with micromolar concentrations of GHB or structural analogues of GHB. Ca(2+) movements studied by cellular imaging were dose-dependently increased but disappeared for GHB concentrations >25 microM. In addition, nanomolar doses of GHB inhibited forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase. This effect was also rapidly desensitized at higher GHB concentrations. Acting as an antagonist, NCS-382 decreased GHB receptor(s) mediated cAMP and calcium signals. The agonist NCS-356 mimicked GHB effects which were not affected by the GABA(B) receptor antagonist CGP-55-845. Our results reveal the occurrence of Ca(2+)-dependent adenylate cyclase inhibition in NCB-20 neurons after GHB receptor(s) stimulation by GHB concentrations NCB-20 neurons of GHB receptors belonging to GPCR family that may recruit various G protein subtypes. Copyright 2010 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Targeting brain tumor cAMP: the case for sex-specific therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole M Warrington

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A relationship between cyclic adenosine 3’, 5’-monophosphate (cAMP levels and brain tumor biology has been evident for nearly as long as cAMP and its synthetase, adenylate cyclase (ADCY have been known. The importance of the pathway in brain tumorigenesis has been demonstrated in vitro and in multiple animal models. Recently, we provided human validation for a cooperating oncogenic role for cAMP in brain tumorigenesis when we found that SNPs in ADCY8 were correlated with glioma (brain tumor risk in individuals with Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1. Together, these studies provide a strong rationale for targeting cAMP in brain tumor therapy. However, the cAMP pathway is well known to be sexually dimorphic, and SNPs in ADCY8 affected glioma risk in a sex-specific fashion, elevating the risk for females while protecting males. The cAMP pathway can be targeted at multiple levels in the regulation of its synthesis and degradation. Sex differences in response to drugs that target cAMP regulators indicate that successful targeting of the cAMP pathway for brain tumor patients is likely to require matching specific mechanisms of drug action with patient sex.

  15. Purification, characterization, and sequencing of novel antimicrobial peptides, Tu-AMP 1 and Tu-AMP 2, from bulbs of tulip (Tulipa gesneriana L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Masatoshi; Ideguchi, Mineo; Minami, Yuji; Watanabe, Keiichi; Tadera, Kenjiro

    2004-03-01

    Novel antimicrobial peptides (AMP), designated Tu-AMP 1 and Tu-AMP 2, were purified from the bulbs of tulip (Tulipa gesneriana L.) by chitin affinity chromatography and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). They bind to chitin in a reversible way. They were basic peptides having isoelectric points of over 12. Tu-AMP 1 and Tu-AMP 2 had molecular masses of 4,988 Da and 5,006 Da on MALDI-TOF MS analysis, and their extinction coefficients of 1% aqueous solutions at 280 nm were 3.3 and 3.4, respectively. Half of all amino acid residues of Tu-AMP 1 and Tu-AMP 2 were occupied by cysteine, arginine, lysine, and proline. The concentrations of peptides required for 50% inhibition (IC(50)) of the growth of plant pathogenic bacteria and fungi were 2 to 20 microg/ml. The structural characteristics of Tu-AMP 1 and Tu-AMP 2 indicated that they were novel thionin-like antimicrobial peptides, though Tu-AMP 2 was a heterodimer composes of two short peptides joined with disulfide bonds.

  16. Genetically-encoded tools for cAMP probing and modulation in living systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriy M Paramonov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular 3'-5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP is one of the principal second messengers downstream of a manifold of signal transduction pathways, including the ones triggered by G protein-coupled receptors. Not surprisingly, biochemical assays for cAMP have been instrumental for basic research and drug discovery for decades, providing insights into cellular physiology and guiding pharmaceutical industry. However, despite impressive track record, the majority of conventional biochemical tools for cAMP probing share the same fundamental shortcoming - all the measurements require sample disruption for cAMP liberation. This common bottleneck, together with inherently low spatial resolution of measurements (as cAMP is typically analyzed in lysates of thousands of cells, underpin the ensuing limitations of the conventional cAMP assays: 1 genuine kinetic measurements of cAMP levels over time in a single given sample are unfeasible; 2 inability to obtain precise information on cAMP spatial distribution and transfer at subcellular levels, let alone the attempts to pinpoint dynamic interactions of cAMP and its effectors. At the same time, tremendous progress in synthetic biology over the recent years culminated in drastic refinement of our toolbox, allowing us not only to bypass the limitations of conventional assays, but to put intracellular cAMP life-span under tight control – something, that seemed scarcely attainable before. In this review article we discuss the main classes of modern genetically-encoded tools tailored for cAMP probing and modulation in living systems. We examine the capabilities and weaknesses of these different tools in the context of their operational characteristics and applicability to various experimental set-ups involving living cells, providing the guidance for rational selection of the best tools for particular needs.

  17. Sleutelmag en amp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Rossouw

    1985-06-01

    Full Text Available As die Heidelbergse Kategismus (Sondag 31 handel oor die sleutels van die Koninkryk, dan word die betrokkenheid van die ampte slegs per implikasie veronderstel. Meer eksplisiet word die amp en sleutelmag in die Nederlandse Geloofsbelydenis gekoppel; “ons glo dat hierdie ware kerk ooreenkomstig die geestelike bestuurswyse wat ons Here ons in sy Woord geleer het, geregeer moet word... hulle (moet sorg dra dat die ware godsdiens onderhou (word, die ware leer orals versprei, die oortreders op geestelike wyse vermaan en in toom gehou (word... (N.G.B. art. 30 en: “Ons glo verder dat die regeerders van die kerk, al is dit nuttig en goed om onder mekaar ’n bepaalde orde tot instandhouding van die liggaam van die kerk in te stel en te handhaaf, tog noukeurig moet oppas om nie af te wyk van wat Christus, ons enigste Meester, vir ons ingestel het nie... Ons aanvaar derhalwe slegs wat kan dien om eendrag en eenheid te bewaar en te bevorder, en om alles in gehoorsaamheid van God te onderhou. Daarvoor is nodig die ban en alles wat daarmee saamhang, toegepas ooreenkomstig die Woord van God” (N.G.B. art. 32.

  18. Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... anxiety to a stress management specialist for relaxation therapy or other treatments. A health care provider may prescribe medications to prevent migraines for people with cyclic vomiting syndrome. Eating, Diet, and Nutrition During the prodrome and vomiting phases of cyclic ...

  19. Assisted Medical Procedures (AMP) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Documentation and Development: The AMP was initially being developed as part the Advanced Integrated Clinical System (AICS)-Guided Medical Procedure System for the...

  20. Constellation of HCN channels and cAMP regulating proteins in dendritic spines of the primate prefrontal cortex: potential substrate for working memory deficits in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paspalas, Constantinos D; Wang, Min; Arnsten, Amy F T

    2013-07-01

    Schizophrenia associates with impaired prefrontal cortical (PFC) function and alterations in cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathways. These include genetic insults to disrupted-in-schizophrenia (DISC1) and phosphodiesterases (PDE4s) regulating cAMP hydrolysis, and increased dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) expression that elevates cAMP. We used immunoelectron microscopy to localize DISC1, PDE4A, PDE4B, and D1R in monkey PFC and to view spatial interactions with hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels that gate network inputs when opened by cAMP. Physiological interactions between PDE4s and HCN channels were tested in recordings of PFC neurons in monkeys performing a spatial working memory task. The study reveals a constellation of cAMP-related proteins (DISC1, PDE4A, and D1R) and HCN channels next to excitatory synapses and the spine neck in thin spines of superficial PFC, where working memory microcircuits interconnect and spine loss is most evident in schizophrenia. In contrast, channels in dendrites were distant from synapses and cAMP-related proteins, and were associated with endosomal trafficking. The data suggest that a cAMP signalplex is selectively positioned in the spines to gate PFC pyramidal cell microcircuits. Single-unit recordings confirmed physiological interactions between cAMP and HCN channels, consistent with gating actions. These data may explain why PFC networks are especially vulnerable to genetic insults that dysregulate cAMP signaling.

  1. A conjugate of decyltriphenylphosphonium with plastoquinone can carry cyclic adenosine monophosphate, but not cyclic guanosine monophosphate, across artificial and natural membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firsov, Alexander M; Rybalkina, Irina G; Kotova, Elena A; Rokitskaya, Tatyana I; Tashlitsky, Vadim N; Korshunova, Galina A; Rybalkin, Sergei D; Antonenko, Yuri N

    2017-10-13

    The present study demonstrated for the first time the interaction between adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), one of the most important signaling compounds in living organisms, and the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant plastoquinonyl-decyltriphenylphosphonium (SkQ1). The data obtained on model liquid membranes and human platelets revealed the ability of SkQ1 to selectively transport cAMP, but not guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP), across both artificial and natural membranes. In particular, SkQ1 elicited translocation of cAMP from the source to the receiving phase of a Pressman-type cell, while showing low activity with cGMP. Importantly, only conjugate with plastoquinone, but not dodecyl-triphenylphosphonium, was effective in carrying cAMP. In human platelets, SkQ1 also appeared to serve as a carrier of cAMP, but not cGMP, from outside to inside the cell, as measured by phosphorylation of the vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein. The SkQ1-induced transfer of cAMP across the plasma membrane found here can be tentatively suggested to interfere with cAMP signaling pathways in living cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Evidence for cAMP as a mediator of gonadotropin secretion from male pituitaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourne, G.A.; Baldwin, D.M.

    1987-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to use sodium flufenamate, a compound that inhibits gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-stimulated adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) production in the pituitary, to evaluate the potential role of cAMP as a mediator of GnRH-stimulated gonadotropin secretion from male pituitaries. Quartered male pituitaries were perifused at 37/sup 0/C and sequential effluent fractions collected every 10 min. Infusions of GnRH resulted in a twofold increase in luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) secretion. Cycloheximide, 5 ..mu..M, completely inhibited the GnRH-stimulated LH and FSH secretion. Infusions of 0.1 mM flufenamate had similar effects on gonadotropin secretion as cycloheximide, whereas the administration of 5 mM dibutyryl cAMP in combination with GnRH and flufenamate restored the secretory responses of both hormones. The flufenamate-inhibited GnRH stimulated LH and FSH release, which was restored by DBcAMP and appeared to be protein synthesis dependent and specific for cAMP.These results suggest an indirect role for cAMP as a mediator of gonadotropin secretion from male pituitaries. However, in contrast to female pituitaries, the secretion of these hormones form male pituitaries is completely dependent on cAMP and de novo protein synthesis.

  3. The catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase induces expression of genes containing cAMP-responsive enhancer elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riabowol, K T; Fink, J S; Gilman, M Z; Walsh, D A; Goodman, R H; Feramisco, J R

    1988-11-03

    Transcriptional regulation of eukaryotic genes by cyclic AMP requires a cAMP-dependent protein kinase (A kinase). Two hypotheses have been proposed to explain how the holoenzyme of the A kinase induces transcription. The regulatory subunits of the A kinase, which bind cAMP and DNA, and have amino-acid homology with the Escherichia coli catabolite activator protein could directly stimulate gene expression. Alternatively, phosphorylation by the catalytic subunits could induce transcription by activating proteins involved in gene transcription. To distinguish between these models, we microinjected purified preparations of the catalytic and regulatory subunits of A kinase into tissue culture cells and monitored expression of a stably integrated fusion gene containing a cAMP-responsive human promoter fused to a bacterial reporter gene, or of the endogenous c-fos gene. The catalytic subunit stimulated expression of these genes, whereas the regulatory subunit did not. These results indicate that the catalytic subunit of A kinase is sufficient to induce expression of two cAMP-responsive genes, without increasing levels of cAMP.

  4. Control of cAMP in lung endothelial cell phenotypes. Implications for control of barrier function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, T; Creighton, J; Thompson, W J

    1999-07-01

    Pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) form a more restrictive barrier to macromolecular flux than pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs); however, the mechanisms responsible for this intrinsic feature of PMVECs are unknown. Because cAMP improves endothelial barrier function, we hypothesized that differences in enzyme regulation of cAMP synthesis and/or degradation uniquely establish an elevated content in PMVECs. PMVECs possessed 20% higher basal cAMP concentrations than did PAECs; however, increased content was accompanied by 93% lower ATP-to-cAMP conversion rates. In PMVECs, responsiveness to beta-adrenergic agonist (isoproterenol) or direct adenylyl cyclase (forskolin) activation was attenuated and responsiveness to phosphodiesterase inhibition (rolipram) was increased compared with those in PAECs. Although both types of endothelial cells express calcium-inhibited adenylyl cyclase, constitutive PMVEC cAMP accumulation was not inhibited by physiological rises in cytosolic calcium, whereas PAEC cAMP accumulation was inhibited 30% by calcium. Increasing either PMVEC calcium entry by maximal activation of store-operated calcium entry or ATP-to-cAMP conversion with rolipram unmasked calcium inhibition of adenylyl cyclase. These data indicate that suppressed calcium entry and low ATP-to-cAMP conversion intrinsically influence calcium sensitivity. Adenylyl cyclase-to-cAMP phosphodiesterase ratios regulate cAMP at elevated levels compared with PAECs, which likely contribute to enhanced microvascular barrier function.

  5. Control of renin secretion from rat juxtaglomerular cells by cAMP-specific phosphodiesterases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ulla G; Jensen, Boye L; Sethi, Shala

    2002-01-01

    , and the PDE4 inhibitor rolipram enhanced cellular cAMP content. Dialysis of single JG cells with cAMP in whole-cell patch-clamp experiments led to concentration-dependent, biphasic changes in cell membrane capacitance (C(m)) with a marked increase in C(m) at 1 micromol/L, no net change at 10 micromol....../L, and a decrease at 100 micromol/L cAMP. cGMP also had a dual effect on C(m) at 10-fold higher concentration compared with cAMP. Trequinsin, milrinone, and rolipram mimicked the effect of cAMP on C(m). Trequinsin, cAMP, and cGMP enhanced outward current 2- to 3-fold at positive membrane potentials. The effects...... trequinsin increased cellular cAMP content, enhanced forskolin-induced cAMP formation, and stimulated renin release from incubated and superfused JG cells. Trequinsin-mediated stimulation of renin release was inhibited by the permeable protein kinase A antagonist Rp-8-CPT-cAMPS. PDE4C was also expressed...

  6. Evidence for cAMP as a mediator of gonadotropin secretion from female pituitaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourne, G.A.; Baldwin, D.M.

    1987-09-01

    Sodium flufenamate, which inhibited gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-stimulated increases in adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP), was used to evaluate the potential role of cAMP as a mediator of GnRH-stimulated gonadotropin secretion. Quartered pituitaries from diestrous II female rats were perifused at 37/sup 0/C, and sequential effluent fractions were collected every 10 min. Administration of GnRH resulted in a characteristic biphasic response for both luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), whereas 5 ..mu..M cycloheximide inhibited the secondary augmented responses (phase II) of both hormones. Infusions of 0.1 mM flufenamate inhibited GnRH-stimulated gonadotropin secretion in a manner similar to that of cycloheximide, whereas the administration of 5 mM dibutyryl cAMP in combination with GnRH and flufenamate resulted in the restoration of LH and FSH secretion. The dibutyryl cAMP-restored response appeared to be protein synthesis dependent and specific for cAMP. These results suggest that although the cyclic nucleotide is not involved in the acute release of LH and FSH, it does appear to play a pivotal but indirect role in phase II release of the hormones, by effects involving the stimulation of de novo protein synthesis.

  7. Biophysical Techniques for Detection of cAMP and cGMP in Living Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viacheslav O. Nikolaev

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP are ubiquitous second messengers which regulate myriads of functions in virtually all eukaryotic cells. Their intracellular effects are often mediated via discrete subcellular signaling microdomains. In this review, we will discuss state-of-the-art techniques to measure cAMP and cGMP in biological samples with a particular focus on live cell imaging approaches, which allow their detection with high temporal and spatial resolution in living cells and tissues. Finally, we will describe how these techniques can be applied to the analysis of second messenger dynamics in subcellular signaling microdomains.

  8. Ru (amp)(bipy)Cl

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    [RuV(amp)(bipy)O]+ intermediate complex which leads to the high affinity for hydrogen atom/hydride abstraction. Acknowledgement. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support from the Department of Science &. Technology, Government of India. We are thankful to Shri Hardyal Singh for his encouragement. Reference.

  9. A cAMP Biosensor-Based High-Throughput Screening Assay for Identification of Gs-Coupled GPCR Ligands and Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedel, Line; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Mathiesen, Jesper Mosolff

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) is an important second messenger, and quantification of intracellular cAMP levels is essential in studies of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The intracellular cAMP levels are regulated by the adenylate cyclase (AC) upon activation of either Gs- or Gi......-coupled GPCRs, which leads to increased or decreased cAMP levels, respectively. Here we describe a real-time Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cAMP high-throughput screening (HTS) assay for identification and characterization of Gs-coupled GPCR ligands and phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors...... also observed for the other representative Gs-coupled GPCRs tested, GLP-1R and GlucagonR. The FRET-based cAMP biosensor assay is robust, reproducible, and inexpensive with good Z factors and is highly applicable for HTS....

  10. The MRP4/ABCC4 gene encodes a novel apical organic anion transporter in human kidney proximal tubules: putative efflux pump for urinary cAMP and cGMP.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aubel, R.A.M.H. van; Smeets, P.H.E.; Peters, J.G.P.; Bindels, R.J.M.; Russel, F.G.M.

    2002-01-01

    The cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP play key roles in cellular signaling and the extracellular regulation of fluid balance. In the kidney, cAMP is excreted across the apical proximal tubular membrane into urine, where it reduces phosphate reabsorption through a dipyridamole-sensitive mechanism that

  11. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases in heart and vessels: A therapeutic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobin, Pierre; Belacel-Ouari, Milia; Bedioune, Ibrahim; Zhang, Liang; Leroy, Jérôme; Leblais, Véronique; Fischmeister, Rodolphe; Vandecasteele, Grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) degrade the second messengers cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), thereby regulating multiple aspects of cardiac and vascular muscle functions. This highly diverse class of enzymes encoded by 21 genes encompasses 11 families that are not only responsible for the termination of cyclic nucleotide signalling, but are also involved in the generation of dynamic microdomains of cAMP and cGMP, controlling specific cell functions in response to various neurohormonal stimuli. In the myocardium and vascular smooth muscle, the PDE3 and PDE4 families predominate, degrading cAMP and thereby regulating cardiac excitation-contraction coupling and smooth muscle contractile tone. PDE3 inhibitors are positive inotropes and vasodilators in humans, but their use is limited to acute heart failure and intermittent claudication. PDE5 is particularly important for the degradation of cGMP in vascular smooth muscle, and PDE5 inhibitors are used to treat erectile dysfunction and pulmonary hypertension. There is experimental evidence that these PDEs, as well as other PDE families, including PDE1, PDE2 and PDE9, may play important roles in cardiac diseases, such as hypertrophy and heart failure, as well as several vascular diseases. After a brief presentation of the cyclic nucleotide pathways in cardiac and vascular cells, and the major characteristics of the PDE superfamily, this review will focus on the current use of PDE inhibitors in cardiovascular diseases, and the recent research developments that could lead to better exploitation of the therapeutic potential of these enzymes in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Persistent cAMP-signals triggered by internalized G-protein-coupled receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Calebiro

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are generally thought to signal to second messengers like cyclic AMP (cAMP from the cell surface and to become internalized upon repeated or prolonged stimulation. Once internalized, they are supposed to stop signaling to second messengers but may trigger nonclassical signals such as mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK activation. Here, we show that a GPCR continues to stimulate cAMP production in a sustained manner after internalization. We generated transgenic mice with ubiquitous expression of a fluorescent sensor for cAMP and studied cAMP responses to thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH in native, 3-D thyroid follicles isolated from these mice. TSH stimulation caused internalization of the TSH receptors into a pre-Golgi compartment in close association with G-protein alpha(s-subunits and adenylyl cyclase III. Receptors internalized together with TSH and produced downstream cellular responses that were distinct from those triggered by cell surface receptors. These data suggest that classical paradigms of GPCR signaling may need revision, as they indicate that cAMP signaling by GPCRs may occur both at the cell surface and from intracellular sites, but with different consequences for the cell.

  13. Uptake of 3H-cAMP by retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moredock Steve

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bluegill sunfish, the melanin-containing pigment granules of the retinal pigment epithelium undergo cyclic movements in response both to ambient lighting and circadian cues. Pigment granules aggregate into the cell body at night (in the dark, and disperse into apical processes during the day (in the light. Regulation of pigment granule aggregation in a number of fishes depends on modulating the intracellular levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate. Results Here we show isolated RPE takes up cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP in a saturable manner, exogenously applied cAMP induces pigment granule aggregation in retinal pigment epithelium isolated from bluegill, and aggregation induced in this manner is inhibited by treatment with probenecid, an organic anion transport inhibitor. Conclusion Our results raise the possibility that cAMP functions as a messenger secreted from the neural retina to signal darkness to the RPE, which takes it up. It further suggests that organic anion transport systems are the route by which cAMP crosses RPE cell membranes since probenecid inhibits extracellular cAMP from causing pigment granule aggregation.

  14. Metformin Activates AMP Kinase through Inhibition of AMP Deaminase

    OpenAIRE

    Ouyang, Jiangyong; Rahulkumar A. Parakhia; Ochs, Raymond S.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism for how metformin activates AMPK (AMP-activated kinase) was investigated in isolated skeletal muscle L6 cells. A widely held notion is that inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain is central to the mechanism. We also considered other proposals for metformin action. As metabolic pathway markers, we focused on glucose transport and fatty acid oxidation. We also confirmed metformin actions on other metabolic processes in L6 cells. Metformin stimulated both glucose transpo...

  15. Visualization of cyclic nucleotide dynamics in neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill eGorshkov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The second messengers cAMP and cGMP transduce many neuromodulatory signals from hormones and neurotransmitters into specific functional outputs. Their production, degradation and signaling are spatiotemporally regulated to achieve high specificity in signal transduction. The development of genetically encodable fluorescent biosensors has provided researchers with useful tools to study these versatile second messengers and their downstream effectors with unparalleled spatial and temporal resolution in cultured cells and living animals. In this review, we introduce the general design of these fluorescent biosensors and describe several of them in more detail. Then we discuss a few examples of using cyclic nucleotide fluorescent biosensors to study regulation of neuronal function and finish with a discussion of advances in the field. Although there has been significant progress made in understanding how the specific signaling of cyclic nucleotide second messengers is achieved, the mechanistic details in complex cell types like neurons are only just beginning to surface. Current and future fluorescent protein reporters will be essential to elucidate the role of cyclic nucleotide signaling dynamics in the functions of individual neurons and their networks.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: cyclic neutropenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Cyclic neutropenia Cyclic neutropenia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Cyclic neutropenia is a disorder that causes frequent infections and ...

  17. Immunohistochemical distribution of cAMP- and cGMP-phosphodiesterase (PDE) isoenzymes in the human prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uckert, Stefan; Oelke, Matthias; Stief, Christian G.; Andersson, K.-E.; Jonas, Udo; Hedlund, Petter

    2006-01-01

    With the introduction of sildenafil citrate (Viagra), the concept of phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibition has gained tremendous interest in the field of urology. Cyclic nucleotide second messengers cGMP and cAMP have been assumed to be involved in the control of the normal function of the prostate.

  18. Dissociations in the effects of β2-adrenergic receptor agonists on cAMP formation and superoxide production in human neutrophils: support for the concept of functional selectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Brunskole Hummel

    Full Text Available In neutrophils, activation of the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR, a Gs-coupled receptor, inhibits inflammatory responses, which could be therapeutically exploited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of various β2AR ligands on adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP accumulation and N-formyl-L-methionyl-L-leucyl-L-phenylalanine (fMLP-induced superoxide anion (O2(•- production in human neutrophils and to probe the concept of ligand-specific receptor conformations (also referred to as functional selectivity or biased signaling in a native cell system. This is an important question because so far, evidence for functional selectivity has been predominantly obtained with recombinant systems, due to the inherent difficulties to genetically manipulate human native cells. cAMP concentration was determined by HPLC/tandem mass spectrometry, and O2(•- formation was assessed by superoxide dismutase-inhibitable reduction of ferricytochrome c. β2AR agonists were generally more potent in inhibiting fMLP-induced O2(•- production than in stimulating cAMP accumulation. (--Ephedrine and dichloroisoproterenol were devoid of any agonistic activity in the cAMP assay, but partially inhibited fMLP-induced O2(•- production. Moreover, (--adrenaline was equi-efficacious in both assays whereas the efficacy of salbutamol was more than two-fold higher in the O2(•- assay. Functional selectivity was visualized by deviations of ligand potencies and efficacies from linear correlations for various parameters. We obtained no evidence for involvement of protein kinase A in the inhibition of fMLP-induced O2(•- production after β2AR-stimulation although cAMP-increasing substances inhibited O2(•- production. Taken together, our data corroborate the concept of ligand-specific receptor conformations with unique signaling capabilities in native human cells and suggest that the β2AR inhibits O2(•- production in a cAMP-independent manner.

  19. Generation of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate and cyclic ADP-ribose by glucagon-like peptide-1 evokes Ca2+ signal that is essential for insulin secretion in mouse pancreatic islets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung-Ju; Park, Kwang-Hyun; Yim, Chang-Yeol; Takasawa, Shin; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Im, Mie-Jae; Kim, Uh-Hyun

    2008-04-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) increases intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)), resulting in insulin secretion from pancreatic beta-cells. The molecular mechanism(s) of the GLP-1-mediated regulation of [Ca(2+)](i) was investigated. GLP-1-induced changes in [Ca(2+)](i) were measured in beta-cells isolated from Cd38(+/+) and Cd38(-/-) mice. Calcium-mobilizing second messengers were identified by measuring levels of nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) and cyclic ADP-ribose (ADPR), using a cyclic enzymatic assay. To locate NAADP- and cyclic ADPR-producing enzyme(s), cellular organelles were separated using the sucrose gradient method. A GLP-1-induced [Ca(2+)](i) increase showed a cooperative Ca(2+) signal, i.e., an initial [Ca(2+)](i) rise mediated by the action of NAADP that was produced in acidic organelles and a subsequent long-lasting increase of [Ca(2+)](i) by the action of cyclic ADPR that was produced in plasma membranes and secretory granules. GLP-1 sequentially stimulated production of NAADP and cyclic ADPR in the organelles through protein kinase A and cAMP-regulated guanine nucleotide exchange factor II. Furthermore, the results showed that NAADP production from acidic organelles governed overall Ca(2+) signals, including insulin secretion by GLP-1, and that in addition to CD38, enzymes capable of synthesizing NAADP and/or cyclic ADPR were present in beta-cells. These observations were supported by the study with Cd38(-/-) beta-cells, demonstrating production of NAADP, cyclic ADPR, and Ca(2+) signal with normal insulin secretion stimulated by GLP-1. Our findings demonstrate that the GLP-1-mediated Ca(2+) signal for insulin secretion in pancreatic beta-cells is a cooperative action of NAADP and cyclic ADPR spatiotemporally formed by multiple enzymes.

  20. Plasma levels of cAMP, cGMP and CGRP in sildenafil-induced headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruuse, Christina Rostrup; Frandsen, E; Schifter, S

    2004-01-01

    whether the pain-inducing effects of sildenafil would be reflected in plasma levels of important signalling molecules in migraine: cGMP, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Ten healthy subjects (four women, six men) and 12 patients (12 women) suffering from......Sildenafil, a selective inhibitor of the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) degrading phosphodiestrase 5 (PDE5), induced migraine without aura in 10 of 12 migraine patients and in healthy subjects it induced significantly more headache than placebo. The aim of the present study was to determine...... migraine without aura were included in two separate double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over studies in which placebo or sildenafil 100 mg was administered orally. Plasma levels of CGRP, cAMP and cGMP were determined in blood from the antecubital vein. Despite the ability of sildenafil to induce...

  1. Salidroside Attenuates Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Cell Damage Through a cAMP-Dependent Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuming Deng

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Salidroside, a major component of Rhodiola rosea L., has shown various pharmacological functions, including antioxidant effects, but the signal transduction pathway of its antioxidant effects is not very clear. In this study, we found that salidroside could attenuate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced HL-7702 cell damage, inhibit H2O2-induced cytosolic free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i elevation, scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS and increase 3’-5’-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP level in a dose-dependent manner, but it couldn’t influence 3’-5’-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP levels. Therefore, these results indicated that the antioxidant effects of salidroside were associated with down-regulation of [Ca2+]i, ROS occur via a cAMP-dependent pathway.

  2. Real Topological Cyclic Homology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgenhaven, Amalie

    , where O(2) is the semi-direct product of T, the multiplicative group of complex number of modulus 1, by the group G=Gal(C/R). We refer to this O(2)-spectrum as the real topological Hochschild homology. This generalization leads to a G-equivariant version of topological cyclic homology, which we call...... real topological cyclic homology. The first part of the thesis computes the G-equivariant homotopy type of the real topological cyclic homology of spherical group rings at a prime p with anti-involution induced by taking inverses in the group. The second part of the thesis investigates the derived G...

  3. The ever unfolding story of cAMP signalling in trypanosomatids: vive la difference!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Nii Aryee Tagoe

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Kinetoplastids are unicellular, eukaryotic, flagellated protozoans containing the eponymous kinetoplast. Within this order, the family of trypanosomatids are responsible for some of the most serious human diseases, including Chagas disease (Trypanosoma cruzi, sleeping sickness (T. brucei spp. and leishmaniasis (Leishmania spp. Although cAMP is produced during the life cycle stages of these parasites, its signalling pathways are very different from those of mammals. The absence of G-protein-coupled recep¬tors, the presence of structurally different adenylyl cyclases, the paucity of known cAMP effector proteins and the stringent need for regulation of cAMP in the small kinetoplastid cells all suggest a significantly different biochemical pathway and likely cell biology. However, each of the main kinetoplastid parasites express four class 1-type cyclic nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterases (PDEA-D, which have highly similar catalytic domains to that of human PDEs. To date, only TbrPDEB, expressed as two slightly different isoforms TbrPDEB1 and B2, has been found to be essential when ablated. Although the genomes contain reasonably well con¬served genes for catalytic and regulatory domains of pro¬tein kinase A, these have been shown to have varied structural and functional roles in the different species. Recent discovery of a role of cAMP/AMP metabolism in a quorum-sensing signalling pathway in T. brucei, and the identification of downstream cAMP Response Proteins (CARPs whose expression levels correlate with sensitivity to PDE inhibitors, suggests a complex signalling cascade. The interplay between the roles of these novel CARPs and the quorum-sensing signalling pathway on cell division and differentiation makes for intriguing cell biology and a new paradigm in cAMP signal transduction, as well as potential targets for trypanosomatid-specific cAMP pathway-based therapeutics.

  4. Amps particle accelerator definition study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellen, J. M., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The Particle Accelerator System of the AMPS (Atmospheric, Magnetospheric, and Plasmas in Space) payload is a series of charged particle accelerators to be flown with the Space Transportation System Shuttle on Spacelab missions. In the configuration presented, the total particle accelerator system consists of an energetic electron beam, an energetic ion accelerator, and both low voltage and high voltage plasma acceleration devices. The Orbiter is illustrated with such a particle accelerator system.

  5. Variation in the excitability of developed D. discoideum cells as a function of agar concentration in the substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, Noriko; Bae, Albert; Amselem, Gabriel; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2010-03-01

    In the absence of nutrients, Dictyostelium discoideum cells enter a developmental cycle--they signal each other, aggregate, and ultimately form fruiting bodies. During the signaling stage, the cells relay waves of cyclic adenosine 3',5' monophosphate (cAMP). We observed a transition from spiral to circular patterns in the signaling wave, depending on the agar concentration of the substrate. In this talk we will present the changes in the times for the onset of signaling and synchronization versus agar concentration, as measured by spectral entropy. We also will discuss the origin of these effects.

  6. Role of endothelin-1 and cyclic nucleotides in ischemia/reperfusion-mediated microvascular leak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, René; Chong, Terry; Curran, Brian; Victorino, Gregory P

    2006-03-01

    A consequence of ischemia/reperfusion (IR) is endothelial barrier dysfunction and intravascular volume loss. The purposes of our study are to explore the impact of: 1) cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) synthesis inhibition, 2) cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) synthesis inhibition, 3) treatment with endothelin-1, and 4) endothelin-1 (ET-1)-mediated cAMP changes on IR-induced fluid leak. We hypothesize that IR-mediated microvascular fluid leak results from increased cGMP activity and ET-1 decreases IR-induced fluid leak via cAMP. A micro-cannulation technique was used to determine fluid leak or hydraulic permeability (Lp) in rat mesenteric venules. Lp was measured during IR and after treatment with 1) cGMP synthesis inhibitor (LY83583,10 micromol/L) 2) cAMP synthesis inhibitor (2',5'dideoxyadenosine,10 micromol/L), 3) ET-1 (80 pM), and 4) cAMP synthesis inhibitor plus ET-1 (n=6 in each group; Lp represented as mean+/-standard error of the mean; units 10-cm/sec/cmH2O). IR resulted in an increase in Lp (Lp=7.07+/-0.20) sevenfold above baseline (1.05+/-0.31) (pcentral role as a mediator of IR-induced postcapillary venular leak. ET-1 mildly decreased leak. Furthermore, ET-1 may not exert its effects on microvascular fluid leak during IR via cAMP.

  7. Cyclic nucleotide specific phosphodiesterases of Leishmania major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linder Markus

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Leishmania represent a complex of important human pathogens that belong to the systematic order of the kinetoplastida. They are transmitted between their human and mammalian hosts by different bloodsucking sandfly vectors. In their hosts, the Leishmania undergo several differentiation steps, and their coordination and optimization crucially depend on numerous interactions between the parasites and the physiological environment presented by the fly and human hosts. Little is still known about the signalling networks involved in these functions. In an attempt to better understand the role of cyclic nucleotide signalling in Leishmania differentiation and host-parasite interaction, we here present an initial study on the cyclic nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterases of Leishmania major. Results This paper presents the identification of three class I cyclic-nucleotide-specific phosphodiesterases (PDEs from L. major, PDEs whose catalytic domains exhibit considerable sequence conservation with, among other, all eleven human PDE families. In contrast to other protozoa such as Dictyostelium, or fungi such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Candida ssp or Neurospora, no genes for class II PDEs were found in the Leishmania genomes. LmjPDEA contains a class I catalytic domain at the C-terminus of the polypeptide, with no other discernible functional domains elsewhere. LmjPDEB1 and LmjPDEB2 are coded for by closely related, tandemly linked genes on chromosome 15. Both PDEs contain two GAF domains in their N-terminal region, and their almost identical catalytic domains are located at the C-terminus of the polypeptide. LmjPDEA, LmjPDEB1 and LmjPDEB2 were further characterized by functional complementation in a PDE-deficient S. cerevisiae strain. All three enzymes conferred complementation, demonstrating that all three can hydrolyze cAMP. Recombinant LmjPDEB1 and LmjPDEB2 were shown to be cAMP-specific, with Km values in the low micromolar range

  8. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli contributes to the survival of cefotaxime-susceptible E. coli under high concentrations of cefotaxime by acquisition of increased AmpC expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tatsuya; Kawahara, Ryuji; Kumeda, Yuko; Yamamoto, Yoshimasa

    2018-01-18

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-E) are becoming increasingly widespread in Vietnam. Antibiotics are detected in many Vietnamese foods; however, the effect of ESBL-E and antibiotic consumption on intestinal bacteria has not been studied sufficiently. Here, we investigated the effect of oral administration of ESBL-E (TB19) and cefotaxime on luminescence-emitting cefotaxime-sensitive E. coli (X14). Mice were given water containing TB19 and then received three injections of 1.0 × 108 CFU of X14 harboring a luciferase gene. The mice were administered 100 μg of cefotaxime and luminescent bacteria were monitored over 24 h, following which luminescent bacteria were isolated from mouse feces. Luminescence continued to be detected in mice administered TB19 24 h after cefotaxime ingestion. Fecal analysis revealed two types of luminescent colonies, cefoxitin-resistant E. coli (X14-R) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pulse-field gel electrophoresis confirmed that X14-R was a clonal strain of X14, suggesting that X14 survived using ESBLs originating from TB19 and acquired cefoxitin resistance due to cefotaxime consumption. Moreover, in vitro analysis of X14 indicated that expression of the ampC gene was upregulated by cefotaxime. Overall, ESBL-E and cefotaxime promoted the expansion of cefoxitin-resistant E. coli in the absence of plasmid-mediated gene transfer. © FEMS 2018. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Modulatory effects of cAMP and PKC activation on gap junctional intercellular communication among thymic epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neves-dos-Santos Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigated the effects of the signaling molecules, cyclic AMP (cAMP and protein-kinase C (PKC, on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC between thymic epithelial cells (TEC. Results Treatment with 8-Br-cAMP, a cAMP analog; or forskolin, which stimulates cAMP production, resulted in an increase in dye transfer between adjacent TEC, inducing a three-fold enhancement in the mean fluorescence of coupled cells, ascertained by flow cytometry after calcein transfer. These treatments also increased Cx43 mRNA expression, and stimulated Cx43 protein accumulation in regions of intercellular contacts. VIP, adenosine, and epinephrine which may also signal through cyclic nucleotides were tested. The first two molecules did not mimic the effects of 8-Br-cAMP, however epinephrine was able to increase GJIC suggesting that this molecule functions as an endogenous inter-TEC GJIC modulators. Stimulation of PKC by phorbol-myristate-acetate inhibited inter-TEC GJIC. Importantly, both the enhancing and the decreasing effects, respectively induced by cAMP and PKC, were observed in both mouse and human TEC preparations. Lastly, experiments using mouse thymocyte/TEC heterocellular co-cultures suggested that the presence of thymocytes does not affect the degree of inter-TEC GJIC. Conclusions Overall, our data indicate that cAMP and PKC intracellular pathways are involved in the homeostatic control of the gap junction-mediated communication in the thymic epithelium, exerting respectively a positive and negative role upon cell coupling. This control is phylogenetically conserved in the thymus, since it was seen in both mouse and human TEC preparations. Lastly, our work provides new clues for a better understanding of how the thymic epithelial network can work as a physiological syncytium.

  10. Inhibition of cyclic diadenylate cyclase, DisA, by polyphenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opoku-Temeng, Clement; Sintim, Herman O

    2016-05-06

    Cyclic di-AMP has emerged as an important signaling molecule that controls a myriad of functions, including cell wall homeostasis in different bacteria. Polyphenols display various biological activities and tea polyphenols in particular have been shown to possess among other properties antioxidant and antibacterial activities. Certain tea polyphenols, such as catechin and epigallocatechin gallate, have been used to augment the action of traditional antibiotics that target the cell wall. Considering the expanding role played by cyclic dinucleotides in bacteria, we investigated whether the action of polyphenols on bacteria could be due in part to modulation of c-di-AMP signaling. Out of 14 tested polyphenols, tannic acid (TA), theaflavin-3'-gallate (TF2B) and theaflavin-3,3'-digallate (TF3) exhibited inhibitory effects on B. subtilis c-di-AMP synthase, DisA. TF2B and TF3 specifically inhibited DisA but not YybT (a PDE) whilst TA was more promiscuous and inhibited both DisA and YybT.

  11. Proteomic signatures implicate cAMP in light and temperature responses in Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Thomas, Ludivine

    2013-05-01

    The second messenger 3\\'-5\\'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenylyl cyclases (ACs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cAMP from ATP, are increasingly recognized as important signaling molecules in a number of physiological responses in higher plants. Here we used proteomics to identify cAMP-dependent protein signatures in Arabidopsis thaliana and identify a number of differentially expressed proteins with a role in light- and temperature-dependent responses, notably photosystem II subunit P-1, plasma membrane associated cation-binding protein and chaperonin 60 β. Based on these proteomics results we conclude that, much like in cyanobacteria, algae and fungi, cAMP may have a role in light signaling and the regulation of photosynthesis as well as responses to temperature and we speculate that ACs could act as light and/or temperature sensors in higher plants. Biological significance: This current study is significant since it presents the first proteomic response to cAMP, a novel and key second messenger in plants. It will be relevant to researchers in plant physiology and in particular those with an interest in second messengers and their role in biotic and abiotic stress responses. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs): The quintessential 'offense and defense' molecules are more than antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Seema; Akhtar, Nadeem

    2017-09-18

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are cationic amphiphilic molecules with α-helix or β-sheet linear motifs and linear or cyclic configurations. For their role in 'defense and offense', they are present in all living organisms. AMPs are named so, as they inhibit a wide array of microbes by membrane pore formation and subsequent perturbation of mitochondrial membrane ionic balance. However, their functional repertoire is expanding with validated roles in cytotoxicity, wound healing, angiogenesis, apoptosis, and chemotaxis [1]. A number of endogenous AMPs have been characterized in human body such as defensins, cathelicidins, histatins etc. They mediate critical functions, but when homeostasis is broken, they turn hostile and initiate inflammatory diseases. This review discusses the sources of therapeutic AMPs; auto-immunity risks of endogenous AMPs, and their dermatological applications; normally overlooked risks of the peptides; and scopes ahead. This holistic work is expected to be a valuable reference for further research in this field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. cAMP level modulates scleral collagen remodeling, a critical step in the development of myopia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijin Tao

    Full Text Available The development of myopia is associated with decreased ocular scleral collagen synthesis in humans and animal models. Collagen synthesis is, in part, under the influence of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP. We investigated the associations between cAMP, myopia development in guinea pigs, and collagen synthesis by human scleral fibroblasts (HSFs. Form-deprived myopia (FDM was induced by unilateral masking of guinea pig eyes. Scleral cAMP levels increased selectively in the FDM eyes and returned to normal levels after unmasking and recovery. Unilateral subconjunctival treatment with the adenylyl cyclase (AC activator forskolin resulted in a myopic shift accompanied by reduced collagen mRNA levels, but it did not affect retinal electroretinograms. The AC inhibitor SQ22536 attenuated the progression of FDM. Moreover, forskolin inhibited collagen mRNA levels and collagen secretion by HSFs. The inhibition was reversed by SQ22536. These results demonstrate a critical role of cAMP in control of myopia development. Selective regulation of cAMP to control scleral collagen synthesis may be a novel therapeutic strategy for preventing and treating myopia.

  14. Endosomal generation of cAMP in GPCR signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilardaga, Jean-Pierre; Jean-Alphonse, Frederic G.; Gardella, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    It has been widely assumed that the production of the ubiquitous second messenger cyclic AMP, which is mediated by cell surface G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), and its termination take place exclusively at the plasma membrane. Recent studies reveal that diverse GPCRs do not always follow this conventional paradigm. In the new model, GPCRs mediate G-protein signaling not only from the plasma membrane but also from endosomal membranes. This model proposes that following ligand binding and activation, cell surface GPCRs internalize and redistribute into early endosomes, where trimeric G protein signaling can be maintained for an extended period of time. This Perspective discusses the molecular and cellular mechanistic subtleties as well as the physiological consequences of this unexpected process, which is considerably changing how we think about GPCR signaling and regulation and how we study drugs that target this receptor family. PMID:25271346

  15. Generalized Wideband Cyclic MUSIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang-Meng Liu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The method of Spectral Correlation-Signal Subspace Fitting (SC-SSF fails to separate wideband cyclostationary signals with coherent second-order cyclic statistics (SOCS. Averaged Cyclic MUSIC (ACM method made up for the drawback to some degree via temporally averaging the cyclic cross-correlation of the array output. This paper interprets ACM from another perspective and proposes a new DOA estimation method by generalizing ACM for wideband cyclostationary signals. The proposed method successfully makes up for the aforementioned drawback of SC-SSF and obtains a more satisfying performance than ACM. It is also demonstrated that ACM is a simplified form of the proposed method when only a single spectral frequency is exploited, and the integration of the frequencies within the signal bandwidth helps the new method to outperform ACM.

  16. Effects of milrinone on contractility and cyclic adenosine monophosphate production induced by beta1- and beta2-adrenergic receptor activation in human myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carceles, Mafía D; Fuentes, Teodomiro; Aroca, Vicente; Lopez, Jesús; Hernández, Jesús

    2007-08-01

    Because milrinone is a widely used phosphodiesterase-3 (PDE3) inhibitor, it would be of interest to know whether it interacts with beta1- and beta2-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonists in human myocardium. This in vitro study was conducted to test whether milrinone differentially regulates cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) production and to examine the effect of milrinone on the positive inotropic responses and cAMP production induced by activation of the beta1-AR with norepinephrine (NE) and activation of the beta2-AR with epinephrine (EPI) in human atrial myocardium. Right atrial trabeculae were obtained from patients undergoing cardiac surgery for valve repair. Concentration-response curves for inotropic responses mediated through the beta1-AR (NE in the presence of the beta2-blocker ICI 118, 551) and the beta2-AR (EPI in the presence of the beta1-blocker CGP 20712A) were obtained in the absence and presence of milrinone 1 micromol/L. This concentration of milrinone was chosen because it corresponded to its 50% inhibitory concentration as a PDE3 inhibitor and its therapeutic plasma concentration. The production of cAMP induced by exposure to selective beta1- and beta2-AR stimulation was also measured in the absence and presence of milrinone. Right atrial tissue samples were obtained from 12 white patients (7 women, 5 men; mean [SE] age, 64.6 [6.3] years) undergoing cardiac surgery for valve repair (8 mitral, 4 aortic). The presence of milrinone was associated with leftward shifts in the concentration-response curves for both NE and EPI. cAMP production in myocardial tissue samples in the presence of milrinone was increased only with NE induction (mean [SEM], 745.0 [136.7] pmol/g in the absence of milrinone vs 1620.5 [372.3] pmol/g in the presence of milrinone; P < 0.05). In this preliminary study in human atrial myocardium, milrinone potentiated the contractile responses to both NE and EPI. However, only the effect of NE on tissue levels of cAMP was

  17. Adenosine receptors regulate gap junction coupling of the human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells hCMEC/D3 by Ca2+influx through cyclic nucleotide-gated channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Almke; Bintig, Willem; Begandt, Daniela; Klett, Anne; Siller, Ina G; Gregor, Carola; Schaarschmidt, Frank; Weksler, Babette; Romero, Ignacio; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Hell, Stefan W; Ngezahayo, Anaclet

    2017-04-15

    Gap junction channels are essential for the formation and regulation of physiological units in tissues by allowing the lateral cell-to-cell diffusion of ions, metabolites and second messengers. Stimulation of the adenosine receptor subtype A 2B increases the gap junction coupling in the human blood-brain barrier endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. Although the increased gap junction coupling is cAMP-dependent, neither the protein kinase A nor the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP were involved in this increase. We found that cAMP activates cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels and thereby induces a Ca 2+ influx, which leads to the increase in gap junction coupling. The report identifies CNG channels as a possible physiological link between adenosine receptors and the regulation of gap junction channels in endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. The human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 was used to characterize the physiological link between adenosine receptors and the gap junction coupling in endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. Expressed adenosine receptor subtypes and connexin (Cx) isoforms were identified by RT-PCR. Scrape loading/dye transfer was used to evaluate the impact of the A 2A and A 2B adenosine receptor subtype agonist 2-phenylaminoadenosine (2-PAA) on the gap junction coupling. We found that 2-PAA stimulated cAMP synthesis and enhanced gap junction coupling in a concentration-dependent manner. This enhancement was accompanied by an increase in gap junction plaques formed by Cx43. Inhibition of protein kinase A did not affect the 2-PAA-related enhancement of gap junction coupling. In contrast, the cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel inhibitor l-cis-diltiazem, as well as the chelation of intracellular Ca 2+ with BAPTA, or the absence of external Ca 2+ , suppressed the 2-PAA-related enhancement of gap junction coupling. Moreover, we observed a 2-PAA-dependent activation of CNG channels by a combination of

  18. Cyclic viscoelastoplasticity of polypropylene/nanoclay composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drozdov, A.; Christiansen, Jesper de Claville

    2012-01-01

    Observations are reported on isotactic polypropylene/organically modified nanoclay hybrids with concentrations of filler ranging from 0 to 5 wt.% in cyclic tensile tests with a stress–controlled program (oscillations between various maximum stresses and the zero minimum stress). A pronounced effe...

  19. Meiotic arrest maintained by cAMP during the initiation of maturation enhances meiotic potential and developmental competence and reduces polyspermy of IVM/IVF porcine oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somfai, Tamás; Kikuchi, Kazuhiro; Onishi, Akira; Iwamoto, Masaki; Fuchimoto, Dai-ichiro; Papp, Agnes Bali; Sato, Eimei; Nagai, Takashi

    2003-08-01

    We investigated effects of invasive adenylate cyclase (iAC), 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) and dibutyryl cyclic AMP (dbcAMP) on porcine oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM), in vitro fertilisation (IVF) and subsequent embryonic development. Porcine oocytes were collected in Hepes-buffered NCSU-37 supplemented with or without 0.1 microg/ml iAC and 0.5 mM IBMX. IVM was performed in a modified NCSU-37 supplemented with or without 1 mM dbcAMP for 22 h and then without dbcAMP for an additional 24 h. After IVF, oocytes were cultured in vitro for 6 days. After 12 h of IVM, no difference in nuclear status was observed irrespective of supplementation with these chemicals during collection and IVM. At 22 h, most (95%) of the oocytes cultured with dbcAMP remained at the germinal vesicle (GV) stage, whereas 44.3% of the oocytes cultured without dbcAMP underwent GV breakdown. At 36 h, oocytes cultured with dbcAMP had progressed to prometaphase I or metaphase I (MI) (32.6% and 49.3%, respectively), whereas non-treated oocytes had progressed further to anaphase I, telophase I or metaphase II (MII) (13.6%, 14.3% and 38.0%, respectively). At 46 h, the rate of matured oocytes at MII was higher in oocytes cultured with dbcAMP (81%) than without dbcAMP (57%), while the proportion of oocytes arrested at MI was lower when cultured with dbcAMP (15%) than without dbcAMP (31%). The rate of monospermic fertilisation was higher when oocytes were cultured with dbcAMP (21%) than without dbcAMP (9%), with no difference in total penetration rates (58% and 52%, respectively). The blastocyst rate was higher in oocytes cultured with dbcAMP (32%) than without dbcAMP (19%). These results suggest that a change in intracellular level of cAMP during oocyte collection does not affect maturational and developmental competence of porcine oocytes and that synchronisation of meiotic maturation using dbcAMP enhances the meiotic potential of oocytes by promoting the MI to MII transition and results in high

  20. The camp analogue, dbcAMP can stimulate rabbit reproductive functions: I. Effect on ovarian folliculogenesis, ovulation and embryo production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrenek P.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to examine the influence of administration of N6,2’-dibutyryladenosine 3’5’-cyclic monophosphate (dbcAMP, a cAMP agonist, on ovarian folliculogenesis and atresia, as well as on reproductive efficiency in rabbits, whose ovarian cycle and ovulation was induced by gonadotropins. Ovarian cycle and ovulation of control rabbits were induced by 20 IU/kg PMSG followed by 35 IU/kg hCG administration. Experimental animals received PMSG and hCG together with dbcAMP (at 5, 25 or 50 μg/animal. After ovulation and insemination, the animals were sacrificed. Ovaries were weighted, histological sections of ovaries were prepared, and the presence of ovulated and not ovulated follicles and different stages of atresia was evaluated by light microscopy. The eggs were flushed from the oviducts after insemination and cultured up to blastocyst cell stage. Numbers of ovarian Corpora lutea, ovulated oocytes and oocyte-derived zygotes and embryos reaching hatched blastocyst stage were determined. Administration of dbcAMP (at doses 25 or 50 μg/animal, but not at 5 μg/animal was able to increase the proportion of follicles with cystic and luteinization-related atresia. Furthermore, dbcAMP (50 μg/animal, but not lower doses increased the ovarian mass, number of Corpora lutea, number of harvested oocytes, zygotes and embryos at blastocyst stage derived from these zygotes after culture. These data demonstrate that dbcAMP can stimulate rabbit ovarian follicle atresia, ovulation, oocyte, zygote and embryo yield and development. Furthermore, they confirm in the involvement of cyclic nucleotide-dependent intracellular mechanisms in the control of rabbit reproductive functions and potential practical usefulness of dbcAMP in improving animal reproduction and fertility.

  1. Highly efficient enzymatic preparation of c-di-AMP using the diadenylate cyclase DisA from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Cao; Wang, Jieping; Luo, Yunchao; Fu, Yang; Su, Jianmei; He, Jin

    2013-05-10

    Cyclic 3',5'-diadenosine monophosphate (c-di-AMP) is a newly recognized bacterial nucleotide second messenger molecule. In addition, it has been shown to be a potential vaccine adjuvant. Although multiple methods are available for c-di-AMP synthesis, the yields are low and the purification procedures are laborious. Here, we report an enzymatic method for more efficient and economical c-di-AMP synthesis using a diadenylate cyclase DisA from Bacillus thuringiensis BMB 171 (btDisA). After overexpression and purification of btDisA, the enzyme-catalyzed reaction conditions were further investigated. Under the optimum conditions, in which 100mM CHES (pH 9.5) containing 2μM btDisA, 10mM ATP, and 10mM MgCl2 was incubated at 50°C for 4h, a high conversion rate of c-di-AMP was obtained. Coupling this process with HPLC purification and lyophilization yielded 100mg of highly pure c-di-AMP that was harvested in white powder form from a 50mL enzyme-catalyzed reaction system. The protocol is not only directly applicable for preparing abundant amounts of c-di-AMP for extensive biochemical and immunological use, but can also be scaled up to meet the requirements for medical applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Timing is critical for effective glucocorticoid receptor mediated repression of the cAMP-induced CRH gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siem van der Laan

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid negative feedback of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis is mediated in part by direct repression of gene transcription in glucocorticoid receptor (GR expressing cells. We have investigated the cross talk between the two main signaling pathways involved in activation and repression of corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH mRNA expression: cyclic AMP (cAMP and GR. We report that in the At-T20 cell-line the glucocorticoid-mediated repression of the cAMP-induced human CRH proximal promoter activity depends on the relative timing of activation of both signaling pathways. Activation of the GR prior to or in conjunction with cAMP signaling results in an effective repression of the cAMP-induced transcription of the CRH gene. In contrast, activation of the GR 10 minutes after onset of cAMP treatment, results in a significant loss of GR-mediated repression. In addition, translocation of ligand-activated GR to the nucleus was found as early as 10 minutes after glucocorticoid treatment. Interestingly, while both signaling cascades counteract each other on the CRH proximal promoter, they synergize on a synthetic promoter containing 'positive' response elements. Since the order of activation of both signaling pathways may vary considerably in vivo, we conclude that a critical time-window exists for effective repression of the CRH gene by glucocorticoids.

  3. Detection of Amp C genes encoding for beta-lactamases in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Shanthi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Amp C beta-lactamase are Ambler class C enzymes that confer resistance to extended spectrum cephalosporins and are not inhibited by beta-lactamase inhibitors. Their detection is crucial, since the phenotypic tests are not standardised leading to ambiguity in interpretation of results. This study was done to detect the types of Amp C prevalent in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Materials and Methods : Seventy-seven consecutive cefoxitin resistant clinical isolates of E. coli (n = 25 and K. pneumoniae (n = 52 were included in the study. Antibiotic susceptibility testing to various classes of antibiotics was performed by disc diffusion using Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC to cefoxitin, imipenem and meropenem were determined by broth microdilution method. Isolates were screened for production of Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL. Multiplex PCR was performed for the detection of Amp C genes after phenotypic testing (Hodge test and inhibitor based test. Results : Cefoxitin Hodge test was positive in 40 isolates which included 20 E. coli and 20 K. pneumoniae. There was zone enhancement with boronic acid in 55 isolates, of which 36 were K. pneumoniae and 19 were E. coli. Multiplex PCR detected Amp C in 11/25 E. coli and 12/52 K. pneumoniae isolates. The Amp C genes detected were CIT (Amp C origin - Citrobacter freundii, DHA (Dhahran Hospital, Saudi Arabia, ACC (Ambler class C, EBC (Amp C origin - Enterobacter cloacae groups. ESBL was co-produced in 54 isolates. Conclusions : Amp C was detected in 29.87% of the study isolates. Majority of them co-produced ESBL. The most common Amp C was the CIT family. Screen tests for cefoxitin resistance may be falsely positive due to production of carbapenamases.

  4. Regulation of antidepressant activity by cAMP response element binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Alana C; Blendy, Julie A

    2004-10-01

    Depression is a clinically and biologically heterogeneous disease that is one of the most prevalent and costly psychiatric disorders. It is the leading cause of disability regarding job performance and burden on family members in the United States and worldwide. Although the therapeutic efficacy of antidepressant drugs has been recognized for years, the exact molecular mechanisms of action remain elusive, making the systematic approach to the development of new drugs difficult. The acute increases in levels of monoamines brought about by various classes of antidepressants cannot account for the requirement of repeated, chronic administration for up to 2-6 wk before treatment benefits become evident. Furthermore, despite their efficacy, current antidepressant drugs improve symptoms in only 60% of patients treated. The development of new and better therapies depends on a thorough understanding of the neurobiology of depression and the molecular mechanisms underlying antidepressant drug action. Early studies focusing on alterations in the levels of receptors and second messengers helped define the important signaling pathways initiated by these drugs, whereas recent molecular studies suggested that long-term adaptations in cellular signaling mechanisms may be required for the onset and/or maintenance of antidepressant effects. Attention has now focused on downstream targets of Ca++ and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in the cell, such as the activation of transcription factors. This article discusses the transcription factor cAMP response element binding protein and a related protein, cyclic AMP response element modulator, and their roles as molecular mediators of antidepressant action.

  5. cAMP signaling in subcellular compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkimmiatis, Konstantinos; Zaccolo, Manuela

    2014-09-01

    In the complex microcosm of a cell, information security and its faithful transmission are critical for maintaining internal stability. To achieve a coordinated response of all its parts to any stimulus the cell must protect the information received from potentially confounding signals. Physical segregation of the information transmission chain ensures that only the entities able to perform the encoded task have access to the relevant information. The cAMP intracellular signaling pathway is an important system for signal transmission responsible for the ancestral 'flight or fight' response and involved in the control of critical functions including frequency and strength of heart contraction, energy metabolism and gene transcription. It is becoming increasingly apparent that the cAMP signaling pathway uses compartmentalization as a strategy for coordinating the large number of key cellular functions under its control. Spatial confinement allows the formation of cAMP signaling "hot spots" at discrete subcellular domains in response to specific stimuli, bringing the information in proximity to the relevant effectors and their recipients, thus achieving specificity of action. In this report we discuss how the different constituents of the cAMP pathway are targeted and participate in the formation of cAMP compartmentalized signaling events. We illustrate a few examples of localized cAMP signaling, with a particular focus on the nucleus, the sarcoplasmic reticulum and the mitochondria. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of interventions designed to perturb specific cAMP cascades locally. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Dynamics of cyclic machines

    CERN Document Server

    Vulfson, Iosif

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on modern methods of oscillation analysis in machines, including cyclic action mechanisms (linkages, cams, steppers, etc.). It presents schematization techniques and mathematical descriptions of oscillating systems, taking into account the variability of the parameters and nonlinearities, engineering evaluations of dynamic errors, and oscillation suppression methods. The majority of the book is devoted to the development of new methods of dynamic analysis and synthesis for cyclic machines that form regular oscillatory systems with multiple duplicate modules.  There are also sections examining aspects of general engineering interest (nonlinear dissipative forces, systems with non-stationary constraints, impacts and pseudo-impacts in clearances, etc.)  The examples in the book are based on the widely used results of theoretical and experimental studies as well as engineering calculations carried out in relation to machines used in the textile, light, polygraphic and other industries. Particu...

  7. Proteomic and Metabolic Analyses of S49 Lymphoma Cells Reveal Novel Regulation of Mitochondria by cAMP and Protein Kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilderman, Andrea; Guo, Yurong; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Perkins, Guy; Zhang, Lingzhi; Murphy, Anne N; Taylor, Susan S; Insel, Paul A

    2015-09-04

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP), acting via protein kinase A (PKA), regulates many cellular responses, but the role of mitochondria in such responses is poorly understood. To define such roles, we used quantitative proteomic analysis of mitochondria-enriched fractions and performed functional and morphologic studies of wild-type (WT) and kin(-) (PKA-null) murine S49 lymphoma cells. Basally, 75 proteins significantly differed in abundance between WT and kin(-) S49 cells. WT, but not kin(-), S49 cells incubated with the cAMP analog 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)adenosine cAMP (CPT-cAMP) for 16 h have (a) increased expression of mitochondria-related genes and proteins, including ones in pathways of branched-chain amino acid and fatty acid metabolism and (b) increased maximal capacity of respiration on branched-chain keto acids and fatty acids. CPT-cAMP also regulates the cellular rate of ATP-utilization, as the rates of both ATP-linked respiration and proton efflux are decreased in WT but not kin(-) cells. CPT-cAMP protected WT S49 cells from glucose or glutamine deprivation, In contrast, CPT-cAMP did not protect kin(-) cells or WT cells treated with the PKA inhibitor H89 from glutamine deprivation. Under basal conditions, the mitochondrial structure of WT and kin(-) S49 cells is similar. Treatment with CPT-cAMP produced apoptotic changes (i.e. decreased mitochondrial density and size and loss of cristae) in WT, but not kin(-) cells. Together, these findings show that cAMP acts via PKA to regulate multiple aspects of mitochondrial function and structure. Mitochondrial perturbation thus likely contributes to cAMP/PKA-mediated cellular responses. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Cyclic quantum teleportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Xuan; Du, Jing; Liu, Si-Yuan; Wang, Xiao-Hui

    2017-08-01

    We propose a scheme of cyclic quantum teleportation for three unknown qubits using six-qubit maximally entangled state as the quantum channel. Suppose there are three observers Alice, Bob and Charlie, each of them has been given a quantum system such as a photon or spin-1/2 particle, prepared in state unknown to them. We show how to implement the cyclic quantum teleportation where Alice can transfer her single-qubit state of qubit a to Bob, Bob can transfer his single-qubit state of qubit b to Charlie and Charlie can also transfer his single-qubit state of qubit c to Alice. We can also implement the cyclic quantum teleportation with N≥slant 3 observers by constructing a 2 N-qubit maximally entangled state as the quantum channel. By changing the quantum channel, we can change the direction of teleportation. Therefore, our scheme can realize teleportation in quantum information networks with N observers in different directions, and the security of our scheme is also investigated at the end of the paper.

  9. Intrusion Detection amp Prevention Systems - Sourcefire Snort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Vuppala

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Information security is a challenging issue for all business organizations today amidst increasing cyber threats. While there are many alternative intrusion detection amp prevention systems available to choose from selecting the best solution to implement to detect amp prevent cyber-attacks is a difficult task. The best solution is of the one that gets the best reviews and suits the organizations needs amp budget. In this review paper we summarize various classes of intrusion detection and prevention systems compare features of alternative solutions and make recommendation for implementation of one as the best solution for business organization in Fiji.

  10. cAMP Signaling of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin Blocks the Oxidative Burst of Neutrophils through Epac-Mediated Inhibition of Phospholipase C Activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, Ondřej; Anderson, K.E.; Stephens, L.R.; Hawkins, P.T.; Šebo, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 198, č. 3 (2017), s. 1285-1296 ISSN 0022-1767 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA13-14547S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015064 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : BORDETELLA-PERTUSSIS * NADPH OXIDASE * CYCLIC-AMP Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.856, year: 2016

  11. Long-Term Memory for Place Learning Is Facilitated by Expression of cAMP Response Element-Binding Protein in the Dorsal Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brightwell, Jennifer J.; Smith, Clayton A.; Neve, Rachael L.; Colombo, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    Extensive research has shown that the hippocampus is necessary for consolidation of long-term spatial memory in rodents. We reported previously that rats using a place strategy to solve a cross maze task showed sustained phosphorylation of hippocampus cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a transcription factor implicated in…

  12. Bordetella pertussis Adenylate Cyclase Toxin Blocks Induction of Bactericidal Nitric Oxide in Macrophages through cAMP-Dependent Activation of the SHP-1 Phosphatase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, Ondřej; Kamanová, Jana; Mašín, Jiří; Bíbová, Ilona; Škopová, Karolína; Šebo, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 194, č. 10 (2015), s. 4901-4913 ISSN 0022-1767 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP302/12/0460; GA ČR GA13-14547S Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : CYCLIC-AMP * MURINE MACROPHAGES * IFN-GAMMA Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.985, year: 2015

  13. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases in human spermatozoa and seminal fluid: Presence of an active PDE10A in human spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maréchal, Loïze; Guillemette, Christine; Goupil, Serge; Blondin, Patrick; Leclerc, Pierre; Richard, François J

    2017-02-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) plays a crucial role as a signaling molecule for sperm functions such as capacitation, motility and acrosome reaction. It is well known that cAMP degradation by phosphodiesterase (PDE) enzyme has a major impact on sperm functions. The present study was undertaken to characterize cAMP-PDE activity in human semen. cAMP-PDE activity was measured in human sperm and seminal plasma using family specific PDE inhibitors. Three sperm fractionation methods were applied to assess cAMP-PDE activity in spermatozoa. Western blots were used to validate the presence of specific family in sperm and seminal plasma. Using three sperm fractionation methods, we demonstrated that in human sperm, the major cAMP-PDE activity is papaverine-sensitive and thus ascribed to PDE10. In seminal plasma, total cAMP-PDE activity was 1.14±0.39fmol of cAMP hydrolyzed per minute per μg of protein. Using specific inhibitors, we showed that the major cAMP-PDE activity found in human seminal plasma is ascribed to PDE4 and PDE11. Western blot analysis, immunoprecipitation with a specific monoclonal antibody, and mass spectrometry confirmed the presence of PDE10 in human spermatozoa. This study provides the first demonstration of the presence of functional PDE10 in human spermatozoa and functional PDE4 and PDE11 in human seminal plasma. Since the contribution of cyclic nucleotides in several sperm functions is well known, the finding that PDE10 is an active enzyme in human spermatozoa is novel and may lead to new insight into fertility. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. New kids on the block: The Popeye domain containing (POPDC) protein family acting as a novel class of cAMP effector proteins in striated muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Thomas; Schindler, Roland

    2017-12-01

    The cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signalling pathway constitutes an ancient signal transduction pathway present in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Previously, it was thought that in eukaryotes three effector proteins mediate cAMP signalling, namely protein kinase A (PKA), exchange factor directly activated by cAMP (EPAC) and the cyclic-nucleotide gated channels. However, recently a novel family of cAMP effector proteins emerged and was termed the Popeye domain containing (POPDC) family, which consists of three members POPDC1, POPDC2 and POPDC3. POPDC proteins are transmembrane proteins, which are abundantly present in striated and smooth muscle cells. POPDC proteins bind cAMP with high affinity comparable to PKA. Presently, their biochemical activity is poorly understood. However, mutational analysis in animal models as well as the disease phenotype observed in patients carrying missense mutations suggests that POPDC proteins are acting by modulating membrane trafficking of interacting proteins. In this review, we will describe the current knowledge about this gene family and also outline the apparent gaps in our understanding of their role in cAMP signalling and beyond. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Adenyl cyclases and cAMP in plant signaling - Past and present

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A.

    2010-06-25

    In lower eukaryotes and animals 3\\'-5\\'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenyl cyclases (ACs), enzymes that catalyse the formation of cAMP from ATP, have long been established as key components and second messengers in many signaling pathways. In contrast, in plants, both the presence and biological role of cAMP have been a matter of ongoing debate and some controversy. Here we shall focus firstly on the discovery of cellular cAMP in plants and evidence for a role of this second messenger in plant signal transduction. Secondly, we shall review current evidence of plant ACs, analyse aspects of their domain organisations and the biological roles of candidate molecules. In addition, we shall assess different approaches based on search motifs consisting of functionally assigned amino acids in the catalytic centre of annotated and/or experimentally tested nucleotide cyclases that can contribute to the identification of novel candidate molecules with AC activity such as F-box and TIR proteins. 2010 Gehring; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  16. Warmer amps for the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    CERN is working together with an Italian company to develop superconducting cables that can function at temperatures of up to 25 K (-248°C). This will make it possible to move LHC magnet power supplies out of the tunnel, protecting them from exposure to the showers of very high-energy particles produced by the accelerator.   Figure 1: devices of this type, which measure approximately 10 metres in length, are inserted between the accelerating magnets at different points along the LHC. When it comes to consuming electricity, the magnets that steer particles through large accelerators can be characterised with just one word: greedy. For the LHC, the total current can reach 1.5 million amps. At the present time, this current is brought in via copper cables of up to 10 cm in diameter. In the tunnel, these cables connect the current leads - which provide the transition between the ambient-temperature cables and the magnets in their bath of superfluid helium - to the power supply. In the a...

  17. Progress in Understanding the Molecular Basis Underlying Functional Diversification of Cyclic Dinucleotide Turnover Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Römling, Ute; Liang, Zhao-Xun; Dow, J Maxwell

    2017-03-01

    Cyclic di-GMP was the first cyclic dinucleotide second messenger described, presaging the discovery of additional cyclic dinucleotide messengers in bacteria and eukaryotes. The GGDEF diguanylate cyclase (DGC) and EAL and HD-GYP phosphodiesterase (PDE) domains conduct the turnover of cyclic di-GMP. These three unrelated domains belong to superfamilies that exhibit significant variations in function, and they include both enzymatically active and inactive members, with a subset involved in synthesis and degradation of other cyclic dinucleotides. Here, we summarize current knowledge of sequence and structural variations that underpin the functional diversification of cyclic di-GMP turnover proteins. Moreover, we highlight that superfamily diversification is not restricted to cyclic di-GMP signaling domains, as particular DHH/DHHA1 domain and HD domain proteins have been shown to act as cyclic di-AMP phosphodiesterases. We conclude with a consideration of the current limitations that such diversity of action places on bioinformatic prediction of the roles of GGDEF, EAL, and HD-GYP domain proteins. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Cyclic Nucleotide Monophosphates and Their Cyclases in Plant Signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A.

    2017-10-04

    The cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (cNMPs), and notably 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) are now accepted as key signaling molecules in many processes in plants including growth and differentiation, photosynthesis, and biotic and abiotic defense. At the single molecule level, we are now beginning to understand how cNMPs modify specific target molecules such as cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, while at the systems level, a recent study of the Arabidopsis cNMP interactome has identified novel target molecules with specific cNMP-binding domains. A major advance came with the discovery and characterization of a steadily increasing number of guanylate cyclases (GCs) and adenylate cyclases (ACs). Several of the GCs are receptor kinases and include the brassinosteroid receptor, the phytosulfokine receptor, the Pep receptor, the plant natriuretic peptide receptor as well as a nitric oxide sensor. We foresee that in the near future many more molecular mechanisms and biological roles of GCs and ACs and their catalytic products will be discovered and further establish cNMPs as a key component of plant responses to the environment.

  19. Reliability of the school AMPS measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkholm, Michaela; Löfgren, Britta; Fisher, Anne G

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use a variety of methods to evaluate and cross-validate the reliability estimates of the quality of schoolwork performance measures in the School Version of the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (School AMPS) (1). Split-half reliability was estimated based on School AMPS data from 6 194 students who had performed at least two school AMPS tasks. Two different split-half methods were used: splitting the School AMPS items vertically and splitting them horizontally. The Rasch equivalent of Cronbach's alpha for the full School AMPS evaluation and standard error of measurement (SEm) were also considered. All three methods yielded high reliability coefficient estimates (r ≥ 0.70) and overall SEm was low. From a practice perspective, the results of this study are of clinical importance as they provide evidence that occupational therapists can have confidence in the consistency of the School AMPS measures when they are used in the process of making decisions about individual students, planning interventions, and later performing follow-up evaluations to measure the outcome.

  20. [Asthma and cyclic neutropenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar Cabrera, A N; Berrón Pérez, R; Ortega Martell, J A; Onuma Takane, E

    1996-01-01

    We report a male with history of recurrent infections (recurrent oral aphtous disease [ROAD], middle ear infections and pharyngo amigdalitis) every 3 weeks since he was 7 months old. At the age of 3 years cyclic neutropenia was diagnosed with cyclic fall in the total neutrophil count in blood smear every 21 days and prophylactic antimicrobial therapy was indicated. Episodic events every 3 weeks of acute asthma and allergic rhinitis were detected at the age of 6 years old and specific immunotherapy to Bermuda grass was given during 3 years with markedly improvement in his allergic condition but not in the ROAD. He came back until the age of 16 with episodic acute asthma and ROAD. The total neutrophil count failed to 0 every 21 days and surprisingly the total eosinophil count increased up to 2,000 at the same time, with elevation of serum IgE (412 Ul/mL). Specific immunotherapy to D.pt. and Aller.a. and therapy with timomodulin was indicated. After 3 months we observed clinical improvement in the asthmatic condition and the ROAD disappeared, but the total neutrophil count did not improve. We present this case as a rare association between 2 diseases with probably no etiological relationship but may be physiopatological that could help to understand more the pathogenesis of asthma.

  1. Escherichia coli Heat-Stable Enterotoxin Mediates Na+/H+ Exchanger 4 Inhibition Involving cAMP in T84 Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrán, Ana R; Carraro-Lacroix, Luciene R; Bezerra, Camila N A; Cornejo, Marcelo; Norambuena, Katrina; Toledo, Fernando; Araos, Joaquín; Pardo, Fabián; Leiva, Andrea; Sanhueza, Carlos; Malnic, Gerhard; Sobrevia, Luis; Ramírez, Marco A

    2015-01-01

    The enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli strains lead to diarrhoea in humans due to heat-labile and heat-stable (STa) enterotoxins. STa increases Cl-release in intestinal cells, including the human colonic carcinoma T84 cell line, involving increased cGMP and membrane alkalization due to reduced Na+/H+ exchangers (NHEs) activity. Since NHEs modulate intracellular pH (pHi), and NHE1, NHE2, and NHE4 are expressed in T84 cells, we characterized the STa role as modulator of these exchangers. pHi was assayed by the NH4Cl pulse technique and measured by fluorescence microscopy in BCECF-preloaded cells. pHi recovery rate (dpHi/dt) was determined in the absence or presence of 0.25 μmol/L STa (30 minutes), 25 μmol/L HOE-694 (concentration inhibiting NHE1 and NHE2), 500 μmol/L sodium nitroprusside (SNP, spontaneous nitric oxide donor), 100 μmol/L dibutyryl cyclic GMP (db-cGMP), 100 nmol/L H89 (protein kinase A inhibitor), or 10 μmol/L forskolin (adenylyl cyclase activator). cGMP and cAMP were measured in cell extracts by radioimmunoassay, and buffering capacity (ßi) and H+ efflux (JH+) was determined. NHE4 protein abundance was determined by western blotting. STa and HOE-694 caused comparable reduction in dpHi/dt and JH+ (~63%), without altering basal pHi (range 7.144-7.172). STa did not alter ßi value in a range of 1.6 pHi units. The dpHi/dt and JH+ was almost abolished (~94% inhibition) by STa + HOE-694. STa effect was unaltered by db-cGMP or SNP. However, STa and forskolin increased cAMP level. STa-decreased dpHi/dt and JH+ was mimicked by forskolin, and STa + HOE-694 effect was abolished by H89. Thus, incubation of T84 cells with STa results in reduced NHE4 activity leading to a lower capacity of pHi recovery requiring cAMP, but not cGMP. STa effect results in a causal phenomenon (STa/increased cAMP/increased PKA activity/reduced NHE4 activity) ending with intracellular acidification that could have consequences in the gastrointestinal cells function promoting human

  2. Pharmacological modification of pulmonary vascular injury: possible role of cAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrukh, I S; Gurtner, G H; Michael, J R

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that drugs which increase adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) in the lung would prevent the pulmonary hypertension and the increase in vascular permeability caused by the infusion of the oxidant lipid peroxide, tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-bu-OOH), in isolated rabbit lungs perfused with Krebs-Henseleit buffer. Pretreatment with indomethacin or verapamil was also studied, since these drugs block the increase in pulmonary arterial pressure caused by t-bu-OOH. Indomethacin or verapamil prevented the pulmonary hypertension but did not prevent the increase in permeability caused by t-bu-OOH. Consequently, indomethacin or verapamil treatment partially reduced the gain in lung weight caused by t-bu-OOH. In contrast, pretreatment with isoproterenol, prostaglandin E1, or a cAMP analogue not only prevented the pulmonary hypertension but also inhibited the increase in vascular permeability caused by t-bu-OOH. Consequently, these drugs completely blocked the gain in lung weight caused by t-bu-OOH. Posttreatment with aminophylline or the cAMP analogue also significantly reduced the gain in lung weight caused by t-bu-OOH. These results indicate that pharmacological therapy can reduce the pulmonary hypertension and the increase in vascular permeability caused by the infusion of a lipid hydroperoxide. Since isoproterenol, aminophylline, prostaglandin E1, and a cAMP analogue all had similar effects, the results suggest that the likely common mechanism for their protective effect is an increase in cAMP.

  3. FimL regulates cAMP synthesis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki F Inclan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous bacteria found in diverse ecological niches, is an important cause of acute infections in immunocompromised individuals and chronic infections in patients with Cystic Fibrosis. One signaling molecule required for the coordinate regulation of virulence factors associated with acute infections is 3', 5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate, (cAMP, which binds to and activates a catabolite repressor homolog, Vfr. Vfr controls the transcription of many virulence factors, including those associated with Type IV pili (TFP, the Type III secretion system (T3SS, the Type II secretion system, flagellar-mediated motility, and quorum sensing systems. We previously identified FimL, a protein with histidine phosphotransfer-like domains, as a regulator of Vfr-dependent processes, including TFP-dependent motility and T3SS function. In this study, we carried out genetic and physiologic studies to further define the mechanism of action of FimL. Through a genetic screen designed to identify suppressors of FimL, we found a putative cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (CpdA, suggesting that FimL regulates cAMP levels. Inactivation of CpdA increases cAMP levels and restores TFP-dependent motility and T3SS function to fimL mutants, consistent with in vivo phosphodiesterase activity. By constructing combinations of double and triple mutants in the two adenylate cyclase genes (cyaA and cyaB, fimL, and cpdA, we show that ΔfimL mutants resemble ΔcyaB mutants in TM defects, decreased T3SS transcription, and decreased cAMP levels. Similar to some of the virulence factors that they regulate, we demonstrate that CyaB and FimL are polarly localized. These results reveal new complexities in the regulation of diverse virulence pathways associated with acute P. aeruginosa infections.

  4. cAMP signalling regulates synchronised growth of symbiotic Epichloë fungi with the host grass Lolium perenne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Rosalie Voisey

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The seed-transmitted fungal symbiont, Epichloë festucae, colonizes grasses by infecting host tissues as they form on the shoot apical meristem (SAM of the seedling. How this fungus accommodates the complexities of plant development to successfully colonize the leaves and inflorescences is unclear. Since adenosine 3′, 5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP-dependent signaling is often essential for host colonization by fungal pathogens, we disrupted the cAMP cascade by insertional mutagenesis of the E. festucae adenylate cyclase gene (acyA. Consistent with deletions of this gene in other fungi, acyA mutants had a slow radial growth rate in culture, and hyphae were convoluted and hyper-branched suggesting that fungal apical dominance had been disrupted. Nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT staining of hyphae showed that cAMP disruption mutants were impaired in their ability to synthesize superoxide, indicating that cAMP signaling regulates accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Despite significant defects in hyphal growth and ROS production, E. festucae ΔacyA mutants were infectious and capable of forming symbiotic associations with grasses. Plants infected with E. festucae ΔacyA were marginally less robust than the wild-type (WT, however hyphae were hyper-branched, and leaf tissues heavily colonized, indicating that the tight regulation of hyphal growth normally observed in maturing leaves requires functional cAMP signaling.

  5. Increases in cAMP, MAPK activity, and CREB phosphorylation during REM sleep: implications for REM sleep and memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Jie; Phan, Trongha X; Yang, Yimei; Garelick, Michael G; Storm, Daniel R

    2013-04-10

    The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) transcriptional pathway is required for consolidation of hippocampus-dependent memory. In mice, this pathway undergoes a circadian oscillation required for memory persistence that reaches a peak during the daytime. Because mice exhibit polyphasic sleep patterns during the day, this suggested the interesting possibility that cAMP, MAPK activity, and CREB phosphorylation may be elevated during sleep. Here, we report that cAMP, phospho-p44/42 MAPK, and phospho-CREB are higher in rapid eye movement (REM) sleep compared with awake mice but are not elevated in non-REM sleep. This peak of activity during REM sleep does not occur in mice lacking calmodulin-stimulated adenylyl cyclases, a mouse strain that learns but cannot consolidate hippocampus-dependent memory. We conclude that a preferential increase in cAMP, MAPK activity, and CREB phosphorylation during REM sleep may contribute to hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation.

  6. Coordinated induction of GST and MRP2 by cAMP in Caco-2 cells: Role of protein kinase A signaling pathway and toxicological relevance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arana, Maite Rocío, E-mail: arana@ifise-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Tocchetti, Guillermo Nicolás, E-mail: gtocchetti@live.com.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Domizi, Pablo, E-mail: domizi@ibr-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Rosario (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Arias, Agostina, E-mail: agoarias@yahoo.com.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Rigalli, Juan Pablo, E-mail: jprigalli@gmail.com [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Ruiz, María Laura, E-mail: ruiz@ifise-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Fisiología Experimental (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas (UNR), Suipacha 570, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); and others

    2015-09-01

    The cAMP pathway is a universal signaling pathway regulating many cellular processes including metabolic routes, growth and differentiation. However, its effects on xenobiotic biotransformation and transport systems are poorly characterized. The effect of cAMP on expression and activity of GST and MRP2 was evaluated in Caco-2 cells, a model of intestinal epithelium. Cells incubated with the cAMP permeable analog dibutyryl cyclic AMP (db-cAMP: 1,10,100 μM) for 48 h exhibited a dose–response increase in GST class α and MRP2 protein expression. Incubation with forskolin, an activator of adenylyl cyclase, confirmed the association between intracellular cAMP and upregulation of MRP2. Consistent with increased expression of GSTα and MRP2, db-cAMP enhanced their activities, as well as cytoprotection against the common substrate 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene. Pretreatment with protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitors totally abolished upregulation of MRP2 and GSTα induced by db-cAMP. In silico analysis together with experiments consisting of treatment with db-cAMP of Caco-2 cells transfected with a reporter construct containing CRE and AP-1 sites evidenced participation of these sites in MRP2 upregulation. Further studies involving the transcription factors CREB and AP-1 (c-JUN, c-FOS and ATF2) demonstrated increased levels of total c-JUN and phosphorylation of c-JUN and ATF2 by db-cAMP, which were suppressed by a PKA inhibitor. Co-immunoprecipitation and ChIP assay studies demonstrated that db-cAMP increased c-JUN/ATF2 interaction, with further recruitment to the region of the MRP2 promoter containing CRE and AP-1 sites. We conclude that cAMP induces GSTα and MRP2 expression and activity in Caco-2 cells via the PKA pathway, thus regulating detoxification of specific xenobiotics. - Highlights: • cAMP positively modulates the expression and activity of GST and MRP2 in Caco-2 cells. • Such induction resulted in increased cytoprotection against chemical injury. • PKA

  7. Opioid receptor activation triggering downregulation of cAMP improves effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Claudia; Hormann, Inis; Roscher, Mareike; Fichtner, Iduna; Alt, Andreas; Hilger, Ralf; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Miltner, Erich

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma are the most frequent and malignant human brain tumors, having a very poor prognosis. The enhanced radio- and chemoresistance of glioblastoma and the glioblastoma stem cells might be the main reason why conventional therapies fail. The second messenger cyclic AMP (cAMP) controls cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Downregulation of cAMP sensitizes tumor cells for anti-cancer treatment. Opioid receptor agonists triggering opioid receptors can activate inhibitory Gi proteins, which, in turn, block adenylyl cyclase activity reducing cAMP. In this study, we show that downregulation of cAMP by opioid receptor activation improves the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma. The µ-opioid receptor agonist D,L-methadone sensitizes glioblastoma as well as the untreatable glioblastoma stem cells for doxorubicin-induced apoptosis and activation of apoptosis pathways by reversing deficient caspase activation and deficient downregulation of XIAP and Bcl-xL, playing critical roles in glioblastomas' resistance. Blocking opioid receptors using the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone or increasing intracellular cAMP by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) strongly reduced opioid receptor agonist-induced sensitization for doxorubicin. In addition, the opioid receptor agonist D,L-methadone increased doxorubicin uptake and decreased doxorubicin efflux, whereas doxorubicin increased opioid receptor expression in glioblastomas. Furthermore, opioid receptor activation using D,L-methadone inhibited tumor growth significantly in vivo. Our findings suggest that opioid receptor activation triggering downregulation of cAMP is a promising strategy to inhibit tumor growth and to improve the effectiveness of anti-cancer drugs in treatment of glioblastoma and in killing glioblastoma stem cells.

  8. Protein phosphatase 2C is involved in the cAMP-dependent ciliary control in Paramecium caudatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Munenori; Sasaki, Jun-Ya; Kamachi, Hiroyuki; Inoue, Hiroshi

    2003-02-01

    Forward swimming of the Triton-extracted model of Paramecium is stimulated by cAMP. Backward swimming of the model induced by Ca(2+) is depressed by cAMP. Cyclic AMP and Ca(2+) act antagonistically in setting the direction of the ciliary beat. Some ciliary axonemal proteins from Paramecium caudatum are phosphorylated in a cAMP-dependent manner. In the presence of cAMP, axonemal 29- and 65-kDa polypeptides were phosphorylated by endogenous A-kinase in vitro. These phosphoproteins, however, were not dephosphorylated after in vitro phosphorylation, presumably because of the low endogenous phosphoprotein phosphatase activity associated with isolated axonemes. We purified the protein phosphatase that specifically dephosphorylated the 29- and 65-kDa phosphoproteins from Paramecium caudatum. The molecular weight of the protein phosphatase was 33 kDa. The protein phosphatase had common characteristics as protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C). The characteristics of the protein phosphatase were the same as those of the PP2C from Paramecium tetraurelia (PtPP2C) [Grothe et al., 1998: J. Biol. Chem. 273:19167-19172]. We concluded that the phosphoprotein phosphatase is the PP2C from Paramecium caudatum (PcPP2C). The PcPP2C markedly accelerated the backward swimming of the Triton-extracted model in the presence of Ca(2+). On the other hand, the PcPP2C slightly depressed the forward swimming speed. This indicates that the PP2C plays a role in the cAMP-dependent regulation of ciliary movement in Paramecium caudatum through dephosphorylation of 29- and/or 65-kDa regulatory phosphoproteins by terminating the action of cAMP. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. The arabidopsis cyclic nucleotide interactome

    KAUST Repository

    Donaldson, Lara Elizabeth

    2016-05-11

    Background Cyclic nucleotides have been shown to play important signaling roles in many physiological processes in plants including photosynthesis and defence. Despite this, little is known about cyclic nucleotide-dependent signaling mechanisms in plants since the downstream target proteins remain unknown. This is largely due to the fact that bioinformatics searches fail to identify plant homologs of protein kinases and phosphodiesterases that are the main targets of cyclic nucleotides in animals. Methods An affinity purification technique was used to identify cyclic nucleotide binding proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. The identified proteins were subjected to a computational analysis that included a sequence, transcriptional co-expression and functional annotation analysis in order to assess their potential role in plant cyclic nucleotide signaling. Results A total of twelve cyclic nucleotide binding proteins were identified experimentally including key enzymes in the Calvin cycle and photorespiration pathway. Importantly, eight of the twelve proteins were shown to contain putative cyclic nucleotide binding domains. Moreover, the identified proteins are post-translationally modified by nitric oxide, transcriptionally co-expressed and annotated to function in hydrogen peroxide signaling and the defence response. The activity of one of these proteins, GLYGOLATE OXIDASE 1, a photorespiratory enzyme that produces hydrogen peroxide in response to Pseudomonas, was shown to be repressed by a combination of cGMP and nitric oxide treatment. Conclusions We propose that the identified proteins function together as points of cross-talk between cyclic nucleotide, nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species signaling during the defence response.

  10. Cyclic transfers in school timetabling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Gerhard F.; Ahmadi, Samad; Geertsema, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we propose a neighbourhood structure based on sequential/cyclic moves and a cyclic transfer algorithm for the high school timetabling problem. This method enables execution of complex moves for improving an existing solution, while dealing with the challenge of exploring the

  11. Cyclic transfers in school timetabling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Gerhard F.; Ahmadi, Samad; Geertsema, Frederik

    In this paper we propose a neighbourhood structure based on sequential/cyclic moves and a Cyclic Transfer algorithm for the high school timetabling problem. This method enables execution of complex moves for improving an existing solution, while dealing with the challenge of exploring the

  12. The crystal structures of apo and cAMP-bound GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum reveal structural and dynamic changes upon cAMP binding in CRP/FNR family transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Philip D; Jungwirth, Britta; Pojer, Florence; Bußmann, Michael; Money, Victoria A; Cole, Stewart T; Pühler, Alfred; Tauch, Andreas; Bott, Michael; Cann, Martin J; Pohl, Ehmke

    2014-01-01

    The cyclic AMP-dependent transcriptional regulator GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum is a member of the super-family of CRP/FNR (cyclic AMP receptor protein/fumarate and nitrate reduction regulator) transcriptional regulators that play central roles in bacterial metabolic regulatory networks. In C. glutamicum, which is widely used for the industrial production of amino acids and serves as a non-pathogenic model organism for members of the Corynebacteriales including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the GlxR homodimer controls the transcription of a large number of genes involved in carbon metabolism. GlxR therefore represents a key target for understanding the regulation and coordination of C. glutamicum metabolism. Here we investigate cylic AMP and DNA binding of GlxR from C. glutamicum and describe the crystal structures of apo GlxR determined at a resolution of 2.5 Å, and two crystal forms of holo GlxR at resolutions of 2.38 and 1.82 Å, respectively. The detailed structural analysis and comparison of GlxR with CRP reveals that the protein undergoes a distinctive conformational change upon cyclic AMP binding leading to a dimer structure more compatible to DNA-binding. As the two binding sites in the GlxR homodimer are structurally identical dynamic changes upon binding of the first ligand are responsible for the allosteric behavior. The results presented here show how dynamic and structural changes in GlxR lead to optimization of orientation and distance of its two DNA-binding helices for optimal DNA recognition.

  13. The crystal structures of apo and cAMP-bound GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum reveal structural and dynamic changes upon cAMP binding in CRP/FNR family transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip D Townsend

    Full Text Available The cyclic AMP-dependent transcriptional regulator GlxR from Corynebacterium glutamicum is a member of the super-family of CRP/FNR (cyclic AMP receptor protein/fumarate and nitrate reduction regulator transcriptional regulators that play central roles in bacterial metabolic regulatory networks. In C. glutamicum, which is widely used for the industrial production of amino acids and serves as a non-pathogenic model organism for members of the Corynebacteriales including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the GlxR homodimer controls the transcription of a large number of genes involved in carbon metabolism. GlxR therefore represents a key target for understanding the regulation and coordination of C. glutamicum metabolism. Here we investigate cylic AMP and DNA binding of GlxR from C. glutamicum and describe the crystal structures of apo GlxR determined at a resolution of 2.5 Å, and two crystal forms of holo GlxR at resolutions of 2.38 and 1.82 Å, respectively. The detailed structural analysis and comparison of GlxR with CRP reveals that the protein undergoes a distinctive conformational change upon cyclic AMP binding leading to a dimer structure more compatible to DNA-binding. As the two binding sites in the GlxR homodimer are structurally identical dynamic changes upon binding of the first ligand are responsible for the allosteric behavior. The results presented here show how dynamic and structural changes in GlxR lead to optimization of orientation and distance of its two DNA-binding helices for optimal DNA recognition.

  14. Phosphorylation of beta-catenin by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taurin, Sebastien; Sandbo, Nathan; Qin, Yimin; Browning, Darren; Dulin, Nickolai O

    2006-04-14

    Beta-catenin is a signaling molecule that promotes cell proliferation by the induction of gene transcription through the activation of T-cell factor (TCF)/lymphoid enhancer factor (LEF) transcription factors. The canonical mechanism of the regulation of beta-catenin involves its phosphorylation by casein kinase 1 at the Ser-45 site and by glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) at the Thr-41, Ser-37, and Ser-33 sites. This phosphorylation targets beta-catenin to ubiquitination and degradation by the proteasome system. Mitogenic factors promote beta-catenin signaling through the inhibition of GSK3, resulting in reduced beta-catenin phosphorylation, its stabilization, and subsequent accumulation in the nucleus, where it stimulates TCF/LEF-dependent gene transcription. In the present study, we have shown that (i) beta-catenin can be phosphorylated by protein kinase A (PKA) in vitro and in intact cells at two novel sites, Ser-552 and Ser-675; (ii) phosphorylation by PKA promotes the transcriptional activity (TCF/LEF transactivation) of beta-catenin; (iii) mutation of Ser-675 attenuates the promoting effect of PKA; (iv) phosphorylation by PKA does not affect the GSK3-dependent phosphorylation of beta-catenin, its stability, or intracellular localization; and (v) phosphorylation at the Ser-675 site promotes the binding of beta-catenin to its transcriptional coactivator, CREB-binding protein. In conclusion, this study identifies a novel, noncanonical mechanism of modulation of beta-catenin signaling through direct phosphorylation of beta-catenin by PKA, promoting its interaction with CREB-binding protein.

  15. Serum modulates cyclic AMP-dependent morphological changes in cultured neurohypophysial astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsell, K D; Zhao, B G; Baker, D; Cobbett, P

    1996-01-01

    The effects of serum on the morphological plasticity exhibited by pituicytes in explant cultures of the neurohypophysis of adult rats have been examined. Cultured pituicytes are normally nonstellate, protoplasmic, amorphous cells (< 25% are stellate with a distinct cell body and phase bright processes). After incubation (90 min) of pituicyte cultures in a HEPES buffered salt solution (HBSS) supplemented with isoproterenol or forskolin, the fraction of stellate pituicytes significantly increased. The increase in the fraction of stellate cells induced by isoproterenol was not reversed by subsequent incubation in isoproterenol-free HBSS for 90 min. In contrast, after stellation was induced in cultures by exposure to forskolin (90 min), the fraction of stellate cells was significantly reduced if these cultures were incubated in forskolin-free, serum (0.5%) supplemented HBSS for the same duration. Serum also blocked the increase in the fraction of stellate pituicytes induced by forskolin. These experiments suggest that serum components may have a significant role in controlling the plasticity of neuroglial relations in the neurohypophysis previously demonstrated in vivo.

  16. Maggot secretions suppress pro-inflammatory responses of human monocytes through elevation of cyclic AMP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plas, M.P.E.; Baldry, M.; Dissel, van J.T.; Jukema, G.N.; Nibbering, P.H.

    2009-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Maggots of the blowfly Lucilia sericata are used for the treatment of chronic wounds. As monocytes may contribute to the excessive inflammatory responses in such wounds, this study focussed on the effects of maggot secretions on the pro-inflammatory activities of these cells.

  17. Activation of cyclic AMP Signaling in Ae2-deficient mouse fibroblasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mardones, Pablo; Medina, Juan F.; Elferink, Ronald P. J. Oude

    2008-01-01

    Anion exchanger 2 (AE2, SLC4A2) is a ubiquitously expressed membrane solute carrier that regulates intracellular pH (pH(i)) by exchanging cytosolic bicarbonate for extracellular chloride. We used fibroblasts from Ae2-deficient (Ae2(a,b)(-/-)) mice to study the effects of an alkaline shift in resting

  18. Reduction of extended-spectrum-β-lactamase- and AmpC-β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli through processing in two broiler chicken slaughterhouses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacholewicz, Ewa; Liakopoulos, Apostolos; Swart, Arno; Gortemaker, Betty; Dierikx, Cindy; Havelaar, Arie; Schmitt, Heike

    2015-01-01

    Whilst broilers are recognised as a reservoir of extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)- and AmpC-β-lactamase (AmpC)-producing Escherichia coli, there is currently limited knowledge on the effect of slaughtering on its concentrations on poultry meat. The aim of this study was to establish the

  19. Reduction of extended-spectrum-β-lactamase- and AmpC-β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli through processing in two broiler chicken slaughterhouses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacholewicz, Ewa; Liakopoulos, Apostolos; Swart, Arno; Gortemaker, Betty; Dierikx, Cindy; Havelaar, Arie|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072306122; Schmitt, Heike|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304831042

    2015-01-01

    Whilst broilers are recognised as a reservoir of extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)- and AmpC-β-lactamase (AmpC)-producing Escherichia coli, there is currently limited knowledge on the effect of slaughtering on its concentrations on poultry meat. The aim of this study was to establish the

  20. Targeting of type I protein kinase A to lipid rafts is required for platelet inhibition by the 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate-signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raslan, Z; Magwenzi, S; Aburima, A; Taskén, K; Naseem, K M

    2015-09-01

    Platelet adhesion to von Willebrand factor (VWF) is modulated by 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling through protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation of glycoprotein (GP)Ibβ. A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) are proposed to control the localization and substrate specificity of individual PKA isoforms. However, the role of PKA isoforms in regulating the phosphorylation of GPIbβ and platelet response to VWF is unknown. We wished to determine the role of PKA isoforms in the phosphorylation of GPIbβ and platelet activation by VWF as a model for exploring the selective partitioning of cAMP signaling in platelets. The two isoforms of PKA in platelets, type I (PKA-I) and type II (PKA-II), were differentially localized, with a small pool of PKA-I found in lipid rafts. Using a combination of Far Western blotting, immunoprecipitation, proximity ligation assay and cAMP pull-down we identified moesin as an AKAP that potentially localizes PKA-I to rafts. Introduction of cell-permeable anchoring disruptor peptide, RI anchoring disruptor (RIAD-Arg11 ), to block PKA-I/AKAP interactions, uncoupled PKA-RI from moesin, displaced PKA-RI from rafts and reduced kinase activity in rafts. Examination of GPIbβ demonstrated that it was phosphorylated in response to low concentrations of PGI2 in a PKA-dependent manner and occurred primarily in lipid raft fractions. RIAD-Arg11 caused a significant reduction in raft-localized phosphoGPIbβ and diminished the ability of PGI2 to regulate VWF-mediated aggregation and thrombus formation in vitro. We propose that PKA-I-specific AKAPs in platelets, including moesin, organize a selective localization of PKA-I required for phosphorylation of GPIbβ and contribute to inhibition of platelet VWF interactions. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  1. Structure of the SthK carboxy-terminal region reveals a gating mechanism for cyclic nucleotide-modulated ion channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Kesters

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotide-sensitive ion channels are molecular pores that open in response to cAMP or cGMP, which are universal second messengers. Binding of a cyclic nucleotide to the carboxyterminal cyclic nucleotide binding domain (CNBD of these channels is thought to cause a conformational change that promotes channel opening. The C-linker domain, which connects the channel pore to this CNBD, plays an important role in coupling ligand binding to channel opening. Current structural insight into this mechanism mainly derives from X-ray crystal structures of the C-linker/CNBD from hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-modulated (HCN channels. However, these structures reveal little to no conformational changes upon comparison of the ligand-bound and unbound form. In this study, we take advantage of a recently identified prokaryote ion channel, SthK, which has functional properties that strongly resemble cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG channels and is activated by cAMP, but not by cGMP. We determined X-ray crystal structures of the C-linker/CNBD of SthK in the presence of cAMP or cGMP. We observe that the structure in complex with cGMP, which is an antagonist, is similar to previously determined HCN channel structures. In contrast, the structure in complex with cAMP, which is an agonist, is in a more open conformation. We observe that the CNBD makes an outward swinging movement, which is accompanied by an opening of the C-linker. This conformation mirrors the open gate structures of the Kv1.2 channel or MthK channel, which suggests that the cAMP-bound C-linker/CNBD from SthK represents an activated conformation. These results provide a structural framework for better understanding cyclic nucleotide modulation of ion channels, including HCN and CNG channels.

  2. Investigation of Cyclic Deformation and Fatigue of Polycrystalline Cu under Pure Compression Cyclic Loading Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Tzu-Yin Jean

    It is commonly accepted that fatigue crack is initiated under tensile fatigue stresses. However, practical examples demonstrate that cracks may also initiate under pure compressive fluctuating loads such as the failures observed in aircraft landing gear frames. However, the mechanism of such failures is rarely investigated. Furthermore, knowledge on cyclic deformation response under pure compressive fatigue condition is also very limited or non-existent. Our recent work already verified that fatigue cracks may nucleate from stress concentration sites under pure compression fatigue, but whether or not a form of stress concentration is always needed to initiate a crack under pure compression fatigue remains uncertain. In this study, compression fatigue tests under different peak stresses were carried out on smooth bars of fully annealed OFHC Copper. The purpose of these tests is to investigate not only the cyclic deformation response but also the possibility of crack nucleation without the stress concentrator. Results showed that overall the cyclic stress-strain response and microstructural evolution of OFHC Copper under pure compression fatigue exhibits rather dissimilar behaviour compared to those under symmetrical fatigue. The specimens hardened rapidly within 10 cycles under pure compression fatigue unlike the gradual cyclic hardening behaviour in symmetrical fatigue with the same peak stress amplitude. Compressive cyclic creep behaviour was also observed under the same testing conditions. Moreover, unlike conventional tension-compression fatigue, only moderate slip activity was detectable on the surface instead of typical PSB features detected from TEM observations. The surface observations has revealed that surface slip bands did not increase in number nor did they become more pronounced in height with increasing number of cycles. In addition, surface roughening by grain boundary extrusion was detected to become more severe as the cycling progressed. Therefore

  3. Uniform cAMP stimulation of Dictyostelium cells induces localized patches of signal transduction and pseudopodia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, M.; Roelofs, J.; Goedhart, J.; Gadella, T.W.J.; Visser, A.J.W.G.; Haastert, van P.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The chemoattractant cAMP induces the translocation of cytosolic PHCrac-GFP to the plasma membrane. PHCrac-GFP is a green fluorescent protein fused to a PH domain that presumably binds to phosphatydylinositol polyphosphates in the membrane. We determined the relative concentration of PHCrac-GFP in

  4. Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs) with Dual Mechanisms: Membrane Disruption and Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juneyoung; Lee, Dong Gun

    2015-06-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are one of the critical components in host innate immune responses to imbalanced and invading microbial pathogens. Although the antimicrobial activity and mechanism of action have been thoroughly investigated for decades, the exact biological properties of AMPs are still elusive. Most AMPs generally exert the antimicrobial effect by targeting the microbial membrane, such as barrel stave, toroidal, and carpet mechanisms. Thus, the mode of action in model membranes and the discrimination of AMPs to discrepant lipid compositions between mammalian cells and microbial pathogens (cell selectivity) have been studied intensively. However, the latest reports suggest that not only AMPs recently isolated but also well-known membrane-disruptive AMPs play a role in intracellular killing, such as apoptosis induction. In this mini-review, we will review some representative AMPs and their antimicrobial mechanisms and provide new insights into the dual mechanism of AMPs.

  5. AMPS/PC - AUTOMATIC MANUFACTURING PROGRAMMING SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroer, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    The AMPS/PC system is a simulation tool designed to aid the user in defining the specifications of a manufacturing environment and then automatically writing code for the target simulation language, GPSS/PC. The domain of problems that AMPS/PC can simulate are manufacturing assembly lines with subassembly lines and manufacturing cells. The user defines the problem domain by responding to the questions from the interface program. Based on the responses, the interface program creates an internal problem specification file. This file includes the manufacturing process network flow and the attributes for all stations, cells, and stock points. AMPS then uses the problem specification file as input for the automatic code generator program to produce a simulation program in the target language GPSS. The output of the generator program is the source code of the corresponding GPSS/PC simulation program. The system runs entirely on an IBM PC running PC DOS Version 2.0 or higher and is written in Turbo Pascal Version 4 requiring 640K memory and one 360K disk drive. To execute the GPSS program, the PC must have resident the GPSS/PC System Version 2.0 from Minuteman Software. The AMPS/PC program was developed in 1988.

  6. PDE4-Mediated cAMP Signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bracy A. Fertig

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available cAMP is the archetypal and ubiquitous second messenger utilised for the fine control of many cardiovascular cell signalling systems. The ability of cAMP to elicit cell surface receptor-specific responses relies on its compartmentalisation by cAMP hydrolysing enzymes known as phosphodiesterases. One family of these enzymes, PDE4, is particularly important in the cardiovascular system, where it has been extensively studied and shown to orchestrate complex, localised signalling that underpins many crucial functions of the heart. In the cardiac myocyte, cAMP activates PKA, which phosphorylates a small subset of mostly sarcoplasmic substrate proteins that drive β-adrenergic enhancement of cardiac function. The phosphorylation of these substrates, many of which are involved in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling, has been shown to be tightly regulated by highly localised pools of individual PDE4 isoforms. The spatial and temporal regulation of cardiac signalling is made possible by the formation of macromolecular “signalosomes”, which often include a cAMP effector, such as PKA, its substrate, PDE4 and an anchoring protein such as an AKAP. Studies described in the present review highlight the importance of this relationship for individual cardiac PKA substrates and we provide an overview of how this signalling paradigm is coordinated to promote efficient adrenergic enhancement of cardiac function. The role of PDE4 also extends to the vascular endothelium, where it regulates vascular permeability and barrier function. In this distinct location, PDE4 interacts with adherens junctions to regulate their stability. These highly specific, non-redundant roles for PDE4 isoforms have far reaching therapeutic potential. PDE inhibitors in the clinic have been plagued with problems due to the active site-directed nature of the compounds which concomitantly attenuate PDE activity in all highly localised “signalosomes”.

  7. Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Pyrene by Biosurfactant-Producing Bacteria Gordonia cholesterolivorans AMP 10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Handayani Kurniati

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pyrene degradation and biosurfactant activity by a new strain identified as Gordonia cholesterolivorans AMP 10 were studied. The strain grew well and produced effective biosurfactants in the presence of glucose, sucrose, and crude oil. The biosurfactants production was detected by the decreased surface tension of the medium and emulsification activity.  Analysis of microbial growth parameters showed that AMP10 grew best at 50 µg mL-1 pyrene concentration, leading to 96 % degradation of pyrene within 7 days. The result of nested PCR analysis revealed that this isolate possessed the nahAc gene which encodes dioxygenase enzyme for initial degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH. Observation of both tensio-active and emulsifying activities indicated that biosurfactants which produced by AMP 10 when grown on glucose could lower the surface tension of medium from 71.3 mN/m to 24.7 mN/m and formed a stable emulsion in used lubricant oil with an emulsification index (E24 of 74%. According to the results, it is suggested that the bacterial isolates G. cholesterolivorans AMP10 are suitable candidates for bioremediation of PAH-contaminated environments.How to CiteKurniati, T. H.,  Rusmana, I. Suryani, A. & Mubarik, N. R. (2016. Degradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Pyrene by Biosurfactant-Producing Bacteria Gordonia cholesterolivorans AMP 10. Biosaintifika: Journal of Biology & Biology Education, 8(3, 336-343. 

  8. The antimicrobial peptide derived from insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 5, AMP-IBP5, regulates keratinocyte functions through Mas-related gene X receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieosilapatham, Panjit; Niyonsaba, François; Kiatsurayanon, Chanisa; Okumura, Ko; Ikeda, Shigaku; Ogawa, Hideoki

    2017-10-01

    In addition to their microbicidal properties, host defense peptides (HDPs) display various immunomodulatory functions, including keratinocyte production of cytokines/chemokines, proliferation, migration and wound healing. Recently, a novel HDP named AMP-IBP5 (antimicrobial peptide derived from insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 5) was shown to exhibit antimicrobial activity against numerous pathogens, even at concentrations comparable to those of human β-defensins and LL-37. However, the immunomodulatory role of AMP-IBP5 in cutaneous tissue remains unknown. To investigate whether AMP-IBP5 triggers keratinocyte activation and to clarify its mechanism. Production of cytokines/chemokines and growth factors was determined by appropriate ELISA kits. Cell migration was assessed by in vitro wound closure assay, whereas cell proliferation was analyzed using BrdU incorporation assay complimented with XTT assay. MAPK and NF-κB activation was determined by Western blotting. Intracellular cAMP levels were assessed using cAMP enzyme immunoassay kit. Among various cytokines/chemokines and growth factors tested, AMP-IBP5 selectively increased the production of IL-8 and VEGF. Moreover, AMP-IBP5 markedly enhanced keratinocyte migration and proliferation. AMP-IBP5-induced keratinocyte activation was mediated by Mrg X1-X4 receptors with MAPK and NF-κB pathways working downstream, as evidenced by the inhibitory effects of MrgX1-X4 siRNAs and ERK-, JNK-, p38- and NF-κB-specific inhibitors. We confirmed that AMP-IBP5 indeed induced MAPK and NF-κB activation. Furthermore, AMP-IBP5-induced VEGF but not IL-8 production correlated with an increase in intracellular cAMP. Our findings suggest that in addition to its antimicrobial function, AMP-IBP5 might contribute to wound healing process through activation of keratinocytes. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. 7 CFR 772.14 - Reamortization of AMP loans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reamortization of AMP loans. 772.14 Section 772.14... AGRICULTURE SPECIAL PROGRAMS SERVICING MINOR PROGRAM LOANS § 772.14 Reamortization of AMP loans. The Agency may approve reamortization of AMP loans provided: (a) There is no extension of the final maturity date...

  10. Chemotactic antagonists of cAMP inhibit Dictyostelium phospholipase C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bominaar, Anthony A.; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    In Dictyostelium discoideum extracellular cAMP induces chemotaxis via a transmembrane signal transduction cascade consisting of surface cAMP receptors, G-proteins and effector enzymes including adenylyl cyclase, guanylyl cyclase and phospholipase C. Previously it was demonstrated that some cAMP

  11. The cyclic nucleotide monophosphate domain of Xanthomonas campestris global regulator Clp defines a new class of cyclic di-GMP effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Fei; He, Ya-Wen; Wu, Dong-Hui; Swarup, Sanjay; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2010-02-01

    The widely conserved second messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) plays a key role in quorum-sensing (QS)-dependent production of virulence factors in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. The detection of QS diffusible signal factor (DSF) by the sensor RpfC leads to the activation of response regulator RpfG, which activates virulence gene expression by degrading c-di-GMP. Here, we show that a global regulator in the X. campestris pv. campestris QS regulatory pathway, Clp, is a c-di-GMP effector. c-di-GMP specifically binds to Clp with high affinity and induces allosteric conformational changes that abolish the interaction between Clp and its target gene promoter. Clp is similar to the cyclic AMP (cAMP) binding proteins Crp and Vfr and contains a conserved cyclic nucleotide monophosphate (cNMP) binding domain. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we found that the cNMP binding domain of Clp contains a glutamic acid residue (E99) that is essential for c-di-GMP binding. Substituting the residue with serine (E99S) resulted in decreased sensitivity to changes in the intracellular c-di-GMP level and attenuated bacterial virulence. These data establish the direct role of Clp in the response to fluctuating c-di-GMP levels and depict a novel mechanism by which QS links the second messenger with the X. campestris pv. campestris virulence regulon.

  12. Prognosis of Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gordon Millichap

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from Teikyo University School of Medicine, Tokyo, Japan, evaluated the clinical features, prognosis, and prophylaxis of cyclic vomiting syndrome and the relationship between the syndrome and levels of adrenocorticotropic/antidiuretic hormones (ACTH/ADH.

  13. A mTurquoise-based cAMP sensor for both FLIM and ratiometric read-out has improved dynamic range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarenbeek, Jeffrey B; Goedhart, Joachim; Hink, Mark A; Gadella, Theodorus W J; Jalink, Kees

    2011-04-29

    FRET-based sensors for cyclic Adenosine Mono Phosphate (cAMP) have revolutionized the way in which this important intracellular messenger is studied. The currently prevailing sensors consist of the cAMP-binding protein Epac1, sandwiched between suitable donor- and acceptor fluorescent proteins (FPs). Through a conformational change in Epac1, alterations in cellular cAMP levels lead to a change in FRET that is most commonly detected by either Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM) or by Sensitized Emission (SE), e.g., by simple ratio-imaging. We recently reported a range of different Epac-based cAMP sensors with high dynamic range and signal-to-noise ratio. We showed that constructs with cyan FP as donor are optimal for readout by SE, whereas other constructs with green FP donors appeared much more suited for FLIM detection. In this study, we present a new cAMP sensor, termed (T)Epac(VV), which employs mTurquoise as donor. Spectrally very similar to CFP, mTurquoise has about doubled quantum efficiency and unlike CFP, its fluorescence decay is strictly single-exponential. We show that (T)Epac(VV) appears optimal for detection both by FLIM and SE, that it has outstanding FRET span and signal-to-noise ratio, and improved photostability. Hence, (T)Epac(VV) should become the cAMP sensor of choice for new experiments, both for FLIM and ratiometric detection.

  14. A mTurquoise-based cAMP sensor for both FLIM and ratiometric read-out has improved dynamic range.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey B Klarenbeek

    Full Text Available FRET-based sensors for cyclic Adenosine Mono Phosphate (cAMP have revolutionized the way in which this important intracellular messenger is studied. The currently prevailing sensors consist of the cAMP-binding protein Epac1, sandwiched between suitable donor- and acceptor fluorescent proteins (FPs. Through a conformational change in Epac1, alterations in cellular cAMP levels lead to a change in FRET that is most commonly detected by either Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging (FLIM or by Sensitized Emission (SE, e.g., by simple ratio-imaging. We recently reported a range of different Epac-based cAMP sensors with high dynamic range and signal-to-noise ratio. We showed that constructs with cyan FP as donor are optimal for readout by SE, whereas other constructs with green FP donors appeared much more suited for FLIM detection. In this study, we present a new cAMP sensor, termed (TEpac(VV, which employs mTurquoise as donor. Spectrally very similar to CFP, mTurquoise has about doubled quantum efficiency and unlike CFP, its fluorescence decay is strictly single-exponential. We show that (TEpac(VV appears optimal for detection both by FLIM and SE, that it has outstanding FRET span and signal-to-noise ratio, and improved photostability. Hence, (TEpac(VV should become the cAMP sensor of choice for new experiments, both for FLIM and ratiometric detection.

  15. Osthole Enhances Osteogenesis in Osteoblasts by Elevating Transcription Factor Osterix via cAMP/CREB Signaling In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhong-Rong; Leung, Wing Nang; Li, Gang; Kong, Siu Kai; Lu, Xiong; Wong, Yin Mei; Chan, Chun Wai

    2017-06-08

    Anabolic anti-osteoporotic agents are desirable for treatment and prevention of osteoporosis and fragility fractures. Osthole is a coumarin derivative extracted from the medicinal herbs Cnidium monnieri (L.) Cusson and Angelica pubescens Maxim.f. Osthole has been reported with osteogenic and anti-osteoporotic properties, whereas the underlying mechanism of its benefit still remains unclear. The objective of the present study was to investigate the osteopromotive action of osthole on mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and on mouse femoral fracture repair, and to explore the interaction between osthole-induced osteopromotive effect and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) elevating effect. Osthole treatment promoted osteogenesis in osteoblasts by enhancing alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and mineralization. Oral gavage of osthole enhanced fracture repair and increased bone strength. Mechanistic study showed osthole triggered the cAMP/CREB pathway through the elevation of the intracellular cAMP level and activation of the phosphorylation of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB). Blockage of cAMP/CREB downstream signals with protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor KT5720 partially suppressed osthole-mediated osteogenesis by inhibiting the elevation of transcription factor, osterix. In conclusion, osthole shows osteopromotive effect on osteoblasts in vitro and in vivo. Osthole-mediated osteogenesis is related to activation of the cAMP/CREB signaling pathway and downstream osterix expression.

  16. Osthole Enhances Osteogenesis in Osteoblasts by Elevating Transcription Factor Osterix via cAMP/CREB Signaling In Vitro and In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Rong Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Anabolic anti-osteoporotic agents are desirable for treatment and prevention of osteoporosis and fragility fractures. Osthole is a coumarin derivative extracted from the medicinal herbs Cnidium monnieri (L. Cusson and Angelica pubescens Maxim.f. Osthole has been reported with osteogenic and anti-osteoporotic properties, whereas the underlying mechanism of its benefit still remains unclear. The objective of the present study was to investigate the osteopromotive action of osthole on mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and on mouse femoral fracture repair, and to explore the interaction between osthole-induced osteopromotive effect and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP elevating effect. Osthole treatment promoted osteogenesis in osteoblasts by enhancing alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity and mineralization. Oral gavage of osthole enhanced fracture repair and increased bone strength. Mechanistic study showed osthole triggered the cAMP/CREB pathway through the elevation of the intracellular cAMP level and activation of the phosphorylation of the cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB. Blockage of cAMP/CREB downstream signals with protein kinase A (PKA inhibitor KT5720 partially suppressed osthole-mediated osteogenesis by inhibiting the elevation of transcription factor, osterix. In conclusion, osthole shows osteopromotive effect on osteoblasts in vitro and in vivo. Osthole-mediated osteogenesis is related to activation of the cAMP/CREB signaling pathway and downstream osterix expression.

  17. Streptococcus pyogenes c-di-AMP phosphodiesterase, GdpP, influences SpeB processing and virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyu Hong Cho

    Full Text Available Small cyclic nucleotide derivatives are employed as second messengers by both prokaryotes and eukaryotes to regulate diverse cellular processes responding to various signals. In bacteria, c-di-AMP has been discovered most recently, and some Gram-positive pathogens including S. pyogenes use this cyclic nucleotide derivative as a second messenger instead of c-di-GMP, a well-studied important bacterial second messenger. GdpP, c-di-AMP phosphodiesterase, is responsible for degrading c-di-AMP inside cells, and the cellular role of GdpP in S. pyogenes has not been examined yet. To test the cellular role of GdpP, we created a strain with a nonpolar inframe deletion of the gdpP gene, and examined the properties of the strain including virulence. From this study, we demonstrated that GdpP influences the biogenesis of SpeB, the major secreted cysteine protease, at a post-translational level, susceptibility to the beta lactam antibiotic ampicillin, and is necessary for full virulence in a murine subcutaneous infection model.

  18. Functionalized linear and cyclic polyolefins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuba, Robert; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2018-02-13

    This invention relates to methods and compositions for preparing linear and cyclic polyolefins. More particularly, the invention relates to methods and compositions for preparing functionalized linear and cyclic polyolefins via olefin metathesis reactions. Polymer products produced via the olefin metathesis reactions of the invention may be utilized for a wide range of materials applications. The invention has utility in the fields of polymer and materials chemistry and manufacture.

  19. Cyclic Processing for Context Fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun

    2007-01-01

    Many machine-learning techniques use feedback information. However, current context fusion systems do not support this because they constrain processing to be structured as acyclic processing. This paper proposes a generalization which enables the use of cyclic processing in context fusion systems....... A solution is proposed to the inherent problem of how to avoid uncontrollable looping during cyclic processing. The solution is based on finding cycles using graph-coloring and breaking cycles using time constraints....

  20. Role of the cAMP-dependent carbon catabolite repression in capsular polysaccharide biosynthesis in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Ting; Chen, Yu-Ching; Jinn, Tzyy-Rong; Wu, Chien-Chen; Hong, Yi-Ming; Wu, Wen-Hao

    2013-01-01

    K. pneumoniae is the predominant pathogen isolated from liver abscesses of diabetic patients in Asian countries. Although elevated blood glucose levels cause various immune problems, its effects on K. pneumoniae virulence are unknown. This study investigated the regulation of capsular polysaccharide (CPS) biosynthesis, a major determinant for K. pneumoniae virulence, in response to exogenous glucose. We found that K. pneumoniae produce more CPS in glucose-rich medium via reduction in cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels. Individual deletion of cyaA or crp, which respectively encode adenylate cyclase and cAMP receptor protein in K. pneumoniae, markedly increased CPS production, while deletion of cpdA, which encodes cAMP phosphodiesterase, decreased CPS production. These results indicate that K. pneumoniae CPS biosynthesis is controlled by the cAMP-dependent carbon catabolite repression (CCR). To investigate the underlying mechanism, quantitative real-time PCR and promoter-reporter assays were used to verify that the transcription of CPS biosynthesis genes, which are organized into 3 transcription units (orf1-2, orf3-15, and orf16-17), were activated by the deletion of crp. Sequence analysis revealed putative CRP binding sites located on P(orf3-15) and P(orf16-17), suggesting direct CRP-cAMP regulation on the promoters. These results were then confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. In addition, we found putative CRP binding sites located in the promoter region of rcsA, which encodes a cps transcriptional activator, demonstrating a direct repression of CRP-cAMP and P(rcsA). The deletion of rcsA in mutation of crp partially reduced CPS biosynthesis and the transcription of orf1-2 but not of orf3-15 or orf16-17. These results suggest that RcsA participates in the CRP-cAMP regulation of orf1-2 transcription and influences CPS biosynthesis. Finally, the effect of glucose and CCR proteins on CPS biosynthesis also reflects bacterial resistance to serum killing. We here

  1. Antifungal activity of synthetic peptides derived from Impatiens balsamina antimicrobial peptides Ib-AMP1 and Ib-AMP4

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thevissen, K.; Francois, E.J.A.; Sijtsma, L.; Amerongen, van A.; Schaaper, W.M.M.; Meloen, R.; Posthuma-Trumpie, G.A.; Broekaert, W.F.; Cammue, B.P.A.

    2005-01-01

    Seeds of Impatiens balsamina contain a set of related antimicrobial peptides (Ib-AMPs). We have produced a synthetic variant of Ib-AMP1, oxidized to the bicyclic native conformation, which was fully active on yeast and fungal strains; and four linear 20-mer Ib-AMP variants, including two all-d

  2. Novel Radioligands for Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterase Imaging with Positron Emission Tomography: An Update on Developments Since 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susann Schröder

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs are a class of intracellular enzymes that inactivate the secondary messenger molecules, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP. Thus, PDEs regulate the signaling cascades mediated by these cyclic nucleotides and affect fundamental intracellular processes. Pharmacological inhibition of PDE activity is a promising strategy for treatment of several diseases. However, the role of the different PDEs in related pathologies is not completely clarified yet. PDE-specific radioligands enable non-invasive visualization and quantification of these enzymes by positron emission tomography (PET in vivo and provide an important translational tool for elucidation of the relationship between altered expression of PDEs and pathophysiological effects as well as (pre-clinical evaluation of novel PDE inhibitors developed as therapeutics. Herein we present an overview of novel PDE radioligands for PET published since 2012.

  3. The involvement of cAMP in the growth inhibition of filamentous fungus Rhizopus nigricans by steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeraj, Natasa; Lenasi, Helena; Breskvar, Katja

    2005-01-01

    Several steroids, in particular progesterone, are toxic for the filamentous fungus Rhizopus nigricans and, at high concentrations, inhibit its growth. Previous studies on this microorganism revealed progesterone specific receptors coupled to G proteins at the plasma membrane. In this study, the next step of steroid signalling in R. nigricans following G protein activation is investigated, together with the possible impact of this pathway on fungal growth inhibition. The intracellular level of cAMP decreased in the presence of steroids, demonstrating the probable involvement of cAMP signalling in the response of R. nigricans to steroids. Results of the growth analysis in the presence of cAMP increasing agents suggest that the role of cAMP in fungal growth inhibition by steroids cannot be ruled out, but it would appear to be minor and not make a major contribution to growth inhibition.

  4. Theophylline and cAMP inhibit lysophosphatidic acid-induced hyperresponsiveness of bovine tracheal smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Jiro; Oike, Masahiro; Hirakawa, Masakazu; Ito, Yushi

    2003-01-01

    We have established an in vitro model of airway hyperresponsiveness, using a bovine tracheal smooth muscle cell (BTSMC)-embedded collagen gel lattice. When the gel was pretreated with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), which activates the small G protein RhoA, ATP- and high K+ solution-induced gel contraction was significantly augmented. This was not due to the modulation of Ca2+ mobilizing properties, since ATP- and high K+-induced Ca2+ transients were not significantly different between control and LPA-treated BTSMC. Y-27632, an inhibitor of Rho-kinase, suppressed the LPA-induced augmentation of gel contraction, whereas it did not inhibit the contraction of control gels. Theophylline (> 1 μm) reversed the LPA-induced augmentation of gel contraction, whereas it inhibited control gel contraction only with a very high concentration (100 μm). We confirmed that theophylline increased the intracellular concentration of cAMP ([cAMP]i) in BTSMC. Elevation of [cAMP]i with dibutyryl cAMP or forskolin also reversed the LPA-induced augmentation of gel contraction. Furthermore, theophylline, as well as dibutyryl cAMP and forskolin, suppressed the LPA-induced membrane translocation of RhoA, indicating that they prevented airway hyperresponsiveness by inhibiting RhoA. We conclude from these results that theophylline inhibits LPA-induced, RhoA/Rho-kinase-mediated hyperresponsiveness of tracheal smooth muscle cells due to the accumulation of cAMP. PMID:12679373

  5. The therapeutic applications of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs): a patent review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hee-Kyoung; Kim, Cheolmin; Seo, Chang Ho; Park, Yoonkyung

    2017-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small molecules with a broad spectrum of antibiotic activities against bacteria, yeasts, fungi, and viruses and cytotoxic activity on cancer cells, in addition to anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory activities. Therefore, AMPs have garnered interest as novel therapeutic agents. Because of the rapid increase in drug-resistant pathogenic microorganisms, AMPs from synthetic and natural sources have been developed using alternative antimicrobial strategies. This article presents a broad analysis of patents referring to the therapeutic applications of AMPs since 2009. The review focuses on the universal trends in the effective design, mechanism, and biological evolution of AMPs.

  6. S-AMP: Approximate Message Passing for General Matrix Ensembles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cakmak, Burak; Winther, Ole; Fleury, Bernard H.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a novel iterative estimation algorithm for linear observation models called S-AMP. The fixed points of S-AMP are the stationary points of the exact Gibbs free energy under a set of (first- and second-) moment consistency constraints in the large system limit. S-AMP extends...... the approximate message-passing (AMP) algorithm to general matrix ensembles with a well-defined large system size limit. The generalization is based on the S-transform (in free probability) of the spectrum of the measurement matrix. Furthermore, we show that the optimality of S-AMP follows directly from its...

  7. Protective features of resveratrol on human spermatozoa cryopreservation may be mediated through 5' AMP-activated protein kinase activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani Nashtaei, M; Amidi, F; Sedighi Gilani, M A; Aleyasin, A; Bakhshalizadeh, Sh; Naji, M; Nekoonam, S

    2017-03-01

    Biochemical and physical modifications during the freeze-thaw process adversely influence the restoration of energy-dependent sperm functions required for fertilization. Resveratrol, a phytoalexin, has been introduced to activate 5' AMP-activated protein kinase which is a cell energy sensor and a cell metabolism regulator. The cryoprotection of resveratrol on sperm cryoinjury via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase also remains to be elucidated. Our aim, thus, was to investigate: (i) the presence and intracellular localization of AMP-activated protein kinase protein; (ii) whether resveratrol may exert a protective effect on certain functional properties of fresh and post-thaw human spermatozoa through modulation of AMP-activated protein kinase. Spermatozoa from normozoospermic men were incubated with or without different concentrations of Compound C as an AMP-activated protein kinase inhibitor or resveratrol as an AMP-activated protein kinase activator for different lengths of time and were then cryopreserved. AMP-activated protein kinase is expressed essentially in the entire flagellum and the post-equatorial region. Viability of fresh spermatozoa was not significantly affected by the presence of Compound C or resveratrol. However, although Compound C caused a potent inhibition of spermatozoa motility parameters, resveratrol did not induce negative effect, except a significant reduction in motility at 25 μm for 1 h. Furthermore, resveratrol significantly increased AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation and mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased reactive oxygen species and apoptosis-like changes in frozen-thawed spermatozoa. Nevertheless, it was not able to compensate decreased sperm viability and motility parameters following cryopreservation. In contrast, Compound C showed opposite effects to resveratrol on AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, reactive oxygen species, apoptosis-like changes, mitochondrial membrane potential, and

  8. The Colletotrichum gloeosporioides RhoB regulates cAMP and stress response pathways and is required for pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Wang, Yonglin; Tian, Chengming; Liang, Yingmei

    2016-11-01

    Rho GTPases regulate morphology and multiple cellular functions such as asexual development, polarity establishment, and differentiation in fungi. To determine the roles of CgRhoB, a Rho GTPase protein, here we characterized CgRhoB in the poplar anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides. First of all, we determined that conidial germination was inhibited and intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) level was increased in the CgRhoB deletion mutants. Loss of CgRhoB resulted in shorter germ tubes and enhanced appressoria formation after germination on the hydrophobic surface. Exogenous addition of cAMP to the wild type generated the similar phenotypes of ΔCgRhoB inoculated in CM liquid. Furthermore, deletion of CgRhoB had discernible effect upon the sensitivity of C. gloeosporioides to cell wall perturbing agents and altered the distribution of chitin on the cell wall. H2O2 sensitivity assay showed the hypersensitive effect on the oxidative stress, and transcriptional analysis revealed that transcription of genes involved in peroxidase activities was altered in the mutants. Finally, virulence assay revealed that CgRhoB was required for pathogenicity. Taken together, our results showed that CgRhoB was associated with appressoria formation and pathogenicity, and affected cAMP level and stress pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cyclic Nucleotide Monophosphates in Plants and Plant Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marondedze, Claudius; Wong, Aloysius; Thomas, Ludivine; Irving, Helen; Gehring, Chris

    2017-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (cNMPs) and the enzymes that can generate them are of increasing interest in the plant sciences. Arguably, the major recent advance came with the release of the complete Arabidopsis thaliana genome that has enabled the systematic search for adenylate (ACs) or guanylate cyclases (GCs) and did eventually lead to the discovery of a number of GCs in higher plants. Many of these proteins have complex domain architectures with AC or GC centers moonlighting within cytosolic kinase domains. Recent reports indicated the presence of not just the canonical cNMPs (i.e., cAMP and cGMP), but also the noncanonical cCMP, cUMP, cIMP, and cdTMP in plant tissues, and this raises several questions. Firstly, what are the functions of these cNMPs, and, secondly, which enzymes can convert the substrate triphosphates into the respective noncanonical cNMPs? The first question is addressed here by comparing the reactive oxygen species (ROS) response of cAMP and cGMP to that elicited by the noncanonical cCMP or cIMP. The results show that particularly cIMP can induce significant ROS production. To answer, at least in part, the second question, we have evaluated homology models of experimentally confirmed plant GCs probing the substrate specificity by molecular docking simulations to determine if they can conceivably catalytically convert substrates other than ATP or GTP. In summary, molecular modeling and substrate docking simulations can contribute to the evaluation of cyclases for noncanonical cyclic mononucleotides and thereby further our understanding of the molecular mechanism that underlie cNMP-dependent signaling in planta.

  10. Down-regulation of protein kinase C by parathyroid hormone and mezerein differentially modulates cAMP production and phosphate transport in opossum kidney cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J A

    1997-08-01

    We examined the effects of prolonged exposure to parathyroid hormone (PTH) and the protein kinase C (PKC) activator mezerein (MEZ) on cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production, PKC activity, and Na(+)-dependent phosphate (Na/Pi) transport in an opossum kidney cell line (OK/E). A 5 minute exposure to PTH stimulated, while a 6 h incubation reduced, cAMP production, Na/Pi transport was maximally inhibited under desensitizing conditions and was not affected by reintroduction of the hormone. MEZ pretreatment (6 h) enhanced PTH-, cholera toxin (CTX)-, and forskolin (FSK)-stimulated cAMP production, suggesting enhanced Gs alpha coupling and increased adenylyl cyclase activity. However, PKA- and PKC-dependent regulation of Na/Pi were blocked in MEZ-treated cells. The PTH-induced decrease in cAMP production was associated with a reduction in membrane-associated PKC activity while MEZ-induced increases in cAMP production were accompanied by decreases in membrane and cytosolic PKC activity. Enhanced cAMP production was not accompanied by significant changes in PTH/PTH related peptide (PTHrP) receptor affinity or number, nor was the loss of Na/Pi transport regulation associated with changes in PKA activity. The results indicate that down-regulation of PKC by PTH or MEZ differentially modulates cAMP production and regulation of Na/Pi transport. The distinct effects of PTH and MEZ on PKC activity suggest that agonist-specific activation and/or down-regulation of PKC isozyme(s) may be involved in the observed changes in cAMP production and Na/Pi transport.

  11. Role of AMP catabolism enzymes in the energetic status of erythrocytes under conditions of glucose depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. I. Dotsenko

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The adenylate metabolism determines the value of energy charge, adenylate pool and ATP concentration, with its level strongly differing in various cell types. The reasons of such differences are still not clear, moreover, role of adenylate metabolism in the regulation of intracellular ATP concentration is not fully known. Hypotheses about mechanisms of adenylate pool stabilization are based on results of mathematical modeling and require the experimental verification. It is known that AMP catabolism enzymes such as AMP-desaminase and 5’-nucleotidase are directly involved in the processes of adenylate charge and pool regulation and their activity depends on the concentration of this metabolite. It is considered that switching from AMP-desaminase pathway of AMP catabolism to 5’-nucleotidase pathway and vice versa may contribute to stabilization of adenylate charge and pool under increased energy load that leads to the reduction of ATP content. The objective of this study consisted in the experimental investigation of mechanisms of adenylate metabolism regulation in human erythrocytes as well as principles of adenylate and energy metabolism interaction in erythrocytes with varied energy charge. Сhanges in activities of catabolism enzymes such as AMP-membrane-bound (eN and cytosolic (cN-IA 5’-nucleotidase, AMP-desaminase (AMPDA of erythrocytes under conditions of glucose depletion and under vibration effect on cells in the range of frequencies of 8–32 Hz, step of 4 Hz, and the amplitude of 0,5 ±0,04 mmhave been studied. Antiphase change of cN-IA and AMPDA activities in erythrocytes incubated in the medium without glucose was shown. Processes of switching of two ways of AMP catabolism create the conditions for the stabilization of energy charge and the ATP concentration stabilization though at a level below the initial one. In the erythrocytes in the medium without glucose and under vibration the antiphase change of enzyme activity was

  12. Changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana Proteome Implicate cAMP in Biotic and Abiotic Stress Responses and Changes in Energy Metabolism

    KAUST Repository

    Alquraishi, May Majed

    2016-06-01

    The second messenger 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is increasingly recognized as having many different roles in plant responses to environmental stimuli. To gain further insights into these roles, Arabidopsis thaliana cell suspension culture was treated with 100 nM of cell permeant 8-bromo-cAMP for 5 or 10 min. Here, applying mass spectrometry and comparative proteomics, 20 proteins were identified as differentially expressed and we noted a specific bias in proteins with a role in abiotic stress, particularly cold and salinity, biotic stress as well as proteins with a role in glycolysis. These findings suggest that cAMP is sufficient to elicit specific stress responses that may in turn induce complex changes to cellular energy homeostasis.

  13. The Applied Mathematics for Power Systems (AMPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-24

    Increased deployment of new technologies, e.g., renewable generation and electric vehicles, is rapidly transforming electrical power networks by crossing previously distinct spatiotemporal scales and invalidating many traditional approaches for designing, analyzing, and operating power grids. This trend is expected to accelerate over the coming years, bringing the disruptive challenge of complexity, but also opportunities to deliver unprecedented efficiency and reliability. Our Applied Mathematics for Power Systems (AMPS) Center will discover, enable, and solve emerging mathematics challenges arising in power systems and, more generally, in complex engineered networks. We will develop foundational applied mathematics resulting in rigorous algorithms and simulation toolboxes for modern and future engineered networks. The AMPS Center deconstruction/reconstruction approach 'deconstructs' complex networks into sub-problems within non-separable spatiotemporal scales, a missing step in 20th century modeling of engineered networks. These sub-problems are addressed within the appropriate AMPS foundational pillar - complex systems, control theory, and optimization theory - and merged or 'reconstructed' at their boundaries into more general mathematical descriptions of complex engineered networks where important new questions are formulated and attacked. These two steps, iterated multiple times, will bridge the growing chasm between the legacy power grid and its future as a complex engineered network.

  14. The Monge-Ampère equation

    CERN Document Server

    Gutiérrez, Cristian E

    2016-01-01

    Now in its second edition, this monograph explores the Monge-Ampère equation and the latest advances in its study and applications. It provides an essentially self-contained systematic exposition of the theory of weak solutions, including regularity results by L. A. Caffarelli. The geometric aspects of this theory are stressed using techniques from harmonic analysis, such as covering lemmas and set decompositions. An effort is made to present complete proofs of all theorems, and examples and exercises are offered to further illustrate important concepts. Some of the topics considered include generalized solutions, non-divergence equations, cross sections, and convex solutions. New to this edition is a chapter on the linearized Monge-Ampère equation and a chapter on interior Hölder estimates for second derivatives. Bibliographic notes, updated and expanded from the first edition, are included at the end of every chapter for further reading on Monge-Ampère-type equations and their diverse applications in th...

  15. Inhibition of growth and modulation of gene expression in human lung carcinoma in athymic mice by site-selective 8-Cl-cyclic adenosine monophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ally, S; Clair, T; Katsaros, D; Tortora, G; Yokozaki, H; Finch, R A; Avery, T L; Cho-Chung, Y S

    1989-10-15

    Site-selective cyclic AMP (cAMP) analogues inhibit growth and induce changes in morphology in a spectrum of human cancer cell lines (D. Katsaros et al., FEBS Lett., 223:97, 1987). The cellular events underlying such effects of cAMP analogues include differential regulation of type I versus type II cAMP-dependent protein kinase isozymes (S. Ally et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 85: 6319, 1988). Infusion (i.p.) of 8-Cl-cAMP, the most potent site-selective cAMP analogue, for 7 days produced regression of LX-1 lung carcinoma in athymic mice in a dose-dependent manner. The tumor regression correlated with the changing levels of cAMP receptor proteins, RI alpha and RII beta, the regulatory subunits of cAMP-dependent protein kinase type I and type II, respectively. By photoaffinity labeling with 8-N3-[32P]cAMP and immunoblotting with a monospecific anti-RII antibody, RI alpha (Mr 49,000) and RII beta (Mr 51,000) were identified in the untreated control tumors. 8-Cl-cAMP treatment induced a rapid increase of both RI alpha and RII beta in tumor cytosols and translocation (within 1 h) of only RII beta from the cytosol to the nucleus. RII beta in both cytosols and nuclei remained elevated during 8-Cl-cAMP treatment, whereas RI alpha in the cytosols gradually decreased with time of treatment after its initial transient increase. Northern blot analyses demonstrated that the RII beta mRNA level increased within 6 h of 8-Cl-cAMP treatment and remained elevated during treatment, whereas the RI alpha mRNA level decreased to below that of the untreated control tumor level after its transient increase during 1-6 h of treatment. 8-Cl-cAMP treatment also caused a sharp decrease in both N-ras and c-myc mRNA levels. These results suggest that the fundamental basis for the antineoplastic activity of 8-Cl-cAMP may reside in the restoration of normal gene regulation in neoplasms in which cAMP receptor proteins play a role.

  16. Antibacterial and anticancer activity of a series of novel peptides incorporating cyclic tetra-substituted C(α) amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Rickey P

    2016-09-15

    Eleven antimicrobial peptides (AMP) based on the incorporation of cyclic tetra substituted C(α) amino acids, as well as other unnatural amino acids were designed, synthesized and screened for in vitro activity against 18 strains of bacteria as well as 12 cancer cell lines. The AMPs discussed herein are derived from the following peptide sequence: Ac-GF(X)G(X)B(X)G(X)F(X)G(X)GB(X)BBBB-amide, X=any one of the following residues, A5c, A6c, Tic or Oic and B=any one of the following residues, Arg, Lys, Orn, Dpr or Dab. A diversity of in vitro inhibitory activity was observed for these AMPs. Several analogs exhibited single digit μM activity against drug resistant bacteria including; multiple drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis, extremely drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis and MRSA. The physicochemical properties of the basic amino acid residues incorporated into these AMPs seem to play a major role in defining antibacterial activity. Overall hydrophobicity seems to play a limited role in defining antibacterial activity. The ESKAPE pathogens were used to compare the activity of these AMPs to another family of synthetic AMPs incorporating the unnatural amino acids Tic and Oic. In most cases similarly substituted members of both families exhibited similar inhibitory activity against the ESKAPE pathogens. In specific cases differences in activity as high as 15 fold were observed between analogs. In addition four of these AMPs exhibited promising IC50 (<7.5μM) values against 12 different and diverse cancer cell lines. Five other AMPs exhibited promising IC50 (<7.5μM) values against selected cancer cell lines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Optimal Design for Reactivity Ratio Estimation: A Comparison of Techniques for AMPS/Acrylamide and AMPS/Acrylic Acid Copolymerizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison J. Scott

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Water-soluble polymers of acrylamide (AAm and acrylic acid (AAc have significant potential in enhanced oil recovery, as well as in other specialty applications. To improve the shear strength of the polymer, a third comonomer, 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid (AMPS, can be added to the pre-polymerization mixture. Copolymerization kinetics of AAm/AAc are well studied, but little is known about the other comonomer pairs (AMPS/AAm and AMPS/AAc. Hence, reactivity ratios for AMPS/AAm and AMPS/AAc copolymerization must be established first. A key aspect in the estimation of reliable reactivity ratios is design of experiments, which minimizes the number of experiments and provides increased information content (resulting in more precise parameter estimates. However, design of experiments is hardly ever used during copolymerization parameter estimation schemes. In the current work, copolymerization experiments for both AMPS/AAm and AMPS/AAc are designed using two optimal techniques (Tidwell-Mortimer and the error-in-variables-model (EVM. From these optimally designed experiments, accurate reactivity ratio estimates are determined for AMPS/AAm (rAMPS = 0.18, rAAm = 0.85 and AMPS/AAc (rAMPS = 0.19, rAAc = 0.86.

  18. Anticipatory nausea in cyclical vomiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleisher David R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclical Vomiting Syndrome (CVS is characterised by discrete, unexplained episodes of intense nausea and vomiting, and mainly affects children and adolescents. Comprehending Cyclical Vomiting Syndrome requires awareness of the severity of nausea experienced by patients. As a subjective symptom, nausea is easily overlooked, yet is the most distressing symptom for patients and causes many behavioural changes during attacks. Case presentation This first-hand account of one patient's experience of Cyclical Vomiting Syndrome shows how severe nausea contributed to the development of anticipatory nausea and vomiting (ANV, a conditioned response frequently observed in chemotherapy patients. This conditioning apparently worsened the course of the patient's disease. Anticipatory nausea and vomiting has not previously been recognised in Cyclical Vomiting Syndrome, however predictors of its occurrence in oncology patients indicate that it could complicate many cases. Conclusion We suggest a model whereby untreated severe and prolonged nausea provokes anxiety about further cyclical vomiting attacks. This anxiety facilitates conditioning, thus increasing the range of triggers in a self-perpetuating manner. Effective management of the nausea-anxiety feedback loop can reduce the likelihood of anticipatory nausea and vomiting developing in other patients.

  19. Antimicrobial activity of a 48-kDa protease (AMP48) from Artocarpus heterophyllus latex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siritapetawee, J; Thammasirirak, S; Samosornsuk, W

    2012-01-01

    Artocarpus heterophyllus (jackfruit) is a latex producing plant. Plant latex is produced from secretory cells and contains many intergradients. It also has been used in folk medicine. This study aimed to purify and characterize the biological activities of a protease from jackfruit latex. A protease was isolated and purified from crude latex of a jackfruit tree by acid precipitation and ion exchange chromatography. The proteolytic activities of protein were tested using gelatin- and casein-zymography. The molecular weight and isoelectric point (pl) of protein were analysed by SDS/12.5% PAGE and 2D-PAGE, respectively. Antimicrobial activity of protein was analysed by broth microdilution method. In addition, the antibacterial activity of protein against Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 was observed and measured using atomic force microscopy (AFM) technique. The purified protein contained protease activity by digesting gelatin- and casein-substrates. The protease was designated as antimicrobial protease-48 kDa or AMP48 due to its molecular mass on SDS-PAGE was approximately 48 kDa. The isoelectric point (pl) of AMP48 was approximately 4.2. In addition, AMP48 contained antimicrobial activities by it could inhibit the growths of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and clinical isolated Candida albicans at minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) 2.2 mg/ml and Minimum microbicidal concentration (MMC) 8.8 mg/ml. AFM image also supported the antimicrobial activities of AMP48 by the treated bacterial morphology and size were altered from normal.

  20. Hippocampal cAMP/PKA/CREB is required for neuroprotective effect of acupuncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian-Qian; Shi, Guang-Xia; Yang, Jing-Wen; Li, Zhao-Xin; Zhang, Zhen-Hua; He, Tian; Wang, Jing; Liu, Li-Ying; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2015-02-01

    Acupuncture has beneficial effects in vascular dementia (VaD) patients. The underlying mechanism, however, remains unknown. The present study was designed to investigate whether the cAMP/PKA/CREB cascade is involved in the mechanism of acupuncture in cerebral multi-infarction rats. In this study, cerebral multi-infarction was modeled in adult Wistar rats by homologous blood clot emboli. After a two-week acupuncture treatment at Zusanli (ST36), hippocampal-dependent memory was tested by employing a radial arm maze test. The hippocampus was isolated for analyses of cAMP concentration, phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity and CREB/pCREB and ERK/pERK expressions. The Morris water maze (MWM) task and CREB phosphorylation were evaluated in the presence of PKA-selective peptide inhibitor (H89). The radial arm maze test results demonstrated that acupuncture treatment at ST36 reversed hippocampal-dependent memory in impaired animals. Compared to those of the impaired group, cAMP concentration, PKA activity and pCREB and pERK expressions were increased following acupuncture therapy. Finally, the blockade of PKA reversed the increase in CREB phosphorylation and the improvement in recognitive function induced by acupuncture treatment. These results suggest that acupuncture could improve hippocampus function by modulating the cAMP/PKA/CREB signaling pathway, which represents a molecular mechanism of acupuncture for recognitive function in cerebral multi-infarction rats. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Sesamol decreases melanin biosynthesis in melanocyte cells and zebrafish: Possible involvement of MITF via the intracellular cAMP and p38/JNK signalling pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Baek, Seung Hwa; Lee, Sang Han

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The development of antimelanogenic agents is important for the prevention of serious aesthetic problems such as melasma, freckles, age spots and chloasma. The aim of this study was to investigate the antimelanogenic effect of sesamol, an active lignan isolated from Sesamum indicum, in melan?a cells. Sesamol strongly inhibited melanin biosynthesis and the activity of intracellular tyrosinase by decreasing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation. Sesamol significantly decrea...

  2. The Steroid Hormone 20-Hydroxyecdysone Enhances Gene Transcription through the cAMP Response Element-binding Protein (CREB) Signaling Pathway*

    OpenAIRE

    Jing, Yu-Pu; Wang, Di; Han, Xiao-Lin; Dong, Du-Juan; Wang, Jin-Xing; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2016-01-01

    Animal steroid hormones regulate gene transcription through genomic pathways by binding to nuclear receptors. These steroid hormones also rapidly increase intracellular calcium and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels and activate the protein kinase C (PKC) and protein kinase A (PKA) nongenomic pathways. However, the function and mechanism of the nongenomic pathways of the steroid hormones are unclear, and the relationship between the PKC and PKA pathways is also unclear. We propose t...

  3. Induction of increased cAMP levels in articular chondrocytes blocks matrix metalloproteinase-mediated cartilage degradation, but not aggrecanase-mediated cartilage degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karsdal, Morten Asser; Sumer, Eren Ufuk; Wulf, Helle

    2007-01-01

    -dependently inhibited by forskolin and IBMX. The highest concentration of IBMX lowered cytokine-induced release of sGAG by 72%. CONCLUSION: Levels of cAMP in chondrocytes play a key role in controlling catabolic activity. Increased cAMP levels in chondrocytes inhibited MMP expression and activity and consequently......OBJECTIVE: Calcitonin has been suggested to have chondroprotective effects. One signaling pathway of calcitonin is via the second messenger cAMP. We undertook this study to investigate whether increased cAMP levels in chondrocytes would be chondroprotective. METHODS: Cartilage degradation...... was induced in bovine articular cartilage explants by 10 ng/ml oncostatin M (OSM) and 20 ng/ml tumor necrosis factor (TNF). In these cultures, cAMP levels were augmented by treatment with either forskolin (4, 16, or 64 microM) or 3-isobutyl-1-methyl xanthine (IBMX; 4, 16, or 64 microM). Cartilage degradation...

  4. A link of Ca2+ to cAMP oscillations in Dictyostelium: the calmodulin antagonist W-7 potentiates cAMP relay and transiently inhibits the acidic Ca2+-store

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malchow Dieter

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During early differentiation of Dictyostelium the attractant cAMP is released periodically to induce aggregation of the cells. Here we pursue the question whether pulsatile cAMP signaling is coupled to a basic Ca2+-oscillation. Results We found that the calmodulin antagonist W-7 transiently enhanced cAMP spikes. We show that W-7 acts on an acidic Ca2+-store: it abolished ATP-dependent vesicular acidification, inhibited V-type H+ATPase activity more potently than the weaker antagonist W-5 and caused vesicular Ca2+-leakage. Concanamycin A, an inhibitor of the V-type H+-pump, blocked the Ca2+-leakage elicited by W-7 as well as cAMP-oscillations in the presence of W-7. Concanamycin A caused an increase of the cytosolic Ca2+-concentration whereas W-7 did not. In case of the latter, Ca2+ was secreted by the cells. In accord with our hypothesis that the link from Ca2+ to cAMP synthesis is mediated by a Ca2+-dependent phospholipase C we found that W-7 was not active in the phospholipase C knockout mutant. Conclusion We conclude that the potentiation of cAMP relay by W-7 is due to a transient inhibition of the acidic Ca2+-store. The inhibition of the proton pump by W-7 causes a leakage of Ca2+ that indirectly stimulates adenylyl cyclase activity via phospholipase C.

  5. Immunomodulatory effects of Lippia sidoides extract: induction of IL-10 through cAMP and p38 MAPK-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajgopal, Arun; Rebhun, John F; Burns, Charlie R; Scholten, Jeffrey D; Balles, John A; Fast, David J

    2015-03-01

    Lippia sidoides is an aromatic shrub that grows wild in the northeastern region of Brazil. In local traditional medicine, the aerial portions of this species are used as anti-infectives, antiseptics, spasmolytics, sedatives, hypotensives, and anti-inflammatory agents. In this research, we evaluate the potential immunological properties of Lippia extract through in vitro analysis of its ability to modulate intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels and interleukin-10 (IL-10) production. These results show that Lippia extract increases intracellular cAMP through the inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity. They also demonstrate that Lippia extract increases IL-10 production in THP-1 monocytes through both an increase in intracellular cAMP and the activation of p38 MAPK. These results suggest that the Lippia-mediated inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity and the subsequent increase in intracellular cAMP may explain some of the biological activities associated with L. sidoides. In addition, the anti-inflammatory activity of L. sidoides may also be due, in part, to its ability to induce IL-10 production through the inhibition of cyclic nucleotide-dependent phosphodiesterase activity and by its activation of the p38 MAPK pathway.

  6. cAMP and cGMP in nasal mucus related to severity of smell loss in patients with smell dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkin, R I; Velicu, I

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate nasal mucus levels of cAMP and cGMP in patients with taste and smell dysfunction with respect to severity of their smell loss. cAMP and cGMP were measured in nasal mucus using a sensitive spectrophotometric 96 plate ELISA technique. Smell loss was measured in patients with taste and smell dysfunction by standardized psychophysical measurements of olfactory function and classified by severity of loss into four types from most severe to least severe such that anosmia > Type I hyposmia > Type II hyposmia > Type III hyposmia. Measurements of nasal mucus cyclic nucleotides and smell loss were made independently. As smell loss severity increased stepwise cAMP and cGMP levels decreased stepwise [cAMP, cGMP (in pmol/ml); anosmia - 0.004, 0.008: Type I hyposmia - 0.12+/-0.03, 0.10+/-0.03: Type II hyposmia - 0.15+/-0.02, 0.16+/-0.01: Type III hyposmia - 0.23+/-0.05, 0.20+/-0.15]. These results confirm the association of biochemical changes in cyclic nucleotides with systematic losses of smell acuity. These results confirm the usefulness of the psychophysical methods we defined to determine the systematic classification of smell loss severity. These changes can form the basis for the biochemical definition of smell loss among some patients with smell loss as well as for their therapy.

  7. Changes in cyclic nucleotides, locomotory behavior, and body length produced by novel endogenous neuropeptides in the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinitz, Catharine A; Pleva, Anthony E; Stretton, Antony O W

    2011-11-01

    Recent technical advances have rapidly advanced the discovery of novel peptides, as well as the transcripts that encode them, in the parasitic nematode Ascaris suum. Here we report that many of these novel peptides produce profound and varied effects on locomotory behavior and levels of cyclic nucleotides in A. suum. We investigated the effects of 31 endogenous neuropeptides encoded by transcripts afp-1, afp-2, afp-4, afp-6, afp-7, and afp-9-14 (afp: Ascaris FMRFamide-like Precursor protein) on cyclic nucleotide levels, body length and locomotory behavior. Worms were induced to generate anteriorly propagating waveforms, peptides were injected into the pseudocoelomic cavity, and changes in the specific activity (nmol/mg protein) of second messengers cAMP (3'5' cyclic adenosine monophosphate) and cGMP (3'5' cyclic guanosine monophosphate) were determined. Many of these neuropeptides changed the levels of cAMP (both increases and decreases were found), whereas few neuropeptides changed the level of cGMP. A subset of the peptides that lowered cAMP was investigated for effects on the locomotory waveform and on body length. Injection of AF19, or AF34 (afp-13), AF9 (afp-14), AF26 or AF41 (afp-11) caused immediate paralysis and cessation of propagating body waveforms. These neuropeptides also significantly increased body length. In contrast, injection of AF15 (afp-9) reduced the body length, and decreased the amplitude of waves in the body waveform. AF30 (afp-10) produced worms with tight ventral coils. Although injection of neuropeptides encoded by afp-1 (AF3, AF4, AF10 or AF13) produced an increased number of exaggerated body waves, there were no effects on either cAMP or cGMP. By injecting peptides into behaving A. suum, we have provided an initial screen of the effects of novel peptides on several behavioral and biochemical parameters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. On Improvements of Cyclic MUSIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Howard Fan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Many man-made signals encountered in communications exhibit cyclostationarity. By exploiting cyclostationarity, cyclic MUSIC has been shown to be able to separate signals with different cycle frequencies, thus, to be able to perform signal selective direction of-arrival (DOA estimation. However, as will be shown in this paper, the DOA estimation of cyclic MUSIC is actually biased. We show in this paper that by properly choosing the frequency for evaluating the steering vector, the bias of DOA estimation can be substantially reduced and the performance can be improved. Furthermore, we propose another algorithm exploiting cyclic conjugate correlation to further improve the performance of DOA estimation. Simulation results show the effectiveness of both of our methods.

  9. Nature of solar cyclicity. I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanchuk, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    The report contains a critical survey of work devoted to the study of the nature of solar cyclicity. The inconsistency of the representation of cyclic curves using a frequency spectrum is indicated. The useful contribution of the ideas of Wolf, Newcomb, and Waldmeier to the solution of the problem is noted. Data are cited in favor of the theory of the tidal nature of solar cyclicity developed by the author, which also takes into account the ideas of the above-mentioned authors: the continuous paired and single tidal actions of the planets and the resonance character of this action, thanks to which the approximately 10-year period of action of Jupiter and Saturn is transformed into the 11-year activity cycle.

  10. A High-Throughput Flow Cytometry Assay for Identification of Inhibitors of 3',5'-Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Efflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Dominique; Simons, Peter C; Smagley, Yelena; Sklar, Larry A; Chigaev, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Assays to identify small molecule inhibitors of cell transporters have long been used to develop potential therapies for reversing drug resistance in cancer cells. In flow cytometry, these approaches rely on the use of fluorescent substrates of transporters. Compounds which prevent the loss of cell fluorescence have typically been pursued as inhibitors of specific transporters, but further drug development has been largely unsuccessful. One possible reason for this low success rate could be a substantial overlap in substrate specificities and functions between transporters of different families. Additionally, the fluorescent substrates are often synthetic dyes that exhibit promiscuity among transporters as well. Here, we describe an assay in which a fluorescent analog of a natural metabolite, 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (F-cAMP), is actively effluxed by malignant leukemia cells. The F-cAMP is loaded into the cell cytoplasm using a procedure based on the osmotic lysis of pinocytic vesicles. The flow cytometric analysis of the fluorescence retained in F-cAMP-loaded cells incubated with various compounds can subsequently identify inhibitors of cyclic AMP efflux (ICE).

  11. Nonsurgical treatment of cyclic esotropia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voide, Nathalie; Presset, Claudine; Klainguti, Georges; Kaeser, Pierre-François

    2015-04-01

    Cyclic esotropia is characterized by a 24-hour period of straight eye position followed by 24 hours of large-angle esotropia. Possible mechanisms include notably progressive loss of compensation of a latent strabismus. The classic treatment is surgical correction of the angle measured on the days with manifest deviation. We report the first case of cyclic esotropia successfully treated by prismatic correction of the latent strabismus present on "straight" days. Copyright © 2015 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.